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Full text of "Colonial Records. Calendar of State Papers, Colonial"

H 




CALENDARS. 



Instructions to Editors. 



The Master of the Rolls desires to call the attention of the Editors of 
Calendars to the following considerations, with a view to secure uniformity 
of plan in the important works on which they are engaged : 

He is anxious to extend, as far as is consistent with proper economy and 
despatch, the utility of the Calendars of State Papers now publishing under 
his control : 1st. As the most efficient means of making the national archives 
accessible to all who are interested in historical inquiries ; 2nd. As the best 
justification of the liberality and munificence of the Government in throwing 
open these papers to the public, and providing proper catalogues of their 
contents at the national expense. 

The greater number of the readers who will consult and value these works 
can have little or no opportunity of visiting the Public Record Office, in 
which these papers are deposited. The means for consulting the originals 
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polis ; still more if they are residents of Scotland, Ireland, distant colonies, 
or foreign states. Even when such an opportunity does exist, the difficulty 
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not made accessible by satisfactory Calendars. 

The Master of the Rolls considers that, without superseding the necessity 
of consulting the originals, every Editor ought to frame his Calendar in such 
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index of the contents of the papers described in it. He considers that the 
entries should be so minute as to enable the reader to discover not only the 
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concealed under a vague and general description, the reader will be often 
misled, he will assume that where the abstracts are silent as to information 
to be found in the documents, such information does not exist ; or, he will 
have to examine every original in detail, and thus one great purpose will 
have been lost for which these Calendars have been compiled. 

U 51912. a 



As the documents are various, the Master of the Kolls considers that they 
wiJl demand a corresponding mode of treatment. The following rules are 
to be observed : 

1st. All formal and official documents, such as letters of credence, war- 
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llth. Each series is to be chronological. 

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are not to exceed fifty pages, unless the written permission of the Master of 
the Rolls to the contrary be obtained. 



Editors employed in foreign archives are to transcribe at full length 
important and secret papers. 



CALENDAR 



OP 



STATE PAPERS, 

COLONIAL SERIES, 
AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



a 2 



Voto \ i c.-V i e nc. 






CALENDAR 



OF 



STATE PAPERS, 

COLONIAL SERIES, 
jyI.Tj 

AMERICA AND WEST INDIES, 




16691674. 



PRESERVED IN 



HER MAJESTY'S PUBLIC RECORD OFFICE. 



EDITED BY 

W. NOEL SAINSBURY, 

ASSISTANT KEEPER OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS, 

HON. MEMBER OF THE AMERICAN ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY AND OF THE HISTORICAL 

SOCIETIES OF MASSACHUSETTS, MAINE, NEW YORK, MARYLAND, 

PENNSYLVANIA, CAROLINA, GEORGIA, VIRGINIA, ETC. 

UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE MASTER OF THE ROLLS, AND WITH THE SANCTION OF 
HER MAJESTY'S SECRETARY OF STATE FOR THE COLONIAL DEPARTMENT. 



LONDON: 

PRINTED FOR HER MAJESTY'S STATIONERY OFFICE, 

BY EYRE AND SPOTTISWOODE, 
PRINTERS TO THE QUEEN'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY. 




And to be purchased, either directly or through any Bookseller, from 
EYRE AND SPOTTISWOODE, EAST HARDING STREET, FLEET STREET, E.G.; or 
ADAM AND CHARLES BLACK, 6, NORTH BRIDGE, EDINBURGH ; or 
HODGES, FIGGIS, & Co., 104, GRAFTON STREET, DUBLIN. 

1889. 




Printed by 

EYRE and SPOTTISWOODE, Her Majesty's Printers. 
For Her Majesty's Stationery Office. 



CONTENTS OP THIS VOLUME. 



PREFACE vii 

LIST OP COLONIAL ENTRY BOOKS xli 

CALENDAR, 1669-1674 - 1 

GENERAL INDEX - - 639 

ERRATA ..... - 715 



PREFACE. 



THIS volume of the Calendar of State Papers, America and 
West Indies, is in continuation of the previous volume of 
the same series ending with the year 1668, and comprises 
six years of our Colonial History, from 1669 to 1674, 
abstracted from 1,433 documents in the National Collection 
of the Public Kecords. 

The American Colonies, 11 of which were in course of 
settlement and development during these six years, and 
Our Possessions in America, in the "West Indies, and in 
Africa, form the principal contents of this Calendar. There 
are also many papers which relate to the French and the 
Dutch West Indies and to South America. 

Attention was drawn in the Preface to the last volume 
of this Calendar, to the valuable collection of " Shaftes- 
bury Papers," relating to the early settlement of Carolina, 
which was presented to the Public Kecord Office, by the 
late Earl of Shaftesbury. About 150 of these " Shaftes- 
bury Papers " are abstracted in this volume, and illustrate 
very fully the progress of the settlements in Carolina 
during this period. 

By Articles of Agreement signed by all the Lords Pro- Carolina, 
prietors, they undertook to contribute 500?., to be laid out 
in shipping, arms, ammunition, tools, and provisions for 
the settlement of Port Eoyal, and a further sum of 2001. 
per annum for the next four years (54). A fleet of three 
ships was, consequently, sent out in August 1669, at a cost 



viii PREFACE. 

of 3,2001 16s. 6d. (55), viz., the Carolina, Henry Brayne, 
master ; the Port Royal, John Russell, master ; and the 
Albemarle, Edward Baxter, master (99.- i.). The list of 
passengers on board 'the Carolina contains the names of 
some of the most prominent settlers in the new Colony, 
many of them taking out with them from five to 10 
servants, the total number of passengers being 92 (97. i.). 
The Albemarle arrived three days after the other ships, but 
broke her cables and was lost on the rocks (124). The Port 
Royal was also cast away and lost near the Bahamas, but 
although Florence 0. Sullivan, who went out as Surveyor 
of the new settlement, wrote to Lord Ashley that all were 
lost but the master and two or three men (250), the 
" humble declaration of John Russell, late master of the 
" Port Royal " (434), in his circumstantial account of the 
loss of his ship, records that after beating about for six 
weeks, and being driven to the greatest extremities, all 
their people were put safely ashore, by the help of their 
boat, and ultimately " got transportation " to Bermudas 
(see also p. 622). Early in 1671, the John and Thomas 
arrived at Albemarle Point from Barbadoes, with 42 pas- 
sengers (433, 471. i.), and on 14th August of the same year, 
the Blessing landed 96 passengers at Ashley River (541, 
612, p. 280). Joseph Dalton, a passenger on the Carolina, 
wrote to Lord Ashley from Charles Town, upon Ashley 
River, in January 1672 (736), an " essay of affairs in this 
place " and on the nature and properties of the country, 
in which he says that 337 men, 71 women, and 62 children 
or persons under 16 years of age, was the full number 
of persons who had arrived since the first fleet from 
England and up to that date, whereof 43 men, 2 women, 
and 3 children had died, and 16 were absent, leaving a total 
of 406 then in the colony, 278 of whom were men able to 
bear arms. 



PEEFACE. ix 

Conditions of encouragement by grants of land and 
other " concessions " (918) were held out by the Lords 
Proprietors of Carolina to all who would settle in their 
Colony, whether from Ireland or elsewhere, likewise to the 
English Planters in Surinam, who were willing to remove 
to Port Koyal (41), which induced " multitudes," and 
many " considerable men " (688) from Barbadoes, New 
England, and other parts, to fit out for Carolina (473). 
Six hundred industrious people from New York also 
resolved to settle at Ashlev River, the Governor and 

tf 

others being much troubled at the inclination of the 
people of New York that way (p. 279), and many removed 
from Antigua "weary of the hurricanes " (1388), and from 
the Bermudas (p. 278). 

On 6th May 1674, further Articles of Agreement were 
signed by the Lords Proprietors, who then undertook to 
subscribe each 100/. per annum, for seven years, to supply 
Carolina with clothing and other necessaries, until the 
inhabitants, by the product of vendible commodities, were 
able to draw a trade of merchandise to themselves (1270). 
Governor Sayle, very soon after his arrival in the Colony, 
urged upon the Lords Proprietors the want of a godly and 
orthodox minister " which I and many others have lived 
" under as the greatest of our mercies " (202), and he 
strongly recommended one Sampson Bond, of long standing 
in Exeter College, Oxford, who was " in my late country 
" of Bermudas, under whose powerful and sole edifying 
" ministry, I have lived about eight years past, . . . and 
" I have written to him to come and sit down with us, 
" which is the most hearty request of the Colony in 
" general." In another letter (246), Governor Sayle again 
dwelt upon the great want of an able minister in the 
Colony by whose means, he said, corrupted youth might 
be much reclaimed, the people instructed, and the Sabbath 



x PREFACE. 

and service of God not neglected. The prosperity of the 
Israelite, Sayle warned the Lords Proprietors, decayed when 
their prophets were wanting, " for where the Ark of God 
" is there is peace and tranquillity." The " good, aged, 
Governor," who was at least 80 years of age, died of a 
consumption on 4th March 1671, very much lamented "by 
" our people, whose life was as dear to them as the hopes 
" of their prosperity" (433, 474). The Rev. Sampson 
Bond remained at the Bermudas many years after Governor 
Sayle's death. 

The original or first set of the Fundamental Constitutions 
of Carolina in 111 articles, a little volume of 75 leaves, 
bound in vellum, entirely in the handwriting of John 



Locke, and full of corrections by him, is dated 21st July 
1669 (84). The Fundamental Constitutions, known as the 
second set, and dated 1st March 1670, consisted of 120 
articles, which were to " remain the sacred and unalter- 
" able form and rule of government of Carolina for 
" ever," but a third set is dated 12th January 1682, 
a fourth set 17th August 1682, and a fifth and last set 
llth April 1698 (157). 

All the Lords Proprietors of Carolina did to promote 
the welfare of their Colony, and the progress of its rapid 
growth and development, may readily be traced in these 
" Shaftesbury Papers " by the help of the General Index, 
which is so constructed that full details will be found of 
all our other Colonies and Possessions referred to in this 
Calendar. 

Virginia The prosperity of Virginia is evidenced in the accounts 

received from the Colony during the six years of this 
Calendar. By 1673 twenty regiments of foot had been 
raised, and as many troops of horse, without making use of 
any slaves, or few English servants. Virginia yearly raised 
a greater revenue to the Crown by customs than any 



PREFACE. x i 

Plantation under his Majesty's dominions, therefore, as 
" they may justly hope for" so the Governor and As- 
sembly petitioned for a sufficient supply of arms and 
ammunition, for they had not arms for every tenth man 
(1118). 

Sir John Knight told the J^arl of Shaftesbury, then 
Lord Chancellor, that Virginia paid 150,000/. revenue in 
customs for tobacco alone imported into England, which 
would in a few years probably increase to 250,0002., " so 
" that Virginia is of as great importance to his Majesty 
" as the Spanish Indies to Spain, and employs more ships 
*' and breeds more seamen for his Majesty's service than any 
" other trade " (1159). The Governor reminded the King 
that soldiers will not serve for tobacco, because the merchants 
give them so little for it that a year's salary will hardly 
clothe them. Locke has noted that corn was worth in 
September 1674, 150 Ibs. of tobacco per barrel (1428). 

The transportation of convicted felons and other prisoners Convicts 
to Virginia was a subject of frequent complaint. It was not Virginia 
unusual for a convict to be discharged from prison on 
giving security for his or her transportation to Virginia or 
some other Colony (11-14), and the influx of these felons 
became so great a grievance that an order of the General 
Court, held at James City, was issued, setting forth the 
danger to the Colony caused by the great numbers of 
felons and other desperate villains being sent over from 
the prisons in England, " the horror yet remaining of the 
" barbarous designs of those villains in September 1663, 
" who attempted at once the subversion of our religion, 
" laws, liberties, rights, and privileges," and prohibiting the 
landing of any " jail birds" from and after 20th January 
1671, upon pain of being forced to carry them to some 
other country (175). This order was approved by the 
Home Government, as appears by a despatch from Thos. 



x ii PREFACE. 

Ludwell, the Secretary of Virginia, to Lord Arlington, 
thanking the Secretary of State, in his country's behalf, 
for his Lordship's assistance in the confirmation of said 
order, prohibiting the importation of " Newgateers." 
" The safety of this country depends upon the continuance 
" of it," wrote Secretary Ludwell, " so many insolent 
" villanies having been committed by men of that sort that 
" greater numbers would hazard the peace of it " (590). 

There is a notable exception to this condemnation of 
" Newgateers " in the person of one William Sherwood, 
who became a respected inhabitant and in a letter to Sec- 
retary Lord Arlington's private secretary says, he " cannot 
" without shame look upon the foul act which was the 
" cause of his being in Virginia." Williamson has endorsed 
this letter " one of those who robbed me whom I saved " 
(564). 

Massachu- The disputes between the Governments of Massachusetts 
setts and an( j M a i ne are the main features in the papers relating 
to these Northern Colonies, abstracted in this volume, 
out of which, however, no inconsiderable portion of the 
history of the several Provinces of New England can 
be gleaned. The petitions of Ferdinando Gorges to the 
King and Council (150, 439) throw considerable light 
on this controversial subject, and led to " New England 
affairs " being brought before the Council for Plantations 
(184, 512, 566, 753) who, after a full hearing, ordered that 
the King should be moved to send Commissioners over, 
which was agreed to, and Commissioners were accordingly 
appointed, and their instructions prepared. Colonel Cart- 
wright, one of the Commissioners who had been sent over 
some years before, told the Council at their meeting in 
June 1671, that he had sent a narrative of former proceed- 
ings in New England to the King at Oxford in 1665. He 
also informed the Council that the Ministers in New Eng- 



PREFACE. Xlii 

land having no settled salary would, he 'believed, be 
contented if the Government might be changed. He 
affirmed that the country was healthful and fruitful, and 
provisions plentiful ; that they had store of good horses, 
and, doubtless, lead and copper mines, and that the number 
of people fit to bear arms might probably double in ten 
years. In 1652 they began to coin money with a palm 
branch on one side, and Salem (their greatest town save 
Boston) on the other ; that they still continued to coin 
money, but put the date of 1652 upon it, so as not to 
seem to trespass on the King's prerogative. [N.B. This is 
ivorth the notice of coin collectors.'] Their total forces by 
land were nearly 50,000, viz., Massachusetts, 30,000 ; 
Connecticut, 14,000; New Hampshire, 1,800; Maine, 
1,000; Plymouth, 1,000, and Providence, &c., 1,000; and 
he conceived there might be about 200 sail belonging to 
New England. The " differences in the several Provinces 
of New England " were, however, no nearer being settled 
in 1674 (1420) than they had been six years before, 
excepting as regarded the disposing of lands. " The Mas- 
" sachusetts, though affecting an universal authority, will 
" allow the Proprietors Gorges and Mason, if they had 
" their right to the Massachusetts, power to have free 
" disposing of the land" (1397). 

" There is a place," wrote a correspondent of Sir Joseph New York. 
Williamson's from Barbadoes, " much cried up of late, 
" taken from the Dutch, now called New York " (126), 
the Governor of which Colony, Francis Lovelace, told 
Williamson their conveyance [of letters] was so slow, " like 
" the production of * ellephats ' once almost in two years," 
and that if he did but know in what darkness they live 
" as if we had as well crossed Lethas as the Atlantic Ocean," 
he could not but take compassion and solace them (285). A 
year later, in October 1671, Governor Lovelace thanks the 



PREFACE. 

Under Secretary of State for that light of intelligence he 
vouchsafes to favour them with, without which they were 
in Egyptian darkness. " It is some satisfaction," he says, 
" to hear what is acted in the theatre of their native 
" country." He then goes on to describe New York as 
smiling in a hopeful and thriving condition, their harbour 
being fuller with shipping than ever was known since the 
discovery was made, but he adds, " a little countenance from 
" their mother would refresh them much " (646). By the 
following year, however, a spirit of immigration, chiefly 
among the English colonists, set in, and 200 families 
were ready to remove to the new and prosperous Colony on 
Ashley River in Carolina, and 600 industrious people 
resolved to go thither from New York (664, 746). 

Colonel Francis Lovelace had succeeded Richard Nicolls 
as Governor of New York (under the Duke of York) in 
August 1668, and it was under his Government that the 
Colony was retaken by the Dutch on 30th July 1673, either 
" by treachery or negligence " (1138), with the loss of one 
man on each side. The Dutch fleet consisted of 20 
ships, and the army landed of about 800 men. Only seven 
of these ships came from Holland, the rest were prizes. 
They were not exactly privateers, though commissioned by 
the States to make spoil where they could. They had 
previously, it seems, brought 100 Frenchmen off from 
Surinam and burnt it, leaving none there. Governor 
Leverett of Massachusetts gives a full account to Secretary 
Lord Arlington of the surrender of New York, which will 
be found abstracted at pp. 520-525. A full and circum- 
stantial account of the taking of New York, which is not 
printed in Documents relating to the History of New York 
(11 Vols. 4fo), is to be found in a letter from Richard 
"Wharton, written from Boston to one of his kinsmen. 
"Wharton was owner of large tracts of territory in Maine 



PKEFACE. XV 

and New Hampshire, and he subsequently became a mem- 
ber of the Council of New York, when Major Andros was 
the Governor. Colonel Lovelace was away in Connecticut 
at the time, through whose neglect and the treachery of 
Captain Manning, who was left Commander-in- Chief, New 
York was surrendered to the Dutch, who had private intel- 
ligence of the weakness and disorder of the place. The 
garrison soldiers were mostly drawn out, the guns dis- 
mounted or the carriages rotten or unserviceable, and the 
people dissatisfied with the oppression of their rulers and 
ready to revolt, on which invitations and encouragements 
they were emboldened to bring up their ships against the 
town, and, finding no resistance, landed about 500 men, 
who in a straight and long street marched up to the fort, 
and were saluted with only one gun, and on their approach 
the English flag was struck and the gates set open, so that 
without the least dispute or complaint the English marched 
out and the Dutch marched in to the fort (1144). Many 
proposals were submitted to the English Government for 
the " retaking of New York," notably by Wm. Dyre, 
Sir John Knight, and Lord Culpeper, together with the 
opinion and humble advice of the Council for Trade and 
Plantations to the King, which was most probably drawn 
up by John Locke (1145, 1159, 1164-1166) ; but neither 
of these was adopted, for in the following year a formal 
cession of the whole territory was made to England by 
the States-General by Treaty, and on 1st July 1674 the 
Duke of York commissioned Major Edmund Andros his 
Lieutenant and Governor for his province of New York 
(1311). 

Sir Thomas Temple, in letters to Secretary Lord Arlington Nova Scotia. 
(24, 25) describes in detail his purchase of Nova Scotia for 
the sum of 16,260Z., of which he was for some years the 
resident Governor, but was, in August 1669, commanded by 

U 51912. 



xvi PEEFACE. 

Charles II. forthwith to restore to the French King, in 
pursuance of the Treaty of Breda (95), and he hopes God 
may inspire his Lordship's heart to do a charitable deed to 
a friendless person in distress, " a rare thing, I confess, 
at Court." In a letter to the King, written 18 months 
later (384), he recounts " the whole truth of his heart }> 
and his own sad condition consequent upon the King's 
commands to surrender his country to the French, which 
he says is annexed to the Crown of Scotland, as the records 
in Edinburgh Castle show, and is of infinite more value 
than St. Christopher's. He beseeches the King to take his 
12 years' faithful services into consideration, and points out 
his reason for first coming to Nova Scotia, which he says 
George Kirke, the Master of the King's House, can 
testify. Sir Thomas Temple describes his design more 
fully in his letter to Secretary Lord Arlington, written 
two years before his said letter to the King, wherein 
he says that the true reason of his coming into those parts 
was to fly Cromwell's fury for having laid a design for his 

King late Majesty's escape when he was at his trial, which Mr. 

Charles 1st. Kirke> if te be aliv6j will i n f or mhis Lordship, Sir Thomas, 

had very nearly effected, having made a brother of his, 
Colonel Edmund Temple, for one night, Captain of the guard 
of the King's person. This coming to Cromwell's ears, Sir 
Thomas was privately advised by his kinsman, the then 
Lord Fienes (in great favour with Cromwell), to absent 
himself till the times might be more propitious, and his 
good friend and uncle, old Lord Say, then advised and 
assisted him to purchase Nova Scotia. This " design " for 
the escape of Charles 1st, which it will be remembered is 
graphically depicted in a popular novel of the present day, 
is undoubtedly an historical fact, otherwise it is scarcely 
probable that Sir Thomas Temple would relate the cir- 
cumstance to Charles II. and to his Secretary of State. 



PREFACE. X vii 

Another interesting reference to Charles 1st will be found 
in Jo. Newington's address, written in 1670, to Jas. Dra- 
water, merchant, at Jo. Lindnpp's, at the Bunch of Grapes, 
in Ship Yard, by Temple Bar (282). Newington says all 
the news he can write about is that one Hugh Peachell, 
who has lived in Barbadoes almost 20 years with many 
persons of good esteem, and lately with Colonel Bar wick, 
has gained much money, yet it was observed none thrived 
less than he. That falling sick some three weeks since he 
was much troubled in his conscience, but would not " utter 
himself" to any but a minister, who being sent for, 
Peachell acknowledged himself to be the person that cut 
off the head of King Charles, for which he had 100/. He 
received such comfort as the divine, one parson Leshley, 
could afford him, and, with much seeming penitence, died 
in a quarter of an hour. " This I may report for a real 
truth," Newington says, " and think that one Mr. Hewel, 
" condemned for the same and "now in Newgate, would be 
" glad to be acquainted with this." 

The controversy as to whether Newfoundland should be Newfouud- 
an English Colony un.der a " settled government " or be a 
used simply as a station for the great fisheries carried on 
there, which is the subject matter of numerous papers in 
the previous volume of this Calendar, is brought to a con- 
clusion in this volume. The arguments for a settled 
government tendered by Captain Robertson to the Duke of 
York, together with his Keply to the Answer of the West 
Country Gentlemen to his own proposals about Newfound- 
land, will be found abstracted Nos. 368, 369. But the 
address of the merchants, owners and masters of ships, and 
the inhabitants of the western parts to the King prays for 
" additional powers about the Newfoundland fishing only." 
They declared that in process of time loose persons stay 

b 2 



xviii PREFACE. 

in the country, who tend to destroy the trade and are 
useless in all respects. That in consequence the fisher- 
men's houses are torn down, timber is burnt, and the 
seamen are debauched, and the French, in their seamen 
and shipping, by their fishery, do much increase. Upon 
this address the King issued an Order in Council directing 
all parties concerned to give their attendance at the Board, 
when they were fully heard, and his Majesty's Council 
for Plantations were ordered to consider the best ways 
and means whereby the fishing trade in Newfoundland 
may be regulated, advanced, and protected and secured 
from foreigners, and managed for the increase of seamen 
and the advantage of his Majesty and his subjects. 
The Council thereupon made their report to the King 
upon the whole matter in controversy, and offered, as their 
opinion and advice, that his Majesty, by way of addition 
to his former charter, should grant certain rules and orders 
for government of the said fishery. That all his Majesty's 
subjects should enjoy the freedom of taking fish in any 
of the rivers in Newfoundland provided they submitted to 
the orders established for the fishery. That no stranger 
should be permitted to take bait or fish, and no inhabitant 
to burn or destroy any wood or plant within six miles of 
the sea shore, nor take up any stage before the arrival of 
the fishermen out of England. And that masters of ships 
were to bring back all seamen and others, and none to be 
suffered to remain in Newfoundland. Fines and forfei- 
tures were to be levied upon all offenders, and encourage- 
ment given to the inhabitants of Newfoundland to go to 
Jamaica or other foreign plantations. The King, by an 
Order in Council, approved this report, and the Attorney- 
General was directed to prepare a Bill for his Majesty's 
signature to pass the Great Seal accordingly (362. i.-v.). 



PREFACE. 

The imposition of an additional duty on sugar was the Barbadoes. 
subject of heated debates in both Houses of Parliament 
during the Session of 1671, and a "full account of all 
passages in this business " was transmitted by a Committee 
of the " Gentlemen Planters [of Barbadoes] in London to 
the Assembly of that island" (519). This Committee "ap- 
plied themselves " to the Council for Plantations, as well 
as to several leading members of the House of Commons, 
to show how ruinous any additional duty on sugar would 
be to the settlement of Barbadoes, nevertheless the Bill 
passed the Commons. The Committee then put in their 
Addresses to the Upper House, knowing the Lords " to be 
" unconcerned and of more discerning judgment than the 
" generality of the Commons," and undoubtedly would 
have had the same [ill] success as in the Commons had not 
the Governor of Barbadoes, William Lord Willoughby, 
who was then in London, and one of the Committee, with 
great efficacy convinced the Lords of the mistake the 
merchants were " running them upon." So the Lords re- 
turned the amended Bill to the Commons who " flew into a 
heat," voted the Lords had no right to abate of any aid 
granted to the King, and both Lords and Commons adher- 
ing strictly to their privileges, the King prorogued Parlia- 
ment. A full account of this debate will be found in the 
Lords' Journal [Vol. XII., April 12-22.] 

The King was not " over well pleased " with the loss of 
his Bill (for laying an additional duty on foreign com- 
modities) " which was occasioned wholly by the dispute on 
sugar." There are many papers on this subject ab- 
stracted in this Yolume, all of which may readily be 
referred to by means of the General Index. Certain it is 
that the representations of the Gentlemen Planters of 
Barbadoes of the ruinous effects any additional imposition 
would have upon the chief produce of that island were 



XX PREFACE. 

strictly accurate inasmuch as there is evidence in a petition 
from the Assembly to the King in Dec. 1671, that through 
the apprehension of customs on sugars being increased, 
upwards of 4,000 inhabitants within three years had 
deserted the island, many being led through great encour- 
agement to settle in foreign plantations (674. i.) 

William Lord William Lord Willoughby, Governor of Barbadoes wrote 
Willoughby. 

for the last time to the Council for Plantations on 7th March 

1673 (1044). At a meeting of the Council on the 5th of 
the following month it was announced that the Governor's 
" indisposition of health " had caused him to appoint Sir 
Peter Colleton Deputy Governor and President of the 
Council (1065, 1068). Governor Lord Willoughby " lay 
sick " only a few days and departed this life on 10th April 
1673 (1098, 1104). Sir Peter Colleton announced the 
death of the Governor and his own appointment as Deputy 
Governor and President of the Council to the Privy Council 
in England, and at same iime enclosed detailed statements 
of the inhabitants and the public stores in the island, as well 
as lists of the most eminent planters and the number of 
acres possessed by each one (1101. i. n. in.). By these state- 
ments it appears that the population of Barbadoes in 1673 
was 21,309 whites and 33,184 negroes, but as a report was 
current that these lists were taken in order to a tax on 
negroes, Sir Peter Colleton was of opinion that one-third 
of the negroes was not given. Of the white population, 
8,435 were women, and 3,600 boys, of which one-half may 
be English, and the rest Scotch, Irish, French, Dutch, and 
Jews. More than half the estimated number of negroes 
were boys and girls, while the women numbered nearly 
1,700 more than the men, the numbers being 11,914 
women and 10,236 men. All the names of the most 
eminent planters in Barbadoes will be found on pp. 496-7, 
with the number of acres possessed by each planter, which 



PREFACE. 

range from 200 to 1,000 acres, the average number held 
by each planter being 300 acres. 

In connexion with Barbadoes there is a curious specimen 
of spelling in a letter from a Quaker, one Lewis Morris, to 
Secretary Lord Arlington (635). The diction is unique 
and so characteristic that it has been printed verbatim et 
literatim. We may, while on the subject of letter writing, 
refer to the Earl of Shaftesbury's letter " to his very affec- 
" tionate friend, Sir John Yeamans." As the last line is John Locke, 
in Locke's handwriting, and the letter book from which 
it is taken contains many letters in his handwriting 
though all were sent in the name of his employer, the Earl 
of Shaftesbury, it may be inferred that this volume was 
Locke's letter book and that the letter in question was 
written by the Great Philosopher. It is a masterpiece of 
composition, and has been printed in full (861). It is well 
known the deep interest that Locke took in the settling of 
Carolina, which is fully evidenced in the " Shaftesbury 
Papers " as the contents of this Calendar show, but it has 
never been suggested that he contemplated a visit to what 
might be called in those days " that distant region." Yeb he 
must have thought of doing so sometime in the year 1673, 
which we gather from a letter addressed to him at Lord 
Shaftesbury's residence in little Exeter House in* the 
Strand (1103). In this letter Sir Peter Colleton tells Locke 
that he has been long expecting to hear news from him 
from New England, and Lord Willoughby and himself 

* 

had projects of taking Carolina in their way (from Barba- 
does) and visiting Locke there. But, adds Sir Peter, it has 
pleased God to dispose things otherwise. Lord Willoughby 
is dead, Locke in employment in England, and himself 
tied by the leg with an office in Barbadoes until the King 
pleases to release him. Locke was appointed Secretary to 
the Lords Commissioners for Foreign Plantations on 



xxii PREFACE. 

14th October 1673, with a salary of 5001. per annum, and 
his 10 years' experience of Colonial affairs, especially as 
regards Carolina, must have materially added to his use- 
fulness at that Board. 

Twenty-two years later he was appointed one of the 
Lords Commissioners, and it is worthy of remark that 
several literary and scientific men of this and a later period 
were rewarded with seats at the Board of Trade and 
Plantations, to mention only, besides Locke, the names of 
Waller and Newton. Pepys was made Secretary to the 
Admiralty, while Addison became Under Secretary of State, 
and Steele held the office of Commissioner of Stamps, 
besides other appointments. 

Jamaica. At the close of the year 1668 Jamaica was in a very 

thriving condition, and growing rich by privateering and 
the produce of the country, and the Governor, Sir Thos. 
Modyford, had the character of a prudent and obliging 
person (Cal. 1661-8, No. 1892), Six years later, in 1674, 
Governor Sir Thos. Lynch reported to the Home Govern- 
ment that the island had improved to a marvel, and the 
people were as contented as Englishmen could be (1389). 
A survey had been made [of Jamaica in 1670 by " the 
" extraordinary diligence " of Thos. Tothill, the King's 
Receiver-General, which showed that at that date there 
were above 209,000 acres granted by patent to the in- 
habitants, there being 717 families, estimated at about 
15,000 persons, and the prosperity of the island is evidenced 
in an abstract of the commodities produced. There were 
57 sugar works, producing yearly 1,710,000 (? Ibs.) weight 
of sugar, 47 cocoa walks yielding 180,000 Ibs. of nuts,, 
and 49 indigo works, producing 49,000 (? Ibs.) weight of 
indigo per annum, besides pepper, salt, and other pro- 
ducts. No island abounded in cocoa more than Jamaica, 
" and the profit is such that if it keep up the moiety of 



PREFACE. xxiii 

" the price it will be of far more gain to the planter than 
" indigo, cotton, ginger, or sugar." Great stock of cattle, 
60 tame cattle had in six years increased to 6,000, and 
sheep, goats, and tame hogs in plenty, " so that all danger 
" of want is past, and in a short time they hope to furnish 
" the ships homeward bound" (270, 271, 375). 

The revenue of Jamaica in the year 1670, arising from 
duties on wines, spirits, &c., quitrents, and fines and 
forfeitures, was 1,870. per annum, while the necessary 
disbursements for support of the Government, which in- 
cluded 1,OOOZ. salary to the Governor, 400?. to the Deputy 
Governor, 200Z. to the Major-General, and 801. to the 
Chief Judge, and other salaries, amounted in all to 
1,960Z., and with incidental expenses for the fort, to 
nearly 3,500Z. (264. i.). 

Governor Modyford's Answers to the Queries of the Lords 
for Trade and Plantations, abstracted pp. 302-307, contain 
a complete history of the island, and show besides the 
numbers of ships under the command of Admiral Morgan, 
those which arrived at and traded with the island, the 
'* trained bands," with names of the captains and number 
of privates, which were in all 2,386 men and officers, also 
a horse regiment with 222 men and officers, the " establish - 
" ment of Jamaica," which was settled in 1663 at 2,500L 
per annum, and the ammunition, guns, and stores, and 
how disposed of. 

One John Style, a fellow student with Lord Arlington at 
Christ Church, continues in this volume his correspondence 
with the Secretary of State, with letters of considerable 
interest. He had been a resident in Jamaica since 1665 
[1023, previous FoL], and wrote on most matters that con- 
cerned the island, which he affirmed would maintain more 
people than England (7). He complained of the great 
number of " tippling houses," and that there were not more 



xxiv PREFACE. 

than 10 men resident to every licensed house that sold 
strong liquors, and of the wickedness of those who called 
themselves Christians. " "Were the most savage heathens 
" here present," wrote Style, " they might learn cruelty 
" and oppression, the worst of Sodom, or the Jews that 
" crucified our Saviour might behold themselves matched 
" if not undone " (138). As opposed to this we have the 
Governor's statement that the King was " piously pleased" 
to pay five ministers 100L each until a law for the main- 
tenance of the ministry was passed. In 1671 Mr. Howser, 
" a Switzer," Mr. Maxwell, a Scotchman, Mr. Lemmings, 
an Englishman, and Mr. Zellers, another Switzer, all 
orthodox men of good life and conversation, preached 
every Sunday ; but Mr. Pickering is dead, and there is 
none to supply his place, " but, alas," writes Governor 
Modyford, " these five do not preach to one third of the 
" island, and the plantations are at such a distance that 
" it is impossible to make up congregations, but they 
" meet at each other's houses as the primitive Christians 
" did, and there pray, read a chapter, sing a psalm, and 
*' home again, so that did not the accessors to this island 
" come so well instructed in the articles of our faith, 
" it might well be feared the Christian religion would 
" be quite forgot" (p. 305). 

Jamaica was divided into 15 parishes, but " many a 
" parish had as yet no church " at the close of the year 
1671, when the Governor said that he could not give any 
account of the number of the dead, as few were brought 
to the parish church to be buried (p. 304). Within a 
year, however, this state of things was altered, for the 
Council of Jamaica, in September 1672, ordered that in 
all parishes where there were ministers either the parson 
or sexton was to keep a true account of all burials and 
christenings, " which has been much neglected," and once 



PREFACE. xxv 

a year deliver it to the churchwardens to make entry in 
the parish book ; and that in all parishes without ministers, 
and where the inhabitants live at such distances from the 
parish church that they cannot conveniently bury there, 
" and possibly the rites of burial are not used," all masters 
of families be obliged in such cases to give account of the 
death and birth of any in their families to the next Justice 
of the Peace, and he to deliver it to the churchwardens, 
who are to enter it as aforesaid, so that a certain record 
be kept throughout the island for the future (933). 

Gambling seems to have been a crying evil in Jamaica. Gambling in 
" Through the immoderate use of unlawful gaming many 
" mischiefs daily arose," both in maintaining idle and dis- 
orderly persons and in coercing and debauching many 
young gentlemen and others to the loss of their time and 
fortunes, so that few escaped a prison or being made 
servants in a very short time. In order to put a stop to 
these abuses it was ordered by the Council of the island 
that all persons keeping public -houses of gaming, or per- 
mitting it, should, on conviction, be fined 101. or more, 
that common gamesters should pay double the money 
they had won, as well .as those winning money at any 
game by fraud or false dice, and that bonds, bills, and 
promises to pay money lost at play or in betting should 
be utterly void ; but " it was not intended," by this Order 
of Council, " to restrain masters of families and others 
" known to be men of at least 2,OOOZ. estate in the island 
" from innocent diversion in said games" (645). The 
remarks in a paper addressed to Governor Lord Vaughan 
some years later are appropriate to this subject. Public 
manly sports, says the writer, instead of cards, dice, and 
tables, should be brought into fashion among the young 
gentry, as riding at the ring, tilting on horseback, shoot- 
ing, running, wrestling, and the like, and prizes should 



xxvi PKEPACE. 

be given to the victors by way of encouragement. A 
good collection of books should be gotten at the public 
expense, and disposed " in the most conspicuous places" 
for such of the gentry as are studious to read, since there 
is nothing more ridiculous than ignorance in a person of 
quality. That idleness be utterly discountenanced as un- 
worthy of a man and most unworthy of a gentleman, and 
certainly the father of expensive vices, and the undoubted 
mother of poverty and shame. That penalties be set on 
men's vices, especially upon swearing, " that unpleasant, 
" unprofitable piece of irreligion," and upon intemperance, 
that shame of society, so that at least it may be brought 
to the state it was formerly, when those that were drunk 
were drunk in the night. That Government would do 
well to make the laws few and plain, and the execution 
certain and severe. If the law be good it ought to be 
executed, if ill, repealed. Besides the laws designed for 
the redress of immoralities must receive their true value 
from the example of the Court. Shame is a greater re- 
straint upon vice than penalties or pain itself, therefore 
the Governor ought to begin the reformation at his own 
house (1425). 

Governors of During the six years comprised in this volume, there 
were three Governors of Jamaica. Sir Thomas Modyford 
was recalled in January 1671, having been Governor seven 
years (377). A petition to the King to continue him 
Governor, which was numerously signed, was read by 
the King in Council, but rejected (331). He was sent 
home a prisoner and committed to the Tower, because of 
his proceedings with the Privateers, and giving them com- 
missions and encouragement to attack the possessions of 
Spain, in the West Indies. We are told that the Privateers 
gave him 20L for every commission, " which, in all, may 
" amount to about 400Z.," and all their presents and his 



PREFACE. xxvii 

gains by them, directly or indirectly, Charles Modyford 
said, never exceeded 500L The King's fifteenth of prizes, 
brought in by Privateers, amounted to 600Z. or TOOL, but 
were expended on fortifications (573. i.). The considera- 
tions which moved Sir Thos. Modyford to give his consent 
for fitting the Privateers of Jamaica against the Spaniards, 
and showing how his Majesty's interest may be strengthened 
in the West Indies by coming into a nearer friendship 
with the Buccaniers of Hispaniola, with his reasons why 
Privateers should not be discontinued in the West Indies, 
and many other propositions presented to the Privy 
Council, are abstracted in this volume, and furnish a full 
and complete record of his conduct in relation to the 
Privateers (276-281 and 577-578). 

Sir Thos. Lynch arrived Governor in June 1671 (552), 
and in August following he sent Sir Thos. Modyford home 
a prisoner on board the Jamaica Merchant, wrote a full 
account of his proceedings by that ship to the Secretary 
of State, and enclosed an elaborate report on the present 
state of the Government of Jamaica, this 20th August 
1671 (604), which was followed by a further report to the 
President of the Council for Plantations, two months 
later (640). 

When Lord Vaughan was appointed Governor of 
Jamaica, in April 1674 (1258-9), the Earl of Carlisle had 
been first nominated, the Council consisted of 12 
persons, all of whom are named in his Draft Commission 
(1251), and the Assembly of 19 members (1233). Captain 
Brayne, refusing to stand for an Assembly man, was 
committed to prison without bail during pleasure (1224). 
The last abstract but one in this volume is of a map of 
Jamaica, showing the boundaries of the parishes as fixed 
in 1674, and also the mountains, harbours, rivers, islands, 
&c. The churches are also delineated, and many houses 



XXVlii PREFACE. 

and plantations are numbered (1432). A full description 
of the Great Seal of Silver is given by Governor Lynch at 
p. 250, who made several Orders in Council for the better 
regulating the delivery of letters, which was complained of 
as "a grand mischief " to every person or merchant, as 
any man opens as he pleases, stifBess (i.e. without cere- 
mony), and it was urged that the establishment of an 
office for receipt of all letters, both coming in and out, 
"would well satisfy the people" (331, 633, p. 268). 

Henry It was in consequence of the receipt by Sir Thos. 

and the Modyford of a commission from the Queen Regent of 
ers ' Spain which the Governor of Curagoa sent to the Governor 
of Jamaica, in which her Governors in the West Indies 
'were commanded to make open war against his Majesty's 
subjects, and because the Spanish Governors granted 
commissions and were levying forces against the English, 
that it was ordered by the Council of Jamaica that a 
commission be granted to Admiral Henry Morgan to be 
Commander-in-chief of all ships of war belonging to that 
harbour, and to attack, seize, and destroy the enemy's 
vessels (209). Admiral Morgan had been 11 or 12 years 
in the Indies, and, "from a private gentleman by his 
" valour has raised himself to now what he is." He and his 
old Buccaniers knew every creek, and the Spaniards' mode 
of fighting, and be a town never so well fortified, and 
the numbers never so unequal, if money or good plunder 
be in the case, they will either win it manfully or die 
courageously. One of the first places taken by Capts. 
Prince and Harris was Granada, in the river of Nicaragua, 
without any considerable loss, when each man shared 
between 30Z. and 40Z. (293). Governor Modyford told 
Secretary Lord Arlington that but 120 men entered the 
town undiscovered, and by their usual wiles got the best 
of the town prisoners, plundered till noon, which they say 



PREFACE. xxix 

yielded but 7 Ibs. in silver and 12L in money per head, 
which is nothing to what they had five years since, but 
the town is much decayed, and the principal men gone to 
Guatemala, as being more secure. A singular challenge 
from Sign or Pardal, " the vapouring [Spanish] Admiral of 
" St. Jago," to Admiral Morgan, was nailed to a tree near 
the west point of Jamaica, but Pardal being soon after 
found by Capt. Morrice, he was attacked in a bay at the 
east end of Cuba, and killed by a shot in the throat (310, 
310. i. n.) On their way to Panama, the Buccaniers took 
Providence, where they found 300 men in garrison, who 
yielded next day, but only 60 slaves and 500?. in plunder 
(483, 494). Admiral Morgan had previously taken pos- 
session of Eio del Hacha (359). 

There are several accounts of the taking of Panama Taking of 
(483, 504-506, 542), but Admiral Morgan's " true account 
" and relation of this my last expedition against the 
" Spaniards " is the fullest and the best, and shows there 
was hard fighting and great slaughter before they got 
possession of the city. Finding that Chagres Castle 
blocked the way, it was determined to attack it, which 
was done by Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Bradley, with 470 
men, who, after fighting in the trenches from 3 till 8 the 
next morning, stormed the castle. The enemy refused 
quarter, which cost them 360 men, while Bradley 's loss 
was 30 killed and 76 wounded, himself amongst the 
number, who died 10 days after. Leaving 300 men to 
guard the castle, they started up the river with 1,400 
men in seven ships and 36 boats. The enemy had set 
on fire their first entrenchments before quitting them, " as 
" they did all the rest without striking a stroke." The 
Admiral was there forced to leave his ships and boats, 
with 200 men to guard them, and to betake the rest of 
his men to the wild woods. They routed the enemy two 



XXX PREFACE. 

miles from Venta Cruz, a very fine village, where all 
goods are landed and embarked for Panama ; but this, as 
all the rest, was found to be on fire and the enemy fled. 
They began their march next day, the enemy constantly 
galling them with ambuscades and small parties, so they 
had to march four abreast. At length they reached the 
desired place, where they saw " a good parcel of cattle and 
horses," which served all their men, and came in sight of 
the enemy, with 2,100 foot and 600 horse. Next morning 
Admiral Morgan drew up his men " in the form of a 
tertia." The vanguard of 300 men was led by Lieut.-Col. 
Lawrence Prince, the main body, 600 strong, by Major 
John Morris, the right wing by Morgan himself, the left by 
Col. Edw. Collier, and the rearguard of 300 was commanded 
by Col. Bledry Morgan. One Francesco de Harro charged 
with the horse so furiously that he could not be stopped 
till he lost his life, upon which the horse wheeled off and 
the foot advanced, but met with such a warm welcome and 
were pursued so close that the enemies' retreat came to 
plain running, though they worked a stratagem seldom 
heard of, that is attempting to drive two droves of 1,500 
cattle into their rear. In the city they had 200 fresh men, 
two forts, all the streets barricaded and great guns in 
every street, but instead of fighting commanded it to be 
fired and blew up the chief fort, which was done in such 
haste that 40 of their^ own soldiers were blown up. In 
the market place some resistance was made, but at 3 o'clock 
they had quiet possession of the city, although on fire, 
with no more loss in the day's work than five killed and 10 
wounded, and of the enemy about 400. They endeavoured 
in vain to put out the fire, but by 12 at night all was con- 
sumed but two churches and 300 houses in the suburbs. 
" Thus was consumed the famous and ancient city of 
" Panama, which was the greatest mart for silver and gold 



PREFACE. xxxi 

" in the whole world, for it received all the goods that 
" came from Spain in the King's great fleet and delivered 
" all the gold and silver that came from the mines of 
" Peru and Potozi." Here they stayed 28 days, making 
daily incursions on the enemy for 20 leagues without 
having one gun fired at them "in anger," though they 
took 3,000 prisoners and kept cruising and fetching pri- 
soners who had fled to the islands. They marched back 
with all their prisoners to Chagres Castle, where the 
plunder, amounting to 30,OOOL, was divided, the castle 
fired, and the guns spiked, and then began their voyage to 
Jamaica, where some are arrived and the rest daily ex- 
pected. The reason there was no more wealth was, the 
prisoners said, because they had two months' notice and 
had laden two great ships of 350 and 700 tons with money, 
plate, gold, and jewels (504). At a meeting of the Council 
of Jamaica, Admiral Henry Morgan received " many 
thanks " from the Council, after hearing a relation of his 
voyage for the execution of his commission, and they 
approved very well of his action therein (542. i.). But 
Morgan's proceedings were severely condemned by the 
English Government, and he was sent home prisoner, and 
a pamphlet containing a relation of " the late attempt 
upon Panama " was by the King's warrant ordered to be 
suppressed (1061). Sir Thos. Modyford had told the 
Council for Trade that there was much reason for a stand- 
ing force of Privateers, or somewhat equivalent, to give 
Jamaica seasonable intelligence and to be prompt to resist 
the first attempts of an enemy, the island being " circled 
with enemy's countries " (p. 303). Governor Lynch com- 
puted the Buccaniers to be near 3,000 strong, themselves 
say above 4,000, in 1671 (p. 247). The following year 
Henry Morgan was sent to England a prisoner on H.M.S. 
Welcome by Sir Thos. Lynch (p. 323), Lawrence Prince, 

U 51912. c 



xxxii PREFACE. 

" one of the most famous of the Privateers," being appointed 
by Lynch, Lieutenant in one of the King's ships, " so that 
" the Spaniards should see they were willing to serve his 
" Majesty" (p. 299). To speak the truth of Morgan, 
wrote Governor Lynch to the Secretary of State, he's an 
honest, brave fellow, and has both Sir Thos. Modyford and 
the Council's commission and instructions, which they 
thought he obeyed and followed so well that they gave 
him public thanks, which is recorded in the Council books 
(p. 299). Major Banister also told Secretary Lord Arling- 
ton that Admiral Henry Morgan was sent home to appear, 
as it is suspected, on account of his proceedings against 
the Spaniard. He said he did not know what approbation 
he might find in England, but that in Jamaica he received 
" a very high and honourable applause for his noble 
" service therein," both from Sir Thos. Modyford and the 
Council that commissioned him, and Major Banister hoped 
he might without offence say, " he is a well deserving 
" person and one of great courage and conduct, who may, 
" with his Majesty's pleasure, perform good public service at 
" home or be advantageous to Jamaica if war should again 
" break forth with the Spaniard" (789). The disappear- 
ance of the " Admiral " from the scene of his many exploits 
was followed by a general break-up of the whole body of 
privateers towards the close of the year 1 672, if Governor 
Lynch's report to the Council for Plantations is to be relied 
upon, where he says planting in Jamaica is heartily and 
successfully intended, and to his own wonder, and he hopes 
to their Lordships' satisfaction, he has reduced all the 
Privateers, so that now there is not one English pirate in 
these Indies, unless some few in French vessels (954). 

St. Christo- There were at least 10,000 planters and inhabitants of 
pher s. 

St. Christopher's before the French invasion in 1666, which 

reduced them to about one-third, when it was calculated 



PREFACE. xxxiii 

two-thirds of the land formerly possessed by English 
was uninhabited (292). For the more speedy replanting of 
which it was the advice of the Council for Plantations to 
the King in 1674 that such malefactors as are by law to 
be transported may be sent to St. Christopher's (879), and 
the Governor entreated the King to send Englishmen out 
of prisons for small debts for defence of the island, 
" because it cannot defend itself but by English " (p. 291). 
St. Christopher's had been taken by the French in April 
1666, but by the Treaty of Breda, France engaged that 
restitution should be made of the English part. Many 
difficulties arose before the actual restitution took place, 
to determine which Commissioners were appointed on three 
several occasions, in February 1668, March 1670, and 
March 1671, and the final " Act of Surrender " to England 
was dated T 5 T July 1671 (583-585). The negotiations on 
both sides, which were long and complicated, may all 
readily be referred to by means of the Index, and the 
Report of two Conferences of the Council for Plantations 
with Sir Charles Wheler, who was then Governor of 
St. Kitts, contains a full account, in 12 pages, of all that 
had taken place (977). 

The Colony of Surinam, which had surrendered to the Surinam. 
Dutch fleet in February 1667, was retaken by Lieut.-Col. 
Henry Willoughby and Sir John Harman in the following 
October, and became once more an English possession, 
but, as we have seen in the. last volume of this Calendar, 
it was again given up to the Dutch in 1668, in accordance 
with certain Articles of the Treaty of Breda. Disputes 
arose respecting the restitution between the Dutch Go- 
vernor and the English settlers, and the King appointed 
Commissioners for the settlement of these disputes and for 
bringing off his Majesty's subjects, their families, and 
estates from Surinam (320-325), though' the "perverseness " 



xxxiv PREFACK. 

of the Dutch Governor forced Major Bannister to leave 
above half the English and those who had the best estates 
in the Colony (485). Soon afterwards Governor Vorsterre 
sent home a dismal account of the state of the Colony 
after Major Banister had taken off two ship loads of 
English. He says, by death and sickness, the number had 
fallen to 200 men only, and there were 50 or 60 sick, and 
they have nothing to eat but rotten bacon, peas, and 
" gruts " (920). Finally, in October 1674, in consequence 
of an Article in the Treaty of Westminster, wherein his 
Majesty had taken particular care that his subjects in 
Surinam should have liberty to depart whenever he should 
send for them, and three years after Major Banister had 
left Surinam, the Council for Trade and Plantations re- 
ported to the King that three ships should be forthwith 
made ready to bring off the 300 English still there, with 
1,100 or 1,200 slaves, besides household stuff. These 
numbers were made up (by Locke) of 20 persons who had 
sugar works and 675 negroes, and of 26 persons who had 
provision plantations and 382 negroes, besides several poor 
people, who may have 60 or 70 negroes, so that there may 
be about 300 Christians, male and female, the total being 
1,397 (1249, 1364, 1368, 1375, 1427). Advices received 
at Jamaica by Governor Lynch computed the number of 
English left in the Colony at very much. less. He wrote 
home that there were not above 40 English at Surinam, 
the ill climate and illusage having killed the rest ; that 
Major Bannister left 100 there, and of all he brought 
thence to Jamaica there were but four dead (p. 624). We 
find, by an agreement for the sale of two plantations in 
Surinam, that 1,600 acres of land sold for 600,000 Ibs. of 
muscovado sugar (1380). 

The Koyal The Company of Royal Adventurers trading into Africa, 

African 

Company, having sustained great losses during the late wars, treated 



PREFACE, xxxv 

with certain persons to enable them to pay their debts and 
became suitors to the King, to accept a surrender of their 
propriety and privileges, and to make said persons a new 
Corporation for carrying on the trade. The King him- 
self was an " Adventurer " for 5,OOOZ. (426). His Majesty 
therefore on 27th September 1672, granted a Charter of 
Incorporation to the " New Royal African Company," who 
were to enjoy all privileges in the City of London as fully 
as any company of merchants heretofore established by 
patent (934). An account of the limits and trade of 
the Royal African Company shows that their limits began 
at Sallee in South Barbary, near Tangier, and ended at 
the Cape of Good Hope, where the East India Company's 
limits take place. This " account " contains a particular 
relation of their several factories, where they were situated, 
and the trade carried on by each. The " slaves " were 
sent to all his Majesty's American Plantations, which 
could not subsist without them, and other commodities 
were brought into England, the gold coined in his 
Majesty's Mint, and all other goods always sold publicly at 
a candle (936). 

In a list of ships freighted by the Royal African Com- Negroes, 
pany, with the names of their commanders, the places to 
which they were bound, and the number of negroes they 
carried, by far the largest number of negroes was sent to 
Jamaica, which received seven ships with 2,320 negroes ; 
five ships carried 1,720 negroes to Barbadoes ; two ships, 
650 negroes to Virginia ; and three ships took 530 negroes 
to Nevis (1215). The price of negroes was fixed at 171., 
or 2,400 Ibs. of sugar, in Barbadoes and in Surinam 
(341, 1132. ii.), but "found not that good acceptance by 
" the planters as was hoped for," although Sir Thomas 
Lynch, the Governor of Jamaica, wrote in January 1672, 
that three days ago 400 negroes were bought at 221. per 



xxxvi PREFACE. 

head, and he believed 1,500 would have sold (p. 316). 
Therefore in a declaration of the Duke of York, Governor, 
and the rest of the Royal African Company, in December 
1672. they resolved and declared that they would deliver 
negroes from 12 to 40 years old at 151. per head at Barba- 
does, at the Leeward Isles at 16 L, at Jamaica at 171., and at 
Virginia at 18/. per head (985). Many died on the voyage, 
which is not surprising when one reads that Captain Tallers 
had them three months on board, that they were almost 
all starved and " surfeycatted," as he fed them with little 
else but musty corn (946). According to Sir Charles 
Wheler, Governor of the Leeward Islands, there were at 
the close of the year 1671 some 1,500 negroes in Antigua 
and Montserrat, worth near40,OOOL (678). Charles Mody- 
ford reported to Secretary Lord Arlington in January 1670, 
that there were at that date 2,500 negroes or slaves in 
Jamaica (144), while four years later, in 1674, in a paper 
presented to the Council for Trade and Plantations, Bar- 
badoes is stated to have been " managed " with 5,000 
English, who had purchased 70,000 negroes (1244). 

Murders, robberies, and other outrages on the King's 
subjects were not of unfrequent occurrence by " out- 
lying " or runaway negroes, and the murder " in cold 
blood " of five Englishmen was the cause of the Council of 
Jamaica issuing very stringent orders against these 
" rebel" negroes. No person was to travel two miles 
from home without being armed, or to give clothes or 
victuals, or parley with such traitors and rebels, but on 
the contrary, he was strictly enjoined to shoot, and, by all 
means possible, endeavour to destroy them, and the wives 
and children of those killed were to become the property 
of the slayers (179, 181, 844). Orders were also given by 
the Council of Jamaica that all masters and overseers, 
under a penalty of 51., were to keep their negroes within 



PREFACE. xxxvii 

their own plantations, and permit none to leave without a 
ticket with their numbers and names, and the merchandise 
they carry, and " it shall be lawful for any person to take 
" up and whip any negroes found out of their master's 
" plantations without a ticket, and return them to their 
" masters without respect to their distance from home " 
(1020). The King, in a Proclamation dated 25th No- 
vember 1674, prohibits all his Majesty's subjects, except 
those of the Royal African Company, from trading to any 
of his plantations for negroes, on pain of his Majesty's 
highest displeasure and forfeiture of " said commodities " 
(1393). An Act passed in Barbadoes making negroes real 
estate 1214). One Nicholas Blake, a planter there, writing 
to Williamson in November 1669, says not a month ago 
he had a negro woman who was delivered of a child with 
five fingers and a thumb on each hand (126). Sir Peter 
Colleton recommended that negroes in Barbadoes should 
be clothed with dimity of the manufacture of that island, 
and that in no trade should any negroes be employed 
except as artificers to the masters of sugar works on their 
own plantations (357). 

When Governor Sayle arrived at Ashley River in 1670 Indians. 
he was carried ashore by the Indians, who gave the 
stroking compliments of the country, and brought deer 
skins to trade with, for which they gladly took knives, 
beads, and tobacco. " A pretty sort of bread " made by 
the women and hickory nuts were brought. When Sayle 
came to the hut palace, the King took the Governor on 
his shoulders and carried him into the house in token of 
his cheerful entertainment, where they had nuts and root 
cakes, and water, " for they use no other liquor." While 
there, the King's three daughters entered the palace, all in 
new robes of new moss, which they are never beholden to 
the tailor to trim up, with plenty of beads of divers colours 



xxxviii PREFACE. 

about their necks. Governor Sayle could not imagine 
that the savages could so well comport themselves, coming 
in according to their age, saluting the strangers, and 
stroking them (255). Henry Woodward, in giving " a 
" faithful relation of his Westoe voyage, begun from the 

u head of Ashley river," to the Earl of Shaftesbury in 

^ 
December 1764, describes his reception by a concourse of 

some hundreds of Indians, dressed up in their antique 
fighting garb, through the midst of whom he was conducted 
to their Chieftain's house, which, not being capable to 
contain the crowd that came to see him, the smaller fry 
uncovered the top of the house to satisfy their curiosity. 
The Chiefs made long speeches, intimating their own 
strength, and, as Woodvard judged, their desire for friend- 
ship with them. Their town consisted of many long 
houses, the sides and tops of which are of bark, and upon 
the tops of most are fastened long poles with " the locks of 
hair" of the Indians they have slain at the end. They are 
well provided with arms and ammunition, trading cloth, 
and other things from the northward, for which they truck 
skins, furs, and young Indian slaves. A young Indian boy 
was given to Woodward (1422). In Major-General Wood's 
relation of his discoveries across the mountains, " to the 
south or west seas," during two years of travel, upon 
which Locke has made many marginal notes, he gives 
graphic accounts of several tribes of Indians which he 
and his party visited, and many strange adventures 
are recorded by him in 14 pages of narrative (1347). 
All the names of the Indian emperors, kings, princes, 
sachems, and chiefs, as well as the different Indian tribes 
mentioned in this volume, will be found in the General 

Index. 

Maps. There are in this volume references to several maps of 

the Colonies in America as well as of the West Indies. Sir 



PREFACE. xxxix 

Peter Colleton writes to " his honoured friend John Locke " 
that Mr. Ogilby is printing a relation of the West Indies, 
and wishes to get a map of Carolina, and he desires he 
will ask Lord Ashley for the maps of Cape Fear and 
Albemarle, so as to draw them into one with that of Port 
Royal, and he will wait upon his Lordship for the nomina- 
tion of the rivers, &c. And Sir Peter adds, if Locke 
would draw up a discourse to be added to this map in 
the nature of a description, " such as might invite people 
" without seeming to come from us," it would very much 
conduce to the speedy settlement of Carolina (715). The 
Sieur Sanson published two maps of Carolina some years 
after Ogilby's map was printed, in which the several 
counties and some of the rivers and capes are named after 
the Lords Proprietors, viz., Albemarle, Ashley, Berkeley, 
Clarendon, Carteret, Craven, and Colleton. John Ogilby 
was appointed cosmographer to Charles II., and supplanted 
Sir William Davenant as Master of the Revels in Ireland ; 
he was also the originator of " Paterson's Roads." His 
" Advertisement " at the end of this volume contains some 
of his contributions to cosmography -and a list of the 
several atlases he was engaged upon. His map of Africa 
was published in 1670, America in 1671, and the first 
part of Asia in 1673, but his Description of the British 
Monarchy, referred to in his " Advertisement," was not 
published until 1675, under the title of ! ' Britannia : a 
" description of the Kingdom of England and Dominion 
" of Wales." All these maps are to be found in the 
British Museum. Ogilby died in 1676, and was buried 
in St. Bride's Church, Fleet Street. 

Augustine Hermann obtained a grant from the King 
in 1674 of the privilege of the sole printing of his map 
of Virginia and Maryland for 14 years, on the ground 
that he had been for several years engaged upon this 

U 51912. 



x l PREFACE. 

map, which consisted of four sheets of paper, and that 
it was " a work of very great pains and charge, and 
" for the King's special service " (1210). John Seller 
held the appointment of hydrographer to the King, and 
his chart of the sea coast from the Land's End to the 
Cape of Good Hope is to be found with a dedication, in 
Latin, to the Eoyal African Company, abstract No. 937. 
His " English Pilot," published in 1671, Atlas Maritimus 
in 1675, and Atlas Celestis in 1677, are all in the British 
Museum. 

Many names of places mentioned in this Calendar and 
on the old maps above referred to, are no longer to be 
found in modern atlases or gazetteers. It will be sufficient 
to quote one or two, as others will be noticed in the 
General Index, where are cross references to avoid in- 
convenience to the reader. Surinam is now merged in 
Guiana, while Hispaniola, or San Domingo, is called 
Hayti. 

It is again my pleasing duty to express my best thanks 
to my colleague, J. E. Ernest S. Sharp, Esq., for his 
valuable assistance. 



W. NOEL SAINSBURY. 
9th April 1889. 



xli 



LIST OF COLONIAL ENTRY BOOKS. 



No. 


COLONY, 


DATE. 


No. 


COLONY. 


DATE. 


1 


AFRICA 


1672 to 1686 


25 


HUDSON'S BAY 


1687 


2 


ANTIGOA - Acts 


1684 1688 


26 


JAMAICA 


1658 Nov. 30 








27 





1661 to 1674 


3 


PROVIDENCE ISLAND 


1630 1650 














28 


~ 


1667 1677 


4 





1630 1641 














29 





1674 1681 








30 


* 


1681 1684 


5 


BARBADOES 


1627 1674 














31 


" 


1684 1687 


6 





1675 1680 














32 





1686 1688 


7 





1680 1688 














33 


Inclosures 


1685 1688 


8 





1688 








9 


laclosures 


1678 1688 


34 


Minutes of \ 
Council -/ 


1661 1672 


10 





1679 1688 


35 





1672 1678 


11 
12 


Minutes of"! 
Council - J 

5> 


1660 1686 
1687 1688 


36 
37 


" 

Minutes ofl 
Assembly J 


1682 1688 
1661 1679 








38 


,, - Acts 


1672 


13 


Minutes of\ 
Assembly J 


1670 1683 


39 


- 


1674 


14 


" > 


1684 1688 


40 





1675 


15 


Acts 


1643 1688 


41 


~ 


1677 


16 





1682 1688 


42 


" > 


1678 








43 


~ n 


1681 1683 


17 


BERMTIDAS- 


1615 1686 


44 


~ 


1681 1688 


18 


?> ~ 


1686 1688 














45 


LEEWARD ISLES 


1670 1671 


19 


,, Inclosure 


1688 July 24 














46 


> 


1675 1681 


20 


CAROLINA - 


1663 1683 


47 





1681 1688 


21 


~ ~ 


1674 1685 


48 


Minutes of \ 
Council -J 


1680 1688 


22 


5> 


1682 1688 


49 


- Acts 


1668 1672 


23 


Grants of Land 


1674 1688 


50 


> 


1668 1682 


24 


Acts 


1663 1688 


51 


~ 5> 


1680 1688 



U 51912. 



xiii 



LIST OF COLONIAL ENTRY BOOKS continued. 



No. 


COLONY. 


DATE. 


No. 


COLONY. 


DATE. 


52 
53 
54 


MARYLAND 
Acts 

Minutes of"l 
Council - j 


1632 to 1687 
I40 1676 

1686 1688 


74 
75 


NEW YORK, Com- "| 
missions J 

Minutes of ) 
Council -/ 


1686 
1687 to 1688 


55 


MONTSERRAT - Acts 


1668 1688 


76 


PENNSYLVANIA 


1681 1688 


56 





1680 1688 


77 


SURINAM - 


1667 1674 


57 


NEVIS - Acts 


1664 1688 


78 





1668 1677 


58 





1680 1688 


79 


VIRGINIA - 


1606 1662 








80 





1675 1681 


59 


NEW ENGLAND 


1620 1639 


81 


> 


1676 1677 


60 





1661 1679 


82 





1678 


61 





1679 1688 


83 





1681 1685 


62 


> 


1688 


84 


> 


1685 1688 


63 
64 


Inclosures 

Minutes of "1 
Council - J 


1686 1688 
1686 1688 


85 
86 


Minutes of"! 
Council -j 

Minutes of \ 
Assembly/ 


1680 1688 
1683 1688 








87 


- Acts 


1661 1684 


65 


NEWFOUNDLAND - 


1623 1671 


88 





1661 1688 


66 


j> 


1677 


89 


" 


1661 1688 








90 


> ~ 


1661 1688 


67 


NEW HAMPSHIRE - 


1679 1686 


91 


> * 


1661 1688 


68 


NEW YORK 


1664 1687 


92 


PLANTATIONS "1 
GENERAL j 


1661 1672 


69 





1687 1688 


93 





1663 1684 


70 


> 


1674 1684 


94 


> 


1670 1674 


71 


Grants of Land 


1665 1688 


95 


5) > 


1674 1679 


72 


- Acts 


1667 


96 


> > ~ 


1675 1677 


73 


Patents 


1686 


97 





1675 1687 



xliii 



LIST OF COLONIAL ENTRY BOOKS continued. 



No. 


COLONY. 


DATE. 


No. 


COLON v. 


DATE. 


98 


PLANTATIONS "1 
GENERAL J 


1677, May 


104 


JOURNALS OP THE 
BOARD OF TRADE. 


1675 to 1677 


99 





1679 to 1684 


105 





1677 1679 


100 





1687 1688 


106 


n 5> 


1679 1682 








107 


)> j> 


1682 1684 


101 


LISTS OF ACTS 


1638 1688 


108 


51 ~ 


1684 1686 


102 





1668 1688 


109 





1686 1688 


103 





1687 1688 









COLONIAL PAPERS. 

AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



1669. 

7. 1. Memorial of the Spanish Ambassador to King Charles II. Re- 
dan* ^- p resen t s that the answer of Sec. Lord Arlington and Sec. Trevor to 
London, his paper of 8th August concerning hostilities committed by his 
Majesty's subjects of Jamaica is so different from what has been 
promised, that he is obliged to demand what was agreed upon in 
writing, and cannot determine upon the expedients offered till he 
receives orders from his Queen. But the truth of the account he 
gave his Majesty on the 12th December last of a new incursion of 
his Majesty's subjects of Jamaica upon Puerto Bello, pillaging and 
committing outrages scarce heard of, being now confirmed by the 
George and Samuel from Jamaica, by whose bills of lading it 
appears that besides what George Potts and other merchants re- 
ceived of plate, the share of every soldier was 600 (oz.) or SQL at half 
a crown an ounce, whence it may be guessed what quantity the 
officers, Governor, and their confidants had; the Ambassador 
desires that his Queen may have full satisfaction, and the Governor 
of Jamaica the punishment due for an incursion so unjust and 
contrary to the faith of the new Treaty of the general peace. And 
as other vessels are arrived with part of the booty, and the number 
of ships designed for Jamaica is increased, he desires that just 
restitution be made, and convenient orders given for the future. 
Annexed, 

1. I. "The Spanish Ambassador's paper" [above referred to as 
delivered on 12th December last]. Being an account of what 
happened at the taking of Puerto Bello by the English of 
Jamaica under the command of John Doglar, which account 
he sent to Havre de Grace : On 10-20 June 1668 we landed 
at Puerto Velo with 422 men in 28 canoes, leaving our ships 37 
leagues off the west coast. On llth we advanced to the walls 
of Fort St. James, where were 30 pieces of artillery. After 
three or four hours hard fighting we assaulted the fort and 
made ourselves masters of the garrison, all of which refusing 
quarter were either killed, wounded, or cut to pieces. The 
next day we attacked Fort St. Philip, on the other side of the 
coast, where were 12 pieces of artillery, and after fighting 
three or four hours it surrendered. After remaining some 

U 5191.2. Wt. 8023. i A 



2 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1669. 

days in said fort sickness broke out among our troops, of 
which we lost half by sickness and fighting, so that we were 
obliged to abandon these places and received 100,000 crowns 
from the Spaniards for retiring. Had we had 800 men we 
might have gone to Panama, about 18 leagues to the south of 
Puerto Velo, and have easily made ourselves masters of it, as 
also of the Kingdom of Peru. The chiefs of the Expedition 
were Henry Morgan, Commander-in-Chief, John Doglar, 
Julian John Salter, Enoch Clarke, Capt. Rudolph Court, 
Colliar, John James, Maurice. French. Together 3 pp. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., Nos. 1-2.] 

1669 ? 2. Mem. " Your Honor" [? Under Sec. Williamson] is desired to 
request of the King a supply of fire arms and ammunition for the 
Somers Islands, also a convoy for the Comp. magazine ship, John 
Jenkins, Commander. Governor Sir John Hey don arrived at the 
Bermudas on 1 6th May 1669, in the magazine ship, Capt. John 
Jenkins. Lefroy, II. 286. \ p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 3.] 

1669. 3. The King to the Governor of Barbadoes. To seize the 

Jan. 13. Mathew and Francis of 300 tons, Rich. Bread, Master, and the 
Sarah and Mary of 270 tons, Edw. Burton, junr., Master, laden in 
the Texel, upon the account of several Jews and others at Amster- 
dam, immediately they arrive in any port under his Government, 
and to proceed with rigour against them according to the late Acts 
of Navigation. Draft by Williamson. See No. 48. 1 p. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 4.] 

T 1& 4. Memorial of M. Colbert, French Ambassador in England. 
n * 23? The Directors of the West India Company, having seen the answer 

London, given by Sec. Lord Arlington to the French Ambassador, concerning 
the restitution of part of St. Christopher's to the English, represents 
that orders should be given to the Commissioners to enquire what is 
due for the maintenance of the English prisoners, and cause reim- 
bursement to be made. If the King desires that the English should 
have a year for re-entering their habitations sold to the French the 
Company submit that a year and a half has already elapsed, and 
three months would suffice. The nomination of Commissioners for 
the execution of the treaty is absolutely necessary, and will be very 
advantageous to both sides, if they have full powers to act in good 
faith. With regard to Acadia the Directors complain of the refusal 
of Sir Thos. Temple to surrender Pentagouet, St. John's, Port Royal, 
Cape Sable, and La Have, which he says compose Nova Scotia, 
before St. Christopher's is surrendered to them, although expressly 
ordered by his Britannic Majesty to do so ; the West India Company 
request that fresh orders be sent to him punctually to obey the 
first order, copy of which is annexed. Endorsed by Williamson, 
Rec. -|-f-. Encloses, 

4. I. The King of France to M. De la Barre. Wrote to him on 
the 17th July, 31st Oct., and llth Dec. last concerning St. 
Christopher's ; but since then the Sieur Colbert has adjusted 
the whole matter with the Ministers of the King of England, 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. S 

1669. 

and the King desires, whether he has received said letters or 
not, that he will execute precisely all that he finds in this 
despatch, which contains his final intentions. As soon 
therefore as this shall be presented to him he is to put those 
empowered by the King of Great Britain into possession of 
that part of the Island, as also of the forts, which the 
English possessed on Jan. 1, 1665, and re-establish those 
English in their goods and habitations which have not been 
sold to the French ; but such as have been sold are not to 
be re established until the price paid has been reimbursed, 
and if such reimbursement shall not have been made. within 
a year, no demand shall be made for same. The points of 
ameliorations and maintenance of prisoners to be accommo- 
dated by Commissioners to be named on either side; and the 
King of Great Britain has declared that the French who 
remain in the surrendered part of the Island shall receive 
equal justice with the English, provided they take the Oath 
of Allegiance. Said restitution to be made without delay or 
difficulty en pain of disobedience and rebellion. M. De la 
Barre is to make known his Majesty's pleasure to the 
Chevalier de St. Lawrence; and if De la Barre should 
have set out on his return home when this arrives; the 
Sieur de Baas, who will have succeeded, is to execute all con- 
tained herein. Endorsed by Williamson, French King's 
4th Order for restitution of St. Christopher's. French. 
Together 6 pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XXIV., Nos. 5, 5 I.] 

T 13. 5. Copies of the preceding memorial of M. Colbert and Louis 
23~ XIV.'s letter to Mons. De la Barre inclosed. Together 5 pp. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXIV., Nos. 6, 6 I.] 

Jan. 14. 6. Farmers of the Customs to the Clerk of the Privy Council. 
Custom House, Understanding that the Commissioners for Trade have given direc- 
on- tions for letters to be sent to the Governors of the Plantations blam- 
ing them for their neglect, and enjoining a strict observance of the 
laws concerning ships from foreign ships trading there, pray that 
(if not perfected) a draft thereof may be sent to the farmers, which 
shall without delay be returned. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., 
No. 7.] 

Jan. 14. 7. John Style to Sec. Sir Wm. Morrice. Refers to his letter of 
Jamaica. 27 Oct. by Capt. Barnard Nicholls, wherein he presented his own 
sad and unjustly abused condition, and that his appeal to his 
Majesty and Council would not be allowed, and begged for com- 
mands to the Governor here for himself to return, either to be 
punished or acquitted. Has since been brought to his trial, of 
which he sends an account. Description of the island ; affirms it 
will maintain more people than England if it be as large as re- 
ported, viz., 7,000,000 acres, not an acre of which but yields some 
food for man or beast the great increase of all things according 
to their kind. Lays down, according to his ability, such things as 
hitherto have hindered any great progress in this settlement, and 

A 2 



4 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1669. 

which for ever will unless remedied. Begins from his own time in 
July 1665. For the first two years things went well forward, as 
appears by the number of patents taken out ; then the old soldiers, 
who call themselves the conquerors of the land, took advantage of 
the Dutch wars to work upon pretending danger to destroy their 
neighbours and keep up their own boundless tyrannical power 
under pretence of carefulness. Martial law was set up, and courts 
martial called at pleasure, and plarters obliged to come down 20 
and 30 miles to keep guard, and not one Christian must be left at 
home. This was the first destruction of small settlements, and the 
hindrance of greater, and many were forced to sell their plantations 
to their lords and masters for what they could get, or else run from 
them and leave all. Had himself the boldness to inform the 
Governor of these great inconveniences, who said they should be 
remedied. Complains of the jurisdiction in the quarter sessions 
and courts of common pleas, which if continued, will prove the 
utter destruction of his Majesty's interest in this island were the 
judges and justices men of discretion and knowledge, and not 
beasts, drowning the reason God hath given them with strong 
liquors. The first and chief is Lt.-Col. Cope, who knows not one 
letter in the book, yet of late hath learnt to write his name ; he 
was long imprisoned in Dublin and elsewhere to save him from 
the gallows his crime deserved. Then Capt. Olefield, a man con- 
demned to be hanged in England, but who got sent hither to labour 
as a servant. Maj. Ascough, judge of the Court of Common Pleas, 
Capt. Aileman, and Capt. Lahor, whose further description may be 
found in Job xxx., all trained up from boys in rebellion and 
murder. Capt.. Nelson, justice of the peace, is a stout man, one of 
the old soldiers and of good estate, but not being of their turn, is in 
all business left out. Abuses in the election of churchwardens ; the 
vestry raise what money they please and how they please, but the 
enquiry what becomes of it is not to be made ; " that is my crime, 
and I think that for it they have made me an example sufficient to 
deter all others." More than 500. raised in the parish of St. John's 
under various pretences, of which he is certain the poor never had 
five pounds. The church not yet finished. Complains of sum- 
moning jurymen to the quarter sessions 16 and 20 miles off when 
there is nothing to do. States what he conceives ought to be done 
in order to the making the best advantage of this place and the 
peace and quiet of the planter, as to planting, feeding and breeding 
of horses, cattle, and sheep. Instances himself and two neighbours, 
about a mile and half a mile distant, who having fenced and 
secured what they had planted in two years, from a small begin- 
ning, got to such a great number that had such laws as he describes 
have been made they would have been able to have killed nearly a 
thousand fat hogs, if not more. Argues against the planting al- 
together with Indian commodities, which here are destructive. If 
this island were able to maintain itself with diet and other neces- 
saries what would become of the New England trade. The trade 
now consists principally in plate, money, jewels, and other things 
brought in by the privateers, who sell them cheap to the merchant, 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 5 

1669. 

and then are sent to New England and the Madeiras and returned 
chiefly in wine, brandy, and victuals. That a proportion of 
Christian indented servants or hired freemen should be allotted 
against such a number of negroes to secure the island from danger ; 
proposes that every one that has six negroes should keep one Christian 
servant and one hired freeman and so on, and be compelled to allow 
them food, clothing, and lodging ; also other regulations in reference 
thereto. The contrary to what he writes is justly a great hind- 
rance to the settlement of this island. Examination of their present 
strength. In St. John's, about 150 men; in St. Katherine's, where 
is St. Jago de la Vega, about 250 foot and 60 horse ; Port Royal, 
about 200; Lygonee, about 400; Clarendon, 160; Port Morant 
and Yellowes, 250 ; on the north side, 140, but they are mostly 
people run thither for shelter from creditors or masters ; in all 
1,580, besides some merchants and few others not appearing on 
duty. Dares say there are not 300 Christians upon the whole 
island who would not be glad to be gone upon easy terms. The 
dangers of settlements being so far distant one from the other, and 
the difficulty of guarding against such. In Col. D'Oyley's time the 
enemy landed and were beaten off, but it is not now as then, for 
there was a considerable army of young lusty men under command 
and pay, but now almost all are gone, or dead, or out for privateers. 
About 800 privateers out on that employment. Questions, if there 
be need of their help, whether they would afford any, when they 
have none or so little interest upon land that they value it not ; 
gold and gain is the only god they worship ; they can drive the 
same trade with far more profit and advantage under French com- 
missions, paying neither tenths, fifteenths, nor waiting for Admiralty 
Courts ; they are the only able and serviceable men in this island. 
A second number, if shipping be saved, cannot be raised here or 
sent forth from hence ; H. M. ships Oxford and Lilly the chief 
defence of this place at present from foreign power. The settlement 
of Jamaica will never b'e in a better condition without a speedy 
supply from England of Christian planters, not merchants, as well 
as servants, and bringing up negro children in the Christian 
religion. 10 closely written pages. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., 
No. 8.] 

Jan. 14. 8. John Style to [Sec. Sir Wm. Morrice]. Since he wrote has 
[Jamaica.] happened the blowing up of the Oxford frigate and men. Refers to 
his past letters, but has little reason to expect to see any fruits of 
his labours, for before he was imprisoned he had notice he was 
waylaid to be murdered going to take ship, so his return for 
England might be hindered. Their malice is not now less than 
before, but does not accuse the Governor, or think it is with his good 
liking ; is persuaded as things stand he cannot help it because on 
Friday last he gave Style liberty to go home on giving good security 
not to go off the island, so is now going forward with English hus- 
bandry, and hopes by Christmas corn, hemp and flax. Must return 
to prison upon notice left at his house. 1 p. [Col. Papers. 
Vol. XXIV., No. 9.] 



6 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1669. 
Jan. 18. 



Jan. 18. 



Jan, 21. 

Whitehall. 



Jan. 21. 

Whitehall. 



Jan. 22. 



Jan. 29. 



Jan.? 

Whitehall. 



9. Peter Du Moulin to Sir Edwd. Walker. In reference to his 
desire for an explanation of the third proposal in the address of the 
Council of Trade to his Majesty, touching the Plantations, is com- 
manded to let him know that said Council took that proposal 
from the Act of Navigation, 12 Car. 2, wherein it is provided that 
no goods be brought from his Majesty's Plantations, but in ships 
that belong to, and whereof the master and three-fourths of the 
mariners are English, on penalty of forfeiture of ship and goods, and 
that all ships of war or ships having commission from his Majesty 
be required to seize them, which Act is further explained by the 
Acts of 14 and 15 Car. 2, and they intend that his Majesty's ships 
of war should have instructions, and any other ships desiring a 
commission might, on giving security, be commissioned accordingly. 
H PP- [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 10.] 

10. Mem. by J[oseph] W[illiamson] of a despatch delivered to 
Mr. Champante to be sent by the William and John, Samuel Weaver, 
Master, for Barbadoes, the 18th Jan. 1668-9. [Col. Papers, Vol. 
XXIV., No. 11.] 

11. Petition of Margaret Griffith, prisoner in Newgate, convicted 
of felony, and desiring to be transported to Virginia, referred to the 
Lord Chief Justice or Mr. Recorder, who sat on her trial, to consider 
and report to his Majesty. Minute. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., 
Vol. 33, p. 4.] 

12. Petition of John Ludlowe, convicted of felony to the value of 
14s. Qd, and desiring to be transported to some of his Majesty's 
Plantations, referred to the Lord Chief Justice or Mr. Recorder, who 
sat on his trial, to consider and report to his Majesty. [Dom. Entry 
Bk., Chas. II., Vol. 33, p. 4] 

13. Henry Wasey's acknowledgement of the receipt of a letter 
from Richard Elkin " by his hand directed to Lord Willobey in 
Barbadoes." Endorsed, " Against Jewes and Dutch Traders." [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 12.] 

14. Warrant to the Sheriffs of London to discharge Margaret 
Gryffyth, convicted of felony at the Old Bailey the 14th Oct. last, 
on her giving security for her transportation into Virginia, to live 
with her brother there, f p. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. 30, 
pp. 99, 100.] Another warrant to tJw same effect is dated 3 March, 
ibid., p. 115. 

15. The King to Wm. Lord Willoughby and Council at Barba- 
does. To cause the demands of the owners of the Pearl to be fairly 
examined and payment made for the expences, freight and damages 
of same in accordance with the Order of Council of 18th Nov-. last, 
taking care to settle the account as low as may be within the sum 
already certified, and registering the orders of payment in a register 
to be kept for debts of this kind. Draft with corrections by 
Williamson. See No. 20. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., 
No. 13.J 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



1660. 
Jan. ? 



Feb. 3. 

Whitehall. 



Feb. 3. 



Feb. 6. 



Feb. 10. 



Feb. 18. 

Port Royal, 
Jamaica. 



Feb. 19. 



Feb. 26. 

Whitehall. 



16. Copy of preceding, with corrections by Williamson. 2 pp. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 14.] 

17. Sir John Trevor to Sir Edward Walker. To deliver to Peter 
du Moulin the papers in his custody relating to Surinam. p. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 15.] 

18. Keceipt of Peter Du Moulin for 4 papers concerning Surinam 
from Sir Edward Walker, viz. : 1. Abstract of the narrative sent 
by Major Bannister, Governor of Surinam. Aug. 2, 1668. 2. Letter 
from Lord Willoughby of llth Aug. 1668. 3. Copy of Lord 
Willoughby's letter to Admiral Crynsens. 4. Letter of Lord Wil- 
loughby to the Lords of the Council, received 27th Oct. 1668. ^ p. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 16.] 

19. Mem. in the handwriting of Under Sec. Williamson con- 
cerning the restitution of St. Christopher's. Lord Willoughby 
never agreed nor treated with De La Barre for an equivalent. N.B. 
We do and must insist on reparation of damages for non-execution 
on the French part. Plantations : by what we have yielded of 
repaying first, no man will be restored, none being able to pay. 
French delays were upon the points of reimbursement, ameliorations 
and the entertainment of prisoners. Indorsed: Feb. 6, 1668-9. 
i p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV. } No. 17.] 

20. The King to Lord Willoughby, or other Commander-in-Chief 
for the time being, and to the Council of Barbadoes. Fair copy of 
draft letter dated January See ante, No. 15. 1^ pp. [Dom. Entry 
Bk., Chas. II., Vol. 31, p. 17- 



21. Richard Browne to Williamson. Gave him account about a 
month since of the unhappy blowing up of the Oxford Frigate and the 
taking of M. La Vivon, of the Cour Volant, of 18 guns and 10 petar- 
ders, which was condemned as a Pirate; she is now called the 
Satisfaction, and victualled for four months, to go as a Privateer 
against the Spaniards in the Bay of Campeachy ; goes surgeon in her. 
Here is one, John Johnson Romane, of the West Friesland of Home, 
ready to sail for Holland ; her consort was taken six weeks since by 
a French privateer, and made a man-of-war of 12 guns, which now 
lies cruizing about the port for this vessel, but as she is going in our 
company, presumes they dare not meddle with her. Here are 10 
sail of ships lading for England, the products of this country. 
Indorsed: Rec. 4 May. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 18.] 

22. Warrant to the Sheriffs of London to discharge John Ludlow, 
convicted of felony, on giving security to transport himself to some of 
His Majesty's Colonies or Foreign Plantations, f p. [Dom. Entry 
Bk., Chas. IL, Vol. 30, p. 



23. Order in Council. Notwithstanding some reasons and pre- 
tensions alleged by Sir Thomas Temple why Alexandria and 
Caledonia, Members of Nova Scotia, should not be surrendered to 
the French King as part of Acadia, it is ordered that Sec. Lord 
Arlington forthwith prepare a second order to Sir Thomas for the 



8 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1669. 

present delivery of Acadia to the French King according to the 
Treaty of Breda in the very same terms as the former order. p. 
[Col Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 19.] 

Mar. 2. 24. Sir Thomas Temple to Sec. Lord Arlington. His last two 
letters were sent by Captains John Fayreweather and John Long, 
with a map of Nova Scotia, the best he could get. His vessels 
are now returned 'from Port Royal, which is in the same posture as 
before the Monsieurs arrival, as are all the rest under his command, 
though these motions have put him to excessive charge. Was about 
to return to England when intelligence came from Nevis that St. 
Christopher's was speedily to be delivered to His Majesty ; whereupon, 
considering that His Majesty sent him word in his last letter of 1 
Aug. 1668 that M. Colbert was then to come to England with new 
overtures concerning Nova Scotia, he thought it his duty to remain 
till His Majesty's further pleasure were known. Has fully informed 
his Lordship of his sad condition, unless His Majesty, in case Nova 
Scotia be surrendered to the French, should make provision with 
the French Ambassador to reimburse Temple what he paid M. De 
La Tour for the purchase of his lands in Nova Scotia and Acadia, 
extending about 1,000 miles along the sea coast. Beseeches him to 
be a means to His Majesty that he may be heard in his defence as 
to anything Mr. Elliott hath to object against Temple. The country 
never yielded above 900?. per annum in furs and elk skins, and 
Elliott receives 600?. Has had to pay merchants 180?. yearly to 
remit it. Has already paid 2,600?. to Elliott in London and 700?. 
more to merchants here for returning it to Elliott there in old 
English money. Thos. Breedon, who Temple employed in England 
to make his addresses to His Majesty, on his return from Breda 
worked so craftily with Elliott and the Lord Chancellor that this 
part of the country, which is propriety and Temple's purchase 
confirmed under the Great Scale of England, was given to Elliott, 
" under the pretence that I was a delinquent and a great Crorn- 
wellist; though I made it appear to his Majesty at my arrival into 
England, by old Mr. George Kirke, then Master of Whitehall, that 
the true reason of coming into these parts was to fly Cromwell's 
fury, for having laid a design for his late Majesty's escape when he 
was at his trial ; which Mr. Kirke, if he be alive, will inform your 
Lordship I had very near effected, having made a brother of mine, 
Col. Edmund Temple, captain of the guard for one night of his 
Majesty's person ; it coming to Cromwell's ears I was privately advised 
by the then Lord Fiens (in great favour with Cromwell) to absent 
myself till the times might be more propitious, he being my kinsman ; 
and my old Lord Say, my very good friend, and my uncle advised and 
assisted me in making this purchase, which, as I have declared, was 
thus injuriously and unjustly given to Mr. Thos. Elliott, who gave 
the government to Captain Breedon, he indenting to pay fine 600?. 
yearly. So soon as I was informed of the treachery I repaired into 
England, and finding Mr. Kirke alive he very nobly informed his 
Majesty of the truth, who very graciously gave me the government 
again ; but finding the Chancellor then so great in favour, and Mr. 



AMEEICA AND WEST INDIES. 9 

1669. 

Elliott, their power being too great for me to struggle with, I con- 
sented to give Mr. Elliott the 600?. Breedon promised him, and 
performed it until the war, and then also he pressing for his rent as 
he termed it, I sent him a ship with 40,000 Ibs. weight of sugar and 
500?. bills, which was unfortunately taken in sight of Barbadoes by 
a Zealander, which great loss I was never able to repair, the ship 
being wholly my own, and indeed all I ever had in my life." 

Beseeches pardon for acquainting him with his sad miserable con- 
dition. Has never had above 120?. a year to live upon since his 
last coming over, more than seven years ago ; but has supported our 
pigmy war with the French, and preserved the King's country at 
his own proper charge, which has cast him into a debt of 5,000?., for 
which he has mortgaged his very house and goods. Has never 
received the least comfort or assistance from the Lord Chancellor or 
Mr. Elliott, and has not dared to write to his Majesty, in which he 
now finds he committed a great mistake. His only hope is in Lord 
Arlington's noble disposition and favour ; being altogether friendless, 
and receiving intelligence that Elliott intends to take away both 
his government and propriety, and now being near 60 years of age, 
infirm and broken with grief and cares, and much in debt, his 
intentions are to make all speed to London so soon as he receives 
his Majesty's pleasure concerning this country. Is sensible that 
this is a most impertinent letter, yet hopes God may inspire his 
Lordship's heart to do a charitable deed to a friendless person in dis- 
tress, (" a rare thing I confess at Court/') for bis Lordship spoke so 
obligingly when Temple took leave of the King at Hampton Court, 
that the very thought thereof has kept his heart up ever since. 
4 pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 20.] 

March 2. 25. Sir Thos. Temple 1 to Sec. Lord Arlington. Excuses for 
Boston, his having insensibly fallen into presumption and impertinent 
tediousness in the above (inclosed) letter, and begs his Lordship's 
favour to hinder Elliott from doing Temple any injury before he 
has time given to answer for himself. . Hopes Lord Anglesea will 
join in his behalf to the King, and that his Majesty will be 
informed that Temple was never in any capacity to open the rich 
copper mine whereof he left a piece in his Majesty's hands, for 
Elliott promised to send miners, but they never came. His inten- 
tions are for London as soon as he receives his Majesty's pleasure 
concerning Nova Scotia, but if the King part not with it to 
the French King, Temple will at his coming reveal a way to 
improve this country so as in a few years to bring in a greater 
revenue to the Crown than he dares to write, for fear his Lord- 
ship should think it a romance, or some end of his own ; but 
will not desire one penny benefit to himself. Annexed, 

25. I. A breviate of the purchase by Sir Thos. Temple, Governor 
of Nova Scotia, for his Majesty, with M. de la Tour, of all 
his lands in Nova Scotia and part of Acadia, all duly passed 
under the Great Seal, with rent paid to Elliott, &c., all 
lands from Marliquesta on the East to La Have, Port de 
La Tour, Port Koyal Mines, Seganecto, St, John's, and 



10 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1669. 

Pentagoet bordering on New England on the West ; for which 
was paid, to Maj. Gibbons and family, 3,350?. ; to Maj. Leverett, 
1,800?. ; to M. De La Tour, about 1,200?. ; for seven years 
rent, &c. to Mr. Elliott, 5,460?. ; for building at Port Rosi- 
gnol, Port La Tour, Port Royal and St. John's, about 1,1 50?. ; 
owing by the French at Port Royal, about 700?. ; and by the 
Indians, 2,600?. ; total, 16,260?.; of which there is still due to 
noblemen, gentlemen, and merchants in Old and New England 
to the value of 7,000?. Together 3 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 
XXIV., Nos. 21, 21 i.] 

March 2. 26. Petition of Sir Gilbert Talbot, Knt., [to the King]. For the 
Whitehall, estate of John Colleton, planter in Barbadoes, forfeited to his 
Majesty by killing one Yeamans, a planter there. With reference 
to the Commissioners of the Treasury to give order for passing it to 
him in such manner as they shall find necessary. p. [Dom. 
Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. 33, p. 11.] 

March 3. 27. Petition of Major Wm. Nedham, Joseph Archer, and 19 
others to the King. The Petitioners being commissioned to go 
against the Indians on the coast of Guiana, his Majesty's enemies, 
did long after the peace with the Dutch put into Surinam, where 
being unjustly seized by Admiral Crynsens, they were sent in irons 
into Zealand, and used with extraordinary cruelty, where they 
have been many months waiting to represent their condition, being 
not able to subsist for want. Pray his Majesty to order some 
compensation for their subsistence, till there may be satisfaction had 
for their sufferings. Endorsed, Rec. 3rd March. Read 5th March 
1668-9. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 22.] 

M 4. 28.- Declaration of Peter Van Buytene, Notary Public of 
T4. Amsterdam, in the presence of Gerrit Slechtenhorst, Adrian Ger- 

Amsterdam. ritson, Peter Jacobson, William Abrahamson, and Claes Ripse; 
also on behalf of Oloff Stevenson, Dirck Van Oleeff, Immetge 
Volckerson, Marritge Van Doesburch, and the wife of Maes Cornelis- 
son, all in this country, subjects of his Majesty of Great Britain 
dwelling at New York and Albany, impowering Jaques Cousseau, a 
subject of his Majesty at New York, to entreat his Majesty, the 
Duke of York, and where else is requisite to obtain freedom for 
them, their families, and companions to sail to New York by a 
certain vessel made in New England, lying at Amsterdam, and 
belonging to New York, they being not able to depart to their 
respective habitations in the ship that sailed hence to New York 
last winter. Endorsed, "Received 2nd April 1669. Read in 
Council, April 14th 1669." Certified translation from the original 
Dutch. 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 23.] 

[1669.] 29. Petition of James Cousseau and Frederick Phillips, in 
behalf of themselves and other free denizens of New York and 
Albany, to the King in Council. On the 23rd June 1668, 
Petitioners, owners and masters of the ship Fort Albany, built at 
Barnstable, New England, and belonging to New York, obtained a 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



11 



1669. 



March 5. 



March 6. 
Whitehall. 



March 8. 



pass from the Governor of New York for said ship to make her 
voyage out of Europe to New York ; and they also obtained a 
pass from the Duke of York, dated 24th Oct. last. But by .reason 
of a later order of the 18th Nov. which puts a restriction on 
Dutch ships trading to that Plantation, several families, denizens 
of New York and Albany, now in Amsterdam, where said ship is 
ready to receive its lading, are unwilling to ship themselves and 
goods unless Petitioners may enjoy the privilege of said pass. 
Wherefore, as Petitioners and said families are in danger of being 
ruined unless they can transpot themselves and goods in said ship 
to New York, and forasmuch as the Duke of York has been 
authorised to grant a pass for the King Charles, a Dutch ship, not- 
withstanding the said order of restriction of 18th Nov., Petitioners 
(" being the first proprietors of any ship which as yet hath belonged 
to the said port of New York ") pray that said ship may be permitted 
to proceed on her voyage, or that said order of restriction may not 
extend to hinder said ship from trading to New York as an English 
built ship. Endorsed, " The Petition of James Cousseau and 
Frederick Phillipps and others, 1669." 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. 
XXIV., No. 24.] 

30. Petition of William Griffith, on behalf of John Style of 
Jamaica, to the King and Council. Refers to a previous petition 
of John Style of 26th Feb. last, setting forth the grievances 
and sufferings of himself and other planters in Jamaica, from which 
the Governor gave them no redress, so Petitioners appealed to his 
Majesty, and in order to the prosecution of the same, licence was 
taken out for John Style's departure thence in the next ship home- 
ward bound, but he was apprehended by warrant from the Governor, 
kept close prisoner, and bail refused. Forasmuch as his Majesty 
has thought fit to refer the examination of said petition to the 
Lords Commissioners of Foreign Plantations, prays for order to 
said Governor of Jamaica to permit said John Style to go aboard 
the next ship from thence homeward bound. Endorsed, Rec. and 
read March 5-6. \ p. [Col Papers, Vol., XXIV., No. 25.] 

31. Petition of William Earl of Kinnoul to the King. Desiring to 
be restored to his estate in St. Christopher's, or have a considera- 
tion for his interest therein. With reference to Committee for 
Plantations to report to the end his Majesty may give Petitioner 
just satisfaction. \ p. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. 33, p. 12.] 

32. The King to Sir Thomas Temple, Governor of Nova Scotia. 
Whereas by letter of 31 December 1667 his Majesty signified his 
pleasure for the immediate restoration of the country of Acadia 
to the French King, and by letter of 1 August directed him to 
forbear the delivery thereof until further order ; his Majesty's final 
pleasure is, that according to his said letter of 31 December, he 
immediately give order for restoring, without any delay or difficulty, 
the said country of Acadia to the said King or such as he shall 
thereto appoint under the Great Seal of France. Draft, with cor- 
rections in Williamson's hand. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV. 
No. 26.] 



12 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1669. 

March 22. 33. Commission to Sir John Yeamans, Col. Philip Bell, Col. 
Whitehall. Samuel Barwicke, Col. Win. Sharpe, and Capt. Philip Payne, or 
any one or more of them, to demand and receive that part of St. 
Christopher's which his Majesty's subjects possessed on January 1, 
1665, in pursuance of the Treaty of Breda and of orders from the 
Most Christian King and the West India Company. All previous 
commissions, particularly one dated 13 February 1668 to Wm. Lord 
Willoughby, Col. Morice, Col. Hooper, and Lieut.-Col. Lambert to 
be revoked. 3 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 27.] 

March 22. 34. Draft of preceding, with corrections by Williamson. 2 pp. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 28.] 

March ? 35. Draft in Williamson's hand of part of the above commission, 
i p. [Col Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 29.] 

March 22. 36. Commission appointing the above-named Commissioners 
Whitehall, finally to determine and adjust all differences and disputes that 
may arise concerning the putting in execution the orders for the 
restitution of that part of St. Christopher's which the English 
possessed before the declaration of the late war. 3 pp. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 30.] 

[March ?] 37. Draft of preceding, mostly in Williamson's hand, with cor- 
rections. Indorsed by him, Powers to adjust differences. 2 pp. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 31.] 

March 22. 38. Mem. of a Warrant to the Lord Keeper to seal two Instruments 
for receiving St. Christopher's and composing the differences that 
may may arise thereupon. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. 30, 
p. 121 <f.] 

March ? 39. Instructions to Sir John Yeamans and the other Commis- 
sioners above named for the amicable composure of differences that 
may arise between his Majesty and the French King about the 
restitution of St. Christopher's. To give the Sieur De la Barre 
notice of their Commission, and adjust with him the time and place 
of meeting with the French Commissioners. The great difficulty 
which his Majesty can yet foresee will occur in that which concerns 
the re-entry of the English into such of their estates as have been 
actually sold to the French, for. which provision is made in the 8th 
article of the treaty, and which is therefore to be the rule to 
determine those differences. As to all moveables, the words of 
the article are express that they shall not be restored till the price 
paid for them be first refunded by the English. As to immoveables, 
as lands, houses, plantations, &c., his' Majesty, having seriously 
considered the matter, finds upon the whole that he could not 
evince that the word Bona in the treaty did not also signify im- 
moveables, his Majesty has therefore concluded to make the case of 
lands, houses, &c. the same with moveable goods, and the English 
must agree to repay what they have actually received for their 
estates before same are restored to them. If within one year and a 
day from the time that the French Bang's orders of the -j^- January 



\ 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 1 

1669. 

last are presented to the French Commander-in-Chief, the English 
shall not refund the price paid for said goods and estates the same 
shall for ever remain to the French that bought them. 4 pp. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 32.] 

[March 24.] 40. Petition of several officers of Sir Tobias Bridge's regiment to 
the King. Whereas they have already presented a petition to his 
Majesty representing the miseries they have indured since their 
going to the West Indies, and the miserable condition they are in at 
present, upon which his Majesty ordered a committee to consider 
how said regiment might be paid. Petitioners, being pressed daily 
to it by their fellow sufferers, beg his Majesty "to order some 
speedy course for the payment of them their arrears, as also for the 
future, and not to suffer so many of your subjects and their 
relations to perish for want of their pay." " Received March 24. 
Read at Committee the 27, 1669." 1 p. [Col Papers, Vol. XXIV., 
No. 33.] 

March 24. 41. Memorial of " the persons concerned in Carolina " to the 
King. Surinam being more proper for the production of sugar 
than any of his Majesty's Plantations, the Dutch are in great hopes 
to beat the English out of that -trade, but the Dutch are no planters, 
and should the English and their slaves be removed Surinam must 
sink. These planters are willing to quit Surinam, and in regard 
many of them are desirous to* remove to Port Royal, in Carolina, 
Memorialists offer that if his Majesty will send a ship of war to 
demand these people and protect their ships, they will, at their own 
charge, send two ships to transport those willing to Port Royal, 
with victuals and necessaries, or if his Majesty will add a fly-boat 
or other vessel they will fit her with masts for his Majesty's use. 
Endorsed, Received 24 March 1668-9. Read the same day: sus- 
pended till we hear from Holland. \ p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., 
No. 34.] 

[April 5.] 42. Memorial to the Duke of York. 1. That he move his 
Majesty to allow 2,000?. yearly for the security of those his domi- 
nions [in New York] by garrisons. 2. That he obtain permission 
that his Majesty's subjects in Scotland, who shall be induced to 
take conditions as planters, may not only transport themselves but 
be allowed to make voyages thither and thence, or remain on 
account of the fishing trade or transporting commodities of the growth 
and manufacture of his Majesty's territories to Barbadoes and other 
Plantations. Endorsed: "Read in Council, April 5, 1669. Scotch 
ships to trade to New York." I p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV. No. 35.] 

April 5. 43. Order in Council. On the proposal of the Duke of York 
ordered that H.R.H. be authorised to grant passes for two- Scotch 
ships, one of 500 tons and the other of 250, to pass from Scotland to 
New York with such as shall desire to plant there, and to trade 
between said places, or remain at New York on account of the 
fishing trade or for transporting the growth and manufacture of 
that place to any his Majesty's Plantations. Provided that said 
ships do not carry said commodities to any foreign territory, 



4 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1669. 

Endorsed : " Read in Council, 16th April 1669. Read in Council, 
23rd April 1669." 1 pp. Printed in New York Documents, III., 
180. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 36.] 

[April 6.] 44. Petition of Nathaniel Kingsland, on behalf of himself and 
William Sandford of Barbadoes, to the King and Council. Having 
suffered great outrages at Surinam by command or permission of 
Lieut-General Henry Willoughby, and finding no remedy from Lord 
Willoughby, Petitioners addressed his Majesty ; whereupon this 
Board on 8 July last signified to Lord Willoughby that these matters 
should be redressed, or " that Petitioners have the law open." But 
on said letter being delivered to Lord Willoughby he put Kings- 
land out of commission, and resolved to bring him to England 
and ruin him. Prays that his Majesty will appoint a day for hearing 
that if Petitioner appears to have right they may be relieved. 
Endorsed : " Read in Council, April 6, 1669." 1 p. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXIV., No. 37.] 

April 7. 45. Petition of Jacob Lucy and Samuel Swinnock of London, 
Merchants, and Company, to the Lords Commissioners of his Majesty's 
Treasury. That his Majesty, by letters patent of 3rd April 1666, 
thought fit that the commodities of Jamaica should not be burdened 
with any impost or custom, for five years from 18th February 1663-4. 
That Petitioners freighted the Mary and Jane for Jamaica, which 
arrived at Plymouth from thence 26th January 1668-9, but could 
not recover the port of London till about 18th February, when the 
time limited was expired. But as said ship would have arrived if 
wind and weather had permitted, Petitioners pray for a warrant to 
the Farmers of the customs, to permit Petitioners to unlade said goods 
without paying custom. Read April 7, 1669. The petition to be 
sent to the custom Farmers, who with the Petitioners are to attend 
the 21. April 21. The Lords will present the case to his Majesty. 
Read in Council April 29, 1669. Granted. Annexed, 

45. i., ir. Affidavits of Barnard Nicholas of Jamaica, Commander 
of the Mary and Jane, and Francis Dilly of Wapping, Master. 
That said ship arrived at Plymouth from Jamaica 26 January 
1668-9, but they could not bring her to London, by reason of 
foul weather, till the time granted for importing merchandise 
from Jamaica free of custom wa,s expired. 1668-9. March 17. 
Together 3 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., Nos. 38-40.] 

April 13. 46. The titles of twenty Acts passed at a General Assembly begun 
Maryland, and held at St. Mary's, 13 April 1669, viz.: An Act for the contin- 
uance of peace with and protection of our neighbours and confed- 
erate Indians in Choptanke river. 2. Limiting ordinary keepers. 
3. For limitation of certain actions for avoiding suits at law. 4. For 
providing of sufficient freight and carriage for the proper goods 
and commodities of his Lordship the Lord Proprietary of this Pro- 
vince and of the Governor of this Province for the time being. 
5. For reviving of certain laws within this Province. 6. Of gratitude 
to the Lieut.-Gen. Chas. Calvert. 7. Limiting the extent of all 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



15 



1669. 



April 16. 



April 21. 

Barbadoes. 



April 21. 

Barbadoes. 



attachments and providing what shall be levied upon attachments and 
executions. 8. To avoid double payment of debts. 9. For marking 
highways and making the heads of rivers,creeks,branches, and swamps 
passable for horse and foot. 10. For payment of money debts with 
tobacco. 11. For recording the Journal of the Lower House. 12. For 
the relief of prisoners taken in execution. 13. Providing what shall 
be good evidence to prove foreign debts. 14. For encouragement of 
such persons as will undertake to build water mills. 15. Appointing 
court days in each respective county in this Province. 16. Provi- 
ding against sheriffs taking excessive fees. 17. For preventing 
servants and criminal persons from running out of this Province. 
18. for the revival and amendment of an additional Act concerning 
the payment of fees due from criminal persons. 19 and 20. Two Acts 
for the payment of the public charges of this Province. All said 
laws passed under the great seal of the Province, 27 May 1669. 
Together 48 pp. [Col. Entry Bk, No. LIII., pp. 129^177.] 

47. Order of the Committee for Trade and Plantations. That 
the petition and address of the planters and inhabitants of Barba- 
does, and the addresses from Antigua, Montserrat, and the rest of 
the islands under the government of Lord Willoughby, be seriously 
considered by his Lordship, who is to extract out of them in writing 
such articles of their demands as he shall think fit for his Majesty's 
concession, and offer them to this Committee to be reported to his 
Majesty in Council for his Majesty's approbation and further direc- 
tion. Endorsed, Referred to Lord Willoughby. Draft with 
corrections. I p. [CoL Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 41.] 

48. Chr. Codrington, Deputy Governor, to [Sec. Lord Arlington]. 
In the absence of his Excellency has received his Majesty's commands 
of 13th January [see ante, -No. 3] for seizing two ships for having 
infringed the Act of Navigation. Had already seized and brought 
to trial the Matthew and Francis, but through some ill management 
she was acquitted ; but will bring her to a new trial. The Sarah 
and Mary is not yet arrived, but will not fail in his duty ; being 
very glad to find himself so well backed by his Majesty's commands, 
since his former actions of this nature have with some gained him 
the imputation of severity. Conceives the customers in England 
give some occasion to such things, by permitting ships from Holland 
to touch in England and bring certificates, upon which license of 
trade hath always been heretofore granted. Endorsed, Aug. 21, 
1669. 2pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 42.] 

49. Sir Tobias Bridge to [Lords of the Privy Council]. Sends 
herewith, in obedience of their Lordships' commands of 31st July 
last, account of the receipts and disbursements of his Majesty's moiety 
of the duty of 4 per cent, in this island from 14th October 1668 to 
14th April 1669. Has paid already four months half-pay to the 
officers, two months quarters for the soldiers, and has completed the 
soldiers' pay for two months on the muster of 20th October, besides 
a good part of 85,361 Ib. of sugar for provisions sent with Lieut.- 



16 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1669. 

Colonel Stapleton and Captain St. John, together with the salaries 
of the officers of the Custom House. There was always allowed 
10 per cent to the chief collector, which is charged in the account 
for himself and deputy ; if it be thought too much, is very willing 
to submit to what their Lordships shall direct. Has not been idle in 
improving his Majesty's revenue. It is impossible to have an account 
from the other islands so soon. Will send the muster rolls of the 
four companies to Leeward as soon as received. 1 p. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXIV., No. 43.] 

April 21. 50. Petition of the Farmers of his Majesty's Customs to the King. 

(Received.) Having taken notice of an Order in Council which gives liberty to 
two Scotch ships to pass from Scotland to New York, &c. (see ante, 
No. 43), and finding some ambiguous words, especially in the last 
clause, which seem to mean that they may trade with any of his 
Majesty's dominions, not excepting Scotland, and having cause to 
believe that the end thereof is to settle a trade betwixt the Planta- 
tions and Scotland, and that these ships, under pretext of this order, 
may withdraw above 7,000?. per annum from the Customs in 
England, and deface three Acts of Parliament made in direct oppo- 
sition to it, pray his Majesty to revoke said order, or make this 
condition, that they first touch in some port of England and there 
pay custom, and enter bond not to carry any goods to any other 
place than England or the Plantations, " for otherwise they will be 
in a more free and unlimited condition than any free built ship of 
England and out of the reach of any English law/' Signed by 
Richard Browne. Endorsed: Received 21 of April 1669. Read in 
Council 23 April 1669. 1 p. Printed in New York Documents, 
III., 180-181 also copy. [Col Papers, Vol. XXIV., Nos. 44, 45.] 

April ? 51. Reply to preceding petition of the Farmers of .H. M. Customs. 
The whole design of the Duke of York in obtaining permission for 
two Scotch Ships to trade to New York and transport planters there 
is merely for the general good of those of his Majesty's late acquired 
Dominions. It is acknowledged that by the said Acts of Parliament 
English built ships only are permitted to trade in the Plantations, 
yet certain merchandize from Scotland and Ireland may be shipped 
in either Kingdom in English built ships, so that the main objection 
lies upon the ships being Scotch, and not on the voyage, passengers 
or planters as Scotchmen, nor on the accommodation of necessaries 
for any number of considerable planters, and that the pretended 
damage is denied, and that the farmers themselves may be convinced 
of our just intentions if his Majesty so ordain, they will (as the 
farmers desire) give security not to carry goods to any place but 
England and the Plantations, paying custom as the law directs. No 
Scotch ship can possibly (without ruin to the adventurers) engage 
in her outward voyage to touch in an English port, by reason of 
demurrage on contrary winds or other accidents. As to the burden 
of ships, smaller ships will be of no great use to a Plantation that 
affords horses, boards, timber frames, houses, and other bulky goods 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 17 

1669. 

for trade to Barbadoes and the Leeward Isles, besides their return 
to England (if laden) will be more acceptable to the farmers than 
smaller ships. Other Plantations have by his Majesty's royal pro- 
genitors and himself been given temporary exemptions from customs, 
and New York stands in as much need of the like grace, yet they 
only importune the privilege for these two Scotch ships not to touch 
in England outward bound, for if brought into an English port they 
wiU not yield to the farmers any considerable profit worth naming, 
necessaries to planters being no wise liable to pay customs. Lastly, 
it is for the security and welfare of Plantations, in great measure 
seated with Dutch, Swedes, and Finns, that such of his Majesty's 
born subjects as desire to be transported thither may not want 
Royal encouragement, by which means the numbers of his Majesty's 
foreign subjects ma^ in a short time be balanced if not exceeded by 
his Majesty's native subjects. 2 pp. Printed in New York Docu- 
ments, III., 181-182. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 46.] 

April 22. 52. M. De Baas, French Lieut. -General in America, to Henry 
May 1. Willoughby, Governor of Antigua. Sent advice to Barbadoes in 
St. Feb. last to Lord Willoughby of his powers for tendering that part 
Christopher's. O f g t Christopher's which in Jan. 1665 belonged to the English, but 
has received no positive answer. Conjures him, in the absence of 
Lord Willoughby, to come and receive the same, " as I intend per- 
fectly to repossess you, and to re-establish a firm peace and of 
long duration." Incloses, 

52. i. Protest of De Baas. That as soon as his master sent him 
to command in America, he was ordered to surrender the 
English part of St. Christopher's, that in the beginning of 
Feb. last the Comte d'Estre'e sent a vessel to Barbadoes to 
give notice of their powers, but the Governor returned an 
ambiguous answer, and they have not received any news 
since. Has sent to Lieut.-Gen. Willoughby at Antigua to 
declare that if within one month some person does not 
come with sufficient order from the King of England and 
the order of their King of 31st Oct. last, to receive that 
part of St. Christopher's, they have no power to make 
restitution, but will keep the same until their King shall 
give them a new power. Protests that the delay cannot be 
imputed to France, and against all costs and losses which 
said delay may occasion to the French King and his subjects. 
Together 2| pp. [Gol. Papers, Vol. XXIV., Nos. 47, 47 i]. 

[April 23.] 53. Answer of Win. Lord Willoughby to petition of Nathaniel 
Kingsland [see ante No. 44]. Believes it true that before the 
taking of Surinam by the Dutch, Petitioner was possessed of a 
plantation and negroes there, farmed to William Sandford, his 
nephew, at the rendition of which Colony all the estates of absent 
persons were confiscated to the Dutch, amongst them his son 
Harry's, left to him by Fras. Lord Willoughby, and Petitioners, 
but in said articles was one in favour of agents or tenants living 
on said confiscated estates, that they were to retain possession for 
the time of their agreement with their employers, paying to the 
States of Zealand what they were bound to pay to their employers. 

U 51912. 



18 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1669. 

But Sandford refused to continue on his uncle's estate, and the 
Dutch having him in suspicion, commanded him off from the 
Colony, and placed Charles Nightingale to manage the plantation 
for the States of Zealand, who continued possessed till the Colony 
was retaken by Harry Willoughby on 7th Oct. 1667. Before the 
taking it was concluded that all estates formerly confiscated to the 
Dutch should be equally divided between the officers and soldiers, 
who were to have no other pay for their services, and accordingly 
Harry's estate and negroes, as well as Petitioner's, were seized and 
divided. Sandford was but a private soldier, and. of no more use 
than any other ; but one John Kettle, an old planter, was chief 
guide and director ; notwithstanding whatever belonged to Sandford 
remaining on his uncle's plantation was restored to him by the 
officers. About the 1st Nov. they left Surinam, and the officers 
empowered Col. Saml. Barry and Capt. Nath. Clarke to employ to 
their use the confiscations left; but no profit was received, nor 
did his son ever sell Petitioner's lands or house, or receive a farthing 
advantage thereby. On arriving at Barbadoes the soldiers offered 
Petitioner's negroes for sale, whereupon Petitioner, without Lord 
Willoughby's knowledge, hired the bellman to make public outcry 
that no person should dare to buy any of them ; whereupon the 
soldiers grew into a very great mutiny, and one of them discharged 
his musket at Petitioner. On information of this uproar, by advice 
of Council, as well for pacifying the mutiny as preserving Petitioner's 
life, whom the soldiers h,ad vowed to kill, Lord Willoughby com- 
mitted Petitioner, and after three days, he, being a Member of the 
Assembly, by their desire was released. Petitioner then petitioned 
for relief, but was referred to recover by law ; yet the negroes sold 
to several planters Petitioner inveigled away and kept them by force ; 
whereupon the planters petitioned for justice, who were also re- 
ferred to a due course of law. When Lord Willoughby had notice 
of Petitioner's first petition against him in England, he asked the 
whole Assembly, whereof Petitioner was one, whether any of them 
had made any complaints to the King and Council, which they all, 
and Petitioner particularly, denied ; whereupon he produced the 
petition and letters, " and upon that the whole Assembly reproved 
him (Petitioner) very severely as a foolish and false fellow." Lord 
Willoughby told the Assembly he had His Majesty's license to go 
for England, and desired Petitioner to prepare to go with him to 
verify before the King and Council his accusation; which, in truth, 
his Lordship did not intend, nor did he take him, but told him 
before his Lordship's departure that he doubted not the King, when 
His Majesty understood how boldly and falsely he had traduced 
his Lordship, would send for him. "And these were all the 
reproachful or threatening expressions I ever used to him." Had 
the truth examined before his own departure by depositions of 
witnesses, at which Petitioner and his counsel were present, and 
has now ready to deliver. Lord Willoughby, on petition of those 
claiming right to the negroes, proposed that all five judges of Bar- 
badoes should try the cause ; but Petitioner peremptorily refused. 
Thus was the matter left depending ; but is since informed that 
Petitioner, despairing of the legality of his cause, has suffered judg- 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



19 



1669. 



ment to go by default, which " I suppose has now again excited 
the rage of that passionate man " to a second clamour. Is ready to 
verify all this, and hopes that some way may be found for vin- 
dicating his own honor and the due punishment of his malicious 
prosecutor. Begs, if other complaints have been made against him, 
to be made acquainted therewith, and the complainants ordered to 
attend to justify them ; to all which, knowing the integrity of his 
own actions, his Lordship will give a plain and positive answer on 
the first hearing ; and thereby doubts not to make it appear that in 
all things he has been a faithful and industrious servant to the 
King and his Majesty's subjects under his government to the best 
of his understanding and ability. Endorsed: Read in Council, 
Ap. 23, 69 ; referred to the Committee for Trade and Plantations. 
[Col Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 48.] 



