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Full text of "Colonial records of Pennsylvania"

GENEALOGY 
974.8 
P384, 
1745-1754 



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Co/ox/ aj ff*ea d rdS o ~t r& r 

MINUTES 



OF THE 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL 



PENNSYLVANIA , 

FROM THE ORGANIZATION TO THE TERMINATION 
OF THE PROPRIETARY GOVERNMENT. 



PUBLISHED BY THE STATE. 



VOL. V., 

CONTAINING THE PROCEEDINGS OP COUNCIL FROM DECEMBER 17TH y 
1745, TO 20th MARCH, 1754, BOTH days included. 



HARRISBURG; 

PRINTED BY THEO. FENN & CO 



CONTENTS. 

£369429 



Address of Council to the King, 51. And to the Assembly, 96. 
Of Governor and Council to King on death of Prince of Wales, 
527. 

Aix-la-Chapelle, peace of, 330, 343, 359-362. 

Albany, account of Treaty held at, with the Indians, 7-26. 

Artillery Company formed, 267. 

Assembly, Messages to and from, (See Messages.) On Union 
for defence, 32, 37. On bills of credit, 44, 45, 48, 49. Ad- 
dress to the King, 51. No money for war, 74. Called, 135. 
Writ for, 135. Money to King, 160. Letter to proprietaries, 
159. Complain of their frequency, 276. Resolutions of Coun- 
cil respecting, 277-279. Reply of, 334. Address to Governor 
— illegal meeting, 492, 494. 

Association formed for defence, 158. Encouraged, by Council, 158, 
161. Parade, 168. Officers appointed, 174. 

Associators, Officers take the oaths, 183. Of Chester county, 
officers, 185. Of Philadelphia County, 193, 247. Bucks, 193, 
247. Lancaster county, 194, 247. Commissioned officers in each 
county, 209, 210, 247. Reviewed in Philadelphia, 223. Assem- 
bly message on, 236. Opinion of T. Penn respecting, 240. Com- 
mission and instructions to Col. Taylor, 251. Letter to proprie- 
taries respecting, 321. A company in Bucks withdraws and 
chooses officers, 325. 
Ballet, Captain, arrives in Sloop-of-War Otter, 241. His instruc- 
) tions, 241. Entertained, 243. Had engagement and ship heav- 
* ing down — called on for aid — proposes battery, 249. Takes prizes, 
324. 

Batteries to be built in Philadelphia, 158, 161, 172. 

iBedford, Duke of, on peace with French, &c, 330, 359, 379, 412, 

456. Letters to, 416. 
Belcher, Governor of New Jersey, arrives, 111. Consulted about 

regulating pilots, 111, 112. Letter from, 266. To, 266. 
Berks county, Sheriff and coroner elected, 597, 662. 



iv CONTENTS. 

Bills of credit, 33, 34, 35, 45, 46, 48, 370, 374, 397, 412, 639. 
Report of committee of Assembly on, 415. Statement of, sent 
to Duke of Bedford, 416. Report of lower counties on, 417, 561, 
605, 609, 613, 616, 638, 723. 

Bribery and Corruption at Elections, bill against, 562. 

Bridge over Cobb's Creek, 100. 

Bristol, burgesses re-elected, 110. 

Bucks, county officers elected for, 3. Court house, 30. Work 
house at Bristol, 34. Justices elected, 113. Officers elected, 120. 
Associators — officers, 193, 210, 247. A company withdraws from 
association and chooses officers, 325-326. Sheriffs and Coroners, 
345, 411, 464, 662. Sheriff charged with fraud at election ac- 
quitted, 344. Justices commissioned, 388. Indians prevent sur- 
veys of land, 489. Sheriffs and Coroners, 550, 662. New county, 
560. Justices, 573. Roads, 576, 597. 

Canada, expedition to, money raised for, in Pennsylvania, 176-180. 
French in, making preparations, 387. Expedition to, laid aside, 
142. 

Canassetego and Solconwanaghly, Indian chiefs, deaths of, 467, 486. 

Cannon applied for in England, 158, 161. To be borrowed from 
New York and Massachusetts, 173. Applications for, 198, 204, 
205, 206, 207, 228. Sent from New York, 215. 

Cape Breton, G-overnor applied to for Cannon, 204. 

Celeron, Captain — letter to Governor Hamilton, 425. A curious 
plate and inscription by, found, 509. 

Chartier, Peter, his enmity feared, 2. Gone over to the French, 5. 

Chastenoy, Monsieur, letter from, 71, 124. Letter to, 131. 

Chester, county officers elected for, 3, 120. Complaint against 
Justice, 78, 94, 98. Associators — officers, 185, 217, 325. Roads, 
202. Petition from commisioners to lay out a road, 203. Com- 
missioned officers, 209, 210, 345, 411, 464, 597. Justices com- 
plained of, 378. Religious differences among Presbyterians of, 
378. Justices commissioned, 387, 548, 572. Sheriff and Cor- 
oner, 550, 662. 

Circular letter to militia captains, 2, 5. 

Clinton, Governor, forces under, 130. Letters to, 132, 143, 164, 
173. From, 135, 175, 182, 187, 215, 265, 297, 387, 430, 462, 
464, 480, 495, 508, §17, 548, 573, 607, 625, 639, 641, 642. 
Letters to, 186, 189, 205, 215, 284, 286, 463, 495, 575, 623, 
640. For cannon, 205. Appoints interview with Indians, 295. 
Message to his Assembly and address, 465. To Governor of 
Canada, 553. 

Cresap, Thomas, 218. 

Commissions, power in President and Council to grant, doubted, 
240. Issued for associators to Col. Taylor, 251. 



CONTENTS. y 

Commissioners to meet Indians at Lancaster, 299. Report and 

Treaty, 306-318. At Ohio, 658. 
Committee of Safety for province and city mentioned, 274. 
Connecticut claim, on Lands, 735, 757. Letter from W. Parsons 

on, 736, 775-77. Letters to Governor, 767, 768. Statement 

and opinion of Attorney General, 774. 

Coroners elected, 55, 345, 411, 464, 662. 

Counties, new, 426. 

Cove, Great, unsigned paper and answer of Justices of Cumberland 
County, 453. Address of Trespassers in, to Governor, 468. Pe- 
tition to Governor, 468. Little, petition of inhabitants of> to 
T. and R. Penn, 453. 

Croghan, George, letters from, 72, 119, 139. Letter to, 214. Ac- 
count of his proceedings among Indians, 287. Presents his ac- 
counts, 294. Letters from, 298, 496. To go to Allegheny, 387- 
Conference at, 438. Instructions to, 519. His proceedings, 530- 
Letters from, 538, 568. To, 570. At Carlisle, 665. Journal 
to Ohio, 731. 

Crown Point, expedition against!, 198. 

Cumberland County, settlers on River to be removed, 431. Con- 
ferences by Weiser, Peters, and Croghan with Indians in, 431. 
Justices appointed, 436. Letter from Governor to Justices of, 
452. Papers and letters, 452-454. From justices to inhabitants 
of Great Cove, 453. Petition of, 453. Sheriffs and Coroners, 
468, 550, 597, 662. And York line law, 503. Disorders in, 
528. A. Montour commissioned to live in, over Blue Hills, 569. 
Indian conference at, 666-685. 

Debts, small, acts respecting, 28, 29. 

De Lancey, Governor, letters from, 716, 717. 

Delaware River, privateers in, 89. Robberies by Spaniards, 96, 98. 
Suspicious vessels in, 103, 111, 124. Council have no funds to 
pay an express from Lewestown, 111. Prizes made, 113. Bay 
and river, petition of pilots respecting Jersey pilots, 226. Procla- 
mation, 227-231. Defence of, 229, 238, 240. Privateers, 233, 
245, 248, 252-4, 268, 283, 284. The Hector, Capt. Maisterson, 
arrives, prizes, 323. Councils advice to him respecting depth of 
water, &c, 324. A French vessels puts in in distress, 528. An- 
other vessel, 580. Allowed to repair, 581. Survey of, 586. Ves- 
sels in distress, 598, 655-657, 661. 

Depositions, John Lcmmon, 585. R. Owings, 585. Alexander 
McGinty, 663. Respecting captures in Delaware, 114. Pri- 
vateers, 115. B. Martin, 115. J. Cowan, 116. Ed. Liston, 
117. J. Hart, 117. J. Aries, 118. P. Green, respecting pri- 
vateer, 233. G. Porteus, do., 245. A Spanish privateer, 248. 
Geo. Proctor (privateer), 253. N Ambler, 261. Jas. White, 



vi CONTENTS. 

261. Eades & Goodwin, 263. Capt, Randolph, 264. Capt. Jen- 
kins, 283. Respecting England's case, 384. Turner and Kil- 
gore, Indian traders — Conduct of Indians, 482. Surveyor ob- 
structed, 489. 

"Digges' Choice," A. Furney killed on, 384. John, case of, 588. 

Dinwiddie, Governor, letters to, 629, 630, 632, 635, 687, 696, 698, 
701, 712, 714, 715. Proclamation against French and Indians. 
766. 

Distances, Carlisle to Shanoppins' town and course, 750, 762. 

Duty on persons convicted of heinous crimes and to prevent poor 
and impotent persons being imported — reasons for not presenting 
the act, 499. 

Elections, charge of fraud against Sheriff — acquitted, 345. Sheriff 
of York county driven from the ground, 468. Bribery and cor- 
ruption at — Bill proposed, 658. 

Embargo on provisions in New York, 42. 

England, Joseph and Samuel, their case, 383-387. 

Exchange, state of, 44. 

Executions, 158, 163, 414, 488, 566, 602, 663. Reprieve 163. 

Fairfax, William, of Virginia, 657. 

Fast Day, proclamation for, 169. 

Finances of the Province, 46, 52, 54. 

Fitch, Thomas, Lieutenant Governor of Connecticut, letter to, 770. 
From, 773. 

Flag of Truce arrives, 71. Prisoners and negroes in, 71. State- 
ment of Captain, 76. Orders to depart, 77. Pass for, 79. To 
be regulated, 78, 80, 82. New Jersey applied to, 80, 122. Pre- 
pared for vessels to Havanna, 245. To Hispaniola, 281, 282. 

Francis Tench, Attorney General, on Connecticut claims, 775. 

French and Indians, 72, 102, 119, 403, 685. At Crown Point, 
198. Fears of, 208. Prisoners sent to Hispaniola, 245. A pri- 
vateer takes a vessel, 245. Living on Lake Erie, 285. in 
Canada, 296, 387. Privateers taken, 324. Peace, 330, 343, 
359. Proclamation 331, 359. Prize arrives, 332. Indians in 
Canada, 431. Have converted to Catholic faith many Indians, 
467. Building a ship at Cataraghqui, 519. Making other pre- 
parations, 549. Vessels in distress, 598, 621,655, 661. On way 
to Ohio, 607-609. On Ohio, 615, 629, 665-685. Narrow es- 
cape from, at Weningo, 659. 

Furney, Adam, killed by Indians on Digges' land, 377. 

Glen, Governor James, of South Carolina, letter from, 303, 696, 

699, 709. 
Gooeh, Governor, letters to, 221, 225, 254 ; 283. From, 221, 225, 

280, 300, 346. 



CONTENTS. vii 

Governor urges preparation for defence, 5, 6, 30. And union for, 
30-45. Proclamations, 39. Going to England, 61, 62, 68. Against 
bills of credit, 44. Adds to the Council, 65. (See Messages) 
Hamilton arrives, 363, (See J. H.) 

Gray's, Ferry, George Gray complains of road to Chester, 99, 100. 

Hamilton, James, arrives as Governor, and succeeds President 
Palmer and Council, 363. His Proclamation, 363. His speech, 
365, 368. Reply of Assembly, 367. Present to, 368. Letter 
to Virginia on boundary, 423. Address of Assembly, 429. 
His objections against law respecting probate of wills, 503. To 
Assembly — complaints against their minutes, 737-746. 

Havanna, letters from Governor of, 198. Spanish prisoners, 199, 
200, 201. Letter to Governor of, 201. Mags of truce sent to, 
with prisoners, 245. Prisoners to be sent to, 281. 

Higginbotham, Captain Charles, his case, 187, 188, 218, 219-221, 
225. Statement of his case, 190. Reply of Secretary Peters to, 
191, 192. He and Perie appear at Council, 218. Insolence of, 
219. Letter to Governor Ogle respecting, 225. 

Huston, Captain, raising men, 105. 

Indians and French making preparations for attacking frontiers of 
Pennsylvania, &c, 1-5. Young to be employed as scouts, 2. 
Oatawbas refuse to come to Philadelphia, 5. Governor opposes 
their neutrality, 5. Suspicions of the Six Nations, 5. Account 
of treaty at Albany, 7, 26. Conferences with ? 10-26, 84, 146, 
149. Messages to, 84. Minesinks, 26. On Lake Erie, 72. At 
war with French, 71, 72. Affairs, 136, 162, 167. Presents to, 
139, 151. In Philadelphia, 145. Treaty on Ohio, 184. Re- 
specting, 188, 190, 212, 217, 230, 273. Presents, 186, 197, 
198. Proclamation against sale of rum to, 193, 194. Horses 
stolen from, 229, 237. Letter from Governor Gooch, 257. A 
paper received from 285. Letter to Governor Clinton about, 286. 
On Susquehanna, 286. Croghan's proceedings among, 287. Let- 
ter from Six Nations, 288. Instructions to 0. Weiser respecting, 
290. Croghan's account of expenses, 294. Interview with Six 
Nations, 295, 296. Proceedings of Governor and Council, 296. 
Treaty with Colonel Johnson at Onondago, 298. Near Lancaster, 
afraid to come to city on account of sickness, 298. Commissioners 
appointed to meet them there, 298. Their Commission and In- 
structions, 299, 300. Letter from Governor of South Carolina, 
303. Report and treaty at Lancaster, 306-318. Expenses, 327. 
Catawabas complain of Northern, 347. Journal of C. Weiser 
to Ohio, 848-358. A. Eurney killed by, 377. Senecas arrive, 
conference, presents, and treaty with, 389-394. Proclamation, 
394. Proclamation against Rum to, 397. On their way to Phila- 
delphia, cannot be stopped, 398. Arrival and conference with 
Senecas and other nations, 398-403, 405. Presents to, 408, 406. 



viii CONTENTS. 

On Ohio, 431. Settlers to be removed from Susquehanna, 431. 
Conference with in Cumberland county, 431. Governor asks 
advice of Council, 436. Message from the Twightwees, 437. 
Conference with at Croghan's, 438. Report of Peters and Cro- 
ghan, 440. Traders killed by, 449. Message of Governor to, 
448. And French Message, 459. Jean Cceur and French, 462. 
At Ohio, presents for Twightwees, 463. Many converted by 
Roman Catholics, 467. Speak disrespectfully of New Yorkers, 
467. Journal of Conrad Weiser at Onondago and message of Pre- 
sident Lee to, 470. Treatment of some traders, 482. French 
praying, 480. Deaths of, 469. Obstruct surveyors of new pur- 
chase, 489. On Ohio, 496. Speech to Col. Johnson, 508. Pre- 
sents for, 519, 617, 639, 711; and message, 520. Treaty with 
Twightwees, 522. Treaty with Six Nations and George Crog- 
han's Journal, 532. Nanticokes in Philadelphia, 543. At Ca- 
daraghqui, 550. Shawanese, message from, 569, 637. Twigh- 
twees' town attacked — murders, 599. Conference with, 614, 617. 
Various papers relating to, 623-628, 629, 636, 639, 685. In- 
formation from traders on Ohio not to be relied upon, 637. Pro- 
ceedings of Council in New York, 640. Journal of C. Weiser 
to Mohocks, 643-647. Invitation to Governor through William 
Fairfax of Virginia, 657. Commissioners appointed with presents 
to, 658, 665. Letter from John Frazer, 659. Petition and de- 
position of A. McGinty, 663. Report of Commissioners to, 665. 
Proceedings at Carlisle, 665-684. Letter from England respect- 
ing, 689. Speeches, 691, 692. Answered by Governor Hamil- 
ton, 693. Message to Six Nations, 705. Commissioners to, 707. 

Instructions to Captain Ballet of Sloop-of-War Otter, 243. For 
batteries, 284. To Conrad Weiser, 290, 304. Commissioners to 
Indians at Lancaster, 299, 300. To George Croghan and Andrew 
Montour with presents for Indians, 519, 520. To John Patten, 
707. 

Iron, pig and bar, importation into England from Colonies to be 
encouraged, and erection of mills for slitting or rolling-forges and 
tilt-hammers and furnaces for making steel to be prohibited, 457. 
Proclamation requiring an account of all such establishments, 458; 

Johnson, Colonel William, 480. 

Journal of Conrad Weiser to Ohio, 348-358. To Onondago, 470- 
480. Of George Croghan and Andrew Montour, 530. Of Conrad 
Weiser to Onondago, 541; to Mohocks, 643-647; to Ohio, 731. 

Justices of the Peace elected, 3, 78, 94, 98, 113, 378, 600. 

Kent county associators — officers, 247, 325. Sheriff and coroner, 
411, 468, 551, 597, 662. 

Kinsey, John, elected speaker, 4, 123, 411. Death of. 456. Suc- 
ceeded by Isaac Norris, 456. 

Kitzmiller, Jacob, case of, 582, 588, 591. 



CONTENTS. ix 

Knowles, Admiral, applied to for defence, 207. For Cannon, 228. 
Takes Port Louis, 228. Wants men, 326. 

Lancaster county to be advised of danger from Indians, 2. Circular 
letter to militia captains in, 215. Officers elected for, 3, 120, 551 . 
Petition for arms, 26. Associators officers, 194, 210, 247, 325. 
Indians at, Commissioners to meet, 299, 300. Report and 
treaty, 306-318. Expenses of, 326, 339. Adam Furney killed 
by Indians 377. Justices commissioned, 378, 600. Sheriffs and 
coroners, 411, 464, 551, 597. New county to be formed, 560, 
597, 662. 

Laws proposed, passed, or repealed, 28, 30, 32, 34, 35, 48, 66, 369, 
370, 371, 374, 402, 404, 426, 428, 456, 458, 461, 499-502, 503, 
505, 509, 511, 512, 514, 516, 549, 550, 559, 560, 562, 565, 576, 
578, 579, 605, 619, 686. 

Lee, Thomas, President of Virginia, to Governor Hamilton, 423, 
424. Message to Indians at Onondago, 470. 

Letters from Governor Clinton, 30, 36, 42, 56, 83, 135, 152, 175, 
187, 215, 265, 297, 387, 431, 462, 465, 480, 495, 508, 517, 
548, 553, 573, 607, 625,639, 641,642. From Daniel Brodhead, 
I 757. To Governor C, 186, 189, 205, 215, 284, 286, 463, 575, 
623,640. From Monsieur Chastenoy, 71-78, 131, 132, 281. 
From George Croghan, 72, 119, 139, 214, 298, 497, 538, 568. 
To George Croghan, 214,570. Monsieur Celeron, 427, R. Cal- 
ender, 599. Connecticut, Governors, 768, 770, 771, 773. 
Canada, Governor, 555. Cumberland, Justices, 452. Governor 
De Lancey, 716, 717. Commander of Cape Breton, 205 
Walter Butler, 624. Jno. Frazer, 650. Wm. Fairfax, 657 
Governor Dinwiddie, 629, 632. 635, 687, 696, 701, 712, 714 
755, 765. Governor Gooch, 56, 221, 225, 254, 256, 257 
280, 283, 301, 306. Governor Ogle, 187, 192, 202, 209 
225, 273, 377, 383, 384, 421. Governor of Havanna, 75> 79 
199, 200, 201. Governor Shirley, 30, 55, 56, 72, 76, 83 
127, 129, 133, 143, 165, 170, 182, 198, 206, 295, 305, 718 
Duke of New Castle, 37, 159. Governor of New Jersey 
94, 266. Conrad Weiser, 82, 120, 122, 132, 136, 166, 185 
212, 213, 229, 285, 298, 467, 480, 517. Proprietaries, 93 
160, 216, 229, 239, 240, 244, 319, 342, 377, 499, 515, 551 
Governor Trelawney, 232, 326. Governor Glen, 303, 696, 699 
709. Captain Maisterson, 323. S. Phips, 419. Duke of Bed 
ford, 331, 359, 412, 416, 456. President Lee, 423. Col. Wm 
Johnson, 480, 573, 775. John Mackey, 252. Dr. Holland 
623, 641. Arent Stevens, 625. B, Sanders, 627, 628. Mona 
katootah, Indian Chief, 635. Earl of Holdernesse, 689, 709 
Lords of Trade, 709, 711. Car>tain Wm. Trent, 461. Ioncaire 
540. B. Stoddard, 549. Shawnese Chiefs, 569, 570. M. Kel 
log, 573. Governor Tasker, 582, 583, 586, 588, 596. H. Mills 
573. 



x CONTENTS. 

Loan office, Bill passed, new trustees, 375. 

Logan, James, resigns from Council, 67. William elected member 
of Council, 68. 

Louisburg, French expected to attack, 6, 28, 30, 32, 37. 

Maisterson, Captain Samuel, letter from — prizes taken, 323. 

Marriage licenses, form to be changed, 69, 71. 

Maryland — disputes, 186, 189. Higginbotham's case, 187, 188 r 
190, 192, 218-221, 225. Letters from Governor of, 187, 202, 
209, 273, 377, 383, 422, 582, 583. To Governor of, 192, 202, 
225, 383, 384, 421, 582, 588-596. A. Furnej killed on Digges' 
land by Indian, 377. J. England's case, 382. Boundary line r 
421. Case of J. Kitzmiller, 582, 591. Depositions, 585. Dig- 
ges' choice, 588, 591. 

Messages from Assembly to Governor, &c, 4, 26, 31, 36, 43, 44 r 
46, 48, 54, 58, 63, 64, 101, 105, 124, 126, 159, 183, 184, 235, 
237, 274, 332, 333, 341, 367, 372, 404, 414. 428, 459, 486, 
493, 506, 511, 513, 526, 545, 546, 562, 607^ 613, 616, 617, 
648-651, 722, 747, 756, 763. To Assembly from Governor, &c, 
4. 26, 30, 36, 41, 44, 45, 46, 52, 56, 57, 62, 97, 154, 156, 163, 
182, 230, 233, 270, 329, 339, 395, 396, 397, 404, 412, 430 r 
454, 484, 488, 491, 493, 498, 503, 513, 524, 528, 546, 561, 
563, 579, 605, 608, 638, 639, 652-656, 719, 729, 737, 751- 
755, 764. On defence, 275, 491. From Governor to Indians, 
705. From Shawonese to Governor, 569. From Twightwees to 
Governor, 600. 

Monakatootah, letter from, 635. 

Montour, Andrew, applies to live over the Blue Hills, 567. His 
commission, 567. Permission to act as Interpreter for Governor 
of Virginia, 568. In Philadelphia, 290, 607. At Carlisle, 665. 
And John Patten examination, 762. Agent, 455, 635, 637, 
730. 

Negroes arrive in flag of truce, 71. Committee to examine, 71, 74 T 
78. Spanish prisoners arrived, 79. To be sent to Havanna to 
have freedom tried, 79, 201. Designs of, 92. Spanish prisoners, 
^200. 

New Castle county associators — officers, 194, 210, 247, 325. Wm. 
Till appointed Collector, 244. Spanish privateer off, 252. De- 
fenceless state of, 268. Guns provided, 270. Road from Phila- 
delphia, 301, 377. Sheriff and Coroner, 411,468,551, 597, 
662. Governor visits, 488. 

New Castle, Duke of, letters, 129, 159. To Governor Clinton, 144, 
164. 

New Jersey, to be applied to respecting, 81. Answer from, 94. 
Young men of, offer their services against privateers, 266. 



CONTENTS. si 

New York, address of Assembly of, to Governor Clinton on Gov- 
ernor Hamilton's application to Governor C. for aid, 405. Pro- 
ceedings of a Council at, on Indian affairs, 640. 

Norris, Isaac, Speaker of Assembly, 45G, 485, 558, 599, 662. 

Northampton (new county), Justices, 573. Roads, 576, 597, 610, 
662. Trouble with Connecticut, 735. Claim Stated — Attorney 
General's opinion on, 774, 775. 

Ogle, Governor Samuel, to, 192, 202, 225, 383, 384, 421. From, 
202, 209, 273, 377, 383. 

Otter, Sloop of War, Captain Ballet, arrives for defence of Dela- 
ware, 241. The Captain handsomely entertained by President 
and Council, 243. Seamen deserted, 256. Captain B. urged to 
get ready, 369. Asks for aid, 273. Cannot sail for want of 
men — must impress, 282. Asks for advice about sailing, 284. 
Takes two prizes, 324. 

Palatines arrive and are visited by physicians' — infectious disease, 
410. Bill respecting numbers in Ships, 427. 

Palmer, Anthony, is President, 68. 

Patten, John, Commissioner to Indians, 707. Instructions, 707. 
In Philadelphia, 730. 

Penalosa, Don Diego de, letter respecting demand for ransom of a 
>essel, 75, 79. 

Penn, John, death, 73. John, son of Richard, introduced, as mem- 
ber of Council, 607. Thomas, letter from, 229, 239, 240, 244, 
343. Memorial for, respecting certain duties on convicts and 
poor, 499. 

Pennsylvania Soldiers, in pay in New York, 135. 

Peters, Richard, appointed Secretary, 68, 365. Also a member of 
Council, 382. And G. Croghan to remove settlers, 431. Their 
Report, 440. Appointed a Commissioner to Indians, 658, 686, 
684. 

Petition of Delaware pilots, 226. Of Merchants for defence, 231. 
Of inhabitants of Little Cove to proprietaries on temporary line, 
453. Do. of Big Cove to Governor, 468. Alexander McGinty, 
663. 

Philadelphia, roads from, 28, 29, 59, 61, 107, 121, 130, 301, 877. 
State House used for meetings of Council, 69. Justices and 
other officers elected, 106, 110, 120. Indians arrive at, 145. 
Petition for defence, 158. Batteries, 158, 160, 172. Cannon 
requested from England, 159, 172. Man of War, 158. Parade 
of associators, 168. Sickness, 168. Fast day, 169. Battery 
and Cannon, 158, 160, 172, 189; 198, 204, 205, 206, 215, 231, 
240, 255. Associators choose officers, 193, 257, 325. Letter 
from Proprietaries, 217. Associators received in, 223. Means 
of defence, 231. Prisoners not to go out after sunset, 238. Num- 



xii CONTENTS. 

ber of vessels in trade, 241. Sloop Otter, Captain Ballet, arrives 
for defence of the river, 241. His instructions, 241-2. The 
Captain publicly entertained, 243. Letter from Thomas Penn 
respecting Dock street, 244. Sickness, 244. A sloop taken, 245. 
A Spanish privateer, 248. Captain Ballet called on — Batteries 
proposed, 249. Difficult position relative to defence, resolutions 
and orders — Commission to Col. Taylor and instructions — Batte- 
ries, &c.,251. Privateer off New Castle, 252. Deposition respect- 
ing, 253. French privateer in river, 255. Despatches sent to 
Virginia, &c, 256. Express to Lewes, 256. Meeting to raise 
money to fit a vessel, 258, 259. Cannot be raised, 260, 265. 
Fears of taking a ship at New Castle, 260. Two intelligence 
boats commissioned, 267. Artillery company formed, 267. Pow- 
der house to be guarded, 268. Block house and magazine at bat- 
tery, 269. Authority to raise volunteers, 269. A vessel of war 
for protection proposed, 271. Estimated cost of equipments, 272. 
Embargo removed, 273. Captain Ballet asks for aid, 273. Num- 
ber of vessels taken on passage to England, 275. Case of adultery 
and murder, 277, 280. Weiser and Montour in, 224, 285, 290. 
Indians afraid to come to, on account of sickness, 298. Road to 
New Castle, 301, 377. Council's advice to Captain of the Hector 
respecting depth of water, &c, 324. Privateer Pandour, Captain 
Dowell, takes a prize which arrives, 332. Governor J. Hamilton 
arrives, 362. His proclamation, 363. Proclamation of peace 
published, 381. Ceremonies with the great seal, 382. Justices 
commissioned, 388, 572. Senecas arrive, 388. Conference with, 
389-394. Presents to, 393, -106. Indian Conference at, 398- 
403, 405 Lighting and watching — law proposed, 505, 506, 513. 
Sheriff and Coroner, 345, 411, 550, 597, 662. New county, 560. 
Sheriff displaced for neglect of duty and contempt of Court, 561. 
New one appointed, 561. 

Phips, S., on expenses of English prisoners, 418. 

Pilots of Delaware Bay and River petition, 226. Proclamation 
respecting, 227. Assembly message, 236. .Recommended, 324. 

Plate, a singular leaden plate with a curious inscription found, 508. 
Inscription, 510. 

Popish, Pretender, 6, 28, 51. 

Presbyterians, parties among, on points of Religion, 378. 

Pretender, Popish — rebellion in Scotland, 6. Defeat of, 51. 

Prince of Wales, death of, 527. 

Prisoners, convicted, pardoned, or punished, 75, 92, 105, 119, 121, 
125, 134, 155, 157, 158, 163, 268, 281, 294, 343-344, 507, 601, 
612. Form of a reprieve, 211. Not to leave houses after sun- 
set, 238. Sent to Hispaniola in a flag of truce, 281. English, 
.expenses of, to be paid, 418. Amount, 420. 



CONTENTS. xiii 

Privateers in Delaware river rob Hart & Listoa, 89. Discussion 
respecting defence against, 91, Letters respecting, 91-93, 98. 
Depositions, 94, 253, 265 Make captures, 233, 234, 260, 265. 
28o, 284. In river, 103, 111, 113, 248, 251, 252, 253, 262. 
Taken, 323-24. 

Proclamations for raising troops, 39. For thanksgiving, 50. On 
President being Governor and continuing officers, 68, 69, 70. 
Respecting flags of truce, 82. Against sickly vessel, 109. Fast 
day, 169. Governor Dinwiddie's, against French and Indians, 
766. Against sale of rum to Indians, 194, 397. Respecting 
pilots, 227. Peace of Aix-la-Chapelle, 331, 360, 361. Of Gov- 
ernor Hamilton, 363. On peace, 379-80. Treaty with Senecas, 
394. Respecting export and manufacture of iron, 457. 

Proprietaries, letters to, 93, 160, 319, 515. Letters from, 216, 
229, 239, 240, 244, 342, 363, 377, 499. Power to grant com- 
missions to associators doubted, 240. Substitute for batteries, 
240. Propose building a house or fort on Ohio, 515, 523, 547. 
Letter from, respecting Abraham Taylor's Claim, 551. Not 
valid— strike his name off from Council, 551*. 

Quakers complained of, 204, 207. Assembly Message, 238. Coun- 
cil resolution, 278. Assembly's reply, 336. 

Report of treaty at Albany by commissioners of Pennsylvania, 7-26. 
Of Committee on Governor's Message, 723. Of commissioners 
to Indians, 306, 307. Of committee of Assembly on Currency, 
415. Do. of lower counties on, 417. Of Peters and Croghan, 
of proceedings with settlers and Indians, 440. Of commissioners 
to Indians, 665-685. 

Reprieve, form of, 163. 

Resolutions of Council on conduct of Assembly, 277 — 280. As- 
sembly's reply, 333, 338. 

Roads and Highways, 29, 59, 61, 99, 100, 105, 107, 121, 130, 
From Darby to Chester, 203. From Philadelphia to New Castle.. 
301, 377, 576, 610. 

Robberies on Delaware, 102. ' 

Roman Catholics have converted many Indians, 467. 

Scotland, rebellion, favor of Popish Pretender, 6. Thanksgiving 
for defeat of it, 51. Address to King in, 51. 

Scull, Nicholas, appointed Surveyor General in place of William 
Parsons, resigned, 274. 

Seal, the great, "John and the date punched out," 382. 

Sergeant-at-Arms, 617. 

Shawnese Indians, message from, 569. Governor's answer to, 571. 

Shekellamy, Indian Chief, sent for, 212. In Philadelphia, 222. 



xiv CONTENTS. 

Sheriff*, elected, 55. (See the several counties.) 

Shirley, William, Governor of Massachusetts, letters from, 31, 55, 
56,72, 83, 127, 129, 140, 152, 170, 182, 198, 295, 718. To, 
76, 133, 143, 165, 170, 173, 305. Reasons for not furnishing 
cannon, 198. Wishes union against Crown Point, 198. Pro- 
ceedings in Massachusetts, 296. 

Sickness, general, 168. 

Sinking Fund proposed by Governor Thomas, 46. 

Snow shoes, large quantities preparing by Indians for war, 1. 

Spangenberg, J. Augustus, applies for passes to three missionaries to 

Onondago, 576. Granted, 576. 
Spanish, fears from, 208. Privateer in Delaware, 248-255, 262, 

284. Taken, 301, 324. Prisoners, 122, 125, 131. 

Spirituous liquors, 194, 230. Proclamation against, 194, 397. In- 
crease of public houses, 430. 
Sussex county, sheriff and coroner, 411, 468, 551, 597, 662. 

Tasker, Benjamin, President of Maryland — murder of Kitzmiller, 

582, 583, 589. Letters to, 586, 596. 
Taylor, Abraham's, name struck off from Council, 551. 
Tax, Provincial, 47. 
Treaty, Indian, held at Albauy by Commissioners from several 

States, 7, 26. With Indians at Lancaster, 307-318. Expenses 

of, 327. Not provided for by Assembly — Council's message to, 

339. 

Trelawny, Governor, asks for help in recruits, 232. Letter from 
for men, 326. 

Trent, Captain William, respecting a French trader taken, 461. 

Troops to be raised, 38, 39, 41, 46, 58. Unpaid, 56, 58. 

Twightwee Indians, message from, 437. Message of Governor 
Hamilton to, 448. Town attacked — murders, 599. 

fJnion of Colonies for defence proposed, 30, 36, 37, 45, 49, 

83, 97. 
Vessel, sickly, arrive, 100, 106, 112. Notice to, 107. Complaint 

against, 108. Proclamation against, 109. Physicians to examine, 

100, 109, 113, 121, 122. 

Virginia, letters from Governor, 221, 225, 280, 300, 346. To, 
225, 254, 283. Large grant of land to, on the Ohio river, 423. 
Boundary line, 424, 758-762. Letter of Governor Hamilton to, 
424. Letter from William Fairfax, 657. Proceedings of Gov- 
ernor and Council on receipt of it, 657. 



CONTENTS. 



xv 



Weiser, Conrad, to employ Indians as scouts, 2. Mission to Sha- 
mokin, 72. Letters from, 83, 122, 136, 166, 185, 212, 213, 
229, 298, 467. Letters to, 120, 132, 285, 517, 642. Instruc- 
tions to, 290, 304. In Philadelphia, 148, 188, 224, 285, 290, 
405. Accompanies Indians, 190. Presents for Indians, 197. 
His journal to Ohio, 348-358. Compensation for damages, 396. 
Journal to Onondago, 470-480. 

Weningo, locality described, 660. 

Woleott, R., Governor of Connecticut, letter to, 768. From, 771. 

York county, sheriffs and coroners commissioned, 411, 551, 597, 
662. A new county west of, to be formed, 426. Election riot 
at, 468. And Cumberland line, 502. 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



PEOVINCIAL COUNCIL OF PENNSYLVANIA. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, December 17th, 1745. 
present : 

The Honourable GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov* 
ernor. 

Samuel Hasell, Abraham Taylor, } ™ 

Robert Strethil, } ^ s ^ rs ' 

The Governor inform'd the Council that as it was become neces- 
sary to add some more Members to the Board, he had thought of 
Mr. James Hamilton & Mr. Benjamin Shoemaker as proper Per- 
sons, k had caused it to be proposed to them, & that Mr. James 
Hamilton had accepted, & Mr. Shoemaker had it under Considera- 
tion, and the Board unanimously approving the Governor's Choice, 
his Honour order' d the Secretary to inform Mr. Hamilton of his 
appointment, & to take care that he shou'd be served with a Sum- 
mons the next Meeting of the Council. 

The Governor laid before the Board a Letter Dated the 15th In- 
stant, which he had received from Governor Morris, inclosing a 
Copy of a Letter wrote by one Major Swartwoutz, of the Minisinks, 
to the Governor of New York, informing him that an Indian in that 
Neighborhood having fallen into Company with some Indians who 
had been on some of the Branches of the Missippi, was told by 
them that the French & French Indians there were preparing a 
large quantity of Snow Shoes in order to March in the Winter time 
to the Frontiers of Pennsylvania, Sopus, & Albany. The Governor 
observed to the Council that as the Indians had actually cutt off the 
People of Saraghtoga, & as Peter Chartier, who was with those In- 

VOL. V.— 1. 






2 MINUTES OF THE 

dians, wou'd not fail to do what Mischief he cou'd to this Province, 
whether this piece of Intelligence should prove true or false, it was 
necessary to give the back Inhabitants of Lancaster County the 
earliest notice possible that they might be upon their Guard, & he 
had for that purpose prepar'd a Letter to the several Captains ap- 
pointed over the Militia in that County, which he propos'd to send 
immediately by Express, & the Letter being read, it was approv'd, 
& is as follows : 

" The Governor's Circular Letter to the several Captains of the 

Militia in Lanc tr - C a : 
" Sir— 

"By an Express from the Governor of New York I am inforni'd 
that one Major Swartwoutz, a Dweller in the Minisink, has re- 
ceived Intelligence from two Indians at different times within a 
Month that the French and French Indians living at a Town or 
Fort on a Branch of the River Missisipppi have made a large house 
full of Snow Shoes, in order, so soon as the Snow shall fall, to At- 
tack Albany, Sopus, & the back parts of Jersey & Pennsylvania. 
Although I am not very apt to give credit to Storys of this kind, 
since they have been so often found to be false, yet considering the 
Success the French have lately had in Attacking & Plundering the 
Inhabitants in & about Saraghtoga, in the County of Albany, & car- 
rying away near Seventy of them Prisoners, after they had burnt all 
their Houses, Barns, & Mills, and considering that-Peter Chartier, 
who is capable of any Villany, is now with the Enemy, it is not 
improbable that something will be attempted upon the Inhabitants 
of the back parts of this Province likewise. You are therefore 
hereby ordered to give notice of this Intelligence to the Company 
under your Command, that they may have their Arms & a sufficient 
quantity of Ammunition in readiness to repel the Enemy in case 
they shou'd make any Attempts upon the Inhabitants on the West 
side of Sasquehanna. And You are further to take all proper 
Measures to procure Intelligence from time to time to prevent a 
Surprise. But you are to be very careful not to offer the least In- 
jury or Violence to any of the Indians in Friendship with Us, but 
permit them to pass as usual without Molestation, lest you shou'd 
provoke them to join with the Enemy. 

« I am, &«*" 

The Governor further asked the Opinion of the Board whether Mr. 
Conrad Weiser shou'd not be directed to employ some Young Indians 
as Scouts to procure Intelligence & to send notice of any March of 
Indians, & it being judg'd very proper, his Honour said he would 
write such Letter & send it to Mr. Conrad Weiser along with the 
Express. 

The Board resumed the Consideration of the new Commissions of 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 3 

the Peace for the Counties of Bucks, Chester, and Lancaster; & 
the following Justices were agreed to, viz U: 

For the County of Bucks. 

Joseph Kirkbride, Abraham Chapman, Mathew Hughes, Benja- 
min Jones, Simon Butler, John Wells, Enion Williams, Mathew 
Rue, Richard Mitchel, Mark Watson, Richard Hough, John Abra- 
ham De Normandy, Robert Ellis, Alexander Brown Houston, John 
Jemmyson, Henry Antes, 'gliomas Qwen, Thomas Craig, Esq rs>: & 
The Chief Burgess of the Borough of Bristol for the time being. 

N. B. — At the same time a separate Commission of the Peace was 
granted to Lawrence Growden, Esq r< 

For the County of Chester. 

John Crosby, Elisha Gatchil, Caleb Cowpland, William Moore, 
Abraham Emmit, Joseph Pennock, Joseph Brinton, William Pymm, 
Joseph Bonsell, William Webb, John Mather, Job Rushton, Charles 
Grant, Samuel Flower, Thomas Cummings, John Parry, Andrew 
McBowel, Esqf-' & the Cheif Burgess of the Borough of Chester 
for the time being. 

N. B. — At the same time a seperate Commission of the Peace was 
granted to Joseph Parker, Esq 1 " - 

For the County of Lancaster. 

Thomas Edwards, Andrew Galbreath, Edward Smout, Emanuel 
Carpenter, John Kyle, Conrad Weiser, James Armstrong, Samuel 
Smith, John Hogg, James Whitehill, David Jones, James Galbreath, 
John Postlethwaite, William Maxwell, James Gillaspy, Samuel 
Anderson, Edward Berwick, Henry Harris, of Cumru Township, 
Esq rs -' & the Chief Burgess of the Borough of Lancaster for the 
time being. 

" N. B. — At the same time a separate Commission of the Peace 
was granted to Thomas Cookson, Esqr. 



January 6th, 1745. 
MEMORANDUM. 

Five Members of Assembly waited on the Governor to inform 
him that the House was met according to their adjournment, & that 
their Speaker not being able from Indisposition to attend the Ser- 
vice of the House, they had proceeded to the Choice of another 
Speaker, and desir'd to know when the Governor wou'd receive the 
House in order to present him. His Honour appointed 12 0' Clock 
the next Day. 



MINUTES OF THE 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, January 7th, 1745. 

present : 

The Honourable GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Robert Strethil, Esqr. 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approved. 

The House waited on the Governor at the time appointed with 
their Speaker, John Kinsey, Esqr., who requested the usual Privi- 
leges for himself, taking notice that those for the House had been 
already granted The Governor made answer, that as long as he 
shou'd have the Honour to continue in the Government, He & every 
Speaker & Assembly might depend on his protection in all their 
just Priveleges. The Speaker returned Thanks, and desir'd to know 
if the Governor had any thing to lay before the House. His Honour 
said he had, & wou'd send a Message to them in the Morning, k 
when they were withdrawn a Message being prepar'd by the Gov- 
ernor to lay before the Council for their Approbation, it was read 
and approv'd by Mr. Strethil, the only Member present, & that the 
House might not receive any delay the Secretary was order' d to 
transcribe it fair to be Signed and deliver'd in the Morning. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, January 17th, 1745. 

present : 

The Honourable GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Thomas Laurence, Robert Strethil, ~\ 

Samuel Hasell, James Hamilton, v Esqrs. 

Abraham Taylor, J 

Mr. Hamilton took and subscrib'd the Oaths to the Government, 
& then took his place at the Board. 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approv'd. 

The Governor laid before the Board his Message of the 3th 
Instant, together with the Report of the Albany Commissioners, & 
a Letter from Admiral Warren Dated at Louisbourg, the 26th of 
November last; he like wise laid before them his Message of the 
10th Instant & the Petition mention'd in it, & likewise the Assem- 
bly's Answer to his Message of the 8th Instant, all which were read, 
& the following ordered to be enter'd, viz*' : 

A Message from the Governor to the Assenibly. 
u Gentlemen : 
" I take the first Opportunity since the return of the Commis- 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 5 

sioners from Albany to lay before You my Instructions to them, & 
their Report of the Treaty held with the Indians of the Six Nations 
at that Place, and I make no doubt but their Conduct will be as 
satisfactory to You as it is to me. You will observe by the last 
Article of these Instructions that had I been at liberty to follow my 
own Judgment, and been secured of Fund for supplying those Na- 
tions with Arms, Ammunition, and other Necessaries for acting 
offensively against the French, I should, in conjunction with y e 
Neighbouring Governments, have urged them to an immediate De- 
claration of War as the only means, in my opinion, of securing their 
fidelity to His Majesty; for as it seems next to impossible for them 
to maintain their Neutrality much longer, if they are not speedily 
engaged by His Majestie's Colonies, their own security will oblige 
them to join with the Enemy. Besides, it is certainly the reverse 
of good Policy to indulge our Indians in a Neutrality after the 
French have compelled their' s to take up the Hatchet; it is giving 
the Enemy an Advantage which they have already made use of, 
and will continue so to do to the Destruction of the Inhabitants upon 
the Frontiers of the several Provinces. Before I quit this Subject 
I must acquaint You, that by a Letter received since your last 
Meeting from the Governor of Virginia, I am informed that the 
Catawbas have refused to come to Philadelphia, as being too distant 
from their Country, and have declared that they will not regard any 
propositions made to them by the Six Nations, without first receiv- 
ing a Token from them, attested by the Marks of some of their 
Sachims; and that from hence it is concluded any farther Endeavours 
to reconcile them will be ineffectual. As this Mediation was set on 
foot at the desire of Governor Grooch, was to be carried on at the 
Expence of his Government, and has since been declined by him 
for the reasons before mentioned, I forthwith took the properest 
Measures to make the Six Nations acquainted with the Catawbas' 
Resolutions, that their Deputies might be prevented from coming 
hither in the Spring, as well to save them the trouble of a fruitless 
Journey as us the Expence of maintaining them for some time here, 
& of making them a Present at their departure. There will probably 
be too frequent Occasions, during the continuance of the War, for 
Expences of this kind. 

" You will observe from the Information transmitted by the Grover- 
nor of New York that preparations have been making by the French 
& their Indians upon a Branch of the River Mississippi, for an At- 
tack upon the back parts of this & some of the Neighbouring Colo- 
nies. Although there shou'd be no real foundation for this Account, 
it is not improbable that something will be attempted upon Us this 
Winter by the Enemy, since Chartier is gone over to them with a con- 
siderable Party of the Shawnese, who is well acquainted with the back 
parts of this Province, knows the defenceless Condition of the Inha- 
bitants, & is of a savage, treacherous Disposition. This & some other 
Circumstances consider'd, I forthwith Dispatched a Messenger with 



6 MINUTES OF THE 

Circular Letters to the Officers appointed for a Militia in Lancaster 
County, with Orders to them to be upon their Guard, and to make 
the best preparations they cou'd for their Defence, enjoining them 
at the same time to be "very careful not to do any injury to the In- 
dians in Amity with us, or to molest them in their hunting. I 
likewise sent Directions to Mr. Weiser to employ some of the Dela- 
ware Indians at Shamokin as Scouts to watch the Enemy's Motions, 
and to engage the whole Body of Indians there to harrass them in 
their March, in case they should attempt any thing against us, and 
afterwards to join our remote Inhabitants for their mutual Defence. 
These measures appeared to me so absolutely necessary that I could 
not doubt of your enabling me to defray any Expence that may at- 
tend them. 

" The last Post brought me a Letter from Admiral Warren, dated 
at Louisbourgh the Twenty-sixth of November, in which he advises 
me that no Ships were then arrived from Britain;, and that as it is 
probable the Regiments expected from Giberalter will be forced to* 
Leeward Islands by the severity of the Season, and not arrive at 
Louisbourgh in time for its Defence against the Preparations which 
he hears are making in Canada to attack it early in the Spring, and 
even then be perhaps extremely weakened by Sickness and other 
Accidents, he calls upon me, agreable to his Grace the Duke of 
Newcastle's Letter, formerly laid before You, to raise a number of 
Men for the Defence of that Important Acquisition, and to send 
them with a quantity of Provisions sufficient for their Support there 
by the middle of March next. He further informs me that he 
thinks himself authorized, in conjunction with Sir William Pep- 
perill, to draw Bills for defraying the Expence, and has sent me an 
Extract of the Duke of Newcastle's Letter to that purpose ; but as 
no Bills have been remitted to me for this Service, nor Officers sent 
to raise the Men, I must apply to You, and I doubt not but it will 
be a Service very acceptable to His Majesty, for an advance of so- 
much of the Publick Money as will be necessary for paying, victu- 
alling, & transporting as many Men as can be raised in so short a 
Time, and for rewarding such Officers as shall be commissioned to* 
raise and to conduct them to Louisbourg, since no commissions 
granted by me can intitle them to any Command in that Garrison, 
or elsewhere out of this Government. 

" I need not tell You that the last Vessels from Europe confirmed 
the Account that a most unnatural Rebellion ,had broke out, and 
was then carrying on in Scotland, in favour of a Popish Pretender, 
supported by France and Spain. At this Distance we can only pray 
that the Great God of Battles will grant Success to His Majestie's 
Arms, and that he will confound the Devices of His & our Enemies, 
open and concealed. I trust that, through the favour of Heaven 
and the Justice of His Majestie's Cause, we shall soon have an op- 
portunity of offering our Congratulations upon an Event so desira- 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 7 

ble by Protestants of all Denominations, as -well as by all that are 
for preserving the Freedom and Independency of their Country. 

"Having" mentioned everything to You of a Publick Concern 
that occurr'd to me, I have only to assure You that whatever shall 
be laid before me for the Welfare of this Province, will meet with 
a favorable Reception and as much Dispatch as the Nature of the 
Business will admit of. 

' ' "GEO. THOMAS. 

"January 8th, 1745." 



AN ACCOUNT OF THE TREATY 

Held at the City of Albany, in the Province of New York, By his 
Excellency the Governor of that Province, and the Honourable the 
Commissioners for the Provinces of Massachusetts, Connecticut, and 
Pennsylvania, witlr the Indians of the Six Nations, in Octo- 
ber, 1745. 

" To the Honourable GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., with the King's 
Royal Approbation Lieutenant Governor of the Province of Penn- 
sylvania, and Counties of Newcastle, Kent, and Sussex, on Dela- 
ware, under the Honoble. John Penn, Thomas Penn, and Richard 
Penn, Esqrs., true and absolute Proprietaries of the said Pro- 
vince and Counties : 

"May it please the Governor: 

" Having been honoured with a Commission authorizing us, the 
Subscribers, in Conjunction with the Governors of the Neighbour- 
ing Colonies or their Delegates, or seperately, to treat with the 
Indians of the Six United Nations at Albany in October last, we 
think it our Duty to render an Account of our Conduct therein, 
which be pleased to receive as follows : 

" The next Day after the Receipt of the Commission, that is, on 
the Twenty-seventh Day of September last, we set out for Albany, 
where we arrived on the third of October following. On the Fourth 
of October, the Day appointed to treat with the Indians, pursuant 
to the Instructions given us, we waited on the Governor of New 
York, acquainted him with our Appointment and shewed him the 
Commission by which we were impowered to treat. 

" The Governor desir'd his Secretary might take a Copy of it, to 
which we consented. The Indians of Five of the Six United Na- 
tions, in number about Four hundred and sixty, arrived the same 
Day, none of them Senecas, it being, as we were informed, a time 
of great Sickness and Mortality among them, which prevented their 
coming. 

. " But the Commissioners from the Massachusetts not being come, 
the Treaty was deferr'd until their Arrival. Two Days after, being 



8 MINUTES OF THE 

the Sixth of October, in the Evening we received a Message from 
the G-overnor of New York, by his Secretary, desiriug to know of 
Us at what time we would confer with a Committee of his Council 
either alone or with the Commissioners of the other Colonies, all 
then arrived, viz. : 

For the Massachusetts. 
Jacob Wendal, Esqr., a Member of the Council. 
John Stoddard, ") 

Samuel Wells, V Esqrs., Members of Assembly. 

Thomas Hutchinson, J 

For Connecticut Colony. 
Wolcot, Esqr., Lieutenant Governor, and Col. 



Stanley. 

" We agreed to return our Answer to his Message in the Morn- 
ing. 

" Accordingly in the Morning we returned our answer by James 
Read, that we would meet the Committee of Council at a Quarter 
after Ten that Day, and chose to have our first Conference with 
them only. A-bout the time appointed we went, but the Commis- 
sioners from the other Colonies coming into the Room soon after, 
deprived us of the separate Conference proposed. Being all thus 
met, the Gentlemen of the Council, to wit, Daniel Horsmanden and 
Joseph Murray, Esqrs., let us know they were appointed by the 
Governor of New York a Committee to confer with us concerning 
the Treaty which was to ensue, that their Governor desired to be 
inform' cb of our Sentiments, whether we were inclinable to speak 
to the Indians of the United Nations seperately, or whether we 
thought a joint Speech to be delivered on behalf of all the Colo- 
nies might be best, either indifferent to him. 

" The Commissioners from New England declared their opinions 
for a joint Speech, as what would show our Union, and consequently 
have the greater weight with the Indians. On the part of Penn- 
sylvania it was objected that we had divers Matters in Charge which 
related to our own Government only, which would be improper in 
such a joint Speech, and perhaps it might be the case of other of 
the Colonies: That such a joint Speech would require much time 
in forming, and with Difficulty, if at all likely, to be agreed on. 

"But it was replied this would be the best judged of when the 
heads of such joint speech were read; & the Committe of Council 
producing what they prepared to this purpose, it was agreed to be 
read. On reading of which, we observed that it mentioned a Com- 
plaint against the Eastern Indians for Killing some white People, 
and therefore among other things proposed the Indians of the Six 
United Nations should be put on Declaring War against the Eastern 
Indians, and to assure them that the several Colonies would support 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 9 

them in it. To this Article it was objected, on the part of Penn- 
sylvania, that it was necessary the Legislature of each Government 
should be consulted before the Indians were put on Declaring ot 
War; That it would be very mischevious to all the Colonies, as it 
would be a means of drawing the War nearer on their Borders ; 
That the Indians did not seem disposed to enter into a War with 
each other, but rather to remain Neutral; That in this Disposition 
little better could be expected from them than what was remarked 
to be the case in the last War, when the Indians of opposite Parties 
passed each other without Fighting, and only Scalped the white 
People ; That as to the People who had been killed the Indians 
might be put on demanding Satisfaction, and might possibly obtain 
it and prevent the Cause of War; or if they were put on Declaring 
of War, at least Care should be first taken to provide them with 
the Requisites necessary for defending themselves and carrying on 
such War, without which it would in Effect be a betraying them. 
What Provision was made by the Government of New York the 
Gentlemen of the Council best knew. In Pennsylvania we knew 
no Provision was made for them ; That, therefore, if this Article was 
inserted in the Speech proposed, we must insist on Treating seper- 
ately. To the Proposal for putting the Indians of the Six United 
Nations on demanding Satisfaction, one of the Commissioners of the 
Massachusets answer'd, That Proposal ought to come on the part of 
the Indians, for that if no more was proposed to them on the behalf 
of the Governments than that they shou'd demand Satisfaction for 
the Injury done, they would offer some thing yet less. At length 
it was agreed all the other Governments, Pennsylvania excepted, 
should treat jointly, and we were desired to be assistant in their 
joint Treaty so far as we judged fit. 

" A Committee was then named to prepare the joint Speech to 
be delivered by the Governor of New York. When it was prepared 
we were to meet again to consider the same. 

" It was two Days after this before the Speech was ready ; and in 
the mean time the Governor and Council of New York made In- 
quiry concerning the Alarm which happened the last Winter among 
the Mohawks, occasioned by a Report spread amongst them that 
the English were coming to cutt them off. To this purpose the 
Governor of New York sent for the Mohawks, and let them know 
that the String of Wampum which had been sent him by them, not 
to make any further Enquiry concerning that Affair, he could not 
accept of; that it was necessary the Authors of this false Rumour 
should be known and punished ; and therefore he insisted they 
would discover all they knew concerning the Authors ; and if they 
had any other cause of uneasiness, to communicate it to him ; And 
thereupon he delivered back the String of Wampum sent him. 
The Mohawks agreed to return their Answer the next Day. Some 
of the Mohawks accordingly attended the Governor of New-York 



10 MINUTES OF THE 

the next Day, and named to him a Person who they said was the 
Author of this false Alarm. The Person being sent for, owned his 
having heard and mentioned the Report, but denyed his being the 
Author of it. 

" After the strictest Enquiry and Examination, the Governor and 
Council seemed to blieve him Innocent, and that the Rumour had 
been raised and spread by means of one or more of the Mohawks 
themselves. 

" On the Tenth of October the Speech proposed to be delivered to 
the Indians by the Governor of New- York being prepared, we were 
desired to meet the other Commissioners and hear the same read. 
Accordingly, about Ten of the Clock in the forenoon we met them ', 
the Speech was read, after which it was objected on the part of 
Pennsylvania that it contained a Narrative of many Facts to which 
we were altogether Strangers, and therefore were not proper to be 
made Parties in the Relation j That it pressed the Indians on 
making of War, which we thought might be attended with inis- 
chevious Consequences to all the Colonies ; That as we were to treat 
seperately, and they had already heard our Reasons against a War, 
they must judge for themselves how far it would be prudent in 
them to press it. The Result was, the Commissioners of the other 
Colonies agreed to the Speech as it had been prepared ; and in the 
afternoon of the same Day the Deputies of the United Nations were 
desired to attend the Governor of New York. They came accord- 
ingly, and the Governor, in behalf of his Government, and those of 
the Massachusetts and Connecticut, and in the presence of the Com- 
missioners from thence read the Speech agreed on, which was Inter- 
preted to the Indians : A Copy whereof was delivered to Us, and 
follows in these Words, viz. : 

* < Brethren : 

" ' Here are present upon the occasion of this Interview Commis- 
sioners from the Governments of the Massachusetts Bay and Con- 
necticut, eonven'd with me on the same righteous Intention of 
Renewing, Bright'ning, and Strengthening the Covenant Chain 
which has tied you and hi| Britannick Majesty's several Colonies on 
this Continent in the firmest Engagements to each other for Sup- 
porting and Maintaining our Common Cause. 

" 'We are glad to see so many of our Brethren, and we bid You 
welcome here ; at the same time that we heartily condole the ab- 
sence of our Brethren the Senecas and the Calamities which have 
occasioned it j may the Almighty comfort them under their griev- 
ous Afflictions, and soon wipe off all Tears from their Eyes. 

" ' We do with you our Brethren, and with you as their Repre- 
sentatives, ratifj r , confirm, and extablish all former Engagements 
enter' d into by us and our Brethren of the Six United Nations j and 



PRO VINCI AL COUNCIL. 11 

assure You that we shall ever hold thern invioblc ; and we doubt not 
of the same from You.' 

"A Belt. 

" ' Brethren : 

" ' The Rumour which last Winter gave an Alarm to our Brethren 
the Maquas, and was from thence spread to the other Nations, now 
appears to have been without Foundation ; and I cannot help ob- 
serving on this occasion that you ought not for the future to suffer 
any such Idle Tales to be raised or propogated among You, as they 
not only tend to seperate your and our Affections each from the 
other, but also to make us Jealous of our own People without suffi- 
cient Grounds for it/ 

u A String of Wampum. 

" < Brethren : 

" l It must be further observed to You that we hear several of the 
Cheifs and others of our Brethren of the Six Nations have, con- 
trary to our Inclinations, & against our express advice, had an In- 
terview with the Governor of Canada this Summer at Montreal ; 

" ' And that your pretence for holding this Correspondence with 
our Declared Enemies was for the public Good and the Preservation 
of the House at Oswego; 

u ' To tell the Governor of Canada that they must not make any 
Attempt or Attack upon that Place, for that our Brethren are re- 
solved to defend it; and that it shall remain a Place of Peace and 
Trade. 

" ' You declared your Intent was good, and that the Governor of 
Canada should never prevail upon You in any thing hurtful to your 
Brethren the English, who you know did not like your going thither \ 
that yet upon your return from thence, your Brother the Governor 
of New York should know all that passed between them and the 
Governor of Canada. 

" ' We will tell our Brethren what we hear was done whilst they 
were with the Governor of Canada ; and we expect the whole Truth 
from them according to their Promise, and whether what we hear 
is true or not. 

" ' We hear that whilst our Brethren were with the Governor of 
Canada the French Indians took up the Hatchet against the Eng- 
lish, which we believe to be true for Reasons you shall hear by and 
by ; and thereby the Treaty of Neutrality concluded between you 
and them is become vain. 

" l We hear, likewise, that our Brethren of the Six Nations there 
present were so far prevailed upon by our Enemies the French, as 
to accept of the Hatchet upon Condition to carry it home to their 
Council to deliberate upon, and then to return the Governor of 
Canada their Answer, which we cannot believe to be true till we 
have it from our Brethrens' own Mouths. 



12 MINUTES OF THE 

" l We expect a plain and full Answer from our Brethren concern- 
ing these Matters that the way may be cleared for wiping off all 
stains from the Covenant Chain, and that we may preserve it Bright, 
firm, & inviolable, as long as the Sun shall shine.' 

" A Belt. 

" ' Brethren : 

" ' We must now acquaint you of some Things relating to the War, 
the Success of His Majesty's Arms against the French in this part 
of the World, and the rise and occasion of our Attacks upon the 
Enemy in this quarter. 

" ' When You were here last Summer you were told that War was 
Declared between the Crowns of Great Britain and France. The 
Events that have since happened are too numerous to relate particu- 
larly. 

u ' His Majesty's Subjects in this Country lay still the last Sum- 
mer without attempting any Thing against the French Settlements ; 
But the French first Attack'd and Destroyed a small Place belong- 
ing to Us call'd Canso, about Twenty five Leagues from Cape 
Breton. 

" ' Afterwards they laid Seige to Annapolis Royal, but therein 
they proved unsuccessful. 

" ' They then agreed to make another Trial for that Place next 
Spring, and in the mean time they sent to France, hoping to obtain 
some of the King's Ships to facilitate the Reduction of it. 

" ' They having proceeded thus far, Mr. Shirley, the Governor of 
the Massachusetts Bay, thought it high time to do something to 
curb the Insolence of that haughty People, and did therefore raise 
a small Army, which was joined by a number of Men from the 
Governments of Connecticut and New Hampshire, and sent them 
early last Spring against Louisbourgh. 

" ' They were likewise joined by a number of His Majesty's Ships 
of War, and after about Seven Weeks' Seige that Important and 
strong fortified Place was, through the goodness of Divine Provi- 
dence, delivered up to our Forces. 

" ' Whereupon the rest of the Inhabitants of the Island of Cape 
Breton, together with those that were Settled in parts adjacent, 
surrendered themselves Prisoners to the English. 

" ' And during the Siege and since many French Ships were taken, 
and divers of them of great value, and the Design of the French 
against Annapolis Royal was frustrated. 

" ' We have in this part of the Country lain still, both the last 
Summer and this, hoping that our Neighbours in Canada would 
either be quiet or carry on the War in a manly and Christian-like 
Manner. 

" ' And to induce them thereto, a Message was sent from this Place 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL, 13 

to the Government of Canada last Summer, by which he was as- 
sured that if he should renew their former vile Practice of treating 
His Majesty's Subjects inhumanly, the several Governors, together 
with the Six Nations, would join and make Reprisals on them. 

" ' And at the same time You publickly declared that if any of His 
Majesty's Subjects in any of his Governments should be killed by 
any Indian, you would immediately join in the War against them 
and the French. 

" ' You likewise sent Your Delegates last Summer to the Eastern 
Indians to warn them not to engage in the War against the English., 
threatening them in case they should do so. 

" ' Notwithstanding these Things, divers Hostilities have been 
committed. 

" ' Some Months ago the Eastern Indians, who had formerly ac- 
knowledged their Subjection to the Crown of Great Britain, entred 
into Solemn Engagements with the King's Subjects, and had been 
since treated by them with great Kindness. 

" ' But at the Instigation of the French, they have lately kill'd 
one Englishman and also great numbers of Horses and Cattle, burnt 
a Saw Mill and many Dwelling Houses, and attack'd an English 
Garrison. 

" ' Notwithstanding such outrageous Insults, the Governor of Mas- 
sachusetts-Bay was so tender of them that he resented it no further 
then to send a Message to them demanding the Delivery of the 
Murderers as they would avoid the Consequences of their Neglect. 

" ' This Proposal was rejected by them, and since that time they 
have killed two or there others; whereupon the Governor of the 
Massachusetts declared War against them. 

" ' And we are informed the English have killed two of them, and 
taken another Prisoner. 

" i About three Months since some of the Canada Indians killed 
two Englishmen near Connecticut River; the Body of one of them 
was treated in a most barbarous manner, by which they left a Hat- 
chet of War, thereby daring Us to take it up and return it. 

" ' There has likewise been several other Parties that have attempted 
to destroy His Majesty's Subjects of New England, but have hitherto 
been prevented. 

" ' These Facts plainly shew that the French are still acted by the 
same Spirit that they were formerly governed by; and they seem 
never pleased but when they are at War, either with the English or 
some of the Tribes of the Indians; and if they had it in their Power 
they would doubtless destroy all about them. 

" l It is likewise Evident that the most Solemn and Sacred En- 
gagements are broken through by those Indians that have commit- 
ted the late Murders. 



14 MINUTES OF THE 

" ' The Belts of Wampum will not bind them to the performance 
of their Promisses. 

"'That we are Slighted, and yon Contemned, as though they 
thought you not worthy to be regarded. 

" ' But now the French and their Indians, by the little Regard 
they have shewn to your threatnings or to the Covenants they have 
made with you, do declare that they think you do not intend to per- 
form what you have threatned, or that they do not fear your Dis- 
pleasure; both which do reflect equal dishonour on You. 

" 'It is high time for Us & You to exert ourselves and vindicate - 
our Honour; and although it is well known that we delight not in 
the Destruction of our Fellow creatures, but have chosen rather to 
suffer ourselves to be abused, yet we cannot think ourselves obliged 
any longer to bear their Insults and evil Treatment. 

" ' Therefore, since neither our peaceable Dispositions nor Exam- 
ples, nor any methods we have been able to use, have been sufficient 
to prevail upon them to forbear their barbarous Treatment of us, but 
they will force our Resentments, in the Name of God we are resolved 
.not only to defend ourselves, but by all proper Ways and Methods 
to endeavour to put it out of their Power to misuse and evil Treat 
us as they have hitherto done. 

" ' And we doubt not of your ready and chearful Concurrence with 
Us, agreeable to your solemn promise made in this Place last Sum- 
mer, in joining with us against our Enemies the French, and such 
Indians as are or shall be instigated by them ; for we esteem them 
enemies to God, as well as to all their Fellow-creatures who dwell 
round about them.'' 

" A large Belt with the Figure of a Hatchet hung to it. 

"'The Pubiick Affairs of my Government have prevented my 
Meeting you sooner. 

" ' I was apprehensive I should not have been able to meet You 
this Fall, and it was determined upon a sudden, so that there could 
not be timely Notice sent to the rest of His Majesty's Governments, 
or, I doubt not, they would likewise have sent Commissioners to be 
present at this Interview. 

"'We are all Subjects to the same Prince, united in the same 
Bonds of duty and Allegiance to the Great King our Common 
Father, and in Friendship and Affection to each other ; and in this 
Union consists that Strength that makes us formidable to our Ene- 
mies, and them fearful of our Resentments. 

" 'We are all united with You in the same Covenant-Chain, which 
as long as we preserve it free from Rust, must remain impregnable : 
And you on your parts have declared that you will preserve it so 
strong and bright that it shall not be in the Power of the Devil 
himself ; with all his Wiles and Art, to break or dirty it. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 15 

"'You are also united with all the far Nations of Indians in 
League with our Great King, with whom we reeommended to You 
to preserve strict Friendship and hold frequent Correspondence. 

" ' That yourselves, who many of you live scattered and dispersed, 
should dwell in Bodies closer together, as you have heretofore pro- 
mised to do. 

" ' And we advise you to keep your Young Men at home, and 
within Call, excepting such as may be sent from Time to Time a 
Hunting or against our Enemies ; and you may depend upon the 
most ready and effectual Assistance from us in all Times of Danger. 7 

" A Belt. 

" The Indians of the United Nations promised to call a Council 
the next morning, and, if they could, to return their Answer to this 
Speech the same Day. 

" The next Day we waited on the Governor of New York, and de- 
livered to him, according to our agreement, the Speech we proposed 
to make to the Indians of the United Nations, in order for his 
perusal, and then to be returned us; which he promised to do by the 
next Morning. 

N October the Twelfth, in the Morning, we received a Message from 
the Governor of New York, with the Speech he proposed to make to 
the Mohiggans of River Indians, which we perused and returned to the 
Secretary without making any objections against what was proposed 
to be said to them. Some time after we received a second Message 
desiring us to be present -when the Governer delivered this Speech, 
and at the receiving the Answer of the Six Nations to the Speech . 
made to them. 

" We attended accordingly. The Commissioners for the Massa- 
chusetts and Connecticut also attended ; And the Speech prepared 
for the River Indians was read by Paragraphs, and translated to 
them, a Copy of which was delivered us, and is as follows : 

<" Children: 

" ' I am glad to see You here, and bid you welcome. I sent for 
you to meet me at this Place, that I might have an opportunity to 
renew and confirm the Covenants and Engagements made from time 
to time between us. And I do now publickly promise that nothing 
shall be wanting on my Part, but that the Covenant Chain shall 
remain bright and strong for ever. 

"< Children: 

" l I must put you in mind of what you promised me last Year. 
You engaged that you would keep your People at Home, which I 
am informed you have not done ; but many of your People have 
lately left Schahkook and are gone to Canajoherie, and some to 
Attowawie. I want to know for what Reason they have left their 



16 MINUTES OF THE 

habitations, and charge You to send for them back as soon as you 
can ; and that you would live together a together a Schahkook.' 

" A String of Wampum. 

"' Children: 

"'Last Year I acquainted you that War was declared between 
the Great King your Father and the French King, and told You 
what I expected of you. You answered me that in all Things re- 
lating to the War you would take the Six Nations for an Example, 
which I expect you will do. ; 

"A Belt. 

"To this Speech the River Indians the same Day returned their 
Answer, of which with what further past between them and the 
Governor of New York we obtained a Copy, which follows in these 
Words : 

"'Father: 

" 'We are glad to see you here in Health. Your Children here 
present bid you all welcome. 

"'Father: 

'"You have renewed the Covenant, and have assured us that you 
will keep it inviolable. We do now likewise assure you that 
nothing shall be wanting on our Parts, but that we will keep the 
Covenant Chain clear and free from Rust. 

"'Father: 

" 'When we were here last you told us that you was glad to see 
. so great a number of us together j and now you ask us what is the 
reason so many of Us left Schahkook and are gone to Canajoherie 
and Attowawie, and that you are sorry so many of Us left our 
Habitations. 

'"Father: 

" ' You have told us that War is proclaimed between the English 
and French, and that you designed to go and Fight the French. 
You told us that we should do as our Uncles the Six Nations did 
with respect to the War. 

"'Father: 

" You told us that you would keep the Covenant, and we are 
resolved to do the same ; as a token whereof we give you this 
Belt. 

'"Father: 

" 'You must not be surprized that so many of our People have 
left Schahkook. They are not gone to a strange Country, but are 
only among our Uncles the Six Nations, with whom we are united 
in Covenant/ 

" A String of Wampum, 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 17 

"'Father: 

" ' Respecting the War with the French we will do as the Six 
Nations and our Fathers, and will take them for Examples in all 
Things relating thereto/ 

" A Belt. 

" ' Father : 

" ' We are glad the Six Nations design to send some of their Peo- 
ple to Canada to treat with the Indians there. We have been two 
or three times to the Carrying Place to treat with some of those 
Indians, in order to keep Peace, and design to send some of our 
People to Canada to speak with some of the Indians there upon the 
same Business/ 

" Gave some Skins. 

" His Excellency recommended to them that they should use their 
Endeavours to prevail upon the Aschicanhook Indians, and all the 
rest of the Indians who have left their old Dwelling Place to return 
to Schakook. 

" They answered they would. 

" The Indians of the United Nations then delivered their Answer 
to the Speech made to them, Canasatego being Speaker : A Copy 
of which, with what ensued, as we received it, follows in these 
Words : 

" 'Brethren: 

" 'Two Bays ago you spoke to Us, and we are now come to give 
you our Answer. You must not expect that we can answer par- 
ticularly to the several Heads you mentioned to Us, but only to the 
principal Articles. You have renewed to Us the Covenant Chain, 
and we do now renew the same on our Parts ) and it is impossible 
that it can ever Rust, for we daily wipe off the Rust and Dirt and 
keep it clean, which we will ever continue to do/ 
. " A Belt. 

" < Brethren : 

" '.You thought fit to mention to us that there had been an Uproar 
among Us last Winter, and told us we ought not to entertain any 
such Notions of you our Brethren, especially as we had no Grounds 
to believe any such Thing. It is true, Brethren, there was such a 
Rumour among us, but it was immediately buried and forgot, and 
we did not expect that our Brethren would have mentioned any 
thing concerning that Affair to Us at this Interview; and we desire 
You think no more of it. We are always mindful of the Cove- 
nants between us and our Brethren, and here is a Certificate* 

* They here produc'd a Certificate under the Seal of the Massachusetts. 

Vol. v.— 2. 



18 MINUTES OF THE 

whereby it appears that we are in Covenant with our Brethren of 
Boston/ 

u A String of Wampum, 

" 'Brethren : 

" 'You spoke to us concerning our going to Canada, and told us 
that the Commissioners of Indian Affairs had last Winter told us 
not to go there, but some of us went. As to what you tell us, that 
we had taken up the Hatchet against our Brethren and promised to 
consider of it at Home, it is not so. The Mohawks and Tuscaro- 
roes, at their Return, gave the Commissioners of Indian Affairs an 
Account of all that passed there, and we are convinced that that 
Account is true." 

"A Belt. 

M * Brethren : 

" 'You have thought fit to relate to us several Particulars concern- 
ing the War between you and the French, and what Reason You 
had for taking up the Hatchet against the French and their Indians. 
We thank you for giving Us a particular Account of the Provoca- 
tions and Inducements you had for declaring War against them. 
You have also mentioned to us that we are one Body and Flesh, 
and that if one of us is touched or hurt the other is likewise ; and 
you have informed us that you were molested and attacked by the 
Enemy, and had therefore taken up the Hatchet against them, and 
desired, as we are one Flesh with you, that we would also take up 
the Hatchet against the French and those under their influence, in 
Conjunction with You. We Six Nations accept of the Hatchet 
and will keep it in our Bosom. We are in Alliance with a great 
number of far Indians, and if we should so suddenly lift up the 
Hatchet without acquainting our Allies, it would perhaps disoblige 
them ) we will, therefore, before we make use of the Hatchet against 
the French or their Indians, send four of our People, who are now 
ready, to Canada, to demand Satisfaction for the wrongs fcliey have 
done our Brethren ; and if they refuse to make Satisfaction, then 
we will be ready to use the Hatchet against them whenever our 
Brother the Governor of New York orders us to do it/ 

" A Belt. 

" His Excellency ask'd them what time they thought necessary to 
see whether the French Indians would make such Satisfaction ? 

"They answered two months. 

"His Excellency asked them, That if in case the Enemy should 
commit any further Hostilities in the mean time, Whether they 
would then, upon his Commands, immediately make use of the 
Hatchet ? 

« They answered Yes. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 19 

u ' Brethren : 

" ' You desired us to gather together our People who are scattered 
and to settle in a Body, especially as it is very uncertain how soon 
we may have occasion for them. Your Bequest is very reasonable; 
and we will use our Endeavours to that End/ 

" A Belt. 

"' Brethren : 

" 'We have now finished our Answer, and have nothing further to 
say but only one Request to make to You all, which is, That you 
our Brethren should be all united in your Councils, and let this 
Belt of Wampum serve to bind you all together; and if any thing 
of Importance is to be communicated to us by any of you 7 this is 
the place where it should be done/ 

" A Belt. 

"The answer thus delivered by the United Nations was received 
with the Approbation of the Governor of New York, the Commis- 
sioners of the Massachusetts only expressed their Diss-atisfaction; 
for that, as they alledged, the Indians the last Year had engaged 
that if any Hostilities were committed against the English, they 
would in such Case declare War; That Hostilities had been since 
committed, and therefore by those Engagements the Six Nations 
ought now to Declare War with the French and Indians. 

"This Day we proposed to have Delivered our Speech to the In- 
dians, but the time being too far spent, & this the last Day of the 
Week ; we were obliged to post pone it until the beginning of the 
next. . 

" The fourteenth of October being the time we appointed for Speak- 
ing with the Indians, we gave Directions to Conrad Weiser to give them 
notice to attend. But before they came to the place appointed, we re- 
ceived a Message from the Governor of New York that he was then 
met in Council, and desired to speak with us. We went accordingly. 
When we came to the Governor's, besides himself and his Council 
there were present the Commissioners from the Massachusetts, who 
then presented to the Governor Letters that they had received by 
an Express, giving an Account that a Party of French and Indians 
had a few Days before made an Attack on the Great Meadow Fort; 
about Fifty Miles, as we are informed; from Albany. That they 
had taken Prisoner a Person whom they found at some Distance from 
it. That two others coming down a Creek near that Fort were shot 
at; one killed the other made his Escape. The Number of French 
and Indians was not mentioned. On reading of these Letters, the 
Commissioners for the Massachusetts were requested to be explicit 
in what they desired on this Occasion. They thereupon represented; 
that their Government thought it unreasonable the whole Burden 



20 MINUTES OF THE 

of the War should remain on one Province, whilst the rest re- 
mained Neutral; That they desired the Indians of the Six Nations 
might be engaged to assist them. That tho' they thought it was 
reasonable other Provinces should bear a part of the Expence, yet 
rather than want the Assistance of the Indians on the present occa- 
sion they would bear the whole Expence themselves. The Gov- 
ernor of New York complained the Massachusetts Government had 
been too precipitate in their Declaration of War ; That the other 
Governments were not obliged to follow the Example ; Said that 
he had done all in his Power towards being better provided for a 
War ; That in the Condition the Inhabitants of that Province were 
in on the Borders, it would be imprudent in him to engage the In- 
dians of the Six Nations in a War ; That proper Provision should 
first be made, which could not be done without his Assembly, who 
were to sit in a little time, and before whom he would lay this 
Affair. After this, and more of like Import said, we parted. The 
Governor of New York having delivered the Presents from that 
Government to the Indians of the United Nations, embarked for 
the City of New York, and we proceeded to meet the Indians ac- 
cording to our appointment. When we came to the Place agreed 
on for this purpose, we found the Deputies of the United Nations 
attending, and the Speech we had before agreed on was now read, and 
Interpreted to them by Conrad Weiser, the Interpreters of New 
York and the Massachusetts being also present and assisting. 
Which Speech follows in these Words : 

" ' Brethren of the Six Nations. 

" 'Altho' it is not long since a Treaty was held with You in Penn- 
sylvania, yet our Governor and the Assembly of the Province', being 
informed of your coming hither, have, at the invitation of the Gov- 
ernor of Now York, sent us here to ]be present at the Treaty now 
held with you. We attend accordingly, and are glad to see You. 
In token whereof we present you with this 

" ' String of Wampum. 

u ' Brethren : 

" ' Before your last going to Canada you promised our Governor 
that on your return you would open your Hearts and give a full 
Account of all that passed between you and the French Governor; 
And we have it in Charge to desire you now to perform this 
promise. 

"'Brethren: 

"'We arc also to put you in mind that by the Treaty made last 
Year with our Governor at Lancaster, you promised him that neither 
the Governor of Canada nor any of his People should come through 
your Country to hurt your Brethren the English, nor any of the 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 21 

Settlements belonging to them : Notwithstanding which some of the 
Shawnese Indians, in Conjunction with some Frenchmen from 
Canada, committed a Robbery on our Traders, and took from them 
a great Quantity of Goods. This our Governor sometime since 
gave you notice of by Conrad Weiser, and you undertook to demand 
Satisfaction for the Injury of the G-overnor of Canada and the 
Shawnese Indians. We, therefore, now desire to be informed 
whether you have made this Demand, and what Satisfaction you 
have obtained. The French men who did this Injury came through 
the Lands you claim, and the Robbery was committed on our 
Traders on those Lands. It was, therefore, a manifest Breach of the 
Neutrality the Governor of Canada pretended to observe towards 
you, and snews the perfidy of the French, and that they regard the 
Treaties they make no longer than whilst they think it their Interest 
so to do. 

'"We hope their Example will not influence you, but that you 
will fulfil all the Treaties you have enter' d into with your Brethren 
the English. To impress this on your minds, and to enforce our 
Request we present you with this 

"'Belt of Wampum. 

'" Brethren: 

"'Besides what we have already said, we are also to remind you 
that our Governor, at the Request of the Government of Virginia, 
became a Mediator between you and the Southern Indians called 
Catawbas ; And you promised him next Spring to send Deputies to 
Philadelphia to meet some of that Nation, in order to conclude a 
Peace with them, And that in the mean time all Hostilities should 
be suspended. But our Governor is since informed that a party of 
the Oneides' Warriors are gone to Attack the Catawbas. Whether 
this be true or not, or whether any of your Young Men went with- 
out your Knowledge we. do not know, and therefore desire you now 
to inform us of all the particulars ; and if any of your Warriors 
are gone against the Catawbas that you will forthwith recal them, 
and take care that no more go against them during the time agreed 
on. 

'" Brethren: 

" ' You may remember that at a Treaty held with our Government 
at Philadelphia, in the Year One Thousand Seven Hundred and 
Thirty -two, 'you were advised' 'To call home all those of your 
Nations who were at Canada or live amongst the French, lest if any 
Occasion or Difference should arise they might be prevented from 
returning.' This in your Answer made to our Governor in the 
Year One Thousand Seven hundred and Thirty-six, you call ' Sound 
Advice, say the French were formerly your cruel Enemies, and that 
you were taking such Measures as you hoped would be effectual to 
bring back your People if any new Breach should happen.' 



22 MINUTES OF THE 

" ' Brethren : 

u ' The French are a subtle People. A Breach hath now hap- 
pened, occasioned by an unjust Declaration of War made by the 
French King against the King of Great Britain and His Subjects; 
and no doubt, if any of your People live amongst the French, they 
will endeavour to engage them in their Service, and therefore we 
think you would act very prudently, as soon as is possible, to per- 
suade them to return and settle amongst you. To enforce this Be- 
quest we present you with this 

" ( Belt of Wampum. 

u c Brethren — 

a i We have more to say to You from our Governor, but this we 
must defer until we hear your Answer to what we have already 
said/ 

u This Speech being Interpreted to them and the Indians by 
Canasetego their Cheif, signifying their Intention of an immediate 
Consultation, and in a little time to return to us an Answer, we 
withdrew/ 

" Sometime after being informed the Indians were come to a Ke- 
sult, we again met them and received their Answer, the Substance 
of which, as the same was translated to us, is as follows, the afore- 
said Canassafcego being Speaker : 

" ' Brethren : 

u 'You that come from Pennsylvania to represent our Brother 
Onas ', you tell us that you come hither at the Invitation of the Gover- 
nor of New York to the Council Fire at Albany to hear what passes 
between us and our Brother the Governor of New York. You 
were pleased to signify to us that you were glad to see us, for which 
we return you our hearty Thanks. We are likewise glad to see 
you ; in Token whereof, we return you this 

u ' String of Wampum. 

" < Brethren . 

" 'The first Thing you required of Us this Morning was, that we 
would give you an Account of all that passed between us and the 
Governor of Canada at our last visit to him, according to the pro- 
mise we made the last Summer to Conrad Weiser, your Interpre- 
ter, at Oswego. And since You desire to hear with your own Ears, 
we are now ready to do it, tho' it will take up time, and therefore 
another opportunity might have suited better. Our going to Mon- 
treal was at the Invitation of the Governor of Canada. At our 
coming there, several great Men, as well of the French as Indians, 
being Bead since our last Journey there, we, according to our Cus- 
tom, spent some Bays in bewailing their Death. During this Time 
divers of the French Council took an opportunity of sounding us 
to learn how the War went on with the English, and how far we 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 23 

were engaged therein. On which occasion we told them that for- 
merly we had inconsiderately engaged in Wars, but that we looked 
upon this War as a War between the English and French only, and 
did not intend to engage on either side ; for that the French and 
English made War and made Peace at Pleasure, but when the In- 
dians once engaged in Wars they knew not when it would end. 
We also told the French that they knew, and all the World knew, 
the Countries on which we were Settled, and particularly the Lakes, 
were ours; and therefore if they would fight our Brethren the 
English they ought to fight on the Salt Water, and that they must 
not come over our Land to disturb them, or to obsiruct the Trade 
at Oswego; That they, the French, had two Trading Houses on 
those Lakes with which they ought to be contented/ The Governor 
of Canada promised us he would not do it unless the King his 
Master should command him, and then he must obey. While 
these Things pass'd, News arrived at Montreal of the taking of 
Cape Breton by the English, at which the French were much 
alarmed ; and the Governor thereupon sent for all the Indians then 
at Montreal, to wit, the French Indians and us the Deputies of 
the Six Nations, who met together in a large House, where the 
Governor of Canada taking in his Hand a large Belt of Wampum, 
in which the figure of a Hatchet was wrought, speaking to us of the 
' Six Nations, said as follows : 

"< Children: 

" ' Your Brethren the English have already taken one of my Towns 
(meaning Cape Breton), and their Fleet I suppose is now coming up 
to Quebec ; and therefore I must take up the Hatchet to defend 
myself against them. As for you my Children (speaking to the 
French Indians), I have no occasion to speak much to You, for you 
must live and die with me, and cannot deny me your Assistance. 
And as for you my Children of the Six Nations (speaking to us), 
he further said, I know you love your Brethren the English, and 
therefore I shall not say much to you ; perhaps you would not be 
pleased with it. But Children, said he, should know their Duty to 
their Father. Then speaking to Us all, he desired- such who loved 
him to go with him and assist him in defending Quebec ; and that 
those who went with him need not take any thing with them save 
their Tobacco pouches; that he would provide Guns, Pistols, Swords, 
Ammunition, Provisions, and every thing, even Paint to paint then! ; 
and thereupon delivered the Belt to the Interpreter, who threw it 
at the feet of the Indians present, some of whom inconsiderately 
and without any consultation first had took it up and danced the 
War Dance; and afterwards divers of the Indians present, chiefly 
of the Praying Indians, went with the French Governor to Quebec, 
where they staid eight or ten Days; but no Notice was taken of 
them, nor any Arms or Necessaries so much as a Knife provided for 
them ; nor were they admitted to speak to the Governor, which so 
exasperated the Praying Indians that they left Quebec and are since 



24 MINUTES OF THE 

gone against their common Enemies to the Southward/ Canassa- 
tego added: 

" ' Brethren — 

" ' You also put us in mind this Morning of the Treaties of Friend- 
ship subsisting between you and us. The last we made with the 
G-overnor of Pennsylvania was at Lancaster the last Year. By this 
Treaty we were to be Neutral (and we wish the English of all the 
Provinces would agree that we should remain so) unless the French 
should come through our Settlements to hurt our Brethren the 
English, which we would not permit. This and all other our Trea- 
ties with our Brethren the English we are determined to observe, 
and in token thereof we return you this 

" ' Belt of Wampum. 

" ' Brethren : 

" ' You also put us in mind of our Brother Onas, his Mediation 
between us and the Catawbas, and that you heard some of our 
Warriors were notwithstanding gone against them. It is not in our 
Power to restrain our Warriors as the English can do until a Peace 
be finally concluded. This the Catawbas know. We have used 
our Endeavours to restrain them from going, and shall continue so 
to do during the time agreed onj although we doubt whether the 
Catawbas are so desirous of Peace as they wou'd have our Brother 
Onas beleive ; otherwise they wou'd have done as the Cherokees did, 
who, tho' they were at War with us, came to desire Peace, but the 
Catawbas have neither come to us nor have they come to our Bro- 
ther Onas. But the Account he has received is only from the Gov- 
ernment of Virginia. When Conrad Weiser brought us an Ac- 
count of this matter we were going to Canada, and at our Return 
we had kindled a Council Fire, but receiving a Message from the 
Governor of New York we were obliged to rake it up until we re- 
turn.' Canastego further said, ' We have spoke to the Governor 
of Canada concerning Peter Chartier and the robbing of your In- 
dian Traders. The Governor of Canada said he knew nothing of 
the matter. At our Council before mention'd we were to have con- 
sidered what we should do further in this Affair, but were called 
away before we had come to any resolution/ He added, i your 
Traders go very far back into the Country, which we desire may 
not be done, because it is in the Road of the French. At our re- ' 
turn we will hold a Council, and in the Spring when our Deputies 
come to meet those of the Catawbas at Philadelphia, we shall send 
our Brother Onas our Result/ Canassatego further said : 

" ' Brethren — 

" ' You put us in mind of a promise we made our Brother Onas at 
his coming over to Pennsylvania, That we would recal our People 
from Canada who were Settled there. We have invited them back 
to us and have done all we can to effect it, but cannot prevail. The 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 25 

Governor of Canada has taken me into his Lap, suckles them as his 
Children, and they are so well pleased with him it is impossible for 
us to prevail with them to come and settle with us. We return 
you this Belt instead of that we received from you.' 

" After we had received this Answer of the Indians, we ac- 
quainted them by our Interpreter that what we had further to say 
to them would be early the next Morning ; In the mean time we 
ordered them a Pair of Oxen and some beer for their subsistence, 
and then parted. 

" The next Morning, being the Fifteenth of October, the Indians 
met us pursuant to our appointment, when we spoke to them to the 
Effect following : 

" ' Brethren — 

" ' We now put you in mind there are two things remaining under 
your Consideration, concerning which you have received Belts from 
our Governor and have as yet returned no full Answer : The first 
relates to the Catawbas, the Second to our Indian Traders. As you 
have signified to us your inability of doing it at this time, we ex- 
pect when you return home a Council will be called, and that you 
will give our Governor a full Answer in the Spring. 

" ' Brethren — 

" ' When our Governor and Assembly sent us hither they did not 
think it fitting we should come empty handed ; but have directed 
us to provide you a Present. We considered Winter was approach- 
ing, that our Brethren would want Cloathing to preserve them from 
the Cold, and Powder & Lead to acquire their livelihood by hunting; 
we therefore provided the Goods which now lie before You, to wit : 

" Six Pieces of Strowds, Eight Dozen of Knives, 

"Four Pieces of Indian Blankets, Four hundred and twenty-five Bars 

" Two Pieces of Striped Blankets, of Lead, 

"Four Pieces of Half Thicks, Four half Barrells of Pistol Pow- 

"One Piece of Shrewsbury Cot- der. 

ton, 

" ' These we present to you on behalf of our Government, and 
have no more to say but to wish you a good Journey Home/ 

"This Speech being Interpreted to the Indians, after a short Con" 
sultation between themselves, they brought Six Bundles of Skins; 
and by Canasatego spoke as follows : 

"'Brethren: 

" ' We thank you for the Goods you present us. We are Poor and 
have little to return; however, out of what we have we present 
You with the Six Bundles of Skins which you see. These we de- 
sire may be accepted of as a Token of our Affection/ 

"To this we replied: We accepted them in the manner they 
desired, wished them well, and then took leave of them. 



26 MINUTES OF THE 

"The Sloop which brought us waiting our Return, we embarked, 
arrived at New York on the Nineteenth of October. The same Day 
took Boat and got to Elizabeth Town Point. Then mounted our 
Horses and on the Twenty-second of October reached Home. 

" Permit us to add, that in the foregoing Relation we do not pre- 
tend to have delivered the several Conversations which past Ver- 
batim, but only the substance, so far as we judge them material, 
and where we have made any Omissions they are of such things 
as we think of too little Consequence to be inserted. If the Gov- 
ernor's health and other Affairs of Importance had permitted his 
Attendance at this Treaty, we make no question it would have been 
managed with greater Skill & Delicacy. Thus much, however, we 
may say, That so far as were able we have, pursuant to the Instruc- 
tions we received, faithfully endeavoured to acquit ourselves of the 
Trust to the Honour & Interest of the Province. But whether we 
are so happy as in any degree to have succeeded herein, is humbly 
submitted to the Governor. By 

"THOMAS LAURENCE. 
"JOHN KINSEY." 

A Message from the Governor to the Assembly. 

"Gentlemen : 

" Since the Meeting of your House a Petition has been presented 
to me from a considerable Number of the Inhabitants of Lancaster 
County, setting forth their Wants of Arms and Amunition, & their 
inability to purchase any from their having expended what little 
substance they had in Clearing & Improving their Lands, and pray- 
ing that I would recommend to the Assembly the making such a 
Provision of both as may enable them to defend themselves against 
any enemy that shall attempt to disturb them. 

" Whether there be any truth in the late Intelligence from Mini- 
sink or not, it must be allowed that there is a possibility of an At- 
tack upon us, and even in that case some Provision should be made 
for the Security of our Frontier Settlements at least. 

" If the Expence of supplying such a Number of People with 
Arms should be thought too great, three or four hundred may be 
purchased and delivered to those that want them most, and are most 
likely to make a right use of them, they giving a Note of Hand 
either to return them in good Order at a certain time, or to pay the 
Cost of them into the Publick Treasury, agreeable to the practice 
in some other Colonies. 

"GEO. THOMAS. 

"January 10th, 1745-6." 

A Message from the Assembly to the Governor. 
" May it please the Governor : 
"We have had under our Consideration the Instructions the 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 27 

Governor was pleased to give to the Commissioners appointed to 
Treat with the Indians at Albany, and their Report concerning 
that Treaty laid before us by the Governor's Directions; both are 
very satisfactory to Us ; the former as it is a fresh Instance of the 
Governor's care for the Inhabitants of the Province, and for 
which we therefore render him our hearty thanks, and the latter 
as it shews the Indians of the Six Nations yet retain their antient 
Friendship towards this & other the King's Colonies in America. 
War in most Cases is attended with some disagreable Consequences 
amongst Indians, with many and of the worst kind, for which and 
and other Reasons it would have been most agreable to us if the 
Circumstances of Public Affairs would admit the Indians of the 
Six Nations to remain Neutral. And it gives us great concern that 
the pernicious Conduct of the French at Canada in setting their In- 
dians on destroying the Inhabitants of some of our Neigboring 
Governments hath given them so much cause to think they are put 
under the Necessity of engaging the Indians in Amity with us to 
declare War against the French & their Indians, and to avenge them- 
selves of the Injuries done. 

" We cou'd have heartily wished the Mediation which the Gov- 
ernor was pleased to undertake at the desire of the Governor of 
Virginia to obtain a Reconciliation between the Indians of the Six 
Nations and the Catawbas had been effectual. Their destroying 
each other not only weakens the British Interest in America, but 
at this time must be particularly injurious to the Six Nations, as 
they are likely to be engaged by the Government of New York in 
a War with the French & their Indians. But if Coll 0, Gooch, at 
whose Request this Mediation was undertaken, continues to decline 
it, we know not what further can be done. We think, however, 
it was prudently done in the Governor to acquaint the Six Nations 
with the Resolutions the Catawbas have taken, as well to save their 
Deputies the Trouble of a fruitless Journey as us the Expence it 
must otherwise have occasioned. 

" When we consider the Information transmitted to the Governor 
of New York, now laid before us, touching the preparations said to 
he making by the French & their Indians upon a Branch of the 
River Mississippi for an Attack upon the back parts of this & some 
of the Neighboring Colonies, in all its Circumstances it leaves us 
room to doubt whether it hath a real Foundation. It was, however, 
discreetly done in the Governor to acquaint the People of Lancas- 
ter County with the Report ; and as the employing of some of the 
Delaware Indians to keep Watch, and to give those Inhabitants 
Notice if any Danger shall Approach, may contribute to render 
them the easier in their present situation, we approve of the Gov- 
ernor's Conduct therein ; and the Expence which shall arise by this 
means we are willing to pay. 

u As to the Letter the Governor is pleased to lay before us, re- 



28 MINUTES OF THE 

ceived from Admiral Warren, in relation to Cape Breton, since we 
have so lately given a Sum of Money which was laid out in Pro- 
visions, and which the Governor was pleased to apply to the use of 
the Garrison on that Island j and as the Admiral thinks himself, in 
conjunction with S r * William Pepperel, authorized to draw Bills for 
any purposes which they shall think necessary to preserve that Im- 
portant acquisition, we think they can he at no loss, especially at a 
time when Bills of Exchange are in so great demand, to raise any 
Sum of Money they may think fitting without any Assistance of 
ours. 

" The unnatural Rebellion which hath broke out, and was lately car- 
rying on in Scotland, supported by France and Spain, gives us great 
concern. It is astonishing to Us how any of our fellow Subjects, 
who enjoy so many and great Priviledges under the present happy 
Establishment, should be so blinded toward their true interest as to 
countenance a Popish Pretender against our present King ; and we 
heartily join in our Prayers to Almighty God to establish his 
Throne, protect his Royal Person, and confound the Devices of his 
Enemies, open and concealed. 

"We return the Governor hearty thanks for the Assurance he is 
pleased to give us, ' That whatever shall be laid before him for the 
welfare of the Province will meet with a favourable Reception/ 
We have divers things of this kind now before us, which in due 
time we shall offer to his Consideration, ' not doubting of as much 
dispatch as the nature of the Business will admit of.' 
" Sign'd by Order of the House. 

"JOHN KINSEY, Speaker. 

" 11th Month, 1745/' 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, January 23d, 1745. 
present : 

The Honoble. GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Governor. 
Abraham Taylor, James Hamilton, ) ^ 

Robert Strettell, j ^ sqrs - 

The Minutes of the preceeding Council were read and approved. 

The Assembly having sent two Bills to the Governor, One En- 
titled "An Act for the more easy & speedy Recovery of small 
Debts/' the other Entitled "An Act for amending the several Acts 
for Electing Members of Assembly/' the same were read for the 
first time. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 29 

At a Council held at Philadelphia, January 25th, 1745. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoblo. GEORGE THOMAS, Esq r -> Lieutenant Governor. 
Thomas Laurence, Samuel Hasell, 



Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettel, J SC ^ rS ' 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approved. 
Mr. Laurence offer'd to the Governor & Council a Return of the 
King's High Road leading from the City of Philadelphia thro' 
Frankfort towards Bristol, made by Anthony Palmer, Benjamin 
Fariaan, Job Goodson, Edward Brooks, & Thomas Chalkley, in 
pursuance of an Order of Council of the 7th of May, 1725, and said 
he did at the Instance of many People who had Lands adjoining 
the Road, and who desired it might either be confirmed or the Road 
Surveyed & Laid out anew. The Board taking into Consideration 
the length of time since the said Road was laid out, and that no 
Notice had ever been taken of the said Return so as to open the 
Road agreeable thereto, & that the same had never been Confirm' d 
or Recorded, It is now referr'd to Mr. Laurence, Mr. Hasell, Mr. 
Strettel, & Mr. Shoemaker, to view the said Road, & in case they 
should judge it necessary to be Survey 'd & Laid out, De Nova to 
take to their Assistance the Surveyor G-eneral, & to cause it to be 
done, & make Return thereof to the Council in order for Confirm- 
ation. 

The two Bills sent up by the Assembly, One Entitled "an Act for 
the more easy & speedy Recovery of small Debts/' the other entitled 
" an Act for amending the several Acts for Electing Members of 
Assembly/' were read a second time & agreed to with some Amend- 
ments, which were put in Writing, & the Secretary was order' d to 
deliver them to the House, along with the Bills. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, February 3d, 1745. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Governor. 
Samuel Hasell, Abraham Taylor, ~) ™ 1 

Robert Strettel, James Hamilton, j '" ' 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approv'd. 

Since the last Meeting of Council two Members of Assembly 
waited on the Governor to inform him that the House agreed to the 
Amendments proposed by the Governor & Council to the two Bills, 
one Entitled '* an Act for the more easy and speedy Recovery of 
small Debts/' the other entitled "an Act for Amending the several 
Acts for Electing Members of Assembly/' & desir'd they might be 



30 MINUTES OF THE 

engross'd, but that the additional Clause propos'd, relating to At- 
tachments, was thought to be attended with many Inconveniences; 
& therefore declined. 



February 1st, 1745. 
MEMORANDUM. . 

Two Members of Assembly waited on the Governor and delivered 
two other Bills, viz. : one Entitled "an Act for Amending the Laws 
relating to the Poor, & for the better appointment of Overseers of 
the Poor within the City of Philadelphia," the other Entitled " a Sup- 
plement to the Act entitled an Act for erecting Houses of Correc- 
tion and Work Houses in the respective Counties, & to the Act 
entitled an Act to enable Jeremiah Langhorne, & ca- ' to Build a 
Court House in the County of Bucks," which were read for the first 
time, & the Act for amending the Laws, & ca " was committed to Mr. 
Hasel, Mr. Hamilton, & Mr. Taylor, to consider & amend. 

The Go.vernor laid before the Board a Letter from Governor Shir- 
ley, Dated at Boston the 13th Day of January last, Importing "that 
there was reason to believe the Canadians wou'd make a vigorous 
Attack upon His Majestie\s Garrison at Annapolis Royal early next 
Spring, & that in Case they should succeed there all Nova Scotia 
would fall into their Hands, & the Loss of Louisbourgh might be 
the immediate Consequence of the Loss of Nova Scotia; or if the 
French shou'd attempt & Succeed in the Recovery of Louisbourgh 
in the Spring, in that case the Loss of Nova Scotia must be the fatal 
Consequence ; and therefore giving it as his opinion that it will be 
absolutely necessary for the Province of Pennsylvania, & all the 
Neighbouring Governments which have not yet raised any Men for 
his Majestie's service in the Expedition, to furnish a large number, 
500 of which he hopes Pennsylvania might raise." And likewise 
a Letter from Governor Clinton, Dated at New York the 27th of 
January, 1745, importing " that the Assembly had requested him 
to appoint Commissioners to Treat, in conjunction with such Com- 
missioners as should be appointed by the Neighbouring Govern- 
ments, for concerting measures for the mutual Security, Defence, 
and Conduct of the Northern Colonies during the present War, & 
that they had further requested him to represent to the several Gov- 
ernments the wavering Disposition of the Indians, and that Com- 
missioners ought to be appointed for this Province." And the 
Governor having wrote A Message to the Assembly on the Subject 
of the said Letters, the same was read and approv'd. k is as fol- 
lows: 

A Message from the Governor to the Assembly. 
u Gentlemen : 

" Having received a Letter from Governor Clinton, and another 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 31 

from Governor Shirley, by the last Post, I have ordered the Secre- 
tary to lay them Before You. And as I cannot take upon me to 
enter into any Engagements in Behalf of this Government without 
your Concurrence and Assurance of enabling me to perform them, 
my Answers to these Letters must arise from the Resolutions . of 
your House. My Sentiments of the Necessity of an Union of the 
several Colonies for the Defence of their Frontiers, and of securing 
the Fidelity of the Six Nations and the Indians dependent upon 
them, and my Apprehensions of their being otherwise seduced by, 
or compelled to join with the Enemy, have been so lately made 
known to You that I need not repeat them. If You shall Agree 
to my appointing Commissioners to confer with such as are & shall 
be appointed by the Governors of the several Colonies, I shall chear- 
fully assist them with the best Instructions I can form for their 
Conduct in an Affair of so great Importance. 

« GEO. THOMAS. 
" February 3d, 1745." 

The Governor ordered the Secretary to inform Mr. Shoemaker of; 
his being appointed a Member of Council, & to take care that he be 
Summoned to the next Council. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, February 4th, 1745. 
present : 

The Honoble. GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Governor, 
Thomas Laurence, Samuel Hasell, ""] 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strethil, V Esquires. 

James Hamilton, Benjamin Shoemaker, J 

The Minutes of the preceeding Council were read and approved. 

Mr. Shoemaker took and subscribed the qualifications as a Mem- 
ber of the Council. 

The Governor laid before the Board a Message he had received 
from the Assembly the 5th Instant, which was delivered by two 
Members, who were directed the same time to inform him that seve- 
ral of the Representatives having Business at the Courts and in the 
Country, the House was inclined to adjourn to the 24th Instant, to 
which he made no objection. 

A Message from the Assembly to the Governor, 
May it please the Governor : 

We have taken into our Consideration the last Message with the 
two Letters which the Gov r - was pleased to send us ; and as to the 
proposal made by the Governor of New York for the appointment 
of Commies 1 " 8 - from the several Colonies, we think it will be both 



32 MINUTES OF THE 

difficult and unnecessary for us to be particular in our Sentiments 
concerning it, until we are ascertained how it will "be taken by other 
Colonies ; and whether any, & which of them, shall concur in such 
an Appointment. If such Commissioners shall be thought neces- 
sary for securing the Indians of the Six Nations in the British 
Interest, or for any other purposes which may appear to us to be for 
the general Good, we shall chearfully concur in it. And we are 
made acquainted that such an Appointment is generally acceded to 
by other Colonies, and the time and place of Meeting proposed; it 
will then, we think, be time enough for us, who are near the Centre 
of these Colonies*", and who meet frequently on the Public Affairs of 
the Province, to deliver our Resolutions thereupon. 

As to the -Letter from Governor Shirley, we observe it was writ- 
ten before the account of the Arrival of the Regiments sent from 
Gibralter to the Garrison at Louisbourgh, and the Proposition he 
makes appears to us to be intended principally as an Expedient to 
have taken Place in case of their Miscarriage ; and as by the Pub- 
lick Accounts there is reason to believe those Regiments are since 
arrived, we presume the Necessity of the Application to this Pro- 
vince may be removed. 

The Expedition to Carthagena, the Manning of divers private 
Ships of War, and the numbers which have enlisted in the King's 
Service, with the Recruiting Officers from the Islands of Jamaica 
and Antigua, have drained this Province of many of its inha- 
tants, and had we no other Objections we conceive it can hardly be 
thought reasonable the Province of the Massachusetts should have 
the Assistance required from hence, even tho' it were necessary, 
rather than from Rhode Island, Connecticut, and New Hampshire, 
whose Situation and engagements Interest them more deeply than 
us in the preservation of Nova Scotia and Cape Breton. 
" Sign'd by Order of the House. 

" JOHN KINSEY, Speaker. 

« 12th Mon. 5th, 1745." 

The Bill entitled " an Act for amending the Laws relating to the 
Poor, & for the better appointment of Overseers of the Poor within 
the City of Philadelphia," was read a second time, & divers Amend- 
ments were reported and proposed by the Committee, which were 
read and approved. 

The Bill entitled " a Supplement to the Act entitled < an Act for 
erecting Houses of Correction and Work houses in the respective 
Counties/ and to the Act entitled an 'Act to enable Jeremiah 
Langhorn, & ca, > to Build a Court House in the County of Bucks/ " 
were read a second time & some Amendments propos'd, which were 
read and approv'd. 

, The Secretary was order' d by His Honour to transcribe the several 
Amendments fair, & deliver them with the Bills to the House. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 33 

24th February, 1745, P. M. 
MEMORANDUM. 

Two Members of Assembly waited on the Governor & acquainted 
hiin that the House was met according to their Adjournment, & 
ready to receive any thing the Governor shou'd have to lay before 
them. His Honour was pleas'd to say he shou'd to-morrow morn- 
ing send down to the House the Bills that had been laid before 
them, with some Amendments. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia February 28th, 1745. 
present : 

The Honoble. GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Gover- 
nor. * 
Abraham Taylor, Robert Strethil, | ™ 
James Hamilton, j ^ 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approved. 

The Governor laid before the Board a Bill entitled " an Act for 
the Re-emitting and continuing the Loan of the Bills of Credit of 
this Province ;" which was read for the first time. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, March 3d, 1745. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Gover- 
nor. 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strethil, } -^ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, j ^ 

The Minutes of the preceeding Council were read and approv'd. 

The Governor laid before the Board the Bill Entitled "an Act for 
the Re-emitting and continuing the Loan of the Bills of Credit of 
this Province ;" which was read a second time, and some Amend- 
ments being propos'd the same were agreed to, & the Secretary re- 
ceived His Honour's Commands to transcribe them fair & deliver 
them to the House with the Bill. 

The Governor likewise laid before the Board two other Bills, one 
entitled "a supplementary Bill to the Act entitled 'an Act for pre- 
venting the Exportation of Bread and Flour not Merchantable,' " the 
other entitled "an Act for the more effectual suppressing profane 
Cursing and Swearing ;" which were read ; and the Flour Act was 
committed to Mr. Hasell, Mr. Taylor, & Mr. Strethil, to consider 
& Amend. 

VOL. v. — 3. 



U MINUTES OF THE 

At a Council held at Philadelphia, March 4, 1745. 

present : 
The Honohle. GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Gover- 
nor. 

Thomas Laurence, Samuel Hasell, \ 

Abram Taylor, Robert Strethill, V Esqrs. 

James Hamilton, Benjamin Shoemaker, J 

The Minutes of the preceeding Council were read and approv'd. 

The Bill for preventing the Exportation of Bread and Flour not 
Merchantable, and the Bill for the more effectual suppressing pro- 
fane Cursing and Swearing, were read a second time, & some Amend- 
ments being propos'd to both Bills, they were order' d to be tran- 
scribe fair & delivered with the Bills to the House. 

The Governor laid before the Board a Bill for erecting a House 
of Correction & Work House in the Burrough of Bristol, in the 
County of Bucks,. & for raising of Money on the Inhabitants of the 
said Burrough for the Publick Use and Benefit thereof ; which was 
read and agreed to. 

A Message was delivered by two Members of Assembly to the 
Governor in Council, that the Amendments propos'd to the Bill for 
the Re-emitting & Continuing the Loan of the Bills of Credit of 
this Province were agreed to by the House j whereupon, the Gov- 
ernor said they might proceed to engross the Bill. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, March 7th, 1745, 

present : 

The Honoble. GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Samuel Hasel, ) ™ 
* Abraham Taylor, j " 

The Minutes of the preceeding Council were read and approved. 

The Governor inform'd the Council that the House had agreed 
to the Amendments propos'd to the Flour Act, & that he had told 
them they might order the several Bills which had been approv'd 
to be engross'd, and Mr. Taylor & Mr. Strethil were desir'd as a 
Committe of Council to examine them when engross'd, with a 
Committee of the House, which they did, and found them to agree 
with the Copies, but that as in one of the Bills there were some 
words that were rendered superfluous by one of the Amendments 
agreed to, the Governor, on a Message from the House, assented 
they shou'd be erased. 

The Governor further inform'd the Council that he had appointed 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 35 

this Bay, at 12 o' Clock, to receive the Speaker & the whole House 
in order to pass the several Bills, and accordingly the Speaker, at 
the head of the whole House, presented the following Bills, which 
the Governor Enacted into Laws, Viz'- : 

" A Bill for the Re-emitting and Continuing the Loan of the 
Bills of Credit of this Province/ 5 

" A Bill for amending the several Acts for Electing Members of 
Assembly." 

" A Bill for the more easy and speedy Recovery of small Debts." 

"A Supplement to an Act entitled 'an Act for Erecting of 
Houses of Correction and Work Houses in the respective Counties/ 
And to the Act entitled 'an Act to enable Jeremiah Langhorn, 
&c a -' to Build a Court House in the County of Bucks/ " 

" A Bill for Erecting a House of Correction and Work House in 
the Borough of Bristol, in the County of Bucks, and for raising of 
Money on the Inhabitants of the said Borough for the Public Uso 
and Benefit thereof." 

" A Supplementary Bill to the Act Entitled c An Act for pre- 
venting the Exportation of Bread and Flour not Merchantable/ " 

" A Bill for the more effectual suppressing profane Cursing & 
Swearing," 

And Mr. Laurence & Mr. Hassel were desir'd to see the Great 
Seal Affixed to them. 

The Speaker at the same time presented the Governor with two 
Orders, one on the Trustees of the Loan Office for £500, and the 
other on the Provincial Treasurer for £1,000, & inform'd the Gov- 
ernor that the House propos'd to Adjourn to the 19th of May, to 
which His Honour made no objection. 

±2osms 

At a Council held at Philadelphia, June 3d, 1746. 
present : 

The Honoble. GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Governor. 
Thomas Laurence, Robert Strethil, ~\ 

Abraham Taylor, Benjamin Shoemaker, > Esqrs. 

James Hamilton, ) 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approved. 

The Governor inform'd the Board that on the 19th of May two 
Members of Assembly had waited on him to inform him the House 
was met according to their Adjournment, and that he had sent a 
Message to the House the next Day and received an Answer from 
them, which, together with the Letter & the several Papers therein 
referr'd to, were read, and the Messages were ordered to be enter'd. 



36 MINUTES OF THE 



A Message from the Governor to the Assembly, 

" Gentlemen : 

" You will see by the Letter and other Papers received from Gov- 
ernor Clinton since your last Meeting, that I am again desired to 
appoint Commissioners in order to concert Measures with those 
already appointed by him and by Governor Shirley for the Security 
and Defence of His Majestie's Colonies during the present War, and 
that the positive Refusal of the Six Nations to join in the War 
against the French and the Indians in Alliance with them is urged 
to shew the immediate Necessity of such an Appointment. 

" My Answer to this Letter was in substance, that I had laid his 
former Letter on this Subject before you, as I should this at your 
next Meeting, and I repeated that you had expressed a readiness to 
enter into any reasonable Measures for His Majestie's Service and 
the Welfare of the Colonies, but that you had thought it would be 
time enough to appoint Commissioners for this when you should be 
made acquainted with the Resolutions of the Neighbouring Gov- 
ernments. I observed, likewise, that those of Virginia, Maryland, 
& Connecticut, were still unknown to us. 

"As my Sentiments on this matter have been fully delivered to 
you already, I shall only add, that notwithstanding the seeming 
Resolution of the Council of the Six Nations to preserve a Neu- 
trality, it is much to be apprehended that their young Men who are 
fond of Military Achievements will join the French Indians in their 
barbarous Incursions upon the British Colonies, and that the old 
Men not having Power to restrain will be obliged to wink at them, 
and perhaps in the end break out into an open Revolt. How fatal 
such a procedure will be to this and the British Colonies in general 
you will judge, and I trust that you will not be so wanting to your- 
selves as not to take the most reasonable Measures to prevent it. 

"GEO. THOMAS. 
" May 20th, 1746." 

A Message from the Assembly to the Governor. 

" May it please the Governor : 

" We look upon it as a Matter of great Importance to this and 
the neighbouring Governments that the most effectual Measures 
be taken, as often as it becomes necessary, to secure the Six United 
Nations, and the Indians in Alliance with them, in their Fidelity 
to the Crown of Great Britain, and to cultivate and maintain that 
Friendship and good Understanding which hath so long subsisted 
between us and them. To this end, as the Governor well knows, 
this Province hath at many times been at great Expence as well in 
Presents made to those Indians as for carrying on of Treaties with 
them, sometimes in conjunction with other Colonies, sometimes 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 37 

seperately. At all which Treaties, and particularly those lately 
held, the Indians have constantly declared themselves steady, un- 
alterable, and determined to continue their antient Amity with this 
and the neighbouring Governments ; and therefore we hope, that 
tho' they may have refused to join in the present War against the 
French and their Indians, they will remain firm in their Friend- 
ship to us and other the British Colonies. However, as the Gov- 
ernor and the Governor of New York seem to apprehend the 
Danger of their Revolt, and the Necessity of appointing of Com- 
missioners from the several Governments, we continue our former 
Resolutions that if such Commissioners shall be thought necessary, 
either for securing the Indians in the British Interest or for any 
other purposes which shall appear to us to be for the general Good, 
we shall chearfully concur in it. But since, as the Governor is 
pleased to observe in His Message, the Sentiments of most of the 
other Colonies are unknown to us, and it is uncertain whether they 
will accede to such Appointments or not, And as it does not ap- 
pear to us that a Meeting of Commissioners for New York, the 
Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania only, would be of any great Ser- 
vice, therefore, as formerly, we think it best to postpone our par- 
ticular Resolutions in the Affair until the Determination of the 
other Colonies are made known to us. 

