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Full text of "Colorado College Nugget (yearbook)"

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PUBLISHED MAY FIRST 
NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FOURTEEN 



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COLORADO SPRINGS 
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PAGE 

Dedication 3 

Corporation 8 

Faculty 9 

College Preachers 23 

Alumni Associations 24 

The Classes : 

V'C^^. Senior Class 25 

m ^^^- Junior Class _ 55 

Sophomore Class 77 

Freshman Class 83 

Specials 90 

College Athletics 93 

Baseball ■. 97 

Track 103 

Football : 109 

Tennis 116 

Fraternities 119 

Literary Societies 133 

Clubs 147 

Dramatics ■. 155 

Publications 163 

Organizations 169 

Musical Organizations ....175 

Religious Organizations 185 

Oratory 189 

Annual Events 193 

Calendar 207 

The Nokkit See index to Part II 

7 




WILLIAM FREDERICK SLOCUM 
President 

EDWARD SMITH PARSONS 
Vice-President 

WILLIAM WALLACE POSTLETHWAITE 
Treasurer 

HARRIET ARSULA SATER 
Cashier 

JOHN LEWIS BENNETT 
Attorney for the College 



TRUSTEES 

William F. Slocum, President of the Board 24 College Place 

Willis R. Armstrong 1420 Culebra Ave. 

George W. Bailey 309 McPhee Building, Denver 

Judson M. Bemis 506 N. Cascade Ave. 

Irving W. Bonbright 14 Wall St., New York 

John Campbell 1401 Gilpin St., Denver 

George A. Fowler 1225 Wood Ave. 

Irving Howbert 17 N. Weber St. 

William S. Jackson 228 E. Kiowa St. 

William Lennox 1001 N. Nevada Ave. 

Horace G. Lunt 431 N. Cascade Ave. 

Charles M. MacNeill 301 Mining Exchange Building 

George Foster Peabody Lake George, New York 

Philip B. Stewart 1228 Wood Ave. 

Mahlon D. Thatcher Hill Crest, Pueblo 

Frank Trumbull 71 Broadway, New York 

8 



UUltam $rtbn\tk riorum, i. 1., ££. i. 

President and Head Professor of Philosophy. 

A. B. (Amherst), 74; B. D. (Andover), 78; LL. D. (Amherst), '93; LL. 
D. (Nebraska), '94; D. D. (Beloit), '01; LL. D. (Illinois College), '04; LL. D. 
(Harvard), '12; Colorado College, '88. Studied in German Universities and at 
Johns Hopkins. Ordained Congregational Minister, 1878. Pastor, Amesbury, 
Mass,, 78-'83 ; First Congregational Church, Baltimore, '83, '88. 

With this thorough preparation, President Slocum came to Colorado 
Springs in the Fall of 1888 to assume the duties of the executive office of 
Colorado College. The property of the college consisted then of a few acres 
of prairie and one building, the original Palmer hall, which has since been used 
by Cutler Academy. From this meager beginning President Slocum, during 
twenty-five years of untiring and faithful work, has developed this institution 
so that it is now one of the leading colleges of the American Continent. The 
early growth of the college has perhaps been slow, but it has been steady and 
certain. All improvements have been made and all buildings have been erected 
with the future in mind, and today the College boasts a beautiful campus and 
buildings of the finest type in the country. College property is today valued at 
$1,047,277.52 and there is a permanent endowment fund of $1,035,752.31. 

During his residence in Colorado, Dr. Slocum's interests have gone beyond 
the sphere of the College at all times. He has been actively interested in the 
political and social problems of the state and nation. He has written extensively 
on social subjects and is the author of "The Nation's Guarantee of Personal 
Rights." He represented the United States at the International Peace Conference 
at The Hague in 1913. 

As one of the leading educators of the country, he was given a place on 
the board of trustees of the Carnegie Foundation for the advancement of teach- 
ing, and has recently succeeded the late President Harper of Chicago Univrsity 
as vice president of that board. 



Hanj (6. riorum 

President Slocum has been fortunate, during his twenty-five years of 
service at Colorado College, in having such a devoted and inspiring helper as 
Mrs. Slocum. In all that he has undertaken for the college she has been more 
than ready to do her part. Perhaps her greatest individual work has been as 
president of the Women's Educational Society, the organization which has given 
help to so many deserving students and which has proved invaluable to the Col- 
lege in many a critical situation. These results are tangible, but it is impossible to 
measure the influence which Mrs. Slocum has brought to bear upon the life of 
the College through the past twenty-five years, and the inspiration which she has 
been to all who have come in contact with her. There is no better proof of the 
esteem in which she is held than the fact that she was awarded an honorary 
degree at Commencement last year and was presented with a Steinway Grand 
piano by students, alumni and friends. Mrs. Slocum is admired and loved by 
all who have ever been enrolled as students in Colorado College, and to them she 
is "Our First Lady of the Land." 



(51)? dollar of Arts ani gwiwa 

JOSEPH VALENTINE BREITWIESER. PH. D. 2~ ; 4>BK 

Professor of Philosophy and Education 

A. B. (Indiana University), '07; A. M. (Indiana University), '08; Ph. D. (Columbia 
University), '11; Colorado College, '10. In the Public Schools of Indiana, '02-'03 ; assistant 
in Psychology. Indiana University, '06-'07 ; assistant Psychology and Philosophy, Indiana 
University, '07-'08 ; Assistant Professor, Columbia, '08-'10; Assistant Professor C. C, '10-'ll; 
Professor Psychology C. C, '11. Member American Society for the Advancement of Science; 
American Psychology Association ; Scholia. Publications. "Attention and Movement in 
Reaction" 1910, "Psychological Experiments" ('14). (Judicious advertising). "Human 
Behavior and Advertising factors." Reviewer of the American Journal of Psychology for 
Journal of Philosophy. 

MARIANNA BROWN, A. M. $BK 

Registrar 

A. B. (Earlham College), 76; A. M. (Cornell), '94; Colorado College, '02. Earlham 
College, '77-02, in Classic Department. 

FLORIAN CAJORI, PH. D., LL. D.. ScD. <J>BK 
Dean of the Department of Engineering and Head Professor of Mathematics 

MOSES CLEMENT GILE, A. M., Litt. D.$BK 

Head Professor of Classical Languages and Literature 

A. B. (Brown), '83; A. M. (Brown), '86; Litt. D. (Colorado College), '13; Colorado 
College, '92. 

ELIJAH CLARENCE HILLS, PH. D., LITT. D. <I>BK ; B@n 

Head Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures 

A. B. (Cornell), '92; Ph. D. (University of Colorado), '06; Litt. D. (Rollins College), 
'06; Colorado College, '02. Cornell graduate fellowship, '92-'93 ; student University of Paris, 
'93-'94 ; Dean Rollins College, Fla., '96-'01 ; Professor Romance Languages, Colorado College, 
1902. Exchange professor at Harvard U., '11-'12. Director of English instruction, Harvard 
summer school for Cubans, 1900. Summer school at University of California, graduate 
courses, '12-'14. Member Modern Languages Association of America; corresponding member 
Hispanic Society of America; Dialectic Society of America. Author, De La Ortografia y 
Pronunciacion Ingles U., '00; Bardos Erbanos, '61; Canadian French, '02; Spanish grammar, 
'04; New Mexican Spanish, '06; Spanish Tales for beginners, '09; Spanish Stories, '10; 
Spanish Lyrics, '12; Dante's Versification in Ollanta, '13; The Speech of a Child Two Years 
Old, '13. 

GEORGE MAXWELL HOWE, PH. D. B©n 

Head Professor of the German Language and Literature 

A. B. (Indiana University), '94; Ph. D. (Cornell), '01 ; Colorado College, '07. Student 
University of Leipsic, '9S-'9S ; Fellow in German, Cornell University, '99-'00; student Uni- 
versity of Berlin, '05-'06 ; University of Indiana, '93-'9S ; Cornell University, '00-'06 ; Hobart 
College, '06-'07 ; Colorado College, '07; head professor of German Language and Literature, 
Colorado College, '11; Editor "Aus dem Leben eines Taugenichts." Author "German Prose 
Composition based on Immensee;" "A First German Book." 

RUTH LOOMIS, A. B. $BK 

Dean of Women 

A. B. (Vassar), '85; Colorado College, '96. Instructor in English, Vassar College, 
'86-'95. Studied at La Snrbonne and at L'Ecole Normale Superieure at Sevres, '92. Dean 
of Women, Colorado College, '96- Member Colonial Dames of Colorado. 

14 



FRANK HERBERT LOUD, PH. D. *BK 

Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy Emeritus 

A. B. (Amherst), 73; A. M. (Harvard), '99; Ph. D. (Haverford), '00; Colorado 
College, 77. Student, Clark University; instructor Mathematics, Amherst, 73-76; professor 
Mathematics and Astronomy, Colorado College, '77-07 ; retired on Carnegie foundation, '07 ; 
in charge of station for stellar photography; counselor Esperanto Association of N. America 
for Rocky Mountain division ; secretary Western Association for Stellar Photography ; mem- 
ber Astronomical and Astrophysical Society of America ; La Societe Beige d' Astronomic 
Author, "An Elementary Geometry on the Analytic Plan," 78. 

ROGER HENWOOD MOTTEN, A. B. 3>A© 

Professor of English 

A. B. (Allegheny), '01; Colorado College, '09. Taught in St. John's College, Loveland 
High School, Denver High School, North Side; Westminister University; Member 
National Council of English Teachers. Publications, dramatization of novels; dramas; 
informal essays and poetry. 

ATHERTON NOYES, A. B. *n 

Professor of English 

A. B. (Yale), '85; Colorado College, '92. Secretary Colorado summer school, '92-'03, 
Director Colorado summer school, '96. For ten years local secretary Archaeological Institute 
of America. 

MANLY DAYTON ORMES, A. B., B. D. M2 

Librarian 

A. B. (Yale), '85; B. D. (Yale), '89; Colorado College, '04. Ordained minister in 
Congregational church, '89. Pastor Second Congregational church, Colorado Springs, '84-'04. 
Librarian N. T. Coburn Library, '04. Member American Library Association ; President 
State Library Association, '13. 

EDWARD SMITH PARSONS, B. D., LITT. D. xE ; *BK 
Vice-President, Dean of the Department of Arts and Sciences and Betnis Head 

Professor of English 

A. B. (Amherst), '83; A. M. (Amherst), '86; B. D. (Yale), '87; Litt. D. (Amherst) 
'03 ; Colorado College, '92. Graduate Brooklyn College and Polytechnic Institute, 79 ; 
ordained Congregational minister, '88 ; pastor First church, Greeley, Colorado, '88-'92 ; pro- 
fessor of English since 1892, vice president C. C. since '98; dean since 1901; studied at 
Columbia University, '83-'84 ; at the Universities of Lausanne, '00-'01 ; at Oxford, '01; and 
at Munich, '12-'13. Author "Milton's Minor Poems," '00; "The Social Message of Jesus," 11. 

WARREN MILTON PERSONS, B. S. #K2 ; *BK 
Dean of the Department of Banking and Business Administration and Professor 

of Economics and Finance 

B. S. (Wisconsin), '99; Colorado College, '12. Assistant professor in Mathematics, 
'01-'02; instructor Mathematics, '02-'05 ; graduate work at University of Wisconsin in 
Economics, Mathematics and Statistics, '01-'05. Special agent for Wisconsin Tax Commis- 
sion, '05; instructor in Economics at Dartmouth College and of Finance in the Amos Tuck 
School of Business Administration and Finance, '06-'12; special agent for the U. S. Bureau 
of Corporations, '08; for U. S. Bureau of Census, '09; of the National Monetary Commis- 
sion, '10-'ll ; professor Economics, '12-'14. Representative to the Nineteenth General Assem- 
bly of Colorado from El Paso County, '12-'14. Member American Economic Association; 
the American Association for Labor Legislation, American Statistical Association. Associate 
editor Quarterly Publication of the American Statistical Association. Translater of Zizck's 
"Die Statistischen Nuttlewerte." Contributor to economic and statistical publications. 

15 



EDWARD CHRISTIAN SCHNEIDER, PH. D. 25 ; *BK 

Head Professor of Biology 

B. S. (Tabor), '97; Ph. D. (Yale), '01; Colorado College, '03. Instructor Chemistry, 
'97 -'99, professor Biological and Physiological Chemistry, '01-'03 ; Tabor; professor Biology, 
'03-'07; head professor since '07, Colorado College. Assistant Bacteriologist Antitoxin Lab- 
oratory, N. Y. State Dept. Health at Albany, summer '02. Fellow A. A. A. S. ; member 100 
men of Colorado State Association for Prevention of Tuberculosis; member American 
Society of Physiology; American Biology Chemists; American Public Health Association. 
Author "Physiological Observation on Pikes Peak, Colorado, with special reference to 
Adaptation to Low Barometric Pressure," '13; "Exercise and Athletic Training," '14. 

WILLIAM STRIEBY, A. M„ E.M., ScD. 

Head Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy 

A. B. (New York University), '75; E. M. (Columbia School of Mines), 78; A. M. 
(New York University), '79; Colorado College, '80. In New West Educational Commission 
Preparatory School for Colorado College at Santa Fe, N. M., '78-'80. 

EDWARD ROYAL WARREN, S. B. 

Director of the Museum 

S. B. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), '81; Colorado College, '09. Member 
American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Ornithologists' Union, 
the Cooper Ornithological Club, the Wilson Ornithological Club, Biological Society of 
Washington, President Colorado Audubon Society. Author "Mammals of Colorado." 

HOMER EDWARDS WOODBRIDGE, A. M. 

Professor of English 

A. B. (Williams), '02; A. M. (Harvard), '04; Colorado College, '06. Exchange profes- 
sor at Harvard College, 1913-1914. 

GUY HARDING ALBRIGHT, A. M. 

Ph. B. (Univ. Michigan), '99; A. B. (Harvard), '04; M. A. (Harvard), '13. In Manual 
Training High School, Indianapolis, '00-'01 ; Polytechnic Preparatory School, Brooklyn, N. 
Y., '01-'07; Colorado College, '07. Published Freshman Algebra; Outline of Solid Geometry; 
Direct Observations. Exchange lecturer at Harvard, '13. 

HESTER DONALDSON JENKINS, PH. D. 

Assistant Professor of History 

Ph. D. (University of Chicago), '98; Ph. M. (University of Chicago), '99; Ph. D. 
(Columbia University), '12. Member American Historical Society, Colorado State Teachers' 
Association. Professor of History and English Composition, Constantinople College, '00- '09; 
professor of Sociology, Adelphi College, Brooklyn, '11-'12. Student in Radcliffe, American 
School of Archaeology, Athens, Greece, the Alliance Francaise, Paris; the University of 
Zurich ; in Dresden and in Constantinople. 

JAMES WILLIAMS PARK, A. B. AKE ; $BK 

Assistant Professor in Public Speaking 

A. B. (Amherst), '03; Colorado College, '07. Head master Kiskiminetas Springs 
School, Saltsburg, Pennsylvania; English master University School, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Author "President William F. Slocum," in Amherst Graduates' Quarterly. 

ROLAND R. TILESTON, A. M. 

Assistant Professor of Physics 

A. B. (Dartmouth). '07; A. M. (Dartmouth), '11. Instructor in Physics at Dartmouth, 
'08-'ll. 

1G 



LEILA CLEMENT SPAULDING, PH. D. $BK 

Assistant Professor in Greek and Latin 

A. B. (Vassar). '99; A. M. (Columbia), '01 ; Ph. D. (Columbia). '11 ; Colorado College, 
'11. Studied in the American School of Classical Studies, Athens. '02-'03 ; in the American 
School for Classical Studies, Rome, '10-11. Instructor in Greek and Archaeology at Vassar 
College, '03-07 ; lecturer in Art and Archaeology at Bryn Mawr College, '07-'08 ; member 
Archaeological Institute of America; the Association of Collegiate Alumnae; the Vassar 
Alumnae Association. Published "The Camillus Type in Sculpture," "On Dating Early 
Attic Inscriptions" in the American Journal of Archaeology. Contributor to Classical 
Weekly. 

MARIE A. SAHM, A. M. $BK 
Assistant Professor in Germany and in the History of Art 

A. B. (Colorado College), '07; A. M. (Colorado College), '08; Colorado College, '07. 
Taught three years at German-American Academy in New York City. Attended Columbia 
University, '04-'0S. Studied at University of Munich. Spent six years in travel and study 
in Europe, Egypt, and Greece. 

HORACE H. BAKER, B. S. 
Instructor in Biology 

B. S. (University of Michigan), '10. Assistant fellow at Michigan, '10-'13. 

ALFRED ATWATER BLACKMAN, M. D. 3>rA 

Medical Adviser 

M. D. (University of Denver), '02; Colorado College, '04. Post graduate courses. 
University of Vienna, Carney, St. Elizabeth, Massachusetts General Hospitals, Boston. Mem- 
ber Colorado Springs Clinical Club, El Paso Medical Society, American Medical Associa- 
tion, Psycho-Medical Society of London. 

EVA TOLMAN CANON, A. B. 

Assistant Librarian 

A. B. (Colorado College), '04; Colorado College, '08. Simonds College Library 
School, '04-'05. Member Colorado State Library Association. 

JOHN A. CARRUTHERS 

Lecturer on Law 

A. B. (University of Michigan), '09; LL. B. (LTniversity of Michigan), '11; Colorado 
College, '13. 

SARAH RUSSEL DAVIS 

Instructor in Physical Training for Women 

Graduate (Boston Normal School of Gymnastics), '07; graduate studies, Berlin and 
Stockholm, Dresden, Munich. Zurich, '10-'ll; Radcliffe, '00-'01 ; Boston Normal School of 
Gymnastics, '05-'07 ; instructor Boston Normal School of Gymnastics, '07-'09. Member 
American Physical Education Association ; Radcliffe Union ; Mary Hemenway Alumnae 
Association, Department Hygiene and Physical Education, Wellesley College. Collaborator 
with M. Montgomery of "Physiological Curves of the Spine." Assistant to Dr. Robert W. 
Lovett in preparation of textbook, "Lateral Curvature of the Spine and Round Shoulders." 

F. R. HASTINGS, A. M. $BK 

Lecturer on History and Pliilosopliv 

Ph. D. (Colorado College), '91; A. M. (Colorado College), '92; Colorado College, '99. 
Studied one term at Oxford and one term at Edinburgh. Has published articles on Philoso- 
phy and Religion in magazines and also in scientific journals articles and illustrations on 
engineering and railroads. 

17 




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MICHAEL BERNARD HURLEY, LL. M. 
Lecturer on Law 
LL. B. (Minnesota), '01; LL. M. (Yale), '02; Colorado College, '12. 

WYLIE BLOUNT MILLER JAMESON, A. B. 

Instructor in French and Spanish 

A. B. (Colorado College), '10; Colorado College, '12. Studied in Europe two years 
and received in 1912 the degree Certificat d' Etude Francaices from the University of 
Lausappe. Studied in Summer School University, Madrid, summer 1913. 

JOSEPHINE KELLERMAN 

Instructor in German 

Hohere Lochter Schume, Bonn. Colorado College, '11. Private tutoring before and 
after coming to Colorado College. 

HELEN O. MAHIN, 3>BK 

Instructor in English 

A. B. (De Pauw), '09. Instructor at De Pauw, '09-'13. Graduate work at University 
of Chicago. Member Indiana College Teachers Association. Author educational articles. 

CLAUDE JAMES ROTHGEB, <J»A© 

Instructor in Physical Training and Director of Athletics 

Member football team, Illinois, '00, '02, '03, '04 (Captain, '03). Member Illinois track 
team, '02, '03 and '04; Illinois baseball team, '03, '04, and '05 (Captain, '05); Washington 
American league baseball team, '05 ; Chicago National league and Indianapolis American 
Association baseball teams, '06; athletic director and coach, Colorado Agricultural College, 
'06-'10. Colorado College, '10. 

DORIS GREENE 

Assistant in the Library 

Graduate Wisconsin Library School, '11; at McClellan Public Library, Pueblo, '11-'13; 
Colorado College, '13. 

LOIS ELLET SMITH, *BK 
Instructor in Biology 
A. B. (Colorado College), '12. Colorado College, '12. 

GUY WENDALL CLARK, A. B. 

Instructor in Chemistry 

A. B. (Colorado College), '12; Colorado College, '12. Additional courses given by the 
professors of the College of Arts and Sciences. 



19 



>rljnnl nf iEngmming 



FLORIAN CAJORI, PH. D., LL. D., ScD. $BK 

Dean of the Department of Engineering and Head Professor of Mathematics 

S. B. (Wisconsin), '83; M. S. (Wisconsin), '80; Ph. D. (Tulane), '94; LL. D. (Uni- 
versity of Colorado), '12; LL. D. (Colorado College), '13; ScD. (Wisconsin), '13; Colorado 
College, '89. Assistant professor Mathematics, '8S-'87; professor Applied Mathematics, 
'89-'98 ; professor Physics, '89-'98 ; Mathematics since 1895; Dean School Engineering since '03, 
Colorado College. Member American Mathematic Society, Deutsche Matbematikec-Verei- 
nigurig ; Ciccolo Mathematic de Palermo ; American Association for the Advancement of 
Science; Society for the Promotion of Engineering. Author "The Teaching and History of 
Mathematics in the United States," '90; "A History of Mathematics," '99; "A History of 
Elementary Mathematics," '94; "A History of Physics, '99; "Introduction to the Modern 
Theory of Equation, '04; "A History of the Logarithm Slide Rule," '09; American Collabora- 
tor of Volume IV of Cantor's "Geschechte der Mathematic," '08 ; one of the editors of the 
"American Mathematical Monthly." 

GEORGE EARL MARTIN, B. S. 
Professor in Civil Engineering 

B. S. (Purdue), '09; Colorado College, '10. Instructor in General Engineering Draw- 
ing, University of Illinois, '09-'10. Publisher of articles in Engineering Journals. 

HOWARD MOORE, C. E. 
Assistant Professor of Graphics 

C. E. (Princeton), '93; Colorado College, '03. 

GEORGE BRINTON THOMAS, M. E. IN E. E. *K5 

Professor in Electrical Engineering 

M. E. in E. E. (Ohio State University), '07; Colorado College, '10. Assistant and 
instructor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, '07-T0; in Electrical department, Ohio 
Work Carnegie Street Company, 1 1-2 years; Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing 
Company, 1 year. Associate member American Institute of Electrical Engineers. Member 
Society for the Promotion of Engineering Education. 

M. A. BLAKEY, B. S. 

Director in the Mechanical Laboratories 

B. S. in M. E. (University Colorado), '12. With Westinghouse Machine Company, 
'12-'13; Colorado College, '13. 



20 



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WILLIAM CODMAN STURG1S, PH. D. AA* ; AKE 

Dean of the Department of Forestry and Lecturer on Vegetable Pathology 

A. B. (Harvard), '84; A. M. (Harvard), '87; Ph. D. (Harvard), '89; Colorado 
College. '03. Student Cambridge University, England, '98- '99 ; assistant Crytogainic Labora- 
tory, '89-90; Plant Pathologist, Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, '91-'01 ; lec- 
turer Yale Forestry School, '00-'01. Fellow American Association for the Advancement of 
Sciences and Harvard Travellers' Club. Member American Phytopathic Society, Boston 
Society Natural History, American Forestry Association, Natural Conservation Association. 
Publications : "On the Carpologic Structure and Development of the Colemaceae and 
Allied Groups ;" reports, bulletins and addresses, Connecticut Agricultural Experiment 
Station, '91-'01 ; papers on Myxomycetes in Colorado College publications and other journals; 
articles on Parasitic Fungi in various scientific journals. 

C. H. GOETZ, M. F. 

Instructor in Forestry 

S. B. (Harvard), '07; Colorado College, '11. In charge of forest investigation in For- 
est District No. 1 (including the national forests of Montana and Idaho, '08-'ll. Member 
Society of American Forests. Additional courses given by the professors of the College of 
Arts and Sciences and the School of Engineering. 

ELWOOD IDELL TERRY, S. B. 
Director of the Department of Forestry and Professor of Forestry 

B. S. (Michigan Agricultural College); M. F. (Michigan Agricultural College). Post 
graduate work at University Michigan U. S. Forestry Service in New Mexico ; 2 years in 
Forestry School, Washington University ; three years at Ohio State University. Contributor 
to forestry journals on scientific and economic forestry. 



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EDWARD DANFORTH HALE, A. M. *BK 

Dean of the Department of Music and Professor of the Theory and Literature 

of Music and the Pianoforte 

A. B. (Williams), '80; A. M. (Williams). '83. Professor at the New England Con- 
servatory, '85-'04; Colorado College, '05. Graduate of New England Conservatory. Mem- 
ber of lecture staff of the New England Education League. Editor of Department of 
Musical Pedagogy, Conservatory Magazine, Boston ; contributor to Etude and Musician ; 
author o-f "System of Theoretical and Technical Pianoforte Study." Director Men's Glee Club. 

ROBERT HAMILTON BERRYHILL 

Instructor in Pianoforte 

Colorado College, '10. 

MRS. GEORGE MAXWELL HOWE 

Instructor in Violin 

Cincinnati Conservatory of Music, '01-'03 ; Stanton College, Natchez, Miss., '03-'05 ;' 
Sternsches Konservatorium, Berlin, '05-'06 ; Woman's College, Columbia, S. C, '06-'07 ; Colo- 
rado College, TO. Active member and officer Colorado branch, American Musical Society; 
active member Colorado Springs Musical Club ; director College orchestra. 

MISS VIOLA PAULUS 

Instructor in Voice Culture 

The German Wallace College School of Music, '99-'01 ; Northwestern School of Music, 
'01-'05; pupil of Mme. Emma Fryhofer, Carlton Huckett ; instructor in American Con- 
servatory, '05-'09; Colorado College, TO. Director Girls' Glee Club. 

21 



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WARREN MILTON PERSONS, B. S. <J>K2 ; *BK 
Dean of the Department of Banking and Business Administration and Professor 
of the Theory and Literature of Economies and Finance 
B. S. (Wisconsin), '99; Colorado College, '12. See page 15. 

A guarantee of the income from $100,000 has been made for the estab- 
lishment of a department of Business Administration and Banking in Colorado 
College. 

The department has been established, first, to meet the demand of students 
in the Rocky Mountain region for a thorough training preparatory to business 
and, second, to supply commercial houses with employees capable of rapid ad- 
vancement to positions of responsibility. On the one hand, the' object is not to 
prepare students to become clerks or bookkeepers, but to prepare them for 
leadership in economic enterprises ; on the other hand, it is not to graduate 
experts or leaders in business but young men whose training is such that they 
are much more apt, than otherwise, to become experts or leaders. To the 
student the Department hopes to give training that will enable him to make 
the transition from school and college to business more readily than he other- 
wise could ; to employers it hopes to offer employees having great possibilities 
of development. In short, the aim is to make the finished product of the De- 
partment the raw material most desired in industry, i.e. young men with tech- 
nical training ; with the ability to concentrate, to reason and to meet new sit- 
uations ; not afraid of work and more work ; with persistence, with adaptability, 
with democracy ; and, finally, with high ethical and moral standards and keen 
appreciation of their social obligations. This is our ideal. 

Technical training for business is becoming a necessity. The colleges 
and universities rather than practical experience must be looked to for this 
technical training. 

When and how is this training to be given ? It should not come too 
early — there is danger of over-specialization upon an insufficient foundation. 
The specialized courses must come after students receive a thorough groundwork 
in English, mathematics, science and foreign language. It is for this reason 
that the specialized business courses to be given in the Department of Business 
Administration and Banking will be offered to Juniors and Seniors only. The 
Freshmen will be given a course in the mathematics of investments and the 
Sophomores one in the principles of economics and one in economic problems, 
but these are not specialized courses. 

The Department wants the men it graduates to be workers, therefore 
seventeen hours of high quality work each semester for Juniors and Seniors 
will be required. 

Finally, the Department will have failed if it does not give its students 
a high sense of moral obligation to their fellow business men and to the 
public at large. Social prosperity is dependent upon the development of a social 



conscience. 



22 




In September, 1911, the College Vesper Service was established. It is 
held every Sunday afternoon during term time at five o'clock. A vested choir 
of twenty-four voices leads in the music under the direction of Mrs. J. S. Tucker. 
The attendance of students is not required, but there is a large voluntary at- 
tendance. 



The list of preachers for iqij-'ij is as follows: 



Reverend Orrin W. Auman. 

Reverend F. T. Baylev, D. D. 

Reverend Gibson Bell. 

The Right Reverend Benjamin Brewster, D. D. 

Proffesor S. H. Clark, Ph. B. 