Shafteslmry 
Tapers. 



April 26. 54. Articles of Agreement between the Lords -Proprietors of 
Carolina in order to the speedy settlement of the said Province. 
That each Proprietor before 25 May next pay to John Portman 
500?. sterling, to be laid out in shipping, arms, ammunition, tools 
and provisions for the settlement of Port Royal, for the purchase 
of which a Husband shall contract and render an account to the 
Lords Proprietors. It is also agreed that each Lord Proprietor shall 
pay for the next four years a further sum not to exceed 200?. per 
annum, and that any Proprietor neglecting or refusing to pay any 
of the said sums shall relinquish and convey his share to the rest 
of the said Proprietors. Endorsed by John Locke. 1 p. [Shaftes- 
bury Papers, Section IX., No. 9.] 



16(59. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



April 27. 

Antigua. 



55. Account of the cost of the ship Carolina and her setting 
to sea, 930?. 17s. lid.; of the ship Port Royal, 199?. 5s. 8d; 
and of the Albemarle, 821. Is. lOd. Also of the provisions 
bought for the expedition to Carolina, 54:01. Us. 8d. ; of the clothes, 
2121 4s. ; arms, powder, and ammunition of war, 397?. 15s. ; tools 
and iron ware, 188?. 9s. Id. ; cask, 87?. Os. Id. ; fishing trade, 
281. 10s. ; Indian trade, 50?. 18s. 8d. ; charges of shipping goods, 
&c., 581. 4s. ; a surgeon's chest and instruments, 30?. ; seamen's 
wages, 76?. 15s. ; Mr. West at Kinsale, 30?., and for his pains 20?. ; 
Lent Capt. O'Sullivan, 10?. ; cargo sent to Virginia to Win. Burgh 
for account of Duke of Albemarle ; in Mr. West's hands, 26?. 5s. 6d. ; 
abated on several bills, 39?. 7s. lid. Total expended, 3,200?. 16s. 6d 
The Dr. side amounts to 2,645?., viz., 550?. each from the Duke 
of Albemarle and Earl of Craven, 545?. from Sir Peter Colleton, 
and 500?. each from Lord Ashley and Sir G. Carteret. 14 pp. 
[Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 13.] 

56. Lieut.-Gen. Henry Willoughby to the Sieur De Baas (at 
St. Christopher's). Has received his letter and protest of April 
22-May 1 [see ante, No. 52], importing his readiness to deliver 
up the English part of St. Christopher's, and were Willoughby 
im powered thereto would use his best endeavours for ending that 
troublesome business. But for that Lord Willoughby, authorised 
by his Majesty of Great Britain to receive it, made two voyages 

B 2 



20 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1669. 



April 30. 

Barbadoes. 



April. 
Whitehall. 



[April.] 

New York. 



to that purpose, and was refused by M. De La Barre and M. St. 
Laurence, and has left no orders, but has given his Majesty an 
account of it ; expects very shortly some commands. 1 p. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 49.] 

57. Sir Tobias Bridge to Lords of the Privy Council. Sent their 
lordships an account of the collecting of the moiety of the King's 
duty of 4^ per cent, on 21 inst. [see ante, No. 49]. Was in 
good hopes of a considerable receipt from Nevis, Montserrat, and 
Antigua; has heard nothing yet from Nevis. Lt.-Col. Stapleton 
writes from Montserrat that he will be very diligent in collecting 
the duty ; and from Antigua there is nothing to be expected, as 
their lordships will understand by the inclosed order of the 
Governor and Council there. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., 
No. 50.] 

58. The King to the Colony of New England. His Majesty 
was well pleased to understand from William Lord Willoughby, 
Governor of the Caribbee Islands, of their great readiness, during 
the late war with France and Holland, to assist Barbadoes and 
the other Caribbee Islands with provisions, &c. Has thought good 
to let them know how well his Majesty takes these expressions of 
their loyalty and good affection, and particularly that of their 
present of masts lately made to him. Will not be wanting on his 
Majesty's part by all good ways to further their welfare. 1 p. 
[Col Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 51.] 

59. Samuel Mavericke to Col. Nicolls, Groom of H.R.H. Bed- 
chamber, Whitehall. Has lately written by way of Boston and 
Virginia, giving account how things stand in these northern parts, 
as how those of the Massachusetts have "unranckled" all that 
was done in the Province of Maine and committed Major Phillipps 
and others to prison for receiving commissions from the Commis- 
sioners ; and given out that if they could take any of those that 
signed them they would punish them severely ; so that at present 
it would not be safe for Mavericke to go thither. Not long since 
tribute was demanded of the Narragansett Sachems, but they said 
" they would pay King Charles and none else." At York, trials 
have been made this spring for cod fish, with very good success ; 
a small ketch sent out by the Governor has found several good 
fishing banks, one not above three leagues from Sandy Hook, where 
in a few hours four men took 1,100 or 1,200 excellent cod fish. 
That vessel is to go to Newfoundland for fishermen, lines, hooks, 
&c. ; most of the vessels that go to and from Virginia take good 
quantities. "Doubts not but this coast will afford fish in abundance. 
On the east end of Long Island 12 or 13 whales were taken before 
the end of March, and some are daily seen in the harbour; the 
Governor has encouraged this design, and two shallops are made 
for it. The Governor with some partners is building a ship of 
120 tons by Thos. Hall's house, and another of 60 or 70 tons is 
building at Gravesend. Nutt Island, by making a garden and 
planting fruit trees, &c., is made a very pleasant place. Thinks 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. . 21 

16 9, 

the old house must conie down to the bottom, and will prove a 
tedious and chargeable piece of work. There is good correspondence 
between English and Dutch, and to keep it closer 10 Dutch and 
6 English have meetings at each other's houses twice a week in 
winter and once in summer. Several people in and about Boston 
have inclination to come hither to live. New England men have 
found the way hither again from Virginia ; this week past there 
were here at one time nine vessels which brought tobacco ; some 
are returned to Virginia for more, others gone to -Boston with corn, 
besides several Dutch sloops. 1 pp. Printed in New York 
Documents, III., 182-183. [Col Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 52.] 

1669 ? 60. Report of the Lords Committee for Foreign Affairs to the 
King. In obedience to his Majesty's order of the 13th instant, 
certify : 1. That they conceive it contrary to law and very preju- 
dicial to trade for license to be granted to three Swedish ships to 
trade at Plymouth. 2. As to the business of Surinam, and Serjt. 
Major Banister's imprisonment in Zealand ; are of opinion that hrs 
Majesty may demand his liberty, no just cause of imprisonment 
appearing ; and as to the difference between the Dutch and the 
English on Surinam, and how far the latter ought to have liberty 
to transport themselves and estates off the Colony, have considered 
the articles of the Treaty of Breda as well as those for the surrender 
of said Colony to the Dutch in 1667, which were confirmed at this 
last delivering up of that Colony ; but not being of one mind among 
themselves in the interpretation, have thought fit to annex them 
for his Majesty's judgment. Annexed, 

60. i. Articles 5, 19, and 20 of the Treaty of Surinam between 
Col. Byam and Adm. Crynsens. 5. In case any inhabitant 
intend to depart, he shall have power to sell his estate, 
and the Governor shall procure that he be transported at 
moderate freight with his estate. 19. Such as intend off 
shall be furnished with a vessel to transport themselves, 
slaves, and goods, and be permitted to take their sloops. 

60. n. Second Articles of Surinam bet ween Major Bannister and 
Adm. Crynsens, 1668. That all articles heretofore made 
with Commander Crynsens are hereby fully confirmed and 
ratified, and shall in all particulars be observed without 
any addition or diminution. Dated on board the States 
ship Surinam, the f-g- of April 1668. Signed by Abraham 
Crynsens and others. Together 4 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 
XXIV., Nos. 53-55.] 

1669. 61. Petition of Major James Bannister, late Governor of Surinam, 

May 5. to the King. That Petitioner surrendered Surinam to the Dutch, 
who agreed that himself and his fellow subjects should have shipping 
at moderate rates to remove themselves and estates to some other 
of his Majesty's Colonies, in order to which Petitioner demanded 
shipping, which the Dutch not only refused, but on 22nd July last 
seized Petitioner and carried him prisoner into Zealand, where he so 
continued 10 weeks, In December last the Lords of Zealand passed 



22 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1669. 

a resolution that Petitioner should forthwith depart thence, never 
return to Surinam, and be enjoined to sell his estate to an in- 
habitant of that place ; whereupon Petitioner repaired hither to 
acquaint his Majesty. The Zealanders also seized 9,500 Ibs. sugar 
sent for Petitioner's support in Zealand, and he is like to lose two 
considerable plantations there, for which he has been proffered 
2,200. All these injuries have been done him for no other cause 
than insisting to have the articles performed, as has been sufficiently 
manifested before his Majesty's Council for Trade, which articles 
Petitioner understands the Dutch have lately agreed to perform. 
Prays that the Dutch may give satisfaction for his losses, and 
restore the sugar seized, and that his Majesty will bestow on 
Petitioner a vessel of 100 tons for the removal of his family and 
moveable estate from Surinam. Endorsed, Read 5th May 1669. 
I p. [Col Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 56.] 

[May 7.] 62. Reply of Nathaniel Kingsland to Lord Willoughby's answer 
to his petition [see ante, No. 53], That Sandford did stay at 
Surinam to enjoy the articles after the capture by the Dutch, but it 
was Col. By am who accused him to the Dutch, and 'twas his 
business to have persuaded them to keep to the articles. That the 
confiscation of Kingsland's plantation was an agreement preceding 
the undertaking is very improbable, being unknown to Sandford, 
and against the rules of common justice to make the " recaption " 
more fatal to their fellow subjects than the loss itself; but if it 
were, the reinstating of Sandford in the plantation by the General's 
order had determined this to be his booty ; and " 'tis easy to prove 
that the Lieut.-General had nothing confiscated, and whoever lost 
in the expedition got amply." By law any man may take his 
own goods wherever he finds them, and 'twas rather a kindness to 
give notice by the crier than affront to the Governor or cause of 
imprisonment. It was as reasonably propounded by Kingsland to 
give security to abide the law concerning his negroes as it was unrea- 
sonable to imprison him that he might not follow the law. As to 
discovering Kingsland's complaint before the Council, affirms the 
contrary, for the order and letter were sent inclosed to Kingsland, 
and his Lordship could not have them but from Kingsland's hand ; 
but if true, it is expressly against the law for any man to be 
menaced for complaining to the King ; and to answer his petition 
for justice with imprisonment was a severity not unworthy 
his Majesty's notice. He suffered judgment to go against him by 
default by advice of counsel, because some of the judges were in 
possession of part of the negroes in demand ; and now the whole 
matter is before his Majesty and Council, Kingsland will acquiesce in 
whatsoever shall be determined. Desires some day next week may 
be appointed for hearing the matter. Endorsed, Received and read 
May 7, 1669. 1 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 57.] 

May 8. 63. Grant to Henry Earl of St. Albans, John Lord Berkeley, 

Westminster. Baron of Stratton, Sir Wm. Moreton, and John Tretheway. Whereas 

by letters patents, bearing date at St. Germain-en-Laye the 1 8th 

September 1649, his Majesty granted to Ralph Lord Hopton, Henry 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 23 

1669. 

Earl of St. Albans (by the name of Henry Lord Jermyn), John 
Lord Culpeper, John Lord Berkeley of Stratton (by the name of 
Sir John Berkeley), Sir William Moreton, Justice of the King's Bench, 
Sir Dudley Wyatt, and Thomas Culpeper, their heirs and assigns for 
ever, all that tract of land in America " bounded by and within the 
head of the rivers of Tappahannock, alias Rapahannock, and Qui- 
riough or Pattawomacke Rivers, the courses of the said rivers, as 
they are commonly called or known by the inhabitants, and 
descriptions of those parts and Chesapoyocke Bay, together with the 
rivers themselves and all the islands within the banks of those 
rivers, and all woods," waters, harbours, fish, beasts, fowl, mines, 
quarries, &c. within the precincts thereof, royalties of hawking and 
hunting, &c., reserving to his Majesty, his heirs and successors, the 
fifth of all gold mines and ore, and the tenth of all silver mines and 
ore ; paying yearly at the Feast of St. John the Baptist the sum of 
61. 13s. 4d. at his Majesty's receipt of James Town, in Virginia. 
And whereas said Lords Hopton and Culpeper, Sir Dudley Wyatt, 
and Thomas Culpeper are dead, and said Lord Hopton conveyed 
all his estate and interest in the premises to John Tretheway, all 
said premises were vested in said Earl of St. Albans, John Lord 
Berkeley, Sir William Moreton, and John Tretheway. And whereas 
said Earl of St. Albans, John Lord Berkeley, Sir William Moreton, 
and John Tretheway have surrendered said letters patents, to the 
intent that his Majesty should grant them new letters patents 
thereof, his Majesty hereby grants to said grantees all that tract of 
land, with the appurtenances and privileges, and on the same terms 
as before described. And further, power to divide the same 
into counties, hundreds, parishes, and townships, and to erect 
cities, churches, and colleges, and endow them with lands and 
goods; and to be perpetual patrons of said churches, colleges, 
schools, fec. ; and to divide any part of said territory into manors, 
and hold therein courts baron for all actions where the demand 
exceeds not the value of 40s., and receive the fines and emoluments 
thereof; and to hold within said manors a court leet and view of 
frankpledge of all tenants and inhabitants of the hundreds within 
which said manors may be, within one month after Michaelmas, and 
before Easter, according to the custom of England ; and o hold in 
said manors in every week one market and two fairs every year, 
with a court of pypowder in every fair, and with all liberties, 
tolls, customs, fines, &c. belonging to any market, fair, or court 
of pypowder in England ; and to erect parks for deer and other 
beasts of chase, and enclose them and enjoy them for ever, so that 
no other person may presume to enter therein or kill any of the 
beasts therein without the license of said grantees ; and to grant 
or sell all or any of the premisses to any persons, to be holden 
of said grantees in free and common soccage, or any other tenure 
in England, any statutes, &c. to the contrary notwithstanding. And 
his Majesty covenants at any time hereafter to enlarge and confirm 
these letters patents, Provided always that these presents shall not 
extend to infringe or prejudice any contracts or grants made by 
the Governor and Council of Virginia of the premisses or any part 



24 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1669. 

thereof to any inhabitants now in actual possession thereof by 
virtue of any grant made before the 29th September 16G1, which 
grants shall continue good and effectual without paying any 
fines other than the rents thereon reserved, together with the 
remainders, reversions, and escheats to the said grantees; which 
lands so granted by the said Governor and Council shall not be 
drawn into manors, nor the grantees compelled to do suit or service 
to any court of the manors without their voluntary consent, but 
shall enjoy all privileges, &c. granted to them by said Governor 
and Council, with such limitations as by these presents are declared. 
And when any of said territories shall have been distributed into 
manors, it shall be lawful for any inhabitants to appeal from any 
sentence in any manor court to the Quarter Courts of Virginia. 
Provided that, as to so much of the premisses as within 21 years 
shall not be possessed, inhabited, or planted by the means of said 
grantees, these premisses shall cease and be void. Provided lastly, 
that the said grantees shall not intermeddle in the military affairs 
of or within the premisses, or with the command of the castles, 
forts, &c. thereof without the authority of the Governor and Council 
of Virginia ; and that said Governor and Council shall have full 
power to impose any taxes and impositions upon the said territories 
and the inhabitants thereof for the public defence of Virginia and 
the territories hereby granted, as upon other parts of Virginia pro- 
portionably; and that said grantees and the inhabitants of the 
premisses shall be in all things subject and obedient to such laws 
and constitutions as are or shall be made by said Governor and 
Council and Assembly for said Colony. And these letters patents 
or the enrollment thereof shall be valid without any further con- 
firmation, and shall be sealed with the Great Seal. [Patent Roll, 
21 Chas. II., part 4>, No. 6.] 

May? 64. Mem., in the handwriting of Under Sec. Williamson, of 
. commissions and papers concerning St. Christopher's to be de- 

spatched to Barbadoes. His Majesty's commissions to receive the 
Island, and to compose disputes ; the instructions ; the French 
King's last order and the preceding ones; and a letter from M. 

4 Colbert. The whole to be addressed to , with a letter from 

Lord Arlington accompanying it. Lord Willoughby to give the 
necessary orders for establishing a Governor in the island. p. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 58.] 

May 19. 65. [Sec. Lord Arlington] to Sir John Yeamans (at Barbadoes). 

Whitehall. The Most Christian King having at .length issued the necessary 
orders for effectually restoring to his Majesty the English part of 
St. Christopher's, and having agreed for the composing by Com- 
missioners on both sides of all disputes that may arise ; his 
Majesty has issued two commissions to Sir John Yeamans and 
others ; one, for receiving restitution of said part of said island 
which ought by the treaty to have been restored forthwith, but 
has been thus long delayed by the insufficiency of the orders 
issued by the Most Christian King ; the other, to empower his 
Majesty's Commissioners with the Commissioners on the French 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 25 

1669. 

part to adjust all differences that may arise on the points specified. 
Each are accompanied by necessary instructions from his Majesty, 
so that it only remains to recommend them to set about the work 
with all expedition, to proceed towards the French with all clear- 
ness and fair meaning according to the rules set down in said 
instructions, and to advertise his Majesty from time to time of 
their progress. Draft with corrections in Williamson's hand- 
writing. 1 p. [Col Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 59.] 

May 19. 66. M. Mignon, Secretary to the French Ambassador, to [Under 
Sec. Williamson]. Called to put into his hands a letter from the 
French Ambassador to M. De la Barre, or M. de Bas, and wishes to 
know if it is in such terms as he desires. French. Endorsed, 19 
May 1669. Surrender of St. Christopher's. 1 p. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXIV., No. 60.] 

[May 20.] 67. Mem., by Under Sec. Williamson, of despatches sent away 
by the ship (blank) for Barbadoes, in a black box addressed to Sir 
John Yeamans. Mr. Champante had the care to deliver them on 
board, May 20, 1669. J.W. 

Commission for receiving the island from the French [dated 22 

March 1668-9 [see Cal. ante, No. 33]. 
Commission for composing and determining all differences with 

the French [same date see ante, No. 36]. 
Instructions for executing those two Commissions [see Cal. ante, 

No. 39]. 
French King's Orders for restoring the island, of 31 Oct. 1668, 

11 Dec. 1668, 16 Jan. 1668-9 [see ante, No. 4 i.]. 
French Ambassador Colbert's letter to De la Barre or De Baas 

[dated -|-f January 1668-9, see Cal, ante. No. 4]. 
Lord Arlington's letter accompanying them, directed to Sir Robt. 

[mistake for Sir John] Yeamans [dated 19 May 1669, see 

Cal. ante, No. 65]. 
Copy of letter of Commissioners of sick and wounded and 

prisoners at war, about entertainment of prisoners. 
Printed copy of the Treaty of Breda. 1 'p. [Col. Papers, Vol. 

XXIV., No. 61.] 

May 20. 68. Edward Rawson, Sec., by order of the Council of Massa- 
Boston, chusetts, to Sec. Lord Arlington. By express from his Majesty 
last year for keeping Nova Scotia, they had hopes they might have 
been silent as to that affair without disservice to God, their Kino-, 
and country, but understanding by a letter from Mr. Barker to Sir 
Thos. Temple of 18th Feb. last, that there is a resuming of that 
matter, they account it their duty to present their sense of the 
affair. Should the French have that country it would not only 
obstruct the trade of peltry, but of fishing, which is most con- 
siderable ; for when they had possession of it, even in peace, the 
least occasion was taken by them to make prize of vessels fishing 
on those coasts, and should there happen a war, how bold their 
attempts may be to annoy these plantations needs no great fore- 
reach to apprehend. It would be doubtless not only a reviving of 



26 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1669. 

the French King's withering interest in North America, but a very 
large Augmentation of advantage to their settlement at Kebeck 
(Quebec), and become as an half girdle to the English settlements 
by laud, added to their sea advantage for the obstruction of naviga- 
tion ; so that the parting with Nova Scotia or Acadia for St. 
Christopher's holds slender proportion. Need not suggest the 
English right by discovery, patent, and possession. 2 pp. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 62.] 

[May 23.] 69. Col. Nicolls to Secretary Lord Arlington. The clamours of a 
people oppressed by the Massachusetts Colony are addressed by 
petition to his Majesty and humbly recommended to his Lordship. 
Their importunity to Nicolls (who knows the justice of their cause) 
compels him to be concerned in their complaint, though he would 
more willingly have contributed to the reconcilement of differences ; 
but now matters are flown so high that the oppressed people of 
Maine implore his Majesty's protection against the Massachusetts, 
who have at once invaded his Majesty's authority and their fellow 
subject's liberties, some of whom remain in prison for asserting 
their Government, established pro tempore by his Majesty. The 
whole matter is left to his Lordship's consideration. Endorsed, 
Bead in For[eign] Committee, 23 May 1669. 1 p. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXIV., No. 63.] 



May 27. 

Virginia. 



June 7. 

Virginia. 



70. Gov. Sir Wm. Berkeley to Sec. [Lord Arlington]. Last 
spring, in the company of 200 gentlemen, he made an essay to find 
out the East Indian Sea, and had hopes to find silver mines, as the 
Spaniard had done in the same latitude, but unusual rains hin- 
dered their intentions. Is of that age which requires that very little 
time should be misspent, and has since considered that he had not 
his Majesty's commission to justify so bold an undertaking, added 
to the memory of the misfortune of Sir Walter Raleigh. The 
bearer, Col. Parkes, will now solicit his Majesty's commission to 
prosecute the design next spring. The King may please to divert 
himself by asking the Colonel questions on the nature, posture, and 
condition of the Colony. Endorsed, Answered 12 Nov. 1669. 
2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 64.] 

71. Thos. Ludwell, Secretary, to Sec. [Lord Arlington]. The 
Colony in a very peaceable condition, but apprehensive of the French 
preparations for war. In great want of at least 40 or 50 culverin, 
not one out of the burnt frigate having endured the trial ; also 
shot, as they cannot apparel their forts. Will write to Col. Mory- 
son to wait upon him on this subject and others. All very joyful 
at the King's acceptance of their present of silk. Sends all their 
made laws and accounts of 2*. per hogshead. Begs to be 



new 



nominated to the government in the Governor's absence, who has 
solicited leave to go home. 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 65.] 

[June 9.] . 72. Petition of William Isles, late commander of the Bachelor, 



and 130 poor men who belonged to said vessel, to the King and 
Council. Said ship was in 1666 impressed into his Majesty's 
service in the Leeward Isles, and honourably lost in that expedition, 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



1669. 



June 12. 

Virginia. 



June 15. 

Jamaica. 



There is about 350?. due to the ship's company for two months' 
wages, besides the loss of ship and freight, for which Petitioner has 
attended 10 months, to his great damage. Prays his Majesty to 
refer same to the Commissioners of the Navy, and order speedy 
payment. Endorsed, Received June 9. Read in Council the 
llth, 1669. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 66.] 

73. Governor Sir W. Berkeley to [Sec. Lord Arlington]. Has 
received his Majesty's gracious acceptance of their present of silk, 
and have most of them laid up vows in their hearts, with their 
utmost endeavours so to improve their skill and industry in that 
excellent work that they shall in few years be able to make a far 
greater present to his Majesty. When he comes to Europe will 
make a voyage to France or Italy to be taught more. Begs he 
will present the inclosed petition ; has not been able in seven years 
to bring home enough to keep him half a year in England. His 
salary less than any other Governor of America, though the King 
has more revenue from Virginia " than all the Islands together." 
Incloses, 

73. I. Petition of Sir Wm. Berkeley to the King. Though the 
terms on which his Majesty's promise was made are not 
fully performed, prays for the customs of a ship of tobacco 
to enable Petitioner to wait on his Majesty's royal person 
one half year " that your Majesty, God's Vice-regent, will 
imitate your great Exemplar, God, and reward good in- 
tentions." 

73. II. Warrant of King Charles II. declaring that when Governor 

Berkeley shall send to England a ship of 300 tons laden 
with silk, hemp, flax, pitch, and potashes, the growth of 
Virginia, he shall have the customs and duties of a ship 
of tobacco of the same burthen. Whitehall, 1662, Sept. 22. 
Together 4 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., Ufa. 67, 67 1. II.] 

74. Governor Sir Thos. Modyford to the Spanish Ambassador 
" You cannot be ignorant how much your whole nation in these 
parts did applaud my justice -and civility to them at my first coming 
to this government, which (notwithstanding the small returns 
I received) I should have continued to this day, had not an invincible 
necessity compelled me to allow our privateers their old way, that 
I might keep them from joining with mine and your master's 
enemies. And now I believe you will find some reason to thank 
me that I took that course ; for had they, or should . they yet join 
with the French forces (to which I find them too much inclinable), 
your master's interest in the Barlevanta Islands, Nova Andaliizia, 
Nova Reyno de Granada, and the Main, would be in great hazard, 

c e if not quite lost ; especially if our advice be true, that they have 
lately with a considerable fleet approached St. Domingo of Hispa- 
niola. I know, and perhaps you are not altogether ignorant of your 
weakness in these parts, the thinness of your inhabitants, want of 
hearts, arms, and knowledge in war, the open opposition of some, 
and doubtful obedience of other, .of the Indians : so that you have 



28 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1669. 



June 15. 

Whitehall. 



June 17. 



1609? 



no town on this side the line, but that my master's forces here 
would give him, did not his signal generosity to yours restrain 
them. What we could have done the French will do, unless these 
men may by your intercession be brought to serve your master ; 
and then you will be so sensible of their usefulness, that you will 
no longer malign me for the evils they have done the vassals of 
your Prince, but rather applaud that providence which by these 
means kept them to serve you in this exigent. It is possible this 
frank discovery of my knowledge in your affairs will invite you 
the more earnestly to endeavour my'oppression ; but I am secure in 
the goodness and wisdom of my Sovereign Lord, and you may be 
in his affection and tenderness to your nation, (so many ways and 
so fully evidenced,) so that, unless by some non-sincere dealing the 
same be justly forfeited, my knowledge and experience in your 
affairs may prove your advantage and security. These men will 
put themselves under any employment (as most will) rather than 
starve ; that the good encouragement your master will give them 
may prevent their seeking other, is recommended to your care and 
consideration." Two copies, 1| pp. [Got. Papers, Vol. XXIV., 
No. 68, and Col Entry Bk., No. 27, p. 41.] 

75. Warrant to the Commissioners of Ordnance. To deliver to 
Joseph West, for the defence of the plantation called Carolina in the 
West Indies, four iron demi-culverin and eight sacres, with ship 
carriages, ladles, sponges and linstocks, and 12 rounds of shot for 
each. p. [Dom. Entry Bk, Chas. II., Vol. 29, p. 34.] 

76. Petition of Anthony Bryskett to the King. Petitioner's 
father, by commission from the Earl of Carlisle, at his own great 
cost gained from the Indians and planted the Island of Montserrat, 
where Petitioner had a valuable estate destroyed at the capture by 
the French, January 30, 1666. At which time his Majesty's poor 
distressed subjects importuned Petitioner to receive a power from 
the French to protect them ; which Petitioner obstinately refused ; 
yet at their lamentable complaints, importunate tears, and most 
deplorable sufferings Petitioner afterwards most unwillingly accepted 
for their sakes, but submitted at the first moment of his Majesty's 
fleet appearing for their relief. Yet so it is, Petitioner's estate of 
ruined lands has been confiscated to his Majesty ; craves his Majesty's 
clemency, and that his estates may be restored to him. With refer- 
ence to Lord Willoughby to report the true state of Petitioner's 
case ; dated Whitehall, 1669, June 17. 2 pp. [Col Papers, Vol. 
XXIV., No. 69.] 

77. Petition of Anthony Bryskett to the King. Refers to his 
Majesty's order of reference of 17th June last on his former petition, 
and to Lord Willoughby 's report annexed. And in regard Petitioner 
accepted a French commission for the preservation of his Majesty's 
most distressed subjects from the fury of barbarous bloody Indians 
and others, and most willingly submitted to his Majesty's forces ; 
prays his Majesty's pardon and to be restored to his lands, of which 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 29 

1669? 

Petitioner was divested by Act of the Assembly at Montserrat. 
Annexed, 

77, I. Report of William Lord Willoughby on above petition. 
That at the time of the capture of Montserrat by the French, 
30th January 1666, Petitioner was possessed of a plantation 
there, since by his Lordship 's-order divided into three plantations, 
viz., the Fort House Plantation of 525 acres, the Water work 
Plantation of 573 acres, and the South side of the River Plan- 
tation of 300 acres ; that on 23rd February following Petitioner, 
being of the Irish nation, accepted a commission from the French 
King and M. De la Barre, to be Governor, especially over the 
Irish inhabitants of the Leeward side, and was Governor there 
till the retaking of the island by his Majesty's forces. Soon 
after, on 16th April 1668, an Act was passed by the Assembly 
to reinstate former proprietors, but Petitioner, without his 
Lordship's moving at all in it, was amongst others excepted ; 
Petitioner applied to Lord Willoughby for relief, but he did 
not think it expedient to do anything contrary to the Act of 
the country ; whereupon Petitioner soon after left the country, 
and his Lordship heard no more of him. Afterwards Lord 
Willoughby,.by ad vice, allotted part of the Fort House Plantation 
for building a town and fort, and the remainder for the future 
maintenance of the Deputy Governor ; and Col. Stapleton being 
afterwards appointed Deputy Governor, and the country not 
being in a condition to support a Governor, Lord Willoughby 
settled upon him and his heirs the Waterwork Plantation ; 
the other plantation remains undisposed of. But Petitioner 
has now produced certificates under the hands of several con- 
siderable planters of Montserrat, testifying that Petitioner 
accepted the government under the French at the request of 
his Majesty's subjects and to preserve them from danger, and 
that he did protect his Majesty's English subjects from the fury 
of the rebellious Irish to the hazard of his own life, and by 
reason thereof was necessitated to keep a guard in his house 
every night till the arrival of his Majesty's fleet. Together 
3 pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XXIV., Nos. 70, 71.] 

i!669. 78. A discourse by Mr. De Witt, Pensioner of Holland, with 

June 22. Sir TJhos. Temple, the King's Ambassador at the Hague, and the 

July 2. English Ambassador's answer concerning the surrender and capitu- 
lations of Surinam to the Dutch in accordance with the Treaty of 
Breda. 13 pp. [Col. Entry Bk, No. 77, pp. 13-19.] 

June ? 79. Petition of Wm. Lord Willoughby, on behalf of himself 
and his son Henry, to the King. Petitioner has heretofore moved 
his Majesty for the vindication of his son Harry from aspersions 
touching his management of affairs at St. Christopher's, at which 
time his Majesty declared himself well satisfied with what his son 
had done. But Petitioner has lately by accident discovered that 
there is a combination against them touching that affair, as will 
appear by the affidavit and articles annexed. Now though 



30 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1669. 

Petitioner well knows his own and his son's unblameable carriage, 
he desires to have the cause heard whilst the witnesses on both sides 
are here in person. Prays therefore that notice of this petition may 
be given to the persons mentioned in the affidavit annexed, and that 
a speedy day be appointed to alter or amend their articles, to which 
he is ready to give answer in writing. Annexed, 

79. I. Affidavit of Capt. Thos. Malet, sworn 25th June 1669. 
On the 17th inst. met with one St. Barbe, who had 
marched under him at St. Martin's, and said he was 
employed by Sir Peter Colleton to draw up articles, draft 
of which he showed deponent, against Lord Willoughby ; 
that he should be backed by eminent persons, and Lord 
Willoughby would be sharply set upon next day at White- 
hall ; and that those who employed him had promised to 
restore him to his condition of a merchant of good repute. 
But deponent knowing St. Barbe to be a person of very 
mean condition, and believing Lord Willoughby and his 
son to be persons of great honour and integrity, acquainted 
his Lordship therewith ; who told him he was very glad 
of it, for he was resolved to petition the King to hear the 
whole business. Since which St. Barbe has discovered 
several malicious practices to deponent. 

79. II. Wm. Lord Willoughby's crimes urged by Wm. St. Barbe. 
That whereas the planters and merchants of Barbadoes 
during the war raised 3,200,000 Ibs. of sugar, besides the 
duty of 4 per cent., for raising fortifications, payment of 
soldiers, hire of ships, provisions and ammunition ; those 
sugars were never expended on the account for which they 
were raised. (2.) That Lieut.-Gen. Henry Willoughby 
through delay lost the opportunity of releasing the English 
at Todos Los Santos, and by a shameful flight from the 
French near Guadaloupe left 400 men and their vessels 
captives. (3.) That after Antigua was retaken from the 
French the Lieut.-Gen. commissioned one Col. Fitz to 
fight the French there ; yet when they came he charged 
the people on pain of death not to fight till he came to 
lead them, and then went to his own plantation, fired his 
own house, took his negroes into a sloop, and came to Nevis, 
which was the occasion of the loss of that island and the 
persons there ; for all which actions he was never ques- 
tioned by the Lieut.-Gen., but looked on as his friend. 
That on 6th June 1667, in the design for reducing St. 
Christopher's, the Lieut.-Gen. neglected the opportunity 
of landing in a convenient and safe place near the Salt- 
ponds, but ordered every vessel, on sight of three flashes 
of powder from the Jersey frigate, to fall down to Pelham's 
Pviver ; but, being overtaken by wine, Lieut.-Gen. Wil- 
loughby overslept himself, and it was upon break of day 
ere the sign was made. The French followed to Pelham's 
River, where the forlorn hope and part of the main body, 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 31 

1669. 

being landed in a bad place, were most of them killed by 
the French from trenches on the top of the rock ; but the 
Lieut.-Gen. kept himself aboard the Jersey, beholding the 
slaughter, but would not permit any boats to fetch the 
soldiers aboard again. Endorsed, Read in Council, 28 
June 1669. Together 4 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., 
Nos. 72-74.] 

June 28. 80. Order of the King in Council on the above petition of 
Whitehall. William Lord Willoughby. That the whole matter be taken into 
consideration on Wednesday the 7th July, at which time Lord 
Willoughby, Sir Peter Colleton, Wm. St. Barbe, and all others con- 
concerned are to attend, with their witnesses and counsel learned, if 
they please. 1 p. [Col Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 75.] 

[July 4.] 81. Wm. Lord Willoughby to Under Sec. Williamson. All he can 
say in answer to the long memorial received last night is in the 
words of Col. Codrington's letter. " " The 6th of February arrived a 
small French man of war with a letter from M. De La Barre, only 
in my opinion for a colour to his old spy Grand Mason. The 
pert Monsieur was not willing to do his duty to the King's flag, 
but being before hand doubtful of some such thing, I had ordered 
Major Bate into the fort, with orders to make him strike or sink 
him. The Monsieur stood two shot through him the loward a 
maine ; this I thought my duty." This being all written concern- 
ing the affair, cannot easily credit the Ambassador's narrative, 
knowing the Governor to be a person of honour and punctual to 
his word, and that Major Bate well understands the duty of his 
' place ; nor could they want a pilot, Grand Mason being on board 
and as well acquainted with the road as himself. They also differ 
much in dates, but presumes there are many now in town that were 
present at this intended salute. Endorsed, Rec. 4 July 1669. 1 p. 
[Col Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 76.] 

July 5. 82. Samuel Mavericke to Col. Nicolls. Sends copy of his letter 
New York. O f April last [see ante, No. 59]. Mr. Laurence has arrived, but 
has not brought one line from Nicolls, which is very strange. Is 
informed how exceedingly those of Boston boast of the gracious 
letters received from his Majesty, of his kind acceptance of the 
masts and of the provision they sent to the fleet at Barbadoes, all 
which were paid for by a rate levied upon the inhabitants. The 
loyal party which groan under the burthen of the Massachusetts 
Government now despair of relief. Those in Maine are in exceeding 
bondage, and most earnestly desire him to endeavour to purchase 
their freedom. How they have lately acted in the King's province, 
Nicolls will see by a letter from Mr. Gorton inclosed. It grieves 
him exceedingly that he should live to see his Majest's loyal subjects 
and his ancient friends enslaved, for they are now in a far worse 
condition than before ; doubts not they have petitioned his Majesty, 
and craved his assistance, which Mavericke in their behalf humbly 
begs of him, and may come' to his hands if not intercepted. The 
ship in building goes on slowly, so does the house, though one-third 



32 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1669. 

of the old house is left out ; wishes Nicolls' advice had been attended 
to. Many from Bermudas and 'Barbadoes intend to remove hither ; 
some are come as agents and have already bought houses and 
plantations. Mr. Davenport has made such a rent in the church of 
Boston as will never be reconciled ; another great church is erect- 
ing for the Dissenters, and some will remove. Hopes Nicolls will 
not forget what he desired him to do ; since Mavericke came over 
he has never received directly or indirectly to the value of sixpence, 
one horse excepted, which Mr. Winthrop presented him with. 
What he had by his Majesty's order he has spent, and 400. besides, 
in England in prosecution of this design. If any course be taken 
, for reducement of the Massachusetts, hopes Nicolls will not leave him 
out as one that may be employed in it. 1 pp. Printed in New 
York Documents, III., 183-184. [Col Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 52, 
pp. 2-3.] 

July 10. 83. Warrant to all Admirals, &c. to permit Sir Robert Cann, 
Knight, merchant trading to Barbadoes, and a planter there, to 
transport 50 nags, not exceeding the price of 101 each, to Barbadoes, 
to be employed on his sugar works, paying customs for the same. 
1 p. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. 25, p. 111.] 

July 21. 84. The original or first set of the Fundamental Constitutions of 
Carolina. A little volume of 75 leaves bound in vellum, entirely in 
the handwriting of John Locke, and full of corrections by him. 
Ill articles. Printed in full, with all the additions and correc- 

Shaftesbury tions, in the 33rd Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records, 
Papers. Appendix 3, pp. 258-269. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section VIII., 
No. 3.] 

July 26. 85. The Lords Proprietors of Carolina to William Sayle, 
Governor of that part of Carolina to the southward and westward of 
Cape Carteret, and his Council. Giving them power to grant land, 
with such provisoes, conditions, and limitations as are directed by 
their Lordships' instructions and concessions annexed ; and ratifying 
and confirming every act which the Governor and Council shall do 
in the premises ; also instructions in case of the absence or death of 
the Governor. 2 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 20, pp. 41-42.] 

July 27. 86. Instructions from the Lords Proprietors of Carolina (to 
William Sayle) annexed to the commission for the Governor and 
Council. In regard the number of people which will at first be 
set down at Port Royal will be so small that it will not be possible 
to put our grand model of Government in practice at first ; but that 
it may be as near as practicable, the Governor on his arrival at 
Port Royal is to summon the freemen to elect five persons to be 
joined with the five deputed by the respective Proprietors to be of 
his Councill, and to govern according to the following limitations, 
observing what can be put in practice of the Fundamental Constitu- 
tions. Councillors to take the oath "of allegiance, but if any person 
for religion's sake be not free to swear he shall subscribe the same 
in a book. To choose a place whereon to build a fort, under the 
protection of which is to be their first town, and in which their 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 33 

1669. 

stores of all sorts are to be kept. If the first town be built upon an 
island, the whole island to be divided into colonies and reserved for 
the use of the people and no signory or barony to be taken up in it, 
if on the mainland the six next adjoining squares of 12,000 acres 
each to be all colonies, so that the people may at first plant together 
in convenient numbers. No one to take up land within two miles 
and a half of any Indian town if it be on the same side of a river 
" we hoping in time to draw the Indians to our government " and 
the quantity of a barony to be left about every cassique's house or 
town. To establish Courts for the administration of justice until 
our grand model of government can be put in execution. To summon 
the freeholders to elect twenty persons who together with the depu- 
ties shall for the present by their Parliament make laws to be 
ratified as as is provided in the 12th and other articles of said Con- 
stitutions. To take notice that the Lords Proprietors grant to all 
freemen above the age of sixteen that come to Port Royal to plant 
before 25th March, 150 acres and 150 for every able man servant they 
bring with them, 100 acres for every woman servant and man 
servant under sixteen, and 100 acres to any servant when out of 
his or her time to their own proper use ; proportions of land to be 
granted to those who come to Port Royal to plant before 25th March, 
1671, and 25th March, 1672, to cause land to be laid out in squares 
each containinig 1 2,000 acres, every of which squares that shall be 
taken up by a proprietor to be a signory, if by a landgrave or cassique 
to be a barony and if planted by any of the people to be a colony 
and reserved wholly for their use, keeping the proportion of twenty- 
four colonies to eight signories and eight baronies. To order the 
people to plant in towns and one town at least in each colony, and 
no inhabitant to have more than a fifth of the depth of his land to 
front the river ; the form of grant to be passed and the manner of 
passing it ; weekly distribution of stores under certain restrictions to 
those people who thro' poverty have not been able to supply them- 
selves. To direct the storekeeper how much of the Indian trade sent 
shall be delivered to any of the Indian cassiques to purchase their 
friendship and alliance, and never to let the Indians know what 
stores there are which has been observed to be prejudicial. 3 pp 
[Col Entry, Bk, No. 20, pp. 43-46.] 

July 27. 87. Commission from the Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Joseph 
West. Appointing him during pleasure Commander-in-Chief of their 
fleet arid the persons embarked in it bound for Carolina. 1 p. 
[Col. Entry Bk, No. 20, p. 39.] 

July ? 88. Instructions from the Lords Proprietors of Carolina for Joseph 
West. To sail with all possible speed with the fleet under his 
command for Kinsale in Ireland, where he is to endeavour to get 
20 or 25 servants for their lordships' own proper account, and then 
sail direct for Barbados, but no servant to be put on board until 
their own number be first complete. To take the best order for 
the fleet keeping company. In case the master of a family die at 
sea, his servants to be reserved to the use of their lordships, who 
pay their passage and have the most right to them. To apply to 
Mr. Southwell and Thos. Gookin at Kinsale for servants. Not to 

U 51912. 



34 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



suffer any freeman to leave the ship without giving security for 
his return, nor to suffer any servants ashore at Barbados. 1 p. 
[Col, Entry Bh, No. 20, p. 38.] 

July ? 89. Instructions from the Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Joseph 
West " about our plantation." On his arrival at Barbados to apply 
to Thos. Colleton to furnish him with cotton and indigo seed and 
ginger roots, which roots he is to carry planted in a tub of earth 
that they may not die before his arrival at Port Royal, as also 
some canes, several sorts of vines and olive sets. On his arrival 
at Port Royal to take up one side of the town, where least incon- 
venient to the people, as much land for their lordships' own use 
as their proportion will come to at 150 acres per head of 30 ser- 
vants, taking care to have some marsh land and as many varieties 
of soil as may be, some sandy, for the purpose of trying what soil 
agrees best with the several things planted. To have convenient 
housing erected for himself and his servants, making them warm 
and tight, which is a great means of preventing sickness, and so 
place the houses that upon a division of their lordships' land, each 
man may have a share of them. When the houses are built the 
land is to be cleared ; the canes and ginger to be planted in a rich 
soil and light mould. Directions for planting the seeds, as also 
Indian corn, beans, peas, turnips, carrots, and potatoes and grape 
vines, and for keeping the cattle to be sent from Virginia. To 
take with him from Barbados six young sows and a boar. To 
consult in all things with John Rivers, agent for Lord Ashley and 
agent for Sir Peter Colleton. 2 pp. [Col Entry Bh, No. 20, 
pp. 34-35.] 

July ? 90. Instructions from Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Joseph 
West, storekeeper. To have erected within the port at Port Royal 
two nouses, which are not to be thatched, for stores of war and for 
victuals, clothes, tools, &c. The key of the war stores to be 
given to John Rivers, who is to have the charge and make an in- 
ventory of them. The presents to be given to the Indian Kings 
and the distribution of victuals, clothes, and tools and the prices 
at which certain commodities are to be reckoned in regard there 
is no money in Carolina. To take account of passengers and goods 
laden from or brought to Port Royal. In the handwriting of John 
Locke. 1-|- pp. [Col. Entry BL, No. 20, pp. 31-32.]. 

July ? 91. Instructions from the Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Henry 
Brayne. To sail to Kinsale in Ireland and thence to Barbados, 
under the command of Joseph West, appointed Commander-in- 
Chief of the fleet, and observe the orders of their lordships' Governor 
for his proceedings to Port Royal, and to return to Barbados or to 
Virginia as directed by Sir John Yearn an s } Thos. Colleton, and 
Major Kingsland, and there take in passengers and freight for Port 
Royal. If he go to Virginia to apply to Wm. Burgh in Chocatuck 
Creek, James 'River for instructions ; if to Barbados to deliver 
the goods from Port Royal to John Hallet for the Lords Proprietors 
account, and take his and Thos. Colleton's advice for his proceedings 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



35 



1669. 



July ? 



July. 

Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



July. 



Aug. e. 

Whitehall. 



to Virginia or back to Port Royal. At Port Royal to consult 
with Jos. West or the Governor there to what port he shall sail. 
To send their lordships from time to time accounts of his proceed- 
ings. | p. In the handwriting of John Locke. [Col. Entry Bk., 
No. 20, p. 33.] 

92. Instructions from the Lords Proprietors of Carolina for 
John Rivers. To take charge of the storehouse at Port Royal and 
to deliver out such quantities of guns, powder, shot, and other stores 
as directed by the Governor and Council in writing. To keep 
account and take receipts for the same and deliver them to Joseph 
West, who is to charge the persons with them in his books and 
account with Rivers for the same. \ p. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 20, 
p. 37.] 

93. Account of monies received [by John Rivers] from Thomas 
South and laid out for clothes, &c. Total, 151. Is. 3d., which 
includes 7s. 6d for three weeks' lodgings. Indorsed by Lord Ashley, 
" Carolina. July 1669. Rivers accounts." [Shaftesbury Papers, 
Section IX., No. 10.] 

94. The form of appointment of a Deputy. Whereas in the 
fundamental constitutions and form of government of Carolina it 
is ordained that each proprietor shall have his deputy who shall 
sit in the Grand Council and Parliament and have several other 
powers, as in said constitutions are set forth. And whereas there 
is no landgrave or cassique in Carolina at present, or such a 
number of people as will admit of said constitutions and form of 
government entirely to be put in practise, yet that their Lordships 
may come as nigh as is practicable at present, it is agreed that 
each Lord Proprietor shall choose a deputy who for the present shall 
act with the Governor as provided in said constitution is 
there appointed deputy to [sic, blanks]. 1 p. [Col. Entry Bk., 
No. 20, p. 40.] 

95. The King to (Sir Thos. Temple, Governor of Nova Scotia). 
In pursuance of the Treaty of Breda and of his Majesty's former 
letter of 31st Dec. 1667, his Majesty did by his letters of 8th March 
1668/9 signify his final pleasure that he should immediately upon 
receipt thereof give effectual orders for restoring forthwith, to the 
most Christian King, the country of L'Accadie, which formerly 
belonged to said King, as namely the fort and habitations of Pen- 
tagouet, St. John, Port Royal, La Have, and Cape Sable ; but 
which the English possessed themselves of in the years 1654 and 
1655, and proceed therein really and sincerely according to the 
10th and llth articles of said treaty, his Majesty's letters of 1st 
August, or anything therein to the contrary in anywise notwith- 
standing. And whereas some doubt hath arisen to the Sieur 
Colbert, ambassador from the French King, whether his Majesty's 
letters of 8th March may not meet with some difficulties or delay 
in their execution, and his Majesty resolving that the same shall 
be duly and fully executed, and the French King having on his 
part according to said treaty issued his orders for restoring to his 

C 2 



36 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



Aug. 6. 



Aug. 10. 

Aboard the 

Carolina. 

The Downs. 

Shaft esbury 
Papers. 



1669. 

Majesty the English part of St. Christopher's, it is the King's 
most express will and pleasure that forthwith and without all 
manner of doubts, difficulties, scruples, or delays the said country 
of L'Accadie be restored to the French King or to whomsoever he 
shall thereto appoint. 2 pp. [Col. Entry Bh, No. 60, pp. 20-21.] 

96. Draught in Williamson's hand of the latter part of the 
preceding letter. 1 p. [Col Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 77.] 

97. Joseph West to Lord Ashley at his house near Exeter 
House in the Strand. The ships are now riding at anchor in the 
Downs, which he has taken all the care he can to fit out and 
make ready, he hopes to his Lordship's satisfaction; expecting a 
good wind he intends to set sail for the port of Kinsale, from 
whence his Lordship shall receive a fuller account. Sends par- 
ticulars of passengers on board. Encloses, 

97. i. List of names of masters, free passengers, and servants 
aboard the Carolina, viz., Masters, Capt. O'Sullivan and 7 
servants, Step. Bull and 6 servants, Ed. Hollis and Jos. 
Dalton and 9 servants, Thos. and Paul Smith and 7 ser- 
vants, Hambleton and 10 servants, John Rivers and 4 ser- 
vants, Nich. Cartwright and 5 servants, Morris Mathews 
and 4 servants, Wm. Bowman and 2 servants, Dr. Wm. 
Scrivener and 1 servant, Wm. Owens and 3 servants, Thos. 
Midleton, Eliz. his wife and 2 servants, Samuel West and 
2 servants, Joseph Bailey and 1 servant. Passengers 
without servants: Thos. Rideall, Will. Haughton, Will. 
Hennis, Thos. Humfreys, Eliz. Humfreys, Marie Clerke, 
Sampson and Nathaniel Dorkenwell, Sarah and Eliz. Erpe, 
Mary Erpe, Martha Powell, and Thomas Motteshed. Total 
number of passengers 92. 
[Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 11.] 

Aug. 11. 98. Petition of John Jefferies and Thomas Colclough, of London, 
merchants, to the King and Council. Traders to Virginia, peti- 
tioners took into their service Giles Cale, merchant, at a yearly 
salary, who now refuses to give any account of the estate entrusted 
to him. Prays their Lordships' letter to the Governor of Virginia 
to cause said Cale to give security or to account with petitioners. 
Endorsed, Rec d 11 Aug*. Read and ordered 28 th August 1669. 
1 p. [Col. Papers. Vol. XXIV., No. 78.] 



Aug. 17. 

The Downes. 

Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



99. Henry Brayne to Lord Ashley. The ships have been 
stayed by the common inconveniences incident to outward-bound 
ships, and provision is far spent. Beseeches him to consider their 
want when they come to Ireland, where they are to take in a 
great number of passengers. The ships just going to sail with a 
fair wind. Encloses, 

99. i. Inventory of all the appurtenances belonging to the 
Carolina, with a list of the seamen's names belonging to 
her, Henry Brayne, master, as also to the Port Royal, John 
Russell, master, and to the Albemarle, Edward Baxter, 
master. [Shaftesbiwy Papers, Section IX., No, 12.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 37 



1669. 

Aug. 19. 100. Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes. Ordered that Major 
Win. Bate remove the powder from the new church to Fontabell 
House ; and that writs issue for the election of an assembly on 
the 30th inst., and a return to be made on the 31st. 1^ pp, 
[Col. Entry Bk, No. 11, pp. 181-182.] 

August? 101. Chr. Codrington, Deputy Governor of Barbadoes, to 
(Wm. Lord Willoughby). Sends copy of his answer to M. De la 
Barre's letter. Encloses, 

101. i. M. De la Barre to (Col. Codrington). Concerning Joseph 
Oaker, who was well treated at Marie Galante and reported 
among the negroes that the English expected a fleet to 
destroy the French islands ; that he debauched five negroes, 
whom he hid in his barque, but were arrested at Mar- 
tinique, and Oaker for having debauched them was con- 
demned to be hanged and executed, in which he will see 
by copies of the proceedings that there was neither 
precipitancy nor violence, and though the barque was 
rightly confiscated, as Codrington says she belongs to 
him, it is sent. Morris is still in hold for accusations 
of depredations by sea before and after the war against 
him. Shall be glad if he be found innocent, but cannot 
refuse justice to his King's subjects. A barque of St. 
Lucia has been since taken, whose commander is Morris' 
lieutenant, which is taken to Barbadoes ; prays he will 
send her back, or it may defer Morris' liberty. Sends 
two negroes belonging to Barbadoes, and entreats him 
not to pardon any French who have committed the least 
piracy, desiring "with an extreme passion" peace and 
amity between the two nations. His own interpreter 
will deliver this packet and inventory of his messenger's 
goods, who has died from fever. 

101. II. Col. Codrington to M. De la Barre. Has received his 
letter. Can hardly judge that Oaker was guilty of invent- 
ing a report that could not have the least ground, and is 
informed that at least four of the negroes were taken in 
the late war from his Majesty's islands of Antigua, Mont- 
serrat, &c. Hopes it will not appear that a revengeful 
prejudice occasioned this example. Will only add that 
had he seized a Frenchman charged with the same facts, 
he would have sent him to De la Barre for punishment, or 
at least given him notice before either trial or execution ; 
but assures him he will be severe on all offenders, as well 
of the French as his own nation. Knows that Morris 
did his Prince good service in the war, and hopes that 
will not be an aggravation of any crime they will make 
him guilty of. Has ordered this vessel to receive him if 
he will enlarge him. Knows nothing of the barque, but 
if she come will seize and send her down and punish the 
offenders. Together 4 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., 
Pos. 79, 80.] 



38 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1669. 

Aug. 23. 102. Warrant to prepare a Bill for making Philip Foussier, an 
alien born at Rochelle of Protestant parents and himself a Pro- 
testant, now residing in Barbadoes, a free denizen of England ; 
but with a clause that he shall have no benefit of the denization 
till he has taken the oaths of allegiance and supremacy before the 
Governor, Deputy Governor, or Chief Magistrate of the island. 
p. [Dom. Entry Bh, Chas. IL, Vol. 25, p. 119.] 

Aug. 23. 103. A Narrative of Sir Thos. Modyford, Governor of Jamaica, 
setting forth the grounds and reasons for granting commissions 
against the Spaniards. His letters to Lord Arlington from Bar- 
badoes will testify what an aversion he had for the privateers, as 
also his affectionate letters to the Spanish Governors after his 
landing in Jamaica on 4th June 1664, and his severe handling 
those people, by imprisoning them, executing some, and restoring 
their prizes, to the great hazard of the peace. But when he found 
how powerful an enemy he had made of those who were formerly 
the best friends to this place, and who not only knew all their 
ports, bays, and creeks, but every path in the island, and had 
many correspondents on shore, and that some of them were gone 
to the French at Tortuga and Hispaniola, and the rest preparing 
to go, and could better attempt this place than we could defend 
it, Modyford found the fatal error he was running into, and having 
notice of the Dutch war by Lord Arlington's despatch of 12th 
November 1664, he changed his behaviour so effectually that he 
persuaded all in or near this harbour to undertake against the 
Dutch at Curaao, giving them suitable commissions and Col. 
Ed. Morgan, his Deputy Governor, for their general ; they went 
cheerfully without putting the King to one penny charge, and took 
Statia and Saba, but by the death of Col. Morgan they scattered and 
left the rest of that service unperformed. He sent Major Beeston 
to treat with them for a second voyage to Cura9ao, which they 
promised to undertake. Meantime he advised the Duke of Albe- 
marle of the state of this place in relation to the privateers by 
letters of 6th March 1665; in answer to which he had orders of 
30th May 1665 to grant or not commissions against the Spaniards, 
as to him should seem most advantageous for his Majesty's service, 
and letters from Lord Arlington, that from the Lord General he 
should receive his Majesty's directions touching the privateers, and 
also letters from the Lord Chancellor to the same purpose, and 
from Sir James Modyford, and also his Grace's own letter in 
Feb. 1667, confirming all the former, and that after the peace with 
Spain, as by the abstracts annexed may appear. The privateers 
meantime were driven to leeward, and the admiral fell in with 
the^ island of Providence and without any commission took it ; to 
which Modyford sent a Governor, which was not only approved 
of at home, but another Governor under the broad seal of England 
authorised and sent. Yet notwithstanding this full power he 
would not proceed to grant commissions until the council of this 
island unanimously affirmed it was for the good of the island and 
gave their reasons hereto annexed (see previous Vol., 22 Feb. 1666) ; 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES, 39 

1669. 

and thereupon in March 1666, there being also war with France, he 
granted commissions, which was approved by his Grace, his end 
being only to keep them from joining with the French, but they 
had only commissions for taking ships, and none for landing. He 
always reproved" them for so acting, especially in the business of 
Puerto Bello and Maracay ; to which they made their defence by 
writing, which he sent home, but never received any answer to. 
Meantime, by reason of their numbers and not knowing the sense 
at home, he thought it prudential to forbear punishing them ; 
and, receiving an intimation of his Majesty's sense in his son's 
letters, and also advice of the intentions of the Spaniards to attempt 
them, the galleons being daily expected in the Indies, and the New 
Spain fleet already there, in order to detain the privateers on the 
island, he repealed all their powers. Hears that divers of them 
intend to set up for themselves, and only two have as yet joined 
the French. " If the peace with France were immortal, or if that 
warlike Prince had no design this way, I should be little con- 
cerned at the lawless motions of these privateers, but well knowing 
the uncertainty of the former, and the assuredness of the latter, 
I must confess it troubles me to be driven to that saddest error 
of all Governments to act so imprudently as in this most active 
age to weaken ourselves and strengthen our enemies." Will say 
something to the unreasonable rumours of the great wealth these 
privateers are said to gefc ; the Puerto Bello business cleared them 
601. per head, and the fight with Don Alonso at Maracay SOL ; 
this the common sort spent immediately in arms, clothes, and 
drink, and the owners of the ships in refitting, and some of the 
officers and civiller sort are settling plantations, and the owners 
of ships spend their shares in refitting, so that they are from hand 
to mouth and have little or nothing left. His Majesty's fifteenths 
he keeps to be employed in fortification, which may be about 
6001., and his Royal Highness's tenths he always sent home to 
Sir William Coventry and Mr. Wren for his Royal Highness's 
account. To himself they gave only 201. for their commission, 
which never exceeded 300?. Affirms this to be true touching his 
transactions with the privateers of this port, and challenges all 
the bold maligners and rash talkers against his actings in this 
particular, to disprove the least inconsiderable tittle or circum- 
stance- herein, not doubting but all sober and true Englishmen 
will not only absolve him but approve of his proceedings. Annexed, 
103. I. Abstract of several letters from Sir James Modyford, the 
Duke of Albemarle, and the Lord Chancellor to Sir Thos. 
Modyford. Governor of Jamaica, from 6 Ma.rch 1665 to 
Feb. 2, 1667, Granting him liberty to give commissions 
to privateers to take Spaniards rather than lose them 
from his Majesty's service; notwithstanding the treaty 
with Spain, in which the Lord General said the West 
Indies were not at all concerned. Lastly, the Duke of 
Albemarle, by his letter of 2nd February 1667, hath 
these expressions, " and for your giving commissions to 
the privateers (against the Spaniards,) I think you have 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



A.ug. 25 

Whitehall, 



Aug. 31. 

Kinsale. 

Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



1669. 

done pursuant to your own instructions and orders sent 
you, until there shall be some other alternative of these 
orders." Signed by Sir Thos. Modyford. Together 5 pp. 
[Col Papers, Vol. XXIV., Nos. 81, 82.] 

104. Warrant approving an Order of Council of 20 January 
1669 concerning the redress of abuses in the plantations and 
the appointment by the Farmers of his Majesty's customs of Edward 
Diggs for the plantation of Virginia as a fit person to execute the 
articles and instructions in such Order of Council and requiring the 
Governor of Virginia to be aiding and assisting said Diggs. 1 p. 
[Dom. Entry Bh, Vol. 25, p. 120.] 

105. Robert Southwell to Lord Ashley. Has received his letter 
of 16 July to procure servants in these parts to serve the Lords 
Proprietors of Carolina at Port Royal, but though he has explained 
to some and advised with others how to raise servants, hitherto he 
could not obtain any, for the thing at present seems new and foreign 
to them, and they have been so terrified with the ill practise of 
them to the Caribbee islands, where they were sold as slaves, that 
as yet they will hardly give credencce to any other usage. Withal 
they are loth to leave the smoke of their own cabins if they can but 
beg near it. Observes that the chief hindrance is the many build- 
ings, repairs, and contrivances that are in all the towns in this 
country since the settlement of the 49 interest, which has made work 
for all that will serve, and again it is harvest time where they may 
earn or steal a sheaf. The Carolina, Joseph West commander, 
arrived last night, the Albemarle the day before, but the Port Royal 
has not yet arrived. Has sent a very intelligent person into the 
country, where he is confident he will prevail with some, who will 
be the easier persuaded now the ships are here. Knows most of the 
people will give credit to him, because he never had anything to do 
with any of the West India trade, but rescued many who were 
snatched up and conveyed aboard the shipping bound that way. 
Will do all in his power to serve the Lords Proprietors. 2 pp. 
[Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 14.] 

106. Joseph West to Lord Ashley. The three ships have been 
here 1 2 days, but now the wind being fair intends sailing, for he 
clearly finds his Lordship's expectations will not be any ways 
answered there in getting servants and a brave wind has been lost 
going there. The sovereign here and other gentlemen have used 
all endeavours, but to no purpose, for he is not assured of a man 
that will go. Mr. Bowman and others not in the way, but hopes 
they will be aboard before the ships sail. Mr. Reade, a deputy or 
steward to Major Hambledon, has clearly run away, and so have 
Humfreys with his wife and child, and he like a rascally knave 
reported very high and scandalous words against the Proprietors. 
Has laid out the 30. received in provisions. Endorsed by John 
Locke also, (( Post paid 4 d ." [Shaftesbury Papers, Sectiou IX., 
No. 15.] 

Sept. 1 3. 107. Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes. A black box directed 
from Whitehall the 20th May last, containing two commissions and 



Sept. 10. 

Kiasale. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



Sept. 16. 
Barbadoes. 



Sep. 16. 

Barbadoes. 



1669. 

other papers relating to St. Christopher's, was delivered to Sir John 
Yeamans, Col. Philip Bell, Col. Samuel Barwicke, and Col. William 
Sharpe, by Richard Noke, deputy secretary. \ p. [Col. Entry Bk., 
No. 11, p. 182.] 

108. Sir Jno. Yeamans, Phill. Bell, Sam. Barwicke, and Wm. 
Sharpe to (Col. Codrington,) Deputy Governor of Barbadoes. In 
pursuance of his Majesty's commission concerning the English 
interest at St. Christopher's, have prepared a letter to the Sieur De 
la Barre to give notice of their powers. And seeing they have no 
intimation of any shipping appointed for transporting them or pro- 
vision for defraying the charge of this affair, they desire to know 
whether he has any orders from his Majesty or Lord Willoughby to 
supply them, and if not, whether as his Majesty's deputy he will do 
the same. 1 p. [Col Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 83.] 

109. Sir John Yeamans, Phillip Bell, Will. Sharpe, and Sam. 
Barwicke to the Sieur De la Barre or the Commander at Martinique. 
Having received commissions from his Majesty of Great Britain to 
treat with him or commissioners authorised by the most Christian 
King, for composing differences that may arise upon putting into 
execution the most Christian King's orders of 16th January last, 
for restoring that part of St. Christopher's which the English 
possessed on 1st January 1665, and concerning ameliorations, diet 
of prisoners, re-eutry of the English into estates sold to the French, 
and all other matters, and being instructed to give him notice, and 
with him fix time and place for meeting, have sent this express 
that by his answer they may understand his intentions. 1 p. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 84.] 

110. Joseph West to Lord Ashley. On leaving this harbour 
the wind veered and has been against them ever since, but hopes 
soon to sail. Has received a letter from Mr. Blany with two bills 
from Robt. Southwell for 30?., which, however, he shall not 
pass except necessity forces by a long stay here for want of wind. 
Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., 
No. 16.] 

[Sept. 22.] 111. Petition of Robert Forth, Merchant, to the King and 
Council. Petitioner pays his Majesty yearly in customs and excise 
to the value of 3,000?. or 4,000?., and having several ships now 
bound for Barbadoes, prays for licence to transport 150 geldings to 
said island. Endorsed, Rec. Sept. 22, read the 28 June 1669, 
and granted. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 85.] 

[Sept. 28.] 112. Narrative of the usages and customs of Barbadoes concern- 
ing proceedings in the Court of Common Pleas, approved by his 
Excellency and Council, 17th October 1664. See previous Vol. 
No. 833, Enclosure I. Endorsed, Read in Council, 28 Sept. 1669. 
1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol., XXIV., No. 86.] 

[Sept. 30.] 113. Deposition of William Lowe before Sir Thos. Modyford 

Jamaica. Deponent with 11 others prisoners in Cartagena, made their escape 

the fth June last, and left behind them 27 English prisoners : 



Sept. 17. 

Kinsale. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



2 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1669. 

viz., Henry Bragg, John Elliott, Hugh Long, Robt. Cookei', Edward 
Browne, Roger Caun, Richard Wight, Emanuel Manchy, Hainan 
Howman, Hugh Hunter, George and his wife, Richard Glascow, 
Richard Trelawny, Jno. Brewen, Thomas Holland, Godfry, Jno. 
Woodham, James , Arthur Certis, Paul Hopely, Mathew Rider, 
Edwd. Gameu, Thomas Cree, Win. Beates, William Pike, and John 
Richardson. All which were cruelly used, and put to hard labour 
daily frorn'4 in the morning till 7 in the evening, each being in irons 
of the weight of 26 lb., many days without any allowance and at 
best but half a rial a day, often times beaten cruelly by the over- 
seers and soldiers, and upon complaint to the Governor of the small- 
ness or no allowance of provisions, had this return, " starve for 
hunger, and go to hell." After escape they took some Spaniards 
prisoners, who informed them that the above 27 were in irons, and 
it 's thought they will be starved, if relief be not obtained. 1 p. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 87.] 

Oct. 1. 114. Governor Sir Thos. Modyford to Sec. Lord Arlington. Has 
Jamaica, lately received his of llth May, in favour of John Woolley. Since 
his Lordship referred him to the Lord General's directions touching 
the privateers of this port, he has corresponded with his Grace 
about their motions and the powers he gave them, which his Grace 
in all his returns approved of; and had the same been remembered 
by his Lordship, he should not in the late debates touching these 
matters, have been thought so imprudent as he hears he has been. 
Has sent his son a narrative of that affair, to present his Lordship 
with, also abstract of the General, the Chancellor, and his Lord- 
ship's letters touching the same [see ante No. 103. I.] which he 
promises himself will once more render him fair in his Lordship's 
opinion. Endorsed, Rec. Jan. 22, 1669-70. 1 p. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXIV., No. 88.] 

Oct. 2. 115. Sir John Yeamans, Philip Bell, Will. Sharpe, and Sam. 
Barbadoes. Barwicke, to Sec. Sir John Trevor. His Majesty's Commissions 
empowering them to receive the English part of St. Christopher's, 
were delivered to them by the Deputy Governor 13th September 
last, with his Majesty's instructions, and divers orders from the 
French King to his Ministers; and on the 16th they wrote to the 
Sieur De la Barre [see ante No. 109] to adjust time and place of 
meeting. But, being ignorant cf any shipping designed or provi- 
sion made for them, they addressed themselves to the Deputy 
Governor, who answered that he was not empowered to press or 
hire any shipping for them. Are not without hopes to receive such 
further directions as may remove these hindrances and difficulties 
and satisfy them for the diet of prisoners if necessary, and into 
whose hands they shall commit the country and forts when sur- 
surrendered by the French. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV. 
No. 89.] 

Oct. 9. 116. Sir Tobias Bridge to the Lords of the Privy Council. Sends 
Barbadoes. account of the receipt of his Majesty's moiety of the 4|- per cent 
jn obedience to their instructions of 31st July 1668. Is preparing 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



1669. 



Oct. 15. 

New York. 



Oct. 19. 

Shaftesbury 
Papers. 

Oct. 20. 

Virginia. 



Oct. 21. 

Cockpit. 



to send the yearly account with the muster rolls ; in the interim 
sends the best computation he can make of the year's revenues. 
Mr. Johnson begins to make further trouble, notwithstanding their 
Lordship's orders of the 5th February last. Is making address to 
the Deputy Governor and Council in order to the King's service ; 
doubts not they will do right. Excessive rains and want of winds 
have caused the crop to fall out one-third less than formerly. Is 
indebted to the country for the soldiers' quarters 197,064 Ibs., and 
to Lord Willoughby 113,798 Ibs. of sugar for the King's provi- 
sions, and if he himself is not relieved it is likely to fall heavy 
upon him. Annexed, 

116. i. The accounts above referred to, estimated in pounds of 
sugar, from 14 Oct. 1668 to 6 Oct. 1669. Together, 3 pp. 
[Col Papers, Vol. XXIV., Nos. 90, 91.] 

117. Samuel Mavericke to Col. Nicolls. Thanks him for his of 
the 12th July, as also for his favour in procuring from H.R.H. the 
gift of the house in the Broadway. Beseeches him to proceed in 
bringing the relief of their poor friends in New England to the 
issue so much desired by himself and them, and is very sorry Col. 
Cart wright cannot be with him to assist him. Has sent copies of 
part of his letter to keep up their drooping spirits ; will not trouble 
him with the sad complaints which frequently come from them, for 
he knows well in what bondage they live. Believes every par- 
ticular of what he writ concerning Jno. Scot. The ship, the Good 
Fame, of New York, was launched 14 days since, and is very 
strong and handsome, but costly. The house is a handsome fabrick, 
but wages are so high that it cannot be expected it should come off 
cheap. The flux, agues, and fevers have much reigned in city and 
country, but not so many are dead as last year ; the like is all New 
England over, especially about Boston, where have died three 
special friends of his and well-wishers to New York, Messrs. Downe, 
Boyse, and Tobias Payne. 1 p. Printed in New York Docu- 
ments, III., 185. [Col Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 92.] 

118. Disbursements on the account of Carolina. Total, 35?., 
which includes 19?. to John Rivers, 101. to Florence O'Sullivan, 
51. to [Joseph] West, and II. to Miller. [Shaftesbury Papers, 
Section IX., No. 17.] 

119. Nine Acts passed at a Grand Assembly held at James City, 
Virginia, by prorogation from 17th Sept. 1668 to 20th Oct. 1669, 
but the titles only of two of these Acts are given, against which, 
in the margin, is written, Repealed, Obsolete. Printed in Col. 
Entry BJcs., Nos. 89, 90, 91, see ante Nos. 262, 1842. Col. Gal, 
1661-1668. [Col. Entry Bh, No. 88, pp. 73-76.] 

120. Minutes of a meeting of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina, 
held at the Cockpit ; present, Duke of Albemarle, who was elected 
the first Palatine of Carolina, Earl of Craven, the first High Con- 
stable, Lord Berkeley, the first Chancellor, Lord Ashley, the first 
Chief Justice, Sir Geo, Carteret, the first Admiral, and Sir Peter 



44 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1669. 
Oct. 22. 



Oct.? 

Whitehall. 



Oct. 27. 



Nov. 1. 

Barbadoes. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



Nov. 11. 

Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



Nov. 12. 

Barbadoes. 



Colleton, the first High Steward. In the handwriting of John 
Locke. [Col Entry Bk., No. 20, p. 46.] 

121. Warrant to all Admirals, &c. To permit John Champante 
Merchant to transport 100 nags or geldings (not exceeding the 
price of 10Z. each) to Barbadoes, to be employed in the sugar works 
there, on payment of the usual duties and customs, f p. [Dom. 
Entry Bh, Chas II., Vol. 25, p. 129d.] 

122. Warrant to the Attorney- General. To prepare a bill to pass 
the Great Seal continuing Wm., Lord Willoughby, Capt.-General 
and Governor-in-Chief of Barbadoes and the Caribbees during his 
Majesty's pleasure, with all the powers, privileges, &c. contained in 
the Letters Patent of 3rd Jan. 1667, said three years having nearly 
expired, and his Majesty not having resolved otherwise to dispose 
of said government. Draft, luith corrections by Williamson. 1 p. 
[Col Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 93.] 



[Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. //., 



123. Copy of preceding Warrant. 
Vol. 30, p. 174.] 

124. Joseph West to Lord Ashley Cooper, at Little Exeter House 
in the Strand. They have arrived at Barbadoes, where they will 
stay until 23rd inst. The people here show a great inclination for 
Port Royal ; Sir John Yeamans being resolved to go down, gives 
good encouragement, and they hope to make up 200 persons. The 
Albemarle arrived three days after the other ships, and has since 
broken her cables and been lost on the rocks. Sir John Yeamans 
and Squire Colleton about hiring another sloop to carry down 60 
or 70 people. Very bad weather at Barbadoes ; the ships have 
been in great danger. Hopes the Proprietors will not let them fade 
in their infancy, but send a supply in the spring, for with all his 
care, their stores are eaten very deep into, and at their landing 
they will not have above three months' provisions. Servants have 
been taken into Sir Peter Colleton's plantation, and by Major 
Kingsland, and those belonging to Major Hambleton, whose steward 
ran away in Ireland, West will keep until further orders. [Shaftes- 
bury Papers, Section IX., No. 18.] 

125. Note of " particulars," being cables, &c. which Henry Brayne 
desires may be furnished by Messrs. Hooker and Shaw for the ships 
Carolina and Port Royal. Endorsed by John Locke. ^ p. [Shaftes- 
bury Papers, Section IX., No. 19.] 

126. Nicholas Blake to (Joseph Williamson). Thanks him for 
giving Thomas Cheveley opportunity to present a paper to his 
Majesty, which was well accepted. Begs he will cast in a good 
word for having more parishes and ministers, and that a course be 
taken for the relief of oppression, which is here so intolerable that 
he f eara God will have a controversy with this place ere long. Com- 
plains of Rich. Lewes, Rich. Jones, Rich. Rice, and others who have 
by subtlety got the whole means of the poor labourers engaged to 
them, and yearly heap interest upon interest and gnaw them to the 
bone, and that such exactors take 30 per 100 per annum and more, 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 45 

1669. 

Some in England live rich upon it, and certainly Nehemiah is needed 
to force them to deliver these poor men out of their bondage. Con- 
cerning Mr. Santabin who was murdered at Madrid. His desire for 
the Commissioners to view the books of the deceased. About three 
months past was the most violent hurricane known by any alive : 
at Nevis the sea came 150 yards up into the land; in another Island 
180 persons were blown away, houses and all, and have not been 
seen since, divers ships were wrecked in New England, and a ship 
was carried off the stocks ; and at Bermuda a ship was cast away in 
harbour, though those harbours are almost land locked. On 1st 
inst. began incessant rains for four days ; many houses deluged ; in 
a piece of ground of his own a ship of 500 tons might have floated, 
and gullies usually dry became great Rivers ; stone buildings fell to 
the ground ; and from a churchyard, 150 coffins were carried into 
the sea ; but now the waters are assuaged. The Commissioner's not 
yet gone to treat for delivering of St. Christopher's ; some doubt the 
French will make the scale weigh heavy, for they have been too 
hard for us in Treaties. Arrival of three vessels to carry 'tis said 
Sir John Yeamans to Surinam to transplant the English for Port 
Royal : he will have few people hence, and if they be not vigorously 
recruited they will endure much hardship : they must be exempted 
from all taxes, for new settlements are like young scions and must 
have time to root and grow and in seven years will bring fruit. 
There is a place much cried up of late, taken from the Dutch now 
called New York, and one of it's Governments called New Jersey, of 
which Mr. Carteret of Jersey is Governor, yields store of beef, pork, 
peas, flour, butter, and horses ; and they had begun a pretty trade 
there with strong liquors, sugar, cotton, molasses, and ginger, but 
advice has come to send no more, for the Governors have put some 
import on their goods ; and by this means a hopeful trade is like to 
be spoiled, and many supernumeraries here who intended to trans- 
plant themselves thither have let fall their resolutions. Not a month 
ago he had a negro woman who was delivered of a child with five 
fingers and a thumb on each hand. 

Nov. 15. Has ridden over to see that churchyard, and the Minister 
told him that the coffins, corpses, and bones of nearer 1,500 than 150 
persons were carried into the sea, for the breach made was 40 or 50 
feet wide and 140 to 150 long, and all the corpses buried there in 
30 years were carried away. It was a dismal spectacle to see the 
coffins sticking out on each side of the banks of the beach and 
" enough to make one think of the Resurrection, for it seemed as if 
the coffins did wait an opportunity to rise out of the graves." 
Indorsed, Received July 1670. 3| pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., 
No. 94.] 

Nov. 20. 128. Commission to Wm. Lord Willoughby of Parham to be 
Governor-in- Chief of the Caribbee Islands. Refers to his Commis- 
sion of Jan. 13, 1667 for three years [see previous Vol.] which being 
almost expired and the late Francis Lord Willoughby, certainly 
deceased, his Majesty reposing especial trust and confidence in the 
prudence, industry, fortitude, and circumspection of said Wm. Lord 
Willoughby hereby constitutes him Governor-in-Chief and Vice- 



i6 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1669. 

admiral over said Islands during his Majesty's pleasure. The 
remaining part agrees ^vith his former Commission. Mem. The 
signet was dated 20 Nov. 1669. The Patent 6 Dec. 1669, see No. 
130. 2 pp. [ Col. Entry Bk. No. 11, pp. 139-140.] 

Nov. 30. 129. Governor Sir Thos. Modyford to the Duke of Albemarle. 
Jamaica. The happy news of his Grace's restoration to health, has been cele- 
brated with the most general joy that can be imagined. Lately 
received his Grace's in favour of Sam. Batch and Tho. Hudson, who 
are really very civil honest gents ; has made the former Judge of the 
Court of Port Royal. Most of their privateers have turned merchants, 
trading with the Indians for hides, tallow, turtle-shell, and log- 
wood ; others hunt on Cuba for hog and beef ; some of the best 
monied are turned planters ; and some knaves endeavour to take 
the Spaniard, and by stealth land what they get in harbours out of 
command, which he will endeavour to prevent. None are yet gone 
to Tortuga, nor will he hopes, by reason they also are forbidden to 
grant Commissions, which in this juncture fell out very happy for 
us. If he is left to those moderate remedies which he has begun, is 
confident to reduce the most part of them, for their ships will wear 
out, and then the}* must stay on shore and plant or starve. 1 p. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 95.] 

Dec. 6. 130. Letters patent constituting Wm. Lord Willoughby of 
Westminster. Parham, Governor-in- Chief of the Caribbee Islands, identical with 
his commission, dated November 20, 1669. 12 pp. [Col. Entry 
BJc.,No. 5, pp. 101-114.] 

Dec. 19. 131. Wm. Freeman to Col. George Gamvell, at his house in High 
Nevis. Holborn over against the Hat and Hand in London. Sir John 
Yeamans, one of the commissioners appointed to receive his Majesty's 
interest in St. Christopher's, passed here about 10 days ago with 
three vessels full of people for settling Port Royal on the main near 
Cape Fear ; who said that the King's commissioners came to Barbadoes 
four months before, but no orders for any vessel to bring down the 
commissioners and no instructions to the Governor, so that to hire 
a vessel on their own account was thought too much ; and that if 
Lord Willoughby had intended to further the design he would not 
have written so slightingly of it, but that Antigua was a great 
obstruction to settling St. Christopher's. The French Governor of 
St. Kitts told him last week that if Lord Willoughby had stayed for 
M. De la Barre three days longer when he first demanded the land, 
De la Barre had delivered it him, and several gentlemen here aver 
that Lord Willoughby said he did not know what to do with it and 
would not go down to demand it, but send others, which the French 
took as a slight and sent as slight an answer. By such proceedings 
his Majesty's subjects are kept out of their estates to their utter 
ruin, as by woeful experience he has found, having left his family in 
Jamaica these 21 months, and lost all he had left in the hurricane 
of August last. Some hundreds of pitiful poor people were suffered 
to settle under the French, no better than slaves, paying them 
half or one third of the produce of their labours, hoping that in 
a short time the land would be surrendered ; but about two 
months ago the French Governor heard that our comntissioners 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 47 

1669. 

would be down in a short time, and ordered all those that lived 
upon the King's land, as it was called, to carry off their provisions 
and houses (or burn them) and begone, so that those poor people 
must still be slaves to the French or perish with hunger. The 
French, notwithstanding the Articles of Breda, have carried off all 
the houses, timber, woods, negroes, coppers, and horses from the 
English plantations, and to this he was a witness in November last 
Complains of the terms by which the English are to be put in 
possession of their estates as a most lamentable thing, and the loss 
it is to himself. Those that chose rather to lose their lives and 
estates than to falsify their allegiance are no more considered than 
cowards that swear allegiance to-day to one prince and to-morrow 
to another. Has endeavoured for 42 years to enlarge and maintain 
his Majesty's interest, losing one of his limbs ; and now he has not 
so much left as he brought with him, only 22 of his offspring left in 
Jamaica, who, though poor and bare, may come to do his Majesty 
service, if self-ended persons, intrusted to promote the good of his 
Majesty and his people, do not occasion a miscarriage in both. 
Thanks him for thinking him worthy to be joined in the commission ; 
but Col. Board did very discreetly in putting by such as were poor 
and bare and would have finished the business out of hand. Cannot 
imagine the design of these delays, unless it be to make those who 
desire to resettle the island unable to do so. Several Barbadians 
have given out on the Exchange and to the Committee of Trade 
that they had rather St. Kitts were sunk than settled, and wherefore 
commissioners should be sent thence of all places he understands 
not. Gam veil's tenant, Mr. Worly, lately come out of New England, 
has been very sick, but is recovered again. 3 pp.' [Gol. Papers, 
Vol. XXIV., No. 96.] 

Dec. 23-30. 132. Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes. Ordered that the 
Deputy Secretary, assisted by the Provost Marshall, publish an Act 
for the settlement of the Government of this island. 

Dec. 30. Also that they publish this day a proclamation sent 
by Governor Wm. Lord Willoughby for the settling of the Govern- 
ment bearing date 5th November last. 1 p. [Col. Entry Bk., 
No. II, p. 183.] 

Dec. 31. 133. Matthias Nicolls to Col. Richard Nicolls, one of the 
New York. Grooms of the Bedchamber to the Duke of York. Two or three 
isiand^n" 18 days s i nce Mr. Boone arrived by way of Virginia with news of 
America, his health and welfare. The Scotch ship so long expected and 
which Nicolls mentions, not yet arrived. There was a silly inten- 
tion of an insurrection amongst the Finns at Delaware, but the 
ringleaders being surprised, their design was broken. They pre- 
tended an expectation of some Swedish ships to reduce the place. 
The Governor sent him there to inquire into the matter, whence 
he returned the beginning of Christmas week. Some few days 
before Mr. White, Survey or- General of Maryland, had been there 
to lay claim to all the west side of Delaware River as belonging to 
Lord Baltimore ; they had sent persons also to exercise their 
jurisdiction at the Hoare Kill, but none either there or in Dela- 



$ COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1669. 

ware will submit till the matter be decided in England. The 
Governor has now sent Mr. White's original claim for England, 
and by the next intends to remit the whole proceedings about the 
Finns. Beseeches him, who has been his kind master and patron 
ever since he had relation to him, to put the best construction on 
the boon he begged in his last letter. Endorsed, Kec d 11 Marcii 
1669-70. 2 pp. Printed in New York Documents, III. 186. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 97.] 

Antigua. 134. Eight Acts passed in the island of Antigua, viz.: 
(1.) April 8. An Act for enlarging and keeping clean the High 
Ways. (2.) April 8. Explaining the Act intituled An Act for 
incouraging and promoting the settling of this Island. (3.) April 8. 
For the bringing all Tobacco of the growth of this Island into 
Public Storehouses. (4.) Oct. 21. For extending Lands and 
Goods for Debts or Fines. (In margin, Repealed, 19 Dec. 1683.) 
(5.) Oct. 21. Against assignment of Bills without the Debtor's con- 
sent. (6.) Oct. 21. For public recompense to the Masters of Slaves 
put to death by law. (7.) Oct. 21. Stating servants' times, wages, 
provisions, apparels, &c. (8.) Oct. 21. Declaring the duties of all 
masters of ships or small vessels trading to this island, and for the 
careful looking after their vessels whilst they stay, and for the 
preventions of fugitives and transportation without ticket. 13 pp. 
[Col. Entry Bks. No. 49, pp. 28-40, and No. 5Q,pp. 272-285.] 

Antigua. 135. The titles of the preceding eight Acts. [Col. Entry tik., 
No. 132, p. 2.] 

1669 ? 136. Petition of the Mayor and Aldermen of New York in 
behalf of the rest of the inhabitants, to the Duke of York. Being 
mostly Dutch born, but now his Majesty's subjects, by the Articles 
of Surrender they were promised free trade and equal privileges as 
any of his Majesty's subjects, and for some years have enjoyed free 
trade with Holland, paying customs as formerly, which encouraged 
most of the Dutch to remain. Upon the happy peace between his 
Majesty and Holland, they made address for three " permissionary 
ships " to trade from Holland for seven years, which was granted by 
his Majesty in Council [see previous Vol., No. 1603], and they en- 
joyed it that year to the great encouragement of the place, and paid 
some considerable value in customs towards the charge of the garri- 
son ; but since, by what information they know not [see previous Vol., 
No. 1875], these ships are forbidden. Request that they may have 
free trade to Holland (which is not denied to any of his Majesty's sub- 
jects) touching in some port in England and paying customs as they 
come and go ; and that they may bring commodities for the Indians 
which cannot be so well made in England ; which if prohibited the 
Indians will go to Canada for " the Dutch duffles and blancoates, 
which are scrupled to be brought into England, saying it is cloth." 
It cannot be called cloth, but is worse than " wadmoll" which daily 
comes from Holland, and is not ever worn by any Christians but 
only by the Indians. So that if the Farmers of his Majesty's 
customs may have order to receive the customs, it would keep the 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 49 

1669? 

trade in his Royal Highnesses territories and relieve Petitioners. 
2 pp. Printed in New York, Documents III., 187. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXIV., No. 98.] 

1669 ? 137. " Answers (in Col. Nicoll's handwriting) to the several 
queries relating to the planters in the territories of his Royal High- 
ness the Duke of York in America." 1. The Governor and Council 
with the High Sheriff and Justices of the Peace, in the Court of 
General Assizes have the power of making, altering, and abolish- 
ing laws ; Country Sessions are held by Justices on the Bench ; 
particular Town Courts by a constable and eight overseers ; the 
City Court of New York, by a Mayor and Aldermen ; and all causes 
are tried by juries. 2. The land is naturally apt to produce corn 
and cattle ; so that the several proportions of land are always allowed 
with respect to the numbers of the planters, what they are able to 
manage, and the feed of cattle is free in commonage to all town- 
ships ; but lots of meadow and corn land are peculiar to each 
planter. 3. His Royal Highness grants lands as freehold for ever, 
the planters pa}dng customary rates and duties towards defraying 
the public charges ; the highest rent will be one penny per acre for 
lands purchased by his Royal Highness ; the least 2s. Qd. per hundred 
acres, whereof the planters themselves are purchasers from the 
Indians. 4. The Governor gives liberty to planters to buy lands 
from the Indians where it pleases them, but the seating of towns 
together is necessary in these parts. 5. Liberty of conscience is 
granted, with the proviso in the query. 6. Fishing and fowling 
are free to all by the patent. 7. All causes are tried by juries ; no 
laws contrary to those of England ; soldiers only triable by court 
martial, except in cases of invasion, mutiny, or rebellion, as in 
England. 8. There is no tax payable by the planter on corn or 
cattle, and the country at present has little other produce ; the rate 
for public charges was agreed to in a General Assembly, and is 
managed by the Governor and Council and the Justices in the 
Court of Assizes. 9. The obtaining of all these privileges is long 
since recommended to his Royal Highness as the most necessary 
encouragement to his territories. 10. Every man, on his request, 
has liberty to trade for furs. 1| pp. Printed in New York, 
Documents III., 188. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIV., No. 99.] 

1670. 

Jan. 4. 138. John Style to "the Principal Secretary of State, Whitehall." 

Jamaica. Refers to the many letters he has written which concerned the good 
of this Island as well as his own particular. Presents the heads of 
his letter of January last on the fertility of this place which would 
maintain more people than the whole Kingdom of England, and 
what has hindered the good settlement of the island, viz. the un- 
limited power of the martial officers, the division of the Island into 
precincts, wherein every chief exercised absolute power, with the 
character of these Rulers and their actions, the condition of the 
people governed, their oppressions and the ways for amendment ; 
then the strength of the Island, which at that time was not 1,600 
men, and about 800 at sea as privateers, and the little advantage 

U 51912. D 



50 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1670. 

they were to the settlement of the place. Sent also with that letter 
concerning himself then a prisoner, reasons for levying a great tax 
in the Parish of St. John's where Style dwelt for repairing a church, 
maintaining a minister and the poor which came to 190Z. ; his com- 
plaint to the Governor and the verbal answer denying redress, where- 
upon Style signified his appeal to his Majesty and Council ; with 
also copies of their warrants and his answers ; the violently taking 
a negro from his son, and many other passages. That he had taken 
out license to go to England, and had taken leave of the Governor, 
when he was sent word to have a care how he went to Port Royal 
to take ship, for he was to be waylaid by some nigger and shot. 
Next day he was apprehended by the Governor's warrant, and infor- 
mation laid against him for words spoken at the Session House, 
which were altogether false, his accusers and the witnesses were 
only the five justices of the peace, and refusing to plead he was 
fined 500Z. ; upon which he presented his petition to his Majesty 
(for release) this was the condition of things, noi; is it bettered. 
Many privateers haye been lost, many have been absent a year, some 
have come in well battered and gone out again ; for though there 
hath not this good while been Commissions granted, yet they go 
forth with let passes, which is all one as to consuming the men of this 
place, who, from inquiries from prisoners still decrease in all parts 
except the Town of Port Royal ; and it may be said of about 800 
Privateers " as Phocion said of Leosthenes' army of Athenians, it is 
a goodly army, but I much fear their return and the continuance of 
the war ; for I do not see the City able to make any more ships, 
neither yet any more soldiers than these." The number of tippling 
houses is now doubly increased, so that " there is not now resident 
upon this place ten men to every house that selleth strong liquors." 
There are more than 100 licensed houses, besides sugar and rum 
works that sell without license ; and what can that bring but ruin, 
for many sell their plantations, and either go out for privateers, or 
drinking themselves into debt, sell their bodies or are sold for prison 
fees. Since Style has been a prisoner there have been 20 sold thence, 
" so interests decrease, negro and slaves increase," yet were not this 
course taken, the prisons would not hold the prisoners. " Were the 
most savage heathens here present, they might learn cruelty and 
oppression ; the worst of Sodom or the Jews that crucified our 
Saviour might here behold themselves matched, if not outdone, in 
all evil and wickedness by those who call themselves Christians." 
It is a common thing amongst the privateers, besides burning with 
matches and such like slight torments, to cut a man in pieces, first 
some flesh, then a hand, an arm, a leg, sometimes tying a cord about 
his head, and with a stick twisting it till the eyes start out, which is 
called " woolding." Before taking Puerto Bello, thus some were used, 
because they refused to discover a way into the town which was 
not, and many in the town, because they would not discover wealth 
they knew not of: a woman there was by some set bare upon a 
baking stone and roasted, because she did not confess of money 
which she had only in their conceit ; this he heard some declare 
boasting, and one that was sick confess with sorrow : besides the 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 51 

1670. 

horrid oaths, blasphemies, abuse of Scriptures, rapes, whoredoms, 
and adulteries, and such not forborne in the common highways and 
not punished, but made a jest of even by authority. Acknowledges 
he ought to have acquainted the Governor with this relation, but 
has had such bad success, the Governor making this jailor his judge. 
Was out on bail, but soon found his liberty to be but a snare, that 
some loose person might witness words against him for breach of 
hi& bond, so that he was forced to return to prison. There has been 
lately much running out of lands, but for the most part by those who 
have settlements already. Hears of but few new settlements, and 
those are for the most part managed by negroes ; which destroys 
the Christian interest, but if they were brought up as such, they 
might prove as good, if not better subjects than many of their masters. 
Begs him to present this petition to his Majesty, that since he was 
pleased upon petitioner's first letter and petition of October 27th, 
1068, to take his condition into consideration, he would now 
signify his pleasure therein to the Governor of this Island. There 
has this year also been levied on the said Parish of St. John's, a 
rate of one penny per acre, which amounts to 2001. 5 pp. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXV,, No. 1.] 

Jan. 10. 139. Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes. Whereas the Great 
Seal for the Caribbee Islands delivered by his Excellency into the 
custody of Lieut.- General Henry Willoughby at Antigua, is now by 
the death of said Henry Willoughby come into the hands of Johu 
Knight, said seal was by said John Knight on 2nd and again on. 
23rd December tendered to the Deputy Governor and Council, but 
they thought not fit to receive it without special order from his 
Excellency. 1 p. [Col. Entry Bk., No.ll, p. 184.] 

1670 ? 140. Instructions from the Lords Proprietors of Carolina to the 
Governor and Council of Albemarle. Not being able at present 
fully to put our Fundamental Constitutions and form of government 
for Carolina into practice by reason of the want of landgraves, 
cassiques, and a sufficient number of people, the Governor and 
Council of Albemarle are instructed to issue writs to the four 
precincts of the county to elect five freeholders to be added to the 
five persons chosen by their Lordships, and who for the present 
represent the nobility and are to be the Assembly. Having chosen 
a Speaker, then to elect five persons to be joined to the five deputies 
chosen by their Lordships, who are to be the Council for the present 
instead of the Grand Council mentioned in the Constitutions, and 
govern according to the following limitations: All persons so 
chosen to take the oath of allegiance or subscribe the same in a 
book. The Governor and the five deputies of the Lords Proprietors 
are to represent the Palatine's Court and exercise the same juris- 
diction and powers as in the Constitutions. To establish necessary 
courts of justice until the grand model of government can be put 
in execution. Power to ratify laws, as in the 12th article and other 
articles of said Constitutions. To cause the Surveyor-General to 
divide the country into squares of 12,000 acres, not to alter any 
man's right, but that the Constitutions and the form of government 

D 2 



52 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1070. 

may the sooner be put in practice, proportions of land to be 
granted to those coming to plant before 25th December 1672, and 
the form of grant to be passed. 3 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 20, 
pp. 52-55.] 

1G70 ? 141. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Sam. Stephens, Governor, 
and to the Council of Albemarle County. Have received a petition 
from the Grand Assembly of Albemarle praying that the inhabitants 
of said county may hold their lands upon the same terms as the 
inhabitants of Virginia hold theirs, which their Lordships are 
content to do, and hereby empower the Governor and Council of 
Albemarle County to grant lands upon the same terms accordingly. 
[Col Entry Bk., No. 20, p. 29.] 

Jan. 20. 142. Eight Acts of the Assembly of Albemarle County ratified 
and confirmed by the Lords Proprietors of Carolina the 20th January 
1670, viz. : 1. An Act prohibiting suing of any person within five 
years. 2. Concerning marriages. 3. Concerning transferring of 
rights. 4. Exempting new comers from paying levies for one year. 
5. Against ingrossers. 6. Concerning defraying the charge, of the 
Governor and Council. 7. What land men shall hold in one dividend. 
8. For the speedier seating of land, and prohibiting strangers trad- 
ing witli the Indians. " The foregoing Acts were passed again the 
loth October and sent per Mr. Nixon " in John Locke's hand- 
writing. 4 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 20, pp. 48-52.] 

Jan. 20. 143. Minutes of a meeting of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina 
Whitehall. a t Sir Geo. Carteret's lodgings at Whitehall. George Duke of 
Albemarle being dead, and Lord Berkeley the eldest in years of the 
surviving Lords Proprietors, is admitted the second Palatine of 
Carolina. Sir Peter Colleton quitted his place of high steward 
and made election of that of chancellor. Duke of Albemarle sent 
his commission to his deputy to the Governor [left blank] in 
Albemarle County by the title of treasurer. Lord Berkeley com- 
missioned Sam. Stephens his deputy and Governor of Albemarle 
County. Lord Craven deputed John Jenkins Lord Ashley, John 
Willoughby Sir Geo. Carteret, Peter Carteret and Sir Peter 
Colleton deputed Mr. Godfrey. 1 p. In the handwriting of John 
Locke. [Col, Entry Bk., No. 20, p. 47.] 

Jan. 22. 144. An account of the present state of the Island of Jamaica, 
given in to Sec. Lord Arlington by Chas. Modyford. Jamaica 
contains by computation 700,000 acres, of which are granted away 
by patent 165,564. Number of fighting men 3,000, besides priva- 
teers, who are incirca 1,500, and have 20 small vessels (the biggest 
carrying but 12 guns) ; women and children incirca 1200 ; negroes 
or slaves, 2,500 ; in all, 8,200. The commodities of the island, being 
cacao, indigo, pimento, sugar, cotton wool, fustick, tortoise shell, 
Brasilletta, tobacco, ginger, and many other commodities, have laden 
20 sail one with another of upwards of 80 tons this year ; the great 
value of which commodities being considered, it will be very obvious 
that by increase of inhabitants his Majesty's Customs will be highly 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 53 

1670. 

advanced, and their navigation exceed all the plantations his 
Majesty hath, cacao, the chief produce, paying 8s. per cwt., and 
being mostly exported again and the money left here, whereas 
sugar, the chief commodity of other colonies, pays but Is. 6<l. per 
cwt. Our own manufactures also are transported to Jamaica in 
great quantities, there going thither this year 18 sail or more : 
all this being done by encouraging planting, which was not till 
1664. Nothing can now hinder the future thriving of that island 
but want of inhabitants and slaves, or the unsettlement of it with 
the Spaniards. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV, No. 2.] 

1670 ? 145. Petition of Henry Earl of St. Albans, John Lord Berkeley, 
Baron of Stratton, Sir Wm. Moreton, and John Trethewy, assignee 
of the late Lord Hopton, to the King. In 1649 the King by letters 
patent granted them all that territory bounded by the Rivers of 
Rappahannock and Patawomacke and Quiriough and the courses 
of those rivers and Chesapayocke Bay ; after the restoration their 
agent Sir Humphrey Hook and other eminent citizens were molested 
by the Governor and Council of Virginia, which being brought 
before the King in Council, the petitioners surrendered some of 
their privileges, and on 8th May last a new patent, with the consent 
of Mr. Morrison, was granted to them [see ante, No. 63]. Pray 
for letters to the Governor and Council of Virginia with command 
not to interrupt their agents in planting and settling said territory. 
1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 3.] 

Jan. ? 146. The King to Gov. Sir William Berkeley. Recites grant 

to Ralph Lord Hopton, the Baron of Stratton (since deceased), and 
others in the first year of his Majesty's reign, of a tract of L'ind 
between the Rivers Rappahanock, Patowomack, and Quiriough and 
Chesapeake Bay; tbe assignment thereof to the Earl of St. Albans, 
Lord Berkeley, Sir Wm. Morton, and John Trethewy, assignee of Lord 
Hopton, and the grant of new letters patent dated 8th May last 
past, and commands him to be assistant to said patentees in the 
seating and settling of same and to give them all due encouragement 
and protection. Draft with corrections by Williamson. 1 pp. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 4.] 

Jan. 26. 147. Fair copy of preceding. \\ pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 93, 
pp. 1-2.] 

Jan. 26. 148. Minutes of the Council of Jamaica. Present Sir Thos. 

St. Jago de Modyford, Governor, Lt.-Gen. Sir Jas. Modyford, Maj.-Gen. Thos. 
Vega> Modyford, Col. Thos. Freeman, Lt.-Cols. Thos. Ballard, John Coape, 
Robt. Byndlosse, and Rich. Hope, Majors Chas. Whitfield, Ant 
Collier, and Thos. Fuller. Major Anthony Collier was sworn one 
of his Majesty's Council. Ordered that Capt. Cooper be sent for to 
give account how he behaved himself with the outlying negroes 
that were at his house, and that two Quakers that catae from 
Guinaboa be discharged out of prison. An ordinance for preventing 
the increase of lawyers, attorneys, and solicitors. 2 pp. [Col. 
Entry Bk., No. 34, pp. 184-186.] 



t COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1670. 

Jan. 26. 149. Commission of war by the Spaniard against the English in 
Feb. 5. the West Indies. Whereas the Queen, by order dated in Madrid 
the 20th April 1669, was pleased to inform Don Pedro Bayona 
y Villa Nueba, Captain-General of the province of Paraguay 
and Governor of the city of St. Jago of Cuba, that relation 
being made to her of the hostilities which the French and English 
make in the Indies, she made complaint to the King of Great 
Britain, giving him notice of the peace celebrated in 1667 ; to 
which his Majesty answered that his subjects had no peace in 
the Indies, upon which the Queen commanded Don Pedro to cause 
war to be published against that nation, and to execute all the 
hostilities which are permitted in war, taking possession of the 
ships, islands, places, and ports which the English have in said 
Indies. To the end all may have due effect, license and authority 
is given to Capt. Francisco Galesio, commander of the St. Nicholas 
de Tolentino, to take and seize the same as above mentioned. 1 p. 
[Col. Entry Bk., No. 27, p. 46.] 

Jan. 150. Petition of Ferdinando Gorges to the King and Privy Council. 

That Petitioner is grandson and heir of Sir Ferdinando Gorges, who 
had a grant from his Majesty's late father of the province of Maine, 
was in quiet possession thereof about 26 years, and expended 
20,0007. thereon. That Petitioner's said grandfather, engaging in 
the service of his Majesty's late father, was dispossessed by the 
Governor of Massachusetts Bay, shortly after which he died, so 
that the province descended to Petitioner. On request of Petitioner, 
his Majesty, by sign manuel dated llth June 1664. sent by his 
Commissioners, required restitution of said province to Petitioner, 
unless they should show cause to the contrary, upon publication 
whereof, the inhabitants submitted to the government of Petitioner's 
agents, and the Commissioners, satisfied of Petitioner's right and 
title, appointed justices, &c. till Petitioner's possession should be 
confirmed by his Majesty, which was done by the declaration of 
his Majesty, recalling the Commissioners. April 10th, 1666. But 
after three years' quiet possession, the Governor of the Massa- 
chusetts again by force of arms took possession of the government 
of said province, turning out or imprisoning all officers, civil and 
military, seizing the records, acting in all things contrary to their 
allegiance to his Majesty, and refusing to send Commissioners to 
attend his Majesty, according to his express command. Prays that 
his Majesty will restore him to the government and quiet possession 
of said province. Full of corrections. Annexed, 

150. I. Order in Council, referring above petition to Lords Com- 
mittee for Trade and Plantations to consider the Petitioner's 
pretensions to the province of Maine, and report their 
opinion upon the whole matter to his Majesty in Council. 
Whitehall, 1669-1670, January 26th. 

150. li. Order of the Lords Committee of Trade and Plantations 
on the above petition. On hearing the testimony of Col. 
Nicolls, Capt. Needham, and Messrs. John Archdale, 
Philipps, and Richard Bowles, and examining the evidence 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 55 

1670. 

produced by the said Gorges, it evidently appeared to 
their Lordships that the allegations in said petition are 
true in every part, and that Mr. Gorges ought to be 
restored to possession of said province of Maine, but the 
manner of the doing thereof is humbly submitted to his 
Majesty's greater wisdom. Whitehall, 1670, May 9. Toge- 
ther 3 pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XXV., Nos. 5-7.'] 

[Feb. 8.] 151. Petition of Francis Cradock, Provost Marshall of Barbadoes 
to the King and Council. That his Majesty, in August 1660, by 
Letters Patent granted the office of Provost Marshall General of 
Barbadoes to Petitioner for life, who sent over his deputy, but the 
President and Council there suspended execution thereof. His 
Majesty having sent command to have the grant obeyed, in April 
1661, Petitioner's deputy was admitted, but great part of the profits 
of said office were taken away by new devised offices, which, Lord 
Willonghby disowning before this Board, Petitioner obtained an 
order of the Council of Barbadoes for the enjoyment of his rights, 
and then removed Richard Dickeson and himself took possession of 
the prison ; but Dickeson confederating with Capt. George Waldron, 
a justice of the peace, and others, broke open the prison, kept 
Petitioner close prisoner, and fined Petitioner, and made Dickeson 
Provost Marshal, till at a meeting of the Council about a month 
after Petitioner was restored to his office. But the old vexations 
were soon again put in practice, and Petitioner having put up his 
name, as all must that go off the Island, to go for England to appeal 
to his Majesty, his confinement was contrived, and he was forced 
to remain in the Island. On the arrival of Lord Willoughby, 
Petitioner moved for justice, but found overtures made to buy his 
office, so he again put up his name to leave the IsLmd, but two 
days before his departure was under writ for 1,500?. debt, where he 
owed not a farthing, to acquit himself of which abuse and proceed 
on his voyage, he procured a special court to be called, but his 
Excellency sent an order to stop the proceedings, and the ship 
departing next day, the underwriting was withdrawn. Petitioner 
details several proceedings at law, of which he was denied the 
benefit, and complains that he has been arrested in England in 
3,000?. for the actings of the deputy kept in against Petitioner's 
will. By all which Petitioner has not only lost the benefit in- 
tended, but has expended 600?. in defence of his Majesty's right 
and his own interest. Prays that Lord Willoughby 's agents may 
answer the matter ol complaint, and that he may be no longer 
denied the benefit of law and justice. Endorsed, Received Feb. 8, 
1669. Read May 12. Ordered to be shown to Lord Willoughby's 
agent. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 8.] 

1670 ? 152. Petition of Averina, late the wife of Richard Holdopp late of 
Barbadoes deceased, on behalf of herself and Hilliard her son an 
infant. Concerning a plantation called Locust Hall, from which 
Richard Holdopp was ejected in 1649, Lord Willoughby then 
alleging it to be part of the 10,000 acres said to be in arrear to the 
Earl of Carlisle ; but which, Holdopp soon after gained possession 



56 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



1670. 

of and entrusted to Edward Pye. That Holdopp came to England 
in 1660, where, after devising said plantation and all other his 
estate to Petitioner and her son and making Ferdinando Gorges one 
of his executors, he soon after died. In 1663 the Provost Marshall's 
deputy, by order of Lord Willoughby, forcibly turned Petitioner -out 
of possession, and seized it with negroes and stock to the value of 
20,000?. to his Majesty's use, and Lord Willoughby soon after 
granted it in fee to Pye, contrary to law. Petitioner, who 
cannot hope for justice there in Barbadoes from those hands that 
have done the injury, prays : that Lord Willoughby 's agents may 
show cause, before the board why the conveyance to Pye ought not 
to be made void by his Majesty ; that said Gorges may give reasons 
why he neglects to prosecute Cradock the Provost Marshall, that was 
arrested here for seizing said plantation by illegal writ ; that Pye 
may be ordered to account for said plantation before auditors here, 
or that his Majesty will commission persons to adjust the accounts 
in Barbadoes. 1 p. [Col Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 9.] 

Feb. 17. 153. John Dorrell senior, and Hugh Wentworth to Lord Ashley. 
Somers Islands. Through his lordship's ship Carolina being forced into one of their 
harbours, they have begat an acquaintance with Captain O'Sullivan, 
Surveyor-General, who acquainted Dorrell with his lordship's desire 
of promoting new plantations. Our island of Bermudas is over 
peopled and the natives much straitened for want of land, so that a 
hundred inhabitants can yearly be spared for new plantations. 
Many have gone to Sta. Lucia, Trinidad, Antigua, and Jamaica, 
but the most part of them died. Some went three or four years 
since to one of the Bahamas, which they first named Sayle's Island, 
but they now call New Providence. Dorrell, and Wentworth an 
inhabitant here, have transported most of those people on credit, 
and given them time for payment until they can raise it off their 
plantations. There are now about 300 inhabitants. The island is 
very .healthy and has gallant harbours, it produces as good cotton 
as is ever grown in America, and gallant tobacco. Their great wants 
are small arms and ammunition, a godly minister, and a good smith. 
Advantages of the situation, it is the nearest place for neighbour- 
hood of any plantation in America. Request his lordship would 
patronise their poor inhabitants of New Providence by gaining a 
patent for all the Bahama Islands so they may be governed accor- 
ding to His Majesty's laws, and that themselves may be remembered 
as the first beginners and encouragers of the settlement of New 
Providence. 2 pp. Examined by John Locke. {Shaftesbwy 
Papers, Section IX., No. 55, pp. 4, 6.] 

Feb. 21. 154. Thomas Ludwell, Secretary, to John Farvacks, Merchant in 
London. Has received his letter of Attorney since he wrote to 
Alderman Jeffries. Finding he submits to the proposition of re- 
ceiving 1,000?. at three payments for what is due to him from Col. 
Scarborough, he will put the business to a speedy issue and hopes 
to both their consents. Desires he will give Scarborough better 
language in his letters or else he cannot show them to him fearing 
they may cause him to try all extremities. Has received his father's 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 57 

1670. 

legacy and could have wished he had lived longer if for no other 
reason than to have gone out of the world with a better opinion of 
this government. Indorsed, Received 22nd June 1670, Read 23rd 
June 1 670. To be read again in full council. 1 p. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXV., No. 10.] 

Feb. 23. 155. Petition of the adventurers trading to the north part of Africa 
to the King. Having occasion to Fend 40 or 50 factors and soldiers 
for Gambia, to carry on the trade of those parts and maintain their 
forts, pray for an Order for passing them at Gravesend. Indorsed, 
Received and Read the 23rd*of February 1669-1670. Granted. 
1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 11.] 

1670 (?). 156. Petition of the Company of Royal Adventurers to Africa. 
That if the Spanish subjects of the West Indies be licensed to trade 
with his Majesty's, the whole trade may be appropriated to peti- 
tioners for the following considerations, viz. : That the license is a 
prerogative of the Crown, being the suspension of a law, is free to 
be placed where his Majesty shall please. The English planters 
were never posessed of that trade, nor will the Spaniards ever be 
drawn to a traffic but for the sake of the negro trade, which is vested 
in the petitioners. His Majesty's subjects in England have been 
invited freely into said Company, like invitations shall be given to 
all English subjects in America. If the trade be made universal it 
will (not) be possible to reserve the benefit to the English, for avari- 
cious persons will lend their names to the goods of strangers, and 
find means to cheat the King of his dues by conveying Spaniards 
goods direct to foreign parts, whereas the Company infallibly bring 
all into England. The trade being dispersed, English manufacturers 
will be prostituted to the Spaniards at vile prices, but the utmost 
benefit may be made when the Spaniards have but one with whom 
to buy and sell. Without the trade is confined to said Company, 
the revenue of 5 per cenb. will not be recovered without great 
expense, whereas the Company will secure the revenue to the King 
at their own charge. As to the objection that this would hinder the 
growth of Jamaica, the Planters never had that trade, and those 
who have stock may have shares in it, it will give them a fair 
advantage by consumption of their fruits, besides money for porterage 
and labour. 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 12.] 

March 1. 157. The Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina. These Consti- 
tutions are known as the Second Set and consist of 120 articles. 
The original or first Set 'is dated 21 July 1669 [see ante, No. 84.] 
This second Set was to " remain the sacred and unalterable form 
and rule of government of Carolina for ever," but a third Set is 
dated 12 January 1682, a fourth Set 17 August 1682, and a fifth 
Set is dated 11 April 1698. Printed 25 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 
XXV., No. 13.] 

March 10. 158. Sir Tobias Bridge to the King. The news of the death of our 

Barbadoes. worthy General gives occasion for this presumption. His Majesty's 

regiment in the Leeward Isles under his command has served near 

three years with great patience, not receiving for the first two years 



58 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670. 

the value of two months pay. Out of his Majesty's moiety of the 4^ 
per cent, there remains due for pay of the Regiment during the past 
year 500,000 Ib. of sugar, the officers being at half-pay, and the 
soldiers at sixpence per diem. Has done his utmost to satisfy both 
Country and soldiers, and made shift to subsist, though very barely. 
The Country has been generally very kind as to continuance of 
Quarters, which have been satisfied for eight months, but finds they 
are indebted besides 292,126 Ib. of sugar. The officers are very 
necessitous but confident of his Majesty's favour for payment of 
their arrears and future subsistence. Indorsed. Received 11 May. 
1 p. [Col Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 14.] 

1670? 159. Petition of divers Merchants, Planters, and Masters of ships 
trading to his Majesties Plantations in America to the Council of 
Plantations. Refer to their petition of 1664 (July 12) when the 
King appointed an officer under the Great Seal to register all 
persons voluntarily going to serve in the Plantations. Pray, seeing 
the necessity of supplying the Plantations with servants, that Rules 
may be set down accordingly for their supply, and that Petitioners 
may be protected and encouraged in their employments. 1 p. 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 94, p. 17.] 

160. " Memorial of the Merchants of England trading to the Plan- 
tations " to [the Lords Committee of Trade and Plantations.] That 
there are two petitions of the said principal Merchants to be read 
before the Board this day and as they may be prosecuted in the 
Crown Office for sending over servants to the Plantations which are 
impossible to be preserved without, it is argued that there must be 
a continual supply of servants from England, that several Merchants 
and masters of ships are now prosecuted for servants that went over 
voluntarily and were duly bound and examined in an office erected 
by his Majesty which has so terrified all merchants and masters 
that of late none will carry them over. Reasons why a way should 
be speedily found for canning servants over in future with safety. 
1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 14.*] 

March 18. 161. Governor Sir Thomas Modyford to Sec. Lord Arlington. 
Gave orders to have the French gentleman [M. Bourdenaux] who 
took his voyage [in the Adventure] secured in the first port, and 
advice given to his Lordship, in case there were war with France. 
Notwithstanding his repeal of commissions, &c., a Spanish man-of- 
war, manned by the Governor of St. Jago of Cuba, fell on a 
merchantman of ours, commanded by Captain Barnard, an old 
privateer, who was admitted a trade by the Spaniard at Biamo, 
who had but 18 men and the other 80 ; our ship made a very 
brave resistance, killed 36 men and was on fire head and stern 
before she yielded ; we lost the good old captain and four men, 
nine came up hither in a boat, and four remaining were carried 
prisoners to Carthagena. Has ordered the whole matter to be 
taken on oath. Since has advice that this Biskayner's consort fell 
on two of our small vessels about Cape Catoch, bound to the Bay 
for Logwood, who was happily taken by them, but his papers not 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 59 

1670. 

yet come up : by them will be able to advise his Lordship what 
powers they have and from whence. . This has so incensed the 
whole body of privateers, that he hears they meditate revenge, and 
have appointed a general rendezvous at Caimanos next month, 
where he shall send to divert them or moderate their councils. 
There arrived also at Port Morant, the Cagway, Captain Searle, with 
70 stout men, who hearing Sir Thos. was much incensed against 
him for that action of St. Augustine, went to Macary Bay, and 
there rides out of command ; will use the best ways to apprehend 
him, without driving his men to despair. Hears of but three 
persons who have revolted to the French, and those such as for 
their felonies deserve death here. Passionately longs to see a letter 
from his Lordship and therein an absolution for his crimes. 1 p. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 15.] 

