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Full text of "Colonial Records. Calendar of State Papers, Colonial"

CALENDARS. 



Instructions to Editors 



The Master of the Rolls desires to call the attention of the Editors of Calendars 
to the following considerations, with a view to secure uniformity of plan in the 
important works on which they are engaged : 

He is anxious to extend, as far as is consistent with proper economy and 
despatch, the utility of the Calendars of State Papers now publishing under his 
control : 1st. As the most efficient means of making the national archives 
accessible to all who are interested in historical inquiries ; 2nd. As the best 
justification of the liberality and munificence of the Government in throwing 
open these papers to the public, and providing proper catalogues of their 
contents at the national expense. 

The greater number of the readers who will consult and value these works 
can have little or no opportunity of visiting the Public Record Office, in which 
these papers are deposited. The means for consulting the originals must 
necessarily be limited when readers live at a distance from the metropolis ; 
still more if they are residents of Scotland, Ireland, distant colonies, or foreign 
states. Even when such an opportunity does exist, the difficulty of mastering 
the original hands in which these papers are written will deter many readers 
from consulting them. Above all, their great variety and number must 
present formidable obstacles to literary inquirers, however able, sanguine, and 
energetic, when the information contained in them is not made accessible by 
satisfactory Calendars. 

The Master of the Rolls considers that, without superseding the necessity 
of consulting the originals, every Editor ought to frame his Calendar in such 
a manner that it shall present, in as condensed a form as possible, a correct 
index of the contents of the papers described in it. He considers that the 
entries should be so minute as to enable the reader to discover not only the 
general contents of the originals, but also what they do not contain. If 
the information be not sufficiently precise, if facts and names be omitted or 
concealed under a vague and general description, the reader will be often 
misled, he will assume that where the abstracts are silent as to information 
to be found in the documents, such information does not exist ; or he will 
have to examine every original in detail, and thus one great purpose will 
have been lost for which these Calendars have been compiled. 

A. 6188. Wt. 8060. a 



As the documents are various, the Master of the Rolls considers that they 
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allusions more than ordinarily obscure, it will be advisable for the Editor to 
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be printed at full length. But when a contemporary or authorised decipher 
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noticed. 

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llth. Each series is to be chronological. 

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are not to exceed fifty pages, unless the written permission of the Master of 
the Rolls to the contrary be obtained. 

%** Editors employed in foreign archives are to transcribe at full length 
important and secret papers. 



-o 



x""i *T~*\ < 

G,.^. 

T\jb. 

. ^ e '^ 4 ^:. CALENDAR 







OF 



STATE PAPERS, 

COLONIAL SERIES, 

AMEKICA AND WEST INDIES, 

JANUAKY, 1693-14 MAY, 1696. 



PRESERVED IN THE 



PUBLIC RECOBD OFFICE. 



EDITED BY 

THE HON. J. W. FORTESCUE. 



PCBLISHED BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE LORDS COMMISSIONERS OF HIS MAJESTY'S TREASURY, 
UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE MASTER OF THE ROLLS. 




LONDON: 

PBINTED FOE HIS MAJESTY'S STATIONERY OFFICE 
BY MACKIE AND CO. LD. 



And to be purchased, either directly or through any Bookseller, from 
EYRE AND SPOTTISWOODE, EAST HARDING STREET, FLEET STREET, B.C.; or 

OLIVER AND BOYD, EDINBURGH; or 
E. PONSONBY, 116, GRAFTON STREET, DUBLIN. 

1903. 



EEK ATUM. 



Abstract No. 1831, fifth line from end, /or Meed read Meech. 



PREFACE. 



THE present volume opens with the year 1693, and closes 
with what may seem to be arbitrary abruptness on the 
1 4th of May, 1696. The latter date, however, marks 
something more than the end of a volume ; for on the 
15th of May, 1696, there was issued a Commission for the 
administration of Trade and of the Plantations, whereby 
the career of the old Committee of the Privy Council, to 
which that business had so far been entrusted, was closed 
for ever. The constitution and powers of the new Com- 
mission will be more fitly discussed after its establishment; 
but students of administration may be attracted by the 
present volume since it reveals to them the last years, 
months and days of the Colonies as governed by the 
omnipotent Privy Council. Nor, it may be added, will it 
be found lacking in interest by the student of Colonial, 
or to use the newer and perhaps more accurate term, 
Imperial history. The years immediately before us 
mark the failure of other things besides the old Committee 
of Trade and Plantations. There may be traced through 
these records the great change which threw the burden of 
Imperial Defence almost wholly upon the Mother Country, 
and the hardening of the old conservative spirit which could 
find no remedy for suffering commerce but increased 
stringency in enforcing the Acts of Trade. It was the 
steady adherence to these two main lines of Imperial policy, 
which in less than a century drove the French from Canada, 
and banished English rule from the old American Colonies. 
With these few words upon the broad issues of these three 
short years of Colonial history, let us now turn to a brief 
consideration of their events in detail. 



Vlll 



PREFACE. 



Sir Francis 

Wheler's 

Expedition. 



Its reinforce- 
ments from 
the West 
Indies. 



The last volume of this Calendar ended, as I said in my 
preface, with order at last restored in the American provinces 
after the Revolution, and with every West Indian Island 
waiting in anxious expectation for the great English 
Armament, under the command of Sir Francis Wheler, 
which was to drive the French from the Antilles. 
Very early in the present volume we find that the 
design of the expedition had been widened, and that the 
Governors both of Massachusetts and New York were 
warned to expect it in May or June, 1693, when the 
fleet would first refit after its service in the West Indies, 
and then proceed to an attack on Canada (48,116). It 
was, however, the 28th of February 1693 before the fleet 
arrived at its rendezvous in Barbados, where it was most 
hospitably entertained by Governor Kendall. A soldier by 
profession, Kendall knew the vaJUie of refreshment ashore for 
troops which had long been cooped up in transports, and he 
had obtained from the Assembly an Act for quartering the 
soldiers on the inhabitants. The British, both seamen and 
landsmen, were extraordinarily healthy, and everyone seems 
to be happy and contented except the Commissary, who com- 
plained that he was excluded from participation in the 
plunder, whereas even the regimental chaplain " whose duty 
"obliges him to pray against our plundering," was admitted 
to a share therein. From the days of Cromwell to the days 
of the younger Pitt, the division of plunder was always a 
mischievous if not a fatal element in all of our West Indian 
expeditions (164, 165, 170). 

Kendall had already prepared two regiments, jointly nine 
hundred strong, together with stores and shipping, in 
Barbados itself to accompany Wheler in his career of conquest. 
It was objected against them that many of the men were 
Irish and might be Roman Catholics, but it was resolved in 
Council of War that they could be trusted and should be 
employed ; Colonel Foulke, who commanded the land forces, 
alone dissenting (204). Yet more reinforcements were 
expected from the Leeward Islands; but it was rightly 



PREFACE. j x 

thought inexpedient to fall so far to leeward as Antigua for 
an attack on Martinique, so a letter was written to Governor 
Codrington that he and his contingent should join the main 
force on the leeward side of Martinique (170 i). Mean- 
while the expedition halted for the present at Barbados, for 
the perfection of its preparations, a delay which gave some 
anxiety to Colonel Foulke, who apprehended that the men 
might sicken unless they were set to work speedily (171). 
Foulke was justified in his forebodings, for the armament had 
arrived in the Islands three months too late ; but there never 
yet was a British West Indian expedition which did not. 
However, for the present the men remained healthy; and 
the Council of War found an opportunity of censuring the 
Commissary, which no doubt gave satisfaction to all ranks. 
On the 16th of March Governor Codrington's answer was 
received from the Leeward Islands, and orders were given 
for the Barbados troops to embark in a week (194). Then 
followed yet another fortnight of preparation, in the course of 
which the Commissary found himself a close prisoner, " in 
'custody of a Serjeant and two files of musketeers, " and his 
duties undertaken by the Admiral ; and at length on the 
30th the fleet and transports sailed away to leeward. It 
seemed to Kendall, and probably with good reason, that 
everything needful had been accomplished with extraordinary 
speed (215, 219, 259). 
its failure at On the 1st of April Wheler anchored in the " Cul de 

Martinique. 

" Sac Marine " (marked in modern charts as Passe clu Marin) 
of Martinique, and on the following day the troops landed 
and began to lay waste the whole of the southern coast of 
the island. The process was continued for a week, when 
Codrington arrived from Antigua with his contingent. He 
had found some difficulty in persuading his men to serve 
under a strange commander, and indeed had only overcome 
their reluctance by accompanying them himself as a Volunteer 
(336). There then arose the question what should be done 
next, and on the 15th it was resolved at a Council of 
War that an attack should be delivered at St. Pierre 



X PREFACE. 

(276). The whole army was accordingly landed there on 
the 17th, and the enemy were driven into the fortification, 
but no further. Between the 17th and 20th eight hundred 
Englishmen went down with wounds or sickness ; the Irish 
showed symptoms of disaffection, and a second Council of 
War determined by an overwhelming majority to retire (281). 
There seems to have been some idea of an attack on 
Dominica, for we find the fleet off that island on the 25th 
of April, and yet another Council of War held (296), at 
which it was decided to abandon further enterprise in the 
West Indies. The Colonial forces returned to their several 
islands, and Wheler took his fleet to St. Christophers as 
the least unhealthy spot that he could find. Before May 
was half passed, the Admiral had lost half of his sailors 
and most of his officers, while the two British regiments 
with him had suffered nearly if not, quite as much as the 
fleet (338-340, 347). At the end of May he was bound by 
his instructions to proceed to North America, and thither 
he sailed accordingly, still in company with sickness and 
death. 
its impotence On his arrival at Boston in June the General Assembly 

in America. . 

of Massachusetts forbade all intercourse with his fleet lest 
the infection should spread from the ships to the shore (410); 
but the most stunning blow to the Admiral was the 
Governor's affirmation that he had received no instructions 
whatever as to the expedition, and had no forces ready for 
an attack upon Quebec. Who was to blame for this 
amazing piece of negligence is not very clear. Sir William 
Phips says plainly that he received no intimation from 
England of the design upon Canada until the 24th of July, 
and then only by a copy of a letter, of which the original 
did not reach him until the 24th of September (578). 
After a month's stay at Boston the health both of troops 
and seamen was restored, though their numbers were 
frightfully reduced; and Wheler then questioned Phips as 
to the practicability of an attack upon Quebec. The answer 
was that the season was too far spent, and that nothing had 



PREFACE. 



XI 



THE AMERICAN 

COLONIES. 

Quarrel 

between 

Massachusetts 

and New 

York. 



been made ready, which was somewhat singular since Phips 
himself had contemplated an attack on Canada in February 
(107). He suggested, however, that possibly some good 
might be done by an attack upon the French merchantmen 
in -Newfoundland (441, 452), Wheler then asked for 400 
men from Massachusetts to sail with him against Placentia ; 
to which Phips answered that he had no power to march the 
militia out of the Colony without their own consent or 
the consent of the Assembly, and that the Assembly had 
unfortunately been dismissed less than a fortnight before 
(475). There is something rather suspicious in this hasty 
dismissal of the Assembly on the 15th of July, within three 
days of Phips's own suggestion of an attack upon Placentia; 
and when the reader has considered certain other facts which 
throw light on Phips's character he will, I think, share my 
own doubts as to his loyalty and veracity. However that 
may be, Wheler sailed in August to Newfoundland, found 
the French there too strong for him, and in September 
returned to England, having lost hundreds of men and 
accomplished nothing. Thus the armament which was to 
have swept the French out of Martinique, out of Hispaniola, 
and out of Canada, came home in impotence and shame. 
Codrington, always clear-headed, wrote home the reasons 
for its failure (336), which may be summed up in the two 
words so familiar in British military history, Too Late. 
But the return of the expedition threw Barbados, the 
Leeward Islands and Jamaica into great alarm (334, 336, 
359, 627), and shook the loyalty even of the Indians about 
New York (603). In a word, the miscarriage of the 
enterprise, owing to the gross mismanagement of the 
Departments in England, was a great and far-reaching 
disaster. 

From this abortive effort of the Mother Country to secure 
the Colonies by an offensive stroke, let us now turn to her 
endeavours to aid them in organizing their own defence. 
The North American provinces were all of them still suffering 
from the unrest of the Revolution, and none more than New 



xii PREFACE. 

\ork, the frontier Colony, upon which the brunt of French 
aggression must necessarily fall. In October, 1692, a circular 
had been addressed from Whitehall to all the Northern and 
Middle Colonies, requiring them to send assistance in men or 
money to New York when called upon, and to decide among 
themselves as to the contribution, or, as it was always called, 
the quota, which should be furnished by each of them. 
This was followed in March, 1693, by a series of orders to 
the same effect (93-97, 139, HO, 158, 168), and by the 
transference of the command of the militia of Connecticut 
from the Governor of New England, Sir William Phips, to 
Colonel Benjamin Fletcher, the Governor of New York. 
Long, however, before these orders reached their destination, 
New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut and 
New Hampshire had embarked on a series of wrangles and 
quarrels among themselves, which l^ft no time for their 
combination for the common defence. In the autumn of 
1692 Governor Fletcher had been called to the frontier at 
Albany by the news that large reinforcements had reached 
Quebec, where Count Frontenac, probably the ablest of all 
the French commanders with whom the British had to deal 
in Canada, was evidently meditating mischief. Fletcher 
succeeded in restoring confidence, but on his return to New 
York found that the whole population had fallen once more 
into their old factious divisions as followers or enemies of 
Leisler's revolution (13, 86). This in itself was disquieting, 
but the trouble was increased by the fact that Abraham 
Gouverneur, one of the dead Leisler's principal partisans, 
had taken refuge in Boston ; whence, being sheltered and even 
honoured by Sir William Phips, he was able to write letters 
of defiance to Governor Fletcher (27). This, of course, 
set Fletcher and Phips at variance ; and it so happened that 
New York and Massachusetts had already found a bone of 
contention in the island of Martha's Vineyard, which was 
claimed by both Governments but had been "violently" 
occupied by Massachusetts. Th^ earlier stages of this dispute 
may be traced in the Minutes of the Council of New York 



PREFACE. 



Xlll 



Sir William 
Phips's 
quarrel with 
Lieutenant- 
Q overnor 
Usher. 



(22, 82) ; but there is also a full account of the visit of 
Governor Fletcher's emissary to Phips in January, 1693, 
which was sent home by Lieutenant-Go vernor Usher, of New 
Hampshire, together with some of the letters that passed in 
the controversy (40 i.,u., in.). From these it appears that 
Phips heartily espoused the cause of Leisler in New York, 
and that the two Governors had some idea of settling their 
difference by a personal encounter. Each of them, of course, 
sent his own account of the matter to Whitehall (84, 107). " I 
" must not levy war against Sir William Phips, though provoked 
" by his unmannerly letter to meet him there," wrote Fletcher. 
" I wrote to Colonel Fletcher to ask what assistance we might 
" expect from New York for the expedition against Canada," 
wrote Phips ; "I find him averse both from correspondence 
" and concurrence. He has sent me a messenger (lately the 

" jailer at New York) to say that he expects me 

"to meet him there [Martha's Vineyard]. His messenger 
" was a herald, for he delivered his message as a challenge." 

Concurrently Phips had contrived to make himself 
another enemy in the person of Lieutenant-Go vernor Usher. 
This functionary had been Treasurer at Boston at the time 
of the Revolution, and had shared the fate of Sir Edmund 
Andros ; but having been released, and promoted to the 
first place in New Hampshire, he was now vainly endeavouring 
to settle his accounts with the Government of Massachusetts, 
and to obtain from it the balance that was due to him. He 
appears to have been justly entitled to 850, but the ruling 
powers at Boston resolutely declined to discharge his claim 
(39, 40, 133), though some of the better men seem to have 
been ashamed of the meanness and trickery which denied 
to the man his due (133i.). Usher therefore did not love 
Phips, and lost no opportunity of reporting the breaches of 
the Acts of Trade which were the rule rather than the 
exception at Boston. But what increased Usher's wrath 
very greatly was the fact that there W 7 as a party in New 
Hampshire which yearned to annex that Province to 
Massachusetts, and shrank from no shift to bring the 



x j v PREFACE. 

annexation about. The truth was that this party was 
republican, and hoped by joining Massachusetts to throw 
off the King's government and return to the virtual 
independence which Massachusetts had enjoyed under her 
old charter. The situation was complicated by the fact 
that Massachusetts had taken the protection of New 
Hampshire upon herself, and kept a few troops, which New 
Hampshire was expected to pay, in the province. By 
refusing to vote money for these men the republican party 
in New Hampshire and Massachusetts hoped to force the 
King's hand, and compel him to amalgamate the two 
provinces whether he would or no. 

sir William The quarrel between Phips and Usher, already sufficiently 

quarrel with acrimonious, was still further embittered by Phips's arbitrary 
Navy. ya an d brutal proceedings towards Captain Short of the King's 

Navy. Those who may be curious as to this rather extra- 
ordinary story may follow it, through many cross-currents 
of lying, by referring to the index under the name of Short. 
It seems that the relations between the officers of the King's 
Navy and the Government of Boston had long been strained 
(42), and that Short had rendered himself peculiarly 
obnoxious to Phips by refusing to lend the King's seamen 
to man a sloop, which was apparently engaged in trading 
for Phips's private behoof (214, 224). Thereupon an 
angry altercation ensued between them, which ended in 
Phips's striking Short with his cane. Short returned the 
blow as well as he could, but his right hand was crippled by 
a wound received in action, and Phips, easily mastering him, 
beat him unmercifully. Not content with this cowardly 
treatment of a disabled man, Phips then suspended Short 
from his command, appointing the gunner to be captain in 
his place, and threw him into the common gaol, evidently 
hoping by sheer cruelty to force him to compliance with 
his wishes (224, 247). It is very significant that he 
bolstered up his complaints against Short by suborning his 
inferior officers to bring accusations against him, which the 
Captain had no chance of refuting (74, 79, 99, 129, 130, 



PREFACE. 



XV 



Sir William 
Phips's 
quarrel with 
Bhode Island. 



262). After keeping Short in prison for about a month, 
Phips put him aboard a ship to be taken to England. Short, 
however, contrived that some of his men should be em- 
ployed on this vessel, and that she should be sent up 
to Piscataqua, where he and his men were promptly 
sheltered by Lieutenant-Govcrnor Usher (247). Phips in 
great wrath sent up Short's purser, Matthew Gary, to New 
Hampshire to apprehend the seamen as deserters, whereupon 
Usher immediately apprehended the purser, imprisoned him 
for three days, and then sent a message to Boston that Gary 
had escaped from justice, and that he desired Phips to 
deliver him up (197, 205 1.). Quite beside himself with 
rage, Phips then sailed to Piscataqua in person to demand 
that Short and the seamen should be given up to him. 
Arrived there, he at once boarded the ship in search of 
them, and rinding that they were gone ashore broke open 
and carried off Short's trunks and chest. He then issued 
a warrant for the arrest of the missing men ; but the 
Council of New Hampshire refused to allow it to be 
executed. He then tried to obtain admission to the fort, 
but was excluded ; and finally he sailed back to Boston fairly 
beaten, while Usher wrote letters of triumph to England 
of the manner in which he had maintained his authority 
against this encroachment. However, Phips avenged him- 
self by refusing to send a garrison to hold the fort on the 
Piscataqua, though he placed a few men at the disposal of 
the republican leaders for their protection (258, 293, 422). 

But even though thus embroiled both with New Hamp- 
shire and New York, Phips was not yet satiated with quarrels. 
At this same time he was engaged in a controversy with 
Rhode Island over some encroachment of that province upon 
the boundaries, or alleged boundaries, of Massachusetts. He 
duly arrested the ringleaders, and having thus thoroughly 
irritated the people he repaired to the seat of Government in 
Rhode Island, and published his Commission to command the 
militia of the province. The Rhode Islanders, however, 
always the most perverse and cantankerous of men, declined 

8060 b 



XVI 



PREFACE. 



French 
attack upon 
Albany, 1693. 



Backwardness 
of the Colonies 
to assist New 
York. 



to take the slightest notice. The Council refused to assemble 
when convened to meet Phips, and though the Governor 
made excuses for them he evidently sympathised with his 
Councillors. He therefore merely waited until Phips's back 
was turned, after which he took no further notice either of 
him or of his Koyal Commission. 

Meanwhile Count Frontenac, doubtless well pleased to 
observe these divisions among the British, had, early in 
February, 1693, pushed forward a force towards the British 
frontier-posts at Albany and Senectady, and inflicted some 
loss upon the Maquas, one of the most important of the 
Five Nations of Indians, upon whose friendship the British 
counted chiefly for their defence against invasion. The news 
came to New York just as Fletcher was at the height of his 
wrangle with Phips, causing him to hurry up to Albany with 
every man that he could raise, and t6 send urgent messages 
to the neighbouring Colonies for help (82, 84). Three 
members of the Council of New York, as was usual in those 
impecunious days, pledged their private credit for the 
victualling of the troops ; and it seems that this promptitude 
of movement went near to making the French repent their 
temerity. Peter Schuyler, a very gallant man with great 
experience of Indian warfare, engaged the enemy without 
delay and defeated them ; and but for some mismanagement 
the whole of the French party would have been cut off. 
However, the British prisoners were at any rate rescued and 
the French driven back in precipitate retreat. Within a 
fortnight of his arrival at Albany Fletcher was able to embark 
again for New York, amid a chorus of congratulation from 
both the Colonists and the Indians on the frontier (124, 
161, 179 I.-VIL). 

Successful though the expedition was for the moment, 
Fletcher before starting upon it had complained of the 
weakness of the two companies of the King's troops in New 
York, and begged not only that they might be kept up to 
strength and regularly paid, but that two more companies 



PREFACE. 



xvil 



Royal 

Instructions 
for the 
Colonies to 
agree as to 
their quotas of 
men for the 
common 
defence. 



might be added to them (84). Usher, also in New Hamp- 
shire, had declared himself unable to uphold the King's 
government or to defend the province without 100 men sent 
from England ; and the result of Fletcher's call upon the 
neighbouring provinces for assistance went far to shew that 
if the Colonies were to be protected at all, England must 
protect them. Connecticut, which Fletcher described as 
"a sort of republic," returned him no answer whatever, 
Pennsylvania sent good wishes only, Rhode Island sent 
nothing at all, and East Jersey sent no men, and only 248 
in money. Virginia, under the stimulus of Sir Edmund 
Andros, who, as an old Governor of New York, appreciated 
its strategical importance, resolved to send 000 ; but on the 
other hand a small contribution sent by Maryland, in the 
form of bills of exchange, proved to be of little value, 
because two out of three bills were protested and only one 
of them paid (178, 274, 287, 342). 

In March 1693, however, Sir William Phips received the 
Queen's orders for the Colonies to agree among themselves 
as to the quota that should be furnished by each ; and there 
seemed to be at last some prospect that the Colonies might 
unite for the common defence (216). In the lull that 
followed upon the expedition to Albany Governor Fletcher 
seized the opportunity to visit Pennsylvania, which, to the 
great indignation of William Penn, had been included in 
Fletcher's commission (397 I.). He spent some weeks 
there, but, to use his own words, " never yet found so much 
"self-conceit. They will rather die than resist with carnal 

"weapons they have neither arms nor ammuni- 

"tion, nor would they suffer the few men fit for it to be 
"trained." This was not a very promising outlook for the 
future, but Pennsylvania, as a nest of Quakers, might be 
presumed to be singular. Little of moment occurred during 
April and May except that Phips and Usher entered upon 
a new wrangle as to the limits of their respective jurisdic- 
tions (372), and that Phips finally withdrew the last of the 
Massachusetts soldiers from New Hampshire (454). Then 



xviii PREFACE. 

in June arrived Wheler's squadron as has already been told, 
depressing the hearts of all by its tidings of death and 
failure. Fletcher and the Council of New York sent an 
emissary to England to represent the danger of the province, 
since her neighbours would give no help, to urge the 
annexation of Connecticut and New Jersey to New York, 
and to suggest an expedition against Canada (414). This 
done, he set out for Albany, and on the 21st of June held 
the annual palaver with the Five Nations at Albany, wherein 
the Sachems expressed themselves as still hearty to the 
English Alliance (501 i. sqq.}. Hardly, however, had he 
returned to New York before new movements of the French 
were* reported (457), and on the 28th of July there came 
disquieting intelligence that the Indians had resolved to 
open negotiations with the French, without his privity (478). 
A letter of rebuke brought them to' their senses ; but there 
could be no doubt that alike by soft words and hard blows 
the French had wrought considerably upon the feelings of 
the Five Nations, who were by this time thoroughly sick 
of the war (501 n., v., 612 vn.). 

Massachusetts Fletcher's next step was to send an emissary to Sir 

refuses to send 

assistance to William Phips to demand a quota of 200 men from 

New York. . 

Massachusetts resell. Ihe interview was a stormy one, as 
might have been expected, and Phips flatly refused to send 
a man or a farthing to the assistance of New York. He 
was so violent that one of the Councillors took the envoy 
aside and told him, " Sir, you must pardon him his dog- 
-days; he cannot help it." Meanwhile the province of 
Connecticut had during the month of June entered upon a 
boundary-dispute with Massachusetts, which furnished fresh 
matter for Phips 's irascible nature to feed on (410). Even 
a peace with the Eastern Indians, the only pacific matter 
recorded of Phips (545), only brought upon him the fiercer 
wrath of Usher for omitting to consult New Hampshire 
before concluding the treaty (647). 



PREFACE. 



xix 



Congress 
summoned to 
fix the quotas 
of assistance. 



Connecticut 
refuses to 
submit her 
militia to 
Governor 
Fletcher's 
command. 



In the autumn of 1 693 arrived the royal orders for the 
various Colonies to contribute to the assistance of New York, 
and Governor Fletcher at once wrote to Connecticut 
for 100 men, to Maryland for a more generous contribu- 
tion, and, most important of all, to Phips, suggesting that 
Commissioners from all the Colonies should meet in Congress 
to agree upon a quota of men and money for defence of the 
frontiers. Phips replied more gently than usual, though he 
was evidently sore at losing the command of the militia of 
Connecticut ; but his answer was none the less thoroughly 
unsatisfactory. Connecticut, on the other hand, was quite 
clear as to her readiness to send a Commissioner to the 
Congress and her refusal to despatch a man to the frontier at 
Albany (546, 570, 571). Fletcher could do no more than 
appoint a day in October for the meeting of the Congress, 
forward Phips 's letter to England, and resolve to go to 
Connecticut in person forthwith (578, 582, 590). He 
foresaw that he should get little help from any of the 
Colonies, and continued to press for reinforcements from 
home (611), but he forwarded at the same time an 
estimate of the quotas that ought to be furnished by each 
Colony, which document was not without its value at 
Whitehall (611 in.). 

Early in October he went to Connecticut, and found that 
the people who would raise no money for defence of the 
frontiers were quite ready to tax themselves in order to send 
an Agent to plead their cause at Whitehall. "I never met 
"the like people," he wrote (649). It was absolutely useless 
for him to publish his commission and declare the militia of 
Connecticut to be under his command ; the only answer was 
some mumbled words about the charter of the Colony, and 
steady refusal to obey. The course of the wrangle may be 
traced in the documents that passed between Fletcher and 
the General Court (650). It is enough to say that after 
arguing in vain for twenty days and kicking one gentleman 
downstairs, he returned to New York absolutely baffled. He 
resolved, however, to send a written order to Connecticut for 



XX 



PREFACE. 



Failure of the 
project for a 
Congress. 



Besolution at 
Whitehall to 
reinforce the 
garrison at 
New York. 



100 men, with a saving clause which presumably was meant 
to shame the province into compliance (667). Meanwhile 
the Congress, from which so much had been expected, had 
come to naught. Phips, probably from jealousy, had refused 
to send a Commissioner at all. Maryland had apparently not 
had time to elect one (585). Rhode Island also complained 
of insufficient time, though it chose a Commissioner to be 
ready for any future Congress (829 n.). Finally the few 
Commissioners that attended very naturally refused to 
proceed unless a representative were present from every 
province (67 2), Half a century was still to elapse before as 
many even as seven provinces were to be gathered together 
in congress. 

Thus the winter of 1693 drew on, not without fresh alarms 
of French aggression (698, 733) and disagreeable signs of 
mutiny within New York itself (679, 739). By this time 
Fletcher's urgent appeals for help had reached Whitehall ; 
and it had been resolved to increase the regular garrison of 
New York to a strength of four full companies, and to send 
out further supplies of ordnance-stores (754, 812). It was, 
perhaps, hardly fair that this burden should have been laid upon 
the Mother Country, when the Colonies, if they could only have 
laid their jealousies aside, should have sufficed easily to have 
driven the French from Canada. Still there the matter was. 
The precedent was made, and having been made it was 
steadily followed until 1763. The Committee of Trade and 
Plantations had ample evidence of the spirit of disunion in 
the Colonies before it in the protest of Rhode Island against 
the subjection of its militia to Sir William Phips's command; 
and it was significant that Rhode Island could not lay even 
this matter before Whitehall without dragging in a reference 
to its eternal dispute with Massachusetts over the question of 
boundaries (524). If the Committee could have thrown 
an eye across the Atlantic it would have found every one 
of the provinces shrinking further and further from their 
duty to help themselves and each other (664, 775, 790, 794, 
829 in.). 



PREFACE. 



xxi 



Recall and 
death of Sir 
William 
Phips. 



Character of 
Sir William 
Phips. 



But fortunately Rhode Island's was not the only complaint 
which came before the Committee in the winter of 1693-4. 
Captain Short had returned to England with Sir Francis 
Wheler's fleet, and his narrative, together with certain 
accusations preferred by the Customs Officer, Jahleel Brenton, 
brought down upon Phips a sudden order to return and 
defend himself at Whitehall, with directions to Lieutenant- 
Governor Stoughton to collect evidence against him in Boston, 
(728, 814, 815, 825-827, 802, 879, 880). It was, however, 
some months before these orders could reach their destination, 
and in the interim Phips continued to work as busily as 
ever for himself. John Usher and Sir Edmund Andros still 
continued to beg in vain for the discharge of the debts due to 
them from Massachusetts (094, 723); but Sir William Phips 
was more intent on obtaining for himself a monopoly of the 
fur-trade than on paying the Colony's just debts. By the 
summer of 1694 he had managed to embroil himself un- 
pleasantly with the Assembly of Massachusetts (1089, 1141), 
and in July of that year he once again shewed his enmity to 
Usher by refusing to send help to New Hampshire after a 
dangerous raid of Indians upon the settlement at Oyster 
River (1306). At last in November, 1094, he sailed for 
England (1508), where evidence against him had been 
rapidly accumulating (1505, 1507). He arrived apparently 
towards the end of January, 1095 (1000) ; but he seems 
to have been in bad health at the time, and before the 
charges against him could be examined he was dead (1876). 

The material before us in the present volume is perhaps 
too one-sided to enable us to pronounce a fair opinion 
upon the man ; but all evidence points to the fact that he 
was ignorant, brutal, covetous and violent, and that his 
appointment to the Government of Massachusetts was a very 
grave misfortune. A short biography of him was published 
soon after his death with the intention of vindicating his 
character, from which it appears that he began life as a 
ship's carpenter, made 300.000 by the recovery of treasure 
from a Spanish wreck, and therewith went home and obtained 



XX11 



PEEFACE. 



The quotas of 
the Colonies 
for common 
defence fixed 
by the Crown. 



the honour of knighthood. It appears further that together 
with his wealth he acquired a certain anxiety as to the state 
of his soul, and so became the tool of the Congregational 
ministers at Boston. This would account for the influence 
wielded by the said ministers in the abortive expedition 
which he led against Quebec, for his appointment as the 
first King's Governor of Massachusetts, and for his steady 
co-operation with the republican party in New Hampshire. 
Meanwhile the one thing that seems certain is that he was 
absolutely unfit to occupy the place in which he was seated, 
or to wield the power with which he was entrusted. 

In the spring of 1694 the alarms of French aggression 
on the side of Albany continued, with the usual hasty pre- 
parations at New York, the usual rush of the Governor to 
the frontier, and the usual uneasiness /of the province under 
the heavy burden of defence that was laid upon it 
(854, 867, 966, 989). The situation was most serious, 
for it was evident that the Five Nations, which were the 
principal bulwark against the French, were more than 
ever weary of the war and were inclined to make peace 
upon their own account (991). Nor were the unfortunate 
savages altogether unjustified in their impatience, for they 
had not been supported as they ought to have been by 
the English settlers. So serious was their discontent that 
even Massachusetts and Connecticut sent Commissioners 
to soothe them in August 1694, and voted money to 
purchase presents for them (1183, 1191, 1221, 1237). 
But it was on England that the Colonies counted chiefly 
for their deliverance, and it is to England that we must 
turn to find any effective measures for their deliverance. 

Rhode Island, as we have seen, had already complained 
of the taking of the command of her militia out of her 
hands. In January 1694 Connecticut came forward with 
a like complaint (845); and the result was a serious 
enquiry as to the rights of the Crown in respect of the 
militia of the Chartered and Proprietary Colonies (999, 
1022). There seems to have been some idea of cancelling 



PREFACE. 



xxni 



The garrison 
of New York 
reinforced 
from 
England. 



their charters and grants wholesale by legal process, and 
bringing the whole of the American Colonies under the 
same dependence on the Crown (861); but this would 
have been a lengthy and tedious business. Finally the 
whole difficulty was solved, or considered to be solved, 
by the despatch of a circular from the Queen, dated 
21 August (1253), fixing the quotas to be furnished by 
each of the Colonies for the defence of the frontier. 
Since the provinces had failed to settle the matter for 
themselves, it seemed not unreasonable that the Crown 
should settle it for them; but it is noteworthy that Rhode 
Island managed at the same time to withdraw her militia 
in great measure from the command of the Governor 
of Massachusetts (1247). There was also a convenient 
loophole for the recalcitrant in the order that no greater 
proportion of the quota should be required from one 
Colony than from another. 

Simultaneously the Crown showed its goodwill by 
strengthening the King's troops at New York to 
the promised total of 400 men; but this was a task 
which was not so easily accomplished. The pre- 
parations took an enormous time, for recruits were 
not easily procured, and the methods of the various 
departments were sufficiently cumbrous (1060-1080, 
1168-1171, 1203-1210). Moreover when marching down 
to Portsmouth the officers became involved in an angry 
quarrel with the magistrates of Petersfield, the particulars 
of which are worth reading for the light that they 
throw upon the relations between soldiers and civilians 
at that time (1190, 1218). Finally, when these unfortunate 
troops did at last put to sea, they were driven back, 
after a severe engagement with three French privateers 
and compelled to return to Falmouth, with their numbers 
sadly thinned (1470, 1524). They did not finally sail 
for New York until March 1695 nor reach their 
destination until July of that year (1902). The chaos of 
administration in all departments of the service may be 



XXIV 



PREFACE. 



Evasion of 
Royal Orders 
as to the 
quota. 



The reasons 
for that 
Evasion. 



traced with instruction in following the career of these 
unfortunate Companies. 

While these designs were going forward in England, 
the Colonies remained as supine as ever. The republican 
party in New Hampshire, strong in the support of 
Massachusetts, continued obstructive (1119); the Southern 
Colonies became more resolute in refusing to contribute 
to the common defence (1092, 1093); and Connecticut, 
while professing to send 600 and taking credit for the 
same, evaded actual payment of more than half of that 
sum (1001 1., 1007). The autumn as usual brought fresh 
cause for alarm at Albany (1340, 1518, 1520) and fresh 
reluctance on the part of the Assembly of New York to 
provide men for the frontier. Application was made, as 
usual, to the neighbouring Colonies for assistance, and 
with the more confidence in view of the Queen's Circular 
of 21 August, but in vain. One and all began to make 
excuse (1790, 1791, 1816, 1870, 1881, 2054), and 
though Virginia and Maryland did indeed contribute 
sums of money, which the King was fain to accept in 
lieu of men (2227, 2228), yet it was sufficiently evident 
that the Crown's scheme for uniting the Colonies for 
defence had utterly and hopelessly failed. The story if 
written at length would be merely a series of repetitions 
of the same facts ; but it may be traced by following 
the fate of the quota under the name of each province 
in the index. 

It may be urged in some excuse for the provinces that 
the two appointed Commanders-in-Chief were men who 
could hardly be trusted. Phips was such a man as has 
been already shewn ; and towards the end of 1695 and 
the beginning of 1696 certain accusations were brought 
forward which reflected very seriously upon Fletcher 
(1802, 2034, 2056, 2084, 2148, 2150). How far they may 
have been justified will appear in the next volume ; but, 
however blameable these individuals may have been, it is, 
I think, indisputable that the true fault la$( with the 



PREFACE. 



xxv 



The 

endeavours of 
Massachusetts 
to regain 
her lost 
privileges. 



Increase of 
illicit trade in 
the Colonies. 



Colonies themselves. The New England provinces, 
beyond all question, were working far more earnestly to 
establish themselves as free republics than to repel the 
French ; and in their blind pursuit of their ideal they quite 
lost sight of the fact that the French, once established at 
New York as well as at Quebec, would have gained the 
whole of the Indians to their side and devoured the 
English settlers piecemeal. Under the guidance of 
William Stoughtou, Massachusetts settled down to live 
in greater moderation and quietness, though her few 
military enterprises were not very successful ; but the 
republican party never ceased to abet the obstructive 
element and to foment disorder in New Hampshire 
(1569, 2105, 2137, 2142). At home again the Agents 
for Massachusetts immediately upon the death of Sir 
William Phips urged the annexation of New Hampshire 
to Massachusetts (1876), while one of them, Sir Henry 
Ashurst, piloted through the House of Commons an Act 
to reverse the attainder of Jacob Leisler, with the evident 
intention of currying favour with the followers of that 
martyr in New York. 

The Acts of Massachusetts tell exactly the same tale. 
A large batch of them was disallowed, chiefly because 
they carefully excluded all rights of the Crown, but in 
more than one case because they contained enactments 
directly contrary to the new charter of the Colony. 
Probably the Assembly hoped that these Acts might 
pass unnoticed or that their confirmation might be bought 
(for the whole administration of England at this time 
was hopelessly corrupt) with hard cash. Though unable 
to raise money to help in the common defence, Massachusetts 
could always find it for her own purposes at Whitehall 
(1103). 

Yet another notable matter was the evidence produced 
in 1695 of the enormous increase of illicit trade in the 
Colonies during these years. These revelations, as might 
have been expected, were the work of Edward Randolph ; 



XXVI 



PREFACE. 



Massachu- 
setts, Pennsyl- 
vania and 
Maryland. 



but there was collateral testimony adduced from other 
quarters also (2198, 2217, 2243, 2303, 2304). 
Together with these may be read two more papers (2187, 
2273), shewing how Scotland endeavoured to share in the 
Colonial Trade of England, and how furiously jealous 
England was of her competition. These, however, are 
matters of which we shall see more in the next volume 
of this Calendar, though even in the present volume there 
is mention (2340), of a new Act passed in 1695-6 for 
preventing frauds and regulating the Plantation Trade. 
This enactment will be constantly before our eyes during 
the years immediately before us. For the present it is 
sufficient to call attention to the remarkable parallel 
between these years and those which immediately preceded 
the American Revolution. Then,-' as in 1693-1696, the 
Colonies refused to face the question of defence, and the 
Mother Country came forward to protect them, but strove 
to indemnify herself by stricter enforcement of the Acts 
of Trade. The only difference was that in 1763 the French 
were conquered, whereas in 1693 they were triumphant. 
The next volume will reveal to us the further fact, of which 
there is already a hint in these pages (1916), that the 
American Colonies, one and all, not content with violation 
of the Acts of Trade, were making good the inevitable 
losses of the war by piracy, and that upon so large a scale 
that they almost swept the English trade with the East 
Indies off the sea. On the whole the story of the American 
Colonies during this war will not be found creditable 
either to them nor, for the most part, to the Governors 
who were appointed by England to bear rule over them. 

For the rest there is little beyond the operations of war 
to arrest attention in the Northern Colonies, though the 
accounts of the grant of the Post Office of Massachusetts 
to Andrew Hamilton, Governor of New Jersey, may be of 
some interest (228, 2234 and Index under Massachusetts). 
In Pennsylvania, the successful struggle of William Penn 
to maintain his rights may be studied in a few papers 



PREFACE. xxvii 

(860, 1127, 1138, 1144, 1181); as also the predilection 
of the Quakers for smuggling and piracy (1916). In 
Maryland there are signs that during the reign of Governor 
Copley there was an attempt by persecution of Edward 
Randolph and Sir Thomas Lawrence, an official sent out 
from England, to treat the Acts of Trade as not existing 
(263). Both of these officials, however, having powerful 
patrons at Whitehall, were reinstated (556, 1937). After 
the death of Copley and a short interregnum under Sir 
Edmund Andros (637), Francis Nicholson, late Lieutcnant- 
Governor of New York, was appointed to the Government 
and matters went more smoothly. There is, however, a 
curious picture of a dispute between him and his Lower 
House, which he ended by handing the Speaker a sermon 
of the Archbishop of Canterbury " of doing good for 
posterity," and adjourning them for twenty-four hours that 
they might peruse it (2263). The shifting of the seat of 
Government to Annapolis in these years may be studied by 
reference to that word in the index. 

Virginia. Virginia, again, apart from the question of the quota, 

presents little of interest beyond the fixed resolution of 
the legislature that there should be no town in the Colony. 
An effort to create one by limiting the number of 'ports 
was frustrated by the House of Burgesses and abandoned 
in despair (628, 652, 776). The province suffered much 
from want of convoys to carry away its produce, and to 
bring the English manufactures upon which it depended 
almost as much for its necessaries as its luxuries (466). 
The next volume will shew us more clearly the stagnation 
and the backwardness of Virginia. In these pages there is 
no sign of it except the persecution of the Bishop of 
London's Commissary (1788) nominally for recalcitrance, 
but really, as the next volume will shew, for his efforts 
to rouse the planters. 

Carolina. The documents respecting Carolina are likewise of 

little significance, except for one or two indications of 
the encouragement of piracy, the abuse of the Acts 



xxvm 



PREFACE. 



The mania in 
England for 
speculative 
enterprise in 
the Colonies. 



Bermuda. 



of Navigation, and maltreatment of the Indians, all 
of them matters of too common occurrence in Carolina 
to call for any special remark (704, 705, 2256). 

A point of greater interest is the rage in England 
at this time for speculative companies to develop the 
resources of the Colonies. The most conspicuous of these, 
Sir Matthew Dudley's, was formed with most comprehensive 
designs for working mines and exporting naval stores from 
New England. Its history may be traced under Dudley's 
name in the index; but it is noteworthy that the Com- 
mittee of Plantations, before coming to any decision 
thereupon, referred the matter - to the Agents for 
Massachusetts, who strongly objected to the grant of any 
such Charter as was desired by the Company, and under- 
took themselves to supply such naval stores as were 
needed (983, 1331). We shall see in the next volume 
how the Government of Massachusetts fulfilled its engage- 
ment. Other undertakings for the supply of naval stores 
may be traced in the index under the names of Richard 
Haynes, John Taylor, and the heading Naval Stores. The 
subject is of some interest to naval history, since it 
marks a growing anxiety on the part of the English 
Government to possess some other source for supply of 
tar, pitch, timber and so forth, than the countries in the 
Baltic. 

Passing now to the West Indies there is little to be 
read of Bermuda except a succession of letters from 
Governor Goddard to the detriment of the late Governor 
Isaac Richier. The latter, it will be remembered, had 
been displaced on an information that he was a Jacobite, 
and without the least enquiry whether there were any 
ground for the information or not. The next volume 
will shew what gross injustice was done by this readiness 
to accept accusations against a prisoner without first 
hearing him in his defence. It was just such cases as 
these that ultimately begat the existing regulation, that 



PREFACE. 



XXIX 



The 
Bahamas. 



The West 
Indies. The 
question of 
defence. 



letters addressed to the Colonial office concerning any 
point in the administration of a Colony must be 
transmitted through the Governor. 

In the Bahamas there is nothing to notice except the 
appointment of Nicholas Trott, the Bermudian, to be 
Governor. His antecedents, which are traceable though 
not worth tracing in former volumes of this Calendar, 
were not of the best; and future volumes will shew that 
he was a very great rogue. It must, however, be conceded 
that had he been an honest man, he would have found 
himself very solitary in the Bahamas of that day. 

In Barbados, the Leeward Islands and Jamaica we find 
comparatively little that calls for attention outside the 
sphere of defence against French aggression; but this 
subject in the West Indies as in North America assumes 
at this time an importance so great that it cannot be 
overlooked. The defence of the islands hitherto had been 
entrusted principally to the militia, which consisted of the 
"white servants" who were regularly imported from 
England, and sold into servitude to the planters for a 
term of years. War and sickly seasons had reduced the 
numbers of these white servants on the spot very seriously ; 
while the dearth of recruits and of seamen in England 
made the importation of a fresh supply a very costly 
business. Moreover since the islands depended on the 
American Colonies for their supplies of food, it was 
essential that their coasts should be guarded so as to 
allow safe ingress for their provision-ships. I have already 
given account of the dismay which fell upon the West 
Indies upon the withdrawal of Sir Francis Wheler's 
expedition; and it is consequently no matter of surprise 
to find that, as soon as the news reached England, the 
Agents for the Leeward Islands began to cry out for 
ships, men, arms and ammunition to be despatched to 
the assistance of Governor Codrington (696, 670). It 
was more than usually difficult to refuse them, since an 
Act of Antigua, to encourage the importation of white 



XXX 



PREFACE. 



Barbados 
obtains a 
Regiment 
from England. 



servants, had been disallowed on the ground that it would 
also encourage the practice "known as kidnapping" 
(622, 806). The Agents were accordingly required to 
state their wants, which they duly did in February 1694 
(859); and an order was given for four ships to be sent 
forthwith to the West Indies (870) and (if the Agents 
for the Leeward Islands are to be believed) four 
hundred recruits with them (1564 1.). 

These recruits, however, were not despatched, for the 
Agents for Barbados had in July 1693 anticipated the 
Leeward Islands by asking that a whole regiment might be 
stationed in that island (451), while Governor Kendall had 
further solicited the sending of five ships thither. To this 
latter request the Admiralty answered firmly with Non 
possumus (618); whereupon the Agents seem to have 
summoned every merchant interested in Barbados to press 
for the despatch of a regiment, and with such success that 
the Committee agreed to recommend compliance with their 
request (709, 721). Having gained so much, the Agents 
proceeded next to point out that Barbados could no longer 
afford to find quarters for the regiment, and that, if the 
King would bear that expense, the favour would be very 
gratefully received (759, 884). The King, though himself 
at his wits' end for money, thereupon consented to pay 
for the men's quarters if the island would meet the expense 
of their transportation (904). To this the Agents rejoined 
that they had no instructions to undertake this outlay nor 
fund to discharge it, and could only beg that the troops 
might be sent as soon as possible, throwing themselves 
at the King's mercy for the cost of their quarters a very 
ingenious method of forcing the King to take the whole 
of the expenses upon himself (917). Finally the matter 
was compromised by an arrangement that as many men 
as could be spared should be sent out at once, and the 
remainder, up to a total of 500 men, despatched by some 
convenient opportunity (928, 964,\ 



PREFACE. 



xxxi 



Governor 
Russell sails 
with half the 
Regiment to 
Barbados. 



Jamaica. Its 
defenceless- 
ness. 



It had already been decided that Francis Russell should 
go Governor to Barbados to relieve Governor Kendall, 
and accordingly in June 1694 he sailed from Plymouth 
in company of four men-of-war, taking with him 230 of 
the 500 soldiers of the Barbados regiment, of which he 
had been appointed Colonel. Arriving at the island on 
the 17th of August he found all in good order (1266), 
but for the presence of some swift French privateers, which 
kept hovering off the coast to cut off the trading craft, 
and defied all efforts of the English men-of-war to catch 
them. After a month's stay he persuaded the Assembly 
to fit out two smart West Indian sloops to make an 
end of these troublesome privateers and manned them 
with one hundred of his English soldiers ; when in 
September 1694 there came news from Jamaica which 
made him long to gather the whole of his force together 
and sail to that island without a moment's delay (1391). 
It is therefore necessary at this stage to pass to leeward 
and see what had befallen in Jamaica. 

That island, it will be remembered, had been nearly 
ruined by the great earthquake of 1692 and by the 
pestilence which followed upon it. Fortunately a strong 
and sensible man, William Beeston, himself one of the 
magnates of Jamaica, had been appointed to take charge 
of it as Lieutenant-Governor, and with great public spirit 
had accepted the very thankless office (211, 285). 
Arriving in the island in March 1693 he found it "in a 
"very mean condition" discouraged, depopulated and heavily 
in debt, while French privateers from Hispaniola plied 
eternally about the coast to snap up the trading schooners 
(209). He therefore begged persistently for frigates of 
light draught, to follow these predatory craft; for the 
French, not content with doing mischief at sea, were 
constantly landing small parties to kill and to plunder. 
Moreover, the operations of an English squadron to wind- 
ward were of little consolation to Jamaica to leeward, 
since they might mean no more than the transfer of the 

8060 C 



xxxn 



PREFACE. 



Warning of a 
coming raid 
of the French 

UpOQ 

Jamaica. 



The French 
descend upon 
Jamaica. 



entire French force from Martinique and Guadeloupe to 
Hispaniola, from whence twenty-four hours would suffice 
to throw it upon the coast of Jamaica (301, 302, 361). 
The scarcity of money and the stagnation of trade made 
it extremely difficult to restore the ruined fortifications 
of the island and to place it in a state of defence ; and 
the Assembly as usual shewed itself readier to obstruct 
than to forward any measures for the benefit of the 
country (635). Throughout 1693 and the beginning of 
1694 the raids of the French became more menacing, 
while lack of men and the wreck of one of the men-of-war 
weakened still farther Beeston's ..resources for protection 
of the island (876, 1004). 

At last on the 17th of June 1694 the blow, long 
dreaded by Beeston, fell with full force upon Jamaica. 
On the evening of the 31st May, Beeston was sitting with 
a few friends in the rude shelter which, since the earthquake, 
had done duty for Government House, when there came 
in a lean, weary man, his clothes in rags and his face 
burnt brown by salt and sun, with a warning that the French 
were coming from Hispaniola under Monsieur Ducasse 
with twenty ships and three thousand men, to make an 
end of British rule in Jamaica. The visitor was one 
Stephen Elliot, a merchant-skipper, who, being a prisoner 
at Petit Guavos, had heard of the French preparations. 
By stealth and skill he had contrived to escape with two 
fellow-prisoners, and had made his way in a canoe just 
larga enough to carry the three of them over three hundred 
miles of open sea to give the alarm in Jamaica. It seems 
strange that such an action should have been forgotten, 
for, if ever a deed of heroism was recorded in English 
history, it is this of the unknown Stephen Elliot. 

Happily he came in good time, though his report led 
Beeston to apprehend that the French might arrive 
within five days. Instantly the Council was summoned, 
and all haste was made to place the island in a state of 
defence. Unable to guard the whole of it, Beeston wisely 



PREFACE. xxxiii 

called in the inhabitants from all outlying quarters, and 
concentrated his entire force within a radius of from 
ten to fifteen miles from Kingston, destroying all works 
that could not be defended, and burying the guns. Day 
succeeded day without a sign of the French, until on 
Sunday, the 17th of June, their fleet came in sight as 
if making straight for Port Royal. But they feared to 
enter the harbour, and dividing their force anchored six 
of their ships at Morant Bay, on the eastern extremity 
of the island, and the remainder at Cow Bay, seven leagues 
to windward of Kingston. Then landing their forces they 
laid waste the whole of the intervening country, destroying 
everything to the very fowls and herbs. " Some of the 
" straggling people that were left behind they tortured, 
" some they murdered in cold blood ; some women they 
" suffered the negroes to violate ; some they dug out of 
" their graves, so that more inhuman barbarities were 
" never committed by Turk or infidel." 
Repulse of the For a month this brutal work continued, without avail 

French. 

to tempt Beeston into imprudent action ; and then the 
raiders made a fresh landing at Carlisle Bay, some ten 
leagues to Westward of Port Royal. Beeston at once 
sent troops to reinforce the post, but, before they could 
arrive, the French had stormed an ill-designed breastwork, 
which had been erected for defence of the landing-place, and 
had driven back the defenders with considerable loss. Weary, 
lame and hungry though they were, after a forced march 
of thirty miles, Becston's reinforcement at once attacked 
the victorious French and succeeded in saving the remnant 
of the beaten militia. Then for a few days there was 
a lull, while the French continued the work of plunder, 
but on the 22nd the enemy was rudely repulsed while 
attempting to storm a fortified house, which was held by 
a little party of twenty-five resolute men. This sharp 
lesson was too much for a force which consisted not of 
regular troops but of cowardly ruffians from all quarters ; 
and on the 28th July Ducasse sailed away with a loss of 



XXXIV 



PREFACE. 



Reinforce- 
ments 
promised 
from England 
for Jamaica. 



A great 
Expedition 
planned 
against the 
French in 
Hispaniola. 



some 350 killed and wounded, thoroughly beaten by 
Beeston's skill and resolution (1236 1.). 

Jamaica, however, had also suffered heavily. 100 men 
had been killed and wounded ; fifty sugar works and 200 
houses had been burned and 1,300 negroes carried off, 
a crushing misfortune to an island already ruined by 
earthquake and sickness. Beeston wrote home plainly 
that without speedy recruits of men and shipping the 
island would be unable to repel a second attack, if the 
French should attempt it (1194). Fortunately his letters, 
written immediately after the landing of the French in 
June, had had a good passage io England. On the 3rd 
of August the Committee of Plantations wrote him a 
letter of commendation, promising not only speedy succour 
but a force that should reduce the French in the neighbour- 
hood (1189). On the 14th it was agreed to recommend 
the despatch of a ship and a draft of soldiers immediately 
(1223), and by the 20th, while the reinforcements for 
New York were still on march to their port of embarkation, 
preparations for a great armament were in full swing. 

The very numerous documents relating to these 
preparations (see index Jamaica) are among the most 
interesting that I have encountered, for the light that they 
shed upon departmental administration at this period. In 
the first place it seems that both the Commissioners of 
the Navy and the Admiralty were of opinion that they 
had sufficient work on their hands without undertaking 
the despatch of an expedition to Jamaica (1239, 1240). 
The Committee was therefore fain to turn to the Com- 
missioners of Transportation, whose reports as to shipping 
were very far from encouraging (1244, 1259-1261). 
Meanwhile it was agreed to draft out two regiments, 
each 600 strong, which involved much calculation of 
expenses (1245, 1262-1264). Then came long correspon- 
dence with the Victualling Board as to the feeding of 
these men, which correspondence was not the shorter 
because the Privy Council named their strength at 1,600 



.PREFACE. xxxV 

men, and the Committee of Plantations at 1,700 men 
(1302), while the Commissioners of Transport were required 
to provide freight first for 2,000 and then for 1,700 
men (1280, 1301). Then came the arrangements for the 
appointment of a Commissary by the Treasury, and for 
supply of medicines (1313, 1348), and at last the 
appointment of Colonel Luke Lillingston to command 
the land-forces. Lillingston, however, who had gained 
experience of West Indian fighting with Sir Francis 
Wheler, complicated matters not a little by certain 
stringent demands for money (1360). This was the more 
awkward since the Agents for the Leeward Islands had 
simultaneously been clamouring for pay and recruits for 
the garrisons in that quarter (1350, 1353). 

ofthe P10greSS ^e Agents seem to have been thrust aside for the 
preparations, moment in the press of business; and we find the Com- 
missioners for Transportation on the 29th of September 
nervously requesting the Committee of Plantations to 
inform the Admiralty that the transports for the expedition 
would be ready to sail from Gravesend on the 15th of 
October (1361). This is noteworthy as shewing the awe 
wherein the Admiralty was held by subordinate depart- 
ments. Meanwhile the expedition was increased by another 
hundred men (1377), and Colonel Lillingston was formulating 
fresh demands for money, clothing, and provisions for 
sick soldiers (1381, 1384) when the Victualling Board 
suddenly declared that it could do no more for the 
Jamaica expedition, having Admiral Russell's fleet to 
victual (1387). They made an effort, however, though the 
obscurity of the orders given to them unnecessarily 
increased the volume of correspondence ; and then 
followed such a torrent of estimates for the various 
items of expense, as to call forth a mild protest from 
the Treasury (1450). Still matters appeared to move very 
slowly, and on the 25th of October Colonel Northcott 
reported that his regiment, which was appointed for the 
expedition, was still 200 men short of its complement, 



XXX VI 



PREFACE. 



Continued 
delay in the 
preparations 



The 

Expedition 
last puts to 
sea. 



at 



and that lie must have an advance of money for clothing 
and accoutrements (1471). Simultaneously, to the distraction 
of the Treasury, Lillingston put forward further (and just) 
claims for money, while the appointed doctors asked for 
an advance of pay (1472, 1529). It is pleasant amid all 
the confusion of the preparations to find a recommendation 
that 500, a medal and chain should be granted to the 
gallant Stephen Elliot, and 50 to each of his companions 
(1476). 

By this time November was nearly past, whereas the 
expedition, if it were to arrive in time, should have 
started at the end of October.-' Everything was delayed 
because the Treasury would not produce the necessary 
money (1532), and at last William Blathwayt addressed 
an indignant letter to the department, urging their Lord- 
ships to make haste and despatch the business before them 
(1533). Meanwhile orders were given on 26 November 
to the transports to sail from Spithcad to Plymouth; 
but the masters professed themselves unable to obey them, 
because their crews had been impressed by the men-of-war 
(1555). At least nine days elapsed before the Admiralty 
could or would provide protections for the crews (1579), 
and then the Commissioners of Transport wrote in 
dismay that though, in obedience to orders, they had taken 
up shipping for 1,800 men, they now heard that only 
1,400 were to be sent out (1574) and dreaded the 
responsibility for the unnecessary expense. Finally on the 
2 1st of December we find that the transports were still 
in the Downs because the Admiralty had not provided a 
convoy to take them round to Plymouth (1582, 1602). 
It is sufficiently evident that the Admiralty worked sulkily 
and with a bad grace for this expedition ; but it was 
not for the first time that they manifested so obstructive 
a spirit, and assuredly it was not the last. 

Meanwhile the Agents for the Leeward Islands, 
losing patience, had again applied for four hundred recruits 
for the regiment in that quarter and for its arrears of 



PREFACE. 



xxxvn 



The Leeward 
Islands steal 
away half of 
the Barbados 
llepriment. 



pay (1564 1.). It is significant that all that had been paid 
to clear this regiment up to April 1692 (it was now 
November 1694) were tallies upon an Act to collect certain 
duties, which would not be paid until three years hence 
(1523). Strong memorials were brought forward shewing 
the hardships endured by the men and officers (1536, 
1537); and an estimate having been submitted of the 
cost of raising four hundred recruits, the King very 
handsomely granted them rather less than half the allotted 
sum in order to raise half the number of men (1558, 
1612). Then, the troublesome Agents having thus been 
temporarily silenced, the business of the Jamaica expedition 
was renewed. On the 23rd of December the Commanders, 
Colonel Lillingston and Commodore Wilmot, received their 
instructions (1619, 1620). On the 8th of January 1695 
the troops were ordered to embark on the following week ; 
on the 10th the royal instructions as to plunder were 
issued ; on the 1 8th a small supplementary instruction 
was sent to the Commodore (1637, 1642, 1654); and on 
the 23rd the expedition fairly put to sea just three 
months too late. 

Before it had been gone a month, there came a letter 
from Governor Russell at Barbados reporting that a great 
storm in September 1694 had cast away many ships and 
disabled two men-of-war, that there had been much sickness 
which had killed many of his soldiers and placed many 
more on the sick-list, and that recruits were consequently 
a great expense to him (1446). As a matter of fact 
there were 270 men of his regiment waiting for transport 
to join him as early as in November (1535), but in the 
confusion of the Jamaica expedition they were left in 
Yorkshire instead of being marched to Plymouth (1557); 
consequently they were still awaiting transport in 
March 1695 (1718). Meanwhile enquiry had shewn that 
the officers of the regiment in the Leeward Islands found 
it almost impossible to obtain recruits ; and the Agents 
of those islands now came forward with a verv insidious 



XXXV111 



PREFACE. 



The 

llispaniola 
Expedition. 
Sources of 
information. 



proposal. The Barbados Agents, they said, had failed 
to find transport for Russell's regiment, but they themselves 
would undertake to provide the necessary shipping, if 
only their Lordships would grant them eighty seamen. 
If these were conceded to them, they would undertake 
to transport Russell's Regiment to the Leeward Islands, 
where it would serve to stave off danger for two months 
until the hurricane season should come, after which, in 
due time, Governor Russell could send transports to bring 
them to Barbados (1747). The Barbados Agents got 
wind of the design and did their best to frustrate it, 
(1723) but in vain, for orders were given against them 
(1748-1751) and the Barbados Regiment was irrevocably 
committed to the Leeward Islands. This clever piece of 
jockeying is a good instance of the length to which Colonial 
jealousy will go. Those who know the West Indies can 
imagine the fury of the Barbados Agents. 

No doubt it was hoped that the expedition under Wilmot 
and Lillingston would draw the whole of the French forces 
to leeward ; and it now behoves us to follow the operations 
of the fleet and army. The narratives of the same are 
sufficiently numerous, there being one from Peter Beckford 
who joined the expedition from Jamaica (1946), another 
taken from a series of letters by one Charles Whittell (1973), 
Commodore Wilmot's own report to William Blathwayt 
(1980), the journal of Commissary Murrey (1983), two 
significant letters from Sir William Beeston (2022, 2026), 
and two letters from Colonel Lillingston (2021, 2324). 
Even these, however, are insufficient to clear up this 
extraordinary story without the help of a pamphlet 
published in 1704, by Lillingston, to vindicate himself against 
certain reflections in the narrative of the expedition as 
given in Burchett's Naval History, the said Burchett 
being the Secretary of the Admiralty whose name occurs 
so frequently in the present volume. Such portions of 
the narrative as are taken from Lillingston's pamphlet 
only I shall place between asterisks; but it must be added 



PREFACE. xxxix 

that the bulk of the pamphlet itself is made up of 
official papers which are printed in this Calendar. 
Commodore * j seems then that King William, being much concerned 

Wilmot s 

designs. Q^ ^he failure of the three previous expeditions to the 

West Indies under Captain Wright in 1689, Captain 
Wren in 1691, and Sir F. Wheler in 1692-3, actually 
summoned Wilmot and Lillingston to his presence and 
entreated them above all things to work together amicably, 
adding that, in order to remove all cause of dispute, exact 
instructions had been drawn up for the division of any plunder 
that might be taken between the army and the fleet 
(1642).* It is somewhat singular that copies of these 
same instructions were placed in the hands of Sir John 
Jervis and Sir Charles Grey for their guidance in 1793, 
and that then, as in the case now before us, the question 
of plunder led to a violent controversy; the only 
difference being that in 1695 the battle was of fleet against 
army, and in 1795 of fleet and army against civilians. 
* However, Wilmot and Lillingston heard their admonition 
and received their instructions, Lillingston's being open 
and Wilmot's sealed, with orders that they should not 
be opened until he had reached the fortieth degree of 
latitude. Lillingston then repaired to Plymouth, where 
he found his regiment awaiting him, six companies of 
1,300 men, a composite body from which the best of his 
own men had been drafted to give place to others of 
extremely indifferent quality (2324 vn.). On the 22nd 
of January the fleet and transports sailed, and on the 
4th of February the Commodore summoned a Council of 
War on board the flag-ship at sea. Then the first elements 
of discord shewed themselves in a furious dispute as to 
whether the Captain-Lieutenant of Lillingston's Company 
should be admitted to the Council (1983). The matter ended, 
according to Lillingston's account, in the Commodore's 
ordering the Captain- Lieutenant to be turned out of the 
cabin "with a rudeness that I had never seen among 
" gentlemen." Three days later, on the 7th of February, 



xl 



PREFACE. 



Wilmot's 
effort to <jet 
rid of Colonel 
Lillingston. 



Wilmot's 
dispute with 
the Spanish 
Commanders. 



Wilmot came into Lillingston' s cabin, pulled out his 
instructions, which he had opened although he had not 
yet reached the prescribed latitude, and expressed great 
dissatisfaction at them, but added that " he would not 
"go to the West Indies to learn the language but would 
"mind his own business, however things went." On the 
12th the fleet came to anchor at Madeira, and then 
Wilmot, "having drunk pretty freely," told Lillingston 
frankly that he had had the misfortune to kill a man, 
which had cost him 1,000, but that if Lillingston 
would work with him they would both make their 
fortunes. Lillingston declined; ^and Wilmot then said 
that he would take care of himself.* 

On the following day, 13 February, Lillingston and 
several officers went ashore, and on that afternoon, as 
all accounts agree, the wind rose high (1983). *Lillingston 
at once repaired to the beach, where he found Wilmot, 
who begged him to wait for a time since "his barge was 
" full of ladies," promising to send another boat to fetch 
him immediately.* It is, however, certain that, whether 
by design (as Lillingston avers) or under pressure of the 
gale, Wilmot sailed away with the whole fleet, leaving 
Lillingston and most of his officers stranded at Madeira. 
As luck would have it, two of the men-of-war were driven 
back to Madeira, enabling Lillingston and his unfortunate 
comrades to obtain a passage ; *but none of these ships 
had any sailing-orders, and if Lillingston had not had 
his instructions in his pocket they would have returned to 
England.* This omission of Wilmot to name any place 
of rendezvous is confirmed by the journal of Commissary 
Murrey (p. 551). 

However, marvellous to state, the entire expedition 
found itself united once more on 25th March at 
St. Christophers, where three officers were tried by Court- 
martial and cashiered, *unjustly, according to Lillingston.* 
Wilmot then sent forward a frigate to St. Domingo to 
announce his coming to the Spaniards, who were to 



PREFACE. xli 

co-operate with him ; and on the 28th he sailed thither 
himself with four ships, sending the rest of the fleet to 
Samana Bay, at the eastern end of the island. On 
the 3rd of April he arrived, and found there Colonel 
Peter Beckford, who had been sent up from Jamaica 
by Sir William Beeston with instructions to concert 
operations with the Spaniards and the English Commanders, 
to offer such assistance as Jamaica could give, and above 
all to send him intelligence of what was going forward 
(2022 i. -ix.). Not a word of answer, however, was sent 
to him, and Beeston's instructions from Whitehall were 
deliberately withheld from him, -Wilmot being evidently 
afraid lest Beeston also should claim a share in the 
plunder, to which indeed he was justly entitled (p. 567). 
Meanwhile Wilmot and Lillingston went ashore and were 
very honourably received by the Spanish Governor 
(1980 i.); but twelve whole days were consumed to no 
purpose, according to Wilmot, in "raising abundance of 
" dilatory scruples." * Lillingston's account, however, is that 
the Spanish Governor, on perusing his instructions, found 
that he was ordered to concert operations by land with 
the Commander of the land-forces only, and refused to 
admit Wilmot to his Councils. Lillingston, however, 
prevailed upon him at last to admit the Commodore, 
and a scheme of operations was agreed upon. The 
Spanish troops, from 1,000 to 1,700 in number, were 
to march across the island to Manchaneel [Mancenille] 
Bay on the north coast, while the fleet sailed round to 
meet them from Samana Bay. This was fully in accord 
with Beeston's own view, who had urged that it was 
useless for this fleet to drive the French from the shore 
unless the army marched inland to cut them off (2022 IX.). 
The The Commodore, however, waited for six whole days 

in the bay,* "rowing about in his barge with the ladies 
" and all the music of the fleet in other boats."* At length, 
on the 4th of May the fleet arrived at Mancenille Bay, 
where on the 7th it was joined by three Spanish 



xlii PREFACE. 

men-of-war. The Spanish Army, however, did not arrive 
until the 12th, when arrangements were made for a joint 
attack upon Cap Francois. On the 14th 200 English 
were landed to join the Spaniards in their march upon 
it from the east; and on the 17th the fleet stood in 
before Cap Frangois, while Lillingston, with the remainder 
of his men, landed a little to eastward of it. * Wilmot, 
however, made the disembarkation as difficult as possible, 
and contrived also to land the troops at a point which 
gave them a march of sixteen miles across a peninsula, 
which might have been saved by four miles of rowing 
at sea,* In spite of all obstacles Lillingston advanced, 
and the French, seeing that they would be cut off, blew 
up the fort and retired westward to Port de Paix, 
carrying all that they could with them. * Thereupon 
Wilmot instantly made a rush for the shore in order 
to seize the place and all that might be valuable in it 
for the Navy, before the Army could reach it.* So 
precipitate was he that one of his captains and men 
were blown up by a train of gunpowder which the French 
had left behind them. * Nevertheless he gained his 
point, for the naval forces managed to carry off all the 
plunder, principally liquor, for themselves ; with the 
result that both Spanish and English soldiers, furious 
at being defrauded, were driven to the verge of mutiny* 
(p. 554). With some difficulty and delay the dispute 
was composed, and it was arranged that the whole Army 
should march by land against Port de Paix, while the 
fleet proceeded against it by sea. The distance by land 
was not great, and was reckoned by the Spaniards to 
occupy not more than four days ; but the country was very 
rugged ; the rainy season had set in ; and the innumerable 
streams that crossed the line of march were much swollen. 
Thus it came about that the march occupied sixteen 
whole days, * during five of which all ranks of the troops 
lived on oranges and such fruits and vegetables as they 
could find. Nevertheless perfect order was preserved, 



PREFACE. 

and not above twelve men died.* On the 13th of June 
the army at last came before the fort of Port de Paix, 
and a party was sent forward to regain touch with the 
the fleet, which was lying in a bay close by. * After 
two days of delay the Commodore joined the Colonel, 
and then for the second and last time he asked him to 
join in making the fortunes of them both; asking first 
that they should divide the plunder equally if the fort 
were taken, though by the royal instructions only such forces 
as were landed were entitled to share in it, and that they 
should then seize the three Spanish men-of-war (which had 
managed to appropriate a good deal of the spoil) and 
carry them to Jamaica. "We'll make them pay us well," 
he said, " before we part with them." Lillingston of 
course declined, and thereupon Wilmot laid himself out 
more than ever to thwart him.* 

Exp U e r d n ition h t e o The remainder of the story can almost be told without 
Jamaica. thLe help o f Lillingston's pamphlet. The Commodore 

refused to land the materials for a siege except at such 
a distance that the Colonel wore his men out with 
hauling them over half a mile of morass to the points 
selected for batteries. The Commissary refused to supply 
the ' materials required of him ; and, in a word, every 
obstacle was thrown in the way of the soldiers. 
* Nevertheless they contrived to complete their batteries 
and open such a fire that on the 3rd of July the French 
evacuated the fort, broke through Wilmot's lines, which 
lay on the opposite side, and with some loss escaped. It 
must be noted that though the Commodore claimed the 
whole credit of the success for himself, his dispositions 
are condemned by Lillingston as futile.* The soldiers 
finding the place evacuated at once occupied it with a 
small force ; whereupon Wilmot promptly overpowered 
them with five hundred seamen and took the whole of the 
plunder for the fleet. This brought the operations to an 
end, for the soldiers were reduced by sickness to a mere 
handful; and the expedition sailed to Jamaica, Lillingston 



xliv 



PREFACE. 



White 
servants in 
the West 
Indies. 



more dead than alive, but Wilmot still intent upon making 
the most of his voyage. Here Wilmot quarrelled with 
Sir William Beeston, and his behaviour led Beeston to 
reconsider the judgment which he had formerly passed upon 
the operations and to lay the blame on the right shoulders 
(2022, 2026). His letters are worth- reading, but the 
most tragic document of all is the state of Lillingston's 
regiment in October 1695 (2123), shewing that over one 
thousand out of thirteen hundred men had been sacrificed 
to the avarice of Wilmot. The Nemesis that overtook 
the principal actors in the drama must not be over- 
looked. Wilmot died before .he reached England. 
Commissary Murrey, who had joined his faction, died 
also at Jamaica and left papers undestroyed which served 
as damaging evidence against him. Captain Launce, a 
favourite of Wilmot and of like nature with him, died 
likewise at sea on the voyage to England. *Finally 
much of the plunder which had been gathered by 
Wilmot was misappropriated by one of the worst of his 
Captains, and these ill-gotten gains became the subject of 
litigation between this thief and the widow of Wilmot. 
Lillingston, on the other hand, though at first coldly 
received by the King, was able to make good his defence 
and was rewarded with a pension. That his story is 
the true one, corroborated as it is on all essential points 
by several documents in the present volume, I cannot 
doubt, the less so inasmuch as Prince George of Denmark, 
consort of Queen Anne and Lord High Admiral, accepted 
the dedication of his pamphlet in refutation of Burchett's 
history. 

For the rest, there is little more to engage our 
attention in the West Indies beyond the peculiar 
circumstances which rendered necessary those numerous 
expeditions from England. First it must be noticed 
that the seasons in the West Indies since the beginning 
of the war had been terribly unhealthy, and that the 
white population had in consequence been greatly 



PREFACE. 

diminished. This had not unnaturally emboldened the 
blacks ; and accordingly we find the whole of the islands 
in mortal terror of a negro insurrection, and actual traces 
of such insurrection in Jamaica (see index). Of the 
systematic intimidation by which the negroes were held 
in check the reader will find instances in Nos. 31, 520, 
and 1963. But unfortunately it was not only negroes 
who were ill-treated. Governor Russell (1738) gives an 
account of the "white servants" in Barbados which is 
painful to read. " I dare say there are hundreds of 
"white servants in the island, who have been out of 
"their time for many years, and who have never a bit 
" of fresh meat bestowed on them nor a dram of rum. 
"They are domineered over and used like dogs . . . ' 
A.nd then he proceeds to recommend (like a true Russell) 
that they might be enfranchised, so that "people would 
" sometimes give the poor miserable creatures a little 
"rum and fresh provisions, and such things as would be 
" of nourishment to them and make their lives more 
" comfortable, in the hope of getting their votes." It is 
noteworthy, too, that when Russell, despairing at the 
state of the fortifications of Barbados, called upon all 
white men without distinction to take their turn of 
military service, he was met by loud murmurs and 
protests of indignation (2011, 2030, 2047). Hence the 
eternal calls on the Mother Country for troops, which 
the petty Assemblies of each petty island seemed to 
think were intended for their own special protection 
(789, 872). The true remedy, of course, would have 
been to send no troops but plenty of ships ; but here 
again there was the difficulty that there were no facilities 
for the refitting of ships in the West Indies. Moreover, 
the King's officers abroad, taking pattern from the 
Board of Admiralty the most despotic of departments 
at home were independent, insubordinate and arbitrary 
to an incredible degree ; while their abuse of their 
powers of impressment was, as will be seen more 



xlvi 



PREFACE. 



Disorganisa- 
tion of Ad- 
ministration 
in England. 



clearly in the next volume, a positive danger (see index, 
Navy, The Royal). 

It need hardly be added that throughout this volume 
there runs one long and continuous thread of testimony 
as to the inefficiency and disorganisation of the English 
Administrative Departments and above all of the dangerous 
condition of English finance. In No. 568 the reader 
will see how an Order in Council for the disallowance 
of an Act of Barbados was surreptitiously obtained by 
a private individual and sprung upon the Governor by 
surprise; while the instances of Orders in Council being 
passed and no action whatever being taken upon them 
are too many to enumerate. In No. 569 it will be seen 
how the Victualling Board allowed the Governor to 
advance 1,600 from his private purse for the King's 
Navy without the least effort to repay him ; and in 
Nos. 2084 in., x., will be seen instances of the kind of 
repayment that he might have received tallies for 
1,670, on which the charges for discount were 901. 

On the whole it may be said that the interest of the 
present volume is rather for Englishmen than for 
Americans, and rather for soldiers than for civilians. 
An editor, however, can only present the material that 
is given to him as faithfully as he can, and plead that 
it is not his personal predilections but the contents of 
the documents before him that have decided his choice 
of the subjects to be dwelt upon in his preface. The 
next volume will bring us to the Peace of Ryswick and 
to calmer times ; but in the present there can be written 
down only that which stares at us from every page 
the collapse of a rotten system of administration under 
the strain of prolonged war. 

J. W. FOETESCUE. 



COLONIAL PAPEES. 



1693. 



1693. 

Jan. 1 1. Extract from a letter of Mr. Stock at Deal. Reporting 

that a ship which sailed in September or October for Virginia ^with 
letters was captured by the French, but that all the packets were 
thrown overboard before the capture. Copy. ^p. [America and 
West Indies. 638. No. 1.] 

Jan. 4. 2. Order of Sir William Phips to Captain Richard Short, R.N. 
To hand over four of his men to H.M. Sloop Mary, for immediate 
service. Copy. 1 p. [Board oj Trade. New England, 6. No. 17.] 

Jan. 4. 3. Depositions of John March, Captain of Pemaquid Fort, 

and Captain Nathaniel Hatch of H.M.S. Mary, as to the provocation 
given by Captain Short to Sir William Phips which led to the 
scuffle between them. Copy. 1 p. 

Another copy of the foregoing. Endorsed. Read at the Com- 
mittee, 15 June, 1693-4. [Hoard oj Trade. New England, 6. 
Nos. 18, 19.] 

Jan. 5. 4. Order of the King in Council. Referring the presentment 

Whitehall. o f the Commissioners of Customs as to illegal trading on the part 

of the Governor of Bermuda, to Lords of Trade and Plantations, 

who will recommend a fit person to be Governor of Bermuda. 

Signed. Rich. Colinge. \ p. Annexed, 

4. i. Presentment of the Commissioners of Customs. We have 
received a report from the Collectors at Liverpool as to 
Governor Richier's having built a sloop and sent tea with 
sugar and tobacco to Scotland, contrary to the Acts of 
Navigation. Signed. Robt. Southwell, P. Warde, Robt. 
Clayton, Jo. Werden. Copy. 1 p. Copies of Reports from 
the Liverpool Customs House of 21 and 26 Dec., 1692, 
are attached. ^ pp. The whole endorsed. Reed. 7 Jan., 
1692-3. [Board oj Trade. Bermuda, 2. Nos. 6, 61. ; 
and 28, pp. 39, 40.] 

Jan. 5. 5. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor produced 
a letter written by Abraham Gouverneur, which had inflamed the 
followers of Leisler, and asked the advice of the Council thereon. The 
Council advised that he should send copy of the letter to Sir 
William Phips, telling him of the mischief that it had done and 

AG780. Wt. 8060/G23. 400 20/G/01. M. A 



! COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1093. 

asking for Gouverneur to be given up to him. Captain Thomas 
Clarke was recommended as a suitable emissary to carry the letter. 
Order for survey of Richard and Thomas Willett's and of Col. Van 
Cortland's land lately purchased from the Indians. The Governor 
showed the Council the letter that he had written to Sir William 
Phips, and it was approved. Order for a proclamation exhorting the 
people to peace. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 364, 365 ; 
and pp. 388, 389.] 

Jan. 6. 6. Governor Fletcher to Sir William Phips. Abstracted below 

under date 31 Jan. (see paye 11). Copy. 1 p. [America and West 
Indies. 579. No. 24.] 

Jan. 7. 7. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Presentment 
of Commissioners of Customs read (sec No. 4 i), and the question 
of a new Governor for Bermuda considered. 

The Commissioners of the Admiralty and Mr. Thomas Povey 
attended on the business of the Naval Officer at Jamaica. Agreed 
that a clause be inserted therein to preserve the rights of the 
Admiralty. 

Petition of Stephen Duport read, and decision thereon taken. 

Petitions of Jeffrey Jeffries and others read, and order given 
thereon. [Board of Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 158-160.] 

Jan. 7. 8. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. That the 
Whitehall. Lord President recommend on their behalf that, on the petition 
of Stephen Duport, orders be given to Governor Codrington for 
petitioner to be allowed the same benefit in recovering his possessions 
in the Leeward Islands as all other subjects. [Board of Trade. 
Leeward Islands, 44. p. 114.] 

Jan. 7. 9. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. That the 
names of Colonel Long and Captain Goddard, recommended by 
Lord Falkland and the Earl of Scarborough, be submitted to the 
King for the Government of Bermuda. [Board of Trade. Bermuda, 
28. p. 46.] 

Jan. 7. 10. Petition of Edward Richier, on behalf of Isaac Richier, to 
Lords of Trade and Plantations. To respite all judgment on Isaac 
Richier until his answer to the charges against him has been heard. 
1 p. Endorsed. Reed. 7 Jan., '92. Read same day. [Board of 
Trade. Bermuda, 2. No. 7.] 

Jan. 7. 11- Petition of Jeffrey Jeffries and other merchants of London, 
owners of the hired ship Wolf, to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 
For the stop on the ship's pay, imposed on account of salvage- 
charges, to be taken off, on their giving security for the same. 1 p. 
Endorsed. Read 7 Jan. 1692-3. [America and West Indies. 638. 
No. 2.] 

Jan. 7. 12. Minute of Lords of Trades and Plantations. Order for 
directions to be given to the Admiralty in compliance with the 
petition of Jeffrey Jeffries. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 36. p. 216.] 

Jan. 7. 13. Governor Fletcher to Joseph Dudley. After great pains in 

New York, allaying the heats of these people (to which you are no stranger), I 

had so far gained my point by persuasion with some, giving 



AMEEICA AND WEST INDIES. 3 

1693. 

equal justice to all, forbidding names of distinction and exhorting to 
amity, that all things appeared serene, no cause to ruffle, no cloud 
to obscure our peace. The face of love was not more smooth. 
But on a sudden I heard from all parts of several meetings, violent 
expressions, with reflections on some of the Council, demands of 
reparation for Leisler's blood, etc. So sudden a storm -surprised 
me. While I was beating my thoughts about the matter, Providence 
directs the enclosed letter into my hands, by which it appears, 
if what is there asserted be true, that your Governor is the 
incendiary or rather the bellows that blows up the dying embers of 
former discontents. How suitable this is to the trust reposed in 
him, and how much it conduces .to their Eoyal Majesties' service 
will best appear when the matter comes before the Council. It is 
utterly impossible for me to accommodate things according to the 
Royal commands and my own native temper, while that knight gives 
encouragement to those actions which the King in Council has 
allowed to be legal. I enclose my letter to Sir W. Phips on that 
occasion. Signed. Ben. Fletcher. Holograph. '2 pp. Enclosed, 
13. i. Copy of Governor Fletcher's letter to Sir W T . Phips. 
(see below, page 11). [Board of Trade. New York. 5, 
Nos. 1, li.] 

Jan. 9. 14. William Blathwayt to Mr. Sotherne. Asking the Lords of the 

Admiralty to draft a clause to preserve their rights, for insertion in 
the Patent of the Naval Officer at Jamaica. [Board of Trade. 
Jamaica, 53. p. 133.] 

Jan. 9. 15. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Ordered that no morning or 

evening gun be fired by H.M.S. Guernsey till further notice. Order 
for a proclamation to recall all British subjects and invite all allies 
and neutrals. Orders for certain payments, for permission to two 
persons to leave the Island, for a Council of War to be held on the 
17th, and for the Colonels to be warned to put themselves in a 
posture of defence, sending no more field-officers than can be spared 
to the Council of War. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. pp. 235- 
237.] 

Jan. 12. 16. Commissions of the Proprietors to Nicholas Trott, as 
Governor of the Bahama Islands. Signed. Craven, Ashley, 
P. Colleton. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXII., pp. 204-205.] 

Jan. 12. 17. Instructions of the same to Governor Nicholas Trott. He 
is within 30 days after arrival to summon the freeholders to elect 
an Assembly of 20 members. Laws passed by the Assembly, and 
ratified by the Governor and any three deputies are to be in force 
for two years only, unless ratified by the Proprietors., Six 
freeholders elected by the Assembly and six deputies of the 
Proprietors will form the Council. Signed as the preceding. 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXII., pp. 205-206.] 

Jan. 12. 18. Additional instructions to Nicholas Trott. 100 acres of 
the best land are to be set apart permanently for the Governor, and 
50 acres in every parish for glebe. Plots not exceeding 25 acres may 
be granted to all immigrants, to their wives and children (if over 
sixteen) and to servants whose term has expired. Proprietors are 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1G93. 



Jan. 12. 



Jan. 12. 

Virginia. 



Jan. 12. 



Jan. 13. 



Jan. 14. 



Jan. 16. 



Jan. 17. 

Kensington. 



Jan. 17. 
Jan. 18. 



entitled to a grant of 3,000 acres. All grants must be signed by the 
Governor and two deputies. One tenth of produce of salt is reserved 
to the Proprietors, Signed as the preceding. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 
XXII., pp. 207-208.] 

19. Minutes of Council of New York. Order for payment of 
60 to James Graham for his many public services, since the revenue 
cannot at present bear the charge of a salary for him. Orders for 
sundry other payments, chiefly on account of military matters and 
presents to Indians. The inhabitants of Newtown consented to the 
Governor's proposal of 22 December last as to their differences with 
the neighbouring townships. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 365, 
366 ; and pp. 389, 390.] 

20. Proclamation of the Government of Virginia. Announcing 
the appointment of Peter Heyman as der/uty postmaster of Virginia. 
Copy. Large sheet. 

Another copy. Endorsed. Reed. 27 March, 1694. [America and 
West Indies, 638. Nos. 3, 4 ; and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXIV., 
p. 771.] 

21. Minutes of Council of Virginia. The Queen's letter in 
favour of Thomas Neale read, and a proclamation in accordance 
with his patent ordered. The accounts of the Rangers referred to 
the Auditor. Ordered that the Rangers do not begin to range again 
until 1st March, unless something extraordinary require it. 

Order for hire of a ship from Captain Henry Finch for 
their Majesties' service, the Henry, prize, being disabled. Order 
for payment of the Rangers' accounts. Agreed to convene an 
Assembly for 2nd March. Licenses to several persons to " catch 
whales granted. 

Order for building a powder magazine. John Lowry licensed 
as a pilot. Form of commission for Justices of the Peace 
approved and the list of justices revised. Order for recording a 
complaint against Ralph Wormeley for neglect of his duties as a 
Collector. Order for the great guns in the several counties to be 
mounted. [Col, Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXIV., pp. 785-790.] 

22. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor produced 
a letter from Sir William Phips of 26 October as to Martin's 
Vineyard, and caused his answer to be read, which was approved. 
Frederick Philips's petition referred to the Attorney General. 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 366-367, and p. 390.] 

23. Warrant for the respite of William Dolby and Edward 
Legg, condemned to death, and for sending the prisoners to England 
with copies of the evidence concerning them. [Board of Trade. 
Virginia, 36. p. 221.] 

24. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for delivery of 
ammunition to H.M.S. Guernsey and to St. Mary's parish. Order 
for payment of salaries. Order for proclamation of martial law. 

Order for H.M.S. Guernsey to cruise for ten days to windward 
and make signals if any hostile fleet be seen. [Board of Trade. 
Jamaica, 77. pp. 237-239.] 



AMEEICA AND WEST INDIES. 



1693. 
Jan. 19. 



Jan. 19. 



Jan. 20. 



Jan. 21. 

Boston. 



Jan. 23. 

Admiralty. 



Jan. 23. 



Jan. 24. 



Jan. 26. 

Whitehall. 

Jan. 26. 

Whitehall. 



25. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. The Queen's letter 
granting Thomas Neale power to erect post offices and appointing 
Andrew Hamilton Postmaster General read. Address to their 
Majesties read and approved. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV., p. 216.] 

26. Minutes of Council of New York. Order for grants of land 
to Thomas Fullerton. Augustine Graham sworn Surveyor-General. 
A Committee appointed to run the boundaries of Boswyck, Brenklin, 
Flatbush and Newtown. Grant to Frederick Philips of the manor of 
Philipsborough and of the right of building a bridge to be called 
Kingsbridge. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 367, 368, and 
pp. 390, 391.] 

27. Abraham Gouverneur to Governor Fletcher. I am in- 
formed that you have demanded of Sir William Phips that I shall 
be sent prisoner to New York, for writing a certain letter, whereof 
the contents are construed by yourself as the words of His Excellency 
to me. I presume that the original has not been well examined, 
for, if any such matter be written, it is what I have been informed 
of by others and has no relation to His Excellency. You are also 
pleased to term me a fugitive from justice, though I was liberated 
by your own order in Council of 1 September last. Copy. ^p. 
[America and West Indies. 561. No. 17.] 

28. Warrant of Sir William Phips to Captain John Fairweather 
to arrest and take into custody Captain Richard Short of H.M.S. 
Nonsuch. Copy. 1 p. 

Another copy of the foregoing. 1 p. [Board of Trade. New 
England, 6. Nos. 20, 21.] 

29. J. Sotherne to William Blathwayt. Enclosing copy of a 
clause for preserving the rights of the Admiralty, for insertion in the 
Patent of the Naval Officer of Jamaica. Signed. J. Sotherne. ^ p. 
Enclosed, 

29. i. The clause referred to in the covering letter. 1J pp. 
[Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. Nos. 1, li; and 53. 
pp. 134, 135.] 

30. Answer of William Cole to the petition of James Twyford 
and others of Bristol. Defending his action in the seizure of the 
ship Society. Copt/. 2| pp. Endorsed. Reed. 23 January, 
1692-3. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. No. 13.] 

31. Minutes of Council of Barbados. Order for sundry 
payments to officers, and for payment of ten guineas to Alice Mills 
for castrating forty two negroes according to sentence of the 
Commissioners for trial of rebellious negroes. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. XII., pp. 396-398.] 

32. Order of the King in Council. Giving effect to the Lord 
President's recommendation on the petition of Stephen Duport 
(see No. 8). [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 44. pp. 114, 115.] 

33. Order of the King in Council. That a letter be written to 
Sir William Phips approving his action in stopping the proceedings 
against the witches in New England, and directing that in all future 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 



proceedings against persons accused of witchcraft or of possession 
by the devil, all circumspection be used so far as may be without 
impediment to the ordinary course of justice. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXII., pp. 417, 418.] 



Jan. 26. 

Whitehall. 



34. Order of the King in Council. Report of the Attorney- 
General of 11 January, 1693, that the letters patent to Margaret, Lady 
Culpeper and others, granting them the Northern Neck in Virginia, 
are good and valid in law. Ordered that they enjoy the benefit of 
them accordingly. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 36. pp. 219-221.] 

Jan. 26. 35. Order of the King in Council. Referring the petition of 
Whitehall. gi r Thomas Laurence, Bart., to the Lords of Trade and Plantations 
for report. Signed. Rich. Colinge. p. Annexed, 

35. i. Petition of Sir Thomas Laurence to the King. I was 

appointed Secretary of Maryland* in September, 1691, but 
did not reach the Colony till September, 1692. There I 
found that by two Acts recently passed a great part of the 
fees of my office had been diverted to the Governor, and 
another part of them diverted to another office by a single 
order in Council of 17 August, 1692. My protests have 
been disregarded. I beg that the fees belonging to my 
office may be restored to me. Copy. 1 pp. The whole 
endorsed. Reed. 31 Jan. Read 11 Feb:, 1692-8. [Board 
of Trade. Maryland, 2. Nos. 99, 99 1 ; and 8, pp. 91-94.] 

[Jan. 26.] 36. Abstract of the complaints in the foregoing petition. 1 p. 
Attached, 

36. i. Copy of order of the Council of Maryland, 17 August, 

1692, to separate the Chancery Office and records from 
those of the Provincial Court, and the fees likewise. 1 p. 
36. n. Memorandum of the Acts of Maryland relating to the 
Secretary's fees. 1 p. [Board of Trade. Maryland, 2. 
Nos. 100 1, 100 ii.] 

Jan. 26. 37. Minutes of Council of New York. Order for grant of land 
to Jane Berriman. Report of the Committee on Major Ingoldsby's 
accounts. Agreed to allow to William Blathwayt 5 per cent, on all 
sums arising from the revenue, as Auditor-General. Orders for 
payment of the Collector's salary. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., 
pp. 368, 369, and p. 391.] 

Jan. 30. 38. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. Report on John 
Usher's accounts brought up and read. Day of thanksgiving 
appointed for the successes of their Majesties' arms. \_Col. Entn/ Jik., 
Vol. LXIV., p. 216.] 

Jan. 31. 39. Lieutenant Governor Usher to Lords of Trade and 
Boston. Plantations. I gave you an account of my arrival in New 
Hampshire. On the 29th October the Assembly, having passed 
by-laws, settled Courts and provided for raising money, was 
dissolved. I could obtain neither Courts nor money until I would 
consent to an act to prevent prosecution of all law-suits above ^20, 
which act was made only to prevent Mr. Allen from endeavouring 
to enjoy what he apprehends to be his right. Such is their 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 7 

1693. 

wilfulness that they will neither raise money for defence of the 
place nor pay Mr. Allen what he demands to enable him to support 
the Government and defend the province. I pointed out that the 
Massachusetts Government expected them to find provisions for the 
soldiers sent by it, and that six months' provisions would cost 
362, but all that I could obtain from the Assembly was a rate of 
eighteen pence a head and of three pence in the pound, which may 
amount to 150, a sum too small even to mount the great guns 
which the King graciously sent to an ungrateful country. 
They hope by refusing money to compel the King to annex them to 
Massachusetts. I think that it would be better to keep them 
distinct until a General Governor is sent to take over all from 
Connecticut to Nova Scotia. Until then I see no prospect of an 
end to the war. I find that the people are against Kingly Govern- 
ment, whatever else they pretend to. The King's Commission was 
never more slighted than by those who petitioned for annexation to 
Massachusetts, and in truth the Government has so far been no 
expense to them. But if joined to Massachusetts they hope at a 
favourable opportunity to throw off the Kingly Government and 
that they may return to their former Charter-Constitution ; and 
upon this they will adventure unless timely prevented. In the 
Massachusetts Government many loyal subjects complain greatly 
of arbitrary proceedings and hardships put upon them, only because 
they favour Kingly Government. The Acts of Navigation are 
frequently violated by sending enumerated commodities to France, 
Holland and Spain, and importing goods from those places without 
clearing in England. The King's collectors are laid aside and 
obstructed in their duty and threatened with imprisonment for 
attempting to do it. New ports are appointed and naval officers 
also, which were not in Sir E. Andres's time, merely to encourage 
breaches of the Acts. The Commissioners of Customs can tell you 
more. The Collector is diligent and faithful in his place, which is 
sufficient to make him maligned by the Government. Sir William 
Phips has passed many laws. That for raising money is, I think, 
contrary to their Charter, which gives them no power to do so 
except for defence and support of the country. But I am informed 
that money is raised to pay for the Canada expedition, which was 
not authorised by the King and cost 100,000, besides the loss of 
1,000 lives. It is to be hoped that the people are not to be taxed 
for things done without authority. There is now a rate of 30,000 
imposed, to be paid in May. Never was there such a time to send 
a General Governor here. You will observe that the Councillor's 
oath is to give advice to the Governor and for the Government, but 
not on behalf of the King, as it should be. It was my fortune to be 
a Councillor and Treasurer under Sir E. Andros. The revolution 
lost me 1,000. I thought it my duty to submit my accounts to 
the King's Exchequer and obtained an order for the Government of 
Massachusetts to . examine them. They find that I have disbursed 
850 more than I received, but so far I can get no report from 
them. I have received not a penny yet as Governor of New 
Hampshire, and hope you will give orders for a salary to be paid to me 
from the date of my commission. I shall do my duty, but as my 
business lies in Boston, I beg dismissal from the post. 8ujncd, 



COLONIAL PAPEES. 

1693. 

John Usher. 2^- pp. Endorsed. Reed. 19 July, 1693. [Board of 
Trade. New Hampshire, 1. A 7 o. 19 ; and Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXVII., pp. 238-243.] 

Jan. 31. 40. John Usher to the Earl of Nottingham. The Assembly 
Boston. sa f rom 4^ to 29th October, and passed several Acts. On my 
arrival I asked the Council what laws and revenue were in being, 
and they said none, nor could be but by Act of Governor and 
Assembly. Notwithstanding this, duties of impost were paid to one 
Captain Stileman all the time from the overthrow of Sir Edmund 
Andros till my arrival. Yet now that the Government is settled by 
the King, let it be never so easy, it is such a burden that they had 
rather perish than act with any cheerfulness as to support thereof. 
I acquainted the Assembly that as Massachusetts supplied men, 
this Province was expected to supply provisions, which for 6 
months would be 362, and reminded them that before my arrival 
they had engaged with Massachusetts to raise pro rata with them, 
or 10s. a head. Still all that I could raise was 18f7. a head and 3rf. 
in the pound, which will amount to about st>150, which will not be 
enough to mount the guns sent by the King to this ungrateful 
people ; and though there is absolute necessity for constant 
attendance of a captain and gunner for the King's fort, I cannot get 
the Council to appoint a certain salary for them. Sir William 
Phips has appointed a naval office at Kittery side. As only two 
vessels of 50 tons burden belong there I look upon this only as a 
cloak to rob the King by violating the Acts of Navigation, and as 
vessels at all times' have made entries and paid duties to the 
Governor in Hampshire I am resolved to assert the right of the 
river according to the Commission until I receive the King's orders. 
I learn that the Assembly are addressing the King to annex them 
to Massachusetts on account of their poverty. It is not poverty 
but disaffection to Kingly Government. Never was greater 
affront put on the King's Commission than when I arrived. 
Endeavour was made that the Councillors nominated by the King 
should not accept, and they have manifested their anger towards 
those who did accept. It would be better to keep the province 
distinct until a General Governor is sent over, which is much 
desired. A levy of 100 soldiers would also be a great security. 
The loyal subjects in Massachusetts implore the King to annex 
all the Governments from Connecticut to Nova Scotia under one 
Governor General ; otherwise they see no likelihood of an end of the 
war nor relief from the grievances under which they suffer from 
arbitrary proceedings, especially towards those favourable to royal 
government. I was asked in England as to the capability of New 
England to supply naval stores. In two or three years' time pitch, 
tar and rosin could be supplied sufficient for both England and 
Holland. Hemp needs good seed and understanding men to raise 
it. I send copy of a letter from Governor Fletcher to Sir William 
Phips, and copy of a letter sent by our Governor to New York 
with reflections on the Court at home. I send also the proceedings 
of Governor Fletcher's messengers, by which you may judge how 
much esteemed here are persons at Court at home and how 
necessary it is to have such in places of trust. I think that a 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 9 

1093. 

Governor General and 200 soldiers should be sent here as speedily 
as possible. Sif/ned. John Usher. 2 pp. Endorsed. Eecd. 
July 19, '93. Enclosed, 

40. i. Narrative of the messenger sent to Boston by Governor 
Fletcher. I set out from New York on the 7th January 
1692-3, and on the 16th arrived at Boston, where I applied 
to Colonel Joseph Dudley and Governor Usher, and 
presented them my letters from Governor Fletcher. They 
showed great willingness to oblige Governor Fletcher and 
sent to acquaint Sir W. Phips, who was just returned from 
Rhode Island, of my arrival. Sir William fixed nine 
o'clock the following morning for me to wait upon him, 
which I did in company with Governor Usher and 
presented my letters in the presence of Mr. Usher, Joshua 
Moody and one Jackson, Sir William's clerk. Sir William 
gave Gouverneur's letter to his clerk to be translated, when I 
pointed out that there was already a translation. After 
the letter was read I asked about Gouverneur, when the 
Governor said that he would consider of it and then 
reflected extraordinarily upon Governor Sloughter, Major 
Ingoldsby and Governor Fletcher, justifying Leisler, and 
saying that if he had delivered the fort to Major Ingoldsby 
he would have deserved to be hanged. He told me that if 
Sloughter had lived he must have stood at the bar for 
putting Leisler and Milborne to death. I answered that if 
he had, it would have been for not hanging them all. I 
asked for his answer as to Martha's Vineyard ; he answered 
that he had sent me ; but I required another for Governor 
Fletcher. He then fell a railing against Lieutenant- 
Governor Nicholson, saying that he had never done a 
good action in his life. I replied that he had never 
done a bad one and that the King knew him to be a 
better man. He then said that the King did not know 
him, that he had been recommended by some courtier, 
and reflected upon the Court for putting improper persons 
in places of trust. I then told him, according to 
instructions, that Governor Fletcher intended to be at 
Martha's Vineyard early in the spring, before he went to 
Albany, and since Sir William pretended that Martha's 
Vineyard was in the Charter of Massachusetts, I told him 
that Governor Fletcher would meet him there. Sir William 
asked if I came to challenge ; I replied that I came to 
deliver my message and had done so. He enquired if I 
had any such orders ; I replied that I had my private 
instructions which I would show to no one. He told me 
that if they were my own words I was an impudent fellow ; 
I answered that I thought so too, but that the words 
were not mine. Sir William then said that he would take 
the words as a challenge, and would certainly meet 
Governor Fletcher. I told him that he might interpret it 
as he pleased. He then said that if he heard Governor 
Fletcher was at Martha's Vineyard he would take him 
prisoner if it cost him twopence, and that he would give 



10 COLONIAL PAPEES. 

1693. 



him cause to repent it. Many reflections also he made on 
Governor Fletcher, saying that he would do his business 
at home, that he would not long be at New York, that he 
was short-lived, and then went on vindicating Leisler. 
I told him that the King and Council were of another mind, 
having pronounced the whole of the proceedings against 
Leisler to be legal. He said that he knew better. I told 
him that Governor Fletcher brought over the judgment of 
of the King and Council ; he said it was false and would not 
be denied. I then again asked for Gouverneur to be delivered 
to me, as he was a fugitive under sentence. He said that 
he would speak with him arid then give an answer. I 
pointed out that Gouverneur' s letter reflected on himself ; 
but he did not disown the matter of fact, only saying that 
it was the business of the King's Governors to do what they 
could against the common enemy. Sir William then 
declared that Governor Fletcher had the Queen's orders 
to release the prisoners, but had none the less kept them, 
in order to force them to petition. 

On the 19th January I received a summons from 
Sir William Phips to attend the Council. After waiting 
some time I was called up and was ordered to relate to the 
Council my message. I said that I had no message to the 
Council but only to himself, and that I had delivered it in 
Governor Usher's presence. He then* asked for my 
instructions : I told him that I could not show them as 
they were private. He told me he would commit me till I 
showed them : I answered that he might do his- pleasure. 
Whereupon he told me that I was an impudent, saucy, pitiful 
jackanapes. I answered that Governor Fletcher would 
never have sent such a person as express messenger. 
He threatened to handle me severely, and I told him that 
he might hang me, but I would do my master's message. 
He told me that I had abused him : I answered that it was 
not my custom to abuse any, especially him. Turning to 
the Council he said, " He justifies his words and says they 
are no abuse." I said that the words were not mine but 
Governor Fletcher's, and that if I had gone beyond my 
orders I would give security to answer for the same to 
Governor Fletcher, and when he denied that I came on the 
King's business, I shewed that my pass spake otherwise. 
He told me I was a pitiful, saucy rascal ; and when I, 
protested against such treatment Mr. Stoughton said that 
not 1 but Gouverneur was meant. I said that I could 
take the words as spoken only to myself. Sir William then 
pulled a paper out of his pocket wherein I was accused of 
having said fourteen months before at New York that Sir 
William Phips was a coward and a fool, and deserved to 
be hanged. I denied the words and told him who was the 
true author, James Barry, but he said he knew better and 
would take the other's word before my oath. He then 
returned to it that Governor Fletcher had challenged him, 
and that his impertinent and scurrilous letter signified as 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 11 

1693. 

much ; and then asked of the Council that I should be com- 
mitted. Mr. Stoughton spoke for me, and urged that an 
express must not be served so. I was then committed 
to the custody of the Marshal for half an hour, and 
was then told that for the present I was dismissed, but 
must attend the Council. Barry and Gouverneur were 
seen in company with Sir William's secretaries on the same 
night. 3 pp. 

Here follows copy of Governor Fletcher's letter to Sir William 
Phips, 6 January, 1693. I send you copy of a letter from 
Boston by one Abraham Gouverneur. Possibly you may 
not know the person, but the ill consequences of the hand- 
ing about of this letter, with your name as voucher of the 
truth of the contents, oblige me to say that, if their asser- 
tions are true, you have forgot your duty to the King and 
your manners to gentlemen. If you have not discoursed 
such things with one who has fled from this province after 
conviction and sentence for murder, and if what he says 
be invented, you will think fit for your own vindication to 
secure him and return him to New York, whence he fled 
with apparent designs of disturbing the peace of the 
Government. I hope you will think it reasonable to give 
me satisfaction in a matter of this moment, wherein the 
chief concern is their Majesties' service. \ p. 

40. n. Copy of Abraham Gouverneur's letter of 12 October, 
1692, relating an interview with Sir William Phips, in 
which the latter showed great sympathy with him and 
Leisler and spoke ill of the New York Council. Abstracted 
in the preceding volume of this Calendar, No. 2548. 
Dutch, with English translations. 4 pp. 

40. in. Governor Sir William Phips to Governor Fletcher. 
Boston, 27 January, 1692-3. I have sent you several letters 
in the hope of maintaining a good correspondence between 
us, but your aversion therein is shewn by your contriving 
ways to prevent it. You want some person of understanding 
to read Gouverneur's letter distinctly and shew you the 
coherence of sentence and the meaning of stops, the want 
of which has occasioned your mistaking Gouverneur's 
opinion of you for my discourse to him. No part of it 
concerns me, as his own letter to you shews (see No. 27). 
I see no cause to deliver Gouverneur to your jailor, for it 
seems that you were obliged by the Queen's order to 
release him. Your absurd abusive letter demonstrates that 
if I have forgotten my manners to gentlemen I have for- 
gotten what you never had. I have observed my duty to the 
King at all times and in particular by asking you what 
assistance you can send us in the spring for an attack on 
Canada, but instead of sending answer and concurrence in 
so good and just a design you send a herald and challenge 
me to a meeting on Martha's Vineyard, which you mean to 
take by force, though it is annexed by Charter to Massa- 
chusetts. Your jailor has been as insolent in delivering 
this challenge as you were inconsiderate in sending it. If 



12 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 



Jan. 81. 

H.M.S. 

Conception, 

Boston. 



Jan. 31. 
H.M.S. 

Conception. 



Jan. 31. 

Dartmouth. 



you are resolved to assert your power at Martha's Vineyard 
I shall take such measures to defend it as you may not like. 
I am only sorry their Majesties' affairs must suffer because 
your advisers use their royal names to cover their own 
designs. Copy. 1 p. [America and West Indies. 561. 
Nos. 18, ISi.-m.] 

41. Captain Fairfax, R.N., to Mr. Sotherne. My stores and 
provisions are all expended some months since, all of which I have 
reported to the Governor as well as the defects of this vessel. 
Without a new upper deck fore and aft she will be unfit for the 
summer's service ; but I find that neither he nor any other persons 
have any instructions in the matter, and I receive little encourage- 
ment from him or from the country. I have moved for a survey, 
but cannot receive any answer. I have given my warrant to the 
purser for 224 days' provisions, who has obtained credit from 
Mr. Jahleel Brenton. I have now laid up the ship for the winter. 
Signed. Robt. Fairfax. ~Lp. Copy of the foregoing. 1 p. Endorsed. 
Reed. 15 Jan., 1693-4. [Board 'of Trade. 'New England, 6. 
Nos. 22, 23.] 

42. Captain Fairfax, R.N., to Mr. Sotherne. I have before 
now hinted to you concerning my uneasiness in this station. It is 
known by every gentleman here that no one commanding one of 
the King's ships was ever used with common civility, but on the 
contrary basely abused. I have endeavoured to comply with the 
humours of those in authority here so far as becomes a gentleman, 
but find that nothing that bears the name shall be so treated. I 
wish that I could serve the King elsewhere, for I am sensible that 
I lie much out of the way of promotion, and beg your favour to 
obtain my removal from this station. Signed. Robt. Fairfax. 
Copy. 1 p. Endorsed. Reed. 15 Jan., 1693-4. [Board of Trade. 
New England, 6. No. 24.] 

43. John Dottin to John Ive. I found Mr. John Nelson at 
Brest on a man of war, bound for Rochefort. I came with him 
from Quebec in Canada having suffered eight months' imprison- 
ment. He is kept close prisoner and will be until the end of the war 
unless solicitation be made for him. The French say that if he 
should return to England, Quebec and those parts would soon be 
lost to them ; and there will be no quietness in America until that 
is done. Pray use your interest to procure his release. A French 
officer has come back to France in our man-of-war to present to the 
King plans of Boston and New York, which they know well. The 
Chevalier Deaux is likewise come, having escaped from prison at 
Boston, as are also a French protestant who is one of the best pilots 
in New England, and other gentlemen, who have been sent home 
from Quebec to ask for twelve frigates and 2,000 soldiers. I am 
told that this has been granted, that the preparations are well 
advanced and that the expedition will sail in March, pick up more 
troops at Quebec and attack Boston and New York. If this be so, 
those places will be in much danger unless a squadron be sent from 
England. Piscataqua is also threatened, also Rhode Island (which 
our ships would have attacked but for foul winds), also Peinaquid 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



13 



1093. 



Jan. 31. 



Jan. 31. 



Feb. 2. 



Feb. 2. 



Feb. 2. 

Whitehall. 



Feb. 2. 

Whitehall. 



Feb. 2. 

Whitehall. 



Fort, which is so situated that ships can storm it. It ought to have 
been built further up the bay. Signed. John Dottin. Holograph. 
2 pp. Endorsed. Reed. 10 Feb., 92-3, from Sir Wm. Warren. 
[Board of Trade. New York, 5. A T o. 2.] 

44. Minutes of Council of New York. A letter having been 
received from Major Ingoldsby at Albany complaining of the rotten- 
ness of the stockades, it was agreed to recommend to the Assembly 
the building of a stone fort at Albany. Order for audit of Governor 
Sloughter's accounts. Committee appointed to consider a method 
for regular payment of the Government's debts out of the fund pro- 
vided by the Act of Assembly. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., 
pp. 369, 370 ; and pp. 391, 392.] 

45. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for careening of 
H.M.S. Guernsey, and for martial law to cease to-morrow. Order 
for sale of an unseaworthy ship, for appointment of additional 
justices for St. Andrew's parish, and for prosecution of several 
persons by the Attorney General. [Board, of Trade. Jamaica, 77. 
pp. 239, 240.] 

46. Minutes of Council of New York. Petitions considered. 
Order for payment to the Governor of i'130, being the expenses of his 
own and his family's passage from England. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 
LXXV., p. 370 ; and p. 392.] 

47. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. Proclamation for 
a day of thanksgiving approved. Report on John Usher's accounts 
referred for further consideration. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV., 
pp. 216-217.] 

48. The King to Sir William Phips. We have fitted out a 
squadron of twelve ships with 1,000 good soldiers on board and 
directed it to sail from the West Indies so as to reach New England 
by the end of May or middle of June at latest. There they will 
refit, and take with them such reinforcement of men and ships 
as New England shall appoint, sufficient to attack the French with 
success in Canada. You will therefore urge the Assembly of 
Massachusetts to have all things ready, for if the present opportunity 
be lost through delay, it may never come again. We have also sent 
Thomas Cox to explain to you our further intentions ; and you will 
consult with Governor Fletcher as to the measures most desirable 
to be taken. Countersigned. Nottingham. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXIL, pp. 454-458.] ' 

49. Order of the King in Council. That copy of the petition 
of Elizabeth Salenave be sent to Governor Codrington, with instruc- 
tions that, if her statements be found true, he shall give orders for 
the confirmation of her inheritance and the restoration of her goods 
to her. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 44. pp. 115, 116.] 

50. Order of the King in Council. For a commission and instruc- 
tions to be prepared for Captain John Goddard as Governor of 
Bermuda. Signed. John Nicholas. \ p. [Board of Trade. 
Bermuda, 2. No. 8; and 28, p. 46.] 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 
Feb. 4. 

Bermuda. 



Feb. 4. 

Bermuda. 



51. Governor Richier to Lords of Trade and Plantations. The 
mortal fever which destroyed so many in the West Indies got among 
us in June last, killing in three months 767 persons, white and 
black, of whom 127 only were slaves. There remain but 610 fit to 
bear arms, and all the Council are dead except Richard Peniston, 
William Pitt, Thomas Foster, Samuel Trott and Charles Walker. 
The mortality has not begotten a better disposition in the remaining 
inhabitants to obedience and loyalty. I am forced to suffer many 
affronts to the King's rights and authority lest by failing to 
punish the offenders the King's power should be absolutely 
despised. An oath is of no account here, except so far as it serves 
the interest of the swearer. I have not the means to encourage by 
rewards, nor can I possibly punish offenders, for I know but of two, 
the sheriff being one, who have inclination and courage enough to 
serve the King. I should not trouble you about so small a place 
except that its importance requires a better settlement of the 
Government than I can yet effect. I beg you to call attention to my 
former representations as to its defencelessness and its unprofitable- 
ness in its present state. These Islands lie almost in the middle of 
the King's dominions in America, so many ships to and from the 
Colonies pass by Bermuda, as also ships bound for Jamaica and 
Southward to England. Virginia ships also pass close by in going 
to and from England. All knowing merchants and mariners who put 
in here conclude that if Bermuda were in an enemy's hand the 
American trade would be in great measure destroyed in time of war. 
The shelves and rocks are our chief defence. Of our 610 men few 
could make use of their arms on occasion. The forts are 
but slenderly guarded and may easily be surprised ; and if 
the castle and the harbour which it commands were taken, 
the whole country would fall an easy prey to the enemy. One 
company of soldiers could defend the castle and the opposite fort, 
and guard the magazine in the town against surprise. But more 
strength is needed to prevent an enemy from landing, which can be 
done in boats in several places. Soldiers in the King's pay would 
obey commands and set an example to the inhabitants, who seeing 
the King's regard for them would recognise to whom their duty and 
allegiance is due. If you think it not worth while to send a company 
to defend the Islands, there can be little profit from them owing to 
the increasing sterility of the soil and the epidemic idleness of the 
inhabitants. The only produce of profit to the King's revenue is 
tobacco, and this year there is not enough to load a vessel of thirty 
tons. I have filled up the vacancies in the Council by appointing 
Henry Fifield, Thomas Walmsley, William Outerbridge, Patrick 
Downing and Thomas Harford, as the men most fitting from 
character and estate. Signed. I. Richier. 1J pp. Endorsed. 
Reed. 19 Aug., 1693. [Board of Trade. Bermuda, 2. No. 9; 
and 21. pp. 88-91.] 

52. Governor Richier to the Earl of Nottingham. I enclose copy 
of a letter that I have written to the Lords of Trade and Plantations 
from whom I have received no commands since my arrival. I beg 
you not to let the government of these Islands be subject to the 
directing of a fanatic scrivener. If you think them of sufficient 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



15 



1693. 



Feb. 6. 



Feb. 6. 



Feb. 7. 



Feb. 7. 



Feb. 7. 



Feb. 8. 

Barbados. 



Feb. 8. 

Barbados. 



importance I hope that you will send forces sufficient for their 
defence. Signal. I. Richier. Holograph. 1 p. [America and 
West Indies. ' 477. No. 49.] 

53. Instrument of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina conveying 
the right of granting land in Carolina to Governor Philip Ludwell, 
or in case of his death or absence to James Colletoii, or in case of 
Colleton's death or absence to Thomas Smith, or in case of Smith's 
death or absence to Paul Grimball. Signed. Craven, Ashley, John 
Archdale for Thomas Archdale, Tho. Amy, P. Colleton. Form of 
indenture for grants of land. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXII., 
pp. 210-213.] 