R. W. Corwin, M. D. 

Reverend Ozora S. Davis, D. D. 

Reverend C. Telford Erickson. 

Reverend Samuel Garvin, D. D. 

The Reverend H. Martyn Hart, D. D. 

Professor Samuel A. Lough, Ph. D. 

The Right Reverend Francis J. McConnell, D. D., LL.D. 

Professor Clifford H. Moore, Ph. D. 

Reverend A. H. Chipman Morse. 

Harry P. Packard, M. D. 

Mr. A. D. Parker. 

Dean Edward S. Parsons, B. D., Litt. D. 

Reverend William W. Ranney. 

President William F. Slocum, D.D., LL.D. 

Reverend Merle N. Smith, D. D. 

Reverend James H. Spencer. 

Reverend Arthur N. Taft. 

Reverend Allan A. Tanner. 

Reverend Frank H. Touret. 

Reverend George B. VanArsdale. 

Reverend Clarence F. Weyer. 

23 




lumni = 

ssociationl 



©ffirrrn 

Dr. C. R. Arnold President 

W. W. Cort First Vice-President 

Nettie Carv Vice-President 

E. W. Wiser Vice-President 

Sperry Packard Vice-President 

Leonard Van Stone Vice-President 

Leonora Pollen : Secretary 

Glen Bowers Treasurer 

iExmittuc (Hommtttre 

Dr. Arnold Leonora Pollen Glen Bowers Dr. Bortree 

Merle McClintock Ella Taylor W. W. Cort 

OFFICERS EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS 

■Publtratum 

"The Colorado College Alumni Monthly." 

Urattrli Asflariatums 

Berkeley Denver Pueblo Canon City Chicago Boston 

New York Greeley Monte Vista Grand Junction 



24 



g>ent0r Allans 

Colors: Red and White. 

<§fbtcts 

F. A. Cajori President 

Elizabeth Sutton Vice-President 

Harriet Gates Secretary 

Karle Weller Treasurer 



26 



FRANCES HELEN ADAMS, A. B. 
420 West Laurel Street, 
Fort Collins, Colorado. 

Major, English 

*BK, Minerva, Y. W. C. A., Dramatic Club, Dais, 
Secretary of Y. W. C. A. (2), Vice-President Y. W. 
C. A. (3), Secretary of Class (2), President of Class 
(3), Delegate to Cascade Conference (2), Class Play 
(3), Assistant Editor of Nugget (3), Vice-President 
of Tennis Association (2), (3), President of Minerva 
(4). 

What the College Gave to Her — The means of catching 
the mumps. 

What She Gave to the College — An ideal college girl. 



MARY FEIMSTER ADAMS, A. B. 
Steamboat Springs, Colorado. 

Major, Biology 

ABII, Dais, Y. W. C. A., Dramatic Club, Student 
Government Advisory Board (3), Secretary Student 
Commission (4), Treasurer Dramatic Club (4), 
Student Government Board (4). 

What the College Gave to Her — A chance to teach the 
young idea how to shoot. 

What She Gave to the College — A circus. 



ARTHUR JONES ALLEN, A. B. 

742 Grand Avenue, 

Grand Junction, Colorado. 

Major, Economics 

A*©, Apollonian Club, Assistant Editor Tiger ( 3 ) 
Glee Club (3), (4), Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (3), (4), 
Secretary Apollonian Club (4), Senior Play Cast. 

What the College Gave to Him — Bright prospects. 
What He Gave to the College — A winning personality. 





27 





MARGARET AGNES ALEXANDER, A. B. 

La Veta Colorado. 

Major, History 

ABIT, I. I. C, Y. W. C. A. Dramatic Club, Dais. 

What the College Gave to Her — Determination. 
What She Gave to the College — A true friend. 



CHARLOTTE ANDERSON, A. B. 

717 Fifth Street. 
East Las Vegas, New Mexico. 

Major, Biology 

ABII, I. I. C, Y. W. C. A., Dais, Dramatic Club, 
Manager Dramatic Club (3). 



What the College Gave to Her- 
What She Gave to the College- 



-Self confidence. 
-Perseverance. 



CONRAD HERMAN ANDERSON, B. S. in E. E. 

1129 Washington Avenue, 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

What the College Gave to Him — A seat in chapel. 
What He Ga~ve to the College — A bred in the bone bach- 
elor. 



28 



IRENE ANSON, A. B. 

4342 Umatilla Street, 
Denver, Colorado. 

Major, English 

Dramatic, Y. VV. C. A., Dais, Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
(3), Nugget Board (3), Vesper Choir (3), Delegate 
to Y. W. C. A. Conference (3). 

What the College Gave to Her — An objectionable nick- 



name. 



What She Gave to the College — A left-handed genius. 



REGINALD MYERS ATWATER, A. B. 

730 East Boulder Street, 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major, Psychology 

*BK, Apollonian Club, Y. M. C. A., Student Volun- 
teer, Class Play (3), Assistant Manager of Nugget 
(3), Secretary Apollonian Club (3), President Apol- 
lonian Club (4), Manager of Debating (4), Assistant 
in Department of Psychology (3), (4). 

What the College Gave to Him — A definite purpose. 
What He Gave to the College — A sample of "the cream of 
the earth." 



GRACE ELIZABETH BALL, A. B. 

410 North Weber Street, 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major, History 

Dramatic Club, Vesper Choir (3), (4), Y. W. C. A., 
Town Girls' Association. 

What the College Gave to Her — The reward of virtuosity. 
What She Gave to the College — A silent woman. 















•vZ$ 







29 




wife 




ERNEST WINFRED BARNES. 

New Jersey. 

Major, History 

Y. M. C. A., Apollonian Club, Eastern Club. Glee 
Club (2), (4), Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (2), (4), Vesper 
Choir (2), (3), (4), Class Play (3). Treasurer East- 
ern Club (3), Tennis Club (1), (2), (4). 

What the College Gave to Him — A new source of power. 
What He Gave to the College — "I am holier than thou !" 



ROBERT HAMILTON BERRYHILL. 

324 East Yampa Street, 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major, Biology 

A*©, Euterpe, Assistant in Music School, Le Cercle 
Francais ( 4 ) , Wolff Medal ( 1 ) , Prize College Song 
(3). 

What the College Gave to Him — A chance to be original. 
What He Gave to the College — Seven operettas and twen- 
ty-three college songs. 



MARIAN ELOTIA BROOKS, A. B. 

1820 Washington Avenue, 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major, Philosophy 

Y. W. C. A., Class Play (3). 

What the College Gave to Her — A long romance. 
What She Gave to the College — A private secretary. 



30 



FLORIAN ANTON CAJORI, A. B. 

1119 Wood Avenue, 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major, Chemistry 

K2, Apollonian Club, President Tennis Association 
(2), Assistant Editor Tiger (3), Assistant Manager 
Football (3), Vice-President Apollonian Club (4), 
President Class (4), Senior Play Cast. 

What the College Gave to Him — An opportunity to live up 
to his father. 

What He Gave to the College — A real man. 



ALAN FULLER CAMERON, A. B. 
260 Logan Street, 
Denver, Colorado. 

Major, English 

Pearsons, Der Deutsche Verein, Le Cercle Francais, 
Class Football Eleven (1), (2), Secretary Pearsons 
(3), Assistant Manager Tiger (3), Glee Club (3), (4), 
Football Squad (1), (2), (3), (4), German Play (3), 
Senior Play Cast. 

What the College Gave to Him — A trip with the Glee Club. 
What He Gave to the College — I'll bite. 



HH 



ANNE BRYAN CARSON, A. B. 
Kissimmee, Florida. 

Major, English 

Columbia College, Florida (T), Minerva, Y. W. C. 
A., Dramatic Club, Eastern Club (2), Dais, Factotum 
Minerva (3), Sergeant-at-Arms Class (3), Y. W. C. 
A. Cabinet (4), Thrall Dais (4), President Dramatic 
Club (4), Senior Play Cast. 

What the College Gave to Her — An army of friends. 
What She Gave to the College — A dead game 'spoht." 




.- 




31 



. : 




HELEN MARGARET CASSIDY, A. B. 

246 South Lincoln Street, 

Denver, Colorado. 

Major, History 

ABII, Minerva, Dais, Y. W. C. A., Dramatic Club, 
Glee Club ( 4 ) , Student Government Board ( 3 ) , Dele- 
gate to Estes Park Conference (3), Student Volunteer 
Leader (4), Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (4). 



tical. 



Illicit the Collene Gave to Her — An opening for the prac- 
l. 

What She Gave to the College — Serious thought. 



LEON B. CLARK 

Major, Philosophy 

Apollonian Club, Y. M. C. A., Treasurer Apollonian 
Club ( 3 ) , Vice President Apollonian Club ( 4 ) , Treas- 
urer and Secretary of C. C. Tennis Association (3), 
Treasurer of C. C. Y. M. C. A., (3), (4), Employment 
Secretary of Y. M. C. A. (4). 

What the College Gave to Hint — A taste for the beautiful. 
What He Gave to the College — A mighty mind lodged in a 
little body. 



GEORGE HOLLIDAY COPELAND. 

Greeley, Colorado. 

Major, Education 

Y. M. C. A., Ciceronian Club, Gospel Team (2), 
President Ciceronian Club (4), Glee Club (4). 

What the College Gave to Him — The ability to sell books. 
What He Gave to the College — The return from the sales. 



32 



KATHERINE EARL COPELAND. 
2110 North Cascade Avenue, 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major, German 

Minerva, Y. W. C. A., Dramatic Club, Le Cercle 
Francais, Der Deutsche Verein, Student Commission, 
Town Girls' Association, Secretary Le Cercle Fran- 
cais (3), Vice-President Dramatic Club (3), Y. W. C. 
A. Cabinet (4), Secretary Minerva (4), Vice-Presi- 
dent Student Body (4), President Town Girls' Asso- 
ciation (4). 

What the College Gave to Her — Intellectual humor. 
What She Gave to the College — A live wire. 



HELEN EMMA DE RUSHA, A. B. 

422 East Cache la Poudre Street, 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major, English 

Minerva, Y. W. C. A., Dramatic Club, Girls' Glee 
Club (1), (4), Treasurer Minerva (4). 

What the College Gave to Her — A Ray of hope. 
What She Gave to the College — An example of apprecia- 
tive domesticity. 



LUCILE WINIFRED DILTS, A. B. 

Fort Morgan, Colorado. 

Major, Philosophy 

Hypathia, Y. W. C. A., Dramatic Club, Dais, Fac- 
totum Hypatia (2), Secretary Hypatia (3), Student 
Government Advisory Board (2), (3), Delegate Cas- 
cade Conference (3), Treasurer Hypatia (4). 

What the College Gave to Her — New vision. 

What She Gave to the College — A cheerful thinker. 








mam .. 

4 



33 




JOHN DUPERTIUS, A. B. 

Chehalis, Washington. 

Major, Romance Languages 

University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, Washington 
(T), Y. M. C. A , Le Cercle Francais, Student Volun- 
teer, Glee Club (3), President Le Cercle Francais, 
Vesper Choir (4), Instructor in French (3), (4), 
Senior Play Cast. 

What the College Gave to Him — A position. 

What He Gave to the College — An amateur moustache. 







SHOAN MASUZO FUKUYA, A. B. 

Kai, Japan. 

Major, Psychology 

What the College Gave to Him — Its sincere regards. 
What He Gave to the College — A real seminar. 




HARRIET EMILY GATES, A. B. 
Sapulpa, Oklahoma. 

Major, Latin 

Drury College (T), Y. W. C. A., Dais, Dramatic 
Club, Local Editor Tiger (4), Secretary of Class (4). 

What the College Gave to Her — Time for fashionable calls. 
What She Gave to the College — What was left. 



. 



34 



FREDERICK MATTHEW GERLACH, A. B. 
Canon City, Colorado. 

Major, English 

Ciceronian Club, Y. M. C. A. (2), Der Deutsche 
Verem (2), (3), Attorney Ciceronian Club (2), As- 
sistant Editor Kinnikinnik (3), Assistant Editor Tiger 
(3), Secretary Ciceronian Club (3), Football "C" (3), 
(4), Editor-in-Chief Tiger (4), Editor Handbook 
(4), President of Hagerman Hall (4), Student Com- 
mission (4). 

What the College Gave to Him — A chance to visit English 
classes. 

What He Gave to the College — A martyr to convictions. 



LILIAN MAY GIBBS, A. B. 
Trinidad, Colorado. 

Major, Biology 

Y. W. C. A., Dramatic Club, Dais, Advisory Board 
Student Government (4). 

What the College Gave to Her — A street to walk on. 
What She Gave to the College — Unsparing advice. 



' * • / - ' : 
-■'... 

.■■ ■ ■ 

i ■ fH 




HELEN GOWDY, A. B. 

Nob Hill, 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major, English 

Y. W. C. A., Dramatic Club, Delegate to Cascade 
Conference (1), Girls' Glee Club (3), Executive 
Board Town Girls' Organization (4). 

What the College Gave to Her — Some Fuller activities. 
What She Gave to the College — A party on Nob Hill. 



'•' ' 's 




35 



'::■! 



• - 
i ' 



MAY LOUISE GREENE, A. B. 
411 East Columbia Street, 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major, Latin and Greek 

<£BK, Y. W. C. A., Dramatic Club, Le Cercle Fran- 
cais, Der Deutsche Verein, Town Girls' Association, 
Honors (2), Perkins Scholarship (2), High Honors 
(3). 

What the College Gave to Her — Chances for service. 
JVIiat Slie Gave to the College — A "near Russian" dancer. 



HAROLD WILLIAM GREGG, A. B. 

1261 Long's Peak Avenue, 
Longmont, Colorado. 

Major, Biology 

A*©, Apollonian Club, Y. M. C. A.. Glee Club (2), 
(3), (4), Vesper Choir (2), (3), Secretary Glee Club 
(3), Assistant Manager Tiger (3), Secretary Student 
Commission (3). Secretary Y. M. C. A. (3). Nugget 
Board (3), Class Play (3), Glee Club Quartet (3), 
(4), Secretary Apollonian Club (4), President Apol- 
lonian Club (4), Manager Tiger (4). 

What the College Gave to Him — The business end of the 



Tiger. 



What He Gave to the College — A "good-natured man." 



MAUDE MAY GRIFFITH, A. B. 

Palisade, Colorado. 

Major, English 

Dramatic Club, Y. W. C. A., Dais, German Club 
(2), (3), (4), Vesper Choir (4). 

What the College Gave to Her — Interested attention. 
What She Gave to the College — The personification of am- 
bition. 



36 



EDGAR HADDON GUM, A. B. 

307 North Fourth Street, 
Colorado City, Colorado. 

Major, Philosophy 

Williams Jewell College (1), (2), Philomathean 
Literary Society, Y. M. C. A., Colorado College (3), 
(4), Y. M. C. A., Minister, Pastor First Baptist 
Church, Colorado City. 

What the College Gave to Him — A chance to argue in 
class. 

What He Gave to the College — The profundity of his re- 
search. 



■ 




MABEL MARGARET HARLAN, A. B. 

920 Cheyenne Road, 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Soloist Diploma. Major, German 

<J>BK, Minerva, Dramatic Club, Y. W. C. A., Secre- 
tary German Club (3), College Orchestra (3), (4). 
Vice-President Minerva, President Minerva (4), Pres- 
ident Euterpe ( 4 ) , President German Club ( 4 ) . 

II' hat the College Gave to Her — Appreciative listeners. 
What She Gave to the College — A, professional president. 



CHARLES ARTHUR HARTER, A. B. 

Loveland, Colorado. 

Major, Chemistry 

<£A©, Engineers' Club (2), Assistant Manager Base- 
ball (3), Pan Hellenic Council (4). 

What the College Gave to Him — Much that he will appre- 
ciate in the future more than he does now. 

What He Gave to the College — The poster-type of college 



-'■' . 




mm 





37 




' 



■\ V 





VEDA EMILY HASTY, A. B. 

511 South Third Street, 
Lamar, Colorado. 

Major, Latin 

Hypatia, Y. W. C. A.. Dramatic Club, Dais, Treas- 
urer Hypatia (4). 

What the College Gave to Her — A pastime as opposed to a 
future. 

What She Gave to the College — Wit and good humor. 



DAGMAR MARGUERITE HOLM, A. B. 

Amo, Colorado. 

Major, German 

Colorado State Teachers' College ( 1 ) , Der Deutsche 
Verein (3), Dramatic Club, Y. W. C. A., Vice-Presi- 
dent Der Deutsche Verein ( 4 ) . 

What the College Gave to Her — Something good to think 
upon. 

What She Gave to the College — Something good to look 
upon. 



SARAH BLAKELEY INGERSOLL, A. B. 

Denver. Colorado. 

Major, Latin 

4>BK, Minerva, Y. W. C. A., Dais, Dramatic Club, 
High Honors (3), Delegate Estes Park Conference 
( 3 ) , Wisconsin First Year Cabinet ( 4 ) , Secretary 
Minerva (4), Senior Play Cast. 

What the College Gave to Her — The halo. 
What She Gave to the College — A perfect saint. 



EVERETT BANFIELD JACKSON, A. B. 

228 East Kiowa Street, 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major, Mathematics 

<J>BK, Apollonian, Baseball (1), (2), (3), (4), Hon- 
ors ( 1 ) , Perkins Scholarship ( 2 ) , Editor of Nugget, 
(3), Captain Baseball (3), Honors (3), Class Play 
Cast (3), President Student Body (4), Rhodes Schol- 
arship (4), Q. Q. Manager of junior Plav, President 
of Class (2), Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (4). 

What the College Gave to Him — An ideal college girl. 
What He Gave to the College — The means of catching the 
mumps. 



£ - 








SARAH JUDITH JACOBS, A. B. 

Des Moines, Iowa. 

Major, Economics 

Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa ( 1 ) , Philoma- 
thean Literary Society (1), Colorado College (2), 
(3), (4), Dramatic Club, Y. W. C. A., Glee Club (2). 

What the College Gave to Her — Work. 

What She Gave to the College — Strictly business. 





MINNA ERNESTINE JEWELL, A. B. 

1020 Mill Street, 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major, Biology 

ABU, Dramatic Club, I. I. C, Dais, Y. W. C. A., 
High Honors (2). 

What the College Gave to Her — An individual philosophy. 
What She Gave to the College — Infinite amusement. 




• .- - . .• 





CHARLES MORTON JOHNSTON, B. S. 
Hooper, Colorado. 

Irrigation Engineering 

Thesis: An Investigation of the Methods of Failure 
of Reinforced Concrete Structures. 

<J>rA, Engineers' Club (2), (3), Y. M. C. A., Vice- 
President Engineers' Club (3), Treasurer Class (3), 
Track (2). (3), (4). 

What the College Gave to Him — A guess of the future. 
What He Gave to the College — The guess. 



PERCY LABAN JONES, JR., A. B. 
Beulah, Colorado. 

Major, History 

Apollonian Club, Y. M. C. A., Mary G. Slocum 
Scholarship (3), Assistant Manager Track (3). 

JJ'hat the College Gave to Him — A busy life. 
What He Gave to the College — An eternal greeting. 



FRANK YONGJU KIM, A. B. 
Chuniju. Korea. 

Major, Philosophy 

University of Pennsylvania ( 1 ) , ( 2 ) , Pearson Lit- 
erary Society (3), (4). Henry Strong Scholarship (3), 
(4), President Student Volunteers (3), Secretary and 
Treasurer of Student Volunteers (4), Secretary and 
Treasurer of Tennis Association (3), (4). 

What the College Gave to Him — A chance to prove his 
worth. 

What He Gave to the College — An example of personal 
adaptation to environment. 



40 






ELIZABETH KNOUS, A. B. 

2000 Eighth Avenue, 

Greeley, Colorado. 

Major, Latin 

Dramatic Club, Y. W. C. A., Dais, I. I. C, Student 
Volunteer, Vesper Choir, Der Deutsche Verein, Dele- 
gate to Estes Park Conference, German Play (4). 

What the College Gave to Her — John Bull. 
What She Gave to the College — Voluble loyalty. 



" , .' - 



m 



■ 



EDWARD HARRY KOCH, A. B. 
Aspen, Colorado. 

Major, Education and Psychology 

K2, Football (1), (2), (3), Track Team (2). (3). 
Captain Football (4). 

What the College Gave to Him — The privilege of taking- 
German four times. 

What He Gave to the College — His opinion of the same. 



'■# 









MARY EMILY LANDON, A. B. 
Quincy, Illinois. 

Major, Biology 

Minerva, Y. W. C. A., Dramatic Club, Junior Play, 
Secretary Dramatic Club (3). 

What the College Gave to Her — Dreams of a lady M. D. 
What She Gave to the College — A militant suffragette. 



41 







AGNES MARTHA LENNOX, A. B. 

1339 North Nevada Avenue, 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major, French 

Minerva. Le Cercle Francais, Dramatic Club, Col- 
lege Orchestra ( 3 ) , ( 4 ) . 

J] 'hot the College Gave to Her — A ripping good time. 
What She Gave to the College — Ninety-seven new dance 
steps. 




RAYMOND LEWIS, A. B. 
Fowler, Colorado. 

Major, Philosophy 

2x, Fraternity, Glee Club (2), (3), Baseball Team 
(3), Football Team (2), Captain Football Team (3), 
President Tennis Club ( 2 ) , Winner Tennis Tourna- 
ment (3), State Doubles (2), Vice-President Pan 
Hellenic (3), (4). 

What the College Gave to Him — A steadying influence. 
What He Gave to the College — An enviable complexion. 



ROFENA M. LEWIS, A. B. 
Canon City, Colorado. 

Major, Biology 

Contemporary, Dramatic Club, Dais, Y. W. C. A., 
Vice-President Contemporary (3), Glee Club (4), 
Secretary Contemporary (4), Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
(4), Student Government Board (4), Custodian 
Dramatic Club ( 4 ) , Assistant in Biology Laboratory 
(4). 

What the College Gave to Her — A chance to cut up, (Oh, 
bugs ) . 

What She Gave to the College — A combination of wit and 
science. 



42 



ROBERT LLOYD, B. S. in C. E. • 
1528 North Nevada Avenue, 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Thesis: "The Use of Oil in Improving City Streets." 

What the College Gave to Him — Something to keep him 
going. 

What He Gave to the College — A pioneer in educational 
circles. 



MAUDE WEBSTER LEONARD, A. B. 

1007 Jackson Avenue, 
Wichita, Kansas. 

Major, Psychology 

Student Volunteer, Y. W. C. A., Dais, Dramatic 
Club. 



hide. 



What the College Gave to Her — A spot where she could 
What She Gave to the College — A gentle smile. 




ELLEN CECELIA M'CAFFERY, A. B. 

11 West Boulder Street, 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major, English 

Dramatic Club, Y. W. C. A., Town Girls' Club. 

What the College Gave to Her — Practice in bluffing. 
What She Gave to the College — A bright spot on the 
campus. 




43 







DOROTHY M'CREERY, A. B. 

Greeley, Colorado. 

Major, Education 

Y. W. C. A., Dais, Minerva, Dramatic Club, Vice- 
President Class (2), Secretary Class (3), Student 
Commission (3). 

J J' hat the College Gave to Her — A serious view of life. 
What She Gave to the College — Refinement. 



•' / .,; V 




WILLIAM CHARLES M'COY, B. S. 

521 South Tejon Street, 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Thesis: "Precision Measurement of Magnetic Induc- 
tion in Straight Bars." 

Apollonian Literary Society, Y. M. C. A. 

What the College Gave to Him — Instruction. 

What He Gave to the College — A quiet unobtrusive chap. 




LEILA BELLE M'REYNOLDS, A. B. 
Rutledge, Missouri. 

Major, History 

K®*, K. S. N. (1), (2), Contemporary, Y. W. C. 
A., Dramatic Club (3), (4), Town Girls' Club (4), 
Treasurer Contemporary (4). 

What the College Gave to Her — A new regime. 
What She Gave to the College — The proper thing. 



44 



•- ;-:-;':: ,- - ' 



DOROTHY WINIFRED MADDEN, A. B. 

590 Ocean Street, 

South Portland, Maine. 

Major, Romance Languages 

Contemporary, Y. W. C. A., Dramatic Club, Dais, 
Annual Board (3), Secretary of Contemporary (4). 



of? 



What the College Gave to Her — What is the moon made 
What She Gave to the College — Lots of fun. 



RAYMOND EDWARD MILLER. A. B. 

Parkersburg, West Virginia. 

Major, .Philosopli v 

K5, Forestry Club (1), Secretary Forestry Club (2), 
Eastern Club (1), (2), Treasurer of Pearsons (3), 
Assistant Manager Football (3), Junior Play (3), 
Pearsons Play (3), Manager Football (4), President 
Pearsons (4), Senior Play Cast. 

What the College Gave to Him — The improving influence 
of a gospel tour to Canon City. 

What He Gave to the College — A nice boy. 



: " ' ?-*AS' 




RALPH ALBERT MOYE, A. B. 

315 East Uintah Street, 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major, Biology 

2x, Football "C"(2), (3), Glee Club (2), (3). 

What the College Gave to Him — Just about everything he 
wants. 

What He Gave to the College — A perfect gentleman. 




45 



-'- 




■'•*'. 




FRANCES JOSEPHINE MULLANEY, A. B. 

741 East Cache la Poudre Street, 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major, English 

Dramatic Club, Y. W. C. A., Le Cercle Francais, 
Town Girls' Club. 



plots 



IV hat the College Gave to Her — A course in hatching 
s. 
What She Gave to the College — A possible authoress. 



NELSON RENFROW PARK, A. B. 

232 Kent Street, 
Longmont, Colorado. 

Major, Psychology 

Glee Club (1), (2), (3). (4), Secretary Glee Club 
(2), Y. M. C. A., Forestry Club, Le Cercle Francais, 
Treasurer Le Cercle Francais ( 3 ) , Track ( 3 ) , Eastern 
Club, New England Club, Manager French Play (2), 
(3), (4), Assistant Manager Tiger (3), Apollonian 
Club (1), (2), (3), (4), Treasurer Apollonian Club 
(3), Football Squad (4). 



What the College Gave to Him- 
What He Gave to the College— 



-An unknown possibility. 
His best wishes. 



MARTHA ELIZABETH PHILLIPS, A. B. 

La Junta, Colorado. 

Major, English 

©BK, Y. W. G A., Minerva, Dais, Dramatic Club 
Treasurer (4), Nugget Board (3), Y. W. C. A. Cabi- 
net (2), Glee Club (1), (2), (3), (4), Student Govern- 
ment Board (T), (2). (3), Inter-Society Council (4). 

What the College Gave to Her — Poise and good judgment. 
What She Gave to the College — A democrat. 



46 



Worn -i .■-■-• - 



EDITH ANTONETTA POWELL, A. B. 

Yampa, Colorado. 

Major, English 

Minerva, Y. W. C. A., Dramatic Club, Dais, Le 
Cercle Francais, Der Deutsche Verein, Factotum Mi- 
nerva (2). Treasurer Le Cercle Francais (2), French 
Play (2), Vice-President Le Cercle Francais (3), 
Class Play (3). Nugget Board (3), Tiger Staff (3), 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (4), German Play (3), Vice- 
President Minerva (4). 

ll'hat the College Gave to Her — Art. 

Ji'hat She Gave to the College — A refined efficiency. 



ARTHUR FISHER ROSE, B. S. in E. E. 

1007 North Wahsatch Avenue, 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Thesis: "The Effect of Altitude on Heating of Elec- 
trical Machines." 

Engineers' Club, Secretary Engineers' Club (3), 
President Engineers' Club (4), Honors (1), (2), (3). 

ll'hat the College Gave to Him — Experience in stereoptics. 
W hat He Gave to the College — A new path across the 
campus. 



ROY MICHAEL ROSE, B. S. in C. E. 

1820 North Corona Street, 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Thesis: "Uses of Cement in Dwelling Houses:" 

Engineers' Club, Football Squad ( 2 ) , ( 3 ) , Sergeant- 
at-Arms Engineers' Club (3), Assistant Mechanical 
Laboratory (3), Football "C" (4), President English 
club (4), Assistant in Civil Engineering Department 
(4). 

What the College Gave to Him — The opportunity to show 
his grit. 

What He Gave to the College — A gritty man. 



,':■■■ ■ . 

§§1p , « 





41 



- ; ;. I,,'- „' ' '. ' •■■ 




ELIZABETH DELPHINE SCHMITT, A. B. 

1336 North Weber Street, 
Colorado Springs. Colorado. 

Major, Latin and Greek 

Hypatia, Y. W. C. A., Dramatic Club, Le Cercle 
Francais, Town Girls' Club, Secretary Le Cercle Fran- 
cais (4), Vice-President Hypatia (4). 