March 18. 162. Extract of a letter (? from Sir Jas. Modyford) to Col. Lynch. 
Jamaica. " I could wish I were not so deeply engaged in planting, especially 
now that I see the Spaniards begin to take the right course to ruin 
us. They have denounced war against us in Cartagena, and given 
out commissions by which they have killed Bart (?), and taken his 
ship trading with them at Savana de Crux in the S to Cayes. 
They tell us plainly they have daily in expectation 12 sail of 
frigates from Europe, commanded by Matias de Saye (?), Who have 
commissions (as all ships shall have that come into the Indies) to 
take all English they can light on. These are letters of reprisals, 
and possibly the Windward Islands may come to suffer first, for all 
know how easy it is to surprize the English. But they talk of 
Port Morant and Yhallah, which they say they can easily destroy, 
and with a frigate or two lying off the point take all the ships, and 
so ruin the place by obstructing commerce. You need not be told 
how dangerous the least part of this will be. I wish you had your 
plantation with you, and that it were not too big to be sold ; mine 
if possible I'll dispose of, and leave this warm sun for your God's 
blessing ; for the Duke of Albemarle's death, that only befriended 
us, this war, our making a blind peace, no frigates, nor orders 
coming, gives us cruel apprehensions and makes many remiss." 
Endorsed, Extract, Jamaica, letter to Coll. Lynch. 1 p. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 16.] 

March 23. 163. Nicholas Blake to Joseph Williamson. Encloses a letter to 
Bilbao Lord Arlington concerning the estate of the late Wm. Santabin, 

Plantation, ^^b imports him at least 200?. Believes it is no news in England 
that the two sons Lord Willoughby left behind him are dead; 
these parts have been nothing smiling or fortunate to that noble 
gentleman. News from the Leeward Isles that a French man-of-war 
has carried two Hollanders prizes into Martinico. Wishes they 
were as strong as the French in men-of-war ; one of the Commis- 
sioners, Sir John Yeamans, went for Port Royal, but is returned re 
infacta, having taken but 150 men, which should be at 'least 10 
times as many for the first settlement, unless they make account to 
be cut off within the year by Spaniards or Indians. Complains 
that a ship from Holland with commodities for this place has lately 



60 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670. 

been condemned and the goods sold, on pretence that she was not 
sailed with so many English as the Act of Trade requires, though 
they had the number of Scotsmen who hazarded their lives in the 
last wars against the Dutch, and take it wondrous unkind to be 
thus debarred the liberty of subjects. Many wish there were not 
this nice distinction between the nations ; if that nation had liberty 
of trading hither it would be a great means of strengthening his 
Majesty's interest, and the loss of a little custom in England would 
be plentifully recompensed by other advantages. Thinks the 
parties aggrieved will appeal to the King and Council, and the 
people generally wish them well, esteeming it to be a thing of 
much rigour, and to the prejudice of these parts. Had none been 
wiser than himself, he would have let them enjoy their goods, giving 
security to pay the value if the King condemned them ; but it is 
too late, A great rumour of Turkish pirates taking many English 
ships. Not many years since they had peace with Algiers, Tunis, 
and Salee, but those Africans have the root in them still of the 
ancient Punic faith, about their suppression in Charles the First's 
time. Showed in his last what incessant rains they had for seven 
months, have had since upwards of three months very dry weather, 
so that the ground gapes as if it would devour its inhabitants ; this 
- is accompanied with a great dearth even to famine of corn and 
potatoes their bread provisions for that plague of the caterpillar 
has passed over the island two or three times, eating away most 
of the slips of potatoes, so that the island is like to endure cruel 
famine for several months. Endorsed, Rec. July 1670. 3 pp. 
[Col Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 17.] 

March 29. 164. " Lord Berkeley's deputation to Lord Ashley." Appoint- 
ment by John Lord Berkeley of Stratton, Palatine of Carolina, of 
Anthony Lord Ashley to be his Deputy as Palatine of Carolina 

Shaftesbury until Lord Berkeley's return to England. Signed and sealed. 
pers * Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., 
No. 20.] 

[March 30.] 165. The King to Sir Thos. Modyford, Governor of Jamaica. 
Whereas Richard Povey, who was constituted by his Majesty's 
letters patent secretary of the Island of Jamaica, was suspended by 
order of the Council of Jamaica of the llth November 1664, and 
the Governor ordered to dispose of same, and it appearing that said 
Povey had license and permission to leave the island, under Sir 
Chas. L3^ttelton's hand, Governor Modyford is commanded forthwith 
to restore said Povey to his said office of secretary, with all its rights 
and profits ; and it. is not thought necessary or fit that a security 
of 10,000?. or any other sum should be given by his deputy. Draft 
with corrections in Williamson's hand. Annexed, 

165. f. License from Sir Chas. Lyttelton to Richard Povey, secre- 
tary of Jamaica, to go to England on private affairs, in 
consideration of nine years' service, and approving Peter 
Pugh to be his deputy. 1664, April 20. 

165, II. Order of the Council of Jamaica. Richard Povey, secre- 
tary, having left the island without permission, and his 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



1670. 

deputy Peter Pugh refusing to keep the office in town or 
give 10,000?. security for performance of said office, ordered 
that the Governor dispose of said office of secretary until 
his Majesty's pleasure be known. 1664, Nov. 11. En~ 
dorsed, Order for seizing the secretary's office. Together 
3 pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XXV., Nos. 18-20.] 

[March 30.] 166. The King' to the Governor of Jamaica. Copy of a letter 
to the same effect as the preceding, somewhat shorter. Also copy 
of the order of the Council of Jamaica suspending Rich. Povey from 
his office of secretary, Two papers [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., 

Nos. 21-22.] 

March 30. 167. Copy of the above letter. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 93, p. 2.] 



March 30. 

St. Jago de 

la Vega. 



April 6. 



April 6. 



April 18. 

Barbadoes. 



168. Minutes of the Council of Jamaica. Ordered that a state- 
ment of the case of Thomas Ledsham be drawn up against the next 
meeting of Council. That the Council be adjourned until the next 
day after the next grand court, f p. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 34, 
p. 189.] 

169. Warrant to the Duke of York. Whereas Major James 
Bannister, late Governor of Surinam, having bought a vessel of 
80 tons for the removal of his family and estate thence, in attending 
his Majesty's pleasure has kept the vessel six months at his great 
charge, it is his Majesty's pleasure that his Royal Highness deliver 
to said Major Bannister provisions for 15 men for six months, with 
ropes and a mainsail, to encourage him towards the voyage. 1 p. 
[Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. 25, p. 154 <.] 

170. Warrant to the Commissioners of Ordnance. To deliver 
to Major James Bannister, late Governor of Surinam, six small guns, 
each weighing about 7 cwt., with their furniture, six barrels of 
powder, and a proportionable quantity of shot. \ p. [Dom. Entry 
Bk., Chas. IL, Vol. 25, p. 155.] 



171. Chr. Codrington, Deputy Governor of Barbadoes, to Gov. 
Wm. Lord Willoughby. Since his last by Capt. Bayley little has hap- 
pened, and they are in daily expectation of his Lordship's arrival, 
therefore this may come too late to meet his Lordship in England. 
Has persuaded the Assembly not to dissolve, but they will not act, 
and all he can do will be to keep the peace till the Governor arrives. 
The disposing of the 4| per cent, to other uses than first intended 
by the country has very much distasted all people, and the Assembly 
would not quarter the soldiers any longer. The commissioners for 
sale of the condemned ship and goods have not given, in their 
accounts. Possibly some may have written to the Deputy Governor's 
prejudice concerning this business, but he has had not the least 
thoughts of disservice to his Lordship. The fear of a breach with 
the French has put him upon repairing the forts, and the Assembly 
have promised to repay disbursements, but the public debts are 
many and the country poor, and he knows not how they will be paid. 



62 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1670. 

Last year the Assembly gave him 200,000 Ib. of sugar ; this year he 
does not find them able or willing to give anything, nor will they pay 
the gunners, so that if his Majesty take no care for their payment 
the forts will be of no use. The French have three great men- 
of-war that take all vessels that trade in their islands ; if a war 
happen fears they will be beforehand with the English, 2 pp. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 23.] 

April 20 [10]. 172. Gov. Sir Thos. Modyford to Sec. Lord Arlington. Has 
Jamaica, apprehended Searle, intending to bring him to trial. By the last 
occasion went one Cornelius, a Dutchman, master of Barnard's ship, 
whose deposition he sent his son to present, but who will give his 
Lordship a more lively account of that action. Has not heard more 
from Rogers, but sends enclosed a deposition touching the advice they 
had of wars proclaimed against them at Cartagena, desiring his 
Lordship would give him latitude to retaliate in case the Spaniards 
act hostilely against them, with whom we shall well enough cope 
of our own strength, not desiring any assistance from England, 
unless the Spaniards send forces from Europe ; and this he the 
more earnestly presses because he doubts the orders given him 
by the late Lord General are extinct by his never too much 
deplored, death. Encloses, 

172. I. Depositions of Capt. John Coxend and Peter Bursett. 
About 10 weeks ago deponents were aboard of Capt. 
Thomas Eogers, commander of a privateer of Jamaica, 
in the Bay of Campeachy, who 16 days before, having 
been assaulted by a Spanish man-of-war from Cartagena, 
did in his own defence board and take it, where said 
Rogers took, amongst other prisoners, an Englishman by 
name Edward Browne, who had revolted from his alle- 
giance and lived with the Spaniards of Cartagena. Said 
Browne being examined by deponents declared that there 
was war proclaimed in Cartagena by beat of drum 
against Jamaica. Jamaica, 1670, March 30. 
172. ii. Deposition of Nicholas Hicks, gent. Being in the 
island of Corisa in November last, he happened into the 
company of one Prince, an Englishman, then pilot or 
master of a Spanish ship from Puerto Bello, who told 
deponent that the Spaniard had made proclamation in 
Puerto Bello that they would give no quarter to any 
Englishman, merchant or man-of-war, and he was sure 
they would never have peace with the Englishmen. 
Jamaica, 1670, March 31. 

172, III. Deposition of Cornelius Carstens, purser of the Mary 
and Jane, Bernard Claesen Speirdyck commander. That 
the end of January last they sailed from Port Royal 
with letters from Sir Thos. Modyford to the Governor 
of Cuba, signifying peace between the two nations, and 
arriving in the Bay of Masanillia, sent to give the 
Governor of Biamo notice, who sent his alcalde aboard, and 
having received the prisoners, and searched the ship three 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 63 

1670 

times, fearing she was a privateer, they entered into trade 
with Capt. Barnard and made a bargain for his whole cargo. 
Five or six days afterwards a Spanish Armadilla was 
fitted from Cartagena, with 86 men, the Captain Manuel 
de Ribero, a Portuguese, saying he had letters of reprisal 
from the King of Spain for five years through the whole 
West Indies, for satisfaction of the Jamaicans taking 
Puerto Bello. On February 27, Capt. Barnard spied a 
sail with an English ancient, and sent two men to see 
who it might be ; the men were detained and the frigate 
fired a broadside, they answering one another with the 
like salutes about three hours. Next day, after a sharp 
dispute of about four hours, the captain being killed and 
the ship on fire in the forecastle and astern, they yielded. 
The English lost only one man and one boy besides the 
captain, the enemy by their own report having lost 36, 
and several with their legs shot off. Eight or ten days 
after the Spaniards gave them their own longboat and 
provision to carry them to Jamaica, carrying four men 
with them prisoners. Jamaica, 1670, March 21. 
172. IV. Deposition of Wm. Lane, boatswain of the Amity of 
Bristol See No. 182. I. Together 5 pp. . [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXV., Nos. 24, 24 I. IT. in. iv.] 

April 10. 173. Copy of preceding letter annexed to one of 18th March 
Jamaica. 1670. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 15, p. 2.] 

April 18. 174. Henry Cowse (mate of the Adventure, of London) to Sec. 
The Downs. Lord Arlington. According to General Modyford's order has en- 
closed his letter, and as to the French passenger that came home 
with them, he went ashore this night to Deal to get a passage 
to France, the wind blowing so hard that Cowse could not get 
ashore to acquaint any officers concerning him. Never could make 
any discovery of his motions in the passage homeward. Encloses, 
174 I. Governor Sir Thomas Modyford to Sec. Lord Arlington. 
Heard from Capt. Mowsley that M. Bourdenaux, a pas- 
senger in his ship, had a letter from the Governor of 
Comana to the King of France, and thought it his duty 
to order the mate to put some delay on Bourdenaux that 
if his Lordship thinks it prudential, his papers may be 
searched. The master is a Quaker, and he durst not 
trust to the uncertainty of his humour. Possibly this 
may be but a French brag, to gain more respect in the 
ship. Jamaica, 1670, February 20. Together, 2 pp. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., Nos. 25, 25 L] 

April 20. 175. Order of the General Court held at James City. Setting 
James City, forth the danger to the Colony caused by the great numbers of 
Virginia. f e i ons anc i other desperate villains being sent over from the prisons 
in England, the horror yet remaining of the barbarous designs of 
those villains, in September 1663, who attempted at once the sub- 
version of our religion, laws, liberties, rights, and privileges, and 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670. 

prohibiting the landing of any jail birds fr.om and after 20th 
January next upon pain of being forced to carry them to some 
other country. Certified copy by Rich. Awborne Ct. Cone. 1 p. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No, 26.] 

April 27. 176. Thos. Ludwell, Secretary, to Alderman John Jeffries, in 
Virginia. London. Is of opinion that Gale will not come home to account, 
and thinks he will have to be forced by law. Detailed account 
of his proceedings in reference to Col. Scarborough's debt to Far- 
vackp. Endorsed, "Reed, this letter the 15 June 1670, per Capt. 
Lightfoot." 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV. . No. 27.] 



April 28. 

Nansamund 

River, 
Virginia. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



177. Ri- Bennett and Tho. Godwin to Sir Peter Colleton, at 
St. James', London, per the ship Coventry, Capt. Goseling. Have 
received his letter and the goods according to invoice by Capt. 
Covell. Both Mr. Burgh and his wife dead, whose business is left 
in trust to Bennett and Godwin. Will comply with his orders in 
buying cattle, hogs, or what else is for the service of Port Royal. 
Hear Sir John Yeamans was at Bermudas and returned to Barbados 
after he had sent away Capt. Sayle, Governor to Port Royal. 
Thirty people put off here in a sloop from Barbados in January 
last, John Baulk, master, to procure food, but sailed away early in 
February. 1 p. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 21.] 

April 29. 178. Thos. Ludwell, Secretary, to [Secretary Lord Arlington.] 
Virginia. The letter from the Lords of the Council in reference to the King's 
customs and the Acts of Navigation were duly received. Action 
of the Council thereon, who have given the Governor a certificate 
of his candor and innocence in those particulars. Refers to a com- 
plaint from New York about a ship consigned to Col. Scarborough. 
Complaints received from the counties of York, Gloucester, and 
Middlesex against the great number of felons banished hither from 
England, with their apprehensions of the danger which might arise 
from the attempts of such desperate villains. Refers to the order 
of the General Court (see ante, No. 175]. The Caribbee Islands 
more proper to receive them. Endorsed, Read in Council October 
21, 1670. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 28.] 

May 2. 179. Minutes of the Council of Jamaica. Whereas the outlying 
St. Jago de la negroes, commonly called the Vermahaly Negroes, have committed 
Vega. murders, robberies, and other outrages on his Majesty's subjects, 
and now, lately, have in cold blood basely murdered John Piper, 
Pallisando Robin, John Townsend, Thomas Mason, and Bloody Dick, 
inhabitants of Clarendon parish, for the prevention of such mischiefs 
and the speedy punishment of those perfidious villains, Ordered, 
that no person travel two miles from his dwelling place without 
being armed. That all persons be ready with their arms to assist 
in apprehending or killing said traiterous villains, and that officers 
and soldiers take every means to do so. That no person give 
clothes, victuals, or parley with said traitors on pain of being pro- 
secuted as assistors, comforters, and adherers to said rebels, but 
that contrarywise, they fire at and by all means possible endeavour 
to destroy them. Rewards of 30. to be given to whoever shall 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



65 



1670. 



May 2. 

Jamaica. 



1670? 



May 5. 

Jamaica. 



kill their governor, 20?. for the sergeant-major, and 10?. for every 
common man, and any servant or slave who shall perform said 
exploit to have his freedom. The wives and children of said 
traitors killed or surprised to be the property of those who 
shall do this good service. Orders for the better drawing forces 
together for this service. Said orders to be published at the head 
of every company. Orders sent to Capt. Thomas Price in reference 
to taking and killing said Varmahaly negroes. 6^ pp. [Col. Entry, 
Bk.,No. 34, pp. 189-196.] 

180. John Style to the Secretary of State. Hopes his last (see 
ante, No. 138), sent with much difficulty, in Capt. Moseley's ship, 
to his son in London, came safe to his hands. Amongst his letters 
formerly sent, was one concerning the actions of the outlying 
negroes here. What he then wrote has since happened, for, besides 
the frequent spoils and robberies they have committed, last week 
six Christian hunters were killed. They were the negroes that 
have been long out, which of late appear very frequently amongst 
the old settlements, and may at any time destroy them. Many 
more negroes have run away from their masters, as appears from 
the number brought to the prison, for whoever takes any such 
to the prison receives 20s., if from the north side 40s. Can say 
nothing with certainty of the number out, but the number of 
Indians, mulattos, and negroes, to whom the oath of allegiance is 
never tendered, much exceeds that of those who call themselves 
Christians, and daily increases. Christians daily decrease. 1 p. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 29.] 

181. Information of John Style. That on the 8th December 1669, 
the jailor Rene' Bailly told Jervase Fletcher, who was committed 
prisoner, he would lend him a brave book to pass away the time, 
which he highly commended, in which were several treasonable 
positions maintained and formerly published by Mr. Prynne in the 
late rebellion. Heard the jailor maintain by quotations out of the 
book that the arms of the late rebels were defensive and just, and 
that they neither committed murder nor treason ; and Fletcher told 
him that the jailor had said that if the King governed not well, it 
was lawful for the Parliament to raise the Militia. Wrote to the 
Governor on May 4th 1669, that he had heard of some mischief 
contriving by the negroes in Guinaboa against the Christians 
from some runaway servants who were prisoners with him ; and 
on Whitsunday following 16 outlying negroes came to that Settle- 
ment, killed and salted hogs, and carried off arms and great store 
of plantains, the particulars whereof he wrote at large to Sir 
Will. Morrice. -1$ pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 30.] 

182. Governor Sir Thos. Modyford to Sec. Lord Arlington, 
Searle is still in custody ; the inhabitants daily increasing ; and 
himself passionately longing to receive those commands from his 
Lordship which may give him encouragement and occasion to 
enlarge himself. Has troubled this despatch with another dis- 
position of the Spaniards' hostility. Encloses, 



U 51912. 



66 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670. 



May 6. 

Whitehall. 



May 11. 

Whitehall. 



May 11. 

Whitehall. 

1670? 



May 13. 



May? 



182. I. Deposition of Wm. Lane, boatswain of the Amity of 
Bristol, Wm. Cands, commander, bound from the Maderias 
to Nevis. About nine weeks past, 35 leagues to Wind- 
ward of Antigua, a Spanish frigate boarded the Amity 
and took her. The captain's name was Don Francisco, 
who sent his prize to Carthagena, and put the English 
ashore at Corasa, showing lhat Governor his commission, 
which was from old Spain against the English and French, 
and not to five quarter to any Jamaicans, or French that 
belong to Tortuga. Together 1|- pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 
XX V., Nos. 24, 24 iv.] 

183. Warrant to the Duke of York. To cause a small vessel to 
be prepared for the voyage of Captain Geoffry Pierce to Barba- 
does and the Leeward Isles for his Majesty's service. ^ p. 
[Dom. Entry Bk, Chas. II., Vol. 25, p. 159 d.] 

184. Order of the King in Council. Whereas by an order of 
26th January last, the petition of Ferdinando Gorges touching 
his pretensions to the Province of Maine was referred to the 
Lords Committee for Trade and Plantations, who having examined 
the witnesses and evidence produced by Ferd. Gorges, were 
satisfied that the allegations therein were true. But it appearing 
a matter of state and importance, it is now ordered that it be 
referred to the Lords Committee for Foreign Affairs ; and to that 
end the papers relating to that business were delivered to Lord 
Arlington, Principal Secretary of State. 1 p. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXV., No. 31.] 

185. Copy of the above. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., 
No. 32.] 

186. Petition of Francis Cradock, Provost Marshall of Barba- 
does to the King and Council. Petitioner has long had a petition 
(fee ante. No. 151) depending before his Majesty and Council, 
wh'ch, without being read, was referred to the Committee for 
Plantations, who have not done anything therein. Prays that 
same may be heard, and that Wm. Willoucrhby and Captain 
Ferdinando Gorges, who appeared for Lord Willouuhby against 
Petit : oner in a matter which now stands referred to the Attorney - 
General, may appear to answer it. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., 
No. 33.] 

187. Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. Upon 
a surrender by James Hamilton, Groom of the Bedchamber, 
of the office of Provost Marshall General of Barbadoes, to pre- 
pare a Bill containing a grant of said office to Edwin Steed with 
all profits, to exercise the same by himself or his sufficient deputies 
during life. f p. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. 33, p. 27 ; see 
also ibid, Vol. 21, p. 88.] 



188. Draft of the 
Vol. XXV., No. 34.] 



preceding warrant. 1 p. [Col. Papers, 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



67 



1670. 
May 17. 



May 31. 

June 10. 

St. Germain 
en La} e. 



May 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



189. Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes. They request the 
Deputy Governor that there be an addition to the number of 
the Council, and of assistants to the Courts of Chancery ; and that 
the regiments of horse and foot be completed with officers. -| p. 
[Col Entry Bk. No. 11, p. 185.] 

190. Edict of the King of France forbidding trade to his plan- 
tations in America. His Majesty having already ordered the Sieur 
de Baas, his Lieut.-General in the Isles of America, not to suffer 
any foreign vessel to traffic there, and having sent a squadron of 
three ships of war to seize all foreign vessels found in the ports 
and roads of said islands or in their neighbourhood, and being in- 
formed that said prohibitions have not been executed as rigidly 
as necessary, and that even vessels taken have been repurchased 
by the proprietors for trifling sums, his Majesty expressly forbids 
any foreign vessel to enter the ports, or anchor in the roads of 
said islands, or sail in their neighbourhood, on pain of confisca- 
tion, and that none of his subjects have correspondence with them, 
on pain of confiscation of said merchandise, 500 livres fine for the 
first offence, and corporal punishment in case of repetition. Ships 
and merchandizes taken at sea shall be divided, one-tenth to the 
commander of his Majesty's squadron, another to the captain of 
the ship that made the prize, a third to the Lieut.-General. and 
the rest, half for maintenance of the ships, and half to the West 
Indian Company to be employed in the maintenance of hospitals 
in the islands; and of prizes made on land, one-third to the in- 
former, another equally divided between the Lieut.-General and the 
Governor of the island, and the third to said Company for said 
hospitals. French. Indorsed, " Received from Sir Joseph William- 
son the llth March 1672 at noon. From Mr. Slingsby 31st July 
79." 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 84.*] 

191. Account of the voyage from St. Katherina of the sloop 
" which we had at Barbados and parted with at sea and did 
arrive at Key-awah the 2'3rd May 167>," and passages there by 
Maurice Mathews who was in her. [Kay-awagh is marked in 
Sansons map as above Edisto River in Colleton County^] Traded 
with the Indians at St. Katherina, the master of the sloop with 
his mate and Mr. Rivers and four men went ashore, the master 
taken by Spaniards and put in chains. Were told to yield and 
submit to the sovereignty of San Domingo, received volleys of 
musket shot and a cloud of arrows from the Spaniards and Indians. 
John Hauke, a seaman, shot at them which made all keep behind 
trees. Had three muskets, but, ' not a bullett, till at last we found 
several upon the deck which reshooting did a little help us." Their 
sails much damaged, but nobody hit. Weighed anchor and steered 
along the shore. Four Indians came aboard, who were entertained 
courteously. They said the place right ashore from thence was 
Odistach, that there were English at Key-awah, and that a Captain 
Sheedow would speak with those on board the sloop. Afterwards 
he and Captain Alush (who were at Barbadues) came on board 
and said that the English with two ships had been at Port Royal 

E 2 



68 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1670. 

and were now at Key-awah, and promised on the morrow to take 
them thither. The next morning they sailed for Key-awah, where 
they found the Bermndian sloop going out fishing which piloted 
them into Key-awah river. 3 pp. Two copies. Endorsed by John 
Locke: "Mr Mathews relation of St. Katherina, Ashley River," and 
" Mr. Mathews relation Carolina." [Shaftesbury Papers. Section 
IX., No. 22.] 

June 10. 192. Grant to John Lightfoot of the office of Auditor-General of 
Virginia, during pleasure, in the place of Thos. Stegg, lately de- 
ceased, to be executed by himself or his sufficient deputy. [Dom. 
Entry BL, Chas. II., Vol. 34, p. 32.] 

June ? 193. Mem. in the handwriting of Sec. Lord Arlington of a letter 
to be written from his Majesty to the Governor of Jamaica 
"[after such preface as his Majesty thinks fit]." His Majesty's 
pleasure is that he absolutely and forthwith abstain and take strict 
care that no descent be made by any ships or forces belonging to 
his Majesty or his subjects, or by any authority derived from his 
Majesty upon any lands or places possessed by the Spaniards to 
invade or plunder any of them, and that he discourage by all the 
persuasions lie can any other nation from the like attempts. 
. This is all his Majesty thinks expedient to command for the pre- 
sent, but because he will be willing in time to settle a perfect 
good correspondence with the Spaniards in the Indies, whereunto 
not only the interest of his Majesty's plantations abroad, but of 
his commerce in Europe may oblige him ; his Majesty expects the 
Governor to send his advice by what method the depredations at 
sea also upon the Spaniard may be most easily and speedily sup- 
pressed, and what encouragement may be given to those who have 
hitheito lived by that trade, so as they may be retained under 
his Majesty's obedience, and their labour converted to his interest 
and honour, l^ pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 35.] 

June 12. 194.. Sec. Lord Arlington to Sir Thos. Modyford, Governor 
Whitehall. O f Jamaica. Has received his letters of 20th Jan., 20th Feb., and 
20th March last. His proposition for the entertainment of the 
English privateers in the Spanish service will scarce be believed a 
practical one, for "if their jealousy be such a spot to admit mer- 
chant trading, with never so much advantage to them and their 
ports, it is hard to believe they will admit a body of soldiers made 
so by preying upon them, or afford them any tolerable good usage.'' 
Ever since Sir Wm. Godolphin's going last into Spain, they have 
daily expected he would be able to bring that Court to some 
articles that might make them live like good neighbours in the 
West Indies, they affording us a safe retreat in their ports, and 
wood, water, and refreshments for money, forbearing to ask freedom 
of trade, which neither we in our Leeward plantations nor they in, 
any parts of America, according to their ancient constitutions, can 
admit of: this they would hardly agree to, such have been their 
resentments for what the privateers have done, and such their 
demands for separation. His Majesty's pleasure is, that in what 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 69 

1670. 

state soever the privateers are at the receipt of th's letter, he keep 
them so till we have a final answer from Spain, with this conrTtion 
only, that he obliges them to forbear all hostilities at land. Fur- 
ther, his Majesty expects Modvford's best advice how, in case of 
agreement with Spain, he mi^ht best dispose of this very valuable 
body of privateers, and whether it were not practicable to oblige 
them to betake themselves to planting, merchandizing, or service 
in his Majesty's men-of-war. Finally, his Majesty bids him tell 
Modyford that his purpose is out of hand to erect a Council 
of Plantations, that may solely attend their improvement, to the 
end that Modyford may furnish said Council with all lights suffi- 
cient for their perfect information in relation to the government 
which his Majesty looks upon as the most valuable he has, or at 
least, capable of being made so. The Spanish men-of-war attacking 
Capt. Barnard and others in the Bay of Campeachy is not at all to 
be wondered at after such hostilities as your men have acted upon 
their territories, and, because this way of warring is neither honour- 
able nor profitable to his Majesty, he is endeavouring to pot an end 
to it, and Modyford shall be timely advertised of the progress of 
the negotiation. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 27, pp. 42, 43.] 

1670 ? 195. A brief memorial by Francis Moryson to Sec. Lord Arlington 
concerning the dispute about the place of Auditor of Virginia. Is 
desired from Virginia to state the whole dispute, and leave it to 
his Lordship's decision. It was lately erected by the Grand 
Assembly of Virginia and the salary paid by them. Duties of the 
office. None to be admitted but one of the Council, and he to have 
been long resident in the country. Captain Stegg, lately deceased, 
one of the Council, the first admitted to it, confirmed by his 
Majesty's grant. The nomination of all places left to the Governor, 
who granted his commission to Edward Diggs, every way qualified 
for it. Diggs' commission bore date long before it was granted to 
Capt. Lightfoot, who is in all respects most improper for the place, 
being no councillor nor inhabitant, and greatly in debt. It is 
desired that Capt. Lightfoot lay down his grant [see ante, No. 192], 
and that Edw. Diggs be continued in possession. 1 p. [CoL Papers, 
Vol. XXV., No. 36.] 

June 13. 196. Gov. Sir W. Berkeley to [Sec. Lord Arlington]. Preparations 
Virginia. f or his voyage this next August to the West. Arrival of two 
Indians, supposed to come 200 miles to the west of Virginia, who 
say they will bring them to some of the English nation, but knows 
they must be Spaniards " for they take all that are labelled like us 
to be English." Advantages of finding a rivulet that runs west for 
commerce. In favour of Edward Digges, who, 15 years since, 
showed them the way of winding silk, that he may have a patent 
or commission for the place of Auditor. 24- pp. [Col. Papers 
Vol. XXV., No. 37.] 

June 21-22. 197. Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes. Ordered, that the 
Secretary and Provot Marshall publish to-morrow his Majesty's 
patent to Win., Lord Willoughby, and his Excellency's commission 
to Christopher Codrington to be Deputy Governor, 



70 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670. 

June 22. Ordered that writs be issued for choosing an Assembly which 
is to meet at St. Michael's Town on Tuesday, 5th July next. 
Also that his Majesty's letters to the Deputy Governor, Council, 
and Assembly, his Majesty's patent to the Governor, and his 
Excellency's commission to the Deputy Governor be recorded in 
the Secretary's office. 1 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 11, pp. 185- 
186.] 

June [22]. 199. Grant to Edwin Steed of the office of Provost Marshall 
General in Barbadoes and in all courts of judicature there, upon 
surrender of said office by James Hamilton, (see ante, No. 187.) 
Endorsed, 22 Junii 1670. [Dom. Chas. II. , Docquet.] 

June 22. 200. Petition of John Farvacks of London, merchant, to the 
King. Setting forth all that has taken place in reference to a 
debt due from Edmund Scarborough of Virginia to his late father, 
and his refusal to comply with the orders already given, and 
praying a.nother letter to the Governor of Virginia to compel him 
to put in good security for. the payment thereof. Endorsed, " Rec d 
22*. Read 23 June 1670. To be read in full Council." 1 p. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 38.] 

June 25. 201. Gov. Sir W. Berkeley to Sec. Lord Arlington. Recom- 
mending Peter Jennings, who faithfully served his Majesty's 
father, to be Attorney-General of Virginia, and that it may be 
confirmed to him by his Majesty's particular grant [see No. 263]. 
1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 39. J 

June 25. 202. Governor Sayle to Anthony Lord Ashley, Little Exeter 
Albemarie House, Strand. Hopes his Lordship has received an account of 
AshleyViver *^ e Colony here in Carolina from himself, Mr. West, &c. Though 
they are at present under some straits for want of provision 
(incident to the best of new plantations), yet doubts not [the 
Shaftesbury com i n g] OI> recruits from sundry places to which they have sent. 
Papers. One thing lies very heavy upon them, the want of a godly and 
and orthodox minister, which Sayle and many others have ever 
lived under as the greatest of their mercies. In " my late country 
of Bermudas" there is one Sampson Bond, heretofore of long 
standing in Exeter College, Oxford, who was ordained by the late 
Bishop Hall (of Exeter) and sent by a commission from the 
Company to the Summer Islands in 1662, " under whose powerful 
and soul-edifying ministry I have lived about eight years last 
past " ; greatly grieved parting with his godly society and faith- 
ful ministry. Mr. Bond has little respect from some who are 
now in authority in Bermudas, and has been invited to Boston 
and New York by the Governors there, and Sayle has also written 
to liim to " come and sit down with us," which is the most hearty 
request of the Colony in general, who were exceedingly affected 
with his ministry all the time- they were in Bermudas, as was also 
Sir John Yeamans, who promised to procure him a commission 
from the King to make him their minister, but Sayle can hear 
of nothing done, which emboldens him to beseech his Lordship " to 
put on bowels of great goodness and compassion towards your 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



71 



1670. 



June 27. 

Albemarle 
Point , at 
Key-awah. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



June 27. 

Shaftesbury 
Papers. 

June 27. 

Virgiiiia. 



June 27. 



Colony here in procuring a commission and competent salary for 
him." Assures his Lordship that Mr. Bond is so well reported of 
and beloved in the Caribbee Islands that were he minister here 
it would gain hundreds of considerable persons to this place. 
Takes his leave with the fixed purpose to the utmost during life 
to further his Lordship's blessed design. l>., ivithseal. Endorsed 
by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 24.] See also 
No. 302. 

203. Joseph West to Lord Ashley. Gave him an account of 
their proceedings in Carolina in his last of 28th May by the way 
of Virginia, and how they came to quit Port Royal and to begin 
their settlement at Key-awah. Has since sent to demand of the 
Governor of St. Augustine the men who were detained there, his 
Lordship's kinsman Mr. Rivers being one of them ; two more of 
their men who went ashore contrary to orders detained by the 
friar at St. Katherina, and being informed by the Indians that 
there were ships at St. Augustine coming to surprise the English 
shallop, she was forced to return to Key-awah, leaving those two 
men more behind. Forced to send to Bermudas for a supply of 
provisions, for fear the ship should miscarry at Virginia, for they 
have but seven weeks' provision left, and that only peas at a pint 
a day a man, the country affording them nothing, and they cannot 
employ their servants as they would, because they have no victuals 
for them. Corn, potatoes, and other things thrive very well, and 
if they have timely supplies now they do not question but to'provide 
for themselves next year, and that it will prove a very good settle- 
ment and answer his Lordship's expectation. 1 p. Endorsed by 
John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 25.] 

204- Entry of the above (examined by John Locke) in the 
" Carolina letter book belonging to the Earl of Shaftesbury." 1 p. 
[Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 55, p. 2.] 

205. Thos. Ludwell, Sec. to [Secretary Lord Arlington]. On 
22nd May the Governor sent out a party of men to discover the 
mountains, who returned after 18 days ; their discovery not con- 
siderable, yet he gives an account of what they saw and conjecturec 
to lie beyond; is very confident that the bowels of those barren 
hills are not without silver or gold. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., 
No. 40.] 

206. Deposition of Cornelius Carstens, purser of the Mary and 
Jane, Barnard Claesen Spierdyck, commander, before Leoline 
Jenkins, Judge of the High Court of Admiralty of England. That 
said ship, victualled for 18 months and laden with goods, was in 
16(19 committed to the care of said Spierdyck for a voyage to 
Jamaica and the West Indies, for account of Jacob Lucie, Samuel 
Swynoke, John Bovey & Co. ; the true value of which ship and 
cargo when taken amounted to 7,5ti6. Which ship and goods 
were taken after four hours' :tout resistance, wherein the captain 
and two men were killed, and the ship on fire in head and astern, 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670. 



June 28. 

Port Royal. 



June 28. 

Fort James, 
New York. 



June 29. 

St. Jago de 
la Vega. 



June 29. 



by Manuel Rivero, a Biscayan, commander of a Spanish private 
man-of-war, in the Bay of Masinilla about the 27th February last. 
1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 41.] 

207. Extract of a letter from Port Royal. The Spaniards have 
landed to leeward, burnt many houses, taken prisoners, and marched 
off. They last appeared off Wealthy Wood, but finding armed men 
on the shore, stood off to sea. All the privateers are called in and 
promised they shall not be liable to any arrest. Col. Morgan is 
ordered by the Governor and Council to get together all the pri- 
vateers, and, with the title of Admiral, burn, sink, and destroy all 
ships that have done or intend anything to the prejudice of this 
place, and land and disperse any forces that have any design this 
way. The ships to leeward have taken one Watson, a Quaker, a 
ketch belonging to this place, and a small barque. We talk of 
nothing here but burning St. Jago de Cuba, being the first places 
that granted out commissions against us. 1 p. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXV., No. 42.] 

208. Declaration of Francis Lovelace, Governor of New York, 
touching provision for a Minister. At the request of the Mayor 
and Aldermen of this city, on petition of the elders and deacons 
of the church for the encouragement of an able and orthodox 
Minister, of which they are at present wholly destitute, to come 
out of Holland. The Governor declares that such Minister shall 
have 1,000 guilders Hollands money each year, a convenient dwelling- 
house rent free, and firewood gratis ; said Mayor and Aldermen having 
engaged to cause said salary to be levied yearly on the inhabitants 
of the city and liberties. " This is a duplicate of the original taken 
out of the records. Examined by me, Matthias Nicolls, Secretary." 
2 pp. Printed in New York Documents, III., 189. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXV., No. 43.] 

209. Minutes of the Council of Jamaica. Whereas by copy of 
a commission sent by Win. Beck, Governor of Cura9ao, to Gov. 
Sir Thos. Modyford, from the Queen Regent of Spain, dated 20 April 
1669, her Governors in the Indies are commanded to make open war 
against his Majesty's subjects, and that the Spanish Governors have 
granted commissions and are levying forces against the English, and 
in accordance with the last article of his Majesty's instructions to Gov. 
Modyford " in this great and urgent necessity," it is ordered that a 
commission be granted to Admiral Henry Morgan to be command er- 
in-chief of all ships of war belonging to this harbour, and to attack, 
seize, and destroy the enemy's vessels with powers herein set forth. 
Also that upon an extraordinary alarm owners bring with them their 
men slaves furnished with bills, axes, and other necessary tools for 
building huts, clearing ways, and other works. Said orders to be 
published in the next full court in every quarter sessions within 
this island. 4f pp. Two copies. [Col. Entry Bks., No. 34, pp. 196- 
200, and No. 27, pp. 47-49.] 

210. Another copy of the preceding Minutes of the Council of 
Jamaica. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 44.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES, 



73 



1670. 
July 2. 
Jamaica. 



July 2. 

St. Jago de 

la Vega. 



211. Commission from Sir Thos. Modyford to Admiral Henry 
Morgan. Whereas the Queen Regent of Spain has, by her royal 
schedula dated 20th April 1669, commanded her Governors in the 
Indies to make open war against the subjects of his Majesty ; and 
Col. Pedro Bayona y Villa Nueba, Captain- General of Paraguay 
and Governor of St. Jago of Cuba, has executed the same, and in 
most barbarous manner landed his men on the north side of Jamaica, 
firing all the houses and killing and taking all the inhabitants 
prisoners they could meet with ; and the rest of the Governors are 
diligently gathering forces to be sent to St. Jago, their rendezvous 
and magazine, for invasion and conquest of this island ; by virtue 
of full power from his Majesty and by advice of Council, Gov. 
Modyford hereby appoints Henry Morgan commander-in-chief of 
all the ships fitted or to be fitted for defence of this island, and of 
the officers, soldiers, and seamen upon the same, and commands him 
to get said vessels into one fleet, well manned, armed, and victualled, 
and by the first opportunity to put to sea for defence of this island, 
and to use his 'best endeavour to surprise, take, sink, disperse or 
destroy the enemy's vessels, and, in case he finds it feasible, to land 
and attack St. Jago or any other place where he shall be informed 
are stores for this war or a rendezvous for their forces, and to use 
his best endeavours to seize the stores and take, kill, or disperse the 
forces. And all officers, soldiers, and seamen upon said vessels are 
strictly enjoined both by sea and by land to obey said Henry Morgan 
as their Admiral, and himself to follow such orders as he shall from 
time to time receive from his Majesty, the Duke of York, or the 
Governor. 1 1 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 45.] 

212. Gov. Modyford's instructions to Admiral Henry Morgan. 
With all expedition to publish and put in execution his commission. 
To inform the Governor of his probable strength and wants. To 
advise his fleet and soldiers that they are upon the old pleasing 
account of no purchase 110 pay, and therefore that all which is got 
shall be divided amongst them, according to the accustomed rules. 
In case he attacks and takes St. Jago of Cuba, to keep that place 
and country until he has received the Governor's further orders. 
And in order to this, to proclaim mercy and enjoyment of estates 
and liberty of conscience to all Spaniards that will submit to his 
Majesty, and liberty to all the slaves that shall come in, and to such 
as may deserve the same to give their fugitive masters' estates, 
reserving to the crown of England one fourth of the produce, for 
the maintenance of forces for defence. If he finds that course take 
good effect, then to preserve the houses, sugar works, and canes ; 
but if he cannot make good the place, and the Spaniards and slaves 
are deaf to his proposals, then with all expedition to destroy and 
burn and leave it a wilderness, putting the men slaves to the sword 
and sending the women slaves hither to be sold for account of his 
fleet ; such of the men slaves also as cannot speak Spanish or are 
new negroes he may preserve for the same account ; or if any ships 
present, to send them on same account for New England or Virginia. 
To inquire what usage our prisoners have had, and what quarter 



74 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670. 



July 4. 

Alhemarlc 
Point. 

Shaftesbnry 
Papers. 



July 6. 
Jamaica. 



July 6. 
Jamaica. 



has been given to ours, and give the same, or rather, as our custom 
is, to exceed them in civility and humanity, endeavouring to make 
all people sensible of his moderation and good nature and his inap- 
titude and loathness to spill the blood of man. To execute martial 
law for government of the fleet. In case any ships have not Gov. 
Modyford's commission, to grant commissions to them, according to 
same form, taking security of 1,000?. bond for performance. Ships 
taken in this expedition to be disposed of for the best improvement 
of this service, not suffering any to sell them till they come to the 
commission port. 'All matters not provided for in these instructions 
are left to his well-known prudence and good conduct. 2 pp. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 46.] 

213. " Mr. Owen's Parliament's return." The freeholders of 
Albemarle Point have, by virtue of the Governor's order and sum- 
mons, elected and chosen the persons hereafter named in order to 
the establishment of laws for the present and better government of 
the people within this Province, who, being added to the five persons 
already in the Council, complete the number of 20, as is by the 
Lords Proprietors institutions warranted and directed, viz. : 
M;iurice Mathews, Henry Hughes, John Jones, Tho. Smith, Henry 
Symons, Henry Woodward, Hugh Carteret, James Marscall, Anthony 
Charne, Will. Kennis, George Beadon, Jonathan Barker, Thomas 
Ingram, Thomas Norris, and Will. Owen. 1 p. [Shaftesbury 
Papers, Section IX., No. 26.] 

214. Gov. Sir Thos. Modyford to Sec. Lord Arlington. He 
will find by the enclosed Order of Council that the Spaniard has 
made sharp war on them, which occasioned the same, and which 
they have no other way to justify, but by his Majesty's last 
instruction therein recited. Desires his favour in procuring his 
Majesty's ratification of what is done, as by said instruction is 
promised. Sends also copy of the commissions granted against 
them, in which is observable that the Queen's shedula was dated 
2()th April 1C 69, and they would not yet have had knowledge of it 
had not the good Governor of Cura$ao sent it. Has often hinted 
to the late Lord General that it is the interest of the Spaniards and 
whenever they are able they will endeavour to defeat this Colony. 
It is possible the Spaniards with their great ships of 40 to 60 guns 
may be masters of the sea and impede their trade, in which case 
they must implore the assistance of his Majesty's frigates ; but on 
shore they fear them not, but hope in time to fix the war in their 
own country, to which his Lordship's advice and favour would 
infinitely encourage. Encloses, 

214. i. Minutes of Council held at St. Jago de la Vega, 29th June 
1670. Gal, see ante No. 209. 

214. II. Commission of war by the Spaniard against the English 

in the West Indies. St. Jago de Cuba, 1670, Jan. 26- 
Feb. 5. Spanish. See Cal., ante, No. 149. Together 3 pp. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., Nos. 47.. 47 I. 11.] 

215. Copy of preceding letter without the enclosures. [Col. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



75 



1670. 
July 6. 

Jamaica. 



July 13. 

Whitehall. 



216. Gov. Sir Thos. Modyford to Lord Ashley. Having formerly 
received his Lordship's commands, and heard that he has very 
affectionately inquired after him, and having few friends at court, 
and knowing the great respect his Lordship hath always borne to 
righteous causes and his great integrity and resolution in defending 
them, in this his own great undertaking implores his Lordship's 
countenance and assistance. His son will present papers in which 
are many reasons for the present justice of their arms against the 
Spaniard ; yet because it may be looked on as a fond rash action 
for a petty Governor without money to make war with the richest, 
and not long since the powerfullest, Prince of Europe, has thought 
it reasonable to give his Lordship a short and true view of their 
affairs here. The Spanish possessions are very large, but the pos- 
sessors very few, and much the major part Indians, negroes and 
other slaves, to whom it is indifferent who is their master ; for 
example, Cuba is in length 600 miles, and not above six towns 
on it, and those so far distant from each other that they cannot 
be any relief to themselves ; the country abounds with cattle, hogs, 
&c., and by this means our private men-of-war careen, refit, and 
victual, without more charge than a gang of hunters and dogs, and 
expect no other pay than what they get from the enemy. These 
men, who may make about 1500, and never will be planters, he 
has employed to keep the war in their own country, " and judge 
you, my Lord, in this exigent, what course could be more frugal, 
more prudential, more hopeful the men volunteers, the ships, 
arms, ammunition their own, their victuals and pay the enemy's, 
and such enemies as they have always beaten." The enemy, as 
appears by the Queen's schedula, have been providing for this war 
since April 1669, and probably longer ; their rendezvous is appointed, 
and their ships have come upon our coast with fire and sword, 
challenging us out to them ; so that should we have delayed for 
orders from hi's Majesty, which must be six months at least, " that 
nation would, if possible, be heightened above its native pride and 
ours perhaps as much cowed, all their designs perfected, and the 
gross of their intended forces embodied; whereas by this more 
speedy course we shall in all probability quell their pride and so 
amuse them in their own quarters as that they shall never be able 
very considerably to join against us." Has reason to hope that this 
war, thus unreasonably begun by them, will so heighten the repu- 
tation of his Majesty's forces here that there will be a good foun- 
dation laid for the great increase of his Majesty's dominions in 
these parts ; yet far more dreads the censure of his friends and 
countrymen on this occasion than the sword of the enemy, such 
has been his hard fortune formerly on like occasions to have been 
misrepresented ; and therefore begs his Lordship so to mediate with 
his Majesty as that according to his instruction this proceeding may 
have its due ratification. 1 \ pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 27, pp. 49-51.] 

217. Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor General. Whereas 
Henry Edlyne, sometime of the parish of St. George's in Barbadoes, 
planter, was executed for murdering his wife, and his estate became 



76 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1670. 

forfeited to his Majesty, and whereas Gov. Wm. Lord Willoughhy 
has, by an instrument under the seal of Barbadoes, dated llth 
March 1668, granted to Francis Raynes and his heirs said estate, 
consisting of 35 acres of land in said parish of St. George's, bounded 
east and south by the lands of Catherine Thompson, west by the 
lands of Wm. Martin, and north by the lands of William Butledge 
and John Home, together with 10 negro slaves, and all houses, &c. 
thereto belonging, it is his Majesty's pleasure that a Bill be prepared 
to pass the great seal containing a grant and confirmation of the 
same. 2 pp. \Dorn. Entry BL, Chas. II., Vol. 25, p. 17M-172.] 

July 15. 218. The King to the Duke of York. Directing him forthwith 
to give order for equipping a sixth-rate frigate to attend his Majesty's 
service at Barbadoes and the Caribbees, and to carry down the 
Commissioners who are to demand of the French that part of 
St. Christopher's which the English formerly enjoyed, f p. [Dom. 
Entry BL, Chas. II., Vol. 31, p. 55.] 

July 25 219. Extracts out of the Register of the resolutions of the High 
4 and Mighty Lords States General of the United Netherlands. On 



and the report of the Lords Schimmelpening and others appointed 
Aug. 11 Commissioners for the affairs of Surinam concerning the letter of 
21. Heer Van Benningen, Minister Extraordinary in England, of the 
_^.th July, and the draught of a letter to be sent by him to Governor 
Lichtenberge of Surinam, it was resolved that said letter be sent, 
viz. : The States-General to Governor Lichtenberge. By letters and 
papers enclosed- he will understand that the States-General have 
agreed with the King of Great Britain for removing of all complaints 
of the English inhabitants of Surinam ; but as their former orders 
differ in several things, these are to serve for an explanation. The 
English are to enjoy all that is contained in said despatches and in 
the capitulations, particularly the 5th and 19th articles concerning 
liberty of departing at pleasure with their persons and transportable 
goods ; and if they are not inclined to sell such things as serve for 
making sugar, they may likewise carry them away, as also all their 
slaves, except such as were bought since the surrender. Not to 
exact anything for transportation. And in regard they have 
accorded to said King freedom to send two merchantmen to make 
said transportation and to continue in the Colony six weeks, and 
to Major Bannister to go with a flyboat to fetch his family, slaves, 
and goods, the merchantmen are to carry no cannon, and when 
arrived at the fort he is without delay to make known that all 
those English who will, may go with said ships, with their transport- 
able goods, provided they give in their names within 10 days, and 
such as shall not so give in their names to have liberty to depart 
at any time. Major Bannister may go to his plantation in case the 
Governor does not judge his presence may occasion any disorder. 
His Majesty's Commissioners have no other authority than to see 
that all is duly executed, but Gov. Lichtenberge is to take care that 
the English Commissioners do not use any persuasions or threats to 
induce any to depart. His power to prolong the time of six weeks 
he will make use of as becomes an honest man. Hague, 26th 



AMERICA AND WEST IK DIES. 



77 



1670. 

July-4th August 1670. "Extract." August 11-21, 1670. Having 
received a letter from the Sieur Van Benningen of 6-1 6th inst., 
importing that Sir John Trevor considered it most unreasonable 
that what is fastened in the ground or nailed fast, such as great 
kettles and the like, should not be included as transportable goods, 
it was declared that kettles fastened by people upon their own 
grounds and the like, which they can carry away, are to be included. 
" This agreeth with the said register. N. Ruysch, Secretary." 
Two copies. 9% pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., Nos. 48, 49.] 

July 25- 220. Copies of the preceding resolutions of the States General 
Aug. 4 and concerning Surinam. 4 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 77, pp. 20- 
Aug. 11-21. 25.] 



July 29. 



July 30. 

Jamaica. 



July 30. 

Jamaica. 

July 30. 

Nansamund 
Kiver, 

Virginia. 



Sbaftesbury 
Papers. 



July 



221. Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet. To prepare a Bill 
making Abraham de Soza Mondes, an inhabitant of Jamaica, a 
free denizen of England, but with a clause that he shall not enjoy 
the benefit thereof until he has taken the oaths of allegiance and 
supremacy before the Governor of the island. p. [Dom. Entry 
Bk., Chas. IL, Vol. 25, p. 176.] 

222. Gov. Sir Thos. Modyford to Sec. Lord Arlington. Has 
proceeded to give the Admiral mentioned in the Order of Council 
[see ante, No. 209,] his commission, and also commissions to 10 
others to be of his fleet, which is already so considerable that 
he will take the sea in 14 days, having appointed a rendezvous 
for divers others ; of whose actions his Lordship shall have a 
speedy account. Has obeyed his Majesty's despatch of 30th March 
last (see ante, No. 165), and according to Mr. Povey's desire placed 
Mr. Joachim Haines his deputy (as secretary). % p. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXV., No. 47.] 

223. Copy of the preceding letter. [Col. Entry Bk,, No. 27, 
p. 44.] 

224. Henry Brayne to [Sir Peter Colleton ?]. That he has drawn 
a bill of exchange payable at sight upon him for SQL 15s. 6d. 
sterling for goods shipped and moneys disbursed for his ship the 
Carolina in furnishing her with a supply for his plantation at 
Keyawah or Port Royal, which Maj.-Gen. Bennett has laid out 
more than came to his hands from Sir Wm. Berkeley and Capt. 
Godwin; also 10s. more for a boar delivered aboard and 10s. for 
a bond for clearing the ship. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., 
No. 27.] 

225. The King's instructions to Edward Earl of Sandwich, 
president, Richard Lord Gorges, William Lord Allington, Thos. 
Grey, and Henry Brouncker, Sir Humphrey Winch, Sir John 
Finch, Henry Slingesby, secretary, Silas Titus and Edmund Waller, 
Commissioners for Foreign Plantations. To take minute informa- 
tion of the state and government of the several Colonies, how the 
commissions given have been carried out, the number of parishes 
and of the planters and servants in each, and if any be overstocked 



78 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670. 



Aug. 1. 

Jamaica. 



Aug. 7. 

Port lloyal, 
Jamaica. 



with servants or slaves to consider the best means of conveying 
them, to enforce justice without provocation to the neighbouring 
Indians, receive any that desire into protection, have persons to 
learn, their languages ; to order pains to be taken in the produce 
of the best native goods and in their manufacture, in the breeding 
of cattle, and in the growth of materials for shipbuilding. See 
Warrant dated 18th Nov. 1670. 5 pp. [Col Entry BL, No. 93, 
pp. 3-5.] 

226. Gov. Modyfbrd's additional instructions to Admiral Henry 
Morgan. Whereas nothing can be of greater prejudice to his 
Majesty's affairs than the old lawless custom of the captains of 
privateers going from the fleet with their vessels when they please, 
on information of any such intention, proved before a court martial, 
Admiral Morgan is to take from such persons their commissions 
and confer them on others in whom the Admiral can confide ; and 
in case any have actually departed without license, and afterwards 
come within his power, to send same prisoners to the Provost 
Marshal of Jamaica. Not to suffer any private soldier or seaman 
to depart the fleet, or run from one ship to another, without license 
under his hand. For the better keeping of the soldiers and seamen 
to their obedience, to appoint lieutenants to captains of every 
ship. To give the Governor due advice of his motions, success or 
losses, that' he may send further instructions and assistance. 1 p. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 50.] 

227. Rich. Browne to Williamson. Has been 18 months at sea 
with a dull and sluggish commander, and could seldom hear from 
Jamaica or see any Spanish ships against whom he had commission. 
Set sail from Jamaica Feb. 1669, and spent most of their time in 
the Bay of Campeachy, taking nothing but a little provision, the 
Spaniards now sailing in fleets and no ships falling in their way. 
Weary of being so long at sea without purchase, they went towards 
Caimanos to make some turtle, where they found orders from 
Sir Thos. Modyford to make all speed for Jamaica. There they 
found Sir Thos. had made peace with the Spaniards in May 1669, 
and since it appears that the Spaniards made war with the English 
and French in April 1669, according to copy of a commission 
(enclosed, see ante, Nos. 149, 209) sent by the Governor of Curacao ; 
by which the subtle dealings of Spaniards may appear, who by no 
means will be brought to a free trade. Found that two Spanish 
men-of-war had been on these coasts, burnt several houses, taken 
some prisoners and provisions, and had left a challenge both in 
Spanish and English ; on which account the Governor and Council 
have made war with them, and Admiral Morgan is preparing a 
fleet with 1,500 men for some notable design on land, and Browne 
goes with him as Surgeon General, and will send a true narrative 
of their proceedings. Finds various reports of a change of Govern- 
ment here, hourly expected from England, and the most profitablest 
place, that of secretary, taken from Mr. Morgan and conferred on 
Mr. Povey, who is yet in England. Has ridden the whole length 
of the island and been in most of the inhabitants' settlements and 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 79 

1670. 

collected what he can from them, and finds Sir Thos. Modyford 
very well resented by the people for a wise, sober, honest, and 
discreet man, as also Lt.-Col. Byndlosse ; Major Beeston, captain 
of Port Royal Fort, is a well deserving person ; Sir Jas. Modyford 
is not well resented by the people. Several persons in public 
employ must be continued to direct others unexperienced in these 
affairs ; for these Colonies cannot be regulated by the true letter of 
the laws of England, but there must be a latitude left to the 
prudent management of the Governor upon several emergencies. 
Has been near two years in the island, and lost all in that unhappy 
blow of the Oxford, and now has been 18 months at sea and not got 
2d. ; hopes this design will do something. Is resolved to stay two 
years longer to get up his losses ; beseeches him to beg of my Lord 
[Arlington] for a recommendation to the Governor for employ on 
shore here. Customer at Port Royal, which Sir Jas. Modyford has, 
Clerk of the Court at Port Royal, which Mr. Lothill has, and Secre- 
tary, which Mr. Povey has, are chiefest places of profit. A week 
since he saw a letter from the Governor of Bermudas to Sir Thos., 
saying that the Spaniards had taken a vessel of that place and used 
them very badly, and that 200 or 300 men should be ready from 
thence to serve this island upon any design against the Spaniard. 
Tortuga and the French upon Hispaniola have offered 500 or 600 
men upon this expedition. This island is much increased with settled 
families from Barbadoes, and more hourly expected, and has great 
trade from all parts ; at present 20 or 30 merchant ships in harbour ; 
in all probability the best settled and governed island in the Indies. 
Begs him to remind my Lord to do something for him, and to present 
his service to Lord Arlington and Sergeant Knights. 15 or 20 
sail of third, fourth, or fifth rate frigates would overrun the whole 
Indies in a very small time and add a splendid diamond to his 
sacred Majesty's crown. Whilst they are absent the island will 
be endangered, and it is heartily wished that his Majesty would 
send some frigates to secure the merchants and people from the 
insolencies of the Spaniards." Endorsed, Mr. Browne the chirurgeon. 
3 pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XXV., JVo, 51.] 

Aug. 8. 228. Rich. Browne to Williamson., About October 1669 off 
Port Koyal, the Colorados on the coast of Cuba, they gave chase to a vessel 
aica> which proved a Dutchman of Amsterdam, Captain Van Ducker 
commander, who produced " the Sir Thos. Modyford let pass," but 
that would not satisfy Capt. John Harmanson. Laboured what 
he could to dissuade him, and told him that the Dutch and they 
had had a long and sharp war, and were now offensive and defensive 
against all nations, and that he utterly detested taking the worth 
of a farthing from any nation in amity with his Majesty ; but he 
would follow no advice, but took out of her 17 cases and " three 
anchors of brandy " and drew a bill on his owners. Van Ducker 
was cleared at Jamaica and sued Harmanson's security. Cannot 
tell what came of it, but Capt. Harmanson for his misdemeanors 
is now in prison. Van Ducker's ship was very leaky, and is since 
broken up at Jamaica. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 52.] 



80 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670. 

Aug. 9. 229. Gov. Sir Thos. Modyford to Sec. Lord Arlington. These 

Jamaica, are chiefly to convey copies of his letters of 6th and 30th July, 

and to assure his Lordship that on Friday next our Admiral will 

sail for the guard of this island ; after which his Lordship shall 

have an account of his success. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 47.] 

Aug. 9. 230. Copy of the" preceding letter. [Col. Entry Bh, No. 27, 

Jamaica. p. 44.] 

Aug. 11. 231. Rich. Browne to Williamson. Since his last of the 8th 
Port Royal, inst. one Mr. Stubbs has corne from England, who brought a large 
Jamaica. p ac k e t f rom his Majesty to Sir Thos. Modyford : what it contains 
is unknown. Omitted in his last " a grand mechiefe to every 
person or rn cht in there letters, from there corespondents, w ch 
every man takes up, and open stiffles (? stiffless, i.e. without cere- 
mony ?) as they please, if an office from my Lord were establish* 
for receipt of all letters, both comeing in and out, it would well 
satistie the people " ; which employ he begs of his Lordship. 
Understands there is due to his Majesty at least 6,OOOL per 
annum, which never comes to his coffers ; which this bearer, 
Edward Fulke, will make appear, with other necessary matters, 
he having been resident in this island seven or eight years. 
Endorsed, Rec. Nov. 1. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 53.] 

[Aug. 16.] 232. Petition of divers merchants, inhabitants, and planters 
relating to the island of St. Christopher's to the King. Whereas 
his Majesty has appointed Commissioners for re-settling St. Chris- 
topher's, and petitioners understand that several inhabitants of 
Barbadoes are nominated, from whom they can expect no kindness, 
some of them having been heard to say it were no matter if the 
Leeward Islands were sunk, for they hinder the trade of Barbadoes. 
Pray his Majesty to join in said commission Lieut.-Col. Russell 
of Nevis, Major Smith of Nevis, Col. Clement Everard, Major 
William Freeman, Capt. Philip Payne, Lt. John Estridge, or others 
that have estates on the Leeward Islands. Signed by Geo. Gamiell, 
Geo. Hill, Valentine Austen, Jos. Groves, Wrn. Baxter, Tho. Ball, 
Wrn. Sewster, Hen. Lawrance, Arthur Hare, Rich. Baker, Hen. Bale, 
Christ. Fletcher, Fran. Wingham, Nath. Robinson, Capt. Sam 
Winthrop of Antigua, and Capt. Walter Simons of Nevis. With 
reference from Sec. Lord A rlington to the Committee for Plantations 
for their opinion. Whitehall, Aug. 16, 1670. Annexed, 

232. I. Report of the Committee of Plantations on above petition. 
Recommend, upon advice with Lord Willoughby and the 
petitioners, that- Sir John Yeamans, Sir Tobias Bridge, 
Col. Clement Everard, Lt.-Col. Randolph Russell, Major 
Michaell Smith, Major William Freeman, Capt. Philip 
Payne, Capt. Walter Symonds, and Lt. John Estridge 
(whereof three to be a quorum) as fit persons to be em- 
ployed for taking possession of that part of St. Christopher's 
which is to be delivered by the French King. Signed by 
Lord Sandwich, president, and six others. 1670, Aug. 22. 
Together 2| pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 54.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 81 



1670. 

[Aug. 16.] 233. Copies of the above petition and report, with the following 
mem. : 23rd August. Sent to Windsor to the Lord Arlington by 
Dr. Clarke inclosed in a letter from Mr. Slingesby. [Col, Entry Bh, 
No. 94, pp. 2, 3.] 

Aug. 17. 234. Rules and Instructions for Win. Lord Willoughby's agents 
Westminster. i n Barbadoes. Touching their accounts which are to be transmitted 
and audited in England, according to the course of the Exchequer, 
for the duty of 4^ per cent, granted to his Majesty, and all other 
the profits in that island. Entered in the Journal of the Assembly 
of Barbadoes of 28 February 1670-1. 2 pp. [Col. Entry Bk, 
No. 13, pp. 39-41.] 

235. Lord Willoughby's observations upon his Majesty's farm 
of the 4 1 per cent, at Barbadoes. Has considered " the Book of 
the Draught of the Farm of the 4 per cent, within the Island of 
Barbadoes/ 1 and submits : That the ends mentioned in the Act for 
raising the duty are for defraying [the charges of the Government 
there, the public meeting of Sessions, the often attendance of the 
Council, reparations and building of forts, Sessions House, Prisons, 
&c., and all other public charges incumbent on the Government ; 
whether therefore the farming of said duty be convenient, may 
deserve their further consideration, for the reasons herein set 
forth, viz., that the island will be much dissatisfied to see what 
they have provided for themselves shipped for England, that in 
case of war they will be unprovided with money or credit, and 
that when those revenues were received in kind, his Majesty's 
storehouses were never quite empty, and there was at least enough 
to preserve Sir Tobias Bridge's regiment from starving. But in 
case " the farmers do go on " then Lord Willoughby offers certain 
other considerations, which are stated at length. As for Antigua, 
Montserrat, and the other Leeward Isles, except Nevis, if they 
should at present be farmed, it would in all probability ruin them. 
3 pp. [Col Entry Bk., No. 5, pp. 122-124.] 

Aug. 20. 236. Governor Lord Willoughby to the Speaker of the Assembly 
of Barbadoes. Has hitherto spent all his time in attendance in 
order to their service, and effected little ; 'tis possible they may 
wonder he has not done more, as in their letter of 30th Sept. 1669, 
they persevere in opinion that their addresses were necessary to be 
granted, though their fellow planters here were of another opinion. 
Must therefore deal plainly with them as hitherto he has done. It 
is not unknown to them what complaints the Royal [African] Com- 
pany made about 12 months since against the whole Island of 
Barbadoes, and though Gov. Willoughby justified their laws to be 
authentic enough for the recovery of just debts, if factors and 
solicitors were not negligent, yet this stands still as a crime against 
them in the opinion of the Court, and the many complaints of the 
traders force him to be unfortunate with them, by just dealing to 
take off that scandal, else their trade will decay with their credit, 
which is very much impaired by the bad sugars sent thence, full 
70 per cent, worse than Jamaica muscovados. Desires them to 

U 51912. v 



82 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1670. 

make or revive laws whereby all just debts may, without delay, be 
recovered, and merchantable sugar made by all, which nothing but 
the old Act of appraisement renewed will effect. His Majesty has 
now commissioned a President and Council to consider of all his 
West India Colonies, viz., the Earl of Sandwich, President, and 
Lord Arlington, Lord Gorges, Thomas Grey, Henry Brouncker, Sir 
Humphrey Winch, Sir John Finch, Mr. Waller, Capt. Titus, and 
Mr. Slingsby, the Council. Is informed that the last Assembly 
passed some votes contrary to his expectation, and particularly one 
for disposal of the 4^ per cent, towards the payment of the matrosses ; 
but till his Majesty order their payment out of that fund, they ought 
not to meddle therewith, lest they bring a greater inconvenience on 
the island than they may imagine. Thankfully takes notice of their 
good liking of his Deputy Governor, and hopes to prove as successful 
in his own endeavours for their service. Read at a Meeting and 
entered in the Journal of the Assembly of Barbadoes, 1 5th Novem- 
ber 1670. 2 pp. [Col. Entry Bh, No. 13., pp. 4-6.] 

Aug. 20. 237. Gov. Sir Thos. Modyford to Sec. Lord Arlington. Has 
Jamaica, with much comfort and satisfaction received his welcome letter of 
12th June, and although he is therein absolved of but one of 
those many imprudences laid to his charge, yet he promises himself 
that those other are also charitably buried in oblivion. His 
Majesty's commands have infinitely revived his despairing heart. 
His Majesty's orders touching the privateers came to his hands 
the 13th inst., whereupon he sent for the Admiral, who had sailed 
the day before out of this harbour, and told him his Majesty's 
pleasure, strictly charging him to observe the same, and behave 
with all moderation possible in carrying on this war. He replied 
that he would observe these orders as far as possible, but necessity 
would compel him to land in the Spaniards' country for wood, 
water, and provisions, or desert the service, and that unless he 
were assured of the enemy's embodying or laying up stores in 
their towns, for the destruction of this island, he would not attempt 
any of them ; which (added he) could his Majesty have been 
acquainted with, he would (as all believe) have had no injunction 
to spare such a place. He sailed next day to Bluefields, on the 
way to the rendezvous, where they expect him to be in a better 
posture than ever any fleet that went out of this island, those 
rugged fellows having submitted to a stricter discipline than they 
could ever yet be brought to. That the Spaniards will never, 
unless necessity compel them, allow trade in these parts, his Lord- 
ship has often advised, neither did Modyford ever think they 
would employ the English privateers, unless the French and Dutch 
should endeavour to oppress them ; but believes, on view of the 
Queen of Spain's schedula, they had hopes of French assistance 
against the English. But that will prove vain, for the French, 
partly because the Governor denied commissions against the 
Spaniard, but principally because he has joined with the Royal 
Company of France to impose some unusual duties on them, have 
rebelled and driven him from the shore, seized his estate and done 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 83 

1670 

him all the injuries they could. Both parties have applied to 
Modyford for assistance, but he has been equally civil to each and 
promised nothing, only has advised Admiral Morgan to assure the 
Protestant party of a good welcome here if they come to plant. 
Had that reputed most wise Council of Spain suspended their 
resentment but two years longer, most of our privateers had 
betaken themselves to some other way of living, for their rigging, 
sails, and ships were almost worn out, and their owners disheartened 
for want of commissions, so that the better sort daily came on 
shore to settle, and the seamen who will never settle began to 
dispose themselves on merchant voyages, and would much more 
willingly on his Majesty's ships were they in these seas, two or 
three of which will be needed, if the peace proceed, to secure the 
island against those rovers who will be always found in these 
parts by reason of the great conveniences they have in the 
Spaniards unpeopled countries, so that in one year longer they 
would have been very considerably reduced had not these unex- 
pected provocations enforced his Majesty's authority here to provide 
for the security of this island by their best expedient. That by 
the same means when the peace is concluded, which Modyford 
can but faintly hope for, namely, denying them commissions only, 
these men may be in some reasonable time diverted from that 
course which has hitherto been their sole support, is his humble 
advice ; other more violent ways will but make them in despair 
or revenge join with foreign nations or set up for themselves, 
which course had Modyford followed they would now be enemies 
or at best not friends, and he should have dearly repented the 
want of that assistance, security, and reputation we now gain by 
them. Could the Council of Spain be well informed of their want 
of men to defend their large possessions in these parts, they would 
conclude themselves incapable of destroying Jamaica and make 
peace ; but they are borne up with false measures of their strength 
and have plunged themselves into this war, and so slight the 
application of Sir W. Godolphin ; but a little more suffering will 
inform them of their condition and force them to capitulations 
more suitable to the sociableness of man's nature. Cannot too 
much celebrate his Majesty's care in erecting a particular Council 
for these West India Plantations ; for whose information he will 
contribute his whole talent by the next, and also endeavour to 
send a survey of the island, which was so thinly inhabited till 
the end of the Dutch war that he was both afraid and ashamed 
to send it, lest it might fall into the enemy's hands ; but now 
they are so well as it matters not if it were printed. Has charged 
the Admiral to send him an account of his strength, and from 
time to time of his motions and intentions, which shall be remitted 
to his Lordship by the first occasion. Cannot conclude till he 
represents how great his distractions were at the frequent advices 
of his Lordship's displeasure, and what the effects were like to 
be, and how much he is overjoyed at this glimpse of the return 
of his favour. 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 55.] 

F 2 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670. 
Aug. 20. 

Jamaica. 

Aug. 23. 

Parham. 



Aug. 25. 
Port Eojai. 



Aug. 31. 

St. Jago de 
la Vega. 



Sept. 1. 



238. Copy of preceding letter. [Col. Entry Bk, No. 27, pp. 51- 
53.] 

239. Minutes of Council of Antigua. Present, Capt. Saml. 
Winthrop, Lt.-Col. Sebastian Bayer, and Serjt.-Major Nathaniel 
Clerke. Ordered, that Jno. Vcrnon, clerk in the secretary's office, 
deliver up all the records to Jno. Parry and George Gowes, 
appointed clerks to the Council, on the decease of Capt. Francis 
St. John, late secretary ; and tKat seeing there is no ordained 
minister on this island, each justice of the peace may join in 
matrimony any persons whose names three several weeks have 
been set to public view in the secretary's office. \ p. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXV., No. 55*.] 

240. Edward Stanton to Col. Thos. Lynch. All his friends 
here are well except Capt. Brown who has been for some time 
very ill. Rivera had lately a design to attempt Port Morant, at 
least Lynch's plantation, which he intended to burn in the night 
and take the negroes, but meeting with a Frenchman, is gone to 
St. Jago; this design was learnt from English prisoners brought 
away by the Frenchman, and that 42 Spanish negroes from 
Jamaica have got safe to Cuba. Our fleet, though gone out, will 
not be ready for their design for two months, and then he hopes 
will meet with Rivera, who they say is afraid of the very shadow 
of a ship. Capt. Atkins is lately dead. Our " Mompose fleet " some 
few leagues from the town were ambushed and lost several men 
and forced to return to their ships. Hears the fleet will consist 
of 27 sail, French and English, and about 1,500 men. To Car- 
thagena the word. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 56.] 

241. Minutes of the Council of Jamaica. Capt. Hender Moles- 
worth sworn one of his Majesty's Council. Ordered, because of the 
great " dryeth " whereby the cocoa trees have been in most places 
blasted, the indigo starved in the ground, and the canes yield far 
less than formerly, and also because of the war with the Spaniard, 
that the Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas, excepting only the 
Judges of Port Royal, adjourn their respective courts until January 
next. Order for settling the bounds of several parishes on the 
north side of this island. 3 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 34, pp. 201- 
203.] 

242. Order of the Governor and Council of Jamaica. Whereas 
the people called Quakers living at Port Royal have given several 
reasons why they cannot against their consciences bear arms, by 
which they seem very obstinate in that matter, which reasons are 
looked upon as weak and frivolous and dangerous and destructive 
to all government, yet out of compassion and pity to those poor 
misled people, and out of respect to the gentlemen and merchants 
living in that town, who by a late order of court-martial are ordered 
to guard every night in person, it is hereby ordered that such 
person who pays three able and sufficient soldiers shall be excused 
from his personal watching, otherwise said order of court-martial 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



85 



1670. 



Sept. T V 

London. 



Sept. T V 

London. 



Sept. ? 



Shaftcsbury 
Papers. 



to be put in execution, as also the statute for regulating the militia 
and against those who have not constantly in their houses the 
quantity of powder and ball, arms and other necessaries therein 
appointed. 2 pp. [Col. Entry Sk., No. 34, pp. 203-205.] 

243. Memorial of the French Ambassador Colbert concerning 
American commerce. Has received orders to assure the King of 
England that in the execution of the edict of 10th June last 
concerning the commerce of America nothing shall be done contrary 
to the good intelligence his most Christian Majesty will maintain 
with the King of England ; and that English ships shall receive 
in all places under his Majesty's obedience all the good treatment 
they receive from the English themselves, on condition that they 
shall not trade in the islands of America. Besides the orders 
already sent to De Baas, his Christian Majesty's Lieut.-General, letters 
have again been written to him ; but as complaints are often 
received from thence of the small assistance and even ill-treatment 
of the French by the English, the French Ambassador desires the 
King to renew his orders to his commanders in Jamaica, Barbadoes, 
and other islands and places in America, to assist the French as 
much as they can, to maintain good correspondence with his 
Christian Majesty's commanders, and compose all petty differences 
between the two nations, leaving the decision to the two Kings 
where they cannot agree. Endorsed, Read at the Foreign Com- 
mittee, 10th Sept. 1670. French. 2^ pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XXV., 
No. 57.] 

244. English translation of the preceding. Endorsed, Received 
from Mr. Bridgman, 16 Sept. 1670. 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., 
No. 58.] 

245. Governor Sayle and Council at Ashley River to the Lords 
Proprietors of Carolina. Since writing their former letter by way 
of Virginia they have sent to demand the captain of the sloop 
and the rest of their men detained by the Spaniards, and gave 
strict orders to those who were sent not to trust themselves with 
the Spaniards, but some of them being deluded by the friars at 
Sta. Katharina went ashore, and so two more men are lost, Joseph 
Bailey and John Collins. Can get no answer either from the 
Governor of St. Augustine or the Friar, so desire their Lordships 
directions how to demean themselves in this matter. Two of the 
Council having acted in said embassy contrary to instructions, 
have been suspended from the council table. Have not above 
one month's provisions in the Colony, so are forced to send the 
sloop to the Summer Islands for provision to keep their people 
from perishing and to charge bills upon their Honours' agents at 
Barbadoes to pay sugar for the provisions taken up at the Summer 
Islands. Their necessities are so great that they must either do 
this or desert the settlement, which were a great pity, for Sayle 
is confident there was never a more hopeful design set on foot; 
he has been in several places, but never was in a sweeter climate 
than this. They have discovered abundance of good land, and believe 



86 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670. 



Sept. 9. 

Albemarle 
Point. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



there is good land enough for millions of people to live and work 
on. There is nothing planted but thrives very well ; some flax 
sowed thrives very well ; good wine, tobacco, silk, and all sorts 
of English grain and manufactures may be plentifully produced, 
and Gov. Sayle conceives the land will bear sugar canes. In 
10 or 12 years doubtless their Honours may have return from 
hence suitable to their great expenses, therefore they beseech that 
they may employ the ships to fetch more people, that the design 
may not fall for want of an industrious management, which a little 
more expense will preserve. They use their utmost endeavours 
for the advancement of their Honours' interests, and have written 
to the Summer Islands and New England to gain what people 
they may to promote the design. Signed by William Sayle, Flor. 
O'Sullivan, Joseph West, Step. Bull, Paul Smyth, Ralph Marshall, 
Samuel West, and Jos. Dalton, secretary. Endorsed by John Locke. 
[Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 42.] 

246. Governor Sayle and Council to Anthony Lord Ashley and 
the rest of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina. For some time 
since the despatch of the Carolina from this place to Virginia 
and the sloop to Bermuda for provisions and supplies they have 
been put to purchase their maintenance from the Indians; party 
of Indians sent by the Spaniards against them near the river's 
mouth, who on the return of the Carolina fired upon Henry Brayne 
and his company although they showed him a white flag. Mounted 
their great guns and fortified and put themselves in a reasonable 
good posture to receive them, also sent out a party of friendly 
Indians to discover their camp, but the Spanish Indians had then 
retreated. The safe arrival of the Carolina with provisions for 
eight months has much encouraged the people ; so hope to defend 
their .Lordships' interests and their own rights till they receive 
further aid, which they very much stand in need of. Have 
despatched the Carolina to Barbadoes, where they understand is a 
considerable number of people ready to be shipped for this place, 
which will conduce much to their own safety and the ease of 
their people, who have been too much overprest with watching 
already. Have not lost above four people, who died from distempers 
usual in other parts. Supply of all sorts of stores wanted, especially 
clothing, as the winter is like to prove pretty sharp ; also 10 barrels 
of powder. Have received cows and hogs from Virginia, but at an 
immoderate rate, 30s. for a hog which might be bought in England 
for 10s. Suggest that a small stock be kept at Bermuda. The 
Bahama Islands being lately settled and as yet no patent, may 
be worth their Lordships' notice. In great want of an able minister, 
by whose means corrupted youth might be very much reclaimed, 
the people instructed, and the Sabbath and service of God not 
neglected. The Israelites' prosperity decayed when their prophets 
were wanting, for where the ark of God is there is peace and 
tranquillity. Pray the want thereof may never be known to their 
Lordships or this place. Signed by Wm. Sayle, Flor. O'Sullivan, 
Ste. Bull, Jos. West, Win. Scrivenor, Ralph Marshall, Paul Smyth, 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



87 



1670. 



Samuel West, and Jos. Dalton, secretary. 2 pp. Endorsed by 
John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 31.] 



[Sept. 9.] 247. Governor Sayle and Council at Ashley River to [Lord 
Ashley], Certify at his request that Joseph Dalton was elected 
one of the Council, and that in confidence of his abilities and 
integrity they have appointed him secretary and register for this 
Colony. For a continuance or any grant thereof they have directed 
him to his Lordship. Signed by William Sayle, Step. Bull, Joseph 
West, Will. Scrivenor, Flor. O'Sullivan, Ralph Marshall, and Samuel 
West. Endorsed by John Locke, " Council at Ashley River recom- 
mendation of J. Dalton to be secretary and register. 9 Sept. 70." 
[Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 29.] 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



Sept. 9. 

Alhemarle 

Point. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



248. Jos. Dalton to Anthony Lord Ashley, Chancellor of the 
Exchequer, at Whitehall. His Lordship has had a full account of 
the harbours, situations, and hopefulness of this place, which indeed 
deserves no other than an excellent commendation. The Colony is 
indeed safely settled and with a very propitious aspect, there only 
remains the preservation of it, which consists chiefly in two things, 
careful supplies and a wise politic government, which two diamonds 
he has borrowed for this structure from the ruins of other settlements 
of this nature of the English especially, who have been very 
unsuccessful of late, which he thinks might very easily have been 
prevented and a free disbursement of a penny in the morning 
have saved a pound at night. Recommends the employment of 
a ship of considerable burthen for three or four years to transport 
people and their goods to this place gratis, they finding their own 
provisions, and that there be a perfect store of all necessaries 
belonging to a new settlement till the people have a produce 
of their own ; hunger-starved infancy seldom produces strong 
maturity, consumptions may be reasonably prevented, but charge- 
ably recovered. Servants' apparel is chiefly wanted. Represents 
the charge that lies upon government in this place, chiefly in 
reference to the clandestine actions of the Spaniards, who "start 
blood with a prick at a thousand miles distance," the principal 
grudge of the Spaniards against them, according to the estimate 
of Hen. Woodward, our interpreter, who had a good opportunity 
during his confinement at St. Augustine to discover the truth. 
The people in very good plight, especially since provisions came 
from Virginia, but are unable to discharge their duties to the 
Lords Proprietors by these alarms, being more like soldiers in a 
garrison than planters ; advises a favourable mitigation of freight 
for their goods. Hears of the loss of the Port Royal upon the 
Bahama Islands, but the truth is not yet manifested. Absolute 
necessity of a speedy despatch of ships to this place ; his Lordship 
may know by a penny how a shilling is coined ; his desire is only 
to give a hint or be as a spark for a nobler flame. Begs his 
Lordship will pardon a pen stupefied with zeal for the prosperity 
of Carolina. The Governor and Council having conferred upon 
him the office of secretary and register for this Colony, he desires 



88 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670. 

he may be treated with the same favour as the first adventurers, 
being one of the first that set forward this design, and that as 
he has struggled through the worst, so may he have a small share 
of the better. Very little paper in the Colony, most of it being 
lost and damnified in the voyage. No provision being made for 
his office, there is not one book wherein to record anything, one of 
considerable bulk in folio especially wanted to register grants in. 
Freedom of trade for seven years should be published in England 
to invite planters. 2 pp. Endorsed by John Locke, [Shaftesbury 
Papers, Section IX., No. 30.] 

Sept. 9. 249. Entry of the preceding in "Carolina letter book." 
Shaftesbury [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 55, pp. 12, 14, 16, 18, 20.] 



Sept. 9. 

Albemarle 
Point. 



Sbaftesbury 
Papers. 



250. Flor. O'Sullivan to [Lord Ashley]. Wrote a particular 
account of all things by the Carolina by the way of Virginia, but 
is doubtful whether it came to his hands. The country proves 
good beyond expectation, abounding in all things, as good oak, 
ash, deer, turkeys, partridges, rabbits, turtle and fish, and the land 
produces anything that is put into it, they have tried it with corn, 
cotton, and tobacco and other provisions, which prove very well ; 
it is also stored with peaches, strawberries, and other pleasant 
fruits. They are settled at Key-awah, 20 leagues to the northward 
of Port Royal, which did not prove according to reports, and have 
built their town upon Albemarle Point, seated upon the river 
called by them Ashley River, where they are fortifying themselves. 
Has made several discoveries into the country, and cannot give a 
better character of it than it deserves. Are humbly thankful for 
store of provisions, for they were forced to live upon the Indians, 
who were very kind to them. Their ship about going to Barbadoes, 
from whence they expect more people and fresh supplies. Expect 
a ship from England with more people ; the Lords Proprietors 
would do well to grant a free passage to passengers for some 
time. Pray send us a minister qualified according to the Church 
of England. Hope the worst is past if their Lordships will stand 
by them. Instructions should be sent to lay out the land to the 
people as it lies, that the good and the bad may go together, by 
which means people will not inhabit at a distance. Account of 
the taking of Mr. Rivers and others by the Spaniards at Sta. 
Katherina, where they still remain. Sir John Yeamans left them 
at Bermuda, where was taken one Col. Sayle for Governor. 
O'Sullivan procured there 20Z. in provisions, which assisted the 
people very much. Is sorry to give account of the loss of the 
Port Royal upon the Bahama Islands, all being lost but the master 
and two or three men. Desires his Lordship to order the Governor 
and Council what he is to have for salary, for according to their 
proposals he is not able to live; the country is troublesome to 
survey, and 107 is little enough for a thousand, which is all he 
desires. Complains of Capt. Brayne for refusing to carry pipe 
staves to Barbadoes for him. Desires Lord Craven would appoint 
Ralph Marshall one of the Council, his deputy, Mr. Bowman having 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



89 



1670. 



Sept. 9. 

Shaftesbury 
Papers. 

Sept. ? 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



left them in Ireland. Endorsed by John Locke. {Shaftesbury 
Papers, Section IX., No. 34.] 

251. Entry of the preceding in " Carolina Letter Book." 
[Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 55, pp. 20, 22, 24.] 

252. Note [in the handwriting of John Locke] of provisions 
at Ashley River. 140 men had seven weeks provisions from 
25th June, which is to the middle of August. At Barbados are 
thirty barrels of 200 bushels of flour and twenty barrels of about 
4,500 Ibs. of beef, which is provision for 140 men 90 days more, 
which is to the middle of November. The Carolina had from 
Virginia the produce of a cargo of 270?. ; what that is I cannot 
tell, but if we are not cheated cannot be less than six months, which 
is to the middle of May. Besides all this they have crop, which 
if it produce according to Virginia will at least 1,000 bushels of 
Indian corn, besides roots and beans, which crop I judge was ripe 
by the middle of August. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., 
No. 28.] 

253. Governor Sayle to Lord Ashley. Sends a relation of the 
country of which his honour has the happiness to be a Proprietor ; 
a more healthful, fruitful, and pleasant place the world doth not 
afford. Beseeches him to be mindful in sending supplies and more 
people to strengthen them against their enemies, for the Spaniard 
watcheth only for an opportunity to destroy them ; also a pink 
of about 80 tons, for one vessel is not sufficient to attend them. 
Refers to their general letter for a more particular account. 1 p. 
Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 32.] 

Sept. 10. 254. Entry of the preceding in the " Carolina Letter Book 
belonging to the Earl of Shaftesbury." [Shaftesbury Papers, 
Section IX., No. 55, p. 8.] 



Sept. 10. 

Albemarlc 
Point. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



255. " Mr. Cartaret s relation of their planting at Ashley River." 
Sailing from Bermuda 26th February, they came up with the land 
between Cape Romana and Port Royal, and in 17 days the long- 
boat went ashore ; friendliness of the natives, who made signs 
where they should best land and stroked them on their shoulders 
saying " Bony conraro Angles," gave them brass rings and tobacco. 
Brought the ship next day to anchor in a handsome channel. 
The Governor, whom they took in at Bermuda, with several others 
went ashore to view the land some three leagues distance. Carried 
ashore by the Indians, who gave them the stroking compliments 
of the country and brought deer skins to trade with, for which 
they gladly took knives, beads, and tobacco ; food made by the 
women, " a pretty sort of bread," and hickory nuts, a walnut in 
shape, brought by them. Came to the hut palace of his Majesty 
of the place, who took the Governor on his shoulders and carried 
him into the house in token of his cheerful entertainment, where 
they had nuts and root cakes and water, for they use no other 
liquor. While there the King's three daughters entered the palace, 
all in new robes of new moss, which they are never beholden to 



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Sept. 12. 

Albemarle 
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Papers. 



the tailor to trim up, with plenty of beads of divers colours about 
their necks. Could not imagine that the savages could so well 
deport themselves, coming in according to their age, saluting the 
strangers and stroaking them. Understanding their business to 
St. Helena, these Indians told them the Westoes were a ranging 

O O 

sort of people reputed to be man-eaters, and had ruinated that 
place, killing the Indians and destroying their habitations, and that 
they had done the like at Keyawah, the Casseeka of which place 
was within one sleep (24 hours) of them. Leaving that place 
called Sowee, and carrying the Casseeka of Keyawah with them, a 
very ingenious Indian and a great linguist, they sailed to the south- 
ward of Port Royal and entered the river (the opening of which 
did not appear to them as Col. Sandford related). Explorations and 
soundings. Cannot say much of the channel, being but a landsman, 
but the Governor, Capt. Brayne, and himself (Mr. Carterett) took 
the longboat upon discovery, of which Capt. Brayne will give a 
more perfect account than he can ; a small kind of whale plentiful 
in this river, some say of the sperm kind. Weighed from Port 
Royal river and ran in between St. Helena and Combohe, where 
they lay at anchor. Gladly received by the Indians, who hoped to 
be protected from the Westoes and brought venison and skins for 
trade ; fertility of the land at St. Helena, where was a mile and a 
half of clear land ready to plant. Oysters in great plenty, though 
not so pleasant to the taste as your Wallfleet oyster ; also wild 
turkeys far bigger than our tame ones. The sloop bought at 
Bermuda was despatched to Keyawah to view that land so much 
commended by the Casseeka, and brought back a report that the 
land was more fit to plant in than at St. Helena, which begot a 
question whether to remove thither, the Governor adhering to 
Keyawah and most being of a temper to follow, though they knew 
no reason for it, imitated the rule of the inconsiderate multitude 
and cried out for Keyawah, yet some dissented ; thus we came to 
Keyawah, where the land is as much as one as at St. Helena. 
4 pp. Endorsed as above by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, 
Section IX , No. 23.] 

256. Governor Sayle and Council to Lord Ashley and the rest of 
the Lords Proprietors of Carolina. Cannot omit to lay before them 
the difficulties which Dr. Woodward [hath met with] from the 
first discovery of these parts, and of the settlement here, with he 
great use he stands us in at present. The great love and courtesy 
with which he is treated by the Indians, how he was surprised 
by the Spaniard at St. Helena and taken prisoner to St. Augustine, 
which being surprised by Serle, Woodward was carried to the 
Leeward Isles, where he shipped surgeon of a privateer, but was 
cast away 17th August 1669 in a hurricane at Nevis, where, we 
happening to touch, Woodward manifested his ready inclination to 
promote their Lordship's service in this expedition. By constant 
travelling and enquiry amongst the natives, who are greatly affected 
towards him, he is able to give a more exact account of the dis- 
covery of several places and rivers than ever they heard before. 



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Sept. 

Albenaarle 

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Keyawah. 



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Sept. 

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He has lately been fourteen days' journey westward as far as the 
fruitful country of Chafytachyque, the Emperor, who highly ap- 
proved a true league and friendship with the English, and sent 
presents by the doctor on his return, and is himself expected in 
person in forty days. The doctor hath been lately very useful in 
dealing with the Indians for supplies, and would have embarked 
this time for England but that they cannot well dispense with his 
absence from the Colony because of his familiar acquaintance 
amongst the natives, and his knowledge of their language. Signed 
by William Sayle, Joseph West, Will. Scrivenor, FJor. O'Sullivan, 
Ralph Marshall, and Jos. Dalton, secretary. 1 p. Endorsed by 
John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 36.] 

257. Joseph West to Lord Ashley at Little' Exeter House in the 
Strand. Refers to his last of 27 June [see ante, No. 203.] Has heard 
nothing as yet of their men who went to Sta. Katherina to look 
for his Lordship's kinsman, Mr. Rivers, and the rest of the men 
detained there by the Spaniards. Have oftentimes been alarmed 
by them, and by Indians, who were within 12 miles of our settle- 
ment when the ship came from Virginia on 23rd August, but the 
noise of their great guns struck such a terror upon the Indians that 
the Spaniards could not persuade them to come upon the settle- 
ment. Provisions and live cattle brought by the ship from 
Virginia. They have not yet taken up any land but what joins 
the town, and. that at 10 acres per head, because they will not 
separate before more people come. Mr. Brayne says many people 
are in readiness to come from Barbadoes, so a ship has been des- 
patched thence so as to be here again before the winter. They 
have already well fortified themselves. The people continue very 
well in health and the country seems to be very healthful, and 
delightsome, and corn and other things planted at their first coming 
thrive very well, only the garden seeds, which were not good, but 
believes the ground will bear anything that is put in it, and that it 
is as hopeful a design as ever was put on foot. Our Governor is 
very aged, and hath much lost himself in his government, and 
would have caused a Parliament amongst them altho' they could 
not make 20 freemen in the Colony besides the Council, and had 
made an order for it had not they who were Deputies and some 
few of the Council vigorously withstood it. Doubts he will not be 
so advantageous to a new Colony as they did expect. Hopes his 
Lordship will send him new instructions for the disposal of the 
Proprietors stores, for the Governor says that those signed by his 
Lordship and Sir Peter Colleton are not sufficient. Has sent to 
Sir Peter for a present supply of stores ; they are grown short in 
many things, which he hopes will be sent in the spring. Has 
taken four servants into his Lordship's service, belonging to Capt. 
Bayley, and shall keep them and Maj. Hainbleton's until further 
orders. Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section 
IX., No. 38.] 

258. Entry of the proceeding in the " Carolina Letter Book." 
[SJiaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 55, pp. 10, 11.] 



92 



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1670. 
Sept. 12. 

Albemarle 
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Papers. 



Sept. 12. 

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Papers. 



259. Stephen Bull to " the Lord Ashley Cooper at Exeter House 
with my duty present." Sent in his last letter a full relation of 
their voyage from Bermuda and what was discovered at Port Royal 
and this place, with such reasons as he could obtain from the 
Governor for deserting Port Royal, which, in the judgment of Bull 
and several other gentlemen, was very much inviting for a settle- 
ment and admirable good land. This place is very good land, and 
with his honour's encouragement in sending ships and supplies 
during their infancy, there is no question to be made but that it is 
likely to be one of the best settlements in the Indies. Recommends 
the granting a free passage for a year or two to persons coming 
from Barbadoes and the Leeward Isles, they would then in a short 
time be well peopled. The country is fit for any produce, and 
everything planted thrives beyond expectation. He brought hither 
orange and lemon trees, also lime, pomegranate, and fig trees, and 
plaintains, and they thrive and flourish very bravely. This is as 
healthful a place as ever was settled, but four persons lost, and 
they in a declining condition before they landed. They have lately 
taken up in a semi-circle about the town 10 acres a head, and have 
chosen in this river above and below the town their great lots. 
There is land sufficient here for some thousands of people, where 
they may make very brave and happy settlements. Scarcity of 
provisions when the Carolina sailed for Virginia in May last, not 
above two months' provisions at a pint of peas a man per diem ; 
received great assistance from the Indians, who sold them provisions 
at very reasonable rates, and taking notice of their necessities, 
brought them daily one thing or another ; they seem to be very 
well pleased at our settling here, expecting protection from other 
sort of Indians called the Westoes, which has been promised. Dr. 
Woodward has travelled 10 days up into the Main to see the 
Emperor of this part of the Indians, who made him very welcome, 
and sent down skins to our Governor, and made a firm league of 
friendship and that he would visit us in 10 days. About 200 
Spaniards and 300 Indians from about St. Augustine came within 
six miles of us, but the Carolina frigate arriving, they withdrew 
their camp and marched home after some 30 in ambuscade had 
fired at Capt. Brayne, who received no hurt. In their camp was 
found a vizor representing an Indian, which it is conceived was to 
keep some Englishman with them undiscovered. The Governor ill 
with feaver and ague, and being aged, his recovery is very much 
feared ; he hath acted or endeavoured to act several things which 
have not been altogether agreeable to the concessions, but it is 
rather imputed to self will and weakness than to any other design 
or his own interest. Complaints against Capt. O'Sullivan, a very 
dissentious troublesome man in all particulars and exacts strangely 
for fees. Mr. Rivers having been taken by the Spaniard, and his 
employment void, would be glad to serve in the same capacity. 
Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., 
No. 35.] 

260. Entry of the preceding in " Carolina Letter Book." [Shaftes- 
bury Papers, Section IX., No. 55, pp. 26-34,] 



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lat. 31, 
45 min. 

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1670. 

Sept. 15. 261. William Owen to Lord Ashley. Although something to the 
Ashley River, northward of Port Royal, considers they have made choice for the 
better, having pitched upon a point defended by the main river with 
a creek on one side and inaccessible marsh on the other which at 
high tides is overflown, this is now pallisaded and with a very small 
charge might be made impregnable. Thinks he shall not very much 
err in saying that a good inlet, a healthy country, security and 
seasonable supplies perform a settlement. Healthiness of the climate, 
only one dead from England and he of a lingering and consump- 
tive distemper. The great point in this design is security for they 
are near a zealous and potent neighbour. The Spanish friars will 
never cease to promote their tragic ends by the Indians whom they 
instruct only to admire the Spanish nation and pay them adoration 
equal to a deity. These have the advantage of the Indian tongue 
and incline the Indians to do any thing and make war by these 
Indians upon those who disoblige them. Account of St. Augustine 
which is but an impotent garrison with not above 200 soldiers. 
The great reverence the Spaniards exact from the Indians will in a 
very short time decline, for by conversing with our Indians they 
become more and more satisfied of the grandeur of the English and 
say we are stronger than the Spaniard which makes them not a 
little proud of our friendship. How the Friars get intelligence of 
our affairs and tamper with the Indians who gave information of an 
intention to destroy the English who thus were kept in arms ten 
days. The friendly Indians who came to their assistance; Is per- 
suaded that the^y might have mustered 1,000 Bowmen. Has seen 
one of their captains speak to his people half an hour with the 
greatest passion that could be, inveighing against the Spaniards and 
applauding the English for the axes, beads, and knives they had 
brought them and showing what massacre they would do if the 
English made use of them as scouts. Account of the attack of the 
Spanish Indians upon Captain Brayne on his return from Virginia 
in the Carolina who fired seven or eight guns at them, " and since 
we have not heard from them but our Indians tell us they are gone. 
This is the third affront the Spaniard offered us by Indians since 
they heard of us here." The Spaniard will say these are the actings 
of Banditti when it is his own contrivance. There are several for 
certain at St. Augustine who have commissions of reprisals for the 
damages done there by Captain Searle. If we had but 500 persons 
here the Friars would remove from the adjacent parts with all the 
speed they could. Wishes they well knew how to demean them- 
selves as they do not wish to infringe the strict league at home with 
the Spaniard. Account of Indian tribes, the Westoes they say are 
Man-eaters, of whom our Indians are more afraid than little children 
are of the Bull beggars in England. Expect the Emperor of 
Tatchequiha a very fruitful country, five days journey to the North- 
west, some of his people being already come, the Indian Dr. says 
where the Emperor lives the land is of a red mould, plenty of black 
and white marble and abundantly stored with mulberries, of which 
fruit they make cakes which Owen has tasted. This design well 
prosecuted will be as well profitable as honorable, Five hundred 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670. 



Sept. 15. 

Shaftesbury 
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more people would render them secure and five hundred more a 
perfect settlement without the least dread from Spain or Indian. 
Hopes his Lordship's care for supplies of necessaries for a short time 
will make them in some measure capable to stand upon their own 
legs, this country being fertile and of a wonderful growth Requests 
freight free of some goods and servants to be sent to him from 
England. Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section 
IX., No. 37.] 

262. Entry of the preceding in "Carolina Entry Bk." [Shaftes- 
bury Papers, Section IX., No. 55, pp. 36-54.] 



Sept. 16. 263. Grant to Peter Jennings of the Office of Attorney-General for 
Virginia during pleasure, with all fees, &c. (Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. 
II., Vol. 33, p. 48<.) 

Sept. 20. 264. Governor Sir Thos. Modyford to Sec. Lord Arlington. Since 
Jamaica, his last no public despatch has arrived. Has, in pursuance of his 
promise, sent three papers for the Council of Plantations, but thought 
it his duty first to put them in his Lordship's possession. The first 
informs, of his Majesty's increasing revenue here, and how it is 
exceeded by its necessary disbursements without reflections on the 
customs at home which the goods exported produce, resigning all 
considerations for the Governor's support to his Majesty's pleasure, 
The second, presents the means to increase the revenue, and that, 
with so little regret to the inhabitants, that it will come into his 
Majesty's coffers with as little noise as the high rents of the Crown 
lands do at home. The third imports the means for the speedy 
increase of people, which is the foundation of all, the causa sine 
qua non ; and therefore has been the larger and perhaps the bolder 
iu it, for these reasons : It is reported here and at home that this 
Island was to be sold to the Spaniard, or at least that there was a 
working to that purpose and therefore advised their factors not to 
plant for as one lately expressed it is not a place to live long or get 
an estate in as affairs now stand betwixt England and Spain ; they 
have further buzzed in the people's ears that his Majesty as Lord of 
this Island, may impose what taxes he pleases on the native com- 
modities before exportation, because it was conquered at the charge 
of the State and so no consent of the freeholders necessary but that 
we shall live under an arbitrary government which his Lordship well 
knows how much Englishmen abhor. To banish these apprehensions 
makes bold to pen the first proposition so full by which the chief 
and almost the only difficulties will be removed. Admittance of 
foreigners and liberty of conscience have been provided for in his 
instructions, and both are very needful and prevalent baits, especially 
the last to increase the number of his Majesty's subjects here. The 
rest carry their reasons with them. Was in hopes to have sent the 
Survey of this Island, with their numbers, and the Comodities the 
place produces, but the Receiver-General could not bring it to per- 
fection, for this, must beg his Lordship to expect it by the next. 
Had advice from Admiral Morgan the 12th inst. by Captain Heath 
that having sailed round this Island, he stood over to the Coast of 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 95 

1670. 

Cuba, where he left one ship to take a prisoner for intelligence, a 
storm separated 3 of his ships, so that he had but 7 when Heath 
met him : 3 good ships and a catch have since arrived at this port and 
dispatched themselves to him. Captain Bradley last week brought 
in a Quaker's vessel commanded by one Watson, which he recovered 
from a Spanish man-of-war 13 days after he had taken her, with 6 
sailors ; said Watson, 2 quaking preaching women, and the rest, the 
man-of-war carried into The Havana, chased by Bradley within shot 
of the Moro Castle. Incloses, 

264. i. Statement of the Revenue of the Island of Jamaica. Arising 
from a duty on wines, spirits, and beer, tonnage of shipping, 
licences to sell ale, quit rents, fines, and forfeitures, 
amounting to 1,870?., besides H.R.H. 10th and his Majesty 
15th in time of war, which have been but a small matter ; 
also of the necessary disbursements for support of the 
government, comprising 1,960?. for salaries, viz., 1,000?. to 
the Governor, 400?. to the Deputy Governor, 200?. to the 
Major-General, 80?. to the Chief Judge, and the rest for 
salaries of Assistant Judges, other officers, ammunition, and 
incidental expenses for the Fort, amounting to 3,473?. ICs. ; 
from which may be abated about 750?. for the sale of old 
powder, and 400?. for the office of Deputy Governor which 
is needless. Jamaica, 1670, August. 

264. II. Propositions how the Royal Revenue may be increased 
without considerably hindering the settlement. There was, 
by account taken last July, granted by patent 213,746 acres 
of land on which was reserved to his Majesty, one penny 
per acre of such as were under manurance, which rent, by 
the Governor's agreement with the Assembly, was not to 
be altered, till his Majesty thought fit to reserve a greater 
rent. Advises this may be done safely after 250,OUO acres 
are granted, which will be by the time these are at home. 
The Order to bear this sense ; Forasmuch as his Majesty is 
informed that his Island of Jamaica is now very con- 
siderably settled and the land very fruitful and passes 
from man to man for considerable prices ; his Majesty being 
willing to increase the Royal Revenue of the Island, the 
better to protect his subjects there, has thought fit to com- 
mand the Governor that after 250,000 acres of land are 
granted, he do not grant any more but on payment of 3d. 
per acre as a fine, and Id. rent per acre whether manured 
or not ; and after 250,000 acres have been granted under 
such fine and rent, then to grant no more but on payment 
of Gd. per acre fine, and 2d per acre rent, until 1,000,000 
acres be granted in the whole. Supposes it may be requi- 
site to moderate this order towards servants newly out of 
their time, slaves newly made free, and other poor indigent 
men, that take up but 5 to 30 acres, in regard such small 
plantations are the strength of the Island, the greatest 



96 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1670. 

producers of provisions, and ought to be encouraged. The 
next 250,000 acres will be taken up in two years and add 
to the revenue 1,041L 13s. 4d., besides the fine which will 
amount to 3,125Z. ; and is confident if no wars hinder, in 
three years after the other 500,000 may be granted away, 
which will make the yearly Revenue more by 5,1661. 13s. 4d , 
besides the 6d. fine of 15,499. 19s. ; after this his Majesty 
may make what he pleases of the remaining six millions of 
acres. 

264. in. Propositions for the speedy settling of Jamaica. That his 
Majesty by Proclamation declare this Island to belong to 
the Crown of England ; that he holds himself obliged to 
protect his subjects there, as amply as in any other his 
Dominions; and that neither he nor his successors will 
impose any tax or other charge upon them, without the 
consent of the Freeholders. That his Majesty's authority 
there may admit any persons of what nations soever to 
settle, and naturalise them for that Island only. That bis 
Majesty will continue the allowance of Liberty of con- 
science and a free exercise of Eeligion to all persons. 
These being granted, the goodness of the soil is now so well 
known, that there will need no other c invitation. That 
all prudential means be used to encourage the Scots to 
come hither, as being very good servants, and to prevent 
them from going to Poland and other nations. That they 
may have license gratis or at moderate rates to trade for 
negroes in Africa. " Did those Honorable persons, which 
make that Royal Company so glorious, but fall into con- 
siderations, how much more it is his Majesty's interest to 
increase the number of his subjects than bullion of Gold or 
Silver (which by law all nations may import) they would 
not only freely consent to this proposal for us, but for the 
whole nation and foreigners also ; mankind is the principal, 
gold the accessory, increase the first considerably and the 
other must follow." From 24 years' experience Governor 
Modyford affirms, that Barbadoes had never risen to its 
late perfection, had it not been lawful for Dutch, Ham- 
burghers, our own whole nation and any other to bring 
and sell them Blacks or any other servants in their infancy. 
That they may have a coin allowed, by a mint set up either 
there or in England, or may be permitted to export to 
Jamaica, 'as much English coin as they import bullion. 
" This the jealous Spaniard allows in the Indies as essen- 
tially necessary to their traffic, though in most other things 
he be austerely reserved to his no small prejudice." 
Lastly. That the Laws made by the Assembly, long since 
sent home for the Royal assent, be returned confirmed 
under the Great Seal, or so many of them as his Majesty 
shall approve. Together 7 pp. {Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., 
Nos. 59, 59 i., IL, nr.J 



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1670. 
Sept. 20. 

Jamaica. 



Sept. 20. 

Jamaica. 



1670? 



Sept. 22. 



265. Governor Sir Thos. Modyford to Sec. Lord Arlington. Copy 
of preceding letter and also of the three enclosures to same. [Col. 
Entry Bk, No. 27, pp. 54-60.] 

266. Extract from the above letter of Sir Thos. Modyford that 
the merchants have buzzed in the people's ears that the King may 
impose what taxes he pleases. Also copies and extracts from 
inclosures to same. Endorsed by Williamson, Kec. from Sir 
Thos. Modyford. Together 5 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., Nos, 
61-63.] 

267. An Act for Naturalization. Be it enacted by his Excellency 
the Governor of this H.M. island and the Assembly, that it shall be 
lawful for any Governor of this island, by public instrument under 
the broad seal, to declare any foreigner settled in this island, who 
shall take the Oath of Allegiance, or otherwise give security thereof, 
to be fully naturalized, as if born within his Majesty's Dominions. 
And the Governor shall receive for the same 10?., and his clerk for 
writing it 10s. and no more. And whereas several aliens have 
patented or purchased lands, houses, &c., and afterwards sold the 
same to his Majesty's liege people ; it is enacted that all who have 
so bought of aliens, shall be confirmed in the peaceable possession 
of said purchases. Endorsed by Williamson, " Jamaica." 2 pp. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 60.] 

268. Petition of divers planters and merchants trading to the 
Leeward Isles to the Council for Foreign Plantations. That 
said Islands are one hundred leagues to leeward of Barbadoes and 
producing better indigo and sugar, their trade is so much to the 
disadvantage of Barbadoes, that the inhabitants thereof rather wish 
that said islands were displanted, than that they should contribute 
to their safety and prosperity, as may appear by their delay in re- 
establishing St. Christopher's. Wherefore petitioners pray that a 
Governor of said islands be constituted under his Majesty, and not 
subordinate to the Governor of Barbadoes ; nothing doubting that 
said islands will he enabled not only to defend themselves, but 
to help even Barbadoes itself. And further that the English and 
their negroes who are to be removed from Surinam, may be sent to 
St. Christopher's to plant ; which will be a great security to his 
Majesty's people there against the French, who are very powerful 
and unneighfcourly in that island. Signed by Geo. Gamiell, Wm. 
Burt, Geo. Hill, Win. Sewster, H. Lawrence, Win. Baxter, Hen. Bale, 
and Val. Austin. Annexed, 

268. i. Report of the Council for Foreign Plantations to the King 
on above petition. Have called before them divers planters 
and merchants belonging to Barbadoes, as well the petitioners 
as Lord Willoughby, and heard the reasons and objections on 
all sides. Are of opinion that it would be for his Majesty's 
service that there were a Go vernor-in- Chief over said islands, 
not subordinate to the Governor of Barbadoes for the annexed 

268. n. Reasons, because ; 1, the French are seated upon part 
of St. Christopher's, and have much increased the number of 
their people and their forces, trade, and plantations there 



U 51912. 



98 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1C70. 

and in the neighbouring islands : 2. Because St. Christopher's 
lying 100 leagues north-west from Barbadoes, the wind com- 
monly blowing east, north-east, or south-east, and there 
setting a great current westwards, the passage to Barbadoes is 
uncertain, sometimes in 7 or 8 days, but for the most part in 
as many weeks ; and on a sudden attack, any of the islands 
may be lost, before relief could come from Barbadoes, or indeed 
notice be given of danger : 3. Because it was found most 
agreeable to the desires of the planters and inhabitants of the 
Leeward Isles. Together 3 pp, [Col. Entry Bk., Xo. 45, pp. 
1-3.] 

[Sept. 22.] 269. Copy of the above petition of planters and merchants 
trading to the Leeward Isles, received and read in Council 
^2nd Sept. 1670. Annexed, 

269. i. Reasons why the petitioners desire there may be a General 
commissionated over them not subordinate to the Barbadoes. 
The Council and Assembly being all planters there, it is to 
their interest that the Caribbee Islands be destroyed, and 
petitioners can prove that several have wished these islands 
sunk, declaring it would be better for them. How then can 
said islands upon invasion expect any relief from Bar- 
badoes, who already wish their ruin, as appears by their 
late delay in re-establishing St. Christopher's. Besides 
Lord Willoughby has detained for the use of Barbadoes 
10 barrels of powder and two guns procured of his Majesty 
for the defence of Nevis, and has not sent a good propor- 
tion of ammunition as commanded by his Majesty. That 
the great distance from Barbadoes will not admit of her 
assisting these islands at a juncture which cannot possibly 
be gained in less than five or six weeks, in which time 
they might be overrun. St. Christopher's afl^r the French 
bad taken it might have been regained if assistance had 
appeared within a reasonable time. That insolencies 
lately committed by the French are unavoidable, without 
a General in chief to take care of these islands, who is 
very necessary for the future safety of the same. Read 
in Council 27th Sept 1670. [Coi Entoy Bk., No. 94, 
pp. 4-5.] 

Sept 23. 270. GOT. Sir Thos. Modyford to Sec. Lord Arlington. Has 
Jamaica. recovered the promised Survey, &c., by the extraordinary diligence 
of his Majesty's Receiver-General. Could wish it were more perfect, 
but hopes betwixt this and March to reduce it to a more certainty. 
His Majesty will find great quantities of land granted to some 
persons, among whom his son, 6,000 acres granted, whose name he 
made use of for himself, having about 400 (si) persons in his 
family, and so but half their due ; 5,000 to Capt Noy, waste land 
by the sea side, mostly covered with salt water, where is a very 
hopeful work begun for salt, &c. ; and 3,200 to one Styles, who 
never had hands proportionable, nor will, as Modyford judges, but 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



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1670. 



who within a year of the Governor's coming made oath that his 
Majesty had granted him a Privy Seal for that quantity, which he 
had lost by the way ; desires his Lordship to direct Modyford's son 
to search the Privy Seal Office, whether there be any such grant. 
As to the rest, the proportion of hands is not wanting, and on the 
whole grants added together hi.s Lordship will find double the 
number. Encloses, 



THE SURVEY OF THE ISLAND OF JAMAICA. 
ST. THOMAS'S PARISH. 






Acres. 





Acres. 





Acres. 


Thomas Amor - 


10 


Uobt. Fargassou 


24 


Rice Prosser 


38 


Southwell Atkins 


1,070 


James Gosling - 


800 


John Putnam - 


200 


Charles Burnett 


90 


Thomas Groves 


238 


Dearmon Regaine 


145 


John Bassett - 


78 


John Hooper - 


140 


More 


40 


Thomas Booth - 


12 


John Hunt 


180 


George Robbius 


12 


William Basnett 


60 


Thomas Hudson 


390 


Thomas Reese - 


60 


Capt. Thomas Browne - 


1,060 


More 


120 


Clement Richardson 


846 


Joseph Barger - 


11 


David Jones 


70 


William Richardson 


10 


Francis Butterfield 


30 


Thomas Johnson 


350 


John Stokes 


25 


Samuel Backs, Esq. 


200 


Widow Lawrence 


73 


John Stevenson 


211 


Christopher Cooper 


690 


Henry Luptou 


400 


Edmond Sweet 


140 


Caesar Carter - 


60 


John Lucy 


92 


Thomas Stacey - 


120 


Gawell Crouch - 


100 


Richard Lay ton 


I'O 


James Scott 


17 


Thomas Carpenter 


6 


Nicholas License 


264 


Thomas Steward 


60 


John Clarke 


90 


Samuel Lewis, Esq. 


880 


John Stephens - 


60 


Josiah Child and Mate - 


1,330 


Edward Madox 


30 


John Salisbury 


150 


John Davenport 


340 


Thomas Manning 


125 


Walter Tresias - 


120 


Francis Davis - 


120 


Daniel Pearse - 


8 


Tobias Wilson - 


f.O 


Thumas Evans - 


215 


Charles Probert 


04 


Thomas Wiltshire 


12-2 


Stephen Kvans - 


330 


Thomas Paulhill 


700 


John Wallis and Boucher 


150 


Col. Thomas Freeman - 


1,309? 











In this parish are families - 



- 59 



And by estimation people 



- 590 



ST. DAVID'S PARISH. 