54. Rules and instructions for granting land in Carolina. 
Two counties, Craven County and Berkeley County, have been laid 
out in blocks of 12,000 acres. Five hundred acres are to be set 
apart on any navigable river for a town, the site to be as high up 
the river as the biggest ship can reach. The squares containing 
this 500 acres is to be called a Colony, and two squares backward 
from the river, with the two squares behind them, making six squares 
in all, are to be a precinct, within which, and within the three 
squares on the opposite side of the river, proprietors may have 
not more than 800 acres, and other dignitaries from 200 to 600 
acres. Ferries are to be established. Any of the squares chosen 
by a proprietor shall be a seignory. Holders of 6,000 acres and 
upwards may have river-frontage equal to the depth of their 
blocks, holders of less than 6,000 acres are to have river-frontage 
in different proportions. Fifty acres may be granted for each white 
servant imported. Here follow forms of grant and indenture. 
Signed as the preceding. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXII., 2>P- 213-219.] 

55. Petition of Joshua van Belle to the Lord President. 
Petitioner has a suit to avoid paying insurance of the ship 
St. Jago de la Victoria, and desires to have a copy of the memorial 
of the Governor and Council of Jamaica, reversing the con- 
demnation of the ship. 1 p. In the margin. Order of Lord 
President Carmarthen to the Clerk of Council to supply copy of the 
memorial. Signed. Carmarthen, P. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. 
A T o. 2.] 

56. Commission to Thomos Povey to be Clerk of the Naval 
Office of Jamaica. Countersigned. Nottingham. [Board of Trade. 
Jamaica, 53. pp. 137, 138.] 

57. Minutes of Coucil of Barbados. Order for a day of general 
thanksgiving for restoration of the healthiness of the Island. A 
special despatch vessel hired for i'250 to carry letters to England 
and back. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XII., pp. 398-400.] 

58. Proclamation for a day of thanksgiving for deliverance of 
the Island from the late contagious sickness. Copy. % p. 
Endorsed. Reed. 25 March, 1693. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. 
No. 1.] 

59. The Attorney General of Barbados to the Attorney 
General of England. By Governor Kendall's order I have sent you 
a' very exact account of Colonel Hallett's case both in the Court of 



16 COLONIAL PAPEES. 

1693. 

Exchequer and the Court of Errors here, from which he has 
appealed to their Majesties in Council. In this business we have 
used the common methods of this place, which we endeavour to 
bring as near to those of England as the constitution of the place 
and people will admit, and I am witness that this cause has been 
carried on with all the gentleness imaginable. If it should be 
alleged by any of Colonel Hallett's friends that the forfeiture much 
exceeds the offence, then I say that Hallett has only himself to 
blame, by putting himself beyond the reach of mercy through his 
resolute defence and justification of his crimes. He was advised by 
his friends to take another course, but he thought fit to do 
otherwise. The money is now paid to the King's Receiver and 
becomes part of the revenue, so that we have done with Colonel 
Hallett here, and doubt not that our action will be approved in 
England. His Excellency desires you to attend the case in Council 
and to take all measures to secure confirmation of the judgment. 
Signed. Ro. Hooper. 1J pp. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. 
No. 2.] 

Feb. 8. 60. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Draft Com- 
mission for Lieutenant-Governor Goddard considered, and, with 
omission of the clauses as to the powers of Admiralty, approved. 
Governor Richier's request for stores ordered to be sent to the Board 
of Ordnance. 

Governor Fletcher's letter reporting his arrival and an address 
from the Council and Assembly of New- York read. Order for the 
Attorney-General to examine the Charter of Connecticut and the 
grants of New 7 Jersey to ascertain the powers of government reserved 
to the King therein. Agreed to recommend that a first rate frigate 
be despatched for defence of New York and that the arrears of the 
two foot companies there be paid. [Board of Trade. Journal, 7. 
pp. 161-165.] 

Feb. 8. 61. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. That a list 
of the stores of war needed for Bermuda be sent to Sir H. Goodrick, 
Lieutenant-General of the Ordnance, with a request for a list of the 
stores of war sent to Bermuda in 1689 and for his opinion as to 
the furnishing of the stores now asked for. [Board of Trade. 
Bermuda, 28. p. 84.] 

Feb. 8. 62. William Blathwayt to the Attorney General. Asking him to 
examine the Charter of Connecticut, and the grants of New Jersey, 
East and West, and report as to the King's powers therein. p. 
[Board of Trade. New York, 5. No. 3 ; and 48. p. 10.] 

Feb. 8. 63. Minutes of General Assembly of Massachusetts. The 
Representatives reported the choice of Nehemiah Jewett as 
temporary Speaker. The Governor recommended to the Repre- 
sentatives to supply money for payment of soldiers and for other 
emergencies. John Usher attended with his accounts. 

Feb. 9. Bill for regulation of cornfields, cattle and fences read and 
debated. Order for the clearing of Jeremiah Toy's ship. 

Feb. 10. Bill for regulation of cornfields again debated. Conference 
with the Representatives as to a supply of money. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



17 



1693. 
Feb. 11. 



Feb. 9. 

Whitehall. 



Feb. 9. 



Feb. 9. 



Feb. 9. 

Whitehall. 



Feb. 9. 

Whitehall. 



Feb. 9. 



Feb. 10. 



Bill to encourage the killing of wolves read and debated. Daniel 
Wilcox and Henry Head brought before Council for high mis- 
demeanours and committed to custody. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXIL, pp. 375-377.] 

64. Order of the King in Council. Approving the draft 
Commission prepared for Captain John Goddard to be Governor of 
Jamaica. Signed. John Nicholas. [Board of Trade. Bermuda, 28. 
pp. 49, 50.] 

65. Sir H. Goodrick to John Povey. I cannot attend the 
Council to-day, my health being worse; but the stores from Bermuda 
are undoubtedly needed and, excepting the powder, are of small 
importance. [Board of Trade. Bermuda, 28. p. 85.] 

66. Order of the King in Council. That the Officers of 
Ordnance shall despatch stores of ammunition [list (jiceti] to 
Bermuda. [Board of Trade. Bermuda, 28. pp. 85, 86.]' 

67. Order of the King in Council. Referring to Lords of 
Trade and Plantations a petition of Lord Baltimore, praying for the 
King's positive orders to Governor Copley to receive the port duties 
or anchorage money as formerly, according to the royal orders 
already issued on that behalf. Copy: 1 p. [America and West 
Indies. 556. No. 15.] 

68. Order of the King in Council. Referring the petition of 
Richard and Killian Van Rensselaer to Lords of Trade and 
Plantation for report. Sic/ned. John Nicholas. \ p. Annexed, 

68. i. Petition of Richard and Killian Van Rensselaer to the 
King. For orders to be given to Governor Fletcher to 
restore them to possession of Rensselaerswyck. Copy. 

68. ii. Warrant of James, Duke of York. For the issue of patents 
from the New York Government to the petitioners for 
Rensselaerswyck. Copy. 1^ p. The whole endorsed. 
Reed, same day. [Board oj Trade. New York, 5. Nos. 
4, 4 i., n. ; and (order only] 48, p. 191.] 

69. Minutes of Council of New York. Report of the audit of 
Peter Delanoy's accounts read and approved. Committee appointed 
to report on the address of the Mayor and Corporation of New 
York for confirmation of their charter and for additional privileges. 
Orders for sundry payments. 

Captain Clarke having returned from Boston, the letters of Sir W. 
Phips and Gouverneur, as well as Captain Clarke's own narrative 
were read. Captain Clarke further reported that Gouverneur and 
Sir W. Phips were certainly together and that Gouverneur was 
expected to go to England shortly, to represent the party of mal- 
contents,' by Sir W. Phips's encouragement. The Council desired to 
address their Majesties on the subject and appointed members to 
draw up an address. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 370-372 ; 
and pp. 382-394.] 



8060 



18 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 

Feb. 10. 70. Governor Kendall to [the Lord President]. After the 
Barbados. g rac ious assurances which I received on the 1st of September that we 
might expect a strong squadron of ships with a considerable .strength 
of land-forces in the following October, and now that we are come to 
the 10th of February without news of them and without the arrival 
of a single ship from Europe for four months you will believe that 
I cannot easily guess the cause of this unfortunate disappointment. 
The most rational conjecture I can make is that the dreadful news 
brought to England by the ships that sailed some time ago, has 
frightened all mankind away from us. It is a sad but real truth that 
I have now lived almost three years in the region of death, and that 
two thirds of those that have arrived, together with one half of the 
inhabitants, have since my being here paid their tribute to the 
Sovereign Prince of Terrors. But since it has pleased Almighty 
God to stay His afflicting hand and we haVe" true reason to turn our 
humiliations into a day of thanksgiving I thought it would be 
well to send an express with the news that this Island is in a 
perfect state of health and in a very flourishing condition. The late 
distemper has been severely fatal to the regiments raised for an 
expedition against the French, having swept away Sir Timothy 
Thornhill, Lieut. Col. Read, besides inferior officers and no inconsider- 
able number of soldiers. I have repaired the breaches as well as I 
could, and the men that remain are good and very well disciplined. 
The raising and keeping of these men, together with the transport- 
ships, which have been taken up ever since October, has been a 
very great charge to this country ; but what seems to be most 
grievous to the inhabitants is the thought of parting with any of 
their men for this intended expedition, considering the late 
mortality and the apprehension of what the slaves may attempt in 
their absence. Being satisfied that these are no idle fears I have 
thought it my duty to lay the case before you. The loss of 
Sir Timothy Thornhill is not only a great misfortune to 
this Island but to all English subjects in the West Indies, he 
being a brave and active gentleman. He died extremely in debt 
and lias left his lady, with whom he had a considerable fortune, in 
a lamentable condition. If the King would bestow the 1,000 
presented to Sir Timothy by this Island, on his widow, it would be a 
great charity and a prince-like consideration of her husband's merits. 
Though the French are much stronger than we are at sea, yet with 
the Diamond, frigate, and the Wild, prize, I have protected all our 
merchant ships and our commerce with North America. We have 
lost only two sloops, which were foolhardy enough to sail without 
convoy. I have laid out about i'1,000 on keeping the two ships in 
repair, for which I have drawn bills in England. The Norwich, 
stationed at the Leeward Islands, was blown away from her anchors 
at St. Christophers seventeen weeks ago, and as she has never been 
heard of since we fear the worst for her. The bearer is under con- 
tract to wait twenty days for your orders before he returns. Signed. 
J. Kendall. Holograph. 2 pp. Endorsed. B. 27 March, '93. 

Duplicate of the foregoing, dated 13 Feb. Unsigned. [America 
and West Indies, 456. Nos. 41, 42.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 19 



1693. 

Feb. 10. 71. Governor Kendall to the Lords of Trade and Plantations. 
A transcript of the foregoing letter of same date, as far as the 
account of the loss of H.M.S. Norwich, from which point the letter 
proceeds as follows: Having since Colonel Stede's departure for 
England taken upon me the receipt of the casual revenue, I think it 
my duty to give you the following account of Colonel Hallett. 
Though bound over to take his trial next Grand Sessions and mean- 
while to be of good behaviour, he had nevertheless the insolence 
to beat and wound one of my servants, without any provocation, 
before the meeting of the Sessions. His recognizances were there- 
fore estreated in the Court of Exchequer, but he made an appeal in 
error to myself in Council, having hopes of better success, since his 
brother-in-law and son-in-law are both of the Council. Nevertheless 
he lost his case, but being still dissatisfied he petitioned to me for 
leave to appeal to their Majesties in Council, which I granted on his 
depositing i'2,000, as I am directed in my instructions. I beg you 
to recommend this case to the Attorney-General, whose care therein 
will do a great deal of right to the royal affairs here and will dis- 
courage such litigious persons in future. Hallett has an ill opinion 
of his cause, for he had the impudence to offer me 300 to favour 
his case in the Council. It was with difficulty, I fear, that I 
mastered my feelings. Signed. J. Kendall. 2 pp. Endorsed. 
Reed. 24 March. Read 1 May, '93. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. 
No. 3; and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIII., pp. 331-335.] 

Feb. 10. 72. Abstract of the foregoing letter. 1 J pp. [Board of Trade. 
Barbados, 5. No. 4.] 

Feb. 10. 73. Statement of the case of John Hallett by himself. Setting 
forth that his original quarrel with the Governor arose from his 
unwillingness to give up his land for the fortifications without 
compensation, that the Governor's resolution to bind him over to take 
his trial was sudden and unwarranted, and that the assault, for which 
his recognizances were estreated, was in defence of a woman at 
his house against a drunken fellow. The whole . 7 pp. Copy. 
[Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. No. 5.] 

Feb. 10. 74. Certificate of the boatswain and carpenter of H.M.S. 
Nonsuch, that Captain Short refused to sign their expense of stores 
unless they first certified that the ship was endangered by riding 
at Pemaquid, and that if they ever signed anything to that effect it 
was in ignorance. Copy. 1 p. [Board of Trade. New England, 6. 
No. 25.] 

Feb. 11. 75. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. The Report 
of the Solicitor General on the Charter of Connecticut and grant of 
New Jersey read. Resolved to send a circular to the Colonies 
bidding them give assistance to New York when called upon ; and 
other orders given. 

Sir Thomas Laurence's petition read, and orders given for the 
Acts respecting his office to be examined, and for himself to be 
admitted to his office on giving the usual security. Address of the 
Council of Maryland as to the suspension of Mr. Frisby read, and 
copy ordered to be sent to Mr. Frisby. 



20 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

Petition of William Talbot, for the post of Escheator of the Lee- 
ward Islands, read and rejected. [Board of Trade. Journal, 7. 
pp. 165-167.] 

Feb. 11. 76. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. To recommend 
that letters he sent to Connecticut and Pihode Island bidding them 
give help to New York if required ; that a Commission be given to 
the Governor of New York to command the Militia of Connecticut, 
and that Joseph Dudley and William Pinhorne be removed from the 
Council unless they reside within the province of New York. [Board 
of Trade. New York, 48. p. 12.] 

Feb. 11. 77. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. To-morrow 
the letters may be sent to Connecticut and Rhode Island, as to 
the other Colonies in North America, ordering them to assist New 
York. [Col. Entry Bk\, Vol. LXIL, p. 420?] 

Feb. 13. 78. The Solicitor General to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 
As to Connecticut and East and West Jersey I am of opinion that 
in virtue of prerogative and sovereignty the King may appoint 
Governors with such powers to raise men and furnish provisions for 
the necessary defence of subjects or of neighbour Colonies as he 
may think fit. I conceive that the proprietor of New York may 
assign his propriety in New Jersey (which is part of New York) to 
others, but cannot thereby sever New Jersey from New York so as 
to cease to be a part thereof, dependent on the government thereof 
and liable to contribute men and provisions for its defence. Signed. 
Tho. Trevor. 1 J pp. [Board of Trade. New York 5, No. 5 ; and 
48, p. 11.] 

Feb. 13. 79. Thomas Dobbins to the Lords of the Admiralty. The 
H.M.S. Governor has suspended Captain Short, and put me in command in 

^Boston' kis place. I am the person who carried the King ashore from his 
barge at Torbay, and obtained a warrant as gunner of the Nonsuch. 
Both officers and men seem very well satisfied at Captain Short's 
removal, as he was constantly confining his officers and beating and 
tyrannising over his men, so much so that the officers threatened to 
lay down their warrants and the men to desert. He is of so morose 
a temper that in his drunkenness he has grossly abused many loyal 
subjects. Signed. Thomas Dobbins, late gunner. 1 p. Endorsed. 
Reed. 15 Jan., 1693-4. [Board of Trade. New England, 6. 
No. 26.] 

Feb. 13. 80. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for pressing two 
vessels for heaving down H.M.S. Guernsey. Two persons sum- 
moned to appear before next Council. Order for two English 
prisoners to be claimed from Petit Guavos. [Board of Trade. 
Jamaica, 77. p. 240.] 

Feb. 13. 81. Extract from Minutes of Council of New York. Setting 
forth that in the Council's opinion Massachusetts has no right to 
Martin's Vineyard. Copy. 2 pp. 

Duplicate of the above. 1 p. [America and West Indies. 579. 
Nos. 25, 26.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 21 



1693. 

Feb. 13. 82. Minutes of Council of New York. Letter from Major 
Igoldsby read reporting the arrival of 350 French and 200 Indians 
within twelve leagues of Senectady. Resolved to despatch 300 men 
from the City Regiment and others adjacent by water to Kingston, 
to order Colonel Beckman to secure all the horses in Ulster to 
carry the detachment to Albany, and to apprise Major Ingoldsby at 
once that reinforcements are on the way and that the Governor 
will accompany them. The Governor laid a letter from Sir William 
Phips and a printed copy of the New England charter before the 
Council, and asked for their opinion as to Martin's Vineyard. 

Feb. 14. The Governor announced the receipt of a second letter from 
Major Ingoldsby, confirming his former report that the French and 
Indians had taken the first and second castles of the Macpaas, and 
remained there in despair of being able to get back, the ice being 
broken up on the rivers. The Governor announced his intention of 
going to Albany, and Colonel Bayard's offer to go with him was 
accepted. Order for sloops to be prepared immediately, and for 
certain money payments in connection with the journey. 

Feb. 15. Ordered that a letter be sent to the neighbouring Colonies to 
report the news of yesterday, to announce that the Governor had 
already embarked with 200 men for Albany leaving 150 men to 
follow to-day, and to appeal to them to contribute something-to the 
expenses. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 372-374; and 
pp. 394-397.] 

Feb. 13. 83. Minutes of General Assembly of Massachusetts. Bill for 
explaining and altering several Acts passed last Session, read. 

Feb. 14. Bills to encourage the killing of wolves, for the regulation of sea- 
men, and for registering births and deaths, read. 

Feb. 15. Bill for registration of births and deaths, and for altering certain 
Acts of last Session, read. John Usher's accounts sent to the 
Secretary's office to be copied. 

Feb. 16. Bill for explaining and altering former Acts again read and 
debated. Bills to grant 100 to Increase Mather and to abate 
eighteenpence in the pound to such as shall forthwith pay the full 
of their assessments, read. 

Feb. 17. Bills for registering births and deaths, and for altering former 
Acts, read and passed. 

Feb. 18. Bill for continuing several duties of impost and excise, read and 
passed. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV., pp. 377-379.] 

Feb. 14. 84. Governor Fletcher to [William Blathwayt] . The papers 
New York, that I enclose will, I fear, take more time than you can spare for 
perusal. They will shew you that I have a very ill neighbour. 
While I am labouring to heal the wounds caused by the outrages of 
Leisler, Sir William Phips has been acting as the attested copies of 
documents herewith sent will shew. These papers shew his princi- 
ples. He has also seized Martin's Vineyard, which has always been 
part of this Government and is named neither in the Charter of 
Massachusetts nor in his Commission. All the people there hold 
their lands under the seal of this province and have contributed to our 
charge for the defence of Albany. Yet I must not levy war against 
him, though provoked by his unmannerly letter to meet him there; 



22 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

I could cheerfully do so, but hope to see him when we may do so 
without prejudice to the King's service. I must ask for your favour 
not only to this province at large but for the two companies here, 
which are under great discouragement. Four would be too few to 
answer the service. There are no returns of money since uiy 
coming. ,1,120 is put down to Colonel Sloughter of which I can 
get no account ; and men grow old and. die here as fast as in 
Europe. I think that it would be well to send two companies 
more while the war lasts, or at any rate recruits to make the 
present companies up to 200 men. I find the Council here men of 
the best parts, quality and estate in the province. I cannot name 
six to fill vacancies, as my instructions bid me. Sir William Phips 
calls them King James's Council, but I find them all zealous for 
their Majesties' service and ready on all occasions to advance money 
from their private purses for the same. ~Colonel Van Cortlandt 
and Mr. Brooke have lately shown their regard for you in 
a debate in Council. I had no account of that matter until 
Mr. Brooke told me that it had formerly been contested. I ordered 
the debate to be renewed, and spoke my sentiments. It is utterly 
impossible for this poor decayed province to defend itself without 
help from our neighbours. Our trade is quite lost and our charge 
very great. The neighbouring Colonies acknowledge no Government 
from the Crown but harbour our deserters and rob us of our trade 
by imposing no duties and ignoring the Acts of Trade and Naviga- 
tion. I shall not say a word of that jargon in New England nor of 
that machine their Governor, but shall beg you to read the enclosed 
papers. An express is just come from Albany saying that the 
French and Indians are marching on Senectady, which calls me to 
attend that service. It is a curse on these occasions to attend wind 
and water, but we cannot march by land. Mr. Graham is a 
very useful man, and deserves some mark of the Royal favour. 
Connecticut would add more strength to us than the Jerseys and 
and Pennsylvania. Signed. Ben. Fletcher. 2J pp. Endorsed. 
Reed. 3 June, 1693. Duplicate. [Board of Trade. New York, 5. 
No. 6 ; and 48. pp. 21, 22 ; abstracted ibid. pp. 46, 47.] 

[Feb. 14.] 85. Enclosures forwarded with the foregoing letter. 

85. i. Copy of Governor Fletcher's letter of 6 January, to 

Sir William Phips. (See No. 40 1.) I p. Endorsed, Reed. 

19 July, 1693. 
85. n. Copy of Abraham Gouverneur's letter of 12 Oct. 1692. 

Dutch. 
85. in. Copy of Abraham Gouverneur's letter to Governor 

Fletcher of 20 Jan. 1693. (See No. 27.) Endorsed as the 

preceding. 
85. iv. Copy of Sir W. Phips's letter to Governor Fletcher of 

27 January, 1693. (See No. 40 in.) 1J pp. Endorsed as 

the preceding. 
85. v., vi. Copy of Captain Clarke's narrative of his mission to 

Boston. (See No. 40 1.) 5 pp. Endorsed as No. i. A 

second copy. 3 pp. 
85. vii. A third copy with copies of enclosures, Nos. i. and n. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 23 

1693. 

85. viii., ix. Minute of the Council of New York, 15 February 
1(>93. Having read a letter from Sir W. Phips of 2nd 
January and the Charter of Massachusetts, we are of 
opinion that Massachusetts has no claim to Martin's Vine- 
yard nor to any other Island to westward of Nantucket. 
Copy. 1^ pp. Endorsed as the preceding. 

Copy of the above. 1 p. [Board of Trade. New York, 5. 
Xos. 6 i. -viii.] 

Feb. 14. 86. Governor Fletcher to the Earl of Nottingham. I gave 
New York. you ail account of my arrival. Three weeks later I went up to the 
frontiers and put them in such a posture that nothing but 
cowardice, laziness or sleep itself can expose those places to the 
enemy. At my return the Assembly met and was cheerful beyond 
their ability in raising money for the public defence. My great 
business was to accommodate the differences occasioned by the 
arbitrary violence of Leisler. All things seemed to be calm 
beyond my hopes. Those who had renounced the Church and 
sacraments repaired cheerfully to both, and nothing of the former 
heat and rancour appeared, until suddenly all was in a flame again 
owing to a letter written by one of the condemned men who was 
released by the Queen's order. This man as soon as he was at 
liberty repaired to Boston and became the favourite of Sir William 
Phips. He quotes the following words from Sir William Phips, 
"Your counsel in England is chosen Parliament-man and your 
cause will then be sufficiently inspected, and there will be satisfac- 
tion for estates and I hope for blood too. For if what Governor 
Leisler and you did was ill, how do their Majesties sit on the 
throne?" I have sent the correspondence on the subject to Mr. 
Blathwayt, from which you will see that these men, having tasted 
the royal mercy, are now blown up to an expectation of revenge and 
reward by Sir William Phips, just at a time when all seemed satis- 
fied with the mildness of the Government. Such of the party as 
were capable of it had been put into the commissions of the peace 
and militia. Sir William Phips has also violently seized on a part 
of this Government called Martin's Vineyard, whereby he has 
obtained the supplies that they were sending up to us for the 
common defence, and which we greatly need. It is very evident to 
me that this single Colony cannot support the present charge, while 
the neighbouring Colonies, under no Government or expense, 
harbour all who desert from us to avoid the burthen. Some of the 
best people of Connecticut have written to me desiring to become 
members of this province ; and the joining of it to New York would 
be a greater advantage than the Jerseys and Pennsylvania could 
bring. The Council here, whom Sir W. Phips endeavours to 
criminate as attached to King James, are zealous for their Majesties' 
service, the ablest men in parts and estates in the province, 
and always ready to advance money for the public good. Those 
who constantly attend are three Englishmen, three Dutchmen and 
a Frenchman. Signed. Ben. Fletcher. Holograph. 3 pp. 
Endorsed. R. July 18, '93. 



24 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 



Duplicate of the foregoing. 

Nos. 27, 28.] 



America and West Indies. 579. 



Feb. 14. 87. Report of the defects of H.M.S. Conception. Estimated 
Boston. cost of making them good, 400. 1 p. Copy. {Board of Trade. 
New England, 6. No. 27.] 

Feb. 15. 88. Governor Sir William Phips to the Earl of Nottingham. 
Boston. I have been obliged to suspend Captain Richard Short from the 
command of H.M.S. Nonsuch and have appointed Thomas Dobbins, 
late gunner of the said ship, in his room. I did not appoint the 
lieutenant, according to custom, as I thought him unfit for the 
station ; for when in sight of two Dutch men-of-war, which we met 
in the Channel on our voyage out from England, he pressed the 
captain to bear away and run his ship ashore to save their lives, 
fearing that they were French ships. Captain Dobbins is the most 
fit man in the ship for the command, being a sober and diligent 
office. He is the same person that carried the King from the barge 
to the shore, when he arrived at Torbay ; and it was the King's 
commendation of him that gained him a warrant for being gunner. 
I was sorry to be obliged to make this alteration, but the fault was 
Captain Short's. First, before going on shore after my arrival here, 
I told Captain Short to be particularly careful to keep his men on 
board, as they would be wanted for immediate service ; but he would 
not, and so lost great numbers by desertion. Then when I gave 
him my written order to cruise he could not obey it for want of men, 
whereupon he pressed men ashore without my warrant, which he 
might have had if he had desired it, and in pressing used such 
violence as greatly to disturb the country, for he beat and abused 
two Assemblymen, as enclosed depositions will prove. Secondly, 
in September, 1692, I went to Pemaquid in a sloop kept in pay by 
this country, and left orders to Captain Short to follow me 
immediately ; instead of which he delayed starting for four or ftve 
days and then stopped at Piscataqua on the way, whereby I lost the 
opportunity of surprising several French and Indians in 
some small islands near Pemaquid, and after waiting several 
days longer than I had intended I was forced to return to 
Boston. Nor, though the wind was favourable, did Captain 
Short appear until some days after my departure. Thirdly, soon 
after I reached Boston I received a report, which seemed likely to 
be true, that three French men-of-war were arrived on the coast. I 
sent written orders to Captains Short and Fairfax of H.M. ships 
Nonsuch and Conception, then lying at Pemaquid, to be in readiness, 
and directed them positively to fight the French ships if they met 
them, and otherwise not to leave the harbour but to stay and secure 
the fort. Notwithstanding this they both came to Boston, deserting 
the fort, which being unfinished to seaward would have been taken 
if attacked. They pretended that they were in want of provisions, 
but if so it was through their own fault, for I told them to send 
their pursers if they wanted any ; but they did not send them be- 
cause they needed the pretence. Fourthly, the officers of the Non- 
such tell me that Captain Short has, in his drunken humours and at 
other times, been very wasteful of the King's stores ; that he has 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 25 

1693. 

beaten and confined some of the officers and abused them all, with- 
out reason ; and that he has driven many men to desertion by his 
cruelty. Fifthly, in November last, I sent Captain Short my written 
order to go to Pemaquid, but he desired that the ship might be laid 
on shore at Boston, and voluntarily offered to supply a sloop with 
men, ammunition, and provisions to ply between Boston and 
Pemaquid during the winter as necessity might require. I con- 
sented ; but, after I had ordered the ship to be laid up, on the second 
time when there was occasion to send to Pemaquid, Captain Short 
refused to send his men, though at the same time he suffered many 
of them to go to other quarters in merchant-ships, taking a reward 
of ^20 a man out of their wages. I checked him, and threatened 
to deal with him according to his deserts, but he disdained to bear 
any reproof, gave me provoking language in public before several 
persons, and drawing near me shook his cane at me. This insolence 
provoked me to strike him a smart blow, which lit on the brim of 
his hat and on his shoulder, which I designed to warn him to keep 
his distance. Immediately he returned the blow and continued 
striking my head and body with his cane until I threw him on the 
ground. He rose, twice laid his hand on his sword, and then again 
assaulted me with his cane until I made him incapable of striking 
any more. He was free from drink, but he had the night before 
used threats against me. I suspended him the same day, and have 
sent him home. I have shewn all manner of respect to the King's 
captains and have tried to make their station easy and comfortable 
to them, but they have taken advantage of this to intrude upon my 
patience and take counsel with my enemies. I shall pass by in 
silence what only concerns myself, but so long as I am in my 
present station I cannot overlook neglect of duty. Signed. 
Win. Phips. 8 pp. Endorsed. Reed. 24 May, 1693. Enclosed, 
88. i. The Warrant officers of H.M.S. Nonsuch to the Lords of 
the Admiralty. Boston. 20 February, 1693. Captain 
Short has been suspended by Governor Sir William Phips, 
for misbehaviour. Our duty obliges us to give you the 
following further information. Captain Short is given to 
drunken habits, which makes him tyrannical both afloat 
and ashore. He has imprisoned most of his officers and 
driven many men to desertion by his cruelty, insomuch 
that we had determined to lay down our warrants rather 
than continue in such bondage. The Governor, however, 
has suspended him and appointed Thomas Dobbins in his 
stead, whom we hope you will confirm. Signed by the 
master, boatswain, purser, cook and gunner. Copy. 1 p. 
Endorsed. R. May 24, '93. 

88. ii. Deposition of Captain John March and another, as to Cap- 
tain Short's assault on Sir William Phips. 1 p. Endorsed 
as the preceding. [America and West Indies. 561. Nos. 
19, 19 1., n.] 

89. Duplicate of the letter and enclosures given in preceding 
abstract. [America and West Indies. 561. Nos. 20, 20 1., n.j 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 
Feb. 15. 



[Feb.] 



Feb. 16. 



Feb. 16. 

Whitehall. 



Feb. 16. 

Whitehall. 



Feb. 16. 

Whitehall. 



Feb. 16. 



Feb. 16. 



Feb. 16. 



Feb. 16. 

H.M.S. 

Nonsuch, 
Boston. 



90. Affidavit of Echvyn Stede. As to the good service of 
Sir Timothy Thornhill at St. Christopher's, St. Eustatia and else- 
where during Governor Codrington's operations, and the expense to 
which Sir Timothy was subjected thereby. Signed. Edwyn Stede. 
1% pp. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. No. 6.] 

91. Statement of the case of Sir Timothy Thornhill, in con- 
traversion of the objections raised by Sir Peter Colleton and 
Sir Robert Davers against the confirmation of the Act of Barbados 
to grant Sir Timothy 1,000. 4^ pp. [Board of Trade. 
Barbados, 5. No. 7.] 

92. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Business of 
New York further considered. Agreed to recommend that 500 
from the quit-rents of Virginia and 200 from the revenue of Mary- 
land be sent to New York. 

The Solicitor General's report on the petition of Lord Baltimore 
and the representation of the Assembly of Maryland read. Agreed 
that it be laid before the King. The petition of the Assembly for 
the impost money of the 25 ships that left in 1690 to be paid 
to Colonel Copley, laid aside, as the money is already disposed of 
by the Treasury. [Board of Trade. Journal, 7. p. 168.] 

93. Order of the King in Council. That letters be prepared 
to the Governments of Connecticut and Rhode Island ordering them 
to give assistance to New York. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LAY/., 
pp. 420-421.] 

94. Order of the King in Council. For 200 to be paid from 
the quit-rents of Virginia, and 250 from the public revenue of 
Maryland towards the defence of New York. [America and West 
Indies. 556. No. 16.] 

95. Order of the Privy Council. That letters be prepared to 
the Governors of Connecticut and Rhode Island, ordering them to 
send men or money for the assistance of New York if required. 
[Board of Trade. New York, 48. p. 9.] 

96. Order of the Privy Council. For the preparation of a 
Commission to the Governor of New York, giving him command 
of the Militia of Connecticut. [Board of Trade. New York, 48. 
p. 13.] 

97. Order of the Privy Council. That 500 shall be contri- 
buted by Virginia and 250 by Maryland towards the defence of 
the frontier of New York, and that orders be given to the Governors 
of these provinces accordingly. [Board of Trade. New York, 48. 
pp. 13, 14.] 

98. Order of the Privy Council. That Joseph Dudley and 
William Pinhorne be removed from the Council of New York, unless 
they reside within the Province. [Board of Trade. New York, 48. 
p. 16.] 

99. The Purser of H.M.S. Nonsuch to Mr. Sotherne. I think 
fit to give you some reasons for the suspension of Captain Short. 
He is much given to drunkenness, which makes him careless and 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 27 

1693. 

negligent in his duty and quarrelsome ashore, as was seen at 
Dartmouth and Totness, where he set the whole town in an uproar. 
When at sea he looked on his officers as slaves, and punished his 
men so severely that they deserted by twenty at a time. I beg your 
favour to procure the confirmation of Mr. Dobbins. Signed. 
Mattw. Gary. 1 p. Endowed. Reed. 15 Jan., 1693-1. [Board of 
Trade. New England, 6. A r o. 28.] 

Feb. 16. 100. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. Address to the 
King and Queen, calling attention to the danger from the French, 
asking the Crown to assume the cost of garrisoning Pemaquid Fort, 
and praying for confirmation of the Acts sent home. Order for 
payment of expenses of jurors and witnesses at the late Assize 
Court in Essex County. 

Order for debentures for discharge of soldiers' wages to be paid 
from the rates of the towns. 

Order for payment of ,27 to Samuel Wheelwright for support 
of garrisons, and for the payment of Councillors' salaries of five 
shillings a day, during session of the General Court. [Col. 
Entry Bk., Vol. XIV., pp. 217-221.] 

Feb. 17. 101. Minutes of Council of New York. Three members offered 
to supply provisions for the troops at Albany out of their private 
estate, upon the security of the revenue, and Colonel von Cortlandt 
was appointed to receive and transport the provisions. Order for 
half a hundredweight of powder to be delivered to Colonel Willett. 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 374, 375 ; and p. 397.] 

Feb. 17. 102. Petition of Luke Lopdell to the Lords of the Treasury. 
For release from the security demanded of him to answer for his 
ship, which was seized in Virginia for unwitting breach of the 
Navigation Acts, i p. Endorsed. Reference of the petition to the 
Commissioners of Customs. 17 February, 1692-3. Signed. Hen. 
Guy. [America and West Indies. 638. No. 5.] 

Feb. 20. 103. Lords of the Treasury to Governor Sir William Phips. 
Ordering him to furnish money to the Commissary of Sir F. 
Wheler's expedition, if required, to the sum of .5,000, drawing 
bills upon the Paymaster General. Signed. Godolphin, Ste. Fox, 
R. Hampden, Cha. Montague. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. C., pp. 309-310.] 

Feb. 20. 104. Lords of the Treasury to Commissary General Fotherby. 
Authorising him to draw bills on the Paymaster General to the 
amount of '5,000. Signed as the preceding. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. C., pp. 310-311.] 

Feb. 20. 105. Address of the Council of New York to the King and 
Queen. Thanking them for the appointment of Governor Fletcher, 
and complaining that as soon as he began to compose all differences, 
the old troubles were renewed by the countenance given to one of 
Leisler's accomplices by Sir William Phips. Signed. Chid. Brooke, 
W. Nicolls, Caleb Heathcote, S. van Cortlandt, John Lawrence, 
G. Minivelle, Frederyck Flypse. l^ pp. [America and West Indies. 
579. No. 29.] 



28 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 

Feb. 20. 106. The Warrant Officers of II.M.S. Nonsuch to the Lords of 
the Admiralty. Already abstracted in A 7 o. 88 1. Cop//. 1 p. 
[Board of Trade. New England, 6. No. 29.] 

Feb. 20. 107. Governor Sir William Phips to the Earl of Nottingham. 
Boston. j have written several letters to Governor Fletcher in the hope of 
maintaining a good correspondence, and to avoid disputes as to 
Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket 1 have sent him a copy of the 
charter. I also wrote to ask him what assistance we might expect 
from New York for the expedition against Canada. I find him 
averse from both correspondence and concurrence. He has sent me 
a messenger (lately the jailor at New York) to tell me that he designed 
to go to Martha's Vineyard early in the spring to take over the 
government and expects me to meet him there. His messenger was 
a herald, for he delivered his message as^i challenge. I sent him 
word that disputes which could not be settled by the charter must 
be determined by their Majesties, but that meanwhile I should use 
the power entrusted to me if he made any such attempt. He also 
asked for the delivery of one Abraham Gouverneur as a fugitive 
from justice; but on Gouverneur's producing a certificate of his 
release by the Queen's order I declined to do so. The true reason is 
that he has intercepted a letter of Gouverneur's which contains some 
reflections upon him ; and Gouverneur tells me that having met 
with threats and hard usage from Governor Fletcher, notwith- 
standing the order for his release, he used then hard expressions of 
him. I do not approve the letter and have checked Gouverneur for 
it, but I do not think it sufficient reason for delivering him up. I 
understand that Governor Fletcher has been moved to make these 
demands by some enemies of mine that are about him. Signed. 
William Phips. 1 p. Endorsed. R, May 24, '93. Duplicate of 
the foregoing . [America and West Indies. 561. Nos. 21, 22.] 

Feb. 20. 108. Governor Sir William Phips to the Earl of Nottingham. 
Boston. The disorders of Rhode Island in civil and military government are 
now most evident. They pretend to three miles on this side the 
river upon the main, which is a part of Plymouth Colony joined to 
Massachusetts, and have improved this pretence to such a height 
that they have stirred up the inhabitants of Little Compton, a town 
lying next to Rhode Island, to a tumultuous assembling to run a 
line for the boundary ; although the boundary has been fixed by 
Council in the midst of the river that parts the Island and the main. 
When I came among them the people were convinced of their error 
and submitted. The ringleaders of the mischief, Daniel Willcocks 
and Henry Head, have given bail to answer for their crimes ; their 
accomplices are fled. I then went to Rhode Island, caused the 
Royal Commission to be publicly read and required obedience to the 
royal commands concerning the militia. Had they concurred I had 
designed to settle the militia and cause forts to be built for their 
defence ; but the Council, though summoned by the Governor, would 
not appear. The governor, a Quaker named John Eastney, shewed 
all due respect, expressed his resentment of the Council's behaviour, 
complained of their disorders in Government and pointed out that 
it was only a perverse humour in the Council that made them show 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 29 

1693. 

such disrespect. He also expressed his earnest desire of having the 
Island under this Government, and promised to send me an answer 
from the Council as soon as he had consulted it ; but he has not 
done so yet, though six weeks have passed since I left that place. 
This plainly demonstrates that they desire to continue in their 
present disorders, which will doubtless expose them to destruction if 
attacked by the enemy ; whereby their Majesties' design of putting 
the militia of the other Colonies under the command of the Governor 
of Massachusetts will be wholly frustrated. New Hampshire cannot 
be supported but by assistance from this province ; and some of the 
principal inhabitants at Piscataqua told me that they intended to 
petition their Majesties to be joined to us. Signed. William Phips. 
1 pp. Endorsed. R. May 24, '93. [America and West Indies. 
561. No. 23.] 

Feb. 20. 109. Governor Sir William Phips to the Earl of Nottingham. 
Boston. i } iave re p 01 -ted m y expulsion of the French and Indians from our 
Eastern frontier, with a force of six hundred men. They have not 
since appeared in any numbers, and the fort at Pemaquid has 
checked further attacks from them. Two ships sent by me to the 
Canada River have also burnt several houses there and taken a 
ship laden with wine, brandy, and other French goods. The French 
in Canada are in great want of provisions, which gives us an 
advantage, if their Majesties think fit to order an attack. The men 
on board these ships were not pressed, but volunteers. Signed. 
William Phips. 1 p. Endorsed. R, May 24, 1693. 

Duplicate of the foregoing. 1 p. [America and West Indies. 
561. Nos. 24, 25.] 

Feb. 20. 110. Governor Sir William Phips to the Earl of Nottingham. 
I have ordered the Acts passed since my last transmission to be 
sent home for confirmation. I desire to be checked if anything be 
amiss. By an Act for granting an assessment a fourth part of 
yearly income and ten shillings per poll was to be levied, but the 
assessors would not observe the Act, and I was obliged to insist 
upon a fresh return, which will bring in 30,000. I found the 
Treasury empty on my arrival, and there is little hope of recruiting- 
it during the war, but I hope that a way will be found to pay the 
expenses of Government. Signed. William Phips. 1,-p. Endorsed. 
R. May 24, '93. 

Feb. 20. Duplicate of the foregoing. [America and West Indies. 561. 
Nog. 26, 27.] 

Feb. 21. HI. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. Letters to 
Mr. Blathwayt and Sir Henry Ashurst approved, and ordered to 
be transcribed and signed by the Secretary. 

Order for Sir Edmund Andres's accounts to be audited before any 
decision is taken as to John Usher's accounts. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXIV., pp. 221-222.] 

Feb. 21. 112. Governor Sir William Phips to the Earl of Nottingham. 
I have already given you an account of my appointing a Com- 
mission to try cases of witchcraft, while I was driving the French 



30 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

and Indians from the Eastern parts of the Colony (sec letter of 
10 October, 1692). On my return I found people much dissatisfied 
at the proceedings of the Court, which had condemned and executed 
some twenty persons, some of whom were believed by many to be 
innocent. The Court still proceeded in the same method of trial, 
which was by the evidence of the afflicted persons who, as soon as 
the suspected witches looked at them in Court, instantly fell to the 
ground in strange agonies and grievous torment, but when touched 
by them on the flesh at once revived. Thereupon they made oath that 
the prisoners at the bar did afflict them, and that they saw their shape 
or spectre come from their bodies, which put them to such torments. 
The judges, on enquiry, told me that they had begun thus, but 
had human testimony against such as were condemned, and 
undoubted proof of their being witches ; but at length I found 
that the devil took upon him the shape of innocent persons, some 
of the accused being of unblameable life to my own knowledge. 

The Deputy Governor however still persisted rigorously in the 
same method until I put an end to the court and stopped the pro- 
ceedings, lest many innocent people should perish, pending 
instructions from England. When I put an end to the Court there 
were at least fifty persons in prison, in great misery by reason of 
.the extreme cold and their poverty, most of them having only spectre 
evidence against them. Some I released on bail, and consulting with 
the judges how to release others I found many of them acknowledge 
that their former method was too violent, and that if they could sit 
again they would proceed differently. Moreover Mr. Increase Mather 
and other divines gave it as their judgment that the devil might 
assume the shape of an innocent person, and that the look and touch 
of suspected persons was not sufficient proof against them. Accord- 
ingly I permitted a special superior Court to sit at Salem on the 
3rd January, with the Lieutenant-Governor as chief judge, using 
another method. Of fifty-two tried all were cleared but three, and 
I was informed by the Attorney- General that there was as good 
reason, in his judgment, to clear the three as well as the rest. The 
Lieutenant-Governor signed a warrant for the speedy execution of 
these three as well as of five more, condemned by the former Court, 
but I reprieved them till the King's pleasure should be known. 
The Lieutenant-Governor, enraged and filled with passionate anger 
on this account, refused to sit on the bench in a superior Court then 
holding. Indeed, from the beginning he has hurried these matters 
on with great precipitancy and by his warrant has caused the goods 
of the executed to be seized and disposed of without my consent or 
knowledge. The stop put on the first method of proceeeding has 
dissipated the black cloud that threatened this province with des- 
truction ; for the delusion of the devil did spread, and its dismal 
effects touched the lives and estates of many and the reputation of 
some of the principal persons here, and indeed clogged and 
interrupted their Majesties' affairs. Signed. William Phips. 2 pp. 
Endorsed. R. May 24, '93. 

Duplicate of the foregoing. [America and West Indies. 561. 
Nos. 28-29 ; and (entered as addressed to William Blathwayt) Col, 
Entry Bk., Vol. LXII., pp. 426-430.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



81 



1693. 
Feb. 21. 



Feb. 22. 



Feb. 23. 

Whitehall. 



Feb. 23. 

Whitehall. 



Feb. 23. 

Whitehall. 



Feb. 23. 

Whitehall. 



Feb. 24. 



Feb. 24. 



113. Minutes of Council of Barbados. The Governor acquainted 
the Assembly of the arrival of Sir F. Wheler's expedition, where- 
upon they brought up a bill for the accommodation of the troops. 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XII., p. 400.] 

114. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for Colonel Peter 
Beckford to go to his command at Port Royal and await the 
Governor's arrival. Order offering '4 a head for every negro 
brought in alive and 2 a head for every negro brought in dead by 
the party sent out after the runaway negroes. [Board of Trade. 
Jamaica,' 77. pp. 241, 242.] 

115. The King to Governor Codrington. Directing him to take 
care for the assignment of a suitable glebe for ministers out of the 
lands escheated in each parish, or to endeavour to prevail with the 
Assemblies to pay the additional allowances to ministers in money. 
[Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 44. pp. 112, 113.] 

116. The King to Governor Fletcher. A squadron and land 
forces will sail for the Caribbee Islands so as to reach New England 
by the end of May or middle of June at latest, there to refit and 
proceed to attack the French in Canada. Sir William Phips has 
been ordered to prepare ships, men and provisions against the 
arrival of the said expedition, and you will consult with him as to 
what shall be done by New York in the enterprise. [Board of Trade. 
New York, 48. -pp. 35-36; and Col Entry Bk., Vol. ('., pp. 305-306.] 

117. Order of the King in Council. Disallowing the Act lately 
passed in Maryland for the fourteen pence tonnage, and authorising 
Lord Baltimore to collect the same for his own use. [Board of 
Trade. Maryland, 8. pj>. 68-69.] 

118. Royal licence granting six months' leave of absence to 
Archibald Carmichael, naval officer of Barbados. [Col. Entn/ Bk., 
Vol. VIII., pp. 330, 331.] 

119. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. Letter from Major 
Pyncheon read, reporting the capture of two Mohawk Castles by the 
French and Indians. Order for repayment of the messenger's 
expenses. Order for payment of 7 per cent, interest on 2,400 
advanced by four of the Council to the public. Order for sundry 
payments, including 250 to discharge a bill of exchange drawn 
by Sir Henry Ashurst. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV.,pp. 222-223.] 

120. Secretary of the Treasury to William Blathwayt. For- 
warding report from the Commissioners of Customs on the case of 
Luke Lopdell. Hiyned. Hen. Guy. ^ p. Annexed, 

120. i. Commissioners of Customs to Lords of the Treasury. 
20 February, 1693. In a former report we recommended 
that the forfeiture of Luke Lopdell 's ship should be 
insisted on ; but in view of a statement to which he has 
sworn we think the forfeiture of the cargo sufficient. 
Sif/ned. G. Boothe, Robert Southwell, Rich. Temple, 
Jo. Werden. 1 p. Endorsed. Read 1 and 3 May, 1693. 

120. n. Affidavit of Luke Lopdell in extenuation of his offence 
against the Navigation Acts 11 February, 1693. 1 pp. 



32 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

120. in. Copy of letter of Commissioners of Customs of 25 August, 
1692, insisting on the forfeiture of Lopdell's ship. 1 p. 
[America and West Indies. 638. Nos. 6, 6 i.-m. ; and 
(without enclosures n., in.) Board of Trade. Virginia, 36. 
pp. 230-232.] 

Feb. 25. 121. The King to the Governor of Virginia. Ordering him to 

Whitehall, propose to the Assembly the allowance of sufficient salaries for the 

clergy, and to enquire whether the several Acts of Virginia for support 

of the Ministry be properly enforced. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 36. 

pp. 222-223.] 

Feb. 25. 122. Memorial of Captain John Goddard to Lords of Trade 
and Plantations. That a protection may be given to the ship 
David to carry himself and household to Bermuda, and that H.M.S. 
St. Alban's may be ordered to convoy^her. p. Endorsed. 
Reed. 25 Feb., 92-8. [Board of Trade. Bermuda, 2. No. 10.] 

Feb. 25. 123. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Sir Thomas 
Laurence's petition read (see No. 35 i.) and decision thereon taken. 

Sir Peter Colleton and Sir Piobert Danvers were heard concern- 
ing two acts of Barbados, as to the qualifications of electors, jurors 
and vestrymen, and as to a gift of 1,000 to Sir Timothy Thornhill ; 
and decision therein was taken. 

Draft instructions to Captain Goddard approved, and his petition 
for a passage considered. [Hoard of Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 169- 
174.] 

Feb. 25. 124. Minutes of Council of New York. Order for careening of 
II.M.S. Aldborough in Jefferies Cove. 

Feb. 26. Two letters from the Governor at Senectady of 21st and 23rd 
February received. Letter of 21.s February. I landed at Albany 
on Friday morning, 18th inst., and got up to Albany that evening on 
a very ill mis-shod horse. I sent out such parties as came up tome 
with Indian guides to reinforce Major Schuyler, who was then got up 
with the enemy. He had some light conflicts in which he always 
drove them to their entrenchments, and killed seventeen of them, 
four being their best officers, to judge by their clothes. On 
Feb. 21st I was directing the detachment of van Cortlandt's regi- 
ment to march and had ordered them their supplies, when I 
observed some men across the river, who being brought over, 
reported the retreat of the French past our reach, and that Major 
Ingoldsby was marching back. We have lost a great opportunity of 
destroying that party. I shall stay no longer than to see our party 
return, and shall then come back to you. The want of obedience in 
the private men, I suppose, occasioned this great loss, for, as their 
position was described to me, it was hardly possible for the French 
to escape. We lost four Christians and ten wounded. 

Letter o/23 February. I returned hither (Senectady) yesterday 
with Major Islington and the officers of his detachment. I shall 
detain Colonel Willett until I have enquired into the apparent delay 
in sending forward men and stores to the parties engaged with the 
enemy. I must also confirm the Sachems in their alliance and 
make provision for such Indians as have been burned out. 
[Col Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 376, 377, and pp. 397-399.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



1693. 
Feb. 26. 



Feb. 26. 



Feb. 26. 



Feb. 26. 



Feb. 27. 

H.M.S. 
Nonsuch. 
Boston. 



Feb. 27. 

H.MS. 

Nonsuch, 
Boston. 



Feb. 28. 

Boston. 



125. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. On the 
petition of Sir Thomas Laurence (see No. 35), agreed to move 
the King whether the acts and order which intercept the Secretary's 
fees shall not be repealed, and to recommend that the Secretary's 
security for performance of his duties be 1,000 and that of his 
Clerks 100. [Hoard of Trade. Maryland, 8. pp. 96-99.] 

126. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. That the 
draft Instructions for Governor Goddard be submitted to the King 
in Council. [Hoard of Trade. Bermuda, 28. p. 83.] 

127. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. That the 
petition of Governor Goddard as to passage for himself and freight 
for military stores to Bermuda be laid before the King. [Board oj 
Trade. Bermuda, 28. p. 86.] 

128. Minutes of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Sir Peter 
Colleton and Sir Robert Davers having objected (1) to the Act of 
Barbados requiring members of the Assembly to qualify themselves 
by a sacramental test, as being prejudicial, and (2) to the Act for 
granting 1,000 to Sir Timothy Thornhill, as an ill precedent; and 
Sir Robert Legard having answered on Sir T. Thornhill's behalf, the 
Lords agree to submit to the King's determination whether these 
two Acts shall be confirmed or not. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIII., 
p. 319, and pp. 339-342.] 

129. Thomas Dobbins to Mr. Sotherne. I beg your favour in 
procuring me a Commission, now that Captain Short has been sus- 
pended from command. Our stores are very low and none are to 
be obtained here but at extraordinary rates, while anchors and cables 
are not to be had. I beg your favour for William Distance to 
succeed me as gunner. Copy. 1 p. [Board of Trade. New 
England, 6. No. 30.] 

130. Thomas Dobbins to Lords of the Admiralty. Since his 
suspension Captain Short has refused to leave behind him one of 
the ship's muster-books, and still refuses to do so despite the 
Governor's written order. I therefore know nothing of the entries, 
discharges and qualifications of men. Signed. Thomas Dobbins. 
\ p. [Board of Trade. New England, 6. No. 31.] 

131. Governor Sir William Phips to Lords of the Admiralty. 
I ask your consideration of my complaints against Captain Short. 
I will only add to them that he has neglected order of all kind on 
board his ship, has pressed men ashore without my warrant and 
afloat beyond his complement, making men pay for their release. I 
therefore forbade him to press at all without my warrant, for he has 
used his power to make a prey of the King's subjects. I have borne 
with much from respect to his commission, but my kindness has 
been misconstrued as weakness ; and I now leave the matter to your 
justice. I have desired your directions for making a dock and 
erecting a victualling office, as it may be done better and cheaper 
here than in any other part of America. Copy. 1 p. [Board of 
Trade. New England, 6. No. 32.] 



8060 



34 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

Feb. 28. 132. Governor Sir William Phips to the Earl of Nottingham. 
Boston. A complimentary note, covering his letters of 20 and 21 February. 
Signed. William Phips. ^ p. 

Duplicate of the foregoing. [America and West Indies. 561. 
Nos. 30, 31.] 

Feb. 28. 133. Lieutenant-Governor Usher to Lords of Trade and Planta- 
Great island, tions. I send the reports of the Massachusetts Committee as to my 

Piscataqua. accounts. The second report varies slightly from the first. On the 
8th of February, pursuant to orders given to me, I presented my 
accounts to the Governor and Council, and was requested to leave a 
fair copy of them in file, which I did. This done, I was asked if I 
had not paid money to Sir Edmund Andros in England, to which I 
replied that the sum was shown in my accounts. Major Winthrop 
said that he understood I had 2,000 of the King's money on the 
day of the Revolution ; to which I answered that he was mistaken. 
Major Richards asked me if I could swear 'that I paid the money 
to Sir Edmund Andros before he w T ent to England, to which 

1 answered that I could. After this the Council appointed another 
Committee to examine my accounts, which came to the conclusion 
that 850 was due to me, in agreement with the first report ; but 
none the less I could obtain no answer, nor anything but delays and 
slights. They take exception to Sir Edmund Andros's salary, 
holding that as the money is raised by the people it must 
be disposed of by the people, and that if the King appoint 
the Governor the people must appoint his salary or the King 
pay him himself out of the revenue in England. At last I put 
in a motion for an answer to my accounts, but notwithstanding 
your order for the same and for payment of the balance to me, I am 
put off from week to week and from month to month. I asked the 
Secretary for a copy of the minutes of the proceedings, but he 
refused, and indeed he enters what minutes he pleases, for he has 
no entry of the question about the 2,000 nor of my answer. 
Excepting Mr. Stoughton all act for the country and not for the 
King and hinder everything relating to the King's service. Any of 
their proceedings in the revolution is encouraged, but anything from 
the King they will not comply with. I hope that you will not 
sanction subsequent payments from the Treasury, considering that 
mine are first due, and that you will order the balance due to me to 
be paid, which indeed is so much out of my pocket. Their delay in 
making the report is due only to the hope that another change may 
come, so as to return to their Charter-Government and not pay the 
debts due under the King's government. Signed. John Usher. 

2 pp. Endorsed. Reed. 18 July, 1693. Read 6 Dec., 1693. 
Annexed, 

133. i. Report of the Committee of the Council of New England, 
31 December, 1692. That John Usher's accounts have 
been duly examined and that a balance of 850 is due to 
him. 

Second report of the same, of same date. Reporting 
the same balance to be due, but that 798 of the rates 
levied at that time, and two bad debts of 27 are still 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 35 

1693. 

outstanding, and that 4,286 has been paid to Sir E. Andros 
for salary, though two receipts for 400 each indicate 
that part of the sum was applied to purchase of provisions 
for the new raised troops. 

Letter of William Stoughton to John Usher, 22 February, 
1692-3. I am much concerned that you should have had 
so much trouble over your accounts, but I have been unable 
to attend Council for some time owing to a fall. As one 
of the Committee appointed to examine the accounts I 
mi^st own that you made everything very clear and 
certain from the first article to the last, as our first report 
showed, and that you have given every facility to the 
Council and answered all questions, so that I know not 
what more you could have done. I shall use my utmost 
endeavour to procure despatch of this business. 

Copies. Tin' /rliole, 2 pp. Endorsed. Reed. 24 May, '93. 
[Board of Trade. New Hampshire, 1. Nos. 20, 20 i. ; 
and (without enclosure) Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXVII., 
pp. 243-247.] 

Feb. 28. 134. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for payment for 
fifty cartouche-boxes delivered to the magazine. [Board of Trade. 
Jamaica, 77. p. 242.] 

Feb. 135. Memorial of Colonel Lidgett. New England is greatly 

distressed by a war with the natives assisted by the French. The 
evil is greatly added to if not wholly continued by some practices 
among themselves done openly and without restraint. The peltry 
is generally purchased from the Indians by English merchants, and 
is paid for in blankets, linen, iron, steel, lead, guns, powder and 
shot, at great rates, which is profitable to the traders but fatal to 
the public, since it supplies the enemy with the means of destroying 
them. In 1688 the Government took care that there should be no 
trade with French and Indians, and the Indians were so much 
distressed for want of arms that they came in April 1689, a few 
days before the revolution broke out, to ask for peace. Not finding 
those to whom they expected to apply they returned and renewed 
the war, which they are enabled to do by the English themselves. 
At the beginning of 1689 a sloop brought into Boston much peltry, 
purchased as above, she having given Bermuda as her destination 
and hence obtained clearance. The French and Indians, who were 
then in great want of powder, thus obtained plenty ; and since then 
many others have pursued and do still pursue the same trade with- 
out contradiction. 1 p. Endorsed. Reed. Feb., 1692-3. [Board 
of Trade. New England, 6. No. 33.] 

[Feb.] 136. Draft letter to the Governor of Massachusetts, announcing 

that Sir F. Wheler's squadron will arrive in New England at the 
end of May for an attack on Canada. 4 pp. [Board of Trade. 
New York, 5. No. 6 A.] 

[Feb.] 137. Similiar draft to the Governor of New York, to same 

purport. 4 pp. [Board of Trade. New York, 5, A 7 o. 6B.] 



36 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 

[Feb.] 



March 1. 

Whitehall. 



March 1. 

Whitehall. 



March 1. 



March 1. 
H.M.S. 

Conception, 
Boston. 



March 1. 

[March.] 



March 1. 



March 2. 



March 3. 



March 2. 



138. Draft Instructions to Daniel Cox to repair to Boston to 
see to the execution of above instructions. ^ pp. [Bo<n-d of 
Trade. New York, 5. Xo. fie.] 

139. The King to the Governor of Virginia. Directing him 
to pay 500 from the quit-rents to New York, to be employed 
against the French. [Board of Trade. New York, 48. pp. 14-15.] 

140. The King to Governor Copley. Ordering him to pay 
the sum of 250 from the royal revenue of Maryland to the 
Government of New York, for assistance in its defence. [Board of 
Trade. Maryland, 8. pp. 51-52, and pp. 99-100.] 

141. Governor Sir William Phips to the Lords of the Admiralty. 
This letter is identical with that to the Earl of Nottingham of 
15 February, complaining of Captain Short. (See Xo. 88.) 



3 pp. [Board of Trade. New 



Another copy of the above. 
England, 6. Xos. 34, 35.] 

142. Captain Fairfax, R.N., to Mr. Sotherne. I have after long 
delay obtained a survey and have enclosed a report as to the rigging, 
sails, etc. I am told that the carpenters have given theirs to the 
Governor and was promised a copy, but I cannot obtain it. Copy. 
\ p. [Board of Trade. New England, 6. A'o. 36.] 

143. Commission to Captain John Goddard to be Lieutenant- 
Governor of Bermuda. [Board of Trade. Bermuda, 28. pp. 47-59.] 

144. Instructions to Captain John Goddard as Governor of 
Bermuda. He is to propose to the Assembly that an export duty of 
one penny per pound be settled on tobacco, in such manner that 
the Crown may lower it as it thinks fit ; that moderate quit-rents be 
fixed for land ; and that the public buildings be repaired. The rest 
of the instructions are of the usual type. [Board of Trade. 
Bermuda, 28. pp. 60-83.] 

145. Minutes of Council of Virginia. Ralph Wormeley 
appointed to act as Secretary on the death of Christopher Robinson, 
and Richard Lee appointed a Councillor in the place of the said 
Robinson. Prayers for a blessing on the proceedings of the 
General Assembly ordered in all churches on Sunday, 19th inst. 
Order for clearing two ships for England, there being not ships 
enough to make a fleet. 

Ralph Wormeley sworn Secretary. Peter Beverley appointed 
Clerk of the Burgesses. William Edwards sworn Clerk of the 
General Assembly. Agreed that the Governor shall address the 
Burgesses in general terms only. 

Sheriff Robert Boiling ordered to attend the Council to answer 
for detention of a negro slave not his own. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXXXIV., pp. 790-793.] 

146. Journal of House of Burgesses of Virginia. The House 
having heard a speech from the Governor presented Thomas Milner 
as their Speaker, who was accepted. Committee of privileges and 
of elections appointed. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



1693. 

March 3. 



List of the House : 

John Pleasant - ) 

Peter Field - - j 

John Taylor - - | 

John Styth - - [ 
Michael Sherman - 
Henry Duke 
Miles Gary - 

Samuel Swan - ) 

Francis Clements - - j 

Henry Baker - ) 

Anthony Holliday - - j 
Thomas Milner 
Thomas Lear 
John Custis - 

William Kendall - - j 

Richard Rogers - - ' 

Richard O'Flint - - j" 

Samuel Mason - - [ 

Francis Sawyer - - j 

John Richardson - - ) 

Jacob Johnson - - j 

Willis Wilson - I 

William Armistead - J 

Thomas Ballard - - ) 

Daniel Parke - ) 
John Lyddall 
William Basset 
James Rawson 

John Baylor - - j 
Matthew Kemp 
John Cant 
John Battaile 

Edward Thomas - - j 

Arthur Spicer - ) 

William Colston - j 

Martin Scarlet j 

Thomas Ousley - [ 

Richard Baylie - ] 

Samuel Sandford - - j 

Daniel Fox - - ] 

John Stretchley - j 

Thomas Yewell - - j 

William Hardidge - - [ 
William Gary 
William Leigh 
The burgesses present were sworn, 



Henrico County. 
Charles City County. 

James City County. 
James City. 
Surrey County. 

Isle of Wight County. 
Nancymond County. 
Northampton County. 
Northumberland County. 
Norfolk County. 
Princess Ann County. 
Elizabeth City County. 
York County. 
New Kent County. 
Gloucester County. 
Middlesex County. 
Essex County. 
Richmond County. 
Stafford County. 
Accomack County. 
Lancaster County. 
Westmoreland County. 



Warwick County. 

King's and Queen's County. 

x , _ _, except John Pleasant who 

refused the oath, whereupon a writ for a new burgess to be elected 
in his place was requested. William Drummond appointed 
messenger. Message to the Governor thanking him for appointing 
persons to attend them, but that they had appointed their own 
messenger. Robert Beverley appointed Clerk. 



38 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



March 2. 



March 3. 



March 2. 



March 2. 



March 2. 

Whitehall. 



1693. 

March 4. Order for enquiry into the election for King and Queen's County. 
The Sheriff of Warwick County was also summoned to attend as to 
the election for that County. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXV., 
pp. 939-946.] 

147. Minutes of General Assembly of Virginia. The Governor 
made the Burgesses a general speech, and announced that he had 
appointed Peter Beverley to he Clerk. The Burgesses then 
presented their Speaker, who was approved. 

Commissioners appointed to swear the Burgesses. Message 
for the Burgesses as to their appointment of a messenger. A new 
writ for the election of a burgess for Henrico County issued. 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXV., pp. 891-895.] 

148. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. Order for payment 
of 156 for the purchase of a sloop by the late Government. 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol LXIV.,p. 224.] 

149. Minutes of Council and Assembly of Montserrat. Order 
for pressing a pink for the expedition now on foot, and for every 
plantation in the Island to make 200 Ibs. of cassava-bread, to be 
delivered to the Treasurer by Tuesday next, for the same. [Col. 
Entry Bk., Vol. XLVIIL, p. 313.] 

150. Order of the King in Council. Approving the report of 
Lords of Trade and Plantations on Sir Thomas Laurence's petition 
(nee No. 125) and ordering that the Acts and order, whereby 
the Secretary's fees are diverted, be repealed, and that the fees of 
the Naval officer remain as at present settled. [Board of Trade. 
Maryland, 8. pp. 94-96, and pp. 100-104.] 

151. Order of the King in Council. Approving the Act of 
Barbados for granting 1,000 to Sir Timothy Thornhill. [Col 
Entry Bk., Vol. VIII., pp. 323, 324.] 

152. Order of the King in Council. Disallowing the Act of 
Barbados for qualification of electors. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIII., 
pp. 324, 325.] 

153. Minutes of Council of War of Barbados. These will be 
found embodied in the letter of the Council of War to Governor 
Codrington (sec -No. 170 i.). [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XII., j^. 313, 
314.] 

154. List of the Burgesses of Assembly of Virginia. 1 p. 
Endorsed. Reed. 2 June, 1693. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. 

No. 14.] 

155. Speech of Governor Sir Edmund Andros at the opening 
of the Virginia Assembly. 1 p. Endorsed. Reed. 2 June, 1693. 
[Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. No. 15.] 

March 2. 156. Minutes of General -Assembly of Massachusetts. A peti- 
tion from the farmers beyond the bounds of Sudbury, Marlborough, 
etc., to be formed into a township, was sent down to the 
Representatives. 

March 3. Resolved that Increase Mather be desired to preach a sermon to 
the General Assembly on Wednesday next. Elisha Hutchinson, 



March 2. 
Whitehall. 



March 2. 

Whitehall. 



March 2. 
Barbados, 



March 2. 



March 2. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



31) 



1693. 

John Foster, Peter Sergeant and Isaac Addington sworn justices of 
the inferior Court of Common Pleas for Suffolk County. Report of 
the Commissioners for regulating the assessment read and deferred 
for consideration. 

March 4. Bills to grant i'500 to the Governor, and to grant a piece of void 
land in Boston to Jane Kind, read. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV., 
pp. 380, 381.] 

March 3. 157. Minutes of Council of Barbados. Sir F. Wheler and 
Colonel Foulke sworn of the Council. Order for the furnishing of 
papers and records to Ralph Lane. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XIL, 
pp. 401, 402.] 

March 3. 158. The King to the Governments of Connecticut and Rhode 

Whitehall. Island. Ordering them to send assistance in men or money to New 

York against the French, and to agree with the other Colonies as to 

the quota of men to he furnished. Countersigned. Nottingham. 

{Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LX1L, pp. 421, 422.] 

March 3. 159. Orders of Lieutenant-Governor Sir William Beeston to 
Captain Stephen Elliot to sail to England with despatches. Copy. 
1 p. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. No. 3.] 

March 3. 160. Governor Sir Edmund Andros to the Earl of Nottingham. 
Virginia. Mr. Robinson, Councillor and Acting Secretary, is dead, and I have 
appointed Mr. Ralph Wormeley to act as Secretary in his place. 
The Assembly met yesterday. I hope for the speedy arrival of 
ships with orders releasing the ports and towns, and with much 
needed supplies. Signed. E. Andros. Holograph. 1 p. Endorsed. 
R. June 2, '93. [America and West Indies. 638. No. 7.] 

March 3. 161. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor reported his 
operations at Albany, mentioning that the French had left all their 
prisoners behind, that he had met the Sachems and made a treaty, 
and that he had made haste to send home all the detached men, 
returning himself yesterday morning. The Council thanked him for 
his prudence and diligence, saying that the like expedition had never 
been seen before in the province. Order for the records of his 
proceedings to be read. Resolved to write to the Justices of Ulster 
County as to the scattered plantations that are in greatest danger, 
and the most convenient places for their joining together for mutual 
defence. Order for the neighbouring Colonies to be apprised of the 
defeat of the French. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., p. 399.] 

[March 3.] 162. Copy of Minutes of Council of New York from 1 Septem- 
ber, 1692, to 3 March, 1693. 13 pp. [America and West Indies. 
579. No. 30.] 

March 4. 163. Governor Kendall to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 
Identical with the letter of same date to Lord Nottingham. (See 
next abstract.} Endorsed. Reed. 1 May, 1693. [Board of Trade. 
Barbados, 5. No. 8; and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIII., pp. 336, 337.] 

March 4. 164. Governor Kendall to Earl of Nottingham. My express 

Barbados, with my last letter sailed on 14 February, and on the last day of 

that month, beyond my expectation but to my great satisfaction, 



40 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 



March 4. 

Barbados. 



March 4. 



March 4. 

Victualling 
Office. 



Sir Francis Wheler's fleet arrived here in perfect health. I have 
had the good fortune to please the officers and soldiers that came 
with him by giving them free refreshing quarters. You will 
doubtless receive full particulars of both fleet and regiments from 
Sir Francis and Colonel Foulke, to whom I shall, despite past 
misfortunes and present fears of intestine enemies, join nine 
hundred of the best men in the Island. We are now taking every 
measure to ensure the success of the expedition. At the earnest 
request of all the officers of the last squadron that was here, I not 
only supplied them with all the money that I had but used all my 
credit also, to keep their men and ships from perishing. For this 
they gave me their bills on the Commissioners for the Navy and for 
Victualling, but by my present letters I find few or none of them 
paid, and no assurance that they ever will be. Since I gained 
nothing by what I did, saved the lives of over a thousand men and 
kept the ships from sinking, and since I have been out of the 
greater part of my money for more than twelve months, I beseech 
you to take my case under your protection, for such unkind usage 
may prove very fatal to the King's affairs in the future. Sinned. 
J. Kendall. Holograph. 1 pp. Endorsed. R. Apr. 26, '93. 

Duplicate of the foregoing. [America and West Indies. 456. 
Nos. 43, 44.] 

165. T. Fotherby to the Earl of Nottingham. At last we have 
arrived at this place, where we have been so long expected, and as 
far as I can learn as healthy as any fleet ever came. Of 117 
soldiers and officers, besides seamen, in this ship we have had but 
one sick. We are landing the stores as fast as we can, to inspect 
and check them. I must complain of an injustice done to me, 
though I fix it upon no one. When the method for disposal of 
plunder was submitted to the King, care was taken that all general 
officers should have their portion, even to a regimental chaplain, 
whose duty I believe obliges him to pray against our plundering ; 
but I find myself excluded by not being mentioned, nor can I 
reasonably ask it, since I am not. My lot will therefore be small, 
if any, since I must stand to their courtesy for it. I entreat that 
my portion may be ordered according to the posts I am in, for the 
trouble of my employ deserves it as much as any. Not being of the 
Council of War I cannot tell you when we shall sail for Martinique, 
but I hope that it will not be long. I would have it as short as may 
be, to be quit of an employ that is very troublesome and vexatious, 
and return to your Lordship's protection. Signed. T. Fotherb}^. 
Holograph. Itjr pp. Endorsed. R. Apr. 28, '93. [America and 
West Indies. 456. No. 45.] 

166. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. Committee 
appointed to examine the accounts of the Committee for war. 
Order for payment of twenty shillings to Daniel Cheever, for 
custody of an Indian Sachem. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV., 

pp. 224-225.] 

167. The Victuallers of the Navy to William Blathnvayt. In 
reply to your questions Sir Francis Wheler's squadron was 
victualled for eight months, which with the money for short 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



41 



1693. 



March 5. 

Whitehall. 



March 6. 



allowance was to last them twelve months. We beg for a letter to 
the officers at Barbados that no custom may be taken for rum and 
sugar delivered to the King's ships in the West Indies. Signed. 
Tho. Papillon, Simon Mayne, John Agar, James Howe. 1 p. 
[Board of Trade. Plantations General, 2. No. 43 ; and Col. Entry 
Bk., Vol. C., p. 807.] 

168. The King to the Governor of Virginia. Ordering him to 
pay 500 out of the quit-rents to New York for the defence of the 
frontier, and to charge the sum of '302, already sent to New York, 
also against the quit-rents ; which fund however is otherwise not to 
be touched without order, except in case of invasion or insurrection. 
[Board of Trade. Virginia, 36. pp. 226, 227.] 

169. William Blathwayt to Commissioners of Ordnance. 
Asking for an account of the stores delivered to the land-forces with 
Sir Francis Wheler's squadron. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. C., p. 308.] 



Resolution, 

Carlisle Bay, 

Barbados. 



March 6. 170. Sir Francis Wheler to Earl of Nottingham. I arrived 
On board the here the 1st inst. and before anchoring ascertained from Governor 
Kendall that the Island had never been healthier. We have met with 
very kind usage. The Governor had procured from the Assembly 
an Act giving free quarters for the soldiers for a month, chiefly 
upon the gentlemen, twenty or thirty in a house. The gentlemen have 
kindly interpreted the laws so as to give the officers and men all 
imaginable satisfaction. In the Channel and soundings we parted 
from the Ruby, Dragon, Experiment, Cygnet (hreship) and some 
merchantmen. On the 26th January we arrived at Madeira and 
found there the Ruby, Dragon, Experiment and one transport. We 
were very civilly received by the Governor and sailed again on the 
29th. On the 8th February in latitude 24^ degrees we parted 
with the Falcon and two Jamaica merchantmen, which intended to 
go to northward of the Caribbee Islands. On arriving here we 
found the Mermaid, the hospital-ship and four transports, which 
had parted from us before we reached Madeira. Yesterday the 
Cygnet came in, so that there is but one small merchant vessel 
missing, with one ensign and thirty soldiers of Goodwill's regiment 
aboard. A few seamen have sickened but the rest and the soldiers 
are in good health. We found the Island full of expectation for 
our arrival. Here are two regiments raised by the country, which 
were each five hundred strong but are now but 400, under Colonels 
Salter and Butler. They have their transports and provisions 
ready to go with us to Martinique. On the 8th instant a Council 
of War was held, when it was resolved to send a sloop to Governor 
Codrington to acquaint him of our arrival and that it is impracticable 
to join his forces with ours in Antigua for the attack on Martinique, 
since to beat up from so far to leeward would take much time and 
sicken our men, so as to spoil the whole design. Copy of the 
letter is enclosed. Governor Kendall gives us good hope that 
the French are not very strong in Martinique so I hope we 
may be able to destroy a great part of the Island ; but the 
fort is a strong European fortress which will be very hard 
to force with our strength. We hear they lose no time 
in fortifying the landing-places, and there is a report 



42 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

that they have sent for men from Hispaniola. The Chester and 
Mermaid were sent to Governor Codrington to convoy his forces to 
the place of rendezvous, and a sloop sails to-night to Martinique to 
discover what naval strength they have in those parts, for we hear 
they have but two fourth-rates and a fifth-rate. Colonel Foulke 
and I have considered how to execute the sealed instructions which 
we opened here, and meanwhile we intend to say nothing of the 
matter. The attack on Cayenne, directed by the King's order of 
13 December last, was dependent on the merchantmen's consent, 
and though I managed it as privately as I could, they unanimously 
refused to go, as the enclosed protest shows. As soon as Governor 
Codrington reports himself ready, we shalL-fix our day and embark 
from Martinique. The Governor, I suppose, has told you that the 
Norwich was blown from her anchors, and has not been heard of 
since, so that I met none of the King's ships but the Diamond, 
Captain Wickham, who some time since had a battle in sight of 
Martinique with the Mary Rose. They fought broadside to broad- 
side for two hours, when the Mary Rose fairly ran away, and, being 
clean, outran the Diamond, which followed her within five leagues of 
Martinique. Everyone says that Captain Wickham played his part 
very well, and so the French captain sent word, and that our 
cannon played too fast for him, after firing three or four times. I 
beg you particularly to let the King know the care Governor 
Kendall has taken to influence the Council and Assembly to use 
the officers and men kindly. The kindness is carried to that pitch 
that the officers are as easy and as welcome in the gentlemen's 
houses as if they were their own. The Act directs that each free- 
holder who quarters soldiers must do it to content, or pay fifteen- 
pence a day for each man to find himself. The ships that bring 
this are four or five which have lain here so long that, if they did 
not go hence, their bottoms would be spoiled by the worm. I have 
advised them to go north between Scotland and Ireland if possible 
and so into the Irish Sea, whence they must announce their arrival 
to London and await the convoy of one of the Channel cruisers. 
Sinned. Era. Wheler. %% pp. Inscribed. R. April 26. An nc.tr d, 
170. i. The Council of War at Barbados to Governor Codrington. 
2 March, 1693. Sir Francis Wheler arrived here on the 
28th February with twelve men-of-war, two regiments and 
recruits for the Blue regiment. At a Council of War 
this day it was resolved that it was very inconvenient 
that the forces here should go to Antigua, and that a 
frigate should be sent down to convoy the Leeward 
Islands' forces to join their forces off' the leeward part of 
Martinique. We desire you to answer by the present 
express with all possible despatch at what time we may 
expect to meet your forces there. It was also resolved, for 
the encouragement of the Plantation forces, that as 
regards the distribution of booty, every regiment of the 
Plantations should consist of not less than 400 men. You 
are desired to acquaint us with the number of your forces, 
and to send with them at least two months' provisions and 
the mortars, field-pieces, etc., that were sent to you last 
year, as also the engineers. Signed by Governor Kendall, 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



43 



1693. 



March 6. 

Barbados. 



March 6. 

Barbados. 



March 6. 
March 7. 

March 6. 



Sir F. Wheler, 11 field officers of the Army, 6 captains of 
the Navy. Copt/. 1^ pp. 

170. ii. Declaration of the captains of merchantmen in Sir F. 
Wheler 's Fleet. Sir Francis having acquainted us that it 
is the King's pleasure that the men-of-war and transports 
should attack Cayenne, we declare that to go to any 
place before Barbados is against our charter-party, and 
that we cannot consent thereto ; if we are forced to do so 
we must justify ourselves by law. Sixteen signatories. 
Copij. 1^ pp. [America and West Indies. 456. Nos. 
46, 46 i., ii.] 

171. Colonel John Foulke to the Earl of Nottingham. Sir 
Francis has no doubt informed you of the reason that prevented us 
from pursuing the King's commands as to Cayenne. One transport is 
missing with 25 men of Colonel Goodwyn's regiment. We lost 
3 officers and about 40 private men of the whole land-forces in our 
passage, and have about 90 men sick at present. Our reception 
has been very kind, and we hope that the refreshing quarters pro- 
vided for the men will contribute to their speedy recovery. I shall 
not trouble you with the resolutions of the Council of War. The 
Barbados regiments will not exceed 400 men apiece ; what rein- 
forcement we may receive from the Leeward Islands is uncertain. 
I hope that the latter may be found ready to join us, that we 
may proceed to Martinique before our men sicken, which I very 
much apprehend. Signed. Jo. Foulke. 1^ pp. Endorsed. R. 
Apr. 26, '93. [America and West Indies. 456. No. 47.] 

172. Colonel Robert Goodwyn to Earl of Nottingham. One 
transport, with about 25 men of Captain Degen's Company is miss- 
ing. We hope she may have fallen down to leeward. No more 
than five or six men died at sea out of the whole, so that I doubt 
not of producing 750 men fit for service, as good men as perhaps 
may be seen in most regiments in the present service. I shall do 
my utmost to keep my men in health and discipline, to gain reputa- 
tion and preserve your good opinion. Signed. Robert Goodwyn. 
Holograph. 1^ pp. Endorsed. R. Apr. 28, '93. [America and 
West Indies. 456. No. 48.] 

173. Minutes of Council of Virginia. Order for discharge of 
the ships hired for Captain Finch. 

Order for payment to Mr. Edward Hill for sixteen pair 
of wheels for the great guns. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXIV., 
pp. 793,794.] 

174. Journal of House of Burgesses of Virginia. The disputed 
election for Northumberland County referred to the Committee of 
Elections. Address to the Governor, praying for their ancient 
privilege of electing their own Clerk. The thanks of the house 
given to Mr. Stephen Fance for his sermon yesterday. Resolved 
that the election for King's and Queen's County was invalid, and 
that a new writ be asked for. 

The election for Northumberland County considered. William 
Drummond empowered to appoint a deputy-messenger for 



44 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 

March 8. 

March 9. 

March 10. 
March 11. 

March 6. 
March 7. 
March 8. 
March 9. 
March 11. 

March 6. 
March 7. 



March 8. 
March 9. 
March 10. 

March 11. 



March 7. 

Boston. 



distant errands. The election for Warwick decided in favour of 
Humphrey Harwood. 

A message from the Governor, showing precedents for his 
appointment of a Clerk of the Burgesses. Address of the Burgesses 
to the Governor, praying him to use his interest with the King to 
procure them restoration of their ancient privilege of appointing their 
own Clerk. Committees of grievances and of public claims appointed. 

Message from the Governor, that in the opinion of him- 
self and Council he ought not to use his interest as requested in 
their message of } 7 esterday. Peter Beverley was then sworn Clerk. 
Several grievances and claims read and considered. 

More grievances considered. William 'Randolph, elected for 
Henrico County, was sworn. 

Address to the Governor for a copy of his first speech to the 
Burgesses. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXV., pp. 946-956.] 

175. Minutes of General Assembly of Virginia. The Burgesses' 
address as to their Clerk received. 

New writ for King's and Queen's County granted. Answer to 
the Burgesses' address. 

Second address from the Burgesses as to their clerk received and 
answered. 

At the request of the Burgesses, Councillors were sent to swear 
in the Clerk. 

The Governor's speech and Peter Heyman's petition sent down 
to the Burgesses. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXV., pp. 895-901.] 

176. Minutes of General Assembly of Massachusetts. The 
Representatives, reporting that many of their members were 
employed as a Committee of Assessment, were adjourned. 

Bills for granting 500 to the Governor, and for granting land to 
Jane Kind, were passed. Report of the Committee for adding to the 
same granted for the public tax read and referred for further con- 
sideration. Resolved, that a suitable vessel be hired for their 
Majesties' service to cruise about Martha's Vineyard and to secure 
coasting vessels. 

Report of the Committee as to the public tax was again read and 
agreed to. 

The same report was again debated. Bill for dividing Essex 
County rejected. 

An order on the petition for settling the bounds of Little Compton 
was read and debated. Petition on behalf of Jeremiah Toy, con- 
fined on board H.M.S. Nonsuch, was read and recommended to the 
Governor. 

After conference, it was agreed with the Representatives as to the 
method of election for Councillors. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV., 
pp. 382-385.] 

177. Governor Sir William Phips to the Lords of the Admiralty. 
I thank you for the seal of the Admiralty Office here. Pray let me 
have a special commission to appoint a judge, registrar and marshal, 
such power being excepted from my present commission. Signed. 
William Phips. p. Endorsed. Reed, at the Committee. 
15 Jan., 1693-4. [Board of Trade. New England, 6. No. 37.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



1693. 

March 8. 178. Governor Fletcher to Earl of Nottingham. As I closed 
my last I was summoned to Albany, owing to an invasion of the 
French. I have sent you home accounts of it. This Colony 
cannot support itself without help from the neighbouring Colonies, 
some of which do not own the Crown, but set up a Government 
which is grievous to many subjects. Connecticut is a sort of 
republic, and all the better sort of people are much dissatisfied and 
wish to be united to New York. During my absence the Council 
wrote to our neighbours for help. Connecticut sent no answer at 
all, Pennsylvania sent us good wishes, East Jersey 248, with a 
promise to make it up to 400. From the rest I have not heard. 
The Governor of New England is a machine moved by every 
fanatical finger, the contempt of wise men and the sport of fools. 
I beg for arms and accoutrements for 120 men. We can always 
beat the French if we can get money to pay and victual our men, but 
we are very poor, and the fur trade is quite lost by this war. A 
great deal of what is written in the letter of same date to William 
Blatliwayt is repeated, in this letter. Signed. Ben. Fletcher. 
Holograph. 2J pp. Endorsed. R. July 18, '93. 

Duplicate of the foregoing. [America and West Indies. 579. 
Nos. 31, 32.] 

March 8. 179. Governor Fletcher to [William Blathwayt] . I was called 
New York. f rom m y } as t letter by the news of a French attack on the outskirts 
of this province, of which I send you a narrative. Our neighbours 
to right and left sit at their ease, and govern by their own fancies. 
Connecticut, full of people, keeps up a Commonwealth ; those in 
power oppress the better sort who dissent from them, but will not 
send a man nor a sixpence to our relief. From that Colony I could 
march up men dry-foot to repel our enemies ; from hence we have a 
voyage of fifty leagues to Albany. In my absence the Council writ 
to all the neighbouring Colonies for men or money. The Republic 
of Connecticut quarrel at the superscription of the letter for wanting 
their proper title. Pennsylvania says that it can send us nothing 
but good wishes. East Jersey has sent us 248 and promises to 
make it 400. The remoter Colonies I have not yet heard from. 
We have quite lost our fur trade. We pay 10 per cent, for money 
borrowed to carry on the war and I see no prospect of paying the 
principal. The fort is dropping down for want of repair ; and so are 
the buildings, especially the Chapel. Nothing but an addition of Con- 
necticut and some other Colonies can support us, by paying small 
duties to the Crown. The Navigation Acts are wholly violated by 
these outliers. I beg for arms for two troops of dragoons, which 
would be of great use on the frontiers. Two companies more of 
foot, whereof one for Major Peter Schuyler, who has behaved himself 
well and understands the Indian language and mode of fighting, 
would encourage these dispirited people. Though the French were 
beaten they are not satisfied that one of them should have got off ; 
and had our Indians been true to us it was next to impossible that one 
of them should have escaped. I send this to Boston in hopes of a 
passage, if Sir W. Phips do not intercept it. Signed. Ben Fletcher. 
la PP' Endorsed. Reed. 3 June, 1693. Abstracted in Board of 
Trade. New York, 48. pp. 46, 47. Annexed, 



46 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

179. i. Major Richard Ingoldsby to Governor Fletcher. Albany, 
11 February, 1693. 10 at night. I gave you an account 
of the advance of the enemy to the Maqua Castles. They 
are there still, and I fear that they may compel our 
Indians to a peace. We have no account in what condi- 
tion they are, though we have scouts out. Ten Christians 
and 40 Maquas have gone out to watch them, and the 
Indians are impatient since the Christians do not join them 
in an attack, which I thought inadvisable while they held so 
strong a position ; but as soon as they move and we can 
have any Indians we think to send 300 of the Fusiliers 
and inhabitants in pursuit. I nave all the provisions 
ready, which shall be sent to Senectady to-morrow. I 
have called in all the farmers and reinforced Senectady 
with 50 men. In all we have 600 men. I hear that the 
French despair of returning by ice, so are in no hurry to 
move. Can you send me some men ? I expect 50 from 
Esopus to-morrow. I have sent Schuyler to Senectady 
with orders to send out scouts and pacify the Indians. I 
dare not tell them of the delay in sending men forward as 
we have always led them to believe that we are stronger 
than we are. The frontier is just manned for defence, and 
men cannot be spared so far off. I have given orders not 
to engage the enemy except at great advantage, for 
their design is desperate and they are short of provisions. 
Copy. 2 pp. Endorsed. Reed. 19 July, 1693. 

179. n. Another copy of the preceding. 

179. in. Journal of Governor Fletcher's expedition Feb. 12, Sunday. 
About 10 or 11 o'clock at night an express from Lieutenant- 
Colonel Beeckman brought advice from Albany of 550 
French and Indians being within twenty miles of Senectady 
on the 8th inst. an hour before daylight, ready to fall 
upon the two first castles of our Mohawks. The City 
militia was ordered to be drawn out next morning. 
Feb. 13. Orders for Colonels van Cortlandt and Willett 
to detail 150 men from their regiments to embark at the 
ferry. The Governor inspected the city regiment and 
called for volunteers, whereupon they unanimously threw 
up their hats, crying " One and all." 150 of the fittest 
were selected with three captains and their subalterns. 
Orders were sent to collect all the horses in Ulster County to 
carry the troops from Kingston to Albany by land, in case 
the river were not open. Feb. 14. Express from Major 
Ingoldsby arrived at daybreak, reporting the capture 
of the two Mohawk castles. Eight sloops with ammuni- 
tion and stores were at once ordered to be ready to sail, 
and at 4 p.m. the Governor, with the detachment of the 
City Regiment and several volunteers, embarked and set 
sail. Feb. 17. The Governor arrived at Albany with five of 
the sloops about 9 o'clock ; the rest arrived towards 
evening, having been delayed by ice. Captain Schuyler 
was ordered to march with 50 men at once to Senectady, 
and at 11 o'clock the Governor started with 16 horse, 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 47 

1693. 

leaving Colonel Bayard with orders to send the other 
detachments forward as they arrived. At 3 p.m. 
Major Ingoldsby met the Governor about eight miles from 
Senectady, and 5 p.m. they arrived at Senectady, and at 
9 p.m. Captain Sclmyler marched in with his men (twenty 
miles) and found quarters and food ready for them. Feb. 18. 
The men were ready to cross the river at daybreak but 
were delayed till afternoon by a violent storm. Indian 
women carrying provisions were sent with them. At 
noon Major Merritt with the rest of the City detachment 
marched into Senectady. Feb. 19, Sunday. At daybreak 
the rest of the forces that were fit to march tried to cross 
the river, but were prevented by the ice, until at 10 a.m. the 
ice set for a time and they crossed on foot ; but in two hours 
the river was open again. More stores were sent with this 
party. Feb. 20. The rest of the City detachment marched, 
their numbers being made up to 42 by men from the garrison 
of Senectady. They took with them thirteen horses laden 
with stores. At 2 p.m. Captain Stillwell arrived with 
50 men of the King's County Militia at Senectady, and 
were halted till next morning, when three horses with 
stores were ordered to be ready for them. Feb. 21. The 
horses had been carried over the river and the men were 
about to cross, when a message came from Major Schuyler 
that he was returning. Since the Governor's arrival 208 
effective men, with large quantities of stores and transport, 
had joined him. Feb. 22. The Governor returned from 
Albany with Major Schuyler and many of the troops that 
had abandoned pursuit of the enemy, reaching Senectady 
at 3 p.m. Major Schuyler and other officers were ordered 
to draw up an account of their action in the woods. 
At 4 p.m. arrived Colonel Willett with 120 men from 
Queen's County, who with the other detachments were 
ordered home next morning. At night the Governor sent 
to all the Indiana who were returned from the fight to meet 
him next morning at Albany. Feb. 23. Proclamation for 
all outlying farmers to draw themselves into neighbour- 
hood for their better protection. Feb. 24. The Governor 
received an address of thanks and congratulation from the 
Corporation of Albany. Feb. 25. The Governor met the 
Indians, made his speech and received their reply. Feb. 26. 
Four of the Sachems came to the Governor with further 
propositions, which he did not at once answer to their 
satisfaction. Feb. 27. After issuing a proclamation pro- 
hibiting the sale of rum to the Indians, we embarked for 
New York. Copy, attested 7 March, 1692-3. 4 pp. En- 
dorsed. Reed. 19 July, 1693. 

179. iv. Another copy of the preceding. 

179. v. Journal of Peter Schuyler's operations against the French 
and Indians. Feb. 8, Wednesday. About 2 p.m. we 
had the news of the capture of the Mohawk castles, 
and soon after, through an escaped prisoner who 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

came to Senectady, we heard that the French num- 
bered 350 Christians and 200 Indians. Major 
Ingoldsby at once called in the farmers belonging to 
two companies of militia, and that night Lieutenant John 
Schuyler with 55 horse marched to Senectady. Fab. 9. 
An express came from Senectady begging that Major 
Schuyler or Major Wessels would come and pacify the 
Indians. Major Schuyler went that evening at his own 
request, and immediately on his arrival sent out scouts to 
spy out the forts and the enemy's motions ; but they 
returned at midnight after going twelve miles, saying that 
they could not cross the river. Feb. 10. John Schuyler 
and another officer went to view the forts and brought 
news that the French were in both of them. Feb. 11. 10 
Christians and 40 Indians sent out to lie near and watch 
the enemy. They made a small fort to retreat into and 
so spied what the enemy did. Feb. 12. The scouts brought 
news of firing at the Mohawks' forts, which was supposed to 
be that of the Tionondoge Indians against the French. The 
news was sent to Albany and Major Ingoldsby at once 
detached 200 men, who arrived at Senectady about 2 p.m. 
The scouts brought in further news that the French were 
still there and had cut off the third Mohawk castle, called 
Tionondoge, and that none of the upper Indians were come 
down. Major Schuyler sent to Albany for orders to march. 
Feb. 13. No answer coming to his letter, Major Schuyler 
sent a second message, but being pressed by the Indians, 
who threatened to desert us, was forced to march the men 
across the river without orders, which arrived at 4 p.m. 
At this very time the scouts reported that the French had 
burnt the Mohawk castles and marched away. We marched 
twelve miles that evening, being 273 Christians. At 10 p.m. 
a scout reported that 600 of our uppermost Indians were 
coming down. The messenger was sent on to Major 
Ingoldsby with a request for stores and ammunition to be 
sent after us. Feb. 14. Decamped about 2 a.m., reached 
our scouts' fort at 6 a.m., and heard that the enemy was 
not above eight miles from us. Scouts were sent forward, 
who reported that they had marched. News came in that 
300 of our upper Indians were within twenty miles of us. 
Orders were sent to hasten them. Sent three Indians 
forward to discover the enemy, decamped at 4 p.m. 
and marched to the place where the enemy had lain the 
night before. Feb. 15. Two of our Indian scouts came in 
and reported the enemy within ten miles. At noon our 
Indians came up, about 290 men and boys armed and 
unarmed. At 4 p.m. marched and traversed ten miles. 
Consultation was held that night and spies sent forward. 
Feb. 16. Marched early and after going ten miles found 
where the enemy had lain two nights before. An Indian 
came from the enemy who had been sent to debauch our 
Indians. Message sent to Major Ingoldsby that the 
enemy had built a fort and meant to fight us, asking for 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 49 

1G93. 

provisions, ammunition and men. Marched on and met a 
wounded Indian ; and two miles .further on learning 
that the enemy were from 600 to 700 men and within 
three miles, pushed on to find a convenient'camping ground 
and fortified it. Scouts, Christian and Indian, were out 
all night, who reported in the morning that we were 
within a mile of the fort. Feb. 17. Decamped, and 
fetched a compass, with scouts before us, for fear of an 
ambuscade. At 8 a.m. came in sight of the fort when our 
scouts came in and shewed us where the enemy lay. We 
were making ready to engage when the enemy seeing us 
gave three huzzas, which we answered with as many and as 
loud as they, and made the woods ring. Our Indians went 
to work to fell trees and fortify, but the enemy sallying out 
immediately, we engaged them and drove them back to 
their fort. The Indians again fell to work, the Christians 
helping them, when the French again sallied out with all 
their strength, crying out " They run and we'll cut them 
all off and get their provisions." We received them briskly 
and beat them back into their fort with loss of several 
men. Again we fell to work to build our fort, and a third 
time the enemy were beaten back into their fort with con- 
siderable loss. Sent an express to Major Ingoldsby praying 
him to hasten our recruits with food and ammunition, for 
most of our men had not had any provisions in two days 
time (sic). Scouts were sent out all night and we lay in our 
fort. It was extreme bad, cold, snowy weather. Feb. 18. 
The scouts reported the enemy still in their fort. At 9a.m. 
an Indian deserter brought news that the French were 
packing their baggage. Major Schuyler ordered the men 
out to cut them off, but at the same time received news 
that they were fled ; so he gave order to pursue them till 
our men and stores came up, but the men wanting 
provisions refused to march. The officers with 60 
Christians and some Indians pursued the enemy to a 
small fortification, but having no troops to engage them 
left 40 men and 100 Indians to watch them, expecting our 
stores next morning. Feb. 19. Our stores came in and 
80 men with them. The victuals were distributed and 
those first served were ordered away after the enemy with 
five biscuits a man. At 4 p.m. our van came up 
near the enemy's rear, and we desired the Indians to 
join us in an attack while we sent word to our people 
to march up with all haste. But the Indians halted 
and could not be persuaded to go on. After an * 
hour most of our men came up, and we went 
on hoping to catch the enemy before they crossed 
the river, but there being a slake of ice in one 
part of the river they were over before we came up. 
Camped on the bank that night. Feb. 20. Major 
Schuyler resolved to cross the river, but many of the men 
being weary, their shoes worn out and provisions 
scarce, we could make no further pursuit. But what 

8000 D 



50 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

discouraged us most was the unwillingness of the Indians to 
pursue or attack. We lost four privates and four Indians 
killed, two officers, twelve men and Indians wounded. 
Escaped prisoners reported the enemy's loss to he thirty- 
three hut we found but twenty- seven, among whom were 
their commandant and three other officers, and twent}^- 
six wounded. We rescued between forty and fifty 
prisoners, and we hear that the enemy carry thirteen 
wounded with them. Copy. 1 pp. Endorsed as tlic -pre- 
ceding. 

179. vi. Another copy of the preceding. 

179. vii. Speech of Governor Fletcher to the Indians at Albany, 
25 February, 1693. You know that I came here in October 
to put the frontier in a posture of defence. I come now for 
your relief and have lost no time. I brought 150 men 
with me ; I sent you 200 men and stores from Senectady 
which with those that joined you before under Major 
Schuyler would, I hoped, have cut the enemy off; and I 
had 200 more men coming. I never thought that the 
Maquas would be so supine as to let the French enter 
their castles without resistance. In future you must keep 
strict watch. I hope that my coming shews how ready 
the King, my master, is to use his arms in your defence. 
I have borne command under him and seen the French 
fly from him ; and last summer we gained a great victory 
at sea. Having come in haste I bring no presents with 
me, but I hope to visit you in summer and renew the old 
covenant-chain. I have ordered provisions to be given to 
the Mohawks ; and you must shew that you still possess 
your old courage and reputation speedily. There is some 
false brother among us who betrays our plans. Bread and 
beer is ready for you, and you must drink to the King and 
Queen. 

The Five Nations to Governor Fletcher.' ' Swift Arrow " 
(for so we have named you for coming so swiftly to us), 
the disaster to the Mohawks is due only to their not 
hearkening to your advice. We thank you for your care 
for them. You ask us to attack the enemy, but you have 
lost blood as well as we, and should join us. It is our 
custom first to bewail our dead. While we attack Canada 
by land, we expect to hear that you will attack it by sea. 
We are short of arms and ammunition, while the French 
Indians are bountifully supplied. We rejoice to hear of 
the King's victories, and we wish you would tell him how 
easy it would be to destroy Canada. Pray send a smith to 
live with us. 

The Governor replied that if they would keep good 
watch he doubted not that he could deal with the Governor 
of Canada ; and granted their request as to the smith. 

Proposals made by four of the Chief Sachems to Governor 
Fletcher on 26 February, 1693. One of our men while 
drunk yesterday killed an Indian deserted from the French. 
Pray prohibit the sale of rum while the war lasts. We did 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



51 



together. 



1693. 

not thank you as we wished yesterday, and desire to do so 
now. We will enquire as to the French prisoners, whom 
we suspect may betray us. We have had two bouts about 
the priest Millet with the Oneidas and shall have a third. 
Pray come when the bark is loose upon the trees, for we 
have a design in hand. We apologise for the young man 
who killed four horses ; it was ill done. 

The Governor answered that he regretted that they should 
fight one another when an enemy was in the field, that he 
would do his best for their security, that he would prohibit 
the sale of rum, and that he hoped they would be vigilant. 
9| pp. Endorsed. Reed. 19 July, 1693. 

179. vin. Another copy of the preceding. 

179. ix. Address of the Mayor and Corporation of Albany 
to Governor Fletcher. Thanking him warmly for his 
unparalleled swiftness in coming with troops to their help ; 
and asking him to order a place for convention of the 
remnants of the Mohawks, and to direct the outlying 
farmers to fortify themselves in companies 
Copy. 2 pp. Endorsed as the preceding. 

179. x. Another copy of the preceding. [Board of Trade. New 
York, 5. No. 7, 7 i-x. ; and (without enclosures) 48. 
pp. 19-20.] 

[March 8.] 180. Pamphlet containing printed versions of Enclosures Nos. 
in., v., vii., ix., of the preceding, also the examination of two escaped 
prisoners and one captured prisoner as to the condition of Canada. 
The -whole, 13 printed pages. Endorsed. Reed. 26 Sept., 1693. 
[Board of Trade. New York, 5. No. 8.] 

March 9. 181. Commissioners of Ordnance to William Blathwayt. 
Forwarding account of the stores despatched to the West Indies. 
Signed. C. Musgrave, John Charlton, Wm. Boulter, W. Meester. 
% p. Annexed, 

181. i. Account of ordnance stores despatched to the West Indies, 

under orders in Council of 25 August and 20 September, 

1692. [Board of Trade. Plantations General, 2. 

Nos. 44, 44i. ; and (letter only] Col. Entry Bk., Vol. C., 

p. 308.] 

March 9. 182. Minutes of Council and Assembly of Montserrat. On the 
proposal of the Assembly, the Council consented (1) that during the 
absence of the detachment now bound for the expedition against 
the French, 16 of the troop be kept continually in arms to patrol 
each division of the Island for seven days and nights, and then be 
relieved by 16 more; also that they visit every guard nightly, 
and be subject in default to the penalties of the Militia Act ; (2) that 
it be lawful for such patrols on meeting negroes without their 
owners' ticket, by day or night, to beat or slash them, and if 
negroes be congregated to disperse them, pistolling or killing them 
if need be. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLVIII., pp. 313, 314.] 



March 9. 183. Minutes of Council of Jamaica, 
sworn Lieutenant-Governor. Proclamation 
in their posts. 



Sir William Beeston 
to continue all officers 



52 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 

March 10. The Royal order for a new seal, and the Governor's commission 
were recorded. Order for the old seal to be defaced. The Council 
and Clerk were sworn. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. pp. 242- 

244.] 

March 10. 184. Information of John Stewart to Sir William Phips. That 
while Richard Short was a prisoner on board ship at Cape Ann he 
prevailed with informant to carry three letters to Piscataqua, one of 
them to Mr. Usher, who drank Short's health, promised safety to 
the ship if she had come to Piscataqua and that the deserters 
from H.M.S. Nonsuch should have been sent on board. 2 pp. 
[Board of Trade. New England, 6. No."38.~] 

March 10. 185. Minutes of Council of New York. The Council gave it as 
their opinion that the neighbouring Colonies should contribute to 
the maintenance of the fort at Albany. A Committee appointed to 
consider what equipages the Governor should take with him on his 
next mission to meet the Indians at Albany. Letters from Con- 
necticut read complaining of the arbitrary conduct of some 
pretended magistrates towards the people of that Colony. Resolved 
to write to them on behalf of the oppressed people, and to remind 
them that though they have exacted much money they have con- 
tributed nothing to the defence of the frontier. Orders for 
provisioning the garrison of Albany. Grant of land to Abraham 
Lockerman confirmed. Orders for sundry payments for provisions 
for the late expedition. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 400, 
401.] 

March 13. 186. Minutes of Council of New York. William Pinhorne 
recommended as Judge of the Supreme Court. Mr. Phillips 
authorised to charge double toll between sunset and sunrise at 
Spitendivell Bridge. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., p. 401.] 

March 13. 187. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. More members of the 
Council sworn. Order for issue of writs for election of an Assembly, 
to meet on the first Thursday in May. William Broadrick sworn 
Attorney General. Order for repair of the fortifications of Port 
Royal to continue. Order that none except Councillors shall attend 
Council without leave, and that people duly qualified may be 
allowed to leave the Island as formerly. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 
77. p. 245.] 

March 13. 188. Journal of House of Burgesses of Virginia. The 
Governor sent copy of his speech, and also Peter Heyman's 
petition as to the Post with the royal letters thereon, which was 
referred to the Committee of Propositions. The Council's proposal 
for building a new prison was referred to the same Committee. 

March 14. Report of Committee of Propositions read. Resolved that 
the Act for better defence of the country be continued for one year 
and that a bill be prepared accordingly. Resolved to address the 
Governor for a copy of the royal instructions as to free trade with 
the Indians. Bill to suspend the Act for Ports ordered. Resolved 
to address the Governor for a joint Committee for revision of the 
laws. Address to the Governor in accordance with above resolutions. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



1693. 



March 15, 



March 16. 



March 17. 



March 18. 



Order for a hill to enable the lands south of James River to the 
boundaries of Carolina to be settled, and for a bill concerning foreign 
corn. 

The proposals concerning Rangers, received from the Council, 
were considered, and it was resolved that the case is met by the 
Act for better defence. Address to the Governor as to revision 
of the laws, approved. 

Report of the Committee of Grievances further considered. The 
House presented the address of yesterday to the Governor and 
reported the Governor's compliance therewith. A proposal to 
address their Majesties for a grant from the quit-rents towards 
support of the clergy was rejected. Resolved to request a Conference 
with the Council as to outrages committed by strange Indians. 
Order for a bill to prevent all trade with Indians in pork unless it 
be proved that such pork was the property of the Indian town and 
the swine marked as such. Bills to continue the Defence Act, to 
suspend the Ports Act, and to amend the 7th Act of 1686, read a 
first time. 

Messages from the Governor, giving the substance of the royal 
intentions to grant Virginia free trade with the Indians, and 
suggesting a Conference to settle as to revision of the laws. Message 
to the Governor announcing the appointment of conferrers. 
Resolved that justices of the peace, being unpaid, should be 
exempted from attending musters, if they be not militia officers. 
Report of the Committee of Propositions further considered. Order 
for a bill to amend the settling of the first day of General Courts 
for the public convenience. The progress of the Conference with 
the Council was reported. Order for a bill to amend the Act to 
encourage the erection of mills. On Peter Heyman's petition it was 
resolved to encourage the erection of a post office. Business of the 
Northumberland election deferred till to-morrow. 

The question of postal charges referred to the Committee of 
Propositions. The conferrers reported that the Council, while 
unwilling to join the Burgesses in a joint Committee for revision 
of the laws, would keep a standing Committee which would be ready 
to give assistance when applied to. The election for Northumberland 
was then considered, and it was resolved that the present members 
were not duly elected, but that John Downing and William Jones 
were duly elected. A new writ requested for election of a member 
for King and Queen's County, the sheriff having died suddenly. 
[Col Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXV., w . 956-973.] 



March 14. 189. Minutes of General Assembly of Virginia. Address from 

the Burgesses undertaking to renew the Defence Act and asking as 

to the Royal instructions concerning free trade with Indians. 
March 16. The Burgesses attended with their address as to revision of the 

laws. Answer to the address concerning free trade with Indians. 

Message to the Burgesses proposing a conference as to the revision 

of the laws. 
March 17. Conferrers appointed. Message from the Burgesses accepting 

the suggestion of a conference. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXV., 

pp. 901-905.] 



54 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 
March 16. 190. Minutes of Council of Virginia. Richard Lee was sworn 

of the Council. 
March 17. Order that the Piscattaway Indians be not molested in crossing 

the Potomac river. [Col Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXIV., pp. 795-796.] 

March 13. 191. Minutes of General Assembly of Massachusetts. The 
King's letter of 11 October, 1692, ordering assistance to be given to 
New York, read. Order for reducing the bounds of Little Compton. 

March 14. Captains Nathaniel Stanley and William Whiting from Con- 
necticut were heard as to the proposals of that Government for giving 
assistance in the prosecution of the war. Message to the Represen- 
tatives urging speedy settlement of the regulation of the assess- 
ment. 

March 15. The gentlemen from Connecticut were again heard, and offered 
proposals in writing. Bill for regulation of the assessment received 
and detailed. 

March 16. Bill for settling a tax of 30,000 read and debated. 

March 17. The same bill was passed, also a bill for payment of the 
Commissioners for the tax. Joseph Curtis appointed Sheriff of 
York County. Assembly dissolved. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV., 
pp. 385-388.] 

March 14. 192. Governor Sir William Phips to Lieutenant Governor 
Boston. Usher. I have already written to you to deliver up several 
deserters from H.M.S. Nonsuch, who have taken refuge in your 
Government, and have given orders to the military officers to seize 
them ; but I understand that you refuse to deliver them and on the 
contrary protect them. I thought you would have seen your first 
error in rescuing the men when seized by the purser and that you 
would at my request have remembered your duty and delivered 
them up ; but it is now evident that you have no sense of duty, 
since you protect deserters and help them in their evil doings. For 
I am advised that you warned them not to leave your Government, 
lest they should be arrested. I now call upon you in their 
Majesties' name to deliver up these deserters, as you will answer 
the contrary. I am sorry that you force me to remind you of your 
duty in this manner. Ciyty. f p. Endorsed. Reed. 24 May. 
[Hoard of Trade. New England, 6. No. 39.] 

March 15. 193. The Agents for Barbados to Lords of Trade and Planta- 
tions. The people of Barbados have presented an address for a 
regiment to be stationed there during the war, and that when any 
of the regiments shall be sent home, such men as volunteer to stay 
there may be allowed to stay. We have now further to represent 
that during this war several French prizes have been condemned 
in Barbados, but as there are no instructions to the Governor from 
what fund the expense of maintaining prisoners shall be defrayed, 
such prisoners are kept at the Island's expense until exchanged. 
We beg you to move the King for orders on these two points. 
Signed. Wm. Bridges, Ed. Littleton. 1 p. Endorsed. Reed. 
15 March. Read 1 May, 1693. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. 
No. 9 ; and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIII., pp. 337, 338.] 

March 16. 194. Minutes of the Council of War in the West Indies. A 
Barbados, letter from Governor Codrington being read, it was resolved that the 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



55 



1693. 

leeward part of Martinique be maintained as the place of rendezvous, 
instead of Mariegalante, as proposed by Governor Codrington, first 
because there is no good water at Mariegalante, and secondly because 
it is doubtful whether the fleet could weather Dominica in sailing 
thither. Order for the embarkation of Foulke's, Lloyds' and Baiter's 
regiments at Bridgetown on the 22nd inst., and of Goodwyn's and 
Boteler's at Holetown and Speightstown on the 23rd, for which Sir 
F. Wheler will please give the necessary orders to the transports, 
and for the whole fleet to sail two or three days later sending forward 
v a light frigate to meet the Leeward Islands forces. Ordered further 
that 200 muskets and ammunition be sent forthwith to Governor 
Codrington, who shall be desired to give information of the time 
when he will embark and to send ships to view the principal ports 
of Guadeloupe, and report as to the shipping therein. Order for 
hire of eighteen transports, the masters of which shall take their 
orders from Sir F. Wheler. Committee appointed to consider what 
further is necessary for the expedition. Colonel Foulke reported 
that Commissary General Fotherby had paid away the King's money 
without his orders. Resolved that Mr. Fotherby had no legal right 
to do so and that he has been guilty of a misdemeanour. Ordered 
that he bring his letters of credit to next Council. [Col. Entry 
Bk., Vol. XII., pp. 314, 318.] 

195. Minutes of Council of New York. A committee appointed 
to prepare the business for next session of Assembly. Order for the 
City authorities to inspect the packing of flour for the West Indies 
to prevent fraud. Order for patents for land to Colonel Willett and 
Daniel Shotwell. 

Agreed to send Mr. Mahew at Martin's Vineyard the Council's 
report on Sir W. Phip's letter and the printed Charter, to tell him 
that the matter is laid before their Majesties, and to instruct him to 
do nothing by Sir W. Phip's authority unless forced. [Col. Entry 
Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 401, 402.] 

March 17. 196. Minutes of Council of Nevis. Colonel Samuel Gardner 
sworn in Lieutenant-Governor, and John Palmer sworn in as 
Councillor and as Secretary. The Assembly agreed to an Act to 
impress such arms as are wanting for the coming expedition. Order 
for the records of the Secretary's office to be delivered to John 
Palmer. The Council agreed with the Assembly to draw up a 
memorial setting forth the weakness and danger of the Island while 
the forces are to windward, and that the Lieutenant-Governor 
should request Sir Francis Wheler to send some ships to cruise to 
leeward. Act for pressing arms agreed to. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 
XLVIIL, pp. 273-4.] 

March 18. 197. The Secretary of New Hampshire to Governor Sir William 
Great Island. Phips. Your letter of 14th was laid before us by the Lieutenant- 
Governor. The men whom you describe as deserters have shewn 
us their legal discharge from the King's service, and as they are 
British subjects they ought to be protected. As to your instructions 
to the military officers to arrest them, we know of no person 
invested with authority to do so except those named in the King's 



March 16. 



March 17. 



56 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 

Commission of Government for this province. As to the Lieutenant- 
Governor's duty, he has proceeded with honour and justice in this 
matter, making the law his rule to walk by. There are many 
imprudent things in your letter, which had better have been 
omitted. Signed. Tho. Davis. Copy. % p. [Board oj Trade. 
New England, 6. No. 39.] 

March 20. 198. Governor Sir William Phips to Lords of the Treasury. 
Boston. I have duly received your order for supplying the West Indian 
squadron with provisions or with credit for obtaining the same, on 
application of the Commanders. I shall take care that all shall be 
prepared to give the said Commanders every assistance. 1 p. 
Endorsed. Reed. 24 May, 1693. [Board of Trade. New England, 6. 
No. 40.] 

March 20. 199. Minutes of Council of New York. Resolved to instruct 
the farmers of Ulster County to join their forces if they discover 
any small party of Indians, and if they find a large party to retire 
all of them to Kingston with their cattle and goods. Resolved also 
that the towns in Ulster and Duchess County do fortify themselves. 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 402, 403.] 

March 20. 200. Minutes of Council of War of the West Indies. The Corn- 
Barbados, mittee presented its report as to what was further needful for the 
expedition. Resolved that the printed Articles of War for the King's 
forces abroad be the articles for the present expedition. Order for 
an appointment of an officer in each regiment to take charge of the 
plunder, to whom all plunder shall be brought, under penalties, and 
who shall be responsible for the same. Further orders as to the 
jplunder, and rewards of the Army and the Fleet. Resolved that one 
sutler be allowed to go with each regiment ; that each regiment 
provide itself with three horses or asses ; that provisions be lent to 
the two Barbados regiments ; that the stores in the victualling ships 
be weighed and checked ; that eight sloops be impressed for the 
expedition ; that if Martinique be taken or when the forces quit that 
Island, the Barbados regiments shall be permitted to return home ; 
that provisions be shipped on board the transports ; and that the 
troops embark two days later than formerly appointed. [Col. Entry 
Bk., Vol. XII., pp. 318-323.] 

March 20. 201. Journal of House of Burgesses of Virginia. The Com- 
mittee of Propositions brought up several bills. Order for the 
house to be called over to-morrow at ten o'clock. A conference with 
the Council reported as to the means of preventing outrages by 
strange Indians. Bills to encourage erection of fulling mills, 
concerning the marking of Indian hogs, for the advancement of 
coins, and for settling lands south of James River and Pamunkey 
Neck, read a first time. Report of the Committee of grievances further 
considered. The Council to be asked as to the service of the 
rangers, and how much of the money voted for them remains 
unexpended, and as to recovery of ammunition lent to Maryland. 
A Committee for revision of the laws appointed, and a further 
conference with the Council on the subject requested. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



57 



1693. 
March 21. 



March 22. 



March 23. 



March 24. 



The Committee reported as to the Post Office and the building of 
a County Prison. Bills to suspend the Ports Act, and to continue 
the Defence Act, read a second time. Bill to amend Act 7 of 1686 
rejected. Bills as to marking Indian hogs, to encourage erection of 
fulling-mills, to settle lands south of James River, and for advance- 
ment of coins read a second time. Message from the Governor 
asking the Burgesses to repeat one of their verbal messages in 
writing ; which was done. The question whether the erection of a 
County prison was necessary was rejected. Order for a bill to 
regulate postal charges. Bill for advancement of coins amended. 
Bill to ascertain price of a permit read first time. 

The progress of the conference as to revision of laws was 
reported. Bills to suspend the Ports Act read a third time and 
passed, also the bill to continue the Defence Act. Bills to alter the 
first day of the General Court and for a Post Office read a first time. 
Bills for marking Indians' hogs, to encourage erection of fulling 
mills, for settlement of certain lands, and for advancement of coins 
read a third time and passed. 

The Bills passed yesterday were sent up to the Council. Bills 
to ascertain the price of a permit, to alter the first day of a General 
Court, and to erect a Post Office read a second time. Reports of 
Committee of Grievances considered. 