" Sign'd by Order of the House. 
, " "JOHN KINSEY, Speaker. 

"3dMon. 21st, 1746." 

MEMORANDUM. 

Two Members of the Assembly waited on the Governor to in- 
form him that the House was inclined to Adjourn to the Eighteenth 
Day of August if he had no objection to that time. The Governor 
said he had no Objection. 

The Governor having received by Express from Boston a Letter 
from the Duke of Newcastle, Dated at Whitehall, 9th April, 1746, 
relating to an intended Expedition against Canada, the same was 
read, and ordered to be entered at length. 

" Whitehall, April 9th, 1746. 
"Sir: 

"I am commanded to acquaint You that 'His Majesty has been 
pleased to order Five Battalions of His Troops, under the command 
of Lieutenant General St. Clair, to go from hence as soon as pos- 
sible, with a sufficient Convoy of Men of War, to Louisbourgh, in 
order to be employed together with the Regiments of Major General 
Frampton, which has been some time ordered to embark for Louis- 
bourgh, and with the other two Regiments sent thither from Gib- 
ralter, and also with such Troops as shall be levied for that pur- 
pose in North America, for the immediate Reduction of Canada. 



38 MINUTES OF THE 

And I am commanded by His Majesty to signify his Pleasure to 
You (as I do to the other Governors of the said Colonies) that you 
should forthwith make the necessary Dispositions for raising as 
many Men as the shortness of the time will permit within your 
Government, to be employed in Concert with His Majesty's regular 
Forces on this important Service. It is hoped that Lieutenant 
General St. Clair will be able to sail from hence, with the Troops 
under his Command, the Latter end of April or the Beginning of 
May. 

"It is the King's Intention that the Troops to be raised should 
consist of Companies of One hundred Men each ; and that those 
that shall be raised in the several Provinces of New York, New 
Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, & Virginia, should be formed into 
one Corps, to be commanded by Mr. Gooeh, Lieutenant Governor 
of Virginia (whom the King has been pleased, on this occasion, to 
promote to the Rank of a Brigadier General), and that they should 
rendezvous at Albany within the Province of New York, or at such 
other Place as Mr. Gooch shall think proper to appoint, in order to 
proceed from thence by Land into the Southern Parts of Canada. 

" The Troops to be raised in the Province of Massachusetts Bay r 
New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, are to rendezvous 
at Louisbourg, and to proceed with the forces sent from hence, under 
Convoy of His Majestie's Fleet, up the River of St. Lawrence to 
Quebec. 

" In consequence of these Dispositions, His Majesty has order'd 
me to recommend it to you in the strongest manner to proceed im- 
mediately to raise as large a Body of Men as the shortness of the 
time will permit within your Government, and you will appoint such 
Officers as you shall think proper to command them; for which pur- 
pose a number of Blank Commissions will be sent you by the next 
Conveyance. And you will transmit to Mr. Gooch a particular ac- 
count of what you shall be able to do herein; and you will follow 
such directions as you shall receive from Mr. Qooch, with regard to 
the Place of Rendezvous and every thing relating to the proceedings 
of the said Troops. 

" You will assure all those that shall engage in this Service, as 
well Officers as Soldiers, that they will immediately enter into His 
Majesty's pay — the Officers from the time they shall engage in His 
Majesty's Service, and the Soldiers from the respective Days on 
which they shall enlist; and that they shall come in for a share of 
any Booty to be taken from the Enemy, and be sent back to their 
respective Habitations when this Service is over, unless any of them 
shall desire to settle Elsewhere. 

" As to the Article of Arms and Cloathing for the Men to be raised, 
His Majesty has commanded me to recommend it to You and the 
other Governors to take care that the Soldiers may be provided with 
them; And His Majesty has authorized aud empowered Lieutenant 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 39 

General St. Clair to make a reasonable allowance for defraying that 
Expence. 

" You will recommend it to the Council and Assembly of Penn- 
sylvania to provide a sufficient quantity of Provisions for the sub- 
sistence of the Troops. 

" I am ordered by His Majesty to recommend it to You to make 
strictest Enquiry for any Persons that may be acquainted with the 
Navigation of the River St. Lawrence ; And if You can find any 
such, You will engage them at any rate to serve as Pilots on board 
His Majestic' s Fleet, and you will send them as soon as possible to 
Louisbourg for that Purpose. 

" I am, Sir, Your most obedient, humble Servant, 

"HOLLES NEWCASTLE." 

It was the unanimous opinion of the Board that Writs shou'd 
Issue to Summon the Assembly to meet on the 9th Instant, & that 
in the mean time a proper Proclamation shou'd be prepared to be 
published on that Day. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 9 th June, 1746. 
present : 

The Honourable GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Captain Palmer, Thomas Laurence, ") 

Samuel Hasell, Abraham Taylor, > Esqrs. 

Robert Strethil, Benjamin Shoemaker, ) 

The Minutes of the preceeding Council were read and approved. 

The Governor laid before the Board the Draught of a Proclama- 
tion, which was approved, and the Secretary was directed to get it 
immediately engross'd in order to be publish'd this Evening at Six 
o'Clock at the Court House. 

" By the Honourable GEORGE THOMAS, Esq r - Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor and Commander-in-Chief of the Province of Pennsylvania, 
and Counties of Newcastle, Kent, and Sussex, on Delaware. 

"A PROCLAMATION. 
"His Grace the Duke of Newcastle, one of His Majestie's prin- 
cipal Secretaries of State, having by His Letter of the 9th of April 
last signified unto me, as well as to the other Governors of the 
Northern Colonies, That His Majesty has been pleased to order a 
considerable Body of His Troops from England under the Com- 
mand of Lieutenant General St. Clair, with a sufficient Convoy of 
Men of War to Louisburg, for the immediate Reduction of Canada, 
and that I should forthwith make the necessary Dispositions for 



40 MINUTES OF THE 

raising as many Men as the shortness of the time will permit within 
my Government to be employ'd in concert with His Majesty's regu- 
lar Forces on this Important Service. 

" That it is the King's Intention the Troops to be raised should 
consist of Companies of One hundred Men each ; and that those 
that shall be raised in the several Provinces of New York, New 
Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia, be formed into one 
Corps to be commanded by Mr. Gooch, Lieutenant Governor of Vir- 
ginia (whom the King has been pleased on this occasion to pro- 
mote to the Rank of Brigadier General), and they should rendez- 
vous at Albany, within the Province of New York, or at such other 
Place as Mr. Gooch shall think proper to appoint, in order to pro- 
ceed from thence by Land into the Southren Parts of Canada; 
whilst those to be raised in the Provinces of Massachusetts Bay, 
New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, are to Rendez- 
vous at Louisburg, and to proceed with the Forces sent from Eng- 
land under Convoy of His Majesty's Fleet up the River St. Lawrence 
to Quebec. 

"That in consequence of these Dispositions, His Majesty has been 
pleased to authorize me to appoint such Officers as I shall thing fit 
to Command the Troops to be raised within this Government, for 
which purpose a number of Blank Commissions will be sent me. 
And I am commanded to assure all such as shall engage in this Ser- 
vice, as well Officers as Soldiers, that they will immediately enter 
into his Majestie's pay — The Officers from the time they shall engage 
in His Majestie's Service, and the Soldiers from the respective Days 
on which they shall enlist. And they shall come in for a share of any 
Booty to be taken from the Enemy, and be sent back to their re- 
spective Habitations when this Service shall be over, unless any of 
them shall desire to settle Elsewhere ; which unquestionable they 
will be encourag'd to do by Grants of the Conquor'd Lands in pre- 
ference to all other persons. 

" That as to the Article of Arms and Clothing for the Men to be 
raised, His Majesty has commanded me to take care That the Sol- 
diers may be provided with them, and has empowered Lieutenant 
General St. Clair to make a reasonable allowance for defraying that 
Expence. 

" And that if any Persons can be found who are acquainted with 
the Navigation of the River St. Lawrence, I do engage them by suit- 
able Rewards to serve on board His Majestie's Fleet, and send them 
as soon as possible to Louisbourgh for that purpose. 

" Now that these His Majestie's Gracious Intentions may be made 
publick, I do, with the advice of the Council, Issue this Proclama- 
tion, Inviting His Majestie's Subjects within this Government to 
exert themselves as becomes a Dutiful & Grateful people to the best 
of Kings, upon an occasion the most interesting to them as well as 
to all the rest of the British Colonies in North America; An occa- 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 41 

sion in which the Quiet and Happiness of them and their Posterity 
are so immediately concerned that it would be an affront to their 
understandings to make use of Arguments to prove it. An occasion 
that has been so long and earnestly wish't for, that it would not be 
unreasonable to expect the whole Body of the People should rise 
up as one Man to secure, under the Blessing of God, the Success of 
the Undertaking, and it may justly be hoped as his Majesty has 
been forced into the War for the Defence of his Crown and the 
Civil and Religious Rights of his People, that the Almighty will 
grant a Blessing to his Arms. His Majestie's Subjects in Europe 
have given proofs of their Loyalty & Affection to his Person and 
Government beyond the Examples of former Ages to the best of 
their Kings. An Opportunity is now offer'd to those in North 
America to shew that a Change of Climate has made no Change in 
their's. I, for my part, am determin'd to Act with the Duty and 
Zeal becoming a faithful Servant to a most Gracious Master, and 
with a Vigour becoming the Trust deposited with me for the In- 
terest & Security of the People under my Government. 

" Given under my Hand and the Great Seal of the Province of 
Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, this ninth Day of June, in the 
Nineteenth Year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord, George the 
Second, King of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, &**•' and in 
the Year of Our Lord One thousand seven hundred and forty-six. 

"GEORGE THOMAS. 
"GOD SAVE THE KING. 
" By His Honours Command. 

"Richard Peters, Secretary." 

The Governor likewise laid beford the Board a Draught of a 
Message to the Assembly, which was approved, and is as follows : 

A Message from the Governor to the Assembly. 

" Gentlemen : 

" My calling you together so suddenly was occasion' d by a Letter 
I have received from His Grace the Duke of Newcastle, by the 
Hinchinbrook Sloop of War arrived Express at Boston, signifying 
to me That His Majesty has been pleased to order a considerable 
Body of his Troops from England, under convoy of a sufficient 
Squadron of Men of War to Louisbourgh, to be employ'd in the 
immediate Reduction of Canada, with Troops to be raised in the 
Northern Colonies. 

" You will observe from his Grace's Letter which I have order'd 
to be laid before You, that I am directed to recommend to You the 
providing a sufficient quantity of Provisions for the subsistence of 
the Troops which shall be raised here. 

" As it is recommended to me likewise to take care that the Sol- 



42 MINUTES OF THE 

diers may be provided with Arms and Cloathing, I must apply to 
You for an Advance of so much of the Publick Money as may be 
necessary for these purposes, which Expence Lieutenant General 
St. Clair is authorized and empowered to defray. 

u The shortness of the Time requiring the utmost Dispatch, a 
Bounty for the Encouragement of able-bodied Men to engage in this 
Service will very much expedite the Levies. 

" Until I see what number of Men can be raised it is not pos- 
sible for me to make an Estimate of the Sum necessary for this 
Service; but if I maybe allow'd to form a Judgment from the Im- 
portance of the undertaking to this and the rest of the Northern 
Colonies, the number will be very considerable ; for Success in it 
will not only deliver them from their present apprehensions of a 
vigilant and enterprizing Enemy, but in all humane probability en- 
sure quiet and Security to them and their Posterity — and this 
shews what Returns of Duty & Gratitude are due to a King who 
has meditated such Blessings to his North American Subjects. 

"GEO. THOMAS. 
"June 10th 7 1746." 

The Governor likewise laid before the Board a Letter from Gov- 
ernor Clinton, informing him that he had laid an Embargo on all 
Provisions for four Months, & desiring the same might be done in 
this Government, which was propos'd to the Council, and they were 
unanimously of Opinion that it was not necessary to lay an Em- 
bargo on any Provisions here, as there was a vast Quantity of all 
sorts in the Country, and as such Embargo might disappoint his 
Majestie's Ships of the Supplies contracted to be deliver' d them 
from this port, besides that such a stop must at this time be pecu- 
liarly prejudicial to all the Islands. 

MEMORANDUM. 

Two Members of Assembly waited on the Governor & acquainted 
him that the House was met pursuant to his Summons & ready to 
receive what he might have to lay before them, & desir'd a Copy of 
the Writts by virtue of which the House was Summon'd. The 
Governor, in Answer, told them he wou'd send a Message to the 
House with the Writts to-morrow morning. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 43 

At a Council held at Philadelphia, 23d June, 1746. 

present : 

The Honobl. GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Governor. 

Thomas Laurence, Samuel Hassel, "| 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, I Es r 

Robert Strettel, Benjamin Shoemaker, j ^ 
James Hamilton, J 

The Minutes of the preceeding Council were read and approv'd. 

The Governor informed the Board that sundry Messages had 
passs'd between him & the Assembly on the Subject of his last 
Message, & that having received Letters from the Governors of 
New England & New York, pressing him to appoint Commissioners 
for securing the Indians of the Six Nations in their fidelity to his 
Majesty, he had likewise sent a Message to the House on this 
Subject, all which were read and are as follows, viz : 

A Message from the Assembly to the Governor. 

"May it please the Governor: 

" We are deeply sensible of the many and great Blessings we 
enjoy under the Crown and present Government, and in Duty and 
Gratitude hold ourselves obliged to yeild chearful obedience to the 
King's Commands so far as our Religious Persuasions permit ; Yet 
as the Governor well knows, many of us labour under great Diffi- 
culties when called upon to be concern'd in Warlike Enterprises, 
such as appear to us inconsistent with the Peaceable Principles we 
profess. The only expedient hitherto found to remove these diffi- 
culties hath been to demonstrate our Loyalty and hearty Affection 
to the Crown by giving a Sum of Money to the King's Use. This 
we are now willing to do, but upon Enquiry are informed that neither 
the Treasury or Loan-Office are furnish'd with such a Quantity be- 
yond what other Exigencies of Government will require as we are 
willing to give, Nor do we see any other way by which such a Sum 
can be speedily raised unless it can be by striking a further Quantity 
of Paper Money ; And this we hope the Governor will be of Opinion 
with us may be done, as that the Sum given may be repaid by the 
Interest to arise by the residue placed out in like manner, as are 
the Bills of Credit current by the Act sometime since past in this 
Province, & which, having had the Royal Approbation, will, we 
presume, be liable to few if any Exceptions, and the Money thus 
raised least Inconvenient to the Inhabitants of the Province. 
" Signed by Order of the House, 

" JOHN KINSEY, Speaker. 

"4th Mon. 12th, 1746." 



44 MINUTES OF THE 

A Message from the Governor to the Assembly. 

11 Gentlemen : 

" I am very much pleased with your Intention to grant a Sum of 
Money to His Majesty upon this Important Occasion, and I wish it 
was as much in my Power as it is in my Inclination to agree with 
you in the Method proposed for raising it; but you must be sensi- 
ble, from the Royal Instruction communicated to a former Assem- 
bly, and I suppose enter'd in the Minutes, that I am forbid, under 
pain of His Majestie's highest displeasure, from passing any Act 
for striking Bills of Credit, without a Clause restrain'g its operation 
until the King's pleasure shall be known. Besides, an addition to 
your Bills of Credit at this time, I apprehend, would very much 
lessen the value of those already Current, as Exchange to London 
is already higher than has ever been known in this Province. I 
grant, where I at liberty to pass such a Bill as you expect, it might 
be a present Convenience, but the future Inconveniences would 
abundantly outweigh it. The Legislature of this Province has hith- 
erto maintain'd its Reputation this Point, whilst others are sinking 
under the Load of their numerous Emissions. You may unques- 
tionably procure any Sum upon Loan which you shall be willing to 
grant to His Majesty, upon Security to repay it out of the Excise 
or the Interest of the Bills of Credit already issued. 

"Whatever you do, Gentleman, let it be done with Dispatch, for 
the time presses, and your Example will have a considerable influ- 
ence upon the Spirits of the People. 

"GEO. THOMAS. 

"June 13th, 1746." 

A Message from the Assembly to the Governor. 

" May it please the Governor : 

" It is very agreeable to us to find our Intentions of giving Money 
to the King approved of by the Governor; And we are equally 
pleased with the kind Inclinations he is pleased to express towards 
raising the Money in the Method we propose ; And we are willing 
to hope that the Governor, on reconsidering the Royal Instruction 
he is pleased to mention, may think himself at Liberty to give his 
Assent to a Bill for striking a further sum of Money in Bills of 
Credit when any extraordinary Emergency requires it. 

" It must be confess' d Exchange hath of late risen amongst us, & 
is at present high ; but we think it clear this rise is not owing to 
the quantity of our Paper Money but the Exigences of Trade, 
since for some time after the Emission by the last Eighty Thousand 
Pound Act, which is the greatest Sum in Bills of Credit that were 
ever Current at one time amongst us, Exchange was lower than at 
any time before. As, therefore, the Sum proposed to be Emitted 



PKOVINCIAL COUNCIL. 45 

is not so great as can either affect the Credit of former Bills or raise 
Exchange, will not only be a present Convenience, but of future 
Benefit to the Province, we hope the Governor will think it consist- 
ent with the Trust reposed in him to assent to the Method pro- 
posed, especially as the Sums of Money which have lately been 
given to the King's use, & the contingent Charges of Government, 
have amounted so high as neither the Money raised by the Excise 
Act nor the Interest of Bills of Credit paid into the Loan Office 
have been sufficient to defray, nor does any Method appear to us by 
which the Money now intended to be given to the King's Use can 
be raised but what will be more chargeable as well as Inconvenient. 
"Sign'd by Order of the House. 

"JOHN KINSEY, Speaker. 
"4th Mon. 14th, 1746." 

A Message from the Governor to the Assembly. 

" Gentlemen : 

" I really do not want Inclination to oblige you in every thing 
you can reasonably desire, and therefore the Mortification to me is 
greater to be pressed down upon a Point which I am not at liberty to 
Comply with. The King's Instruction, founded upon the Addresses 
of the Houses of Lords k Commons, is so positive that I cannot 
bring myself to such a pitch of Boldness as to contravene it. Argu- 
ments are not wanting to shew the Mischiefs like to accrue from an 
Addition to your Paper Currency, but I would give up my own 
Reason to You upon this pressing occasion, were that only in the 
way. Upon a due Consideration of my being thus circumstanced,, 
I promise myself that you will proceed to some less exceptionable 
Method of raising the Sum designed to be granted for the King's 
Use. 

" GEO. THOMAS. 

"June 14th, 1746." 

A Message from the Governor to the Assembly, 

" Gentlemen ; 

"As the Necessity of securing the Indians of the Six Nations m 
their Fidelity to His Majesty becomes every Day more pressing and 
apparent, and I am again sollicited by the Governors of New Eng- 
land and New York, whose Letters I have ordered to be laid before 
you, to appoint Commissioners for that purpose, I must renew my 
Application to you to enable me to co-operate with the four Northern 
Governments at the Treaty to be held with those Nations on the 
Twentieth of the next month, at Albany, And since this is a mea- 
sure immediately recommended by his Majesty to the Governor of 
New York, to facilitate the Reduction of Canada, it is not to be 
doubted but the two Southern Governments will readily accede 
to it, 



46 MINUTES OF THE 

" Since I heard of the Resolve of your House to grant Five thou- 
sand pounds for the King's Use, we have been informed from the 
Public News Papers of the Bounty given in some other Colonies to 
encourage able body'd Men to engage in the Service. As the like 
Bounty will be expected here, the Sum voted will not be sufficient 
to raise and victual above three Companies, which will fall very 
short of the general Expectation from a Colony of so much Importance. 
Let me, therefore, recommend such an addition as may very well 
comport with the Circumstances of the Province, and be a proof of 
your at least equalling your Neighbours in Duty to his Majesty and 
Zeal for the common Interest. 

"GEO. THOMAS. 

"June 19th, 1746." 

A Message from the Assembly to the Governor. 

" May it please the Governor : 

"The funds by which this Government is supported, and the Con- 
tingent Charges defrayed, are the Interest which arises from the 
Bills of Credit lent out and the Money paid into the Treasury by 
the Excise Act ; both these the last Year proved deficient, so that 
the Bal lance against the Province exclusive of Outstandings was 
upwards of Two Thousand Pounds, besides the like Sum due from 
the Province on Account of the State House. And as the Gov- 
ernor seems to be under Difficulties with Respect to further Emis- 
sions of Bills of Credit, and as an additional Tax would we conceive 
be attended with many Inconveniences, we therefore resolved on the 
Payment of Five thousand Pounds only to the King's Use. If the 
Sum to be given must arise from the present Funds we do not think 
it will be fit to add much, if any Thing, to the Sum resolved on. 
But if the Governor can think himself at Liberty to add a fitting 
quantity in Bills of Credit to be emitted amongst us as usual, in 
like manner as we are informed & believe our Neighbours must do, 
we think it will redound greatly to the Advantage of the Province, 
be attended with no Inconveniences, and will enable us on the pre- 
sent & future occasions to give the proof the Governor is pleased to 
mention of having at least equal ' Duty to His Majesty/ tho' we 
may have different Modes of expressing it from our Neighbours. 
We wait the Governor's Result on this head before we proceed on 
the Bill before us, and in the mean time shall take into Considera- 
tion the residue of his last Message. 

" Signed by Order of the House. 

"JOHN KINSEY, Speaker. 

" 4th Mon. 20th, 1746." 

A Message from the Governor to the Assembly. 
" Gentlemen : 
" If I cou'd think myself at Liberty to consent to an Act for 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 47 

Striking Bills of Credit in the manner you propose, the occasion as 
well as my Inclination to render a Grant to His Majesty as little 
burthensome as possible to the people, wou'd soon determine me in 
favour of it, tho' I cannot but think the present Convenience wou'd 
be bought too dear, for it is plain to me that an addition to your 
Currency to be lent out for a Term of Years upon Interest, would 
lessen the value of the Bills already issued, & consequently affect 
all Contracts now subsisting, as any the most self Evident proposi- 
tion. I have not been well informed of what is done or intended 
to be done in other Colonies as to this point, neither wou'd it be- 
come me to Censure the Conduct of their Governors should they 
act a part different from me. The Circumstances of these Colonies 
and their Method of sinking their Bills of Credit may be different 
from this. If I am rightly inform'd it has been done at New York 
by Taxes, and that in Jersey so great a part of their Currency has 
been sunk that a new Emission would be no advance upon what has 
been usually Current there; whereas your's is entire, & to be re- 
emitted upon Loan for several Years to come. If you will agree to 
sink any addition you shall make to the Five Thousand Pound 
already voted, by a Tax to be levied in any reasonable time, I will 
give my Assent to an Act for striking Bills of Credit for that Sum, 
and surely a People who have not paid a Provincial Tax for above 
Twenty Years past cannot be uneasy under it in a Case which so 
immediately concerns their own Happiness and that of their Pos- 
terity. Should you resolve notwithstanding to confine yourselves 
to Five Thousand Pounds, which, as I before told You, will not raise 
& victual above Three Companies, even supposing the Men are to 
subsist upon the King's Pay during their stay in this Province, I 
must be obliged to call upon you for an advance of so much Money 
as will be necessary to Cloath & Arm them in Case General St. Clair 
should not arrive in time to furnish me with Bills for that purpose. 
My own stock has been already advanced for the King's Service in 
Purchasing Cloathing for the Troops in Garrison at Cape Breton, 
and for raising the Regiment under the Command of Governor Shir- 
ley. Considering how the time presses, abundantly too much of it 
has been already spent. I beseech you, therefore, to give all the 
Dispatch possible to this Important Business, that I may be enabled 
so far to answer the King's Expectation as relates to myself. 

"GEO. THOMAS. 
"June 26th, 1746." 

The Governor further informed the Board that he had, in Conse- 
quence of these several Messages, receiv'd from the House a Bill 
Entitled "an Act for Granting Five thousand Pounds to the King's 
Use out of the Bills of Credit now remaining in the hands of the 
General Loan Office, for exchanging torn & ragged Bills, & for 
striking the like Sum to replace in their hands," which was read, 
& some Amendments being propos'd, the Secretary was order'd 



48 MINUTES OF THE 

to transcribe them fair & deliver them with the Bill in the After- 
noon. 



At a Council held at Philada., 24th of June, 1746. 

PRESENT I 

The Honble. GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr. ; Lieutenant Governor. 

Thomas Laurence, Samuel Hassell, ) -p, 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strethil, j ^ 

The Minutes of the preceeding Council were read and approved. 

, Two Members of Assembly having deliver'd a Bill from the 

House Entitled "A Supplement to the Act Entitled 'an Act for 

Imposing a Duty on Persons convicted of Henious Crimes, &"•" 

the same was read and approved. 

MEMORANDUM. 

Two Members of Assembly waited on the Governor this Morning 
with the Bill for Granting Five Thousands Pounds &"*•• & desir'd his 
concurrence thereto j & withal acquainted him that it was engross'd 
with his first Amendment j and desir'd him to appoint some Mem- 
ber of Council to join with a Committee of the House in comparing 
it with the Original. The Governor was pleas' d to say he wou'd 
send his Secretary to some of the Members of Council to be at the 
State House at Three 0' Clock in the Afternoon, to join with the 
Members at the House in comparing the Five thousand Pound Bill, 
& hop'd that by Five 0' Clock he shou'd be ready to pass it, 
together with the Bill for appointing Joseph Prichard the Officer 
for executing the Act for imposing a Duty on Persons convicted of 
henious Crimes ; and accordingly Mr. Strethill & the Secretary 
examin'd the Bills and found them to agree with the Copies laid be- 
fore the Governor. 

Two Members of Assembly deliver'd to the Governor in Council 
the following Message : 

A Message from the Assembly to the Governor. 

" May it please the Governor : 

" Since our last Message we have taken into our Consideration 
that part of the Governor's which relates to the Indians of the Six 
Nations ; and also the Letters which the Governor was pleased to 
direct to be laid before us. And by what we gather from thence 
the Treaty proposed to be held at Albany on the Twentieth of next 
Month, in pursuance of some Instructions the Governor of New 
York hath received from the Crown which concerns himself only, 
and not the Governor of any other of the Colonies. 

u It is not improbable that the purport of these Instructions is 
to engage the Indians of the Six Nations in the War against the 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 49 

jEYench, and to join in the Expedition against Canada. If so, our 
uniting with the other Governments in the Congress proposed will 
be of little use, since it cannot be doubted but that provision is 
made to defray the Expence which shall arise thereby ; and that 
these Indians will pay greater Regard to the directions of the Crown 
than to the joint Request of all the Colonies. Besides, the Gov- 
ernor must be sensible that Men of our peaceable Principles cannot 
consistently therewith join in persuading the Indians to engage in 
the War. If it be thought there be any real Danger of the Indians 
deserting the British Interest & going over to the French, and that 
to preserve them steady in their Friendship further Presents are 
necessary to secure them in their Fidelity to the Crown of Great 
Britain, and Amity with the Inhabitants of this and the neighbor- 
ing Colonies, and the Governor can think his Health and Business 
will permit his negotiating this Affair in person, we shall be willing 
to pay the Expence to arise by it. 

"JOHN KINSEY, Speaker. 
"4th Mon. 24th, 1746." 

And at the same time told his Honour the House desir'd to 
know when they, with their Speaker, might wait on him in order 
to pass the Bills, & his Honour saying immediately, the Speaker at 
the head of the House presented the Bill entitled "An Act for 
granting Five Thousand Pounds to the King's Use out of the Bills 
of Credit now remaining in the hands of the Trustees of the Gene- 
ral Loan Office for exchanging torn & ragged Bills, & for striking 
the like Sum to replace in their Hands," And likewise the other 
Bill Entitled " A Supplement to the Act entitled an l Act for imposing 
a Duty on Persons convicted of Heinous Crimes, & ca -'' " & pray'd the 
Governor's assent to them, and accordingly his Honour Enacted 
them into Laws; then the Speaker Inform'd him that the House 
was inclin'd to adjourn to the 18th of August, being the same Day 
to which they had before adjourned. The Governor said he had no 
objection. 

Mr. Laurence was desir'd to go along with a Committee of As- 
sembly to see the Seals affix' d to the Acts. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia 14th July, 1746. 

present : 
The Honoble. GEORGE THOMAS, Esq r - Lieutenant Governor. 
Thomas Laurence, Samuel Hassell, ~\ 

Abraham /Taylor, Robert Strethil, I Esqrs. 

James Hamilton, Benjamin Shoemaker, J 

The Minutes of the preceeding Council were read and approv'd. 
The Governor laid before the Board the Draught of a Proclama- 
VOL. v. — 4. 



50 MINUTES OF THE 

tion appointing a Day of General Thanksgiving for the Success of 
His Majestic' s Arms under the Command of His Royal Highness, 
the Duke of Cumberland, over the Rebels in Scotland, which was 
approv'd, and is as follows : | 

"By the Honourable GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant 
Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Province of Pennsylva- 
nia, and Counties of New Castle, Kent, and Sussex, on Delaware. 

"A PROCLAMATION. 

" Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God, for the Punishment 
of our Sins & for awakening Us to a juster Sense of His peculiar 
& distinguishing Blessings to the British Nation above all the Na- 
tions upon Earth, to permit an unnatural and Bloody Rebellion 
to be begun & carried on in Scotland by the Son of a Popish 
Pretender, encouraged and supported by our antient and inveterate 
Enemies the French & Spaniards, and by that Monster of Iniquity 
the Court of Rome. And Whereas God of His Great Mercy after 
a Chastisement far short of our Deserts, hath at length been pleased 
to give a blessing to the Forces of our Rightful and Lawful Sov- 
reign King George, under the Command of His Royal Highness the 
Duke of Cumberland, by a compleat Victory over his ungrateful and 
rebellious Subjects, and thereby to preserve to the British Nation their 
Civil and Religious Rights, with their independancy of any foreign 
Power, I do with the advice of the Council hereby Order That 
Thursday, the Twenty-Fourth Day of this instant July, be observed 
throughout the Province and Counties under my Government, as a 
Day of Public Thanksgiving to Almighty God for this and all other 
His great Mercies, And that the several Ministers of the Gospel do 
compose Prayers and Sermons suitable to the Occasion, & perform 
Divine Service on that day in their respective Churches or Houses 
of Religious Worship. 

u And that the said Day may be observed with a Solemnity be- 
coming our Christain Profession, and not as has been too often the 
practice with Drunkenness and other kinds of Licentiousness, to 
the dishonor of God & to the Reproach of the Christian Name, I 
do hereby order that the Majestrates and other Officers of Justice 
be especially careful to prevent all Immoralities or riotous disorders 
whatsoever. And further I do recommend to the People of the 
several Religious perswasions within the Province and Counties 
aforesaid, that they do abstain from all servile Labour on that Day. 

" Given under my Hand & the Great Seal of the Province of Penn- 
sylvania, at Philadelphia, this Fourteenth day of July, in the 
Twentieth Year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord, George 
the Second, King of Great Britain, France, & Ireland, &c, and 
in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred & forty-six. 

" GEO. THOMAS. 
" GOD SAVE THE KING." 






PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 51 

At a Council held at Philadelphia the 4th of August, 1746. 

present : 

The Honoble. GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Samuel Hassell, Abraham Taylor, V L 

Hobert Strethil, James Hamilton, j ^ 

The Minutes of the proceeding Council were read and approved. 

The Governor propos'd to the Council to send a congratulatory 
Address to the King on the Defeat of the Rebels in Scotland, & 
they being unanimously of Opinion that it would be highly proper, 
His Honour, having prepar'd the draught of an Address, the same 
was read an$ approv'd & order' d to be engross' d in order to send by 
Captain Budden, who was to Sail the Next Day, and a Duplicate to 
go by Capt a - Arthur, via Maryland. 

" To the King's most Excellent Majesty. 

u The Humble Address of the Lieutenant Governor and Council of 
the Province of Pennsylvania. 

" Most Gracious Sovereign : 

"We, your Majesty's Dutiful & Loyal Subjects, the Lieutenant 
Governor and Council of the Province of Pennsylvania, being truly 
sensible of the Blessings we enjoy under your Majestie's mild & 
Gracious Government, humbly beg leave, with Hearts full of Joy & 
Gratitude, to present our most sincere Congratulations on the 
Success of your Majesty's Arms under His Royal Highness the 
Duke, in defeating the Rebels in Scotland, and thereby extin- 
guishing the hopes of a Popish Pretender and his detestable Con- 
federates. 

" If Mercy, Justice, & the strictest Regard & attention to the 
Liberties and Interests of your Subjects could have secured to Your 
Majesty a Reign of Peace, Your Annals would not have been Clouded 
by a black & most unnatural Rebellion ; but it is no new thing for 
Arbitrary Princes to contrive & promote Schemes for the subversion 
of a Government which is a standing Reproach upon their own, or 
for wicked Subjects to hate virtues in a King which are Restraints 
upon their base & Savage Natures. 

" May the Almighty preserve Your Majestie's precious Life for 
the general Good of Mankind, direct your Councils, and confound 
the Devices of your enemies, and may there never be wanting One 
of Your Royal Blood, form'd upon Your Majestie's Example, to 
Sway the British Scepter, or one to command the British Armies 7 . 



52 MINUTES OF THE 

in Valour & Conduct equal to the Glorious Instrument of the late 
signal Victory. 

" GEO. THOMAS 7 Gov r - 
"Philadelphia 4th August, 1746." 

The above Address being Transcrib'd fair, was signed by the 
Governor & Council in the order as they here stand : 

" GEO. THOMAS, Gov r - 
"ANTHONY PALMER, 
"THOMAS LAWRENCE, 
" SAMUEL HASSEL, 
"WILLIAM TILL, 
"ABRAHAM TAYLOR, 
^ROBERT STRETHIL, 
"JAMES HAMILTON, 
"BENJAMIN SHOEMAKER." 



18th August, 1746. 
MEMORANDUM. 

Two Members of Assembly waited on the Governor to acquaint 
him that the House was met according to their adjournment, & 
ready to receive any thing he might have to lay before them ; the 
Governor said he had nothing to lay before them at present. 



At a Council held at Philacladelphia, 22d August, 1746. 
pee sent: 

The Honoble/GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Governor. 
Abraham Taylor, Robert Strethill, ) -p, 

Benjamin Shoemaker, j *"" 

The Minutes of the preeeeding Council were read and approv'd. 

The Governor laid before the Board the Draught of a Message to 
the Assembly, which was read & approved, & is as follows, viz 1 " : 

A Message from the Governor to the Assembly. 
" Gentlemen : 

" The Money granted at your last Meeting for the King's Use 
has & will be applied by me agreable to His Majesty's Intentions 
& the Directions of General Gooch, in raising four Companies of 
Men for an Expedition against Canada, and in providing Tents, 
Provisions, & other Necessaries for them, as you will see by a 
Sketch of the Accounts which I have ordered to be laid before 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 53 

You. After the Bounty, Freight of the Provisions, Carriages for 
the Soldiers, Baggage, and the Expence of their Transportation 
from Brunswick to Albany are discharged, the Account shall 
be closed & submitted, with Vouchers for every Article, to the 
Examination of your House. 

" The Cloathing, Arms, and Accoutrements have been procured 
upon my own Credit, in expectation of heing speedily enabled to 
pay for them by Remittances from Lieutenant General St. Clair ; 
but as we have yet no account of his Arrival at Louisbourg, & some 
of the Persons who supplied me with them grow Importunate for 
their Money, I am obliged to renew my Application to you for a 
Loan to His Majesty of so much as will be necessary for this Ser- 
vice. 

" But the Difficulty I labour under with Regard to the Subsist- 
ance of the Men is still greater, as they have received no Pay, and 
are run into an arrear to the Publick House Keepers for their 
Quarters from the time of their Inlistment • and if they have not 
some supply soon it is to be feared they will Mutiny or Desert, so 
that the greatest part of what has been granted by the Assembly, 
and provided by the King's Orders, will be lost. In some other 
Provinces the Soldiers have been allowed Nine Pence ^ Diem, or 
their Victuals, besides the Pay they are to receive from the King, 
which has preserved the Governors there, and the Officers of those 
Troops, from the Embarrasments we find ourselves under here from 
the Delay of Greneral St. Clair's arrival. The subsistance of the 
Private Men, exclusive of Officers, amounts to One hundred k forty 
Pounds per Week, which is too large a Sum to be furnished out of 
my own private Stock. 

" After this plain state of the Case, I hope I need not be at much 
Pains to convince you of the necessity of supplying me with the 
Sums requisite, as well for discharging the Arrears due for the sub- 
sistence of the Troops as for supporting them until the Fleet shall 
arrive or proper Directions be given by the King for paying them. 
And I promise myself the more ready complyance from You as it 
will not be laying any additional Burthen upon the Province, His 
Majesty having engaged both to defray the Expence of Cloathing & 
Arms and to allow the Men Pay from the time of their Inlistment. 
•And you may assuredly depend that when Remittances shall be 
made to me for these purposes, they shall be punctually paid into 
such hands as your House shall appoint to receive them. 

"The Exactions of the Publick House Keepers for the Soldiers' 
Quarters oblige me to recommend the preparing a Bill, either to 
impower the Justices to Billet them at such a Price as they shall 
think reasonable, or to settle it yourselves in the Bill. Twelve 
pence per Day, which is now demanded, is more than is allowed by 
the King for a Soldier's subsistence, that being but Six Pence Ster- 
ling, and is twice as much as is paid in England, tho' Provisions 



54 MINUTES OF THE 

are said to be much cheaper here. This I am sensible is a matter 
quite new to you j but the Circumstances of the Times will neces- 
sarily require many Things which the wisest forecast cannot pro- 
vide for. 

"GEO. THOMAS. 
« August 22d, 1746." 



On the 23d August. 
MEMORANDUM. 

Two Members of Assembly deliver' d the following written Mess- 
age to the Governor & at the same time presented him with the 
Order of the House for Five hundred Pounds, the Remainder of 
His Support for the Current Year, & inform'd him that the House 
was inclined to adjourn on the 30th September; to which he made 
no objection. 

A Message from the Assembly to the Governor. 

"May it please the Governor : 

" We entertained no doubts but that the Five Thousand Pounds 
given for the King's Use the last Session would be applied agreeable 
to such Instructions as the Governor should receive to that purpose; 
and therefore we neither expected nor desired any account thereof 
to be laid before us. Since that Donation the Public Accounts of 
the Province have been settled, by which it appears our Treasury is 
Low; that there remains a Sum too small to pay to the usual and 
necessary Charges of Government; and that the Trustees of the 
General Loan Office are near Eight hundred Pounds in advance, So 
that we have no Fund from whence we are enabled to lend to the 
Crown the Money requested, were we ever so desirous of doing it. 
Besides, we observe from the state of the Account the Governor 
was pleased to direct to be laid before us, that part of the aforesaid 
Five Thousand Pounds as yet remains unexpended; and altho' this 
is intended for other uses, we must submit it to the Governor's 
Judgment whether that Money may not be applied to the present 
Exigences, and a like Sum replaced out of what General S l Clair is 
to pay on his Arrival. 

"The Season of the Year is so far advanced, and a new Election 
for the Choice of Representatives to serve in Assembly so near, that 
we think it too late to enter into the Consideration of a Bill of such 
Importance as that for Billeting for Soldiers in any shape must be. 

"JOHN KINSEY, Speaker." 

i 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 55 

At a Council held at Philadelphia, Oct r - 4th, 1746. 
present : 

The Honoble. GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Gover- 
nor. 

Thomas Laurence, William Till, *) 

Robert Strethil, Benjamin Shoemaker, > Esqrs. 

Abraham Taylor, j 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approv'd. 

The Governor laid before the Board a Letter from Governor 
Shirley, Dated at Boston the 22d of September last, with some 
Depositions inclos'd, importing that as a large Fleet of French Men- 
of-War had been seen on Cape Sable Shore he desir'd & expected 
that this Province wou'd have as good a Force as they can spare, 
with a number of Vessels ready to Sail to Rhode Island upon the 
first advice of the Approach of the Enemy. 

The following Persons being legally chosen & return'd were ap- 
pointed Sheriffs & Coroners for the several Counties for the ensuing 
Year: 

Nicholas Scull, Sheriff, ) * ™.Vj n -, Pn , 
tj t> ^ h t Of Philada. City & County. 

Henry Pratt, Coroner, j j j 

Benjamin Davis, Sheriff, I rf ^^ Q 

Isaac Lea, Coroner, j J 

Amos Strickland, Sheriff, } o x> ^ n *. 
T i ni L ' y or Bucks County. 

John Chapman, Coroner, j J 

James Sterrat, Sheriff, ) £ T . n , 

u i , tir 11 n r.ot Lancaster County. 

Robert Wallace, Coroner, j J 

Gidean Griffith, Sheriff, 1 c XT ,, n 

James MeMullin, Coroner, } of ^wcastle Connty. 

John Hunter, Sheriff, 1 f tt + n + 
George Goforth, Coroner, j ^ 7 

William Shankland, Sheriff, 1 f q P <- 

John Molliston, Coroner, j " ?' 



14th October, 1746. 
MEMORANDUM. 

Five Members of Assembly waited on the Governor to acquaint 
him the House was met and had proceeded to the Choice of a 
Speaker, and desir'd to know when they might present him. 



56 MINUTES OF THE 



15th October. 
A Council was summon'd, but no Members appeared. The whole 
House waited on the Governor at the time by him appointed, and 
presented their Speaker, John Kinsey, Esq n ' who requested the 
usual Priviledges, which were granted. The Governor having pre- 
pared the following Message, the Secretary was order' d to write it 
fair & deliver it to the House in the Morning. 

A Message from the Governor to the Assembly. 

u G-entlemen : 

" Had General St. Clair, with the Troops from England, arrived 
in the time we had reason to expect from His Grace the Duke of 
Newcastle's Letter, the Money granted by the last Assembly, and 
applied by me to the Service directed by His Majesty, would have 
been more than sufficient for the number of Men raised here, but as 
they received no subsistence from the King, I have been obliged, 
agreeable to the Assembly's Answer to my last Message on this 
Subject, first, to furnish each Captain with one hundred and fifty 
Pounds towards the discharge of this Company's Quarters, and after- 
wards with the like Sum for their subsistence in their March to 
Albany, so that I am now £413 11 7 in advance, as will appear by 
the Accounts which I have ordered to be laid before You; for every 
Article of which I am ready to produce Vouchers to such of the 
Members of your House as you shall think fit to appoint for the 
Examination of them. I need not be at any pains to convince you 
that without this Advance the Troops could not have Marched out 
of the Province, & consequently would have been a Burden upon 
the Publick, or have subsisted by Plundering the Inhabitants. 
You will observe by Governor Gooch's and Governor Shirley's Let- 
ters in answer to my Applications to them for the Pay of the Sol- 
diers to discharge their Quarters, that as Those raised in the other 
Colonies were subsisted by them respectively, I can have no expect- 
ation of being re-imbursed by the Crown, nor will be in my power 
to make any stoppages out of their pay, since it is now all together 
improbable that it will ever come into my Hands, so that my only 
resource is to You ; and I assure myself that as I have nothing but 
my trouble for my Pains in this Business, and have acted for the 
general Ease and Advantage of the Province, you will not allow 
me to be a sufferer. 

" You will observe likewise from a Letter which I received last 
Week from Governor Clinton, that the Troops from hence had 
threatned a general Desertion if they were not supply'd with 
Blankets as those from the other Governments had been; and that 
he had already secured one hundred and fifty for them upon the 
Credit of this Government, but could get no more. I wrote to him 
in Answer, That the Money granted was all Expended, and as 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 57 

Blanketts were not allowed by the King as part of a Soldier's 
Cloathing, I knew not how to act in it, but would recommend it to 
the Consideration of the Assembly. The Season sufficiently speaks 
the Necessity of such a Provision, without any Arguments of mine 
to perswade You to it. 

"GEO. THOMAS. 

" October 15th, 1746." 



October 17th, 1746. 
MEMORANDUM. 

Two Members of Assembly waited on the Governor to inform 
him that the House inclin'd to adjourn to the 5th Day of January 
next, if he had nothing to offer to y e contrary. The Governor said 
it was equal to him when they adjourn'd, since they were not dis- 
posed to take His Message into their Consideration. 

On the 5th January Two Members of Assembly waited on the 
Governor to acquaint him that the House was met & desir'd to 
know if he had any Business to lay before them. On the 6th Day 
of January the Governor being too indisposed to call a Council, 
sent his Secretary to the House with the following written Mes- 



from the Governor to the Assembly. 

" Gentlemen : 

"The troops raised in this Government, and now in Winter 
Quarters at Albany, "having been furnished with provisions for four 
months by the direction of Brigadier Gooch, commencing from the 
Day of their Arrival there, and that time being near expired, it has 
been recommended by Governor Clinton, and application has been 
made to me by the Captains of the four Companys, that a timely 
supply be forthwith sent them. As the season of the Year render'd 
this impracticable, I thought I might save You the Trouble of a 
Meeting for this purpose only, and left it to the Commanding Offi- 
cer to make a reasonable Provision for them in that Country until 
Your house and a return of favourable Weather should enable me 
to supply their Wants. 

"I have not received any Orders from His Majesty relating to the 
Pay or subsistence of these Troops since Your last Meeting, nor do 
I hear that any are come to the other Governors upon the Con- 
tinent, so the care of the four Pennsylvania Companys must still 
lye upon You. 

"GEO. THOMAS. 

"January 6th., 1746." 



58 MINUTES OF THE 

On the 12th January Two Members of Assembly waited on the 
Governor with the following Message : 

A Message from the Assembly to the Governor. 

u May it please the Governor : 

"As the Time proposed for the Expedition against Canada is 
elapsed, and neither Ships of War nor Troops sent to America, nor 
any continuance of the Orders to the several Governors in this 
Affair, it seems not unreasonable to conjecture the Enterprize is laid 
aside. And if this be, as probably it is the Case, we see not why so 
great a number of Men, especially at the Charge of the Colonies, 
should be kept together when the Service originally proposed by 
raising them is at an end. 

But if the Governor of New York, who, as we are informed, com- 
mands in Chief the Troops at Albany, from any Instructions he 
hath received may think he shall be justified in keeping them to- 
gether, there is as little Reason to doubt he will also be justified in 
the necessary means of doing it, viz'- : by continuing to draw Bills 
for their Support and Pay. So great a Burden we persuade our- 
selves it is not the King's Intention his Subjects of these Northern 
Colonies should be loaded with. 

" Signed by Order of the House, 

" JOHN KINSEY, Speaker. 
" 11th Mon. 12th, 1746." 

On the 14th January, 1746, Two Members of Assembly waited 
on the Governor to inform him the House was dispos'd to adjourn 
to the 4th of May, if that time shou'd not be disagreeable to the 
Governor. He said it was not. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, April 6th, 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. GEORGE THOMAS, Esq., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hassell, *) 

William Till, Abraham Taylor. I Esqrs. 

Robert Strettel, ) 

The Governor laid before the Board the several Messages that 
had pass'd between him & the Assembly since the last Meeting of 
Council, viz'-: his of the 15th of October and of the 6th January 
last, & that from the Assembly of the 12th January • which were 
read, and are enter'd before according to the Dates & the times when 
they were delivered. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 59 

Mr. Lawrence, Mr. Hassel, Mr. Strettel, & Mr. Shoemaker, Lav- 
ing now delivered in to the Board their Report and Return made 
pursuant to the Order of Council of the 25th of January last, for 
viewing & (if they found it necessary) laying out the Road leading 
from Philadelphia, thro' Frankford, towards Bristol ) the same was 
read, & after due and full Consideration had of it by the Board the 
same was approved of, Confirmed, and Allowed, & ordered to be 
laid out accordingly, & to be Recorded in the Council Book as a 
King's Highway or Publick Road, as the Act of Assembly in such 
Case directs ; And the Secretary is ordered forthwith to prepare 
Warrants or Orders to the respective Overseers of the Highways of 
the several Precincts & Townships thro' which any part of the said 
Road leads, that the same be forthwith cleared and opened in such 
parts as require it, & that the whole be with all convenient Speed 
laid out, cleared, and opened, according to the said Survey and Re- 
turn. 

Pursuant to the Order of the Honourable the Governor & Coun- 
cil of the Twenty-fifth Day of January last, referring it to Us the 
Subscribers to view the Road leading from the City of Philadelphia 
through Frankford towards Bristol, and in case we shou'd judge it 
necessary to be Surveyed and Laid out De Novo to take to our As- 
sistance the Surveyor General, and to cause it to be done and make 
Return thereof to the Council in order for Confirmation, We do 
humbly Certify and Report to the Honourable the Governor and 
Council that we have viewed and with the Assistance of William 
Parsons, the Surveyor General, Re-surveyed the said Road, and 
finding that the same as now laid out and used is neither agreable 
to the Survey and Return made pursuant to the Order of Council 
of the seventh of May, 1725, nor so commodiously laid out as it 
might be, but in many Places very inconvenient & injurious to the 
Plantations & Settlements thereabouts ) We have, therefore, to the 
best of our Skill & Judgment, now Surveyed and Laid out the said 
Road so as to render the same more direct and commodious for the 
Publick, and more convenient for the adjacent Settlements according 
to the following Return, Viz'- : Beginning at the Place of Intersec- 
tion of the North side of Vine Street & the Bast side of Front Street 
near Penny Pott Landing, and from thence extending the Course of 
Front Street North eighteen Degrees ten minutes East sixty four 
perches opposite to the Bridge near Poole's Point, thence the same 
Course one hundred and fifty-one perches more to a stake, thence 
South seventy-five Degrees East along the Causey of Long Bridge 
fifty-two perches to a Corner, thence North five Degrees East one 
hundred and sixty-nine perches opposite to Captain Palmer's old 
Road, thence North thirty-nine Degrees and a-half East sixty perches 
to Hanover street, & thence the same Course sixty-six perches to 
Adam Klemper's Land, thence North forty-two degrees twenty 
Minutes East two hundred and ninety-six perches opposite to John 
Moland's Corner, thence North sixty-seven Degrees and a-half East 



60 MINUTES OF THE 

one hundred and fifty-six perches to a Corner between John Dil- 
wyn's and Rawle's Land, thence North sixty-two and an half De- 
grees East eighty -two perches to Gunner's Run, and the same Course 
seventy-three perches to a corner seven perches beyond Robert 
Worthiugton's Fence, thence North fifty-four degrees East one hun- 
dred and fifty-four perches to a stone, thence North-East one hun- 
dred and thirty-five perches to Frankford Creek Bridge, thence 
North twenty-seven Degrees and a-half East twenty perches to a 
marked Sassafras on the North side of Frankford Creek, thence 
along the Ground late of Enoch Coats, deceased, North forty-six 
Degrees East thirty-one perches to a marked Cherry Tree, and the 
same Course crossing the said Creek six perches to the Bridge over 
the Mill Race, thence North thirty-one Degrees East over an old 
Field of Henry Paul one hundred and twenty-one perches to a 
marked black oak tree in the old Road five Miles from the Begin- 
ging, thence North forty degrees East two hundred and fifty-one 
perches to a marked black oak, thence North fifty-four Degrees East 
one hundred and thirty perches to the Road from Tackony to Oxford 
Church, thence over the Personage Land North seventy-nine de- 
grees East one hundred and twenty-four perches to the Middle of 
the old Road, North eighty-six Degrees East one hundred and 
twelve perches to a stump of the old seven Mile tree, then leaving 
the old Road North sixty degrees East over John Shallcross's Land 
one hundred and twelve perches to a post in John Kene's Field, 
thence along Kene's Land North sixty-seven Degrees East sixty- 
four perches to a marked cherry Tree near Kene's House, thence 
the same Course eighty-five perches to a marked Spanish oak Tree 
in the old Road, North sixty-one Degrees East thirty-two perches 
to the old marked eight Mile black oak Tree, thence the same Course 
about Sixty-four perches more to Lower Dublin Township, and 
thence the same Course one hundred and twenty-eight perches to a 
marked Spanish oak, thence North seventy-eight Degrees twenty 
minutes East one hundred and thirty-two perches, one perch short 
of a Spanish oak marked nine Miles from the Beginning, thence 
North seventy-two Degrees East eighty-two perches to a stump, 
thence along the Causey and Bridge over Pemmepeck Creek South 
eighty-two Degrees East forty-three perches, thence North forty- 
eight Degrees forty minutes East two hundred perches to the Ten 
Mile hickery tree marked in Joseph Boor's Lane, thence the same 
Course one hundred and twelve perches to a marked black oak, 
thence North fifty-three Degrees East one hundred perches, thence 
over the Land late of Evan Thomas, deceased, North seventy-seven 
Degrees East one hundred and seventy-two perches to a marked 
white oak in Septimus Robinson's Lane, and thence over the said 
Septimus Robinson's Land North sixty-three Degrees East one 
hundred and ninety perches to the Ford over Poquessing Creek 
near the Widow Amos', being in all Eleven Miles and three Quar- 
ters. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 61 

Witness our Hands and Seals the Fifth Day of April, Anno 
Domini, 1747. 

Benj a - Shoemaker [l. s.], Rob'* Strettell [l. s.], Sam 1 - Hasell 
[l. s.], Tho. Lawrence [l. s.] 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 4th May, 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Governor. 
Anthony Palmer, Thomas Lawrence, "J 

Samuel Hasell, William Till, [ -™ 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, ( % 

Benjamin Shoemaker, J 

The Minutes of the preceeding Council were read and ap- 
proved. 

A Petition was presented to the Governor by Nicholas Craft & 
Peter Widowfield, of the Northern Liberties of the City of Phila- 
delphia, purporting that the Road lately laid out from the City of 
Philadelphia through Frankfort towards Bristol would prove inju- 
rious to the Petitioners, as it would take in part of the Front of two 
Lots whereon they were building ; and praying that the said Road 
might either be continued on its former Course, or some other Re- 
lief afforded them. 

On reading the said Petition it was the Unanimous Opinion of the 
Board that it should be rejected — the parties having had Notice of 
the intended Course of the Road • but it is thought equitable that 
the value of the Land, & of so much of the Buildings as was carried 
up before such Notice, should be paid by the Commissioners of the 
County. 

The Governor communicated to the Board his Resolution of going 
to England for the re-establishment of his Health j and as the As- 
sembly of the Province was to sit this Evening, he proposed to- 
morrow to order the attendance of the Speaker and the House, and 
if his Health wou'd permit to declare this his Resolution to them j 
and having put down in Writing what he thought proper to say on 
the Occasion, the Draught was read and approved. 

In the Evening two Members of Assembly waited on the Gov- 
ernor to acquaint him that the House was met pursuant to their 
Adjournment, and desired to know if he had any thing to lay be- 
fore them; the Governor appointed the Speaker and the whole 
House to Attend him at Twelve 0' Clock the next Day. 



62 MINUTES OF THE 

At a Council held at Philadelphia, 5th of May, 1747. 
present : 

The Honoble. GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Governor. 
Thomas Lawrence, Benjamin Shoemaker, ) E^ar'« 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, j Jk " * 

The Minutes of the preceeding Council were read and approv'd. 

The Speaker and Assembly waited on the Governor at the time 
appointed, when His Honour made them the following Speech ; and 
as soon as he had done he delivered a fair Copy to the Speaker, who 
withdrew with the whole House : 

" Mr. Speaker, and Gentlemen of Assembly — 

" I am sorry for the Occasion of condoling with you on the Death 
of Mr. John Penn, late one of Your Proprietors. As his Hu- 
manity, Good nature, and Affibility made him much lamented by 
his private Acquaintance, so his constant Regard for Your Liberties 
and Interest would render the Loss of him very sensible to the 
publick, were there not still remaining two worthy Branches of the 
same Family. 

" My own want of health, and from thence an Inability to Dis- 
charge the Trust committed- to me with that Vigour and punctu- 
ality which the Duty of my Station requires, has at length deter- 
min'd me to embark, God willing, for England, in hopes that a 
relaxation from Business or the Change of Climate may afford me 
some Releif; And I am, therefore, glad of this Opportunity of seeing 
you upon your own adjournment, as that may be concluded most 
convenient to your private Affairs. If you have any thing imme- 
diately necessary for the Publick Service to lay before me, you will 
not fail of receiving a further proof of my Regard for it, but if the 
Execution is to be carried into a distant time, it will better become 
me to leave it to my Successor in the Government, as a means of 
recommending himself to the Goodwill of the People. 

" It will be to no purpose for me to give a Character of my own 
Administration. My Lot has fallen into difficult and tempestuous 
Times, and a greater variety of Business has been transacted during 
my Nine Years Residence here, than in any time since the Settle- 
ment of the Province. Whether any Degree of Prudence or Skill 
has appeared in my Conduct must be left to the judgment of others. 
I will only venture to say of myself, that my Intentions have been 
good, and my Actions incorrupt, and that the Service of his Majesty 
and the Honour and Reputation of the Province have always had 
the preference with me to my own ease or private Interest. 

" As I have received many Marks of the Publick Esteem, it 
will readily be believed that I take my leave of the Province with 
concern. I really-do, and very heartily, wish it Prosperity. Some 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 63 

Memorials of my past Regard will be left with You, and I shall 
during my Life embrace every occasion wherein I may be useful of 
promoting the general Good of Pennsylvania. 

« GEO. THOMAS." 



7th May, 1747. 
MEMORANDUM. 

Two Members of Assembly waited on the Governor to inform 
him that the House had prepared an Address in Answer to his 
Speech, & desired to know when they might Attend him in order 
to Deliver it; his Honour appointed 12 o ? Clock the next Day. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, May 8th, 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hassell, ") 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, I Esqrs. 

William Till, Benjamin Shoemaker, jj 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approved. 

The Speaker, at the head of the Assembly, waited on the Gover- 
nor, and in the name of the House read the following Address : 

An Address from the Assembly to the Governor. 

"To the Honourable GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor of the Province of Pennsylvania, &c. : 

" The Humble Address of the Assembly of the said Province : 

" May it please the Governor : 

" We, the Representatives of the Freemen of the Province of 
Pennsylvania, return the Governor our hearty thanks for his last 
favourable Speech. We sincerely condole with him on the Loss the 
Province hath sustained by the Death of one of our Proprietors. 
The Benevolence, Generosity, and Public Spirit of our late worthy 
Proprietary, his Father, are yet fresh in our view. The Regard 
paid to his Memory naturally devolved on his Descendants, who 
being Educated in like Principles and under the influence of so 
good an Example, gives us reason to hope for the continuance of 
the like Beneficence. 

" As the Governor has long resided amongst us, is perfectly ac- 
quainted with our Publick Affairs, and so good Harmony subsists 
between the Branches of the Legislature, his continuance in the 



64 MINUTES OF THE 

Exercise of the Government if his Health had permitted, would he 
most agreeable to Us. But since the Governor's Indisposition and 
his hopes of Relief by a Relaxation from Public Business, or Change 
of Climate, has determined him to imbark for England, we acquiesce 
under the Necessity. 

" We have had divers Bills under our Consideration, which when 
past into Laws will, we judge, be for the general Good of the 
Province; but as the Time for the Governor's Departure draws 
near, to proceed in them at this Juncture might take up more of 
his Time than can well be spared, and therefore we have concluded 
to postpone them until some future opportunity, such only excepted 
(if any concur to us) as shall be thought immediately necessary for 
the publick Service. And we Return the Governor our grateful 
Acknowledgements for the Assurance he gives us, that when these 
are laid before him we shall not fail of receiving a further proof of 
his Regard. 

" In Transacting of Publick Affairs it is not to be expected but 
that there will be a variety of Sentiments, more especially in such 
Difficult and Tempestuous Times as the Governor is pleased to men- 
tion. Yet whilst both parts of the Legislature act with Integrity 
and consistently with their Judgments, such a variety must be 
beneficial to the Publick. No body, we think, entertains any 
Doubts of the Governor's Skill or Abilities, and we believe that he 
hath been regardful both of the King's Service and the Honour and 
Reputation of the Province. 

"The concern the Governor expresses on taking Leave of the 
Province — His Hearty Wishes for its Prosperity, and the Decla- 
ration he is pleased to make of embracing every opportunity wherein 
he may be useful in promoting the general Good of Pennsylvania, 
as they are instances of his Regard are very acceptable to Us, and 
engage our best Wishes for his prosperous Voyage, the Restoration 
of his Health, & all manner of Happiness. 

" Signed by Order of the House. 

"JOHN KINSEY, Speaker. 

" 3d Mon., 8th, 1747." 

To which the Governor was pleased to make the following Reply : 
" I thank You Gentlemen for this Address. You have said full 
as many Things of me as I could expect. Notwithstanding your 
private Sentiments at this Time, more might look like putting your- 
selves in the wrong, considering our former Disputes. I can only 
repeat what I said to You a few Days ago, that I very heartily 
wish the Prosperity & shall do every thing in my Power for the 
Service of Pennsylvania." 

MEMORANDUM. 

Two Members of Assembly waited on the Governor & presented 






PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. G5 

hira with an Order on the Treasurer for £500 towards his Support, 
and inform' d him that the House was inclinable to adjourn to the 
17th of August, To which he assented. 

The next Day the Speaker gave His Honour an Order on the 
Treasurer for £211, to enable him to Discharge the Draughts of the 
Officers at Albany for Blankets & other Things. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia the 13th May, 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Governor, 
Anthony Palmer, Samuel Hasell, ~\ 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, V- Esqrs. 

Benjamin Shoemaker, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approved. 

The Governor having some Days before intimated his determina- 
tion to make an addition to the Council, he now inform'd the Board 
that since on his Departure the Administration of the Government 
wou'd devole on the Council, and no Business cou'd be done by the 
President without the attendance of four Members, & there were 
now but seven who acted, he had in his Letters to the Proprietaries 
mention' d the necessity of a new appointment ; and in expectation 
of their Answer had deferr'd making it ; but as the time of his 
Embarkation drew near, & the Vessells expected from London might 
not arrive, and it was of the utmost consequence both to the Pro- 
prietaries & the Province that this shou'd be done, he cou'd not 
postpone it any longer. He assured them it had given him no 
small concern, & he had taken all the pains he was Master of to 
find Gentlemen equal & willing to accept, and after long considera- 
tion he had thought of Mr. Joseph Turner, Mr. Lawrence Growden, 
and Mr. Thomas Hopkinson, and had taken measures previously to 
know their Inclinations, the two last were willing, but Mr. Turner 
had not yet come to a determination. He therefore named these 
three Gentlemen to be of the Council if they had no just objection 
to them. And each Member being seperately ask'd his opinion 
expressed his Approbation of the Governor's Choice ; and the Sec- 
retary was directed to inform them of their Call to the Board, & to 
take care that they shou'd be summoned to the next Council. 
VOL. V. — 5. 



66 MINUTES OF ^HE 

At a Council held at Philadelphia. 

present : 

The Honourable GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Anthony Palmer, Thomas Lawrence, 

Samuel Hasell, William Till, 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, J-Esqr's. 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, ! 

Lawrence Growden, Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the preceeding Council were read and approv'd. 

Mr. Turner & Mr. Hopkinson took and subscrib'd the usual Oaths, 
& Mr. Growden the usual Affirmations. 

The Governor having by Captain Dowers received from the Council 
Office His Majestie's Repeal or Disallowance of the Act of Assembly 
Imposing a Duty on Persons convicted of Heinous Crimes, &c, The 
same was read and order' d to be enter'd ; and it is recommended to 
the Council to lay it Before the Assembly at their next Meeting : 

" At the Court at St. James, the 17th Day of December, 1746. 
"present: 

" The King's most Excellent Majesty. 
" Lord President, "Earl of Grantham, 

"Duke of Argyll, "Lord Delaware, 

" Duke of Atholl, " Lord Monson, 

"Earl of Pembroke, " Sir John Norris, 

" Whereas, in pursuance of the Powers granted to the Proprie- 
tarys of the Province of Pennsylvania by Letters Patent under 
the Great Seal, the Deputy Governor, Council, and Assembly of the 
said Province did in February, 1742, pass an Act which hath been 
transmitted, and is Intitled as follows, Viz'- : 

l " An «Act imposing a Duty on Persons convicted of heinous 
Crimes brought into this Province, and not warranted by the Laws 
of Great Britain, and to prevent poor and Impotent Persons being 
imported into the same/ 

" His Majesty this Day took the said Act into His Royal Con- 
sideration, and having received the Opinion of the Lords Commis- 
sioners for Trade and Plantations, and also of a Committee of the 
Lords of His Majestie's most Honourable Privy Council thereupon, 
Is hereby pleased to Declare his Dis-allowance of the said Act, and 
pursuant to His Majestie's Royal Pleasure thereupon expressed, the 
said Act is hereby repealed, declared void and of none Effect. 
Whereof the Deputy Governor, Council, and Assembly of the said 
Province, and all others whom it may concern, are to take Notice 
and Govern themselves accordingly. 

"WILL- SHARP." 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 67 

On Examination of the Council Books, it appears that the late 
•Secretary, Mr. Patrick Baird, has omitted to enter several Messages 
Which pass'd between the Governor & Assembly in the Year 1742, 
they are, therefore, now ordered to be enter' d at the end of this 
Book, the Secretary taking care to Page the Council Book, & in the 
Margin over against the Place they are omitted to make a proper 
reference to the Place where they are inserted.* 



Esqrs. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 29th May, 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honourable GEORGE THOMAS, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Anthony Palmer, Samuel Hasell, 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, 

Robert Strettell, Benj m - Shoemaker, 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approved. 
The Governor informed the Board that by a Letter he had re- 
ceived from Mr. Logan, and another which the Clerk of the Council 
had likewise received from him, it appeared that he had not con- 
sidered himself as a Member of this Board since his Accession to 
the Government, and requested that his Declaration and absolute 
Resignation might be enter' d in the Council Books, and on Reading 
his Letters, the Secretary was directed to make an Entry that Mr. 
Logan's Resignation was Accepted, and that he was no longer a 
Member of this Board. 

The Governor then proposed that the Secretary should write down 
the Names of the Members of Council according to the Order they 
stand on their respective Calls to the Board, which being done & 
read, it was unanimously agreed that the following Gentlemen, & 
no others, are Members of the Council, & take their Precedency as 
follows, viz 1 -: 

ANTHONY PALMER, 
THOMAS LAWRENCE, 
SAMUEL HASELL, 
WILLIAM TILL, 
ABRAHAM TAYLOR, 
ROBERT STRETTELL, } Esqrs. 

JAMES HAMILTON, 
BENJAMIN SHOEMAKER, 
JOSEPH TURNER, 
LAWRENCE GROWDEN, 
THOMAS HOPKINSON, 

* In transcribing the Colonial Records, the Messages have been inserted) 
in their proper places. 



68 MINUTES OF THE 

The G-overnor then recommended Mr. William Logan to be a 
Member of this Board, & no material Objection being offer'd, it was 
Agreed that he shou'd take the usual Affirmation before the Goyer- 
nor & be admitted thereupon to his Seat at the next Council. 

The above Minute was read and approv'd. 



At a Council held at Philada., 6th June, 1747. 
• present : 
Anthony Palmer 7 Thomas Lawrence, *) 

Samuel Hasell, William Till, [ 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, I j* 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, j ^ 

Lawrence Growden, Thomas Hopkinson, f 

William Logan, J 

The Governor haviug Embarqued for Great Britain, the Council 
in his Absence met this Day in pursuance of the Act of the 
10th of her late Majesty Queen Ann, Entitled " An Act for the 
further securing the Administration of the Government/' and the 
Act being read it appeared that the full Power and Authority of 
a Governor of the Province, Legislation excepted, is lodged in- this 
Board. 

The Rank and Precedency of the Several members of Council 
having been established at the last Council, & it appearing thence 
that Anthony Palmer, Esq., is the Eldest Councellor, he took his 
Seat as President of this Board, 

The Board appointed Mr. Richard Peters to be Secretary and 
Clerk of the Council. 

It being directed by the said Act of the 10th of Queen Ann that 
the President or first-named Member of Council that shall succeed 
at the time of the Death or Absence of a Governor, shall give due 
Notice thereof, by the first opportunity, to one of the Secretaries of 
State of Great Britain, and to the Board of Trade and Plantations, 
& also to the Governor in Chief of this Province. The Secretary 
was ordered to draw proper Notices, & to ky them before the Board 
in order to be signed by the President, & likewise to prepare 
Draughts of letters to be wrote to the Neighboring Governors on 
this occasion. 

The Board was unanimously of opinion that a Proclamation No*- 
tifying the absence of the Governor, & for the continuing of all 
Officers in their respective offices shou'd be issued, & the Secretary 
is accordingly order' d to prepare one against four of the Clock in 
the Afternoon, to which time the Council, is adjourned* 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 69 



P. M. 

PRESENT I 

The Honourable the President and the same Members as in the 
forenoon. 

A Proclamation for the continuance of Officers in their respective 
Offices being agreed to, the same is ordered to be engross'd and to 
be ready at ten of the Clock on Monday in order to be sign'd and 
seal'd, and the Secretary is order'd to take care that the Sheriff, 
Magistrates, and proper Officers be served with Notice to attend the 
Publication thereof at the Court House on Monday at 12 0' Clock. 

A motion was made that the Board might now enter upon the 
consideration of the most proper Methods to be observed for the 
Dispatch of common Business ; and some giving it as their opin- 
ion that the best way would be to make an order of Council that the 
President only shou'd sign the Papers of Course, enumerating 
what particulars shou'd be deem'd Papers of Course, for that all 
Papers so sign'd wou'd be look'd on as the Act of the Council, by 
virtue of such Vote, & others conceiving that they cou'dnot legally 
make such Vote, as it wou'd be deem'd a delegation of the Power 
of the Council, & the Council being themselves only in the Place 
of a Lieutenant or Deputy Governor, & consequently invested in a 
Trust not transferable, cou'dnot Delegate their Power; the question 
was put whether it be the opinion of the Board that the Council can 
legally impower the President to sign Marriage Lycences, Publick 
House Lycences, Pedler's Lycences, Indian Trader's Lycences, 
Begisters of Vessells & Let Passes, without the Concurrence of at 
least four of the Council, & it Pass'd in the Affirmative. 

The Board then took into their Consideration the alterations 
proper to be made in the forms of Marriage Lycences, Let Passes, 
Public House Lycences, & other papers of Course, and not coming 
to any determination, the same is referr'd to the next Meeting of 
Council which is appointed at 10 of the Clock on Monday Morning, 
and the Secretary is order'd to wait on the Attorney General to de- 
sire his attendance here at that hour. 

The Secretary inform' d the Board that Marriage Lycences were 
immediately wanted, whereupon the President Signed four Marriage 
Lycences, and deliver'd them to the Secretary to be distributed as 
they shou'd be apply' d for. 

The Board being of Opinion that the Council Chamber in the 
State House wou'd be the most commodious Place for them to meet 
in, the Secretary is directed to wait on the Speaker to know if the 
same be now in order, or can with any conveniency be put into 
order for the use of the Council. 



70 MINUTES OF THE 



At a Council held at Philada., 8th June, 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honourable ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, VEsqrs. 

Lawrence Growden, Thomas Hopkinson, 

William Logan, 

The Minutes of the preceding Council was read and approv'd. 

The Engross' d Proclamation was Sign'd by the President, & a 
Warrant to affix the Great Seal thereto was signed by the President 
& the four Eldest Members present. Order' 'd, That the same be 
enter' d and Printed, & Copies Dispatched to the Sheriffs of the 
several Counties to be dispers'd as usual. 

u By the Honourable the President & Council of the Province of 
Pennsylvania. 

"A PROCLAMATION. 

" Whereas the Honourable George Thomas, Esq r -> Lieutenant 
Governor and Commander-in-chief of this Province hath embarqued 
for Great Britain, and by his Absence the Exercise of the Powers 
of Government, by virtue of an Act of Assembly pass'd in the 
Tenth Year of the Reign of the late Queen Ann, is devolved on and 
lodged in Us, We have therefore thought fit to Publish, and De- 
clare that all persons whatsoever who held or enjoy'd any Office of 
Trust or Profit in this Government, by virtue of any commissions 
in Force at the time of the said Governor's Departure, shall con- 
tinue to hold and enjoy the same Offices until they shall be deter- 
min'd by Us or some other sufficient Authority. And we do 
hereby command and require all Judges, Justices, and other Officers 
whatsoever, in whom any Publick Trust is reposed in this Govern- 
ment, that they diligently proceed in the Performance & Discharge 
of their respective Duties therein for the Safety, Peace, and Well 
being of the same. 

li Given at Philadelphia, under the Great Seal of the said Province, 
the Eighth Day of June in the TAventieth Year of the Reign of 
our Sovereign Lord, George the Second, by the Grace of God of 
Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, & ca - 

"ANTHONY PALMER, President. 
11 By Order of the President & Council. 
"Riciiard Peters, Secry. 
"GOD SAVE THE KING." 

The Attorney General being consulted on the alterations neces- 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 71 

sary to be made in the Forms of Lycences & other Papers of Course, 
the same were settled. 

Order' d, That the President sign all Marriage Lycences, Publick 
House Lycences, Indian Trader's Lycences, Registers of Vessells & 
Lett Passes. 

The President laid before the Board a Letter from Monsieur 
Ghastenoy, Lieutenant General of the French Leeward Islands, 
Dated the 12th May last at St. Domingo, directed to Governor 
Thomas, & delivered to the President by one Captain Rogers, who 
arrived yesterday in a Flag of Truce from Petit G-oava, in Hispaniola, 
which being read, the Consideration thereof was postpon'd to the 
Afternoon. 

The Sheriff & other Officers waiting to attend the Council to the 
Court House, the Board adjourned to 5 of the Clock. 



P.M. 

PRESENT : 

The Honourable ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr. President. 

Samuel Hasell, Robert Strettell, "] 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, ( ™ 

Laurence Growden, Thomas Hopkinson, | ° 
William Logan, J 

The Letter and Papers brought by the Captain of the Flag of 
Truce from Hispaniola being again read, and the purport thereof 
being that the Flag was sent at the Instance of some English Pris- 
oners, in number Eight, who were taken by the French and carried 
into Leogane, & that there were likewise Shipt on board Three 
Negroes and a Mulatto, taken by a French Privateer in a Bermu- 
dian Sloop, Capt n - Dickenson, & on their own alligations of being 
Free the Governor of St. Domingo requested that if it shou'd ap- 
pear that they were not free, they might be sent back by this Sloop 
to be delivered to the French Captors. 

Captain Rogers attending without, was called in & told that en- 
quiry would be immediately made into the Condition of the Negroes 
& Mulatto, and an answer given as soon as the Council shou'd be 
inform'd of the Truth. Capt n Rogers then told the Council that 
his Sloop cou'd not go to Sea without being Careen'd, & praying 
Liberty to do it; the same was granted, & it was recommended to 
him to use all the Dispatch possible, for as there were no French 
Prisoners in this port to give in Exchange he wou'd not be de- 
tain'd, & the Council expected he wou'd stay no longer time here 
than was absolutely necessary to repair & victual his Vessel. 

Mr. Turner & Mr. Logan were appointed a Committee to ex- 
amine the Negroes and Mulatto, and were desir'd to make all the 






72 MINUTES OF THE 

enquiry possible into their respective Conditions that the President 
might be enabled to write an Answer to Monsieur Chastenoy's 
Letter. 

Mr. George Crogan, a considerable Indian Trader, inform'd the 
Secretary by Letter that he had traded this Winter on the Borders 

of Lake Erie with a Nation of Indians called ■ , who were 

formerly in the French Interest, but are now come over & have 
begun Hostilities along with some of the Six Nations against the 
French, & that he had there received from them a Letter, with a 
String of Wampum & a French Scalp, to be deliver' d to the Gov- 
ernor of Pennsylvania, & as he was prevented by Indisposition from 
waiting on the Governor himself, he had sent them by his Servant ; 
and further desiring the Secretary to inform the Governor that as 
this Nation was of great Consequence on account of their Numbers 
& Alliances, the Government wou'd do send them, immediately, a 
Present for their Encouragement, & if they were disposed to do so 
he wou'd forthwith dispatch a Servant with it; and on reading the 
Indian Letter & Mr. Croghan's Letter, the Council were of opinion 
that they shou'd be communicated to the Speaker. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, June the 11th, 1747. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ") 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Stretell, [ -p, 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, | " 

William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approv'd. 

The President laid before the Board a Letter from Governor 
Shirley, which came by the Post, dated at Boston the 1st Instant, 
purporting — "That the Indians of the Six Nations were generally 
engaged in the War against the French, owing in a great measure 
to the influence & prudent management of Coll 0, Johnson & Mr. 
Lydius, who have in this Service laid themselves under such En- 
gagements to the Indians as they are not able to fulfill without 
proper Supplies from the Governments of His Majestic' s Colonies 
of North America ; and as it may of the last consequence, if these 
Gentlemen shou'd not be enabled to perform their Contracts with 
the Indians, he was requested by the General Assembly to repre- 
sent this in a pressing Letter to the Governor of Pennsylvania, & 
to desire him to lay the same before the Assembly that they might 
thereby be indue'd to contribute handsomely towards this import- 
ant & necessary Service." 

The Council took it into their Consideration whether they shou'd 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 73 

issue Writts for the Summoning of the Assembly, and it being the 
Sentiments of all the Members that previous to their doing this 
it wou'd be proper to communicate the Contents of Mr. Shirley's 
Letter to the Speaker, & to know from him whether, as it was a 
very busy time of Year with the Country Members, it wou'd be 
better to call them now or to postpone the laying the Letter before 
them till their time of Meeting on their own Adjournment, which 
was the 17th of August next, Mr. Lawrence and Mr. Strettell 
were appointed to confer with the Speaker on this, & likewise on 
the Contents of the Letter received from the Tugans. 

The Secretary informing the Board that the Indian Interpreter, 
Mr. Weiser, was charg'd with a Message to the Indians at Shamokin, 
to notify to them the Death of the Late Prop r * Mr. John Penn, & 
likewise the Departure of Governor Thomas, and that a Letter might 
reach him before he set out the Board directed the Secretary to 
Send Mr. Weiser a Copy of Governor Shirley's Lett 1 "- & to write to 
him a full & proper Letter on the Subject, adding thereto that he 
shou'd be sure to give the Indians the strongest assurances that the 
President & Council wou'd not be wanting to pay the same Regards 
to the Indian Nations as had always been shewn them by this 
Government. 






At a Council held at Philadelphia the 13th June, 1747. 
present : 

The Honourable ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Abraham Taylor, ~\ 

Benj n - Shoemaker, Robert Strettell, > Esqrs. 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, J 

Mr. Lawrence & Mr. Strettell reported that they had conferr'd 
with the Speaker, agreeable to what was requir'd of them at the 
last Council, and thut he was of opinion that the Country Members 
wou'd not like being call'd from their Business in the midst of 
Harvest, besides there lay some just objection why this Province 
shou'd not send the Supplys in the manner & for the Service they 
were requested j But this Answer not appearing to the Council a 
sufficient Justification for not calling the Assembly, the said two 
Members were requested to wait on Mr. Kinsey again, & desir'd he 
wou'd consult with such of the Members of Assembly as lived in 
Town, and that he wou'd be present at the next Council. 



Esqrs. 



74 MINUTES OF THE 



At a Council held at Philada. the 15th June, 1747. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esq., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, 

Abraham Taylor, Benjamin Shoemaker, 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, 

William Logan, 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approved. 

Mr. Kinsey was told y* the Council looking on the contents of 
Governor Shirley's Letter to be of great Moment, had desir'd a 
conference with him ; that knowing his Sentiments & those of such 
other Members of Assembly as cou'd be easily spoke to, they might 
be the better enabled to come to a determination what to do. 

Mr. Kinsey said he had consulted with his Brother Members, 
and they were all of opinion with him, that shou'd they be now 
called to meet in Assembly they wou'd not Answer Governor Shir- 
ley's Expectations. Their principles were too well known to give any 
reason to believe they wou'd Contribute to offensive Warrs; besides, 
it had long been his Opinion that whatever Presents were made to 
the Indians they should be given immediately to them by this Pro- 
vince by their Interpreter, & it should be known for what Services 
he as well as those he had convers'd with were Strangers to the 
Contract made by Mr. Lydius & Coll 0, Johnson, and it might be of 
such a nature as neither the Indians of the Six Nations nor this 
Province wou'd approve of. He cou'd assure the Council that the 
Assembly was never averse to making proper Presents to the In- 
dians, & it was probable, if this Request was left to be made to 
them when they shou'd meet on the 17th of August next, the time 
to which they stood adjourn'd, the Assembly wou'd give a sum of 
Money to encourage the Indians in their Zeal for the Interest & 
Service of the Colonies. 

Mr. Kinsey withdrawing, the Council thought it would be to no 
purpose to call the Assembly now for the reasons mention'd by Mr. 
Kinsey, & therefore requested the President to write an Answer to 
Governor Shirley, wherein he wou'd be pleased to set forth their 
Proceedings & their Reasons for postponing the Application to the 
Month of August, the usual time of the sitting of the Assembly 
for the Dispatch of Business. 

Mr. Turner reported that he & Mr. Logan being appointed to 
examine whether the Negroes & Mulatto brought by Capt n - Roger 
in the Flag of Truce were free or not, on their giving Orders to 
have brought before them, they were inform'd that Capt"- Benj n - 
Dickenson, the very Person who Commanded the Sloop to which 
Negroes belong'd when they were taken by the French Privateer, 
passing by Captain Roger as he was coming up the Bay of Dela- 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 75 

ware the Negroes made themselves known to him, whereupon he 
demanded them of Captain Roger, who was weak enough to deliver 
them up to him. The Captain attending without, was called in, & 
being examined, acknowledged that he had deliver'd the Negroes & 
Mulatto to Captain Dickenson. 

Ordered, That Captain Roger put the whole Transaction in wri- 
ting, & that he & Mr. Wilson depose to the Truth of it before the 
Council. 

Mr. John Mackey deliver'd to the President in Council a Letter 
directed to Governor Thomas, which he said was given him by his 
Excellency Don Diego de Penalosa, Lieutenant Governor for the 
King of Spain at the Havanna, and on its being translated it ap- 
peared to be Dated at the Havanna, 31st May, 1747, & to contain 
in Substance that " there Sail'd last Year from the Port of the Ha- 
vanna, on a Cruize, the Privateer Frigate called the " St. Christo- 
pher," & the privateer Brigantine called " our Lady of the Rosary," 
alias, " the Fame," the Property of the Royal Company of the Island 
of Cuba, that upon their return the Brigantine was Shipwreck' d on 
the Keys, & her People came to Baracao in the Lanch ; that some 
time after the St. Christopher arrived, whose Crew informed that 
they had taken & dismissed on a Ransome for Four thousand Dol- 
lars an English Frigate, Commanded by Alexander Mathiew Row- 
erdon, bound from London to Pennsylvania, where, as they have 
been since inform' d, she arrived safe • that the two Ransomers were 
Dead, one in the beginning of the Voyage before the Shipwreck, 
the other afterwards in going to Barracoa in the Lanch, as appears 
more at large by a Certificate attested by D n Domingo Antonio De 
Aristegni, Second Capt n - of the St. Christopher, who was ordered to 
give the said Certificate in the Absence of the other Officers, pray- 
ing that in conformity thereto the Gove r - of Pennsylvania wou'd 
vouch safe to give orders that the Four thousand pieces of Eight 
agreed for & justly due may be paid to the Order of the President 
and Directors of the said Royal Company." 

A Petition from Uty Perkins in Philad 3 - Goal was read, setting 
forth that he was convicted of Horse Stealing, & sentenc'd to re- 
ceive 21 Lashes, & to pay £30 for the support of Government, 
praying that as he had suffer'd the Corporal Punishment his Fine 
might be released. 

Order } d } That he give bond for the £30, & be Discharg'd paying 
his Fees & departing the Province forthwith. 



76 MINUTES OF THE 

At a Council held at Philadelphia, 18th June, 1747. 

present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ") 

Abraham Taylor, Benj n - Shoemaker, > Esqrs. 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the preceeding Council were read and approv'd. 

The President laid before the Board a Letter which he had wrote 
to Gor r " Shirley in answer to his of the 1st Instant, which being 
read, was approved & ordered to be enter'd. 

"Sir: 

"Governor Thomas being gone to England for the Recovery of 
his health, your letter of the 1st Instant, address' d to him, was sent 
to me as President of the Council of this Province ; and as the 
Administration of the Government in the Absence of a Governor 
devolves on the Council, I immediatly on Receipt thereof laid it 
before them, & have the honour to inform You that the Council 
thinks with you that shou'd there be a failure of any Engagements 
enter'd into by any of His Majestie's Colonies with the Indians, now 
that they have actually begun Hostilities against the French, it 
might prove of the last Consequence to every Province on the Con- 
tinent. Was the Disposition of the Public Money in the Council 
such a Resolve wou'd have been forthwith taken as the Importance 
of the Service demanded ; but this being in the Assembly, which 
is not now sitting, the only step in the Power of the Council was to , 
convene them in order to lay your letter before them ; and this wou'd 
have been done had it not been discourag'd by the Speaker of the As- 
sembly, to whom Your Letter was communicated, who on conferring, 
at the Instance of the Council, with such of the Members of As- 
sembly as live in or near the City, gave it as his & their opinion 
that shou'd the County Members be obliged to leave their Family's 
before the Harvest was over they might not meet in a good humour, 
& thereby the Intent of calling them might be frustrated ; but as 
they were set on their own Adjournment on the 17th day of Au- 
gust next, if the Letter was then laid before them there might be 
more hopes of success ; at least there was reason to believe that 
the Assembly wou'd go into giving Presents to the Indians in their 
own way — their Principles not permitting them to give to such a 
purpose as you apply for. Your knowledge of Assemblies will in- 
duce You, I make no doubt, to think with the Council that these 
previous Steps were proper to be taken, & that as these are the 
Sentiments of the Speaker, & of the leading Members of the House, 
it wou'd answer no purpose to convene them against their will, & 
that no more remains to be done than when they meet to lay Your 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 77 

Letter before them, which you may be assured will be done, & noth- 
ing omitted that can be thought will give weight to the Application* 
" I am Sir, 

" Your most obed'- h'ble Serv f ' 

« f ANTHONY PALMER. 
"Pnllada,, ]( 8th June, 1747. 

" His Excels Will m - Shirley, Esq r - r; 

The Precedent's Letters to the Secretary of State, to the Lords 
Commiss 13, of Trade & Plantations, & to the several Governors, wer© 
likewise read & approved. 






At a Council held at Philadelphia the 26th June, 1747, 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 

Thomas Lawrence^ Samuel Hasell, "1 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, [ ™ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, j " 

Thomas Hopkinson 7 J 

The Minutes of the Preceeding Council were fead and approv'cL 
The President laid before the Board sundry Papers delivered to? 
him by one James Vincent de Pre, Captain of a French Ship called 
" the Fortune/' which came in here yesterday carrying a Flag of 
Truce. On perusal of his Despatches it appeared that he came from 
New Orleans, on the River Mississippi, in Louisiana, and was bound 
to Cape Francois, in Hispaniola; that there being at New Orleans sev- 
eral English Prisoners who earnestly requested that they might ga 
with Capt n - De Pre and be put into New York or any other Colony 
belonging to his Britannick Majesty, he was permitted to take them 
& deliver them accordingly. Among the Prisoners were Captain 
Alexander Forbes of London & Capt "• Taylor of this Port, who at- 
tending with Capt n - De Pre were called in, & being examined con- 
firm' d the Contents of the Dispatches. They assur'd the Council 
that the French Capt"- brought Seventeen French Prisoners into this 
Port at their own Request, who must otherwise been detained at 
New Orleans & there have suffered many hardships, & that they 
were treated with great humanity by him and his People, in return 
for which they thought he was entitled to the favour of every Eng- 
lish Government. Capt B - De Pre being told that s£s there were no 
French Prisoners here to give in Exchange he was at liberty to pro- 
ceed on his Voyage forthwith. He thank' d the Council, & pray'd 
Liberty to take in such Quantity of Provisions,* Liquors, and other 
Necessaries as he wanted 5 w ch " was granted, & he was told to use all 



78 MINUTES OF THE 

the Expedition Possible, & that the Secretary wou'd give him his 
Dispatches the beginning of the week. 

A Petition was presented to the President & Council by David 
Cochran & John Glenn, Inhabitants of Chester County, setting 
forth that they & many others had just Cause of Complaint against 
Job Huston, Esqr., one of His Majestie's Justices of the Peace for 
Chester County, praying that a Day might be appointed to hear 
their Complaints. 

Order' d j That the Petitioners be heard on the 17th of August 
next, & that Justice Huston be previously inform' d by them of the 
Causes of Complaint, that he may be prepared to make his Defence* 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, the 29th June, 1747; 

present : 
The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ] 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, ! -™ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, [ 1 

Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approv'd* 
Captain Roger & Mr. Wilson attending without, were called in, 
& having reduc'd into writing the Transaction between the said 
Captain Roger & Capt n " Benjamin Dickinson, touching the Delivery 
of the three Negroes and Mulatto, made oath to the same, and a 
Certificate of the said Oath being prepared and approv'd, the Presi* 
dent was desir'd to attest it under the Lesser Seal of the said Pro- 
vince, which was accordingly done j and the President having pre* 
par'd a Letter to Monsieur Chastenoy, inclosing said Certificate, it 
was read and approved. 

Ordered, That the Secretary prepare a Let Pass, such as is usual 
in these Cases, for Capt 11 " Rogers, & that the President Sign it un- 
der his Seal at Arms, & that Capt 11 ' Rogers' Dispatches be deliver' d 
to him this Afternoon, & he be told that the Council commands & 
expects he will go away immediately. 

The Secretary having prepared a Certificate or Let Pass for Capt nj 
Jacques Vincent De Pre, the President signed it under his Seal at 
Arms. 

Order' d, That the Secretary deliver to Capt 11, De Pre his Dispatches 
this Afternoon, & tell him that the Council expects he will not stay 
longer than to Day. 

The Council apprehending from the Circumstances of the Pro- 
vince that some mischievious consequences may ensue from Flags of 
Truce coming directly up to the Port without previous Notice being 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 79 

given to the Government, they are unanimously of opinion that it is 
necessary for the safety and Trade of this Province that all Vessels 
coming as Flags of Truce shou'd be laid under some Restrictions & 
Regulations, and that a Proclamation should be prepared for this 
purpose, and Mr. Lawrence, Mr. Hassell, & Mr. Hopkinson, are 
appointed a Committee to consider the Regulations necessary to be 
made, and to prepare a proper Proclamation. 

The Council took into Consideration the Letter deliver'd by Mr. 
John Mackey from the Governor of the Havannah to the President 
in Council, of the 15th Instant, and Mr. Hopkinson saying that a 
Cause having been brought before him, as Judge of the Admiralty, 
wherein the Friends of the Hostages for the 4,000 Peices of Eight 
mention' d in the Spanish Governor's Letter were Plaintives, & the 
Owners & Freighters of Captain Rowerdon's Vessell were Defend- 
ants, & that in pursuance of his Decree the Money, or a great part 
of it, was collected & paid into the hands of Mr. Willing & Mr. 
Sober, to be remitted to the Spanish Captors for the Release of the 
said hostages, the Council was of opinion that it would well become 
the Honour of this Government to endeavour that the Money be ex- 
peditiously paid or remitted for the use of the Royal Company of 
the Isle of Cuba, & recommended it, to Mr. Hopkinson to speak to 
Mr. Willing & Mr. Sober to Pay the Money, or to give reasons why 
they can't, that the Council may know what Answer to make to 
Monseiur Penelosa. 

Mr. Turner inform'd the Council that there were in this Port 
several Spanish Negroes taken by the Philadelphia Privateers, & as 
they alledg'd they were free, & the Judge of the Admiralty on their 
Examination was of opinion that it might be so, & wou ; d not con- 
demn them to be sold as Slaves, a great Expence had accrued in 
maintaining them, and as he was one of the Owners of the Priva- 
teers, he was desir'd to apply to the Council, by the other Gentle- 
men concern' d with him, for Liberty, at their own Expence, to send 
a Vessel to the Havanna with these Negroes under a Flag Truce, 
& they desir'd, further, that the Council wou'd be pleased to set 
forth the whole matter in a Letter to the Spanish Governor at the 
Havanna, requested that if the Negroes shou'd be found to be free 
they might be discharg'd, otherwise be return'd for the use of the 
Captors. 

The Council conceiving the motion to be just and reasonable, gave 
Liberty to the Owners of the Privateers to send a Vessel to the 
Havanna, & promised the Privilege of the Flag & a Letter, such as 
Mr. Turner moved for. 



80 MINUTES OF THE 



At a Council held at Philada. the 1st of July, 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, 



Esqrs. 



Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, 

Thomas Hopkinson, 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approv'd. 

Mr. Lawrence, one of the Committee appointed by the last Coun- 
cil to consider the Regulations proper to be made with respect to 
Mags of Truce, deliver'd their Report in writing, which being read 
Paragraph by Paragraph was approved, & order' d to be entered : 

" To the Honble. the- President & Council of the Province of Penn^ 

sylvania. 

" We, the Committee appointed by this Honble. Board to consider 
of Ways and Means for preventing the Inconveniences which may 
arise to this Province from the coming in of foreign Vessels carry- 
ing Flags of Truce, do Report as followeth, to wit : 

" As a thorough knowledge of the Bay and River of Delaware, 
and of the present defenceless State of this Province, may encourage 
our Enemies to form some Enterprise which may prove fatal both 
to Us and the Neighbouring Governments, We think it absolutely 
necessary to prevent, if possible, all foreign Vessels carrying Flags 
of Truce from coming up the Bay and River of Delaware, and to 
that End we humbly propose— 

" 1. That a Proclamation be immediately issued by the Honble. 
the President and Council, strictly enjoining and commanding all 
Pilots and Mariners that they do not presume, on any pretence what- 
soever, to conduct, Pilot, or bring up any foreign Ship o? Vessel 
carrying a Flag of Truce, or pretending to carry a Flag of Truce, 
into the Limits of this Government, without a special Lycence first 
had and obtained for that purpose from the Honble. the President 
& Council. 

" 2. If notwithstanding such Proclamation, any Ship or Vessel 
carrying a Flag of Truce should come into this Port ox within the 
Limits of this Province without Lycence as aforesaid, We are of 
opinion that the Council should immediately meet on the first No- 
tice thereof, & order the Sheriff or some proper Officer directly to go 
on board such Vessel and bring the Captain or Chief Officer before 
the Council, there to be examined, and that the Vessel be forthwith 
ordered down to such Place as the Council shall approve, and that 
a prosecution be ordered against the Pilot for acting contrary to his 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 81 

Duty & Allegiance in introducing His Majestie's Enemies within 
this Government without Lycence ) 

"3. That it be requested by this Board of His Honour the Presi- 
dent that he would be pleased at his first Meeting of the Council 
of New Castle, Kent, and Sussex, on Delaware, earnestly to recom- 
mend to them the Regulations and Restrictions following, or such 
others as they shall judge most proper for their safety as well as 
ours, viz*- : 

" That the Laws now in force in that Government relating to Pi- 
lots be strictly put in Execution, and that a Proclamation issue for 
that purpose if they think it necessary. 

" That the Pilots be forbid the taking Charge of any foreign Vessel 
carrying a Mag of Truce, until the Chief Commander thereof shall 
have come on shore with some of the English Prisoners, and have 
given a Satisfactory Answer to such particulars relating to the occa- 
sion of the Voyage, the Condition of the Vessel, and the People on 
Board, as the Magistrates at Lewis shall think fit to demand. 

" In case the Letters or Dispatches brought by such Commanders 
be directed to the Governor or Council of Pennsylvania, that the 
said Council of the three Lower Counties would be pleased to give 
Order that the said Letters be immediately conveyed to Philad" at 
the Expence of this Government, and that in the mean time the 
Pilots be forbid to proceed with such Vessel to the Northward of 
Lewis Town Road until the special Permission of the Council of the 
said three Lower Counties be obtained in Writing, nor to the North- 
Ward of Marcus Hook until a Lycence be obtained in like manner 
from the President & Council of Pennsylvania. 

u That (as our Enemies becoming acquainted with the Navigation 
of the Bay may be attended with the most dangerous Consequences 
both to the People of the said Counties and to those of this Province) 
the Council of the said Three Lower Counties be desir'd in no Case 
to grant permission to foreign Vessels coming with Flags of Truce 
to proceed up the Bay, unless there shall appear to be an absolute 
Necessity, which it is supposed can very seldom happen, since (it is 
presumed) this Government will chearfully pay the Expence of 
bringing up such English Prisoners from Lewis as may be put on 
shore there, and take care that the Commanders of such Flags of 
Truce shall not want any Necessaries for their Ships or themselves. 

11 4. This Committee further think it necessary that the President 
& Council of the Province of New Jersey be likewise applied to on 
this occasion, & be made acquainted with the Dangers we apprehend 
from the Resort of His Majestie's Enemies to this Port under the 
Sanction of Flags of Truce, and of the precautions we have thought 
fit to use to prevent it, and that they be desir'd to take the matter 
into their Consideration, and make such Provisions & Regulations* 
on their Side as they may think proper for the purposes aforesaid. 
VOL. v. — 6. 



82 MINUTES OF THE' 

" All which is humbly submitted to the Consideration of tLtf 
Board by 

"THO. LAWRENCE, 
"SAMUEL HASSELL, 
"THOS. HOPKINSON. 

" Philad a - July 1st, 1747." 

The Council recommended the several matters mention'^ m the 
above Report strongly to the President, who said he was to meet 
his Council at New Castle on the 10th Instant, & wou'd do all in 
his power to procure proper Regulations to be made in that Govern- 
ment. 

Mr. Hopkinson having likewise prepar'd the Draught of a Pro- 
clamation, the same was read and appro v'd. 

Order'd, That the Sheriffs and Magistrates have Notice to attend 
the publication of it at the Court House on Saturday at Eleven 
o'Clock, & that it be Printed immediately after Publication, & every 
Pilot served with a Printed Proclamation. 

" By the Honourable the President and Council of the Province of 
Pennsylvania. 

" A PROCLAMATION. 

u Whereas, the coming of foreign Vessels under the Sanction of 
Flags of Truce into this Port of Philadelphia without previous Ex- 
amination and a Lycence obtained from this Government, may be 
attended with misehevious Consequences, which may be prevented 
by laying the Pilots using the Bay and River of Delaware under 
proper Restrictions & Regulations. We have, therefore, thought it 
necessary to issue this our Proclamation, hereby in his Majestie's 
Name strictly enjoining k commanding all Pilots, Mariners, and 
others, that from henceforth they do not presume on any pretence 
whatsoever to conduct, Pilot, or bring up any foreign Ship or Yesse) 
carrying a Flag of Truce, or pretending to come under a Flag of 
Truce from our Enemies to any Port or Place within this Province 
above that tract of Land lying in Chester County, commonly called 
and known by the Name of Marcus Hook, without our special Ly- 
cence first had and obtained, as they will answer the contrary at 
their highest peril. 

" Given at Philadelphia, under the Great Seal of the said Province, 
the Fourth day of July, in the Twenty-first Year of the Reign of 
our Sovereign Lord George the Second, by the Grace of God of 
Great Britain, France, & Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, 
&c, Annoqz Domini, 1747. 

" By Order of the President <fc Council, 

" ANTHONY PALMER, President. 
" Richard Peters, Secretary. 

"GOD SAVE THE KING." 






PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 88 

At a Council held at Philadelphia, 9th July, 1747. 

PRESENT I 

The Honourable ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Abraham Taylor, ~\ 

Robert Strettell, Joseph Turner, > Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, j 

The Minutes of the preceding Council was read and approv'd. 

The President laid before the Board a Letter which he received 
yesterday by the Post from Governor Shirley, dated at Boston, 29th 
June, informing him That the Government taking into Considera- 
tion the great Danger which all his Majestie's Colonies in North 
America are in of being in time destroyed by the French and the 
Indians under their influence, without a firm Union between them- 
selves for their mutual Defence, & for weakning & destroying the 
Power of the Enemy, <fc more especially for driving the French from 
the Borders of the Province of New York & New England, had ap- 
pointed Commissioners to meet in a Congress to be held at New 
York on the Second Day of September next, with such Commiss 78, 
as may be appointed by all his Majestie's Governments from New 
Hampshire to Virginia, inclusively, then & there to treat & agree 
upon Measures for encouraging the Indians of the Six Nations 
vigorously to prosecute their Incursions on the Enemy, as also to 
agree upon the method and proportion of raising Men & Money for 
carrying on the War both offensively and defensively, & to project 
& settle such Enterprizes and plans of Operation as the common 
Interest shall require, desiring that the President wou'd represent 
this in the strongest Light to the Assembly, and recommending it 
to the several Governments separately to make Provision without 
Delay for the Encouragement of the Six Nations till the Congress 
can be held. 

On reading the Letter the Council was of opinion that at present 
no more was necessary to be done than that the President shou'd 
acknowledge the Receipt of it, & assure Governor Shirley that when 
the Assembly met it shou'd be laid before them. 

The Secretary laid before the Board several Letters which he had 
received from Mr. Conrad Weiser, in one of which he informs him 
that in his Journey to Shamokin, in obedience to the Command of 
the President and Council, he fortunately met at Chambers' Mill, 
in Pextang, with Shikalamy & several Indians, amongst whom was 
Scaienties, a man of Note of the Cayiuga Nation, which accidental 
Meeting rendring it unnecessary for him to go further, he there 
communicated to them the Messages given him in Charge, as well 
from the Prop rs - as the Council, & having committed what pass'd be- 
tween them to writing, he had inclos'd it in order to be laid before 
the Council, & the Report being read it was order' d to be enter'd. 



84 MINUTES OF THE 

Memorandum of the Message delivered to the Indians of Shamohin 
at the House of Joseph Chambers, in Paxton, by the Subscriber. 

There was Present Shikalamy, Taghneghdorrus, Caniadarogon, & 
Scaienties (a man ofrNote among the Cayiuckers). 

" Brethren : Yoythat Live at Zinachson (Shamokin) ; I am sent 
to you by your Brethren the President & Council of Philadelphia 
to pay you a Visit, and to acquaint you of what passes among the 
White People, also to inform myself how you do and what passes 
among the Indians in these critical times/' 

Gave a string of Wampum. 

" 1. Brethren : in the first place I am to acquaint you that your 
Friend & Countryman John Penn, the Eldest Son of great Onas, 
Died last Winter with a contented mind, and as his Death must 
needs affect you as it did us, being you are sensible he always has 
been a true friend to the Indians, I give you these Handkerchiefs 
to wipe all your Tears." 

Grave 12 Silk Handkerchiefs. 

u 2. Brethren: I also inform you that your Brother Governor 
Thomas has left us and is gone to England, not out of any ill will 
or disgust, but for the sake of his Health ; he has been ill ever 
since the Treaty of Lancaster, the Doctors of this Country could do 
no good to him, he is hopes that the Air of his Native Country and 
the assistance of some skilful Doctor there will give him ease. He 
went away a good friend of the People of Pennsylvania and of 
his Brethren the Indians, and will do them what Service he can 
when in England." 

Laid a string of Wampum. 

"3. Brethren: notwithstanding the Governor is gone, the same 
correspondence will be kept up with all the Indians by the Presi- 
dent & Council of Philadelphia ; they resume the same Power with 
their President as if the Governor was here, and the body of the People 
heartily joins them to keep up a good correspondence with all the 
Indians, according to the Treaties of Friendship subsisting between 
us. Your old and assured Friend James Logan is also in being 
yet, although he layd aside all Public Business as to the White 
People, in Indian Affairs he assists the Council and will not lay 
that aside as long as he is alive & able to advise." In Confirma- 
tion whereof I 

Laid a String of Wampum. 

"4. Brethren : there was a Trunk found in one of the Rooms 
where your Friend John Penn used to Lodge when in Philadelphia, 
with some Cloaths in it, and as he has been gone for several Years, 
and the Cloaths were almost spoiled, your Friend, the Secretary, 
changed them for new ones, and sent them up to me to give to the 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 85 

Indians at Zinachson, to wear them out in remembrance of their 
.good Friend & Countryman, John Penn, deceased." 

Gave 10 Strow'd Match Coats and 12 Shirts. 

" Brethren : I have at present no more to say." 
June 17th, 1747. 

After about 15 Minutes, Shikalamy made answer, directed his 
Discourse to the President & Council of Philadelphia, and said : 

" Brethren : We thank you for this kind visit. We longed- to 
hear of you and to inform ourselves of the truth reported among 
us; some few of us intended a visit to Philadelphia this Summer 
for that purpose j we are pleased with what has been said to us, and 
will give you a true account this Day of all what passes among 
the Indians." 

We then broke up for about an hour. 

Then Shickalamy informed me, in the presence of the others 
before mention'd, that in the beginning of last Spring some of the 
*Zistagechroanu came to treat at Oswego with a Message from their 
whole Nation, joined by the rest of the Indians about the Lakes of 
Canada, to the Six United Nations, to the following purport, viz** : 

" Brethren, the United Nations : We have hitherto been kept 
like Prisoners on the other side the Lake, Onontio our Father 
told us that if we should treat with the English he wou'd look upon 
it as a breach of the Peace with him j now we come to let you know 
that we will no more be stop'd from treating with your Brethren, 
the English; We will join with you to support the House of 
Oswego, where the Goods that the Indians want are so plenty. All 
the Indians about the Lakes will join, and if need take up the 
Hatchet against our foolish Father Onontio whenever you require 
it ; his Goods are very dear, and he is turned malicious because he 
sees our Women & Children Clothed fine in English Cloaths bought 
at Oswego. We have already let him know that we want no more 
of his advice, as we did formerly when we were Young, but that we 
became now Men of Age, and would think for ourselves let the 
consequences be what it will." In Confirmation of the above 
Speech the said Deputies Laid several fine Tobacco Pipes adorned 
with Wampum & fine Feathers. 

" They had an agreeable Answer from the Six Nation Council. 
The Six Nations have received Messages from other Nations to the 
the same purport, all promising to engage in favour of the Six Na- 
tions, and the House of Oswego. 

" Shickalamy told me further that of late a Council was held at 
Onontago by the Six Nations, in which it was agreed to send a Mes- 

* The Zistagechroanu are a numerous Nation to the North of the Lake 
Frontenac; they don't come by Niagara in their way to Oswego, but right 
across the Lake. 



86 MINUTES OF THE 

sage to Canada of the last Importance, and that also a Message was 
sent to Albany to desire their Brethren the English to tye their 
Canoes or Battoes for a few Days to the Bushes, and not to proceed 
in their Expedition against Canada till their Messengers came back 
from Canada, which would clear up the Clouds, and the United 
Nations would then see what must be done. 

" Scaienties informs that a few Days before he came away from 
Cayiucker (which was about the Twentieth Day of May last) a 
Message arrived at the Cayiucker Country, and the Seneckers from 
the Commanding Officer of the French Fort at Niagara, inviting 
them two Nations to come and pay him a visit, and to receive a fine 
Present which their Father Onontio had sent those two Nations, he 
having understood that the large Presents he had made the Six Na- 
tions from time to time were withheld by the Onontagers & Mohocks, 
of whom he had been informed that they are corrupted by the Eng- 
lish by which & what they had received from Onontio they had 
enriched themselves & cheated the other Nations in Union with them. 

" That some of the two Nations were actually gone to Niagara to 
receive the Presents, and were set out the same Day when Scaien- 
ties came away. 

" Warr against the French in Canada was not declared by the Six 
Nations when Scaienties came away, and it was, as yet, uncertain 
when it would be done, at least not before the arrival of their Mes- 
sengers, and perhaps not this Summer. The Sinickers and Cay- 
iuckers are against it, the Mohocks are for it very much, the 
Onontagers have declared in open Council last Spring, never to leave 
the Mohocks, their eldest Brother and founder of the Union, the 
Oneiders & Tuscarroros, the Onontager's Example. 

" This is what Shikelamy & Scaienties assures to be true. The 
Mohocks engaged themselves in the War against the French on their 
own accord, without the Approbation of the Six Nation Council, they 
having been over persuaded by their Brethren, some of the White 
People at Albany, and by the force of Presents prevailed upon. 
The Council of the Six Nations does not altogether like it, but 
think it too Rashly of the Mohocks. 

" Shikalamy and Scaienties wonder at the dexterity of the French 
to have Intelligence of the Declaration of the Onontagers in Coun- 
cil, and so soon had Presents at Niagara and a Message in the 
Sinickers Country, but both say the Six Nations will after all stick 
together, notwithstanding the Presents received from the French. 

" The Five French Indian Traders that were killed on the South 
side of the Lake Erie, have been killed by some of the Six Nations 
(ihere called Acquanushioony, the name which the Six Nations give 
their People, signifys a Confederate). Another French Trader has 
since been killed in a private quarrel with one of the Jonontatich- 
roanu, between the River Ohio and the Lake Erie — the French man 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 87 

offering but one charge of Powder & one Bullet for a Beaver skin 
to the Indian ; the Indian took up his Hatchet, and knock'd him on 
the head, and killed him upon the Spot. 

" This is all the news that can be depended on j several more 
sWies I heard not worth while to trouble the Council with, as 
there was no Confirmation of them. 

u I am sorry to add that there are great Complaints against two 
of our Traders; one is James Dunning, who is accused to have 
stollen 47 Dear Skins and three Horses (or Mares), upon the 
lieads of Joniady River; the circumstances are very strong; the 
Indian from whom the Skins & Horses have been stollen is a 
Delaware Indian, a Sober, quiet, and good natur'd man ; he was 
down at my House with his Complaint, a few days before I set out 
for Sbamokin. I sent him back again till I had learned the par- 
ticulars, being I could not talk with him sufficient to find out the 
Truth of the Story ; he was now with Shikalamy and renewed his 
Complaint. James Dunning is gone down Ohio River, and will 
stay out long; the Indian was content that I should inform the 
■Council of his misfortune ; he not only lost his skins & Horses, but 
pursued James Dunning in vain to the place call'd Canayiahagen, 
on the South side of the Lake Erie, from thence back again to the 
Place where he left the Skins, and from thence again to Ohio, but 
all in vain, for he could not find or come up with James Dunning. 

" The other Complaint was made by the same Indian against one 
John Powle, a Liver on Sasquehanna River on the Indians Land 
above the Endless Mountain, who is accused for stealing two Bun- 
dles of -Skins from the said Indian whilst he was pursuing James 
Dunning. He (the Indian) had sent his Brother down Joniady 
River with the Skins they had left, and desired his Brother to leave 
his two Bundles on the Island at such an Indians House, which ap- 
pears this Indian did, and then fell sick at the House of the said 
John Fowle and dyed there. Before he was dead John Powle 
fetched the Skins from ike Island (he says by order of the de- 
ceased), and paid himself of what the Deceas'd ow'd him, who had 
Skins of his own sufficient to answer all his Debts and defray his 
Expeitee ; and would pay what he wanted, notwithstanding the de- 
ceased's Skins & his that is alive are all gone, and a very poor ac- 
count John Powle gives of the whole. The Indians insist upon it 
that he stole them. 

" The said John Powle had also taken a very fine Grun in pawn 
from the said two Indians for three Gallons of Liquor (Brandywine). 
After the deceas'd paid him he did not deliver up the Gun, but 
alledged that he lent it out, and endeavoured to cheat the Indian out 
of it entirely. I sent a few Lines to him hj the Indian to come to 
Joseph Chambers' to me and answer to the Same Complaint. He 
appeared, but Laugh' d at the Indian ; but upon Examination I found 
he was a Lier, if not a Thief, and offer'd his Oath to confirm a Lie 



88 MINUTES OF THE 

of winch lie was afterwards convinced by me. I then sent to Jus- 
tice Armstrong to come and assist in the affair ; but we could not 
do no more than to order John Powle to pay the Indian the value 
of the Gun. As for the Skins we could do nothing. I for my part 
am convinced he stole them, at least the most of them. 

" A great deal of other Mischief has been done to some of the 
Indians j some Horses have been taken on pretence of Debt, some- 
times Skins belonging to a third Person, & so on. 

" The Delaware Indians last Year intended a visit to Philadel- 
phia, but were prevented by Olumapies weakness, who is still alive 
but not able to stir ; they will come down this Year sometime after 
Harvest, and by what I can hear Shikalamy along with them, & 
there is no doubt but they will renew the above Complaint. Olima- 
pies has no Successor of his Relations, and he will hear of none so 
long as he is alive, and none of the Indians care to meddle in any 
affair. Shikalamy advises that the Government of Philadelphia 
should name Olumapies' Successor and set him up by their Au- 
thority, that at this Critical time there might be a man to apply to 
since Olumapies has lost his Senses and is uncapable of doing any- 
thing. I have informed the Indians of what I thought was proper 
both from Europe & America, and among other things that the 
Northern Colonies had been informed that the Six Nations had de- 
clared Warr against the French, & that thereupon they had resolved 
to put a stock of Money & Goods together in some honest Gentle- 
man's hands to supply their Brethren in every thing, & to take care 
that their "Wives and Children should not want ; that the Govern- 
ment of Pennsylvania had not seen cause yet to contribute some- 
thing towards it, as doubting the truth of the matter, that the 
Government of Pennsylvania being of a peaceable disposition from 
the beginning of times, did not hitherto see cause to encourage 
their Brethren, the Six Nations, to declare War against the French, 
knowing their Brethren to be People of sound understanding and 
Judgment, and will know best themselves what to do ; but if things 
shou'd come to Extreames, that their Brethren the Six Nations' 
Blood should grown warm against the French (who broke the peace 
and shed the first Blood on the Governments of New York & New 
England), in order to humble their Pride, the Government of Penn- 
sylvania wou'd not fail to contribute handsomely towards their 
Brethrens Support. 