Nicholas Alexar-di-r 

Kobert Avery - 

Thomas Bend - 

Kdmuul Bates - 

John Burton 

John Banfu-ld - 

John Campion - 

.More - 

Cornelius Cole - 

Henry Cole 

William Davis - 

Thomas Evans and 
Mate- 

George Elkin and Petty 

Edward Elliot and 
Pearse 

Francis Fouracers 

Lieut.-Col. Robert Free- 
man - 

Col. Thomas Freeman - 

Edward Fox - 

Thomas Fargar 

Richard Gwiunell 

Morgan George 



760 
30 
80 
49 

150 
60 
90 
13 
90 
30 

150 

160 
563 

80 
160 

1,338=| 
440 

90 
345 
140 

30 



Thomas Griffin - 

Matthew Halpin 

John Harris 

Thomas Harry - 

George Hooke - 

Henry Henderson 

John Hobby and 
Alexander 

John Hobby 

George Hunt - 

John Hutchins - 

Samuel Hancock 

John James and Mate - 

Edward Jackson 

Peter Jacob 

John Gerrard and 
Jourden 

John Lamstead 

Major Richard Lloyd - 

Major Lloyd and Bur- 
ton - 

Bryan Mascall, and 
Sylvester 

Matthew Oliver 



15 
60 
60 
120 
90 
30 

82 
1-26 
45 
30 
60 
70 
30 
30 

30 

30 

1,370 

294 

54 
30 



Luke Phillips - 
Henry Poores - 
John Price 
Francis Powell 
Richard Pt-arce and 

Elliott 

Matthew Price - 
William Powell 
Robert Puncher 
William Ring - 
William Rives, Esq. 
Walter Roles - 
Richard Richardson, 

Esq. - 
Richard Richardson and 

Mate- 

Edward Reid - 
Thomas Reid - 
James Rogers - 
Clement Richardson 
Thomas Ransdon 
Robert Scubbs and Mate 
Jacob Stokes - 
Jacob Stokes and Smith 

G 2 



150 
40 

140 
17 

90 
60 

so 

60 

:<* 

210 
40 

1,034 

152 
30 

150 
30 
58 

130 
66 

640 
1 



100 

1670. 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 






Acres. 





Acres. 





Acres. 


William Sheldrake 
Benjamin Smith 
Robert Smith - 


35 
60 
374 


Robert Thompson 
Stephen Valley 
Thomas Whittle 


30 
55 
60 


Robert Woddard 
William Witch 
John Wilson and Wil- 


60 
30 


Major John Saunderson 
Thomas Swaine 
John Terry 
Jenkin Thomas 


44 
60 

58 


William Wolfe 
Henry Winkes and 
Mate 
James Wallis - 


30 

65 
30 


liam Parker - 
John White and Elkins 
John Wimble and Sea- 
more 


30 
30 

152 


Charles Thomas 


30 











In this parish are families - 



John Andrewes 

Henry Archboule, Esq. 

Thomas Aldworth 

John Akin 

John Bonnett - 

Ed-ward Bussell 

Robert Bull 

Charles Benway 

Doctor Richard Brian - 

John Barrett and Mates 

Nicholas Barrett and 
Mate- 

Edward Berry - 

Capt. Samuel Barry 

Major William Buston - 

Titus Boreman - 

John Browning 

Widow Backhouse 

James Barry 

James Boney - 

More 

William Eurt - 

George Bennett 

Nicholas Butler and 
Mate 

John Baugh 

Francis Bussell and 
Smith 

Henry Bowen and Mate 

Thomas Butler 

Phillip Botterill 

Henry Banfield 

John Burdis and Mate - 

William Bent and Henry 
Bonner 

George Blundall 

John Belfield - 

Jasper Blanch - 

John Cor.per 

Samuel Conyers 

Thomas Cater - 

Matthew Cotton 

Joseph Casteele 

Richard Collinwood 

Ancill Cole 

John Cooke 

Capt. Thomas Clarke - 

John Cape and West- 
bury - 

Markham Clouds 

Anthony Collier 

Thomas Brewer 



80. 



And by estimation persons - 



- 9CO 



ST. ANDREW'S PARISH. 


4 


John Cahauue and Mate 


11 


2,030 


George Campe - 


91 


5 


William Capon 


6 


71 

' 2 


John Clove 


20 


5 


Edmond de la Crez 


660 


11 


William Davison 


240 


34 


Nicholas de la Roch 


6 


30 


Richard Dunn - 


60 


351 


Henry Dawkins 


15 


90 


Robert Davis and Mor- 






gan - 


200 


20 


Francis Dauiell 


33^ 


279 


Edward Exceceune 


17 


400 


John Edwards and Mate 


56 


878 


George Ecclestone 


14 


78 


William Elder - 


96 


22 


Thomas Edmonds 


70 


28 


Richard Feilder 


100 


27 


Jeremiah Fowler 


63 


50 


Morris Fleyne - 


42 


12 


Henry Ford 


100 


110 


Thomas Flood - 


3 


234 


William Ford - 


210 




Jenkin Lloyd - 


7 


34 


Mary Fisher 


7 \ 


11 


William Groves 


15 




Luke Grose 


28 


60 


Charles Griffin - 


9 


84 


James Grimes - 


7-i 


31 


Sampson George 


40~ 


22 


Robert Galloway 


9| 


21 


Widow Gay 


74 


23 


John Garrett - 


8- 




Daniel Garviu - 


2J 


800 


Nathaniell Guy 


190" 


15 


Morgan Hopkins 


19 


369 


William Hazard 


11 


6 


Charles Hudson 


44 


512 


Lieut. - Coll. Richard 




216 


Hope and ye Inhabi- 




100 


tants - 


970 


40^ 


Lieut. - Coll. Richard 




217| 


Hope 


1,497 


50 


Gowen Hill 


80 


20 


James Howell - 


1,233 


107 


Richard Hussett 


8 


605 


James Hunt 


8 




John Hendy 


47 


22 


Nicholas Hancock 


50 


7i 


John Hone 


21 


44 


Henry Hanimot 


6 


211 


Gregory Hubbart 


48 



George Home - 

Francis Hope 

John Hattevill - 

William Jones - 

Walter Jenkins 

John Johnson - 

Andrew Jewell - 

John Jefferies - 

Thomas Joyce - 

Samuel Keamor 

Matthew Knight 

Abraham Keeling 

William Kilgress 

William Cane - 

Nicholas Keine 

Jane Leader 

Widow Lane - 

Francis Larow - 

John Lewis 

Nicholas Leford 

Jacob Lucy and Com- 
pany - 

William Launce 

John Maverley 

William Mayo - 

Sir James Modyford 

James Mandersou 

Owen Macarta - 

Alexander Mills 

John Murrow - 

Christopher Mayam 

Robert Moody - 

Richard Mapeley 

William Parker 

Wm. St. Onyon 

John Priest 

John Pond 

Janes Pinnuck - 

John Potter 

Joseph Phypes - 

John Pitts 

John Pearse 

Capt. William Parker - 

Robert Pyatt - 

Capt. William Rivers - 

Ralph Rippon - 

John Robinson 

James Russell - 

Francis Russell and 
Mates 

Moses Raco 

Francis Scarlett, Esq. - 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



101 



1670. 






Acres. 





Acres. 





Acres. 


Edward Stanton and 




Thomas Todd and Mate 


49 


Thomas Taylor 


18 


Henry Bonner 


500 


Peter Tan agon 


16 


Richard Thorne 


16 


Edward Manton (szc) - 


374 


Anne Thome - 


156 


William Wilson 


80 


John Spread 


qi 

2 


William Tanton 


24 


Hugh Weekes - 


44 


Lieut. John Stanley 


90 


Thomas Trinado 


38 


Charles Whitfield 


950 


Morris Shehanx 


4 


Peter Turpin 


622 


William Warren 


707 


David Spence - 


H 


Thomas Turtle - 


40 


Edward Wooden 


9* 


John Stiles and Mate - 


67 


William Terrill 


35 


Thomas Watson 


9 


Cornelius Stray s 


122 


Thomas Tothill 


1,300 


Richard Wood - 


70 


Thomas South - 


60 


Richard Teage 


88 


John Wilson - 


20 


Richard Seaward 


7 


Capt.. William Vallett - 


220 


Anthony Woodhouse - 


4 


John Stephens - 


20 


Thomas Vaughan 


37 


George Wattle - 


56 


William Sparkes 


75 


Richard Wilson 


54 


James Woodall 


8* 


Samuell Sawyer 


14 


William Waters 


8 


Richard Valley 


200 


Richard Smith - 


16 


Capt. Saul Wanner 


60 


John Walker - 


308 


Thomas Sampson 


120 


John Williams - 


30 


Charles Whitefield 


51 


James Thompson _ | 18 


William Warrington 


270 


Henry Wastell and Mate 


16 


In this parish are families - 194. People hy estimation - 1,552 



ST. KATHERINE'S PARISH. 



John Archer 


560 


Thomas Davis - 


440 


Capt. John Bourden 


2,255 


William Deane- 


597 


Richard Beckford 


578 


George Dunkin and 




John Bonner - 


82 


Mate 


60 


William Bunn and Mate 


64 


Timothy Dodd - 


300 


Robert Bedford 


30 


Oliver Dust 


60 


John Berry 


40 


John Drinkewater 


27 


Lieut.-Colonel Robert 




John Ellis 


150 


Bindlos 


1,935 


Henry Edey 


30 


Edward Black man 


62 


George Elkin - 


3,286 


Coll. Thomas Ballard - 


2,391 


Dorothy Eaton 


220 


More - 


1,000 


Augustine Evans 


401 


Peter Burton - 


78 


Capt. William Freeman 


40 


Richard Boyse - 


148 


Bartholomew Fant 


1,130 


Susanna Barker 


160 


Angelina Fant - 


210 


Anthony Burroughs 


40 


William Floyd - 


60 


Thomas Burden 


67 


Widow Farefield 


385 


Francis Barnes - 


CO 


Major Thomas Fuller - 


1,309 


Hersey Bawett - 


32| 


Humphrey Freeman, 




William Benton 


44 


Esq. - 


627 


Edward Burt - 


27 


Tobias Foot - 


120 


Christopher Butler 


9 


Roger Fugas 


30 


Nicholas Collins 


60 


John Flemming 


34 


John Casteele - 


210 


Robert Ford 


100 


John Collett 


120 


John Gimball - 


618 


John Colebeck 


812 


Andrew Groves 


38 


Capt. Colebeck and In- 




William Gray - 


720 


habitants 


1,340 


John Gillingham 


120 


Josua Cooper - 


60 


William Gibson 


45 


William Cussaus 


551 


Richard Guy - 


270 


John Cater 


252 


Joachim Hane - 


420 


James Casement 


190 


William Hebb, Esq. - 


437 


James Crookshanke 


90 


Henry Hilliard 


100 


Matthew Crew- 


800 


Wm. Hill and Mate - 


190 


Thomas Cox 


300 


Nicholas Homes 


100 


Bryan Clackcy - 


100 


William Hubblethorne 




Derby Cecill - 


110 


and Mate 


160 


Francis Crookshanke - 


40 


Anthony Hopper 


70 


Major Anthony Collier 




George Hollowfield 


140 


and Mates - 


2,600 


George Hanborow 


450 


Coll. John Cope 


144 


Edward Hans and Mate 


123 


John Doughty and 




Richard Hemmings 


J,600 


Mate 


80 


John Hatkins and Mate- 


1,190 



William Herbert 

John Hillier and Perrot 

Francis Hull - 

Alice Howell - 

William Harker 

George Holyday 

Simon Huse 

Gary Hellgar - 

Wm. Hobbleton 

Francis Inians - 

John Jackson - 

Wm. Knowles - 

George Knight - 

Thomas Lyon - 

Samuel Long - 

Thomas Lilly - 

Samuel Lewis and 
Francis Man 

William Mullins Esq. - 

Capt. Render Moles- 
worth 

Wm. Matthews 

John Moore 

Charles Morgan 

William Mosely 

William Morris 

Bryan Macue - 

Thomas Modyford, Esq. 
and Company 

Phillip Masters 

Thomas Martin 

Hugh Mighty - 

William Mathewes 

Sir James Modyford 

William Markham 

Lucas Martin - 

Sir Thomas Modyford - 

George Newell - 

George Needham, Esq.- 

Capt. John Noyc 

William Oakes- 

John Parsons and Mate 

Joseph Peters - 



120 

320 

100 

15 

164 

33 

3 

146 

120 

453 

30 

760 

63 

96 

18 

782 

1,555 

522 

2,480 

520 

19 

910 

1.242 

40 

30 

6,090 

411J 

130 

140 

170 

3,500 

33 

30 

109 

475 

1,764 

5,868 

19 

30 

30 



102 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670. 






Acres. 





Acres. 





Acres. 


Francis Phillips 


33 


John Ridgway - 


340 


Thomas Webb - 


250 


Alexander Pitts and 




Royal 1 Company 


470 


Michael Whaley and 




Mate 


90 


Henry Rimes - 


530 


Mate 


163 


Francis Price and Mate 


150 


Thomas Raby - 


398 


Henry Weston - 


61 


Thomas Parnell 


!I20 


Fulke Rose 


30 


John Went 


H 


William Perkins 


88 


Jos. Char. Stevenson - 


30 


More - 


150 


Thomas Pitts - 


500 


John Slicker 


90 


John Welting - 


150 


James Parsons - 


34 


James Sharpington 


60 


Robert Willias and 




John Parish 


175 


Henry Saw 


400 


Mates 


iae 


More - 


120 


George Tirlow - 


42 


John Wooleyand Mates 


201 


Joseph Peters - 


55 


John Thomas and Mate 


- 153 


George Woodgcr and 




George Reekstead 


60 


Thomas Tyler - 


210 


Parris 


100 


George Russell 


160 


John Vine 


45 


I*aac Wells 


9 


Bartholomew Roe 


33 


Henry Veasy - 


90 


William White - 


15| 


Evan Rice 


120 


More - 


33 


John Whiting - 


30 



In this parish, families 



- 158. 



People by estimation - 2,370. 



Capt. Whitigift Aylmor 
Major Thomas Ascough 
William A'dridge 

Mate 

Edward Allen - 
Edward Arthur 
Robert Bennet - 
Thomas Burgan 
John Bagnoll - 
Francis Bostock 
Stephen Bassett 
Edward Barfield 

Mate 
Charles Buckley 

Mate - 
Wm. Bragg 
Thomas Bland - 
Hersy Barrett - 
Thomas Butler - 
Elizabeth Bagnoll 
Lieut.-Col. John Cope - 
Laurence Charnock and 

Mate- 

Gilbert Cope 
Robert Cote and Mate - 
John Cantrill - 
Nicholas Clarke 
Jonathan Cock 
William Collier 
Theo. Gary 



mor 


294 


>ugh 


880 


and 




. 


60 


. 


155 


. 


250 


_ 


30 


- 


62 


_ 


36 


- 


N 

276 


and 




_ 


100 


and 




- 


205 


_ 


950 


_ 


8 


_ 


300 


_ 


510 


- 


7 


>pe - 
and 


683 


. 


740 


. 


80 


ate - 


23 


. 


21 


. 


210 


- 


1,000 
120 


- 


83 



ST. JOHN'S PARISH. 

Timothy Dodd - - 108 

John Davis and Mate - 119 

John Davenport Esq. - 220 

Bartholomew Dowse - 10 

Lieut. John Dowler - 9 

Robert Evans - 18 

John Frizell - - 300 

John Frizell and Mate - 300 

Capt. Richard Guy - 753 

William Gaywood 64 

Thomas Griffin and Mate 1 7 1 
Richard Garland and 

Mate - 60 

Joseph Gunn - 90 

William Gillman 43 

Lieut. Richard Hysam - 984 

Daniell Harris - 7J 

Robert Hazell - - 270 

Thomas Jones - - 373 

Richard Jenkins 108 
To the Inhabitants of the 

Parish - 500 

Thomas Johnson - 250 

Doctor Thomas Jones - 20 

Robert Kilby - - 300 

Capt. John Laugher - 204 

Owen Mason - - 150 

Alexander Martin - 206 

Sir James Modyford - 1,000 

Capt. Robert Nelson - 1,300 



Capt. Richard Oldfield - 
Aaron Peterson 
Francis Price - 
Thomas Perry - 
Robert Paine - 
Francis Palmer 
Edmund Roe - 
Elizabeth Reid - 
Capt. George Reid 
Edward Rawlins 
Roger Reynolds 
John Steele and Mate - 
Thomas Small - 
Edmund Sykes 
John Styles 
William Sams - 
John Stubbs 
Wm. Thorpe 
James Tuckey and Mate 
John Trigg 
Richard Vildy - 
John Weaver and Mate 
John Wright - 
John Wilson and Mate 
Ellis Ward and Mates - 
William Wright and 

Company 
Samuel Warren 
Edmund Willett 
John White 



370 
250 
175 
180 
4 

200 

215 

927 

1,403 

120 

4 

300 

15 

150 

3,200 

400 

320 

(.8 

50 

90 

60 

200 

60 

6fi 

233 

418 

360 

72 

259 



In this parish, families 



- 83 



People by estimation 



996 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



103 



1670. 



CLARENDON PARISH. 





Acres 




jfVcrcs 




A-CFG** 














Lewis Anderson 


58 


Michaell Garrett 


91 


John Newman - 


112 


John Ashley 


156 


James Griffin - 


60 


Richard OHife - 


66 


The Widow Allwinckle 


600 


Edward Garret and Mate 


30 


Richard Phelps 


320 


Cornelius Adams 


50 


Richard Greene 


260 


Jasper Pickerine 


550 


Eleanor Barrett 


55 


Edward Gerrard 


95 


John Powell 


60 


Richard Barrett 


149 


Hugh Ginge 


20 


Roger Phypes - 


80 


John Butcher and Mutes 


297 


John Gage 


10 


Wm. Pritchett - 


30 


George Booth 


1,200 


Martin Goldin - 


20 


George Pattison 


122 


Robert Barriffe 


JOO 


William Gunter 


200 


Wm. Pearse 


42 


Widow Bolton - 


100 


Capt. Christopher Homer 


1,083 


Ralph Rippon - 


140 


Robert Brownlow 


190 


John Hill 


275 


George Rickets 


40 


Edward Bramfield 


100 


Henry Billiard 


1,668 


Edward Ray and Mate - 


109 


John Bankes and Street 


60 


John Hewitt - 


890 


Thomas Roden - 


243 


Ezraell Baldwin 


400 


George Holsworth 


186 


Edmund Rule and Mate 


330 


Nicholas Bolton 


500 


George Hammond 


65 


Phillip Roberts 


405 


Anthony Boroughs 


30 


John Hunt 


120 


Roger Ramsy and Mate 


41^ 


Peter Beckford 


2,238 


Richard Hooton and 




Thos. Robinson and Mate 


50 


Lieut-Col.RobertBiudlos 


250 


Gunter 


100 


George Ragg - 


36 


Edward Bull - 


61 


Richard Haj'mas 


100 


Elias Sedgwick 


10 


Joseph Bathurst 


1,200 


Thomas Halse - 


466 


Francis Starkey 


227 


Major Anthony Collier 


1,261 


Capt. Joachim Hane - 


1,500 


Francis Sperry - 


349 


Jane Clarke 


240 


Harman Jacob - 


305 


More - 


240 


Thomas Casnell 


270 


Lt.-Coll. William Ivy - 


1,075 


John Smith 


76 


Richard Carr - 


30 


John Jonson 


220 


Robert Smith - 


180 


Edmund Cross - 


90 


Edward Isles - 


30 


Robert Stone - 


75 


William Courtman 


65 


Ralph Johnson 


40 


John Stiles 


90 


Thomas Cole - 


136 


Ruth Kilby 


90 


John Shewin - 


30 


William Coxhead 


54 


Hugh Kinn 


81 


Nathaniell Shin and Mate 


84 


George Child - 


120 


William Lord - 


435 


Robert Smart - 


60 


Edward Cock - 


136 


John Lock 


35 


Michaell Saunders 


120 


Lord Clarendon 


3,000 


Robert Little - 


106 


John Shaw 


450 


Barbara Call 


70 


Capt. Samuel Long 


2,200 


Amos Stevens - 


10 


Peter Cockup - 


60 


Jane Lumbard - 


150 


John Sheppard 


185 


Robert Cooper - 


90 


Robert Leonard 


100 


John Skellin 


210 


Capt. Edward Collier - 


1,020 


John Loyd and Frank- 




John Thompson 


300 


Feter Copake - 


160 


ling - 


379 


Joseph Taylor 


12 


Henry Dunnell 


30 


John Lory 


50 


John Taylor 


190 


John Downer - 


210 


Originall Lewis 


70 


John Townsend 


210 


John Durant - 


432 


Richard Mugg and Mates 


770 


Benjamin Tillinghurst - 


300 


Henry Douch - 


20 


John Marshall - 


186 


Robert Varney, Esq. - 


701 


Henry Davis - 


41| 


John Magill and Mate - 


60 


John Vizard 


120 


John Fisher 


138 


Adam More 


90 


Priscilla Willoughby - 


600 


William Frogg 


90 


John Morant - 


30 


John Warren - 


188 


William Frame 


120 


Valentine Munby 


105 


Robert Warner and Mate 


350 


William Foliar - 


30 


Francis Man 


285 


Robert Wright 


100 


Hugh Gilbert - 


93f 


Wm. Mason 


185 


Tobias Winsor 


60 


Joseph Gardner 


570 


Richard Masey - 


50 


Thomas Waite - 


88 


Richard Gray - 


180 


Daniell Morris - 


30 


Thomas Wills - 


32 


William Gent - 


240 


Widow Netherland -, 


120 







In this parish are, families 



- 143 



People by estimation - 1,430 



104 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670. 



ABSTRACT OF THE WHOLE. 



PARISHES. 


ACRKS 
PATENTED. 


FAMILIES. 


NUMBERS 

OF 

PEKONS. 


St. Thomas' Parish - 


14,825| 


59 


590 


St. David's Parish - 


11,946! 


80 


960 


St. Andrew's Parish - 


29,199f 


194 


1,552 


St. Katherine's Parish 


68,590 


158 


2,370 


St. John's Parish 


25.197J 


83 


996 


Clarendon Parish - - - - 


39,260f 


143 


1 ,430 


We likewise calculate the Privateers, Hunters, Sloop, and Boatmen"! 








which ply about this Island, and are not reckoned in any of the > 








2,500 


above Parishes, to he at least 2,500 lusty able men 








The four Parishes on the North Side, vizt., St. George's, St."] 








Marie's, St. Anne's, and St. James, and the Leewardmost parish, | 








St. Elizabeth, hath not been yet collected, as not worth it, by 1 
reason of its distance and new settlements, where' we find about j 


20,000 





1,500 


20,000 acres patented, and calculate there cannot he less than j 








1,500 people 










209,020^ 


717 


11,898 


More ; We calculate of Persons in the Towns of Port Eoyal and St. Jago to be no less ~| 
than, men, women and children - - - J 


3,300 




15,198 



" The Receiver- General hath not yet received any rent these two 
years, it not being worth the going so far every year, the last 
collection amounting to but 1511. 9s., whereof some being for three 
and some two years ; but now this Michaelmas he begins to collect 
for two years, and is ordered at the same time to take an exact 
account of all the persons in every family, which, with the rental 
(when finished) shall be presented for his Majesty's view, and we 
are confident will amount to one half more at least than the above 
calculation, this being guessed at according to the last collection, 
made two years since." [Col. Entry BJc., No. 27, pp. 61-80 and 
p. 82.] 

[Sept. 23.] 271. " Commodities which this island produceth, with a calcula- 
tion of the quantities of some of them." There are 57 sugar works, 
producing yearly 1,710 thousand weight of sugar ; 47 cocoa walks, 
yielding 188,000 Ib. of nuts, in seasonable years in these improving ; 
49 indigo works, producing 49,000 weight of indigo per annum, 
and other walks and works daily adding. Three salt ponds, con- 
taining upwards of 4,000 acres, under the management of Captain 
John Noye, yielded this year 10,000 bushels, he affirming to have 
been able to make as many tons if he could have had vent for it. 
The mountains are full of pimento or Jamaica pepper, and, if there 
were encouragement, 50,000 weight might be yearly sent off. An 
undestroyable quantity of fustick, brasilletto, lignum vitse, ebony, 
sweet-smelling, and other curious woods, of which great quantities 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 105 

1070. 

are daily exported. Anotto (by the Spaniards called Acheot), 
vanillas, china roots, cassia, fistula, and tamarinds, the planters 
endeavour to increase, being very good drugs. The land very good 
for cotton and tobacco, but the other commodities being more 
profitable, very few busy themselves with it. Large savanas 
and great stocks of cattle, which have increased within these six 
years from 60 tame cattle to 6.000. Sheep, goats, and tame hogs in 
great plenty, so that they are past all danger of want, and hope in 
a short time to furnish the ships homeward bound. Signed, by the 
Governor's command, by Thos. Tothill, "Receiver-General. 1 p. 
[Col Entry BL, No. 27, p. 81]. 

Sept. 23. 272. Commission (with corrections by Williamson) to Colonel 
Whitehall. Lynch. Appointing him Lieut.-Governor of Jamaica, to command 
in chief in the want, absence, or disability of Sir Thos. Modyford, or 
other his Majesty's chief governor there, during pleasure. Parch- 
ment. Endorsed, Minute of Sir Thomas Lynch's Commission. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 64.] 

Sept. ? 273. Draft of preceding, with corrections by Williamson. 1 p. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 65.] 

Sept. 25. 274. The King to the Duke of York. Directing him forthwith 
to give order for the hiring of two good merchant ships of 150 to 
200 tons, well fitted and victualled for five months at least, for 
bringing off such of his Majesty's subjects as yet remain upon 
Surinam. p. [Dom. Entry Bk., Ckas. II., Vol. 31, p. 61 <.] 

Sept. 28. 275. Petition of Chas. Modyford in behalf of Sir Tho. Modyford 
and the planters and traders of Jamaica, to the King. That Sir 
Thos. Modyford, Governor of Jamaica, was strictly commanded to 
call in the privateers and endeavour a trade with the Spaniard ; 
which he did to his utmost perform, by hanging six privateers and 
restoring two ships, as by the affidavits annexed will appear. 
This civility to the Spaniards, who in retaliation used his Majesty's 
subjects worse than formerly, occasioned all the privateers to betake 
themselves to Tortugas to the French ; which had been undoubtedly 
the less of the Island had not the Governor had order from his 
Majesty, by the Duke of Albemarle, to grant or not commissions 
against the Spaniards as to him should seem most advantageous ; 
whereupon, proclaiming war against the Spaniard, all the privateers 
came in. Prays that his Majesty, if he deems it fitting that the 
privateers should be called in, will signify his pleasure, since Gov. 
Modyford ought to persist in the way he is in, till his Majesty order 
the contrary, when he prays that Sir Wm. Godolphin, Envoy 
Extraordinary for Spain, have order to have an article added to the 
Articles of Peace, whereby the King of Spain may acknowledge 
that Jamaica belongs to his Majesty; for if the privateers are 
ordered to be reduced and that omitted, it will discourage all 
persons to trade or plant there, since the Spaniards have raised 
and do at this present raise men to attempt the island. 1 p. [Col 
Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 66.] 



106 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1G70? 

276. Reasons presented by Chas. Modyford to the King in Council 
why privateers should not wholly be discontinued in the West 
Indies, it being of great concernment and at present the security 
of the island of Jamaica. 1. By the frequent intelligence which by 
means of privateering it hath of the coming of the King of Spain's 
fleet, and of designs against the island, which if wanted, the islanders 
may grow secure and being set upon unawares be easily overcome, 
for hunting, upon which privateers greatly depend, would be laid 
aside on the north of Jamaica where the Spaniards might easily 
land, fortify, and become impregnable, and the English lying in the 
midst of the King of Spain's dominions, are so great an eye sore to 
them, that they would be glad on any terms to be rid of such a 
neighbour. 2. What is gotten by the privateers is brought into 
Jamaica, and assists the planters, and encourages the merchants to 
come there. 3. It will appear but reasonable to have privateers, 
when it shall be considered how inhumanly treacherous and cruelly 
the Spaniards use the English there that fall into their hands, 
making them work like slaves, and forcing their shipping and goods 
from them ; as will appear by the oaths of Roger Baker, commander 
of the Leghorn Merchant, Major Samuel Smith, late Governor of 
Providence, Henry Wasey, commander of the Concord, and Francis 
Steward, herewith delivered. 4. Privateering 'tis feared cannot 
now be well reduced without great charge to his Majesty and much 
prejudice to the island; for Sir Thos. Modyford used his utmost 
endeavour to reduce them, but they went to Tortugas to the French, 
turned pirates and took English as well as Spaniards, who reaped 
no benefit, and the island lost above 1,000 men and 8 or 9 ships ; 
so that it was much feared, that had not his Majesty's letter to the 
Governor given timely encouragement to countenance them, the 
island might have been in the time of the late war lost by their 
joining with the French. 5. If there should be no men-of-war in 
the Indies, the Spaniards would undoubtedly attempt Jamaica, or 
at least take every ship sent from Jamaica to England. Will only 
add that if it be his Majesty's pleasure the privateers should be 
reduced, he would send sufficient forces, and order Sir William 
Godolphin, Envoy Extraordinary for Spain, to procure an acknow- 
ledgment from the King of Spain that Jamaica doth belong to his 
Majesty's Crown, and that an attempt on it shall be an absolute 
violation of the peace ; for without it, if the privateers be reduced 
no merchants will trade, or any person settle a plantation there. 
Endorsed by Sec. Lord Arlington, Pretended reasons why priva- 
teers ought to be maintained in the West Indies. 1^ pp. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXV., No. G7.] 

1670. 277. "Additional Propositions" to the Privy Council about 

Sept. 28. Jamaica, "offered by order from Sir Thos. Modyford, by Chas. 
Modyford." In regard by contract with the Assembly here his 
Majesty's subjects are to pay one penny per acre for all that is 
planted, and that the rents amount not yet to 1501., and that it is a 
great trouble for his Majesty's officers always to be running out the 
manured land to find how many pennies are due, it is proposed that 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 107 

1670. 

his Majesty send order that after 200,000 acres are granted, the 
Governor reserve Id. per acre for every acre granted whether 
manured or not, there being as yet but 165,000 granted, and after 
500,000 be granted to reserve 2(7,., and after 750,000 4d, till there 
be a million; for these reasons: (1.) The island is so well settled, 
that so great an encouragement as formerly :s not so absolutely 
necessary. (2.) There is not that reason for obliging future settlers 
as there was for the first settlers and old soldiers, the first settlers 
having borne the heat of the day, to make it easy and safe for new 
comers. (3.) Trade will increase and every man's land prove more 
profitable so the augmented rents will be easier paid. (4.) A con- 
siderable revenue which is necessary to repay his Majesty's great 
charges and support the government cannot be better raised than 
b}' annexing it to the Estates, which can never be thought a grievance 
to posterity, as all aids, taxes, impositions, and subsidies generally 
are. (5.) This his Majesty will receive as aright, and not be obliged 
to lessen any part of his prerogative for it ; and therefore after the 
first million acres are granted, it is presumed that a reasonable fine 
of ready money, as well as a rent of 6d. or 12d. per acre may be 
reserved, not judging it reasonable the rents should be generally the 
same, lest in time their interest should be too much ynited. (6.) It 
will be some satisfaction to the first settlers, to find how much they 
have been favoured. (7.) This will be a great revenue, Barbadoes, 
which consists but of 126,000 acres, every year loading away 200 
ships with sugar, indigo, and cotton, and this Island is above 60 times 
as big, with better land ; here being also cattle, horses, and pastures 
in great plenty, " so that there is nothing wanting but whites and 
blacks to go through stitch with our designs of planting." To hasten 
this settlement and forward the revenue all means are to be 
endeavoured for filling the Island with people. (1.) By ordering 
all snch as lie on the parishes in the three nations that are of able 
body, and all other superfluous persons ; whom the owners of shipping 
will willingly transport, the price being males 121. to 151., females 
101. to 121. ready money, with which they buy cocoa which near 
doubles at their return, so that many have been brought hither 
within these ten months. (2.) By ordering the Governors of the 
Windward Islands, especially Barbadoes, to encourage superfluous 
planters and servants to come hither, forbid them other new settle- 
ments, and suppress false scandals of this place ; which his Majesty's 
letter required of the late Lord Willoughby, but without effect, for 
he sent near 1,500 lusty men to Sta. Lucia, most of whom subscribed 
to come with Sir Thos. Modyford, where they were all lost ; there- 
fore its necessary to have it enquired how his Majesty's commands 
are observed. (3.) By inclining the nobility, gentry, and merchants 
to settle plantations ; some of which have already begun to their 
great advantage, among whom Alderman Beckford can tell of 2,000. 
per annum he gets, clear of all charges. (4.) By inclining the Royal 
Company to send plenty of negroes, the war with Holland and France 
having been a great hindrance to this Settlement, and the having 
no blacks from the Royal Company since 1665 a greater. 2i pp 
[Col Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 68.] 



108 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670. 

[Sept. 28.] 278. Copy of the above propositions of Sir Thos. Modyford to 
the Privy Council, with additions, " To the intent I may never incur 
the real or seeming displeasure of his Majesty's Council, but walk 
enntirely by their directions, humbly desire their Lordships' con- 
siderations and solutions to these ensuing queries " 1. Whether he 
may continue to allow our men-of-war, who else could not subsist 
and carry always in their vessels a gang of dogs, to victual at 
certain parts of Cuba and Hispaniola, which are infinitely stocked 
with cattle and hogs and have very few or no inhabitants, which 
are brought to this market, and is a great help to the poorer sort 
of planters and but little detriment to the Spaniard. 2. Whether 
he should forbid our seamen and merchants holding a trade and 
correspondence with the Indians of Darien and Yucatan to the 
southward of Campeachy, whom the Spaniards account rebels, but 
have no actual authority over them, and from whom our people 
have tortoiseshell, logwood, and other commodities for beads and 
knives. 3. Whether if they happen to take Indians who are under 
the Spanish Government and will not hold peace with the English, 
they may not sell them for slaves in Jamaica. Modyford has never 
suffered any Indians to be sold in Jamaica for slaves, except the 
Caribbees of St. Vincent, with whom Lord Willoughby had war, 
so that many Indians live very contentedly amongst them. Received 
from Charles Modyford, Sir Thos. Modyford's son, 28th September 
1670. 3| pp. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 27, pp. 36-39.] 

Sept. 28. 279. " Sir Thos. Modyford's proposal about logwood, &c.," being 
the second query in the preceding copy of his propositions to the 
Privy Council. Endorsed by John Locke, Logwood and as above. 
28 Sept. 1670. Lord Ashley, afterwards Earl of Shaftesbury, was 
a member of his Majesty's Privy Council at this time, and John 
Locke was his private secretary. 1 p. [Col. Papers Vol XXV 
No. 69.] 

1670? 280. Propositions of Chas. Modyford, by order of Sir Thos. 
Modyford, to his Majesty's Privy Council concerning Jamaica. 
That they would take notice that, according to order from his 
Majesty's ministers, Sir Thos. Modyford did proclaim peace with 
the Spaniard, upon which 'twas certain the privateers would have 
gone to the French at Tortugas, had not Sir Thos. prevailed with 
them to stay till answer came to his letters to the Duke of Albe- 
marle and the Lord Keeper ; which he desires may be sent as soon 
as possible, with the Council's approbation of what he has already 
done. And if his Majesty think not fit he should, or the Spanish 
Ambassador, decline employing the privateers there, that his Majesty 
would authorise the Governor to keep 1,000 of them, with 10 of 
their most considerable ships, in pay, for security of the island ; for 
these reasons : (1.) Because the French increase daily in those 
parts, having already ships of 70 guns. (2.) They live encompassed 
by the Spanish quarters, who, whatever they pretend, intend their 
supplanting, knowing the island was taken from them by force, 
which consideration will never die. (3.) It is necessary to keep up 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES, 109 

1670 ? 

a military spirit in that people, which when reduced to dull trained 
bands will come to nothing, (4.) 1,000 men under good pay and 
discipline will do more than 5,000 train soldiers or new raised men. 
(5.) The reputation of such a force will prevent the enemies' 
attempts, so that planting will go on uninterrupted. (6.) Such a 
force may be in a readiness on all emergencies to execute his 
Majesty's commands. (7.) In regard the state of the island is not 
yet fully assured from the pretensions of the Spaniard, the settle- 
ment of plantations is hindered : and therefore he prays that if his 
Majesty do not approve of the aforesaid reasons, Sir W. Godolphin 
may be ordered to conclude on what terms that island stands with 
the Spaniard, it not being positively mentioned or understood to be 
included in any articles of peace yet made ; they having granted 
commissions against all to the southward of the Tropic of Cancer, 
and did, last June 1G69, make prize of one ship, one ketch, and three 
sloops at Caimanos, as appears by affidavits annexed. The reso- 
lutions of the Council to the following queries as soon as possible 
are also desired. The first three queries are the same as are in 
Modyford's propositions calendared ante, No. 278. The remaining 
query has reference to the Spaniards having many of his Majesty's 
subjects in irons, and having lately carried away some fishermen 
from " Caimanos ; whether in such new actions of hostility, the 
Governor may not retaliate until he has received his Majesty's 
orders, in regard of the time the obtaining those orders must take 
up ? Annexed, 

280. I. Affidavits of Sam. Hutchinson, commander of the Hope- 
well, and Edward Attenberry, giving account of the 
Spaniards' attempt upon the English fishermen at Cai- 
manos, the burning of the Governor's house, carrying 
away all his goods, taking one ship, one ketch, and three 
sloops, and destroying all the fishing boats upon the 
island. Jamaica, 1669, June 16. Together 3 pp. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXV., Nos. 70, 70 i.]. 

1670 ? 281. Copy of the preceding propositions of Modyford, but without 

the queries and affidavits. 1-| pp. [Gol. Entry Bk, No. 27. pp. 30- 

40.] 

Sept. 30. 282, Jo. Newingtoii's address to James Drawater, merchant, at 
St. Michael's J o . Lindupps, at the Bunch of Grapes in Ship Yard, by Temple 

Barbadoes -^ ar - -^ ^ Q news ne caa write is that one Hugh Peachell, 
who has lived in this island almost 20 years with many persons of 
good esteem, and lately with Col. Barwick, and who it was observed 
gained much money, yet none thrived less than he, falling sick 
three weeks since, was much troubled in his conscience, but 
would not utter himself to any but a minister, who being sent for, 
he did acknowledge himself the person that cut off the head of 
King Charles, for which he had 100., and with much seeming 
penitence and receiving such comfort as the divine, one parson 
Leshley, an eminent man here, could afford him, he died in a 
quarter of an hour. This he may report for a real truth. One Mr. 
Hewel, condemned for the same, and he thinks now in Newgate, 



110 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670. 



Sept. 30. 

Barbadoes. 



Oct. 1. 



Shaftebury 
Papers. 



Oct. 3. 

Fort Jarnes, 
Mauhataus. 



will be glad to be acquainted of this. p. [Col. Papers, Vol. 
XXV., No. 71.] 

283. Copy of the preceding. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., 
No. 72.] 

284. " Memorial about the prisoners at St. Katharina, delivered 
to the Spanish Ambassador 1st Oct. 1670." The Duke of Albe- 
marle, Earl of Craven, Earl of Clarendon, Lord Berkeley, Lord 
Lieutenant of Ireland, Lord Ashley, Sir Geo. Carteret, Vice-Cham- 
berlain of his Majesty's household, Sir Peter Colleton, and Sir 
William Berkeley, being concerned in a plantation bordering on 
the south of Virginia, sent last year some English people in a sloop, 
who through foul weather, about loth May last anchored off St. 
Katharina in Florida. John Rivers, a kinsman and agent of Lord 
Ashley, with the master of the sloop, his mate and six or seven 
men, one woman and a girl, were encouraged to go ashore, when 
they were by order of a friar, the chief man of the place, detained 
prisoners. The friar refused to restore them, and commanded the 
sloop to yield, and endeavoured by shot from the shore to force 
her to it. Letters were afterwards written to the Governor of St. 
Augustine and the friar to demand the delivery of the English, 
but the friar who gave the two men fair words not only refused to 
set the prisoners at liberty, but kept the two men also who had 
upon his parole ventured themselves into his power. In the 
margin to tJie following paragraph Locke has written " Delivered 
to the Spanish Ambassador, 9th Sept. 1672." The lords above 
mentioned concerned in this affair, and particularly the Earl of 
Shaftesbury, who hath lately heard from his kinsman, John Rivers, 
that he is prisoner at St. Augustine, desire the lord ambassador to 
procure an effectual order from the Council of Spain to the Governor 
of St. Augustine, that said persons who have been seized at St. 
Katharina and ever since detained, may be set at liberty, as they 
have not given any provocation to make them prisoners. And 
said lords having sent these persons only to carry on the before 
mentioned plantation without disturbing any others, are very 
willing to continue an amicable correspondence with his Catholic 
Majesty's subjects, nor will they allow any piracy or any acts of 
hostility. A duplicate of such effectual letter as shall by the 
Council be sent to America is desired by said Lords to convey 
themselves to the Governor of St. Augustine to secure the delivery 
of said prisoners if that sent from Spain should miscarry. Names 
of prisoners known to said Lords, viz., John Rivers, Capt. Bayly, 
John Collins, William Car, Margaret Martin, the rest they know 
not the names. Draft with corrections, written by John Locke, as 
also the endorsement. The second paragraph has been copied, with 
some additions. 2 pp. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 40.] 

285. Governor Francis Lovelace to [Joseph] Williamson, secre- 
tary to Sec. Lord Arlington. Excuses himself from ingratitude for 
not maintaining his correspondence, but their conveyance is so 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. Ill 

1670. 

slow, " like the production of ' ellephats ' once almost in two years." 
Has sent two letters " but the^ uncertainty of our vessels touching 
in their most convenient port makes letters oftenly to become 
abortive." If he did but know in what darkness they live " as if 
we had as well crossed Lethae as the ' Athlantiq ' ocean," he could 
not but take compassion and solace them with what news is 
stirring on the stage of " Brittang," " for we love the sound of Greek 
though we understand it not." If a disordered dream would serve 
the turn, could tell him that an Indian King Agapow, taking the 
air in his "gundelo " (with them known as a canoe) with his cargo 
of two pecks of oysters " was intercepted by a strong party of the 
enemy in Europe it would have been called 7,000, but here it goes 
but for four men, two women, and a boy seizes on this monarch, 
brings him to their castle, first bites oflf all his nails, next his ears, 
and then tortures him to death with those exquisite torments that 
Plalaris' invention was but a fleabite to it; four days he was a 
dying, yet as long as he hail breath would call for a pipe and 
threaten a revenge." This happened six weeks since, but what 
cornes near them is the encroachment of the French in Canada. 
His Catholic Majesty most profusely sends legionary soldiers thither, 
500 annually being an ordinary recruit, so that it is feared he will 
attempt to disturb his Majesty's plantations here, to which his 
soldiers will be easily incited " out of hopes to be in the sunshine," 
being generally locked up three-quarters of the year. A small 
party of Jesuits, 1 in all, have settled on this side Lake Iroquois ; 
they pretend it is no more but to advance the kingdom of Christ, 
when it is to be suspected it is rather the kingdom of his most 
Christian Majesty. Will do all here to discover their designs, but 
it were necessary to have an inspection over him at home. l pp. 
Printed in New York Documents, III., 189, J 90. [Ool. Papers, 
Vol. XXV., No. 73.] 

Oct. 3. 286. Twelve Acts passed at a Grand Assembly held at James 
Virginia. City, Virginia, by prorogation from 20 Oct. 1669 to 3 Oct. 1670, 

but the titles only of three of these Acts are given, against which, 

in the margin is written, Repealed, Needless. Printed in Col. 

Entry Bits., Nos. 89, 90, 91, see ante, No. 119. [Col Entry M., 

No. 88, pp. 76-79.] 

Oct. 5. 287. Order of the Council for Foreign Plantations, present, 
Lords Gorges and Arlington, and Messrs. Brouncker, Waller, 
Slingesby, and Titus. Whereas they have received particular com- 
mands from his Majesty to consider the commission and instructions 
of Sir Thos. Modyford, Governor of Jamaica, and accordingly to 
prepare despatches for Col. Thos. Lynch, as his Majesty's Lieut, of 
the same, as also to prepare a commission and instructions for said 
Col. Thos. Lynch, and the rest of the Commissioners to be appointed 
for receiving St. Christopher's from the French. Ordered that 
Joseph Williamson be desired to send (with what speed he can) 
copies of the commissions prepared for Jamaica and St. Chris- 
topher's. Signed by H. Slingesby, Secretary. 1 p. [Col Papers 
Vol. XXV., No. 74.] 



112 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1 p. [Col. Entry Bk., 



1670. 

Oct. 5. 288. Cop}' of the preceding order. 

No. 94, p. l.J 

Oct. 6. 289. Order of the Council for Foreign Plantations. His Majesty 

having lately referred to this Council the speedy preparing of 
despatches for St. Christopher's and Jamaica, and Lord Arlington 
having promised copies of certain papers, ordered that Mr. Slingesby 
speak with Mr. Williamson about same, so the Council may be the 
better able to offer to his Majesty their opinion and advice con- 
cerning the commissions and instructions for the settlement of St. 
Christopher's and Jamaica. 1 p. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 94, p. 2.] 

Oct. 6. 290. An Act for raising an imposition on wines and other strong 

[Barbadoes.] liquors imported into this island. Read and passed the Assembly 
C Oct. 1670. John Higinbotham, clerk of the Assembly. Read 
and passed the Council same day. Richard Noke, Deputy Secretary, 
and consented to by Chr. Codrington. A true copy attested 21 Oct. 
1670 by Rich. Noke, Deputy Secretary. 5 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., 
No. 5, pp. 125-129.] 

Oct. 6. 291. The Council of Plantations to Sec. Lord Arlington. Having 
agreed upon most of the instructions for Major Bannister and the 
rest of the Commissioners for bringing off the English from Surinam, 
and the two merchantmen appointed for that service now getting 
ready, desire his Majesty's commission may be speedily prepared 
with a blank for the Commissioners' names, and a copy sent the 
Council. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 75.] 

[Oct. 10.] 292. Reasons why the planters and merchants of the Leeward 
Isles desire the planters of Surinam to be directed to St. Chris- 
topher's. There were at least ten thousand planters and inhabitants 
of St. Christopher's before the French invasion, now reduced to about 
one-third, so that two-thirds of the land formerly possessed by 
English will be uninhabited, and their number being so small cannot 
be safe from French rapine. How the planters of Surinam, who 
are by his Majesty's order to be removed, may be secured against 
those who may pretend a right to the lands they may take up at 
St. Christopher's and how to satisfy those employed in transporting 
said planters from Surinam. Read in Council Oct. 10, 1670. [Col. 
Entry Bk., No. 94, pp. 6, 7.] 

293. Richard Browne to Sec. Lord Arlington. Narrates how a 
small frigate of 9 guns, Captain John M'orris, commander, sent by 
Sir Thos. Modyford to Admiral Morgan captured the frigate of 
Captain Emanuel Rivera of 14 guns and good store of ammunition, 
granadoes and stink pots. Rivera was shot through the neck and 
immediately died. This is that same vapouring captain that so 
much annoyed Jamaica in burning houses and robbing the people 
and sent that insolent challenge to Admiral Morgan (See No. 310 II.). 
The frigate is now added to our fleet. The Admiral has sent 6 
sail upon " the design his Honour intended," and on their return 
will go upon "the grand design." Understands by letters from 
Jamaica that Sir Thos. Modyford (durante vita) is settled Governor 



Oct. 12. 

On board the 
Satisfaction 
Frigate at 
Hispaniola. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 

1670. 

of Jamaica, which gives general satisfaction ; that Hill and Reginald 
Wilson are collectors of Customs in place of Sir James Modyford ; 
and that Prince Rupert with 25 men-of-war and 5,000 soldiers is 
coming into these parts, either to force a trade, or to prosecute open 
war, which the Spaniards have so insolently begun. No doubt this 
noble fleet would in a short time overrun and conquer all these 
Indies, but without Admiral Morgan and his old privateers things 
cannot be as successful as expected ; for they know every creek, and 
the Spaniard's mode of fighting, and be a town never so well forti- 
fied, and the numbers never so unequal, if money or good plunder 
be in the case, they will either win it manfully or die courageously. 
Captain Rivero's commissions from the Governors of Carthagena 
and St. Jago, which Admiral Morgan has sent to the Governor of 
Jamaica, are much insulting and domineering over our nation. Begs 
a recommendation to some employment and his service to Joseph 
"Williamson, and John Knight, Sergeant Surgeon to his Majesty, 
also the conveyance of enclosed letter to his wife. The 15th inst. 
arrived Captain Ludbury with news that he with Captains Prince and 
Harris and 170 men took Granada in the river of Nicaragua about 
six weeks since without any considerable loss, and have shared 30?. 
or 40. a man. Admiral Morgan has been in the Indies 11 or 12 
years, and from a private gentleman by his valour has raised himself 
to now what he is, and no one can give so clear an account of the 
Spanish force. 3 pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 76.] 

Oct. 1 5. 294. " An account of what arms and ammunition have for these 
ten years last past been issued out of his Majesty's stores within 
the Office of Ordnance for the use of the Island of Jamaica." These 
include 59 ship carriages for cannon, &c. ; 500 barrels of powder ; 
3,550 muskets, bandaliers, pistols, and carbines, with belts and 
swivels; 18,000 spikes ; 40 drums; 100,000 flint stones, ready cut; 
21 tons of sheet lead, shot, and bullets; 10 fodder of pig lead; 6 
tons of bar iron ; and hand granades, matches, nails, baskets, paper, 
wire, wheelbarrows, shovels, troop saddles, cartouch boxes, oaken 
plank, hand barrows, and solder. 1 p. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 27, 
p. 83.] 

Oct. ? 295. Proposals of several planters relating to St. Christopher's 

to the Council for Foreign Plantations. It has been propounded by 
the French agent that if the French now upon English plantations 
at St. Christopher's have improved them, said French shall be 
allowed for such improvement at the return of the English over 
and above what is agreed upon by the articles of Breda. Therefore 
said English planters beseech that since the agent's proposals are 
irregular, instructions may be given to the Commissioners who are 
to receive St. Christopher's to insist on full reparations being made 
to the English for damages committed by the French upon the 
English plantations since they should have been delivered up, in 
cutting timber, demolishing dwelling houses, and carrying off" 
materials to the value of 20,000. sterling. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 94, 
p. 7.] 

U 51912. H 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1670. 

[Oct. 18.] 296. A brief of the late Government of St. Christopher's, with 
the number of forts and great guns, presented to the Council for 
Foreign Plantations, in obedience to their commands. The civil 
and military power was in one Governor, he usually choosing his 
Council and Assembly, two out of each of the six parishes, and 
trying all suits with a jury of twelve men. Sir Thos. Warner lived 
upon a sweet plantation in the middle of the island, set out for and 
not to be alienated from the Governor for the time being, but Lord 
Willoughby bought that plantation of Philip Warner and paid for 
it, as reported, out of the four and half per cent, granted to him by 
the island, amounting to forty negroes. Names and description of 
the forts, in all three forts four small sconces, and one platform with 
thirty -nine guns. In each fort ten soldiers, one corporal, and one 
gunner, all paid by the country. Received and read in Council 
18 October 1870. 1| pp. [Col. Entry BL, No. 94, pp. 7, 8.] 

Oct. 18. 297. Order of the Council for Foreign Plantations. Having 
this day considered the business of St. Christopher's and the rest of 
the Leeward Isles, the Council think fit to speak to Lord Willoughby 
and some of the chief planters of the Barbadoes thereon. Ordered 
that Lord Willoughby, Sir Peter Colleton Henry Drax, Messrs. 
Bell, Wardall, Pye, Bawden, and some others now residing in 
London, have notice to be present at the meeting at Lord Arlington's 
lodgings in Whitehall on Friday next. Also that the petitioners of 
St. Christopher's and the Leeward Islands also have notice to 
attend. [Col. Entry Bh, No. 94, pp. 2, 3.] 

Oct. 20. 298. Nicholas Blake to the King. Hinted in his despatch of 
^Biibao^ 28th February 1668-9 somewhat of the ill-management of the 
design of St. Lucia, whereby were lost about 1,000 men, and which, 
if rightly ordered, might by this time have been as profitable as 
Barbadoes is. Five great ships about to go down thither for timber, 
which small sloops have fetched without molestation from Indians 
or French, so that it seems a very fit conjuncture for planting and 
settling it, and by following rules set down by himself doubts not but 
in two years' time the whole island shall be well settled. People 
begin to ask why they should not settle this island ; indeed must 
confess himself the foundation of this talk, which would be readily put 
in execution were reasonable conditions granted, with security to 
have them performed ; for the last breach of promise sticks sadly in 
their memory, when having gone down on large promises, new orders 
were sent enclosing them all within one acre of ground. Proposes, 
first, that his Majesty send a small frigate to Barbadoes to take pas- 
sengers down and stay for their defence for six months ; also a ketch 
to stay 12 months : with 20 pieces of ordnance for forts, 300 cara- 
bines, 200 pair of pistols, 5 00 swords, powder, bullets, drums, colours, 
a surgeon's chest, &c. ; and a godly minister, with his salary " to be 
ascertained him in England by your Majesty " for two years. That 
the island may be suddenly inhabited, and in seven years' time it 
may walk hand in hand with Barbadoes " and come to be a fair 
flower for revenue in the garland of your Majesty's crown," the 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 115 

1670. 

Governor should be commissioned by his Majesty and independent 
of any commands but those of his Majesty. This is a chief ground 
work of bringing about the settlement. Another loadstone will 
be profit and privileges, so a certain quantity of acres should be 
bestowed on every one that goes down, with freedom from duties 
for four or five years. Could wish himself thought worthy of the 
chief command ; none can be found more willing, and (it may be) 
few more able ; there will be need of much prudence, dexterity, and 
resolution, and believes, though he will not in the least brag of 
himself, that his Majesty, pondering what he now writes, may think 
he has more abilities in him than his modesty will permit him to 
boast of. Being of an active and stirring genius, he is fully 
ascertained that he could as his Majesty's deputy carry at least 
1,000 people with him, and hopes the second year to make it up to 
5,000, for he has been so punctual with his payments and so com- 
passionate to the people in their distress that he has a name over 
the island for it ; but hardly any would go if any of the generation 
of those who were formerly chief in it should have a hand in it, for 
it pities him to hear the curses they give their memory. Has one 
thing to beg, which is the loan of 5001. for four or five years, when 
it shall be faithfully repaid, in case his Majesty, on reflection of his 
services, thinks not fit to remit the debt. Does not desire this for 
himself, but for the people, as will appear by the list of things sent 
to Jacob Lucy to provide with that money ; but if his Majesty will 
not advance it, will endeavour to supply it himself; and should be 
glad if his commission might extend to seven years. Lord Willoughby 
when he intended the settlement declared he would not be a pro- 
prietor for less than 10,000 acres, about the eighth or tenth part of 
the island ; but Blake will not crave above 500 acres, and for any 
other land will have no more privilege than any other man, according 
to the hands he shall carry. The island is but 27 leagues from 
Barbadoes, and they go down in 20 hours and are coming back four 
to six da} T s. Will send his Majesty answers to the queries, copy of 
which goes herewith. Desires to receive his Majesty's commission 
by March, when he will have good quantities of undertakers and 
passengers ready against the ships come in May, one month before 
the season for planting. As to the advantages to his Majesty, is of 
opinion that within six or seven years the revenue will not be less 
than 20,000. ; his Majesty may also have 2,000 acres laid out in 
four large sugar works, which may be peopled at an easy rate by 
sending over poor miserable people who have forfeited their lives 
for offences less than treason, murder, witchcraft, and the like, or 
vagrant and idle people who are continually put into Bridewell ; 
none to serve less than four years, his Majesty maintaining them 
with food and apparel. Thus in three or four years his Majesty 
may reap 8,000. to 10,000. per annum, but each settlement will 
require at least 2,000. laid out and 800 men and women to people 
these four works. This is the fourth time he has sent papers for 
his Majesty's view, the first of 28th February 1668-9, the next of 
22nd July 1669, the third of the 28th August last, which pointed at 
several grievances the island groans under, and showed how the 

H 2 



116 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1670. 

planters might increase their substance one third and his Majesty s 
customs from 8,000?. to 10,OOOZ. per annum. These things must be 
done as the Spaniard saith, con mana, by sleight and dexterity and 
by a method that will not enter everybody's thoughts. Thinks the 
300 carabines should be made 500. Encloses, 

298. I. Estimate of the quantity of acres in St. Lucia and in what 
proportion to be distributed. Suppose the island contains 
90,000 or 10,000 less than Barbadoes. Set apart for his 
Majesty 2,000 : glebe land for 16 parishes at 30 acres each, 
480 ; for himself, 500 ; 150 persons of substance at 50 acres 
each, 7,500 ; 3,000 people, whites and blacks, 10 acres per 
head, 30,000 ; 1,700 of these maybe whites who after their 
times are expired are to have 20 acres each, 34,000, making 
74,480, and leaving 15,520, which will give scope for 500 
more. So that 2,350 whites will take up all the ground, 
and the rest must be negroes and servants, for the island 
will crave at least 50,000 people, and there are not so 
little as 60,000 in Barbadoes. His Majesty would not 
do amiss to suffer the Scotts to come this way, who have 
been the chief instruments of bringing Barbadoes to its 
perfection and in two years would bring thousands of 
hardy people. Unless people have the encouragement 
above mentioned none will go, and Lord Willoughby pro- 
posed higher encouragement, which he could not have 
performed unless the island had been near as big again. 
298. Jl. Queries given to "Neighbour Martin," with answers. 
Has seen four or five small rivers 10 or 12 feet broad ; two 
or three very good roads ; one harbour land-locked ; land 
very fertile, but somewhat mountainous ; several sorts of 
gallant timber ; no French inhabitants or trade ; Indians 
come and go and bring turtle, potatoes, and fruit ; venomous 
snakes and great frogs : excellent good fish ; a small quantity 
of sugar canes growing ; the seasons of rain come as here, 
knows of no hurricanes ; some say the island is as big as 
Barbadoes, and some bigger, &c. Together 9 pp. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXV., Nos. 77, 77 i. IL] 

[Oct. 21.] 299. Petition of the Deputy-Governor, Council, and Assembly 
of Barbadoes to the King. That on the 12th September 1663, 
Francis Lord Willoughby required an imposition for his Majesty's 
use, whereupon it was enacted that 4|- per cent, of all commo- 
dities exported should be paid, provided the support of the 
Governor and other public charges expressed, should be satisfied 
out of the same. Notwithstanding which, and although for relief 
of the Leeward Isles petitioners have been at greater charge 
than they can well bear, the 4 per cent, is ordered to other 
uses than intended. Pray that same may be converted to no 
other uses than those for which it was raised ; and further, that 
they may be permitted free trade with Scotland for a supply of 
servants, and equal privileges of trade with Tangiers; that no 
person may be compelled off the island to answer any complaint 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



117 



1670, 



Oct. 21. 



Oct. 21. 

Barbadoes. 



Oct. 24. 

Albermarle 

Point in 
Ashley River. 

Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



in England; and that Sir Tobias Bridge's regiment may "be forth- 
with disbanded, the private soldiers being very few but the officers 
full, a great charge to his Majesty, but of little use in this time 
of peace. Signed by Chr. Codrington, Deputy-Governor, Hen. 
Hawley, Daniel Searle, Sam. Farmer, and John Knight, of the 
Council, and by Simon Lambarle; Speaker of the Assembly. 
Endorsed, Eead at Foreign Committee, 13 Dec. 1670, [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 78.] 

300. Journal of the Assembly of Barbadoes. Copy of the 
preceding. 1| pp. [Col. Entry Bh, No. 13, pp. 1-2.] 

301. The Council and Assembly of Barbadoes to Wm. Lord 
Willoughby (at London). Although they have not been made 
happy by his Majesty's concession of any part of their former 
addresses, they have not wanted information of his Excellency's 
endeavours on their behalf, for which they heartily thank him and 
beg him to continue promoting their petitions, especially those 
now sent, which they deem the most material. In token of 
gratitude have this day voted him 100,000 Ibs. of sugar, which 
though little when they take his Excellency into consideration, 
is something in respect of the extreme poverty of the country, 
they not being yet able to pay their debts, all which had long 
since been satisfied had the uses of the 4 per cent, been per- 
formed. The heads of their above petition to the King of this 
date are annexed. 2 pp. [Col. Entry Bh, No. 13, pp. 24.] 

302. Governor Sayle to Anthony, Lord Ashley. This is a 
duplicate of Governor Sayle's letter dated 25 June 1670 [see 
ante, No. 202], but ivith a different seal. Endorsed by John 
Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 41.] 



Oct. 24. 303. Entry of the preceding in " Carolina Letter Book," 
Shaftesbury [SJiaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 55, pp. 56-60.] 

Papers. 

Oct. 25. 304. Draft instructions for [Major Bannister and others, see 
Nos. 324, 325] appointed Commissioners for bringing off from 
Surinam his Majesty's subjects, their families, and estates. 1. To 
use their best endeavours to arrive as speedily as possible at 
Surinam. 2. To deliver to the Governor the State's letters, 
acquaint him with the tenor of his Majesty's Commission, and 
agree to a place of meeting for settling all things. 3. To insist 
upon leave to send on shore Major Banister or some other best 
acquainted with the planters, to let them know that none of the 
planters his Majesty's subjects who shall within one year trans- 
plant themselves to any of his Majesty's Colonies shall be liable 
for any debts confiscated to the Dutch by virtue of the Articles 
made by Col. William Byam ; and that his Majesty has written 
to the Governors of the Caribbees and Jamaica to apportion 
ground, and furnish them with provisions and other necessaries, 
and to endeavour to delay the publication of the 10 days' liberty 



118 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1670. 

to enter names, that so time may be gained fully to inform the 
planters what course has been taken for their encouragement to 
remove from Surinam. 4. To press for punctual payment of debts 
from the Dutch to the English, and to prevent any artifice for the 
detention of the English. 5. In the case of those indebted 
to the Dutch, the Commissioners must act as they shall judge 
best, but urge the detention of the English contrary to the 
Articles as the occasion of such debts having been contracted. 
6. Not to insisi upon any demands so as to make a breach. 7. If 
the ships cannot receive all, to endeavour to hire others. 8. If the 
departure be hindered by the Governor, to send one or both of the 
ships to England with an account of proceedings. 9. To do what 
else they shall judge necessary. Also additional instructions. 

1. As soon as the ships are laden and freed from Surinam to 
sail t f or the Leeward Islands or Jamaica, and land passengers. 

2. To send account thereof to his Majesty, and discharge or other- 
wise dispose of the empty ships. 3. To inform his Majesty 
whether the Articles of Surrender made by Col. Win. Byam have 
been punctually observed. Endorsed by Williamson, Surinam 
Commissioners, 1670. 5 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 79.] 

Oct. 25. 305. Copy of the preceding instructions comprised in 12 Articles 
without additional instructions, but the word Jamaica is omitted 
in Article 1 of above additional instructions. Endorsed by 
Williamson 25 Oct. 1670. Kec, 27. J. W. also for the Lord 
Arlington. 4s pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 80.] 

Oct. 25. 306. Copy of the preceding instructions without numbers to the 
several articles. Jamaica is also omitted in this copy. Endorsed 
by Williamson. Surinam Instructions, 25 Oct. 1670. Rec. 27. 
4 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 81.] 

Oct. 26. 307. Benedict Arnold, Governor [for the colony] of Rhode Island 
Newport. an d Providence Plantations, to the high and mighty monarch Charles 
II. Gratitude to his Majesty for their Charter of Incorporation and 
for sending his Commissioners to compose the differences in relation 
to their boundaries who determined that certain lands called the 
Nayhautinck and Narragansett countries and parts adjacent, which 
were claimed by the colony of Connecticut should be called the 
King's Province and be ruled by the petitioners (the writers of this 
letter) till his Majesty should declare his pleasure. By virtue of 
which decree petitioners have for several years had the jurisdiction 
of these lands until of late the colony of Connecticut, by the assistance 
of some of the principal as they term them united colonies, has 
entered into said lands and exercised jurisdiction therein. Have 
often proffered to leave the whole matter to his Majesty's decision, 
and have entreated them to forbear forcing it upon petitioners till 
his Majesty's pleasure be known but all in vain, no entreaties, no 
desires can procure them to accept so loyal and reasonable proposals. 
Beseech his Majesty to command both his colonies to appear by 
their agents in England before his Majesty to hear and determine 
this difference or to give such other orders as his Majesty shall 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 119 

1670. 

judge convenient for ending this and preventing the like disputes. 
1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 82.] 

Oct. 29. 308. Lord Ashley to John Dorrell and Hugh Wentworth. 
Exeter House, Acknowledges receipt of their letter of 17th February last [see 
on ' ante, No. 153] and thanks them for their willingness to put them- 
selves and the rest of the inhabitants of New Providence into his 
hands. In compliance with their desire six of the Lords Proprie- 
tors of Carolina have obtained a grant from his Majesty of the 
Bahama Islands [see No. 311] and having heard that Wentworth is 
Shaftesbury chosen Governor by the people, their Lordships approve same and 
will send commission and instructions as soon as their Lordships 
patent has passed the great seal having resolved to establish the same 
government as at Carolina and to give to the inhabitants of New 
Providence the same terms. As to themselves, will take care of 
their concernment to their satisfaction. They are desired by the 
first opportunity to send word how many people there are at New 
Providence, the quantity of land taken up and the advantages and 
disadvantages of the place, as also an account of the rest of the 
Bahama Islands. Will take care they be supplied with small arms 
and all necessaries at reasonable rates. About a bill of exchange 
for 20Z. drawn by O'Sullivan. They will see by the Constitution 
of their Lordships' government in the division and allotment of land 
that one fifth is to be in the possession of the proprietors, one fifth 
settled on the nobility, and three fifths possessed by the people, and 
as they are like to have a particular concernment in this doubts not 
they will be very careful of it. 2 pp. Examined by John Locke. 
[Shaftesbury Papers. Section IX., No. 55, pp. 5, 7.] 

[Oct. 29.] 309. Answer of Lord Willoughby to the petition of the planters 
and merchants of the Leeward Islands with their reasons for desiring 
that a general be commissioned over them not subordinate to the 
government of Barbadoes [see ante, No. 268] addressed to his 
Majesty's Council for Foreign Plantations. Upon the best inquiry 
Lord Willoughby has been able to make, petitioners are unknown to 
an} 7 of the considerable planters or traders in those islands and have 
subscribed petition in order to their own private ends. The repre- 
sentatives of said islands have under their own hands, which his 
Lordship is ready to produce, utterly disavowed what petitioners so 
boldly affirm will therefore apply himself to their reasons. Every 
one of said islands is governed by a deputy appointed by Lord 
Willoughby and has a distinct Council and Assembly who make 
their own laws, and the Council and Assembly of Barbadoes have 
neither jurisdiction nor influence over any of said islands as is sug- 
gested, nor would ever act anything to their prejudice, being equally 
concerned with them in the care of every of them and to strengthen 
themselves for their mutual defence and support in regard of the 
increasing strength of the French and of the Dutch a new planter, 
so that to divide the government and put every island upon its 
particular guard would enfeeble the strength of the whole. Had 
not Barbadoes expended at least 50,000?. during the Dutch war 
most of all of said islands had been destroyed, Should the govern- 



120 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1C70. 

ments be separated many inconveniences would ensue and persons 
indebted would escape from island to island for protection to the 
prejudice of trade and the discouragement of the merchant. Slaves 
also upon every slight discontent would fly from place to place. 
Refers to his narrative as to the delay in Barbadoes for re-establishing 
St. Christopher's. Concerning supplies of powder, &c. from Barbadoes 
the Assembly of Nevis returned their solemn thanks to Barbadoes 
for their assistance and begged a continuance thereof. As to distance 
Antigua is not above 70 leagues from Barbadoes, and advice may be 
had from the Leeward Isles ordinarily in six or seven days and from 
Barbadoes in three days. It is certain that the English interest in 
St. Christopher's was lost by their own precipitancy and rashness 
in not attending the orders from Barbadoes, and had they attempted 
nothing against the French until the arrival of the fleet, the French 
had inevitably lost their own instead of the English. Concerning 
the insolencies lately committed by the French, Lord Willougby has 
himself from time to time acquainted his Majesty's ministers there- 
with, and when he receives commands is ready to see the same duly 
put in execution. Is persuaded the matter of this petition will be 
found a design of very inconsiderable persons for their own private 
advantage. Delivered and read in Council Oct. 29, 1670. 3|- pp. 
[Col. Entry Bk, No. 94, pp. 8-11.] 

Oct. 31. 310. Governor Sir Thos. Modyford to Sec. Lord Arlington. Is 
Jamaica. advised by a despatch from our Admiral [Henry Morgan] that 
about the end of September Capt. Morrice, driven by wind into a bay 
at the East end of Cuba, found Signor Pardal, the vapouring Admiral 
of St. Jago, who had been sent there double manned, and with 80 
musketeers on land to attack Capt. Yellows (?), who was careening, 
but had gone. At the first volley the Spaniards left their guns, 
and the captain running to bring them back, was killed lay a shot in 
the throat, after which the men leapt overboard and about 40 
came short home, and the vessel with five prisoners was carried to 
the Admiral. Presents Pardal's commission, whereby his Lordship 
will find him a person of great value amongst them, and empowered 
to cany the royal standard in the maintop ; also the original canvas 
challenge, which was nailed to a tree near the west point of this 
island, whereby a guess may be made of the man's vanity. On 
the 7th inst. so violent a storm assaulted the fleet that all the 
vessels except the Admiral's were driven on shore, but all except 
three are fetched off again ; he has more men than shipping, which 
has encouraged some merchantmen to go up to him. Admiral Morgan 
has sent a small fleet with 400 men to the main of Carthagena 
for provisions, and thinks he cannot take the seas till the end of 
November. Six days since arrived in port three privateers, Prince, 
Lubborough, and Harrison, with 200 men, who went up the river 
of Nicaragua and attempted the fort, lately built to stop the 
incursions of the French, in which were 37 men ; the enemy killed 
16 and wounded 18, but yielded on quarter for life only. This 
done, the Castellano told them he had sent advice of their coming 
four hours before to Granada, whereupon Prince double manned 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 121 

1670. 

the swiftest caiioe, which, in three days' rowing overtook the advice. 
Leaving 20 men in the fort, they entered the town undiscovered, 
being but 120 men, and having by their usual wiles got the best 
of the town prisoners, plundered till noon, which they say yielded 
but 7 Ibs. of silver and 12?. in money per head, which is nothing to 
what they had five years since, but the town is much decayed, 
and the principal men gone to Guatemala, as being more secure. 
Modyford reproved the captains for daring to do this without com- 
missions, but not deeming it prudent to press the matter too far 
in this juncture, commanded them to attend the Admiral, which 
they were very ready to do, and will be gone in five days. One 
of these captains offered to make oath that he took a prisoner who 
told him that in September came advice from Old Spain, wherein the 
Governor was commanded to prosecute the war against this island, 
and much blamed for having done nothing all this time. The like 
letters were despatched to all the other Governors, by which his 
Lordship may have some aim at the violence of their intentions 
and the little force they have to execute them. Three days since 
came a sloop from Campeachy with seven men, laden with logwood ; 
the master told him he was chased by a frigate of 22 guns, and 
being forced to run into shoal water, the captain of the man-of-war 
in his long boat, with 14 men attacked the sloop, but they killed 
him five men, and took himself and the rest at mercy ; for 
the captain they got a good composition in linens and silks from 
the man-of-war, and dismissed him and the survivors. There are 
about a dozen vessels that only ply this trade, and make great 
profit selling the wood at 2ol. to SQL per ton ; they were privateers, 
but will not leave the trade again. They go to places either in- 
habited by Indians or void, and trespass not at all upon the 
Spaniard, and if encouraged, the whole logwood trade will be 
English, and be very considerable to his Majesty, paying 51. per 
ton custom. Humbly offers that the Governor of this place may 
have instructions to permit vessels to go to such places, to fetch 
thence logwood, cattle, deer, horses, and other commodities. Is 
persuaded above two thirds of the privateers will betake themselves 
to this trade when there is peace with Spain, and these soldierly 
men will be kept within peaceable bounds, and be always ready to 
serve his Majesty on any new rupture. The places they now trade 
at are Cape Gracia Dios, Darien, Mosquito, and many deserted 
places in Campeachy, Cuba, and Hispaniola. Has formerly troubled 
the General's despatch with these things, but never had any answer. 
Beseeches his Lordship seriously to consider this point, and believes 
that these new sucking colonies must have some help besides the 
native goodness of the soil. Has a great ambition to bring it to 
perfection, having waded in it these seven years, and obtained a 
perfect knowledge of the neighbouring countries, their forces, 
qualities, governments, &c., as also of this place and people, their 
interests and several factions, and how to keep them all composed 
for his Majesty's service without any considerable charge to his 
Majesty, which another Governor (let him be never so wise) shall 
not comprehend the first year. However, if it be his Majesty's 



122 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1670. 

pleasure to place another in his seat, will heartily and faithfully 
assist him, yielding cheerfully into his bosom all the fruits of his 
seven years' experience, and when no further useful, will humbly 
retire to his plantation and die. This he says to evince to the 
whole world that the happiness and thriving condition of this 
place is more than any other worldly thing in his spirit and desires. 
Forgot to tell his Lordship that Morgan wrote that he had 1,100 
English and 200 French, and is capitulating with 400 French more 
who are of the rebels ; it is thought most of them will increase 
this colony, some few of the best having already sent down their 
negroes. There are also the three Granada men and five sail more 
going hence with at least 400 English, so that he cannot be less 
than 2,100 well seasoned and experienced men. Endorsed by 
Williamson. Rec. 7th March 1670-1. Encloses, 

310. 1. Commission from Don Pedro de Ulloa Riva Deneyra, Gover- 
nor and Captain-General of Santiago, Carthagena, and the 
Indies, to Captain Manuel Rivero Pardal, with his frigate 
San Pedro y La fama to be Admiral against the English. 
Carthagena, 1670, June 6. Spanish. 6^ pp. 

310. II. Captain Manuel Rivero Pardal's challenge: "I, Captain 
Manuel Rivero Pardal, to the chief of the squadron of 
privateers in Jamaica. I am he who this year have done 
that which follows. I went on 'shore at Caimanos, and 
burnt 20 houses, and fought with Captain Ary, and took 
from him a catch laden with provisions and a canoa. 
And I am he who took Capt. Baines, and did carry the 
prize to Carthagena, and now am arrived to this coast, 
and have burnt it. And I come to seek General Morgan, 
with two ships of 20 guns, and having seen this, I crave 
he would come out upon the coast and seek me, that he 
might see the valour of the Spaniards. And because I 
had no time I did not come to the mouth of Port Royal 
to speak by word of mouth in the name of my King, 
whom God preserve. Dated the 5th of July 1670." 
[Col. Entry Bk, Vol. 27, p. 49.] Together, 9 pp. [Col. 

Papers, Vol. XXV., Nos. 59, 59. iv.] 

Nov. 1. 311. Grant to Christopher Duke of Albemarle, William Earl of 
Westminster. Craven, John Lord Berkeley, Anthony Lord Ashley, Sir George 
Carteret, and Sir Peter Colleton, their heirs and assigns, of "all 
those islands called Bahama, Eleutheria, Ucanis (?), Providence, 
Inagua, and all other those islands lying in the degrees of 22 to 27 
north lat., commonly known by the name of the Bahama Islands, or 
the Islands of the Lucayos." Constituting them absolute Lords and 
Proprietors, paying to his Majesty and his successors one fourth of 
all the gold and silver ore found, and also as often as he or they 
shall enter said islands one pound of fine silver. With power to 
establish counties, manors, &c., to make and administer laws, 
appoint magistrates, and to benefices, establish customs and ordi- 
nances as near as may be agreeable to those of England, transport 
people thither from England, or his Majesty's islands and colonies, 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 123 

1670. 

. and export goods from or import them into any of his Majesty's 
ports in England or elsewhere, paying the usual customs and duties. 
With license to export, custom free, all sorts of tools necessary for 
planters. Said grantees to enjoy all customs and subsidies assessed 
within said islands by consent of the freemen ; and power to sell or 
dispose of any part of said islands ; and to confer on any of the 
inhabitants marks and titles of honour, so as they be not the same 
as are conferred in England. Also power to build forts, castles, 
towers; appoint governors and other officers, civil and military; 
to muster and train men ; make war and exercise martial law. 
Said islands not to be subject to or depending on any other Govern- 
ment or Colony, but immediately upon the Crown of England ; 
with power to the grantees to grant indulgences and dispensations 
with regard to religious worship. 6 Membs. Patent Roll, 22 
Car. II., pt. 9.] 

1670 ? 312. "A short computation of expense in settling and improving 
the Bahama Islands for the first three years/' vizt. : For transport- 
ing 300 families, or 1,000 persons, 12,000?.; subsistence, tools, and 
other necessaries for six months, 25,000?. ; 600 slaves, 18,000?. ; 
recruiting the settlement for three years, 27,500?. ; 8,000 negroes to 
be delivered at Providence in two years before any returns can be 
expected, 200,000?. ; the like value in British goods ; wages and 
provisions for 200 workmen, 30,000?. ; fortifications already made, 
40,000?., and to be made, 50,000?. ; besides agency, sloop hire, and 
additional subsistence to the King's garrison of 100 men ; amount- 
ing in all to 633,000?. 1 p. [Col Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 83.] 

Nov. 1. 313. Lord Ashley to Joseph West. Acknowledges receipt of 
his letter of 27 June last (see ante, No. 203). Doubts not that his 
care and prudence, which have so much contributed to the promis- 
ing condition of the settlement in Carolina, will answer the ex- 

Shaftesbury pectation we all have of his management of this affair, and Lord 
Papers. Ashley himself very much relies upon him in it. Hears the Port 
Royal, which was thought to have foundered in the storm, was 
run on shore on the Bahamas. Begs, that he take care to get as 
many of the men who were saved, which will be a good addition 
to his number and strength. For the well ordering the manage- 
ment of the provisions is informed that if a right course be taken 
in planting, the people may be maintained in future by the pro- 
ducts of the county. The Spanish Ambassador has assured Lord 
Ashley that Mr. Rivers and the rest detained by the Spaniards 
at St. Katherine's shall be re-delivered. Is told that upwards of 
2 cwt. of ambergris has been taken up at Ashley River, but 
neither West nor Governor Sayle have given any account. Desires 
he will diligently inquire into the matter. Does not expect that 
any of those who the Lords Proprietors have been at the charges 
of transporting and maintaining in a fruitful country would make 
their Lordships so ungrateful a return as to go about to defraud 
them of their just rights. And as they shall take care that nobody 
there shall be oppressed in his just rights and liberties, so they 
expect that nobody should offer to injure them by such fraud, as 



124 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670. 



Nov. 3. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



Nov. 4. 

Barbadoes. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



they will not suffer him to use to his neighbour. Looks to hear 
from him concerning this, and by every opportunity concerning the 
state and progress of affairs. And that he may not hereafter 
mistake the name of the place he is in, he is to take notice that 
the river was by Capt. Sandford long since named Ashley Biver, 
and is still, to be called so, and the town he has now planted out 
he is to call Charles Town, His present palatine is Lord John 
Berkeley, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, who has succeeded the Duke 
of Albemarle, deceased. l pp. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., 
No. 55, pp. 3, 5.] 

314. Release from Anthony Lord Ashley of his eighth part of 
the propriety of Carolina to Thomas Stringer of St. Clement Danes, 
co. Middlesex, upon trust for the benefit of the son and heir of the 
said Anthony Lord Ashley and his heirs male for ever. With power 
to said Lord Ashley to revoke and make void the same. Signed by 
Lord Ashley, with seal. Endorsed, " The release of Carolina to 
Mr. Stringer." [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 43.] 

315. " Barbados Prockmation." Whereas certain intelligence is 
now come from Ashley River, in the province of Carolina, by the 
Carolina frigate, Capt. Henry Brayne, now riding in Carlisle Bay, 
that all those people who departed hence about 12 months past in 
said frigate for the settling of the province are in very good health 
and safely arrived at Ashley River, and settled in a very rich and 
fertile soil in 32 45' N. L., the river convenient for ships of 100 to 
400 tons, and which beyond all men's expectations produces all 
manner of plants which this island affords, of which experience has 
been had in planting sugar canes, cotton, ginger, tobacco, potatoes, 
yams, corn, &c., and that from this day forward there will be no 
need of supplies from hence, as what is planted will be sufficient to 
maintain them and to spare, the friendly Indians supplying them 
with deer, fish, and fowl in great abundance, as likewise assisting 
them to plant. For the better expedition in settling said province 
the Lords Proprietors have provided said Carolina frigate for the 
transportation of such people, with their servants, negroes, or utensils, 
as will be ready to depart within 30 days from the date hereof. 
All persons as formerly underwrote 1,000. or more of muscovados 
sugar towards defraying the charge of setting forth Capt. Hilton 
on the discovery of said province of Carolina will have certain 
quantities of land allotted to them in consideration of their dis- 
bursements, according to the terms promised, said land to be run 
to every such person before 25th March next. As likewise those 
who are now minded to transport themselves for this present expe- 
dition in said frigate shall have the benefit of the ensuing articles 
for grants of land, &c. confirmed unto them at their arrival in 
Ashley River by the GoA T ernor and agents of the Lords Proprietors ; 
those not able to pay for their own passage or furnish themselves 
with provisions shall for the same pay to said Lords Proprietors, 
within two years after their arrival at Ashley River, 500 Ibs. 
merchantable tobacco, cotton, or ginger, or what they shall first 
produce ; all persons willing to transport themselves on these terms 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 125 

1670 

to repair to John Strode, merchant, at St. Michael's Town, where 
Capt. Henry Brayne will confirm their agreement, Major Nath. 
Kingsland at Windward, Thos. Colleton at the Cleift, Sir^ John 
Yeamans at Leeward; these may also put names timely in the 
secretary's office, according to the custom of this place, to prevent 
the ship staying for their tickets. Annexed, 

315. i. The conditions of the grants of the Lords Proprietors of 
Carolina to those that settle therein. Endorsed by John Locke, 
as above. 2 pp. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 44.] 

Nov. 6. 316. Commission appointing Major James Bannister Major- 
General of all the forces in the island of Jamaica, under the orders 
of the Governor and Lieutenant-Governor. Also note of the pro- 
visions necessary for victualling his ship. Endorsed, Mr. Ranger's 
note for provisions and other necessaries for Major Bannister's 
vessel, and with notes by Williamson, 5QI. or 60/. given to Major 
Bannister for providing himself with these things. Two papers. 
3 pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XXV., Nos. 84, 85.] 

Nov. ? 317. Draft in Williamson's hand, with corrections, of the above 
commission to Major James Bannister. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. 
XXV., No. 86.] 

Nov. ? 318. Copy of commission to Maj. Bannister, not so full, but to 
the same effect as the above. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 27, p. 84.]j 

Nov. 6. 319. Names of the persons agreed unto to be inserted in the 
commission and instructions for fetching off the English from 
Surinam, viz., Major James Bannister, Capt. Francis Yates, Thomas 
Stanter, Lieut. Henry Masey, Capt. James Maxwell, Lieut. Tobias 
Bateman, Capt. Christopher Reader, Henry Ayler, Master of the 
America, Richard Colvile, Master of the Dutch Flyboat, and John 
Ranger, Master of Major Bannister's Flyboat ; any three to be a 
quorum, of whom Bannister, Yates, or Ayler to be one ; to whom 
only the additional instructions (after shipping the English from 
Surinam) are to be directed, impowering Bannister (and in case of 
death or absence, Yates and then Ayler) to give orders to the 
masters of the two merchant ships. Lord Arlington promised to 
speak to the Duke of York about the instructions to the masters 
of the hired merchant ships. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., 
No. 90*.] 

Nov. ? 320. Draft commission to Major James Bannister and others 
[names not given in this copy, see preceding] for removing the 
English and settling all disputes at Surinam. Refers to the Articles 
of Surrender of Surinam between Col. Wm. Byam and Admiral 
Abraham Crynsens, which were confirmed by the Treaty of Breda, 
and afterwards ratified by said Crynsens and others on | April 
1668 ; also the orders of the States General of the 4th and 21st 
August past, to Commander Lichtenberge, Governor of Surinam 
[see ante, No. 219]. For the better execution whereof, and that 
all disputes may be fairly settled, his Majesty has appointed the 
aforesaid Commissioners to demand and treat with Commander 



126 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



Oct.? 



Nov. 6. 

Whitehall. 



Nov.? 



Nov. 6. 

Whitehall. 



1670. 

Lichtenberge concerning the execution of all that has been agreed 
upon or granted to his Majesty's subjects in that Colony, particu- 
larly as to their liberty of departing thence with their slaves and 
goods. Draft, with corrections in the handwriting of Williamson, 
who has endorsed it, Minute, 1670. 4<pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XX V., 
No. 87.] 

321. Fair copy of the preceding. 5 pp. [Gol. Papers, 
Vol., XXV., No. 88.] 

322. Entry of the above commission to Major James Bannister, 
Captain Francis Yates, Thomas Stanter, Lieut. Henry Masey, Capt. 
James Maxwell, Lieut. Tobias Bateman, Capt. Christopher Reader, 
Henry Ayler, Richard Colvill, and John Ranger. [Col. Entry Bks., 
No. 77, pp. 20-28, No. 78, pp. 75-79, and No. 93, pp. 10-11.] 

323. Draft, in the handwriting of Williamson, of part of Com- 
mission for fetching off the English from Surinam. 1 p. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 89.] 

324. Instructions to Major James Bannister, Capt. Francis 
Yates, Thomas Santer, Lieut. Henry Masey, Capt. James Max- 
well, Lieut. Tobias Bateman, Capt. Christopher Reader, Henry 
Ayler, Richard Colvill, and John Ranger, the King's Commissioners 
for bringing off from Surinam his Majesty's subjects, their families, 
and estates. Calendared ante, No. 304. 3 pp. [Col. Entry Bks., 
No. 77, pp, 29-31, No. 78, pp. 80-84, and No. 93, pp. 11-12.] 

Nov. 6. 325. Additional instructions to Major Jas. Bannister, Capt. 

Whitehall. Fras. Yates, and Henry Ayler. As soon as they are freed from 
Surinam to sail for Barbadoes, St. Kitts, or any of the Leeward 
Isles or Jamaica, and suffer such people as desire it to settle there. 
To send home an account of their proceedings, and whether the 
Articles for the first surrender of Surinam made by Col. Byam have 
been observed. 1 p. [Col. Entry Bks., No. 77, p. 32, No. 78, 
pp. 85-86, and No. 93, p. 13.] 

Nov. 6. 326. H. Slingesby, Secretary to the Council of Trade, to Joseph 
Queen Street. Williamson, Secretary to Lord Arlington, at his lodgings in Scot- 
land Yard. Having notice that Sir Philip Frowde's son, one of 
his clerks, whom he ordered to call upon Williamson for copy of 
the Articles of Surinam had misbehaved himself, and left a note 
about said Articles in a slighting way, begs to have a copy of said 
paper, with an account of his clerk's carriage in the business. 
Yesterday, upon Major Bannister's motion for leaving out of his 
commission and instructions some of the English planters at Suri- 
nam, who might be unwilling to leave the place, it was ordered by 
the Council that Thomas Stanter and Lieut. Tobias Bateman be 
left out, and one Gerrard Marshall, Master Mate of the America, 
put in; which Williamson will be pleased to have done. 1 p. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 90.] 

Nov. 7. 327. Govr. Wm. Lord Willoughby to Col. Codrington, Deputy 

London. Governor of Barbadoes. Sends copy of petition and reasons lately 

put to the Council for Foreign Plantations by some who pretend to 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 12/T 

1670. 

be employed for the Leeward Isles, together with his own answer. 
If the Leeward Isles have the same desires with the petitioners, 
cannot but think they are acting the part of him that saws off the 
bough he sits on. What the result shall be neither knows, nor, for 
his own private interest, has he any reason to care, for he would be 
quitted of the troublesome and hazardous part of his Government, 
from which he could never aim to reap any pleasure, profit, or 
advantage ; but cannot easily be persuaded that the projectors are 
in earnest. Holds it advisable that they immediately send copies 
of these papers to the Leeward Isles, that if parties in this project 
they may see how much they have mistaken their interest, and if 
not they may take the speediest course to vindicate themselves. 
Has it from very good hands that Sir Charles Wheler, one of the 
farmers of the 4 per cent., is to be the man, which may be worthy 
most serious consideration ; and it is fit they should be acquainted 
that the building of forts and supply of soldiers and ammunition is 
what he has often pressed on his Majesty as absolutely necessary, 
and has always purposed to appoint a Lieutenant- General among 
them ; so these things are only a blind by the petitioners, whilst 
they introduce their destructive dividing design, which must end 
either in the ruin of those islands, or in subjecting Barbadoes to 
a Lieutenant-General resident at St. Kitts. Has also sent a copy 
of the Council's letter, and inquiries, which they are requested to 
answer. If clipping his wings be for his Majesty's honour and 
the advantage of Barbadoes, though by misfortune a Leeward 
planter, he will never oppose it, but has given his reasons, as in 
duty bound, and let reason prevail. Encloses, 

327. I. The Council for Foreign Plantations to himself, Lord 
Willoughby. His Majesty having constituted them a 
standing Council for all affairs concerning his foreign 
plantations, it is his Majesty's pleasure that all Governors 
give them frequent information of the condition of their 
Governments. Desire him to send a copy of his com- 
mission and instructions, and return answer in writing to 
the several heads of inquiries herewith sent with all con- 
venient speed. 

327 II. Inquiries to the Chief Governor of Caribbee Islands 
concerning their strength and condition. 1670. Sep. 29. 
Read at a meeting of the Assembly at Barbadoes April 19, 
1671. Together 5 pp. [Col Entry Bk, No. 13, pp. 21-26.] 

Nov. 7. 328. Lord Ashley to Sir John Hayden. The courtesy where- 
with he entertained " our people " at their passage to Carolina, 
and the forwardness with which he hath assisted their new settle- 
ment there has obliged several persons of some consideration in 

Shaftesburj- England, whom he will not find unmindful of his favour. Has a 
Papers. particular sense of his kindness himself, and shall be very glad of 
an opportunity to repay him otherwise than by bare acknowledg- 
ments. Begs his favour to search into the truth of a matter of 
some moment in reference to 2 cwt. of ambergris, said to have been 



128 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670. 



Nov. 9. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



Nov. 9. 

Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



taken by some of " our people," a part whereof belongs to the 
Proprietors. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 55, p 9.] 

329. Henry Brayne to Lord Ashley. Has written of all proceed- 
ings from Virginia and the hopes of their settlement if it be but well 
managed, for the coast and country will answer any man's expec- 
tations, both as to navigation and plantation, and the greatest of 
our wants is good men of reason, fit for a commonwealth, for 
though the Governor is ancient and crazy, yet if there was but 
a wise council of planters it would be for the good of the settlers 
and a great encouragement to lay out their money, but are now 
constrained to follow the rules of those who are ignorant, greatly 
to the ruin of the settlers. Assures his Lordship there are but 
four or five men of the Council that have any reason, viz. : 
Capt. West, Messrs. Bull, Scrivenor, Dun, and Dalton, who are 
good honest men but know nothing of planting ; if there were 
more of the Council who did their grievances would soon be 
remedied. Complaints against Capt. O'Sullivan, Surveyor-General, 
for his rash and base dealings and abuse of the Governor, Council, 
and country ; his surveying very irregular and gives no satisfac- 
tion. Suggest the appointment of a new surveyor. Has hitherto 
been as great an encourager as any one ordinary man to the design, 
and has the best stock of any three men in the Colony, but his 
grievance is that he has not as yet a convenient piece of land 
worth making a settlement upon, though Sir Peter Colleton pro- 
mised he would get Brayne a patent for 5,000 acres of land for 
" the moneys, &c. I was out at Cape Faire (sic), and for my first dis- 
covery with Col. Sandford," which he begs his Lordship to grant 
to him, with liberty to take it up in any part of the province, 
and upon which he will put 30 hands and will get 60 more to 
settle by him on their own lands adjacent. Asks permission also 
to take three or four small guns out of the ship for the safety of 
said Settlement. Is heartily sorry that Mr. Rivers and the rest 
are detained by the Spaniard, and, as "I have the Portugal 
language/' thinks he could procure their liberty the next summer 
if commanded by his Lordship. Mr. Colleton, and Mr. Strowd, 
the merchant, have furnished the ship with necessaries and pro- 
visions for passengers and seamen to 1007., and almost 20 servants 
betwixt himself and one Justice Harvey. We do dearly want 
another vessel that may sail at a small charge, which Brajne's 
mate is very fit to take charge of. If he is to be continued in 
the ship, desires a little better power, that "he may not be 
threatened by such of our Governor's Council to turn me out of 
the ship, or by any other men's humours for their own private 
interest." Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section 
IX., No. 45.] 

330. Entry of the preceding in Carolina Letter Book. [&ketftct* 
bury Papers, Section IX., No. 55, pp. 62-70.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 129 



1670. 

[Nov. 9.J 331. Petition of merchants and freeholders of Jamaica residing 
in London to the King. The Island of Jamaica has since 1664 been 
under the Government of Sir Thos. Modyford, whose prudent 
government hath not only exceedingly advanced the improvement 
of said island by the invitation of planters but hath also encouraged 
the old and attracted new merchants and planters to proceed 
vigorously in supplying those plantations with all things necessary, 
and that singly upon the advantages they have reaped from the 
prudent regulation and justice of the present Governor, as his 
Majesty will clearly understand from the annexed petition of the 
inhabitants of that island, which petitioners with all just confidence 
confirm. Pray that Sir Thos. Modyford may not be removed from 
said Government. Signed by J. Robinson, And. Riccard, Thomas 
Ducke, Nicolas Pennyng, Will. Bragg, Andrew Orgill, Sam. Bernard, 
Richard Ford, Fran. Chaplin, Jonathan Dawes, Andr.. King, Jno. 
Kempthorne, John Buckworth, Richard Beckford, Ja. Lucie. 
Enclose, 

331. i. Petition of officers, freeholders, and inhabitants of Jamaica 
to the King. That petitioners for several years lived in 
this island in very poor and unsettled estate, till it pleased 
his Majesty to send for their Governor Sir Thos. Modyford, 
who by the great encouragement he gave to planting (more 
especially by his own example, having brought and laid 
out a considerable stock) induced petitioners to betake 
themselves to a planting and settled condition, wherein he 
daily endeavours to oblige them by many wholesome laws, 
with a free and unbiassed administration of justice ; and 
the loud fame hereof draws great numbers of his Majesty's 
subjects from all parts to settle amongst them, to the great 
benefit of this island, his Majesty's revenue, and the 
English nation. Now petitioners being jealous (by reason 
of various reports) that his Majesty may be persuaded to 
remove so good a Governor, pray him to continue Sir 
Thos. Modyford as Governor, unless his Majesty shall find 
very pregnant reasons to the contrary. Signed by Cols. 
Henry Morgan and Theodore Gary, Lieut. -Cols. John 
Cope, Robert Byndlos, Thomas Ballard, and William Ivye, 
seven sergeant-majors, 17 captains, and 13 lieutenants, 11 
ensigns, 11 merchant freeholders, 2 2 merchant inhabitants, 
and 251 freeholders. Endorsed, Rejected. Endorsed, 
Read in Council Nov. 9th, 1870 and rejected. Together 
3 pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XXV., Nos. 91, 91 1.] 

[Nov. 12.] 332. Petition of several planters belonging to his Majesty's 
sugar plantations to the Council for Plantations. That the growth 
of said plantations has diminished one fourth and the charge of 
making sugar has much increased by reason whereof the English 
planter finds little or no recompense for hazard and labour, pray 
their honours to represent to his Majesty how ruinous it will be to 
the plantations and to trade to have any further imposition upon 
the growth of said plantations. Annexed, 

U 51912. I 



130 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1070 



Nov. 



12. 



22. 

Westminster 



Nov. 15. 



Nov. 15. 
Nov. 15. 

Earbadoes. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



332. I. Reasons against such impositions. The English sugar 

plantations are stated to employ 10,000 seamen in their 
trade, and by the industry of 10,000 English planters is 
produced a native commodity of 800,000?. per annum value. 
2 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 94, pp. 12-14.] 

333. Memorial to the Dutch Ambassadors, Joh. Boreel and Van 
Brenningen, on the proposed commission concerning Surinam. 
Have examined the commission annexed, and earnestly desire that 
it may be amended according to the observations hereunder speci- 
fied. These have reference to the obedience to be given to the 
Governor of Surinam and to other details in carrying out his 
Majesty's commission in Surinam so that a true report be made to 
his Majesty. French also English translation. Annexed, 

333. i. Commission to Major Bannister and others, see Gal. ante, 

No. 320. Endorsed by Williamson. Together 3 papers. 
18 pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XXV., Nos. 92-94.] 

334. Order of the Council for Foreign Plantations. The Lord 
President to move his Majesty that some discourse be had with the 
.Spanish Ambassador how the 16th Article of the late treaty with 
Spain in relation to the West Indies may be published there. 
Annexed, 

334. I. Article 10 of the treaty for the composing of differences, 

restraining of depredations, and the establishing of peace 
in America, between the Crowns of Great Britain and 
Spain. Within eight months from the exchange of 
ratifications they shall be published throughout the 
Dominions of both Confederates, as well in the West 
Indies as elsewhere. Together, 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 
XXV., Nos. 95, 96.] 

335. Copy of the above order. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 94, p. 3.] 

336. Sir John Yeamans to the Lords Proprietors of Carolina. 
Has formerly given account of their affairs at Port Royal to the 
time of the departure from hence of their fleet thitherwards through 
his great desire to serve their Lordships in a matter tending so 
much to the increase of the honour and benefit of the English 
dominion. Their fleet being dispersed by the violence of storms, he 
with much difficulty attained the harbour of " Burmoodoes," where 
refitting, took so much time he was of necessity engaged to return 
to Barbados to execute the King's commission for negotiation with 
the French commissioners in the affair of St. Christopher's. Before 
his departure and according to their Lordships' blank commission he 
" substituted " Col. Wm. Sayle, a Bermudian, the Governor, who, 
although a man of no great sufficiency, yet the ablest he could then 
meet with, and by whom he had great reason to hope many of that 
island would be the sooner invited to their Lordships' settlement. 
Arrival of the Carolina some few days past with intelligence of the 
welfare of the people there, the wholesorneness of the air, the fruit - 
fulness of the earth even to admiration, the pleasant situation beyond 
expression, the friendliness and ready assistance of the natives, with 
whom they have contracted a perpetual peace and friendship by 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 131 

1670. 

articles ratified by their supreme Cassique. Account of the warlike 
posture of the Spaniards and their endeavours to stir up the Indians 
to prevent the English settlements, threatening destruction to those 
Indians who continued their friends. Complains of the poorness of 
spirit shown by Governor Sayle in this business, which may in the 
future cause greater inconveniences, to prevent which Sir John intends 
,oing thence the latter end of the coming summer, if possible. Will 
endeavour the speedy dispatch of their ship, with what passengers 
he can encourage to that design, the welfare of that Colony now 
principally depending upon the increase of their strength and 
numbers. Holds it his duty to give their Lordships notice that 
sundry gentlemen in these parts desirous to be concerned in their 
province are absolutely dissatisfied and discouraged upon considera- 
tion of the 10th article in the concessions in the charter, viz., That 
the lands appertaining to all Landgraves or Cassiques, with the 
dignities, shall go to the heir male, and for want of issue escheat to 
the Proprietors. Now they say that all such lands so assigned, 
being altogether without improvement and from whence no produce 
can be reaped without vast disbursements, nor advantage hoped for 
till the second generation, it will be an undertaking not warranted 
by discretion to hazard so great an estate upon such an uncertain 
limitation, and therefore they will by no means be induced to lay out 
their money in that settlement unless it may redound to them and 
their heirs for ever. But as to the bare title of honour, they are 
contented that in default of heirs male it may be in their Lordships' 
gift, if they will have it so. Further, they say they are not satisfied 
how inferior persons that hold under these Landgraves or Cassiques 
shall be dealt with in case of such an escheat as aforesaid, and whether 
they shall be put to compound with their Lordships in such case for 
their inheritances. There are some that take exception that their Lord- 
ships have not in their Concessions acquitted the produce of the country 
from customs and impositions answerable to his Majesty's grant to 
their Lordships, which they conceive their Lordships have omitted 
for their own advantage. If their Lordships will explain themselves 
in these particulars by some instrument as public as their Concessions, 
it will abundantly satisfy many here who are men of purse and 
parts to promote the settlement. In the meantime if their Lordships 
will send him a patent for a Landgrave, with directions for laying 
out the baronies belonging thereto, by a tenure free and unfettered, 
so that the estate he intends to bury there may in its resurrection 
become the benefit of his posterity, it will be a means the sooner to 
free those persons from their doubts and jealousies and to encourage 
them to go on cheerfully in the great work their Lordships have 
designed. 4 pp. Endorsed by John Locke. [Skaftesbury Papers, 
Section IX., No. 46.] 

337. Sir John Yeamans to Lord Dudley. Refers to his preceding 
letter to the Proprietors of Carolina. Intends going in person 
thither this summer; his great ambition to serve his Lordship. 
Sends him 12 cedar planks as the firstfruits of that glorious 
province, which promises in abundance all those good things the 

I 2 



132 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



Nov. 15. 

Barbadoes. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



heart of man can wish for. Encloses letter from Henry Woodward, 
who was left at Port Royal by Col. Robt. Sandford upon the first 
discovery, which letter Sir John desires may be imparted to the rest 
of the Lords Proprietors. Is informed that Woodward has made a 
very large discovery in the colony, but is much unwilling to declare 
it to the Government there, being desirous to be sent for to make it 
out to their Lordships, which, if granted, will redound much to the 
prejudice of that settlement, he being the only person by whose 
means they hold a fair and peaceable correspondence with the 
natives. Questions not at his own arrival there to have a full 
relation of all Woodward's proceedings, which he will send for their 
Lordships' consideration. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 55, 
pp. 72-74.] Encloses, 

337. i. Henry Woodward to Sir John Yeamans. Has discovered 

that fruitful province of Chusytachyq, where the Emperor 
resides, a country so delicious, pleasant, and fruitful that 
were it cultivated doubtless it would prove a second 
paradise. It lies west by north from us 14 days' travel 
after the Indian manner of marching. There he contracted 
a league with the Emperor and all the petty cassekas, so 
that after his return by the help of (Owen) Jones they 
were able to procure provisions from the natives, without 
which it had gone very hard with them all. Attempts of 
the Spaniards and the Indians of St. Helens to starve 
them out and make them surrender frustrated by the 
arrival of the Carolina ; her great guns made them retreat 
to St. Augustine. The Spaniards threaten to destroy the 
Indians of St. Helens, Cuinbokee and Edisto, who are 
friendly to the English. Is more beholden to his agent 
than anything from the public. Will endeavour to send 
him some of their American rarities, their troubles at 
present not permitting him to travel the country, it being 
his business to wait in town and to give an account of 
what relations the natives bring from the southward or 
the northward. 1\ pp. Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftes- 
bury Papers, Section IX., No. 33.] 

338. Sir John Yeamans to Sir Peter Colleton. Has received 
his letter of 28 August with copy of his of 30 May, but not the 
original. About six weeks since arrived Mr. Berrow who was in 
the Port Royal bound for Carolina, a person very industrious in 
taking an exact account of their unhappy voyage, which he 
brought Sir John, with plots of the Bahamas, copies of which 
his brother Thomas Colleton should give to him. Arrival of the 
Carolina frigate from Carolina a few days since with ample 
account of the people's arrival and good health, only their de- 
ficiency in strength and number of people. Has withdrawn 
several persons from their resolutions of other settlements, as 
Col. Sharpe from New York, who intended a large settlement 
there, but has suspended the same until a moderation be made 
to the several exceptions specified in his general letter enclosed 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 133 

1 670. 

to the Lords Proprietors. Presumes the Carolina may be ready 
in about three weeks to depart for said province, wherein by 
his persuasion go Oapt. Godfrey and Thos. Gray, Sir John's chief 
agent here with a very considerable strength of servants, and 
many others unknown to Sir Peter, so needless to name. An Act 
lately passed in this island imposing great penalties upon those 
persuading any to go hence for other colonies which will be a 
great hindrance of supplies from hence. Desires his concurrence 
and urgency for a speedy answer to Jiis general letter. 2 pp. 
[Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 47.] 

Nov. 17. 339. Report of the Council of Plantations to the King on peti- 
tion of planters and merchants of the Leeward Isles. That said 
islands might be under one Go vernor-in- Chief not subordinate to 
the Governor of Barbadoes, for the reasons annexed. Two papers, 
both signed by Sandwich, President; Rich. Gorges, W. Alington, 
Tho. Grey, H. Brouncker, Hum. Winche, S. Titus, Ed. Waller, and 
H. Slingesby, Secretary. See Gal. ante, No. 268, Enclosures I., n. 
2 pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 97.] 

Nov. 17. 340. Copies of the preceding report and enclosures. [Col. Entry 
Bk.,No. $4>,pp. 15-16.] 

Nov. 17. 341. Journal of the Assembly of Barbadoes. Commission read, 
from Governor Lord Willoughby to Capt. Abraham Langford, 
dated 19th August 1670, appointing him Lord Willoughby's sole 
agent for inquiring into the collection and receipt of all revenues 
belonging to his Majesty in Barbadoes and the Caribbees. Answer 
and reason of Nathaniel Johnson why he did not pay the gunner 
and matrosses according to order. 

Nov. 17. Symon Lambert, Speaker on behalf of the Assembly, to Gov. 

Barbados. Lord Willoughby, in answer to his of 20th August last [see ante 
No. 236]. Thank him for his great care and pains which they 
well hoped might have proved more effectual; but they cannot 
despair, since his Majesty promised in his letter of 6th April to 
take their addresses into consideration. Cannot judge their opposers, 
but that his Excellency will deem them the representatives of the 
island as best knowing their own wants. Have contracted their 
addresses into the fewer and the most necessary heads to be 
prosecuted. Might with more reason complain of the Royal 
Company, who have not complied with" their proclamation to 
furnish negroes at 171. or 2,400 Ib. sugar per head, but have 
sold the best to the Spaniard, and the refuse here at near double 
that sum. The laws every way effectual and speedy for the re- 
covery of debts as the laws of England. The chief consideration 
now before them whether the planters shall have credit from the 
merchant or purchase for ready payment, which will encourage 
the planter to the utmost to make good sugar, and if after all 
their care they come short of the goodness of Jamaica sugar they 
must impute it to the unfitness of their land ; but if his Majesty 
vrill grant them a mint, ready payment will be made and the 



134 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1670. 

complaints of merchants be answered. Through the unseasonable- 
ness of last year the sugar proved worse than ordinary. Take 
notice of his Majesty's great care in appointing the committee, 
before whom they hope his Excellency will at all times appear 
on their behalf. As to the 4 per cent., they have thought it 
not impertinent to acquaint him, that it was given for maintain- 
ing the dignity of his Majesty's authority here, the public meeting 
of the sessions, the often attendance of the council, the reparation 
of the forts, the building a sessions house and a prison, and all 
other public charges, and therefore suppose the charge on Nathaniel 
Johnson for payment of matrosses was just and warrantable, and 
cannot but hope his Majesty's favour therein ; which they desire 
he will speedily represent in regard the prison is utterly decayed, 
and the forts soon will be the like. Have requested some gentle- 
men in London to afford their utmost assistance to his Lordship 
in accomplishing their desires to his Majesty, and defending their 
rights ; which they desire his Excellency to take in good part, 
for they neither doubt nor fear his prudence or care, but desire 
him to be their director. 17th November, 1670. 

Nov. 17. Symon Lambert, Speaker of the Assembly, to the Gentlemen 
Barbadoes. Planters in London, viz., Sir Peter Colleton, Sir Paul Painter, 
Henry Drax, Philip Bell, Constant Sylvester, Edward Pye, Thomas 
Wardall, Col. Thomas Middleton, Jacob Lucy, John Bawden, Major 
John Gregory, and Ferdinando Gorges. Refer to addresses to his 
Majesty delivered to Governor Willoughby on leaving the island 
in 1668, to his Excellency's letters of 20th May and 20th August 
1669. Taking his Excellency's advice have lately sent him a 
petition to his Majesty with fewer heads, begging his prosecution 
thereof; which letter, petition, and addresses are herewith enclosed ; 
and for that his Excellency's great concerns may not permit his 
often attendance, desires them, as greatly concerned in the welfare 
of this place, to apply to his Excellency to enforce their last 
addresses ; assist at all times before his Majesty and all Com- 
mittees, in asserting their wants and preventing anything that may 
be prejudicial ; and let them know how all things move. His Excel- 
lency is acquainted with these their desires ; and what charge may 
be expended will be discharged out of the first goods raised for any 
public use. Refer to the charge for the matrosses being denied by 
the Receiver here of his Majesty's revenue by his Excellency's 
order, and his commission to Capt. Langford. Heads of addresses 
sent by his Excellency in November 1668, to be presented to his 
Majesty. 1. To represent their sense of his Majesty's care. 2. The 
abuses in the Customs and mistakes of sugars. 3. Liberty to 
transport commodities to any place in amity with England, upon 
security given for payment of duties. 4. To set up a mint. 
5. The great inconvenience of patents. 6. Customs on goods from 
England to be taken off. 7. The customs on strong liquors in 
England to extend to those made here. 8. For procuring a 
charter to be made a body corporate, and to have all the powers 
formerly granted to the Earl of Carlisle. Also those to be now 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



135 



1C70. 



Nov. 18. 



presented [see ante, No. 299]. 
No. IS, pp. 6-14.] 



Together Si pp. [Col Entry Bk., 



342. Warrant to the Attorney- General. Whereas his Majesty 
by Commission^under the Great Seal of 30th July last constituted 
Edward Earl of Sandwich, Richard Lord Gorges, Wm. Lord 
Allington, Thomas Grey and Henry Brounker, Sir Humphrey 
Winch, Sir John Finch, Silas Titus, Edmond Waller, and Henry 
Slingesby his Majesty's Council for Foreign Plantations, and 
granted them certain yearly salaries, viz., to the Earl of Sandwich, 
as President of said Council, the sum of TOOL, and to each of the 
Council 500. ; his Majesty's pleasure is that the Attorney-General 
prepare a Bill to pass the Great Seal authorising the Commis- 
sioners of the Treasury to pay said salaries to said Earl of 
Sandwich, &c., so long as they shall serve as members of said 
Council, quarterly at the four usual feasts, to commence from 
Midsummer last ; and also to said Henry Slingesby or his assigns 
the further sum of 1,OOOZ. by the year to be employed for inci- 
dental charges relating to that service, according to such warrants 
as he shall receive from said Council. Mem. This warrant was 
signed anew the 2nd Dec 1670, with the addition of a grant to 
Dr. Benjamin Worsley of 300?. by the year, in consideration of 
the assistance he has already given and r>hall hereafter give in 
matters relating to his Majesty's Plantations. 1 p. [Dom. Entry 
Bk., Chas. II., Vol. 33, p. 59 fc] 

Nov. 20. 343. Henry Brayne to Lords Proprietors of Carolina. His last 
Barbadoes. was dated from. Virginia, 12 June, wherein he rendered a full 
account of all proceedings from Bermuda to Port Royal and from 
thence to Ashley River, before called Keywahah. Death of Mr. 
Shaftesbury Burgh, so applied to Maj.-Gen. Bennett and Capt. Godwin, who 
had their Lordship's goods in possession, and we're very ready to 
assist, as was also Sir Wm. Berkeley. Sailed on 4th August, met 
with a hurricane, but saved his ship, though a great deal of damage 
was done to the planters' crops and houses (in Virginia) so that 
tobacco will be extraordinarily dear. Anchored at the mouth of 
Ashley River 22 Aug., and seeing Indians ashore, went in his boat 
with Mr. Carteret and two Indians of our country ; account of their 
adventures with some Spanish Indians or Westoes, who fired upon 
them as they rowed off. Found all the Colony in arms, the Governor 
having been told by our Indians that Brayne's ship was one of the 
Spanish ships. Acquainted the Governor and Capt. West with what 
had passed, and desired that a party might be sent out against the 
Indians who opposed them, but nothing was done, tho' all the sea- 
men were willing to go. Is certain that if the Indians find they 
are let alone in their roguery it will increase their boldness and 
animate them on to more mischief. Through the ill-contriving of 
the Governor and Council, as Brayne understood by Messrs. Bull and 
Owen, neither Mr. Rivers nor the rest have been brought away 
[from St. Augustine], but Capt. Bayly has been left in the friar's 
hands, he being a person of very good worth and a good linguist. 



136 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1670. 

Consulted the Governor and Capt. West as to lading his ship with 
timber for Barbadoes or what else they could think on, but they 
answered that all the time Capt. Brayne was absent they were fain 
to put the people to a pint of peas a day, which sharp allowance 
was the cause of their having done little work and of no timber 
being ready to be shipped, as the distraction they were in about 
those Spaniards made them think it better to fortify themselves as 
strongly as they could, and to send Brayne away to Barbadoes 
before the foul weather set in. Fell down to the river's mouth, and 
met the sloop that was hired in Barbadoes, when we went down to 
Port Royal, deeply laden with corn, but not above two passengers, 
being afraid to venture because of the Spaniards, and of their 
dislike to the Governor, which Brayne read in some letters from 
Bermuda to some of our gentlemen that came out of England. 
Set sail for Barbadoes 23 Sept, where he arrived 31 Oct., being 
becalmed 12 or 14 days, and finds abundance of people making 
read} 7 to go down with him, from the good reports they hear of 
our country, assuring themselves that in one, two, or three years 
they will live there very happily and comfortably; the seamen 
have also a great fancy to settle there, and are going to apply for 
their wages to fit themselves out, he could not any longer keep 
them off their pay. -Capt. Godfrey and five hands go with him, 
also Mr. Gray, overseer to Sir John Yeamans, and 10 able men, 
most of them carpenters and sawyers. Mr. Stroud, the merchant, 
and Justice Harvy is sending down his son with 10 or 1 2 more 
hands. Sir John Yeamans has many more, who will in a short 
time be ready, and himself and friends will get about 10 hands, so 
shall be forced to get another vessel, and hopes to sail in about a 
month and touch at the Leeward Isles, especially at Antigua, where 
are abundant [persons] ready to desert, being a mere grave, and 
will never advance the King's interest, and where terrible hurricanes 
destroy their crops and houses every year. As our design is so 
likely to be prosperous they dearly want another vessel, either a 
pink of 70 or 80 tons or a ketch of 50 or 60 tons, which their 
Lordships would find both useful to their own interests and that of 
the country's. The Port Royal was cast away upon the Bahamas 
by the master's own wilfulness, and there is only Brayne's ship to 
depend upon, and she has been a long time off the ground and will 
want sheathing ; the necessity of another vessel. Supposes he shall 
carry down 150 or 200 people more, besides those who will come 
in the spring from other places when the country will be safely 
settled. Will then load with timber for Barbadoes, and with sugar 
from thence as deeply as she can swim to arrive in the Thames 
about the end of July, which freight will pay the seamen's wages 
and then fit her out again for our country, when he makes no 
question of having 200 or 300 people out of London. Recommends 
his mate, John Coming, a very honest, trusty, and able man to 
command said vessel, he having already an interest in our country, 
and knowing our coast and rivers, &c., and the bearer of this letter. 
4 pp. Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section 
IX,, No, 48.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



137 



1670. 