Order for enquiry into the authority under which Colonel 
Henry Whiteing has acted as Treasurer. Conferrers having 
reported the result of the Conference with the Council, the House 
disagreed with the Council's proposal to enter on the revision of the 
laws this session, and referred the question of revision to a com- 
mittee. The three bills which were read a second time yesterday 
were read a third time, passed and sent to Council. Message from 
the Governor asking for particulars as to the powder lent to Mary- 
land. Further reports of the Committee of Public Claims 
considered. The Committee on the revision of the laws submitted 
an address to the Governor, asking that the work of revising the 
laws might go on after Session. Address to the Governor stating 
that the powder lent to Maryland was spared on condition that it 
should be repaid. Order for members absent without leave to be 
taken into the custody of the Marshal. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 
LXXXV., pp. 973-985.] 



March 20. 202. Minutes of General Assembly of Virginia. A new writ 
was issued for election of a burgess for King and Queen County. 

March 21. Two verbal messages from the Burgesses as to the Rangers and 
as to ammunition lent to Maryland not being understood were sent 
up again in writing. Conferrers appointed to meet the Burgesses 
on the question of outrages committed by strange Indians. 

March 22. New writ for King and Queen County election issued, on 
account of the sheriff's death. Order to the Auditor to report as to 
the service of the Rangers, and the funds remaining to pay them. 

March 23. Six bills received from the Burgesses. Report of the conferrers 
as to the revision of the laws ; on which the Council decided that its 
own proposal, for the laws to be revised during the present session, 
is preferable to that of the Burgesses. 



58 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 
March 24. 



March 25. 



March 21. 

March 23. 
March 25. 



March 22. 

Barbados. 



March 22. 

New 
Hampshire. 



The accounts of the Rangers and a message as to the ammu- 
nition lent to Maryland, sent down to the Burgesses. Further 
enquiry as to the sufferers by the outrage of strange Indians 
ordered. The six hills received from the Burgesses were read a 
second time. Three more bills were received from the Burgesses. 

The bills for defence and for suspension of the Ports Act were 
further considered. Messages from the Burgesses as to the powder 
lent to Maryland ; and a further message refusing to agree with 
the Council as to the revision of the laws. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXXXV., pp. 906-915.] 

203. Minutes of Council of Virginia. Forms of patents for 
land examined, and an alteration therein ordered, to stop the 
exemption of planters from paying quit-rents for the first seven 
years. 

The complaints against Mr. James Boisseau heard ; and it was 
ordered that he continue to be minister of St. Peter's parish, King's 
and Queen's County. 

Order for induction of Mr. Jacob Ware as minister of St. Peter's 
parish, New Kent County. Order for a messenger to be appointed 
to the Council with salary of 25 a year. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXXXIV., pp. 796-799.] 

204. Minutes of the Council of War in the West Indies. Orders 
for all the men to be sworn by the Muster-master when mustered ; 
for pilots to be impressed and for payment to the surgeons for care 
of sick men on the transports. It being represented that there were 
many Irish in the Barbados regiments who might be Roman 
Catholics, Lieut. -Colonel Hamilton and Colonel Salter spoke of their 
good behaviour in the Leeward Islands, and it was resolved that 
they could be trusted and should be employed, Colonel Foulke alone 
dissenting. [Col Entry Bk., Vol. XII., pp. 323-325.] 

205. The Secretary of New Hampshire to William Blathwayt. 
Forwarding copies of correspondence with Sir William Phips, in 
connection with the case of Captain Short. Signed. Tho. Davis. 
i p. Annexed, 

205. i. Governor Usher to [the Council of Massachusetts ?] 
13 March, 1694. I have received a letter from Sir William 
Phips, asking for the arrest of alleged deserters from 
H.M.S. Monarch. The letter was laid before Council who 
decided that those who could shew discharges should be 
protected. Copies of the discharges of these are enclosed 
to you, and I know of no more. One Matthew Gary on 
the 5th inst. seized some men by force of arms, without 
warrant. He is fled from justice, and as he is said to be 
within your government, I must ask for him to be secured 
and delivered to me. Copy. 

Here follow copies of Sir William Phips's letter to John 
Usher of 14 March, and of the reply of the Council of 
New Hampshire of 18 March. (See Nos. 192, 197.) [Board 
of Trade. New Hampshire, 1. Nos. 21, 21 1.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



59 



1693. 

March 22. 

Whitehall. 



March 22. 

Jamaica. 



206. Earl of Nottingham to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 
The King has appointed Colonel Francis Russell to he Governor of 
Barbados, and Colonel Kendall to be Governor of Jamaica. You 
will prepare Commissions and Instructions for them. Signed. 
Nottingham, %p. Endorsed. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. No A; 
and 53. p. 139 ; ami Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIIL, p. 379.] 

207. Lieutenant-Governor Sir William Beeston to Earl of 
Nottingham. I arrived here on the 9th. The Island is in a 
ruinous condition and the people have been very sickly, but health 
is perfectly recovered, and our arrival has put new life into them. 
On my way down I called at St. Domingo to save the time and 
expense of sending a ship up again and then writ the President and 
received his answer. I enclose copies of both letters [iiiissiny']. 
How I shall do for landsmen, when he sends me his desires to join 
him (sic) I know not, for the earthquakes, sickness and desertion 
have left the country very bare of men, but I will assist with both the 
King's ships and what force else I can raise. The Mordaunt is on the 
coast of Porto Bello where the Spaniards have inhumanly cut off 
Captain Tristan and all his company of about fourteen persons belong- 
ing to this Island. The President wrote to the Council here to excuse 
himself, and I have returned him an answer, of which I enclose copy. 
Tristan was undoubtedly trading on the coast, but whether that be 
cause enough for them to murder him and all his men in cold blood 
I leave to your Lordship. They pretend for their excuse that he 
was a Frenchman, but he has been a British subject and an 
inhabitant of Jamaica for many years, and his people were all 
English. I shall report more fully when the Mordaunt returns. 
The sloop that takes this has orders to return speedily as possible ; 
I beg that she may not be stopped nor her men, who are inhabitants 
here, taken from her. I have no authority to condemn prizes, and 
to let men take ships and plunder them at sea is to give them too 
much latitude. I spoke to you about this before I left England and 
foresaw the trouble that it would cause, but the Admiralty insisted 
on taking that clause out of the commission, and yet gave me no 
authority about it nor about the King's ships which want money 
for various necessaries. Without authority I cannot get the mer- 
chants to advance the money. I shall write more at length by 
next ship. Kiyned. W^m. Beeston. 1J pp. Endorsed. R. 27 May, 
'93. Enclosed, 

207. i. The President of Panama to the Council of Jamaica. 
16-26 January, 1693. Ever since peace was made between 
the two Crowns of Spain and England I have endeavoured 
to preserve it, never doubting that the Government of 
Jamaica would do the like. But recently a sloop has come 
from Jamaica manned by Frenchmen under Captain 
Tristan, with merchandise to trade on these coasts. I am 
surprised that you should have permitted this breach of 
the treaty. These men though bidden by the Lieutenant- 
General of Porto Bello to come to him would not do so, 
and he, understanding that they were French, seized the 
ship. The men resisted and were all killed. I cannot 
omit to point out to you the danger to which the arrival of 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 



such vessels, especially manned with Frenchmen, exposes 
me. Translation. 1 p. 

207. ii. Sir William Beeston to the President of Panama. I 
have seen your letter of 26 January to the Council defend- 
ing those who cut off Captain Tristan and his company. 
What his business was on the coast, I know not, but he 
and all his men were British subjects, and therefore even 
if they were trading I conceive that the utmost required by 
the Articles of Peace is the seizure of themselves and the 
condemnation of their goods. But to cut them all off in 
cold blood on pretence of friendship (you must pardon me 
for saying it) was sanguinary, and contrary to the good 
agreement between the two Crowns. Nevertheless, being 
anxious to preserve a good agreement, I shall only repre- 
sent the case as I find it to the Secretary of State ; but I 
beg you to be more tender lest you exasperate British 
subjects beyond my power to restrain them. Still, let not 
this accident terrify your men from coming hither in that 
allowed concert of the Assiento, for they shall receive civil 
treatment so long as they make no infraction of the peace. 
Copij. 1 p. [America and West Indies. 540. Nos. 29, 
29 I, ii.] 

March 22. 208. Minutes of Council of New York. William Pinhorne 
nominated second judge of the Supreme Court with salary of .100 
a year. 

March 28. Order for sundry small payments. Resolved that if a printer 
settle in New York for printing of Acts etc. he shall have 40 per 
annum besides private business. Order that the pieces-of-eight 
shall pass for more or less value according to their weight, if Peru 
at the rate of 4d. per dirt., if other pieces at the rate of 4%d. per diet. 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV.,pp. 403, 404.] 

March 23. 209. Lieutenant-Governor Sir William Beeston to Lords of 
Jamaica. Trade and Plantations. I arrived here 011 the 9th, took the oaths 
and swore in the Council. The Island is in a very mean condition. 
The earthquake, sickness and desertion of discontented people have 
carried off so many as to leave the Island very thin of people. The 
public and private buildings are all down, and the whole country is 
a melancholy prospect. Part of Fort Charles was left standing and 
is almost repaired again, and a battery near it called Morgan Line 
has also something preserved, so that between the two there are 
nearly fifty guns mounted. But there is little of Port Royal left, 
being now a perfect island of about twenty-five acres, and too 
small to hold the trade and people. President White and the 
Council therefore very deliberately resolved on the building of a 
new tower in the main at Leganie, and gave the people all 
encouragement to settle there, which they did. Nevertheless, 
after the death of President White, the Council having different 
interests aimed at different ends, some pretending for 
Port Royal, others for other places that interested them, and 
took away the public officers which they had before settled among 
them. Thus at my arrival I found the people at a stand and no 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 1 

1093. 

provision made for the reception of themselves or of any that should 
come to them ; but since I arrived they have made me an address 
about it, of which I enclose a copy, shewing the advantages of the 
place and their desire to be there, on which I have visited place and 
people and promised them all encouragement. With this they seem 
to be satisfied, and will go on with their buildings, but they seem 
not to be fully pleased unless I remove all the public officers to them 
from Port Royal, which I cannot yet grant ; for what fortifica- 
tions remain are all there, and I cannot so discourage the 
people as to make them leave those unguarded. But I am in 
hopes that the trade will fall into the new town, being a place 
of safety and pleasure, and very fit for it ; and that just so 
many may be encouraged to remain at Port Royal as shall 
suffice to man and defend Fort Charles. If you approve this 
I hope you will signify your approbation, which will much encourage 
the people to go on. The King's House at Port Royal is, like the 
land, all under water and past recovery ; that at St. Jago has been 
repaired somewhat against my coming, and I am now living there, 
but it has neither kitchen, outhouses nor enclosures, and there is 
no money in the Treasury, but on the contrary a large debt. 
Everything is very dear, the sickness and calamities having terrified 
those who used to bring provisions from New England and North 
America from coming near us ; but now, blessed be God, the 
country is returned to its usual health, and the people that are left 
appear to wake out of a lethargy, and begin to build their houses 
and sugar works. I hope by God's blessing and with your favour 
that the Island will recover again, but it will be a work of time and 
a great expense, and how the loss and want of people is to be 
repaired during this time of war I cannot see, since so few come to 
us from England. I have sent a proclamation to Petit Guavos, 
Coriza and some of the North American Colonies to invite all that 
have deserted to return. I enclose a copy of it. 

There are two vacancies in the Council for which I recommend 
Fulke Rose and Henry Low, who are men of integrity, ability and 
estate. I see too plainly that if I should die, the country will fall 
back into the same unsettled condition as was produced by the 
diversity of interests of ten or twelve men ; so I would beg for a 
dormant Commission for one of them to take my place, and would 
recommend Mr. Samuel Bernard, the Chief Justice, to hold it. The 
Council are of opinion that an Assembly is absolutely necessary for 
the quieting and settling of all things, and I have issued writs for 
one to meet on the 4th of May. The French often threaten us from 
Hispaiiiola, knowing our weakness, while their small vessels cruise 
on our coasts and take our small trading ships. To prevent this 
we much want two fast-sailing, small fifth-rate frigates, which would 
be able to follow them in shoal water, where bigger ships dare not 
venture. But I have no authority to condemn prizes if taken, 
which will discourage men to go and seek them. If on the other 
hand they have liberty to dispose of ships without account, ill men 
may take advantage of it to plunder the King's friends. I beg for 
your orders herein. The officers are so much reduced by the late 
calamity that many deputies of patentees will not act without taking 
the whole profits of their offices. I cannot prevent it, for the whole 



62 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 



of the business would be neglected else. I do not know how the 
patentees in England will like it, but I cannot help it. The fleet 
will sail under convoy of H.M.S. .Guernsey about the 10th of May. 
Signed. Wm. Beeston. 2 closely written payes. Endorsed. Reed. 
27 May. Read 12 and 15 June, 93. Enclosed, 

209. i. Address of certain inhabitants of Jamaica to Lieutenant- 
Governor Sir William Beeston. Being driven from Port 
Royal by the earthquake we settled at Kingston, as invited 
and encouraged by the President and Council ; they and 
all disinterested persons thinking it the best site on every 
account. After the town had been surveyed and marked 
out, a plan thereof drawn and all other matters settled, we 
removed thither at great expense, and considering our 
many difficulties and discouragements made good progress. 
We hope that the unhealthiness of the place will not be 
objected to, as it is well known that the late sickness was 
as universal a judgment as the earthquake. Now the 
sickness has ceased we may hope for a continuance of 
health, a wholesome soil, sound air and plenty of good 
water. Again such of us as escaped, by miracle, from the 
destruction of Port Royal cannot endure the least thought 
of settling on that fatal spot. The miserable remains of 
that place are nothing near capable of receiving us and our 
effects that are now here, much less those that we are daily 
expecting from England. Again many of us have received 
instructions from our principals in England not again to 
trust their estates to so dangerous a foundation. We beg 
you therefore to establish in their Majesties' name what 
was so judiciously begun by the Council, and is now so 
far advanced that it wants nothing but your favour and 
encouragement. We ask you to order all ships to unload 
at Kingston and all officers to reside there, with such 
other directions you shall judge best. Copy. 1 pp. 
Endorsed. Reed. 27 May, 1693. 

209. u. Proclamation of Sir William Beeston to recall to Jamaica 
all English subjects who have deserted the Island, 
promising them all encouragement. Dated 14 March, 1693. 
Copy. 1 p. Endorsed. Reed. 27 May, 1693. [Board oj 
Trade. Jamaica, 7. Nos. 5,5i.,ii.; and (without enclosures) 
53. pp. 147-152.] 

March 23. 210. Abstract of the foregoing despatch of Sir W T illiam Beeston. 
2^ pp. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. No. 6.] 

March 23. 211. Petition of merchants and planters concerned with 
Jamaica to the King. Sir William Beeston's zeal has made him 
surmount all the difficulties of earthquake and sickness in Jamaica 
and proceed cheerfully to the service of Goverment. We should be 
discouraged from resettling our interests in the Island, but for our 
confidence in his ability ; but we have now freely adventured our 
estates in the task. Sir William is greatly beloved in the Island, 
and his departure put him to great expense. We hear that another 
person is under consideration to go out as Governor, which though 
it would leave Sir William Beeston Lieutenant-Governor, would 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 03 

1G93. 

deprive him of all salary and power. We beg therefore that he 
may be continued in the government, at least until the Island is 
resettled. Tltirty-six signatories. Copy. 2 pp. Endorsed. Reed. 
23 March 92-3. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. Xo. 7.] 

[Mar. 23.] 212. Considerations offered as to the state of Jamaica. The 
revenue of the Island consists of the quit-rents and the duty on 
wines. The first charge on these is for fortifications, the next for 
the Governor's salary of 2,000. Since the earthquake the revenue 
is much diminished, and the whole of the fortifications require to 
be reconstructed. It is submitted that it would be better to keep 
Sir William Beeston as Lieutenant-Governor at 1,000 a year. I;). 
Undated, [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. No. 7A.] 

March 23. 213. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. Thomas Neale's 
patent for the post office read, also a memorial from Andrew 
Hamilton as to the rates to be charged on letters. John Foster and 
Peter Sergeant appointed to discuss the matter with Mr. Hamilton 
and to report. Order for Nathaniel Williams, Sampson Stoddard 
and Joseph Parsons to audit the accounts of the Commissaries for 
War. Order for payment of 29 to Benjamin Harris for printing 
the laws. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV., pp. 224-226.] 

214. Extract from a letter from Boston. The settlement of 
the militia has proceeded very slowly. In several counties there is 
no field officer above the rank of Major; in some no commissioned 
officer at all. Sir William Phips figured so well as Lord Lieutenant 
of Connecticut and Rhode Island that he sent a set of Com- 
missions to Colonel Sanford, with a demand (as it is said) of 50 
for his clerk for writing them. The Assembly of Rhode Island 
then met and issued a proclamation saying that they had never yet 
seen Sir W. Phip's commissions, and that the persons he had 
appointed were enemies to the country, and calling upon the people 
to obey officers of their own appointing. Connecticut also refused 
to appoint officers of Sir William's nomination, and the Assembly 
let him know that they would abide by former arrangements until 
the King's pleasure were known. In the business of Courts seven 
months lapsed before any were held, and now there is nothing 
but an Admiralty Court wherein the Governor once sat as judge 
himself and in another case put in certain deputy-vice-admirals 
who condemned ten or twelve thousand pounds without recollecting 
any rights of the Crown. The witchcraft at Salem went on 
vigorously during the summer, and twenty were executed and a 
hundred more restrained, until at last members of Council and 
Justices were accused ; and now every one is acquitted. Sir William 
and Council have given the College a charter, with power to receive 
gifts and confer degrees. They are proceeding to create Mather a 
doctor of divinity, which by some misunderstanding is to be 
obstructed. The deputies too are so displeased since Cooke's 
arrival that they will allow him no salary unless he be resident, 
and would have another man chosen. Sir William's salary is in 
much the same state. The deputies voted him 500 per annum, 
and he huffed it, so they have got their vote again and only 
given him an order for 500 gratuity, alleging that there 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 



March 24. 

Barbados. 



March 25. 

Boston. 



is no revenue except per annum. The Assessment must 
amount to 30,000 this year, a sum very fit to be managed 
by an able general for the reduction of Quebec. Sir William 
gives out that he is sending Captain Short home. The 
poor Captain has been a cripple in his right hand ever since he 
came, owing to a wound. Sir William took a prize from him, and 
Short dared not displease him by demanding his own. Since that, 
Short says he has borrowed his men from time to time and now 
made such a demand as would have dismantled the ship, so he re- 
fused him. The Governor abused him and struck him, Short struck 
him back with his left hand and tripped over a gun as he stepped 
back, whereupon the Governor beat him lustily and committed him. 
A quarrel of much more importance is between Phips and Governor 
Fletcher. He threatened Fletcher's messenger and Fletcher him- 
self, praising Leisler and so forth. It is useless to tell all. 
Ex uncfiie Icon cm. Little news of the Indians, though lately they 
took a sloop at Pemaquid. Since I began this Sir William has made 
his pilgrimage to Khode Island and read his Commission, and re- 
ceived for answer that if the province had any more to say when 
the Assembly met, the Governor would write to Sir William. Sir 
William has reprieved eight more persons condemned for witch- 
craft. Sir E. Andros and Mr. Usher have great trouble in getting 
their accounts settled. Copy. 3J pp. Endorsed. 1692-3. [Board 
of Trade. New England, 6. No. 41.] 

215. Minutes of the Council of War in the W T est Indies. Order 
for two more transports to be hired. Resolved that the Master- 
apothecary and his mates be admitted to share in the plunder. 
Mr. Fotherby's petition to be admitted likewise was deferred to a 
Council to be held at Martinique, when it will be easier to judge 
whether his service entitles him thereto. Order for Mr. Fotherby 
to give account of the money that he has received or spent in 
Barbados, and that, if his health do not permit him to accompany 
the expedition, he shall propose a fitting person to take his place ; 
also that he leave none of the King's stores behind him, but send 
them all with the fleet. Order for Lieutenant Powell to send back 
to Madeira a negro and a Portuguese whom he had taken from that 
Island, paying their passage and restoring to them any money that 
he has taken from them. Resolved that transports containing any 
lumbering goods shall not discharge them, the Council promising 
to indemnify them if such cargo be damaged. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. XII. , pp. 326-329.] 

216. Governor Sir William Phips to the Earl of Nottingham. 
I have received the Queen's letter of 11 October, 1692, and 
despatched letters accordingly to the Governors of New York, Mary- 
land, Pennsylvania and Virginia for speedy agreement as to a quota 
to be furnished for defence of New York. I shall do my best for the 
safety of neighbouring Colonies. New Hampshire cannot be 
supported except from hence, and a force of 120 men, which has been 
for some months in that province, is still continued there. I hope 
shortly to report any further measures as to New York. Signed. 
William Phips. 1 p. Endorsed. R. May 24, '93. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



1693. 



Duplicate of the foregoing. [America and West Indies. 5G1. 
Nos. 32, 33.] 



March 25. 217. Minutes of Council of New York. Order for a patent 
for land to Hester Browne. Ordered that a new coin, known as 
dog-dollars, pass current as 5s. Qd. apiece. Committee appointed to 
audit Robert Livingstone's accounts. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 
LXXV., p. 404.] 

March 27. 218. The Governor of Pennsylvania to Governor Fletcher. 

Philadelphia. " Gov r , the account from thee of your successes against the French 
and Indian?, their complices, I do thankfully acknowledge to have 
received." My congratulations. As to the burthen and hard cir- 
cumstances of New York in this undertaking, we are more ready to 
believe than to give you relief herein. We may and do commiserate 
you, but supply you at this juncture we cannot. Our representa- 
tives here have not thought fit to concur in the raising of money 
either for the expenses of government or the help of our neighbours 
since the proprietor's absence. I will consult the Council, but I 
expect little of it. '" Thus far I am serious and plain with thee; 
but by wa} T of a Rehearsal transposed I might comically represent 
unto thee my personal difficulties and domestic circumstance under 
this station, and so request thy candid consideration and kindness 
towards me, whom a Government hath burthened but not relieved. 
I hope and unfeignedly desire a sudden supersedeas &B to my present 
place, and a quietus herein would be welcome unto me." Sif/ncd, 
Tho. Lloyd. Holograph. I p. Endorsed. Reed. 3 June, '93, from 
Colonel Fletcher. [Board of Trade. New York, 5. Xo. 9.] 

March 27. 219. Minutes of the Council of War in the West Indies. Order 
Barbados, for 120 to be paid for 12 asses, to carry ammunition ; for the sick 
men to be left behind and for seven shillings a week to be paid for 
their maintenance ; for Edmund Allen to take over the duties of 
Mr. Fotherby, disabled by sickness ; for the sealing up of all un- 
expended treasure for the expedition in a box ; and for the taking 
up of money on such terms as can be obtained. On Mr. Fotherby 's 
refusal to sign bills of exchange, as ordered, it was resolved that 
he be committed to a ketch as a close prisoner, in custody of a 
Serjeant and two files of musketeers. [Col. Entry 13k., Vol. XII., 
pp. 329-333.] 



March 27. 220. Journal of House of Burgesses of Virginia. Committee 
of the whole house on the book of claims. The allowances to 
officers of the house were settled. Colonel Henry Whiteing's 
commission as Treasurer examined, and a bill to appoint a 
Treasurer ordered. 

March 28. Resolution for exempting liquors imported for the Governor's use 
from duty sent to Council. Bill to appoint Henry Whiteing 
Treasurer read twice and committed. 

March 29. Bill to appoint the Treasurer read a third time and sent up to 
Council. 

8000 E 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1698. 

March 80. John White appointed a door-keeper. The bills for defence, for 
suspending the Ports Act and for marking Indian hogs, returned by 
the Council. The question of a bill to define qualifications of jurors 
deferred to next session. The three bills sent down by the Council 
agreed to as received from them ; also the bills to encourage erec- 
tion of fulling mills and to ascertain the price of coasting cockets. 
Bill to continue the Rangers read a first time. 

March 81. Thanks voted to Mr. William Cole for his care in distribution of 
the sum allowed for the Colony's affairs in London. Bill to continue 
the Rangers read a second and third time and passed. The resolu- 
tion as to exempting the Governor's liquors from duty was returned 
from Council not agreed to. A conference requested with the 
Council as to its amendments to the bill for settling lands south of 
James River. Bills for advancement of coins and for appointment 
of a Treasurer returned from Council not agreed to, and a con- 
ference with the Council desired as to them and also as to the 
Post Office bill. Conferrers appointed. The Council's amendments 
to the bills for suspending the Ports Act and to ascertain the price of 
cockets agreed to. 

April 1. The Conference reported that the Council adhered to their 
amendments to the bill for settlement of lands, and could not agree 
to the bills for appointing a Treasurer and for advancement of coins. 
The amendments to the Post Office bill were settled by compromise. 
The Rangers bill received from Council and agreed to ; the book of 
claims also received and one amendment not agreed to. Bill for 
raising a public levy read the first time. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXXXV., pp. 986-996.] 

March 27. 221. Minutes of General Assembly of Virginia. Bills to fix the 
price of cockets, to alter the first day of the General Court and for a 
Post Office read a first time. Other bills deferred till to-morrow. 
The book of public claims received from the burgesses. 

March 28. Bill for marking Indians' hogs agreed to ; bill for advancement of 
coins rejected. Other bills deferred for further consideration. 
Resolution to exempt the Governor's liquors from duty received. 

March 29. Bill to suspend the Ports Act (with amendments), bill for defence 
(with amendments), bill for marking hogs (without amendments) 
returned to the Burgesses, also the bill as to coasting cockets, with 
amendments. Bill for a Treasurer read a first time. 

March 30. Bill as to fulling-mills returned to the Burgesses agreed to. Bill 
for a Post Office amended. Bills for settlement of lands, and to 
alter the first day for General Courts not agreed to. 

March 31. The bills rejected by Council were returned to the Burgesses. 
Post Office Bill returned \\ith amendments. Resolution as to 
exemption of the Governor's liquors from duty not agreed to. 
Message from the Burgesses as to the Council's amendments to 
certain of the bills ; and a conference agreed to. 

April 1. Reports of the Conferrerrs as to the various bills. The book of 
claims and the bill for Rangers returned to the Burgesses with 
amendments ; the former of which were not accepted but the latter 
agreed to. [Col Entnj Bk., Vol. LXXXV., pp. 915-932.] 

March 28. 222. Minutes of Council and Assembly of Montserrat. Order 
for the Commander-in-Chief to billet the men on duty for defence 



AMEPJCA AND WEST INDIES. 



(57 



1693. 



March 

st - 
, op 



of the Island, being one third of the entire force. [(W. Entry ]!!,-. 
TW. XLVIII., i>. 814.] 

28. 223. Certificate of the Lieutenant -Governor that Captain 

William Mead was a member of Council of St. Christophers, that 
eih. | ie commam { ec j a company of foot when the French took the Islam' 1 , 

and that he acquitted himself well in both stations. Hir/ncd. 

Tho. Hill. I p. Endorsed. Eec. 2 Nov., '98. [Board of Trade. 

Leeward Islands, 4. J\'o. 11.] 

March 29. 224. Captain Fairfax, E.N., to the Admiralty. The severe 
Boston. usage with which Captain Short has met from the Governor obliges 
me, as a brother officer, to write on his behalf. Captain Short in 
the fall of the year was from some private pique (as is supposed) 
ordered to lie up with H.M.S. Nonsuch at Pemaquid. I sounded 
the place with him, and found that it was impossible for him to 
winter there without certain ruin to the ship from touching the 
ground or the ice. This was the general opinion of the masters 
here and of his own officers, who were about to protest against it ; 
but the Governor on further consideration laid her up at Boston, 
and requested Captain Short to send thirty men in country sloops 
with stores to Pemaquid, which the men voluntarily did, rather 
than hazard a King's ship. Since then some friends of the 
Governor having occasion to man a merchantman for a short voyage- 
asked Captain Short to spare them some men while his ship was 
laid up, which he declined to do until they influenced the Governor 
to request him, saying that the voyage was short and would be a 
kindness to his men as well as to them, and promising never to 
thwart him with it. The ship sailed, and then the Governor 
ordered him to send four more men with the sloop Mary for 
Pemaquid, and 36 more for other service. Captain Short refused, 
for the men were unwilling and those that had already sailed were 
not yet returned. On this the Governor flew into a passion and 
gave him the lie, calling him lubber, rascal, etc. and laid him over 
the pate. Captain Short returned the blow with his left hand (his 
right hand being lame) but the Governor got him down and beat 
him most severely, breaking his head. He then went on board the 
ship and dispossessed him, putting the gunner in command and 
obliging the officers by threats to obey him. He then made out n 
mittimus and confined Captain Short to the common, nasty gaol, 
under such severe restraints, to my knowledge, as were more fit 
for the worst of villains than for a gentleman holding the King's 
Commission, barring him all help from friends or servants. Captain 
Short being much indisposed by ill lodging and the extreme cold, I 
waited, at his request, with two other gentlemen of considerable 
estates on the Governor, asking that he might be enlarged on their 
bail. The Governor refused, saying that Captain Short was lucky 
not to be laid in a dungeon in irons; and he also refused, though 
frequently requested by the most eminent gentlemen and merchants 
of the place, to give him some warmer lodging. I then went to the 
judge for a habeas eorpus, which he was inclined to grant, when the 
Governor suddenly removed him to Castle Island, about a league from 
the town, where he is again deprived of any opportunity of settling 
his business or preparing his defence. The Governor said that he 



68 COLONIAL PAPEKS. 

1693. 

should bo sent away in a day or two, which is now near two months 
since. I am well assured that Captain Short has behaved himself 
with great civility to Sir William Phips both during his passage and 
since then on shore, but has never met with other return than hard 
usage, though wanting not for large promises. I remember that 
when I first came to the country it was common report that Sir 
William Phips had threatened him with his cane. I have never 
seen Captain Short guilty of neglect of duty or breach of orders, 
though 1 am told that the Governor lays breach of orders to his 
charge. When we were lying at Pemaquid to cover the building of 
the fort the pilots gave us a written certificate that we could 
not safely stir from thence at that season of the year with less 
than nine days' provisions, and we had not so much left. Had 
we stayed we should have taken an unanswerable risk both of ships 
and men. This usage of the Governor has encouraged the people 
to uncivil behaviour, which cannot be excepted by the civillest 
deportment imaginable. Siyned. Robert Fairfax. Copy. '2% pp. 
Endorsed. Reed. July, 1693. From my Lord Falkland. 

Another copy of the above. Endorsed. Reed, at the Committee 
15 Jan., 1693-4. [Board of Trade. New England, 6. Nos. 42, 43.] 

[March.] 225. Captain Richard Short, R.N., to the Admiralty. I have 
given account of my proceedings until my last voyage to Pemaquid, 
where I lay with H.M.S. Conception until w r e had but five days' 
provisions left. On arriving at Boston we could get provisions only 
from hand to mouth, and in October I was ordered to Pemaquid 
again, though, on the risk being pointed out, I was allowed to lay 
up at Boston. I supplied thirty men for two sloops going with 
stores to Pemaquid, though I had lost my best bower anchor and 
great part of the cable on the former voyage, the Governor being 
then on board and so advising the pilot that he nearly lost the ship. 
Since then he has taken a grudge against me for asking for anchor 
and cable and for conveniences for sick men, and also for giving 
him an item of his generosity to me who took him and his retinue 
first to New England and then to eastward, giving up to them my 
cabin and finding them their table at great cost and charge, 
though I was then in danger of losing my right hand. 
For speaking about these things he has several times abused 
me and threatened to break my head, and on the 4th of 
January he knocked me down and as I lay broke my head, which is 
very generous of a gentleman, I being sick for many days before 
and lame in my right hand. Afterwards he sends me to prison 
among witches, villains, negroes and murderers, where I lay for 
seventeen days in an open cold room in the worst of weather, so 
sick that I was like to die. He would suffer none of my friends to 
come near me, though most people in the town railed against him 
for this inhumanity and though the merchants offered sufficient 
bail. Afterwards he moved me to Castle Island, where I now am. 
On the 4th January he appointed the Gunner, Thomas Dobbins, to 
be captain of the ship, over the head of the lieutenant, though an 
ancient man and an old lieutenant, whereas Dobbins can hardly 
write his name and has never been in any engagement. I am not 
the first of the King's Captains to be abused in New England, 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



1693. 



March 29. 



March 29. 

Portsmouth. 



Captain John Wybourn was set upon in the street and barbarously 
treated. Captain John George was falsely calumniated and 
imprisoned, so also was Captain George St. Lo, who hardly dared 
venture ashore without a guard, so likewise Captain Moule ; and Sir 
Robert Robinson can tell you how I was abused when I asked for 
an anchor and cable. Captain Fairfax too is daily threatened to 
have his head broken. I have made it my whole care to do my 
duty and observe all lawful orders, yet cannot be free from the fate 
that all other of the King's Commanders have suffered. \\ pp. 
Unsigned. Endorsed. Reed. 15 Jan., 1693-4. 



3|- pp. Endorsed. 
[Board of Trade. 



Reed, from my 
New England, 6. 



hanged. Certified copij. 2 pp. Endorsed. Reed. 
[Board of Trade. New York, 5. No. 10.] 



Copy of the foregoing, 
lord Falkland. July, 1693. 
Nns. 44, 45.] 

226. Minutes of a Court Martial held at Albany. Major 
Richard Ingoldsby was President. John Suddeck, private, of 
Major Ingoldsby 's Company, was charged with desertion. The 
defence was that the prisoner wished to get back to England to 
his wife, since he had been enlisted for three years only and had 
served for longer than that time. He was found guilty and 
sentenced to be 

26 Sept., 1693. 

227. James Blair to [Earl of Nottingham?]. Thinking the 
public peace of the Colony wherein my lot is cast to be endangered 
by Colonel Nicholson's temper T wrote to Mr. Blathwayt about it, 
who communicated the letter to you; and accordingly I find that 
Colonel Nicholson is stopped. I think this much better than to 
send him to Virginia, unless some care had been taken first to 
modify his mind by bettering his circumstances ; but I hasten to add 
that I know nothing worse against him than I have written, and 
that I do not believe he has any design of exciting any commotion. 
He has not written a line to Virginia but sends formal messages of 
service to his friends, desiring them not to write to him. This does 
not look like a man who would work against the Government. The 
only ground of my fear about him was that he was exceedingly 
angry that any one should be set over his head in Virginia, where 
he thought that his behaviour had earned him the government if it 
fell vacant, and especially Sir Edmund Andros, against whom he 
has a particular pique on account of some earlier dealings with him. 
In short I thought that if these two as Governor and Lieutenant- 
Governor would divide the Colony into two parties, and if Nicholson's 
party proved the bigger it could not be foreseen how far a mien so 
soured and discontented might go, even though he might wish to 
keep the people peaceable. I find him very apprehensive himself of 
the difficulty of his circumstances between the love of the people 
and the jealousy of the Government. I write thus minutely to shew 
that though Nicholson is discontented he is no enemy to the Govern- 
ment, and I doubt not that you are sufficiently sensible of his care 
and integrity while he held the Government of Virginia to think 
him worthy of a like post in another Colony or of a better salary if 
he be continued in his present office. I should be _ sorry if what T 
formerly wrote should givei a worse character of him than is true 



70 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 

and just, or should hinder encouragement or reward to one who 
deserves it as well as any Governor that ever was in America. 
Signed. James Blair. 3 pp. [America and West Indies. 638. 
No. 8.] 

March 30. 228. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. Agreed to 
recommend to the General Assembly the acceptance of Mr. Andrew 
Hamilton's proposed rates of postage, viz. letters from beyond sea, 
kL per packet, and if delivered at the parties' houses after forty 
eight hours' lying at the Post Office Id. in addition ; to or from 
Rhode Island to Boston, 6(7. per single letter ; to or from Connecticut 
(by the post-road) 9<7. ; to or from New York 12(7. ; to or from 
the Jersies or Pennsylvania 15(7. ; to or from Virginia and 
Maryland 24 d.; to or from Salem, 3d., and the towns eastward of 
Salem 4(7. ; to or from Piscataqua 6(7. All further letters to go free, 
and the post to pass all ferries free of charge. Report on 
John Usher's accounts to be confirmed. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXIV., pp. 226-228.] 

March 30. 229. Minutes of Council of New York. Letters to the Governor 
from the King and from Sir William Phips read, and an answer to the 
latter ordered. Audit of the accounts of Governor Sloughter as to 
s61,120 grant to him, returned. Copy to be furnished to Madam 
Sloughter if desired. Orders for payments. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 
LXXV.,p. 405.] 

March 30. 230. Order of the King in Council. Referring the petition of 
Lord Mayor, Sir John Fleet, and others to Lords of the Treasury 
for report. Signed. Wm. Bridgeman. Below, Minute of the 
Secretary to the Treasury, 3 April, 1693. Referring the same to 
the Commissioners of Customs. Signed. Hen. Guy. Enclosed, 
230. i. Petition of Sir John Fleet and others to the King. For 
payment of the hire of the ship Joseph, which was im- 
pressed by Lord Inchiquin, and did good service against 
the French. Copy. ^ p. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. 
Nos. 8, 8 i.] 

231. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. That the 
King be moved to send a fifth-rate frigate to guard the coast of 
New York, and to order payment of the arrears due to the two 
New York Companies. {Board of Trade. New York, 48. p. 15.] 

April 1. 232. Minutes of Council of Nevis. Walter Symonds's Com- 
mission as President of the Island read. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. XLVIII., pp. 273, 274.] 

April 3. 233. Minutes of Council of Virginia. James Mings ordered to 
attend on the 20th with the papers as to the survey of Pamunkey 
Neck. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXIV., p. 799.] 

April 3. 234. Journal of House of Burgesses of Virginia. Additions 
were inserted in the book of claims. Message from the Council 
withdrawing their amendments to the book of claims and sending 
down the accounts of the impost on liquors. Bill for a public levy 
read twice more and passed and sent to Council. The roll of the 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 71 

1693. 

Acts was then sent up to the Council, and the house presently 
attended the Governor in obedience to his summons. [Col. Entry 
Bk., Vol. LXXXV., pp. 996-998.] 

April 3. 235. Minutes of General Assembly of Virginia. Bill for a public 
levy received and passed. The Governor assented to the following 
Acts (1) to suspend the Ports Act (2) for marking Indians' hogs 
(3) to encourage erection of fulling mills (4) to fix the price of 
coasting cockets (5) to encourage erection of a Post Office (6) to 
continue the Rangers (7) to raise a public levy. The Assembly 
was then dissolved. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXV., pp. 932-934.] 

April 3. 236. Minutes of Council of New York. William Pinhorne, 
Chidley Brooke and John Lawrence sworn judges of the Supreme 
Court. Order for audit of the accounts of four companies of 
fusiliers and other expenses claimed by Robert Livingstone. [Col. 
Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., p. 406.] 

April 3. 237. Governor Sir William Phips to Lords of Trade and Planta- 
Boston. tions. I have given a particular account to Mr. Blathwayt of my 
stopping a supposed witchcraft, which had proved fatal to many, 
had not a speedy end been put thereto, of my suspension of Captain 
Short, and of the condition of New Hampshire and Rhode Island. I 
have also sent home our laws, but I would ask you to take into con- 
sideration that I have no salary settled nor intended here. Letters 
as to the quota of men for New York have already been sent to the 
neighbouring Colonies. I have no account of French or Indians 
advancing on Albany, except what comes by uncertain reports. I 
have caused the inhabitants of Port Royal to renew their oath of 
allegiance, and about three weeks since sent them a supply of pro- 
visions to encourage their loyalty. There were two French men-of- 
war on the coast in October, but I hear from Port Royal that they 
have gone to France. Fort Pemaquid is finished, and I under- 
stand from some redeemed captains that it is a great check on the 
Indians, and that my destruction of their corn last year put them in 
a miserable condition for the winter. I design immediately to 
settle two more forts to eastward. The Indians begin to appear on 
our frontiers in small parties, but I have sent two or three hundred 
men to drive them away. As soon as I receive your directions I 
shall make some proposals as to providing naval stores and other 
things of the kind. If such produce be encouraged there may well 
be enough supplied for the Royal Navy, and I shall study that it 
may be done at cheaper than the ordinary rates. I have informed 
the Admiralty that I can do the duty of H.M.S. Conception 
in defending the province at half the expense, for I have 
built a yacht of J.50 tons for that special purpose, which 
quite answers my expectations. She has eighteen guns and 
six patararoes, and can follow French privateers where ships of 
greater burden cannot. I beg that, if possible, she may be kept on 
their Majesty's pay as a sixth-rate for six months in the year, and 
be employed by me in the winter. H.M.S. Conception may 
then be moved to another station, where she can do better service. 
I have dissolved the General Assembly and ordered the Secretary 
to send you the Minutes. I have erected Naval Offices in Boston 



72 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 



[April 3.] 



April 4. 

H.M.S. 

Nonsuch, 
Boston. 



April 4. 

Boston. 



April 4. 

Plymouth. 



April 4. 



April 4. 



April 4. 



and other convenient places for enforcement of the Acts of Trade 
and Navigation. The people, except a few disaffected subjects who 
were active in the late revolution, are well satisfied with the gov- 
ernment ; and if another attack in Canada be ordered, their zeal 
and loyalty will sufficiently appear. Signed. William Phips. 
% pp. [Board of Trade. New England, 6. jVo. 46 ; and Col. Entry 
Bk., Vol. LXII., pp. 423-426.] 

238. Petition of Governor Sir William Phips to the King. 
That a salary may be appointed for him and the royal commands 
respecting the same signified to the Assembly of Massachusetts. 
Signed. William Phips. 1p. [Board of Trade. New England, 6. 
No. 47.] 

239. Lieutenant Hore, R.N., to Mr. Sotherne. Owing to a 
quarrel on the 4th of January, Sir William Phips dispossessed 
Captain Short of the command of this ship and put the gunner 
in command, ordering myself and all the officers to obey him, though 
my instructions appoint me, as lieutenant, to take command in such 
an event. I have served the Crown for thirty years, in several 
engagements, and as a lieutenant since 1678, nor have I ever heard 
of any complaint against me. As for the gunner I never heard of 
his serving in any ship before the Nonsuch. Pray procure me 
redress of this injustice. Signed. Abraham Hore. 1 p. Endorsed. 
Reed. 15 Jan. 1693-4, at the Committee. [Board of Trade. New 
England, 6. No. 48.] 

240. Governor Sir William Phips to Lords of the Admiralty. 
Reporting that he has built a yacht which will more efficiently do 
the work of H.M.S. Conception, and begging that she may be taken 
unto the King's service for six months, and the Conception employed 
elsewhere. Signed. William Phips. 1 p. Endorsed. Reed. 
15 Jan. 1693-4.' [Board of Trade. New England, 6. A T o. 49.] 

241. Formal protest of William Lovell and Philip and Robert 
Willcocks of Plymouth, merchants, against the seizure of the ship 
Fortune, in Virginia. 2 pp. Endorsed. Reed. 1 May, 1693. 
[America and West Indies. 638. No. 9.] 

242. Petition of Sarah Brookhaven and others to Lords of 
Trade and Plantations. That their rights to certain lands in 
Barbados may not be impeached or prejudiced by certain proceed- 
ings on the part of John Kirton, who is endeavouring to procure an 
Act upsetting former settlement of the same under colour of the 
authority of the Council and Assembly. 1 p. Endorsed. Presented 
4 April, 93. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. No. 10.] 

243. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. A paper of 
proposals for the charter of Sir Matthew Dudley's Company was 
read, and the Attorney General's report thereon being heard, it was 
ordered that a copy of the report be delivered to the petitioners. 
[Board of Trade. New England, 35. Pp. 20, 21.] 

244. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Orders given 
for the preparation of commissions and instructions for Governors 
Russell and Kendall. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



101)3. 



April 5. 



April 5. 

Weathers- 
field, 
Connecticut. 



April 5. 
April 6. 



April 6. 
Boston. 



The proposals of Sir Matthew Dudley's Company considered, and 
order given thereon. 

Petition of Sarah Brookhaven read. Mr. Brookhaven to have 
notice when the Act, of which she complains, comes before the 
Committee. 

Agreed that there is no need for any further embargo. Ordered 
that Governor Russell have a copy of Governor Kendall's instruc- 
tions, and Governor Kendall's agent of Governor Beeston's 
instructions. [Board of Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 174-178.] 

245. Ger shorn Bulkeley to Governor Fletcher. I think it my 
duty to report to you what has lately happened here in Connecticut 
contrary to the peace of the people, in contempt of Their Majesties' 
Government, and to the extirpation of liberty and property. As 
we rarely have ships passing from hence to England, I beg you to 
forward it to Their Majesties by first conveyance, unless their orders 
for a settlement should render this unnecessary. Signed. Gershom 
Bulkeley. Annexed, 

Address of Gershom Bulkeley to the King and Queen. On the 
8th of March last five persons were imprisoned, without precept or 
mittimus, but by the simple mandate of Peter Blin and John Francis, 
constables, for refusing to pay their country rates. Next day the 
prisoners sued out a habeas corpus, but the General Court had 
authorised constables to levy on the estates of those who refused to 
pay rates, or in default of estate (which is not the case with these 
five persons) to put them in gaol. The prisoners then complained 
to me as a justice of the peace, and I issued a warrant for their 
release on their finding sureties to appear and answer any charge, 
taking particular pains to convince the gaoler of its legality. The 
gaoler however shewed it to his masters who issued a contrary 
warrant. One of the prisoners now bought his release, but the 
rest were very ill treated, being shut up in a noisome place with 
felons and murderers until the 24th March, when they W 7 ere delivered 
on composition with the gaoler. Then the Governor and Council 
summoned me before them, and on my non-attendance sent a 
capias that I might be taken by force, but the marshal despite 
some threats left me alone. So the matter rests at present ; but 
this suffices to show the resistance of this arbitrary government to 
your royal authority, tiifjiicd. Gershom Bulkeley. The whole, 
lpp. Endorsed. Reed.' 4 Oct., 1693. [Board of Trade. New 
York, 5. No. 11.] 

246. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. A full Council to be 
called for the 12th, for the settlement of Mr. John Usher's accounts. 

Instrument to secure interest and security to the Councillors who 
have advanced money to the public, signed. Elisha Hutchinson 
and John Walley appointed to manage the sources of revenue thus 
guaranteed. Bartholomew Gidney, Elisha Hutchinson and John 
Walley to be the Committee for managing the war. Order for 
payment of sums due for military service and for salaries of officers. 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV., pp. 228-230.] 

247. Governor Sir William Phips, to the Earl of Nottingham. 
I have in another letter given my reasons for suspending Captain 



74 COLONIAL PAPEES. 

1693. 

Richard Short, hut these are but a small part of what I might say 
were I actuated by so much malice as he and his advisers. I put 
him on hoard a ship, Jeremiah Toy, master, and he should long 
ago have reached London, but that Toy has lingered so long on the 
coast to pick up deserters from the Nonsuch, using every endeavour 
to get them and giving me much trouble to prevent him. I have 
been thwarted also by others who should have done better service. 
Several men have deserted the Nonsuch to go in Toy's ship, and, 
that they might be secure, Mr. John Usher has protected them in 
New Hampshire. I sent letters to demand them and to the purser of 
the Nonsuch to seize them, but they were rescued out of his hands 
by Mr. Usher, and that they might be the better protected he 
obtained an order for their protection from the Council, on the 
ground that they had been discharged by Captain Short, though 
such discharge, being subsequent to his suspension, was invalid. 
The owner of the ship, Mr. Nathaniel Bye, a Boston merchant, also 
furnished the deserters with money and horses to proceed to 
Piscataqua. He then gave the ship orders to go round to Piscataqua 
and make a signal for the men to be sent ashore. The ship put in 
at Cape Ann, but Mr. Usher bade her come on to Piscataqua, Cape 
Ann being in this Government. I know this to be true by letters 
found on Mr. Usher's messenger. I also arrested the master, for 
thus weakening the King's ships, but the owners sent another 
master on board who took the ship to Piscataqua to take in the 
deserters. I sent the purser of the Nonsuch to demand them again, 
but he was at once seized under a warrant of Mr. Hincks, the 
president (during the absence of Mr. Usher at Boston) and 
kept a prisoner for several days until the ship sailed. The 
purser sent a sloop after her (for she had not dared to 
pass the fort) which brought her in again. The Governor 
gave me an account of this by land and I then went to 
Piscataqua myself to check these irregular proceedings. When 
I came into the river, Toy, Short and the deserters at once 
went on shore before I could come up with them, whereupon I went 
ashore myself and desired to speak with the President but was 
refused. I also required Toy to produce Captain Short, but he would 
not, being encouraged by the Government and by the owner, who 
was then at Piscataqua. I then took from Toy my warrant to 
transport Short to England and twice sent to the President for a 
warrant for his arrest as an absconded prisoner, but he refused to do 
so or to deliver him up, and then I was obliged to retire to Boston, 
leaving Short and the deserters under the protection of the Govern- 
ment. Before my departure I caused my Commission to be read in 
public, that they might obey the royal commands as to the militia, 
but the President refused to hear it. I then w r ent to the fort to view 
it and sent to the President to acquaint him of my intention, but 
he refused to answer and sent an order to the captain to deny me 
admittance, which he did by closing the gate and sending a corporal 
with a file of musketeers to warn me that by the President's order 
he would not admit me. Four gentlemen of our Council can vouch 
for the truth of this. Signed. William Phips. 2 pp. Endorsed. 
B. 24 May, '93. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



1(593. 



April G. 



April 6. 

Whitehall. 



April 6. 

Whitehall. 



April 6. 



April 7. 



Duplicate of the foregoing. [America and West Indies. 561. 
Nos. 34, 35 ; and (entered as addressed to William Blathtraut) Col. 
Entry Bk., Vol. LXII., pp. 430-435.] 

248. Governor Sir William Pbips to Lords of the Admiralty. 
Identical with the preceding. Endorsed. Reed. 15 Jan. 1693-4. 
[Board of Trade. New England, 6. Xo. 50.] 

249. Order of the Privy Council. Referring the petition oi 
Sir Matthew Dudley and others to Lords of Trade and Plantations 
for report. Signed. Win. Bridgeman. -J p. Annexed, 

249. i. Petition of Sir Matthew Dudley and others to the Queen. 

In 1688 and 1691 we prayed for a charter of incorporation 
to work minerals in New England, and on 7 July, 1692, a 
warrant for passing Letters Patent to us was actually 
ordered, hut was delayed owing to another petition, 
submitted in ignorance by others of our body. We beg 
that we may be incorporated according to two Orders in 
Council already passed in March and July, 1692. 1 p. 
[Board of Trade. New England, 6. Xos. 51, 51 i. ; and- 35. 
pp. 21-24.] 

250. Order of the Privy Council. Referring two addresses from 
New Hampshire to Lords of Trade and Plantations for report. 
Sif/ned. Wm. Bridgeman. \ p. Annc.rcd, 

250. i. Addresses of the General Assembly of New Hampshire to 

the King and Queen. We thank you for the supply of 
guns and ammunition, and beg to lay before you our 
deplorable state owing to the present war. Without the 
help of Massachusetts we could not defend ourselves, and 
we are not able to support a distinct Government. We 
beg therefore to be annexed to Massachusetts. Signed. 
Richard Martin, Speaker. Cop//. 1 p. 

250. n. Address of certain inhabitants of New Hampshire to the 
King and Queen. To the same effect as No. i. 232 
signatures. Copy. 2 pp. The ichole endorsed. Reed. 
Sept. 14, 1695. [Board of Trade. New Hampshire, 1. 
Nos. 22, 22, i., n. ; and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXVII., 
pp. 214-219.] 

251. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. In consequence of a 
landing of French privateers at Port Antony, ordered that a sloop 
be forthwith pressed and manned. Order for there to be one 
Commission of the Peace for the four parishes on the north side of 
the Island. The members of Council signed the test. Peter 
Beckford, Francis Blackmore, Charles Knight, and Thomas Sutton 
sworn justices for the whole Island. [Board oj Trade. Jamaica, 77. 
p. 246.] 

252. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Governor Philip Ludwell. 
Repealing all laws relating to the Courts of Judicature or in 
alteration of the forms of proceedings from those observed under 
the government of Joseph Moreton and James Colleton. All 
bills relating to such matters and to matters of election to the 
Assemblies shall remain unpublished and not become law until 



76 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

confirmad by the Proprietors. Signed. Craven, Ashley, John 
Archdale for Thomas Archdale, Tho. Amy, P. Colleton. [Col. 
Entry Ilk., Vol. XXII., p. 220.] 

April 7. 253. Warrant of Lords Proprietors of Carolina. Repealing an 
Act to provide indifferent jurymen. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXII., 

p. 221.] 

April 7. 254. Minutes of Council of New York. Resolved to admit a 
pirate ship that had surrendered, to the benefit of the Act con- 
cerning pirates. The Governor produced his patent for the 
Government of Pennsylvania and Newcastle, whither William 
Nicolls and Chidley Brooke offered to accompany him forthwith. 

April 8. Committees appointed to report as to the capacity of the 
province to supply flax, hemp and naval stores, and to consider 
what may be done for supply of the Commissaries of Sir F. Wheler's 
expedition. Resolved to prosecute the lands of sundry people who 
have left Staten Island to escape payment of taxes and to issue a 
proclamation requiring them to return. 6 granted to a soldier 
wounded in the late expedition. Patent for land granted to John 
Stillwell. Warner Wessells and Antie Christiani authorised to 
collect charity to pay their ransom to the Bailee Rovers. Sundry 
orders as to Robert Livingstone's accounts. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXXV., pp. 406-408.] 

April 10. 255. Minutes of Council of New York. Order for payment of 
=200 for the Governor's expenses in his journey to Pennsylvania ; 
and for other smaller payments. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., 
p. 408.] 

April 10. 256. Warrant of Lords Proprietors of Carolina. Disallowing 
an Act of 1692 to regulate elections of Members of Assembly. 
Sif/ned. Craven, Ashley, P. Colleton, Tho. Amy. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. XXII., p. 224.] 

April 10. 257. Warrant of Lords Proprietors of Carolina. Authorising 
Philip Ludwell to commission a Chief Judge and four justices for trial 
of cases in any county which has a sufficient number of freeholders, 
and to remove them at pleasure. Signed as the prccedinq. [Col. 
Entry Bk., Vol. XXII., p. 226.] 

April 11. 258. Lieutenant-Governor Usher to Lords of Trade and Planta- 
Boston. tions. I came to Boston, understanding that ships were sailing to 
England. Though I have repeatedly written to Sir William Phips 
for men to garrison the fort and defend the country, I have been 
unable to obtain any. He accommodated Mr. Moody, Vaughan, 
and Walderne with twenty-four men. I am sorry that one holding 
the King's Commission as Commander-in-chief should be judged 
unworthy by Sir William Phips to command and post his soldiers. 
To my own mind, the placing of men at Major Vaughan's disposal 
is only for an inlet to seize the Government, and thereby to usurp 
powers contrary to the King's Commission ; and the following are 
my reasons. Sir William Phips, in his letter of 14 March (of 
which copy is enclosed), gave orders to the militia at the Bank to seize 
some persons whom he pretended to be deserters. I did not know 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 77 

1G93. 

before that he could pretend to command the militia or could 
order militia-officers to meddle in civil affairs. As to Sir William's 
regard for his duty to their Majesties, his actions in time will show; 
but for a private subject to use the King's name and command a 
Government at their peril to obey, is a thing beyond my reach. It 
looks as if he had taken upon him the powers vested in your Lord- 
ships. Major Vaughan is the officer to whom he gave this order, 
and Vaughan is the man who must command the twenty-four men, 
I presume, to enforce Sir William's orders. As to the pretended 
deserters, they were all called before the Council, who judged their 
clearings to be correct and themselves to deserve protection. Their 
mind is expressed in their answer to Sir William's letter. After I 
had been some time at Boston, Sir William goes away privately to 
New Hampshire, without acquainting his Council or myself so that 
I might have given him satisfaction. Had I acted in his 
Government as he has in mine, I should expect to be 
called upon by you to answer for my conduct. On the 28th 
of March, with his flag of Vice-Admiral flying (though outside 
his jurisdiction of Vice-admiralty) he boards a ship in har- 
bour, breaks open a cabin-door, and carries off a trunk and 
chest with him to Boston, never applying to anyone in authority for 
a warrant. How far this conduct conflicts with the law, I leave you 
to judge. He then issues a warrant for the arrest of certain 
subjects, declaring himself to be in his government and to hold a 
commission of vice-admiralty for the place. The President 
thereupon summoned the Council, who recorded their opinions on 
this matter. Now for a Government to have two heads is unnatural, 
and those of the Council who are legal subjects are so uneasy that 
they have asked for dismission, which I cannot grant. No Governor 
is safe if another Governor can enter his Government and issue 
warrants without special authority from the King. Sir William has 
not taken care of the King's subjects as he pretends. Before my 
arrival he took the people out of the frontier-towns, leaving none in 
their room, but visited not the garrisons, nor the lakes, nor took care 
for the King's fort. This is his care for matters relating to militia. 
He acts without his Council's advice, and such things are done that 
I judge you will hear by next ships that New Hampshire and 
Massachusetts are at civil war. If it be for the King's service to 
have the overthrow of Kingly Government carried on in his name, 
I leave to your consideration. It is no ways delightful to me to be 
always writing grievances, but I hope that these may be redressed. 
Unless the King appoint another Governor nothing but ruin and 
misery is likely to befall the province. I beg for your order 
also for payment to me of the balance shewn by my accounts to be 
due to me. Signed. John Usher. Holograph. '2pp. Endorsed. 
Reed. 24 May. ' Read 12 June '93. Annexed, 
258. i. Copy of Sir William Phips's letter to Lieutenant-Governor 

Usher. 14 March, 1693 (ace \o. 192). p. Endorsed. 

Reed. 16 June, '93. 
258. n. Copy of the reply of the Council of New Hampshire to 

Sir William Phips. 18 March, 1693 (see No. 197). 

Endorsed. Reed. 16 June, '93. 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

258. in. Minutes of Council of New Hampshire. 10 March, 
1693. Giving the decision of the Council to protect the 
men claimed by Sir William Phips, and copies of the 
discharge of two of them. 1 p. Endorsed an the 
preceding. 

258. iv. Thomas Davis to Lieutenant-Governor Usher. Great 
Island. 30 March, 1693. On Tuesday last Sir William 
Phips entered this river with about twelve hands, and at 
once boarded Captain Toy's ship. He then sent ashore to 
ask Mr. Hindis and Captain Toy to come aboard. Hincks 
sent word that he was to be found at home if Sir 
"William had anything to say to him. Sir William after 
trying to obtain the key of the cabin without success, went 
ashore with all his company for the night. Next morning 
he asked Mr. Hincks to call a Council to have his com- 
mission read, which Mr. Hincks agreed to do, and to give 
him notice of the meeting. At noon Sir William boards 
Toy's ship, breaks open the cabin and carries Captain 
Short's trunks and chest ashore. He also asked Toy for 
the packets that he had delivered to him and to see the 
warrant that he had given him to carry Captain Short. 
Toy declined to part with it but allowed Sir William to 
see it, whereupon Sir William tore off his name and seal. 
Toy took them up, but was obliged by threats to give them 
up, and Captain Byfield coming in took away the warrant. 
Sir William then issued a new warrant directing Toy to 
give Short up to him, but Toy declined, as he had given 
Short a copy of the original warrant, and also doubted 
Sir William's authority in another Government. To-day 
the Council met and gave Sir William notice, but he never 
came, and after waiting three hours the Council rose. 
Just as we were leaving, Jackson came up to demand Short 
or a warrant to search for him, but Mr. Hincks told him 
that he was too late. Toy petitioned the Council as to the 
breaking into his ship, etc., but was referred to his legal 
remedy. It was moved in Council whether Sir William 
Phips should not be called to account for claiming 
jurisdiction out of his Government, but as no harm had 
been done, it was decided not to do so. 2 pp. Endorsed. 
llecd. 24 May, '93. 

258. v. Another copy of the preceding. Endorsed. P^ecd. 15 
June, '93. 

258. vi. Copy of Jeremiah Toy's petition for redress for his treatment 
by Sir William Phips. 1 p. Endorsed. Ptecd. 16 June, '93. 

258. vii. Thomas Davis to Lieutenant-Governor Usher. Great 
Island, 31 March, 1693. The sloop not being gone, I 
must inform you that about 10 o'clock this morning Sir 
William came from the bank in his pinnace with a trum- 
pet sounding and landed at West's. The sloop at once 
went out, as also did the pinnace, and Sir William Phips 
sent word to Mr. Hincks that he had a mind to see the 
fort. Mr. Hincks answered that unless Sir William paid 
him the due respect of a visit he would neither come to him 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 79 

1698. 

nor admit him to the fort. Sir William sent to demand 
Captain Short, but was told that he must now wait till the 
Council met again. Sir William then went to the new 
ship hoping to see Mr. Hincks, but Air. Hindis stayed 
within. He then went to the fort, but was stopped by a 
guard by Captain Walton's order. Sir William departed 
saying that Captain Walton should not long be Captain of 
the fort, and sailed away. 1 p. Endorsed. Reed. 24 
May, '93. 

258. vui. A copy of the preceding. \_Koard of Trade. New 
Hampshire, 1. Nos. 23, 23 i.-vin. ; and (icitltoiit en- 
closures') Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXVIL, }>}>. 222-224.] 

April 10. 259. Governor Kendall to Earl of Nottingham. Since the 
Barbados, fleet's arrival the time has been wholly spent in preparations for 
the expedition, and to such good purpose that on the 30th March 
the whole fleet and forces sailed in good order for Martinique. 
This dispatch is due chiefly to the diligence of Sir E. Wheler, who 
himself acted all parts from the Admiral to the purser, and 
particularly that of Commissary-General of Provisions, the 
person who came here in that post having by his sickness here and 
his foolish and indiscreet behaviour been very uneasy to us all. 
Under such conduct and in conjunction with Colonel Foulke, 
a gentleman with all the qualities requisite for his command, we 
have every encouragement to expect success, nor can it be doubted 
that Guadeloupe and Martinique will be utterly destroyed. If 
after that the commanders perform the further secret commands 
of the King and within the time limited, they will have a very large 
portion of the King's victorious spirit, and their exploits will 
deserve as great encomiums as Roman historians have given to 
Caesar's. These gentlemen having shewn me their orders to return 
to Europe towards the end of the year, I must tell you that, in my 
opinion, to perfect the ruin of the enemy and secure peace and com- 
merce of the English here, it is absolutely necessary to keep a large 
squadron of ships in these parts while the war lasts, and especially 
in October next to intercept the reliefs sent by the French King to 
the miserable remainders of his subjects in these Islands. For 
after much talk with Sir F. Wheler and Colonel Foulke as to the 
disposal of prisoners, we could come to no conclusion but that they 
must be left there, we having neither ships nor provisions for their 
transportation. If therefore five good sailing frigates be ordered to 
be here at the beginning of that month, they, joined with the ships 
on the station, would probably destroy the French successes. The 
rest of the squadron might convoy the fleet hither. It is Sir F. 
Wheler 's opinion, and I agree with him, that the relieving of the 
West Indian squadron every year will preserve the King's ships, 
and save the lives of many of the seamen. The resolutions of the 
Council of War, which I have sent to the Lords of the Committee. 
will shew that I have obeyed the King's orders as zealously as 
though I had been placed in command of the expedition myself. 
I enclose the muster-rolls of Foulke's, Goodwyn's, and of the 
recruits of Lloyd's. It was a work of much time and trouble, and 
done with much care and integrity by Mr. Mein, of the Council here. 



80 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1G93. 



April 10. 

Barbados. 



April 11. 



April 11. 

H.M.S. 

Nonsuch, 
Boston. 



April 11. 

Maryland. 



I beg that he may be recompensed. About forty soldiers and as 
many sailors are sick here, but I hope that most of them will 
recover, when they shall be sent after the fleet. Signed. 
J.Kendall. Holograph. 2; 1 , pp. [America and West Indies. 456. 
No. 49.] 

260. Governor Kendall to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 
This letter is identical with that to Lord Nottingham of same date. 



Abstract read, 18 Sept., '93. 
No. 11 ; and Cvl. Entry 7> ) /;., 



Endorsed. Reed. 5 July, 1693. 
[Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. 
Vol. VIIL,pp. 365-368.] 

261. Minutes of Council of Barbados. Order for rebates of 
duty and for payments. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XII., pp. 402, 403.] 

262. Thomas Dobbins to Lords of the Admiralty. Since his 
suspension Captain Short has done all he can to obstruct the King's 
service by trying to draw away and corrupt the men of this ship. 
Some he persuaded that they would receive no pay, and to others he 
granted their discharge. He thus drew away four men to 
Piscataqua, where he himself was. The purser was sent up to 
Piscataqua to apprehend the deserters, but they were rescued by 
Lieutenant -Govern or Usher, who threatened him for what he had 
done and finally committed him to prison for three days, during 
which time his ship was seized and condemned. Sir William Phips 
then went thither in person, who set the purser at liberty, but was 
refused delivery of Captain Short and the deserters. This obstruc- 
tion to the King's service by these petty Governments is of very ill 
consequence. Signed. Thomas Dobbins. ly pp. Endorsed. 
Reed, at the Committee. 15 Jan., 1693-4. [Board of Trade. 
New England, 6. No. 52.] 

263. Governor and Council of Maryland to Lords of Trade and 
Plantations. We send duplicate of ours of 21 December, with 
complaints against Sir Thomas Laurence and Edward Randolph. 
We are sorry that we have continual occasion to repeat these 
complaints, but the insolencies of these men have grown to such a 
height as to strike at the root of all government. We have been 
obliged to confine and commit Sir Thomas on several charges, 
which have been proved to our satisfaction and will be proved to 
Their Majesties'. A copy of these charges and of depositions are 
enclosed, and will, we hope, be considered sufficient reason for 
confining him and dismissing him from the Council and from the 
office of Justice of a Provincial Court. We have prospect of further 
discovery of his base and treacherous confederacies with papists and 
disaffected persons. We are credibly informed that Sir Thomas has 
represented us in the blackest colours to you, but we are confident 
that we can clear ourselves from his malicious imputations, and beg 
you to suspend any censure of us until we have had an opportunity 
of vindicating ourselves. He has been very free and prodigal in 
abuse of the Government, as one of his letters (written under the 
assumed title of public notary), in vilification of the Council, can 
shew. We only name Mr. Randolph as a partner in his villanies, 
though we have a large charge against him when next we meet with 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 81 

1693. 

him. Signed. L. Copley, Nea. Blakiston, Nicholas Greenberry, 
David Browne, Thomas Tench, John Addison, John Courts, Tho. 
Brooke. 1% PP- Endorsed. Abstract read, 15 Sept., 1693. 
Annexed, 
263. i. Heads of a charge against Sir Thomas Laurence, Bart. 

(I) Disobedience to the Governor and Council's order, to 
provide seals for every county in the Province. ('2) 
Entering on his office of Secretary before giving security, 
though demanded of him, and extorting from the clerks 
unjust fees for their commissions. (3) Unjustly demand- 
ing of the clerks commissioned under the late Revolutionary 
Government to account to him for their fees from the date 
of his commission. (4) Protesting in Council against the 
Act and an order of Council concerning officers' fees. 
(5) Displacing county clerks and putting incapable men 
in their places, for mercenary ends. (6) Neglecting an 
order of Council to suspend one of his clerks for open 
contempt of Government. (7) Consorting with and 
countenancing none but papists and avowed enemies of 
Government. (8) Removing the records of the Province 
from his office to his own chamber for his own sinister 
ends, in defiance of the Council's order. (9) Embezzling 
certain of the said records. (10) Refusing to produce an 
agreement which he had made for farming the Secretary's 
place, contrary to law, in defiance of the Council's order. 

(II) Acting as Public Notary, without being commissioned 
or sworn, and (12) in that capacity accusing the Govern- 
ment, in his protest, of arbitrary and illegal action. 
(13) Suggesting and alleging false and scandalous 
reflections on the Government in the same protest. 
8 April, 1693. Certified copy. 3J pp. 

263. n. Deposition of Cleborne Lomax, Clerk of Charles County. 
As to Sir Thomas Laurence requiring of him a tenth part 
of his fees before he would continue him in his place. 
Sworn. 18 October, 1692. 1^ pp. 

263. in. Another copy of No. n. 

263. iv. Deposition of Henry Bonner, formerly Clerk of Anne 
Arundel County. That Sir Thomas Laurence offered 
him half fees to act as Deputy Clerk, and on his refusal 
dismissed him. Sworn 26 Oct. 1692. p. Endorsed. 
Reed. 18 May, 1693. 

263. v. Another copy of No. iv. Scrap. 

263. vi. Deposition of Philip Lynes. That he had heard that 
Edward Randolph had illegally discharged a ship's master 
from his board. Sworn. 24 October, 1692. Scrap. 

263. vii. Deposition of Henry Smith. To the same effect as 
No. vi. Scrap. 

263. YIII. Record of a Court of Oyer and Terminer held in Maryland, 
12 January, 1693, for trial of the ship Margaret for illegal 
trading. The ship was condemned, but appeal to the 
Governor in Council allowed. 8 pp. 

263. ix. Copy of a letter from Charles Carrell. Setting forth the 
hopelessness of appealing in the case of the ship Margaret, 

8000 i? 



82 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1G93. 

and announcing that he has a better proposal to make. 
15 January, 1693. ticrap. 

263. x. Protest of Sir Thomas Laurence, Secretary and Public 

Notary of Maryland, 2 March, 1693, against the illegality 
of the proceedings of the Court in the condemnation of the 
ship Margaret and of the Governor and Council ,in 
conspiring not to hear the appeal. Copy. 1 p. [Board 
of Trade. Maryland, 2. A T os. 101, 101i.-x.; and (covering 
letter and enclosure No. i. only] 8. pp. 114-119.] 

[April.] 264. A collection of papers sent out to the office of Plantations 
by Edward Randolph. 

26-1. i. Copy of Governor Copley's warrant for the arrest of 
Sir Thomas Laurence, and for depriving him of all his 
offices. Dated 27 March, 1693. 1 p. In Randolph's 
handwriting. Endorsed. Reed. 13 Dec. 1693. 

264. ii. Copy of Governor Copley's warrant for the arrest of 

Edward Randolph. Endorsed. Reed. 25 Sept. 1693. 
264. in. Another copy of No. II. Endorsed. Reed. 13 Dec. '93. 

Both copies are in Randolph's hand. 
264. iv. Attestations as to Randolph's accepting money to indemnify 

a ship's master for a bond legally forfeited. Copy. 

1^ pp. Endorsed. Reed, from Mr. Randolph. [Board 

of Trade. Maryland, 2. Nos. 102, i.-iv.] 

April 12. 265. Captain Fairfax, R.N., to Mr. Sotherne. I have not yet 
H.M.s. received the survey of this ship ; though the Governor on receiving 
' ^ e or ders of the Lords of the Treasury gave orders for her to be 
examined and repaired. The remainder of the letter is a repetition of 
letters previously written. Signed. Robt. Fairfax. 1 p. Endorsed. 
Reed. 15 Jan. 1693-4, at the Committee. [Board of Trade. New 
England, 6. No. 53.] 

April 12. 266. Letters patent of the Lord Proprietors of Carolina. Grant- 
ing a general amnesty and pardon for all offences against them and, 
the constitution, committed before the date of Philip Ludwell's 
Commission of 8 November, 1691, treason, piracy and arrears of 
rent excepted. Signed. Craven, Ashley, P. Colleton, Tho. Amy. 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXII., pp. 222-223.] 

April 12. 267. Warrant of the same, appointing Thomas Smith to be 
Sheriff and Chief Judge of Berkeley County. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 
XXII., p. 224.] 

April 12. 268. Declaration of the same. That they will take no advan- 
tage of any alien's estate that escheats to them, if he shall have 
grants for the same and have paid his rent, or have bought the 
same, but will allow it to go to the next of kin. Signed. Craven, 
Ashley, P. Colleton, Tho. Amy. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXII., 
pp. 225-226.] 

April 12. 269. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Governor Philip Ludwell. 

We have not received your letter as to the Bahamas, of which we 

have appointed Nicholas Trott to be Governor. We are concerned 

" to hear of the behaviour of the deputies towards you and of your 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 83 

1693. 

quarrel with them. We do not know of such quarrels in the King's 
plantations, for they would soon put a stop to the King's affairs or 
bring all to the arbitrary determination of the Governor. W T e do 
not see how the Government of Carolina can be carried on, if you 
put yourself out with all parties, and especially with our friends. 
We hope that you will reconcile yourself with those deputies who 
have been disrespectful to you, and we have by this conveyance 
censured them. We think that you will succeed in your effort to 
gain the people of both parties, if you avoid James Moreton's 
mistake. He was extremely in the good opinion of the people when 
he first assumed the Government ; whereupon the people at Goose 
Creek, seeing their power gone unless they could destroy 
that good opinion, offered to pass an Act for an excise on 
imported liquors for his benefit, and in order to pass it made him 
turn out many of our deputies and disoblige others. They then 
gave advice to their friends in Parliament to hinder the bill, and 
then cried out against the avarice of the Governor, who would 
enslave and ruin the people. Then having damaged his good name 
they contemned and opposed him. We now hear that the same 
trick is being tried on you, James More and others having given 
out that they were to present you with .1,000 by a gift of the 
Assembly, if you would pass an Act of Indemnity. We hope that 
it is not true, for such an Act is beyond your powers. W T e hear 
that you have denied writs of right to persons to sue those who have 
injured them. We would gladly see people forgive each other, 
but this conduct is contrary to your orders. We note that our greatest 
enemies admit our title to the land in Carolina. In that case we may 
grant it on our own terms, and w r e think it high time to take legal 
proceedings against those that refuse to pay their rent. We hear 
that Mr. James More offered to pay a year's rent down, and a third 
of his arrears annually until all are discharged. We do not wish to 
press him, so we would have you speak with him, and if he pays 
the year's rent and a third of his arrears you will accept the terms, 
but if he boggles or delays you will order Mr. Grimball to sue him, 
but Grimball must act by your orders only, for we know his indis- 
cretion. As this money will be for yourself we hope you will take 
pains in the matter. If More pays, we think you may proceed to sue 
others also. There need be no legal difficulties as to the validity of 
our Patent. Mr. Percival desired to take up land in excess of that 
allowed for imported servants, promising to pay rent or buy 
outright, but now we are told that he refuses to do either. If he will 
not yield on your speaking to him, you will pass the land to others. 
Jurors in the trials of such cases should be men who have paid 
their rents ; others we look upon as merely parties. The excuse of 
some, that they have not grants, must not be accepted, for they can 
obtain grants if they wish, though it may be not such as they would 
have. Some again say that the laws of England are not in force 
there, but our Patent answers this argument. Deputies who have 
suffered under Sothell's persecution and may be in want of money, 
may have their money due to us and received from them returned 
to them again for the present. As the Goose Creek men are 
resolved to oppose us, right or wrong, you will take care not to 
encourage or employ them. As to Sir Nathaniel Johnson's hopes 



84 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

from the Crown if the Government of Carolina were centred therein, 
it cannot be expected that one who gave up the Leeward Islands will 
receive another Government from the present King. You will 
keep a watchful eye on him. We do not believe in the deputies 
discouraging the payment of rents, for it is not to their interest. 
People who cut cedar from our land must be indicted and fined. 

You advise the lessening the number of Assemblymen for Colleton 
and Craven Counties, and adding them to Berkeley County, which 
has three-fourths of the people at present ; but those that govern a 
settling country must have an eye for the future. We hope to see 
both these counties with as many people as Berkeley County, and 
then how shall we reduce the elections to equality ? We hear that 
a committee is drawing up a system of government for the future, 
but of what use this can be we know not, since they have so dis- 
respectfully refused our excellent Constitutions. We shall part 
with none of our powers until the people are more orderly. As 
these men may throw the odium of rejecting such laws on you, we 
have reserved to ourselves the right of ratifying all Acts dealing 
with juries or elections before they can be executed. We wish you 
to pick out from the moderate party, honest, loyal, industrious men, 
and raise them by degrees, so as to qualify them for the first rank. 
We hear good accounts of Captain Simson, and desire that you 
will make him a justice of the peace, so that he may (unless you 
see reason to the contrary) rise higher. We note that you and the 
Assembly disagreed as to an Act of Pardon. We have put an end 
to all disputes on that matter by sending you a pardon of our own. 
If the Assembly that sat in October be still undissolved, you will 
call them together and propose to them such further measures for 
their safety as you think necessary, sending us a copy of the same 
for record against them. If they refuse to do anything, you will 
dissolve them and call no other Assembly till they are in better 
temper. We want no new laws, and if they will consent to none 
for their own security, the fault is not in us. We do not under- 
stand Mr. Grimball's behaviour about paying your salary, for his 
instructions have been reiterated rather than altered. But he has 
orders to remit the proceeds of land sold to us, for we judged that 
the rents and perquisites would suffice to pay your salary. We 
have sent you authority to appoint and remove judges, but it must 
not be used in respect of Thomas Smith, whom we have ourselves 
appointed Chief Judge. Tell Mr. Gibbs that no slight is intended 
to him ; but as he has been compelled to swear to the Juries Act, 
which we have disallowed, we thought it better to do as we have 
done. But you will keep this authority secret till you have occasion 
to use it. Mr. Grimball complains of restraints placed on him by 
you, that makes his place irksome to him. We would have you 
rather make it as easy as possible. Signed. Craven, Ashley, 
P. Colleton, Tho. Amy. [Co/. Entry 'Bk., Vol. XXII., pp. 227-231.] 

April 12. 270. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to the Deputies and Council 
of South Carolina. We have seen an Act to provide indifferent 
jurymen in all civil and criminal causes, the provisions of which 
we think unreasonable and dangerous, and likely to leave the most 
enormous crimes, especially piracy, unpunished. The sheriff by 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 85 

1693. 

this Act is to write the names of the persons in the County by 
twelves, two of which papers are to be drawn, and one of these 
again drawn, which last is to contain the jury for next court. It 
would be easy to insert the name of some notorious favourer of 
pirates in every list ; and we disallow the said Act. We have also 
seen an Act to regulate electing for the Assembly, which makes all 
persons worth .10 electors. We think that electors ought to be 
freeholders and as the Act does not even provide that electors should 
be resident, thus possibly giving every pirate a vote, we disallow 
this Act. We have however confirmed the Act to prevent swine 
running loose about Charlestown, being ready to confirm all useful 
Acts. W T e have sent you new instructions as to passing laws, and 
we hereby forbid you to ratify any laws that impair our powers. 
The French complain that they are threatened to have their estates 
taken from their children after their death, as they are aliens. We 
have sent a declaration to ease their minds herein. They complain 
also that they are obliged to begin their divine service at the same 
time as the English. They must not be molested herein, but be 
free to choose their own time. They have also been told that their 
marriages are not valid nor their children legitimate, because their 
ministers are not ordained by a bishop. This is opposed to the 
liberty of conscience that prevails in England, and which we have 
granted under our Patent. These things must be remedied and 
the French encouraged in every way. We would have a larger 
allowance made to Joshua Hobson, Mr. Grimball's deputy, who 
suffered from Mr. Sothell's usurped authority. The Juries Act sets 
apart the fines of jurymen for the Treasurer, to be disposed of by 
the General Assembly. We know of no precedent for this, and you 
will take care that no such clause is again passed. We have 
appointed Thomas Smith to be Sheriff of Berkeley County, but he 
will not therefore cease to be a deputy. Signed. Craven, Ashley, 
P. Colleton. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXII., ^..232-234.] 

April 12. 271. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Paul Grimball. We 
have given the Governor instructions to sue for recovery of our 
rents. You are too hard and too soft in the matter of our rents, so 
will act entirely under his orders. You ought to have accepted 
James More's offer as to payment of his rent and arrears. We send 
you the Act of Parliament for distraining for rents that you may 
know the law, for the laws of England, whatever people may object, 
are in force in Carolina. We have ordered the Governor to let the 
bonds and licences of taverns be issued from your office, and to 
make your post as easy as possible for you. You will study and 
observe our new instructions as to passing laws. Y^ou will pay the 
Governor's salary constantly out of any money of ours in your 
hands, excepting from the proceeds of sale of lands. People may 
pay their rents in the counties where they reside, if they wish. 
Signed. Craven, Ashley, P. Colleton. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXII., 
pp. 235-236.] 

April 12. 272. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Mons. Trouillard, and 
others, ministers in Carolina. The hardships imposed on you are 
against our will and desire, and contrary to our constitutions. 
What hand you had in rejecting those constitutions you best know, 



86 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

and we hope that you may not suffer for hearkening to men who 
misled you. However we have issued a declaration to ease you of 
your hardships. Had our constitutions being ratified in Parliament, 
you would have been on the same footing as Englishmen and in no 
need of our assistance. Do not be misled by our and your enemies. 
You will find the Proprietors your best friends. Kir/ned. Craven, 
Ashley, P. Colleton, Tho. Amy. [Col Entry Bk., Vol. XXII., 
p. 286.] 

April 12. 273. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. Isaac Addington 
appointed Registrar of the Court of Chancery. Mr. Usher's ac- 
counts were inspected, and he himself being present showed that it 
was false that there were 2,500 in the Treasury at the beginning 
of April, 1689. Order for payment of a bill of 512 drawn by Mr. 
Increase Mather for the service of the country. Commissions for 
the War-Committee approved. 

April 13. Order for erection of a fort at Saco River to annoy the enemy, 
and for 300 militia to be detached for the purpose. John Usher's 
accounts referred for further consideration. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 
LXIV., pp. 230-232.] 

April 13. 274. Minutes of Council of New York. Orders for sundry pay- 
ments to Robert Livingstone and of 650 for the general cost of 
the late expedition to Albany. 

April 14. It was reported that two of the bills sent by Maryland in pay- 
ment of her contribution of 100 towards defence of the frontier, 
had been protested and the third paid. The Governor represented 
the difficulty ahead, since Mr. Livingstone was considerably 
indebted for subsisting the fusiliers at the frontiers, and unless 
their debts were discharged he could get no more credit ; -besides 
which sums were w r anting to pay the troops that were to be 
discharged, and the former taxes were not yet paid. Resolved that 
the frontier is the first thing to be regarded and that all the money 
in hand be devoted to that object, also that Robert Livingstone be 
authorised to collect the arrears of taxes in the Island of Nassau for 
payment of the troops. The Governor, before taking his leave for 
Pennsylvania, urged upon the Council to see to the payment of the 
forces on the frontier and to the conciliation of the Indians. The 
Clerk of Council directed to attend the Governor. [Col. Entry Bk., 
LXXV., pp. 414-416.] 

April 15. 275. The King to Governor Sir William Phips. In the terms 
of Order in Council of 26 January, 1693, as to prosecutions for 
witchcraft. (See No. 33.) [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXII., 
pp. 418, 419.] 

April 15. 276. Minutes of the Council of War in the West Indies. 

H isr.s. Question put whether the forces land and destroy Fort St. Pierre 

CuTd" Sac' m " s ^ or P r ^ Ry a l- Resolved to land at St. Pierre and that the 

Martinique', fleet sail to-morrow night with that object. This entry is dated 

Z5th, evidently by error. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XII., p. 337.] 

April 18. 277. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Draft com- 
mission for Governor Kendall considered, and decision taken as to 
the Admiralty clauses. Governor Russell's draft commission also 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



87 



1693. 



April 18. 



April 13. 

Whitehall. 



April 19. 



April 20. 



April 20. 

Before 

St. Pierre, 

Martinique. 



read and, with a new clause as to martial law, approved. [Board 
of Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 179-180.] 

278. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. That the 
King's attention be called to two clauses, as to the power to erect 
Admiralty Courts, which are inserted in Governor Kendall's and 
Governor Russell's Commissions, but omitted from Sir William 
Beeston's, and to take his pleasure as to their passing the Great 
Seal. Copy. 1 p. [Board oj Trade. Jamaica, 7. No. 9 ; and 
53. p. 139.] 

279. Order of the Queen in Council. Referring the petition of 
William Lovell and others to Lords of Trade and Plantations for 
report. Signed. "Win. Bridgeman. \ p. Annexed, 

279. i. Petition of William Lovell and others to the King and 
Queen. Asking that certain goods wrongfully taken from 
their ship Fortune may be restored and the ship itself, 
which is under detention in Virginia, may be released. 
Copy. 1% pp. The whole endorsed. Reed. 1 May, 1693. 
[America and IVest Indies. 638. Nos. 10, 10 i. ; and 
(order only] Board of Trade. Virginia, 36. p. 234.] 

2SO. Minutes of Council of New York. On intelligence that 
the Indians threatened to attack the English to avenge the blood 
of Leisler, Frederick Phillips and Stephen Van Cortlandt were 
directed to send for the Sachems and examine the matter. 

Orders for sundry small payments. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., 
pp. 416,417.] 

281. Minutes of the Council of War in the West Indies. On 
the question whether St. Pierre should be closely besieged, or 
whether to retire with the forces on board ship and consider 
further, the President (Sir F. Wheler) moved that every member 
(26 in all) should give in his opinion in writing, which was done as 
follows: Colonel Goodie yn. lam for retiring ; the enemy appears 
to be in superior strength ; great part of our force is composed of 
Irish, whom we cannot trust ; in three days since our landing we 
have lost 800 killed, wounded and sick, and cannot produce above 
3,000 men, the suspected men included ; the roads are impassable ; 
if repulsed we cannot make good our retreat. Lieutenant Colonel 
Colt. I am for attack ; we have driven in one strong post with a 
small party and may risk somewhat. Major Abrahall. I am for 
burning and destroying all we can, but not for attacking the fort ; 
for we have 800 men dead or disabled and cannot trust the Irish. 
ColonelHolt. lam for withdrawal, owing to the enemy's strength and 
our own weakness. The Irish may have behaved well in St. Kitts, 
but they are always drinking health to King James. Lieutenant 
Colonel Lilling ston. I am for retiring. Our forces are weak ; we 
cannot hold the town if we take it, and retreat in case of mishap 
would be very hazardous. I think we should burn and destroy all 
that we can. Captain Lilly, Chief Engine e>\ The fort is unassailable 
without heavy guns, which we can only land under fire of the 
enemy's batteries, and then, owing to the steepness of the country, 
cannot move to a suitable position. Even if the fort be breached, 
an assault will be very hazardous, the enemy being as strong as we. 



88 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

Sir Francis Wheler. I am for opening trenches and mounting large 
ship's guns and mortars, the fleet meanwhile standing close in to 
batter the town. The rest of the officers are for withdrawal jor one 
or other of the reasons quoted. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XII., pp. 
338-352.] 

April 20. 282. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. Order for payment 
of 54: to Mr. Addington, and for the Treasurer to accept all deben- 
tures drawn on him by the War Committee. Order for prosecuting 
certain bonds and recognisances given in by John Usher, for 
which he has taken credit in his accounts. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXIV., pp. 232-233.] 

April 20. 283. Captain Short, R.N., to Mr. Sotherne. I have written you 
New an account of Sir William Phips's treatment of me. Here follows 

Hampshire. a rambling restatement, extremely ill-spelt, of the principal grounds of 
his complaint, as given in Ids letters of March 29 and April 24, 
Nos. 225, 293. ij pp. Endorsed. Reed, at the Committee. 
15 Jan. 1693-4. 

Duplicate of the foregoing, with same endorsement. [Board of 
Trade. New England, 6. Nos. 54, 55.] 

April 20. 284. Governor Sir William Phips to the Lieutenant- Governor 
Boston. and Council of New Hampshire. Myself and Council have become 
very sensible of the great expense incurred for defence of Their 
Majesties' subjects and interest. You have had a principal share 
in the advantage hereof but have contributed nothing towards 
defraying the charge, which has fallen wholly on Massachusetts. 
In 1689 your people petitioned us to receive them under our 
government and protection, promising submission and payment of 
a proportionable part of the expense, and on these conditions they 
were accepted and protected. You are therefore requested to choose 
one or more Commissioners to meet ours for the adjustment of the 
accounts of the war, to settle your proportion of the expense, and 
to agree on arrangements for the future. Certified copy. 1 p. 
Endorsed. Reed. 20 Dec. '92. [Board of Trade. New England, 6. 
No. 56.] 

April 20. 285. Petition of merchants and planters concerned in Jamaica 
to the Queen. Knowing Sir William Beeston's qualifications for the 
Government of Jamaica, we earnestly besought him to undertake it, 
he being wholly averse to it, as having settled here with his family, 
and living at ease with a comfortable estate. The fortifications 
being destroyed by the earthquake and no revenue being obtainable 
to repair them, it was prayed that his salary should be 1,000 a year 
only, even for which he must wait till there be peace or the Island 
be settled. We hear that a Commission is passing for another 
Governor of Jamaica, which will not only ruin our expectations 
from Sir William Beeston, but burden the Island with a further 
charge of 2,000 for the Governor's salary. We beg that Sir 
William may be continued in the Government, and that no one else 
be sent there till advice of the state of the Island be received. 22 
signatories. Copy. 1 pp. Endorsed. Reed. 20 April, 1693. 
Nothing. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. No. 10.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 89 

1693. 

April 20. 286. Commissioners of the Navy to Lords of the Treasury. 

Navy Office. Sir John Fleet and other merchants concerned have produced to us 
Lord Inchiquin's certificate as to the pressing and good service of 
the ship Joseph. The charge is 1,147, which, the treasury of 
Jamaica being empty, Lord Inchiquin begged the Admiralty to 
discharge. This is the petitioner's case ; what the Admiralty will 
say to it we do not know ; but according to our reckoning the 
charge for the ship should be 762. As no wages to seamen are 
mentioned in petitioner's account, we presume that they were paid 
by the Island, and we think that the rest of the account should be 
too. Signed. J. Russell, E. Dummer, Ch. Aberginy (?), D. Lyddell, 
J. Plett. 3 pp. Endorsed. My Lords recommend that enquiry 
be made whether this has not been paid in Jamaica. [Board oj 

Trade. Jamaica, 7. No. 11.] 
,> 

April 20. 287. Minutes of Council of Virginia. John Childs sworn 
messenger of the Council. On reading copy of a deposition from 
Maryland, a warrant for the arrest of William and Elizabeth 
Digges was ordered. 

April 21. On the application of the Governor of New York, it was resolved 
to send 600 as a contribution to the defence of that province. 

April 22. Colonel William Digges was examined as to his knowledge of a 
plot to restore King James to the throne, and was bound over, with 
his wife, in 1,000 to appear before the next General Court. [Col. 
Entry Bk., Vol. LXXX1V., pp. 800-803.] 

April 22. 288. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor gave his 
final instructions before leaving for Pennsylvania. Order for 
further audit of Governor Sloughter's accounts, the widow being 
btill unsatisfied. The farmer of the excise of New York City 
approved. The Governor thanked the Council for their readiness, 
during his absence, to advance money from their private coffers, for 
the public service. [Co/. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 417-418.] 

April 22. 289. Governor Fletcher to the Earl of Nottingham. I 
New York, received my Commission for the Government of Pennsylvania 
on the 6th. I am just starting for that province, but I find by 
some prints that there is a separate and dissenting party among 
them. I have sent some of their fiery books to Mr. Blathwayt. I 
send the Minutes of Council and Assembly accounts of revenue and 
taxes, list of civil and military offices, an address from for Con- 
necticut and other documents. We too frequently lose one ship in 
two sent hence for Europe. Since my coming one ship reckoned 
worth 10,000 was snapped up by the French, and we hear of two 
from England lost, one of them carrying my instructions. I am 
much concerned for the losses of others as well as for the want of 
light to myself. I shall report by first opportunity as to Penn- 
sylvania. Signed. Ben. Fletcher. 2 pp. HoloyrapJi. Endorsed. 
R. June 8, '93. Abstracted in Board of Trade. New York, 48. 
p. 46. Annexed, 

289. i. Report of a Committee of Council on the needful repairs for 
Fort William Henry. Estimated cost, 1,985. Signed, 
N. Bayard, S. v. Cortlandt. Dated 5 April, 1693. 



90 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

289. n. Eeport of Chidley Brooke as to trade and revenue. The 
produce of the revenue for the half-year ended 25 Decem- 
ber last is 1,883. No increase can be hoped for during 
the present war, nor can a revenue, settled for two years 
only, be much improved. List of shipping is enclosed. 
No way can be found to prevent the Jerseys from trading 
with the Indians to our prejudice, except by annexing 
them to this province. Pennsylvania and Connecticut by 
not enforcing the Navigation Acts deprive us of much of 
our trade. Signed. Chid. Brooke. 1 p. Endorsed. Reed. 

3 June, 1693.' 

289. in. Duplicate of the preceding. 

289. iv. List of the Council of New York, with a brief description 
against the name of each. Richard Townley and William 
Pinhorne have been suspended for non-residence. The 
chief assistance in the Council is given by the members 
belonging to New York City, who however are so much 
taken up by private business, that it is frequently difficult 
to make up a quorum. I suggest Abraham Depeyster and 
Charles Lodowyck to fill any vacancies. Signed. Ben. 
Fletcher. 1 p. 

289. v. List of salaried officials with their salaries, amounting in all 
to 1,738 ; of the city officers of New York and Albany; of 
the justices of the peace and of the Courts of the province. 

4 pp. Endorsed. Reed. 8 June, 1693. 

289. vi. Duplicate of the preceding. Endorsed. Reed. 8 Sept., 

1693. 
289. vii. State of the militia in New York Province. 

New York City. 8 companies of foot and one troop of 
horse, in all 477 men. Colonel Abraham Depeyster. 

Queen s County. 9 companies of foot, and one troop 
of horse, 580 men. Colonel Thomas Willett. 

Suffolk County. 9 companies of foot, 553 men. Colonel 
John Young. 

King's County. 6 companies of foot; one troop of 
horse. 319 men. Colonel S. van Cortlandt. 

Albany County. 5 companies of foot ; one troop of 
dragoons. 359 men. Major Peter Schuyler. 

Ulster and Duchess County. 4 companies of foot ; one 
troop of dragoons. 277 men. Lieutenant - Colonel 
Beeckman. 

West Chester County. 6 companies of foot. 283 men. 
Colonel Caleb Heathcote. 

Richmond County. Two companies of foot. 104 men. 
Captain Andrew Cannon. 

Total : 2 troops of horse, 2 troops of dragoons, 41 com- 
panies of foot. 2,932 men. Signed. Ben. Fletcher. 1 p. 
Endorsed. Reed. 8 June, 1693. 

289. vin. Report of the Council of New York on the accounts of 
Peter Delanoy. The general conclusion is that Delanoy 
is indebted 2,884 to the Crown. Signed. Ben. Fletcher, 
and by nine members of Council. Long sheet. Endorsed. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 91 

1693. 

Reed. 8 June, 1692. [Board of Trade. New York, 5. 
Nos. 12, 12 i.-vm.] 

April 22. 290. List of stores wanting in Fort William Henry, New York. 
10 cannon, 100 barrels of powder, 120 carbines with accoutrements 
for dragoons, and other smaller matters. Si</xed. Ben Fletcher. 
2 pp. Endorsed. Read 15 June and 27 Dec. 1693. [Board of 
Trade. New York, 5. No. 13.] 

April 22. 291. Governor Fletcher to Earl of Nottingham. I have ap- 
pointed Mr. Robert Wharton to be second lieutenant in my com- 
pany, in the room of Mr. George Bradshaw deceased. I beg for a 
commission for him dated 4 November, 1692. tiiyned. Ben 
Fletcher. Holograph. 1 p. [America and West Indies. 579. 
No. 33. 

April 22. 292. Abstracts of Governor Fletcher's letters to William 
Blathwayt of 14 February, 8 March and 22 April. The last named 
letter contained, apparently, nothing that had not been said in other 
letters. 1| pp. [Board of Trade. New York, 5. No. 14.] 

April 24. 293. Captain Richard Short, R.N., to the Admiralty. I have 
Piscataqua. t icl you of my ill usage by Sir William Phips, though for no breach 
of orders, as the accompanying affidavits will shew. He offered me 
language and affronts which I thought I ought not to take, holding 
the King's Commission. I am an old servant in the Navy, having 
entered it in 1678 as lieutenant ; and I hold good certificates from 
Sir Cloudesley Shovel and others. Sir William Phips would give 
no reason for promoting the gunner over the lieutenant, nor for 
- tyrannically sending others to prison. He thought to have wearied 
me out, and sent his emissaries daily to me in gaol to make me sub- 
mit to his base dealings, but I would not. He allowed no friend to 
come near me, no letters to be given to me, no evidence to be sworn 
for me. On the 1st of March he ordered me on board a merchant- 
ship, Jeremiah Toy, master, and gave him a warrant for my trans- 
portation to England, and on the 10th or llth we arrived at Pisca- 
taqua. About the 28th Sir William Phips arrived with about four- 
teen armed men and went into a dirty little ale-house under pretence 
of reading his commission. Five or six carpenters came to him, 
but no gentleman would go near him, he carried himself so dirty. 
On the 29th he asked Mr. Toy for the warrant he had given him, to 
observe the date, promising on his honour to return it, instead of 
which he tore off his name and seal and threw it on the ground. He 
then went on board Toy's ship, I being ashore not well, broke open 
my cabin, and carried off my chest with all my clothes, money, 
papers, certificates, affidavits, journals and other matters which he 
knew that I had kept to vindicate myself before the Lords of Trade 
and Plantations. A baser action was never done ; it is termed piracy 
or robbery. Some of the gentlemen of the country, wiser than 
Governor Phips, told him that he could prove no matter of fact 
against me. He answered that as he had begun, he would end it, if 
it cost him half his estate. The Governor is so full of malice that 
he knows not what lies to invent against me and other people in the 
country, especially the Church of England men, which go by the 



92 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

name of Jacobites. Sir William Phips has put in a commander 
who will condescend to his private interest and tends upon him like 
a boy. I understand that Sir William contrives to set some of my 
officers against me. I had writ home about some before the quarrel. 
Sir William Phips has ordered Mr. Toy not to carry me home, but 
as it is out of his Government he has no power here, and Captain 
Fairfax of H.M.S. Conception and my best friends here advise me 
to make the best of my way to England, which I shall do by the 
first ship that I can, to set forth the inhuman treatment of me be- 
fore the Lords of the Admiralty. I beg your pardon for writing so 
much, but my abuses have been great. I have had a lame hand 
almost all the voyage. A piece of steel which lodged in my hand 
nine months since has much tormented me, so that I thought I 
should never have the use of it. The Governor refused to admit 
my officers to me in prison, to set some things to rights. 1 p. 
Annexed, 
293. i. Copies of depositions of John Hams, mariner, and Joseph 

Short as to the assault made by Sir William Phips on 

Captain Short. 1J pp. 

Copy of the foregoing. Endorsed. Reed. July, 1693. 

[Board of Trade. New England, 6. NOB. 57, 57 1., 

and 58.] 

[April 24 ] 294. Abstract of the foregoing letter and of Captain Fairfax's 
letter of 29 March, 1693. (See No. 224.) 6J pp. [Board of 
Trade. New England, 6. No. 59.] 

April 24. 295. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Proclamation forbidding 
the imprisonment of men by the captains of King's ships without 
the Governor's warrant. Order for purchase of a sloop for the 
King's service, that she be victualled and manned, and that she be 
commanded, together with one other sloop, by the youngest 
lieutenant of H.M.S. Mordaunt. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. 
pp. 247-248.] 

April 25. 296. Minutes of Council of War in the West Indies. The 

H.M.S. question of an attack on Guadeloupe was put, when it was carried 

Resolution, U1 the negative, and the Island troops were ordered back to Barbados 

llca " and the Leeward Islands. The opinions of the various officers are 

(liven in full. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XII., pp. 352-362.] 

April 26. 297. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor left for 
Pennsylvania on the 24th. Order for payment of the four fusilier 
companies, and for letters to be written to four counties urging the 
payment of former taxes. Order for the sloops for Albany to be 
prepared, and for the fusiliers to embark as soon as they come to 
town. Order prohibiting the export of grain from Albany until the 
wants of the garrison have first been supplied. Madame Sloughter 
allowed to nominate two auditors for her late husband's accounts. 

April 27. Letters to the Counties for collection of taxes, and to the Indians 
to explain the Governor's absence, approved. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXXV., pp. 418-420.] 

April 26. 298. Minutes of Council of Virginia. Order for appointment 
of properly qualified surveyors to Accomack and Nancymond 
Counties. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



98 



1693. 

April 27. 



April 29. 



April 27. 

Whitehall. 



April 27. 
H.M.S. 

Resolution, 
at Dominica. 



April 28. 

Jamaica. 



James Mings appeared and was examined ; and, since the 
matter of Pamunkey Neck is before the King, it was agreed to 
take no action till the arrival of next fleet. Order for arrest of 
William Anderson for carrying Edward Randolph forcibly away 
to Maryland. 

Complaint of Wicocomoco Indians agamst Captain John Smith 
heard, and John Smith ordered not to molest them. Address of 
the burgesses as to revision of laws to be referred to next General 
Assembly. Order for the Court of Richmond County to explain 
their conduct in turning out the vestry of Farnham parish, and 
that all concerned have notice to attend Council. On complaint of 
the Government of Maryland against Colonel Fitzhugh, it was 
ordered that he be required to take the oaths, and give security to 
answer all charges agamst him at the next General Court. Procla- 
mation for a day of humiliation ordered. [Co/. Entry 7>/t., To/. 
LXXXIV., pp. 803-806.] 

299. Order of the Queen in Council. On reading a report from 
the Admiralty, that the Governors of Jamaica and Barbados will 
receive full powers to erect Admiralty Courts in the Commissions 
which they will receive from the Admiralty, the whole matter was 
referred to the Lords of Trade and Plantations for report. Signed. 
Wm. Bridgeman. 1 p. Endorsed. Read 1st and 3rd May, 1693. 
[Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. No. 12 ; and 53, p. 140.] 

300. Minutes of the Council of War in the West Indies. Resolved 
to leave three months' provisions for Lloyd's regiment. Other 
arrangements on the break up of the expedition. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. XII., p. 363.] 

301. Lieutenant-Governor Sir William Beeston to Lords of 
Trade and Plantations. Since my last the Falcon is returned with 
a prize of about 100 tons taken oft' Hispaniola, and I have ordered 
her back to that coast to look for more. My Commission of 
Admiralty, being different from that formerly issued, gives scruple 
to people here to undertake the condemnation of prizes, though the 
opinion of our lawyers is that the Commission I had for that 
purpose from Doctors' Commons is sufficient. However it is 
absolutely necessary for the Royal service that they pass a legal 
judication, to which end I have appointed Richard Lloyd, Esq., to 
be sole judge of Admiralty, and, to strengthen his authority, have 
granted him a Commission under the Great Seal, which I take to 
be effectual. Nevertheless I beg for your approbation and further 
directions herein. The French have recently landed parties out of 
small vessels in two or three parts of the Island where the people 
are thin, and have carried away forty negroes from one place, 
killed two men in another, and done other mischief. I sent the 
Mordaunt after them, but to no effect, she being too large to follow 
these small vessels near the shore. We therefore want much two 
small frigates, good sailers of sixteen to twenty guns, to secure 
the coasts from inroads of these small privateers. I am now 
encouraging small vessels of this Island to go out as private men- 
of-war, but the country is so weakened of men by the earthquake, 
sickness and former discouragements that it will be hard to raise 



94 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1003. 



April 28. 

Jamaica. 



April 28. 

Whitehall. 



April 28. 



April 28. 



any number ; and those that can be prevailed on expect nothing to 
be taken from them, so that I am obliged to promise them Their 
Majesties' tenths for their encouragement and to lend them money 
to buy provisions. I beg your approval hereof, as I am in hopes 
that it may call back many of our discontented seamen who have 
gone to other Colonies and even to the French at Hispaniola. 
Signed. Wm. Bseston. 1 pp. Endorsed. Reed. 27 Feb., 1693-4. 
Read 5 March, 93-4. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. No. 13 ; 
and 53, pp. 168, 169.] 

302. Lieutenant-Governor Sir William Beeston to the Earl of 
Nottingham. My letter to the President of Panama has not yet 
gone forward, owing to the return of the Mordaunt from Porto Bello 
with 100,000 pieces-of-eight for the Assiento. She brings no further 
account than that Tristan and all his men were cut off and their 
ship and all they had with them seized. I have had no letter yet 
from the President of St. Domingo, but the Falcon has returned 
from St. Domingo with a prize. I find it absolutely necessary for 
these prizes to be legally condemned and have taken measures 
accordingly. I beg also for particular directions as to Their 
Majesties' ships which are too far from Sir Francis Wheler to 
receive his orders. We hear that our forces are on the attack of 
Martinique, but know not of their success. If they prevail and 
send the French to Hispaniola, as has formerly been done, it may 
prove fatal to this Island. They have landed twice within the past 
fourteen days on our north coast, killing and plundering. I sent 
the Mordaunt after them, but we want a couple of smaller vessels 
to follow them into shoal water. It is our thinness in numbers 
that makes the French so bold. Their intelligence also is so sure 
that they could tell our people, before I arrived, that I was coming 
and that I was coming only with the old dumb Falcon. I have 
sent some fire-arms overland to the north side of the Island to 
strengthen them, and when the Assembly meets I shall propose to 
them to fit out two small sloops against these French privateers. 
One is already hired and another about to be bought ; but unless 
I can incline the Assembly to raise money for the service I doubt 
if we shall be able to support it, for the Treasury is empty. 
tiir/ned. Wm. Beeston. li pp. [America and West Indies. 540. 
No. 30.] 

303. William Blathwayt to the Secretary of the Admiralty. 
Desiring the attendance of some of the Commissioners of the 
Admiralty at the meeting of the Board of Trade and Plantations on 
1 May, when the question of the powers of Admiralty to be given to 
Governors Kendall and Russell will be considered. Draft. 1 p. 
[Board of Trade. Plantations General, 2. No. 45.] 

304. William Blathwayt to Governor Russell and Mr. Bridges. 
Desiring their attendance on the 1st of May, for the purpose given 
in the preceding abstract. Draft. \ p. [Board of Trade. 
Plantations General, 2. No. 46.] 

305. William Blathwayt to Sir Charles Hedges. Desiring his 
attendance on the 1st May for the same purpose. [Board of Trade. 
Plantations General, 2. No. 47.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 95 

1098. 

April 29. 306. Proclamation of the Government of Virginia. For a 
Virginia. day of fasting and humiliation, on account of an epidemic of measles. 
Copy. 2 pp. Endorsed. Reed. 23 Mar. '94. 

Duplicate copy of the above. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. 
Xos. 16, 17; and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXIV., p. 778.] 

April 30. 307. Minutes of Council of New York. Letters to the Governor 
from Albany were opened, which gave account of the murder of an 
Englishman by a skulking party of the enemy. The letters were 
sent on to Pennsylvania. Instructions sent to Major Schuyler to 
let no men wander about on their private affairs without a sufficient 
escort. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 420, 421.] 

May 1. 308. Minutes of Council of Virginia. Robert Beverley sworn 
to act as Clerk of the General Court during the absence of Peter 
Beverley. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXIV., pp. 806-807.] 

May 1. 309. Minutes of Council of Barbados. The Governor acquainted 
the Assembly that the money raised for the Martinique expedition 
was insufficient, and reminded them of their promise to make the 
deficiency good. The Committee then brought up an Act for a 
Committee of Public Accounts, which was passed. Orders passed 
for payment of the Officers of Assembly. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. XII., pp. 403, 404.] 

May 1. 310. Commission to Governor Fletcher. Appointing him 

Commander-in- Chief of the militia of Connecticut and revoking the 
former commission to Sir William Phips for the same. [Board of 
Trade. New York, 48. pp. 29-32.] 

May 1. 311. Heads for a Charter of incorporation of the Company for 

working minerals in New England, proposed by the petitioners 
(sec No. ^^ i.}. Ten articles. I p. Endorsed. Reed. 1 May, 1693. 

Duplicate and triplicate of the above. [Board oj Trade. New 
England, 6. Nos. 60, 61, 62 ; and 35, pp. 25-27.] 

May 1. 312. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Sir Charles 

Hedges, Colonel Russell and Governor Kendall's Agent were heard 
as to the question of prize Courts, and ordered to attend again at 
next meeting. 

Petition of Thomas Couch read. Agreed to send a copy to the 
Governor of Virginia for his report. Petition of Luke Lopdell read ; 
and agreed that the forfeiture of his ship need not be insisted on. 

The heads of a Charter for Sir Matthew Dudley's Company ordered 
to be sent to the Attorney-General. 

Two addresses from New Hampshire read (sec Xos. 250 i., n.). 
Ordered that the parties concerned attend on the 8th inst. 

Order for Governor Fletcher's Commission, to command the 
militia of Connecticut, to pass the great seal at the King's charge. 

Colonel Prideaux's suspension from the Council of Barbados con- 
firmed ; Colonel Hallett's to be respited until his appeal be heard. 
The representation of the Agents of Barbados as to leaving a regi- 
ment there was held over for further consideration. Colonel 
Kendall's letters of 3 and 11 November, 1692, and 10 February, 1693, 



96 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 



May 1. 



May 2. 



May 2. 



May 2. 

Admiralty. 



May 2. 

Whitehall. 



May 2. 



May 2. 



May 3. 



May 3. 



May 3. 



read. Order for the Victuallers of the Navy to explain their 
objections to take up his bills of exchange. [Board of Trade. 
Journal, 7. pp. 180-186.] 

313. William Blathwayt to Sir Charles Hedges. Desiring his 
attendance at the meeting of the Lords of Trade on the 3rd inst., 
to advise as to erection of Courts of Reprisal in the Colonies. 
Draft. \ p. [Board of Trade. Plantations General, 2. No. 48.] 

314. William Blathwayt to Mr. Sotherne. Desiring his 
attendance at the meeting of the Lords of Trade, on the 3rd inst., 
on the business of Courts of Reprisal in the Colonies. Draft. 

% p. \_Board of Trade. Plantations General, 2. No. 49.] 

315. William Blathwayt to the Attorney and Solicitor General. 
Desiring their attendance on the 3rd of May, as in preceding abstract. 
Draft, f- p. [Board oj Trade. Plantations General, 2. No. 50.] 

316. Order of the Lords of the Admiralty to Captain Edward 
Powlson, of H.M.S. St. Albans. To convoy the ship David, with 
Governor Goddard on board, to Bermuda. Signed. Falkland, J. 
Lowther, H. Priestman, R. Austen. [Board of Trade. Bermuda, 
28. p. 87.] 

317. John Povey to the Attorney General. Forwarding copy 
of the heads of incorporation submitted by Sir Matthew Dudley's 
Company, for his opinion (see No. 311). ^ p. Inscribed. 
Reed, the 1st June per Sir Matt. Dudley. [Board of Trade. New 
England, 6. No. 63 ; and 35, p. 27.] 

318. John Povey to Sir Henry Ashurst. Warning him to 
attend the Committee of Trade and Plantations on the morrow, 
upon the business of New Hampshire. Draft. ^ p. [Board of 
Trade. New Hampshire, 1. No. 24.] 

319. John Povey to Samuel Allen. Forwarding copies of the 
addresses from New Hampshire, and warning him that the matter 
will be considered on the morrow. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXVII., 
p. 219.] 

320. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. The question 
of Commissions of reprisals considered, and orders given for 
preparing a draft Commission. 

The address from New Hampshire read, and decision taken. 

Captain Thomas Gardner's petition read and referred to 
Lord Howard of Emngham. [Board of Trade. Journal, 7. 
pp. 187-189.] 

321. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. That Mr. 
Wallis and others concerned attend at the meeting of 13 May, 
touching two addresses received from New Hampshire. Draft. % p. 
[Board of Trade. New Hampshire, 1. No. 25.] 

322. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. The addresses 
from New Hampshire not appearing to have been presented by any 
duly authorised person, it is advised that the Governor of that 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



97 



1698. 



May 3. 



May 3. 



May 3. 

Whitehall. 



May 4. 

Whitehall. 



May 4. 

Whitehall. 



May 4. 



May 4. 
May 4. 



province be ordered to consult with the Council and Assembly and 
propose what shall be done for its security. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. L^VII.,pp.. 219-220.] 

323. William Blathwayt to the Attorney and Solicitor General, 
and to the Judge of the Admiralty Court. Desiring them to prepare a 
commission for Governors Kendall and Russell to enable them to 
erect Courts of Reprisal. Draft. I p. [Board of Trade. 
Plantations General, 2. No. 51; and Jamaica, 53. No. 51. 
p. 141.] 

324. Extract from the Commission of Governor Beeston relating 
to the Admiralty, with a marginal note. 5 pp. Endorsed, Referred 
to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. []-><>ard of Trade. 
Plantations General, 2. No. 52 ; and (in part only) Col. Entry 
Bk., Vol. C., p. 208.] 

325. [W T illiam Blathwayt] to Mr. Sotherne. Forwarding 
extract of Governor Kendall's letter as to the omission of the 
Commissioners of the Navy and for Victualling to take up his bills, 
for the consideration of the Admiralty. [Col. Entry ]Jk., Vol. 
VIII., p. 352.] 

326. Order of the Privy Council. For a letter to be prepared 
from the Queen directing the Governor of New Hampshire to 
consult with the Council and Assembly and propose what shall be 
done for the security of the province and support of the 
Government. Sif/ncd. Rich. Colinge. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 
LXVIL,p. 220.] ' 

327. Order of the Privy Council. That Sir Edmund Andros 
be ordered to discharge Luke Lopdell's recognisance to answer for 
his ship. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 36. pp. 233-284.] 

328. Order of the Privy Council. On recommendation of the 
Lords of Trade and Plantations of 1 May, ordered that the copy of 
petition of William Lovell and others be sent to Sir Edmund 
Andros with directions to enquire as to the same, and if the state- 
ment of the petition be correct, to restore them their ship and goods. 
[Board of Trade. Virginia, 36. pp. 236-237.] 

329. Minutes of Council of New York. Order for payments. 
The Mayor directed to mount ten of the great guns brought out by 
the Governor. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., p. 421.] 



330. Minutes of Council of Jamaica, 
returned members of Assembly : 
John Walters \ 

John Dore 

James Whitchurch ) 

John Bonner ) 

James Banister ) 

Henry Low 1 

Richard Dawkins j 

Thomas Ayscough [ 

Fulke Rose I 



The following were 



St. Katherine's 



St. Dorothy's 
Clarendon 



St. John's 



80CO 



98 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 



May 5. 

May 6. 

May 8. 






St. Thomas in the Vale 
St. Andrew's 

Port Royal 

St. David's 
St. Thomas's 
St. George's 
St. Mary's 
St. Ann's 
St. James's 
St. Elizabeth's 



Yere 



Francis Rose 

Matthew Gregory 

Thomas Clark 

Edward Harrison 

Anthony Stoddart 

Lancelot Talbot 

Robert Wardlow 

Edward Turner 

John Clark 

Moodyford Freeman 

Nicholas Richardson 

John Moone 

William Hutchinson 

Andrew Langley 

Michael Figes 

William Whitehead 

John Abraham 

Usher Tyrrell 

John White 

Leonard Claibourne 

Michael Houldsworth 

George Ivy 

Thomas Fisher 
Andrew Langley was presented as Speaker, and approved. 
William Doddington and Joseph Bathwisk admitted Clerks of the 
Common Pleas for Port Royal, by Patent. 

331. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for careening of 
H.M.S. Mordaunt. 

Order for payment for fitting out a sloop. [Board of Trade. 
Jamaica, 77. pp. 249-251.] 