" This is what I have told them as from myself, according to 
what I had learned from the Voice of the generality of the People 
of Pennsylvania, both Gentlemen & Common People. 

" CONRAD WEISER, Interpreter." 

The Council judging Mr. Weiser's Report & Letters contained 
several matters proper for Governor Clinton to know, as he was 
now at Albany in Treaty with the Indians, the President was de~ 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 89 

sired to write a Letter on the subject, & to enclose an Extract of 
such parts of Mr. Weiser's Report as were thought necessary. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, the 22d July, 1747. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, ") 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, V Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the preceeding Council were read and approv'cl. 

Mr. Hopkinson informed the President that the Members of 
Council in his absence had met, on an Express received the 13th 
July from New Castle, and desir'd that as what had pass'd was re- 
duc'd into writing, the same might be read and enter' d in the 
Council Books ; and thereupon deliver'd sundry Papers, the Con- 
tents whereof are as follows, viz 1 - : 

Monday, 13th July, 1747. 
An Express arriving from New Castle about 10 of the Clock this 
morning, such of the Members of Council as were in Town imme- 
diately met (his Honour the President being then on the River on 
his return from New Castle), viz'- : 

Samuel Hasell, Abraham Taylor, ") 

Robert Strettell, Joseph Turner, V Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, j 

The Letters received by Express were read in these words, viz 1, : 

" Gentlemen : 

" This Moment Thomas Quant & a Son of Mr. Nandins informs 
me a Company of French or Spaniards, to the Number of One 
hundred or thereabouts, has Robb'd & Plunder' d the Houses of 
James Hart & Edmund Liston and carried off all the valuable part 
of their Negroes & other Goods, and its supposed they have done 
so all the way from Lewis Town. This I thought my duty to let 
you know ; You may depend its no false alarm. I am, in haste, 
yours, &c._, 

"D d - WETHERSPOON. 

"12 O'Clock Sunday Night, 

"July 12th, 1747. 
"To John Curtis & John Finney, Esqrs., at New Castle." 

" May it please Your Honours : 

" Inclosed is an Express which this Moment came to hand from 
Mr. David Wetherspoon, which we judge our Duty to forward with 



90 MINUTES OF THE 

the utmost Dispatch. We are, Gentlemen, endeavouring to Arm 
what Men we can on the occasion, & are, Gentlemen, 

" Your very humble Servants, 

"JEHU CURTIS, 
"JOHN FINNEY. 

"New Castle, July 13th, 1747, at 4 o'Clock in the Morning. 

"For the Honoble. the President & Council of Pennsylvania." 

Thereupon the Members of Council were unanimously of opinion 
that some measures ought immediately to be taken for the Safety of 
this Province & the assistance of the Government of the lower Coun- 
ties, and as such Measures would be attended with some Expence, 
for the defraying whereof no provision was made by Law, even in 
Case of the greatest Emergency, the Publick Money being wholly 
at the Disposal of the House of Assembly, which was not then sit- 
ting, it was proposed and agreed that such of the Members of As- 
sembly as were in Town should be sent for; That they should be in- 
formed of the Contents of the said Dispatches, and that they shou'd 
be desir'd to acquaint the Council whether they would Use their 
endeavours with the Assembly at their next Meeting that the neces- 
sary Expences on this occasion should be defrayed out of the Pub- 
lick Money in their Disposal. 

The said Members of Assembly being accordingly sent for, the 
Speaker, Mr. Pemberton, Mr. Leech, Mr. Morris, and Mr. Trotter, 
attended, and after Some time spent in a conferrence on this Subject, 
the further Consideration thereof was referr'd to the Afternoon. 



EOD. DIE, 3 o'Clock, P. M. 

PRESENT I 

Thomas Lawrence, 
Samuel Hasell, 
Abraham Taylor, 
Robert Strettell, 
Thomas Hopkinson, 
William Logan, Esqrs., . 

John Kinsey, 

Thomas Leech, 

Joseph Trotter, 

James Morris, 

Oswald Peele, 

The Conferrence on the Subject matter of the Letters receiv'dby 
Express from New Castle was resumed, and several Measures pro- 
posed by the Members of the Council to the Members of Assembly 
as necessary on this occasion, To which the Speaker answered, 



- Members of Council. 



i 



Members of Assembly. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 91 

amongst other things, to the following purpose : That they knew 
the Difficulties Men of their Principles were put under on these 
occasions, That whilst they contended for their own the same Rea- 
sons induced them to make allowances for the opinions of others; 
That the Majority of the Council were not of their Sentiments, and 
different conduct would be expected from them. On which it was 
asked who would bear the Expence of what was necessary to be 
done, & whether the Members of Assembly present would under- 
take, the Assembly wou'd do it; to which the Speaker reply'd, that 
none of them had any Authority from the Assembly, That therefore 
their Acts could only be consider'd as those of private Men, that if 
it was expected they were to make a bargain with the Council, & 
that they the Council were to fitt out a Vessell & the Assembly 
shou'd Pay them, they would not do it, that none of them cou'd 
say what the Assembly would do, but that he the Speaker would 
not deceive them, that he did believe whatever the Dangers were 
some of them would Act up to their Principles, that if it depended 
on his own vote he could not consent, that he would as soon accept 
their Commission to go in Person against the Enemy, That whatever 
was done must be the result of their own Judgments, not their Advice, 
that tho' these were their Principles, yet those of great part of the 
Province were of different, that whatever was done by the Governor 
& Council or President & Council for the time being for the good 
of the Province, tho' it were neither such as the Assembly wou'd 
advise the doing of nor perhaps approve of when done, he did be- 
lieve they would not be sufferers by, that tho' the Assembly might 
decline entering into the particulars of such an Expence, yet they 
would always shew so much regard for what was intended for the 
benefit of the Province that they would make Compensation by the 
Money given to Support the Government or otherwise. 

It was then objected by one of the Council that perhaps the 
measures they might propose to take might by the Assembly be 
judged imprudent & the Expence refused to be paid on that account. 
The Speaker answer' d that tho' he could not advise what to do, yet 
if he observed any Inconveniencies like to arise on what was deter- 
mined to be done he had no objection to pointing them so farr as 
occurr'd to him. 

He further observed to the Council, that what they proposed to 
do was such as they judged immediately necessary for the defence 
of the Province, or some steps necessary to be taken to prevent the 
like attempts for the future. If the former, what they did would, 
he judged, be favourably construed ; if the latter, it was too late, 
though they should attempt, as he thought, to overtake the Enemy, 
and that it would be more prudent to let what they were to do be 
the result of their further deliberations; That if any such depre- 
dations were committed as the Express mentioned, it must be plain 
they had no intentions of doing Injurys higher up, otherwise they 






92 MINUTES OF THE 

would not have alarmed the people below; That what was done 
was not done in this Province, and the Government here lay under 
no obligations of doing any thing unasked; that the account received 
was uncertain, and if true there would no doubt be further Expresses 
one after the other, or if they were minded to be at a certainty, it 
might not perhaps be amiss to send a Messenger to be informed of 
the truth of the particulars, the Expence of which he made no 
doubt the Assembly would pay; that on the return of this Express 
they would be the better able to judge what was fit to be done, if 
no other arrived in the meantime. 

The said Members of Assembly being withdrawn, the Members 
of Council prepared a Letter to Jehu Curtis and John Finney, 
Esqrs., at New Castle, which was immediately sent by Express, in 
these words, viz*- : 

" Gentlemen : 

" His Honour the President not being yet arrived your Letter by 
Express came to our hands at 10 o' Clock this morning, since which 
we have received no further Account of the matters therein men- 
tioned. 

"We wait the Arrival of our President, whom we hourly expect, 
when such measures as are in our Power will be taken ; in the mean- 
time we desire you would be pleased to acquaint Us by Express 
whether the accounts we have received from You have been con- 
firmed, and of every other Fact relating thereto that you shall think 
material and well attested. 

" "We are, Gentlemen, Your very h'ble Serv' 3- ' 

"THOMAS LAWRENCE, 
"For self & the rest of the Members of Council. 
"Philada., 13th July, 1747." 

Mr. Logan acquainting the rest of the Members of Council that 
he had been informed of a Design lately projected by some Spanish 
Prisoners, Negroes, & others to run away with a Ship's Boat in this 
Harbour, which, if put in Execution, might be attended with dan- 
gerous Consequences, especially if they shou'd join our Enemies, 
now supposed to be in the River, and give them Intelligence of our 
defenceless state, whereby they might be encouraged to come fur- 
ther up, Mr. Strettell & Mr. Logan were appointed to wait 
on the Mayor and acquaint him therewith, and to desire he would 
give the Watch a particular Charge to attend the Wharfs in order 
to prevent the Execution thereof. 

Two Vessels going to England, the Board were unanimously of 
Opinion that accounts of the several Publick Matters that had been 
before the Council since the Departure of Governor Thomas, par- 
ticularly those relating to Flaggs of Truce & the late bold Act of 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 93 

the Spanish Privateer in Plundering Liston's & Hart's Plantations 
shou'd be transmitted to the Proprietaries. 

Order' 'd, That the Secretary make two fair Copys of the Minutes 
of Council for the Proprietaries. 

Mr. Taylor, Mr* Shoemaker, & Mr. Hopkinson are appointed a 
Committee to write to the Proprietaries on this occasion. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia the 27th July, 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, 1 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, I -™ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, ( * 

Thomas Hopkinson, j 

Mr. Taylor laid before the Board the Draught of a Letter to the 
Proprietaries, to be sign'd by the President £ Council pursuant to 
the last Minute, which was read and approved : 

"Sirs— 

" As the Administration of the Government, upon Coll - Thomas' 
Departure, devolved upon the Council, the President in his Letter 
of the 1 8th Instant, acquainted You therewith ; But as that Letter, 
for want of Conveyance, has not yet been sent, he takes this oppor- 
tunity by Captain Mesnard to transmit it to You, and we desire 
you wou'd please to be referred to it for the first step that was 
taken. 

" As we have not yet received any of your favours, nor have any 
Instructions to regulate our Conduct by, and as your own Secretary 
will acquaint You with the State of your other Affairs, relating as 
well to the Province as the Counties, we beg leave to refer You to 
his Letter for the particulars, and shall not trespass further upon your 
time than just to lay before You the procedings of the Council, which 
will give You a more particular Information than any thing we can say 
in a Letter upon such Events, tho' at the same time we think it our 
Duty to acquaint You that the coming of our Enemies up to this 
very City, under the Sanction of Flaggs of Truce, & the boldness 
of a French or Spanish Privateer continuing for some time between 
the Capes, & manning a Pilot Boat & Plundering 2 Plantations 4 
Miles above Bombay Hook, added to the defenceless Condition we 
are in, have encreased many People's uneasiness, and the want of a 
proper power to pass Laws must in such a critical Conjuncture be 
look'd upon to be a very great Misfortune, and such a Defect in the 
G-overnment as stands in need of the most speedy Remedy, which 
You are sensible is not in our Power to Apply. You may however 
rest assured no care or endeavours of ours to preserve the Internal 



94 MINUTES OF THE 

Peace of the Province shall be wanting, tho' it will require a trmeli 
abler & more skilful Hand to remove or prevent a Return of the 
external disorders, and we sincerely wish your Affairs in England 
wou'd permit you to come over and undertake the cure. 

" The Governor at his Arrival will undoubtly give you a par- 
ticular Account of the State of the Province, and we have the satis- 
faction to acquaint You that every thing remains pretty near in the 
same Condition as when he went away. If there be any thing that 
you think requires the more immediate care or particular attention 
of the Council, we desire you wou'd be pleased to signifie your plea- 
sure therein. You may be assured of our real and sincere incli- 
nations to discharge the Trust reposed in us to Your & the Country's 
Satisfaction, and that we are with the most unfeigned Esteem and 
Regard, 

" Honour'd Sirs, 

" Your most obedient humb. Serv ts " 

"ANTHONY PALMER, 
"THOMAS LAWRENCE, 
"SAMUEL HASELL, 
"ABRAHAM TAYLOR, 
"ROBERT STRETTELL, 
"THOMAS HOPKINSON. 
"Philad a '> 29th July, 1747/' 

Ordered, That the Secretary prepare fair Copies of such Depo- 
sitions as shall come to his hands relating to the Conduct of the 
Spanish or French Privateers, that in case they come time enough 
they may be sent to the Proprietaries with the Minutes of Council.* 

The President laid before the Board a Letter from John Reading, 
Esq r,) President of the Province of New Jersey, requesting that he 
would be pleased to cause to be delivered to the Bearer the Under 
Sheriff of Middlesex County, in East Jersey, a certain Henry Bos- 
Worth (Apprehended in this Province by the Sheriff of Bucks 
County, by virtue of a Writ that issued out of the Supreme Court 
at the instance of the Chief Justice of New Jersey, there being a 
charge exhibited against him there for counterfeiting Peicesof Eight), 
in order that he may be convicted in that Province where the Wit- 
nesses live & where the fact was committed, & on considering the 
same the President is desir'd to inform himself of Mr. Kinsey, in 
what manner Mr. Reading's Request may be best complied with, 
& to take this opportunity of informing Mr. Reading of what has 
been done in this Province k at Lewes with respect to Pilots, & 
desiring the Pilots of that Government may be laid under the same 
or as effectual Restrictions. 

* See Minute of the 25th Sept., 1747. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL, 95 

At a Council held at Philadelphia the 10th August, 1747, 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Abrah 1 "- Taylor, Benjamin Shoemaker, \ « 

Robert Strettell, Thomas Hopkinson, j ^ sc l rs ' 

Mr. Taylor & Mr. Hopkinson are appointed a Committee to draw 
up a Speech to be made by the Council to the Assembly at their 
Meeting. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 17th August, 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble, ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President, 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, 



Esqrs, 



Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, 

Thomas Hopkinson, 

The Minutes of the two preceeding Councils were read & ap* 
prov'd, 

Mr Taylor & Mr. Hopkinson having, in pursuance of the last 
Minute of Council, prepar'd the Draught of a Speech to be made by 
the Council to the Assembly, the same was taken into Consideration, 
& being read Paragraph by Paragraph, it was Settled, k unani- 
mously agreed to, & the Secretary was order' d to transcribe it fair. 

David Cochran and John Glenn on behalf of themselves & sundry 
others, having on the 26th June last presented a Petition, wherein 
they complain of Job Ruston, Esq r " one of the Justices of Peace 
for Chester County, which was ordered to be heard on this Day, the 
Council wou'd have proceeded to the Examination thereof, but 
being informed that some of the Petitioners were absent, the Council 
adjourned to 4 o' Clock in the afternoon, at which time all Persons 
concern' d were to have notice to be present, 



P. M- 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., Preside 
Thomas Lawrence, Robert Strettell, ") 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, v Esqrs.- 

Thomas Hopkins, . j 

The Petitioners & Mr. Ruston attending, they were called in, 
David Cochran presenting to the Board a Paper containing several 
Charges against Justice Ruston, the Council proceeded to the Exam- 



90 MINUTES OF THE 

ination thereof, but Night coming on before the whole cou'd be 
heard, they adjourned to 10 o' Clock next Day. 



At a Council held at Philada., 18th August, 1747. 
present : 

The Honobl. ANTHONY PALMER, Esq., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ~\ 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, * v Esqrs. 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, ) 

The Secretary having prepared a fair Copy of the Draught of the 
Speech to be spoke by the President to the Assembly, the same 
was read, & Mr. Strettell & Mr. Hopkinson were appointed to 
carry the following Message to the Assembly, Viz. : That the Presi- 
dent & Council being met, desir'd the Attendance of the Speaker 
& the whole House immediately in the Council Chamber. These 
Gentlemen being returned, report they delivered the said Message, 
& were told by the Speaker that the House wou'd take into Consid- 
eration & forthwith give their Answer, & that in a very short time 
they received for Answer that the House wou'd immediately wait 
on the President & Council as was desir'd ; and accordingly the 
Speaker, with the whole House, attending, the following Speech 
Was spoke, viz'- : 

u Mr. Speaker & Gentlemen of the Assembly : 

" As upon our late Governor's Departure for England for the 
Recovery of his Health', the Administration of the Government (by 
an Act pass'd in the 10th Year of Queen Ann, entitled ' an Act for 
the further securing the Administration of the Government*), de- 
volved upon the Council, We have pursuant thereto taken upon Us 
the Execution of that Trust. 

" As this important Charge hath fallen to our Lett in a very 
tempestuous Season, we are sensible of the Trouble & Difficulties 
that must attend the Execution of it, and heartily wish some one 
Person of known Integrity and Abilities had the Administration j 
but as that (how desirable soever) cannot be immediately accom- 
plished, we shall endeavour to supply the want of it by a just and 
impartial discharge of our Duty according to the best of our Judg- 
ments; and when it is considered how closely our several Interests 
are connected with those of the Publick, the Obligations we are 
under by the Ties of our Families, Friends & Neighbours, We think 
none can doubt of our Zeal and sincere Intentions for the welfare 
of this Province. 

" We have Published our Proclamation for the continuing all 
Magistrates & Officers in their respective Offices, requiring them to 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 97 

proceed in the exercise of their respective Trusts to prevent any 
failure or defect that might otherwise arise from this Change in the 
Government. 

"Just before the Governor's Departure he received from the 
Council office a Repeal of an Act of Assembly passed in the 16th 
Year of his present Majesty, entitled ( An Act imposing a Duty on 
Persons convicted of heinious Crimes, &c.,' which we have ordered 
to be laid before You. 

" We have received a Letter from Governor Shirley informing 
Us 'That divers Parties of Indians were then out, & others daily 
offering their Service to the English, which is a matter of great & 
universal Concern to the welfare of all his Majesty's Colonies upon 
this Continent; and that if this spirit which seem'd thoroughly 
raised, and had been to that time kept up, was cherished and pro- 
perly managed and directed, it might by the blessing of God prove 
of unspeakable Benefit for the safety of His Majesty's Colonies in 
North America.' We also receiv'd another Letter from him wherein 
(after representing the Danger which all these Colonies are in of 
being destroyed by the French and the Indians under their influ- 
ence, without a firm Union between ourselves for our mutual De- 
fence), he acquaints Us ' That he had appointed Commissioners to 
meet in a Congress to be held at New York on the Second of Sep- 
tember next with such Commissioners as should be appointed by all 
his Majestie's Governments from New Hampshire to Virginia inclu- 
sive, there to treat and agree upon Measures for encouraging the 
Indians of the Six Nations vigorously to prosecute their Incursions 
on the Enemy, and pressing Us to make Provision for them till the 
Congress can be held.' Thereupon we dispatched Conrad Weiser, 
the Provincial Interpreter, to Shamokin to sound ithe Indians, and 
get the best Information he cou'd of their Sentiments, which he ac- 
cordingly did, and sent us a Report of his proceedings with his opin- 
ion; which with Governor Shirley's Letters we have ordered to be 
laid before you as well deserving your most Serious Consideration, 
since they contain matters of very great Importance to the safety of 
this as well as the rest of his Majestie's Colonies on the Continent. 
Gov r * Shirley presses earnestly for an Answer, but as we could not 
take upon Us to enter into any Engagement on behalf of this Gov- 
ernment without your concurrence and Assurance of enabling us to 
perform them, we deferr'd it till this Meeting of your House, and 
desire your Resolutions, that we may acquaint him therewith, and 
how far he may depend on the Assistance of this Government in 
concerting & executing such Enterprizes and Plans of Operation as 
the common Interest may require. 

" The Indians seated on Lake Erie & on the Inomoy Creek, that 
runs into that Lake, being part of or in alliance with the Six Na- 
tions, said by the Indian Traders to be numerous and People of 
consequence, have sent Messages to this Government, which will 
Vol. v.— 7. 






98 MINUTES OF THE 

be delivered for your perusal. As they are desirous to be taken, 
into Friendship, and it may be of great Service to encourage such 
Applications, you will enable us to make them proper Presents. 

" You will find by Mr. Weiser's Report that some complaints have 
been made by the Indians of several Injuries done them by White 
People, which deserve your particular Notice, and, if true, require 
that some reparation should be immediately made. 

" Some Indians are expected to arrive in Philadelphia during your 
Recess, which will occasion some Expence in their Maintenance and 
in Presents. You will, therefore, give Orders to the Treasurer to 
pay all such Sums of Money as shall be by you deemed necessary 
for those purposes, as well as to defray the Expences the Provincial 
Interpreter has been at in his Negotiations with them ; and that a 
suitable Reward be allowed him for his Trouble & Service. He 
attends in Town by order of the Council to the end you may be 
more particularly informed from him of the present Situation of the 
Indians & their Affairs. 

" The Council apprehending some Inconveniences from our Ene- 
mies coming into the Port of Philadelphia under the Sanction of 
Flags of Truce, as they hereby have an opportunity of making 
themselves better acquainted with the Bay and River of Delaware, 
have published a Proclamation prohibiting all Pilots from bringing 
up any such Vessells within the Limits of this Government without 
Leave first obtained for that purpose, and have like wise recom- 
mended to the Government of the Lower Counties the laying their 
Pilots under proper Restrictions, which was accordingly done. "We 
have also wrote to the Government of New Jersey to the same pur- 
pose. 

" A notorious insult hath lately been committed in New Castle 
County by an inconsiderable party of French & Spaniards in con- 
junction with some Englishmen, Tray tors to their King and Coun- 
try, and who we are informed have dwelt in this City and are too 
well acquainted with the Condition of it. After having had the 
Boldness to come up the whole length of the Bay and part of the 
River even within about 18 Miles of the Town of New Castle, they 
there plundered two Plantations, the Owner of one of them they 
bound and abused and dangerously wounded his Wife with a Mus- 
ket Ball, carrying off their Negroes and Effects to a considerable 
value. On their Return they met with a valuable Ship in the Bay, 
bound to this Port from Antigua, which they likewise took and car- 
ried off. The Circumstance of this Affair you will be more particu- 
larly inform' d of from the Depositions and Papers we have or- 
dered to be laid before You. 

" This Instance of the Boldness of our Enemies, increased by 
the Success they met with, together with some Expressions which 
fell from them importing a thorough Knowledge of our defenceless 
State, and a Design of shortly paying this City a visit, must afford 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 99 

but a melancholy prospect to peeople in our Circumstances, and de- 
mand a very particular attention. The Length and Difficulty of 
our Bay & River seem now no longer to be depended on for our Se- 
curity since our Enemies in all probability are but too well ac- 
quainted with both. The Terror and Confusion, the Ruin of vast 
numbers of Families, the Destruction of Trade, the Bloodshed, 
Cruelty, & other fatal Consequences which must unavoidably attend 
the plundering or burning this City, are too obvious to need a Dis- 
cription. Is it not then absolutely necessary for the security of this 
so valuable a part of His Majesty's Dominions, & the preservation 
of the Lives and propertys of the Inhabitants, that some Method 
should be fall'n upon to prevent the Evils which threaten Us, and 
to which we lie exposed. We assure you on our parts we shall be 
always ready to concurr with you in every measure that may tend 
to the Safety, Peace, and Happiness of the People of Pennsylvania, 
and as a perfect Harmony among the several parts of the Govern- 
ment must greatly contribute to these Ends, You may depend on 
our sincere Endeavours to cultivate and promote it to the utmost of 
our Power/' 

The Secretary having delivered a Copy of the above Speech to 
the Speaker, the House immediately withdrew. 

The Council resum'd the Examination of the Complaints against 
Justice Ruston, which were left unfinished last Night, and after 
hearing the whole Charge & all that was offered in support thereof, 
the Board was of opinion that the several Charges exhibited by the 
Complainants against Mr. Ruston were frivolous & malicious, none 
of them amounting to a breach of his Duty in the execution of his 
Office as a Magistrate, and therefore the Petition is dismiss'd. 

A Petition of G-eorge Gray, Keeper of the Lower Ferry over 
Schuylkill on the Road from the City of Philadelphia to Chester, & 
of others using the said Road, was presented to the Board, shewing 
That the said Road leading from the South Street of the said City 
over the said Ferry to Cobb's Creek Bridge near Darby, in the 
County of Chester, had, time out of mind, been the only old <k 
accustom'd Road to Darby, Chester, New Castle, and the Lower 
Counties. That the Inhabitants of the Township thro' which the 
same Road passes, not doubting its being a Recorded Road had 
hitherto duly prepared & amended the same, but being apprized that 
it either has not been regularly recorded, or that the Record thereof 
cannot be found, so that they are not oblig'd to repair the same or 
contribute thereto, the said Road is at present much out of repair 
and growing worse, will in the Winter become impassable or danger- 
ous to travel with horses or Chaises or other Carriages, unless repair'cL 
immediately; And therefore pray that the Council wou'd be pleased' 
to grant an order for the Survey & Recording of the said Road, or 
give such other Order or Warrant concerning the same as the na- 
ture of the case may require. 






100 MINUTES OF THE 

And likewise another Petition relating to the said Road was pre- 
sented to the Board, sign'd by the Commiss rs - and sundry Inhabi- 
tants of the County of Chester, shewing that Whereas it appears 
after strict search made that there are divers parts of the King's 
Road leading from Cobb's Creek Bridge over Chester Bridge to the 
Line of New Castle County, not to be found upon Record or any 
return thereof made, therefore as well for the Benefit of the Pub- 
lick as the satisfaction of private Persons, likewise for the erecting 
of Bridges and repairing the said High Way, the Petitioners hum- 
bly crave the Council will be pleas'd to take the same into Consid- 
eration, and appoint proper Persons to lay out such Parts of the said 
Road as are deficient. 

As the Road mention'd in the Petitions is an antient Road, in 
use before the Grant of the Province, the Board thinks there must 
have been some Orders of Council made about it, & therefore post- 
pone the Consideration thereof till the Council Books be well 
search' d by the Secretary, &, it be known what Orders have been 
formerly given. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 20th August, 1747. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Abraham Taylor, 1 

Robert Strettell, Joseph Turner, > Esqrs. 

Thoma3 Hopkinson, J 

Captain Ricks, Commander of the Ship Vernon from Rotterdam, 
but last from Leith, in Scotland, & Mr. Stedman, waiting without 
were called in, & inform' d the Board that the said Ship Vernon, 
having on board a great number of Foreigners from Switzerland & 
the Palatinate, came to an Anchor last Night below Wicaco, & pray'd 
an order might be given to two Doctors immediately to examine 
their State of Health, and that they might have leave to come up 
to the City & land their Passengers. 

An Order was immediately sent to Doctor Thomas Greme and 
Doctor Thomas Bond, & in case they shou'd Report that there was 
no Sickness among the Crew or Passengers; the Captain had leave 
to proceed to the City & to land his People. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 101 

At a Council held at Philadelphia the 25th August, 1747. 

present : 
The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esq., President. 



Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ^ 



[►Esqrs. 



Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, 

Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the two preceeding Councils were read and ap- 
prov'd. 

Two Members of Assembly deliver'd the following Message from 
the House : 

To the President & Council from the Assembly. 

" May it please the President & Council : 

" As by the Act of Assembly pass'd in the 10th Year of the 
Reign of the late Queen Ann, to which You are pleased to refer us, 
the Powers of Legislation necessary in every Government are ta- 
ken from us during the Absence of our Governor, we agree with 
You in Opinion, " it were to be wished that some one Person of 
known Integrity & Abilities had the Administration/' but since 
this, as You well observe, how desirable soever is not immediately 
to be expected, the Declarations you are pleased to make of your 
Zeal & sincere Intentions for the welfare of the Province, and of 
executing the Trust devolved on You in a just and impartial man- 
ner, are very acceptable to us. 

" The Proclamation you have been pleased to issue for the con- 
tinuance of all Magistrates & Officers within this Government, and 
your requiring them to proceed in the exercise of their respective 
Trusts as it hath been usual on like occasions, and may have pre- 
vented Doubts that otherwise would have arisen, was, we think, a 
prudent Step, whether in strictness of Law such a Proclamation 
was absolutely necessary or not. 

" By the Order of the King in Council which was directed to be 
laid before us, we observe the Act for imposing a Duty on Persons 
convicted of heinous Crimes, &c, last passed, is repealed; & by a 
Letter from our honourable Proprietor Thomas Penn, Esq 1 "-' we are 
informed the Report from the Lords of Trade & Plantations to the 
King in Council advised the Repeal of all the former Acts past on 
like occasions, but this, on the kind Interposition of our Proprie- 
tors, is for the present forborn, and the last Act only repealed, by 
which means the former stands revived. But since Exceptions 
have also been taken against this Act as not consistent with some 
late Acts of Parliament, it will, we think, be necessary on the Ar- 
rival of our Governor to revise & amend it so as to make it more 
conformable to the Sentiments of our Superiors. 



102 MINUTES OF THE 

" The Accounts sent by Governor Shirley, on the Report of the 
Persons he employed with the Indians of the Six United Nations, 
we observe differ much from those given by our Indian Interpreter, 
from which last, and as we take it most authentick Account, it 
appears these Indians have not hitherto joined in a Declaration of 
War against the French. And as there is reason to believe the 
Expedition against Canada is now laid aside, and that the Forces raised 
to that end will be disbanded, it is not to be expected the Indians 
of the Six Nations will involve themselves further in the War ; & 
therefore, had we no other reasons to induce Us, we are of opinion 
the Congress proposed in September next at New York can be of 
little avail. It is, nevertheless, our Sentiments, conformable to 
the Practice of this Government since its first Establishment, that 
great Care should at all times be taken to preserve the Friendship 
& good Correspondence which at present subsists between us and 
the Indians, that the Injuries of which they complain should be en- 
quired into & speedily redress'd ; And as it is highly probable they 
are at this time in necessitous Circumstances, we think a Present 
ought to be made them, and shall, therefore, before our rising make 
the Provision necessary to this End, as we shall likewise do for 
Payment of the Interpreter & maintenance of the Indians expected 
here during our Recess. We are further of Opinion, that if on 
Enquiry the Persons against whom the Indians complain appear to 
be guilty of the Crimes laid to their Charges, they ought to be pro- 
secuted & punished as the Law in such Cases directs, besides being 
oblig'd to make the Indians Restitution if they are able, & if not 
able, that Compensation should be made them out of the Money 
we intend to provide for Presents. The Plundering of the two 
Families in New Castle County is indeed an Instance of the Bold- 
ness of our Enemies, but we think it will be difficult, if not im- 
possible, to prevent such Accidents"; the Length of the Bay and 
River, & the scatteringness of the Settlements below, must ever, 
while thus Circumstanc'd, render them liable to Depredations. It 
is equally difficult to guard against the wiles of an Enemy. The 
Ship which You inform us was taken near the Entrance of our Bay, 
we observe from the Papers laid before us was a Yessel of Force, 
her Captain and Men willing and probably able to have defended 
her & to have taken their Enemy. But the Captain, deceived by 
the appearance of a Pilot and Pilot Boat known to him, and which 
he wanted to conduct him up the Bay, suffer'd the Boat to come 
along side of his Yessel, and thereby gave an opportunity to a 
number of Armed Men which lay hid to jump on board, & by 
this Stratagem to prevail against superior Force. This render' d 
the Steps you have been pleas'd to take in respect to Pilots both 
prudent and necessary; but what further can be done to prevent 
the like for the future we do not see. If any thing be necessary 
your Sentiments in this Affair will, we think, be as properly laid 
before the Assembly of the three Lower Counties in which Gov- 
ernment these Accidents happen'd as before us. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 103 

u The Depositions you were pleased to direct to be laid before us 
mention the Conjectures of the Persons deposing that the» Privateers 
intended a Descent somewhere near our Coast; but this time hath 
discover'd to be their mistake. The Depositions also mention some 
of their Threats against this City; But these rather appear to us as 
so many Bravados than what they either really intended or had the 
Power to do. We, therefore, could have wished you had been 
pleased to have spared that part of the Speech which mentions the 
defenceless State of the Province, and the Consequences which might 
attend the plundering of the City; the tendency of which, in our 
Opinion, is rather to beget or Augment Fears than to prevent those 
Dangers which thro' the favour of Providence we have hitherto 
escaped. Besides, as this Speech from the President & Council may 
be sent beyond Sea, if it should fall into the Hand of our Enemies 
it may possibly induce them to make an Attempt they otherwise 
would not have thought of. We may also add, that the Defence of 
the Province hath been a matter already much controverted, and you 
cannot be unsensible of the different Sentiments of our late Gover- 
nor and former Assemblies, nor of the Difficulties they & we have 
been & yet are under on this Account, altho' neither they nor we 
look upon the Province in so defenceless a Condition as it then was 
& now is represented; nor can we understand on what Grounds You 
are pleased to alledge the Length & Difficulty of the Bay are now 
less Security than heretofore; nothing in the Papers laid before us 
carry any Evidence, that we can discover, in support of this Allega- 
tion. And were we under no Restraint from the Principles pro- 
fess' d by most of us, it would not be an easy Task to persuade 
us that the measures which have been proposed for the Defence 
of the Province, either by erecting Fortifications or building Ships 
of War, would be of any real use to the Province. The Charge 
which must have arisen would have been great, the Benefit uncertain 
and small. And if you will be pleased coolly to reflect on the several 
Applications which have been made to former Assemblies & to Us 
for Granting of Money on this Account, on the several Expeditions 
against Carthagene, Cape Breton, & Canada, you must have Reason 
to be of our opinion, that had they been Complied with it would 
have brought such a Burthen upon the Province as it would scarce 
have been able to bear. And were all these Difficulties removed, 
the Application to Us at this Juncture is not the best timed when 
our Treasury is low, and You as well as we know that if the Re- 
straint put upon us by the Act of Assembly to which You are 
pleased to refer us be binding, it is not in our Power to join in the 
making of any one Act whatsoever. We desire You will excuse 
this Freedom, which the part of Your Speech now under Considera- 
tion render'd necessary, and would not otherwise have been our 
Choice, for we are clearly of Opinion with You that a perfect Har- 
mony among the several parts of Government must greatly contri- 
bute to the Safety, Peace, & Happiness of the People of Pennsyl- 



104 MINUTES OF THE 

vania j And we shall be pleased with every opportunity, consistently 
with our Judgments, to shew the President & Council how heartily 
we are disposed to promote & cultivate it. 

" Sign'd by Order of the House. 

"JOHN KINSEY, Speaker. 
"6th Mon. 25th, 1747." 

It was recommended to the President to write to Governor Shirley, 
& send him such Extracts of such parts of the above Speech & Mes- 
sage as related to him. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia the 31st August, 1747. 
present : 

The Honourable ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Abraham Taylor, ~) 

Robert Strettel, Benjamin Shoemaker, > Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, ) 

The Captain of the Scarboro' Man of War having advertized his 
Sailing from New York for England, the Board are of opinion that 
Copys of the Council's Speech & the Assembly's Message, with a 
proper Letter on the occasion, shou'd be sent by him to the Proprie- 
tors. 

Order' d, That the Secretary prepare such Copys & Letter against 
Thursday, to which time the Council adjourn'd. 

Some of the Members moving that the Council's Speech & As- 
sembly's Message might be printed, & some diagreeing, the Consid- 
eration thereof was referr'd to the next Council. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia 3d September, 1747. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, > 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, f- Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Secretaire's Letter to the Prop"*' wrote in pursuance of the 
last Minute of Council, was read and approv'd. 

The Board postpon'd the taking into Consideration the printing 
of the Council's Speech and of the Assembly's Answer to a fuller 
Board. 

A Petition was preferr'd by Hugh Bruslam, a Prisoner in Phila- 
delphia County Goal, setting forth that in June Term last he was 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 105 

convicted of Horse Stealing & fined the Sum of Ten Pounds, which 
he prayed might be remitted as he was unable to Pay it. 

No Magistrate having recommended him as a proper Object of 
Compassion, & no Member of the Board knowing any thing of his 
Tryal or the Circumstances attending his Conviction, the Petition 
was for these reasons rejected. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, the 7th Sept r -» 1747. 

PRESENT *. 

The Honourable ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, ") ™ 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, j S( * rS " 

The Secretary having searched the Council Books & found therein 
sundry Orders relating to the Road leading from Philadelphia to 
Newcastle, the same were read, but as there was a thin Council the 
Consideration thereof was postpon'd to the next day. 

Captain Huston, an officer in Coll 0- Shirley's Regiment, attending 
without being call'd in, he prayed the Assistance of this Board with 
respect to the Execution of some orders he had received from Gov- 
ernor Shirley, which orders he produc'd, together with an Extract 
of a Letter wrote by the Duke of Newcastle to Governor Shirley, 
& then withdrew. 

One of the Members said he had been Recruiting here a long 
while, & as it was not known whether he had the leave of the Gov- 
ernment for so doing, it was his opinion that previous to the Con- 
sideration of his Application he shou'd be ask'd by what authority 
he Recruited in this Province ; the Capt n ' being gone away the 
Board 

Ordered, That the Secretary know of Captain Huston by what 
Authority & how long he has been Inlisting Men in this Province. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 8th Sept r '' 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Thomas Hopkinson, 

William Logan, 

One of the Members moved that as there was a pretty full Board 
it might now be determined whether the Council's Speech to the 
Assembly & their Message in Answer shou'd be Printed & put into 



Esqrs. 



106 MINUTES OF THE 

the next News Paper or not, & on putting the Question it pass'd in 
the Negative. 

Information being given to some of the Members of Council that 
the Ship Euryale, Captain Cox, who arrived here last Night from 
Barbadoes, was a Sickly Vessel, & ought to be removed from the 
City, Captain Cox was order'd to attend the Council, & being come 
and examined he gave this Account, viz. : that the Island of Bar- 
badoes was very Sickly, that one of his Sailors fell sick in the Pass- 
age & recovered, that another Man fell sick & dyed after a short 
illness, & his People (for he did not care to visit him himself) be- 
leiv'd he dyed of the Yellow fever; that this was twenty Days ago, 
having then been ten Days from Barbadoes ; that except a Gentleman 
Passenger who had a Constitutional weakness all the Persons on 
board were in good Health. 

The Board considering that by the late Accounts from Barbadoes 
there was a very infectuous Distemper of which numbers Dyed, and 
that the Season of the Year continued unusually warm, they or- 
dered the Secretary to prepare a Warrant, to be signed by the Presi- 
dent, to command Captain Cox forthwith to remove his Ship to the 
distance of at least one Mile from the Southernmost part of the 
City of Philad a -' and there remain till further Order — taking espe- 
cial Care not to break bulk nor to suffer any Goods to be carried 
ashore out of the said Ship. 

Mr. Lawrence presented a paper sign'd by the Justices of the 
Peace for the County of Philadelphia at their Court of Quarter Ses- 
sions, recommending Mr. John Lawrence, Mr. James Read, & Mr. 
Robert Greenway to the Council, in order that one of them might 
be nominated to serve for Clerk of the Peace of the said County 
in the room of Mr. Andrew Hamilton, deceased. 

Order'd, That a Commission be forthwith made out to Mr. John 
Lawrence to be Clerk of the Peace for the said County of Phila- 
delphia. 



u By the Honoble. the President & Council of the Province of Penn- 
sylvania. 

" It appearing on Your Examination before us that the Island of 
Barbadoes at the time you took your departure from thence was 
very sickly, and that one of your Sailors dyed on board your Ship 
in the Passage, and that there is reason to believe he had the Yel- 
low Fever, You are hereby strictly ordered and commanded to cause 
your Vessel, now lying at Mr. Allen's Wharf, immediately to be 
removed to the distance of at least one Mile from the Southernmost 
part of the City of Philadelphia, and there to remain till our further 
Order — You taking especial Care not to break Bulk, nor to suffer 
any thing to be brought ashore from the said Ship. Hereof fail not 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 107 

at your Peril. Given under my Hand & the Lesser Seal of the 
Province of Philad a - aforesaid, this 7th Day of Sept r, > 1747. 

" ANTH. PALMER. 

" To Captain John Cox, 

" Commander of the Ship Euryale." 

The Board resuni'd the Consideration of the Petitions relating to 
the King's High Road leading from the City of Philadelphia to the 
Town of New Castle. 

The Secratary reported that he had examin'd the Council Books 
& found therein several Orders of Council for the laying out the 
several Parts of the said Road, and likewise the Record of a Return 
of that part of the said Road which lies between Darby & Chester, 
& gave it as his opinion that tho' there were no Returns of the other 
Parts of the said Road to be found on Record, yet that the whole 
Road had been actually laid out by order of the Council, and that 
it might reasonably be presum'd the Returns thereof had been given 
to the late Secretary Patrick Robinson, & that he had omitted to 
enter them in Council Books ; That the Papers of the said Patrick 
Robinson, Publick as well as Private, coming into the Hands of 
his Wido' upon his Decease, many of the Papers belonging to the 
Secretaries Office were lost & destroyed, of which these Returns 
might be some. 

The Board, on reading several Orders of Council for the laying 
out particular parts of the said Road, & likewise the Record of the 
Return of that part of the said Road which lies between Darby & 
Chester, and considering that the Road is an antient Road, & being 
of opinion that altho' several of the Returns thereof do not appear 
on Record & are not now to be found, yet that the whole Road had 
been regularly laid out as now used, & that it wou'd be unjust & 
very inconvenient to the Owners of Lands abutting thereon to make 
any Deviation or Alteration from the present Courses thereof; 
Therefore, to the end that the said Road may be now regularly re- 
corded, It is Ordered, That the said Road shall be Resurveyed and 
laid out according to the Courses it now runs, beginning at the 
South Boundary of the City of Philadelphia, and from thence ex- 
tending to the Lower Ferry, and from thence to Darby Creek, and 
from thence by the Courses described in the recorded Return made 
in the Year 1706 (a Copy whereof is to be deliver' d to the Persons 
hereafter named for their Direction) to Chester Bridge, & from 
thence by the present Courses thereof to the Limits of New Castle 
Government. 

And it is further Ordered, That Septimus Robinson, Esqr., Hugh 
Roberts, James Coultas, John Bartram, Mathew Moss, Charles 
Justis, Nathan Gibson, or any five of them, view & lay out by 
course and distance that part of the said Road which runs thro' the 
County of Philadelphia; And that Caleb Cowpland, Esqr., Joseph 



108 MINUTES OF THE 

Parker, Esqr., Joseph Bonsell, Esqr., Samuel Levis, James Mather, 
John Davies, Peter Dicks, Thomas Pearson, & John Sketchley, or 
any five of them, do then join the above-named Persons of Phila- 
delphia County, or any three of them, in continuing to lay out as 
aforesaid the said Road from the Division Line which parts Phila- 
delphia County from Chester County to the Limits of the County 
of Newcastle, they taking to their Assistance the Surveyor General, 
and that they carefully lay out the said Road and make Return 
thereof to this Board on or before the first Day of October next. 



At a Council held at Philada., 9th Sept r -' 1747. 

present : 
The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 

Thomas Lawrence, Robert Strettell, 1 

Abraham Taylor, Samuel Hasell, ( -™ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Thomas Hopkinson, [ " 

William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the five preceding Councils were read and 
approved. 

Mr. Taylor inform'd the Board that several of the Inhabitants of 
the City had been with him to complain that Captain Cox's ship lay 
still near the City, & that he not only refus'd to obey the Order of 
the President & Council, but used contemptuous Language toward 
them, & that Mr. Edgar, one of the Persons who heard Captain 
Cox give this opprobious Language, attended the Council to relate 
what was said, & being call'd in he declar'd that Captain Cox was 
told by him & some of his Neighbours that his Ship lying near their 
Houses gave them great uneasiness, & that they heard the Presi- 
dent & Council had given him Orders to remove to a greater dis- 
tance from Town ; they wished he would do so ; and that Captain 
Cox in answer to this said, that neither for the President & Council 
nor for them should his ship stirr an Inch ; he did not value their 
Warrent; he knew what they cou'd do & what he should do. 

•Mr. Edgar withdrawing, the Council requested Mr. Lawrence & 
Mr. Hasell as Magistrates to issue a Writ to apprehend him, that 
he may be dealt with according to Law, which they promised to do. 

Order'd, That the following Proclamation be transcribed fair & 
signed by the President, & issue in the afternoon with the usual 
Solemnity, if it can be got ready so soon : 

" By the Honourable the President & Council of the Province of 
Pennsylvania. 

"A PROCLAMATION. 
" Whereas, the Ship Eurayle, John Cox Commander, is lately 
% 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 109 

arrived in this Port of Philadelphia from the Island of Barbadoes, 
which Island at the time of the said Ship's Departure from thence 
being much afflicted with a Dangerous & Contagious Distemper, 
there is great Reason to fear that the said Ship & her Company are 
infected therewith ; And whereas, the Captain & Mariners of the 
said infected Ship, & the Passengers that were on board her, have 
in Contempt of the Law presumed to come on Shore & disperse 
themselves in the City and Places adjacent, to the great Danger of 
the Health & Lives of the Inhabitants of this Province, We 
have therefore thought fit to issue this our Proclamation, strictly 
charging & Commanding all Persons that they do not henceforth 
receive, harbour, or entertain any Person or Persons that arrived in 
the said infected Ship Eurayle, without acquainting the President 
& Council aforesaid, or some one of them, or one of the Justices of 
the Peace for the county or City of Philadelphia therewith, that the 
Condition and health of such Persons so arriving may be examined, 
and that they may be dealt with according to Law. 

" Given under the Great Seal of the Province of Pennsylvania, at 
Philadelphia, the Ninth Day of September, in the Year of Our 
Lord 1747, and in the Twenty-first Year of the Reign of our 
Sovereign Lord George the Second, by the Grace of God, of 
G-reat Britian, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, 
& so forth. 

"ANTHONY PALMER, 

" Presid 1 - 
" By Order of the Governor & Council. 
"Richard Peters, Secry. 
"GOD SAVE THE KING." 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 12th Sep ,r - 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, "1 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, V Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, J 

Order'd, That an Order issue to Doctor Thomas Groeme & Doctor 
Thomas Bond to examine the Ship Eurayle & make Report whether 
the said Ship be, in their opinion, a healthy Ship or not, & whether 
she may be permitted to come into this Port without Danger to the 
Inhabitants, and that they would give a particular account of the 
State & Condition of the Health of the Mariners & Passengers be- 
longing to the said Ship; and in case the said Doctors shall report 
the said Ship to be a healthy Ship, the Board thinks Captain Cox 



110 MINUTES OF THE 

shou'd have leave to bring up the said Ship to this Port of Phila- 
delphia; and it is further Order' d, That Capt 11, Cox do not presume 
to unlade the Ballast of the said Ship within the limits of the City 
of Philadelphia. 

William Buckley, Esqr., produc'd to the Board an Indenture 
whereby it appears that he, the said William Buckley, was chosen 
Chief Burgess and Mathias Keen Second Burgess for the Borough 
of Bristol on the 8th day of Sept r -' Instant, and one other Indenture, 
whereby it appears that John Priestly was on the same Day chosen 
High Constable for the said Borough according to Charter, and the 
Secretary being out of Town & having lock'd up the Book contain- 
ing the Subscriptions of such as take the Oaths & Affirmations to 
to the Government, Ordered, That a Dedimus issue to Mr. Grow- 
den or some other Justice of Peace for the County of Bucks to 
tender Mr. Buckley the said Affirmations. 



Esqrs. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, the 14th Sept r " 1747. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the two preceeding Councils were read and ap- 
prov'd. 

The President & four Members of Council sign'd a Commission 
constituting Mr. John Lawrence Clerk of the Peace for the County 
of Philadelphia. 

Edward Stretcher, Captain of a small Sloop of about Ten Tons, 
made a proposal to carry the 13 Spanish Prisoners that are now in 
the Work House to the Havannah, if he might have a Flag of 
Truce & the Government wou'd furnish a necessary Quantity of 
Provisions to serve them in their Passage. 

The Captain of a Pilot Boat, Dispatch'd as an Express from 
Lewes Town last Saturday, delivered to the President this morn- 
ing the following Letter directed to the President & Council : 

" Sir & Gentlemen : 

" On Tuesday last 2 Sloops went up the Bay with a Pilot Boat 
tending on each of them ; on Wednesday evening they returned & 
anchored with the said boats in Lewes Koad, which hath kept our 
Watch upon hard Duty Day and Night. One of the Said Vessels 
we imagine to be gone over to Cape May, the other took in our 
sight last Night a Ship outward Bound, and her Pilot Boat another 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. Ill 

Ship this Morning that was coming in, and is now in Chace of a 
third Ship, which we fear will fall into her hands in an hour or 
two. These Things we judg'd proper to immediately communi- 
cate, and hope the Merchants & Traders at Philadelphia will pay 
this Express £3, being the Sum agreed for to convey it. Tide 
calls upon Us to heartily conclude. 

" Sir & Gentlemen, Your obed f - hble. Serv ,s " 

" II s - HOLT, 
"JACOB KOLLOCK, 
"JACOB PHILLIPS. 
" Saturday Noon, Septf- 12th, 1747. 

u P. S. — We have ordered the Bearer to acquaint Capt n - Bowne 
of these Transactions, whom we expect down Daily." 

And on reading the same the Board are unanimously of Opinion 
that they shou'd thank the Gentlemen for their Care in giving such 
early intelligence, and in answer inform them that the Assembly 
having made no Provision when applied to very lately on a like oc- 
casion, they had nothing in their Power, & cou'd only lament their 
& the good People of Lewes Town's unhappiness in being thus 
remedilessly expos'd to any Attempts the Enemy shou'd please to 
make. 

Order } d, That the Secretary call on the Treasurer for Three 
Pounds to be paid for the Express, agreeable to the promise made 
in the above Letter. 






At a Council held at Philadelphia, the 21st Sept 1 "-' 1747. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, William Till, ") 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, v Esqrs. 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, j 

His Excellency Mr. Belcher, the Governor of New Jersey, being 
in Town, Mr. Lawrence & Mr. Taylor were desir'd to take an op- 
portunity to inform him of the many mischevious consequences that 
arose from the Liberty Pilots took of going on board Vessells before 
they knew whether they were Friends or Enemies ; and that as no 
measures to be taken by this Government or the Lower Counties 
wou'd avail, unless the same or as effectual ones were taken in 
Jersey, he wou'd be pleas'd immediately on his return to Burling- 
ton to take this important affair into his Consideration, & give the 
necessary Orders. Information being given that several Vessells 
belonging to this and other Ports were lately taken by a French 
Privateer off the Capes of Delaware, and that some of the Pilots & 



112 MINUTES OF THE 

People who were on board at the time of Capture were in Town, 
they were sent for, and Mr. Kelly & Luke Shields, one of the 
Pilots who had the Charge of the Privateer, attending without, 
they were examin'd. 

Order' d, That Mr. Kelly's Examination be reduc'd to writing, 
& sworn to before a Magistrate in the presence of Luke Shields. 

The Brigantine Recovery, Joseph Greenaway, arriving on Satur- 
day, the Members of Council issued an Order to Doctor Groeme & 
Doctor Bond to visit the said Brig% & Captain Greenaway attend- 
ing in order to produce the Doctor's Certificate, was call'd in, & it 
oppearing thereby that the Vessell was healthy & the Mariners in 
a good State of Health, the Captain was permitted to bring her to 
the Wharf. 

The Ship Lydia being this morning arrived from London with 
Palatines, Doctor Groeme & Doctor Bond are Order' d to visit said 
Ship & report the state of Health of the People on board. 



At a Council held at Philada., 25th Sept., 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Abraham Taylor, ") 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, >Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, J 

Mr. Lawrence & Mr. Taylor report, that agreeable to the Request 
of the Council they had waited on his Excellency the Governor of 
New Jersey, & endeavour' d to shew him how much the safety of 
both Governments depends on putting the Pilots under proper 
Restrictions; they inform'd his Excellency that a Proclamation had 
been already Published in this Province respecting Flaggs of Truce; 
that they Council had got a number Printed, & sent one of them to 
Mr. Reading, the late President, in a Letter on the Subject, that 
an Order had been made by the Magistrates of the Town of Lewes, 
which the had likewise caused to be publish' d in Franklyn's News 
Papers, but that notwithstanding these or any other Steps might be 
deem'd necessary to be taken, they wou'd all prove ineffectual unless 
the Jersey Pilots shou'd be likewise laid under the same or as 
effectual Restrictions. His Excellency was pleased to say that if 
the President & Council wou'd write to him on this Subject on his 
Return to Burlington, he wou'd then take it into Consideration & 
do the best he cou'd. 

Mr. Lawrence laid before the Board a Certificate Signed by Doctor 
Groeme & Doctor Bond, purporting that in Complyance with the 
orders of the honoble. the Council they had carefully examin'd the 
State of Health of the Mariners & Passengers on board the Ship 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 113 

Lydia, Captain Tiffin, from London, and found none of them with 
any of the Symptoms of an infectious Disease ; so that they are of 
opinion the Ship may be immediately admitted to come up to the 
Town, and thereupon the Ship was admitted to come up to the City. 

Mr. Lawrence moved the Board that there might be one or two 
Justices of the Peace appointed for that part of Bucks County which 
lies on the other side of the Blue Hills, and it appearing necessary 
on many Accounts, the Board agreed to grant separate Commissions 
to Mr.. Daniel Broadhead & Mr. Moses Depue, which are to be pre- 
pared & signed by the President, with a Dedimus to the nearest 
Magistrate to administer the usual Oaths or Affirmations. 

Mr. Hopkinson inform' d the Council that Mr. William Kelly had 
made an Affidavit before him in the presence of the Pilot, Luke 
Shields, the 21st Instant, which was read & ordered to be enter'd. 

William Kelly, being sworn on the holy Evangelists of Almighty 
God, deposeth and saith, that he being a Passenger on board the 
Sloop Elizabeth, Pyramus Green Commander, bound from Provi- 
dence to Philadelphia, on or about the Twenty-eight Day of August 
last he was taken off the Coast of North Carolina by a French Pri- 
vateer Sloop called the Marthel Vodroit, Capt n - Lehay Commander, 
belonging to Cape Francois, who had taken three English Prizes 
before as this Deponent was informed ; that after they had taken the 
said Sloop Elizabeth they stood to the Northward, and on their 
Cruise took six more English Prizes, to wit, a Brigantine and two 
Ships off the Capes of Virginia, and a Sloop about fifteen Leagues 
off the Capes of Delaware, one Newbold Master, & two Ships in 
the Bay of Delaware, one of them called the Bolton, Oswald 

Eves Commander, and the other called the Delaware, 

Lake Commander, this Deponent being at the times of the taking 
the said Six Prizes, a Prisoner on board the said French Pri- 
vateer. That the said French Privateer was a Vessel of about 
Ninety or one hundred Tons, and carried fourteen Carriage Guns, 
sixteen Swivels, and six Swivel Blunderbusses, and had when he left 
Cape Francois, as this Deponent was inform' d, about one hundred 
and seventy Men, but at the time of this Deponent's being taken, 
had but one hundred & thirty Men belonging to her. That this 
Deponent took some of the Privateer's Crew to be English, some 
Irish, and some Scotch, but the most part of them were Frenchmen 
& Spaniards. That the Commander was, as this Deponent beleives, 
a Frenchman. That the first Land they made off Delaware was 
Cape May; that the Privateer hoisting English Colours, one Wil- 
liam Flower, a Pilot, came off from the said Cape and came on board 
the Privateer, that when the said William Flower came on board, 
the Commander of the Privateer, by a Linguist, order' d him to take 
Charge of the said Privateer & to carry the said Privateer where 
the Shipping lay ; that the said William Flower at first misunder- 
standing the said Commander's Orders, as this Deponent imagines, 
VOL. v.— 8. 






124 MINUTES OF THE 

made answer that there was Water enough there, pointing towards 
the Sea, but upon bis being told that was not what the Commander 
meant, he the said William Flower ask'd if they meant that he 
shou'd carry the said Privateer up the River, to which the a* - Com- 
mander answer'd Yes, and then the said William Flower took 
Charge of the said Privateer and was carrjing her round towards 
Cape Henlopen, when Luke Shields, another Pilot, came on board 
from 1 ) Cape Henlopen, the said Privateer then being under English 
Colours j That the said Commander of the said Privateer was very 
Inquisitive concerning Philadelphia, and ask'd William Flower how 
Matters stood at Philadelphia,, and what Shipping was. coming; 
down, that William Flower answered he could not tell for that he 
had not been at Philadelphia for seven or eight Days; That upon 
Luke Shields coming on board, the Commander of the Privateer 
asked him the like Questions,, and Lulke Shields answered that as he 
had net been at Philadelphia a great while he eou'd not tell, but 
that his Man had been there lately, Aad his Man being ask'd what 
he knew about it, answered that the Privateer Trembleur was then, 
coming down,, and that he believed the Pandour was sitting out. 
That after Shields coming on board the care of the Privateer was? 
committed te him in conjunction with Flower, that this Deponent 
acquainted Shields that Flour had promised this Deponent to carry 
the Privateer within less than a Mile of Cape Henlopen,. to the end 
this Deponent might swim; o© shore in the Night, which this Depo- 
nent had resolv'd to do in order to obtain his Liberty and inform 
the People of the said Privateer, and this Deponent made' it Ms re- 
quest to the said Shields that he wou'd assist this Deponest in his 
Design by bringing the said Privateer so near the shore that this 
Deponent might swim on shore with safety, but the said Shields 
refused to> do it, & said he would carry the Privateer where she 
might meet with the most Prizes; upon this deponent asking him 
why he w-ould do so, he answered that the Privateer came for Prizes 
and would not go away without them, and that by this Means he 
should the sooner get his Liberty ; That the said Pilot brought the 
said Privateer to an Anchor somewhere about the Brown, but it 
blowing hard she afterwards came to an Anchor within two Leagues 
of the pitch ©f the Cape; That the Day after the taking of the last 
of the Prizes, the English Prisoners to the number of about sev- 
enty, according to the best of this Deponeat's Judgment, were per- 
mitted tO' go- on shore in three Pilot Boats which the Enemy had 
taken. And more this Deponent saith not. 

"WILLIAM KELLY. 

" Sworn the 21st Sept^ 1741, before me, 

"THOMAS HOPKINSON."* 
Ordered, That the several Affidavits relating to- the Privateers 

* See Minute* of y e 2.7th of July, 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 115 

mention'd in the Minute of the 27th of July last be here enter'd, 
& a reference made in the former Minute to this Place, & from this 
place to the former Minute* 



Copies of Depositions relating to the Conduct of the Privateers men- 
tion'd in the Council's Speech to the Assembly. 

" Bernard Martin, of Philadelphia, Mariner, late Commander of 
the Ship Mary of London, being sworn on the holy Evangelists of 
Almighty God, did depose and declare, That on his Passage in the 
said Ship from the Island of Antiqua to this Port of Philadelphia, 
being within about a Mile of Cape Henlopen, and a signal for a 
Pilot being out on Tuesday the fourteenth Day of July, Instant, 
about seven o' Clock in the Morning this Deponent was hailed by a 
Privateer Sloop of about tea Guns; but as this Deponent had every 
thing ready for an Engagement, the Privateer made off without mak- 
ing any attack. That about Eight o' Clock the same Morning this 
Deponent saw a Pilot Boat coming towards him, which this Deponent 
well knew as well as the Pilot who this Deponent saw upon Deck ; 
that this Deponent taking it to be an English Pilot permitted it to 
come along side of his Ship ; that thereupon a number of French 
& Spaniards, to the amount of TJiirty-five or thereabouts, instantly 
boarded this Deponent's Ship, and this Deponent offering to make 
some Resistance, he, this Deponent, was shott at by three of the 
Enemy, and one of the Balls grazed this Deponent's Cheek, and 
another his arm & his side, and immediately afterwards this Depo- 
nent was knocked down ; that then they tacked the Ship and stood 
out to Sea, but did not crowd Sail ; and the next Morning they 
tack'd again and stood in for the Bay, and at about four o'clock in 
the Afternoon on Wednesday they put this Deponent & seven of his 
Men into the Pilot Boat and discharged them, and then stood off 
with the Ship with an Intention, after they had got Provisions & 
other Things necessary (as this Deponent heard some of them say), 
to cruize between this Bay, the Capes of Virginia, and Cape Fear. 
That this Deponent understood the People on board the Pilot Boat 
who took this Deponent did belong to the Privateer Sloop which 
this Deponent had seen in the morning of the Day he was taken. 

That the Captain's name was — « Barnard, a Frenchman, & had 

a French Commission which he shewed to this Deponent; that 
about half his Company were French and about half Spaniards. 
That among the said Privateers there was one Englishman who this 
Deponent was told was a Boston Man, he having owned the same 
to one of this Deponent's Mariners as this Deponent was informed; 
that he spoke very good English, and like an Englishman, and told 
this Deponent he knew Philadelphia. That the Captain Barnard 
told this Deponent he did not doubt b'ut he should be up at Phila- 
delphia in Six Months. That from the scarcity of Provisions among 



116 MINUTES OF THE 

the said Privateers this Deponent verily believes they intend tc 
make a Descent in order to procure more, that what little Provisions 
they had they were very lavish of, washing their feet in fresh 
Water and throwing their offal Victuals overboard ; that this De- 
ponent understanding Spanish & French heard the said Privateers 
talking among themselves, and understood from them that they in- 
tended to make a Descent somewhere for Provisions — this Deponent 
being in his Hammock he supposes they imagined he was asleep. 

" BERNARD MARTIN. 
" Sworn the 17th July, 1747, before 

"JOS. TURNER." 

"John Cowan of Philadelphia, Mariner, late Mate of the Ship 
Mary Bernard, Martin Commander, being sworn on the holy Evan- 
gelists of Almighty G-od, deposeth and saith, That on Tuesday the 
fourteenth Day of July Instant, being on a Voyage in the said Ship 
from Antigua to Philadelphia, and about a Mile from Cape Hen- 
lopen, early in the morning they were spoke with by some People 
on board a Privateer Sloop, but as every thing on b.oard the said 
Ship was ready for an Engagement, the Privateer did not think fit 
to attack them; that about an hour or two afterwards this De- 
ponent saw a Pilot Boat making towards the said Ship, and Captain 
Martin ordered the Top sail aback, in order to take the Pilot on 
board and to proceed up the Bay; that the Pilot Boat accordingly 
came alongside, there being then only two or three Men upon the 
Deck of the Pilot Boat, among whom the Pilot belonging to the 
said Boat was one, and the rest spoke good English & were English- 
men, as this Deponent verily believes j that as soon as the Pilot 
Boat came along side and a Rope was thrown them from the said 
Ship, about thirty Men instantly came from under the Hatches of 
the Pilot Boat, where they had lain concealed, and boarded the said 
Ship with Arms in their Hands ; that they immediately drove the 
People belonging to the Ship down to the Hatches & fired at them 
there ; that this Deponent saw one man fire at Captain Martin, and 
soon afterwards he saw Captain Martin lying on the Deck ; That 
after the Enemy had in this manner taken possession of the said 
Ship, they stood off with her to Sea till next Morning, & then they 
stood in again, and about three in the afternoon on Wednesday, 
they gave the Captain the Pilot Boat, and turned him, this De- 
ponent, with about Seven more of the Ship's Crew into it, and then 
stood off with a small easy Sail towards the Sea. 

"That this Deponent understood the People who took the Ship 
as aforesaid belonged to the above-mentioned Sloop which this De- 
ponent had spoke with the same morning he was taken, & that they 
consisted chiefly of French Men <& Spaniards ; that there was one 
Englishman among them who said he belonged to Boston, as this 
Deponent was informed by some of the Ship's Company to whom 



PKOYINCIAL COUNCIL. 117 



(as they told this Deponent) he had confessed it j that this De- 
ponent is of opinion that the Privateers aforesaid did not intend to 
go to Sea, because there was not a sufficient Quantity of Provisions 
on board the Ship at the time of her Capture, and what little there 
was this Deponent observed they were very lavish of, washing their 
feet in fresh Water and wasting the Victuals, for which Keason 
this Deponent imagines they intend to make another Descent before 
they quit the Capes, or to wait there till they can furnish them- 
selves with a fresh supply of Provisions. 

" JOHN COWAN. 

" Sworn the 18th Day of July, 1747, before me, 

"THOS. HOPKINSON. 

" Edmund Liston, of Apoquinimink Hundred, in the County of 
Newcastle, Yeoman, being one of the People called Quakers, on his 
solemn Affirmation declares and affirms, that on Sunday the twelfth 
Day of this Instant, July, about one o' Clock in the afternoon, a 
Company of Foreigners, which this Affirmant believes to be Spaniards, 
to the number of Nineteen, came ashore in an open Boat from a 
Pilot Boat riding at Anchor in the Biver Delaware over against 
this Affirmant's House, which is Situate about four Miles above 
Bombay Hook and about half a Mile from the Banks of the said 
Biver Delaware, and as the Affirmant was afterwards told by his 
Daughter, as soon as they landed some of them ran to the Place 
where his Daughter and a Negro Girl happen' d to be getting Crabbs, 
seized the Negro Girl, tyed her, & put her into the Boat. This 
Affirmant further Declares that the said Foreigners came Directly to 
him, this Affirmant, arm'd with Gunns, Cutlashes, & Pistols, and 
telling him they belong'd to a Spanish Privateer not fan off, they 
demanded his Negroes, Money, and the Keys of his Drawers, & 
having got some Keys from him they proceeded to riffle & plunder 
his House, & took out of it several sorts of wearing Apparall, Bed- 
ding, Cloaths, & Furniture, & tying them in separate Bundles they 
carried them to the Shore, & afterwards put them on board the 
open Boat ; they likewise took a Negro Woman and two little 
Negro Children, one of a sucking Child, and then clapping their 
Pistols to this Affirmant's Breast they compelled him to go with 
them to the next Plantation, belonging to James Hart, at the dis- 
tance of about half a Mile. 

his 
" EDMUND E L LISTON. 
mark 

" Affirmed the 27th July, 1747, before me, 

"THOS. HOPKINSON/' 

" James Hart, of Apoquinimy Hundred, in the County of New- 
castle, on Delaware, being sworn on the holy Evangelists of Al- 
mighty God, did depose and declare that on Sunday the 12th Day 



118 MINUTES OF THE 

of this Instant, July, about three of the Clock in the Afternoon^ 
several People who this Deponent took to be Spaniards, to the 
number of»fifteen, and one Man with a laced Hat, who this De- 
ponent took to be an Englishman (being much fairer than the rest) 
came Arm'd to this Deponent's House, Situate about half a Mile 
from the River side, together with Edmund Liston, a neighbour of 
this Deponent's, who they had forced along with them ; That this 
Deponent seeing them coming at some distance shut up and bolted 
his Doors and got his Gun in readiness lest they should prove to be 
Enemies ; That they came directly up and surrounded this Depo- 
nent's House, and some of them pursued a Negroe Girl belonging 
to this Deponent, which this Deponent perceived thro' a Window, 
that some one of the said Company called out to this Deponent in 
good English to surrender or that they wou'd set fire to his House, 
and several Bullets were fired into the Room where this Deponent, 
his Wife and Children were, that one of the Bulletts wounded this 
Deponent's Wife in the Hip, & she bled very much, whereupon this 
Deponent thought fit to surrender, and accordingly opened the 
Doors of his House ; thereupon the Spaniards seized this Deponent 
and bound his Hands and immediately plundered the House, & 
took away the above-mentioned Negroe, almost all this Deponent's 
wearing apparel, a pair of Gold Buttons, & several other things to 
the value of about seventy pounds j That when they had done 
plundering this Deponent's House as aforesaid, they forced this De- 
ponent away with them to Edmund Liston's Plantation, about half 
a Mile from this Deponent's, where they tyed up into Bundles the 
Plunder they had got at this Deponent's House and the said Ed- 
mund Liston's, & having carried it on board the Boat they went 
off to the Pilot Boat from whence they came. 

"JAMES HART. 

" Sworn the 27th July, 1747, before me, 

" THOMAS HOPKINSON," 

" John Aries, of Philadelphia, Pilot, being sworn on the holy 
Evangelists of Almighty God, deposeth and saith that having 
Piloted a Vessel down the Bay, upon his return homeward on Sun- 
day, the 12th Day of July Instant, about Eight of the Clock in 
the Evening he was haled by some Person on Board a Pilot Boat 
(this Deponent then being in his Boat about Ten Miles below 
Reedy Island), and presently afterward the said Boat came along 
side, and several Spaniards came on board this Deponent's Boat 
and seized this Deponent and took from him his Buckles, his Ring 
from his Fingers, his Money, viz., £3 1 9, and most part of his 
Cloaths, & all the Sails belonging to his this Deponent's Boat, & all 
the Victuals on board. After giving this Deponent some Mouldy 
Bread and some greasy Water, they told this Deponent he might 
go, and gave him his Boat; that immediately after the Spaniards 
haled this Deponent they fired two Muskets at this Deponent ; that 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 119 

©we of the People among the Spaniards spoke good English & en- 
quired after Mr. Allen, Mr. Turner, & Mr, Lawrence, and bid this 
JDepone'Ht give his Service to them. « 

"JOHN ARIS. 

u Swora the I7th Bay of July, 1747, before me, 

« JO. TURNER." 

A petition from John Thomas Jones 'k Stephen Barnes, Prison- 
ers in Philadelphia Jayl, was read., setting forth that at the last 
Supream Court they were found Guilty of being possess' d with 
divers Stamps for mailing mili'd Pieces of Eight, with intention to 
coin the same, & were sentenc'd to stand in the Pillory two Market 
Days, to fee imprison 9 d for the space of Sis Months, & to give 
Security for Six Months after, & to pay a fine of £50 each, & pray- 
ing the Council to remit the said Sentence, for that they are willing 
to serve His Majesty as Soldiers in any part of his Dominions 
where the Council shall direct. 

The Board is of opinion that as there is reason to believe from 
the sundry Examinations taken in Jersey & other places, that there 
is a great aumber concerted in this most pernicious Practice of 
•coining, if the Prisoners will discover all their Accomplices, & 
make a fall h fair Confession of all that they know relating to them- 
■selves & their Confederates, that they may be entitled to Mercy; 
but suspend their determination on the Petition till they know what 
is to be expected of this kind from the Petitioners, & in case they 
are inclined to make an honest discovery, the Chief Justice is de- 
csir'd to take their Examinations, 

Mr. Lawrence laid before the Board a Letter from Mr. George 
Oroghaia, Indian Trader, purporting that one of his Men yesterday 
come down from the woods, and informed him that the Indians on 
-Lake Erie were making War very briskly against the French, but 
were very impatient to hear from their Brethren the English, ex- 
pecting a Present of Powder & Lead, which if they do not get he 
is of opinion they will turn to the French, who will fee very willing 
to make it up with them, Mr. Croghan adds, that if this, for 
want of a Present, should be the Case he wou'd not go, or send his 
Men this Tear, into the Indian Country for fear of Danger, The 
^Council are of opinion that a Present of <xoods to the value of twe 
Iiundred Poinds should be immediately sent to the Indians oaa Ohio 
<& Lake Erie, and Mr. Lawrence undertaking to confer with Mr. Ed- 
ward Shippea and settle the proper sorts of "Gcods, the .Secretary is 
•order'd to prepare a Letter & String of Wampum to accompany the 
Present-; and as it is said the Assembly have voted a Sum of 
Money for the use of the Indians, he is ftirther ordered to get a 
Oopy of their Minute from the Clerk and to send it to Mr. Weiser 9 
together with a Copy of that part of the Council's Speech & the 
Assembly's Message which relate to Indian Affair^ «& *o write him 



120 MINUTES OF THE 

a Letter requesting bis Advice and sentiments about the most atl* 
vantagious manner of laying out the Mosey. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 3d October, 174T. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMEK, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Abraham Taylor, "1 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, f ™ 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, f ' 

William Logan, j 

The Minutes of the two preceding Councils were read and ap- 
proved. 

The several Returns of Sheriffs & Coroners being presented to 
the President, he laid them before the Council, & the Board having 
taken the same into Consideration, the following Persons were 
appointed, & their Commissions, with "Writs of Assistance & a 
Warrant for the Great Seal, were signed by the President, Mr, 
Lawrence, Mr. Taylor, Mr. Strettell, & Mr. Shoemaker, viz t- : 

Richard Sewell, Sheriff, ) -ofi j t i:- n-*. en i 
Henry Pratt, Coroner, j Philadelphia City & County. 

Benjamin Davis, Sheriff, j Q 

Isaac Lea, Coroner, j J 

Amos Strickland, Sheriff, ) -r, i /1 , 
T , n , r, ' y Bucks County. 

John Chapman, Coroner, ) J 

James Sterrett, Sheriff, 1 j f P * 

Edward Dougherty, Coroner, j r u y, 

The Secretary laid before the Board a Copy of his Letter to Con- 
rad Weiser, Esq., & likewise the Draught of a Letter to be sent to 
the Indians on or near Lake Erie j but as no Letter is yet come to 
hand from Mr. Weiser in answer to the Secretaire's Letter, the 
Council postpon'd the Consideration of Indian Affairs to another 
Day. 



At a Council held sA> Philada., 5th October, 1747. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMEK, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawreiice, Samuel Hasell, ~) 

William Till, . Abraham T?ylor r > Esqrs.- 

liobert Strettel, Thomas Hopkinson, ) 

The Surveyor General inform'd the Council that he & the Per- 
sons appointed to lay out the Road from Philadelphia to Newcastle 



PEOVINCIAL COUNCIL. 121 

Government had laid it out as far as Darby, but that they cou'd 
proceed no further unless the Board wou'd be pleased to alter that 
part of their Order wherein they were confin'd to follow the Courses 
of a Road said to be laid out between Darby & Chester Creeks in 
the Year 1706, & give the same directions as to that part of the 
Road which they had given as to all other parts, viz*-' to follow the 
Courses of the Road as it is now used. 

The Council considering that that part of the Road was actually 
laid out, return'd and Recorded, tho' it does not appear ever to have 
been cleared or taken Notice of, did not incline to come to any de- 
termination till they shou'd receive full Information how it wou'd 
aifect the Inhabitants & the Possessors of Lands between Darby & 
Chester. 



9th October, 1747. 
MEMORANDUM. 

An order issued to Doct r - Grceme & Doctor Thomas Bond to visit 
& report the State of Health of the Ship Restoration, James Hall 
Master, just arrived from Rotterdam with Palatines, & Doctor 
Grceme having reported the said Ship to be an healthy Ship, & the 
Passengers and Mariners to be in good Health, she was admitted to 
come to the City & to Land the Men. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 12th October, 1747. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esq., President. 
Samuel Hasell, Abraham Taylor, ") 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, > Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approved. 

It being represented to the Board that some Spanish Prisoners 
who were brought into this Province in Aug'- last lay in the Work 
House in a wretched Condition, having no Cloaths nor Bedding, 
The Board appointed Mr. Turner to examine into the truth of this 
Information & to report their Condition; that as the Assembly was 
to sit the 14th a proper Message might be sent to them on this 
Subject. 

The Secretary having received a letter from Mr. Weiser in answer 
to his wrote by Order of Council, the same was read, & Mr. Weiser 
concurring in Sentiment that an handsome Present shou'd be made 
to the Indians on Ohio & on lake Erie, who, by their Situation, 
were capable of doing this Province abundance of mischief if they 
shou'd turn to the French, The Board thereupon took into Con- 



122 MINUTES OF THE 

sideration what wou'd be the best method to take in order to be 
sure that the Present wou'd be safely delivered, & to proper Indians. 
It was said that in committing goods of such a value to the Indian 
Traders there mio;ht be Danger either that the Indians wou'd not 
get all or that they might not be given to the Chiefs & Men of the 
greatest Consequence, or that the Distribution of it might be made 
to serve private purposes- but since none were acquainted with the 
Indians or the Road to them but the Indian Traders, & there was a 
necessity to make use of them, it was therefore resolved that a Letter 
shou'd be wrote to Mr. Croghan, letting him know that the Council 
had determin'd to make an handsome Present to those Indians to 
the value of £200, that they wou'd bear the Expence of their Car- 
riage to the Indian Country, & therefore that he wou'd provide a 
Waggon to carry them to Harris' Ferry, & Horses -to carry them 
thence; and further, that he wou'd either go himself & take the 
Charge of the Present & be answerable for the Delivery, or recom- 
mend some proper Person. It was likewise mentioned that if Mr. 
Croghan shou'd undertake the Charge it would not be amiss to send 
some reputable Man from this Place to accompany him, that the 
Council might be sure their Intentions wou'd be answer'd, & like- 
wise that they might be better inform'd of the Strength & number 
of those Indian^. 

The Ship Two Brothers, Captain Ornett, being arrived with 
Palatines from Rotterdam, the President gave an order to Doctor 
Groeme & Doctor Thomas Bond to visit her, & Captain Ornett now 
producing a Certificate sign'd by the said Doctors, that the Ship 
was healthy & that no Danger cou'd accrue to the Inhabitants of 
the Town in permitting her immediately to come to the City, the 
Board gave permission accordingly. 

The President laid before the Board some French Papers & a 
letter which he received this morning from the Hands of a French 
Gentleman, who called himself John Baptist Cosnay, & said he was 
the Captain of the Sloop Adventurer, a Flagg of Truce from Leo- 
gane, lying at Marcus Hook, had brought with him 13 English 
Men who were taken into Leogane, 15 came from thence but 2 
dyed in the Passage. By the Dispatches it appear'd that 15 English 
Prisoners at Leogane had requested a Passage to Philadelphia, & 
that Monsieur Chastenoye at their request had granted a Flag of 
Truce to Captain Cosnay to carry them there & deliver them to the 
Commander-in-Chief of this Province. The Captain attending 
without was call'd in & Petition'd for Leave to do some necessary 
repairs to his Sloop & to take in a sufficiency of Provisions for his 
Voyage to Hispaniola, & desir'd if there were any French Prisoners 
they might be deliver'd to him in Exchange. 

Mr. Humphrey's informing the Council that the Sloop really 
wanted repairing, they gave the Captain Leave to do what was ne- 
cessary to her & likewise to take in a sufficiency of Provisions, re- 






PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 123 

commending to him to make the utmost Dispatch. He was told 
there were some French Men here, & that they shou'd be deliver' d 
to him as soon as ever he was ready. 

The Council thinking this a good Opportunity to send away the 
Spanish Prisoners, propos'd it to Captain Cosnay to carry them to 
Leogane, and on his consenting Mr. Turner was desir'd to know of 
the Spaniards if they were willing to go. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 15th Oct r -- 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, } ™ 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, j ^ r ' 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approved. 

The President told the Board that Six Members of Assembly 
waited on him this morning & inform'd him that the House had 
met last Night, & having Chose their Speaker they desir'd to know 
when they might attend him & the Council; he answer'd that he 
was going to Council & wou'd let the House know as soon as they 
were met. 

The Secretary was sent with a Message to tell the House that 
the President & Council were met & ready to receive them imme- 
diately, and very soon after the Delivery of this Message the whole 
House came into the Council Chamber, & Mr. Kinsey addressing 
himself to the Board spoke as follows: "I am commanded by the 
House to acquaint the President & Council that the Representatives 
in pursuance of the Charter & Laws met last Night & proceeded to 
the Choice of a Speaker, & chose me. I am further commanded to 
say, That as the Administration of the Government is lodg'd in the 
President & Council, the House will always be ready to receive 
from them whatever may contribute to the Peace & Prosperity of 
the Province, wherein their concurrence is necessary." The House 
withdrew. 

The Board having had under Consideration what matters might 
be proper to be communicated to the Assembly before the House 
came, resum'd their consultations, & appointed Mr. Taylor & Mr. 
Hopkinson a Committee to prepare a Message to the Assembly 
against 4 o' Clock in the Afternoon, to which time the Council ad- 
journ' d. 



124 MINUTES OF THE 

P. M. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President, & the 
same Members as in the forenoon, with Mr. Hasell & Mr. Logan. 

The Committee having prepar'd a Message to the Assembly, it 
was read & approv'd ; Ordered, That it be transcrib'd fair to be 
sign'd to Morrow morning in Council, & it be then sent to the 
House. 



At a Council held at Philada., 16th Oct r - 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER. Esqr., Presid 1 - 
Samuel Hasell, William Till, } 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell," I -™ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, | ^ 

William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The Message to the Assembly being transcrib'd fair was again 
read & approv'd, and the President having sign'd it, the Secretary 
deliver'd 

A Message from the President & Council to the Assembly. 

" G-entlemen : 

" We shall ever think it a Duty incumbent on Us to lay before 
You such Matters wherein your Concurrence is necessary as may 
affect or promote the Peace or Prosperity of the People of this Pro- 
vince, and as when you attended on Us with Your Speaker you ex- 
press'd your readiness to receive anything of that kind, we have 
thought proper to inform You of the following Transactions : 

" About the 14th July last a Party of French & Spaniards, in 
conjunction with some English Men, some of whom we are inform'd 
have formerly dwelt in this City, came up in a Pilot Boat within 
about eighteen Miles of the Town of Newcastle, plunder' d two 
Plantations, bound & abused the Owner of one of them & wounded 
his Wife with a Muskett Ball, carrying off Negroes & Effects to a 
considerable Value. On their return they met with a valuable Ship 
in the Bay bound to this Port from Antigua, which they likewise 
took & carried off. Since that, on the fourteenth of September last, 
we received Information by Express from Lewes that on Tuesday, 
the 8th of September, two Sloops went up the Bay with a Pilot 
Boat tending on each ; on Wednesday Evening they return' d and 
Anchor'd in Lewes Road, which kept the Watch at Lewes upon 
Duty Day and Night, and that one of the said Vessels in sight of 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 125 

the People at Lewes took a Ship outward bound with her Pilot Boat 
& another Ship next Morning coming in, and was at the time of 
sending away that Express in chase of a Third, which it was fear'd 
wou'cl fall into the Enemy's Hands in an hour or two. It appeared 
afterwards that the Privateer mention'd in the said Express be- 
longed to Cape Francois, that she carried fourteen Carriage Guns, 
sixteen Swivels, & came out with about one hundred & seventy 
Men, that she had taken in that Cruize no less than ten Prizes. 
These facts, with the Circumstances attending them, will appear 
more particularly in the Depositions & Papers we have ordered to 
be laid before You. 

" From the Success which attends our Enemies by Cruizing in 
our Bay without risque or opposition, it may reasonably be expected 
that they will continue their Depredations in the Spring, and in all 
likelyhood block up the Trade of this flourishing Colony — a Loss 
which we apprehend will be sensibly felt by all sorts of People. 
Trade supports the Merchant, the Planter, the Artificer j every one 
in the Country as well as in the Town will be alike involv'd in the 
loss of Commerce, as they derive from thence many of the necessa- 
ries & conveniences of Life. A Concern then so Interesting to Men 
of all Degrees amongst Us well deserves your most serious Consid- 
eration. 

" The Boldness of our Enemies and the Knowledge they have 
gain'd of our Bay and River, gives us great Reason to apprehend an 
Attack on this City unless some Provision be speedily made to dis- 
courage them from the Attempt or to disappoint them in it. 

" As we can't doubt but you will think the Protection of this 
City & the Trade of it highly worth your Care, you will wisely 
provide for both. If a Law was wanting for these purposes, the 
People of Pennsylvania would be unhappy indeed, since there is 
no Legislative Power at present in the Government; but we appre- 
hend that as the Publick Money is in your disposal, no further 
Law is necessary. 

" Some Spanish Prisoners now in the Work House, waiting for 
an opportunity to be Shipp'd Off, are in want of Cloaths k other 
Necessaries. As this Government hath always behaved with Hu- 
manity & Kindness to Prisoners, you will no doubt provide for the 
Expences necessary on this Occasion. 

"ANTHONY PALMER, President. 

" 16th Oct r - 1747." 

The President having received the Examinations of John Thomas 
Jones & Stephen Barnes, taken before the Chief Justice on the 7th 
Day of October & sign' by the said Prisoners, the same was read ; 
& as there are no Discoverys of Consequence made by the said 
Prisoners, the Board are unanimously of opinion that the Sentence 
against them shou'd be no longer respited. 

Order' d, That y e Sheriff be told this that he may do his Duty. 






126 MINUTES OF THE 

The 17th Oct r -> 1747. 
MEMORANDUM. 

Tavo Members of Assembly deliver'd the following Message : 

A Message to the President & Council from the Assembly. 

" May it please the President & Council : 

" Whatever Matters you shall be pleased at any time to lay be- 
fore Us wherein our Concurrence is necessary, and which we shall 
conceive to have a tendency to promote the Peace & Prosperity of 
the .Province, will ever be chearfully received & deliberated on 
by us. 

"The Transactions you are pleased to mention in the former 
Part of your Message we observe is only an abridged Account of 
what was laid before the last Assembly. These Accidents and 
those which after happened appear to us to be chiefly owing to like 
Causes, viz., the Misconduct of the Pilots residing thereaway, 
without whose Assistance it is not probable these Attempts would 
have been made ; and sure it can be no great difficulty for the Gov- 
ernments adjoining to the Bay to oblige these Pilots to such Regu- 
lations as may prevent like Accidents for the future. 

u As to any Enterprize intended against the City, we hope there 
is no Danger, and if there be, one of the best Expedients to pre- 
vent it will, we think, be to check every appearance of illicit Trade 
which, under Colour of Flags of Truce or otherwise, may be at- 
tempted to be carried on : for if any Acquaintance be gained of our 
Bay & River it is most likely to happen by this means. 

" As the Members of the present Assembly are mostly the same 
with the last, & their Sentiments the same as at that time, it will 
be unnecessary, we think, to add to what is before contained in an- 
swer to your present Message further than to refer to their last 
Address in answer to the Speech deliver'd to them by the Presid 1, in 
Council. 

" The Circumstances of the Spanish Prisoners in this City, 
which you are pleased to recommend to Us, have been under our 
Consideration. We hope Care will be taken to Ship them off with 
as much speed as can be; & in the mean Time we concurr in 
opinion with the President & Council that they ought to be treated 
with Humanity & Kindness, & we shall make the Provision neces- 
sary to that End. 

" Signed by Order of the House. 

" JOHN KINSEY, Speaker, 
« October 17th, 1747/' 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 127 



At a Council held at Philadelphia the 19th Oct r - 1747. 

FRESENT : 

The Honoble, ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President, 
Samuel Hasell, William Till, "] 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, I ™ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, t v "^ 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, J 

The Minuter of the preceding Council were read and approved. 
The President having received a Letter by Express from Gover- 
nor Shirley & Governor Knowles, it was read & ordered to be en- 
ier'd, together with the Extract inelos'd in it, 

Boston, October, 1747. 
"Sir: 

H The Ineloartt is an Extract from a Letter of the Duke of New- 
castle's to Governor Shirley, signifying His Majesty's Commands to> 
us upon the several matters eontain'd in it. In obedience to which 
We must desire you will be pleased to transmit to us by return of 
this Express, or as soon after as you can, Muster Rolls or Lists of 
the several Officers & Soldiers raised within your Government for 
His Majestie's Service in the late intended Expedition against Can- 
ada (which His Majesty has laid aside for the present), distinguish- 
ing the Companys in which they were form'd, with the respective 
Times of every Officer engaging in His Majestie's Service, & Days; 
on which the Soldiers were inlisted into it (which last may be best 
done by attested Copys of the Inlistments* themselves), also an Ac- 
count of the Deaths of s-itcb of Officers & Men which have happened 
since they enter' d into the Service, with the respective Times when 
they happen' d, as also of the dissmissions and desertions of any of 
the Soldiers & Times of their being discharged or deserting, together 
with ass account of the furloughs which have been granted from 
time to time to the Soldiers, or any of them, & for what time, as 
also upon what Command or Duty the Officers k Men have been 
respectively employ' d since the time of their entering into the Ser- 
vice, together with a Muster Roll or List of the Officers and effect- 
ive private Soldiers bow remaining in the Service, all which Rolls, 
Lists, & Accounts, we desire may be duly certified by the proper 
Officers, under their Hands, upon Oath taken before yourself and 
attested by You \ also, that you wou'd transmit to us an account of 
the Charges of the Cloatfeing, Arms, h Accoutrements of the Sol- 
diers, & of all other Expences which have been incurred on account 
of the Expedition and are not to be defray'd by the Colony under 
your Government, from the time of their being Levied! to the time 
of your attesting the said Accounts, together with the Touchers 
thereof, all duly Certified upon Oath by the proper Partys before- 
You,, and a Copy of the Proclamation issued by You for the En- 



128 MINUTES OF THE 

couragement of Troops to inlist into the said Service, with Copies 
of the Votes for your Assembly touching the Bounty & Subsistance 
or Allowance of Provisions granted by them for the Troops; and 
We must further desire that You wou'd, in pursuance of His Ma- 
jesty's Orders, Communicate to Us your Sentiments & Opinion as to 
the manner of discharging these Officers & Soldiers, & upon what 
foot it maybe best done, having due Regard to His Majesty's Com- 
mands to us for doing it in the most frugal manner & His Expecta- 
tions in this Affair ; and this we desire you will forthwith do, as a 
great Charge is running on till the Soldiers shall be dismissed by 
Us from this Service. 

"We must also desire You, in obedience to His Majesty's Com- 
mands, to recommend it to your Assembly to furnish such sums of 
Money or Credit as may be wanted to pay off the Soldiers, which 
You will perceive by the Extract of the Duke of Newcastle's Letter 
is to be provided for by Parliament as soon as the Accounts of the 
whole Charge incurred by raising the Levies shall be transmitted to 
His Grace by Us, and forthwith to let us know your opinioi*of the 
Success of such an Application, as also to let Us know whether You 
have advanced any & what Sums of Money to the Officers and Sol- 
diers, or any of them, on account of their Pay, & after what Rate 
and to what time they are paid in full. 

" And as You perceive, We are Commanded by His Majesty to 
retain such a number of the American Levies in His Pay as we 
shall judge sufficient for the securing of Nova Scotia against the 
Enemy's Attempts until a reinforcement can be sent thither from 
Great Britain, the Preservation of which Colony is of the greatest 
Importance to the Safety & Welfare of all His Majestie's Northern 
Colonies; and also that Mr. Shirley is order'd by His Majesty to 
compleat his own as well as Sir William Pepperell's, as likewise 
Lieutenant General's Phillips' Regiment, out of those. We hope 
You will assist the Officers who shall be sent to raise Recruits for 
those purposes in Your Government with your influence and Au- 
thority, & contribute every thing in your Power to their Success & 
the promoting of His Majesty's Service. 

" We think it clear that the Arms & Accoutrements of the Sol- 
diers are to be return' d, and where the Men have lost them their 
value must be stopt out of their Pay ; or rather, the several Cap- 
tains are to be called upon for the Arms of their respective Com- 
pany's and are chargeable therewith, which you will be pleased to 
consider; and we must desire you will forthwith let Us know your 
opinion of what Pay it will be reasonable to allow the Officers as 
well as Men for their Service. 

"We are Your Honour's most obcd' : hum. Servants, 

" WILLIAM SHIRLEY, 
" CHAS. KNOWLES. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 129 



Extracts of a Letter from his Grace the Duke of New Castle to 
Governor Shirley, dated White Hall, May 30th, 1747. 

" His Majesty has been pleased to direct me to Signify to You 
His Pleasure that You shou'd immediately appoint a Meeting with 
Commodore Knowles at such place as shall be agreed upon, and con- 
sider with him the present State of Nova Scotia & Louisbourg, & 
take the proper measures for the defence of those Places. 

" It is His Majesty's pleasure You shou'd endeavor to compleat 
from out of the Americans which are now raised for his Majesty's 
Service, Sir William Pepperell's Regiment and Your own. 

" Lieutenant General Phillip's Regiment is, I am afraid, very 
weak. I will, however, send him his Majesty's Orders to send what 
Recruits can be got from hence, and you will also endeaver to have 
his Regiment compleated out of the Americans. 

" As it is His Majesty's Intention that the Americans shou'd be 
Immediately discharged, except only such few as are mentioned 
above, the manner of discharging them, the satiafaction for their 
time, & ca - must be left to Commodore Knowles and Yourself; the 
King, however, is persuaded You will do it as Cheap as possible. 

" And as these American Troops have done little or no Service 
hitherto, It is to be hoped they will not expect to be paid in the 
manner they wou'd have been had they actually been employ'd on 
Service ; and as it seems highly reasonable that such of these Troops 
as have remain'd in the Provinces where they were inlisted shou'd 
be contented with less Pay than such of them as may have Marched 
into other Provinces. When You and Mr. Knowles shall have met 
and fully consider'd the Service to be undertaken in the manner 
above directed, and shall have agreed what number of Americans it 
will be necessary to keep in Pay for that purpose, it is His Majes- 
ty's Pleasure that you shou'd procure an Account of the whole Ex- 
pence incurred on account of the American Troops from the time 
of their being Levied to the time of their Discharge ; & when the 
same shall be fully adjusted & Liquidated, you will transmit it to 
me with the proper Vouchers from the several Governors, that it 
may be laid before Parliament, to the End that Provision may be 
made for the Payment; and in the mean time, in order to prevent 
any Complaint amongst the Men that have been inlisted (as well 
those that shall be discharged as those that shall continue in Ser- 
vice) for want of immediate Pay, You will recommend it to the 
G-overnors of the Provinces when these Levies have been made to 
procure Credit from the respective Assemblies for that purpose^ 
which His Majesty hopes may be done without Difficulty. 

"It is also His Majesty's Pleasure that Mr. Knowles and Yoti 
shou'd consider what number of Americans will be really wanted 
for the Service above mention'd, and the King wou'd have you re- 
Vol. v. — 9. 



130 MINUTES OF THE 

tain as many as may be absolutely necessary for that Service & 
no more ; and the King hopes that a small Number of the Ameri- 
cans with His Majestie's Forces which you have may be sufficient 
for that purpose, as the Expence is very great. And as to the 
Americans in general, except only such as may be wanted for the 
Service above mentioned, it is His Majesty's Pleasure that You in 
conjunction with Commodore Knowles shou'd thank them in such 
manner as You think proper, and immediately discharge them upon 
the best & cheapest foot You can, and in order thereto You will con- 
sult with the respective Governors upon the manner of doing it, 
and you will transmit to His Majesty an immediate account of what 
You shall do therein. 

" N. B. — This Paragraph shou'd have been inserted between the 
fourth & fifth Paragraphs. 

"W. SHIRLEY, 

« CHARLES KNOWLES." 

The forces rais'd in this Province having been under the Com- 
mand of Governor Clinton, the Board judg'd it necessary to receive 
from him an Account of what he had paid to those Forces, & 
what there remains due to them, before they can call the Assembly ; 
and as the President is obliged to go to-morrow to Newcastle to meet 
the Council & Assembly there, Mr. Taylor & Mr. Hopkinson are 
appointed a Committee to write an Answer to the above Letter, & 
likewise to write a proper Letter to Governor Clinton. 

The Return of that part of the Road from Philadelphia to New 
Castle which runs thro' the County of Philadelphia, was read and 
confirmed, and ordered to be opened 60 foot wide. 

" Pursuant to the Order of the Honourable the President and Coun- 
cil of the 8th of Septr., 1747, referring it to us the Subscribers to 
view and lay out by Course & Distance that part of the King's High 
Road leading from the City of Philadelphia to the Town of New 
Castle, which runs thro' the County of Philadelphia, We do humbly 
Certify & Report to the Honourable the President & Council, that 
we have viewed, and with m the Assistance of William Parsons, the 
Surveyor General, Resurveyed that part of the King's High Road 
aforesaid which runs thro' the County of Philadelphia; Beginning 
at a Corner of the Lands of John Kinsey, Esqr., & Abraham Clay- 
pole, at the South Boundary of the City of Philadelphia, where the 
Road now runs, and from thence extending betw'n the Lands of s d> 
John Kinsey & Abraham Claypole South fifty-six Degrees and an 
half, West about one hundred and eleven perches, and continuing the 
same Course one hundred and four perches more to a Gum Tree 
marked, thence North eighty-five degrees and an half West one 
hundred and thirty-seven perches to a marked black oak in the Line 
dividing the Lands of George Gray and Peter Cox, thence sixty-nine 
Degrees & an half W T cst one hundred and fifty-three perches to the 
low Water Mark at the end of the Causway of the Lower Ferry on 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 131 

the East side of the River Schuylkill, then beginning at the Land- 
ing Place of the said Ferry on the West side of the said River, and 
from thence extending North eighty-six Degrees West eighty-six 
perches to the Mill Road, thence South fifty-two Degrees & an half 
West seven hundred and eighty-eight perches to a corner opposite 
to the Sign of the Bell, and from thence South sixty-three Degrees 
West fifteen perches to the middle of a Bridge over Cobb's Creek, 
being the Boundary between Philadelphia & Chester County s ; And 
We do humbly recommend to the Honourable Board that they will 
please to order the said Road to be opeu'd not less than sixty foot 
wide, 

"SEPT. ROBINSON, 
"HUGH ROBERTS, 
"JAMES COULTAS, 
"JOHN BARTRAM, 
"NATHAN GIBSON, 

his 
"CHARLES G JUSTICE." 
mark. 
The Spanish Prisoners having consented to go to Leogane in the 
French Flag of Truce, Captain Cosnay & the Secretary having put 
their Names in a List, the same was sign'd by the President, to- 
gether with a Let Pass & likewise a Letter to Monsieur Chastonoye, 
which was ordered to be enter' d : 
"Sir— 

"I have the Honour of your Excellency's, dated at Petit Goave 
the 17th September last, by Capt n> Cosnay, who delivered me your 
Dispatches & a List of 15 Prisoners, two of which he said Dyed at 
Sea. 

"Had it been in my power to return you man for man I wou'd 
have done it, but there are very few French Prisoners brought here, 
and in defect of these Captain Cosnay has consented to take 12 
Spanish Prisoners, whose Names are in a List sign'd by myself and 
countersign'd by the Secretary, and are to be deliver'd to You or 
your Order, and you are desir'd to extend your Compassion so far to 
these miserable People as to assist them to get to the Havannah or 
any other Spanish Port they desire to go to with all possible Dis- 
patch, they having continued here a long while for want of a con- 
venient opportunity of sending them away. 
" I am, with perfect Esteem, 

" Your Excellency's most Obedient Servant, 

"ANTHONY PALMER. 
" Philadelphia, 19th Octr., 1747. 

" To His Excellency MoNS r - Chastenoy, Governor of the French 
Leeward Islands, at Petit Goave." 



132 MINUTES OF THE 

The Secretary having received a Letter from Mr. Weiser, Dated 
the 19th Instant, wherein he relates his Intelligence received at> 
Shamokin, the same was read & the Consideration thereof postponed 
to another time. 



In the Council Chamber 22 d October, 1747. 

PRESENT : 

William Till, 

Abraham Taylor ; 

Joseph Turner, j> Esqrs, 

Thomas Hopkinson, 

"William Logan, 

Mr. Hopkinson produced a rough Draught of a Letter to Gover- 
nor Clinton, and another to Governor Shirley & Admiral Knowles, 
which were read in these words, Viz**: 

" Philada., 20th October, 1747. 
" Gentlemen : 

"Your Excellency's joint Letter arriving when our President 
was oblig'd to go to Newcastle to meet the Assembly on some ne- 
cessary Affairs of Government there, it falls on me as the next 
Eldest Counsellor to acknowledge the Receipt of your Excellency's 
Letter, & to assure You that the Council will use the utmost Expe- 
dition possible to collect the materials necessary for answering the 
several Things expected from them. Governor Thomas being in 
England, and Mr. Andrew Hamilton, the Agent employed for His 
Majesty, being dead, they are in a manner Strangers to the Trans- 
actions ) but this is known, that four Companies were raised in this 
Province in obedience to His Majestie's Commands, signified to the 
late Governor by the Duke of New Castle, for an Expedition against 
Canada, consisting of one hundred Men each, including four Ser- 
geants, four Corporals, & two Drummers ; that the late Governor 
supply'd them out of his own Pocket with Clothing, Arms, & Amu- 
nition, and his Secretary says that by his Letter Book it appears 
that the Expence amounted to £3,821 16 11, Pennsylvania Cur- 
rency, which at 70 ^ Cent. Exchange is £2,248 2 11 Sterling. 
That Coll 0- Thomas drew Bills for the said Sum on the Pay Master 
General of His Majestie's Forces, Dated 16th Septr,, 1746, & these 
Bills are paid. 

" Mr. Thomas having received Directions from General Gooch 
to March the Troops raised in this Government to Albany, the 
Place of general rendezvous, the four Companys accordingly 
Marched from hence on Thursday the 4th Day of September, 1746, 
& as they have since that time been under the Command of Gover- 
nor Clinton, & an action at or near Albany, I have wrote to Mr, 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. . 133 

Clinton fully on the Subject, for I consider it as impossible for the 
Council to give any Account of Expences, or answer any of the 
Things requested in your Letter, after the Departure of the said 
Forces from this Government. I have been informed that the 
Companies are paid off to May last, but however this is, on receiv- 
ing an Answer from Mr. Clinton what Sum may be necessary to be 
paid them on their discharge, the Council will Summon the Assem- 
bly to make the Provision for that purpose. 

" The other parts of your Letter requiring more deliberation and 
an application to sundry Offices, tho' the Council will make no de- 
lay, yet it will necessarily take up. a good deal of time. Their Zeal 
for His Majestic' s Service will lead them to use their utmost en- 
deavours to give you all imaginable Satisfaction in what You ask, 
but I cannot help saying that such of them as were posted at Al- 
bany during the Winter, have, in the opinion of the Council, 
contributed to the Preservation of Albany & the parts adjacent, 
<& that from all Accounts the forces there have done very severe 
Duty. 

" I am, with the greatest Esteem, 

" Your Excellency's most obed'- Serv'' 

"THOMAS LAWRENCE. 
a Their Excellency's Gov r - Shirley & Admiral Knowles." 

" Philadelphia, October 20th, 1747. 
"Sir: 

" Our President being obliged to meet the Assembly at New- 
castle on some Affairs of Government there, it falls on me as the 
next Eldest Counsellor to acquaint Your Excellency with the re- 
ceipt of the Dispatches from Governor Shirley and Admiral Knowles, 
of which Copies are inclosed. 

" As it is not possible to give the answers desir'd without your 
Excellence's Assistance, I beg your Excellency would be pleased to 
inform this Government of the several particulars there mentioned 
so far as relates to the Troops raised in this Colony for the Expedi- 
tion against Canada from the time they came under your Command, 
with proper and authentic Certificates of each particular, and in 
this we doubt not but Your Excellency will use all possible Dis- 
patch, since the service of His Majesty so much requires it. 

"As we find His Majesty expects the several Colonies should 
immediately provide for the Payment of the Troops raised by them 
respectively till Provision be made by Parliament for that purpose, 
it is more particularly desired that your Excellency would inform 
this Government as soon as possible of the Sum now remaining due 
for the Pay of the Officers & Soldiers raised here, to the end of our 
Assembly may be called to make Provision accordingly, which 






134 MINUTES OF THE 

cannot be done till we receive Your Excellency's Answer to this 
particular. 

a I am, with the greatest Esteem, 

" Your Excell cy ' s - most hum. Serv*- 

"THOMAS LAWRENCE. 
" His Excellency Gov' 1 Clinton/' 

Order' d, That the said Letters be transcrib'd fair and sent by 
the Post. 

The Petition of John Thomas Jones & Stephen Barnes, & the 
Confession made by them, were again taken into Consideration, & 
it being represented to the Board that a material part of their Con- 
fession was omitted to be wrote down by the Clerk employed in 
taking it, viz., that Jones had thrown the Stamps for Counterfeiting 
Dollars into the River, It was Order' 'd, That the Sheriff make fur- 
ther Enquiry into that Circumstance, and if the Stamps shou'd be 
found that he report the same to the Board, but that if they should 
not be found that then the Sentence pronounced against the Peti- 
tioners be immediately put in Execution. 



At a Council held at Philada , 29th October, 1747. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, 1 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, I ™ 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, j ^ 

Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approved. 

The President having received a Letter from Captain Perry, & 
Mr. Lawrence having likewise received one from Gov r Clinton, they 
were read & ordered to be enter' d. 

" New York, October 26th, 1747. 
" Sir : 

"I received Orders from His Excellency Gov r> Clinton this 
Morning to transmit to Your Honour the number of Officers & Men 
belonging to the Province of Pennsylvania, since the Payment he 
made to them, which was to the 24th of June inclusive, but as I 
have not my Papers here, I cannot be quite particular in the num- 
ber, but so near that it will make a small difference in the Sum 
that may be raised to pay them. Underneath is as particular 
Account as I can send at present. Governor Clinton intends to 
write Your Honour in what manner he paid the Subalterns. The 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 135 

Captains have not received any pay as yet. An Exact Account will 
be sent to You as soon as possible. 

" I remain Your Honour's most obed*- hum Ue Serv t- ' 

"SAM 1 - PERRY." 

Names of the Officers, viz. : 

Captain John Deimer, Lieut. John Wildt, Ensign Win. Franklin, 

Captain Willm. Trent, Lieut. Daniel Byles, Ensign Wra. Rush, 

Captain John Shannon, Lieut. Jacob Kalloch, Ensign Wm. Morgan, 

Captain Saml. Perry, Lieut. James Lavvrie, Ensign Jams. Stevenson, 

Under the Command of the above Officers has been Muster' d in 
two different Musters of two Months, each from the 25th June to 
the 24th of this Instant Inclusive, viz. * 

16 Sergeants, 16 Corporals, 8 Drumers, & about 190 Private 
Men. 

"New York, 26th Oct r - 1746. 
"Sir: 

" I am favoured with Your Letter of the 20th Instant, and in 
answer thereto I can inform You that I have paid the Troops raised 
in the Government of Pennsylvania to the 24th of June last, and 
the Subalterns two Months' Pay from the Dates of their Commis- 
sions. It is not in my Power at present to transmit to you an 
Exact Account of what Sums are due to these Troops without 
exact Lists, which, by the Distance they are at, cannot be readily 
obtain'd, besides the frequent Desertions make it uncertain ; but I 
have ordered Captain Perry, their Commanding Officer (who lately 
came down here upon account of His Health), to transmit to You 
their Numbers as nearly to truth as he can. 

" I am, Sir, Your most humble Servant, 

" G. CLINTON. 

" The Hon b,e - Tho s - Lawrence, Esq r "" 

The joint Letter of Governor Knowles & Governor Shirley, & the 
Extract of the Duke of New Castle's Letter, were again read, & on 
considering the same the Board was unanimously of opinion that 
the Assembly shou'd be immediately summon'd to meet on the 23d 
of November next, And tEe Writts being wrote were sign'd by the 
President & four Members of Council & Dispatch'd to the several 
Sheriffs, one of which is order' d to be enter' d : 

" The Honourable the President & Council of the Province of Penn- 
sylvania, 
" To the Sheriff of the County & City of Philadelphia within the 
said Province, Greeting : 

" Having recieved some Dispatches of great Importance to His 
Majesty's Service, which it is necessary should be forthwith laid be- 



136 MINUTES OF THE 

fore the Assembly of this Province, We have, therefore, thought fit 
to convene the said Assembly before the time to which they now 
stand adjourn'd. These are, therefore, to require and command You 
on receipt hereof to Summon the Representatives chosen for the 
said County & City of Philadelphia to meet in Assembly at the said 
City on Monday the Twenty-third Day of November next, and 
thereof to make return to Us on the same Day. 

" Given under our Hands & the Lesser Seal of the said Province 
at Philadelphia, the 29th Day of October, in the Twenty-first 
Year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord, George the Second, 
of Great Britain, & ca -> King, Annoqz Domini, 1747. 

"THOMAS LAWRENCE, 
"ABRAHAM TAYLOR, 
" ANTHONY PALMER, 
" ROBERT STRETTELL, 
"JOSEPH TURNER." 



At a Council held at Philada., 6th Nov r " 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 

Thomas Lawrence, William Till, "} 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, L~ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Thomas Hopkinson, j ^ ' 

William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The Board resum'd the Consideration of Indian Affairs, & call'd 
for Mr. Weiser's Letter of the 15th October last, which was again 
read in these words : 

"S r -: 

" On the Sixth of this Instant I set out for Shamokin, by the 
way of Paxtang, because the Weather was bad. I arrived at Sha- 
mokin on the 9th about Noon. I was surprised to see Shikalamy 
in such a miserable Condition as ever my Eyes beheld ) he was hardly 
able to streth forth his Hand to bid me welcome j in the same Con- 
dition was his Wife, his three Sons not quite so bad but very poorly, 
also one of his Daughters, and two or three of his Grand-Children 
all had the feaver ; there was three buried out of the Family a few 
Days before, viz'" Cajadies, Shikalimy's Son-in-Law, that had been 
married to his Daughter above 15 Years, and recon'd the best 
Hunter among all the Indians, Item his Eldest Son's Wife, and 
Grand Child. Next Morning* I administer'd the Medicines to 
Shikalimy and one of his Sons, under the direction of Doctor Grceme, 
which had a very good Effect upon both ; next Morning I gave- the 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 137 

same Medicine to two more (who would not venture at first) ; it had 
the same Effect, and the four Persons thought themselves as good 
as recover'd, but above all Shikalamy was able to walk about with 
me with a stick in his Hand before I left Shamokin, which was on 
the 12th in the Afternoon. 

u As to what passes among the Indians the Six Nations (except 
the Mohocks) have not yet declared against the French ; some of 
their Cheifs are now in Canada, but for what reason is not known. 
It is generally believed by the Indians that they are about bringing 
over the French Praying Indians to the five Nations' Country, or 
lay a Stop to their War against the English. Shikalamy says if 
they miss in their Schemes, War will then be declared against the 
French; some of the Siniker's Young Men have followed the Ex- 
ample of the Mohocks and went to Warr against the French, and 
had five of their Company killed by the French. The Young Peo- 
ple of the Six Nations are inclined to fight the French. 

u Shikalamy told me further that the Governor of Canada has 
sent a Message to all the Indians about the Lakes and desired them 
to take up his Hatchet to fight the English • that two of the Na- 
tions had accepted it, but Shikalamy does not know which Two; all 
the rest of the Six Nations refused it at once. 

"The Zis-gechroona, or Jonontadyhagas, or both, jointly have 
sent a large Black Belt of Wampum to all the Delaware and Shaw- 
nese Indians Living on the Rivers Ohio and Sasquehanna, to invite 
them into the War against the French ; the Belt came to Shamokin 
with the said Message ; Shikalamy saw the Belt, but the Delaware 
Indians that brought it could not remember which of the above 
mentioned two Nations (or whether jointly) had sent it. That one 
hundred Men of the Delawares were actually gone to meet the Jon- 
ontadyhagas about Deoghsaghronty, where 70 or 80 of the Six Na- 
tions Living at Canoyinhagy were also expected ; they intend to cut 
off a French Settlement to the South of Lake Erie. 
- " Another such Black Belt of Wampum was sent by the aforesaid 
Indians to the Six Nations to the' same purpose. 

u Shikalamy said that himself and the Indians about Shamokin 
keep their Ears open to the said Nations, and they will act accord- 
ing as the Six Nations act. 

"Whilst I was at Shamokin 14 Warriors came down from Diao- 
gon, about 150 Miles above Shamokin, to go to War against the 
Catawbas. 

" On my Return, about three Miles this side Shamokin I met 
eleven Onontages coming from War; they, with some of the Ca- 
jukers, in all 25 Men, had an Engagement with the Catawbas, in 
which five of the Oajukers were killed. The Onontagers said the 
Catawbas were 200 Men ; I sat down and smoked a Pipe with them ; 
I had some Tobacco and a little Rum left with which I treated them^ 



138 MINUTES OF THE 

and we discoursed about the Warrs. Their Captain was a very In- 
telligible man ; I told him before we parted that we their Brethren 
of Pennsylvania long to hear of the Six Nations how things go con- 
cerning the War with the French, whether or no they had engaged 
in it, that if they had we were desirous our Brethren the Council 
of Onontago would let us know; If they have not, we had nothing 
to say to them, well knowing that our Brethren the Six Nations 
were People of Understanding and experienc'd in the War; we 
therefore leave that intirely to them, only we wanted now and then 
to recieve a Message from them in these critical Times and to hear 
of their Welfare. I gave the Captain a Peice of Eight to remem- 
ber what has been said to the Council at Onontago. In my going 
up I saw a French Scalp at the House of Thomas McGee; some 
Indians from Ohio had brought it there ; Thomas McGee was gone 
to Philadelphia ; I left it where it was ; The same Day I met the 
Indian that brought it there ; he desir'd me to take it to the Gov- 
ernor in Philadelphia since Thomas McGee was not at home, who 
was desir'd to do it, and pressed very hard upon me to receive the 
Scalp for the Government of Pennsylvania, in who's favour the 
Scalp was taken, and at the Government of Pennsylvania's Request 
the Indians of Canayiahagon had taken up the Hatchet against the 
French, and that I was the fittest man to receive it. I told him 
that I had been concerned in Indian Affairs these many Years, but 
I never knew that the Government of Pennsylvania had given the 
Hatchet or employ' d any body to kill French Men, and that I was 
sensible the Government had never requested the Indians at Canay- 
iahagon to kill French Men, and therefore I could not recieve the 
Scalp, and as I was well inform'd that this Scalp had been taken in 
time of Peace I could in no ways receive it ; all White People would 
look upon such Actions with Contempt, and as my Commission for 
the Transaction of Indian Affairs did not extend to Ohio or Canay- 
iahagon, but reached only to the Six Nations, I must leave that 
Affair to those that had Correspondents that way to inform the Go- 
vernment of it, and recieve an answer. I hoped he would excuse 
me, and so we parted in Friendship. 

" I must at the Conclusion of this recommend Shickalamy as a 
proper object of Charity; he is extreamly poor; in his Sickness the 
liorses have eat all his Corn; his Cloaths he gave to Indian Doctors 
to cure him and his Family, but all in vain; he has nobody to hunt 
for him, and I cannot see how the poor old Man can live ; he has 
been a true Servant to the Government & may perhaps still be, if 
he lives to do well again. As the Winter is coming on I think it 
would not be amiss to send him a few Blankets or Match Coats, 
and a little Powder & Lead if the Government would be pleased to 
do it, and You could send it up soon. I would send my Sons with 
it to Shamokin before the Cold Whcather comes. 

" Olomipies is Dead; Lapaghuitton is allowed to be the fittest 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 139 

to succeed him, but he declines ; he is afraid he will be envied, and 
consequently bewitched by some of the Indians. However this 
must lie still till next Spring, according to what Shickalamy says. 