Nov. 20. 

Barbadoes. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



Nov. 20. 

Barbadoes. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



344. Henry Brayne to Lord Ashley. Understands that Capt. 
Gilbert, the bearer, hath a great inclination to our country, and 
believes if his Lordship gives Capt. Gilbert any encouragement he 
can get abundance of his sect or friends to settle, he having a very 
good ship for that purpose. Has heard Gilbert say he would come 
and see us if he could have encouragement as to a freight that 
might be worth his time. Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury 
Papers, Section IX., No. 50.] 

345. Henry Brayne to [Sir Peter Colleton]. Received his letter 
at Virginia advising Brayne to take in cattle, hogs, and provisions 
for our colony and to follow his former instructions to take the 
goods brought from Port Royal to Mr. Hallett and his brother 
Thomas Colleton and take their advice how to proceed. Thinks Mr. 
Stroud a more convenient man for that purpose who is a great settler 
and promoter of our design having with Justice Harvy got almost 
20 people to send down. Stroud and Thos. Colleton have taken up 
about 100?. to furnish our ship with necessaries and provisions for 
carrying on" our designs. Hopes to have a quick passage being so 
late in the year. Complains of having only heard from Sir Peter 
once and of the want of stores for his ship which has been almost 
18 months off the ground. About the account of the ship's stores 
and men to Thos. Colleton which he was ordered to give and which 
he has faithfully done. Her gains but little at present, only 
2,400 Ibs. of sugar for the passage of a young man and 1 3 hogsheads 
of tobacco from Virginia to Barbadoes. Could not take in a freight 
of timber at our colony, being tied by his instructions to follow the 
orders of the Governor and Captain West who said the safest way 
was to send Brayne for more people. Hopes now by the going down 
of Captain Godfrey, Mr. Gray and other ingenious planters that 
things will be better carried in future. If it be not convenient for 
Brayne to come home in the spring begs Sir Peter will send him to 
the value of 501. in commodities fit for New York as shoes, stockings, 
hats, blue linen, &c., with which it will be very useful to pay the 
carpenters and seamen. Proposes to fit his ship at New York, and 
as to the management of all things hopes power will be given to 
Thos. Colleton, Stroud, Sir John Yeamans, Major Kingsland, and 
himself. Our Governor is not fit, being very aged and feeble and 
having gone through a great deal of sickness of late, inclining much 
to the lethargy dropsy and other diseases, that what small reason 
he had is almost taken from him insomuch that he is hardly " com- 
l>ti* mcntes," and Brayne wishes him safe to his own house ao-ain 
at Bermudas. It is much doubted whether he can live, for Brayne 
left him sick and does not know whether he has recovered. Will 
pawn his own life that Sayle is one of the unfittest men in the 
world for his place and his being Governor keeps our settlement 
very much back and very chargeable to their Lordships. But 
though the Governor is crazy, yet if there were a wise council or 
three or four men of reason, planters who knew what did belong to 
settle such a country it would be to the good of the country and 



138 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1G70. 



Nov. 22. 

Barbadoes. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



Nov. 23. 

Barbadoes. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



their Lordships' interest. Brayne has himself the greatest inteiest 
of any one particular man in the country. As to the accuracy of 
his account has not charged one shilling more than his just right, 
which he desires may be paid to Peter Jones, Sir Peter Colleton's 
Secretary, if living. Wishes a commission from the Duke of York for 
the command of his ship and men, &c. There arc only himself, 15 
men and one boy in the ship, which is as little as possible he can 
sail her with safety. Has sent by Mr. Gilbert eight barrels of 
powder which were damnified in the storm and he desires may be 
changed. Will keep three barrels and deliver five barrels to Captain 
West. 4 pp. Endorsed by John Locke. {Shaftesbury Papers, 
Section IX., No. 49.] 

346. [N. Carteret] to [Sir George Carteret], Arrival of the 
ship (Carolina) on the coast [of Carolina] 22 August when Captain 
Brayne, himself with two others and an Indian went ashore ; a flag 
of truce, which proved to be a white handkerchief, displayed by 
some Indians who turned out to be Westoes, but seeing a great 
number in ambush caused them to row off again. Account of the 
efforts of the Westoes to surprise and take them and of their firing 
upon them before they could get to their boat. Arrival in Ashley 
River where they were received joyfully. How Captain Bayly and 
the Marshal of Key-awah who went to St. Augustine in a sloop com- 
manded by the Governor Sayle's son went ashore with letters to the 
friar and the Governor of St. Augustine, and were detained as 
pirates for want of credentials. 3 pp. Endorsed by John Locke. 
" N. Carteret to Sir G. Carteret, 22 Nov. 70." [Shaftesbury Papers, 
Vol. IX., No. 51.] 

347. Thos. Colleton to [Sir Peter Colleton]. Concerning bills 
given to various persons for payment for negroes for the Windward 
Plantation ; also Capt. Brayne's account. Sir Peter ought to take 
care to have things better ordered at Carolina, for not a stick came 
away from there in the ship, and 100 men upon the place, and all 
for fear of two or three Spaniards and a few Indians. The people 
mind solely their own interest, and not the Proprietors, who they 
think are bound to maintain them. About freight of cattle and 
goods. Begs instructions may be sent to the Governor and Capt. 
West to follow Colleton's orders as to the loading and sailing of 
the Carolina, by which means his vessel will do a great deal more. 
Looks upon the present Governor as very unfit, and if the Bermudians 
do not come to him this year he ought to be changed for a more 
active, prudent man ; but if he had a good Council he would do 
well enough. Suggests his having a blank commission empowering 
himself and others to appoint a new Governor in a case of necessity, 
for Sir Peter is so remote and it is so long before he can hear from 
hence that all may be lost before he can remedy it. Capt. Brayne 
has reduced the number of his seamen from 20 to 16 ; two or three 
have settled in the country, and others are going home to bring 
their families to do so ; a cargo of commodities for seamen's apparel 
very necessary. Capt. Brayne wishes Colleton to write in his 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



139 



ItiTO. 



Nov. 28. 

Jamaica. 



Nov. 29. 

Barbadoes. 



favour. New York a better place for cattle and horses than 
Virginia, the former about 50s. a head at New York and provisions 
cheaper ; so is clearly of opinion that Carolina should be stocked 
from thence and not from Virginia. Business matters ; shipping of 
molasses, rum, and tobacco ; the best way to employ the Carolina. 
Doubts not that 80 people will settle from Barbadoes, besides 
what may be expected from the Leeward Islands. Indeed the 
Proprietors are much obliged to John Stroud, who could not have 
done more to promote the design had he been their agent, and has 
engaged several of his own relations to go, and is a copartner him- 
self. Thinks about 150 will go by the next shipping and upon the 
John and Thomas, a ship of our own. Entreats the Proprietors to 
thank Stroud for his kindness and to grant him a considerable 
parcel of land. Both himself and Capt. Brayne believe J. Stroud 
will be fitter for liis concernments than Capt. Hallet, who is, as it 
were, strange to them all. Has been constrained to take up bills 
on account of fittings and provisions for the Carolina; remarks 
thereon ; the difference of taking up of sugar for bills of exchange is 
30 per cent. 4 pp. Endorsed by John Locke, "Mr. T. Colleton to 
Sir Peter Colleton. 23 Nov. 70." [Shaftesbury Papers, Section 
IX., No. 52.] 

348. Tho. Bromhall, junr., to Williamson. Is safely arrived at 
Jamaica. Called in at Montserat and Nevis, which are both 
much ruined by hurricanes, and doubtless this is the best place in 
the West Indies. Is but a week since arrived, but was loth to 
omit any opportunity of making his acknowledgments for all 
favours, especially in recommending him to Col. Lynch. One 
Mr. Rookes will wait on him about the encouragement of the Trade 
Mercury, which, if he be pleased to join to the Gazette, it will be 
to his advantage ; doubts not that when he has considered how 
public a good it will be and how great a security to the peace of 
the nation, he will encourage it and further oblige Bromhall. 
Endorsed, Rec. Feb. 1670-1. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 98.] 

349. Order of the Deputy Governor and Council of Barbadoes. 
On a writ of error brought by William White, father-in-law and 
guardian of James White, executor of James White, late of this 
island, deceased, to reverse a judgment, dated the 28th April 1670, 
obtained against him at the suit of Segar de Hem (?), attorney of 
Sir John Maynard, knt., for the sum of 2,000?. and 41s. costs. 
The board found error in the judgment and ordered it to be 
reversed. Then follow a declaration of the state of the case, and 
reasons why the judgment was in error, signed Sam. Williams and 
Wm. Carpenter ; and mem. that petitioner conceives that the 
proceedings there ought to be summary, and not according to 
formalities of courts, but the substance and truth, else all their 
proceedings in English are error, it being impossible that pro- 
ceedings there should be the same as in England. Endorsed, 
" Read June 5, 72." 3| pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 98*.] 



140 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



Nov. 

Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



1670. 

Sept.-Nov. 350. Extracts in the handwriting of John Locke of letters from 
Carolina to Lord Ashley, viz. from 

William Owen, Sept. 15 (calendared No. 261). 

Stephen Bull, Sept. 12 (cal No. 259). 

Henry Brayne, Nov. 9 (oal. No. 329). 

Joseph West, Sept. (cal. No. 257). 

William Sayle (cal. No. 253). 

Sir John Yeamans, Nov. 15 (cal. No. 336). 

Joseph Dalton, Sept 9 (cal. No. 248). 
5 pp. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 39.] 

351. Extracts, in the handwriting of John Locke, of letters from 
Carolina from the Governor and Council, Sir John Yeamans, Thos. 
Colleton, Hen. Woodward, Jos. Dalton, Jos. West, Henry Brayne, 
&c. (already calendared). Arranged under the following heads, 
viz. : Proposals and wants ; Governor and Government ; Information ; 
Provisions and stores ; Chusytachyque ; Indians ; Spaniards ; Town ; 
Country; Ship Carolina; 'Planters going. 8 pp. [Shaftesbury 
Papers, Section IX., No. 53.] 

[Dec. 4.] 352. Petition of Randall Holden and John Greene, deputies for 
the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantation, to the King. 
In 1644 the chief Indian Princes of the Narragansett country sub- 
mitted themselves to his Majesty's father, and renewed their sub- 
mission in 1664 in the presence of his Majesty's commissioners, 
who named the country the King's Province, and committed the 
government to the Governor and Council of Rhode Island and 
Providence Plantation, who since that year have actually governed 
it, notwithstanding the many encroachments of the neighbouring 
colonies of Massachusetts, Plymouth, and Connecticut. But about 
last June the magistrates of Massachusetts set up printed papers 
declaring the said Narragansett country to belong to them, with 
offers to make sale of the lands to any who will purchase the same, 
and do dispose the government thereof to Connecticut Colony. All 
which is humbly submitted to his Majesty for redress. Endorsed, 
Read in Council the 4th Dec. 1670. Read again the 2nd of March 
1679-80. I p. [Col Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 99.] 

353. Order of the King in Council. That the petition of Wolf- 
gang Howser, attorney of Henry Howser and James Zellar, his 
Majesty's chaplains in Jamaica, concerning an allowance for main- 
tenance of said chaplains, be referred to his Majesty's Council for 
Foreign Plantations, to report to this Board. Endorsed, Received 
17th December 1670. 17th of January reported by Mr. Brouncker 
that the Lords of the Treasury will meet thereupon when notice 
given. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 100.] 

354. Sebastian Byar [Bayer], of the Council of Antigua to [Lord 
Willoughby]. The French King has had two considerable men-of-war 
and several Biscay sloops with oars, attending his islands near 12 
months, one of them carries 70 guns. For facilitating the trade 
has sent a considerable sum of a peculiar coin for the use of those 



Dec. 7. 

Whitehall. 



Dec. 7. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 

1670. 

islands. The French endeavour to make their islands very con- 
siderable, and show they set great value upon them. The 
inhabitants of the English Islands suspect they are neglected. ^ p. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 100*.] 

Dec. 9. 355. Warrant to the clerk of the Signet. To prepare a bill for the 
- King's signature to pass the Privy Seal to pay to Sir Thomas Lynch 
1,OOOZ. for his equipage and expense in going to Jamaica, whereof 
we have designed him our Lieutenant-Governor. Signed by the 
King and countersigned by Sec. Lord Arlington. 1 p. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 101.] 

Dec. 9. 356. Minute of preceding. [Dow. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. 34,. 
p. 65.] 

Dec. 14. 357. Sir Peter Colleton and other planters in London to Chris- 
topher Codrington, Deputy Governor, the Council and Assembly of 
Barbadoes. The prodigious power France is arrived unto has so 
alarmed all the states of Europe that the writers are suspicious 
England will not be long without a war, and therefore warn them 
to be thinking how to defend themselves. Are informed that nigh 
2,000 people are gone off Barbadoes this last year, and more are 
still going. Recommend the making of a law that no man 
possessed of land in Barbadoes be capable of purchasing any more, 
which will uphold the number of freeholders ; next, that negroes 
and servants shall be clothed with dimity, &c. of the manufacture 
of Barbadoes instead of the manufactures of France and Germany, 
which would find employment for many of the poor, who go off 
because they know not how to subsist, and that in no trade shall 
any negroes be employed, except as artificers to the masters of 
sugar works on their own plantations. Parliament is now laying 
a very heavy imposition on sugars, which is like to put the rates 
in favour of Portugal and the refiners of England, which the writers 
are labouring to withstand. The lodging some stock in England 
for defraying charges for the public concerns of Barbadoes, and to 
allow a salary to a person of quality to attend Councils. Desire 
they will be speedy in their resolutions, for they have powerful 
antagonists here, as they will see by the printed paper enclosed. 
Signed also by Ferd. Gorges, Thos. Wardall, Tbos. Middleton, John 
Gregory, John Bawden, John Searle, Henry Drax, John Worsam, 
Ja. Lucie, and Edw. Pye. Read at a meeting of the Assembly of 
Barbadoes, March 7, 1670-1. 2 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 13, 
pp. 15 and 17.] 

Dec. 15. 358. Extract of. a letter from Jamaica. Our fleet of 35 sail 
Jamaica. are gone to take Panama^ on the South Sea, and may be landed 
about this time with near 2,000 men. If they take it (which 
we doubt not) there will be much money found in it, and it will 
make a great noise in Europe, being so instant on the expecta- 
tion of a peace to be made in the Indies. Supposes this will 
be news. We have good reason for it, in that by the oaths of 
several Spaniards, they are there arming men against us, whom 



142 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670. 



Dec. 18. 

Jamaica. 



Dec. 19. 



Dec. 20. 

London. 



it is best to disperse before they are too strongly united. \ p. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 102.] 

359. Governor Sir Thos. Modyford to Sec. Lord Arlington. 
Has received since his last two expresses from our Admiral 
[Morgan] the first of 23rd November, intimating the return of 
Vice-Admiral Collier from the Main, where he too.k Bio del 
Hacha and possessed it above a month, and brought a reasonable 
supply of provisions to the fleet ; the other of the 6th inst. ad- 
vising that he was 1,800 strong, whereof 200 or 300 French and 36 
ships, and was under sail to make further discoveries of the enemy, 
having by prisoners been informed that about Carthagena," Puerto 
Bello and Panama, soldiers were listing against the Galleons came, 
to be transported against this island ; but that if want of provi- 
sions or the just ends of his commission invited him on any 
shore, he would instantly despatch the Betty sloop to advise of 
it. Had despatched to the Admiral, before the first of these 
expresses arrived, a copy of the articles of peace with Spain, inti- 
mating that though he had them from private hands and no orders 
to call him in, yet thought fit to let him see them, and to advise 
him to mind his Lordship's letter of 10th June, and to do nothing 
that might prevent the accomplishment of his Majesty's peaceable 
intentions ; but the vessel returned with Modyford's letters, having 
missed him at his old rendezvous, however, has returned her to 
the main with strict instructions to find the Admiral out. On 
the whole his Lordship cannot but be sensible how necessary a 
guard these men are to this infant island, who, on notice of 
Jamaica's danger, in less than four months ran together so con- 
siderable a body of men and ships. All the privateers of this 
port are now with the Admiral, except the logwood men, who 
are grown to the number of 20 small vessels, and are like daily 
to increase, and will be a good reserve on all accidents. The 
differences amongst their French neighbours still increase, which 
he hopes to improve for his Majesty's service, having had repeated 
applications from both parties. Endorsed, Rec. 7 March 1670-1. 
2 pp. [Col Papers, Vo.1. XXV., No. 103.] 

360. Estimate of the charge of the carriages, powder, match, 
arms, ladles, sponges, and sundry other stores and provisions of war 
to be issued out of his Majesty's stores for the supply of Cabo 
Corso according to warrant from the Council Board, dated 
2nd December 1670, amounting to 1,464?. 18s. 8d. 1 pp. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 104.] 

$01. Governor Wm. Lord Willoughby to Col. Chr. Codrington, 
Deputy-Governor of Barbadoes the Council and Assembly of 
Barbadoes. Received on 14th inst. a petition from the island to 
his Majesty of great importance, with a letter from the Council 
and Assembly. Sent for Sir Peter Colleton and other planters the 
next day to advise upon it, but all failed except Col. Drax ; and 
presented it to his Majesty on 16th inst., who ordered Lord 
Arlington to make a reference upon it to the Lords of the 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 143 

1670. 

Treasury, and two days after it was read at the Junto Council, 
and Lord Willoughby was ordered to attend his Majesty at the 
Treasury on the 22nd inst. ; so that by the next they may 
expect a further account. Returns thanks for the 100,000 Ibs. of 
sugar, assuring them that if the advancement of their concerns 
requires that or a greater sum, his credit shall be at stake to 
compass it. By what he has heard, even from some of their 
fellow planters besides courtiers, is like to have a hard task in 
justifying their good meaning in this petition, but will speak the 
truth to the hazard of the loss of his Government. Read at a 
meeting of the Assembly of Barbadoes, March 7, 1670-1. 1 p. 
[Col. Entry Bh, No. 13, pp. 17 and 18.] 

[Dec. 23,] 362. Petition of the merchants, owners, and masters of ships, 
read. and inhabitants of the western parts of this kingdom adventuring 
to the Newfoundland in fishing voyages, to the King in Council. 
That the laws for regulating the fishery have been confirmed by 
his Majesty, who by letter of 4th Dec. 1663 commanded certain 
mayors of corporations and others to see them put in execution. 
That notwithstanding private boatkeepers still continue to fish in 
Newfoundland and great number of passengers still go there. That 
the whole state of this affair is now presented in an address to the 
King. Pray that the fishery may be maintained by fishing ships, 
and that the mayors may depute persons to execute laws for the 
fishery. Signed by the Mayors of Exeter, Dartmouth, Plymouth, 
Lyme Regis, Barnstaple, Weymouth, and Poole. Annexed, 

362. i. The address to the King above referred to, showing that 
about 30 years since 270 sail of ships were employed in 
the fishery and 20,000 seamen. That in process of time 
loose persons stayed in the country, who tend much to 
destroy the trade and are useless in all respects, New- 
foundland being a barren island. That in consequence 
the fishermen's houses are torn down, timber is burnt, and 
the seamen are debauched. The fishery is carried on 
without fishing ships by the inhabitants. And the French 
in their seamen and shipping by their fishery do much 
increase. The inconveniences through permitting private 
boatkeepers being allowed to fish. 

362. II. Additional powers desired by the petitioners about the 
Newfoundland fishing. 

362. III. Order by the King in Council upon above petition, read 
at the Board 23 Dec. last, when it was ordered that Mr. 
Gould and all other parties concerned should give their 
attendance, who being fully heard it was now ordered 
that all papers relating thereto be referred to his Majesty's 
Council of Plantations, who are to consider the best ways 
and means whereby the fishing trade in Newfoundland 
may be regulated, advanced, and protected and secured 
from foreigners and managed for the increase of seamen 
and the advantage of his Majesty and his subjects ; also 
to take into consideration his Majesty's charter and the 



144 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670. 

additional powers desired by the western traders, and to 
report their opinion to his Majesty within 14 days. 
Whitehall, 11 January 1670-1. 

36*2. iv. Report of his Majesty's Council for Foreign Plantations. 
Having heard the petitioners and all parties concerned, 
they offer, as their opinion and advice, That his Majesty 
grant, by way of addition to his former charter and rules 
and orders for the government of said fishery : That all 
his Majesty's subjects enjoy the freedom of taking fish in 
any of the rivers in Newfoundland, provided they submit 
to the orders established for the fishery. That no stranger 
be permitted to take bait or fish, no inhabitant to burn 
or destroy any wood or plant within six miles of the 
sea shore, nor take up any stage before the arrival of the 
fishermen out of England. Masters of ships to bring back 
all seamen, fishermen, and others, and none to be suffered 
to remain in Newfoundland. Fines and forfeitures on 
offenders. Encouragement to the inhabitants of New- 
foundland to go to Jamaica or other foreign plantations. 
These rules and orders are contained in 29 articles. 
1670-1, March 2. 

362. V. Order of the King in Council approving above report 
and directing Sir Heneage Finch, Attorney-General, to 
prepare a bill for his Majesty's signature to pass the 
Great Seal, containing his confirmation of said charter, 
with the additional powers hereby ordered to be inserted 
therein, as also for establishing a certain way of judi- 
cature for hearing and determining felonies and murders 
and other offences committed in Newfoundland. Together 
24 pp. [Col. Entry L, No. 65, pp. 39-62.] 

[Dec. 23.] 363. Copies of the above petition, Order of llth Jan. 1670-1, 
and Report dated 2nd March 1670-1 (enclosures Nos. in., iv.). 
Together 8 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 94, pp. 18-25.] 

364. Thos. Colleton to the Governor and Council of Albemarle 
Point, in Ashley River. Theirs by his sloop Three Brothers came 
lately to hand, with their desire of speeding people thence, in order 
to which the Carolina sails to-morrow with about 60 or 70 pas- 
sengers, with orders to touch at the Leeward Isles to see what 
more she can get, having provisions for 120 passengers besides her 
crew. Also John Strode and himself send a vessel of their own, 
the John and Thomas, Thos. Jenner, commander, with about 40 
persons to settle on their own accounts, to whom Colleton hopes 
the Governor and Council will be kind in assisting them, and also 
in dispatching the ship hither loaded with timber, which will 
encourage Colleton to continue a trade with them and send a great 
many people to them. Entreats them also to load the Carolina 
with timber on the Lords Proprietors' account, or she will hardly 
return to them ; for here the seamen's wages are to be paid, and 
he knows not how to produce money without effects ; it has cost 



Dec. 26. 

Barbadoes. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES, 145 

1670. 

2001. to set the Carolina to sea this time, and will cost a great deal 
more. Certified copy examined 19th March 1671 by Jos. Dalton, 
Registrar. Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section 
IX., No. 54.] 

Dec. 28. 365. Alterations and additions to be made in several articles of 
Sir Thos. Lynch's instructions as Lieut.-Governor of Jamaica, with 
respect to the King's revenue in that island. Signed by G. Downing. 
Endorsed, Additions to Sir Thos. Lyiich's instructions made by the 
Commissioners of the Treasury, December 28, 1870. 1 p. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 105.] " 

Dec. ? 366. " Amendments " to Sir Thos. Lynch's instructions in the 

handwriting of Williamson. 5 lines. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., 
No. 106.] 

Dec. 31. 367. Instructions for Sir Thomas Lynch, Lieut.-Governor of 
Whitehall. Jamaica. (1.) With these instructions he will receive his Majesty's 
Commission as Lieut.-Governor of Jamaica, a revocation of Sir 
Thos. Modyford's Commission of 15 February 1664, and a letter 
to said Sir Thos. (2.) To deliver to Sir Thos. said letter and revo- 
cation, assemble the present Council and principal persons and 
officers, and publish said revocation together with his own commis- 
sion. (3.) Neither to augment diminish nor suspend the present 
members of the Council without good and sufficient cause, but to 
send to his Majesty and Council of Plantations a list of their names 
and qualities from time to time. (4.) With the advice of the 
Council to call assemblies, to make laws and levy moneys ; said 
laws to be as agreeable to those of England as may be, and to be in 
force two years and no longer unless confirmed by his Majesty. 
(5.) To appoint justices, sheriffs and other officers, and not to execute 
himself or by deputy any of said offices in the absence of a governor. 
(6.) To examine the judicatories established there, and if defective 
cause them to be amended. (7.) To establish courts o admiralty as 
he shall see cause. (8.) Not to suffer any person to execute more 
offices than one by deputy. (9.) To suspend or discharge all officers 
upon misbehaviour. (10.) Take especial care that all salaries and 
fees be within the bounds of moderation. (11.) That drunkenness, 
debauchery, swearing and blasphemy be punished, and none of ill- 
fame admitted to public employment. (12.) To send an account to 
his Majesty and Council of Plantations of all the arms, ammunition 
and stores in his Majesty's magazines, fortifications, or garrisons. 
(13.) Likewise to demand an account from Sir Thos. and Sir Jas. 
Modyford, how the arms, ammunition and stores sent from his 
Majesty's office of Ordnance have been employed or disposed of, and 
what others have been bought with public moneys ; and he will 
herewith receive an account of what has for these last ten years 
been sent out from said office of Ordnance [see Cal. } ante No. 294.] 
(14.) To cause account to be sent to his Majesty, his Commissioners 
of Treasury, and Council for Plantations, how his Majesty's 
fifteenths and other duties have been disposed of since Sir Chas. 
Lyttelton's return. (15.) To examine what duties and revenues 
arise to his Majesty, and use his best endeavours for improving them 

U 51912. K 



146 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1670. 

(16.) To cause a survey to be taken of landing places and harbours 
and erect such fortifications as shall be necessary, at the public 
charge there. (17.) Inform whether it may be necessary to continue 
the suspension of the setting apart of 400,000 acres for his Ma; 
royal demesne ; and, if not, then to set apart such quantities as, 
with the advice of the Council, he shall think fit. (18.) To forbear 
taking advantage of penalties against any of the present inhabitants 
for not manuring or planting their lands, until further directions. 
(19.) To contrive that the plantations be near together, and the sea 
coast first planted. (20.) To take care that all planters and 
Christian servants be well provided with arms, mustered and trained, 
and in case of insurrection or invasion to use martial law. (21.) To 
appoint markets and fairs. (22.) That wild cattle, horses, hogs, 
and sheep may be preserved, to prohibit or license hunters as shall be 
judged most requisite. (23.) To encourage the improvement of cacoa 
walks, plantations of sugars, indigo and vanillas, and repairing the 
houses in St. Jago. (24.) To give all possible encouragement to 
persons of different opinions in religion, he shall dispense with the 
oaths of supremacy and allegiance, except to members and officers 
of the Council, finding some other way of securing allegiance, and 
suffer no man to be molested, in the exercise of his religion, so he 
be content with a quiet and peaceable enjoying of it : but his Majesty 
obliges him in his own house and family to the profession of the 
Protestant religion, as it is practised by his Majesty in England, and 
the recommending of it to all others. ^25.) To give encouragement 
to merchants, and suppress the engrossing of commodities. (26.) 
His Majesty is content that no custom be laid in Jamaica on any 
goods exported or imported for 14 years from 18 February next ; 
but that they be not exempted from custom in England, as the rest 
of his Majesty's plantations. (27.) Due entries to be made of all 
goods imported or exported and a yearly account transmitted to his 
Majesty. (28.) To give due encouragement to the trade of the 
Royal Company. (29.) Servants transported to said island to serve 
four years, and every person that transports servants, for every ser- 
vant, to have 30 acres of land for ever, and at the end of said term, said 
servants to have 30 acres. (30.) To send as often as he can account 
of the number of plantere, masters, servants and slaves, and the 
wants, products, improvements and advantages of trade. {31.) To 
cause the treaty for establishing peace in America concluded at 
Madrid the ^ July 1670, to be published within eight months from 
^ October 1670, if he can agree with the Spanish governors for a 
certain day ; and at the time of publication to revoke all commis- 
sions of what kind soever, to the prejudice of the King of Spain or 
any of his subjects. (32.) Carefully to observe all the articles of 
said treaty. (33.) For the better encouragement of all belonging to 
the privateer ships to come in, immediately after the publication of 
said peace to proclaim a general pardon to all that shall submit to 
his Majesty within reasonable time and betake themselves to 
planting or merchandising, of all offences committed from June 1660 
to the said publication, and assure them that they shall enjoy all 
such goods as they shall be possessed of at the time of said publica- 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 147 

1670. 

tion, except the lOths and loths, and that if they will plant they 
shall have 35 acres by the head ; that if they will employ their ships 
in trade, they shall be admitted to trade in them with the same 
freedom as if they were English built ; and that if any will serve 
on his Majesty's ships of war, they shall be received into bis service 
and pay. But to appoint as short a time for the coming in of the 
privateers as the nature of that affair will bear, and not to insist so 
positively on payment of the lOths and 15ths as to discourage their 
submission. (34.) In case the encouragements before mentioned 
shall not have the effect his Majesty desires, to use all means by 
force or persuasion to make them submit to and continue under his 
Majesty's obedience. (35.) And as there are many things for which 
it is not easy for his Majesty to prescribe, with the advice of the 
Council to take care therein, giving his Majesty due information, 
and he shall receive further ratifications as his Majesty's service 
shall require. These instructions are signed by the King and 
countersigned and sealed by Secretary Lord Arlington, but 
probably Lynch did not receive his instructions until a month 
later, for his commission bears date 5 January 1671, and a 
copy of these instructions is dated 31 January following. 14 pp. 
[Col, Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 107. See Col. Entry Bk., No. 27. 
pp. 88-95.] 

368. Reply of Capt. Robinson to the answer of the West 
Country Gentlemen to his own proposals about Newfoundland 
[see previous vol. of Cal, 1661-1668, No. 1,732]. The papers of 
the West Country Gentlemen given in after so long premeditation 
on his proposals were not very pertinent to his Majesty's interest, 
but only a discourse on their own particular trade, nor is it 
material to insist on Sir David Kirke's Government, how careless 
or severe soever, for if there be a bad Government it doth not follow 
that said Governor and planters should be removed, and so the 
country left to any other nation, but rather that said bad Governor 
be removed. Still asserts that Sir David Kirk e was Governor round 
great part of the island, and made many of the French pay toll ; 
that Sir Humphrey Gilbert took possession by patent from Queen 
Elizabeth in 1586 [sic, mistake for 1583 ; he died in 1584], as Capt. 
Whitbourne an eye-witness relates in his book of that plantation ; 
and that there is constant destruction of stages, outhouses, and 
woods, and the harbours spoiled, besides abuses between fishers 
and planters without any justice between them, and no offices of 
Christianity or public worship amongst them. But the thing in 
hand is, whether Newfoundland ought not to be kept from an 
enemy, and his Majesty's subjects encouraged and secured, being 
surrounded by the French to the north and south, Placentia Bay 
to the west with 100 ships before it, and the Bank to the east. 
That nation are not as they were 50 or 60 years ago, when they 
durst not encroach on the rights of the Kings of England, nor did 
mind any trade in navigation, nor delighted in their navy strength, 
nor had they men to man their few ships. Now 'tis otherwise, for 
that King is busy to increase his trade and to settle plantations in 

K 2 



148 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1670. 

several parts, and increase his trade and navy at a strange rate, is 
rich, and values not wronging his neighbours for his own profit, 
and certainly will use all ways to gain such a nursery for seamen. 
Knowing that country may be kept at little charge, so it may be 
kept, if taken, from us, especially if the planters are taken off as 
some have begged. Some say if St. John's harbour were taken 
there are fishing places enough beside, as if they could not as well 
take the smaller and weaker as the greater, Ha vre-de- Grace to the 
north, and Freizeland to the south, and so command the whole 
country. But the main thing to consider is, if the French should 
take it, whereas now they employ 400 ships and 18,000 men, and we 
300 ships and 1 5,000 men, they would then employ 700 ships and 
30,000 seamen and others, and we be shut out of that nursery and 
its returns of 700,000?. yearly, for which is not carried out of the 
kingdom 100Z. per annum, which the French would make better 
worth than 1 ,400,000?. yearly ; and we that have been so flourishing 
a nation for seamen, have his Majesty at a loss to man his ships of 
war, whilst the French King shall have at his devotion 30,000 
men, which will man 90 ships. Who would believe that any 
English noble spirit would plead with his Majesty against having 
a strength in those parts, we having so dearly paid for it by 
leaving places of concernment without forts, and power to withstand 
an enemy. Besides if the French gain this to what he possesses 
already, Canada, Nova Scotia, and other places, he would be an 
exceeding bad neighbour to New England, New York, and 
Virginia; and therefore as 500 men more would secure that 
harbour, country, and trade, he presents it to his Majesty's favour, 
especially at this juncture, and when their neighbours are lower 
they may be called off if thought convenient. Endorsed, " Capt. 
Robinson's reply to the answer of the West Countrymen about 
Newfoundland, 1670. Reed, in 1676." 2 large pp. closely written. 
[Col Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 110.] 

369. Certain arguments for a settled Government in New- 
foundland, tendered by Capt. Robinson to the Duke of York, with 
a description of that part of the country inhabited by the English 
and French. That there hath been these 100 years a very 
profitable fishing in that country, with the yearly employ of 
several hundred ships and about 15,000 seamen and others. For 
many years Sir David Kirke was settled there as Governor by 
Charles the First, with several forts for security, and, caused the 
French that fished there to pay toll ; since which they have seated 
themselves at Placentia Bay, the best place of fishing, where they 
have a Governor and forts. The glory of God and honour of 
his Majesty exceedingly suffer in having so many thousands of 
his subjects without any public prayers, preaching, baptizing, 
marrying, burying, or religious observation of the Lord's Day, 
which is altogether spent in drinking, every house being as it 
were a tavern, so that many fishermen and planters have com- 
plained to Capt. Robinson, and several have become wholly 
atheistical. His Majesty's laws for the preservation of the planta- 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 149 

1670. 

tion are generally violated. (1.) There is a yearly destruction of 
260,000 young trees, by reason of the seamen's breaking down 
all their stages and other rooms at the end of the year ; (2) and 
of 50,000 bigger trees by pulling off the rinds to cover their 
stages, to the great hindrance of the fishing, the seamen being 
constrained to travel much further in snow and ice up the country 
for others, and also to come sooner, to the hazard of all from ice 
and fog, so that many have lost both their ships and lives ; (3) 
many looser persons out of carelessness or wilfulness set fire to 
the woods to the exceeding prejudice of the country ; (4) but the 
most pernicious custom is the throwing overboard at the end of 
the year their press stones of very great bigness into all harbours, 
to the endangering of vessels that follow, and the spoiling of as 
brave and safe harbours as any in the world ; (5) there is no 
plantation of equal account but has laws for Church and State 
discipline, and a person to administer them, and keep the place 
from foreign powers ; only this place is liable to be a prey to any 
Christian or Turk that comes to surprise it, as was seen lately in 
the example of De Ruyter, for had St. John's harbour 10 or 12 
guns and a Governor a greater force could no more have hurt 
them than Barbadoes ; (6) what is alleged against a settled 
Government is for private ends, and tends to anarchy, and is 
easily answered, viz., that it would occasion the forestalling of 
fish, raising the price of commodities, settling more planters than 
are fitting, and pulling down stages ; all which his Majesty may 
take care by commands to his Governor to prevent ; as to the 
last particular he knows that the fishers themselves do it, and 
not the planters, through want of a Governor to restrain them ; 
and reason and experience teach us in peace to provide for war ; 
(7) lastly, the charge will be inconsiderable, for one penny the 
" kentall " of merchantable fish, one halfpenny for refuse, and one 
shilling per hogshead of oil, and the benefit of the furs which the 
planters little use, and to have the benefit of the furs of the 
country would make the Governor a competent salary, which they 
need not grudge, who for all their fish and oil exported amount- 
ing to several 100,000. pay no duty to his Majesty at all. 
Endorsed, " A paper given in by Capt. Robinson in 1670, touch- 
ing Newfoundland. Reed, in 1676." 2 pp. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXV., No. 111.] 

1670 ? 370. Petition of Morgan Lewis, merchant to the King. Has lived 
in Barbadoes for nearly 20 years, and being on his return prays 
license for the transportation of 100 horses, of which there is great 
want in the island. | p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 112.] 

1670. 371. Six Acts of Barbadoes passed in 1670, viz., Aug. 11 (1), an 

additional Act to the Act concerning the conveyance of estates ; 
(2) to prevent spiriting people off this island ; Oct. 18 (3), an addi- 
tional Act to the Act for establishing the courts of Common Pleas 
within this island ; Oct. 19 (4), an Act to prevent the abuse of 
lawyers, and multiplicity in law suits ; Oct. 21 (5), for trying all 
petty larcenies at the several quarter sessions within the island ; 



150 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1670. 



and (6) for regulating the secretary's fees, 
Printed, (Col, Entry Bk., No. XV., 75-83.) 



with a list of fees. 



Montserrat. 372. Nine Acts passed in Montserrat, viz. Feb. 24 (1), An Act 
touching the merchants selling liquors, and that the keepers of 
taphouses do not exact in selling of their liquors for money, &c., and 
containing a tariff for liquors ; (2) for paying tobacco in leaf, &c. ; 
(3) for planting of provisions, and disannulling of writings made 
out of the secretary's office ; (4) Sept. 29, for reducing the trade 
of this island unto three certain towns in the same ; and for 
encouraging of those who shall bring any foreign corn unto this 
island ; (5) Oct. 8, for restraining the liberty of negroes and to 
prevent the running away of Christian servants, &c. ; (6) Oct. 13, 
for the repairing the highways in this island, and for keeping them 
so ; (7) Nov. 5, touching such as shall buy any sorts of liquors on 
board any ships or other vessels in this island, and against those 
who shall sell any liquors in or upon this island without license ; 
(8) Nov. 19, to prevent the abuse committed by paying of such 
indigo and sugar as are not fit to be received ; and that the sugars 
made in and upon this island shall not pass under the rates in this 
Act mentioned ; and (9) an Act that the bounds of every person's 
land in this island be examined. 8 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 49, 
pp. 79-87.] 

Montserrat. 373. The preceding nine Acts passed in Montserrat are in the 
printed Acts passed in Montserrat 10(58-1740. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. 55, pp. 14-24.] 

Montserrat. 374. Five of the above Acts passed in Montserrat, Nos. 1, 4, 5, 
7 and 9, with two additional Acts, viz., 24 Feb., an Act against 
the importing of rum, and turning away servants in sickness ; and 
29 Sept., an Act for rating sugar, raising of foreign coin, and 
preventing the plague. 21 pp. [Col. Entry Bk,, No. 50, pp. 199- 
219.] 

1C70 ? 375. A summary prospect of the advantages and conveniences 

capable to arise to his Majesty from the planting of Jamaica. The 
things in Jamaica that distinguish it from all other plantations are its 
situation, largeness, and value of commodities. As to its situation, 
lying off Hispaniola and Cuba, and not far from St. Martha and 
Carthagena, none can be chosen equal to it, to erect as a citadel over 
all the Spanish West Indies ; and consequently there is no place so fit 
to be well manned, planted, and fortified, for awing or defending the 
Spaniard, strengthening trade, and preventing designs of French or 
Dutch. It is therefore more absolutely necessary to be regarded 
than any other plantation, because it is so thinly inhabited that it 
is scarce able to defend itself, there being, by Sir Thos. Modyford's 
own account, not much above one acre planted for every 200 in the 
island. It also lies so much to the westward of the rest of our 
plantations that no speedy communication could be held or any 
sudden succours sent on an emergent difficulty, so that it must rely 
wholly upon its own strength. It is not yet actually confirmed to 
us by the Spaniard ; the French seem to be drawing down forces 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 151 

1670. 

into those parts more than formerly ; and by how much the more 
import Jamaica is to us by so much the more is it jealously looked 
on by our neighbours. As to its largeness, it is not only capable 
of receiving the greater number of inhabitants, but capable of 
breeding the greater number of horses and cattle on the many and 
large savannahs ; which gives the greatest encouragement of any 
to plantations. As to the commodities, as no island abounds in 
cacao more than Jamaica, it is easy with good management to beat 
out the Spaniard ; which commodity is not only exceedingly valued 
(as it is ready money in Spain, France, Flanders, Holland, and 
England), but is greatly growing in request; and the profit is 
such that if it keep up but the moiety of its price it will be of 
far more gain to the planter than indigo, ginger, cotton, or sugar. 
Wherefore if sugar has raised our plantations to far greater value 
than most plantations in the world, what may we expect cacao 
may do if once strenuously followed ; and if Barbadoes have risen 
to be so rich by sugar alone, where land is dear and cattle, pro- 
visions, and wood scarce, what may Jamaica arrive to, where all 
these are in plenty. To which, if the quantity of pepper, spice, 
drugs, and commodities for dyeing and joiners' use be added, it 
is very evident that if well planted it might yield more wealth 
than all our plantations besides. Whether, therefore, we regard 
interests of State or trade, it will be found our main interest to 
mind the planting, settling, and increasing of its inhabitants. 4 pp. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 108.] 

1670 ? 376. Description of and conditions of settling the island of Vaca, 
[Vache] on the south side of Hispaniola, near the westernmost end 
and five miles from the shore. It has a convenient harbour, for 
which reason it ought to be settled to prevent the reception of 
pirates or other enemies, is environed with rocks and small cayes 
or islands, the principal of which is called Cay de Roy, about a 
mile in compass and necessary for fortification as it commands the 
harbour. The conditions to settle this island are these : (1.) A 
patent under the Broad Seal, for said island, as lying vacant in 
the sea without inhabitants, so the true right belongs to the first 
possessor. (2.) Power to said patentees to send Governors and 
other officers with such powers as have formerly been granted to 
Lords Warwick and Carlisle. (3.) All fishing and royalties of the 
harbour of Vaca, with all cayes and islands, to be included in the 
patent. Vaca is 11 miles in length and three in breadth, and fit 
for planting cotton, indigo, sugars, tobacco, and cacao, with a good 
air, plenty of fish and tortoises and two small rivers. 1 p. [Col. 
Peters, Vol. XXV., No. 109.] 

1071. 377. The King's revocation of his commission to Sir Thos. 

Jan. 4. Modyford. Whereas his Majesty did, by commission under the 
Whitehall. Great Seal, bearing date loth Feb. 1664, appoint Sir Thos. Mody- 
ford Governor of Jamaica, and whereas his Majesty has now thought 
fit to recall him, his Majesty by these presents revokes said com- 
mission, yet nevertheless Sir Thos. Lynch, Lieut.-Governor of that 
island, shall enjoy all powers and privileges granted by said com- 



152 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

mission to his Majesty's Lieut.- Governor. Given under our signet 
and sign manual 1 Jan. 1671, has been altered by Sec. Williamson 
to, We have caused these our letters to be mode patent. Parch- 
ment, [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 1.] 

[Jan. 4.] 378. Draft of preceding, with corrections by Williamson. 3 pp. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXVL, No. 2.] 

Jan. 4. 379. Three copies of preceding. [Col. Entry Bks., Nos. XXVI I., 

85, XCIL, 471-3, and XCIIL, 16, 17.] 

Jan. 4. 380. Minutes of Council of Barbadoes, present, the Deputy 
Governor, Henry Hawley, Sam. Farmer, Daniel Searle, and John 
Knight. Ordered that, whereas Edward Strode came into the road, 
wearing the King's flag, for which he said he had authority, but 
peremptorily refused to show it, he stand committed to the custody 
of the Provost Marshal till he produce his authority, or the Governor 
shall judge meet to discharge him. 1 p. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XL, 
187, 188.] 

Jan. 5. 381. Commission to Sir Thos. Lynch to be Lieut.-Governor of 
Jamaica during his Majesty's pleasure, li pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 
XXVL, No. 3.] 

Jan. 5. 382. Three copies of preceding. [Col. Entry Bks., Nos. XXVIL, 

86, XCIL, 473-5, and XCIIL, 16, 17.] 

Jan. 5. 383. Nicholas Blake to the King. Wrote at large, 28 Oct. last, 
Bilbao concerning a settlement on St. Lucia, that it might be a good time 
to undertake it, several ships going to cut timber there, since which 
four of them are returned full laden and reported much good of 
the place ; a gallant island, well watered with rivers and springs ; 
the Indians came often among them and were very kind ; there 
were a few Frenchmen sawing cedar boards, but all very peaceable. 
The ship his neighbour went in shot beyond the island, so that he 
has yet to seek answers to many queries, but the reports of the 
place inflame many with a desire to go there, so that he is persuaded, 
if his Majesty's commission come over, and people had security for 
the conditions, near 2,000 would presently go down, and more 
within a year. If his Majesty's ships cannot be here soon enough 
to go in May it may be best that they be here in December, to be 
ready in January, four months before the rains, against which time 
they will have cleared much ground for planting provisions, cotton, 
ginger, &c. whereby to subsist whilst they are preparing sugar 
works, they will be also be better seasoned to the country and 
provided with houses against the rains, only the charge will be 
greater by carrying down three or four months' provisions extra- 
ordinary, for they cannot plant any (so as to grow) till rains come. 
If his Majesty resolve to have 2,000 acres for himself, and send 
people by the first ships, provisions for six months must be sent 
with them, after the rate of 4 Ib. of beef per week and ^ Ib. biscuit 
per diem per man, after which there will be little need of supplies 
from England. If his Majesty will lay the chief charge on Blake, 
he will do the most he can for his Majesty's honour and profit, and 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 153 

1671. 

hopes that all will be sent as is hinted so as to be at Barbadoes in 
December next, and that his Majesty will furnish the 500?. to 
Jacob Lucy. Hopes his Majesty will not think it dear to have the 
island settled for that sum'; thinks Sir Tho. Modyford had 1,000?. 
advance and 1,000?. per annum to go Governor of Jamaica, which 
was a settled place, but Blake aims at no yearly salary, nor any 
more than this 500?. to be disbursed for the general good. Sends a 
map of the island, which he believes is without much error; it is 
much bigger than he formerly wrote, being 25 miles in length by 
11 in breadth, one part with another, but imagining it only 10 
miles, it will contain 250 square miles, or 160,000 acres. Encloses 
a fitter compute of what may be allowed to the first adventurers. 
Prays pardon for so often troubling his Majesty with his unpolished 
papers. P.S. Besides the things formerly hinted, two barrels of 
fine powder more for pistols and carrabins would be very necessary, 
and two able gunsmiths with tools. Encloses, 

383. I. Estimate of the amount of land in Sta. Lucia, which con- 
tains by estimate 160,000 acres, and how it should be 
allotted, viz. For his Majesty, 2,000 acres ; glebe land for 
20 parishes at 40 acres per parish, 800 ; hopes his Majesty 
will bestow on him 500, total 3,300 ; 200 adventurers at 
50 acres per man, J 0,000; 3,000 persons within a year 
furnished out by others, at 20 acres each to the under- 
taker, 60,000 acres ; to each when his covenant is finished 
20 acres, total 60,000; total 130,000 acres. Thus in one 
year there may be 3,200 inhabitants, besides as many 
more negroes, and in two years when those furnished by 
others come to be free, there will be 3,000 freeholders. 
383. n. MS. map of the island of Sta. Lucia, with the names of 
some of the points, harbours, bays, and rivers. Together 
5 pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XXVI., Nos. 4, 4 i. IL] 

Jan. 10. 384. Sir Thos. Temple to the King. Received his Majesty's 
Boston, l as t letter of 6th August 1669 on 20th June 1670, which he has 
L punctually obeyed in surrendering up the country of Acady to the 
French, but beseeches his Majesty to take notice that the places 
named in his letter enclosed is not only the province of Acady, 
but ail parts of Nova Scotia, together with part of New England, 
which Sir Thos. had the honour to command. Nova Scotia is as 
large as Great Britain, and is annexed to the crown of Scotland, 
as appears by the records in Edinburgh Castle, and is of infinite 
more value than St. Kitts. Had begun a fishing trade, which 
would have brought his Majesty a great revenue and other advan- 
tages, which are dwelt upon and about which he has written the 
Lord Chancellor and the Lords of the Council, but never received 
one word of answer. Points out the danger of the French joining 
with these people of New England if they should make any attempt 
upon the country. Having told the whole truth of his heart, begs 
leave to acquaint his Majesty with his own sad condition and 
sickness, and the ill offices done him to his Majesty, whom he has 
faithfully served 12 years. The whole revenue of the fur trade 



151 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1671. 



Jan. 11 

to 
March 10. 



Jan. 13. 

Whitehall. 



Jan. 1 3. 

Whitehall. 



Jan. 15. 



is only 900?. per annum, of which he pays GQOl. to Mr. Elliot 
and 1801. per annum for remitting it, until the war broke out, 
which wholly disturbed it, there remaining but 120Z. to maintain 
the dignity of Governor. Bought the propriety of a great part of 
the land of which he was possessed of the late French Governor, 
which cost him and his friends 10,000., the purchase drawn up by 
Sir Orlando Bridgman, now Lord Keeper. His reason for first 
coming to these parts was to avoid the fury and jealousy of the 
Protector, having designed a way to save the life of his Majesty's 
father, as George Kirk, the master of his Majesty's house, can 
testify, and told Temple he had acquainted the King with the 
whole design. He is now by the French denied trade with the 
savages, so that unless his Majesty relieve his miserable estate he 
must miserably perish in the lowest poverty. His weak condition 
compels him to make use of another hand. Encloses, 

384. i. The King to Sir Thos. Temple. Whitehall, 1669, Aug. 6 

(see Gal. ante, No. 95). Together 6 pp. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXVL, Nos. 4*, 4* L] 

385. Order of the King in Council upon a petition of the 
merchants, owners and masters of ships, and inhabitants of the 
western parts of this kingdom, adventuring to Newfoundland in 
fishing voyages. Present, the King, Duke of York, Prince Rupert, 
Lord Keeper, Dukes of Buckingham, Monmouth, and Ormond, 
Marq. of Dorchester, Earls of Ogle and Ossery, Lord Chamberlain, 
Earls of Oxford, Bridgewater, St. Alban's, Anglesea, Craven, and 
Lauderdaii, Bishop of London, Lords Arlington, Newport, and 
Ashley, Mr. Treasurer, Vice- Chamberlain, Sec. Trevor, Chancellor 
of the Duchy, Sir John Duncombe, and Master of the Ordnance. 
This Order in Council, the report to which it refers, dated 2nd 
March, and a further Order in Council dated 10th March approving 
said report, are all annexed to the aforesaid petition and abstracted 
therewith [see ante, No. 362]. 19pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVL, 
No. 5.] 

386. The Duke of York's commission to Sir Thomas Lynch. 
To be Commander-in- Chief of his Majesty's ships in and about 
Jamaica, provided, nevertheless, that in case it shall be judged fit 
to send a fleet into America under command of any person com- 
missionated as Admiral, Vice-Admiral, or Rear- Admiral, nothing 
herein shall empower him to give orders to such fleet or commanders. 
With power to appoint a Judge Advocate, Register, Proctor, and 
Marshall of the Court of Admiralty. 1 p. [Col. Entry We., No. 
XXVII., p. 87.] 

387. Warrant to prepare a Bill for Moseh Pereyra of Barbadoe.s, 
merchant, to be a free denizen of England, but with a clause to 
have no benefit until he has taken the oaths of allegiance and 
supremacy before the Governor or Deputy Governor of the island. 
| p. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. 25, p. 190.] 

388. Christopher Codrington, Deputy Governor of Barbadoes, 
to Lord Willoughby, Governor of Barbadoes. No opportunity has 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 155 

1671. 

presented itself since his of 24th November by Capt. Gilbert. At 
the sessions in December many criminals were indicted, but now 
condemned to die : those last year condemned for murder and 
reprieved, not receiving from his Lordship his Majesty's pardon, 
were executed. Encloses the grand jury's presentments, that his 
Lordship may see their grateful acknowledgment of his favours. 
A sloop arrived 23rd December from the French General with two 
gentlemen and enclosed letters, more to inquire whether they were 
preparing to revenge injuries received than anything else. Encloses 
his answer and Col. Stapleton's letter to Sir Tobias Bridge, by 
which his Lordship will perceive the French proceedings, who of 
late grow very insolent ; hopes his Majesty will nip them in the 
bud. About the middle of December arrived a Dutch ship from 
Guinea, which had been plundered of all her cargo, which was 
considerable, by the French ; by advice of the Council gave them 
leave to buy provisions. Were well pleased to see the great 
animosity between the French and Dutch ; to prevent mischief 
was forced to secure the Dutch captain till the French were gone, 
otherwise is confident they had never returned to Martinique. 
At the French being here the farmers of the customs arrived, with 
the King's flag in the main top ; on sending to know who was 
aboard answer was returned Mr. Stroud, commissioner for the 
customs, but as he refused to show his power to the Council for 
wearing the flag he was committed, but two days after released, 
that he might not complain he was hindered from doing his duty. 
Hopes his Lordship will adjudge what punishment is due for such a 
crime. Finds the country much dissatisfied that the 4|- is not 
employed to the uses first intended, and doubts they will do any- 
thing more for the Governor or Government. Has by earnest 
persuasions got the Assembly to quarter the poor soldiers for two 
months longer, before which time he hopes some care will be 
taken for their support ; and has also persuaded them to promise 
payment to the " mountrosses " once more at Christmas. The 
Council and Assembly dined with him when he got them in this 
good humour, but fears it will not last. As to placing or dis- 
placing of any, waits his Lordship's commands ; he hopes his 
Lordship will confirm what has been done by the Council. Has 
received his Lordship's of November 7th, with enclosures, whereof 
he has sent copies to all the Leeward Governors. Supposes they 
will hardly own so ridiculous a thing as the petition and reasons ; 
it has so nettled the people here that on a second occasion doubts 
they will want that hearty assistance they formerly received. 
Will take all possible care to answer tho Lords Commissioners' 
queries. Are afflicted with a pestilential fever, which yet is only in 
the Ridge (sic) Town, where many die ; Mr. Knights was two nights 
since taken with it, but is pretty well again. Encloses, 
388. 1. M. De la Barre, Governor of Martinique to the Deputy 
Governor of Barbadoes. Has received orders from the Kino- 
his Master of 26th Nov., that his Britannic Majesty has 
written to his subjects in the islands of America to con- 
tinue good correspondence with the French nation. The 



150 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

French King also desires that all his subjects live recipro- 
cally with the English, and on all occasions render mutual 
services as if they were but one nation ; and if his 
Britannic Majesty's subjects are constrained to come into 
French Roads to be received with amity and permitted to 
take necessary refreshment ; but all trade being excluded 
believes it to the purpose that each makes a public ordi- 
nance of these instructions to the people, that navigators 
may avoid confiscations, such as happened to Thomas Beck, 
James Thorpe and others at St. Christopher's, who were 
chastised for trading with the French inhabitants. Those 
honoured with command are bound to maintain the laws, 
and if any imprudent Frenchman falls in error and is 
punished according to form, no complaint shall be made, 
and expects he will do the same. Has sent this barque 
expressly to Barbadoes with a gentleman who will present 
this letter and request his resolution thereon. Martinique, 
1670, Dec. if. 

388. II. Deputy Governor Christopher Codrington to M. De la 
Barre, Governor of Martinique. Has received his of the 
i-fth by MM. Salnave and Bergere and is glad of this 
opportunity to let him know his desire of continuing peace 
and amity between the two nations, though does not think 
it fit at present to publish any new ordinance, since the 
late Articles of Peace sufficiently instruct all traders how 
far they may act with safety. As for the new commands, 
De la Barre's publication of them in his own islands may be 
sufficient, if those that arrive there have due notice, since 
he is willing to believe his ordinances are to direct and not 
to surprise. Has received several complaints of the severe 
usage several English have received from those under his 

o o 

command, as seizing vessels, and plundering and impri- 
soning the men ; which he hopes may be grounded on 
mistakes, or if true, that he will take care that satisfaction 
be made, and such rigid proceedings be prevented for the 
future. Barbadoes, 1670, Dec. 27. 

388. in. Col. W. Stapleton to Sir Tobias Bridge, colonel of his 
Majesty's regiment in Barbadoes. This only serves to pay 
his duty in not omitting any occasion to give him new 
assurance of his faithful service. Their neighbours (the 
French) begin again to molest Dutch and English, bringing 
all under their stern that sail by St. Christopher's. They 
have seized one Sleiser lately come from home, and not only 
detain the vessels but commit the men. God grant it may be 
their turn if there be any falling out. Refers to the bearer 
for anv other news. Montserrat, 1670, Nov. 16. Together 
8 pp. " [Col Papers, Vol. XXVI., Nos. 6, 6 i., IL, in.] 

Jan. 17. 389. Minutes of Council of Antigua. On demand of Captain 
Abraham Langford, empowered from Lord Willoughby, for an account 
of the excise of wines and strong liquors in the island, and all escheat 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 157 

1671. 

and prize goods, and of the fines and mulcts due to the King ; it 
was answered that, the King never had any excise, nor they any 
escheated or prize goods or strong drink on the island. That the 
return of the inhabitants was in much poverty, and many must have 
perished for want if not relieved, that they fined those that deserved 
fine to the relief of the poor, and can give no account thereof, but 
though a small thing it belongs to his Majesty, and for the future 
an exact account shall be kept. ^ p. [Col, Papers, Vol. XXV., 
No. 55*.] 

Jan. 19. 39O. Warrant to pay Major Edmond Andros of Sir Tobias 
Bridge's regiment in Barbadoes and the Leeward Isles the sum of 
673. 6s. 8d. for clothes for the soldiers, to be defalked out of the 
pay of the regiment. [Dom. Chas. II. Docquets.~\ 

Jan. 24. 391. Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes. Present, the Deputy 
Governor, Henry Hawley, Sam. Farmer, Daniel Searle, and John 
Knights. Ordered, that a commission issue to John Knights, 
Timothy Thoruhill, John Stanfast, and William Bate, to survey all 
the works and fortifications of the island, and give account of their 
condition and wants at the next sitting of the Deputy Governor, 
Council and Assembly 21st March next; and that a general fast be 
proclaimed to be kept on Wednesday next. \ p. [Col. Entry Bk., 
No. XL, 188.] 

Jan. 25. 392. Warrant to the Attorney-General to prepare a Bill con- 
taining a commission to Sir Chas. Wheler appointing him Governor 
of the Leeward Islands. 13 pp. [Col. Entry Bh, No. XCIL, 419- 
431, see also Vol. XCIIL, pp. 22-25.] 

Jan. 25. 393. Commission to Sir Chas. Wheeler, Bart., appointing him 
Governor-in-Chief over St. Christopher, Nevis, Montserrat, Antigua, 
Barbudo, Anguilla, and all other the Leeward Islands, which his 
Majesty has thought fit to separate from the Government of 
Barbadoes. With power to choose a council of 12 of the principal 
inhabitants in each of the said islands, and with their advice to 
summon assemblies and make laws which shall be in force for two 
years and no longer unless approved by his Majesty ; to exercise a 
negative voice, dissolve general assemblies, and use a public seal. 
To erect courts of judicature, constitute judges and justices, and 
administer oaths, provided all establishments be submitted to his 
Majesty, to pardon offenders, treason and wilful murder excepted, 
in which cases he may grant reprieves for a year till his Majesty's 
pleasure be known, present to churches, levy and arm persons, 
pursue enemies, and treat them according to the law of arms. To 
prepare articles of war, agreeable to those in England, for soldiers in 
pay only, to erect forts, cities, towns, &c., or demolish them. To erect 
Courts of Admiralty, exercise the office of Vice- Admiral, grant his 
Majesty lands under moderate quit rents, also charters to towns for 
holding fairs and markets. To appoint ports and harbours, and erect 
Custom houses. If a Deputy Governor die, immediately to certify 
his Majesty thereof and appoint one in his place till his Majesty's 
pleasure be known ; and in case he die, the Deputy Governor of 



158 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

Nevis shall take on him the Government till his Majesty's pleasure 
be known. And his Majesty's commission or letters patent of 
6th Dec. 1 669 to Lord Willoughby as to what concerns the govern- 
ment of the aforesaid islands are hereby determined and revoked, 
but remain in full force as to the Government of Barbadoes and the 
other Caribbee Islands not above mentioned. 18 pp. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXVI., No. 7.] 

Jan. 5. 394. Copy of the above. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLV.,p. 4-10.] 

Jan. 25. 395. Copy of the preceding commission in which after the name 
of -Sir Chas. Wheeler, Bart., Sir Jos. Williamson has struck through 
"one of the captaines of our guards" and written instead "of a 
company of foot in our regiment of guards under the command cf 
Col. John Russell." 6 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 8.] 

396. Draft of the preamble to above commission in handwriting 
of Williamson. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 9.] 

397. Draft of two clauses in above commission, one in William- 
son s hand. [Col Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 10.] 

Jan. 31. 398. Instructions to Sir Chas. Wheeler, Bart., Governor of the 
Whitehall. Leeward Islands in 21 articles. To repair to Nevis, call together 
the Council, cause his commission to be read, administer the oaths, 
and supply vacancies in the Council, taking care they be men of 
estate and ability, " and not much in debt." Not to augment nor 
diminish the number of councillors, nor suspend any member without 
good cause, to be forthwith transmitted to his Majesty. To send a list 
of the respective councils, also copies of laws. Not to displace any 
judges or other officers without good cause, or execute himself or by 
deputy any of said offices, or suffer any person to execute more offices 
than one by deputy. To regulate salaries, fees, &c. No man's life, 
member or freehold to be taken away or harmed, but by laws agreeable 
to those of England. The oaths of allegiance and supremacy to be dis- 
pensed with, except to members and officers of the council, some other 
way being found of securing allegiance ; and no man to be mo- 
lested in the exercise of his religion, but he is enjoined to the 
profession of the Protestant religion as practised in England. 
Drunkenness, debauchery, swearing, and blasphemy to be dis- 
couraged and punished, and none to be admitted to public trust 
whose ill-fame may bring scandal thereon. All planters and 
Christian servants to be well armed and trained, and an inventory 
of arms, ammunition and stores sent to his Majesty. Also an 
account of the numbers of masters, servants and slaves in each of 
the islands, a yearly account of the increase or decrease of goods 
imported or exported, and of the rates and duties payable in the 
respective islands, what profits or revenues arise to his Majesty 
and how accounted for. To give encouragement to merchants, and 
in particular to the Royal African Company. To give account from 
time to time of the wants, defects, products, and improvements of 
the respective islands ; and to cause the late treaty concluded at 
Madrid the -^th July 1670, to be published within eight months 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 159 

1671. 

from the |-|th. Oct. 1670, or sooner if he can agree with the Spanish 
governors there, and at the same time to revoke all commissions 
and letters of reprisal to the prejudice of the King of Spain or his 
subjects, and to observe all articles of the said treaty. To take 
present order for the advantage of the islands not h ereinprovided 
for, provided he do not declare war without his Majesty's particular 
commands. In regard St. Christopher's is best seated for govern- 
ment, he is r2commended to remove thither, as soon as that part 
which the English possessed on the 1st Jan. 1665-6, before the late 
war with France, shall be delivered up to him. 14 pp. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XX VI., No. 11.] 

Jan. 31. 399. Copy of the preceding. 6 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., 
No. 12.] 

Jan. 31. 400. Three copies of the above. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XLV., 
11-16, No. XCIL, 432-444, and No. XCIII.Jo. 26-28.] 

Jan. ? 401. Mem. of cannon, muskets, and ammunition, also two draw- 

bridges ready fitted, and a tent that the Master of the Ordnance is 
to bargain and take care for the transportation of [to St. Kitts]. 
That Sir Chas. Wheeler covenants with the Master of the Ordnance 
that the inhabitants shall in two years pay for the muskets. En- 
dorsed by Williamson, St. Christopher's. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. 
XXVI., No. 13.] 

Jan. ? 402. The King to Sir Thos. Lynch. With his instructions he 

will receive his commission as Lt.-Governor of Jamaica, the revo- 
cation of Sir Thos. Mody ford's commission, an exemplification 
thereof, and a letter from the King to Sir Thos. Modyford. 1 p. 
Endorsed by Williamson. Exemplification for Sir Thos. Lynch. 
[Col Papers, Vol. XXVI, No. 14.] 

Jan. 31. 403. The King's instructions to Sir Thomas Lynch, Lt.-Governor 
of Jamaica. In margin passed the sign manual 31 Jan. 1671. 
See ante, No. 367. [Col. Entry Bk., Nos. XX VII., 88-95, XCIL, 
475-498 and XCIIL, 17-21, dated 24 February 1671.] 

[Jan. 31.] 404. Extract of Sir Thos. Modyford's instructions. In reference 
to customs on imports or exports at Jamaica, the first part of Art. 
26 [in Sir Thos. Lynch's instructions] was altered from 2 1 years to 
14 years, being the remainder of the 21 years already granted. The 
latter part was left out, the five years having expired, because the 
Council [for Foreign Plantations] did not think fit that the commo- 
dities of Jamaica should be free of custom here. 1 p. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 15.] 

Jan. ? 405, The King to Sir Thos. Lynch. Whereas Sir Thos. Mody- 

ford, late Governor of Jamaica, hath contrary to the King's express 
commands, made many depredations and hostilities against the 
subjects of his Majesty's good brother the Catholic King, it is the 
King's pleasure that as soon as he has taken possession of that 
government and the fortress, " so as not to apprehend any ill 
consequences thereupon," he cause the person of Sir Thos. Mody- 



160 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

ford to be made prisoner and sent home under a strong guard to 
answer for what shall be objected against him. Then to publish 
the King's proclamation, offering free pardon to all abettors on their 
promise to abstain from the like in future. Draft ivith corrections. 
2 pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 16.] 

Jan. ? 406. Note of " papers and draughts of despatches prepared by 

the Council of Plantations for Sir Thomas Lynch, and delivered to 
the Lord Arlington/' The revocation of Sir Th'os. Modyford's 
commission; the instructions to Sir Thos. Lynch, Lieut.- Governor 
of Jamaica ; a copy of the account of the arms and ammunition 
sent to the plantations out of the office of his Majesty's ordnance, 
mentioned in the 13th instruction, ^p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., 
No. 17.] 

Jan. ? 407. Notes of Sir Thos. Lynch's, and Sir Charles Wheeler's 

despatches. For Sir Thos. Lynch ; letter of revocation to Sir Thos. 
Modyford ; letter for his license to return, cypher ; commission, 
instructions, copy of Sir Thos. Modyford's commission ; " know 
from Sir Tho. Chichely what ordnance, ammunition, &c. sent to 
Jamaica ;" " acquaint the Treasury with the instructions." For 
Sir Ch. Wheeler, "letter for the living well with the French 
plantations;" "letter enabling him to make Lieut.-Governors." 
2 papers. 2 pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XXVI., Nos. 18, 19.] 

Jan. ? 408. Remembrances about the dates of the despatches for Sir 
Thos. Lynch, signed, H. Slingesby, Secretary. The commission 
to Sir Thomas Lynch, constituting him Lieutenant-Governor of 
Jamaica, to bear date in the first place ; the revocation of Sir 
Thos. Modyford's commission of 15th February 1664, and the 
exemplification thereof, in the second - place ; and his Majesty's 
letter to Sir Thos. Modyford, and instructions to Sir Thos. Lynch, 
in the last place. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XX VI., No. 20.] 

Feb. 1. 409. Minutes of the Council of Jamaica. Present : Sir Thos. 
St. Jago dc la Modyford, Bart., Governor, Lieutenant-General Sir Jas. Modyford, 
Vega> Major-General Thos. Modyford, Lieutenant- Colonels John Coape, 
Robert Byndlosse, and Win, Ivey, Major Thos. Fuller, Colonels Thos. 
Ballard and Thos. Freeman, Majors Chas. Whitfield and Ant. Collier, 
and Hender Molesworth. On request of the Grand Inquest to 
take into consideration the mis-patenting of the glebe land in the 
minister's name and his beves contrary to the meaning of the 
parishioners who intended only for the minister then being and 
his successors ; Ordered, that the Bench request his Excellency's 
advice how a safe title might be made from Mr. Sellers, the 
minister of St. Andrew's to the parish. Ordered that Mr. Sellers 
make a deed of sale of said land to the churchwardens of the 
parish of St. Andrew's and their successors, for the use of the 
parson and his successors, unless he can give good reasons to the 
contrary. Whereas many disputes hath happened by reason that 
the surveyors through carelessness, ignorance, or knavery have 
laid out more land within their lines than expressed in their 
returns, upon which divers persons have in behalf of the King 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 161 

1671. 

obtained re-surveys and come within the bounds of patent land 
to the great vexation of the proprietors. Ordained, that on 
information of surplusage land, the patentee or his agents have 
notice, and if he shall make appear that he has hands already, 
or shall engage for the bringing of hands and payment of 
rents, that then he shall have the order of survey and a 
patent for the same, but if he neglect or refuse the same, or be 
convicted of having bribed or persuaded the surveyor or those 
that carry the chain to commit the errors, then the informer 
shall have the survey and enjoy the same by patent ; this 
ordinance to continue to the next General Assembly and to be 
confirmed if they think just. Ordered that John Mackene Mar- 
row be continued a prisoner till the next council after the fleet's 
coming in, that they may be truly informed concerning him, and 
that he remain on the Angell's Plantation on parole till discharged 
by the Governor and Council On complaint of the great delays 
and partialities of late observed in his Majesty's Supreme Court, 
and other courts of Common Pleas, by reason the clerks of those 
courts are permitted to be of counsel, and to plead on behalf of 
their clients, whereby they are inclined to favour their clients, 
and, as much as they dare, hinder the adverse part} 7 , and suppress 
or enfeeble the evidence, and are also diverted from the due 
service of the court ; be it ordained that if any clerk take any 
fees to plead for any party in his court, or gratis undertake the 
same, he shall forfeit his office, and the judges are required to put 
another in his place. Petition of Christopher Horner, George 
Osborne, John Aldred, George Child, Tho. Coswell, Jno. Warren, 
Wm. Hinkston, Robt. Smith, James Jenner, Jno. Downer, and 
Phi. Robarts, inhabitants of Withy wood and Dry River. That 
whereas his Excellency had recommended Mr. Lander to them 
for their minister, and they had bought land and were building 
him a church, and had provided him a competent maintenance, 
pray they may not be liable to contribute to any other church 
within the parish, referred to the next General Assembly, in 
regard the justices and vestrymen of every parish are empowered 
by Act of the General Assembly to lay such assessments and 
parish duties as they shall think requisite, and that power cannot 
be taken from them by the Governor and Council only. [Col. 
Entry Bh, No. XXXIV., pp. 305-212.] 

Feb. 9. 410. Proposals of Sir Chas. Wheeler. 1. Though some of the 
planters have reported to the Council that Nevis contributes to the 
Governor 800?. per annum, Lord Willoughby assured him the 
Governor never received 200?., in regard it arose from many poor 
planters, of whom he had no way to collect it but by greater 
severity than he would use ; however, Sir Chas. will accept it for 
800?. as part of his entertainment, and desires that the 700?. 
arising out of the 4^ per cent, of the Leeward Islands may be 
added ; with proviso that if St. Christopher's should be any way 
beneficial to the Governor, his Majesty may retrench the like value 
from the 70U?. per annum. 2. He prays that before Sir Tobias 
Bridge's regiment be disbanded, 200 of his soldiers may be drawn 

U 51912. 



162 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

out for the forts to be raised at St. Christopher's, unless the rendi- 
tion be still delayed. 3. He hopes he may so order the planters of 
the respective islands, that they may send negroes to the works 
and fortifications of St. Christopher's and his Majesty be at no 
other expense than for some masons and carpenters, and for two 
drawbridges which he desires may be sent with him ready framed. 
4. He prays for 22 cannon, with ammunition ; which cannon may 
be returned in case the French restore the 30 cannon they took 
from the English. 5. He also desires 1,000 muskets, to be paid 
for by the planters in two years ; an order to his Royal High- 
ness for a ketch. 6. A donation from the King, without which 
he cannot make so long and expensive a voyage, and put him- 
self in a condition suitable to his employment. Endorsed, 
"Brought in and read in Council, 9th Feb. 1670-1." 3 pp. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 21.] 

Feb. (13). 411. Grant of denization to John St. Clemens, native of France, 
provided he pay custom and subsidy as strangers do, and take the 
oaths of allegiance and supremacy before the Governor of Barbadoes. 
Endorsed, 13 Febr. 1670-1. [Dora., Chas. II., Docquets.] 

Feb. 14. 412. Report of the Council for Plantations to the King, con- 
cerning the government of the Leeward Islands. In pursuance of 
his Majesty's commands have prepared a commission and instruc- 
tions for Sir Chas. Wheler, Governor of the Leeward Island, and 
transmitted copies the 21st January last to Lord Arlington for his 
Majesty's approbation. That Sir Chas. may have power to appoint 
Deputy Governors in the islands under his command, and for his 
better maintenance the 700Z. per annum arising by the farm of 
the 4^- per cent, of said islands, together with all profits hereto- 
fore enjoyed by the Governor of Nevis, provided that when 
St. Christopher's can contribute towards maintaining a governor 
there, the said 700Z. per annum cease ; that the Master of the 
Ordnance deliver to Sir Chas. 22 cannon, 1,000 muskets with 
swords, ammunition, &c., and two drawbridges ready framed, the 
muskets, swords, and bandoliers to be paid for by the planters 
in two years, and the cannon to be returned in case the French 
restore the 30 pieces they formerly took from the English there, 
and that he may also have a ketch ; that the Treasury, by virtue 
of some Privy Seal dormant, may pay him 400. for extraordinary 
expenses, but not to be drawn into a precedent; and that Sir 
Tobias Bridge's four companies of foot now in Nevis, Montserrat, 
and Antigua be reduced to two companies of 80 men each, besides 
officers, and settled in St. Christopher's for one year, in his Majesty's 
pay under Sir Chas. Wheler's command. 2 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., 
No. XCIV, pp. 86-87.] 

Feb. 17. 413. The Gentlemen Planters in London to the Assembly of 

London. Barbadoes. Send copy of their letter of 14th December last [see 

ante, No. 357]. Have received theirs of 17th November, thank 

them for their great confidence, and will let slip no occasion for 

their advantage ; in order to which have formed themselves into 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 163 

1671. 

a committee to promote their petition, designing Coll. Edward 
Thornburgh to attend their affairs and transmit what is done, 
whom they recommend to be continued with a convenient salary, 
business in this great town being not to be done without great 
expense. Think fit to hint that the not sufficient humility of 
their petition gives a latitude for ill constructions, and therefore 
desire them in future, when petitioning the King, to express them- 
selves in as humble manner as may be, or send the heads of what 
they desire, and leave the writers to clothe them in the style the 
Court expects. In confidence of their promise of seeing it repaid; 
have made subscriptions, list whereof will be sent by Col. Thorn- 
burgh, and desire them to speed home effects for reimbursement. 
Lord Willoughby's commission to Capt. Langford to call before 
him all Treasurers, &c., was occasioned by his Lordship being 
referred by the Commissioners of the Treasury to an Auditor of 
Exchequer to prepare his accounts for their view, but conceive 
that the excise was inserted in that commission rather from want 
of remembrance that the Act required the Treasurer to be account- 
able to the Governor, Council, and Assembly only than from any 
will in his Lordship to interfere with their privileges, which they 
are certain the King will never take from them without their 
consent ; hope they will let nothing pass injurious to the island, 
lest men say they have consented to it. Lord Willoughby is veiy 
ready to assist their affairs, and ought to have thankful acknow- 
ledgment. The King of France makes vast preparations by sea 
and land against next summer, wherefore mind them to keep their 
lines and fortifications in repair, " plant all that wants with pin- 
pillows," put the militia in good order, and timely advise for 
supply of arms and ammunition if wanted, and lodge effects here 
for procuring same. Once more recommend the keeping up the 
number of their freeholders by a law that no one possessed of 
25 acres of land shall be capable of buying, renting, or receiving 
more unless by descent, forfeiting all lands so purchased to the 
first man that has not 25 acres that enters action for it in the 
court of the precinct where it lies ; otherwise the land will fall 
into the hands of a few, and they will be lost for want of enough 
interested men to defend the place. Also hope they will contrive 
means that their poor may subsist without increasing the charge 
of making sugar, lest the French and other English Colonies 
undersell them. Signed by Sir P. Colleton, Sir Paul Painter, 
Henry Drax, Edward Pye, Thos. Wardall, John Gregory, John 
Bawden. and Ferdinando Gorges. " Received in Barbadoes, May 
the 31st, 1671." 2 pp. [Col. Entry Bh, No. XIII., pp. 33-35.] 

Feb. 17. 414. Edward Thornburgh to the Assembly of Barbadoes. The 
London. enclosed papers will show the cause of these lines. The gentlemen 
empowered in their concerns have appointed him to attend them, 
intreats their favour in continuance of it. Represents that a corre- 
spondence at the Court, Parliament, and Cc;mcil of Plantations, will 
not only employ a great part of his time, but be very chargeable. 
Received by the Assembly 31s May 1671. Encloses, 

L 2 



164 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

414. 1. List of subscriptions to be paid within 10 days to Jacob 
Lucie for the service of Barbadoes, advanced in pursuance of 
a letter of the Assembly of 17th November last, viz. : Sir 
Paul Painter, Henry Drax, Giles Sylvester (in behalf of his 
brother Constant), Edward Pye, Thomas Wardall, Jacob 
Lucie, John Bowden (for himself and John Sparke), John 
Bendish, John Gregory, Ferdinando Gorges, Sir Peter Col- 
leton, John Searle, and Phillip Bell, Wl. each ; and Robert 
Legard, Thomas Batson, and John Worsam, 5?,. each ; total 
145?., January 28, 1671. 

414. II. Minutes of a meeting of the above-named committee of 
the Barbadoes planters in London, 28 January 1671. 
Names of a committee appointed for the business of Barba- 
does, viz.: Lord Willoughby and eleven of the subscribers 
above mentioned, also Col. Thos. Middleton. The com- 
mittee to meet at the Cardinal Cap in Cornhill, on Friday, 
3rd February, at 3 in the afternoon, and afterwards 
weekly at the same hour, to consider and do all things 
requisite for the good of the island. 

414. III. Minutes of the above-named committee, 3 Feburary. 
1671. Ordered, that a letter be drawn to the Assembly of 
Barbadoes in answer to theirs received 17th November last, 
and presented at the next meeting on Thursday next ; That 
Lord Willoughby's assistance be to-morrow desired to wait 
on Lord Lauderdale in order to procure free trade from 
Scotland to Barbadoes, especially for men servants ; That 
Sir Peter Colleton and Colonel Drax entertain a Parlia- 
ment solicitor to negotiate the business about the impo- 
sition voted to be laid on sugars ; That Edward Thornburgh 
be their agent to attend the committee and that he buy a 
book and register all transactions of the committee ; That 
Jacob Lucie pay Edward Thornburgh 10. for the charge 
of this committee ; and that the committee adjourn till 
Thursday, 9th inst,, at the Cardinal Cap tavern in 
Cornhill. 

414. iv. Minutes of above-named committee, 9th February 1671. 
Ordered, that Edward Thornburgh send copies of the 
subscriptions for the service of the island and of all 
orders of the committee, with their letter to the speaker 
of the Assembly of Barbadoes ; that he buy two books to 
enter all orders of the committee, and keep copies of 
letters ; and that he have a fair copy of the letter presented 
to-day ready at the next meeting of the committee at the 
Cardinal Cap on Tuesday next. 

414. v. Minutes of the above named committee, 14th February 
1671. Draft letter to the Assembly read and approved, 
and Edward Thornburgh ordered to draw fair copies of 
their last letter sent by Colonel John Drax, and of this, to 
be sent by Captain Perriman to Barbadoes. Next meeting 
appointed at the Cardinal Cap on 28th and meantime the 
committee to give attendance on Parliament to keep off the 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 165 



1671. 

imposition on sugars, and to seek an opportunity to confer 
\\ ith Lord Lauderdale about trade with Scotland. 

414. vi. Minutes of the above-named committee, 28th February 

1671. Sir Peter Colleton and two others desired to be 
at Westminster Hall daily till the new imposition on 
sugar be determined, and all the gentlemen planters to give 
attendance on notice through Edward Thornburgh, who 
is likewise to attend. Ordered that Jacob Lucie pay to 
Edward Thornburgh Wl. for the charges of the committee. 
Together 4 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XIII , pp. 35-30.] 

Feb. 20. 415. H. Slingesby, Sec. to the Council of Foreign, Plantations, 
to Sir Chas. Wheeler. Is ordered to send him the enclosed inquiries, 
and to desire his answer in writing in relation to the respective 
Leeward Islands under his command, as soon as he can with con- 
veniency after his arrival. Doubts not it will be esteemed as a 
good service if he will inquire into his Majesty's right and title to 
Saba and Statia, and advise the Council thereof, and of his opinion 
about their usefulness. Encloses, 

415. i. The aforesaid inquiries in 24 Articles, the answers to which 

by Sir Chas. Wheeler will be found calendared, 9 Dec. 
1671. Together 3 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI.. Nos. 
22, 22 I.] 

Feb. 416. A clause to be inserted in his commission between the 

llth and 12th clauses empowering Sir Charles Wheeler to appoint 
deputy governors in the islands under his command. \ p. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 23.] 

Feb. 24. 417. Commission to Sir Charles Wheeler, Capt.-General of the 
Leeward Islands. Authorising him to appoint deputy governors in 
the islands under his command, instead of certifying his Majesty as 
directed in his commission (see ante, No. 393), but to continue 
Lt.-Col. Wm. Stapleton, Lt.-Governor of Montserrat, for the good 
opinion his Majesty has of his abilities. 1 p. [Col. Entry Bk., 
No. XLV., 17.] 

Feb. 24. 418. Draft of the preceding in Williamson's hand. 1 p. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 24.] 

Feb. 24. 419. Two copies of the above [Col. Entry Bks., No. XCIL, 
444-446, and No. XCIIL, fo. 28, 22.] 

Feb. ? 42 O. Relation of the governments, forts, &c. of St. Christopher's 

" received from the petitioners and planters of St. Christopher's " by 
order of the Council for Foreign Plantations. The Commander-in- 
chief of the civil and military power was one single Governor, and 
usually chose his Council and Assembly, viz., two out of each of the 
six parishes belonging to the English, and the trial of all suits was 
by a jury of 12 men, with the Governor as judge. Sir Thos. Warner, 
when Governor, lived on a sweet plantation in the middle of the 
island, which was not to be alienated from the Governor, but since 
Lord Willoughby bought it of Philip Warner, who pretended to 
the inheritance as heir to Sir Thos., paying for it (as reported) out 



166 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1071. 

of the 4 1 per cent, granted him by the island, to the value of 40 
negroes. What power Sir T. Warner had for disposing of lands, 
his commission, which Mr. Sec. Slingesby has, will show, but the 
manner was believed to be by indenture, reserving something to 
the Governor for ever. There were three forts, viz., Charles Fort, 
at the Old Road, with seven sakers, Stones Fort, to the east, with 
six culverin, which was the most considerable at sea, and Sandy 
Point Fort to the west, with seven great guns and three brass field 
pieces. The foits mostly built of hard stone, to be had near at 
hand, and lime, to be had at Brimstone Hill or the salt ponds ; 
three small sconces at Permita Point, one on Brimstone Hill, and a 
platform at the Old Road, the guns in all 39, and in each fort 10 
soldiers, one corporal and one gunner on constant duty, all paid by 
the country with lands set out for the soldiers. Cannot give a 
particular of the losing of the island, but one Watts, formerly a 
chirurgeon, and put in by the late Lord Willoughby, was then 
Governor. Copy of No. 296, which was read in Council, 18 Oct. 
1670. H pp. [Col. Entry Bh, No. XLV., pp. 18, 19.] 

Feb. 24. 421. Commission to Sir Chas. Wheeler to be captain of a company 
of foot to be formed in the Leeward Islands, and there employed, 
consisting of 80 men besides officers, and to have superior command 
of the other company, whereof Lt.- Col. Stapleton is captain. And of 
a commission for Lt.-Col. Stapleton to be captain of one of the com- 
panies to be formed in the Leeward Islands under Sir Chas. 
Wheeler. $ p. [Col. Entry Bh, No. XLV., p. 19. See also No. 
XCIIL, p. 2.9.] 

Feb. 24. 422. Draft of preceding in Williamson's handwriting. -| p. 
[Col Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 25.] 

Feb. 24. 423. Protest of the King's Commissioners sent to Surinam to 

Mar. 6. bring off the English subjects against the Dutch Governor of 

Surinam, which is contained in the " Narrative of the proceedings 

of Major Banister," calendared, No. 486. 4 pp. [Col. Papers, 

Vol. XXVI., No. 26.] 

Feb. 28. 424. The King's letter of revocation to Sir Thos. Modyford. 
Having found fit by letters patents of Jan. 4th last to revoke 
his commission for government of Jamaica, and to constitute Sir 
Thos. Lynch Lieut.-Goveruor of same, his Majesty requires him 
forthwith to deliver up the government to said Sir Thos. Lynch, 
and to be assisting to him by the best means he can. And 
his Majesty gives him leave to return to England, according to 
his son's petition, as soon as the Lieut. -Governor shall have no 
further use of his assistance, as well for his private affairs as to 
inform his Majesty of the state of that island. Draft by Sec. 
Williamson. \p. [Col Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 27.] 

425. Copies of preceding. [Col. Entry Bks., Nos. XXVII., 
95, and XCIIL, 29.] 

Feb. 28. 426. Warrant to pay Thomas Holder, Treasurer of the Royal 
African Company, 5,OOOZ. for his Majesty's adventure in the said 
stock. Endorsed, "28 Fetor 1670." [Dom. Chas. II., DocquetsJ] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 167 



1663. 427. Lists of the King's letters to Sir Thos. Modyford and the 

March Deputy Governor of Jamaica, nine in number, all of which are 

to calendared under their respective dates, except the following, viz. : 

1671. 1663, May 26. To the Deputy Governor of Jamaica, to forbear 

Feb. acts of hostility. 

1664, Feb. 24. To Sir Thos. Modyford, to receive into his hands 

the government of Jamaica. J\ r .B. His commission is 
dated 15 Feb. 1664. 

1665, Jan. 17. To Sir Thos. Modyford, for the defence and safety 

of the island and to follow the Lord High Admiral's 
instructions. 1| pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., Nos. 28.] 

1671. 428. Joseph West to Anthony Lord Ashley, defers to his last 

March '2. letter of loth September last, in which he gave some account of the 
Alhemarlo Spaniard, since when they have lived very peaceably. Hopes orders 
Ashley' River nave been given for the release of the men so unhandsomely detained 
at Sta. Katherina. The sloop sent to Bermudas for a supply of 
provisions has safely returned. She could not get a freight of 
people from the Bahamas enough to defray her charges, so went to 
Shaftesbury Barbadoes. Arrival on 8th February last, to their great encourage- 
m ent, o f a sn jp from Barbadoes belonging to Thos. Colleton and 
John Strood, with about 40 passengers; lias sent a list of their 
names to Sir Peter Colleton. Also eight days after of the Carolina 
frigate with abuut 70 passengers and Capt. Godfrey and six servants 
on his Lordship's account, which will be a great charge to the 
plantation, having nothing as yet but what is brought. Has cleared 
this year above 30 acres of ground, and built convenient houses for 
themselves and servants, and palisadoed it, so they are able to 
defend themselves against 1,000 Indians. Capt. Godfrey has come 
to manage Sir Peter Colleton's interest in partnership with his 
Lordship, a very able man and a good planter. Intend this year 
planting mostly provisions, something of every commodity, the 
better to know what the land will produce. Last year all things 
were blasted in October before they could come to perfection, but 
does not question all will be full grown this year before the cold 
weather comes, which is especially sharp in the morning. The 
planters from Barbadoes say the ground will produce as good ginger, 
cotton, &c. as they have there. Advises him to part partnership 
with Sir Peter Colleton and Sir Geo. Carteret for the reasons stated. 
Their stock from Virginia thrives very well, especially hogs ; the 
cattle is of a small kind, and will be only profitable for breeding ; 
believes they can have cattle from New York and Bermudas at 
easier rates, and one cow will be worth two from Virginia. The 
Governor lies in a very weak condition and past all hope of recovery. 
Hopes an honest, able Governor may speedily be sent over, one that 
desires to fear God above all worldly interest. If Sir John Yeamans 
comes amongst them again it is to be feared a hopeful settlement 
will soon be eclipsed. Reminds him to encourage some able godly 
minister to come to them. Requests that when the Great Seal of 
the Province is sent out he may be trusted with it, for he supposes 
it may prove of some benefit to him hereafter, Has not received 



168 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1671. 



March 2. 

Albemarle 

Point, in 

Ashley River. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



March 2. 

Albemarle 

Point. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



March 2. 



any letter from his Lordship since their departure from Ireland. 
Endorsed by John Locke, Jo. West to Ld. Ashley, 2 Mar. 70-1. 
1 p. with seal. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bdle. 48, 
No. 56.] 

429. Joseph West to Sir George Carteret, Almost a duplicate 
of the preceding letter. Also that they have settled as near the 
town as they can, and that he has taken up 300 acres near the town 
upon the account of Sir George's partnership with Lord Ashley and 
Sir Peter Colleton for present planting. Believes English grain 
will grow very well in this soil ; he sowed some English wheat in 
November and it thrives very well. They are now in great for- 
wardness towards settling a new colony, and he hopes the Lords 
Proprietors will not be slack in sending timely supplies from 
England. Encloses invoice of goods received from Thos. Colleton 
in Barbadoes. Hopes Sir George will see that his salary be paid to 
his wife as well as the moneys owed to him by Sir George's son 
James. 1 p. with seal. [Ibid., No. 57.] 

430. Joseph West to Sir Peter Colleton. His last was by Sir 
Peter's shallop by way of the Bahamas where they could not answer 
our expectations, for the people would not come off before they 
were provided with provisions. Also that the 70 people who arrived 
in the Carolina were most of them without provisions, we having 
none in store, for there was a distribution of all that came from 
Virginia and Bermudas by order of the Governor and deputies, 
so it will go something hard with them if the supply should not 
come timely which Sir Peter's brother sent by way of Bermudas. 
They have been something weak handed and their men have been 
sickly and weak, but not one has died out of our family since we 
came into the country. Hopes most part of the old standers will 
plant enough this year to produce provisions for the next. The 
winter is something cold and sharp but no great frost only in the 
morning, neither has he seen any snow. The inhabitants have 
assisted Capt. Jenner towards lading his ship with pine timber, 
and there is as much fallen (felled) as will lade 'the Carolina. 
The shallop Mr. Brayne and West bought in Bermudas is very 
usefull to the country ; hopes the Proprietors will consider us some- 
thing for her service. To send him a good fowling piece 7 feet 
long, well fortified and double locked. [Most of the news in his 
letter to Lord Ashley is also in this letter.] Mem. by Sir Peter 
Colleton. Pray do not send this away as I have no copy. Endorsed 
by Colleton and also by Locke. 1 p. with seal. [Shaftesbury Papers, 
Section IX., Bdle. 48, No. 58.] 

431. Copy of the preceding, which is also addressed for the 
Honourable Sir Peter Colleton, Bart., near Clarendon House in St. 
James' Street. These London. Endorsed by Locke. [Ibid.] 



Shaftesbury 

Papers. 

March 2. 432. Stephen Bull to Lord Ashley. Arrival of the John and 
Thomas from Barbadoes with about 42 passengers sent by Thos. 
Colleton. [Sain] Farmer and John Stroud with one Mr. Maverick, a 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



169 



Shaftesbury 
Papers . 



March 4. 

Albemarle 

Poiut, in the 

province of 

Carolina. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



gentleman entrusted to settle an estate for them also of the Caro- 
lina with 70 or (SO persons with Capt. Godfrey, Capt. Thomson, 
Mr. Gray, Mr. Culpepper and several other gentlemen who were 
all within five days settled amongst them as close together as con- 
venient, the greatest distance that any person or family is seated 
is within less than two miles either up or down the river from the 
town, and these gentlemen are satisfied and promise to give an 
account in Barbadoes and other parts of their contented settlements, 
which will be a means to invite others to follow. The Indians 
still continued their accustomed kindness and he believes they will 
very hardly make any war upon us and look upon themselves over- 
awed by our guns. Was employed last year in their extreme want 
of provisions to get corn from the Indians and went 30 miles from 
the town and lay out several nights and was very well treated by 
and received great kindness from the Indians and they showed great 
joy that we were settled amongst them and promise assistance 
against the Spaniard or any Indian nation that shall oppose us. 
They have had very cold weather this winter ; has seen ice of one 
night's freezing atove an inch thick but no snow and very clear 
days and little or no rain. Cattle will be bred, fed and kept at very 
easy rates as in any part of the world, also very good feeding for 
hogs of acorns, hiccory nuts, berries and roots. The Governor very 
weak and not likely long to live. Does not perceive that any of 
this country's distemper hath seized him but age, his spirits are 
clearly "flatted," he complains of no sickness. Endorsed by Locke. 
1 p. with seal. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX,, Bdle. 48, No. 
59.] 

433. The Council at Ashley River to the Lords* Proprietors of 
Carolina. This hasty messenger comes sorrowing, without company, 
to acquaint their honors with the decease of our grave and honourable 
Governor Colonel Wm. Sayle. who died of a consumption this day 
about noon, very much lamented by our people, whose life was as 
dear to them as the hopes of their prosperity. Desire that some 
worthy honourable person may be dispatched to take this great 
charge in hand, whose wisdom and sanctity may cherish that infant 
reformation until it has obtained so much strength as to walk alone, 
curbing the vicious, countenancing the virtuous, with qualifications 
suitable for actions as well military as civil. Have in the meantime 
elected, with the approbation of our said governor in his lifetime 
Capt. Joseph West to be governor until they hear his honor's 
pleasure [sic]. It has been bruited that their honors have designed to 
commissionate Sir John Yeamans again as governor, yet have good 
reason to believe the contrary, for it doth breed a very great dis- 
satisfaction to the people. Reasons why they could not repose any 
trust in him. Capt. Thos. Jenner ready to sail with the John and 
Thomas for Barbadoes so will leave other matters to Captain Brayne 
who will sail hence very suddenly. Signed by Stephen Bull, Will 
Scrivener, Flor. O'Sullivan, Paul Smyth, Ra. Marshall, Samuel West, 
Ro. Donne, and Jos. Dalton, secretary. Endorsed by Locke, 1 p. 
with seal. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 60.] 



170 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1671. 

March 4. 434. The humble declaration of John Russell, late Master of the 
Port Royal to Sir Peter Colleton. That from England lie sailed to 
Kinsale, where Captain West shipped a mate, whence they sailed to 
Barbadoes where Sir John Yeamans embarked, he being appointed 
Governor of the settlement. Bad weather forced them to put in at 
Shaftesbury Nevis where Sir John sent Christopher Barrowe on board with 

1 apers ' instructions to pilot the ship to Port Royal. After leaving Nevis 
foul weather forced them to part from the fleet ; they beat about 
for six weeks and were driven to great want and many were forced 
to drink their own urine. They endeavoured to touch at the Bahamas, 
but unfortunately were cast away where neither pilot nor himself 
ever were before. By the help of their boat all their people were 
put safely ashore, but through the neglect and delays of their in- 
human carpenter, who was the cause of their tedious stay upon the 
island, many of their people lost their lives there and Russell was 
forced to make the boat himself because the carpenter would not 
work. In that boat they went to Eleutheria where Russell hired a 
shallop and sailed to New Providence, where they got transportation 
to Bermudas ; but Barrowe and his wife went to a place called New 
York. Russell has since arrived in London, and now prays his 
honor to take his own and the rest of their conditions into his 
charitable consideration. They were cast away 12 January 1670. 
Endorsed by Locke, Russell's relation of the Port Royal. 1 p. 
[Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bdle. 48, No 61.] 

March 5. 435. The King to Sir Chas. Wheeler. Having constituted him 
Governor-General of the Leeward Islands, with instructions to see 
possession taken of that part of St. Christopher's which was possessed 
by his Majesty's subjects before the late war, and is to be restored 
by virtue of the 7th Article of the Treaty of Breda, and to compose 
all differences arising thereupon with the fairest satisfaction that 
may be to the subjects of the most Christian King ; his Majesty 
further recommends him to maintain good correspondence with the 
French generals and governors in the West Indies, and amicably to 
compose all disputes with them ; especially for that the said King 
has declared by his Ambassador his desire to continue all good 
offices of friendship, and that nothing shall be done in the execution 
of his ordinance of the 10th June last concerning the trade in 
America which may any way disturb their good correspondence in 
those parts, but that the vessels of his Majesty's subjects shall 
receive all kind treatment in places under his obedience, save only 
that they may not trade there. And such differences as he can- 
not thus amicably settle he is to transmit information of to his 
Majesty. 1J pp. [Col. Entry BL, No. XLV., 20-21.] 

March 5. 436. Draft of preceding in Williamson's handwriting. Endorsed, 
To Sir Chas. Wheeler and Sir Thos. Lynch. 1 p. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXVI,, No. 29.] 

March 5. 437. Mem. of the first part of the above which differs from the 
letter sent to Sir Thos. Lynch. p. [Col. Entry Bit., No. XCIII., 
fo. 30.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 171 



1671. 

March 5. 438. The King to Sir Thos. Lynch. Duplicate of the preced- 
ing letter to Sir Chas. Wheler. [Col Entry, Bl:, No. XCIIL, 
fo. 30.] 

[5 March.] 439. Petition of Ferdinando Gorges, Esq., to the King and 
Council. Is the grandson and heir of Sir Ferdinando Gorges, who 
had a grant for him and his heirs from the King's late father of 
the province of Maine, and having been many years in quiet posses- 
sion and expended above 20,000. in plantations there, was, owing 
to his having engaged in the King's father's service in the late 
wars, put out of his possession by the Governor of the Massa- 
chusetts ; the province had since been governed by the Massachu- 
setts, who deny to yield up the government till order from the 
King. On the petitioner's request the King had by his letter of 
the llth of June, in the 16th year of his reign, required restitution 
to be made and quiet possession to be delivered to him, unless the 
Governors of the Massachusetts showed cause to the contrary. To 
this letter the inhabitants of the province yielded obedience, but 
the Governor for the Massachusetts denied to surrender the pro- 
vince. The Commissioners appointed by the King for settling 
affairs in New England declared the province to be the petitioner's 
right, and appointed justices of peace to the Government till he 
should be established there by the King. Since the coming away 
of the Commissioners, after three years' quiet possession of the 
province, the Governors of the Massachusetts have again in a 
hostile manner assumed possession contrary to the King's letter, in 
which they were commanded not to intermeddle with the province 
until the King's determination. Requests that he may be restored 
to the quiet possession of the province, as being his undoubted 
right, and that the Governors of the Massachusetts may be com- 
manded to deliver to him the quiet possession of the province, 
and that the inhabitants may be required to yield obedience to 
him. With reference to the Council of Plantations, 5th March 
1671, signed by Sec. Lord Arlington [see ante, No. 150]. Annexed, 
439. I. Report of the Council for Plantations to the King. Have 
considered Gorges' petition, and on perusal of the charters, &c. 
transmitted with the petition, and discourse with Gorges, 
find that the chief cause of the differences arises from ex- 
pressions concerning the boundaries of lands contained in 
charters of the King's father and grandfather. As they have 
not been able to get copies of some original grants, or had 
any opportunity of hearing the Massachusetts Government in 
defence, recommend the King to send Commissioners to New 
England to examine the differences concerning the boundaries 
of the Massachusetts and the rest of the colonies, that the 
Commissioners be despatched to arrive before the end of next 
October as ships cannot without danger come into harbour there 
after that time. Signed, Sandwich. President, Lauderdale, 
Arlington, Tho. Gre} T , Rich. Gorges, T. Clifford, Brouncker, 
Ed. Waller, John Finch, H. Slingesby, Secretary, 12 July 1671. 
Together 2 pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XXVI., Nos. 30, 30 T.] 



172 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



KJ71. 



March 7, 

Whitehall. 



March 7. 

Barbadoes. 



March 7. 

Barbadoes. 



March 7. 



440. Two copies of the preceding report dated 12 Aug. 1G71. 
[Col Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 31, and Col. Entry Bk., No. 94, 
pp. 2-4.] 

441. The King to the Duke of York, High Admiral of England. 
Having thought fit to direct Sir Thos. Lynch going Lt.-Governor of 
Jamaica to seize the person of Sir Thos Modyford late Governor 
there and send him hither to answer for the many hostilities com- 
mitted upon the countries and subjects of the Catholic King in 
America without warrant from his Majesty, and to concert the 
execution thereof with Capt. Hubbart, commander of the frigate 
which is to transport him ; his Majesty's pleasure is that he direct 
Capt. Hubbard to perform all things for accomplishing said reso- 
lution according to his Majesty's letter and private instructions to 
Sir Thos. Lynch, not to go on shore until Sir Thos. Lynch be in 
quiet possession of the Government and shall have executed his 
Majesty's pleasure in the seizure of Sir Tho. Modyford, and if any 
accident befall Sir Tho. Lynch or he find opposition or resistance, to 
assist Sir Tho. Lynch with his utmost force, by annoying by all 
ways the island and particularly by destroying the privateers that 
shall assist the island in such opposition to his Majesty's commands. 
1 p. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. 24, p. 48.] 

442. The Assembly of Barbadoes to Sir Peter Colleton, Col. 
Henry Drax, and Ferdinando Gorges, gentlemen planters, in London. 
Have been summoned by the Deputy Governor to consider his 
Excellency's letter and theirs of the 14th December last. Cannot 
but take in very good part their advice, and doubt not of their 
future actings in the island's behalf, as being partakers in their 
good and bad success. By theirs of 17th November last they 
will know how far the Assembly have sympathised with them. 
There is already a Bill drawn to prevent depopulation, which will 
answer most of their proposals. A more perfect account of all things 
they may expect at their next sitting, this being shortened by a 
public day of humiliation appointed for the morrow. Signed by 
Henry Walrond, junr., Speaker. ^ p. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XIII., 
18-19.] 

443. The Assembly of Barbadoes to his Excellency (Wm. Lord 
Willoughby). Have been summoned by the Deputy Governor to 
receive his Excellency's letter of 20th December last, and return 
hearty thanks for his wonted care. To-morrow being appointed a 
solemn day of humiliation for imploring the Almighty to remove 
His heavy judgments, and the ships being suddenly to depart, are 
forced to be thus short, but they will meet again very suddenly, 
and doubt not then to give his Excellency an account at large. 
Signed by Henry Walrond, junr., Speaker. | p. [Col Entry Bk., 
No. XIII., 19.] 

444. Mem. of a letter from the King to Lord Willoughby, to 
live in friendship with the French Governors, similar to letters to 
Sir C. Wheler and Sir Thos. Lynch, of 5th March 1671 [see ante, 
Nos. 435, 43C). [Col. Entry Bk., No. XCIII.Jo. 30.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



173 



1671. 
March 8. 

Office of the 
Ordnance. 



March ? 



March ? 
March 10. 



445. Estimate sent to the Council of Plantations by the Officers 
of Ordnance, of the charge of ordnance, carriages, powder, shot, 
arms, and other ammunition, to be issued to Sir Chas. Wheeler. 
Governor of the Leeward Islands, according to his Majesty's warrant 
of the 8th March 167J. These include eight culverin, eight demi- 
culverin, and six 3 -pounders, with carriages, round shot, double- 
headed hammered shot, cases of musket shot, powder, match, 1,000 
snaphance muskets with cartouche boxes and girdles, musket shot, 
sheep skins, canvas, oil, starch, needles, thread, powder horns, twine, 
tarred rope and nails ; an extraordinary large tent for the Governor, 
60?. ; materials for making two drawbridges ; carpenters', smiths', 
stonecutters', and bricklayers' tools, &c., amounting, together with 
300?. for packing and carriage, to 2,600?. 14s. 2^d. " These stores 
were issued 15th March 1671." 3^ pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 
XLV., 21-24.] 

446. Warrant (to the Attorney-General ?). To prepare a Bill to 
pass the Privy Seal authorising the Commissioners of the Treasury 
to pay to Sir Chas. Wheeler, Governor-in-Chief of the Leeward 
Islands, 700?. yearly as Governor of St. Christopher's, and the 
same to abate in proportion as any part thereof shall grow pay- 
able to him from that island ; also the sum of 400?. as a free gift 
out of her Majesty's portion for the entertainment of two com- 
panies of foot in the Leeward Islands, to consist of 80 men each, 
besides officers, according to the establishment under his Majesty's 
signature. Draft with corrections by Williamson. 1 p. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 32.] 

447. Rough draft of preceding, in the handwriting of William- 
' p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 33.] 



son. -| 

448. Privy Seal authorising the Commissioners of the Treasury 
to pay to Sir Chas. Wheeler as Governor of St. Christopher's 
700?. yearly by half-yearly payments, to be accounted from Christ- 
mas last, as long as he shall remain Governor, the same to abate 
in proportion as any part thereof shall grow payable to him from 
the Leeward Islands. And likewise 400?. as a free gift out of the 
remainder of the Queen's portion. I p. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XLV., 
25-26. See also Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. 34, p. 72, and 
Dom., Chas. II., Docquets.] 

March 10. 449. Privy Seal authorising the Commissioners of the Treasury 
to pay to Sir Chas. Wheeler, Governor of the Leeward Islands, 
2,778?. 10-s. 8d. for the pay and entertainment of two companies 
of foot for service in the Leeward Islands, consisting of 80 men 
each, besides officers, according to an establishment under his 
Majesty's signature of the 8th instant. 1 p. [Col. Entry Bk 
No. XLV., 26-27., and Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. XXXIV' 
p. 72.] 

March. 450. Mem. of an Establishment of the pay of two companies of 
foot, consisting of 80 soldiers each, besides officers, to be enter- 
tained for his Majesty's service in the Leeward Islands, amounting 



174 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



3671. 

to 2,778?. 10s. 8d. per annum. Endorsed, " A computation of the 
charge of two companies of foot for the da.y, the month, and the 
year, for Sir Charles Wheeler." \p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., 
No. 34.] 

March. 451. Mem. about Sir Charles Wheeler. That his Majesty speak 
to the Duke for a ketch ; that H.R.H. order the receiving of Sir 
Charles, his family, and goods on one of the frigates designed for 
the West Indies ; and that his Majesty give Sir Charles Wheeler 
a tent. \p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI.] No. 35.] 

March 10 ? 452. The King to Sir Thomas Lynch, Knt., Lieut.-Governor 
Whitehall. o f Jamaica. Whereas Sir Thomas Modyford, late Governor of 
Jamaica, has, contrary to his Majesty's express commands, com- 
mitted many depredations upon the territories of the Catholic King 
in America, his Majesty's pleasure is that he cause the said Sir 
Thomas Modyford to be made prisoner and under a strong guard 
brought to his Majesty's presence to answer what shall be objected 
against him ; and, having done this, that he publish it, with the 
cause thereof, to the whole island, confirming his Majesty's free 
pardon to all who have been partakers with, him upon condition 
that they quietly submit to his Majesty's authority and abstain 
for the future from the like hostilities, observing punctually the 
late treaty with the Catholic King of T 8 ^- July last, f p. [Dom. 
Entry Bk. Ckas. II., Vol. XXIV., p. 49, and Col Entry Bk., 
XXXIV., 22G-7.] 

March 10 ? 453. The King's private instructions to Sir Thomas Lynch, Knt., 
Whitehall. Lieut.-Governor of Jamaica. When he has possessed himself of 
the government and fortresses of the island so as to apprehend no 
disorder thereby, he shall execute the contents of his Majesty's 
private letter given herewith, concerting with Capt. Hubbard the 
best ways and means of execution, and having seized Sir Thomas 
Modyford, shall immediately cause him to be earned on board the 
frigate, there to be kept until they have agreed of the safest way 
of transporting him to England, whether on board the ketch 
designed to accompany him from Barbadoes or some merchantman 
or privateer hired or, if need be, pressed for this service, and 
manned with such men as Capt. Hubbard shall undertake to 
answer for. f p. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. XXIV., pp. 
49-50, and Col. Entry Bk , XXX TV., 228-9.] 

March 11. 454. John Stow to Sir Peter Colleton. Has brought from his 
brother Thomas Colleton about seven tons of provisions from 
Barbadoes to send to Col. Sayle at Carolina, also three tons more 

Shaftesbury which are bought. Has hired a ship to go there, and there will be 
Papers. SO me quantity of passengers, and does not question but that there 
are a great many young men here who will go. Wishes to know 
where to direct letters, for there will be a commerce betwixt him 
and them at Carolina. Has charged bills of exchange on Sir Peter's 



brother 
bought 



in Barbadoes 
for Carolina 



for 57?. 

and consigned 



sterling 



for freight and provisions 
to Capt. West, or, in his 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



175 



1671. 



March 14. 



March 14. 
Whitehall. 



March 14. 
March 14. 



March 14. 

Whitehall. 



absence, to Col. Sayle. Endorsed by Locke. 1 p. with seed. 
[Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bdle. 48, No. 62.] 

455. The King to Sir Tobias Bridge. Has given order for the 
disbanding of his regiment as by his instructions is directed. Has 
thought good to give him particular notice, assuring him of his 
Majesty's entire satisfaction with his services, which his Majesty 
desires him to declare to the regiment at their disbanding, and that 
besides the provision made by his instructions, his Majesty will 
have a particular regard as well for soldiers as officers on all 
occasions, and principally towards himself. $ p. [Col. Entry Bk., 
No.XCIII.,fo.3Q.] 

456. Instructions for Sir Chas. Wheeler, Sir Tobias Bridge, 
Sir TJios. Lynch, and Christ. Codrington, Deputy Governor of Bar- 
badoes, for " disposing " of the regiment of foot under Sir T. Bridge 
in the Caribbee Islands, in six articles. As soon as Wheeler and 
Lynch arrive at Barbadoes they are to communicate these instruc- 
tions to Bridge, the colonel of the regiment, and to the Deputy 
Governor or commander-in-chief. The regiment to be then dis- 
banded, grants of land in Jamaica or any of the Leeward Islands 
"where there shall be room" to be offered to such, of "the old 
raised men " in England as choose to remain, with other privileges 
for their " good services "; passage home to be provided for those 
who wish to return ; arrears of pay to be duly satisfied and clothes 
delivered to them upon the place ; the same orders to be carried 
out for disbanding the rest of the regiment in the Leeward Isles. 
Two companies of foot having been appointed for service in those 
islands under Sir C. Wheeler, preference is to be given to the old 
raised men to enlist therein. No officer or soldier to be detained 
for any debt not exceeding the arrears of his pay, wherewith the 
respective creditors will be duly answered. Draft by Williamson. 
3 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 36.] 

457. Copy of the above, corrected by Williamson. 4 pp. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 37.] 

458. Copies of the above instructions "taken out of my Lord 
Arlington's office." 3 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XLV., 27-29, and 
No. XCIII., pp. 31, 32.] 

459. Commission to Sir Chas. Wheeler to receive that part of 
St. Christopher's which belonged to the English in January 1665. 
Whereas in conformity with the Treaty of Breda of |J- July 
1667, the most Christian King put into his Majesty's hands certain 
instruments directed to the Sieur De la Barre, his Lieut.-General in 
America, to the director of the West India Company, and to the 
Chevalier de St. Laurence, for restoring to his Majesty the said 
part of St. Christopher's, which orders not having been complied 
with, the said King has issued more express orders to the Chevalier 
de St. Laurence and the Sieur de Baas, his Lieutenant in America, 
of the - t %th Jan. 1670-1. His Majesty therefore by these presents 
nominates Sir Charles Wheeler or whom he shall thereto appoint, 



176 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1671. 

his Commissioner to demand and receive the said part of St. Chris- 
topher's, revoking all former commissions, particularly that of the 
13th Feb. 1668 to William Lord Willoughby, Col. Lewis Morrice, 
Col. Robert Hooper, and Lt.-Col. Symon Lambert ; and that of the 
22nd March 1670 to Sir John Yeamans, Col. Philip Bell, Col. 
Saml. Barwick, Col. William Sharp, and Capt. Philip Payne. 2 pp. 
[Col. Entry Bk., No. XLV., 30-31, see also No. XCIIL, 35, 36.] 

March 14. 46O. Commission to Sir Chas. Wheeler to compose differences. 
His Majesty having agreed with the most Christian King that 
Commissioners should be appointed on each side to compose all 
differences in putting in execution the late orders issued by the 
said King for restitution to his Majesty of that part of St. Christo- 
pher's, possessed by the English the 1st January 1665, appoints 
Sir Chas. Wheeler his Commissioner, granting to him, or such 
persons as he shall substitute, full power to treat with the Commis- 
sioners thereto authorised by the said King, and amicably to 
determine all differences arising in putting into execution the late 
orders of -^ January last, and any other orders heretofore issued 
by the said King, particularly those of the 16th January 1668-9, 
for restoring the said part of St. Christopher's, and concerning 
ameliorations, keeping and dieting of prisoners, the re-entry of the 
English into possession of estates and goods sold by them to the 
French, and all other matters relating to the full execution of that 
part of the Treaty of Breda. And his Majesty promises to ratify 
whatsoever shall be by him or them stipulated and agreed. 1-i- pp. 
[Col. Entry Bks. No. XLV., pp. 23-33, and No. XCIII.,pp. 36-7.] 

March ? 461. Draft of some clauses of the preceding Commission in 
Williamson's handwriting. Endorsed, Alterations in the Com- 
mission for Meliorations. ^ P- [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 38.] 