What the College Gave to Her — Eighteen language courses. 
ll'hat She Gave to the College — A real high brow. 




JESSIE MARGUERITE SHELDEN, A. B. 

321 West Kiowa Street, 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major, English 

Hypathia. Y. W. C. A., Dramatic Club, Nugget 
Board (3), Assistant Editor Kinnikinnik (3), Presi- 
dent Hypatia (4), Editor Kinnikinnik (4). 

What the College Gave to Her — The pleasure of knowing 
"Pink." 

11 'hat She Gave to the College — Literary encouragement. 




RUTH FOXWORTHY SHEPPARD, A. B. 

Eaton, Colorado. 

Major, German 

Dais, German Club, Y. W. C. A., Dramatic Club, 
Student Government Advisory Board (2), Y. VV. C. 
A. Cabinet (3), (4), Glee Club (3), Estes Park Dele- 
gate (3), Henry Strong Scholarship (3), (4), Y. W. 
C. A. President (4), Student Government Board (4). 

What the College Gave to Her — Xot as much as it might 
have. 

What She Gave to the College — A practical religion. 



4S 






' v'*'.^'v 



MAUDE ELIZABETH STANFIELD, A. B. 
Paris, Illinois. 

Major, Latin. 

n<£, James Millikin University (3), Contemporary, 
Y. W. C. A. Dramatic Club, Dais, President Contem- 
porary (4). 



What the College Gave to Her- 
What She Gave to the College- 



-Amiable attention. 
-The same. 




'..■.... . ■ . :■■><:■: 



FREDERIC PUTNAM STORKE, A. B. 

Auburn, New York. 

Major, Romance Languages. 

<£BK, A*©, Apollonian Club, French Club, French 
Play (1), Perkins Scholarship (2), Correspondent 
Tiger (2), Assistant Editor Tiger (3), Annual Board 
(3), Pan Hellenic Council (3), (4), Student Commis- 
sion (3), Debating Team (2), (3), Kinnikinnik Board 
(4), President Tiger Board 
Pan Hellenic Council (4). 



4), Secretary-Treasurer 



What the College Gave to Him — Its congratulations. 
What He Gave to the College — A wise youth. 



CLAUDIUS AUGUSTUS STREET, A. B. 

1806 Wood Avenue, 

Linville Falls, North Carolina. 

Major, Biology 

Ciceronian Club, Y. M. C. A., Assistant in Chemistry 
Laboratory (4), Senior Play Cast. 

What the College Gave to Him — A helpmeet. 
What He Gave to the College — His tuition. 




49 




MAURICE EDWARD STRIEBY, A. B. 

Major, Mathematics 

Y. M. C. A., Apollonian Club, Vesper Choir, Assist- 
ant Manager Tiger (3), Nugget Board (3), Class 
Play (3), Treasurer Apollonian (4), La junta Deputa- 
tion Team (4), Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (4). 

What the College Gave to Him — A more serious view of 
life. 

What He Gave to the College — Pep, fun, and good na- 
turedness. 




ELIZABETH CHASE SUTTON, A. B. 

1547 Clarkson Street, 

Denver, Colorado. 

Major, Romance Languages 

<E>BK, Contemporary, Y. W. C. A., Dramatic Club, 
Dais, Euterpe, Le Cercle Francais, Der Deutsche 
Verein, Vesper Choir (2), Girls' Glee Club (1), (2), 
( 3 ) , Librarian Girls' Glee Club ( 2 ) , Secretary-Treas- 
urer Girls' Glee Club ( 3 ) , Student Government Execu- 
tive Board (3), Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (2), (4), Dele- 
gate Cascade Conference (1). Nugget Board (3), 
Honors (3), President Le Cercle Francais (3), Vice- 
President Tennis Association ( 4 ) , Vice-President 
Class (4), Factotum Contemporary (2), Treasurer 
Contemporary (4), Vice-President Contemporary (4). 

IVhat the College Gave to Her — Penalty of distinction. 
What She Gave to the College — The thoughts of a mod- 
ern young woman. 



FRANCES HELEN TOWNSEND 
Golden, Colorado. 

Major, Psychology and Education 

Y. W. C. A., Dramatics, Tiger Club, Dais, junior 
Play. 

What the College Gave to Her — A school for scandal. 
What She Gave to the College — Chili Con tomava. 



50 



. . ,.-'.■'. ■ ' ,,■•.-. . - 



LUCILE WAKEFIELD, A. B. 

Loveland, Colorado. 

Major, Biology 

Contemporary, Dais, Dramatic Club, Y. W. C. A., 
Secretary Class (1), Factotum Contemporary (2), 
Student Government Board (2), (3), (4), Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet (3), (4), Student Commission (4), President 
Student Government (4), Inter-Society Council (4). 

What the College Gave to Her — A desirable reputation. 
What She Gave to the College — A college woman. 




HELEN FRANCIS WARREN, A. B. 
Fort Morgan, Colorado. 

Major, Romance Languages 

Lake Forest College (1), (2), Colorado College (3), 
(4), Y. W. C. A., Dramatic Club, French Club, Dais. 

What the College Gave to Her — A schooling. 
What She Gave to the College — Not entirely sure. 



HARLEY ALBRO WATSON, A. B. 
Fort Collins, Colorado. 

Major, Chemistry 

<E>rA, Monmouth College (1), (2), Apollonian Club, 
Y. M. C. A., Vice-President Class (3), Treasurer 
Apollonian Club (3), Assistant Manager Track (3). 
Assistant Football Manager (3), Manager Baseball 
(4), Pan Hellenic Council (4), Assistant in Chemistry 
Laboratory (3), (4), Manager Class Play (4). 

What the College Gave to Him — A distant prospect. 
What He Gave to the College — The appearance of being 
square. 




51 




KARL FOREST YYELLER, A. B. 

Eaton, Colorado. 

Major, Economics 

$rA, Pearsons Club, Y. M. C. A., Glee Club (1), 
( 2 ) , ( 3 ) , ( 4 ) , Manager Freshmen Baseball ( 1 ) , Treas- 
urer Pearsons (3), Second in Sweet Oratorical (3), 
Assistant Football Manager (3), President Glee Club 
(4), Secretary Pearsons (4), Class Treasurer (4), 
President Tennis Club (4), Senior Play Cast. 



What the College gave to Him- 
IVhat He Gave to the College— 



-Feet to dance on. 

A sin°er of sentiment. 




GLADYS MAY WHITTENBERGER, A. B. 

1911 North Tejon Street, 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major, Latin 

Y. W. C. A., Dramatic Club, Contemporary, Repre- 
sentative Cascade Conference (2), President of Con- 
temporary (4), Society Member of Student Council 
( 4 ) , Euterpe. 

What the College Gave to Her — Limited enjoyment for un- 
limited capacity. 

What She Gave to the College — A ray of sunshine. 



LOUISE MAY WILLSON, A. B. 

810 East Platte Avenue, 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major, Education 

Hypatia, Y. W. C. A., Dramatic Club, Vice-Presi- 
dent Hypatia (4), Class Play (3), Town Girls' Asso- 
ciation. 

What the College Gave to Her — Relative values. 
What She Gave, to the College — A well-meaning girl. 



52 



RUTH CATHERINE WOOD, A. B. 

301 South Second Street, 
Montrose, Colorado. 

Major, Latin. 

$BK, Y. W. C. A., Dramatic Society, Dais. 

What the College Gave to Her — A poet's power. 
What She Gave to the College — Sterling worth. 




■ ■ " -•■■■ 




-'-. '"■;-.. 



WM 



MARY EVELYN WOON, A. B. 
Aspen, Colorado. 

Major, Biology 

Dais, Y. W. C. A., Dramatic Club, Der Deutsche 
Verein, Vesper Choir (3) . 

What the College Gave to Her — A wider sphere. 
What She Gave to the College — A typical secretary. 



HARRY CLINTON WRAY. 
514 Harrison Avenue, 
Canon City, Colorado. 

Major, Psychology 

A$0, Track "C" (2), (3), Nugget Board (3), 
Senior Play Cast. 

What the College Gave to Him — It would be intensely 
humorous to say. 

What He Gave to the College — A chance to pun on his 
name. 




YY,:Vv.\'. 





Z: ™B- 




.■Zi 



53 







■.''-'^Si*-' *> 



JN MEM07HAM 



ASMUS ROHL 



HAZE.L HlNClt 



LURE. TE.RTLY 



'W.M.5 .'•'.. 




itmtnr GHaaa 

Colors : Green and White. 

©fftrrrs 

Cornelia E. Schuyler President 

Chauncy A. Border Vice-President 

Jean H. Ormes Secretary 

Harry S. Kramer Treasurer 



56 



ExtrarlH from Nonantsr Nowls 



ADAMS, CLARENCE MORRISON 
"ADDY" 

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, COLORADO 

If Adams happened to be the subject for 
conversation and there was any uncertainty 
as to which Adams out of ;i thousand Adams 
he might be, the introducer of the subject 

would always say : "You know — good-natured, 
'peppy,' loud necktie — the one that was quar- 
antined and fumigated." And the little bru- 
nette sighs softly as she thinks, "A good 
brother maketh a good husband." 

ARGO, WILLIAM CHENAULT 
"BILLY" 

SCHOOL FOR DEAF AND BLIND, 
COLORADO SPRINGS 

A slender boy tripped into the library and 
was soon bent lovingly over the classiest girl. 

"Gee! you look good today. I like your 
hair that way. What are you reading? 
There's a good story in the August 1900 At- 
lantic. Did you see it? Know anything ex- 
citing? Oh, there's — I must see her," and he 
darted off. The girl heaved a sigh: "Bill 
Argo certainly makes you feel woozy by the 
time he leaves." 



ARMSTRONG, 
GARET— 



DOROTHY MAR- 
-"WORKUS" 



R. F. D. NO. 3, FT. COLLINS, COLO. 

"Work, for the night is coming." The 
sweet refrain arose like a benediction in the 
quiet hall of McGregor as the energetic junior 
plunged her hands into the suds and drew 
out another handkerchief. Every detail of 
the well-kept room bore testimony to the do- 
mestic tastes of the smiling little woman. 
A dash of talcum powder on the floor re- 
minded her of an episode of her freshman 
year — a fight with talcum powder and pil- 
lows and boys, which had somehow escaped 
the watchful eyes of the house mistress. A 
ripple of laughter replaced the song. Amus- 
ing and easily amused was she. 



BAKER, SAMUEL WILLIAM 
"CYE," "SAM" 

912 W. SECOND ST.. ERIE, PA. 

Soon a very charming young man came 
with a curious dancing step into the room. 
Sam Baker always gave the effect of extreme 
youth and the utmost joy and mirth in life 
itself. He regarded everybody with a smile 
as of humorous appreciation and yet the ap- 
preciation was so good uatured that it offend- 
ed nobody. "Look at me. I am absurd and 
happy. Look at yourself also absurd and 
happy ; look at life — a delicious jest, attractive 
girls who complain when a man gets senti- 
mental or dances too fast, profs to urge 
against quitting school — a luxurious, happy- 
go-lucky existence." 




57 




*BANTA, MARGUERITE 
"BUNTY," "MAGGIE" 



913 N. 






WAHSATCH AVE., COLORADO 
SPRINGS 



She was a blooming lass of twenty, plump 
as a partridge, ripe and melting as a peach. 
She was a spendidly feminine girl, as whole- 
some as a November pippin, and no more 
mysterious than a window pane. Her soft 
brown eyes and rosy cheeks suggested dewy 
country lanes, where daisies nodded and sleek 
cattle grazed. Utterly unaffected she was, 
ami possessed a charming disregard of un- 
pleasant trivialities, a sincere friendliness 
that won the hearts of all. 



BARTLETT, AGNES GRISWOLD. 

2220 N. NEVADA AVE., COLORADO 
SPRINGS 

On a mountainside where the spicy air 
through the pines was like wine and the 
gray ocean of plains could be seen fading 
into the horizon, the two women built their 
cabin. Agnes, the elder, was a type peculiar 
to the west, a woman who could with equal 
skill drive a six-inch spike or paint a V. W. 
C. A. poster. In her was the sturdy and en- 
thusiastic spirit of the pioneer. 



BATES, RUTH EMMA 
"EMMIE" 

22 N. 13TH ST., COLORADO SPRINGS 

The children loved her. The calm, serene 
conteut in her face promised them assurance 
and sympathy. And she in turn loved them, 
giving bountifully to their welfare and hap- 
piness. Her older friends, too, felt the com- 
fort of her soothing presence, the balm of 
her voice ever gentle and soft. 



BERWICK, MARION BEATRICE 

"MIM" 

429 S. NEVADA AVE., COLORADO SPRINGS 

Over the balustrade they watched the 
crowd gathering. A stern and dignified fig- 
ure passed. "I'm afraid of her," the man 
said, -"the shark 'gets my goat.'" His com- 
panion laughed. "Afraid of Marion? You 
shouldn't be. She's the prophet of altruism 
and has several redeeming faults — eats di- 
vinity fudge in chapel and is one of the worst 
of moving picture 'fans.' " 



58 



BORDER, CHAUNCY ABRAHAM 
"ABE" 

STRASBURG, OHIO 

Presently Abe spoke. He was a gaunt 
Ohioan, suggestive in a small way of his 
famous predecessor and leader. Ou his brow 
deliberation sat and public care. Instinctively 
swayed by the personality of this leader of 
men — Hagermau and the Y. M. C. A. — the 
group about him leaned forward. Some 
worthy cause would receive his aid. "I am," 
his voice dropped to a whisper and the silence 
was intense. "I am going to — " you could 
have heard a pin drop — "to speak at Aps on 
•Variole, Its Pleasures.' Strange, indeed, was 
this man — a mixture of religion, oratory, hot 
air, horseplay, push and ability. 



BOURQUIN, HELEN 

92C N. WAHSATCH AVE., COLORADO 
SPRINGS 

Cruel publicity turned her glass upon Hel- 
en. "Neat, but" not gaudy," she wrote in 
her notebook of classifications and in two 
columns arranged opposing traits. "Modest 
and quiet" was offset by the inscription, "An 
actress of ability and an excellent dancer." 
Closing the long catalogue of traits were 
"loyalty and self-control." 



BOWER, MARIE 

GUTHRIE CENTER, IOWA 

"Into the lives of many of us has crept 
the joyousness of love. I was bright-eyed, 
vivacious and twenty when he came to me. 
Never was the world so bright and radiant. 
Probably if I had one admirer instead of 
many, I should have married him sooner or 
later, but the problem of several lovers pre- 
vented my drifting in this fashion. Now, 
my heart is made fast by a jeweled shield, 
and I feel that T have not made a mistake 
in waiting." 



BRENNICKE, PEARL MAY 

Just as the silence was getting unendur- 
able, a series of soft thumps resounded on 
the ceiling. The man's eyes questioned. Here 
was a subject of conversation at last, rnd the 
man did not hesitate to make the most of it. 
"Pearl's rolling. I guess." "Rolling? Rotting 
what?" "Herself, stupid — gymnastic exer- 
cises to make one skinny. She goes to bed 
with the light on sometimes, too ; I don't mean 
to reduce." The man shook convulsively, "A 
lady of many eccentricities, I presume." A 
negative shake silenced him. "If you call 
being a good sport, pulling down Phi Beta 
Kappa keys and being appreciative, eccen- 
tricities, I'll have to admit she has them." 






59 




BREWER, EDYTHE LILLIAN 
"FAT" 

MANZANOLA, COLO. 

He drew out his watch and opened the 
ease. It was a pretty face — more than that, 
it was a refined prettiness. The eyes were 
merry, the brow intelligent, the nose and chin 
were good, both turned up a trifle, showing 
a certain dashing independency. Topped by 
a profusion of fluffy hair, the picture was 
very pleasing. At least, he thought so — he 
thought of her merry, wise, witty, sarcastic 
at times, but always sweet and womanly with 
her friends. He wished everyone knew her 
as he did. but then — wasn't he one of the 
lucky ones? 



BI« h )KS, KVA 

STEAMBOAT, SPRINGS, COLO. 

"First," began the man with- businesslike 
coldness, "what is your name— your given 
name, I mean?" "Eva." answered the young 
woman. He raised his eyebrows question- 
ingly and commented to himself: "What a 
name for a woman like her!" lint he added 
aloud: "Your age — er — I mean your ad- 
dress?" 

"Steamboat Springs, sir. I have taught 
school for several years. I have references 
fimii my employers. I have completed my 

course at Colorado College and " "Stop!" 

he interrupted. "You say you are Eva Brooks 
from Colorado College? You are THE Eva 
Brooks of Colorado College? Call tomorrow 
morning, my dear Hiss Brooks, and you can 
have the position. I am so glad of the oppor- 
tunity." He bowed her to the door. "Good 
morning." she said, and hurried out; but she 
stopped to giggle just outside the door. 



OLIVE BROWN 



This is not a story. This is a tract, and 
I am proud of it. Making a tract is a feat. 
Everybody has a right to live his own life, 
but nobody has a right to set his standards 
so high that Freshmen cannot hope to attain 
them, and even Sophomores can only aspire. 
This is what Olive Brown does. Studious, 
hospitable and efficient, she goes her way. 
Therefore. I appeal to the world in general to 
stop her. 



BRUNNER 

112 S. SEVENTH(?) COLORADO SPRINGS 

Among the motley array of Juniors was a 
quiet man, Brunner by name, who had risen 
from '14 to '15. He oftentimes rose at four 
a. in., dined on mathematics and drank elec- 
tricity. And yet he was human, for he had 
loyal class spirit, preferring a member of his 
own class to anyone else in the universe. But 
in spite of this partiality, the college admired 
him for his dignity and ability. 



60 



CARLEY, OSA MAURINE 
"OCY" 

2401 EDDY CT.. CHEYENNE. WTO. 

"Do you ever look at your face in the 
glass? I do. 

"Sometimes I stand for hours aud peer at 
my face and wonder at it. Is this the face 
that attracted a thousand glances and lured 
the frat pin from its wearer's breast? 

"I try to think what it means. It seems 
to look back at me with big blue eyes, as if it 
knew me and wanted to speak. 

"Why was I born? To be admired, to do 
tatting, to be compelled to leave history 
classes for fussing or to get A's in snap 
courses? 

"I do not know. California is far distant. 

"At times I make a batch of fudge and 
wear my old clothes. Then, again, I dress 
like my chum or put on my big hat with 
the burnt orange feather and powder my nose. 
Even then I do not know why I was bora." 

CATREN, LILLIAN 

GEORGETOWN 

She who helps the Fresh with math, the 
Soph with her Latin, and the Junior with 
her Ec, and brings a true comprehension to 
the ignorant, is indeed a rara avis. To Lillian 
the title is awarded. The only thing that 
offsets her broadness of view, strength of 
purpose and telling wit is an inclination to 
argue the point — and the worst of it is, she 
wins her case. Nor does she care to discuss 
classical music or famous pictures in a high- 
brow manner, but she prefers to enjoy life 
in her own way. 

CHEESE, CHARLES B., 



"CHUCK," "CHARLEY" 



1002 COLORADO AVE.. 
SPRINGS 



COLORADO 



A hoarse roar burst from a thousand 
throats. As one. spectators rose in their seats. 
Dazed with success, our hero fell panting into 
friendly arms, but not before he had caught 
a glimpse of a smiling face, laughing Irish 
eyes and lips that seemed to say. "I'm proud 
of you, Charley." Forgotten was the pride of 
deeds done in times past, forgotten all former 
glories of track — all driven away by the sight 
of a "Maddening" face. 



CONRAD, SALOME- 
"SALOMY" 



117 



E. ESPANOLA ST., COLORADO 
SPRINGS 



Handicapped by a name, Salome — kindly ac- 
cent the second syllable and don't think of Ger- 
trude Hoffman — was as pleasant and modest a 
young woman as could be found. She liked 
to hike, go to picnics and dance — two-steps 
aud waltzes only. She was always ready for 
a good time and was troubled by no pangs 
of remorse when lessons were left unstudied 
for some pleasanter occupation. 




61 




CRAMPTON, JOHN HUEGH 
"MR." 

1014 N. TEJON ST., COLORADO SPRINGS 

"Is that nice Mr. Crampton going to be 
there?" said the golden-haired little co-ed as 
she grabbed another pillow and settled down. 
"You know I'm wild about him! He makes 
me feel as if he could do anything. He's 
quiet, I kuow; but that's it — and when he 
looks at you that — that way, why you'd just 
give anything if he'd like you. He's a good 
worker, too — always 'there.' " O, you're too 
practical intinupted hit buttiiflj fihnd. 
"He may be nice, but he dances like a fish!" 



CRUTCHER, HESTER 

SALIDA. COLO. 

"Divinely tall and — that's as far as you can 
go with the quotation — not that Hester's not 
good to look upou, but eveu her best friends 
could hardly call her divinely fair." 

"Especially since she's quite dark," suggest- 
ed the other woman, putting up her monocle. 
"An interesting face, upou my word." 

"Yes, I should call her typically western — 
breezy, vigorous, wholesome and an awfully 
good sport. She's remarkably fond of the 
most amazing yarns and really tells them 
quite well, but there's a twinkle in her eyes 
that gives her away." 



DAVIS, HAROLD- 



-CAESAR 



MONTROSE, COLO. 

They came to Hagerman Hall about two 
o'clock and hastened to room 23. In the room, 
lighted by a single caudle, they found a little 
weazen fellow tracing the lines of Euclid with 
his nose. In one hand he held a slide rule, 
and in the other two pencils connected by a 
series of cords. One of the men touched him 
<>ii the shoulder and the mathematician mur- 
mured a formula: they shook him and gave 
an equation: they whispered "rough house," 
and he sprang from his chair yelling: "Every- 
body out! Rough house!" 



DAVIS, HAZEL RHODA- 
"HAKE" 



321 N. WEBER ST., COLORADO SPRINGS 

At this moment Hazel appeared. She was 
fair to look upon. Her hair, like spun gold, 
was piled high on her head. Her cheeks were 
suffused with a blush deeper in hue than the 
coral of her eardrops. Her clothes, worn with 
the grace of a fashion plate, and the black and 
white ribbon of the monocle half hidden by 
cascades of white linen, were only features 
that marked her as one of the "Elite." Impe- 
riously she gazed around her, sizing up with 
a glance, that made the man before her feel 
that his hair needed cutting, his shoes were 
only half p.olished. and not being a Sig. was 
unworthy of mention. 

"Seen Pink':" She slammed the door of 
the machine peevishly. "Tell him I'm look- 
ing for him. Gee! it's muddy here. I wish 
I was in California." 



(12 



DAW, ARTHUR "ART" 

I was not surprised to see a pale blonde 
fellow wearing a negligee shirt and poetic tie 
enter chapel and take his assigned seat. He 
sat quietly through the entire service. His 
seeming reverence inspired admiration and 
would have continued to do so had I not dis- 
covered that he was as loquacious there as 
elsewhere. 



DENNIS, GEORGE WESLEY 
"WES" 

553 HARRISON ST., LOVELAND, COLO. 

"I feel as if I'd covered ground and ac- 
complished something. Mr. Dennis gives one 
more satisfaction in five minutes' discussion 
than anyone else I ever saw. Of course, he's 
too independent to agree with me, but I enjoy 
his point of view. He's got an old-fashioned 
idea that woman's suffrage is not so very nice 
and he certainly does show me up in discuss- 
ing questions like divorce, the single tax and 
feministic movements. Simply aggravating!" 
The speaker, a class president herself, paused 
for breath and finished excitedly, "Just the 
same, he's mighty entertaining and sympa- 
thetic even if he has an unbounded imagina- 
tion and curiosity concerning all sorts of peo- 
ple and places all over the earth." 



EMERY, CHARLES FRANCIS 
"FAT," "CHUCK" 

1420 N. NEVADA AVE., COLORADO SPRINGS 

The eldest son of the house of Emery was 
a perfect type of the athletic, literary and so- 
ciety man. The years he had spent in fra- 
ternity life, literary societies, and in "tea 
fighting," had given him a peculiar suavity 
and blandness in fussing, while his long clerk- 
ship at Cascade had rendered him impervious 
to the criticisms that fall to the lot of the 
"tango" and "Boston" artist. As editor of 
the Nugget and leading man in the French 
play, he had seen something of the sterner 
side of life, while in the title role of Gammer 
Gurton he had undergone some of the trials 
and tribulations that restrict the activities 
of the fairer sex. 



ERICKSON, STATIE ESTELLE 
"STATE" 

BOX 203, OURAY, COLO. 

The woman had a Grecian face — one of 
those faces artists paint so often and which 
are seen so seldom in the world of reality. 
With her eyes expressive of kindness and in- 
tellectual power, her classic profile, to her 
admirers she was a modern Diana; and, like 
her prototype of mythology, she. too, cared 
naught for man, but with manner quiet and 
reserved, pursued her own course of dignity 
and generosity. 




63 




FERRIL, HARRIET PECKHAM 

"LITTLE PECKHAM," 

"HAT" 

2123 DOWNING ST.. DENVER, COLO. 

We were sitting in the over-gaudy ball- 
room, be and I, watching the dancers at the 
tht'-dansant. A woman, absurd in an ultra- 
futurist gown, was "grapevining" madly 
across tbe floor. He turned away : "How for- 
tunate for us men that there are still a few 
women of the old school left for us. Do you 
know Miss FerrilV She's not here, of course." 

"Miss Perril, the rather delicate looking 
girl, the one with the madonna-like face and 
the aureole of golden hair?" I asked. "Yes," 
he replied, "she's my ideal. Conscientious, 
practical, the manners of a Lady Chester- 
field." He glanced at the dancers. "I'm sure 
she would not be guilty of the frivolities we 
see before us." I did not reply. I had a se- 
cret. 

FORSEE, ELEANOR ELIZABETH 

KL'TCH, COLO. 

Eleanor unlocked the door and went in. The 
library, with its rows and rows of books, 
reminded her of a dozen things she had 
planned to do during the time she was in 
charge of the desk; a German lesson to be 
read over, a synopsis of a play to be written, 
biology to be studied. Overwhelmed by the 
magnitude of her tasks, she sighed and 
checked off in an absent-minded way the 
books which had been returned, while through 
her head ran a German poem and a confusion 
of biological terms. 



GARDNER, HELEN 

507 OSTEOPATHY, KIRKSYILLE, MO. 

Half this story is about Helen Gardner. 
The other half concerns the Thomas boy from 
Colorado Springs. She was an attractive, vi- 
vacious young woman of about sixteen and 
four possessed :>f a sunny disposition that 
found an outlet in the twinkling of her eyes 
and a merry, nervous smile. Of confiding 
nature and possessed of a knowledge of many 
things worth confiding, she was sometimes 
indiscriminate in choosing confidants. A frat 
pin she wore, and the old proverb is reliable, 
"Straws show which way the wind blows." 



GILMORE, WILLIAM MAY- 
NARD "GILLY" 

COR. 6TH AND MAIN STS., PUEBLO, COLO. 

At the corner of Pikes Peak and Tejon 
they met Bill Gilmore. Although Bill was 
registered in college and attended" classes and 
chapel, he was unknown to the student body. 
In his freshman year he was active in the life 
of the institution, but with the flight of time 
his interests changed. They lay in unknown 
regions, yet they seemed to be real interests. 
for he was always wrapped in deep thought 
and did not have time for the common frivoli- 
ties of college folk. 



64 



GREENLEE, LAWRENCE AL- 
BERT "LARRY" 

BELLAIRE, OHIO 

"Larry Greenlee intersts me — that twinkle 
in his eye makes me want to know him bet- 
ter." The speaker began to take notes rap- 
idly, lending an attentive ear to her neigh- 
bor. "He impresses me the same way," said 
the second girl. "I don't know him well, but 
I've heard that he studies hard during exam 
weeks and keeps himself awake by drinking 
strong coffee, and that's not the best part 
of it. One night he grew so sleepy that he 
upset his cup aud tried to mop up the coffee 
he had spilt with — guess what — a rake!" Then 
the two giggled until the prof rapped on the 
desk for silence. 



GRIMSLEY, 



RICHARD ELMO 
-"GRIM" 



LEXINGTON, ILL. 

Richard E. Grimsley of the Phi Gamma 
Delta fraternity was thought by outsiders to 
be of the type to which most frat men belong. 
He was a well-arranged young gentleman, 
who wore good clothes, drove automobiles au- 
daciously and believed the student govern- 
ment members of his alma mater to be a 
bunch of "unpops" who considered Sunday 
school papers thrilling literature. As he had 
worked one summer in the museum among 
butterflies, owls and other zoological speci- 
mens, people said he was a typical product 
of that institution. So if the frat man, like 
the sea serpent at the summer resort, con- 
tinues to agitate the faculty and social com- 
mittee, one is thankful that whatever his dis- 
guise may be, he is always a distinctly pre- 
sentable young person. 