" It is my humble opinion that the Present intended for the In- 
dians on the River Ohio should be larger. If that what George 
Croghan is to take with him is intended for the Indians at Canayia- 
hagon, the Indians at Ohio our much nearer Neighbours should 
not be pass'd over without something. I arrived this Day about 12 
of the Clock at my House in good Health, & I hope this will find 
You in perfect Health & profound Peace of Mind, who am 
"Sir, 

" Your ever Dutiful, 

" CONRAD WEISER. 
"Tulphockin, October 15th, 1747. 
".To Richard Peters, Esq 1 "-' Secretary of the Province of Penn- 
sylvania." 

Resolved, That a Present of Goods to the value of Sixteen 
Pounds, or thereabouts, be made to Shikalamy, & that it be forth- 
with provided & sent to Mr. Weiser, with a request to dispatch it 
immediately by one of his Sons to Shamokin. 

Mr. Logan inform'd the Council that there was a "Waggoner of 
George Croghan's in Town, and that he had by Mr. Croghan's 
Order call'd for the Goods designed as a Present to the Indians on 
Ohio & at Canayihage, & he desir'd to know whether he might de- 
liver them. 

The Secretary having likewise received a Letter from Mr. Crog- 
han in answer to his about these Goods, it was read, and the Council 
not receiving that Satisfaction which they expected as to the Per- 
son who was to be trusted with the Carriage of the Goods & the 
delivery of their Message to the Indians, Mr. Logan received di- 
rections to send the Goods by this Waggon to John Harris', to re- 
main there till further Order, and the Secretary is order' d to dispatch 
an Express forthwith to Mr. Weiser to let him know that the Goods 
are sent there, & that the Council will proceed no further without 
consulting him, & as the Season was far advanced they desir'd he 
wou'd not fail to come & attend the Board as soon as possible. 



140 MINUTES OF THE 



At a Council held at Philadelphia the 9th Nov r -< 1747. 
present : 

The Honoblc. ANTHONY PALMER, Esq r -" President. 
Thomas Lawrence, William Till, S 

Abranam Taylor, Robert Strettell, f ™ 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, j J * 

William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approved. 

The Secretary inform'd the Board that he had sent an Express 
to Mr. Weiser, & receiv'd an answer from him that he wou'd be in 
Town on Wednesday next. Mr. Weiser says in his Letter, that at 
Lancaster he saw Ten Indians from Ohio on their way to Philad a ' 
& that he wou'd endeavour to be in Town as soon as them. 

The Petition and Confession of Barnes & Jones were again taken 
under Consideration, and the Petitioners having made a further 
Discovery by informing the Sheriff of the Place where the Stamps 
where thrown, & they being accordingly found there & produced, It 
was resolv'd upon the Question, That that part of the Sentence en- 
joining the Pillorying the Petitioners be remitted, and that the 
residue thereof be put in Execution. And it is further Ordered, 
That Mr. Lawrence & Mr. Till be a Committee to see the said 
Stamps utterly defaced, and that the same when defaced be pro- 
duced at the Council. 

The President having received a Letter from Governor Shirley, 
Dated at Boston the 29th Day of October last, the same was read 
in these words : 

" Boston, October 29th, 1747. 
"Sir: 

" As a very great Expence to the Crown is running on whilst the 
Accounts of the Forces rais'd within your Government for the Ex- 
pedition against Canada are preparing and adjusting, Mr. Knowles 
and I think it our indispensable Duty to send You the inclos'd Dis- 
charge of them, which we desire you would have publish'd among 
the Levies in such manner as you shall think proper. 

" You will perceive by the Extract of the Duke of New Castle's 
Letter, which we enclos'd in our last, that it His Majestie's Plea- 
sure the Levies should be Discharged in the most frugal manner, 
so that it is doubtless his Expectation that all such of them as have 
not marched out of the Province or Colony where they were raised, 
shou'd be paid off at the rate of the ordinary establishment for all 
His Majestie's Regiments of Foot, viz.: 'the Private Men at the 
rate of 6d. Sterling ^ Day, out of which a Stoppage must be made 
of 4d. for their Provisions, so that there will remain to be paid to 
them in Money only 2d. Sterling ^ Day j the Corporals after the 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 141 

rate of 8d. *$ Day, out of which a Stoppage of 4d. for their Pro- 
visions, so that 4d. Sterling ^ Day will remain to be paid in 
Money to them ; the Sergeants after the rate of 1 Shill ? - Sterr 5 * ^ 
Day, out of which a Stoppage must be made of 4d. for their Pro- 
visions, so that there will remain 8d. Sterr 5- ^jl Day to be paid to 
them/ And this is agreable to the Terms of their Enlistment, in 
which no more is promised than the usual Pay of His Majestie's 
Troops, viz. : 6d. Sterl 8 - ^ Day for a private Man, 8cl. for a Cor- 
poral, & 1 2d. for a Sergeant, out of which they find themselves 
with Provisions, & where Provisions are found for them as in the 
Case of Lt. General Phillips' Regiment posted in Nova Scotia & 
Newfoundland, a Stoppage of 4d. Sterl 5- ^ Day is made out of their 
Pay for it ; & in this Case it makes no difference with respect to 
the Soldiers that Provisions have been generally found for them at 
the Charge of the Colonies where they were rais'd, and not the 
Crown's; for that was not given them as the Bounty of the several 
Colonies, but was required by His Majesty from those Colonies to 
be done in ease of the National Expence, and as what was their 
reasonable part of the Charges to be incurr'd by the late intended 
Expedition, set on foot cheifly for the immediate Benefit of the 
several Colonies concern'd in it; and considering these Troops have 
not march'd out of their respective Colonies, they have no pretence 
to expect more than was promis'd them by the Terms of their In- 
listment, and ought to be satisfied with that. 

" As to the method of paying off the Men when they are dis- 
charg'd, it appears to Mr. Knowles and me that there are but two 
Ways of doing it, viz. : either by procuring Money or Credit from 
your Assembly, which we are commanded by His Majesty to re- 
commend to You, or else by borrowing Money of the Merchants 
upon Publick Bills, payable when the Parliament shall make Pro- 
vision for defraying the Charges incurr'd on account of these 
Levies; which Bills Mr. Knowles & I think shou'd be sold for 
the highest Exchange that can be got for the benefit of the Men, 
but not at a lower rate than 700 ^ Cent. Advance in Bills of the 
old Tenor, or £800 of that Currency for £100 Sterl*; & if both 
these Methods should fail, then we can't see what more can possi- 
bly be done than to give the Men Certificates of what is due to 
them at the time of their being discharged, with a promise of Pay- 
ing them as soon as possible. But we hope there will be no neces- 
sity of having recourse to this expedient. 

" Mr. Knowles being much very engag'd in the Business of his 
Squadron, which detains him great part of his time at Nantasket, has 
desir'd me to take upon myself the settling of the Terms for paying 
the Men off; and as he is under Orders from the Lords of Admir- 
alty to repair to Jamaica to take upon him the Command of His 
Majesty's Ships there, & designs to sail in about a fortnight, we 
shall be glad to proceed as far as possible in the Execution of His 



142 MINUTES OF THE 

Majesty's Orders committed to our joint Care before he goes; and 
besides, if the Accounts are not transmitted home in time to be 
laid before the Parliament this Session, it may occasion a Delay in 
raising the Money for defraying the Charges, 

"Since Mr. Knowles' & my joint Letter to Your Honour, I am 
informed by Mr. Secretary Willard that upon the first raising of 
Troops in this Province for the Expedition against Canada in 
Queen Ann's time, her Majesty expressly promis'd (among other 
things) as an Encouragement for Voluntiers to inlist, that they 
shou'd retain their Arms, which had been provided for them by the 
Crown. But as the Expedition did not proceed that Year, and the 
Queen sent Orders to disband those Levies, which was done, this 
Government then thought proper (notwithstanding the Queen's ex- 
press Promise, and those Troops had march'd out of the Province 
to be ready to proceed by Land to Canada) to make the Soldiers 
deliver up their Arms, as they had not actually proceeded to 
Canada, in order to be kept for the Service of the Expedition when 
it should be prosecuted, which seems to be the Case where the 
Men had far greater reason to expect to retain their Arms than 
they have in this, especially as the Duke of New Castle, in his 
Letter to me of the 30th May, only says that ' His Majesty had 
laid aside the design of the Expedition for the present.' 

" It was necessary to transmit to You the Terms for the Pay- 
ment of the Men and Non-Commissioned Officers, together with 
the enclos'd Discharge of them j As to the Officers, it may be time 
enough to send You Mr. Knowles' & my opinion of the Terms on 
which they shou'd be paid off, by the Post following, he being now 
at Nantasket; With Regard to myself, I must, in the meantime, say 
that I think they ought to have the full Sterling Pa}^ which the 
Officers of his Majesty's other Troops in their Ranks receive. 
"I am, with very great regard, 
"Sir, 

" Your Obedient humble Servant, 

" W. SHIRLEY." 

Discharge of the Levies raised for the Expedition against Canada. 

" His Grace the Duke of Newcastle having in his Letter to Gov- 
ernor Shirley signified that His Majesty finding it necessary to em- 
ploy the greatest part of his Forces to assist His Allicb and defend 
the Liberties of Europe, had thought proper for the present to lay 
aside the prosecution of the intended Expedition against Canada, 
and commanded him & Governor Knowles to discharge all the 
Forces raised for that Service (except such as they should judge 
necessary to be kept in Pay for securing the Province of Nova 
Scotia), and to thank the Officers & Men in His Majestie s Name for 
their readiness & Zeal to enter into His service. 



, PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 143 

"In consequence thereof We do hereby discharge all the said 
Officers & Men (except four hundred) out of His Majestie's Service 
from the 31st October, 1747, and they are hereby discharged ac- 
cordingly. 

" And We do also Thank them in His Majestie's Royal Name 
for their readiness to engage in their Country's Cause against the 
common Enemy; and though they are prevented at present of re- 
venging themselves on a cruel, perfidious Enemy, it cannot be 
doubted but the same Zeal & Spirit will always animate them to 
serve whenever they are called upon. Given under our Hands this 
28th Day of October, 1747. 

"W. SHIRLEY, 
"CHAS. KNOWLES." 

Mr. Till, Mr. Taylor, & Mr. Hopkinson are appointed a Commit- 
tee to prepare an Answer to the same against to-morrow morning, 
to which time the Board adjourn' d. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 10th November, 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ") 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, | 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, V Esqr's. 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, 

William Logan. 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approv'd. 

Mr. Till, Mr. Taylor, & Mr. Hopkinson, the Committee appointed 
to prepare Draughts of Letters to be sent to Governor Shirley and 
Admiral Knowles & Governor Clinton, produced the same to the 
Board, which were read and approved, and follows in these words, 
viz. : 

" Philad a - Nove r - 10th, 1747. 
" Sir : 

" Your Excellency's Letter of the 29th, October last, was deliv- 
ered to me on Sunday, and yesterday I laid it before the Council, 
together with the Discharge of the Levies raised within this Pro- 
vince for the Expedition against Canada, dated the Day before, and 
by their advice I have this Day forwarded it by Express to Gover- 
nor Clinton, as those Forces have all along been within his Govern- 
ment & under his command. In a Letter I have the honour to 
receive from him, he informs me he has paid off the Private Men 
to the 24th June inclusive, and the subalterns two Months pay from 
the Dates of their Commissions ; and as his Excellency when he 



144 MINUTES OF THE 

advanced this Pay for them had no doubt a regard to the Terms on 
which they were Inlisted, it cannot be supposed that any alteration 
can be now made therein without Murmer & Discontent, especially 
as the Soldiers have had hard Duty during a long Winter, & in a 
very cold Country. Your Excellency supposes the Pennsylvania 
Companys to have remained in thia Province in good Quarters, but 
this is not the Case. The settlement however of their Pay, whether 
this does or does not make any difference between their Case & that 
of the Men belonging to Coll 0- Phillips' Regiment, must be entirely 
left to the Judgment of Governor Clinton on what Your Excellency 
has wrote to him on this subject which I presume is the same as 
what I have the honour to receive from You. 

u In case the Proclamation published for their Encouragement to 
Inlist shou'd be mention'd by the soldiers, I have sent a Printed 
one to G-overnor Clinton, and likewise enclose one to Your Excel- 
lency, and if either the Proclamation or the Men's having March'd 
out of the Province and having remain'd iu actual Service from the 
time their Companies were compleat, shall cause a change in Your 
Excellency's Sentiments, You will be pleased to communicate such 
Change, and give the necessary directions, the Council requesting 
me to assure You that they will with great Zeal and heartiness lay 
before the Assembly, which they have Summon' d to meet for this 
purpose on the 23d Instant, everything recommended to them for 
His Majestie's Service, which they desire to promote by every 
method in their Power on this and all other Occasions. 
"I am with perfect Esteem, 

" Your Excellency's most obedient humble Servant, 

" ANTHONY PALMER. 

" His Excellency William Shirley, Esqr." 

"Philada., Nov r - 10th, 1747. 
" Sir : 

" On Sunday I received the inclos'd Discharge from Gov r ' Shir- 
ley in a Letter requesting, among other Things, it might be pub- 
lished among the Levies raised in this Province for the Expedition 
against Canada, and having yesterday laid them before y e Council, 
I do by their Advice transmit it to you. 

" On His Majestie's Orders, signified by the Extract of the Duke 
New Castle's Letter, and by the joint Letter of Governor Shirley & 
Admiral Knowles, Copys whereof were sent to Your Excellency by 
Mr. Lawrence while I was in the Lower Counties. 

" The Assembly is summon'd to meet on the 23d Instant, and 
as I depend on Your Excellency to furnish the Council with an 
Account of what has been paid the Pennsylvania Forces under Your 
Command, <fe what still remains due to them, & with Materials to 
answer the several Queries put by Admiral Knowles & Governor 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. ■ 145 

Shirley, I most earnestly repeat my Request to Your Excellency 
to honour me with a full Letter on this Important Affair, time 
enough for the Council to form from thence a proper Message to 
the Assembly. 

" Your Excellency will he pleased to be referr'd to Governor 
Shirley's Letter of the 29th October last (as I suppose he wrote in 
the same manner to all the Governors) for his Sentiments about 
the Pay of the Levies, their Arms and other things relating to 
them ; And as I am an entire Stranger to Millitary matters, and 
to the particular Circumstances of those Levies, having no other 
Judgment to form of what is proper to be done than from the Pro- 
clamation issued by Governor Thomas to encourage them to Inlist, 
I shou'd be extremely obliged to Your Excellency if You wou'd 
favor me with Your Sentiments on these Several Points. 

" As Governor Thomas's Proclamation may be mention'd by the 
Officers or Soldiers, I herein inclose a Printed one, and am with 
very great Regard, 

" Your Excellency's most obedient humble Servant, 

" ANTHONY PALMER. 
"His Excellency George Clinton, Esqr." 

Order' d, That fair Copies be immediately made and sent with 
the Papers therein mentioned by Express. 

Mr. Lawrence & Mr. Till agreable to an Order of the last Coun- 
cil produc'd to the Board the Stamps for coining Pieces of Eight 
entirely defac'd. 






At a Council held at Philadelphia, 13th Nov r " 1747. 

PRESENT I 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hassell, ^ 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, I ™ 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, [ ^ rs ° 

Joseph Turner, William Logan, J 

Ten Indian Warriors from Ohio having arrived in Town on 
Wednesday, the President sent them a Message yesterday by Mr. 
Weiser, the Interpreter, to bid them welcome ; and understanding 
that they were desireous to be heard to-day, he summon'd the Coun- 
cil for this purpose. Mr. Weiser attending he was sent to tell the 
Indians the Council was sitting and ready to receive them. They 
immediately came. The President inform' d them the Council were 
glad to see their Brethren ; took their Visit kindly, and desired to 
know what they had to Communicate. 
VOL. V.—10. 



146 MINUTES OF THE 

After a Pause, rose up and spoke as follows : 

" Brethren the English, the Governor of York, the Commission- 
ers at Albany, the Governor & Counsellors of Pennsylvania : 

" We who speak to you are Warriors living at Ohio, and address 
You on behalf of ourselves and the rest of the Warriors of the Six 
Nations. 

" You will perhaps be surpriz'd at this unexpected Visit ; but we 
cou'd not avoid coming to see You, the times are become so critical 
& dangerous. We are of the Six Nations, who are your antient 
Friends — having made many Treaties of Friendship with the Eng- 
lish, and always preserved the Chain bright. You know when our 
Father the Governor of Canada declar'd War against our Breth- 
ren the English, You, the Governor of York, the Commissioners of 
Indian Affairs at Albany, the Commissioners for this Province sent 
to inform the Council at Onondago of it, and to desire that they 
wou'd not meddle with the War ; that they wou'd only look on & 
see what wou'd be done ) that we, the Indians, wou'd let you fight 
it out by yourselves, and not pity either side ; and that we wou'd 
send to all the Nations in alliance with us to do the same. And, 
accordingly, the Indians did send to all their Friends and Allies, 
and particularly to the Indians about the Lakes, and in the Places 
where we Live, requesting they wou'd not engage on either side ; 
and they all stood Neuters except the French Praying Indians, who, 
tho' they promised, yet were not as good as their words. This is 
the first thing we have to say to our Brethren, and we hope they 
will receive this in good part, and be willing to hear what we have 
further to say. 

" Brethren : 

" When the Indians received the first Message from the English, 
they thought the English & French wou'd fight with one another at 
Sea, and not suffer War to be made on the Land j but sometime after 
this Messengers were sent to Onondago by all the English to tell us 
that the French had begun the War on the Land in the Indian 
Countries, and had done a great deal of Mischief to the English, & 
they now desir'd their Brethren the Indians wou'd take up the 
Hatchet against the French, and likewise prevail with their Allies to 
do the same. The old men at Onondago, however, refus'd to do 
this, and wou'd adhere to the Neutrality. And on their declaring 
this, the English sent other Messengers again and again, who pressed 
earnestly that the Indians would take up their Hatchet ; but they 
were still denied by the old Men at the Fire at Onondago, who, un- 
willing to come into the War, sent Message after Message to Canada i 
and Albany to desire both Parties wou'd Fight it out at Sea. At u 
last the Young Indians, the Warriors, <fe Captains consulted together j 
& resolved to take up the English Hatchet against the will of their I 
old People, and to lay their old People aside as of no use but in il 
time of Peace. This the Young Warriors have done — provoked to i 



'i 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 147 

it by the repeated Applications of our Brethren the English. And we 
are now come to tell you the that French have hard Heads, and that 
we have nothing strong enough to break them. We have only little 
Sticks & Hickeries, and such things that will do little or no service 
against the hard Heads of the French. We therefore present this 
Belt to desire that we may be furnished with better Weapons, such 
as will knock the French down; and in token that we are hearty 
for You, and will do our best if you put better Arms into our Hands 7 
we give you this Belt/' 

Here they gave a Belt of seven Rows. 

" Brethren : 

u When once we, the Young Warriors, engaged we put a great 
deal of Fire under our Kettle, and the Kettle boil'd high, and so it 
does still (meaning they carried the War on briskly), that the French 
Men's Heads might soon be boil'd; But when we looked about us 
to see how it was with the English Kettle, we saw the Fire was 
almost out, & that it hardly boil'd at all, & that no French men's 
heads were like to be in it. This truly surprizes us, & we are come 
down on purpose to know the reason of it. How comes it to pass 
that the English, who brought us into the War, will not fight them- 
selves ? This has not a good appearance, and therefore we give you 
this string of Wampum to hearten and encourage you, to desire you 
wou'd put more Fire under your Kettle." 

Here they presented the string of Wampum of 7 strings. 

" Brethren : 

"We have now done with general Matters, but old Scaiohady 
desires to inform the Council that he was here in James Logan's 
time, a long while ago, when he had but one Child, and he a little 
one; that he was then employ' d in the Affairs of this Government; 
that James Logan gave him this String to assure him if he ever 
shou'd come to want & apply to this Government they wou'd do 
something for him. Scaiohady is now grOwn old & infirm, & re- 
commends himself to James Logan's & the Council's Charity." 

Here he laid down a String of Wampum. 

The Indians withdrew, & the Council adjourn'd to Eleven O'Clock 
to-morrow morning. 



In the Council Chamber, 14th November, 1747. 
present : 
Thomas Lawrence, Robert Strettell, ) ™ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, William Logan, j • Ls( l rs ' 

The President being indisposed & the other Members not attend- 
ing there could be no Council. 

The Members present judg'd that before the heads of an Answer 
to the Speech of the Indians cou'd be considered, it was necessary 



148 MINUTES OF THE 

previously to Learn from Mr. Weiser the particular History of these 
Indians, their real disposition towards Us, and their future designs; 
and accordingly sent for him. He said the Indians had in part told 
him their mind, and he thought they might be brought to tell him 
more, and when they did he wou'd inform the Council. 

The Members likewise judged that it might be of Service to know 
Mr. Logan's Sentiments about what might be proper to be said to 
the Indians, & requested Mr. Weiser & the Secretary to wait on 
him for that purpose. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia the 16th November, 1747. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, "1 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, ! -™ 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, | ^ 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, J 

Mr. Weiser attending was called in, and inform'd the Council 
that he had Learn' d the following particulars from the Indians, 
viz. : That last Summer the Governor of Canada had sent the 
Hatchet to the Indians about the Lakes and on the branches of 
Ohio; that one Nation took it up; and that these Indians and the 
Indians in those Quarters, consisting principally of Warriors, being 
afraid others wou'd do the like, to prevent this took up the English 
Hatchet and proclaim'd War against the French, which had a good 
effect, no more daring after this to meddle with the French Hatchet; 
That these Indians on Ohio had concluded to kindle a Fire in their 
Town, and had invited all the Indians to a considerable distance 
round about them to come to their Fire in the Spring, and that they 
had consented to it. Mr. Weiser added that the Indians in the 
Parts these People came from were numerous, not less than Five 
hundred Men, and had many Allies more numerous than them- 
selves ; That it was always the Custom in War time to put the 
management into the hands of the Young People, & that it 
would be of the most pernicious Consequence not to give them 
encouragement at this time, and particularly he thought the 
Council should at least tell them they approv'd of their taking; 
up the Hatchet, & acknowledge the Service done to the Eng- 
lish by their seasonable declaration in their favour. He thought 
Providence had furnished this Province with a fine opportunity of ! 
making all the Indians about the Lakes their Friends, & warm Friends ;, 
too. Mr. Weiser being ask'd what sort of a Present should be ;' 
given them at this time, he said Goods were now so dear that the 
value of One hundred Pounds wou'd appear but small, that they J 
should have so much given them at least, and half as much to the I 
Canayiahaga Indians ; Not that this was by any means sufficient, I 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 149 

but wou'd be a good Salutation Present, and preparatory to a larger 
to be sent in the Summer. This he judg'd necessary to be done, 
and that they should be told of the future Present, And tho' he had 
never been in those Parts, yet he judg'd the attaching these Indians 
and their Friends to the English Cause to be so necessary that he 
wou'd, if the Council pleased & his Health shou'd permit, go with 
the Present himself, and see with his own Eyes what number of 
Indians were there, & in what disposition. He said further, that he 
accompanied the Secretary to Mr. Logan's yesterday, & that the 
Secretary had informed Mr. Logan of all these particulars, and taken 
his Sentiments in writing, and on them form'd the Plan of an an- 
swer. The Board order' d the Secretary to read what he had wrote, 
and on considering this & Mr. Weiser's Information, an answer was 
agreed to and the Presents settled. The Council adjourn' d to 4 
o'Clock in the Afternoon, and directed that the Indians should be 
told to be there in order to receive the answer of the Council to 
their Speech. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 16th Nov r -' 1747, Four o'Clock 
in the Afternoon. 

present : 
The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President, and the 
same Members as in the Forenoon. 

The Indians having taken their Seats the President spoke as fol- 
lows : 

" Brethren, Warriors of the Six Nations — 
" We, the President & Council of the Province of Pennsylvania, 
have taken what You said to Us into Consideration, and are now 
going to give you an answer. 

" We are always glad to see our Brethren, and are particularly 
pleas'd at this critical time with your present Visit. You are sen- 
sible of the constant Freindship this Government has always shown 
to the Indians of the Six Nations, and that from their first Settle- 
I ment in the Country their Interest has been put on the same foot 
i|with our own; And as long as you shall act up to your Engage- 
Iments you will never want the most substantial proofs that we can 
give of our Regards to your Nations. 

" You tell us that at the beginning of the War you received a 

Message from all the English to stand Neuter, and to prevail with 

your Allies to do the same ; that in compliance therewith you did 

stand neuter, & all your Allies except the Praying Indians, who 

I ipromis'd and broke their word; That the French commencing Hos- 

I tilities, you received repeated Messages from the English to con- 

] jtinue Neuter no longer, but to take up their Hatchet against the 

[French, and that you and your Allies have accordingly done this. 






150 MINUTES OF THE 

Brethren, You did well to hearken to the Messages sent by The 
English. Your Allies so readily concurring with you, shews you 
keep up a good understanding with them, for which you are to he 
commended. You live in small Tribes at a distance from one an- 
other. Separate, you will be easily overcome; United, it will be 
difficult if not impossible to hurt You. Like the Strings on which 
you put your Wampum, a single Thread is soon snapp'd, a few re- 
quire more strength, But if you weave them into a Belt and fasten 
them tight together, it must be a strong hand that can break it. 

11 We are pleas' d to hear that at the pressing Instances of the 
Governors of New York & New England, you have taken up the 
Hatchet against the French, who you know, notwithstanding their 
fair Speeches, have been from the beginning your inveterate Ene- 
mies; And in Confirmation that We approve of what you have done, 
we give you this Belt. 

" By your String of Wampum you tell us that you observe the 
English Kettle does not boil high, & you give the String to all the 
English to encourage them to put more Fire under their Kettle. 

" As you Address this to all the English, we shall send your 
string to the other Governors. But to lessen your Concern on this 
account, We are to apprize you that the French were sending large 
Forces in big Ships well arm'd with great Cannon over the Seas to 
Canada, that the English pursued them, attack' d them, took their 
Men of War, killed a number of their Men, & carried the rest 
Prisoners to England. This Victory put a stop for the present to 
the Expedition intended against Canada. You are, therefore, not 
to judge by the appearance things make now that the English Fire 
is going out, but that this is only accidental, & it will soon blaze 
again. 

" As this is the first Yisit paid us by our Brethren the Warriors 
living on the Branches of Ohio, to shew that we take it kindly of 
them, and are desirous to cultivate & improve the Friendship sub- 
sisting between the Six Nations & Us, we have provided a Present 
of Goods, a list whereof will be read to You at the close of our 
Answer. They are at John Harris', & the Interpreter will go 
along with You & deliver them to you there. In the Spring we 
propose to send Mr. Weiser to You, & he will be furnish'd with a 
proper Present to be distributed to all the Indians at Ohio, at Cana- 
yiahaga, & about the Lake Erie. In confirmation of what we say ' 
we give you this string of Wampum. 

" Having received by the Traders a kind Message from the Cana- .-' 
yiahaga Indians, to let them see we are pleased with it, We have ( 
sent them a small Present of Powder & Lead by Mr. Croghan i 
which you will inform them of, and likewise of our further inten- j 
tions in their favour with this String of Wampum, which is given ji 
you for that purpose. 

"The President & Council at your recommendation will take care I 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 



151 



to give Scaiohady a Present for his own private use, & his old friend 
Mr. Logan will do the same." 

A String of Wampum. 

The Indian Speaker having consulted with Scaiohady, took up 
the Belt and Strings of Wampum in the order they were presented, 
and repeating the Substance of every Paragraph, express' d high 
Satisfaction at what the Council had said, & promised to send the 
String of Wampum to the Canayiahaga Indians, who being their 
own Flesh & Blood they were pleased with the Regards shewn to 
them; And in Testimony of their entire Satisfaction & Devotion 
to the English Interest they gave the Indian Marks of Approbation 
and Danced the War Dance. 



A List of Goods bought for the Ohio Indians, 



viz. : 



4 Barrells of Gunpowder 


- 


- @£11 


£44 





5 cwt. Barr Lead 


_ 


40s. 


10 





8 Guns - 


_ • 


50s. 


20 





2 Pieces Striped Duffels 


- 


£14 


28 





1 Piece Blew Strowds 


- 


- 


15 





1J Dozen Tomhawks 


_ 


80s. 


2 5 





10 lb. Vermillion 


_ 


18s. 


9 





10 doz. best Knives - 


- 


- 9s. 6d. 


4 15 





2 m. Flints 


_ 


15s. 


1 10 





6 doz. Screw Boxes - 


_ 


18d. 


9 





5 lb. Red Lead 


_ 


9d. 


3 


9 


Cash paid John Smith the Waggoner for Carriage ) 


4 17 





up to John Harris' 


- 


" " -i 


i Cask of Gunpowder 


-, 




2 15 





1 doz. Looking Glasses 


_ 


_ 


19 





1 doz. Knives - 






9 


6 


Cash paid for Pipes & Tobacco - 


- 


1 1 


6 


i cwt. Turkey shot - 


- 


- 


1 3 


9 


1 cwt. Bread - 






18 





11 pair of Sizzars 


.. 


- 


3 


3 


1 Groce of Awl Blades 


- 


- 


18 






£148 7 9 



A List of Goods bought for the Canayiahaga Indians, 
4 cwt. Barr Lead - @ 45s. 

3 half Barrells & 2 Quarter Casks of Gunpowder - 
2 doz. best Knives - @ 10s. 6d 

4 Guns -.-... 55s. 

1,000 Flints 

Cash paid John Smith, Waggoner 



£9 








24 








1 


1 





11 








1 


5 





1 


12 


6 



£47 18 6 



152 MINUTES OF THE 

A List of Goods bought for Shikalamyj viz. 

5 Strowd Match Coats - - @ 28s 
\ Cask of Gun Powder - 

J cwt. Barr Lead - 40s 

15 Yards of Blew Half Thicks - - 3s. 2d 

1 doz. best Buckhafted Knives - 

4 Duffell Match Coats - 15s 



£7 





2 15 





1. 1 





I. 2 7 


6 


9 





j. 3 





£16 11 


6 



At a Council held at Philadelphia 17th Novr., 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The HonobWAN^HONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 

Thomes Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ") 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, v Eqrs. 

Robert Strettell, Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approved. 

Mr. Till, Mr. Taylor, & Mr. Hopkinson were appointed a Com- 
mittee to prepare the Draught of a Message to the Assembly on the 
several Letters receiv'd from Governor Shirley, Admiral Knowles, 
& Governor Clinton, & likewise another Message to accompany the 
Indian Treaty. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia the 20th Novr., 1747. 

PRESENT I 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Samuel Hasell, William Till, ~\ 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, > Esqrs. 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approv'd, 

The President having received a Letter from Governor Clinton ? 
inclosing an Account of the Monies paid by him for the use of the 
four Pennsylvania Companies, together with an Estimate of what 
he, on conferring with some of the Pennsylvania Officers at New 
York, judg'd still to be due to them, the same were read & ordered 
to be laid before the Assembly at their meeting. 

A Letter from Governor Shirley was likewise read & order'd to 
be enter'd, & referr'd to the Committee, to be recommended to the 
Assembly in the same Message with the Indian Treaty. 

" Boston, November 9th, 1747. 
"Sir: 

" I am to inform your Honour that at a meeting of Commiss"' 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 153 

from the Government of the Massachusetts Bay, New York, & Con- 
necticut, at the City of New York in September last, It was agreed 
in behalf of the said Governments that an Expedition shou'd be 
undertaken against the French Fort at Crown Point • That certain 
Measures shou'd be us'd to retain & confirm the Indians of the Six 
Nations & others in Alliance with them in the Interest of the Eng- 
lish Governments, & other matters were agreed upon for the Defence 
of the English Colonies against the French & Indian Enemy j and 
also that there should be another Meeting of the Commissioners 
about the middle of December next, and that in the meantime all 
the other Governments from New Hampshire to Virginia should be 
Invited & earnestly urg'd to join in this Publick & Important 
Undertaking, wherein his Majestie's Honour & the Interest of all 
Subjects in North America are so deeply concerned. The Agree- 
ment of the Commissioners was laid before the General Assembly 
of this Province in their late Session, but finding so thin an appear- 
ance of the Representatives and most of the principal Members 
absent, I judg'd it best to adjourn the Assembly to Tuesday the 
seventeenth Instant, that these matters might be considered in a full 
Court, By which means it will be later before our General Assem- 
bly can determine upon them than was expected, which obliges me 
to entreat You to order your Publick Business so as that your 
General Assembly may be able to meet about the time when You 
may expect to know our Resolutions upon this Affair. And I doubt 
not but you are so fully appriz'd of the great Importance it is of to 
His Majestie's Service in North America to have the Indians of the 
Six Nations and others in Alliance with them kept in Friendship 
with us and not suffered to go over to the French, which there is 
the utmost Danger of unless all these Colonies shall unite with 
their greatest Zeal & Expedition to improve this favourable oppor- 
tunity for fixing those Indians in the English Interest. I am in- 
formed from those that know the Situation of the Countrey, that if 
the Six Nations should join with the French, the Colonies of New 
Jersey and Pennsylvania will have but a very thin Barrier between 
them & the Enemy, which would probably in such Case stand but 
a few Months, & then those Provinces would lye as much open to 
the Enemy as those of the Massachusetts Bay & New York, which 
would be so unhappy an Event that I am persuaded the Wisdom of 
making seasonable Provisions against it must be very manifest to 
You, and therefore that the Regard & Concern you have for the 
Prosperity of the Province under your immediate Government will 
prompt you to do every thing in your power to promote the design 
now on foot for securing the Six Nations in our Interest, & de- 
stroying or at least weakening the Power of the French. 
" I am, with great Regard, Sir, 

" Your most obed'- humb. Servant, 
«W. SHIRLEY." 



154 MINUTES OF THE 

The G-entlemen of the Committee having prepar'd the Draught 
of a Message to the Assembly according the directions of the last 
Board, the same was settled & ordered to be copied fair,to be Sign'd 
by the President on Tuesday morning the 24th Instant, to which 
time the Council adjourned. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia the 24th Nov r -' 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble Anthony Palmer, Esquire, Presid'- 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, "} 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, [ 



J-Esqrs. 



Robert Strettell, Joseph Turner, 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, j 

The Minutes of the preceeding Council were read and approv'd. 

Two Members of Assembly being sent from the House with a 
Message, they were called in, & inform'd the Board that the House 
was met according to their Summons, & desir'd a Copy of one of 
the Writs by which they were Summon' d. 

The Message to the Assembly was again read & Signed by the 
President. 

A Message from the President & Council to the Assembly. 
u G-entlemen : 

" You are called together at this time in pursuance of certain 
Instructions from His Grace the Duke of Newcastle, dated the 30th 
May last, ' Signifying that it was His Majesty's pleasure that Gov- 
ernor Shirley should immediately appoint a Meeting with Commo- 
dore Knowles at such Place as shou'd be agreed upon, & consider 
with him the present State of Nova Scotia & Louisbourg, and take 
the proper Measures for the Defence of those places, and as it is 
His Majestie's Intention that the Americans shou'd be immediately 
discharged, except only such few as are mention' d, and that when 
Governor Shirley & Mr. Knowles shall have met k fully consider'd 
the Service to be undertaken in the manner directed, and shall have 
agreed what number of Americans it will be necessary to keep in Pay 
for that purpose, It is His Majestie's pleasure that he shou'd procure 
an Account of the whole Expence on Account of the American Troops 
from the time of their being levied to the time of their Discharge, and 
when the same shall be adjusted & Liquidated, to transmit it to His 
Grace with the proper Vouchers from the several Governors, that it 
may be laid before Parliament, to the End that Provision may be made 
for the Payment ; and in the meantime, in order to prevent any 
Complaint amongst the Men that have been Inlisted (as well those 
that shall be discharged as those that shall continue in Service) for 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 155 

want immediate Pay, to recommend it to the Governors of the Pro- 
vinces where these Services have been made to procure Credit from 
the respective Assemblies for that purpose, which His Majesty 
hopes may be done without Difficulty/ 

"In Obedience to his Majestie's Commands We do therefore 
most earnestly recommend it to You that You wou'cl immediately 
provide Money or Credit for the Payment of such Sums as shall 
remain due to the Forces rais'd in this Government at the time of 
their Discharge, an Estimate whereof sent us by Governor Clinton 
we have order' d to be laid before You, together with the several 
Letters & Papers we have received from Governor Shirley, Admiral 
Knowles, & Governor Clinton, on this Subject. 

u You will perceive, Gentlemen, by the above Instructions that 
an Account must be prepared of the whole Expence of the Penn- 
sylvania Companies from the time of their being Levied to the time 
of their Discharge. You will therefore furnish Us with the Votes 
& Minutes of Your House & such other Materials in Your Power 
as shall be necessary, & that with all the Dispatch possible, so that 
they may be transmitted to His Majesty time enough to be laid 
before the Parliament at their next Session. 

" As His Majesty hopes what is demanded will be done without 
Difficulty, You will no doubt consider of the most effectual ways to 
answer His Majestie's Expectations. 

"ANTHONY PALMER, Presid'- 

"November 24th, 1747." 

The Secretary is order'd to deliver it immediately, together with 
one of the Writts. 

The Gentlemen of the Committee having finished their Draught 
of a Message to the Assembly to accompany the late Indian Treaty, 
& to recommend the Services mentioned by Governor Shirley in his 
Letter of the 9th Instant, the same was read and approved, & or- 
der'd to be wrote fair & Sign'd & laid before the House as soon as 
there shou'd be reason to think they were come to some Conclusion 
on the several matters before them. 

The Board call'd for the Assembly's last Message in answer to 
their' s on the State & Condition of the Province, but not concluding 
on any thing to be said in reply, they postpon'd the Consideration 
thereof to another Day. 

The Clerk of the Supreme Court having deliver'd in a fair Copy 
of the Record of the Conviction of Patrick Burne, Michael Burne, 
& William Ward, of the City of Philadelphia, Labourers, who were 
found guilty of Burglary at the late Court of Oyer & Terminer, & 
lay under Sentence of Death, the same was read, & after hearing a 
relation of the Circumstances which appeared on the Tryal by Mr. 
Till, one of the Supreme Judges, & likewise an account of what 



156 MINUTES OF THE 

appear'd by Examinations on their Commitment from Mr. Law- 
rence & Mr. Turner, the Justices who committed them, The Board 
was of Opinion that from any thing which appear'd at present they 
did not merit Mercy, & therefore order'd the Secretary to prepare 
the Draught of a Warrant for their Execution, to be laid before the 
Board on Thursday next, at which time they propos'd to take their 
Case further into Consideration, & that they might be fully inform'd 
of every thing relating to them the Secretary was order'd to call 
upon the Justices of the Supreme Court for their Report of the 
Tryal. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia the 25th Novr. 1747. 

PRESENT I 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esquire, President. 
Thomas Lawrence, William Till, ~\ 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, V Esqrs. 

Joseph Turner, William Logan, ) 

The Minutes of the preceeding Council were read & approv'd. 

The Message agreed to yesterday was Sign'd & left with the Sec- 
retary, together with the Papers referr'd to therein, to be deliver'd 
to-morrow morning. 

A Message from the President & Council to the Assembly. 

" Gentlemen : 

" You will see by the Papers which are ordered to be laid before 
you that we have had a Treaty with some Indian Warriors from 
Ohio, who came to Town for that purpose. By them we are given 
to understand that the Tribe of Indians, being a mixture of the Six 
Nations, to which these Warriors belong, have actually resolved to 
adhere to their Brethren the English against the French, & pro- 
pose to kindle a great Fire at Ohio in the Spring, to which they 
have Invited the Indians living round about them to join with them 
in these Resolutions. 

"This is an extraordinary Event in our favour which ought to be 
improv'd to the greatest Advantage. From the Situation of these 
People, being mostly within the Limits of this Government, they 
are capable of doing or preventing the greatest Mischiefs; and 
from what passed at a Conversation between them & the Inter- 
preter, there is reason to apprehend that without Encouragement 
from this Province they may be seduced by the French to go over 
to their side, whereby the Lives of the back Inhabitants will be in 
the utmost Danger. These Considerations have induc'd us to give 
them the Goods mentioned in the Account delivered you herewith, 
and to promise to send the Interpreter with a larger Present to 
their Fire at Ohio in the Spring. You will, therefore, take care at 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 157 

this Session to come to such Resolves as will enable us to make 
good our Engagements. 

"The last Post brought a Letter from Governor Shirley, dated 
at Boston the 9th of November, 1747, purporting that at a Meet- 
ing of Commissioners from the Government of the Massachusetts 
Bay, New York, and Connecticut, at the City of New York in Sep- 
tember last, it was agreed in behalf of the said Governments that 
an Expedition shou'd be undertaken against the French Fort at 
Crown Point ; That certain Measures shou'd be used to retain & 
confirm the Indians of the Six Nations & others in Alliance with 
them in the Interest of the English Governments, and other Mat- 
ters were agreed upon for the Defence of ' the English Colonies 
against the French and Indian Enemy; and also that there shou'd 
be another Meeting of the Commissrs. about the middle of Decem- 
ber next, and that in the mean time all the other Governments 
from New Hampshire to Virginia shou'd be invited & earnestly 
urged to join in this Publick & Important Undertaking, wherein 
His Majestie's Honour and the Interest of all His Subjects in North 
America are so deeply concern'd. The Agreement of the Commis- 
sioners was laid before the General Assembly of that Province in 
their late Session, but finding so thin an appearance of the Repre- 
sentatives, and most of the principal Members absent, Mr. Shirley 
judg'd it best to adjourn the Assembly to Tuesday the Seventeenth 
Instant; this obliged him to entreat the Government of Pennsyl- 
vania to order their Publick Business so as that the Assembly may 
be able to meet about the time when we may expect to know their 
Resolutions upon this Affair/ 

" As the Province of Massachusetts Bay is suppos'd to be now 
sitting, & we may every Day expect to receive their Resolves in 
order to be laid before You for your Sentiments & Concurrence, & 
as we cannot think but You will heartily join in promoting every 
Scheme that shall appear to contribute to retain & encrease the 
Friendship of the Indians, you will readily comply with Mr. Shir- 
ley's Request. 

"ANTHONY PALMER, President. 

"25th November, 1747." 

A Petition from the Criminals under Sentence of Death was read, 
& likewise a Letter from the Chief justice relating to them, & the 
Consideration thereof was postpon'd till to-morrow, to which time 
the Council adjourn'd & the Secretary was order'd to tell the ab- 
sent Members that their attendance was required. 



158 MINUTES OF THE 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 26th November, 1747. 

present : 
The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr. President. 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ") 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, | 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, ^Esqrs. 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, 

William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approv'd. 

The Petition from Patrick Burne, .Michael Burne, & William 
Ward, Prisoners under Sentence of Death, & the Chief Justice's 
Letter in relation to them, were again read, & after much Delibera- 
tion the Board determin'd that the Warrant shou'd be Signed to the 
Sheriff for their Execution on Saturday the 7th Day of December, 
of which the Criminals were to have immediate Notice. 

The Consideration of the State of the Province was again re- 
sum' d, and from the Accounts brought by Persons of Credit, some 
of them belonging to this Port, who had been taken by the Ene- 
mies Privateers & carried Prisoners into one or other of the Spanish 
or French Islands, it appear' d that Several Privateers from dif- 
ferent Places might be expected to come on the Coast in the Spring, & 
numbers falling into Company together, tho' there shou'd not have 
been any Scheme previously concerted (which is also very much to 
be fear'd), might join Forces and attempt the City. It further ap- 
pear'd that the Inhabitants of the City, to the number of 260, had 
from these just Apprehensions presented a Petition to the Assem- 
bly to put the City & Province into some Posture of Defence, and 
that many Hundreds had enter'd into an Association for the gen- 
eral Defence of the City & Province, & intending to erect one or 
more Batteries at the narrowest & most proper Places of the River, 
had petitioned the honoble. Prop' 8 for an early Supply of Cannon 
& Arms ) and that the Corporation, concurring with the Associa- 
tors, had likewise preferred a Petition to the Proprietaries, setting 
forth the defenceless Condition of the City, & praying their aid & 
an early Supply of Cannon, &c. It further appeared that the Mer- 
chants of the City had Petition' d the Board of the Admiralty for a 
Man of War to be sent early enough to protect the Trade, & to 
prevent or defeat the mischievous designs of our Enemies. 

On Consideration hereof, the Board resolv'd to give all due Pro- 
tection & Encouragement to the Members of the Association, it 
being the only Method thought on likely to preserve the Lives & 
Properties of their Fellow-Citizens in case of a Descent; and like- 
wise to give the Proprietors an account of what was propos'd to 
be done for the Defence of the Place, and to bespeak their favour- 
able Reception of the several Addresses which would go by this 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 159 

Conveyance; and Mr. Taylor & Mr. Hopkinson are desir'd to pre- 
pare the Draught of a suitable Letter to them on this Important 
Occasion. 



At a Council held at Philada. the 28th Novr., 1747. 

PRESENT I 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Samuel Hasell, Abraham Taylor, ") -^ 

Robert Strettell, Thomas Hopkinson, j ±jS( * rs ' 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

Two Members of Assembly having in the morning delivered to 
the Secretary a written Message from the House, dated yesterday, 
the same was read in the words following, viz f> : 

i A Message from the Assembly. 
" May it please the President & Council : 

"The Duke of Newcastle in his Letter to Governor Shirley, 
dated the 30th May last, to which you are pleased to refer us, 
directs Governor Shirley & Commodore Knowles ' to procure an 
Account of the whole Expence incurr'd on Account of the Ameri- 
can Troops, from the time of their being Levied to the time of their 
Discharge, and when the same should be fully adjusted and liqui- 
dated to transmit it to him, with the proper Touchers from the 
several Governors, that it might be laid before Parliament, to the 
end that Provision might be made for the Payment. And after 
signifying His Majesty's Intention that the Americans shou'd be 
immediately discharged, except the few there mentioned/ directs 
' that the manner of discharging them, and the satisfaction for their 
time, should be left to Governor Shirley & Commodore Knowles/ 
who, in pursuance of these Instructions, in their Letters to You 
have requested you would furnish them with the particular Accounts 
& Proofs they judge necessary for that purpose ; and tho' they are 
also directed c to recommend it to the Governors of the Provinces 
where those Levies have been made to procure Credit from the re- 
spective Assemblies, in order to prevent any Complaint amongst 
the Men that have been inlisted for want of immediate Pay/ Yet 
we apprehend till the Sums due to the several Companies are regu- 
larly ascertain'd, it is not in our Power to judge what Credit or 
Money may be expected to be borrowed from this Province for the 
King's Use on Account of the Levies rais'd here. But consider- 
ing the great Desertions in those Companies & the Payments made 
them by Governor Clinton, who, we presume, had the Command 
in Chief of these Troops, we hope there can be no extraordinary 
occasion of Complaint amongst the Men for want of their remain- 
ing Pay till Provision shall be made for them by Parliament, or at 



160 MINUTES OF THE 

least till their Accounts can be fully adjusted and Liquidated in 
the manner directed by the Duke of New Castle's Letter. 

" The Accounts necessary for settling the Expence of the Penn- 
sylvania Companies to the time of their leaving this Province we 
suppose are mostly in your Hands j but the several Sums of Money 
granted upon this Occasion, & which by our Votes & Minutes ap- 
pear to have been paid for the King's Use, with such other Mate- 
rials as are in our Power, we have ordered to be laid before You. 
" Sign'd by Order of the House. 

"JOHN KINSEY, Speaker. 
"Nov'- 27th, 1747." 

An Account of Money given to the King's Use by the Assembly, 
viz : 

Mo. 

"1746 — 4. Given by Act of Assembly for the 

King's Use £5,000 

Mo. th. 

" Do. — 8. 17. Given to the King's Use by order 

of Assembly- - - - 450 
" 1747. Paid by the Treasurer to Governor Thomas 

by Order of Assembly as ^ Account 

settled with him, 1747 - - - 211 8^ 
" Do. Paid by Order of the House to several 

Innholders for Dieting the Soldiers - 552 16 11 



£6,213 17 7 



" There are several other Demands of the Innholders on Acco f - 
of Dieting & Taking Care of the Sick Men nor yet allowed by the 
House. 

" Signed by Order of the House, 

"B. FRANKLIN, Clerk of Assembly." 
The Gentlemen of the Committee having prepar'd a Letter to 
the Proprietaries, the same was read & approv'd, & sign'd by the 
Presid'- & the Members present. 

" Philada., 27th Nov r - 1747. 

" Gentlemen : 

" In our Letter of the 29th July last we laid before You the 
State of the Province at that time. We are now to acquaint You 
with the present State of it, & are sorry to say that our Circum- 
stances are not changed for the better, but that this City in particular 
must be look'd upon to be in a much more dangerous Situation than 
it has hitherto appear' d to be since the commencement of the French 
War. 

" The French, by the Prisoners they have taken and otherwise, 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 161 

liaving fully inform'd themselves of the naked and defenceless Con- 
dition we are in, have at length presum'd to take their Station in 
our Bay, and either by Corruption or some other Methods have 
found out the Art of procuring the Assistance of the Pilots, by 
which Means our Inward and Outward Bound Vessels are wholly 
at their Mercy, and we are given to understand that as they met 
with such great Success last Summer, they intend to augment their 
Force and make a push for Something more considerable in the 
Spring, which we apprehend must be and can hardly be suppos'dto 
be any other than an Attempt on the City. What the Consequences 
of such an Invasion upon a Place without Force or any Means for 
Defence will be You will easily imagine. It is past a Doubt that 
the City must be given up to the Plunder of a cruel Enemy, & the 
Inhabitants left to the Exercise of the brutal Passions of a sett of 
Banditti usually employed in the Enemy's Privateers, and to com- 
pleat our Misfortunes the burning of the City will probably be the 
last Act of the Enemy. 

" These Considerations afford but a melancholy prospect of the 
approaching Year, & many have resolved to send away their Familys 
& Effects at the opening of the Spring, 

" Under these unhappy Circumstances the Inhabitants of the 
City are greatly alarmed, and despairing that any Provision will be 
made by the Assembly for their Protection they have generally 
enter' d into an Association for that purpose, and many hundreds 
have resolv'd to learn Military Discipline and form themselves into 
Bodies, and such Arms as can be made serviceable will be collected. 
They have likewise form'd a Scheme for erecting a Battery on the 
River, which may be so plac'd as effectually to prevent any Attempt 
on the City; and we understand Applications are intended to be 
made to You for some Cannon for the Battery. As these Measures 
seem so necessary for the Publick Safety we cannot but heartily 
approve them, and doubt not but they will meet with Your. En- 
couragement, being well assur'd of Your Concern for the welfare 
of this Province & its Inhabitants; thus will this City owe its pre- 
servation, under G-od, to the same Family from which it had its 
Birth & Foundation. 

"The Assembly is now sitting and have under their Considera- 
tion a Petition for the Defence of the City & the Protection of its 
Trade, Sign'd by great numbers of People of all Ranks and Condi- 
tions (and amongst the rest no less than Sixty- two of those hitherto 
deem'd to be against Defence). What Success it may have we can- 
not at present say, but apprehend that it will meet with the same 
Fate as all Applications of that sort have hitherto had, 

" The Merchants of the City having set forth in a Petition to the 
Lords of the Admiralty the ruinous State of our Trade, & that it is 
likely to become worse, have pray'd their Lordships that a Man of 

VOL. V. — 11. 



162 MINUTES OF THE 

War may be appointed on the New York Station, & be ordered to 
come sometimes within the Bay of Delaware. This Petition is sent 
to Mr. Simpson to be presented to their Lordships by him & the 
other Gentlemen who have contracted to supply with Provisions His 
Majestie's Navy in the West Indies; and we have reason to think 
they will be attended by most of the Merchants concerned in the 
American Trade. 

u As We have sign'd the Petition, & are importun'd by the rest 
to write in its favour to the Proprietors, we desire You will do all 
in your Power to promote its Success, whereby You will confer the 
greatest Obligations on all the Petitioners, & in particular on 
" Gentlemen, Your most obedient Servants,- 

"ANTHONY PALMER, 
" THOMAS LAWRENCE, 
"SAMUEL HASELL, 
« "WILLIAM TILL, 

" ABRAHAM TAYLOR, 
"ROBERT STRETTELL, 
"JOSEPH TURNER, 
"THOMAS HOPKINSON, 
"WILLIAM LOGAN." 
The London Ship being expected to Sail in the morning, the 
Secretary was directed to offer it to the absent Members in the 
Afternoon, and if they approv'd, to desire them to sign it. 

A Letter from Mr. Weiser to the Secretary, dated the 24th In- 
stant, was read, purporting that Shikalamy being at his House on a 
Visit he delivered to him the Present of the Council, for which he 
returned the Council his hearty thanks; that the Ohio Indians re- 
peated to Shikalamy what had pass'd at Philadelphia, with which 
he was mightily pleas' d; they further assur'd him that the Janontady 
Hayas, the Twigtwees, the Unich Cathallan, the Konatawadeany, 
the Quisagochroanos had actually made Use of their Hatchet against 
the French in favour of the English, & expected the English wou'd 
assist them with Necessaries ; that the said Indians had seiz'd all 
the French Goods they cou'd meet with, and knocked some of the 
Traders in the Head, and some they permitted to go to Canada 
naked & acquaint their father Onontio that his Children the Indians 
were angry with him. And in a Postscrip Mr. Weiser adds this 
Important piece of News, that the Gechdagechroanos & the Runateg- 
wechsuchroanos, two Strong -Nations of Indians, had received the 
French Hatchet, & sometime last Summer several hundreds of them 
were coming this way to make an Invasion upon this or the Neigh- 
bouring Provinces, but were persuaded to go back again by the 
Twigtwees, who told them it wou'd be as much as declaring War 
against the Six Nations & their Allies, who were become one body 
with the English. These two Nations live to the West of the Lakes, 
not far from the Mississippi. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 163 

"Tlie Secretary was order'd to lay the Letter before the Assembly, 
which was accordingly done. 

A Message from the Assembly by two of their Members, viz. : 
that the House inclin'd to adjourn to the first Monday in January. 

The Members were told that the propos'd adjournment was quite 
unexpected, as there were sundry Matters of great Conseqence under 
deliberation; but as they claim' d the Right of adjourning when & 
fro what time they pleas'd, the Council was oblig'd to acquiesce. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia the 3d Deer., 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel HaseK, "] 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, I ™ 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, ] " 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, j 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approved. 

The Warrant for the Execution of Patrick Burne, Michael Burne 5 
& William Ward not being yet sign'd, the President & four of the 
Eldest Members Sign'd it, After which it was agreed that William 
Ward shou'd be Reprieved at the Gallows, and a Reprieve was 
order' d to be got ready against Saturday morning, to which time 
the Council adjourn' d. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 5th December, 1747, 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, *) 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, { -™ 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, ] ^ 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 
William Ward's Reprieve was Sign'd by the President & the 
four Eldest Members, in these words : 

u George the Second, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain^ 

France, & Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, & so forth, 
a To the Sheriff of the City & County of Philadelphia, Greeting : 
u Whereas, By our Warrant under the Lesser Seal of our Prov- 
ince of Pennsylvania, bearing date the 3d Day of this Instant, Dec r,? 
to You directed, We did Command & Require you, the said Sheriff, 
that you should, on the fifth Day of this Instant, December, execute 



1SZ MINUTES OF THE 

a Judgment lately given against William "Ward by having the said 
William Ward hung by the Neck until he should be Dead, We 
do hereby Command You that from the Execution of the said Wil- 
liam Ward by virtue of the said Warrant you totally abstain. In 
Testimony whereof we have cans' d the Lesser Seal of our said 
Province to be hereunto affixed. Witness Anthony Palmer, Esq r " 
President, Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, William Till, & 
Abraham Taylor, Esquires, in Council at Philadelphia the 5th Bay 
of December, in the Year of our Lord, 1747, and in the Twenty- 
first Year of our Reign. 

"ANTHONY PALMER, 
"THOMAS LAWRENCE, 
" SAMUEL HASELL, 
"WILLIAM TILL, 
"ABRAHAM TAYLOR." 

The Draughts of a Letter to Governor Clinton, k of another to 
Governor Shirley, were read & approv'd, & order'd to be transcribe 
fair & Sign'd by the President. 

" Philada.-, 5th De@ 7 > 1747. 
"Sir: 

"The Assembly meeting in pursuance of a Summons- on the 23<f 
of November, the Council laid before them the several Letters & 
Papers receiv'd from their Excellencies Governor Shirley a&d Ad- 
miral Knowles, relating to the dismission & Pay of the American; 
Levies,, and likewise Your Excellency's Letters on that Subject & 
the- Estimate, and notwithstanding they were convened on this very 
account, & pressed by the Council to give it all the Dispatch possible,, 
yet aifter sitting four Days they return'd no other answer than tha-t 
' they apprehend till the Sums due to the several Companies are 
regularly ascertained it is not in their Powe? to judge what Credit 
or Money may be expected to be borrowed from this Province for 
the King's Use on account of the Levies rais'd here ; But consider- 
ing the great DcsertioBS in those Companies, & the Payments made 
them by Governor Clinton, who they presume had the Command 
in Chief of those Troops, they hope there can be no extraordinary 
occasion of Complaint amongst the Men for want of their remaining. 
Pay till Provision shall be made for them by Parliament, or at least 
till their accounts can be fully adjusted k liquidated in the manner 
directed by the Duke of Newcastle's Letter.' 

"While the Council was considering the extraordinary answer, 
not having had it half an hour before them, they were surpriz'd 
with a verbal Message by two Members, informing them that the 
House had adjourn' d to the first Monday in January; and tho' the 
two Members who brought this unexpected Message were told by 
the Council that there were several Important Affairs under Con- 
sideration, yet the House adher'd to their Adjournment & broke up 
Instantly; and as they have this Privilege it was not in the Power 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 165 

«o£ the Council to prevent it. One of the Members of the Assem- 
bly said he believed the House adjourn'd to a short Day, supposing 
the Council wou'd be furnished by that time with materials for 
knowing the exact Sum demanded of the Province. It was thought 
the Estimate you was so good as to send wou'd serve to show pretty 
nearly the Money wanted, but as the Assembly took no notice of 
this, and insist on knowing the exact Sum before they determine 
what todo, lam obtig'd once more to desire you wou'd settle thatSuni 
with the Officers & Men, & when done to transmit it in an authen- 
ticated manner, so that there may be no further pretence of Delay. 

"Do you propose to send your own account of the Sums advane'd 
by you for the Provision & Pay of the four Pennsylvania Com- 
panies while they were under your Command to me, to be trans- 
mitted to Mr. Shirley and Mr. Knowles in the manner directed by 
their joint Letter? Or as You have already sent over some Accounts 
relating to these Companies when you paid them off in June, d<$> 
You chuse to send them with their proper Certificates immediately 
to the Duke of New Castle or to those Gentlemen? If you take 
this last method, then I conceive, as Mr. Thomas' accounts of all 
the Monies paid on account of those four Companies till they ar- 
rived within your Province are already Liquidated & lodg'd in the 
proper Office in England, there remains no more for the Council to 
do than to transmit with authentick Certificates the Copies of the 
several Minutes of Council & of Assembly that have pass'd or shall 
pass touching or any wise concerning the American Levies. This 
being the Light in wkich this Affair appears to me at present I 
shall fee oblig'd to you to give me your Sentiments on it, that the 
Council may do what is regular & what will be expected from them 
in pursuance of the Orders transmitted to them by Governor Shirley 
& Admiral Knowles' Letters. 

"I ant, with sincere Regard, 

" Your Excellency's most obed L humble Servant, 
"ANTHONY PALMER. 

"I nave enclosed Copies of the Messages between y e Council & 
Assembly on this Subject. 

"His Excell cy " George Clinton, Esqr." 

"Phxlaba., Bec T - 5th, 1747. 

"The enclosed Copies of the Messages that have passed between 
the Council & Assembly of this Province will Inform You what has 
heen done in pmrswance of your Excellency's & Admiral Knowles' 
Letters, and what likelyhood there is of a complyance with His 
Majestie's Demand. 

"The Assembly soon after presenting their answer sent a Message 
hj two Members to inform the Board that the House had adjourn'd 
$0 the 1st Monday in Jamuary, & tho' the Persons who brought the 



166 MINUTES OF THE 

Message were told that there were under Consideration several mas- 
ters of great consequence,, yet they broke up, & thereby prevented 
all further Applications from the Board. 

"One of the Members who were sent to inform the Council of 
this unexpected adjournment said it was made on a supposition that 
the certain Sum wanted to Pay off the Soldiers wou'd be then known. 
One wou'd think by this that at least he believed they wou'd ad- 
vance the Money, but as they have not, that we hear of, declared 
their willingness to do it, we cannot take- upon us to give any other 
Expectations than what may be gathered from their answer. 

"When Mr. Clinton shall have adjusted the Sum due to the 
Officers & Men at the time of their dismission he will furnish Us 
with the Account, and we shall not fail to repeat our Recommenda- 
tions of this Service to the Assembly at their next Sitting. 

"What they design to do with respect to the several matters 
already concerted or to be concerted by the Commissioners for the 
common Safety of all the Colonies, which depends so much on dis- 
lodging the French from their Stronghold at Crown Point, & thereby 
securing the Indians to the English Interest, cannot be known, for 
they return'd no answer to the Message which accompanied your 
Letter of the 9th Nov 1 ** on that Subject. 

" I am Your Excellency's most obed t Servant,. 

"ANTHONY PALMER. 

"His Excell oy - William Shirley, Esq 7 -" 

A Letter from Mr. Weiser was read, & ordered to be enter'd, Sc 
laid before the Assembly at their next Sitting. 

"Faxton, Nov* 28th, 1747. 
"Sir: 

" Last night I arrived here with the Indians all in good Health 
but Oanachquasy, the Speaker, who took sick by the way from 
Philadelphia to my House-, and one of the Women, but I hope not 
dangerously. This Bay I deliver' d the Goods to them 7 and they 
are well pleased for my adding two half Barrels of Powder to the 
four which they were to have. George Croghan was present, and 
lie undertook to find Men and Horses to carry the Powder and the 
Lead, with tw9 Casks of Liquor for them, to Ohio. I was oblig'd 
to allow them the Liquor because they all followed my Advice and 
did not get drunk, neither in Town nor by the way. Seaiohady,. 
after they had received the Goods, spoke to me in the following 
manner : ' Brother, I am very glad that our Brethren in Philadel- 
phia took into their serious Consideration what we have said to- 
them. The French Party is very strong among us, and if we had 
failed in our Journey to Philadelphia, or our Expectations wou'd- 
sot have been granted by our Brethren in Philadelphia, the Indians 
would have gone over to the French to a Man, and wou'd have re- 
ceived Presents (or Supplies) from the French,, who have offcr'd It, 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 167 

but now I hope We've got the better of them. Let me desire You 
to set out early in the Spring with the Supplies our Brethren have 
been pleased to promise Us, and send somebody before You to give 
us timely Notice that we may meet, for we are scattered up & down 
the Country, & we will send three or four Men to meet You by the 
way and to convey You to the place appointed; pray don't miss, 
and let us that are for our Brethren the English not be asham'd ; 
the French Party who speak now under the Ground will speak 
above the Ground if You shou'd miss, but if You arrive early in 
the Spring all the Indians will unite heartily, & the French Party 
will be brought over to us/ They spoke to me & George Croghan, 
who must be my guide. I made answer that nothing should be 
wanting that I could do, and if I was alive and well I hoped to see 
them in their Country next Spring before the Grass comes out, or 
at farthest when they begin to Plant their Corn. 

u Scaiohady pressed upon me to put the Government in mind of 
what he had said against the Traders in Bum, that it might be 
suppressed, for the Indians (said he) will drink away all they have 
and not be able to do any thing against the Enemy for want of 
Ammunition ; and if rightly considered, Death, without Judge or 
Jury, to any Man that carrys Bum to sell to any Indian Town, is 
the only remedy to prevent that Trade & a just reward to the 
Traders, for nothing else will do. It is an abomination before God 
& Man, to say nothing of the particular Consequences it is alto- 
gether hurtful to the Publick, for what little Supplies we can give 
them to carry on the War is not half sufficient, they must buy the 
greatest part with their hunting, and if they meet with Bum they 
will buy that before anything, and not only drink away their Skins 
but their Cloathing and every thing they may get of us ; in short, 
the Inconveniences occasion' d by that Trade are numerous at this 
very time, the English & French Party will fall out in their Drunk- 
enness and murder one another, & the English will be charged 
with the mischief thereof. I must leave off before I wear out your 
Patience, & remain, 

u Sir, Your very Dutiful, 

" CONRAD W T EISEB. 

"P. S. — Scaiohady told Shikalamy at my House very privately 
that Peter Chartier & his Company had accepted of the French 
Hatchet, but kept in their bosom till they wou'd see what Interest 
they cou'd make in favour of the French. 

" To Richard Peters, Esqr." 

The Board appointed Mr. Lawrence & Mr. Logan a Committee 
to consider what methods can be apply'd to prevent the abuses com- 
plained of by the Indians, & to make their Reports so as to form a 
proper Message to the Assembly on this Subject at their next 
Sitting. 



168 MINUTES OF THE 

Mr. Lawrence is requested to issue a "Writ to apprehend a French- 
man, one Captain De Cheverie, who was order'd to go on board 
Captain Casnay along with the Spanish Prisoners, yet notwith- 
standing this Order continues in Town, & walks publickly about 
the Streets. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, at the Court House, the 7th 
Dec r - 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ~) 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, V Esqrs. 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, j 

The Associators to the number of near Six Hundred being drawn 
up under Arms before the Court House, the Secretary was order'd 
to make the following Declaration : 

" Gentlemen — 

"I am commanded by their Honours the President & Councils 
to acquaint You that Your Proceedings are not disapprov'd by the 
Government, & that if You go on & chuse your Officers according 
to your Articles, Commissions will be readily granted them." 



In the Council Chamber at Philadelphia, 8th December, 1747. 
present : 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, 



Esqrs. 



Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, 

Thomas Hopkinson, 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approved. 

The Members taking into Consideration the State of the War in 
general, the Sickness that lately rag'd over this City & the Province, 
the probability of our Enemies making a Descent on the City, & 
the calamitous Situation of our Frontiers on the Dismission of the 
Forces rais'd for the intended Expedition against Canada, thought 
it highly necessary to awaken in the minds of the Inhabitants of 
this Province a just Sense of their Condition, & to call upon them 
by a Proclamation to implore with fervency & Solemnity the mer- 
ciful Protection of Almighty God, & appointed Mr. Taylor & Mr. 
Hopkinson a Committee to prepare a suitable Proclamation for a 
General Fast against to-morrow in the Afternoon. 



1 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 169 

At a Council held at Philadelphia, 9th Dee r -' 1747. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esq., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, William Till, ~\ 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, I Esqrs. ■ 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approv'd. 

Mr. Taylor & Mr. Hopkinson having prepar'd the Draught of a 
Proclamation for the appointment of a General Fast on Thursday, 
the 7th Day of January next, the same was read & approv'd, & 
order' d to be engross'd & publish'd to-morrow forenoon at the Court 
House with the usual Solemnity. 

" By the Honourable the President & Council of the Province of 
Pennsylvania. 
"A PROCLAMATION 
"for a general fast. 
" Forasmuch as it is the Duty of mankind, on all suitable oc- 
casions to adknowledge their dependence on the Divine Being, to 
give Thanks for the Mercies received, and no less to deprecate his 
Judgments and humbly pray for his Protection; And as the ca- 
lamities of a bloody War, in which our Nation is now engaged, seem 
every Year more nearly to approach us, and the Expedition form'd 
for the security of these Plantation hath been laid aside, As the 
Inhabitants of this Province & City have been sorely visited with 
mortal sickness in the Summer past, & there is just reason to fear 
that unless we humble ourselves before the Lord & amend our 
Ways, we may be chastized with yet heavier Judgments, We have, 
therefore, thought fit, on due consideration thereof, to appoint 
Thursday, the seventh Day of January next, to be observed 
throughout this Province as a Day of Fasting & Prayer, exhorting 
all, both Ministers & People, to observe the same with becoming 
seriousness & attention, & to join with one accord in the most hum- 
ble & fervent Supplications That Almighty God would mercifully 
interpose and still the Rage of War among the Nations & put a 
stop to the effusion of Christian Blood j That he would preserve 
and bless our Gracious King, guide his Councils, & give him victory 
over his Enemies to the establishing a speedy & lasting Peace ; 
That he would bless, prosper, & preserve all the British Colonies, 
and particularly that he would take this Province under his Protec- 
tion, Confound the designs and defeat the Attempts of its Enemies, 
& unite our Hearts and strengthen our Hands in every Undertaking 
that may be for the Publick Good, and for our defence & Security 
in this time of Danger; That he would graciously please to bless 
the succeeding Year with Health, Peace, & Plenty, & enable us to 



170 MINUTES OF THE 

make a right use of his late afflicting Hand in a sincere and tho- 
rough Reformation of our Lives & Manners, to which the Minis- 
ters of all Religious Societies are desir'd earnestly to exhort their 
People. And it is recommended to all Persons to abstain from 
servile Labour on the said Day. 

" Given at Philadelphia, under the Great Seal of the said Province, 
the ninth Day of December in the Twenty-first Year of the Reign 
our Sovereign Lord, George the Second, by the Grace of God of 
Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, & ca- 
Annoqz Domini, 1747. 

"ANTHONY PALMER, President. 
" By Order of the President & Council. 
"Richard Peters, Secry. 

"GOD SAVE THE KING." 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 29th Deer., 1747. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esq., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ~\ 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, > Esqrs. 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approved. 

A Letter from Governor Shirley, Dated at Boston the 5th Instant, 
was read & order'd to be enter'd. 

" Boston, Dec T - 5th, 1747. 
"Sir: 

" I am favour'd with Your Letter of the 10th of November, 
which I communicated to Mr. Knowles, who is now sail'd for his 
Command in the West Indies. And I am to inform You that since 
mine of the 29th Oct r - to You, Mr. Knowles & I have received a 
Letter from Governor Clinton, wherein he acquaints us that he had 
paid the Levies of his own Government, Pennsylvania, Maryland, 
& Virginia, to the 24th June last, after the rate of Six pence Sterling 
^ Day over & above the Provisions which have been allowed 'em, 
& that he shou'd pay them off, at least the Levies of his own Gov- 
ernment, the remainder still due to them at the same rate, which 
intirely fixes the Article of Pay with Regard to the Levies of those 
four Governments, and will make any Abatement or Stopage in the 
Pay of the Levies of the other Governments for Provisions or bil- 
letting Money allow'd them by the Colonies seem unequal & 
grevious, & raise the utmost Discontents among them, to the preju- 
dice of His Majestie's Service in general upon any future Emer- 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 1T1 

gencies of the like Nature ; all which Mr. Knowles & I think it 
most adviseable to prevent, and therefore look upon ourselves in a 
great measure oblig'd to conform to Mr. Clinton's Rate of Payment 
with Respect to the New England Forces & those of New Jersey ; 
which we have accordingly determin'd shall be paid 6d a-Day, with- 
out any Deduction for the Provisions or billetting Money allow'd 
them by the respective Governments where they were rais'd, which 
determination we the more readily come into, as We find it is 
agreeable not only to the expectation of the Soldiers but to the 
opinion likewise of all the Governments concerned in the Expedi- 
tion from whom we have yet heard ; and this we thought it wou'd 
be proper, Sir, to communicate to You, that in case You are to pay 
the Pennsylvania Levies what remains due to them, You may know 
Mr. Knowles' & my opinion therein, viz., that they shou'd be paid 
Sixpence Sterling ^p Day clear of any Stoppage for Provisions or 
billetting which they have actually received. 

" You have not mention'd any thing to Mr. Knowles & me con- 
cerning the Arms & Cloathing of the Pennsylvania Levies, so that 
I conclude Your Government has no demand upon the Crown for 
the Expence of them, and if it had I presume You wou'd have 
Transmitted us the Accounts & Vouchers, that we might have 
transmitted them to His Grace, with the other Accounts of the Ex- 
pedition, pursuant to his Grace's Directions to us. 
" I am, with great Regard & Esteem, Sir, 

" Your most obed f - humble Servant, 

"W. SHIRLEY. 
" Honoble. Anthony Palmer, Esq r -" 

A Letter in Answer having been prepared, the same was read & 
approv'd. 

" Philada., 29th Dec 1 > 1747. 
"Sir: 

" Your Excellency's letter of the 5th Instant came to hand yester- 
day, and as the Assembly sits on Munday next, there will be an op- 
portunity of laying it before them. It is suppos'd they will then 
come to their final Resolutions with respect to His Majestie's 
Demand, which will be transmitted to you when received without 
Delay. 

" Your Excellency will be pleas' d to be referr'd to Mr. Lawrence's 
Letter of the 20th October last, in answer to Admiral Knowles & 
Your joint Letter, wrote in my absence, wherein he informs You 
that Governor Thomas advanced the sums that were laid out in the 
Purchase of Arms, Clothes, & ca -> for the four Pennsylvania Com- 
panies, and sent authenticated acco ts - thereof with proper Vouchers 
to his Grace the Duke of New Castle, and as the Bills drawn for those 
Sums were paid, & none of the Accounts or the Vouchers are in 



172 MINUTES OF THE 

the Power of the Council, they judg'd You wou'd agree with them 
that these Accounts wou'd not now be now meddled with, & that 
no more cou'd be expected than to give Your Excellency Informa- 
tion of what Governor Thomas had done. 

u The Forces rais'd here being under Governor Clinton's Com- 
mand, he was requested to observe the same Method, & to make 
the same Demands with respect to them as he did with respect to 
the other Companies, & tho' I have not yet receiv'd his answer, I 
make no doubt but the Pennsylvania Forces met with the same 
Treatment as the others, and if it shou'd happen that Your Direc- 
tions have not been punctually complied with, is undoubtedly owing 
to the particular Circumstances the Forces were in at the time of 
their Discharge. 

u I am, Sir, Your most obedient, humble Servant, 

"ANTHONY PALMER. 

" His Excels William Shirley, Esq." 

11 Much time was taken up in the serious Consideration of the 
State of the Province, and least the Cannon wrote for to England 
for the Supply of the Batteries, the principal thing relied on for 
the Defence of the City, shou'd not arrive in time, it was unani- 
mously agreed to take the opportunity of the Post to apply to Gov- 
ernor Clinton & Governor Shirley for a Loan of Cannon till ours 
shou'd come, and the Letters being immediately prepared, were 
read & signed by the Members. That to the Governor of New 
York in these words : 

"Philada., 29th Deer.. 1749. 
"Sir: 

" By the frequent Informations we have had & are daily receiving 
of the Designs of our Enemies from English Prisoners who have 
been among them, there is great Reason to fear this City will be 
attempted in the Spring; and as our Assembly consist for the most 
part of Quakers principled against Defence, the Inhabitants despair 
of their doing any thing for their Protection, they having been 
very frequently applied to for that End without Success. These 
Considerations have induced great numbers, as well in the Country 
as in Town, to enter into an Association for the Defence of this 
City & Province, and several Companies are already form'd. As a 
further Security, the Associators have contriv'd to raise a Sum of 
Money to be laid out in Building a battery or two on the River, 
and have wrote to England to purchase Cannon fit for the purpose ; 
but as the Designs of our Enemies will probably be put in Execu- 
tion in the Spring, the Cannon they have wrote for may possibly 
arrive too late ; we therefore, at the Request of great numbers of 
the Associators, and from our own Sense of the great Danger to 
which this Colony lies exposed, earnestly entreat Your Excell C) - that 
You wou'd furnish this Government with as many battering Can- 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL, 3735 

mm asean conveniently be spared, which we assure Your Excellency 
shall be returned on Demand, Your Compliance with our Request 
will contribute much to His Ma^estie's Service, as it may be the 
means of preserving this valuable part of His Dominions, or at 
least prevent the plundering of the City, and will conferr the highest 
obligations on Us & the rest of the Inhabitants of this Province. 
" We are, with perfect Esteem & Regard, 

" YciM" Excellency's most obedient Servants', 

"ANTHONY PALMER, 
"THOMAS LAWRENCE, 
" SAMUEL HASELL, 
"WILLIAM TILL, 
"ABRAHAM TAYLOR, 
"ROBERT STRETTELL, 
" BEN J u ° SHOEMAKER, 
"THOMAS BOPKINSON^ 
"JOSEPH TURNER. 

(i His Excels George Clinton, Esq?/' 

The same Members sign'd the Letter to Mr. Shirley which fol- 
lows : 

"Pbilada, 7 29th Deer., 1147, 
"Sir: 

" By the frequent informations we bsve bad & are daily receiving 
of the Designs of our Enemies frosa English Prisoners who have 
been among them, there is great Reason to fear this City will be 
attempted in the Spring; and as our Assembly consist for the most 
part of Quakers principled against Defence, the Inhabitants despair 
of their doing anything for their Protection, tbey having been very 
'frequently applied to for that End without Success. These Con- 
isiderations have induced great numbers, as well in the Country as 
jin Town, to enter into an Association for the Defence of this City 
\k Province, and several Companies are already form r d, As a fur- 
ther Security, the Associators have contrived to raise a Sum of 
Money to be laid out in building a Battery or two or the River, an J 
pave wrote to England to purchase Cannon fit for the purpose ; but 
p the Designs of our Enemies will probably be put in Execution in* 
he Spring, the Cannon they have wrote for may possibly a?rive too* 
ate; We therefore,, at the Request of great numbers of the Associa- 
tes, and from our own Sense of the great Danger to which this 
polony lies expos'd, earnestly entreat Your Excellency that You 
would furnish this Government with as many battering Cannon as 
pan conveniently be spared, which we assure Your Excellency shall 
be return'd on Demand, Your Complyance with our Request will 
contribute much to His Majestie's Service, as it may be the means 
>f preserving this valuable Part of his Dominions, or at least prevent 
she plundering of the City, and will conferr the highest Obligation® 
bo Us & the rest of the Inhabitants of this Province, 



174 MINUTES OF THE 

" We further beg your Excellency wou'd use your Interest with 
the Commanders of such of His Majestie's Ships as may be station'd 
within Your Government or at Cape breton, that they may extend 
their Cruises to our Capes, without which our Trade, we imagine, 
will be quite block'd up & destroyed next Summer. 

u We hope the Liberty we have taken will meet with a favourable 
Interpretation, & that the same Zeal which Your Excellency has 
shewn upon a former occasion to augment his Majestie's Dominions 
may, without prejudice to your own Government, be exerted to the 
preservation of this Province. 

"We are, with perfect Esteem & Kegard, & 01 
" His Excellent Will m - Shirley, Esqr." 

The Secretary laid before the Board a number of Blank Military 
Commissions, which were Signed by the President & the four Eldest 
Members of Council present, in order to be ready against New Year's 
Day, the Day appointed by the Associators to Elect & present their 
Officers. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia the 1st January, 1747. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, *) 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, I ™ 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, j ^ 

Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approv'd. 
The Associators having form'd themselves into several Companies, 
appear' d this Day under Arms & proceeded to chuse their Officers, 
& the following Gentlemen being Elected & return'd for the Appro- 
bation of the Council, the Secretary was order'd to fill up the Blanks 
in the Commissions Sign'd last Council Day, with their names, & 
to Countersign the Commissions. 

John Inglis, Esqr., Captain. 

Lynford Lardner, Gent., Lieutenant. 

Thomas Lawrence, Jun, Gent., Ensign. 

John Boss, Esqr., Capt n . 

Richard Swan, Gent., Lieut. 

Philip Benezet, Gent., Ensign. 

James Polegreen, Esqr., Capt". 

William Bradford, Gent., Lieut. 

William Bingham, Gent., Ensign. 

Charles Willing, Esq., Captain. 

Atwood Shute, Gent., Lieut. 

James Claypoole, Gent. ; Ensign. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 175 

William Cuzzins, Esqr., Captain. 

George Spafford, Gent., Lieut. 

Abraham Mason, Gent., Ensign. 

Thomas Bourne, Esqr., Captain. 

Robert Owen, Gent., Lieut. 

Peter Etter, G-ent., Ensign. 

Peacock Bigger, Esqr., Captain. 

Joseph Redmond, Gent., Lieut. 

Joseph Wood, Gent., Ensign. 

Thomas Bond, Esqr., Captain. 

Richard Farmer, Gent., Lieut. 

Plunkett Gleeson, Gent., Ensign. 

Septimus Robinson, Esqr., Captain. 

William Klemm, Gent., Lieut. 

William Rush, G-ent., Ensign. 

Richard Nixon, Esqr., Captain. 

Richard Renshaw, Gent., Lieut. 

Francis Garrigues, G-ent., Ensign. 

James Coultas, Esq., Captain. 

George Gray, Jun., Gent.. Lieut. 

Abraham Jones, Gent., Ensign. 

The above Gentlemen after receiving their Commissions withdrew 
into another Room, & in a little time waited on the Council to in- 
form their Honours that they had proceeded to elect their Superior 
Officers, and that the Choice falling on Abraham Taylor, Esqr., for 
Colonel, Thomas Lawrence, Esqr., for Lieutenant Colonel, & Samuel 
McCall for Major, they pray'd Commissions might be granted, & the 
Secretary was order' d to prepare them accordingly, to be sign'd next 
Council. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia 4th Jan ry -> 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr. President. 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ) 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, ( -^ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, | S( ^ rS * 

Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approved. 

A Letter from Governor Clinton by Express was read, together 
with the Estimates therein inclos'd, & order'd to be enter'd: 

"New York, 30th Dec r -> 1747. 
"Sir: 

" I am favour' d with your Packet of the 3d Instant, with a Copy 
of your Message to the Assembly and their answer thereto, touching 



176 



MINUTES OF THE 



the Payment of the Troops rais'd in the Province of Pennsylvania, 
and as You seem desireous to have accounts certified of what I have 
paid & victualled, and what is still due to them from the Crown upon 
account of their pay, I have enelos'd you the. whole Demand cer- 
tified by the Officers & Commissary for issuing Provisions to them 
at Albany. 

" You'll observe the Pay is only computed to 31st October last, 
the time that Mr. Shirley and Mr. Knowles discharg'd the Troops; 
but as that discharge cou'd not be made Publick 'till the 19th Nov r * 
at Albany, the Officers expect some time allow'd in Pay for them- 
selves & Men on that Account. 

" I shall be glad to know the Besolutions of Your Assembly with 
respect to these Demands as soon as may be, & then I shall be able 
to write to You more fully on the Subject Matter of Your Letter. 

" I received no Packet inclos'd for Governor Shirley, which You 
mentioned to be from S n William Gooch. 
" I am, with regard, Sir, 

" Your most obedient humble Servant, 

«G. CLINTON. 
" P. S.— -By the Acco 1, 1 transmitted to You before, Y T ou'll see 
what I have paid to these Levys, for which I have Beceipts. 
" The Honoble. Anthony Palmer, Esqr." 

An Account of the Pay due to the four Companies raised in the 
Province of Pennsylvania for the late Intended Expedition against 
Canada, from the time His Excellency the Honoble. George Clin- 
ton paid them to the time of the Discharge. 



Due to Captain Samuel Perry's v 
Company, viz. : To two Months' 
Muster, from the 25th June, 
1747, to the 24th of Aug Bt - fol- 
lowing, both days included, is 
61 Days for 4 Sergeants, 4 Cor- 
porals, 2 Drummers, & 72 Pri- 
vate Men, 

To Two Months' Muster, from 
the 25th August, 1747, to the 
24 th October following, both 
Days included, is 61 Days for 4 
Sergeants, 4 Corporals, 2 Drum- 
mers, & 72 Private Men, 

Carried over, 



Sterl* 



s. d. 



Currency. 
£ s. d. 



201 6 



201 6 



£402 12 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 



177 



Account — Continued. 



Brought over, 

To 7 days' Pay, from 25th Oct r -< 
1747, to the 31st Ins*- the 
time the Men were Discharged, 
for 4 Sergeants, 4 Corporals, 
2 Drummers, & 72 Private 
Men, 

To the Captain's Pay, from the 4th \ 
June, 1746, to the 31st October, I 
1747, is 515 Days, at 10s. Ster 5 - j 
f Day, J 

To the Lieutenant's Pay, from the"^ 
4th June, 1746, to the 31st Oct r * • 
1747, both Days included, is 515 r 
Days, at 4s. 8 SterK, 

To the Ensign's Pay, from the 4th^ 
June, 1746, to the 31st Octo- ! 
ber, 1747, is 515 Days, at 3s. f 
8 SterK, J 

The above is the Pay due to the 
Officers & Men late under my 
Command. 

SAM L - PERRY. 



Due to Capt D - William Trent's Com- 
pany, viz. : To two Months' Mus- 
ter, from the 25th June, 1747, to 
the 24th August following, both J> 
Days included, is 61 Days for 4 
Sergeants, 4 Corporals, 2 Drum- 
mers, & 53 Men, 

To two Months' Muster, from the" 
25th August, 1747, to the 24th 
of October following, both Days 
included, is 61 Days tor 4 Ser- f 
geants, 4 Corporals, 2 Drum- j 
mers, & 55 Men, J 



Sterls- 



Carried over. 
Vol. v.—12. 



£ s. d. 



257 10 



120 3 4 



94 8 4 



Currency. 

£ s. d. 
402 12 



23 2 



157 16 9 



162 8 3 



£472 1 8 



£745 19 



178 



MINUTES OF THE 



Account — Continued. 



Brought over, 

To 7 Days' Pay, from the 25th") 
Oct" 1747, to the 31st Inst., | 
the time the Men were Dis- 1 
charged, for 4 Serjeants, 4 Cor- j 
porals, 2 Drummers, & 55 Pri- { 
vate Men, J 

To the Captain's Pay, from the 4th"| 
of June, 1746, to the 31st Oc- I 
tober, 1747, is 515 Days, @ | 
10s. SterK, J 

To the Lieutenant's Pay, from the"") 
4th June, 1746, to the 31st Octf- I 
1747, is 515 Days, @ 4s. 8 \ 
SterK, J 

To the Ensign's Pay, from the 4tlT) 
June, 1746, to the 81st Oct r - I 
1747, is 515 Days, @ 3s. 8 i 
SterK, J 



The above is the Pay due to the 
Officers & Men late under my Com- 
mand. 

WILLIAM TRENT. 

Due to Captain John Diemer's" 
Company, viz. : To two Months' 
Muster, from the 25th June, 
1747, to the 24th August fol- 
lowing, both Days included, is 
61 Days for 4 Sergeants, 4 Cor- 
porals, 2 Drummers, & 38 Men,_, 

To two Months' Muster, from the 
25th August, 1747, to the 24th 
of October following, both Days 



included, is 61 Days for 4 Ser- { 

geants, 4 Corporals, 2 Drum- j 

mers, & 47 Men, J 

I 

Carried over. 



SterK 



£ s. d. 
472 1 8 



257 10 



120 3 4 



94 8 4 



Currency. 

£ s. d. 
745 19 



18 12 9 



123 10 6 



144 2 3 



£944 3 4 £1,032 4 6 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 



179 



Account — Continued. 



Brought over, 

To 7 Days' Pay, from the 25tlT| 
Oct r - 1747, to the 31st Instant, | 
the time the Men were Dis- ! 
charg'd, for 4 Serjeants, 4 • 
Corporals, 2 Drummers, & 47 
Men, 

To the Captain's Pay, from the 4th ^ 
June, 1746, to the 31st Octo- ! 
ber, 1747, is 515 Days, @ 10s. f 
SterK, J 

To the Lieutenant's Pay, from the""} 
4th June, 1746, to the 31st Oc- » 
tober, 1747, is 515 Days, @ [ 
4s. 8 SterK, J 

To the Ensign's Pay, from the 4tlTj 
June, 1746, to the 31st Octo- « 
tober, 1747, is 515 Days, @ f 
3s. 8 SterK, J 



The above is the Pay due to 
the Officers & Men late under my 
Command. 

JOHN DIEMEfv. 

Due to Captain John Shannon's" 
Company, viz. : To two Months' 
Muster, from the 25th June, 
1747, to the 24th August fol- 
lowing, both Days included, is 
61 Days for 4 Serjeants, 4 
Corporals, 2 Drummers, & 41 
Men, 

To two Months' Muster, from the : 
25th Mf- 1747, to the 24th 
October following, both Days , 
included, is 61 Days for 4 Ser- { 
geants, 4 Corporals, 2 Drum- | 
mers, & 41 Men, J 



Carried over, 



SterK 



£ s. d. 
994 3 4 



257 10 



120 3 4 



94 8 4 



£1,466 5 



Currency. 



1,032 4 6 



15 18 9 



130 7 9 



130 7 



£1,308 18 9 



180 



MINUTES OF THE 



Account — Continued. 



Brought over, 

To 7 Days' Pay, from the 25tlT| 
October to the 31st Inst'., the j 
time the Men were discharged, J> 
for 4 Serjeants, 4 Corporals, 2 | 
Drummers, & 41 Men, J 

To the Captain's Pay, from the 4th^ 
June, 1746, to the 31st Octo- I 
her, 1747, is 515 Days, @ 10s, j 
SterK, J 

To the Lieutenant's Pay, from ihe~] 
4th June, 1746, to the 31st Oc- I 
tober, 1747, is 515 Days, @ 4s. f 
8 SterK, J 

To the Ensign's Pay, from the 4tnl 
June, 1746, to the 31st Octo- { 
ber, 1747, is 515 Days, @ 3s. f 
8 SterK, J 

The above is the Pay due to 
the Officers & Men late under my 
Command. 

JN°. SHANNON. 

By two Months' Subsistance paid' 
to the Lieutenants & Ensigns by 
His Excellency the Honoble. 
George Clinton, except Captain 
Diemer's Ensign, who has not 
received any pay yet, 



SterK 



£ s. d. 
1,466 5 



257 10 



120 3 4 



94 8 4 



65 11 



Currency. 

£ s. d. 
1,308 18 9 



14 19 3 



£1,822 15 8 £1,323 18 



Pennsylvania Levys. 

To an Account of Provisions supply'd the Pennsyl- } 
vania Levys, from 6th January to 23d April, 1747 $ 

To Ditto, from 24th April, 1747, to the 1st Sep 1 
following, 

To Ditto, from 2d Sepf., 1747 to 19th Nov r . fol- ) 
lowing, j 



■} 



SterK 
£ s. 


d. 


1,253 5 


6i 


1,028 14 


9 


472 6 


n 



£2,754 7 0| 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 181 

"New York, 30th Dec r - 1747. 
" We do hereby Certify that the above Charge for Provisions sup- 
ply'd the Troops rais'd in the Province of Pennsylvania for the late 
Intended Expedition against Canada is just & true, for which we 
have given Certificates to His Excellency the Honoble. George 
Clinton, Governor of New York, who order' d the said Troops to be 
furnish'd therewith. 

« SAMUEL PERRY. 
"WILLIAM TRENT. 
"JOHNDIEMER. 
"JNO. SHANNON. 
" I do Certify that I issued the above Provisions for the use of 
the Pennsylvania Levies by order of His Excellency the Honoble. 
George Clinton. 

"HENRY HOLLAND, Commissary." 

Mr. Taylor & Mr. Hopkinson were appointed a Committee to 
draw a Message to the Assembly from these Papers & Governor 
Shirley's last Letter. 

The Commissions prepar'd according to the Directions of the 
Board were Sign'd constituting 

Abraham Taylor, Esqr., Colonel, ") Of the Associated Re- 

Thomas Lawrence, Esqr., Lieut. Colonel, v giment of Eoot of 
Samuel M'Call, Esqr., Major, J Philadelphia. 

The Officers having returned their Commissions in order to have 
the Names of the Superior Officers inserted in them, the Secretary 
was order' d to get them ready against Friday afternoon, & to give 
them notice to attend then & take the Oaths to the Government in 
Council. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia the 5th Janry., 1747. 
present : 

The- Honourable ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell "| 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, I -p 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, [ ™" 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The President inform' d the Board that two Members of Assem- 
bly waited on him last Night to inform him the House was met 
according to their adjournment. 

The Committee having prepar'd the following Message to the 
Assembly- the same was approv'd, & being transcribed fair, the 
Presid'- Sign'd it. 



182 MINUTES OF THE 



A Message from the President & Council to the Assembly. 
u Gentlemen : 

" Since our Message to You of the 24th November last, & Your 
answer thereto dated the 27th of the same Month, We have receiv'd 
from Governor Shirley a Letter informing us that the Pay of the 
Companies of New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, & Virginia, had 
been fixed at the rate of Sixpence Sterling ^ Day over and above 
the Provisions which had been allowed them, and that any abate- 
ment or stoppage wou'd now seem unequal and grievous, & raise the 
utmost Discontents amongst the Disbanded Troops, which, as he 
very justly observes, may be a prejudice to His Majestie's Service 
in general upon any future Emergency of the like nature. 

" We have, likewise, received a Letter from Governor Clinton, in- 
closing an Account of Pay due to Pennsylvania Company's from the 
25th June last to the 31st of October, wherein it appears that there 
remains due to the Officers £1,822 15 8 Sterl s " and to the Sergeants, 
Corporals, Drummers, & Private Men of the said Companies 
£1,323 18 Currency, besides an allowance which Governor Clin- 
ton observes the Officers expect, as they have computed their Ac- 
counts only to the 31st of October, but were not actually discharg'd 
till the 19th November; which Papers together with an Account 
of Provisions Supplied the said Company's by Governor Clinton, 
amounting to £2,754 7 Of, we have order'd to be laid before You, 
and earnestly request you will now proceed with all possible Dis- 
patch to Comply with His Majestie's Demands. 

"ANTHONY PALMER. 
"January 5th, 1747." 



At a Council held at Philada. the 6th January, 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., Presid'- 
Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, \ ™ 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, j sc ^ rs ' 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

It was expected that the Assembly wou'd send a Message, but 
none coming, & to-morrow being appointed for a general Fast, they 
adjourn' d to Friday morning, after having Sign'd some Blank Mili- 
tary Commissions, to be fill'd up with such Persons names as shou'd 
regularly chosen & return'd. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 183 

At a Council held at Philada. the 8th Jan^ 1747. 

present : 
The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, 



Esqrs. 



William Till, Abraham Taylor, 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, 

Thomas Hopkinson, Joseph Turner, 

A Message from the Assembly, delivered to the Secretary on the 
6th Instant in the Evening, was read. 

A Message from the Assembly to the Presid^ & Council. 

" May it please the President & Council : 

"We shou'd have chearfully embraced the opportunity now 
offer' d Us, of shewing our Loyalty & y e Regard We have to the 
King's Request, by lending him the Money mention' d in Your last 
Message, until Provision cou'd be made by the Parliament for the 
repayment of it, were We in circumstances which enabled Us so 
to do. 

" But the Demands upon our Treasury have of late been so many 
& considerable, that the Money at our disposal hath been scarcely 
sufficient to pay the necessary Charges of Government; And had 
We a Stock sufficient in the Treasury or Loan Office, yet as there 
is an Act of Assembly of the Province, now in force, which in the 
absence of a Governor prohibits the passing of any Act, however 
great the Necessity may be, We think You must be of our Opinion, 
that it would be inconvenient to apply any part of the Publick 
Money to the purposes now required of Us. 
" Signed by Order of the House. 

"JOHN KINSEY, Speaker. 

" January 6th, 1747." 

The Members thinking several parts of this Message liable to 
objections, proceeded to consider it, but in regard they had not 
receiv'd an answer to their' s relating to Indian Affairs, they came to 
no conclusion, but postponed the matter, and adjourn'd to four 
a' Clock in the afternoon. 



P. M. 

Present as before. 

The Oaths to the Government were taken & Subscrib'd, first by 

Colonel Taylor, Lieutenant Colonel Lawrence, & Major McCall, & 

then by the Captains, Lieutenants, & Ensigns of the several Com- 



184 MINUTES OF THE 

panies of the Associated Regiments of Foot of Philad a - County , 
except Lieutenant Richard Renshaw, who being a Quaker took & 
Subscrib'd the Affirmations. 



Esqrs. 



At a Council held at Philada. the 9th January, 1747. 

PRESENT : 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, j 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The President sent to inform the Council that he was so indis- 
pos'd that he cou'd not come. 

The Council resum'd the Consideration of the Assembly's Mess- 
age of the 6th Instant, & being unanimously of opinion that the 
Reasons offer' d by the Assembly why they cou'd not comply with 
His Majesty's Demand were not satisfactory, and that they shou'd 
be reminded that if the large Sums due to the Province on Mort- 
gages were collected, as by Law they ought, there would be sufficient 
to answer His Majesty's Demands & the Exigencys of Government; 
they appointed Mr. Taylor & Mr. Hopkinson to draw a Reply to 
the said Message against the Afternoon. 

A Message from the Assembly was delivered at the Board 
by two of their Members, who inform'd the Council at the same 
time that the House was inclinable to adjourn to the 16th May 
next; being desir'd to withdraw, the Message was read in these 
words : 

A Message from the Assembly to the President & Council. 

u May it please the President & Council : 

" We have taken into our Consideration Your Message of the 
25th of November last, concerning the Treaty held with the Indians 
from Ohio. The Importance of these Indians towards the con- 
tinuing & cultivating the good Understanding which hath so long- 
subsisted between this Government & the Six Nations we observe 
from this Treaty depends pretty much on the Account they give of 
themselves. However, as they are a part of the Six Nations, who 
very probably in this calamitous time are often in want of Necessa- 
ries to acquire their Livelihood, we approve of the Present You 
have thought fit to make them, and also of the Account You have 
sent the Six Nations of a larger Present intended for them in the 
Spring; And we shall take the Care which is necessary to enable 
You to fulfil that Engagement. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 185 

" Permit us, however, to add, that we think it will be necessary 
to press their Union amongst themselves, and that they will do well 
to have due regard to the Opinion of their old & experienc'd Men, 
whose Advice from the Account they give seems to have been laid 
aside ; most of Us you are sensible are Men of Peaceable Principles, 
& the Presents we gave (and those formerly given on behalf of this 
Government so far as we have understood) were to supply them 
with Necessaries towards acquiring a Livelihood and to cultivate the 
Friendship between Us, and not to encourage their entring into 
War. This we think most for the King's Interest and the Peace & 
Safety of his Colonies in America, it being well known that Wars 
once begun amongst them are not to be ended without great diffi- 
culty, & are attended with so much Bloodshed & Cruelty as usually 
excite Revenge & like Inhumanity from the Indians in the French 
Interest against those in Amity with us, and against others the 
King's Subjects. 

"We observe from Conrad Weiser's Letter, which You were 
pleased to order to be laid before us, the Indians continue their 
Complaints of the Injuries they have received by the carrying of 
Rum amongst them, and we therefore hope You will endeavour to 
prevent this for the future by directing the Laws provided against 
this abuse to be duly put in Execution. 

" As to that part of the Message we have mentioned which re- 
lates to Governor Shirley's Letters & Proposals, we are not inform'd 
of any further Accounts receiv'd from him since our last Meeting, 
and therefore our Sentiments on that Occasion at this time will, we 
presume, be of little Use. 

" Sign'd by Order of the House. 

"JOHN KINSEY, Speaker." 
" 11th Mon. ; 9th, 1747." 

And then they were call'd in & told that tho' the Council was 
preparing some Matters of Moment to lay before the House, yet 
since they were inclined to adjourn the Board were willing to ac- 
quiesce. 

The Secretary was order'd to desire the President to send a copy 
of the Assembly's Message of the 6th Instant to Governor Clinton, 
with a proper Letter on the Subject. 

Mr. William Moore & Mr. Samuel Flower presented to the Board 
the Returns of the Subaltern Officers of Eleven Companies chosen 
by the Associators of Chester County, whereby it appear'd that 
Mr. Moore was Elected Colonel, Mr. Flower Lieutenant Colonel, & 
Mr. John Mathers Majors of the Associated Regiment of Foot of 
the said County. Colonel Moore & Lieutenant Colonel Flower 
having took & subscribed the Oaths to the Government, their Com- 



186 



MINUTES OF THE 



missions were delivered to them 
tuting the said 

John Mathers, Major. 
David Parry, Esqr., Captain. 
Isaac Davy, Gent., Lieut. 
Nathaniel Davies, Gent., Ens". 
Roger Hunt, Esqr., Capt". 
Guyon Moore, Gent., Lieut. 
William Littler, Gent., Ens n . 
George Aston, Esqr., Capt n . 
Robert Morrell, Gent., Lieut. 
Edward Pearce, Gent., Ens 11 . 



Commissions were Sign'd Consti- 



] John M'Coull, Esqr., Capt n . 
I John Culbertson, Gent., Lieut. 
( James Scoot, Gent., Ens n . 

"j George Taylor, Esqr., Captain. 

> John Vaughn, Gent., Lieut. 

3 Robert Aull, Gent., Ens n . 

S James Graham, Esqr., Capt n . 

V- William Darlington, Gent., L't. 

J Francis Garmer, Gent., Ens". 
William M' Knight, Esq., Capt. 1 Robert Grace, Esq., Capt n . 
Robert Anderson, Gent., Lieut. > John Kent, Gent., Lieut. 
Samuel Love, Gent., Ens n . ) Jacob Free, Gent., Ens a . 
Moses Dickie, Esq., Capt n . S Hugh Killpatrick, Esqr., Capt n . 
John Boyd, Gent., Lieut. >■ William Buchanan, Gent., L't. 

James Montgomery, Gent, Ens 11 . ) William Cumming, Gent., Ens n . 
Richard Richison, Esq., Capt". ^ John Williamson, Esqr., Capt n . 
John Cuthbert, Gent., Lieut. >■ James M'Maken, Gent., Lieut. 
John Hambrith, Gent., Ens 11 . J John Johnson, Gent., Ens 11 . 
Andrew M'Dowell,Esq., Capt D . S John Mathers, Esqr., Capt". 
John Cunningham, Gent, Lieut, j- James Mathers, Gent., Lieut. 
George McCullough, Gent, Ens. ) Joseph Talbert, Gent., Ens\ 
James Hunter, Esqr., Capt n . ~\ 

Charles Moore, Gent., Lieut. v 

Benjamin Weatherby, Gent., Ens 11 . ) 



At a Council held at Philada. the 22d Jan^., 1747. 

present: 
The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ~) 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, [■ Esqrs. 

Robert Strettell, Thomas Hopkinson, ) 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The President's Letter to Governor Clinton, inclosing the Assem- 
bly's Message of the 6th Instant, was read as follows : 



" Philada., 11th Jan r 



1747 



" Sir : 

" Your Excellency's Letter by Express arriving the Day before 
the Assembly sat, the Council had an opportunity of laying it be- 
fore them, together with Your estimate of the Pay due to the four 
Pennsylvania Companies who were on the Muster Roll at the time 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 187 

of their Discharge, & again earnestly desir'd them to comply with 
His Majestie's Demand, but without Success as You will see by 
their Message, a copy whereof I have inclos'd. Now your Excel- 
lency knows that they will do nothing. Be pleas'd to favour me with 
an Answer to the Letters I have had the honour to write to You on 
this Occasion, being with perfect Esteem & Regard, 

" Your Excellency's most obed*. Servant, 

" ANTHONY PALMER. 
" His Excellent Gov 1 . Clinton." 

A Letter from Governor Clinton to the President was read & 
order'd to be enter'd. 

" New York, 5th Jan^., 1747. 
" Sir : 

" I am favour' d with Your Letter of the 29th December, in con- 
junction with several Gentlemen subscribers thereto, representing 
that a Scheme is sett on foot for raising Fortifications for the De- 
fence & Security of Your Province, But as You have not Cannon 
in readiness for that End, You desire the lent of some from this 
Province till You can be supply'd from England. 

" I acquainted His Majesty's Council with Your Request, who 
have advised me to inform You That as His Majesty has sent an 
Engineer over to his Province on the Pay of the Crown, & whose 
Arrival from Boston I daily expect, it will not be adviseable in me 
to part with any of the Cannon within my Government till he is 
thoroughly informed with the State & Condition of this Province, 
& what further Fortifications may be wanting for the better defence 
thereof. 

" I shou'd be very willing to oblige You on this Occasion, as I 

am sensible it must contribute to His Majesty's Service, & when 

this Gentleman arrives I can better Judge whether & how far I can 

comply with what You desire. In the mean time I am very truly, 

" Sir, Your most obedient humble Serv 1 "' 

"G. CLINTON. 

a The Honoble. Anthony Palmer, Esqr." 

The President having last Night recieved a Letter from Mr. Ogle 
by one Captain Higginbotham, he laid it before the Board for their 
Consideration, and the Letter being read it was order'd to be enter'd. 

" Annapolis, Dec 1, 3d, 1747. 

"S r : 

" The Bearer of this, Captain Higginbotham, is one of those who 
had Patents for Land on Your side of the Temporary Line before 
His Majestie's late Order in Council, & as he inform'd me that he 
meets with some Difficulty in enjoining the Benefit of the said Order 



188 MINUTES OF THE 

of His Majesty, I thought myself obliged to trouble You with this 
in his favour, not doubting of your doing him Justice & preventing 
Your People from giving him any molestation under any pretence 
whatsoever, which piece of Justice I shall be always ready to ob- 
serve in favour of any of Your People under the like Circum- 
stances. 

" I am, Sir, Your most obed n & h'ble Serv u 

"SAM. OGLE. 
" The Honoble. Anthony Palmer, Esqr." 

The Members observing that as the Royal Order referr'd to in 
Mr. Ogle's Letter was to be the measure by which both Govern- 
ments were to regulate their Conduct in all Disputes happening 
upon the Borders, order'd the Secretary to read it, & then calling 
for Captain Higginbotham, who attended without, they heard from 
him a Relation of his Case, and least they shou'd misconceive any 
part of what he said, they desir'd he wou'd get it drawn in writing, 
which he promis'd to do & to "deliver it to the Secretary. 

Some Members informing the Board that if the Indian Goods 
designed to be sent with Mr. Weiser were not immediately secur'd 
there wou'd be difficulty in getting them, Mr. Lawrence & Mr. Lo- 
gan were desir'd to set down the particulars of what the Present was 
to consist, & to bespeak the Goods in time. 

The Board taking into Consideration that the Indians having in 
their late Treaty address'd themselves to all the Provinces, & con- 
ceiving that the Burthen of so large a Present as wou'd be neces- 
sary to be made ought not entirely to lye on this Government, since 
the other Southren Provinces were equally with this expos'd to 
Danger in case the Indians shou'd turn against Us, came to a Reso- 
lution to send Copys of the Treaty & of the Messages that had 
pass'd in Consequence thereof between them & the Assembly to the 
Governors of Maryland & Virginia, & to entreat them to lay the 
same before their Assemblies, & to recommend it to them to send 
one or more Persons to go with Mr. Weiser, & order'd the Secretary 
to prepare proper Letters to be laid before the Board on Monday 
next. 



At a Council held at Philada. the 25th Jan ry -' 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ^ 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, i Esqrs. 

Robert Strettell, Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council was read & approv'd. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 189 

The President's Answer to Governor Clinton's Letter of the 5th 
Instant ; was read in these words : 

"Philada., Jan ry - 25th, 1747. 
" Sir : 

" The Council who did me the Honor to join with me in the Ap- 
plication for a supply of Cannon for the Batteries intended to be 
placed on our River, desire me to return Your Excell cy ' their very 
hearty Thanks for Your obliging Letter. They are in hopes, since 
You are pleased to express a willingness to gratify their Request, 
that when the Engineer arrives & knows your Excell cy ' 9, Inclinations, 
there may be some Cannon spared, without prejudice to Your own 
Fortifications. As I acquainted You in my former that We had 
sent Orders to England for a Supply, I can now assure Your Excel- 
lency that we expect them the next Summer, and as soon as they 
arrive, the others shall be return'd upon Demand, so that your own 
Cannon may be with You again in a few Months, or before the En- 
gineer may have occasion for them. 

" I am Your Excellency's most obed 1, hum. Servant, 

"ANTHONY PALMER. 

" His Excelly cy ' George Clinton, Esqr." 

The Secretary laid before the Board the Draught of a letter to 
Governor Gooch & Governor Ogle, which was read & approved, & 
order' d to be sent forthwith by Express to those Governors : 

" Philada., January 25th, 1747. 
" Sir : 

" I have the pleasure to inform You that the Indians seated on 
the Branches of Ohio, and to the South & West of Lake Erie 
(Places within the Bounds of Virginia, Maryland, & Pennsyl- 
vania), have this last Summer shewn great Zeal for His Majestie's 
Interest in those parts, & by their seasonable Declaration of War 
have prevented some very bad Designs of the Governor of Canada, 
which wou'd otherwise have taken Effect. This came to be known 
first by a Letter sent to this Government from some of the Six 
Nations & other Indians seated at Canayahaga, a Place on or 
near the river Conde, which runs into the Lake Erie, who send 
down a French Scalp in token of their having begun Hostilities 
against the French and their Indians. The Traders afterwards 
confirm'd this, with this further Circumstance, that the French 
Governor had sent the Hatchet to those Indians, and that they had 
rejected it, at the same time letting the French Governor know that 
they were heartily for the English, & wou'd fight for them & not 
against them. This determin'd our Government to give them all the 
.Encouragement possible, & while they were deliberating in what 
manner to Convey to the Indians a quantity of Goods bought for 
their use, ten Warriors living at Ohio came fortunately to Phila- 



190 MINUTES OF THE 

delphia to remonstrate against the backwardness of the English, & 
to tell them plainly that unless they alter' d their Conduct the 
French wou'd soon be uppermost in their Parts. As they addressed 
themselves to the Governors of all the Provinces, & were told that 
they shou'd be made acquainted with their Complaints, the Coun- 
cil, in discharge of their Promise, & considering that Your Province 
is equally with ours expos'd to Danger, shou'd these Indians for 
want of proper Encouragement go over to the French, have thought 
it their Duty to send You a Copy of the Treaty held with these 
Ohio Warriors, and of the Message of the Council & of the Answer 
of our Assembly, wherein they promise to enable the Council to 
fulfil their engagements of sending them a present by Mr. Weiser 
in the Spring, tho' they were then supply'd with a considerable 
quantity of Powder & Lead & Cloathing to ljielp them thro' the 
Winter, & most earnestly request that You wou'd lay these Matters 
before Your Assembly, and recommend it to them to join with this 
Province & that of Virginia in making a Present to these Indians, and 
if it shall be thought proper that there may be appointed one or more 
Persons with full Power to join with Mr. Weiser in any Measures that 
may be there thought to be most conducive to the Publick Good. 

"Mr. Weiser was order'd to accompany & take care of the Indians 
in their Return to Ohio as far as the Inhabited part of the Country, 
& from what pass'd between those Indians & Shickalamy, a Person 
of Character at Shamokin, who happen'd to be at Mr. Weiser* s on 
their coming there, and likewise from what was said by the Prin- 
cipal Indian Scaiohady at parting with Mr. Weiser, of all which 
he wrote an Account which is Copied & sent herewith, I cannot 
think but the Person or Persons who go to Ohio may do extraordi- 
nary Service if they are well supported by an Union of the Southern 
Provinces, since they will thereby be enabled to give a larger Pre- 
sent & to distribute it among the Indians according to their Num- 
bers, Dispositions, & Influence, as the same shall appear to them 
upon the Spot. 

" It may be expected that the French will use their Utmost En- 
deavours this Winter to corrupt the Indians ) there is, therefore, a 
Necessity that this Present be sent to them early in the Spring; and 
as the time cannot be fixed until I shall receive your Answer I beg 
the favour of You to give this AfTair, which is of so much Import- 
ance to the Peace & Safety of the Publick, all the Dispatch possible. 
"I am, with perfect Esteem & Regard, 

"Your Excellency's most obed' Servant, 

" ANTHY. PALMER." 
Captain Higginbotham having deliver'd in the State of his Case, 
the same was read in these words : 

Charles Higginbotham 1 s Case. • 

" 1737 — 2d May. The Deputy Surveyor of Baltimore County in 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 191 

Maryland, by Order of the Governor & Judge of the'Land Office 
in Maryland, Survey'd to the said Charles Higginbotham a Tract of 
Land on the North side of Codorus Creek (then reputed in Balti- 
more, now reputed in Lancaster County) by Metes & Bounds con- 
taining 172 Acres. 

d 1737— 5th May. The Lord Baltimore, by Patent here produced, 
Grants and Confirms the said Tract of Land to the said Charles 
Higginbotham, his Heirs & Assigns for ever. 

" 1 738— 25th May. At a Council held at Kensington, the Honoble. 
the respective Proprietors of Pennsylvania & Maryland laid before 
His most Excellent Majesty & Council their Certain Agreement for 
Settling Peace and Tranquility among the Inhabitants on the Bor- 
ders of their said Provinces, which was approved of by his Majesty 
& Council, & order'd to be carried into Execution. 

" By the third Paragraph of the said Agreement all other Lands 
(besides the Lower Counties) in Contest between the said Proprie- 
taries, then possess' d by or under either of them, should remain in 
the Possession as they then were. 

" And altho' the said Charles Higginbotham, before & at the time 
of the said Agreement between the Proprietors aforesaid, had a 
Grant & Patent £or the same under Lord Baltimore, & by virtue of 
the said Agreement & Approbation & by Order of His Majesty & 
Council, ought peaceably to hold & enjoy the same until the Boun- 
daries of the Provinces shall be finally Settled, Yet a certain 
Nicholas Perie of Lancaster County hath enter' d upon the said 
Tract of Land & forcibly holds the same from the said Charles Hig- 
ginbotham, pretending to have a right from, or that he has Attorn'd 
Tenant to the Proprietors of Pennsylvania, tho' the said Charles is 
well inform' d he has no Warrant, Survey, or Patent for the same 
under the Proprietors of Pennsylvania. 

"Wherefore, the said Charles Higginbotham humbly prays the 
Advice & Assistance of the Honoble. the President & Council of 
the Province of Pennsylvania in the Premisses, & that the Articles 
aforesaid & Order of His Majesty in Council, so far as relates to 
his Case, may be carried into Execution. 

" CHARLES HIGGINBOTHAM. 

"Philada., J*tf> 23d, 1747." 

The Board having Consider' d it order'd the Secretary to write 
to him the following Letter, and adjourn'd to the Afternoon: 

"Philada., 25th Jan ry > 1747. 
" Mr. Higginbotham : 

"The Honourable President & Council having taken into Con- 
sideration the State of Your Case which You have left with me on 
Saturday Afternoon, command me to give You this Answer, That 



192 MINUTES OF THE 

they will cause Nicholas Perie to be serv'd with a Copy of Your 
Complaint, & order him to attend them forthwith if You desire it, 
or if this may not suit You they have thought proper to appoint 
the first Tuesday in April, at which time both Parties will have an 
opportunity of being heard. 

u I am, Sir, Your humble Servant, 

"RICHARD PETERS." 