332. Minutes of Council and Assembly of Montserrat. The 
Assembly proposed to the Lieutenant-Governor and Council that a 
general sessions be held with all speed, that creditors against the 
public bring in their accounts, that the Treasurer's accounts be 
audited, and that the Militia Act be put in execution. In reply 
to certain proposals of the Council the Assembly answered : (1) That 
the season being so dry it would be loss of time to begin entrench- 
ing, but that the places fit for fortification be viewed and plans 
considered. (2) That the arms returned by the men employed in the 
late expedition be delivered to the custody of the commissioned 
officers. (3) That a letter be written to the Governor in Chief asking 
him to draw bills (as allowed by the King) on the English Treasury, 
for hire of transports ; to appoint a time for holding general 
sessions ; and to send to Montserrat the great guns allotted for it, 
which are now at Nevis. (4) That the wounded men of the late 
expedition receive 2s. 3d. a day till cured, and that the provisions 
for relief of widows of soldiers be enforced. (5) That officers be 
reimbursed the money spent by them on their men, including com- 
pensation to one of them who lost a man by desertion. (6) That 
the Governor's late disbursements be discharged as soon as possible. 
[Col Entry BL, Vol. XLVI1L, pp. 315, 316.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 99 

1693. 

May 9. 333. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for H.M.S. 
Guernsey to cruise round the Island till the merchant ships are 
ready to sail under her convoy. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. 
p. 251.] 

May 9. 334. Governor Kendall to Earl of Nottingham. On the 18th 
Barbados. April I received an account from Sir F. Wheler, dated from the 
Resolution, at anchor in Cul de Sac, Martinique, 12th April, to the 
following effect : Leaving Barbados on 30 March he anchored in 
the Cul de Sac Marine of Martinique on the morning of 1 April, 
and at once went on board a sloop with Colonels Foulke and 
Lloyd and Mr. Codrington to find a convenient landing place. He 
was struck by a bullet under the left pap, which, after drawing 
blood and bruising him sorely, fell at his feet. The army would 
have landed that day, but that the wind blew too fresh to tow the 
boats to windward ; but on Sunday 2 April, by 9 o'clock in the 
morning, Colonel Foulke was landed with a thousand men, and 
the whole of the forces before nightfall. By Monday night all the 
Cul de Sac Marine, consisting of a great number of sugar- works, was 
destroyed, and on Wednesday the troops embarked again. Since 
the several parties have destroyed all the plantations on that side 
the Dimond for many miles. Their loss was slight, the enemy 
always flying before us. On the Sunday following, 9th April, 
Governor Codrington arrived with about 800 Creoles in two regi- 
ments, under Colonels Williams and Blakiston, and five hundred of 
Lloyd-'s regiment. Sir F. Wheler writes that Fort Royal appears to 
be a difficult work, and so no doubt it is. Therefore I hope they will 
follow my advice and not attempt it till they have destroyed all the 
plantations on Martinique and Guadeloupe. Colonel Boteler, of one 
of the Barbados regiments, has been brought back very ill of a fever, 
also an officer of Baiter's, who was accidentally shot. Both are in a 
fair way of recovery. The troops continue in perfect health and 
cheerfulness. After this news you will doubtless be mightily sur- 
prised to hear that in April the fleet and forces quitted Martinique, 
declined to go on to Guadeloupe, and have returned all the Creoles 
to their respective islands. These are matters of such consequence 
that I have enclosed to you the whole of the notes of the Councils 
of War on the subject. The news has put this Island into great 
consternation, but I hope to prevail with them in a little time to 
recover their senses. Let me renew my request for frigates in 
October, not for the reasons formerly assigned, but for the safety 
and preservation of the Island. Let me ask also for a regiment of 
foot to be quartered here during the war, for if the French should 
attack us with no greater strength than that with which we 
attempted them I shall have great reason to doubt of success. 
Signed. J. Kendall. HolograpJt. 2 pp. Endorsed, R. July 4, '93. 
Enclosures wanting. [America and West Indies. 456. No. 50.] 

May 9. 335. Governor Kendall to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 

Barbados. This letter is identical with that to Lord Nottingham of the same 

date. Endorsed, Reed. 5 July. Abstract read 18 Sept. '93. 

[Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. No. 12; and Col. Entry Bk., 

Vol. VIII., pp. 369-372.] 



100 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 

May 10. 336. Governor Codrington to Lords of Trade and Plantations, 
r f * h On the 16th September the Wild, frigate, arrived here with the 
Queen's letter announcing that a squadron would arrive here at the 
end of August, and ordering me to get ready the militia with 
provisions and transport to join it. Accordingly I sailed to each 
Island of my Government, laid the letter before the Councils and 
Assemblies, and pressed them with the greatest earnestness to join 
the King's forces with their utmost strength. They with all 
earnestness assented, enacting laws for the raising of forces and 
supplying them with victuals, and, I myself issuing commissions 
and press-warrants for transport ships -and provisions, all was soon 
ready. But the squadron was detained for so long in Europe that 
it was the 6th of March before the welcome news came to me from 
Sir Francis Wheler of his arrival at Barbados, with the resolutions 
of the Council of War that the Leeward forces should join it to 
leeward of Martinique. On this I at once returned to St. Christo- 
phers and sent expresses to the other Islands to embark their forces 
and be ready to be taken under convoy by me on my return to 
Antigua, the most windward of these Islands, where notwithstanding 
great calms I arrived on the 25th of March. On mustering the 
forces of that Island I found them universally backward to go under 
a stranger, notwithstanding all the encouragement which I gave 
them on one hand, and threats on the other hand if they declined. 
At last they assured me that they would go cheerfully if I went with 
them, on which I gave them my promise, which took away their 
dissatisfaction, and encouraged fifty more men to enlist than w r ere 
appointed under the Act ; for I preferred to go with the forces of 
my Government as a volunteer without any command rather than 
that the King's service should want all the furtherance that I could 
give it. By the 2nd of April I embarked, with the Leeward 
Island forces, consisting of about 1,000 men, mostly freeholders 
and men of substance, and by much the better half of the 
strength of my Government. In eight days most of our 
forces joined the squadron at the Cul de Sac, Martinique, the rest 
arriving a few daj's later. Of our safely landing the whole army 
near Fort St. Pierre, on the 17th April, our repulsing the enemy to 
their fortifications at the town, and of our re-embarking on the 21st 
April, you will doubtless have received a full account from the 
Commanders-in-Chief. But I returned with the Leeward Island 
forces, when having taken care for the discharge of the transports 
and the quartering of Colonel Lloyd's regiment I sailed at once to 
St. Christophers, where I found Sir F. W T heler with the squadron, 
refreshing and taking in water. Both soldiers and sailors were 
sickly, though much better there than they could possibly be in any 
other Island of this Government, St. Christophers being far the 
healthiest and best watered of them all. 

And now I hope you will pardon me if I presume to offer what I 
conceive has very much disappointed the King's intentions in this 
expensive and not so happy expedition. First the time of the fleet's 
arrival proved unhappy, for in these climates the great rains fall in 
May, which would have been very fatal had our army been then in 
the field; whereas, had the squadron been able to sail from Europe 
in September or the beginning of October, as the Queen's letter had 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



101 



1093. 



May 10. 

St. 
Christophers. 



May 10. 

St. 
Christophers. 



[May.] 



signified, we should have had a prospect of success and of finishing 
the conquest of the French Islands before the rains could annoy us. 
Again, the King's instructions to the squadron positively ordering it 
to leave the Islands by the last day of May, the time allowed was 
far too short for so great a work. By setting forth at the beginning 
of April there remained but two months to destroy Martinique and 
Guadeloupe, islands so strong and large that the King would have 
been well served if the work had been done in four months. Further 
by the great delay of the squadron the French were animated, and 
had full time to fortify themselves after the best manner. But, 
above all, the forces from Europe were not strong enough for so 
great work, the Islands being thin of inhabitants, the people much 
wasted by war and their numbers lessened more than one half by 
sickness. Had two more regiments of seasoned men been sent, the 
expense would have been well recompensed by the destruction of 
the whole French sugar-trade, an advantage of which you are 
doubtless sufficiently sensible. Now on the other hand these Islands 
having the whole burden of the war upon them are much wasted, 
so that their safety compelled rne to acquaint Sir Francis Wheler 
of the danger in case the enemy should make any attempt on us 
and we be without any force to withstand them. Our numbers are 
so small that all the forces dispersed in the several Islands of this 
Government would not, if assembled, suffice for the defence of one. 

I beg that you will represent this to the King, to the end that he 
may grant us a sufficient sea-force for our protection. Should he 
favour us with a land-force also, strong enough to attempt the 
French Islands, he will find the inhabitants express their loyalty 
zealously and cheerfully by venturing their lives and fortunes in 
his service. Signed. Chr. Codrington. 2 doseli/ written, paycs. 
Endorsed, Eec. 5 July, 1693. Read 18 Sept., 1693. [Board oj 
Trade. Leeward Islands, 4. No. 12 ; and 44. pp. 119-124] . 

337. Governor Codrington to [the Lord President '?]. I have 
duly received letters up to the 29th December. I need not trouble 
you ^^ repe tition of the reports that I have made to the Lords of 
Trade and Plantations. Siyncd. Chr. Codrington. 1 p. Endorsed, 
R. July 4, 93. [America and West Indies. 551. No. 78J. 

338. Governor Codrington to Sir Francis Wheler. After con- 
sideration of my late discourse with you and Colonel Foulke, I am 
t oo QQ-^^IQ that the great mortality among your sailors and officers 
makes it impossible for us to expect you to return hither from New 
England, since the people there have always shewn aversion to 
serving in the fleet. I must therefore beg you to represent the 
matter to the King, as I shall myself, to the end that we may not be 
left defenceless. Copy. ^ p. [America and West Indies. 551. 
No. 79.] 

339. A list of the Commissioned and Warrant Officers and sea- 
men in the West Indian Squadron, who have died since leaving 
England; 7 commanders, 3 lieutenants, 3 masters, 7 gunners, 

II carpenters, 4 chaplains, 8 pursers, 7 boatswains, 8 surgeons, 
9 cooks, 608 seamen. Total, 668. The names of the officers arc 
given. Sufned. Fra. Wheler. 2 pp. [America and West Indies. 
551. iVo. 80.] 



102 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 

[May.] 340. A List of officers dead in the two regiments with Sir 

Francis Wheler's squadron. In Colonel Foulke's regiment, the 
Colonel, 1 Captain, and " about 6 subalterns." In Colonel 
Goodwyn's regiment, the Colonel, Major, 6 captains, "and about 10 
lieutenants and ensigns." Here follows a summary of Ilie losses 
in the fleet, for which see preceding abstract. Signed. Fra. 
Wheler. 1 p. 

' Copy of the preceding. 1 p. Endorsed, Reed. 20 Mar., 93-4. 
[America and West Indies. 551. Nos. 81, 82.] 

May 11. 341. Minutes of Council of Nevis. The Assembly agreed 
to the Council's proposal for billeting three companies of Lloyd's 
regiment, just returned from Martinique, for obtaining if possible 
arms for the Island from Sir F. Wheler and for appointing 
a place of refuge for women, stock, etc., in case of an invasion. 
The Assembly refused to agree with the Council as to abating 
the value of pieces-of-eight. The Council on petition of William 
Bates agreed that his accounts should be settled by the gentleman 
who adjusts the Island's accounts. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLVIII., 
pp. 274, 275.] 

May 11. 342. Minutes of Council of New York. A letter from Sir W. 
Phips complaining of Captain Chant of II. M.S. Aldborough was 
opened, and the Captain being summoned and denying every article 
of the complaint was ordered to send his answer by first opportunity. 
The letter also announced that Connecticut and Rhode Island had 
refused to send the 200 men ordered by Sir W. Phips to march to 
Governor Fletcher's assistance. Order for the delivery of ammuni- 
tion to the fort. Sundry business connected with the collecting of 
taxes, and the furnishing of men for the frontier. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXXV., pp. 422, 423.] 

May 11. 343. Proclamation of the Proprietors of Carolina. That no 
obedience be given to Seth Sothell, unless he receive fresh powers 
from the Palatine and majority pf the proprietors. Signed. Craven, 
Ashley, G. Carteret, P. Colleton, John Archdale for Thomas Arch- 
dale, P. Colleton. [Board of Trade. Carolina, 4. p. 1.] 

May 11. 344. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Governor Philip 
Ludwell. Your letter of 27 August is come to hand, but not the 
further papers as to Mr. Sothell's proceedings. The power of the 
proprietors is not vested in any one of them but in the majority of 
them, and for him to oppose that majority is high treason. We now 
send you a declaration, which you will publish, so that none may 
pretend ignorance. Signed as the preceding. [Board of Trade. 
Carolina, 4. p. 2.] 

May 13. 345. Lieutenant-Governor Sir William Beeston to the Earl of 
Jamaica. Nottingham. The Guernsey was lately ordered to England by Sir 
F. Wheler, but I have detained her until the convoy is ready to sail 
at the beginning of June, and have meanwhile sent her to cruise 
round the Island. The Assembly is sitting, and is as unanimous 
as the people were in choosing them. The places here being 
mostly given by patent I had nothing in my gift for Mr. Hanses, 
whom you recommended to me, except the Judge-Advocate's place 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 103 

1693. 

in the Admiralty. The Attorney General is much displeased at 
this and pretends to go to England in the Guernsey, as he says for 
his health, but, as is well known, to complain. I do not believe 
that he will go, but what he will write may be ill enough. The 
place has generally been distinct from the Attorney General's here, 
and is always so in England. I have told him that if it be his due 
it shall be restored to him, and if not I know not why he should 
expect it. I have been the best friend he ever had in the Island, 
but to little purpose. His relation to Lord Rochester makes me 
wish to be kind to him and to take no notice of many things that 
happen, but it was an unhappy thing for the Island that the place 
fell to his share, and we have not yet had the experience how it will 
answer to Their Majesties. However I shall always treat him as 
Their Majesties' officer, and beg that no accusation may be received 
against me till I can be heard in my defence, when I doubt not that 
I shall be able to acquit myself of any private animosities that 
discontented spirits may say against me. Were I an angel I am 
sure that I could not please everyone, tivjned. Win. Beeston. 
1-2 PP- [America and West Indies. 540. No. 31.] 

May 13. 346. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for the sloop Ad- 
venture to be taken into the King's service. Richard Lloyd sworn 
judge of the Admiralty Court. [Hoard of Trade. Jamaica, 77. 
p. 252.] 

May 15. 347. Governor Codrington to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 
St. I shall shortly send you accounts of all public acts and proceedings 

Christophers. j n these Islands, with the number of inhabitants able to bear arms, 
muster-rolls of the King's forces and an account of the revenue. I 
shall draw bills on the Treasurer of the Navy for hire of transports, 
as directed. The pay and subsistence of Colonel Lloyd's regiment 
is ordered to be discharged out of the four and a half per cent, duty, 
which customs were some time since ordered to be remitted home, so 
that at present there is no fund here to supply them. Colonel Lloyd 
has asked me to represent this, in order that methods may be found 
for their speedy payment, otherwise the officers will be greatly dis- 
couraged. I must inform you also that Sir F. Wheler's squadron 
caught an infection or plague from the merchant ships in harbour 
at Barbados, which has much wasted both the sailors and soldiers on 
board. Since our leaving Martinique to this time the sickness has 
increased with such rage that, as Sir Erancis informs me, he has lost 
half his sailors and most of his officers. After discourse with him 
I am of opinion that he cannot reasonably be expected to return 
with his squadron to these Islands, according to the Royal orders. 
Again the aversion that the people of New England have always 
shewn to serve in the King's fleet will make their sailors abscond 
and make us despair of recruiting with sailors there. But I must 
remind you of the weakness of these Islands, which is such that 
without the attendance of a squadron they are in danger of being 
lost. Since we cannot expect Sir F. Wheler to return hither we are 
dependent on your representations to the King to provide for our 
safety. If another squadron be sent, we beg that it may not be 
sent to Barbados, which has been very fatal to all the sailors hitherto 



104 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

sent out ; whereas the Leeward Islands are healthy. Signed. 
Chr. Codrington. 3 pp. Endorsed, Reed. 5 July, 161)3. Abs. 
read 18 Sept., 1693. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 4. 
No. 13; and 44. pp. 124-127.] 

May 15. 348. Minutes of Council of New York. The Councillors 
resolved to provide most of the presents for the Indians from their 
own warehouses and to purchase the remainder in the town. 
Report of the prices at which naval stores can be exported ; 
production would be no difficulty if properly encouraged. Resolved 
to recommend that Sir F. Wheler be apprised that flour and biscuit 
are very scarce owing to a blight on the corn last summer, but that 
plenty of beef can be afforded next November, and of flour next 
January ; and that pork is supplied only by Virginia and Maryland. 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 423, 424.] 

May 17. 349. Copies of letters from Jamaica to merchants in London. 

16 Mai/. I wrote to you formerly about insuring on board sundry 
ships that were to sail under convoy of the Guernsey. I now find 
that the captain of the Guernsey intends to sail to-morrow morning 
without the knowledge of the Governor, or indeed of hardly any- 
one. I fear that this wilful action of Oakley may spoil the 
insurance made on the ships that were to sail under the convoy. 

17 Mat/. The above is a copy of a letter which we sent you by 
three ships, which are still at sea, a few leagues away. Our plans 
have been upset by the captain of the Guernsey, which started on a 
cruise twelve days ago until the merchant vessels here were ready. 
He came back in sight of this port, but only sent his lieutenant 
ashore to advise the Governor that he was sailing for London by 
the Admiralty's orders. We have only just learned that he is ready 
for this voyage, so can do nothing unless some accident happens to 
delay him. This latter letter is in French. The icJiole, 1-J pp. 
[Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. No. 14.] 

May 18. 350. Minutes of Council of New York. Authority given to the 
farmers of the excise of New York city to collect the same. Order 
for twenty- six more men sent to the frontier to replace as many 
deserters. [Col. Entry 13k., Vol. LXXV., pp. 424-425.] 

May 18. 351. Order of the Privy Council. Referring the petition of 
Colonel John Hallett to Lords of Trade and Plantations for report. 
J p. Signed. Richard Colinge. Annexed, 

351 i. Petition of John Hallett to the Queen. Setting forth his 
case against Governor Kendall, and praying that ,2,500 
may not be taken from him on the Governor's mere dis- 
pleasure. Co}>y. 2 pp. The whole endorsed, Reed. 20 May. 
Read 12 June, 1693. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. 
Nos. 13, 13 1.; and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIII., pp. 353- 
358.] 

[May 19.] 352. Petition of Thomas Gardner to the King. During the 
rebellion in Virginia in 1676, I received a warrant from Sir William 
Berkeley for the arrest of Nathaniel Bacon, for the taking of whom 
a reward of 200 was offered. I did apprehend him, but though I 
have made frequent applications I have never received the reward, 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 105 

1693. 

and I beg that you will order it to be paid to me. 1 j>. Annexi'd, 
352. i. A further statement of Gardner's case, shewing that he 

had received .25 from Lord Howard of Effingham, but 

for the securing of Giles Bland and not for the arrest of 

Bacon. 2J pp. 
352. ii. Warrant of Governor Sir William Berkeley constituting 

Thomas Gardner Vice-admiral of the fleet riding at James 

City. 9 September, 1676. Copy. 1 j). 
352. in. Letter of Sir William Berkeley to Thomas Gardner, 13 

September, 1676. Ordering him to keep Giles Bland in 

custody. Orif/inal. J j>. 
352. iv. Warrant of Sir William Berkeley to Thomas Gardner, for 

the arrest of Nathaniel Bacon. 7 January, 1676-7. Copy. 

I p. 
352. v. Order of the General Assembly of Virginia. 20 February, 

1676-7 ; that the thanks of the Assembly be given to 

Thomas Gardner, with regret that the Assembly cannot 

reward him as it w r ould. Copy. 1 p. 
352. vi. Letter of recommendation in favour of Thomas Gardner 

from the English Commissioners. 4 May, 1677. Copy. ^ ]>. 
352. vn. Order of King Charles II. for the payment of a bounty 

of 111 to Thomas Gardner for his good service in 

Virginia. 17 March, 1677-8. Copy. p. 
352. vin. The Lord Treasurer's warrant for the payment of the 

above sum of 111 to Thomas Gardner. 20 March, 

1677-8. Copy. p. 
352. ix. Copy of the Order in Council of 12 October, 1691, on a 

former petition of Gardner's, and of Lord Howard of 

Emngham's report thereon at that time. 1 p. [.Board 

of Trade. Virginia, 5. Nos. 18, 18 i.-ix. ; and (icithout 

enclosure) 36. pp. 274-276.] 

May 20. 353. Minutes of Council of New York. Orders for detachment 
of the quota of Nassau Island for Albany. An account of affairs to 
be written to the Governor. [Co/. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., p. 

425.] 

May 22. 354. John Povey to the Attorney General. Forwarding the 
laws of Virginia passed on 16 April, 1691 and 1 April, 1692, for 
report as to their fitness to be confirmed. List of the said laws. 
[Board of Trade. Virginia, 36. pp. 238-240.] 

[May.] 355. Abstracts of the Virginian Act for ports, and to revise the 

Act for encouragement of manufactures. 1^ pp. and 4J pp. 
[Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. Nos. 19, 20.] 

May 22. 356. Minutes of Council of Nevis. The Council and Assembly 
agreed to quarter the officers of three companies of Lloyd's 
regiment, but not their wives. Joint Committee appointed to 
choose a place of refuge for the women, etc. in case of invasion. 

May 23. Joint Committee appointed to agree with the owners of land 
before clearing the place of refuge. New auditors appointed to 
inspect the accounts of the expedition to St. Kitts, those formerly 
appointed being dead. Joint Committee appointed to draw up 
select articles of war. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLVIII., pp. 275, 276.] 



106 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 
May 23. 

Whitehall. 



May 23. 



May 24. 

Jamaica. 



357. The Queen to Lieutenant-Governor Usher and the 
Council of New Hampshire. Directing them, together with the 
Assembly, to represent the true condition of the province, and what 
may he done for the security of the inhabitants and the support of 
the Government. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXVIL, p. 221.] 

358. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for payment for 
the passage of English prisoners from Hispaniola. Order for 
payment for fortifications. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. p. 252.] 

359. Lieutenant-Governor Sir William Beeston to Lords of 
Trade and Plantations. The Guernsey, which was newly careened 
at great cost, received orders from Sir F. Wheler to sail to England. 
I in no way intended to obstruct those orders, but having the Royal 
commands to send the merchant ships home under convoy as far as 
possible I told Captain Oakley that they should be ready to sail 
by the beginning of June and that in the meanwhile he should sail 
round the Island in search of the French pickeroons that infest the 
north side. Very unwillingly he went, but sailed only to the 
eastward and then returned, anchored without orders, and brought 
me a paper signed by his carpenter as his excuse. On this I told 
him that if the Guernsey were not fit to sail round the Island she 
was not capable of sailing home, and that I would therefore 
order her to be surveyed. This he permitted, and the ship 
was found sound and in good condition. On this he wrote 
me a letter and immediately weighed and came about thirty 
leagues to leeward of Port Royal, where I understand that he 
means to stay till the 1st of June for his own advantage and 
in hopes that money will be sent him as freight, but to keep 
himself from all authority here. I send you the papers relating 
to the affair. Captain Maynard has now orders for the Mordaunt 
to sail for England, but I have the King's command to keep 
him here. This will show you how the orders differ ; but the 
Island being in want of assistance, having neither fortifications, 
men nor money (of which Sir F. Wheler knew nothing when he 
gave the order), the Council and Assembly desired me to keep the 
Mordaunt and to represent their condition to you. I have now 
sent their representation in their own words and beg you to lay it 
before Their Majesties. The Assembly are now sitting and go on 
very unanimously, there being an agreeable temper between 
those remains that are left. They have passed a bill for 
keeping the 7th of June annually as a day of humiliation, 
and for the present supply of the country's wants are raising 
money to fit out two sloops to follow the French pickeroons 
that infest our coasts and plunder the poor inhabitants daily. 
Seiior Porcio of the Assiento being bound a few days since to 
Porto Bello in a Spanish sloop had his ship seized by the naval 
officer for having dry goods on board for the Spanish trade. 
Finding that it gave great offence and might prove of ill consequence 
and cause the removal of that beneficial interest (which they daily 
threaten for want of supplies of negroes), I have remitted to them 
my own and the Royal thirds, which has pacified them. I beg your 
approbation hereof. Signed. Win. Beeston. Holograph. I p. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 107 

1693. 

Endorsed, Heed. 23 Aug. '93. Abstract read 18 Sept. Enclosed, 

359. i. Order of Sir William Beeston to Captain Oakley. For 
H.M.S. Guernsey to cruise round Jamaica in search of 
French privateers, until the merchant-ships are ready to 
sail under his convoy at the beginning of June. Dated, 
5 May, 1693. 

Order of Sir William Beeston for the survey of H.M.S. 
Guernsey, Captain Oakley having represented her as unfit 
to sail round the Island. Dated, 15 May, 1693. 

Report of the officers appointed to survey H.M.S. 
Guernsey. That she is fit to sail to England. Dated, 
17 Mav, 1693. Copies. The ichole, 2^ pp. Endorsed, 
Reed. 23 Aug. 1693. 

359. ii. Captain Oakley to Sir William Beeston. H.M.S. Guernsey, 
17 May, 1693. My ship being reported sound, and my 
orders being to give notice to merchant vessels that I am 
about to sail for England and, if none of them be ready, to 
sail without them, I beg to inform you that I shall sail to 
Blewfields Bay to water, and await your commands there 
till the 1st of June, which is reported to be the day which 
you have appointed for the sailing of the convoy. Copy. 
1 ;>. Endorsed, Reed. 23 Aug. 1693. 

359. in. Speech of Sir William Beeston to the Assembly of Jamaica. 
I think that you will feel grateful to Their Majesties for 
sending as Governor one who is personally known to you, 
and who is a fellow sufferer with you in your recent cala- 
mities. You will find the Treasury so far postponed that 
unless you make additions to the revenue beyond the 
scope of the perpetual Revenue Act we cannot re-erect 
our fortifications and public buildings. I recommend 
the more effectual collection of the quit-rents. I would 
recommend the setting, apart of the 7th of June as a 
day of fasting and humiliation for ever, and I beg you 
not to be jealous of the Council, whose interest is the 
same as yours, but to consult and w r ork with them, and 
to avoid quarrels and disputes. Copy. 2 pp. Endorsed, 
4 May. Reed. 23 Aug. '93. 

359. iv. Duplicate of No. III. 

359. v. Address of the Council and Assembly of Jamaica to Sir 
William Beeston. Sir F. Wheler having ordered H.M.S. 
Mordaunt to sail to England with such merchant-vessels 
as are ready to depart, we beg you to order her to 
stay about this Island, which otherwise we fear will be 
in danger of falling into the hands of the enemy. We 
beg you also to represent to Their Majesties the damage 
which this Island has sustained through the disobe- 
dience and misbehaviour of the captains of their ships, 
and in particular of Captain Oakley, who has refused 
to comply with any orders that he has received before 
or since your arrival. We beg you also to point out 
that the reason for Their Majesties being so ill served 
in those parts is that ships are not under the orders of 
the Governors ; for it is impossible that anyone at so 



108 COLONIAL PAPEKS. 

1693. 

great a distance as Sir Francis Wheler, or any other on 
the station, can be aware of our danger owing to the 
presence of so powerful an enemy to windward. Copy. 
Large sheet. Endorsed, Reed. 22 Aug. '93. [Hoard of 
Trade. Jamaica, 7. Nos. 15, 15 i.-iv. ; and (without en- 
closures) 53. pp. 160-162.] 

[May 24.] 360. Abstract of the preceding letter of Sir William Beeston. 
1-2 PP- Endorsed, Piead 18 Sept. 1693. [Hoard of Trade. 
Jamaica, 7. No. 16.] 

May 24. 361. Samuel Bernard to the Earl of Nottingham. We are 
Jamaica. sensible of Their Majesties' favour in sending us a Governor that is 
a fellow sufferer with us in the late dreadful calamity, from which 
we now hope to be restored. The Council and Assembly have made 
a representation as to the inconvenience of Captains of Their 
Majesties' ships not being under the orders of the Governor ; and 
indeed the Governor here, being on the spot, must of necessity 
understand what is required of them better than the most far-seeing 
Admiral, unless he be more than mortal, especially at a time when 
our fortifications are down and ourselves defenceless. We want 
ships as moving castles until we can build fixed ones, or we run 
risk of falling, even if meanly attacked. Since the attack on 
Martinique I have seen the minutes of the Council of War, and the 
reasons of the officers for drawing off after having done so little. 
There I see that the gentlemen of Barbados and the Leeward 
Islands intended not only to ruin the French, but to force them 
down on us, as Colonel Codrington plainly says. So that they 
pretend not only to spoil the sugar-trade of the French, but to 
engross it to themselves, though almost unavoidably to the ruin of 
Jamaica, if they had driven the French down on Hispaniola as they 
did at St. Christophers. For at that place there was no medium 
between starving and attempting us in this Island, which is of more 
importance to the Crown than all the Windward Islands put 
together except Barbados. This comes out so plainly that I thought 
it worth while to put it before you. Signed . Sam. Bernard. 1 p. 
Endorsed, R. Sept. 15, '93. [America and ]Veat Indies. 540. 
No. 32.] 

May 24. 362. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. Order for sundry 
payments on account of money advanced for the public service. 
Leave granted for the enlargement of the north meeting-house at 
Boston. Order for payment for a hired ship, which was lost 
while returning from the expedition to Canada. Letter from 
Captain Convers that he had arrived at Saco, without meeting any 
of the enemy, and that he apprehends an attack on Pemaquid or 
one of the towns to westward. Order for the Indians to be dismissed 
but for the militia to continue abroad and to scout for the enemy. 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV., pp. 233-235.] 

May 24. 363. Minutes of Council of New York. Order for Lieut.- 
Colonel Hicks to arrest certain suspected Indians. 

May 25. Order for the inhabitants of Newtown to agree by majority at a 
public meeting as to some expeditious method of collecting their 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



109 



1693. 



May 25. 



May 25. 



[May.] 



May 25. 

Whitehall. 



May 25. 



May 25. 

Virginia. 




quota of the tax. Order for payment of 15 for presents for the 
Indians. [Col. Entry Bk., VoLLXXV., pp. 425, 426.] 

364. The Attorney and Solicitor General to William Blathwayt. 
Forwarding draft Commissions for the Governors of Barhados and 
Jamaica to erect Courts for trial and condemnation of prizes. We 
have left a blank for the boundaries. Xiyned. Edw. Ward, Tho. 
Trevor. Mem. The draft was opposed by Sir Charles Hedges, 
Judge of the Court of Admiralty. \ p. 

Copy of the above. Endorsed, Read 25 May, 1693. [Board of 
Trade. Plantations General, 2. Nos. 53, 54 ; and Jamaica, 53. 
p. 141.] 

365. Draft of Commission to erect prize Courts ; certified by 
Sir Charles Hedges as fitting for the Governor of Barbados. 2 pp. 
[Board of Trade. Plantations General, 2. No. 55 ; and Col. Entry 
Ilk., Vol. C., pp. 300-305.] 



366. Memorandum, 
and James Kendall a: 



That the Commissions of Francis Russell 
Governors of Barbados and Jamaica 

[Board oj 

No. 14.] 



respectively be laid before the Queen to-morrow. \ p 
Trade. Barbados, 5. 



367. Memorandum. That Mr. Russell begs leave to look over 
his predecessors' instructions in order to be able to make suggestions 
to their Lordships. -J- p. Undated. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. 

No. 15.] 

368. Order of the Privy Council. Referring the draft com- 
missions for the Governors of Barbados and Jamaica to erect 
Courts for trial and condemnation of prizes, to Lords of Trade and 
Plantations for completion and report. Signed. Rich. Colinge. 
J p. [Board of Trade. Plantations General, 2. No. 56 ; and 
Jamaica, 53. ^. 142.] 

369. Minutes of Council of Nevis. The Council and Assembly 
agreed as to damages to be paid to proprietors of land where 
property is occupied by the selected place of refuge. The Council 
agreed on proposal of the Assembly that no sick persons be allowed 
to land from a ship lately arrived from St. Kitts, as there is an 
infectious distemper aboard her. [Col. Entry Bl\, Vol. XLVIIL, 
pp. 276, 277.] 

370. Proclamation of the Government of Virginia. Granting 
power to Thomas Neale to establish ferries on all waters where the 
power to do so is not already granted aw r ay by Letters Patent. Copy. 
2 pp. Reed. 28 March, '94. 

Duplicate of the above. [Board oj Trade. Virginia, 5. Nos. 
21, 22 ; and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXIV., p. 775.] 

371. Minutes of Council of Virginia. Thomas Neale's patent 
to erect Post Offices recorded, also Andrew Hamilton's deputation 
from the Postmaster General in England. Proclamation ordered 
as to Thomas Neale's patent to establish ferries. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Fitzhugh took the oath and was bound 
over to appear before the Governor and Council on the 17th 



110 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1093. 

October. A request of the Government of Maryland for Edward 
Randolph to be remitted to their custody read, when it was 
resolved that he ought not to be so remitted. Edward Randolph 
was then brought up and discharged and William Anderson 
suspended from the Commission of the peace for his behaviour in 
arresting him. Order for embargo on all ships bound for Europe 
until 30 June. James Sherlock sworn Clerk of Council in place of 
William Edwards, resigned. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXIV., 
pp. 807-810.] 

May 26. 372. Governor Sir William Phips to Lieutenant-Governor 
Boston. Usher. Complaint has been made to me of the seizure of the 
barque Mary in Piscataqua River, for no cause known to the owner, 
Mr. Peprell. This fresh complaint, with former ones of the same 
nature, make me ask for what offence this vessel is detained. If 
you claim jurisdiction over both banks of the river I should be in- 
formed thereof, that the matter may be adjusted by the two Govern- 
ments or by the King, for it is contrary to the royal instructions 
that there should be hindrance to trade or misunderstandings be- 
tween Governments. Certified cop//. 1 p. [Board of Trade. New 
England, 6. No. 64.] 

May 27. 373. Minutes of Council of New York. Order for Captain 
Chant to seize a ship that has not cleared as the law directs, and 
that an express be sent to arrest the captain who has absconded. 
Order for a letter to the Governor asking when the Indians shall be 
summoned to meet him at Albany. Robert Livingstone reported 
that he had collected 1,075 of arrears of taxes of which 884 was 
allowed to him, he having advanced that sum for payment of the 
troops. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 426, 427.] 

May 28. 374. Charles Hanses to the Earl of Nottingham. I must express 
Jamaica. m y gratitude to you for your recommendation to Sir William 
Beeston. Never was Governor more welcome to any country than 
he to this, nor any country more grateful to you for sending him 
here. You will always have its prayers and good wishes that you 
will use your interest to continue him here till the work of recover- 
ing the Island from ruin be perfected. No one else except 
Mr. Bernard could have kept us from sinking, to such difficulties 
has the earthquake reduced this once flourishing Island. Under 
his government it begins once more to revive, and I am sure that 
not many have laboured so hard for the service of their Majesties 
and the people as he has since his arrival. Had I not the voice of 
the people with me, I should not have presumed to write this. 
Signed. Charles Hanses. 1J pp. Endorsed, R. Sept. 15, '93. 
[America and West Indies. 540. A T o. 33.] 

May 29. 375. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. A new clause 
in the Commission for reprisals read and referred to the Admiralty. 
Heads of enquiries to be made by the Commander-in-Chief of the 
convoy to Newfoundland approved. [Board of Trade. Journal, 7. 
p. 190.] 

May 29. 376. John Povey to Mr. Sotherne. Forwarding the draft 
Commissions for trial and condemnations of prizes in Barbados and 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. Ill 

1093. 

Jamaica, for the Admiralty to define the boundaries of jurisdiction. 
Draft. % p. [Board of Trade. Plantations General, 2. No. 57 ; 
and Jamaica, 53. p. 143.] 

[May 29.] 377. Boundaries proposed for the jurisdiction of Prize Courts 
in America. 1 p. [Board of Trade. Plantations General, 2. 
No. 58.] 

May 30. 378. William Blathwayt to the Secretary of the Admiralty. 
Directing the Lords of the Admiralty to be ready with their report 
as to the limits of jurisdiction of the Prize Courts of America, for 
the meeting of the Lords of Trade on 1 June. Draft. \ p. 
[Board of Trade. Plantations General, 2. No. 59.] 

May 30. 379. Minutes of Council of Barbados. Return of the writs for 
the election of an Assembly, and names of the members. r Co/. 
Entry BL, Vol. XII., j>p. 404-407.] 

May 31. 380. List of the Councillors, or Assistants, chosen by the 
General Court of Massachusetts. For Massachusetts Baij ; William 
Stoughton, Thomas Danforth, John Pyncheon, John Richards, 
Nathaniel Saltonstall, Wait Winthrop, James Russell, Bartholomew 
Gidney, Robert Pike, Elisha Cooke, John Hathorne, Elisha 
Hutchinson, Samuel Sewall, Isaac Aldington, William Browne, 
John Phillips, Jonathan Curwin, John Foster, Peter Serjeant. 
For New Plymouth ; William Bradford, John Walley, Barnabas 
Lothrop, Nathaniel Thomas, John Saffin. For Maine ; Francis 
Hooke, Charle_s Frost, Samuel Donnell. For the country bettreen the 
ricer Sagadchock and Nora Scotia ; Silvanus Davis. Memo. Mr. 
Addington wrote Mr. Povey that all were approved by the Governor 
except Elisha Cooke, in whose place Daniel Pierce was chosen and 
accepted. 1 p. Endorsed. Reed. 21 October. [Board of Trade. 
New England, 6. No. 65.] 

May 31. 381. Minutes of General Assembly of Massachusetts. The 
Assembly met pursuant to return of the writs. Sixty eight 
Representatives present. The Representatives chose William Bond 
for their Speaker, and proceeded to the election of twenty-eight 
Councillors. 

June 1. The Governor approved all the elected Councillors except Elisha 
Cooke. Nineteen of the Councillors were sworn. Bill for a public 
market in Boston read. 

June 2. Daniel Pierce elected Councillor in lieu of Elisha Cooke, and 
accepted. 

June 3. James Taylor elected Treasurer. Bill for prevention of clan- 
destine sales. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV., 393-398.] 

June 1. 382. Minutes of Council of New York. The difference about 
the assessment of Newtown still continuing, it was ordered that two 
men of each party attend the Council on the 3rd inst. [Col. Entry 
Bk., Vol. LXXV., p. 427.] 

June 2. 383. Petition of Benjamin Skutt to the Queen in Council. 
Praying that, in consequence of the losses of West Indian 
merchants, he may have a licence for his advice-boat of 150 tons 



112 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1698. 

and 16 guns to sail to and from Barbados, also a commission for 
her as a private man-of-war, and immunity from embargo or press- 
gang. 1 p. 

Orer page. Order of the King, of 2 June, referring the petition 
to Lords of Trade and Plantations for report. Sif/ncd. J. Tren- 
chard. The irhole endorsed, Reed. 12 June, '93. [Board of Trade. 
Barbados, 5. No. 16.] 

June 2. 384. Minutes of Council of Xevis. The Assembly agreed with 
the Council to draw up an address to the King, asking for despatch 
of another squadron. Joint Committee appointed to levy an 
assessment. The Assembly again refused to accept the Council's 
proposal as to altering the value of pieces-of-eight except by repeal 
of the existing Act ; to which the Council agreed. [C W. Entry Bk., 
Vol. XLVI1L, p. 277.] 

June 3. 385. Minutes of Council of New York. The disputing parties 
from Newtown being heard, it was ordered that the present 
assessment be forthwith completed by the present assessors. 
[Col. Entry ML, Vol. LXXV., p. 427.] 

June 5. 386. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor returned 
and reported that though he could prevail little with the people and 
Government of Pennsylvania, yet that he had gained them to sub- 
mit to the Royal Government and his own administration, and to 
furnish a little assistance which, though trifling, was an introduction 
of a future supply. He also reported that Virginia had given 600 
(New York money) towards the assistance of this province, in the 
form of bills on England, which bills Mr. Van Cortlandt at once 
accepted. The Council resolved itself into a grand Committee on 
the present Act of Revenue. Order for material to the value of 7 
to be furnished to Jonathan Marsh for experiments on the model of 
a new vessel of his invention. 

June 6. The letters from Virginia and Maryland as to assistance 
read, and the Governor desired to return thanks. The Governor 
reported that sixty men were wanting to make up the complement 
of the force on the frontier. Resolved to examine the Militia Act 
and see what provision is made against deserters and absconders. 

June 7. Order for Colonel William Smith and Colonel Willett to go to 
Queen's County and enquire as to the foundation of a rumour of 
an insurrection of Indians in Nassau Island. Resolved that 
H.M.S. Aldborough accompany the Governor, there being rumours 
that the French have gained over the Five Nations. Resolved that 
Colonel Lodowyck be authorised to explain the state of affairs in the 
province to the authorities in England. Agreed to discharge the 
ship Elizabeth, her papers being in order. 

June 8. Agreed to replace John Young by Colonel William Smith in 
command of the detachment of Suffolk County for the frontier. 
Order for Captain Edward Chant to answer Sir W. Phips's accusa- 
tions in writing. Orders for sundry payments. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXXV., pp. 428-433.] 

[June 5.] 387. Lord Howard of Effingham to Lords of Trade and Planta- 
tions. Thomas Gardner did apply to me when I was in Virginia 
for the 41200 promised by Sir W. Berkeley for taking Bacon during 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 113 

1693. 

the rebellion ; but the revenue being very low I paid him but 25, 
on which I heard no more of him until the present petition. I was 
told by the Council at the time that he did very good service in 
apprehending Bacon, but I do not know if he has received any more 
of that gratuity. Sir/ned. Effingham. Holograph. 1 p. Endorsed, 
Reed. 5 June, 1693. \Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. Xo. 23 ; and 
36. pp. 276-277.] 

June 6. 388. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. Order for payment 
of 10 to Elizabeth Fothergill for nursing two sick men of H. M.S. 
Conception. Order for payment of 100 to Increase Mather as 
President of Harvard College. [Co/. Entn/ /*/,-., Vol. LXIV., 
p. 239.] 

June 6. 389. Minutes of General Assembly of Massachusetts. Several 
Councillors sworn. Bill to prevent clandestine sales read a second 
time. Four Councillors appointed to thank Increase Mather for 
his sermon. Bill for confirmation of titles in Martha's Vineyard 
read a first time. Bartholomew Green allowed to set up a press in 
Boston, for the printing of what is licensed only. 

June 7, Proclamation for apprehension of deserters from Their Majesties' 
service. Bills for restraining excessive usury, and to regulate the 
building of ships read a first time. James Taylor approved as 
Treasurer. 

June 8. The bills as to usury and ship-building passed. Bill to encourage 
a Post Office read a first time. 

June 9. Post Office bill passed. William and Benjamin Browne sworn of 
the peace in Essex County, and John Carey approved as Clerk of 
the peace etc. in Bristol County. Bill for confirming titles in 
Martha's Vineyard read a second time. Order for payment of the 
expenses of the Commissioners who visited Martha's Vineyard. 
Bill for better collection of the Impost and Excise duties read a first 
time. 

June 10. Bill for better securing the estates of deceased persons read a 
first time. [Col Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV., pp. 398-402.] 

June 7. 390. Lords of the Admiralty to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 
We think that all prizes taken to westward of Fayal should be 
within the jurisdiction of the Admiralty Courts to be established in 
America. Signed. Falkland, J. Lowther, Robt. Austen. \ p. 
Endorsed, Reed. 9 June. Read 12th June, 1693. \_Board of 
Trade. Plantations General, 2. X'o. 60 : and Jamaica, 53. 
p. 143.] 

June 10. 391. Minutes of Council of New 7 York. William Pinhorne 
readmitted to the Council on his coming to live in New York. 
Orders for repairs of the fort. The Committee presented its report 
as to the debts of the Colony and the manner of paying them. 
Order for the payment of the debts enumerated by them. 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXX]'., pp. 433, 434.] 

June 10. 392. Lieutenant-Governor Sir William Beestoii to the Earl of 

Jamaica. Nottingham. Since my last I have news from Carthagena that a 

strong rebellion of blacks was lately designed in and about that 

city. The plot having been revealed to the Governor by a negro 

8060 H 



114 COLONIAL 1'Al'ERS. 

1G93. 

boy the soldiers were presently ordered in arms, who fell upon all 
the negroes, free as well as slaves, that they met in the city, and 
destroyed them. The Governor then raised about 2,000 men, 
marched into the Country and fell upon all that they met with 
there. I cannot yet say bow many they killed, but they themselves 
say about 300. Yet before this could be accomplished (so the 
report says) the blacks seized upon about sixty of the handsomest 
young virgins and carried them into the woods. This will cause 
a great want and make negroes dear amongst them. When I sent 
the Falcon to cruise on the coast of Hispaniola, there being no 
negroes here to supply the Assiento, Sir Tames Castile sent four 
sloops to St. Thomas with about .-'300,000 in money in hopes of 
securing negroes there. There is no news yet of any of them 
though we daily expect them, and now here are about 700 negroes 
arrived and more daily expected. The Assembly has passed four 
Acts to which I have consented, one for a day of humiliation, 
another to raise money to arm two sloops for our defence, a 
third to recall deserters from us, and the fourth to hinder 
export of provisions and stores of war. They have now adjourned 
and gone home to levy the tax. There is still much trouble about 
the Admiralty Court. Many think I have not power to condemn 
prizes, and the Assembly wishes to pass a special act, but this I 
refused, not being willing to trench on the Royal prerogative for 
the enlargement of my own authority. Letters from England 
by way of Barbados say that I am already removed from this 
Government, but I cannot believe that when the King has raised 
me to such employment he will turn me out without cause assigned. 
Whatever the royal decision I shall not complain, but I submit it to 
your consideration what a loss it must be to a man to disseat 
himself, spend much money, and hazard a dangerous 'voyage to a 
desolate and sickly country, only to be turned out without having 
offended. It must lead to reflections and disreputation which is 
greater loss to an innocent man than all the rest. Signed. Wm. 
Beeston. Duplicate. 1^ pp. \_Amenca and. West Indies. 540. 
No. 34.] 

June 10. 393. Lieutenant-Governor Sir William Beeston to Lords of 
Jamaica. Trade and Plantations. I. enclose copies of four Acts passed by the 
Council and Assembly. Several privateers and pirates "that go 
under the notion of this Island" have found their way into the lied 
Sea, where they have committed unheard of piracies, murders and 
barbarities. These are now returned with vast wealth to most of 
the northern plantations in America where they quietly enjoy their 
ill-gotten riches, but whether with or without the knowlege of the 
Governments I do not know. The Assembly has adjourned till the 
27th inst., most of the members, as justices of the peace, having 
gone to raise the tax to lit out sloops against the French privateers. 
Sinned. Wm. Beeston. f p. Endorsed, Reed. 6 Nov. 1693. 
[Board of Trade. Jamaica, 1. Xo. 17 ; and 53. pp. 170, 171.] 

June 12. 394. Minutes of Council of Nevis. The Council proposed that 
the sick men should be brought ashore from H.M.S. Chester and 
provided for at the Island's expense. The Assembly agreed to set 
apart a place for them, but thought it unreasonable for the charge 



AME1UCA AND WEST INDIES. iir, 

1H98. 

to be borne by the Island. Joint Committee appointed to make a 
new division of the trenches. The Assembly agreed with the 
Council to draw an Act to compel horses and negroes to be sent to 
their respective companies on an alarm. The King's letters patent 
for grant of an escheated estate to Samuel Gardner offered for 
consent of the Council and consented to. The Assembly and 
Council agreed to replace such gun-carriages as are rotten by lignum, 
vitce or mastic wood. Joint Committee appointed to fix the price of 
provisions. [Col. Entry Ilk., Vol. XLVIII., pp. '278. 279.J 

June 1'2. 395. Governor Fletcher to William Blathwayt. The bearer, 
Xow York. Colonel Lodowyck, is charged by the Council to lay the affairs of the 
Province before my Lords and yourself, if you can spare the time. 
He can tell you more than I can write. He is a man of very good 
principles and strict morals, and will find credit with you. I can- 
not promise much assistance to this province from Pennsjdvania. 
I have spent some weeks there, but never yet found so much self 
conceit. They will rather die than resist with carnal weapons 
nay they would persuade me their province was in no danger of 
being lost to the Crown, though they have neither arms nor 
ammunition ; nor would they suffer the few men lit for it to be 
trained. Their minutes of Council and Assembly, which are now 
transmitting to you, will appear a farce. I was at a loss for want 
of a provincial seal. I could not carry that of New York with me, 
nor would it have done for Pennsylvania, as it is yet distinct. Pray 
procure me a warrant to use the seal of New York. We shall also 
want 20 pieces or artillery for the fort, with ammunition, but I know 
not whether these people will ever answer so great a charge to the 
Crown. They will not fight themselves nor part with money to such 
as will do it for them. I am now starting for Albany, having news 
that some of our Five Nations are inclined to treat with the French. 
Signed. Ben. Fletcher. Holor/rajrii. 2-J pp. Endorsed, Heed. 
8 Sept. 1693. [Board of Trade." New York, 5. X<>. 15 ; and 48. 
pp. 53-55.] 

June 12. 396. Abstract of the preceding letter, with the following 
abstract from the Minutes of Council in Pennsylvania. 2G April. 
Philadelphia. Governor Fletcher's Commission was published, 
Thomas Lloyd, the Deputy Governor, being offered the first place 
in the Council, refused. Mr. Markham was sworn to that place, 
and several other persons also were appointed of the Council. 
27 April. Mr. Markham appointed Lieutenant-Governor. A list 
of civil officers approved. On debate as to the number of 
representatives, it was decided that four members be chosen for 
Philadelphia, the like for Newcastle, and three for each of the other 
Counties. 2 May. Newcastle. Governor Fletcher's Commission 
published, and several justices of the peace took the oaths or signed 
the declarations. 5 Mai/. Petition of seven persons, styling 
themselves the delegates of the Provincial Council, read, praying 
that the Legislative powers should be called together as provided by 
the received law of the province. Agreed that, the address being 
general, the Governor cannot regard nor answer it. 8 May. 
Besolved to build a fort to command the channel on the river ; the 



116 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1093. 

site to 1)0 considered. 10 May. Some Indians came to pay their 
respects, and to ask that the Senecas may be persuaded not to harm 
them, as last summer. They were thankful for a Lieutenaut- 
Governor whom they knew, as, when the Quakers governed, 
sometimes one and sometimes another pretended to the Govern- 
ment, and when they went to war with French or Indians the 
Quakers would not encourage them nor make any preparation 
themselves. 18 May. Several justices took the oaths or signed the 
declarations; three refused. IG May. George Ferman sworn of 
the Council. 2^ pp. \_Jioard of Trade. New York, 5. Xo. 16 ; 
and (abstract of letter only) 48. p. 49.] 

[June 12.] 397. A collection of documents sent hy Governor Fletcher with 
his letter of 12 June. 

897. i. William Penn to Governor Fletcher. London. 5 Decem- 
ber, 1(592. Hearing that a Commission goes to thee to 
command my province at least during the war and my 
absence, I give thee this caution that I am an English- 
man, and that country and the Government of it inseparably 
my property, dearly purchased in every way, and much 
indebted to me and to my children. No quo icarranio has 
been brought nor trial held in that affair, so \ must impute 
it to misinformation given to the Lords of Trade and 
Plantations and to excessive care on their part for British 
territory. I therefore hope thou wilt tread softly. Thou 
hast formerly discoursed largely in favour of free and 
property principles ; I expect proof of it in my own case, 
and that my deputies find no interruption, they being as 
fully empowered by my patent as though I myself were on 
the spot. The discouragement which will be given to the 
inhabitants, who went there in reliance on the faith of the 
Crown, and the decay of their infant trade, are the motives 
that prompt me to write thus. Copi/. 1^ pp. Endorsed, 
Reed. 20 Dec. '93. 

397. ii. Extract from a letter from William Penn to a gentlemen 
in Philadelphia. You will have heard of the Commission 
adding Pennsylvania to the Government of New York. 
Insist on your patent with moderation but with steady 
integrity. Obey the Crown speaking the language of 
the law, which this Commission is not, but mere sic rolo 
sicjubeo. Doubtless this is due to misrepresentations by 
your jealous neighbours who suggest that the French Anil 
make invasion through my province. Set forth the 
falsehood of this, your singular situation by land and sea, 
your hazards, charges, labours, that the government and 
not land was your motive, that you were a people that 
could have lived at home and went not upon motives of 
guilt or poverty, that it will be the ruin of the Province, 
which daily brings in more custom to the Crown than 
revenue to the Government there. Send this to our 
friends in London and Bristol, who will deliver your 
representation to the Lords of Trade and Plantations, 
Jlcre is added the following, 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 117 

1(593. 

In another letter Mr. Penn asks for a hundred persons 
in Pennsylvania to lend him each '100 without interest 
for three years and without further security than his bond 
and his promise to embark with all his family within six 
months after receipt. However they may be his friends 
they stagger when he comes near their purses. Copy. 
I}: pp. Endorsed, Eecd. 20 Dec. '98. 

897. in. Address of some of the well affected inhabitants of Phila- 
delphia to Governor Fletcher. Welcoming him to Penn- 
sylvania, and thanking him for the appointment of 
William Markham as Lieutenant-Governor. 117 signatures. 
Copy. Ivy pp. Endorsed, Reed. 8 Sept. 1698. 

897. iv. Printed copy of No. III. Endorsed, Reed. 26 Sept. 
1693. 

397. v. List of officers appointed by Governor Fletcher in 
Pennsylvania. 26 April, 1693. Lieutenant Governor. 
William Markham. Council. Andrew Robeson, Robert 
Turner, Patrick Robinson, Laurence Cork, William 
Salway, John Cann, William Clarke, George Foreman. 
Assembly. Twenty elected representatives. Chief Justice. 
Andrew Robeson. Justices of Snjtreinc Court. William 
Clarke, John Cann, William Salway, Edward Blake. 
Collector and Reccicer General. Robert Turner. 36 
justices of the peace. Signed. David Jamison. 2t} 7^). 
Endorsed, Reed. 8 Sept. 1693. [Board of Trade. New 
York, 5. No. 16, 16i.-v.] 

June 12. 398. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Abstract of 
Governor Fletcher's letters of 14 February, 8 March, and 22 April 
read (see Nos. 84, 179, 289). The Attorney General was asked to 
report on the Charters of Rhode Island and Connecticut and the 
grants of New Jersey. 

Petition of Benjamin Skutt as to a packet service referred to the 
Commissions of the Post Office. 

Colonel Ralph Wormeley to be recommended as Secretary of 
Virginia. 

Sir W'illiam Beeston's letter of 23 March read (see No. 209). 
Agreed to make the appointments which he recommends to the 
Council and to give a dormant commission to a Lieutenant- 
Governor. The Admiralty's report on the Commission for reprisals 
was received and approved. 

John Kirton's petition referred to the Attorney General. John 
Hallett's suspension from the Council confirmed until his case can 
be heard. Petition of Richard Haynes referred to the Attorney 
General. 

Abstracts of Sir William Phips's letters of 20th and 27th February 
and 3rd and 6th April read (ace Xos. 107-109, 237, 247). Order for 
extracts relating to Captain Short to be sent to the Admiralty. 
{Board of Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 191-198.] 

June 12. 399. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. To recommend 
the confirmation of Ralph Wormeley in the post of Secretary of 
Virginia. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 36. p. 237.] 



11H 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 

June 12. 400. Petition of John Kirton to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 
For confirmation of a private Act of Barbados to enable him to sell 
the estate of Brookhaven in that Island. ^ p. Endorsed, llecd. 
12 June, '93. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. X<>. 17.] 

[June.] 401. Act of Barbados to enable John Kirton to sell certain 
lands, passed 4th Aug. 1691. Copy. 3 pp. Attached, a certificate 
that the copy is sworn correct. Signed. J. Kendall. [Hoard of 
Trade. Barbados, 5. No. 18.] 

[June 12.] 402. Abstract of Sir William Phips's letters written in Febru- 
ary, March and April, 1693. 63- pp. Endorsed, Reed. 12 June, 
1693. [Hoard of Trade. New England, 6. No. 66.] 



June 12. 



June 12. 



June 12. 



June 12. 



June 12. 



June 12. 



June 12. 



June 13. 



June 12. 



403. John Povey to Mr. Sotherne. Forwarding extract from 
Sir William Phips's letter of 3 April (see No. 237), as to the substitu- 
tion of his own ship for H.M.S. Conception on the New England 
Station. [Col. Entry HI,:, Vol. LXIL, pp. 435-436.] 

404. John Povey to Henry Guy. Forwarding extracts from 
Governor Fletcher's letters as to the violation of the Navigation 
Acts, for information of the Treasury. [Board of Trade. New 
York, 48. p. 27.] 

405. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. That the 
King be moved to order arms and accoutrements for two troops of 
dragoons to be sent to New York. [Board of Trade. New York, 
48. p. 28.] 

406. John Povey to the Recorder of London. Recruits being- 
needed for the two companies at New York, you are desired to state 
what number of malefactors are now in Newgate who are to have 
the benefit of the transportation-pardon and may properly be used 
for this service. [Hoard of Trade. New York, 48. pp. 46-47.] 

407. John Povey to Mr. Sotherne. Forwarding an extract 
from Sir William Beeston's letter (see No. 209), and asking if 
two small frigates can be sent to Jamaica instead of the Falcon. 
[Hoard of Trade. Jamaica, 53. p. 147.] 

408. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Recommend- 
ing the issue of a dormant Commission to Samuel Bernard to be 
Lieutenant-Governor of Jamaica. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 53. 
p. 155.] 

409. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor asked 
the Council if they had any suggestions to make before he left for 
Albany. Orders for sundry payments in connection with the 
operations at the frontier. 

Order for payment of the four companies at Albany up to 1 May. 
Colonel Lodowyck's instructions signed. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXXV., pp. 434-436.] 

410. Minutes of General Assembly of Massachusetts. Order 
forbidding all intercourse with the officers and men of Sir F. 
Wheler's fleet owing to the sickness thereon, the Governor having 
made provision for the accommodation of the sick. Bill to secure 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. Ill) 

1693. 

deceased persons' estates read a second time ; bill to confirm titles 
in Martha's Vineyard read a third time and debated. Letter 
written to the Government of Connecticut as to the complaints of 
the towns of Enfield and Suffield of the encroachment of the in- 
habitants of Windsor in Connecticut. 

June 13. Bill as to titles in Martha's Vineyard passed. Militia Bill read a 
first time. 

June 14. Bill for better collection of import and excise duties passed. Con- 
ference as to the bill for a market in Boston. Bill to encourage the 
killing of wolves read. Order for an allowance of 100 to the 
town of Gloucester at next assessment, 30 a year granted as salary 
to the doorkeeper and messenger of the Council Assembly. 

June 15. Bill to encourage the killing of wolves passed. Bill for regulating 
Their Majesties' forces read. Major Pyncheon sent to enquire as to 
the murder of persons by Indians at Deerfield, and a letter written 
to Governor Fletcher, asking that the Magistrates at Albany may 
enquire as to the same likewise. 

June 16. Bill for coasting vessels read. Bill to change the time of the 
Superior Court in Bristol, Barnstable and Plymouth carried. Francis 
Hooke appointed Probate judge of York County and John Wincoll 
registrar of wills. 

June 17. Order for allowance of 50 to the people of Nantucket at next 
assessment. James Taylor sworn Treasurer. Bill allowing 500 to 
John Phillips, late Treasurer, read and debated. Adjourned to 6 
July. [Col. Entn/ Bk., Vol. LAY P., pp. 402-408.] 

June 13. 411. John Povey to Mr. Sotherne. Forwarding extract from 
Sir William Phips's letter, reporting his suspension of Captain 
Short, for information of the Admiralty (sec No. 88). [Col. 
Entn/ Bk., Vol. LXIL, p. 436.] 

June 13. 412. John Povey to the Commissioners of the Post Office. 
Forwarding the petition of Benjamin Skutt . (sec Xo. 383) for 
their report. Draft. J p. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. No. 19.] 

June 13. 413. John Povey to the Attorney General. Forwarding the 
petition of John Kirton, and the Act of Barbados concerning him, 
for his report. This entry is misdated, 1692, in tlie Entn/ Jjook. 
[Col. Entn/ Bk., Vol. VIII., pp. 374, 375.] 

June 13. 414. Instructions of the Governor and Council of New York 
to Charles Lodowyck. He is to represent to the Lords of Trade 
and Plantations the exhausted state of the province and the im- 
possibility of guarding the frontier at Albany without help in men 
and money from the neighbouring Colonies, which despite the 
Royal orders will give no assistance. Nothing is to be hoped for 
from Pennsylvania, the people being mostly Quakers, unless it be 
joined to New York. The annexation of the Jerseys would be of 
great advantage since all the people that can are moving thither to 
escape taxation, likewise the annexation of Connecticut being within 
two days' march, "dry-foot," of Albany. The Indians are inclined 
to make peace with the French, not having received the usual 
presents. If this happen the province will be ruined, and not only 
the province but the whole of the Colonies. New York again is 



120 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

much injured in her trade since the Navigation Acts are not enforced 
in neighbouring Colonies. If Canada were once taken from the 
French, all dangers would he removed. Copy. 3 pp. [Board of 
Trade. New York, 5. Xo. 17.] 

June 14. 415. The Receiver of London to Lords of Trade and Planta- 
tions. In reply to your letter ordering me to inspect my papers of 
convicts for transportation I can find but fourteen men, which I 
think would answer your purpose. Signed. S. Lovell. } f p. [Board 
of Trade. New York, 5. No. 18 ; and 48. -p. 47.] 

June 15. 416. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Sir William 
Beeston's letter of 23 March further considered. Order for part of 
it to be reported to the King, and for the new Commissions for the 
government of Barbados and Jamaica to be respited for the present. 
The Attorney General's report on the draft charter of the 
Proprietors of New Jersey read. 

Order for the Board of Ordnance to report on Governor Fletcher's 
request for stores. [Board of Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 198-200.] 

June 15. 417. Memorandum of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Recom- 
mending that the signature of the commissions and instructions to 
the Governors of Barbados and Jamaica be delayed until August, 
by which time the Committee will have further particulars before it 
and can act accordingly. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 53. pp. 152- 
153.] 

June 15. 418. John Povey to the Lieutenant-General of the Ordnance. 
Enclosing a list of the ordnance stores asked for by Governor 
Fletcher, for report whether they can be supplied. [Board of 
Trade. New York, 48. pp. 71-72.] 

June 15. 419. Order of the Privy Council. For arms and accoutrements 
Whitehall, for two troops of dragoons to be sent to New York. [Board oj 
Trade. New York, 48. pp. 28-29.] 

June 19. 420. Governor Richier to Lords of Trade and Plantations. I 
Bermuda, have an account of several articles exhibited against me before you. 
I thank God I can safely say that they do not affect me and do not 
doubt that I shall justify myself. I could not read the last article 
without horror. Innocency itself could not preserve me at that 
moment from consternation at finding myself accused of breach 
of trust and black ingratitude, crimes which my soul abhors. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Jenkins (who died of the sickness) is charged 
with disaffection, and I hear that it is sworn that he refused the 
oaths of allegiance. Twice he took them on assuming different 
offices ; the times and places are registered and sworn to by the 
Secretary. I beg leave to come to England and defend myself. I 
cannot uphold the King's authority nor carry out my duty without 
a sufficient number of soldiers. I have now little more than the 
name of Governor, especially since my accusers have written to 
announce their success against me. Samuel Trott, Thomas 
Walker and another have endeavoured to raise an open rebellion 
against me, which I have so far with difficulty prevented by the 
help of Mr. Fifield. So little assistance have I had that those 



AMERICA AN]) WEST INDIES. 121 

1603. 

people would say that if Fifield were out of -the way, the Governor 
would have none to execute his commands. They pitched upon 
Walker, a man of violent temper, to finish their malice against 
him, who after lying in wait for him several times without success, 
caused Mr. Fifield to meet him outside the town on the 29th of May 
and having a sword hidden in the grass gave him (both their 
swords being drawn) a mortal wound above the left pap. Walker 
has made many friends by this murder, and so little is the crime 
resented that it is made a great article against me for putting him 
in irons, which Trott tells them is against the Magna Charta. I 
have granted a warrant to his brother, John Fifield, to remain in the 
Secretary's office till I receive the King's orders. I trust that you 
will not assume my guilt before I have an opportunity of defending 
myself. Signed. I. Richier. 2 pp. Endorsed, Reed. 6 Dec. '93. 
[Board of trade. Bermuda, 2. No. 11 ; and 28. pp. 92-94.] 

June 20. 421. Minutes of Council of Barbados. Councillors Bond and 
Bromley reported that John Sutton, John Pilgrim and John Leslie 
had been returned by a majority of votes for the Assembly, but 
could not produce certificates that they had taken the sacrament, 
as required by law. Councillor Bond therefore did not return the 
members as elected ; but Mr. Bromley, having returned Mr. Leslie 
as elected, was with him severely rebuked by the Governor, who 
declared the election void. John Holder's election was objected to 
on the same grounds and on other grounds also, and the objection 
was upheld by the Governor. Other members and returning 
officers also were rebuked for being unqualified and returning 
unqualified men. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XII., pp. 407-410.] 

June 22. 422. J. Sotherne to JohnPovey. Forwarding a letter, respect- 
Admiralty, ing the withdrawal of the guard over the masts at Piscataqua. 
Signed. J. Sotherne. \ p. Annexed, 

422. i. Extract of a letter from John Taylor. 15 June, 1693. I 
am informed that Sir W. Phips has removed from Pisca- 
taqua a company of soldiers that had lain there three years 
and, with the inhabitants, pretty well secured the place 
from insults of French and negroes. The masts and all 
other concerns are now exposed, and may be destroyed by 
a small number of men, so I beg that the frigate may be 
ordered from Boston to Piscataqua. Copy. % p. [Board 
of Trade. New Hampshire, 1. Nos. 26, 26 i.] 

June 22. 423. Captain Richard Short to Mr. Sotherne. I have already 
Xew York, acquainted you with my illtreatment at Sir William Phips's hands. 
T made my way from Piscataqua to New York, arriving about the 
middle of May, and lay there till the 17th of June, when, while 
waiting for a fair wind, I received a letter from Captain Fairfax 
advising me of Sir Francis Wheler's arrival at Boston, whither I am 
now bound with all speed. Copy. 1 p. {Board of Trade. New 
England, 6. No. 67.] 

June 22. 424. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for payments of 

certain salaries and on account of fortifications. Order for purchase 



I'll 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



-Tune 23. 



June 24. 



June 20. 



June 29. 



June 30. 

Whitehall. 



June 30. 

Whitehall. 



June BO. 

Whitehall. 



June 30. 



and delivery of arms, for revival of night guards, and for em- 
powering colonels to hold regimental courts martial. [Hoard of 
Trade. Jamaica, 77. pp. 252, 253.] 

425. Petition of JohnHallett to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 
I hear that, my petition to the Queen having heen referred to you, 
you will not examine the proofs until the whole of the proceedings 
are hefore you. I beg therefore that all testimonies and records proper 
to he sworn on my Behalf in Barbados may be taken there, and that 
the sum of 2,500 be deposited in the Court there, not to be disposed 
of till you have determined the case. I p. Inscribed. Reed. 23 June. 
'93. [Board of 'Oracle. Barbados, 5. No. 20; and Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. VIII., pp. 358-359.] 

426. Minutes of Council of Nevis. Acts for sending down 
horses on alarms, and for fixing the price of fresh provisions, passed. 
A new member added to the Committee appointed for assessment. 
New Articles of War and Act to confirm the same passed. Agreed 
to grant compensation to Mrs. Earle for damage to her property in 
the fortifying of Mount Mary. Agreed to empower the Treasurer 
to repair the Sessions-house. On the proposal of the Assembly for 
withdrawal of half the negroes from work on Mount Mary the 
Council agreed to withdraw three fourths of them on the first Monday 
in August. Act to repeal the Act for regulating of money passed. 
[Co, 7 . Entry Bk., Vol. XLV1IL, p. 279.] 

427. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. A letter to Major 
Pyncheon was approved, directing further enquiry into the case of 
an Indian arrested for a murder at Deerfield. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXIV., pp. 239-240.] 

428. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. Order for payment 
of 500 to Sir William Phips for his expenses since his arrival. 
Proclamation for a day of prayer and fasting. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXIV., pp. 240, 241.] 

429. Order of the Queen in Council. Appointing Fulke Rose 
and Henry Low to be of the Council of Jamaica. $i<ined. John 
Nicholas. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 53. p. 156.] 

430. Order of the Queen in Council. For a dormant com- 
mission to be prepared for Samuel Bernard, to be Lieutenant- 
Governor of Jamaica. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 53. p. 157 ; 
and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIII., pp. 844-345.] 

431 . Order of the Queen in Council. Directing the Commissions 
for the Governors of Barbados and Jamaica to erect Courts for trial 
and condemnation of prizes, to pass the Great Seal. Signed. John 
Nicholas. 

Here follows copy of the Commission. [Board of Trade. 
Jamaica, 53. pp. 144-146 ; and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIII., 
pp. 348-351 ; and Vol. C\, p. 299.] 

432. Minutes of Council of Virginia. Order for clearing all 
ships for Europe that are ready to sail on the 17th of July, on their 
giving security to assemble at York River. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 
LXXXTV., pp. 810-311.] 



AMERICA AM) WEST INDIES. 1-2:; 

1698. 

[June?] 433. Abstract of a Memorial from the Governor of Martinique 
to Monsieur de Chamlay. 1. The French are divided between too 
many Islands, consequently, being unable to succour each other, 
several have been driven off and others much endangered. 2. To 
relieve these people I propose to settle them in Jamaica. Five or 
six men-of-war, with above forty guns, and two thousand regular 
troops will suffice, with arms and ammunition for five thousand 
men. A number of smaller vessels will carry two thousand persons 
who have been ruined by the English in St. Christophers, Guade- 
loupe, Hispaniola, eve. The enterprise should be conducted under 
the flag of England and by Commission from King James. The 
real design should appear to be the proclamation of King James, 
and then by his name the people will be gained over. The advan- 
tages of Jamaica are set forth. Translation. 2 pp. Undated. 
[Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. Xo. 17.v.] 

July 1. 434. Office of Ordnance to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 

We have considered the list of stores demanded for Fort William 
Henry in New York, and though the list is very long considering 
that the place has already been supplied once since Their Majesties' 
accession according to Governor Sloughter's full requisition, yet we 
cannot say that they are unnecessary, the less so since Governor 
Fletcher reports the embezzlement of much of the stores before his 
arrival. The arms and accoutrements for the troops of dragoons 
are already shipped. As to brass guns, none but iron guns are 
allowed for any garrisons at home or abroad. If the Treasury will 
provide the money, the stores can be supplied. Signed. H. Goodricke, 
Jo. Charlton, Tho. Littleton, Win. Boulter. 1 p. Endorsed, Reed. 
2 July. Read 15 Sept. and 27 Dec. '93. [Hoard of Trade. 
New York, 5. No. 19 ; and 48. pp. 72-74.] 

[July 2.] 435. Act of East New Jersey. To forbid the exportation of 
timber, etc., except .100 security be given by the ship's master to 
carry the same to Great Britain or the West Indies. Copy. 1 p. 
Endorsed. Reed. 2 July, 1698, from Colonel Fletcher. [Board of 
Trade. New York, 5. No. 20.] 

July 3. 436. Commissioners of the Post Office to Lords of Trade and 
Post Office. Plantations. On the petition of Benjamin Skutt (sec No. 383), 
we see no objection to his proposed packet-service provided he be 
obliged to deliver all letters both in England and Barbados immedi- 
ately on arrival ; and we believe that such a service will be of great 
utility to the merchants. Signed. R. Cotton, Tho. Frankland. 1 p. 
Endorsed. Reed. 5 July, 1693. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. 
No. 21.] 

July 3. 437. Governor Codrington to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 
I enclose duplicates of my letters of 10 and 15 May. After writing 
them I visited all the Islands of my Government ; and in each they 
have ever since been mending the old fortifications and making 
some new ones, in case of an attack by the French. But I must 
acknowledge that our numbers are so lessened by sickness and by 
the war that we cannot be safe unless a squadron of ships be sent to 
us ; for if ships of war should arrive from France we may undoubtedly 



124 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1698. 

expect a descent from Martinique, and we have little reason to 
believe that Sir Francis Wheler can be fitted in New England to 
return to us. I beg therefore the more urgently for a squadron to 
be sent to us. Sinned. Chr. Codrington. 1 j>. Endorsed, Reed. 
30 October, '93. Undated ,- but intended date is given in Codrinyton's 
letter of 17 October, 1693. [Hoard of Trade. Leeward Islands, 4. 
No. 14 ; and 44. pp. 129, 130.] 

July ('). 438. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for payment for 
despatch of messages by land and water. [Board of Trade. 
Jamaica, 77. pp. 253, 254.] 

July (>. 439. Minutes of General Assembly of Massachusetts. The 
Governor, being unwell, directed the Assembly to consider what 
bills were before them and adjourn de die in diem. 

July 7. A joint Committee appointed to examine the dispute between the 
towns of Ipswich and Topsfield as to boundaries. Bills for securing 
estates of deceased persons debated. Governor Fletcher's letter 
as to the murder at Deerfield read, as also the answer thereto. The 
Governor reported that the Indians at Pemaquid desired a cessation 
of arms. 

July 8. Bill to enable John Phillips to collect his arrears read a first 
time. Agreed to send Major-General Wait Winthrop and Major 
John Pyncheon to Albany to treat with the Indians there. [Col. 
Entry Bh., Vol. LXLV., pp. 409-411.] 

July 7. 440. Dormant Commission to Samuel Bernard to be Lieutenant- 
Governor of Jamaica in case of Sir William Beeston's death or 
absence. Copy. 1 J pp. Undated. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. 
No. 18; and 58. pp. 158, 159 ; and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIII., 
pp. 345-347.] 

July 8. 441. Sir Francis Wheler to Governor Sir William Phips. I 
New England, have already communicated to you our extremely sickly condition, 
and the King's orders for us to join such forces as you have raised 
and attack Quebec. Your answer was that you had received no 
instructions as to the expedition, that the force for that service 
should be at least 4,000 strong, that we ought to have sailed on 
that service at very latest on the 1st of July, and that you should 
have been given at least four months to collect your forces from 
the other colonies. The health of our men is now restored, but of 
the two regiments with us not above 650 of all ranks are left, and 
of the fleet not half its complement remains, and of that remainder 
not above a third are seamen. The ships themselves are in good 
order, and we have plenty of provisions. Pray give me your 
opinion in Council whether we alone can attack Quebec, and if not, 
what place in the Canada river or Newfoundland can be forced by 
us. Pray state also and give in writing your opinion as to the men 
and ships necessary and the time of year most fitting for an attack 
on Quebec or other of the French plantations in Canada. Here 
follows a list of the squadron. Copy. 1J pp. Endorsed, Reed. 
'5 Jan. 1693-4. " [Board of Trade. New England, 6. No. 68.] 

July 10. 442. Governor Kendall to Lords of Tra.de and Plantations. 
Barbados. When the Assembly of last year brought me a bill for raising a 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 125 

1693. 

thousand men and for a sum. of money to defray the expense, they 
at the same time presented me with an unanimous address, assuring 
me that if the money proved insufficient for the expense of the 
expedition they would raise what should further be needed. After 
the departure of the forces for Martinique the accounts were made 
up, when it was found that no less than 5,000 would he wanting 
for that service. I therefore called the Assembly and acquainted 
them that their honour would suffer much if they did not make 
provision for the payment of the debt, the Commissioners having 
upon the public faith engaged themselves for it. But no arguments 
prevail with them, one great reason being that, their time being 
near expired, they thought by this shew of frugality to commend 
themselves to the county at the next election. Being much con- 
cerned at this behaviour and at the ill consequences of it I expressed 
myself warmly about it in Council, where some of their patrons and 
advisers endeavoured to excuse them, and all were of opinion that if I 
issued writs at the expiration of that Assembly, the same men would 
be chosen and would certainly make good what they had promised. 
This I accordingly did, and in the writs reference was made to an 
Act passed in the former Assembly, by which, among other qualifi- 
cations, all candidates were required to produce a certificate of their 
having received the sacrament within twelve months before. But 
when the writs came to be returned there were but twelve members 
found so qualified and therefore the rest of the elections were 
declared void and new writs issued in the same form as the first. 
Notwithstanding this second writ some members of the Council, 
to whom they were directed, had the insolence to return the same 
men as before, though they knew them to be still unqualified 
and obstinately so. I took this as a signal affront to myself and 
the Government and expressed myself accordingly, asking these 
Councillors before their parishioners if they thought that Act about 
electing had the force of law. They agreed that it had. Then I 
asked them if the}^ would advise me to dispense with any part of it. 
They said no ; on which I think you will agree that I had reason 
enough to be angry with them. Notwithstanding the endeavours of 
these factious fellows the members duly elected amounted to seven- 
teen ; and as fifteen suffice to make a house I sent to them to choose a 
Speaker and ordered new writs to be issued for the five wanting 
members. But these incendiaries, resolved to give me as much 
trouble as they could, prevailed with three of the seventeen to 
absent themselves, though on the place immediately before, so that 
there were but fourteen left, not enough to make a house, choose a 
Speaker and punish refractory members. But at the return of the 
next writs I doubt not but there will be a house, and that the 
villainous designs of these ill men will be defeated. 

The names of the chief persons for whom there has been so much 
struggle are Holder, Sutton and Pilgrim. The first of these owned 
himself at quarter sessions to be a Quaker, and it is notorious that 
neither he nor any of his children have been christened; and 
therefore it is to be believed that he has a dispensation to take the 
oaths and pull off his hat that he may be the more serviceable to 
his party. The Quakers indeed are very numerous here and a great 
weakness to the Island, for they are wholly useless for its defence 



120 COLONIAL PATERS, 

1693. 

and yet of considerable interest and great industry in promoting 
the election and preferment of such as are well affected towards 
them. It is most certain that they are all Jacobites and many of 
them papists in masquerade, the heads of them here holding 
correspondence with William Penn, who governs them as absolutely 
as the King of France does his miserable subjects. Button and 
Pilgrim come to our Church in the morning and go to the Quaker 
meeting in the afternoon ; they are not christened themselves 
nor are their children, nor when dead are they given Christian 
burial. The last Assembly seeing how fatal it would be 
if in process of time they should come to be the greater 
part in the Council or Assembly passed the above mentioned law to 
check them, to which I readily assented. A better proof of its 
necessity could hardly have been given than the present disturbance. 
These three persons, though they had publicly declared that they 
would not qualify themselves under the Act, had yet the impudence 
to make interest to be elected twice, telling the people that they 
were standing up for their liberties, which were abridged Iry that law. 
Such defiance of a law made for the security of the country is in 
my opinion a near approach to rebellion. But that members of 
Council should so far countenance it as to present the same men to 
me twice, after they had refused to produce the certificates required 
by law, seemed to me plain evidence of their unfitness for that trust ; 
and I have accordingly suspended Major Andrews and Mr. John 
Bromley and taken security for their good behaviour. Signed. J. 
Kendall. P.S. Having directed- the writs for the five wanting 
members to well affected men I find, since writing the above, that 
they have returned duly qualified members, so that we have now an 
Assembly legally chosen. I submit five names of honest and 
well affected gentlemen for the vacancies in the Council. The first 
named was lieutenant-colonel to Salter's regiment in the expedition 
to Martinique, and greatly distinguished himself. On a separate 
sheet are tlte names as follows : Colonel Eobert Bishop, John Whet- 
stone, Colonel Eichard Scott, Colonel Willoughby Chamberlayne, 
Philip Price, Burch Heathersall. 3J pp. Endorsed, Reed. 2 Jan. 
Head 3 Jan., '93-4. Annexed, 
442. i., n. Copies of the first and second writs issued to George 

Andrews for election of a member for St. Joseph's, with the 

return of John Holder in each case. 
442. in., iv. Copies of the first and second writs issued to John 

Bromley for election of a member for St. John's, with the 

return of John Leslie, in each case. [Board oj Trade. 

Barbados, 5. Nos. 22, 22 i.-iv. ; and 44. pp. 54-60.] 

July 10. 443. Minutes of General Assembly of Massachusetts. Join 
Committee appointed to draw up a letter to Governor Fletcher as to 
the despatch of negotiation to Albany. Bill to prevent clandestine 
sales again read and debated. 

July 11. The Governor laid before Council Sir F. Wheler's letter of 8 July 
(see Xo. 441). Militia Bill read a second time and committed. 

July 12. A reply to Sir F. Wheler approved. Militia bill amended. 
Additional Bill for regulating the House of Representatives read and 
committed, 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 1'27 

1698. 

Inly 13. Bill for coasting vessels read and amended. Grant of .-500 to 
John Phillips approved, and of an annual salary of .150 until a 
new Treasurer be sworn. Bill for partition of lands read. Letter 
sent to Governor Fletcher to apprise him of the departure of 
messengers to make peace with the Maquas. 

July 14. Bills for coasting vessels, for punishment of criminal offences, and 
for partition of lands were read and passed. The additional bill for 
regulating the House of Representatives was rejected. Bill for 
Sheriffs' accounts read first time. Letter to the Government of New 
Hampshire as to the detention of William Peprell's ship. 

July 15. The Militia Bill was sent down to the Representatives for altera- 
tion. Bill for Sheriffs' accounts passed. Order from John Phillips 
to furnish the last assessment lists. The Governor dissolved 
the Assembly. [CW. Entn/ Bl;., Vol. LXIV., pp. 411-416.] 

July 11. 444. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for the Naval 
Officer to endeavour to get credit for supply of the King's ships, and 
draw bills for the same on the Admiralty. [Board of Trade. 
Jamaica, 77. j>. 254.] 

July 11. 445. Governor Kendall to Earl of Nottingham. Identical with 
the letter to Lords of Trade and Plantations of 10 July, with 
the omission of the recommendations of new members of Council. 
Holograph: 4 pp. [America and West Indies. 456. Xo. 51.] 

July 11. 446. Warrant for the appointment of John Whetstone to be 
of the Council of Barbados. fcCol. Entry P>L:, Vol. VIII., }>. 851.] 

July 11. 447- Minutes of Council of Barbados. John Leslie being now 
duly qualified, was sworn of the Assembly, also William Allonby, 
Richard Walters, George Andrews and John Stewart. John 
Waterman approved as Speaker. The Assembly asked for an 
adjournment, which was granted. George Andrews and John 
Bromley suspended the Council, and ordered to give security for 
good behaviour. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XII., pp. 410-410.] 

July 11. 448. Journal of Assembly of Barbados. List of Members. 
o, Tv T - . i f George Peers 

St. Michael John Stewart 

f Thomas Meyrick 

fei Peters I Alexander Walker 

cu m ' William Eastchurch 

St Thomas William Allonby 

( Archibald Carmiehael 

fet " John f John Leslie 

, . , , ( John Dempster 

Christchurch Thomas . 



G . T I Michael Terrill 

i Robert Yeamans 

c ,, T Abel Alley ne 

fet " James , Richard Walters 

Q, -p, - r f Philip Price 

I Willoughby Chamberlayne 

( John Mills 

Si Andrew Charles Sandiford 



128 COLONIAL PAPEBS. 

1(593. 

| Sir Henry Pickering, Bart. 

TT A 1 j 1 j 

( Henry Applethwaite 

(j, T John Waterman 

fet. Joseph T i ITT ^ 

( John Waterman, jun. 

John Waterman, chosen Speaker, George Payne, Clerk, William 
Burnet, Marshal. The House requested an adjournment, but first 
fixed the salaries of the officers, and altered the rule of the House, 
so that voting should in future he by " escroll " and not by vote. 
Adjourned to 1st August. [Col. Entry l$k., Vol. XLV., pp. 347, 
348.] 

July 11. 449. Extract from Minutes of Council of Barbados, giving the 
proceedings for the suspension of George Andrews and John 
Bromley. Copy. 1^ pp. Endorsed, Kecd. 23 Dec. 1(503. [Board 
of Trade. Barbados, 5. No. 23.] 

July 11. 450. Extract from Minutes of Council of Barbados. Order of 
the Governor deferring the date of the sailing of the fleet to 
England, in concession to a petition from the merchants and 
planters. 4 -pp. Endorsed, Piec. 23 Dec. '93. [Board of Trade. 
Barbados, 5. No. 24.] 

July 12. 451. [The Agents for Barbados to Lords of Trade and Planta- 
tions ?] Before the last fleet sailed to the West Indies we repre- 
sented the extreme want of men and asked that a regiment might 
be stationed there (see No. 193). Hearing now that the cam- 
paign is over and that the regiments are ordered another way, 
we entreat that a regiment may be sent from England with all 
convenient speed. A guard is allowed to the Leeward Islands, and 
the like is as much needed in Barbados. If Barbados should fall, 
the Leeward Islands must likewise perish. The late taxes and the 
present war have so ruined us that we cannot defend ourselves. 
Our sugar works are dropping down: not one man in twenty can 
repair them, so that the whole Island is in poverty and misery. We 
strained ourselves to the utmost to send 1,003 men to the late expe- 
dition, and the number that returned is much short of that which 
went, so that we are weaker than ever, unless helped from England. 
The expedition cost us in one way or another ,30,000, and we have 
not 30,000 acres that can pay taxes, so that the charge of this one 
thing conies to a noble in the pound. We must also ask for a few 
light frigates to protect our provision-ships against French 
privateers. Had not our privateers been discouraged by the 
exaction of the King's tenth part from them, we should not have 
needed these frigates. On the whole matter Barbados will be ruined 
unless supported by ships and men from England. It will be con- 
venient, and no charge to Their Majesties, if there were two despatch 
boats between England and Barbados. We beg for a permission 
and protection for them. Unsigned. 1^ pp. Endorsed, July, 
12, '93. [America and West Indies. 456. No. 52.] 

July 12. 452. Governor Sir William Phips to Sir Francis Wheler. In 

Boston. answer to yours of the 8th we think that you are not strong enough 

to force Quebec, besides that the time is too late to make a descent 

by land in aid of your attack. There is no place in the Canada 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



129 



1693. 



July 14. 

Boston. 



July 14. 

Boston. 



July 14. 

Boston. 



river below Orleans that is worth attacking but you may find French 
merchantmen at St. Pierre and Placentia in Newfoundland worth 
attacking. To attack Quebec 4,000 land-forces are necessary for 
attack on the city and for a diversion by land higher up the river. 
2,000 men should be sent from England, and 2,000 raised in these 
Colonies. The Indians are under the direction of the Government of 
New York. The naval force should be as strong as your present 
squadron. 3,000 firearms and 500 barrels of powder should be sent 
to Boston, and all the Colonies should be warned in good time, so 
that the expedition should be in the river by the 1st of June at 
latest. The English and Colonial forces should meet at the fort of 
Canseau. Copy. 1^ pp. Endorsed, Reed. 5 Jan. '93-4. [Board 
of Trade. New England, 6. No. 69.] 

453. The Secretary of Massachusetts to the Lieutenant-Governor 
and Council of New Hampshire. The complaint of William Peprell 
as to the seizure of his barque is still before us (sec No. 372). 
The matter is highly resented by the Governor and Council, who 
however are ready to accommodate it in a friendly way ; and I am 
desired therefore to ask your reasons for the detention of the ship. 
Signed. Is. Addington. Copy. 1 p. Endorsed, Reed. 20 Dec. '93. 
[Board of Trade. New England, 6. No. 70.] 

454. Lieutenant-Governor Usher to the Earl of Nottingham. 
Since my last, the great guns granted by the King for New Hampshire 
are all mounted, and at the mouth of the river is built a good stone 
fort, called Fort William and Mary. Had we a few more men I 
should not doubt our ability to defend ourselves against a foreign 
enemy. The port is of great importance, since it is the only place 
where the King is supplied w r ith masts ; and it could supply all 
England with resin, pitch and tar, if an end were put to the war 
with the Indians. It would be of great advantage to have a general 
governor over all these provinces. New Hampshire has but 750 
men who ever since April last have been compelled to stand on 
their defence, for Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island 
refuse to help us with men or money, though for this eight weeks 
the enemy's scouts have been discovered about our frontier towns, 
which are greatly exposed to incursions. I hope that the neigh- 
bouring provinces will be ordered to help us with men and money, 
the men to be placed under the orders of the Commander-in-Chief 
of the place which they are in, who will be best able to turn them 
to account. Sixty or a hundred men over and above our own would 
suffice. I fear that the constant watch and ward and the conse- 
quent neglect of husbandry will force our inhabitants to desert the 
frontier-towns, which would be a great advantage to the enemy and 
a great loss to us. Signed. John Usher. 1 _p. [America and 
West Indies. 561. JVo.' 36.] 

455. Lieutenant-Governor Usher to Lords of Trade and Planta- 
tions. All last winter Sir, William Phips kept 63 soldiers in our 
frontier towns for their defence, but in April last (though the 
enemy's scouts had been seen) he withdrew them all and left the 
towns defenceless. The enemy's way is to skulk in the woods till 
an opportunity for onset offers itself ; and when they have done 



8060 



130 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

their mischief to fly back to the woods again. It is a vast expense and 
loss to so little a place for all the men to be on duty daily, and we can 
raise but 750 in the whole province, but I can get no assistance from 
Massachusetts, Connecticut nor Rhode Island, in money or in men. 
If New York can hardly carry on the war by itself, much less can 
we. These Colonies would be better defended if placed under one 
Governor-General. Sir William Phips claiming authority on the 
Piscataqua, I have perused the Charter of Massachusetts and con- 
ceive that he has no right to do so. So I shall assert the right of 
this province from three miles north of the Merrimac up to Maine, 
until your pleasure is known. One Peprell with a ship from the 
south was stopped by the fort to pay duty to Massachusetts. He 
appealed to the General Court at Boston, and some persons were 
sent to treat with me about it, but as they declined to set down their 
business in writing I heard no more of it. If the King would next 
spring send seven or eight frigates and some soldiers and order all 
the Colonies to help, I doubt not but that Canada might easily be 
taken. Signed. John Usher. 1 p. Endorsed, Reed. 24 Sept. 
Read 6 Dec. 1693. [Board of Trade. New Hampshire, 1. No. 27; 
ami Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXVIL, pp. 228-230.] 

July 14. 456. Statement of the sum received by the Agent of Colonel 
Godfrey Lloyd's regiment from 1 April, 1690. '15,888, and 4,490 
for provisions. Scrap. Endorsed, Mr. Gery's acco. 14 July, 1693. 
[Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 4. No. 15.] 

July 14. 457. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor returned 
from Albany and reported that the Indians appeared better satisfied 
than at any period heretofore, and that they had promised to go as 
far against the French in Canada as ever. He reported also that 
he had intelligence from Senectady of the departure of 400 French 
and Indians from Canada to Cadaraqui and of another party of 
French marched for some unknown destination, and that he was 
ready to go to the frontier if he could find forces. It was agreed to 
ask for the 200 men promised by Sir W. Phips. On enquiry into 
the case of the two Indians in custody for murder at Deerfield, the 
Council agreed that their innocence was established, and that Sir 
W. Phips be asked to take care that their blood be not shed by the 
New Englanders. Order for inspection of the city fortifications. 
The Governor reported the receipt of 362 from Maryland as a 
contribution to defence. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 436-439.] 

July 15. 458. Instrument of the Chancellor and Senate of the University 
of Oxford, granting the degree of Master of Arts to Samuel Miles of 
New England. 15 July, 1693. Copy. Latin. Endorsed (by error), 
25 July, 1693. 1 p. [Board of Trade. New England, 6. 
No. 71.] 

July 15. 459. Robert Hooper to Governor Codrington. I have 
acquainted Mr. Crispe with the contents of your letter, but his 
answer is that he knows of no such order as you refer to, and that if 
it was obtained by Captain Thorn and Sir Timothy Thornhill it was 
without his privity. He seemed much unsettled in his resolutions, 
but now he informs me that, not having been in the least 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 131 

1693. 

instrumental in obtaining the order, he will not meddle in the 
prosecution of the accusations against you, and that he begs for 
restoration to your favour, to which end he will acknowledge his 
error in the most signal and open manner that you may think fit to 
propose. (See Governor Codrington's letter of October 17, infra.) 
Copy. 1 p. Endorsed, Eecd. 12 Dec. 1693. 

Duplicate of the foregoing. Endorsed, Eecd. 29 Dec,. 1693. 
[Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 4. Nos. 16, 17.] 

July 17. 460. Minutes of Council of New York. Resolved to send a 
member to Boston to welcome Sir Francis Wheler, and to ascertain 
if he designs an attack on Canada, that there may be time to make 
preparations to help him. Order for a circular to be sent" to the 
neighbouring Colonies asking them to send Commissioners to New 
York on the first Wednesday in October, there to deliberate as to 
the quotas to be furnished for relief of the frontier-guards. Order 
for a circular to the Justices to collect the arrears of taxes. A 
Committee appointed to consider as to the advisability of establishing 
a Court of Exchequer. Order for payments. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 
LXXV., pp. 439-441.] 

July 20. 461. Minutes of Council- of New York. Orders for sundry 
payments ; also for certain licences to purchase lands, and for 
excusing the town of Senectady the payment of the quit-rents due 
Lady-day last. Reduction ordered to be made in the purchase of 
a licence to sell liquor in favour of William Appeel, a poor man 
who was wounded by the French at Senectady in 1689. [Col. 
Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 441-442.] 

July 20. 462. Clerk of Burgesses of Virginia to Lords of Trade and 
Plantations. Forwarding the Journal of the House of Burgesses 
from 2 March to 3 April, 1693. Signed. Peter Beverley. ^ p. 
Endorsed, Reed. 25 Sept. 1693. Enclosed, 

462. i. The Journal of the House of Burgesses, from 2 March to 
3 April. 60 pp. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. 
Nos. 24, 24 1.] 

July 20. 463. Duplicate of the above covering letter. [Board of Trade. 
Virginia, 5. No. 25.] 

July 21. 464. Peter Beverley to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 
Virginia. Forwarding duplicate of the Journal of the House of Burgesses from 

2 March to 3 April, 1693. \ p. Endorsed, Reed. 28 Mar. '94. 

[Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. No. 26.] 

July 21. 465. Minutes of Council of Virginia. George Kener being 
charged by the Rangers with refusing to pay them the tobacco due 
to them, was discharged on his explanation, and offers as to pay- 
ment in future. Charles Anderson ordered to be inducted to 
Westover parish. On the petition of the inhabitants of Sittenborne 
for division of the parish it was ordered that some of the vestrymen 
from each side of the Rappahannock attend on 23rd October. 
Complaint of Hugh Cambell against the County Court of Nancy- 
mond heard, and complainant left to his legal remedy. 



132 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 
July 22. 



July 22. 

Virginia. 



July 22. 



July 22. 

Virginia. 



Order for the fleet to sail to Europe. [Col. Entry Bh., Vol. 
LXXXIV., pp. 811-814.] 

466. Governor Sir Edmund Andros to Lords of Trade and 
Plantations. All is well and orderly here, but we are in great want 
of supplies and have large stores of tobacco in our hands, the 
London fleet not coming in this year, while we have another crop 
already in view. I send the laws and the proceedings of the General 
Assembly, the records of the Council and the Auditors' accounts. 
The revenue is in unexpected arrear ; but want of the usual fleet 
and the contribution of .600 to the Governor of New York is the 
reason. He applied for it just after the French had burned the 
Maquas' Castles and made further attempts on Albany, so I thought 
I could not do less. I wrote the Governor also offering further 
assistance in men or money. I have tried to put the militia in a 
good posture, but find them indifferently armed, few being able to 
provide themselves. I have mounted twelve guns, which were lying 
on the ground at James City, on land carriages, and two more on old 
ship-carriages, to command part of the river. Carriages are also 
making for some good guns at Tindall's Point on York river, and 
designing for other old guns in other places. Pray send us some 
powder and cannon shot, for they are not to be had here, and there is 
no powder in store. I am building a good vault at James City, for 
want of which the powder was formerly distributed all over the 
several Counties. Signed. E. Andros. 2J pp. Endorsed, Reed. 
25 Sept., '93. Read 16 Mar., '93-94. Enclosed, 

466. i. Journal of the General Assembly of Virginia from 2 March 
to 3 April, 1693. 44 pp. 

466. n. Names of persons recommended to supply vacancies in the 
Council. 22nd July, 1693. William Cole, John Armstead, 
Richard Johnson, Edward Portue, Lewis Burwell, Matthew 
Page, Robert Carter, Dudley Diggs, William Randolph, 
John Lloyd, Lawrence Smith, Anthony Lawson. Signed. 
E. Andros. 1 p. Endorsed, Reed. 25 Sept. '93. 

466. in. Another copy of the preceding. 

466. iv. Stores wanted for forts and other places where great guns 
are. A short list in the handwriting of Sir E. Andros. 
1 p. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. Nos. 27, 27 i.-iv. ; 
and (tcitkont enclosures) 36. pp. 241-243.] 

467. Abstract of a letter from Sir E. Andros. Asking leave to go 
as far as Delaware or New York, for the benefit of his health. 1 p. 
Endorsed, Read 16 Mar. '93-4. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. 
No. 28 ; and 36. p. 248.] 

468. Governor Sir Edmund Andros to the Earl of Nottingham. 
This goes by a small fleet of ships to Bristol, which voyage the 
masters have urged to prevent the ships from being eaten up by 
the expense if not by the worm. I forward journal of the 
Assembly and other returns. All is well and quiet here. There 
are few persons who are not satisfied and ready to serve in any 
capacity proper for them. For some of them, as Colonel Richard 
Lee and Mr. Ralph Wormeley, I have already found vacancies pend- 
ing the King's further orders, I find the militia indifferently 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



138 



1693. 



July 22. 



July 25. 

Virginia. 



July 25. 

July 25. 
July 25. 

July 25. 



July 26. 



July 27. 

Boston. 



armed but promising better as soon as they can. Repeats the 
information as to the mounting of guns and the sending help to Neic 
York as in letter to Lords of Trade and Plantations of same date. 
No. 466. Signed. E. Andros. 3 pp. Endorsed, R. Sept. 25, '93. 
[America and West Indies. 638. No. 11.] 

469. Copy of Minutes of Council of Virginia. 20 September, 
1692, to 22 July, 1693. 37 pp. [America and West Indies. 638. 
.Vo. 12.] 

470. Ralph Wormeley to the Earl of Nottingham. Forwarding 
Journals of Council and Assembly. 1 p. Inscribed, R., Sept. 25, 

'93. [America and West Indies. 638. A 7 o. 13.] 

471. Ralph Wormeley to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 
Advising despatch of journals of Council and Assembly. ^ -p. 
Endorsed, Reed. 25 Sept. '93. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. 

No. 29.] 

472. List of the ships lying in James River, Virginia, ready to 
sail for England. Eleven ships in all. 1 p. Endorsed, Reed. 
25 Sept. '93. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. A 7 o. 30.] 

473. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for payment of 
100 to Peter Beckford for repair of fortifications, and to empower 
him to press workmen if he cannot hire them. [Board of Trade. 
Jamaica, 77. p. 254.] 

474. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. Order for the 
discharge of the Indians in custody on suspicion of a murder at 
Deerfield. A letter from Captain March at Pemaquid read, report- 
ing that the Indians had come with a flag of truce and agreed to a 
cessation of arms until the 4th of August. Leave granted to 
Thomas Child and Madame Sarah Leverett to erect buildings in 
Boston. 

Order for payments to Aaron Cooke and John Pyncheon for the 
expense of their mission to Connecticut, relating to a joint prosecu- 
tion of the war. Sir Francis Wheler's letter applying for 400 
men for an attack on Placentia read and an answer approved, show- 
ing the impossibility of supplying the men. The Governor 
announced his intention of going to Pemaquid to hear the 
proposals of the Indians. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV., pp. 241- 
244.] 

475. Governor Sir W T illiam Phips to Sir Francis Wheler. I have 
received your letter of 24th announcing your intention to attack 
Placentia, if reinforced by 400 men from hence. Our charter 
forbids me to march the militia out of the country without their 
own consent or the consent of the Assembly. Had you made your 
proposal while the Assembly was sitting (who were dismissed on 
the 15th hist.), I should have promoted the consideration thereof 
with them. An expedition is now forming against the Indians to 
eastward, which will require many men ; and the contagious 
sickness on the fleet discourages men from going, for it has 
already spread into the country and proved very deadly. Copy, 
l^pp. Endorsed, Reed. 5 Jan. 1693-4. [Board of Trade. New 
England, 6. No. 72.] 



134 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 

July 27. 476. Proclamation dissolving the Assembly of New York. 
New York. Printed sheet. Endorsed, Reed. 26 Sept. 1693. [Board of Trade. 
New York, 5. No. 21.] 

July 27. 477. Lieutenant-Governor Sir William Beeston, to Lords of 
Jamaica. Trade and Plantations. Since my last of 10th June, the two sloops 
raised by the Island are actually at sea, and the country has given 
the whole direction of them to myself, a trust never before granted 
to any Governor. I have now sent them with the Mordaunt to the 
coast of Hispaniola to do all the mischief they can to the French. 
The Falcon has lately returned from cruising, very sickly, having 
buried her captain and fifty seamen. Could she have gone with the 
Mordaunt I doubt not but to have spoiled all the French and their 
settlements, but now I cannot hope for much to be done, for want 
of men. For since this distemper has again fallen upon us, very 
many new-comers and seamen in the merchant-ships are carried 
off by it. Also the encouragement given to the pirates that have 
been in the Red Sea causes our people to run away to them, for 
there they are all pardoned, as I learn from masters of several 
vessels that have come here from those parts and who are 
now buying and fitting out vessels to go again on the same 
design. I have been tempted by order of some of them to pardon 
them here but, much as we want men, I shall not turn the Royal 
authority to such wicked ends, though I know not what I shall do 
for men for the Falcon unless some be sent here on the merchant 
ships from England. After her arrival I ordered her men to be 
taken ashore and attended by doctors. The Commissions both 
civil and military are now filled all over the Island and I have since 
called a Council of War and settled all things necessary for our 
defence, according to our strength. The country generally is quiet 
and easy but for the sickness which is among us (and in most of 
these parts of the world). We have also, still, earthquakes pretty 
frequently, but not with violence enough to do ravine though 
sufficient to terrify. But the Treasury is much in debt, and 
there is no appearance when it will be otherwise, or when 
there will be money to fortify withal. In the opinion of the 
Council and Assembly it would be very hard to make the 
factors pay the duty that was due on the wines destroyed in the 
earthquake, because it is losing more than their all and they cannot 
recover it from their principals in England. I have therefore shewn 
willingness to forgive it, on the Assembly's promising me to raise 
an equivalent, and I have not only their assurance of that, but good 
hope that, through their confidence in me, they will make a con- 
siderable addition to the Royal revenue and settle that and the body 
of their laws indefinitely. They are very unanimous and not 
jealous of me, and I shall take care that nothing is done prejudicial 
to the royal interest. I hope also to get them to raise money to put 
King's House at St. Jago (where I live) in order, for at present it 
only protects me from the sun and rain, having no convenience for 
horses or servants, nor room for but few in a family and being as 
common as the highway. Nevertheless my cost of living, for the 
honour of the Government, is more than double what I am 
allowed, nor is there money, nor like to be yet awhile to pay me 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 135 

1693. 

what I am allowed by their Majesties. I beg your consideration of 
this. I hope that the Assembly will have done by the time that the 
fleet sails in September. Signed. Wm. Beeston. 1 pp. Endorsed, 
[Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. A 7 o. 19; and 53, py. 171-174.] 

July 27. 478. Minutes of Council of New York. Order for all who have 
agreed to advance money for the public use, receiving interest for 
the same, since 1690, to bring in their certificates before 1 Septem- 
ber that a method of payment may be found. The Committee ap- 
pointed to consider the expediency of erecting a Court of Exchequer 
reported against it. Advised that the Assembly be dissolved and 
new writs issued. Orders for sundry payments. Resolved to pull 
down the chapel in the fort, it being unsafe. 

July 28. The Governor reported that he had received information that the 
Five Nations had resolved to treat with the French without his 
knowledge. Order for reading of the letters reporting the same, and 
for translating the French letters of the Jesuit Millet and of the 
Superior in Canada. The Governor expressed his surprise at this 
behaviour of the Five Nations after their late friendly profession, 
and proposed to send Dirck Wessels to them forthwith to remind 
them of their promises and to Exhort them to exchange Millet, their 
prisoner, for an Indian boy, according to their pledge. [Col. Entry 
Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 442-447.] 

July 28. 479. Lieutenant-Governor Sir William Beeston to the Earl of 
Jamaica. Nottingham. I transmit a duplicate of mine of the 10th June and 
part of the Marquis de les Menez's answer to me as to Captain 
Tristan. Sickness has come among us again and the Falcon has 
suffered much. I do not know how to man her without wholly 
ruining the merchant ships, for besides the losses through death the 
press for the King's ships frightens away many, and many go to 
the Northern Plantations, where the Red Sea pirates take their 
plunder, are pardoned and fit out for a fresh voyage, which makes 
all kinds of rogues flock to them. We have none of them here, but 
some would have come and to do so offered money through their 
friends to be pardoned, which I have wholly refused. I have had 
the Falcon's men tended ashore which has restored most of them ; 
and the lieutenant of course takes command of her, but how to give 
him another lieutenant I know not, having no powers from the 
Admiralty. I recently sent the Mordaunt to Hispaniola. Could I 
have sent the Falcon with her and raised no more than 500 men 
from the shore we could have destroyed their craft and their 
settlements by the seaside. There are near 300 seamen about 
Corisac, but though I have sent a proclamation to them to return, 
offering to receive them well, they will not come for fear of being 
pressed. No vessels will come from North America for the same 
reason ; we have no trade by the sloops, and no ships come to us 
from England. So that we are in great difficulty and in a meaner 
condition than I have ever known. Unless men are sent to 
us we shall sink. Signed. Wm. Beeston. Holograph. 1 pp. 
Endorsed, R. Nov. 6, 93. Enclosed, 

479. i. Extract from a letter from Marquis de les Menez to Sir 
William Beeston. I confess that Captain Tristan's business 
has troubled me much, for I have always endeavoured that 



136 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

English vessels should have good passage in these harbours, 
and have given orders accordingly. Frenchmen have too 
often been allowed to come and prosecute unlawful trade, 
under pretence of being English. I was lying very sick 
when 1 first heard of the matter, and my grief over the 
deceit of these men went near to cause my death. I have 
put the guilty parties in close confinement with a view to 
proper punishment. But do not doubt that the vessel was 
lawfully seized, for most of her people were French and her 
captain known to be one of the greatest pirates in America. 
Had he been brought in alive, I should have punished him. 
I ought to believe that you would hinder such vessels from 
sailing from Jamaica. 1 p. A translation so crude as to 
be barely intelligible. [America and West Indies. 540. 
No. 35, 35 1.] 

July 28. 480. Minutes of the General Council and Assembly of the 
Antigua. Leeward Islands. The Assembly sent up an Act for fortifications, 
which was returned by the Council with amendments, which were 
agreed to with modifications. The Assembly sent up a short 
additional Act to the Act encouraging the importation of white 
servants, which was accepted by the Council. The Council asked 
the Assembly for particulars of their accusations against Colonel 
Thomas Hill. Orders for quartering of soldiers, for certain 
payments, and for holding of a special court. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. XLVIII., pp. 235-239.] 

[July?] 481. Address of the Mayor and Common Council of New York 
to Governor Fletcher. Thanking him for his good service towards 
the Indians and to the whole province and presenting him with a 
cup of gold. Printed sheet. Endorsed, Eecd. 26 Sept. 1693. 
[Board of Trade. New York, 5. No. 22.] 

July 31. 482. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor's 
letter to the Sachems of the Five Nations read and approved. 
[Col Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., p. 447.] 

July 31. 483. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. Letter from 
Major Pyncheon read, reporting the murder of eight or nine 
persons at Brookfield by Indians, and praying instructions. Advised 
that a garrison of ten men be despatched thither. The Governor 
read the Queen's letter of 15 April, 1693, concerning the pro- 
ceedings as to witchcraft. 

Aug. 1. Order for withdrawing the friendly Indians in the neighbourhood 
of Mendon and Woodstock within those towns. Permission granted 
to the French at New Oxford to stockade the most suitable houses 
therein ; two Englishmen to take up their residence there and 
superintend. A Committee appointed to assess the damage done in 
Long Island by the recent landing and entertainment of troops 
there. [Col Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV., pp. 244-246.] 

Aug. 1. 484. Minutes of Council of Barbados. Orders for sundry pay- 
ments. The Assembly brought up a bill appointing a controller of 
the duty on liquors. Mr. Bond gave the Governor an Order in 
Council disallowing the Act to regulate elections. [Col Entry Bk., 
Vol. XIL, pp. 416-418.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 137 



1693. 

Aug. 1. 485. Journal of Assembly of Barbados. Bill passed to appoint 
John Pilgrim controller of the duty on liquors. The house then 
waited on the Governor, who informed them that Colonel Francis 
Russell had been appointed to succeed him, and asked for provision 
for his expense on leaving Government House. The House voted 
him a present of ,500, and ordered that 6 pipes of Madeira wine, 2 
tuns of beer and 1,000 Ibs. of best sugar should be laid in at Fonta- 
belle for the reception of the new Governor. This order and the 
bill for a present to the Governor were then carried to his 
Excellency. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XIV., pp. 349, 350.] 

Aug. 2. 486. Chidley Brooke to Governor Fletcher. I reached this on 
Boston. yth at 7 p.m., and immediately went to wait on Sir W. Phips and 
Sir Francis Wheler at his Excellency's house. I delivered your 
letter and expected that Sir William would have asked me some 
questions as to New York, but instead thereof he entertained me 
with a flat harangue as to the expense that New England had been 
at since the present war, the poverty of its people, etc., I suppose to 
soften me to take a better impression of his answers to my 
questions. I said little that night, but he desired me to come next 
day, 'which I did twice, but found him not at home ; I did the like 
next day in vain. On the 1st inst. I went again with Colonel 
Depeyster and some others, when we were fortunate enough to 
find him at home and with him a gentleman of the Council. He 
desired us to sit down, and asked how you did. I said, well, but 
struggling hard to support a tottering Government which (maugre 
all your endeavours) must fall speedily to ruin unless assisted by 
him and by the other Colonies to defend the frontier at Albany. 
This put him into a ferment. I waited till his passions cooled a 
little and then told him of your difficulties, the wavering temper of 
our Indians, their weariness of the war, the great presents you were 
forced to give them when last at Albany, the great taxes repeated 
upon us, the harassing of the people (to the great depopulation of 
the province) for defence of the frontier. I then proceeded to 
demand 200 men, furnished at all points and paid by his Govern- 
ment, as a fit quota from the same, pursuant to the royal order, and 
told him that it was your order to me to demand that number. 
This threw him into a rude passion. What he said was loud and angry, 
but so confused that I knew not what to make of it. At length I 
understood him to say, " I will not send a man nor a farthing to the 
assistance of New York and monstrous to suppose I should. I 
could not keep myself from replying, " 'Tis then, Sir, the monstrous 
thought of the Queen." "How? how?" said he, "a monstrous thought 
of the Queen " (repeating the words three or four times angrily over). 
"Yes," said I, "for had not her Majesty and the Council of England 
thought it reasonable that you and the rest of their Majesties' 
Governments should send aid to New York, no letter had been 
directed to you or to them to that end." The next thing that I 
moved to him was to send commissioners to New York in October 
next to agree as to the quotas of men and money, pursuant to the 
royal letter. This aggravated his former heat and made him 
angrily say, " If they have no other business no commissioners 
shall come from me." I found his reason was drowned in passion 



138 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

and the storm increasing, so thought it high time to leave him. 
The gentlemen of the Council present all the while seemed ashamed 
of his behaviour and desired me to blame his education for what I 
saw. I told one of them that the Governor was very hot. He 
answered, " Sir, you must pardon him his dog-days ; he cannot help it." 
I observe that the people here are highly taxed and no less displeased 
at the ill pennyworth they have for their money. Their Governor 
is little feared and little loved. He selects his company out of the 
mob for the most part, amongst whom noise and strut pass for wit 
and prowess. Some few of the better sort pay him respect and 
compliment for their ease's sake, rather than for any esteem they 
have for him ; the rest ridicule him. Several of the late Assembly 
told me that they could get no account of the country's money 
when required, nor any reason why the country was so much in 
debt ; that his whole "managery" was very crooked, tending much 
more to his own interest than the good of the people. New York 
in the midst of calamities has this comfort, that her taxes are 
applied for her defence and safety only, that the accounts are at all 
times open to the Assembly if desired, and that your watchful care 
gives the people all reasonable hope of security. All this is wanting 
here. Signed. Chid. Brooke. Holograph. 3 pp. Endorsed, 
Eecd. 20 Dec. 1693, from Colonel Fletcher. [Board of Trade. 
New York, 5. No. 23.] 

Au<r. 2. 487. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for payment for 
materials for repairing Fort Charles. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 
77. pp. 254, 255.] 

Aug. 2. 488. Minutes of the General Council and Assembly of the 
Antigua. Leeward Islands. Act for additional fortifications on Monk's Hill, 
and additional Act to the Act for encouraging importation of white 
servants passed. The Assembly accused Colonel Hill of cowardice, 
violence, oppression and conniving at an open trade. The Council 
undertook to summon him to answer the same. Orders for sundry 
payments, and for the goods of Major Joseph Crispe to be taken in 
custody by the Treasurer. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLVIII., pp. 
239-241.] 

Aug. 2. 489. Minutes of the Council and Assembly of Montserrat. 
Proposals of the Lieutenant-Governor and Council to the Assembly. 
(1) We beg you to consider the question of fortifications, which was 
deferred this day. (2) The arms being out of order we propose to 
send them to Barbados for repair, also a fit person to buy lead, 
powder and flints there. (3) We call your attention to the debts of 
the country and suggest the expediency of raising a levy. 
(4) Negroes having become very insolent of late we desire you 
to take further measures to prevent this. (5) We are willing to 
assent to the Act for easing of tenants which we formerly rejected, 
and desire you to draw up an Act accordingly. Answer of the 
Assembly. (1) We readily assent to fortification of Palmeto Point, 
and that an Act be passed for enforcing the employment of every 
twentieth negro in the work, owners who have not twenty negroes 
being joined together so as to make up twenty. (2) We beg you to 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 139 

1693. 

appoint a fit person to go to Barbados, and we will provide for pay- 
ment to him. (3) We are willing to raise a levy, and wish that an 
assessment be made forthwith. (4) We desire to renew the Act to 
restrain the insolence of negroes with such additions as you think 
fit. (5) We agree to pass the Act for easing of tenants and ask you 
to appoint a Committee to join with us in drawing up an Act. The 
Council concurred in all these matters with the Assembly. Further 
proposals of the Assembly, (a) That the arms of the Militia be 
placed in the custody of the officers, and that all the officers be duly 
commissioned, (b) That the Secretary, Marshal and Treasurer 
give bond for due performance of their office. (<) That a fitting 
person be appointed to inspect and be responsible for the repair of 
the fortifications, (d) We would point out that our former Acts are 
not sent home, so are unconfirmed, and being unrenewed are set at 
defiance, (e) We propose the building of a magazine to windward. 
Two gentlemen have undertaken to house the powder till it be built. 
The Council concurred in all of these proposals. [Col. Entry Bk. 
Vol. XLVIIL, pp. 317-320.] 

Aug. 3. 490. Order of the Queen in Council. Referring the petition of 
Whitehall. Sir Richard White to Lords of Trade and Plantations for report. 
Signed. Wm. Bridgeman. \ p. Annexed, 

490. i. Petition of Sir Richard White to the Queen. For 
admission of his appeal against a decision of the Court of 
Jamaica given against him in a suit with St. Jago de 
Castillo. Copy. 1 p. The whole endorsed, Read, 
15 Sept. 1693. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. Nos. 20, 
20 i. ; and (without enclosure) 53. p. 165.] 