GUY, LIN- 



-E. LINN 



MONTROSE, COLO. 

Groaningly and unwillingly the people in 
the chapel row stumbled over their books as 
they got up to let past an intelligent looking 
gentleman who seemed to have consentrated 
al! his dynamic energy into this plunge for 
safety; it was not the first time, either, as 
the faces of the participants showed. He 
looked scholarly enough to have known bet- 
ter than to have asserted himself in this way 
when the peace of the community was at stake. 
But his nerve was as characteristic as his 
spontaneous and deep(?) puns. Perhaps his 
mysterious past was responsible for the im- 
penetrable present. 



HADLEY, JULIA 

COLORADO CITY, COLO. 

The girl pressed her lips firmly together 
and pushed on across the mesa from Colorado 
City to the college. She was plump and dark 
and had wrinkles of laughter at the corner of 
her eyes. Once in a while she rested for a 
moment and shifted the books to the other 
arm. It was like a pilgrimage, and the Mecca 
at the other end of the desert-like path was 
a college edueatiou. 




65 




HALL, JAMES SMITH "JIM" 

ROCKY FORD, COLO. 

The young fellow was James Hall, perhaps 
twenty-one years of age, with blue eyes and 
a grave mouth. His face was of that type 
in which is indescribably mingled primness 
and force of character. I should have guessed 
the oratorical ability from the keen eyes, firm 
jaw and clear voice, even if I had not heard 
him speak in old Cutler. A gentleness and 
apparent timidity in his manner concealed 
the forcefulness of his persuasive power, which 
was of sufficient strength to sway even "the 
power that is, who rules from a Dais." A 
lover of the finer arts, music and literature, he 
was aesthetic in tastes. 



HALL, RALPH LYMAN- 
"SHORT" 



1326 GARFIELD ST., DENVER, COLO. 

In appearance his not inconsiderable stature 
was accentuated by his suprisiug length of 
lower limb. A kindly face, a humorous twinkle 
of the eye, a pipe hanging from a softly 
drawling mouth completes the picture. Im- 
agine him, then, as he was wont to set out 
ia the morning with his books thrust care- 
lessly under one arm, dressed in blue serge 
or corduroy, according to the condition of the 
weather, walking rather aimlessly and unaf- 
fected by the rush and whirr of life about 
him, and you have the Mr. Short Hall known 
to the student. 



HEMENWAY, FLORENCE 
LOUISE 

315 N. 4TH ST., COLORADO CITY, COLO. 

Queen of the gigglers is Florence of the 
class of 1915, and if there is still left in the 
world regard for honest merit, she should 
have a laurel wreath for her optimistic view 
of life and an extra reward for the inspiration 
she gives to others. Florence is a junior; 
yes, but what a junior! There have been oth- 
er juniors to whom life was one broad, sweet 
smile — a ripple of delicious laughter — but this 
sweet singer of the glee club surpasses them. 

HENSLEY, MARY OLIVE 



"GUSSY," "PINKY THE 
SHRIMP" 

125-4 JOSEPHINE ST., DENVER, COLO. 

The little lady— "little, but O. my!"— I 
give you everybody's first name for her — had 
an introspective, intuitive personality. Now, 
if you drop her story at this point, fearing 
a page from the Society for Psychical Re- 
search, you will have made a mistake. For 
"little, but O my!" was none other than 
"Gussie ;" moreover, she was no higher than 
the heart of a short man, and her pink cheeks 
and soft eyes effectually disowned research 
of any sort, marking her, so to speak, with 
the brand of dreams — the idealism of a high- 
brow. To gaze upon her you could guess the 
artistic ability and would not be surprised 
to know that she cherished an ambition to 
become an architect. 



HOPKINS, GUY HUSKIN- 
"HOPPY" 

Hopkins was a little fellow with black curly 
hair, a grin that provoked more grins, and a 
bushel of pep. As his motto was, "There's 
nothing like experience," he tried his hand at 
every college activity, from athletics, through 
class and hall stunts, to fussing. No matter 
what his luck was. he faced everyone with 
a crooked grin that seemed to say, 'Well, I 
sure got my money's worth. You should have 
gone along." 



HOWLAND, WENDELL BAR- 
KER "SHORT" 

1248 S. BROADWAY, DENVER 

"If at first you don't succeed, you flunk." 
was Short's experience in a nutshell. How- 
ever as his motto was. "God hates a quitter 
and so do I," he stuck to his purpose with 
the tenacity of a rouletteer. The game of 
attending college was a "bear," but there was 
the possibility that luck might turn and that 
he might win the stakes. 



HUTCHISON, HOMER ROSE 
"HUTCH" 

732 N. WAHSATCH AVE., COLORADO 
SPRINGS 

From her Psychology notebook. Type XV. 
Individual No. 15. Temperament — melancholic. 
Age — 22 (approximate). Race — Indeterminate 
(probably American). 

Illustrative anecdotal notes: — (1) One of 
few C. C. male humans which I have not ex- 
amined at close range, but that which I have 
ascertained has filled me with a desire to 
know more, (a) Physical appearance — Ex- 
ceedingly well developed specimen of com- 
manding presence. Arguing from the outward 
aspect, one would infer on first inspection, a 
powerful and commanding intellect. I made 
further notes regarding certain phenomena 
discovered, and they are tabulated and ap- 
pended as follows: Hair, dark, not abundant: 
skin, of brownish cast (perhaps due to action 
of the sunny eyes; fine, evasive; nose — (now. 
why did she stop there?) 



JEANNE, PAUL ANDREW 

52.j E. KIOWA ST.. COLORADO SPRINGS 

In a dingy observatory they found a meek- 
faced man sweeping up for a Contemporary 
meeting. 

"And he?" said the visitor, pointing to the 
submissive one. "He is one of the few consistent 
fussers of the college. Calls on the same girl 
on every Sunday evening, he manages class 
plays and other activities," said the guide. 

"Does he. indeed?" said the visitor. "He 
scarcely looks so." 





JOHNSON, BLANCHE 

"JULIET" 

MARNE, IOWA 

Blanche looked about her casually for a 
minute and then broke into a quiet smile. She 
listened to the lecture; it had in it some 
technical biological phrases that no one else 
seemed to understand. The professor saw 
Blanche and thought with a flush of pride 
that she at least understood how to perform 
the laboratory experiments. After the class 
he pressed forward to speak to her, but she 
had slipped away. 



KAMPF, FREDERICK WILLIAM 
"FRITZ" 

1516 N. TEJON ST., COLORADO SPRINGS 

A fastidiously groomed, unusually hand- 
some young man, across whose nose a pair 
of eyeglasses straddled gingerly, was not per- 
haps monopolizing more than his share of the 
women : for Frederick Kampf was the kind 
of person to whom a large portion of atten- 
tion was universally conceded — the shining 
light, especially in the summer time — around 
which circled a bevy of feminine moths; but 
lie was without doubt worthy of such ad- 
miration — for. athletic, possessed of a rich 
voice, he had never fallen a victim of "fem- 
initis or cranial enlargement," but, immune, 
remained a dependable friend. Selah ! 



KELSEY. 



RUTH MARIE- 
"RUTH- 



sterling, COLO. 

Miss Kelsey was intensely alive and alto- 
gether compelling — a woman with an indi- 
viduality that impressed one as vividly as the 
bright-colored sashes she wore. The soil of 
Sterling is fertile, but hardly of a quality 
to produce that particular flower, the polished, 
worldly wise beauty. A select finishing school 
in the east, dramatic training, and a thorough 
knowledge of human nature, usually go to 
the making of such products, which belong 
essentially to the boulevardes rather than 
prairie towns. 



KNUTZEN, MARGUERITE VIO- 
LET "DIMPLES," "RITA" 

ALAMOSA, COLO. 

Marguerite, cut from the same cloth as the 
Vikings, was an example of the type of woman 
whose temperament is utterly opposed to her 
racial extraction. Hers was the soul of a 
Latin, a dusky-haired daughter of the south, 
an idealist, a dreamer, a lover of art and mu- 
sic — not the soul of a tawny-haired watcher 
of stormy seas; and her melting lips and 
fleeting dimples lacked the firmness of the 
Teuton. 



KRAMER, HARRY STILLMAN 
"POLL" 

LAS ANIMAS, COLO. 

Harry Stillman Kramer was an ardent 
athlete and enthusiast. His name was common 
coin in athletic circles, where he was eulo- 
gized for his attainments, his football and 
baseball captaincies. His associates called 
him "Poll," and in the college community, 
where he passed his winters fussing and col- 
lecting "Cs," it was a nickname suggesting 
to every hearer the big, blonde and likeable 
young man who had his picture taken five 
times before one could be gotten to suit, who 
sometimes fussed in the jungle, and was al- 
most as daring in that art as in a football 
game. 



LATSON, HARLEY 

ROCKY FORD, COLO. 

The candidates for the Tiger squad trotted 
out on the field. Among them were the "C" 
men of former years, gridiron stars fresh from 
high school, and Harley Latson. Harley was 
the biggest candidate — so big, in fact, that the 
trainer had difficulty in draping the football 
togs about the lank figure. Harley had many 
difficulties on the field. The signals were a 
Chinese puzzle to him, and he could not get 
his man. But he proved his loyalty by doing 
his best, even in scrubdom. 



LINDA M'COY 

521 S. TEJOX ST.. COLORADO SPRINGS 

If she had a hobby it was for animals. She 
was forever picking up a stray cat or a home- 
less dog and bringing it home. In vain, her 
family "protested. It was this kindness of 
heart that made her liked by her classmates. 
The faculty also liked her as being one stu- 
dent with a serious purpose. 



M'NEIL, FRED BRAINARD- 
"MAC" 



SHAWNEE, OKLA. 

This introduces to your attention Fred- 
erick Brainard McNeil — the immaculate, the 
aristocratic, the business-like, luxury loving 
society man. Many have developed since their 
freshmen days, but few have changed more 
than the dauntless Fred, who now faces with 
enjoyment long receiving lines, sharp-eyed 
business men or good-looking girls. He may 
appear nervous and stammer a little ; he may 
say "they is," but these things are only man- 
nerisms. 




69 




EDNA M'REYNOLDS 

RUTLEDGE, MO. 

When to an attractive cast of countenance 
and nature full of fun, you add a desperate 
determination to study, you are bound to get 
some extraordinary results. Perhaps an un- 
yielding disposition is natural to this sort of 
a combination, or perhaps it is acquired. 
Anvwav. it is there — there with a large capi- 
tal' T. ' 



MASON, ALICE DARLING 

1105 SIXTH ST.. GREELEY, COLO. 

Alice was a puzzle. She had a regular baby 
face — big blue eyes, round, pink cheeks, and 
she walked like a child. Her whole manner 
indicated extreme youth, but if you suggest- 
ed this to her friends, they'd gasp: "Why, 
Alice is the best friend we have. We take all 
our troubles to her; she can discuss anything 
from the latest dance to the eclipse df the 
moon." 



MERWIN, MARGARET- 
"MARG" 

BLOOMINGTON, ILL. 



Wherever Margaret was you might be sure 
that she was playing the role of charmer — 
not a charmer of the college-widow type, 
nor even a willing one, for she greatly disliked 
to be seen with more than three men at once, 
or to have more than two engagements for 
the same date. But a charmer she was, in- 
capable of being disturbed by the proctors' 
repeated admonishments during quiet hours. 
Perhaps her guitar and sougs aided her in 
her art: at any rate, it must be conceded that 
she was witty, brilliant, nerveless and inde- 
pendent, never knocking her friends. Oue 
soon became accustomed to her individual- 
istic way of dragging her heels, and letting 
her hair get hopelessly tangled. 



MILLER, CLINTON VAN 
GIESEN "CLINT" 

415 E. UINTAH ST., COLORADO SPRINGS 

"That's a good-looking suit," said Jack as 
he walked Tip to a figure in front of a clothing 
store and started to feel of the cloth. "Say!" 
said the figure, and started away so quickly 
that he bumped into a lady shopper and 
scattered her bundles over the walk. He was 
so disconcerted that he turned and ran. We 
both laughed as we helped gather the scat- 
tered parcels and wondered why he had run 
away so fast. Just then two pretty girls, 
shaking with mirth, passed us, and we knew! 

N. R. This is only fiction. In reality, 
Clint would have run the other way. 



70 



MUNRO, EDWARD EVERETT 
HALE "EV." 

COLUMBUS. NEB. 

In the next cell we found an inmate who 
had not shaved for some time. Upon inquiry, 
we found that he was not out of his head, but 
was obtaining one cigar each day that he al- 
lowed more hair to accumulate. His character 
was about one-half as bad as that of the pro- 
verbial minister's son. and his high forehead 
bespoke an intelligent being. 



ORMES, JEAN HARRIET 

1623 N. TEJON ST., COLORADO SPRINGS 

"Come, let us stop nonsense and speak of 
Jean. How do you find her?" 

"Very charming." 

"Isn't she pleasant! Manner, intellect, abil- 
ity, an appreciation of the aesthetic, she has 
all the qualities a woman needs. So, of course, 
you must love her." 

"Yes ; not only that, but she's capable, she's 
capable! I'm sure she could cook a dinner or 
take care of a house, and she has a sense of 
humor, too — a rare combination in a woman." 

Without listening to me. he caught my arm 
and drew me into the library. She was taking 
a book from the shelves. 

"Announce us," said my uncle. 



ROBINSON, GEORGE DE WITT 
"DOC" 

121 E. DALE ST., COLORADO SPRINGS 

The son of a pillar of the church, young 
Robinson had shown himself, as yet. a rather 
undependable prop to the religious edifice. 
Not that he lacked the qualities of a success- 
ful elder, for the young man was unusually 
polite, attentive and likeable, but business was 
too pressing. Managerships must be attended 
to. Nuggets must lie mined with profit, anil 
the fires of Hades must rage at a cost less 
than gate receipts. "What does the future hold 
in store for a man who. attired in the gar- 
ments of a demon, has danced among flaming 
pyres, and has flapped his wings in the breeze 
as an insignia angel? 

SASANO, KAKUTARO 

OKAYUMA. JAPAN 

Honorable Fritz Gerlach, immersing from 
Hagerman sleeping house, asked me to pre- 
pare slight entertainment for Pan-Pan. I tell 
him there is no time, since I find it necessary 
to take photo snapshots for Nugget and must 
try to study biology. "It must be," he depose. 
"It is need for you. Pan-Pan must be not like 
any before." At end of few minutes I dis- 
sent and tell him I try. although I have more 
much than can do at present. In enlarged 
punts I give four sword plays like men dance 
in Japan. Audience clap much. Say panto- 
mime very fine. One girl make me disgust. 
She say I almost nearly equal Russian 
dancers. Yours truly, 

HASHIMURA TOGO. 




71 




SAWHILL, RAY 

CANON CITY, COLO. 

"Aesthetic, you tell nie : well, it's a long 
chapel row that has not its lusty singer. Be- 
sides being able to enjoy life, the pleasure 
is increased by enjoying it on the higher 
plane. Sawhill takes all the cultural courses 
in college, seeming really to enjoy 'em. He has 
a sense of literary appreciation and — here he 
comes now." The man under consideration 
nodded pleasantly as he jumped off his bicy- 
cle, adjusted his celluloid collar and disap- 
peared into the library. 



SCHROEDER, PEARL 

Pearl was either in the midst of merry- 
makers or sitting in a corner in a st,raight- 
backed chair tatting lace by the yard. There 
was something motherly in her disposition 
that seemed to go with the tatting. Gener- 
ous and good-natured she was, except occa- 
sionally when the opinions of those about her 
clashed with hers. Then came what she called 
excitement — but look out! There were some 
who questioned the definition. 



SCHUYLER, CORNELIA ELIZA- 
BETH "KINX" 

1244 DETROIT ST., DENVER, COLO. 

"Step right up, ladies and gentlemen ; don't 
crowd ; take your time. You can all see her," 
said the barker, readjusting his megaphone. 
"You see before you a woman like whom 
there is no other. Observe the suppressed 
'pep' rippling over her face. Watch ambition 
glow in her eyes. See the ideas illuminate her 
brain. Look, look, look at this crank on 
manners, morals and fresh air, who uses such 
words as 'ratioeinative' and 'ubiquitous,' as 
easily as a college girl consumes soda." And, 
breathless, he pauses, while searching his vo- 
cabulary for adequate descriptive phrases. 



SNYDER, MARJORIE MAY 
J 

The sun was slowly setting over the moun- 
tains in a mist of purple and gold as down the 
winding path tripped a slender girl. Brown 
were her eyes as the leaves that blow around 
Ben Nevis in autumn. Graceful her step as 
the fawn bounding by its mother's side in the 
forests of Loch Lomond. Truly artistic was 
this maid at the same time excelling in the 
Highland Fling and the Tango. 



72 



STRAWN, BERNARDINE 

"DERN" 

ALBION, ILL. 

"But Bernadine — where is she?" 
"Oh, she'll be here in a minute — she's al- 
ways late. I guess she had to stop and have 
one more cup of tea. Yes, she's that romantic 
little thing with the dramatic air. She's 
'strong' for theatricals and she can do every- 
thing from starring in 'Trelawney' to darn- 
ing stockings — those are the two things she 
most loves except, perhaps, writing themes. 
She's a wonder. I can't decide whether she 
ought to marry or not — she's capable of other 
things — and yet, so in need of someone to 
take care of her ! Why, she never goes to 
meals unless she's forced to !" 



STUNTZ, EDNA MATILDA 

105 N. THIRD ST.. COLORADO CITY. 

Edna Stuntz stopped and stared over the 
assembling congregation. She was a plump 
little woman and wore a remarkable hat that 
accentuated her shortness. A teacher in the 
Sunday school, a singer in the choir of her 
own church, she paid careful attention to the 
prayer that the imposing looking man in the 
academic gown was delivering and nodded 
her approval of his words, while, with half- 
open eyes, she looked with disgust on the 
two girls whispering and the boy with head 
bent over a text book propped up on his 
knees. 

SUMNER, MARY BEATRICE 

"B. C." 

115 E. DEL NORTE, COLORADO SPRINGS 

Let us speak of B. C. Mary Beatrice Sum- 
ner had known neither the difficulty of ac- 
quiring the broad "a "or lengthening the "e" 
in been. She had inherited both from a long 
line of Anglo-Saxon ancestors. Blessed at an 
early age with exceeding proficiency in con- 
versational lines, she grew into a strikingly 
witty and entertaining fusser. True, at times 
she was a bit too candid and talked too much. 
Her friends seemed to be amused at the point- 
ed remarks which they pretended were the 
vaporiziugs of a woman laboring under a tem- 
perament, but in their hearts they trembled 
for the words had struck home. Of unusual 
personality, indeed, was the great grand- 
daughter of the archbishop of Canterbury. 



TAYLOR, MILFORD EDSON 

429 LINCOLN AYE., COLORADO SPRINGS 

Milford was the eldest of two brothers, a 
light-haired man who seemed to hold himself 
aloof from his associates, although this im- 
pression was the result only of a quiet, re- 
served manner. Perhaps it was because his 
conscience troubled him for neglecting col- 
lege girls and fussing town girls, but he kept 
up an air of modest diffidence. At any rate, 
he was rarely seen on the streets without a 
coquettish looking young lady of high school 
age. 




73 




TEAGUE, CONSTANCE HELEN 
—"CONNIE" 

77 SHERMAN ST., DENVER, COLO. 

A witty little lady with a Pi Phi pin was 
pouring tea and acting hostess. Only for an 
instant did she stop talking — voicing her 
opinions energetically — and passed the sugar 
to the newcomer. Then she smiled mischiev- 
ously and was again plunged into a heated 
argument on the desirability of being engaged 
in college. From the way her friends gath- 
ered about her it was not difficult to discover 
the regard which they held for her or to 
realize that she had marked accomplishments — 
being hostess, keeping order during quiet 
hours, and hair dressing, etc. 



THOMAS, WALTER DILL — 
"WALT" 

1203 N. NEVADA AVE., COLORADO 



SPRINGS 

"Is that Dorothy Stott and Lloyd Shaw?" 
"Naw. they're married uott. That's our new 
couple. She's always tagging along that way. 
They're engaged. Poor Helen! Just think 
of having to listen to those jokes all one's 
life! But. then, he likes to sing, and perhaps 
he'll spend part of his time doing that! 
What he likes to do he does, and no one can 
keep him from it." 



TWEEDY 

COLORADO SPRINGS 

I found myself face to face with a small 
dark man with a very uneasy air. He did 
not at first impress me as forceful, but when 
he began to talk of his ambition, his church 
and his college, I saw that his sombre exte- 
rior had deceived me. Here was a man living 
the virtures we think about on Sunday, and 
I felt like apologizing. 



VAN STONE, WILFRED- 
"DIT" 



1125 N. NEVADA AVE.. COLORADO SPRINGS 

She hadn't seen him since they were chil- 
dren together, and yet he had not changed 
much. He was taller and more mature in 
every way. She noted with satisfaction that 
he had gained control of his hands and feet — 
almost — but he had the same boyish face, the 
same square, well-molded chin and the same 
nice blue eyes. Was he still afraid of girls? 
She wondered. 



74 



WADE, ELBERT STAUGHTON 
"BERT" 

1828 JEFFERSON ST., DULUTH, MINN. 

"Whaddye mean, politician? No. I'm not 
one; only I didn't want to give a wrong im- 
pression after having told her what I meant, 
and knowing that he'll probably find out from 
her why you thought she did it. See?" The 
speaker began to tease his companion until 
the latter wished he had not asked for an 
explanation. "Bert, you shouldn't take life 
so seriously. You are narrow," was the re- 
tort. Judging from the glimpse of character 
revealed in this bit of conversation, the ob- 
server concluded that Bert possessed a con- 
scientiously black and white aura. 



WALL, HAMPTON GROVER 
"BUD" 

1819 N. NEVADA AVE., COLORADO 
SPRINGS 

When a man is sole heir and a bachelor, 
wears tailor-made clothes and rides in his 
own automobile, he is worth marrying. At 
least that is what ladies say. There was a 
Sig in college in those days who was, and 
wore and did all that I have said. He was an 
amusing man with a contagious laugh — with 
two exceptions the most contagious laugh on 
the campus — (occasionally he was a campus 
visitor). His was a face to dream about and 
try to carve on the bowl of a pipe. In his big 
fur coat he was like unto a blandishing bear. 



WALLACE, RUTH 

131 SHERMAN ST., DENVER, COLO. 

From the point of view of mere line, Miss 
Wallace seemed a handsome woman. How- 
ever, it was not the somewhat haughty head, 
the blonde hair or the "C" sweater that im- 
pressed one. It was the easy going manner. 
the breezy "I should worry" attitude that 
attracted one. She was a woman who pur- 
sued the even tenor of her way, drinking her 
customary sodas at the drug store, cracking 
her customary jokes and smiling her cus- 
tomary smiles. Opposed to the new dances, 
a member of student government, she was a 
being most of the world might look up to. 



WILKIN, DOROTHY "DOT" 

CANON CITY, COLO. 



The house president did not mind if the 
larks were not harmful. She was in for every- 
thing herself. With a saving sense of humor 
and a propensity to tease, Dorothy refused 
to worry. Taking life as it came, she natu- 
rally escaped the adverse criticism that came 
to any girl except a "perfect lady." 




75 




WILLIAMS, TUDSON THOMAS 
-"JUD" . 

108 E. BOULDER. COLORADO SPRINGS 

Jud felt guilty of palming off old chestnuts 
as new jokes and of imitating "Rudy." On 
his own merits he would have had a hearty 
welcome with any vaudeville outfit or in any 
club. Everybody wanted his opinion on every- 
thing, and he did not disappoint them. With 
his tactful diplomatic way. backed by real 
efficiency, it was no wonder he was elected 
to committees and boards. To see him in his 
foolish moods — fussing or hiking — the casual 
onlooker would fail to realize the sensitive and 
fastidious inner man so effectively cloaked or 
to conceive of the ambitions that lay in his 
heart. 

YOUNGMAN, FLORENCE 
"DISHY ANGEL" 

CANON CITY, COLO. 

This young lady, whose face was pure oval, 
whose eyes were gray and whos'e lips closed 
for seriousness looked who' she was — a lady. 
By instinct you would have said she knew her 
worth. She was neatly and even severely 
dressed., without a trace of coquetry There 
was a Quaker tinge upon her: a dovelike hab- 
it. She was like a bird, but did not trail a 
wing. She gazed upon her gloved and folded 
hands. She was feminine, but not standing 
iiff. She showed no fear of possible advances. 
but rather assumed that as a matter of course 
there could be none. 



ZIRKLE. MINA- 



"MINNIE" 

DENVER, COLORADO. 

"Say, the funniest thing happened in class 
this morning." The girl at the desk looked up 
to see a tall red-haired girl standing in the 
doorway doubled up with mirth. She clasped 
her right fist with her left hand. "O, it was 
a scream ! I wish you could have seen it !" 
The girl at the desk smiled. She knew Mina, 
her cheerful nonchalance that concealed un- 
expected depths, her friendliness and her apt- 
ness to exaggerate — so she prepared to listen 
eagerly but sceptically to the tale which was 
about to be unfolded. 



HOLMES, CHARLES LUDWELL 

PUEBLO, COLORADO. 

Once upon a time in rne dear dead days a 
sporting editor wrote (before the Boulder 
game) : "Holmes is playing the brand of foot- 
ball that lands all-conference honors. He is of 
■a chunky, build, developed almost perfectly 
physically, and has unusual speed for a big 
fellow. Holmes' long suit is following the ball 
and his thefts of forward passes have figured 
materially with the Tiger victories this year." 
(After the Boulder game: "Holmes was the 
real star of the game for the Tigers. His 
work stood out above that of any other play- 
er, and but for him that game would have 
depreciated into a rout." 



76 



Sfiatnnj nf 191 fi 



Now in the beginning there was a class greener in hue than the verdure 
clothing the sloping sides of Mount Cheyenne. Nevertheless there were in that 
class men of brains and brawn and so it came to pass that the other classes de- 
fended with difficulty their title against 1916. This was when 1916 were "frosh." 
Because the brains temporarily forsook the job and the brawn was nor sufficient 
unto itself the Sophomores gave a slightly disturbed banquet and certain fresh- 
men, like Sampson of old, lost sundry hairs and tempers. Next day some Sopho- 
mores lost a few more hairs but kept their tempers thereby averting further 
hostilities. Here endeth the first lesson. 

The second lesson is found in Chapter XVI of "How to be a Sophomore." 
Next year the color of 1916 waxed less striking but the hat size corre- 
spondingly increased. Thus it came to pass that they gave a non-fussing hike 
and elated with success pulled off a barbecue and the joke of that was it was a 
good one. Verily, I say unto you, "It was one of the best." Their confidence 
increasing they desired a fight which ended in a lightning change of Presidents. 
Now they rest on their laurels planning something stirring for next year. Verily 
their Annual should be good for they are beginning early and "are not going to 
be rushed to death at the end next year." 



Colors : Scarlet and Gray. 

(©fixtns 

Lavina B. White President 

Frank H. Hall Vice-President 

Ruth Higgins Secretary 

Willard C. Ross Treasurer 

Frank E. Evans Manager of the Barbecue 

lull 

Allward, Charlotte Pearson, 218 E. St. Vrain St., Colorado Springs. 

Baker, Evelyn, Montgomery Hall,, Toledo, Ohio. 

Balch, Harry Hughes, 1125 N. Nevada Ave., Greeley, Colo. 

Barnett, Margaret Elizabeth, McGregor Hall, Denver, Colo. 

Barney, Martin Davis, 1828 N. Nevada Ave., Colorado Springs. , 

Bartlett, Harriett Morgan, 2220 N. Nevada Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Becker, Bernard Carl, 930 N. Weber St., Belen, N. Mex. 

Bennett, Hila, 301 N. Walnut St., Colorado Springs. 

Bernard, Robert James, 815 N. Weber St., Denver, Colo. 

Black, Charles Miller, (E) 1724 Wood Ave., Denver, Colo. 

Blades, Leslie Burton, 417 N. Corona St., Colorado Springs. 

Bourke, Edna Marie, 512 E. Cache la Poudre St., Colorado Springs. 

Boyd, Helen Shelley, 1220 N. Tejon St., Colorado Springs. 

Bradley, Margaret Carrington, Montgomery Hall, Denver, Colo. 

Brooks, Adin Paul, (E) 1820 Washington Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Brooks, Hattie Estella, 1820 Washington Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Brown, Robert John, Hagerman Hall, Denver, Colo. 