P. M. 

PRESENT I 

The Honoble. the President, & the same Members as in the Fore- 
noon. 

The Secretary inform' d the Board that he had in pursuance of 
their Commands wrote the Letter to Captain Higginbotham • but 
not finding him at his Lodgings he had not an opportunity of de- 
livering it, & pray'd their Orders what to do ; & just as he spoke a 
Servant came to tell the Council Captain Higginbotham waited 
without & desir'd admittance ; & being come in the Secretary read 
his Letter & afterwards delivered it to him. He thank'dthe Coun- 
cil for giving him an opportunity of being heard in April, since he 
cou'd not stay now, & withdrew. 

The following Letter to Governor Ogle being agreed to, the Presi- 
dent Sign'd it, & it was delivered to Captain Higginbotham : 

"Philada., 25th Janry, 1747. 
"Sir: 

" I have the Honour of Your Letter of the 3d December by Cap- 
tain Higginbotham, who did not reach this City till Thursday last. 
On the Receipt thereof the Council was call'd and he order' d to 
attend ; & having related the Cause of his Complaints, the Board, 
least they should mis-conceive what he said, desir'd he wou'd get his 
Case drawn in Writing; which having done he presented it to the 
Council, & it appearing that one Nicholas Perie was in Possession 
of the Land he laid Claim to, he was told they wou'd order his at- 
tendence forthwith if he desired it ; or if this would not suit him, 
they appointed the first Tuesday in April next for the hearing of 
both Parties, which last day he himself approved of. 

After the Hearing I shall do myself the honour of writing to You 
further on this Subject. Being with perfect Esteem & Regard, 
" Sir, Your most obedient humble Servant, 

"ANTHONY PALMER." 

" His Excellency, Samuel Ogle, Esqr." 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 193 



In the Council Chamber at Philada., 12th February, 1747. 

PRESENT : 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ) -p 

Abraham Taylor, Thomas Hopkinson, j * 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The President having inform'd the Board that he was prevented 
by Indisposition from waiting on them, they resumed the Consider- 
ation of Indian Affairs, and gave orders to the Secretary to prepare 
& Proclamation as full as possible against carrying Rum into the 
Indian Country, to be laid before them at the next Meeting. And 
it js their Opinion that Mr. Weiser shou'd be instructed to take the 
Proclamation with him under the Great Seal, &, deliver it at the 
Treaty to the Indians, & make them sensible that by virtue thereof 
they have the remedy in a great measure in their own Power ) & 
by staving the Casks they may throw such a discouragement on 
these Practices as will effectually prevent the future Sale of Rum 
amongst them. The Members then took into Consideration the 
List of Indian Goods thought by Mr. Lawrence & Mr. Logan proper 
to be sent with Mr. Weiser j & the Secretary informing the Members 
that Mr. Weiser wou'd be in Town next Week, they postponed the 
further Consideration of the Present till they shou'd have consulted 
with him on the Subject. 

The Associators having return'd some more Officers, the following 
Commissions were filled up, viz. : 



} 



Officers chosen for Philadelphia County. 

John Hughes, Esqr.,, Capt". 1 Henry Pauling, Esqr., Captain. 
Mathias Holstein, t Gent., Lieut. I Robert Dunn, Gent., Lieut. 
Frederick Holstein, Gent., Ens". J Hugh Hamilton, Gent., Ens". 
Samuel Shaw, Esqr., Capt". 1 Thomas York, Esqr., Capt". "V 
Isaac Ashton, Gent., Lieut. I Jacob Leech, Gent., Lieut. v 
John Roberts, Gent., Ens". J John Barge, Gent. Ens". } 

Jacob Hall, Esqr., Capt n . 

Joseph Levis, Gent. Lieut 

William Finney, Gent., Ens 

Officers chosen for Bucks County. 
Alexander Graydon, Esq., Capt". ^ Langhourne Biles, Esqr.,Capt n . 
Anthony Denormandie, Gent. (Garret Vanzant, Gent., Lieut. 

Lieut. {John Severns, Gent., Ens n . 

James Barber, Gent., Ens". J 
Joseph Inslee, Esqr., Capt n . ^ George Bennet, Esqr., Capt 



- 1 

ns".J 

y> 

} 

Anthony Teate, Gent., Lieut. [►Garret Wyncoop, Gent., Lieut. I 
David Lawell, Gent., Ens". J Ralph Dunn, Gent., Ens . J 

Richard Walker, Esqr., Capt". 

Robert Walker, Gent., Lieut. 

William Davis, Gent., Ens". 
VOL. v.— 13. 



} 



194 MINUTES OF THE 

Officers chosen for Lancaster County, 
Hugh Patrick, Capt". 
Thomas McDowell, Lieut. 
Thomas Grubb, Ens a . 

Officers chosen for New Castle County. 
William McCrea, Esqr., Capt. ~\ David Bush, Esqr., Capt", 
Alexander Moody, Gent"., Lieut, y John McKinley, Gent., Lieut 
Francis Graham, Gent"., Ens D . J Charles Bush, Gent., Ens n . 
Henry Dyre, Esqr., Capt. ") John Vance, Esqr., Capt n . 

Paul Allfree, Gent., Lieut. J- John Vandyke, Gent., Lieut. 
Jerrard Rothwell, Gent., Ens", j William Harraway, Gent., Ens' 1 . 
David Steward, Esqr., Capt". ~\ Alexander Porter, Esqr., Capt". 
Jerome Dusheene, Gent., Lieut. > James King, Gent., Lieut. 
Isaac Dusheene, Gent., Ens". ) Samuel Allricks, Gent., Ens". 
George Gano, Esqr^ Captain. ") Edward Fitzrandolph, Esqr., 
James Egbertson, Gent. Lieut, j* Capt". 
Thomas Bennet, Gent., Ens". J Alexander Chance, Gent. Lieut, f 

Joseph Hotham, Gent., Ens". J 
As the President is frequently indisposed, & several Officers apply 
to take the Oaths to the Government, the Board think it might 
conduce to their Ease if the Secretary had a Dedimus to administer 
the said Oaths to such as shou'd apply, & therefore request the 
President to Grant a Dedimus to him for that purpose, & likewise 
a Dedimus to the Justices of the Peace of each County to administer 
the Oaths to the Officers of the respective Counties. 



In the Council Chamber at Philada., 18th February, 1747. 
present : 
Thomas Lawrence, Robert Strettel'l, "] 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, J^Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The Secretary laid before the Board a Draught of a Proclama- 
tion, which was read, & having approv'd it, they directed him to 
transcribe it in order to be sign'd by the President, & Publish'd 
with the usual Solemnity. 

" By the Honoble. the President & Council of the Province of Penn- 
sylvania. 

« A PROCLAMATION. 

" Wliereasy by several Acts of Assembly of this Province, the 
Selling of Rum to the Indians is prohibited under severe Penalties, 
& particularly by an Act of the 12th of King William it is enacted 
as follows : * That all Rum, Brandy, or other Strong Liquors that 
shall be carried, or offer'd to Sale or Disposal to or at any of the 






PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 195 

Indian Towns or Habitations within the Bounds of this Province, 
shall be forfeit, and it is hereby declared to be forfeit, one-third to 
the Governor & two-thirds to such Person or Persons as shall seize 
the same j and all Persons (as well Indians as others) are thereby 
irapowered to seize & secure all such Rum, Brandy, & other Strong 
Spirits so found at any Indian Town or Settlement as aforesaid f 
And by another Act of the 8th Year of the late King George the 
first, it is (among other things) enacted 4 That no Person whatso- 
ever, otherwise than is therein declared, shall Sell, Barter, or give 
to any Indian or Indians, or to any other Person for their use, nor 
by any Means directly or indirectly furnish or cause to be furnish'd 
any Indian or Indians with any Rum, Wine, or other Strong Li- 
quors, mixed or unmixed, under the Penalty of Twenty Pounds for 
each Offence, one half to the Governor for support of Government, 
& the other half to the Informer or such Person or Persons as will 
sue for the same/ And further, ' That in Case any Rum or other 
Strong Spirits, above the quantity of one Gallon, be carried amongst 
the Indians at their Towns, or beyond the Christian Inhabitants, 
the Person carrying the same, or he in whose possession the same 
shall be found, shall forfeit & pay the Sum of Twenty Pounds 
to the Uses aforesaid/ And further, f That no Person or Persons 
whatsoever after the first Day of August then next following, under 
the Penalty of Twenty Pounds for the uses aforesaid, shall Trade 
or Traffick with any Indian for any Commodity whatsoever, but at 
their own Dwelling Houses and Places of Residence with their 
Families, within some settled Township of this Province, without 
being first recommended to the G-overnor for his Lyeence by the 
I Justices of the County Courts of Quarter Sessions where he resides, 
■ or the next Quarter Sessions within this Province to the Place of 
rsuch Residence ; and that no Person shall be so Lycenced without 
' first giving Bond in the said Quarter Sessions, with one or more 
i substantial Freeholders of the same County, to be bound with them 
In the Sum of One hundred Pounds, condition* d that he will duly 
'! observe the Laws of this Province for regulating the Trade with the 
| Indians, which Recommendations & Lycences shall be renew' d an- 
nually in the manner before directed ; and shall further, by his 
; Oath or Affirmation, oblige himself that he will not directly or in- 
directly sell or dispose of any Rum or other Spirits, mixed or un- 
mixed, to any Indian/ 

" And Whereas, frequent Complaints have been made from time 
to time, & of late earnestly renewed, that divers gross Irregularities 
j & Abuses have been committed in the Indian Countries by means 
of the great Quantities of Strong Liquors which are every Year 
'brought & Sold amongst them, contrary to & in contempt of the 
[said Laws, & that many of the Indians by being intoxicated & 
jdrinking to excess of those Liquors are not only most grossly im- 
I posed upon & cheated in their Bargains, but are also thereby in- 
| flam'd to such a degree as actually to destroy many of their own 
Lives & greatly to endanger the Lives of others ; We have ? there- 



196 MINUTES OF THE 

fore, thought fit, for the future prevention of such Disorders as far 
as in Us lies, to publish this Proclamation, strictly Charging & Com- 
manding That no Person or Persons do hereafter presume to trade 
with the Indians, without first obtaining a Licence from the Gover- 
nor or Commander-in-Cheif for the lime being, according to the di- 
rections given in the said. Act of Assembly; & We do hereby also 
strictly enjoin the Magistrates of the several Counties within this 
Province, and especially those of the County of Lancaster where 
these abuses are mostly carried on, to be very vigilant & careful in 
the Discharge of the Duties required of them by the said Acts of 
Assembly, & in particular to demand such Lycence of all Persons 
travelling with goods to trade with the Indians; and to make or 
cause diligent Search to be made for any Quantity of Rum or other 
strong Liquors exceeding the quantity allowed by Law which they 
shall have reason to suspect is carrying to the Indians. And for 
the more effectual detecting & suppressing the abuses aforesaid, We 
do further earnestly recommend it to the said Magistrates to give 
all due Countenance & Encouragement to the Persons who shall ap- 
ply or can give Information against those who have been or shall 
hereafter be guilty of carrying or vending Rum & other strong Li- 
quors amongst the Indians contrary to the said recited Laws or 
any of them. Moreover, in as much as by the said Act of Assem- 
bly of the 12th of King William, all Rum, Brandy, & other Spirits, 
carryed into any of the Indian Towns, are declared to be forfeit, 
one-third to the Governor and the other Two-thirds to the Persons 
seizing the same, We do hereby give full Power and Authority to 
any Indian or Indians to whom Rum or other Strong Liquors shall 
hereafter be offer' d for Sale contrary to the said Laws, to stave & 
break to pieces the Cask or Vessel in which Rum or other strong 
Liquors is contained, without being accountable to Us for the Gov- 
ernor's third Part ; And for the better Encouragement of all Per- 
sons to give in Informations & prosecute the Offenders against any 
of the said Laws, We do hereby further declare that the said In- 
formers shall have & recieve to their own Use the whole Penalties 
& Forfeitures incurred by & to be recover' d of the Persons against 
whom they shall so inform, as well the Parts & Shares allotted by 
the said Laws to the Informer, as to those given to the Governor or 
Commander-in-Chief, for the time being. 

" Given at Philadelphia, under the Great Seal of the said Province, 
the 18th Day of February, in the Twenty -first Year of the Reign of 
our Sovereign Lord, George the Second, by the Grace of God of 
Great Britain, France, & Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, 
&c., Annoqz Dom., 1747. 

" By Order of the President & Council, 

" ANTHONY PALMER, Presid 1 - 
" Richard Peters, Secretary. 
" GOD SAVE THE KING/' 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 197 

Mr. Weiser, attending, was call'd in, & after much Deliberation 
the Present to the Indians was Settled as follows : 

18 Barrells of Gunpowder - - @ £9 10s. £171 
20 ewt. Barr Lead, viz., 10 cwt. @ 45s. & 10 cwt. 

@ 42s. ------- 43 10 

40 Guns @ 30s. 60 

16 P. Duffels, 15 P. @ £13 10s., & 1 P. @ 

£14 10s. 217 

50 Doz. Knives, sorted 24 5 

6,500 Flints 4 11 6 

341 Garlix Shirts, with making & thread - - 105 12 1 

100 Ozenbrig's Do. with Do. ... 29 

20 Groce Gartering 25 5 

15 lbs. Vermillion ------ 11 16 10* 

10 P. Half thicks - - - 48 1 7 

9 Doz. & 4 Looking Glasses - - - - 7 11 

SO Brass Kettles, wht. 55* lb. - - @ 4s. 11 2 

20 Doz. Indian Hatchets - - - 18s. 18 

14 Groce Rings — 10 10 

U Groee Medals ------ 600 

2 Groce Awl Blades - 20s. 2 

35 P. Ribbon - 29 2 

%h lbs. Beads ----- 6s. 15 

4 Doz, & 10 Dutch Pipes - - - - - 2 11 

1 doz. jointed Babys ----- 15 

£828 8 0i 

Clvarges paid on said Goods, viz. : 

Paid Porterage of said Goods from 

Trenton £0 3 

Paid James Livingston Freight of 

Goods from Brunswick - 3 12 

& for a Trunk for Conrad Weiser's Use 12 ? 

Paid Cutlob Hill & Jacob Wyer, Car- 
riage of Goods to J. Harris' - - 13 16 

Paid hawling the Powder to the Pow- 
der House 2 6 

Paid for 56 lb. of Rice for C. Weiser's 

Use, lis. 8d. & bag 3s. 6dL - - 15 2 

Paid William Hodge for Tobacco - 16 3 

Paid Fra. Manny for a Hammock for 

Conrad Weiser - - - 1 7 10 

Paid for 3 half Barrels, 3 Cags, & 1 

Box - - ' - • - - - 1 2 6 

22 7 3 



£850 15 3* 



US MINUTES OF THE 

And Mr. Lawrence & Mr. Shoemaker & Mr. Logan are appointed 
a Committee to purchase them at the easiest Rates & with the ut- 
most Expedition, that they may be ready to be sent to Lancaster as 
soon as the Roads will admit. 



At a Council held at Kensington the 26th February, 1747. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esq., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ~) 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, Lp 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, f * 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approvM. 

A Letter from Mr. Shirley to the President was read : 

" Boston, February 1st, 1747. 
"Sir: 

" I am favoured with Tour's in answer to mine upon the Article 
of sending Commissioners to treat with those from this Government, 
New York, & Connecticut, and another inclosing an Application to 
me from Yourself & other Gentlemen of the Association in Your 
Province for the Loan of some Cannon ; the Request of which last 
I am extremely sorry it is not in my power to answer, a3 You will 
perceive, Sir, by the present State of His Majesty's Warlike Stores 
Jhere, which I shall give You an account of. 

" Upon the Expedition against Cape Breton I was obliged to take 
eight battering Cannon of twenty-two Pound Shot & eight of nine 
Pound, with three Mortar's, their Carriages & Implements, out of 
his Majesty's Castle William, the Principal Fortress & Key of this 
Province, & to send them to Louisbourg, where three of the Mortars 
<& all the eight large Cannon were either burst or rendered so un- 
serviceable as to be fit for nothing but Ballast, & for that Reason 
they were never return'd to the Castle. And since this I have been 
oblig'd to erect a new Battery upon an Island over against Castle 
William, in order to prevent the Enemy from Landing Mortars or 
Cannon there to annoy our Works at the Castle, so that by this 
means we want Cannon here to fill up the Gap at Castle William 
& have not a sufficient Number of proper Cannon to mount our new 
Battery with, & the Batteries of the Town of Boston are still worse 
supply'd with Ordnance. 

"I do assure You, Sir, it would have given me great pleasure io 
have answer'd the good Opinion of me which You and the other 
Gentlemen do me the Honour to express in their Letter, by sending 
the Cannon You desire, and I beg the favour of You to make them 
sensible that it is not in my Power to do it. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 199 

" I am sensible what Danger there may be at this critical junc- 
ture of the Indians being turn'd against us by the Artifice & Insti- 
gation of the French, and for that reason most ardently wish the 
several Colonies may unite in an imediate Expedition against the 
French Fort at Crown Point, which would be the most effectual 
Means of fixing the Indians of the Six Nations & other Tribes Tin 
their Dependence or Alliance] in the English Interest, & securing 
ourselves from the Ravages & Depredations of the Enemy. But 
shou'd we be so unhappy as not to agree to make so necessary an 
attempt, & Your Province shou'd feel the bad Consequences of it, 
You may depend upon it that it shall want no Succour or Assist- 
ance which may be in my Power to afford You upon any Emer- 
gency. And when the two Gruardships of this Province are fitted 
out & go upon their Cruises, I will take care to give the Commanders 
of them Orders to protect Your Coast & River as much as is consist- 
ent with the Service to which they are appointed. 

" I heartily wish the Gentlemen of Your Association Success in 
the Defence & Protection of their Country, & that Your Assembly 
may soon emulate their Publick Spirit j being with sincere wishes 
for the Prosperity of Your Province & a most real regard for your- 
self, 

" Sir, Your most obedient, humble Servant, 

"W. SHIRLEY. 
" The Honoble. Anthony Palmer, Esq r -" 

The Translation of two Letters from Don Francisco Caxigalde De 
La Yega, Governor of the Havannah, to the President, deliver' d 
him by Captain G-eorge Davis, was read in these words : 

" Most Excellent Sir: 

" The President & Directors of the Royal Company of this Island 
have taken upon them to answer You upon the Subject of the Ran- 
som of the Prize taken by the St. Christopher, & having given the 
necessary orders to that Body, that part of Your Excellency's Let- 
ter remains answer'd. 

"By the three annex' d Instruments of Writing, which among us 
are of the highest validity for the Justification of Liberty, Your 
Excellency may see that Mark Antony Bias De La Chandelaria, Mar- 
roquin, & Stephen Joseph Ocharcoaga, were born free ; & as I am 
persuaded that it is agreeable to Your Excellency's Nature, I desire 
they may be treated as such & sent to me, with what other Spanish 
Prisoners you may have in your Power. 

" The same favour that I beg for the three before named I desire 
for Andreas Antonio & Michael Joseph ; as they were not born here 
I know nothing of them, but as soon as they arrive we shall enter 
into the strictest enquiry, according to our Custom, which is suffi- 
ciently rigorous, & if it appears they are not free, I shall remit to 



200 MINUTES OF THE 

Your Excellency their value ; if they are found to be free I shall 
send You Instruments in Writing, Certifying their being so, to 
Your entire Satisfaction, for the performance of which I give You 
my word of Honour. 

" I remain with immutable affection at Your Excellency's Ser- 
vice, & beg God may preserve You many Years. 

"D N - FRANC - CAXIGALDE DE LA VEGA. 
« Havannah, Dec'- 4th, 1747." 

" Excellent Sir : 

" George Davis, Commander of the Pompey, returns to Your Port 
with Sixteen English Prisoners, as the annex'd List Certifys, and 
tho' Your Excellency sent but four Spaniards, I am persuaded it 
was because You had no more to send. 

"I commiserate much the misfortune of those Prisoners, for 
which reason I have determin'd to send all British Subjects to the 
British, first treating them with the greatest good nature. I hope 
Your Excellency will do the same by all Spaniards who may meet 
with the like Misfortune, that by this Means a good Correspondence 
for the Exchange of Prisoners being establish'd one & the other 
Nation may reap the Benefit of being soon restor'd to their Country. 

" I repeat my being at Your Service with the most affectionate 
Good will, & beg God may preserve Your Life many Years. 

«D N FRANC " FAXIGALDE DE LA VEGA. 

" Havannah, 21st Nov r -' 1747." 

Thereupon the Board call'd for the Minute of Council of the 29th 
of June, & the Copy of the President's Letter of that Date to the 
Gov r - of the Havannah, & on considering them they thought them- 
selves engag'd to send to the Havanna' the Negroes mention'd in 
the said Certificates, & on Mr. Turner's undertaking to carry them 
there in the Brigantine Pompey, Capt n - George Davis, if Capt n - Davis 
might have the Privilege to wear a Flag of Truce, the Question was 
put whether the Privilege of the Flagg shou'd be granted or no; 
And all the Members except Mr. Lawrence & Mr. Logan voted in 
the Affirmative. 

Order' d, That the Secretary prepare an answer to the Spanish 
Governor's Letter, & a Lycence for Capt n ' Davis to wear the Flagg, 
& to carry to the Havannah four Negroes, viz. : Mark Antony, Bias 
Dela Candelaria, Marroquin, Stephen Joseph Ocharcoaga, & Andreas 
Antonio, Micheal Joseph the other Negroe mention'd in the Certi- 
ficate having died of a Fever. 






PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 201 

At a Council held at Philadelphia 2d March, 1747. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President, 
Thomas Lawrence, Abraham Taylor, ) v 

Robert Strettel, j ljSqrS ' 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The President's Letter to the Governor of Havanna' was read & 
order'd to be enter'd : 

" Sir— 

" Captain George Davis deliver'd me Your Excellency's two Let- 
ters of the 4th of September & 21st of November last, together 
with Sixteen English Prisoners, towards whom, as You have exer- 
cised a very distinguishing humanity & sent them to their Native 
Country by the first opportunity, I cannot but in their behalf return 
You my heartiest acknowledgment. It is not in my power to send 
You any of His Catholick Majesty's Subjects, I having already sent 
fourteen at their own Instance to Leoganne for fear of their being 
oblig'd to stay here all the Winter, no opportunity offering for Your 
Port. They were well fed & well taken care of here, & as they 
were without Cloaths, this Government before their Departure gave 
them Cloaths, & wrote to His Excellency Monsr. Chastenoye, Gov- 
ernor of Leoganne, to aid them all in his Power to get to the Havan- 
nah. 

" On the Certificates transmitted by Your Excellency the three 
Negroes, Bias Marroquin Estevan, Hosea Cherquava, & Marcus An- 
tonia, are released & put on board Captain George Davis, who has 
my Orders to deliver them to Your Excellency, & to whom for that 
purpose I have granted the Privilege of the Flag. 

" I have likewise deliver'd to him Andreas Antonio, one of the 
Negroes that Your Excellency requests may be sent to You ; the 
other dyed here of a Fever. If on the Examination into his State 
You find he is not a free Negroe, You will be pleas'd to remit the 
value that it may be given to the Captors. 

" I have receiv'd no Letter from the Directors of the Royal Com- 
pany about the Ransom of the Prize taken by the St. Christopher, 
which was expected by what Your Excellency says in Your's. 

" May Your Excellency be bless'd with a long Life & all manner 
of Happiness. 

"I am Your Excellency's most obed'- h'ble Servant, 

"ANTHONY PALMER. 

" His Excell cy - D n - Franc - Faxigalde De La Vega, Gov r> of Ha- 
vannah. 

"Philada., Feb ry 1747." 



202 MINUTES OF THE 

The President having receiv'd a Letter from Mr. Ogle in answer 
to the Council's Letter of the 25th of January last, it was read in 
these words : 

" Annapolis, Feb ary - 15th, 1747. 
" Sir : 

" Your Letter of the 25th of January did not come to my hands 
till last Night, the Messenger having Died upon the Road in Balti- 
more County, and this Day I have forwarded the inclos'd Packet to 
the Governor of Virginia. 

" You may be assur'd of my doing every thing in my Power to 
induce the People of Maryland to contribute their part towards so 
general a good as keeping the Six Nations our hearty Friends, & I 
flatter myself that the Gentlemen of Virginia will set us a good 
Example upon this occasion, as I have writ to S r - William Gooch. 

" But how far You may rely upon us I cannot pretend to say, as 
it will be sometime before I can' get a Council together at this un- 
seasonable time of the Year ; when I know their Sentiments you 
shall hear further from me; in the meanwhile I beg leave to remain, 

" Sir, Your most obedt. humb. Servant, 

" SAM. OGLE. 
" The Honoble. Anthony Palmer, Esqr." 

A Petition from sundry Persons living on the Boad leading from 
Darby to Chester, was read in these words : 

u To the Honoble. the President and Council of the Province of 
Pennsylvania, &c. 

" Whereas, You was pleased by Your Order bearing date the 8th 
Day of September last, to appoint us, the Subscribers, with some 
others, to lay a Boad out from Cobb's Creek to New Castle Line, 
with directions to follow the Boad as now used, where it is not al- 
ready laid out, & where it is to follow the Courses & Distances 
therein mentioned in order (as we presume) to prevent as much as 
might be injuring the Owners of the Land adjacent to the s d . Boad. 
We, therefore, in obedience to the said Order, met at Cobb's Creek 
Bridge, & took the courses and Distances of the Boad as now used, 
until we came to that part of the Boad which leads from Darby to 
Chester, and has been already laid out by course & Distance, & then 
upon trying the Courses thereof found them to run a considerable 
distance in divers Places from the Boad now used, & that frequently 
through Improved as well as wood Lands, and would in our opinion 
be very injurious to a great number of the Inhabitants adjacent to 
the Boad, & as we conceive very contrary to Your Intention. 

u Therefore we pray, in behalf of ourselves & others, that You 
wou'd be pleased to appoint a jury and Grant them such Powers as 
You may think proper to enable them to lay out a Boad in the most 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 203 

convenient Place to accommodate the Publick, & least injurious to 
the Inhabitants, which We apprehend is agreeable to Your Design, 
& we as in Duty bound shall ever Pray. 

" SAMUEL LEVIS. 

"CALEB COUPLAND. 

"JOSEPH BONSALL. 

"PETER DICKS. 

"JOHN DAVIS. 
" December 3d, 1747." 

And Mr. Bonsall & Mr. Davis attending without were call'd in, 
& on their Examination & Inspection of a Draught of the Road as 
it wou'd run was it to be made agreeable to the Return of the Year 
1706, & of another Draught of the Road as it now runs, the Board 
made the following Order, viz. : 

" Whereas, by our Order of the eighth Day of September last, 
Wo directed You, among others, to lay out the Road leading from 
Darby to Chester, agreeable to the Courses described in a Recorded 
Return of the same made in the Year 1706 : And whereas, on Ex- 
amination of several Persons living on or near the same Road, it 
appears that the same was never actually cleared according to the 
said Return, and that was it to be so now it wou'd exceedingly pre- 
judice the Lands through which it shou'd pass, and on further con- 
sideration of the matter & perusal of the Draught of the Road as 
it now runs, it appears to us that it will be most convenient to have 
it laid out agreeable thereto, And therefore we have thought proper 
to revoke that part of our former Order which relates to the Return 
made in 1706, and Do now Order & Direct that You lay the same 
Road out in the manner it now runs, making no other alterations 
than what may be absolutely necessary to make it more regular & 
direct in some Places, or more commodious to the Fording Places or 
Bridges that are now used in the said Road." 



In the Council Chamber, 5th March, 1747. 

PRESENT I 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, *) 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, \- Esqrs. 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The Board being informed that Mr. George McCall was going in 

the Sloop to Cape Breton, & that she was not to tarry there 

but to return immediately to this Place, thought it necessary to 
inform the Commander-in-Cheif thereof the unhappy Circumstances 



204 MINUTES OF THE 

of the Province, & to apply for a loan of Cannon, & thereupon the 
following Letter was wrote & approv'd & sign'd by the President. 

"Philada., 5th March, 1748. 
" Sir : 

"The Administration of the Government of this Province of 
Pennsylvania being, in the absence of the Governor, devolved on 
the Council, I as their President & at their Instance in Council 
Assembled, have the honour to inform You that from sundry ad- 
vices given by Prisoners & others who have been lately at the 
Havannah & in several of the French Ports in the West Indies, 
We have the greatest reason to expect an Invasion from a number 
of French & Spanish Privateers sometime this Summer. ' These 
Intelligences have likewise been confirmed in Letters from Persons 
of undoubted veracity residing in the British West India Islands; 
& that thereupon we have done all in our Power to put the Province 
in a posture of Defence by forming an Association, & thereby 
bringing together a voluntary Militia, & by preparing Batteries on 
the most commodious Places in our River, & all this at a private 
Expence, for We have the Misfortune to have an Assembly consist- 
ing chiefly of Quakers. Having no Cannon wc have wrote to Eng- 
land for some, & for fear of disappointment we have in the most 
pressing manner apply'd to the Neighboring Governments to be 
furnish'd, but without Success, from the unhappy Circumstances 
they find themselves in; and now, Sir, as our last resourse, we 
make it our earnest request to You, on behalf of His Majestic' s 
Subjects of this Province, if there be any battering Cannon fit for 
Service with You, which You can any ways spare, that You wou'd 
be pleas'd to supply us with them. 

u Mr. George McCall, the Gentleman by whom we send this, will 
inform You of our melancholy Situation, & of the great & imminent 
Danger to which this Colony stands expos'd ; & as he has assured us 
that the Vessel he goes in will not tarry, but immediately return to 
this place, if we shou'd be so happy as to be favour' d with the 
Loan of the Cannon, We further desire You wou'd be pleas'd to 
deliver them to him to be shipp'd on board her, assuring You we 
shall take the greatest Care imaginable of them & return them to You 
or Your Order on Demand, or if this Vessel shou'd not return so soon 
as is expected we beg You wou'd put them on board any other Ves- 
sel that is ready to Sail for this Place or any other of the Neigh- 
bouring Colonies. 

"The importance of this Colony, situate in the Center of His 
Majestie's American Dominions, whose Trade is so essentially ne- 
cessary for supplying the British Islands & His Majestie's Fleets 
there, & the Service that will be done His Majesty by the preserva- 
tion of the Lives of so many of His Subjects, are Considerations 
that make us hope You will favour us with all the Assistance in 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 205 

Your Power, not only in the Loan of the Cannon but in giving 
Information to all the Commanders of His Majestie's Ships of War 
of the Enemie's Designs, that if they can any ways, consistent with 
their Orders, extend their Cruises to the Capes of Virginia, nothing 
else can prevent a total obstruction of Trade on this Continent — an 
Event which wou'd be of the worse Consequence at this time, as 
added to all our other Calamities we shou'd thereby be disabled 
from furnishing the Indians with Amunition & Goods, & so force 
them to go over to the French Interest. I conclude with saying 
Your Assistance will lay an Infinite Obligation on all the Inhabitants 
of this Province, & in particular on the Gentlemen of the Council, 
& on 

" Sir, Your most obed'- h'ble Servant, 

"ANTHONY PALMER. 
"To His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief for the time being 
at Cape Breton." 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 8th March, 1747, 

PRESENT : 

The Honourable ANTHONY PALMER, Esq., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, 1 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, I -™ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, [ ' 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approved, * 
The Council resumed the Consideration of the Condition of the 
Province, h one of the Members saying that Mr. Samuel McCall 
had received a Letter from Mr. Rutherford at New York from which 
there was reason to believe Mr. Armstrong, his Majestie's Engineer, 
was arrived there, the Board was of opinion that they ought to re- 
new their application to the Governor of New York for a Loan of 
Cannon, & to add the greater weight thereto, they thought that 
sollicitations shou'd be made by two of their Members, & Mr. 
Lawrence & Mr. Taylor were requested to undertake the Journey, 
& on their consenting to go, the following Letter was wrote to Mr. 
Clinton & approved. 

" Philada., 8th March, 1747. 
"Sir: 

" As the President & Council of this Province acquainted Your 
Excellency some time ago with the Accounts we had receiv'd of an 
Attempt upon this Colony being intended to be made by the French 
& Spaniards this Summer, and that the Inhabitants had resolv'd to 
erect one or two Batteries upon this River, and had wrote to Eng- 
land for Cannon, but were afraid they wou'd come too late to answer 



206 MINUTES OF THE 

the purposes intended, & therefore desir'd Your Excellency wou'd 
be so good as to assist us with the Loan of such as cou'd be spared 
from Your own Works. And Your Excellency in Your Letter of 
the 5th January was pleas' d in the most kind & obliging manner to 
express an Inclination to oblige us on that occasion, as you thought 
it wou'd contribute to His Majesty's Service. Encouraged by Your 
Excellency's humane & benevolent disposition, & prompted by our 
own unhappy Situation, We have taken the Liberty to renew our 
former Application, and have appointed Mr. Lawrence & Mr. Tay- 
lor, two of the Members of this Board, to wait upon Your Excel- 
lency to request as the last favour the loan of as many Cannon 
as the Gentleman (whose arrival Your Excellency waited for, 
& who We understand is now with You) thinks proper. If Your 
Excellency knew how many hearts You wou'd set at ease, and how 
many hands wou'd be lifted for the preservation of that life to whom 
they owed their own, We think all other Arguments wou'd be un- 
necessary. For our own parts We have no doubt but that what- 
ever shall be thought to promote His Majestie's Service & the Good 
of the Colonies will be the object of Your Excellency's Care. I 
am, Sir, for myselfe & the Gentlemen of the Council, 

•' Your Excellency's most obedient Servant, 

" ANTHONY PALMER. 
" His Excellency, George Clinton, Esqr." 

A Letter was likewise wrote to Mr. Shirley in these words : 

"Philada., 8th March, 1747. 
" Sir : 

" Being indispos'd when the last Post went away he did not carry 
the acknowledgements due to You for your obliging Letter of the 
1st of February in answer to the Council's application for the Loan 
of Cannon. The Gentlemen of the Council who did me the honour 
to join with me in that Letter are perfectly satisfied with the reasons 
You give why you cannot comply with their Bequest, and desire 
me to return You their heartiest thanks for the just & commissera- 
ting Sense you express at our calamitous Situation. 

" As we know not but we may be disappointed in every applica- 
tion we have made for Cannon, & we have try'd but every Place 
where there was the least prospect of succeeding, & as our depend- 
ence is now principally on the arrival of the Cannon order'd to be 
sent us from England, which is a very precarious dependence in War 
time, the safety of this Colony runs a great risque, unless some of 
the Commanders of His Majestie's Ships of War or of Your Pro- 
vince Sloops can be directed to cruize early in the Spring between 
Sandy Hook & the Capes of Virginia, and to look into the Bay of 
Delaware. The Council, therefore, make it their earnest Request 
that You wou'd use all your Interest to bring this about. The ap- 
pearance of any Vessel or Vessels of force on our Coasts, & that 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 207 

early in the Season, may entirely defeat the Enemies Schemes, or at 
least oblige them to postpone the execution of them j and if they 
are oblig'd to do this the Colony may be preserved — for then our 
Cannon may arrive, & we may have time enough to make sufficient 
Preperations for our Defence. 

"It is certain that His Majestie's Fleets in the West Indias de- 
pend on being supplied from New York and this Place, and we are 
told that there will be a large Fleet in the West Indies ; surely then 
no greater Service can be done to His Majesty, exclusive of saving 
the Lives & Fortunes of ,so many of his Subjects, than to prevent 
an obstruction of the Supply of His Majestie's Navy. This con- 
sideration will, we hope, make the People of your Government who 
have been so remarkably zealous for their Regard to the Trade of 
the Continent, pleas' d & desirous to see their Vessels of Force or- 
der'd on a Service of such great Importance even to them, & will, 
I know, animate You to use your utmost endeavers with the Cap- 
tains to extend their Cruizes as far as will answer these good pur- 
poses. I am with perfect Esteem, 

" Sir, Your most obedient humb. Servant, 

"ANTHONY PALMER. 
" His Excellency, Will m- Shirley, Esqr." 

And another Letter was wrote to Admiral Knowles at Jamaica, 
and one of the same Tenor to the Commodore of His Majesty's 
Ships of War in the Leeward Islands : 
"Sir— 

" The Administration of this Government being in the absence of 
the Governor devolv'd on the Council, at which Board I have the 
honour to be President, we in Council assembled think it our Duty 
to represent to You the unhappy state of the Colony, & the reasons 
we have to apprehend an Invasion of our Province & the Plundering 
of our City & a TotaJ loss of our Trade. 

" We need not tell You, who are so well acquainted with the 
Condition of the Colonies, that the Majority of the Assembly con- 
sisting of Quakers, their Principles wou'd never suffer them to put 
this Province into a posture of Defence, nor to fit out Vessels for 
the protection of their Trade ; encourag'd by this, the Coast was 
last Year infested with swarms of French & Spanish Privateers, 
numbers of our Vessels were taken within our own Capes, & the 
Enemy seeing no resistance seiz'd our Pilots & fell a plundering the 
Plantations Situate on the Bay side. This Success more than an- 
swering their expectation, we are told by Prisoners who have been 
carried into the Enemie's Ports that great preparations are making 
& mighty Schemes concerted for our Ruin ; whether they be con- 
certed by the Government in order to make a lodgement in so 
fruitful a Province, the Granary of America, or be a Confederacy 
of private Adventurers to burn the City or lay it under Contribu- 



208 MINUTES OF THE 

tion, we cannot say. To prevent this the Inhabitants have enter'd 
into an Association, and are preparing Batteries in the most commo- 
dious Places of our River, which we hope will save the City, but 
whatever becomes of Us our Trade runs a manifest risque of being 
totally obstructed'. 

" This is an Event of so much Importance to His Majesty, as His 
Majestie's Fleets in the West Indies are to be supplied with a great 
part of their Provisions from hence, & His Majestie's Subjects there 
cannot get many of the necessaries of Life but from the Continent, 
that we think it our indispensible Duty to apprize the Commanders 
of His Majestie's Fleets in the West Indies of our apprehensions, 
& of the whereon they are founded, not doubting but when they 
come to know the dangerous State of the Navigation of North 
America, & what terrible Mischeifs may ensue thereon, they will do 
all in their Power to prevent them, & order some of the Men of War 
under their Command to Cruize on that part of the Continent which 
is threatned & lies most expos'd to the Depredations of the Enemy. 

" You will easily imagine whatever may be the designs of the 
French & Spaniards, whether they Act on a Government Scheme or 
only on private Views, that they will be put in Execution early in 
the Season, & that their Privateers will take their Stations at the 
most convenient Places of the Coast, if unguarded, as soon as Navi- 
gation begins to be safe; So that no greater Service can ba done His 
Majesty, nor no surer Method be taken to disappoint the Schemes 
of the Enemy, than to order it so that one or more Men of War 
may be beforehand with them on the Coast. The severity of the 
Season it is thought has drove many of the Vessels expected to 
arrive here to the West Indies, & these will probably fall in with 
the Enemie's Privateers to the great detriment of Trade in general ; 
but it may at this time prove particularly fatal to His Majestie's 
Interest with the Indians, who are in great want of Amunition & 
Cloaths, none of the Fall Vessels wherein these G-oods were shipp'd 
being arriv'd, & if they are taken it will not *be possible for the 
several Governors to answer their Engagements to the Indian Na- 
tions, nor execute the Plans concerted for the operations of the en- 
suing Year. 

" I am, Sir, Your most obedient humble Servant, 

"ANTHONY PALMER. 

"Philada., 8th March, 1747." 



At a Council held at Philada. the 29th March, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

Thomas Lawrence, Abraham Taylor, | -™ 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, } S( * rS ' 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 209 

The following Letter from Mr. Ogle was read : 

" Annapolis, 8th March, 1747. 
"Sir: 

u I have this Day laid Your Letter of the 25th January, with 
other inclosed Papers, before the Council, & find them unanimously 
inclin'd to do every thing in their Power to induce the Lower House 
of Assembly to make some acceptable Present to the Indians in 
Concert with Your Province, & they express' d a particular Concern 
that we had not an opportunity of laying the said Papers before 
them the last Session, which ended the 23d of December, as they 
apprehend the Lower House might then have been more easily per- 
swaded into a thing of this Nature than if we were to call an As- 
sembly on purpose, whicn is always unpopular, as it brings a con- 
siderable Expense upon the People. This being considered, it was 
the unanimous Opinion of the Council that the best way to answer 
the expectation of Your Government wou'd be to leave the Affair 
till the next Meeting of our Assembly, which is to be the Tenth of 
May, when I really flatter myself We shall do something on our 
Part to keep up that good Correspondence with the Indians which 
is so necessary to all His Majesty's Subjects in this part of the 
World ; in the mean time I remain, Sir, 

" Your most obedient humble Servant. 

"SAM OGLE. 
" To the Honoble Anthony Palmer, Esqr." 

A list of Officers to whom Commissions have been granted since 
the Last Entry in the Council Books : 

Captains. Lieutenants. Ensigns. 

Philada. Co. 
Edward Jones, Griffith Griffiths, 1st James Richey, 

Abraham Dehaven, Lieut., John Pauling, 

Christopher Robbins, William Coats, 2d do., Benjamin Davis, 
Roger North, 
Peter Knight. 

Bucks County, 

Alexander Graydon, Mathew Hughes, Lieu*. John Denormandie, 

Col ., Col ., Maj r ., 

Simon Butler, James Meredith, Benjamin Butler, 

James Huston, Archibald Finley, William Walker, 

Henry Croson, Isaiah Yanzant, Joseph Hart, 

Griffith Owen, Thomas Kelly, William Williams, 

Alexander Hunter, James Martin, John Miller, 

William Craig, George Gray, Thomas Armstrong, 

George Hughes, James Bogart, Barnet Yanhorne, 

William Ramsey, Hugh Miller. James Adams, 
vol. v. — 14. 



210 



MINUTES OF THE 



Captains. 

Andrew McDowell; 

Col . 
Job Ruston, 
William Bell, 
Joseph Wilson, 
Henry Glassford, 
William Boyd, 
William Reed, 
William Porter, 
John Miller, 



James Gillaspy, 
Gabriel Davis, 
Samuel Crawford. 



Lieutenants. 
Chester County. 

John Frew, Lieu 1 . Col 
Joseph Smith, 
Robert McMullen, 
James Cochran, 
Robert Allison, 
John Culbertson, 
Thomas Hope, 
Robert Macky, 
G-eorge Bently. 

Lancr. Co. 

James Gilcrease, 
Robert Ellis, 
Willikm Rowland. 



Ensigns. 

John Miller, Major, 
James Dysart, 
Rowland Parry, 
Joseph Parke, 
John Emmit, 
John Donald, 
Thomas Clarke, 
John Smith, 
Thomas Brown, 



Samuel Jemmison, 
Edward Davis, jun., 
Richard M'Donald. 



The following Officers were chosen for that part of Lancaster 
County which lies between the River Sasquehanna & the Lines of 
this Province, viz. : 



Benjamin Chambers, 

Col . 
Richard O'Cain, 
Robert Chambers, 
James Carnaghan, 
John Chambers, 
James Silver, 
Charles Morow, 
George Brown, 
James Woods, 
James McTeer, 
Mathew Dill, 
Benjamin Chambers, 
William Maxwell, 
Robert Dunning, 



Robert Dunning, Lieu 1 

Col. 
William Smith, 
Andrew Finla, 
James Jack, 
Jonathan Holmes, 
Tobias Hendricks, 
James Dyssart, 
John Potter, 
John McCormick, 
William Trindle, 
Andrew Miller, 
Charles McGill, 
John Winton, 
John Mitchel, 



.Wm. Maxwell, Maj[. 

John Mitchel, 
John Lesan, 
John Thompson, 
Walter Davis, 
Joseph Irwin, 
John Anderson, 
John Randals, 
Samuel Fisher, 
Moses Star, 
George Brenan, 
Robert Muk, 
James Wilkey, 
Adam Hayes. 



Neio Castle County, 

John Read, Thomas Montgomery, 

Henry Colesberry, Peter Jacquet, 
Alexander Armstrong, Anthony Golden, 
Abel Armstrong, Thomas Ogle, 

James Morris, Thomas Philips, 

Jacob Vanbebber, David Howell. 

The Council having repriev'd William Ward, was pleas' d on his 
Inlisting to serve His Majesty as a Soldier in the Garrison of Cape 



William Patterson, 
William Danford, 
David Witherspoon, 
James McMechen, 
William Armstrong, 
Jacob Gooding, 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 211 

Breton, to grant him a Pardon, which was Sign'd by the President 
& four Members & Order' d to be enter'd. 

u George the Second by the Grace of God of Great Britain, France, 
and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, &c, To all Persons 
to whom these Presents shall come Greeting : 

" Whereas William Ward, late of the City of Philadelphia, in the 
County of Philadelphia, within our Province of Pennsylvania, at a 
Court of Oyer & Terminer & General Goal Delivery held at Phila- 
delphia in and for the said County, the 17th, 18th, & 19th Days of 
November last past, has been Indicted, Tried, & Convicted of & for 
Felony and Burglary, in breaking & entering in the Night time of 
the 28th Day of September last the Mansion House of a certain 
Ann Cox, at the Township of Moyamensing in the said County, 
with Intent the Goods & Chatties of the said Ann in the House 
then being then and there feloniously & burglariously to steal, take, 
and bear away • for which he the said William Ward hath received 
Sentence accordingly, that he should be hang'd by the Neck till he 
be dead, as by the Record of the said Conviction and Judgment 
thereon more at large appears. Now Know Ye that We being gra- 
ciously pleas'd to extend our Royal Mercy & Compassion to the said 
William Ward, have remitted, pardon'd, abolish'd, & released, And 
Do by these Presents remit, pardon, abolish, & release, unto the 
said William Ward, All that part of the said Sentence before speci- 
fied, so that he shall not suffer Death, as by the said Judgment of 
the said Court he is Sentenced to suffer; And hereof we command 
all our Officers and our Liege Subjects whom it doth or may con- 
cern, to have a due regard & observance ; And our Will & Pleasure 
is that the said William Ward stand right in our Courts, if any 
against him wou'd speak of the Premisses. In Testimony whereof 
We have caused the Great Seal of our said Province to be hereunto 
affixed. Witness, Anthony Palmer, Esq., President, Thomas Law- 
rence, Samuel Hasell, Abraham Taylor, & Robert Strettell, Esqrs., 
in Council Assembled at Philadelphia, the Thirty-first Day of 
March in the Year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred & 
forty-eight, and in the Twenty-first Year of our Reign. 

"ANTHONY PALMER, 
"THOMAS LAWRENCE, 
"SAMUEL HASELL, 
"ABRAHAM TAYLOR, 
"ROBERT STRETTELL/' 



212 MINUTES OF THE 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 31st March, 1748. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., Presid'- 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, "1 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, > Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approv'd. 

The following Letter from Mr. Weiser, sent by Express, was 
read : 

" Tulpyhockin, March 28th, 1748. 
"Sir: 

" I let You know by these Lines that our old Friend Shikalamy, 
with his Eldest Son, came down from Shamokin at my request; they 
arrived this afternoon; I wanted to consult with him about the 
Journey to Ohio, and to hear what passes among the Indians on 
Sasquehanna River and elsewhere. Shickalamy informs me he had 
certain Intelligence that some of the Chiefs of the Six Nations will 
be down early this Spring to pay a Yisit to their Brethren in Phila- 
delphia, and to transact an affair at Shamokin concerning the Del- 
aware Indians and their deceas'd King Olumpies. This was agreed 
upon at the Council at Onontago last Fall. Shikalamy had this 
account from an Onontager Indian, and also from a Kayucker In- 
dian. He further informs me that two of the Indians that were at 
Philadelphia last Fall from Ohio, stayed all Winter at Juniata, one 
is there still, the other in his way homewards was detained at Sha- 
mokin by the high Waters, and lodg'd several Nights at Shikala- 
my' s House; his Name is Hodeecherich, of whom Shikalamy 
Learn'd ' that the Indians on Ohio had not proclaimed War against 
the French; that they wou'd do nothing against the French before 
the Six Nations had declared War; that they were altogether sub- 
ject to the Six Nations; that upon the first Notice they shou'd 
receive from the Six Nations they wou'd Act against the French, 
& not before ; that it was the Zisagechroanus that had commited 
Hostilities against the French, & had desir'd the Indians between 
Lake Erie & Ohio to join them ; that the Indians on Ohio sent 
them (or their Belt of Wampum) to the Six Nations; that the In- 
dians about Ohio were all inclin'd to keep a good Correspondency 
with the English and protect their Traders, and that they expect 
nothing else but to have a War with the French ; ' so far Hodeeche- I 
rich. Shikalamy for his own part tells me ' that he was well as- j 
sured the Information of the said Hodeecherich was true, and that ! 
the Journey to Ohio wou'd avail but little ; that he has no Inclina- I 
tion to go, yet if I insisted upon it he wou'd accompany me/ This, j 
Sir, is the substance of what Shikalamy told me, and I have 
thought fit to send my son with it by Express to Philad 3 -, & I hope i 

I 
I 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 213 

You will lay it before the President & Council, & let my Son be 
Dispatch' J with their Result. If the Journey shou'd be delay'd or 
given over, What must be said to the Indians by George Croghan ? 
His own Cargo is already gone, & he must follow it in a few Days. 
I will undertake a ride to George Croghan's, let things go as they 
will, before he goes to the Woods ; I reckon he will be greatly dis- 
appointed, he having kept about Twenty Horses in readiness to 
carry the Goods. I am ready to do whatever the President & Coun- 
cil will be pleas'd to signifie to me, and so conclude & remain, 
u Your humble Servant, 

"CONRAD WEISER. 
"To Richard Peters, Esqr., Secretary of Pennsylvania." 

Mr. Weiser' s former Letters on this Subject were then call'd for, 
and on their being read there appear'd to be an inconsistency between 
them and this present Letter; & no light at all being given from 
whence to form a Judgment of the Truth, the Members were unani- 
mously of opinion that Mr. Weiser & Shickalamy shou'd be sent 
for, and thereupon the following Letters were wrote by the Secre- 
tary : 

" Philada., 31st March, 1748. 
" Sir : 

" I received Yours of the 28th Instant about Six a'Clock yester- 
day in the afternoon, and at ten this morning the Council met, when 
I laid it before them, and on considering it they think the contents 
thereof are of the highest Importance, & that they cannot come to 
any resolves without consulting with You & Shickalamy, and there- 
fore desire you will immediately on receipt hereof set out and pre- 
vail on Shickalamy to come along with You. It is expected that 
neither of You will make any excuses nor the least delay, since not 
to come, or not to come forthwith, as the matters under Consider- 
ation affect this Province, and indeed all the Indian Nations in a 
very sensible manner, would be equally dangerous ; and if I knew 
either of You, you will not suffer it to be said that any harm shall 
happen to The Public weal thro' Your or either of Your faults. 

" Their Honours have further order' d me to write to Mr. Croghan, 
if his Affairs cannot possibly admit of his stay till Your return from 
Philadelphia, that he may proceed to Ohio; For as the Southern 
Provinces have now under their Consideration the Application made 
by the Ohio Indians to them in their Treaty with this Government, 
& which, at their Instance, was sent with their String of Wampum, 
and have not yet, thro' the Severity of the Winter Season, commu- 
nicated their final Resolves, This Government is thereby oblig'd to 
delay their Messenger with a view of sending the Result of their 
Councils & their own together. 

" I am, Sir, Your obedient Servant, 

"RICHARD PETERS. 
" To Conrad Weiser, Esq." 



214 MINUTES OF THE 

" P. S. — I have left Mr. Croghan's Letter open that You may pe- 
ruse it, and that You may in Your Letter to him say what You shall 
think necessary, for I am sensible more may be said to him, & it 
will come better from You. The Council order You to send Mr. 
Croghan's Letter by Express to him immediately on the Receipt of 
Your's, for he waits impatiently for the answer of the Council, 
especially as two Waggon Loads of Goods are order' d to Thomas 
Harris' & there remain till further order." 

" Philada., 31st March, 1748. 

"Sir: 

" I am favour'd with Your Letter which I communicated to the 
Members of the Council, and I have their Orders to thank You for 
your Care of providing everything in time for the Ohio Journey, & 
to inform You that as the Southern Provinces have now under y e Con- 
sideration the application made to them by the Ohio Indians at their 
Treaty with this Government, and shew favourable Dispositions to- 
wards those Indians, but have not, thro' the Severity of the Winter 
Season, been able to send their final Resolves, their Honours, for 
this & other weighty Considerations, are oblig'd to delay their Mes- 
senger, & to send for him to come to them at Philadelphia in order 
to consult with him on Indian Affairs, and particularly on an Intel- 
ligence they have received by Shickalamy that some of the Chiefs 
of the Council at Onondago will come to this City early in the 
Spring to transact some business of Consequence. You will be 
pleas'd in the best manner to apprize the Indians of the reasons of 
this Delay, and if, on seeing the Interpreter & talking with him, his 
presence here should be thought necessary in this case, it is not 
possible to say what time Mr. Weiser can be expected to arrive at 
Ohio, though they hope it will not be long; however, that the In- 
dians may not be kept long in suspence, either Mr. Weiser or an 
Express will be dispatch'd whenever the answer comes from the 
Southern Provinces. 

u The Council is sensible You have been at an Expence & that 
Your detainment at home must be a considerable inconvenience to 
You, and therefore desire You will make a Charge of every thing, 
that You may be paid to Your Satisfaction. It will be very agree- 
able to them if, as you have staid so long, your Business wou'd per- 
mit you to stay a little longer, that Mr. Weiser might go along 
with You, in case the Council after conferring with him shou'd be 
at Liberty to send him to Ohio. I conclude with repeating the 
President's & Council's acknowledgements to You for your Care & 
Services in this troublesome Affair, & am, 

" Sir, Your humble Servant, 

"RICHARD PETERS. 
"Mr. George Crogan." 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 215 

The President having received a Letter from Governor Clinton, 
the same was read & order' d to be enter' d : 

" New York, March, 1747. 
" Sir : 

" I would have done myself the pleasure of answering the favour 
of Your Letter, which I received by the Gentleman that came hither 
to assist Your sollicitation for the loan of some Cannon for the Ser- 
vice and Defence of Pennsylvania Province, but that the Gentleman 
went away in a hurry • and I am glad I had it in my power to 
oblige You and them on that Occasion. As I suppose they are by 
this time return'd to Philadelphia, I shall refer you to their Report 
how far I have been able to comply with your Request ; & I per- 
suade myself, if the Cannon which I have spared get safe to Your 
Province, they will contribute greatly to the Defence and Satisfac- 
tion of His Majestie's Subjects there, and I heartily wish You Suc- 
cess in the use of them till You can be better Supplied elsewhere. 
" I am, with great Regard, Sir, 

" Your most humble Servant, 

" GEORGE CLINTON. 

" P. S. — I am inform' d that Don Pedro is upon the Coast with 
one or two Vessels, which makes me think the sending the Cannon 
by Water will be hazardous, therefore wou'd much rather chuse to 
have them sent by Land, as first propos'd. 

"The Honourable Anthony Palmer, Esq'*" 



At a Council held at Philadelphia 5th April, 1748. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ~\ 

Abraham Taylor, Benjamin Shoemaker, vEsqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The following Letter in answer to Governor Clinton's was Signed 
by the President : 

" Philada., 5th April, 1748. 
"Sir: 

" I have the honour to acknowledge the Receipt of Yours by last 
Post. The Gentlemen employed to sollicit the Loan of the Cannon 
had given in their Report before your obliging favour came to hand, 
and had made the Board so sensible of the readiness with which 
Your Excellency & the Council acceded to their Application, that I 



216 MINUTES OF THE 

find it difficult to make their acknowledgements in Terms* that -will 
sufficiently express their Gratitude. 

" The People of this Province saw themselves in imminent Dan- 
ger, and as they had been disappointed in every scheme they had 
form'd for the procuring of Cannon, if Your Excellency had not 
enter' d with so much zeal into the Consideration of their Calamitous 
Circumstances, we shou'd have had reason to dread the Conse- 
quences in case of an Attack. 

" The Council have these reasons, in common with their fellow- 
Citizens, for their grateful sense of Your Excellency's kindness, 
but they find even these heightened by the personal Regard You 
have been pleas'd to shew to them, & by the obliging manner in 
which you have always express'd yourself towards them. This 
they desire me to say they will ever remember with the utmost 
affection. After baving endeavour' d to do Justice to my fellow- 
Counsellors, be pleas'd to believe I am imspir'd with the same 
Sentiments & the some Gratitude, & that no one can be with truer 
Esteem, 

" Your Excellency's most obedient Servant, 

" ANTHONY PALMER. 
" His Excellency George Clinton, Esqr." 

A Letter from the honoble. the Proprietaries was read : 

" London, October, 16th, 1747. 
" Gentlemen : 

u We have received the Duplicate of Your Letter of the 29th of 
July, the Original of which was sent by Captain Mesnard, who 
was taken, & also duplicate of the Minutes of Council to the 22d 
of the same Month, by which we have the satisfaction to see you 
have taken the most proper Measures that the Circumstances of the 
several Affairs that came before You required, & with a dispatch 
that shews your attachment to the Service of your Country. This 
is what we expected from the knowledge we had of the former Gen- 
tlemen of your Board ; and we are much 'pleas'd with your late wor- 
thy Governor's having fill'd up the number of Council with Gen- 
tlemen so capable of Assisting the Public Service, & which must 
make the attendance less burthensome by increasing the number. 

u We are very sensible that the sending Flags of Truce from our 
Enemies to a place situated as Philadelphia is, so far within Land, 
and at so great a distance from the Country s they came from, when 
they might in much less time have gone to other Settlements, must 
be chiefly with a view to make themselves Masters of the Naviga- 
tion of the Bay in order to come in another manner, & shou'd be 
prevented by all methods in your power. The regulations drawn 
up by Your Committee are very good ones, and we shall hope to 
hear the President will procure the same to be obser'd in the Lower 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 217 

Government; this we recommend to You to inforce the Execution 
of, and to prevent as much as possible any communication between 
our People and those with whom we are engaged in War, which 
perhaps an Inclination to advantageous Trade may tempt some 
People to. 

" The daring attack made by the Crew of the Privateer, as well 
on the Plantations at Bombay Hook as the Ship in the Bay, are 
fully sufficient to increase the uneasiness of the People, & if Acts 
of Assembly cou'd put a stop to it they would very soon have those 
in their Power, as it can depend on us ; but former Experience 
fully shew us, and your own Minute of your conference with the 
Members of Assembly as fully confirms, that Your Assembly will 
not pass any Act, or be active in any thing tending to Your Defence ; 
they may give a little Money, just as they shall see proper, after other 
Gentlemen shall have advanced their Money for the Public Service. 
What appears to us the only thing that can be done for Your Secu- 
rity is to procure a Ship or Sloop to be Station'd at Lewis; this we 
shall immediately apply for and sollicit in the strongest manner, 
and we hope we shall meet with Success. 

" We are well pleased to find by your Minutes that some consid- 
erable Nations of Indians on the Lakes are come over to the Eng- 
lish Interest, & into confederacy with the Six Nations. We recom- 
mend it to you to encourage such Inclinations in them, and as You 
have given that You will continue to give the necessary orders for 
keeping up a good Correspondence with the several Tribes with 
whom we are allied, & who, having ever been faithful to Us, are 
justly entitled to our Regard, as well as that in point of Pollicy 
their further Friendship may be of great use. We observe Com- 
plaints have been made of the injustice of the Indian Traders 
towards some of that poor People, and desire You will cause the 
most speedy & effectual enquiry to be made into that Business, 
that Justice may be done to them, the most exact performance of 
which is the only Basis on which a firm Union can be established. 

"It is needless for Us to say anything further to a Board so well 
acquainted with their Duty ; we have a firm Confidence in your 
acting such a part as will be most for the honour & safety of Your 
Country; this is all we have to desire, and with which we should 
rest satisfied under your administration ; but as You have not the 
power of joining with the Assembly to make Laws, you may be 
assured if the Affairs of our Family will not one of us to leave 
this Country the next Summer, we shall make an apointment that 
the Province may not want that most necessary part of Govern- 
ment. 

" We had some expectation the Governor wou'd have continued 
another Year with You, on account of the late melancholly altera- 
tion in our Family, but find his state of health would not permit, 



218 MINUTES OF THE 

or perhaps we might have been more determined in this affair. "We 
are, 

" Gentlemen, Your very affectionate Friends. 

"THO. PENN, 
"RICH d . PENN. 
" London, Oct r * 16, 1747. 

" The Honoble the President & Council of the Province of Penn- 
sylvania. " 

Nicholas Perie & Captain Charles Higginbotham attending the 
Council in pursuance of their Order of the 22d of January last, were 
called in. Nicholas Perie desir'd that as he was a German & did not 
understand the English Language, that he might be permitted to 
speak by an Interpreter, & having leave from the Council to do so, 
Mr. Christian Grasshold, who is usually employed in this Service by 
the Germans, deliver'd in a Paper, & desir'd it might be received as 
the Defence of the said Perie • the Paper was read in these words : 

"May it please the President & Council: 

"I have receiv'd Your Honour's Orders to wait on You this Pay 
to answer some Complaints of one Higginbotham, who gives out 
that he is to have my Land under a pretence of a Maryland Patent. 

"I am one of those Foreigners who Petition' d nine or ten Years 
ago against the proceedings of Captain Cresap & this very Higgin- 
botham, and His Majesty was pleas'd to make an Order that I, as 
well as others who were at that time in possession of the Lands 
contested between the Proprietors of Maryland & Pennsylvania, 
should remain in possession till the final determination of the Cause 
between the said Proprietaries. 

" I have been guilty of no breach of the Peace ; I have liv'd within 
the Government of Pennsylvania quietly & like a good Subject, and 
have paid my Taxes regularly for the Support thereof, & in return 
I expect the protection of this Government of Pennsylvania if my 
property be attempted to be wrested out of my Hands by violence, 
and if You will not grant it to me, I will immediately apply to His 
Majesty that he wou'd graciously enforce obedience to his own 
Royal Order, and His Majesty on such application will, I doubt 
not, let fall the Severity of his Displeasure on any one who will 
presume to disturb his Subjects after such terrible harrassments as 
they have undergone, and this in opposition to His Gracious Order, 
obtain'd after a full hearing of both Proprietaries to quiet us in our 
Possessions. 

" With all humility I beg Leave to say, that in as much as I 
have been in possession before the lloyal Order at the time the 
same was made, & ever since, I will not give up possession, neither 
at the Instance of Pennsylvania nor Maryland, till there be a final 
Settlement between the Proprietaries of Pennsylvania & Maryland, 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 219 

& this ratified by His Majesty, or at least till I have the joint 
Orders of the Proprietaries of Pennsylvania & Maryland served upon 
me in a legal manner. I in the humblest manner beg leave to say 
the President & Council have no Power, so long as I behave peace- 
ably & like a good Subject, to make any Orders respecting the pos- 
session & Title of my Land. It is true that I hold this very Land 
by a grant from the Proprietors of Pennsylvania, which I have 
ready to produce. In all other matters, that only excepted which 
respects the Title & Possession of my Land, I owe suit & service to 
the Government of Pennsylvania. 

" Higginbotham's Patent is nothing to me, he may have Twenty 
Patents, but they cannot operate against his Majestie's Royal Order, 
since I have been in possession of the Land these twelve Years. 

"NICHOLAS PERIE. 

"April 5th, 1748." 

The Board taking notice of the incivility of the Language, ask'd 
Mr. Grasshold if he knew who penn'd the Paper. He said Nicholas 
Perie dictated the substance of it first in Dutch, & when that was 
Settled he translated it into English ; That neither Perie nor him- 
self intended any Incivility, and if there was any thing of this sort 
that cou'd give offence, it was owing to his Ignorance of the Eng- 
lish Language, & begged it might be seen in that Light, as the 
Man had his sole dependence on the Justice of this honourable 
Board. 

" Mr. Grasshold further for Nicholas Perie offer' d to the Board 
another Paper, which he said wou'd shew that Nicholas Perie had 
possession of the said Land by a Grant from Proprietor Thomas 
Penn in the Year 1736, desiring it might be taken notice of that 
the Date of this Grant was prior to Higginbotham's Patent or 
Right. This Paper the Secretary read in these words, viz. : 

"Pennsylvania ss. 

" Whereas, sundry Germans and others formerly seated themselves 
by our Leave on Lands Lying on the West side of Sasquehanna 
River within our County of Lancaster, & within the bounds of a 
Tract of Land Survey'd the Nineteenth and Twentieth Days of 
June, Anno Domini, 1722, containing about Seventy thousand 
Acres, commonly called the Manor of Springetsbury ; 

"And Whereas A Confirmation to the Persons seated on the 
same for their several Tracts has hitherto been delayed by reason of 
the Claim made to the said Lands by the Indians of the Five Na- 
tions, which Claim the said Indians have now effectually released to 
Us by their Deed bearing date the Eleventh Day of this Instant, 
October ; 

" And Whereas Nicholas Perie, one of the Persons living within 
the said Manor, hath now applied for a Confirmation of Two hun- 
dred Acres, part of the same where he is now Seated ; 



220 MINUTES OF THE 

"I Do hereby Certify that I will cause a Patent to be drawn to 
the said Nicholas Perie for the said Two hundred Acres (if so much 
can be there had without prejudice to the other Settlers) on the 
common Terms other Lands on the West side of Sasquchanna 
River are granted, so soon as the said quantity shall be Survey'd to 
him & a return thereof made to me. 

"THO. PENN. 

"October 30th, 1736." 

After this was read, Mr. G-rasshold inform'd the Council that this 
very man in the Year 1737 had been arrested by a writ issuing out 
of the Supreme Court of Maryland for refusing to hold this Land 
under Lord Baltimore; that he pleaded to the Jurisdiction of that 
Court; and that on the arrival of His Majestie's Order of Council 
for quieting People in their possessions, he was pursuant thereto 
Discharg'd on his Recognizance, & that he did not expect to be 
troubled a second time, as he was legally Discharg'd for the same 
reasons, & as he thinks, at the same time that Cressap was set at 
Liberty at Philadelphia by virtue of the said Order. 

Charles Higginbotham was then Interrogated as to the fact set 
forth in the first Paper, viz., whether he, the said Nicholas Perie, 

had been in possession of the Tract of Acres Patented to him, 

the said Charles Higginbotham, some Years before the Royal Order, 
& had continued in Possession ever since. Captain Higginbotham said, 
as to himself he had never been in possession nor any under him, 
& that he had never seen the said Land, & that he believed what 
the Man had set forth might be true, for before his the said Hig- 
ginbotham's, Patent issued, he remembers this Nicholas Perie was 
arrested on the said Tract & carried to Annapolis Jayl for refusing 
to hold under any Lord Baltimore, tho' his Land was Survey' d by 
a Maryland Warrant j & to this Point he clesir'd that as Coll 0, White, 
now living in Philadelphia, was the then Surveyor in Baltimore 
County, he might be examin'd. Mr. Higginbotham had leave to go 
for Coll 0, White, but not finding him at home, & shewing an Incli- 
nation that he might be examin'd, the Board indulg'd him till ten 
a' Clock to-morrow morning. 



At a Council held at Philada., 6th April, 1748. 

present : 
The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 

Samuel Hasell, Abraham Taylor, ~) 

Robert Strettell, Joseph Turner,' I Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, j 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approv'd. 

Captain Higginbotham with Coll 0, White and Nicholas Perie, with 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 221 

the Interpreter Mr. Grasshold, attending without were call'd in, & 
the Secretary having read that part of the Minutes of yesterday 
which contained Captain Higginbotham's reply to Perie's Paper, 
Coll 0- White was interogated as to what he knew of the Survey or 
Possession of the Land included in Captain Higginbotham's Patent. 
He said he was Surveyor of Baltimore County in Maryland, & he 
or his Deputy had Survey'd Lands in that County, and that at the 
Instance of some Germans who had obtain'd Warrants from the 
Land Office at Annapolis, he or his Deputy had Survey'd Sundry 
Tracts for them in the upper Part of that County; that this Man, 
for ought he knew, might be one of those Grermans, but he did not 
remember ever to have seen him; that those Germans, after the 
Survey of their Lands by Warrants from Lord Baltimore's Com- 
missioner of Property, refus'd to pay for them, being as they pre- 
tended within the Province of Pennsylvania, upon which Lord 
Baltimore afterwards gave him directions to return the Surveys of 
these Lands to any Person that wou'd apply for them; & that 
Captain Higginbotham's applying, he believes he might return the 
Survey of this Land to the Maryland Land Office for his use, & 
thereupon the Patent produc'd might issue; but he knows nothing 
in particular about this Tract or the possession thereof. 

The Board directed the Secretary to search the Papers in his 
Office and to report the proceedings of the Supreme Court of this 
Government on the Receipt of His Majestie's Order, & whether 
there be any Copies of the proceedings of the Suprasme Court of 
Maryland, from which it might appear that Nicholas Perie was dis- 
charge in the manner he has set forth. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 11th April, 1748. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, "] 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, ! -^ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, [ " "' 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The following Letter which the President received from S r - Wil- 
liam Gooch, in answer to the Council's Letter of the 25th January 
last, was read. 

" Williamsburg, March 7th, 1748. 
"Sir: 

" Your Packet of the 25th *f January I did not receive till the 
date hereof, or You shou'd have heard sooner of the unhappy Cir- 
cumstances of this Colony on account of the Small Pox, which has 



222 MINUTES OF THE 

made the Calling an Assembly impracticable, we Laving no otter 
place in the Government for us to meet at but this Town, where 
that Distemper has so lately prevail'd, and not yet quite finis'd its 
Course. However, Sir, I must acknowledge the Request You make 
is so just & equitable, considering the Share we shall have in the 
advantage of fixing the Ohio Indians steadfast in the British In- 
terest, that the ]0th of next Month, when I expect the Gentlemen 
of the Council in Town, I shall recommend the contents of Your 
Letter to them, & am satisfied they will readily agree to send Your 
Honour something to encrease Your Presents. I trust this will not 
be too late ; what may be resolved on it is impossible for me to 
foresee, as You have not given any Intimation concerning the Sum 
You hop'd for from us, which if you think proper to advertise me 
of, I shall do my endeavour that you may not be disappointed in so 
laudable an undertaking. 

"I am, with perfect Esteem, 

" Sir, Your most obedt. hum. Servant, 

"WILLIAM GOOCH. 

"The Honoble. Anthony Palmer, Esqi*." 

Mr. Weiser, with Shikalamy & his Son attending, they were 
call'd in, & Shikalamy related to the Board that an Indian, a Mem- 
cer of the Council of the Six Nations at Onondago, was sent to him 
with a Message from the Council to inform him that they were 
come to a Resolution of sending some of their old Men to Phila- 
delphia to treat about some Business of Consequence, & particularly 
about the appointment of a proper Person to succeed Olomipas the 
King of the Delaware Indians, lately deceas'd at Shamokin ; he 
said further : The Speaker of the Ohio Indians had staid all Win- 
ter with the Nanticoke Indians at their Town, Situate at the mouth 
of Juniata, and in his return home had call'd at Shamokin, & 
during his stay there he & his Son had several free Conversations 
with him about the Concerns of the Indians at Ohio & about Lake 
Erie, in which he told them that those Indians had not taken up 
the Hatchet, nor wou'd not do it without consulting with the Six 
Nations, to which they belong'd; a particular Tribe of Indians, 
call'd , had indeed began Hostilities, but none of these In- 
dians had join'd with them nor wou'd do it till the Sentiments of the 
Council at Onondago shou'd be fully known j that knowing these 
particulars he thought them of so much consequence, considering 
what was done at Philadelphia with regard to these Indians, as to 
come & impart them to Conrad Weiser, & that he was clearly of 
opinion that Mr. Weiser' s presence wou'd be requisite when the 
Onondago Deputies shou'd come to Town, & that if it should be 
thought proper to delay the Interpreter's Journey for this purpose, 
he belicv'd no harm cou'd possibly ensue, as those Indians were not 
at War & were determin'd to govern themselves by the advice of 
the Six Nations. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 223 

On this Information, & considering the good Dispositions of the 
Governors of Virginia & Maryland, the Council determin'd not to 
send Mr. Weiser to Ohio till after the arrival of the Onondago 
Deputys, since they wou'd then be furnish'd with an opportunity 
of making full Enquiry of all particulars relating to these Indians; 
& the President was desir'd to answer Mr. Ogle & Mr. Gooch's 
Letters on this Subject, & to frame his Letters agreeable to the Re- 
solve of the Council. 

The Secretary was order'd to give 12 Pieces of Eight to Shicka- 
lamy & 8 to his Son. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 12th April, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, 



Esqrs. 



William Till, Abraham Taylor, 

Robert Strettell, Joseph Turner, 

Thomas Hopkinson, 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The City Regiment of Associators having been review'd by the 
President & Council, the President expressed great Satisfaction 
to see so large a number of the Inhabitants under Arms ; and 
as none can doubt of their Zeal & readiness to do their utmost for 
the preservation of the City & Province, he hop'd the minds of the 
People wou'd now be pacified as having a more solid Security 
against an Enemy than had been known in times past. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 13th April, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr. President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ~\ 

William Till, Joseph Turner, y Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, ) 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd- 
The President having wrote his Letters to the Governors of Vir- 
ginia & Maryland, the same were read, as was likewise the Presi- 
dent's Letter to Mr. Ogle, in answer to his of the 3d of December 
last, about Captain Higginbotham. 

"Philada., 12th April, 1848. 
" S r : * 

" I postpon'd answering your kind favours of the Twenty-fifth 



224 MINUTES OF THE 

February & 28th of March, till I should hear from the Governor of 
Virginia, and as his Letter did not arrive till Saturday last I em- 
brace this first opportunity of making You my acknowledgements 
for the Care You was pleas'd to take in forwarding my Packet, & 
taking the trouble to write to him on the Subject. S r - William is 
entirely of the same Sentiment with You & Your Council that every 
thing shou'd be done to preserve the Indians about Ohio our hearty 
Friends, & promises to do all in his power to induce his Assembly 
to join in the Present. 

" The Death of the Messenger might have prov'd an heavy mis- 
fortune had Your Assembly & that of Virginia been sitting, but as 
both Houses were in their recess & are to sit again pretty near the 
same time, the Delay was not of any Consequence. 

u Our Council, indeed, on my laying before them Your first Let- 
ter, imagin'd this accident wou'd render it impracticable to receive 
answers time enough to fulfill the Engagement they had laid them- 
selves under in their Treaty with those Indians, & therefore came 
to a Resolution of dispatching Mr. Weiser with a Present of the 
value of One thousand Pounds, so as to be at Ohio within the time 
concluded upon at his parting with Scaiohady in his return home ; 
But when I imparted to them Yours & the Governor of Virginia's 
Letter they alter' d their mind, and on consulting with Mr. Weiser, 
who happen'd fortunately to be in Town the Day S r * William 
Gooch's Letter came to my Hand, they were contented to send a 
Message to the Indians to inform them that the Interpreter was 
prevented by some unforeseen Public Business from coming to 
them so early as he had given them reason to expect, but that he 
should hasten up to them as soon as this Business shou'd be finish'd, 
which was hop'd wou'd be about the middle of Summer. 

" How they will even take this Delay I cannot say ; they are in 
extreme want, & by all Informations very numerous ; the French 
leave nothing unattempted to seduce them from the English Interest; 
there are some small French Forts a little to the West of these In- 
dians j but whether there are any & what quantity of Powder & 
Goods in them to give to the Indians I cannot learn ; perhaps they 
have none or not much, and in this case those poor Indians may be 
necessitated, if they do not receive Supplys soon ; to fall upon the 
Provinces that are nearest to them to get wherewith to subsist. 

" They receive no part of the Presents that are annually made to 
the Six Nations by the Governments of New York & Boston; these 
are all cngross'd by the Mohocks and the Nations to the Eastward 
of Ohio, so that there is the greater reason why the Southren Pro- 
vinces shou'd take care of them, as they live upon their Borders & 
can by their Situation be an effectual Barrier against the French. 

il S r- William Gooch by his manner of writing seems to be of 
opinion that Virginia will not send Commissioners, but chuse to 
make an addition to the Present to be sent by Mr. Weiser from 



! 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 225 

foeace, & says lie wou'd be glad I had told him what Sum was ex- 
pected. But this I have not presumed to do any otherwise than by 
relating the Circumstances of these Indians, and that not so much 
for his Information as for the satisfaction such Relation may give 
to the Assembly, & indeed this is the reason why I have wrote so 
long a Letter to You, who know these .matters much better than I 
do. I am with perfect Esteem & Regard, 

tl Sir, Your most obedient humble Servant, 

"ANTHONY PALMER, 
« Gov* Ogle." 

A Letter of the same Te&or with the above was sent to S r " Wil- 
liam Groock, 

* Philaba., April 11th, 1748. 
wfiBr: 

u Captain Higginbotham's Affair has been heard by the Coun- 
cil with all the Regard due to a Person under jour recommenda- 
tion, 

11 It appear' d that he had never seen the Land, and that neither 
he nor any under him had ever been possess' d of it, but on the 
contrary that Perie, the Person complained of, was in possession 
before and at the time of His Majestie's Order for quieting the 
Borders of the Provinces, which possession has continued in him 
ever since. 

" Some Facts decisive in the opinion of our Council if true, & 
which perhaps have mot come to Your knowledge, were insisted on 
by Perie. That before the Royal Order he was arrested by process 
from Your Provincial Court for a suppos'd Trespass conimited on 
this Land; That he was imprison' d at Annapolis several Days, & for 
kis Release oblig'd to give Bail to abide the Judgment of the Court; 
That the Suit was continued against him until the Royal Order was 
made, by virtue of which the Provincial Court finally discharg'd 
him. The truth of these matters will best appear by Your Records. 
But on the whole were unanimously of opinion that His Majesty's 
Order absolutely restrain' d them from dispossessing Perie of the Land 
he enjoy'd at the time the Order was made. 

" I am sincerely sorry to hear by Captain Higginbothani that 
| You were indisposed, & most heartily wish You a speedy Recoverj 
i of Your Health, being with true Esteem & Regard, 

44 Sir, Your most obedient Servant, 

"ANTHONY PALMER, 

jjif Gov r - Ogle." 

VOL. V. — 15, 



226 MINUTES OF THE 

A Petition from the Pilots using the Bay & River of Delaware 
was read in these words, viz : 

" To the Honourable ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., PresicV' of the 
Government of the Counties of New Castle, Kent r & Sussex, on 
Delaware^ &■ Province of Pennsylvania 7 

u The humble Petition of the Pilots, Inhabitants of the County of 
Sussex; on Delaware. 

" Whereas, Your Petitioners, as well pursuant to an Act of Gene- 
ral Assembly of this Government as Your Honour's late Proclama- 
tion, are prohibited going on board any inward bound Vessel in the 
Bay & River Delaware, which said Act & Proclamation your Peti- 
tioners are fully convinced are justly Calculated for the safety of 
this Government^ and therefore willing to pay all due obedience, 

" And whereas, The Pilots that dwell in the Government of New 
Jersey (from a false Representation of Your Petitioners having 
Lycence to Cruise for Vessels & go on board the same as Pilots) are 
not restrained by any Law of that Government, but, as Your Peti- 
tioners are informed, have leave to Cruize and go on board Vessels* 
as Pilots, & daily do the* same within the Bay & River aforesaid, 
which in its Consequence may prove prejudicial to this Government, 
and likewise prevent Your Petitioners acquiring a Competent Sup- 
port for their Familys, for Your Honour may be assur'd that no in- 
ward bound Vessel will call at Lewes for a Pilot when any other 
may be had Cruizing off. 

" Your Petitioners therefore humbly entreat jour Honour's In- 
terest & Friendship with the Governor of the Jersey for restraining: 
the Pilots of that Government in such manner & by such measures.' 
as may be thought most expedient,, not only for the safety of this 
Government but that Your Petitioners may have an Equal Chance 
for their Livelyhood in their proper Employments; And Your Peti- 
tioners shall ever pray. 

"W^FiKLP, 
"LUKE SHIELD, 
" SAMUEL ROWLAND, 
" SAMUEL ROWLAND, Jun„ 
m w M ROWLAND, 
"SIMON EDWARDS. 
"JOHN BAILY, % 
"JOHN MAUL, 
"JOHN ADAMS.' y 
On Consideration whereof, and of the Danger that might accrue 
to the Province & Counties if any Pilots shou'd be permitted to 
abuse their Trust in so shameful manner, the following Proclama- 
tion was agreed to, ; & the Secretary was order' d to engross it to be 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 227 

sign'd by the President, & to prepare a Warrant for affixing the 
Great Seal to it, & to take care to have it published the next Market 
Day with all the usual Solemnity : 

" By the Honourable the President & Council of the Province of 
Pennsylvania. 

"A PROCLAMATION. 

" Whereas, divers Insults, Captures, & Depredations were made 
& committed by our Enemies the last Summer in and near the 
Bay & River of Delaware, several Vessels taken, Plantations plun- 
der' d, and the Goods, Negroes, and effects of the Inhabitants carried 
off, all which was the more easily effected by means of some Pilot 
Boats using the Bay & River aforesaid, which the Enemy by pre- 
tending to be friends had got possession of. To the end, therefore, 
that no means in our Power may be wanting for the preventing 
the like Insults, Captures, & Depredations for the future, and for 
the Security as well of the Inhabitants on both sides of the Bay & 
River of Delaware as of the City of Philadelphia and the Trade 
thereof, in this time of common Danger, We have thought fit to 
issue this our Proclamation, strictly enjoining & commanding all 
Pilots whatsoever using the Bay or River of Delaware, and all other 
Persons taking charge of any Ship or Vessel in or near the said Bay 
or River, that from & after the Tenth Day of April to the Twenty- 
fifth Day of September in every Year during the Continuance of the 
Present War between Great Britain & France & Spain, or either of 
them, they do not presume on any pretence whatsoever to go on 
board any inward bound Vessel until the Commander thereof or 
some of the Mariners or People have first come on Shore, to the end 
that it may the more certainly be known whether such Vessel be- 
longs to British Subjects or not, as they shall answer the contrary 
j at their highest peril; And for the Discovery of Delinquents due 
|j Care will be taken & strict enquiry made of all Commanders of 
! Ships, Mariners, & others, by the proper Officers to be appointed 
for that purpose. 

u Given at Philadelphia, under the Great Seal of the said Province, 

the Eleventh Day of April, in the Twenty -first Year of the Reign 

of our Sovereign Lord, George the Second, by the Grace of God 

\ of Great Britain, France, & Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, 

& ca -> Annoqz Domini, 1748. 

"ANTHONY PALMER, 

" By Order of the Honourable the President & Council, 

" Richard Peters, Secry. 
" GOD SAVE THE KING.' 7 

It being thought necessary that proper Measures should be taken 
as soon as possible for procuring Intelligence in case of an Enemy's 






228 MINUTES OF THE 

appearing in the Bay and River Delaware, to the end the Military 
preparations now made in this Government may be used to the best 
advantage, Mr. Taylor & Mr. Hopkinson are appointed to consider 
of the best Method of making Alarms in order to be laid before the 
Board for their Consideration. 



At a Council held at Philada. 9th May, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honourable ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Samuel Hasell, William Till, ") 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, > Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approved. 

The Assembly being to meet on the 16th, Mr. Till, Mr. Taylor, 
& Mr. Hopkinson are appointed a Committee to consider their last 
Messages, & from thence & the Business transacted since at this 
Board, to prepare a Message to be sent to the House at their 
Meeting. 

Certain advice being brought by several Vessels from the West 
Indies, that His Majesty's Fleet under the Command of Admiral 
Knowles had taken Port Louis, dismantled the Fort, & carried the 
Cannon to Jamaica, the President was desir'd to request of Gover- 
nor Trelawney the Loan of some Cannon for the use of His Ma- 
jestie's Subjects in this Province. 

The Presid 1, having receiv'd a Letter from P. Hopson, Esq r-r 
Command r, -in-Chief at Cape Breton, dated at Louisbourg 18th 
April last, in answer to his of 5th March last, the same was read. 



At a Council held at Philada. 14th May, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honourable ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ~] 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, V Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

A Letter from the Proprietor by the Post was read : 

" London, October 29th, 1748. 
" Gentlemen : 

" Since I wrote You jointly with my Brother, I have waited on 
the Duke of Bedford, & acquainted him of the insolent behaviour of 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 229 

the Enemy's Privateers, desiring we might have a Ship station'd in 
our Bay, as the only means of preventing such attacks for the 
future j the .Duke received my application as I cou'd wish, saw the 
necessity there was to grant my Request, and promis'd me his 
assistance at the Board when I shou'd present a memorial, which I 
did this Bay, & their Lordships assur'd me that soon after Christ- 
mass they would order a Ship for this Service, which would be there 
as soon as the Season of the Year permitted, for that the Winter 
wou'd come so soon upon us as to render it unsafe for a Ship now 
sent to come upon your Coast. 

" You may be assur'd I will watch this Business with great atten- 
tion, & not suffer their Lordships to forget it, as I think it necessary 
for Your Security. This I write at random, but was willing to give 
You the earliest Notice, as it may make the People more easy. 
" I am, Gent"-' Your very affectionate Friend, 

"THO. PENN. 
" The Presid'- & Council of Pennsylvania." 

The Committee appointed to prepare a Message to the Assembly 
delivered in their Draught, which was read, & the Consideration 
thereof postpon'd to the next Council, that the Sentiments of the 
whole Board might be taken thereon. 

The Indian deliver' d a Letter from Mr. Weiser, 

setting forth that James Denny had taken from him Horses & 
Skins to a considerable value, & that if some satisfaction was not 
made to the Indian by the Publick, it might be of mischevious con- 
sequence. 

The Board having examin'd into the Circumstances of this 
Affair, agreed to lay his Case before the Assembly, & to recommend 
it to them to make him satisfaction. 



At a Council held at Philada., May 17th, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ") 

William Till, Robert Strettell, I E 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, ( ^ 

William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The following Message to the Assembly being settled & agreed 
to, the same was order'd to be transcrib'd fair & deliver'd by the 
Secretary to the House at their Meeting in the Afternoon. 



230 MINUTES OF THE 



A Message from the President & Council to ilie Assemhly . 
ei Gentlemen : 

" Since You were pleas'd in Your Message of the 9th January 
last to express Your approbation as well of the Present then made 
to the Indians as of the engagement enter'd into at the Treaty of send- 
ing our Interpreter with a larger Supply in the Spring, We accord- 
ingly provided a suitable quantity of Indian Goods for that purpose ; 
but observing the Indians address'd themselves to the English in 
general, & considering that the Burthen of So large a Present as 
wou'd be necessary to preserve their Friendship, ought not to be 
born by this Government only, We dispatched Letters to the Gov- 
ernors of Virginia & Maryland, acquainting them with the late 
Treaty, representing the Importance of the Friendship of those 
Indians to their Governments as well as ours, and in treating them 
to recommend it to their respective Assemblies to act in Concert 
with us on this occasion. As the Resolutions of those Govern- 
ments cannot be known til the Meeting of their Assemblies, when 
this affair will be laid before them, and we have receiv'd advice 
that the Six Nations intend to send some of their Chiefs early this 
Summer to transact some business of Consequence with Us, on 
which occasion our Interpreter's presence will be absolutely neces- 
sary, We have come to a resolution to defer sending him with the 
Goods to the Ohio Indians for the present, & have dispatch' d a 
Messenger to acquaint them with the reasons of this delay, & to 
assure them that our Interpreter will set out with the Goods as 
soon as the Business with the Six Nations is compleated. The 
Letters which have pass'd between Us & the Southren Govern- 
ments, together with the Instructions intended to be given to the 
Interpreter for his Conduct in treating with the Indians on his 
arrival at Ohio, we have ordered our Secretary to lay before you, 
as also an account of the Goods we have purchased for the intended 
Present, amounting to about £1,000, which with the Charge of 
Carriage and the necessary Expences of the Interpreter & his Com- 
pany, You will provide for, so that the Merchants may be paid as 
soon as possible, the Goods having been purchased at ready Money 
Prices. 

" We have long under Consideration the mischevious Practice of 
carrying Bum among the Indians, &, have issued a Proclamation, 
drawn in as strong Terms as the nature of the Case would admit, 
to prevent it; but as the Laws provided in those Cases are very de- 
fective, we cannot expect the abuses & Iregularitics committed by 
those who pass under the Name of Indian Traders will be prevented 
until those Laws be amended. We, therefore, earnestly recommend 
it to Your House to take the State of the Indian Trade into Con- 
sideration, and to prepare a Bill for limiting the number of Indian 
Traders, and the putting them under proper Regulations, so that it 
may be passed into a Law on the Governor's arrival. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 231 

u Great Inconveniences caving arisen by the Imprudence of Pilots 
going on board Vessels at the Capes before they knew whether they 
were Friends or Enemies ; proper care has been taken to prevent 
those of this Government & the Lower Counties from entering on 
ho&rd any Ships or Vessels without Lycence from the Magistrates, * 
and this Board was in hopes the Government of the Jerseys would 
have Laid their Pilots under the like Restrictions j but since that has 
not been done, we have caused a Proclamation to issue prohibiting 
Pilots from going on board any inward Bound Vessel until the Com- 
mander or some of «the Mariners have first come on Shore, & it be 
known whether such Vessel belong to British Subjects. 

" This Province, which very lately was in a defenceless State is 
now, thro' the zeal & activity of some who have the Love of their 
Country sincerely at heart, render' d capable, with the blessing of 
God, of defending itselfe against the Designs of our Enemies, many 
Thousands of the Inhabitants having voluntarily enter'-d into the 
most .Solemn Engagements for that purpose, in consequence whereof 
Arms have been provided, & every one appears assidious in quali- 
fying himself for the defence of his Country. We see with the 
greatest Satisfaction such Order & Regularity observed among 
them, and such a progress made in so Short a time in Military 
Skill as far exceeds our expectations. They have, likewise, at a 
considerable expence erected Batterys on the River, so situated & 
of such strength & weight of Metal as to render it very dangerous 
for an Enemy to attempt the bringing any Ships before the City. 
Designs so commendable^ & at the same time so necessary, could 
mot fail of the approbation & Encouragement of this Board. We 
have, therefore, granted Commissions to such General & other Offi- 
cers as have from time to time -been presented to us for that pur- 
pose by the Associators. Since these Measures tend so manifestly, 
under God, to the Security of this Province, the preservation of 
its Metropolis, & the protection of the Aged & Helpless from the 
Calamities which would attend an Invasion, We think they justly 
'deserve the Encouragement & Assistance of Your House. 

" In December last the Common Council & Merchants of this 
City taking into Consideration the many losses that had been sus- 
tain' d k the melancholy State to which our Trade was lik'd to be 
redue'd, have in seperate Petitions address'd the Lords of the Ad- 
miralty for a Man of War, at the same time desiring the Proprie- 
taries to give them their utmost assistance ; to which we have not 
only added Representations & Addresses from this Board, but have 
likewise applied to almost all the Governors & Commanders in 
America from whom there was -any probability of being furnished 
with Cannon or Ships of War. We are glad to say these Applica- 
tions have not been altogether unsuccessful. Gratitude calls upon 
Us to acknowledge We are under to the Government of New York 
for a supply of Battering- Cannon^ and to our worthy Proprietaries, 



282 MINUTES OF THE 

from whose Interest & earnest Solicitations at the Admiralty Boar! 
We have good reason to expect that a Man-of-War is order'd for 
the Security of our Trade; hereby the sinking Spirits of the Mer- 
chants & Tradesmen will he revived, the produce of our Country 
he exported at less Risque & the price of it thereby kept up, to the- 
Encouragement of the Farmers. 

"The French & Spanish Prisoners now in town will require- 
some Provision to be made for them during their stay here, which 
"We shall endeavour to make as short as possible. 

"ANTHONY PALMER. 

" May 17th, 1748/' 

A Message from the Assembly by two of their Members, that 
the House met last Night according to adjournment, & desir 7 d to* 
know if the Council had any Business to lay before them. The 
President said there were divers Matters under the Consideration 
of the Council, which wou'd be communicated to then* by a Mess- 
age in the Afternoon. 

The Secretary was ordered to lay Mr. Weise/s Letter, relating 

to the Complaint of the Indian , before the House, and 

to recommend it to them to male him Satisfaction. 

One of the Members saying that the Rieha, Captain Burke 7 
would sail to-Day for London, the Board thought there wou'd not 
be sufficient time to draw up a proper State of the Business done 
by them to be sent to the Proprietaries by this Conveyance for this 
reason, & as it was not known what the Assembly wou ; d do in the- 
se veral matters before them, it was agreed not to write by this 
Conveyance, but to direct the Secretary to make their Complement 
& to acknowledge the Receipt of their favours to them, which wou'd 
be fully answer' d as soon as the Assembly shou 7 d come to Deter- 
mine as to the present Business kid before them. 

A Letter from Governor Trelawny was read, desiring the Coun- 
tenance of this Board for Lieut. Wiseheart, sent to recruit in North 
America for the Jamaica Regiment j whereupon Leave was giver* 
Mm to beat up for Vohua tiers in any part of this Province. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, the 20th May, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence ; Samuel Hasell, 1 



William Till, Abraham Taylor, • 



J- Esqrs", 



Robert Strettell, Joseph Turner, 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, j 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 233 

An Express arriving from New Castle with a Letter from Mr. 
Ross, inclosing a Deposition made by Pyramus Green, who had been 
taken off the Capes of Delaware by a French Privateer, the late 
Clinton Privateer -of New York, the Council was call'd & the Depo- 
sition read in these words : 

" New Castle County, ss. 

"Pyramus Green of the City of Philadelphia, Mariner, being 
Sworn on the holy Evangelists of Almighty God, Deposeth & saith 
that on Saturday morning last, the fourteenth Day of this Instant, 
April, this Deponent left Cape Henlopen in a small Schooner 
called the Phenix, bound to Bermudas, laden with Bread & Indian 
Corn; that on Sunday morning after this Deponent was chas'd by 
a Sloop about thirty leagues South-East of Cape Henlopen, and 
about eleven of the clock in the same morning was taken by the 
Sloop, which prov'd to be a French Privateer (late the Privateer 
Sloop Clinton of New York), mounting fourteen Carriage & sixteen 
Swivel Guns, with One hundred & seventy -five Men on board; that 
after being so taken the Captain of the said Sloop order' d ten of his 
Men on board the said Schooner Phenix, & divers Muskets or fire 
Arms, with Blunderbusses & Amunition, were put on board the 
said Schooner, & four Persons belonging to the said Schooner were 
taken on board the Privateer, & all Bread on board the Schooner 
was also taken on board the Privateer & the Indian Corn thrown 
over Board, this Deponent being left on board the Schooner; that 
after the Schooner was thus mann'd & Arm'd with French Men as 
aforesaid, the Commander of the said Privateer gave orders to them 
to proceed with all dispatch to the Capes of Delaware; that about 
four a' Clock in the afternoon on Monday last they made the Cape 
of Delaware, & observ'd a Brigantine & Sloop standing in under 
Sail; the Brigantine went into the Road & came to an Anchor, the 
Sloop proceeded up the Bay; That the said Schooner stood into the 
Boad after the Brigantine, & about nine a' Clock at Night came to 
an Anchor a small distance above the Brigantine; about 12 a' Clock 
they weighed & boarded the said Brigantine, all of them except 
one French Man, who now is Prisoner with this Deponent; that 
upon their boarding the Brigantine as aforesaid, they neglected to 
make fast the said Schooner to the said Brigantine, whereupon she 
the said Schooner floated off, which this Deponent observing, he 
this Deponent re-possessed himself of his said Schooner, hoisted his 
Sails & proceeded over to Cape May & there hired one Man & got 
a Passenger to come with this Deponent to Philadelphia; that this 
Deponent met with one English Prisoner on board the Privateer, 
who inform' d this Deponent there were two other Privateers, 
Consorts with the Sloop aforesaid, to wit, one Brigantine & one 
Sloop; and this Deponent verily believes by this time the Pri- 
vateer that took this Deponent is at the Capes of Delaware in 



234 MINUTES OF THE 

Quest of & Search after this Deponent's Schooner, & further saith 
not. 

"PYRAMUS GREEN. 

"Sworn at New Castle the 18th May, 1748, before 

"Jno. Finney, David Bush, James Armitage, Wm. Pat- 
terson. " 

The Board was unanimously of opinion this Deposition should be 
immediately laid before the Assembly, & as frOm many advices that 
might be depended on there was reason to expect more of the Ene- 
mie's Privateers, they agreed to send a pressing Message to the 
House along with the Deposition, & the following one being drawn 
& agreed to, the same was transcrib'd & sent to the Assembly by 
the Secretary. 

A Message from the President & Council to the Assembly. 
"Grentlemen : 

"We have just receiv'd advice from New Castle that there is 
a French Privateer upon our Coast, mounting fourteen Carriage 
& sixteen Swivel Guns and 175 Men on board, with two other Pri- 
vateers in Consort ; and by the Deposition which the Secretary will 
lay before You, it appears that on Sunday morning last they had 
taken a Schooner bound from this Port to Bermuda, on board of 
which they had put part of their Men with Arms, and Orders to 
proceed to the Capes of Delaware where the Schooner arrived, and 
on Monday Evening took in our Bay a Brigantine with a very valua- 
ble Cargo on board, bound to this Port. One of these privateers 
is the same that came into our Bay last Summer and there took 
several inward & outward bound Ships of very great value. The 
apprehensions of this Board that the Success our Enemies then met 
with without opposition wou'd be an Encouragement to further At- 
tempts, appears by the present Event to be well founded; & if some 
speedy & effectual Measures for putting a Stop to these Depreda- 
tions are not soon taken, there will be just reason to fear worse 
Consequences. Private Subscriptions, if they cou'd be procur'd, 
wou'd be insufficient for the preservation of the Trade of this Pro- 
vince, & are an unreasonable as well as a grevious Burthen on a 
few in a case where all are concern'd. It is from your House only 
that the Merchants & Traders expect Protection, and if that be now 
refus'd or proper Measures neglected to disperse the Enemy, our 
Port must continue block'd up, our inward bound Vessels inevitably 
lost, & a total stagnation of Trade must follow, which will certainly 
bring Poverty & Ruin upon many of our Inhabitants. We there- 
fore most earnestly recommend it to You as you have the sole dis- 
posal of the Publick Money, that you would employ some part of 
it for the Service of the Publick in the Protection of their Trade. 

"ANTHONY PALMER. 
♦ "May 19tb ; 1748." 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 235 

At a Council held at Philada. the 21st May, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honourable ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, William Till, "] 



Esqrs. 



Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

Mr. Burge, owner of two Bermudian Sloops bound for Jamaica, 
nttde a proposal to the Council that he wou'd carry all the French 
Prisoners to Leogan«e if the G-overnment would lay in their Pro- 
visions. 

Mr. Taylor & Mr. Turner are appointed a Committee to treat 
with him about it. 

A Message from the Assembly by two of their Members, in these 

words : * 

" May it please the President & Council : 

" By our Message to which you are pleased to refer in Yours of 
the 17th Instant, We expressed our approbation as well of the Pre- 
sent then made to the Indians as of the Engagement You had 
enter' d into at the Treaty of sending our Interpreter with a larger 
Supply in the Spring, And to enable You to discharge these En- 
gagements we caused our Order to be drawn at our last Sitting on 
the Treasurer for the Payment of Five hundred Pounds, which 
with what was remaining of the Money formerly given for the like 
purposes we thought, and yet think, might be sufficient for our 
part of the Present to be made to the Indians at this time, espe- 
cially since, as You very justly observe, ' the burthen ought not to 
be borne by this Goverment only.' From the Letters You are 
pleas' d to direct to be laid before us we further observe that the 
Governors of Virginia & Maryland shew a willingness to promote 
the giving of additional Presents on behalf of their Governments, 
and if our Proprietaries, whose Interests are very nearly concerned 
and will be much augmented by cultivating a good understanding 
with those Indians on our Borders, would be pleased, as formerly 
they have done, to join their Presents with ours (which We are 
humbly of opinion they ought to do), the whole would make a very 
handsome Present, and all that we think is necessary without any 
further Provision than what is already made. However, as we know 
the time is critical, we are willing to. do all we judge reasonable on 
this occasion, and shall therefore make the necessary Provision to 
pay for the Goods, which by the Accounts exhibited to Us appear 
to be already purchased, together with the usual Charges allowed 
for transporting them. 



236 MINUTES OF THE 

u We agree in Sentiments with You that the Practice of Selling 
Rum among the Indians is mischevious, and therefore think it was 
prudently done to issue the Proclamation you are pleas'd to mention, 
to prevent as much as might be the like ill Practices for the future. 
This mischeif we conceive is occasion'd rather by the difficulty of 
putting the Laws already made in Execution, than any Defects in 
those Laws j however, we shall at a proper time resume the Con- 
sideration of these Laws, & shall chearfully consent to any amend- 
ments which shall appear to us reasonable or necessary. 

" The Care you have been pleas'd to take for preventing the Incon- 
veniences which may arise by the Imprudence of Pilots, was well 
judg'd. On the arrival of our Governor we think it will be neces- 
sary to provide Acts of Assembly, both here & in the three 
Lower Counties, for this purpose, And the Example we doubt not 
will be follow'd by the Government of New Jersey ; the not having 
any Laws respecting Pilots amongst us being, as we are inform'd, 
the only reason which prevented an Act for like purposes from 
passing among them. 

" As to that part of your Message which respects the Association 
lately enter' d into and the preperations made for the defence of 
the Province, it is difficult for Us to express our Sentiments j the 
most of Us as well as many others within this Province, you know 
have professed ourselves principled against the bearing of Arms ; 
and yet as we enjoy the liberties of our own Consciences, we think 
it becomes us to leave others in the free exercise of their's. The 
Assistance you have thought fit to give the Associators we make 
no doubt arose from a sense of what You belie v'd Your Duty, 
And the Zeal & activity many of them have shewn on the occasion, 
we suppose may have arisen from the Love they bear to their 
Country. And as We are willing to make Charitable construc- 
tions on their Conduct, we hope the like Charitable Sentiments will 
prevail with them concerning Us & others like Principled, when we 
have repeatedly declared we cannot in Conscience join with any 
preparation of this kind. 

" As We have the honor of representing the whole Province, in 
which we know there are numbers of People whose Judgment in 
the point we have mentioned do not exactly correspond with ours, 
we think it no inconsistency, notwithstanding anything we have said, 
to add that we acknowledge with Gratitude the Regard the Lords 
of the Admiralty are pleas'd to shew for protecting the Trade of the 
Province, and also the kindness shewn by our Proprietaries in 
soliciting for it. Nor have we less grateful Sentiments of the kind- 
ness of our Neighbouring government of New York, as we believe 
their Intentions were good, and it may have quieted the minds of 
divers of our Inhabitants, tho' it is a favour we could not have 
asked, and intended for such a mode of defence in which we do not 
place our Confidence. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 237 

" The French & Spanish Prisoners you are pleas'd to mention 
are, as we are informed, imported by a Vessel not belonging to this 
Port; & it is not clear to us that Owners of Ships belonging to any 
other Port have a right to bring Prisoners hither to become a 
Charge upon Us, and if allowed in this Instance may encourage 
multitudes of others. However, whilst they are amongst us we 
think they ought to be provided for & treated with Humanity, 
whether at the Expence of the Province in the whole, or in any & 
what part may hereafter be considered. In either Case we approve 
of Your Resolutions to make their stay amongst us as short as 
possible; And we hope You will think it reasonable that the 
Prisoners may in the mean time be confined, at least by Night, to 
prevent their doing any Injuries to the Inhabitants of this City. 

" We have likewise consider'd the Complaint You were pleas'd to 
recommend to Us made by an Indian, of the Theft committed on 
him in taking Horses & Peltry from him, and we have made such 
Enquiry as hitherto hath been in our Power. But having heard 
only one side it is not fit we shou'd come to any determinate Reso- 
lutions therein. We are, however, sensible of the Dangers which 
may arise from Complaints of this kind where due Care is not taken, 
& therefore as a Court of Oyer & Terminer is, as we are inform'd, 
likely to be held in Lancaster in a little time, we entreat the Presi- 
dent & Council it may be recommended to the Care of the Judges 
of that Court to make the necessary Enquiry, & if they find Cause, 
to direct a Prosecution against the offender, & that if he shall be duly 
convicted ; to take care that he suffer as the Law directs, and be 
oblig'd to make Restitution to the Party aggrieved. 

" In the mean time we have thought it necessary to make the 
Indian a Present, because as they have little knowledge of our 
Laws & the time requisite for Convicting offenders, he might other- 
wise think the Delay an Intention of depriving him of his Right, 
& be thereby excited to disturb the Peace of the Government, if 
not to do some greater Inguiry. 

" Sign ; d by Order of the House. 

"JOHN KINSEY, Speaker. 
«3Mon., 21st, 1748." 

As soon as this was read, a second Message was deliver' d by two 
Members who inform'd the Board that the House proposed to ad- 
journ to the 22d August, if the Council had nothing further to be 
laid before them. They were told that the Council wou'd imme- 
diately read the Message & let the House know their mind to the 
Secretary. 

A Message from the Assembly to the President & Council. 
" May it please the President & Council : 
" We have so often declared our Sentiments on like occasions as 



238 MINUTES OF THE 

the Subject Matter contain'd in Your last Message, You cannot 
possibly be unacquainted with them, and therefore we think it can 
be of no use to repeat them here. Besides, we do not see what pru- 
dence or pollicy cou'cl be done in the present Emergency. To send 
a Vessel in pursuit of the Privateer suppos'd to be at the Capes, 
the distance is so great, a late Example may convince us the Priva- 
teer might and very probably would be out of reach before any 
Vessel cou'd get thither. And to keep a Vessel constantly at our 
Capes to guard the Coast must be introcluctive of an Expence too 
heavy as we conceive for the Province to bear. We may add to 
this, that to put so great Burthen on the Inhabitants at this time 
would we think be inexcusable, when, from the Message You were 
lately pleas'd to send Us, as well as by other accounts, there is great 
reason daily to expect a Ship of War to be station' d on our Coasts 
for the protection of the Trade of the Province. 

" Sign'd by Order of the House. 

"JOHN KINSEY, Speaker. 
" 3d Mon. 21st, 1748." 

Tho' the Board on considering this Message thought it extremely 
afflicting to be left by the Assembly in a time of such imminent 
Danger without Money or a Vote of Credit, for want whereof they 
had it not in their Power to protect the Trade or defend the Province, 
yet since the House had express' d themselves in such positive Terms, 
& seem'd determined on their adjournment, they agreed to send them 
the following Message : 

" As the House has informed the Board that they incline to ad- 
journ till the 22d August, the Council is unwilling to press their 
stay longer at this time j but if the Ship of War shou'd not arrive 
so soon as expected, & our Port continue tg be block' d up, they 
shall be under a Necessity of calling You together before the time 
to which You propose to adjourn." 

Ordered, That the Prisoners be not suffer'd to go out of their 
Lodgings after Sunsett, & that notice hereof be given to all Persons 
concern'd. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 23d May, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honourable ANTHONY PALMER, Esq., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Benjamin Shoemaker, N 

Samuel Hasell, Joseph Turner, 

William Till, Thomas Hopkinson, 

Abraham Taylor, William Logan, 

Robert Strcttell, 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 



> Esqrs. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL, 239 

The President having receiv'd Letters from the Proprietaries by 
the Otter Man of War, John Ballet, Esqr., Commander, who ar- 
rived yesterday morning after a Passage of seven Weeks from Ports- 
mouth, the same were read & order' d to be enter' d. 
** Gentlemen : 

" I wrote to Yon on the 29th of October, & sent by two Convey- 
ances to inform Yon that the Lords of the Admiralty had promis'd 
me a Ship to be station'd in Delaware Bay, and that she wou'd be 
ordered to Sail so as to get on the Coasts of North America as soon 
as it wonld be safe for her. ^1 now take this opportunity by a Ship 
bound to New York, who does not stay for Convoy, to acquaint 
You that their Lordships have appointed the Otter Sloop, Capt. 
Ballet Commander, for this Service ; but as a very large Fleet is in 
a very short time to Sail for the several ports of North America, 
they have ordered the Otter to stay till they are ready to strengthen 
their Convoy, 8c they are expected to Sail in about fourteen Days, 
I make no doubt but on their arrival You will make the Place as 
agreable as You can to the Captain, & give him any assistance he 
can reasonably desire for His Majesty's Service. <JE must say the 
procuring this Security to You is a great Satisfaction to me, and 
tho' it has been very difficult & required much application to get 
this Sloop, as there never was a Ship Station' d in the Bay before, 
I hope we may be sure for the future to succeed in any application,, 
as there is now a precedent established. 

" I think it necessary, also, to inform You that we appointed Mr, 
James Hamilton Governor of Pennsylvania, who will be ready tq 
embark the latter end of the Summer, so as to meet the Assembly,, 
if possible, in October. I have nothing to add but that I am, 
" Gentlemen, 

" Your very affectionate Friend, 

"THOMAS PENN, 

" London, March 12th, 1748. 
" The President & Council of Pennsylvania." 



" Gentlemen : 

" On the other side is a Duplicate of a ~LeUer I sent hj way of 
New York, to which I have little to add. This comes by His Ma- 
jesty's Sloop the Otter, Capt n> Ballet Commander, who, I make no* 
doubt, You will assist in any Case where in he may stand in Need. 
of Your Aid for the King's Service, and whicb I recommend to Yots. 
I remain,, 

u Gentlemen, 

" Your very affectionate Friend, 

"IHO..PENN, 
"London, Maich 29th, 1748," 



240 MINUTES OF THE 

" Gentlemen : 

"I have just now received Your Letter to my Brother & myself, 
which is Duplicate of one sent by the Widow, Captain White, who 
was taken into France, and is dated the 27th of November. I ob- 
serve with great Concern the apprehensions you were under that 
the French wou'd send a very considerable force in the Spring, & 
perhaps attack the City of Philadelphia. If your Informations are 
to be depended on, You may have great reason for such fears, and 
should do every thing in Your power for your defence, & endeavour 
to raise in the People such a sense of Danger as may induce them 
chearfully to obey such Orders as it may be proper for You to give, 
both as to preparing by using themselves to discipline, & meeting 
for Your mutual defence when Danger is near. The Association 
you sent me is lost; but I have seen one printed in one of your 
News Papers which I apprehend is the same you mention ; and 
tho' on the one band We shall on all occasions desire to join in 
every fit proposal that may contribute to Your Safety, and on the 
other with great caution object to any proposal that is not liable to 
great objections, We have great doubts whether this is not liable 
to such objections as renders it unsafe for the Persons who have 
joined in it, and which are not warranted by Necessity. However, 
We have desired the Attorney & Solicitor General's thoughts upon 
it, which will be sent you by Mr. Paris, & on which we desire you 
will for the present proceed. I fear they will not be got before I 
am oblig'd to go into the Country, or I would write to You with 
them. I apprehend at present You cannot be warranted to give 
^Commissions to any Officers who are to receive their Orders from 
others than yourselves or those you appoint, as this is giving the 
power of the Militia, or calling the People together for their de-~ 
fence, from the King to themselves, & which I fear will be esteemed 
greatly Criminal. If the People had desir'd to unite for their de- 
fence they should have applyed to You, their legal Governors, for 
License so to do, when you would have formed them into Bodys proper 
for Service, & issued such Orders as would be from time to time thought 
necessary ; but for them to chuse a Council to make Military Laws 
& order the Marching of Armed Men, is certainly very contrary to 
what is practised here, & I conceive to Law ; for in the last Rebel- 
lion People did no more than engage to join together under such 
Persons the King & Laws had, or the King should appoint to com- 
mand them, 

" Whenever any Law shall be made in Pennsylvania for estab- 
lishing a Militia & erecting a Fort or Battery, we shall be very 
ready to show our Concern for the safety of the City by giving Can- 
non for such a Battery. But unless a Law was to be pass'd for the 
support of a Battery & of Men to attend it, I fear it will be ne- 
glected as soon as made ; & am of opinion that the most proper 
method you could have taken would have been to hire as large at 






PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 241 

SVip as any in your River, k maon'd her as a Guard Ship to have 
lain in some proper part of the River, However, I hope the arri- 
val of the Otter will make this unnecessary • or if You shall want a 
further Security a Ship I think will be of the greatest use. The 
Hector, a forty Gun Ship, goes to Virginia, and there is no ques- 
tion but a Ship will Sail soon for New York ; so that I shall expect 
to hear on the arrival of these Ships with the Fleet your Coasts will 
fee secure. I find by your Letter you did not expect a Ship or 
Sloop on your Station, and I believe had not the Affidavits of the 
Landing a Privateer's Crew in New Castle Gouoty been sent me I 
should not have got it. 

" You may rest assured that we shall ever think it our duty to 
apply our time & Interest in the first place to the Service of, 
the Province; & therefore in any case where our assistance can 
be of use you may depend on its being given with an hearty good 
will. My Brother is now in the Country or we should have wrote 
jointly, 

■"I am, Gentlemen, Your very affectionate Friend, 

«THO. PENN. 
!" London, March 30th, 1748. 

<< I observe the Assembly broke up without giving any assistance, 
which is what You must have expected." 

The President acquainted the Council that Captain Ballet having 
on his arrival waited on him & presented his Instructions from the 
Lords of the Admiralty, whereby he was directed to consult with 
this Board, he had Invited him to Council, & the Captain accord- 
ingly coming was introduc'd by the President & received the Salu- 
tations & Compliments of each Member of the Board, & then 
delivered in a Copy of his Instructions, which were read in these 
words : 

** By the Commissioners for Executing the Office of Lord High Ad- 
miral of Great Britain & Ireland*, &c. 

" Whereas wc have received a Memorial from the Proprietors of 
the Province of Pennsylvania & Counties of New Castle, Kent, & 
Sussex, on Delaware, setting forth that the Inhabitants of the said 
Province & Counties carry on a considerable Trade to Great Britain. 
Ireland, and the Colonies in America, & in particular Export Pro- 
visions to the Islands in the West Indies for the Support of the 
I Inhabitants of the said Islands, & of His Majestie's Ships employed 
! there, insomuch as to employ Four hundred Vessels Yearly in that 
J Service from that side the River Delaware, besides the Great Trade 
\ of the Province of Jersey, Situate on the other side the said River ; 
I but that since the Commencement of the present War the same has 
vol. v.— -16. 