Aug. 3. 491. Minutes of Council of New York. Order for sundry 
payments. The accounts for the Governor's visit to Albany pre- 
sented, amounting to 799, in all of which 346 is unpaid, which 
latter sum was ordered to be discharged. A Committee appointed 
to design and superintend the building of a new chapel in the fort. 
Patent for land in New York granted to Peter Sloutenburgh. 
Overseers appointed to superintend the fitting of Albany Fort with 
new stockades. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 447-448.] 

Aug. 8. 492. Minutes of Council of Barbados. The question was 
brought up whether the Assembly was duly elected, the elections 
having been held under an Act which had been disallowed. 

Aug. 9. The Speaker and eleven members of Assembly appeared and 
asked for an adjournment. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XII., pp. 419, 
420.] 

Aug. 8. 493. Journal of Assembly of Barbados. Message from the 
Governor that the Council had voted the Assembly to be legal. 
Adjourned till to-morrow. 

Aug. 9. Twelve members only present, five others being sick. The 
twelve waited on the Governor and told him that in their opinion the 
Assembly was legal. The Governor discoursed to them of the undue 
measures taken to procure the disallowance of the late Election 
Act, and to influence members to believe that the present Assembly 
was illegal. Adjourned to 22nd. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XIV., pp. 
350-352.] 



140 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 

Aug. 10. 494. Order of the Privy Council. Referring a memorial of the 
Whitehall. Commissioners for the Leeward Islands to Lords of Trade and 
Plantations for their report. Signed. Wm. Bridgeman. \ p. 
Annexed, 

494. i. Memorial of the Commissioners for the Leeward Islands 
to the Queen. Representing the danger of the Islands 
since the departure of Sir F. Wheler's squadron and the 
great loss of the inhabitants through war and sickness ; 
and requesting that a new squadron may be sent out, and 
that if Colonels Foulke's and Goodwyn's regiments return 
to the Leeward Islands they may be reduced into one 
regiment under Governor Codrington, since both of the 
said Colonels and most of the officers are dead. Signed. 
Bastian Bayer, Rd. Gary, Jeff. Jeffreys, Joseph Martyn. 
Certified copy. \ p. The whole endorsed, Reed. 7 Sept. 
1693. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 4. Nos. 18, 
18 i. ; and 44. pp. 151-152.] 

Aug. 10. 495. Minutes of Council of New York. Orders for sundry 
small payments. Survey of the plantations on the Killrancull 
in Staten Island presented. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 448, 

449.] 

Aug. 10. 496. Minutes of Council and Assembly of Montserrat. Joint 
Committee appointed to settle the public accounts. William Irish 
sworn of the Council. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLVIII., pp. 320, 
321.] 

Aug. 12. 497. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for demanding 
,i'721 due from Lord Inchiquin's Attorney to the revenue of the 
Island. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. p. 255.] 

Aug. 15. 498. Minutes of Council of Barbados. The Governor addressed 
a speech to the Council as to the legality of the Assembly now 
sitting, and called upon the Councillors to sign a declaration to that 
effect, which they did. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XII., pp. 420-425.] 

Aug. 15. 499. Governor Fletcher to Earl of Nottingham. I have re- 
ceived no orders from you yet, though I have sent home full re- 
ports, and copies of all documents. I have written at length to Mr. 
Blathwayt and beg your countenance to us in all matters relating 
to defence. I heard from Mr. Povey that you had written to me by 
another ship. He told me that I have been given command of the 
Connecticut Militia, which will be of great advantage if I can make 
them raise money for their payment. I have daily complaints 
against the republicans. I wish my commission would come, being 
hard put to it for men. I shall now have to make many journeys 
to Connecticut and Pennsylvania, for which I have no salary. A 
sailor has lately died intestate worth 500. My predecessors 
looked on the taking of this as a right, but I cannot. I blush 
to ask for it, and yet I must ask you to pardon me if I do. 
Sir F. Wheler's departure startles us all. Signed. Ben. Fletcher. 
Holograph. 3 pp. [America and West Indies. 579. No. 34.] 

Aug. 15. 500. Governor Fletcher to William Blathwayt. As soon as I 
received the royal commands for the Government of Pennsylvania 
I went thither and tarried about six weeks, but could not prevail 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 141 

ir>93. 

with the people to settle a revenue to defray the expenses of Govern- 
ment nor to give assistance to New York. They would pay no 
regard to the Queen's letter, so that instead of a help they are likely 
to prove a trouble. As soon as I returned I went to Albany to con- 
firm the old covenant-chain with the staggering Indians of the Five 
Nations; from whence being lately returned, I understand that the 
French are gathering in all their strength from their many small 
fortifications in the Canada River to Quebec and Montreal, and are 
bidding liberally for a peace with the Indians. I have endeavoured 
all in my power to hinder this, but my arm is shortened from want 
of assistance. Count Frontenac is busy with his fortifications at 
Quebec and if let alone for a year or two more will require an 
experienced officer and a considerable force to turn him out. If we 
lose our Indians, Virginia, Maryland and all our neighbours will have 
their hands full. I do all I can to prevent this and write often to 
them, but all the help I have received this year is .600 from 
Virginia, New York money, and 300 sterling from Maryland. 
Sir William Phips will give nothing. A stone fort is wanting at 
Albany, and money to build it. *,I have fixed the first Wednesday 
in October for a meeting of Commissioners to settle the quota of 
the several provinces for defence of Albany ; but it is doubtful if 
they will come or do anything to the purpose. If I have not the 
absolute government of Connecticut, it will be hard to bring them 
to anything. H.M.S. Aldborough is of little use, being a dull sailer 
and too weak for the privateers that infest our coasts. Captain 
Chant deserves a better ship. A frigate of thirty guns, that sails 
well, would be of service. Mr. Dudley is gone to England. Mr. 
Pinhorne, having removed to New York, has been re-admitted to 
Council. The revenue is settled for but two years, notwithstanding 
all my efforts to have it settled on Their Majesties' lives. The people 
said they were unequal to the burden. Connecticut, Pennsylvania 
and -the Jerseys pay nothing and are under no duty : our inhabi- 
tants flee there for ease and leave us almost destitute. We cannot 
muster 3,000 men now, whereas a few years ago we could muster 
5,000. If the three provinces above named were united into one 
Government with us the burden would be light, and the cause of 
complaint removed. Pray do your best for the province, and to 
obtain us stores. I have sent Mr. Brooke to Boston to consult Sir 
Francis Wheler. Signed. Ben. Fletcher. 3 pp. [Board of Trade. 
New York, 5. No. 24 ; and 48. pp. 56-58.] 

[Aug. 15.] 501. A collection of papers forwarded with the preceding letter. 
501. i. Propositions of the Skachkook Indians to Stephanus Van 
Cortlandt, Nicholas Bayard and Peter Schuyler, com- 
missioners acting for Governor Fletcher. Albany, 15 June, 
1693. 

The Skachkooks spoke as follows : We have been for 
long as in great darkness, but now the sun shines again. 
We thank you for the protection of our wives and 
children while we were absent hunting. We were 
received as children of your government twenty years ago, 
and seeing that some of our people are detained in New 
England on suspicion of a murder at Peerfield we submit 



142 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693 



the whole to His Excellency's judgment. We beg for 
his protection ; and since the French are potent let us 
keep our eyes open. 

Propositions made by the Maquas, 21 June 1693 ; 
Governor Fletcher being present besides the above 
Commissioners. " Lord of the Swift Arrow," when our 
castles were destroyed by the French this spring you came 
up very speedily for our succour and relief, and promised 
to come to us again. You are heartily welcome. We 
have kept good watch, as you bade us, by sending a party 
into the enemy's country, which has brought back three 
scalps ; but the provisions and ammunition were given 
us by you. We earnestly desire you to continue such 
favour to us, for we are a poor people and have lost all 
by the war. But our obligations to you are so great that 
we would not wait for the other nations in our haste to 
thank you. It was particular kindness of you to send 
for the release of our people who were detained in New 
England, before we had learned of it ourselves ; and to 
shew our gratitude we give you a Christian prisoner taken 
from Canada. 

Governor Fletcher replied by thanking them for their 
good service, promising future favour and assistance, 
and distributing presents. 

On the 2nd of July, about 9 p.m. the Speaker of the 
Five Nations with two Sachems of the Onandagas desired 
a private conference with Governor Fletcher. They spoke 
as follows. We have heard much of a desire to subdue 
Canada with a fleet. Our young men are eager to make 
an end of the war. Tell us the truth, that we may know 
how to manage them. We have often had changes of 
Governors. As soon as they have learned our ways, they 
are gone. We wish to know how long you will stay, for 
we do not wish you to go. We remember how speedily 
you came to our help in the spring. 

The Governor answered : The great King my master 
knows best his own time for taking Canada. As yet we 
have no notice of any such design. When we receive it, 
I shall at once acquaint you. I stay here only during 
my master's pleasure, but be sure that I shall be here 
long enough to see Canada subdued. 

On the 3rd July, the Governor made a speech to 
the Five Nations. I was disappointed in not coming to 
you as early as I designed, for I was obliged by the King's 
order to go to Pennsylvania, and for a week after my return 
was indisposed. But now I am come, and I have taken care 
to strengthen the frontiers. I have told you before that 
the enemy cannot harm you unless you are careless 
and enfeeble yourselves by drunkenness. Drunkenness is 
the worst vice of martial men, so be sober and vigilant. 
The blow you received last winter is fresh in our 
memories ; and you know that it came from your supine 
humour. You know that I marched from Senectady on 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 143 

1093. 

the day that the enemy was defeated. Could I have joined 
you before the engagement not a man of the enemy 
would have escaped. You promised to check all irregular 
actions of your young men ; but I had intelligence on my 
journey hither of a barbarous murder committed at 
Deerfield, and that three of your people were imprisoned 
on suspicion of the same. I have sent to New -England 
such evidence as I could collect here. The Maquas have 
shown signs that they have not lost their ancient valour, 
and have given me a French prisoner, who tells me that 
the French lost 80 killed and 33 wounded in their attack 
on the Maquas last winter. I am told that some of you are 
wavering and inclined to peace with the enemy. This 
must be the work of the Jesuit Milet, who will only delude 
and betray you. I advise you to remove him from 
among you. I am now come to promise you protection 
and to renew the old covenant-chain. Here follows a 
list of presents given, including 86 guns, 800 Ib. of powder. 

On the 4th of July, the Five Nations made their answer 
as follows. We are gl&d that you are come to renew the 
covenant not only for your Government but for all the 
provinces. We heard nothing of Milet living among the 
Oneidas till we came here, and we were surprised to hear 
that he had sent letters to Canada. Do not be alarmed at 
any misbehaviour of our prisoners, for we shall never 
countenance it for the future ; and on your side take care 
that none of your prisoners correspond with the enemy, as 
we suspect w r as done by Chevalier D'Eaux. We are 
resolved to stick to the war, and shall be steadfast to the 
last drop of our blood. We thought that a fleet was 
fitting out against Canada, which gave great joy to our 
young men, who hoped to end the war at a push. We have 
one request to make, that you will not leave us, for you 
know our ways. We are glad to hear that Pennsylvania 
is put under your Government, and hope you will bring 
some of the men here to fight. We are glad that the 
Shawanees came to you for protection, and wish they would 
come and assist us against the common enemy. Pray let 
us have a smith and a gun-stock-maker to keep our 
arms in order. Here they (/are their present* of furs. In 
the evening the Governor asked several of the leading 
Sachems on board H.M.S. Aldborough, when at their 
desire he told them of the past victory of the English fleet 
over the French last summer, and of the battle on land 
where the King attacked the enemy in their camp because 
they would not come out to fight him [Steenkirk] , when 
many men were slain on both sides. He also encouraged 
them to renew their ancient valour, reminded them to 
drive Milet for driving them, and bade them be faithful to 
the alliance; after which five of the Aldborough's guns 
- were fired. It was noticed that the Indian most suspected 
and known to be a particular friend of Milet sang a war- 
song of threats against the French, and promised that all 
letters for Canada should be sent down to New York, 



144 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1(593. 



The Governor further spoke to the Sachems in private 
conference, and told them that it was time for them to go 
and secure their castles. But first he required an answer 
to his proposals, as follows. I hear of no satisfaction 
offered for some horses killed by your young men, of which 
complaint was long ago made. Again you have said 
nothing about the priest Milet. I will give you a pretty 
Indian boy in exchange for him. Lastly you have said 
nothing of the men imprisoned in New England on sus- 
picion of murder. 

The Sachems answered as follows. We forgot about the 
horses ; but any Indians who kill any cattle, etc., of the 
Christians shall give satisfaction in future. As to the 
priest I am willing to take the boy in exchange for him, 
but not until the return of the messenger from Canada ; 
and the boy may stay here till we bring the priest. As to 
the murder we believe it to be the work of Canadian 
Indians ; and we doubt not that the people in New 
England will be patient till this be ascertained. The Five 
Nations do propose to make peace with the Dionondades, 
a nation in alliance with the Erench. This will strengthen 
us and weaken the enemy ; and we desire your approval 
hereof. Whereat the Governor signified his approval. 

On the 5th July, the Governor then bade the Indians go 
back and keep a strict watch, as the enemy were supposed 
to be on march for Cadaraqui, for some unknown design, 
and wished them a safe return and good success. They 
promised to obey his orders and thanked him. 

On the 6th July the Governor called to him certain of 
the Sachems to whom he reported his recommendations, 
and presented rich laced coats and other presents. He 
also made a speech to the River Indians as follows. This 
is the first time that I have met you, and I come to tell 
you what I like and what I dislike in your conduct. Some 
of you have fought valiantly in attacking the enemy ; but 
on the other hand you have all gone hunting, leaving no 
one to protect your wives and children. You must give 
me notice when you go in future, and leave a sufficient 
force for protection behind you. Again, when you return 
from hunting you drink away the labour of months in a few 
days and you come home beggars. From henceforth you 
should bring the profits of your hunting home to support 
you the rest of the year. I hear that the enemy send out 
small parties to kill some and capture others. You should 
send out men against them to knock such on the head, 
and fifty shillings shall be given you for every head which 
is killed within three miles of Albany or Senectady. I 
now renew the covenant with you and promise you pro- 
tection. 

The River Indians answered, promising obedience and 
amendment, and giving thanks for the measures taken 
by the Governor as to the suspected Indians in confinement 
in New England. The whole, 27 pp. Endorsed, Reed, 
20 Dec. 1693, 



AMEKICA AND WEST INDIES. 145 

1693. 

501. ii. Peter Schuyler to Governor Fletcher. Albany, 25 July, 
1698. Last night the Maqua, whom I had sent to 
Onandaga to learn intelligence, returned with the news 
that the French design against the Five Nations was all 
stories ; but he had letters from Canada, the Jesuit's 
messenger being returned two days before he came to 
Oneida. I was in hopes that the Oneidas would have sent 
us the packet before it reached the Jesuit's hands, but 
perusing the superscription I found there two letters 
addressed to Dr. Dellius, one from the Jesuit himself and 
one from the superior at Canada. I asked why the letters 
had not been taken and sent straight to you, but my 
messenger told me that the Jesuit has a great authority 
among the Oneidas as any Sachem of them all, and rules 
the roost there so that little good can be expected so long as 
they are guided by an enemy. The letters themselves 
will show you what the French are about ; I believe them 
to be written at the instance of the Governor of Canada. 
I thought this business of such moment that I was in 
the mind to come over to you for advice, but fearing 
accidents in the meantime have sent Dr. Dellius and 
Mr. Robert Livingston to you. I need not tell you how 
weary the Five Nations are of the war, nor of how ill 
consequence it is to have such a general meeting at 
Onandaga devised by the French, to divert them from 
incursions on their frontier this season and to spin 
out time till they are ready to attack them or us. At 
present I presume that the Governor dares not leave Quebec. 
Beyond all doubt some great design is at the root of his 
efforts to make peace with the Five Nations, or else things 
are very low with him. In the latter case it is "a pity that 
our fleet should let slip the opportunity. The messenger 
at Oneida is said to brag loudly of the strength of the forti- 
fications of Quebec. I was quite resolved to send my own 
messenger back to dissuade them from any meeting 
(which will not be effected without difficulty, for it is only 
invented by the French to amaze them) and withal to 
encourage them to prosecute the war against Canada with 
vigour, but thought better first to await your orders, which 
please despatch as soon as possible. Copy. 2pp. Endorsed, 
Reed. 26 Sept., 1693. 

501. in. Information of Jurian, the Maqua messenger sent to 
Onandaga by Major Schuyler. On arrival at Oneida he 
found out that the story of a French march to Cadaraqui 
was false, but heard that the messenger sent to Canada this 
spring by the Jesuit Milet was returned two days before 
with letters from Count Frontenac. Milet refused to give 
up these letters, saying that there was a letter from 
Dr. Dellius that they might have, but that he would rather 
throw the rest into the fire than give them up. An Oneida 
then said to him that if the letters were thrown into the 
fire the belt of peace sent by the Governor of Canada 
should be thrown into the fire too, and asked why the 

8060 K 



146 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

Jesuit was so much incensed. The Jesuit answered that 
there would be a general meeting of all the nations at 
Onandaga, when the letters should be read. The Jesuit 
finally refused to give up the letters, having great sway in 
the Indian Castle. The Sachems of Oneida have also sent 
belts of wampum and a letter to Governor Fletcher saying 
that the Five Nations have concluded to hold a meeting of 
themselves, the Christians of New York and the 
Mahekanders as to this belt of peace sent by the Governor 
of Canada ; for Count Frontenac had said that though he 
was ready to make an immediate attack on the Five 
Nations, he would wait two months for their answer. The 
Mohocks who went out fighting towards Canada six weeks 
ago have all deserted to the French. 2 pp. Copy. 
Endorsed, Reed. 26 Sept. 1693. 

501. iv. Claude Bablin, Superior of the Jesuits of Canada, to 
Godefridus Dellius, at Albany. Quebec, 1 July, 1693. 
Father Milet who is a prisoner at Oneida has let me know 
of your bounty and charity in giving him presents. I pray 
God to reward you, and I assure you that it would be a 
great satisfaction to me if I could be of any service to you 
in Canada. I beg you to continue your assistance to him, 
and I will order satisfaction to be given you at any port of 
France where you may have a correspondent, if you will 
inform me through Father Milet or any other channel. 
Renewed thanks. Copy. 1 p. 

Peter Milet to Godefridus Dellius. Oneida, 31 July, 
1693. My messenger has returned from Canada with a 
letter of Count Frontenac saying that it is not his fault if 
the whole world, and above all the Iroquois Indians, are 
not at peace, though he is in a better condition than 
ever for war. He has stopped all the fighting parties 
from going out, and has promised not to move himself 
for two months, having summoned the chiefs of 
the Five Nations to meet him and conclude a peace, 
which the Christians of Oneida have desired of him. 
Pray let your gentlemen know this, that they may 
not hinder a peace. Postscript. The Oneidas wish 
me to add that they do not wish the boy offered to them 
to be sent here, but require one who understands the 
Scriptures well. Jurian, the Maqua, being come here, has 
learned that the Indians imprisoned in New England have 
been wrongfully accused. They complain of wrongful 
suspicions, and of tampering with the letters which were 
sent to Onandaga three or four years ago. They desire 
therefore that nothing may be altered in this present 
letter. I am a servant of the English and would give my 
life to be of service to them. Father Lamberville writes 
me that he has seen Mr. Nelson at Paris. He says that 
if the English really knew us they would not mistrust us 
as they do. I am obliged to the English for wishing for 
my release, but it seems that God keeps me prisoner 
and none save Him can deliver me, and with this I 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 147 

1693. 

comfort myself. I beg the English to remember that I have 
contributed to the restoration of seven English prisoners, 
two of them young children, who were clothed in black of my 
own clothes. Their mother told me that if I came to 
Virginia she would go miles to meet me. The last was a 
young girl, in return for whom Major Andros promised 
four Indians. I have never been thanked, and I suppose 
that Major Andros had gone to England before the girl 
arrived. I look to God for my reward, and I say this only 
to show that I am a friend of the English. This Count 
Frontenac is the same who formerly sent twenty English 
back to Boston, who had been captured by the River 
Indians. Why then is peace so long delayed ? The 
innocent suffer with the guilty. Copy. 3J pp. The whole 
endorsed, Reed. 26 Sept. 1693. 

501. v. Governor Fletcher to the Sachems of the Five Nations. 
Fort William Henry, New York, 31 July, 1693. I am 
astonished that after our late renewal of the covenant you 
should receive a belt '"bf peace from the Governor of 
Canada and propose a meeting at Onandaga to treat for 
peace. You should never have defiled your hands by 
touching that belt. You know that Albany has always 
been the ancient place of meeting. I have often warned 
you that the Jesuit Milet would betray your Councils; and 
now he has refused to deliver up his letters from Canada 
lest the poison should be discovered. It is clearly owing 
to him that the Oneidas have treated with our common 
enemy and proposed a meeting at Onandaga ; all of which 
denies our covenant. I hope that you will abhor all 
thoughts of consent thereto, and that in proof of your 
innocence you will send Milet to me with all his papers, 
according to your promise. If the Governor of Canada 
had proposed peace first to me I should have sent for you 
to Albany to inform you thereof. Hearken not to the 
Governor of Canada and hold no correspondence with him 
without my knowledge and consent. I am true to my 
promise to protect you, and am not afraid of any force that 
he can send. Copy. 2 pp. [Board of Trade. New 
York, 5. Nos. 24 i.-v.] 

Aug. 15. 502. Governor Fletcher to Lords of the Treasury. I am 
New York, sorry that my endeavours for supply of the West Indian fleet will be 
lost. I fear that its not proceeding to Canada may lose the Indians 
to us. The cost of providing naval stores is as follows : Tar at 12s. 
per 31 gallons, flax at 6d. per lb., hemp 4d. per Ib. No rosin is 
made here. Signed. Ben. Fletcher. 1 p. Endorsed, Reed. 4 
Oct. 1693. [Board of Trade. Plantations General, 2. No. 61 ; 
and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. C., p. 325.] 

Aug. 16. 503. Minutes of Council and Assembly of Montserrat. Acts 
for fortification of Palmeto Point and for restraining the insolence 
of negroes passed. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLVIII., p. 321.] 

Aug. 17. 504. Minutes of General Council and Assembly of the Leeward 
Islands. Sundry petitions heard and dealt with. John Blackleach's 



148 COLONIAL PAPERS,. 

1(593. 

name added to the members of the coming Special Court. 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLVI1I., pp. 242-244.] 

Aug. 17. 505. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Further orders as to 
payment of the money due from the late Lord Inchiquin to the 
revenue. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. pp. 255, 256.] 

Aug. 17. 506. Minutes of Council of New York. Patent for land ordered 
to Ryck Abrahamse. Order for sundry payments. 

Aug. 18. The Governor reported intelligence from Boston of the arrival of 
a French force on the coast, designed to attack New York province 
and city, and added that he had already warned the Colonels of 
Militia to see that their regiments were fit for service. Resolved 
that it is expedient to transport ten of the largest guns to Sandy 
Point at the mouth of the Hudson River in New Jersey. The 
Governor announced that he would ask Governor Hamilton and his 
Council to meet him there. 

Aug. 19. The Governor reported that since the fortifications would not be 
strong enough to repel a French fleet if it anchored before the city, 
it would be necessary to have a large land force, which would 
require to be fed ; and it was therefore resolved to prohibit the 
exportation of grain. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 449-452.] 

Aug. 18. 507. Governor Fletcher to the Earl of Nottingham. The want 
New York. O f a sea } j or Pennsylvania is an obstruction to business, and I beg 
that one may be sent. Some Quakers who have acted in the 
Government by Mr. Penn's commission and are very fond of lording 
it over their brethren are now sending their delegates to Court in 
the hope of getting Mr. Penn restored or themselves empowered to 
act, or failing that, to ask to be put under Maryland. These 
gentleman all refused my commission. I observed Mr. Thomas 
Lloyd creep away when he saw me order the Royal Commission to 
me to be published. I sent for him and offered him the first place 
on the Council Board, knowing that he would not accept it, and I 
took care to have some present to bear witness of his pride. The 
others, David Stead, Tho. Duckett, John Simcock, Griffith Owen 
aud John Bristow are less men, but have always opposed the King's 
service as far as in them lay. I received an address from the peace- 
able and loyal inhabitants of Philadelphia County and I hear that 
the like are preparing in other counties. This will show you that 
those who will trouble you are but a faction. Signed. Ben. Fletcher. 
Holograph. 2^ pp. Endorsed, R. Oct. 4, '93. [America and West 
Indies. 579. No. 35.] 

Aug. 18. 508. Abstract of a letter from Governor Fletcher to Lords of 
Trade and Plantations. He has put a stop to proceedings upon 
recognizances taken from persons concerned with Leisler ; but 
several of them had been estreated and the money disposed of for 
support of the Government. He has no order to restore the money, 
nor can it be spared, for the Government is already much in debt. 

Abstract of a letter from the same to the Lords of the Treasury. 
15 August, 1693. He fears that the fleet's not proceeding to 
Canada will drive the Indians into the arms of the French. As to 
naval stores, tar is produced at 12s. per barrel, flax at 6d. per lb., 
hemp at 4d. per pound. No rosin is made. The quantities are 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



149 



1693. 



Aug. 18. 

Whitehall. 



Aug. 21. 



Aug. 21. 



Aug. 22. 

Aug. 22. 
Aug. 22. 



Aug. 22. 

Whitehall. 



Aug. 22. 
Aug. 22. 



small, but the soil agreeable to improvement. 
Trade. New York, 5. No. 25 ; and 48. p. 48.] 

509. John Povey to Mr. Sotherne. Forwarding copies of 
two letters received by merchants from Jamaica (see No. 849) 
and asking for the report of the Admiralty thereon in time for 
next meeting of the Committee of Plantations. Draft. J p. 
[Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. No. 21.] 

510. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. The Governor 
reported the treaty made with the Eastern Indians. Order for 
acquainting the Government of New Hampshire thereof, and for 
reducing the frontier garrisons. Order for John Walley to go to 
Bristol and make preparations for the forthcoming Assize Court 
there. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV., pp. 246-247.] 

511. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. The laws of 
several of the Colonies were presented, and referred to the Attorney 
General. Report of the Attorney-General on draft charters for 
trading Companies to New Jersey and Pennsylvania. 

The report of the Commissioners of the Post Office on Benjamin 
Skutt's petition read, and copy of the petition sent to the 
Commissioners of Customs. [Board of Trade. Journal, 7. 
p. 202.] 

512. John Povey to the Secretary to the Customs. Forwarding 
copy of Benjamin Skutt's petition (No. 383) for report of the 
Commissioners. Draft. \ p. [Board oj Trade. Barbados, 5. 
No. 25.] 

513. John Povey to the Attorney General. Forwarding the 
Acts of Barbados of 1690 and 1692, for his report. List of the 
Acts. [Col, Entry Bk., Vol. VIII., pp. 375-378.] 

514. John Povey to the Attorney and Solicitor General. 
Forwarding the Acts of New York passed in 1690 and 1692 for 
their report thereon. Here follows a list of the Acts. [Board oj 
Trade. New York, 48. 'pp. 38-42.] 

515. John Povey to the Attorney and Solicitor General. For- 
warding the Acts of Maryland for their opinion, with the exception 
of two which have been already disallowed. [Board of Trade. 
Maryland, 8. p. 123.] 

516. John Povey to the Attorney General. Forwarding the 
Acts of Massachusetts passed in 1692, for his report. [Col. 
Entry Bk., Vol. LXII., p. 458.] 



517. 

Forwarding 
opinion. 
517. i. 
A. 



John Povey to the Attorney or Solicitor General. 
Acts received from the Leeward Islands for their 
Signed. John Povey. \ p. Annexed, 
List of Acts passed in the Leeward Islands, 1692. 

Acts passed in the General Assembly of all the Islands. 
(1) Act to empower certain persons to recover certain 
moneys for the public service from Joseph Crispe and 
others. 



150 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

(2) Act to explain an act for rewarding the soldiers who 

served in the late expedition to St. Christophers, and 
for taking away benefit of clergy for stealing of negroes 
and slaves. 

(3) Act to continue an Act appointing commissioners to 

manage the affairs of the Leeward Islands. 

(4) Act to continue an Act for speedily getting in the 

plunder due to the army in the expedition to 
St. Christophers. 

(5) Act for settling General Assemblies and Councils. 

B. Acts passed in the Assembly of Nevis. 

(1) Act for settling General Assemblies and Councils for 

the Leeward Islands. 

(2) Act for easing of tenants from taxes, and for assessing 

of landlords. 

(3) Act for granting and levying executions for security of 

debts. 

C. Acts passed in the Assembly of Antigua. 

(1) Act for establishing courts and for administration of 

justice. 

(2) Act for quieting inhabitants in their present posses- 

sions, and for preventing litigious lawsuits. 

(3) Act for dividing the Island into parishes, for mainten- 

ance of ministers and the poor, and for erecting and 
repairing churches. 

(4) Act for getting in the plunder due to the army at 

St. Christophers. 

(5) Act for raising tenants from taxes, and for assessing 

of landlords. 

(6) Act for regulation of the Militia. 

(7) Act to encourage importation of white servants. 1 J pp. 

Endorsed, Mr. Solicitor General's report on them 
received 16 Oct. 1693 ; read 8 Jan. 1693-4. [Board 
of Trade. Leeward Islands, 4. Nos. 19, 19i; anc?44, 
pp. 135-138.] 

Aug. 22. 518. John Povey to the Attorney General. Forwarding the 
Acts of New Hampshire for 1692 for his opinion. List of the Acts. 
[Co/. Entry Bk., Vol. LXVIL, p. 225.] 

Aug. 22. 519. Journal of Assembly of Barbados. Three members only 
present, owing to the great rains. Adjourned to 29th. [Col. Entry 
Bk., Vol. XIV., p. 352.] 

Aug. 22. 520. Minutes of Council and Assembly of Montserrat. A negro 
named Peter Boone was brought before the Council and convicted 
of the theft of nine pigs. He was condemned to be cut to pieces 
and have his bowels burnt, and his quarters put up in the most public 
paths adjoining the towns of Plymouth and Kinsale. Another 
negro who had in his house fresh flesh of which he could not give an 
honest account was condemned to have his right ear cut off and to 
be burned in the breast with an iron appointed for the purpose. 
Acts for easing of tenants and for a donation to the Lieutenant- 
Governor. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLVIIL, pp. 321, 322.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 151 



1693. 

Aug. 23. 521. Minutes of Council of Nevis. The Assembly was 
sworn and presented Philip Dewitt as their Speaker. Act to 
encourage the taking of runaway negroes passed. The Council 
agreed to the Assembly's proposal that all persons should keep one 
gun and cartouche box per every fifteen dutiable negroes, in order to 
arm the poor who cannot provide themselves ; and that a penalty 
be considered upon for such as wilfully break or sell their guns. 
Joint Committee appointed to draw up an Act for the purpose. 
The Council and Assembly agreed to effect an exchange with St. 
Christophers of stores of cannon-shot, those in Nevis being better 
fitted for the guns in St. Kitts and vice versa. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. XL VIII. , pp. 280, 281.] 

Aug. 24. 522. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. Order for writs for 
a General Court to assemble on 27 September. Advised that a 
small fort be erected at Saco and part of the Militia on the Eastern 
frontier moved thither under command of Francis Hooke, Esq. 
Proclamation forbidding trade with the Eastern Indians without the 
licence of the Governor and Council. Order for payment of 
debentures for wages and supplies of seamen and soldiers. Letter 
from the Government of New Hampshire read, justifying the 
detention of William Peprell's vessel. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV., 
pp. 247-248.] 

Aug. 24. 523. Minutes of Council of New York. Captain Chant's journal 
of the Governor's journey to Sandy Point having been read, 
it was agreed to substitute a large battery upon the outermost point 
of rock to command both rivers, rather than to erect a battery on 
each side as suggested by the Governor. Order for the repair of 
the city fortifications to be hastened. Chidley Brooke returned 
from Boston with a letter from Sir F. Wheler, setting forth the 
state of his force. Orders for sundry payments. 

Aug. 25. The Governor again brought forward his project for a battery 
on each side of the Narrows, but the Council adhered to its former 
preference for a single battery, and a Committee was appointed to 
superintend the work. The Governor proposed to collect the Militia 
into camp for two or three weeks, but in view of the near approach 
of winter the matter was for the present deferred. Proclamation 
for regulating alarm-beacons, and for the rules to be observed on 
an alarm. Two letters from Albany read as to the examination of 
a French prisoner brought in by the Indians. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXXV., pp. 452-454.] 

Aug. 24. 524. Order of the Privy Council. Referring the petition of 
Whitehall. Christopher Almy and an address of the Government of Rhode 
Island to Lords of Trade and Plantations for report. Signed. Win. 
Bridgeman. ^ p. Annexed, 

524. i. Petition of Christopher Almy to the Queen in Council. For 

permission to present the address of Rhode Island to 

the Queen. 1 p. 

524. n. Address of the Governor and Company of Rhode Island 

to the King and Queen. We have sent you several 

addresses to which we have received no reply. This has 

stirred up certain " malediscontented " people to attempt 

the subversion of the Government, urging that the persons 



152 COLONIAL PAPEES. 

1693. 

commissioned by Sir Edmund Andros ought to continue 
until some immediate order from the Crown. Sir William 
Phips on his arrival wrote us a letter, declaring himself to 
be empowered with the Militia of this Colony, and, with- 
out enclosing copy, of his Commission, desiring us to 
propose men for commissions, whereas our patent 
gives us sole control of the Militia. None the less we 
sent two gentlemen with lists of proper men for com- 
missions, and of those who had disclaimed the King's 
Government ; but Sir William Phips instead of sending 
an answer to the Governor, as he promised to do, sent up 
Commissions to Major Peleg Sanford with the intention 
of commissionating those against whom we objected and 
of deposing those who have supported the King's Govern- 
ment. But most of both parties refuse to receive 
commissions, so that the royal intentions for the defence 
of the Colony are like to make way for an inlet to the 
enemy unless prevented. We therefore convened the 
General Assembly to resettle the Militia, and beg for 
redress herein. We believe private interest to be at the 
root of this matter, some of Sir W T illiam Phips's persons 
having claims to the Narragansett country by virtue of a 
pretended mortgage, which has more than once been 
pronounced invalid. By reason of these overtures in the 
Militia several persons of Kingstown in the Narragansett 
country have riotously rescued a prisoner, setting at naught 
the Deputy-Governor's warrant, and saying that they 
would answer for it to two justices who held Sir Edmund 
Andres's commission. We shall do our best to set this 
right, but we cannot tell what the issue will be. By 
reason of these overtures too we cannot raise money for 
support of the Government, nor for sending a messenger to 
England. For the same reason much of the Narragansett 
country remains unpurchased and a wilderness, so that our 
inhabitants go away to other Colonies. We beg you to 
send us immediate confirmation of your Government 
here according to the limits and boundaries of the 
patent and of previous decisions. 2 Aug. 1692. Signed. 
John Easton. 

524. in. The Governor and Company of Khode Island to the 
King. We have received no answer to our letters 
reporting that we had restored our former Government 
according to our charter. We have therefore sent 
Christopher Almy to obtain for us your gracious answer. 
And since a difference has arisen betwen us and Sir 
William Phips as to our boundaries we beg that we may 
keep the boundaries appointed us by our Charter. 
Dated, 22 Nov. 1692. I p. Endorsed, Eecd. 31 Aug. 
1693. Abstract read 15 Sep. '93. 

524. iv. Credentials of Christopher Almy as bearer of the foregoing 
addresses. 22 November, 1692. Copy. 1 p. [Board of 
Trade. New England, 6. Nos. 73, 73 i.-iv. ; and 35. 
pp. 116-125.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 153 



1693. 

Aug. 26. 525. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Orders as to divers 
receipts and payments. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. pp. 256- 

267.] 

Aug. 29. 526. Minutes of Council of Barbados. The Governor ac- 
quainted the Assembly with the need for repairing the trenches of 
the Island, and for an Act to prevent negroes deserting to the enemy 
and poor whites flying from the enemy, in case of an invasion. 
The Assembly brought up an Act for a present of 500 to the 
Governor, and an order for payment for placing Fontabelle in a 
condition to receive the new Governor. They also asked for safer 
custody of a store of gunpowder, and submitted the names for a 
joint Committee on the defence of the Inland. Orders for sundry 
payments. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XII., pp. 425-429.] 

Aug. 29. 527. Journal of Assembly of Barbados. Debate arose whether 
the Assembly were legal. The Governor sent down the King's order 
to annul the late Election Act. Carried that the Assembly is legal. 
Bill for a present of 500 to tha. Governor passed. George Peers 
appointed to the Committee of Public Accounts. Order for a bill 
to be prepared to raise labourers for repair of the fortifications. A 
Committee appointed to wait on the Governor to hear of an 
emergency that he had to impart. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XIV., 
pp. 352-353.] 

Aug. 29. 52S. Address of the Council and Assembly of Barbados to 
Barbados. Governor Kendall. Thanking him for the benefits of his adminis- 
tration and offering him a present of 500 on his departure. Copy. 
Large sheet. Endorsed, Reed. 12 Jan. 1693-4. Read 15 May, 
'94.' [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. No. 26.] 

Aug. 29. 529. Minutes of General Council and Assembly of the 
Leeward Islands. Message from the Governor asking, in view of 
the menaces of French privateers, that the Act relating to the 
articles of war be amended and that the work of providing guard- 
houses be hastened. The Assembly answered that they thought the 
existing Act sufficient for articles of war, but were ready to improve 
it if necessary. On a message from the Governor desiring 
measures to be taken to secure lead for bullets, the Assembly asked 
the Council's concurrence in buying up certain weights, and 
requiring those responsible for custody of lead previously purchased 
to account for it. The Assembly agreed to pay the salaries to 
ministers as required in the King's letter. The Council gave orders 
for proving of gunpowder and desired the appointment of a 
- custodian thereof. The Council also approved of the buying of lead 
and the payment of salaries to ministers. Sundry petitions 
considered, and persons summoned to attend next Council. 

Aug. 30. Philemon Bird appointed custodian of gunpowder. Conferrers 
appointed to draft an amending Militia Act. The Assembly sent 
down the plan of a new gaol to the Council, which was approved. 
Message from the Council to the Assembly as to the payment for 
negroes employed on the forts. The Assembly complained of an 
affront put upon it by the Provost Marshal, and demanded that an 
apology should be required of him. The Assembly sent up an Act 



154 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 



Aug. 31. 



[Aug.?] 



Sept. 1. 

Vhginia. 



Sept. 1. 

Virginia. 



Sept. 1. 



to amend the Militia Act, and asked for the Council's decision as to 
the Act in favour of renters. The Council concurred that the 
Provost Marshal should apologise and asked for an answer as to the 
payment of the negroes. The Assemhly replied that it. would pass 
a short Act for the purpose, in which suggestion the Council 
concurred. Orders for sundry payments. [Col. Entry 13k., 
Vol. XLV1IL, pp. 244-254.] 

530. Affidavit of John Brookes. That the ship Joseph was 
taken up for the Royal service in March, 1691, and that no money 
for that service has yet been received. \ p. [Board of Trade. 
Jamaica, 7. No. 22.] 

531. Governor Codrington to [Earl of Nottingham?]. I shall 
not fail in accordance with the Royal instructions to set apart 
competent parcels of the escheated land in each parish for the 
Ministers in these Islands, and to propose to the several Councils 
and Assemblies that the Ministers' stipends shall be paid in money. 
One parish has already set an example by settling 120 per annum 
on its minister, besides all perquisites, which are not inconsiderable. 
I give no account of the late unhappy expedition, as no doubt the 
commanders will do so. I could not be of service, being present only 
as a volunteer, because otherwise I could not have raised many men. 
Colonel Lloyd, who went from hence to Barbados, is dead. I beg 
for the command of the regiment. The salary and the foot- 
company which I have do not pay half the expenses of Government. 
Signed. Chr. Codrington. 1^ pp. Endorsed, R. Nov. 6, '93. 
[America and West Indies. 551. No. 83.] 

532. Proclamation of the Government of Virginia. For the 
suspension of the Act for Ports and the Act for reviving an Act for 
encouragement of manufactures. Copy. 2 pp. Endorsed, Reed. 
28 March, '94. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. No. 31 ; and Col. 
Entry BL, Vol. LXXXIV., p. 847.] 

533. Proclamation of the Government of Virginia. For proper 
execution of the Acts providing for the maintenance of the clergy, 
and for the proper officers to furnish returns with that object. 
Copy. 2 pp. Endorsed, Reed. 28 March, '94. [Board of Trade. 
Virginia, 5. No. 32 ; and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXIV., p. 877.] 

534. Minutes of Council of Virginia. James Blair presented 
the Royal Charter for erecting of a College, which was read and 
recorded. Order for the payments directed in the charter to be 
made. Order for a proclamation to be drafted to put the laws for 
support of the Ministry in force. On the Royal order to send 500 
to New York, as a contribution to defence, from the quit-rents, it was 
resolved that this had been already obeyed by the previous 
remission of 600, and the Auditor was directed to reimburse 
himself for that outlay from the quit-rents. Order for a Com- 
missioner to be despatched to New York for the Congress to fix the 
quota of the Colonies. Warrant ordered for the transportation of 
William Dolby and Edward Legge to England. Order for a 
proclamation to suspend the Acts for Ports and for encouragement 
of manufactures. Order for payment of 28 to John Povey for 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 155 

1693. 

tees, etc., in connection with the business of Northern Neck. 
Writs for an Assembly to meet on 10 October, ordered. Letters 
from the Commissioners of Customs as to ships suspected of illegal 
trading, read. 

Sept. 2. Embargo ordered for all ships to Europe until 10 November, and 
that no ship not ready to sail and cleared, and arrived at Point 
Comfort by that time, be allowed to sail then. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXXXIV., pp. 817-826.] 

Sept. 1. 535. Minutes of Council of New York. Report of a Committee 
upon a certain dispute over some land [names illegible] and order 
thereupon. Estimate for stockading Albany Fort presented and 
approved. Estimate of part of the material required for the new 
battery in the river presented. Order for certain payments, and 
for a report as to compensation for a wounded soldier. [Col. Entry 
Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 455, 456.] 

Sept. 2. 536. Commission of the Governor and General Assembly of 
Connecticut to Major General '3?itz John Winthrop to be the 
Colony's Agent in England. Copy. 1| pp. [Board of Trade. 
New York, 5. No. 26.] 

Sept. 3. 537. The King to the Governors of New England and New 
Jersey. Ordering them to countenance and assist the officers of the 
Customs in the execution of the Acts of Trade and Navigation. 
[Board of Trade. New York, 48. p. 89.] 

Sept. 4. 538. Minutes of Council of New York. Dirck Wessells arrived 
from Albany, to report his interview with the Indians ; and, his 
journal being read, it seemed that the Indians were much inclined 
to peace with the French. He himself reported that they had 
declared that they would not make peace with the Governor of 
Canada, but that if he were minded to do so, he must apply first 
to another tribe. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., p. 456.] 

Sept. 6. 539. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. The Com- 
missioners of the Admiralty and the merchants attended on the 
question of convoys. 

Sept. 7. Memorial of the Commissioners of the Leeward Islands read 
(see No. 494 1.). The Commissioners were informed that no 
answer could be given till Sir Francis Wheler's return. [Board 
of Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 203-204.] 

Sept. 6. 540. Minutes of General Council and Assembly of the Leeward 
Islands. The Council appointed Conferrers to draw up a short 
supplementary Militia Act, and drew the Assembly's attention to 
the necessity for repairing the fortifications. The Assembly asked 
as to the King's gunpowder that it might be stored with that of the 
country ; to which the Council would not assent. 

Sept. 7. The Assembly addressed a protest against the holding of special 
Courts, and against the withdrawal of slaves from Monk's Hill Fort 
to make guard houses. The Council defended the holding of the 
Special Court, and the present system of repairing the fortifications. 
Joint Committee appointed to confer as to the disposal of certain 
prisoners, French and Indian. The Council refused to agree with the 



156 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 
Sept. 8. 



Sept. 7. 



Sept. 7. 



Sept. 8. 

Whitehall. 



Sept. 11. 

Antigua. 



Sept. 11. 

Boston. 



Assembly that they should be set free. The Council and Assembly 
agreed on the purchase of two heavy guns. 

The Assembly renewed its protest as to Special Courts and the 
repair of fortifications. The Council sent the Assembly a complaint 
that billets had been refused to men of the Blue regiment. The 
Assembly explained the matter and undertook to remove the 
grievance. The Assembly sent up a Supplementary Militia Act 
and an Act for repair of fortifications. The Council passed them 
both, but refused to pass the Act for relief of renters. [Col. Entry 
Bk., Vol. XLVIII., pp. 254-267.] 

541. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. Order for the 
removal of the convicted prisoners Henry Head and Daniel Wilcox 
to the gaol at Boston. Order for survey of H.M.S. Mary. A con- 
tract agreed on for thirty shillings a week to be paid for entertain- 
ment of three Indian hostages. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV., 
pp. 248-249.] 

542. Minutes of Council of New York. Orders for sundry 
payments. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. T^XXV., pp. 456-457.] 

543. Lords of Trade and Plantations to the Governors of Rhode 
Island and Connecticut. We hear that there has been of late much 
violation of the Laws of Trade and Navigation. The King expects 
that you will enforce obedience to these Acts and give all needful 
assistance to the officers of the Customs therein. [Board of Trade. 
New England, 35. pp. 64-66.] 

544. Hugh Syms to the Board of Ordinance. I lately wrote 
you an account of our Martinique voyage, wherein I requested some 
money, for I can get none here upon my bills. Not that they 
question payment, but the time of payment. I also beg your orders 
for my return home, for the Islands will not repair more than they 
have now in hand, which will shortly be finished. I thank God I 
am in health, only want the use of my hands, which I hope to 
regain by degrees. The miner, Henry Symonds, died here on 
8 December, 1692 ; the other miner was called from me at 
Martinique, since which I have not heard of him. I beg you to let 
my wife have money to supply her occasions at home. Signed. 
Hugh Syms. P.S. If you remit me money here, Colonel Bastian 
Bayer can effect it. In tJie margin, The Committee of Plantations 
to be spoke or writ to about Syms's coming home. 1 p. Endorsed, 
Reed. 24 Dec. 1693. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 4. No. 20.] 

545. Governor Sir William Phips to the Earl of Nottingham. 
On the 27th of July the Queen's letter ordering me to stop further 
proceedings against the persons accused of witchcraft was duly 
handed to me. Next to divine Providence it is the stop to these 
proceedings which has averted the ruin of this province. I have 
also copy of a letter sent to me by Mr. Blathwayt but not the 
original nor the King's orders as to Canada, to which reference is 
made. Thus I could make no preparation for Sir Francis Wheler's 
fleet, having no intimation of the design until Mr.Blathwayt's copied 
letter reached me, which was only a few days before the fleet sailed 
from hence to England. I am much grieved at the loss of this 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 157 

1693. 

opportunity of subduing Canada. Sir F. Wheler and his fleet 
arrived here about the middle of June from Martinique, but in very 
ill condition owing to a contagious distemper among the men. 
All possible endeavours were made for recovery of the sick and 
sweetening of the ships, with the result that fleet and land-forces 
were in perfect health before they sailed. In July last a French 
privateer from Martinique landed 130 men at Sandwich in this 
province, but two companies of Militia marched up and took them 
all prisoners, while H.M.S. Nonsuch under Captain Dobbins, after 
two days' chase took the ship. I put the men on board the fleet, 
which was much in need of men. I have received a letter from the 
Governor of New York asking me to send persons to meet the 
Commissioners from other Colonies for the settlement of the quota 
of men to be furnished for defence of New York. I have caused 
a large stone fort, called Fort William Henry, to be built at 
Pemaquid, and have kept a force -ready to attack the Indians when- 
ever they appear on our frontiers, which it has done with success. 
The fort is strong enough to resist all the Indians in America and 
has so much discouraged them that they have laid down their arms 
and sent their Sagamores to beg for an everlasting peace. I went 
to Pemaquid accordingly and concluded articles of peace, of which 
copy is enclosed. This province will now be better able to help the 
others, though much impoverished by the war. There was lately 
some danger of a breach between the Maquas and New York, but 
the matter is now accommodated. The reason why I did not write 
by the fleet of the miscarriage of the King's letters as to Canada was 
the sickness of my clerk. Pray move the King to spare us twenty 
great guns, with ammunition, for Pemaquid Fort. Si<ined. 
William Phips. 2 pp. Endorsed, R. Dec. 21, 1693. Enclosed, 
545. i. Treaty of peace concluded with the Eastern Indians at Fort 

Pemaquid. 11 August, 1693. Copy. 3 pp. The peculiar 

marks of the Indian chiefs are faithfully copied. 
545. n. Duplicate of Enclosure A T o. I. Endorsed, Reed. 19 Dec. 

1693. 

545. in. Triplicate of the same. Endorsed, Reed. 5 Jan. '93-4. 
545. iv. Declaration of peace by Sir William Phips on the said 

treaty. Copy. 2 pp. [America and West Indies. 561. 

Nos. 37, 37 i.-iv.] 

Sept. 11. 546. Minutes of Council of New York. The King's letter to 
Connecticut and Rhode Island read, ordering them to give assist- 
ance to the frontier garrisons. Resolved to send them by special 
messenger who will report how they are received. The Governor 
ordered a letter to be prepared requiring from Connecticut 100 men, 
armed and provisioned, for defence of the frontier this winter. 
Resolved to write to the Governor of Maryland that the contribution 
sent by him from that Colony is very disproportionate to the expense 
of defending the frontier. 

Sept. 12. Order for a patent to be issued to Anthony Tyre for land. 
Sep. 13-14. Orders for sundry payments. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 
457-459.] 

Sept. 12. 547. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for Charles Sadler, 
late Provost Marshal, to attend next Council and bring accounts of 



158 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1698. 

all moneys received by him in virtue of his office. '[Board of Trade. 
Jamaica,' 77. p. 257.] 

Sept. 12. 548. Minutes of Council of Barbados. Burch Heathersall 
sworn of the Assembly. Act for repair of the defences passed, and 
Act appointing John Pilgrim controller of the liquor duty rejected. 
Orders for sundry payments. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XII., 
pp. 430-432.] 

Sept. 14. 549. Journal of Assembly of Barbados. The Governor sent 
down certain letters received from England. Bill for repair of 
fortifications passed. The House elected Charles Thomas as 
controller of the liquor duty in the room of John Pilgrim, rejected 
by the Governor, and the bill for the purpose was twice read. 
Committee appointed to consider measures for rewarding freemen 
and slaves who behave well against the enemy. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. XIV., pp. 353-355.] 

Sept. 14. 550. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. Order for audit of 
the accounts of Nathaniel Hall, surgeon, and for the payment of 
their commission of three per cent, to the Committee for 
debentures. Advised, in reply to Governor Fletcher's application 
for help, that he be apprised that the Colony is too heavily burdened 
to be able to promise it ; and that the same be represented to their 
Majesties. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV., pp. 250-251.] 

Sept. 14. 551. Report of the Attorney-General on the petition of Sir 
Matthew Dudley and others (see No. 249 i.). Having heard the 
petitioners I find that they waive their request for grant of lands, 
mines and minerals in New England, but pray to be incorporated as a 
joint-stock Company to work mines, grow hemp and flax, dig salt- 
petre and produce naval stores. As to the heads of incorporation 
suggested by the petitioners I see no objection to the three first now 
that the grant of land is waived, nor to the fourth, which gives 
them liberty to trade, provided that they enjoy no privileges not 
accorded to all other subjects. The fifth head which obliges the 
company to furnish the King with naval stores, I conceive to be for 
the King's service. I see no objection to the sixth and seventh 
clauses, granting jurisdiction as Justices to the Company's officers 
over their workmen, but I think that the exemption of their work- 
men and servants from serving on juries should be conditional. The 
eighth head secures to the King a royalty on the produce of mines. 
The ninth clause, giving the Company liberty to coin small copper, 
is waived by the petitioners. The tenth clause being unnecessary 
is waived. The Agents of New England see no objection 
to the charter except the clause exempting the company's 
servants from service in the Militia, which the petitioners have 
accordingly waived ; but they wish the charter to be submitted to 
the Government of Massachusetts before it be passed. The 
petitioners protest against this delay, and I cannot see how the 
charter can injure anyone in New England. Signed. Edw. Ward. 
2 pp- [Board of Trade. New England, 6. No. 74 ; and 35. 
pp. 28-37.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 159 



1693. 

[Sept. 14.] 552. Heads of a charter of incorporation from Sir Matthew 
Dudley's Company, drawn by the Attorney General. 2^ pp. 
Endorsed, Reed. 15 Sept. 1693. 

Duplicate of the foregoing. [Board oj Trade. New England, 6. 
Nos. 75, 76 ; and 35, pp. 41-47.] 

Sept. 14. 553. Order of the Queen in Council. Referring a presentment 
of the Commissioners of Customs, with its enclosures, to Lords of 
Trade and Plantations for report. Signed. Rich. Colinge. \ p. 
Annexed, 

553. i. Commissioners of Customs to Lords of the Treasury. 
6 December, 1692. We submit three several affidavits in 
proof of violation of the Acts of Navigation by Governor 
Richier of Bermuda. We beg that the King's former letter 
for countenancing the Collector in Bermuda be renewed, 
and that the several matters contained in the Circular of 

26 November, 1684, for enforcement of the said Acts, may 
be sent to the Governor of Bermuda. Signed. Jo. Werden, 
Robert Southwell, J. Warde, Robt. Clayton. 1 pp. 

553. n. Copy of the Circular of 26 November, 1684. Calendared 

in Jormer volume. 1J pp. 
553. in. Affidavit of Nicholas Trott, senior. As to the refusal of 

Governor Richier to recognize the Collector of Customs, 

and his overruling of that Collector's authority. 1^ pp. 
553. iv. Affidavit of Nicholas Trott, junior. To the same effect. 

I p. 

553. v. Declaration of Samuel Trott. To the same effect. 2^ pp. 
553. vi. Copy of the King's letter to Governor Richier of 

27 October, 1690, ordering him to admit and support 
Samuel Trott as Collector of Customs in Bermuda. ^ p. 
[Board oj Trade. Bermuda, 2. Nos. 12, 12i.-vi.J 

Sept. 15. 554. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Address from 
Rhode Island read, and copy ordered to be sent to the Attorney 
General to report as to it with relation to the Charter of the Colony. 

Proposals of the New Jersey Company and the Pennsylvania 
Company as to Naval stores referred to the Admiralty. 

Governor Copley's and the Council of Maryland's letters of 19 
October and 21 December read, together with the charges against 
Sir Thomas Laurence, and orders given thereon. [Board of 
Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 205-207.] 

Sept. 15. 555. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Recommend- 
ing that the Governor of Barbados be directed to furnish copies of 
all proceedings in respect of the prosecution of John Hallett, that 
meanwhile the money deposited by him in the Courts of the Island 
be not disposed of, and that permission be given to gather evidence 
in Barbados on his behalf. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIII., pp. 360, 
361.] 

Sept. 15. 556. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. On the 
letters of the Governor and Council of Maryland of 14 October 
and 21 December, 1692, and 11 April, 1693, the Lords find no 
ground for such proceedings as have been taken against Sir Thomas 



160 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

Laurence, even if the articles against him were true; they find 
also that the action of the Governor and Council has been illegal 
and arbitrary, and they recommend that they be ordered to furnish 
Sir Thomas Laurence with a copy of the articles against him that 
he may answer them and that meanwhile he be restored to all his 
places without molestation and have permission to take all evidence 
that he requires. [Hoard of Trade. Maryland, 8. pp. 120-121.] 

[Sept. 15.] 557. Memorial of Charles Lodowyck to Lords of Trade and 
Plantations. Setting forth the matters prescribed in his instructions 
(see No. 414) and asking that the stores of war already requested 
may be sent, that four companies of foot may be sent to reinforce 
the garrison and kept there in the King's pay during the 
war, that Connecticut, New Jersey and Pennsylvania may be 
annexed to New York, that money may be sent yearly during the 
war for presents to the Indians, and that all the Governments on 
the Continent may be ordered to contribute proportionately in men 
and money for the defence of Albany. 2J pp. Endorsed, Pre- 
sented 15 Sept. 1693. Read same day. [Board of Trade. New 
York, 5. No. 27 ; and 48. pp. 50-53.] 

[Sept.] 558. Petition of inhabitants of Elizabethtown, East New 
Jersey, to the King and Queen. Our predecessors came hither by 
invitation of Governor Nichols in 1664, and obtained patents from 
him for purchase of their lands. But the proprietors have now 
separated us from the Government of New York ; they grant our 
lands to newcomers and require us to take new patents from them 
at a halfpenny an acre per annum since 1670. We were sorry to be 
cut off from New York and do our best to assist her, but the 
proprietors exempt all their own land from that .and from every 
other public charge. 23 signatures. Large sheet. Endorsed, 
Presented at the Committee by Mr. Lodowyck. [Board of Trade. 
New York, 5. No. 28.] 

[Sept. 15.] 559. Boundaries of the provinces of Massachusetts, Connecticut, 
Rhode Island and New Plymouth. A description of the limits of 
each province set down in a few lines. 1 p. [Board of Trade. New 
England, 6. No. 77.] 

Sept. 560. Memorandum as to the Northern Provinces of America 

from New Hampshire to New Jersey. These provinces should all 
have English laws and the same dependence on the Crown ; and 
all are equally concerned in danger from French and Indians. Yet 
their laws vary greatly and also the forms of administration in great 
as well as small matters. There are frequent jars between royal 
governments and proprietary and chartered governments ; there is 
great disunion and inequity in military service, some villages 
paying .500 per annum in time of war, and others as wealthy not 
one farthing. Massachusetts has now been settled by the King ; 
but the English Common and Statute law should run in all the 
provinces, and they should send up to the Crown not Magna Charta 
or Capital laws, but bylaws such as are necessary to make good 
omissions in the English law. All money granted to the Crown 
should be accounted for in the English Exchequer. Loyal persons 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 161 

1693. 

only should be employed in the government. If persons unskilled 
either in law or in the sword be employed, loyal persons will be 
discouraged ; and it may come to pass in time that some province 
will set up for itself, and the example of one will have dangerous 
influence on the rest. Unsigned and undated. 2 pp. [Board 
of Trade. New England, 6. No. 78.] 

[Sept. 15.] 561. Memorandum by Christopher Almy, giving reasons 
against taking the control of the Militia out of the hands of the 
Rhode Island Government. Rhode Island having a frontier to the 
sea is open to an enemy, and having a small population would be 
endangered if men were withdrawn from it. Our forefathers were 
driven from Massachusetts many years since by the cruelty of the 
people ; and Boston has an "unfcipothy" to us because we differ 
from it in religion and in our attachment to the Crown of England. 
We have never had assistance from Massachusetts in time of war, 
against either French or Indians, but Massachusetts has made war 
against Indians in our Colony without our consent and contrary to 
our charter. Yet we " suckered " their armies with men and 
provisions during the Indian rebellion and have supplied them with 
what we could spare in the expedition against Canada. 1 p. 
Endorsed, Mr. Almy's paper. [Board of Trade. New England, 6. 
No. 79.] 

Sept. 15. 562. Gilbert Heathcote to John Povey. I was asked to speak 
a few words at the delivery of the Jamaica address to the Queen. 
I expressed myself as you see in the enclosed paper. The Queen 
was pleased to receive an address graciously and to say that she 
was very glad but she beginning then to go away, the noise was 
so great that I could not hear what more she said. Signed. Gilbert 
Heathcote. \ p. Enclosed, 

562. i. Speech of Gilbert Heathcote on delivering the address from 

the Council and Assembly of Jamaica. A few sentences 
to the effect that the merchants in England join in the 
address, and that the Island has lately suffered great 
calamities from the earthquake but is now beginning to 
recover. %p. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. AW. 23, 23 1.] 

Sept. 15. 563. John Povey to the Attorney-General. Forwarding copy of 
the address of the Governor and Company of Rhode Island (see No. 
524 n.) and desiring his report on the charters or grants of East 
and West New Jersey, Rhode Island and Connecticut. p. 
Annexed, 

563. i. Copy of the address above mentioned. 4 pp. Endorsed, 

Reed. 16 Sept. [Board of Trade. New England, 6. 
Nos. 80, 80 1. ; and 35. p. 126.] 

Sept. 18. 564. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. The mer- 
chants trading to the Colonies brought forward their various 
proposals as to convoys, together with the Admiralty's report 
thereon. 

Sir William Beeston's letter of 24 May read (see No. 359). 
Order for the passages as to the men of war to be extracted and 
sent to the Admiralty. 

8060 L 



162 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

Mr. Sotherne's letter of 22 June read, and decision taken as to 
the protection of Piscataqua. 

Governor Codrington's letter of 15 May read (see No. 347). 
Agreed to refer that portion of it which refers to the pay of Lloyd's 
Regiment to the Treasury, for speedy settlement of the matter. 

Governor Kendall's letters of 10 April and 9 May read. Extract 
of the portions relating to shipping to be sent to the Admiralty. 

The Circular as to enforcement of the Acts of Trade signed. 
[Board of Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 208-217.] 

Sept. 18. 565. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Recommend- 
ing that extracts from Sir William Beeston's letter of 24 May 
concerning H.M. ships Guernsey and Mordaunt and the behaviour 
of Captain Oakley be sent to the Admiralty. [Board of Trade. 
Jamaica, 53. p. 163.] 

Sept. 18. 566. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. To move 
the Queen in Council to order one of the frigates on the New 
England coast to be stationed at Piscataqua for the protection of 
the harbour, in case the said protection be not afforded as hereto- 
fore by soldiers from Massachusetts. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXVII., 
p. 226.] 

Sept. 18. 567. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Recommending 
that extracts from Governor Kendall's letters of 10 April and 9 May 
as to the expediency of sending five frigates to Barbados about 
October, be sent to the Admiralty for their report. Mem. The above 
was ordered in Council, 5 Oct. 1693. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIII., 
pp. 372, 373.] 

Sept. 18. 568. Governor Kendall to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 

Barbados. j n mv \ a ^ j to\& vou ^hat I had at last got a legal Assembly, but I 
was mistaken, for at the beginning of July there arrived a packet 
from Sir Peter Colleton (as I was informed) to Mr. Bond, with an 
order in Council disallowing the Elections Act passed here in 1692. 
I never saw nor heard of this order till it was delivered to me on the 
2nd August, though it appears now that in that time it was shewn 
in triumph to all the enemies of the Government and called the 
Damnation of the Sacrament Act. After consulting together how 
they might do further mischief they delivered the order to me, who 
received it of course with all dutiful respect ; though if you had 
seen my letter to Mr. Blathwayt, or Mr. Bridges had been heard 
concerning the Act, I feel sure that the reasons for its confirmation 
would have appeared sufficient. But it seems that Mr. Bridges 
had no notice of the hearing, and that Mr. Littleton, the 
other agent for this country, betrayed his trust by keeping 
silence, though present. For this they intend to discharge him 
from the service. When I examined Mr. Bond how he durst detain 
the King's order so long before he presented it to me, he answered 
that he was directed to do so by Sir P. Colleton, and having 
done no more than his duty, hoped that I would pardon him, adding 
that he had communicated it to none but persons interested, 
for that Sir P. Colleton had joined three others with him in con- 
ducting the business. Now if Sir P. Colleton is entrusted with any 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 163 

1693. 

superintendence over this Island I must submit to it; but if 
not, I conceive he cannot answer for not sending the King's 
order directly to me, much less for directing it (for private 
and sinister ends) to be kept from me, as it was, for more 
than twenty days after its arrival. On the whole it is strongly 
to be presumed that this order has been surreptitiously obtained, 
and your Lordships and the King surprised in it. All the honest 
men in the Island are extremely mortified that an Act should be so 
abrogated without hearing of their case therein. Again Mr. Blathwayt 
might have informed you that in Sir Jonathan Atkins's time two 
laws, which were not approved by the King, were sent back here to 
be repealed, to preserve the honour and reputation of the Govern- 
ment. I am sorry that on a similaf occasion I shall be worse used, 
for I do not think that I deserve it. If a Governor's reputation be 
not maintained and the peeple, as a natural consequence, despise 
him,, he cannot perform the King's service as he ought. At the 
first sitting of the Assembly I perceived why the order had been so 
long stifled, for they were consulting how to raise fresh obstructions 
and had debauched many with the notion that as the Act was 
repealed the Assembly was dissolved. The same doctrine was 
broached in Council by Messrs. Bond, Farmer and Gibbes, but was 
exploded both there and in the Assembly. For particulars I refer 
you to the Minutes of Council herewith enclosed, and shall only add 
that notwithstanding all their pernicious arts to disturb the 
Government, these few representatives who had been seduced are 
now undeceived. The Island is healthy and prosperous. Marti- 
nique is very sickly and so short of provisions that salt beef is sold 
for twenty pence a pound. If we have some frigates here at the 
end of October to intercept the reliefs from France, the Island will 
be reduced still lower. Signed. J. Kendall. 2J pp. Endorsed, 
Reed. 21 Nov. Read 27 Dec. '93. Annexed, 
568. i. Extract from Minutes of Council of Barbados. Speech 
of the Governor on the question raised by certain members 
of Council, that the disallowance of the Elections Act of 
1692 dissolved the Assembly. Declarations laid before 
the Council by the Governor and signed by them, dis- 
avowing any such construction of the royal action. Copy. 
2 pp. Endorsed, Reed. 21 Nov. Presented with the 
letter of 18 Sept. 

568. ii. A second copy of foregoing enclosure. [Board of Trade. 
Barbados, 5. Nos. 27, 27 i., n. ; and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 
VIII., pp. 879-383.] 

Sept. 18. 569. Governor Kendall to Earl of Nottingham. This letter 
Barbados. opens with a transcript of the letter to Lords of Trade and Plantations 
of same date, and continues as follows. Since writing the above a 
box of letters has arrived, which the packet-master said were all for 
me, so I was not a little surprised to find one addressed by you to 
Sir W. Beeston ; but on my honour I did not read it, and resealed 
it at once. I beg your forgiveness for my mistake. I am glad to 
learn by your letters of 22 April and 18 May that my conduct has 
been approved ; but I am barbarously used by the Commissioners 
for Victualling and for the Sick and Wounded, who have long owed 



164 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

me over 1,600. I again beg for your protection herein. Signed. 
J. Kendall. 3| pp. [America and West Indies. 456. No. 53.] 

Sept. 18. 570. Governor Sir William Phips to Governor Fletcher. A ship 
Boston. from Cadiz confirms the unhappy news of the loss of the Straits fleet 
of English and Dutch. As to your proposal for a meeting of 
commissioners from the various provinces to agree on a quota of 
men and money for defence of the frontiers, the fatal epidemic 
sicknesses and other calamities among us make it difficult for 
anyone at present to attend such a Congress. Moreover the transfer 
of the militia of Connecticut and Pennsylvania seems to make it less 
reasonable to require assistance for the defence of Albany from this 
province, which has borne the loss of a long war almost without 
assistance, and is saddled with the guarding of the frontiers and the 
maintenance of a garrison at Pemaquid. For though we are at 
peace with the Eastern Indians, we are still liable to attack by the 
French. I shall not be backward to contribute what assistance I 
can, and had the militia of Connecticut remained under my 
command I should have sent some of them to reinforce your posts. 
Copy. \\ pp. Endorsed, Reed. 20 Dec. '93. \_Boanl of Trade. 
New England, 6. No. 81.] 

Sept. 19. 571. Minutes of Council of New York. Letter from Godfrey 
Dellius read, reporting that the French have prepared 100 batteaux 
for transport. The Governor said that he understood their designs 
to be against our frontiers, and asked the Council's opinion as to 
the expediency of his going to live at Albany this winter. Order for 
an agreement to be made with the weigh-master for a salary not 
exceeding 501. per annum. 

Sept. 20. The special messenger returned from Connecticut with a letter 
signifying that Colony's readiness to send a Commissioner, but 
refusing to send men and supplies to Albany. 

Sept. 21. John van Comp's petition as to land referred to a Committee. 
[Col Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 459-461.] 

Sept. 20. 572. Journal of the House of Assembly of Maryland. List of 
Members present. The House sent a message to the Council, who 
desired their attendance to-morrow. 

Sept. 21. Message to the Council desiring to be informed as to the condition 
of the Government on the death of Governor Copley. 

Sept. 22. Orders for a Committee of Grievances and for summoning of 
absent members. Agreed to hold a full conference with the Council 
to-morrow. The complaints of Sir Thomas Laurence examined by 
the Committee of Grievances. 

Sept. 23. Message from the Council that Sir E. Andros had announced that 
he was on his way to assume the Government. The complaints of 
Colonel Jowles examined by the Committee of Grievances. [Board 
of Trade. Maryland, 12. pp. 237-250.] 

Sept. 21. 573. Minutes of Council of Virginia. On a letter from Maryland 
reporting the death of Governor Copley and the disorder consequent 
thereupon, it was resolved after examination of the Governor's 
Commission that he set out for Maryland forthwith. Mr. Randolph's 
letter as to the escape of a ship which he was about to seize for 
illicit trading read and referred to Colonel Christopher Wormeley. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



165 



1698. 



Sept. 28. 



Sept. 25. 



Sept. 25. 



Sept. 25. 

Whitehall. 



Sept. 25. 

Boston. 



Proclamation ordered, declaring Secretary Wormeley President of 
the Council, which will take over the administration during the 
Governor's absence. Petition of John Edmeston for restoration of 
his vessel, seized by Mr. Randolph, referred to Mr. Randolph. 
[Col, Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXIV., pp. 826-829.] 

574. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for detention of 
the merchant ships till a convoy be ready for them. Order that the 
French officer who has arrived with a flag of truce to buy provisions 
have permission to buy the same, and also a ship and cargo for 
which he is in treaty. Order for* payments. [Board of Trade. 
Jamaica, 77. pp. 257, 258.] 

575. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Agreed to 
postpone the consideration of the time for departure of London ships 
for Virginia and Maryland for a fortnight. 

Report of the Attorney General on the heads of Sir Matthew 
Dudley and Company's Charter, with his counter-proposals, read, and 
decision thereon taken. 

Mr. Lodowyck attended from New York and gave in a report of 
matters there. Order for the Attorney General to hasten his report 
on the Charters of Rhode Island and Connecticut and the grants of 
New Jersey. 

Agreed to recommend that the appeal of Sir Richard White 
against a judicial decision in Jamaica be admitted. [Board of 
Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 218-220.] 

576. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Recommending 
that Sir Richard White be admitted to make his appeal on giving 
the usual security, and that authentic documents as to the case be 
ordered to be sent from Jamaica (see No. 490). [Board oj Trade. 
Jamaica, 53. p. 166.] 

577. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Agreed to 
recommend that the heads of a charter proposed by Sir Matthew 
Dudley and Company, together with the Attorney General's report 
thereon, be referred to the Lords of the Treasury for report. 
[Board of Trade. New England, 35. pp. 37, 38.] 

578. Governor Sir William Phips to Lords of Trade and 
Plantations. As the principal reason for sending the squadron 
and forces under Sir F. Wheler was that an attack should be made 
on Canada, I regret greatly that the affair should have been dis- 
appointed. But I knew nothing of the royal intentions till the fleet 
arrived, when Sir Francis Wheler told me that he wondered that 
no express had been sent to me ; and I had no intimation till the 
end of July, when I received a copy of Mr. Blathwayt's letter saying 
that the King's letter was sent to me by way of Virginia. As I had 
no news of its arrival there and as it was too late to think of the 
expedition, I did what I could for the speedy despatch of the squadron 
from hence, to save the expense of so large a force. Had the King's 
commands reached me in time there is no object for which I would 
have worked more gladly, but his letter never came to my hand 
until the 24th inst. I humbly acquiesce in the King's pleasure to 
place the militia of Connecticut under command of the Governor of 



166 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

New York. Here follow details of a descent by a French privateer, 
the treaty with the Eastern Indians and the building of Fort Pemaqiiid 
as in letter of September llth (see No. 545). The 18th October next 
is fixed for the meeting of the Commissioners to settle the contribu- 
tions of the Colonies towards the defence of New York. Mr. 
Benjamin Jackson, my agent, can inform you as to all the other 
matters. Signed. William Phips. - 2 pp. Endorsed, Reed. 5 Jan., 
1693-4. [Board of Trade. New England, 6. No. 82 ; and 35. 
pp. 85-88.] 

[Sept. 25.] 579. Abstract of the foregoing. 1| pp. [Board of Trade. 
New England, 6. Xo. 83.] 

Sept. 25. 580. Lords of the Treasury to the Queen. On the petition 
of Sir John Fleet (sec No. 230) we have received a report 
from the Commissioners of the Navy, and we recommend that 
it be first ascertained whether the petitioners' demands have been 
paid in Jamaica, before your decision is given (see No. 286). 
Signed. Godolphin ; R. Hampden ; Phil. Montague. I p. Endorsed, 
Read in Council, Oct. 5. 1693. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. 
No. 24.] 

Sept. 25. . 581. Proclamation of the Governor of Virginia. Appointing 
the Council to administer the Government with Ralph Wormeley as 
president, during his absence. Copy. 2 pp. [Board, oj Trade. 
Virginia, 5. No. 33 ; and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXIV., p. 879.] 

Sept. 25. 582. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor reported 
that he had fixed the day for the Commissioners to meet and agree 
as to the quotas for defence of the frontier, and caused a letter from 
Sir William Phips, refusing to send any assistance, to be read. 
Ordered that the letter be sent home. The Governor again sub- 
mitted to the Council the question of his going to Albany for the 
winter. Resolved to settle 50 a year on the post-office for its 
encouragement. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 461, 462.] 

Sept. 25. 583. Journal of House of Burgesses of Virginia. The examina- 
tion of grievances was continued. 

Sept. 26. After some minor business the House attended Sir E. Andros, who 
after a short speech dissolved the Assembly. [Board of Trade. 
Maryland, 12. pp. 250-252.] 

Sept. 25. 584. Minutes of Council of Maryland. Sir Edmund Andros 
produced his commission and was sworn, after which he swore in 
the eight Councillors present. 

Sept. 26. The Order in Council of 2 March relating to Sir Thomas Laurence 
was read, recorded and ordered to be complied with. The fees 
fixed in the book of laws for the Keepers and Naval officers were 
then compared with the Order in Council aforesaid. 

Sept. 27. Resolved that the publication of the disallowance of the Act 
for ordinary-keepers, enjoined by the said Order in Council, be 
deferred until the King's pleasure be known, but that meanwhile 
the fees go to Sir Thomas Laurence. The Order of the Council of 
17 August, 1692, as to fees in Chancery was cancelled. [Board of 
Trade. Maryland, 12. pp. 1-3.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 167 



1693. 

Sept. 25. 585. Minutes of Council of Maryland in Assembly. Sir Edmund 
Andres's commission was read and himself sworn. 

Sept. 26. Proclamation for continuing all officers in their posts. The 
Speaker and burgesses then attended according to summons, when 
Sir Edmund explained the present circumstances and dissolved the 
General Assembly. Proclamation announcing the dissolution. Sir 
Thomas Laurence's business considered. 

Sept. 27. Sir Thomas Laurence's business again considered and the Order 
in Council concerning him read. ^ 

Sept. 28. Order for John Llewellin to proceed forthwith to complete the 
records of the Council and then deliver them to the present clerk. 
The King's letter as to furnishing a quota of men to New York, and 
Governor Fletcher's letter as to a congress were read, when it 
appeared that owing to Governor Copley's long illness and death, 
no steps had been taken for sending a Commissioner. Order for 
the Collectors to bring in their accounts. [Board of Trade. Mary- 
land, 12. pp. 11-25.] 

Sept. 27. 586. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. Few Representa- 
tives of the Assembly being present owing to the stormy weather, 
the Court was not held ; and it was ordered that it be convened 
for the 8th of November. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV., p. 251.] 

Sept. 28. 587. Minutes of Council of New York. Orders for sundry 
payments. The Governor again pressed the question of his residing 
at Albany for the winter. The Council decided to meet by themselves 
and give their opinion thereon in writing. \_Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 
LXXV., pp. 462, 463.] 

Sept. 28. 588. Order of the Queen in Council. Approving the report of 
Whitehall. Lords of Trade and Plantations as to Sir Thomas Laurence (see No. 

556) and ordering accordingly. Copy. \\ pp. Subscribed. 

21 May, 1694, a true copy by me, Thomas Laurence. Endorsed, 

8 June, Read 13 June, 1695. [America and West Indies. 556. 

No. 17; and Board of Trade. Maryland, 8. pp. 121-123.] 

Sept. 29. 589. Minutes of Council of Maryland. Order for inspection of 
the Provincial Court Office and Chancery Office, and for report 
thereon. 

Sept. 30. The report as to the state of the records in the above offices was 
read. The former officers undertook to complete the records up to 
the time of their leaving office. [Board of Trade. Maryland, 12. 
pp. 3-5; and pp. 25-29.] 

Oct. 2. 590. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor's Com- 
mission to command the militia of Connecticut read. The Governor 
put it to the Council whether it would be needful for him to go to 
Connecticut. Order for examination of the assessment rolls of the 
penny per pound duty, the receipts from the same being of late 
much diminished. A Committee appointed to call on Mrs. Sloughter 
for her husband's accounts of certain sums received from the 
revenue. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 463-464.] 

Oct. 2. 591. Minutes of Council of Barbados. Orders for sundry pay- 
ments. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XII., pp. 432-433.] 



168 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 
Oct. 2. 



592. Minutes of Council of Maryland. A former suspension 
and commitment of Sir Thomas Laurence being brought to notice, 
it was resolved that being now restored to Council, he be not 
excluded therefrom, but that as he is unable to attend through 
sickness, Colonel Blakiston shall preside. The Order in Council of 
23 February, 1693, and the Attorney General's report of 2 November, 
1692, as to Lord Baltimore were read, and orders thereon given. 
Orders for sundry payments. [Board of Trade. Maryland, 12. 



Oct. 3. 



Oct. 3. 



Oct. 3. 



Oct. 4. 

Treasury 
Chambers. 



Oct. 5. 

Whitehall. 



Oct. 5. 

Whitehall. 



Sir Edmund Andros and six members present. New Commission 
for the Provincial Court signed, and Colonel Blakiston suspended. 
Mr. Cheseldyne received his commission as Commissary General. 
Proclamation of Sir Edmund Andros's assumption of Government. 
The members present signed the test. [Board of Trade. Maryland, 13. 
pp. 1-3 ; and 12. pp. 29-39.] 

593. Journal of Assembly of Barbados. Bill to appoint a 
controller of the liquor-duties passed. The Committee brought in 
heads, which were drawn into a Bill for rewarding freemen and 
slaves who behave well against the enemy, which was read a first 
time. Bill to appoint a committee of public accounts also read a 
first time. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XIV., pp. 355-356.] 

594. Acts of Barbados passed in 1693. 
Act to present the Governor with 500. 

Act to provide labourers for repair of fortifications. 
Act to appoint a Controller of the liquor duties. 
Act to appoint Commissioners to settle the accounts of the late 
expedition. 

Act to supplement the Militia Act. 

The whole of the foregoing dated 30 October, 1693. 

[Col Entry Bk., Vol. XIV., pp. 403-408.] 

595. The Secretary of the Treasury to John Povey. Forward- 
ing Governor Fletcher's letter to the Treasury of 15 August (see 
No. 502). Signed. Hen. Guy. \p. Endorsed, Reed. 8 Jan. 1693-4. 
[Board of Trade. Plantations General, 2. No. 62 ; and Col. Entry 
Bk., Vol. C., p. 324.] 

596. Order of the Privy Council. That the Admiralty order one 
of the frigates on the New England coast to take station at 
Piscataqua unless they see objections thereto. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXVIL, p. 227.] 

597. Order of the Privy Council. Referring the Attorney- 
General's report of 14th September, as to Sir Matthew Dudley's 
Company, to Lords of the Treasury for consideration. Signed. 
John Nicholas. ^ p. Enclosed, 

597. i. Copy of the Attorney-General's report of 14th September 
(see No. 551). 5 pp. The whole endorsed with Minute to 
the effect that the Lords think it reasonable for the charter 
to be referred to the Government of New England. [Board 
of Trade. New England, 6. Nos. 84, 84 i.; and 35. 
pp. 38, 39.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



169 



1693. 

Oct. 5. 

Whitehall. 



Oct. 5. 

Whitehall. 



Oct. 5. 

Whitehall. 



Oct. 5. 

Whitehall. 



Oct. 5. 



Oct. 5. 

New York. 



Oct. 5. 



598. Order of the Privy Council. That extract of Governor 
Codrington's letter relating' to the pay of Colonel Lloyd's regiment 
be sent to the Lords of the Treasury for their orders thereon (see. 
No. 347). [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 44. 7^.128,129.] 

599. Order of the Privy Council. That extracts of Sir William 
Beeston's letter of 24 May respecting H.M. ships Guernsey and 
Mordaunt be sent to the Admiralty, who shall report what they do 
as regards the complaint against Captain Oakley. [Board of Trade. 
Jamaica, 53. pp. 163, 164.] 

600. Order of the Privy Council. That the appeal of Sir 
Richard White be admitted, on his giving the usual security, and 
that the necessary documents bearing on the case be ordered to be 
sent from Jamaica (see No. 490). [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 53. 

p. 167.] 

601. Order of the Privy Council. Referring the report of the 
Treasury on Sir John Fleet's petition (see No. 580) together 
with all other papers on the subject to Lords of Trade and 
Plantations, for them to enquire therein and report. Signed. John 
Nicholas. \ p. Endorsed, Reed. 21 Oct. 1693. [Board oj 
Trade. Jamaica, 7. No. 25.] 

602. Order of the Privy Council. For enforcing the recom- 
mendation of Lords of Trade and Plantations in the case of John 
Hallett (see No. 555). Sif/ned. John Nicholas. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. VIII., pp. 361, 362.] 

603. Governor Fletcher to Earl of Nottingham. Sir William 
Phips is positive that he will give me neither men nor money. 
Connecticut answers with misty saying which I cannot understand, 
pretending an old charter, which they surrendered to the late King 
but have now reassumed. They are sending over Agents to obtain a 
renewal of it, after exercising arbitrary power these five years. The 
Government is a republic; they are enemies of the Church of 
England and no friends to monarchs. Jersey, thanks to Governor 
Hamilton, has done more for us than any of the Colonies. That 
gentleman deserves Their Majesties' trust. I have already reported 
what Virginia and Maryland have done for us. Mr. Penn's last 
letters to Pennsylvania have put some of them into a ferment, but 
nothing can be hoped for from thence for Albany, while their 
Assembly is composed of themselves [Quakers] . If Canada be not 
taken next spring I doubt lest our Indians will desert to the French, 
who bribe high. Sir F. Wheler's departure shook our Indians, 
though he was in no manner of condition to attempt Canada. If the 
Indians leave us, 1,000 foot will hardly secure our frontier. Signed. 
Ben. Fletcher. Holograph. 2 pp. Endorsed, R. Dec. 21, 1693. 

Duplicate of the above. [America and West Indies. 579. 
Nos. 36, 37.] 

604. Abstract of a letter from Governor Fletcher to W T illiam 
Blathwayt. Governor Fletcher construed the royal order as to 
discharging all proceedings against Leisler as a warrant for opening 
the prisons, which he did, studiously endeavouring to allay all heats 



170 COLONIAL PAPEES. 

1693. 

between the opposing parties. Several prisoners under sentence of 
death he advised to ask for a pardon, but they continue positive in not 
owning their release as a favour nor ceasing to justify their crimes. 
On the contrary some of them stood and were elected for the 
Assembly, which he could not suffer. They say this is arbitrary 
power ; the other party say no less of this release. He hopes that 
he was warranted in what he did, and that the prisoners will either 
be pardoned or executed, for they will own no crime, but persist 
that all was done for King William and Queen Mary. The prisoners 
are six in number, including Abraham Gouverneur. 1 pp. 
Endorsed, Reed. 12 March, 93-4. [Board oj Trade. New York, 5. 
No. 29 ; and 48. pp. 90, 91.] 

Oct. 5. 605. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Proclamation for a general 

embargo. Order for the complement of the hired sloops to be made 
up to seventy men each. Order for writing off bad debts to the 
revenue. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. pp. 258-260.] 

Oct. 5. 606. Minutes of Council of New York. Chidley Brooke's 

accounts of the revenue for the first quarter of this year passed. 
Patent for land granted to Colonel William Smith. A committee 
appointed to enquire into John Van Comp's case. Orders for certain 
payments. 

Oct. 6. The Governor reported the receipt of an account from Major 
Peter Schuyler of the probable designs of the French, and put it to 
the Council whether he should go to Albany direct, or take Con- 
necticut on his way. Advised that he go by way of Connecticut. 
A letter from Governor Hamilton read, reporting opposition met 
with in Elizabeth Town to the furnishing of a relief to the detach- 
ment on the frontier, owing to the work of an independent minister, 
and complaining also of the stubbornness of the Quakers. 

Oct. 7. Order for JtlOO salary to be paid to James Graham, and for other 

payments. Chidley Brooke's accounts passed. [Co/. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXXV., pp. 464-468.] 

Oct. 7. 607. Minutes of Council of Nevis. On the motion of the 
Council the Assembly ageed to hire cattle for hauling of great guns, 
and to renew the Act for an impost on strong liquors. The 
renewing Act was passed. [Co/. Entry Bk., Vol. XLVIII., p. 281.] 

Oct. 9. 608. Minutes of Council of Montserrat. The Assembly having 
been dissolved on the 7th inst., the following members were now 
returned, Joseph Littell, John Davis, Richard Bass, William Einch, 
William Erye (Speaker), Nathaniel Bass, Nathaniel Harris, William 
White. [Co/. Entry Bk., Vol. XLVIII., p. 322.] 

Oct. 9. 609. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order to permit the 

Erench flag of truce to return to St. Domingo. [Board of Trade. 
Jamaica, 77. p. 260.] 

Oct. 9. 610. Governor Fletcher to the Earl of Nottingham. I have 

New York, received arms for two troops of dragoons, also your letter to 

Sir F. Wheler and my commission to command the militia of 

Connecticut. I am just informed that the French are making an 

attempt on our frontier, so am hastening to Connecticut to publish 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 171 

1693. 

my commission and thence to Albany. Allow nie to say that I 
have the greatest work and least wages of any Governor in these 
parts, hut I am cheerful in my duty. Signed. Ben. Fletcher. 
Written at the close of a duplicate of his letter of 5 October. 1 p. 
Endorsed, R. Dec. 21, 1693. [America and West Indies. 579. 
No. 37.] 

Oct. 9. 611. Governor Fletcher to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 
Fort William H.M.S. Richmond, Captain John Evan's, arrived at Sandy Hook on 
^ ie ^ i ns ^' bringing me my commission to command the militia 
of Connecticut, and 120 arms for dragoons. I am advised that 
Count Frontenac has got 500 men and recruits of stores, artillery, 
etc., from France this summer, so I expect he will trouble us this 
winter with a greater force than in February last. Their design is 
at least to compel our Indians to a peace, who are lately become 
very weary of the war and indifferent to us. It is plain that they 
cannot continue long neutral. Sir Francis Wheler's coming to 
Boston and doing nothing has almost completely discouraged them. 
The French outbid us in presents, but have not yet prevailed. Our 
Indians upbraid our neighbouring Colonies with sloth and 
cowardice. The Mohawks are mostly destroyed by the war, and 
some of them have run "over to Canada. A French Jesuit, 
Millet, who has long been a prisoner with the Oneidas has 
gotten such interest with them and with the three other natives 
that they cannot be persuaded to surrender him, though I have 
offered a sum of money and an Indian boy for him and promised not 
to hurt his person. That Jesuit has done much harm to our Indians, 
and I am resolved to move him if possible. This province is now 
hardly circumstanced. Our militia is small here 5,000 to 3,000 
men and more families are daily moving to Pennsylvania 
and Connecticut to be safe from taxes and detachments. The 
Assembly have provided 300 men for the frontier (too few by one 
half for safety) and 6,000 to pay the charge for one year up to 
1 May next. The Revenue does not pay the expense of government. 
The war augments incidental charges, and Albany is supported by 
other funds, chiefly taxes. Since the arrival of Governor Sloughter 
the frontiers have cost this poor province 20,000, which 
lies heavy on the inhabitants. I have fixed the 4th of October 
for the meeting of Commissioners to settle the quotas of 
the several Colonies for defence of the frontiers. Sir 
William Phips has sent a refusal, as the enclosed correspondence 
shows. Sir Edmund Andros has sent one. None come from 
Maryland. Pennsylvania denies the carnal sword, nor will they 
dip their money in blood. They add nothing but trouble to us. 
Nothing will be done. Those who are here pretend that they 
cannot proceed to adjust a quota without the rest of the Com- 
missioners. When it will be done I cannot divine, since some had 
the boldness to give denial to the Royal commands. A copy of the 
suggested scheme of quotas is enclosed. Virginia did send us 600/. 
(New York money) and Maryland 300/. before they knew of the royal 
order for 500/. and 250J. Sir E. Andros writes that he will make up 
Virginia's contribution to 500J. sterling. Colonel Copley wrote that 
he had exceeded the Royal orders, but the gift was by the free will 



172 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

of the people in assembly, and we have thanked them for it. New 
Jersey has sent us 100. and 65 men, which I attribute to the good 
offices of Governor Hamilton. Connecticut, as Mr. Bulkeley's letter 
will show you, is preparing to resist the Royal commission for my 
command of the militia, which shall not move me from my duty. 
They have desired a tax of a penny a pound on the people for Major 
Winthrop, who is to go home, it is said, as their agent. I am told 
that the east end of Nassau Island goes with them herein and asks 
to be lopped off from New York and joined to Connecticut. 

We cannot build a stone fort at Albany, though such a one, 
with good artillery and fewer men, would make a better defence 
than the present rotten and unrepaired one. The renewing of it 
will take much time. The wood in this country will not last like 
that in the Northern parts. This Province cannot hold out thus 
much longer. The different provinces are too much divided in 
government and circumstance from one another, and they drive 
their private interests. Though a numerous people we are weak 
and fit for no design ; and it falls to New York's share to be in the 
first line of battle. I heartily wish that another expedition would 
come next summer and put an end to the matter. We are far more 
healthy here than the Leeward Islands. I beg you to procure for 
me the military stores for which I have asked, and twenty great 
guns more, and longer guns than those I brought with me. It 
seems that those last were never proved, for the first I tried split. 
I have selected a site for a new battery. It is so designed that, 
owing to the swiftness of the tide, no ship can ride before the town 
but must have her stem or stern towards it. Our powder wastes 
apace, as we are obliged to supply the troops and forts on the 
frontier from the King's stores. If Canada be not taken next 
summer I suggest the building of a stone fort at Albany and 
the sending out of four companies of Grenadiers, with pay, to 
ease our people ; else they will all move into the neighbouring 
provinces, and if Albany be lost the whole of the Colonies 
are ruined. I beg that at least our two independent companies 
may be made up to 200 men. Our detachments come in 
slowly, and for the most part unarmed. May I beg you to 
send me 200 light fusils for the Indians, for they will not carry 
the heavy firelocks. I have lately called an Assembly, and though I 
failed to obtain the revenue for Their Majesties' lives I have secured 
it for five years longer. The people object that the Colonies on each 
side of them are free of Customs-duties while they are clogged ; and 
that it will be a bad precedent and inconvenient for them if their 
neighbours are not made subject to the same duties. I have also 
got them to settle a ministry for New York and three other counties. 
I have within two days advice of the advance of the French to 
Albany. Mayor Schuyler's letters will show you what force I am 
despatching. I am bound first to Connecticut to publish my 
Commission and obtain assistance, and shall then march straight to 
Albany, if required. Mine is a difficult and troublesome post, yet I 
have a far less salary than the Governors of Virginia and Maryland. 
Signed. Ben. Fletcher. 4 pp. Endorsed, Reed. 20 Dec. 1593. 
Read 27 Dec. Annexed, 
611. i. Governor Fletcher to Sir William Phips. 31 August, 1693. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 178 

1693. 

I am glad to learn of your peace with the Eastern Indians. 
Let me remind you of my letter of 31 March, for I have not 
heard a syllable of the two hundred men you promised me. 
In yours of 20 April you told me that you had left 
directions for the men that I desired to march with all 
speed from Rhode Island and Connecticut, and that as soon 
as the quotas were fixed you would endeavour to be first to 
serve Their Majesties herein. I have written you several 
letters since, which Mr. Stoughto'n tells me were expedited 
to you, yet not a man is yet come to Albany from your 
Government, nor does it appear that any care has been 
taken for the same. A party of Indians have brought in 
two French prisoners from Canada. Major Schuyler 
redeemed one of them from being burnt, who reports the 
arrival of nine French ships, two of them of forty guns, 
with 500 recruits. Three more ships put back for repairs, 
the Chevalier D'Eaux being in one of them ; and the 
French are very busy over the fortification of Quebec. 
I expect another French attack this winter and have every 
reason to do so. Our frontier is weakly manned, and with- 
out your help we cannot remedy this. Since you have 
made peace with your Indians I doubt not that you will 
exceed rather than fall short of the number of 200 men for 
our help, and that you will send a Commissioner to assist 
the others in fixing quotas for defence. Copy. 1^ pp. 

611. n. Sir William Phips to Governor Fletcher. Boston, 
18 September, 1693. Already abstracted under date. 
See No. 570. 

611. in. Estimate of the annual charge for the defence of Albany, 
and of the quotas to be furnished by the various Colonies. 
600 men and officers. 16,800. Presents to Indians and 
contingencies 200. Incidental charges 2,000. Total, 
20,800. 

Virginia has 6,000 men. quota, 120 men. 4,200 

Maryland ,, 4,000 ,, ,, 80 ,, 2,800 

Pennsylvania ,, 2,000 ,, 43 ,, 1,400 

Connecticut ,, 3,000 ,, ,, 60 2,100 

New England ,, 9,500 ,, 176 ,, 6,160 

Rhode Island 1,200 ,, 24 ,, 840 

New York ,, 3,000 100 ,, 3,300 



Total 28,700 600 men. 20,800 

New York by this scheme advances 40 men and 1,200 
more than her quota proportionable to the other Colonies. 
1 p. Endorsed, Reed. 20 December, 1693. 

611. iv. Another copy of the preceding. Endorsed, Reed. 
20 Dec. 1693. 

611. v. Gershom Bulkeley to Governor Fletcher. Weathersfield, 
15 Sept. 1693. I have received yours of the llth, and have 
seen a copy of the Queen's letter, which I confess sets a 
non plus upon my wit to know what to make of it. It is 
not directed to any person or persons particularised by 
name or office but to such as for the time being take care 



174 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

for the preservation of the peace and the administration of 
the law, etc. Now the question is who they are, for the 
gentlemen to whom it was delivered do nothing less than 
exercise the government without the royal authority, which 
is a high breach of the peace and violation of the laws. 
In what capacity they can or will think themselves enabled 
by this letter to act I cannot tell, but believe they are 
somewhat sick of this superscription, for I hear they are 
consulting about calling another General Court to advise 
what is to be done. The result of their present delibera- 
tion you will have heard from another source, and 
I shall not enter into it. For my own part I hope 
that the letter is but an introduction to something 
else, though I doubt not that they will take advantage 
of it by misconstruction to abuse the people and make them 
believe that the King looks upon their charter and govern- 
ment as good as ever such notions begin to walk already. 
We had a fast-day kept last Wednesday, and this letter 
following so swiftly upon it may be looked upon as an 
answer to their prayers. If the letter were intended for 
them as in their present state, it is, as you say, a permission 
to connive at their present government, but all the world 
knows that a permission is no commission, and where then 
is our obligation to obey them ? If a confirmation of this 
government should follow upon it, the best subjects here 
cannot do better than look for some other quarters for 
themselves, for three things have been given out plainly 
enough : (1) that the present rulers are resolved to crush 
those who comply not with their usurpation, right or wrong, 
they care not how ; (2) that they would have the people 
kept in the dark that they may not know the law nor 
their lawful rights ; (3) that if we must have English 
liberties they would as lief have no charter, and if 
that must be they will throw up their charter 
quickly. This was plainly declared by their great oracle 
and dictator but three weeks ago, when some of them were 
met in a special Court ; and it is only yesterday that a 
dwelling-house at Hartford and a corn-house in this town 
were broken open ri ct armis, and the owners carried before 
some of these worthies and bound over in 50 to appear 
before next Court for trial, or else they would have gone to 
prison. And all the cause is a surmise that they have 
taken away growing corn, whereas, if it be true, it was but 
taking corn that was growing on one of the men's own 
lands, of which he has never been dispossessed by law. 
But they would fain thrust him out by will and doom to 
his utter ruin. It is high time for Their Majesties to settle 
a Government, or it will be impossible for loyal subjects 
to serve them. So we long for the frigates that we may 
see what they will do for us. Copy. 2 pp. 
611. vi. Peter Schuyler to Governor Fletcher. Albany, 3 October, 
10 o'clock at night. Last Saturday night news came 
that an Indian was come from Canada to Oneida, and 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 175 

1693. 

that the Sachems of the Upper Nations were to meet 
and consult there ; that the messenger was arrived at 
Canada with the Jesuit's letter and that our prisoners in 
Canada were secured lest they should run away, for that 
a party was designed to make an attack somewhere this 
fall, though the Indian would not say where. I caused 
the guards to be doubled, viewed the men's arms, supplied 
every man with ammunition, and sent word to the farmers 
to be upon their guard this evening. This evening two 
Indian women came in, who reported that about three days 
ago a party of ten French and twenty Onnagongue Indians 
took a squaw prisoner near Tionondoge, the third Maqua 
Castle, and after keeping her half a day sent her under 
charge of two Indians to the Castle, bidding her tell the 
Indians there not to stir out, and that they would do 
them no harm but come and fetch them away. The 
two Indians, hearing shots fired in the Castle, were afraid 
to go in, but gave the woman a fathom of wampum 
to deliver the message, and withal cut off her hair as a 
sign (so they said) that they had been there themselves. 
The news quickly spread from the third Castle to the first 
and thence to us. While we were examining the woman 
news came from the flats that the waggon going thither 
with provisions had been set upon by the enemy, two 
horses killed and two soldiers taken prisoners, while the 
rest had escaped. The fort immediately fired two guns to 
alarm the farmers, and the express which bears this had 
orders to command all the farmers in and ask Colonel 
Beeckman to send us 100 men, we not knowing how consider- 
able the enemy's force may be, since they have taken such 
pains to keep our Indians quiet. I have sent an express 
to the Maquas to order them to come in with their wives 
and children, and warned Oneida and Onandaga to be on 
their guard and to send us down some men. We luckily 
received 80 good men from you within these four days. 
We are all well and on our guard and do not fear a brush 
since we have so good warning. Copy. 2 pp. Endorsed, 
Reed. 20 Dec. '93. 

611. vn. Peter Schuyler to Governor Fletcher. Albany, 5 October. 
5 o'clock in the afternoon. On the night of the 3rd 
another party of the enemy on the Eastern side of the 
Hudson River fired six shot at a canoe coming down, but 
hurt no one. This makes me believe the party is divided 
into small troops to annoy the farmers. We sent two 
parties out yesterday to range the woods, but they saw 
nothing, and to-day another party is gone as far as Canas- 
tagione to range the woods on this side the Maquas River, 
and they of Senectady are to meet them there. The 
farmers whom I sent out to range 011 the east side of our 
river fear lest some skulking parties may go as far down 
as Kinderhook ; but in my opinion the only way to find 
out if it is a great party or not, and whether they will settle 
themselves at Lake St. Sacrament or on this side the Great 



176 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

169:5. 

Lake, is to send scouts as far as Crown Point. I am about 
to procure such, but know not how to pay them, having 
neither money nor goods, public nor private, in my hands, 
and being unable to find anyone who will advance any 
more to the public. I long for an answer from our 
Indians. I declare that I never so much suspected their 
fidelity as now. The Maquas seem but little concerned at 
all this news. It is as if they were disposed to join the 
enemy as soon as they come. They are weary of the war, 
and we can have no service of them without ready pay, 
which I cannot give them. They say they will stay in 
their castle and hold it when the French come, and keep 
good watch ; but it is no sign of watchfulness when the 
enemy have now twice reached the gates of their 
castle undiscovered and tied bundles of reeds at the 
very doors. I have dissuaded them from staying 
in their castles if an army comes, but have bid them 
keep out good scouts towards the lake and, as soon 
as they spy the enemy coming with a great force, 
to warn us and retreat hither with their wives and children 
for protection. I expect the 100 men from Esopus 
to-morrow and shall keep them till I am satisfied there is 
no army on this side the lake. It will be no great incon- 
venience to them, for their land is sowed. I can hardly 
believe the French will venture so late in the year with 
any great force ; they send but parties to keep us in alarm 
and meantime endeavour to gain our Indians. As soon as 
I have the least certainty of an army I shall send you an 
express. Our Indians all think these parties the fore- 
runners of a great body. I shall keep good watch and if 
they come shall give them as good a reception as I can. 
Our men are all brisk and well. I have ordered them to 
be furnished with ammunition on account of their pay, so 
they are now all fitted, for they had none of their own, 
nor is there any of the public's to give them. I am sorry 
that the New Jersey men will be relieved this year, for 
they are disciplined and brisk men. If they are, please 
send up money and pay them here, for several have bought 
arms from the inhabitants with which they cannot fit 
themselves so well at home. Copy. 1J pp. Endorsed, 
Eecd. 20 Dec. '93. [Board of Trade. New England, 5. 
Nos. 30, 30 1. -vii. ; and (without enclosures) 48. pp. 59-66.] 

Oct. 10. 612. Governor Fletcher to Lords of Trade and Plantations. I 
New York, have been stayed from proceeding to Albany and Connecticut to-day 
by the capture of the captain of a French privateer on the north 
side of Nassau Island, whom I have examined this morning. I find 
him to be a French Protestant, naturalised an inhabitant of this 
province eighteen months ago. His name is John Eeaux. In a 
voyage to Boston, being master of a sloop, he sunk his vessel and 
ran away with 600 or 700 in money and was imprisoned. He 
broke gaol in Boston, and with some of the prisoners of war got to 
Canada, and from thence to France. He came from Kochelle three 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 177 

1693. 

months ago with a bark of 4 guns and 35 men, and he says 
that lie lias a commission from the French King. On his way he 
took a ketch belonging to Boston, and on the 6th took a sloop from 
Rhode Island. He says that he might have taken more, but wishing 
to take his wife and children on board, took his ship into the sound, 
went ashore and was discovered. I have sent after the vessel and 
hope that by this time she is taken. Several whom he has defrauded 
have urged me to have him tried and executed at once, but with 
the Council's advice I have resolved to keep him close prisoner till 
the King's pleasure is known. He denies any knowledge of designs 
from France against this province. I shall start for Connecticut 
and Albany to-day and stay at Albany for the whole winter if 
necessary. Signed. Ben Fletcher. P.S. The prisoner avers that 
700 recruits were sent to Canada this summer. Second P.S. I 
observe that I am not allowed to leave this province without per- 
mission. I had a special warrant to go to Pennsylvania, but none 
for going to Connecticut. However as I have the great seal for the 
command of the militia and as I cannot well command the militia 
without seeing them, I beg for a favourable construction of my 
action. Signed. Ben. Fletcher. 2^ pp. Endorsed, Reed. 
19 Dec, 1693. Enclosed, 

612. i. Confession of John le Roux, made to a French Protestant 
minister, when under the expectation of death. When I 
was in France in February last Monsieur Gabaret, the 
Lieutenant-General of the French forces by sea, asked me if 
there were any easy method of attacking New York with the 
squadron of ten men-of-war and six fireships commanded 
by Mons. de Pales. Having received the offer of conducting 
the squadron thither I pointed out the difficulties of the 
enterprise, the strength of the fort, the number of 
inhabitants in the adjacent country, and the dangers of 
the navigation at the entrance to New York ; which 
having heard they laid aside the enterprise. As to 
Canada, the Governor and all the forces are gone to 
Montreal ; from what I could gather they design to stand 
on the defensive. About 700 soldiers have left France for 
Canada this year, mostly boys and all newly raised. The 
French fleet has taken or burnt a great part of the 
Smyrna fleet. They came before Cadiz and levied a 
"contribution on the town. There is no news from Flanders. 
I beg the Governor and Council to take compassion on 
my desolate family of five children. French. So much 
faded as to be hardly Icr/ible. 1J pp. Endorsed, Reed. 

19 Dec. '93. 

612. ii. Translation of the preceding. 2 pp. Endorsed, Reed. 

20 Dec. '93. 

612. in. Major Ingoldsby to Governor Fletcher. Albany, 
23 August, 1693. A party of our Indians has brought in 
two French prisoners from Canada, a Monsieur Crevier 
and his servant, the former a man well known and of 
considerable fortune. He is at present very ill from hard 
marching and barbarous usage. Major Schuyler and 
myself only with difficulty saved him from being burnt. 

8060 W 



178 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

I have examined him but found him disinclined to say 
much. I desire your orders what to do with him on his 
recovery. C<>]>>/. 1 j>. Endorsed, Reed. 20 Dec. 1693. 
612. iv. Peter Schuyler to Governor Fletcher. We saved Mons. 
Crevier with much difficulty, paying forty or fifty pounds 
for his redemption, which he promises to repay us. His 
nails are bitten off. and he has been sick in bed ever since 
he arrived. Pray send for him as soon as he recovers, for 
it is not convenient that he should stay here, for several 
French prisoners desire to speak with him. but I allow no 
one to come at him. His examination has been sent to 
you. Copy. I p. Endorsed, Reed. 20 Dec. 1693. 
612. v. Godefridus Dellius to Governor Fletcher, 1693. Mons. 
Crevier died last Sunday. He wrote to his wife that we 
had redeemed him from the Indians. I have examined his 
servant, who gives me the following intelligence. Here 
folio n' s an account identical with that given in No. VI. below. 
Copy. 2 pp. Endorsed, Reed. 20. Dec. 1693. 
612. vi. Examination of a French prisoner taken 12th September, 
1693. There is a detachment of 55 men at Chambly, and 
eight companies of 30 men each at Montreal. There are 
twenty small forts in Canada with garrisons of 10 or 12 
men. The party that came to the Maquas' Castles last 
winter consisted of 650 Christians and Indians, of which 
5 men were detached from each company and the rest 
were inhabitants. Four died of starvation on the journey 
home. The soldiers are so hardly treated in Canada that 
they would desert but for their fear of Indians. Over 100 
bateaux were made last summer, for what purpose is 
unknown. The forces in Canada, soldiers and inhabitants, 
number 3,000 men. The French keep their designs so 
secret that the officers themselves do not know them until 
the orders are opened after the first three or four leagues' 
march. Copy. 1 p. 

612. vn. Journal of Dirick Wessels, sent envoy to the Five Nations 
to prevent them from concluding a peace with France. 
Aug. 5. Left Albany and arrived at Senectady. Aug. 6. 
Reached the first castle of the Maquas, where I was told 
of one Maqua and four Indian women who had deserted to 
the French. Aug. 7. Passed the second castle and came 
to the third, where I delivered the Governor's letter to the 
Sachems. They answered as follows. We think that the 
Upper Nations should have rejected the proposals of 
Canada without answer, and that there should be no 
general meeting at Onandaga ; for our parts we will go to 
no such meeting. As to Milet W 7 e think it well for two of 
our Sachems to go with you with a belt of wampum, and 
ask for him to be delivered up according to promise. 
Having no belt of wampum ready they asked me to wait 
whilst they sent for me, and while tarrying one 
day I understood by their discourse that they had 
inclinations towards the meeting at Onandaga, which 
I opposed, reminding them that I had their answer 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 179 

1693. 

already and waited only for the belt to show in the 
meeting that by their advice Milet ought to be 
delivered to Governor Fletcher. Aug. 9. Left Oneida, and 
on my way met two messengers coming to summon the 
Maquas to the general meeting. They told me that the 
Senecas and Cayonges were already there. I turned them 
back and took them with me. Aug. 10. Reached the first 
castle of the Oneidas. Aug. li. Reached the second 
castle of the Oneidas, summoned the Sachems, and made 
them a speech, telling them that the Maquas would not 
attend the meeting, and advised the surrender of Milet. 
They bade me, in reply, tell the Governor that the Senecas 
had sent for them or they would not be going, and that 
the priest was going up with them. This, however, I 
forbade, and the priest's master among the Indians forbade 
him to go up. The priest answered, "What would they 
have of me ? I have no papers except private letters from 
my relatives." Aug. 12-13. Journey from Oneida to 
Onandaga, where the Sachems welcomed us with 14 bands 
of wampum. I then began to speak, when they would 
have put me off till the general meeting next day, but I 
said that I must speak with every nation severally. An 
Oneida Indian who had been in Canada said that he had 
seen Count Frontenac, who gave him an account of great 
armaments coming from France, and offered peace to the 
Five Nations, which if they refused, he would destroy them, 
adding that the French King had forced both English and 
Dutch to peace over the sea. I told them that our Maquas 
from Canada knew nothing of this, that our King had 800 
ships ready to transport 80,000 men to France, which did 
not look like peace. I added that the Indians in custody 
in New England had been released, and that we had taken 
a large French privateer. Aug. 14. I communicated the 
Governor's letter to the Onandagas, Senecas and Cayonges, 
who all professed themselves glad to hear his wisdom. In 
the afternoon the Oneidas complained to the other three 
nations that I had hindered Milet from coming to the 
meeting. I defended my conduct, and after some con- 
sultation the Oneidas were answered in the negative. 
There was an alarm of the enemy this day, and some 
French prisoners taken at a little distance were killed. 
Aug. 15. All this day there were consultations as to 
Governor Fletcher's orders and Count Frontenac's pro- 
posals. Aug. 16. The Sachems were all assembled, and 
a chief of the Oneidas rose and shewing the belt sent 
by Count Frontenac asked them to accept or reject it. 
I then went to the Chief Sachem of the Onandagas, and 
asked him how he thought the Nations were inclined. 
He answered that all that were not weak were wavering. 
The capture of Canada had been promised five years ago, 
and though the present Governor had behaved himself like 
a soldier, New England, Virginia and Maryland did nothing 
to help him. Aug. 17. I advised with the same chief as 



180 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

to delivering the Governor's orders to the general meeting. 
He was inclined to have it done, but answered that 
the Governor should object to a general meeting. In the 
afternoon the meeting was held, and this chief gave his 
advice against trusting the French. I then repeated the 
Governor's orders and exhorted them not to break 
the Covenant. Auy. 18. The Sachems met to consult, 
but gave me no answer. An;/. 19. A chief in the presence 
of eighty Sachems made answer as follows. Tell Governor 
Fletcher we will keep our covenant and reject the over- 
tures of the Governor of Canada. We will tell him 
that if he desires peace he must go to His Excellency 
who is our master. Do you tell His Excellency that we 
think the business of an attack on Quebec should have 
been better managed ; that our people ought not to be 
imprisoned, as lately happened in New England, on light 
suspicion ; and that we hold him still for our master. 
I replied that he seemed to be no longer their master since 
they disobeyed his orders in sending a messenger to 
Canada, and would not give up the Jesuit and his papers, 
as he had expected. An old Sachem then said that they 
would say no more to the Governor of Canada than to 
tell him to address himself to Governor Fletcher, adding 
that the owners of the Jesuit, in spite of much pressure 
put on them, refused to give him up. Copy. 7 pp. 
Endorsed, Reed. 20 Dec. '93. [Board of Trade. New 
York, 5. Nos. 31, 31 i.-vn. ; and (without enclosures) 48. 
pp. 67-69.] 

Oct. 10. 613. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor reported 
that a French privateer was at anchor off Nassau Island, and that her 
captain going ashore had been arrested and had been found to be 
a naturalised subject of New York, who had deserted to Canada- 
He reported also that lie had sent a vessel to seize this ship and 
was waiting to hear further of her before he went to Connecticut. 
He then announced that in view of the danger from the French he 
would winter at Albany, moving thither with what men he could 
collect in Connecticut, and particularly recommended to the Council 
all preparations for building the new battery, so that it should be 
begun in the spring. The prisoners belonging to the French 
privateer were then examined and remanded to custody. It was 
resolved that the captain be kept close prisoner till the King's 
pleasure be known. [Co/. Entry Bk. } Vol. LXXV., pp. 468-470.] 

Oct. 10. 614. The Queen to Governor Kendall. Directing the execution 

Whitehall, of Order in Council of 5 October (Xo. 602) relative to John Hallett. 

Countersigned. Nottingham. Xotc. The like letter was signed 

by the King and countersigned by Mr. Secretary Trenchard, 

19 November, 1693. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIII., pp. 363, 364.] 

Oct. 10. 615. Journal of House of Burgesses of Virginia. List of the 
Burgesses. Such burgesses as were present were sworn, but the 
Governor sent a message that he would not meet them until there 
was a fuller attendance. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



181 



1693. 
Oct. 12. 



Oct. 13. 



Oct. 14. 



Thomas Milner elected Speaker, who was approved ; and a copy 
of the Governor's speech was asked for and received. A Committee 
of Elections and Privileges was appointed. 

A new writ requested for York County, Daniel Parke having 
elected to sit for James City. William Sherwood's petition against 
Mr. Parke's election dismissed. Committees of grievances and of 
public claims appointed, and the usual orders as to the same made. 
The Governor was asked for a copy of the reports of the Commis- 
sioners of Customs on the Ports Act. 

Address to the Governor asking for the appointment of William 
Drummond to he messenger ; which was granted. Petition of 
London merchants against exportation of hulk-tohacco read and 
referred to the Committee of grievances. On the report of the 
Committee of propositions, there were ordered bills to continue the 
Bangers Act and to encourage manufacture of linen cloth. Order for 
an address to the Governor praying for withdrawal of the restraints 
on settlement south of the Blackwater. The question of amending 
the Tanners Act referred to a Committee. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXXX}'.,pp. 1064-1077.] 



Oct. 10. 616. Minutes of General Assembly of Virginia. Councillors 

appointed to swear in the Burgesses. 
Oct. 12. James Sherlock sworn Clerk of the General Assembly. The 

Burgesses attending, the Governor made them a speech, of which 

he afterwards sent them a copy, and approved their Speaker. 
Oct. 13. New writ issued for York County ; and a copy of the report of 

the Commissioners of Customs sent down to the Burgesses. 
Oct. 14. William Drummond appointed messenger to the Burgesses. 

[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXV., pp. 1003-1007.] 

Oct. 12. 617. Minutes of Council of Virginia. Order for the King's 
letter, with the report of the Commissioners of Customs on laws 
passed in Virginia, to be referred to the Burgesses. [Col. Entry 
Bk., Vol. LXXXIV., 2>. 829.] 

Oct. 11. 618. Lords of the Admiralty to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 
Admiralty. As to Governor Kendall's request for five frigates to be sent to 

Barbados in October, it is impossible to comply without taking 

ships from other necessary services. Kilned. Falkland, J. 

Lowther, H. Priestman, B. Bich. Countersigned. J. Sotherne. 
Mem. This report being read in Council on 12th October, no 

order was given thereupon. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIII. , pp. 373, 

374.] 

Oct. 11. 619. Lords of the Admiralty to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 

Admiralty. W"e have examined Captain Oakley as to the complaints of Sir 
William Beeston against him, and finding after strict enquiry that 
he did not do his duty as to the conveying of the homeward bound 
merchant ships, we have dismissed him from his command. Signed. 
Falkland, J. Lowther, H. Preistman, B. Bich. [Board of Trade. 
Jamaica, 53. pp. 164, 165.] 



182 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

Oct. 12. 620. Order of the Privy Council, Referring a report of the 

Whitehall. Admiralty of llth hist, to Lords of Trade and Plantations for 

report. Signed. John Nicholas. ^ p. Annexed, 

620. i. Minute of the Lords of the Admiralty. On the suggestion 

that the frigate from Boston should be sent to protect the 

masts at Piscataqua, we are of opinion that it would he 

1 tetter for the frigate to remain at her station and for 

Piscataqua to he protected by soldiers from Massachusetts, 

as before. Signed. Falkland, J. Lowther, H. Preistman, 

R [illegible'], J. Sotherne. 1 p. The irhole endorsed, 

Read 6 Dec. '93. [Board of Trade. New Hampshire, 1. 