March 14. 462. Instructions to Sir Chas. Wheeler in eight articles for corn- 
Whitehall, posing all differences that may arise upon the restitution of (the 
English part of) the island of St. Christopher's. Although by the 
tenor of the French King's orders of the 16th Jan. 1669, and 
18th Jan. last, his Majesty believes that the sovereignty of the 
English part of St. Christopher's will be fully delivered up on showing 
those orders to the French Lieut.-General, for which the 7th Article 
of the treaty of Breda is express and clear ; yet having found that 
some differences are like to arise as to the restitution of private 
goods and estates, and in some other particulars, his Majesty and 
the said King have agreed to constitute Commissioners for finally 
determining the same ; and this trust his Majesty has reposed in Sir 
Chas. Wheeler by commission of this date. On receipt of the said 
commission he is to repair with all speed to the Leeward Islands and 
there adjust with the Sieur de Baas, Chev. de St. Laurence or the 
French Commander-in-chief, a fit time and place for meeting the 
persons commissioned by the French King. The great difficulty 
his Majesty can yet foresee concerns the re-entry of the English into 
estates sold by them to the French since the taking of the island, 
for which provision is made in the 8th Article of the Treaty of 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 177 

1671. 

the treaty of Breda, which expresses that movables so sold shall not be 
restored till the price paid by the French be refunded by the English, 
and after frequent deliberations his Majesty has concluded to make the 
case of lands, houses, plantations, &c. the same with movable goods 
as- to that particular. His Majesty has agreed with the French 
Ambassador that a term of a year and a day, to be accounted from 
the time the said orders of the 16th January 1669 and 18th January 
last shall be presented to the French Commander-in-Chief, be limited 
for the English to use this power of resuming their estates at the price 
they received for them ; leaving it to Sir Chas. Wheeler to yield to 
a shorter day in case the French be pressing in it, and it may be 
done without much inconvenience to his Majesty's subjects. The 
point of amelioration or damages in the English estates during the 
time they have been in the French possession must be left to Sir 
Charles' own discretion ; only it seems not reasonable that any 
demand of amelioration should hinder restitution or re-entry, the 
price received being first repaid to the French purchaser, the dispute 
about any such amelioration to be left to the parties to adjust them- 
selves, in which the Commissioners on both sides are to give their best 
help to bring the parties to reason. The demands of the French for 
their keeping and dietting the English prisoners to be paid by the. 
prisoners themselves if for better accommodation and medicaments 
than were ordinarily allowed. The Commissioners to help all they can 
in obliging such person to make speedy satisfaction ; but ordinary 
keeping and diet his Majesty thinks it best reasonable should be on 
the French account ; if, however, he finds the sum demanded not 
considerable, and especially if French prisoners in those parts have 
been made to pay for their ordinary keeping and diet, his Majesty 
would have him agree to give satisfaction for all such debts. To 
proceed with all fairness towards the French, it being his Majesty's 
mind to make an end of the whole matter forthwith without raising 
unnecessary difficulties. To give notice on his arrival to the French 
Commander-in- Chief of their commission, and to demand and receive 
the sovereignty of St. Kitts, and to demand restitution of such guns 
and ordnance as were in the forts when taken, insisting thereon, 
especially if it fall out that the same be now found in the forts, or 
in the English part of the Island. 5 pp. [Col Entry Bk., No. XIV., 
34-38, see also No. XCII., 446-456, and No. XGIIL, 32-35.] 

March. 463. List of despatches delivered to Sir Charles Wheeler, going 
Governor March 1671 to the Leeward Islands, viz., his com- 
mission and instructions, letter to live well with the French, 
commission as captain of a company, commission to Lieutenant- 
Colonel Stapleton as captain of a company, power to appoint 
deputy-governors, power to receive St. Christopher's, and in- 
structions for executing the same. \p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XX VI., 
No. 39.] 

March. 464. Another list of Sir Charles Wheeler's despatches, viz., 
his commission and instructions, order for arms and ammunition, 
power to appoint deputy-governors, two commissions for captains 
(as above), M. Colbert's letters to the Chev. de St. Laurence and 

U 51U12. M 



178 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1671. 



March. 



March 15. 



M. de Baas, cypher, and the King's letter to live with the other 
Governors. p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 40.] 

465. Another list containing all the above, and the following in 
addition, viz., commission and instructions for ameliorations, letter 
to Sir Tobias Bridge, and instructions for disbanding his regiment, 
four establishments, warrant to Sir Stephen Fox for his pay, and 
two privy seals. 1 p. [Col. Entry Bk, No. XCIIL, fol 37.] 

466. Mem. of despatches delivered to Sir Thomas Lynch. His 
commission under the signet ; revocation of Sir Thos. Modyford's 
commission under the Great Seal, and letter to him notifying 
same ; instructions ; private letters to Sir Thos. Lynch ; 2nd 
instructions ; letter to live well with the French ; authentic copies 
of Sir Thos. Modyford's commission, and of Sir Thos. Modyford's 
revocation ; and cypher. [Col. Entry Bk, No. XGIII., fol. 37.] 

March 15. 467. Draft of preceding in Williamson's hand. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXVI., No. 41.] 

March 15 ? 468. Mem. of arms and ammunition to be put on board the 
Assistance, Captain Hubbard, and the Welcome, Captain Wilgress, 
for Jamaica. [Col Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 42.] 



March 17, 
Bermudas. 



Shaftesbury 
Tapers. 



March 20. 

Whitehall. 



469. Gov. Sir John Heydon to the Lords Proprietors of Carolina. 
Has not omitted, in obedience to their commands in their letter 
of 17 Nov. last, any opportunity to promote his Majesty's and 
their own interest in Carolina. Since when has arrived one of 
Colonel Sayle's sons who brings news of the health of the people 
and good progress in that plantation. Has procured a ship from 
hence which he intends setting forward the end of this month with 
the provisions this island can afford. Finds the people very well 
affected to that undertaking. Shall now send their Lordships 
packet to Ashley River, and hopes to get intelligence of their affairs. 
Has inquired after but cannot hear of any ambergris. Will 
instruct Captain James Harmour to examine more effectually 
upon the place. Endorsed by Locke. 1 p., with seal. [Shaftesbury 
Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 63.] 

470. Warrant to the Attorney-General. To prepare a Bill em- 
powering the Duke of York, Prince Rupert, Duke of Buckingham, 
Duke of Ormond, Earl of Lauderdale, and Lord Culpeper, at all 
times to enter the Council for Foreign Plantations and vote, the 
first two not to be required to take the oath, with the same privi- 
leges that were granted in the commission of 30th July 1670, 
constituting the said Council ; and further appointing John Evelyn 
to be the standing Council, with the yearly salary of 5001. granted 
to every member of said Council. Endorsed, " Persons added to 
the Council of Plantations." 6 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., 
No. 43.] See also Domestic, Chas. II., Docquets. 

471. J O s. Dalton to the Lords Proprietors of Carolina. Encloses 
letters > lnar ked A., B., and C., giving an account of the general 



March 21. 

A po!nf rle 

Carolina, affairs of this place, the remonstrance of the Council for the first 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 179 



1671. 
Shaftesbury adventurers and also themselves, and a relation of the demeanour 

Papers. Q wj}ii am Scrivener, deputy to Lord Berkeley, and William Owen, 
one of the first freeholders. Encloses, 

471. i. The Council at Ashley River to the Lords Proprietors. 
The arrival of the John and Thomas with about 42 people, 
and the Carolina with about 64 was not a little welcome, 
yet this bee has its stings, for many brought little or no 
provision with them. Thei'e is good opinion generally in 
all parts concerning this place ; some of those arrived are 
of good repute and fame and known to be experienced 
planters. Refer to their last letter and the election of 
Capt. Joseph West to be Governor, an act seemingly to 
vary from their Honours' directions, but for which they 
give reasons, the late Governor dying at a time when the 
Colony stood in greater need of a head than ever. Two 
seata vacant in the Council, the Lord Craven and Sir 
George Carteret's deputies. Are expecting every day the 
provisions their Honours sent to Barbadoes for them, 
having reason to believe that Capt. Stoe is waiting at 
Bermudas to bring people from thence in the spring. 
Some of those arrived in the Carolina have made claims 
of land pursuant to their Honours' concessions, 500 acres 
for every 1,000 Ibs. of sugar underwrit for defraying the 
charges of setting forth Capt. Hilton on the discovery 
of the province ; request directions, as they have passed 
an order for these lands to be granted, so that no dis- 
couragement be given. Have with much ado, our people 
being weak from scarcity of provisions, pallisadoed about 
nine acres and mounted seven great guns, all the carriages 
having been lost in the Port Royal, and when the people 
have done planting hope to finish it. Are forced to 
encourage and invite people not only by our tongues and 
pens, but also by our axes. Reasons why they cannot 
possibly observe all their Honours' instructions concerning 
the land, which is not lying as they were formerly 
informed, but will as near as they can. Thought it most 
conducive to safety on their arrival to build a town, 
where they are now settled ; describe it. To keep the 
planters near together were forced to grant them town 
lots of 11 poles or thereabouts per head and 10 acres 
per head to plant about the town, which it is con- 
ceived will prevent any sudden surprisal. Arguments in 
favour of people being allowed to choose plots for them- 
selves ; some delighting to be near the sea and others 
from it; the denial of this was fatal to the late settle- 
ment at St. Lucia. Hope their Honours will allow what 
they have done, or it may prove a great retarding of a 
speedy peopling this country. Having given account of 
the irregularity of our land, are forced to acquaint their 
Honours with the irregularity of our Surveyor-General, 
who, though receiving warrant upon warrant, has not yet 

M 2 



180 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

completed any man's land in the Colony, though promised 
2d. an acre as much again as any artist in surveying 
would do the like for, so have been forced to employ 
two gentlemen to survey the land gratis before any more 
people arrive. If the Surveyor-General does not complete 
pursuant to warrants, intend to employ John Culpeper, 
a very able artist, to finish the same, who will undertake 
to do it, return a plot (plan), keep a record of the same 
for 10s. a day under 500 acres, and above 500 Id. per 
acre, until further directions concerning Flor. O'Sullivan, 
Surveyor-General, and as to surveyor's fees and those to 
be employed. Bequest that two bales of parchment, one 
cwt. of well tempered wax, and the seal for passing grants 
may be sent to them, for the people very much desire 
the grants of their lands ; also a parchment book to record 
the grants and six other good paper books for the Regis- 
ter's office and the Council. Great necessity of supplies 
of tools, clothing, and provisions, the want of which has 
not a little pinched the first adventurers, not having 
received any since their first arrival. Also that cattle 
and hogs may be brought from New York, where they 
understand is a very good breed, with some horses for 
ploughing, which the people intend to fall upon as soon 
as ever they can get materials, by which means the people 
will be sooner able to discharge themselves of their 
Honours' store books and raise some advantage to them- 
selves, and the country be brought to a flourishing con- 
dition. Signed by Stephen Bull, Paul Smyth, Ro. Donne, 
Ra. Marshall, Samuel West, and Jos. Dalton, Registrar. 
Albemarle Point, 1 671, March 21. 

471. II. The humble remonstrance of the Council on behalf of 
themselves and the freeholders, the first adventurers to 
the province of Carolina, to the Lords Proprietors. Set 
forth the hardships they endured in being forced to 
employ themselves upon public works on their first 
arrival in the country to defend themselves from the 
' attacks of the Spaniards, the destruction of their first 
plantations, and the necessity of their being supplied 
with provisions from their Honours' stores, and pray them 
to mitigate what is thought to lie too severely upon 
them in their store books, and to qualify the freight of 
petitioners' goods for some time yet to come, to sweeten 
the hardships of their late adventures, and to recover 
their shattered and almost worn-out fortunes. Signed 
by Flor. O'Sullivan, 'Paul Smyth, Ro. Donne, Ra. Mar- 
shall, and Samuel West. Albemarle Point, 1 671, March 21. 

471. in. The Governor and Council at Ashley River to the Lords 
Proprietors. It is not a little trouble to them to present 
these unsavoury actions in this Colony occasioned by 
troublesome spirits, a malady that all regularity in 
government is more or less subject to. Have hitherto 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 181 

1671. 

smothered them, but of late those sparks meeting with 
more fuel have been blown into a flame by Wm. Owen 
chiefly and William Scrivener, deputy to Lord Berkeley, 
which they are unwilling to notice were it not to purge 
the air from such infectious actions to the exciting of 
mutinies among the people. Relate how at the election 
of five councillors after Col. Sayle was made Governor, 
the freemen of the Colony, having by that time thoroughly 
discovered Wm. Owen, wholly rejected him, which proved 
one spark more to his fire. How much the Sabbath day 
was profanely violated and divers other abuses practised 
by the people, which caused the Governor and Council, 
finding the number of freeholders in the Colony not 
sufficient to elect a Parliament to make and publish 
orders, to suppress the same, whereupon Owen endea- 
voured to possess the people that such orders could not 
pass without a Parliament, and seconded by Scrivener 
persuaded them to elect a Parliament among themselves, 
which they did and returned to the Governor, two of 
which Parliament men it was disputed were servants, 
Mich. Moran, a labouring Irishman,, and Rich. Crossley, 
set free by his master for idleness. Thus is discovered 
one part more of Owen's disposition, because the altitude 
of his body will not show itself taller than any other 
man by the head and shoulders, he will climb upon the 
pinnacle of any desperate attempt to be seen above 
others. This is not all. After the arrival of the two 
ships the said orders, revised by the present Governor 
and Council, were assented to and approved by the new 
freemen as well as the ancient freeholders, but Owen, 
finding himself swallowed up in a general consent, invents 
a new stratagem and possesses the chief of the people, 
especially the new comers, that as there was no Great 
Seal in the province, unless a Parliament were forthwith 
chosen to prevent it, their lands and all their improve- 
ments thereon would not be assured to them, but might 
be taken away at pleasure. Now Owen hath hit the 
mark, he is what he would be, the leader of a company 
of people upon any terms, the people's prolocutor, and 
therefore must have room in the Council to show himself 
and the people's grievances. The arguments of Owen 
before the Governor and Council upon the true inter- 
pretation of their Honours' instructions and the people's 
rights patiently heard ; the Governor's speech to the 
people, giving them to understand his power and authority 
to convey and assure to them all their lands until he 
received the Great Seal, and that he intended to summon 
the people for the election of a Parliament when oppor- 
tunity served or necessity of making laws required, upon 
which all or most of the freemen were fully satisfied, 
which Scrivener perceiving and that himself and Owen 



182 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 



were likely to lose the title of men of understanding, 
on a sudden arose up with somewhat more than ordinary 
heat and desired the people to take notice that he con- 
ceived their proposals were very just and reasonable, and 
that those who should deviate from them were disturbers 
of the peace and inf ringers of the people's liberties. For 
such speeches tending to the slighting and utter destruc- 
tion of this present Government and inciting the people 
to sedition and mutiny, and consequently the ruin of this 
settlement, it was the same day ordered that from henceforth 
Scrivener be suspended from the Council, and that both he 
and Owen be incapable of bearing any public office or 
employment in this Colony until further orders. Being 
very sensible that the name of a Parliament is strangely 
resented abroad, and that the quality of our Parliament 
men might not give an occasion of disputing in other 
parts, and no great necessity at present of one, our time 
being well employed in planting and other necessary 
works, and knowing how treacherous reports are, have 
deferred the summoning of a Parliament till the ships 
be gone, at which time, the heat of planting being over, 
the Governor and Council will, now some more people are 
come, proceed to the prosecution of their Honours' instruc- 
tions by and with the consent of the Parliament or the 
major part, to make such laws as are found necessary in 
this place. In the meantime desire instructions how long 
this Parliament is to continue, for two or three years, 
that they be dissolved at the pleasure of the Governor 
and Council and summons for a new election issued at 
any time. Signed by Joseph West, Ste. Bull, Flor. O'Sul- 
livan, Paul Smyth, Ro. Donne, Ra. Marshall, and Jos. 
Dalton, Registrar. Albemarle Point, 1671, March 21. 
Endwsed by Locke. Together 10 pp. [Shaftesbury Papers, 
Section IX., Bundle 48, No. " 



March 21. 472. Governor Joseph West to Lord Ashley, Sir Geo. Carteret, 
Arbemarie an d Sir Peter Colleton. Since his last of the 2nd instant it has 

Ashley River. P^ ease( i God to call for our Governor, who was very aged, and 
nature quite decayed in him. The 4th instant in the morning, 
finding himself very weak and sensible, he sent for the Council, 
and nominated the writer to succeed him in the government 
until their Honours' pleasure be further known, the Council being- 
all ready to give their consents. Conscious of his weakness he 
Shaftesbury dares not be a suitor for so great a charge, but desires to con- 
tinue no longer than their Honours can find out a gentleman 
that may give more encouragement to a new settlement. To 
leave the people last come inexcusable he called all the free- 
holders of the Colony together to hear the publication of some 
orders made by the late Governor and Council for the better 
keeping of the Sabbath Day, and preserving their stock this 
year, but some hot spirited persons, ambitious of perpetuating 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 183 

167). 

their own wicked inclinations, spurn at all order and good govern- 
ment, fearing to be reduced from a sordid beastly life that they 
will rather not live than be induced to live well. Such hath 
been especially the life of Win. Owen amongst them, he having 
some relation to his Lordship's secretary, Mr. Blany, who many 
times since their departure from England hath appeared at the 
head of the people and stirred them up to differences as their 
Honours may see more at large in the general letter from the 
Governor and Council. Has since the Governor's decease reduced 
the people into two companies, that they may be the better 
disciplined. Not 150 men yet in the colony fit to bear arms, 
Are still forced to lie upon their guard, keeping good watch, not 
trusting the Indians further than security will allow, for he is 
very sensible, though they carry themselves never so fair, yet 
are the Indians very treacherous and will let no opportunity slip 
to destroy us. Has taken up for present planting about 300 
acres disjoined from the town by a small creek bordering upon 
the river, but interrupted by a marsh. Has cleared this year 
about 30 acres and built convenient houses for ourselves and 
servants, and enclosed the houses with pallisadoes as described, 
so do not fear what all the Indians shall attempt. Arrival of 
Captain Godfrey from Barbadoes in the Carolina to manage Sir 
Peter Colleton's interest, and is very glad of his assistance, for 
he believes him to be a good planter. Intend to plant most of 
their ground this year with provisions, it being the life of a new 
settlement to provide in the first place for the belly. Have 
already sown peas and planted some Indian corn and wheat, 
and believes English grain will agree very well with this soil. 
Have also planted ginger and several other things to make ex- 
periment of what commodities the country will best produce. 
The winters here prove something sharp and cold, so that he 
fears it will not prove a cotton country, but new comers like it 
very well, and say they believe it will produce any commodities 
that the Caribbee Islands do, as cotton, ginger, indigo, &c., and 
have written several letters to encourage their friends in Barba- 
does to come, and he believes many will come in a short time. 
Stock thrives very well, especially hogs, which increase very fast. 
The four cows he kept are a very small breed, and will be but 
little profit except for stock. Is informed there is a very large 
breed of cattle at New York, and that one cow will give two 
gallons or more at a meal ; they want half-a-dozen such cows, 
likewise horses are there very cheap and of good breed. Very 
much in want of some to draw down timber to the water's side, 
and most of the ground planted this year may be ploughed the 
next. Has despatched the Carolina laden with pine timber, some 
of it fit for masts for small ships, and for points for windmills. 
Supposes the inhabitants have petitioned to take off Mr. Colle- 
ton's sloop from here to Bermudas, she being upon that voyage 
about three months at 30. a month, which is charged to the 
inhabitants ; likewise they desire a mitigation of freight upon 
goods sent to the first adventurers for the reasons stated. Negli- 



184 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671, 

gence of Captain O'Sullivan in laying out the people's lands, doubts 
he is not capable, and if found so shall suspend him and employ 
another surveyor from Barbadoes. Hopes they will send the seal 
for the grants, two or three bales of parchment and a considerable 
portion of good wax, likewise the patent from his Majesty, not 
having so much as seen a copy. Very little of any stores left, 
except a few nails ; requests supplies according to invoice, with 
instruction as to freight. In want of a good doctor and a medicine 
chest ; believes most part of the few people have died for want 
of good looking after ; not one has died out of their family since 
they came ashore. Hopes their servants who have been sickly 
are now seasoned to the country, and that their Honours are 
thinking of sending a supply from England, for some will be out 
of their time next year, and one English servant is worth two 
Barbadians, for they are so much addicted to rum that they will 
do little but while the bottle is at their nose. Reasons why he 
advises their Honours to part partnership. Wishes his salary paid to 
his wife, that she may supply his wants which are at present very 
great, and that they will consider he has managed the particular 
affairs in partnership. The late Governor had about 40Z. worth 
out of the stores. Desires instructions, for he was promised 100/. 
per annum by Sir John Yeamans. Sends lists of people come 
from Barbadoes in the John and Thomas and Carolina, also note 
of bills to be paid. Captain Brayne hath taken some to be paid 
in Barbadoes. With mem. of three seamen of the Carolina, de- 
ceased, who are indebted to their Honours' stores. Endorsed by 
Locke. With seal. 2 pp. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., 
Bundle 48, No. 65.] 

March 21. 473. William Owen to Robert Blayney. His Lordship (Ashley) 
Ashley River, in great esteem in the country for his prudence and wisdom and 
lat. 324o'm. care ^ them a ll a t this distance, and daily expect to hear that his 
Lordship has made choice of a Governor fit for such an employment, 
because of the continued growth of the country by the concourse of 
people arriving. Multitudes from Barbadoes, New England, and 
other parts already fitting for this country. The chief part of the 
fabric of this design and settlement depends upon the prudent 
management of things abroad and the good conduct of all affairs 
upon the place. Is dubious whether the late Governor, whom they 
took in at Bermudas, hath riot done a discourtesy already, for he 
declared he had been an Independent these 24 years. He was, it 
seems, very well known at Roanoke and Virginia, and in other 
places, but with whom they were not well pleased. When dying, 
partly with age and partly with a kind of lethargical distemper, he 
desired that Mr. West, the Proprietors' storekeeper, should succeed 
him in the government. Lord Berkeley's deputy, [W. Scrivener] the 
most understanding amongst our statesmen here, insisted that West, 
by reason of his employment, was not competent and prayed the 
government might rest with certain other persons, in regard there was 
not any one fit for the place, but this was carried against him. So the 
same day the Governor was interred, the new Governor West, store- 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 185 

1671. 

keeper and a deputy, feeling authority creeping over him, undertook 
to make a speech to the people, .the sum of which was that he assured 
them he would inflict punishment upon them if they did swear and 
profane, but not a word of encouragement to industry and planting, 
&c. Some few days after he sent a Marshal to require all free- 
holders to be at the storehouse. We are about 200 and odd 
souls, of whom about 40 or 50 freeholders who were called before 
the council table, where the Governor sitting said they had made 
very good laws for beating down sin and swearing, which imposed 
equal fines upon poor people here as the greatest of estates are subject 
to in England, and in default gagging and whipping. Some told 
him the laws of England knew no such thing as gagging, others 
inquired why they were sent for, they might as well have posted 
these laws to promulgate them. He told them he intended to have a 
book wherein every man should subscribe his religion. The people 
wondered where that book hath been all this while, being one of the 
main things in the Governor's instructions. They then desired to 
withdraw and consider what they had heard, and, having done so, 
they unanimously agreed to adhere to the Lords concessions, saying 
that when laws were to be made they were to be framed by 20 
persons, freeholders, in the nature of a Parliament, and that these 
being not founded upon the basis of the Lords' instructions for the 
Government, they could not concur with them, to which the Governor 
answered that they were but orders, but the people told him that 
the King of England did not by orders impose either pecuniary or 
corporal punishment upon his subjects, and the people very modestly 
told him they desired a Parliament which the Lords had prescribed 
for them and it were safe in them to obey and in him to command, 
yet nothing of this doth he clearly understand. Other reasons why 
a Parliament is necessary. Measures taken for the assuring of lands. 
Cannot believe but the man (the Governor) is honest, but whether 
of parts and reason sufficiently qualified in judging of civil rights he 
cannot tell. A man for this place must be of parts learning and policy 
and of a moderate zeal, not strict episcopal, nor yet licentious, nor 
rigid presbyterian, nor yet hypocritical, but swaying himself in an 
even balance between all opinions, but especially turning his fore to the 
liturgy of the Church of England. This country will doubtless be 
in a few years a place of plenty and trade ; all persons who come to 
t ettle in it are pleased with it, and as they come they draw more 
and are encouraged by those lately arrived from Barbadoes, so that 
by the latter end of the year we cannot be less than 1,000 people. 
In the meantime they are straitened for provisions until their crop 
is off the ground. Those sent from England by way of Bermudas will 
come by Tom Long. Had but one supply in August from Virginia 
and a little corn and peas only from Bermudas, yet are they cheerful 
and want not hope that within 18 months they will be able to eat and 
drink plentifully. Had almost forgot to tell him the issue of their 
debate. When they had urged all they could that things might be 
acted only by the rule of the commissions, Lord Berkeley's deputy 
stood up saying what we had offered was but just and reasonable, and 
that whoever should deviate from the Lords Proprietors' directions for 



18G 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1671. 



March ? 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



the Government injured their prerogative and infringed the people's 
liberty, whereupon the Governor for this protestation caused him to 
be suspended from the Council, and the rest of the Lords' Deputies 
concurred. This is an act which cannot be well resented by the 
Lords, neither can any Governor, as the Lords have qualified him 
here, expel any of the Lords Deputies from the Council, being upon 
the matter co-equal with himself, without a breach of the Lords' 
rights. Many here admire where my Lord Ashley hath met with 
his deputy. Was sorry to hear that he studied hard in a great 
strong house at London, and hath appeared suitable to the quality of 
that academy, an informer, &c. If he had 10,OOOL per annum in 
England yet would he have an interest here, and if ginger continues 
a price we doubt not of more than an ordinary living. Wants only 
about 25?. to be returned in commodities vendible in Bermudas to 
buy young heifers to stock his great lot with a cooper and a carpenter 
and a smith. Has heard the new Governor will write to the Pro- 
prietors and bespatter Owen all he can, so that Owen may not be 
concerned in anything. Was charged the other day with inciting 
the people to muting and committed to the Marshal's hand but 
discharged the next day, and told forsooth that the Governor did not 
commit him for speaking for the people, but for scratching his head 
and misdemeanoring himself in his presence. By this means the 
Governor thought to take away his inclination from appearing in 
behalf of the people. Reflections upon the Government who would 
deter any body from acquainting the Lords Proprietors with the 
state of things, and to that end the Governor hath ordered that no 
letters be carried off before he sees them. Beseeches him to make 
it his business to inquire and give no credit to what they say 
ex parte. If he is found in the least otherwise than endeavouring 
the good and amity and encouraging industry he will forfeit his life 
and acknowledge himself guilty. Begs him to speak to Lord Ashley, 
and procure his letter to Sir John Yeamans if he comes Governor to 
see him righted or to any other person who may be appointed. Is 
as forward in his plantation as any man in the country and they of 
the Council ; most of them have not one servant nor any concerns, but 
only once seemed to be zealous in the old Governor's time. A ddressed 
to Robt. Blayney, Esq., at the Rt. Hon. Lord Ashley's, at Exeter 
House, in the Strand, London. Endorsed by John Locke, o closely 
written pages. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 66.] 

474. " An old letter," so endorsed, neither signed nor addressed. 
Description of " our river," by the Indians called Kiawa, but by us 
Ashley River. Questions whether this country may not be com- 
pared with any in the world for either health, pleasure, profit, or 
delight ; in the summer it is like a bowling alley, full of dainty 
brooks and rivers of running waters ; full of large and stately 
timber. Account of its products ; the woods may rather be called 
a garden than an untilled place. Has seen millions of ducks in a 
flock darken the sky, and innumerable other birds ; it would ravish 
a man in a morning to hear the chanting harmonious sounds. 
Hunting both for pleasure and profit, cattle fit for the knife all the 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 187 

1671. 

year round, and hogs, sheep, goats, and other serviceable animals, 
but too plenty of wolves. The place very healthy, not one master 
of a family died since the settlement, except our good aged Governor, 
Col. Wm. Sayle, who was at least 80 years of age ; no sickness, 
though about 200 in the Colony. All sorts of grain thrive exceed- 
ingly. In great hopes of ginger, indigo, tobacco, and cotton to be 
their main commodities ; potatoes like to thrive. Our town, called 
Albemarle Point, situated on a point almost encompassed with a 
large marsh which may be easily strongly fortified. Mild winter, 
summer not extreme hot. As of the land of Canaan, it may be 
said it is a land flowing with milk and honey, and it lies in the 
same latitude. Prays God to send them more thankful spirits and 
grateful hearts than those stubborn, hard hearted, stiff-necked and 
rebellious Jews. 1-J- pp. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 
48, No. 85.] 

March 22. 475. Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes. Present, the Deputy 
Governor and four of the Council. Ordered, on the motion of the 
Assembly, that William Bate forthwith deliver to Robert Rich 60 
barrels, or 50, if there be not so much in the stores, of defective 
powder, taking security of him to redeliver the like quantity of 
good powder in six months, f p. [Col. Entry BL, No. XI., 189.] 

March 22. 476. Governor Sir William Berkeley to (the Committe of Trade 
Virginia. a nd Plantations). Explains his conduct in reference to a business 
that concerned one Farvacks, of London, merchant, and one Scar- 
borough, a planter in this Colony, which his Royal Highness (the 
Duke of York) had commanded the Governor to review ; that he 
could not give a new hearing to Scarborough, nor would the 
Governor's duty suffer him to let His Royal Highness' mediation 
be altogether ineffectual, being the first that ever he received from 
his Royal Highness of this nature. Has retarded the execution 
ready to be issued out on Scarborough's first sailing for one year 
to give time to his brother, Sir Charles Scarborough, to produce 
anything to their Lordships that might alleviate his brother's debt 
in equity. Hopes this will not be too severely censured by their 
Lordships. Endorsed, " Rec. the 12th, showed his Royal Highness 
17 May 1671." 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 44.] 

March 23. 477. Governor Sir William Berkeley to (Secretary Lord Arlington). 
Did not receive his letter of 21st August until the 17th of March, 
with another from the Duke of York, both intimating that he, the 
Governor, should review the cause of one Scarborough, who seemed 
to his Royal Highness and his Lordship to have more equity in his 
cause than appeared to the Governor. Could have wished that 
Scarborough's friends had procured this attestation before judgment 
had passed against him, but this being the first of his Royal High- 
. ness' commands, he could do no less than supersede the judgment, 
hoping his Royal Highness will protect him from the censure of 
the Lords of the Council. Encloses, 

477. I. Copies of the orders in Court in the case of Scarborough, 
1670, Oct. 26, 27. Together 3 pp. [Col Papers, Vol. 
XXVI., Nos. 45, 45, i.] 



188 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1671. 

March 24. 478. Warrant to Sir Thomas Chicheley, Knt, Master of the 
Whitehall. Ordnance. To deliver to such as Anthony Lord Ashley shall ap- 
point, four sacres, four minions, and four drabes, with ship carriages 
to eaeh, to be used in the plantation of Carolina in the West Indies. 
| p. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. XXIX., p. 53.] 

March 27. 479. Minutes of Council of Antigua. Resolved, on receipt of 
his Excellency's letter from London of the 26th November 1670, 
importing his approbation of the way of government of the Council 
after the decease of Col. Byam ; that the monthly courts be kept 
by the Justices, and execution granted as formerly ; that no jury 
court be held till further order from his Excellency, but that the 
Judges issue out attachments on all judgments ; that in case any 
person refuse to pay the levies per acre for the public treasury, the 
act be put in execution, and that payments out of the public 
treasury be ordered by the President, one of the Council, and one 
of the Assembly. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 55*.] 

March 29. 480. Minutes of the Council of Jamaica. Major-General James 
St. Jago de la Bannister sworn of the Council. Petition of Priscilla Rignallfor her 
Vega. husband's estate, viz., one house in St. Jago de la Vega, also several 
debts, and some few goods and chattels forfeited to his Majesty, by 
reason he was executed for killing Thomas Monroy, without which she 
and her three small children must immediately crave relief from the 
parish, she having paid 51. 10s. to the late Provost Marshall, the 
coroner's fees and quitrents to his Majesty, and unable to pay her debts 
by reason several persons indebted to her deny to pay the same, 
alleging that they are forfeited to his Majesty : granted, with full 
power to sue for her debts, in regard of her great poverty, great charge 
of children, and the small value of the house and goods. Petition of 
Richard Taylor, planter, that having for many years laboured as a 
planter, and been held an industrious and sober person, he was one 
day provoked by one Henry Westond to try his strength and skill 
in the art of wrestling, when several falls were exchanged on 
either side, but though Westond remained well to every one's 
apprehension, and presently after had a more dangerous quarrel" 
with one Wm. Heb, yet happening to die presently upon it, peti- 
tioner was arraigned as equally guilty with Heb, and the jury gave 
a verdict of manslaughter against both, for which, having past the 
clergy, petitioner lies liable to be branded in the hand, a mark of 
infamy to a sober minded person as grievous as death ; prays his 
Excellency to remit the punishment, which shall teach him more 
caution for the future : granted. Ordered that henceforth the 
Secretary draw no licenses for drink unless the person bring a 
certificate from two Justices of the peace, one to be of the Council 
of the parish where he sells the drink, that he is a fit person to 
draw drink. Ordered, on petition of Thomas Shutt and other 
merchants riding at Port Royal, who having brought several quan- 
tities of liquors to the island, for which they are obliged to pay 
great sums to his Majesty for custom and import, according to an 
Act of his Excellency and Council, pray relief ; that the merchants 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 189 

1671. 

have 28 days from the arrival of their ships to make up their 
account of liquors, and then pay one third of the customs and give 
bond for the other two thirds, dated within three days of their 
ships coming in, and after that no allowance or dispute. 5i pp. 
[Col Entry Bk., No. XXXIV., 212-217.] 

March. 481. Warrant for allowing the account of William Lord Wil- 
loughby, of Parham, Governor of Barbadoes. With directions to 
the Auditor of the imprests for allowing on the said account 
302,780 Ibs. Muscovado sugars paid to the customs officers in that 
island, 2,500 Ibs. paid to Captain Poole for a wherry for his 
Majesty's service, 216,912 Ibs. paid to Sir Tobias Bridge and his 
regiment, and 616,067 Ibs. paid to Jeremy Eggington and William 
Bate for provisions and disbursements in the time of Francis 
late Lord Willoughby of Parham ; with further directions for 
certifying a mistake of 1,200 gallons of molasses instead of 120 
gallons, whereby the charge will be lessened 32,400 Ibs. Musco- 
vado sugars. [Z)om. Chas. II, Docquets.~] 

April 4. 482. A Committee of the Assembly of Barbadoes to Sir Peter 
Barbadoes. Colleton and 11 others, Gentlemen Planters in London. Were 
appointed at the last sitting of the Assembly to give them thanks 
for their kindness expressed in theirs of the 14th December. 
Since theirs of the 7th March the Deputy-Governor, Council and 
Assembly have taken into consideration the present necessity of 
repairing the forts, platforms, and breastworks in and about the 
island, and have levied 200 Ibs. sugar on every copper and still 
in all sugar works, and 18 Ib. sugar per head on all negroes in 
plantations where there are no works, besides the proportionable 
tax on the towns and traders ; which in their present condition 
will lie very heavy on them, but are willing to break through 
all obstacles to put the island in a good posture of defence, and 
that his Majesty may see their readiness to lay themselves out 
to the utmost for his honour and renown. This free act nothing 
but true principles of loyalty could have compelled them to, it 
being chiefly appropriated to those necessary uses the 4|Pr. Ct. was 
to perform ; but present affairs requiring a more speedy remedy 
than they could expect by waiting an answer from England to 
that part of their addresses, and unwilling to force the Farmers 
to the performance of the conditions of the Act, have chosen this 
as a middle way. By the Act one quarter is reserved to their 
own use, a good part whereof is intended home to the Gentlemen 
Planters, for prosecuting their addresses before his Majesty, and 
satisfying their former disbursements about the island's concerns. 
Have concluded on a Bill to prevent depopulation, which they 
have good assurance will pass into an Act next sitting, in which, 
as also by another to encourage the making and wearing of the 
island's manufactures, provision is made suitable to their pro- 
posals. Ere long they may expect a fuller account from the 
House. Signed by Ralph Frettwell, Henry Odiarne, and Nicholas 
Prideaux. 2 pp. [Col Entry BL, No. XIII., 19-21.] 



190 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1671. 

April 4. 483. " Copy of the relation of Wm. Fogg concerning the action 
of the privateers at Panama, taken the 4th of April 1671." Sailed 
6th December from Cape Liburon for Providence, where they 
found 300 men in garrison, who yielded next day, but only 60 
slaves and 500?. in plunder. In five days they sent Captain 
Bradley with 400 men to take Chagre Castle ; where after nine 
days he landed. They fired a volley at the castle, and fell into 
the trench, which was 12 foot deep; that night they fired the 
castle, which made it so hot they could not enter, it being of 
double palissades and thatch, and lay under the walls the next 
day ; the third day they fell on, but were beaten back, the enemy 
being 370 men, but they rallied, entered the castle, and put all to 
the sword, saving none but slaves and such as hid themselves. In 
this conflict they lost Captain Bradley, Lieutenant Powell, and 150 
men. A week after Admiral Morgan came up, and at the entry 
over the bar the Admiral, which had been retarded by contrary 
winds, and six small vessels were cast away and 10 men drowned. 
Ten days after they went up the River Chagre in five vessels 
about five leagues, and put their necessaries in canoes, the men 
marching the other five leagues by the river side, cutting the path 
with difficulty and finding five breastworks which the enemy left ; 
and so in five days they came to Venta de Crux, the landing place, 
where they found all burnt. Finding next morning that they were 
about 1,200 men they marched, and in the afternoon were am- 
buscaded by 1,000 Indians, but put them to flight, losing one 
man, whilst the Indians lost their commander, the Prince of the 
Indians, and about 30 men. Next day they marched about six 
miles, and the third the like, and found they were within three 
miles of the enemy's camp. Next morning they found the enemy 
ready to receive them, being about 2,000 foot and 700 horse. 
The horse in two divisions charged their " forlorn " and right 
wing, but having received much loss by our first volley fled, and 
their foot gave one volley and fled after them; they had the 
pursuit about three miles, in which the enemy lost 500 men, and 
they one Frenchman. That night they entered Panama, and found 
the houses fired by the enemy. They lodged in the churches and 
monasteries, which were of stone, and there lay a week ; found 
plenty of victuals, but all the goods burnt, and the plate conveyed 
away. After this their men marched out in parties, sometimes 
100, sometimes 40, and 10, and took prisoners every day, but never 
saw an enemy to face them, and after 28 days marched the way they 
came and returned to Chagre ; whence a month since they sailed, 
" and three days after the said vessel came," left the Admiral about 
Puerto Bello, with three sail ; and the rest, he supposes, made the 
best of their way for Jamaica. The party got but 101. per man 
in money and plate, besides negroes. If pp. [Col. Entry Bk., 
No. XXVII., 120-121.] 

April 5. 484. Draft patent for a Landgrave of Carolina to Sir John 
Shaftesb Yeamans. In the handwriting of John Locke, with corrections 
Papers. and additions. Latin, 2 pages and 3 lines. Endorsed. [Shaftesbury 
Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 78.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 191 



1671. 

April 8. 485. Major Jas. Banister to the King. Has brought away in 
Old Harbour, performance of his charge as many as the two ships would carry, 
Jamaica. n i s own being wanting, and would have brought all his Majesty's 
subjects from Surinam had things been carried as they ought and 
he had had shipping; but by the perverseness of the Governor 
was forced to leave above half and they who had the best estates, 
of which his Majesty may be informed by the narrative of his 
daily proceedings. These people have presented the enclosed peti- 
tion; begs leave to add, that without his Majesty's favour they 
will be undone and no way left them to get off the country, their 
masters well knowing that the colony is broke if all the English 
go off. Arrived at Jamaica 12th March and was received with 
all civility by Sir Thos. Modyford who hath a special care for the 
settlement of the people, and is very well satisfied with the fertility 
of the island, which he is confident will in a short time prove one 
of his Majesty's best plantations. Prays his Majesty's acceptance of 
the small presentment he has presumed to send, viz., two Indian 
swords, three lances which they mortally poison at their going to 
war, and one bow, made without any iron tool, the only instruments 
they ever knew being hare's teeth and sharp stones, with a snake's 
skin, two fowls called cusslisses, and a young fowl called a gallding, 
which when grown will be all of a perfect scarlet colour. Encloses, 
485. I. Petition of his Majesty's loyal subjects now residing in 
Surinam under the Government of the United Netherlands, 
to the King. That depending upon the sudden return of 
Col. Jas. Banister with orders for their transportation, 
petitioners for several months kept themselves out of 
engagements that they might be in a posture to withdraw 
with their estates ; but being wearied by delays, intelli- 
gence failing by the miscarriage or interception of letters, 
and the Dutch frequently suggesting that there would 
never be any such concession, many began anew, whereby 
they became so deeply indebted to the Dutch, that without 
apparent ruin it was at this time impossible to remove. 
Humbly request therefore a future conveniency by two 
other ships, with which the Dutch will never furnish them, 
being possessed that the welfare of the colony consists in 
detaining the intelligent and industrious planters, of whom 
they have few of their own nation, they being absolutely 
determined to sell their plantations, which, with the crop 
in the ground, they hdpe will not only disengage them 
from their creditors, but enable them to begin some 
considerable settlement in Jamaica. Signed by Thomas 
Scattergood, Oliver Hempson, and 54 others. [Col. Entry 
Bk..,No. LXXVIL, 57-60.] 

1670. 486. " A narrative of the proceedings of Major Banister in the 
Nov. 15 business of Surinam." Left London 15th November 1670; re- 

to ceived Henry Ayler, master on board the America, at Dover, the 

1671, 27th ; kept company till 9th December, when falling foul of the 
April. Johanna in the night broke their head and " bole splitt," lost 



192 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

company of the other two ships ; and arrived in Surinam 9th 
January, delivered to the Governor the States General's orders, 
and received the most kind and respectful show of civility to be 
imagined. Wrote to Lord Arlington, landed on the 12th with 
Captain Yates and Mr. Ayler, and found the Governor with others, 
who caused the following declaration to be read. Declaration of 
Governor Philip Julius Lichtenberghe : That the English merchant 
ships were to stay but six weeks after Major Banister's arrival ; that 
all the English inhabitants might transport themselves in the same, 
with their estates and slaves, except those bought of inhabitants 
of the colony since the surrender, and other goods, provided their 
debts are duly paid ; that a court was appointed at Paramaribo 

31 Jan. 
on the ,Q y, i to decide controversies as to the price for which 

slaves purchased since the surrender shall be restored; all who 
intend to leave to give notice to the Governor in 10 days after 
the -g-f tn January; that any English may remain without fear 
of his Majesty's displeasure ; and may at all times transport 
themselves from the colony on the same conditions. That those 
departing shall not destroy anything they will not take with them, 
or cannot dispose of. Stated his objections to this declaration to 
the Governor, who would have had him sign it, which he denied to 
do, finding he could not have the States General's orders published, 
and was commanded not to speak to the people. This declaration 
was read to the people, who would have had some -conference 
with Major Banister, but no opportunity presented, for he was 
guarded by two captains. That day and the next all the people 
of Paramaribo division (except one) gave in their names, which 
caused the Governor to put forth two notifications in the other 
divisions to prevent them declaring their intentions to remove by 
leaving them no way to pay their debts but in money or such 
goods as sugar or speckle wood, which he knew few or none were 
masters of. Went up the river in the America to his plantation, 
accompanied by the Scakerlope ship of war, which placed a guard 
at the creek's mouth and another on the land side of his planta- 
tion, to prevent any English from coming to him till the 10 days 
for giving in their names were expired. The declaration was 
published at Toorarica on ^-fth, whither he sent Captain Ayler, 
who was commanded not to speak to the people. Knew the 
notifications would prevent many from giving in their names, 
and wrote to the Governor desiring a conference. His letter 
letter dated Occaribo 29th January 1671. Receiving no answer 
and hourly hearing what menaces and persuasions were used to 
prevent the English from removing, wrote again to the Governor 
desiring a conference, and not to persist in using threatenings or 
menaces. The Governor's reply, desiring him to come to Para- 
maribo the following Monday, which Banister knew was designed 
to spin out the little time he had to stay, he therefore wrote 
again to the Governor, that he desired to be present at the deci- 
sion of debts, and requested that the removers might be first paid 
what was justly owing to them, that they might satisfy their 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 193 

1671. 

creditors, and offering to charge bills on the Council for Foreign 
Plantations for what they have not wherewithal to satisfy. The 
Governor's answer : That the decision of the debts must be by the 
ordinary court of justice ; that he would endeavour to compose the 
business, and be glad if the creditors would accept the bills he 
propounds, but cannot see how they can be forced ; that he thinks 
it more convenient Banister should stay at his plantation to avoid 
all jealousies, but will confer with him after the court. Where- 
upon Major Banister wrote again complaining that as concerns 
debts the Governor was acting contrary to the Articles of Sur- 
render by Colonel Byam and the States General's orders, him not 
to infringe ; also desiring him to permit Captain Yates to acquaint 
those that have given in their names, what care his Majesty has 
taken for their transportation and settlement ; or must protest 
against him for what he has done or shall do contrary to said 
Articles and orders. The Governor's reply : Is much surprised at 
his accusation, and will be glad to see by his protest how he has 
infringed his orders. Takes his letter to proceed from too much 
inflamed passion, which may be was kindled because some things 
here do not succeed according to his imagination, but will be glad 
to confer with him and the other Commissioners concerning debts 
and for the despatch of the departing people. At their coming the 
Governor was told he sent for them to confer about the debts of' 
those that would remove, and that Major Banister should have the 
executions delivered to him for the debts owing to the removers, 
which the Marshal should serve according to his orders. His 
reasons for refusing the Governor's proffer, and that he would not 
concern himself in the business, but would receive on board all 
such as came within the time* limited, and if the Governor did not 
grant this, he would take it as a breach of the orders and act 
accordingly. Next morning the Governor sent him a paper, which 
he ordered the secretary to read in Dutch in the presence of several 
Jews and Dutch, again presenting to the Commissioners the execu- 
tions against the unwilling debtors of the departing English, and 
offering to command the Marshal to wait on them with strict 
order to execute the same without delay; and requesting the 
Commissioners, if they are of opinion that he has faltered in per- 
forming any part of the orders of the States General, that they will 
put the same in writing that all disputes may be debated and friendly 
annulled, otherwise he shall take no more notice of what has been 
complained of by word of mouth. By which paper their Lord- 
ships may perceive that the Governor's drift was to know whether 
Major Banister would protest, but was resolved to keep him in 
doubt. Ten days later the Commissioners wrote to the Governor 
that finding he would make believe by his fair pretences that his 
desire has always been to act according to the Articles, despatches, 
and orders passed in this business, and that notwithstanding they 
could not prevail with him to condescend to several things granted 
in favour of the English, nor to admit of a friendly debate before 
the court, nor to accept their reasonable propositions ; but on the 
contrary that he has acted to the prejudice of those that would 

U 51'J12. 



19-i COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

remove, contrary to said Articles, they have declared this in their 

n 24th February 
protest winch follows, and is dated ,, AT . > 1671, and signed 

by Jas. Banister, Fras. Yates, Thos. Stantor, Hen. Massey, Ja. 
Maxwell, Tobias Bootinan, Christ. Rendar, Hen. Ayler, and Rich. 
Covile. Caused this protest to be read in the presence of the 
Governor, Capt. Vorstarr, and his Secretary, Mr. Boll, with several 
of the Dutch nation, and besides themselves, Sam. Sleigh, Thos. 
Lambert, and John Yates. The Governor seemed much troubled 
at the reading yet could not contradict any one article, but 
importuned them to dine with him, after which he caused the 
enclosed paper to be read in the Dutch tongue, the contents of 
which Banister knew not. The Governor came aboard the 
America and Johanna and examined all the passengers the same 
evening, to see if there were any aboard contrary to the States 
Generals orders. They then weighed anchor, and were accompanied 
to the river's mouth by the Dutch ship of war, and most of his 
fellow subjects of any account in the Colony, with their wives ; 
whom he entertained with the Governor, and sailed on the 28th 
February, the ship of war saluting them with seven guns. On 
1st March the Johanna stood away for Barbadoes, to land three 
families there. On the 12th the America arrived at Port Royal in 
Jamaica, where Sir Thos. Modyford received him with all possible 
respect and friendship, and ordered shallops with provisions to 
carry the people to proper places of the island, with a surveyor to 
lay out their lands. The Johanna missing Barbadoes, arrived five 
days after in good condition. Begs their Lordships to take notice 
of the sad condition of his fellow subjects left in Surinam, most of 
whom are of good estates, yet entangled with debts to the Dutch, 
and by the unjust proceedings of the Governor made incapable of 
parting with anything to clear themselves till the Governor knew 
it was too late, thinking they would be persuaded to stay when 
Banister was gone ; but in that they were much mistaken, for at his 
coming away the chiefest of them came under pretence of taking 
their leaves, and presented him with a letter to his Majesty begging 
him to send -for them off, though at their own charges. Besides 
their utter ruin hangs on the Dutch having discovered this plot. 
Beseeches their Lordships therefore to solicit his Majesty's favour, 
without which it is impossible to obtain their enlargement ; for their 
Lordships may judge what unreasonable terms will be exacted for 
transportation, if they demanded of Banister for the hire of a fly 
boat for a short trip to Barbadoes no less than 360?., when the 
Johanna was hired by his Majesty for 90?. per month. This caused 
him and others to sell their cattle for anything they could get, yet 
was he forced to leave goods behind to the value of 300?. or 400?., 
for he never heard of his own vessel since Capt. Covile left her. 
[Col. Entry Bk., No. LXXVII., 33-56.] 

April 8. 487. Major James Banister to Sec. Lord Arlington. Thanks 

Old Harbour, f or hi s ' many exceeding kindnesses. Begs him to defend and assist 

the distressed condition of his Majesty's remaining subjects at 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



195 



1671. 

Surinam, whom he left extremely desirous to remove from their 
subjection to such strange people's government but could not clear 
themselves in the time limited. Desires him to induce his Majesty 
to send them shipping, which they are ready to freight at their 
own cost, or they will be all ruined and never be able to get off'. 
As to his particular business at Surinam, refers to his narrative 
sent by Francis Wightwick. Sailing thence in 14 days they 
arrived at Jamaica, where he was courteously received by Sir 
Thos, Modyford, and his commission published with great respect. 
This island is very fertile, and questionless in a short time will 
be a flourishing settlement, but till Sir Thos. Modyford showed 
them the way, the very name of a planter was strange amongst 
them. Endorsed, Answered August 15th 71. 1 p. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXVI., No. 46.] 

April 10. 488. Lord Ashley to Joseph Dalton. He is in so good esteem 

Exeter House. w ith all the Lords Proprietors [us] that he need not doubt those 

encouragements to which he may have any just pretences. Are 

all willing to continue him in the office of Secretary, as they 

have no complaints against him and hope he will so behave as 

Sbaftesbury to give them reason always to think of him as they do now, the 

fittest man for that place. He will by this ship receive a paper book 

as desired and all sent to him by friends freight free. [Skaftes- 

bury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 55, p. 13.] 

April 10. 489. Lord Ashley to Col, Wm. Sayle. The river he has chosen 
Exeter House, to plant on, though not that they (the Lords Proprietors) intended 
when their ships went out of England, yet is so much better and so 
well fitted to all the ends of their present design that they very 
much approve of his remove from Port Royal to Ashley River and 
think that Charles Town where settled is very convenient for their 
new settlement. Expect much good success from this hopeful 
beginning and from his integrity, experience, and careful manage- 
ment. Complain of his having refused observance to instructions 
because signed only by Sir Peter Colleton and himself, we two 
having the great care of this business left to them. They have been 
at great charges for supplying him with all necessaries, and they 
must expect from the people there and from him in particular to be 
careful of their interests. Is forced to remind him of this because 
the Carolina went away from Barbadoes in September last, not 
for their advantage but other men's, who loaded timber for them- 
selves ; some might have been taken in upon their own had their 
concerns been regarded. Recommend him to be very punctual in 
observing his instructions, and some are of more consequence for 
the security and thriving of their settlement than the planting of 
towns in which if men be not overruled their rashness and folly 
will expose the plantation to ruin ; the difference whereof is 
apparent in New England and Virginia. To press this so abso- 
lutely on the people is for their safety and advantage. A bill of 
20?. charged upon him by O'Sullivan for the use of passengers 
without authority, Mr. West being their agent. Desires to be 
informed about this. As to Col. Sayle's wishes concerning Mr. 

N 2 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



196 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

Sampson Bond, if he will go to Carolina lie shall have 500 acres, 
401. per annum, and a house, but though allowed this to he Preacher 
among them, the Lords Proprietors give neither him nor Sayle 
authority to compel any one in matters of religion, having in their 
Fundamental Constitutions granted a freedom in that point which 
they resolve to keep inviolable. 2 pp. [Shaftesbury Papers, 
Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 55, pp. 15, 17.] 

April 10. 490. Lord Ashley to Stephen Bull. His behaviour in their 
Exeter House, government very acceptable to the Lords Proprietors and to him- 
self in particular, and he may be confident his Lordship will be 
careful of him. Is very well satisfied with the goodness of the 
climate and country he is pitched in, and thanks him for the 

Shaftesbury account he has given of it and to continue his correspondence. 
Papers. They have now sent another ship fitted with people and design 
not to stop the supply until they are 1,000 strong. Only expect 
the people's carriage to be answerable to the care the Lords Pro- 
prietors have of them and intend to continue. [Shaftesbury Papers, 
Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 55, p. 27.] 

April 10. 491. Lord Ashley to William Owen. Keturns thanks for his 
Exeter House, letter (see ante, No. 261) and for his discreet and partial infor- 
mation of the state of affairs. The Lords Proprietors intend 
not to slacken their hands until they have brought such an 
addition of people as he has mentioned to be sufficient for the 
support and security of the plantation. As they are careful to 

Shaftesbury supply their present necessities, hope they will not fail to answer 
Tapers. ^e j j0r( j s Proprietors' expectations and be careful of their just 
interests there. Begs he will send notice what may be most 
advantageous for the settlement and of the condition of affairs. 
Particularly desires he will send word whether the Indian Cas- 
siques, their neighbours, be absolute lords in their own terri- 
tories, or else be tributary princes and pay subjection and homage 
to any greater King who is their Emperor. He need not doubt 
that the Lords Proprietors will be sparing of their encourgement 
to a man who shall contribute to the welfare of their people 
there. Have at his request granted freight free for things or 
persons his friends shall now send out of England. [Shaftesbury 
Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 55, pp. 37, 39.] 

April 10. 492. Lord Ashley to Sir John Yeamans. Is very pleased to 
Exeter House, receive the first fruits of their plantation at Ashley river from 
his hands, who has been so forward to promote their settlement 
there. Sends herewith a patent for Landgrave in acknowledgment 
of his assistance to the design in which his exceptions to the 
descent have been considered according to his desire, so that it 

Shaftesbury shall not be in any danger of going out of the family. The Lords 
Papers. Proprietors have no othejr aim in framing their laws than to make 
every one as safe and as happy as possible, and to order every 
one's condition so that all together may make up a quiet equal 
and lasting government, wherein every man's right, property, and 
welfare may be so fenced in and secured that the preservation of 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 19? 

1671. 

the government may be every one's interest. Recommends to him 
as very necessary the planting of people in towns, the chief thing 
that hath given New England so much advantage over Virginia. 
Desires therefore that when he goes to Carolina this summer lie 
gives direction and assistance in it and put them in such a way 
of settling in towns as may be most equal and convenient for the 
planters and so order the home lots in every colony, the Lords 
Proprietors requiring that all the inhabitants of every colony 
should set their houses together in one place, which place is left 
to the choice of the inhabitants themselves, so that those who 
come after may share in the conveniency of the town and have 
an equal proportion of home lots left them. Has moved the rest 
of the Lords Proprietors in the behalf of Mr. Woodward who have 
sent him 1 001., besides which Lord Ashley has sent him 20. which 
is not all they intend to do for him. Desire that while his stay 
is necessary to maintain correspondence between our people and 
the Indians that he would be persuaded to stay where they will 
be sure to be mindful of him. 2 pp. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section 
IX., Bundle 48, pp. 73, 75.] 

April 10. 493. Lord Ashley to Woodward. Thinks himself obliged to 
Exeter House, take care of him and his concernments, and he shall have no reason 
to repent the pains he has taken and the ventures he has run in 
Carolina. Has recommended his services to the rest of the Lords 
Proprietors, who have, out of their public stock, ordered him 1 001., 
Shaftesbury so he may take up either part or the whole in servants or goods 
aper8 ' out of their stores at Charles Town, or in commodities, as he 
desires, from England, Barbadoes, Virginia, or any other placev 
Sends him, besides, 201. as a particular gratuity from himself. 
Hears that besides the correspondence he manages with the 
neighbour Indians he has been 14 days' journey up the country 
with a great Emperor there, with whom he has made a league, and 
where he has discovered things he thinks nob fit to reveal to any 
but themselves, in which he has done very discretely. Wishes the 
condition of their people there did not yet awhile need his stay 
among them for keeping up the friendship and commerce with, 
those language and customs he is so well acquainted with that 
nobody can be so helpful to their settlements. Their planters too, 
till they have learnt the natives' language and got a better know- 
ledge of them, cannot, his Lordship fears, well do without him. 
The Lords Proprietors must, therefore, for some time deny them- 
selves the satisfaction of those discoveries he reserves for them till 
he comes to England, and Lord Ashley desires he will not leave 
their plantation till the Indians and their people are grown into so 
good an acquaintance one with another as not to need an interpreter 
between them. Earnestly desires him not to give the least hint to 
anybody if he have any knowledge or conjecture of mines, for fear 
the people, tempted by hopes of present gain, should forsake their 
plantations and so run into certain ruin, which has followed those 
who have formerly marched into this country in search of gold and 
silver. Begs him therefore to keep any such thing secret, but if 



198 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1671. 

convenient td give any hint in letters to call gold antimony and silver 
iron, in case his letters fall into other hands. 2 pp. [Shaftesbury 
Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 55, pp. 77, 79.] 

April 11. 494. Sir James Modyford to Joseph Williamson. Has not 
Jamaica, written to or heard from him for a long time, nor has he ever had a 
word from Lord Arlington, notwithstanding his many large epistles 
from Barbadoes since leaving England, though he pressed for his 
Majesty's commands whether to stay or return, Providence being 
retaken before his arrival ; which island; being again possessed by 
the privateers, on their way to Panama, who carried off all 
Spaniards, thinks himself bound to go and take possession thereof 
for his Majesty. His setting -out from England and stay at 
Barbadoes, with all his people, cost him 1,000?., if not more, whereof 
he is never like to have a farthing. His resolution is to send over 
a party with a Deputy Governor to take possession, and follow 
himself with such force as he can get. Endorsed, R., 29 June 1G71. 
1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVL, No. 47.] 

April 11. 495. Copy of preceding. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV I., No. 48.] 



April 12. 

Jamaica. 



498. Sir James Modyford to Joseph Williamson. This addition 
is to beg that he will assist his cousin Charles Modyford towards 
obtaining as much as possible of all sorts of ammunition, there being 
nothing left from our people's plundering, to the very great guns, 
which they threw into the sea or spiked. Received 5th July 1671. 
1. p. [Col Papers, Vol. XXVL, No. 49.] 



April 11-12. 497. Copies of preceding letters. 

No. 50.] 



[Col Papers, Vol. XXVL, 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



April 12. 498. Lord Ashley to Hugh Wentworth, Governor of the 
Exeter House. Bahamas Islands. He will receive with this the King's Patent for 
Providence and the rest of the Bahamas, wherein he will find some 
other considerable Lords Proprietors, with Lord Ashley, in this 
grant of Wentworth's islands, of which he has procured a commis- 
sion for him to be Governor. Will readily do anything for him as 
an acknowledgment " for the beginning of this and putting of it 
into my hands." The Lords Proprietors intend as soon as they are 
informed of the extent of his island and the quantity of good 
plantable land in it to establish a lasting, fair, and equal form of 
government for all sorts of people. It is designed to keep for the 
Lords Proprietors, for the nobility, and for the people. Looks 
upon him as a man who hath so much contributed to the planting 
of this island that he shall not find himself neglected when by the 
settlement of the Government the nobility shall be named. Intends 
that he and his posterity shall, by the shares he shall have among 
the nobility, reap the benefit of having led a colony of English 
there. Nor shall he be unmindful of Mr. Dorrell, who has a good 
share in this undertaking, and has laid out money and pains in 
transporting people thither. Desires him to take care of his in- 
structions to govern the people with equal justice, and to allow 
them proportions of land advantageous to the settlement. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



199 



1671. 



April 18. 

Barbadoos. 



April 19. 



April 20. 
Barbadoes. 



him to write often, and so let him know if there be a great deal of 
land fit for cocoa nuts, which ho hears grow well in Providence. 
Also as to the quantity of brazilletto, and what worth per ton, 
2 pp. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No, 55, 
Pi). 85, 87.} 

499. Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes. Present, the Deputy 
Governor and four of the Council. Demand made on Robert 
Parker, Commissioner of the Customs of 4| per cent., for necessary 
repairs of the fortifications as by the Act he ought to do. Answered 
that they could not pay anything without particular order from 
his Majesty or the Farmers of said Customs, i p. [Col. Entry 
Bk., No. XL, 189-190.] 

500. Minutes of the Assembly of Barbadoes. This day was 
communicated to the Assembly by the Deputy Governor a letter 
from his .Excellency, dated Nov. 7 last, together with copies of a 
letter and inquiries from the Commissioners for Foreign Plan- 
tations to his Excellency, dated 29th Sept. last (see ante, Nos. 327, 
327. i., ii.) 5 pp. [Col Entry Bk, No. XIII., 21-26.] 

501. The Assembly of Barbadoes to Sir Peter Colleton and ten 
other Gentlemen Planters in London. Refer to their Committee's 
letter of 4th inst., and the levy therein mentioned which may 
amount to 1,000,000 Ib. sugar, and have appointed their Treasurer 
forthwith to ship 100,000 Ib. to them, not doubting they will 
manage whatever shall come to their hands to the best advantage 
of this place. And for the better method in carrying on their 
addresses, have chosen Ferdinando Gorges to be their solicitor at 
all times before the King, Council, and committees, upon such in- 
structions as the Gentlemen Planters shall give him, allowing him 
for his pains 100Z. for one year. The five heads which they lately 
desired might be presented by Lord Willoughby, with one more, 
all which are enclosed, are what at present they suppose neces- 
sary to be addressed to his Majesty. Hear his Majesty was 
displeased with those heads, and supposing the manner rather than 
the matter might be the cause, give all their other heads of ad- 
dresses sent home by his Excellency, all or any of which they 
may with caution petition his Majesty for. But as to the 4| per 
cent, the most material are these six. Desire that the first may 
be principally insisted upon, and it is the earnest request of the 
Assembly that they use their utmost endeavour to give his Majesty 
a true relation for what uses and ends said imposition was granted, 
when the Assembly is confident his Majesty will grant the con- 
dition expressed in the Act. Instructions as to the second head, 
in relation to free trade with Scotland, unless merchants from 
Scotland may make return thither of the produce of their cargoes, 
they will in a short time be left destitute of Christian servants, 
few or more coming from other parts ; as to the third, their desire 
is to obtain leave to send their produce to any nation in amity 
with England, first paying custom in Barbadoes or well securing 
it to be paid in England ; as to the fourth head, to answer any 



200 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

complaints in England, desire them to lay before his Majesty the 
great prejudice if not utter ruin to any person of the island to 
be compelled to do so ; as to the fifth, that if Sir Tobias Bridge's 
regiment be disbanded, it would redound to the advantage of the 
island, to represent to his Majesty their great burden and how 
useless being fully officered, but the soldiers few and many of them 
islanders, so that the island would be weakened by their going 
hence ; as to the sixth head, heartily thank them for their en- 
deavours to prevent the laying on a new imposition on sugar ; have 
nothing to add to their reasons, but desire they may be more 
vigorously pressed, and if the imposition cannot be prevented, then 
that it be doubled on foreign sugars. Enclose copy of the refusal 
of the Commissioner for receiving the duty of 4^ per cent, to pay 
anything for the uses expressed in the Act without special order 
from his Majesty or his employers. It is generally rumoured that 
they lie something under his Majesty's displeasure, but know not 
for what cause, having ever showed their readiness in his Majesty's 
service, though to their own impoverishment, which are evidenced 
by the several A.cts for raising sugar for their defence in the last 
war, amounting to 4,869,571 Ib, besides the labour of 232,972 hands, 
amounting at 10 Ib. per day to 2,329,700 Ib. sugar. This last levy 
on coppers, stills and negroes, copy of which Act is enclosed, 
are all besides what has been given to defray the charge of govern- 
ment. To use their diligence to endeavour their re-establishment 
in his Majesty's favour, and to inform the Committee of their re- 
quests, lest others take advantage to present such glosses as may 
cause more trouble to remove than the obtaining of the addresses 
themselves. Signed by Henry Walrond, Speaker. Enclose, 

501. I. A paper containing the heads of addresses sent by his 
Excellency in Nov. 1668, with the six heads mentioned in 
the above letter, viz. : (1) To represent to his Majesty 
their sense of and hearty thanks for his care, <&c. ; (2) the 
abuses and heavy taxes in the Customs, and mistakes of 
sugars ; (3) that they may transport produce to any place 
in amity with England, the duties to his Majesty first 
secured; (4) to be permitted to set up a mint; (5) the 
great inconvenience of patents ; (6) that all custom be 
taken off goods transported from England ; (7) that 
customs laid on strong liquors in England may not ex- 
tend to those made here and transported thence ; (8) for 
procuring a charter, making them a body corporate with 
all powers formerly granted to the Earl of Carlisle. 
These not yet granted. The following to be now presented, 
(1) about the 4 per cent, being appropriated to other 
uses than intended ; (2) the grievance of want of free 
trade with Scotland for supply of servants ; (3) that they 
may enjoy the same privileges of trade as Tangier ; (4) 
that none be compelled off the island to answer any com- 
plaint in England; (5) about disbanding Sir Tobias 
Bridge's regiment ; (6) to use their utmost endeavour to 
prevent a new imposition on sugar. 



AMEEICA AND WEST INDIES. 



201 



April 20. 

Barhadoes, 



April 20. 
Barbadoes. 



1671. 

501. II. Extract from the Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes of 

the 19th (sic. 18th) April (ivhick see). Refusal of Robert 
Parker, Commissioner of the Customs of the 4| per cent., 
to pay anything out of that duty without order from 
his Majesty or the Farmers. Together Q pp. [Col. Entry 
Bk, No. XIII. 26-31.] 

502. The Assembly of Barbadoes to Governor Wm. Lord Wil- 
loughby. Return hearty thanks for his Excellency's care in their 
behalf, especially in presenting their late addresses to his Majesty, 
the success of which they have not yet been informed of, but do not 
doubt so soon as his Majesty shall be rightly informed of the state 
of Barbadoes ; and, being informed (by the last ships) that his Ex- 
cellency was required by his Majesty to repair to his Government 
here, have solely empowered some Gentlemen Planters in London to 
do their utmost for the accomplishment of their desires, and the 
rather because his Excellency declared before going that some of 
them could not properly be presented by him for reasons best known 
to himself, but that he would not hinder their prosecution by others. 
Signed by Henry Walrond, junior, Speaker. [Col. Entry BL, No. 
X'lIL, 32.] 

503. The Assembly of Barbadoes to Ferd. Gorges in London. 
Having some time since received friendly advice from their fellow 
Planters in England as to how they may most aptly proceed for the 
interests of his Majesty and this place, desire him to solicit before his 
Majesty, the Council, and all Committees concerned, what they shall 
give him in charge, returning account thereof on all opportunities, 
and that he apply himself from time to time to the Planters in 
London for their advice, to whom they have also written. Have 
ordered 100?. to be paid to him for his pains herein for one year, 
besides all his other necessary charges. Signed by Henry Walrond, 
junior, Speaker. p. [Col. Entry Bh, No. XIII., 32-33.] 

[April 20.] 504. A true account and relation [by Henry Morgan] of 
this my last expedition against the Spaniards by virtue of a 
commission from Sir Thos. Modyford, Governor of Jamaica with 
the advice of his Council [see ante, No. 209]. In order to the 
execution of his commission [see ante, No. 211], sailed from 
Port Royal, 14th August, with 11 vessels and 600 men for the 
Isle of Ash, the rendezvous, and on September 6th despatched 
Vice-Admiral Collier with six sail to the main for intelligence. 
September 30th arrived Captain John Morris, with Emanuel 
Rivero's vessel (who burnt the coast of Jamaica), which he had 
taken, and in her three original commissions. In October arrived 
three French vessels, and in November seven more sail from 
Jamaica; but upon examination of some of their own men and 
some Spanish prisoners, the time of the year, and but one land- 
ing place strongly fortified, it was impossible to attempt the 
place without the hazard of the whole party and the certain loss 
of most if not all our vessels. On 28th October Vice-Admiral 
Collier returned with two of the enemy's vessels, one of which 
the Gallardee, was assisting to Rivero in burning the coast of 



202 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

Jamaica. In her were 38 prisoners, who were examined, and 
what was said by two of the most sensible was reduced to 
writing. Marcus Delubra, master, deposed, That he saw the 
people at Carthagena " listed and all in arms offensive against 
the English"; that several Spanish ships have commissions from 
the President of Panama, Don Juan Peres De Gusman, and have 
taken several Englishmen, and that they have great encourage- 
ment against Jamaica by reason of a fleet out now from old 
Spain under one Don Alonzo. Lucas Perez also deposed to the 
same effect. On 2nd December the captains, 37 in number, 
unanimously resolved, " that it stands most for the good of 
Jamaica and safety of us all to take Panama, the President 
thereof having granted several commissions against the English." 
Signed by said captains. Whereupon on December 8th they 
sailed, and on the 14th arrived at Old Providence, and on the 
15th the Governor submitted and was transported with his men 
to the main, but four of his soldiers became guides to the 
English. Understanding that the Castle of Chagraw blocked 
the way, it was determined to attack it, which was done by 
Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Bradley with 470 men, who after 
fighting in the trenches from 3 o'clock till 8 the next morning, 
stormed the place. The enemy refused quarter, which cost them 
360 men, while ours lost 30 killed and 76 wounded, whereof the 
brave Bradley was one, who died 10 days after. Leaving 300 men 
to guard the castle and ships under Major Richard Norman, they 
started on 9th January 1671, with 1,400 men in seven ships 
and 36 boats up the river. The enemy had basely quitted the 
first entrenchment and set all on fire, as they did all the rest, 
without striking a stroke. Was forced there to leave his ships 
and boats with 200 men to guard them, under command of 
Captain Robert Delander, and betook themselves to the wild 
woods. Routed the enemy by the forlorn commanded by Captain 
Thomas Rogers two miles from Venta Cruse, where they arrived 
on 15th. It is a very fine village where they land and embark 
all goods for Panama, but they found it as the rest all on fire and 
the enemy fled. Began their march next day, the enemy con- 
stantly galling them with ambuscades and small parties. Had to 
march four abreast, the enemy laying over their heads to get to the 
Savanas ; losses on both sides. On 17th they saw the desired place, 
the south seas and a good parcel of cattle and horses, which 
served all their men, and came in sight of the enemy in Batalia 
with 2,100 foot and 600 horse. Next morning drew up his men 
in the form of a tertia, the vanguard led by Lieutenant- Colonel 
Lawrence Prince and Major John Morris, in number 300, the 
main body 600, the right wing led by himself, the left by Colonel 
Edw. Collyer, and the rear guard of 300 commanded by Colonel 
Bledry Morgan. Account of the manoeuvres which forced the enemy 
to change their ground. One Francesco de Harro charged with the 
horse upon the vanguard so furiously that he could not be stopped 
till he lost his life ; upon which the horse wheeled off and the foot 
advanced, but met with such a warm welcome and were pursued 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 203 

1671. 

so close that the enemies' retreat came to plain running, though 
they did "work such a stratagem as has been seldom heard of, viz., 
attempting to drive two droves of 1,500 cattle into their rear. In 
the city they had 200 fresh men, two forts, all the streets barri- 
caded, and great guns in every street, which in all amounted to 
32 brass guns, but instead of fighting commanded it to be fired, 
and blew up the chief fort, which was done in such haste that 40 
of their own soldiers were blown up. In the market place some 
resistance was made, but at 3 o'clock they had quiet possession of 
the city, although on fire, with no more loss in this day's work than 
five killed and 10 wounded, and of the enemy about 400. They 
endeavoured to put out the fire, but in vain, for all was consumed 
by 12 at night, but two churches and 300 houses in the suburbs. 
Thus was consumed the famous and ancient city of Panama, which 
is the greatest mart for silver and gold in the whole world, for it 
receives all the goods that come from Spain in the King's great 
fleet, and delivers all the gold and silver that comes from the mines 
of Peru and Potozi. Here they stayed 28 days, making daily 
incursions on the enemy for 20 leagues without having one gun 
fired at them " in anger," though they took 3,000 prisoners, and 
kept " dargues " in the south seas cruising and fetching prisoners 
who had fled to the islands. February 14th. Began their march 
to Venta Cruse with all their prisoners, where they stayed and 
refreshed till 24th, and on 26th came to Changraw, where the 
plunder (amounting to about 30,000.) was divided and the castle 
fired and the guns spiked. March Oth. Began their voyage for 
Jamaica, where some are arrived and the rest daily expected. 
Had it from the prisoners that the reason there was no more 
wealth was because they had two months' notice, and laded two 
great ships of 350 and 700 tons with money, plate, gold, and 
jewels. Signed by Henry Morgan. 8 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 
XXVI., No. 51.] 

April 20. 505. " The relation of Admiral Henry Morgan touching the 
service done his Majesty in the late expedition against the 
Spaniards, by virtue of an Order of Council [of Jamaica] and a 
commission given him accordingly." Copy of the Minute of Council 
of June 29, 1670 [see ante, No. 209], and of the preceding account 
and relation of Sir Henry Morgan. 4| pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 
XXVII.,pp. 121-128.] 

April 20. 506. Another copy of the Order of Council of Jamaica of 29 
June 1670, mentioned above, with the heading only, " The Relation 
of Admiral Henry Morgan." 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 26, No. 52.] 

1671 ? 507. Capt. James Hayes to Col. Christopher Codrington, Deputy 
Governor of Barbadoes. Bound from Virginia to Barbadoes 
19th March 1671; in the Hope pink, of London, Capt. Thomas 
Blackinan, commander, fell in the night amongst the breakers on 
the windward side of Martinique, and having put her through at 
great hazard came to anchor at Portagalloone, where their captain 
gave account of the distress they were in to the chief in power 



204 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

for that side of the island, who cleared them ; but, forced to tarry 
two days for wind, the French general sent a company of soldiers, 
who surprised them, took the ship, and brought them about to 
Backstar; where the French general, after examination, said he 
believed they were about their lawful employ, but a Jamaica 
privateer had taken a French sloop, valued at 54,000 Ib. sugar, 
which he was resolved they should pay, being subjects to the same 
crown ; and without any legal proceeding he took both ship and 
goods, bidding Hayes address himself to the King of England for 
satisfaction. Prays his honour's favourable representation of their 
cause to his Majesty. Endorsed, " Copy of a letter to Coll. 
Christopher Codrington, Deputy Governor of Barbadoes, from 
Captain James Hayes." 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 53.] 

1670? 508. William Byam, Governor of Antigua, to William Lord 
(Antigua.) Willoughby, Governor of Barbadoes. Sent his Excellency the sad 
news of the death of the Lieutenant-General, and of the manner of 
the death of James Willoughby in this island, together with an 
account of the state of affairs, and would have written as con- 
veyances presented, but for advice that his Excellency was daily 
expected in Barbadoes. Renders humble thanks for his Excellency's 
commission for the government of this island and Barbuda, received 
21st May last; and that this honour may not consume his estate, 
which is low, as the gout does his body, hopes his Excellency will 
mind his Majesty that there may be an establishment for its 
support, and if not speedily done the favour intended may prove 
his ruin. The French are rampant among these islands, having 
two men-of-war of 70 and 40 guns at St. Kitts, and a frigate of 14 
guns at S te Cruce, commanded by M. La Barett, and all these to 
secure their trade from the Dutch, whom they handle with severity. 
Cannot omit one ignoble passage of the Governor of the Grenadoes. 
A Dutchman from Guinea falling in with the island with 200 
negroes, was invited by the Governor to trade, and security assured 
him, but no sooner were the negroes landed, but the Governor 
dispatched a shallop to La Barett, who sent up his Vice Admiral 
and immediately seized poor Hans, suspecting no danger, being of 
24 guns, carried him to St. Kitts, and keeps him as a prize till the 
business be decided in France. Hears his Lordship's choleric 
enemy, M. St. Laurence, is to go home, and a new Governor 
expected. The Proprietor of Guadaloupe, who sold his right to the 
Royal Company of France, but are unable to pay his 200,000 
crowns, is returning over. M. St. Leon continues Governor there ; and 
M. La Biere [sic La Barre] of Martinique. M. De Baas, their general, 
continues rigid to them all. Has a friendly correspondence unless in 
two passages. One occasioned by a privateer taking a French, or 
rather a Spanish, shallop on the main, bringing her to Nevis ; the 
French demanded the shallop and justice on him that took her ; 
upon which the captain of the privateer was imprisoned and the 
French desired to come and prosecute, but after long imprisonment 
and none appearing the captain was enlarged : on this, or before, 
an English ship, bound from Virginia, was seized at Martinique, 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 205 

1671. 

and thinks is still detained there. The other passage savoured of 
hostility ; a French man-of-war sloop, coming off from St. Kitts 
with a trading sloop of ours, commanded the English sloop to 
strike, which the master refusing to do to any but his own 
sovereign's flag, the French fired, wounding the master, who shortly 
after died. But though they thus huff it for the present at sea, 
on shore the planter lives miserable through the tyrannical taxa- 
tions of the R C. The Dutch are more fortunate in their trade 
than in their colonies : if not weary of Surinam, they shortly will 
be ; they are no planters, sad souls for suffering any hardship. 
They have called off their small colonies at Banrooma and other 
places to reinforce Surinam ; but fever and ague, belly-ache and 
yawes, disable or destroy them, especially their new comers; so 
that many are returned and more will follow. The Jews seem now 
highly dissatisfied with the country ; if those and the English 
withdraw it will be but a sad colony. Heard very lately thence : 
Major Bannister was not then arrived ; most of the English would 
gladly withdraw could they disentangle themselves of the debts, 
which the policy of the Dutch has noosed them withall. They 
are still sickly; great supplies of negroes and no whites, so that 
if once the blacks get a head they will make the colony theirs ; 
really believes that will be the end of it. They expect a new 
Governor, the present one, Captain Lichtenberg, being very ill, and 
'tis thought will hardly go alive out of the country. Their colon}'' 
of Tobago has lately received a great blow by the invasion of 
the Island Indians. But they thrive in their trade, for at Cura9oa 
they vend a vast quantity of negroes to the Spaniard, and of late 
four ships from Jamaica for ready pieces of eight carried thence 
great store. They intend to settle a mart for negroes at Tortola 
to engross the trade of Porto Rico. This advice Finsly brought, 
who by his Excellency's order was employed thither to bring off 
the English, most of whom were gone, and of the few there none 
would come off. The natives of the islands still punctually observe 
the articles agreed with his Excellency, often inquiring when he 
will give them a visit. Nevis lately presented the Governor of 
Dominica with the liquor they love to be distributed amongst 
them, and other acceptable gifts, and several Indians went 
with the sloop to Nevis. Has now brought his Lordship to 
Antigua, the island of greatest consequence, though least spoken 
of and regarded, unless by his Excellency ; did his Majesty under- 
stand its invaluable convenience for situation and unparalleled 
harbours, whereby lying to windward it might be a curb to the 
French and Dutch on any breach. Their present condition is 
sadly deplorable, all his Majesty's islands supplied with negroes 
except poor Antigua, not but that they can have them if they act as 
some do, the Dutch would supply them, but they dare not embrace 
it; they languish and decline for want of hands, and it is his 
Majesty will feel it in the end ; the strength of the planters con- 
sists in single men, who have neither servant nor slave. A great 
drought has rendered the crops backward and bad, and brought 
the planters in debt, and, if the rigour of the law be used, they 



206 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

fear a general desertion of the land, and nothing will stay the 
planters or increase the settlement but a free trade or supply of 
slaves, which, if his Majesty would connive at for a time, the 
island were made, otherwise utterly ruined. Barbuda is thriving ; 
is now despatching a commission to Captain Campbell, Governor 
there. All at Parham are well ; the windmill does exceedingly 
well. The canes are very old and bad : 40,000 Ib. has been made 
of them : none of the new yet ground : Tom Garret has been 
overseer there four or five months : he is careful and just, and is 
passed his trial and now recovered. The Amity, of Bristol, bound 
for Nevis with wines, was taken accidentally by a Spaniard, near 
Deseada, which landed the men at Cura9oa. They had positive 
orders to heave all privateers overboard. TJds letter was probably 
written in 1670. 3 pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 28*.] 

April 24. 509. Lords Proprietors of -the Bahama Islands to Gov. Hugh 
Wentwortb, and the Councillors and Assistants. Commission 
granting power and authority with consent of not less than six 
of the Council, whereof three at least to be their Lordships' 
Deputies, to lett, sett, convey, and assure lands in said islands with 
the conditions and limitations set forth in their Lordships' in- 
structions and concessions herewith sent. Also, to execute all 
powers and authorities in relation to the Government, both civil 
and military, according to instructions sent herewith. In case of 
absence power to appoint a deputy. Mem. John Wentworth com- 
missioned in the same form 26 December 1671. All in Locke's 
handwriting. [Col. Entry Bh, Vol. XX., pp. 56-57.] 

April 24. 510. Lords Proprietors' instructions in sixteen articles to the 
Whitehall. Governor and Council of Providence : To summon all freeholders, 
inhabitants of Providence and Eleutheria and the rest of the 
Bahamas; to elect twenty freeholders who with the Governor, the 
deputies as their Lordships' representatives, and five other councillors 
as the nobility, are to be their Parliament to make necessary laws, 
which, ratified under the hands and seals of any three of the 
deputies, shall be in force for two years unless their Lordships' 
pleasure to the contrary be declared in the meantime. To send 
copies of all laws enacted, which when approved and ratified by 
the Lords Proprietors, shall remain in force three years from the time 
of being enacted. The Parliament to choose five freeholders, who 
joined with the five deputies are to be the Grand Council, with 
whose consent or the consent of six of them whereof three to be 
deputies shall hear and determine all controversies and judge all 
civil and criminal causes. The deputies and councillors to take the 
oath of allegiance or to subscribe promise of allegiance, fidelity, 
and submission in a book for that use provided. To enact a law 
that every ship carrying guns upon her arrival pay one pound of 
gunpowder per tun for the supply of ammunition of the islands. To 
call a Parliament in November of every second year and oftener if 
there be occasion. To take notice the Lords Proprietors grant to 
every free person inhabiting any of the Bahamas before 26th March 
1671 [? 1672] fifty acres, and the like for each servant they bring, 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



207 



1671. 

and thirty acres to each servant so brought when out of his time, 
paying yearly from the year 1690 a penny per acre as a chief rent 
for ever; also to all free persons who arrive after 26th March 1672 
thirty acres, and the like number for each servant they bring, and to 
each servant who shall arrive before that time 30 acres when out of 
his time to him and his heirs for ever, and the same conditions to 
all who arrive after 26th March 1672 until further instructions be 
received. To all such as by these concessions have right to land 
having sworn or subscribed allegiance this grant shall be passed 
which follows, to be signed by the Governor and three deputies 
and recorded in the Registrar's office appointed for the purpose. 
Every lot to be set out in one entire piece, and that the front of his 
land abutting upon the sea or any swamp be but one fifth part of 
the length running upwards into the country. To take care that 
two fifths of all the land respectively of equal goodness with what 
the people plant be reserved for the Lords Proprietors and such as 
they constitute the nobility. The land to be laid out in squares of 
1,200 acres to be bounded by limits running directly from east to 
west and from north to south, and are to be called colonies. When 
any of the Council dissent from any act or resolve of the Council 
they are to send their reasons and the others the reasons of their 
proceeding. One square of 1,200 acres to be set apart for the use 
of the Governor in perpetuity. One third of all ambergris found to 
be reserved to the Proprietors, of which part they bestow a third 
upon the Governor. Prohibition to cut any brazilletto wood except 
upon his own plantation without leave. Signed . by Albemarle, 
Craven, Ashley, G. Carteret, and P. Colleton. The first article and 
a few corrections in Locke s hand. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XX., pp. 
58-60.] 

April 27. 511. Lord Ashley to Joseph "West. The plantation he manages 
Exeter House. i s no more upon the private account of Sir G. Carteret, Sir P. 
Colleton, and himself, but upon account of all the Lords Proprietors, 
so that cattle or anything else out of the stores is not to be satisfied 
for to the public stock. Is somewhat unsatisfied that the Carolina 
had no timber aboard for Barbadoes upon the Lords Proprietors' 
account, though a great deal upon private men's. But is not satis- 
fied with any of Brayne's voyages, and thinks it necessary to say 
that the Lords Proprietors are apprehensive that Sir Peter Colleton 
may have advantage of them by mingling trade with Barbadoes. " I 
expect you make no words of this," but not to suffer Sir Peter an 
advantage beyond the rest of the Lords Proprietors to their prejudice. 
Expects an account to be kept of their stores, to whom delivered, and 
at what rates, that so they may be repaid in work, timber, or goods 
as may best consist with the ease of the planters. Confesses freely 
he has not been a little unsatisfied, and if they have not fair dealing 
they will stop their supplies. Desires an exact account by every 
ship. Did not think the Governor would have disputed any in- 
structions signed by Lord Ashley and Sir Peter Colleton, and cannot 
imagine he should deviate from the rules set down for him unless to 
order the disposal of the stores more to the Lords Proprietors' 



Shaftesbury 
Tapers. 



208 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

advantage in some things which at this distance they could riot see. 
Approve his taking Capt. Bay ley's four servants into employ until 
they can return to their master. In Locke's handwriting. [Shaftes- 
bury Papers, Section IX., Bdle. 48, No. 55, pp. 88-89.] 

1671. 512. "New England affairs before the Council of Plantations," 
April 27 1671, April 27. Ferdinando Gorges petitions the Council. May 22 

to May 10, Robert Mason's first petition to the Council ; divers relations con- 

1672. cerning New England, with observations of the Commissioners lately 
employed there, read. June 16, Col. Cartwright's papers concerning 
the New England colonies read. June 10, the patent of the Mas- 
sachusetts read. June 21, commission and instructions of Col. 
Nicolls, Col. Cart wright, and others employed by the King in New 
England read : Colonel Cartwright informed the Council that he 
believed that the ministers of New England would be contented that 
the government might be changed. June 26, the papers given into 
the Council by Lord Arlington but the same that had been taken 
from copies of Col. Cartwright's papers. July 24, Robert Mason's 
second petition to the Council read. Aug. 3, the Council agreed to 
present an address to the King about sending Commissioners to 
New England to examine differences touching boundaries and com- 
pose them amicably, if they could, if not to state the case to the 
King for his determination. Aug. 12. report concerning New 
England, a representation of the present state of New England and 
sending over Commissioners. Signed by E. of Sandwich, E. Lauder- 
dale, E. Arlington, Lord Clifford, Lord Gorges, Tho. Grey, H. 
Brouncker, Jno. Finch, Ed. Waller. Sept. 19, Lord Arlington in- 
formed the Council that the King had agreed to send Commissioners 
to New England, and desired that instructions might be prepared 
against spring. Nov. 13, Mr. Slingsby informed the Council that 
he had spoken to Lord Arlington concerning the King's sending 
Commissioners to New England, and the Council to treat with Mr. 
Mason and Gorges about sale of their estates in New England, the 
Council expected that they should not sell their interests in New 
England without the King's leave, which they promised. 1672, 
Jan. 22, the Council ordered that the King should be moved for 
sending Commissioners for New England, the season of the year now 
approaching. Feb. 13. Lord Arlington moved to the Council to 
proceed in preparing commissions and instructions. April 30, the 
Council informed by Lord Culpepper that the King had named 
Commissioners. Mr. Slingsby desired to cause a draught to be made 
out of the late reports to the King. May 10, the Council agreed 
that the commission for New England should be expedited in 
drawing up. Mr. Slingsby desired to advise with the Attorney- 
General. 1 p. Two copies. [Col. Papers, Vol. 26. Nos. 55, 56.] 

April 30. 513. (Don Gasparo de Arteaga), Governor of St. John de Puerto 
Rico to Sir Thomas Modyford. The Queen Regent was pleased to 
send him the Treaty of peace, concerning a good correspondency 
between the two nations within the seas and ports of America ; and to 
command him to agree with Modyford and the neighbouring Governors 
for publication of them at the same time. Has sent the orders 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 209 

1671. 

of his Majesty to the President of Hispaniola, San Domingo, and the 
Governors of Caraccas, Cumana and Margarita, leaving to Mody- 
ford's pleasure the day, but has proposed that of the Vespers of St. 
John. If there should be any inconvenience in this, will do it the 
day that Modyford shall appoint ; and if advice from him should 
be retarded, the publication shall be celebrated on said festival, and 
will repeat it on the day Modyford assigns, " because good news doth 
never weary." The Governor of Antigua sent him notice of the 
peace some months before, demanding the English prisoners on the 
island, but because it did not come authorised from his master could 
not agree to deliver them ; now, if any ships come from English 
islands will embark them with all speed, and if none come will 
furnish them with ships ; not failing in anything on his part towards 
fulfilling said articles of Peace. 1 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 
XX VI I., 129-130.] 

May 1. 514. " Carolina Instructions " in twenty articles from the Lords 
Whitehall. Proprietors. To summon the freeholders of the plantation to elect 
twenty persons who, together with the deputies, their Lordships' 
representatives, are to be the Parliament to make laws, which Acts 
shall be in force as provided in the Fundamental Constitutions and 
* temporary laws. To call a Parliament the first Monday in November 
every two years and as often besides as the state of affairs requires. 
To require the Parliament to choose five men to be joined with the 
five deputies, who, with the five eldest men of the nobility, are to be 
the Grand Council. To every free person arriving in Carolina before 
26 March 1672 shall be granted 100 acres, 100 acres to each man 
servant, and 70 to each woman servant or man servant under 
sixteen, and to every servant that arrives before that time 70 acres 
to his or her proper use when out of their time and to their heirs 
for ever, and the same condition to all who arrive after said 26 March 
1672. The land to be laid out in squares, each square to contain 
12,000 acres, and to be bounded by limits running directly from 
east to west and from north to south, and to be set out for signories, 
colonies, and baronies. All who take up Jand in the same colony 
to set their houses together in one place, but the place so set out for 
a town to be left to the choice of the inhabitants themselves. When 
the town is chosen the surveyor is to lay out the streets according 
to the model herewith sent, those afterwards building to set their 
houses fronting the streets, that so when the town shall come to be 
built with good houses the streets also may be large, convenient, and 
regular. In all towns built upon navigable rivers nobody shall 
build a house within 80 feet of low-water mark, but it shall be left 
for a wharf for the public use of the town. A common of 200 acres 
shall be set out round about the place chosen for a town where for 
the first one and twenty years each householder proportionably may 
plant provisions, and after that time the common to be to the use of 
the inhabitants for feeding cattle and exercise of the people. Each 
freeholder to have not above one-twentieth part of his whole right for 
a home lot, and not more than one fifth of that lot to front upon a 
navigable river, the remainder, called his out lot, in what place he 

U 51912. o 



210 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

likes best, but not within the prescribed distance of the town designed 
for home lots for others. To persuade the people to plant far up the 
country, to avoid the ill air of the lowlands near the sea. To send a 
description of the first convenient healthy high land upon Ashley 
River where it is fit to build the chief port town for shipping. To 
send a description of Ashley and Wando Rivers, drawn by a compass 
to a scale, and a map of the country divided into squares of 12,000 
acres a piece by lines running east and west, north and south. To 
defend^themselves against acts of hostility, but to keep a fair corres- 
pondence with the people round about them, and to be careful not 
to give just causejof offence, and punish those who offend, and make 
reparation to the injured. Two of the discreetest men in every town 
to be chosen to trade with the Indians, that so the price of beads 
may not be brought low by covetousness or ill-management, the 
choice of these men to be once a month in every town. The stores 
not to be spent idly, and only given to those who stand in absolute 
necessity, and pay for them in work or the produce of the country. 
That on the arrival of the Blessing, Capt. Halstead be provided with 
a ship loading of timber. To endeavour to procure the collection of 
debts for stores by work at moderate rates, at cutting, squaring, 
and loading said ship with timber. To set out baronies according 
to the Fundamental Constitutions to James Carteret, Sir John 
Yeamans, and John Locke, who have been made landgraves. In 
setting out every man's lot to reserve convenient highways from the 
colony town to the plantations beyond it, and from one colony town 
to another. Signed by Craven, Ashley, G. Carteret, and Peter 
Colleton. With mem. in Locke's hand. That the model of the 
town above mentioned was of streets running straight, whereof the 
largest was 80 feet, the back street to that 40 feet, the next 60 feet, 
and the back street 30 feet, which streets divided the town into 
squares, each of whose sides was 600 feet. [Col. Entry Bk., XX., 
pp. 62-65.] . 

May ? 515. " Temporary Laws, Carolina." It is resolved and agreed 

by the Lords Proprietors that till by a sufficient number of inhabi- 
tants the government of Carolina can be administered according to 
the form established in the Fundamental Constitutions : 1. That the 
Palatine name a Governor, and each of the Lords Proprietors a 
deputy, which deputies, with an equal number of others chosen by 
the Parliament, shall be the Councillors till the Lords Proprietors 
order a new choice or the country be so peopled as to be capable of 
government according to the Fundamental Constitutions. And when 
landgraves or cassiques are created by the Lords Proprietors, an 
equal number of the eldest resident in Carolina of the deputies to 
be of the Council, that so the nobility may have a share of the 
government, and the whole administration come as near the form 
designed as the circumstances of the growing plantation will permit. 
2. The Governor, with the deputies, landgraves, and cassiques 
chosen councillors, to be the Grand Council and have all the power 
and authority of the Grand Council and other courts till they come 
to be erected. 3. Besides the deputies for councillors, the Chief 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 211 

1671. 

Justice shall choose and constitute the Provost Marshall, the Chan- 
cellor, the Secretary, the Treasurer, the Receiver, the High Steward, 
the Surveyor, the High Chamberlain, the Register of Births, Burials, 
and Marriages, and the Admiral, the Marshal of the Admiralty. 
4. The article in the Fundamental Constitutions beginning, All the 
revenues and profits shall not take place till the Lords Proprietors 
who have laid out money in carrying on the plantations be reim- 
bursed. 5. In the first taking up of land each Proprietor shall have 
but three signories, and each landgrave and cassique one barony, 
till by the increase of the inhabitants part of 72 colonies shall be 
possessed by the people, after which time every man to be free 
to take up the proportion of land due to his dignity. 6. All lords 
of baronies and manors to have each upon his barony 30 persons 
and upon his manor 15 persons respectively within seven years of 
the date of his grant, or be liable to a fine by the Parliament of 
Carolina, unless the Lords Proprietors allow him longer time. 7. 
All Acts of Parliament before the government is administered 
according to the Fundamental Constitutions to cease at the end of 
the first session of Parliament chosen according to the articles con- 
cerning Parliaments established in the Fundamental Constitutions. 
Signed by Craven Ashley, G. Carteret, and P. Colleton. [Col. Entry 
Bk., XX., pp. 66, 67.] 

May 1. 516. Instructions from the Lords Proprietors of Carolina to 
Whitehall. Capt. Halstead, in 18 articles, the last being in Locke's hand, as 
likewise are the signatures' of the Lords Proprietors at the end. On 
his arrival at Ashley River to deliver the eight leaser guns, with 
their carriages, to the Governor and Council there, and procure a 
lading of timber, pipe staves, and other commodities for the Blessing, 
fit for the market of Barbadoes, and, if need be, have the help of 
the Lords Proprietors' servants, under the care of Mr. West, to fell 
and load. To take an account of Joseph West how the provisions 
of victuals and clothes and the stores of war have been disposed of, 
and how they are to be paid for, and what remains ; also as to the 
fishing and Indian trade, the remainder of money sent by Lord 
Ashley never accounted for, the cargo from Virginia, provisions 
received from Bermudas, the disposal of 24,000 Ibs. of sugar drawn 
upon Mr. [Thos.] Colleton, and the beef and flour sent by him. 
To deliver his cargo to Mr. West, and take his receipt for same. 
If there 'is time during the ship's loading at Ashley River, to take a 
view of the country and seek for a healthy high land to set out a 
town, also to bring descriptions of Wando and Sewee Rivers. To 
inform himself concerning the healthiness, richness, and other pro- 
perties of the soil, and the useful productions of the country, and 
the size of masts, and to bring samples of casini and their dyeing 
stuffs. When the ship is laden to go with her to Barbadoes and 
touch at Augustine, and, if he may safely do so, trade at Bridge 
Town and dispose of the timber, if possible, for ready money, and, 
if not, to consult with John Strode, whom he may trust. If he 
hath trade at Barbadoes, to consult with Sir John Yeamans and 
Thos. Colleton, to get a quick freight of passengers for River Ashley, 

o 2 



212 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671 

the carrying of passengers thence being the main end of sending 
out this ship, and to lay out the produce of his timber and freight 
for passengers in rum and sugar for trade to Virginia. To inquire 
at Barbadoes what Mr. Colleton's bills charged upon the Lords 
.Proprietors were for. After landing his passengers at Ashley River 
to sail to Virginia and lay out the produce of the rum and sugar 
in cattle, to be delivered to Mr. West at Ashley River, and the 
remainder of the cargo to lay out in provisions fit for Barbadoes, if 
no need of them in Carolina. To get statement of accounts from 
Messrs. Godwin and Bennet, and apply to Sir Wm. Berkeley, Henry 
Chicheley, and Mr. Applewright concerning these accounts, and 
how the Lords Proprietors may have right done them. From 
Ashley River to sail again to Barbadoes with another cargo of 
timber, and the produce to invest in a cargo fit for the Bahamas, 
and if passengers present to sail to Ashley River, and from there to 
New Providence, and there to deliver the boxes and letters sent by 
him, and the four sakers with their carriages, and the shot and 
powder to the Governor for the use of the island, and get his 
assistance for sale of the rum and sugar, to procure a lading of 
braziletto wood and what else is fit there for the market of Eng- 
land, and if fully laden to sail direct for London, but if not, to 
touch again at Ashley River, fill her with cedar, and thence sail 
to London. If unsafe to trade at Barbadoes by reason of any 
infectious disease, to deliver the timber to John Strode, and with 
the produce load salt at the Salt Tortugas for Virginia, and from 
thence as above directed. To remember the chief employment of 
the ship is to carry people to Ashley River, and to make other 
business of traffic subservient thereto. To learn as much as he 
can of the husbandry and manufactures of the places he goes to, 
particularly in Virginia of the sorts and ordering of mulberry trees 
and silkworms, some of the best of which he is to plant in 
Carolina, and the right way of making silk, tobacco, indigo, cotton, 
&c. To consult with the Governor as to the best way of disposing, 
&c. of the stores at Ashley River, and that upon the fair dealing 
of the people will depend the continuance of the supplies. To 
leave with John Dorrell, senr., at Bermudas duplicates of the Lords 
Proprietors' despatches to New Providence. Liberty to take a 
trip to any other place for the purpose of carrying people to 
Carolina, except to Jamaica, which we would not have you do 
upon any pretence. To take an account of the ship's stores and 
the expenses from time to time during the voyage. Signed by 
Craven, Ashley, G. Carteret, and P. Colleton. [Col. Entry Bk, 
XX., pp. 68-71.] 

May 1. 517. Form of deputation for the Bahama Islands, or appoint- 
ment of a deputy who shall act with the Governor as one of the 
Council and be the Lord Proprietors' representative in Parliament. 
John Robinson is hereby appointed deputy for Lord Ashley. With 
mem. in Locke s hand that in the same manner Sir G. Carteret 
deputed Richard Jones May 10, Lord Craven, Capt. David May 9. 
Sir P. Colleton, Jarvis Ingolsby May 13. On 30 December 1671 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 213 

1671. 

were sent to Capt. Halstead blank deputations to be filled with fit 
deputies by Capt. Halstead, Lord Craven, Lord Ashley, Sir G. 
Carteret, and Sir Peter Colleton. [Col. Entry BL, XX., p. 61.] 

May. 518. List of deputies in Providence. Capt. David for the Earl 

of Craven, John Robinson for the Earl of Shaftesbury, Richard 
Jones for Sir G. Carteret, and Jarvis Ingolsby for Sir P. Colleton. 
[Col. Entry Bk, Vol. XX., p. 83.] 

May 1. 519. The Committee of Gentlemen Planters in London to the 
London. Assembly of Barbadoes. Since their last by Perryman and a copy 
by Capt. Yates, it has pleased God to put a better end to their 
solicitations in Parliament than they could have expected, and they 
judge it their duty to give a full account of all passages in this 
business. Parliament having agreed to lay an additional duty on 
foreign commodities, amongst which sugar was mentioned, they 
applied themselves to the Council of Plantations, showing how 
ruinous it would be, and to several leading members of the House 
of Commons ; and then they began to perceive that the refiners had 
brought sugar on the stage, thinking by their interest in the House 
to get the tax so proportioned as to prevent the planters from 
making any improvement by sun-drying, claying, &c., and encour- 
aged by the Barbadoes merchants, they dispersed the enclosed 
papers amongst the members of the House ; petitions were put in 
by the refiners and the merchants, praying to be heard at the Bar of 
the House and what took place thereon. Knowing the Lords to be 
unconcerned and of more discerning judgment than the generality 
of the Commons, they put in their addresses to them, as will be seen 
by the enclosed petition and reasons, and the merchants, Lisbon 
merchants, and refiners, did so also; account of what followed; 
undoubtedly they had had the same success as in the Commons, 
had not Lord Willoughby, who was one of the Committee, with great 
efficacy convinced the Lords of the mistake the merchants were 
running them upon, so they reduced white sugars to 2| farthings, 
and returned the amended Bill to the Commons, who flew into a 
heat, and voted the Lords had no right to abate of any aid granted 
to the King ; and both adhering stiffly to their privileges, the King 
prorogued Parliament to 16th April next; by which the Bill fell 
and they are eased of this tax for the present (N.B. A full 
account of this debate is in the Lords Journal, Vol. XII., April 12 
to 22.) Have thus shown with how great difficulty they kept off 
their ruin ; and hope they are convinced how necessary it is to have 
the Barbadoes merchants concerned in their improved sugars, by 
passing some law for their receiving their outstanding debts in those 
sorts ; which would also compel all contracts for the future to be 
made in money, and avoid the great objection the refiners and 
merchants so fiercely urged, that brown sugar was the money of the 
plantation. This will separate the merchants' interest from the 
refiners', who, united, may prove too powerful should Parliament at 
their next sitting think of laying an imposition upon sugar. Lord 
Willoughby has shown himself wonderfully affectionate and zealous 
in their concerns, and very instrumental with the Lords in the ease 



4 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

they have. Col. Thornburgh also took great pains, and, being an 
unconcerned person, was of great use to convince the Lords that 
the " improcured " sugars was the concern of all the planters ; and 
the like did Capt. Collier, which has so angered the merchants, that 
it may prove prejudicial to him, unless the Assembly assist him. 
Hope they will mind Col. Thornburgh. Are not over hasty in 
promoting their addresses, by reason the King is at present not 
over well pleased with the loss of his Bill, which was occasioned 
wholly by the dispute upon sugar ; but will be mindful of it when 
a fit opportunity presents. Again recommend the care of the forti- 
fications, and the speedy home of money for reimbursing and 
defraying the charge of their affairs. Signed by Sir P. Colleton, 
Henry Drax, Thos. Wardall, Edw. Pye, James Lucie, Ferd. Gorges, 
John Bowden, Sir Paul Paynter, and John Searle. Received by the 
Assembly of Barbadoes 4th July 1671. Enclose, 

519. I. Propositions humbly offered to the Council by the refiners 
of sugar in England for the encouragement of that mystery 
within this kingdom. 4 pp. 

519. ii. An exact account of the net value of white and unpurged 
brown sugar, imported from his Majesty's plantations in 
America, humbly offered to the serious consideration of 
the House of Commons on behalf of the planters, 
merchants, shipowners, and mariners trading to said 
plantations. 2^ pp. 

519. in. The state of the case of the sugar planters in America, 
being the planters' first paper (see N~o. 520). 3 pp. 

519. IV. The state of the English sugar trade with that of 

Portugal (see No. 520). 1 p. 

519. v. The case between the English sugar plantations and the 
refiners stated (see No. 520). 1 p. 

519. VI. The case of the refiners of sugar in England stated. 
This was the refiners' first paper. 3 pp. 

519. vn. The case between the English sugar plantations and 
the refiners by some of the planters stated, and by the 
refiners answered. 3 pp. 

519. VIII. Reasons humbly offered by the refiners for the pro- 
portion of four upon white to one upon brown in the 
imposition to be laid upon sugars. 4 pp. 

519. IX. Petition of the merchants, shipowners, and mariners 
trading to his Majesty's sugar plantations in America to 
the House of Lords. 2 pp. 

519. x. An exact account of the net value of the three sorts of 

Barbadoes sugars presented to the House of Lords on 
behalf of the merchants, shipowners' and mariners trading 
to his Majesty's sugar plantations in America. 3 pp. 
Together 31 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XIII., 45-76.] 

520. " The state of the case of the Sugar Plantations in 
America." In 1666 the English possessed Barbadoes, the better half 
of St. Christopher's, Nevis, Montserrat, Antigua, and Surinam, which 
employed annually 400 English ships, with 10,000 seamen, and 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 215 

1071. 

furnished a native commodity of above 800,000. value per annum 
to the nation, besides a considerable revenue to the Crown, of 
which not above 40,000. was clear gain to the planter, and the rest 
was distributed in England in exchange for provisions and manu- 
factures. In 1666 the French made sugar on half St. Christophers, 
and a very inconsiderable quantity on Martinique and Guadaloupe ; 
but in that year they took from the English their half of St. Chris- 
topher's, Antigua, and Montserrat, with above 15,000 negroes, and 
materials for 150 sugar works, amounting in value to 400,000?., 
which they carried to their own plantations, whereby they not only 
much increased the making of sugar, but increased in strength also by 
the great numbers coming to them from France and from our colonies. 
The French King knowing this trade to be the best nusery for 
seamen, furnished his West India Co. with a very great stock of 
money, with many other acts of grace and favour for beating the 
English out of that trade ; and has imposed a custom in France but 
of 4 livres per cent, on sugars of his own plantations, and 15 livres 
on whites, and 32 livres 10 sous on English and foreign refines. By 
reason whereof English and foreign sugars are no longer transported 
into France, and great quantities of foreign sugars are imported 
into England ; so that there is little profit to the planters, who, 
encumbered by a custom of 4^ per cent, in the colonies, and 12^ 
per cent, in England, will be necessitated to lay down the trade, or 
the poorer sort, who are the strength of the colonies, will be neces- 
sitated to go to the French or other plantations, as 1,600 within this 
last year have done from Barbadoes alone. By which means the 
French King may take the English plantations, and make himself 
sole master of the sugar trade. The inconveniences which would 
follow, England would have 400 sail and 1 0,000 seamen less, and 
France as many more ; a native commodity of 800,000?. would be 
left, making 1 ,600,000?. difference in the balance of trade ; and the 
Guinea trade would infallibly be lost also. From which it appears 
that the English plantations are no way able to bear further impo- 
sitions on sugars ; but that rather, after the example of France, a 
higher duty should be laid on foreign sugars. 

The state of the English sugar trade with that of Portugal. The 
planter of Brazil can produce sugars 30 per cent, cheaper than the 
English planter. There is not imported from Portugal above 2,000 
chests of sugar annually, costing 40,000?.; three-fourths of the sugars 
received in Portugal in exchange of English manufactures, being in 
English ships carried to the Straits and other places, it would be 
much more to the advantage of the nation to have all carried the 
same way. The sugars bought in Portugal for the English market 
are the very best made in Brazil, and are sold at 3?. to 3?. 10s. per 
cent., whereas the English being confined all to England, most of 
their whites are sold for 45s. per cent. ; so that if Id per Ib. be laid 
on English as well as foreign sugars the English are charged above 
35 per cent, heavier than the Portugal sugars. 

Statement of the case between the English sugar plantations and 
refiners. Two-thirds of the planters turn all the sugars they send 



216 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

* to England into whites, and the rest do not bring both ends 

together. Two Ibs. brown sugar will make one Ib. good white ; 
if white sugars from the plantations be taxed one penny and 
browns one farthing, the refiner can supply white sugar at one half- 
penny per Ib. less than the planter, and a few refiners, of whom 
there are not above 12 in England, yet those enough to melt down 
all the brown sugars from the plantations, will beat out the planters 
from the white sugar trade, engross it themselves, and, as the only 
buyers of brown sugars, will set what rate they please, to the utter 
undoing of the sugar colonies. Printed one large folio sheet. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 57.] On 12 April 1671, the Earl of 
Sandwich gave the House of Lords an account of ivhat the committee 
had prepared to be offered at the conference with the House of 
Commons concerning the amendments made by their Lordships in 
the Bill for additional impositions on foreign commodities. 
Touching the imposition upon sugars of our own colonies, the 
committee recite the case of the planters, merchants, and refiners laid 
before them, and state their reasons for recommending to tJie House 
of Commons an abatemeut on the imposition of sugars. See Lords 
Journal XII., pp. 486, 487. 

521. Address of the merchants, owners of ships, and mariners 
trading to his Majesty's sugar plantations to (The House of Com- 
mons). That the white sugar planters by an account delivered to 
the Committee of the House of Lords, have untruely stated the 
relative values of un purged brown sugars and white sugars. Pro- 
pose that if this honourable House will reduce the rate of unpurged 
brown sugar from one farthing to half a farthing per Ib. his 
Majesty will receive a greater and more certain revenue ; for most 
of the unpurged sugars imported would then be refined and con- 
sumed in this kingdom, and his Majesty receive the full excise. 
Whilst paying one farthing per Ib. the refiner cannot be encouraged 
to manufacture them, and they must be exported. See as above, 
Lords' Journal, XII., pp. 486, 487. Printed, 1 p., two copies. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., Nos. 58, 59.] 

May 5. 522 Licence from Col. Jas. Russell, Governor of Nevis, to John 
Perey Marat (?), merchant, for three months. To land at his own 
storehouse all goods brought from any his Majesty's dominions, and 
the same to sell at reasonable rates ; provided, he keep no disorder 
by drinking or other enormity on the Sabbath Day ; have no 
dealing with any slave without licence; sell no liquors under the 
quantity of three gallons, nor refuse to sell the same without 
laying injunction to take other sort of commodities ; refuse not pay- 
ment in any commodities of the growth of this island ; nor depart 
hence without the Governor's licence 1 p. [Col Papers, Vol. 
XXVI., No. 60.] 

May 5. 523. Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet. To draw a bill for 
Whitehall, making Jacob de Tones, of Jamaica, merchant, an alien born, a free 
denizen of England. Mem. only. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., 
Vol. 35A., p. 1.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



217 



1671. 

May 9. 524. Major James Bannister to Sec. Lord Arlington. Returns 
Old Harbour, most humble and heart}' thanks for the multitude of his favours 

Jamaica. an( ^ ki n( j nesseSi Heartily wishes the business his Majesty employed 
him about had received its desired issue in the exportation of all 
his Majesty's subjects from Surinam ; but it could not be effected, 
as his Lordship will see from his Narrative sent to the Council for 
Plantations, (see ante, No. 486). Has left the greatest part, and men 
of the chiefest account who . are all very desirous to remove, but 
could not clear themselves in the time limited. Earnestly begs his 
Lordship's favour to his M'ajesty that some shipping may be sent 
for them, otherwise they shall all be ruined and never capable to get 
from that colony. Hopes the original hereof will safely arrive 
with his Narrative, sent with Capt. Fierce Johns three weeks 
before. Encloses I. [Petition to his Majesty from his subjects in 
Surinam. (Gal. ante, No. 485. I.)] Together 3 pp. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXVI., Nos. 61, 61. L] 

May 1 2. 525. Lord Ashley to Sir H. Chicheley. The Lords Proprietors 
Exeter House, of Carolina have fallen into the hands of two men of Virginia, 
who have by no means used them well, but have so ordered 
affairs that instead of being as they should be, in debt to the 
Lords Proprietors, they have charged bills upon us here. He 
Shaftesbury w iH receive a more particular account of the matter between the 
Papers. L or( } s Proprietors and his neighbours, Richard Bennet and Thomas 
Godwin by the bearer, Capt. Halstead, sent on purpose to procure 
right to be done, for they cannot patiently bear the affront to have 
bills drawn upon them which they must refuse as unreasonable. 
Wishes those gentlemen had not made choice of them to impose 
upon. However, doubts not the justice of his country will right 
them, so they will not be forced to look elsewhere for redress. 
His relationship to his brother makes him confident of his assistance 
in this business in showing Capt. Halstead the over-value put on 
their (Virginia) commodities and what those sent might reasonably 
yield in his 'market. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, 
No. 55, pp. 89, 90.] 

May 13. 526. Lord Ashley to Col. Wm. S:iyle. Has received information 
Exeter House, from Barbadoes, just as the ship is ready to sail, that Mr. Woodward, 
when up in ihe Emperor of Tatchequia's country, had discovered 
it bordered upon the Spaniards, and that probably mines were 
there. Apprehends this may tempt some of our people, covetous 
Shaftesbury of present booty, to some attempt that way, which the Lords 
Papers. Proprietors absolutely prohibit, and he is to take care that he 
suffers not the people out of greediness to molest either the 
Spaniards or any of their neighbour Indians in their quiet posses- 
sions. And he is also required to avoid all searches too far that 
way lest the Spaniards, discovering how near they border on them 
should join forces and attempt to cut them off ; therefore that the 
people go no further up the country than necessary to their planting. 
It is the King's pleasure he looks well to this, and that they should 
keep themselves within the rules of peace. Neither will the Lords 
Proprietors allow their people to live by rapine and plunder, plant- 



218 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

ing and trade is their design, and their directions shall follow to 
get all the Spaniards' riches in that country with their consent. 
Recommends him to bend the people's minds wholly to planting 
and trade, which will answer his Majesty's and their own ends. 
In Locke s hand. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, 
No. 55, p. 91.] 

May 15. 527. Warrant from the King to [Sir Thos. Chicheley], Master of 
the Ordnance. To deliver to Sir Chas. Wheeler, going Chief Governor 
of the Leeward Islands, eight whole culverin, eight demi-culverin, 
six three^pounders on standing carriages, with powder and ball 
proportioriably, 1,000 muskets snaphances with powder and bullet, 
two drawbridges ready fitted, and one tent ; contracting with the 
said Sir Cbarles for the price of the said muskets to be paid by him 
in two years, and also contracting for the transportation of the said 
cannon, &c. 1 p. \_Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 62, see also Dom. 
Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. XXXIV., p. 22, where the Warrant is 
dated 21 February 1671.] 

May 16. 528. Warrant to Robert Oseler to search for and take into 
custody Charles Modyford, Esq., and seize his papers and writings. 
Mem. only. [Dom, Entry Bk, Chas. II., Vol. 34, p. 89.] 

May 16. 529. Similar warrant to deliver Charles Modyford to the Lieut, 
of the Tower or his deputy. Mem. only. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. 
II., Vol. 34, p. 89.] 