Caldwell, Blanche Edna, Montgomery Hall, Hastings, Neb. 

Caldwell, Herschel Lyal, 307 N. Fourth St., Green Ridge, Mo. 

Cheley, Glen Evan, 424 S. Tejon St., Colorado Springs. 

Christy, Eleanor Gladys, 1419 N. Tejon St., Colorado Springs. 

Christy, William Glen, 1419 N. Tejon St., Colorado Springs. 

Claybaugh, Edwin Parsons, 1125 N. Nevada Ave., Austin, Colo. 

Conrad, Edith Louise, 1130 N. Cascade Ave., Campbell, Mo. 

Crissey, Marjorie, 227 E. Willamette Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Cross, Eugene Herbert, (E) 919 N. Weber St., Glenwood Springs, Colo. 

Culp, Hamer, 122 N. Cascade, Rocky Ford, Colo. 

Cunningham, Rachel, McGregor Hall, Denver, Colo. 

Davis, William Mack, (E) Hagerman Hall, Monte Vista, Colo. 

Dixon, John Philip, 2819 N. Cascade Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Dockstader, Henry Peter, (E) 1316 N. Nevada Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Downing, Emma Beatrice, Ticknor Hall, Oil City Pa. 

Eager, Leonard Prentice, 510 N. Nevada Ave., Evansville, Wis. 

Eaton, Elizabeth June, Montgomery Hall, Eaton, Colo. 

Esmiol, Morris Alfred, 1125 N. Nevada Ave., Denver, Colo. 

Estabrook, Evelyn, Montgomery Hall, Greeley, Colo 

Evans, Frank Edward, 1912 N. Tejon St., Colorado Springs. 

Faulkner, James Edmund, (E) 631 Colorado Ave., Colorado City, Colo. 

80 



Flora, Harriette Pearl, 2129 N. Nevada Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Fuller, Lillian Eliza, 1429 N. Weber St., Colorado Springs. 

Gault, Elva Maude, Montgomery Hall, Pueblo, Colo. 

Geissler, Anna Louise, 233 N. Franklin St., Colorado Springs. 

Gibson, Merle Veron, 1211 N. Weber, Denver, Colo. 

Gleason, Ruth, McGregor Hall, Austin, Minn. 

Graves, Cecil Henry, 1222 Lincoln Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Greenlee, Lawrence Albert, 930 N. Weber, Bellaire, Ohio. 

Hall, Frank Herbert, 928 N. Weber St., Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Hallock, Rachel Maryette, McGregor Hall, Denver, Colo. 

Hamilton, Edith Magill, Montgomery Hall, Canon City, Colo. 

Hasty, Veda, Bemis Hall, Lamar, Colo. 

Harrison, Charles Allison, (E) 223 E. Platte Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Heald, Helen, McGregor Hall, Denver, Colo. 

Healy, Charlotte Agnes, Deaf and Blind Institute, La Junta, Colo. 

Heilman, Roy Basil, Hagerman Hall, Monte Vista, Colo. 

Henderson, Isabel Corbin, McGregor Hall, Sterling, Colo. 

Hensley, Mary Olive, Ticknor Hall, Denver, Colo. 

Herron, John Lawrence, 919 N. Weber, Aspen, Colo. 

Higgins, Ruth, McGregor Hall, Pueblo, Colo. 

Hill, Florence Mildred, McGregor Hall, Denver, Colo. 

Holm, Agnes Marie, 512 E. Cache la Poudre, Amo, Colo. 

Holman, Newton Davis, (E) 425 E. St. Vrain St., Colorado Springs. 

Holmes, Charles Ludswell, 315 N. Custer St., Colorado Springs. 

Hubbell, Elizabeth Guion, 1915 Wood Ave,. Colorado Springs. 

Hutchinson, Homer Ross, 732 N. Wahsatch Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Hyde, James Francis Clark, (E) Hagerman Hall, New York City. 

Isensee, Arthur Frederick, (E) Hagerman Hall, Delta, Colo. 

Jewell, Lucy Cornelia, Montgomery Hall, Colorado Springs. 

John, Edward Leslie, Hagerman Hall, Florence, Colo. 

Johnson, Elva Caroline, 611 N. Wahsatch Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Jones, Gladys Vernna, Montgomery Hall, Florence, Colo. 

June, Persy Ellsworth, 730 North Weber, Denver, Colo. 

Keating, Jerome Hughes, 731 N. Wahsatch, Pueblo, Colo. 

Keating, Lawrence Francis, (E) 731 N. Wahsatch, Pueblo, Colo. 

Keener, George Herring, 426 E. Cach la Poudre St., Colorado Springs. 

Kingman, Victor Christie, 530 N. Nevada Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Kirkwood, Helen Grace, 1409 S. Nevada Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Kramer, Harry Stillman, (E) 122 N. Cascade, Las Animas, Colo. 

Landon, Mary Emily, Ticknor Hall, Columbus, 111. 

Latimer, Charles Trowbridge, 914 N. Conora, St., Colorado Springs. 

Lee, Gale Auten, 930 N. Weber, Lamar, Colo. 

Leipheimer, Helen L., 629 N. Weber St., Colorado Springs. 

Liljestrom, George William, (E) 9 Barnes Bldg., Pueblo, Colo. 

Long, Mildred, McGregor Hall, Denver, Colo. 

McCammon, Floyd Franklin, (E) 14 S. Eighteenth St., Colorado Springs. 

McNeil, Frederick Brainard, 919 N. Weber, Shawnee, Okla. 

Martin, Earl Gilbert, (E) Hagerman Hall, Loveland, Colo. 

Merrill, Madre, 226 E. Monument St., Colorado Springs. 

Mimmack, Rufus Frederick, 1125 N. Nevada Ave., Eaton, Colo. 

Mohrbacher, Florence, Ticknor Hall, Cripple Creek, Colo. 

Morse, Levi Parminter, 930 N. Weber, Grand Junction, Colo. 

Nelson, Robert Rutherford, (E) 1319 N. Nevada Ave., Denver, Colo. 

Pearce, Virginia Lizette, 1335 N. Nevada Ave., Colorado Springs. 

81 



Peck, Bertha Merea, 914 Cheyenne Road, Colorado Springs. 

Pollock, Milton Wayne, (E) 1908 Colorado Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Pooler, Dorothy Hazel, McGregor Hall, Austin, Minn. 

Powell, Arthur Lester, (E) Canon City, Colo. 

Randolph, Jay, (E) 103 N. Spruce St., Colorado Springs. 

Ransdell, Hollace Vivian, 813 N. Wahsatch Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Ritteman, Chloie May, 501 E. Buolder, Hawley, Minn. 

Rogers. Edythe Alwilda, 1422 N. Weber St., Colorado Springs. 

Ross, Willard Cherrington, 1319 N. Nevada Ave., Grand Junction, Colo. 

Savage, Laura Ada, McGregor Hall, Great Falls, Mont. 

Savage, Lucy Eunice, McGregor Hall, Great Falls, Mont. 

Sawhill, Ray, 427 N. Weber, Canon City, Colo. 

Shadford, Charles Alfred, 1211 N. Franklin St., Colorado Springs. 

Smythe, William Ralph, 210 E. Dale St., Colorado Springs. 

Spahr, Harold, 1530 Lincoln Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Sprengle, Eva May, McGregor Hall, Pueblo, Colo. 

Stanard, Margaret Emily, McGregor Hall, Pueblo, Colo. 

Steuerwald. Lois, McGregor Hall, Longmont, Colo. 

Stiles, Frank Luther, Hagerman Hall, Loveland, Colo. 

Stocks, Joseph Wendell, 1319 N. Nevada Ale., Denver, Colo. 

Sweetser, Mary Louise, 1729 N. Corona St., Colorado Springs. 

Tamayo, Fernando Carlos, (E) 796 N. Nevada Ave., San Cristobal, Tachira, 

Venezuela. 
Taylor, Clarion Wells, 429 Lincoln Ave., Colorado City, Colo. 
Taylor, James Earl, 1526 Hayes St., Colorado Springs. 
Taylor, Milford Edson, 429 Lincoln Ave., Colorado City, Colo. 
Teague, Dorothy Tremayne, McGregor Hall, Denver, Colo. 
Thompson, Ethel Borrowdale, Montgomery Hall, Florence, Colo. 
Turner, Merrill Henry, 1122 N. Cascade, Eaton, Colo. 
Van Diest, Alice Elfrieda, 719 N. Nevada Ave., Colorado Springs. 
Walker, Prudence May, McGregor Hall, Grand Junction, Colo. 
White, Lavina Belle, Montgomery Hall, Pueblo, Colo. 
Will, Donald Jesse. 122 N. Cascade Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 
Williams, Jessie Jeannette, McGregor Hall, Woodland Park, Colo. 
Williams, Russell Ventres, (E) 1203 N. Tejon St., Colorado Springs. 
Winans, Byron, 1319 N. Nevada Ave., Denver, Colo. 
Winternitz, Elizabeth, 319 Colorado Ave., Colorado City, Colo. 
Wright, Lillian, 1414 Lincoln Ave., Colorado Springs. 
Young, Gladys, 320 E. Boulder St., Colorado Springs. 



S2 







A-" ***"% 






0V 



, jj?*^* »f 



KHft# '•' 



TJftBtorg of 101 r 



DO YOU SEE THIS CLASS? 

YES, I SEE THE CLASS. IT IS THE FRESHMEN CLASS OF 
CO-LO-RA-DO COL-LEGE. 

DO YOU SEE THE CAPS ? 

YES. ARE THEY NOT FUN-NY ! 

CAN THE FRESH-MEN READ? 

YES, THE FRESH-MEN CAN READ. 

CAN THE FRESH-MEN "FUSS?" 

NO ; THEY ARE TOO YOUNG. 

SEE THE FIRE? IS IT NOT PRET-TY? LOOK O-VER ON THE 
HILL. CAN YOU READ THE FIG-URES ? 

YES. I CAN READ THE FIG-URES. THEY ARE 17. YES, THAT 
IS THE AV-ER-AGE OF THE FRESH-MEN IN MATH. IT IS A VE-RY 
LOW AV-ER-AGE. SOME DAY, MAY-BE, IT WILL BE 71 AND THEN 
THEY WILL BE PHI BET-A KAP-PA. 



S5 



Stoaljmatt (Elaaa 

Colors: Purple and Black. 



©fiirrra 

Lee Cover President 

Lee Glezen Vice-President 

Marjorie Whipple Secretary 

Wilbur Mann Treasurer 

lull 

Abrams, Esther, Ticknor Hall. Little Rock, Ark. 
Anderson, John Forbes, Hagerman Hall, Ouray, Colo. 
Augh, James Hern Young, (E) Hagerman Hall, Seoul, Korea. 
Aylard, Margaret Helen, 1521 X. Weber St., Colorado Springs. 
Bailey, Edythe, Ticknor Hall, Pueblo, Colo. 
Banfield. Gertrude Sterling, McGregor Hall, Austin, Minn. 
Barnard, Foster Goldsboro, Manitou, Colo., Manitou, Colo. 
Bateman, Kathrvn, Bemis Hall, Salida, Colo. 
Beavers, James Leslie, (E) Hagerman Hall, Lamar, Colo. 
Belk, Dorothea, McGregor Hall, Pueblo, Colo. 
Berry, Alice America, 436 E. St. Vrain St., Colorado Springs. 
Bispham, Miriam Freeman, 2111 X. Nevada Ave., Colorado Springs. 
Bolles, Frederick Howett, 1123 N. Weber, Rocky Ford, Colo. 
Boyd, Edith, 1220 N. Tejon St., Colorado Springs. 
Boyd, Helen Margaret, Bemis Hall, Xorton, Kan. 
Bowers, Hazel, 2008 N. Nevada Ave., Colorado Springs. 
Bradley, Ruth Elizabeth, 430 W. Pikes Peak Ave., Colorado Springs 
Briscoe, John Lee, Hagerman Hall, Castle Rock, Colo. 
Bryson, Florence June, Ticknor Hall, Pueblo, Colo. 
Bunker, Jerome Vickers, 930 N. Weber, Greeley, Colo. 
Caldwell, Helen Elizabeth, McGregor Hall, Brookings, S. D. 
Caldwell, Jesse Carter, (E) 712 N. Tejon, Longmont, Colo. 
Carnahan, Mary Katharine, Ticknor Hall, Durango, Colo. 
Carlson, Georgia May, McGregor Hall, Denver, Colo. 
Carrick, Mattie, 1430 N. Weber St., Colorado Springs. 
Claybaugh, Esther, Montgomery Hall, Austin, Colo. 
Clemens, Martha Elizabeth, 17 E. Dale St., Colorado Springs. 
Cochran, Fielding B., 915 N. Weber, Chickasha, Okla. 
Cole, Mark Stevens, Hagerman Hall, Yampa, Colo. 
Collins, Ruth Graham, Plaza Hotel, Colorado Springs. 
Cook, Albert Rolland, (E) Hagerman Hall, Delta, Colo. 
Cover, Lee Hulbert, 1122 N. Cascade, Rocky Ford, Colo. 
Craise, Marguerite, Bemis Hall, Denver, Colo. 
Cross, Florence, 1630 Grant Ave., Colorado Springs. 
Crossan, Robert Reid, (E) Hagerman Hall, Yampa, Colo. 
Davis, Chester Carl, 1211 N. Weber St., Loveland, Colo. 
Davis, Gladys Marshall, McGregor Hall, Sterling, Colo. 
Dawson, Ruth Elizabeth, Bemis Hall, Denver, Colo. 
Donaldson, Irene I'.rovv ni.ee, l!emis Hall, Denver, Colo. 
Depuy, Percy Leroy, 520 E. Uintah St., Girard, Kan. 
Dudley, Donald Ashworth, (E) 14 Cheyenne Road, Colorado Springs. 
Duke, Bruce Edward Dudley, 416 N. Nevada Ave., Hotchkiss, Colo. 
Duke, Horace Edward, 416 N. Nevada Ave., Colorado Springs. 

86 



Dunlavy, Eva Irene, Ticknor Hall, Denver, Colo. 

Durbin, Helen Avery, Bemis Hall, Denver, Colo. 

Dworak, Frances Emma, 1203 Grant Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Eads, Perry Raymond, 715 S. Sierra Madre, Colorado Springs. 

Elliott, Cleona Eva, Manitou, Colo., Canon City, Colo. 

Emerick, Gladys, 412 N. Nevada Ave., Colorado Springs. 

England, Stephen Jackson, Jr., 417 N. Corona St., Salida, Colo. 

Ettinger, Carl Newman, (E) 1115 Wood Ave., Pierce City, Mo. 

French, Henry Julius, 919 N. Weber St., Glenwood Springs, Colo. 

Frickey, Edwin, 418 N. Nevada Ave., Brush, Colo. 

Gardner, Florence Blanche, 1627 N. Weber St., St. Johns, Mich. 

Garnett, Anna Maud, Ticknor Hall, Pueblo, Colo. 

Garrett, Myriam Christy^, 710 N. Cascade Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Garside, Ben Charles, Jr., 1125 N. Nevada Ave., Denver, Colo. 

Geiser, Claude William, (E) Hagerman Hall, Monte Vista, Colo. 

Gilbert, Clara Belle, Bemis Hall, Long Beach, Cal. 

Gill, Rose Miriam, Bemis Hall, Vinita, Okla. 

Glezen, Lee Louis, (E) 826 E. Cucharas St., Colorado Springs. 

Golden, Carl Errol, 712 N. Tejon St., Longmont, Colo. 

Griffith, Kean, Hagerman Hall, Cory, Colo. 

Hamilton, Sara Grace, 315 E. Willamette St., Colorado Springs. 

Harbison, Edithe Estelle, McGregor Hall, Denver, Colo. 

Harris, Marea Vaughn, Montgomery Hall, Newcastle, Colo. 

Harrison, Hazel Dawn, Montgomery Hall, Canon City, Colo. 

Hassell, Julia Frances, 1424 Wood Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Hathway, Julia, Plaza Hotel, Colorado Springs. 

Hazen, Frank De Forrest, (E) 919 N. Weber, Hamilton, 111. 

Heald, Edward Clifford, 1319 N. Nevada Ave., Denver, Colo. 

Heffner, Pete, Jr., 913 N. Weber, Chickasha, Okla. 

Heimeecher, Louis, 1319 N. Nevada Ave., Denver, Colo. 

Henn, Samuel Chester, 930 N. Weber, Paonia, Colo. 

Henry', James Smith, 911 N. Nevada Ave., Camp Point, 111. 

Hill, Gladys Beatrice, Bemis Hall, Denver, Colo. 

Huston, Harold, 114 N. Weber, Manzanola, Colo. 

Hutchison, Mary Elizabeth, 732 N. Wahsatch, Colorado Springs. 

Ingram, William, 608 N. Nevada Ave., Omaha, Neb. 

Jackson, John Evans, 1122 N. Cascade, Rocky Ford, Colo. 

Johnson, Charles Arthur, Jr., 230 E. Yampa, Durango, Colo. 

Johnson, Frances, McGregor Hall, American Fork, Utah. 

Jones, Mildred Ankeny, McGregor Hall, Ottawa, Kan. 

Judevine, Harriett, Ticknor Hall, Longmont, Colo. 

Judevine, Horace Franklin, 712 N. Tejon, Longmont, Colo. 

Kapitzky, Ruth Lela, McGregor Hall, Strasburg, Ohio. 

Keating, Kathrine, Bemis Hall, Pueblo, Colo. 

Keeth, Francis, 308 E. Platte, Colorado Springs. 

Kennison, Viola Frances, McGregor Hall, Salida, Colo. 

Kinnikin, Mathias Bond, (E) 423 E. El Paso, Worden, 111. 

Kinsley, Arthur Carruthers, (E) 1340 N. Weber, Colorado Springs. 

Kurth, Norval Alvin, (E) 218 S. Twelfth St., Colorado Springs. 

Kutzleb, Charles Albert, Hagerman Hall, Canon City, Colo. 

Lane, Preston, 540 W. Monument, Lynn Haven, Fla. 

Lennox, Helen Virginia, 1339 N. Nevada Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Leiberknecht, Scott Lewis, 1319 N. Nevada Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Lillie, Agnes Farrar, Bemis Hall, Denver, Colo. 

87 



Lisenby, Ruby. 409 Olive St., Colorado Springs. 

Lough, Vance, 501 N. Weber, Pataskala. Ohio. 

Lyons, Mabel Jessie, 808 N. Weber, Chicago, 111. 

McIntire, Oliver Simpson, 106 E. San Rafael, Olathe, Colo. 

Mackay, Annie Louise, McGregor Hall. Denver, Colo. 

McKesson, William Bryan, 1215 Colorado Ave., Colorado Springs. 

McLain, Ernest James. 919 N. Weber, Canon City, Colo. 

Madden, John Henry, 1319 N. Nevada Ave., Denver, Colo. 

Mann, Wilbur Reece, 919 N. Weber, Tabor, Iowa. 

Marsh, George Austin, Jr.. 928 N. Weber, Pueblo, Colo. 

Martin. Gladys Marian. 1411 S. Tejon St.. Colorado Springs-Ivywild. 

Mason, Edith Parsons, 619 N. Prospect, Colorado Springs. 

Maxwell, Raymond Waldron, (E) Hagerman Hall, Castle Rock, Colo. 

Merrill, Glen, 1319 N. Nevada Ave., Grand Junction. 

Meyer, Grace, 1606 Cheyenne Road, Colorado Springs. 

Milstead, Veffie Gertrude, Ticknor Hall, Olney Springs, Colo. 

Mimmack, William Edward, 1125 N. Nevada Ave., Eaton, Colo. 

Morrow, Walter Tomson, (E) Broadmoor, Colorado Springs. 

Moseley, Helen Fern, 221 E. Cimarron, Colorado Springs. 

Mullen, Florence, 127 E. Las Animas, Colorado Springs. 

Neff, Kenzie Benewell, 928 N. Weber, Delta, Colo. 

Neuswanger, Peter Christopher. 1122 N. Cascade, Greeley, Colo. 

Nicholson, Helen Louise, 110 S. Wahsatch, Colorado Springs. 

Nordeen, Ansel Gilbert, (E) 930 N. Weber, Aurora, Neb. 

Nowels, Kenneth, 721 W. Cucharas, Colorado Springs. 

Oberndorfer, Beulah, 916 N. Weber, Colorado Springs. 

Ord, Malcolm Llewellyn (E) 326 E. Kiowa, Colorado Springs. 

Patton, Pearl. 215 E. Monument. Colorado Springs. 

Paulson, Paul Alvin, (E) Hagerman Hall, Davenport, Iowa. 

Perryman, Lora Ara Belle, 1809 N. Tejon, Overbrook, Kan. 

Porter, Alfred Jones, Plaza Hotel, Greensburg, Pa. 

Prichard. George William, 928 N. Weber. Pratt, Kan. 

Pugh, Mortimer, 1224 N. Tejon, Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Puntenney, Harriet, Bemis Hall, Pueblo, Colo. 

Ragle, William Floyd, 1722 N. Royer St., Salina, Kan. 

Randol, Josephine, Ticknor Hall, Salida. Colo. 

Rawlings, John William, (E) 1122 N. Cascade. Monte Vista, Colo. 

Reed, Cecil David, (E) 936 E. Moreno Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Richardson, Maude, Montgomery Hall, Canon City, Colo. 

Richardson, Ruth Velma, 1328 S. Tejon, Colorado Springs. 

Ringle, Flora Helen, Montgomery Hall, Greeley, Colo. 

Roebins, Dwight Lincoln, 324 N. Institute, Colorado Springs. 

Roberson, Gladys, Montgomery Hall, Glenwood Springs, Colo. 

Roe, Kathleen, 20 E. Dale St., Ohio, Colo. 

Rose, Lynn Talmage, 915 N. Weber St., Chickasha, Okla. 

Sager, Henry, 117 N. Weber, Custer, S. Dak. 

Scheib. Waldo, 1319 N. Nevada Ave., Denver. Colo. 

Schlessman, Gerald Lee, 312 E. Willamette, Colorado Springs. 

Schweiger, Carl Albert, 312 N. Cascade, Lafayette, Colo. 

Shadowan, Ethel, McGregor Hall, Ft. Morgan, Colo. 

Shaw, Fred Francis, 1319 N. Nevada Ave., Denver, Colo. 

Sheldon, Alan Bancroft, Hagerman Hall. Kansas City, Mo. 

Sinton, Ernest Albert, 431 S. El Paso, Colorado Springs. 

Slack, Arthur Benjamin, Broadmoor, Lazear, Colo. 

88 



Smillie, Cecil Clare, McGregor Hall, Eaton, Colo. 

Smith, Earl Boulware, 518 N. Pine St., Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Sommers, Minnie Esther, 14 W. Costilla, Colorado Springs. 

Spalding, John William, (E) 1122 N. Cascade, La Junta, Colo. 

Spalding, Marion Rose, McGregor Hall, La Junta, Colo. 

Steele, Robert Borden, 1123 N. Weber, Rocky Ford, Colo. 

Stewart, Thomas Leidigh, 1319 N. Nevada Ave., Spearville, Kan. 

Strain, Frank Elven, 1122 N. Cascade, Lamar, Colo. 

Stubbs, Maurice Garver, 1122 N. Cascade, La Junta, Colo. 

Sundquist, Theodore LeRoy, (E) 923 N. Weber, Alamosa, Colo. 

Taylor, Charles Chauncey, (E) 1526 Hayes St., Colorado Springs. 

Taylor, Charles Edgar, 1126 N. Corona, Colorado Springs. 

Taylor, Theron, 444 W. Uintah, Colorado Springs. 

Teague, James Hogg, Plaza Hotel, Gorman, Texas. 

Tegtmeyer, Emerson Ralph, 715 N. Tejon, Colorado Springs. 

Telfer, Annis, Bemis Hall, Pueblo, Colo. 

Thrall, Laura Ernestine, 119 Tyler Place, Colorado Springs. 

Titler, Floyd John, (E) 712 N. Tejon, Longmont, Colo. 

Touzalin, Charlotte, 16 College Place, Colorado Springs. 

Van Diest, Annette- Josine, 719 N. Nevada Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Verner, Ogden E., 930 N. Weber St., Paonia, Colo. 

Vickers, Denver, 419 N. Wahsatch, Colorado Springs. 

Walker, Bertha Ellen, McGregor Hall, Grand Junction, olo. 

Walker, Graham Rutledge, 919 N. Weber, Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Wallrich, Florence Edna, Bemis Hall, Alamosa, Colo. 

Walsh, Winnifred Isabel, Bemis Hall, Denver, Colo. 

Waples, Dorothy, Ticknor Hall, Cody, Wyo. 

Warnock, Janet, Ticknor Hall, Loveland, Colo. 

Waterhouse, Georgiana, Ticknor Hall, Weiser, Idaho. 

Weaver, Bertha Elizabeth, 2609 N. Cascade, Colorado Springs. 

Webb, Marian Esther. 2 E. Bijou St., Colorado Springs. 

Weber, Glenn, (E) 234 Franklin St., Colorado Springs. 

Wendell, Forrest Ellsworth, 219 N. Wahsatch, Buttes, Colo. 

Weston, Sylvia Gwendolyne, 1112 E. Pikes Peak, Colorado Springs. 

Whipple, Marjorie Helen, Ticknor Hall, Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Wickham, Esther Lionne, Bemis Hall, Denver, Colo. 

Williams, Edward, 1319 N. Nevada Ave., Walsen, Colo. 

Williams, Homer Hanson, 919 N. Weber, Hamilton, 111. 

Wills, Benjamin Grun, 2018 Armstrong Ave., Colorado City, Colo. 

Wilson, Beulah, Bemis Hall, Manitou, Colo. 

Wilson, Martha, Ticknor Hall, Denver, Colo. 

Wood, Ben Walter, (E) Spear fish, S. Dak. 

Wubben, Horace Jay, 1339 N. Nevada Ave., Paonia, Colo. 

Yant, Philip, 712 N. Tejon, La Junta, Colo. 

Yokoyama, Matsusaburo, 1130 Wood Ave., Mito, Japan. 



89 



Gkafcttatr Slitfottta 

(Handioatra fur tbr Srgrrr of Hastrr of Arts 

Clark, Guy Wendell, A.B., 318 E. St. Vrain St., Colorado Springs. - 

Colorado College, '12. Chemistry. 
Detmoyer, Mary Susan, A.B., Denver, Colo., Denver, Colo. 

Colorado College, '11. English. 
Havens, Leon Clive, A.B., 707 E. Columbia St.. Colorado Springs. 

Colorado College, '13. Physiology. 
Sisco, Dwight Lewis, A.B., 1301 N. Weber St., Colorado Springs. 

Colorado College, '13. Physiology. 

(Eanotoatr fnr a Irgrrr of (Html ISngiurrriuo. 

Burgess, John. B.S. in C.E., Canon City, Colo.. Canon City, Colo. 
Colorado College, 'l(t. 

Not (Canoioatrs for a Sryrrr 

Bowers. Glenn Alwyn, A.B., 1125 N. Nevada, Colorado Springs. 

Colorado College, '13. 
Hemenway, Addie, A.B., 1342 N. Nevada. Colorado Springs. 

Colorado College, '11. 
Parsons, Ernestine, A.B., 825 N. Weber St., Colorado Springs. 

Colorado College, '08. 
Roberts, Marie E., 1503 N. Weber St., Colorado Springs. 

Colorado College, '08. 
Smith, Lois Ellett, A.B., McGregor Hall, Colorado Springs. 

Colorado College, '12. 
Wharton. Jessie Catherine, B.M., 14 S. Wahsatch, Colorado Springs. 

Colorado College, '13. 



Serial anft Jtegtatmi g>tui>ntts 

Adams, Mrs. Frederick W., 119 Palmer Park Boulevard, Colorado Springs. 

Baldwin, John A., 518 S. Nevada Ave.. Sarcoxie, Mo. 

Blackman, Ida Louise, 1806 Wood Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Campbell, Jane Allen, 816 N. Nevada Ave., Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Coltrin, Charles Wesley, 118 E. Platte Ave., Franklin, Neb. 

Davis, Elizabeth, Montgomery Hall, Greenfield, Mass. 

Dickey, Nana B.. 319 N. Weber, Colorado Springs. 

Fischer, Claribel Ben Hur, McGregor Hall, Santa Fe, N. Mex. 

Fulton, Archie F„ 315 N. Weber, Treghorn, Scotland. 

Funabashi, Keusuke, 1121 N. Tejon St., Aichiken, Japan. 

Johns, Charles Robert, Plaza Hotel, Blaine, Colo. 

Jones, Lucy Dunbar, 525 N. Cascade, Colorado Springs. 