242 MINUTES OF THE 

been much Interrupted by the Privateers of the Enemy, which have 
generally Cruized at the mouth of the Bay, and have taken many 
Ships laden with Provisions; & that some have even gone up the 
Bay about fifty Miles above the Capes, the Crews of which have 
landed & Plunder'd the Houses of several of the Inhabitants, & 
therefore requesting that a Ship of War may be stationed in the 
Bay of Delaware to protect the Trade & Inhabitants of the Country 
from any such Insults for the future : And Whereas We have ap- 
pointed His Majestie's Sloop under Your Command to perform this 
Service, and to go out in Company with the Hector (which is or- 
dered to Convey the Trade to Virginia) as far as the entrance of 
the Bay of Delaware, where You are to part from her & to proceed 
up the Bay with any Trade bound to Pennsylvania or to any other 
place in that River. 

" When You arrive in the River of Delaware yo^i are to acquaint 
the Governor & Council of Philadelphia of your arrival, & to shew 
them a Copy of these Instructions when You have an opportunity ? 
and to consult & advise with them from time to time in what manner 
the Sloop under Your Command may be best employed in guarding 
the Coast & securing the Trade from any Attempts of the Enemy ; 
and You are to use your utmost endeavours to take or destroy all 
Ships & Vessels of the Enemy that shall come upon the Coast, and 
to protect the Trade of His Majestie's Subjects; 

u And Whereas We have directed the Captain of His Majestie's 
Ship the Hector, Station' d at Virginia, to hold a constant Corres- 
pondence with You, You are, whenever You shall find the Ene- 
my's Ships too strong for You, to send immediate advice thereof to 
the Captain of the said Ship, whom we have ordered to repair to 
your assistance, and You are jointly to endeavour to take or destroy 
them; and if the Captain of the said Ship shall at any time send 
You Notice of the Enemy being too strong for him, You are with 
all possible diligence to proceed to his assistance, communicating in 
the first place the Intelligence You have reeeiv'd to the Governor & 
Council of Philadelphia; & when the Service is performed You are 
to return to Your Station, 

" You are hereby directed to keep constantly at Sea when the 
Wheather will permit, & to Cruize in proper Stations for meeting 
with the Enemy's Ships or Privateers, & for protecting the Trade 
of His Majestie's Subjects & guarding the said Colony of Penn- 
sylvania from any attempts of the Enemy. 

" And in order to enable You the better to keep the Sloop under 
Your Command in a good Condition to Cruize & protect the Trade 
as well as to annoy the Enemy, You are to cause her to be clean'd 
once in Six Months at the most convenient place in the River, & to 
victual her as often as there shall be occasion ; & You are to take 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 243 

<m board no more Provisions at a time than is necessary for the 
Service You are em ploy' d on. 

" Given under our hands the Second Day of March, 1747. 

"ANSON, ■ 
"DUNCANNON, 
"W. ELLIS. 
" To Captain Ballet, Commander of His Majestie's Sloop the 
Otter, at Spithead. 

" By Command of their Lordships. 

"THOMAS CORBETT." 

Captain Ballet having inform' d the Board that in his Passage he 
met with a very large Ship, & fought her for four hours, & had 
receiv'd so much damage in the Engagement that he shou'd be 
oblig'd to heave his Vessel down, the Board express'd great Con- 
cern at this, informed the Captain that there were Privateers upon 
the Coast, & that if these who were the first Comers shou'd not be 
repulsed, they wou'd encrease fast & become too powerful j but if 
these were either taken or driven off, it wou'd discourage others. 
Every body look'd upon his arrival as a signal Instance of Provi- 
dence in favour of this Colony, since, should the Enemies be dis- 
appointed in their first Attempt, they would alter their Measures & 
think of Cruizing somewhere else. 

They added that this was one of the worst Ports in the World 
for Seamen, & shou'd he now go upon the Careen, it wou'd not be 
possible to prevent Desertion. He said his Ship was not now in a 
Condition to go on a Cruize ; that he must refit, but wou'd use all 
the dispatch possible; & as neither he nor the Vessels which 
arrived here two or three Days ago had seen any Privateers, he 
hoped they were gone off, & he wou'd do his utmost endeavours to 
be ready for them if they shou'd return; that he was under no fear 
of desertion, & so took his leave & withdrew. 

The Board finding him determined to heave down, concluded to 
give him all the assistance in their power. 

Order' d, That the Secretary bespeak an handsome Entertain- 
ment at Roberts' Coffee House to-morrow, & invite Captain Ballet 
& his Officers to dine with the President & Council, & that the 
Judges & Magistrates & principal Persons of the City be likewise 
invited. And as the Council is to review the Associated Regiment 
of Philad a - City in the Afternoon, the Captain & his Officers may 
be requested to accompany them to the Review. 

The Secretary laid before the Board a Letter which he had 
received by this Conveyance from Proprietor Thomas Penn, in 
answer to his of the — — — , wrote by Order of the Board, 



244 MINUTES OF THE 

which wag read, & he was directed to communicate that part 
of it which related to the Dock to the Mayor or Recorder of the 
City. 

" London, March 80th, 1748. 
" Mr. Peters r 

" We are much concern'd at the account you give of the sickly 
state of the City, and would with great pleasure lend our assistance 
to prevent such a Calamity if any thing in our power wou'd do it, 
hut we cannot think the Mud in the Dock can be different from 
what is left on the side of the River, unless it is occasioned by the 
Tan Pits; and if any unwholesome effluvia comes from them they 
should be removed. What Scheme to form for the removal of the 
Mud in the Dock that will be most proper & effectual we cannot 
by any means advise, and think you that are on the Spot much 
better able to do it. If the Corporation or Publick expect a Dock, 
it should be done at their Expence, or else on their giving up any 
Right they may have to it, the Persons to whom it fell will perhaps 
clear & build upon it. It is to be considered that the Dock has 
been many Years nearly in the same Situation, & yet no such fever 
was known till the Year 1741, when it undoubtedly came from the 
West Indies, which is almost a plain proof it does not arise from 
the Mud in the Dock. The Wharfs about the Dock are we suppose 
much more used than in the upper part of the Town, and therefore 
any Infectious Distemper from abroad is much more likely to 
spread from thence. I desire you will communicate this to the 
Council, & am 

u Your very affectionate Friend, 

"THO. PENN." 

Mr. Till having received a Deputation from the Commissioners 
of His Majestie's Customs to be Collector of New Castle, & like- 
wise a Letter from them to this Board, which he was desir'd to 
deliver in Council, he presented it, & it was read, together with the 
blank Bond : 

» Sir— 

" In pursuance of a Warrant from the Lord's Commissioners of 
His Majestie's Treasury, We have issued our Deputation to William 
Till, Esq r " to be Collector of the Customs at New Castle, in Penn- 
sylvania, in the room of Mr. Thomas Grceme, deceas'd. And secu- 
rity having been given for him here, We desire you will please (in 
the absence of Mr. Dinwiddie, the Surveyor General) to take card* 
he executes the inclos'd Bond before proper Witnesses, & return 
the same to us; and that You will then admit him to the said 
Employ on his taking the Oaths enjoined by Law for the due dis- 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 245 

charge of his Duty, & favour him with a Certificate thereof, to be 
transmitted to Us. 

" We are, Sir> your most obed*- hble. Servants, 

"BEAUM T - HOTHAM, 
"J. EVELYH. 
«RQB T BAYLIS, 
"W. SEVIEUR, 
u Custom House, London, 9th March, 1747. 
" Gov'" of Pennsylvania." 

Mr. Till having executed the Bond, which was witnessed by Mr. 
Turner & the Secretary, he took & subscrib'd the Oaths and De- 
clarations to His Majesty, and likewise took an Oath for the faith- 
ful Discharge of his Office. 

Order' d j That a proper Certificate of Mr. TilPs Qualification be 
prepar'd, to be attested by the President under the Great Seal. 

Mr. Taylor & Mr. Turner reported that they had contracted 
with Mr. Surge to carry 35 French Prisoners to the Island of His- 
paniola for £32 in two Bermuda Sloops. 

Ordered, That a Flagg of Truce be prepar'd for each Vessel, & a 
Letter to the Governor of the Havanna by each Captain. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 25th May, 1748. 
present: 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ~] 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, J>Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approved. 

George Porteus, Captain of a small Sloop from Providence, 
having been taken off the Capes of Delaware by a French Priva- 
teer, the late Clinton of New York, his Examinatian was taken, & 
having made Oath thereto before Mr. Hopkinson, his Deposition is 
order'd to be enter'd : 

" George Porteous, of Philadelphia, Mariner, being sworn on the 
Holy Evangelists of Almighty God, deposeth & saith, that he with 
three others are Owners of the Sloop called the Three Brothers, of 
which George Smith was lately Captain ; that he sail'd in her from 
the Island of New Providence about the third Day of May, In- 
stant, bound to this Port of Philadelphia, and in the Vogage, on 
the Seventeenth Day of this Instant, May, about two Leagues from 
the false Capes, which then bore North-West & by North, were 
chased & taken by a French Privateer Sloop, the late Clinton Pri- 



246 MINUTES OF THE 

vatecr of New York j that the said Clinton Sloop mounted twelve 
four-Pounders, &, as he thinks, about sixteen Swivel G-uns, & had 
on board about one hundred & twenty Men belonging to her and 
about thirty English Prisoners ; that the Privateer took all the 
People belonging to the Sloop Three Brothers on board the Pri- 
vateer, & afterwards putting this Deponent, his Wife, his Son, and an 
old Man on board the Three Brothers, together with three French 
Sailors, order'd them to proceed to the Capes of Delaware, whither 
the Privateer was then going; that the three French Men accord- 
ingly took the Command of the Sloop Three Brothers, but it 
coming to blow hard, they lost Sight of the Privateer, & then this 
Deponent took the Helm & brought the Vessel into the Capes of 
Delaware, & after a good deal of difficulty he the old Man and 
Boy made themselves Masters of the three French Men, took in a 
Pilot at Lewes & sailed directly for this Port, where he arrived yes- 
terday with the three French Men Prisoners. This Deponent fur- 
ther saith, Captain Burke & the Crew of the Brigantine Richa, 
bound from Philadelphia to London, were on board the said French 
Privateer at the time he was taken by her, as were likewise several 
of the Men belonging to two other English Vessels that had been, as 
this Deponent was inform' d, taken on this Coast by the said French 
Privateer; that this Deponent heard the French Men say they intend- 
ed to continue to Cruise about the Capes of Delaware, and had dis- 
patch'cl the Recovery, an English Privateer Schooner lately belong- 
ing to Providence, which they had taken, who were to return with 
more Men to Mann the Prizes they shou'd take. That this De- 
ponent further understood from the People belonging to the French 
Privateer that there was likewise a French Sloop & a Spanish 
Schooner Cruizing on this Coast in Consort, which this Deponent 
believes he saw at some distance; and his reason for believing the 
Vessels he saw to be the said Privateer Sloop & Schooner is, that 
when the Sloop was ahead she shortened Sail & waited till 
the Schooner came up, and this she did several times, and that 
they came out from under Cape May & were Sailing Cross the 
Bay. 

"GEO. PORTEOUS. 

" Sworn the 25th Day of May, 1748, before me, 

"THOS. HOPKINSON." 

As there may be sundry Emergencies which will require imme- 
diate & frequent Consultations with Captain Ballet, Mr. Hasell, Mr. 
Taylor, & Mr. Strettell are appointed a standing Committee to con- 
fer with him, & they have it in Charge to inform him of the Mat- 
ter.-; depos'd by Captain Porteous. 

Resolved, That the Council sit every morning at ten o' Clock in 
the City Court House. 

The following Officers being chosen & returned by the Associators 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 



247 



to the Presid'- & Council, were approved of & Commissions issued 
to them accordingly : 

Captains. Lieutenants. Ensigns. 

Philadelphia County. 

John HalL Joshua Thomas. Philip Wynkope. 

N. B. — -Edward Jones is Chosen Col -' Thomas York, Lieut. Col ' 
& Samuel Shaw, Major of a Regiment in this County. 



Charles Stewart, 
Anthony Wright, 
Robert Jemmison, 
James McLouglin, 
John Wilson, 
Bernard Yaahorne, j r. 



Bucks "County. 

James Hart, 
Lewis Rue, 
John Beard, 

James Davis, 
Thomas Blair, 

Robert Cummin gs. 



William Hart, 
Richard Vanhorne, 
Samuel Martin, 
John Hall, 
George Overpack 5 
Ralph Dunn. 



William Clinton. 



James Galbreath, 
John Smith, 
Adam Reed, 
John McKown, 
John Galbreath, 
David M'Clure, 
James Armstrong 
Thomas McKee, 
James Graham, 
Robert Baker, 
James Patterson, 
Thomas Harris. 



Chester County.. 
Morris Thomas. 

Lancaster County. 

James Sample, 
Willm. Cunningham, 
John Crawford, 
James Anderson, 
William Allison, 
Thomas Foster, 
Alexander Armstrong 
Robert Smith, 
John Purrins, 
William Mitchell, 
James Smith. 



William Carr, 



John Harris, 
Joseph Candor, 
John Young, 
James Finney, 
Nathaniel Little, 
Andrew Boggs, 
, John Dougherty, 
Will-* Baskell, 
William McMullan, 
Henry Rennicks, 
Thomas Mitchel, 
John Wilson. 



M. B— "Thomas Cookson is Chosen Coll "' James Galbreath, 
Lieut. Col 0- & Robert Baker, Major of the above Regiment. 



Samuel Anderson, 
Jedidiah Alexander, 
Andrew Gregg, 
James Snoodgrass. 



John Woodside, 
Hugh Whiteford, 
William Crawford, 
John Alexander. 



John Barkley, 
James Smith, 
Samuel Simpson, 
John Snoodgrass. 



N. B. — James Gillaspy is Chosen Col -- Samuel Anderson, Lieut. 
Col -' & James Whitehill, Major of one other Regiment in the s d ' 
County. 



248 



MINUTES OF THE 



Captains. 



Lieutenants. 



Ensigns. 



New Castle County. 
David Finney, Francis Janvier, French Battle, 

Evan Rice, James Walker, Charles Bryan, Ser?- 

John Almond, Luloff Peterson, Luke Mounce, 

Timothy Griffith, William Faries, David Rowland, 

Archibald Armstrong.. Thomas MeCulbugh. Robert Pierce. 

N. B. — John Coocling, Sen,, & William Armstrong, are ehoseD 
Colonels, Thomas James & William Patterson, Lieut. Colonels, 
Jacob Vanbebber & William McCrea., Majors of two Regiments m 
the above County. 



John Vining, 
John Hunn, 
Robert Blackshire. 
G-eorge Martin, 
John Caton. 



Kent County. 
Thomas Parke, 
William Hirons, 
John Rees. 
Jacob Allee, 
Robert Gatlim 



Richard Wellsy 
Mark Hirons, 
William Rees. 
John Vanwinkle 7 
Joseph Hodsoik. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia the 2.6th May, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President, 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ~V 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, [-Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, ) 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

An Express arriving at two o* Clock this Afternoon from Salem, 
in West Jersey, with Intelligence that there was a Spanish Priva- 
teer of fourteen Carriage Guns lying off Elsenbourgh, about ten 
Miles below New Castle, the Council was call'd, & it appearing, by 
a Letter to Mr. Lawrence, that the fact was sworn to before Justice 
Frazier by one George Proctor, his Deposition was read in these 
words : 

« Salem County, May 25th, 1748. 

u Came before Me, one of His Majestie's Justices of the County 
of Salem, one George Proctor, and being sworn upon the holy Evan- 
gelists, did Depose that he being a Prisoner of War did swim ashore 
from a Spanish Privateer of fourteen Carriage Guns, eight six 
Pounders & six four Pounders. She is a Brigantine of a hundred 
& sixty Men. She lies now against Elsenbourgh in the River. 

" Sworn before me, WILLIAM FRAZIER." 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 249 

Then the Messenger, Roger Sherron, was examin'd, &l the Sec- 
retary having reduc'd what he said to writing, Sherron made Affi- 
davit thereof before Mr. Lawrence in these words : 

" Roger Sherron, of the Town of Salem, Joiner, being sworn on 
the Holy Evangelists of Almighty God, deposeth & saith that he 
was sent express by the Magistrates of the said Town at Eight 
o'Clock this Morning, on one G-eorge Proctor's swimming ashore 
from a Vessel in the River, and deposing before a Magistrate of the 
said Town of Salem that he had been a Prisoner of War on board 
a Spanish Privateer of fourteen Carriage Guns, eight six Pounders 
& six four Pounders, a Brig of 160 Men, lying against Elsen- 
bourgh in the River. That he saw the said G-eorge Proctor after 
he came ashore this morning, k was present when he made a Depo- 
sition to the purport as above, and that he heard several Persons of 
Credit declare at Salem that they saw such Brigantine lying oppo- 
site to Clement Hall's plantation, Situate in Salem County, about 
ten or eleven Miles below the Port of New Castle. 

"ROGER SHERRON. 

" Taken & Sworn before me, this 26th May, 1748, at 4 o'Clock, 
P. M. 

"THOMAS LAWRENCE." 

The Council having sent for Captain Ballet, inform' d him of th% 
near Approach of the Spanish Privateer, & that as the Wind is 
South if she should have any Consorts with her they might be before 
the Town in a very little time, and desir'd to know what he pro- 
pos'd to do; he said as his Guns were ashore & the Otter unrigg'd, 
the first & most serviceable thing to be done was for his Men quickly 
to raise a good Battery & place his Guns on it, & he accordingly 
withdrew to attend that Work. 

Order' d, That as many Hands be hired as possible to work on 
the great Battery, & that the New York Guns be forthwith mounted 
thereon, & Coll 0- Taylor is desir'd to impart this Order to the 
Managers, & press them to take care that the same be carried into 
Execution with all the Dispatch possible. 

Order'd, That a Commission be prepar'd immediately, author- 
izing Col 0, Taylor to take Charge of the Batteries, with a power of 
appointing others to act under him till such time as proper Persons 
can be thought of. 

Mr. Lawrence being one of the Owners of the Privateer Trem- 
bleur, express' d his willingness that she shou'd immediately be got 
ready for the use of the Publick, & desir'd a Committee might be 
appointed to obtain the Consent of the rest of the Owners, where- 
upon Mr. Hasell & Mr. Hopkinson undertook to go and speak to 
all the other Owners. 

Mr. Hasell & Mr. Hopkinson return' d & reported that the other 



\ 
250 MINUTES OF THE 

Owners of the Trembleur Privateer had readily given their Con- 
sent for her to be fitted out, & Captain Bowne attending the Coun- 
cil, was ask'd if he was willing to take the Command of her ; he 
said he was on this Condition, that if he shou'd be disabled from 
geting his Livelyhood by the loss of a Limb -he shou'd have pro- 
vision made in that Case for him by the Publick. Mr. Lawrence 
likewise said that he & the Owners wou'd expect Security to be 
given to be paid a reasonable Sum in case the Trembleur shou'd 
be taken or receive any considerable Damage. The Council con- 
ceiving they cou'd not enter into such Engagements this Affair 
dropp'd. 

Mr. Hasell & Mr. Strettell were desired to inform Capt n . Ballet 
immediately of the Council's disappointment in their Expectation 
of getting the Trembleur, that now their sole depencence was on 
the King's Ship, & it was therefore desir'd she might not heave 
down, but Sail directly if it cou'd possibly be done. 

Mr. Hasell & Mr. Strettell return' d & told the Board that they 
had spoke to Captain Ballet in the Terms given them in charge, but 
without Success, he still retaining his opinion that his Ship was not 
fit to go to Sea without Careening. 

The Speaker of the Assembly & the Judges of the Supreme 
Court having been sent for, they were consulted with on the present 
gtate of Affairs, & while they were present the Board came to the 
following Resolves : 

Order 'd, That the French Prisoners shou'd not now be sent away, 
since they might, if taken, add a considerable strength to the 
Enemy. 

Order' d } That a Centinel of ten Men be set to guard the Powder 
House. 

Order' d, That there be an Embargo laid on all Vessels, & that 
the Collector of Philadelphia & New Castle be serv'd with it. 

Order' d, That there he a strong Guard mounted on every Bat- 
tery, and that a set of Instructions be immediately prepared for the 
regulation of the Commanding Officers. 

Order' d, That Expresses be dispatch' d in the morning to the 
Governments of Virginia, New York, & Boston, to give Informa- 
tion of the State of Affairs here, & that Captain Ballet be told 
he may have an opportunity of sending a Letter to Captain Mas- 
terson, Commander of the Hector Man-of-War, by Express to Vir- 
ginia. 

Order' d, That two Pilot Boats shou'd be employ'd to Cruise in 
the Bay and River for Intelligence, & Abraham Wiltbank, the 
Pilot, shou'd be taken into Service k sent away instantly. 

The Speaker having concurr'd in the above regulations as 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 251 

absolutely necessary, was pleas'd to declare his Sentiments as fol- 
lows: 

That if the President & Council, in whose hands the executive 
powers of Government now were, in discharge of what they con- 
ceive to be their Duty, were put to any Expense, tho' it might 
happen in such an Instance as the Assembly wou'd not have 
advised, yet he believed that the Regard the Council might shew 
for the Good of the Province would ever be considered by the 
Assembly, and an adequate Provision made in the Support of Gov- 
ernment. 

The following Commission to Mr. Taylor was Sign'd by the Presi- 
dent & four Members : 

" By the Honourable the President & Council of the Province of 
Pennsylvania , 

u To Abraham Taylor, Esq., Colo, of the Associated Regiment of 
the City of Philadelphia. 
" Whereas, By virtue of our Commission bearing date the first 
Day of January last, We have constituted and appointed You, the 
said Abraham Taylor, to be Col 0, of the Associated Regiment of 
Philad a - 1 And whereas, By our Order & Direction since the issuing 
our s d< Commission, some Batteries have been erected & Guns 
mounted on some parts near the said City for the security & de- 
fence thereof against the Common Enemy, But the said Batteries 
& Guns have not yet been put under the Care, Direction, or Charge 
of any particular Officer, Reposing special Trust & Confidence as 
well in Your Care, Dilligence, & Circumspection, as in your Loyalty 
& Courage, We have authoriz'd, constituted, and appointed, and 
We do by virtue of the Powers & Authorities to Us given hereby 
authorise, constitute, and appoint You, the said Abraham Taylor, 
to take the said Batteries & Guns into Your Charge & Care, and to 
give such Orders & Directions for mounting, fitting, & preparing 
them for Service, and to appoint such Officers & Men of your said 
Regiment as a Guard thereto as to You shall seem meet and requi- 
site ; And as they are commanded to obey You as their superior 
Officer, So are You likewise to observe & follow such Orders & 
Directions from time to time as You shall receive from the Com- 
mander-in-Chief of this Povince; and as We have just reason to ap- 
prehend from the near approach of our Enemies they may attempt to 
pass the said Batteries with their Ships or Vessels, and to land their 
Men in order to plunder, burn, or destroy this City of Philadelphia, 
We do further authorize & impower You to burn, sink, or destroy 
the Enemy, their Ships or Vessels, attempting to pass the said Bat- 
teries or endeavouring to Land within any part of the County of 
Philadelphia. And You are hereby further Commanded & required 
not to suffer any Ships, Vessels, or Boats coming up the River to 
pass the said Batteries without some person first coming from the 



252 MINUTES OF THE 

said Ships, Vessels, or Boats, and giving an Account of themselves, 
and from whence they came. 

" Given in Council uuder our Hands & Lesser Seal of the said Pro- 
vince, at Philadelphia, the 26th Day of May, in the Twenty-first 
Year of His Majestie's Reign, Annoqz Domini, 1748. 

"ANTHONY PALMER, 
"THOMAS LAWRENCE, 
" SAMUEL HASELL, 
« WILLIAM TILL, 
"ROBERT STRETTELL, 
"By their Honour's Command. 

" Richard Peters, Secretary/ 7 



At a Council held at Philadelphia the 27th May, 1748. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, "j 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, J -^ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Thomas Hopkinson, [ ^ " 

William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approv'd. 

G-eorge Proctor, the Sailor who swam ashore from on board the 
Spanish Brigantine, Captain Don Vincent Lopez, having been 
despatch'd from Salem to New Castle, the Magistrates there sent 
him up Express with the following Letter from Mr. Macky, which 
was deliver'd to some Members of Council late last Night : 

"New Castle, May 26th, 1748, Eleven o' Clock. 

" To the Honoble. the President & Council at Philadelphia. 
" Gentlemen : 

" About nine o'clock arrived here the Bearer, who swam last Night 
from a Spanish Privateer Brig who was at Anchor off Elsenbourgh 
with fourteen Guns & 160 Men ; she came up within Gun Shot of 
this Place about an hour ago, & came to an Anchor with a Spring 
on her Cable; we fired at her with our four Guns many Shot, most 
of which pass'd her, but none took place as the Tide was against 
her, & the wind became immediately calm it prevented her boarding 
the large Jamaica Man who lyes in our Road, which was evidently 
her design; if that had happen'd, ere this in all probability this 
Town wou'd now have been in flames ; nothing but the ebb Tide 
and a Calm prevented it. After she, the Privateer, lay some time 
at Anchor the Jamaica Man fired at her as we continued to do, on 
which she weighed & towed away, fired a Gun, hoisted Spanish 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 253 

Colours, & gave three Huzzas, -which we returned. She is now about 
two Leagues from hence, as we shall have the flood in less than, & 
as it continues Calm, she must be under a Necessity of coming to 
an Anchor; if it were possible to send 60 or 80 stout Seamen on 
board the Jamaica Man, & that the Captain, who is at Philadelphia, 
would -^gree to let her fall down after her, I think she may be easily 
taken. We have sent twenty odd Men on board the Jamaica Man; 
we expect the Country in to our assistance every Minute. If we 
can persw r ade the Mate of the Jamaica Man to stay, we shall throw 
into him 150 Men, of which number I shall be one, and the Town 
is willing to give him Security for the Ship & Cargo. I beg Your 
Honours wou'd excuse the roughness of these Lines ; be assur'd that 
I am, with the greatest zeal for the publick safety & highest Esteem 
& Regard, 

" Your Honours most obedient humble Servant, 

"JOHN MACKY. 
" The People recede from giving Security for the Jamaica vessel, 
& it is like she will go up this Tide." 

Proctor attending was examin'd, & his Examination order'd to be 
taken down in writing, & that he shou'd make oath thereto before 
some Magistrate. 

The Examination of Greorge Proctor, Mariner (being sworn & 
examin'd before Joseph Turner, Esqr., one of the Justices, &c), 
who saith : 

" That this Examinant having been taken & made a Prisoner in 
the Island of Cuba, he was put on board a Spanish Privateer Brig- 
antine belonging to the Governor of Havannah, whereof Don Vin- 
cent Lopez is Commander, having one hundred & sixty Men on 
board, & mounted with fourteen Carriage Gruns & twenty swivels ) 
And the said Brigantine being out upon a Cruize near the Capes of 
Delaware, the said Captain Lopez & his Crew in the said Privateer, 
on or about the Twentieth Day of May, Instant, took and burnt a 
Sloop about seven or eight Leagues from the said Capes, which 
Sloop was bound from Boston to South Carolina, but the name of 
the said Sloop or the Captain of her this Deponent does not remem- 
ber ; that soon after the said Captain Lopez having resolv'd to go 
with his said Brigantine into the Bay & River of Delaware, he ac- 
cordingly arrived with her in the said River on the 25th of May 
aforesaid, and came to an Anchor in sight of New Castle, one John 
Dobbins, an Englishman, who came in the said Brigantine from 
Havannah, being the Pilot of her; That just before they came to an 
Anchor they took a Pilot Boat belonging to one Jones, whom they 
made a Prisoner on board the said Brig ; That the said Don Lopez 
& his Company perceiving that there was a pretty large Ship lying 
at New Castle, he determined & declared he wou'd go up to New 
Castle with the said Brigantme ? & after he had taken the said Ship 



254 MINUTES OF THE 

he wou'd throw one hundred & twenty Men ashore & plunder & 
destroy the Inhabitants of New Castle & set the Town a-fire, and 
then wou'd proceed to do the like by the Inhabitants on both sides 
the said River; that about ten o' Clock in the Evening of the same 
Day the same Brigantine came to an Anchor in the s d> River, this 
Examinant made his Escape from her by getting into a Shallop 
which the said Privateer had just before taken, and after this Ex- 
aminant had loosed the fast by which the said Shallop was tied to 
the said Brigantine, she drove with the tide of Ebb from the said 
Brigantine unseen by the People, and being got to a proper distance 
from the Brigantine, he put her under Sail and stood for the Jersey 
Shore, being then about a League off, but it soon aftar falling Calm 
he quitted the said Shallop & swam ashore about two or three 
o'Clock in the morning, and immediately alarmed the Inhabitants at 
and about Salem, acquainting them with the said Threats and In- 
tentions of the said Don Lopez of plundering, burning, & destroy- 
ing the Country j That from Salem this Examinant went early the 
next morning over to New Castle, & there likewise alarmed & ac- 
quainted the Inhabitants with the said Don Lopez's designs against 
them & the said Ship then at Anchor there \ that about the same 
time that this Examinant arrived at New Castle the said Spanish 
Privateer Brigantine coming up under English Colours within Gun 
Shot of New Castle, this Examinant called out to k assur'd the 
People there that the said Brigantine was a Spanish Privateer, and 
after he had (with no small difficulty) prevailed on them to believe 
him, they, with this Examinant' s Assistance, fired several Guns 
from the Battery or Platform at the said Brigantine, whereupon the 
said Ship, which lay at Anchor near the said Town, being also 
alarmed & acquainted from the Shore that the said Brigantine was 
a Spanish Privateer, and several People being sent on board her 
from the Shore, gave the said Brigantine two stern Guns, & this 
Examinant with the People at New Castle continued to fire at the 
said Brigantine for near half an hour, by which the said Privateer's 
Company then finding that they were discovered to be an Enemy, 
immediately slipped their Cable, as this Deponent beleives, & being 
towed down stern foremost, giving three Huzzas & one Gunn, hoisted 
Spanish Colours & went down the River again. 

" GEORGE PROCTOR. 
" Sworn before me the 27th May, 1748. 

"JO. TURNER." 

The President's Letter to the Governor of Virginia was read & 
order'd to be enter'd. 

"Philadelphia, 27th May, 1748. 
"Sir: 

"A French Privateer Sloop, the late Clinton Privateer of New 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 255 

York, with one or two Consorts fitted out at Cape Francois, bave 
for some time past been Cruizing on this Coast and at the mouth of 
the Bay of Delaware, & has taken several Vessels inward & outward 
bound, and amongst the rest the Brigantine Richa, Captain Burk, 
with a very rich Cargo, who had just sail'd from this Place for Lon- 
don; And yet while all this mischief was doing, one of our Pri- 
vateers, as well as His Majestie's Sloop of War the Otter, Captain 
Ballet, sent by the Lords of the Admiralty for this Station, arrived 
here, the former this Day seven night & the latter on Sunday last, 
without seeing any Enemy on the Coast. Captain Ballet having 
some time ago had an Engagement with a large French Ship, re- 
ceived so much Damage as to think himself under a Necessity of 
immediately heaving down, & while in this Condition yesterday 
about two in the afternoon came an Express from Salem, in New 
Jersey, that there was a Spanish Privateer mounting eight sis 
pounders & six four pounders lying at Anchor in the Biver Dela- 
ware off Elsenbourgh, about ten Miles from New Castle. 

" On this the Council applied to Captain Ballett to get the Otter 
away instantly if there was any possibility of doing it, but he said 
she was in such a Condition that it wou'd a week to refit her. 
At eight a' Clock in the Evening M. Mackay's Letter was deliver* d 
to the Council, by which we learn' d that the Spanish Privateer at- 
tempted to Board a Large Jamaica Ship, Captain Randolph, of 20 
Grunns, in New Castle Cove, but in this he was disappointed & had 
retreated to a little distance perhaps to renew the attempt when the 
Wind and Tide should be favourable. Proctor, who swam ashore 
from the Spaniard, was the Carrier of Mr. Macky's Letter, <& in his 
Examination before the Council he says the Spanish Capt D is of a 
savage, barbarous disposition, & declared frequently that he wou'd 
rob, plunder, & burn whatever he cou'd ; & as it is known that there 
are other Privateers on the Coast, if they meet & concert together 
there must be a total Stop put to Trade & infinite mischief done 
to the poor People who Live on the Bay side. Proctor says further, 
that the Spaniard was attended by fifteen small Craft which he had 
taken in the Bay. I have the pleasure to say that this City is in a 
tolerable posture of defence by the Industry & Management of the 
Associators, two or three good Batteries being already erected & 
Cannon mounted on them, but the Trade of the Place must be in- 
evitably ruin'd unless the Man-of-War Station' d at Virginia can be 
prevaiFd with immediately to put to Sea & join Captain Ballet. I 
entreat, therefore, You will be so good as instantly to communicate 
the Contents hereof to the Captain of the Man-of-War, & use all 
Your Interest to induce him to put to Sea without the least loss of 
time. 

u Captain Ballet is by his Instructions order' d to consult with 
Captain Masterson, Commander of the Hector Man-of-War ap- 
pointed for the Virginia Station, with whom he sail'd from Spithead 



256 MINUTES OF THE 

having 26 Merchant men under their Convoy, but he lost him and 
the Fleet in continuance of foggy Weather j he has wrote to Cap- 
tain Masterson by this Express, & told him he wou'd be ready to 
Sail by the latter end of next week, & I hoped to meet the Hector 
at the Capes or on the Coast between here & Virginia. 

" I am, Sir, Your most obed 1, humb. Serv tM 
"ANTHONY PALMER. 
" His Excels S r - Will m - Goocn." 

One of the like Tenor to Governor Clinton was read, & another 
to Governor Shirley, & Copies of the Affidavits already taken, to- 
gether with a Copy of Mr. Mack'y Letter, was sent with the 
Letters. 

Captain Ballett was pleas'd to read his Letter to Captain Master- 
son, Commander of the Hector, purporting that he parted with him 
& the Fleet in thick, Hazy weather ; that having receiv'd a good deal 
of hurt in an Engagement with a large Ship, he was oblig'd to refit 
but wou'd be ready to Sail in ten Days ; that there were several 
French & Spanish Privateers at the Capes & in the Bay & River of 
Delaware, and he hoped to meet him there as soon as possible. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 28th May, 1748. 

present : 
The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President, 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, "") 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, ' rg 

Robert Strettell, Thomas Hopkinson, \ ■ ' 
William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

It being represented to the Board that Captain Ballet, Com- 
mander of the Otter Sloop, has just reason to apprehend that some 
of his Seamen intended to desert from His Majestie's Service on 
board the said Sloop, It is the opinion of the Board that Orders 
shou'd immediately issue to the Keepers of the several Ferries that 
they do not suffer any Sailor to pass those Ferries without a License 
from some Magistrate of this City; and it is further ordered that an 
Express be immediately dispatch'd to Governor Belcher, requesting 
him to issue the like Order to be observ'd within his Government, 
and that no Sailor may be permitted to travel without a pass. 

Order'rf, That Coll 0, Jones give Notice to the Company he lately 
Commanded as Captain that it is necessary they shou'd chuse a 
Captain in his stead, he being chosen Coll 3, of the Philadelphia 
County Regiment, and that the like Notice be given to the Com- 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 257 

pany whereof Lieutenant Coll - York was lately Captain, & to the 
Company whereof Major Shaw was lately Captain. 



P. M. 

PRESENT : 

The Honourable the President & the same Members as in the 
forenoon. 

It was moved by one of the Members that an Express be sent to 
New Castle to know whether the People at Lewes have had In- 
formation of the Spanish Privateer now in the River, and that if 
they had not that an Express be forthwith sent to them from New 
Castle for that purpose ; and Mr. Logan now informing the Board 
that the Speaker was desirous such an Express shou'd be sent, it 
was order'd to be done immediately. 

A Letter from Governor G-ooch was read in these words : 
« Sir— 

" Immediately upon the Receipt of yours, dated April 12th, the 
Council being then in Town, I call'd them together in order to 
have their final advice upon what at our first Meeting I told them 
I thought deserved their Consideration & my speedy answer. The 
Gentlemen, as they were very sensible of the Importance of keeping 
the Ohio Indians steady & firm in their present good disposition, 
and of the general Benefit which all the Neighbouring Provinces 
will receive from their friendship, readily & with one accord agreed 
it was incumbent upon us to act in Concert & Conjunction with 
the other Governments, and that we ought to contribute a reason- 
able proportion towards making those Indians an handsome Present 
at this Juncture. 

" In consequence whereof, the Council came to a Resolution of 
sending two hundred Pounds our Currency, which we hope Your 
Honour & Council will think & accept as a proper Sum for us to 
advance on such an occasion ; and as I could not have a more secure 
& quick Conveyance of the Money, I have commited it to the Care 
of Capt n> Robinson, who is appointed our Commissioner for that pur- 
pose, & who has directions to consult your Honour in the purchase 
of such Goods as will best Suit with those your Province intend 
for them- which Goods when bought) with the assistance of Mr. 
Weiser, he has order'd to deliver himself to Mr. Weiser, who will 
have Instructions from us to place either the Money or Goods, as 
Your Honour & he shall think most expedient, in the hands of 
those Indians as a free Gift from the Government of Virginia, that 
the Ohio Indians may know to whom they are oblig'd, and not only 
remember their Engagements to the Crown of Great Britain, but 
they & all the Indians living near that River may by Gratitude be 
Vol. v.— 17. 



258 MINUTES OF THE 

restrain'd from doing any manner of Injury or Wrong to our In- 
habitants. These are the Instructions we have thought fit to give 
CajDtain Robinson and your honest & worthy Interpreter, which 
we trust will be satisfactory to Your Honour & the Council of 
Pennsylvania. 

" I am, with much Esteem, 

" Your Honour's most obedient humble Servant, 

"WILL. GOOCH, 
" May 9th, 1748." 

Mr. Robinson waiting on the Board & acquainting them that he 
was going to New York where he might be supply' d with such In- 
dians' Goods as could not be purchased here, the Board appointed 
Mr. Lawrence & Mr. Logan to furnish Mr. Robinson with a List 
of Goods proper for the Virginia Present, to assist him in the pur- 
chasing such of the Goods as might be got here, & to recommend 
him to a proper Person in New York for the purchasing of the 
rest. 

The Board being sensible of the critical & dangerous Situation 
of the Publick Affairs at this Juncture agreed to meet to-morrow 
at nine o' Clock, to which time the Council adjourn'd. 

It being alledg'd by Mr. Chubb that there were numbers willing 
to subscribe a Sum of Money for the immediate fitting out a Vessel 
of force to go against the Privateers, it was agreed that some Mem- 
bers shou'd meet at the Coffee House to Night in order to promote 
this Subscription j &, accordingly, some Members did meet there, 
& having seen the Subscription Paper, they desir'd Mr. Willing, 
Captain Lloyd, Mr. Wilcox, Mr. John Mifflin, & Mr. Stamper, to 
calculate the Expence that wou'd attend the fitting out a Vessel, & 
to make their Report to them in the morning at Council. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Sunday, the 29th May, 1748' 
/ present: 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ~] 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, ! Eg rg 

Robert Strettcll, Thomas Hopkinson, i 

William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

Mr. Chubb reported to the Council that he had done his utmost 
Endeavours to procure such a Subscription as wou'd enable the 
Council to fit out a Vessel of force to accompany the Man of War, 
but met with great discouragement & despair'd of effecting it ; tho' 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 259 

it was his opinion that if some Persons of more note than himself 
were to try they might do it. 

Mr. Willing, Mr. Stamper, Capt n> Lloyd, Mr. John Wilcox, & 
Mr. John Mifflin, the Persons who last Night undertook to consider 
what Vessel or Vessels of force cou'd be immediately got ready to 
Sail with the Man of War, & to calculate the Expence that would 
attend it, reported that the People of the City were exceedingly 
backward to advance Money; that People generally believing the 
Assembly would not reimburse them, &, therefore, insisted upon 
some certain Security ; & Mr. Chubb being ask'd if the want of 
Security was the reason why he had no better Success, he said it 
was. Mr. Willing further declared that to fit out a Vessel or Ves- 
sels only to repel or take the present Nest of Privateers wou'd be 
of little or no Service, since there were by all Accounts numbers of 
Spanish & french Privateers all along the Coast of North America 
who wou'd successively take their Stations at our Capes as they 
were the least defended ; & that he & the other Gentlemen were 
clearly of opinion nothing less wou'd do than to fit out a Vessel of 
force at the Expence of the Government for a Cruize of three or 
four Months at least, to Cruize without interuption off our Capes. 
And that as the Council had not the Command of the Publick 
Money, they humbly offer'd it to their Consideration whether the 
Assembly should not be forthwith calF'd. 

They then withdrew, & the Council debated for some time whether, 
considering the absolute negative put upon their Message by the 
Assembly, it wou'd answer any purpose to call them ; & after they had 
spent abundance of time in this Consultation, it was agreed to call 
the Assembly to sit next Monday seven-night ; and the Secretary 
was accordingly order' d to prepare the Writs to be sign'd in the 
morning, and to have Expresses ready to set off with them as soon 
as they shou'd be Sign'd. 



At a Council held at Philada., Monday, the 30th May, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ~] 

William- Till, Abraham Taylor, I™ 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, j " 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The Secretary offer'd the Writs to the Board for calling the As- 
sembly on Monday next • & while they were Signing Mr. Chubb 
desir'd admittance, having something of consequence to propose to 
the Council, & being admitted, he said he was desired by a number 
of substantial Freeholders to wait on the Council, & to assure them 



260 MINUTES OF THE 

that on the Credit of their Minute of Council, wherein the Senti- 
ments of the Speaker are mentioned, any reasonable Sum of Money 
might be rais'd ; being ask'd what Sum might be thought reasonable ; 
he said three, four, Six, or Ten thousand Pounds, & that the Money 
wou'd be laid down on the Table for them to dispose of as they 
shou'd think proper. Mr. Chubb was told that all applications to 
the Board ought to be in writing, k when the Council shou'd see 
his in writing they would give an answer. 

The Board postpon'd signing the Writs for calling the Assembly, 
in order to see the issue of this Application. 

The Secretary is order' d to sign the following Notice, & to take 
care that it be inserted in the next Gazette : 

" May 30th, 1748. 
" Notice is hereby given, that it has been thought necessary for 
His Majestie's Service & the safety of this City, that no Ship, Ves- 
sel, or Boat be permitted to pass the Lower Battery, from the 
Hours of Eight in the Evening to four in the Morning, until the 
Master of such Vessel have sent his Boat on Shore, or have other- 
wise made himself known to the Garrison, for which purpose Orders 
have been issued to the Commanding Officer of the Batteries. 
" By Order of the President & Council. 

" RICHARD PETERS, Secry." 

Captain Ballet came into Council, & inform' d the Board that if 
the Privateers shou'd take Captain Randolph's Ship, which lay at 
New Castle, & carried fourteen Carriage Guns, it wou'd be such an 
addition to their Strength that they might attempt the City & come 
& burn His Majestie's Ship, whereupon, as the President was going 
down to New Castle to see what cou'd be done for the Security of 
the Counties, it was recommended to him to remove the Ship into 
a place of more safety. 



At a Council held at Philada., Tuesday, 31st May, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, "j 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, I -p 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Thomas Hopkinson, [ ^ ' 
William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approv'd. 

The Depositions made by the several Persons who were lately 
taken by the Enemie's Privateers, were read & order'd to be enter'd. 
Captain Nathaniel Ambler, late Commander of the Sloop Joseph & 
Mary, of Philadelphia, being sworn & examined the 30th May, 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 261 

1748, Saith : That on the 25th of this Instant this Deponent's said 
Sloop being at Anchor at Reedy Island in the River Delaware, in 
Company with three other Sloops belonging to Boston (which ha(J. 
been chased into the Bay on the 23d Instant by a Privateer, as the 
Captains of them told this Deponent), a large Brigantine came up 
the River, pass'd by them, & came to Anchor at Reedy Point, & in 
the Evening three Boats, mann'd out by the said Brigantine, came 
and boarded this Deponent's said Sloop and took her, and stripp'd 
this Deponent <fe his Crew naked, taking from them all their 
Cloaths, save that they left this Deponent his Breeches only, & 
soon after took the said three other Sloops, & serv'd their several 
Crews in the same manner j That the said Brigantine proved to be 
a Spanish Privateer called the St. Michael, Vincent De Lopes Com- 
mander, having about 170 Men, consisting of some Spanish, some 
English & Irish, many Mulattoes, & some Negroes on board, & 
mounted 14 Carriage Gruns, 6 Pounders, doubled fortifyed, besides 
Swivels; That about two Hours after the said Privateer's Men had 
got all the Crews belonging to the said four Sloops on board the 
said Privateer, they weighed Anchor and stood up the River for 
New Castle, where a Ship outward bound for Jamaica was lying at 
Anchor, and the said Privateer hoisting English Colours went up 
along side of the said Ship, and haling her told the Men on board 
her that She was an English Man-of-War from Jamaica, and that 
therefore they expected the s d - Ship (which had then Jack, Ensign, 
& Pendant flying) wou'd strike their Colours to the said Brigantine, 
which if they refus'd to do they wou'd take the Ship from them 
and burn the Town ; and soon after a shot being fired from the Bat- 
tery at New Castle at the Brigantine, She hoisted Spanish Colours, 
and giving three Huzzas, return'd the Shot from the Town with one 
<xun, but immediately after (although they had their G-raplings out 
along side ready to Board the Ship) they tack'd about & stood 
down the River again, came to an Anchor a little above Morris 
Liston's high Land, and put this Deponent and about 45 more 
English Prisoners ashore there ; That besides the said four Sloops 
the said Privateers had taken two Shallops laden with Wheat. 

"NATHANIEL AMBLER. 
" Taken & Sworn before me. 

"JO. TURNER." 

Captain James White, late -Commander of the Schooner called 
the Mary of Philadelphia, being sworn & examined before Joseph 
Turner, Esqr., one of the Justices, this Thirtieth Dav of May, 
1748, Saith— J 

" That this Deponent on the 27th Instant, being arrived with the 
said Vessel in the River Delaware from the Island of New Provi- 
dence, and standing up with the Tide of Flood, a Pilot Boat with 
about Thirty Hands, mann'd out by a Spanish Privateer Brigan- 



262 MINUTES OF THE 

tine then in the said Bay and under Sail, standing for this De- 
ponent's said Vessel, which was then abreast of the high Lands of 
Bombo Hook, came along side of the said Schooner & boarded her 
with Pistols and drawn Cutlasses, and this Deponent not -having 
any Arms on board to make any resistance was oblig'd to strike to 
the said Privateer's Men, who having stripp'd all the Crew be- 
longing to the said Schooner k plunder' d her, they carried this De- 
ponent & most of his Men on board the said Privateer; that the 
said Privateer was called the St. Michael of Havannah, commanded 
by Vincent De Lopez, & mounted with fourteen Carriage Guns, six 
Pounders, besides as many Swivel Guns; that the Person who 
commanded the said Boats Crew of Privateer's Men, and took this 
Deponent as aforesaid, then told this Deponent that there was a 
large Ship lying at New Castle, outward bound, which they were 
determined to take before they left the Coast, & that their Boat 
had been up the River within five Miles of Philadelphia & had 
learned that there was a Man-of-War heaving down at Philadelphia, 
& that the Trembleur Privateer was there likewise, butunrigg'cl, and 
said further that they had a Consort Cruizing at the Capes of De- 
laware, which came with them from Havannah, had 150 Hands on 
board, & was mounted with fourteen large Guns; That the said 
Privateer's Crew consisted of Spaniards, French men, many English 
& Irish, some Dutch Men, many Mulattoes, & some Negroes; That 
the Day before this Deponent was taken as aforesaid, he was chased 
by two of the Enemie's Privateers into the said Bay, which he 
judged to be the Clinton Privateer & her Consort. 

" JAMES WHITE. 
" Sworn before me, 

"JO. TURNER." 

Nicholas Eads of the City of Philadelphia, Mariner, being sworn 
& examined before Joseph Turner, Esqr., one of the Justices, the 
30th Day of May, 1748, Saith— 

"That this Deponent with his Partner Pyramus Green, being 
bound from Philadelphia to the Island of Bermuda in a Schooner 
called the Phenix of Philadelphia, laden with Indian Corn & Bread, 
was chased & taken on the 15th Instant, about 35 Leagues to the 
South-Eastward of the Capes of Delaware, by a French Privateer 
called the Clinton, commanded by Captain De Blane, with about 
125 Men, and mounted with 12 Carriage Guns and about 18 
Swivels; That whilst this Deponent was a Prisoner on board the 
said Privateer, viz., On the 16th Instant, the said Privateer took 
the Brigantine called the Richa, Captain Burke Commander, bound 
from Philadelphia to London, about 25 Leagues to the South-East 
& by South of the Said Capes; And on the 17th Instant they also 
took a Sloop bound from Providence to Philadelphia, Commanded 
by Captain George Smith, laden with Sugar & Indigo; and on the 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 263 

twenty-first Instant the said Privateer took Hermophradite Vessel, 
Captain Hinsley Commander, bound from Virginia for Bristol, 
about 25 Leagues to the Eastward of Cape Henry; That on the 
25th Instant the said Privateer Clinton coming to an Anchor in 
Whorekill Road, within the Capes of Delaware, the said Cap'- De 
Blane pressed the said Captain Burke & this Deponent very much 
to Pilot the said Privateer Clinton up to Philadelphia, and they 
telling him they were not well enough acquainted with the Bay, he 
grew very angry and insisted they should carry him into the River 
Delaware, and declared he should then know very well where he 
was, & could find his way up to Philadelphia himself, having been 
a Prisoner there ; but finding he could not prevail upon them to 
carry him up into the River, nor get a Pilot from the Shore, he 
broke out into a violent Passion, and soon after a Sloop heaving 
in Sight and standing in for the Road, the Clinton weighed Anchor 
& gave Chase to the said Sloop, and whilst they were in pursuit of 
her they saw a Large Brig which stood towards them, & coming 
up with them proved to be a French Privateer, commanded by Cap- 
tain Bruneau, with 180 Men, and mounted with fourteen Carriage 
Guns & 30 Swivels, & had been 33 Days out from Cape Francois, 
& as they then declared, they had in that time taken 6 Prizes ; That 
the said Sloop which the Clinton was in Chase of getting Clear, 
they the next day stood in for the Shore, & seeing two Sloops 
lying at Anchor at a place called Townsand's Inlet, about 16 Miles 
to the Northward of Cape May, they manned out & sent two Boats 
to board the said two Sloops, which when they had plundered they 
left them & took one of their Boats to board the said two Sloops, 
which when they had plunder' 'd they left them & took one of their 
Boats which they gave to this Deponent & 27 more English Pris- 
oners to carry them to the Jersey Shore. 

"NICHOLAS EADES. 
u Taken & Sworn before 

" JO. TURNER/' 

John Goodwin, of the City of Philadelphia, Carpenter, being 
also Sworn & examined the 30th Day of May, 1748, Saith — 

" That he was late a Passenger on board the Brigantine Richa, 
Benj. Burk Commander, & was taken in her on the 16th Instant 
by the French Privateer called the Clinton, as set forth in the pre- 
ceding Deposition of Nicholas Eads, which being now read to this 
Deponent, & he having been a Prisoner with the said Nicholas 
Eads on board the said Privateer Clinton from the time of this 
Deponent's being taken as aforesaid till their being put ashore on 
the Jersey Coast ; he Saith that he likewise was privy to all the 
Transactions related in the said Deposition from the time of his 
coming on board the said Privateer Clinton, & that the same are 
all true as set forth in the said Deposition. And saith further, that 



264 MINUTES OF THE 

he was told by some of the Crew belonging to the said Privateer 
Clinton, whilst he was on board her, that they had been out from 
Cape Francois between 8 & 9 Weeks, & in that time they had 
taken Eleven Prizes, Five of which they had cut out of Oericott, 
in North Carolina, where they went ashore, killed 70 or 80 head of 
Cattle & plunder' d the Country, and also told this Deponent that 
there were then 14 Sail of French & Spanish Privateers out Cruising 
between Sandy Hook & South Carolina, viz., the said Privateer 
Clinton, the said Brigantine, Commanded by the said Captain Bru- 
neau, and a Schooner, all from Cape Francois, 3 from St. Donringo, 
1 from Petit Guava, 5 from Augustine, but from what place the 
other two came this Deponent does not now remember. 

"JOHN GOODWIN. 
" Taken & Sworn. before me, 

"JO. TURNER." 

The French Prisoners, brought in the Trembleur & her Prizes, 
are order' d to be sent to Bucks County, & the Secretary to write 
a letter to Coll 0- Grayclon to escort them to Newtown Jayl. 

Mr. Lawrence, Mr. Taylor, & Mr. Hopkinson are appointed a 
Committee to consider how to form an Artillery Company, & to 
confer with the Associators on this Subject, and it is recommended 
to them to give this Affair ail the Expedition possible. 



At a Council held at Philada., Wednesday, 1st June, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ] 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, I -^ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Lawrence Growden, j * 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, j 

The Minutes of the preceeding Council were read & approv'd. 

Mr. James Read, Notary Publick, with Captain Isham Randolph, 
applied for Liberty to read a Protest, & having read a Paper he de- 
liver'd it to the Board, & it is order'd to be entr'd : 

"June 1st, 1748, 
" Appear'd Isham Randolph, Commander of the Ship Rachel of 
London, burthen 250 Tons or thereabouts, and declared that the s d - 
Ship having been loaded in this Port with Lumber & Provisions & 
bound on a Voyage from hence to the Island of Jamaica, the said 
Ship sail'd from this Port on the 20th of this Instant, May, & fell 
down as far as New Castle, on Delaware, where she was detained 
until yesterday upon account of some of the Enemie's Privateers 
being Cruising in and about this River; that yesterday Ballet, 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 265 

Esqr., Commander of His Majesty's Sloop of War the Otter, being 
then at New Castle aforesaid, gave the said Appearer Orders to re- 
turn with the said Ship to this Port in order (as he alledg'd) to pre- 
vent her falling into the Enemie's hands, which said Orders the said 
Capt 11 - Ballet informed the appearer he gave him by virtue of direc- 
tions he had received to that purpose from the Honoble. Anthony 
Palmer, Esqr., President, &c, and therefore the said Appearer de- 
clared to Protest against the said Capt n - Ballet & all others concerned 
in detaining the said Ship Rachel from proceeding on her said in- 
tended Voyage, & ordering her back to this Port. 

"ISHAM RANDOLPH. 
" On the 1st June Mr. James Read, Notary Publick, applied to 
the Council for Liberty to read Capt 11, Isham Randolph's Protest, & 
being admitted he read the foregoing Paper & then deliver' d it to 
the Board. 

"RICHARD PETERS, Sec'ry." 

Mr. Voyall Chubb sent in a Paper to the Board purporting that 
he had done his utmost endeavour to promote the Subscription peti- 
tioned for on Monday, but despaired of Success, whereupon the Sec- 
retary was order'd to tell him that the Council is sorry they & he 
have had so much trouble to so little purpose. 



At a Council held at Philada., Thursday, 2d June, 1748. 

present : 
The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 

Thomas Lawrence, Abraham Taylor, "] 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, I-™ 

Lawrence Grrowden, Thomas Hopkinson, j \ ' 
William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approved. 

A Letter from Governor Clinton was read & order'd to be en- 
ter'd : 

"New York, 30th May, 1748. 
" Sir : 

" I have Your favour of the 27th Instant, with several Papers 
inclos'd, touching the Captures of a French & other Privateers on 
your Coast, which I am sorry to hear of, and as You inform me that 
the Spaniard designs a visit to this Port, I have inform'd the Mer- 
chants thereof, in hopes that they will send out what Privateers are 
here for the protection of their Trade. In the mean time I hope 
that when Capt n - Ballet is able to go out upon a Cruize he will look 
in this way, otherwise the Trade of this Port must be obstructed as 



266 MINUTES OF THE 

well as your's. I have forwarded Your Letter to Governor Shirley, 
and am with Respect, 

" S r - Your most obedient humble Servant, 

"GK CLINTON. 

" P. S. — Your Packets were safely deliver'd by Mr. Franklin. 

" The Honble. Anthony Palmer, Esq." , 

A Letter from Governor Belcher by Express was read in these 
words : 
" Sir— 

" Upon an Express I received this Day from Salem of several 
French Privateers being; come up Delaware River as far as New 
Castle & the Mouth of Salem Creek, a number of good hearty young 
Fellows has been with me to offer themselves for the Service of 
their King & Country, by making a Cruise in one of Your arm'd 
Vessels, and the bearer, John Jolly, who is very forward in the 
affair, carries this to Your Honour to be inform' d how forward your 
Vessels, and on what Terms Men enter upon them, and I hope these 
brisk young fellows will find Encouragement. 

" I am, S r "Your Honour's most obed t- Servant, 

"J. BELCHER. 

" Burlington, May 31st, 1748. 

"The Honoble. the Presid*-" 

To which the President return'd the following Answer : 
"S r -: 

" The Spirit shewn by the good People of New Jersey is truly 
commendable, & the Council is oblig'd to Your Excellency for the 
dispatch with which You have been pleas'd to impart to us this 
generous offer; but, alas, on the Assembly's absolutely refusing to 
furnish Money, we think no Vessels of force are likely to be fitted 
out. If there shou'd be any alteration of measures, the brave young 
men of your Province will be the first in our remembrance, & have 
early notice. 

" I am, Your Honour's most obedient Servant, 

"ANTHONY PALMER, 

" Philada., 2d June, 1748. 

" The Honoble. J. Belcher, Esqr." 

The President & four Members sign'd a Commission to Abraham 
Wiltbank to Command an Intelligence Boat & to wear a Flagg. 

" By the Honoble. the President & Council of the Province of Penn- 
sylvania. 
" To Abraham Wiltbank of Lewis Town, Pilot, Greeting: 

" Whereas, by reason of the Bay & River Delaware being now 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 267 

greatly infested with the Enemie's Privateers, we have juclg'd it 
necessary that some fit & proper Persons shall be forthwith employed 
& commissioned to observe & give us constant Intelligence of the 
Motions & Designs of the said Privateers; And We have thought 
you fitly qualified for that purpose, & confiding in Your Loyalty, 
Vigilance, & Integrity, Do hereby Grant Commission to authorize 
and appoint You the said Abraham Wiltbank to fit out & command 
an Intelligence Boat for the purposes aforesaid, & therewith imme- 
diately to proceed & continue to pass & repass down & up the said 
River & Bay (During our Pleasure) in order to discover, observe, & get 
all the Informations & Intelligence you possibly can of the motions, 
force, & designs of the said Privateers or other his Majestie's Ene- 
mies, & from time to time bring or transmit to Us with the utmost 
Expedition full Accounts and Advice thereof, Hereby giving & 
granting to You Licence & Authority during your acting & continu- 
ing in the same Service to hoist & wear in Your said Boat A Reel 
Pendant with two white Cresses, and for your so doing this shall be 
your Warrant. 

r Given under our Hands in Council & the Lesser Seal of the said 
Province, at Philadelphia, the 3d of June, in the Twenty-first 
Y r ear of His Majestie's Reign, Annoqz Domini, 1748. 

" ANTHONY PALMER. 

Another of the same Tenor was Sign'd to John Maule, authoriz- 
ing him to wear an English Jack. 

The Brigantine Chesterfield, Captain Coatam, going to Jamaica, 
the Board thought proper to take this opportunity of obliging Cap- 
tain Coatam to take the remainder of the French Prisoners under a 
Flagg of Truce, & deliver them in some Port in the Island of His- 
paniola, and Captain Coatam appearing in Council, he agreed to 
take Eighteen. 

A Letter from Coll 0- Gragdon was read, purporting that he had 
communicated the Council's Orders to some of his Officers & their 
Men, & that they chearfully offer' d to meet the Prisoners at Ne- 
shaming Ferry & conduct them safe to Newtown. 

' Mr! Lawrence & Mr. Taylor inform' d the Board that at their re- 
commendation an Artillery Company was form/d & the Officers 
chosen on the Plan of the Association, & desired that their Return 
might be read & a Commission issue to Captain Sibbald to com- 
mand the Batteries. The Return was read £ a Commission order' d 
accordingly for Captain Sibbald, to be drawn by the Attorney Gen- 
eral. 



268 MINUTES OF THE 

At a Council held at Philadelphia, Friday 3d June, 1748. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Abraham Taylor, ~) 

Lawrence Growden, Thomas Hopkinson, v Esqrs. 

William Logan, ) 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The President reported the weak & defenceless Condition of the 
Town of New Castle, that they had but 4 (kins, little or no Pow- 
der or Ball, & pray'd that some Expedient might be falPn on to 
supply them with Cannon & necessary Amunition j & thereupon 
Mr. Hopkinson & Mr. Strettell were appointed a Committee to ap- 
ply to the Gentlemen Associators or others for Cannon, &c, for the 
use of the Fort at New Castle. 

Information was given by some Englishmen who were taken by 
the Enemie's' Privateers & put ashore, that there was an Enemy's 
privateer off of Cohansy, & that there were two others at the 
Capes. 

Order' d, That the keeper of the Powder House be sent for, & 
being come and examined as to the condition of the Powder House 
& the number of Men who had watch' d there, & how many were 
necessary to guard it as a watch, it was order' d by the Board that 
the Windows shou'd be stopp'd up, & that four or five Men shou'd 
be kept in Pay at 4s. |p Day for a Guard. 

The Board took again into consideration whether the Assembly 
shou'd be call'd, & after a long time spent therein, it was unani- 
mously agreed to call them to meet on Wednesday next, the 8th 
Instant, & Writts were accordingly Sign'd to the Sheriff's to Sum- 
mon the Representatives. 

A Petition of John Jones, Convicted for being concern'd with 
some others in Coining Mill'd Dollars, was read, praying he might 
be releas'd out of Jayl on his enlisting to serve his Majesty. The 
Petition was granted. Another of the same Tenor was read from 
Stephen Barnes his Associate & Granted. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Monday, 6th June, 1748. 

present : ! 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Samuel Hasell, Abraham Taylor, ") 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, v Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approv'd. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 269 

The Board taking into Consideration the many Inconveniences 
arising from the want of a Block house & Magazine at the Grand 
Battery, order'd the attendance of the Managers for the Associators 
to-morrow morning, to confer with them on this affair. 

Some Vessels having arriv'd safe from Sea, the Board consider'd 
whether the Emhargo shou'd be taken off, but Mr. Taylor, the Col- 
lector, saying that one of the Captains told him on delivering his 
Papers that he was chas'd for several hours by a Privateer Brig 
about 5 Leagues off of Cape May, & the further Consideration thereof 
is postpon'd till to-Morrow. 

Mr. James Read, Clerk of the Supream Court of Pennsylvania, 
& Clerk of the Court of Oyer & Terminer & General Goal Delivery, 
deliver' d into Council an Exemplification of the proceedings of a 
Court of Oyer & Terminer held at Philadelphia from the 23d to the 
28th May, by which it appears that one Alexander Urie of the said 
County of Philadelphia was convicted & sentenced to Death for the 
Murther of Arthur McGinins of the said County, &, that by order 
of the Court Execution of the said Sentence was respited for four- 
teen Days. No Report having as yet been made by the Judges of 
the Supreame Court, the Council order'd the Exemplification to lye 
upon the Table. 

The standing Committee appointed to confer with Captain Ballet 
are desir'd to press him to use all the Expedition possible in fitting 
out this Ship that the Vessels that are now ready to Sail may be 
no longer detained. 

Mr. Taylor & Mr. Hopkinson are appointed a Committee to draw 
a Message to the Assembly. 

Order'd, That the Secretary prepare an account of all Moneys 
disburs'd . & receiv'd on account of Indian Affairs during the 
Council's Administration. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, "Wednesday, 8th June, 1748. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Samuel Hasell, Abraham Taylor, "") 

Robert Strettell, Joseph Turner, v Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, ) 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

Lieutenant George Cotnam, of the Honoble. Lieutenant General 
Philips' Regiment of foot at Annapolis Royal, appear'd before the 
Board, & having produced His Majestic' s Letters authorizing Coll 0, 
Philips to raise Volunteers in any of the Provinces of North 
America to fill up the Companies of his Regiment to the numbers 
allow' d upon the Establishment, he had leave to -beat up for Volun- 
teers in any part of the Province. 



270 MINUTES OF THE 

The Committee for drawing the Message to tlie Assembly de- 
liver' d in their Draught, which was read the first time entirely 
thro' and then Paragraph by Paragraph, & after some alterations 
the Draught was approv'd. 

Mr. Hopkinson reported that he had procured an Order for 4 
Six-Pounders to be deliver'd to the Presid'- or his order for the use 
of the Town of N. Castle. The Board took further into Considera- 
tion the taking oif the Embargo, & resolv'd to take the sense of the 
Merchants this Evening, in order to come to a conclusion. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Thursday, 9th June, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Samuel Hasell, Abraham Taylor, ~\ 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, y Esqrs. 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, j 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The Message to the Assembly being transcrib'd fair was again 
read, & it was put to the Vote whether it shou'd be agreed to. It 
pass'd in the Affirmative, Mr. Shoemaker & Mr. Logan only dis- 
sentient. 

A Message from the President & Council to the Assembly. 
u Gentlemen : 

u The reason for calling You together so soon after your adjourn- 
ment will appear from the Depositions & Papers herewith laid be- 
foro You, and tho' You have hitherto refused to grant Money for 
the protection of the People or the Trade of this Province, yet as 
we think it our Duty, You .must excuse Us if in this time of gen- 
eral Calamity we again press You on that disagreeable Subject in 
hopes that the miserable Circumstances to which we are now 
reduc'd may at length prevail with You to provide a proper 
Remedy. 

" At the time of Your last Sitting our Port was actually block'd 
up by the Enemy's Privateers; they have since grown more nu- 
merous and have taken almost all our inward bound Vessels, using 
our Countrymen with great Barbarity. One of them, a large 
Spanish Privateer with 160 Men on board, came up the River as 
high as Elsenborough, where she came to an Anchor without being 
discovered to be an Enemy, & intended next morning to take a 
Ship then lying before New Castle & burn the Town, which they 
had certainly effected had not an Englishman swam on shore in 
the Night and alarmed the Inhabitants. 'Tis true most of t 
Privateers are now thought to be gone off with their Prizes, but 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 271 

'tis reasonable to suppose they will soon return for more, or that others, 
encouraged by the fame of their Success, will supply their Places. 

" During the Enemy's stay in the River they took a great num- 
ber of small Craft & thereby gained exact Intelligence of what 
pass'd among us ; and it is not unlikely but that among other things 
they had learn' t the Resolutions of your House, and had a Depend- 
ance that no Vessel of War would be fitted out against them by 
this Government, otherwise' they might have expected their Inso- 
lence & Cruelty would not have gone unpunished, it being an un- 
usual thing for Englishmen to bear tamely, & without resistance,, 
the Insults of so despicable an Enemy — Crews of Negroes, Mulat- 
toes, & the very Dregs of Mankind. 

" Soon after Your adjournment His Majestie's Sloop, the Otter, 
under the Command of Captain Ballet, arrived here; but not being 
in a Condition to proceed immediately on a Cruize, and being be- 
sides a Vessel of small force insufficient without an Assistant to 
attack such a number of Enemies, We have hitherto reap'd no ad- 
vantage from her arrival. She is now Careen' cl, & we hope will 
soon be fit for Service, to which End the Captain assures Us noth- 
ing in his Power shall be wanting. And we have dispatch'd an 
Express to Virginia in order to procure, if possible, the Hector Man- 
of-War to join her; But as the obtaining this Assistance, and its 
continuence if obtain'cl, are on many accounts uncertain, We have 
thought it absolutely necessary that a Ship of War shou'd be fitted 
out by this Province to be join'd with the Otter for the protection 
of our Trade, the Consideration whereof we now earnestly recom- 
mend to Your House ; and that You would accordingly furnish a 
sufficient Sum of Money, which we assure You shall be applyed 
faithfully to that purpose, and with the utmost frugality. You will 
herewith receive an Estimate of what we judge the Charge will 
amount to by the Month, which we shall endeavour to lesson as 
much as possible. 

" We find that it has been the opinion of Your House that the 
KeepiDg a Vessel constantly at our Capes to guard the Coast will 
be introductive of an Expence too heavy for the Province to bear, 
and too great a Burthen on the Inhabitants. But if our Port con- 
tinues block' d up; if not only our inward bound Vessels must be 
taken, but those in Port dare not venture out, whereby the perish- 
able Commodities with which they are laden spoil in the hands of 
the Merchants ; if those Colonies that us'd to take off great part of 
our produce are discouraged from sending their Vessels hither, & 
endeavour to be furnish' d, as they maybe, with the same Commodi- 
ties at a safer. Port ; if by these means our Trade diminishes, being 
turn'd into another Channel, our Produce sinks in value, & every 
necessary Commodity from abroad is enhanc'd in Price ; if thro' the 
Decay of Business our Merchants fail, our Tradesmen want Employ- 
ment, our Farmers are reduced to Poverty, our Inhabitants remove, 



272 



MINUTES OF THE 



and our Lands and Houses fall far below their present worth, all 
natural Consequences of an obstructed Navigation, We beg You 
would consider whether these will not prove Burthens vastly heavier, 
and to which that of Keeping a Vessel to protect our Trade bears 
no proportion. We having good Grounds to assure You that the 
loss sustained within one week only amounts to a much larger Sum 
than would be necessary to be expended in guarding our Coast for 
several Years. We shall only add that if there shou'd not be 
Money enough at present in the Treasury, a sufficient Sum might 
readily be raised by way of Loan on the Credit of a Vote of Your 
House. 

"ANTHONY PALMER. 
"June 9th, 1748/' 

The Estimates of the Charge attending the Equipment of a Col- 
ony Vessel for the protection of Trade was read & approv'd : 

An 'Estimate of the Charge attending the Equipment of a Colony 
Vessel for the protection of our Trade. &c : 

The Vessel to be hired with her Ordnance, Stores, Arms, & 



Amunition, about £300 ^ Month 

Giving the Owners Security to make 

good all Damages hy Engagement, or if lost. 
120 Men, Commander & Officers in- 
cluded, Wages, viz. : 

Commander ^ Month - 

Lieutenant - - 

2d Lieutenant - 

Master __'-_-. 

Mates — 2, @ £6 10s. each - 

Gunner 

Surgeon 

Surgeon's Mate 

Carpenter - 

Carpenter's Mate 

Quarter Masters — 2, @ £5 5s. ea. - 

60 Able Seamen @ £5 

47 Landsmen @ £3 10s. 

Victualling Bill for 120 Men ^ Month, - 



Medicine Chest for the Cruize, 
Stores for Officers for the Cruize, 
Ditto for the Company for the Cruize, 



£300 



£13 10 




10 




8 




8 




13 




6 10 




6 10 




5 10 




6 10 




5 10 




10 10 




300 




164 10 






£558 
130 


. 



£988 

£85 
45 
55 

£185 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 273 

The Consideration for smart Money, usually paid by His Majesty 
& private Ships of War to those who are maimed or wounded in 
Engagements with the Enemy, ought to be estimated & are allowed 
in this Port f Articles : 

For Loss of a Leg or Arm - £150 

For Loss of an Eye - 90 

For Loss of a joint »'--.-, SO 

Mr. Ogle's Letter was read & order'd to be enter'd: 

"Annapolis, 31st May, 1748. 
"Sir: 

" Our Assembly has sow been sitting for three Weeks, and the 
ILower House came to a Resolution sometime ago not to make any 
allowance for the Indians. This I deferred giving You an Account 
of as the G-entlemen of the Council, out of their great Inclination 
to promote this Service, flatter' d themselves that We might have 
been able to induee them to change their Sentiments ; But as we 
now begin to despair of doing any thing to the purpose, I give You 
this Notice, very much to my mortification, having done every thing 
in my power to have answer' d your reasonable Expectations. I am, 
a S r '' Your most obedient humble Servant, 

"SAM.. OGLE. 
"Anthony Palmer, Esq." 

A Message from the House by two Members that the Represen- 
tatives were met according to Summons & ready to receive what the 
Council has to lay before them. They were told by the President 
that he wou'd send a Message in the Afternoon. 

Abraham Wiltbank, Commander of one of the Government Pilot 
Boats, bringing advice that he had been for a Day or two off of the 
Capes & met with no Enemie's Vessels—the Embargo was taken 
off 



At a Council held at Philadadelpkia, Friday, 10th June. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALME&, Esq., President 
Samuel Hasell, Joseph Turner, "J 

Abraham Taylor, Thomas Hopkinson, I Esqrs. , 

Robert Strettell, William Logan, j 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

Captain Ballet applied to the Board for an Assistant, setting 
forth that he shou'd not be of sufficient force to protect the Trade if 
Capt D - Masterson shou'd not be in a Condition to come to his as- 
sistance. The Captain was told there was now a Message before 
VOL. v. — 18, 



274 MINUTES OF THE 

the Assembly on this Subject, to which they had not yet gives 
their answer. 

The Secretary informed the Board that the present Surveyor 
General, Mr. William Parsons, finding his Health decline, desir'd 
leave to resign his Office, & Mr. Nicholas Scull being thought the 
properest Person to succeed him, his Commission was ordered to be 
made out, 

A Petition from Alexander Ure, under Sentence of Death for 
Murther, was read, praying a Reprieve for twelve Months, 

The Council not having yet received the Report of the Judges 
the Consideration thereof is postpon'd. 

The Secretary is ordered to remind the Speaker of the several 
Orders issued by the Council for the safety of the Province & City,, 
and of the Expence that will accrue thereon, & to know of him if it 
be necessary to send a particular Message to the House oa this Sub- 
ject. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Saturday, 11th June, 174$. 
present: 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Samuel Hasell, Abraham Taylor, \ 

Robert Strettell 7 Thomas Hopkinson, ; f- Esqrs*. 

William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approv'd. 

A written Message from the Assembly was deliver' d by two Mem- 
bers to the President before the Board met, who at the same time 
said they were directed to inform the Council that the House in- 
clin'd to adjourn to the time of their last adjournment, if there wag* 
no further Business to lay before them.. The President told them 
they shou'd receive an answer when the Council met. 

The Message was read in these words : 

A Message t& the President & Council from the Assembly, 
" May it please the President & Council : 

" That we refused to- grant Money in the manner You have some- 
times thought proper to apply for it is very true, & yet we think the 
Charge You are pleas'd to make against us in your last Message, of 
our having ' hitherto refus'd to grant Money for the protection of 
the People and the Trade of this Province/ is too generally ex- 
pressed. That Government ought to he honourably supported, & 
that we ought to contribute towards it proportionally to our Cir- 
cumstances, have been both our Sentiments & Practice; And the 
1 protection of the People & the Trade of the Province/ we look 
upon as principal Parts of the Duty of those by whom this Support 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 275 

h received; And wherever those in whose Hands the Executive 
Powers of Government have been or now are in discharge of what 
they conceive to be their Duty, are or shall on any Emergency be 
put to an Expence for the Good of the Province which the Assem- 
blies have or hereafter shall judge reasonable, as we remember no 
Instances past, so we believe not any such will hereafter happen 
wherein a suitable Provision will not be made in the support of 
Government. 

" We would not from hence be understood to encourage your put- 
ling the Province to any extraordinary Expence at this time, and 
particularly in hiring and fitting out a Ship of War, which we think 
unnecessary, & which, from the Estimate You were pleased to send 
us, amounts to near £1,000 ^jJ Month, besides the Risque and Re- 
pairs of the Vessel ; a Burthen we now think, as formerly we have 
thought, too heavy for the Province to bear. 

a The answer You are pleas'd to give to this objection consists 
only in pointing out the Consequences You are pleas'd to suppose 
may attend the blocking up our Ports, &o. But in the Judgment 
You form on this Occasion you seem to consider the Province in- 
dependent • as neither intitled to nor having reason to expect any 
other Protection or Defence but such as it is able to provide for itself. 
If this were really the Case, the Dangers You apprehend might be 
better grounded— it being evident that were the whole Province to 
exert themselves to the utmost of their abilities, it would not be suf- 
ficient to protect them against such a force as might possibly come 
against them. 

" The late Attempts appear by the Depositions you were pleas'd 
to lay before us, to have been made by three Privateers who did not 
come altogether, And if an additional Ship of War was necessary 
in that Case, is it not possible that double the number of Privateers 
may come, and will not by the same reasoning a double number of 
Ships of War be necessary ? Is the Province able to bear such an 
Expence ? Or is it reasonable to suppose that when by the favour 
of the Crown one Vessel is station' d among Us, and the assistance 
of another enjoin'd if it shall become necessary, that it was not in- 
tended to relieve the Province from a Burden it was judged unfit to 
bear ? Can it be prudent to strain our Circumstances and load the 
Province with so heavy an Expence after the Provision thus made 
for us ? And might not the making such farther Provision deprive 
the Province of the Vessel which by the Lenity of the Government 
is already provided for guarding our Coast & protecting our Trade 
free from any Expence to us 1 

u In times of War it is not to be expected but that losses will 
happen ; the Channel of England we suppose hath been as well 
guarded of late as ever, and yet as we are informed not less than 5 
out of 6 Vessels which Sailed from this Port within the space of 15 
Months last past have been taken, & but one of them on our Coast. 



276 MINUTES OF THE 

The Estimate You have been pleased to make of the Losses whicli 
lately happen'd is in our opinion much too large. Two of those 
Vessels (one of which was the most valuable of those lately taken), 
were taken at a distance from our Capes, and this might have been 
the Case if a Ship of War had been Cruizing there. 

u On the whole, as You are pleased to inform us that most of the 
Privateer (we suppose all) are gone off, that the Ship of War in our 
Port will soon be fit for Service, and that You have dispatch'd an 
Express to Virginia in order to procure the Hector Man-of-War to 
join her, if the Commander of that Ship be, as we are told he is, 
instructed to assist the Otter when it is necessary, there is no reason 
to doubt but he will Comply with his Instructions, and this on the 
present occasion is all that appears to us necessary. And we must, 
therefore, desire to be excused when we declare that we cannot con- 
curr in opinion with You that it is at this time necessary a Ship of 
War shou'd be fitted out by this Province. 

" Sign'd by Order of the House. 

f* JOHN KINSEY, Speaker. 

"4th Mon. 11th, 1748." 

While the Message was reading a second Message was deliver'd 
by two Members from the Assembly that the Country Members 
were impatient to be gone, & desir'd to have the Council's answer 
as soon as possible. 

A Member of Council coming in the Message was order' d to be 
read again, but before this cou'd be done two Members came with 
a third Message, that the House having for some time finished all 
their business & determin'd to adjourn, they were impatient for the 
Council's answer. They were told that the Message was so lately 
deliver'd that the Board had not time to consider it, to which one of 
the Members reply'd they might have had it sooner if the Council 
had sat sooner. 

The Board conceiving themselves ill used by these frequent Mess- 
ages coming so quick after one another, & that the House was not 
in temper to stay till a proper answer cou'd be made to their Mess- 
age, which appear" d at first Sight exceeding faulty & full of false 
reasoning, concluded to send the Secretary to tell them that after 
what the House had said in their Message, they think it will be to 
no purpose to say any thing further to them. 

The Secretary inform'd the Board that he had deliver'd to the 
Speaker what was given him in Charge yesterday, & he frankly de- 
clar'd that there was no manner of occasion for a Message with 
respect to Expences already accrued or that shou'd accrue on the 
Orders the Council judg'd necessary to give for the Publick Safety. 

Mr. Kinsey as Chief Justice waited on the Council & related the 
proceedings of the Court of Oyer & Terminer, whereby it appear'd 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 277 

that Alexander Ure liv'd in an illegal manner with another Man's 
Wife, & the People frequently threw Stones on his House top, & 
that in the night time that in particular stones were thrown by 
McGinnis or his Company that very Night, & that Ure in a passion 
having his Gun loaded with a Ball, fir'd at McGinnis in the Dark, 
& lodg'd the Ball in his Neck, so that he dyed immediately. 

In regard there was but a slender Board it was thought proper to 
postpone the consideration of Ure's Petition till another time. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia the 14th June, 174&. 

present : 
The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ~\ 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, V Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The Board taking into consideration the last written Message 
from the Assembly, and the repeated importunate verbal Messages 
following it, that the House was determined immediately to adjourn 
if the Board had no other Business to lay before .them, &c, and 
their adjourning accordingly before the Board had an opportunity 
of reading, considering, & replying to the said written Message, 
unanimously 

Resolved, That it was never understood in this Province that the 
Salaries voted to Governors for their Support were intended to be laid 
out in protecting & Defending the People & Trade of the Province, 
otherwise those Salaries ought to have been much larger in time of 
War than in time of Peace, which has not been the Case ; and as the 
Council receive no such Salaries tho' they bear an Equal share of 
all Taxes in proportion to their Estates, it is unreasonable to ex- 
pect they should if they were able advance out of their private 
Fortunes such Sums of Money as may be requisite on any emer- 
gency to be expended for the Publick Safety, upon no better Secu- 
rity than the belief of the present Assembly that future Assemblies, 
if they shall judge it reasonable, will probably repay them. 

Resolved, That there is no probability that others will be induced 
to advance their Money to the Government for publick Service on 
so uncertain, obscure, and evasive a declaration as is contain' d in the 
last Message of the Assembly, their being repaid again depending 
on the Good will and pleasure of the House, to be obtain' d by hum- 
ble petitioning and by submissive personal Application to the Mem- 
bers, and on the Judgment the House may happen to form of the 
reasonableness of the undertaking in which the Money was ex- 
pended, especially when it is consider' d that it is the known opinion 



278 MINUTES OF THE 

of the People calPd Quakers (of whom the Assembly chiefly con- 
sists), that all warlike preparations for defence are so far from being 
advantageous to the Publick that they have a direct contrary ten- 
dency (from whence it may be reasonably supposed such an 
Assembly are unfavorable as well as incompetent Judges of the 
Expediency of any military undertakings whatever), & that far 
from offering to repay, the House has never so much as thank' d 
those that by private Subscriptions fitted out a Vessel the last Year 
to scour our Coast; but instead thereof publickly disapproved their 
Conduct in a late formal Message to this Board. 

Resolved, That the Assembly have therefore at this time, by the 
declaration made in their last Message, done nothing for His Ma- 
jesty's Service or for the Security of the People & Trade of this 
Province, for which Ends they were call'd together. 

Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Board that the Sum of 
Three thousand, or at most four thousand Pounds, including all 
Charges, would have been sufficient, according to the Estimate laid 
before the Assembly, for equipping & maintaining a Vessel of War 
to Cruise the remaining Summer Months as an Asistant to the 
Otter Sloop, & that such a Sum could by no means have been a 
Burthen too great for this Province to bear, might have been of the 
greatest Service to the Publick, & paid or rais'd in a manner that 
would not have been felt by the Inhabitants; and that if one single 
Ship should be taken for want of it, the loss might be many times 
greater than such Expence, besides enriching & strengthening our 
Enemies. 

Resolved, That the reason given in the Assembly's Message why 
no Provision at all shou'd be made for our Defence, viz. : " Be- 
cause, were the whole Province to exert their utmost abilities it 
would not be sufficient to protect them against such a force as might 
possibly come against them, &c./ ; is evasive & trifling, and might 
equally prove the inexpediency & folly of making any preparations 
for defence in any Country in the world, since the strength of no 
one Nation is equal to a force that may possibly be brought against 
it. But because we are not able to provide against the greatest 
possible force, that therefore we should make no Provisions at all 
for our protection, is, in the opinion of this Board, a most extraor- 
dinary Conclusion. 

Resolved, That the fact addue'd in the Assembly's Message to 
prove the inexpediency or rather the mischievious Consequence of 
guarding any Coast, and that an unguarded Coast is the safest, viz., 
"Because out of our five London Vessels lately taken four were 
taken in the well-guarded Channel of England, and only one in our 
unguarded Coast, &.C.," is not fairly stated, nor the whole truth 
honestly related, it being well known that most of those taken in 
the Channel sail'd from hence in the Winter, when the Privateers 
of the Enemy cannot for the cold abide on onr Coast, which there- 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 279 

fore at such a time needs do Guard; that the Richa with several 
other Vessels which SaiPd from hence this Summer clearly were 
taken on our Coast for want of a Guard; that two of those taken 
In the Channel were retaken & sent into England before they 
reach'd the Enemie's Ports, which evidently shews the guarded 
Coast is the most advantageous, since nothing of all they took on 
our Coast has been retaken from them by any Guardship of ours ? 
& one half of what was taken in the Channel was recovered * be- 
sides that the Privateer which took on the British Coast of the two 
the Enemy carried off, was herself taken by an English Man-of-War, 
which must have diseourag'd & weaken' d the Enemy in some degree, 
and thereby tended to the greatest Security of that Coast for the 
future ; while the continual losses on our Coast, without resistance 
or reprisal, being so much clear gain to the Enemy, must not only 
encourage them to come again but enable them to come with greater 
force. 

Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Board, the fitting out a 
Ship-of-War to act in conjunction with the Otter Sloop, which we 
have been lately favoured with by the Crown for the protection of 
our Trade, would not probably have any tendency to the depriving 
us of that Vessel, no such effect having ever been observ'd in the 
neighbouring Colonies of New England, New York, Virginia, South 
Carolina, or the West India Islands, which have almost all at times 
found it necessary, notwithstanding the Guardships stationed among 
them, to fit out Vessels of War to act in conjunction with those 
Guardships, or independant of them as Circumstances required; & 
they have been found very serviceable, being immediately under the 
Command of their respective Governments, &, obliged to Cruize 
when & where those Governments thought fit to order, which the 
King's Ships are not; And when any further assistance from the 
Crown has been asked it has always been judg'd of Use to shew 
that the Colony requesting such assistance is not backward, but has 
already done or is willing to do a^l in its own Power, which was 
never yet observed to occasion the withholding such Assistance or 
the withdrawing what had beea before granted. 

Resolved, That when the Assembly is called by the Governor or 
"by the President & Council to consult on Matters of the highest 
Importance His Majesty's Service and the Safety of the People, 
their determining hastily to adjourn, without giving time for an 
^explanation of what might be misunderstood, or for producing any 
further reasons in support of what is proposed to them, or for any 
answer that might clearly obviate their objections (as hath been 
often practised by the Assemblies of this Province) when a thorough 
discussion of the Point by calm & temperate Debates or Messages, 
might bring both Parts of the Government to be of the same mind, 
is indecent & improper, inconsistent with the Nature of good Gov- 
vernment, & may in its Consequences be very injurious to the 



280 MINUTES OF THE 

King's Service, & equally prejudicial to the People whom they 
represent. 

The Express sent to Yirgmia return' d this , Day & brought the 
following Letter : 

"June 4th, 1748. 
"Sir: 

" This morning about ten o'Clock I received Your Letter with 
the inclosed Affidavits ; but before I set down to answer it I sent an 
Express to Captain Norbury, who Commands His Majesty's Ship 
the Loo, and is at present upon this Station, with a Letter giving 
Mm an account of the purport of yours, but I fear he is gone to- 
Sea, for he inform' d me yesterday he would sail to-Day, if not I 
am perswaded by what I have wrote he will take a Cruize your 
way, for he is a very alert k diligsnt Officer. He brought in three 
Days ago two Privateers, one from the Havanna, with 12 Guns, 16 
Swivels, k 140 Men, the other from S t- Augustine, with 4 G-uns, 
some Swivels, & 40 Men j during his Cruize we were alarm'd with 
a Spanish Privateer being got into our Bay, nor are our fears over, 
iho' he promises to make a clear Stage ; he has taken the largest 
Prize to Sea with him. 

" Our Fleet is not yet arrived, nor had we any Certainty of their 
Sailing till yours came to hand ; however, I sent the inclosed for 
Captain Masterson, with that for the Purser of the Loo to Hamp- 
ton, seeing the former may be every Day expected. 

u I am become a very bad scribe, therefore I hope you'll eseuse 
all blunders, k beleive that I am with great respect, 

" Sir, Your most obedient humble Servant, 

« will; gooch. 

" The Honoble. Anthony Palmer, Esqr " 

A Petition was read of William Clark, praying he may be ap- 
pointed to succeed Mr. Morgan as Measure Sealer. 
Order' 'd to lye upon the Table. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Thursday I6th, June, 1748. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., Presid u 
Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, "1 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, J- Esqrs, 

William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The Board resum'd the Consideration of Alexander Ure's Peti- 
tion, & being inclinable to reprieve him till the Governor's arrival, 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 281 

the Secretary was order' d to consult the Attorney General on 
the words of the Royal Charter relating to Persons found guilty of 
Murder. 

Mr. Burcji appear' d before the Council & Petition 'd that the 
Board wou'd release him from his Contract to carry 35 french Pris- 
oners to Leoganne for £32, alledging he was apprehensive the 
French wou'd take reprisals for some of their Flaggs of Truce that 
had lately been seized in America ; & likewise that the number 
being too great they might rise & force him to carry them directly 
to Hispaniola, which would be detrimental to him, since he was 
oblig'd to touch at Burmudas and leave some goods there. After a 
long debate it was insisted on by the Board that he shou'd carry 18 
Prisoners for £18, & the following Letter was wrote to the French 
Governor at Hispaniola : 

"Philada., June, 16th 1748. 
" Sir : 

" A number of Prisoners brought in here by our Privateers were 
likely to continue a long time for want of vessels to carry them 
off had I not, in compassion for them, laid my Commands on Mr. 
Burch, one of the Owners of two Sloops bound to Jamaica (but 
under a Contract to touch at the Island of Bermudas in order to 
deliver there a few Goods) & oblig'd him to carry the Prisoners to 
Leoganne & deliver them to your order. Mr. Burch has made 
abundance of objections, & is really possess' d of fear least the 
honour due to the Flagg should not be paid to him, as he has a 
Jamaica Cargo on board ', but I have assured him that from the 
Character Your Excellency bears he will run no risque of this kind, 
especially since I do hereby Certify that he is press' d by me into the 
Service. Capt n - Brownlow, in one of the said Sloops call'd the Royal 
Ranger, waits on Your Excellency with this Letter, & I most 
heartily recommend him as well as Mr. Burch to your favor, 
not doubting that every thing will be made agreeable to them, 

" I am, &c, 

"ANTHONY PALMER. 

" His Excellency Mons r - De Chastenoy, Gov r< at Petit Goave." 

The following Pass was Signed by the President : 
" Philada., ss. 
"By the Honourable ANTHONY PALMER, Esq., President of 

the Province of Pennsylvania, & the Government of the Lower 

Counties of New Castle, Kent, & Susex on Delaware : To all to 

whom these Presents shall come Greeting : 

" Whereas, I have authorized & appointed as I do by these Pre- 
sents authorise & appoint Brownlow, Commander of the 

Sloop Royal Ranger, to wear & go under a Flag of Truce from this 



282 MINUTES OF THE 

Port of Philadelphia to Leaganne, or to any other Port in the 
Island of Hispaniolia, in order to carry Nine Prisoners of War, 
Subjects of His Most Christain Majesty. 

" These are, therefore, requiring all & singular whom it may con- 
cern, to suffer the said Captain Brownlow with his said Sloop, 
Crew, & Passengers to pass freely and quickly without any Let, 
hinderance, or Molestation to the aforesaid Island of Hispaniolia, & 
from thence to the Island of Jamaica. Given under my Hand & 
Seal-at-Arms at Philadelphia aforesaid, this 22d day of May, in the 
Twenty-first Year of the Reign of His Majesty King George the 
Second, Annoqz Domini, 1748. 

" ANTHONY PALMER." 

A Letter & Pass of the same Tenor with the above was prepaid 
for Captain Coatam, to Cape Francois. 

Captain Coatam was sent for & told that the Council understood 
he only intended to carry 18 French Prisoners, but it was their 
Express Order that he shou'd carry 30. The Captain said he would 
acquaint the Owners with their Honour's Commands. 

Captain Ballet inform'd the Council that he cou'd not Sail for 
want of Men, & shou'd therefore be put under the disagreeable 
necessity of pressing if no other Method cou'd be found to furnish 
him with his Compliment. 

It is the opinion of the Board that the best way to avoid the 
Inconveniences of pressing Men, wou'd be to give a Bounty to as 
many Seamen as wou'd voluntarily enter on board, but as the 
A^embly has made no Provision for the Payment of such Bounty, 
the Board have it not in their power to assist the Captain as they 
are desir'd ; the Secretary may, however, apprise Mr. Kinsey of 
this matter, & if he thinks this method reasonable & will advance 
the Money, the Board will give an Order for it upon him as 
Trustee, as they are inform'd there is no Money in the Treasury, in 
which may be likewise included the Sum expended for Supernu- 
merary workmen employ'd in Careening y e Otter. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Friday, 17th June, 1748. 

PRESENT I 



} 



Samuel Hasell, William Till, 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, J-Esqrs. 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 
Captain Thomas Jenkins arriving this Afternoon, after having 
been taken by a Spanish Privateer at the Capes, the Secretary took 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 283 

his Examination, which he depos'd before Mr. Turner in these 
words : 

" Thomas Jenkins, Captain of the Sloop Industry, being sworn 
on the Evangelists of Almighty God, deposeth & saith, that he 
sail'd from Boston in the said Sloop Industry bound to Philadel- 
phia, & on Wednesday the 15th Instant about Eleven a' clock in the 
morning, being about five Miles from Cape May, he was taken by 
a Spanish Privateer from the Havannah commanded by Don Joseph 
Hannoteau, mounted with six Carriage Guns & about ten swivels, 
having on board about forty Men to the best of this Deponent's 
Judgment. And this Deponent further saith, that there were 
then in Sight two Ships, three Brigantines, & one Sloop, which he 
verily believes to be Enemies Vessels, as the said Sloop by which 
he was taken came from amongst the said Vessels & return'd to 
them ) and that one of the said Ships is a large Ship of upwards of 
Thirty Guns & has Top Lights & Poop Lanthorns ; That he was 
plundtr'd of every thing that was valuable, & then they gave him 
his Vessel and set him at Liberty. This Deponent further saith, 
that he saw one of the Brigantines fire upon a Pilot Boat that was 
about three Miles to the Eastward of this Sloop, & believes she was 
likewise taken as he saw nothing of her afterwards. 

"THOMAS JENKINS. 
" Sworn this 17th June, 1748, before me, 

"JO. TURNER." 

On considering this Deposition the Members present concluded 
to send an Express to Gov r> Gooch, with the following Letter : 

"Philadelphia, 17th June, 1748. 
"Sir: 

" I have the honour to acknowledge the Receipt of Yours in 
answer to the Council's Letter, by the Express. It was exceeding 
kind in Your Excellency to dispatch a Messenger so soon to Cap- 
tain Norbury, & we hope your Letter reach' d him before he went to 
Sea. 

u This afternoon arrived here one Captain Jenkins, who was taken 
off our Capes, & having made Oath to what pass'd, the Council 
think the Contents of his Deposition to be of so much Consequence 
that they have immediately dispatched a Messenger to apprize Your 
Excellency thereof, that You may give notice to the Vessels which 
are ready to Sail, & likewise may make Captain Masterson ac- 
quainted with the arrival of this fresh Set of Enemies' Privateers. 
By the Accounts of several Persons who have seen Don Pedro's 
Ship at the Havanna, the great Ship mention'd in Jenkins' Deposi- 
tion must be the same, & the others his Consorts. 

" The Council desire me as Eldest Member, in the absence of the 



284 MINUTES OF THE 

President, to assure Your Excellency of their Respects, in which I 
most heartily join with them, being very truly, 

" Your Excellency's most obedient humb. Servant, 

"THOMAS LAWRENCE. 
"Gov'-Gooch." 

Another of the same Tenor was sent by Express to Governor 
Clinton, requesting him to impart the advice to Governor Shirley 
by the Post, who wou'd be just setting out for Boston on the arrival 
of the Express at New York. 



At a Council held at Philada., Saturday 18th June, 1748. 

present : 
The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 



Samuel Hasell, William Till, ""] 

Abraham TfiTTlnr "RrvViorf Sfrotfoll 



)>Esqrs. 



Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, 

William Logan, j 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

Captain Clymer, in a Sloop bound here from Carolina, having 
been Chased by a Brigantine in Company with a large Ship, which 
he believ'd to be Don Pedro, & left his Vessel at Anchor about 18 
Miles to the Northward of Cape May, his Examination was order' d 
to be taken by the Secretary. On this further Intelligence Captain 
Ballett came into Council, & desir'd the Board wou'd give their 
advice whether, as the Enemy's force was so strong at the Capes, 
it wou'd be prudent in him to venture down with the Convoy till 
he shou'd receive some tidings from the Loo or the Hector, & every 
one present thought it not safe either for the Convoy or the City 
that the Captain shou'd go down without some more perfect advices, 
which were hourly expected by the Intelligence Boats in the Employ 
of the Province. 

Coll 0- Taylor, under whose Command the Batteries were put for 
the present, produced a Set of Instructions to Mr. John Sibbald, 
commissionated to be Captain of the Fort, which were read & ap- 
prov'd. 

The following Paper was presented by Mr. Weiser in Council. 

" MEMORANDUM taken the 13th June, 1748. 

" Last Night arrived at my House Ganataraykon, Sogogockiather, 
Achnoara, Kattake, & Sanagaranet, sent by Shikalamy to inform 

me that a Message from the Six Nations (in the Cajucka ) 

to the following purport. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 285 

" Brethren & Cousins, You that live on Sasquehanna' River & 
elsewhere : 

" We let You know that our Brethren, the English, have sent a 
Message to us to inform us that the French had come to live on this 
side the Lake, & threaten destruction to the Six Nations as well as 
to the English, & that, therefore, it was requisite our Nation in 
Concert with the others shou'd take up the English Hatchet and 
exert themselves against the French. To encourage us, therefore, 
they gave a large Belt of Wampum made in the shape of a Hatchet, 
and told us further that the English cried out for help, having suf- 
fer' d much by the French. So far the English Message. 

" Whilst the Indians were in Council to think on an Answer the 
English Messengers were very kind, & made Presents of Hatchets 
& other things to the Women & Children. 

" The Council of Cajucka made answer — ' Brethren, the English : 
We are surpris'd at what You say. How is it possible that you 
cou'd be beat before you fought ? You hitherto sat still & did 
nothing but use all the Arts possible to bring us into the War, and 
then, no doubt, you'd be easy enough ) but we once more must re- 
turn your Hatchet to You, & desire you to fight like Men. You 
are very numerous, and if in Case we shou'd see that the French 
wou'd be too many for You, we will assist You \ but never before 
You fight like Men.' The Indians return'd the Belt. Upon 
which the Messenger said that he must acquaint them that their 
Brethren, the English, wou'd for the future look upon the Indians 
to be their Enemies & in the French Interest, and the English wou'd 
use them accordingly. Upon which the English answered Yoh, do 
so.' After some pause the English Messenger offer' d the Indians a 
dram, & gave them a large Cask ) but the Indians wou'd not taste 
it, & return'd it; and said: 'Brethren, We have drunk too much of 
Your Rum already, which has occasion' d our Destruction ; we will, 
therefore, for the future beware of it.' The Indians also order' d 
the Women & Children to return every thing they had receiv'd as 
Presents from the said Messenger, which was accordingly done. 

"The remainder of the Indian Message is as follows, viz : 'Breth- 
ren & Cousins that live on Sasquehanna River : We send You this 
String of Wampum, and desire you to have your Ears open & be 
on Your Gruard ; we also desire You will with all speed carry this 
our Message from Town to Town until it arrives at Schohonyady. 
This was accordingly done — the said Message came to Shamokin on 
the 9th Instant, and the Indians met in Shikalamy's House. It 
was delivered by a Delaware Indian that lives on Wayamuck or 
Seahantowany. The Indians on Shamokin dispatch'd it immedi- 
ately to Scohonihady aforesaid, tho' the Sun was just down. 

" Shikalamy is sick & like to loose his Eye sight, but said in 
Council that either some of the Indian or English Messengers must 
have falsified the Message, for that he could not believe it, & 



286 MINUTES OF THE 

would, therefore, dispatch two of his Sons with two other Indians to 
let Tharughiawagon know of it, who wou'd. soon inform the Indians 
of the truth of the Matter. I made no other answer, hut told the 
Young People I was of their Father's opinion entirely, & wou'd 
immediately set out for Philadelphia, and it was no more than for 
the Council of Philad^ to write to the Governor of New York to 
enquire whether the above Message was his own or not, & the Truth 
wou'd soon come out. 

"CONftADWMSER." 

Adjourn'd to 4 o'Clock in the Afternoon to consider the above, 
& Conrad Weiser is order'd to attend. 



P. M. 

PRESENT : 

The same Members as in the forenoon. 

Mr. Weiser's Paper was again read, & on mature Consideration 
thereof a Letter to Govern'or Clinton was drawn up in these words, 
& the President requested to Sign it & send it by Express : 
" Sir— 

" The inclos'd Paper which was this Day deliver'd by Mr. Weiser 
to the Council is deem'd of the last Consequence. If your Messen- 
gers really expressed themselves in the manner related by the Cay- 
juckers, and the Indians think they had Your Excellency's Orders 
for such Expressions, it is not to be doubted but they will be ex- 
tremely cautious & watchful of the English behaviour, & perhaps 
they may think it necessary to advertize the French Governor of 
this proceeding, & to bespeak his Friendship & Assistance in case 
the English be as good as their words, and what Change of Coun- 
cils & Opinions may be brought about among the Indians by such 
a measure cannot be foreseen. We are certain that 750 Indians, 
all Inhabitants on the Borders of Virginia, Maryland, & this Pro- 
vince, met a Messenger sent by this Government to Ohio but the 
last Month, & declar'd that they and as many more were heartily 
for his Majestie's Subjects against the French at Canada, & waited 
only the Message from this Province to point out to them in what 
manner they cou'd do the most Service for the King's Interest. 
They were presented with Goods amounting to above the Value of 
Two hundred Pounds, and that only as an earnest of a much larger 
Present now ready to be sent to them by our Interpreter, Mr. Wei- 
ser. It is likewise certain that Jealousies are already rais'd in the 
minds of Indians who are known to be Friends of the English by 
this last Message, and shou'd they encreasc, we judge it will be ex- 
ceedingly difficult to quiet their fears, which perhaps wou'd not be 
of so great moment if it was not known that Indian Fears have as 






PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 287 

bad consequences as if they were in actual War. They are at least 
thereby put upon consulting & siding with every body that may 
strengthen them against those People of whom they are afraid. 
May not this proceedure, if real, throw them into the Measures of 
the French Governor, and if the Messengers did use such Expres- 
sions & were not authorized to do so, will it not become absolutely 
necessary to set the Indians right? if they were authorized to de- 
clare War (for this is little else), shou'd not the Governments to 
the Southward of New York be duly apprized of this Step that 
they may be prepar'd ? If Your Excellency will be pleas'd to fur- 
nish the Council with Your Instructions to the Persons sent to the 
Six Nations, & with the relation they gave to Your Excellency of 
what pass'd between the Six Nations & them, the Board from thence 
may be enabled to give a proper answer to the Indians at Shamokm 
& the other Tribes that Live on & near the Borders of this Pro- 
vince. 

" This Board has a high Sense of your Excellency's regard for 
every thing that can conduce to preserve the Friendship of the In- 
dians or remove ill grounded Jealousies, & therefore write with the 
utmost freedom, sending a special Messenger that You and Your 
Council may be immediately inform' d of this important piece of 
Intelligence, & that the Sentiments of Your Excellency may be 
convey'd to Us, in order to regulate our Conduct in an Affair of so 
much Consequence to the Lives of His Majestie's Subjects dwelling 
in all the Provinces of North America. 

a Your Excellency will be pleas'd to observe the Message*" comes 
only from the Cajuckers, one of the Six Nations; but notwithstand- 
ing this Singularity in the Message, it may be in consequence of a 
general Resolve of the Council at Onondago, for as this Cajucka 
Nation claims property in the Lands & authority over the Indians 
seated on the Waters of Sasquehanna, they think all publick orders 
shou'd be imparted by them to these Tribes. 

" The Indians wait at Mr. Weiser's for his Report, and he is de- 
tain'd in Town till Your Excellency's answer by the return of the 
Express shall arrive. 

" I am Your Excell sy ' s - most obed f ' Servant, 

"ANTHONY PALMER, 

" Philada., 18th June, 1748. 
" His Excell cy - Gov 1- - Clinton/ 7 

Mr. Croghan presented to the Board a Narrative of his proceed- 
ings at Ohio, with his account of Expenees, which was read : 

" Ohio, April 28% 1748, 
" Brothers of the Six Nations s 
" I am sent here by the Honourable the President & Council of 



288 MINUTES OF THE 

Philadelphia to return You thanks for the French Seulp You sent 
down last Spring as a token of your engaging in the War against 
the French, your & our common Enemy, and to acquaint You that 
their Honours have provided a large Present of Goods for all their 
Brethren that are Settled in and about Ohio j & they have sent 
You by me this Present of Powder, Lead, Vermillion, Knives, & 
Flints, to supply You to kill Meat for your Families till the rest 
of the Goods can be brought up, which are to be brought by Con- 
rad Weiser, Esq r> ' and will be here at your Towns by the first of 
August next. In token whereof, I present you this Belt of Wam- 
pum." 

Gave a Belt of Wampum. 
u Brothers of the Six Nations : 

"I am order'd to acquaint you that your Brothers having taken 
much to heart the many abuses you have received by strong Liquors 
being brought up amongst you, such as inflaming your Blood and 
I endangering many of your Lives, &c a> ' have issued a Proclamation 
strictly forbidding all. Traders carrying any strong Liquors to 
your Towns under severe Penalties; and further, to stop such 
abuses desire that if you see any strong Liquors brought to Your 
Towns that you may stave the Casks containing such Liquors, and 
likewise make information of the Trader's Names, that they may be 
prosecuted as the Law directs. Further, your Brothers have sent 
you this string of Wampum to desire that you may not give Credit 
to every Report that you will hear, either from Indians or White 
men, without you see the President & Council's Letter, for you 
may be sure whenever your Brothers have any News to acquaint 
you with they will let you know it by Mr. Weiser." 

Gave a string. 

"Ohio, May 2d, 1748. 
Ci Brother Onas : 

" We have seen the Messenger you sent us, & have heard what 
he says; we have also received the Present you sent us by him, to 
our great Satisfaction, for at this time we are but poor by reason 
that we are engag'd in a War against the French, & we are oblig'd 
to supply other Nations with Ammunition to assist us in the War. 
We have made intercession with some Nations of Indians that was 
in the French Interest, & have brought them to dwell amongst us ; 
Your Messenger can inform You as to the number. Brothers : we 
have not prosecuted the War with that vigour we might have done, 
for this reason, that we wanted all our Brethren home from amongst 
the Enemy before we strike the home stroke, which we intend to 
do. It is true some of our Young Men go to pay the French a 
visit now and then, and Brothers we assure You that we resent the 
abuses done to You & us by the French. We send you this French 
Sculp as a token that we don't go to visit them for nothing." 

Gave a Sculp and Wampum. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 289 

"Ohio, May 4th, 1748. 
w Brother Onas : 

a We return You thanks for the Present we have received, & 
likewise for sending us word that you will send us another Present 
by Mr. Weiser, which could never come in better time, as we have 
a large Body of our Brethren that are lately come to supply as 
well as ourselves. We have heard by Schaiohady, & now by your 
Messenger, that you have put a stop to the Traders carrying out 
strong Liquors, which we approve of very well, for we have suffer' d 
considerably by such abuses — for there is many People who brings 
nothing else but Liquor, & so cheats us of our Skins, & many of 
our People have lost their Lives. But, Brothers, we have one thing 
to acquaint you with, that is there a great Nation of Indians come 
from the French to be your Brothers as well as ours, who say they 
never tasted English Bum yet, but would be very glad to taste it 
now as they are come to Live with the English, so we hope you 
will order some of your Traders to bring them some, for which re- x 
quest we send you this string of Wampum." 

Grave a String of Wampum. 
u Brother Onas : 

"We have no more to say at present but to acquaint you that 
there is 730 Men of us of the Six Nations settled here on Ohio 
& able to go to War, exclusive of other Nations which will make 
up as many more, and all we wait for is for our Brothers the Eng- 
lish to tell us when &, where we shall go ; and to assure our Bro- 
thers of our Constancy, we send you this string of Wampum." 

Gave a String of Wampum. 



At a Council held at Philada., Thursday, 23d June, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 

Thomas Lawrence, William Till, } 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, I -^ 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, j ' S( * rs * 
William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approved. 

A Letter from the Shawonese & some of the Six Nation Indians, 
Dated the 4th Instant, at Loggs' Town, the first of the Indian Towns 
on the Road from Lancaster to Allegheny, was read, purporting that 
some of them were coming down to present the Chiefs of the Twig- 
twees, a Nation lately come over from the French into the Interest 
vol. v. — 19. 



290 MINUTES OF THE 

of the English, & desir'd their Brethren wou'd send somebody to 5 
meet them on the Road with Provisions; & that they wou'd be 
pleas'd to kindle a Council Fire for them at Lancaster. 

Mr. Weiser & Andrew Montour attending without were ealFd in. 
Mr. Weiser presented Andrew to the Board as a Person who might 
be of Service to the Province in quality of an Indian Interpreter & 
Messenger, informing them that be had employ'd him in sundry 
affairs of Consequence & found him faithful, knowing, & prudent , 
that he had for his own private Information, as Andrew lives amongst 
the Six Nations between the Branches of Ohio & Lake Erie, sent a 
Message to him in the Winter, desiring him to observe what pass'd 
amongst those Indians on the- Pieturn of Schaiohady & come down 
to his House in the Spring, which he did, & gave him such a full 
account of the Numbers & Importance of the Indians in those parts; 
a-s wou'd be useful to him in his intended Journey there with the 
Province Present, & recommends him to the Council for a Reward 
for his trouble. 

The Letter received from the Shawonese & others was read again 7 
<& Mr. Weiser 6l Andrew were ask r d whether they knew the Sub- 
scribers Tammany Buck, Big Hommony, Pala Kishaw, & Lawac- 
quaqua. Andrew said the two first named were the principal Men- 
among the & the two last were , that the Twig- 
twee Nation were a very considerable Nation, Sz, that it was happy 
that they & their Friends shewed an Inclination to be well with the 
English, & might prove of extraordinary Service, for they were a. 
Nation of vast importance to the French on the Lakes. 

The Council ordered Andrew to go «& meet them, & if possible to* 
prevail with them to come to Philadelphia; but if he found it dis- 
agreable not to press it too much, & to be sure to send an Express 
by Mr.. Weiser's to Philadelphia, with an account of their number 
-& Business, if they shou'd not be willing to come to this City. 

Ordered, That Andrew Montour have for his trouble £ — , & that 
his Expence & that of his Company be likewise paid. 

Mr. Weiser's Instructions were read to him in these words, viz.: 

"Instructions to Conrad Weiser, Esq,, Interpreter for the Province 
of Pennsylvania- 
-''Sir: 

" This Government having promised the Indians who came here 
from Ohio in November last to send You to them early in the 
Spring, k having provided a Present of a considerable Value, You, 
are to proceed thither with all convenient Dispatch. Mr. George 
Croghan, the Indian Trader, who is well acquainted with the Indian 
Country and the best Roads to Ohio, has undertaken the Convoy of 
you & the Goods with his own Men and Horses at the Publick Ex- 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 291 

pence, & as it cannot be foreseen how long the Journey will take 
him nor what trouble may attend it, so as to enter into Contract 
before hand with him, all affairs relating thereto are entirely left to 
You, wherein we recommend all the frugallity that can consist with 
the Nature of Your Business, the Treasury being Low and a large 
Sum expended in the Purchase of the Present. 

u As soon as You come to the place of general Rendezvous you 
are to notify your arrival in a Speech to all the Tribes, wherein you 
are to deal in generals, reserving all particular Matters to your 
closing Speech. 

" You are to use the utmost diligence to acquire a perfect know- 
ledge of the Number, Situation, Disposition, & strength of all the 
Indians in or near those parts, whether they be Friends, Neutrals, 
or Enemies, & be very particular in knowing the Temper & In- 
fluence of the Tribes of Indians who send Deputys to receive You, 
for by the knowledge of these matters You are to regulate the dis- 
tribution of the Goods which is to be divided amongst them in as 
equal & just a manner as possible, that all may go away satisfied, 
& none receive the Least Cause of Disgust at any undue preference 
given to others. 

" You cannot be at a loss for Matter from whence to form Your 
Speeches. The antient Enmity of the French to the Indian Na- 
tions, their perfidy upon all occasions, of which if any reliance can 
be had on the Articles of News in the Publick Papers you may 
give some late Instances in the Death of Taghananty the Black 
Prince, who perished in a Jayl at Montreal, & in the cruel Treat- 
ment of the Indians in general at Canada, who are conhn'd to 
loathsome Prisons without proper or wholesome Sustenance, 

" The Inability of the French to protect the Indians or to supply 
them with such Necessaries as they stand in need of for their Sub- 
sistence, These observations are what cannot but occur to You. 
You may further enlarge on the constant & antient Friendship of 
the English, & their readiness at all times to assist them against 
the Attempts of the French, who have ever been for destroying or 
enslaving them. And an ample field will be furnish'd to You in doing 
Justice to this Province, which has ever shewn the greatest readi- 
ness to supply the Indians in their most pressing Necessitys, men- 
tioning the several valuable Presents made them from time to time, 
particularly since the commencement of the War, instancing the 
Governments Presents at Philadelphia over & above the, Price of 
their Lands in the Year 1742, the large Presents at Lancaster & at 
Albany, & then the present occasion will bear a peculiar enlarge- 
ment, this Government having no sooner heard of the Distresses of 
the Indians, & that abundance of Families & Young Warriors had 
for the convenience of Hunting remov'd to the Waters of Ohio &■ 
Lake Erie 7 than they determin'd to send them a Supply of Goods &, 



292 MINUTES OF THE 

Powder, which in this time of Scarcity they cou'd have from no 
other Place. This tenderness for those who out of every Nation 
had came & fix'd their habitation in these Parts, must needs make 
deep Impressions on their Affections, & especially on the minds of 
their Young People, to the advantage of the kindness of this Pro- 
vince for all the Indians. 