May 16. 530. Warrant to the Lieut, of the Tower or his deputy. To take 
the body of Charles Modyford, Esq., and detain him in custody, yet 
so as he may have the liberty of that place, for matters relating to 
misdemeanours committed by his father Sir Thos. Modyford, late 
Governor of Jamaica, till his Majesty's further pleasure. \ p. [Dom. 
Entry Bk, Chas. II., Vol. 34, p. 89 r.] 

May. 531. Sir Thos. Modyford to the Governor of Porto Rico. 

Received last night by Don Francisco Calderon, his Excellency's 
despatch of f~- April, with the articles of peace between the crowns 
of Great Britain and Spain. Has not yet received any orders from 
his master, but is in daily expectation, having received advertise- 
ments from private hands touching same ; if they come time enough, 
and he is not commanded any other day, will make publication of 
the treaty on St. John's Day, as he desires, but if his orders are for 
some other time, will not fail to make his Excellency acquainted. 
Is glad to find the Governor of Antigua so early in his duty, and 
could have wished that his Majesty's orders had arrived so soon 
as that he might have by these assured him of the like publica- 
tion here, it being that which they all desire and which shall be 
most religiously observed, f p. [Col. Entry Bk, No. XXV II., 
130.] 

May 16. 532. " Translate of a letter from Ignatio Desayas Bazan, the 
Governor of S to Domingo in Hispaniola, to Sir Thomas Modyford." 
Received on the llth inst. by a ship from Spain a packet whereby 
his Majesty Chas. II. of Spain and the Queen Regent give him to 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



219 



1671. 



May 17. 



May 19. 

Jamaica. 



May 19. 

Jamaica. 

May 23. 

Whitehall. 



understand that there is Peace between the crowns of Spain and 
Great Britain, send him the Articles, and command him to endeavour 
that said Peace be published in these kingdoms at one and the same 
time. And in regard this is news of so great satisfaction, thought 
not fit to delay any longer, and therefore makes him participant 
thereof, to the end he may command said Peace to be proclaimed, 
and recall the ships which they are informed are gone to do acts of 
hostility on their coasts. On their part the Peace shall be observed 
in every particular. Sends Capt. Don Francisco Calderon, whom 
he may please to despatch away speedily and advise him of the 
precise day the Peace shall be published in his jurisdiction, that 
the same may be performed in theirs. His Honour ought to be 
kind to him, for the affection he has to the English nation, for 
being a colonel in Flanders, he had the happiness to serve under 
the Duke of York and received much honour from him. 1 p. 
[Col Entry Ek., No. XXVII., 131.] 

533. Minutes of the Council of ^arbadoes. Present, the Deputy 
Governor and three of the Council. Ordered that the fast be sus- 
pended and the first Thursday in June next kept as a day of 
thanksgiving throughout the island. Proclamation appointing said 
day of thanksgiving to God for removing a grievous sickness and 
pestilential distemper. All justices, &c. required to see the strict 
observance of so solemn and Christian a duty, not exacting labour 
from slaves that day, and all taverns, victualling houses, and 
retailers of strong drink are strictly charged to entertain no one 
during the time of Divine worship. 1^ pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 
XL, 190-191.] 

534. Sir James Modyford to (Sir Joseph Williamson). The 
enclosed are copies of those formerly sent. Has given commission 
to one Col. Blodre Morgan, a good old soldier, to go before him 
(to Providence Island) as Deputy Governor, who may depart in 
four or five days in a ship hired on purpose, and may have 300 
men by the time he arrives at the island. Doubts not but through 
Williamson's assistance he may be reimbursed the considerable 
charges he is at, and this service rendered very acceptable to his 
Majesty. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XX VI., No. 63.] 

535. Copy of preceding. [Col. Papers, Vol. 26, No. 64.] 

536. Commission to Lt.-Col. Win. Stapleton. Appointing him 
Governor of Montserrat, to obey orders and commands from Sir 
Chas. Wheler, Governor-in-Chief of the Leeward Islands. Signed 
by the King and countersigned by Sec. Ld. Arlington. 1 skin 
[Col Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 65.] 

537. Rough draft of the preceding, with corrections by William- 
son, to Lt.-Col. RoU. Stapleton. I skin. [Col. Papers Vol XXVI 
No. 66.] 

538. Fair copy of the preceding, with the name of Robt. Staple- 
ton. 1 p. [Col Papers, Vol XXVI. t No. 67.] 



220 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1071. 



Copy of the above. \ p. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XGII1., 



May 23. 

Virginia. 



M;>y 25. 



Shaft esbury 
Papers. 



May 31. 



539. 

fo. 98.] 

540. Governor Sir W. Berkeley to (Secretary Lord Arlington). 
Since his last Scarborough is dead, but assures his Lordship he has 
secured the estate of Scarborough for Faierfax (sic Farvacks), who 
will now sooner have his debt than if Scarborough had been living. 
Begs that the place of Surveyor-General of Virginia, formerly held 
by Col. Scarborough, may be confirmed to his (the Governor's) 
wife's brother, Culpeper. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI, No. 68.] 

541. List of bills for the ship Blessing, as they were signed 
25th May 1671, to be paid by Mr. Portman. These include 49?. 
to a sail maker in St. Katherine's, 151?. to a baker at the Blue 
Anchor, Limehouse, 146?. to a butcher in Little Eastcheap, 14?. to 
a boatmaker in Ratcliffe, 52?. to a ropemaker in Shadwell, 31?. to 
a brewer in Wapping, 22?. to a fishmonger at the Hermitage, 21?. 
to a ship chandler in Tower Street. 45?. to a cooper in Shadwell, 
10?. to an apothecary in Wapping, 113?. to a shipwright in Wapping, 
and 5?. to Julius Fowles, pilot. Total amount, 887?. The Blessing 
arrived at Carolina I4<th Angust 1671, see No. 612. 1 p. 
[Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 74.] 

542. " A true Account and Relation of this my last Expedition 
against the Spaniards," almost identical with Admiral Sir Henry 
Morgan's Relation, 20th April (see ante, No. 504). Annexed, 

542. I. Minute of a Council held at St. Jago, that Admiral Henry 
Morgan gave Governor Sir T. Modyford and Council a 
relation of the voyage to Panama, who gave him many 
thanks for the execution of his last commission and 
approved very well of his acting therein. 1671, May 31. 

542. 11. Deposition of John Peek before Sir Thos. Lynch, Governor 
of Jamaica, that he was secretary to Admiral Henry 
Morgan all the Panama voyage ; was present when the 
two Spaniards were sworn: Sir Thos. Modyford had 
knowledge of the design to attack Panama by a ship sent 
on purpose, and in a letter 10 days after the arrival of 
said ship he gave no countermand, so they marched for 
the city ; the above is a true copy of the journal delivered 
to the Council 31st May, for which they gave thanks and 
ordered it should be recorded. 1672, April 3. Together 
8 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 69.] 

May 31. 543. Minutes of the Council of Jamaica. Ordered, that it shall 
St. Jago de la be free for any master of a ship to take what ballast he shall want 
at Chocoletta Hole on Port Royal ; which order is to be published 
forthwith by the Governor of Port Royal. Relation by Admiral 
Morgan of his voyage to Panama [see ante, No. 504]. The Board 
gave him many thanks for executing his last commission and 
approved well of his acting therein. On information that a verdict 
of a jury had been obtained against Capt. Edward Collier and that 
he was threatened further to be sued, for executing a warrant of the 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 221 

1671. 

Major- General at the going out of Admiral Henry Morgan's fleet, viz., 
giving notice that as the Admiral intended to sail very early in the 
morning, all persons belonging to the fleet were immediately to 
repair on board their respective ships under penalty of losing the 
benefit of the General's protection, and that all persons keeping 
victualling houses were strictly commanded to draw no more drink 
to any person of the fleet, and that any taken offending therein by 
the guards appointed one hour after publication to search their 
houses, should be liable to imprisonment ; ordered, to encourage his 
Majesty's officers courageously and cheerfully to execute like orders 
for his Majesty's service, that Lt.-Col. Robt. Byndlosse, Chief Judge 
of the Court of Port Royal, do not suffer any proceedings, nor grant 
execution on any verdict of a jury, against the said Collier for 
anything he was authorized to do by virtue of said warrant. 
Ordinance for satisfying the owners of slaves wilfully murdered, for 
the ease of the prison, and for putting such prisoners to work as are 
in gaol for such offences. 3 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XXXIV., 
217-221.] 

May. 544. Sir Thomas Modyford to the Governor of San Domingo of 

Hispaniola. Received last night by Don Francisco Calderon his 
Excellency's despatch of the -^- current, with the Articles of Peace 
between the crowns of Great Britain and Spain, and his desire that 
the same be published by them both on the same day. Has not 
yet received any orders from his master, but is in hourly expecta- 
tion thereof, and if they come soon enough, will cause the treaty to 
be published on St. John's Day as the Governor of Porto Rico 
desires. All his master's subjects under his command rejoice much 
in this peace, and will contend with the Spaniards in all points of 
civility and friendship ; and so forward was he towards it, that in 
May 1069, he repealed all commissions against his Catholic Majesty's 
vassals, until in June last Capt. Emmanuel Revera Pard[al] came on 
the coast with three vessels, fired their houses, destroyed their 
people, and sent in challenges to come and fight with him ; which 
enforced them to this last Expedition, and the more so because 
having taken said Revera, they found in his vessel three commissions 
under the firms of the Governors of St. Jago of Cuba, Carthagena 
and Panama, wherein was recited the Queen's Schedula of 20th 
April 1669, empowering the Spaniards to make that war upon 
them, which they are now willing to forget. The person of Don 
Francisco Caldron was very acceptable, being both a soldier and 
planter, which is the profession of all the gentlemen of this island ; 
also they look on it as no small advantage, that his Excellency 
understands their language, and has been under command of their 
master's royal brother. Assures him they have no ships of war on 
his coasts, all being commanded into port, which the major part 
have obeyed. 1 pp. [GoL Entry Bk., N'o. XXVIL, pp. 132, 133.] 

May. 545. Revocation of his Majesty's Privy Seal of 10th March last 

for 2,7781. 10s. 8d. to Sir Charles Wheler for two companies in the 



222 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

Leeward Isles ; and warrant to the Exchequer out of the revenue 
of 4 per cent, at Barbadoes to pay to said Sir Charles said sum of 
2,7787. 10s. 8d. on account of pay of said companies, and also to pay 
to Major Andros for use of Sir Tobias Bridge's regiment all such 
sums as shall be due till they be disbanded, and such further sums 
as shall amount to a moiety of the pay due to the officers. [Dom. 
Oh as. II., Docquef] 

May. 546. Twenty Acts and two petitions made at a General 

Assembly begun and held at St. Maries, in the Province of Mary- 
land, 27th day of March, in the 39th year of the Dominion of 
Csecilius, &c., A.D. 1671. The titles are as follow : 

(1 ) An Act for the advancement of foreign coins ; Petition of 
Barnard Johnson, of Calvert County, Wm. Nengfinger, of St. Maries 
County, John Gotee and Margaret, his wife, of Dorchester County, 
and Stephen Besson, of same county ; (2) An Act touching coopers ; 
(3) for stay of executions after April Court ; (4) for the reviving 
of certain laws within this province ; (5 ) for the encouraging the 
importation of negroes and slaves into this province ; (6) em- 
powering the Commissioners of the county courts to levy and raise 
tobacco towards the defraying the necessary charges of their 
counties ; (7) against divulgers of false news ; (8) for the making void 
and punishing of all fraudulent practices tending to the defrauding 
of real purchasers and creditors ; (9) for quieting possessions; (10) 
against hog stealers ; (11) for the providing a standard with English 
weights and measures in the several and respective counties within 
this province; (12) for the coroners' fees; (13) prohibiting the 
importation of all horses, geldings, mares, or colts into this pro- 
vince ; (14) an explanation of two clauses in an Act entitled An 
Act for the clerk's fees and allowance for jurors in civil causes with 
an addition of a fee to the seal of each respective county ; petition 
of Alexander Shymossa, of Foster Island, County Talbot, and 
Margaretta his wife and others; (15) An Act for the settling the 
rates and prices in money of all wines, liquors and other commo- 
dities sold by retail within this province ; (16) against runaways 
and such persons that shall give them entertainment and others that 
shall travel without passes ; (17) for the encouragement of the 
sowing and making of hemp and flax ; (18) for the raising and pro- 
viding a support for his Lordship, the Lord and Proprietor of 
this Province during his natural life, and likewise supply towards 
the defraying the public charges of government ; (19) for the pay- 
ment of the public charge of this province ; and (20) An Act for the 
enrolment of conveyances and securing the estates of purchasers. 
Memorandum, That the laws before mentioned passed the Great 
Seal the 27th of May 1671. Philip Calvert Cane. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LIII., pp. 178-223.] 

May ?j 547. Account by the President of Panama of the Expedition 
taken by a French man-of-war as it was going for Spain and sent 
to the Governor of Jamaica, and there faithfully translated. 4 pp. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 70.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 223 



1671. 

June 6. 548. Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes. Present, the 
Deputy Governor and three of the Council. Ordered, that whereas 
Thomas Bond, of the ship Noble Katherine, is employed to carry to 
England his Majesty's regiment under Sir Tobias Bridge, his bond 
not to carry off any person without ticket be null and void so far 
only as shall concern the carrying off of any officer or soldier of 
said regiment, but good and effectual as regards any other person. 
& p. [Col. Entry BL, No. IX., 191, 192.] 



June 7. 549. Sir Thos. Lynch to Sec. Lord Arlington. Wrote from 
Barbadoes. Maderia, whence they sailed about 1st May, and arrived here but 
on Wednesday last, Sir Ch. Wheeler and the Welcome sailing 
heavily. Found 40 or 50 great ships in port to load home sugar, 
and a small ketch of the King's, the Eaglet, that was to wait on 
Lord Willoughby's plantation at Antigua, but since those islands 
have been lopped from his government, she is ordered hither, to 
what purpose of the King's nobody can tell. Wishes he had such 
an one to wait on the Assistance, and possibly may send home the 
Welcome, the King's revenue at Jamaica being so little. Hopes his 
Lordship has heard of Major Banister's arrival (at Jamaica). Was 
told yesterday that the Dutch Governor was gone sick from 
Surinam, and on his way home, six weeks since, at Montserrat, said 
Banister was gone from Surinam with the English, and that 
the Colony was like to be deserted. Abundance here designing for 
Jamaica, and some principal persons of the island : his coming and 
staying has confirmed those that staggered on the noise of Sir Thos 
Modyford's removal. A fine vessel goes with him with 150 or 200 
passengers, and as many more, he is confident, will follow as will 
settle the island without a man from England, provided the 
Governor and form of government please them. They dread 
nothing like the 4| per cent. ; has assured them he is instructed to 
lay no imposition at all. Nobody here thinks of St. Kitts or the 
Leeward Isles, but judges it oleum et opera perdere to endeavour 
their settlement ; yesterday had an address from some principals of 
Antigua about their coming to Jamaica. The day after their 
arrival was a day of thanksgiving for the ceasing of a contagious 
fever that had swept away divers persons of quality. The island 
appears very flourishing, and the people numerous and live 
splendidly : what they owe in London does not appear here, but 
has caused the Deputy Governor and Assembly to make an Act 
prohibiting the importation of all wines for three years, to retrench 
the expense of the planter and pride of the Portuguese. By 
this means, and the King's alienating the 4| per cent., the Govern- 
ment and Governor have nothing but what the capricious Assembly 
will give, which is little, unless they are mightily pleased, for by 
the law they are to be chosen new every year. Col. Christopher 
Codrington, my Lord's deputy, being of a debonaire, liberal humour, 
a native, and a planter, they have been kind to, giving him, in the 
two and a half years he has commanded 300,000 or 400,000 Ibs of 
sugar ; and he has got them to raise 1,100,000 or 1,200,000 Ibs. 



224 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1G71. 

sugar for finishing the four forts, where he has mounted 92 guns : 
when finished they will mightily secure and adorn the island. 
They have a good militia of about 1,500 horse and 8,000 foot, well 
armed and frequently exercised. Monday they got Sir Tobias 
Bridge's six companies together, being 340, according to the muster 
rolls, and they heard the King's letter and instructions with great 
acclamations, all but six declaring they would go for England. Sir 
Charles Wheeler is to provide transportation on his own ship, but 
the Deputy Governor and Sir Tobias will not covenant to embark 
above 200, thinking that, on second thoughts, many will change 
their minds, if there be so many effective men. Thinks it is the 1 4th 
of next month they are to embark. Intend to sail to-morrow, Sir 
Charles in his own flyboat : will just see him land at Nevis that he 
may enter into his government with all the grandeur possible, but 
cannot stay to see what he does at St. Kitts, having two or three 
merchants full of passengers, as well as the men-of-war ; besides, 
the time for adjusting the Peace is relapsed, and they dreadfully 
apprehend the hurricanes, and tell him should he stay there he 
would draw away more than ever Sir Charles will bring there- 
Observes Sir Charles's concern in the 4| per cent, has made him 
little courted here but by the Deputy Governor, for besides that 
tliey take it for a great grievance to pay it to any but the Island's 
use, the methods and persons employed have made it more uneasy ; 
for it is not possible to make the planters bring their goods to 
particular bays, scales, or custom house, labour and cartage is so 
exceeding dear, which is what they insist on; and there have 
been divers quarrels and several people imprisoned about it. The 
Deputy Governor countenances the officers so as not to fall into 
any offence against the King, but not so much as to exasperate his 
neighbours, by whose kindness only he subsists. Understands that 
some have taken away their sugar after seizure and offer to come 
to trial, and it is thought they will cast the officers by proving that 
it were no lawful Assembly that laid it, or else because they collect 
it not as the Act prescribes. Judges the Farmers will lose by it 
unless they bring mighty defalcations on the King, and the trade 
and planter will be exceedingly discouraged. Thinks that if this 
Deputy Governor were dealt with he might induce the Assembly to 
pay to the Exchequer 7,000. per annum, which they may levy with 
infinitely more ease to the people and trade and advantage to the 
King, nor would it be lessened, as this must in time, the quantities 
of sugar growing less. Has written Lord Sandwich, but not thus 
largely, supposing his Lordship would put this into his hands. The 
Dover pleasure boat that came here about the customs, and which 
the King has hired at 701. per mensem to wait on Sir Charles 
Wheeler, went hence four months since with passengers to Jamaica, 
and it is imagined here he will not come again for all the Governor's 
endeavours to apprehend him, it being reported that he had killed 
divers Indians, which they fear may make a war, which the 
Leeward Islands cruelly apprehend. Endorsed, with a summary, 
and "Ansd. Aug. 15, 71." 4 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., 
No. 71.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



225 



or Bridge 

Town. 
Barbadoes. 



1671. 

June 8. 550. Sir Chas. Wheler to (Sec. Lord Arlington ?). Wrote from 
St. Michael's Madeira April 28 by way of Holland, but was so over careful of the 
delivery of the packet that he thinks it has miscarried. Sailed 
thence May 2nd, and arrived at Barbadoes the 31st, all in good 
health. Has not been very well used in the manner of the men-of- 
war's keeping company with the Noble Catherine, on which his 
Majesty's stores were freighted. Thinks they will weigh hence this 
day, the Assistance making signs so to do, but to this hour has had 
nothing communicated to him. His Lordship was very pressing 
with him to be ready to sail with Sir Thos. to the intent that two 
men-of-war might countenance his demanding St. Christopher's ; 
has kept company and waited Sir Thomas' times and been left at 
sea, and will do so still in hopes of Sir Thos. going at last to St. 
Christopher's, which Sir Chas. would not have done but that he 
knows it will be for his Majesty's service ; has been a little mortified 
in this affair. The King's instructions were read to six companies 
of Sir Tobias Bridge's regiment, of 340 men, with great acclama- 
tions of joy, and they unanimously chose to return for England ; 
upon which he contracted with Thos. Bond, master of the Noble 
Catherine, for transportation of 200, bringing Sir Tobias Bridge to 
indent they should be ready to embark, because he suspected 
there might be a design to keep the soldiers in the island. Sir 
Tobias declared that under five or six weeks he could not possibly 
state the arrears for defalcation, and in that time many of the 
soldiers might change their minds, so the medium of 200 was pitched 
upon as certain, and the rest to be taken care for on reasonable 
notice given to Sir Charles's agent, without which no master of a 
ship would stay expecting so long. Has observed the extreme 
sufferings this regiment has lain under, and possibly 100 such men 
are fitter to serve the King in arms in England than 500 tapsters 
and tailors. Is tempted much to write of this island and its 
'government as it now stands in the vacancy of Lord Wilioughby, 
but that is another's province, yet duty binds him say that if the 
King were pressed hard in Europe no man can give any rational 
account that he can have any interest here. However, the Deputy 
Governor is not an ordinary man, believes he is a worthy one, yet 
he lies under great temptations, as all do who seek their profit from 
those whom they are to govern. The bay, where there are 50 
great and good ships at anchor almost all the year round, is well 
enough fortified, and a Governor only concerned for monarchy could 
secure it to his Majesty at so small a charge that it would be pity 
the King should not do it, for the Assembly here will never give a 
shilling to buy a snaffle for their own mouths as they ignorantly 
suppose it. Should there be any revolution in Europe, this place 
will not be defended long against but an indifferent force, that has 
the knack of offering conditions, if he does not take very false 
measures. Will give account by the first ship that shall part from 
the Leeward Isles after his arrival. Endorsed with abstract. 7 pp. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 72.] 

551. The Committee of Gentlemen Planters in London to the 
Assembly of Barbadoes. Send copy of their last by Capt. Collier. 



June 10. 

London. 



U 51912. 



226 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1671. 



June 12. 

? mistake 

for 
Aug. 12. 

Port Koyal. 



June 15. 

Nevis. 



Are giad to find by their welcome letters of the 7th March and 
4th April their kind acceptation of their advice for the good of that 
once happy island, and kinder resentment of their poor labours, 
which hath given a keener edge, if possible, to their passionate 
desires and wills to cut through all manner of difficulties. Are not 
a little pleased with their resolution to keep the fortifications in 
good repair, the rumour whereof, together with a well disciplined 
militia, may greatly check designs of foreign invasion or domestic 
insurrection. Their last address still lies before his Majesty, to 
which in time they doubt not to receive a gracious answer, being 
well assured of Lord Willoughby's assistance. Pray them to rest 
assured of their zeal to obey their commands and prevent all 
mischiefs, with a just account of such public stock as they shall 
remit. Received by the Assembly 22nd November 1671. 1 p- 
[Col Entry Bk, No. XIII., 77-78.] 

552. Minutes of the Council of Jamaica. Present, Sir Thomas 
Lynch, Knt., Lt.-Governor, and four of the Council. Ordered that, 
whereas there are divers soldiers, planters, privateers, and other late 
inhabitants of this island now at Caimanos, Musphitos, Keys, and 
other remote places who make scruple of returning, either fearing 
his Majesty's displeasure for their past irregular actions or doubting 
their being prosecuted by their creditors, the Governor sends forth 
to declare his Majesty's pardon and promise freedom from all arrests 
and debts to said soldiers, &c., for the term of one year, provided 
they return within eight months after the date hereof and enter their 
names in the Secretary's office, from which time their impunity shall 
commence ; and that this be proclaimed and affixed on some con- 
venient place at Port Royal. Ordered on consideration of the age, 
service, and poverty of Capt. Vallet, Judge of Legonee, that he 
henceforth receive a salary of 2,01. per annum. Petition of his 
Majesty's collectors for impost, tonnage, &c., to Lieut. -Gov. Sir 
Thos. Lynch, that whereas there appears in the Council Book an 
order upon a petition of Thos. Scutt, merchant, which comprises 
nothing within the prayer of the petition, petitioners desire that 
the time of 28 days therein granted to merchants for making up 
their accounts be reduced to 14, petitioners having not only received 
great trouble themselves, but are sensible his Majesty's interest has 
been much damnified thereby. N.B. Sir Thos. Lynch arrived at 
Jamaica on 25 June 1671, and the last Council held on 28 June 
1671 adjourned for eight- weeks, see No. 576. 2 pp. [Col. Entry 
Ek. t No. XXXIV., 223-225.] 

553. Sir Thos. Lynch, Lt.-Governor of Jamaica, to Sec. Lord 
Arlington. Wrote from Barbadoes what occurred there. Stood in 
with Dominica on their way to caress the chief Indian Governor, 
Warner, that he might continue his friendship to the English, but 
he was not on the coast, and they passed on to Montserrat, where 
were seven or eight vessels. Governor Stapleton was gone to Nevis 
to marry Lt.-Col. Russell's daughter. The masters told them most 
of the produce of that island and Antigua was carried to Statia by 
the Dutch, and that last year they fetched thence in sloops near 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 227 

1671. 

400,000 Ibs. tobacco. Montserrat better peopled than ever, having 
300 or 400 that belong to St. Christopher's. Antigua has some, 
but most intend thence for Jamaica, finding it impossible to settle 
that island. Hears there are near 3,500 men in all these islands. 
Arrived at Nevis on Sunday last, and next day Sir Charles 
(Wheeler) and his lady were lodged at a house Governor Eussell 
prepared for them. Tuesday the two companies were disbanded, 
all resolving for England, so Sir Chas. must raise his two com- 
panies here ; does not see that any will go to St. Christopher's 
but from these islands, so the strengthening that island must be 
the weakening of these. Has stayed here a day extraordinary to 
hear answer from St. Christopher's. Yesterday Capt. Mathews 
returned and is to-day gone again. The Governor gives good 
words and promises rendition, but has no order from the King or 
the Captain General at Martinico ; they expect every day seven 
frigates from France. Intend to sail to-morrow, and think to 
touch at San Domingo, because the time for publication of the 
Peace is already elapsed. Has not been well this 10 days, " so 
that if I had more to say I could not." Endorsed, " R d Aug. Ans d 
Aug. 15.71." 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 73.] 

June 15. 554. Sir Tobias Bridge to Major Edmd. Andros at Lord 
[Barbadoes.] Craven's house in Great Drury Lane. Sir Chas. Wheeler and Sir 
Thos. Lynch are arrived here. Has received his Majesty's orders 
for disbanding, which were communicated to the six companies at the 
head of each company, and inviting such as were free to go with 
Sir Chas. or Sir Thos., but there were not above 4 or 5, they 
chosing rather to be shipped home. The clothes for each company 
have been proportionably divided according to the latest muster, 
Sir Chas. Wheeler taking those for the four companies at the Leeward 
Has also sent copy of the King's letter and instructions to Lt.-Col. 
Stapleton, for stating the accounts of those companies. Will 
endeavour to the utmost to follow the orders and instructions con- 
cerning accounts, and to be faithful to the King's interest as well 
as just to the officers and soldiers. The 16th July is appointed for 
shipping the men off, and if he comes not with them, purposes to 
settle his businesses so as to follow in 14 days. Desires his care for 
them, being sure that both officers and soldiers will be pennyless. 
If he conies not with them, because he would receive from Lt.-Col. 
Stapleton the accounts from the Leeward Isles, will commit the 
care of them to Capt. Barrett and the other officers. Encloses the 
bill of lading for one butt, mentioned in the former invoice, together 
with the other for the 10 butts. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., 
No. 74.] 

1671 ? 555. Sir Tobias Bridge to (Capt. Talbott) concerning Lieut. 

Crofte's behaviour. Talbott's Lieut, has so ill behaved himself to the 
scandal of the King's service, by marrying another man's wife, who 
was then in England and since returned, and by taking to her 
employment of selling rum and such other pitiful things, that the 
were forced to bring him to a court-martial, who dismissed him, 
and purpose by the next muster to put another in his place, and 

P 2 



228 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1671. 



June 15. 

London. 



June 15. 
London. 



June 15. 

London. 



settle things so as shall be most for the King's service and Talbott's 
satisfaction. Lieut. Fenwicke who went Lieut, to him out of 
England and has since been Lieut, to Major Andros, has likewise 
committed such misdemeanors, as he confessed to Capt. Langford, 
that his commission has been taken from him. Endorsed, " Barbadoes 
regiment, Lieu** Crofts L* to Cap* Talbott." 1 p. [Col Papers, 
Vol. XXVI., No. 75.] 

556. The Committee of Gentlemen Planters in London to the 
Assembly of Barbadoes. Since writing the foregoing (see ante, No. 
551) theirs of 20th April is come to hand ; but in regard to his 
Majesty's absence and this ship's sudden departure, can only say 
that at their meeting this day Capt. Gorges expressed his thankful- 
ness for their good opinion, but seeing his hands were full, joined in 
the unanimous desire that they would employ Lt.-Col. Thornburgh. 
Join with him, knowing Gorges to be much more capable to serve 
Barbadoes, united with them as formerly, than as the Assembly's 
solicitor, and pray this may meet with no unkind construction. 
Signed by Sir P." Colleton, Sir Paul Paynter, Phillip Bell, Henry 
Drax, John Gregory, John Searle, John Bowden, Eclw. Pye, Tho. 
Middleton, Tho. Wardall, Ferd. Gorges, and Jac. Lucie. Received 
by the Assembly 22nd November 1671. 1 p. [Col Entry Bk., 
JTo. XIII., 78-79.] 

557. Ferdinand Gorges to the Assembly of Barbadoes. Has 
received theirs of 20th April with deep gratitude for the trust 
reposed in him, on receipt of which and of their general letter to his 
brother Planters, they procured a meeting, and calling to mind their 
former requests in behalf of Col. Edw. Thornburgh, who has already 
taken much pains in soliciting the Assembly's concerns and has 
entitled himself to their kindness, and observing that their said 
letters had not been received by the Assembly, they unanimously 
reiterate their requests that Thornburgh may be their solicitor with 
such salary as may be suitable ; he himself being more capable to 
serve them co-united than in a single capacity. Received by the 
Assembly 22nd November 1671. 1 p. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XIII., 
79-80.] 

558. Li-Col. Edw. Thornburgh to the Assembly of Barbadoes. 
By command of the Gentlemen they have empowered here in their 
concerns, remits copies of all their transactions since 14th February 
last ; by which, and the Gentlemen's letter, they will perceive that 
Capt. Gorges has very modestly resigned the authority sent to him 
to be their solicitor ; and because the Gentlemen have been well 
pleased with his own acting in their affairs, on which he has spent 
near his whole time these five months, they have continued him 
therein, and hopes the Assembly will afford their approbation. 
Received by the Assembly 22nd November 1671. Encloses, 

558. I. Minutes of Meetings of the Committee for the Public 
Concern of Barbadoes. Present, Lord "Willoughby, Sir 
P. Colleton, Col. Henry Drax, Ferd. Gorges, Thos. Wardall, 
Edw. Pye, and Col. John Searle. Feb. 28. Abstracted, 
see o,nte, No. 414. vj. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 229 

1671. 

March 23. Ordered, that since they can have no relief in the impo- 
sition laid on sugars in the House of Commons, Sir Peter 
Colleton, Col. Henry Drax, and Capt. Ferd. Gorges attend 
the Parliament at Westminster and consult with Lord 
Willoughby of a convenient time to petition the House 
of Lords against this tax ; and that the rest of the com- 
mittee appear upon notice given by Thornburgh. That 
Edw. Thornburgh give his constant attendance. 

April 27. Ordered, that a letter be prepared to send to the 
Assembly of Barbadoes by Capt. Thos. Collier that Edw. 
Thornburgh get all the papers of the planters, merchants 
and refiners put forth relating to the imposition laid upon 
sugar by the House of Commons, to be registered at one 
end of the Copy Book of Letters belonging to the com- 
mittee. That J. Lucie pay Edw. Thornburgh 20 guineas 
and 101. ; that Edw. Thornburgh pay Capt. John Cressett 
20 guineas for soliciting the business of withstanding this 
tax in the two Houses of Parliament, and also 71. Us. 3c?. 
disbursed for fees. That this committee meet at the 
Cardinal Cap Tavern in Cornhill on Monday next to 
peruse and firm the letters to be sent by Capt. Collier. 

May 1. The letter ordered to be prepared, read, approved, and 
firmed ; and Edw. Thornburgh ordered to copy it into the 
Book of Letters, and also to hire a trusty messenger to go 
down the next tide and deliver their letters to Capt. 
Collier at Gravesend. 

June 8. Ordered, that an answer to the letters lately received 
from the Assembly of Barbadoes be prepared to be sent by 
Capt. James Gilbert ; that Sir Peter Colleton and six 
others named, or any three of them, wait on Lord 
Willoughby, to entreat his assistance in prosecuting the 
addresses sent from Barbadoes, and that the rest of the 
committee attend on notice given by Edw. Thorn- 
burgh, who is to give constant attendance ; that Edw. 
Thornburgh send fair copies of all orders of the committee 
since the 17th February last to the Assembly, with their 
letter by Capt. Jas. Gilbert ; and that J. Lucie pay Edwd. 
Thornburgh 2QL, for which he is to account. 

June 15. A letter drawn, signed by all present, to send to the 
Assembly of Barbadoes, and Edw. Thornburgh ordered 
to copy it into the Book of Letters, and send it to Barba- 
does by Capt. Gilbert, with copies of their former by 
Capt. Collier and of this day's orders. An authority from 
the Assembly of Barbadoes to act as their solicitor, pro- 
duced by Capt. Ferdinando Gorges, and resigned for 
pregnant reasons. Ordered that Edward Thornburgh con- 
tinue to give his constant attendance as formerly upon 
this committee. Together 5J pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 
XIIL, 81-86.] 



230 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1671. 

June 16. 559. Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet. To prepare a Bill to 
Windsor, pass the Great Seal for making Baudouin Clasen, of Jamaica, 
merchant, an alien born, a free denizen of England ; with a clause 
that he should have no benefit thereof until he has taken the oaths 
of allegiance and supremacy before the Governor or Deputy 
Governor of the island. % p. [Dom. Entry BL, Chas. II., Vol. 
XXXVI., p. 13.] 

June 16. 560. Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes. Ordered, that Col. 
Symon Lambert and others be desired to agree with Col. Richard 
Bayley, or any other, for the finishing of the small fort at Speights 
Bay, the charge to be paid by the treasurer out of the last levy for 
fortifications and other public charges. \ p. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 
XL, 192.] 

June 16. 561. Don Francisco Zauches Calderon to Sir Thomas Modyford. 
Port Munday. Received his Excellency's letter with great satisfaction and will 
very willingly preserve it. Begs that the bark may without fail 
go out of port on Wednesday next, because it is necessary for 
him to arrive at San Domingo with all expedition. And his Excel- 
lency may please to write to the Lord President the cause of his 
stay, and that, the ship in which he came being small and not very 
sound, he freighted " a Billander for the carrying of the infantry, 
in which your Excellency did me a great favour ... As to the 
brigantine which came to the northern coast of this island, and 
carried a man away, I am as much troubled for it as if it were my 
own affair." Left at San Domingo the packet of the Queen for 
the Governor of the, Havanna and Cuba, and so it never came to 
his hands. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XXVII., p. 133.] 

June 16. 562. The Assembly of Barbadoes to the Gentlemen Planters in 
Barbadoes. London. Have theirs of 17th Feb., and return hearty thanks for 
their careful diligence, and advancing money in their concerns, and 
conceive that they have hit the right path in forming themselves 
into a committee. Have also received from Colonel Edward Thorn- 
burgh copy of their proceedings up to 28th February, and if their 
former letter had intimated a desire for his establishment, .would 
have saved them the trouble of voting another in his place, but 
the same having passed in favour of Captain Ferdinando Gorges, 
a person by all esteemed, and his salary of 100. for one year 
allowed him, cannot make an alteration without his consent. 
Their former petitions having been rejected for want of the style 
the court expects, rather than any unreasonableness of the matter 
desired, are content that the Gentlemen Planters give them that 
dress which may make them most acceptable, provided they still 
keep to the heads of the address sent. Have shipped them 90 
butts of sugar, viz., 30 aboard the Unity, Captain Marmaduke 
Woolter, and 30 aboard Captain Coleman, which are already on 
their voyage, and 30 aboard Captain Pidgeon, who may sail in 
three or four days ; and out of the produce each subscriber is to 
be repaid, and the rest to lie in the their treasurer's hands till 
further order, or urgent necessity to use it in the island's cause. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



231 



1671. 



June 16. 

Barbadoes. 



June 17. 
Lower 



irginia. 



Have raised a very considerable levy as formerly advised to put 
themselves in a posture of defence. By the enclosed Act to prevent 
depopulation, they may understand that special care is taken to 
encourage mean freeholders, and deter covetous rich men from 
laying land to land without keeping up the cottages and families, 
as also by another Act for encouraging the manufacture of cotton. 
Deem themselves a most happy people in the continuance of his 
Majesty's favour in the enjoyment of their laws and privileges. 
Are glad to hear they intend to prosecute the obtaining a free 
trade with Scotland especially for men servants, which in time 
may prove a great means of strengthening his Majesty's dominions 
in these parts. Request them to use all possible interest with 
Lord Lauderdale for accomplishing the same. Enclose copy of 
another Act that all may see what encouragement is given for 
bringing Christian servants. Are informed through particular 
friends that the Bill including an imposition on their sugars is 
laid aside on the prorogation of Parliament, and they hope that 
part will never be re-assumed. A letter from a particular friend 
to the Governor intimated a packet to be sent from them by 
Captain Collier, but cannot find that any such thing was given 
to his care. Give them all hearty thanks for their care, and 
especially for their successful endeavours in putting a stop to that 
insupportable imposition on their sugars. Signed by Simon Lam- 
bert, Speaker of the Assembly. 2| pp. \_Col. Entry Bk., No. XIII., 
41-43.] 

563. The Assembly of Barbadoes to Lord Willoughby (in 
London). Acknowledge with gratitude his Lordship's care in 
endeavouring against the laying on of the imposition on their 
sugars, especially by appearing at the Commons Bar to assert the 
truth of their allegations delivered by Sir Peter Colleton, though 
his endeavours produced not the effect aimed at, yet his Lordship's 
zeal is as cordially received as if it had brought it to the desired 
issue. By the arrival of Captain Collier find themselves bound in a 
further obligation to his Lordship for asserting their interest before 
the House of Lords so that they have been retrieved one whole 
year from that insupportable burden, by which they are obliged 
beyond their present abilities of requital, the public treasury being 
exhausted and several debts unsatisfied. Yet desiring to comply 
with their vote in October last of 100,000 Ibs. sugar to his Lordship 
have been enforced to borrow so much out of their last levy, 
principally intended for fortifications, and have taken care that 
Lieutenant-Colonel Wm. Bate make speedy payment. Signed by 
Symon Lambert, Speaker. !$. pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XIII., 
44-45.] 

564. Wm. Sherwood to Joseph Williamson, Secretary to Lord 
Arlington, Principal Secretary of State. The past three years of 
*" 8 time he must attribute to his (Williamson's) worthy donation. 
Acknowledges the great debt he owes him, and cannot without 
shame look upon the foul act which was the cause of his being 
in that country, yet he can say without ostentation that he has 



232 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

found good out of evil. Sends this by Captain Culpeper, a gentle- 
man of this country, that he may not be blackened with ingrati- 
tude. Endorsed by Williamson, " Rec d 13 Sept. 1671, one of 
those that robbed me whom I saved." 1 p. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXVI,, No. 76.] 

June 20. 565. Governor Sir Wm. Berkeley to (the Committee for Trade 
Virginia, and Plantations). Sends answers to inquiries dated 29th September 
1670, but not received till January llth by his brother Culpeper, 
who is able to inform of other particulars not yet mentioned, 
especially of their great hopes of silk of which he now sends a 
pattern as they now make it, and when the rest is wound, for 
it is newly made, will present his Majesty with 60 or 70 pounds 
made in the Governor's own house this year. If they had skilful 
men from Sicily or Naples or Marseilles they might make and send 
for England 500 bales yearly. 2 pp. Encloses, 

565. I. Answers to the inquiries of the Lords Commissioners 
for Foreign Plantations to the Governor of Virginia: in 
reference to the Government and condition of the colony. 
These consist of 23 queries and answers, signed by William 
Berkeley. Virginia, 1671, June 20. (6 pp.) 

565. n. " The draft of York River in Virginia." A pen and ink 
drawing 3 ft. long, scale % of an inch to a mile. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXVI., Nos. 77, 77 i., IL] 

21 June. 566. Minutes of the Council for Foreign Plantations. Commis- 
sion and instructions of the New England Commissioners to hear 
appeals read and copies ordered to be made for the use of the 
Council. Col. Cartwright, one of the Commissioners, informed the 
Council that he had sent a map of New England and a book of three 
pages fol., containing narratives of their proceedings and observa- 
tions, to the King at Oxford in 1665, which, he believed, was 
delivered to one of the Secretaries of State. At the request 
of the Lord Chancellor, Col. Cartwright had drawn up in 
writing a recollection of his thoughts. Another copy was given to 
Lord Arlington. Informed the Council that the ministers in New 
England, having no settled salary, would, he believed be contented 
that the government itself might be changed. As to the country, 
he affirmed that it was healthful, fruitful, and provisions plentiful, 
had store of good horses, and doubtless lead and copper mines, 
number of people fit to bear arms may probably double in 10 
years. In 1652 they began to coin money with a palm branch on 
one side and Salem (their greatest town save Boston) on the other ; 
they still continue to coin money, but put the date of 1652 on it, so 
as not to seem to (trespass on) the King's prerogative. They make 
frequent musters. Total forces by land 50,400. (New York, &c. 
1,500, Connecticut 14,000, Providence, &c. 1,000, Plymouth 1,000, 
Massachusetts 30,000, New Hampshire 1,800, Mayne 1,000, Ken- 
nebec 100). As to shipping he conceived there might be about 200 
sail belonging to New England, 8 or 10 ships of 200 tons burden 
each. 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., No, 78.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



233 



1671. 
June 21. 

Nevis. 



June 22. 

Barlxidoes. 



567. Sir Chas. Wheeler, Governor of the Leeward Islands, to 
(Sec. Lord Arlington?). Arrived on Whitsunday [11 June], and two 
or or three days after Sir Thos. Lynch or Capt. Hubbard seized a 
ship in this road, and without more ado concluded she was prize and 
made her sail with them on Friday ; but the prize spent one of her 
masts, and while that was mending Sir Chas, sent the enclosed to 
Capt. Hubbard, who returned the answer herewith sent, and so left 
the ship to be judged here. Supposes he has power to erect 
a Court of Admiralty, having power to erect " all sorts of courts " ; 
but, though appointed vice-admiral, is bound by " such instructions 
as he shall receive from H.R.H.", which he conceives is only at sea ; 
however, that he may walk the surest path, intends to try the ship 
in a Court of Record, and report to his Majesty. Endorsed, " R. Aug. 
30." Encloses, 

567. I. Sir Chas. Wheeler to Capt. Hubbard, of H.M.S. Assistance 
in Nevis Road. Whereas several merchants of this island 
have complained that he intends to seize and carry away 
the ship James of Belfast to Jamaica, on pretence that she 
is lawful prize ; but as there is a Court of Record here 
where Sir Chas. is Governor, he has erected a Court of 
Admiralty here. If said ship be condemned, the Act 
plainly says one-third of the penalty will be to the 
Governor of the place where the seizure be made. Promises 
a fair trial here or in Montserrat, but he has not complied 
in any reasonable answer. Will represent to his Majesty 
the grievance to his subjects in Hubbard making himself a 
judge, whereas he is only a seizer. Earnestly presses him 
not to do anything by force, but to proceed legally. 

567. II. Capt. John Hubbard to Sir Chas. Wheeler. Has not time 

to consider his, being under sail with the prize. When he 
first spoke of it Sir Chas. said there was no Admiralty here, 
and would have him carry her to Montserrat, and that he 
was not concerned, it being seized before publication of his 
commission. Would gladly have had her tried here had 
there been a court, and he had time ; but Sir Thos. Lynch 
commands him immediately to be gone, and he believes 
the Act will justify him in trying her in any Court of 
Record convenient for his voyage. Believes Sir Chas. 
mistakes the Act as to the other clause, for the King's 
Commanders have more latitude than ordinary informers, 
and if he tries her here there is nothing due to the 
Governor, but one moiety to the Admiral or Commander 
and the other to the King, which may be as well answered 
to his Majesty in one Government as another. P.S. The 
above is his own clear sense, but in obedience to Sir Thos. 
Lynch's commands intends to leave her behind, not ques- 
tioning but to receive right from his justice. Together, 
3 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., Nos. 79, 79 i., n.] 

568. Sir Tobias Bridge to Sec. Lord Arlington. Has received his 
Majesty's most gracious and kind letter ; and his instructions for dis- 
banding the regiment under his command have been communicated 



231 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1671, 



June 22. 

Barbadoes. 



June 22. 

Whitehall. 



June 23. 

Virginia. 



June 26. 
Virginia. 



by Sir Chas. Wheeler to the Deputy Governor, himself, and the 
regiment. Sir Chas. Wheeler and Sir Thos. Lynch set sail for 
the Leeward Isles after five days' stay, so that the stating of the 
accounts lies upon the Deputy Governor and himself, who have 
contracted with Sir Chas. that the soldiers choosing to return for 
England shall be ready to embark on the Constant [? Noble] Katherine 
or some other good ship on 16th of next month, when doubts not all 
their accounts will be stated. Has sent orders to Lt.-Col. Stapleton 
to cause his Majesty's instructions to be put in execution jointly 
with Sir Chas. Will commit the care of those transported to Capts. 
Barrett and Painter and other officers to keep them in order, and 
await his Lordship's commands for disposing of their arms ; and has 
written to Major Andros meantime to receive his Lordship's com- 
mands herein. Will accompany his poor comrades to England if 
possible, or at furthest follow by the next opportunity. 1 p. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 80.] 

569. Sir Tobias Bridge to Major Edmund Andros, at Lord 
Craven's house in Great Drury Lane. Though he so lately wrote, 
sends these few lines by Lt. Morgan. They are very busy stating 
the accounts according to instructions, which is very troublesome, 
and fears will be injurious to several who were listed in this island 
at their first coming over, and went to the Leeward Isles and were 
taken prisoners at St. Kitts, and so continue ; but the instructions 
are positive. Hopes he will make diligent inquiry for the arrival 
of the ship Noble Katherine, in which it is intended to ship at least 
200 of the old men, that care may be taken for their reception. 
She went with Sir Chas. Wheeler to Nevis, but expects her return 
daily, and 16th July the soldiers are to be shipped. Intends to 
send Capts. Barrett and Paynter and other officers to see good order 
kept and the arms delivered to the Tower or disposed of as he shall 
procure orders to direct. Eespects to Capts. Cotter and Talbot 
and other friends. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 74.] 

570. Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet. To prepare a Bill to 
pass the Great Seal for making Abraham Espinosa, of Jamaica, 
merchant, an alien born, a free denizen of England ; with a clause 
that he shall have no benefit thereof until he has taken the oaths 
of allegiance and supremacy before the Governor or Deputy Governor 
of the island. p. \Dorn. Entry EL, Chas. IL, Vol. XXXVI., p. 1 5.] 

571. Governor Sir William Berkeley to (Secretary Lord Arling- 
ton). Scarborough's estate so secured that on his life Fairfax 
[Farvacks] shall not lose one penny of his debt. Again petitions him 
to procure his Majesty's grant of the Surveyor-General's place for 
his brother Culpeper [see No. 644] ; his father lost all his estate, 
life, and liberty in the King's service. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. 
XXVI., No. 82.] 

572. Thomas Ludwell, Secretary to (Secretary Lord Arlington). 
Since his last here is come the new patent for the land between 
Rappahannock and Patowmeck Rivers, which formerly demurred 
to by the Government and Council, is now readily submitted to 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 235 

1C71. 

and the limitations thankfully acknowledged, but being not two 
years old and granting land taken up nine years before breeds 
infinite discontents and may produce sad effects. Has never 
observed anything so much move the people's grief or passion, 
or which doth more put a stop to their industry, than their 
uncertainty whether they should make a country for the King or 
other Proprietors. The patentees' agents begin already to slight 
the Government further than their patent warrants, and he believes 
their design is to get themselves freed wholly from this Govern- 
ment, which would ruin the country and render it incapable to 
defend itself. This grant includes at least a third of all left to 
poor Virginia by the other Proprietors of acres. Begs a stop may 
be put to their further pretensions till the next Assembly represent 
the ruin that is like to fall upon them, and that he will conceal 
this relation from the fury of Mr. Justice Morton. 1 p. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 83.] 

June 28. 573. Chas. Modyford to Sec. Lord Arlington. Sends letter and 
Tower of paper just received from his father, and likewise, in obedience to his 
on> Lordship's commands, the account of his father's estate, begging his 
Lordship to consider his own condition. Encloses, 

573. I. An account of the profits accrued to Sir Thomas Modyford 
by being Governor of Jamaica. The country gave him 
1,000?. per annum out of an imposition on liquors, which 
for the five years made not above 600?. per annum. The 
privateers gave him 20?. for every commission, which in 
all may amount to about 400?., and all their presents and 
his gains by them directly or indiretly never exceeded 
500?. His plantations were produced by his stock carried 
from Barbadoes and effects sent to him from England, and 
are valued at three or four years' purchase. As for his 
estate in the writer's hands, he is debtor ; what he depended 
on in England was the establishment money due from his 
Majesty, which is now 6,250?. ; his Majesty's 15th of 
prizes brought in by privateers, amounting to 600?. or 
700?., were expended on fortifications, besides which he 
disbursed out of his own money on fortifications 2,500?., 
for which his Majesty is debtor, with interest at 15 per 
cent, for two years, according to the custom of the country, 
750?. ; he paid also by order of his Majesty and Council, 
1,100?., interest for which at 6 per cent, amounts to 132?. ; 
all which sums amount to 10,732?., which is all Sir Thos'. 
estate that he knows of in Europe. Together, H pp. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., Nos. 84, 84. L] 

June 28. 574. Copy of the preceding. Signed in the margin by H. 
Slingesby. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XXVIL, 134.] 

June. 575. Petition of John Fairvack, of London, merchant, to the 

King and Privy Council. Recapitulates what has been done in 
reference to the debt of 840?. sterling due from Edmund Scar- 
borough to petitioner's father, now deceased, and Governor Berkeley's 



236 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671, 

suspension of the execution of the judgment given in petitioner's 
favour. Prays that the Governor may be ordered to take off said 
suspension that justice may not be delayed. Endorsed, "Rec d 
2 June '71. Read in Council 7 July 71. To be heard when his 
Royal Highness is present. To be heard 15 Sept." 1 p. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 85.] 

June 28. 576. Minutes of the Council of Jamaica. Present, Sir Thos. 
St. Jago Lynch, Knt., Lieut.-Governor Sir Jas. Modyford, Major-General 

de la Vega. B anisterj Thos. Modyford, Thos. Freeman, Thos. Ballard, Wm. Ivey, 
Anthony Collier, John Coape, Robt. Byndlosse, Thos. Fuller, Hender 
Molesworth, Robfc. Freeman, Chas. Whitfield, and John White, all 
of whom were this day sworn of the Council. Ordered, on a motion 
made by several Judges for payment of their salaries, that inspec- 
tion be made into the accounts of the revenue, and if there be any 
money in the Treasury that they be paid according to the Act in 
that case provided. Ordered, that Proclamation be forthwith made 
that all proceedings at law issued in the name of Sir Thomas 
Modyford continue in force till the next Supreme Court, and that 
all Justices of the Peace act by virtue of their commissions from Sir 
Thos. Modyford until new commissions shall be issued. Ordered, 
that St. Elizabeth and Clarendon parishes be united, and all 
proceedings both of Courts of Judicature and Sessions of the Peace 
be held for both parishes at the Court in Clarendon parish. 
Adjourned for eight weeks. 2 pp. [Col. Entry Bh, No. XXXIV., 
221-222.] 

June ? 577. " Considerations humbly offered by Sir Thomas Modyford, 
setting forth how his Majesty's interest may be strengthened in the 
West Indies by coming into a nearer friendship with the Buccaniers 
of Hispaniola, which may grow in time to that greatness that they 
will put themselves under his Majesty's Government." In priuiis, 
the Buccaniers of Hispaniola, being most French, and the rest 
Dutch, Walloons and ^English, are in revolt against the French 
Government, and have offered all they have to Sir Thos. Mody- 
ford's protection. It will be no difficult matter by infusing fears 
and jealousies into their leaders to keep them in revolt. They 
have already applied to the Dutch, who have supplied them 
with arms and ammunition and carried away their tobacco, but sup- 
poses they intend no further than matter of trade ; however, it were 
better the Dutch have them than the French. The Spaniards fear 
them much, and Don Francisco Calderon, Envoy from St. Domingo, 
told him they wished an accommodation made, viz., that the 
Buccaniers should quietly keep their bounds, and the Spaniards 
theirs ; and the President " had commanded the rounds upon pain 
of death not to kill a buckaneer." Is persuaded the Buccaniers 
will apply to him for making those articles of accommodation, and 
it is possible the Spaniards will do the like, for " they acknowledge 
our King to be the best friend the Spaniard hath in Europe," and 
is so strong that he may compel the Buccaniers to reason ; and 
being armed with this power doubts not to fix it so, that the 
English shall have the greatest interest in that island. Is so near 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 237 

1671. 

and the privateers of this port have so much influence with the 
Buccaniers, that he may make use of time and occasion ; and success 
must be thereunto referred, and to the powers he may be entrusted 
with. Signed by H. Slingesby in the margin. [Col. Entry Bk., 
No. XXVII., 135.] 

June ? 578. " Considerations from Sir Thomas Modyford which moved 
him to give his consent for fitting the privateers of Jamaica 
against the Spaniard/' 1. The peaceable state they were under, 
having in May 1669 called in all commissions, and never intending 
to give more, till in July 1670 they were enforced by the Queen of 
Spain's Scsedula of 20th April 1669, commanding war against them, 
which arrived in June 1670. 2. The execution of this war by the 
violences of Rivera Pardal, who, after burning their houses, took two 
vessels, and would have taken all vessels from England. 3. The 
constant advices of more vessels preparing to come to him, " every 
little success setting that easily heightened nation a tiptoes." 4. 
His Majesty's instructions empowering the Governor on extra- 
ordinary cases by the Council's advice to use extraordinary remedies. 
5. The unanimous consent of the Council and their fear of the ruin 
of the country. 6. The complaints of the merchants, fishermen, and 
sailors, fears of the planters, cries of the women and children, and 
the danger of the Governor's person and reputation should he have 
denied to take arms on so general an importunity. 7. The certain 
increase of the enemy's courage and pride, " if it were possible," and 
the debasing of ours, " which is the next to beating." 8. The fatal 
consequences of the foregoing evils. 9. Lord Arlington's letter of 
11 June 1670, which arrived in August, commanding him to keep 
the privateers in the posture that letter should find them in. 10 
The commission to Morgan being solely to revenge these affronts 
and prevent more. 11. The commission to private captains being 
only to execute Morgan's orders, whereby it is evident nothing was 
in design but his Majesty's service. 12. And whereas it may be 
objected that the fleet might have been called in after the coast 
had been secured, and so the mischief at Panama prevented ; it 
must be considered that, the privateers finding ships, arms, ammuni- 
tion, and provisions on their own charge, would not have obeyed 
such orders, expecting " as the late Lord General, that great master 
of war, adviseth, the soldier to look on the enemy as the surest 
pay." 13. If Sir Thos. Modyford should be censured for granting 
this commission, then this fatal doctrine must necessarily follow, 
that let French, Dutch or Spaniard make war on Jamaica, the 
Governor must not take up any offensive arms, till he has advised 
his Majesty and received his Majesty's orders to proceed therein ; 
which advice, if it escape the enemy and all sea hazards, cannot 
arrive under three months, attendance for orders will take two or 
three months or more if the enemy's ambassador be there to put in 
delays, and the answer may arrive in three months ; which makes 
nine months during which the pressure of the enemy must be 
endured. How destructive this doctrine will prove is easily imagin- 
able if the advice or orders be delayed or miscarry ; " and therefore 



238 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

my humble request to your Lordships is to advise his Majesty to be 
sure of a prudent and loyal person for the Government, and then 
trust him with that commission which the wise Romans gave their 
generals, videat ne Insula nostra Jamaica aliquid detrimenti accipiat 

the Romans giving such large powers even inltaly, at their own 

doors, so well did they understand that rule of trusting him that 
was on the place, who clearly sees what cannot be imagined by 
much wiser men at so great a distance." 14. They had reason to 
believe that this in time might so humble the Spaniards that they 
would be willing to embrace a free trade. " And to conclude, the 
necessity of affairs was such, that if it were to be done again and I 
assured of all the trouble which now threatens me and worse, it 
could not have been avoided without the manifest ruin of this 
island." 2 pp. [Col. Entry Bk, No. XXVII., 136, 137.] 

June ? 579. Petition of John Horsham, George Lapthorne, John Munion, 
Richard Cowes, and John Warren, merchants of Plymouth, to the 
King. In February 1671 petitioners sent over to Jamaica John 
Head and John Molum as their factors, who being deficient in 
making returns, petitioners pray his Majesty's letter to Lt.-Gov. 
Sir Thos. Lynch to countenance Samuel Girard, whom petitioners 
are now sending over, to require Head and Molum to render him 
all petitioner's goods, together with books, accounts, and particulars 
of debts. Annexed, 

579. I. The King to Lt.-Gov. Sir Thos. Lynch. Draft of the 
letter requested in above petition. Endorsed by William- 
son, " Merchants to Jamaica," Together, 2 pp. [Col. Papers 
Vol. XXVI., Nos. 86, 86. 1.] 

July 2. 580. Sir Thos. Lynch to Sec. Lord Arlington. Has kept his 
Jamaica, bed four out of the seven days he has been here, and now writes 
this on it. Was very sick all the way from Barbadoes, and such 
a fit of the gout has taken him as he never had before. But no 
time has been lost, for he must have a house and know how to 
get victuals, give commissions to officers, and appear at the head 
of the several regiments before he can embark him [Sir Thos. 
Modyford]. Feared nobody but this regiment, which made him 
divide it into two. Does not see but on a dispute he would have 
more adherents than Modyford, for people love novelty, are displeased 
about privateering, and the quantity of land given out. The truth 
is, " there is not in him or any the least appearance of any dis- 
position to resist the King's authority," however, shall not till 
well established put him on board, nor is there any ship fitted or 
a farthing in the treasury to fit one, so thinks of putting him on 
board a good merchant's frigate that will sail about six weeks 
hence; or else to send the Welcome, which will save the King a 
great deal of money ; she is an old vessel, and if taken in any 
distress of weather would be lost and all her men, but the Assist- 
ance with a catch would be sufficient to awe the privateers and 
reduce the refractory. This voyage has mightily lessened and 
humbled them, and they would take it for a great compliment to 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 239 

1671. 

be severe with Morgan, whom they rail on horribly for starving, 
cheating, and deserting them. Resolves on sending one of the 
frigates to Carthagena, but despairs of any kind reception, this last 
fatal design has so exasperated them. Must likewise send to St. 
Jago de Cuba, for last month a Spanish brigantine carried off 
one Buffet from the north side of the island. Prays for his Lord- 
ship's directions and countenance at home, but above all things 
" for God's sake to give your commands about the Logwood," for 
though it is so mightily profitable, he shall prohibit it if the 
Spaniards complain. Sends to Sir Chas. Lyttleton some cocoa and 
vanillas, which he got with great difficulty for the King, and some 
chocolate for his Lordship. The blasting of the cocoa trees strangely 
defeats their hopes, and the dry season is likewise a great dishearten- 
ing. " Daniel is well, but not that good boy we took him for." His 
wife is better. Endorsed, R. 21 Sept. . . . Ans d Nov r 14 th . 3 pp. 
[Col Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 1.] 

July 3-4. 581. Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes, July 3. Present, the 
Deputy Governor and four of the Council. Ordered that the Com- 
missioners for Fortifications for Oistins Bay agree for lime, stones, 
boards, tar, carpenters, masons, and labourers, with an overseer, for 
which the Treasurer is to pay according to order. 

July 4. The agreement made by Lt.-Col. Christopher Lyne with 
Simon Cooper, mason, for squaring and laying stones on the forts 
at Oistin's Bay approved, and the Commissioners ordered to see it 
performed, and to charge for payment on the Treasurer, according 
to the Act for the levy, of 31st March last. 1 p. [Col. Entry Bk., 
No. XL, 192, 193.] 

July 4. 582. The Assembly of Barbadoes to the Gentlemen Planters in 
London. Enclose duplicates of their letters of ICth June sent by 
Capt. Banten to his Excellency and themselves. This day being 
the last of their sitting as an Assembly, their packet sent by Capt. 
Collier came too late for them to return any answer, but have 
recommended it to the care of the next Assembly. Enclose an 
order drawn on the Gentlemen Planters for payment of 171. to John 
Champante. Signed by Simon Lambert, Speaker. p. [Col. 
Entry Bk, No. XIII., 45.] 

July ^-. 583. Act of the surrender of St. Christopher's by the French to 
the English. This -j^-th July 1671, before the undersigned, on 
demand of Sir Chas. Wheler, Capt.-General of the English islands, 
on behalf of the King of England, M. de Baas, Lt.-General for the 
King of France in America, makes restitution by order of his master 
to Sir Chas. Wheler, in the name of the King of England, of that 
part of St. Christopher's which belonged to the King of England in 
the year 1665, in accordance with the Treaty of Breda ; with which 
restitution Sir Charles is content, and has taken real and actual 
possession. And for deciding differences between the subjects of 
said Kings on this subject, Major-Gen. Wm. Stapleton, Col. Randal 
Russell, and Lt.-Col. Michael Smith arc named Commissioners on 
the part of Sir Charles, and M. de St. Laurent, M. de Ruan Pallu, 



240 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

and M. du Mouche on the part of M. De Baas, with power to deter- 
mine said differences. Signed by Sir Charles Wheler, W. Stapleton, 
Ran. Russell, Michael Smith, Francis Morton, Abed Mathew, De Baas, 
Pellissier, Le Chevalier St. Laurent, Du Boise, De Ruan Pallu, and 
Frere Philippe de Nogel. Copy. " Examined and collated with the 
original this T 8 F July 1671, and signed %'Charles "Wheler, W. Staple- 
ton." French. Endorsed by Williamson, " Act of the restitution of St. 
Christopher's to the English." 3 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., 
No. 2.] 

July _5^ 584. Two copies of the preceding, one endorsed by Williamson, 
" The Act of the Surrender of St. Christopher's to the English/' the 
other endorsed, " The Act of Rendition of the English part of St. 
Christopher's." French. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., Nos. 3, 4.] 

July .jSg.. 585. Two copies of the above, examined with the original T 8 F 
July 1671, and signed Charles Wheler and W. Stapleton. French. 
[Col, Entry Bks,. Vols. XCIL, 466-470, XCIIL, 50.] 

July 6. 586. Sir Charles Wheler, Governor of the Leeward Islands, 
Nevis. to (Sec. Lord Arlington). Assures his Majesty that he is in full 
and quiet possession of that part of St. Christoper's which his 
subjects possessed in 1665. At the beginning of his treating 
complained of the discourtesy of the men-of-war Assistance and 
Welcome. Has since received a letter from M. De Baas that he 
would sail for St. Christopher's on the 26th, where he arrived 
on Wednesday, the 28th, but gave no notice till the Monday after ; 
and the people at Nevis being informed that all the Governors of 
the respective islands were there rendezvoued looked upon that 
"protract of time" as an espece of that delay they had been 
accustomed to, and despaired ; of Governor Wheler's success. But 
on Monday, the 3rd July, their Secretary, M. De Ruan, with several 
other gentlemen and a hermit who is in great esteem with them, 
came, and in a set speech told him M. De Baas would deliver pos- 
session, and demanded when he would receive it, and pressed him 
to dine with M. De Baas ; to which Governor Wheler replied he 
would wait on M. De Baas next morning, but would not set foot 
on St. Christopher's but to receive possession. Sent next day 
Colonel Stapleton, Deputy-Governor of Montserrat, whom he has 
made Major-General of militia of the islands, Colonel Russell, and 
Captain Mathew, who returned with an appointment from M. De 
Baas to be at the English Road the next morning (-j^- July) to 
deliver possession ; which he did, according to the copy herewith 
sent of the Act made by the Public Notary [see ante, No. 583], 
Keeps the original here, M. De Baas keeps his part ; a third part 
was added by the Notary, and a fourth they will give to be 
registered by the English also. Afterwards M. De Baas drank 
the King's health and then his, and he the King of France's and 
M. De Baas's, with whom he went to dinner at his castle, and 
they made several strict promises to each other to live with good 
intelligence. Knows nothing in his management of this affair, 
that any man might not have done as well, but it was the King's 
good fortune that was Wheler's genius, but if there was any 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



241 



July 6. 
Jamaica. 



July 7. 

Jamaica. 






1671. 

small artifice on his side, it was that they apprehended he would 
have attempted it by force, because of the preparations he was 
making, for at this time they had no ships, and the English had 
20 in their road. Promises it shall as hardly be lost as it has 
with trouble been regained, and is now going with 20 cannon for 
the old fort, to set up the King's colours, and carry some soldiers 
to relieve a corporal and file of mu.sketteers whom he left yesterday 
to keep possession. Will give particular account of the settlement 
so soon as the inhabitants return, and as shipping departs will 
send into all parts of the world (news) of the restitution, and 
desires notice be given upon the Exchange at London, that men 
may in reasonable time put in their claims to their lost estates, 
lest they be disposed of to such as will replant the country. 3 pp. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXVIL, No. 5.] 

587. Rich. Browne to Joseph Williamson. Hopes his letter 
to Lord Arlington came safe to hand, since which has been very 
sick. Sir Thos. Lynch arrived about 12 days since, and was very 
well received by the old Governor and people : he has been much 
troubled with the gout ; the old Governor visits him very often, 
and they have agreed to suffer ships to fetch logwood out of the 
Bay of Campeachy. Is informed there are about 40 ships cutting 
logwood : certainly the Spaniards cannot suffer it, but may take 
some of them, which will occasion a new war. About six weeks 
since Spaniards landed from a small bark, burnt a house and 
carried a prisoner to Cuba. The Assistance frigate, and the 
Welcome are to go to Carthage n a and Cuba with the articles of 
peace. If God gives him strength to bear the sea, hopes to see 
him in London. Endorsed, E., Sept. 21. 1 p. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXVIL, No. 6.] 

588. Sir Thomas Lynch to Joseph Williamson. Wrote to his 
Lordship by a ship that sailed four or five days since, and does so 
by this, the whole history of his voyage and reception, and a 
particular letter about his secret commission. There is no fear of 
any disobedience, for he has been received with abundance of 
civility and joy by the General and people ; but has lain on his 
bed these eight days. There is no money in the treasury, a dry 
season has blasted all the cocoa and sugars, four-fifths of our men 
that went to Panama are lost, believes there are not so many of the 
island as seven years ago when he went off, yet prodigious quan- 
tities of land run out for people to come. Hopes in time to remedy 
all, and begs for God's sake for frequent letters and directions. 
U pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVIL, No. 7.] 

July 14. 589. Sir Chas. Wheler to (Sec. Lord Arlington). Refers to his 
Nevis. letter of the 6th inst. by Colonel Russel, late Governor of this place, 
enclosing copy of the Act of restitution of the English part of St. 
Christopher's, that his Majesty might know his own business 
before the news should come on the Exchange; and hastens this 
by way of Plymouth in case this ship might meet with a more 
prosperous voyage. The trouble of transporting the heavy iron 

U 51912. 



242 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1671. 



July 17. 

Virginia. 



July 20. 

St. Chris- 
topher's. 



July 20. 

St. Chris- 
topher's. 



guns was never so entangled between the fear of losing the King's 
stores and ships (the season of hurricanes being just upon them), 
and his earnestness to be in a posture of defence. Hopes by the 
one more ship to sail for Bristol to send word some of the guns are 
mounted, and that the King has 500 good men with muskets to 
stand by them ; and then dares promise he will not be pulled out 
till his Majesty shall hear from him. There could not be a fairer 
correspondence between him and M. De Baas, who is a very 
prudent, civil gentleman ; takes him to be a man of his word, 
because he uses fewer than one shall meet with from his nation," 
and they have promised each other all they can do, where their 
masters' commands do not interpose. Endorsed, "R. 4 Sept.' 
2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 8.] 

590. Thomas Ludwell to Secretary Lord Arlington, Thanks in 
his country's behalf for his assistance in the confirmation of the 
order of the Governor and Council prohibiting the importation of 
Newgateers. The safety of this country depends upon the con- 
tinuance of it, so many insolent villanies having been committed 
by men of that sort, that greater numbers would hazard the peace 
of it. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 9.] 

591. Governor Sir Charles Wheeler to Dr. Durel, Canon of 
Windsor, at Windsor Castle. Since the English part of this island 
has been delivered to him, many French Protestants who have 
purchased estates there, have applied that they may send to France 
for a minister of our religion whom they will liberally reward ; to 
which he has consented on condition that the liturgy of the Church 
of England be used, but as they are wholly unacquainted with any of 
their nation who know the English Liturgy ; desires him to recom- 
mend one. The minister shall have WQl. per annum, for the English 
paying theirs so, will oblige the French to do the same, and mean- 
time the French will have built a church. An answer sent to Mr. 
Williamson, will be forwarded to him. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. 
XXVIL, No. 10.] 

592. Sir Chas. Wheeler, Governor of the Leeward Islands, to 
(Sec. Lord Arlington). Entreats his Lordship to deliver enclosed 
petition to the King, has written to Dr. Turner earnestly pressing 
him not to refuse to be consecrated Bishop of these islands, in case 
his Majesty thinks fit to send him Has proposed to him that bis 
Bishopric shall be worth 4007. per annum, with a house that may 
deserve the name of a Bishop's Palace; that he bring eight fellows 
of colleges who shall have 800. per annum among them ; desires this 
only on his prevailing with his Lordship to move his Majesty that 
the fellows in their absence enjoy the full profits of their fellow- 
ships, and Dr. Turner have his mastership of St. Johns and all 
other Ecclesiastical preferments preserved for him ; hopes that in 
few years the good Dr. would so settle things that he might return 
to his mastership, and thence furnish these islands with fit men on 
any vacancies. Begs pardon for the trouble given, but doubts not 
this would be extremely advantageous to his Majesty's dominions 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



243 



1671. 

here. Has done this without. Dr. Turner's leave, knowing his 
modesty would never have consented to that high office, and he is 
the fittest man he knows in England. Encloses, 

592. I. Petition of Sir Chas. Wheler to the King. That in these 
Leeward Islands his Majestys has near 10,000 Christian 
subjects, for whose care petitioners found but two in Holy 
Orders, both scandalous livers, and one a notable scis- 
matic active in the late bloody rebellion. Knowing it is 
impossible to remove out of England men fit to be 
ministers, and that divers well-qualified laymen are willing 
to be priests and deacons ; that the islands have made liberal 
provisions for the maintenance of the clergy, and are 
everywhere erecting churches and chapels ; and that there 
will be means found for founding a college ; beseeches his 
Majesty to command Dr. Turner, Master of St. John's 
College, Cambridge, to be consecrated Bishop of Nevis and 
the other Leeward Islands, to settle the government of the 
Church and answer the most earnest cries of the people for 
ministers to instruct them. Together 3 pp. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXVII., Nos. 11, 11 I.] 

[24 July.] 593. Petition of Robert Mason to the Council for Foreign Plan- 
tations. King James by letters patent dated 3 Nov. 1620 granted 
to the Council of New England all the land in New England from 
40 to 48 N. lat. The Council of New England by an indenture 
dated 22 April, 11. Chas. I. sold to John Mason (petitioner's grand- 
father) sundry tracts of land by the name of New Hampshire and 
Masonia. Petitioner's grandfather and heirs were in quiet possession 
thereof several years, and disbursed 20,OOOZ. towards the planting of 
the colony. About 1651 the Massachusetts colony taking advantage of 
the late sad divisions violently entered on, the petitioner's estate, 
forced the inhabitants to take an oath of fidelity to them, and 
deprived him of his lands. Prays that their Lordships will take his 
case into consideration and make report to the King. Received and 
read in Council, 24 July 1671. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., 
No. 12.] 

July 29. 594. Sir Tobias Bridge and Col. Christopher Codrington to Sec. 

Barbadoes. Lord Arlington. The foregoing is copy of what was last sent by 
Lieut. Morgan. Have faithfully stated the accounts of the six com- 
panies under command of Sir Tobias Bridge remaining on this island, 
and sent them by Capt. Barrett sealed up to the Lords of the 
Treasury. Sir Chas. Wheeler and Lt.-Col. Stapleton have not yet 
sent up those of the four companies to Leeward, but they shall be 
forwarded. Capt. Barrett and other officers come in the Noble 
Katherine with 200 men, and there remain about 60, for whose 
transportation care shall be taken. On same sheet Sir Tobias Bridge 
to Lord Arlington. 22 June, see ante, No. 568. Together 2 pp. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 81.] 

Aug. 2. 595. John Reid to (Sec. Lord Arlington ?). Takes this sure 

Barbadoes. convenience by his honour's old acquaintance, Capt. Barrett, to let 

him know he has another old servant, acquaintance, and beadsman 

Q 2 



24.4 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

^ 

1671. 

alive here. This island affords nothing worthy his Lordship's acce{ 
tance, but has delivered Capt. Barrett a monkey to be presented to 
her Ladyship, being confident it will please her for it is the finest 
he ever saw. His condition is little mended since he saw his honour, 
for having come in on a parcel of old and bad debts has almost lost 
his credit with the Royal Co., because he cannot recover them. 
Hears they are renewing their stock, and intend another factor, and 
to pinch him in his small salary. Begs his honour as his patron to 
speak to H.R.H. Secretary Mr. Wrenn, who is the chief manager of 
their affairs, that he may be continued in their service. 2 pp. [Col. 
Papers, Vol., XXVII., No. 13.] 

Aug. 3. 596. Address of the Council for Plantations to the King. On 
consideration of Major Bannister's Narrative of his proceedings at 
Surinam about the fetching off the English Planters detained there 
by the Dutch, and the letter and petition of the remaining English 
expressing their desire and readiness to remove thence, they advise 
that his Majesty give order that the two ships formerly sent (or two 
others of the same burden) be despatched so as to arrive at Surinam 
in December next, for fetching off the said English ; and that new 
and more strict orders be meantime procured from the States-General 
to prevent further obstructions or disputes about their removal. 
Signed by Sandwich President and eleven others. 1 p. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 14.] 

Aug. 3. 597. Two copies of the preceding. [Col. Entry Bks., No. XCIV., 
88, and No. LXXVIL, CO.] 

Aug. 12. 598. Representation of the Council for Plantations to the King 
concerning New England. Find that after the best enquiry there 
are many informations necessary to be got for the well grounding 
of the King's future proceedings, which cannot be better had than 
by sending Commissioners, due regard being had to their qualifica- 
tions of ability and integrity to send faithful and judicious advices 
and yet with temper, not too much contrary to the present 
humour of the people. Besides the benefit of the considerable 
notices hoped for from them, it will be conducible to the King's 
honour to have some persons there on his part to contribute to 
the prosperity of the colonies and to show his good opinion of 
their disposition and obedience to his government. Moreover there 
are many differences between the colonists concerning boundaries, 
which if not compromised cannot be determined without civil 
war, except by the King's sovereign power. Advise that the 
Commissioners' public instructions may be only to promote the 
general good of the colonies and to hear and determine the 
questions about boundaries. Other secret instructions may be 
given in points where with good direction they may do the King 
considerable service. 1 p. Three copies. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., 
Nos. 15, 16, 17. See also Col. Entry Bh, No. 94, pt. 2, p. 5.] 

Aug. 12. 599. Chas. Modyford to Sec. Lord Arlington. Encloses letter 

Tower. f rom hj 8 father and Admiral Morgan's Narrative. Has also a 

letter from him to the King with the strict order to present it 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 245 

1671. 

with his own hand. Desires that the enclosed petition be read 
to his Majesty, and if possible granted, relying upon his Lord- 
ship's favour and all other the concerns of the writer's family at 
Court. Remains here in entire submission to the King which he 
hopes will be a reason for his sooner eulargenent. 1 p. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXVIL, No. 18.] 

Aug. 14. 600. Major James Banister to (Sec. Lord Arlington). Nothing 
Old Harbour, o f moment has happened since his last, but the imprisonment of 
ica - Sir Thos. Modyford the 12th hist., Sir Thos. Lynch acquainting 
none with his intentions but Banister that same morning, who 
accompanied them on board his Majesty's frigate and there showed 
him his Majesty's orders ; which he supposes Sir Thomas Mody- 
ford little suspected till then, having ordered his affairs to sail 
in his own ship. Will only say that on his arrival was enter- 
tained by Sir Thos. Modyford with very great kindness, and Sir 
Thos. Lynch received from him as honourable a reception as could 
be, which he has ever since continued, being also very forward 
with his best advice for the good of this island till the very time 
of his restraint. Has made it his business to understand the 
grounds of this last war against the Spaniard, the sum whereof 
the enclosed will inform his Lordship. 1 p. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXVII., No. 19.] 

Aug. 15. 601. Minutes of the Council of Jamaica. His Majety's letters 
Port Koyal. an( j instructions concerning sending home Sir Thomas Modyford 
read and ordered to be entered on record. Proclamation drawn 
upon same and ordered to be published and recorded. Copy of 
order of council dated 29th June 1670, compared with the original 
and signed by the Governor as owned by the persons present at 
said council to be their act. The late General Sir Thomas Mody- 
ford's accounts shown to the council. The King's warrant, dated 
Whitehall, 10th March 1671, to Sir Thos. Lynch. Also the 
King's private instructions to Lieutenant-Governor Lynch [see ante, 
Nos. 452, 453]. 

Instructions from James, Duke of York, Lord High Admiral, 
to Captain John Hubbard, of his Majesty's ship Assistance. Autho- 
rising and directing him, in pursuance of directions contained in a 
letter from his Majesty of 7th March [see ante, No. 441], to do all 
things for the accomplishing of his Majesty's orders to Sir Thos. 
Lynch, Lieutenant-Governor of Jamaica, to seize Sir Thos. Mody- 
ford, his Majesty's late Governor there, and send him in safe 
custody to England, according to his Majesty's private letter and 
instructions given to Sir Thos. Lynch with command to impart 
them to him ; for the more effectual execution thereof not to go 
ashore in the island, till Sir Thos. Lynch be settled in quiet pos- 
session of the government, and shall have seized Sir Thos. Mody- 
ford ; and if any accident befall Sir Thos. Lynch, or he find 
opposition in possessing himself of the government, or in seizing 
Sir Thos. Modyford, to assist Sir Thos. Lynch with the utmost 
of his force, by annoying in all ways the island, and particularly 
by burning, sinking, and destroying the privateers that shall 



246 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

assist the island in such opposition to his Majesty's commands. 
6 pp. [Col Entry Bk., No. XXXIV., 225-231.] 

Aug. 15. 602. Proclamation of Sir Thomas Lynch, Lieutenant-Governor 
Port Koyai, of Jamaica. Whereas his Majesty has by letter and instrument 
Jamaica. Q f ^e 10th March last commanded him to make prisoner the late 
Governor Sir Thos. Modyford and send him with a strong and 
safe guard to his Majesty's presence in England, for making war 
and committing depredations and acts of hostility upon the sub- 
jects and territories of the King of Spain in America contrary to 
his Majesty's express order and command ; also that his Majesty 
grants a free pardon and indemnity to all who have been partakers 
with him, on condition that they quietly submit to Sir Thos. 
Lynch and his Majesty's authority, and abstain for the future 
from the like hostilities, observing punctually his Majesty's late 
Treaty with the Catholic King of the -fy Julv now last pa,st. 1 p. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXVIL, No. 20.] 

Aug. 19. 603. Major James Banister to Sec. Lord Arlington. Cannot 
Old Harbour, b u t sympathise with his fellow subjects in Surinam which presses 
lca ' him to pursue his Lordship with fresh addresses to extend his 
second kindness in compassion to the remaining English there 
for commiserating their distressed condition to his Majesty and 
endeavouring a further supply of shipping for their exportation 
thence. His Lordship may be sensible by their petition to his 
Majesty what great inconveniences they have already suffered 
from their arbitrary Dutch masters, who he suspects have since 
ushered in more heavy oppressions ; from which they so earnestly 
desire to withdraw, that they will gladly receive the ships, if 
his Majesty will send them, at their own charge, without which 
they can never remove, the Dutch imposing such heavy rates on 
the hire of their shipping, supposing the English to be excluded 
from any further redress, which must prove true without his 
Majesty's goodness. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVIL, No. 21.] 

Aug. 20. 604. Lieutenant-Governor Sir Thos. Lynch to Sec. Lord Arling- 
Jamaica. ton. Has written to his Lordship twice at large since he came, 
and about three weeks since to Mr. Williamson, and acquainted 
his Lordship with the reason for deferring putting into execution 
the King's orders. Has established the Government, as he will 
see by the enclosed ; people would be much satisfied if the form 
of government were continued, though Governor and officers were 
changed : will send same, and write at large to " our Council," by 
this ship. Herewith writes to Sir Thos. Clifford for the Lords 
of the Treasury, and remits Sir Thos. Modyford's accounts, with 
some few remarks, as also the state of the revenue, wherein they 
will see what a poor thing this mighty Government is, and how 
excusable he was in pressing for that little the King ordered him, 
for Sir Thos. Modyford must say that 1,0001. per annum will not 
keep a Governor's house. Will by next ship send a perfect account 
of all arms and ammunition, and afterwards a list of all the regi- 
ments, an account of the inhabitants, and a more exact map of 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 247 

1671. 

the island than ever was made. Has sent a most extraordinary 
Derrotero (sea chart) to Sir Robert Murray for the King ; desires 
his Lordship to have a sight of it, with the history, which, or a 
copy, he wishes sent back. The sloop that carried Don Francisco 
Calderon to San Domingo is returned with five prisoners, runa- 
ways from Nevis. The Spaniards dreadfully apprehend the French 
Buccaniers now settling withing 16 leagues of them, and the 
Governor wrote to the Conde de Peneranda to admit our privateers 
to come and kill these French for the booty, and also for liberty to 
buy negroes for the King. If his Lordship and the Council think 
the taking of Hispaniola will be so prejudicial as we here think it 
will be, and if his Lordship order him he might find a way to save 
San Domingo and not engage the English or his Majesty's name 
in it. Sends herewith the President's letter, which contains 
nothing but " compliments of Panama." Hears that the French 
Buccaniers are still in rebellion, and will receive neither the 
Governor nor the Royal Company. Both have their agents here, 
and if Lynch interposes will adhere to the royal party, for if the 
Buccaniers got exemption, in a few years neither Hispaniola nor 
the Indies could resist them, for they are already near 3,000 strong, 
themselves say above 4,000. Intends to send the Assistance that 
way when she goes to Cuba ; she and the Welcome came back from 
Carthagena 10 days since ; they were treated infinitely well by the 
Governor and the city, of which his Lordship has here a narrative 
by Major Beeston, and " all the autos and formalities of it in 
Spanish from the Governor," and likewise the Governor's letter, 
the publication of the Peace, and a letter about the " sweepstakes." 
Gave Major Beeston and Mr. Read, factor to the Royal Company, 
order to treat with the Assienta's factor to come hither for negroes, 
but " he was so hated, and the gentleman so watched that nothing 
could be done." They brought away 32 prisoners and five French, 
which they took out of " one of the Grilles ships " at sea, bound to 
Cura9ao for negroes. Captain Hubbard died on the voyage ; 
has put the Captain of the Welcome into his place. Thinks to 
send the Welcome for Havannah and so home, being old, and 
with the other will do all his Majesty requires, for the Privateers 
are all divided, lost, or taken to planting or fetching logwood. 
Has sent Proclamations to all their haunts, promising exemption 
from arrest if they come in in six months, intimating that he 
has written to Bermudas, the Caribbees, New England, New 
York, and Virginia, for their apprehension, has declared them 
pirates in all the Spanish ports, and intends to send to Tortuga 
to prevent their reception ; which will infallibly bring them all 
in. Has favoured them against their Commanders about the 
plunder, of which they have cheated them, which has contributed 
mightily to the bringing them in and reducing them. Is every 
day troubled about the negroes and mulattoes freedom and other 
differences that happened in this wretched voyage. Will free 
them cautiously that the people may not be too much exasperated : 
there are nearly 400 or 500 of them brought from Panama, and 
the gentlemen have agreed with the Governor of Carthagena to 



248 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

have them fetched away at 80 pieces of 8 per head. But the 
sending home SirThos. Modyford a prisoner according to the King's 
order troubled him most; he was prepared to come home when 
told " by the by " lest I should too much exasperate his friends 
and surprise him that the King expected him. But 12 days 
since came news by a Bristol man, which by great luck and art 
he suppressed, that Mr. [Chas.] Modyford was secured in the Tower, 
which made Lynch mortally apprehend Sir Thomas' escape. To 
prevent which watched himself divers nights. Set guards or 
rather spies on the boats and at the ports, and last Friday week 
having ordered Lieutenant-Colonel Freeman to come armed, letting 
none know the reason, Major-General Banister and some others 
very luckily coming to town, he invited them to accompany the 
Lieutenant-Go vernor to the sea side. In the morning went to Sir 
Thos. Modyford and prayed him to go with them, and that the 
Lieutenant-Governor's wife should return with him. Modyford 
excused it, but told him he must enter the boat and go on board 
the Assistance, where Lynch had something to communicate to him 
from the King. Called those of the Council into the boat, and 
being come on board acquainted Modyford with the King's orders 
to send him home prisoner. Both he and they were much sur- 
prised and troubled. To lessen it, said all he could to him which 
his Lordship had bid Lynch say, that his life and fortune were 
in no danger, and that the Lieutenant-Governor had orders to 
pardon all which was a mark Sir Thos. Modyford was not such 
a capital offender, but there was a necessity of the King's making 
this resentment for such an unreasonable irruption. Wrote to the 
same purpose to his son and to Admiral Morgan, who were sick, 
and to some of the Council in the town, fearing the surprise or 
fear might occasion some rash actions ; but, God be thanked, all 
remained quiet, only by some in secret Lynch was traduced as a 
trapan, and one that had betrayed the good General. On Monday 
the Council met " all but Colonel Modyford and Sir James, who 
was reported to be frantic ; " showed them his orders, and told them 
what the King had commanded was not to be disputed, though his 
manner of doing it might privately be censured, but told them 
there were but three ways of doing what he was commanded, viz., 
either by taking M odyford's oath and security to render himself 
a true prisoner, which he could not do with one whom the King 
had charged with such crimes ; or to have made him a prisoner at 
town, which was impossible, his own servants being sick, the 
townsmen partial, and any of Modyford's desperate friends might 
have murdered him, and has since heard that two have sworn 
that had they known Lynch's intentions they would have cut 
his throat. But the third and the way taken was the safest. 
Shows lie could not be charged with ingratitude, and that his 
arguments seemed to satisfy all, and immediately the cause of his 
imprisonment was published and the King's pardon, he allowed 
the Council to confirm the Act by which Morgan was commis- 
sioned, which Modyford carries home with him, and gave him a 
letter certifying that he found in him or the people no disposition 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 249 

1671. 

to rebel. Has likewise visited him every day aboard and carried him 
to take the air, and showed him all the civilities imaginable, both to 
palliate his misfortunes, for two days after his restraint came 
public news of his son's imprisonment, and " to set myself with 
those friends of his that might think I was the cause and not the 
instrument of his misfortunes." Before letting him go aboard the 
Jamaica merchant that is to bring him home, swore the Captain, 
Joseph Knapman, with all his crew, and put aboard 12 of the 
Assistance's men under Lieutenant Bucke and Mr. Fogge, with 
commission to guard him, if possible, right into the Thames ; so 
hopes it will appear he has served the King with all the duty and 
punctuality imaginable, and that they may blush who have re- 
proached his Lordship for preferring him to this occasion. Did 
they but know the risks run and the money expended, and the 
little advantage he is like to have by it, they would pity rather 
than envy him. Encloses, 

604. i. The present state of the Government of Jamaica, under 
his Majesty's Lt.-Governor and Commander-m-Chief Sir 
Thomas Lynch, Knight, this 20th August 1671. His 
Majesty is sovereign and proprietor ; is stiled King, &c. 
and Lord of Jamaica ; and the Governor and Lt.-Governor 
are appointed during his pleasure. The present Lt.- 
Goveruor has a council of 14 of the best men in the island 
viz., Major-Generai Jas.Banister, Sir Jas. Modyford, Colonels 
Thos. Modyford, John Coape, Thos. Freeman, and Thos. 
Ballard, Lt.-ColoneLi Wm. Ivy, Robert Byndlos, Chas. 
Whitfield, and Thos. Fuller, Major Anthony Collyer, Capt. 
Hender Molesworth, Lt.-Col. Robert Freeman, Secretary, 
and John White, Chief Justice ; they may be suspended 
for misdemeanour, but the Lords of the Council of Foreign 
Plantations must judge if it is reasonable. There is an 
assembly numbering 18, viz., two from each of the 
districts of St. Catherine, Clarendon, St. Andrew, Port 
Royal, St. John, St. David, St. Elizabeth, St. Thomas, 
and North Side : these are chosen indifferently by the 
people, and make laws which are of force for two years, 
and ever after with the Royal Assent. The people look 
on it as their Magna Charta, that they shall be governed 
by these municipal laws and those of England, and not 
have anything imposed on them but by their own consents 
as in Barbadoes and the Caribbees. There is a Major- 
General v\ hose office resembles that of Muster Master in 
England. Here follow Major-General James Banister's 
orders, which include " the sum of the Act for the militia." 
There are six regiments of foot, commanded by Colonels 
Thos. Freeman and Thos. Modyford, the Lt.-Governor, 
Major General Banister, Sir Jas. Modyford, and Col. 
John Coape ; and one regiment of horse commanded 
b> the Lt.-Governor with Col. Thos. Ballard, Lt.-Colonel. 
There is no fortification but at Port Royal: the castle 
has about 40 guns, and there needs two platforms and a 



250 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 



fort at Bonhams Point to make the harbour secure : there 
are kept in the fort only one gunner Col. Theod. Gary and 
two matrosses : six files of inhabitants watch there every 
night. Of all ordnance, arms and ammunition the Lords 
of our Council and the Master of the Ordnance have, and 
shall have yearly, a particular account. His Majesty's 
revenue is but small, and arises from rents of land, fines 
and escheats, a taxation on alehouses, and import on 
liquors and tonnage. Land at the Point pays \ penny a 
foot, and all cleared land one penny an acre ; licence for 
selling drink 40s. ; spirits 6s. per gallon ; wines 4>l. per 
tun, beer 80s., and rum 40s. per tun, every ship 12d per 
ton for anchorage, foreigners double. The Act directs 
these shall be laid out as follows, viz., 1,000?. per annum 
to the Governor, 400. to the Lt.-Governor, 200Z. to the 
Major-General, 8Ql. to the Chief Justice, 20. to every 
judge, Wl. to their assistants ; but it never yet held out to 
pay all them. To receive this there is a Receiver-General 
who has 2s. 6d. per ; there follow the commission and 
instructions of Thomas Tothill, Collector and Receiver- 
General. The collectors of the imports have likewise 101. 
per cent, allowed them because the revenue is so small. 
Commission and instructions of Robert Freeman and 
Reginald Wilson, Commissioners of Impost. To receive 
account of these officers there is a chief treasurer, Gary 
Helyar, who has other employs and so does it at 8d. per 
. Commission and instructions of Gary Helyar. Mr. 
Povey has the office of secretary for life, and Lt.-Col. 
Freeman now holds it as purchased from him. This office 
dispatches all public writings, issues let-passes to ships, 
has the probate of wills, gives licenses for marriages and 
alehouses, &c. Table of fees, as settled by an Act of the 
Assembly, viz., the Secretary's. The Marshall's office is 
held by patent for Sir Thos. Lynch's life, and possessed 
now by Robert Thornton, having been sold by Sir Thos. 
to Peter Pugh and Wm. Cheeke seven years since ; he is 
the Executive Minister of Justice, waits on the Governor, 
Council, Assembly, and Justices, and executes all their 
orders. The Provost Marshal's fees. Both these officers 
give in great security for faithful performance of their 
offices. His Majesty has favoured the island with a mace 
that cost near 80, which is carried before the Governor on 
solemn occasions. There is a Great Seal of Silver, where- 
with all Commissions, Patents, and Acts, &c. are sealed ; 
on one side is his Majesty on his throne, with two Indians 
on their knees presenting fruits, and two cherubims aloft 
supporting a canopy, and under his feet this motto " Duro de 
Cortice Fructus quam dulces." The inscription about is 
the King's title ; on the other side is an escutcheon 
bearing a cross charged with five pines, two Indians the 
supporters, and an aligator the crest; the inscription 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 251 

1671. 

inclosing all is Ecce alium Ramos porrexit in orbem, nee 
sterilis Crux est, and underneath the escutcheon is Indus 
uterque serviet uni. It has always been kept by the 
Governor, lest it should be made an office to the multi- 
plying of chancery suits, whereof hitherto there have been 
none. The King by instructions to the Governor has ordered 
30 acres to be given to everyone that comes to settle, and 
his Majesty reserves all Royal Mines and the fifth of 
others. There is an office, which Capt. Edward Waldron 
has, for the registry of all patents, leases, and mortgages 
about land. As yet there is no Court of Admiralty, nor 
any great need of it, for the common law courts are 
infinitely less chargeable ; but for extraordinary cases is 
erecting one, and appointing Major Win. Beeston judge. 
The Governor has always been Judge of the Prerogative 
Court. For speedy administration of justice, the island is 
divided into precincts. A ridge of lofty mountains divides 
the north from the south side, and there is now no plant- 
able land to be taken up near the sea on the south side. 
The parishes of St. Thomas and St. David to the east- 
ward have no minister. Col. Thos. Freeman is chief 
judge of the Court of Common Pleas and Captains Wm. 
Ryves and Edward Stanton his assistants. Their com- 
mission, instructions and rules of court ; amongst other 
things to " discourage lawyers, attorneys, solicitors, and 
such like, who stir up differences and suits amongst his 
Majesty's subjects," and " allow no lawyers or attorneys 
fees in any bill of cost, nor let any action lie for such upon 
any pretence whatever." Quarterly sessions are also held 
in these two parishes by the Justices ; their instructions. 
Port Royal has a minister, Robt. Freeman, Saml. Bache 
and Reginald Wilson are judges ; Lygonee has a minister, 
and Wm. Valet, and Captains Richd. Brayne and Parker 
are judges ; for Clarendon and St. Elizabeth, Major- 
General Banister and Sam. Long and Wm. Parker are 
judges ; and the judges and justices have the same com- 
missions and instructions as above. At St. Jago there is 
a minister, and John White is judge of the supreme court. 
His commissions, and instructions, and table of fees. 
There is likewise an Attorney-General, his commission. 
All his Majesty's Council join with the Lt.-Governor in 
sending this state of the government home to beg his 
Majesty's orders for its continuance. 

604. II. Minutes of the Council of Jamaica held at St. Jago de 
la Vega, 1670, June 29, see ante, No. 209. 

604. in. Letters and depositions touching the Spaniards hostili- 
ties against Jamaica, viz., Lt.-Col. Wm. Ivy to Sir Thos. 
Lynch. Samuel Jenkes to Sir Thos Lynch. Depositions 
of Wm. Brewer, Arthur Burnham, Cornelius Johnson, 
Jean Boys, and Julian de Cobino. 1670, June. Certified 



252 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1671. 

Aug. 20. 

Aug. 21. 



Aug. 21. 

Jamaica. 



Aug. 21. 

Jamaica. 



by Lt.-Gov. Sir Thos. Lynch. Together 48 pp. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXVII., Nos. 22, 22, i., u., m.] 

605. The State of the Government of " Jamaica under command 
of Sir Thomas Lynch, Knight, his Majesty's Lieut-Governor 
there, in the year 1671." Calendared above. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 
XXVIII., 6-38.J 

606. Commission from the Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Sir 
John Yeamans, Governor of Carolina south and west of Cape Car- 
teret. Granting him power to let, set, convey, and assure lands, with 
consent of his Council and under the conditions set forth in his 
instructions. Also to execute all powers and authorities in relation 
to the government, and, in case of his absence, the power to appoint 
a deputy. Similar to a commission to Gov. Wentworth of the 
Bahamas, see ante, No. 509. The name of Major Ark hurst, Esq., (sic) 
has been carefully eroded, and that of Sir John Yeamans, Bart., 
written over it by John Locke, who in a mem. at p. 76 writes that 
on 26 Dec. 1671 Sir J. Yeamans was made Governor by a Com- 
mission in the same form under the Great Seal of the Province, 
signed John Berkeley, Ashley, G. Carteret, and P. Colleton. [Col. 
Entry Bk., XX., 72, 73.] 

607. Sir Thos. Lynch to Joseph Williamson, Sec. to Lord Arling- 
ton at Court. By Knapman, who brings Sir T. Modyford prisoner, 
and by this vessel that sails with him, has written largely to his 
Lordship, and also to Williamson, and by every occasion will let 
him know how much he owes to and expects from him. Had like 
to have miscarried by not being advised of Chas. M.'s apprehension ; 
" for God's sake tell me (for the future) where I do ill, and direct 
me how to do well ; I value me hugely on you ; and be pleased 
to my (sic) Sir W. Godolphin to write at adventure by all despatches 
into Spain to give me more credit and introduction ; but nothing 
will do better than this sending prisoner Sir T. M." Has been kind 
to Dr. Browne, because Williamson bid him, and made him Clerk of 
the Market. Yesterday a young man came and said Williamson 
was his brother ; could not believe him, but Major Tolhurst says 
he is so, is sending for him to serve him. Endorsed, R. ] 3 Nov r 
1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 23.] 

608. Richard Browne to Joseph Williamson. His last, written 
in great pain, gave account of the reception of Sir Thos. Lynch and 
other occurrences. Is now well recovered and finds he left off the 
account of their voyage at their return out of Panama Town. They 
reached their vessels without finding any other enemy than hunger, 
which the commanders might have prevented, for they loaded the 
mules that might have brought provisions, with plate and other good 
plunder to the value of above 70,000?., besides other rich goods, and 
cheated the soldiers of a very vast sum, each man having but 101. 
a share, and the whole number not being above 1,800. At Chau- 
grave they gave what they pleased, " for which .... we must be 
content or else clapped in irons, &c.," and after staying there a 
week the Admiral and four or five more stood for Jamaica, being 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 253 

1671. 

like to starve in that 10 days' run, and the rest for want of pro- 
visions were forced to leeward, where hundreds were lost, starved, 
which is half the undoing of this island. At their going out on 
this unfortunate voyage they had 37 sail of men-of-war, and knows 
of 19 cast away and not above 10 have ever yet returned. Cannot 
tell what infatuated " our Grandees " to send forth such a fleet on 
so slender an account ; can " find no other cause but a pitiful small 
Spanish man-of-war of 8 guns, which came vapouring upon these 
coasts with a commission from the Queen of Spain, . . . took one 
small vessel, . . . burnt 4 or 5 houses, and took away about 30 
live hogs, . . . and he himself was taken with his ship." We do 
the Spaniards more mischief in one hour than they can do us in 
seven years ; it is incredible what loss they received by us at 
Panama. Spanish gold and silver is the only cause of the quarrel ; 
and they can easily make a ground for the contest, for the first 
design is the getting of prisoners, whom they force, some by 
torments, to say that either at Carthagena, Porto Bello, or other 
maritime place, they are mustering men and fitting a fleet to invade 
Jamaica ; and those who will not subscribe what they know not 
are cut in pieces, shot, or hanged; which they did to a poor 
captain at Hispaniola, whom a month after quarter they hanged 
for not subscribing what they suggested ; but what they extorted 
from other pitiful spirited Spaniards was the sole ground work 
of our design. There have been very great complaints by the 
wronged seamen in Sir Thos. Modyford's time against Admiral 
Morgan, Collier, and other Commanders, but nothing could be done, 
but since Sir Thos. Lynch's arrival they are left to the law. The 
Commanders dare but seldom appear, the widows, orphans, and 
injured inhabitants, who have so freely advanced upon hopes of 
a glorious design, being now ruined through fitting out the priva- 
teers. Cannot omit to write how prudently Sir Thos. Lynch 
managed the business in making prisoner Sir Thos. Modyford, 
who was drawn by invitation on board the Assistance, and " after 
their regailios " left aboard in custody ; a few days after Sir Thos. 
Lynch issued the Proclamation enclosed, which gave good satis- 
faction to the people who before were much startled. By a sloop 
from . Tortuga they are advised that four or five French men of 
50 or 60 guns cruising upon those coasts took her goods, but the 
Governor writes that satisfaction shall be made. Major Beeston 
and others sent in the Assistance and Welcome with the Treaty 
of Peace, had a very kind acceptance at Carthagena and brought 
away all the English prisoners there ; Capt. Hubbard, of the Assist- 
ance, died of fever. From Carthagena they have flying news of 
the taking of the Sweepstakes frigate at Lima, where report speaks 
she was sent out upon discoveries. " The report from England is 
very high, and great deal worse than it was ; what was in fight 
and heat of blood in pursuit of a flying enemy, I presume is 
pardonable ; as to their women, I know or ever heard of anything 
offered beyond their wills ; something I know was cruelly executed 
by Capt. Collier in killing a friar in the field after quarter given ; 
but for the Admiral, he was noble enough to the vanquished 



254 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1071. 

enemy." Sir Thos. Lynch, solely upon his Honour's recommenda- 
tion, was wonderfully civil and obliging, and gave him the tirst 
employment that offered, which was Clerk of the Market at Port 
Royal, with assurance of a better. Has received signal favours also 
from Lt.-Col. Rob. Freeman through his Honour's goodness ; and 
begs him to return thanks in his behalf to both. 3 pp. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 24.] 

Aug. 22. 609. Sir Thos. Lynch to Sec. Lord Arlington. Has sent on this 
Jamaica. s hip, the Jamaica Merchant, Sir Thos. Modyford prisoner, and put 
on board 12 of the King's seamen under Lt. Buck of the Assistance, 
with order to come straight into the river, but if he touches 
anywhere to send this to his Lordship. Has sent by him an 
account of all at large, the state of the island, Sir T. Modyford's 
accounts, and some things to Sir Chas. Lyttelton ; also by one Lee 
that sails with this he has sent such a multitude of papers that 
he cannot judge his Lordship will peruse them. Is infinitely glad 
to see Sir T. M. gone, for many have shown themselves so exceed- 
ingly affectionate to him that he would not permit him to go to 
his own son that was dying, which has undone all the civilities 
he showed. Sir T. M.'s accounts are not fair, supposes the Lords 
of the Treasury will send him further orders to audit them. 
Yesterday came back the sloop he sent to Hispaniola ; at Little 
Guana four French men-of-war seized and sold her goods. The 
Governor was much troubled at this, because she came back with 
released prisoners, bought what he could and sent it back, and 
promises satisfaction for the rest. Thinks by this proceeding the 
frigates had order that none are to come near the coast. Prays 
him to command Mr. Williamson or Bridgman to send him direc- 
tions. The buccaniers are now reduced. Endorsed, R. 18 Nov. 
2 pp, [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 25.] 

Aug. 30. 610. [Maurice] Matthews to Anthony Lord Ashley. The river 
Ashley Elver. Ashley lies in lat. 32 40', as he best guesses by all the artists that 
have been there. Description of the soil and timber : the pine 
land, besides its turpentine, yields very good pasturage ; also of 
the plants, herbs, and fruits. Indian corn thrives well, also 
Shaftesbury English peas and Guinea cane ; likewise cotton, ginger, and indigo, 
Papers. potatoes, pumpkins, water and musk mellons, and tobacco, which 
he has now in cure, as good as ever was smoked, and the Indians 
say they never knew the like before. The Indians all about are 
their friends and trade with them, and are as follows : St. Helena, 
the Southernmost, Ishpow, Wimbee, Edisto, Stano, Keyawah, 
where we now live, Kussoo, to the westward, Sampa Wando, Ituan, 
St. Pa, Sewee, Santee, Wanniah, Elasie, Islaw, Cotachicach. Some 
of these have four or five Cassiques, whose power is no more 
(scarce as much) as we own to the Topakin in England. Finds 
no tributaries among them, but intermarriages and poverty cause 
them to visit one another, never quarrelling who is the better man, 
afraid of the very footstep of a Westoe who lived to the westward, 
which these say eat people and are great warriors. The general 
letters will inform of treaties and matters of peace. Hopes before 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 255 

1671. 

winter there will be a greater discovery made amongst them. 
About three months ago Thos. Gray, Win. Owen, and himself made 
a discovery of this river when the Carolina landed her company. 
About 30 miles upwards they came among the Kussoo Indians, 
their friends. Account of their discoveries : found cypress trees 
innumerable ; were stopped by trees that lay athwart the river, 
thrown down by the weather or fallen by age. The north river, 
commonly called Wandoe, where is excellent good land, but truly 
yet unknown, for none were up this river nor that branch above 
10 or 15 miles. Describes the fish in both rivers, which "play in 
crowds," and seem to be trout or young salmon. Governor West 
assures him the greater sort are sturgeon. Multitudes of ducks 
and geese in the winter, and ice, but no thicker than a shilling. 
4 pp. Endorsed by Locke, Mr. Matthews to Lord Ashley, 30 Aug. 
1671, Ashley River. ^Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, 
No. 75.] 

Aug. 611. Commission appointing Sir Richard Temple, Knt. of the 

Bath, a member of the Council for Foreign Plantations during his 
Majesty's pleasure, without salary, with all such powers and 
privileges as were granted to Lord Culpepper. [Dom. Chas. II. 
Docquef] 

Sept. 1. 612. Governor Joseph West to Anthony Lord Ashley, Chancellor 
Charles Town. o f the Exchequer, at Exeter House, Strand, London. Safe arrival 
Ashley Kiver. Q . ^ B} ess j n g on 14 August last, and of his letter. Perceives the 
plantation which he manages is to be upon the public account of 
the Lords Proprietors, and will use his utmost endeavour to answer 
Shaftesbury tne i r expectations. Will send in his next, account of goods and 
Papers. provisions and. how disposed of, and now encloses various accounts 
for sums received to procure servants in Ireland, &c. Promises to 
discharge his trust faithfully, and to be just and free from any rancour 
or malice. There have always been some differences in the Colony. 
Within two or three days of the arrival of Sir John Yeamans he 
retired to his country house disgusted that the people did not 
incline to salute him Governor. As more people arrived, on 8th 
July he summoned all the freemen and required them to elect 20 
persons to be of the Parliament, which in three days was performed. 
Sir John Yeamans was chosen Speaker, but a dispute arose about 
choosing a clerk and whether West was made Governor according 
to the Lords Proprietors directions, which dissatisfied many of the 
Parliament, who broke up and came to West. Sir John declared 
there must be three Deputies besides West, and that it would be 
in vain for them to proceed unless West would surrender his power 
as Governor and make the third Deputy. But he resolved to the 
contrary and dissolved the Parliament, when Sir John and his party 
went hastily away much dissatisfied. This distraction much re- 
sented by the people, who began to murmur, saying Sir John 
intended to make this a Cape Fear settlement. Wherefore he 
summoned them five days after to elect five Councillors, upon 
which Sir John preached this doctrine, that in all elections those 



256 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1671. 



Sept. 7. 

Jamaica. 



Sept. 7. 

Jamaica. 

Sept. 7. 

London. 



who will stand at the greatest distance from the Governor should 
be chosen. Sir John has privately sent Dr. Woodward away to 
Virginia, at which the Governor is much concerned, for they want 
an interpreter. Account of a very ill office (a murder) done by 
an Irishman upon an Indian between Sir John's and Thos. Gray's. 
Hopes to be able to send a full account of the transaction by the 
next. Wishes Sir John Yeamans may be clear of it. The Irish- 
man is on his bail. The Colony in a very good state and con- 
dition. 2 pp. Endorsed by Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section 
IX., Bundle 48, No. 76.] 

613. Sir James Modyford to Joseph Williamson. Wished his 
cousin Charles long since to acquaint him that the business of 
Providence was at a stand, the reasons for which his brother, who 
departed a prisoner 16 days hence, will inform him. Is likely to 
suffer much for his good intentions, being out of pocket 1,000?., 
which he must look upon as lost without Williamson's assistance, 
now that the Lord General is gone, who promised him a good part 
thereof, but in the interim died. Will be out through this last 
attempt at least 200^., and would accept some favourable employ- 
ment in lieu thereof, but doubts that is as hard to be found as 
money. Hopes the prisoner will be found innocent, and all mis- 
understandings cleared at home ere this arrives, and is confident 
at least of Williamson's faithful aid. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. 
XXVII., No. 26.] 

614. Copy of preceding. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 64.] 

615. The Committee of Gentlemen Planters in London to the 
Assembly of Barbadoes. Have received theirs of 16th June and 4th 
July, with the Acts therein mentioned. Have not yet found a fit 
opportunity for prosecuting their addresses by reason of the King's 
uncertain abode here this summer, but have taken care to make way 
for them and prevent misconstructions. Desire Capt. Gorges may 
have their thanks for generously leaving the employment to Lt. Col. 
Thornburgh. Have received the 30 butts of sugar sent by the 
Unity, Marmaduke Wolters, Commander, well conditioned ; 30 more 
by the Aleppo Merchant, Francis Coleman Commander, have come to 
hand, but 2 are quite washed out and 6 more damaged, and 10 more 
by the Golden Phoenix, Richard Pidgeon Commander, have arrived 
but not yet landed ; return thanks, also for putting themselves in a 
posture of defence, the French still increasing their naval forces, 
some of which are coming their way. Are glad they have their 
packets by Capt. Collier, whereby they will perceive with how much 
malice some men have pursued their ruin. Their order in behalf of 
Mr. Champante shall be observed, though could wish some compen- 
sation had been allowed him for his pains besides his bare disburse- 
ments. Signed by Sir Peter Colleton and ten other*. Received by 
the Assembly of Barbadoes, 23 January 1672. H p. [Col. Entry 
Bk., No. XIIL, 94-96.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



257 



1671. 

Sept, 9. 
On board of 



o i th 
Bar of Bulls. 



Sept. 13. 



Sept. 14. 
The Tower. 



616. (Capt. Davis) to (M. Wren). Arrived 3rd August with the 
Success, and sent word to the West and South that the first convoy 
wou ^ be ready to sail 15th August, and that the writer should sail 
20th September. It was 20th August before any ships arrived, and 
on 28th the first convoy sailed with 23 vessels. The fishers generally 
have not made above 140 kintalls per boat, unless in the Bay of 
Consumption [? Conception], where they have made over 200. Has 
now 15 vessels, and waits for the rest, and will not miss any oppor- 
tunity of following his orders. Great complaint by the inhabitants 
against the West Countrymen's petition for removing them into the 
woods ; but it is only the West Countrymen that are in fault, for he 
sees the stages for fuel broken down, and the transportation of men 
to New England is done by the masters of the fishing ships, who 
employ them to the end of the year, and then to save provisions and 
freight pack them away to New England. Is sorry to see how many 
have gone this year, and fears that most of the inhabitants, being so 
affrighted with this order for their removing, if not speedily 
prevented, will repair to the French, who fortify two places, keeping 
in one fort 50 soldiers in continual pay, and are very kind to the 
English who come to them, the King of France if they require it 
sending them a protection and giving them a year's salary. 
Encloses the report of a French merchant, who affirms it on his oath. 
"By Mr. Parker and Mr. Hernernan of Dartmouth." 1| pp. 
Endorsed, "Capt. Davis to Mr. Wren ..... Rec d on the 8 th 
December 1676." [Got. Papers, Vol. XXVII No. 27.] 

617. Minutes of Council of Antigua. Present, Col. Philip 
Warner, Govr., Lt.-Col. Nath. Clerke, Majr. Rowland Williams, 
Capts. Richd. Ayres, Paul Lee, Jno. Cade and Win. Thomas, and Jno. 
Parry. The Governor's Commission from his Excellency Sir Chas. 
Wheeler read ; Jno. Parry and Capt. Renatus Ennis, sworn Secretary 
and Provost Marshall ; commissions for gentlemen of the Council to 
be Justices of the Peace. Ordered, that the churches of Falmouth 
and St. John's be speedily set forward ; that the Monthly Courts, a 
Court of Chancery, the General Sessions of the Peace, and the Courts 
of Common Pleas, be held as formerly ; that a special Court be held 
and a jury empannelled in behalf of the King on the first Tuesday in 
January next at the town of Falmouth, to try the titles and forfei- 
tures of land not settled according to the Act, and that a strong 
prison be built at Falmouth at the public charge. ^ p. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 55* ] 

618. Chas. Modyford to Joseph Williamson. The vessel from 
Jamaica has run aground near the Isle of Sheppey, which has 
hindered his letters from coining, bub is informed that Sir Thos. 
Lynch is arrived, and had received the government from his father, 
Sir Thos. Modyford, with all respect due to his Majesty's commis- 
sion, and had proclaimed the Peace. For the truth of which dare 
forfeit his life ; however has despatched an express for his letters, and 
if they arrive to-morrow will enclose them to Lord Arlington ; but 
if not will petition, if his Lordship think fit, his Majesty and Council 
for his liberty to-morrow, for his grandmother is very ill, and her 



U 51912. 



258 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

affairs cannot be settled without his presence, but to his great 
disadvantage ; and understands that his Lordship goes on Saturday 
into the country. 1 p. [Col Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 28.] 

619. List of such officers as were at the first raising and still 
remain in Sir Tobias Bridge's regiment. Col. Sir Tobias Bridge ; 
Capt.-Lieutenant John Painter, now a captain; Ensign Oliver 
Franklin, now a lieutenant ; Lieut.-Col. William Stapleton ; Major 
Edm. Andros ; Lieut. John Rodney, now a captain ; Capt. James 
Cotter, Lieut. Abednego Mathews, now a captain; Capt. Edw. 
Talbott ; Lieut. Peter Fenwick, now a captain-lieutenant ; Ensign 
Henry Crofts, now a lieutenant; Capt. Morley's Ensign, Tho. 
Morgan, now a lieutenant; Capt. James Barett; Lieut. Rupert 
Billingsley, now a captain ; Capt. Abraham Langford, adjutant ; 
Leolin Floyd, Chirurgeon. Endorsed, "1671, Barbadoes Regiment." 
\ p. [Col Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 29.] 

620. List in Sec. Williamson's handwriting of the Lieutenants 
and Ensigns of the Barbadoes [Sir Tobias Bridge's] Regiment. 
Mallet and Morgan, Lieutenant and Ensign to Andros ; Billingsley 
and Whitacre to Cotter ; Langford and Strode to Barrett ; and 
Fenwicke and Rodney to Talbott. ^ p, [Col. Papers, Vol. 
XXVII., No. 30.] 