Lewis, Mrs. Inez Johnson, 1825 Cheyenne Blvd., Colorado Springs. 

Lippincott, Camilla, Broadmoor, Colorado Springs. 

Lloyd, Catherine, 1528 N. Nevada Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Lloyd, Lucy Annette, 1528 N. Nevada Ave., Colorado Springs. 

McFarlane, Albert, 723 N. Weber, Victor Colo. 

Pearce, Wallace James, Y. M. C. A., Plainfield, N. J. 

90 



Perley, Clara Chaplin, 717 Main St., Nob Hill, Colorado Springs. 

Perry, Geneva, 630 E. Willamette, Colorado Springs. 

Prescott, Della Reed, McGregor Hall, Woolwich, Me. 

Quinn, L. C, Broadmoor, Colorado Springs. 

Riggs, Eva Victoria, 819 E. Cache la Poudre, Colorado Springs. 

Smith, Madame Gulliford, Bemis Hall, Pueblo, Colo. 

Smith, Roy R., 1400 Cheyenne Blvd., Council Bluffs, la. 

Spicer, Wilma Olive 423 N. Weber, Colorado Springs. 

Strohm, Lillie B., 512 S. Prospect St., Colorado Springs. 

Taff, George, 1932 N. Cascade, Colorado Springs. 

Taylor, Mrs. G. M., 405 N. Cascade, Colorado Springs. 

Washburn, Miriam S., 9 E. Cache la Poudre, Colorado Springs. 

iepartmntt of iMuatr 

Abrams. Esther, Ticknor Hall, Little Rock, Ark. 

Beach, Mary Edna, 3 Ruby Ave., Colorado City. 

Berryhill, Robert Hamilton, 324 E. Yampa St., Colorado Springs. 

Brooks, Eva, Ticknor Hall, Steamboat Springs. 

Bruno, Mrs. Frank, 2106 N. Tejon St., Colorado Springs. 

Caldwell, Vivian, 1112 Palmer Park Blvd., Colorado Springs. 

Cameron, Hila Katherine, 327 N. Tejon St., Colorado Springs. 

Carnahan, Mary Katherine. Ticknor Hall, Durango, Colo. 

Carroll, Kathleen Gardner, 306 E. Bijou St., Colorado Springs. 

Cassidy, Helen Margaret, Bemis Hall, Denver, Colo. 

Christy, Gladys, 1419 N. Tejon St., Colorado Springs. 

Davis, Mildred, Pueblo, Colo., Pueblo, Colo. 

Deane, Ruth, 418 N. Pine St., Colorado Springs. 

De Nio, Lois, 25 E. Las Animas St., Colorado Springs. 

Dunlavy, Eva Irene, Ticknor Hall, Denver, Colo. 

Durnell, Margaret Elizabeth, 427 W. Uintah St., Colorado Springs. 

Emery, Dorothy, 1420 N. Nevada Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Fischer, Claribel Ben Hur, McGregor Hall, Santa Fe, N. M. 

Friedman, Mrs. Joseph, 815 E. Monument St., Colorado Springs. 

Fuller, Violet Minerva, 1429 N. Weber St., Colorado Springs. 

Fulton, Archie, 315 N. Weber St., Treghorn, Scotland. 

Griswold, Beryl, 915 N. Weber St., Colorado Springs. 

Hale, Donald Emerson, 1428 N. Nevada Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Harlan, Lois, 905 Cheyenne Road, Colorado Springs. 

Harlan, Mabel Margaret, 920 Cheyenne Road, Colorado Springs. 

Henderson, Isabel Corbin, McGregor Hall, Sterling, Colo. 

Hills, George, 12 College Place, Colorado Springs. 

Jahn, Helen, 815 N. Cascade Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Jencks, Philip, 627 N. Wahsatch Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Kelsey, Ruth Marie, McGregor Hall, Sterling, Colo. 

Korsmeyer, Helen, 1411 N. Weber St., Colorado Springs. 

Lacy, Lester Daniel, 1318 N. Chestnut St., Wakita, Okla. 

Leslie, Myrtle, 433 W. Bijou St., Colorado Springs. 

Mathis, Irene Edna, 814 E. Monument St., Colorado Springs. 

Merwin, Margaret Stone, McGregor Hall, Bloomington ,111. 

Nothuang, Alma Lydia, 1428 N. Nevada Ave., Portland, Colo. 

91 



Organ, Ruth Margaret, 424 N. Pine St., Colorado Springs. 

Paige, Margaret, 219 N. Wahsatch Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Parsons, Edward Smith, 1130 Wood Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Prichard, Margaret Elizabeth, 1518 Washington Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Reinking, Bethany, 21 Washington St., Colorado Springs. 

Rippey, Margaret Elizabeth, 1311 N. Wahsatch Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Roberson, Gladys Adeline, Montgomery Hall, Glenwood Springs, Colo. 

Shaw, Minta, 8 S. Corona Ave., Kanorado, Kan. 

Shields, Mrs. Viola, 814 E. Yampa St., Colorado Springs. 

Sinton, Ernest Albert, 431 S. El Paso St., Colorado Springs. 

Smillie, Cecile Clare, McGregor Hall, Eaton, Colo. 

Spicer, Wilma Olive, 423 N. Weber St., Colorado Springs. 

Stelson, Fay, 209 W. Cheyenne Road, Colorado Springs. 

Stelson, Julia Catherine, 209 W. Cheyenne Road, Colorado Springs. 

Sutton. Elizabeth Chase, Bemis Hall, Denver, Colo. 

Thrall, Laura Ernestine, 119 Tyler Place, Colorado Springs. 

Warnock, Janet Zilpah, Ticknor Hall, Loveland, Colo. 

Waterhouse, Georgiana, Ticknor Hall, Weiser, Idaho. 

Wharton, Jessie Catherine, 10 S. Wahsatch Ave., Colorado Springs. 

Whittenberger, Gladys Mae, 1911 N. Tejon St., Colorado Springs. 

Wickham, Esther Lionne, Bemis Hall, Denver, Colo. 



®lfr 3tetortrk ijL Qlnaaitt IHrmnnal ifall 

The "Cossitt Memorial" building, the gift of Mrs. A. D. Julliard, is prac- 
tically completed and will be dedicated during the commencement exercises 
this spring. 

The prime purpose of this new structure is to place physical training and 
the whole athletic life of the college on the broadest basis. All this is in 
line with the best plans of the institutions of the hrst rank in the country. 
The arrangements for games with other institutions will be complete. The 
rooms on the first floor to the west have special baths, rubbing rooms, lockers 
and dressing rooms for the various teams. There are also admirable accommoda- 
tions for the visiting teams from other colleges. 

The gymnasiums show what a large part of the great building is given 
to the department of physical culture. Both the main indoor room and the 
stadium, or out-of-door gymnasium, under competent instructors, will be operated 
together for the courses and individual work in physical training and exercise. 
The running track will be in the stadium, and as much as possible of the exercises 
will be given in the open air. 

The large indoor gymnasium, which extends up into the roof, has two 
galleries, where visitors may watch the physical work and such games as basket- 
ball. To the east of this large room is the smaller one for boxing, fencing and 
wrestling. To the south is the general audience hall, where all kinds of student 
meetings will be held. 

The stadium, in addition to the regular physical training work, can be 
used for the finals in tennis and other contests. The seats will accommodate 
about 1,000 spectators. This will also be used for preliminary work in baseball, 
It will be possible to have here out-of-door plays, as the whole stadium can be 
beautifully lighted at night. It is estimated that 4,000 people can witness these 
events. 

The building will be the center of wholesome sports of all kinds, and 
under the director it is expected that every man in college will regularly enter 
into some kind of game which will give health and recreation at the same time. 
It is believed that at Colorado College, as elsewhere, interest in competitive 
athletics of all kinds will be greatly increased by the participation of every able- 
bodied man in well-directed sport. The eastern institutions have already dis- 
covered this to be a fact, and in place of one or two there are in these colleges 
often as many as 40 or 50 baseball teams. From these come the varsity team, 
which is all the better because it has so many trained men from which to draw. 
But, best of all, it teaches all students to love good sport for its own sake and 
gives them an interest in play. It is most fortunate that Washburn Field, the 
exceptionally fine grounds of the College, is contiguous to the new building, and 
so everything in the athletic and physical life will be closely related. The build- 
ing will in every way tend to broaden and intensify every kind of athletic exercise 
and put the work in this institution abreast of the best work that is being done 
anywhere in the country. 

95 



®ljr (ttnlorato (Eolbge Atljbtir Aaaariatum 

©fftrrra 

President L. H. Bortree 

Vice President J. W. Park 

Secretary ! R. H. Motten 

Treasurer Howard Moore 

iflantltji Urmlm's 

Professor Park Professor Moore 

Professor Motten C. J. Rothgeb 

Alumni iHrmbrrs 

Dr. L. H. Bortree H. G. Sinton 

^tu&rnt ifflpmbrrs 
J. L. Herron R. L. Hall 

fflrmbrrs E.v-GMirui 

D. L. Sisco, H. A. Watson Managers Baseball 

E. B. Jackson, H. S. Kramer Captains Baseball 

H. A. Watson, E. S. Wade Managers Track 

J. J. Sinton, E. H. Koch Captains Track 

R. E. Miller, G. DeW. Robinson : Managers Football 

G. A. Bowers. H. S. Kramer Captains Football 

(&tnhmtv fHanager of Atljlrtirs 

Glenn A. Bowers 



96 




97 




GJoarlj 




Captain, E. B. Jackson 



Manager, D. L. Sisco 



uJt|0 Scam 

Years 

Name Position Played 

Kramer, (Capt.-Elect) Catcher 2 

J. Jackson Pitcher 1 

E. Jackson, Capt Shortstop 3 

Culp First Base 1 

Lindstrom Second Base 3 

Evans Third Base 1 

Hughes Left Field 4 

Wall Center Field 2 

Moberg Right Field 3 

Lewis Shortstop 1 

Claybaugh Catcher, Pitcher 1 

Team Average 



Batting 




Average 


Fielding 


.407 


.975 


.350 


.813 


.250 


.739 


.286 


.984 


.207 


.927 


.241 


.906 


.226 


.923 


.375 


.882 


.290 


.700 


.308 


.750 


.250 


.875 








.290 



.859 



99 



Saturday, April 5. C. C. vs Mines, Washburn Field. C. C, 0; Mines, 6. 

The Tigers started the season with a bad case of stage fright and "blew 
up" in the sixth inning of this first game. Before they returned to earth again 
the game was over and the Mines had the long end of the score. 

Saturday, April 26. C. C. vs. U. C, Boulder. C. C, 1; U. C, 4. 

Seven errors made by the Tigers on an exceedingly fast field tells the 
story of the 4 to 1 defeat administered to C. C. by the State university in the 
second game of the season. 

Friday. May 2. C. C. vs. D. U., Washburn Field. C. C, 7; D. U., 0. 

Playing errorless ball behind superb pitching, the Tigers "came back" 
with a vengeance and scored a shutout against D. U. for their first victory 
of the season. Although a strong wind, carrying clouds of dust, made good 
fielding difficult, there was but one error made and the game was one of the 
best seen on Washburn field for some time. 

Saturday, May 10. C. C. vs. U. U., Washburn Field. C. C, 11; U. U., 0. 

Having acquired the shutout habit in the preceding game, with D. U., 
the Tigers kept up the good work and piled up a score of 11 to against Utah. 
The feature of the game was the pitching of Jackson. He held Utah to one 
hit and only thirty men faced him in nine innings. 

Saturday, May 17. C. C. vs. Aggies, Washburn Field. C. C, 16; Aggies, 5. 

This game was an exhibition of the kind of baseball they used to play 
when the game was in its infancy. Terrific batting and ragged fielding was 
the order of the day and the only good thing about it was that we won. 

Friday, May 23. C. C. vs. Mines, Golden. C. C, 7; Mines, 6. 

The nerve of "Josey" Hughes and the everlasting fight of the whole Tiger 
team won this game for C. C, after a nerve-racking ten-inning fight. In the 
last half of the ninth, with the score 5 to 5, two men on bases, three balls on the 
batter and none down, Hughes took Jackson's place in the box and retired the 
Miners without a score. In the next inning, his team mates won the game. 

Monday, May 26. C. C. vs. D. U., Denver. C. C, 6; D. U., 5, 

C. C. used three pitchers and played errorless ball in an effort to win this 
game. After a hard fight the Tigers finally took the long end of a 6 to 5 score and 
won one of the closest games of the season. 

100 



Friday, May 30. C. C. vs. U. C, Washburn Field. C. C. 8; U. C, 5. 

After U. of C. had obtained a lead of three runs in the first inning, the 
Tigers came from behind and fell on Chamberlain's delivery for a total of 14 
hits and 8 runs. By winning this game, we tied U. of C. for first place in the 
Conference championship series. 



Sir utrui of tfjr Reason 

The outlook at the beginning of the season was dark. To begin with, 
there were a number of positions to be filled by new men. As if this were not 
enough, three weeks of bad weather prevented regular practice and the team 
started the season with a big handicap. Both of these factors showed them- 
selves in the first two games, which the Tigers lost. But what the men lacked 
in experience, they made up in fight and the team goes down in the annals of 
athletics at Colorado College, as the hardest-hitting and hardest-fighting baseball 
team which this institution has yet turned out. A strong battery and a team 
of consistent, heavy hitters tells the story. The season was a success. We 
did not land the pennant, but we tied the University of Colorado for first place, 
which, considering early-season reverses, was a remarkable performance. The 
Tigers are coming into their own again. Two years ago they lost the champion- 
ship after holding it for four years ; last year they tied for first place and this 
year we predict will see them once more at the top. 



101 




At the suggestion of President Slocum, a Campus League was formed to 
play a series of games for a large pennant, which "Prexy" offered as a trophy. 
Each of the fraternities, Hagerman Hall and a team of college men, who lived 
in town, were represented by a team. Each team played every other team two 
games. Sigma Chi went through the season without a defeat and won the pen- 
nant, after a close race with the Independents. "Prexy" presented the trophy 
at commencement time. The suggestion turned out to be a good one. The 
men got a great deal of good and a lot of fun out of the games. Not the 
least amusing feature of the games were the costumes worn by the players in 
lieu of baseball suits. 

£$tmiMug of tltr ulrama 

Won. Lost. Pet. 

Sigma Chi 6 1,000 

Independents 4 1 .800 

Phi Gamma Delta 3 3 .500 

Kappa Sigma 2 3 .400 

Hagerman Plall 2 4 .333 

Phi Delta Theta 2 4 .333 

Delta Phi Theta 1 5 .167 



102 




103 




(Hoarfj 
(£. 3. ftnttjgeb 

Assistant Coach 
Herbert Vandemoer 




Captain, J. J. Sinton 



Manager, H. A. Watson 



Sinton, Captain Half Mile. 

Davis Pole Vault — High Jump — Shotput — Discus. 

Cowdery Hurdles. 

Wray Mile— Two Mile. 

Cheese 220-yard — 440-yard Dash. 

Koch, (Capt. -Elect) Shotput — Hammer — Discus. 

Havens Two Mile. 

Balch Broad Jump — 220 Hurdles. 

Taylor Mile. 

Hall Two Mile. 

Johnston High Jump. 



Pmnt0 Won 



Davis 43 

Cowdery 19 

Wray 15 

Cheese 13^> 

Koch 1 3 

Johnston 



Havens 10 

Balch 10 

Taylor 8 

Sinton 8 

Hall 6 

5 



105 



She §>?aH0n 



May 2. C. C. vs. D. U., Washburn Field. C. C, 83; 

100-yard Dash, Stender, D. U Cheese, C. C. 

220-yard Dash, Wycoff, D. U Stender, D. U. 

440-yard Dash, Cheese, C. C Vogel, D. U. 

880-yard Dash, Sinton, C. C Kampf. C. C. 

1 Mile Run, Wray, C. C Taylor, C. C. 

2 Mile Run, Havens, C. C Hall, C. C. 

120-yard Hurdles, Cowdery, C. C Cajori, C. C. 

220-yard Hurdles, Cowdery, C. C Balch, C. C. 

High Jump, Johnston, C. C Davis, C. C. 

Broad Jump, Balch, C. C Wycoff, D. U. 

Pole Vault, Pierce, D. U Davis, C. C. 

Shatput, Davis, C. C Koch, C. C. 

Discus, Bingham, D. U Koch, C. C. 

Hammer, Bingham, D. U Koch, C. C. 

Relay, Forfeited to C. C. 

*Broke State Record. 



D. U., 34. 

Time: 10 1-5. 
Time: 24 1-5. 
Time : 53 2-5. 
Time: 2:10 2-5. 
Time: 4:54 4-5. 
Time: 10:39 2-5. 
Time: :\7 flat. 
Time: :27 1-5. 
Dist. 5 ft. 4 in. 
Dist. 21 ft. 6 in. 
Dist. 11 ft. 2]A in.* 
Dist. 41 ft. 2 in. 
Dist. 115 ft. 
Dist. 118 ft. 7 in. 



About three hundred High School men saw C. C. defeat D. U. in track, 
on the afternoon before High School Day, last year. It was a one-sided affair, as 
the score shows. Mack Davis was high individual point winner. The feature 
of the meet was the breaking of the state pole vault record by Pierce, of D. U., 
with a vault of 11 feet 2 l / 2 inches. The old record was 11 feet \y 2 inches. In 
most of the events the Tigers had everything their own way and were not pushed 
hard to win. 



May 16. C. C. vs. U. C, Washburn Field. C. 

100-yard Dash, Cline, U. C Ireland, U. C. 

220-yard Dash, Ireland, U. C Cheese, C. C. 

120-yard Hurdles, Vincent, U. C Cowdery, C. C 

220-yard Hurdles, Cowdery, C. C Vincent, U. C. 

440-yard Dash, Ireland, U. C Cheese, C. C, & 

Cline, U. C, tied 
880-yard Dash, Warner, U. C Sinton, C. C 

1 Mile Run, Taylor, C. C Wray, C. C. 

2 Mile Run, Havens, C. C Wray, C. C. 

Shotput, Koch, C. C Davis, C. C. 



C, 61 '/ 2 ; U. C, 


55'/ 2 . 


Time: 


10 2-5. 


Time : 


22 2-5. 


Time : 


16 2-5. 


Time : 


25 2-5. 


ied Time : 


52 2-5.* 


Time : 2 


!:05. 


Time : - 


L-54. 


Time : '. 


1:15 2-5 



Dist. 39 ft. 3 in. 



106 



Discus, Davis, C. C Sawyer, U. C. Dist. 113 ft. 

Pole Vault, Davis, C. C Donovan, U. C. Dist. 11 ft. 1 in. 

High Jump, Hall, U. C, and 

Davis, C. C, tied Dist. 5 ft. 9 in. 

Broad Jump, Balch, C. C I vers, U. C. Dist. 21 ft. 

Hammer Throw, Crouter, U. C Koch, C. C. Dist. 122 ft. 7-10 in. 

Mile Relay, Won by U. C. Time : 3:31 1-5.* 

Words fail to describe this meet. It was nip and tuck up to the last 
event. Every event was closely contested. When the meet was over we could 
hardly realize that we had beaten Boulder. For the first time U. of C. humbled 
in a track and field meet by a Colorado team. And our men deserved to win. 
They had trained faithfully and had worked hard in preparation for this contest 
and on the day of the meet, they gave all they had and out-fought the State 
team all the way around. We had the best team and no ill-luck interfered with 
our winning. Three state records went by the board ; U. C. relay team broke 
the state record for the mile relay, Cowdery lowered the record for the 220 
hurdles and Davis, after winning the pole vault with a vault of 11 feet 1 inch, 
cleared the bar at 11 feet 3 inches. Davis was the star of the meet, winning two 
firsts, a tie for first and a second. Taken all in all, it was probably the most 
exciting and most successful meet ever held on Washburn field. 

May 24. Conference Meet, Boulder. 

100-yard Dash, Cline, U. C, Ireland, U. C, Stender, D. U Time: :10 flat. 

220-yard Dash, Ireland, U. C, Cline, U. C, Travers, U. U Time : :22 3-5.* 

120-yard Hurdles, Vincent, U. C, Hopper, A., Cowdery, C. C Time: :16 flat. 

220-yard Hurdles, Vincent, U. C, Melzer, D. U., Ivers, U. C Time : :25 3-5. 

440-yard Dash, Cline, U. C, Ireland, U. C, Cheese, C. C Time: :48 4-5.* 

880-yard Dash, Jamieson, U. C, Cole, U. U., Warner, U. C Time: 2:00 flat.* 

1 Mile Run, Cole, U. U., Wray, C. C, Jamieson, U. U Time: 4:41 3-5. 

2 Mile Run, Deeds. D. U., Hall, C. C, Wray, C. C Time: 10:41 3-5. 

Broad Jump, Swink, A., Hopper, A., Ivers, U. C ...Dist. 21 ft. 8 in. 

High Jump, Hall, U. C, Hennebold, A., Davis, C. C, tied Dist. 5 ft. 9y 2 in. 

Pole Vault, Davis, C. C, Golden, A., McFadden, U. C Dist. 10 ft. 6 in. 

Discus, Bingham, D. U., Lofgren, U. U., Davis, C. C Dist. 122 ft. 8 in. 

Shotput, Davis, C. C, Koch, C. C, Johnson, D. U Dist. 42 ft. 2 in.* 

Hammer, Bingham, D. U., Crouter, U. C, Koch, C. C .Dist. 130 ft. 8 in. 

Relay, U. C, U. U., C. A. C Time: 3 :29 4-5.* 

Score : U. C, 48^ ; C. C, 27 ; U. U., 21 ; D. U., 20^ ; C. A. C, 18. 
*State record. 

This was the first conference meet of the Rocky Mountain Athletic Gen- 
ii 07 



ference. Utah was represented for the first time and to the sorrow of the Tigers. 
We had great hopes of winning this meet, but Utah sprung a surprise on us and 
captured a number of events which we expected to take and did not take any 
events from Boulder, as we had hoped. But the meet was a whirlwind. Five 
state records were broken and two tied. Mack Davis again loomed up, taking 
high individual honors with 14 points, closely pushed by Cline of Boulder with 
13 points. Davis also established a new record in the shotput, with a put of 
42 feet 2 inches. 

Urmrut of tljf i>raamt 

There is no one connected with Colorado College, who will not vote the 
track season of 1913 "the best ever." True, we only succeeded in getting second 
place in the Conference meet, but we beat Boulder. That is the thing never 
to be forgotten. We defeated the State team in the first meet which they have 
lost in all the history of state contests. Besides this, we produced high individual 
point winner and broke three state records. As in the preceding year, we were 
weak in the dashes ; we held our own in the middle distances and excelled in 
the long distances and field events. A great deal of the credit for our good 
showing is due to Coach Rothgeb and his assistant, Herb Vandemoer. These 
men worked and planned ceaselessly to develop the material at hand and their 
efforts were crowned by winning the state championship through the victories of 
the dual meets. 



108 




109 




(Eoarlj 




* Cap tain, G. A. Bowers 



Manager, R. A. Miller 



Left End ,-,' Kramer 

Left Tackle Ragle 

Left Guard .....Gerlach-Rose 

Center : Mimmack 

Right Guard Koch-Davis 

Right Tackle Gibson 

Right End Bowers- VanStone 

Quarterback Ross-Balch 

Left Half E&miol-Cheese 

Fullback Claybaugh 

Right Half Taylor 

Substitutes: — Kampf, Stocks, Randolph, Park, Isensee, Cameron, Moye, 

Latson. 



*Raymond Lewis was Captain-elect but due to early season injuries was unable to 
play throughout the year. Bowers, who captained the 1912 team, became acting captain in 
Lewis' place. 



Ill 



QIlip ^rasnn 



September 27. C. C. vs. C. S. H. S., Washburn Field. C. C, 54; C. S. H. S., 0. 

Playing straight, old-fashioned football, the Tigers took the Terrors into 
camp in the first game of the 1913 season. They outplayed the High School men 
in every department and with the added advantage of weight and experience, piled 
up a big score on their opponents. 



October 4. C. C. vs. Alumni. Washburn Field. C. C, 34; Alumni, 7. 

The Tigers met the scrappiest alumni team, this year, that has yet been 
gotten together. Opening up with trick plays and forward passes, our men had 
the grads guessing throughout the whole game. The feature play of the game 
came when Harry Black intercepted a forward pass and raced fifty yards for the 
Alumni's only score. 



October 11. C. C. vs. Wyoming, Washburn Field. C. C, 49; Wyoming, 0. 

Showing remarkable early season form and playing first class football, in 
every department of the game, the Tigers defeated the U. of W. by a decisive 
score. The team's over-head work was especially good. A triple forward pass, 
Balch to Kramer to Taylor to Bowers was one of the prettiest plays seen on 
Washburn field for years. 



October 18. C. C. vs. Utah, Washburn Field. C. C, 6; U. U., 7. 

At this late day, we still weep over that Utah game. Outplaying then- 
opponents from the start to the finish of the game, the Tigers still went down 
to defeat. Four times they had the ball on Utah's one-yard line but they scored 
only once. Utah's score came when Travers picked up a fumbled punt and ran 
seventy yards for a touchdown. Fumbling and a lack of judgment at psychological 
moments, were the causes for the defeat. It was no one man's fault. Every 
man on the team contributed to the good plays and almost every one to the bad 
ones. The game was a thriller from start to finish. "If only " 



November 1. C. C. vs. U. of C, Boulder. C. C, 0; U. of C, 0. 

We all went to Boulder and we all came back satisfied — almost. Playing 
a heavy team on a heavy field and with five men on the sick list, the Tigers did 

112 



•themselves proud. It was probably the hardest-fought game that the two teams 
have played, in the nineteen years that the schools have battled with each other. 
The ball see-sawed up and down the field, neither side being able to score and the 
game finally resolved itself into a punting duel between Nelson and Claybaugh. 
The Tigers didn't win, but we were all glad that we were backing a team which 
put up the fight that they did on Gamble Field. 



November 8. C. C. vs. Mines, Denver. C. C, 13; Mines, 17. 

Fumbles and Stringham and several other little things caused the down- 
fall of the Tigers, when they met the Mines, a week after the Boulder game. 
Outclassed and outplayed during the first three-quarters of the game, the Tigers 
"came back" in the fourth quarter with a rush, the rush that threatened to wipe 
the Mines off the field. But it was too late and the Mines celebrated that night. 

November 15. C. C. vs. D. U., Denver. C. C, 21; D. U., 2. 

And the Tigers "came back." Nothing daunted by their former defeat, they 
sailed into the D. U. team with a fight and a dash that completely smothered the 
Ministers. Line bucks and end runs were the order of the day and the Tigers 
rambled up and down the field almost at will. D. U. scored their two points 
on a safety resulting from Bingham's attempted drop-kick. The chief interest in 
the game lay in trying to figure out what the Tigers would "pull off" next. 



Noember 27. C. C. vs. College of Emporia, Washburn Field. C. C, 49; C. of E., 0. 

Touted as the champions of Kansas, the College of Emporia came here for 
the Turkey day game with a reputation to live up to. But, although they showed 
flashes of form throughout the whole game, they fell an easy prey to the Tiger. 
When they tired of bucking the line, the Tigers ran their opponents to death with 
overhead play and they finished up the season with a nice fat score to their credit. 



Uevrietu at itje B>?aBon 

In many respects the football season was a success. Coach Rothgeb started 
the season with only five regulars from the preceding season. With these men as 
a nucleus, he built up a team, recruited from last year's freshmen squad, that 
would have been a credit to any school in the west. And then of course we tied 
Boulder on her muddy, home grounds, and we count that season a success in 
which we beat Boulder, or keep her from beating us. And yet, the season was a 

113 



disappointment in one way. In the four conference games which the Tigers 
played they were only defeated by a total of five points. It is hard to lose by 
such a narrow margin, and it is hard for us not to make excuses, when we feel 
that we should have had those two games. This year's team was one of the 
strongest elevens that has ever represented Colorado College. The back field 
especially, which was almost entirely new, was one of the best seen here for years. 
Captain Bowers and Jack Taylor must be given especial mention. Bowers' foot- 
ball knowledge and fighting spirit was a big asset to the team. Jack Taylor played 
in slashing style, not making many touchdowns, but carrying the ball the length 
of the field, so that others could put it over. He won for himself a place on the 
"All State" team, which was given to him, and on the "All-Conference" team, 
which was denied him. All in all, it was a successful season. Every man on the 
team played good football and showed that true Tiger spirit that brought them 
back fighting at the end of the season after suffering two defeats. A large share 
of the credit for the showing made by the team is due the scrubs. They took the 
roughing and the drubbing of the first team throughout the season in order that 
that first team might be more efficient. We take off our hats to these men. 