Nos. 28, 28 1. ; and (icitJiont enclosure} Col. Entry Bk., 

Vol. LXVII., p. 227.] 

Oct. 12. 621. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor 
announced that the French privateer had escaped, having outsailed 
the vessel that he sent to take her. Order for Nathaniel Cole to be 
suspended from the commission of the peace, for not giving the 
Governor information of the presence of the privateer in Oyster 
Bay, where she might easily have been surprised and taken. 
Agreed that the new battery should be begun without delay, and 
that the justices of the adjacent counties be required to order the 
inhabitants to cut stockades for the same. Orders for sundry pay- 
ments. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 471, 472.] 

Oct. 12. 622. Report of the Solicitor General on the Acts of the 
Leeward Islands. (Sec No. 517.) I conceive all these laws to 
be agreeable to law and justice except that taking away benefit of 
clergy for stealing negroes or slaves, wherein a clause orders execu- 
tion 'to be done within forty eight hours after receipt of the warrant, 
any reprieve or pardon notwithstanding. This is an infringement 
on the prerogative of the crown ; so the clause should not be con- 
firmed. I am doubtful also how far the Act for encouraging im- 
portation of white servants may tend to encourage the " spiriting" 
away of white servants to the plantations without their consent, a 
practice which is very frequent and known by the name of kid- 
napping. Signed. Tho. Trevor. The whole (including list of the, 
Acts) 3 pp. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 4. Ko. 21 ; and 
44. pp. 138-141.] 

Oct. 12. 623. Speech of Governor Sir Edmund Andros to the Assembly 
of Virginia. I have received the royal orders for the Acts for ports 
and for encouraging manufactures to be suspended until further con- 
sidered by you. 1 am also to recommend to you a law to prohibit 
the exportation of bulk-tobacco ; and I need not remind you of the . 
necessity of providing for the defence of the Colony. 1p. Endorsed, 
Reed. 28 Mar. '94 from Mr. Randolph. [Board of Trade. 
Virginia, 5. No. 34.] 

Oct. 14. 624. Minutes of Council of Virginia. Order for remission to 
Thomas Cock of the King's share in his ketch, condemned in the 
Court of Virginia. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXIV., p. 830.] 

Oct. 14. 625. Minutes of Council of Maryland. Order for the fees of 
the Clerk to remain unaltered, and that the Secretary make the 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 183 

1693. 

usual allowance for transcription of Acts, public ordinances, etc. 
In consequence of the appointment of Catholic surveyors in several 
counties by persons acting under pretence of Lord Baltimore's 
authority, ordered that the surveyors appointed by the Government 
continue in their places, pursuant to proclamation. Report as to 
the condition of the State-house read, and repairs ordered. On the 
application of Sir T. Laurence Mr. Llewellin was summoned, and 
promised not to leave the Colony until he had perfected the records 
of Talbot County. As to his acting as Notary Public, of which Sir 
T. Laurence complained, his commission from Governor Copley was 
held to be sufficient. On a letter from Colonel Darnall showing 
authority from Lord Baltimore to open a Land Office and asking 
for facilities for the same, Sir Thomas Laurence complained that 
this would be an infringement of his rights, as all these matters 
ought to pass through his office. Ordered that the Land Office is 
in the right of the Secretary, Sir Thomas Laurence, and that no 
one presume to encroach thereon. [Board of Trade. Maryland, 12. 
l>p. 5-8 ; and pj>. 40-49, and 18. pj>. 3-7.] 

Oct. 1G. 626. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for payments on 
account of fortifications. 

Oct. 17. Order for a general embargo on the shipping in Port Royal till 
the two frigates be ready to put to sea. Order for arrest of 
Redman McCragh for seditious language, and for summoning the 
witnesses against him. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. pp. 260-261.] 

Oct. 17. 627. Governor Codrington to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 

Antigua. By my last of 3 July I sent duplicates of my letters of 10 and 
15 May. About ten days ago a French privateer in the night 
carried off one Captain Buncombe and forty negroes from Mont- 
serrat. We are informed by prisoners returned us from Martinique 
that a squadron is daily expected there from France, with a land-force 
for attack on these Islands. Our numbers have been much lessened 
by the war and sickness, though at present these Islands are 
healthy. Ever since Sir F. Whelers departure we have been very 
busy over our fortifications, but I must repeat that if a force arrive 
from France these Islands will be in great danger, notwithstanding 
our firm resolution of defence ; for we are assured by letters from 
New England that Sir F. Wheler's squadron has been forced by 
the mortality among the sailors to return homeward, and "we may 
reasonably expect a descent by the French w r hen they discover that 
we have no ships to prevent them. The Secretary is sending you 
the minutes of Council and Assembly. By your order of 27 Feb. 
1691 you empower the Lieutenant-Governors and Councils of the 
Leeward Islands to hear and examine the complaints of Sir T. Thorn- 
hill, Captain Thorn and Major Crispe against me; but the com- 
plainants, in despair of making good their allegations, have never 
since thought fit to make use of the order, though they have had all 
freedom and encouragement to proceed therein. Sir T. Thornhill and 
Captain Thorn are since dead, and Major Crispe being at Barbados 
I sent word to him to attend the General Councils and make use 
of the order, assuring him that he might proceed with freedom and 
safety and without fear of injury. He answered that no such order 



184 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

had been obtained by any procurement of bis but without bis privity, 
that he would not meddle in the prosecution, and was ready in the 
most signal manner to acknowledge bis errors. A certificate to 
this effect will be laid before you, which I hope will satisfy you that 
my accusers could not prove any part of their statements. In future 
I beg your favour and justice to allow me time to defend myself 
and prove my innocence before giving belief to the calumnies of my 
enemies. Signed. Chr. Codrington. '2 j>]>. Endorsed, Reed. 
12 Dec. 1693. Read 8 Jan. 1693-4. [Board <>f Trade. Leeward 
Islands, 4. No. 22 ; and 44. pp. 130-132.] 

Oct. 17. 628. Journal of House of Burgesses of Virginia. Report of 
Committee of propositions further considered. Committee of the 
whole House on the Ports Act. Resolved that the appointment of 
certain ports at which alone goods may be imported or exported will 
in the present circumstances of the country be very injurious. 
Leave given to bring in a bill to make the whole parish of Lyn- 
haven contribute to maintenance of the bridge over the river that 
divides the said parish. Question put whether the exportation of 
bulk-tobacco shall be prohibited, and carried in the negative. A 
bill to repeal the Act for encouragement of manufactures ordered. 
Resolved that the revision of the laws is absolutely necessary. 

Oct. 18. Resolved that the revision of the laws be proceeded with this 
session. Address to the Governor, asking what assistance the 
Council will give therein. Resolved to address the Governor to 
build a Governor's residence as soon as the revenue for contingent 
charges can bear the expense. Bills to continue the Rangers, and 
to encourage manufacture of linen read a first time. 

Oct. 19. Adjourned till the morrow. 

Oct. 20. Messages from the Governor, sending a memorial as to the College, 
and proposing that the revision of the laws shall pass the Burgesses 
first and then come before the Council. A Committee appointed for 
the work of revision. The papers concerning the College were read 
and Mr. James Blair heard thereon. 

Oct. 21. The Committee for revision of the laws brought up sixteen bills 
which were read twice, three of them being slightly amended. The 
bills to continue the Rangers and to encourage manufacture of linen 
read a second time. [Co/. Entry Bk., VoL LXXX1\, pp. 1077- 
1086.] 

Oct. 18. 629. Minutes of Council of Virginia. William Drummond, 
sworn King's messenger, and his salary fixed at i'10 per annum. 
Edward Randolph made answer to John Edmeston's petition, and 
the matter was left to due course of law. 

Oct. 19. The memorial and proposals of the Rector and Governors as to the 
College were referred to the Burgesses, as also Mr. Blair's charges 
for his services in England in connection with the College. 

Oct. 20. Ralph Wormeley's petition for an allowance for Military Com- 
missions referred to the Burgesses. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol.LXXXIV., 
pp. 830-833.] 

Oct. 19. 630. Minutes of General Assembly of Virginia. The Burgesses' 
message as to revision of the laws received. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 185 

1693. 

The answer to the above message was sent down. [Co/. Entry 
Bk., Vol. LXXXV., pp. 1007, 1008.] 

Oct. 18. 631. Minutes of Council of New York. Orders for an advance 
of ,i'50 for incidental expenses of the garrison at Albany, and for 
beds to be provided for the soldiers, one bed for every two men. 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., p. 473.] 

Oct. 18. 632. Governor Kendall to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 

Barbados. Having received a copy of Colonel Hallett's petition to the Queen I 
shall offer the following remarks thereon, though the papers already 
sent are sufficient to shew that his statements are false and 
scandalous. (1) It may be true that he was zealous in furthering 
Their Majesties' accession. I was not here, and though Lieutenant- 
Governor Stede may speak to it, I never heard of it before. (2) I. 
admit that I found nothing amiss with his behaviour on my arrival, 
but I know nothing of his helping me more than others. (3) It is 
true that there were apprehensions of an invasion, but not the 
whole truth. I had most certain intelligence that an invasion 
would be attempted, so his resistance to me in providing for defence 
was the more culpable. (4) It is true that he owned a wood 011 certain 
land required for fortifications, but of little value. It was appraised 
by duly appointed persons at '27 only when cut down ; and it was 
cut down not by my agents, as he invidiously puts it, but by 
workmen hired and an engineer paid out of the public funds. The 
Commissioners appointed to superintend the fortifications told me 
that the entrenchments were carried near Colonel Hallett's land 
and that he was unwilling to have the wood cut down, saying that 
it was unnecessary. They asked me therefore to view the place, 
which I did, and found it to be the likeliest spot in the whole Island 
for an enemy to land in. I told him that for the safety of the 
Island it must be fortified, whereupon he used insolent language 
and encouraged his servants to resist the workmen, who would not 
desist, even when I came there myself, until I fired a pistol, which 
frightened them awa} r . I positively aver that he never asked me 
to defer cutting down the wood till it had been surveyed, and can 
bring evidence to prove it. (5) It is true that he was suspended 
the Council, but it is also true that he had intimation through 
his nearest relations, that if he made a handsome submission, 
no further notice would be taken. (6) It is true that, when he 
first came to tell me that he was going to England, I bade him 
go, not intending then to proceed further against him ; but 
finding afterwards that he was not gone but was using every- 
where disrespectful language and combining with disaffected persons, 
I required security of him to take his trial for such misdemeanours 
and to keep the peace. He asked that he might go to England and 
be tried there, but this I refused. (7) On the day he mentions as 
to the assault, my overseer came to me all bloody, and complained 
that Colonel Hallett had beaten him without provocation. He had 
knocked down a negro who refused to give way to him in the street 
(the slaves were very insolent just then) and pursued him till he 
took shelter in Colonel Hallett's house. There the women called 
him many scurrilous names and Colonel Hallett coming up broke 



186 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 



Oct. 19. 



Oct. 11). 

Jamaica. 



Oct. 19. 

Jamaica. 



his head with his cane. Thereupon he was prosecuted. But he 
cannot say that he had not a fair trial. As to the other proceedings 
I am advised that all has heen regularly conducted. It is true that the 
jury found a special verdict, but their doubt was on a very insigni- 
ficant matter. (8) The jury might scruple at the form of the 
indictment, but they found him guilty. This is a true account of 
the matter, to which I am prepared to swear. If it be considered 
that Colonel Hallett told me he would resist the workmen, that he 
sent his servants with weapons to the place where they did resist, 
and that he refused to make submission but joined all the factious 
enemies of Government, I doubt not that my action will be approved. 
tiif/nc<L J. Kendall. 4tV closely written paries. Endorsed, Reed. 
28 Jan. Read 27 Feb. '98-4. Read 2 Dec. 1695. [Board of Trade. 
Barbados, 5.- No. 28 ; and 44. pp. 74-81.] 

633. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for entry of 
certain accounts in the Minutes. The laws made under Sir Francis 
Watson's presidency were cancelled in pursuance of the Royal order 
of 20 February, 1689. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. pp. 261, 

262.] 

634. Lieutenant-Governor Sir William Beeston to the Earl of 
Nottingham. The Mordaunt and our two hired sloops have returned, 
after little success beyond the taking of two or three sloops and 
plundering some small places ashore. The French there have 
little trade, but live chiefly on privateering, and plant only indigo, 
tobacco and provisions. But they grow too numerous, and in time 
will overpower us if not prevented before too late. Their man-of- 
war has lately taken two good ships and cargoes of ours, and carried 
them into Petit Guavos. The French have sent a flag of truce here 
under colour of exchange of prisoners, but in reality to sell one of 
their ships, and I have consented that the owners, who are many 
of them here, shall buy her. The French pickeroons land on our 
coasts and steal negroes and other goods almost every week. They have 
good intelligence from some of our villainous deserters, who, if I can 
catch them, shall meet with the punishment of traitors. The 
Assembly for a time after their last meeting would do nothing for 
the country, and indeed things came to a crisis. But now I think 
they will go on cheerfully, and raise provisions and pay for men. I 
have promised not only the King's ships and the Island's sloops, but 
also to furnish arms and ammunition, and two or three hired ships 
in Their Majesties' pay to attack the French before they get too 
strong for us. If the Spaniards would help us by land w y e should 
do well, but I have heard nothing about it from the Governor of 
St. Domingo. We are so thin of people that any great loss in the 
enterprise would weaken us greatly. Signed. Wm. Beeston. 1^ pp. 
Endorsed, R. Feb. 25, '98. [America and West Indies. 540. 
No. 36.] 

635. Lieutenant-Governor Sir William Beeston to Lords of Trade 
and Plantations. Since mine of 27 July the Mordaunt and the two 
sloops have returned from Hispaniola without success. The French 
there are not traders, but live wholly on the spoil of their neigh- 
bours ; and they kept their ships at home while ours were on their 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 187 

1693. 

coasts. I have with much ado got the Falcon manned and sent her 
to the coast of Porto Bello as well to seek the French as well as to 
convoy over the money, most of which belongs to British subjects. 
At the meeting of the Assembly on the 7th inst. I moved them to 
consider the state of the country, the necessity of preventing the 
daily depredations of French privateers on our coasts, and the 
means for better collection of the quit-rents. Against this they 
pleaded the expense of the fitting out of the sloops, their ill-success 
at Hispaniola and recent calamities and discouragements, and 
declared themselves unable and unwilling to lay any more on the 
country. Things went so far that 1 feared they must have ended 
in a dissolution, with the country left in its present defenceless 
state, but I have got over it, and the Assembly is now again very 
unanimous and 1 hope will raise money and men. For if some 
means be not found to root the French out of Hispaniola before 
they grow too numerous they will be too hard for this Island and 
will bring it into great danger, unless we have more people. I send 
copies of the Acts passed since those last transmitted by me. I 
should not have assented to the twenty shillings per head on 
exported negroes, but that the Treasury is empty, the revenue much 
in debt, and the income insufficient to pay the common contingent 
expenses of government in time of war. We find also by 
experience that it does no harm to the Assiento and pleases 
the people; for few wines are now 7 imported, which was the 
great income, and the quit-rents are ill-collected, so that the 
two great branches of revenue are mightily anticipated. Nor do I 
see how the damage done by the earthquake can be repaired until 
there is a better trade to fill the Treasury. In addition to previous 
vacancies in the Council Mr. John Peeke is now dead. I recom- 
mend Mr. Edward Stanton to succeed him. Age and sickness have 
carried off so many Councillors in the last seven years that if a few 
more fall I cannot think how I shall find qualified persons in the 
whole Island. I send various accounts and returns as to the Island, 
but am unwilling to send the muster-rolls lest they fall into the 
enemy's hands. I shall send the Mordaunt to see the fleet that bears 
this safe out of the Indies. The ships are very rich and the French 
have one man-of-war besides smaller craft which are only kept in 
awe by the Mordaunt. Owing to the desertion of so many of our 
people to the French the enemy know every part of the Island and 
all that we do. I think it a great un happiness to me to have come 
here in Their Majesties' service at such a time of difficulties and 
calamities. The earthquakes are still severe, the mortality has 
been very great, an enemy daily infests our coasts, our fortifications 
and public buildings are all down and there is no money to rebuild 
them, the private buildings are but huts, the people are discouraged, 
but no misfortune is to me so great as that I should be removed 
soon after my arrival. If I am thought worthy to serve Their 
Majesties no difficulty should be too great for me ; but if I am not, 
I beg that I may be removed. Sic/ned. Wm. Beeston. 2^ j>p. 
Endorsed, Reed. 27 Feb. '93-4. Read 5 March. Enclosed, 
635. i. Speech of Sir William Beeston to the Assembly on its 
meeting after prorogation. 9 October, 1693. I was un- 
willing to keep you adjourned longer than this month, for 



188 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

the depredations on our coasts are ruining both our country 
and our reputation. The two sloops fitted out for defence 
have proved insufficient in number or strength of men 
to defend this long Island, wherein there are so many 
landing-places. I think that twenty men added to 
each of these sloops, and the raising of two more of the 
same strength could answer the purpose. When this is 
settled I beg you to consider an Act for the more certain 
collection of quit-rents, and also the condition of the 
Revenue Bill, for there are now two on foot, and we know 
not which to act by. I beg you to set heartily about these 
things and any others that may be necessary, for at such 
times of danger the members of Council and Assembly, who 
are also the chief officers, of the Island, should rather be at 
their homes, looking to the security of the Island, than 
wasting time in town at amending laws which, if our 
enemies get the better of us, we may never make use of. 
1^ pp. Endorsed, Reed. 5 Mar. '93-94. 

635. ii. Address of the Assembly of Jamaica to Sir William 
Beeston. Though we have met with some disappointment 
in an expectation of immediate assistance from the King's 
ships and from the unwillingness of our sloops to work with 
them owing to disproportion of sharing, we have yet 
unanimously voted forty additional men for the two sloops. 
We beg to suggest that the Spanish trade is quite capable 
of maintaining its own charge without frigates for security 
and convoy, and that the persons concerned therein might 
hire vessels to guard them, leaving the King's ships and our 
hired sloops for defence of the Island. As the defence of 
the Island seems to be our first concern, we shall enter 
upon no business till that be despatched. 

635. in. Sir William Beeston's second speech to the Assembly at 
Jamaica. I did not expect that when I asked you to 
provide for defence on the coasts you would have reflected 
upon me, as you have, as though our misfortunes were 
due to my fault. The ships made their agreement about 
shares without reference to me ; and if they have been 
unsuccessful, it was through no fault of mine. As to the 
employment of the frigates in convoys for the Assiento, 
the ships are under my orders, and I hold myself account- 
able for their employment not to you but to the King. 
Whatever your opinion of the Assiento, the King and all 
the Lords at home think it of the greatest importance to 
the nation of England in general and to this Island in 
particular. And the majority of people in this Island 
think so likewise. I do not understand the purport of 
your concluding paragraphs, but if you mean that you will 
do nothing for defence or revenue unless the King's ships 
are kept cruising in sight of the Island, then I will be bound 
by no such obligation ; and if you will not look to such 
matters as defence and revenue without first making 
bargains you had better go home and look after your 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 189 

1693. 

business and the commands you hold, than waste time 
here. 3 ]>/>. Endorsed, Reed. 5 Mar. 1093-4. 

635. iv. Second address of the Assembly of Jamaica to Sir 
William .Beeston. We had no intention of reflecting upon 
you in our former address. Our request for assistance of 
the frigates was not grounded on inadvertent interference 
with your authority. Our concluding paragraphs meant 
only that we were going to make defence our first business. 
Lar</e sheet. Endorsed, Reed. 5 Mar. 1693-4. 

635. v. List of the Council, Assembly, judges, justices, and civil 
and military officers of Jamaica. September, 1693. The 
troops are divided into 1 regiment of horse and 7 of foot. 
11 pp. Endorsed, Reed. 5 Mar. 1693-4. 

635. vi. Account of the fortifications, arms and ammunition in 
Jamaica. 27 September, 1693. Fort Charles : 38 guns, 
well mounted. Fort Morgan: 15 guns, of which but 8 
can be fired, the battlements being shaken into the sea. 
Fort Walker : 6 guns, mounted, that may be fixed, but 
the platforms badly shaken by the earthquake. 2 pp. 
Endorsed as tJie preceding. 

635. vn. Account of powder received from ships from December, 
1692, and of powder expended from January, 1693. 14^. 
[.Board oj Trade. Jamaica, 7. Nos. 26, 26 i.-vm. ; and 
(icitliout enclosure) 53. -pp. 175-179.] 

Oct. 23. 636. Minutes of Council of New York. Order for carpenters 
to be sent on board the barquentine hired for the King's service, to 
complete their work thereon. [Col. Entn/ Bh\, Vol. LXXV., 
p. 474.] 

Oct 23 637. Governor Sir Edmund Andros to Lords of Trade and 

Virginia.' Plantations. On the 18th past I received an account of the death 
of Governor Copley of Maryland on the 9th past, and of great 
contest who should be president. I summoned the Council and 
showed my commission to be Commander-in-Chief of Maryland in 
case of the death of Lieutenant-Governor Nicholson and the absence 
of Governor Copley. It was unanimously agreed that this Com- 
mission did now apply, and accordingly I appointed Mr. Ralph 
Wormeley to be President in my absence, and set out for Maryland. 
I arrived at St. Maries on the 25th, and found the Council and 
Burgesses sitting, and the Presidency of the Council still contested. 
On my producing my Commission, however, it was at once 
accepted ; so I issued a proclamation to confirm all officers 
in their posts, and next day dissolved the Assembly. I have 
since put everything in order as well as I could in so 
short a time, but it is very necessary that a Governor 
or Lieutenant-Governor be despatched to Maryland. On my 
arrival I found Sir Thomas Laurence at liberty and not " faulted " 
in the Council until I spoke of my return to Virginia. I was then 
told that the charges against him had been sent home by Governor 
Copley and the Council, but on calling for the Minutes of Council, 
found no book, but only loose sheets, very imperfect, with no 
certain copy either of the charge or of Sir Thomas Laurence's 



11)0 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 



Oct. 23. 

Virginia. 



Oct. 23. 

Virginia. 



Oct. 23. 



Oct. 23. 



Oct. 24. 



Oct. 25. 



Oct. 26. 



commitment. Sir Thomas, however, asked that, owing to indis- 
position, he might not be thought of as President, and might also 
be dispensed from attending Council. Having, in consequence of 
complaints displaced Mr. Blakiston as Commissary of Probate, and 
he also desiring to be excused attendance in Council owing to 
sickness, I declared Colonel Nicholas Greenberry to be president in 
my absence and till further order ; and then on advice of the 
Council, I suspended Mr. Nehemiah Blakiston from sitting and 
voting therein. This done, I left St. Maries, and on the 3rd inst. 
embarked at Patuxen for Virginia. I found all quiet on my return. 
The Burgesses have passed votes as to ports, to prohibit bulk- 
tobacco, to revise the laws, and to continue the Rangers. Signed. 
E. Andros. 2J pp. Endorsed, Reed. 20 Feb. Read 16 Mar. 
'93-4. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. No. 35 ; and 36. pp. 244- 
247.] 

638. Governor Sir Edmund Andros to William Blathwayt. 
Desiring him to add the name of Daniel Parke to the list of persons 
to till vacancies in Council. Signed. E. Andros. Holograph. % p. 
Endorsed, Reed. 20 Feb. '93-4. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. 
No. 36.] 

639. Governor Sir Edmund Andros to Earl of Nottingham. 
This letter is practically the same as that to Lords of Trade 
and Plantations of same date, No. 637. 2^ pp. Endorsed, R. 
Feb. 22, 1693-4. [America and West Indies. 638. No. 14.] 

640. Minutes of Council of Virginia. Miles Sherman's petition 
for an allowance for himself and two officers at the late and present 
Assemblies, referred to the Burgesses. Lieutenant-Colonel Fitzhugh 
presented two orders in Council from Whitehall, which were 
recorded. [Col Entry BL:, Vol. LXXXIV., pp. 833, 834.] 

641. Journal of House of Burgesses of Virginia. Fifteen of 
the bills sent up by the Laws-revision Committee passed, chiefly 
dealing with religious matters. Bill to punish persons refusing to 
have their children baptised, rejected. The remainder were sent 
up to Council. The Revision Committee then brought up twenty- 
three more bills which were read a first time. 

The bills to continue the Rangers, and to encourage manufacture 
of linen were passed and sent to Council. The twenty-three bills 
of yesterday were read a second time and some of them amended. 
Eleven more bills were received from the Revision Committee, and 
four of them read a second time and amended. 

Further consideration of the last batch of bills sent up by the 
Revision Committee. The said Committee then brought up eleven 
further bills. The Charter of the College was then considered, and 
the Rector and Governors were warned to attend to-morrow to dis- 
cuss the question of the site. 

The Revision Committee presented a further batch of twelve bills. 
Four alternative sites being then suggested for the College, it was 
resolved that that at Middle Plantation should be chosen, and a bill 
for the erection of the College in that place was ordered to be pre- 
pared. Thirty-seven of the bills submitted by the Revision 
Committee read a third time and passed. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIE 8. 



191 



Oct. 25. 

Warwick. 



1693. 
Oct. 27. Twenty-two 'of the bills prepared by the Revision Committee were 

read a first time, and some of them amended. The Revision 

Committee submitted thirteen more new bills. Eleven bills read a 

first time, and two of them amended. 
Oct. 28. Thirty- six bills read a second time and some of them amended. 

[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXV., pp. 1086-1101.] 

Oct. 23. 642. Minutes of General Assembly of Virginia. Fifteen bills 

received from the Burgesses. 
Oct. 24. The bills to continue the Rangers and to encourage manufacture 

of linen were received from the Burgesses and read a first time. 
Oct. 25. Fifteen of the revised bills read a second time. 
Oct. 26. Thirty-seven revised bills read a first time. \_CoL Entry Bk., 

Vol. LXXXV., pp. 1009-1013.] 

Oct. 25. 643. Minutes of Council of Virginia. William Fitzhugh and 
William Digges appeared to answer for words spoken as to a plot to 
restore King James, and were discharged for want of sufficient 
evidence against them. [CoL Entry Bl'., Vol. LXXXIV., pp. 834- 
835.] 

644. Address of the General Assembly of Rhode Island to the 
King. We thank you for your letter of 3 March, 1693. We have 
also received one from the Governor of New York, asking us to send 
Commissioners to decide as to the quota of men to be furnished by 
the several provinces for the defence of Albany. The letter not 
arriving till the day appointed for the meeting we were unable to 
send Commissioners, which otherwise we had gladly done. Our 
own frontier is towards the sea, and Block Island has been thrice 
attached by the French. Once the Governor sent Captain Thomas 
Paine to drive them away, which he did with small loss to us and 
much loss to the enemy. H.M.S. Nonsuch took a French privatee: 
which had landed parties on Block Island this summer, but since 
her departure another French privateer has seized several of our 
vessels. We sent a vessel after her, but without success. So that we 
are at great charge in watching and warding for our own defence. 
Still we shall be ready to obey your commands to the best of our 
ability. We beg your favour to Mr. Almy, who went to England 
some time since on the business of our militia, and to ask for 
confirmation of our patent. Signed. Weston Clark, clerk of 
Assembly. 2 pp. Endorsed, Reed. 10 June, 1694. [Board of 
Trade. New England, 6. No. 85 ; and 35, pp. 134-137.] 

Oct. 26. 645. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. The Com- 
missioners of Customs attended on the business of convoys. 
[Board of Trade. Journal, 7. p. 221.] 

Oct. 27. 646. Abstract of a letter from Governor Fletcher, referring to 
his visit to Connecticut. The substance is identical with that of 
the letter of 30 October with its enclosures (sec AW 649, 650). 5 pp. 
[Board of Trade. New York, 5. Xo. 32.] 

Oct. 30. 647. Governor John Usher to [the Earl of Nottingham]. Since 
Newcastle, my last Sir William Phips has sent us an account of a peace con- 
cluded between Massachusetts and the Eastern Indians and advises 



192 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



Oct. 30. 

Newcastle. 



1693. 

us to take measures accordingly. He gave this Government no 
notice of his intention to make peace nor writ us to join with him in 
the same. He has only engaged a cessation of arms between his 
Government and the Indians belonging to this place, who, having 
murdered the King's subjects, are sheltering themselves there. "We 
are in the dark as to the measures he would have us take. We are this 
day informed that according to the treaty no captives are returned 
[this is inaccurate, for tlie treaty docs provide for return oj captives 
unransomed] , and the Indians' carriage is so high that another 
breach is feared. I shall give orders for watch and ward to be con- 
tinued in the frontier-towns. 

The Secretary goes to England by this conveyance, bearing the 
usual returns as to the transactions of Government. He will give 
you all particulars better than I can relate them by pen. I have 
proposed to the Lords of Trade a way to support the honour of the 
Government and the security of the Province, which I hope will be 
approved, for I can think of no other until the King maintains it 
out of the revenue in England. Though the people have not killed 
me outright, they have done their best to starve me, for I have not 
received a penny from them yet. I beg you to consider this and 
to obtain for me relief. Sif/ncd. John Usher. 1 p. 

Duplicate of the foregoing. 1 p. 

[America and Wext Indies. 561. Nos. 38, 39.] 

648. Lieutenant-Governor Usher to Lords of Trade and Planta- 
tions. Sir William Phips has made a peace with the Indians, 
without consulting this Government and without including this 
Province in the same, which I conceive may prove very prejudicial. 
On the 16th I laid before the Assembly the necessity for providing 
for the honour of the Government and the security of the place. 
I received no answer except as to their poverty. I have spent a je&i" 
and a quarter in the Province, laid out over 200 of my own, and shewn 
them how by my care I have saved 750 for them, yet they have not 
voted a penny for the Government nor given me so much as thanks. 
As I conceive the reason to be sullenness and aversion to the King's 
Government rather than want of ability, I send the Secretary to 
give you all particulars and to lay before you my proposals for duties 
on timber, which will support the Government without hardship to 
the inhabitants. At present there "is vast havoc and waste of the 
timber for the support of a few idle and lazy people. I hope soon 
to receive your directions as to the right of the river. Sir William 
Phips has appointed a naval officer who permits vessels to unload 
at the Isle of Sholes and bring in goods from Europe without clearing 
in England. As they unload on the Maine side we have no control 
over them. Vessels to the eastward should be ordered to enter 
with the King's Collector at Newcastle. If the King send not fifty 
or sixty soldiers for defence of this place, I fear that it may be lost 
to the French and Indians. Siyitcd. John Usher. 1^ pp. Reed. 
21 Dec. '93. [Board of Trade. New Hampshire, 1. No. 29 ; and 
Col. Entry BL, Vol. LXVIL, pp. 231-233.] 

Oct. 30. 649. Governor Fletcher to [William Blathwayt]. I have been 
Connecticut, in this Colony twenty days labouring to persuade the people to 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 

1698. 

their duty. I published my commission in the General Court at 
Hartford and assured them that I had no pretension to civil 
administration, but v;as come to take charge of the militia, the con- 
trol of which was lodged in the Crown and not to be separated from 
it. They refuse obedience to my commission. They have separated 
not only from the Church but from the Crown of England ; they 
allow no appeal from their Courts and no force to the laws of 
England. Some of the "wissest" have said that not being permitted 
to vote for Members of Parliament they are not liable to their laws. 
I had designed to march hence with what force I could get 
and put myself into Albany this winter, but am now disappointed. 
I must return to New York and take other measures of 
defence of that place. I never saw the like people. They 
have raised a considerable tax to send one Mr. Winthrop, their 
Agent, to England, yet they pay no obedience to the Crown. Neither 
their Agent nor any in office have taken the oaths or subscribed the 
test. Having no company with me except two friends and a few 
soldiers I could not enforce obedience, nor did I think it for the 
King's service to carry on the contest to blood, though they threaten 
to draw mine for urging my master's right. They desire a suit at 
law with the King and say that if their charter be vacated by 
quo warranto they will submit. This I know, that if speedy course 
be not taken to make these people useful to the defence of Albany, 
that place will be lost. I have sent over the papers that passed 
between the people and myself. If I have made any false steps I 
beg that it may be imputed to the weakness of my judgment, for 
I have studiously endeavoured to serve the King, and in all places 
of my little trust used the utmost of my skill to make the people in 
love with the mildness of Their Majesties' government. I have 
just now a letter from a sure friend telling me that the mob have 
a design upon my life. I must not go out of the way, though I am 
very thinly attended, Kilned. Ben. Fletcher. 2. J , pp. Endorsed, 
R. 28 Dec. [Board of Trade. New York, 5. tf. 88.] 

[Oct. 30]. 650. Enclosures sent with the foregoing letter : 

650. i. Order of the General Court at Hartford, Connecticut, for 
raising a rate of a penny in the pound, to defray the 
expense of sending an Agent to England. Certified copy. 
I p. 

650. ii. Order of the same for a day of fasting and humiliation to 
implore the divine blessing on the Agent's mission. 
Certified copy. 1 p. 

650. in. Governor Fletcher to Governor Treat. Milford Bay, 
14 October, 1693. I am come to publish the King's 
commission to me to take command of the Militia of 
Connecticut, but have thought it right first to communicate 
the Royal pleasure to you. I send this gentleman, the 
Secretary for New York Province, to acquaint you with 
what may further be said on this occasion, and to ask your 
directions for so publishing the King's commands as to 
make them most effectual. Certified copy. ^p. Endorsed, 
Reed. 26 Dec., 1693. 

80GO N 



194 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

650. iv. Governor Fletcher to Governor Treat. Newhaven, 17 
October, 1693. I landed at this place somewhat late on 
Sabbath-day at night. My horses and other conveniences 
are in another sloop which is not yet come up. This has 
detained me here longer than I designed or desired, being 
informed that your General Court is now sitting. I am 
willing to communicate the Royal orders to you while you 
are together, conceiving that this will be best for the 
Royal service, so I desire that you will not adjourn till I 
come to Hartford, which will be as soon as my horses 
arrive. Certified copy. ^ p. Endorsed as No. in. 

650. v. The General Court of Connecticut to Governor Fletcher. 
Hartford, 18 October, 1693. Your letter of 17th reached 
the Governor's hands this morning, who has acquainted us 
with its contents. In reply I am to inform you that the 
General Court has been together on Their Majesties' service 
and is about despatching the affairs under hand as it may. 
But we shall not break up until Friday next and shall be 
ready to wait on you and hear what you have to tell us 
that may be for Their Majesties' service and the public good 
of their subjects. Sir/ncd. John Allyn, Secretary. 
Certified copy. 1 p. Endorsed as No. in. 

650. vi. Governor Fletcher to the General Court of Connecticut. 
Newhaven, 19 October, 1693. Yours of yesterday I have 
received ; but the wind continuing northerly I can get 
no news of my horses, so cannot hope to get to Hartford 
to-morrow. I beg therefore that you will adjourn to this 
place, when a very short time will suffice for me to 
lay my business before you. Copy. \p. Endorsed as 
No. in. 

650. vn. The General Court of Connecticut to Governor Fletcher. 
Hartford, 20 October, 1693. We cannot, under the present 
circumstances, adjourn to Newhaven, so though we have 
waited several days for you, we prefer to continue our 
General Court here by adjournment till Tuesday next. 
Sifjned. John Allyn, Secretary. Certified copy. % p. 
Endorsed as No. in. 

650. vin. Governor Fletcher to the General Court of Connecticut. 
24 October, 1693. I have come with Their Majesties' 
commission to act as their lieutenant and commander-in- 
chief of the militia and of all forces by land and sea of 
Connecticut, which commission I now produce, and expect 
a ready compliance with, that I may proceed to the 
execution of that trust. I desire your reply without loss 
of time, as my duties call for my immediate repair to the 
frontier. Certified copy. % p. Endorsed as No. in. 

650. ix. Nicholas Bayard and Matthew Clarkson to the General 
Court of Connecticut. Hartford, 25 October, 1693. We 
are come from the Governor to acquaint you that he has 
just received letters from Albany giving him an account 
of the weakness of the garrison and the growing strength 
of the enemy. Your delays are a great hindrance to the 
King's service here. The Governor has no instructions 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 195 

1693. 

to apply to you ; he did not publish his commission until 
he did it in this Court, nor could he suppose, neither will 
it be believed in England, that an English Colony should 
deny the right of their Protestant King. The letters from 
Albany still show apprehension of an attack by the enemy, 
and if the post be lost by want of your compliance with 
the King's Commission, you may be sensible that the 
consequences will be dangerous to yourselves. The Jerseys 
are in the same circumstances as yourselves in respect of 
their charter, yet have willingly submitted to the King's 
pleasure in_ respect of their militia, which is commanded 
by Governor Fletcher. Yet the Governor of that Colony acts 
without the least interruption, calls Assemblies, makes laws, 
raises money and keeps Courts ; only he commands the 
militia under His Excellency, who has not altered one 
single officer in that Colony. We are charged in conclusion 
to tell you that the fatal consequences of your action will 
l>e represented to you and to your posterity too late. You 
are the only people who will venture to dispute with the 
King as to the inherent right of the Crown, settled by 
several Acts of Parliament, to the control of the militia. 
1 p. Certified copy. Endorsed as No. in. 

650. x. The General Court of Connecticut to Governor Fletcher. 
Hartford, 25 October, 1693. We find in your commission 
no express superseding of the commission of the militia in 
our charter nor any order to us to surrender the same, 
and being sensible of the importance of the matter, and 
finding in it several main things which require particular 
explication and settlement (as we hope to manifest to Their 
Majesties) we conceive it to be our duty, for Their Majesties' 
service and for our own preservation in this time of war 
to continue the militia as formerly, until by our Agent 
now sent to England we receive further orders from Their 
Majesties; after which we shall be happy to give assistance 
according to our ability, though we have already spent 
5,000 for defence of Albany since the war began, besides 
the loss of lives. Further we see reason to grant 600 
in country pay out of our country rate towards the expense 
of the garrison of Albany in advance of what shall be our 
proportion, in obedience to the Royal letters of 3 March, 
1693. Signed. John Allyn, Secretary. Certified copy. 1 p. 

650. xi. Governor Fletcher to the General Court of Connecticut. 
26 October, 1693. Your paper is no answer to my 
memorial, for I do not demand the militia from you, since 
you know as well as I do that you have no right to it. I gave 
in my memorial from tender regard to this colony and in 
expectation of your compliance with my commission and 
your assistance to me, who am a stranger in these parts, 
for the speedier execution of that commission. It is a 
lawful commission and is granted as well for your security 
and defence as for assertion of the Royal right. In Their 
Majesties' name therefore I require your obedience to this 



1!>6 COLONIAL PAPEKS. 

1693. 

commission as you will answer the consequences ; and I 
await your speedy reply. Certified copy. 1 p. Endorsed 
as No. in. 

650. xii. Nicholas Bayard to the General Court of Connecticut. 
26 October, 1608. I am further to tell you from the 
Governor that he is resolved to execute his commission 
and immediately to issue a proclamation shewing the 
methods that he has taken for the ease and satisfaction 
of the people in this Colony, leaving the militia in the 
hands wherein he found it. I am also to tender to 
Governor Treat a commission from His Excellency 
to command all the militia in the Colony ; and to 
acquaint you that the Governor has neither power nor 
intention to invade your civil rights hut would have all 
things run in the same channel with no alterations, only 
requiring your acknowledgement of the King's inherent 
right to the militia. The Governor will not set foot out of 
this Colony till he sees obedience paid to his commission 
by all loyal subjects, and will distinguish the rest 
Certified coj>y. 1 p. Endorsed as No. in. 

650. xni. Memorandum. Colonel Bayard returning from the 
General Court, reported their desire to have a copy of the 
Letters Patent, and that they promised a speedy reply. 
The Governor sent to them the Original Letters Patent, 
requiring them to be recorded, which the Secretary seemed 
willing to do after the Court should be broken up. 
26 October, 1603. Certified copi/. 1 p. Endorsed as 
No. in. 

650. xiv. The General Court of Connecticut to Governor Eletcher. 

26 October, 1603. We have only received' 3 T ours of 26th. 
We have informed you of our opinions in ours of the 25th, 
which you may please to take as our answer ; but we say 
further that we agree with you that the inherent right of 
the militia is in Their Majesties, that it is at their disposal, 
and that it has been settled on us, and enjoyed during the 
two last reigns as well as the present. Lately we received 
from them some directions for the improvement of the 
same, to which we shall attend, and therefore we beg that 
you will not interrupt us in our enjoyment thereof till we 
have Their Majesties' further order, which we trust will be 
no prejudice to their service and may be a good means to 
prevent further inconvenience. Signed. John Allyn, 
Secretary. Certified copy. 1 p. Endorsed as No. in. 

650. xv. The same to the same. 27 October, 1603. We formerly 
offered you 600 towards the charge of maintaining the 
garrison of Albany. If you think men would be better, 
we shall raise about fifty men, with what speed we may, 
to continue at Albany till the spring. Signed. John 
Allyn, Secretary. Certified copy. J p. Endorsed as 
No. in. 

650. xvi. Governor Fletcher to the General Court of Connecticut. 

27 October, 1608. I have yours of to-day before me, and 
must tell you that I am coinmander-in-chief of all the 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 107 

1693. 

forces in this Colony, and that by my commission pub- 
lished in the General Court all others are superseded. 
When you think fit to acknowledge this commission, which 
has nowhere else been disputed, I will consult with you 
for the settling of the militia and the defence of Albany. 
Meanwhile I conceive myself obliged to pursue the 
execution thereof, till I find an open violation of the Royal 
right by force of arms. Certified copy. ^ P- Endorsed 
as Xo. in. 

650. xvn. Proclamation of Governor Fletcher, 28 October, 1603, 
setting forth the tenor of his commission, his efforts to 
make it acceptable, and his offers to leave matters 
practically unaltered, declaring all existing commissions 
in the militia of Connecticut to be void, and calling upon 
all loyal subjects to yield obedience to his commission. 
One large pa</e. Certified copy. Endorsed as Xo. in. 

650. xviii. Gershom Bulkeley to Governor Fletcher. Weathers- 
field, 30 October, 1603. I have this morning heard from 
a sure friend that he truly fears not only some outrage to 
myself but damage to you and others if I appear in 
Hartford to-day. They have threatened to come and pull 
my house down, and a little more irritation will certainly 
more than effect it. They also hear of a severe declaration 
to be published against them, which, if it be done, the 
effect of the people's rage upon it is unaccountable. Some 
mischief will certainly ensue it. They hear also of some 
Weathersfield friends appearing there in arms to guard 
you; and it is feared a bloody issue will be of it; and 
what may be done to prevent it is thought to be service 
to God and King and this Colony at this juncture. Your 
speedy advice and commands are desired by your Excel- 
lency's, etc. Signed, G. Bulkeley. p. Original. 
Holograph. \ p. Endorsed as No. in. 

650. xix. Abstract of Colonel Nicholas Bayard's journal of his 
journey to Connecticut with Governor Fletcher. Oct. 13. 
The Governor left New York arriving at New Haven on 
the loth, and after some days' waiting for his horses, 
reached Hartford on the 23rd. He took his lodging at 
the ordinary, where he was first saluted by Mr. Allyn 
and Mr. Pipkin, and afterwards by Governor Treat and 
several others. He told them that he had come to take 
command of the militia, as he had already written to 
them, and for that purpose desired to meet the General 
Court. Governor Treat said that next morning at 10 
o'clock they would be ready to hear him. Oct. 24. At 
10 o'clock the Governor went to the General Court, said 
that he was come to publish his commission in obedience 
to the King's commands, and asked Governor Treat that it 
might be read. Governor Treat avoided the reading and 
said they were ready to hear what he had to say, where- 
upon the Governor ordered Mr. Clarkson to read it, and to 
avoid all misunderstandings, gave in a memorial (No. vin.), 
which Mr. Treat promised to answer in writing, only 



198 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 



desiring that the Governor would hear their charter read. 
His Excellency replied that he had no business to concern 
himself with their charter or with civil affairs, but 
only with the militia, and so took leave. Then one 
of the members cried out, " Let the charter be read 
that all the people may hear it " ; and it was observed 
that when the Governor's commission was read, the 
sergeants kept the people out with their halberts, until 
several made their way by force, saying that they would 
hear it. Oct. 25. Mr. Clarkson and myself went with a 
message to the General Court, and some time afterwards 
Governor Treat, Mr. Allyn, Mr. Pipkin and Mr. Stanty 
had a conference with His Excellency, desiring that he 
would suspend the execution of his commission until they 
could hear again from Their Majesties through their Agent, 
now preparing to go to England. His Excellency declined 
with such prevailing arguments that they seemed to be 
convinced, and in particular Mr. Allyn. They asked 
whether, if they submitted to the commission, they 
would on invasion or other urgent occasions be obliged to 
send to New York for orders, to which the Governor 
answered No ; for he would give Mr. Treat a commission 
granting him full powers in his absence. Oct. 26. Several 
letters (Xos. ix.-xrv.) passed between the Governor and 
the Court. Oct. 27. The Governor called on Mr. Yealls, 
one of the deputies of the General Court, and told him how 
dangerous the consequence of their obstinate refusal would 
be, and that they would repent it ; to which Captain 
Yealls said he could not help it, for if they parted with the 
militia they might just as well part with the civil power, 
for the one was nothing without the other, which words 
the Governor told him were factious and seditious. Yealls 
also refused to accept a commission from the Governor as 
Captain of Wallingford (his former post) and was there- 
upon warned not to take upon him that office at his utmost 
peril. At noon came an offer of the General Court to 
supply 50 men or 600, country pay, (computed to be about 
.250 sterling), which the Governor answered. That even- 
ing about twenty men came to the Governor offering their 
obedience to the commission and desiring that the same 
might be noted. Several others crowded in, but the 
Governor called upon all who would not acknowledge his 
commission to leave his room, which they did except one 
who remained boasting that he held a commission under 
the charter and so forth. The Governor bade him begone, 
but as he continued his impertinency, the Governor took 
him by the arm and led him out ; and as he dared the 
Governor to do the like inside his chamber His Excellency 
made towards him and threw him down the stairs. Oct. 28. 
This morning came intelligence that the Court was broke 
up and the members dispersed, also that many men had 
been in arms round the Governor's lodgings at night, some 
threatening to insult him, others to shoot him if he 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 1'ji) 

1698. 

published his proclamation in the streets. The Governor 
therefore sent Clarkson and myself with the proclamation 
to the Chief Magistrate at Hartford, to require him to 
publish it, also to report the affronts put on him since he 
landed and to ask if the Court had prepared any answer to 
the Governor's last memorial. We went therefore to Mr. 
Allyn, who said that he thought the proclamation would, 
not be published, but that he would deliver it to Mr. Treat, 
who was expected to return next day. He expressed 
sorrow for the affronts put on the Governor but said he 
could not help it, as the people were in a ferment ; and he 
knew nothing of any answer from the General Court. 
Toward evening about twenty more people came to signify 
their obedience to the commission. Oct. 29 being 
Sunday, the Governor went and heard sermon in one 
church in the morning, and in the other in the afternoon. 
In the evening came a letter from Mr. Bulkeley that the 
people were in great ferment. Oct. 30. Another letter 
from Mr. Bulkeley to the same effect. The Governor gave 
orders to prepare to start to-morrow. Signed. N. Bayard. 
34 pp. Endorsed as No. in. 

650. xx. A list of the foregoing documents with the exception of 
Nos. i. and n. I p. Endorsed as No. in. [Board oj 
Trade. New York, 5. Nos. 83i.-xx.] 

651. A duplicate set of the enclosures abstracted in the pre- 
ceding, with the exception of Nos. i.-in., xn.-xiv., xvn., xvin. and xx. 
[Board of Trade. New York, 5. Nos. 34i.-xi.] 

Oct. 30. 652. Journal of House of Burgesses of Virginia. Address to 
the Governor in reply to his speech. We think that an Act fixing 
ports where alone goods can be imported or exported would be very 
burdensome, so we have thought best not to proceed with it. We 
are quite content with the suspension of the Act for the encourage- 
ment of manufactures. We think that the prohibition of exports of 
bulk-tobacco would be prejudicial to all parties. We are diligently 
engaged in revising the laws. We have taken measures for the 
defence of the country, and favour the erection of a house for the 
Governor. Thirty-six of the revised bills were read a third time 
and passed. The Revision Committee submitted a further batch of 
eighteen bills, which were read a first time, and some of them 
amended. Resolved that the Tanners' Act be omitted from the 
revised laws. 

Oct. 31. Eighteen revised bills were read a second time and some of them 
amended. Six new bills were submitted by the Revision Committee, 
which were read a first time, and some of them amended. Order 
for arrest of Thomas Rooke for assaulting a burgess. Address to 
the Governor, asking him to throw open the land south of the 
Blackwater to settlement, and also the land on Pamunkey Neck. The 
affairs of the College were considered. A proposal to exempt all 
masters and pupils in the College from levies was rejected. A bill 
imposing a duty of 7 per cent, on exported furs was ordered, for 
support of the College. A Committee appointed to examine the case 
of Thomas Rooke. Eight revised bills ordered for third reading. 

Nov. 1. Twenty-six revised bills read a third time and passed. 



200 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1093. 

Nov. '2. Thomas Rooke having begged the pardon of the House on bended 
knees, was discharged from custody. The House attended the 
Governor by summons, and heard a speech from him. Message 
from the Governor that the land south of the Blackwater could not 
l>e thrown open to settlement until so much of it as had been granted 
to the College should be surveyed. Fifteen bills returned by the 
Council with amendments. 

Nov. 3. The Council's amendments to these bills considered, and a con- 
ference with the Council desired. Message from the Governor with 
a copy of his speech and of letters from the Queen and the Governor 
of New York. 

Nov. 4. Adjourned to 6th. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXV., pp. 1101- 
1117.] 

Oct. 31. 653. Minutes of General Assembly of Virginia. Thirty-five 
bills and an address received from the Burgesses. 

Nov. 1. Address from the Burgesses as to throwing open land for settle- 
ment received. The Acts for Rangers and for encouraging the 
manufacture of liiien, read a second time. Twenty-six revised 
bills received from the Burgesses ; and fifteen others returned to 
them with amendments. 

Nov. 2. The Governor's answer to the address concerning the land south 
of the Blackwater sent down to the Burgesses. Speech of the 
Governor to the Burgesses, reporting the Royal orders to assist 
New York and to agree with the other Colonies as to the proportion 
of assistance, and reporting further that he had sent a Commissioner 
to the proposed Congress at New York and 600 to Governor 
Fletcher. 

Nov. 3. Order for a copy of the speech and letters to be delivered to the 
Burgesses. [Col. Entry BL, Vol. LXXXV., pp. 1013-1019.] 

Oct. 31. 654. Minute's of Council of Barbados. Order for sundry 
payments. A letter from Ralph Lane to the Governor read, 
reproaching him for disobedience of the Royal orders in reference to 
his case. The Governor pointed out that he had enquired into 
Lane's case, and had executed the King's orders respecting him ; 
and it was ordered that the Provost Marshal bring Lane before 
Council at next meeting to answer for the scurrilous language of 
his letter. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XII., pp. 433-437.] 

Oct. 31. 655. Journal of Assembly of Barbados. John Waterman 
re-elected Speaker. Account of the debt due for the Leeward 
Islands expenditure brought up, amounting to 7,760. William 
Bridges and John Gardneir elected agents. Committee appointed to 
draw up a remonstrance of grievances against the Royal African 
Company. Adjourned to 14 November. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XIV., 
Dp. 356, 357.] 

[Oct?] 656. Grievances of the inhabitants of Barbados against the 

government of Governor James Kendall. He assumed a power, 
never before pretended to, of judging the election of members for 
the Assembly. He published, without advice and consent of the 
Council, articles of war whereby he compelled every man (Coun- 
cillors only excepted) to serve in some troop or company and not to 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. '201 

1693. 

leave it without the Captain's permission ; imposed an oath of 
obedience to himself on all officers, militia and divers other matters, 
all under penalty of death. He directed writs for the election of 
several members of Assembly to one man, which Assembly 
voted him large sums. He suspended John Hallett from the 
Council and lined him heavily for refusing to cut down a wood on 
ground which he required for fortifications. He in June last issued 
writs for an Assembly wherein he required certificates from 
members under an Act which was presently disallowed, and yet got 
the Council to declare the Assemby so elected a legal Assembly. 
He enforced strictly an Act of Militia which, owing to mortality 
and depopulation of the Island, wrought very harshly, in order to 
terrify members of Assembly, and put in one who had turned 
papist in King James's time as officer of militia, turning out 
experienced and faithful officers. 5 pp. Undated. [Board of 
Trade. Barbados, 5. Xo. 29.] 

Nov. 1. 657. Minutes of Council of Virginia. The suit between Henry 
Stonham and John Adams heard, and the GOO acres of land in 
dispute divided, Stonham receiving 200 acres and Adams 400 
acres. 

Nov. 2. Letter from the Governor of New York, asking for assistance, 
read, and referred to the Burgesses. [Col. Entry BL'., Vol. LXXXIV., 
pp. 835-88G.] 

658. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for disposal of certain 
muskets and carbines, according to the directions of Colonel 
Nicholas Lawes. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. p. 262.] 

659. Extract from Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Message of 
the Council to the Assembly desiring them to proceed with the Act 
for raising money for defence of the Island. Answer of the 
Assembly that they were concerned with other business. Second 
message of the Council desiring the bill to be sent up presently. 
The messenger returned with the news that the house had broken up 
and had not proceeded with the bill. After a short adjournment, the 
Council again desired the bill to be sent up, and declined to receive 
any message until this was done ; and the house finally sent up the 
bill with a protest against the uncommon action of the Council. 

Nov. 4. Message from the Assembly that no ill was intended by the 
House ; and after a conference the dispute was adjusted and the 
Governor in presence of the Assembly gave his assent to four bills. 
The Governor then told the Assembly that as they would not 
attend to his admonition to settle the bills for revenue and quit- 
rents and had sent insulting messages to the Council he would 
dissolve them. 5 pp. Endorsed, Reed. 27 Feb., 1693-4. [Board 
of Trade. Jamaica, 7. Xo. 27.] 

Nov. 4. 660. Minutes of General Assembly of Virginia. The Con- 
ferrers reported the result of their Conference with the Burgesses. 

Nov. 5. The Burgesses agreed to all the bills amended by the Council 
except one, on which the Council accepted a compromise. 

Nov. 6. Message to the Burgesses as to the Ports Act and bulk-tobacco. 

Nov. 7. Twenty live revised bills read a first time. 



202 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

Nov. 8. The bills for Rangers and manufacture of linen passed and sent 
to the Burgesses. Seven revised bills read a third time and sent to 
the Burgesses with amendments. 

Nov. 9. Five acts were returned by the Burgesses as agreed to, and ten 
more were read a first time. Address of the Burgesses setting forth 
the inability of Virginia to help New York. Nine acts were read 
a second time. 

Nov. 10. The nine acts were read a third time and returned to the 
Burgesses with amendments. Message of the Council as to appoint- 
ment of a commission for the Congress. Two bills assented to. 

Nov. 11. Address from the Burgesses as to the Ports Act and bulk-tobacco. 
Messages from the Governor and Council as to giving help to New 
York, and as to the Ports Act and bulk-tobacco. Three bills read a 
third time and returned to the Burgesses with amendments. \_CoL 
Entry BL, Vol. LXXXV., pp. 102M036.] 

Nov. 5. 661. Minutes of Council and Assembly of Montserrat. Order 
for the Treasurer to take up all necessaries for the men encamped, 
for publications to be set up for the inhabitants on the first alarm 
to drive all their cattle to windward and to bring in what country 
provisions they have to the Treasurer, who will pay ready money for 
the same, also for a publication for the inhabitants of the Middle 
and Windward divisions to send all their horses, with negroes to 
attend them, to White River Camp, and those of the Northern 
Division to send their horses and saddles to Carr's Bay Camp. 
Ordered also that any trespass in driving cattle in case of invasion 
shall, if the enemy be repulsed, be made good by the country. 
[Co/. Entry Bk., Vol. XLVIII.,p. 323.] 

Nov. 6. 662. Governor Codrington to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 

Antigua. Our apprehensions of a French attack were true. On the 29th 
October one of our privateer-sloops took two prizes going from 
Martinique to Guadeloupe and brought them in hither. By 
examination of the prisoners and several French letters we have 
certain intelligence that three ships of war have recently reached 
Martinique from France, one of fifty-two guns, one of forty-eight, 
and a third of twenty odd, with 150 recruits from the King's 
companies there ; that immediately on their arrival the French 
resolved on an attempt on Montserrat, and that accordingly com- 
missions were issued for 600 militia, who, with the assistance of 
three frigates, the King's Companies and three East Indiamen, 
should endeavour to surprise Montserrat this week. These prizes 
had commissions and were going to pick up men at Guadeloupe for 
this same expedition, the rendezvous being Marie Galante. 
I at once sent orders to Colonel Blakiston to put Montserrat 
into the best posture of defence and to guard against surprise, 
and ordered fifty men of the King's Companies here to embark 
for that Island at once. I hope that the vigilance of Colonel 
Blakiston and Major Nott may defeat the French designs, but in 
case the French should change their plan I have warned the Lieu- 
tenant-Governors of all the Islands to be on their guard and shall 
send to Governor Kendall to spare us the man-of-war there. That 
ship when joined with our frigate may be able to give the enemy 
some diversion, though it will be with extreme hazard, and I shall 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 203 

1693. 

endeavour to relieve Montserrat in person if it should be brought to 
any stress, of which they are to give me notice by signals. While 
the French are masters of the sea they will be continually attempt- 
ing some of our Islands, which will oblige us to encamp and will 
harass and destroy our inhabitants ; whereas, if the King could 
spare us a few frigates with active commanders, we should not only 
be free from apprehension but could continually alarm and harass 
our enemies. I beg therefore for speedy despatch of ships. Signed. 
Chr. Codrington. 2 pp. Endorsed, Reed. 2 Jan. 1693-4. Read 
8 Jan. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 4. No. 23 ; and 44. 
pp. 133-135.] 

NoV. 6. 663. Duplicate of the foregoing. [Board of Trade. Leeward 
Islands, 4. No. 24 ; and 44. pp. 183-185.] 

Nov. 6. 664. Journal of House of Burgesses of Virginia. The book of 
claims was presented to the House. Report of the Conferrers as to 
the Conference with the Council received, and further conference 
ordered. 

Nov. 7. Report on the Conference of yesterday. Resolved to agree to the 
Council's amendments. Message from the Council, with several 
arguments why the House should reconsider its decision as to the 
Ports Act and the prohibition of export of bulk-tobacco. After 
debate thereon, the House resolved that it adhered to its former 
resolutions on the question. The Governor's speech of the 2nd 
inst. read, and order given to draw up a reply. 

Nov. 8. Address of the Burgesses to the Governor giving their opinion 
that the affairs of New York are in no such desperate condition as 
is represented, that Albany is no bulwark to Virginia, and that 
Virginia is so much burdened by the weight of her own defence that 
she can spare no help for New York. The bills for Rangers and 
for encouraging the manufacture of linen were received from the 
Council with amendments, which were accepted by the Burgesses. 

Nov. 9. Bill for an impost on furs for support of the College read a first 
time. Seven revised bills were received from the Council and the 
amendments considered. Bill to fix the site of the College read 
first time. 

Nov. 10. Message received from the Governor that he had appointed a 
commissioner to attend the Congress at New York. Ten bills 
returned by the Council with amendments, on which the House 
declined to proceed since the bill as to subpoenas was not sent with 
them, sending a message to that effect. The House attended the 
Governor, who assented to two bills. Address to the Governor 
saying that beyond the revision of the laws and two bills concerning 
the College they had nothing further 011 hand. The House attended 
the Governor, who expressed his regret that it would not consider 
the matters submitted to it by the King. 

Nov. 11. Address to the Governor, setting forth that the House adhered to 
its first resolution as to the Act for Ports and bulk-tobacco. 
Another address to the Governor setting forth the House's opinion 
that the expenses of the commission to New York should be paid 
out of the Royal revenue. Messages from the Council that it was 
about to join the Subpoena bill to another bill, and that the House's 



204 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

reply to the Governor's speech urging the measures ordered by the 
King as to New York, was still awaited. The bills to fix the site 
of the College, and for an impost on furs were passed. [Col, Entry 
Bk,, Vol. LXXXV., pp. 1117-1134.] 

Nov. 7. 665. Lieutenant-Governor Usher to Lords of Trade and 
Newcastle. Plantations. Mr. Thomas Davis, Secretary of New Hampshire, is 

going to England to lay before you the condition of the province. 

Signed. John Usher. ^ p. Endorsed, Reed. 10 Jan., 1693-4. 

[Board of Trade. New Hampshire, 1. No. 30 ; and Col. Entry Bk., 

Vol. LXVIL, p. 237.] 

Nov. 7. 666. Lieutenant-Governor Usher to Lords of Trade and 
Newcastle. Plantations. Captain Stileman, a justice of the peace and Judge 
of the Court of Common Pleas refused to obey my order for billet- 
ing twenty soldiers, who were impressed for work at the fort, and 
deported himself in so contemptuous a manner, that I took away 
his commission and appointed Captain Nathaniel Fryer to be judge 
in his stead. Since then the Assembly has sat, when I made them 
the enclosed speech, and after three days' waiting it was moved (the 
Representatives being then in Council) that they should despatch the 
business proposed to them. One Furbur, a Representative, asked 
me if I threatened them, adding in a contemptuous manner that I 
had already undone them by putting hardships upon them and 
making them sit in corners. When the Representatives withdrew 
every member of the Council pressed me to call him to account, and 
to make an example of him, or otherwise the Government would be 
run down. I left Furbur alone for that day, hoping that the 
Assembly would deal with him. Next day, having passed all the 
Acts, I acquainted them with Furbur's words, and said that I had 
thought they would have taken cognisance thereof, and that as they 
had not I had no further service for them and therefore prorogued 
them. The Council taking the affront as to the whole 
board ordered him to be taken into custody, when after some 
days he sent me a petition acknowledging his fault and 
asking for clemency. I released him accordingly, but deprived 
him of his commission as ensign and made him incapable of serving 
in any public station during our pleasure, for which clemency he 
gave me many thanks. I hope there is nothing illegal herein, but 
we want a judge out of England to advise us in such matters. The 
matter has caused much discourse and even an expectation of the 
people's rising, and I think it likely that it may be represented to 
you as a complaint against me. As nothing has been done for 
support of the Government and as a justice tells me he cannot execute 
his warrants from fear of the people, I am about to retire to Boston, 
where I shall remain for my own safety until the King will afford 
us 100 soldiers for our assistance or give us fresh orders. Signed. 
John Usher. 1% pp- Endorsed, Reed. 21 Dec., 1693. Annexed, 
666. i. Speech of Lieutenant-Governor Usher to the Assembly of 
New Hampshire. 16 October, 1693. Pointing out his 
work for the province, his economical administration of 
funds and his expenditure out of his own pocket, and ask- 
ing for funds for the support of the Government. I p. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 205 

1698. 

Endorsed, Reed. '21 Dec., 1693. [Board of Trade. New 
Hampshire, 1. No. 31, 31 1. ; and (icithout enclosure) 
Col Entry Bk., Vol. LXVIE, pp. 234-236.] 

Nov. 7. 667. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor reported 
his visit to Connecticut and how he had tried to persuade the 
Government to obey the Royal orders, but that he had met with 
nothing but opposition and disrespect. Agreed that an order be 
sent to Governor Treat to furnish 100 men for Albany, provided 
that the proceedings in the said order be good and lawful. The 
Governor asking whether he should reside at Albany this winter, 
and it being represented that money would be wanting to pay the 
cost of the expedition, he offered to go without considering the 
expense if his presence w r ere thought necessary. The Council 
thought that Albany was in no such imminent danger as to require 
the Governor's presence. Warrant for grant of land to Anthony 
Crepell. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 476, 477.] 

[Nov. 9.] 668. Memorial of the Commissioners for the Leeward Islands 
to the King. Praying that a squadron may be despatched to the 
Leeward Islands, as the inhabitants are much diminished by war 
and sickness, and the French have ships at Martinique, which may 
lead to the ruin of the Islands. Sir/ncd. Bastian Bayer, Jeff. 
Jeffreys, Joseph Martyn. Rd. Gary. J p. Endorsed, Reed. 9 Nov., 
1693. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 4. No. 25 ; and 44. 
p. 153.] 

[Nov. 9.] 669. Declaration of Jacob Woolster, master of the Teneriffe, 
merchantman. That he threw overboard some packets for the 
Admiralty and the Lords of Trade from America, on meeting some 
ships which he took to be French, but which turned out to be an 
English vessel with her prizes. ^ p. Endorsed, Reed. 9 November, 
1693. [Board oj Trade. New York, 5. A T o. 35.] 

Nov. 9. 670. Minutes of Council of New York. Order, owing to 
alleged scarcity of provisions, that a Committee board a Dutch 
ship in the harbour, and see if she have more provisions on board 
than are permitted by her licence. [Col. Entry Bl>., Vol. LXXV., 
pp. 477, 478.] 

Nov. 10. 671. Minutes of Council of Virginia. Colonel Hamilton's 
letter and Peter Heymaii's petition, for a subvention to the Post 
Office, referred to the Burgesses. The Council decided that the 
letter from the Governor of New York had been sufficiently 
recommended to the Burgesses. Order for all creditors on the 
estate of Edward Davies and his fellow-pirates to bring in their 
claims. The Council decided that the easiest method of providing 
for the Clergy would be found on revision of the laws. The embargo 
on shipping for Europe raised. [Col. Entri/ Ilk., Vol. LXXXIV., 
pp. 835-838.] 

Nov. 10. 672. Governor Fletcher to Lords of Trade and Plantations. I 
New York, am returned from Connecticut. The documents that I have sent 

home will shew you what contempt is thrown on the Royal authority. 

It would be tedious and troublesome to repeat the personal slights 



200 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

I met with ; but I confess that I found them upon their penitentials 
on my return, wishing to have their money restored by Winthrop, 
their Agent, and that the General Court had made a dutiful sub- 
mission. Major Palmer, Mr. Gershom Bulkeley, the two Bosewells, 
and Mr. Trowbridge are gentlemen of the best education, sense and 
estates among them. They with many other w T ell-affected people have 
suffered very much from the arbitrary illegal proceedings there. If 
Connecticut be annexed to New York, these are the fittest men for 
Councillors. I find from their charter that they have no other 
military power than to array their people upon urgent occasions, 
which does not extend to a fixed, standing militia. I am persuaded 
that their irregularities have been so great that they would not 
defend their charter against a quo war rant o. I am told that the 
east end of Nassau Island have joined them to use the same 
person, Major Winthrop, to procure that they may be cut off 
from this province. They also are an independent people, and think 
anything may be done at Whitehall for money. While everyone 
pursues their sluggish ease, Albany is in imminent danger of being 
lost. I tried to get assistance from the neighbouring Colonies and 
to have quotas of men and money ascertained for each for the 
defence of the frontier. Commissioners met on this business at my 
summons in October ; but Sir William Phips declined to send a 
Commissioner, and the rest would not proceed unless there were a 
full meeting of at least one from each colony. Sir E. Andros and 
Colonel Copley have discounted a former contribution sent by them 
for the sum now ordered by the King from the treasuries of Virginia 
and Maryland. Governor Hamilton of New Jersey has proved very 
zealous and forward to our assistance, and has prevailed with the 
Assembly to give us thirty men, with pa} 7 , from 1 May next during 
the war. Our hardships grow upon us. Canada by a late informa- 
tion has received 700 men and stores from France. Our Indians 
falter, and the enemy pass them and turn their sword upon our 
farmers, which is their great cunning and likely to be our ruin. 
There is no remedy left but a squadron of ships and land forces to 
take Canada next summer, and the building of a stone fort at 
Albany and finding us four companies of grenadiers at the King's 
charge. These small polite Colonies on this main are as much 
divided in interest and affection as Christian and Turk. Pray 
remember the artillery and stores that I wrote for. tiu/ncd. Ben 
Fletcher. 2 pp. Endorsed, Ptecd. 28 March, '94. [Board of 
Trade. New York, 5. No. 36 ; and 48. pp. 93-96.] 

Nov. 11. 673. Lieutenant- Governor Usher to Lords of Trade and Planta- 
Neweastie. tions. Advising despatch of several affidavits, etc., relating to the 

case of the prize, Three Brothers. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXVIL, 

p. 238.] 

Nov. 13. 674. Journal of House of Burgesses of Virginia. Two 
Addresses to the Council, setting forth that the House still adheres 
to its resolutions as to the Ports Act and the question of bulk 
tobacco, and as to the inability of the Colony to help New York. 

Nov. 14. Four bills received from the Council with amendments. Accounts 
and claims considered and 250 voted to James Blair for his 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 207 

1693. 

services in connection with the College. Five bills amended by 

the Council were considered, and a conference desired. 
Nov. 15. A further conference desired on the Subpoena bill, which being 

held, it was resolved to prepare a new bill. 

Nov. 16. Further consideration of bills amended by the Council. 
Nov. 17. Address to the Governor and Council asking them to concur in 

an Address of thanks to Their Majesties for the Charter granted to 

the College. Further consideration of bills amended by the 

Council. 
Nov. 18. Bill for a public levy read thrice and passed. Message from the 

Council concurring in an Address of thanks to the King and Queen. 

Copy of the Address. The House attended the Council by summons. 

[Co/. Entry 13k., Vol. LXXXV., pp. 1134-1146.] 

Nov. 14. 675. Minutes of General Assembly of Virginia. Two bills as 
to the College read a first time, also fourteen revised bills. Two 
addresses were received from the Burgesses. 

Nov. IH. Conferrers appointed on the Subpoena bill. Message to the Bur- 
gesses offering amendments on the book of claims. Two bills read 
a second time, and two a third time, and the two latter sent to the 
Burgesses with amendments. 

Nov. 16. The two bills as to the College received back from the Burgesses 
with the amendments agreed to. 

Nov. 17. Answer to the Burgesses to the amendments of the book of claims 
[these pages are so faded as to be icith difficulty legible], and further 
messages exchanged thereupon. 

Nov. 18. The Governor having assented to the bill to fix the site of the 
College and the bill for a public levy, dissolved the Assembly. 
[Col Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXV., pp. 1036-1050.] 

Nov. 14. 676. Minutes of Council and Assembly of Montserrat. The 
Assembly, 011 the motion of the Council, agreed to draw up an Act 
for the more speedy sending of negroes to work on the fortifications. 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLVIIL, p. 323.] 

Nov. 14. 677. Journal of Assembly of Barbados. Remonstrance of 
grievances against the African Company passed, viz., (1) that the 
incorporation of the Company has diminished the number of ships 
engaged in the negro-trade, and therefore (2) diminished also the 
King's customs in divers ways. Monopoly is always an evil, and 
the warm trade driven in Africa by foreign nations, despite the 
pretensions of the Company, threatens to drive the English out. 
Moreover it is a fact that the Colonies have not been so well or 
cheaply furnished with slaves as before the establishment of the 
Company ; and the consequence is injury to the sugar industry, 
which will thus fall into the hands of the French. [Co/. Entry Bk., 
Vol. XIV., pp. 357-360.] 

Nov. 14. 678. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. The Com- 
missioners of Customs and the merchants attended 011 the business 
of convoys. 

Draft grant to Sir John Hoskyns read and approved. [Board of 
Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 222-224.] 



20S 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 
Nov. 1C. 



Nov. 17. 

Bermuda. 



Nov. 17. 

Bermuda. 



679. Minutes of Council of New York. Agreed that the 
Assemhly should be dissolved. In consequence of scandalous re- 
ports in the town that there were not ten men in a company in the 
troops at Albany, the Governor produced the latest returns showing 
261 effective men in the four companies, 39 having deserted. Order 
for the release of Nathaniel Cole, junior, on his giving security to take 
his trial at next Supreme Court. The audit of Governor Sloughter's 
accounts sent to Mrs. Sloughter to see if she objects thereto. [Col. 
Entry Ilk., Vol. LXXV.,pp. 478, 479.] 

680. Governor Goddard to Sir John Trenchard. My voyage 
lasted twelve weeks and four days, so that I did not arrive till the 
10th of August. I found the place in general confusion owing to the 
action of Governor Richier. The people had not only been oppressed, 
but were in daily fear of their lives, the late Governor intending 
to govern by martial law. To redress these grievances I called a 
General Assembly of which a Committee of Grievances exhibited 
several articles against Mr. Richier, a copy of which I have sent 
home. By next opportunity, six weeks or two months hence, I will 
send the Acts of Assembly, the articles against Mr. Richier and the 
sworn evidence against him. I can give you no account of the 
Islands yet. I must, however, call your attention to the following 
matter. One Fifield, a wicked profligate fellow, had by means of 
one of your clerks obtained a patent for the places of Sheriff and 
Secretary. Shortly before my coming he was killed by one Mr. 
Thomas Walker, who will shortly be tried for the same. The two 
places vacated I gave gratis to two gentlemen who came over with 
me, the sheriff's place to Mr. Stephen Crow, who served in the 3rd 
troop of Horse Guards in Ireland and Flanders, and the secretary's 
place to Mr. Nicholas Trott, junior. Fifield had, by favour of Mr. 
Richier, cut down and destroyed the King's timber to the value of 
ci'2,000, and the King's lands have been so generally wasted by the 
late Governor and Sheriff that there is hardly a good tree left in 
them. Fifield had put his brother John Fifield, into the Secretary's 
place as his deputy, so idle and drunken a fellow that everyone was 
forced to go to the public drinking houses to transact their business, 
and the Island records are so confused that no one can understand 
them. In some cases not only of me um and tiinni but even of 
life and death persons have been condemned to die, and there is no 
record of process or judgment against them. I could easily send 
you bundles of affidavits to prove what I say, but I will only ask 
you to confirm these two gentlemen in their places. Signed. Jo. 
Goddard. l^ pp- Endorsed, R. Feb. 21, 1693. [America and 
West Indies. 477. No. 50.] 

681. Governor Goddard to the Earl of Nottingham. To the 
same effect as the preceding with the following postscript. One Mr. 
Hordesnell, who sails in the same ship as this packet, tells me that 
he is very intimate with your Lordship. He came here two months 
before me and assured Mr. Richier that I was then actually in 
Flanders with the King and could not come here this summer, and 
that before next summer there would be such changes in England 
that I should not come at all, so that Mr. Richier might consider 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



209 



1693. 



Nov. 17. 

Bermuda. 



Nov. 17. 
Nov. 18. 

Nov. 18. 



Nov. 20. 



Nov. 20. 



Nov. 21. 



Nov. 22. 



Nov. 22. 

Custom 
House. 



himself safe for twelve months more. This gentleman has been 
Mr. Kichier's only council and comes, I believe, to defend his 
administration. %% pp- Endorsed, R. Feb. 22, 1693. [America 
and West Indies. 111. No. 51.] 

682. Governor Goddard to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 
To the same effect as preceding letters. 2 pp. Endorsed, Reed. 
20 Feb. 1693-4. Read 5 March. [Board of Trade. Bermuda, 2. 
No. 13 ; and 28, pp. 95-97.] 

683. Abstract of the preceding letter. 2 pp. [Board of Trade. 
Bermuda, 2. A 7 o. 14.] 

684. Minutes of Council of Virginia. Order for public notice 
to be given of the grant of land by the King to the College, in the 
Courts of the Counties wherein the said land lies. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXXKIV., pp. 838-839.] 

685. Address of the Council and Burgesses of Virginia to the 
King and Queen. Thanking them for granting a Charter for the 
College of Virginia, which they will not be slow to encourage. 
8ic/ned. R. Wormeley ; Tho. Milner, Speaker. 1 p. [America and 
West Indies. 638. No. 15.] 

686. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. The question 
of convoys again considered. 

Petition of Richard Levy, master mariner, read ; agreed to 
recommend that his ship be cleared for the Plantations, as he 
requests. 

The King to be reminded as to the despatch of Governor Russell's 
Commission. [Board of Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 225-227.] 

687. Minutes of Council and Assembly of Montserrat. Orders 
for the billetting of the three companies of the English regiment, 
and for a gratuity to be paid to Captain Glover and his men for 
discovering the enemy's late design of invasion. [Col. Entn/ Bk., 
Vol. XLVIII., p. 324.] 

688. Extract from the minutes of the House of Representatives 
of Massachusetts. A messenger came to summon the house to the 
Governor, who thereupon declared the Speaker to be dismissed, as 
he had been the occasion of sundry disorders committed in the 
house, and desired the house to choose another Speaker. A deputa- 
tion waited on the Governor to know by what right he did this. 

Resolution of the House of Assembly approving of fourteen 
items of accounts, excepting the grant of ,500 to the Governor. 

Protest of several members of the House of Representatives 
against a vote compelling all representatives chosen for towns to be 
residents in those towns. 4pj>. [Board of Trade. New England, 6. 
No. 86.] 

689. Commissioners of Customs to Lords of the Treasury. We 
have received an account from Mr. Jahleel Brenton, Collector in New 
England, of an assault by Sir William Phips on him and of other 
obstruction offered to him on his seizure of a ship for illegal trading. 
From affidavits received, it seems that this is not the only occasion 



8060 



'210 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

on which he has been hindered and discouraged by Sir William 
Phips. We beg that the affair may be laid before Council, for re- 
dress. Signed. Jo. Werden, liobert Southwell, Kobt. Clayton, J. 
Warde. 1^ pp. Endorsed, Piead in Council. 23 Nov. Annexed, 
689. i. Petition of Jahleel Brenton to Lords of the Treasury. In 
October I seized a ship in Massachusetts for illegal 
training and prosecuted her. The trial was deferred at 
the instance of Samuel Shrimpton, merchant, and mean- 
while the Court illegally turned me out of the ship and 
gave her to Samuel Shrimpton together with her cargo, 
who sent her at once to sea. I still prosecuted my infor- 
mation and obtained a verdict against the ship ; but at 
Shrimpton's instance an appeal was allowed, and the 
judgment was reversed by the Court of Assistants, who 
refused me an appeal to the King in Council. The ship 
returned after some time from Spain with a cargo, and I 
again seized and prosecuted her. The jury found for me, 
but the judge refused to accept any verdict except for the 
defendant. I then entered a review of the cause which 
would have assured the condemnation of the cargo, where- 
upon Samuel Shrimpton broke open the King's storehouse 
and took the cargo away. The Governor and Council have 
lately issued an order forbidding me to enter and clear 
vessels, saying that this duty lies only in the Naval 
Officer, which is a great encouragement to illicit trading. 
Sir William Phips himself is carrying on private and illicit 
trade, but finding this order insufficient to conceal it he has 
prevailed with the Assembly to pass an Act exempting all 
ships trading from Colony to Colony from entering or 
clearing, in the teeth of the Acts of Navigation. Sir 
William and his Naval Officer have kept all : cocquets 
and certificates from me and have frequently permitted 
ships to unload without producing them. I lately seized 
a sloop called the Good Luck for illicit trading, where- 
upon Sir William Phips came with about fifty persons 
and laid violent hands on me, dragging me about the 
wharf, striking me with his cane and his fists, and 
threatening to break all my bones and commit me to 
prison if I did not give up the ship and goods, which 
I was forced to do. I beg that I may prosecute these 
cases before the King in Council and collect evidence for 
that purpose. iMrge sheet. 

689. n. Copies of three affidavits, showing that Sir William Phips 
denied the authority of Jahleel Brenton as King's Collector, 
and encouraged masters of ships to ignore it. 3^ pp. 
[Board of Trade. New England, 6. Nos. 87, 87 i., n. ; and 
(without enclosures) 35. pp. 67-69.] 

Nov. 23. 690. Order of the King in Council. Approving the draft of a 
Whitehall, grant of the Islands of Ascension, Martin Var, and Trinidad in the 
West Indies to Sir John Hoskyns, and directing it to be prepared 
for signature. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. C., p. 324.] 



AMEEICA AND WEST INDIES. 211 



1693. 

[Nov.] 691. A collection of documents relating to the grant of Islands 

to Sir John Hoskyns. 

691. i. Order of the Privy Council, 18 June, 1691, referring a 
petition of Sir J. Hoskyns for grant of the said Islands, for 
consideration and report. 

691. ii. Heads of a grant of the Islands. 2J pp. 
691. in. Draft of a grant of the Islands. Endorsed, Reed. July 
29, 1691. 2 pp. 

691. iv. Abstract of the grant of the Islands. 1J pp. [Board of 

Trade. Plantations General, 2. Nos. 63 i.-iv. ; and Col. 
Entry Bk., Vol. C., pp. 314-316.] 

Nov. 23. 692. Order of the King in Council. Referring the petition of 
Whitehall, planters and merchants of Barbados to Lords of Trade and Planta- 
tions for report. Signed. Wm. Bridgeman. \ p. Annexed, 

692. i. Petition of planters and merchants of Barbados to the King. 

Praying for disallowance of an Act lately passed in 
Barbados limiting freight of muscovado sugar to seven 
shillings per hundredweight, and of other goods in propor- 
tion ; since petitioners being unable to get ships to sail at 
those rates have been forced to contract at higher rates. 
Ticenty-tliree signatures. Copy. \p. The ichole endorsed, 
Read 6 Dec. '93. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. Nos. 30, 
31 1.; and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIIL, pp. 432, 433.] 

[Nov.] 693. Copy of an Act of Barbados, for regulating the exorbitant 

rates demanded by masters of ships. Passed : 22 Dec. 1690. 
^ PP- Endorsed, with a precis. '[Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. 
No. 31.] 

Nov. 23. 694. Order of the King in Council. Referring the petition of 
Whitehall. John Usher to Lords of Trade and Plantations for report. Signed, 
Wm. Bridgeman. ^ p. Annexed, 

694. i. Petition of John Usher to the King. On the alteration of 

the Government of Massachusetts I submitted my accounts 
to the Treasury, and being in disburse was referred to the 
Governor and Council of Massachusetts. I laid my 
accounts before them, and a Committee reported 
851 2s. Wd. to be due to me ; but I can obtain no order 
from the Governor for payment of the money. I beg 
therefore for the King's order for it to be paid to me. 
Copy. 1 p. Endorsed, Reed. 1 Dec. 1693. Read 21 
March, 1693-4. [Board of Trade. New England, 6. 
Nos. 88, 88 i. ; and 35. pp. 107, 108.] 

Nov. 23. 695. Order of the King in Council. Referring the petition of 

Whitehall. Thomas Newton to Lords of Trade and Plantations for report. 

Signed. Wm. Bridgeman. p. Annexed, 

695. i. Petition of Thomas~Newton to the Queen. For appoint- 

ment to the office of Attorney General in New England. 
Copy. % p. The whole endorsed, Reed. 7 Dec. '93. 
[Board of Trade. New England, 6. A 7 o. 89, 89 1.] 



212 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 

Nov. 23. 696. Order of the King in Council. Referring the memorial 
from the Commissioners for the Leeward Islands to Lords of Trade 
and Plantations for report. Signed. Wm. Bridgeman. p. 
Annexed, 

696. i. Memorial of the Commissioners for the Leeward Islands. 
Begging for the reinforcement of the ships of war in the 
Islands as the French are reinforcing their squadron at 
Martinique, and for the despatch of recruits to strengthen 
the regiment and company of foot stationed in the 
Leeward Islands. Signed. Bastian Bayer, Jeff. Jeffreys, 
Joseph Martyn, Rd. Gary. Copy. 1 p. The whole endorsed, 
Reed. 6 Dec. '93. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 4. 
Nos. 26, 26 i. ; and 44. pp. 154, 155.] 

Nov. 25. 697. Minutes of Council and Assembly of Montserrat. Order 
for two great guns to be sent to Carr's Bay, and for all the negroes 
in Middle and Windward Divisions to begin work on the fortifi- 
cations on the 4th and complete it on the 14 December. [Col. 
Entry Bk., Vol. XLVIII., p. 324.] 

Nov. 27. 698. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor reported 
news from Albany that some of the Mohawks are cut off by the 
French, that the Jersey men have run away, that Governor Hamilton, 
for all his unwearied endeavours, cannot get men to fill their places, 
and that he had ordered twenty or thirty men to be sent up from 
New York. The Council approved. Orders for sundry payments. 
[Col Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 479-480.] 

Nov. 29. 699. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Further 
consideration of the convoys of the outward trade. [Board of 
Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 228-230.] 

Nov. 29. 700. Minutes of Council of Nevis. Letter from Governor 
Codrington of 7 October. Joyful news has arrived of an entire 
victory over Marshal Luxemburg, in which the French had 30,000 
slain, and their cannon and baggage taken. God send confirmation 
thereof. I must forbid you to admit Colonel Charles Pym to sit in 
Council, as he left the Government without my leave in time of 
danger. I have reported this to the Lords of Trade and Plantations. 
You may swear Mr. John Smargin in his stead. I have ordered 
the great guns lying in the sand at Nevis to be brought to Antigua, 
where they are much wanted. Pray give your assistance herein. 
I shall visit all the Islands shortly and look at their arrangements 
for defence, but I am assured by some of our prisoners returned 
from Martinique that the French are so sickly that they can give 
us little cause for alarm. At the return of the frigate I shall send 
her up to Barbados to refit. (letter ends.) Colonel Charles Pym 
was accordingly dismissed the Council, but first entered his 
protest, denying the Governor's charge against him. The Council 
and Assembly agreed as to the Committee to regulate the trenches. 
The Assembly proposing an Act to make the Secretary give security 
for due performance of his office, the Council agreed, provided that 
the Assembly could produce a precedent for the same. [Col. Entry 
Bk., Vol. XLVIII., pp. 281-283.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 213 



1693. 

Nov. 29. 701. Instructions of the Proprietors to Thomas Smith, 
Governor of Carolina. These are identical with those to Governor 
Ludwellof 8 November, 1691 (see preceding volume of this Calendar], 
except that laws affecting courts of justice, juries or elections are 
not to be executed until ratified by the Proprietors. Signed. 
Craven, Ashley, P. Colleton, Tho. Amy. [Board of Trade. 
Carolina, 4. pp. 3-7.] 

Nov. 29. 702. Commission of Thomas Smith to be Governor of 
Carolina. Signed. Craven. [Board of Trade. Carolina, 4. 
p. 8.] 

Nov. 29. 703. Warrant of Lords Proprietors of Carolina. Empowering 
Governor Thomas Smith to appoint a chief judge and four justices 
in any county, and to remove them at will. Signed. Craven, 
Ashley, P. Colleton, Tho. Amy. [Board of Trade. Carolina, 4. p. 9.] 

Nov. 29. 704. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Governor Smith and 
Council. We find from your letters that the Government is in your 
hands, which is as we would have it. We have not received the 
eight Acts passed by the Assembly. As to the Act of Indemnity, we 
hope that our pardon, sent by last ship, will settle that matter. We 
see that some of the tremblers of the peace have left Carolina, and 
you say that if three more were gone, all would be quiet. There 
are laws to punish those who disturb the peace by false reports and 
seditious speeches, which might be enforced. Governor Ludwell 
had no right to propose to the Assembly a form of deed for grant of 
land. The land is ours, and we shall grant it on our own terms. 
Be careful as to your proceedings concerning the Englishman 
murdered by Indians. Indians are apt to throw the blame for such 
outrages on another tribe, and to take vengeance for bloodshed. So 
be sure that the right tribe is taken to task, and that the culprit be 
punished by his ow,n people. You will explain why the pirates from 
the Red Sea, who were obliged to leave their ship and to land in 
Carolina, were not prosecuted. Signed. Craven, Ashley, P. Colleton, 
Tho. Amy. [Board of Trade. Carolina, 4. p. 10.] 

Nov. 29. 705. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Governor Thomas 
Smith. We sent for your commission and instructions, and hope 
you have obeyed our last orders to Governor Ludwell. We believe 
that the Goose Creek men have promoted disorder in order to avoid 
paying rent, which will come to an end when they see that we are 
determined to enforce payment. We hear that the persons indicted 
for murder of Indians were acquitted, the jury throwing out the 
bill. Peace cannot be expected if Indians are murdered, and no 
satisfaction given. You will enquire into this matter, and if you 
find plain proof against the offenders you will take care for their 
condign punishment. You will do your best to seize any pirates and 
their plunder, try them and make examples of them. Signed as the 
preceding. [Board of Trade. Carolina, 4. p. 11.] 

Nov. 29. 706. The same to the same. Forwarding copy of the letter to 
Paul Grimball of 12 April (see No, 271). [Board of Trade. 
Carolina, 4. p. 12.] 



214 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 

Nov. 30. 

Whitehall. 



Nov. 30. 

Whitehall. 



Nov. 30. 

Whitehall. 



Nov. 30. 



Nov. 30. 



707. Order of the King in Council. Referring the memorial of 
Stephen Duport to Lords of Trade and Plantations for report. 
Sif/ncd. Win. Bridgeman. J p. Annexed, 

707 i. Petition of Stephen Duport to the King and Queen. My 
estate having been plundered by your Majesties' forces at 
the retaking of St. Christophers, I asked for an order 
directing Governor Codrington to procure for me 
.restitution of the same. This order was granted on 
26 January last, but I am informed not only that Governor 
Codrington has slighted it, but that he directed my 
overseer to keep all the negroes, etc., on the plantation, 
and then had them sent to Barbados, giving my overseer 
a negro-woman for his pains. I beg for an order directing 
Governor Codrington to restore to me these my 
possessions. Copy. 1^ pp. The ichole endorsed, Reed. 
2 Dec. 1693. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 4. 
No. 27 ; and 44. pp. 172-175.] 

708. Order of the King in Council. Referring the presentment 
of the Commissioners of Customs of 22 November, on the 
petition of Jahleel Breiiton, to Lords of Trade and Plantations for 
report. Siyncd. Wm. Bridgeman. ^ p. Endorsed, Read 6 Dec. 
'93. [Board <>f Trade. New England, 6. No. 90; and 35. 
pp. 66, 67.] 

709. Order of the King in Council. Referring the petition of 
several persons interested in Barbados to Lords of Trade and 
Plantations for report. Signed. Win. Bridgeman. |- p. Annexed, 

709. i. Petition of several persons interested in Barbados to the 
King. Setting forth the dangerous condition of the 
Island from want of men ; the late mortality, the expedi- 
tion to Martinique and the burden of taxation having done 
much to dispeople it ; and praying that a regiment may 
be quartered there during the war and frigates kept there 
constantly to secure the provision ships. Copy. 1 p. 
The ivliole, endorsed, Read 6 Dec. 1693. [Board of Trade. 
Barbados, 5. Nos. 32, 32 1. ; and 44. pp. 44-46.] 

710. Additional instructions for Governor Thomas Smith of 
Carolina. If it is impossible to get delegates from Albemarle 
County for the General Assembly, then Berkeley and Colleton 
Counties shall choose seven delegates and Colleton County six for 
South Carolina until more country is planted. You may appoint a 
Deputy- Governor of North Carolina. Signed. Craven, Ashley, 
P. Colleton, Tho. Amy. \_Board of Trade. Carolina, 4. p. 8.] 

711. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor issued 
writs for a new Assembly, to meet on the 1st of March. Order for 
the accounts of the revenue to be prepared for tbe Assembly, and 
for the progress of the new battery to be examined. Order for the 
privateer-captain, John Reaux, to be released from irons and lodged 
in New York gaol. Order for the small arms in the armoury to be 
fitted forthwith for service. Orders for sundry payments. [Col. 
Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 480, 481.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



215 



1693. 

Nov. 



Virginia. 



Dec. 2. 



Dec. 2. 



Dec. 5. 

Whitehall. 



Dec. 6. 



Dec. 6. 



Dec. 6. 



Dec. 6. 



Dec. 6. 



712. Accounts of receipts and disbursements of William Cole, 
Virginia, from October, 1692, to November, 1693. 2 pp. [Board of 
Trade. Virginia, 5. No. 37.] 

713. Ralph Wormeley to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 
Forwarding duplicate copies of the Minutes of Council and 
Assembly. Signed. R. Wormeley. p. Undated. Endorsed, Reed. 
28 March '94. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. No. 38.] 

714. Deposition of Symon Tristane. In confirmation of the 
statements made in Stephen Duport's petition (sec No. 707 i.). 2pp. 
[Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 4. No. 28.] 

715. Minutes of Council of New York. Order for Mrs. 
Sloughter to account for the sums received by her husband for pay 
of the two independent companies. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., 
p. 481.] 

716. Warrant for the appointment of Edward Cranfield to be 
Naval Officer of Barbados. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 44. 
pp. 84, 85.] 

717. Extract from Minutes of House of Representatives of 
Massachusetts for 21 and 22 November, 1693 (see No. 688), and 
additional Minutes of 6 December. Resolutions upholding the 
right of the Representatives to ascertain to what use money is to be 
devoted before they vote it. The whole, 1^ pp. [Board of Trade. 
New England, 6. A T o. 91.] 

718. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Petitions of 
the merchants of Barbados and the Agents for the Leeward 
Islands, for men and ships for their protection, read and referred to 
the Admiralty, in the matter of ships. Decision as to the men 
taken. The memorial of the Agents of Barbados against the Act 
for freight read. Agreed to move that the question be referred to 
the Treasury. 

Report of the Admiralty as to the protection of Piscataqua read. 

Petition of Jahleel Brenton and presentment of Commissioners of 
Customs against Sir William Phips read and decision thereon 
taken. [Board of Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 231-235.] 

719. Minutes of Lords of Trade and Plantations. On reading 
the presentment of the Commissioners of Customs of 22 November, 
with its enclosures (see No. 689), it was agreed to recommend the 
appointment of Commissioners to take evidence as to the statements 
of Jahleel Brenton, and that the parties concerned in his complaints 
return their answer thereto in writing. [Board oj Trade. New 
England, 35. pp. 69-72.] 

720. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Requesting 
that the Commissioners of Customs may hear the objections of the 
merchants of Barbados to the Act for limiting freight. [Col. Entry 
Bk., Vol. VIII., p. 434.] 

721. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. On the 
petition of persons interested in Barbados (see No. 709), agreed to 
recommend that a regiment of foot be stationed at Barbados during 



210 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1693. 



Dec. 7. 



Dec. 7. 



Dec. 7. 

Whitehall. 



Dec. 7. 

Whitehall. 



Dec. 7. 

Whitehall. 



Dec. 7. 

Whitehall. 



the war ; and that the request as to ships be referred to the Lords 
of the Admiralty. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 44. pp. 47, 48.] 

722. Minutes of Council of New York. Orders for sundry 
payments. Mrs. Sloughter produced her husband's accounts for 
money received by him, arid a Committee was appointed to report 
on the same. The Mayor of New York directed to hasten the work 
in the new battery. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 481-482.] 

723. The Attorney General to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 

1 have perused the Address and Charter of Rhode Island. The 
Charter puts the nomination of officers of the militia in the hands 
of the Governor and majority of the Assistants. When the writ of 
Quo Warranto was issued in 1686 no final proceedings were taken, 
but it was mentioned that the Colony would not contend with the 
King, and Sir Edmund Andros was made Governor by King James 
until at the revolution the Corporation reassumed its rights. By 
Sir William Phips's Commission he is Commander-in-Chief of the 
militia and all forces in Rhode Island. How far this Commission 
may influence the Charter I submit to you ; but I see no reason in 
law for not complying with the petition. Signed. Edw. Ward. 

2 pp. Endorsed, Reed. 11 Dec., '93. [Hoard of Trade. New 
England, 6. No. 93 ; and 35. pp. 126-131.] 

724. Order of the King in Council. Referring it to the 
Treasury to report how a regiment quartered in Barbados can be 
paid out of the revenue there, or what part of the revenue may be 
applied to that object, after the expenses of Government are pro- 
vided for. Signed. Wm. Bridgeman. J p. Endorsed, Read 
5 March, '93-4.' [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. No. 33 ; and 44. 
pp. 48, 49.] 

725. Order of the King in Council. Referring the consideration 
of the question of sending ships of war to Barbados and the Leeward 
Islands to the Commissioners of the Admiralty for report. [Board 
of Trade. Barbados, 44. pp. 49, 50.] 

726. Order of the King in Council. Referring petition of 
Edward Bushell to Lords of Trade and Plantations for report. 
Signed. Win. Bridgeman. \ p. Annexed, 

726. i. Petition of Edward Bushell, on behalf of Ralph Lane, to 
the King. That the Royal order of 15 December, 1692, 
be enforced, so that copies of all evidence in Ralph Lane's 
appeal case may be sent from Barbados and the appellant 
himself set at liberty to come to England and prosecute his 
appeal. Copy. 1 p. The whole endorsed, Reed. 13 Dec. 
Read 27 Dec. 1693. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. 
Nos. 34, 34 i.; and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIIL,pp. 386-388.] 

727. Order of the King in Council. Referring a petition from 
merchants and planters of Barbados to Lords of the Treasury for 
report. Signed. Wm. Bridgeman. Inscribed, Minute of the 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



217 



1693. 



Dec. 7. 

Whitehall. 



Dec. 8. 

Whitehall. 



Dec. 10. 

New York. 



Dec. 11. 



Dec. 11. 



Commissioners of the Treasury, referring the petition to the Com- 
missioners of Customs. 3 Jan. 1693-4. Signed. Godolphin, Ste. 
Fox, Edw. Seymour. 1 j>. Annexed, 

7 '27. i. Petition of merchants and planters against the Act for 
limiting freight. Original, already abstracted in No. 692 i. 
[Board of Track. Barbados, 5. Xos. 35, 35 1. ; and 44. 
pp. 66-68.J 

728. Order of the King in Council. Referring the petition of 
Captain Richard Short, R.N., to Lords of Trade and Plantations for 
report. Signed. Wm. Bridgernan. \ )>. Annexed, 

728. i. Petition of Captain Richard Short to the King. Setting 
forth how Sir William Phips took from him a French prize 
which he had captured, and sold her without judgment 
neither for the King's use nor for the officers and ship's 
company; and summing up Sir William Phips' s harsh 
treatment of him, which compelled him ultimately to come 
to New York and take passage home in Sir Francis 
Wheler's fleet. Prays for the share of the prize, and for 
reparation for his ill-treatment. Copy. l\ j>p. Tlie whole 
endorsed, Reed. 11 Dec. '93. [Hoard of Trade. New 
England, 6. Xos. 92, 92 1. ; and 35. pp. 75-78.] 

729. Order of the King in Council. That the stores of war 
desired by Governor Fletcher be sent to New York, the brass guns 
excepted. Signed. Wm. Bridgeman. [Board of Trade. New 
York, 48. p. 74.] 

730. Governor Fletcher to the Earl of Nottingham. Sir 
William Phips never entered upon the militia of Connecticut, and 
those people having received a letter from Their Majesties to assist 
New York with men or money for the defence of the frontier were 
buoyed up to an absolute refusal of compliance with my Commission. 
At my parting many of them seemed very penitent, but if Mr. 
Winthrop, their agent, find countenance at the Court, and their 
Commonwealth Charter be confirmed, it will be of very ill con- 
sequence by the example that it will give to others. Nothing is so 
great a weakening to Their Majesties' service and interest in this 
part of their Empire as those Governments which act by separate 
interest from the Crown, make their own laws and exercise sovereign 
powers without appeal. These people in Connecticut are in a great 
fright. The noise of a Quo Warranto or a sharp letter from Their 
Majesties will reduce them. The wisest and richest of them desire 
to be under the King's immediate government. Signed. Ben 
Fletcher. Holograph. 2 pp. Endorsed, R. March 29, 1694. 
[America and West Indies. 579. Xo. 38.] 

731. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Further 
consideration of the convoys for the outward trade. 

The same on the 20th December. [Board of Trade. Journal, 7. 
pp. 235-239.] 

732. Minutes of Council of Barbados. Ralph Lane was 
brought up, when the Governor admonished him as a turbulent 



218 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

person, and pointed out that he could not order his release, since 
he was in prison for debt. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XII., pp. 487-43.9.] 

Dec. 11. 733. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor reported 
that Count Frontenac had made fresh overtures. The Council ad- 
vised that Major Peter Schuyler be sent to the Five Nations to per- 
suade them to hold their consultation as to their answer at Albany, 
but did not consider it necessary for the Governor to go thither. Com- 
mittee appointed to draw up Peter Schuyler's instructions. Order 
for a special Commission for trying certain grenadiers of the garri- 
son for felony. [Co/. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 482, 483.] 

Dec. 13. 734. Lords of the Treasury to the King. On the report of the 
Attorney General as to Sir Matthew Dudley's Company, we think 
that, in deference to the request of the New England Agents, the 
charter should be referred first to the New England Governments, 
before it be passed. Signed. Godolphin, Ste. Fox, Cha. Montague. 
\ p. Endorsed, Read 18 January, 1693. [Hoard of Trade. New 
England, 6. No. 94 ; and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIL, p. 40.] 

Dec. 14. 735. Draught of a grant of the Islanls of Ascension, Trinidad, 
etc., to Sir John Hoskyns, as approved by the Attorney General and 
Lords of Trade. Note. The Great Seal bears date 14 December, 
1693. [Col Entry Bk., Vol. C., pp. 316-323.] 

Dec. 14. 736. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. William Broadrick 
received permission to go to England, and was desired to represent 
the state of the Island to the King. Order for purchase of 
provisions for the King's ships. Orders for payments. [Board oj 
Trade. Jamaica, 77. pp. 262, 263.] 

Dec. 14. 737. Minutes of Council of New York. Order for the Aldermen 
and Common Council to attend to-morrow, on the business of the new 
battery. The Committee presentedtheir report on Mrs. Sloughter's 
accounts. Orders for sundry payments. 

Dec. 15. The Mayor and Common Council attended and reported that 
owing to snow and other reasons, they could not raise a quorum. 
The business was adjourned to the 18th. [Col. Entn/ Bk., 
Vol. LXXV., pp. 483, 484.] 

Dec. 16. 738. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Warrant for appointing 
Henry Low to the Council read, and himself sworn in. Orders for 
payments. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. pp. 263, 264.] 

Dec. 18. 739. Minutes of Council of New York. The Common Council 
and Aldermen attending, the Governor made them a speech, 
shewing that it was not true that his instructions bade him draw 
bills in England for the expense of the new battery. The Council 
objected that they doubted if they had any power whatever to raise 
money on the inhabitants of the city, and that they were required 
to do the work as a county charge, which it was not. The Governor 
referred them to the legal Members of Council for their answer, 
which was given by Mr. Pinhorne, who asked if the Corporation 
had not to common knowledge raised many large sums already on 
the inhabitants. The Corporation answered that though not 
satisfied of its powers, it could supply the money of its own free 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 219 

1693. 

will. The Governor rejoined, that for the future they must take 
care, in that case, to levy no more money on the people of the city ; 
and then rebuked them severely for alleging such foolish things, 
since they had frequently levied money before for repair of the 
fortifications. Now, their bad example had discouraged the County 
people from working at the stockades. The Council persisting in 
their opinion, the Governor disclaimed all responsibility for the 
consequences. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., j>j>. 484-490.] 

Dec. 19. 740. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order as to sharing of 
prizes and plunder. Martial law to cease on 1st January. Order 
for sundry payments. [Board- of Trade. Jamaica, 77. p. 265.] 

Dec. 19. 741. Minutes of Council and Assembly of Montserrat. Order 
for all persons on whom the three companies of the English Regi- 
ment are quartered to weigh out to their provisions for a fortnight, 
they being ordered to encamp at White River and German's Bay 
on the 24th inst. The impost on liquors farmed for a year by 
Edward Parson for 18,000 Ibs. of sugar, also the licenses to sell 
liquor for 20,000 Ibs. A negro convicted of having beaten his over- 
seer almost to death, was condemned to be hanged in chains and to 
be given no sustenance till he should die. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 
XLVIIL, p. 325.] 

Dec. 21. 742. Report of the Attorney General on the petition of John 
Kirton (sec No. 400). Gives a history of the case as it stands 
between Kirton and Brookhaven, and reports that he sees no 
objection to confirmation of the Act, excepting the omission of 'a 
clause to save the Royal rights and to give the co-heirs time to 
make out their title. Signed. Edw. Ward. 2 pp. Endorsed, 
Read 2 Feb. 1693-4. Annexed, 

742. i. Petition of Sarah Brookhaven and the co-heirs of Brookhaven 
to Lords of Trade and Plantations. Praying for time to 
collect evidence of title before the Act be confirmed. At 
the foot, Draft of the clause proposed by the Attorney 
General to be added to the Act. The ichole, 1 p. 
742. ii. Certificate of Robert Thomson and three others that John 
Brookhaven was incapable of transacting business for 
over thirty years before his death. Dated 29 Nov. 1693. 
\ p. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. Nos. 36, 36 1., n. ; 
and (without enclosures) Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIII., 
pp. 439-443.] 

Dec. 23. 743. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for purchase of a 
ship for a fire-ship. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. p. 266.] 

Dec. 26. 744. Minutes of Council of Nevis. The Assembly agreed to 
leave to the Lieutenant-Governor the arrangements for compelling 
widows of considerable estates to contribute horses and accoutre- 
ments for the troops. The Assembly proposed to dimmish expense 
by removing the overseer in charge of the negroes at work on Mount 
Mary, their number being small. [Col. Entry Bk., Veil. XLVIII., 
p. 283.] 

Dec. 27. 745. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Colonel 
Nicholson to be recommended to succeed Governor Copley in 
Maryland. 



220 
1693. 



Dec. 27. 



Dec. 27. 



Dec. 28. 

Whitehall. 



Dec. 28. 

Whitehall. 



Dec. 28. 

Whitehall. 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



Colonel Russell attending, his instructions were considered, and 
the question of his accepting a present from the Assembly was 
decided. 

Governor Fletcher's letter of 9 October read. 

Reports of the Admiralty on the proposal to incorporate certain 
persons to trade to Pennsylvania and to New Jersey read. A 
proposal to insert a clause empowering the King to revoke the 
charter by Order in Council, if the Company do not within five 
years provide naval stores annually, was accepted by the Penn- 
sylvania and rejected by the New Jersey Company. 

Petition on behalf of Ralph Lane read ; it was agreed to insert a 
clause in Governor Russell's instructions as to the same. [Board 
of Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 240-246.] 

746. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. That a clause 
be inserted in Governor Russell's instructions directing him to 
examine as to the truth of the petition of Edward Bushell, on 
behalf of Ralph Lane, and to report thereon (see Xo. 726). [Col. 
Entry Bk., Vol. VIII., p. 388.] 

747. Minutes of Lords of Trade and Plantations. To recom- 
mend that, in consideration of the expense of his preparations for 
a voyage to Barbados, Governor Francis Russell be allowed to 
accept the first present offered to him by the Assembly after his 
arrival ; that 200 tons of shipping be allowed to him for his passage ; 
and that Colonel Kendall be appointed one of the Council of 
Barbados after Mr. Russell's arrival there. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. VII L, p. 384.] 

748. Memorial of Governor Francis Russell. For allowance of 
200 tons of shipping to transport him to Barbados. \ p. 
'Endorsed, 27 Dec. '93. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. Xo. 37 ; 
and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIII., p. 385.] 

749. Orders of the King in Council. Referring Governor 
Russell's request for 200 tons of shipping to the Commissioners of 
the Admiralty ; and appointing Colonel Kendall senior member of 
the Council of Barbados. \Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIII., p. 385.] 

750. Order of the King in Council. Referring the petition of 
Charles Mein to Lords of Trade and Plantations for report. Signed. 
Wm. Bridgeman. ^ p. Annexed, 

750. i. Petition of Charles Mein, in behalf of Patrick Mein, to the 

King. For the confirmation of Patrick Mein in the 
post of Clerk of the Naval office of Barbados. Copy. 
1 p. The whole endorsed, Reed. 2 Jan. Read 8 Jan. 
1693/4. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. Nos. 38, 88 1.; 
and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIII. , pp. 435-437.] 

751. Order of the King in Council. For the preparation of a 
charter to Richard Haynes and others to trade with a joint stock to 
Pennsylvania according to their proposals. Signed. Wm. Bridge- 
man. 1 J pp. Annexed, 

751. i. Proposals made by the applicants for the above Charter. 

(1) That on receiving their charter they shall at once fall 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



221 



1G93. 

to bringing the manufacture of pitch, tar, etc., to perfection. 

(2) That they will immediately fall also to whale-fishing and 

(3) to planting of hemp and flax. (4) That they will 
apply themselves also to building of ships, and (5) will 
begin this year with the export of .18,000 or 20,000 
worth of goods. Additional proposal. They will under- 
take in the first year to provide 20 tons and in the second 
40 tons of pitch and tar, and as much ship's timber as is 
desired. Copy. 2^ pp. 

751. n. Draft of the Charter to be granted to Richard Haynes and 
others. 85 pp. [America and West Indies. 599. Nos. 8, 
8 i., ii.] 

[Dec.] 752. Draft of a bond in 500 to be given by Richard Haynes 

and others to fulfil their proposal. 9 pp. [America and West 
Indies. 599. No. 9.] 

Dec. 28. 753. Order of the King in Council. That Colonel Francis 

Whitehall. Nicholson be Governor of Maryland, and that his despatches be 

prepared forthwith. [Hoard of Trade. Maryland, 8. pp. 130, 131.] 

Dec. 28. 754. Order of the King in Council. That two companies of 
Whitehall, foot each of 100 men, and sufficient recruits to make the two 

independent companies at New York up to 100 apiece, be forthwith 

raised and sent for the defence of the province against the French. 

Signed. Wm. Bridgeman. p. [Board of Trade. New York, 5. 

No. 37 ; and 48. p. 71.] 

Dec. 28. 755. Minutes of Council of New York. Several of the 
Council sworn justices of the whole province. The petition of 
Peter King against the Sheriff of New York was dismissed and 
petitioner left to his legal reined} 7 . [CoL Entry l>k., Vol. LXXV., 
p. 490.] 

Dec. 30. 756. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. It was reported that the 
men-of-war sloops refused to go out any longer on the old terms. 
Consideration deferred. [Board oj Trade. Jamaica, 77. p. 266.] 

Dec. 30. 757. Clerk of the Burgesses of Virginia to Lords of Trade and 
Plantations. Forwarding the Journals of the Burgesses and of the 
General Assembly begun on 10 October, 1693. Signed. Peter 
Beverley. \ p. Endorsed, Reed. 13 Aug. '94. [lioard of Trade. 
Virginia, 5. A T o. 39.] 

[Dec. 31.] 758. Abstract of several papers transmitted by Governor 
Fletcher respecting the Indians. These papers will be found chiefly 
among the enclosures to the despatches of 9 and 10 October (Nos. 
610-612). 4 pp. Dated, 31 July, 1693, which is probably a mistake 
for December, [lloard of Trade. New York, 5. No. 38 ; and (in 
part) 48. p. 55.] 

Dec. 759. Memorial of [the Agents for Barbados]. The Island of 

Barbados has petitioned the King for a regiment of soldiers ; and 
the King is inclined to grant it. It is therefore humbly offered (1) 
that the sending of these men is of great importance to the nation, 
since otherwise the Island must be lost ; (2) that the Island is too 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1693. 

much reduced to bear the cost of the regiment'; (3) that the regiment 
will be a gracious supply, owing to depopulation caused by loss of 
men on service, heavy taxes and mortality by sickness ; (4) that 
while under terror of a rising of negroes an act was passed to give 
free quarters to soldiers, but now the Island cannot bear the bur- 
den of free quarter owing to the expense of the expedition to Mar- 
tinique, which was 30,000 ; (5) that the people have no idea of the 
extraordinary cost of transporting a regiment, so have left no 
instructions with their Agents, but they will do anything 
that the King directs ; (6) that the 4J per cent, duty 
might be applied to this purpose ; (7) that the people of 
Barbados would be better able to serve the King, if more shipping 
were allowed to trade thither, the present number being so small 
that it cannot bring half the commodities required from England nor 
carry away a third of their produce. As they have no trade except to 
England, the stopping of that trade is plainly ruinous. Unsigned. 
2 pp. Endorsed, Dec. 1693. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. 
No. 39.] 

[Dec.] 760. Copy of the Act of Barbados for granting free quarter for 

a regiment, if the King will send one. 29 October, 1692. 1 j>. 
[Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. No. 40.] 

761. Petition of Sir William Phips to the King. The fur trade 
with the Eastern Indians, being unrestricted has passed into the 
hands of unscrupulous men, whose dishonesty brought on the recent 
war. I know many of the Sagamores personally, my property 
has suffered from the war, and the trade can only be carried on in 
peace if managed by some person who will put it under good 
reputation. I beg for a patent for the fur-trade with the Indians 
from Saco eastward to the utmost bounds of the province. Signed. 
William Phips. 1 p. [Board of Trade. New England, 6. 
A 7 o. 95.] 

762. Extract of the accounts of the two shillings per hogshead 
duty in Virginia 1692 and 1693. Total payments, 300. 1 p. 

A rough copy of the above. 1 p. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. 

1694. ^ s ' 40 ' 41 J 

Jan. 2. 763. Minutes of Council of Barbados. Acts for continuing 

the imprest on liquors and for manning two of the King's ships, 
received from the Assembly and passed. Orders for sundry pay- 
ments. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XII., pp. 439-441.] 

Jan. 2. 764. Journal of Assembly of Barbados. Bill to appoint 
Agents thrown out. Order for a bill to be drawn for manning the 
King's ships, which bill was twice read. Adjourned to 20 February. 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XIV., p. 361.] 

Jan. 3. 765. Memorial of the Commissioners for the Leeward Islands 

to the King. Begging that the appointment of Provost Marshal of 
the Leeward Islands, vacant by the death of Thomas Belchamber, 
may be given to William Barnes. Signed. Bastian Bayer, Bd. Gary, 
Joseph Marty n, Jeff. Jeffreys. % p. Inscribed, Order of the King 
referring the memorial to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 4 Jan., 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. '223 

1694. 

1693-4. Signed. J. Trenchard. Endorsed, Reed. 3 Jan. '98-4. 
[Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 4. No. 29 ; and 44. pp. 169, 
170.] 

[Jan. 3.] 766. Commissioners of the Leeward Islands to the King. 
Renewing their prayer that he will give the regiment of the deceased 
Colonel Lloyd to Governor Codrington. Signed. Jeff. Jeffreys, 
Joseph Martyn, Bastian Bayer, Rd. Gary. ^ p. Endorsed, Reed. 
3 Jan. '93-4. Annexed, 

766. i. Memorial of the services of Governor Christopher Codring- 
ton. Setting forth his services since he became Governor 
of the Leeward Islands in 1689, both in military matters 
and in respect of his generous advances of money for 
military purposes. 2 pp. [Board of Trade. Leeward 
Islands, 4. Nos. 30, 30 i.J 

Jan. 3. 767. Another copy of the enclosure to the preceding. 1 p. 

[America and West Indies. 551. No. 84.] 

[Jan. 3.] 768. Abstract of Lieutenant-Governor Stede's letter of 
10 March, 1688, respecting Quakers in Barbados. 1 p. Endorsed, 
Read at the Cabinet. May, 88. His Majesty thinks that Colonel 
Stede has performed the orders given to him. Tins paper teas 
evidently brought up in reference to Governor Kendall's letter oj 
10 July, 1693, tchich was read in the Committee on 3 January, 1694. 
[Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. No. 41.] 

Jan. 3. 769. Minute of the Lords of the Treasury. Referring the 

petition of the Barbados merchants against the Act for limiting 
freight, to Commissioners of Customs for report. Signed. 
Godolphin, Ste. Fox, Edw. Seymour. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 
44. p. 68.] 