" By the Treaties subsisting between His Majes tie's Subjects & 
the Indian Nations, they are laid under the strongest obligations to 
give each other the earliest Intelligence of whatever may affect their 
Persons or their Properties. In discharge of our duty you are to 
inform the Indians that the management of the War being com- 
mitted to the Governors of New York & Boston, operations of this 
Year are concerted by them j that they have Orders from His Ma- 
jesty exceedingly favourable to the Indians, & in pursuance thereof 
they will prosecute the War against the French & their adherents 
with the utmost vigour; that His Majesty in token of his Regard 
to the Indian Nations has sent a large Present to the Governor of 
New York to be distributed at Albany, but that as by their distance 
from this Place the Indians on Ohio & Lake Erie may be supnos'd 
not to receive much Benefit from the Albany Present, This is an 
additional Consideration why this Government chuses to be kind to 
these Indians & assist them the readier when they are in distress, 
because they cannot without extreme difficulty get Supplies from 
other Places. 

" On the other hand, Y"ou are to use all means in your Power to 
get from them all kinds of Intelligence as to what the French are 
doing or design to do in these parts, & indeed in every other Place. 
You are not to satisfy yourself with generals, but to inform your- 
self truly & fully of the real dispositions of these Indians, & what 
dependance can be had on them for the Security of this Province, 
and for the total prevention of all Hostilities within our Limits. 
You are to make particular Enquiry into the number and Situation 
of the Indian Nations between these People's Settlements on Ohio 
& the liiver Mississippi, &c, to the West of Lake Erie, since it ia 
said there are several Indian Nations within these Limits & on the 
Lakes Hurons & Illenois, who are disoblig'd with the French, & 
might easily be brought into the Amity of the English. 

" You will see by the Assembly's answer to the Council's Mess- 
age, a copy whereof will be given You herewith, what Sentiments 
they entertain about War ; and as they have the disposal of the 
Public Money it wou'd be wrong to urge the Indians to War, since 
no dependence cou'd be had on the Assembly to support them in 
such an undertaking, and consequently any Encouragement of this 
kind wou'd be to bring them into a Snare, and in the end might 
prove extremely hurtful.- This consider'd, nothing of this kind 
must be urg'd by you, & if the Indians mention it themselves you 
need not be explicit, you are to tell them that this Point is not in 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 293 

your Instructions, that your Business was to make them a visit & to 
be truly inform' d of their Situation, & to bring them a valuable 
Present — the most substantial Mark that can be given of the great 
affection which this Province bears to their Friends the Indians ; & 
if they insist any further you are to tell them that at their Instance 
you will make a faithful Relation of every thing given you by them 
in charge to the Government, & transmit to the Indians their Re- 
solves. But whatever You do on this head, as a good deal must be 
left to Your discretion & Judgment on such information as shall be 
given You, You are to take special Care not to disoblige the In- 
dians or in any wise diminish their heartiness for His Majestic' s 
Cause against the French. 

" You are to make particular Enquiry into the Behaviour of the 
Shawonese since the commencement of the War, & in relation to 
the Countenance they gave to Peter Chartier. It is proper to tell 
You that they relented, made acknowledgements to the Government 
of their Error in being seduc'd by Peter Chartier, & pray'd they 
might be permitted to return to their old Town, & be taken again 
as sincere Penitents* into the favour of the Government ; & tho' the 
Governor gave them assurences that all past misbehaviour should 
be pardon'd on their sending Deputies to Philadelphia to acknow- 
ledge their fault, yet they contented themselves with loose Letters 
by Indian Traders, some of which have been delivered & some not, 
but had they all been delivered this was not a becoming manner of 
addressing the Government, nor cou'd they expect any thing 
from it. 

" You will, therefore, speak to them by themselves, & give them 
such a quantity of Goods as, upon their present Temper & the frank- 
ness of their Submissions, you shall think they deserve. 

" Given in Council under my Hand & the Lesser Seal of the said 
Province, at Philadalphia, the 23d Day of June, Anno Domini, 

1748. 

" ANTHONY PALMER." 

These Instructions were drawn up in March last when Mr. 
Weiser was upon the point of going to Ohio, & were laid be- 
fore the Assembly in May, but his Joupney being postpon'd for 
the reason set forth in former Minutes, thejv w|re never delivered 
to him. 

The Secretary having consulted the Attorney General on the 
words of the Royal Charter relating to Reprieves, agreeable to the 
Order of the Board reported, that it was his opinion "the Council 
might Reprieve for a definite or indefinite time, as they shou'd think 
proper ; whereupon the following Reprieve of Alexander Ure was 
SWd: ■ 



2C4 MINUTES OF THE 

" George the Second, oy the Grace of God King of Great Britain, 
France, & Ireland, Defender of the Faith, and so forth, To 
the Sheriff of the City & County of Philadelphia, in our Pro- 
vince of Pennsylvania, Greeting : 

" Whereas, at a Court of Oyer & Terminer & General Goal De- 
livery held at Philadelphia for the City & County of Philadelphia 
aforesaid, in the Twenty-second Year of our Reign, before John 
Kinsey, Thomas Grceme, & William Till, Esq rs " our Justices, a cer- 
tain Alexander Ure was arraign'd & convicted of Felony & Murthcr, 
as by the Eecords of the said Court relation being thereunto had 
more fully appears ; And Whereas, the said Alexander Ure did 
then receive Sentence of our said Court that he be taken from thence 
to the Place from whence he came, and from thence to the Place of 
Execution, &, there be hanged by the Neck until he shou'd be dead, 
We do hereby Command You that from the Execution of the said 
Sentence you abstain until our Pleasure be further known. In Tes- 
timony whereof We have caused the Lesser Seal of our said Pro- 
vince to be hereunto affixed. Witness, Anthony Palmer, Esq 1 "" 
President, Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, William Till, & Abra- 
ham Taylor, Esq rs ' in Council at Philadelphia, the Twenty-third 
Day of June, in the Year of our Lord 1748, and in the Twenty- 
second Year of our Reign. 

" ANTHONY PALMER, 
"THOMAS LAWRENCE. 
"SAMUEL HASELL, 
« WILLIAM TILL, 
" ABRAHAM TAYLOR." 
Mr. Croghan Petition'cl the Board that his account might be set- 
tled & discharg'd, whereupon it was with his consent agreed that he 
shou'd take other Goods in lieu of those charg'd in Account of the 
Goods at Harris/ & receive an order from the Council on the Pro- 
vincial Treasurer to pay him the Sum of . 

Province of Pennsylvania to George Croghan, Dr. 
Dec r - 1 St, To 1 cwt. of Tobacco which I bought 

by order of Conrad Weiser - - £ 1 5 
To Cash paid for Provisions for the Hands 



that went with the Goods, viz. 

2 cwt. Flower - - £10 
1 cwt. Bacon - 2 10 



o 



10 



To 00 lb. of Deer Skins to wrap the G oods in 5 
To the hire of 12 Horses to carry the Goods 

sent by me to Ohio, @ 40s. each 24 

To 2 Men's wages from the 1st Dec r - to the 

1st May is 5 Months, @ 4s. each f M°- 20 
To 1,000 white Wampum which I gave at 

the Speeches 1 10 

Carried forward, £55 5 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 295 

Brought forward, £55 5 

April 28th, To Goods of my own which I 
was oblig'd to add to the Present sent by 
the Province, finding near 1,500 Indians im 
.great want of Powder, Lead, &c, & the 
Present sent by the Province so small as 
not sufficient to supply one-half of them 
with Amunition to kill themselves Meat, 
viz. : 



9 Cask of Powder - 


63 Q A 


11 cwt Lead - ' - @ 45s. "§ cwt. 


24 15 


25 lb. Vermillion @ 20s, 


15 


20 Doz- Knives - - . - ' @ 12s. . 


12 


1,000 Flints - 


1 10 


"6 lib. Brass Wire - - - @ 5s. 


1 10 


1 cwt. Tobacco ... 


15 


Carriage of those Goods from Philad 3 ^ to my 




Place, and from there to Ohio 


50 




169 




£224 5 



A Letter from Mr. Shirley, hy the Post, was read in these words: 

"Boston, June 11th, 1748. 
"Sir: 

"His Exellency Governor Clinton having appointed an Interview 
with the Indians of the Six Nations to be held at Albany the tenth 
of July next, wherein matters of great Importance to the Safety 
& Welfare of all His Majestie's Colonies in North America will be 
transacted, I have at the desire of the General Assembly of this 
Province (a Copy of whose Vote is inclosed You), as also Governor 
Clinton, & in consequence of His Majestie ? s Commands to" me to 
join with Governor Clinton in this Service, determin'd (God willing) 
to be present at the interview, attended by Commissioners from 
this Province; & as a full Representative by Commissioners from 
all the Northern Colonies will have a great tendency to render our 
Negotiations with the Six Nations successful, & fix them in His 
Majesty's Interest, & engage them in carrying on the War against 
His Majesties Enemies, and as other Matters may be transacted 
at the said Congress which may be for the lasting Security and Ad- 
vantage of these Colonies, I do now upon my own meer motion, 
and the solicitous desire I have that His Majestic' s Service upon 
this Continent may be consulted in the best manner, and the Inter- 
ests of all His Colonies there be most effectually secured, as well 
.as at the Request of the General Assembly, earnestly desire your 
Honour wou'd cause Commissioners to be sent from your Govern- 
ment to be present at the aforesaid Interview, and to consult & join 
with the other Commissioners there in transacting the several mat- 



296 MINUTES OF THE 

ters contained & proposed in the inclosed Copy of the before-men- 
tioned vote. 

" I shall write to all the rest of the English Governors from New 
Hampshire to Maryland, & am with great Regard, 

u Sir, Your Honour's most obedient humb. Servant, 

"W. SHIRLEY. 

"The Honoble. Anthony Palmer, Esq." 

"The Committee appointed to take under Consideration those 
Parts of His Excellency's Speech which relate to the Meeting of 
y e Commissioners lately held at New York, & to the securing the 
Indians of the Six Nations, and also His Excellency's Message of 
the 31st May, are humbly of opinion That it is not expedient for 
the Court at this time to come into any new Resolutions respecting 
the Result of the Commissioners who lately convened at New York, 
but that it is of great Importance to the Government, as well as to 
those whose Borders the Six Nations of Indians are Situated, that 
measures should sow be taken for preserving said Indians in their 
good affection to His Majesty's Subjects and Attachment to his In- 
terest, and that the Treaty or Interview proposed by His Excellency 
will in all probability greatly tend to strengthen such affection and 
attachment j and as this Government have generally appeared by 
their Commissioners at such Interviews, the Committee are of 
opinion that three Gentlemen be now chosen by this Court to attend 
to His Excellency the Governor, & that they be empower'd, in Case 
any Bounty or Reward shall be found necessary, in order to en- 
courage the Indians to Acts of Hostility against the French, over 
and above what may be allowed by His Majesty to engage for the 
same on the part of this Government, agreeable to such Instructions 
as they shall receive from the Court for this purpose. 

"The Committee are further humbly of opinion that the Gentle- 
men sent from this Government be Instructed by the Court and 
fully impower'd (with the Approbation of his Excellency the Gov- 
ernor) to join with any other Governments who shall be present at 
this Interview, in humbly representing to His Majesty the dis- 
tressed State of their Governments by means of the French in 
Canada, the Necessity of the Reduction thereof, & the inability of 
the Several Governments to effect the Same at their own Charge, 
and humbly His Majesty's favour in allowing forces to be raised in 
America for this purpose at the Charge & in the pay of the Crown, 
& to order such a number of His Majesty's Ships to be sent up the 
River St. Lawrence as may be thought proper, and that His Ex- 
cellency be desir'd immediately to advise the several Governments, 
as far as Maryland, of this Interview, that as many may be present 
as possible. 

" By Order, 

"JACOB WENDAL. 

In Council, June 8th ; 1748, Read & sent down. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 297 

"In the House of Representatives, June 8th, 1748. Read & 
order'd that this Report be accepted, & that Mr. Tyng & Coll - Heath 
& Capt 0- Rowell, with such as the Honoble. Board shall join, be a 
Committee to wait upon His Excellency & lay the same before him 
accordingly. 

"Sent up for Concurrence, 

"T. HUTCHINSON, Speaker." 

"In Council, June 10th, 1748. Read & Concurr'd, and S r - 
William Pepperell & Samuel Danforth, Esqrs., are joined in the 
Affair. 

"By Order of the Board, 

"WM. PEPPERELL. 
" Copy Examined, 

"Per J. Willard, Secretary." 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Saturday, 25th June, 1748. 
present : , 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Samuel Hasell, William Till, ^ 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, I -^ 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, f " 

William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 
A Letter from Governor Clinton in answer to the President's 
Letter by Express was read & order'd to be enter' d. 

"New York, 21st June, 1748. 
" Sir : 

"I have your favour of the 18th with a Paper inclos'd containing 
a Message from the Cayukas to the Sasquehanna' Indians, together 
with a recital of what pass'd upon a Message sent them from the 
English, which I am quite Ignorant of, as nothing of that kind is 
contained in Coll 0- Johnson's Treaty, who I sent lately among the 
Six Nations to prevent their going to Canada. Therefore, if any 
Person has surreptitiously undertaken to deliver them a Message 
with such Expression, in order to intimidate the Indians, or make 
them revolt from their repeated Engagements to support His 
Majestie's Interest, it is perfectly contrary to my Directions & 
Knowledge ; and I look upon such (whoever they be) aiming at 
nothing less than a total defection of those Tribes, or at least to 
anticipate the advantages I have improved among them for His 
Majesty's Service. 



298 MINUTES OF THE 

" As I have not time to get transcrib'd the Treaty which Col a 
Johnson had with those Tribes at Onondago, I have inclos'd the 
original he sent me, and if you think it expedient to take a Copy 
thereof I must desire You'll return the Original by the first oppor- 
tunity, as I shall have occasion for it soon at Albany. 

"I am glad the Information you sent me touching the Enemy is 
contradicted by the last JExpress, and I am, Sir, 

"Your most obedient humble Servant, 
«Ch CLINTON. 
" The Honoble. Anthony Palmer, Esq'-" 

The Secretary was order' cl to take a Copy of Col 0- Johnson's 
Report of his proceedings at Onondago, & to send it with a Copy 
of Mr. Clinton's Letter to Mr. Weiser for the satisfaction of the 
Indians. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 16th July, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr. President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ] 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, ! -™ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, j ^ 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

A letter from Mr. "Weiser and another from Mr. Croghan were 
read, whereby it appsar'd that the Ohio Indians were on their 
Road near the town of Lancaster and cou'd not be beat out of a 
Notion they had entertain'd of this City's being sickly, but 
desir'd the Council wou'd be pleas'd to give them the Meeting at 
Lancaster. 

The Council after taking up a long time in deliberating upon the 
Request at last agreed to accede to it, & Mr. Shoemaker, Mr. Turner, 
Mr. Hopkinson, & Mr. Logan, were appinted Commissioners to 
treat with these Indians at Lancaster, and the Secretary was order' d 
to prepare a Commiss a and a Sett of Instructions from the heads 
now deiivcr'd to him, to be Sign'd in the Afternoon. 



P. M. 

Present as before. 
The Commission & Instructions were agreed upon & sign'd in 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 299 

Council, & a Warrant issued to the Keeper of the Great Seal to 
affix the same to the said Commission : 

u George the Second, by the Grace of God of Great Britain, France, 
& Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth, To our 
Trusty and well beloved Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, 
Thomas Hopkinson, & William Logan, Fsqrs., and to every of 
them, Greeting : 

" Whereas, some of the Chiefs of the Six Nations Indians 
living on the Waters of Ohio, a Branch of the Mississippi, in 
Amity & Alliance with Us, have signified to our Governor of our 
Province of Pennsylvania that the Twightwees, a considerable 
Nation of Indians residing on the Borders of Lake Erie, and late 
in the Interest of the French King, are now earnestly desirous to 
enter into the Alliance & Friendship of Us and our Subjects; and 
for that end that several Cheifs and Deputies have been sent from 
the said Twightwees Nation, and are now waiting at Lancaster with 
divers Cheifs of the said Six Nations, in order to enter into a Treaty 
of Alliance & Friendship with Us and our Subjects; And also, that 
several Cheifs & Deputies from the Shawonese Nation of Indians at 
Allegheny are now likewise waiting at Lancaster in order to renew 
the League of Amity subsisting between Us*& that Nation : Know 
ye, that reposing special Trust and Confidence in your Loyalty, 
Abilities, and Circumspection, We have thought fit to Nominate & 
Appoint You the said Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, Thomas 
Hopkinson, & William Logan, & every of you, our Commissioners 
on behalf of our Governor of our Province of Pennsylvania afore- 
said, to treat with the said Indians now at Lancaster, or with their 
or any or every of their Cheifs or Delegates, & with them to renew, 
ratify, & confirm the League of Amity subsisting between our said 
Province of Pennsylvania and the said United Nations of Indians, 
or between us and the said Shawonese Nation of Indians, & like- 
wise to enter & compleat such Treaty of Alliance with the said 
Twightwee Nation ; And further to do, act, transact, & finally to 
conclude and agree with the Indians aforesaid all and every other 
Matter and thing whatsoever necessary, touching or in anywise con- 
cerning the Premisses as fully and amply to all Intents, Constructions, 
and Purposes, as our Governor of our Province of Pennsylvania 
aforesaid might or cou'd do being Personally present, hereby rati- 
fying and confirming and holding for firm and effectual whatsoever 
you, the said Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, Thomas Hop- 
kinson, and William Logan, or any of You, shall lawfully do in and 
about the Premisses. In Testimoney whereof We have caused the 
Great Seal of our said Province to be hereunto affixed. Witness 
Anthony Palmer, Esqr., President, Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Ha- 
sell, Abraham Taylor, and Robert Strettell, Esqrs, Members of our 
Council for our Province of Pennsylvania aforesaid at Philadelphia, 
the sixteenth Day of July, in the Year of Our Lord One thousand 



300 MINUTES OF THE 

seven hundred and forty-eight, and in the Twenty-second Year of 

our Reign. 

" ANTHONY PALMER, Presid 1 - 
"ROBERT STRETTELL, 
"ABEAM TAYLOR, 
"SAM. HASELL, 
"THOM. LAWRENCE. 

" By the Honourable the President & Council of the Province of 
Pennsylvania. 

11 Instructions to Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, Thomas 

Hopkinson, & William Logan, Esqrs., Commissi to treat with 

certain Indians now at Lancaster 

u Whereas, by a Commission from His Majesty bearing date here- 
with, You are hereby instructed to enquire into the Temper and 
Number of the Twightwees, one of the said Nations, whether they 
are really and sincerely come off from the French & heartily in the 
English Interest, or this Change of their' s is only pretended & occa- 
sional, taking its rise from the scarcity of Indian Goods among the 
French, and so likely to drop on the Publication of a Peace with 
France; and when you shall be inform' d of the true and real State 
and Disposition of these People You will in your receiving any 
proposals from them govern Yourselves accordingly. 

" As to the Shawonese, You are to enquire very exactly after 
their Conduct since the commencement of the War, and what 
lengths they went in favour of Peter Chartier, where he is, & what 
he has been doing all this time, and be careful that these People ac- 
knowledge their fault in plain Terms, & promise never to be guilty 
of any behaviour again that may give such reason to suspect their 
fidelity, & according to the reality of their Submissions You are to 
regulate what You shall say to them. 

" With respect to the Indians of the Six Nations, You are hereby 
Instructed to tell them, exclusive of what shall be proper to be 
said to them in answer to the Business they come to transact with 
this Government, that their behaviour during the War has been 
very acceptable to the King's Governors, & that they will always be 
receiv'd by them in a most affectionate manner, & recommend it to 
them to cultivate a good understanding with all the Nations on the 
Borders of this and the Neighbouring Provinces in alliance with 
them, notwithstanding the probability of an approaching Peace, 
which You are likewise to mention with the greatest prudence lost the 
Cessation of Hostilities shou'd not be followed by a General Peace. 
" Given in Council under our Hands & the Lesser Seal of the said 

Province of Philadelphia, this Sixteenth Day of July, 1748. 
" ANTHONY PALMER, Preside 
"ROBERT STRETTELL, 
"ABRAM TAYLOR. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 301 

Governor Gooch's Letter in answer to the Council's sent by Ex- 
press was read in these words : 

" June 25th, 1748. 

"Sir: 

" I immediately upon reading your Letter of the 17th Instant, 
which I this Day received, I took my Pen in hand to return You 
and the Gentlemen of the Council all due thanks for the Regard 
You were pleased to shew for our Safety as well as Your own, in 
communicating to me so speedy Intelligence of a Sett of Privateers, 
with Don Pedro at their head, with whom we have been no less 
alarm'd & pester' d than You, having had several small Vessels taken 
in the Bay and within the Mouth of the Capes. 

" My Express dispatch'd to Captain Norbury in Consequence of 
Mr. President's Letter, reach' d him the Day before he sail'd, and 
just after he had brought in with him two Privateers, the one from 
the Havannah with 14 Carriage Guns and 100 Men, the other from 
St. Augustine with four Carriage Guns and 10 Swivels and 40 Men, 
who promis'd me in his Answer to it to go down to your Capes, and 
of whom I must therefore suppose You have had long before this 
the satisfaction of hearing. Captain Masterson is now also out upon 
a Cruize, so that it is to be hoped if neither of them is so fortunate 
as to meet with Don Pedro, the Enemy will at least be so much 
terrified as to keep their distance, and not give us so much disturb- 
ance by Intercepting our Trade and infesting our Coasts with such 
audacious Insolence as they have presum'd to do of late. 

" I am, with my best Respects to the Gentlemen of the Council, 
with great Regard, 

" Sir, Your most obed 1, humb. SerV" 

"WILL. GOOCH. 

I should have told You that Capt 13 - Norbury manned & took with 
him the largest of the two Privateers he had taken ; and that I 
desired You would make my Compliments to Mr. Peters, your 
worthy Secretary. 

Mr. Joseph Bonsall & Mr. John Davis, Commiss rs - appointed to 
Survey that part of the high Road leading from Philadelphia to 
New Castle which runs thro' the County of Chester, made their 
Return, which was read, approved, and confirmed, and order'd to 
be recorded in the Council Book • and the said Road is to be open'd 
sixty feet wide, except in the Towns of Darby & Chester, where the 
Streets are to retain their present breadth, of which all Supervisors 
of the Highways are to take notice, & open the Road in the several 
Townships thro' which it passes of the width aforesaid, agreeable to 
the said Return. 

Pursuant to two Orders from the Honourable the President & 
Council, one of the 8th Day of September, 1747, the other of the 



302 MINUTES OF THE 

2d Day of March then next following, referring it to Us, the Sub- 
scribers, to view and lay out by Course and Distance that part of 
the King's high Road leading from the City of Philadelphia to the 
Town of New Castle which runs thro' the County of Chester, We 
do humbly Certify and Report to the Honourable the President & 
Council, that We have viewed, and with the Assistance of William 
Parsons, Surveyor General, we have as regularly and as near as 
conveniently cou'd be to the Courses it now runs, Resurvey'd that 
part of the King's high Road aforesaid which Runs thro' the 
County of Chester, Beginning at the middle of the Bridge over 
Cobb's Creek, being the Boundary between Philadelphia and Ches- 
ter Counties, and from thence extending South seventy degrees 
West twenty-eight perches, North seventy-nine degree and an half 
West twenty-four perches, North seventy degrees West one hun- 
dred and fifty-one perches, thence South seventy-nine degrees West 
twenty-eight perches to a Run of Water, thence North seventy-four 
degrees West forty perches to a Stone twenty foot distance from 
the East Corner of George Woods' House in Darby, thence South 
sixty-one degrees and an half West twelve perches to Darby Creek, 
and the same Course twenty-eight perches more to a post, then 
South fifteen degrees twenty Minutes West one hundred and thirty- 
one perches to the middle of the old Road, thence South fifty-nine 
degrees West two hundred and twenty-six perches to Dwyer Run, 
one hundred and sixteen perches more to Deel's Run, and sixty- 
two perches more to a post, thence South thirty-nine degrees 
West one hundred and two perches to Talnell Run, two hundred 
and ninety-six perches more to another Run, & one hundred 
and one hundred and sixteen perches to Isaac Gleeve's House, 
thence South sixty degrees West one hundred and twenty perches 
to a post, thence South sevent3 r -one degrees and an half West one 
hundred and seventy- six perches to a post, thence South sixty 
degrees and an half West one hundred and seventy-eight perches to 
a post, thence South sixty-three degrees and a quarter West two 
hundred and forty perches to Crum Creek, thence South sixty-one 
degrees and an half West one hundred and thirty perches to a post, 
thence South sixty-four degrees West twenty-eight perches to 
Ridley Creek Bridge, and the same Course fourteen perches more 
to a post, thence South thirty-four degrees West one hundred 
& thirty perches to a post, thence South four degrees and an 
half West fifty-six perches to a post, thence South eleven degrees 
& an half west fifty-six perches to a wild Cherry Tree, thence 
South fifty-six degrees and an half West ninety-five perches 
to Welsh Street, in the middle of Free Street, in the Borough 
of Chester, then along Free Street South sixty-two degrees West 
twenty-three perches to Market Street, thence along Market Street 
South twenty eight degrees East thirty-one perches to the middle 
of James' Street, thence along James' Street South sixty-two 
degrees West thirty-eight perches to the Bridge over Chester 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL, 303 

Creek, thence crossing the Creek over the Bridge South fifty-two* 
degrees and an half West nineteen perches to a post opposite to and 
thirty foot distant from James- Mathers' Smith Shop, thence South 
sixty-eight degrees and an half West seventy-six perches- to a post 7 
thence South seventy-six degrees- West eighty-four perches, thence 
South fifty-eight degrees West one hundred and seventy-one perches 
to a black oak Sapling, marked, thence South seventy-two degrees 
and an half West one hundred & fifty-two perches to a white oaky 
marked, about two perches short of Jacob Roman's Line, thence 
South fifty-one degrees West ninety-one perches,, thence South 
sixty-four degrees and an half West two hundred and fifteen 
perches, thence South forty-six degrees West one hundred and 
twenty-seven perches to the middle of the Bridge over Marcus 
Hook Creek, thence South seventy degrees West one hundred & 
thirty-four perches to the Road leading from Marcus Hook to Con- 
cord, thence South fifty-eight degrees West seventy-two perches, 
thence South sixty-one degrees West one hundred and twenty-two 
perches to an old Stump about eight beyond Thomas Howell's 
House, thence South sixty-two degrees forty minutes West one 
hundred and thirty perches to New Castle Line, about half a perch 
West from, an old marked Bicker v in the old Road. 

CALEB COWPLAND, 
. JOSEPH BONSALL, 

SAMUEL LEVIS, 
JOHN DAVIS, 
PETER DICKS, 
JAMES MATHERS, 
THOMAS PEARSON, 
JOHN SKETCHLSY- 

A Letter from the Governor of Carolina was read : 

"South Carolina, Charles Town t April 9tb, 1748, 
«Sir; 

"As the safety of this His Majesty's Province depends much on 
preserving the Friendship of the numerous Nations of Indians that 
surround Us, I have made it my particular Care r more especially 
since the commencement of the French War, to keep them steady 
in the British Interest ; and I have the satisfaction to see that not- 
withstanding the French Intrigues our good Friends and Allies the 
Catawbas, the Cherokees, the Creeks,, <fe the Chickesaws, are all 
firmly attach'd to Us, & that the Chactaws, who have hitherto been 
Friends to the French,, have declared War against them & Killed a 
good number of their Men near the Mississippi. The Chactaw Na- 
tion is reckoned one of the most numerous in America, consisting 
of many thousand fighting Men, & have lately made a Treaty of 
Peace & Commerce with this Grovernment. But the Catawbas 
have been some Years harass'd by the French, k Northward In- 



304 / MINUTES OF THE 

dians called Nottooyaws, & tho' they are a brave People these con- 
stant Wars have thinn'd them. 

"I must, therefore, earnestly desire that You will strongly re- 
commend it to the several Indians in Amity with your Government 
not to come to War against them, nor to join the French and their 
Indians in their Incursions upon these People, as I am inform 'd 
they have done. 

" This has now become absolutely necessary, for a few Days ago 
a Party of the Nottooyahs have carried off into Slavery some of the 
Inhabitants of the out parts of this Province, particularly one Cap- 
tain Haig, a Gentleman much respected and esteemed, & one Mr. 
Brown & some others. 

" I hope you will have the Goodness to cause diligent Search to 
be made for them in case they shou'd be brought near Your Parts, 
& that when you have any Exchange of Prisoners with the French 
Indians or the Governor of Canada, that you will procure the Ran- 
som of these People shou'd it have been their misfortune to have 
been carried amongst them. 

"I beg leave to assure You I am, 

u With very great respect, Sir, 

" Your most obedient humb. Serv*., 

"JAMBS GLEN. 
"The Honoble. Anthony Palmer, Esq 1 "." 

Whereupon the Council gave an additional Instruction to Mr. 
Weiser in these words : 

a By the Honourable the President & Council of the Province of 

Pennsylvania. 
" To Conrad W^eiser, Esq 1- ., Indian Interpreter. 

" Whereas, We have received a Letter from the Governor of 
South Carolina, a Copy whereof is herewith sent, informing Us 
that in or about the beginning of April last, a party of the Nattoo- 
yaws or some of the Northern Indians have carried off into Slavery 
some of the Inhabitants of the out parts of the Province of South 
Carolina, particularly one Capt n . Haig, a Gentleman much respected 
& Esteemed, & one Mr. Brown and some others. You are hereby 
further Instructed, when you speak to the Indians at Ohio to men- 
tion this Affair, k to make the strictest enquiry after them ; and 
if you can find out where they are carried to, you are to engage 
some of the Indians to sollicit for their discharge, now there is 
a Cessation of Hostilities, or if this may not be practicable you are 
to desire that they may be well used till an opportunity shall offer 
of treating with the Governor of Canada about them. 
"Given in Council under my Hand & the Lesser Seal of the said 

Province at Philadelphia, the Twenty-sixth day of July, 1748. 

"ANTHONY PALMER." 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 305 

The President having at the last Council taken the Sentiments ef 
the Board with respect to an answer to Governor Shirley's Letter, 
«& having accordingly wrote one, which was sent to him at Albany 
under a Cover to Governor Clinton, the same was read in these 
words : 

" Philadelphia, Jane 25th, 1748. 
"Sir: 

" I have the Honour of Your's of the 11th Instant, informing me 
<of Governor Clinton's appointment of an Interview with the Indians 
of the Six Nations at Albany the 10th of the next Month, & of your 
Intention to be there, earnestly desiring I wou'd cause Commission- 
ers to be sent from this Government to be present at this Interview. 

" The Council, before whom I laid Your Letter, desire me to ex- 
press their Concern that Your Court did not come to their Resolu- 
tion time enough to lay this Important Affair before the Assembly, 
which has sat twice since the 16th May. They have, however, de- 
liberated whether, notwithstanding their two late Sessions and the 
Season of the Year which, as the House consists mostly of Farmers, 
requires their presence to do their Country Business, they shou'd 
not call them to meet a third time, & have concluded not to convene 
them, for that on former occasions of the like Nature the Assembly 
have expressly declar'd their Sentiments against engaging the In- 
dians to act offensively with the French, in consequence whereof 
Governor Thomas found himself oblig'd in his Instructions to the 
Commissioners which were sent from this Province to join with His 
Excellency Governor Clinton & the Commiss rs - for the Colonies of 
the Massachusetts & Connecticut to tye up their Hands from urging 
the Indians to an open declaration of War against the French, & 
that contrary to his own judgment of its being absolutely necessary 
for His Majestie's Service & the Security of the Northern Provinces, 
and as the Members of this Assembly are the same Persons & of 
the same Principles, & have but the other Day absolutely refus'd to 
be at any expence in defending the Province against the King's 
Enemies, tho' they were in their River & had like to have burnt 
New Castle, it is not to thought that they would alter their Senti- 
ments or enable the Council to send Commiss 1 ' 5 ' that would be at 
liberty to act in Concert with Your Excellency on the two points 
insisted on by your General Court. 

" The Council had just before the arrival of Your Letter sent an 
Express to Governor Clinton on Indian Affairs, & expecting the 
return of their Messenger every Moment they postponed coming to 
a Resolution upon it, thinking that Governor Clinton might have 
receiv'd some Instructions from His Majesty relating to this Affair 
and would impart them in his Answer, but his Excell cy - takes not 
the least Notice of this Interview. I only mention this in order to 
shew Your Excellency the reason why the return of the Post did 
vol. v.— 20. 



306 MINUTES OF THE 

i 

not bring you the Council's answer, which it wou'd have done had 
they received Governor Clinton's favour time enough. 

"The Council entirely concur in Sentiment with Your Excellency, 
& should be extremely glad to appoint some of their Members to 
wait on You, but as they stand circumstanc'd they are firmly of 
opinion the Comrniss 1 " 8 - laid under such limitations would do more 
harm than good. My Age and Infirmities render such a Journey 
impracticable for me, or none wou'd be more pleas' d to have the 
honour of waiting on You at Albany than, 

" Sir, Your Excellency's most obedient humble Servant, 

"ANTHONY PALMER, 
" His Excellency Gov r * Shirley/ 7 

Another of pretty much the same Tenor was wrote to Gov r# Clin- 
ton. 



At a Council held at Phllada. 26th July, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esq., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ^ 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, VEsqrs. 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, 

William Logan, 

The Minutes of the preceeding Council were read & approved. 

The Commissioners appointed to Treat with the Indians at Lan- 
caster made their report in writing, which was read and approv'd 7 
& is as follows : 

u To the Honourable the President & Council of the Province of 
Pennsylvania. 

u We, the Subscribers, having been Honour' d with a CommisB""' 
authorizing us to hold a Treaty with some of the Six Nations, 
Twigh twees, and others at Lancaster, do make the following Re- 
port of our Proceedings therein : 

" We hope what we have done will be of Service to the Province 
and to Your Satisfaction. We are, 
" Honourable Gentlemen, 

" Your most obed' - humb. Servants, 

"BENJAMIN SHOEMAKER, 
"JOSEPH TURNER, 
" THOMAS HOPKINSON, 
"WILLIAM LOGAN." 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 307 

A TREATY 

At the Court House in Lancaster, Tuesday, July 19th, 1748. 
present : 
Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, 



Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, J Eso l rs - 

The Magistrates and Inhabitants of Lancaster County, Fifty-five 
Indians of several Nations, viz. : Of the Six Nations, Delawares, 
Shawonese, Nanticokes, and Twightwees. 

Conrad Weiser, Esqr., Interpreter for the Six Nations. 

Mr. Andrew Montour Interpreter for the Shawonese & Twigh- 
twees. 

A Proclamation was made for Silence, and then a Commission 
in His Majesty's Name, under the Great Seal of the Province, was 
read, constituting the Honourable Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph 
Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, and William Logan, Esquires, Com- 
missioners to treat with these Indians, & the Interpreter was order'd 
to tell them the purport thereof & to bid them heartily welcome 
among their Brethren. 

The Commissioners having been informed that Scarrowyady, a 
Chief of the Oneido Nation, living at Ohio, was appointed Speaker 
for the Indians, but was so much hurt by a fall that he was unable 
to attend, order'd the Interpreter to tell them that they condoled 
with them on this unfortunate accident, but hoped that as what 
they came to transact was of a Public Nature and well known to 
them, all this wou'd occasion no delay, As the Government had 
shewn them great Indulgence in granting them a Council at Lan- 
caster, so far from the usual Place of Business, and in so hot a Sea- 
son, it was expected they wou'd not detain the Commiss ^s •' but de- 
liver what they had to say to-morrow morning at ten o' Clock, and 
further to desire they wou'd use no manner of Reserve, but open 
their Hearts freely and fully, the Commissioners promising to treat 
them with the same freedom and Plainness. 



At the Court House at Lancaster, Wednesday, July 20th, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, } p 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, } JJiS( * rs ' 

The Magistrates and many of the Inhabitants of Lancaster 
County. 

The same Indians as yesterday. 

The Interpreter informed the Commissioners that Scarrowyady 
still continuing ill and unable to attend, had deputed Andrew Mon- 



308 MINUTES OF THE 

tour to deliver his Speech, which the Indians desir'd might be re- 
ceived on their behalf, the substance thereof having been delib- 
erated upon and settled by them in Council. 

The Commissioners saying they had no objection to this, Andrew 
Montour said he was now going to speak for the Indians of the Six 
Nations living at Ohio. 

" Brethren, the Governor of Pennsylvania, and all the Governors 
of the great King of England over the Seas : 

" You have often sent pressing Messages to the Council Fire at 
Onondago to engage in your Interest as many of their Allies as 
they cou'd influence ; These Messages they have transmitted to us 
desiring we would take all opportunities of complying with your 
request, in consequence whereof we have now the pleasure to pre- 
sent to You some of the Cheifs of the Twightwee Nation, a large 
and powerful Tribe living on Ouebach, a great River running into 
Ohio, who come as Deputies sent by the whole Nation^ with a Re- 
quest that You would be pleased to admit them into your Amity. 
We join with them in the Petition — take their Hands, and let them, 
together with ours, be lock'd close in yours, and there held fast. 
We have opened unto You the occasion of our Visit, and to make 
it acceptable we lay down this String of Wampum. 

" Brethren, Onas, and all the King of England's Governors : 

u It will be necessary to lay before You what has pass'd between 
the Twightwees and us previous to our coming here, that You may 
be sensible of our Zeal for your Service, and of the ardent desire 
of that Nation to enter into Your Alliance. 

" Last Fall they sent a Message address'd to all the Tribes of 
Indians at Ohio & elsewhere in Amity with the English, which was 
deliver* d to the Shawonese as living nearest to them, and by them 
communicated to Us, to this Effect. 

" 'Brethren: 

a 'We, the Twightwees, are desirous to enter into the chain of 
Friendship with the English ; and as You are the next to Us of the 
Indians in their Alliance, we entreat You to signify this our Desire 
to the other Indians, and that You and they will open us a Council 
Road to the English Governments. Make it so clear and open for 
Us that neither we nor our Wives or Children may hurt their feet 
against any Log or Stump j and when once You have cleared a Road 
for Us we assure you we will keep it so, and it shall not be in the 
power of Onontio to block up or obstruct the passage. We further 
desire of You that when you have cleared a Council Road for us 
to the English, you and the other Indians will join your Interest to 
recommend -us in the most effectual manner to them to be admitted 
into their Chain/ Upon receipt of this Message from the Twight- 
wees the following answer was sent them : 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 309 

' a ' Brethren, the Twightwees : 

" c We received your String of Wampum expressing your desire to 
enter into Friendship with our Brethren, the English, and praying 
our Assistance to obtain this for you. We are glad you are in this 
Disposition, and wou'd, by all means, encourage you in it; but we 
are afraid lest you shou'd have taken this Resolution too hastily. 
Are you proof against the sollicitations that the Governor of Canada 
and his People will certainly use to engage your adherence to him ? 
Can you withstand his Resentment ? Consider this well, lest when 
we shall have recommended you to our Brethren the English, you 
shou'd prove unsteady, and so we shou'd lose their Esteem. Take, 
therefore, we urge you, time to consider & let us know your mind, 
& we will give you all the assistance in our Power/ 

u The Twightwees having received this answer, sent in the Spring 
a second Message addressed to all the Indians on Ohio in alliance 
with the English, to this purport : 

" l Brethren : 

eci Our Message in the Fall was not sent rashly or unadvisedly. 
We thought many Nights & Days of this Affair. We weighed 
every thing well relating thereto before we took the Resolution of 
seeking the Friendship of the English, and we now repeat to you 
our Assurances that this Request does not come from the Mouth 
only ; no, it comes from the heart, and is what we ardently wish to 
accomplish, and that we may not fail of Success we desire your 
assistance and that of all the Indians in the English Chain to 
help us to obtain this favour, and particularly we desire some of 
you will go along with us and present us to Onas/ 

il Brethren : 

"We have now faithfully related what passed between the 
Twightwees and us. We deliver over to You the strings of Wam- 
pum which we received with their Messages. Their Nation has 
sent thirty Beaver Skins, which we desire you would accept, & now 
be pleased to hear what their Deputies have to say." 

Here were laid down two strings of Wampum and 30 Beaver 
Skins. 

Then Andrew Montour acquainted the Commissioners that he 
was now going to be the Mouth of the Twightwee Deputies. 

u Brethren : 

" We present to You the Calumet Pipe, and pray we may be 
admitted to become a Link in your Chain of Friendship, & give you 
the strongest assurances if this favour be granted to us that we will 
keep it bright as long as the Rivers run." 

Here the Deputies laid down a Calumet Pipe with a long stem 
curiously wrought, & wrapp'd round with Wampum of several 



310 MINUTES OF THE 

Colours, & fill'd with Tobacco, which was smoked by the Commis- 
sioners & the Indians according to Custom. 
" Brethen : 

" We, the Deputies of the Twightwees, have it in Charge further 
to tell you that our Nation received a Calumet Pipe from some of 
the Allies, consisting of twelve Towns or Nations, with a Message 
to this Effect : That they had a Report among them that we in- 
tended to sollicit the English to be received into their Friendship 
and Alliance. That if such Report was true they desired us to 
acquaint them with our Success, that they might apply for the same 
favour, which they earnestly desire, and said they would wait a 
Day & a Night for an answer/' * 

Then the Deputies offer* d another Pipe to the Commissioners, 
not to keep, but that they might speak to it and return it with 
their answer. 

Andrew Montour said he was now going to resume t*he Speech 
of the Six Nations at Ohio. 
"Brethren: 

" You have now heard the Twightwees speak for themselves. We 
heartily join with them in their Petition. They are numerous, and 
tho' poor yet they are worthy of your Friendship, and as such we 
most heartily recommend them to you by this bundle of Skins." 

Here they laid down a bundle of Skins. 
" Brethren : 

" We beg leave before we conclude to become Intercessors for the 
Shawonese, who have given you just Cause of Complaint. They 
have told us that the Grovernor of Pennsylvania sent a Letter some 
Years ago requiring them to come down, but being conscious they 
had acted wrong, they had delayed hitherto to clo it, & have taken 
this opportunity of our coming to make use of us, desiring us to 
ask that for them which they dare not ask for themselves; that is, 
that they may be received again into favour, they having owned 
their fault, and given us the strongest assurances of their better 
behaviour for the future. Forgive us, therefore, if we entreat you 
wou'd be pleas'd to drop your resentment, and however they have 
behav'd hitherto, we hope a sense of your goodness will prevail 
with them to become good & faithful Allies for the future." 

Gave a String of Wampum. 

Andrew Montour informing the Commissioners he had delivered 
all that was given him in Charge to say at present, the Indians 
withdrew. 

*N. B. — A Day & a Night in the Indian Language signifies a Year. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 311 

At a Meeting of the Commissioners held at Lancaster the 21st 
July, 1743. 

PRESENT : 

Benjamin Shoemaker^ Joseph Turner, \ ™ 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, j J " " 

The Secretary having settled the Minutes of yesterday, the same 
were taken into Consideration, k that part thereof which relates to 
the Shawonese not giving the Commissioners satisfaction, Mr. Wei- 
ser was sent to Scarrowyady to consult with him thereupon, who 
returned & inform'd the Board that according to order he had con- 
sulted with Scarrowyady, and he in the presence of Andrew Mon- 
tour deliver'd himself as follows : 

" Neueheeonno, Kekewatcheky, Sonatziowanah, and Sequeheton, 
Chiefs ef the Shawonese now left at Allegheny, met in Council and 
addressed themselves to the Delawares and to the Six Nations on 
Ohio in the following manner : 

" ( Grand Fathers and Brethren — 

" c We the Shawonese have been misled, & have carried on a pri- 
vate Correspondence with the French without letting you or our 
Brethren the English know of it. We travelled secretly through 
the Bushes to Canada, and the French promis'd us great Things, 
but we find ourselves deceived. We are sorry that we had any 
thing to do with them. We now find that we cou'd not see, altho' 
the Sun did shine. We earnestly desire you wou'd intercede with 
our Brethren the English for us who are left at Ohio, that we may 
be permitted to ,be restored to the Chain of Friendship and be 
looked upon as heretofore the same Flesh with them.' Thus far the 
Shawanese.* 

" Whereupon the Indians of the Six Nations & the Delawares 
having received these assurances of their Concern for their past be- 
haviour, undertook to become their Intercessors, and have brought 
along with them three of the principal Shawonese to make their 
Submissions in Person. 



* Some of the Shawonese were seduc'd by Peter Chartier, a noted Indian 
Trader and Inhabitant of Pennsylvania at the beginning of the French 
War, & remov'd from their Towns to be nearer to the French Settlements 
on the Missississipi. Some time after several of these Deserters return'd, 
of which Neucheconno & his Party were some ; these, it seems, together 
with Kekewatcheky, the old Shawonese King, and his Friends, who had 
withstood the sollicitations of Chartier, join'd together & apply'd in this 
submissive manner to Scarrowyady. 



312 MINUTES OF THE 

At the Court House at Lancaster, Friday, the 22d July, 1748 1 . 
present : 
Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, > -Eg aTS 

Thomas Hopkinson, ' William Logan, j " * 

The Magistrates and many of the Inhabitants of Lancaster 
County. 

The same Indians as on Wednesday. 

The Commissioners order' d the Interpreter to let the Indians 
know they were going to give them an answer. 

" Brethren, you who live at Ohio of the Six Nations and others: 

u We are coneern'd that Scarrowyady continues so ill as not to 
be able to attend, but are pleas' d to hear he is in a fair way of Re- 
covery, and that he cou'd give the necessary Instructions to Mr. 
Andrew Montour about the Business which brought you here. We 
take it for granted that your Sentiments are fully & truly expressed 
in the Speeches delivered, & shall, therefore, answer the several 
matters contained therein in the order they were spoke. 

" Brethren of the Six Nations & others living at Ohio : 

" It gives us no small Satisfaction to observe the Regard you 
have shewn to the Messages sent you by the Governors of His 
Majesty's Provinces in endeavouring to gain over to His Majesty's 
Interest as many of your Allies as you cou'd influence. This is 
agreable to your Duty, & was recommended to you in a particular 
manner by the G-overnor of this Province at the commencement of 
the French War. As the Twightwees shewed so great an Inclina- 
tion to enter into our Friendship and desir'd you to conduct them 
hither, the part you have acted on this occasion was kind and pru- 
dent, and we think ourselves oblig'd to You for encouraging them 
& shewing them the way. 

" Our Approbation of your Conduct is testified by this String of 
Wampum. 

l( Brethren : 

" As there is reason to think from the manner in which the 
Twightwees have made their Application for a Council Road to the 
English Provinces, that it is not a sudden or a hasty step, but well 
considered by them, & may take its rise from the different Treat- 
ment which Indians of all Nations meet with at the hands of the 
English from what they experience while in the French Interest, 
we are inclinable to think them sincere, and that when admitted 
into our Chain they will not likely break it. 

" A Council Road to this Province is a measure which nearly 
concerns you, as it is to be laid out thro' your Towns, and no doubt 
you have thought well of this, and conceive you may depend on the 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 313 

sincerity of their professions & that it may be for our mutual 
benefit, or you wou'cl not join with them in making this Request. 
At your Instance, therefore, and from the opinion we have of your 
prudence & Integrity, we consent that such Road may be opened ; 
and it may be depended on that on our Parts it will always be kept 
clean, not the least obstruction shall be suffer'd to remain in it. 

" In Confirmation whereof, We give this String of Wampum. 
" Brethren of the Twightee Nation : 

" At the Intercession of our good Friends & Allies the Six Na- 
tions we have granted you a Council Road, whereby you have free 
access to any of His Majestie's Provinces; we admit you into our 
Friendship and Alliance, and, therefore, now call you Brethren, an 
appellation which we hold sacred, and in which is included every 
thing that is dear. It obliges us to give you assistance on all occa- 
sions, to exercise unfeigned affection towards you, to take you into 
our Bosoms, to use our Eyes and Ears and Hands as well for you 
as for ourselves. Nothing is put in competition by an Englishman 
with the Faith and Honour due to those whom our Gracious King 
pleases to take into his Protection, admit into his Chain of Friend- 
ship, and make them our Fellow Subjects. From that Moment 
they become our own Flesh and Blood, and what hurts them will 
equally hurt us. Do you on your parts look upon this Important 
Name of Brethren in the same Light • You must no more think of 
Onontio & his Children, all that sort of Relationship now ceases — 
His Majesty's Friends are your Friends, and his Majesty's Enemies 
are your Enemies. On these Conditions we accept your Calumet 
Pipe, and shall lay it up very carefully that it may be always ready 
for use when you and we come together. In token of our readiness 
to receive you into our Chain of Friendship, we present you with 
this Double Belt of Wampum as an Emblem of Union. 
" Brethren of the Twightwee Nation : 

" We understand that by an antient Custom observ'd by your 
Ancestors, the Delivery and acceptance of the Calumet Pipe are the 
Ceremonies which render valid & bind fast your Alliances. We 
must now tell you what our Usages are on these occasions. The 
English when they consent to take any Nation into their Alliances 
draw up a Compact in writing, which is faithfully Interpreted to the 
contracting Parties, and when maturely consider'd and clearly and 
fully understood by each side, their assent is declar'd in the most 
publick manner, and the stipulation render' d authentick by Sealing 
the Instrument with Seals, whereon are engraven their Familie's 
Arms, writing their names, and publishing it as their Act & Deed, 
done without force or constraint freely and voluntarily. This is the 
English Method of ratifying Treaties, this is the grand Security 
each gives of his Faith, and our Brethren of the Six Nations, the 
Delawares, Shawonese, and all other Indian Nations, when they 
first enter' d into the Chain of Friendship with us, executed Instru- 



314 MINUTES OF THE 

merits of this Nature, and as you are now one People with us in 
the same manner with all other of our Indian Allies, it will be ex- 
pected by this and His Majesty's other Governments that you will 
do the same. For your satisfaction we now show you some of the 
Deeds that the Indians executed when they first enter'd into our 
Alliance. 

" Brethren Deputies of the Twightwees : 

"You say some of your Allies having heard of your Intentions 
to apply for admittance into the Freindship & Alliance with the 
English, desired you to acquaint them with the Success of such Ap- 
plication, to the end that they might have an opportunity of asking 
the same favour. As we don't know the Names of those of your 
Allies, their number, or Situation, we cannot be more particular at 
present on this head than to tell you that we are always ready to 
receive favourably the applications of all those whom our Brethren 
of the Six Nations shall recommend as worthy of our friendship 
and Regard. 

" In Testimony whereof we have wrapped a String of Wampum 
round the Calumet Pipe sent by your Allies. 

"Brethren of the Six Nations, &c, at Ohio : 

" You perceive that at your Request we have receivee the Twigh- 
twees into our Friendship. We take kindly your conducting them 
to us for that end, and as a proof of our being well pleased with 
your Conduct on this occasion, we have ordered our Interpreter to 
deliver you at Mr. Croghan's some English Goods that are lodged 
there for the use of the Indians. 
" Brethren : 

" Your intercession for the Shawonese puts us under difficulties. 
It is at least two Years since the Governor of Pennsylvania wrote 
to Kekewatcheky a Letter, wherein he condescended out of regard 
to him & a few other Shawonese who preserved their fidelity, to 
offer those who broke the Chain a Pardon on their submission on 
their Return to the Towns they had deserted, and on their coming- 
down to Philadelphia to evidence in Person the sincerity of their 
repentance. This they should have immediately complied with, and 
they wou'd have readily been admitted into favour, but as they did 
not do it, what can be said for them ? You who live amongst them 
best know their Dispositions, and wou'd not, it may be hop'd, become 
Mediators for them were you not persuaded they wou'd return to 
their Duty. Some of them it may be allowed are weak People, 
and were perverted from their Duty by the persuasions of others, 
but this cannot be thought to be the Case of Ncucheconno & a few 
more. As, therefore, you have taken upon you the Office of Inter- 
cessors, take this string of Wampum & ^herewith Chastize Neuche- 
conno and his Party in such Terms as shall a proper Severity 
with them, tho' the expressions are left to your discretion, and then 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 315 

tell the delinquent Shawonese that we will forget what is past and 
expect a more punctual regard to their Engagements hereafter." 

Here was delivered a String of Wampum. 

" ' Tis but Justice to distinguish the Good from the Bad ; Keke- 
watchekyand his Friends who had virtue enough to resist the many 
fine Promisses made by the Emissaries of the French, will ever be 
remembered with Gratitude & challenge our best Services. To 
testify our Regard for these, we present them with this 

"Belt of Wampum. 

" And have ordered our Interpreter who is going to Ohio to give 
them a present of Goods." 

The Commissioners gave a handsome Entertainment to the Depu- 
ties of the Twightwees and the Indians who conducted them from 
Ohio, and after Dinner enter'd into a free Conversation with them 
about the Numbers and Situation of their Towns and those of their 
Allies; and by their Informations it appears that the River 
Ouabache takes its rise from a Lake at a small distance from the 
West end of Lake Erie, from which it runs South- Westerly 4 or 
500 Miles, and falls into the Ohio about 300 Miles from the Missis- 
sippi ; that on this River and another River called the Hatchet, the 
Twightwees- and their Allies have Twenty Towns, and that they 
count one thousand fighting Men; that it is a plain Country & of 
a rich Soil abounding with Game. The principal Deputy of the 
Twightwees laid clown with Chalk the Courses of the Mississippi, 
of Ouebache,& of Ohio, marking the Situation of their own Towns, 
of Lake Erie, & of two Forts that the French have on the 
Mississippi, whereby it is Manifest that if these Indians and their 
Allies prove faithful to the English, the French will be deprived of 
the most convenient & nearest communication with their Forts 
on the Mississippi, the ready Road lying thro' their Nations, and 
that there will be nothing to interrupt an Intercourse between 
this Province & that great River. 



At the Court House at Lancaster, Friday, July 22d, 1748. 
P. M. 

PRESENT : 

The same as in the Morning. 

Taming Buck, one of the Chiefs of the Shawonese, stood up and 
spoke as follows : 

" Brethren — 

" We, the Shawonese, sensible of our ungrateful Returns for the 
many favours we have been all along receiving from our Brethren 
the English ever since we first made the Chain of Friendship, came 



316 MINUTES OF THE 

along the Road with our Eyes looking clown to the earth, and have 
not taken them from thence till this Morning, when you were pleased 
to Chastise us, and then pardon us. We have been a foolish Peo- 
ple & acted wrong, tho' the Sun shone bright and shewed us very 
clearly what was our Duty. We are sorry for what we have done 
and promise better behaviour for the future. We produce to you 
a Certificate of the renewal of our Friendship in the year 1739, by 
the Proprietor and Governor. n Be pleased to sign it afresh, that it 
may appear to the world we are now admitted into your Friendship, 
& all former Crimes are buried & entirely forgot." 

The Commissioners received the Deed but refus'd to Sign it, 
letting them know they were forgiven on Condition of better be- 
haviour for the future; and when they shall have performed that 
Condition it will be time enough to apply for such Testimonials. 
Orders were given for mending their Guns and Hatchets, and then 
the Twightwees were told that the Secretary was preparing an In- 
strument for rendering authentick our Treaty of Friendship with 
them, which wou'd be ready at Nine o' Clock in the morning, to 
which time the Commissioners adjourn'd. 



At the Court House at Lancaster, Saturday, 23d July, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, ) ^ 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, j ^ 

The Magistrates and many of the Inhabitants of Lancaster County. 

The same Indians as Yesterday. 

The Instrument and Counterpart having been prepar'd and ap- 
prov'd by the Commissioners, the Contents thereof were read and 
carefully Interpreted to & approv'd by the Indians, & then they 
were executed by the Commissioners and the three Deputies of the 
Twightwees, the other Indians mentioned therein signing as Wit- 
nesses, together with the Magistrates and Inhabitants present. 

" Whereas, at an Indian Treaty held at Lancaster, in the County 
of Lancaster and Province of Pennsylvania, on Wednesday the 
Twentieth Day of July, Instant, before the Honourable Benjamin 
Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, and William Logan, 
Esquires, by virtue of a Commission under the Great Seal of the 
said Province, dated at Philadelphia the sixteenth Day of the same 
Month, Three Indian Chiefs, Deputies from the Twightwees, a Na- 
tion of Indians situate on or about the River Ouebache, a Branch 
of the Biver Mississippi, viz. : Ciquenackqua, Assepausa, and Na- 
toecqucha, appeared on behalf of themselves & their Nation, & prayed 
that the Twightwees might be admitted into the Friendship and 
Alliance of the King of Great Britain and his Subjects, professing 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 317 

on their Parts to become true and faithful Friends and Allies to the 
English, and so forever to continue, and Scarrowyacly, Cadarianiaha, 
Chiefs of the Oneido Nation, Suchrachery, a Chief of the Scneka 
Nation, Caniuckodon, Cantyuckqua, Ecknisera, Chiefs of the Mo- 
hocks, Lawachcanricky, Taming Buck, Ossoghqua, Chiefs of the 
Shawonese, and Nenatcheehon, a Chief the Delaware Nation, all of 
them Nations in Friendship and Alliance with the English, becom- 
ing earnest Intercessors with the said Commiss r ' on their behalf, the 
Prayer of the said Deputies of the Twigh twees was granted, and a 
firm Treaty and alliance of Friendship was then stipulated and 
agreed upon between the said Commissioners and the said Deputies of 
the Twightwee Nation, as by the Records of Council remaining at 
Philadelphia, in the said Province, may more fully appear. Now 
these Presents Witness, & it is hereby declared that the said Na- 
tion of Indians called the Twightwees are accepted by the said Com- 
missioners as Good Friends & Allies of the English Nation, and 
that they, the said Twightwees and the Subjects of the King of 
Great Britain, shall forever hereafter be as one Head and one Heart, 
& live in true Friendship as one People, in Considertaion whereof 
the said Ciquenackqua, Assepausa, & Natoecqueha, Deputies of the 
said Twightee Nation, Do hereby in behalf of the said Nation Cove- 
nant, Promise, & Declare that the several People of the said Twigh- 
twee Nation, or any of them, shall not at any time hurt, injure, or 
defraud, or suffer to be hurt, injured, or defrauded, any of the Sub- 
jects of the King of Great Britain, either in their Persons or Estates, 
but shall at all times readily do Justice & perform to them all Acts 
and Offices of Friendship and good Will. Item; that the said Twigh- 
twee Nation by the Alliance aforesaid becoming entitled to the 
Privelege and Protection of the English Laws, They shall at all times 
behave themselves regularly & soberly according to the Laws of this 
Government whilst they shall live or be among or near the Christian 
Inhabitants thereof. Item ; that none of the said Nation shall at 
any time be aiding, assisting, or abetting to or with any other Na- 
tion, whether of Indians or others, that shall not at such time be in 
Amity with the Crown of England and this Government. Item ; 
that if at any time the Twightwee Nation by means of Evil minded 
Persons & Sowers of Sedition shou'd hear any unkind or disadvan- 
tageous Reports of the English, as if they had evil designs against 
any of the said Indians, in such case such Indians shall send No- 
tice thereof to the Governor of this Province for the time being, & 
shall not give Credit to the said Reports till by that means they 
shall be fully satisfied of the truth thereof; And it is agreed that 
the English shall in such cases do the like by them. 

" In testimony whereof as well the said Commissioners as the 
said Deputies of the Twightwee Nation have smoked the Calumet 
Pipe, made mutual Presents to each other, & hereunto interchange- 
ably set their Hands and Seals, the Twenty-third Day of July, in 
the Year of our Lord, 1748, and in the 22d Year of the Reign of 



318 MINUTES OF THE 

George the Second, King of Great Britain, France, and Ireland; 
Defender of the Faith, &c. 

"BENJAMIN SHOEMAKER, [l. s.] 
"JO. TURNER, [l. s.] 
"THO s HOPKINSON, [l. s.] 
" WILL M - LOGAN, [l. s.] 

" The Mark of 
" CIQUENACKQUA, X [l. s.] 

"The Mark of 
"ASSAPAUSA, X [l. s.] 

" The Mark of 
"NATOECQUEHA, X [l. s.] 
" Signed, Sealed, & Delivered in the Presence of Us ; — 
"RICHARD PETERS, Secretary. 
" CONRAD WEISER, Interpreter. 
" The Mark of 

" X ANDREW MONTOUR, Interpreter. 
" ADAM PETER REEHM. 
* "DAVID STOUT. 

" GEORGE CROGHAN, 
" MICHAEL HUBLY, 
"JOHN FORSYTH, 
" CONRAD DOLL, 
" PETER PREEST, 
" EDWARD SMOUT, 
"THOMAS COOKSON, 
"PETER WORRAL, 
" GEORGE SMITH, 
" The Mark X of SCARROWYADY, 
" The Mark X of CADARIANIRKA, 
" The Mark X of SUCHRAQUERY, 
"The Mark X of CAMINCHODON, 
"The Mark X of CUNTYUCKQUA, 
"The Mark X of LAWACHCAMICKY. 
"The Mark X of DOMINI BUCK, 
" The Mark X of ASSOGHQUA, 
"The Mark X of NENATCHEHON. 
The Commissioners then enquired if the Indians had any particu- 
lar news to communicate, and after some time spent in Conference 
Suchraquery spoke as follows : 

" The Indians of the several Nations living at Ohio return you 
thanks for your acceptance of their good Offices in conducting the 
Twigh twees and admitting them into your Alliance j likewise for 
your Goodness in accepting their Mediation on behalf of the Shawo- 
nese, & thereupon forgiving their late Breach of Faith. Our new 
Brethren, the /Twightwees, tell us that they have brought a few 
Skins to begin a Trade, and they desire you would be pleased to 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 319 

order the Traders to put less Stones in their Scales that their Skins 
may weigh more, and that they may allow a good Price for them, 
which will encourage them and their Nation to Trade more largely 
with You." This the Commissioners promis'd to do. 

The Commissioners inform'd the Indians that there was likely 
to be a Peace between the King of England and the French King j 
that the News was but just arriv'd and imperfectly told, but that 
there was actually a Cessation of Arms. The Indians making no 
Reply, the Commiss"' after ordering a Present to the Twightwee 
Deputies, rose & put an End to the Treaty. 

Captain Smyter being ready to Sail for London, Mr. Taylor & 
Mr. Hopkinson are appointed a Committee to draw up an answer to 
the Proprietaries Letters, and it is recommended to them to sett all 
matters relating to the Association in their true Light. 



At a Council held at Philada. 30th July, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President, 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, "] 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, j^Esqrs, 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, 

William Logan, 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approved. 

Mr. Taylor laid before the Board the Draught of a Letter to the 
Proprietaries, which was approved, & the Secretary is order' d to 
write it fair to be Sign'd by all the Members. 

"Philada., July 30th, 1748, 
u Gentlemen : 

" As we don't think it necessary to distinguish between the Let- 
ters which we receive from either of you seperately & those which 
are signed by both jointly, we take this opportunity by Captain 
Smyter of acknowledging your several favours of the 16th & 29th 
of October, and of the 12th, 29th, and 30th March last, and are 
well pleased to find therein that some parts of our Administration 
are approved of. But we must own it gave us no small Concern 
that the measures which have been taken to prevent this City or 
perhaps this Colony from falling into the Hands of His Majestie's, 
or that endeavouring to preserve the Lives & Properties of its In- 
habitants from Murder & Rapine (at a time when it was notorious 
both to this & the neighbouring Governments that Designs were 
meditating & preparations in our Enemie's Ports actually and 
avowedly carrying on for these purposes) shou'd be thought Illegal 
or Unwarrantable. 



320 MINUTES OF THE 

"The frequent & repeated Accounts we received of the Enemie's 
designs and their Preparations (the Truth whereof hath been since 
confirmed) — their Boldness and Insolence in coming up the River 
last Summer — the weak & impotent Condition of the Province, 
either to repell an Enemy or suppress Tumults and Insurrections, 
which were very much apprehended wou'd attend an Invasion, added 
to the Murmurs and complaints of the People, who having been re- 
fused any assistance from their Iiepresentatives, were laid under a 
Necessity of applying to the Council for their Countenance and 
leave to bear Arms and form themselves into proper Bodies for their 
mutual defence, were sufficient Causes for our taking this matter 
into our most serious Consideration ; And it was very evident that 
the Government of itself was unable to give them any Protection, 
and wou'd in our opinions have been both unjust & unreasonable as 
well as very unfit to disable them from defending themselves, as it 
might increase their discontent and probably end in a dissaffection 
if not a real disobedience to such Government and Laws as wou'd 
allow them no kind of Security in so dangerous a Conjuncture. 
The Council observing that the best and soberest of the Inhabitants 
were extremely desirous of uniting upon this occasion, provided 
they cou'd have Lycence and Permission from them for so doing, 
accordingly granted them the liberty of meeting under Arms & 
forming themselves into proper Companies for learning Military 
Discipline; and as some will of course be more expert and assiduous 
than others, such were thought fittest for a Command and were ac- 
cordingly recommended to the Council for their approbation • and as 
we had an opportunity of knowing the Characters of the Persons and 
their fitness for such a Trust, and that such as were recommended were 
Friends to the Government, especially the Principal Officers who 
were under the immediate direction of this Board, we accordingly 
granted them such Commissions as the former Governor had issued; 
and in a few Months we had the satisfaction to see a great number 
of the most substantial Freeholders formed into Companies, fur- 
nished with Arms and Ammunition, & every Day attending with 
great Chearfulness, in a most severe Cold Season, to learn the use 
of them, in which they made a very amazing progress in a short 
time, so that from a State of the greatest anxiety we soon found 
this Association had given us a degree of strength and security 
sufficient to quiet the minds of the People, to preserve the Peace of 
the Government in case of Insurrections, and to frustrate the 
Designs of our Enemies, and to it (under God) we must attribute 
the Preservation of the City of Philadelphia. 

" If any doubt shou'd remain with you about the Legality of it, 
we imagine it must arise from a supposition that the Associators 
acted independently of the Government; but this will appear to be 
without foundation from the very Tenor of the Officers' Commis- 
sions, one of which we have inclos'd for your Satisfaction. 

" You are pleas'd very justly to observe, that we cannot be war- 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 321 

ranted in granting Commissions to any Officers who axe to receive 
their Orders from others than ourselves or those we shou'd appoint, 
as this wou'd be giving the power of governing the Militia from the 
King to the People, and wWct undoubtedly he greatly Criminal ; 
but this we always guarded against, tho' we cou'd not find it was 
ever expected or intended ; on the ^contrary, the inferior Officers 
were to take their Orders from their Superiors, & the Superior 
Officers were constantly to receive their Orders from this Board. 

" Possibly the not fully understanding that part of the Articles 
of the Association relating to the Military Council might occasion 
this mistake ; but when we assure you that Council was Invested 
with no Powers in respect to Actions, but was only intended as a 
proper Band of Union for the different Regiments of different 
Counties, that the whole might become as one body, & that one and 
the same Spirit might, by the means of this ^Common Council, be 
more easily communicated to & diffused among the several Parts; 
•and also to ma'ke those Regulations which are usually the matter of 
Militia Laws and are necessary in every Militia, but cou'd not be 
hoped for from our Assembly, and if made by any not chosen by 
the People wou'd not proBably be so likely to be regarded ; such 
as fixing the, times & places for the meeting of the Companies to be 
exercis'd in Arms, and directing the Conduct to be observ'd on 
these occasions; settling the manner of making and spreading 
Alarms, the places of Rendezvous of particular Companies & of 
whole Regiments, on the Alarm, & the Conduct the Officers are to 
observe at such times till they shall receive Orders from the G-over- 
aor or Comna&ndef -in-Chief, &c, &c, &c.j All which Regulations 
were intended to fee laid before the Governor or President & Coun- 
cil for their approbation, and to be of no force without that .Sanc- 
tion. 

a But in Matters of Action in Time of Service it was never 
-•undestood that the Military Council shou'd meet to give Orders; 
no such thing wasimagin'd; but the Orders were to be expected from 
the Captain General, i. e., the Governor for the time being. If 
•every thing intended by the Assoeiators was not dearly exprest in 
that short Instrument, by which they first engaged themselves, it 
may be imputed to the Novelty of the Scheme, for which they had 
no Precedent, and to the haste in which the whole Affair was neces- 
sarily carried on, especially since they have not in any part of their 
Conduct given the least Umbrage that they aim at in assuming any 
Powers inconsistent with the prerogatives of Government; and we 
have reason to believe that if the Military Council are not prevented 
from sitting by the declaration of a Peace, One of their first Acts 
may be an Explanation of every thing in the Scheme that is doubt- 
ful or liable to misconstruction, to the full satisfaction of the Gov- 
ernment. 

•" On the whole, as the Associators had no Power 7 nor pretended 
yol. y. — 2L 



322 MINUTES OF THE 

to have any but what thej receiv'd from this Board, and as we 
granted none but such as we think are well warranted by the Char- 
ter, we hope you will be as well satisfied of the Legality of this 
proceeding as we assure ourselves you are of the usefulness and 
necessity of it. 

" Shou'd the Associators have assumed to themselves Powers the 
least derogatory of His Majestie's Prerogative, or have acted other- 
wise than for His Majestie's Service, or that of the Country, we 
always had it in our Power instantly to put a stop to such proceed- 
ings by suppressing their Officer's Commissions; but this we had not 
the least reason to apprehend ; on the contrary, their Conduct from 
the Beginning has been orderly k regular ; their zeal & Industry 
remarkable, tho' it has been a hard Service on them and their Offi- 
cers ; a constant, regular Guard has been kept on the Battery with- 
out the least Grudging or Discontent, and at their general Musters 
they have discovered a Skill & Regularity that has surprised every 
body; the whole has been attended with such Expence, Care, and 
Fatigue (in which permit us to say we have had our share) as would 
not have been born or undertaken by any that were not warm &; 
sincere Friends to the Government, and true Lovers of their. Coun- 
try. In short, by this means we have, in the opinion of most 
Strangers, the best Militia in America, and one of the compleatest 
Batteries, of its size, on the Continent, so that had the War con- 
tinued we shou'd have been in little Pain about any future Enter- 
prizes of our Enemies. 

u As the part we have acted in this Affair was intended, so it has 
really proved, to be of the greatest Service to our Country, and the 
most that could be done at such a critical Juncture for His Majes- 
tie's Service and your own; and whatever opinion Lawyers or others 
not fully acquainted with our unhappy Circumstances, may enter- 
tain of it, it is, in our opinion, one of the wisest & most useful mea- 
sures that was ever undertaken in any Country. It would, there- 
fore, be too sensible a mortification to the Inhabitants to find their 
zeal and laudable Intention on this occasion and the real Service 
they have done so far mis-understood as to subject them to Censure. 
We hope, however, when the Association & the good effects of it 
come to be fully considered & understood, and the Conduct of its 
Members impartially cxamin'd, it will be found to have been under- 
taken with a laudable Design, and conducted in all its Parts with 
such order as is consistent with the strictest Rules of good Govern- 
ment, and will, therefore, merit your approbation. 

" The Treaty we have lately had with the Indians at Lancaster 
will, we hope, be productive of considerable advantages to the 
People of this Province, by enlarging our Indian Trade and ex- 
tending our Friendship & Alliance to Indians hitherto unknown to 
us. We parted with much satisfaction on both sides, & expect on 
their Return we shall be address'd by other Nations in their Neigh- 
bourhood. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 323 

"The Pardon so earnestly sought for by the Shawonese, & their 
submission appearing sincere, we thought not proper to refuse, 
especially as the Six Nations became Intercessors for them. We 
hope when you have perus'd the Treaty itself, to which we beg leave 
to refer, you will approve of it. We earnestly wish for the arrival 
of our Governor, as we expect great Satisfaction from his Adminis- 
tration, & as it will be some Relief to Us who we assure you have 
been fully employed in the Business of the Publick ever since Col - 
Thomas' Departure. If we shou'd be so happy as to have given 
You the same satisfaction in our Administration as we flatter our- 
selves we have given the People under our Care, we shall think our 
Time & Pains well bestowed. We are, 

"Gentlemen, Your most obedient humble Servants, 
" ANTHONY PALMER, 
"THOMAS LAWRENCE, 
" SAMUEL HA'SELL, 
"WILLIAM TILL, 
"ABRAHAM TAYLOR. 
"The Honoble. the Proprietaries of the Province of Pennsyl- 
vania." 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Thursday, 4th August, 1748, 
present : 

The Honourable ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ~) 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, > Esqrs. 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, J 

The President laid before the Board a Letter from Captain Mais- 
terson, which being read and the sentiments of the Board taken 
thereon, an answer was wrote thereto, & both order'd to be enter'd* 

"Hector, Delaware Bay, July 28th, 1748. 
"Sir: 

" Being cruizing along the Coast I put in here thinking it my 
Duty to .see if I cou'd get any Intelligence of the Enemie's 
Privateers. 

" On the 9th Instant I wrote a Letter & sent it to Coll 0, McKenzie, 
desiring him to direct it to some Gentleman in Philadelphia (I not 
being acquainted) to inform the Inhabitants that on the 6th I retook 
a Schooner of about 40 Tons, laden with Sugar. She had no Eng- 
lish on board, only ten Spaniards, & no Papers of any kind. The 
Spaniards cou'd not tell her Name, nor give any other account of 
her than that she came from Providence laden with French Sugar 
& bound to Philada. I shou'd be glad to know, Sir, if any Person 
in this Colony lays claim to her. 



324 MINUTES OF THE 

"As His Majesty's Ship, the Loo, is now gone to Norfolk in 
order to heave down, I am afraid it will prevent me from doing so 
for sometime. I should therefore be very much oblig'd to you to 
inform me whether there is a conveniency here to heave down a 
Ship which draws seventeen feet Water. 

" I shou'd be very glad to have the pleasure of seeing you or any 
Gentlemen on board the Hector. Your answer will be of great 
Satisfaction to, 

" Sir, Your most obed'- h'ble Servant, 

"SAML. MAISTERSON. 

"The Honoble. Anthony Palmer, Esqr. 

u P. S. — On the 15th Instant in the Evening I joined Company 
with His Majesty's Sloop the Otter, who had with her two French 
Prizes. The next Day, in the morning, we took a Spanish Priva- 
teer Schooner of ten Carriage & ten Swivel G-uns, and retook three 
Vessels that had been taken by the said Privateer, and carried them 
into Hampton Road. 

" On the 27th I left the Otter and the Prizes there." 

"Philada., August 2d, 1748. 
"Sir: 

" I have the Honour of yours of the 28th July, which did not 
come to my Hands till Yesterday afternoon. The Council, to whom 
I communicated it, express a good deal of Pleasure at your kind 
Inclinations to favour this City with your Company if the depth of 
the River wou'd permit, & You wou'd have any conveniency of 
Careening. As to the first, there are several careful and knowing 
Pilots at Lewes, who can give you satisfaction on this head, par- 
ticularly Abraham Wiltbank & John Mawle, and if they will un- 
dertake to Pilot You, as they know all the places of Danger well, I 
believe you may safely trust them. I am told that Vessels of as 
large a draught of Water as the Hector have come up here, & that 
at Red Bank, the Place of the greatest Danger, the Channel is 
deeper now than formerly, but as to the Navigation you will be 
pleas'd to take the advice of the Pilots at the Capes. As to the 
second point I can venture to assure You that there are Wharfs 
here which your Ship may easily lye at & with safety heave down; 
the danger mostly apprehended by the Council is, that you will not 
be able to keep your Sailors j this Port is on this account one of 
the worst in the World, as there is abundance of ways to get out of 
Town, & abundance of bad People to conceal & assist the Run- 
aways. Capt" - Ballet experienc'd this & found it an hard matter to 
get Men, tho' our Vessels were taken every day at the Capes, and 
it was the Interest of every trading Person to assist him ; and the 
Merchants did really exert themselves. 

* In every other respect it is believed you will be well accom- 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 



325 



modated, and you may depend on the Council's doing all in their 
Power to make the place agreeable to You, in which they shall have 
the hearty concurrence of, t 

" Sir, Your most humble Servant, 

"ANTHONY PALMER. 
" To Capt n - Maisterson, of the Hector, Man-of-War, in Delaware 

Bay- 

Coll " Graydon inform'd the Board that Bernard Yanhorn, Ralph 
Dunn, & some other Persons belonging to the Associated Company 
of Northampton Township, Bucks County, had withdrawn them- 
selves from that Company, & had presum'd, contrary to the Asso- 
ciation sign'd by them, to form a new Company & to proceed to 
the Choice of Officers, and the Choice falling on the said Bernard 
Vanhorn to be Captain, Robert Cummings Lieutenant, & the said 
Ralph Dunn to be Ensign, they had so far impos'd on the Board 
as to obtain Commissions, & as this might be attended with evil 
Consequences, he requested that the Affair might be examin'd into 
& their Commiss ns superceded ; whereupon Orders issued from the 
Board to the Officers of both Companys to appear in Council on 
Friday the 12th Instant. 

li A List of Officers to ivhom Commissions have been granted since 
the last Entry. 

Philadelphia Goiinty. 

Jacob Leech, late Lieutenant, was elected Captain in the room of 
Thomas York. 

John Barge, late Ensign of the said Company, Lieutenant in 
the room of Jacob Leech. 



Jacob Naglee Ensign in the room of John Barge. 



Captains. 



Ensigns. 



Lieutenants. 

Chester County. 
Thomas Hubert, jun T -' John Rees, Anthony Richard, 

George Leggit, Thomas Leggit, Archibald Young. 

Lancaster County. 



John Harris. 
John Edwards, 

David Marshall, 
James Edwards, 



Neio Castle County. 

David John, Robert Stewart. 

Kent County. 
David Clark, William Green, 

James Lewis, • James James. 



326 MINUTES OF THE 

At a Council held at Philadelphia, 12th August, 1748. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ~) 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, > Esqrs. 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, j 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

Lieutenant Wynkoop, in behalf of Captain Bennetts Company of 
Associators in Northampton Township, Bucks County, & likewise 
C. Bernard Vanhorne & Lieutenant Robert Cummings, in behalf 
of their Company, attending with their Witnesses, both Returns 
were examin'd ; & it appearing from thence that the said Vanhorne 
and fourteen more did actually belong to Captain Bennet's Com- 
pany, and that, therefore, they cou'd not, consistent with their Ar- 
ticles, proceed within the Year to another Election, the Commis 115, 
of the said Bernard Vanhorne, Robert Cummings, & Ralph Dunn, 
were superseded. Such of the Inhabitants, however, as did not be- 
long to Captain Bennet's Company & were minded to Associate 
might chose their Officers again, & on the Return of fit Persons & 
their Petition for Commissions, the Council would readily grant 
them. 

The following Letter from Governor Trelawny was delivered to 
the President in Council, & read as follows, viz. : 

" Jamaica, May 27th, 1748. 
« Sir : 

"Admiral Knowles having represented to me in a Letter how 
much His Majesty's Ships under his Command had suffer' d by de- 
sertion, that they wanted 500 Men of their Compliment, by which 
his Squadron would be disabled from doing the Service it was sent 
for unless he cou'd be supplied with Men, which he had no hopes 
of, but by having a Liberty to impress, he having tried all other 
methods — by promising Pardon to such Deserters as skou'd return 
within a limited time, & offering to Volunteers the Choice of serv- 
ing on board any Ship in his Squadron they pleas' d and for what 
time they shou'd agree for. His Majesty's Council of this Island, 
to whom I communicated his Letter, were unanimously of opinion 
that this was such an Emergency as required an Impress, within 
the meaning of the Act for the better Encouragement of the Trade 
of His Majesty's Sugar Colonies; and accordingly consented that 
he might impress for the space of two Months, which they did the 
more willingly as they were of opinion that the very deserters that 
might be apprehended wou'd go a great way towards manning his 
Ships, which might be effectually compleated by the Idle Seamen that 
keep about the Punch Houses & wait to get extravagant wages for 
the Run home, and that it cou'd be no prejudice to the Northward 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 327 

Trade, the Admiral having been so kind to assure me that he wou'd 
mot impress any that were Inhabitants or settled in any of the Colo- 
nies in North America, which I thought it wou'd be proper to ac- 
quaint you with, least the Merchants & Seafaring Men of Your 
Province shou'd be under any uneasiness upon hearing of this Im- 
press. 

" For they may be assured the Admiral will religiously comply 
with his Promise. 

u I am, with great Respect, 

u Sir, Your most obedient humb. Serv'- 

" EDWARD TRELAWNY. 

The Board were of opinion that as there was a Suspension of 
Arms between Great Britain, France, and the States General, & all 
likelyhood of a General Peace, there was no need of making the con- 
tents of the Letter Publick. 

The Accounts of the Expences of the late Treaty at Lancaster 
were laid before the Board by the Secretary (after deducting the 
value of the Presents from the Indians), amounting to the^Sum of 
£166 18 0, and as all the Sums, excepting such as were disbursed by 
the Secretary himself by order of the Commissioners, were certified. 
by Mr. Weiser, they were approv'd, and it was resolv'd that they 
should be laid before the Assembly with a proper Message to re- 
commend the immediate payment of them. 

Province of Pennsylvania to Expences of the Indians at the late 
Treaty of Lancaster: 

1748, July, Dr. 

To George Croglian, as by Account of particulars 

To George Gibson, as ^ Do. 

To Michael Crouse, as *f Do. 

To Jacob Sclaugh, as f Do. 

To Doctor Boudes' Bill ----- 

To Docf- Regre - ' 

To Roger Connor ------ 

To Samuel Devenny, an Express to the Council on 

the Indians' Arrival ----- 110 

To John Morris attending the Indians by special 

Order during their whole stay - - - 1 10 



£ 


s. 


a. 


62 


1 





73 


5 


6 


41 


9 


2 


2 


10 





4 








1 


5 





1 


10 






£189 8 



Cr„ 
By 800 White Wampum to George 

Croghan by Mr. Peters - - £1 4 

By 55 lb. of Beaver, @ 8s. • - - 22 



Carried forward, £23 4 £189 8 



328 MINUTES OF THE 



Brought forward, 
By 7 J lb. of ordinary ditto, @ 6s. - 
By 41 ordinary Summer Deer Skins, 

weight 86 lb., @ 22d. - 
By 15 dyes* Leather Skims, weight 

29 H* - - . - - 



Balanee - 

N. B. — These Skins were received from the Indians at the Treaty , 
24th August, 1748. 

Perus'd & approved by the Commissioners.. 

RICHARD PETERS, Clerk, 



,23 4 

2 5 







£189 8 


7 17 


8 


- 


5 16 





39- 2 $ 




- 


- 


£149 18 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Tuesday,. 23d Aug*' 1748. 
present r 

The Hoooble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., Presld 1 - 
Samuel Hasell, William Till, *) 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, ( ™ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Thomas Hopkinson, j ^ 

William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

A Message from the Assembly by two of their Members that a 
Quorum of the House met last Night pursuant to their Adj.ourn>- 
ment, and if the President & Council have any thing to lay before 
them they are ready to receive it; they were told that a Message 
wou'd be sent them to-morrow morning. 

The Board having examin'd the Council Mk>utes k from thence 
extracted what is necessary to be laid before the Assembly, a Mes- 
sage was drawn and agreed to, in order to be sent to-morrow morn- 
ing at ten o'Clocli, to which time the Council adjourned. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Wednesday, 24th August, 1748. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, 

Robert Strettcll, Benjamin Shoemaker, 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, 

William Logan, 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approved . 



Esqrs. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 329 

The Message agreed to yesterday was again read & signed by the 
President, & the Secretary sent with it to the House. 

A Message from the President & Council to the Assembly. 
" Gentlemen : 

"In pursuance of His Majesty's Commands, signified to us by 
His Grace the Duke of Bedford, we have caused His Majesty's 
Proclamation for a Cessation of Arms to be Published here, which 
by the Advices we have received we expect will soon be followed 
by a General Peace. 

" Since your last Sitting we have again taken into Consideration 
the mischievious Practice of carrying Rum among the Indians, and 
have not only issued a Proclamation for preventing it, but have or- 
dered the Magistrates of Lancaster County to recommend it to the 
Grand Jury, that the Delinquents may be prosecuted; whereupon 
Bills of Indictment have been found against a great number of them, 
which we hope will be some Cheque to this growing Evil, tho' we 
cannot expect a total Stop will be put to it until the Laws provided 
against selling Bum to the Indians be amended. 

" The latter end of June last we received a Letter from His Ex- 
cellency Governor Shirley, acquainting us that an Interview with 
the Indians of the Six Nations was appointed to be held at Albany 
on the 10th July, desiring that Commissioners might be sent from 
this Government to be present at it to consult & join with the 
other Commissioners there; but taking into Consideration your 
Sentiments delivered to us in a matter of the like kind, and ob- 
serving the Notice being so short that it wou'd scarcely afford time 
sufficient for consulting with You on this Affair, and for appointing 
Commissioners with proper Instructions, we declined calling You 
together on this occasion. 

" The Information we received from the Cajukas had the appear- 
ance of a matter of the greatest Importance to the safety of the 
People of this and the Neigbouring Governments; we, therefore; 
immediately dispatched an Express with it to His Excellency the 
Governor of New York, whose answer together with the Informa- 
tion we received will be delivered you by our Secretary. 

"In consequence of the Letters which in our Message we ac- 
quainted you we had wrote to the Governors of Virginia and Mary- 
land, the former has sent a Present for the Indians at Ohio, to be 
delivered them by Mr. Weiser with the Presents from this Govern- 
ment. 

"We have the Satisfaction to acquaint You that the Twightwees? 
a considerable Nation of Indians living on the Biver Ouabache, a 
Branch of Ohio, hitherto in the French Interests, being desirous of 
entring into Friendship with the English, communicated their In- 
tentions to the Indians of the Six Nations at Allegheny, who con- 



330 MINUTES OF THE 

ducted their Deputies to Lancaster, where a firm Treaty of Friend- 
ship & Alliance has been established between us. This must 
necessarily strengthen the English Interest in general among 
the Indians, contribute greatly to the Security of our Inhabitants 
in time of War, and tend considerably to the enlarging our Indian 
Trade, especially as we are assured .by the Twightwee Deputies 
that not less than twelve towns in their Neighbourhood are equally 
desirous with them to become our Allies, and settle a Correspond- 
ence with us; & that they only waited to know the Success of their 
Negociations, when they would make the like Application. Sbou'd 
this be effected, besides the advantages already mentioned the 
Intercourse between the French at Canada & the Mississippi would 
be greatly interrupted, the nearest & most convenient Passage 
being thro' those Towns. For other Matters of less Moment trans- 
acted at that Treaty we shall refer you to the Treaty itself. You 
will be pleased to order Payment of the Expences accrued on this 
& other necessary occasions, an Account whereof will be delivered 
to You. 

" ANTHONY PALMER, President. 
"August 24th, 1748. " 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 25th August, 1748. 

present : 
The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 

Thomas Lawrence, William Till, "] 

Abraham Taylor, Benjamin Shoemaker, vEsqrs. 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, J 

A Letter from His Grace the Duke of Bedford, receiv'd by the 
Delaware Captain Mesnard, was read, inclosing a Proclamation for 
a Cessation of Arms, &c, whereupon the Board appointed Wednes- 
day next, 11 o'Clock, for Publishing the same. 

Order' 'd, That Notice be given to the Magistrates & the proper 
Officers to give their attendance, and Copies are order'd to be sent 
to Lancaster & the Lower Counties. 

"Whitehall, 7th May, 1748. 
"Sir: 

"The King's Plenipotentiary & those of His most Christian 
Majesty & the States General of the United Provinces having 
Signed at Aix-la-Chapelle on the 19th of April last, 0. S., Prelimi- 
nary Articles for restoring a General Peace, and in Consequence 
whereof His Majesty has been pleased to order a Proclamation to 
be Published, declaring a Cessation of Arms as well by Sea as 
Land, which I send You herewith inclos'd. I am commanded by 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 331 

His Majesty to signify to You His pleasure that You cause the 
same to be Published in all the proper Places under your Govern- 
ment, to the end that all His Majesty's Subjects there may pay due 
obedience to, & a strict observance of the same. 

" I am, Sir, Your most obedient, humble Servant, 

" BEDFORD. 
" Governor of Pennsylvania/' 



" By the KING. 
" A PROCLAMATION, 

" Declaring the Cessation of Arms, as well by Sea as Land, 
agreed upon between His Majesty the Most Christian King and 
the States General of the United Provinces, and enjoining the ob- 
servance thereof. 

" George R. 

u Whereas, Preliminaries for restoring a General Peace were 
Sign'd at Aix-la-Chapelle on the 19th Day of April last, 0. S., by 
the Ministers of Us, the Most Christian King, and the States Gen- 
eral of the United Provinces ; And Whereas, For the putting an 
End to the Calamities of War as soon and as far as may be pos- 
sible, it hath been agreed between Us, His Most Christian King, 
and the States General, as follows, that is to say — 

" That Hostilities shou'd cease at Land within the Times and in 
the manner in the said Preliminary Articles for that purpose agreed 
upon; and at Sea from the respective Times and within the re- 
spective Places hereinafter particularly mentioned. 

" And to prevent all occasions of Complaints & Disputes which 
might arise upon Account of Ships, Merchandizes, and other effects 
which might be taken at Sea, it hath been also mutually agreed that 
such Ships, Merchandizes, and Effects as shou'd be taken in the 
Channel & the North Seas after the space of twelve Days, to be 
computed from the said Nineteenth Day' of April last, on which 
Day the said Preliminaries were Signed, and that all Ships, Merchan- 
dizes, and Effects, which should be taken after Six Weeks from the 
said Nineteenth Day of April beyond the Channel, the British 
Seas, and the North Seas as far as Cape St. Vincent ; and for the 
space of Six Weeks more beyond the said Cape to the Equinoctial 
Line, whether in the Ocean or Mediterranean ; and for the space of 
Six Months from the said Nineteenth Day of April beyond the said 
Equinoctial line or Equator, & in all other Places of the World, 
without any Exception or other more particular distinction of time 
or place, shou'd be restored on both sides. 

u And Whereas, pursuant to such agreement hostilities havo 



332 MINUTES OF THE 

ceased in the Low Countries, in such manner as was agreed upon 
by the said Preliminaries ; 

" We have thought fit, by and with the advice of our Privy Coun- 
cil, to notify the same to all our Loving Subjects; and We do de- 
clare that our Royal Will & Pleasure is, and We do hereby strictly 
Charge & Command all Our Officers, both at Sea and Land, and all 
other Our Subjects whatsoever, to forbear all Acts of Hostility, 
either by Sea or Land, against His most Christian Majesty, his 
Yassals or Subjects, from & after the respective Times above-men- 
tioned, and under the Penalty of incurring our highest Displeasure. 
u Given at our Court at S 1, James', the fifth Day of May, in the 

Twenty-first Year of our Reign, & in the Year of our Lord, 

1748. 
"GOD SAYE THE KING/' 



At a Council held at Philadelphia Thursday, 1st Sept r- ' 1748. 
present : 

The Honourable ANTHONY PALMER, Esq., President. 
Samuel Hasell, Abraham Taylor, j ™ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Thomas Hopkinson, j ^ 

Captain Dowell, of the Pandour Privateer, having taken a large 

French Ship called the S t- Jaques Geneveive, Capt n ' Ke- 

raudran, bound from Hispaniola to France, on the 14th August 
last, which is after the time limited for Captures by His Majestic' s 
Proclamation, the said French Captain came before the Council & 
pray'd liberty to provide a new Mast, his present one being exceed- 
ingly hurt by Thunder, & likewise to take on board a sufficiency of 
Provisions. His Request was granted on his using the utmost Ex- 
pedition, & not Landing any Goods. 

Mr. Taylor inform'd the Board that he had put Officers on board 
who wou'd prevent the Landing of any Goods. 

A written Message from the House by two Members of the As- 
sembly, who said that another was under the Consideration of the 
House, & wou'd be ready to be sent in the Afternoon, The Message 
was read, & it appearing that the Expences arising on the late Indian 
Treaty had not all this time been consider'd by the House, it look'd 
as if they wou'd let this lye over, whereupon the Gentlemen who 
drew the former Message were desir'd to prepare another on this 
Subject against to-morrow morning. The Council adjourn'd to the 
Afternoon. 

A Message from the Assembly to the President & Council. 
" May it please the President & Council : 
" The Information you are pleas'd to give us in your Message of 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 333 

the 24th past, that 'in pursuance of His Majestie's Commands You 
had caused His Majesty's Proclamation for a Cessation of Arms to 
be publish'd here/ affords us great Satisfaction, & the greater from 
the Prospect there is that it will 'soon be followed by a General 
Peace/ The Calamities attending of War are so many & so great, 
that every well-disposed Mind will be humbly thankful to Almighty 
God for inclining the Hearts of the contending Monarchs towards 
Peace. And every dutiful Subject ought to acknowledge the 
Paternal Regard of our King, which appears in the great Care & 
Sollicitude he hath been pleased to shew for the Accomplishment 
of so salutary a Work. ' 

"The Care you have taken to prevent the carrying of Rum 
amongst the Indians, and to remove the misunderstandings you 
judge likely to have arisen between the Government of New York 
& the Six Nations, and also the Measures pursued for extending 
our Alliances & promoting Peace amongst the Indians by the Trea- 
ties carried on within our own Government, and your not calling Us 
together at a time when it could have been of little Publick Use, 
we very much approve. 

" The Particulars of the Treaty you have been pleased to lay be- 
fore us, and the Charge which hath arisen by this Means, will in 
due time come under our Notice, & such Provision made in it as the 
House on Consideration shall judge reasonable. 
" By Order of the House, 

"JOHN KINSEY, Speaker. 

"7th Mo. 1st., 1748." 



P. M. 

PRESENT : 

The same Members as in the forenoon. 

The following Message was delivered by two Members of As- 
sembly & read, & the former Committee appointed to draw up an 
answer. 

A Message from the Assembly to the President & Council. 

" May it please the President & Council : 

"As it hath been our constant Care during the whole Time of 
your Administration to avoid giving just Cause for any misunder- 
standings between you and the Assembly, and have for this reason 
overlook'd things which otherwise we might have eccepted against, 
so we should have been very well pleased if nothing had happen' d 
on your part which had a contrary tendency, such as might make it 
necessary to shew our disapprobation of any parts of your Proceed- 
ings. But the Resolves of your Board, which bear date on the 



334 MINUTES OF THE 

14 th June last, publish'd in the Gazette of the 16th of the same 
Month, as we presume by your Order, are so very extraordinary, 
as that without Breach of the Trust reposed in us by our Country, 
we cannot, forbear to speak our Sentiments of them in the manner 
which we think becomes the Representatives of the Freemen of the 
Province of Pennsylvania. 

" In the first Place, therefore, permit us to observe, we know but of 
one Instance in which any such attempt was ever before made, viz. : 
in the year 1741 ; and the Resolution of the Assembly at that time 
upon it was, That for the Governor and Council to drawn in question, 
arraign, & censure the Proceedings of the Representatives of the 
Freemen of the Province in Assembly met, after the adjournment 
of such Assembly, is assuming to themselves a Power the Law 
hath not entrusted them with, is. illegal & unwarrantable, a high 
breach of their Privileges, & of dangerous Example. On that oc- 
casion the Governor allowed the properest time to have taken Notice 
of the proceeding in Assembly was whilst they were sitting, but ex- 
cused his not doing it as not knowing what they had done until 
after their adjournment; and if this is reasonably to be expected 
from a Governor who is at the head of the Legislature within the 
Province, it is more! reasonable to expect it from the Presid'- and 
Council, who, by our Constitution, are no Part of the Legislature, 
nor are entrusted with any share in the making of Laws. 

" In the present Case, the President & Council can have no such 
Pretence as was made at the time we have mention'd. The Mess- 
age which occasion'd the Resolves of your Board was delivered be- 
fore we adjourn'd, and if you had thought any Remarks necessary 
to have been made, it was in your Power to have desir'd our Stay 
until it cou'd be done; but you were so far from desiring this, that 
after the House had waited more than an hour, you at length let 
them know, after what was contained in their Message, you did not 
think it would be of any Service to say any thing further to them. 

"How, after this and divers days' adjournment, the Board hap- 
pened to resume the Consideration of our Message & form such 
Resolves, introduced by publishing to the World that the House 
adjourned before the Board had an opportunity of reading, con- 
sidering, & replying to the written Message, will require some 
Skill to account for. 

"It appears to us rather as an after-thought, & calculated to 
Purposes of no Benefit to the Publick, as well as expressed in 
Terms far from being decent to the Representative Body of a Pro- 
vince. Having premised thus much in general, permit us next to 
take notice of such Particular Parts of the Resolves as we shall 
think necessary, in order to acquit ourselves from the Aspersions 
we think unjustly thrown upon us. And what we shall say to this 
purpose we desire may be understood as intended to such of the 
Council whose names are annexed to these Resolves; for we are 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 335 

willing to think that had there been a full Council they wou'd not 
have pass'd in the manner they are Published. 

" By the first Resolve the President & Council are pleased to 
say, that it was never understood in this Province that the Salaries 
voted to Governors for their Support were intended to be laid out 
in protecting and defending the People and Trade of the Pro- 
vince, &c. 

" You may be pleas' d to observe that in this Part of the Resolve 
You have changed the word (Government) which alters the State 
of the question between us very much; for tho' Money given to 
support Government and Money given to support a Governor differ 
but as the whole does from a part, it must be allowed the former is 
a much more extensive Donation than the Latter. And yet where 
Money is given for the support of the Governor,, it must, as we 
conceive, be understood as given the better to enable him to dis- 
charge the Trust reposed in him; and if any Emergency shou'd 
require his laying out a part of this Money for the Publiek Good, 
any Government might justly think themselves unkindly used if it 
were denied them, especially where there was no doubt of being re- 
paid with advantage, 

" You are pleased to add, You receive no such Salaries. And to 
this we as readily answer, neither do nor did we expect you would 
advance any Money. We might, however, have justly expected 
you did know that the present Assembly had no Right to bind those 
who were to succeed them, and, therefore, their belief of what future 
Assemblies would do was all that could be reasonably expected from 
the present. 

u Part of your Resolve is, that there is no probability that others 
will be induced to advance Money on so uncertain, obscure, and 
evasive a Declaration as is contained in the last Message of Assem- 
bly, their being repaid again depending on the good will k pleasure 
of the House, to be obtain'd by humble Petitioning and by submis- 
sive personal Applications to the Members, &c. The Language you 
have here been pleased to make choice of is such as neither for 
Delicacy nor Decency will we hope be drawn into Example on any 
future Debate ; but waving this as what can reflect no dishonour 
upon us, be pleased to recollect that by your Message of the 9th of 
June last, after having acquainted us the Sloop Otter would soon 
be fit for Service, that You had dispatch'd an Express to Virginia 
to procure the assistance of the Hector Man-of-War to join the 
Otter, you let us know you thought it absolutely necessary that a 
Ship of War shou'd be fitted out by this Province to join with the 
Otter for the protection of our Trade. To this by our Message two 
Days after we answer' d in substance, that the hiring and fitting out 
a Ship of War we thought unnecessary, that from your own Esti- 
mate the Charge would be near £1,000^ Month, besides the Risque 
& Repairs of the Vessel, a Burthen we thought too heavy for the 



33G MINUTES OF THE 

Province to bear ; That if the Comntiarider of the Hector Man-of- 
War had, as we were inform'd, been Instructed to assist the Otter, 
there was no reason to doubt he would comply with his Instructions, 
and that this was all we thought necessary on the occasion. Is not 
this a direct answer to your Message, without any obscurity, uncer- 
tainty, or evasion ? Had we not at least an equal Right to judge of 
what was fit to be done as your Board ? And has not the Event 
shewn the Judgment we form'd was right and sav'd the Province 
divers thousand Pounds ? But what renders the proceedings of the 
Board yet more remarkable is, that notwithstanding the great ob- 
scurity in the Message you complain of, and that it is such as neither 
you nor any other wou'd advance Money on, yet by virtue of this 
Message (for without you had no pretence) in a few Days after you 
thought fit to draw an Order on the active Trustee of the Loan Office 
for a Sum of Money payable to your Secretary, which he accord- 
ingly receiv'd. How to reconcile these parts of your Conduct we 
are at a loss. 

" When those whose Duty it is to protect Men in the enjoyment 
of their Religious & Civil liberties become their accusers & censure 
at random, it is hard to be born. The People call'd Quakers think 
this their Case when they find themselves publickly charg'd in your 
Resolves with Principles they do not hold, viz., that it is their known 
opinion that all warlike Preparations are so far from being advan- 
tageous to the Publick that they have a direct contrary tendency. 
It is not our Business, nor are we on this occasion inclinable to enter 
into religious disputes, but had you been pleased to recollect what 
has been frequently said on this Subject by former Assemblies in 
their late Messages to the Governor, you must have been convinc'd 
of your Mistake, and it is the less excusable as you were at the 
time Members of Council. To asperse Men in any manner is doing 
them an Injury, and to make your Resolves the Instruments of 
spreading such an aspersion agninst a considerable Body of People 
is a very great aggravation of the Injury. 

u The third & fourth Resolves you were pleased to form on this 
occasion, viz. : 'That the Assembly had done nothing for His Ma- 
jesty's Service or for the Security of the People & Trade of the 
Province ; That three or at most four thousand Pounds wou'd have 
been sufficient for equipping & maintaining a Ship of War, &c.,' 
require but a short answer. We think good service was done both 
His Majesty & the Province by withholding the three or four thou- 
sand Pounds which you would have laid out in a manner that would 
have been of no Benefit to either. 

"The fifth Resolve you are pleased to introduce in these words, 
viz. : i That the reason given in the Assembly's Message why no 
Provision at all shou'd be made for our Defence, viz. : Because, 
were the whole Province to exert their utmost Abilities it would 
not be sufficient, &c, is evasive & trifling, &c.' 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 337 

" Overlooking the delicacy of the Language, permit us to say, 
the words here recited were neither intended nor apply'd to prove 
that nothing ought to be done for the defence of the Province, but 
to shew we had reason to expect and were entitled to greater Assist- 
ance, or that otherwise all that cou'd be done wou'd be insufficient. 
This is the obvious sense of the Paragraph as it stands in our Mess- 
age, Si if there be any thing trifling or evasive it is owing to the 
wrong Light in which you attempt to place it. 

"In just the same manner you mistake the Sense of the House 
in your sixth Resolve, introduced in these words, ' the fact ad- 
duced in the Assembly's Message to prove the inexpediency or 
rather the mischievious Consequence of guarding any Coast, and 
that an unguarded Coast is the safest, &c.' 

ff Surely you must have read our Message with great haste and 
little attention, or you cou'd not possibly thus misunderstand the 
Sense of it. Is there one Syllable throughout the whole which 
makes the guarding any Coast to be mischievous, or that makes the 
unguarded Coast to be the safest ? If there be anything of this 
Import you shou'd have pointed it out to us; if there be not, as 
surely there is not, what can we say when we find you by your Re- 
solves published to the World things as our Sentiments which we 
never thought of? 

" To your seventh Resolve, all that we think necessary for us to 
say is, that it must be evident the greater Ability any Province shews 
towards its own defence the less it needs & the less it has to expect 
from our Mother Country. If you will be pleased to apply this 
to the Otter, and the great Preparations you were for having the 
Province to make for its defence, it will fully answer the purport of 
this Resolve. 

" The eighth Resolve makes your Conclusion of much the same 
Import as your Introduction, touching which you have already 
heard our Sentiments. You are pleased to say that when an As- 
seinbl}' - is called by the Governor or by the President & Council 
to consult on Matters of the highest Importance for His Majesty's 
Service and the safety of the People, their determining hastily to 
adjourn without giving time for an Explanation, &c, as hath been 
often practiced by the Assemblies of this Province, is indecent & 
improper, &c. 

"To this we answer that, notwithstanding the Charges you are 
pleased to make against the Assemblies of this Province, we know 
of no such Practices as you mention. It is true we have by Law 
a Right to meet & sit upon our own adjournments; and therefore 
when all is done that we think is necessary for the King's Service 
or the Good of the Country, we have a Right to adjourn, without 
being harrassed and kept together, either at the pleasure of the 
Governor or the President & Council ; and we wou'd hope you are 
Vol. v.— 22. 



338 MINUTES OF THE 

better Friends to the Constitution than to wish it deprived of this 
Privilege, tho' we must own the Resolve now under Consideration 
seems to strike at it. You may be pleased to recollect that we have 
never exercised this Power of adjourning ourselves, without first 
acquainting the Board with our Intentions of so doing ; and par- 
ticularly we did it on our last adjournment, of which you complain, 
altho' by your Message delivered to us, which we have already 
mentioned, you let us know that after what was contain'd in it 
you did not think it wou'd be of any Service to say any thing fur- 
ther to us. The Terms therefore of indecent & improper are, we 
think, much more applicable to your Resolves than our adjourn- 
ment. 

" Upon the whole we are of opinion that for the Presid'- and 
Council to form such Resolves and publish them after the adjourn- 
ment of the Assembly, thereby arraigning & censuring their pro- 
ceedings, is assuming a power the Laws of this Government never 
entrusted them with, is unparliamentary — -such as strikes at the 
Freedom of Assemblies and the Rights of the Freemen of this 
Province, hath a tendency to create animosities in the minds of the 
People, & to cause great confusion amongst us; and therefore we 
hope will not be drawn into Example. 

" Signed by Order of the House. 

"JOHN KINSEY, Speaker. 

" 7th Mo. 1st, 1748." 

The Members who delivered the above were told a Message of 
some Consequence wou'd be sent to the house in the Morning. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 2d Sept r -> 1748. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President, 
Abraham Taylor, Benjamin Shoemaker, ") 

Robert Strettell, Joseph Turner, 5- Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, ) 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approved. 

The Message prepar'd in answer to the Assembly's of yesterday 
was read & sign'd & sent by the Secretary, who was order'd to tell 
the House that the Council had something under Consideration, 
which they hoped wou'd be ready to lay before them to-morrow. 

A Message from the President & Council to the Assembly. 
u Gentlemen : 

" We expected that on the Receipt of our Message you would 
have provided for the Expence accruing on the Treaty held with the 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. S39 

Indians at Lancaster, and were not a little disappointed when we 
found by your Message of yesterday that you had not then taken 
it into Consideration. As any considerable delay will, in our 
opinion, reflect dishonour on this Government, we find ourselves 
under a Necessity of entreating you to order the Payment of the 
necessiry Charges accruing on that Treaty before you adjourn, since 
if it be postponed the People may be long kept out of their Money, 
this being usually the last Sitting of your House on Business. Be- 
sides it would be a particular Satisfaction to the Board that the neces- 
sary Expences which have accrued during our Administration in 
the Public Service shou'd be honourably discharged. 

"ANTHONY PALMER, Presid' 
" Se P t r - 2d, 1748." 

A Message by two Members of Assembly that the House had 
nearly done what Business lay before them so as that they might 
adjourn the Afternoon, but being inform 'd by the Secretary that 
the President & Council had something under their Consideration 
to be laid before them to-morrow morning, they intended to adjourn 
to that time, but desire they may have it early in the Morning. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 3d Sept r -' 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., Presid*' 
Samuel Hasell, Abraham Taylor, "J 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, I „ 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, j S ^ rs ' 

William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The Gentlemen appointed to draw up an answer to the Assembly's 
Message relating to the late Resolves of Council presented their 
Draught, which was Settled & sent to the House by the Secretary, 
in these words : 

A Message from the President & Council to the Assembly. 
" Gentlemen: 

" Shou'd we give you a particular Answer to your last Message, it 
wou'd probably draw on a Controversy which we on many accounts 
desire to avoid. 

" By comparing your Message with the Resolves of this Board? 
it may be seen how little Candour and ingenuity is to be expected 
in the Course of such a dispute; your observing That we have Cen- 
sur'd a part of your former Message for its obscurity as being evasive, 
&c, & quoting another part of it which we did not object to on that 
account, & your dropping material words in The middle of a Sea- 



340 MINUTES OF THE 

tence, where they did not serve your purpose, &c., are a few of the 
many Instances we might produce, were we to enter the Argument) 
but as such a Controversy may be attended with a considerable Ex- 
pence, and as things are now circumstanc'd, can bring no advantage 
to the Publick, we shall decline it. 

"We are not accountable to each other for our Conduct* His 
Majesty & the Freemen of this Province are the proper Judges of it; 
to them we can safely appeal. As we had no Party views, no 
Personal Interest or Power to support, we shall the more readily be 
believed when we declare that we have acted on the sole Motive of 
the Publick Good. It is well known that during our Administra- 
tion our time has been chiefly employ'd in the Service of the Coun- 
tr y> D y using all means in our Power for its safety & protection in 
times of the greatest Danger- how far you have assisted us & those 
who to their Immortal Honour joined in this necessary work, all the 
world knows. 

" Your Message, upon which our Resolves were made, we thought 
justly liable to be Censured by every one who had Sense enough to 
see how they were deserted by their Representatives, whose Assistance 
they had a Right to expect, and as it appear'd to us calculated to 
mislead the People at a time when their All was at Stake, we 
judged it our indispensible duty to His Majesty & our Country to 
expose it in the manner we did, & that justly, notwithstanding what 
is said in your last Message • & tho' we have thereby drawn on us 
your Resentment, we are not concern'd on that account. While 
the Administration of the Government continues in our Hands, we 
shall persevere in preferring the Good of the Commonwealth to 
every other Consideration. 

" The single point between us, as we conceive, is, whether your 
Conduct or our's has contributed most to the Publick Service, and 
on that point we will leave it without entring into a fruitless Debate 
on the Subject. 

" ANTHONY PALMER, Presid n 

•" Sept r - 3d, 1748." 



P. M. 

PRESENT I 

The Honoble. the President and the same Members as in the 
forenoon. 

Two Members of Assembly delivered the two following Messages 
& acquainted the Board that the House inclin'd to adjourn to the 
30th Instant : 
" May it please the President & Council — 

" As you were acquainted by our last Message save one that the 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 341 

particulars of the Treaty and the Charges which had arisen by that 
means would in due time come under our Notice, and such Provi- 
sion made in it as the House on Consideration shou'd judge reason- 
able ; And as you justly observe this is usually the last Sitting of 
the House on Business, it necessarily followed we could not have 
intended to postpone the Consideration of the Charges beyond the 
present Session, and, therefore, we are at a loss why you are pleased 
to express any ' Disappointment ' that it was not ' then taken into 
Consideration/ However, to give you full Satisfaction in this 
Affair, we now let you know that we have since examined the Ac- 
counts concerning the Indian Treaties, the Goods purchased for the 
Present, and the Charges which have arisen thereupon, and have 
made Provision for Payment of the whole which remains due on 
those Accounts. 

" Signed by Order of the House. 

"JOHN KINSEY, Speaker, 
"Sept r -3d, 1748/' 

" May it please the President & Council : 

" We agree with you it was prudently judged on many Accounts, 
and especially one to decline a particular answer to our last Mess- 
age; and we are of your Sentiments, that by comparing your Re- 
solves with our Message it may. be seen how little Candour & 
Ingenuity is to be expected in the Course of such a Dispute. Your 
last Message will further illustrate this, which contains fresh 
Charges, but express'd in terms so obscure as if, since you are 
determin'd not to be particular in your answer, it should not be in 
our Power to be so in our Reply. Since, therefore, it is your 
Pleasure, we must leave the former part of your Message in the 
obscurity we find it until you shall condescend to explain your- 
selves. 

" You are pleased to say, i We are not accountable to each other 
for our Conduct/ give us leave to wish you had thought of this 
before you had bestowed so heavy Censure on ours : It might have 
saved both you and us some trouble. 

" You are pleased to add, ; You had no Party views, no Personal 
Interest, or Power to support/ It may be so, since You are pleased 
to say it ; but when this is urged as a motive to your being ' the 
more readily believed/ in opposition to the Representative Body of 
the Province, it seems to require a little Demonstration. 

" If it was as you are pleased to say, really e well known that 
during your Administration your time has been chiefly employed 
in the Service of the Country, &c./ there was the less Necessity you 
shou'd become the Publishers of it. But you are pleased to add 
how we have assisted you; & those who to their Immortal Honour 



342 MINUTES OF THE 

joined with you in the necessary Work you mention, all the World 
knows. 

" If those who joined with You deserve Immortal Honour, how 
much more do you deserve? Enjoy unmolested all the Honour, all 
the applause you think fit to bestow on yourselves, but why must 
you depreciate the Characters of others? 

" You are further pleased to say ( that our Message, on which 
your Resolves were made, you thought justly liable to Censure; 
that it appeared to be Calculated to mislead the People ; that you 
judged it your indispensible Duty to His Majesty & your Country 
to expose it, &c/ 

" Since you are pleased to allow we are not accountable to You 
for our Conduct, whence then do you derive Your Right of Cen- 
suring ? or of what you exprest yet more indecently of exposing ? 
In the h eighth of the late Controversies such Expressions were not 
used that we remember, and we are at a loss to find from whence 
you cou'd Copy such Language to the Representative Body of a 
Province. Besides, when the event has shewn the Judgment formed 
by the Assembly was right, & has saved the Province some Thou- 
sand Pounds, we think you might have spared these Censures be- 
stowed thus unprovoked. What Motives cou'cl we possibly have 
for judging amiss ? Have we not also Estates & Families in the 
Province ? Have not many of us drawn our first Breath here ? 
Have not divers of our Fathers and some of our Grand Fathers 
been of the first Settlers ? What Inducements can we possibly have 
to biass us against the Interest of our Country ? 

" To conclude, as You shew a disposition to submit both your 
own Conduct and ours to the opinion of the Publick without 
entring into further Debate, so do we. If we have committed any 
mistakes the time draws near in which our Constituents, if they 
think it necessary, may amend their Choice. 

" And the time also draws near in which your mistakes may be 
amended by a succeeding Governor. Permit Us to congratulate 
our Country on both. 

" Signed by Order of the House. 

"JOHN KINSEY, Speaker. 

"Scpf-3d, 1748." 

The following Letter receiv'd by the Mary Galley, Capt 11, Lawson, 
from Thomas Penn, Esqr., was read. 
" Gentlemen : 

"Above is a Duplicate of my last Letter by the Otter Sloop, 
since which time Publick Aifairs have taken a different turn, & I 
now congratulate You on an approaching Peace, Prcliminarys 
having been Signed long siuce by England, France, & Holland, to 
which the Empress & King of Sardinia have acceded, & we expect 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 343 

Spain will very soon. All places taken are to be deliver'd up on 
each side, & a small Settlement in Italy given to Don Philip. 

u This Change, no doubt, will be highly acceptable to Pennsyl- 
vania in particular, & we having received an Account of it before 
the Attorney and Soilicitor General cou'd consider the Cases, we 
took them back, as thinking it now not necessary to send them. 