J^rlalj ! 



114 




(Hjr iflrrBljutan JfaotbaU Squall 

Manager, Heimbecker. Captain, Cover. 

Beavers, Stubbs R. End 

Garside R. Tackle 

Ettinger R. Guard 

Judevine Center 

Cook L. Guard 

Shaw L. Tackle 

Mann L. End 

Heffner 0. Back 

Mimmack, Shaw F. Back 

Cover R. H. Back 

Cochran L. H. Back 

Substitutes: Tegtmeyer, Pugh. 



The Freshman team was not given much opportunity to show what it was 
capable of doing, this year. They had only one game, that one with the local 
High School, which they won by a score of 7 to 0. There was first-class football 
exhibited in this game and several of the men gave promise of developing into 
star players. There are some big linemen who handle themselves in good shape 
and are anxious to learn. Heffner, at quarter and Cover at half, put up the 
best game and showed up well in scrimmage against the first team. Mann, 
Cook and Mimmack also played a good game and Ettinger showed a willingness 
to work and to learn, which augurs well for his future. The team as a whole 
was a good one and judging from the few times they were seen in action there 
will be plenty of material to take the places left vacant by the men who graduate. 

115 



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P resident, K. F. Weller 



P"ic£ President, Elizabeth Sutton 



Secretary-Treasurer, F. Y. Kim 

The last year has seen a new interest in Tennis and a much more alive 
Tennis Club at Colorado College. The club arranged the regular spring tourna- 
ment and it was run off in better shape than for several years. Raymond Lewis 
won the tournament and with it the cup offered by the Lucas Sporting Goods 
companv. This year, the club is even more active. There was a good tourna- 
ment in the Fall, which did not drag along as formerly. A number of good 
matches were played and Florian Cajori was high man. At the present writ- 
ing, the courts are being put in excellent condition for the Spring tourna- 
ment, which bids fair to be the best ever. Definite plans are also under way for 
an intercollegiate tournament this spring, which is a step in the right direc- 
tion, for there is certainly plenty of good material, here at C. C, out oi 
which to mould an intercollegiate tennis champion. It is to be hoped that 
this renewed interest will continue to grow and that tennis will occupy the 
place that it should hold, among the sports at the college. 



no 




Iftgtj g>d}00t lag, Hay 13, 1914 

Manager, G. A. Bowers 

In spite of the disagreeable weather which prevailed throughout the 
morning, High School Day was a great success. The rain, snow and hail 
which fell in the morning, made track and field heavy and as a result, no 
records were broken. However, in several of the track events and in all 
of the field events, better records were made than in the year before. 

Pueblo Central had the class of the 230 athletes, who represented the 
31 schools taking part in the meet. Excelling in track events and with point 
winners in the field events the Pueblo school easily took first place with 31 
points. Colorado Springs High School was second with I6J2 and Greeley 
was third with 10j/2 points. Individual honors were won by Eubank, of Springs 
High, with 11 points. He was crowded by Cary of Central, Pueblo, with 10 
points and Schweiger of Lafayette with 8. 

Although handicapped by bad weather Coach Rothgeb lived up to the 
reputation which he has established for conducting the best track meets in the 
state. All the events went off like clock work. The meet surpassed any ever 
held by the college, in number of athletes entered, the cups awarded and the 
general "pep" and interest shown. Incidentally, there are now registered in 
Colorado College, four men, who took 24 out of the 117 points scored in the 
meet. 



117 




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liiiit^ 






fl^il* 



JCappa ^tgma 

Founded at the University of Virginia in 1S6/. 
Beta Omega Chapter Installed in 1904. 

919 North Weber Street 



Argo, William K. 
Beavers, J. Leslie 
Cajori, Florian A. 
Cross, Eugene H. 
Davis, Mack W. 
French, Henry J. 
Hazen, Frank D. 
Heron, John L. 
Koch, Edward H. 



Soil 

Fratres in Collegio: 

Mann, Wilbur R. 
McLain, Ernest J. 
McNeil, Frederick B. 
Miller, Ray E. 
Pollock, M. Wayne 
Robbins, Dwight 
Schlessmann, Gerald 
Walker, Graham R. 
Williams, Homer H. 



Henry, James 



Pledged 



Heilman, Roy B. 



Fratres in Urbe 



Acker, Dr. Frank A. 
Ackley, G. F. 
Black, Harry L. 
Chamberlain, Dr. Dean 
Chamberlain, Paul 



Latta, William B. 
Tucker, St. George 
Hayes, William D. 
Preston, Eugene D. 
Seldomridge, Gerald B. 



121 



Founded at Miami in 1853. 
Beta Gamma Chapter Installed in 1905. 

1125 North Nevada Avenue 



Soil 



Fratres in Collegio: 



Balch, H. H. 
Claybaugh, E. P. 
Cochran, F. B. 
Duke, B. E. 
Eager, L. P. 
Emery, C. F. 
Esmiol, M. A. 
Garside, B. C. 
Heffner, P. T. 



Kampf, F. W. 
Keener, G. H. 
Kingman, V. C. 
Lewis, I. Raymond 
Mimmack, R. F. 
Mimmack, W. E. 
Moye, R. A. 
Van Stone, W. D. 
Wall, H. G. 



Pledged 
Rose, Lynn 



Fratres in Urbe 



Appel, R. G. 
Allebrand, G. A. 
Bowers, G. A. 
Capen, B. C. 
Holland, R. L. 
Holland, P. A. 



Jonston, W. G. 
Lennox, L. C. 
Morrison, Richard 
Powell, E. S. 
Shaw, L. L. 
Sisco, D. L. 



123 



pjt (Samma §?lta 

Founded at Washington and Jefferson in 1848. 
Chi Sigma Chapter Installed in igo8. 

1122 North Cascade Avenue 



Sail 



Fratres in Collegio: 



Cheley, Glen E. 
Cover, Lee H. 
Culp, Hamer, S. 
Dennis, G. Wesley 
Evans, Frank 
Grimsley, R. Elmo 
Hall, H. E. 
Hall, R. L. 
Harrison, Charles A. 
Jackson, John E. 
Johnston, Charles 
Kramer, Harry S. 
McCammon, Floyd F. 



Neuswanger, P. C. 
Nowels, Kenneth 
Porter, Alfred 
Rawlings, John 
Robinson, G. DeWitt 
Spalding, John W. 
Strain, Frank E. 
Stubbs, Morris, G. 
Taylor, Theron 
Turner, Merrill H. 
Watson, Harley A. 
Weller, Karle F. 
Williams, Judson T. 



Pledged 
Davis, Chester E. 

Fratres in Facilitate 
Blackman, Dr. A. A. 



Fratres in Urbe 



Armstrong, J. Roy 
Armstrong, Willis 
Blackman, Carl R. 
Bortree, Dr. L. W. 
Fawcett, H. H. 
Franklin, J. E. 
Frost, H. E. 
Harrington, W r . 
Henderson, Alva 



Hoagland, Dr. H. W. 
Horton, A. H. 
Howbert, Van Dyne 
Rhodes, H. O. 
Stewart, B. H. 
Stewart, O. W. 
Thomas, H. F. 
Thompson, E. C. 
Willis, Willet R. 



125 



;"* 







1 


tP 


• 


■ 


:. 




i - i 

1 


» 









ftjt irlia ®^ta 

Founded at Miami University, 1848. 
Colorado Beta Chapter Installed igij 

1319 North Nevada Avenue 



Soil 

Fratres in Collegio: 



Baker, S. W. 
Christy, W. G. 
Crampton, J. H. 
Gibson, M. V. 
Harter, C. A. 
Heald, E. C. 
Heimbecher, L. W. 
Leibernecht, S. L. 
Merrill, H. G. 



Miller, C. V. 
Nelson, R. R. 
Ross, W. C. 
Scheie-, W. L. 
Stewart, T. L. 
Stocks, J. W. 
Thomas, W. D. 
Wade, E. S. 
Williams, E. 



Williams, R. V. 



Hoi.man, N. D. 
Johnson, C. A. 



Pledged 



Tegmeyer, E. R. 



Madden, J. H. 
Ragle, W. 



Motten, R. H. 



Brown, A. R. 
Castello, Charles 
Downs, R. B. 
Ewart, Rev. J. Y. 
Monroe, D. E. 



Fratres in Facilitate: 

Rothgeb, C. J. 

Fratres in Urbe 

Perry, Hubert 
Ross, T. W. 
Sinton, H. G. 
Smiley, D. R. 
Spurgeon, W. H. 
Wolfe, Rev. R. B. 



127 



Local Founded in igo6. 
1106 North Weber Street 



loll 



Fratres in Collegio. 



Allen, A. J. 
Becker, B. C. 
Berryhill, R. H. 
Bolles, F. H. 
Bunker, J. V. 
Cheese, C. B. 
Glezen, Lee 
Golden, C. E. 
Graves, C. H. 
Greenlee, L. A. 
Gregg, H. W. 
Guy, E. Lin 



Hall, F. H. 
Hall, J. S. 
Henn, Chester 
Lee, Gale 
Lloyd, Robert 
McKesson, William 
Morse, L. P. 
Munro, E. H. 
Nordeen, A. G. 
Storke, F. P. 
Taylor, C. E. 
Wray, H. C. 



Caldwell, Jesse 
Crossan, Robert 



Pledged 



Verner, Ogden 



Geiser, Claude 
Maxwell, Raymond 



Frater in Facilitate 
Clark, G. W. 



Clark, V. C. 



Fratres in Urbe 



Fuller, J. E. 



129 




fan ij ?llwtr (Homtril 



©ffirrra 

President Dean Cajori 

Vice-President Raymond Lewis 

Secretary-Treasurer Fred P. Storke 

mpmbrrBljtp 

Dean Cajori 



_ .,-. l racultv Member. 

Dean Parsons j 

j. Kappa Sigma. 

Sigma Chi 
Harley Watson 



John Herron 
William Argo 

Ray Lewis 
Wilfred VanStone 



Judson Williams 

Fred Storke 
Everett Munro 

Charles Harter 
Walter Thomas 



Phi Gamma Delta. 
Delta Phi Theta. 
Phi Delta Theta. 



The purpose of this Council is the consideration of matters pertaining 
to the welfare of the College and of the Fraternities. Each Fraternity elects its 
own representatives which are chosen in their Junior year to serve two years. 

The Deans of the Liberal Arts and Engineering Departments constitute 
the Faculty representation. 



130 




iFarultg Mtmbtra 

Marianna Bkown, (Colorado College). 

Florian Cajori, (Colorado College). 

Moses C. Gile, (Brown). 

Edward C. Hale, (Williams). 

Frederick R. Hastings, (Colorado College). 

Elijah C. Hills, (Cornell). 

Ruth Loomis, (Vassar). 

Frank H. Loud, (Amherst). 

Helen 0. Mahin, (DePauw). 

James W. Park, (Amherst). 

Edward S. Parsons, (Amherst). 

William M. Parsons, (Wisconsin). 

Marie A. Sahm, (Colorado College). 

Edward C. Schneider, (Colorado College). 

William F. Slocum, (Colorado College). 

Lois Smith, (Colorado College). 

Leila C. Spaulding, (Vassar). 

Homer E. Woodbridge, (Williams). 



mpmbrrB ttt ffinllrge 

1914. 



Adams, Frances 
Atwater, Reginald 
Greene, May 
Harlan, Mabel 
Ingersoll, Sarah 

Brennicke, Pearl 

Bateman, Mabel 
Bortree, Leo W. 
Campbell, Melicent 
DeSaint, Edna 
Elrick, Mae 
Hall, Frances 



1915. 



Jackson, Everett 
Phillips, Martha 
Storke, Fred 
Sutton, Elizabeth 
Wood, Ruth 

Davis, Harold 



Qtaum Alumna? 

Hemenway, Addie 
Jencks, Mabel 
Kinney, W. P. 
Motten, Mrs. Roger 
McClintock, R. M. 
Ruby, W. N. 

131 



Saylor, Ella 
Shaw, Mrs. Lloyd 
Stewart, Orrie 
Wolfe, Mrs. R. B. 
Woods mall, Ruth 



§>tgma Helta fst 

Founded at Indiana University, 1912. 
Colorado College Chapter Installed in 1914. 



(Charter ifflcmbrrs 

President William F. Slocum Rothgeb, Claude James 

Albright, Guy Harry Schneider, Edward Christian 

Motten, Roger Henwood Thomas, George Brinton 



This fraternity was organized to encourage the comprehensive physical 
development and training among college students. It puts the stress on individual 
growth rather than on team growth. It emphasizes all-round athletic achievement 
rather than specialization. All male students in the Colleges of the United States 
are eligible to membership, and it is believed that this fraternity will inspire in 
college students the belief that the body is the servant of the mind. 



132 



' N8P y . , . ^P^ 









£3 , '" k,B 












Is*** 



®Ij0 Apollonian (ttlnb 



Founded 1S90. 

©fftcprs 

FIRST SEMESTER. SECOND SEMESTER. 

R. M. Atwater President H. W. Gregg 

L. B Clark Vice-President F. Cajori 

H. W. Gregg Secretary A. J. Allen 

M. E. Strieby Treasurer H. Bruner 

F. H. Bolles Sergeant-at-Arms W. R. Smythe 





Soil 






1914 




Allen, A. J. 




' Lloyd, Robert 


Atwater, R. M. 




Jones, P. L. 


Barnes, E. W. 




McCoy, W. C. 


Cajori, F. A. 




Park, N. R. 


Clark, L. B. 




Storke, F. P. 


Gregg, H. W. 




Strieby, M. E. 


Jackson, E. B. 


1915 


Watson, H. A. 


Borden, C. A. 




Robinson, G. D 


Bruner, H. 




Williams, J. T. 


Hopkins, G. A. 




Davis, H. T. 



Thomas, Walter 



1916 



Bolles, F. P. 
Hall, Frank 
Lee, Gale 
Neuswanger, P. 



C. 



Keener, G. 

McKesson, William 
Nowels, K. B. 



1917 



Randolph, J. 
Smythe, W. R. 
Taylor, C. E. 
Caldwell, H. L. 

Strain, F. E. 
Stubbs, M. G. 
Sinton, E. A. 



135 



raaflttB ffiiterarg gwiriy 



Founded 1S9S. 

(Mtrrrs 

FIRST SEMESTER. SECOND SEMESTER. 

Ray E. Miller President James S. Hall 

James S. Hall Vice-President W. C. Argo 

Karl F. Weller Secretary B. C. Becker 

Paul Jeanne Treasurer Paul Jeanne 

F. Y. Kim, Sergeant-at-Arms R. E. Miller 





Soil 

1914 




Kim, R. Y. 


Miller, R. E. 
1915 


Weller, K. F. 


Adams, C. M. 




Jeanne, P. A. 


Argo, W. C. 




Munro, E. E. H 


Emery, C. F. 


1916 


Hall, J. S. 


Blades, L. B. 




Steele, R. B. 


Graves, C. H. 




Morse, L. P. 


Stiles, F. 


1917 


Becker, B. C. 


Glezen, L. 




Henn, S. C. 


Huston, H. 




Bunker, J. V. 


Neff, K. 




Maxwell, R. W. 


Wubben, H. 




Sheldon, G. 



137 



ML . s L^ii 






. ** 




♦ 






~ 






• '**" 






" 





(Eireronum (Ulnb 

Founded 1904. 
Colors: Pale Blue and Gold. 



GMftrrrs 

FIRST SEMESTER. 

G. H. Copeland President 

R. J. Brown Secretary 

R. Sawhill Treasurer 

C. T. Latimer Attorney on Debate R. Sawhill 

K. T. Sasano Sergeant-at-Arms G. H. Copeland 



SECOND SEMESTER. 

F. M. Gerlach 

Lin Guy 

K. T. Sasano 



Copeland, G. H. 

Guy, Lin 
Sawhill, R. 

Brown, R. J. 
June, P. E. 



Stoll 

1914. 

1915. 
1916. 



Gerlach, F. M. 

Latimer, C. T. 
Sasano, K. T. 

Briscoe, J. L. 
Keating, J. H. 



139 



ilmmra Utorary gwirty 



Founded l8gi. 
Colors: Blue and White. Flower: 



White Rose, 



first semester. 

Frances Adams 

Mabel Harlan 

Katharine Copeland.. 

Martha Phillips 

Mina Zirkle 



©fftrpra 

SECOND SEMESTER. 

President Mabel Harlan 

rice-President Netta Powell 

Secretary Sarah Ingersoll 

Treasurer Helen De Rush a 

Factotum Cornelia Schuyler 



Adams, Frances 
McCreery, Dorothy 
Phillips, Martha 
Powell, Netta 
De Rusha, Helen 
Ingersoll, Sarah 

Carley, Mauri ne 
Ormes, Jean 
Schuyler, Cornelia 



Soil 

1914 



1915 



Lennox, Agnes 
Carson, Anne 
Cassidy, Helen 
Copeland, Katharine 
Harlan, Mabel 
Landon, Emily 

Sumner, Beatrice 
Wallace, Ruth 
Zirkle, Mina 



141 



(Efltttempnranj (ttlub 



Founded iSgg. 
Colors : Red and White. Flower : 



Red Carnation. 



Wtfutts 

FIRST SEMESTER. SECOND SEMESTER. 

Gladys Whittenberger President Maude Stanfield 

Elizabeth Sutton Vice-President Hester Crutcher 

Rofena Lewis Secretary Dorothy Madden 

Leila McReynolds Treasurer Elizabeth Sutton 

Emma Bates Factotum Harriet Ferril 



Soil 

1914 



Lewis, Rofena 
Madden, Dorothy 
McReynolds, Leila 



Stanfield, Maude 
Sutton, Elizabeth 
Wakefield, Lucile 



Whittenberger, Gladys 



1915 



Armstrong, Dorothy 
Banta, Marguerite 
Bates, Emma 
Brewer, Edyth 
Brooks, Eva 



Crutcher, Hester 
Ferril, Harriet 
Hensley, Olive 
Knutzen, Marguerite 
McReynolds, Edna 



Wilkin, Dorothy 



1-13 



Ijgpatta IGtteran} Swtrtg 

Founded 1903. 
Colors: Green and White. Flower: White Daisy. 



FIRST SEMESTER. SECOND SEMESTER. 

Jessie Sheldon President Jessie Sheldon 

Louise Willson Vice-President Delphine Sen mitt 

Constance Teague Secretary Lillian Catren 

Veda Hasty Treasurer Lucile Dilts 

Alice Mason Factotum Statie Erickson 





Soil 




1914 


Hasty, Veda 


Schmitt, Delphine 


Sheldon, Jessie 


Willson, Louise 




Dilts, Lucile 




1915 



Teague, Constance 
Bower, Marie 
Snyder, MaV 
Strawn, Bernardine 
Youngman, Florence 



Mason, Alice 
Gardner, Helen 
Erickson, Statie 
Catren, Lillian 
Roe, Kathleen 



145 



Founded 190/. 



©fiirrra 

Jean Dupertuis President 

May Snyder Vice Presidente 

Delphine Schmitt Secretaire 

Charles Latimer Tresorier 

Alice Van Diest Bibliothccaire 



Afliup iflrmbrra 



Bartlett, Harriet 
Berryhill, Robert 
Bourquin, Helen 
Brennicke, Pearl 
McReynolds, Edna 
Mullaney, Frances 
Park, Nelson 
Pearce, Virginia 



Stanard, Margaret - 
Sutton, Elizabeth 
Green, May 
Barr, Orpha 
Hathaway, Julia 
Rogers, Edyth 
Touzalin, Charlotte 
Warren, Helen 



Lennox, Agnes 



Hills, Prof. E. C. Jenkins, Dr. Hester D. 

Jameson, M. W. M. Meunier, Madame 

Meunier, M. Campbell, Mlle. 

Le Cercle Francais was organized in the Fall of 1907 by a group of 
some eight students of advanced French, independently but with the hearty 
co-operation of the Department of Romance Languages. It has ever since 
remained a student organization. Its purposes are to inculcate a love of the 
French language and literature and to help its members to a mastery of spoken 
French. The meetings are bi-weekly, social and literary in character. Seven 
annual plays have been given by the Club, ranging from the modern comedy of 
Halevy to the classics of Moliere. Not a few graduates of Colorado College, 
now actively interested in the study of French, owe their first inspiration to 
work pursued under the direction of Le Cercle Francais. 



149 




f GERMAN CL UB) 
Founded 190S 



iflahrl ffiarlatt 
Daymar iSjnlm 
tlrannr iforarr 
(Sale 2Jcr 



©fftrrra 



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Hirt-JIrrBifipnt 

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limilatuY, f^tpplim 
trirkann. 3>tatie 
JfiBttftt. ffllarabrl 
3Fnrarc. lElrauar 
(Srmtr. JHag | 
(Sriffttli. Mauite 
ISarlan, JHabfl 
iSiolm. Ayttra 
ffiolm, Saijmar 
Sjomr. (Sroryr ill. 
iKfllrrmaun. .Dnafphutr 



IKituua. Elizabeth. 
(Sale, ICrr 
Siong. iHilitrrft 
SJunitB, fRabfl 
fUrrurin, fHaryarrl 
JHnlirbarljrr, 5flnrnu? 
(ibmtitnrfrr. Urulal] 
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(iffirrra 

Marguerite Knutzen President 

Mina Zirkle Vice-President 

Olive Brown Secretary 

Eva Gault Treasurer 

This organization is the girls "pep" club of the college. Under the direc- 
tion of its officers the girls of the college are taught the college songs which are 
sung at athletic contests of the institution. The splendid enthusiasm of the 
women exhibited at all times in the intercollegiate activities of the school is 
due to the good work of this club. 



151 



Engineers' (ttlnh 

Founded October, igio. 
Colors : Brown and Green. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 

R. M. Rose 

A. C. Norton 

H. Latson 

G. L. Gebhardt.. 
A. L. Powell 



©fftrrrs 

SECOND SEMESTER. 

Presiden t A. F. Rose 

Vice-President H. Latson 

Secretary A. P. Brooks 

Treasurer A. L. Powell 

S erg eant-at- Arms P. A. Paulson 



ilrmbrrs 



Anderson, C. H. 
Rose, A. F. 
Rose, R. M. 
Gebhardt, G. L. 
Latson, H. 
Shadford, C. A. 
Brooks, A. P. 
Powell, A. L. 
Tamayo, F. C. 



Williams, R. V. 
Beavers, J. L. 
Cook, A. R. 
Crossan, R. R. 
Dudley, D. A. 
Ettinger, C. M. 
Paulson, P. A. 
Reed, C. D. 
Weber, G. 



153 




Sljr Sramattr Qllub 

©fftrrrs 

President Anne Bryan Carson 

Vice President Marguerite Knutzen 

Secretary Virginia Pearce 

Treasurer Mary Adams 

Manager Jean Ormes 

Cos tinner Bernardine Strawn 

Custodian Rofena Lewis 

jUtrmbrra 

All college girls paying seventy-five cents. 



15) 



8>nttnr QUaas Patj 

"iflUtdi Alio About £fatl?tttg" 

Presented in Cogswell Theatre, June 11, 1913. 

(East of QHjaraflers 

Don Pedro Charles Carson, Jr. 

Leonato Arnold Rowbotham 

Count Claudio ; Abel Gregg 

Benedick Lloyd Shaw 

Antonio Herbert Bennett 

Don John Thomas Lynch, Jr. 

Dogberry D. Lell Boyes 

Verges Rudolph Klein 

Borachio Joseph Floyd 

Balthazar William Winchell 

Conrad John Shaw 

The Friar Paul Bailey 

The Sexton Milton Kimball 

Seacoal William Winchell 

Oatcake Herbert Bennett 

Beatrice Marion Haines 

Hero Anne Baker 

Ursula Helen Rand 

Margaret Carrie Burger 

Bridesmaids, Court Ladies, Watchmen and Revelers. 

fHanagrmntt 

Miss Evelyn Lewis Directress 

Miss Ruth Law Orchestra Directress 

Mr. Charles Carson Manager 

Miss Mary Walsh Assistant Manager 

Mr. William Winchell Assistant Manager 



156 




®lj? Jtmtar (ttlaaa fjlay 

" (Utrlauntnj of tljc HMI0 " 

By Arthur J. Pinero 

Perkins Hall, November 22, 1913. 
©iir ^rranna of tlj? Play 

THEATRICAL FOLK. 

Tom Wrench C. A. Borden 

Ferdinand Gadd Chas. Emery 

James Telfer 0/ the William Greenlee 

Augustus Colpoys Bagnigge-Wells Glen Gebhardt 

Rose Trelawny Theatre Bernadine Strawn 

Avonia Bunn Margaret Merwin 

Mrs. Telfer, Miss Violet Frances Townsend 

Tmogen-Parrott, of the Royal Olympic Treatre Ruth Kelsey 

O'Dwyer, prompter at the Pantheon Theatre DeWitt Robinson 

Mr. Denzil of Chas. E. Bruce 

Mr. Mortimer : the , J. H. Crampton 

Mr. Hunston Pantheon Guy Hopkins 

Miss Brewster Theatre Cornelia Schuyler 

Hallkeeper at the Pantheon Clarence Adams 

non-theatrical folk. 

Vice-Chancellor Sir William Gower, Kt Judson Williams 

Arthur Gower His E. Linn Guy 

Clara DeFcenix grandchildren Jean Ormes 

Miss Trafalgar Gower, Sir William's sister Helen Bourquin 

Captain DeFcenix, Clara's husband William Argo 

Mrs. Mossop, a landlady Mina Zirkle 

Mr. Ablett, a grocer Guy Hopkins 

Charles, a butler Clarence Adams 

Sarah, a maid Dorothy Armstrong 





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fraranna flag 

Pearsons Literary Society of Colorado College, under the Direction of Professors 
Mottcn and Woodbridge, Presents 

" (Samntrr (burton's 5frrMr " 

El}t Namrs nf tljr g>|jrakrrs In tljta (UrnnrMr 

Diccon, the Bedlem : L. L. Shaw 

Hodge, Go miner Gitrt on's seruante Joe Sinton 

Tyb, Gammer Gin -ton's mayde Will Argo 

Gammer Gurton C. F. Emery 

Cocke. Gammer G art on's boye Willard Ross 

Dame Chatte J . S . Hall 

Doctor Rat, the curate D. Lell Boyes 

Master Bayle „ Ray Miller 

Doll Arthur Wilson 

Song Karl Weller 

Scene: — A village in England. 

An eight-minute intermission between Acts II and IV. 

God Save the Oucene! 



15S 




aty? itfnmrlj flay 

Ha SataUlr bt Samra 

COMEDIE EN TROIS ACTES 

PAR 

SCRIBE ET LEGOUVE 

iPwBnmtagra 

La Comtesse D'Autreval, nee Kermadio Mlle. Charlotte Touzalin 

Leonie de la Villegontier, sa niece Mlle. May Snyder 

Henri de Flavigneul M. Charles Emery 

Gustave de Grignon M. Jean Dupertius 

Le Baron de Montrichard M. Charles Johnson 

Un Domestique ] ,., „ TT 

TT „^ I M. Guy Hopkins 

Un Sous-Officer J 

La scene se passe au chateau d'Autreval, pres de Lyon, en octobre, i8iy. 



159 



®lje (Snunan Pag 

Stc Irruljmtr iFrait 

LUSTSPIEL IN DREI AKTEN 

VON 

FRANZ VON SCHONTHAN UND GUSTAV KADELBURG 

Prraonrn 

Baron Romer-Saarstein Gale Lee 

Agnes, seine Frau Netta Powell 

Wally 1 , _, . f Beth Knous 

TT !- deren lochter J 

Hernia I \ Margaret Merwin 

Paula Hartwig Helen Leipheimer 

Ottilie Friedland, Hire Nichte Hazel Harrison 

Graf Bela Palmay* William B. McKesson 

Ulrich van Traunstein Steven J. England 

Professor Georg Ziegler H. Houston 

Fraulein Seeman 1 im Hause f Irene Donaldson 

Anton j des Baron Romer y Horace J. Wubben 

Betty, Stubenmadchen bei Ottilie Mildred Long 

Zcit: — die Gegenwart. 

Ort der Handlung : Berlin. 



*Graf Bela Palmay ist Ungar und spricht schlechtes Deutsch. 



160 




Function Play 

" (Earsar tmb (Elropatna " 

Cogswell Theatre, March 7, 1914. 