Jan. 4. 770. Order of the King in Council. Referring the memorial 

Whitehall. o f the Commissioners of the Leeward Islands to Lords of Trade 
and Plantations for report. Signed. Richard Colinge. % p. 
Annexed, 

770. i. Memorial of the Commissioners for the Leeward Islands 
to the King. Representing anew the dangerous condition 
of the Leeward Islands, as reported in Governor Codring- 
ton's last letters, for want of a fleet ; and pressing for 
despatch of ships and of arms, ammunition and recruits 
for the English regiment and company in the Leeward 
Islands. Signed. Bastian Bayer, Rd. Gary, Joseph 
Martyn, Jeff. Jeffreys. Copy. I p. The ichole endorsed, 
Reed. 3 Jan. 1693. [Board of Trade. Leeward 
Islands, 4. Nos. 32, 32 1.; and 44. pp. 156, 157.] 

Jan. 4. 771. Instructions to Francis Russell, as Governor of Barbados. 
New instructions are inserted, forbidding the establishment 
or execution of Articles of War without consent of the Council ; 
and directing that a law be passed, if possible, to ascertain the 
qualification of jurors. No land is to be granted out in any Island 
of the Government except Barbados. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIII., 
pp. 407-431 ; and Board of Trade. Barbados, 44. p. 19.] 



224 

1694. 



Jan. 4. 

Custom 
House. 



Jan. 4. 



Jan. 4. 



Jan. 5. 

Virginia. 



Jan. 5. 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



772. Commission of Francis Russell to be Governor of 
Barbados, and of St. Lucia, Dominica, St. Vincent, and the rest of 
the British Islands lying to windward of Guadeloupe. [Col. Entry 
Bk., Vol. VIII., pp. 389-406 ; and Board of Trade. Barbados, 44. 
pp. 1-18.] 

773. Commissioners of Customs to Lords of Trade and Planta- 
tions. We recommend the following persons as Commissioners to 
enquire into the complaints of Sir William Phips, viz. : Colonel 
Francis Nicholson, Joseph Dudley, Thomas Graves of Charlestown, 
Nathaniel Byfield of Boston, Jonathan Ting, Richard Sprague, 
Francis Foxcroft, Daniel Allyn, John Usher, Captain Legge. 
Siyned. C. Godolphin, Rich. Temple, Jo. Werden, Robert South- 
well, Robt. Clayton, P. Ward. 1 p. Endorsed, Read 8 Jan. 
1693-4. [Board of Trade. New England, 7. No. 1 ; and 35. pp. 
73, 74.] 

774. Minutes of Council of Virginia. Several letters being read 
from the Governor of New York asking for assistance, it was re- 
solved that the Secretary draw up an account, showing the reasons 
why Virginia cannot furnish such assistance. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXXXIV., pp. 839-840.] 

775. Minutes of Council of New York. A Committee appointed 
to enquire as to some who acted as Justices without commissions or 
without being sworn. Colonel Bayard represented that Governor 
Copley's bill for .362, being Maryland's contribution to defence, 
had been protested. Ordered that copy of the bill be sent to Gover- 
nor Copley, and that he be apprised of all the inconvenience caused 
by this disappointment. Order for a day of thanksgiving for the 
King's escape at the battle of Laiiden. Orders for payments. [Col. 
Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 490-492.] 

776. Governor Sir Edmund Andros to Lords of Trade and 
Plantations. All is quiet, but the late Assembly, wanting in the 
several matters recommended to them by Their Majesties, only ran 
over their old laws (which they call revising) , left out that for Ports 
altogether, and though kept on for some time in the hope that they 
might be prevailed with, would do no more. On the 18th of November, 
therefore, I dissolved them. I have since advised with the Council, 
and am concerned that we can give no further help to New York. 
The revenue of two shillings per hogshead is in arrear, and the 
income is insufficient to pay the necessary charges of government. 
Moreover the country lies open to attack, especially by Indians. 
We hope to be allowed to use the quit-rents in emergency. All is 
quiet in Maryland. Signed. E. Andros. 1^ pp. Endorsed, Reed. 
2 April. Read 1 June, 1694. Annexed, 

776. i. An account of the proceedings in the seizure of the ship 
Fortune, Philip Willcocks master, in Virginia. 12 pp. 
Endorsed, Reed. 2 April, 1694. [Board of Trade. 
Virginia, 5. Nos. 42, 42 1.; and (without enclosure} 36. 
pp. 251-252.] 

777. Petition of Benjamin Jackson to Lords of Trade and 
Plantations. I have been appointed by Sir William Phips as his 
agent to give you a full account of affairs in Massachusetts, and 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. '225 

1694. 

have been further directed by him to ask you for copies of any 
complaints that may be made against him. Understanding that 
many such complaints now lie before you, I beg that copies of them 
may be given to me, that I may be allowed time to answer them or 
if need be to communicate with Sir William, and that meanwhile 
all proceedings against him shall cease. 1 p. Endorsed, Heed. 
5 Jan. 1693. [Board of Trade. New England, 7. Xo. 2 ; and 35. 
pp. 78-80.] 

Jan. 6. 778. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for the lookouts 

who were taken by surprise by the French in St. David's parish to be 
tried by General Court Martial. Orders for receipts and payments. 
Since the men in the ships of war refuse to go to sea, ordered that 
Captain Jacobs have leave to go out in the vessel lately captured 
from the French, on terms of " no purchase, no pay," and that the 
tenths and fifteenths on captures be remitted to them. [Board of 
Trade. Jamaica, 77. pp. 266, 267.] 

Jan. 6. 779. Lord Sydney to the Board of Ordnance. Ordering them 

St. James's, to comply with the Order in Council of 28 December, 1693, for 
despatch of ordnance stores to New York. Copt/. 1 p. [Board of 
Trade. New York, 5. A T o. 39 ; and 48. p. 75.] 

Jan. 8. 780. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Petition of 

Charles Mein read (sec No. 750), and the parties concerned summoned 
to attend on the 12th. 

Report of the Commissioners of Customs as to the charges against 
Sir W. Phips read, and next meeting fixed for hearing them. 

Governor Codrington's letter of 6 November read (.svr Xo. 662). 
Memorial of the Leeward Islands Agents read, as to which the 
Lords agree to move that the command of the English regiment be 
given to Governor Codrington. Agreed to move for payment of the 
arrears due to the troops in the Leeward Islands. The request of 
the Agents for military stores to be referred to the Board of 
Ordnance. Decisions taken as to other affairs of the Leeward 
Islands. 

Governor Fletcher's letters of 18 August and 10 October read, 
also his letter to the Treasury of 6 August. Agreed to lay his 
memorial for leave to accept a present before the King. 

Governor Kendall's letter of 10 July read. [Board of Trade. 
Journal, 7. pp. 245-253.] 

[Jan. 8.] 781. Memorial of Governor Fletcher to Lords of Trade and 
Plantations. Praying for leave to accept the rate of one penny in 
the pound voted to him by the Assembly of New York. Copy. 1 p. 
Endorsed, Read. 8 Jan. 1693. [Board of Trade. New York, 5. 
No. 40 ; and 48. pp. 85-86.] 

Jan. 8. 782. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. To recommend 

that Governor Fletcher be allowed to accept a present from the 
Assembly of New York. [Board of Trade. New York, 48. p. 86.] 

Jan. 8. 783. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. On reading 

Governor Fletcher's letter of 10 October (see No. 612) concerning 
John Reaux, agreed to submit it to the King whether the said John 

8060 t 



22(5 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1 694. 

Reaux be not prosecuted for the crimes he has committed in those 
parts. [Board of Trade. New York, 48. p. 84.] 

Jan. 8. 784. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. The 
Lords decide, on the report of the Solicitor General (sec No. 622) 
to recommend the Acts of the Leeward Islands to the King 
for confirmation, excepting the Act of Antigua for encouraging 
the importation of white servants, as to which they will represent 
the Solicitor General's objection, and the Act to deprive people 
corrected of stealing slaves and negroes of benefit of clergy, as to 
which they advise that the Act be remitted to the Leeward Islands 
for insertion of a clause to save the Royal prerogative. [Board oj 
Trade. Leeward Islands, 44. pp. 148, 144.] 

Jan. 8. 785. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Recommend- 

ing the appointment of William Barnes to be Provost Marshal of the 
Leeward Islands, so long as he shall reside therein. Mem.: A patent 
was accordingly directed to be passed on 11 January, 1693-4. 
[Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 44. pp. 170, 171.] 

Jan. 8. 786. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Agreed to 
move the King to grant the late Colonel Lloyd's regiment to 
Governor Codrington, and to order the arrears of the regiment and 
of Colonel Hill's company to be paid. Me in. : On presentation 
of this minute on 11 January the King declared that he would con- 
sider of the command of Lloyd's regiment. [Board of Trade. Lee- 
ward Islands, 44. pp. 162, 163.] 

Jan. 8. 787. William Blathwayt to the Agents for the Leeward Islands. 
Desiring them to state in detail what military stores they require. 
[Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 44. p. 164.] 

Jan. 8. 788. William Blathwayt to the Secretary of the Admiralty. 
Forwarding copy of the prices of Naval stores given by Governor 
Fletcher that they may be compared with the prices of the same 
commodities in England. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. C., p. 326.] 

Jan. 8. 789. Minutes of Council of Nevis. Letter from the Governor 
read, ordering the withdrawal of Captain Holt's company to Mont- 
serrat. Address to the Governor, protesting against this, pointing 
out the weakness of the Island, now reduced from 420 armed men 
to much below that number by emigration to St. Kitts and by 
sickness, recalling the value of the Island and its efforts in the past, 
and that it had already borne the expense of the company for two 
years and was ready to bear it still. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLVI1I., 
pp. 283, 284.] 

Jan. 8. 790. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor asked 
the Council to use their influence to get the best men elected for 
vestrymen. A letter from Connecticut read setting forth the 
artifice used by the Government to pervert the meaning of the 
King's Commission to Governor Fletcher to command the Militia, 
and to stifle Governor Fletcher's proclamation. Advised that the 
Commission and proclamation be printed and copies distributed all 
over Connecticut. Rebate of certain Customs-duties granted to 
Thomas Merritt for reasons shown. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., 
pp. 492, 493.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



227 



1694. 
Jan. 8. 



Jan. 9. 



Jan. 9. 

Virginia. 



Jan. 10. 

Bermuda. 



Jan. 10. 

Bermuda. 



Jan. 10. 

Bermuda. 



791. John Povey to the Secretary of the Treasury. The Lords 
of Trade desire the attendance of some of the Commissioners of 
Customs on Friday the 12th, when the charges against Sir William 
Phips will be examined. Draft. ^ p. [Board of Trade. New 
England, 7. No. 3.] 

792. John Povey to Mr. Sotherne. Desiring the presence of 
some of the Lords of the Admiralty on the 12th, when Captain 
Short's complaint against Sir William Phips will he heard. Draft. 
i p. [Board of Trade. New England, 7. Xo. 4.] 

793. Commissioners for the Leeward Islands to Lords of Trade 
and Plantations. Being asked to particularise our wants, we ask 
for 500 good fire-arms, 2,000 Ibs. of bullets for the same, 1 barrel 
of flints. Sinned. Bastian Bayer, Joseph Marty n, Rd. Cary. I p. 
Endorsed, Heed. 9 Jan. '98-4, at night. Read 12 Eeb. [Board of 
Trade. Leeward Islands, 4. Xo. 33 ; and- 44. p. 104.] 

794. Ralph Wormeley to Earl of Nottingham. The Royal order 
to give assistance to New York has been laid before the Burgesses, 
with Governor Fletcher's letter, but they utterly refused to raise 
men or money for the service. The charge of our own soldiers at 
the heads of the rivers is very great, and the Government of New 
York has misrepresented this country by saying that it is any pro- 
tection to us. It never has been a protection to us, nor can it 
possibly hinder the enemy from attacking us ; and the raising of 
men for defence of New Y^ork would weaken us, who are quite as 
much exposed to the attempts of the French and Indians. We are 
always willing to do our best for Their Majesties' service, but the 
Auditor's accounts show that we cannot give the assistance which 
New York expects. Sif/ned. R. Wormeley. 1 J j>p. Endorsed, R. 
March 28, 1694. [America and West Indie*. 638. Xo. 1(5.] 

795. Governor Goddard to the Marquis of Carmarthen. 

Repeats the substance of bis former letters of 17 Xoreuiber, and 
continues. I beg your favour in procuring for me to be transferred 
from this government to that of Maryland, vacant by Colonel 
Copley's death. The perquisites of this place are so small that they 
will hardly pay my expenses. Without a wonderful Providence I 
may live here twenty years and not get twenty pence, for the 
inhabitants are so base and niggardly that they would deprive me 
even of the fees enjoyed by my predecessors. Your favour herein 
would lay me under great obligations. Sinned. J. Goddard. 2 pp. 
Endorsed, Reed. 22 Feb. 1693-4. [Board of Trade. Bermuda, 2. 
No. 15.] 

796. Governor Goddard to Sir John Trenchard. I have sent a 
full account of the Islands to the Lords of Trade and Plantations. 
Here follows a repetition of the account of the Fiiields and of his 
appointments to the places of Sheriff and Secretary as given in 
letter of 17 November, 1693 _(see No. 680). Sinned. Jo. Goddard. 
1^ pp. Endorsed, R. Feb. 22,1693. [America and West Indies. 
477. No. 52.] 

797. Governor Goddard to the Earl of Nottingham. A repeti- 
tion of the preceding. 1| pp. Endorsed, R. Feb. 23, 1693. 
[America and West Indies. 477. Xo. 53.] 



228 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1694. 

Jan. 10. 798. Governor Goddard to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 
Bermuda. I send fourteen new articles against Mr. Richier with affidavits in 
support thereof. A committee of Assemhly has reported as to the 
great waste of the King's timber. I have also enquired as to the public 
stores and found only those mentioned in enclosed list remaining. 
What is become of the rest I know not. The sheriff, who kept them, 
is dead, and his executors cannot or will not find any account. Mr. 
Richier was too cunning to write for many barrels under his hand, 
but the affidavits will show where some of the missing stores are 
gone, and the general opinion is that the rest are gone the same 
way. I have sent a list of stores that are required. I send copies of 
the Acts passed by the Assembly, also a list of those passed in Mr. 
Richier's time, as there is no record of their confirmation or other- 
wise. Meanwhile T have adjourned the Assembly till the 1st of 
March. Recapitulates from this poinl the substance of his letter of 
17 November (A T o. 680). Sic/ncd. Jo. Goddard. 8 pp. Endorsed, 
Reed. 22 Feb. Read 5 March, 1693-4. Enclosed, 
798. i. Additional charges against Governor Richier. (1) That 
he slighted the King's patent for wrecks, granted to 
Thomas Neale, ridiculed its authority and impeded its 
execution. (2) That he condemned Thomas Walker to fine 
and imprisonment for acting as Agent to the said Patentee. 
(3) That he dispossessed Robert Hall of the ship Rebecca, 
and put another commander in his place. (4) That by 
partial and unjust orders he caused Thomas Walker great 
loss by preventing him from recovering certain divers. 
(5) That, when the Island was almost starving, he refused 
to let a ship go to fetch provisions. (6) That the 
Governor has been a constant tolerator and encourager of 
quarrels, drunkenness and debauchery ; and in particular 
stirred up Henry Fifield to fight Thomas Walker. (7) 
That he assaulted a justice of the peace for enforcing the 
law for the Collector of Customs. (8) That he loaded a 
sloop and sent her off without entry to trade direct with 
Scotland, and resisted the seizure of this vessel for such 
illegal practice. (9) That he and Henry Fifield permitted 
the wasting of the King's stores. (10) That he cut down 
the King's timber and turned it to his private use. (11) 
That he granted a commission to a known pirate without 
taking security. (12) That he neglected the guards of the 
Island against pirates. (13) That he filled up the Council 
with his own creatures and proposed to bind the majority 
of the Council in 500 bond, to be true to him. (14) That 
he did away with civic trial and endeavoured to try them 
obnoxious to him by court-martial. 7^ pp. Endorsed, 
Reed. 19 Feb., 93-4/ 
798. n. Duplicate copy of preceding. Endorsed, Reed. 22 Feb. 

1693-4. 

798. in. A collection of depositions by William Seymour and 
\ three others in support of the 1st charge against Governor 

Richier. 2 pp. 

798. iv. Depositions of John Somarsell in support of the 2nd 
charge. 1 p. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 221) 

1694. 

798. v. Deposition of James Hilton in support of the 3rd charge. 

1 p. 

798. vi. Depositions of Benjamin Stow in support of the 5th 

charge. 1 p. 
798. vii. Depositions of Thomas Clarke and ten others in support 

of the 6th charge. 12 pp. 
798. YIII. Depositions of William Bryne and three others in 

support of the 7th charge. 4 pp. 
798. ix. Further depositions of Shechariah Burrows in support 

of the 7th charge. 2 pp. 
798. x. Depositions of William Outerbridge in support of the 8th 

charge. 1^ pp. 
798. xi. Depositions of John Richardson and four others in 

support of the 9th, llth', and 6th charges. 3 pp. 
798. xn. Depositions of Joseph Eyon and nineteen others, with 

reports of the Committee of the Assembly, in support of 

the 10th charge. 6 pj>. 
798. xin. Depositions of Robert Hall in support of the llth 

charge. 1^ pp. 
798. xiv. Depositions of Samuel Stone and three others in 

support of the 12th charge. 4 pp. 
798. xv. Depositions of Thomas Walker, 12 pp., and of William 

Outerbridge, 1 p., as to divers of the charges. Certificate 

of the Governor as to the authenticity of all the foregoing 

depositions, 1 p. 
798. xvi. Record of the escheat of laws of Nicholas Worfe at 

Bermuda in 1688. 1 p. Endorsed, Reed. 22 Feb., 

1693-4. 
798. xvn. Governor Richier's warrant for the arrest of Thomas 

Walker. 5 October, 1691. I p. 
798. xvni. A second warrant for the arrest of Thomas Walker. 

2 November, 1691. 1 p. 

798. xix. Copy of the preceding and of an order to the gaoler. 
2 November, 1691. 1 p. 

798. xx. Further order as to the custody of Thomas Walker. 
11 December, 1691. Scrap. 

798. xxa. Record of the court fining Thomas Walker .50 and 
imprisoning him for a month. 12 Dec., 1691. Scrap. 

798. xxi. Order of Governor Richier for upholding the right of 
Thomas Neale to wrecks in Bermuda. 12 January, 1691-2. 
I p. 

798. xxn. Order for publication of the grant of wrecks to 
Thomas Neale. 12 January, 1691-2. 1 p. 

798. xxiii. Order of the Governor of Bermuda in Council. That 
all persons suspected of going to search for wrecks to give 
security to bring what they may recover to Bermuda. 
7 March, 1691-2. 

798. xxiv. Agreement of several inhabitants of Bermuda with 
Thomas Walker to send a sloop down to Barbados for 
recovery of certain divers. 26 March, 1692. 1 p. 

798. xxv. Queries put by Governor Richier as to his powers to 
proclaim martial-law, to suspend persons holding commis- 
sions from the Admiralty, and other matters. 1 p. 



230 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1694. 

798. xxvi. Order for arrest of Thomas Walker for inciting to 

rebellion. 14 Oct., 1692. I p. 
71)8. xxvii. Order of Governor Richier to William Outerbridge to 

sit as a Court Martial to try Thomas W r alker for the 

murder of Henry Fifield. 29 June. 1 p. 
798. xxvin., xxix., xxx. Similar orders to John Gohan, Samuel 

Hubbard, and Richard Stafford. 
798. xxxi. Proceedings of the Attorney General of Bermuda in the 

escheat of Lands formerly belonging to John Squire. 3 pp. 
798. xxxn. Account of stores of war found by Governor Goddard 

on his arrival at Bermuda. 2 j>p. 
798. xxxin. Account of military stores wanting in the forts at 

Bermuda ; with the following notes by Governor Goddard. 

I am sending home the 313 matchlocks sent out with 

Governor Richier, as they are quite eaten up with rust. 

Pray also send us another seal for the Island, as we have 

been forced to rase the letters I. R. out of the present seal. 

We need also a seal for the Admiralty. 1J pp. 
798. xxxiv. Representation of certain masters of vessels that the 

Governor of New Providence has announced his intention 

of taking a duty from Bermudians who come to take salt 

from Turks' Islands ; with a protest against the same. 

Copy. 1 p. 

The irhoJe of foregoing enclosures endorsed, Reed. 22 Feb. 1693-4. 
[Board of Trade. Bermuda, 2. Xos. 16, 16 i.-xxxiv. ; and (without 
enclosures) 28. pp. 103-107.] 

[Jan. 10.] 799. Abstract of the Additional Articles against Governor 
Richier (see Xo. 798i.). 2J pp. [Board of Trade. Bermuda, 2. 

Xo. 17.] 

Jan. 10. 800. John Povey to '? . Summoning Edwyn Stede 

to be present at the meeting of the Committee of Plantations on the 
12th inst. Draft. f p. Endorsed, 10 Jan. '93-4. [Board of 
Trade. Barbados, 5. Xo. 42.] 

Jan. 10. 801. William Blathwayt to Lord Sydney. Asking if the 
military stores desired by the Agents for the Leeward Islands can 
be spared. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 44. p. 165.] 

Jan. 10, 802. Minutes of Council and Assembly of Montserrat. Captain 
John Scott appointed captain of the forts, and Jacobus Leduke 
gunner of Plymouth fort. The President was requested to write to 
the Governor that the courts at law may be open from March till 
hurricane time. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLVIII., p. 325.] 

Jan. 11. 803. Order of the King in Council. For the arrears due to 
Whitehall, the regiment of foot and to Colonel Hill's company in the Leeward 

Islands to be paid. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 44. pp. 

163, 164.] 

Jan. 11. 804. Order of the King in Council. That Governor Fletcher 

Whitehall, cause John Reaux to be prosecuted for the crimes committed by 

him, according to law. [Board of Trade. New York, 48. p. 85.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



281 



1694. 
Jan. 11. 

Whitehall 



Jan. 11. 

Whitehall. 



Jan. 11. 



Jan. 11. 

Great 
Queen Street. 



Jan. 12. 



Jan. 12. 



Jan. 12. 

Whitehall. 



Jan. 13. 

Office of 
Ordnance. 



805. Order of the King in Council. Granting leave to Governor 
Fletcher to accept a present from the Assembly of New York. 
[.Board <>/ Trade. New York, 48. p. 87.] 

806. Four orders of the King in Council. Confirming the laws 
passed in the Leeward Islands, and Antigua, excepting the Antigua 
Act, to encourage importation of white servants; and referring the act 
to deprive persons convicted of stealing negroes and slaves of henefit of 
clergy, to the Leeward Islands for insertion of a clause preserving 
the Royal prerogative. [Board of Trade, Leeward Islands, 44. 
pp. 145-150; and (icith the confirmed Acts given at lonjth, but icith- 
out reference to those unconfirmed) Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LI., ]>/>. 
95-183.] 

807. Minutes of Council of New York. Orders for sundry 
payments. The widows of Leisler and Milborne were permitted to 
continue in enjoyment of their estates, on showing the Royal grant 
of the same. Patent for land granted to Jannitie Bruys. [Col. 
Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 493, 494.] 

808. Edwyn Stede to John Povey. Pray tell Mr. Blathwayt 
when you see him that my health prevents me from waiting on 
him, hut that I shall he ready to answer any command in writing 
as best I can, and will wait on him the first minute I am able to get 
abroad. Mr. Cranfield is just come to summon me to attend the 
Committee to-morrow on the business of the Naval Office at 
Barbados, but I must ask their Lordships to excuse me. All that 
I can say of the office is that it was granted to Abraham Langford 
by King Charles II. about 1676, and that after his death it was 
granted by like patents both by King James and by their present 
Majesties to Archibald Carmichael, who held it till his death. 
Sif/ned. Edwvii Stede. 1^ pp. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. 
No. 43.] 

809. John Povey to Mr. Sotherne. The hearing of Captain 
Short's complaints against Sir William Phips has been deferred till 
the 15th. Draft. ^ ]>. [Board of Trade. New England, 7. 
No. 5.] 

810. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Draft Com- 
mission for Governor Nicholson of Maryland read. Agreed to 
insert clauses making Sir Edmund Andros Commander-iii- Chief of 
Maryland in case of his absence, and Governor Nicholson Commander- 
in-Chief of Virginia in Sir Edmund's absence. 

Mr. Mem and Mr. Craniield heard as to the Provost Marshal's 
and Naval officers' places in Barbados, and Mr. Mein's petition 
referred to the Treasury. \Board of Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 
254-256.] 

811. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Recommending 
that the petition of Charles Meiii be (see No. 750) referred to the 
Treasury. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIII., pp. 437, 438.] 

812. Board of Ordnance to Lord Sydney. New York's request 
for Ordnance-stores was referred to us by Order in Council of 15 
June, 1693, and we reported thereon that the stores could be supplied 



232 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1694. 

if the Treasury would furnish money ; since which time no further 
progress has been made in the affair. We must repeat that without 
such an assignment of money, it would he a great hardship on the 
office, and we think that you should insist on the money before you 
agree with this demand. We enclose an estimate and would point 
out that the 20 great guns and 200 fusees are inserted by a kind of 
memorandum, which, if stores proportionable be expected, will 
greatly exceed the forepart of the demand. There will be great 
difficulty in finding the 20 guns, so we beg to be eased of that part 
of the charge at least. Hir/ned. Jo. Chaiiton, Tho. Littleton, 
Wm. Boulter. Copy. 1^ pp. Annei-ed, 
812. i. Estimate of the cost of stores desired for New York, ,2,347. 

4J pp. [Board of Trade. New York, 5. Nos. 41, 41 i. ; 

ami 48. pp. 76-81.] 

Jan. 13. 813. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for payments. 
[Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. p. 269.] 

Jan. 15. 814. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Captain Short 
and Mr. Brenton's agent made their complaints against Sir William 
Phips, and were ordered to put them in writing against the 19th 
inst. [_Board of Trade. Journal, 7. p. 257.] 

Jan. 15. 815. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. That the 
evidence given on both sides on the complaint of Captain Short 
against Sir William Phips be written down and attested, and 
delivered to the Committee on the 19th inst., each party delivering 
its evidence to the other meanwhile. 1 p. [_Board of Trade. New 
England, 7. No. 6.] 

Jan. 17. 816. John Povey to Mr. Sotherne. The further hearing of 
Captain Short's complaints against Sir William Phips will be taken 
on the 19th inst. when some of the Lords of the Admiralty are 
desired to attend. Draft. ^ p. [Board of Trade. New England, 7. 
No. 7.] 

Jan. 17. 817. Lord Sydney to the King. I duly gave orders for the 
Bt. James's despatch of the Ordnance stores to New York, in obedience to Order 
in Council of 28 December, 1693, but the Board of Ordnance has 
made a representation thereon, on which I beg your directions 
(sec X<>. 812). Copij. 1 p. [Board of Trade. New York, 5. 
No. 42 ; and 48. pp. 81-82.] 

Jan. 17. 818. Minutes of Council of New York. Letters from Albany 
as to the French designs, and the treaty between the French and the 
Five Nations read. A letter from Colonel Henry Beeckman complain- 
ing of the backwardness of the militia to repair to Albany, having no 
pay and being apprehensive as to their families during their absence. 
An express message sent to him to expedite such militia as he can 
collect to Albany. Order for the neighbouring colonies to be in- 
formed of the news from Albany. Address from the Mayor and 
Common Council thanking the Governor for his care in projecting 
the new battery, offering assistance, and asking if they are empowered 
to levy money on the inhabitants. Committee appointed to draw 
up an answer. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



1694. 
Jan. 18. 



Jan. 18. 

Whitehall. 



Jan. 18. 

Whitehall. 



Jan. 18. 

Whitehall. 



Jan. 18. 

Whitehall 



Jan. 18. 



Jan. 18. 



The Governor reported that he had spent the day before in 
writing to the neighbouring Colonies, and had ordered all the 
Colonels of the militia to have a detachment ready to march at beat 
of drum. Orders for certain payments. Answer to the Mayor and 
Corporation that in the Council's opinion they have power to levy 
money. [Col. Entry KL, Vol. LXXV., pp. 494-496.] 

819. Order of the King in Council. The Report of the 
Office of Ordnance of 13th hist, being read, it was ordered that ten 
of the twenty guns mentioned therein, with stores proportionable, 
be provided, and that these be sent forthwith to New York. [].>oar<l 
of Trade. New York, 48. pp. 82, 88.] 



820. Order of the King in Council, 
of Charles Mem to the Treasury. [CoL 
pp. 438, 439.] 



Referring the petition 
Entry Ilk., Vol. VIII., 



821. Order of the King in Council. Report of the Lords 
of the Admiralty, that the gentlemen interested in Barbados 
ask for live ships, and the Agents for the Leeward Islands for six 
ships, but that no more than six ships can be spared for both. 
Ordered, that the Lords of Trade and Plantations consider the 
matter and report. Sinned. Rich. Colinge. 1 p. Endorsed, 
Reed. 2 Feb., 1693-4. '[Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. Xo. 44 ; 
and 44, pp. 50, 51 ; and Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 44. 
p. 158.] 



822. Order of the 
the Treasury, on the 
Matthew Dudley, to Lords 
Signed. Rich. Colinge. J p. 
822. i. Copy of the letter of 
December, 1693 (see 



King in Council. Referring the report of 
heads of incorporation proposed by Sir 
of Trade and Plantations for report. 
Annexed, 

the Lords of the Treasury of 13 
Xo. 734). 



The whole endorsed, Reed. 2 Feb. 1693-4. 

Copy of the foregoing. Endorsed, Reed. 22 July, 1696. [Board 
of Trade. New England, 7. Xos. 8, 8 i., 9, 9 i. ; and (icilliout 
enclosure) 35. p. 39.] 

823. Governor Sir William Phips to the Earl of Nottingham. 
On the 23rd December last I sailed for Pemaquid, to meet the 
Indian Sachems and ascertain their fidelity to the treaty. 1 found 
that the French had done their utmost to break the same, but 
without success, for the Indians with a great deal of freedom 
changed their hostages, who are kept as pledges of their fidelity at 
Boston. The Indians also informed me that small-pox is very sore 
at Quebec, sweeping off many of the inhabitants and Indians, which 
seems encouraging for an attack in the spring ; and if Their 
Majesties will commit the command to me I doubt not to reduce 
Quebec to their obedience. Signed. William Phips. 1^ pp. 
Endorsed, R. April 15, 1694. [America and West Indies. 561. 
No. 40.] 

824. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for relief of 
debtors to the Crown. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. p. 269.] 



234 COLONIAL TAPERS. 

1694. 

Jan. 19. 825. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. The Agents 
for New England attended, and the complaints against Sir William 
Phips were heard, and laid by for further consideration. [Board <>f 
Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 258-259.] 

Jan. 19. 826. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. On considera- 
tion of Captain Short's complaints against Sir William Phips we 
find that Sir William Phips did, after a scuffle with Captain Short, 
keep him in illegal imprisonment for nine months, that he did break 
open Captain Short's chest and carry off his goods, that he did 
condemn a French prize, sitting himself as judge, and that it does 
not appear that he ever accounted for the King's share nor the ship's 
company's, and that he did condemn the ship St. Jacob without 
reserving any share for the King, though it is sworn in evidence 
that he pressed guns and stores for the ships that captured the 
St. Jacob on pretence of His Majesty's service. Draft. 3 pp. 
Endorsed, Approved, 22 Jan. '93-4. [Board of Trade. New 
England, 7. No. 10 ; and 35, pp. 89-92.] 

Jan. 19. 827. A collection of documents used in evidence, during the 
examination of the charges against Sir William Phips. 
827. i. The complaints of Peter Woodbery. 4 July, 1692. 1 p. 
827. n. The complaint of John Tomson. 4 July, 1692. These 

tn'o have been already abstracted under date. 
827. in. Warrant for the arrest of Captain Richard Short. 

4 Jan. 1693. 1J p. 
827. iv. Letter from the warrant officers of H.M.S. Nonsuch. 

20 February, 1693. Already abstracted. See No. 88 1. 
827. v. Deposition of Elizabeth Harris, as to the forcing of 
Captain Short's chest, by Sir W. Phips's order. Sworn, 
30 March, 1693. 1 p. 

827. vi., vn. Depositions of John Halsey and David Thomas, 
mariners, as to Captain Short's taking money from them 
when lent from H.M.S. Nonsuch for service in other 
vessels. Sworn, 25 April, 1693. 

827. vm. Record of the Admiralty Court of Massachusetts, 27 July, 
1692, on the condemnation of the ship Catharine, of 
Rochelle, prize to H.M.S. Nonsuch. Parchment sheet. 
827. ix., x. Records of the same Court on the condemnation of 

the ship St. Jacob. 30 October, 1693. Two larae sheets. 
827. xi. Affidavit of Captain Robert Fairfax as to Captain 
Short's good observance of his duty before his quarrel with 
Sir W. Phips, and the cruel treatment of him in prison. 
Sworn, 13 January, 1694. 1 p. 

827. xu. Sir Robert Robinson to William Blathwayt. 15 Jan. 
1694. Testimony to Captain Short's good behaviour as an 
officer. Surely it is very strange that the Captain of a 
man-of-war should be struck by any Governor whatsoever. 
I told Sir William how ill it looked on his part, and that 
if he had fault to find with Captain Short he ought to have 
complained at home. Holograph. 1 p. 

827. xm. Deposition of George Mills, of H.M.S. Nonsuch. As 
to the appropriation of the ship Catharine by Sir William 
Phips, and his borrowing of men from Captain Short for 
his private interests. 1 p. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 235 

1694. 

827. xiv. Deposition of George Webster. That Sir "William 
Phip's clerk and the purser of the Nonsuch were always 
trying to stir up animosity between Sir William and Cap- 
tain Short ; but that Captain Short always showed great 
respect and civility to Sir William. \p. 

827. xv. Deposition of Joseph Short. As to the provocation 
of Sir William Phips towards Captain Short that led to 
the scuffle between them ; and the offers made through 
Mr. Moody and another to Captain Short while in prison, 
that on his submission and confession of disobeying 
orders, all his goods would be restored to him. 1 p. . 

827. xvi. Deposition of Benjamin Jackson. To the effect that 
Captain Short rifled the Catharine, prize, before giving her 
up, and did not attend the prize court when it was tried. 
A long story of the proceeding subsequent to the quarrel, 
in favour of Sir William Phips. G pp. 

827* xvn. Depositions of Captains March and Hatch. Already 
abstracted. 

827. xvin. Depositions of Alexander Mitchell and another. As 
to the help given to deserters to escape to New Hamp- 
shire. 3 pp. 

827. xix. Summary of the depositions against Sir William 

Phips. 19 January, 1694. 1^ pp. The whole of the fore - 
f/oiuff endorsed, Reed. 19 Jan. 1693-4. [Board of Trade, 
New England, 7. Xos. 10, i.-xix.] 

Jan. 19. 828. The Council of New Hampshire to the Earl of Nottingham. 

TT STeV u- We give thanks for the great guns and ammunition sent to us, for we 
are much reduced by the war. Of late we have had a small cessation, 
but are in daily fear and expectation of a 'fresh invasion. Thomas 
Davis, who left for England in the last ships, has entered in the 
Council book an order for his going, to give an account of this 
province. Such an order was never passed, as enclosed declaration 
will show, so we beg that he may not be received as a messenger 
from us. tiiyned. William Bedford, Secretary. 1 p. Endorsed, 
Reed. 25 May, '94. Annexed, 

828. i. Resolutions of the Council of New Hampshire unani- 

mously declaring that no such order as that entered by 
Thomas Davis for his departure to England was ever 
known to them, nor was their advice or consent thereto 
asked or given. Sitjned. William Redford. ^p. [Board 
of Trade. New Hampshire, 1. Xos. 32, 32 1.] 
Duplicate of the foregoing. [Board of Trade. New Hamp- 
shire, 1. Nos. 33, 33 1.] 

Jan. 22. 829. Governor Fletcher to Lords of Trade and Plantations. I 
New York. . send herewith several papers concerning this Government and 
the Five Nations, whereby you will see what discouragement has 
possessed them owing to the sloth and negligence of our neighbours. 
The whole burden of the war lying on this province, we cannot give 
the Indians requisite succour nor make that appearance on the 
frontier which was necessary to secure all its parts. The French 
in Canada have now supplies annually from France and are a 
growing vigilant enemy. The Indians are now upon overtures of 



236 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1694. 

peace with Count Frontenac and break all their covenants with us. 
They would be for neutrality, but it's much feared that the French 
will not allow that, but will make them wholly their own. I foresaw 
this as soon as I arrived in New York and have been unwearied 
in my applications to our neighbours ; and though Their Majesties 
have ordered assistance to be given, nothing is done to purpose. 
The people here, though numerous, are scattered so wide and 
into so many different governments that they are divided in 
affection and interest, which makes them weak. I told you of the 
failure of my attempt to collect commissioners to settle the quotas, 
and of Sir William Phips's positive refusal to send one. The 500 
and 250 ordered to be furnished by "Virginia and Maryland were 
discounted for bills given for other contributions before that time, 
although the Royal order was that they should be paid out of their 
own coffers ; and the bills from Maryland were returned protested. 
Connecticut refused obedience to my commission, and has since 
cajoled me with the offer of a sum of money towards the expense of 
the frontiers, but I find nothing done, having had no answer from 
them. Pennylvaiiia consists mostly of Quakers, who under that 
pretence would escape all duty and payment, nor could I find enough 
others among them to make any figure of government. New 
Jersey alone has been of good help, thanks to Governor Hamilton. 
The Assembly gave us upwards of sixty men last year and have 
agreed to give us thirty from the 1st of May next as long as the war 
lasts. Our youth are gone to pursue their private ease among the 
neighbouring provinces, so that scarce any men are left for service 
except poor farmers, who cannot be spared but at the loss and ruin 
of their families. The people on Nassau Island value themselves 
upon their situation and grow hard hearted towards their brethren 
up the Hudson, saying that if Albany be destroyed they will be able 
to shift better than Maryland, Virginia and Connecticut. They bear 
great sway in our Assembly and I doubt will throw difficulties in the 
way of furnishing a supply for next year's reinforcement. I have 
had the fort at Albany fitted with new stockades and a dry 
graft round. I hear that Count Frontenac comes in person with 
the whole strength of Canada, and if we lose Albany it will 
open a way to the loss of all. There are 245 fusiliers on pay in 
the frontier, and the company of grenadiers in the fort. All the 
circumjacent farmers are gathered into the city, and I have ordered 
other forces to march from Ulster County, and detachments of 
militia to be ready to march at beat of drum. I expect every 
moment to hear of the enemy's approach, when I shall head the 
militia, march to Albany and put myself in that post. While we 
are thus harassed, our neighbours are all at ease and pursue their 
private advantages. I have projected a new battery for defence of 
New York against attack by sea, and the people are busy getting 
stockades to fill up the water. It will take some time to finish. 
I hope that you will send me out the great guns and stores for which 
I asked. The guns I brought with me are not so long as I could 
wish, our river being over a mile across. I also want money to 
pay the two companies of grenadiers. I hope that an expedition to 
take Canada will be sent next summer, or that a regiment of foot will 
be sent here, with money to build a sttfne fort at Albany, otherwise 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 237 

1694. 

I do not see how our hold on the main can he preserved. This 
Colony must sink under, which will he the greatest trouble that 
ever happened to these Colonies. $i</ncd. Ben. Fletcher. 3 pp. 
Endorsed, Reed. '28 Mar. Read 13 April, and in Council 19 April, 
'94 Anne.Ked, 

S % 29. T. Governor Fletcher to the General Court of Connecticut. 
Milford Bay, 19 October, 1693 (error for 14th). 
Abstracted in \<>. in. 

8'29. n. General Assembly of Rhode Island to Governor Fletcher. 
Warwick, '25 October, 1693. Your letter of '2'2 September 
was laid before us, with our Governor's answer of *27th, 
wherein we concur. It was impossible for us to send you 
a Commissioner, the time being' already elapsed, but, in 
order to yield obedience to Their Majesties' wishes as far 
as possible, we have elected a Commissioner to be in 
readiness in case any future time be appointed for a 
meeting of the Colonies. Hif/iicd. .). Weston Clarke. 
Copy. J j>. Endorsed, Reed. 28 March, 1694. 
S'29. in. The Governor and Council of Connecticut to Governor 
Fletcher. 27 November, 1693. Your letter met the 
Governor at New London on the 13th (?) inst, who at 
once called the Council together. It was then agreed 
that, even taking your late intelligence of the renewed 
and increased danger of Albany for granted, it did not 
seem to us safe for you or for us to wear away time in 
fruitless controversy about those things which you, as we 
hear, and [ourselves], be sure, have endeavoured to 
present to Their Majesties for decision. We held it part 
of our obedience to them to await the issue, and not to 
preoccupy the same. [We] suppose it to be more 
savouring of loyalty for us all, according to our capacity 
to join together for preventing and repelling the 
common enemy. \Ye have always been willing to put 
our hands hereto, as we suppose is evident to you, and we 
hope will quickly be manifested to Their Majesties as well 
by our past expenses for the securing of Albany as by our 
late tender to you of men and money, as we suppose, be- 
yond our proportion. Had you accepted our offer then, the 
season of the [year] would have allowed us to do either, 
whereas now by reason of the winter's coming on [it will 
be] certainly difficult and probably impossible for us to 
transport men, am [munition] and provisions to Albany. 
Moreover we take it to be a new thing for any part [of 
our] Militia to be called so far from home and for so 
many months, and to be [required at] our own charge 
and on our own backs to carry provision. We suppose it is 
[ordinary practice] for the King's strongholds to be fur- 
nished with provisions for those who are called [thither] , 
but we would not take up time about these things. W T e 
still are willing [to do] what we are capable of. If by the 
authority of the General Assembly we should essay to send 
men, we fear we shall not be able at this season to 
send provisions for them. Wherefore please give us a few 



238 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1694. 

words of advice whether allowing a suitable [sum] of 
money, being the most certain, be not also the most eligible 
way to [afford assistance] to Albany, and [to send it?] 
up this river of Connecticut [against] your return. We 
hope there will be such [three lines lost]. We will only 
intimate in conclusion that whereas in your proclamation 
you are [pleased to say] that the General Assembly did 
positively refuse obedience and [compliance] you will 
esteem it preposterous for us until the Royal pleasure is 
known to do anything in submission to your commands. 
We therefore desire your patience, and that it may be quiet 
till the Royal pleasure be made known to us. We are 
quite ready, in obedience to the Royal letters of 3 March, 
1693, to agree to state a quota of men for Albany and New 
York. Sinned. John Allyn, Secretary. Copy. 1 pp. 
Much damaged by rats. Endorsed, Reed. 28 March, '94. 

829. iv. Information of Johannes Luykasse, who was sent up to 
the Onandagas. The Indian messenger is returned from 
Canada, and the Onandagas summon the Governor and 
Council of New York, as well as the rest of the Five 
Nations to come and keep Council in Onandaga and hear 
all the news. The Onandagas do not pass the Governor 
by, for it was intended that the messenger to Canada 
should return to Albany, and that the meeting should be 
held there, but now that he is come to Onandaga, the 
meeting is to be held in that place. Luykasse also 
brought a secret message from the Sachems of Onandaga 
to Major Schuyler, that he should not hinder the Maquas 
and Oneidas from coming to the meeting as he did on his 
last journey, but rather encourage them, that a firm 
conclusion may be made. The parties are requested to 
arrive within ten days' time. The messenger from 
Canada says that the Governor there will have nothing to 
do with Governor Fletcher, but only with the Five 
Nations. The question of sending Indians down to 
guard Albany will be considered at the meeting. The 
Governor of Canada has since sent for two of the principal 
Indians of each nation to go to Canada and treat with 
him ; and this matter also is to be considered, at the 
meeting. Copy. 1 p. 1 kited. Onandaga, 22 November. 
Endorsed, Arrived at Albany, 1 December, 1693. 

829. v. Godefridus Dellius to Governor Fletcher. Albany, 
12 January, 1693. On the 30th December came a writing 
from the Jesuit, Milet, explaining the meaning of the 
three belts of peace which the Indian messengers should 
bring to Canada. I have copied it, to be sent to you by 
Major Ingoldsby. The original, with a translation by 
myself, Major Schu3der took with him to Onandaga. I 
find some words doubtful in the lines beginning, " J'ai 
resolu de m'exposer," etc. I suppose the sense to be 
" That he had hazarded himself as being more willing to 
die or to be thrown into the kettle than to live longer in 
the Indian country when 1 Honontochionni gives up the 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 239 

1694. 

ghost." This Indian word I take to mean the whole 
house, or all the Indians together. I have not answered 
the letter, for [ saw no occasion for it. I hear that Major 
Sclmyler is coming hack and will he here to-morrow 
hecause of the rumour that the French are coming against 
us or Onandaga. What truth may he in it, time will 
show. If they attack us, I hope God will hless our arms. 
Copt/. I p. 

829. vi. Major Richard Iiigoldshy to Governor Fletcher. Albany, 
12 January, 1693-4. Your orders for Major Schuyler to 
start for Onandaga were duly received, and he had prepared 
all things for his journey, when, two days after, Indians 
from thence told us that the Sachems were coming down. 
He stopped his journey hereupon, thinking it better that 
the Indians should fulfil their promise to you. On the 
30th Decemher two Sachems came in who advised us that 
the Sachems would not come down, that they had had a 
meeting at Onandaga, at which the priest Milet was 
present, when some overtures for peace had heen discussed 
but no conclusion arrived at until we should first be heard 
from. Milet was asked to take minutes of the meeting, 
which were sent to us to see if he had acted faithfully 
therein. He had enlarged somewhat ; hut in the main the 
Indians had agreed to send to Canada and make peace, 
which I believe they will do if they have not done it 
already. If this be so, and if the French attack us, I 
cannot believe that the Five Nations will be neutral, but 
will become our enemies. Copy of the minutes is en- 
closed. This hastened Schuyler's journey. He sent an 
express to them that he was on his way and that they 
should assemble at Oneida and on the 3rd hist, he set out 
with Major Wessels and the interpreter. When arrived' 
between the Maquas' and Oneidas' Castles they got an 
alarm that the French were coming down on Onandaga. 
Suspecting their real designs to be against Albany they 
turned back. I have sent express to Colonel Beeckman to 
send me what forces he can get ready from Ulster County 
and I design to call in all the farmers also and make what 
force I can, since we have so long warning. I doubt not 
that we shall be able to make a good defence, although 
the fusiliers here in the towns and at the outposts do not 
exceed 245 men. Copy. 1 J )>p. 

829. vn. Minutes of the meeting of the Five Nations at Onandaga, 
by the Jesuit Priest, Milet. 1 was summoned to Onandaga 
by the Iroquois, who shewing me the belts made me write 
as follows : The first belt has four black squares on a white 
ground, which stand for the Five Nations and shew that they 
have all agreed to send this Embassy to Quebec. By this 
belt they say "We are come, Father Onnontio, whither you 
have called us, and myself also, whom you call Gannisoren, 
having heard you call me by name three times, I am come. 
You ask, it is said, what doth Gannisoren fear that he 
hesitates to come ? My father, it is your cauldron of war 



240 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1694. 

that I fear and that has hindered me from coming before. 
But at the last I have resolved to expose myself to death 
and to be thrown into the cauldron that the land of the 
Iroquois may live where Notinnonchioni giveth up the 
ghost. (Set 1 Xo. v.) Hearken then, my father, to that 1 
have to say. I like better to let you speak first. It is said 
that the Iroquois have no reason left in them. We will 
enquire among us, and we will see if we can content you." 
The second belt, large and almost entirely black, signifies 
that if Onnontio will not himself overthrow his cauldron 
of war, this belt of the Iroquois, his children, is to over- 
throw it. The third belt, which is the largest of all, sig- 
nifies that the Iroquois wish their words to cross the sea 
and be carried to the Kings of France and England, 
especially to the King of France, to the end that he may 
himself speak in this matter and that he may give them, 
if possible, a general peace, not only among the Indians, 
but between all their kinsmen, and above all between the 
Kings of France and England ; and they beg for an answ r er 
as soon as possible. 

Fifty days have been assigned for their ambassadors; if 
they delay for sixty days, there will be much anxiety. 
The Iroquois asked me [Milet] to open the letter from the 
Minister at Albany [Dellius] to Father D'Ablon, but as it 
was sealed I said that this was forbidden, but that I could 
ask Father D'Ablon to let me learn the contents, which I 
would then impart to the Iroquois. French. Copy. '1pp. 

[Board of Trade. New York, 5. Xos. 48, 43 i.-vn. ; and 

(irilltoHt enclosures) 48. pp. 96-99.] 

830. List of five more enclosures belonging to the above letter, 
with a memorandum that they w'ere eaten by rats at Whitehall. 
J p. [Hoard of Trade. New York, 5. No. 44.] 

Jan. 22. 831. Governor Fletcher to the Earl of Nottingham. I have 
New York, written at such length to the Lords of Trade and to Mr. Blathwayt 
that I shall be brief. The French have debauched our Indians on 
the frontier, whereby Albany is exposed and must be lost unless 
strongly garrisoned. Our neighbours still look on, but give no as- 
sistance. New r Jersey alone has helped up beyond expectation ; Sir 
William Phips positively refuses ; Connecticut sets up for a free 
state and will own neither the laws nor the Crown of England. We 
are torn in pieces by these little governments who rail at arbitrary 
power, while they exert it to the height of Turkish tyranny I mean 
these little commonwealths, Ehode Island and Connecticut. I am 
gathering what forces I can to Albany and shall leave nothing un- 
done to prove my loyalty, tinned. Ben. Fletcher. Holograph. 
2 pp. Endorsed, R. Mar. 29, 1694. [America and West Indies. 
579. No. 39.] 

Jan. 22. 832. Order of the Privy Council. Referring the petition of 
Whitehall. Richard Raw 7 stone to Lords of Trade and Plantations for report. 
Signed. Rich. Colinge. \ p. Annexed, 

832. i. Petition of Richard Rawstone to the King in Council. I 
was Deputy Collector of the Eastern shore of Maryland 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 241 

1694. 

and as such seized two vessels which had made no entry ; 
but the ships were extorted from me and I was imprisoned 
and shamefully abused by means of Henry Darnall and 
Nicholas Seawell, two of the judges there. I beg that my 
case may be heard again by Governor Nicholson, and that 
I may have liberty to prosecute Darnall and Seawell. 
Copy. 1 p. TJie whole endorsed, Reed. 31 Jan. Read 
12 Feb. 93-4. [Board of Trade. Maryland, 2. Xus. 
103, 103 i.] 

Jan. 22. 833. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Ordering 
notice to be given in the Exchange that due consideration will be 
given to all proposals for importing Naval stores from North 
America. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. C., p. 329.] 

Jan. 22. 834. Lord Sydney to William Blathwayt. I find by the report 
of the Board of Ordnance that the request of the Commissioners 
for the Leeward Islands may be complied with, but that whenever 
the arms are delivered an estimate must be laid before Council and 
sent on to the Treasury, that monies may be assigned, as usual in 
such cases, tiiyned. Sydney. J p. Endorsed, Reed. 23 Jan. 
Read 12 Feb. 93-4. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 4. No. 34 ; 
and 44. p. 165.] 

Jan. 23. 835. Commission to Francis Nicholson to be Governor of 
Maryland. Note. This passed the Great Seal on 10 February, 
1693-4. [Board of Trade. Maryland, 8. pp. 131-149.] 

Jan. 23. 836. Minutes of Council of Barbados. Orders for sundry pay- 
ments. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XII. , pp. 441-444.] 

Jan. 25. 837. Memorial of John Taylor to Lords of Trade and Planta- 
tions. I sent a cargo of considerable value to New England, brought 
back 15 tons of rosin and samples of pitch and tar, and with much 
difficulty accomplished the building of one ship at Piscataqua. My 
agent informs me that the work is much interrupted by the Governor 
of Massachusetts and the Lieutenant-Governor of New Hampshire 
who try to impress my carpenters and force them to bear arms for 
days together ; also the guard of soldiers has been removed from 
Massachusetts. I beg therefore (1) for powers not inferior to any 
other in New Hampshire, with authority to appoint a deputy ; (2) 
that the King will grant his commission to some person to raise 60 
soldiers, to be paid by me and employed as workmen or soldiers as 
occasion may demand ; and, (3) that my ships and commodities may 
be exempted from paying tonnage or duty in New Hampshire,' that 
the commodities imported from New England may be admitted free, 
and double duty charged on the same commodities if brought from 
other countries, when once the industry is sufficiently established. 
If this be granted I shall be ready to supply the King's Navy with 
all the rosin that it wants next year, and to build another man-of- 
war as well. Signed. Jno. Tajdor. 2^ pp. Endorsed, Reed. 
25 Jan. Read 2' Feb. and 16 March, '93-4. [Board oj Trade. 
Plantations General, 2. No. 64.] 

[Jan. 25.] 838. Petition of Benjamin Jackson to the King in Council. On 
Friday last I attended in Council and combated Captain Richard 
Short's complaints against Sir William Phips, and proved several 

8060 Q 



242 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1694. 

things against Captain Short. But the charge against Sir William 
of embezzling the King's tenths of a prize that had been taken, was 
new to me, so that I was not prepared to meet it ; though I doubt 
not that if I had time to write to New England I could prove it false 
and scandalous. I have instructions from him to lay before the 
Admiralty an account of three prizes taken, which gives no appear- 
ance of any intention to embezzle. I beg that this matter may be 
examined by the Commissioners already appointed to enquire as to 
Mr. Brenton's charges. 2 pp. Endorsed, Presented in Council. 
25 Jan., 1693-4. [Board of Trade. New England, 7. No. 11 ; 
and 35. pp. 80-84.] 

Jan. 25. 839. Minutes of Council of New York. Order for Colonel Peter 
Schuyler's journal to be copied for England. Orders for certain 
payments, for the wall at the fort to be repaired, and for letters to 
be written for the Governor's signature to the County Justices, urging 
them to gather in the taxes. Order for payment of ,50 to Augus- 
tine Grassett as weigh-master. 

Jan. 26. Order for a patent for land to be issued to Thomas Hicks and 
Company. An ordinance of the Corporation to raise money for 
building and repairing fortifications confirmed. 

Jan. 27. An address from the principal inhabitants of Hartford and other 
documents from Connecticut read. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., 
pp. 496-498.] 

Jan. 27. 840. List of the ships riding at Point Comfort, and bound for 
England under convoy of the King's ships. 72 ships in all. 2 pp. 
Endorsed, Reed. 28 Mar., 94. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. A T o. 43.] 

Jan. 27. 841. Proposals made by Sir Matthew Dudley and others, on their 
petition for incorporation. 1. Immediately on obtaining our charter 
we purpose to send out from five to ten thousand pounds to New 
England to procure men and material for our intended copper 
works. 2. In the course of the next twelve months we shall also 
send out some 40,000, to purchase land for timber and naval 
stores, of which we will contract to deliver 50 to 100 tons each of 
pitch, tar and rosin within twenty months, double the quantity in the 
year following, and 600 to 1,000 tons in the third year. For masts, 
yards, etc., we engage to have three ships loading in twenty months, 
double the number in the following year and eight or ten ships the 
year after. In the fourth 3 r ear, with suitable encouragement, we hope 
to double all these quantities once more. 3. As soon as our copper 
works are brought to perfection we shall be ready to grant preemp- 
tion to the King, or to contract to deliver a certain quantity. 4. We 
hope that you will obtain for us encouragement by remitting 
customs on our stores, and by such other reasonable immunities 
as we may propose. Signed. Jno. Bullfinch, Clerk to the petitioners. 
Copy, li pp. 

Copy of the foregoing. 1 p. [Board of Trade. New England, 7. 
A T os. 12, 13 ; and 35, pp. 48-51.] 

Jan. 27. 842. Another copy of the preceding. Endorsed, Read. 
Feb. 2, 93-4. [Board of Trade. Plantations General, 2. No. 65.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



243 



1694. 

[Jan.] 843. Eeasons for granting to Sir Matthew Dudley's Company 

the right to erect a mint in New England to make small copper 
coin. The chief reason is that unless this power be given, the 
Company will be obliged to pay its workmen in commodities or 
produce, on which terms it will be extremely difficult to procure 
them. 1% pp. Endorsed, For my Lord President. [Board of 
Trade. New England, 7. No. 14.] 

[Jan. 27.] 844. Computation of the quantities, sorts, etc. of Naval stores 
to be supplied by the New England Company, with the prices. 1 p. 
Endorsed, Reed. 2 Feb., 1693-4. Read 16 March. [Board oj 
[Trade. Plantations General, 2. A 7 o. 66.] 



Jan. 29. 

Whitehall. 



Jan. 29. 

Whitehall. 



Jan. 80. 

Navy Office. 



Jan. 30. 



845. Order of the Privy Council. Referring the petition of 
the Colony of Connecticut to Lords of Trade and Plantations for 
report. Signed. Rich. Colinge. ^ p. Annexed, 

845. i. Petition of the inhabitants of Connecticut to the King. 
Our charter of 14 Car. II. granted us not only the civil 
administration but full power and control in respect of 
the militia. We have enjoyed all the privileges without 
molestation (excepting a little interruption in the latter 
end of King James's time) ; but now Governor Fletcher 
under your commission claims command not only of our 
quota contributed for the general defence (which we were 
always ready to grant and to send our quota when and 
wherever commanded by him) but of full lieutenancy over 
the militia ; and he has also by several artifices tried to 
insinuate himself into the civil government of the Colony. 
We beg that his Commission may be so restricted as to 
give us relief. Copy. I p. The irhole endorsed, Reed. 
30 Jan, Read 2 Feb., 1693-4. [Board of Trade. New 
York, 5. Nos. 45, 45 1., and 48,;;;;. 109-112.] 

846. Order of the Privy Council. Referring the petition of the 
Colony of Connecticut, presented by Major Winthrop, against 
Governor Fletcher to Lords of Trade and Plantations for report. 
[Board of Trade. New York, 48. p. 112.] 

847. Commissioners of the Navy to Richard Colinge. We send 
an account on the other side of the present rates of Naval stores 
from the East Country, as well as the rates of the same before the 
war. We cannot wait on the Lords of Trade at the appointed time, 
as we must be present at the launch of H.M.S. Queen. Signed. 
R. Haddock, and by six otlters. 1 p. Over page, 

Table of comparative prices of naval stores before the war and in 
1693. Masts are cheaper as a rule in 1693, deals up to three inches 
in thickness rather dearer, deals of 4 inches thickness and upwards 
have risen 50 per cent. Pitch has also risen 50 per cent., hemp 
about 30 per cent, and tar nearly 100 per cent. 1 p. [Board oj 
Trade. Plantations General, 2. No. 67; and Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. C., pp. 330-331.] 

848. Another copy of the table of prices of Naval stores, given 
in last abstract, with the rates at which Mr. Sly and Sir Stephen 
Evans offer to furnish the same, the former in Maryland, the latter 



'244 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1694. 

in England. The quotations for timber are in general 25 per cent. 
below current present. The prices given under the head of 
" Maryland " are generally speaking one-third of those given under 
the head of " England." Large sheet. [Board of Trade. Planta- 
tions General, 2. No. 68.] 

[Jan. 30.] 849. Another comparative table of the prices of Naval stores, 
as paid by the Navy and as proposed by the New England Company. 
It is noted that the New England Company does not specify whether 
the prices are those of Old England or New England. Large 
sheet. [Board of Trade. Plantations General, 2. No. 69.] 

Jan. 31. 850. Secretary of the Admiralty to William Blathwayt. 
Forwarding copy of a report of the Commissioners of the Navy as to 
the prices of Naval stores quoted by Governor Fletcher. Signed . 
J. Sotherne. % p. Annexed, 

850. i. Extract of a Minute by the Navy Board, 23 January, 
1693-4. The prices quoted by Governor Fletcher are 
higher than ours. He gives hemp at 1 17s. 4d. 
per cict. ; we pay 1 2s. 6d. to 1 Is. Gd. ; he gives tar at 
12 per last, whereas our usual price was 11 12s. Gd. ; 
though we have been accidentally obliged to give as much 
as 13. Copy. 1 p. The. icliole endorsed, Reed. 31 Jan. 
Read 2 Feb. 93-4. [Board of Trade. Plantations 
General, 2. Nos. 70, 70 i. ; and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. C., 
pp. 327-328.] 

Jan. 31. 851. William Blathwayt to the Agents for Massachusetts. 
Desiring them to attend the Lords of Trade on the 2nd February, 
when the proposals of Sir Humphrey Edwyn and others for bringing 
Naval stores from New England will be considered. Draft. % p. 
[Board of Trade. Plantations General, 2. No. 71.] 

Jan. 852. The case of the Executors of the late Sir John Witham 

against Sir Richard Button, for the affirmation of a judgment given 
against Sir Richard in the Exchequer Chamber. Printed sheet. 1 p. 
Endorsed, In the House of Lords. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. 

No. 45.] 

Feb. 1. 853. Minutes of Council and Assembly of Montserrat. Order 
for the seizure or destruction of corrupted indigo, in pursuance of 
an Act to prevent adulteration thereof. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 
XLVlII.,p. 326.] 

Feb. 1. 854. Minutes of Council of New York. Letter from Colonel Henry 
Beeckman read, reporting a design of the French to attack Kingston 
and march thence against Albany, also that he had stopped 50 men 
who were on march to Albany and acquainted Major Ingoldsby 
thereof. The Council thought the report very unlikely, but urged 
that the detachments of the militia should be kept in readiness. 
The Council addressed the Governor to go to review the militia in 
King's and Queen's Counties and give them something to drink 
their Majesties' health. Patent for land granted to Peter Billian. 

Feb. 2. Letter from Governor Hamilton read, reporting the presence of 

the enemy among the Minissuck Indians. Order for a detachment 
to be sent thither. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 499, 500.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



245 



1694. 
Feb. 1. 

Whitehall. 



Feb. 2. 



855. Order of the King in Council. For payment of 50 to 
Captain Cyprian Southwick, for the buying of a gold chain as a 
mark of the King's favour in consideration of his services in several 
expeditions against the French from New England. [Board of 
Trade. New England, 35. p. 115.] 

856. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Petition of 
the Governor and Company of Connecticut read (see No. 845 i.) 
and referred to the Attorney and Solicitor General. 

Further hearing of the complaints against Sir W. Phips, when 
decision was taken. 

The Attorney General's report on the Act concerning John Kirton 
read, which it was agreed to recommend in Council. 

Agreed to represent to the King the danger from the number of 
Quakers in North America, and the little help that they contribute 
towards defence. 

The draft Charters of the Pennsylvania!! and New Jersey Com- 
panies read, and the former approved. 

Proposals of sundry gentlemen as to import of Naval stores read. 
Sir Matthew Dudley's was referred to the Attorney General, that of 
Sir Stephen Evans to the Admiralty. 

The report of the Admiralty on ships for the defence of the Lee- 
ward Islands read. Agreed to lay the whole matter before the King. 
[Board of Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 259-265.] 



Feb. 2. 857. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. To recom- 

Whitehall. mend that the Attorney General prepare a clause, such as he 

has suggested, in the Act concerning John Kirton, after which it 

may be confirmed. (See No. 742.) [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIII., 

pp. 443, 444.] 

Feb. 2. 858. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. On consider- 
ing the report of the Admiralty as to the ships that can be sent out 
to Barbados and the Leeward Islands, and the further request of 
the Agents of the Leeward Islands for ships, the Lords agree to lay 
the whole matter before the King for his pleasure. [Board of 
Trade. Leeward Islands, 44. pp. 160-161 ; and Barbados, 44. 
pp. 51-52.] 

Feb. 2. 859. Memorial of Commissioners for the Leeward Islands to 
Lords of Trade and Plantations. Being summoned by the Admiralty 
to say what number of ships we desired to be allotted to the Lee- 
ward Islands, we returned the answer enclosed, asking for six. We 
are since informed that the Lords of the Admiralty have allotted six 
ships for Barbados and the Leeward Islands jointly. We would 
point out the necessity of six ships for the Leeward Islands alone, 
and beg that they may be despatched thither straight, without going 
' out of their way to Barbados as they have hitherto done, with great 
prejudice to the service and great loss to our merchants and traders. 
We beg also that the ships allotted to the Leeward Islands may be 
ordered to remain therein and not depart from thence without 
Governor Codrington's orders, as many of the ships detailed for 



246 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1694. 

that service have spent great part of their time in going up to 
Barbados and lying in the 'road there, tiiyned. Bastian Bayer, 
Jeff. Jeffreys, Rd. Gary, Joseph Martyn. 1 p. Annexed, 
859. i. Commissioners for the Leeward Islands to Lords of the 
Admiralty. We beg that six ships may be sent to the 
Leeward Islands, one of them to be of about 16 guns and 
a good sailer to keep French small privateers at a distance ; 
and we beg that they may be sent at once to prevent the 
mischief that must come from the French being masters at 
sea. We would also represent the mischief of the ships 
designed for the Leeward Islands going first to Barbados. 
It is 100 leagues out of the way, and many men have been 
lost there, insomuch that of the 420 sent out to recruit the 
regiment in the Leeward Islands all but 195 died or were 
lost in Barbados. We beg therefore that the commander 
of these ships be strictly ordered to attend the service of 
the Leeward Islands. Copy. 1 p. The icholc endorsed, 
Reed. 2 Feb., 1698-4. Read same day. \_Boanl of 
Trade. Leeward Islands, 4. Nos. 35, 35 1. ; and (enclosure 
only) 44. pp. 159, 16.] 

Feb. 2. 860. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Having 
considered the complaints made against the Quakers of 
Pennsylvania by Governor Fletcher and a letter from Mr. Penn 
bidding his people protest against Governor Fletcher's Commission 
for the Government of Pennsylvania, the Lords agree to lay the 
whole matter before the King. [Hoard of Trade. New York, 48. 
p. 88.] 

[Feb.] 861. John Povey to the Attorney and Solicitor General. 

Ordering them to consider the charters of Connecticut, Rhode 
Island and the Jerseys, with a view 7 to uniting those Colonies with 
New York under one Commander-in-Chief, commissioned by Their 
Majesties, for defence of the frontier. [Board of Trade. New 
York, 48. p. 88.] 

Feb. 2. 862. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Recommending 

Whitehall, that Sir William Phips be summoned home by first ship to answer the 
charges against him ; that free liberty be given to all concerned 
to collect authenticated copies of records and depositions, wherein 
Sir William shall not intermeddle except in respect of such proofs 
as he may himself require ; and that a letter be written to the 
Lieutenant-Governor accordingly. Draft. 1^ pp. [Board of 
Trade. New England, 7. No. 15 ; and 35. -pp. 93, 94.] 

Feb. 2. 863. William Blathwayt to the Attorney-General. Forwarding 

copy of the proposals of Sir Matthew Dudley's Company of 27 January, 
with directions to report if they encroach 011 the charters of the 
New England Colonies, and to prepare a clause to prevent stock- 
jobbing. [Board of Trade. New England, 35. pp. 47, 48 ; and 
Col Entry Bk., Vol. C., pp. 332-333.] 

[Feb. 2.] 864. Memorial of Governor Samuel Allen and Sir Stephen 
Evans to Lords of Trade and Plantations. We and several others 
have formed an association to carry on the making of tar, pitch 



AMEEICA AND WEST INDIES. 



247 



1694. 



Feb. 2. 



Feb. 3. 

Whitehall. 



Feb. 5. 



Feb. 8. 



Feb. 8. 

Whitehall. 



Feb. 8. 

Whitehall. 



Feb. 9. 



Feb. 10. 



and rosin and provide all sorts of Naval stores in New Hampshire. 
We have raised stock sufficient for all purposes and have engaged 
skilled persons from Sweden. Samuel Allen is preparing to go to 
New Hampshire with more men, and we propose that the King 
shall have the refusal of all the said Naval stores. 1 p. Endorsed. 
Read 2 Feb. 93-4. [Board oj Trade. Plantations General, 2. A 7 o. 
72.] 

865. William Blathwayt to the Secretary of the Admiralty. 
Forwarding the various proposals for importation of Naval stores 
from North America for the report of the Lords of the Admiralty. 
[Col. Entry BL, Vol. C., p. 332,.] 

866. William Blathwayt to the Attorney and Solicitor General. 
Referring the petition of the Colony of Connecticut to them for their 
report, in conjunction with the question previously referred to them 
of uniting the Colonies for defence. [Board of Trade. New 
York, 48. p. 113.] 

867. Minutes of Council of New York. Another letter from 
Colonel Beeckman that the people were flying into Kingston from 
all parts. The Council still disbelieved in the probability of danger 
there. The Governor said that it was high time to have 500 men 
ready to march at short notice, and expressed his sense of the hard- 
ships of marching men away fro'm their families on every uncertain 
report, though himself ready at a moment's notice. The Council 
approved his suggestion to call out the nearest troops of horse for 
service. [Col Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., p. 500.] 

868. Minutes of Council of New York. Committee appointed 
to examine the accounts of the Governor's journey to Pennsylvania. 
[Col. Entry BL, Vol. LXXV., pp. 500-501.] 

869. Order of the King in Council. For the Attorney- General 
to prepare a clause for insertion into the Act concerning John 
Kirton, after which the Act will be confirmed. (See No. 742.) 
Signed. John Nicholas. ^ p. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. 
A T o. 46; and Col. Entry BL, Vol. VIII., p. ' 444.] 

870. Order of the King in Council. That one fourth-rate ship, 
two fifth-rates and one sixth-rate be forthwith equipped and sent to 
the West Indies, and that the Admiralty give directions as to their 
disposition and appoint a commander-in-chief in order to their join- 
ing when necessary for mutual defence. [Board of Trade. Leeward 
Islands, 44. pp. 161, 162 ; and Barbados, 44. pp. 52, 53.] 

871. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Captain Philip Dawes, of 
H.M.S. Falcon, was brought before the Council for misconduct and 
encouragement of his men to mutinous behaviour, and after 
examination was suspended from his command. Order for payments 
on account of gunpowder. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. 
pp. 267-269.] 

872. Minutes of Council of Nevis. Letter from the Governor 
read to the following effect. I have received your address protesting 
against the withdrawal of Captain Holt's company. I have as 



248 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1694. 

much regard for Nevis as for any of the Islands, hut having 
intelligence of French designs against Montserrat, owing to their 
dependence on a rising of the Irish, I have thought it my duty to 
do as I have done. As to Antigua, it contains many more landing 
places than Nevis which require to he guarded. Had I intelligence 
of an intended attack on Nevis I should not only not withdraw 
troops from it, but should go there myself to defend it. My 
intention is to take care of all the Islands ; all have been at equal 
expense for their defence ; and you may be sure that I shall neither 
neglect you nor suffer my commands to be disobeyed. I pitched 
upon Captain Holt's company as the fittest to be under the eye of a 
field officer. (Letter end*.) Warrant for the Lieutenant-Governor and 
Council of Nevis to sit as a Court of Admiralty to condemn certain 
prizes. [Co/. Entry Bk., Vol XLVIIL, pp. 285, 286.] 

Feb. 10. 873. Arent Schuyler to Governor Fletcher. I submit the 
following journal of my journey to the Minnesink Country. Feb. 3. 
Left New York and reached Bergenstown in East New Jersey, where 
I hired two men and a guide. Feb. 4. Travelled about ten miles be- 
yond Hackinsack to an Indian place called Peckwes. Feb. 5. 
Travelled about thirty two miles north by west. Snowy and rainy 
weather. Feb. 6. Travelled to within a half a day's journey of the 
Minnesink. Feb. 1. About 11 a.m. arrived at the Minnesink, where 
I enquired of the Sachems and others whether the French or their 
Indians had sent for them or had been in the Minnesink Country. 
They say that neither one nor the other had been there, and pro- 
mised to inform you at once if the French should happen to come. 
They told me further that six days ago three Christians and two 
Shawanees had passed by on their way to Albany from the Shawa- 
iiee Country to fetch powder for Arnout Vielle and his Company ; 
and that Arnout and 700 Shawanees were expected to arrive with 
furs about June. They said also that they feared that one of their 
hunting parties had been cut off by the Senecas, and desired that the 
Senecas might have order not to molest them. I left the Minnesinks 
that same afternoon and arrived in New York on the 10th. Signed. 
Arent Schuyler. 2 pp. [Board of Trade. New York, 5. No. 46.] 

Feb. 12. 874. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Letter from 
the Ordnance of 22 January read. The Lords agreed to lay the 
whole matter of arms for tlie Leeward Islands before the King. 

Petition of Richard Rawstone, complaining of false imprisonment, 
was referred to Governor Nicholson, to deal with on his arrival in 
Maryland. [Board of Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 266-268.] 

Feb. 12. 875. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Agreed to lay 
Lord Sydney's letter of 22 January, as to stores for the Leeward 
Islands, before the King. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 44. 
p. 166.] 

Feb. 12. 876. Lieutenant-Governor Sir William Beeston to Lords of 
Jamaica. Trade and Plantations. Just before the departure of the fleet in 
November, I dissolved the Assembly. I sent the Mordaunt to con- 
voy the fleet beyond danger, but on the night when she left it she 
ran ashore, through the obstinacy of her pilot, and was cast away. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 249 

1694. 

Her Captain, who is a very honest man and good officer, went home 
in the fleet and about forty of his men were left ashore at 
Cuba, whither I have sent a vessel to bring them away, and shall 
put them on board an advice-boat sent by Sir F. Wheler. The 
Spaniards at St. Domingo make no preparations to join us against 
the French but send me word that they cannot proceed till they 
have received men and orders from the Viceroy of Mexico. They 
have sent me a packet addressed to him, desiring me to send it on 
to him and a gentleman with it who can concert matters ; but this 
is too foreign and too tedious to undertake. I would have under- 
1 taken it without them, but apart from the loss of the Mordaunt, I can- 
not raise 500 men for the expedition, and should they be battled 
and cut off it would leave us exposed to the insults not only 
of the French but of our blacks, who are twenty to one white 
and know their strength so well that they might be encouraged 
to reduce Jamaica to another Guinea. I have therefore 
resolved to stand on the defensive till we are stronger. The 
French on the night of the 12th of December landed about 170 men 
unobserved, seized three look-out men who were asleep, secured all 
the passes and great guns, so that no alarm could be given nor 
message sent for help, and then plundered the whole parish, taking 
' off 370 negroes, all the money that they could find and all 
the goods that they liked. They got clear off with their 
booty, though they had landed at a place but seven leagues from. 
Port Royal. As soon as I had notice of it I sent the Advice 
and Falcon after them ; but the Advice was not manned, and the 
Falcon made such hauls and delays that they got clear away. The 
Captain of the Falcon has had so many complaints against him, 
that by the Council's advice I suspended him from his command. 
I have written fully to Lord Nottingham and to the Admiralty and 
enclosed depositions on the neglect. Mr. Fulke Rose was gone to 
England when the warrant for his appointment arrived. I 
recommend that Captain Brodrick, the Attorney General, be 
admitted to the Council. I have added one large bastion to Fort 
Charles and design to add another if I can, which when finished 
will bring the strength of the fort to forty guns, "being very 
regular, beautiful and serviceable." But Ave are still so short of 
men that the seamen in the Island's sloops of war though victualled, 
paid forty shillings a month and allowed all prizes without 
defalcation, mutinied and would serve no longer. The reason is that 
men can get seventy to eighty shillings a month from trading 
vessels. I went myself to Port Royal to remonstrate with them, 
but they only grew the more obstinate and insolent, so I ordered 
guards on all the boats to prevent them from getting off, caused the 
drums to beat and brought the regiment to arms, and then sending 
for Captain Harman of the Advice pressed fifty of them and put 
them aboard him. This was all that could be found, the rest being- 
hid by their wives and friends. But though the Advice has thus 
some help to her manning, the sloops lie still. Signed. 
Wm. Beeston. 1J pp. Endorsed, Reed. 13 June. Read 14 Aug. 
1694. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. No. 28 ; and 53. 
pp. 185-188.] 



250 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1694. 

[Feb. 12.] 



Feb. 13. 



Feb. 14. 



Feb. 15. 



Feb. 15. 

Whitehall. 



Feb. 15. 



Feb. 15. 

Whitehall. 



Feb. 15. 



Feb. 15. 

Whitehall. 



Feb. 15. 



877. Proposals offered by Gerard Slye of Maryland for supply- 
ing Naval stores at Wiccocommoco. 1 p. Endorsed, Reed. 12 Feb. 
1693-4. [Board of Trade. Plantations General, 2. No. 73.] 

878. Minutes of Council of Maryland. Jolm Courts, who was 
sworn on the 8th, now took his seat. Letters from the Governor of 
New York read, reporting that ^362 of Governor Copley's bills had 
been protested, and asking what further assistance might be ex- 
pected this May. 

Resolved to send an express to Sir E. Andros for his orders as to 
New York, and another express to New York to explain. Mr. George 
Plater, collector for Patuxent district, representing that several 
Navigation bonds are in his custody for which he has no certificates, 
it was ordered that notice be given that twelve months will be 
allowed for procuring certificates, during which time the bonds will 
not be put in suit. Order for displacing Philip Clark, put in as 
Collector by Edward Randolph. 

Order appointing William Taylard to be Registrar, and Nicholas 
Greenberry to be judge in Chancery. Order for no ships to be 
cleared for Europe without giving security to join the fleet in Vir- 
ginia. [Hoard of Trade. Maryland, 13. pp. 7-10 ; and 12. pp. 
.42-63.] 

879. The King to Governor Sir William Phips. Summoning him 
home to answer the charges of Jahleel Brenton and Captain Short, 
and the additional charge of having condemned the prize St. Jacob 
without reserving the King's share. The rest is in the terms of the 
report of 2 Feb. (see No. 862). Countersigned. J. Trenchard. 
Draft. 4 pp. [Board of Trade. New England, 7. No. 16 ; and 
35. pp. 95-99.] 

880. The King to the Lieutenant-Governor of Massachusetts. 
Recounting the reasons for the recall of Sir William Phips to take 
his trial, and giving directions, according to the report of 2 February, 
for the collection of evidence. He will administer the Government 
during Sir William's absence. Draft. 3J 2W- [Board of Trade. 
New England, 7. A'o. 17 ; and 35. "pp. 100-105.] 

881. The King to the Governor of New York. Ordering him to 
encourage people to contribute freely for the rebuilding of the 
chapel in the fort at New York. [Board of Trade. New York, 48. 
p. 89.] 

882. The Attorney General to the King. Submitting a clause 
for insertion into the Act concerning John Kirton, as directed. 
Sifined. Edw.'Ward. ^ p. Endorsed, Read in Council, 15 Feb. 
'93. Barbados, 5. No. 47; and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VIII., p. 445.] 

883. Order of the King in Council. For Lord Sydney, Master- 
General of the Ordnance, to make an estimate of the stores desired 
by the Agents for the Leeward Islands. [Board of Trade. Leeward 
Islands, 44. p. 167.] 

884. Reasons offered against quartering soldiers on free quarter 
in Barbados, notwithstanding the Act of the Island for that purpose. 
(1) When the Act was passed, the people were apprehensive of a 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 251 

1694. 

negro rising as well as of foreign invasion ; also (2) they were in a 
better condition to bear the expense, having since expended 
30,000 on the expedition to Martinique, for which they were 
warned to be ready in October 1692, whereas the ships did not 
arrive till February 1(593. (3) The Island is further disabled by 
great losses during the two past years, by the capture of their ships 
by the French, and by excessive rates of freight. (4) Free quarter 
was given to the troops under Sir F. Wheler, and became almost 
insupportable after no more than a month. For these reasons as 
well as in consideration of the impoverishment and sacrifices of the 
people, it is hoped that the King will not expect free quarter for the 
regiment, but will send it to Barbados to be paid and quartered like 
all other forces on the English establishment. 2 pp. Endorsed, 
15 Feb. 93-4, Read 27 Feb. 93-4. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. 
No. 48.] 

Feb. 15. 885. Minutes of Council of New York. Order for payment of 
40 towards the expenses of the Governor's journey to review the 
militia. Accounts of the Governor's journey to Pennsylvannia 
approved. Orders for sundry payments. The Council refused to 
recognise the licence brought by the Rev. John Miller from the 
Bishop of London to act as Chaplain in New York, as entitling him 
to induction with the living. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., 
pp. 501, 502.] 

Feb. 17. 886. Lieutenant- Governor Sir William Beeston to Sir John 

Jamaica. Trenchard. A ship has come in from England, but with no letters 

from Whitehall. I have heard however that you have succeeded Lord 

Nottingham as Secretary of State, and I beg your good offices 

for this Island. [America and West Indies. 540. No. 37.] 

Feb. 19. 887. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Few members present. 
Order for a full Council on the 27th. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 
77. p. 270.] 

Feb. 20. 888. Minutes of Council of Barbados. Orders for sundry 
payments. The Assembly reported that having barely made a 
house they were entering on no business except the choice of a 
Committee to arrange for Colonel Russell's reception. [Col. Entry 
Bk., Vol. XII., pp. 444-447.] 

Feb. 20. 889. Journal of Assembly of Barbados. Abel Alleyne elected 
Speaker. Joint Committee appointed to arrange for Colonel Russell's 
reception. Two members lined for non-attendance. Adjourned to 
2 March. [Co/. Entry Bk., Vol. XIV., p. 363.] 

Feb. 20. 890. William Blathwayt to the Secretary of the Admiralty. 
Forwarding copies of Messrs. Bernon's and Slye's memorials as to 
supply of Naval stores from North America, for the consideration of 
the Admiralty. [Col. Entrt/ Bk., Vol. C., p. 333.] 

Feb. 21. 891. William Blathwayt to Sir Stephen Evans and Mr. Slye. 
Directing them to attend the meeting of the Committee of Trade and 
Plantations on the 26th inst. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. C., p. 334.] 



252 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1694. 

Feb. 22. 

Treasury 
Chniiihers. 



[Feb.] 



Feb. 22. 



Feb. 22. 

Whitehall. 



892. Secretary to the Treasury to William Blathwayt. For- 
warding report of the Commissioners of Customs on the Barbados 
Act for limiting freight. Signed. Hen. Guy. \ p. Endorsed, 
Reed. 22 Feb. Read 5 March, 93-4. Annexed, 

892. i. Commissioners of Customs to Lords of the Treasury. 
10 February 1693-4. We have considered the Act of Bar- 
bados submitted to us, and heard the merchants, some 
of whom tell us that they are directed by their correspon- 
dents at Barbados to take up freight at whatever rate. On 
the whole we think that the Act would prove very pre- 
judicial to the trade of Barbados, especially during this 
time of war, and would discourage shipping from coming 
from the neighbouring Colonies, which not only supplies 
them with provisions, but carries off large quantities of 
the produce for England. Signed. G. Boothe, Jo. 
Werden, Robert Southwell, J. Warde. 1 p. Endorsed as 
the covering letter. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. Nos. 
49, 49 i. ; 'and 44. pp. 64-66.] 

893. Reasons for annulling the Barbados Act for the limitation 
of freight. (1) It is unprecedented. (2) Losses from war have been 
so great that if freight in sugars be not in some measure answerable, 
men will not send their ships to Barbados. (3) Had not the 
merchants engaged to pay more than the limited price not a ship 
would have left London for Barbados this season ; from which (4) it 
is clearly a discouragement to trade, and would prevent the supplying 
of the Island with provisions. (5) It seems to trench 011 the freedom 
of English property by limiting the price of that which is to be 
paid outside their jurisdiction, since the Act says " notwithstanding 
any contracts made in England." (6) Disallowance of the Act will 
encourage trade and increase the King's customs. 1 p. [Board of 
Trade. Barbados, 5. No. 50.] 

894. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor reported 
that he had inspected the militia of King's and Queen's Counties 
and found them very cheerful. Commissioners appointed to consider 
Governor Hamilton's letter as to laying down the boundary between 
New York and New Jersey. [Co/. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., 
pp. 502, 503.] 

895. Order of the King in Council. Referring the petition of 
Lord Baltimore to Lords of Trade and Plantations for report. 
John Nicholas. Signed. } p. Annexed, 

895. i. Petition of Lord Baltimore to the King. An act was 
passed in Maryland in 1692, enacting that all lands sur- 
veyed before 10 July, 1689, shall be held by the persons 
for whom they were surveyed without being obliged to 
take patents and grants from me; and that where 
warrants only were granted and the land not surveyed for 
the last five years, the persons to whom such warrants 
were granted may proceed to survey and enjoy the land, 
as if patent had been granted by me. I beg for disallow- 
ance of this Act, which will utterly put an end to my 
property in the province, and for orders to preserve my 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 258 

1694. 

right to grant surve} 7 s and patents. Copy. 1 p. The 

whole endorsed, Reed. 24 Feb. '93-'94. [Board of Trade. 

Maryland, 2. Nos. 104, 104 i. ; and 8. pp. 172-174.] 

Feb. 22. 896. Copy of the above Order in Council, without enclosure. 
[Hoard of Trade. Maryland, 2. A T o. 105.] 

Feb. 22. 897. The Attorney General to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 

I am of opinion that the proposals of Sir Matthew Dudley and 

Company do not interfere with the charters of Massachusetts, 

Connecticut and Rhode Island ; and I enclose draft of a clause to 

prevent members of the proposed corporation from selling any 

share or interest in the joint stock for three years after the date 

of the Charter. Signed . Edw. Ward. p. Annexed, 

897. i. Draft of a clause to above effect. 1 p. The whole 

endorsed, Reed. 27 Feb. 1693-4. [Board of Trade. New 

England, 7. Nos. 18, 18 1.; and 35. pp. 51-55.] 

Feb. 24. 898. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Petition of 
Lord Baltimore read (see No. 895 i.) and referred to the Attorney and 
Solicitor General. 

Petition of the owners of the ship Joseph read and referred 
to the Treasury. [Board of Trade. Journal, 7. p. 268.] 

Feb. 24. 899. John Povey to the Attorney and Solicitor General. 
Forwarding copy of Lord Baltimore's petition for their report. 
[Board of Trade. Maryland, 8. pp. 174-175.] 

Feb. 26. 900. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. That notice 
be sent to the merchants and planters of Barbados to attend the 
meeting of the Committee on 27th inst., 011 the business of the 
regiment of foot that is to be sent to Barbados. Draft. 1 p. 
[Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. A T o. 51.] 

Feb. 27. 901. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. The Council being 
consulted as to the expediency of calling an assembly, in view of a 
sudden alteration in the government, decided against it. The Rev. 
Samuel Cook made a recantation of certain writings published by 
him. Several accounts passed. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. 
pp. 270, 271.] 

Feb. 27. 902. Minutes of Council of New York. Letters from the 
Council of Maryland read, as to the dishonouring of their bill for 
^360. Committees appointed to draw up an answer and to make a 
draught of the new battery. [Col. Entry BL\, Vol. LXXV., p. 503.] 

Feb. 27. 903. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Reports of 
the Treasury as to sending a regiment to Barbados, and of- the 
Commissioners of Customs as to the freight Act, were read, and 
copies of them given to the Agents. [Board of Trade. Journal, 7. 
p. 269.] 

Feb. 27. 904. Secretary of the Treasury to William Blathwayt. As 
regards the regiment for Barbados, the King is willing to ease the 
Island of giving it free quarters, if the Island will bear the charge of 



254 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1694. 



Feb. 28. 

Whitehall. 



Feb. 28. 



Feb. 28. 



[Feb.] 



[Feb.] 



[Feb. ?] 



March 1. 

Whitehall. 



transporting it and the recruits. Signed. Hen. Guy. 1 p. 
Endorsed, Reed. 27 Feb. and 5 March, 1693-4. [Board of Trade. 
Barbados, 5. Xo. 52 ; and 44. p. 54.] 

905. William Blathwayt to Henry Guy. Forwarding all the 
papers concerning the hire of ships in Jamaica for attack on the 
French in 1691, with reference to Sir John Fleet's petition. Draft. 
\ p. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. No. 29.] 

906. John Povey to the Agents for Barbados. Forwarding 
copy of Mr. Guy's letter of 27 February, and directing them to 
attend the Lords of Trade and Plantations, on the 2nd March. 
Draft. p. \_Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. No. 53.] 

907. John Povey to the Agents for Barbados. Forwarding 
copy of the report of the Commissioners of Customs on the 
Barbados Act for limiting freight, and " summoning them to be 
present at the meeting of the Committee of Plantations on 2 March. 
Draft. J p. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. No. 54.] 

908. State of the case of the Charter desired by Sir Matthew 
Dudley and Company. A summary of the transactions up to the 
Attorney General's report of 22 February. 1 p. [Board of Trade. 
New England, 7. No. 19 ; and 35. pp. 57, 58.] 

909. A second state of the case of Sir Matthew Dudley's 
Company, carried one stage further ; and with a request that the 
charter may be passed. 1 p. [Board of Trade. New England, 7. 

No. 20.] 

910. Sir John Evelyn to Lord Godolphin. Asking for the 
appointment of Mr. Parks to the Council of Virginia. Signed. 
J. Evelyn. Scrap. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. No. 44.] 

911. Order of the King in Council. Granting the petition of 
Isaac -Richier, and referring it to Lords of Trade and Plantations 
to take care everything may be done in order thereto. Signed. 
William Blathwayt. % p. Enclosed, 

911. i. Petition of Isaac Richier to the King. Governor Goddard on 
arriving at Bermuda in August last demanded of me 
1,000 as half the profits of the Government since he 
received his Commission, and on my demurring seized all 
my cellar and goods, arrested me and kept me in close con- 
finement for a time, and though he has now released me 
on parole, threatens further persecution unless I pay the 
money. I offered him to give security to answer this or 
any other matter in England, which he at first agreed to 
accept but afterwards refused, and seized all goods of mine 
that he could lay hands on. I beg that my property may 
be restored on my giving security to answer any action in 
England, and that evidence may be allowed to be collected 
for my defence. Copy. 1^ pp. The whole endorsed, 
Reed. 5 March, 1693-4. [Board of Trade. Bermuda, 2. 
Nos. 18, 18 1. ; and 28. pp. 98-101.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



255 



1694. 
March 1. 

March 1. 

March 2. 
March 8. 



March 2. 



March 2. 



March 2. 



March 2. 



912. Copy of the preceding order. J p. [Board of Trade. 
Bermuda, 2. No. 19.] 

913. Minutes of General Assembly of New York. The Repre- 
sentatives not being come, the Assembly adjourned till to-morrow. 

The Representatives were sworn. 

Henry Pierson chosen Speaker and approved. 

The Governor recommended consideration of the reinforcement 
of Albany and the frontiers from 1 May next ; of the regular pay- 
ment of the troops weekly or fortnightly ; of securing the Indians, 
who are staggering, by presents or otherwise ; of the continued 
expense of the war ; and of repair to the fortifications. [Col. Entry 
Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 674-670.] 

914. Minutes of Council of Barbados. The Governor at the 
Assembly's request consented to leave three or four rooms at 
Fontabelle furnished, against Colonel Russell's arrival. The 
Assembly brought up an Act for presenting the Governor with .500. 
Orders for sundry payments. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XII., pp. 
447-449.] 

915. Journal of Assembly of Barbados. On the report of the 
Committee for the new Governor's reception, it was agreed to ask 
the Governor to leave Fontabelle and leave some of his rooms 
furnished for Colonel Russell, which he consented to do. Address 
passed to present the Governor with 500 ; also addresses for 
payment of the clerks' and marshals' salaries, and for payment 
of 50 to buy fresh provisions for Colonel Russell's reception. 
Adjourned to 20th. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XIV., pp. 364, 365.] 

916. The Agents for Barbados to Lords of Trade and Planta- 
tions. The King has promised to ease the Island of free quarter 
for the regiment to be stationed there, provided it will bear the cost 
of transportation. We have no authority to undertake this expense 
nor fund to discharge it ; and we can therefore only renew our 
importunity that men may be sent out as soon as possible, while 
for quartering them the people must cast themselves on the King's 
goodness and mercy. Unsigned. 1 }>. Endorsed, Read 5 Mar. 
'93-4. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. No. 55.] 

917. The Same to the Same. We have read the copy of the 
reasons for annulling the Barbados Act for limiting freight, and 
the report of the Commissioners of Customs thereon. We have 
received 110 intimation of the reasons why it was passed, though we 
are well informed that it was due to combination of the masters of 
ships to take no goods on board under twelve shillings per hundred- 
weight ; and we doubt not that if the Council and Assembly had 
supposed that there would have been application for disallowance 
of the Act, they would have transmitted their reasons for having 
made it. We therefore beg that the Act may not be annulled on 
the petition of the merchants, but that copies of the reasons against 
the Act and of the report of the Commissioners of Customs may be 
sent to the Governor, with orders to repeal the Act if it be found 
inconvenient, and if not to send the reasons for passing it. 
Signed. Edw. Littleton ; Wm. Bridges. 3 pp. Endorsed, Reed. 
5 March, 1694. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. No. 56.] 



256 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1694. 
March 2. 



March 2. 



March 2. 



March 2. 



March 4. 



March 5. 



March 5. 



March 5. 



March 5. 



918. Copy of an Act of Barbados to present Governor Kendall 
with 500. 1 p. Endorsed, Reed. 15 May, '94. Read same day. 
[Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. Xo. 57.] 

919. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. The 
Companies formed to trade to Pennsylvania and New Jersey 
attended, and were told to propose clauses to prevent stock jobbing. 

Agreed to recommend the appointment of Henry Hartwell 
and James Blair to the Council of Virginia. [Board of Trade. 
Journal, 7. -p. 270.] 

920. Memorandum. Recommending the confirmation of Colonel 
Hartwell and the appointment of Mr. Blair to the Council of 
Virginia. Scrap. Endorsed, Presented by the Bishop of London. 
[Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. Xo. 45.] 

921. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Recom- 
mending the appointment of Henry Hartwell and James Blair to 
the Council of Virginia. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 36. p. 251.] 

922. Commissioners for Victualling to William Blathwayt. We 
beg for a letter to the officer at Barbados to take no custom for the 
rum and sugar delivered to the King's ships in the West Indies. 
The proportion is three quarters of a pint of rum and a quarter of a 
pound of sugar per day to every man. Extract. ^ p. [Board of 
Trade. Barbados, 5. .Vo. 58.]' 

923. Minutes of Council and Assembly of Montserrat. Joint 
Committee appointed for audit of the Treasurer's accounts. A 
gunner appointed to Kingsale Fort. [Co/. Entry 7^/r., Vol. 
XLVIIL, p. 326.] 

924. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. The Agents 
of Barbados made their proposals as to the sending of a regiment 
to that Island, which it was resolved to lay before the King. 

Governor Nicholson's instructions approved, and his passage to 
be provided for. It w r as ordered that all Governors should be sworn 
before the Council, and their despatches not delivered to them until 
they are sworn. 

Governor Richier's petition (see Xo. 911 1.) read. Agreed that his 
appeal be admitted and the usual orders given as to collection of 
evidence. 

Sir William Beeston's letter of 19 October read (see Xo. 635), 
and Colonel Rose from Jamaica was heard, after which decision 
was taken. [Board of Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 271-276.] 

925. Memorandum. Colonel Nicholson asks for orders for 
transportation of himself and family to Maryland ; also that 
Mr. Randolph may be appointed to the Council. Draft. p. 
[Board of Trade. Maryland, 2. No. 106 ; and 8. p. 175.] 

926. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Agreed to 
recommend that Colonel Nicholson and his household be given 
passage to Maryland on one of the King's frigates ; also that the 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



257 



1094. 

Governors be ordered to be sworn in Council to observe the Acts of 
Trade, as lias been usual. Memo. The King gave orders 
accordingly. [Board of Trade. Maryland, 8. p. 176.] 

[March.] 927. Memorandum of Colonel Nicholson. Proposing that an 
Act of oblivion be sent to Maryland for all offences done before 
Governor Copley's arrival, i. [Board of Trade. Maryland. 2. 
No. 107.] 

March 5. 928. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. To lay 
before the King the correspondence with the Agents as to the 
despatch of a regiment to Barbados, with their proposals that 300 
of the 500 men required be drafted out of the old regiments and 
sail immediately, while the residue be raised and sent out by next 
opportunity. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 44. p. 61.] 

March 5. 929. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. To advise 
the suspension of the Barbados Act for limiting freight, till further 
order. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 44. p. 69.] 

March 5. 930. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Agreed to 
lay before the King Sir W. Beeston's letter of 19 October and Mr. 
Fulke Eose's memorial, and to recommend the despatch of three 
frigates to Jamaica, one of them immediately ; also to recommend 
that impressment of seamen be forbidden in Jamaica without the 
Governor's leave, and that Colonel Edward Stan ton be appointed to 
the Council. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 53. pp. 184-185.] 

[March 5.] 931. Representation of Fulke Rose. Jamaica has lost most of 
her seamen owing (1) to the discouragement given them in Lord 
Inchiquin's time, when their share in prizes was withheld ; (2) to 
the earthquake and the subsequent sickness ; (3) to the pressing 
of seamen born in the country for the King's ships, while many 
men who could better be spared are cleared for a piece of money. 
Many men have fled to Providence or Curacoa, and some grown 
desperate have joined the French. We beg that no men may be 
pressed by the King's Captains without the Governor's leave ; and 
that all men-of-war coming from England to Jamaica may bring 
with them supernumerary men. 

The French force at St. Kitts, which was sent down to Petit 
Guavos, has greatly strengthened that settlement. They have a 
man-of-war of forty-four guns, and many privateers which have 
ruined the remoter settlements of Jamaica, taken away ships and 
goods and carried off negroes to the value of 30,000. Nothing 
can stop this but a fourth-rate and a fifth-rate frigate, good sailers. 
Of the fleet of fourteen ships that last sailed from Jamaica two are 
in England, one in Wales and three in Ireland. Of the rest the 
French have got two, one foundered at sea, two were wrecked 
on the British Isles, and of three we have no news. Such mis- 
fortunes have attended the fleet ever since the war began. To 
remedy them we recommend that the ships sail from England by 
the last day of December and return twelve 'weeks after their 
arrival at Jamaica, by which means they will have a summer voyage 
and fair weather. pp. Endorsed, Read. 5 Mar. 1693-4. 
[Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7- No. 30 ; and 53. pp. 180-182.] 

8060 R 



258 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1694. 

March 5. 



March 5. 



March 5. 

Whitehall. 



March 6. 

March 6. 

March 7. 
March 8. 

March 9. 



March 8. 

Whitehall. 



March 8. 

Whitehall. 



March 8. 

Whitehall. 



March 8. 



932. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. For the 
merchants and planters of Barbados to be summoned to the meeting, 
on the business of the Acts for limiting freights, and for free- 
quartering of soldiers, and of the sending of a regiment to Barbados. 
Draft. | p. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. No. 59.] 

933. John Povey to the Agents for Barbados. Summoning 
them to attend the meeting of the Committee of Plantations the 
same evening. Draft. \ p. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. 
No. 60.] 



934. John Povey to the Attorney General. 
William Penn's patent for Pennsylvania. 
West Indies. 599. No. 10.] 



Forwarding copy of 
J ]). [America and 



Order for a patent for 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 



March 8. 



' 935. Minutes of Council of New York, 
land to be granted to Jacques Guyon. 
LXXV., p. 510.] 

936. Minutes of General Assembly of New York. The opinion 
of the law-officers as to a disputed election sent down to the Repre- 
sentatives. 

The Representatives brought up a bill concerning pilotage, which 
was redrafted and returned. 

The Representatives asked to see the Collector's accounts. 
Order was given to the Collector to shew his books to such members 
as might be appointed to view them. 

The Pilotage bill passed by the Representatives and returned. 
It was then passed. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 676-679.] 

937. Order of the King in Council. That a fourth-rate frigate 
be forthwith sent to Jamaica ; that impressment of seamen in 
Jamaica be forbidden without the Governor's leave ; and that 
supernumerary seamen be sent out in the frigate aforesaid. [Board 
of Trade. Jamaica, 53. p. 183.] 

938. Order of the King in Council. That the stores desired by 
the Agents for the Leeward Islands be provided and despatched by 
the Board of Ordnance. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 44. 
pp. 167, 168.] 

939. Instructions to Francis Nicholson as Governor of Mary- 
land. Lord Baltimore is still to receive half of the two shillings 
per hogshead duty. [Board of Trade. Maryland, 8. pp. 150-171.] 

940. J. Bulfinch to Lords of Trade and Plantations. At a meet- 
ing of all the subscribers to Sir Matthew Dudley's Company it was 
resolved to accept the clause against stock- jobbing. It was desired 
that an addition may be made enabling those who can make it appear 
that their losses compel them to sell their stock, to do so on obtaining 
permission from the Governor or Deputy-Governor, and three 
Assistants. ^ p. Endorsed, Reed. 12 March, 1693-4. [Board oj 
Trade. New England, 7. A T o. 21 ; and 35. p. 56.] 

941. Minutes of Council of New York. Orders for sundry 
payments. Samuel Bayard and Arent Schuyler refused the patent 
for the land which they desire, it having been already bought for the 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



259 



1G94. 

King's service. The Governor reported that in case of alarm 
during his absence he had directed 1,500 militia to encamp at New 
York, with three troops of horse, Colonels A. Depeyster, Thomas 
Willett and Caleb Heathcote to command the foot, and Colonel van 
Cortlandt the horse. 

March 9. Committee appointed to consider the running of the boundary 
line between New Jersey and New York. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 
LXXV.,i>)>. 510, 511.] 

March 12. 942. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantation. The parties 
concerned in the importation of Naval stores were again heard. 

Dr. Payne's petition for the office of Registrar in Maryland read 
and dismissed. 

Extract from a letter of Governor Fletcher to William Blathwayt 
of 5 October read (sec No. 604). \_]$oard of Trade. Journal, 7. 
pp. 'ill, 278.] 

March 12. 943. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. On considera- 
tion of Governor Fletcher's letter of 5 October, (No. 604,) agreed to 
recommend that the King order a pardon for the six persons con- 
demned as accomplices of Leisler, to be passed free of charge under 
the Great Seal. Ordered accordingly on the 15th March. [Board 
of Track. New York, 48. pp. 91, 92.] 

March 12. 944. Petition of William Payne, D.D., to the King. For grant 
of the place of Commissary of Probates, etc. in Maryland, in con- 
sideration of the orphan children of his murdered brother, John 
Payne. Inscribed, Reed. 12 March. Nothing. [Board of Trade. 
Maryland, 2. No. 108.] 

March 12. 945. Report of the Lords of the Admiralty. We have examined 
the memorial of Mr. John Taylor as to the supply of Naval stores, 
for which he has already had a contract since 1691. He has already 
imported five loadings of timber, and in the last ships a parcel of 
rosin which proves good and useful. He has built one ship in 
America and is about building another. He has been of good 
service, and in our opinion deserves encouragement. Signed. 
Falkland, J. Lowther, H. Priestman, R. Rich. 1 p. Endorsed, 
Reed, and read 16 March, 1693-4. [Board of Trade. Plantations 
General, 2. No. 74 ; and Col Entry Bk., Vol. C., pp. 334-385.] 

March 12. 946. Report of the Lords of the Admiralty. We have considered 
the proposals of Sir Stephen Evans and Mr. Allen, and think that 
they should have fitting encouragement without exclusion of others 
from the like trade, and that the King should have the refusal of 
all goods. Sinned. Falkland, J. Lowther, H. Priestman, R. Rich. 
1 p. Endorsed, Reed, and read 16 March, 1693-4. [Board of 
Trade. Plantations General, 2. No. 75 ; and Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. C., p. 336.] 

March 12. 947. Report of Lords of the Admiralty. We have read the 
proposals of Sir Matthew Dudley and others and think that they 
should receive all fitting encouragement. We see no objection to 
their being incorporated, but not to the exclusion of others from the 
like trade ; and the King should have the refusal of all Naval stores. 



260 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1694. 

Signed. J. Lowther, H. Priestman, II. Rich. 1 p. Endorsed, 
Reed. 12 March. Read 16 March, 1693-4. [Board of Trade. 
Plantations General, 2. No. 76; and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. C. r 
p. 337.] 

March 12, 948. Copy of the foregoing. Endorsed, Read 22 July, 1696. 
{Board of Trade. New England, 7. No. 22.] 

March 13. 949. Minutes of Council of New York. Order for payment of 
a quarter's salary to Chidley Brooke, and for refitting Albany Fort 
with stockades. {Col Entri/ BL:, Vol. LXXV., pp. 511, 512.] 

March 14. 950. Governor Codrington to Governor Kendall. I am sorry 
Antigua. to lose so good a neighbour, but since it is your own desire I am sure 
England will be more to your satisfaction. Blenac sent me some 
prisoners a few days ago under flag of truce, from whom I learn 
that the French expect no more than four ships; but a few days 
past nine ships passed to windward of Barbuda and stood to south- 
ward, which made me doubt they might be from Petit Guavos. 
This made me send a flag of truce to Martinique to ascertain their 
strength, and I shall let you know if I hear anything worth your 
knowledge. Copy. 1 p. Endorsed, Reed. 5 July, 1694. [Board 
of Trade. Barbados, 5. No. 61.] 

March 14. 951. Lord Sydney to the King. Forwarding estimate of the 
stores required for the Leeward Islands. Total estimated cost, 517. 
{Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 44. pp. 168, 169.] 

March 15. 952. Minutes of Council of New York. Orders for sundry pay- 
ments. Resolved that John Reaux's services be accepted on board 
the man-of war, provided that Captain Evans take care that he shall 
not escape. Patent for land granted to John Ward. [Col. Entry 
Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 512-513.] 

March 15. 953. Minutes of General Assembly of New York. Bill against 
unlawful laws received from the Representatives, and read twice. 
{Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., p. 680.] 

March 15. 954. Lords of Trade and Plantations to the Governor of 

Whitehall. Barbados. Directing the insertion of a clause in the Act concerning 

John Kirton. Signed. Somers, C. Carmarthen, P. Pembroke, 

C.P.S., Shrewsbury, Bridgewater, H. Goodricke. Draft. 1^ pp. 

[Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. No. 62.] 

March 15. 955. Lords of Trade and Plantations to Governor Goddard. 
Ordering him to release Isaac Richier, restore him his goods and 
allow him to return to England, on his giving security to answer 
all actions against him and to prosecute his appeal before the Privy 
Council against all the accusations against him ; also that he be 
given full facility to collect evidence on his behalf. Signed. 
Carmarthen, P. ; J. Somers, C. ; Pembroke, C.P.S. ; J. Bridgewater, 
Shrewsbury, H. Goodrick, W. Bridgeman. Copy. 1 J pp. [Board 
of Trade. Bermuda, 2. No. 20 ; and 28. pp. 101-103.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



261 



1694. 

March 16. 956. Agents for Governor Christopher Codrington to Lords 
of Trade and Plantations. Asking for a copy of Stephen Duport's 
petition that they may present their remarks thereon. 1 p. 
Inscribed, Reed. 16 March, 1693-4. [Board of Trade. Leeward 
Islands, 4. No. 36.] 

March 16. 957. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Draft of a 
letter to the Lieutenant-Governor and Council of Bermuda, con- 
cerning Mr. Richier's petition, read and approved, also draft of a 
letter to the Governor of Barbados concerning John Kirton. 

Sir Edmund Andros's letter of 23 October read (see No. 637), also 
an extract of a letter from him asking leave to be absent from his 
Government for two months in the year, which it was agreed to 
recommend. 

The parties concerned in the importation of Naval stores were 
again called in, and the business further considered. 

The Agents for Barbados were desired to bring their proposals for 
raising men for that Island, in writing. []>oard of Trade. 
Journal, 7. j>p. 279-281.] 

March 16. 958. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. To recom- 
mend that permission be given to Sir Edmund Andros to leave 
Virginia for any of the neighbouring Colonies for two months in 
the year. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 36. p. 248.] 

March 16. 959. Order for summoning Sir H. Ashurst, Sir William 
Warren, Sir Stephen Evans, Colonel Francis Nicholson, Mr. John 
Taylor, Mr. Gilbert Heathcot, Mr. Samuel Allen, Mr. Paggen, 
Colonel Dudley, Mr. Gerard Slye, and Mr. Gabriel Bernon to attend 
the Committee of Trade and Plantations on the subject of Naval 
stores. | p. [Board of Trade. Plantations General, 2. No. 77.] 

[Mar. 16.] 960. Proposals of Gabriel Bernon, merchant of Boston. That 
the Naval stores sent by him- to John Taylor may be tested, for 
he will undertake to send as many more as may be needed. 
He has no wish but to serve the Government if the King will 
encourage him. Sinned. Gabriel Bernon. 1 p. Endorsed, 
Reed. 23 Feb. Read 12 and 16 March, 1693-4. [Board of Trade. 
Plantations General, 2. No. 78.] 

[Mar. 16.] 961. Memorandum of Gabriel Bernon. The encouragement 
for which he asks is an order from Their Majesties to manufacture 
rosin and other Naval storesin all places where he may think fit, 
without molestation, saving always the rights of others. French. 
\ p. [Board of Trade. Plantations General, 2. No. 79.] 

March 16. 962. William Blathwayt to John Taylor, Sir Stephen Evans, 
Samuel Allen and Gerard Slye. Forwarding a list of Naval stores, 
with a column to be rilled with the prices at which they are ready 
to supply the said stores in America and England. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. C\, pp. 338-339.] 

March 17. 963. Minutes of Council and Assembly of Montserrat. The 
Assembly, being asked by the Council to provide for the quartering 
of the King's soldiers, prayed that the old billets should be 



262 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1694. 

withdrawn and new billets issued by an Act for that purpose, and 
that a house might be hired in Kingsale for sick soldiers. [Col. 
Entry Ilk., Vol. XLVIIL, p. 327.] 

March 18. 964. Memorial of the Agents for Barbados to Lords of Trade 
and Plantations. The King having granted that 500 men shall be 
raised and transported to Barbados, and as such of the men as are 
and can be raised in time may be shipped on board the merchant- 
ships now bound thither, we beg you to procure us an order for the 
men to be victualled by the Victualling Commissioners. We hear 
the H.M.S. Hampshire, which was ordered to convoy the fleet to 
Barbados and the Leeward Islands, has now been ordered to sail 
directly to Jamaica. We beg that she may wait a fortnight to join 
the Bristol for convoy to the said fleet, after which she may proceed 
to Jamaica with little delay. If the King will order that the fleets 
to the Islands and to Virginia, which will all be ready to sail in 
twenty days at latest, shall sail together, their convoy will be the 
stronger to oppose any enemy until they separate ; it would be 
well also if single ships were forbidden to slip away without con- 
voy, as several bound for Barbados have lately done. 2 pp. 
Endorsed, Directed, 18 March, at Kensington. [Board of Trade. 
Barbados, 5. No. 63 ; and 44. pp. 62-63.] 

March 19. 965. Minutes of Council of New York. Committee appointed 
to enquire as to the arrears of taxes. The Governor announced that 
lie must shortly go to Pennsylvania, and suggested commissionating 
certain gentlemen to take charge of military affairs in his 
absence, which was approved. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXX1 T ., 
p. 513.] 

March 19. 966. Minutes of General Assembly of New York. Message 
from the Governor to the Representatives, asking them to expedite 
their subsidy for the forces at Albany, to provide a fund for paying 
them up to the 1st of May, and to lay all business but that of the 
frontiers aside for the present. 

March 20. Bill against unlawful laws read a third time and passed. The 
Governor signified that the Representatives had voted 120 men for 
Albany, and that he could not ' undertake to defend the post with 
that number. The Council agreed that the number was too small, 
and a message was sent to the House to that effect, and asking how 
it was proposed to dispose of the '2,400 voted by them. Bill for 
settling establishments rejected. The Representatives attending, 
the Governor pressed them to provide more men for Albany, as no 
dependence could be placed in the help of neighbouring Colonies. 

March 21. Message to the Representatives, setting the least number for the 
frontier at 200 men, including the 30 from New Jersey, and that 
more money was required than had been voted for the Indians and 
other purposes. 

March 22. The Representatives refusing to provide more men for Albany, 
the Governor asked the Council if they knew of any reason for 
weakening the garrison ; to which they replied that it was a time 
rather for strengthening than weakening it. The Governor sum- 
moned the Representatives and made them a speech, rebuking them 
for their obstinacy and showing the folly of their letting their house 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



263 



1691. 

be destroyed because their neighbours would not help to quench 
the fire. He asked them for money for presents for the Indians on 
his approaching visit to Albany, and begged them to get to despatch 
of business. 

March 23. The Representatives sent up a bill for the City and County of 
Albany, which was passed with one amendment. 

March 24. On the news of the intrigues of the Indians with the French, a 
message was sent to the Representatives to apprise them thereof, 
and that the Governor was starting forthwith for Albany and thence 
for Pennsylvania, and that at least 600 would be wanted for the 
Expedition. Bill for raising 170 men received from the Represen- 
tatives, amended and passed. Conference appointed to consider the 
charge of the Governor's journey to Albany. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 
LXXV., pp. 680-690.] 

March 20. 967. John Taylor to John Povey. I have received a list of 
Naval stores, with blank columns for me to fill up the prices at 
which I would undertake to furnish them. I have not heard that 
hemp grows in New England, but I know that hemp and cordage 
are the best commodities that I can send thither. As to tar, the 
gentlemen of New England engaged to furnish it at 4s. or 5s. a 
barrel, but their barrel is of six to eight gallons, whereas the 
Swedish barrel is of thirty to thirty-two gallons, which is sold in 
Finland at half a dollar. Ships' masters tell me that a gallon of 
Swedish tar is worth two of New England. I send pitch and tar 
to New England for my own use. New England plank is not 
esteemed here, being generally worm-eaten and bad. Deals and 
masts may doubtless be had in any quantity in New England. 
Now as to prices in New England and England, the first is 
not my business ; and to speak as to the second I must be 
assured that the commodities are to be obtained in New England, 
and of fit quality ; I must know what price they will stand me in 
before they are shipped and when they will be ready for shipping. 
Hemp, tar and pitch can hardly be called products of New England 
yet. Masts and timber are more certain, but even for them some 
time must be allowed, for masts must be hauled out of the woods 
when the snow is on the ground. I always allow a year for getting 
them out of the woods and preparing them for shipping. I hope 
therefore that I may be pardoned for not making rates, much less 
undertaking the delivery of the stores. I was bred to the trade of 
importing Naval stores, and think I know more about it than the 
gentlemen who expect a charter on the merit of importing them 
from New England. I do not pretend to love my country so much 
better than myself as to encourage a trade which would be to my 
prejudice ; but the supply of stores would not be so, but merely 
a transferring of my trade. I would gladly see this Kingdom 
independent of Sweden and Denmark, but I must speak as a 
merchant who judges his trade only by the measure of profit ; and 
then arises the difficulty how w r e shall bring bulky goqds from a 
very remote part as cheaply as from countries near us. I cannot 
solve the difficulty because (1) The commodities are more plentiful 
in Sweden and Denmark than in New England. (2) Labour costs 
but one sixth of the price. (3) One voyage to New England costs 



264 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1691. 

as much as four or five to the Baltic, and the difference would be 
still greater if the Swede and Dane lowered their duties. True, 
building of ships in New England may abate the difference some- 
what, but this is done in the other countries also, and much cheaper 
than in New England. I take the King's chief end in having Naval 
stores from New England was to be supplied from thence in case of 
necessity, with more regard to getting it than to the price ; and this 
may be done by encouraging the manufacture of pitch and tar. 
New Hampshire has the best facilities for transportation. Wooden 
ware is a question only of the time needed to convert it. Hemp 
could be better furnished from Ireland. Signed. Jno. Taylor. 3J pp. 
Endorsed, Reed. 21 March, 1693-4. [Board of Trade. Planta- 
tions General, 2. No. 80.] 

March 968. Minutes of Council of Barbados. Orders for sundry 

20-21. payments. Bill for raising a levy committed for amendment. 
Order passed for payment of ,100 to the Committee for receiving 
Colonel Russell. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XII., pp. 449, 450.] 

March 969. Journal of Assembly of Barbados. Bill for a levy on 

20-21. negroes passed, and sent to the Council, which returned it for 

amendment. Adjourned to 17 April. [Col. Entni l>k., Vol. XIV., 

pp. 365, 366.] 