621. Report to the King, by Sec. Lord Arlington's order of the 
officers of Sir Tobias Bridge's late regiment, now pretending to 
lieutenants' and ensigns' commissions. Capt. Thos. Mallett went 
over a captain, was wounded on St. Christopher's, and in April 
1668 quitted the regiment, and desires a lieutenant's place. Capt.- 
Lieutenant John Painter went in that capacity, continued with the 
regiment, and stays in Barbadoes. Capt. John Rodney, went over 
lieutenant, was made captain in 1668, left those parts llth June 
same year, and desires a lieutenant's place. Lieut. Peter Fenwick 
went over lieutenant, and so continued. Lieut. Rupert Billingslie, 
went over lieutenant, so continued, and desires a lieutenant's 
place ; as does also Capt. Abraham Langford, who went out 
adjutant and muster master, was on St. Christopher's, and came 
twice to England for the regiment. Abednego Mathews went 
ensign, so continued, and now stays behind. Henry Crofts, went 
ensign, was cashiered by court-martial, but by intercession of the 
Deputy Governor restored. Thos. Morgan went ensign, continued 
still so, and now desires to be continued. George Stroud, went 
sergeant, was made lieutenant, came home chief conductor of the 
200 soldiers on board the Noble Catherine, and desires to be ensign. 
See Memorandum of Commissions, 30 March 1672. Endorsed by 
Williamson, Barbadoes Regiment, the Officers, "1671." 1^ pp. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 31.] 

622. Memorandum of the case of Capt. John Rodney, of the 
Barbadoes Regiment. In 1666 his Majesty sent forces to Barbadoes 
under Sir Tobias Bridge, when Capt. Rodney quitted the Guards, 
where he had served seven years under Sir P. Howard, to go lieu- 
tenant to Major Andros ; but 15 months after had a commission 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES, 259 

1671. 

for a company of foot, which he kept till the regiment was disbanded 
in July 1671. The truth of this will appear by the muster rolls 
and commissions. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 32.] 

1671? 623. Warrant for the establishment of four companies of foot. 

Each company to consist of 80 men, besides officers, to be taken from 
the regiment raised for the service of Barbadoes in the late war with 
the Dutch, and now on their return to England, and for the grant 
of 5s. per day to Edmond Andros, late major of the regiment, to 
commence from the day of their landing. .Draft, with corrections, 
by Williamson. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 33.] 

624. Warrant for an establishment of four companies of foot. 
Not to exceed fourscore men in each, besides officers, out of the 
regiment of Barbadoes lately disbanded, about 340 men of which 
are shipped and on their way home, in expectation of his Majesty's 
declaration that they might be entertained in his service. Each 
company to consist of one captain at 8s. per diem, a lieutenant 4s., 
ensign 3s., two sergeants Is. Gd. each, three corporals and a drummer 
Is. each, and 80 men 8d. each, total charge for one company 
3?. 15s. 4id. per diem, and for four companies 11?. 6s. per diem. 
Edmond Andros as major to be allowed 5s. per diem, total, 15?. 6s. 4d5. 
per diem for the four companies or 5,575?. 5s. 4>d. per annum. 
See Memorandum of Commissions, 30 March 1672. Signed by 
the King and countersigned by Lords Arlington and Ashley and 
Sir T. Clifford. 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 34.] 

Sept. 14. 625. The King to Major Andros. Whereas the regiment of foot 
raised in the time of the late war with the Dutch and transported 
to Barbadoes has been lately disbanded, with a declaration that so 
many as desired it might be transported into England at his 
Majesty's charge and entertained in his service, his Majesty being 
pleased as a particular mark of acceptance of the good service per- 
formed by the said regiment to re-establish it, constitutes him major 
of the said regiment. See Memorandum of Commissions, 30 March 
1672. i p. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. XXXV. A, p. 28d] 

Sept. 14. 626. Mem. of commissions to Capts. Talbot, Cotter, and Barret 
to be captains of the Barbadoes Regiment. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. 
II., Vol. XXXV. A., p. 29.] 

Sept. 14. 627. Mem. of commissions to Thomas Mallet to be Lieut, to 
Uarbadoes. Major [Andros], Rupert Billingsley Lieut, to Capt. Cotter, Peter 

Fenwicke Lieut, to Capt. Talbot, and Abraham Langford Lieut. 

to Capt. Barret (in the Barbadoes Regiment). [Dom. Entry Bk., 

Chas. II., Vol. XXXV. A., p. 29.1 

Sept. 14. 628. Mem. of commissions to Thomas Morgan to be Ensign to 
Major [Andros], Charles Whitacre Ensign to Capt. Cotter, John 
Rodney Ensign to Capt. Talbot, and George Stroud Ensign to 
Capt. Barret (in the Barbadoes Regiment. See 30 March 1672, 
where are alterations in Major Andros' and Capt. Talbot's Lieut, 
and Ensign. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. XXXV. A., p. 29.] 

R 2 



260 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1671. 
Sept. 18. 

London. 

Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



Sept. 18. 

London. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



629. Lord Ashley to Sir John Heyden. Has sent by this con- 
veyance a small chest with three locks directed to Sir Jo. Yeamans, 
marked C. A., which his Lordship wishes sent to Ashley River in 
Carolina by the first opportunity. Gives him many thanks for all 
former favours. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, 
No. 55, p. 94.] 

630. Lord Ashley to Sir John Yeamans. Is very glad he is at 
Carolina. Shall expect good success to their new settlement when 
it shall be countenanced and conducted by so judicious and worthy 
a person. Has therefore sent him a commission for Governor, and 
relies upon his being firm and industrious in settling the govern- 
ment established. Recommends him to make a port town upon 
Ashley River ; directions to choose the ground ; the place now 
planted in is so moorish it must needs be unhealthy and bring great 
disrepute upon their new settlement, whereas a town in a healthy 
place will give more reputation, security, and advantage to the 
Lords Proprietors than ten times that number of people scattered 
about the country. When he has chosen a place for the town he 
must lay out six colonies about it to make a precinct, and none of 
the Proprietors' seignories or of the nobility's baronies must be 
intermixed It is necessary he lay out the great port town into 
regular streets, for, be the buildings never so mean and thin at 
first, yet as the town increases in riches and people the void places 
will be filled up and the buildings will grow more beautiful. If 
he design six score squares of 300 foot each, to be divided one from 
the other by streets and alleys, it will be a good proportion of a 
town, and let no man have above one of those squares to one house, 
and to each of those squares let there be allotted four score acres 
in the same colony and four hundred in some of the other five 
colonies of the same precinct. Those that build first to choose 
their lots and shares first. Their great street cannot be less than 
one hundred or six score foot broad, their lesser streets none under 
sixty, their alleys eight or ten foot. A pallisado round the town, 
with a small ditch, is a sufficient satisfaction against the Indians. 
There is a necessity to leave a common round the town, so that no 
enclosure may come nearer than the third part of a mile to the pal- 
lisado. This will add conveniency, beauty, and security to the place 
and will afford room to enlarge or better fortify the town hereafter. 
He may for the present, when he has designed and measured both the 
town and the common and men's shares, give leave to the inhabitants 
to make use of this common to plant, sow corn (sic), or make gardens, 
for the better clearing of the place if it be encumbered with wood. 
Not to grant any man a lease for longer than 7 years, so it may 
all at the end of that term be a common for the cattle of the 
town, every square of which is to have its proportionable part 
for feeding. By the Fundamental Constitutions there is to be one 
port town upon every navigable river, where all people are bound 
to lade and unlade, and the Proprietors have obliged themselves to 
grant only one port town upon a river for 31 years. Recommends 
him to take care of the lesser townships in the several colonies, 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 261 

1671. 

and that the houses be placed both orderly and conveniently 
together, so as their nearness to each other may be a security. 
Find by the experience of both Virginia and Maryland that men 
will expose themselves to the inconvenience and barbarism of 
scattered dwellings in unknown countries. If any man has taken 
land found convenient for a town he must of necessity give way 
and be provided with another place. T!ie Lords Proprietors trust 
him with this, ancl measure all their future expectations from him 
by this, that in settling this their first port town he seek only the 
public interest and let no private design engross the land which is 
likely to hinder the speedy building and increase of the place. 
Desires to hear from him as often as he can. 3 pp. [Shafteslury 
Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 55, pp. 94-97.] 

Sept. 20. 631. Warrant to the Attorney-General. Whereas Capt. Hubbart 
Whitehall. nas seized the ship James of Belfast at Nevis, which ought to be 
condemned under the Act of Navigation as not being a free ship, 
his Majesty's pleasure is that he prepare a Bill to pass the Privy 
Seal containing a grant to Louis, Marquis Blandford, Sir Charles 
Wheeler, Bart., Governor of the Leeward Isles, Col. John Strode, 
Farmer of the Customs in the Leeward Isles, and Col. Stapleton, 
Governor of Montserat, of all his Majesty's part of the tackle, 
apparel, furniture, and lading of the said ship for their own proper 
use. \ p. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. IL, Vol. XXXIV., p. 117.] 

Sept. 21. 632. Pardon to George Robinson, gentleman, convicted of perjury 
in the Court of King's Bench, upon his answers in the Court of 
Chancery, to a Bill of Complaint exhibited against him and 
others by one John Annand concerning a plantation called Hil- 
cotts in Barbadoes, and of all pains, forfeitures and other pro- 
ceedings. [Dom., Chas. IL, Docquet.] 

Sept. 21. 633. Minutes of the Council of Jamaica. Ordered, that the 
St. Jugo do la Marshal go en board every vessel on coming into harbour, and 
receive all letters from the masters and passengers which they 
are not willing to deliver themselves, or if no body else that is 
known be there to demand them, and having drawn them all 
into a list to give a receipt for them ; and distinguish what are 
received from the master and what from the passengers, set it 
up at the Post House in town, and at the Market Place at the 
point ; and to receive 3d for every superscription, and give in 
his own bond for 5001. Ordered, that Gabriel Martin, on his 
petition, have the sole privilege to hire horses from Passage Fort 
to town and back, and have horses always ready for all persons 
from sunrising till 8 at night, upon any extraordinary occasion 
to receive 2s. for every horse left at town or Passage Fort, and 
3s. if the person rides back, and 4s. for a side saddle or a 
double hor.se, and to give in good security. Petition of George 
Holmes, gentleman, to the Governor and Council. That peti- 
tioner put in one Humphrey Thurston, commander of his ship 
the Port Royal, of 30 tons, to sail to the Bay of Campeachy for 
logwood, but Thurston, contrary to his instructions, made of the 
ship a man-of-war, took a Spanish ship of 40 tons, laden with 



262 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

silk, wine, new Spanish cloth, and other goods, fitted her out of 
the said man of- war, and having laid the latter up as a wreck 
which was really worth 300?., in January last carried the ship 
in the fleet for Panama, and being entertained by Admiral Henry 
Morgan, sailed with the fleet to Changra, where following the 
Admiral into the river, Thurston was forced into the breakers, 
and compelled to run ashore ; but though the Admiral received 
1,000?. for his ship, and promised to indemnify all others that 
had lost ships, according to articles signed by consent of the Ad- 
miral, Captain Edw. Collier, Captain Lawrence Prince, Captain Thos. 
Haines, and others. Petitioner received no satisfaction ; prays that 
said Admiral may appear before their Honours to answer the 
premises. Ordered, that Admiral Morgan appear before the next 
Council to answer Dr. Holmes in the premises, that such order 
may be made as shall be agreeable to law and equity. 4 pp. [Col. 
Entry Bk., No. XX XIV, 231-235.] 

[Sept. 22.] 634. Petition of Edwyn Stede, Provost Marshal-General of 
Barbadoes, to the King and Council. Has lately by petition set 
forth the ruinous condition of the common prison in Barbadoes, 
with his great expense for a year and a half in maintaining a guard 
to watch the prisoners, beseeching his Majesty's order for rebuild- 
ing the same, and his Majesty referred his said petition to the 
Lords Commissioners of the Treasury to examine and report. The 
last ships of this season will be ready to sail for that island by 
the end of October next, and petitioner with them ; so that it will 
be impossible for the Lords Commissioners to examine petition and 
report to his Majesty, so as to have the same confirmed before the 
ships are gone ; nor will any more ships arrive at that island till 
about Lady Day next. Prays therefore that the whole matter may 
be referred to the final determination of the Lords Commissioners. 
In margin, "Rec d and read Sept 22, 71." 1 p. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXVII., No. 35."] 

Sept. 30. 635. Lewis Morris to the Lord Arlington. 

Barbadoes. MY FRIND, 

FOR so in truth I Can Call thee being maed so by a Pouar Devin 
and not by Merrit, or seking. For I was as a Strangar in a strang land 
opprest by a weked and unjost Man who had hoeps of enriching himselfe 
by my Ruing undar the pretenc of Eiet and layed that to my Charg I was 
not guilti of and becaus I could not swear and break the comands of Christ 
he hoeped to facilitat his weked desines undar the pretenc of Justis but the 
Great God that knue my Enosenti gave me favor in thy Eyes by which in 
shortar time then usall I obtaind a Dismetion acording to the Justis of 
my Caues the expediting therof I holy attribut to the Enflueuc of thy 
favor for which as in Dutie bound I retorne Prayes to God and thankes to 
thee as the Enstrument by which I was Delivared from unResnable men 
I doe not troble thee with this to Bag Moer but Gratfully to thanke thee 
for what is past For though it May prove a hindrance from thy Moer 
waity affaires yet Cannot but Lat thee knoe my thankeffulnes a Mesuar 
wherof will Rest in me waching an opartuniti to Manifest it self whilest 
I Remain LEWIS MORRIS. 

Barbados the last of the 7th, 1671. ' 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 36.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 263 



1671. 

Oct. 1. 636. Richard Browne to Joseph Williamson. Since his last 
Jamaica, three weeks since they have but little news, only that a timber ship 
from Barbadoes was cast away in a hurricane off the Deseadas. 
From Tortuga they are advised of a French man-of-war cast away 
on Hispaniola, and that a Bristol ship, Taylor master, was seized 
by three French men-of-war, but M. Ogeron, the Governor, would 
not admit them, so they give out that they will take her to St. 
Christopher's or some other island. No news yet of the Assistance 
and Welcome. Begs him to give Sir Thos. Lynch and Col. 
Freeman thanks for the favours he receives. Sends humble service 
to his Lordship and Serjeant Knight. Endorsed, Rd. Feb. 167|. 
1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 37.] 

Oct. 4. 637. Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes. Present, the Deputy 
Governor and four of the Council. Ordered, that writs issue to 
be published in the several parishes the 22nd and 29th instant, for 
the election of an Assembly on the 30th, to meet at the Bridge 
Town on Tuesday, the 31st instant. | p. [Col. Entry Bh, No. XI., 
193, 194.] 

Oct. 9. 638. Sir Thos. Lynch to Joseph Williamson. Has written by 

Jamaica. every opportunity, but never received a syllable from Whitehall, 
though the securing Chas. Modyford might have ruined him if he 
had not had advice of it accidentally before his father. Hopes to 
hear how Sir Thos. Modyford is received and his own proceedings 
liked, and what he shall do about cutting wood at Campeachy. It 
is where no inhabitants are, and the only trade they now have for all 
their cocoa walks are dead or blasted, and there is no sugar. Causes 
all the men to be sworn that they have not stolen it or used any 
violence against the Spaniards. The Assistance is gone into the 
bay after a privateer that robs all, with letters to the Spanish 
Governors to assist with brigantines. Expects every day the 
Welcome from St. Jago de Cuba. Finds it will be easier to live 
by the Spaniards than the French. Thought the King's command 
to be civil to the French was because the King of France had 
declared that his ordinance commanding all to be seized that 
appeared on any of his coasts in America did not intend the 
English. However, as formerly advised, about ten weeks ago he 
sent a sloop to Tortuga with French prisoners they had redeemed, 
and at Le Petit Guanoa four French men-of-war made prize of her, 
but the Governor was so ashamed that he sent her back with part 
of her cargo. At her return four or five more French prisoners 
hired her, but coming to Tortuga found the biggest of the frigates cast 
away ; the other frigates paid no freight, but pressed the vessel to 
work ten days at getting up the guns without a farthing considera- 
tion. They left a Bristolman of 80 tons in possession of the men- 
of-war. Communicated to the Governor his Majesty's commands 
grounded on the French King's explanation of that ordinance in 
our favour, and the answer is the sending the orders the Commander 
of that squadron has, by which, if allowed, all our vessels will be 
taken that go home by the back of Hispaniola. Sends the 
Governor's letter, the merchants', and Sir T. M's. As for the patach 



264 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

he complains of, it did come with letters for Sir T. M., and, on 
pretence of the seamen selling tobacco, was condemned and sold 
something too severely : his Council were all of opinion that it 
ought not to have been done, but not willing to asperse the late 
Governor left it to Lynch, and the Governor has the patach 
restored, and lends his agent 30, to fit her for Tortuga. Many 
people murmur at him for this and the respect he seems to 
have to all French and strangers. When the sloop returns 
from Cuba will send the depositions, but in the interim begs 
positive directions, for had he command for it, lie could soon take 
satisfaction for this injustice and insolence. Poor Major Tolhurst is 
dead. Has been to Windward to take a view of the truops, and 
intends to Leeward as soon as these dead rains are over : then 
their Lordships shall have lists of the militia and accounts of the 
plantation and people, and, in about three months, a most exact 
map of the island. One Capt. Diego, with Sir Thos. Modyford's 
commission, took a small Spaniard and sold her at Tortuga ; intends 
to write to have him sent down hither. There was likewise a 
Fleming taken off the Havannah, going to fish for wrecks in the 
Gulf of Bahama. Encloses, 

638. I. Instructions for the Sieur de Villepars, Commander of the 
ships Mazarin, San Sebastian, Petite Infante, Belle Isle, 
and Aurora, sent by the (French) King to the French 
islands in America. To apply himself to three principal 
ends : first, to protect the trade of the King's subjects ; 
second, to assist M. d'Ogeron, Governor of Tortuga, in 
reducing to obedience the King's subjects on the coast of 
San Domingo ; and, third, to chase away all foreigners from 
the French islands ; and, whether the inhabitants of the 
said coast be in obedience or revolt, to give chase to all 
strangers offering to land or come near the said island and 
coast of San Domingo, to seize and deliver them to said 
Sieur d'Ogeron. Collated with the original on board the 
Mazarin, the 14th July, and at Tortuga, the 3rd Oct. 1671. 
French. Together 4 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., 
Nos. 38, 38. i.] 

Oct. 10. 639. Sir Tobias Bridge to Sec. Lord Arlington at Court. Sent 
London. 200 soldiers in the ship Noble Katherine, Capt. Bond, commander, 
10 days before he left Barbadoes. They were disbanded according 
to his Majesty's directions, and their accounts stated with all justice. 
They landed on Thursday last [5th] at St. Margarets, and marched 
to Gravesend. Has seen Capt. Cotter and other officers, and their 
order for reception, and given them the best advice he could. 
They were to muster on Monday last. Sixty and odd more are daily 
expected on board [Capt.] Ferryman. Begs excuse for not having 
paid his duty to his Majesty at Newmarket, having been here 
seven or eight days ; it was nothing but his indisposition as to 
health. Hopes to be able to wait on his Lordship in two or three 
days, and meantime throws himself and the other disbanded men 
on his Lordship's protection. Re-directed " at his house at Ewston 




AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 265 

1071. 

Hall, in Suffolk, near Thetford. Frank Edm. Sawtell." 1 p. [Col. 
Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 39.J 

Oct. 14. 640. Sir Thos. Lynch to the Earl of Sandwich, President of 
Jamaica, the Council of Plantations. Wrote at large by the vessel that 
carried Sir Thos. Modyford, and since to Mr. Slingesby, and by 
all occasions to Lord Arlington or Mr. Williamson. Does not find 
it easy to have account of the militia ancf plantations, the parishes 
being large and ill bounded and not well peopled. Fell ill of a 
contagious fever the very day Sir T. M. sailed. Has taken account 
of the regiments and plantations eastward as far as P[or]t M[oran]t, 
and intends to do as much to leeward. Has found nothing so 
disorderly as the method of granting and surveying land ; for Sir 
T. M. gave 30 acres per head to any that gave security to bring 
on their complement in two years, which has occasioned the taking 
up oi ? 100,000 acres without a farthing of rent to the King or a 
foot planted ; Sir T. M. giving liberty to all kinds of surveyors 
to survey has caused so many mistakes that Lynch has appointed 
nine surveyors, allotting them particular quarters, with the enclosed 
instructions. Has likewise given them a general scale, and they 
promise in three months to make a more exact description of the 
island than ever was yet. In all the parishes on the south side 
there is not a foot of land to be had for church, King, or public ; 
all is appropriated after so disorderly a fashion that the town of 
Port Royal is rendered unhealthy for want of streets and public 
commodities, nor is there hardly left landing places ; and there is 
neither house, land, nor conveniency for the King or his ministers. 
Has bought a house dear, and must give 15s. per acre for poor 
land seven miles off for a provision plantation. These orders have 
respect most to the north side ; for the future intends no patent 
to be given but to actual planters, all wood lands to pay 40s. per 
1,000, and no land to be granted on bond. Does not find that 
300,000 which Sir T. M. granted at Id!, per cleared acre bring in 
the King 1501. per annum ; durst not now charge it more, but 
supposes that in six months' time the other halfpenny may be 
laid, but without their Lordships' orders shall dare do nothing. 
Has begged their Lordships' advice about the logwood cutting, 
which he connives at, as the Spaniards do. There are no priva- 
teers out now but one Yhallahes, after whom has sent the Assist- 
ance, with orders to make examples of those rogues. One named 
Diego lately brought a Fleming and the Advice of Carthagena into 
Tortuga, where have been four French frigates, the biggest now 
cast away, which have seized all vessels that come near that coast, 
according to the King's letter. Has done the French all the 
civilities imaginable, restored the Governor's pattach, and released 
from the Spaniards all the French he could, and the very sloop sent 
up with them they made prize of, and have now a Bristol man. 
Has sent Mr. Williamson the letters, affidavits, and French Kind's 
orders to seize all ships that approach the coast of San Domingo and 
Tortuga ; if this be not restrained our passage by the back of His- 
paniola must be left, nor will the corning down on the south side 



266 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1071. 

be long safe. Are likely to live better with the poor Spaniard, for 
two days since came the Welcome from St. Jago de Cuba, where 
the gentlemen he sent were 12 days nobly treated ; they could 
contract for no merchandise, the Governor and people being at 
variance, but had liberty to buy provisions. Had thought to have 
sent the Welcome to Tortuga to demand this privateer, but dare 
not, fearing some dispute might arise, that might lose her or ruin 
me. When he has his Lordship's advice shall be more resolute. 
Endorsed, Rec d from Sir" Charles Littleton, 20 th Feb. 1671(2). 
2 pp. [Col, Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 40.] 

Oct. 17. 641. Fran. Benson to Joseph Williamson, at the Court at New- 
market. The enclosed (wanting) will at large inform him of the 
pretensions of the French to Canada in 1614, when Mons. Buisseau 
was Ambassador ; his late Majesty having consented to the restitu- 
tion of the fort and habitation of Quebec. In 1634 the French 
took an English ship, Capt. Phillips, at Tadousac, and judged it 
lawful prize, the French King having prohibited trade except to 
the Canada Comp., his own subjects. The sentence to be altered 
if the French might have free trade in Virginia. Difference 
between the Kings' respective rights. Wish of M. Fouquet to have 
the matter accommodated. Sir Peter Wyche had read over one 
book of Sir Isaac Wake's letters. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., 
No. 40*.] 

Oct. 21. 642. Minutes of the Council of Jamaica. Ordered, on considera- 
St. Jago tion of the many abuses and law suits daily arising from the 
de la Vega. jg norance an( j multiplicity of surveyors, each of whom has liberty 
to survey in all parts of the island, that Mr^Inyons be appointed 
sole surveyor for the parishes of St. Katherine's and St. John's, 
Henry Wornel of the Point and Clarendon, Jas. Wornel of St. Andrew's 
and St. David's, Mr. Rugg of St. Thomas, Mordecay Rogers of St. 
George's and St. Mary's, Mr. Whiston of St. Ann's, Mr. Robinson of 
St. James's, and Mr. Wytter and Capt. Scanter of St. Elizabeth's, 
and that they take no more than three halfpence per acre of the 
planters, paying the charges of the hands, and do their utmost to 
serve the country faithfully ; in default of which they shall be pre- 
sentable at sessions, and be fined 101. to the King and 10Z. to the 
informer. Instructions for Francis Inyons, surveyor of the parishes 
of St. Katherine's and St. John's ; not to presume (on penalty of 
20?.) to exact more than three halfpence per acre, nor to run into any 
man's land, nor project any lines where it is possible to be run out. 
To consult with the surveyors for adjoining parishes, and make the 
inland bounds of said parishes as distinct as possible ; and having 
done so, to take from the clerk of the patents copies of such plots 
within said parishes as are not in his hands, and make them, with 
such as he shall survey for the future, into two books, which lie 
must keep fair, and on demand give his Majesty's Receiver an 
extract thereof, that lie may know how to demand his Majesty's 
rents. To advise the Clerk of the patents what land there is to take 
up, giving the quantity, quality, and conveniences thereof, that new 
comers may knowSmmediately where to settle. To preserve in 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 267 

1671. 

every parish 400 acres of good land for glebe, in such places as he 
and the chief of every parish shall think fit, where churches or 
towns may come to be built ; and to survey for his Majesty's use 
2,000 acres in each parish, in two or three parcels, returning the 
survey to the Clerk of the patents to be recorded, and for this and 
the glebe land the Governor will order him satisfaction. To advise 
the Receiver of land long taken up and unemployed, or having no 
proprietors, or escheated to the King, and also where the land laws 
are broken, especially such as do not clear their lines ; and where 
there is great overplus in any run of land, to inform the Governor 
on penalty of 20/. To lay that order first that first comes to hand, 
without respect to poor or rich, and if he cannot immediately survey 
the place chosen, to enter it, and not presume to lay any post order 
on that place. To mention how much- wood land and how much 
savanna in the return of his plots. To take special care not to run 
out any harbour, port or bay, but reserve what is requisite for 
building churches, court houses, towns and fortifications. Not to 
divide any small order of 80 or 100 acres into two or three parcels, 
as divers hunters have done to have pretence only to keep others 
from hunting till their order is out. And further, whereas there 
are many differences and law suits between planters, by reason the 
lines between their lands are not sufficiently cleared and known, 
on every survey made, to summons owners of land adjoining to 
appear and show their lines and clear such as are not sufficiently 
opened, returning into the Quarter Sessions any that shall disobey. 
Similar instructions to be delivered to all Surveyors. Ordered, that 
whereas there is nothing more for the benefit of the island than 
that everyone's exact property be known, whereby good neighbour- 
hood is preserved and law suits and differences about bonds 
(? bounds) prevented, that all planters and proprietors of land 
within six months clear their lines, and do the same once every 
year from that time for ever, on penalty of being presented at 
sessions and fined 20s. per 100 acres, provided that where lines join 
the Proprietors shall clear to halves. And because several not upon 
the island are Proprietors of great quantities of land, their attorneys, 
factors or agents shall be obliged by this order. And wliereas if 
there be not a day fixed in each parish, some persons might possibly 
run their lines into another man's land, ordered, that every Gustos 
Batulorum appoint a day for the first six months, and the same 
annually every sessions. JH^is order was read and published at the 
Grand Court held at St. Jago, the last day of October 1671. And 
also the following order, "Whereas nothing could give more satis- 
faction to strangers inquisitive of the nature, conveniences and 
situation of this island, or be of so great use to the present 
planters, as an exact map of the whole island, perfectly de- 
scribing all the mountains, valleys, rivers, and settlements, ordered 
that each of the nine surveyors make an exact description of his 
own division which may afterwards be reduced into a larger scale, 
and if they want any help that they apply to two Justices of 
Peace, who are required to give them assistance, to be paid out 
of the Parish stock. Order, that whereas several merchants and 



268 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1G71. 

masters of ships passing- between the point and the town of St. 
Jago, have Buffered great inconveniences from the badness of the 
horses and furniture, Gabriel Martin is appointed Post Master with 
privilege of supplying horses from Passage Fort to Town and 
back, in accordance with instructions hereto annexed ; and those 
used to let horses are forbidden to do it unless with allowance 
from said Post Master; his instructions. Order published at the 
Grand Court at St. Jago the last Tuesday (31) in October 1671 : 
On consideration of the great want of money in this island, 
occasioned by making it current below the intrinsic value, and 
so much beneath the standard of all their neighbours, that it 
advances 20Z. per cent., whereby their produce is not so much in 
demand, which has infinitely retarded the settlement of the island ; 
ordered that pieces of 8 and half pieces of 8, being Pillar, 
Seville or Mexico, be raised to os. and 2s. Qd., and all other 
Spanish money of that coin proportionably, and that doubloons, 
now passing at 16s., be received current at 20s. ; this advance to 
begin within six mouths after date. Ordered on petition of the 
English merchants against the trading of the Jews, that an exact 
account be taken of those Jews that produce their Letters of 
Denization, and the Council will advise what to do with those 
that have none. James Barkly sworn Deputy Secretary. Ad- 
journed to 26th inst. 14 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., XXXIV., 235- 
249.] 

Oct. 22. 643. Mem. of a warrant for 218 muskets, 114 pikes, 218 bando- 
Barbadoes. Hers, 344 swords, 344 belts, 8 halberts, 4 partisans, 4 drums, powder 

bullet and match proportionable for the Barbadoes regiment. 

\_Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. //., Vol. XXXV. A., p. 29.] 

Oct. 25. 644. Grant to Alexander Culpeper of the place of Surveyor- 
Genera] of Virginia by himself or his deputy during the King's 
pleasure. [Dom., Chas. II., Docquet.'] 

Oct. 26. 645. Minutes of the Council of Jamaica. Order, published at 
the Grand Court of St. Jago the last Tuesday in October (31) 1671 : 
"Whereas by the immoderate use of unlawful gaming many mischiefs 
daily arise, both in the maintaining several idle and disorderly 
persons in their lewd and dishonest course of life, and in the cozen- 
ing and debauching many young gentlemen and others to the loss 
of their time and fortunes, ^hereby they are disabled from making 
any settlement in the island, and few escape a prison or being 
made servants in a very short time: Ordered, that all persons 
keeping public houses of gaming, or permitting it in their houses, 
shall be presentable at Sessions, and on conviction fined 10l. } or more 
at the discretion of the Justices, one third to the King, another to 
the parish, and another to the informer ; and those known to be 
common gamesters shall be likewise presentable, and to pay double 
the money they have won, to be distributed as before, and recovered 
without e.soin, wager of law, or protection, in any Court of Record, 
or by Order of Sessions. Any person winning money at any game 
by fraud or using false dice, shall forfeit double the money so won, 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 269 

1671. 

to be recovered and disposed of as before, and be further punished 
as a cheat at the discretion of the Justices. All bonds, bills, promises 
to pay, &c., made by any person losing money at play or in betting 
shall be utterly void. Provided that it is not intended to restrain 
masters of families and others being known to be men of at least 
2,00()Z. estate in the island from innocent diversion in said games, 
but if any other person whatsoever shall adventure and lose any sum 
above 40s. at cards or dice, all persons concerned shall be subject to 
an information and to penalty as aforesaid ; provided that if the person 
that lost complains first, he shall not only be excused from any 
information brought against him, but shall recover ta his own use 
one third of the fine. And all constables and other officers shall 
make search in the watches where such gaming houses are suspected 
to be kept, and arrest as well the keepers as the persons resorting 
thither, and keep them in prison till they shall have found sureties 
no more to keep or frequent said houses. Ordered, that the Provost 
Marshal proclaim same twice in some public places, and that every 
Gustos Batulorum take care that the Clerk of the Peace read it 
openly every Sessions, so that the country being met together, may 
the better understand and observe it. Order, to be proclaimed by 
the Provost Marshal and read every Court day or Sessions at Port 
Royal. Order : Whereas several seamen shipped abroad do con- 
trary to their contracts frequently desert, drawn thereto by the 
variety of voyages offered them here, and to have some present 
money to pay debts contracted on shore, whereby merchants and 
masters are put to great distresses, many voyages disappointed, and 
seamen put upon demanding extraordinary wages which the mer- 
chants and masters are compelled to comply with ; ordered, that 
no seaman be hereafter trusted above 5s., and that whosever trust 
them further or retain them, shall not only lose his money, but be 
liable to be proceeded against by the Act for retaining men's ser- 
vants, seamen being hereby declared to be accounted only as servants 
All alehouse keepers, attorneys, and solicitors encouraging seamen to 
sue their masters or captains in order to free themselves, shall be 
presented and punished at the discretion of the Justices, as also any 
master or captain inveigling or enticing away any seaman belonging 
to another vessel before lawfully discharged. Ordered, on reading 
Dr. Geo. Hume's petition, that the whole matter be referred to 
common law. 6 pp. [Col Entry Bk., XXXIV., 249-255.] 

28 Oct. 646. Col. Francis Lovelace to [Jos. Williamson ?]. Thanks for 
Fort James, that light of intelligence he vouchsafes to favour them with, 
without which they were in Egyptian darkness ; it is some satis- 
faction to hear what is acted in the theatre of their native country. 
Is sorry he cannot repay him in his own " quoine," here occurring 
nothing worthy his view, only those parts, over which he is 
constituted by his Royal Highness superintendent under him, 
seems to smile in a hopeful and thriving condition, their harbour 
being fuller with shipping than ever was known since the discovery 
was made ; a little countenance from their mother would refresh 
them much, of which they can in no ways despair, having so worthy 



270 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

a patron as he to represent their condition to his Majesty and his 
Royal Highness. P.S. Desires his service to his good Lord 
Arlington, whose perfect servant he is. Endorsed, " For your self." 
Reed. 22 Dec. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 41.] 

Oct. 647. Journal and relation of a new discovery made behind the 

Apuleian mountains to the west of Virginia. A commission being 
granted by Maj.-Gen. Wood for finding out the ebbing and flowing 
of the water behind the mountains, in order to the discovery of the 
South Sea, Thomas Batts, Thomas Woods, and Robert Fallam, 
accompanied with Perecute, a great man of the Apomatock Indians, 
and Jack Nesan, formerly servant to Maj.-Gen. Wood, with five 
horses, set out from Apomatock Town, in Virginia, Sept. 1st, 1671, 
and that day travelled 40 miles due west from the Okenechee path ; 
on Sept. 2 they travelled 45 miles ; and on Sept. 3, 40 miles ; Sept. 4, 
arrived at Sapong Town, where they were kindly entertained, and 
hired a Sapong Indian for their guide to the Totera Indian town ; 
Sept. 5, went to Hanahaskie, Indian town in an island of the 
Sapong River, Richland, 25 miles from the Sapongs ; Sept. 6, left 
Thos. Wood sick of a flux, and travelling over hilly and stony 
ground, dangerously came on the 8th to a tree marked with a coal 
MA NI ; Sept. 9, reached the Totera Indian town in a very rich 
swamp between a breach and the main river of Roanoke ; Monday, 
Sept. 12, leaving their horses set forward afoot ; and, Sept. 13, 
came to trees marked as before ; climed a mountain, whence they 
had the pleasing but dreadful sight of mountains and hills piled 
one on another, passed rich but stoney ground, pleasant hills, brave 
rich meadows with grass above man's height, and several times 
passed a great river; Sept. 14, from the top of a hill saw a curious 
prospect of hills like waves rising one behind another, and Mr. 
Batts supposed he saw houses, but Mr. Fallam rather took them 
for white cliffs. Perecute continued very ill with ague ; Sept. 15, 
lived a dog's life, hunger and ease, for the Indians could kill no 
meat, yet they ventured forward; Sept. 16, the Indians brought 
some exceedingly good grapes, and killed two turkeys and a deer, 
and they had sight of a curious river like the Thames against 
Chelsea; Sept. 17, the Indians being impatient of longer stay, they 
proclaimed King Chas. the Second, and marked four trees, the first, 
0. R., for his Majest} r , the second, W. B., for the Governor, the 
third, A. W., for Maj.-Gen. Abraham Wood, and the last, T. B. : 
R. H., for themselves, and P. for Perecute, who said he would be an 
Englishman, and on another tree are letters for the rest. Found 
the river full as broad as the Thames at Wapping, with falls much 
like those of James River, in Virginia, and imagined it flowed about 
three foot; fearing the Indians would leave them they returned 
homewards, and from the top of a hill saw westerly, over certain 
delightful hills, a fog and a glimmering light as from water, and 
suppose there may be some great bay ; came to the Toteras on 
Tuesday, and found a Mohetan Indian who was sent to inquire if 
they were come to fight with them ; he informed them " they had 
been from the mountains half way to the place where they now 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 271 

1671. 

lived, and that the next town beyond them lived on a plain level, 
from whence came abundance of salt," but any Indian that went 
down never returned, and that a very great company of Indians 
lived upon the Great Water ; Sept. 21, left the Toteras, and the 24th 
came to the Hanahaskies, where they found Mr. Wood dead and 
buried, and the 25th reached the Sapongs, the 27th, Apomatock 
Town, and Oct. 1st arrived safe at Fort Henry. Endorsed, " 1671. 
Rec d March 1687, from Dr. Cox." Printed in New York Docu- 
ments, HI., 193-197. 20 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 42.] 

Oct. 648. Nine Acts and two Petitions made at a General Assembly 

held at St. Maries (Maryland), the 10th day of October, in the 40th 
year of the Dominion of Coecilius, &c., AD. 1671, the titles of 
which are as follow : (1.) An Act for explanation of one clause 
in an Act entitled an Act prohibiting the importation of all 
horses, mares, geldings, and colts into this Province, with an 
additional amendment therein. (2.) For marking highways and 
making the heads of rivers, creeks, branches, and swamps 
passable for horse and foot. (3.) Prohibiting all sheriffs, sub- 
sheriffs or deputy sheriffs, all clerks, sub-clerks, or deputy clerks to 
plead as an Attorney in any court or courts within this Province 
where he or they shall bear such office. (4.) For stay of executions 
after April Court. (5.) For the killing of wolves. (6.) Limiting 
servants' times. (7.) For the preservation of orphans' estates. 
Petition of Matthias Dewsta, of St. Maries. Petition of Hans 
Hansun, Cornelius Comegys, and others. (8.) An Act for the reviv- 
ing of certain laws within this Province, and (9.) for the payment 
of the public charge of this Province. 

Mem. These laws passed the Great Seal the 27th day of October 
1671. Philip Calvert, Can. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. L1IL, pp. 224- 
255.] 

Nov. 1. 649. Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes. Present, the 

Deputy-Governor and four of the Council. Ordered, that an 
Assembly be called to meet at the Bridge Town, on Tuesday, the 
21st instant, and that writs issue to be published the 12th and 
19th instant, the Assembly to be chosen on the 20th. p. [Col. 
Entry Bk., No. XL, 194.] 

Nov. 9. 650. Minutes of a Council of War. Present : Sir Thos. 

St. Jagode Lynch, Governor, 12 of the Council, and Majors John Cole- 
aVega. b anc k, Wm. Beeston, Sam. Barry, and Whitegift Aylemore, and 
Colonel Gary, Captain of the Fort. Declaration of the Governor 
that on consideration of the advices come of preparations by the 
Spaniards to invade the island, and that divers ignorant and 
malicious persons have refused to obey their military officers on 
pretence that the Act of Militia is not of force, it is hereby de- 
clared that said Act is and shall be of force, and all persons are 
commanded to take notice thereof at their peril. Ordered, whereas 
nothing can be more for the safety of the island than that the 
regiment of horse be well armed and mounted, and for that since 
the Act of Militia the price of horses is much raised, whatsoever 



272 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

trooper shall appear on an exercising day with a horse under 
the value of 101., shall be subject to the penalties the Act 
mentions, as if the horse were not worth 51. Order to call a 
regimental court-martial, and put in execution the Act of Militia, 
ordain places of rendezvous, and times of exercise, and in case of 
invasion publish and put in execution all the Articles of War, 
and in fine order within the precincts of the regiment what shall 
be for his Majesty's service, and the safety of the island. Ordered; 
that the appearance of five ships make an alarm, and Colonel 
Thos. Freem.-in take care to give it from Windward to the 
Point ; that the chief officer at Port Royal, on pain of death, send 
it on to Lygonee and St. Jago ; and that it be carried from town 
to Major-General Banister, who is to give it to Major Collier, and 
he to carry it on to Lieutenant-Colonel Ivey. Ordered, that on 
the landing of any enemy, the chief officer residing in every 
quarter, be fully empowered to act at his own discretion .till he 
receive orders from his superior officer. Ordered, that the chief 
officer residing in Port Royal have, in case of invasion, full power 
to burn or pull down any house, press ships, and do anything 
for the preservation of the place, and be indemnified by this order. 
4| pp. [Col Entry Bh, XXXIV., 256-260.] 

Nov. 13. 651. Proposal of Robert Mason to the King. That if the King 
grant to him the importation of 300 tuns of French wine free of 
all customs, he will sell to the King his patent of New Hampshire 
in New England. Signed, Robert Mason. The above said wine 
to be imported in three ships nnd no more, and before the arrival 
of the said ships, said Robert Mason will make oath before the 
Commissioners of the Customs. The quantity laden in such ships 
to be brought into the Port of London and nowhere else. Read 
in Council, 13 Nov. 1671. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., 
No. 43.] 

Nov. 16. 652. Minutes of the Council of Plantations. Lord Arlington 
reported that Mr. Slingsby having been with him to mind him to 
move his Majesty about sending Commissioners to New England 
he had done so, and it was thought fit by the King to defer the 
consideration thereof, the season being past. 

Dec. 18. That Mr. Slingsby do speak to the Lord Keeper, the 
Attorney -General, and others of the King's Council, to know their 
opinion on the reference formerly made to them about the patents 
granted to the Massachusetts, the reservations therein to the King, 
and the boundaries of the colony. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., 
No. 44.] 

Nov. 17. 653. Warrant to Sir John Robinson, Lieutenant of the Tower. 
Whereas his Majesty understands that Sir Thos. Modyford, Bart., 
late Governor of Jamaica, is brought pursuant to his Majesty's 
command into this kingdom, he is to receive and keep him close 
prisoner iu the Tower for several misdemeanours committed during 
the time of his government. 4- p. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., 
Vol. XXXIV., p. 121 <?.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



273 



1671. 
Nov. 17. 



(Nov.) 17. 

The Jamaica 
Merchant. 



Nov. 20. 

Jamaica. 

Nov. 24. 



654. Warrant to deliver Sir Thos. Modyford to the Lieutenant of 
the Tower. Mem. only. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. XXXIV., 
p. 121 <?.] 

655. Sir Thos. Modyford to (Sec. Lord Arlington). Begs his 
Lordship to represent to his Majesty that on 25th June he re- 
ceived his Majesty's despatch of 28th February last, commanding 
the delivery up of the government to Sir Thos. Lynch, with a 
letter from Lynch from on board the Assistance frigate. Where- 
upon he immediately sent orders to Major Banister and his son 
to deliver to him the town and castle of Port Royal, observe his 
orders and publish his power ; and next day he brought him his 
wife and his family, with a troop of horse and five coaches, to his 
own house in St. Jago, and published his power and the revoca- 
tion of his own. From that time to the 12th August Sir Thos. 
Lynch and his family lived under his roof, and received all the 
assistance he could give. About 10 days after his arrival Sir 
Thos. told him his Majesty expected him in England, but he 
might chose his ship ; whereupon, being part owner of this vessel, 
he resolved to embark on her on the 22nd August, to which Sir 
Thos. Lynch consented. On 12th August Lynch invited him on 
board the Assistance, and showed him his Majesty's order to send 
him home a prisoner; to which he submitted, desiring only to. 
have his passage in this vessel, which Sir Thos. Lynch consented 
to, ordering a guard of 12 to secure him there. Must confess that 
Sir Thos. Lynch executed these orders with as much civility as 
the nature of them would bear, though with more caution than he 
needed, and he assured Modyford that his Lordship bid him tell 
him that the proceeding was formal only to give satisfaction to the 
Spanish interest, and there was no intention to prejudice his person 
or estate, which he publicly repeated to his great consolation. Finds 
in a book lately printed his Lordship's general promise of protec- 
tion to the late Duke of Albemarle's domestics, and is willing to 
promise himself (the same ?) on account of the great kindness the 
Duke had for him. This lieutenant and the bearer with their 
whole party have been very civil to him according to Sir Thos. 
Lynch's orders. Endorsed, ] 7th Nov., &c. 3 pp. [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XXVII., No. 45.] 

656. Warrant to Sir John Robinson to discharge Charles Mody- 
ford [from the Tower]. Mem. only. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas II., 
Vol. XXXIV., p. 122.] 

657. Order of the Council for Plantations. That the Earl of 
Lauderdale be desired forthwith to report to his Majesty their 
opinion upon Sir Chas. Wheler's proclamation concerning St. Chris- 
topher's, and to acquaint his Majesty with the way that Sir Chas.'s 
letter and proclamation came to the Council, as also that within 
10 days there will be a ship ready to go to the Leeward Islands, 
that his Majesty may with speed make his pleasure known therein ; 
and that Mr. Slingesby be desired to deliver to the Earl of Lauder- 
dale copies of Sir Chas. Wheler's letter and proclamation, with the 
opinion of the Council to be presented to his Majesty. Mem. to 



51912, 



274 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

mention the 4 per cent. 1 p. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XCIV., 108, 
109.] 

[Nov. 24.] 658. Report of the Council for Plantations to the King, on the 
proclamation lately published by Sir Chas. Wheler in the West 
Indies, and proposed by him to be published here. To the 1st article, 
That what devastation the French have made on the English lands 
[in St. Christopher's] since the first demand of restitution ought to 
have been insisted upon by Sir Chas., at least so far as to have been 
laid against any pretences of melioration ; besides it will be impos- 
sible for the Proprietors to provide and pay their money " forth- 
with." To the 2nd, Do not find he has power to impose any 
such conditions, and apprehend it repugnant to common reason 
that the planters who by the war were rendered indigent should 
lose their plantations on that very account, nor is it possible for 
them to stock their plantations till growing profits enable them 
to purchase negroes. To the 3rd, As concerns the French, no 
payments to be made but such as are personal and ought not to 
be charged by a public levy, which would much discourage the 
planters' return ; the second part of that article is well known, and 
is no way fit to be part of a Proclamation, which should be 
intended to invite the planters. To the 4th, He has no power to 
make any such distinctions. To the 5th, He has no power to 
impose any quitrent on the old planters, much less to increase or 
decrease it according to his judgment of their merits. To the 6th, 
Though latitude is left him to shorten the year and a day agreed 
on between the two Crowns for the return of the English, yet it 
was not to be done unless without much inconvenience to the old 
planters, which they must necessarily incur by the short time of 
three months. On the whole apprehend these articles tend appa- 
rently to the discouragement of the planters' return, and are directly 
repugnant to the 8th Article of his instructions, which enjoins that 
no man's freehold shall be taken away or harmed but by established 
laws not repugnant to those of England. Signed by Sandwich, 
President, Lauderdaill, Arlington, Rich. Gorges, Tho. Grey, H. 
Brouncker, W. Alington, John Finch, Hum. Winche, S. Titus, and 
H. Slingesby, Secretary. Annexed, 

658. I. Sir Chas. Wheler to Col. Strode, Governor of Dover Castle, 
at his house in the Piazzo in Common Garden [sic]. En- 
closes a publication to be published on the Exchange, and 
at Bristol if his Majesty sees fit in all respects. Nevis, 
St. Bartholomew's Day (24th August) 1671. Whereas his 
Majesty's sovereignty in the island of St. Christopher's 
was on T 5 ^th July last restored by M. De Baas, Lt.-Gen. 
to the King of France, to Sir Chas. Wheler, and Articles 
interchangeably signed pursuant to the Treaty of Breda ; 
Sir Chas. Wheler, by the advice of his Council, has erected 
a court of claims to be held the first Monday in October 
next, on St. Christopher's, to receive the claims of all his 
Majesty's subjects having any right, title, interest, or 
propriety to any estate in the island, and to restore to all 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 275 

1671, 

their just rights under the Articles of Peace at Breda, and 
on such considerations as shall tend most to his Majesty's 
honour and interest and the future security o.f his sove- 
reignty in the said island. To the intent therefore that 
his Majesty's subjects who have returned for England or 
transported themselves elsewhere may not return to meet 
with conditions that may disappoint them : 1. That all 
who have sold their interests to the French must forthwith 
repay the purchase money, otherwise any other of the 
English may repurchase, or the French be confirmed in 
their estates. 2. All who shall repurchase or be restored 
must sit down on their estates with proportionable stock, 
otherwise the same will be permitted to others of his 
Majesty's subjects who can put on sufficient stock, because 
it will be impossible to preserve his Majesty's sovereignty 
without hands. 3. An equal levy must be made for 
satisfying the French demands on any Article of the 
Peace at Breda, and for all other public expenses. 4. 
Those counselling or acting in the rendering of the King's 
subjects and sovereignty to the French must not expect 
the like advantages with those who did their duty. 5. 
Every one shall hold his estate to which he shall be 
restored by a quitrent to his Majesty, according to his 
merit or demerit, as a recognition of his Majesty's grace 
in their pardon and restoring them to their estates, which 
by the high misdemeanour of some, and cowardice and 
folly of many others, they have forfeited. 6. To those in 
England, Europe, Virginia, Jamaica, Carolina, Bermudas, 
or New England three months shall be allowed to put in 
their claims, and for Barbadoes and the Caribbee Islands 
one month after the publication hereof. Together, 4 pp. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., Nos. 46', 46 i.] 

Nov. 24. 659. Copy of the above letter and Proclamation which were 
delivered by Col. Strode to Mr. Slingesby, 10th November 1671, 
and by him communicated, on 13th November, to the Council, who 
after several days' consideration agreed to the Report to the King 
of 24th November. [Col Entry Bk., No. XCIV., 91-94.] 

Nov. 25. 660. The King to all Admirals and other officers, &c. Whereas 
Capt Hubbert has seized the ship James of Belfast at Nevis, which 
by virtue of the Act of Navigation has been there condemned and 
is in the hands of Sir Chas. Wheeler, Bart., Governor of the Leeward 
Isles ; and whereas his Majesty has granted to Louis Marquis of 
Blandford, Sir Chas. Wheeler, Col. John Strode and Col. Stapleton 
(see ante, No. 631) his share of said ship, and they have besought him 
to make the said ship English ; his Majesty by these presents 
naturalizes said ship and wills that it be registered by the Commis- 
sioners of Customs and a certificate thereof granted accordingly. 
2 pp. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. XXXIV., pp. 127 and 127 $.] 

Nov. 27. 661. Report of the Earl of Lauderdale to the Council of Plan- 
tations. On presenting their opinion on Sir Chas, Wheler's Procla- 

S 2 



276 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

mation to his Majesty at the Foreign Committee on the 26th inst., 
it was resolved : That the Proclamation be wholly disowned, and 
that the Council for Plantations forthwith consider and prepare 
what may be fit to be done for undoing what Sir Chas. Wheler has 
done, and preventing the ill consequence it may have to the settle- 
ment of St. Christopher's. And that another Governor be forthwith 
found out and instructions prepared for him. ^ p. [Col. Entry 
Bk., No. XCIV., 94, 95.] 

Nov. 28. 662. Minutes of the Council of Jamaica. Whereas his Majesty 
has adjusted a Peace with his Catholic Majesty in America, and 
strictly commanded the Governor to release all prisoners ; and 
whereas abundance of suits and disputes have arisen about freeing 
Indians, negroes and mulattos, the Governor and Council having 
considered how advantageous it would be to have those useless and 
dangerous persons sold, which will bring money to the island to buy 
better of our own merchants, and Major Bees ton and Capt. Read 
having, per order, treated with the Governor of Cartagena for 80 pieces 
of 8 for each Spanish negro, said Governor promising to send hither 
for them, but since it appears he expects them to be sent to him ; 
Ordered, that all persons give account of all Spanish negroes they 
have and of what age, sex, and country they are, on pain of being sent 
prisoners to the Council for contempt. And all persons interested are 
hereby assured it is not intended that one of said negroes shall be 
commanded out of their hands without securing to be paid within^two 
months for every sound negro above 12 years 80 pieces of 8 or 20 
doubloons, and under 12 years the moiety. And it is ordered, that 
Major-Genl. Banister, Li- Col. Ivey, Major Ant. Collier, and Capt. 
Wm. Parker take account of the parishes of Clarendon and St. Eliza- 
beth ; Lt.-Col. Coape, Lt.-Col. Fuller, and Major Almore of 
St. John's ; Major Jno. Colbeck of St. George's, St. Mary's, St. Ann's 
and St. James's ; Col. Ballard, Lt.-Col. Byndlosse and Col. Moles- 
worth of St. Katherine's ; Col. Modyford, Lt.-Col. Freeman, Lt.-Col. 
Byndlosse, Capt. Molesworth, and Major Beeston of Port Royal ; 
Lt.-Col. Whitfcild, Major Barry and Capt. Brayne of Lygonee ; and 
Col. Thos. Freeman and Capt. Ryves of St. Thomas's and !St. David's. 
Ordered that writs be issued for choosing an Assembly to meet at 
St. Jago 1st February next, and that three be chosen for St. Kathe- 
rine's parish. 2| pp. [Col. Entry Ek., No. XXXIV., 260-262.] 

Nov. 29. 663. Sir Thos. Lynch to Sec. Lord Arlington. Refers to his last 
Jamaica. to Williamson. Again earnestly begs for directions how to live by 
these French ; endeavours to keep a good correspondence with them. 
Has pressed the Governor of Tortuga to send down Thurstone and 
Diego, " two of our men-of-war," and has sent the Welcome after the 
latter to the Isla de Vaca, with order if possible also to intimate the 
Peace to the Governors on the Main. The Assistance is to Leeward 
after a pirate that has been robbing them all. Has sent for both 
of them, for by merchants' letters from Spain, Holland, and London 
they are advised that the Church and Grandees of Spain have 
undei taken to reduce this island with 36 sail and 5,000 men. Only 
fear the port ; the island, in probability, is as safe as England. Has 
had a general council of war, and resolved to defend that place to 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 277 

1071. 

the last man, and on his own credit, the King or public having no 
money, is fitting the fort the best they can. Has bought stores of 
rosin, oil, &c. for fireships, and hired a frigate of Bristol at 901. per 
mensem to go to Carthagena with prisoners, and discover what they 
are doing. This noise of war makes him more strict in observing 
the Peace, people being too apt to wish for a rupture to satisfy their 
own particular designs, and cannot think it is for the Spaniards' 
interest to break it, lest we should bring the war again into their 
quarters. Will never do this without positive directions, " for 1 
had rather sustain the charge of the whole nation in Jamaica than 
<'f one ambassador in the Tower," though he is told it will check 
these people mightily to know they must only fight like baited 
beasts within the length of their chain. Supposes there is no danger, 
because no one from Court has written a syllable of it, but will be 
glad to know whether such an invasion would not give them liberty 
to offend the enemy, without further order from his Lordship. 
Has answered all Mr. Secretary Slingesby's inquiries at large, and 
remitted to the Master of the Ordnance and to him the account of 
all arms, ammunition, &c. ; as also, to the Lords Treasurers, Sir 
Thos. Modyford's accounts with some little remarks, for here they 
think he has placed to the account of this revenue many thousands 
of pounds he ought not. Has likewise sent Mr. Slingesby the rolls 
of the militia, and numbers of Port Royal, with a petition against 
the Jews ; but only troubles his Lordship with the President of 
Panama's relation of " that fatal business." His wife was brought 
to bed of a son (Charles) five weeks ago : " she has not been able to 
govern Daniel, but he is in my family still with an ingenious gent 
that serves me as secretary, and will, if possible, teach the boy to 
write better." 2 pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 47.] 

Nov. 664. Extracts of letters from Carolina in Locke's handwriting, 

viz. : 

Owen to Sir Peter Colleton. Ashley River not so large as at 
first imagined ; good land about it ; abounds in salmon trout, very 
Shaftesbnry big flounders, tench, and sturgeon. Very tall cypress trees on the 
banks. Wando thought to be the better river ; likelihoods of a 
plentiful harvest notwithstanding drought. Want clothing for 
half the people. Winter begins end of October and spring in 
February. But four sick in a year of ague or fever, and all 
recovered. 

Mathews to Sir P. Colleton. Same news as in his letter to 
Lord Ashley [see ante, No. 610]. 

Coming to Sir P. Colleton. Two hundred families ready to 
remove from New York to Ashley River, will give one third of 
their cattle to transport the rest. Want a fly boat of 300 tons 
to transport people and cattle and carry pipe staves to Barbadoes, 
which will clear herself. The Blessing like to be laded back with 
people and cattle, a ship of 100 tons going with them from New 
York to Carolina. Mr. Foster has bought a sloop of 30 tons to 
load cattle at Virginia for Ashley River. The Barbadians endeavour 
to rule all. Want sails and a suit of colours. 



278 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1671. 

Nov. Dalton to Sir P. Colleton. A sloop of 150 tons going from 

Barbadoes to Ashley River with passengers. The place healthy 
and begets a good stomach. Rainy season March and July, mode- 
rate showers at other times once a week ; a crop of peas and corn 
from the same ground in a year. In want of provisions of tools 
and clothes and seeds of all sorts and books of husbandry. 

O'Sully van to Sir P. Colleton. Complaints of Governor West and 
disorders about the Surveyor-General's place. Sir John questioning 
the goodness of those titles whose lots are not set out lay the 
Surveyor-General. Another malapert expostulatory letter about 
his survey orshi p. 

Coming to Lord Ashley. H. Wentworth will accept the Govern- 
ment if the Lords Proprietors admit of his proposals. Sir John 
Yeamans hath bought in Virginia 100 head of cattle for Carolina. 
Bermudians likely to remove to Ashley River if they could have 
passage when their tobacco and provisions are out of the ground. 

Halstead to Lord Ashley. Desires to know what to do with 
three letters directed to Col. Sayle from his Lordship and one from 
Sir P. Colleton. West is a person faithful and stout, but no good 
Governor. Col. Kingsland or Col. Morris recommended to be 
Governor. Sir J. Yeamans disaffected as too selfish ; intends to 
discover the rivers of Carolina ; suspects Ashley River to be only 
an arm of the sea. Woodward sent by Sir John Yeamans to 
Virginia by land. Wants a deputation for himself. The Spaniards 
at the Havannah intend to disturb the settlement next summer. 
In want of a fly boat strong and well fitted for a close fight. 

Godfrey to Lord Ashley. Has been sole manager of the Lords 
Proprietors' plantation since 1st March 1671. Twenty acres of pro- 
visions planted ; ginger and indigo planted destroyed by drought 
and the seed lost. The Indians say such droughts not usual. 
Gagging one of their enacted punishments. Great stirs about 
calling a Parliament. O'Sullyvan no Surveyor. Desires to be 
Survey or- General. A divine and physician. Cattle and horses 
would turn to great profit. Sir J. Yeamans intends to stay all 
the winter ; hath brought negroes and expects more. The number 
of Deputies to be kept up and their power not to determine in two 
years. 

Sir J. Yeamans to Lord A.shley. West proud and peevish ; denied 
a Parliament for fear his election or actions should be questioned. 
Sir P. C. writ the Proprietors were sending 300 people. Tobacco 
seven years custom free will draw the Virginians. Sent word to 
Virginia that from Carolina they could carry their goods whither 
they would. M.any rich men like to remove from Barbadoes. 
Gray, an active man, hath brought a good stock. He and the 
Barbadians at Carolina intend to have a ship of their own. Queries : 
1. Surveyor-General to be chosen by Governor and Council. 2nd. 
Also Deputy and all other officers. And 3rd, How those shall be 
employed that sell their land. 

J. West to Lord Ashley. Calendared, see ante, No. 612. 

Mrs. Sayle to Lord Ashley. Desires some consideration for her 
husband's service, something being promised by Sir J. Yeamans. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 279 



1671. 

Nov. Godfrey to Sir P. C. Has received eight servants on Sir P. C.'s 

account and 16 on the Proprietors'. Has planted 25 acres of corn, 
some potatoes, and peas. The new comers all sick of the bloody 
flux, occasioned by the green corn. Indigo, ginger, tobacco, cotton, 
potatoes, yams, and peas grow well. Sir J. Yearn ans, Owen, Gray, 
Matthews, and O'Sullyvan are the contrary party to the Governor 
West. Want of drums, spear heads, cords, snares, braces, and 
colours. 

West to Sir P. C. The place very healthy, some of the last 
servants sick of the flux through eating green corn. Want of a 
set of smiths' tools, drums, field colours, carpenters, sawyers, and 
a cooper, a stock of cattle from New York, horses, and a plough. 
Indigo as good as grows. Commends Godfrey for a good planter 
and honest man, who intends to go higher up the river, and they 
two not to part this year. 

Halstead to Lords Proprietors. Rectifies his former accounts 
about the servants. Escaped the poll money at Gravesend by his 
commission. All the passengers gave bond for 61. in three years 
except Ed. Mathews, who refused till arrived at Carolina. Three 
servants dead. Received by Sir J. Heydon kindly. Patent and 
commission delivered to H. Wentworth. Intends to be at Bar- 
badoes January next. Capt. J. Darell and Capt. F. Tucker in 
Bermudas very civil. Capt. DareH's proposals for victualling. 
Refused to pay port duties at Bermudas because of his commission. 
Darell's proposals. Beef, 11. per cwt. Fish, 8s. per cwt. Butter, 
6d. per lb. Candles, 7d. per lb., to be delivered at Bermudas. 
Freight to Carolina, 40s. per ton. Live cattle of one year's growth 
at 3. per head, to be delivered at Charles Town. 

Halstead to Lords Proprietors. An Indian killed by Fitzpatrick, 
about whom Sir J. Yearnans and West had a hot contest. Sus- 
pects both Sir John and Gray to have a hand in the Indian's 
death. To be paid by the colony 521. a month for his voyage to 
New Jersey in pipe staves at three farthings apiece. Coming a 
good and careful seaman, ready and active to give direction, for 
this coast. Pipe staves should be set at a low rate to draw 
customers and trade. Intends to shift mates for the increase of 
pilots. For a sea mark a buoy is wanted and constant sounding 
at the charge of the colony, a fishing town, and a look-out to pilot 
in ships. Has sold 80 bushels of peas at prime cost for pipe 
staves at \d. apiece, having no instructions to deliver them to 
the Governor, to get intelligence, and to raise a stock. Requests 
that orders be given to the Governor and Council to assist him 
in the discovery of the country, and Coming and Culpeper to attend 
him. In want of paper books, paper, ink, quills, small arms, iron- 
work, clothing, &c. Will be at Barbadoes in February. The 
Governor and others at New York troubled at the inclination of 
the people to Carolina. Ten per cent, customs and a hard winter 
makes them weary where they are. Desires his commission from 
the Duke may be continued, which is of great use to him. Also 
answer to Berry and Morris' letter, and copies of the laws and 
concessions to be dispersed in New England and Virginia. A fly 



280 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1671. 

Nov. boat will give reputation to the port, carry 120 cows and 50 
passengers, sail with 18 hands, and carry 100,000 pipe staves, 
which will people the country and stock it and get in the debts in 
pipe staves without charge. The tiy boat to be at Barbadoes the 
middle of June. In barter for cottons, serges, &c. there is to be 
had at New York beef and pork at less than Id. per lb., bread at 
8s. per cwt., peas at 20rf. per bushel. H. Wentworth dead at 
Barbadoes, where Halstead intends to be the end of February, from 
thence to Carolina with passengers, and at Barbadoes again middle 
of June, thence to Carolina with passengers, rum, and molasses, 
and thence to New York, and so on. A considerable quantity of 
ginger, indigo, and tobacco fit for the market of England to be 
expected in three years in Carolina. Expects the Lords' orders in 
Barbadoes. Ninety -six passengers delivered at Ashley River. From 
New York they will carry 14 cows and mares, all the Blessing can 
carry, and 30 passengers ; another ship with them carries 50 cows 
and mares and 20 passengers. Two hundred families ready to 
remove from New York if they had convenient transportation. 
Shall be necessitated to draw bills in April. Desires letters to 
Morris, Sanford, and Berry to be directed to Mr. J. N. Tollife in 
Boston, and a copy of the butcher's bill to be sent to him. 

Governor and Council to the Lords Proprietors. The stores have 
been well disposed of, and care shall be taken for repayment. The 
town surrounded with a creek, the banks bold that ships ride by 
it, the farthest house from the town two miles off, the ground about 
it 3,000 acres. They will search for a convenient seat for a town. 
Charles Town seated high and healthy. What sickness hath been 
amongst them hath been occasioned by want of other conveniences. 
An Indian after divers insolencies slain ; satisfaction made to the 
Indians about it. The Blessing sent to New Jersey for provisions, 
to be paid for at 52L 13s. per mensem in pipe staves at three 
farthings. The present Council: Gov. West, Sir Jno. Yeamans, 
Mr. Godfrey, Mr. Bull. Owen, Gray, Mathews, Portman, Hughes, 
and Marshal. Will follow instructions, and think next years they 
will have an overplus of provisions. Want of two or three ships 
to carry goods and passengers, negroes. New York cattle, stores of 
peas, corn and flour, Irish frieze, bandel linen and broges, nails of 
all sorts, stock locks, hoofs and hinges, drums, colours, small arms 
and fine powder, draft of arms for the judicature, a bill of 100 Ibs. 
weight. For Indian trade hats and beads, blue and white, some 
great ones. Carpenters, and boats of 20 feet in the keel. A piece 
of Vitry canvas, a coil of inch rope, 1 2 hand lines, fishing hooks and 
lines, and a set of gunsmith's tools. 4 pp., very small and closely 
written. [Skaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 77.] 

Nov. 665. Extracts of letters from Carolina in the handwriting of 

John Locke, viz. : 

Gray to Lord Ashley. Intends to discover Cooper River, which he 

thinks the better, but Edisto River best, which is fresh 12 miles up, 

Shaftesbury anc j j s 15 f ee t ^eep at low water. In want of boats for discovery. 

Ashley River navigable for sloops of 20 tons CO miles from the mouth. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 281 



1671. 

Nov. Better land and better timber up the river. The sides and bottom 
of the river rock of sandstone. Pleasant hills and valleys, and large 
dry Savanas, with very good grass. He chose land for himself, but 
was denied it by the Governor. West accused for commanding 
Scrivener and Mathews out of the Council, and for declaring he cared 
not what became of the Government. The want of a good Governor. 
The country very good. 

Mathews to Lord Ashley. Calendared, see ante, No. 610. 

Culpepper to Lord Ashley. Promises a draught of the rivers 
thereabouts and description of the land [see Nos. 666-668], The 
draught he hath sent of Ashley River no more for want of a boat 
and men [see No. 667]. Stone River runs into Edisto River, which 
has a better entrance than Ashley River. The land high and fruitful, 
and the water fresh. 

Jos. West to Lord Ashley. Calendared, see ante, No. 612. 

Jos. West to Lords Proprietors. Has received the Blessing's 
cargo. Most want of clothes. All comers depend upon the Pro- 
prietors' supply, and expect five years for payment for which con- 
cessions were produced under Sir P. C's hand ; the people refused 
to give bonds, but by order of Council gave receipts in the book and 
are to pay 10 per cent., but as yet hath received nothing. It was 
Col. Sayle's fault that the Carolina went away without the timber, 
which was then ready. Desires instructions concerning those that 
die in debt to tlfe Lords Proprietors as to their lands and goods. 
Godfrey and West cannot part till the crop is in, which is much 
more than they expected. Halstead disposed of above 100 bushels 
of peas to the old Standers, who had less need of them to the Pro- 
prietors' disadvantage. Promises an account of stores. The pines 
being pitch pines and ponderous not good for masts. Want boats 
for discovery. Complains of Woodward being sent away by Sir 
John Yeamans. 

Culpeper to the Lords Proprietors. Sent a draught of Ashley 
River and promises a perfecter. No place that he hath yet seen on 
Ashley River fit for a town. Wando River he thinks hath, which is 
reported to run up broad a great way. 

Berry, Morris, and Sansford to Lords Proprietors. Intending to 
remove from Virginia to Carolina. Propose a fly boat drawing 
12 feet water and at least 5 feet between decks. To carry cattle at 
one-third, the owners providing meat and water for them and their 
persons carried free, they providing their own victuals. Many 
inclined to remove from Virginia to Carolina. 

Manning to T. Colleton. Proposes to furnish provisions and 
cattle to be delivered at New York. A cow under five years 40 
gallons of rum, a cow of three years 30 gallons, a mare to breed or 
draw 50 gallons. Bread and flour per cwt. 10 gallons, sheep, goats 
and hogs 10 gallons, 19 ewes and a ram 80 gallons, and a yoke of 
oxen 70 gallons of rum. 

Brigs to Halstead. Many ready to remove out of Virginia, but 
want transportation. Some are frightened with the remembrance 
of Cape Fear. 1 pp. [Skaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 
48, No 77.] 



282 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1671. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



Dec. 1. 



Dec. 6. 

Bilbao 
Plantation, 
Barbadoes. 



666. Map or plan in colours showing the course of Ashley, 
Cooper and Colleton Rivers, also Charles Town, Waping and Comings 
Point, with a scale of 10 miles. Parchment. [Shaftesbury Papers, 
Section IX., Bundle, 48, No. 73.] 

667. Culpeper's draught of Ashley River. This map or plan 
shows the situation and size of the plots of land abutting on Ashley 
River, each one of which is lettered, with a key to same thus, A, Sir 
John Teaman's land 70 acres. Also the situation of Charles Town, 
and the names of the several points and creeks, and where they run 
to. Size 24 inches by 18 inches on a scale of five English miles. 
[Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 71.] 

668. " Culpeper's draught of the Lords Proprietors' Plantation. 
Corolina, 1671." This plot represents the shape and form, the 
larger of 340 acres of land which, by warrant from Gov. Jos. West 
and his Council, John Culpeper, Surveyor-General, measured and 
laid out for Anthony Lord Ashley, Sir Geo. Carteret, and Sir Peter 
Colleton, three of the Lords Proprietors ; the smaller draught for Sir 
Peter Colleton and partners containing 60 acres or thereabouts. The 
first warrant dated 5 May 1671 ; the second warrant dated 5 Dec. 
1671 ; said parcels of land abutting and bounding on each other and 
on other men's plots whose names are mentioned and as is herein 
represented. Certified by John Culpeper. Endorsed by Locke as 
above. Size, 30 inches by 18 inches. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section 
IX., Bundle 48, No. 79.] 

669. Writ signed by Sir Thos. Lynch, Lieut.-Governor of Jamaica, 
in the name of the King, to the Provost Marshal of Jamaica, or his 
lawful deputy. Requiring him to make publication in the parish of 
Clarendon of his Majesty's pleasure that an Assembly be convened 
on 1st February next, and on the 25th inst. to proceed to an election 
of two of the fittest freeholders to serve in said Assembly for said 
parish, to which election all freeholders in the precinct are to be 
admitted to give their voices. To give notice to all Justices of 
Peace in that parish, and the constables to all freeholders ; and see 
that the election be freely and indifferently carried without faction 
or interest ; and on penalty of 501. make a true return to the Govr. 
and Council at their first session after such election. With certifi- 
cate annexed, and the hands of six or seven principal freeholders ; 
and to take care that none but freeholders who have taken out their 
patents give their voices. l pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XXXIV., 
263, 264.] 

670. Nicholas Blake to the King. Sends copies of his letters of 
20th Oct. 1670 and 5th Jan. last (see ante, Nos. 298, 383), because, 
though the originals have been many months in London, does not 
think they have been presented, not having money so plentiful as to 
procure them admission ; and 'tis pity but such addresses should 
come speedily to his Majesty's knowledge, which would encourage his 
loyal subjects to proceed, or put their minds at rest. Judges what 
he proposed will be to his Majesty's honour and profit, and of some 
advantage to him ; but if his Majesty decline it, will attribute it 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



283 



1C71. 



Dec. G. 

Barbadoes. 



Dec. 6. 

Barbadoes. 



Dec. 6. 

Barbadoes. 



Dec. G. 

Barbadoes. 



to a cross influence of fate which uses to keep persons of ingenuity 
low, while fortune seems to come to others sleeping. Looks on his 
Majesty as the sun and himself as a shrub overshadowed by larger 
trees, and if not transplanted to enjoy the sun's beams, will never 
be a cedar, but remain a shrub to his dying day. Has taken the 
boldness to relate most of the passages concerning Sta. Lucia to 
H.E.H., with whom he intercedes that these papers may come to his 
Majesty's view. If harkened to, the next December will be the 
best time for his Majesty's ships to arrive here ; and the cure of these 
things may best be committed to some able and honest merchant, 
who will be able to give account of all transactions. Together, 7 pp. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 48.] 

671. Minutes of the Assembly of Barbadoes. Letters this day 
sent to his Excellency, the Gentlemen Planters in London, and 
Thos. Henchman (chosen solicitor) ; with two petitions to his 
Majesty, for obtaining the uses of the 4J per cent., and preventing 
the imposition like to be laid on sugars ; and duplicates of the 
Assembly's letters of 1 6th June to his Excellency and the Gentlemen 
Planters. | p. [Col Entry Bk., No. XIII., 86.] 

672. The Assembly of Barbadoes to Lord Willoughby (in 
London). Have not received any letter from his Excellency since 
their last of 16th June, a duplicate of which is enclosed ; but are 
still mindful of his kindness in the prevention of the great imposi- 
tion that was like to be laid on them, and assure him that if that 
imposition be laid on their sugar, and that on foreign sugar not 
raised proportionably, they are all undone, and many will be forced 
to seek some other way of living. Signed by Simon Lambert, 
Speaker. p. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XII I., 86, 87.] 

673. The Assembly of Barbadoes to Thos. Hinchman. Have 
several times received friendly advice from their fellow planters in 
England, how they may most aptly proceed for the interest of his 
Majesty and welfare of this place and people. Desire him to solicit 
before his Majesty's Council and all committees concerned, what shall 
be given him in charge for them, and to return account thereof on 
all opportunities, and refer him to their letter to their said fellow 
planters, and have ordered 100. to be paid to him, besides necessary 
charges, for his pains for one year. Signed by Simon Lambert, 
Speaker. 1 p. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XIII., 91, 92.] 

674. The Assembly of Barbadoes to the Committee of Gentlemen 
Planters in London. Have received theirs of 10th June, and 
hope they will persist in their endeavours to their utmost for the 
well being of this island, wherein they are so eminently concerned. 
Have raised nigh 800,000 Ibs. sugar for repair of fortifications, which 
is mostly expended, and without their care to procure for the future 
the use of the 4^- per cent, for which it was raised and intended, 
they will be reduced to poverty and wholly unable to raise any 
further tax, and forts and other works must fall to ruin. Their 
militia by the care of their Deputy Governor is in formidable order for 
opposing any foreign enemy or inbred insurrection. Hope for their 



284 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1071. 

endurance, taking notice that their last addresses lie under his 
Majesty's consideration. Request that against the sitting of Parlia- 
ment in April, they will arm themselves with the strongest and 
best arguments they may against the tax on sugar, and entreat them 
to take to their assistance the best counsel in the law, to preserve 
their rights and their trade from further imposition. Send enclosed 
petition relating to said tax to present to his Majesty. As to a 
money trade to be passed into an Act, it will require time for debate. 
By a vessel of Bristol lately arrived from Ireland are informed that 
their sugars are prohibited by an Act of the English Parliament to 
be shipped from Barbadoes for that place ; but can give little credit 
thereto. Request if there be any such thing in agitation, timely to 
interpose to prevent it. Whereas this House chose Capt. Ferdinando 
Gorges for their solicitor for one year, and, on his refusal, approved 
of Lt.-Col. Edwd. Thornburgh, the year being expired have according 
to the rule of the House proceeded to a new election, which is 
carried for Thos. Hinchman, who they desire may receive the same 
salary. Have formerly sent them copy of petition to his Excellency 
to be presented to his Majesty concerning the 4 per cent, and other 
things ; but fearing they may be deemed to desire too many things 
at once, herewith send petition for the uses of the 4 per cent, only, 
being of the greatest importance. Signed by Simon Lambert, 
Speaker. Enclose, 

674. i. Petition of the representatives of Barbadoes to the King. 
Have been informed of some motions in the last Session of 
Parliament for increasing the custom on sugars, which is 
the chief produce of this island. Time has so much im- 
poverished their lands, that notwithstanding their endless 
labours in improvements, they yet remain near barren and 
unfruitful, the timber and wood made use of and destroyed, 
and the difficulty in making sugar as much increased as its 
value has lessened, whereby the produce is not answerable 
to the necessary charge, so that without the addition of 
mere, petitioners can manifest that if the large supplies 
they have yielded to his Majesty's occasions during the 
late war and since had not very much impoverished 
them, yet now their very industry will but serve to draw 
on them leisurely inevitable ruin, which is so obvious to 
the most vulgar capacity that the apprehension thereof 
has caused upwards of 4,000 inhabitants within the last 
three years to desert the island, many of them being led 
through great encouragements to settle in foreign planta- 
tions. Pray his Majesty therefore, by forbidding increase 
of customs, and granting some immunities of trade, to 
preserve this small part of his dominions from at least swift 
destruction. Signed by Simon Lambert, Secretary. 
674. u. Petition of Representatives of Barbadoes to the King. 
The imposition of 4^- per cent, on the produce of the island, 
for support of the Government and forts, and other public 
occasions necessary for its well being and safety, has been 
duly paid to his Majesty's treasurers, and by his Majesty's 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 285 

1671. 

Governors employed for the most part to the ends men- 
tioned, until Commissioners arrived empowered by his 
Majesty to collect the same, who have refused to dis- 
burse anything for said ends ; notwithstanding the forts 
will speedily fall to decay, the prison is useless, and many 
public occasions neglected. Pray his Majesty to command 
said Commissioners or Farmers to perform the conditions in 
the Act for the collecting of same. Together, 6 pp. \_CoL 
Entry Bk, XIII., 87-94.] 

[Dec. 7.] 675. Report of the Council for Plantations to the King. Have 
considered, in obedience to his Majesty's commands, what may be 
fit to be published concerning St. Christopher's, and advise that a 
Proclamation be made to the following effect. Having understood 
that Sir Chas. Wheler, Governor of the Leeward Islands, has, since 
the restitution of the English part of St. Christopher's, on or about 
the 24th August last, caused a Proclamation to be made to the 
great discouragement of the late Proprietors and English Planters ; 
his Majesty declares that said Proclamation is null and void, that 
said late Proprietors and Planters shall be admitted to their plan- 
tations with such stock as they can provide, but those who have 
not sold to the French must return thither before the 25th 
December 1672, and such as have sold to the French are to 
reimburse to the purchasers the money they actually received for 
their estates, within one whole year from the re-delivery of the 
English part of the said island on the T \th July 1671. That no 
quitrents shall be imposed, or any moneys levied, but by a public 
law made by the Assembly with the consent of the Governor and 
Council ; and that none shall suffer in person or estate by reason 
of any miscairiages in the late surrender of the island to the 
French. 1 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 49.] 

[Dec. 7.] 676. Copy of preceding. [Col Entry Bk., No. XCIV., 96, 97.] 

Dec. 7. 677. Minute of the Council for Foreign Plantations. That 
Lord Arlington, being present at the framing the Proclamation 
concerning St. Christopher's, proposed something fit to be offered 
to the French ambassador, which was approved and his Lordship 
charged himself to acquaint his Majesty therewith and receive 
his commands. Mem. by Williamson, The 4 per cent, to be taken 
off St. Christopher's for the two or three first years. ^ p. [Col 
Papers, Vol. XX VII., No. 50.] 

Dec. -$. 678. Sir Charles Wheler, Governor of the Leeward Islands, to 

St. Christo- (Sec. Lord Arlington). In obedience to his Majesty's letter of the 

pher's. fj^h March 167^-, herewith sends account of difficulties met with 

at St. Christopher's since the restitution. The accompanying 

paper, signed by himself and M. De Baas, was sent on the Tho. 

and Benjamin of Bristol [ T 5 F Dec.], and will send a double by the 

next occasion, according to an agreement with M. De Baas that 

two should be sent by each of them. Remarks on " these articles 

of our Treaty," and on what M. De Baas refused. The difficulty 



236 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

of the greatest importance is the choice the negroes of Antigua and 
Moutserrat are to have to return to the English. His Majesty's 
pretence to these negroes (which number some 1,500) amounts to 
near 40,000., whereas the payment for the French prisoners' diet, 
&c. comes not to above G,000. The Commissioners, Col. Stapleton, 
Col. Russell, and Lt.-Col. Smith, upon this difference parted the 
second day and drew up protests one against the other ; upon which 
M. De Baas and Sir Charles entered into it themselves. Concerning 
the negroes on St. Christopher's, the English never got any but 
such as ran away to them by night, and it was only yielded that 
if the English could inform of any of their negroes detained in 
chains, &c., they should be brought forth to make their election 
within six months. Leaves him to judge how impracticable this 
would be in Martinico, Guadalupa, and other French islands. 
Suggestions on this subject which his Majesty may make use of in 
his Treaty with the King of France. Computes his Majesty's 
subjects lost about 400 negroes at St. Christopher's, of which about 
100 are come in, and near 100 more may be detained by their 
French masters. Has sat down with the loss of the other 200 for 
peace sake, for the French were so inflamed at their negroes coming 
in that when the Commissioners broke off their treaty was forced 
to lie for 14 days (till M. De Baas and he entered into a new one) 
in a little hole of a fort which he was scrambling to get in some 
repair to mount some cannon, and M. De Baas hinted he was not very 
well assured of the populace. Discusses at length the points trans- 
mitted to their Majesties, with his own arguments and those of 
M. De Baas, viz. : On the 2nd and 3rd Article, for reparation ; on 
the 5th Article, touching the diet, &c. of the prisoners ; on the 8th 
Article, remarks on the folly of the English in being aggressors in 
this war, their ignorance in the conduct of it, stupidity in their 
capitulation, and great honesty in suffering as they did rather than 
take an oath of fidelity to the French King, for such a medley of 
madness and loyalty it must be God's will in an extraordinary 
manner to punish them. After it was agreed to render up the 
country, and it was published that they were to take an oath to 
the French King, all as one man resolved to quit all they had and 
begin the world again, some in New England, some in Jamaica, 
and in other places ; and whereas by the capitulation they might 
sell and carry off the price of their estates, they were so mad to 
be gone that they sold for the twentieth part of the value, and the 
French and Dutch paid them in canvas and shoes and trumpery, 
paid their debts and gave them passage by sea hither and thither. 
Has only heard of two that had payment made in money, sugar, or 
indio-o. The French have put in twice as much as the consideration 
really was, so that where the English bring to repurchase their 
estates 20,000 Ibs. sugar which they honestly contracted for, they 
find in their contracts (besides that their houses are pulled down) 
40,000 Ibs. ; some signed these contracts in ignorance of the French 
language, and some refused, but afterwards signed, for fear of being 
made prisoners. M. De Baas made him believe this is usual in 
France for security against re-purchase, and they dare not make a 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 287 

1671. 

breach upon the sanction of a contract ; nor is this all, for many 
were robbed and pillaged even of what they had thus embarked. 
The decision of this is left to the two Kings, yet his Lordship may 
see in the paper agreed upon that it is depending on the honour 
and conscience of M. De Baas. Has done his utmost amicably to 
settle all differences. Endorsed, "R. Mar. 3, 1671-2." Encloses, 

678. 1. Articles transmitted by Sir Charles Wheler and M. De 

Baas to their Majesties to be decided. These have reference 
to the 2nd and 3rd Articles, concerning reparation to be 
made to the English for all taken away since publication 
of the peace, as buildings, churches, moveables, houses, 
sugar works, coppers, cattle, cannons, &c. To the 5th 
Article, for payment to the French for diet, medicines, 
and clothes furnished to the English prisoners. To the 
8th Article, for an exact account of all the English 
received and enjoyed, so they repay no more for their 
estates than effectively they had. To the 13th Article, 
concerning negroes, whether they will stay with their 
French masters or return under the English. As to those 
of Antigua and Montserrat, as the English had always 
possessed those islands, there could be no choice for the 
negroes. Lastly, Sir Chas. Wheler does not present his 
sense of these Articles which remain undecided so his 
Majesty's ministers should be bound by his reasons and 
excluded from making better arguments or replies. Dated 
and signed at Christopher's in double, both in English and 
in French, the ^gp 1671. Endorsed, "Sent by the 
William of Bristol the -& Dec r 1671, Duplicate by the 
Thomas and Benjamin of Bristol, the -^ Dec. 1671." 
Together, 30 pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XXVII., Nos. 51, 
51 L] 

679. Articles transmitted by Sir Chas. Wheler and Mons. De 
Baas to their Majesties for their determination. Copy of the above 
enclosure. [Col. Entry Bk., XLV., 113-129.] 

Dec. 9. 680. Answer of Sir Chas. Wheler, Governor of the Leeward 
St. Chris- Islands, to the inquiries of the Council for Foreign Plantations (see 
tophcr's. an te, No. 415. L). 1. In every island under his Government there 
is a Council, which he will complete to 12, except Anguilla and 
Barbuda ; Assemblies are called as the Governor sees occasion : at 
present one is convened at Nevis only ; the courts of judicature are 
monthly courts or quarterly sessions, the former held by the justice 
of the peace of the division (always one of the Council) ; with two 
of the Assembly assistants, for all suits under the value of 1,000 Ibs. 
of sugar ; if they exceed that, appeal is to the sessions, where are 
heard all criminal causes and matters touching the Crown ; the 
Governor (or next in rank) is Judge, Chancellor and Bishop, with 
all the Council on the bench, and the Assembly beneath. Council 
and Assembly sit bare ; the Council speak, the Assembly when the 
Governor calls on any of them, as is usual in merchants' business, 
most of them having been merchants ; but judgment is given only 



288 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

by the Governor. The manner of proceeding is cheap and short ; two 
days are appointed for entering actions, of which all men take 
notice, and plaintiff and defendant are asked whether they will 
abide the judgment of the court or have a jury empannelled. After 
judgment follows an execution, mentioning first the person's ready 
sugar, next his grindable canes, then his person, and if after six 
months' imprisonment the debt be not satisfied, his estate to be sold 
at an outcry. The office of High Sheriff in England tears the name 
of the Provost Marshal. 2. In Montserrat there is a Court of 
Admiralty by commission or direction from the Duke, but in no 
other island of his government. 3 and 4. The Book of Statutes and 
Laws made here is too large yet to be made ready, but a Committee 
of the Council and Assembly will abridge the statutes as much as 
may be, and he will then pass them in full Council and Assembly 
and transmit them to the Council of Plantations ; the executive 
power is wholly in himself and his Lt.-Governors and subordinate 
officers in ecclesiastical, civil and military affairs. 5. St. Chris- 
topher's is in too low a condition to be taken notice of. Nevis has 
a regiment of trained bands (under Col. Russell, a great support of 
the Government), consisting of 12 companies and 1,200 Englishmen, 
and a militia troop of 100 horse under Capt. Jas. Russell, eldest son 
to the Colonel ; Antigua has a regiment of 900 English in eight 
companies, under Col. Philip Warner, Lt. : Governor, son to Sir Thos. 
Warner, who settled all those islands for the King, and sent out a 
colony for Barbadoes ; there is no troop of horse, but a very good 
and numerous breed of horses ; the English male children under 12 
are 150. Montserrat has almost all Irish, and there are about 1,000 
in the regiment of Col. Stapleton, Lt.-Governor ; three files are 
entertained in pay for the guard of the platforms in Nevis. 6. No 
castles, a platforni or two in Montserrat ; one or two in Antigua, five 
in Nevis very bad, two in St. Christopher's, one called Sandy Point 
Fort, about which he has laid out a little money. 7. No privateers 
frequent the coasts. 8. The strength of the French on St. Chris- 
topher's about 1,200, the same of Martinique and Guadaloupe; the 
Indians inconsiderable, and when they break the Peace he will drive 
them into the sea ; nor has he any doubt of the French, if neither of 
their Majesty's send help from Europe ; has no other neighbours. 
0. Has little to do with Martinique and Guadaloupe. 10 and 11. 
Found 10 barrels of powder, and arms in the trained bands' hands 
of their own ; stores none, nor any money paid on any consideration 
of Government ; 30 pieces of bad cannon at Nevis of their own, at 
Montserrat and Antigua six or eight, some of which are of Lord 
Willoughby's sending. 12. Sends map of Nevis and St. Chris- 
topher's ; Montserrat rock is not so big as either ; Antigua as large 
as Barbadoes. 1 3. The commodities are sugar chiefly ; tobacco in 
great quantity in Antigua, so much indigo and cotton that he hopes 
his Majesty will favour them in the prohibition of Cyprus cotton 
and East India indigo which rob England of money ; no manu- 
factures, nor shall be while he is Governor, unless he has further 
commands; no materials for shipping. 14. Saltpetre might be made 
in abundance in Antigua and possibly elsewhere, but it must be 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 289 

1671. 

done at the King's charge are given to sugar and indigo. 15. No 
river or harbour in all his Government but in Antigua, concerning 
which he chooses to discourse apart, and therefore he is abandoned 
by all shipping about the hurricane season. J6. There may be 40 
parishes in his Government, to supply which he found one drunken 
orthodox priest, one drunken sectary priest, and one drunken parson 
who had no orders. 17. No conjecture can be made of the English, 
Scotch and Irish that have come yearly to plant these seven years' 
past, but there have not been six since his arrival, though 40 ships 
have come and gone, nor has one black or slave been brought these 
five years, the injustice of which he will further discourse of. At 
St. Christopher's, Nevis, and Montserrat the air is so good that not 
six have died since he came. 19. About 40 ships come yearly, chiefly 
from Bristol, some few from London, Plymouth, and Liverpool, all 
inconsiderable in force and burden. 20 and 21. Nil. 22. The 4f 
per cent, is all the duty exported, manufacture or other trade they 
have none ; nothing imported pays anything but wine, which 
defrays public expenses, and if that be touched upon by the Crown, 
they would presently drink none, which would endanger their 
healths. 23. The 4| per cent. Col. Strode farms and collects and 
pays 700Z. per annum. To the Governor of Nevis is allowed by 
courtesy (as is pretended), and Sir Chas. Wheler takes it for granted 
they will allow it him at the year's end, as much by the poll as is 
valued at GOOl. or 700?.. per annum, and something the Lt.- Governor's 
have. 24. The course taken for instructing the people and paying 
the Ministry is the same as in Northumberland, and other remote 
parts of the North and Wales, where there be store of impropria- 
tions and men's livings of about 10. a year, but ours proceeds 
from the want of ministers not for want of provision for paying them, 
and want of power in the bishops to send out ; why should it be a 
breach on the liberty of an Englishman to be sent abroad by the 
King to preach, any more than to press a soldier or seaman, both being 
warfares, and the latter of 50 times the consequence to the Crown, for 
no good Christian was ever a bad subject ; and because he serves for 
an University in Parliament is the more bold to affirm, that it would 
be for the good of the Universities if young men, instead of retiring 
to remote parts for 101. a year, and into schools to be ushers, or to 
teach A B C to children, might be sent into the plantations for five 
years, to have their voyage defrayed and 100Z. per annum allowed 
them, and his Majesty's countenance at their return ; but because 
he thinks that will not be, has obtained from the Council and 
Assembly to dispose of the revenues of the Church according to 
his design, provided he supplies them with preaching ministers ; 
and if he does not take very wrong measures, will in a year erect 
a college or two, out of which the Government shall be supplied 
with pious and able men. Will now give an account of the state of 
the islands under his government in one continued discourse. Has 
erected a Court of Admiralty, but will not exercise his office of 
Vice-Admiral without His Royal Highness's direction ; his proposals 
concerning condemned ships and other seizures and rules for men- 
of-war in his roads, The two men-of-war which brought Sir Thos. 

U 51912. T 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

Lynch governed in Sir Chas. Wheler's roads under his own cannon 
at that rate, that had it not been ridiculous for him to have a 
difference with those who came to countenance his demand of St. 
Christopher's, he should have put them to complain. Nevis is the 
most considerable of these islands, Antigua and Montserrat sending 
their freight there in shallops, and if the King has any interest in 
the sugar trade it is owing to the valour and vigilance of its 
inhabitants, which defended themselves against several attempts of 
the French fleet and has given the King a rise for the establishment 
of all that was lost in St. Christopher, Antigua, and Montserrat ; hopes 
therefore for some assistance of cannon, powder, muskets, swords, 
&c., for there is nothing but of their own acquisition, nor have they 
ever received a shilling from the Crown, nor is it hardly known to 
the King that there is such a little island as Nevis, nor how loyal 
the inhabitants are, nor how unanimous in the Protestant religion, 
and the practice of the English Church, which cannot truly be 
said of many of his Majesty's colonies. Has proposed to raise a 
good fort on the high rocky promontory of Pelican's Point, and if 
the King would lay the foundation, negroes here will be spared to 
do much of it ; his reasons for pitching upon this place rather than 
the old fort, it will be less expense, and the town which was called 
the Red Storehouse, but which he has honoured with the King's 
name, will shortly have 500 men able to bear arms, which will be 
secured under the fort ; and it is possible to make a harbour for 
vessels of 70 or 80 tons. Nevis ships a great deal of sugar and 
indigo every year, which would all be sold for the growth and manu- 
facture of England, if the English merchants would do their part, 
but great part is bartered for beef from Ireland and fish from New 
England ; but salt salmon and other fish for the north of England 
would beat out the New England trade if quantity enough were 
brought for the negroes, and people would rather give 4 Ib. sugar 
per Ib. for good English beef than 2 Ib. for Irish ; and should the 
King oblige Barbadoes and these islands to take English beef, it 
would not much hurt them, provided English merchants were bound 
to furnish a quantity and quality at a standing rate ; the great 
advantage this would bring the King in raising gentlemen's rents, 
which would facilitate his land tax. Complains of the manner in 
which English merchants trade at twice the profit the Dutch would 
and give no credit, while the Dutch give a year ; neither will they 
take the poor man's tobacco, nor the worst sugar. Montserrat is a 
colony of Irish, and after Col. Stapleton's time his Majesty should 
take care that not only an English Governor be always constituted, 
but a small garrison of English kept in pay. Hopes the King will 
think of Antigua; 'tis as large as Barbadoes and the best land in the 
West Indies ; Falmouth and English harbours, divided only by a 
neck of land, which may be cut through with inconsiderable charge, 
and are so landlocked as to be out of danger of hurricanes. The Dover 
Castle, which Col. Strode lets to the King for the use of Sir Chas. 
Wheler's Goverment, suffered no harm though the hurricane was as 
violent as ever was known which should persuade the improvement of 
English harbour and settling that quarter of the island. Has already 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 291 

1671. 

moved that the Koyal Company may bring negroes ; at least 4,000 
are wanted, for by negroes only can that island be planted till it be 
cleared of wood for more health for the English. Nevis is not half 
planted for want of negroes ; they should have to furnish them- 
selves ; poverty cannot be objected ; wishes Barbadoes were so near 
out of debt. St. Christopher's is otherwise ; will not suffer a negro 
to be brought thither, but entreats his Majesty to send Englishmen 
out of prisons for small debts, &c., because it cannot defend itself 
but by English. Observations on the map and how the island is 
quartered. At the Old Road Fort between two rivers kinds of 
torrents between guts of rocks a foot deep, was Sir Thos. Warner's 
seat, which Lord Willoughby bought for the Governor. Reasons 
why he takes it not to be a proper seat for the Governor, he would 
have a stone house built for the Governor. Has begun to repair a 
fort in the English Leeward quarters near Sandy point, wherein 
are two companies of English foot, bordering on the French quarter. 
Suppose the French and English fall out, the former cannot march 
from Basseterre to Brimstone Hill through the English Leeward 
quarter. Remarks on the last war, and how Col. Reemes behaved 
with 300 musketeers ; this house of the Governor's between these 
precipices will prevent the like folly ; next time the English must 
think of a defensive war till they have help from Nevis. Another 
reason for having the Governor seated to windward, the English 
quarters would be joined and the French separated. Comes now 
to the difficult point of his Majesty's expense for keeping his 
sovereignty in St. Kitts. Values not the Governor's plantation at 
all, being confident it will not be let for 100?. per annum, but if the 
King would stock it with 100 negroes, and horses and cattle to the 
value of 500?. and build a house for the Governor and sugar and 
indigo works upon it, all which would amount to 4,000?., it might 
be reckoned a revenue of 1,000?. a year, which, with other perqui- 
sites, might invite a fit man out of England to be Governor ; till 
then the King must either join the Government with that of Nevis 
with as at present a yearly addition out of the Exchequer, or make 
a planter Governor, and lose it again when the French please ; for a 
Knight of Malta is always their Governor, and there is a general 
commanding, which is odds against the conduct of a planter. Has 
begun the fort at Sandy Point, but it is a pitiful thing, only fit to 
keep off the populace, which he feared would have forced away the 
negroes, so hopes the King will think it necessary to send him some 
money to make it something, as also to make a little fort at Stones 
Point ; where he has placed five guns upon the ruins of a pitiful 
platform, or else he must pull it down and make it a platform only 
against shipping. His Majesty thought of entertaining the two 
companies for one year only, but it is impossible to disband them, 
or to subsist without a third, for the French delays are so unjust 
that no Englishman who sold his estate has got possession, and the 
French refuse the oath to the King, and will, he fears, attempt 
something on him for the recovery of their negroes. There are 
never less than two French men-of-war sailing from island to 
island, and every moment 400 French soldiers are expected to be 

T 2 



292 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

in garrison in St. Christopher's, nor will the English venture 
themselves and their estates on it unless they see their Governor 
very confident, and without another company the island is in 
danger. Hopes after two years that by the revenue of 4 per 
cent, the Government may keep itself. As to Eustatia and Saba, 
he demanded Eustatia of M. De Baas, but was worsted ; could 
wish the King would purchase it, a particular Dutchman, Quirin- 
son or some deriving from him, having the seignory of it, and 
plant it with 200 English, for it lies on the back of the French 
quarter at Sandy Point, within an hour's rowing. Saba is the 
King's by right and should be demanded of the Dutch Ambas- 
sador, for it was taken by the Dutch the same day the English 
retook Surinam ; it is an inconsiderable little rock, and not worth 
asking, but that 50 musketeers inhabiting there would be a thorn 
in the side of the Sandy Point French quarter, and it is near 
enough to Nevis for a bigger number to be set down on fit 
occasion. The third company for St. Kitts should consist of 80 
or 100 men ; they should be young married men with their wives, 
some of whom would have encouragement to ata,y and plant. 
It is impossible to raise men here ; when Lord Wil lough by 
raised men in these islands upon their own expense, and by their 
valour took 48 cannon, he carried them to Barbadoes ; hopes 
they may be restored. 21 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 
52.] 

Dec. 9 ? 681. (Sir Charles Wheler) to (Sec. Lord Arlington). Thought 
fit to put this paper into his hands apart from other business, con- 
cerning the prisoners paying the expense of their diet. Desires him 
to mind the King that these men were not loose men or dissolute 
privateers, for there is not one in his government but substantial 
inhabitants, who armed and victualled themselves, and their officers 
were the very best of the country ; will the King be kinder to his 
mercenary soldiers, of whose ordinary expense and ransom too he 
usually takes care ? Desires his Majesty to consider the conse- 
quences if he should have occasion again to make any levies in these 
parts. Having done all he could in public treaty with the French 
to put off the payment from the King, hopes he shall have pardon 
in offering his sense in private. Endorsed, " R. 3 Mar. 167-^," 
about French prisoners. | p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII , No. 53.] 

Dec. 9. 682. Sir Chas. Wheler to Joseph Williamson, Secretary to Sec. 
St. Christopher's.L or d Arlington. Has no business to trouble him with, but ventures to 
thank him for his civility at parting, and to ask whether that money 
was brought him, which he left unpaid at his coming away ; and 
prays him to send word how his endeavours to serve the King in 
this affair of St. Christopher's are accepted ; has very ill luck if they 
please not, for he never took so much pains in his life, and if the 
King would give him the inheritance of his part of St. Christopher's, 
would not have undertaken that affair, could he have foreseen the 
hazard he once thought himself in, not of his life, but of his credit 
in the conduct of it. Endorsed, "R. 3 Mar. 167!" &c< * P- 
Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 54.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 293 



1671. 

[Dec. 11.] 683. The King to Sir Chas. Wheler, Governor of the Leeward 
Islands. On consideration of the ill accidents that have befallen 
ships returning from the Caribbee Islands from the want of their 
associating themselves in fleets, his Majesty by letters of this date 
(copy inclosed) to the Deputy Governor of Barbadoes has appointed 
three seasons for ships from Barbadoes to sail for England, viz., the 
last of March, June, and September, and not at any other time, and 
that said fleets touch at the Leeward Islands not staying at any above 
48 hours, to gather ships bound for England. Requires him not to 
fail to have shipping ready against the time the Barbadoes fleet tnay 
be expected, and to signify this his Majesty's pleasure to the masters 
and merchants, preventing any from going before the time and 
punishing any contemners of this his Majesty's pleasure in such 
manner as may deter others. Dvaft, with corrections, in William- 
son's hand. Endorsed, " Dec. 11, 167V 1-r PP- [Col. Papers, 
Vol. XX V1L, No. 55.] 

Dec. 11. 684. The King to Sir Tho. Lynch, Knight, Lt.-Governor of Jamaica, 
Whitehall. Having taken into consideration the ill accidents that have befallen 
the ships of his Majesty's subjects on their return from the West 
Indies, chiefly through their coming scattering, his Majesty has 
thought fit to appoint three seasons at which only ships are to be 
permitted to return from Jamaica, viz., the 24th of March, June, 
and September. He is required for the preventing of any surprise 
upon any sudden change of affairs in Europe not to neglect to make 
provision for the safety of the island and the protection of the 
shipping there. 1-|- p. [Dom. Entry Bk, Chas. II., Vol. XXIV., 
pp. 43, 44.] 

Dec. 11. 685. The King to Capt. Christopher Codrington, Lt.-Governor of 
Barbadoes. Having taken into consideration the ill accidents that 
have heretofore befallen the ships of his Majesty's subjects in their 
return from the Caribbee Islands for want of returning in fleets for 
mutual defence and at certain seasons whereby his Majesty might 
give order for their security by his own shipping, his Majesty 
appoints three seasons only for ships to sail from Barbadoes, viz., 
the last of March, June, and September, touching at the Leeward 
Islands for ships bound thence. To notify the arrival of these 
orders. The remainder of this letter is the same as the King wrote 
to Governor Lord Willoughby, Nov. 16, 1665 (see previous Vol. 
No. 1079), except those clauses referring to Surinam, Saba, Eustatia, 
and Tobago. 

Mem. This letter was sent to Mr. Bragg 25th December 1671, a 
like having been sent to the Lt.-Governor of the Leeward Islands at 
same time. [Dom. Entry Bk, Chas. II., Vol. XXIV., pp. 45-47.] 

Dec. 11. 686. The King to Sir Charles Wheler or the Officer command- 
ing in chief in the Leeward Isles. To the same effect as the 
preceding, to the Lt.-Governor of Barbadoes, which is enclosed, enjoin- 
ing him not to fail to have the shipping of the Leeward Islands ready 
against the times when the Barbadoes fleet may be expected. 



294 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

Mem. This was sent with a duplicate of the letter of same date 
to Capt. Codrington to Mr. Lodge at Deal, Jan. 17, 167|. IT p- 
[Dom. Entry L, Chas. II., Vol. XXIV, pp. 55, 56.] 

FDec. 11.] 687. Account by Robert Mason of the commodities of New 
Hampshire New Hampshire the best improved for land and most 
populated of any in those parts ; abounds with corn, cattle, timber, 
fish ; people generally live comfortably and happy, having a great 
trade to all parts. Store of shipping of their own, exporting and im- 
porting some thousands of tons of goods of their own growth and 
foreign, which pays no custom to the King, but some small duty to 
Massachusetts Bay, which if looked after would amount to at least 
4,OOOZ. per annum. Goods exported yearly ; 20,000 tons of deal 
and pipe staves, 10,000 quintalls of fish, 10 ship loads of masts, 
several thousand beaver and otter skins. Imported : 300 tons of 
wine and brandy, 200 tons of goods from the Leeward Islands, 
2,000 tons of salt. As regards land every person would be willing 
to take new leases and pay the Lord Proprietor a quitrent with a 
fine according to their capacity, provided they might have a final 
confirmation, which would mount up to a considerable sum. The 
income of the saw-mills at Newichewanock is considerable, they 
paying 200/. for privilege of common. Rec d 11 Dec. 1671. 1 p. 
[Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 56.] 

Dec. 15. 688. Lord Ashley to Sir John Yeamans. Hopes he has re- 
Exeter House, ceived his commission to be Governor, and that he will endeavour 
to settle all things to the advantage and settlement of the planta- 
tion, one main point of which is the setting down together in 
towns. The Lords Proprietors have in favour of the first planters 
altered their minds about the port town on Ashley River, as he 
will find by their general letter, which through the little care taken 
to lay it out into convenient streets at their first coming it 

Shaftesbury cannot be made so exactly regular and beautiful as they wish, 
apers ' yet he is desired to have the streets laid out as large, orderly, 
and convenient as possibly may be, and when it is done the 
houses which shall hereafter be built on each side those designed 
streets will grow in beauty with the trade and riches of the 
town. To prevent the like inconveniences hereafter desires he 
would be early enough in choosing a place and laying out the 
model of an exact regular town on the next river, and to send 
the Lords Proprietors the draft of it. Intend Charles Town for 
the port town on Ashley River, where they will oblige all ships 
that come into that river to unlade and take in their lading, 
except timber and such like bulky commodities as cannot without 
great trouble be brought to the port town, and thus on all the 
navigable rivers they intend to have in the most convenient 
situations port towns. Looks upon him as his friend and there- 
fore expects plain dealing from him, for though it was resolved 
to make him Governor, yet he was making himself by the people 
a little too quick. Beseeches him to trust Ashley when he 
assures him that a man of his abilities doth not need nor will 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 295 

1671. 

find any other way successful but the direct one of serving the 
Lords Proprietors and endeavouring the good of the plantation. 
Is glad to hear so many considerable men come from Barbadoes, 
for the Lords Proprietors find by dear experience that no others 
are able to make a plantation but such as are in a condition to 
stock and furnish themselves, " the rest serve only to fill up 
numbers and live upon us, and therefore now we have a compe- 
tent number until we are better stocked with provisions I am 
not very fond of more company unless they be substantial men." 
The first of his queries is answered by their appointment of Mr. 
Culpeper, a man of his own approbation, to be Surveyor-GeneraJ. 
To the second concerning their Deputies, hopes he will, not expect 
them to be named by any but ourselves ; and to the third, if 
men sell their lands it is expected that the Governor and Council 
take care he pays any debt due to the Lords Proprietors, when they 
may dispose of themselves and their land as they think fit. 
Desires he will do the particular kindness to take with him Mr. 
Mathews, his deputy, Mr. West, and Captain Halstead, if there, 
and with them take up for Lord Ashley 12,000 acres in some 
convenient, healthy, fruitful place upon Ashley River. [Shaftes- 
bury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 55, pp. 100-101.] 

Dec. 15. 689. Lord Ashley to Sir John Coming. Has received his 
Exeter House, letter and is well satisfied with his behaviour, ability, and service, 
and the Lords Proprietors are resolved to continue in their em- 
ployment a man so diligent and successful in his business. Takes 
Shaftesbury particular notice of his care to instruct others in the navigation 
of Ashley River and the directions he has spread abroad for those 
who may have occasion to sail thither. Promises him all the 
encouragement and kindness he can justly expect. [Shaftesbury 
Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 55, p. 98.] 

Dec. 15. 690. Lord Ashley to his very affectionate friend Maurice 
Exeter House. Matthews. Besides the kindness he has for him upon his uncle's, the 
Challoners account, the industry he has employed in discovering 
the country, and the account he has given of it, hath made Ashley 
choose him his deputy, for which he sends him a commission, 
[see No. 698] and doubts not he will continue all that vigour and 
Shaftesbury activity which has made Ashley take notice of him, and which 
he will be careful to encourage as he gives him reason to do it. 
Desires he will have an eye to his private and public concerns 
there, in particular to consult with Sir John Yeamans to lay 
out 12,000 acres of fruitful, healthy land in the most convenient 
place for a pleasant seat upon Ashley River. [Shaftesbury Papers, 
Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 55, p. 102.] 

Dec. 15. 691. Sir Thos. Lynch to Joseph Williamson. His of 22nd 
Jamaica. September came to hand about 10 days ago. Is glad the King 
and Duke were satisfied with the manner of Lynch receiving the 
Government, and hopes that Sir T. M. will arrive safe, and that 
his other proceedings here will not make his Lordship ashamed of 
having recommended him. Has written to his Lordship at large, 



296 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



Dec. 1G. 



1671. 

and not above three weeks since he and Mr. Slingesby had "a vast 
packet " from Lynch ; and there is nothing left to make them 
understand this place, but the numbers of the people and a map 
of the island, which cannot possibly be had these three months. 
Begs for his Lordship's directions about cutting wood, and the 
Spanish and French seizing our vessels. Has suspended Mr. 
Ardrey (?), who has carried himself so sottishly and imprudently in 
the Assistance, but hopes he may learn better from a better Com- 
mander, for has turned out Wilgress. Is infinitely obliged for the 
packets of printed and written Gazettes, and hopes he will send 
more, for seldom a week passes but a ship is coming hither. This 
comes to Plymouth or Chester ; a month hence will write by a 
Londoner. There is come to Barbadoes a vessel that parted with 
Sir Thos. Modyford in a storm in the lat. of Bermudas. Endorsed, 
R. 16 Apr., &c. 2pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVII., No. 57.] 

692. Instructions from Lords Proprietors of Carolina to the 
Governor and Council at Charles Town on Ashley River in five 
Articles. To follow the rules for government in the fundamental 
constitutions, temporary laws, and previous instructions. Instruc- 
tions of the latest date always to take place. Always to fill up the 
Grand Council with an equal number of Councillors chosen by the 
Parliament to the Deputies. To prepare such Bills as he thinks for 
the good of the plantation, and present them to Parliament to be 
passed into laws if Parliament think fit, for there is nothing to be 
debated or voted in Parliament but what is proposed to them by the 
Council. To afford all assistance they can to Capt. Halstead in his 
discoveries. Signed by Craven, Ashley, G. Carteret, P. Colleton. 
In Locke's hand. [Col. Entry Bk, Vol. XX., p. 79.] 

Dec. 16. 693. Lord Ashley to Stephen Bull. Has made choice of 
Exeter House. Mr. Mathews because of his acquaintance with some of his near 
relations to succeed Bull as his deputy. He must not interpret this 
as any unkindness or disrespect to himself, who though a stranger 
when put in that trust, yet will continue to him this advantage of 
being ready to do him any good, and to show his respect grants his 
desire for the free freight of his goods which come in the Blessing, 
and has ordered Capt. Halstead to deliver up his bond for the freight 
of those goods. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, 
No. 55, p. 99.] 

Dec. 16. 694. Lord Ashley to his very affectionate friend Capt. Halstead. 
Exeter House. I s very glad to find he has not been mistaken in the person 
employed in our Carolina affairs and that he has acquitted himself 
so well to our satisfaction. This gives great encouragement to 
continue him in our service. The orders sent for his coming home 
so far from any dislike for him that it is intended to send him again 
Shaftesbury w ^ n ^ r - Coming to Carolina in a ship most convenient for our 
Papers. business here. In all places where he touches to encourage men of 
estate to remove to Carolina, but to forbear to invite the poorer sort 
yet awhile, " for we find ourselves mightily mistaken in endeavour- 
ing 10 get a great number of poor people there, it being substantial 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



297 



Shaftesbury 
Papers. 



1671. 

men and their families that must make the plantation which will 
stock the country with negroes, cattle, and other necessaries, whereas 
others rely and eat upon us." Is sorry for Hugh Wentworth's 
death at Barbadoes, but is now satisfied that his brother John, now 
at Providence, was the fitter man to be Governor, and he whom they 
purposed to make so, but the shuffling of names caused the mistake. 
He is to assure John Wentworth of this, for the mistake is now 
rectified. Has written to Sir John Yeamans and Mr. Mathews to 
take up a colony on Ashley River, which if he likes we will forthwith 
stock ; wishes his opinion upon it and also upon Mathew's honesty, 
skill in planting, and ability to manage a plantation. Desires exact 
observations of the two islands of the Bahamas which are planted. 
[Skaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 55, pp. 103, 104.] 

Dec. 16. 695. Lord Ashley to his very affectionate friend Mr. West. 
Exeter House. Jj as received his letters and is abundantly satisfied in all that he 
doubted of before, which he had not done had West given an 
account of his management of affairs there before. Finds he has 
been a very honest man to the Lords Proprietors in the distri- 
bution of stores and securing their debts, who have resolved in 
future to put the disposal of their stores wholly into his hands 
without any order from the Governor and Council, for now it is 
thought that every man by his own industry may be not only 
provided with victuals but with commodities to pay for cloths, 
tools, and other necessaries out of England. Intend so to furnish 
their stores that industrious people may be supplied who will pay 
ready truck, but not that the lazy or debauched shall run further 
into debt. It was through no personal dislike or disrespect to 
him that Sir John Yeamans was made Governor, but the nature 
of their government, which required that a Landgrave should be 
preferred to any commoner, but their opinion of his discretion, 
vigilance and fidelity is not at all lessened. Looks upon him as 
one who does in earnest mind the interest and prosperity of their 
settlement. Being assured that Charles Town and the country 
about it is healthy, the Lords Proprietors have altered their minds 
concerning the remove of their servants farther up the river, and 
would have him now go on in the plantation he has begun and 
employ them all there chiefly in planting provisions. [Shaftesbury 
Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 55, pp. 104, 106.] 

Dec. 17. 696. The King to Governor Sir Wm. Berkeley. To suspend 
John Lightfoot from the office of Auditor-general in Virginia and 
to continue Edward Digges in the peaceable possession and enjoy- 
ment of said office, his Majesty having been informed that the 
Governor of Virginia granted his commission to said Digges prior 
to the date of his Majesty's letters patent to Lightfoot, and that 
said Digges is a person every way fit for said office of Auditor- 
general, [Dora. Entry BL, Chas. II., Vol. XXXI., p. 77.] 

Dec. 17. 697. Sir Thos. Lynch to Sec. Lord Arlington. Wrote about a 

Jamaica, month since to his Lordship, and to Mr. Secretary Slingesby 

sending answer to inquiries ; and will with all possible speed send 



298 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1671. 

exact maps of the island, and the best account he can get of the 
number of the inhabitants. From what his Lordship and others 
have written concludes the Spaniards neither can nor will do anything, 
nevertheless continue making all preparations. The Spaniards could 
only ruin Port Royal ; it is absolutely impossible for them to 
destroy or retake the island. Again begs advice what to do if 
they should invade Jamaica, and whether to suffer the French 
to insult and injure them so. Has freed the Governor of Tortuga's 
patache. The Spaniards carried into St. Jago one of our ketches 
from New York, wounded some of the seamen, robbed all and 
then dismissed her ; but she has had harder measure here, for being 
a Jew's, the merchants informed against her, and she was con- 
demned for a foreigner, though the vessel, master, seamen, and 
goods were English. Sent Mr. Slingesby a petition of divers 
merchants against the Jews, but he supposes they will not be 
expelled, for there are but 16 without pa