Mr. Hamilton proposes to embark in August, in order to meet 
the Assembly in October. 

" I am, Gentlemen, your very affectionate Friend, 

" THO s - PENN. 

"To the Honoble. the President & Council of the Province of 
Pennsylvania. 

"London, June, 13th, 1748." 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 30th September, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Samuel Hasell, Abraham Taylor, ""J 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, ! « 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, f * 

William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approved. 

The following Petition was read, & Mr. Till, one of the Judges 
of the Suprseme Court, reporting that the facts set forth in the 
Petition were true, & y 1 the Petitioner was a proper object of Com- 
passion, the following Pardon was Sign'd with a Warrant to affix 
the Great Seal thereto, & the Secretary was order' d to expedite the 
Seal so as that the Pardon might be deliver'd during the Sitting of 
the Court. 

u To the Honourable the President & Council of the Province of 
Pennsylvania. 

" The Petition of John King of the City of Philad 3 " Mariner, 
" Most humbly She with : 

H That your Petitioner is a Poor Orphan & Mariner on board 
Captain Mesnard's Ship from London; that about three Weeks 
since your Petitioner & one of his Brother Mariners, named Joseph 
Seal, had a difference on board the said Ship ; that the said Joseph 
Seal Challenged Your Petitioner to leave the Ship & go on the Wharf 
to fight ; that they went on Shore, k the said Seal first struck your 
Petitioner, & in the Combat the said Seal fell to the Ground & re- 
ceived by the fall a mortal Wound in his Head, of which he In- 
stantly Dyed, & now your Petitioner stands indicted for Man- 



344 MINUTES OF THE 

slaughter, to which he has pleaded Guilty. Altho' your Petitioner 
never designed more Injury to the said Joseph Seal than to Com- 
bat with him, & that owing to the Challenge, k in some sort force, 
of the said Joseph Seal. 

" Wherefore your Petitioner humbly implores Your Honours' 
Mercy & Compassion, that in Consideration of his tender Years, 
& intending no such Injury to the deceas'd, your Honours will be 
pleased to pardon this offence & prevent your Petitioner's being 
stigmatized & branded. 

" And your Petitioner will ever Pray, & ra - 

" JOHN KING. 
"Philad\, Sept r . 27th, 1748. 

"We think the Petitioner an object worthy your Compassion, & 
as such We recommend him. 

"JOHN KINSEY, 
"THOMAS GROGME, 
" W M - TILL. 
" To the honoble. the President & Council. 
" Sept r - 27th, 1748/' 

" George the Second oy the Grace of God of Great Britain, 
France, & Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, & c ** 
" Whereas, upon the Petition of John King of the City of Phila- 
delphia, [Mariner, setting forth that about three Weeks since the 
Petitioner & another Mariner named Joseph Seal had a difference 
on board Captain Mesnard's Ship, lying at one of the Wharfs of 
the said City ; that the said Joseph Seal Challenged the Petitioner 
to fight; that they went on Shore & the said Seal first struck the 
Petitioner j that in the Combat the said Seal fell to the Ground, & 
in the fall received a wound on his Head of which he dyed ; & that 
thereupon the Petitioner was Indicted for Manslaughter, to which 
he pleaded Guilty j that the said Joseph Seal did not come by his 
Death thro' any design of the Petitioner but by Accident only, & 
praying the Royal Mercy & Pardon of the said Offence. Now 
Know Ye, that it being made appear to Us that the facts set forth 
in the said Petition are true, We have thought fit graciously to ex- 
tend our Royal Mercy to the said John King, & have pardon'd, & 
do by these Presents Pardon the said John King the Offence afore- 
said, whereof all our Judges, Justices, Sheriffs, & all our Officers & 
other our Leige Subjects are to take Notice; and our will & pleasure 
is, that the said John King stand right in our Courts, if any against 
him wou'd speak of the Premisses. In Testimony whereof We 
have caused the Great Seal of our said Province to be hereunto 
affixed. Witness, Anthony Palmer, Esq., President, Samuel Ha- 
sell, William Till, Abraham Taylor, &, Robert Strettell, Esqrs., in 
Ceuncil Assembled at Philadelphia for our said Province, the Thir- 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 345 

tieth Day of September, in the Year of our Lord one thousand 
seven hundred & forty-eight ; & in the Twenty-second Year of our 
Reign. 

" ANTHONY PALMER, Presid 1 - 
"ROBERT STRETTELL, 
"ABRAM TAYLOR, 
"WM. TILL, 
"SAM. HASELL." 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 4th October, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
William Till, Samuel Hasell, *} 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, ! ™ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Jeseph Turner, | " 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The Returns of the Sheriffs & Coroners for the several Counties 
were taken into Consideration, & the following Persons receiv'd 
their Commissions in Conncil, viz : 

Richard Sewell, Esq., Sheriff, ~) „,., , n . 
tt -o *; n 4.n n r Philada. County. 

Henry Pratt, (rent"-' Coroner, j J 

Benjamin Davies, Esqr., Sheriff, \- chem Count 
Isaac Lea, u-ent"- Coroner, j r 

Amos Strickland, Esqr., Sheriff, ) -d i rt . 
T r tt j. n 4.11. n r Bucks County. 

John Hart, (lent"-' Coroner, j J 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 5 th Oct r - 174? . 

present : 
The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President, 

Samuel Hasell, William Till, ^ 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, I ™ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, [ ^ 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, J 

A Letter from Mr. Lawrence Growden, one of the Members of 
Council, was read, setting forth that he had received sundry Infor- 
mations of male Practice in Amos Strickland, Sheriff of Bucks, at 
the late Election of Assembly Men for that County, & desiring the 
Board wou'd examine into the matter before they issued Sheriff's 
Commissions; whereupon the Secretary was sent for the Commission 
from Charles Brockden's Office, & the Board proceeded to the Ex- 



346 MINUTES OF THE 

animation of Mr. Strickland, but it not appearing that he was guilty 
of any ill design, tho' there was on his own Confession great Care- 
lessness in the Election, he was severely reprimanded & dismissal 
and his Commission return'd to him. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 13th Oct r - 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, ) -^ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Thomas Hopkinson, J " b " 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

A Letter from Mr. Gooch was read, together with the President's 
Answer, in these words : 

" Williamsburg, August 17th, 1748. 
"Sir? 

" The 12th Instant I receiv'd a Letter from the Governor of 
South Carolina, dated the 18th July, acquainting me that the Ca- 
tawba Nation have for some Years past been harrass'd by various 
Nations of Northward Indians, who meeting with little opposition 
to their Incursions upon these People, have ventur'd near their 
Settlements & carried off into Slavery two of their People, one of 
them Mr. Haig, a Captain of the Militia & Justice of the Peace, a 
most useful man among their G-erman Inhabitants, desiring at the 
same time my assistance towards their Redemption. 

" In Consequence of which I thought I could not do any greater 
Service than to request the favour of You to cause diligent Enquiry 
to be made amongst all (he Indians in your Parts for such Person, 
in order that if discover' d he may be sent thither as soon as possi- 
ble, & if so be he has been carried to any of the French Settle- 
ments he may be redeem'd. I am with great Respect, 

" Sir, Your most obedient Servant, 

"WILL. GOOCH. 

" The Honoble. Anthony Palmer, Esqr., President of the Pro- 
vince of Pennsylvania. " 

" Philadelphia., 8th Oct'- 1748. 
" Sir : 

" I wou'd have answer' d your Letter relating to Mr. Haig sooner, 
but as our Interpreter, who had the Enquiry of this Gentleman 
given him in Charge at the Iustance of the Gov" of Carolina, was 
daily expected from Ohio, I chose to delay it that I might write 
something certain. 



PKOVINCIAL COUNCIL. 347 

" I have the mortification to tell you that Mr. Weiser, in an im- 
perfect Diary which he sent to me as soon as he arrived among our 
Inhabitants, says Mr. Haig is actually Murdered, »nd his Man, one 
Brown, was deliver'd to him by some Indians of the Senaca Nation. 
For further Particulars I must refer You to my next, entreating you 
wou'd advertize Mr. Glenn of this Melancholy Story, & assure him 
of my best respects, & that I shalj do myself the Honour to inform 
him of every Circumstance attending the Murder, & assist in bring- 
ing the Murderers to Punishment. 

" Justice will not suffer me to omit informing You of a Story 
that prevails here as if a French Ship, bound for this Port with 
Letters from the Governor of Hispaniola to me as President, & with 
a Cargo of Sugars destinated to discharge a Ransom due to the 
Owners of the Privateer Pandour, from a French Merchant at Leo- 
ganne, was seiz'd & actually Condemn'd with her Cargo in the 
Court of Admiralty at Williamsburg, for no other reason than that 
the Papers she carried were supposed to be false ; whereas the Presi- 
dent & Council on the Petition of the Owners of the Pandour, & 
from the Strongest Principles of Justice, wrote to Mons r- Chastes- 
noye to oblige that Merchant, one Rasteau, to discharge that Debt, 
by the Delay whereof the Faith of Nations was extremely violated, and 
in Consequence hereof this shou'd have been done by Bills of Ex- 
change on old France ; how they came to send Sugars I cannot ac- 
count for ; but I assure You the Vessel shou'd not have been per- 
mitted to have broke bulk here, but have been sent back directly, 
tho' considering the reality of the Debt, & the Publick Faith due 
to the Instruments of Governors, I shou'd not have suffer'd her to 
have been seiz'd unless she shou'd have broke the Laws of Nations 
or the particular Acts of Trade. 

"I am Your Excellency's most obedient humble Servant, 

" ANTHONY PALMER. 
" His Excellency S' - William Gogch." 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, 15th Oct., 1748. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esqr., President. 
Samuel Hasell, Abraham Taylor, 1 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, lEsqrs. 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

A Message from the Assembly having been delivered by four of 
their Members to the President before there was a Board that a 
Quorum of the House were met, & having proceeded to ehuse their 
Speaker, desir'd to know when the House with their Speaker might 



348 MINUTES OF THE 

wait, on the Council. The Secretary was sent to tell the House the 
Council was met & ready to receive them with their Speaker im- 
mediately ; &l being come, the Speaker said the House having met 
according to Charter had chose him their Speaker, & had given him 
in charge to acquaint the Council that they were heartily disposed 
to join with them in what might be for the real Service of the Pro- 
vince, & ready to receive any thing they had to lay before them, & 
so withdrew. 

The Secretary was order' d to lay before the House Mr. Weiser's 
Journal of his proceedings at Ohio. 

The Journal of Conrad Weiser Esqr., Indian Interpreter to Ohio. 

" Aug st - 11th. Set out from my House & came to James Galbreath 
that day, 30 Miles. 

" 12th. Came to George Croghans, 15 Miles. 

"13th. To Robert Dunnings, 20 Miles. 

"14th. To the Tuscarroro Path, 30 Miles. 

" 15th and 16th. Lay by on Account of the Men coming back 
Sick, & some other Affairs hindering us. 

" 17th. Crossed the Tuscarroro Hill & came to the Sleeping 
Place called the Black Log, 20 Miles. 

" 18th. Had a great Rain in the afternoon ; came within two 
Miles of the Standing Stone, 24 Miles. 

"19th. We travelled but 12 Miles; were obliged to dry our 
Things in the afternoon. 

"20th. Came to Franks Town, but saw no Houses or Cabins; 
here we overtook the Goods, because four of George Croghan's 
Hands fell sick, 26 Miles. 

"21st. Lay by, it raining all Day. 

" 22d. Crossed Allegheny Hill & came to the Clear Fields, 18 
Miles. 

" 23d. Came to the Shawonese Cabbins, 34 Miles. 

"24th. Found a dead Man on the Road who had killed himself 
by Drinking too much Whisky ; the Place being very stony we 
cou'd not dig a Grave ; He smelling very strong we covered him 
with Stones k Wood & went on our Journey ; came to the 10 Mile 
Lick, 32 Miles. 

" 25th. Crossed Kiskeminetoes Creek & came to Ohio that Day, 
26 Miles. 

" 26th. Hired a Cannoe ; paid 1,000 Black Wampum for the loan 
of it to Logs Town. Our Horses being all tyred, we went by Wa- 
ter & came that Night to a Delaware Town ; the Indians used us 
very kindly. 

"27th. Sett off again in the morning early; Bainy Wheather. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 349 

We dined in a Seneka Town, where an old Seneka Woman Reigns 
with great Authority; we dined at her House, & they all used us 
very well 5 at this & the last-mentioned Delaware Town they re- 
ceived us by firing a 'great many Guns; espeeially at this last Place. 
We saluted the Town by firing off 4 pair of Pistols ; arrived that 
Evening at Logs Town, & Saluted the Town as before ; the Indians 
returned about One hundred Guns; Great Joy appear'd in their 
Countenances. ■ From the Place where we took Water, i. e. from 
the old Shawones Town, commonly called Chartier's Town, to this 
Place is about 60 Miles by Water & but 35 or 40 by Land. 

" The Indian Council met this Evening to shake Hands with me 
& to shew their Satisfaction at my safe arrival; I desired of them 
to send a Couple of Canoes to fetch down the Goods from Chur- 
tier's old Town, where we had been oblig'd to leave them on account 
of our Horses being all tyred. I gave them a String of Wampum 
to enforce my Request. 

"28th. Lay still. 

" 29th. The Indians sett off in three Canoes to fetch the Goods. 
I expected the Goods wou'd be all at Chartier's old Town by the 
time the Canoes wou'd get there, as we met about twenty Horses 
of George Groghan's at the Shawonese Cabbing in order to fetch 
the Goods that were then lying at Franks Town. 

" This Hay news came to Town that the Six Nations were on the 
point of declaring War against the French, for reason the French 
had Imprison'd some of the Indian Deputies. A Council was held 
& all the Indians acquainted with the News, and it was said the 
Indian Messenger was by the way to give all the Indians Notice to 
make ready to light the French. This Day my Companions went 
to Coscosky, a large Indian Town about 30 Miles off. 

" 30th. I went to Beaver Creek, an Indian Town about 8 Miles 
off, chiefly Delawares, the rest Mohocks, to have some Belts of 
Wampum made. This afternoon Rainy Wheather set in which 
lasted above a Week. Andrew Montour came back from Coscosky 
with a Message from the Indians there to desire of me that the en- 
suing Council might be held at their Town. We both lodged at 
this Town at George Croghan's Trading House. 

" 31st. Sent Andrew Montour back to Coscosky with a String of 
Wampum to let the Indians there know that it was an act of their 
own that the ensuing Council must be held at Logs Town, they had 
order'd it so last Spring when George Croghan was up, & at the 
last Treaty in Lancaster the Shawonese & Twightwees have been 
told so, & they stayed accordingly for that purpose, & both would 
be offended if the Council was to be held at Coscosky, besides my 
Instructions binds me to Logs Town. & could not go further 
without giving offence. 

" Sept r - 1. The Indians in Logs Town having heard of the Mess- 



S50 MINUTES OF THE . 

age from Coscosky sent for me to know what I was resolv'd to do, and 
told me that the Indians at Coscosky were no more Chiefs than 
themselves, & that last Spring they had nothing to eat, & expect- 
ing that they shou'd have nothing to eat at our arrival ; order'd 
that the Council should be held here ; now their Corn is ripe, they 
want to remove the Council, but they ought to stand by their word; 
we have kept the Twightwees here & our Brethren the Shawonese 
from below on that account, as I told them the Message that I had 
sent by Andrew Montour; they were content. 

"2d. Rain continued: the Indians brought in a good deal of 
Yenison. 

" 3d. Set up the Union Flagg oil a long Pole. Treated all the 
Company with a Dram of Rum; The King's Health was drank by 
Indians & White men. Towards Night a great many Indians ar- 
rived to attend the Council. There was great firing on both sides ; 
the Strangers first Saluted the Town at a quarter of a Mile distance, 
and at their Entry the Town's People return' d the fire, also the 
English Traders, of whom there were above twenty. At Night, 
being very sick of the Cholick, I got bled. 

" 4th. Was oblig'd to keep my bed ail Day, being very weak. 

" 5th. I found myself better. Scaiohady came to see me; had 
some discourse with him about the ensuing Council. 

" 6th. Had a Council with the Wondats, otherways called Ionon- 
tady Hagas, they made a fine Speech to me to make me welcome, & 
appeared in the whole very friendly. Rainy Wheather continued. 

" 7th. Being inform'd that the Wondats had a mind to go back 
again to the French, & had endeavour'd to take the Delawares with 
them to recommend thern to the French, I sent Andrew Montour to 
Beaver Creek with a string of Wampum to inform himself of the 
Truth of the matter; they sent a String in answer to let me know 
they had no Correspondence that way with the Wondats, and that 
the aforesaid Report was false. 

" 8th. Had a Council with the Chiefs of the Wondats; enquired 
their number, & what occasion'd them to come away from the French, 
What Correspondence they had with the Six Nations, & whether or 
no they had ever had any Correspondence with the Government pf 
New York; they inform'd me their coming away fftnn the French 
was because of the hard Usage they received from them; That they 
wou'd always get their Young Men to go- to War against their 
Enemies, and wou'd use them as their own People, that is like 
Slaves, & their Goods were so dear that they, the Indians, cou'd not 
buy them ; that there was one hundred fighting Men that came over 
to join the English, seventy were left behind at another Town a 
good distance off, & they hoped they wou'd follow them ; that they 
had a very good Correspondence with the Six Nations many Years, 
& were one People with them, that they cou'd wish the Six Nations 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 351 

wou'd act more brisker against the French ; That above fifty Years 
ago they made a Treaty of Friendship with the Governor of New 
York at Albany, & shewed me a large Belt of Wampum they re- 
ceived there from the said Governor as from the King of Great 
Britain ; the Belt was 25 Grains wide & 265 long, very Curiously 
wrought, there were seven Images of Men holding one another by 
the Hand, the 1st signifying the Governor of New York (or rather, 
as they said, the King of Great Britain), the 2d the Mohawks, the 
3d the Oneidos, the 4th the Cajugas, the 5th the Onondagers, the 
6th the Senekas, the 7th the Owandaets, and two Rows of black 
Wampum under their feet thro' the whole length of the Belt to 
signify the Road from Albany thro' the 5 Nations to the Owendaets; 
That 6 Years ago they had sent Deputies with the same Belt to 
Albany to renew the Friendship. 

"I treated them with a quart of W'hiskey & a Boll of Tobacco; 
they expressed their good Wishes to King George' & all his People, 
& were mightily pleas'd that I look'd upon them as Brethren of the 
English. 

" This Day I desir'd the Deputies of all the Nations of Indians 
settled on the Waters of Ohio to give me a List of their fighting 
Men, which they promis'd to do. A great many of the Indians 
went away this Day because the Goods did not come, & the People 
in the Town cou'd not find Provision enough, the number was so 
great. 

"The following is the number of every Nation, given to me by 
their several Deputies in Council, in so many Sticks tied up in a 
Bundle : 

" The Senacas 163, Shawonese 162, Owendaets 100, Tisagech- 
roanu 40, Mohawks 74, Mohickons 15, Onondagers 35, Cajukas 20, 
Oneidos 15, Delawares 165, in all 789. 

"9th. I had a Council with the Senakas, & gave them. a large 
String of Wampum, black & White, to acquaint them I had it in 
Charge from the President & Council in Philadelphia to enquire 
who it was that lately took the People Prisoners in Carolina, one 
thereof being a Great man, & that by what discovery I had already 
made I found it was some of the Senekas did it; I therefore desir'd 
them to give me their Reasons for doing so, & as they had struck 
their Hatchet into their Brethren's Body they cou'd not expect 
that I could deliver my Message with a good heart before they gave 
me Satisfaction in that Respect, for they must consider the English, 
tho' living in several Provinces, are all one People, & doing Mis- 
cheif to one is doing to the other; let me have a plain & direct 
answer. 

"10th. A great many of the Indians got drunk; one Henry 
Noland had brought near 30 Gallons of Whiskey to the Town. 
This Day I made a Present to the old Shawonese Chief Cacka- 



352 MINUTES OF THE 

watcheky, of a Stroud, a Blanket, a Match Coat, a Shirt, a Pair of 
Stockings, & a large twist of Tobacco, & told him that the Presi- 
dent & Council of Philadelphia reraember'd their Love to him as to 
their old & true Friend, & wou'd Cloath his Body once more, & 
wished he might weare them out so as to give them an opportunity 
to cloath him again. There was a great many Indians present, two 
of which were the big Hominy & the Pride, those that went off with 
Chartier, but protested against his proceedings against our Traders. 
Catchawatcheky return'd thanks, & some of the Six Nations did the 
same, & express'd their Satisfaction to see a true man taken Notice 
of, altho' he was now grown Childish. 

u 11th. George Croghan & myself staved an 8 Gallon Cag of 
Liquor belonging to the aforesaid Henry Norland, who could not 
be prevailed on to hide it in the Woods, but would sell it & get 
drunk himselfe. 

" I desir'd some of the Indians in Council to send some of their 
Young Men to meet our People with the Goods, and not to come 
back before they heard of or saw them. I begun to be afraid they 
had fallen into the Hands of the Enemy ; so did the Indians. 

" Ten Warriors came to Town by Water from Niagara; We 
suspected them very much, & fear'd that some of their Parties went 
to meet our People by hearing of them. 

" 12th. Two Indians and a white man went out to meet our 
People, & had Orders not to come back before they saw them, or 
go to Franks Town, where we left the Goods. The same Day the 
Indians made answer to my Request concerning the Prisoners 
taken in Carolina : Thanayieson, a Speaker of the Senekas, spoke 
to the following purpose in the presence of all the Deputies of the 
other Nations (We were out of Doors) : ' Brethren, You came a 
great way to visit us, & many sorts of Evils might have befallen 
You by the way which might have been hurtful to your Eyes & 
your inward parts, for the Woods are full of Evil Spirits. We 
give You this String of Wampum to clear up your Eyes & Minds 
& to to remove all bitterness of your Spirit, that you may hear us 
speak in good Chear/ Then the Speaker took his Belt in his Hand 
& said : ' Brethren, when we and you first saw one another at your 
first arrival at Albany we shook Hands together and became Breth- 
ren & we tyed your Ship to the Bushes, and after we had more 
acquaintance with you we lov'd you more and more, & perceiving 
that a Bush wou'd not hold your Vessel we then tyed her to a large 
Tree & ever after good Friendship continued between us; after- 
wards you our Brethren told us that a Tree might happen to fall 
down and the Rope rot wherewith the Ship was tyed. You then 
propos'd to make a Silver Chain & tye your Ship to the great 
Mountains in the five Nations' Country, & that Chain was called 
the Chain of Friendship ; we were all tyed by our Arms together 
with it, & we the Indians of the five Nations heartily agreed to it, 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 353 

& ever since a very good Correspondence have been kept between 
us ; but we are very sorry that at your coming here we are obliged 
to talk of the Accident that lately befell you in Carolina, where some 
of our Warriors, by the Instigation of the Evil Spirit, struck their 
Hatchet into our own Body like, for our Brethren the English & 
we are of one Body, & what was done we utterly abhor as a thing 
done by the Evil Spirit himself; we never expected any of our 
People wou'd ever do so to our Brethren. We therefore remove 
our Hatchet which, by the influence of the Evil Spirit, was struck 
into your Body, and we desire that our Brethren the Gov" of New 
York & Onas may use their utmost endeavours that the thing may 
be buried in the bottomless Pit, that it may never be seen again — 
that the Chain of Friendship which is of so long standing may be 
preserv'd bright & unhurt/ Gave a Belt. The Speaker then took 
up a String of Wampum, mostly black, and said : ' Brethren, as 
we have removed our Hatchet out of your Body, or properly speak- 
ing, out of our own, We now desire that the Air may be clear' d up 
again & the wound given may be healed, & every thing put in 
good understanding, as it was before, anc we desire you will assist 
us to make up every thing with the Gov r . of Carolina; the Man 
that has been brought as a Prisoner we now deliver up to You, he 
is yours (lay'd down the String, and took the Prisoner by the Hand 
and delivered him to me). By way of discourse, the Speaker said, 
'the Six Nation Warriors often meet Englishmen trading to the 
Catawbas, & often found that the Englishmen betrayed them to 
their Enemy, & some of the English Traders had been spoke to by 
the Indian Speaker last Year in the Cherrykees Country & were 
told not to do so ; that the Speaker & many others of the Six Na- 
tions had been afraid a long time that such a thing wou'd be done 
by some of their Warriors at one time or other/ 

" '13th. Had a Council with the Senekas and Onontagers about 
the Wandots, to receive them into our Union. I gave a large Belt 
of Wampum and the Indians gave two, <fc everything was agreed 
upon about what shou'd be said to the Wandots. The same Even- 
ing a full Council was appointed & met accordingly, & a Speech 
was made to the Wandots by Asserhartur, a Seneka, as follows: 

" i Brethren, the lonontady Hagas : last Spring you sent this Belt 
of Wampum to Us (having the Belt then in his hand) to desire ua 
and our Brethren, the Shawonees & our Cousins the Delawares, to 
come & meet you in your retreat from the French, & we accordingly 
came to your Assistance & brought you here & received you as 
our own flesh. We desire you will think you now join us, & our 
Brethren, the English & you to become one People with us — then 
lie lay'd that tfelt by & gave them a very largs String of Wampum/ 

" The Speaker took up the Belt I gave & said : 

Ui Brethren: the English, cur Brothers, bid you welcome & are 
glad' you escaped out Captivity like : You have been kept as Slaves 
VOL. v. — 23. 



354 MINUTES OF THE 

by Onontio, notwithstanding he call'd You all along his Children, 
but now You have broke the Rope wherewith you have been tyed, 
& become Freemen, & we, the united Six Nations, receive you 
to our Council Fire, & make you" Members thereof, & and we will 
secure your dwelling Place to You against all manner of danger. 
Gave the Belt. 

" 'Brethren : We the Six United Nations & all our Indian Allies, 
with our Brethren the English, look upon you as our Children, 
tho' you are our Brethren ; we desire you will give no ear to the 
Evil Spirit that spreads lyes & wickedness, let your mind be easy & 
clear, & be of the same mind with us whatever you may hear, noth- 
ing shall befall you but what of necessity must befall us at the 
same time. 

tt l Brethren : We are extremely pleased to see you here, as it hap- 
pened just at the same time when our Brother Onas is with us. 
We jointly, by this Belt of Wampum, embrace you about your mid- 
dle, & desire you to be strong in your minds & hearts, let nothing 
alter your minds, but live & dye with us.' Gave a Belt — the Coun- 
cil broke up. 

ct 14th. A full Council was Summon'd & every thing repeated by 
me to all the Indians of what pass'd in Lancaster at the last Treaty 
with the Twightwees. 

" The News was confirm' d by a Belt of Wampum from the Six Na- 
tions, that the French had imprisoned some of the Six Nations Depu- 
ties, & 30 of the Wandots, including Women & I hildren. The In- 
dians that were sent to meet our People with the Goods came back 
& did not see any thing of them, but they had been no further than 
the old Shawonese Town. 

" 15th I lot the Indians know that I wou'd deliver my Message 
to morrow, & the Goods I had, & that they must send Deputies 
with me on my returning homewards, & wherever we shou'd meet 
the rest of the Goods I wou'd send them to them if they were not 
taken by the Enemy, to which they agreed. 

u The same Day the Delawares made a Speech to me & presented 
a Beaver Coat & a String of Wampum, & said, Brother: 'we let 
the President <& Council of Plrila. know that after the Death of our 
Cheif Man, Olomipies, our Grand Children the Shawnese came to 
our own Town to condole with us over the loss of our good King, 
your Brother, & they wiped off our Tears & comforted our minds, &, 
as the Delawares are the same People with tbe Pennsylvanians, & 
born in one & the same Country, we give some of tbe Present our 
Grand Children gave us to the President & Council of Philda. be- 
cause the Death of their good Friend & Brother must have affected 
them as well as us.' 

" Gave the Beaver Coat & a String of Wampum. 

M The same Day the Wandots sent for me & Andrew & presented 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 355 

us with 7 Beaver Skins about 10 lbs. weight, & said they gave us 
that to buy some refreshments for us after our arrival in Pennsylvania, 
wished we might get home safe, & lifted up their Hands & said they 
wou'd pray God to protect us & guide us the way home. I desir'd 
to know their Names; they behav'd like People of good Sense & 
Sincerity; the most of them were grey headed; their Names are as 
follows : 

" Totornihiades, 1 Wanduny, 

" Taganayesy, > Taruchiorus, 

" Sonachqua, ) their Speaker. 

" The Chiefs of the Delawares that made the above Speech are 
Shawanasson & Achamanatainu. 

" 16th. I made answer to the Delawares & said, — 

a< Brethren the Delawares : 

" l It is true what you said that the People of Pennsylvania are 
your Brethren & Countrymen ; we are very well pleas'd of what 
your Children the Shawonese did to you; this is the first time we 
had publick Notice given us of the Death of our good Friend & 
Brother Olomipies. I take this opportunity to remove the re- 
mainder of your Troubles from your Hearts to enable you to attend 
in Council at the ensuing Treaty, & [ assure you that the President 
& Council of Pennsylvania condoles with You over the loss of your 
King our good Friend & Brother.' 

"Gave them 5 Strouds. 

11 The two aforesaid Chiefs gave a String of Wampum & desir'd 
me to let their brethren, the President & Council, know they in- 
tended a Journey next Spring to Philadelphia to consult with their 
Brethren over some Affairs of Moment, .since they are now like 
Orphan Children; they hoped their Brethren wou'd let them have 
their good Advice and Assistance, as the People of Pennsylvania & 
the Delawares were like one Family. 

u The same Day the rest of the Goods arriv'd the Men said they 
had nine Days' Rain & the Creeks arose, & that they had been 
oblig'd to send a sick Man back from Franks Town to the Inhabi- 
tants with another to attend him. 

" The neighbouring Indians being sent for again, the Council was 
appointed to meet to-morrow, it rain'd again. 

" 17th. It rained very hard, but in the Afternoon it held up for 
about 3 hours ; the Deputies of the several Nations met in Council 
& I delivered them what I had to say from the President & Council 
of Pennsylvania by Andrew Montour. 

" ' Brethren, you that live on Ohio : 

<(< Iam sent to You by the President & Council of Pennsylvania, 



356 MINUTES OF THE 

& I am now going to Speak to You on their behalf, I desire You 
will take Notice & hear what I shall say.' 

" Gave a String of Wampum. 
"< Brethren: 

" 'Some of You have been in Philadelphia last Fall & acquainted 
us that You had taken up the English Hatchet, and that You had 
already made use of it against the French, & that the French had 
very hard heads, & your Country afforded nothing but Sticks & 
Hickerys which was not sufficient to break them. You desir'd your 
Brethren wou'd assist You with some Weapons sufficient to do it. 
Your Brethren the Prcsid'- & Council promis'd you then to send 
something to You next Spring by Tharachia wagon, but as some 
other Affairs prevented his Journey to Ohio, you receiv'd a Supply 
by George Croghan sent you by your said Brethren ; but before 
George Croghan came back from Ohio News came from over the 
Great Lake that the King of Great Britain & the French 
King had agreed upon a Cessation of Arms for Six Months 
& that a Peace was very likely to follow. Your Brethren, the Pre- 
sident & Council, were then in a manner at a loss what to do. It 
did not become them to act contrary to the conimand of the King, 
and it was out of their Power to encourage you in the War against 
the French; but as your Brethren never miss'd fulfilling their 
Promises, they have upon second Consideration thought proper to 
turn the intended Supply into a Civil & Brotherly Present, and 
have accordingly sent me with it, and here are the Goods before 
your Eyes, which I have, by your Brethren's Order, divided into 5 
Shares & layd in 5 different heaps, one heap whereof your Brother 
Assaraquoa sent to You to remember his Friendship and Unity 
with You ; & as you are all of the same Nations with whom we the 
English have b i en in League of Friendship, nothing need be said 
more than this, that the President & Council & Assaraquoa have 
sent You this Present to serve to strengthen the Chain of Friend- 
ship between us the English & the several Nations of Indians to 
which You belong. A French Peace is a very uncertain One, they 
keep it no longer than their Interest permits, then they break it 
without provocation given them. The French King's People have 
been almost starv'd in old France for want of Provision, which 
made them wish & seek for Peace; but our wise People are of 
opinion that after their Bellies are full they will quarrel again & 
raise a War. All Nations in Europe know that their Friendship 
is mix';! with Poison, & many that trusted too much on their 
Friendship have been ruin'd. 

" ' I now conclude & say, that we t'he English are your true 
Brethren at all Events, In token whereof receive this Present.' The 
Goods being then uncover'd I proceeded. 

" ' Brethren : 

" i You have of late settled the River of Ohio for the sake of 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 357 

Hunting, & our Traders followed you for the sake of Hunting also. 
You have invited them yourselves. Your Brethren, the President 
& Council, desire You will look upon them as your Brethren & see 
that they have justice done. Some of your Young Men have 
robbed our Traders, but you will be so honest as to compel them to 
make Satisfaction. You are now become a People of Note, & are 
grown very numerous of late Years, & there is no doubt some wise 
Men among you, it therefore becomes you to Act the part of wise 
men, & for the future be more regular than You have been for 
some Years past, when only a few Young Hunters lived here.' 
" Gave a Belt. 

" ' Brethren : 

" ' You have of late made frequent Complaints against the 
Traders bringing so much Rum to your Towns, & desir'd it might 
be stop't; & yjur Brethren the President & Council made an Act 
accordingly & put a stop to it, & no Trader was to bring any Rum 
or strong Liquor to your Towns. I have the Act here with me & 
shall explain it to You before I leave you; But it seems it is out 
of your Brethren's Power to stop it entirely. You send down 
your own Skins by the Traders to buy Rum for you. You go 
yourselves & fetch Horse loads of strong Liquor. But the other 
Day an Indian came to this Town out of Maryland with 3 Horse 
loads of Liquor, so that it appears you love it so well that 
you cannot be without it. You know very well that the Country 
near the endless Mountain affords strong Liquor, & the moment the 
Traders buy it they are gone out of the Inhabitants & are travel- 
ling to this Place without being discover'd ; besides this, you never 
agree about it — one will have it, the other won't (tho' very few), a 
third says we will have it cheaper; this last we believe is spoken 
from your Hearts (here they Laughed). Your Brethren, therefore, 
have order'd that every of Whiskey shall be sold to You for 

5 Bucks in your Town, & if a Trader offers to sell Whiskey to You 
and will not let you have it at that Price, you may take it from him 

6 drink it for nothing/ 
" Gave a Belt. 



iC c 



Brethren 



Here is one of the Traders who you know to be a very sober & 
honest Man ; he has been robbed of the value of 300 Bucks, & you 
all know by whom ; let, therefore, Satisfaction be made to the 
Trader.' 

" Gave a String of Wampum. 
" ' Brethren, I have no more to say.' 

" I delivered the Goods to them, having first divided them into 5 
Shares — a Share to the Senekas another to the Cajukas, Oneidos, 
the Onontagers, & Mohawks, another to the Delawares, another to 



358 MINUTES OF THE 

the Owendaets, Tisagcchroanu, & Mohickons, and the other to the 
Shawonese. 

" The Indians signified great Satisfaction <fc were well pleased 
with the Cessation of Arms. The Rainy Wheather hasted them 
away with the Goods into the Houses. 

" 18th. The Speech was delivered to the Delawarcs in their own 
Language, & also to the Shawonese in their's, by Andrew Montour, 
in the presence of the Gentlemen that accompanied me. I ac- 
quainted the Indians I was determined to leave them to-morrow & 
return homewards. 

" 19th. Scaiohady, Tannghrishon, Oniadagarehra, with a few 
more, came to my lodging & spoke as follows : 
" ' Brother Onas — 

" ' We desire you will hear what we are going to say to You in be- 
half of all the Indians on Ohio j their Deputies have sent us to You. 

" ( We have heard what you have said to us, & we return You 
man} 7 thanks for your kindness in informing us of what pass'd be- 
tween the King of Great Britain & the French King, and in par- 
ticular we return you many thanks for the large Presents ; the same 
we do to our Brother Assaraquoa, who joined our Brother Onas in 
making us a Present. Our Brethren have indeed tied our Hearts 
to their's. We at present can but return thanks with an empty 
hand till another opportunity serves to do it sufficiently. We must 
call a great Council & do every thing regular; in the mean time 
look upon us as your true Brothers. 
" ' Brother : 

" ' You said the other Day in Council if any thing befell us from 
the French we must let you know of it. We will let you know if 
we hear any thing from the French, be it against us or yourself. 
You will have Peace, but it's most certain that the Six Nations & 
their Allies are upon the point of declaring War against the French. 
Let us keep up true Corrispondence & always hear of one another.' 

" They gave a Belt. 

" * Scaiohady & the half King, with two others, had inform'd me 
that they often must send Messengers to Indian Towns & Nations, 
& had nothing in their Council Bag, as they were new beginners, 
either to recompense a Messenger or to get Wampum to do the busi- 
ness, & begged I wou'd assist them with something. I had saved 
a Piece of Strowd, an half Barrell of Power, 100 lb. of Lead, 10 
Shirts, G Knives, aud 1 lh. of Vermillion, & gave it to them for 
the aforesaid use ; they return'd many thanks and were mightily 
pleased. 

" The same Day I set out for Pennsylvania in Rainy Weather, 
and arrived at George Croghan's on the 28th Instant. 

« CONRAD WEISER. 

"Pennsbury, Sept r - 29th, 1748. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 359 

At a Council held at Philadadelphia, 29th October, 1748. 
present : 

The Honoble. ANTHONY PALMER, Esq., President 
Samuel Hassell, Abraham Taylor, \ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Robert Strettell, V Esqrs. 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

Two Packets from the Secretary of the State's Office were opened, 
which were found to contain the following Letters and Papers. 

" Whitehall, 28th June, 1748. 
"Sir: 

" The Act of Accession of the King of Spain as likewise that 
of the Republick of Genoa to the Preliminaries signed at Aix-la- 
Chapelle the 19th April, 0. S., 1748, having been Signed by their 
respective Plenipotentiary's on the 28th Instant, N. S., in conse- 
quence of which Hostilities are to cease as well by Sea as Land, ac- 
cording to the Terms and periods agreed upon for a suspension of 
Arms in the Treaty sign'd at Paris the 19th Day of August, N. S., 
1712, I herewith inclose to You a literal Translation of the clauses of 
the said Treaty of the 1 9th Aug st: 1712, N. S., which relate to this 
matter, & which together with my Letter to You of the 7th May last, & 
the Copy of His Majestie's Proclamation which was therein inclos'd, 
will serve for your Information and for the rule of your Conduct 
on this occasion ; and you are to give proper directions to the end 
that all His Majestie's Subjects in your Government may pay due 
obedience to & strictly observe the same. 

"I am, Sir, Your most obed'' humb. Serv'-' 

" BEDFORD. 

"Anthony Palmer, Esqr., Presid 1 - 

" Translation of the third Article of the Treaty for a suspension of 
Arms for four Months, made & concluded, at Paris between Ann, 
Queen of Great Britain, & Lewis 14th, King of France, at Paris 
the 19 th Day of August, 1712. 

" To prevent in like manner all Subjects of Complaints & of Con- 
testations which may arise on occasion of Ships, Merchandises, or 
other Effects which may be taken at Sea during the time of the 
Suspension, it is mutually agreed that such Sh'ips, Merchandises, & 
Effects which may be taken in the Channel & in the North Seas 
after the Space of twelve Days, to be computed from the Signing of 
the said Suspension, shall be restored mutually. 

" That the Term shall be of Six Weeks for Prizes made from the 
Channel, the British Seas, & the North Seas as far as Cape St. Vin- 
cent. 



360 MINUTES OF THE 

" And in like manner of Six Weeks from & beyond that Cape 
as far the Line, whether in the Ocean or in the Mediteranean. 

" Lastly, of Six Months beyond the Line, & in all other parts of 
the World without any exception or other more particular distinc- 
tion of time & Place. 

" Whitehall, 9th August, 1748. 
"Sir: 

" In my Letter of the 28th June Last I acquainted You with the 
King of Spain & the Republick of Genoa's accession to the Prelimi- 
nary Articles, Sign'd at Aix-la-Chapelle the 19th April, 0. S., 
1748, for restoring a general Peace. I am now to inform You that 
their Excellency's the Lords Justices have since order'd a Procla- 
mation to be published, a Copy of which is inclos'd, declaring a 
Cessation of Hostilities against His Catholick Majesty & the Re- 
publick of Genoa & their Subjects, as well by Sea as Land, which 
Proclamation you are to cause to be publish d in all the proper 
Places under your Government, to the end that all His Majestie's 
Subjects there may pay due obedience, & strictly conform them- 
selves thereto. 

u I am, Sir, Your most obed t- h'ble Serv t# 

" BEDFORD. 
" Anthony Palmer, Esq. Presid 1 " 



" By the Lords Justices. 
"A PROCLAMATION. 
"Tho. Cantuar, "Bedford, T 

"Hardwick, C. "Argylc, j 

" Whereas, preliminaries for restoringa General Peace were Sign'd 
at Aix-la-Chapelle on the 19th Day of April last, 0. S., by the 
Ministers of His Majesty, the most Christian King, & the States 
General of the United Provinces. And whereas, for the putting 
an end to the Calamities of War as soon and as far as might be 
possible, it was agreed between his Majesty the most Christian 
King & the States General that Hostilities shou'd cease at Land 
and at Sea within the times & in the manner in the said Preliminary 
Articles for that purpose agreed upon. And whereas f since the Sign- 
ing the said Preliminaries His Catholic Majesty and the most serene 
Republick of Genoa did, on the Seventeenth Day of June last, 0. 
S., accede to the said Preliminaries, We have thought fit by & 
with the advice of His Majesty's Privy Council, & do hereby in His 
Majesty's Name notify the same to all His loving Subjects, and do 
strictly charge & command all his Officers and all other His Sub- 
jects whatsoever, to forbear all Acts of Hostility against his Catho- 
lick Majesty and the Republic of Genoa, or either of them, their 
or either of their Vassals or Subjects, from & after the respective 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 361 

Times following, that is to say, from & after the end of Twelve 
Days, to be computed from & after the said seventeenth Day of June 
last, 0. S., in the Channel & in the North Seas ; and from and after 
the end of Six Weeks from the said seventeenth Day of June last, 
0. S., beyond the Channel, the British Seas, and the North Seas 
as far as Cape St. Vincent, and beyond the said Cape to the Equi- 
noctial Line, whether in the Ocean or Mediterranean ; and from & 
after the end of Six Months from the said seventeenth Day of June 
last, 0. S., beyond the said Equinoctial Line, and in all other 
Places of the World without any exception or other more particular 
distinction of time or Place, and do declare that all Ships, Merchan- 
dizes, & Effects belonging to His Catholick Majesty & the Repub- 
lick of Genoa, or either of them, or their or either of their Subjects 
or Vassals, that have or shall be taken contrary to the true meaning 
of this Proclamation, shall be restored. 

" Given at Whitehall the 4th Day of August, 1748, in the Twenty- 
second Year of His Majesty's Reign. 
"GOD SAVE THE KING."" 

" Whitehall, 27th August, 1748. 
"Sir: 

"The Lords Justices having in obedience to His Majesty's Com- 
mands caused a Proclamation to be issued for taking off the prohi- 
bition of Commerce between His Majesty's Subjects and those of 
His Catholick Majesty, I am commanded by their Excellencies to 
send You a Copy of the said Proclamation, and to Signify their di- 
rections to You that you cause the same to be publish'd in all the 
proper Places under your Government. 

"I am, Sir, Your most obedient h'ble Serv'., 
"RI. RO. ALDWORTH. 

"Anthony Palmer, Esqr., Presid'-" 



" By the Lords Justices. 

"A PROCLAMATION. 

"Dorset P., "Montagu, 

" Bedford, " Harrington. 

" Whereas, by an Act of Parliament made in the thirteenth Year 
of His Majesty's Reign, entitled 'an Act for prohibiting Commerce 
with Spain,' all Commerce between His Majesty's Subjects & those 
of Spain in Europe was prohibited and restrained in manner in the 
said Act mentioned : And Whereas it was provided by the said 
Act that if His Majesty in his great Wisdom should at any time 
during the present War judge it for the benefit of His People to 
take off the said Prohibition & Restrictions, it shou'd be lawful for 
His Majesty by one or Proclamation or Proclamations to signify 



362 MINUTES OF THE 

the same, & thereupon such Goods & Commodities as in the said Act 
are mentioned shou'd and might Ye imported, being first duly en- 
ter'd, and paying the Customs & other Duties then due by Law for 
the same, any thing in the said Act contained to the contrary not- 
withstanding. We, therefore, judging it expedient immediately to 
take off the said Prohibitions & Restrictions created by the said Act of 
Parliament, have thought fit by & with the advice of His Majesty's 
Privy Council, and do hereby in His Majesty's Name, in pursuance 
of the Power reserved in & by the said Act of Parliament, by this 
Proclamation signify the same to all his loving, and do hereby de- 
clare that the said Prohibitions and Restrictions are from henceforth 
taken off. 

" Given at Whitehall the Twenty-fifth Day of August, 1748, in the 
the Twenty-second Year of His Majesty's Reign. 
"GOD SAYE THE KING." 

And thereupon the Proclamations were immediately publish'd at 
the Court House, & order'd to be printed & dispers'd thro' the 
several Counties. 



At a Council held at Philada., Wednesday, 23d Novr., 1748. 

present: 
The Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov 



ernor. 



Anthony Palmer, Thomas Lawrence, *| 

Samuel Hasell, William Till, I v . 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, f ^ s( l uires - 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, J 

A letter from the Honourable Proprietaries to the Council by the 
Governor, was read in these words : 

" Gentlemen : 

u As the arrival of Mr. Hamilton, who embarks in the Ship that 
carrys this Letter, will put an end to your Administration of Gov- 
ernment, we cou'd not avoid declaring to you the Sense we have of 
your having executed those Powers with great Zeal and attachment 
to the true Interest of your Country; such a Conduct deserves and 
has our hearty acknowledgments, and you may be assur'd of our 
good will on all occasions. We recommend our Governor to your 
advice & assistance, and are, 

" Gentlemen, Your very affectionate Friends, 

"THO. PENN. 
"RICH'D. PENN. 
" London, August 30th, 1748." 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 363 

And then a Commission, Dated the 17th Day of March last, un- 
der the Hands and Seals of the Honoble Proprietaries, Thomas 
Penn and Richard Penn, Esqrs., constituting the Honoble. James 
Hamilton, Esqr., Lieutenant Governor & Commander-in-Chief of 
the Province of Pennsylvania & Counties of New Castle, Kent, & 
Sussex, on Delaware, His Majestie's Order in Council under the 
Seal of the Privy Council, dated the 12th May last, approving of 
him to be Gov r -' & a Copy of the Minute of the fourth of August 
last of their Excellencies the Lords Justices in Council, certifying 
the Governor's having that Day taken the Oaths of Allegiance & 
Supremacy, &c, before them, and likewise a Warrant from the Pro- 
prietaries to the Keeper of the Great Seal of the Province bearing 
even date with the Commission commanding him to Affix the said 
Seal thereto, were produc'd by the Governor & read; the Secre- 
tary was thereupon sent to the Keeper of the Great Seal to get 
the Seal affix'd to the said Commission. 

Oa his return the Governor's Commission was again read, & His 
Honour signifying his Intention that it shou'd be immediately pub- 
lished, the Council waited on him to the Court House where the 
Publication was made in the usual Forms. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Thursday, 24th Nov r -> 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ") 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, > Esqrs. 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, ) 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The Governor propos'd to the Council the issuing a Proclamation 
for the continuance of Magistrates & other officers, & a Draught 
being Laid before them it was approv'd and agreed to be published on 
the Governor's return from his Government of the Lower Counties : 

<*By the Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant 
Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Province of Pennsyl- 
vania and Counties of New Castle, Kent, and Sussex, on Dela- 
ware : 

"•A PROCLAMATION. 

u Forasmuch as the Honourable Thomas Penn and Richard Penn, 
Esquires, true and, absolute* Proprietaries & Governors-in-Chief of 
the Province of Pennsylvania and Counties of New Castle, Kent, 
and Sussex, on Delaware, have been pleased by their Commission, 
under their Hands and Seal, bearing date the seventeenth Day of 



364 MINUTES OF THE 

March last, to constitute and appoint me to bo their Lieutenant 
Governor of the said Province and Counties, with all necessary 
Powers and Authority for the well governing of the same, which 
said appoinrment the King's most excellent Majesty, in a Council 
held at St. James' the Twelfth Day of May last past, was graciously 
pleased to allow and approve of : Therefore, in pursuance of the said 
Trust in me reposed, having a special Regard to the Safety of the 
State & Government of the said Province and Counties, and to pre- 
vent failures in the Administration of Justice therein, I have by &, 
with the Advice & Consent of the Council of the said Province & 
Counties, thought fit to ordain and do hereby ordain and declare 
that all Orders and Commissions whatsoever relating to the Govern- 
ment of the said Province and Counties heretofore Lawfully and 
rightfully issued, which were in force on the Twenty- third Day of 
this Instant, November, shall be, continue, and remain in full force, 
power, and virtue, according to their respective Tenors, until my 
further pleasure shall be known therein ; and that all Persons what- 
soever who on the Twenty-third Day of this Instant, November, held 
or enjoyed any Office of Trust or Profit in this Government, by 
virtue of any such Commission as aforesaid, shall continue to hold 
and enjoy the same until they be determined by me as aforesaid, or 
by other sufficient Authority. And I do further hereby command 
and require all Magistrates, Officers, and Commissioners whatsoever, 
in whom any publick Trust is reposed in this Government that they 
diligently proceed in the performance and discharge of their re- 
spective Duties therein for the Safety, Peace, and well-being of the 
same. 

" Given under my Hand and Great Seal of this Province at Phila- 
delphia the Thirtieth Day of November, in the Twenty-second 
Year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord, George the Second, 
King of Great Britain, France, & Ireland, Defender of the Faith, 
& ca -' Annoqz Domini, 1748. 

"JAMES HAMILTON. 
" By his Honour's Command, 
" Richard Peters, Secretary. 
" GOD SAVE THE KING." 

The Governor inform'd the Board of his Appointment of Mr. 
Richard Peters to be Provincial Secretary and Clerk of the Council. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 365 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Monday 2d January, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ""» 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, I -p, 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, | "^ 

Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the proceeding Council were read & approv'd. 

The Governor Laid before the Board the Draught of a Speech 
which he propos'd to make to the Assembly, who by their Adjourn- 
ment were to meet to- Morrow, which was read & approv'd, & the 
Council adjourn'd to 12 o' Clock the next Day. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Tuesday 3d January, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ~) 

Abraham Taylor, Benjamin Shoemaker, v Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, ) 

The Minutes of the proceeding Council were read and approv'd. 

The Governor inform'd the Board that he had received a Message 
last Night from the Assembly by five of their Members, acquainting 
him that a Quorum of the House was met according to adjournment, 
& were ready to receive any thing he had to lay before them, to 
which he answer'd that he intended to order the attendance of the 
House in the Council Chamber this Day about Noon ; whereupon 
the Secretary was order'd to let the House know that the Governor 
required their attendance in the Council Chamber immediately, & 
the Speaker & the whole House coming accordingly the Governor 
spoke as follows : 

" Mr. Speaker and Gentlemen of the General Assembly — 
11 1 should have called you together immediately after my Arrival 
if I had either observ'd or been inform'd His Majesty's Interest or 
that of the Country required it; but as no Necessity of that kind 
appear'd, I forbore to give you the trouble of meeting in Assembly 
before the time Yourselves had appointed for the Dispatch of Pub- 
lic Business. 

" It is with great pleasure I now see you met in your Legislative 
Capacity, & very gladly embrace the opportunity it affords me 



366 MINUTES OF THE 

of signifying to you, by the express Command of the honourable 
Proprietaries, the great Affection they bear to the Inhabitants of 
this Province, the earnest desire they have to preserve Peace & 
Concord among them, & the particular satisfaction they receive by 
their Welfare & Prosperity; and as I know them to be perfectly 
sincere in their professions, I have not the least apprehension but 
they will meet with suitable Returns of Gratitude from You. 

" Having been for some time absent, it cannot be presum'd the 
Condition & Circumstances of the Country are so well known to me 
as to Gentlemen who have constantly resided on the Spot, & who 
being the Representative Body of the People are to be suppos'd 
best acquainted with their real wants & expectations, wherefore I 
shall for the present decline laying any thing before you on my 
part; at the same time I very sincerely assure you that whatever 
Bills you shall judge proper to present for my approbation shall be 
favourably received and considered with attention, and where they 
shall appear to be, as I doubt not they will, for the general Utility 
of the People & not inconsistent with the Duty I owe to His Ma- 
jesty or the Rights of the honourable Proprietors, they shall be 
sure to receive my most speedy & hearty concurrence. 

" With respect to myself I have little to say. It is now a long 
time that I have been personally known to most of You, & from 
thence you are much better able to form a Judgment of my Regards 
for your Liberties, both Civil & Religious, than by any thing I can 
say in my own behalf. One Circumstance, however, you will give 
me leave to take Notice of, as it is in my opinion no unfavourable 
one to the People you represent, that having myself a considerable 
Stake in the Province, it is really my I jterest as well as inclination 
to support them in the enjoyment of all their just Rights & Privi- 
leges, since whenever the time shall come in which I shall cease to 
be their Governor & return to a private Station, I shall find myself, 
my Family, & Friends equally affected with every other Person by 
any injury the Constitution may suffer under my Administration. 

" I shall conclude what I have to say at this time with entreating 
you that all Transactions between us may be carried on with Can- 
dour & Moderation as the most effectual means of avoiding disagree- 
able animosities and uniting us in the strict Bands of Friendship & 
mutual Confidence, so necessary for the public Good. This is what 
I will endeavour by every method in my Power, and I have no reason 
to doubt that you, Gentlemen ; are now come together with like Sen- 
timents & Inclinations. 

"JAMES HAMILTON. 
" January 3d, 1748-9." 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 367 

At a Council held at Philadelphia, Thursday, 5th January, 1748. 
present : 

The Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, v | 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, i ™ 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, { ^ r8 " 

William Logan, j 

The Minutes of the proceeding Council were road & approved. 

The Speaker with the House of Representatives waited on the 
Governor in the Council Chamber, & in answer to His Honour's 
Speech road the following Address : 

11 To the Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant 

Governor of the Province of Pennsylvania, .& Counties of New 
Castle, Kent j & Sussex, on Delaware, 

u The Address of the Representatives of the Freemen of the said 
Province in General Assembly met, 

u May it please the Governor : 

" We heartily congratulate the Governor on his Accession to the 
Goveifiment of this Province & safe Arrival among us; And we 
return him our sincere thanks for his favourable Speech at the 
opening of this Session, and for the Regard he hath been pleas'd 
to shew us in forbearing to call us together before the time we had 
appointed for the dispatch of pubiick Business. 

"The great Affection our honourable Proprietaries are pleased to 
express ' to the Inhabitants of this Province/ their desires ' to pre- 
serve Peace & Concord among them,' and ' the particular satisfac- 
tion they receive from their Welfare & Prosperity/ justly merit 
those grateful Returns which we are perswaded they will ever re- 
ceive from the Freemen of Pennsylvania. 

" Tho' the Governor has been sometime absent, yet his former 
long acquaintance & thorough knowledge of the pubiick Affairs of 
the Province, joined with his distinguished Abilities, render him 
a very competent Judge of the Bills which shall be presented to 
him in order to be past into Laws. Such only We are determined 
to offer as shall appear to Us to be for the general Utility of the 
People and consistent with the duty we all owe to the King, as 
well as with a due Regard to the Rights of the honourable the Pro- 
prietaries; and we gratefully acknowledge the obligation we are 
laid under in the assurance the Governor is pleas'd to give us, that 
such ' shall be sure to receive His most speedy &> hearty concur- 
rence/ 

" The Fidelity, Impartiality, & Justice with which the Governor 



368 MINUTES OF THE 

lately acquitted himself in the principal & most honourable Office 
within this City, as well as on other Occasions, leave Us no room to 
doubt 'his Regards to our Liberties, both Civil and Religious.' 
And it merits our particular acknowledgments to the honourable 
the Proprietors that they have been pleased to confer the Govern- 
ment on a Gentleman of so considerable an Estate among Us, whose 
' Interest' we know it is, and whose l Inclination' we believe it to 
be, to support the People of this Province ' in the enjoyment of all 
their just Rights & Privileges.' 

"We shall chearfully pursue the steps the Governor is pleas'd 
to point out to Us, of carrying on " with Candour and Moderation 
all Transactions between us,' & on our part endeavour not only to 
maintain l the strict Bands of Friendship & mutual Confidence 
necessary for the Publick Good,' but to shew the just -Regard We 
entertain for the Government by making an honourable Provision 
for its Support. 

" Sign'd by order of the House, 

" JOHN KINSEY, Speaker. 

« 11th Mon. 4th, 1748-9." 

When he had done he delivered the Address into the hands of 
the Governor, with an Order of Assembly for £600, and the Gov- 
vernor spoke as follows: 

" I heartily thank you for this kind and affectionate Address. 
The favourable Sentiments you are pleased to entertain of me give 
me a particular pleasure, as by an harmony between the several 
parts of the Legislature We shall be the belter able to recommend 
ourselves to His Majesty, give Satisfaction to the Proprietaries, and 
consult the true Interest of the People. 

" The Present You have in so handsome a manner now made me 
previous to our entering upon Business, is a mark of Confidence 
which I trust you will find not ill-plac'd, since I think myself by 
this Confidence laid under the strongest obligations of exercising 
my best Endeavours for the Service of the Province." 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Monday, 23d of January, 

1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. « 

Thomas Lawrence, William Till, ~\ 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, V Esqrs. 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, ) 

The Minutes of the proceeding Council were read & approv'd. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 369 

The Governor laid before the Board a Bill deliver'd to him yes- 
terday by two Members of the House for his concurrence, Entitled 
" An Act for the new appointment of Trustees, & c *-'" which being 
read the Board proceeded to compare it with former Acts of As- 
sembly made on the like occasion, & finding a different mode of 
expression from some of the former Acts, tho' exactly the same 
with the last pass'd by Governor Thomas, it was consider' d whether 
an Amendment shou'd not be offer'd to this Clause, viz.: " Pro- 
vided always, and it is hereby further enacted, that none of the Per- 
sons herein before named shall longer continue in the exercise of 
the said Office than the space of four Years from the time of the 
commencement of their trust as aforesaid, & from thence until a 
new Nomination & Appointment of Trustees of the said General 
Loan Office be made, as in and by the last-mentioned Act of As- 
sembly is directed f and some time being taken up in the Con- 
sideration thereof, the Council adjourn'd 'till to-morrow morning. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Tuesday, 24th January, 1748. 
present : 

The Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Thomas Lawrence, William Till, h 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, >- Esqrs. 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The Bill for the new appointment of Trustees was read a second 
time, & a good deal was said further concerning the dark & per- 
plex'd manner of expression in the Clause which was the Subject 
of yesterday's Consultation ; but in as much as it was agreeable to 
the last Act, & that the present offer of a Bill by the Assembly to 
renew the Act, & the passing one thereupon, wou'd strengthen the 
conclusion that the Trustees cou'd not act longer than four years 
or till the next Session of Assembly immediately succeeding the 
expiration of that term, it was thought adviseable to pass the Bill 
in the manner it was presented. 
vol. v.— 24. 



370 MINUTES OF THE 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Thursday, the 26th Jan^ 1748. 

present : 

The Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Thomas Lawrence, William Till, "] 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, ! ™ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Thomas Hopkinson, { ^ 

Joseph Turner, J 

The Minutes of the preceeding Council were read & approv'd. 

The Governor laid before the Board a Bill deliver'd to him by 
two Members of the House for his concurrence, Entitled " An Act 
for amending the Laws relating to the Partition and Distribution of 
Intestates Estates, & concerning the Probate of Wills ;" which was 
read for the first time, and it appearing that it differed from the Laws as 
they now stand, as well as that there were some new Clauses where- 
by the Estates of the Inhabitants of the Province wou'd be greatly 
affected, it was agreed to postpone the consideration thereof till the 
Attorney General shou'd have examin'd it and made his Report 
thereon. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Tuesday. 31st of January,, 
1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 



Esqrs. 



Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, "} 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, 

Robert Strettell, Lawrence Growden, 

Joseph Turner, Thomas Hopkinson, 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The Governor inform'd the Board that he had received three more 
Bills from the House ; that one was for an addition of £20,000 to 
the Money now Current; but as he did not intend to take it at 
present into his Consideration, he wou'd not lay it before them. 
The other two were read, viz. : one Act to encourage the killing of 
Squirrels within this Province, to which two Amendments were 
made, & the Secretary was order'd to return the Bill with those 
Amendments; And then the other entitled " An Act for amending the 
Laws relating to the Poor, & for the better appointment of Over- 
seers of the Poor within the City of Philadelphia,'" was likewise 
read first all at once, and then Paragraph by Paragraph, together 
with some observations which the Governor on perusal of it had 
committed to writing ; & the Board unanimously thinking that the 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 371 

Bill wanted much Amendment, tho' there were some good things 
in it, they proceeded to make the amendments ; but finding as they 
went on that the exceptions to the Bill were more numerous than 
might consist with this method, they were Laid aside, & the Gov- 
ernor was advis'd to set forth His Sentiments of the Bill in a Mess- 
age to the House. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Wednesday 1st February, 

1748. 



Esqrs. 



PRESENT : 

The Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov r 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, 

William Till, Abraham Taylor, 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, 

Lawrence Growden, Joseph Turner, 

Thomas Hopkinson. 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approved. 

The Governor having prepared a Message agreeable to the Senti- 
ments of the Council yesterday, relating to the Poor Bill, the same 
was read and approv'd & order' d to be deliver'd. 

" Gentlemen : 

" I have consider'd with the greatest Attention the Bill entitled 
1 An Act for amending the Laws relating to the Poor, & for the 
better appointment of Overseers of the Poor within the City of 
Philadelphia/ & perceive it contains many new & wise Provisions, 
tending to the Utility of the Inhabitants of this City & Province, 
yet as the greatest part of the Bill consists of Clauses revoking 
Powers given by several former Acts, & establishing New in their 
Places without assigning any Cause for the alteration, I cannot pass 
it as it stands. 

" It would have been very agreeable to me could I have sent you 
down the Bill under Amendments, but as a small Trial convinc'd 
me the parts, in my opinion necessary were so inseparably wove 
into the repealing Clauses that the Attempt must end in obscurity 
& a fruitless wasting your Time. 

" I wish any method cou'd be fallen upon to preserve the new & 
truly valuable Provisions in the Bill. To them you may always be 
assur'd of my hearty concurrence. 

"JAMES HAMILTON. 
" February 1st, 1748." 

While the Council was sitting A Bill entitled "An Act for regu- 
lating Horse Jockeys" was delivered to the Governor by two Mem- 
bers, with a Message from the House that the greatest part of the 



372 MINUTES OF THE 

Business before them was gone thro', & that the greater dispatch 
he gave the Bills under his Consideration the more he wou'd oblige 
the House ; to which the Governor was pleas'd to make answer that 
he wou'd give the several Bills before him all the dispatch possible. 
The Governor having conferr'd with the Attorney General on the 
Bill for x\mendment of the Laws relating to Intestates Estates, & 
Communicated to the Board his opinion on the several parts of the 
Bill, was read a second time, Paragraph by Paragraph, & several 
Amendments propos'd &, settled, & the Secretary was order'd to 
transcribe them fair & deliver the Bill to the House with the 
Amendments. 

The Horse Jockey Bill was read and agreed to & order'd to be 
return'd with a Message that the Governor was ready to pass it 
when it shou'd be presented to him for that purpose. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Saturday 4th Feb'ry., 1748. 

PRESENT I 

The Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Thomas Lawrence, William Till, ~) 

Abraham Taylor, Bobert Strettell, V Esqrs. 

Lawrence Growden, Thomas Hopkinson, ) 

The Minutes of the preceeding Council were read and approved. 

The Governor inform'd the Board that the House had signified to 
him by two of their Members their Agreement to the Amendments 
propos'd to the Squirrel Bill, that they had return'd the Poor Act 
& likewise the Act about Intestates Estates, with a written Mess- 
age on each Bill, which were read and are as follows : 

" May it please the Governor — 

K It gives us some pleasure to find the Governor express himself 
go much in favour of some parts of the Bill entituled i An Act for 
amending the Laws relating to the Poor, &c./ And we wish, as in 
his opinion, 'it contains many new Provisions tending to the Utility 
of the Inhabitants of this City & Province/ the whole had been 
such as that we might have obtain'd his Assent to it. 

11 We observe from the Message the Governor was pleas'd to send 
us in relation to this Bill, that although as it now stands he cannot 
pass it, yet he is desirous some Method may be fallen upon to pre- 
serve the new aud truly valuable Provisions in the Bill, and in this 
we heartily concur with him.' The best expedient we know of to 
answer this good purpose is, to entreat the Governor he will be 
pleased to reconsider the Bill & point out such parts of it as he dis- 
likes, to the end we may be able to judge whether, consistently with 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 373 

the Trust reposed in us, we can so amend the Bill as to remove the 
objections against its Passage. 

" Sign'd by Order of the House, 

"JOHN KINSEY, Speaker, 
"February 2nd, 1748." 

" May it please the Governor : 

" We have taken into Consideration the amendments propos'd to 
the Bill entituled ' An Act for amending the Law relating to the 
Partition & Distribution of Intestates Estates, & concerning the 
Probate of Wills/ & agree to all of them, the last save one excepted, 
and as to that Amendment we look upon it as bestowing Powers on 
the Register General and his Deputies, with the Justices they shall 
think fit to call to their Assistance, which by Law neither can, nor 
as we conceive ought to be granted to them for the reasons follow- 
ing : 

" First. The Register General and his Deputies in respect to the 
Probate of Wills, & C1 -' have only the same Powers which by the 
Royal Charter the Proprietor is authorized to grant, and this we 
think neither is nor can be any other than the Probate of Wills 
which concern Personal Estates. But the Amendment now proposed 
to us gives the like Power in respect of Lands, which is directly 
repugnant to the Laws of England. 

" It it true if the Register General or his Deputies and those 
they are pleased to call to their Assistance shou'd doubt, the 
Parties are intitled to a Trial by a Jury. But then they themselves 
are made absolute Judges of these doubts, and tho' they shou'd 
direct a Trial to be had by a Jury, yet no Provision is made to 
oblige them to have any Regard to the Verdict so to be given, but 
they may, for aught which the Clause proposed contains, give 
Judgment against the Verdict, without any appeal to be had 
against their Sentence. 

" Secondly. As the Law now stands, we suppose it clear that if 
the Register General and his Deputies, with their Assistants, exceed 
their Powers, the Justices of the Supream Court may prohibit 
them ; and at a time when the Powers of the Register General, his 
Deputies and Assistants, by the Clause proposed are so much 
enlarged, we cannot think it proper to take away the Superintend- 
ence of the Supream Court. 

" Thirdly. Because this Clause directs the calling of a special 
Court to try the Issues directed, & provides no Remedy, were the 
Justices to commit ever so gross mistakes, either by bringing on 
any such Trial when the Witnesses of either Party are beyond sea, 
by admitting Jurors or Witnesses against whom just exceptions are 
taken. But these or any other mistakes notwithstanding by the 
Amendment now proposed, the i Trial shall be had, made, taken, 



374 MINUTES OF THE 

perfected, & concluded in the said special Court, any Law, Usage, 
Custom, Writ or Writs prohibitory notwithstanding. 

" In England the Ordinaries, who have the Probate of Wills con- 
cerning Personal Estates, have not like Power so far as concerns 
Lands, tho' they are often Men well skill' d in the Civil Law, & 
proceed by it in Cases not repugnant to the Laws of England ; yet 
if they mistake, there are Appeals first to the Arches & next to 
the Delegates, before the Parties are concluded ; But by the Provi- 
sion in this Clause the Sentence is to be final, & no appeal from it, 
tho' it may happen the Justices called to the Assistance of the 
Register General or his Deputies are concern'd in Interest, know 
little of the Common Law, less of the Civil Law, & yet made 
Judges in the last Resort. 

" For these Reasons we would willingly hope the Governor, on 
considering the premises, will recede from the Amendment, & give 
his Assent to the Bill as it now stands without the Clause proposed. 
" Signed by Order of the House. 

'•JOHN KINSEY, Speaker. 
"Feb 1 * 2d, 1748." 

And further, that the House had acquainted him by two Mem- 
bers that they were inclinable to close the Sessions to-morrow, & 
therefore desir'd to know his Result on the Bills depending before 
him, & at what time he wou'd please to be waited on by the House 
with the Bills that have or wou'd receive his Assent in order to 
their being enacted into Laws ; and that he wou'd appoint some 
Gentlemen of his Council to join a Committee of the House in 
order to compare the Bills, whereupon he had sent three Messages 
to the House, one on the Paper Money Act as follows : 

*' Gentlemen : 

" As the Currency of this Province is a Matter of the greatest 
Consequence to the Inhabitants, it ought previously to the passing 
an Act to increase the quantity to be well consider'd what Effect 
such an Addition might have on Trade in general, & the private 
Estates of particular Persons, in order that we may, as far as in us 
lies, do equal Justice to all. I hope, therefore, you will not think 
me unreasonable if I take some time, and the best information I 
can get, the better to enable me to form a right Judgement of the 
Bill now before me for making Current Twenty Thousand Pounds 
in Bills of Credit of this Province to be emitted on Loan. And I 
the rather hope this delay will not be attended with any consider- 
able Inconveniences to the People, as there is confessedly a greater 
Sum of Money now circulating among us than any time heretofore. 

"JAMES HAMILTON. 
» February 3d, 1748." 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 375 

Another on the Act for Intestates Estates, as follows : 
"Gentlemen : 

" Upon considering that part of the Bill relating to the distribu- 
tion of Intestates Estates, &c, which concerns the Probate of Wills, 
& the Message I receiv'd from yon on the Amendments by me pro- 
pos'd, I find it a Matter of great Importance and attended with 
some difficulty. As to the other Parts of it I approve of them, & 
am ready to give my Assent for their being passed into a Law. 

" If the Laws relating to the Probate of Wills shall be thought 
to want Amendment I shall always be ready to take into Considera- 
tion any Bill that shall be prepar'd for that purpose. 

"JAMES HAMILTON. 

"February 3d, 1748." 

And the third on the Poor Bill, as follows : 
"Gentlemen : 

" The Bill now before me for amending the Laws relating to the 
Poor, & for the better appointment of Overseers of the Poor within 
the City of Philad a ., being of considerable Length and of great con- 
sequence to the Publick, the necessary corrections & alterations 
will require time and deliberation • &, as many of you have been 
long from your Families and are desirous to adjourn, I imagine it 
will be agreable to you to defer the further Consideration of them 
to another Session. 

"JAMES HAMILTON. 

" February 4th, 1748." 

Mr. Taylor and Mr. Strettell were desir'd to compare such Bills 
as were assented to with the engross'd Copies, and on their report- 
ing that they had done so in conjunction with a Committee of As- 
sembly, the Governor order'd the attendance of the House in the 
Council Chamber at 12 o'Clock, in order to pass the Bills into 
Laws; and the Speaker accordingly attending with the whole 
House, he presented four Bills, praying the Governor wou'd enact 
them into Laws ; each of which, on the Titles being read, was dis- 
tinctly pass'd by the Governor, & then sign'd by his Honour & 
countersigned by the Secretary, & delivered to a Committee to be 
carried to the Recorder's Office in order to be enroll'd. The Titles 
are as follows viz : 

"An Act for the new Appointment of Trustees of the General 
Loan Office of Pennsylvania, and for the making current Five 
thousand Pounds in new Bills of Credit, to exchange such of those 
now by Law current as are torn and defaced." 

" An Act to regulate Horse Jockeys and Dealers in Horses, & 
to prevent the bringing into this Province for Sale such as are 
small, unsizeable, or unsound." 



376 MINUTES OF THE . 

" An Act to encourage the Killing of Squirrels within this Pro- 
vince." 

" An Act for amending the Laws relating to the Partition and 
Distribution of Intestates Estates." 

The Speaker then presented the Governor with an Order for 
£400, & inform' d his Honour that the House propos'd to adjourn 
to the Seventh of August, to which no objection was made ; then 
the Speaker with the House withdrew. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Saturday, the 11th of March, 

1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ern or. 

Samuel Hasell, Abraham Taylor, ~\ 

Robert Strettell, Joseph Turner, v Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, ) 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

John Salkeld having complain'd to the Board that if the High- 
way leading from Philadelphia to New Castle shou'd be laid out so 
wide as sixty foot to the front of some Lands which he held on 
both sides the Road near Chester Bridge, according to the order of 
the late President & Council, it wou'd interfere with another Road 
laid out by the County Court and be an exceeding damage to him, 
& the Commissioners who laid out that Road having had notice to 
attend, both Parties were called in & examin'd, & it not appearing 
that John Salkeld had any just Cause of Complaint his Petition 
was dismiss'd. 

The Governor laid before the Board a Letter from Mr. Ogle, 
dated at Annapolis the tenth of February, complaining of a breach 
of the Peace committed by one Samuel England & William Hay, 
Under Sheriff of Chester County, in serving a Writt on & dispos- 
sessing one of the Inhabitants of Maryland, together with sundry 
Depositions to prove the fact, which were read. 

Order'd, That the Letter with the Depositions be copied & sent 
to the Persons complain'd of, & that they be required to attend the 
Governor & give him a full & true Account of the Affair that he 
may enabled to give a proper answer to the Letter. 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 377 

At a Council held at Philadelphia, Friday, 17th March, 1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Samuel Hasell, Abraham Taylor, ") 

llobert Strettell, Joseph Turner, v Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, ) 

The Minutes of the preceeding Council were read & approv'd. 

An Express arriv'd from Mr. Cookson, Prothonotary of Lan- 
caster County, with a Letter that Adam Furney, of Conewago, over 
Sasquehanna, was shot dead by an Indian in Liquor as he stood at 
his own Door; that the Indian was immediately seiz'd & carried 
before Justice Schwoop, at the town of York, & there detained by 
him 'till the Governor shou'd give Orders what shou'd be done with 
him. The Tract of Land where the fact was committed being 
(thro' to the Northward of the Temporary Line) held under a 
Maryland Patent by Mr. Diggs, & as such the Temporary Juris- 
diction seeming by the Royal Order to be given to Maryland, 
whereupon the Secretary was examin'd, & it appearing by what he 
said that the very spot where Furney was kill'd was on a careful 
Survey made by the Deputy Surveyor of Lancaster County found 
to be within the Lines of Mr. Digges' Patent, on a complaint 
formerly made by the Governor of Maryland to Governor Thomas, 
the Royal Order was read; and tho' it appear'd plain enough to the 
Board that this Tract was within the words of the Royal Order, yet 
as it was an Affair of the utmost Consequence to the Inhabitants of 
Lancaster County & to the Rights of the Proprietaries, they de- 
termin'd to consult the Attorney General & to take his opinion as 
to the directions proper to be given by the Governor to Justice 
Schwoop. 

MEM'N. 

In another Letter receiv'd soon after from Mr. Cookson, the 
above Account was contradicted, Furney tho' shot recover'd, & so 
nothing further was done. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, "Wednesday, 22 d March, 
1748. 

PRESENT : 

The Honoble. JAMES HAMILTON. Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Thomas Lawrence, Abraham Taylor, ") 

Robert Strettell, Joseph Turner, 5- Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 



378 MINUTES OF THE 

Justice Ruston & Justice Emmet attending by appointment of 
the Governor to answer some Charges that were exhibited against 
them for male Administration in the Execution of their Office in 
several Petitions preferred to the Governor by the Inhabitants of 
Chester County, & the Petitioners likewise attending with their 
Evidences to make good their Accusations, the Parties were call'd 
in, & after a long Examination of the Witnesses on both sides, it 
appeared to the Board that Justice Huston had acted an imprudent 
& unjustifiable Part, & that there were Parties subsisting among 
the Presbyterians in that part of the Country about Points of Re- 
ligion which bad but too much imbitter'd the Spirits of the Magis- 
trates of that Persuasion. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Saturday, 22d April, 1749. 
present : 

The Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esq., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Samuel Hasell, William Till, ] 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, ( -™ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, [ * 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approv'd. 

The Governor observ'd to the Board that the Commissions of 
the Peace being only of force by virtue of his Proclamation, & as 
it was usual for Governors to renew them at or soon after their Ac- 
cession to the Government, he proposed to issue new Commissions, 
& desir'd the favour of the Board to recommend proper Persons to 
be Magistrates for the several Counties, & particularly at this time 
for the County of Lancaster, that Court sitting next Week, where- 
upon the Board took this Affair into Consideration, & the following 
Persons were agreed to, viz. : Thomas Edwards, Edward Smout, 
Emanuel Carpenter, Conrad Weiser, Samuel Smith, John Kyle, 
James Galbreath, Thomas' Cookson, James Whitehill, Edward Ber- 
wick, James Gillaspy, William Maxwell, Samuel Anderson, John 
Postlethwaite, George Swope, the Chief Burgess of the Borough of 
Lancaster for the time being, William Parsons, Bernard Yanleer, 
James Wright, James Webb, George Croghan, William Ilartly, 
Thomas Foster, David McClure, James Smith, John Bay, Robert 
Dunning, Robert Harris, Patrick Watson, Mathew Dill, & Jedediah 
Alexander. • 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 379 

At a Council held at Philadelphia, Monday, 15th May, 1749. 
present : 

The Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Thomas Lawrence, Abraham Taylor, ~\ 

Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, V Esqrs. 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read and approv'd. 

The Governor inform' d the Board that having while he was at 
New Castle receiv'd a Packet from His Grace the Duke of Bedford, 
dated at Whitehall the 6th of February, 1748, containing His 
Majestic' s Proclamation of Peace and His Grace's Letter signifying 
His Majestie's Commands to have the same Published in all Places 
within His Government, he had accordingly issued a Proclamation 
at New Castle & propos'd to do the same here, & after reading the 
Letter and His Majestie's Proclamation, which are as follows : 

"Whitehall, 6th February, 1748. 

"Sir: 

" A Definitive Treaty of Peace and Friendship having been con- 
cluded at Aix-la-Chapelle the 7th Bay of October last by the Pleni- 
potentiaries of His Majesty, the Most Christian King & the States 
General of the United Provinces, to which the Empress, Queen of 
Hungary, the Kings of Spain & Sardinia, the Buke of Modena, and 
the Republick of Genoa, having acceded, & the Ratifications thereof 
having been since exchanged, His Majesty has been pleased to com- 
mand me to transmit to You the Proclamation which he has thought 
fit to issue on that occasion, & to signify His Pleasure to you that 
you cause the same to be published in all the proper Places in your 
Province, to the end that all His Subjects do take Notice of His 
Royal Will & ' Pleasure therein & conform themselves thereto ac- 
cordingly. I am, 

" Sir, Your most humble Servant, 

"BEDFORD." 



" By the KING. 

"A PROCLAMATION. 

u Whereas, A Definitive Treaty of Peace & Friendship between 
Us, the Most Christian King, & the States General of the United 
Provinces, hath been concluded at Aix-la-Chapelle the seventh 
Day of October last, to which the Empress, Queen of Hungary, the 
Kings ot Spain & Sardinia, the Duke of Modena, & the Republick 
of Genoa, have acceded, & the Ratifications thereof have been since 



380 MINUTES OF THE 

exchanged ; In conformity thereunto We have thought fit hereby 
to command that the same be published throughout all our Do- 
minions. And We do declare to all our Loving Subjects our Will & 
Pleasure that the said Treaty of Peace and Friendship be observed 
inviolably, as well by Sea as Land, and in all Places whatsoever, 
strictly charging & commanding all our Loving Subjects to take 
Notice hereof, & to conform themselves thereto accordingly. 

" Given at our Court at St. James' the first Day of February, 
1748, in the Twenty-second Year of our Reign. 
" GOD SAVE THE KING." 

His Honour laid before the Board the Draught of a Proclamation 
to be Publish'd here, which was read & approved, & is as follows : 

" By the Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov" 
& Commander-in-Chief of the Province of Pennsylvania & Coun- 
ties of New Castle, Kent, and Sussex, on Delaware. 

"A PROCLAMATION. 
" Whereas, His Majesty hath lately thought fit to issue His 
Royal Proclamation in the words following, viz : 

"<G. R. : 

" ' Whereas, a Definitive Treaty of Peace and Friendship between 
Us, the Most Christian King, & the States General of the United 
Provinces hath been concluded at Aix-la-Chapelle the seventh Day 
of October last, to which the Empress, Queen of Hungary, the 
Kings of Spain and Sardinia, the Duke of Modena, & the'Republick 
of Genoa, have acceded, & the Ratifications thereof have been since 
exchanged ; In conformity thereunto We have thought fit hereby to 
command that the same be published throughout all our Dominions. 
And we do declare to all our Loving Subjects our Will & Pleasure 
that the said Treaty of Peace & Friendship be observ'd inviolable, 
as well by Sea as Land, & in all Places whatsoever, strictly charg- 
ing and commanding all our Loving Subjects to take Notice hereof 
& to conform themselves thereto accordingly. 

" ' Given at our Court at St. James' the first Day of February, 
1748, in the Twenty-second year of our Reign.' 

" And Whereas, a Copy of the said Proclamation hath been 
transmitted to me by His Grace the Duke of Bedford, one of His 
Majestic's Principal Secretaries of State, who hath signified to me 
that it is His Majestic's Will & Pleasure the same should be pub- 
lished at all the proper places in my Government, I have, there- 
fore, in obedience to the Royal Order signified to me as aforesaid, 
with the advice of the Council, caused the said Proclamation to be 
this Day published, And do hereby strictly charge & command all 
His Majestic's Subjects within this Province to take Notice of His 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 381 

Royal Will & Pleasure therein, & conform themselves thereto ac- 
cordingly. 

" Given under my Hand and the Great Seal of the Province of 
Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, this Seventeenth Day of May, in 
the Twenty-second Year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord, 
George the Second, King of Great Britain, France, & Ireland, 
& ca> in the Year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred and 
forty-nine. 

"JAMES HAMILTON 

" By His Honour's Command, 

"Richard Peters, Sec'ry. 
"GOB SAVE THE KING/' 

And it was agreed that the same shou'd be published at the Court 
House on Wednesday at 12 o' Clock, & that the Sheriff, Supreme 
Judges, Mayor, & Commonalty of the City of Philadelphia, & all 
Magistrates & other Officers should have Notice, & be commanded 
to give Attendance that the same might be performed with the 
utmost Solemnity. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Wednesday, 17th May, 1749. 

PRESENT : 

The Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov r . 
Anthony Palmer, Thomas Lawrence, ") 

Samuel Hasell, William Till, | 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, [^Esqrs. 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, { 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The Governor & Council, preceded by the Sheriff and his Offi- 
cers, and attended by the Supreme Judges, Mayor, Alderman, & 
Common Council of the City of Philadelphia, & a large company 
of Gentlemen, went in Procession to the Court House & there pro- 
claim'd the Peace. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Friday, 19th May, 1749. 

PRESENT : 

The Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov r * 
Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, ") 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, I ™ 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, ( SC * rS ' 

Thomas Hopkinson. J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approved. 



382 MINUTES OF THE 

Mr. Lardner, Keeper of the Great Seal of the Province, and 
Mr. Richard Peters, who as Secretary of the Province and of the 
Land office had the Custody of the two lesser Seals, brought them 
into the Council, and after the word (John) and the Date were 
punch'd out and the place fill'd up so as to make a plain surface, 
the Great Seal was return'd to Mr. Lardner and the other Seals to 
Mr. Peters, and they withdrew. 

Then the Governor inform' d the Board that He had received a 
letter from the Proprietaries, directing that Mr. Richard Peters 
might be called to the Council Board, and as He thought with the 
Proprietaries that Mr. Peters might be an useful Member, He pro- 
posal to do it immediately, if they had no objection; and every One 
expressing his satisfaction at the appointment, Mr. Peters was call'd 
in and took the Oaths as a Member of Council. 

The Governor told the Board that he had call'd them to resume 
the Consideration of Governor Ogle's Letter of Complaint against 
Samuel England & William Hay, Sub-Sheriff of Chester County, 
for the Service of a Writ issuing out of Chester Court on a Tract of 
Land lying to the South of the Temporary Line & part of Talbot's 
Manor in Maryland, which was read in these words, viz. : 

" Annapolis, 10th February, 1748. 
"Sir: 

"As the inclosed Papers relate to the Peace of both Provinces, I 
am persuaded you would desire to have the earliest Notice of what 
might interrupt it. 

"These Copies of Affidavits will inform you that two Persons in 
possession of Lands two Miles to the Southward of the Temporary 
Line held under this Government manys Years before and in & 
ever since the Year 1738, were about a Year ago forcibly turned out 
of their Possessions, and one of them carryed under Confinement 
into Nottingham, & there compell'd to enter into a Bond for the 
Payment of £10 10s., in order to procure his Releasement & pre- 
vent an Imprisonment in Chester Goal. This outrage appears to 
have been committed by one William Hay, Sub-Sheriff of Chester 
County, on behalf of Joseph England, who then set up a Claim to 
the Land, & was also present with his Son Samuel England. 

" Joseph England is lately dead, and his Son Samuel having, from 
a Sense of his mistaken Claim, apply ed for his Lordship's Lease of 
all such part of those Lands as the Agent may think proper to give 
him, I need not trouble You about, the future Possession; But 
that unwarrantable behaviour of William Hay, as well as of Samuel 
England (who is an Inhabitant of Chester County), so plainly in 
disobedience to the third Article of the two Proprietaries' Agree- 
ment, confirra'd and inforc'd by His Majesty's Order of the 20th 
May, 1738, leaves me no room to doubt of your Assistance, not only 
in discouraging any future violence of the like kind, but also for 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 383 

bringing the present Offenders to Justice at the next April Assize 
Court of Cecil County in this Province, where a Presentiment some- 
time ago was made against them. 

"I think myself indespensibly oblig'd to be the more earnestly 
pressing on this point, by His Majesties Order of the 18th of Au- 
gust, 1737, injoining 'The Governors of these two Provinces upon 
pain of incurring his highest displeasure not to permit or suffer 
any Tumults, Riots, or other outragious Disorders to be committed 
on the Borders of their respective Provinces, but that they do im- 
mediately put a stop thereto, & use their utmost Endeavours to 
preserve Peace, & ca- " This part stands confirmed by that subsequent 
Order of 1738." 

" As a strict complyance with those Orders must be attended with 
Peace to the People & a good understanding between ourselves, you 
may be assured of every endeavour in my Power to attain those 
ends." 

"I am, Sir, Your most obedient, humble Servant, 

" SAM. OGLE." 

And to consult on a proper answer to be return' d to Governor 
Ogle j that finding some difficulty in tracing the first settlement of 
the Land on which the Arrest was made, he had inform' d Mr. Ogle 
of this by Letter, which was read in these words : 

" Sir : 

" Your Letter of the 10th of February, containing a complaint 
against Will" 1- Hay & Samuel England for Misbehaviour to your 
Government, came not to my Hands till the middle of March ; 
which is a circumstance I think it necessary to acquaint you with, 
least you may imagine I have not paid you so great a regard 
to what you are pleased to mention to me, as the Importance 
of the thing & your recommendation of it justly require at my 
Hands* 

" I assure you, Sir, I have nothing more at heart than to pre- 
serve Peace on the Borders of the two Governments, for which pur- 
pose I no sooner receiv'd your Letter than without delay I ap- 
ply' d myself to make the Enquiries that are nceessary to lay that 
Matter in a clear light before you, which I apprehend is not fairly 
stated in the Affidavits you were pleased to transmit to me. This 
I flatter' d myself I should have been able to have done by the pre- 
sent Conveyance, but having been disappointed in the examination 
by the absence of certain Persons whose testimonies I am told are 
considerable in the Case, I must beg your patience sometime longer 
till I can fully inform myself of the whole Transaction, and if 
it shall be found these People have acted against the Royal Order, 
I shall not hesitate one Moment to do what is incumbent on me 



384 MINUTES OF THE 

in an Affair wherein the Peace of the two Provinces is so nearly 
concern'd. 

" I am, with geat Regard, Sir, your most obedient Servant, 

« JAMES HAMILTON. 

« Philadelphia, April 17th, 1747/' 

That Samuel England having been before him & minutely ex- 
amined, he thought it best that what he said shou'd be reduc'd to 
writing & affirm'd to by him; that Samuel England was further 
order'd to furnish him with his Title to the said Land & such In- 
formation, on Oath or Affirmation, as any of his Neighbours of 
good Credit cou'd give about the Settlement & Possession of the 
Place at or before May, 1738. That having but just received the 
necessary Papers he thought it his Duty immediately to lay them 
before the Board for their Judgment. 

Then the Secretary was order'd to read first Mr. Ogle's Letter 
& the proofs in support of the Complaint, & then the Depositions 
& Papers in support of Samuel England's Right to that Land 
under Pennsylvania; all which being read & duly consider'd, the 
following Letter was form'd, read, and approved : 

"Sir: 

u I have carefully inquired into the Rights of Joseph England, 
deceas'd, under the Proprietaries of Pennsylvania, to the Tract of 
Land in Nottingham, on which you suppose a trespass committed 
by him, his Son Samuel, and one Hay, the Under Sheriff of Ches- 
ter County, & find : 

" That one Steelman sometime before the Year 1706 or 1707 
cleared & was possessed of a Tract of Land, part of the five hundred 
Acres claimed by Joseph England in his life time. That some- 
time in tho ? ;e Years one James Brown purchased it from Steel- 
man, took possession of & occupied it until the Year 1713, when 
dying he devised it to his Son William Brown. The Devisee en- 
ter'd into it & soon after in that year, under the Proprietors of 
Pennsylvania, Surveyed Five hundred Acres of Land, including 
Steelman' s improved Ground. Under this Warrant & Survey Wil- 
liam Brown continued seized until the Year 1716. In that year 
lie died & left the possession in his Widow Esther. She sold the 
five hundred Acres to Benjamin Vining of the City of Philadel- 
phia, who afterwards in the Year 1723 sold the same to Joseph 
England. I cannot find from any of the Depositions that Steel- 
man, cither of the Browns, the Widow Esther, Benjamin Yining, 
or Joseph England, through all these Transactions, ever did any 
any Acts that shew they held the Land under Lord Baltimore or 
owned obedience to the Jurisdiction or Laws of Maryland. On the 
contrary, as a point decisive, it appears Joseph England, who was 
in possession of the Land when the Royal Order was made, did at 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 385 

that time acknowledge obedience to the Jurisdiction & Laws of 
this Province by paying Taxes in & serving as a Juryman for the 
County of Chester. 

" To prove these Matters you have Copy of the Survey, Vining's 
Deed, & kSundry Depositions inclos'd. 

" As I apprehend the Settlements of Robert Mitchell & Mary 
McFadein are within the five hundred Acres Survey'd & Possessed, 
as far as possession can be without actual cultivation of the whole 
under this Province, permit me from the Depositions transmitted 
to observe with respect to their Rights under your Proprietor, that 
John Dawson says Steelman took up Two hundred Acres of Land 
in Talbot's Manor under a Maryland Right. When he was examined 
in this Province, which is in nature of a cross-examination upon the 
ex parte Deposition taken in yours, he declared he knew not of any 
Right Steelman had to settle the Land under either Province. Jere- 
miah Brown, the Son of Brown the purchaser from Steelman, says 
the same. You have their Depositions inclosed. But can you think 
it agreeable to reason or the Interests of the several Proprietors to 
admit general declarations, frequently founded on hearsay & opinion, 
as sufficient evidence to prove their granting rights, when such Acts 
are always in writing, & for the most part publickly register'cl ? 

"I can't find from the Depositions with certainty that Mitchell 
& McFadein or those they claim under, were in possession at the 
time of the Royal Order. Some general words intimate the Land 
was always possess'd, and in the. words of the Deposition deemed 
under the Lord Baltimore. But as such possession is capable of 
more particular proof, certainly it ought to be given, 

" Admitting their possession, how does it appear they held under 
your Proprietor? John Dawson says the Land was held under 
Maryland, without mentioning any Acts done by the Possessors to 
to shew such Tenure, except the Payment of Customs & Duties. 
I don't understand what they were or under what Laws. Generally, 
in all His Majesty's Dominions Duties & Customs may be paid by 
a Foreigner that has Lycence to trade, & in the Plantations they 
are often particularly impos'd on the King's Subjects who reside 
out of the Government. You will favor me with an explanation. 
As far I can learn by your Constitution, all the Inhabitants of each 
County are annually taxed to defray the County Charge, which 
taxes are collected from them by the Sheriff, & they are obliged oc- 
casionally to serve in Public Offices & as Jurymen. The taxing 
serving in Public Offices, or as Jurymen, maybe proved by your 
Records & Payments by the Sheriff's Receipts. Any of these Acts, 
at or just before the time of the Royal Order, properly testified, 
will give Satisfaction that they held under your Government. But 
if no such Facts, or some others equivalent, can be made appear, & 
they had no rights under your Proprietor, they shou'd be regarded 
by both Governments as freebooters. And then being possessed of 
vol. v. — 25. 



386 MINUTES OF THE 

part of a tract of Land Surveyed under the Proprietors of Penn- 
sylvania they ought to be consider'd as Persons holding under 
them, for under them they must hold if under any. Shou'd this 
reasoning, just as it appears to me, be contravened, perhaps it may 
shake the possessory Rights of many who hold Lands near the bor- 
ders as under your Proprietor. 

" I can't approve of the method taken by your Courts & Officers 
in sending Complainants against our Inhabitants about Crimes done 
near the Borders, & wherein jurisdiction is concerned, to your 
Jurys. It is not unlikely the Courts & Jurys in each Province 
may differ in Sentiment about the same Rights & the jurisdiction 
depending upon them. Experience has shown they have done so, 
& what were the Consequences? The King's Subjects were pun- 
ished in one Government for what was deemed lawful & right in the 
other, & sacrificed by the disagreement of two independent Powers. 
To remedy these Mischiefs was the Royal Order made, & the 
several Governors are thereby specially required to prevent them. 
To You then ought the application to be made in the first Instance, 
and upon Notice I should not have failed to do the injured Parties 
justice as far as my Power extended. I may mistake, & shall with 
pleasure be convinced, but to me it appears clear that in point of 
jurisdiction in criminal matters the first and only resort on this 
side the Water ought to be to the several Governors, and to His 
Majesty in the last. 

" I send you Samuel England's Deposition, from whence I 
believe you will have reason, as I do, to doubt the truth of what 
Mitchell has deposed concerning Hay's turning him or any other 
out of possession. It may, perhaps, be objected that England is 
Interested in what he declares ; the same may be said against 
Mitchell, who swore to avoid a contract that ought to bind him if 
he was not forcibly turn'd out. The very Papers signed by Joseph 
England, as sent me, is strong evidence that Mitchell gave up his 
possession by Contract, & was not removed by force. I will but 
mention it, be pleas'd to enquire into the Characters of England & 
Mitchell, & you'll easily determine to whom Credit ought to be 
given. 

" You'll pardon me, I can't easily comprehend what you mean by 
requiring my assistance in bringing Samuel England to Justice in 
your Province, when you say he was applying to some of your Offi- 
cers for a Lease. He was then in your Power if you had thought 
proper to exercise it, & I suppose, as you represent the Case, may 
be always so at your pleasure. 

" Your Agent, if unrestrained by you, may Grant what Leases 
he pleases; but as Samuel England's Father, from whom he de- 
rives his Title, was a Tenant in possession under our Proprietors at 
the time of the Royal Order, I am apprehensive such Leases will be 
a manifest violation of the third Article; And we shall think our- 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 387 

selves well warranted in exacting obedience to our Laws from him 
& all other Persons that reside on the Land notwithstanding. 

" I shall upon all occasions inviolably observe the King's Orders. 
Nothing can be more agreable to our Proprietaries or pleasing to 
me, especially as it will be a means of preserving a good understand- 
ing & harmony between us, which I think a matter of the greatest 
Importance to, 

" Sir, Your most obedient humble Servant, 

« JAMES HAMILTON. 

" Philada., May 15th, 1749." 

And the Papers were order'd to be number'd & Laid up carefully 
in the Secretarie's Office. 

The Council resum'd the Consideration of the new Commissions 
of the Peace, & agreed to appoint the following Persons Justices for 
Chester County, viz. : Caleb Cowpland, Elisha Gatchil, William 
Moore, Joseph Pennock, Joseph Brinton, William Pymm, Joseph 
Bonsell, John Mather, Charles Grant, Samuel Flower, Thomas 
Cummings, Thomas Worth, Aaron Ashbridge, John Churchman, 
John Miller, Richard Richison, Isaac Davis, John Scot, William 
Read, & the Chief Burgess of the Borough of Chester for the time 
being. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Friday, 30th June, 1749. 
present : 

The Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, 1 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, VEsqrs. 

William Logan, • Richard Peters, J 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The Governor laid before the Board a Letter with some Papers 
from Governor Clinton receiv'd this morning by express, purporting 
that two New England Men in their return from Canada, where 
they had been to solicit the Release of some Prisoners, reported 
that they saw an Army of One thousand French ready to go on 
some Expedition, & that they were inform'd it was to prevent any 
Settlements being made by the English on Belle Riviere, i. e. Ohio, 
whereupon it was determined to dispatch a Messenger to Mr. George 
Croghan, with a Request that he wou'd go immediately to Alle- 
gheny, & on his arrival send away a Trader or some Person he cou'd 
confide in to the Lakes, or to the Eastward, to discover whether any 
French were coming into those parts, & if any in what numbers & 
what appearance they made ; that the Indians might be appriz'd k 
pu,t upon their Guard. 



388 MINUTES OF THE 

The Council resum'd the Consideration of the new Commissions 
of the Peace, & agreed to appoint the following Persons Justices for 
Philadelphia County, viz. : Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, Abra- 
ham Taylor, Robert Strettell, Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, 
Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, the Mayor of the City of 
Philadelphia for the time being, the Recorder of the City of Philada. 
for the time being, William Allen, Jonathan Robinson, Owen Evan, 
Joshua Maddox, Septimus Robinson, Edward Shippen, Charles 
Willing, Thomas Yenables, Nicholas Ashton, Thomas Fletcher, 
Samuel Morris, of White Marsh, Thomas York, Francis Parvin, 
John Potts, Anthony Lee, William Colenian, Benjamin Frauklyn, 
John Smith, k Rowland Evans. 

And the following Justices for Bucks County, viz. : Abraham 
Chapman, Matthew Hughes, Simon Butler, Enion Williams, Rich- 
ard MitcHel, Mark Watson, John Abraham De Normandy, Robert 
Ellis, Alexander Graydon, Henry Antes, Thomas Owen, Thomas 
Craig, Daniel Broadhead, Mahlon Kirkbride, Langhorn Biles, 
Thomas Janney, Benjamin Griffith, Richard Walker, & the Chief 
Burgess of the Borough of Bristol for the time being. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, in the Supreame Court, July 
1st, 1749. 

PRESENT : 

The Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, "] 

Benjamin Shoemaker, William Logan, J-Esqrs. 

Richard Peters, J 

Indians. 

Three Senecas, two Onontagos, some Tutatos & others, Nanty- 
cokes and Conoys. 

Ogashtash, | ~ , 

Assuchquay, j P 

Conrad Weiser, Esqr., Interpreter. 

Some Deputies of the Seneca Nation having arrived in Town on 
Thursday, & letting the Governor know that they had some Busi- 
ness to transact with the Government, His Honour appointed this 
Day to hear them, and on the Indians taking their Seats the Inter- 
preter was order' d to tell them that the Governor was ready to hear 
what they had to say, on which Ogaushtosh stood up & spoke as 
follows : 

" Brethren, the Governor & Council & all the Inhabitants of 
Pennsylvania — 

" We believe the Visit is unexpected, & therefore think proper 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 389 

to tell you the reason why we came. Early in the Spring a Council 
was held at Onontago by our Nations, in which sundry Affairs were 
taken into Consideration, and amongst others an answer to a pro- 
posal made by the former Governor of Pennsylvania concerning a 
Peace made between us & the Catawbas; it was likewise said that a 
new Governor was arriv'd at Philadelphia, & that it would be pro- 
per to shake Hands with him, & this wou'd furnish an opportunity 
of settling some affairs which, if not set to right at the beginning, 
might occasion differences; it was, therefore, unanimously determined 
to send Deputies to Philadelphia to congratulate the new Governor 
on his arrival, & to transact with him what other Business we had 
to do with the Province. The Deputies were appointed, & engaged 
to meet at a certain place on the River Sasquehanna. We, the 
Deputies of the Seneca Nation, accordingly came to Wyomen, the 
Place appointed, & staid there a whole Month, but no Deputies 
coming, nor hearing no Tydings of them, we concluded something 
extraordinary had happened, & then deliberated with ourselves what 
to do, whether we shou'd return or proceed to Philadelphia; the 
last was resolv'd on, for the reasons which we shall give by & by; 
& in token of the truth of what we say concerning the occasion of 
our coming here we give you this 

" String of Wampum. 

" Brethren: 

" One of the most considerable Points which induced the Council 
to send Deputies at this time was, that they heard the white People 
had begun to settle on their side the Blue Mountains, & we, the 
Deputies of the Senecas, staying so long at Wyomen had an oppor- 
tunity of enquiring into the truth of this Information, and to our 
Surprize found the Story confirmed, with this addition, that even 
this Spring, since the Governor's Arrival, numbers of Families were 
beginning to make Settlements. As our Boundaries are so well 
known, & so remarkably distinguish'd by a range of high Moun- 
tains, we could not suppose this could be done by mistake, but that 
either it must be done wickedly by bad People, without the know- 
ledge of the Government, or that the new Governor had brought 
some Instructions from the King or Proprietors relating to this 
Affak; we, therefore, thought it was become necessary to proceed 
& to make our Complaints, to hear what the Governments had to 
say on an Affair whereby we are likely to be very much hurt. The 
Governor will be pleased to tell us whether he has brought any 
Orders from the King or the Proprietaries for these People to set- 
tle on our Lands, and if not, we earnestly pray that they may be 
made to remove instantly with all their Effects, to prevent the sad 
Consequences which will otherwise ensue; & to enforce this Request 
we present you with this 

"Belt of Wampum. 



390 MINUTES OF THE 

" Brethren : 

" We can take upon us in behalf of the Six Nations heartily to 
congratulate the Governor's arrival. We are pleased to hear he is 
a Native of the Country, promising ourselves in him a true and 
hearty friend to all the Indians, as he is our Countryman. 

"We recommend it to the Governor to tread in the Steps of those 
wise People who have held the Reins of Government before him in 
being good & kind to the Indians. Do, Brother, make it your Study 
to consult the Interest of our Nations ; as you have so large an au- 
thority you can do us much good or harm ; we wou'd therefore en- 
gage your Influence & Affections for us, that the same Harmony & 
mutual Affections may subsist during your Government which so 
happily subsisted in former Times, nay from the first Settlement of 
this Province by our good Friend the great William »Penn. We 
bind this our Congratulation & Request by 

"A String of Wampum. 

" Brethren : 

" The Governor & Council know that we are Poor and not able 
to present them with any thing worth their Acceptance ; but not- 
withstanding this we cannot help, as a testimony of our Regards, 
presenting the Governor with a Small Bundle of Skins to make 
him a pair of Shoes. " 

Bundle of Skins. 

Ogaushtosh having finish'd, Assuehquay got up & spoke as fol- 
lows : 
"Brethren: 

" As we were coming here the Conoy Indians gave us this String 
of Wampum, thereby putting their Case into our Hands, which we 
undertook to Speak to. It seems when the Proprietaries bought the 
Land between Delaware and Sasquehanna from us, the Tract, as 
they told us, on which the Conoy Town stood was reserv'd out of 
the Grant on account of those Indians then living there, & when 
they should quit it they were to have a Consideration paid them for 
it. This we think they are now intitled to, as they have left the 
Land & Live among other Nations at Juniata ; and as they tell us 
that they have never receiv'd any thing for their Land, we ff ecom- 
mend it to you to see them paid." 

Here he gave the Conoy's String. 

On the Indians withdrawing, the Council judg'd it necessary that 
a Present should be prepar'd for the Indians, & appointed Mr. Law- 
rence & Mr. Logan to confer with the Speaker on the value, who 
return'd & reported that it was the Speaker's as well as their 
opinion that a Sum not less than One hundred Pounds shou'd be 
laid out in a proper Assortment of Goods, which being approv'd of 
Mr. Logan was desir'd to get the Goods ready to be produe'd on 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 391 

Monday or Tuesday, at the time the Governor shou'd return his 
Answer to the Indians Speech. 



^Esqrs. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia on Tuesday, July 4th, 1749. 
present : 

The Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Thomas Lawrence, Samuel Hasell, 

Abraham Taylor, Robert Strettell, 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Joseph Turner, 

Thomas Hopkinson, William Logan, 

Richard Peters, 

The Minutes of the preceding Council were read & approv'd. 

The Governor laid before the Board the Draught of an Answer to 
the Speech made by the Indians on Saturday ; which being ap- 
proved, the Interpreter was sent to the Indians to let them know 
the Council was met & the Governor ready to give them an Answer; 
& on their taking their Places he spoke as follows : 
" Brethren of the Six United Nations of Indians : 

" In the Speech you made to us the other Day you told us that 
at a Council at Onontago it was considered that no Answer as yet 
had been made to a proposal of the Governors of Pennsylvania 
in behalf of the Government of Virginia concerning a Peace be- 
tween the Six United Nations & the Catawbas, & that the Council 
of the said*"' Nations agreed to send Deputies to Philadelphia for 
that purpose, as well as to congratulate me on my arrival, & to 
lodge a Complaint against some of the Inhabitants of this Province 
for the Settlements not yet purchased from you. 
u Brethren : 

"I could have wished that all the Deputies had arrived, but 
since the others did not come, & you had proceeded so far as to 
Wyomen, You did well in resolving to come to Philadelphia to our 
Council Fire, at which I kindly recieve you as true Deputies from the 
Six United Nations, & heartily bid you welcome ; in token whereof 
I give this 

" String of Wampum. 
u Brethren : 

" You further inform'd us that an Account having been given 
of some white People's making Plantations on your side of the 
Blue Hills, the Council at Onontago had given it in charge to the 
Deputies to make a Complaint of this; that staying so long at 
Wyomen you had an opportunity of having it confirm' d to you 
that several had settled there, & some since my arrival, and you 



392 MINUTES OF THE 

desire to know whether this is done with the Consent of this Gov- 
ernment or in Consequence of any Orders' T have brought from the 
King or the Proprietaries j and if not, that they may be instantly 
removed. Brethren, as this Government stands engag'd to you by 
Treaty not to suffer any of their People to settle on Lands till 
they are purchas'd by the Proprietaries, they have ever endea- 
vour'd faithfully to observe this Engagement by causing it to be 
proclaimed that none should, on the highest Penalties, presume to 
settle on the "West side of that ridge of Mountains which is the 
Boundary between us and you; yet, notwithstanding these Procla- 
mations, some have been so audacious as to go there, but they have 
been forcibly removed & their Plantations broke up & destroy'd. 
" Brethren : 

" I give you the strongest assurances that these People have not 
had the least countenance from the Government for what they have 
done, and that I have received no Orders from His Majesty or the 
Proprietaries in favour of them, And that I am heartily inclined to 
take the most -effectual Care that these unwarrantable Settlements 
be not made, as all such are against the Publick Faith given to the 
Six Nations, & have a tendency to disturb the Peace between us and 
you, & to create endless differences. No endeavors, therefore, shall 
be wanting on my part to bring these offenders to Justice, & to 
prevent all further Cause of Complaint; and in Confirmation of 
the truth of these Assurances, I present you with this 

"Belt of Wampum. 
"Brethren : 

"The People of this Province cannot but entertain an high opin- 
ion of the regard of the Six Nations for them, in that they are al- 
ways ready to pay all proper respects to their Governors. In this 
Light I receive their Compliments to me on my arrival, & am par- 
ticularly oblig'd to you, their Deputies, for your favorable opinion of 
me. Had I more Power it should be all used in your favour, so long 
as you maintain the Character you have hitherto done ; for I can 
sincerely assure you y ( the Proprietaries cannot commit the Adminis- 
tration of their Affairs to any one who has heartier Inclinations to 
do you Service than I have, so that I shall on all occasions study & 
promote your true Interest, to which I am strongly impell'd, not 
only by my own Affection as being a Native of the Country, but by 
the laudable Example of my Predecessors, & above all by the plea- 
sure 1 know any Good I shall do you will give to the Honorable 
Proprietaries, whose Commands I have repeatedly receiv'd to be 
sure to be kind to the Indians. In Testimony of the sincerity of my 
love for you I present you with this 

" String of Wampum. 
" Brethren : 

"The value of a Present arises principally from the Affection 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 393 

with which it is given, and Yours, therefore, on this Account is as 
agreeable as if it was of more real worth. In return, the good 
People of this Province, sensible of the trouble and fatigue so long 
a Journey must needs have given you, & in token of their Esteem 
for the Six Nations who appointed You on the Deputation, have pro- 
vided a Present of Goods which they desire your Acceptance of; 
the Secretary will read the List, & the Interpreter will deliver them 
to you when you please to recieve them/' 

The Governor gave the List of Goods to the Secretary, who 
read it. 
" Brethren : 

" I now return an answer to Assuehqua, who gave this String in 
behalf of the Conoy Indians. I am sorry to say that these Indians 
have misrepresented the fact, for on the Information I have recieved 
from the Proprietor's Officers, this Land, which is but a Small 
Piece where their Town stood, was not reserv'd out of their Grants 
of the Lands sold by the Six Nations ; but at that time the Conoy 
Indians being desirous to continue there, prevail'd with the Six 
Nations to ask this as a favor from the Proprietaries, while they 
(the Conoys) remain'd on it, and at their Instance the Proprietaries 
granted them this favour, & they might have lived there till now ; 
but as they chose voluntarily to go away, & signified this by a 
String of Wampum to the Government, they had leave accordingly 
to go to Juniata or elsewhere. You cannot but know the Six Na- 
tions have frequently desired the Proprietaries not to give Money 
to any tributary Nations for Land, & as these Conoys are such they 
would have reason to find fault with the Proprietaries shou'd they 
pay them anything, especially as they have already given to the 
Six Nations a valuable Consideration for it; I confirm this by 

" A String of Wampum/' 

10 Pieces of Strowds, 6 Groce of Awl Blades, 

10 Pieces of Striped Duffills, 15 Groce of Gartering, 

10 Pieces of Half Thicks, 15 Pieces of Ribbon, 

10 Half Barrels of Gun-powder, 3 Pieces of Bed lace, 

10 cwt. of Barr Lead, 5 doz. of Scizzars, 

3 cwt. of Small Shott, 3 Groce of Ear-Rings, 

20 Ho. of Vermillion, 10 Groce of Rings, 

140 Plain Shirts, 5 Pack of Morris' Bells, 

50 Ruffled Ones, 4 Groce of Brass Thimbles, 

15 guns, 5 it), of small white Beads, 

20 Brass Kettles, 1J Groce of small Brass Juice 

3 doz. of Hatchetts, Harps, 

20 doz. of Knives, 1 p ce - of Handkerchief, 

5 M. of Flints, Tobacco & Pipes. 

5 doz. of Looking Glasses, 

The Indians having by Mr. Weiser made a Request to the Gov- 



394 MINUTES OF THE 

era or to order their Guns to be mended, he gave Orders accord- 
ingly. 



At a Council held at Philadelphia, Tuesday, 18th July, 1749. 
present : 

The Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor. 

Samuel Hasell, Robert Strettell, ) ^ 

Thomas Hopkinson, Richard Peters, j ^ 

The Minutes of the preceeding Council were read and approved. 

The Governor laid before the Board the Draught of a Proclama- 
tion, agreeable to the Request of the Seneca Deputies at the last 
Treaty, which was approv'd & order'd to be publish' d & printed. 

"By the Honourable JAMES HAMILTON, Esqr., Lieutenant 
Governor & Commander-in-Chief of the Province of Pennsyl- 
vania & Counties of New Castle, Kent, & Sussex, on Delaware. 

"A PROCLAMATION. 

" Whereas, The Deputies of the Senekas, at a Treaty lately held 
at Philada., complained to me, in behalf of the Six United Nations, 
that contrary to the Tenor of a former Treaty now subsisting 
between them & this Government, & without their Consent, divers 
Persons, Inhabitants of this Province, have seated themselves & 
Families on Lands not purchased of them, lying Westward of the 
Blue Hills, very much to their Hurt, earnestly prayed that they 
should be forthwith remov'd, to prevent the bad Consequences that 
might otherwise ensue. And forasmuch as these Persons have 
neither Lycence from the Proprietaries nor colour of Title to the 
said Lands, & to permit them to stay there wou'd not only be a 
breach of the Publick Faith given to the Six Nations, but may oc- 
casion dangerous Quarrels with them, & be the Cause of much 
Bloodshed; Therefore for preventing these Mischiefs I have thought 
fit, with the advice of the Council, to issue this Proclamation ; & 
do hereby, in His Majesty's Name, strictly charge, command, and 
enjoin all & every the Persons who have presum'd to settle in any 
part of the Province Westward of the Blue Bills to remove them- 
selves, their Families & Effects, off those Lands on or before the 
first Day of November next ; And in Case of their Neglect or Re- 
fusal, I do, in His Majesty's Name, strictly charge & command all 
& every the Justices of the Peace, Sheriffs, & Officers within this 
Province, whose Assistance may be necessary, that they, immedi- 
diately after the said first Day of November, cause the Delinquents, 
with their Families and Effects, to be removed off the said Lands, 
as the Law in such Cases directs. And hereof all Persons con- 



PROVINCIAL COUNCIL. 395 

cerned are to take Notice, and not to fail in their obedience, as they 
will answer the contrary at their Peril. 

' Given under my Hand & the Great Seal of the Province of Penn- 
sylvania, at Philadelphia, this Eighteenth Day of July, in the 
Twenty-third Year of the Reign of ou