March 20. 970. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for an Assembly to 
meet on 7th May. Sundry accounts passed. Order for all who 
have claims against the revenue to bring them in. 

March 21. Adjourned till to-morrow. 

March 22. The Governor reporting that an intercepted letter from Mr. 
Stapleton implicated Colonel Edward Stanton, it was ordered that 
Colonel Stanton be arrested and his papers seized. Order for an 
embargo on all shipping in Port Royal. [Board of Trade. 
Jamaica, 77. pp. 271-273.] 

March 21. 971. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Mr. Taylor's 
reply as to Naval stores read. 

Petitions of Sir E. Andros and Mr. Usher read (Sec Xo. 973). 
Agreed that a letter be sent to Massachusetts ordering their 
accounts to be examined and payment to be made. 

The Barbados Agents attended, and were heard as to the Barbados 
freight Act. Agreed to recommend that it be disallowed. [Board of 
Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 281-283.] 



March 21. 972. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. To move the 
King in Council to disallow the Barbados Act for limiting the price 
of freight. [Board- of Trade. Barbados, 44. p. 69.] 

March 21. 973. Petition of Sir Edmund Andros to Lords of Trade and 
Plantations. When I left New England several sums of money were 
due to me for the public service ; and my petition and accounts were 
referred to the Governor and Council of Massachusetts. A Com- 
mittee was appointed to examine them, but I have not been able to 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



265 



1694. 



obtain any payment. I beg that orders may be given to bring my 
accounts to a final determination. 1 p. Endorsed, Reed. 21 March, 
1693-4. Attached, 
973. i. Letter from Dirck Wessels to Sir E. Andros. New York, 

5 May, 1(591. Enclosing the accounts for his last journey 

to Quebec, and entreating 

obtain for him payment. 

England, 7. Xos. 23, 23 1. ; and (without enclosure) 35. 

pp. 105-107.] 



Sir Edmund's good offices to 
p. [Board of Trade, New 



March 21. 974. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. On the peti- 
tions of Sir Edmund Andros and Mr. John Usher it was agreed to 
move that a letter be written to the Governor of Massachusetts, 
instructing him to examine their accounts and pay what is justly 
due to them out of the public revenue. [Board of Trade. New 
England, 35. pp. 110, 111.] 

March 21. 975. Proposals of Samuel Allen and Company, stating the 
price at which they will furnish Naval stores. 1 p. Endorsed, 
21 March, '93-4. Bead same day. [Board of Trad". Plantations 
General, 2. No. 81.] 

March 21. 976. Gerard Slye to John Povey. I return the price list of 
Naval stores with the column for Maryland filled up. Pitch, tar 
and deal plank can be better supplied by New England than by 
Virginia and Maryland, though the reverse is true of masts and 
bowsprits. The land will produce the best of hemp, and there is 
oak enough, if the charge of exporting it be not too great. It would 
save half the charge if the men-of-war were built out there. Signed. 
Gerard Slye. ^ p. Endorsed, Reed. 21 March, '93-4. Annexed, 
976. i. Price list of Naval stores and timber in Maryland. 1 p. 

Endorsed, Reed. 21 March, 1693-4. [Board of Trade. 

Plantations General, 2. Xos. 82, 82 1.] 

March 21. 977. Minutes of Council of New York. Patent for land granted 

to Colonel Thomas Willett. 
March 22. Order for discharge of Nathaniel Cole, junior, on his penitence 

and submission. 
March 23. Patents for lands granted to William and Apollonia Welsh and 

to Hendrick Cornelius Bogard. 
March 24. Order for payments. Committee appointed to consider as to goods 

suitable for presents to the Indians. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., 

pp. 513-515.] 

March 22. 978. Order of the King in Council. Repealing the Barbados 
Whitehall. Act for limiting the price of freight. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 44. 
pp. 70-72.] 

March 22. 979. Order of the King in Council. Granting leave to Sir 

Whitehall. Edmund Andros to leave Virginia and go to any of the neighbouring 

Colonies for two months in the year for the benefit of his health, 

provided that the state of his Government permits it. [Board of 

Trade. Virginia, 36. p. 249.] 



266 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1694. 
March 26. 



March 26. 



March 26. 



March 26. 



[March.] 



980. Journal of Lords of Trade arid Plantations. The 
proposals of Sir Henry Ashurst and Sir Stephen Evans as to 
importation of Naval stores read, and decision taken. The letters 
in favour of Sir E. Andros and Mr. Usher were signed. 

A new decision taken as to John Kirton's Act in Barbados. 
[Board of Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 284-286.] 

981. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. To move the 
King to assent to the Barbados Act concerning John Kirton, 
without insertion of the clause formerly proposed to save the 
rights of the Crown. [Board oj Trade. Barbados, 44. pp. 72, 73.] 

982. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. On the 
question of providing Naval stores from New England, it was 
agreed to recommend that the proposal of Sir Henry Ashurst and 
Sir Stephen Evans be accepted, viz., to bring a ship-load of Naval 
stores and knee timber to the port of London within one year, with 
a certified account from the Governor and Assembly stating what 
quantity they will be prepared to send over yearly that the 
Treasury be instructed to reimburse them the first-cost interest and 
insurance charges, and that the Governor of Massachusetts be 
instructed to give all possible assistance in the undertaking. 
[Board of Trade. New England, 35. pp. 58-60 ; and Col. Entry 
Bk., Vol. 'C'., pp. 340-342.] 

983. Sir Henry Ashurst and Sir Stephen Evans to Lords of 
Trade and Plantations. The ruin of Massachusetts will inevit- 
ably follow if an}' persons in England receive a patent enabling 
them to engross the mines and trade of New England. We under- 
take within a year to bring over a ship-load of all the Naval stores 
there with an account under the hand of the Governor and Assembly 
of the quantity that they will send over yearly, if the quality be 
approved. We shall constantly undertake the service of the Crown 
in the matter of these stores, and having no interest of our own 
therein, we propose that on our producing a bill of our first cost, 
interest, charges and insurance of the said goods, the same may be 
repaid to us by the Treasury, and that if the goods be approved the 
King shall grant us what he thinks fit for our pains and hazard. 
1 p. Endorsed, Reed. 26 Mar. '94. [Board of Trade. Plantations 
General, 2. No. 83-] 

984. Reasons why Sir Matthew 7 Dudley and others should not be 
delayed in obtaining their patent. The matter has been in agitation 
six years and has been thoroughly examined in various quarters. 
The scheme was contrived in New England before it was set on foot 
here, and several gentlemen of the Government are privy to it 
and subscribers. Sir William Phips and Mr. Usher and others 
have seen and read our proposals and heads of a charter, which the 
Attorney General has reported not to encroach on the Charter of 
Massachusetts ; so that it cannot be said that people out there were 
ignorant of the design. Sir Henry Ashurst made the same request 
nine months since, in which time he might easily have sent copies 
of our proposals to Massachusetts and obtained an answer, so that 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



267 



March 26. 

Barbados. 



1691. 

his object is evidently only delay. The Treasury have pronounced 
our patent not to he prejudicial to the Royal revenue. 1| pp. 
Undated. [Board of Trade. Plantations General, 2. No. 84.] 

March 26. 985. Lords of Trade and Plantations to Governor Sir William 
Phips. Ordering him that the accounts of Sir Edmund Andros be 
examined and that the amount justly due to him be paid, or that, 
if this order be not complied with, the fact shall be reported and 
reasons given. 

Similar letter in favour of John Usher. [Board of Trade. New 
England, 35. pp. 111-114.] 

986. Edward Cranfield to the Duke of Shrewsbury. News has 
arrived that several ships of the fleet that sailed on 30 August last 
are missing, and it is feared that they have been lost in the storm, 
which they met in latitude 84. I have already written to you 
that at the first meeting of the Assembly they presented the Governor 
with 2,000, and that every thing had then the appearance of 
a peaceful settlement ; but in meetings since they have trifled away 
their time without raising money for the payment of the Island's 
debts due to artisans and poor labouring men, or for putting the 
Island into a state of defence. All good motions have been 
rendered ineffectual by some few turbulent-spirited men. Doubtless 
the Governor will have given you details, and has asked for two 
sixth-rate frigates, instead of one fourth-rate, and that in future all 
ships from England may sail soon enough to return before winter, 
so as to avoid hurricanes, storms and privateers. Planed. Edw. 
Cranfield. Endorsed, R. 29 May, 1694. [America and West 
Indies. 456. Xo. 54.] 

March 26. 987. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for pressing a 
ship for the King's service, the Council undertaking to indemnify 
the owner in case of her loss. Two members appointed to examine 
and report on Colonel Stanton's papers. [Board of Trade. 
Jamaica, 77. pp. 273, 274.] 

March 26. 988. Minutes of Council of New York. Orders for sundry 
payments. The widows of Leisler and Milborne were referred to 
their legal remedy for recovery of their goods. [Col. Entn/ Bk., 
Vol. LXXV., pp.515, 516.] 

March 26. 989. Minutes of General Assembly of New York. Bill for the 
continuation of the additional duty read thrice with an amendment, 
and passed. The Bills for 170 men and concerning Albany were also 
formally passed. The Governor summoned the Representatives 
and made them a speech as to the Bills just passed, regretting much 
that they had reduced the pay of the soldiers at Albany from one 
shilling to eightpence, but thanking them for other enactments. 
lie then adjourned them to 25th September. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. LXXV., pp. 690-693.] 

March 28. 990. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor took leave 
on his departure for Albany, and reported that he had given the 
detachments orders to be in readiness. Additional patents for land 
granted to Thomas Hicks and Hendrick Cornelius Bogard. Orders 
for payments. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 516-517.] 



268 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1694. 

March 28. 991. Governor Fletcher to Lords of Trade and Plantations. 
New York. The Five Nations are now so weary of the war and have been so far 
prevailed on by the presents and power of the French in Canada 
that it is impossible to engage them to turn their arms that way. 
The enclosed papers will show you what steps the Indians have 
already made towards a peace. I have been at great pains and 
charge to divert them hitherto and am now going to meet them at 
Albany. Those of greatest experience in this country believe that 
we must give way to their humour of making peace with Canada, 
including the safety of this province provided neither French nor 
Indians make incursions on us nor come on this side of the lake ; but 
I doubt they cannot be neutral. Nothing has more discouraged the 
heathen than the weakness of our forces. The neglect of our neigh- 
bours has left the whole war to a small handful of people in this 
province who, being the first line of battle, must defend themselves, 
while their neighbours sit at ease. Our Assembly was lately sitting, 
and in hope of speedy relief ordered subsidy for 170 men for one 
year from the 1st of May next. I hardly know where to find the 
men or money without the ruin of a great many families. Most of 
our youth are returned into neighbouring Colonies to avoid payment 
and service, and except thirty men from New Jersey we are likely to 
have little assistance from them. Here the complaints ayainst the 
neighbouring Colonies are repeated an in letter of 22 January and in 
former letters. In the time of Leisler's rule Connecticut assisted 
him at Albany with 100 men and maintenance, but since the arrival 
of Governor Sloughter with the King's Commission she has not sent 
a man nor a farthing, though much nearer to our frontier than Long 
Island (now called Nassau Island) which forms over two-thirds of 
this Government. Pray remember my requests for relief and 
defence of this province, and especially the pay of the two 
companies of Grenadiers, tinned. Ben. Fletcher. %pp. Endorsed, 
Reed. 13 June. Read 18 June, 1694. Annexed, 
991. i. Information of Johannes Luykasse. Abstracted above. 

No 829. iv, 1 p. Endorsed, Reed. 13 June, '94. 
991. n. Minutes of the meeting of the Five Nations at Onandaga, 
by the Jesuit Milet. Abstracted abore. No. 829. vn. 
Translation. 1J pp. Same endorsement. 

991. in. Information of Joseph, a Christian Mohawk who was 
sent messenger to Oneida, on his return to Albany, 
2 December, 1693. I delivered my message to the 
Sachems of Oneida and told them they were to meet at 
Albany, as agreed this summer, and that the messenger 
from Canada with the French letters was to be sent there 
too. They replied that they knew of no letters from the 
Governor of Canada, but only of a belt of wampum which 
was sent to Onandaga at the meeting of the Five Nations. 
I had some discourse with the messenger from Canada 
who said that as soon as he reached Montreal he 
was met by a number of officers, who asked him where 
were the 800 men of the Five Nations that were to fall 
on them, since there was a report that he had come to 
betray the French, and that he would no sooner return 
than a great party would come to destroy the French. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 269 

1694. 

He was then at once sent down to Quebec, where he 
delivered his belt of wampum to the Governor ( and told 
him that the Five Nations had decided not to hearken to 
any peace, and that if the Governor were minded to 
discourse of it he must do so at Albany. The Governor 
was very wrath and turned his back upon the belt, 
refusing to receive it, but after consulting with the 
Jesuits who had formerly been among the Five Nations 
he took up the belt, and signified his pleasure by send- 
ing another belt repeating his demands, viz. that two of each 
Nation should come to Quebec, acknowledge their error and 
beg "peace, when he would receive them again as children 
and further send to the children of the Five Nations, who 
are strangely deluded by the Governor of New York, which 
Governor has assumed a new and strange name never 
used by former Governors. "Will you (ran the message) 
wage war with the French, who have supplies daily from 
France ? If you are killed where have you any recruits to 
supply your place ? You are made to believe that we have 
war with you, but we have not begun yet. Now I will 
hang over the great kettle of war and show that I am 
an enemy to the English ; for they of Boston have been 
here to visit me and promise to come again, but I see none 
of them and therefore I must go and visit them this 
winter." Great preparations were making by the French 
for some design, by their own account against Boston, 
but more probably against Albany. Copy. 2 pp. Endorsed, 
Reed. 13 June, 1694. 

991. iv. Peter Schuyler to Governor Fletcher. Albany, 4 Decem- 
ber, 1698. As soon as the Indian messenger from Canada 
arrived I sent for him and for the letters, and desired that 
two of the principal Sachems should come with him to 
hear their contents. They say there are no letters, but 
Joseph tells me that he believes the Sachems will come. 
Pray tell me what should be said to them if they do come, 
or what answer shall be sent to them if they do not, for I 
find that the Indians in general are inclined to peace with 
the French. I have sent the messenger back to Onandaga 
with seven bands of wampum for the Sachems, desiring 
them to come down, reminding them of their promise to 
meet here and no where else, and telling them not to 
let themselves be deluded by the French. We have an 
answer to the belt sent by you to the Onandagas. The 
four Sachems send you four beaver skins with their 
thanks, and they say they will corne with presents in the 
spring to treat with you. They say they have peace with 
New England but that some of their Castles are still at 
war, and that four of the Sachems were gone to treat with 
the English. The Jesuit who was among them is gone 
home to Canada, for as soon as the Indians got rum at 
Pemaquid they became abusive to him and he was forced 
to retreat. The French labour hard for a peace with our 



270 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1694. 

Indians : I wish they may not gain their point to our 
prejudice. Coj>i/. I p. Endorsed, Reed. 13 June, 1694. 

991. v. Journal of Major Peter Schuyler's intended journey to 
the Five Nations, begun 4 January, 1698-4. Having waited 
fourteen days for the Sachems to eome to Albany as they 
had promised, I set out for Oneida with Major Wessells 
and an interpreter on the 4th of January and arrived that 
night at Senectady. Jan. 5. Left Senectady and cam,e 
to the Maquas' Castle of Tionondoroge. Jan. 6. Went 
on to the last Castle of the Maquas where we met the 
Sachems and young Indians convened, who received us 
kindly, making a Ions speech. They said, We are discom- 
fited. We thought it was understood that no messages 
from the Governor of Canada should be received except at 
Albany, but now we heard that the messenger from Canada 
is again come to Oneida, and that the French Governor 
insists for Commissioners to be sent to him from the 
Five Nations to speak of peace. We doubt not that they 
are sent by the Four Nations, and we are much troubled 
that your journey will be hindered by the deep snow. 

I answered as follows. You say you lie discomfited, so 
I come to set you on your feet. You will go with me to 
the General Meeting which I have called at Oneida. It is 
true that the messenger is returned from Canada to Oneida, 
and that the Four Nations have asked the Governor to send 
Commissioners to a meeting at Onandaga. But before the 
messenger came to Albany I had sent an express to the 
Sachems that I expected them and the messenger to come 
down to Albany. But instead of coming, the Sachems 
sent us a resolution, written by the Jesuit, asking our 
advice on it. I have therefore the Governor's orders to 
make this journey, and I want you to go with me to a 
meeting which I have called together. 

On this the Sachems asked me to stay over Sunday, the 
7th. and on the 8th they deputed four of their Sachems to 
go with me. Jan. 9. Came to the last Castle of the 
Maquas, which was burnt by the French last spring. 
Jan. 10. After twelve miles travelling I found the snow so 
deep that I almost resolved to turn back. On the way an 
Indian brought us the news which I wrote to you on the 
10th, telling us further that the snow was so deep that we 
could not possibly get on. I therefore sent a belt of wam- 
pum to the Four Nations to say how far I had come, and 
bidding them send me 100 brisk young Indians to Albany 
and be sure not to send to Canada before first seeing us 
here. So we arrived at Albany on the 12th. Copy. 3 pp. 
Endorsed, Reed. 13 June, 1694. 

991. vi. Major Richard Ingoldsby to Governor Fletcher. Albany, 
15 January, 1693-4. Since my last Major Schuyler has 
returned. His own letter will explain the matter. The 
people here are in great consternation for fear of the 
enemy, of whom we hear no more, nor believe that we 
shall. However we are ready for them. I fear nothing 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 271 

1694. 

except our Indians betraying us. They have certainly 
concluded a peace with the French. Copy- 3 !> 
Endorsed, Reed. IB June, 1694. 

991. vii. Father Milet to Godefridus Dellius. Oneide, 31 January, 
1694. I write unwillingly for I have received no answer 
to my former letter to you. My brothers, Bannasitiren 
and Tarsha, make me take pen in hand to ask you what is 
the meaning of several false reports and ill discourses 
which dishonour some of the Iroquois. They called me to 
Onandaga, where they were assembled, and made me write 
in full council. A Sachem then asked my leave to send the 
paper to Albany. I told him that it was his wish rather 
than mine, because I did not approve their reasons in the 
explanation of the first belt, as being against true Christian 
speech. The Sachem had ordered the messenger to bring 
. back the said paper and to make three, so that the minister 
at Albany might inform us in French or Iroquois what 
they disliked, so that it might be corrected in Council, if 
convenient. They endeavour to do things so well that they 
may not be reproached ; we are seen from Heaven and 
from far off upon earth. The messenger in going by said 
that Major Schuyler was bringing the paper and letters not 
only from the minister but also from Bonando. All this 
proves false. They make me write this letter to know what 
is the truth, and what has been disliked in the explanation 
of the three belts, for all is not so firmly done that 
it cannot be altered. I hear that it is discoursed at Albany 
that my letter must not be carried to Canada ; and that the 
Indians desire to know who is the author of these reports, 
and if he would have the Ambassadors ill-received or 
would have them not return. It is well known that 
without my letter the messenger had not returned as he 
did ; and his return shows the malice of these calumnies 
and of many others. The Council of Oneida have resolved 
to send me with the Ambassadors to Canada, so I may be 
the bearer of your letter myself. Sifined. Pierre Milet. 
P.S. I have six Spanish pistoles given me to assist the 
poor, the orphans and the other unhappy wretches of this 
mission. Pray give them to your lady that she may buy 
some shirts and some stockings as cheap as possible. I 
will write to Canada what I shall receive, and they will 
partake of the benefit and of the glory which will return 
to God. If this messenger and one of my Indian sisters 
cannot carry all, pray tell me what is left that I may send 
for it later. They sent Spanish instead of French gold 
this time that there might be no suspicion. Our pro- 
fession obliges us to be obliging to all and to offend none. 
Why do they then despise us, and why do they endeavour 
to cry us down by false imputations '? It is not enough 
that we have suffered within these five years. You spoke 
to me about endeavouring my deliverance, but if these 
slanderers had been believed my bondage would have 
been increased rather than relieved. What will these 



272 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1694. 

gentlemen say to God when He makes them sensible of 
the good treatment given me by the Indians in comparison 
with what they have said and done against me '? Trans- 
lation. 3 pp. Endorsed, Reed. 13 June, 1694. 
991. vni. Account of the meeting of Major Peter Schuyler, Mayor, 
and the Aldermen of Albany, with the Five Nations. 
Albany, 2 February. The Sachem of the Onandagas 
spoke as follows. We the representatives of the Five 
Nations are come to tell you that the Oneidas have of their 
own accord sent a messenger to Canada, who brought us 
back a belt of peace from the Governor there. We told 
him that we could not treat without Governor Fletcher. 
When Tarrika, the messenger, came to Quebec and gave 
this answer to the Governor, he was angry and said that 
he would treat only with the Five Nations, that he was 
sorry to see the Five Nations so degenerate as to receive 
the English among them, and that we had done ill in 
letting the English triumph over us. Finally he bade the 
messenger tell us to come speedily and speak of peace, or 
he would stop his ears ; and that unless we came before 
spring he would turn all his force against us and destroy 
us. Thus far said the Governor of Canada. We make 
our apology for not taking the letters from Tarrika and 
for not coming to Albany as soon as the Governor of 
Canada sent his second belt. The reason was that the 
chief Sachem, being lame, could not travel, so I, the 
speaker, took upon me to summon the meeting at 
Onandaga. At that meeting the Senecas, Cayonges and 
Oneidas asked why the meeting was not at Albany, and 
the above reason was given. The same three Nations 
asked if the Onandagas were resolved to send an answer 
to Canada, and being told that they were, whereupon they 
agreed to do likewise. The Onandagas thanked them but 
said they must first consult the Maquas and obtain the 
consent of their brethren at Albany. They therefore 
resolved to send to Albany an account of all their 
proceedings, for they had determined to send (though not 
without Major Schuyler's approval) three belts to the 
Governor of Canada. The first belt was to explain why 
they had not come before, the second and third to ask for 
peace not only among the Indians but between the 
English and French. The Jesuit Milet, who had been 
sent for, insisted much that he should carry two belts and 
two proposals to Canada (for he counts as a Sachem) and 
he spoke as he has written, only with the distinction that 
Father Lamberville was to return from France not to 
Onandaga but to Montreal. 

The speakers then proceeded to a long discussion 
as to the private intelligence they had received of the 
preparations of the French against the Five Nations if they 
did not make peace, and resumed. This is the true account 
of all our messages to and from Canada. We now see by 
his own letters that Milet has deluded us, as Governor 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 273 

1694. 

Fletcher had warned us, but we shall not trust him again. 
Let all our misunderstandings caused by him be forgotten, 
and let no evil stories of us be believed by you. And give 
us your advice what we shall do. 

3 February. Major Peter Schuyler addressed the 
Sachems as follows. When the second belt from Canada 
arrived I sent to inform Governor Fletcher, but I never 
thought you would have been so treacherous as to call 
a meeting at Onandaga after your late promises' to 
him. You would have done better to have persuaded 
the Oneidas to deliver up the Jesuit to us than 
to accept their advice as you did. I need not enumerate 
the many things that Governor Fletcher has done 
for you. This Government has always been true and 
faithful to you, whereas the French have always been 
perfidious. When they speak of peace they have war 
in their hearts. Was it not so at Cadaraqui ? I was 
ashamed to find the Maquas abject and discomfited three 
weeks ago. It is shameful for you to truckle to the 
French. If they speak with you in your own country 
Governor Fletcher will give them passes to do so at Albany, 
and I now summon you to meet him there in seventy days. 
Remember two things. Be faithful to your promise to 
have no correspondence with the French ; and be sure to 
meet Governor Fletcher here in seventy days. 

5 February. Answer of the Five Nations to Major 
Schuyler. We accept your proposals to cease correspon- 
dence with the French, and to meet Governor Fletcher here 
in seventy days. We did not expect the first, but if before 
the seventy days are gone the enemy do any mischief, let 
no one complain and let us not blame one another. If 
there be anything further to be proposed for the common 
security, let it be done now. Major Schuyler then asked 
if it was agreed that there should be no correspondence 
with the French for seventy days ; to which they said that 
they would hinder it. 

6 February. Major Schuyler spoke as follows. I am 
not satisfied with your dubious answer yesterday, and I 
would have you consider of it and be plain. The heavens 
are propitious to us, for to-day the fore-runners of the 
Shawanees are come, saying that a thousand souls are on 
their way to us. 

7 February. The Sachems of the Five Nations said, We 
have considered what you said yesterday, and beg you to 
grant what we have considered and desired. Major 
Schuyler answered that he would gladly grant anything 
that was right. The Sachems then continued. We accept 
Canada as closed to us, but we think it necessary to let the 
Praying Indians know that we shall not come thither in 
the spring, as the Jesuit Milet has played us false herein. 
We beg that this may be granted. Major Schuyler there- 
upon consulted the Aldermen and Justices present, who 
were unanimous that the request might be granted. The 

8060 



274 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1694. 

Indians were accordingly answered that their request was 
granted, on condition that neither the priest nor any Indian 
should go or send to Canada until they had spoken with 
Governor Fletcher, and that the Praying Indians should 
be told that the Five Nations would not send Commis- 
sioners to Canada, and that if the French wished to meet 
them they must come to Albany. To this the Indians 
agreed, desiring it to be added, that there be a cessation 
on both sides till the messengers' return. 

9 February. The explanation of the three belts to be 
sent to the Praying Indians was agreed on and written 
down, and the messengers started with them on the 10th 
of February. 12J pp. Endorsed, Reed. 13 June, 1694. 
991. ix. Godefridus Dellius to Father Milet. Albany, 9 February, 
1694. You complain that I have not answered your letter. 
Your own measures obliged me to the contrary, when you 
write that if the English did not take care they would 
make themselves sole authors of the war, and so multiply 
difficulties for themselves that they could not withdraw 
without recourse to God's mercy. You ought to know that 
the English do not fear the French, being strong enough 
to resist them, as was seen in the forest last winter. 
Moreover the King has ordered the forces of the other 
Colonies to join those of Albany, so that they are not yet 
reduced to implore the clemency of your King. You ask 
my advice as to your explication of the three belts. I tell 
you sincerely that it is opposed to peace and to your pro- 
fessions of friendship towards the English. Take the 
words upon the first belt. It gives Count Frontenac a 
fine game to play in taking the Iroquois as his children, re- 
establishing their affairs and so forth. Then again the 
words of the second belt, that they need Father Lamber- 
ville for their pastor, are equally open to objection. I leave 
it to you to judge if these be true methods to advance 
peace. They are better fit to kindle than extinguish war, 
so that there is no hope of peace while you continue them. 
If the French desire peace let them consider the three 
belts which have been sent this day by the Five Nations 
to the Praying Indians, of which the signification is 
written down. I have bought the shirts for you and have 
sent them by your messengers. Copt/. 2J pp. Endorsed, 
Reed. 13 June, 1694. 

991. x. Godefridus Dellius to Governor Fletcher. Albany. 12 
February, 1693-4. While the Indians were here I received 
the enclosed letters (No. vn.) from Milet, and have written 
him the enclosed reply (No. ix.). I have written also a 
French translation of the explanation of the three belts 
sent to the Praying Indians, at the express desire of one 
of the messengers. It is almost incredible how much the 
Indians are inclined to make peace with the French. To 
divert them I have told the proselytes and other Maquas 
that they have every reason to be dissatisfied with the 
other Indians for treating of peace without consulting them. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 275 

1694. 

Through the same means I have infused it into the Four 
Nations that they cannot make peace with L the French 
without making the English and all the Indians in English 
territory their enemies; and thus if they again fell to war 
with the French (as experience teaches that undoubtedly 
they would) there would be none to whom they could fly 
for succour. These reasons have prevailed with them for 
a time, but I fear that they may be upset by the delusive 
teaching of the Jesuit. I hope that affairs may stay as 
they are until you come and meet the Indians yourself. 
Copy. 'i-QPP' Endorsed, Reed. 13 June, 1694. 
991. xi. Major Peter Schuyler to Governor Fletcher. Albany, 
14 February, 1694. As the enclosed proceedings will 
shew you, I have struggled for ten days with the Five 
Nations. They are weary of war and distrust our 
ability to protect them. I would not for anything have 
gone to their meeting at Onandaga. There I should quite 
have despaired of ever effecting what I have now done, for 
I never heard them speak with more hesitation. Yet I 
have gained the time till you come up to meet them, and 
the message to the Praying Indians will shew the French 
that their words are not trusted. While we were treating, 
Luykasse arrived with the news that a good many of the 
Shawanees will be here next summer and good store of 
beaver. Many of our young men long to go and meet 
them. Please give me your orders that not above five or 
six are to go to Luykasse to meet them, for we know not 
how we may want our men next summer. I should like to 
see this place well garrisoned, but fear that our neighbours 
will continue obstinate. Milet does us a deal of mischief. 
He wanted to go himself to Canada, which made me the 
readier to grant their request of sending this way to stop 
that road. I have sent in the accounts for my journey and 
entertainment of the Sachems ; but I shall think myself 
well rewarded if I earn your approbation. Copy. 1% pp. 
Endorsed, Reed. 13 June, 1694. 

991. xn. Robert Livingston to Governor Fletcher. Albany, 
14 February, 1693. I am apt to think all danger over for 
this winter. I fear not the French while we have the Five 
Nations secure, which I hope we shall when you have met 
them. After ten days' stay they have promised faith- 
fully (but little faith is in them) to hold no 
correspondence with the French and to meet you 
here in seventy days. I fear that nothing will prevent 
their inclination to peace, unless we could make some 
spoil of the French and make us formidable in their eyes. 
I blush to think how base people are grown, and that they 
should so palpably discover it as they do now, by their 
voluntary gift, as they call it. Never were people more 
generous than they were to a Papist Governor, who never 
did nor designed them any good, and now that Heaven has 
given us a Government of our own religion, we know not 
what pretence to make to shuffle it off. They may repent 



276 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1694. 

it when too late. The Magistrates have appointed persons 
to view our stockades and I have written warrants for such 
numbers as are wanting. All our men are in health, not- 
withstanding that they are on duty every other day. Copy. 
1^ pp. Endorsed, Reed. 13 June, 1694. 
991. xin. Major Richard Ingoldsby to Governor Fletcher. Albany, 

14 February, 1693-4. I have been as cautious as possible 
in the matter of harassing the people or tiring the men, 
knowing very well that if they be jaded they will not be 
fit for service ; but the scouts returning before their time 
owing to the departure of the Indians, the people were so 
uneasy and timorous that I could have no rest till I doubled 
the guards. Everyone told me that we could not know 
within half an hour of the enemy's coming, and this caused 
me to send for forces from Ulster to be in readiness here. 
For if they be not in the town at the news of the enemy's 
approach they can do us no service, for without scouts 
continually at the lake, we cannot know 7 of the enemy's 
coming. We have had the Sachems of the Five Nations 
here, and hope that they may be stopped from corres- 
pondence with the enemy till you meet them next spring. 
They are much terrified by the growing power of the 
French, and nothing will be more acceptable to them than 
a peace. In spite of the burden of business laid on you I 
believe that your presence at the appointed time will be 
very requisite. If we lose the Five Nations our neighbours 
that neglect us will smart for it. There are 100 men who 
came up in October last and were to be relieved on 

15 March. Shall I keep them till May and until new 
relief come up, or will you send me the money to clear 
them? I hope to wait on you in the middle of March. 
Copy. 1^ pp. Endorsed, Reed. 13 June, 1694. [Board 
of Trade. New York, 5. Nos. 47, 47i.-xm. ; and '-(without 
enclosures) 48. pp. 105-107.] 

March 28. 992. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Colonel Stanton being 
called in made his defence, and the question was deferred. 

March 29. Several accounts passed and payments ordered. [Board of 
Trade. Jamaica, 77. pp. 274-276.] 

March 29. 993. The King to Sir Edmund Andros. Granting him leave 
to go to any of the neighbouring Colonies for two months in the 
year for the benefit of his health. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 86. 
p. 250.] 

March 29. 994. Order of the King in Council. Approving the proposal 
Whitehall, of Sir Henry Ashurst and Sir Stephen Evans, for the importation 
of timber and Naval stores, and directing the Lords of the Treasury 
to see that they are satisfied for the same. Signed. William Blath- 
wayt. Copy. 1 p. [Board of Trade. New England, 7. No. 24 ; 
and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. C., pp. 342-343.] 

March 29. 995. Order of the King in Council. Confirming the Act of 
Barbados concerning John Kirton. [Board of Trade. Barba<fbs, 
44. pp. 73-74.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 277 



1694. 

March 30. 996. Receipts for packets entrusted to him for the Governors of 
Massachusetts and New York. Signed. Charles Lodwick. p. 
[Board of Trade. New York, 5. No. 48.] 

April 1. 997. Statement of the pay for five companies of the Barhados 
regiment, each company consisting of a captain, two lieutenants, 
three sergeants, three corporals, 2 drummers, 100 privates. Total 
cost per annum (including field and staff officers) .8,988. '[Board 
of Trade. Barbados, 44. p. 89.] 

April 1. 998. Warrant for the establishment of four companies of foot 
for New York, and for a chaplain, surgeon, storekeeper, armourer, 
gunner and two matrosses to be maintained out of the surplusage 
due to the difference of 30 per cent, between the value of English 
and New York money. Each company is to consist of a captain, 
2 lieutenants, 3 sergeants, 3 corporals, 2 drummers, 100 privates. 
[Board of Trade. New York, 48. pp. 155-157.] 

April 2. 999. The Attorney and Solicitor General to Lords of Trade and 
Plantations. We have inspected the charters of Rhode Island and 
Connecticut and the grants of East and West New Jersey with a 
view to uniting the strength of these colonies with New York for 
purposes of defence. By the charters of Rhode Island and 
Connecticut the governors and officers of the Companies are 
empowered to nominate commanders of the militia ; but Sir William 
Phips's commission appointed him commander-in-chief of the forces 
of both colonies, until in 1693 the power, so far as regards Con- 
necticut, was transferred from him to Governor Fletcher. The 
representatives of the colonies now agree to furnish the quotas 
suggested by Mr. Blathwayt, but desire that, except in time of 
actual invasion and imminent danger, the militia shall remain 
under the command appointed by their charters, and that at all 
times a good portion thereof may remain so. We think therefore 
that the command of the militia rests with the several provinces, 
but that in times of urgency the King may appoint a commander- 
in-chief to take command of all. [Board of Trade. New 
England, 35. pp. 155, 159.] 

April 2. 1,000. The King to Governor Russell. To discharge George 
Andrews and John Bromley from their recognisances, and suspend 
all prosecutions thereupon ; and to report on the case for the signifi- 
cation of the King's further pleasure. Countersigned. J. Trenchard. 
[Board of Trade. Barbados, 44. pp. 82-84.] 

April 3. 1,001. Council of New York to Lords of Trade and Planta- 
New York, tions. The Governor having gone to Albany to meet the Five 
Nations, we on his behalf enclose copy of a letter which he has 
received from Connecticut. We know very well that twice as much 
can be had or done in this country for ready money as for ' ' country 
pay," which is their .600 rates. Some pay wheat for this rate, 
some Indian corn, some beef, pork, pease, butter, cheese, flax, 
hemp, hides, tallow, soap, tar, etc., at double the value of their 
purchase for ready money. We are now sending sloops along that 
coast to gather them up. When the charges are defalcated the net 
produce of this 600 will scarce amount to 300 New York money, 



278 COLONIAL PAPEBS. 

1694. 

which is the first assistance from that Colony since Governor 
Sloughter's arrival. We believe that the Governor has sufficiently 
represented to you the state of the province ; he is unwearied in his 
service, but the country is so exhausted that it cannot answer his 
proposals for its defence. It is unfair that the burden should be 
wholly on us, for if we sink the rest must follow. Signed. Frederyck 
Flypse, S. van Cortlandt, Wm. Smith, Chid. Brooke, W. Nicolls. 
1-J pp. Endorsed, Eecd. 13 April [mistake for June]. Read 
18 April, 1694. Enclosed, 

1,001. i. Secretary of Connecticut to Governor Fletcher, Hartford, 
20 March, 1694. In obedience to the Eoyal order our 
General Court has granted towards the maintenance of 
the frontier at Albany 600, to be paid as it shall rise in 
the rate and at the price of the last county rate, to be 
delivered in our ports and shipped at your risk and charge. 
All is gathered and ready to be shipped as soon as you 
shall send vessels, which we beg that you will speedily. 
8i fined. John Allyn. Copy. 1 p. 

1,001. n. Address of certain loyal subjects of Hartford County, 
Connecticut, to Governor Fletcher. Our hearty thanks to 
Their Majesties for the commission of lieutenancy in our 
militia, and to yourself for your speedy visit to us as 
an earnest of Their Majesties' intention to restore their 
immediate government over us. We know your wisdom, 
vigour, and moderation in the government of New York, 
and we observe with regret what exception the Eoyal favour 
has met with in Connecticut. Your proclamations as to your 
commission have not been published as you expected, and 
are only lately and by accident come to our hands. We 
hasten to acknowledge it, and to acknowledge thus King 
William and Queen Mary to be our rightful sovereigns 
and yourself commander-m-ehief of the militia. But it is 
hard for us to serve two masters, and we hope that you 
will represent our state at home. We desire no revenge, 
but we claim to receive justice in the Eoj'al Courts and by 
the Eoyal laws for the security of our lives, liberty, and 
property, which can never be when the administration of 
justice is monopolised by a corporation. We beg therefore 
your intercession with Their Majesties on our behalf. 
Signed. Gershom Bulkeley, and by 34 others. Copy. 3pp. 
Endorsed, Eecd. IB June, 1694. [Board of Trade. New 
York, 5. Nos. 49, 49 i., n.; and (without enclosures) 48. 
pp. 108, 109.] 

April 3. 1,002. Eeceipt for a packet to be delivered to Sir William Phips 
at Massachusetts. Sif/ncd. Eobert Maxwell. Scrap. [Board of 
Trade. New England, 7. No. 25.] 

April 5. 1,003. Lords of Trade and Plantations to Governor Sir. William 
Phips. Directing him to give all possible assistance to Sir Henry 
Ashurst and Sir Stephen Evans in providing Naval stores 
(see No. 983). [Board of Trade. New England, 35. pp. 61-62 ; 
and Col. Entry Bk., Vol C., pp. 341-343.] 



AMEEICA AND WEST INDIES. 279 



1694. 

April 5. 1,004. Lieutenant-Governor Sir William Beeston to Lords of 
Jamaica. Trade and Plantations. My last was of 12 February. Since then 
we can get no men to man our armed sloops, so that the money 
raised for that purpose now lies still. I have therefore issued writs 
for an Assembly for 7 May next in order to devote the money to 
some other purpose. I shall also bring the collection of the quit- 
rents and other matters before them. Not being able to make our 
attack in Petit Guavos, we feared that the French, being collected 
there for defence, might turn and attack us. I therefore at the 
country's desire proclaimed martial law, though I shall take it off 
on the 7th May because of the elections. Meanwhile it has 
greatly helped forward the second new bastion of Fort Charles. 
One Captain Stapleton, a Roman Catholic, has lately run away to 
the French, with a vessel belonging to this Island and .1,000, out of 
which he has cheated his friends. By intercepted letters to his wife 
I find that he threatens us hard. I have written to Colonel 
Codrington to confiscate an estate that he owns in Montserrat. 
He has also money in England, which can be found by enquiry of 
the Jamaica merchants. I have received no directions from you 
nor from the Admiralty since my coming, so I am obliged to use my 
own judgment in all things and hope that you will put a good con- 
struction on my intentions. The country has of late been finely 
freed of the " shakes," which by degrees seems to abate. We are 
very healthy, if the coming in of hotter weather do not alter it, and 
we are very peaceable among ourselves ; but if we continue to 
decrease and the French to increase, what is to become of the 
country ? We have no news yet of the men-of-war and ships from 
England. The delaying of them till so late is a vast prejudice, for 
it means that they arrive here in the summer and go home in the 
winter. The extent of the Island and the planting of it by the 
coast tempt people much to break the law by sending produce by 
stealth to Cui^oa and bringing back European goods. It is 
impossible to watch the whole Island, but the officers have lately 
seized two sloops, which have been condemned. I beg to be allowed 
the King's share to pay for the attendance on the sick men of the 
Falcon and to put the King's house into tolerable condition. 
Signed. Wm. Beeston. l^pp. Endorsed, Reed. 13 June. Read 
14 Aug. 1694. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. No. 31 ; and 53. 
pp. 189-191.] 

April 5. 1,005. Secretary of the Treasury to William Blathwayt. For- 
Treasury warding copy of a presentment from the Commissioners of Customs 
Chambers. on a proposal of Virginia merchants. Signed. Hen. Guy. J p. 
Endorsed, Read 18 June, 1694. Annexed, 

1,005. i. Commissioners of Customs to Lords of the Treasury. 
22 February, 1694. The principal merchants of Virginia 
and Maryland have complained that their trade is greatly 
injured by ships trading directly from Scotland and 
Ireland to Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania and from 
thence back again, without paying duty. To prevent this 
they suggest that a small vessel of competent force and 
under a competent commander may cruise where necessary, 
and that the books ofthe Collectors may be inspected by 



280 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1694. 



April 5. 

Whitehall. 



April 6. 



April 7, 



April 9. 

Jamaica. 



the same ; it being alleged that former commanders of the 
King's ships were too unskilful in such matters and the 
ships themselves of too heavy draught. We agree in this 
recommendation, and we beg also that letters may be 
written to the Government of Scotland on the subject. 
Signed. Robert Southwell, R. Temple, Jo. Werden, 
J. Warde. Cop}). 1^ pp. Endorsed, Original read, 
18 June, 1694. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. Nos. 46, 
46 1.; and 36. pp. 259-261.] 

1.006. Order of the King in Council. Referring the memorial 
of John Taylor to Lords of Trade and Plantations for report. 
Si(jned. William Bridgeman. ^ p. Annexed, 

1,006. i. Memorial of John Taylor to the Lords of the Admiralty. 
Praying for an order that his agents and workmen may 
not be molested in New England, where he has a contract 
for supply of masts and bowsprits, and has already built 
one fourth-rate ship. Copi). 1 p. The whole endorsed, 
Reed. 16 April, 1694. Read 15 May, 1694. [Board of 
Trade. Plantations General, 2. Nos. 85, 85 1. ; and 
(u'itho-ut enclosure') Col. Entry Bk., Vol C., p. 346.] 

1.007. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor before 
his departure recommended to the Council the consideration of the 
management of the i'600 granted by Connecticut, and hereon it was 
ordered that a letter be written to the Lords of Trade pointing out 
that this contribution is the first given by Connecticut since 
Governor Sloughter's arrival, and that being paid in country rates, 
with expenses of collection deducted, the amount will not exceed 
,300 New York money. Two members set apart to go to Con- 
necticut for the money. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., 517-518.] 

1.008. Minutes of Council of Assembly of Montserrat. Acts 
passed to prevent adulteration of indigo, for billeting officers and 
soldiers of the King's regiments, to prevent abuses that may arrive 
through persons returning in the lists of their families (sic), and to 
raise a levy. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLVIIL, p. 327.] 

1.009. Lieutenant-Governor Sir William Beeston to Sir John 
Trenchard. One Captain Stapleton has lately deserted us (see 
No. 1,004). The Jamaica merchants can tell you in whose hands 
his estate in England lies. One Henry Badger has also been 
here and has beaten a man to death. He was tried and 
sentenced to death, but was recommended to mercy, so I have 
reprieved him pending signification of the Royal pleasure. I 
know not to whom application will be made for him, for he is very 
poor and no more than a waterman. The country is very peaceable 
but the French constantly land and plunder us, and we are very 
weak in men. We much want the fleet from England, which by 
arriving so late will, I fear, again endanger the health both of sea- 
men and passengers. H.M.S. Advice has lain in Port Royal for 
months for want of seamen and I have not been able to man our 
two Island sloops for -the same reason, in spite of high wages and a 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



281 



1694. 



April 12. 

Whitehall. 



April 12. 



April 12. 

Whitehall. 



April 13. 



April 13. 



promise of full share of all captures. You see our danger if we get 
no recruits. tiifjncd. Wm. Beeston. 1^ pp. Endorsed, R., 
12 June, 1694. '[America and West Indies. ^540. A T o. 38.] 

1.010. Order of the King in Council. Referring the petition of 
Major Joseph Crispe to Lords of Trade and Plantations for report. 
Sif/ned. Wm. Bridgemaii. J p. Annexed, 

1,010. i. Petition of Major Joseph Crispe to the King. I was sent 
from St. Christophers to Barbados to raise a regiment for 
the security of the Island, which by the help of Governor 
Stede I did ; but meanwhile the rebellious Irish rose, the 
French took the Island, and I, who had made 20,000 
there, was ruined. I had nothing left but the ship which 
carried me to Barbados, which was taken up as a transport 
for your Majesty's service, and since has been lost. No 
compensation has been paid to me. I beg that the value 
of the vessel and of what I lost in her may be made good 
to me from the casual revenues of Barbados and the 
Leeward Islands. Copy. 1 p. The whole endorsed, Reed. 
13 April, 1694. Read 17 Aug. 1694. [Board of Trade. 
Leeward Islands, 4. Nos. 37, 37 1. ; and (without enclosure] 
44. p. 183.] 

1.011. Report of the Attorney General. On the petition of 
Stephen Duport, I am informed by Mr. Archibald Hutchinson that 
all the negroes in the Island were divided among the soldiers as 
pillage, and that the accounts for the same have been passed. 
Though he thinks it hard that he should lose his property, which 
was always his own and was never taken by the French, yet he 
submits to this so far as concerns such portions thereof as were 
bonafide made over to the army, only asking for such portions as 
cannot be claimed by the army, which I think may be granted. 
Signed. Edwd. Ward. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 44. 
pp. 175-178.] 

1.012. Order of the King in Council. That the Attorney 
General prepare a suitable letter on Stephen Duport' s behalf. 
[Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 44. p. 178.] 

1.013. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. The West 
Indian merchants attended on the business of convoys. 

Governor Fletcher's letter of 22 January read (see No. 829) 
and decision thereon taken. The quotas to be furnished by the 
various Colonies fixed. [Board of Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 285- 
288.] 

1.014. Memorandum of Lords of Trade and Plantations. To 
recommend that the Jamaica convoy may be allowed to accompany 
the Barbados convoy within sight of Barbados, and that they sail 
from the Downs on the 20th of April at latest ; and that the Jamaica 
convoy do not stop at Barbados, except in case of necessity, and 
that none of the men belonging to it be allowed to be pressed at 
Barbados without the Governor's leave, which shall not be granted 
except on the greatest exigency. Draft. I p. [Board of Trade. 
Jamaica, 7. No. 32.] 



282 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1694. 

April 13. 1,015. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. The present 
condition of New York and the Charters of Connecticut, Rhode 
Island and New Jersey having heen considered, together with the 
opinion of the law-officers as to the command of the militia therein, 
it was agreed to advise that suitable directions in accordance there- 
with he sent to the Governors of New York and Connecticut and that 
the quota of Connecticut be fixed at 120 men. 1^ pp. [Board <>j 
Trade. New York, 5. No. 50 ; and 48. pp. 114, 115.] 

April 14. 1,016. Minutes of Council of Virginia. William Randolph sworn 

Attorney General. Order for the ships assembled at Point Comfort 
to sail on May 8th. The justices of two counties ordered to see to 
the punishment of certain negroes, for whose trial a special com- 
mission is judged unnecessary. Order for a proclamation for 
. furthering the laws concerning negroes and for restraining the 
licentious liberty granted them by several masters. (Copy of this 
proclamation 15 April, 1694. p. 875.) An account of certain 
riotous proceedings in Elizabeth City County referred to the Attorney 
General for prosecution of the offenders. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 
LXXXIV., pp. 851-854.] 

April 16. 1,017. Minutes of Council of Maryland. Order for sending bills 
of exchange for 250 immediately to New York. List of the bills. 
Roger Newman appointed to be the bearer of them. James Bigger 
appointed Ranger on the west side Patuxent River, with orders to 
sell all unmarked horses for the King, instead of marking them or 
turning them out as heretofore. [Board of Trade. Maryland, 13. 
pp. 10-12 ; and 12. pp. 63-71.] 

April 17. 1,018. Minutes of Council of Barbados. Orders for sundry 
payments. The Assembly brought up the bill for raising a levy, 
which was passed. \_Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XII., pp. 451, 452.] 

April 17. 1,019. Journal of Assembly of Barbados. The bill for a levy 
passed as amended by Council. Order for payment of .100 to 
Captain Charles Coates for his good service to the Island against the 
French. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XIV., pp. 366, 367.] 

April 17. 1,020. Minutes of Council of Nevis. Petition of the prize-master 
for a Court of Admiralty for condemnation of a prize taken by 
H.M.S. Wolf. Sentence of the Court condemning the vessel. 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLVIII., pp. 286, 287.] 

April 17. 1,021. Minutes of Council of New York. Resolved to send salt 
provisions up to Albany for the troops, and that Peter Schuyler be 
required to provide them with pease. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. T.XXV., 
pp. 518, 519.] 

April 19. 1,022. Order of the King in Council. On the petition of the 
Whitehall. Colony of Connecticut, the report of the Attorney and Solicitor- 
General was read, as follows. 2 April, 1694. W T e have examined 
the Charters of Connecticut, Rhode Island and East and West 
New Jersey, as ordered, and we have heard Colonel Winthrop and 
his counsel on behalf of Connecticut, Mr. Almy and his counsel on 
behalf of Rhode Island, and Dr. Cox on behalf of the Jerseys. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 283 

1694. 

Colonel Winthrop and Mr. Almy are prepared to agree to the quotas 
suggested by Mr. Blathwayt but desire that the rest of the militia 
may remain under the same control as heretofore. We think that 
the charters of these Governments give the ordinary power over the 
militia to these Governments, but we think that the Crown has 
power to appoint a Commander -in- Chief over the quotas to be 
furnished in time of war and at times of great emergency over the 
whole of their militia, but that in time of peace the command of the 
militia ought to revert to the Governors of the several Colonies. 

Report approved ; and it was ordered that the quota of 
Connecticut be 120 men at all times during war, to be commanded 
by the Governor of New York. [Board of Trade. New York, 48. 
pp. 116-126.] 

April 19. 1,023. Order of the King in Council. For hastening the 
despatch of the recruits and the two additional companies to New 
York. [Board of Trade. New York, 48. p. 158.] 

April 19. 1,024. Order of the King in Council. Referring the petition of 
Whitehall. William Alexander to Lords of Trade and Plantations for report. 
Signed. Win. Bridgeman. ^ p. Annexed, 

1,024. i. Petition of William Alexander, on behalf of himself and 
of the younger children of the late Earl of Stirling, to the 
King. For the grant of a tract of three degrees of latitude 
and six of longitude, adjoining on the north west bounds 
of Pennsylvania ; in lieu of the propriety of Long Island 
which the late Earl conveyed to James, Duke of York, in 
consideration of an annuity which has never been paid. 
Copy. 1 p. The whole endorsed, Reed, and read 22 May, 
1694. [Board of Trade. New York, 5. Nos. 51, 51 1. ; 
and 48. pp. 100-102.] 

April 21. 1,025. Minutes of Council of Virginia. The Attorney General 
was ordered to prosecute two men for incestuous marriages. [Col. 
Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXIV., pp. 854-855.] 

April 23. 1,026. Minutes of Council of Virginia. The prosecution of Tony, 
a negro, for breaking and entering, referred to the County Court of 
York. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXIV., p. 855.] 

April 24. 1,027. The King to Governor Codrington. Directing him to 
restore to Stephen Duport his plantation, and such other of his pro- 
perty as cannot be claimed as pillage by the army. [Board of Trade. 
Leeward Islands, 44. pp. 179-181.] 

April 24. 1,028. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Governor Thomas Smith. 
We are surprised to hear of yours of 12 October of the strong ferment 
of discontent among the people, of your despair of allaying it, and 
of your intention to move with several others to some different part 
of America. We hope that this will find the country quieter and 
your fears abated. Inform us of the people's grievances, and we 
doubt not to satisfy them. You will assist the Receiver-General to 
collect our quit-rents, and also by degrees the four years' arrears 
also. We expect two years' arrears by next Michaelmas, and so on 
till all be paid in full, and we think this reasonable, as at the 



284 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1694. 

beginning of our planting people were given their land rent free for 
fifteen years. We desire an account of the lands, said to be taken 
up -on our account, and we cannot understand how the general 
pardon, which was sent in the same box with the other writings, 
has failed to reach you. You .say the people complain that no rent 
or purchase money can be paid, as the Lords have not joined in the 
power sent by them ; but these complaints have no ground what- 
ever. We are willing to amend our orders as to our wharves, to meet 
people's wishes. Lord Bath is admitted a proprietor. Sir Peter 
Colleton is dead, and has bequeathed his proprietorship to his son 
Sir John. Signed. Craven, Bath, Ashley, John Archdale for 
Thomas Archdale, Tho. Amy. [Board of Trade. Carolina, 4. 
p. 13.] 

April 24. 1,029, The same to the Governor and Deputies. Amending the 
rule as to wharves at Charlestown. Signed as the preceding. 
[Board of Trade. Carolina, 4. p. 14.] 

April 26. 1,030. Minutes of Council of Nevis. The Assembly agreed to the 
Council's nomination of James Bevan (?) to be Treasurer. Articles 
describing the duties to be performed by the Treasurer. Joint Com- 
mittee appointed to inspect the Island's accounts. [Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. XLVIII., pp. 287, 288.] 

April 26. 1,031. Minutes of Council of New York. Order for money to be 
sent up to Albany for payment of the troops that are to be dis- 
charged on 1st May ; and for sale of the grain from Connecticut 
to the best advantage. Warrant ordered for issue of ammunition. 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., p. 519.] 

April 26. 1,032. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Philip Ludwell. We 
are sorry to hear of the differences among you. We send copy 
of a paper signed by us in your favour, which will show you that 
we look upon evil reports as a result of their unhappy animosities. 
Sir Peter Colleton is dead and Lord Bath admitted a Proprietor. 
Signed. Craven, Bath, Ashley, John Archdale for Thomas Archdale, 
Tho. Amy. [Board of Trade. Carolina, 4. p. 14.] 

April 26. 1,033. Minutes of Council of Virginia. On consideration of a 
letter from Governor Fletcher, ordered that 500 be remitted to 
him. Order for exempting the College lands in Pamunkey Neck 
and to south of James River from the restraints otherwise imposed 
thereon. Order for the documents as to the College, which are in 
the Secretary's office, to be delivered to the Governors. The Council 
concurred with the Governor that it would be well for him to go to 
Maryland. 

April 27. William Heslett appointed Surveyor of the south west side of 
Elizabeth river, and William Lowry, appointed Surveyor of Warwick 
and Elizabeth City Counties. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXIV., 
pp. 856-859.] 

April 27. 1,034. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to the Governor and 
Deputies of South Carolina. Authorizing them to assent to any Act 
as to juries which uses the form prescribed in the 67th article of the 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 285 

* 

1694. 

Constitutions. Signed. Craven, Bath, Ashley, John Archdale for 
Thomas Archdale, Tho. Amy. [Board oj Trade. Carolina, 4. 
p. 15.] 

May 1. 1,035. Minutes of Council of Maryland. Sir Edmund Andros 

presided. The Justices commissioned for the Provincial Court were 
sworn. 

May 2. Sir Thomas Laurence produced the Order in Council dated at 
Whitehall, 28 September, 1693, on his behalf, which was entered 
and ordered to be observed. Order for Sir Thomas to be Com- 
missioned Chief Justice of the Provincial Court. 

May 3. Order for delivery to Sir Thomas Laurence of copies of the 

charges against him. Security was taken from Sir Thomas for due 
execution of his office. The Collectors' and Naval Officers' Accounts 
of the 4(7. a gallon duty received. 

May 4. George Plater's accounts returned to him to be writ fair. The 

Collectors directed to bring in their accounts of all other revenue. 

May 5. Orders for certain payments ; also for delivery of Lord 

Baltimore's records to the hands of Henry Darnall, and for his 
surveyors not to be obstructed. [Board of Trade. Maryland, 12. 
pp. 71-76 ; and 18. pp. 12-16.] 

May 4. 1,036. Minutes of Council of New York. The Indians from 

Nassau came to pay their acknowledgment to the Governor and to 
claim his protection, according to custom. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 
LXXV., p. 520.] 

May 4. 1,037. Governor Sir Edmund Andros to Lords of Trade and 

St. Maries, Plantations. I came here on the representation of the President 
Maryland. an( j (] ounc ii to be present at the Provincial Court appointed to sit 
on the first Tuesday in May. There being no quorum we adjourned 
till the 2nd inst., when the order of 28 September, 1693, restoring 
Sir Thomas Laurence to the Council and to the office of judge of 
the Provincial Court, was read and recorded. I then issued a new 
Commission for the Provincial Court, with Sir Thomas as chief 
justice, which has proceeded to work as usual with all quiet and 
order. I hope that the arrival of a few more Councillors will enable 
me to settle everything till the new Governor comes. .250 has 
been sent to the assistance of New York, and 500 from Virginia, 
which latter we beg may be taken from the quit-rents. Signed. 
E. Andros. Endorsed, Reed. 5 July. Kead 7 Aug. 1694. 
[Board of Trade. Maryland, 2. No. 109 ; and 8. pp. 177-178.] 

May 5. 1,038. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Agreed to 

recommend leave to be given to Governor Kendall to accept the 
presents voted to him by the Assembly of Barbados. 

The petition of Christopher Almy as to the boundaries of Rhode 
and the counter-petition of the Agents of Massachusetts were read, 
and, both parties having been heard, the matter was referred to the 
Attorney General for report. 

Agreed to send further instructions to Governor Fletcher as to the 
quota of Connecticut. 

Mr. Taylor's memorial read, and a copy sent to the Agents of 
Massachusetts. [Board of Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 288-290.] 



286 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1694. 

May 7. 1,039. Minutes of Council of Maryland. Order for prosecution 
of a seized ship. Philip Clarke appointed to act as Collector for the 
Potomac district. Orders for due exercise and training of the 
militia; and for certain guns to be delivered to Benjamin Hall unless 
reason can he shewn to the contrary. Proclamation for Sir Thomas 
Laurence to he President of the Council. Nicholas Greenherry 
appointed Keeper of the Seals. [_]><>(ird of Trade. Maryland, 12. 
pp. 78-82, and IB. pp. 16-18.] 

May 8. 1,040. Minutes of Council and Assembly of Montserrat. Order 

for building a small house in the fort at the Old Road. The 
Assembly agreed to the Council's proposals as to certain details of 
the fortifications, and as to sending home sugar to reimburse the 
Agents. [Col Entry Bk., Vol. XLVIIL, p. 328.] 

May 9. 1,041. Governor Sir Edmund Andros to Lords of Trade and 

Virginia Plantations. On the 4th I wrote to you from Maryland of my visit 
to Maryland, when Sir Thomas Laurence was restored to his 
appointments, pursuant to the Royal orders. I stayed till the 
7th inst. when, as all was going satisfactorily, I declared Sir T. 
Laurence president of the Council and returned here. I found all 
well on my arrival, and that several ships for the next convoy had 
arrived at Point Comfort. I beg for .500 from the quit-rents, 
having advanced that sum from the two shillings per hogshead 
duty to New York, which fund is insufficient for the expenses of 
government. Unsigned. 1^ pp. Endorsed, Reed. 13 Aug. 
Read, 17 Aug. '94. 'Enclosed^ 

1,041. i. List of ships waiting at Point Comfort to make up the fleet. 
8 May, 1694. 2pp. Endorsed, Reed. 13 Aug. 1694. 
[Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. Nos. 47, 47 i. ; and (with- 
out enclosure) 36. pp. 288, 289.] 

May 12. 1,042. Minutes of Council of Maryland. Order affirming the 
decision of the delegates as to the estate of Richard Charlet, deceased, 
Thomas Greenfield and James Bigger to be answerable for said estate. 
James Bigger's bond as Ranger of Calvert County received. Robert 
Lockwood commissioned a Captain of horse, and James Philips a 
Captain of foot. Justices added to the Commission of the Peace 
for St. Maries County. [Board of Trade. Maryland, 12. pp. 83, 
84 ; and 12. p. 18.] 

May 14. 1,043. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor reported 
the circumstances of Pennsylvania, and on putting it to the Council 
whether he should meet the Assembly of that Province, the Council 
voted 100 towards the expenses of his journey thither. Orders 
for sundry payments. Auditors appointed for the accounts of the 
four companies at Albany. Patents for land granted to Daniel 
Shottwell -and Tirck de Witt. The Governor reported that he had 
made a contract with Robert Livingstone for victualling the troops 
at Albany, at sixpence per man per day from 1 May to 1 November. 

May 15. Letter from the Council of Maryland read, with bills for 250. 
Orders for several payments. Resolved to appoint a collector of 
arrears of taxes. 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 287 



1694. 

May 16. On the representation of Captain John Evans, of H.M.S. 
Richmond, that he was twenty men short of his complement, orders 
were issued for the public houses to be searched and the men to be 
provided. The audit of the Governor's expenses on the expedition 
to Albany was approved. Orders for sundry payments. Patents 
for land granted to Captain John Evans. Letter from Sir E. Andros 
read, sending ,500 from Virginia. Commanders of the troops and 
forts appointed against the Governor's absence in Pennsylvania. 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., pp. 520-528.] 

[May 15.] 1,044. Memorial of Major-General FitzJohn Winthrop to Lords 
of Trade and Plantations. Praying that the quota of troops drawn 
from Connecticut may not exceed that drawn from the other Colonies 
in proportion. 

The Lords agreed that a clause to that effect should be inserted 
in the letters to be sent to Governor Fletcher. [Board of Trade. 
New York, 48. pp. 126, 127.] 

May 15. 1,045. Petition of Sir Henry Ashurst and Constantine Phips, 
Agents for Massachusetts, to Lords of Trade and Plantations. One 
Christopher Almy has petitioned Their Majesties for confirmation of 
the charter of Rhode Island and for fixing the bounds of the 
province. As the Governor and Company claim land which really 
belongs to Massachusetts, we beg to be heard before the Charter is 
confirmed or the bounds ascertained. 1 p. Endorsed, Read 
15 May, '94. Copy of tJte foregoing. [Board of Trade. New 7 
England, 7. Nos. 26, 27 ; and 35. pp. 132, 133.] 

[May 15.] 1,046. Pleas of the Colony of New Plymouth, respecting the 
bounds fixed by their patent. (1) The bounds expressed in our 
charter comprehend all the lands in controversy, our southern 
limit being the Narraganset River. (2) Our charter is thirty years 
older than that of Rhode Island, and theirs was obtained, as we 
conceive, on misinformation. (3) As to the temporary boundaries, 
Providence river, etc. were acknowledged to be our true bounds. 
(4) New Plymouth possessed those lands and had improved them 
before Rhode Island was settled. (5) The plea of fortification is the 
same for us as for Rhode Island, and we are straitened also for 
want of land. Copy. 1 p. Endorsed, Left by Sir H. Ashurst. 
[Board of Trade. New England, 7. No. 28.] 

May 15. 1,047. Christopher Almy to the Duke of Leeds. I beg you 
to consider my deplorable condition, my mission being to obtain 
confirmation of Rhode Island's charter and the fixing of our 
eastward boundary. The question of boundaries has caused 
much dispute between us and Boston, and I beg that it may be 
settled. 1 p. Endorsed, Reed. 15 May, '94. 

Copy of the foregoing. 1 p. [Board of Trade. New 
England, 7. Nos. 29, 29A ; and 35. pp. 131, 132.] 

[May 15.] 1,048. Reasons for the claim of Rhode Island to the boundaries 
fixed by her patent. (1) New Plymouth never had any collateral 
grant from any of the Kings of England for jurisdiction. (2) It is 
incorrect to say (as has been asserted) that New Plymouth had 
possession seventy years ; and jurisdiction cannot be given or sold 



'288 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1694. 

by subjects. (3) The settlement made by the Commissioners was 
but temporary. (4) Our patent was never condemned nor actually 
surrendered, whereas New Plymouth, having no patent, was put 
under Sir Edmund Andros without any question. (5) The new 
charter of Massachusetts in mentioning the boundaries of Rhode 
Island must mean the certain bounds fixed by our charter. 
(6) Unless an eastern boundary be upheld we cannot defend our- 
selves, nor can the Magistrates on the mainland come to court at 
Rhode Island without passing through another jurisdiction. l[pp. 
Endorsed, Left by Mr. Almy. [Board of Trade. New England, 7. 
A 7 o 30.] 

May 15. 1,049. John Povey to the Attorney General. Forwarding 
copies of the petition of Clif istopher Almy and of the Agents for New 
England, for his opinion on the question of boundaries. [Board 
of Trade. New England, 35. pp. 133, 134.] 

May 15. 1,050. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Recom- 
mending that Governor Kendall be allowed to receive 1,000 
granted to him by the Barbados Assembly. [Board of Trade. 
Barbados, 44. p. 86.] 

May 16. 1,051. Minutes of Council of Maryland. Sir Thomas Laurence 
sworn to observe the Acts of Trade. Order for a special Commission 
for trial of the ship Anne. Order for a Commission of the Peace 
to be prepared for Talbot County. Order for custody of the King's 
share of the condemned ship Margaret. Council for appointment 
of sheriffs fixed for the 13th June at Battletown. Order for the 
bonds of certain captains, known to have sailed direct to Scotland, 
to be put in suit. Embargo on all ships for Europe until the 20th 
June. Order for delivery to the Attorney General of certain records 
sold by John Llewellin to Thomas Hemsley. Rules for the Pro- 
vincial Court approved. Certificate of the division of Dorchester 
County into parishes. [Board of Trade. Maryland, 12. pp. 83-91 ; 
and 13. pp. 19-21.] 

May 16. 1,052. Minutes of Council of Barbados. Orders for payments. 
[Col Entry Bk., Vol. XII. , p. 453.] 

May 17. 1,053. Order of the King in Council. Confirming two Acts of 
Whitehall. Barbados, for granting 1,000 to Governor Kendall. [Board of 
Trade. Barbados, 44. pp. 87, 88.] 

May 17. 1,054. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Accounts passed and 
payments ordered. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. p. 277.] 

May 19. 1,055. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Governor Thomas Smith. 
We hope that the information that James More, a chief opposer to 
the payment of our rents, has promised to pay his rent, is true, 
and that others will follow his example. We do not insist on pay- 
ment in fine silver, but in marketable commodities. Siyned. 
Craven, Bath, Ashley, John Archdale for Thomas Archdale, Tho. 
Amy. [Board of Trade. Carolina, 4. p. 16.] 

May 19. 1,056. Minutes of Council and Assembly of Montserrat. 
Members chosen to attend the General Council and Assembly of the 
Leeward Islands. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLVIIL, p. 328.] ' 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 289 



1694. 

May 21. 1,057. Minutes of Council of New York. Order for reporting to 
the Governor by letter that the French are very insolent at Albany, 
having thrown a club over the stockade and appeared several times 
on the hills around the town. Orders for sending all the money in 
the Receiver-General's hands to Robert Livingstone, and for sending 
hour glasses up to Albany for the guards. [Col. Entn/ />/,., Vol. 
LXXV., pp. 528, 529.] 

May 22. 1,058. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Mr. 
Alexander's petition read (sec No. 1024 i.), and decision taken. 

Order for letters to be prepared to the Governments of Massa- 
chusetts and New Hampshire in favour of Mr. Taylor. ]>oard of 
Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 291, 292.] 

May 22. 1,059. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. On the 
petition of William Alexander, referred by order of 19 April (set- 
No. 1024 1.), the Lords agree to recommend that petitioner may 
be given some compensation for the late Lord Stirling's interest in 
Long Island, but not the actual grant for which he asks. 

This report was approved by the King on 30th May. [Board <>J 
Trade. New York, 48. pp. 103, 104.] 

May 22. 1,060. John Povey to Mr. Sotherne. Asking what shipping has 
been taken up for the companies and recruits of foot for New York 
and in what readiness they are, also when the convoy for the mast- 
ships, with whom they are to be sent, will be ready to sail. Draft. 
% p. [Board of Trade. New York, 5. No. 52.] 

May 22. 1,061. John Povey to Mr. Heathcote. Desiring his attendance 
at the Committee of Trade and Plantations on the 24th inst., to give 
an account of the readiness of the two companies and recruits to 
embark for New York. Draft. %p. [Board o) Trade. New York, 5. 

No. 53.] 

May 23. 1,062. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for payment for 

maintenance of French prisoners. 
May 25. Order for payments to Colonel Peter Beckford on account of 

fortifications. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. pp. 277, 278.] 

May 24. 1,063. J. Sotherne to John Povey. The Admiralty have directed 
Admiralty, the Navy Board to provide transport for the recruits and companies 
to New Y'ork either in the mast-ships bound to New England, if 
they will carry them, or in some other shipping bound to those 
parts. But no one has yet been here to say when the men will be 
ready, of which the Navy Board should be informed as soon as may 
be. The convoy for the mast-ships will, it is hoped, be ready in 
about fourteen days. Signed. J. Sotherne. [Board of Trade. 
New York, 5. No. 54.] 

May 24. 1,064. The Admiralty to the Navy Board. Ordering them to 
provide transport for 340 men to New York, in the mast-ships or in 
other ships bound to America. Signed. J. Lowther, H. Priest- 
man, R. Austen, G. Rooke, Jno. Houblon. Copy. 1 p. [Board oj 
Trade. New York, 5. No. 55.] 

8060 T 



290 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1G94. 

May '24. 1,065. Sir Henry Ashurst to John Povey. On the memorial of 
John Taylor (see. No. 1,006) I think that the Government of 
Massachusetts is better able to provide masts and build ships 
for the King's Navy than private men. The Government of 
Massachusetts far from obstructing Mr. Taylor has always 
encouraged him, so that his application was needless ; but if the 
Lords think lit to grant his request we have no objection, provided 
that their letter give Mr. Taylor no ground for interfering with the 
supplies of Naval stores which we have undertaken to furnish. 
Xi</ned. Hen. Ashurst. \ p. Endorsed, Reed. 1 June, '94. 
[Board of Trade. Plantations General, 2. Xo. 86.] 

May 24. 1,066. Lords of Trade and Plantations to the Governor of Massa- 
chusetts and the Lieutenant-Governor of New Hampshire. Directing 
that no obstruction be offered to John Taylor in the legal execution 
of his trade for Naval stores, and in the building of ships. [Board 
of Trade. New England, 85. pp. 63, 64 ; and Col. Entry Bk., 
Vol. C.,pp. 346-348.] 

May 24. 1,067. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. An appeal brought 
by Ann Richards was at her request adjourned, few Councillors 
being present. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV., p. 255.] 

May 26. 1,068. Minutes of Council of New York. Orders appointing 
Dirck Stone Justice for the County of Westchester and Jacobus 
Kierstead Sheriff of King's County. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXV., 
p. 529.] 

May 26. 1,069. The Victualling Board of the Navy to the Navy Board. 

Victualling We have received orders to provide victuals for the troops to be 
Office. sen t to New York, but we must ask for directions as to the actual 
numbers of the men, and as to the allowance of victuals to be pro- 
vided, as we do not remember ever to have furnished any soldiers' 
provisions for New York. You are aware that we were unable to 
make good provision of flesh for this year, so we suggest whether 
some other sort of provisions might not serve for the supply of the 
soldiers. Signed. Tho. Papillon, Jno. Agar, Hum. Ayles. Copy. 
I p. Endorsed, Reed. 30 May. [Board of Trade. New York, 5. 
Xo. 56 ; and 48. pp. 159, 160.] 

May 29. 1,070. J. Sotherne to John Povey. Forwarding the letter from 
Admiralty, the Victualling Board of 26 May, to be laid before the Lords of 

Trade and Plantations, ^p. Endorsed, Read 1 June, '94. [Board 

of Trade. New York, 5. " Xo. 57.] 

1,071. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Mr. Heathcote 
called in, who said that he had raised about fifty men for the New 
York Companies. Orders issued for obtaining a warrant for 
quartering the men in some convenient place. [Board of Trade. 
Journal, 7. p. 293.] 

May 30. 1,072. Minutes of General Assembly of Massachusetts. Names 
of the Council and Representatives. 

The Representatives chose Nehemiah Jewett for Speaker and 
proceeded to the Election of Councillors, 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. '21)1 

1694. 

May 31. The Governor approved the whole of the twenty-eight Councillors, 
who were accordingly sworn. The appeal of Ann Richards against 
the decision of the Probate Court of Suffolk was dismissed. The 
Governor moved the Representatives early to answer the question 
of supply. 

June 1. Bill to ascertain the fees of the Messenger of the House of Repre- 
sentatives read and ordered for second reading. A vote of 500 
for fitting up the galley lately built to cruise 011 the coast was read. 
Samuel Willard thanked for his sermon at the opening of the 
Assembly. Joint Committee appointed to draw up a report 
respecting the proposed incorporation of Sir Matthew Dudley and 
Company. 

June 2. Bill as to the Messenger's fees read a second time. Additional 
Bill for setting forth general privileges read and debated. [Col. 
Entry Ilk., Vol. LXIV., pp. 421-427.] 

May 31. 1,073. John Povey to Mr. Heathcote. Directing him to attend 
the Committee of Trade and Plantations on 1st June on the business 
of despatching the soldiers to New York. Draft. ^ p. Endorsed, 
2 companies, 200 men. To complete those at New York, 80 men. 
Recruits for their old complement, 60 men. Total, 340 men. 
[Board of Trade. New York, 5. No. 58.] 

May 31. 1,074. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. The Council met at 
9 p.m. when the Governor informed it of the arrival of Captain 
Stephen Elliot with warning that a Erench expedition was about to 
sail against Jamaica. Resolved to hold a Council of War. 

Minutes of the Council of War. Orders for publication of Articles 
of War ; for all women and children to be sent from windward to 
Port Royal, and for a path to be cut for their retreat ; that all officers 
give out that any slave killing a Frenchman shall receive his freedom 
and further reward for good service ; that all retired officers appear 
in arms ; and that sixteen foot and six horse be left to patrol 
Guanoboa and as many continued at Sixteen Mile Walks. [Board 
of Trade. Jamaica, 77. pp. 279, 280.] 

June 1. 1,075. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. The draft 
letters to Massachusetts and New Hampshire in favour of Mr. Taylor 
approved. 

Sir Edmund Andros's letter of 5 January read, also a memorial 
as to the state of the revenue and a request for stores of war, which 
last was sent to the Board of Ordnance for estimate of the cost. 

Extract of a letter from the A T ictualling Commissioners of 26 May 
read, and orders issued thereupon (see Xo. 1,069). List of 
documents received from New York. [Board of Trade. Journal, 7. 
pp. 294-297.] 

June 1. 1,076. Memorandum. The Lords of Trade and Plantations 
desire that bedding may be provided for 340 men, who are to be 
sent to New York to recruit the existing companies and form two 
new companies. Draft with corrections. ^ p. Endorsed, Reed. 
28 June, 1694. [Board of Trade. New York, 5. No. 59.] 

June 1. 1,077. John Povey to Mr. Heathcote. You are to attend the 
Board of Admiralty to inform them what number of the troops for 



292 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1694. 

New York will be now ready to go with the convoy for the mast- 
ships. You will also attend the Board of Ordnance, as to bedding 
for these men. Letters to Mr. Sotherne and to the Board of Ord- 
nance are enclosed. Mr. Clerk, the Secretary at War, has been 
ordered to obtain the Queen's order for the subsistence and medicines 
for the men. limit. 1| pp. [Hoard of Trade. New York, 5. 
Xo. 60.] 

June 1. 1,078. John Povey to the Secretary at War. Desiring him to 
obtain the Queen's order for clearing the subsistence of the troops 
for New York, that they may be able to pay off their quarters and 
march as soon as the shipping is ready ; and* further to obtain the 
Queen's order for a chest of medicines. Jlrajt. J p. [Hoard of 
Trade. New York, 5. No. 61.] 

June 1. 1,079. John Povey to Mr. Sotherne. As the 340 men for New 
York cannot all be got ready in time to sail with the mast-ships, 
the Agent for the companies has been ordered to state how many 
are ready to embark at once, that no more shipping than necessary 
may be taken up for them. The men now embarking will be 
victualled in the same manner as the two companies sent to New 
York in January, 1690. The rest will wait for next convoy. [Hoard 
of Trade. New York, 48. pp. 160, 161.] 

June 1. 1,080. John Povey to the Lieutenant-General of Ordnance. 
Ordering him to provide bedding for the troops to be sent out to 
New York. [Hoard of Trade. New York, 48. p. 161.] 

June 1. 1,081. John Povey to the Lieutenant-General of Ordnance. 
Submitting a list of the stores of war asked for by Sir Edmund 
Andros, and asking for an estimate of their cost. [Hoard of Trade. 
Virginia, 36. p. 254.] 

June 5. 1,082. Minutes of General Assembly of Massachusetts. Addi- 
tional Bill for setting forth privileges amended. Bill against 
adultery and polygamy read and amended. Bill for ascertaining 
Messenger's fees passed. Bill for regulating ferries read a first 
time. 

June 6. The Additional Bill as to privileges read a second time. Bill to 
continue duties of impost and excise read a first time. Bill against 
adultery and polygamy passed. Commissioners appointed to 
investigate the refusal of the inhabitants of Newton to contribute to 
the maintenance of the great bridge over the Charles River at 
Cambridge. 

June 7. Additional bill as to privileges passed. Bill to continue duties 
read a second time. James Taylor unanimously elected treasurer. 

June 8. The Governor assented to the election of James Taylor to be 
Treasurer, also to the bill against adultery, the bill to continue . 
duties, and the bill granting 500 to Sir William Phips. Bill to 
regulate trade with Indians read and amended. John W'alley voted 
to be Commissioner of the office of impost and excise. 

June 9. Bill to regulate Indian trade read a second time. Bill to enable 
towns, etc. and proprietors in common to be sued, read a first time. 
[Col Entry BL:, Vol. LXIV., pp. 427-432.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



293 



1(394, 
June 6. 



June 6. 



June 9. 

Office of 
Ordnance. 



June 9. 

Ordnance 
Office. 



June 11. 



1.083. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for abandoning the 
forts to windward, and that all the people come in to Liguanea 
and Kingston with their cattle, negroes, etc. [Board of Trade. 
Jamaica, 77. j>. 278.] 

1.084. Minutes of Council of Nevis. The Council and Assembly 
agreed that a letter be drawn in answer to a letter from the Agents. 

The Council and Assembly agreed that, since they are informed by 
the Agents that the quartering of officers and soldiers is no way 
advantageous to Their Majesties, and since the poor centinels do not 
know (it is thought) that the provisions sent for them by the King 
are disposed of by the officers to their own private advantage, the 
soldiers have been granted free quarter, and it [? the provisions] 
may be turned with advantage to the use of the Island. [This 
appears to be the sense of this entry, irliich an it stands in the original 
is absolutely unintelligible.'] Question of the insurance of the sugar 
to l)e sent home deferred till next meeting. Agreed to leave it to 
the Lieutenant-Governor to procure ministers for the several 
parishes. Joint Committee appointed to draw up the letter to the 
Agents. Permission given to the Treasurer to ship four tons of 
sugar without insurance. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLVIIL, p. 289.] 

1.085. Board of Ordnance to John Povey. On the requisition 
for bedding for the troops for New York we desire you to send the 
Agent of the place to attend us that we may ascertain what quantity 
is required. Signed. Tho. Littleton, Job. Charlton. % j>. Endorsed, 
Read 11 June. [Board of Trade. New York, 5. \o. 62.] 

1.086. Board of Ordnance to Lords of Trade and Planta- 
tions. Forwarding estimate of the cost of warlike stores 
required for Virginia. Sinned. Jo. Charlton, Tho. Littleton, C. 
Musgrave. \ p. Endorsed, Reed. 11 June, 1694. Read 22 May, 
1695. Annexed, 

1,086. i. Estimate of stores of war required for Virginia. Total, 
,807. Signed as tJie letter. 1 p. Endorsed as tlie letter. 
[Board of Trade. Virginia, 5. Xos. 48, 48 i. ; and 36. 
pp. 255-257.] 

1.087. Memorandum as to the revenue in Virginia. By the 
account of the two shillings per hogshead and port duties for 1693, 
the revenue is indebted 1,265. Of this 600 has been sent to New 
York, of which 500 has been ordered to be paid out of quit-rents. 
200 more has been disbursed for fortifications and the remaining 
465 for the usual charges of government. The Governor asks that 
the said several sums, amounting in all to 765, may be repaid out 
of quit-rents. The balance of the revenue, quit-rents, in 1692 
amounted to 3,639. Of this 1,135 has been ordered for the 
College, 100 to Mr. Blair, and 500 (as aforesaid) to New York, 
leaving 1,903, out of which the 765 may be paid, if this be 
thought fit. The Governor asks also for military stores. May not 
this charge be paid from the balance of 1,138? 2 pp. Endorsed, 
Reed. 1 June, 1694. Read 22 May, 1695. [Board of Trade. 
Virginia, 5. No. 49 ; and 36. pp. 253, 254.] 



294 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1694. 

June 12. 1,088. Journal of Assembly of Barbados. No quorum. 
Adjourned to 10 July. [Col. Entry Jlk., Vol. XIV., p. 868.] 

June 12. 1,089. Nathaniel Byfield to Joseph Dudley. A French privateer 

Boston. has recently taken five of our fishing boats, and as the Nonsuch is 
gone to St. Johns and the Conception is laid up for survey of 
defects, we have nothing to attack the French or to convoy our 
merchant vessels except a small vessel of about 70 tons, built by 
order of the last Assembly. She may do service against small 
privateers but is not comparable to the transport of near 200 tons 
taken by the Nonsuch last year, which was sold by the Governor, 
for reasons known to himself, for ,500. On the 30th of May last 
the Assembly met to the number of more than forty members, in 
the town hall at Boston. We met between 8 and 9 in the morning, 
and after waiting two hours sent a message to the Council asking 
for members to swear us in ; but it was not until after dinner that 
the Governor sent for us to attend him, which we did to the number 
of fifty-six. I had been returned for Bristol, Captain Davis for 
Springfield, Samuel Legge for Marblehead, Captain Disley for Oxford, 
Timothy Clarke for Chencford (?), and Ebenezer Thornton for 
Swansea. On our coming in the Governor said that there were 
many more of the gentlemen of Boston than could serve for the 
town, and that, for reasons which he would give later, I, Davis, 
Dudley Clarke and Captain Foxcroft should not be sworn. The 
rest being sworn, not without confusion, I told the Governor that 
the House of Bepresentatives were proper judges of their own 
members, but he commanded silence ; and when Samuel Legge, 
having held up his hand among the rest, came forward to sign, he 
was stopped by the Governor for being a non-resident of Marble- 
head. After some discourse among ourselves, we five agreed to go 
again to the Governor and Council, with myself as spokesman, to 
claim to be sworn in as duly elected members. We did so accordingly 
and I made the claim, though the Governor kept forbidding me to 
speak, and threatened me if I did not hold my tongue. We 
then returned to our own House, having told the Governor that 
what we had done was the least that we could do. In the House of 
Bepresentatives Captain Legge took his stand and said he would not 
go out for all the Governor, until rejected by the House. The 
Governor, hearing of this, came down to the Bepresentatives in fury 
without his hat, said that he had heard that a member, against 
whom he had objected, had refused to leave the House unless the 
House put him out, and that he wished he knew who it was. 
Legge at once came forward, and the Governor said that he had 
nothing against him and wished he had been returned for Boston, 
in which case he could freely have embraced him, but as to the 
others, if the House did not turn them out he would turn 
them out himself. Now if the making of such a law (which 
we hope you will get negatived) and the refusal to swear duly 
elected members be allowed, so that a Governor shall be able to pack 
the Assembly, farewell to all good ; and I shall find another place 
to live in. That law is contrary to our charter, though, to our 
shame be it spoken, we infringe on our own privileges simply to be 
revenged of particular persons. Mr. J. M. ['? Joshua Moody or 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. '21)5 

1694. 

Increase Mather] said a month ago that, but for myself, that law 
would not have been passed ; which Mr. Willard well touched on in 
his election sermon, but, as you will see, to no purpose. The 
Speaker has issued writs, differing from that form prescribed by 
law, for the election of members in our places. To me personally to 
be out of the Assembly is ease, for I have my own business to 
attend to, but it is ruinous if we are to be excluded as we five 
have been, and so it will be found if this law be confirmed. We 
are now busy over a letter received from the Agents, and the 
thing proposed is to raise a sum of money and send it home 
to get the laws passed, and to send an Agent to stand in 
the gap ; with which the Assembly will doubtless comply. It is 
suggested here that you injured yourself much in a public hearing 
before the Lords of Trade by saying that Sir W. Phips had not 
done one good thing since he had been Governor, when } T OU were 
silenced by the question whether the peace with the Eastern Indians 
were not a good thing. It is also said that you have conformed to 
the Church of England, or you could not hold your place under 
Lord Cutts etc. 

A ship lately came in to Rhode Island with great quantities of 
gold and silver, most likely obtained by wickedness. The people 
belonging to her were in Boston, and the Lieutenant-Governor 
issued a warrant against the captain and others, but when the 
Governor came back from Pemaquid he called the warrant in. Much 
more might be added about the power of gold. Governor Eletcher has 
been unhandsomely treated by the Mohawks and Senecas, who 
were negotiating with the French while he was negotiating with 
them. They admitted and excused themselves by pointing out that 
of all the six English Nations (so they call them, beginning at 
Virginia) New York, though small and unable to defend them 
from the French, alone concerned herself with the war. It is more 
than probable that they will break with us, which will be ruinous ; 
but while we are divided into so many governments we cannot keep 
the peace nor defend ourselves. Pray do not let the Governor's 
behaviour towards the five members die, but let us know how it is 
resented. We languish for want of news, and I beg to cee you here ; 
but you had better not come till you are well equipped, and then 
the sooner the better. I look upon the dangers of this country as 
greater now than ever, and without a general governor we shall all 
be ruined. Copy. 2J pp. Endorsed, Reed. 25 July, '94, from 
Mr. Dudley. \_Board of Trade. New England, 7. Xo. 31.] 

June 12. 1,090. Minutes of General Assembly of Massachusetts. Bill to 
regulate Indian trade again read. Voted that if the ship lately hired 
for a despatch boat be lost, the public will make good the loss to 
the owners. The Governor assented to the Bill for continuing 
duties. 

June 13. Bill to regulate Indian Trade passed. Bill to raise a province 
tax read. Bill to enable towns, etc., to be sued read again. The 
Commissioners reported as to the maintenance of the great bridge 
over Charles River ; and it was voted that the town of Newton bear 
one third of the cost thereof. 



296 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1694. 
June 14. Bill to prohibit purchase of lands from Indians read. Bill for 

granting the township of Tiverton passed. The Governor assented 

to the Bill for regulation of the Indian trade. 
June 15. Bill to prohibit purchase of lands from Indians again read. 

Eeport of the Committee on Sir Matthew Dudley and Company's 

proposals read. 
June 16. Bill to raise a tax of a shilling per poll and one penny 

per pound for estates- read. Additional bill to the Act concerning 

strangers read. [Co/. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV., pp. 482-436.] 

June 13. 1,091. Minutes of Council of New York. Order for the discharge 
of the last year's quotas of men for the frontier as the new year's 
quotas appear, and that those who have been relieved be not detained 
owing to the neglect and delay of those counties that have not sent 
up reliefs. [Col. Entry HI;., Vol. LXXV., p. 530.] 

June 13. 1,092. Minutes of Council of Virginia. Seven masters of ships 
forbidden to sail for Europe until a fleet be formed. Governor 
Fletcher's application for 200 men being read, it was agreed that the 
revenue of the Colony could not stand the charge. On a report of 
strange Indians on the frontiers, it was resolved to reinforce the 
rangers by eighteen men. 

June 14. Order for ships for Europe to assemble in James River and be 
ready to sail on the 14th of July. Order for the justices for Charles 
City to attend on the 17th July to answer for their disobedience to an 
order to prosecute certain offenders. Ordered that Sittenbourne 
parish be not divided unless they can agree to join the next parish. 

.June 15. Order for close confinement of a condemned criminal. \_Col. 
Entry BL'., Vol. LXXXIV., pp. 859-864.] 

June 14. 1 ,093. Minutes of the Council of Maryland. Certain Piscattaway 
Indians appeared in relation to the murder of an Englishman in 
Charles County. Order for the murderers to be demanded from 
the Emperor, and for a party to range from Potomac falls to 
Patuxent falls. Order for Nicholas Greenberry to have power to 
raise twelve men to range whenever he thinks necessary. Letters 
from the Governor of New York for assistance ; resolved to answer 
that at present there is no money, but that the matter will be laid 
before the Assembly as soon as the new Governor arrives. Receipt 
for the 250 formerly sent, received. Order for a court for trial 
of a French prize-ship. Thomas Johnson brought up and committed 
for treasonable words until he find security to answer the charge at 
next court. [Board of Trade. Maryland, 12. pp. 91-95 ; and 13. 
pp. 21-23.] 

June 14. 1,094. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for payment of 
500 towards fitting up a fire-ship, and of other expenses on account 
of defence. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. p- 278.] 

1,095. John Povey to Henry Guy. Forwarding a memorandum 
as to the revenue of Virginia, and the estimate of the cost of stores 
of war required by the Colony, for the opinion of the Lords of the 
Treasury. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 36. p. 258.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 297 

1694. 

June 15. 1,096. Governor, Council and Assembly of Massachusetts to 
Lords of Trade and Plantations. We thank you for the opportunity 
of suggesting our objections to the incorporation of a company to 
work minerals, raise hemp and naval stores and purchase lands in 
New England, as is prayed for by Sir Matthew Dudley and others. 
The proposed company has already waived several heads of the 
proposed charter in deference to the objections of the Attorney 
General, so we shall only represent further, that all British sub- 
jects, singly or in company, have always had free liberty of ship- 
building, fishing, and working and trading in such commodities as 
they think fit, subject to the Acts of Trade and Navigation. For 
the gaining of such commodities as are named by the Company at 
easier rates, we think that the Company should be on an equal 
footing with all other traders, otherwise with so great a stock 
it will engross the trade to the ruin of the Jirst planters, 
who settled this country at their own expense and defended 
it against all enemies. Should the Company be incorporated, 
it can make no settlement but by acquiring large tracts of 
land. Many of the people here have little better title than 
bare possession ; so if the corporation make strict and narrow 
inquisition by the law, the settlers will not be able to uphold them- 
selves against so wealthy a body. The first planters were so much 
troubled by litigious controversies over title to lands that they 
passed laws to provide that no purchase of lands from Indians should 
be valid without the previous sanction of the General Court ; and the 
invalidation of this establishment, by grant to the proposed corpora- 
tion or otherwise, would mean ruin or at least endless litigation to 
many. Siffiu.'d. William Phips, Nehemiah Jewet, Speaker of the 
Assembly. 2 pp. Endorsed, Reed. 14 Feb. 1094-5. Read 22 May, 
1695. [Board of Trade. New England, 7. Xo. 32 ; and 35. 
pp. 183-186.] 

June 16. 1,097. Lieutenant-Governor Usher to Lords of Trade and 
Boston. Plantations. On the 1st inst. I gave you an account of my suspension 
of John Hincks from the Council, and of my commitment of William 
Partridge, the Treasurer, for issuing money contrary- to the King's 
Commission. Herewith you will receive an account of stores, and 
the minutes of Council. As to the allegations of the Council in 
their letter of 19 January, I would reply, that when I ordered the 
Secretary to sail for England not one of the Council objected ; that 
when I moved the Council to thank the King for sending the guns, 
they refused to do so ; that I agree with them that the cessation 
with the Indians may be interrupted at any moment, so beg for 100 
soldiers ; that they should have declared their minds as to the 
Secretary's mission when the order was made in Council. Signed. 
John Usher. 1 p. Endorsed, Reed. 7 Sept. 1694. Abstract read 
28 Sept. '94. [Board of Trade. New Hampshire, 1. No. 34; and 
Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXVII., pp. 249-251.] 

June 18. 1,098. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Governor 
Fletcher's letter of 28 March and that of the Council of New York 
of 3 April read. The Attorney General ordered to hasten his report 
on the boundaries of Rhode Island. The quota of Pennsylvania to 



298 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1694. 

be considered when the Queen's decision as to the other quotas is 
known. Draft letters as to the quota of Connecticut. 

Thomas Gardner's petition read and referred to Lord Howard 
of Effingham. Agreed to lay the letters from the Commissioners 
of Customs of 22 February and of Mr. Guy of 5 April before the 
Queen in Council, [Board of Trade. Journal, 7. pp. 297, 298.] 

June 18. 1,099. Petition of Thomas Gardner to the Privy Council. For 
further consideration of his claim to the reward offered for 
apprehension of Nathaniel Bacon in 1676. 1 p. Inscribed. Read 
18 June, '94. Referred to Lord Howard. [Hoard of Trade. 
Virginia, 5. Xo. 50 ; and 36. pp. 277, 278.] 

June 18. 1,100. John Povey to Lord Howard of Effingham. Forwarding 
him a copy of Thomas Gardner's petition for his report. [Board 
of Trade. Virginia, 36. p. 279.] 

June 18. 1,101. Minute of Lords of Trade and Plantations. That the 
presentment of the Commissioners of Customs of 22 February (sec 
Xo. 1005 i) be laid before the King. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 36. 
p.- 262.] 

June 18. 1,102. John Povey to the Attorney General. Desiring his 
report on the boundaries of Rhode Island and New England. Draft. 
% p. [Board of Trade. New England, 7. Xo. 33.] 

June 18. 1,103. Minutes of General Assembly of Massachusetts. The 
Report of the Committee appointed to hear pleas for abatements 
and allowances in the assessment, read and approved. The Bill 
for a poll-tax passed. 

June 19. Voted that an additional 50 be given to Increase Mather for his 
services as Agent ; also that 100 be given to Elisha Cooke and 
Thomas Oakes ; also 60 to Ichabod Wiswall for his services on a 
journey to England. 10 granted to Ambrose Daws in compensa- 
tion for the loss of one of his eyes in the public service. 

June 20. ^5 voted to Andrew Hamilton for encouragement of the Post 
Office. A Bill concerning Sarah Price was read and sent down for 
concurrence. A representation against the proposed incorporation 
of Sir Matthew Dudley's company was read, approved and signed. 

June 21. 100 voted to William Blathwayt ; and 100 each to Sir Henry 
Ashurst and Mr. Constantino Phips, with 200 more for expense of 
their office. James Taylor sworn in as Treasurer. Report on the 
arrears of rates in the towns and county of Hampshire read, and 
the sum ordered to be paid to the Treasurer, with certain abate- 
ments. Bill to enable the Treasurer to answer present demands 
read and committed. 

June 22. The bill last named was passed. A vote of the Representatives 
to send Commissioners to treat with the Indians at Albany was 
agreed to. 250 voted to James Taylor for his last year's service as 
Treasurer. A committee appointed to revise the accounts of the 
late Government of Massachusetts. Adjourned to 5 September. 
[Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV., pp. 437-444.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 



1694. 

June 19. 1,104. John Povey to the Lieutenant-General of Ordnance. 
Enclosing a certificate of the arms wanting for the troops to be 
sent to New York. Draft. J p. [Board of Trade. New York, 5. 
No. 63.] 

[June 19.] 1,105. Certificate of articles wanting for 80 recruits. 80 fire- 
locks, 80 cartridge boxes, 80 girdles and frogs, 80 " byonets," 80 
hatchets, bedding, etc. 1 p. [Board of Trade. New York, 5. 
No. 64.] 

June 20. 1,106. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for fresh meat to 

be furnished to the forces, and arrangements made accordingly. 

Order for ships to be sent to report the danger of the Island to 

England, calling if possible also at Barbados. 
June 21. Application from Liguanea for reinforcements received. Agreed 

to reinforce it from Passage Fort if necessary. [Board of Trade. 

Jamaica, 77. pp. 281, 282.] 

June 21. 1,107. The Queen to the Governor of New York. Restricting his 
Whitehall, command of the militia of Connecticut to the quota of 120 men, of 
which the proportion is not to be greater than that required from 
other Colonies, except in case of imminent danger of invasion, when 
he may, with the advice of the Governor, command the whole of the 
militia, leaving a sufficient force for the protection of the Colony. 
Countersigned. John Trenchard. [Board of Trade. New York, 48. 
pp. 127-130.] 

June 21. 1,108. The Queen to the Magistrates of Connecticut. Rehearsing 
the substance of the foregoing despatch arid ordering their com- 
pliance therewith. Major General Winthrop will inform them of 
the gracious intentions of the Crown in respect of their rights 
and privileges, he having been very zealous in their behalf. 
Countersigned. John Trenchard. [Board of Trade. New York, 48. 
pp. 130-134.] 

June 23. 1,109. Lieutenant-Governor Sir William Beeston to Sir John 
Jamaica. Trenchard. I have already reported our danger from our own 
weakness and the growing power of the French. What I foresaw 
has now come upon us. The French making daily inroads on our 
out-parts, I sent the Falcon to cruise to eastward and keep them 
off, which she did, for six French sail which were designing to 
plunder St. Davids and St. Thomas refused to fight her, and turned 
back to' Petit Guavos. Three strong French men-of-war had just 
arrived there which, together with another already in that port, 
were sent out in search of the Falcon which they easily found and 
took. They then formed a design to attack us in force, while we, 
knowing nothing either of the design or the capture of the Falcon, 
sent up a flag of truce to complain of ill usage done to our people 
by privateers. The messengers Major Low and Lieutenant-Colonel 
Thomas Clarke, were detained, which made me suspicious ; 
and at length on the last of May Captain Elliott and two of 
his men, prisoners with the French, stole away in the 
night at the hazard of their lives in a very small canoe and 
brought me warning. On this I immediately endeavoured to get 
Fort Charles finished, collected all the forces from the out parts 



BOO COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1694. 

about the town, made breastworks at the landing places and 
wherever they might be useful and altogether brought things into 
as good a posture of defence as we could. We had but just time to 
accomplish it, when on Sunday morning, the 17th inst., their fleet 
of fourteen sail came in sight and came to an anchor in Cow 
ti&y, seven leagues to windward of Port Royal. There they 
landed, and have ever since been ravaging, plundering and burning 
all before them in St. David's or St. Thomas; but I had ordered the 
people with the best of their goods and many of their negroes to 
these parts, about three days before. We now expect them daily to 
attack us, and we shall do our best to defend ourselves; but a 
deserter, an Irishman, says they are three thousand men. If so it 
is a third more than we can raise. Our people seem hearty yet, but 
time will weary them out and the consideration that they have left 
their homes and families to the mercy of the enemy or negroes. 
The best we can expect is that they will not attack our united 
forces ; but then having command of the sea they will plunder and 
destroy all out-parts of the Island, and I fear to think of the 
consequences to people who live well here but have nothing anywhere 
else. Mr. Benjamin Way, who goes home with this letter, will give 
you many particulars which I cannot mention. I beg you to lay 
them and our condition before the King and Council that relief may 
be sent to us and advice of its coming despatched in good time ; 
otherwise I doubt my ability to prevent the people from complying 
with the enemy in order to save part of their property. If this 
happens the Island will be lost, and with it the English trade in the 
West Indies. It will also be fatal to the Spaniards, for there is no 
Island comparable to Jamaica in these parts either for trade or a 
seat of war. I intend to send off another ship, with three gentlemen 
on board, in a week or ten days, and soon after that another for fear 
of miscarriage, that relief may be sent to us. The relieving force 
, must be speedy and very considerable, at least six men-of-war and 
a thousand or twelve hundred soldiers ; else all will be lost, for the 
French will never leave us now 7 till they conquer or we beat them 
off the coast. This is matter of great moment, and I hope for your 
utmost favour herein. ~L^pj>. Duplicate. [America and West Indies. 
540. No. 39 : and Hoard of Trade. Jamaica, 53. pp. 192-196.] 

June 23. 1,110. Copy of the foregoing. Endorsed, Reed, and Read at the 
Committee, 17 Aug. '94. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. 
No. 33.] 

[June 23.] 1,111. Computation of the strength of the French and English 
at Jamaica. The French have four men-of-war, with 160 guns and 
950 men, also about 1,500 men at Petit Guavos. The strength of 
Jamaica is reckoned at 1,630 men. liouyli draft. I p. [Board of 
Trade. Jamaica, 7. No. 34.] 

June 24. 1,112, Minutes of Council of Jamaica. A letter from a French 
rnan-of-war as to exchange of prisoners was considered, on which 
letter was a notice that unless William Grubbin's wife were sent 
back, none of the English nation should be returned. Agreed to 
take no notice of it. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77- pp. 282, 283.] 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 301 

1694. 

June 25. 1,113. Account given by a deserter from the French fleet of the 
force designed against Jamaica. Twenty-two ships, 278 guns, and 
3,164 men. Signed. Wm. Beeston. 1 j>. Endorsed, Reed. 
15 Oct. '94. 

Duplicate of the above. 1 }>. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 7. 
Xos. 35, 36.] 

June 27. 1,114. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order permitting the 
overseers of St. Mary's to return to their plantations, and directing 
a small reinforcement to inarch to YVithywood. \Board /' Trade. 
Jamaica, 77. ]>. 283.] 

June 29. 1,115. Samuel Gardner to Sir John Trenchard. On receipt of 
Ni'vis. your letter, with the petition of the executors and legatees of John 
Xetheway to the King, I made enquiry and shall see that the 
petitioners have justice done to them. Sit/ned. Sam. Gardner. 
1 p. Endowed, R. Dec. f>, 1694. [America and ll'est Indies. 
551. Xo. 85.] 

June 29. 1,116. Minutes of Council of Maryland. Six of the chief men 
of the Piscattaways attended ; and the surrender of the Anacosti 
King was required of them, for the murder lately committed. Order 
for a Commission for his trial. Order for a session of the Council for 
the election of sheriffs. Representation of the Justices of Calvert 
County that they have been obliged to adjourn the Court for want 
of a duly appointed sheriff. Order for the said justices to attend 
next Provincial Court. [Board of Trade. Maryland, 13. pp. 23- 
27.] 

June 30. 1,117. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order to move the two 
companies from Passage Fort to the town and to St. Dorothy's, as 
they are sickly. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. p. 213.] 

July 1. 1,118. Certificate of Colonel Henry Holt. That Paul de Bris- 

London. sack served as a volunteer in Bolton's regiment at the talcing of 
St. Kitts, at Mariegalante, Guadeloupe and Martinique, at which 
last he was dangerously wounded. On board H.M.S. Diamond, 
wherein he was a passenger, he behaved with great courage at the 
defence of the ship and was thrice wounded. After the capture of 
the ship he was much ill-treated by the enemy, who stripped him 
naked and threw him into prison at St. Malo, where I saw him in a 
sad condition. He also remitted me a sum of money, which I had 
put in my chest, and which I lost, with everything else of my 
own. tiiyned. H. Holt. Copy. 1-J pp. [Board of Trade. 
Leeward Islands, 4. Xo. 38.] 

July 1. 1,119. Lieutenant-Governor Usher to Lords of Trade and 

Boston. Plantations. I send the proceedings relating to the suspension of 
Mr. John Hineks. As to his answer thereto, he was summoned to 
hear the charges and proofs against him but refused to attend. 
After his suspension he caused great disturbance by giving out that 
neither he nor any of the people would obey warrants issued by 
Captain Fryer, who by the King's instructions was to succeed him 
in Council. Last April I sent a warrant to the Captain of the fort 
to demand of Hineks two barrels of powder taken by him out of the 



302 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1694. 

King's stores, or 28 in purchase of the same. He disoheyed the 
order and still retains the money received for the said powder. I 
should have no help in further proceedings against Hincks, so await 
your instructions. The Assembly met in May. I enclose copy of 
my speech, and of their answer, which I take as a reflection on the 
King's commission. I offered to the Assembly to lay before the 
King proposals for the security of the place and the support of the 
Government. After ten days' sitting they sent their answer, than 
which, I submit, no greater affront was ever put on the King's com- 
mission, namely Luke xiv., 28, 29, " This man began to build and was 
not able to finish." Thus though there is absolute necessity to raise 
money for the preservation of the place they positively refuse to do 
so. The meaning is that if the King will keep New Hampshire as a 
separate province, he must do so out of his own Exchequer in 
England ; and if the King expects them to support it he will find 
that he has not first sat down to count the cost. I have given 300 
of my own money to the expenses of Government and much of my 
time, but to this day have not received a penny. I have tried with 
abundance of civility and patience to gain them, but unless they may 
govern as they please they will do nothing. I have also committed 
William Partridge, the Treasurer, to the fort, until he gives 
security in 2,000 to answer to the Commissioners of the Treasury 
in England. I have repeatedly told him of the Royal order that no 
money shall be issued from the Treasury unless first allowed in 
Council and a warrant signed by the Governor or President and 
countersigned by the Secretary. Yet he disobeys this order ; he 
refuses to pay money according to my warrant and pays it away to 
other persons without warrant. In his accounts he has charged the 
King with 36 for clamps for the fort, when not a penny of work 
was done ; and he has paid away great sums for work of which no 
particulars were laid before Council, contrary to my positive order. 
Again, besides his own salary he has charged the King with 18, 
for money converted to his own use out of the King's revenue, 
without any order in Council. The Council called him to account 
for this, but he says that what is not allowed in his accounts will be 
given credit for, which is as much as to say, catch a thief, let him 
go, and he will pay that which he has stolen. This behaviour of the 
Treasurer is due not to ignorance, but to wilfulness and contempt 
of the King's commission. He refuses to give me copies of his 
receipts and vouchers ; I am sure Government by the King's com- 
mission was never so sorely tried as in New Hampshire. Though 
the people are but few, yet being awed by two or three persons they 
do all that in them lies to affront the Royal authority. I am sorry 
to give you so unsatisfactory an account. When they could govern 
themselves the people's purses could be stretched to pay for their 
irregularities, though they were poorer than they are now ; but now, 
let the King appoint a Governor and if they do not kill him out- 
right they will starve him to death before they will give one penny 
to his subsistence. Signed. John Usher. 2 pp. Endorsed, Reed. 
9 March, '94. Read 22 May, 1695. Enclosed, 
1,119. i. Copy of the orders and warrant for John Hincks to appear 
and answer the charges against him. Sworn evidence of 
Captain Shadrach Walton that John Hincks removed four 



AMEKICA ANT) WEST INDIES. 303 

1694. 

barrels of powder out of the King's stores, without the 
Lieutenant-Governor's order and without his own know- 
ledge. Further evidence that the Treasurer gave an order 
for payment of 25 to Captain Walton out of the rates, 
which rates Hincks gave orders not to he gathered. The 
Treasurer, being asked why he paid this money without 
warrant, gave assurance that he had paid none without an 
order in Council. 

Reasons for suspending John Hincks. That he had 
taken upon himself to prove wills, etc. without authority, 
and refused to give up the said wills. That he had taken, 
without orders, four barrels of powder from the King's 
stores, sold them, and converted the money to his own use, 
and refused to return either the powder or the money. 
That he had ordered the sum of .25, for which a warrant 
had been issued by the Treasurer for payment to Captain 
Walton, not to be collected ; and that he had refused to 
attend and answer these charges when summoned. Copy. 
% pp. Endorsed, Reed. 9 March, 1694-5. 

1,119. ii. Speech of Lieutenant-Governor Usher to the Assembly 
of New Hampshire. 18 May, 1694. I must remind you 
of the King's gracious care in taking you under his 
immediate Government, and sending you great guns and 
powder to the value of 1,500. You have been witnesses 
of my own care for the province, yet I have not received a 
penny from you. Let me remind you of the passage in 
Corinthians, "No man goeth to war at his own charge." 
Sundry debts are due for wages due to soldiers and to 
garrisons, and money is needed for repair of the fort, and 
for building a house for the King's stores, which I judge 
may amount to 1,000. Also money is needed for the 
support of the Government. If you strengthen not my 
hands you cannot expect such assistance for defence and 
security of the province as I could wish to give. I beg 
that you will despatch this business speedily. 

Answer of the Assembly. We know that to raise money 
for security and defence of the province is as much for 
our own interest as for the King's service. We are satis- 
fied with your quotation from Corinthians, and would 
answer it by Luke xiv. 28, 29. Now that the cost can be 
counted we find that we cannot defray so much as 1,000. 
Even a less sum could not be collected for several months, 
for most of the people depend on corn and cattle for 
money from which to pay their nites, and neither will be 
fit for market for a considerable time. We hope that the 
money in the Treasurer's hands and current revenue will 
suffice to pay the province's debts. AYe shall defer any 
support to the Government until w 7 e hear the result of the 
Secretary's mission to England. 

Message of the "Lieutenant-Governor. You kept me so 
long waiting for your answer, that I hope you will not 
judge my delay in replying too hardly. You did well to 
remind me of Luke xiv. 28, 29, and I ask you to choose 



304 COLONIAL PAPERS. 

1694. 

two members to form a joint committee to count the cost 
of repairing the fort. 21 May, 1694. 

Answer of the Assembly. Having already given you 
our views as to raising money, we beg respectfully to 
refer you to them, as we can give no other answer. 
21 May, 1694. 

Message from the Lieutenant-Governor. To refer to 
^ your former statement is no answer. 24 May, 1694. 

Message from the Assembly. Then we answer Nay. 

Message from the Lieutenant-Governor. I ask you for 
602 ; viz. ,202 due for w r ork already done at the fort, 
100 for a store house, and 400 for a sconce of refuge. 

Answer of the Assembly. We cannot raise the money, 
and we believe the money in the Treasurer's hands and 
the current revenue to be sufficient to pay our debts and 
for present needs. Besides you tell us that the whole of 
our affairs have been submitted to the King, so we loyally 
await his pleasure. 

Message from the Lieutenant-Governor. The King will 
judge of your loyalty, when you refuse to join in esti- 
mating the cost of work necessary for the safety of the 
country. I have submitted the Council's estimate to you, 
and showed you my commission to erect forts, but you 
refuse to grant the money. You are therefore dissolved. 

Minutes of Council of New Hampshire. 19 May, 1694. 
The Treasurer presented his accounts, and on examination 
replied as follows, That he had no authority to take 18 
for himself, that he had not paid to an officer the sum 
ordered by warrant, that he had Mr. Hincks's order to pay 
36 for clamps when the work was not done, that he had 
an order of Council for a certain payment of 5, but 
neither order nor warrant for another payment of 8. 
The Council disallowed the charge of 36 and 8; and a 
warrant was issued for taking the Treasurer, William 
Partridge, into custody. The. icliole, 4 pp. Inscribed, 
Reed. 12 Nov. 1694. 
1,119. m. A copy of the Minutes of Council of 19 May, 1694, above 

abstracted. 2 pp. Endorsed, Reed. 9 March, 1694-5. 
1,119. iv. Abstract of the items objected to in the Treasurer's 
accounts, amounting to 136/L ^ p. Endorsed, Reed. 14 
Nov. 1694. [Board of Trade. New Hampshire, 1. Nos. 
35, 35 i. -iv. ; and (without enclosures) Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 
LXVIL, pp. 257-261.] 

July 2. 1,120. Minutes of Council of Nevis. Letter to Governor 
Colrington. We are deputed by the Council and Assembly to 
represent to you the unkindness of Lieutenant-General Hill to this 
Island. For two years past he has put a guard over the salt-ponds 
in St. Kitts to prevent any (except certain persons) from gathering 
it, until a few days ago the rain fell and wasted it. This year again 
there appeared a vast quantity of salt, but he refused permission to 
gather it till the 18th of May, when the rains fell and continued so 
long as to waste it for this season. Consequently, if the French 



AMERICA AND WEST INDIES. 305 

1694. 

should take our provision ships, we shall be compelled to make use 
of our stock, which will soon be consumed. This will be a hardship 
to all and especially to the poor. We beg you to grant us free access 
to the salt, without restraint, as the seasons may ofi'er. The 
Lieutenant General also has often been desired to exchange shot 
with us, weight for weight, since much of ours is too big for our 
guns and much of his too small for his own ; but he returns no 
answer. Again we require a gunsmith to repair our arms, but: 
though he promised us to send us one, he has not done so, and 
many have been put to great expense in taking their arms to St. 
Kitts for repair. We also complain that many of our runaway 
negroes are detained in St. Kitts under colour of an order for paying 
1,000 Ibs. of sugar per head and sixpence a day for them during 
their imprisonment, which sums, if due notice be not given, may 
amount to more than their value. Signed. Jno. Smargin, Jno. 
Cole. [Co/. Entry Bk., Vol. XLVIII., p. 290.] 

July 2. 1,121. Lieutenant-Governor Sir William Beeston to Sir John 

Jamaica. Trenchard. I enclose copy of mine of 23 June. The enemy are 
twenty-two sail and three thousand men and odd, as appears from 
the account of a deserter, which agrees with that of some escaped 
British prisoners. Most of their ships are now at Port Morant and 
their men ashore thereabouts, burning and destroying all they 
meet. Some men have been killed on both sides, but few, for it is 
too far for us to march against them, and also very unsafe, for they 
are watching for us to divide our forces, when they will fall on our 
strength hereabouts. We have nothing at sea but the Advice, and 
she has but seventy men, though she has been pressing ever since 
last November and has frightened all our seamen away, put the 
Crown to great expense and done us no service. The least I can 
expect is that the enemy will destroy all the outparts ; and, as they 
have command of the sea, this part here will not be able to support 
the people and forces here as well as the many that will be ruined 
when the enemy is destroying. So I can only commend our 
condition to the King and beg for speedy relief. P.M. July 4th. 
They are now burning all in St. George's and St. Mary's. Duplicate. 
% p. [Amenoa and West Indies. 540. No. 39.] 

July 2. 1,122. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor referred 

the Council to the minutes of his proceedings in Pennsylvania, and 
ordered the news of the treaty between the French and Indians to 
be read. Letter from Governor Treat read, reporting a rumour in 
Connecticut that Governor Fletcher had threatened to proclaim war 
against the Five Nations unless they should come in within a 
hundred days. Order for the proceedings at Albany to be printed 
and distributed in order to check these false reports. Piesolved to 
summon the justices who are negligent in collecting taxes before 
the Governor and Council. [Col. Entn/ file., Vol. T<XXV., pp. 
531, 532.] 

July 3. 1,123. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Order for the arrest of 

Captain Usher Tyrrell for insubordination and conniving at 
desertion. Leave given to despatch a vessel to the Spanish coast 
to warn ships not to come to Jamaica. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 

77. p. 284.] 

8060 u 



306 COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1694. 

July 4. 1,124. Minutes of Council and Assembly of Montserrat. Act 
passed for reimbursement of those who have lent money to the 
Island. [Col Entry Bk., Vol. XLVIIL, p. 329.] 

July 5. 1,125. Minutes of Council of New York. Orders for sundry 
payments. John Van Comp's case about a grant of land referred to 
a Committee for examination and report. A Committee appointed 
to see to the repair of the Governor's lodgings in the fort. Order 
for leasing the cellar under the Custom house to the best advantage, 
it being valueless for the public service. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 
LXXV., pp. 531-533.] 

July 5. 1,126. Minutes of Council of Massachusetts. The Lieutenant- 
Governor presented the King's letter with orders as to the charges 
against Sir William Phips. The 17th inst. was appointed for 
receiving of evidence. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXIV.,pp. 255, 256.] 

July 5. 1,127. Petition of William Penn to the Queen and Privy Council. 
Protesting against the inclusion of Pennsylvania in Governor 
Fletcher's commission. 1 p. Inscribed, Bead 5 July, 1694. 
Referred to Mr. Attorney and Solicitor General. [America and 
West Indies. 599. No. II; and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXVI., 
pp. 41, 42.] 

July 5. 1,128. Order of the Privy Council. Referring William Penn's 
petition to the Attorney and Solicitor General for report. [Col. 
Entry Bk., Vol. LXXVI., p. 42.] 

[July 5.] 1,129. A collection of documents relating to the sailing