(East 

Caesar Ruth Kelsey 

Cleopatra Virginia Pierce 

Fatateeta Minna Jewell 

Apollodorus Elizabeth Sutton 

Britannus Cornelia Schuy^ler 

Ptolemy Dorothy Madden 

Theodotus Lucy Jewell 

Ruflo Helen Ringle 

Pottinus Helen Bourquin 

Lucius Septimus : Helen Durbin 

Belzanar Florence Bryson 

Chairmian Dorothy Belk 

Iris Margaret Stannard 

Lady in Waiting Winnifred Walsh 

Bel Affris Katherine Keating 

Achillas Katherine Bateman 

Sentinel Gertrude Banfield 

Page Harriet Puntenny 

Porter Marjorie Whipple 

Priest Statie Erickson 

Manager Katherine Copeland 

At which the gentlemen of the College were the guests of the Dramatic 
Club. 



i«i 



CHRISTMAS PLAY 

" ®t}t Wtt\?v Wis? $Lan" 

By Van Dyke 
Dramatized by Robert Berryliill. 

Presented in Cogswell, December 12, 1913. 

SI}? (Ea0t 

Artaban Sarah Ingersoll 

Abdus Katheryn Bateman 

Rhodaspes Rachel Hallock 

Tigranes Irene Anson 

Abgarus Ida Blackman 

Hebrew Lucy Jewell 

Hebrew Rabbi Dorothy Waples 

Mother Claribel Fischer 

A Young Girl Ethel Shadowen 

Captain Agnes Bartlett 

Soldiers Frances Mullaney, Margaret Stannard, Delphine Schmidt 

Leader of Mob Pearl Brennicke 

Mob: — Helen Ringle, Esther Abrams, May Green, Marie Bowers, 
Florence Mohrbacher, Florence Bryson. 



(Ertrkrt nn tljp ijrartl) 

Cogswell Theatre, October 13, 1913. 

utyr (Uaat 

Dot Bernadine Strawn 

May Felding Harriet Ferril 

Bertha Lavina White 

Miss Fielding Claribel Fischer 

Tilly Slowboy Margaret Alexander 

Tackleton Beatrice Sumner 

John Helen Cassidy 

Stranger Helen Kirkwood 

Caleb Plummer Minna Jewell 

Spirit of the Cricket Olive Hensley 

Tackleton's Man Mina Zerkle 

Manager: — Emily Landon. 

162 



®Ij? Stger 



The Colorado College Newspaper. Published semi-iveekly by the Students. 
Issued Tuesday and Friday of each -week. 

Frederick M. Gerlach Editor-in-Chief 

Harold W. Gregg Business Manager 

Ebttorial i>taff 

William C. Argo Assistant Editor 

E. Lin Guy Assistant Editor 

Harold T. Davis Assistant Editor 

Charles F. Emery Assistant Editor 

C. Edgar Taylor Athletic Editor 

Arthur L. Powell Engineering Editor 

Jean Ormes Alumni Editor 

Ralph L. Hall Forestry Editor 

Beatrice Sumner Local Editor 

Harriet Gates Local Editor 

Guy Hopkins Assistant Manager 

James S. Hali Assistant Manager 

Elbert S. Wade Assistant Manager 

CEorrraviDntH'nta 

C. A. Borden Frank Kim Levi P. Morse Edward Williams 

E. H. Cross Gladys Whittenberger May Snyder 
Winnifred Walsh Ruth Kapitzky Alice Mason Evelyn Estabrook 



165 



Slje pk?a |teak Nugget 

The Annual of Colorado College. Published by the Junior Class during the 
Month of May Each Year. 

iSoarn uf iEoitara atto Managers 

Charles Francis Emery Editor-in-Chief 

George DeWitt Robinson Business Manager 

Marguerite Banta Assistant Editor 

William C. Argo Associate Editor 

Chauncey A. Border Associate Editor 

Eva Brooks Associate Editor 

Cornelia Schliyler Associate Editor 

Beatrice Sumner Associate Editor 

May Snyder '. Art Editor 

Marguerite Knutzen Assistant Art Editor 

Harriet Ferril Assistant Art Editor 

Judson Thomas Williams Athletic Editor 

Kahutaro Sasano Photographer 



167 



®lj? 101 fi Nuggrt Snarfc 



Frank Evans Editor-in-Chief 

Frank Hall Business Manager 

Helen Kirkwood Assistant Editor 

Edgar Taylor Assistant Editor 

Ruth Higgins Associate Editor 

Levi Morse Associate Editor 

June Eaton : ..Associate Editor 

Merrill Turner Associate Editor 

Edith Hamilton Associate Editor 

Robert Nelson : Associate Editor 

Willard Ross Athletic Editor 

George Keener Alumni Editor 

Jay Randolph Staff Artist 

Margaret Stannard Assistant Artist 

Henry Dockstader Assistant Artist 

Newton Holm an Staff Photographer 

Carl Becker Assistant Photographer 

Jessie Williams Assistant Photographer 

Floyd McCammon Assistant Manager 

Morris Esmoil - Assistant Manager 

Qlnlnraftn Gklbg? ftobliraitfltt 

Published every six weeks by the faculty. Under this title is now included the 
scientific publication formerly issued as "Colorado College Studies," as zvell as the announce- 
ments of the various departments of the college, the annual catalog, etc. 

William F. Slocum, LL. D Editor-in-Chief 

Florian Cajori, Ph. D Managing Editor 

E. C. Hills, Ph. D., Litt. D Associate Editor 

E. C. Schneider, Ph. D Associate Editor 

G. M. Howe, Ph. D., Secretary Associate Editor 



®lje Ijanbhrnik 



Published annually by the Christian Associations. Designed as a handy book of 
information and reference. 

Fred M. Gerlach Editor-in-Chief 

Leon B. Clark Business Manager 

C. A. Border Supervisor 



®lje Alumni Sulbtm 



A monthly publication of the alumni of Colorado College, dealing with news of 
especial interest to the alumni. 

W. M. Jameson Editor 



168 




®lj? ^tufont QIommtaHtcn 

The authority of the Associated Students is vested in a Student Commis- 
sion, elected by the student body at a general election held in May of each year. 
The members of the Commission for the past year were : 

President Everett B. Jackson. 

Vice-President Katiierine Copeland 

Secretary Mary Adams 

Treasurer Elbert Wade 

Editor of The Tiger Fred M. Gerlach 

Manager of Debating Reginald M. Atwater 

Senior Member Athletic Board John L. Herron 

Junior Member Athletic Board Ralph L. Hall 

Junior Member Tiger Board Judson T. Williams 

Alumni Member Athletic Board William W. Cort 

Junior Woman Representative Statie Erikson 

Under Class Representative Frank Hall 



170 




(Eljr iExrruttor Suarfc 

Lucile Wakefield President 

Rofena Lewis Vice-President 

Ruth Higgins Secretary 

Ruth Wallace Treasurer 

Wilkin, Dorothy Caldwell, Blanche 

Catren, Lillian Garnett, Anna Maude 

Adams, Mary 



Afcutanrg Utaarb 

Kelsey, Ruth Carlson, Georgia 

Hensley, Olive Gibbs, Lillian 

Anderson, Charlotte Landon, Emily 

Teague, Constance 




Ha 





j^S^li 





TOWN GIRLS' ASSOCIATION 

J %1 



9§M 



A 7 



x^ 



kW M 



Founded 1913. 

©ffircrs 

Katharine Copeland President 

Jean Ormes Vice President 

Helen Kirkwood Secretary and Treasurer 



Exrrutiur Unarb 



Sheldon, Jessie 
Banta, Marguerite 
Hubbel, Elizabeth 



Gowdy, Helen 
Hohn, Agnes 
Hutchinson, Mary 



For many years the need of an organization of the town girls has been 
felt — for social reasons and for the interests of town girls in College affairs. 
This year such an organization was formed. The sponsorship or "sister" 
system has been adopted as a means of accomplishing the aims of the association. 



& 



Qkmjma Aaaflriatum 



Founded 1913. 

This organization has been founded with the view of giving all persons 
connected with the College an opportunity to co-operate with the town people in 
keeping up and improving the appearance of the Campus. The officers will 
be elected in the spring elections. The organization is an all-student one, 
originated by the class of 1915. 



172 




©fftrrra 

FIRST SEMESTER. SECOND SEMESTER. 

Lillian Gibbs High Mogul Martha Phillips 

Beth Knous Sommoner. Lucile Dilts 

Martha Phillips Clerk Harriet Gates 

Margaret Alexander Almoner. Irene Ansen 

Rofena Lewis Baillie Helen Warren 

Ruth Wood Jester Mary Adams 

Maude Leonard Thrall Anne Carson 

Veda Hasty Thane Evelyn Woon 

Min na Jewell Yeoman Sarah Jacobs 

Netta Powell Franklin Charlotte Anderson 

Dorothy Madden Page Maude Standfield 

Lucile Wakefield Lord High Kicker of the Grub Helen Cassidy 

Francis Adams Lord High Suppressor Maude Leonard 

Maude Griffith Lord High Physician Minna Jewell 

Elizabeth Sutton Base Knave Dorothy McCreery 

Ruth Sheppard Lord High Inspector of the Movies Sarah Ingersoll 



173 




Ijagmnan Ijall 

(iffirrra 

President G. M. Gerlach 

Vice President C. A. Borden 

Secretary-Treasurer C. M. Adams 

Matron G. A. Bowers 

Janitor C. Thorsmark 

Protector Emeritus Dean 

Godfather R. H. Motten 

Adams, Clarence Cook, Albert Kutzleb, C. A. Davis, Mack 

Border, Chauncy Gerlach, Fred Park, Nelson Anderson, Forbes 

Baker, Professor Davis, Harold Augh, James Barnes, Winifred 

Briscoe, John Hopkins, Guy Tamayo, F. C. Williams, Russell 

Brown, Robert Heilman, Roy Fukuya, Shoan M. Gebhardt, G. L. 

Copeland, George Isensee, A. F. Cameron, Alan Sheldon, Alan 

Clark, Leon John, Edward Hyde, James Bowers, G. A. 

Clark, Merritt Kim, Frank Miller, Ray 

174 




©ffirrrs 

President Karl Weller 

Secretary Sam Baker 

MtmbetB 



FIRST TENORS. 


SECOND TENORS. 


FIRST BASS. 




SECOND BASS 


Baker 






MUNRO 


Weller 




Gregg 


Kampf 






Park 


Grimsley 




Claybaugh 


Blades 






Merrill 


Emery 




SlNTON 


Move . 






Hall, J. 


Sheib 




Cameron 








INSTRUMENTAL DUO 








Hall, 


H. 






Jackson, J. 



Baker 



QUARTET 
Kampf Weller Gregg 



177 




©ffirrrs 

Marguerite Knutzen President 

Gladys Christy Vice President 

Agnes Bartlett Secretary-Treasurer 

Claribel Fischer Librarian 

Ernestine Thrall Assistant Librarian 



ifflrmbrra 



first sopranos. 
Bartlett, Agnes 
Dunlavey, Eva 
Hemenway, Florence 
McKay, Anne 
Phillips, Martha 
Thrall, Ernestine 
Warnock, Janet 

second sopranos 
Allward, Charlotte 
Cassidy, Helen 
Carnahan, Mary 
Christy, Gladys 
Savage, Ada 
Walsh, Winnifred 



first altos. 
De Rusha, Helen 
Kelsey, Ruth 
Liepheimer, Helen 
Long, Mildred 
Puntenney, Harriet 
Ringle, Helen 
Savage, Lucy 

second altos. 
Garnett, Anna Maude 
Knutzen, Marguerite 
Lewis, Rofena 
Perley, Clara 
Spicer, Wilma 
Young, Gladys 



179 





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Mrs. John Speed Tucker Director 

Still well F. Moore Organist 



sopranos. 
Bartlett, Agnes 
Griffith, Maude 
McKay, Anne 
Pierce, Virginia 
Savage, Ada 

RlTTEMAN, CHLOE 
TENORS. 

Allen, Arthur 
Baker, Sam 
Henston, Harold 
Kampf, Fred 
Munro, Everett 
Strain, Frank 



Mtmbtts 

ALTOS. 

Ball, Grace 
Garnett, Anna Maude 
Knous, Elizabeth 
Knutzen, Marguerite 
Perley, Clara 
Spicer, Wilma 
Walsh, Winnifred 

bases. 
Atwater, Reginald 
Cameron, Alan 
Dupertuis, John 
Maxwell, Raymond 
Merrill, Glen 
Striebv, M. Edward 



i&i 




Mrs. George M. Howe Conductor 

VIOLINS 

Harlan, Mabel Lennox, Agnes 

Gibson, Merle Hall, James 

Greene, Doris Hamilton, Sara 

Parsons, Edward Merrill, Madre 

Cameron, Hila Bunker, Gerome 

Johnson, Adah Carroll, Kathleen 
Hills, George 

Piano Margaret Barnett 

Clarinet Roy Glezen 

Flute Robert Putnam 

Cellos Lucy Lloyd, Homer Reynolds 

Double Bass C. H. Anderson 

Comet Robert Organ 

The College Orchestra had its beginning several years ago when Mrs. 
George M. Howe took charge of the violin department of the School of Music, and 
at once gave special attention to planning ensemble work with small combina- 
tions of instruments, so that a nucleus for the Orchestra might be formed. 
These efforts grew into realization and last year an orchestra of twenty pieces 
was formed ; rehearsals were held weekly and an excellent concert was given 
in April. 

The worth of this organization is inestimable not only to those who 
are members and have the opportunity to gain experience in orchestra playing 
and become acquainted with thoroughly good music (one Symphony being 
studied each year, as well as classic and modern numbers in smaller forms), 
but to college friends and townspeople alike, who feel that this annual concert 
by the orchestra is one of the really worth-while musical events of the year. 
The orchestra also assists at the Commencement exercises, at special Vesper 
musical services, and on other important College occasions. 



182 




The Euterpe Society of the Department of Music is a year old. In that 
short time it has demonstrated its claim to its motto : Good work and lend a hand. 
The purposes of the Society are "to promote the ideals and efficiency of the 
School of Music, and the Culture and the social and musical life of its members." 

Meetings are held weekly, every other session being a social evening 
with a program, musical and otherwise, including studies on the most significant 
literature, both musical and related to music. Much enthusiasm has developed 
in the club, nearly the full membership of the department is in it and the stimu- 
lant of it is felt throughout the work of the department. 




183 




Garden of the Gods, taken the from Kissing Camels 



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©ffirers 

President C. A. Border 

V ice Prcsiden t E. Wade 

Secretary E. B. Jackson 

Treasurer L. B. Clark 

(Eummtttrr (Bljairmrn 

Bible Study E. Wade 

Mission Study C. M. Adams 

Employment L. B. Clark 

Meetings M. E. Striebv 

Social J. Williams 

Social Service A. Allen 

Membership E. B. Jackson 



Abuisnra 



Motten, R. H. 



Thomas, G. B. 



iSG 




f nmtg Itomrn QHjrtsttan Aaanriatum 



(!3ffirrra 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



SECOND SEMESTER. 

Ruth Sheppard President Harriet Ferril 

Harriet Ferril...... Vice-President June Eaton 

Maurine Carley Recording Secretary Katherine Bateman 

Marjorie Crissey Corresponding Secretary Helen Kirkwood 

Dorothy Wilkin Treasurer Dorothy Pooler 

Harriet Ferril Membership June Eaton 

Elizabeth Sutton Devotional Edith Hamilton 

Sarah Ingersoll Affiliated Membership Marguerite Banta 

Rofena Lewis Bible Study Lillian Catren 

Katherine Copeland Mission Study Kathleen Roe 

Marguerite Knutzen Social Service Ruth Higgins 

Cornelia Schuyler Conference Lavina White 

Netta Powell Social Ruth Gleason 

Edith Hamilton Rest Room Ruth Wallace 

Anne Carson Poster May Snyder 

Agnes Bartlett Music Marguerite Knutzen 

Gladys Christy Church Affiliation Dorothy Wilkin 

Alice Mason , Finance Dorothy Pooler 

Lucile Wakefield Student Government Representative.... 

Helen Cassidy Student Volunteer Representative 



187 



g>tafottt HflltmtwB 



©fftrrra 



Helen Cassidy.. 
Frank Y. Kim... 



President 

.Secretary-Treasurer 



Helen Cassidy 
Frank Y. Kim 
Elbert Wade 



iHrmurra in (Cnllpgr 



Maude Leonard 



Reginald Atwater 
Elizabeth Knous 
John Dupertius 



imputation Steams 



As usual the College Y. M. C. A. carried on the deputation work. In 
former years the teams went out during the Christmas vacation but this year 
they went out for week ends. The Colorado College teams do not stand for 
any creed or denomination except the mind, body and spirit of the Y. M. C. A. 
triangle. 



monument team. 

Barnes, E. W. 
Thomas, G. B. 
Maxwell, R. W. 
Stubbs, M. E. 



LA JUNTA TEAM. 

Border, C. A. 
Motten, R. H. 
Guy, E. T. 
Strieby, M. E. 



188 



■ 




3nt?r-(!lnllr0tat£ irbaie 

Colorado College vs. University of Denver. 
Denver University Hall. 



Qjhirstum 

Resolved, That the Monroe Doctrine, as it has been applied by the United 
States, should be abandoned. 



affirmative. 
Colorado College. 

James S. Hall, (Captain) 

C. Edgar Taylor 

Frank Hall 



negative. 

Denver University. 

Holbrook Working, (Captain) 

Leslie Tuck 

Ralph Brown 



Harry E. Kelly Judge James Owen 

Judge J. J. Garrigues 

The decision was rendered two to one in favor of the negative. 



190 




3htt?r-&0ri?tg fobaie 

1914. 
Presiding Officer J. W. Park 

(ipurHtton 

Resolved, That the only elective officers of the State Government of Colo- 
rado should be a commission of fifteen qualified electors in whom shall reside all 
legislative powers, a State Auditor and a Governor who, with his appointed 
cabinet, shall exercise all executive powers. 



AFFIRMATIVE. 

The Apollonian Club 
Hall, F. H. 
Bolles, F. H. 
Border, C. A. 

C. C. Hemming 



negative. 
Pearsons Literary Society 
Morse, L. P. 
England. S. J. 
Hall, J. S. 



J. W. SCOTT 



Dr. W. F. Martin 



Chas. L. McKesson J. L. Bennett 

The decision was rendered in favor of the affirmative. 




g>mr?t ©rafnrtral (Hmtfrai 



§>yrakrrs anil ^ubtpfts 

"The Awakening of China:' — Guy H. Hopkins. 

"The Conservation of Our Human Resources:" — C. Edgar Taylor. 

"Society and the Criminal." — Frederick H. Bolles. 

"Paramount Problems:" — Karle F. Weller. 

"Essentials in College/' — Chauncev A. Border. 

"Child Labor." — Frank H. Hall. 

"Scholastic Standards in Colorado College:" — Helen M. Rand. 

The judges were the Rev. Gibson Bell, George M. Irwin, the Rev. W. W. 
Ranney. 

Prizes were awarded as follows : Helen Rand, $30 ; Karle Weller, $20. 



192 




vm 



>.-; 




The pretty old English custom of celebrating May Day with the crowning 
of a queen and its attendant ceremonies has been observed at Colorado College 
for many years. The program consists principally of dances of different kinds, 
a May pole dance, a Greek dance by the girls of Minerva, a wreath dance by the 
Freshmen, a colonial minuet by the Sophomores and folk dances. The pageant 
is given in a picturesque woodland setting in the college park and is carried on 
under the auspices of the Y. W. and Y. M. C. A. 

The hockey game between the men's literary societies, which decides who 
will be made queen, was this year declared a tie but in the drawing contest the 
Apollonian Club won the cherished honor of selecting the reigning lady. Miss 
Carrie Burger^ was escorted to the throne by Rex Atwater and the crown of 
flowers was placed upon her head. Her attendants, Miss Lillian Wright and 
Miss Kathleen Kingsley gave a dance of greeting, and the dances by the classes 
and organizations followed. 

Judson Williams was in charge of the refreshments and had prepared for 
his guests an appetizing supper that touched the spot. 

See Calendar for month of May. 



194 



■ % _ 



aWfXBEKT 



The Commencement of 1913 at Colorado College was a memorable occa- 
sion in the history of the institution. It marked the completion of twenty-five 
years of service on the part of President Slocum, years during which the college 
under his leadership has made steady and rapid progress. The occasion was 
made notable by the addresses of Professor George Lincoln Henderson, L. H. D., 
Yale University, President William Trufant Foster, Ph. D., Reed College, Port- 
land, Oregon, Dean LeBaron Russel Briggs, LL. D., Harvard University, and 
Mr. David F. Matchett, Chicago, Illinois. 

Program of (Eammettrematt Wnk 

FRIDAY, JUNE 6. 
Senior Play, "Much Ado About Nothing," The College Park, 4:30. 
Sweet Oratorical Contest, Perkins Hall, 8 o'clock. 

SATURDAY, JUNE 7. 
Minerva Breakfast, Acacia Hotel, 9 o'clock. 
Recital by the School of Music, Bemis Hall, 3 o'clock. 
Second Presentation of Senior Play, College Park, 8 o'clock. 

SUNDAY, JUNE 8. 

Baccalaureate Service, Perkins Hall, 4 o'clock. Sermon by President Slocum 
Juniors, Seniors, Alumni, Faculty, and invited guests assembled in Coburn 
Library at 3 :45. 

MONDAY, JUNE 9. 

Contemporary Breakfast, Acacia Hotel, 7 :30. 

Commemorative Exercises at Perkins Hall, 10:30, Professor William Strieby 
presided. Brief Addresses were given by Mayor Charles L. McKesson, 
for the City; Judge H. G. Lunt, for the Trustees; Superintendent Carlos 
M. Cole, for the Public Schools. Historical Address, President William 
Trufant Foster, Ph. D., Reed College, Portland, Oregon. Presentation of 
Portrait of President Slocum, Mr. Philip B. Stewart. Responses : Dean 
Florian Cajori, Everett B. Jackson, President of Student Body. 

Apollonian Alumni Luncheon, Alta Vista Hotel, 12 :30. 

Pearsons Alumni Luncheon, Alamo Hotel, 12:30. 

The Laying of the Cornerstone of The Frederick H. Cossitt Memorial Building, 
West Campus, 3 :30. Music by The College Glee Club. Statement: Presi- 

195 



dent Slocum. Prayer: Rev. W. W. Rannev. Address: Dean Florian 

Cajori. Placing of the stone by Mrs. Slocum for the donor, Mrs. A. D. 

Juilliard. Presentation of the President's Pennant to the Champion of 

the Campus Baseball League. 
Reception to all Alumni, 24 College Place, 4:30. 
Senior Reception, Bemis Hall, 5 o'clock. 
Public Meeting of the Phi Beta Kappa Society, Perkins Hall, 8:15. Address 

by Professor George Lincoln Hendrickson, L. H. D., Yale University, 

formerly a member of the Faculty of Colorado College. 

TUESDAY, JUNE 10. 

Hypatia Breakfast, Cliff House, Manitou, 8 o'clock. 

Class of 1899, Breakfast, 1432 Culebra Avenue, 8 o'clock. 

Class of 1906, Breakfast, Palmer Park, 8 o'clock. 

Class of 1908, Breakfast, Acacia Hotel, 8:30. 

Class of 1911, Supper, Monument Valley Park, 6 o'clock. 

Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees, Palmer Hale, 10 o'clock. 

Reunion of Class of 1904, Coburn Library, 10 o'clock. 

Class of 1910, Luncheon, Golf Club, 12:30. 

Class Day Exercises, The College Park, 4 o'clock. Speech by the President 

of the Senior Class, Thomas Lynch, Jr. Class Poem by Dorothy Stott. 

Class Oration by Charles A. Carson, Jr. Musical Selections by the Class 

Quartet. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11. 

Commencement Exercises, Burns Theatre, 10 o'clock. Address : Dean 
LeBaron Russell Briggs, LL. D., Harvard Lhiiversity. 

Seventy-one diplomas were presented in 1913 at the thirty-second annual 
Commencement of Colorado College. 

Scholarships were awarded by President Slocum at the beginning of his 
statement . as follows : 

Perkins ScJwlarships — Pearl May Brennicke of the class of 1915, and Wil- 
liam C. Argo, class of 1915. 

Mary G. Slocum ScJiolarship — Percy Laban Jones, Jr., class of 1914. 

Hairy Strong ScJwlarships — Arthur Allen, Chauncey Border, Henry 
Brunner, Harriett P. Ferril, Frank Y. Kim, Everett Munroe, Ruth Sheppard, 
Elbert S. Wade, Lucile Wakefield. 

Hypatia Scholarship — Delphine Schmidt. 

The fraternity scholarship prize was awarded to the Delta Phi Delta fra- 
ternity. 

HOiNORARY DEGREES WERE PRESENTED AS FOLLOWS: 

Doctor of Science — Theodore Dru Allison Cockerell, professor of biology 
at the State University. William Strieby, head professor of chemistry, Colorado 
College. 

196 



Doctor of Literature — Moses Clement Gile, head professor of Greek and 
Latin, Colorado College. William Henry Smiley, superintendent of schools of 
Denver. 

Doctor of Laws — Florian Cajori, head professor of mathematics and dean 
of the engineers' school of Colorado College. William Trufant Foster, president 
of Reed College, Portland, Oregon. Fred Burton Renney Hellem, dean of 
State University. George Lincoln Hendrickson, professor of Latin at Yale. 
Howbert Alonzo Howe, dean of Denver University. 

Master of Arts — Mrs. Mary Goodale Slocum, wife of President William 
F. Slocum of Colorado College. 



-^ 



The pan-pan is a queer bird being a composite of vaudeville, free lunch and 
patriotic assembly. Just before a vacation a pan-pan is held to reinspire the 
students with a burning love for their Alma Mater which shall impel them to 
go forth and convert the horny-headed High School Senior to an imperative 
craving for a C. C. education. Almost anybody can give a pan-pan, ( the girls 
gave one once) but it takes a remarkable compound of nerve, brains and endur- 
ance to give a really super-excellent one such as the Senior pan-pan bfore 
Christinas which was overflowing with wit and (far more general in its appeal) 
humor ; or the different Hagerman Hall conglomerate of foreign dances, Ameri- 
can wit and local talent. 

The method of conducting a pan-pan is as follows : 

At eight of the clock you and your friend or friends arrive in Bemis. 
After greeting all the people whom you owe and whom you have successfully 
avoided during the previous month, you descend into Cogswell and strive to 
get a good seat which means a seat not on the aisle which you will probably 
have !to yield to belated ladies or faculty but a seat in the middle of a row, 
yet not one behind a white cast iron pillar nor yet one farther forward than the 
sixth row front else you will presently become involved in a wilderness of 
facultv. Still only the uninitiated will take a back seat since there you can neither 
see, hear nor breathe. Having located yourself and friend or friends according to 
your nerve and knowledge you attend strictly to the program. When that is 
finished you get up stairs as fast as a faculty congratulating the performers will 
let you and partake of eats. ( No matter how different the program the eats are 
the same). Then everybody assembles in the Common Room to sing "Curfew 
Will Ring in a Minute" and tries to beat Curfew out of doors. Those who do 
not succeed are marked victims for the rest of their College Course unless with 
great presence of mind they start to washing dishes. 

197 



Jnaignta flag 



Insignia Day, when the Seniors for the first time don the academic cap 
and gown, was held this year on October 22nd. It is the custom each year 
for the Juniors to devise some novel form of celebration for this so important 
event in the life of the upper classmen. 

The Freshmen and Sophomores who came to chapel early on Insignia 
Day cast questioning glances at the big white and gold gate, garlanded with roses 
and surmounted by a huge Senior cap from which golden beams radiated. The 
mystic number seven above the closed portals signified little to them. Not until 
the trumpet of Gabriel had sounded and that winged being appeared, followed 
by St. Peter with an enormous golden key, did they realize that they were to 
witness the advent of the Seniors into the "seventh heaven," which is the 
height of bliss. Then came eight Juniors in full costume with flowing white 
robes and sweeping pinions. After them followed the members of the class 
each wearing a pair of tiny white wings. The gate was ceremoniously thrown 
open and between the double line of Juniors holding roses to form an archway, 
the Seniors marched to their seats. They were then showered with the flowers. 

The faculty in academic robe occupied places on the rostrum and a chapel 
service appropriate to the day was held. 



199 




®1|? g>tag Sail 



ON WITH THE DANCE, LET JOY BE UNREFINED. 

And eventually they did on with the dance also some joy was rather un- 
refined. The costumes were striking and of the latest, some so late that they were 
partially omitted. Anyway they were only half there. The lightning change of 
some artists aided by orange-peel teeth added to the apparent numbers of beau- 
tiful damsels and escaped lunatics. The appearance of a smallpox patient caused 
a near-disturbance which was rapidly allayed by the prompt action of a doctor 
and nurse. The Football championship was hatched out and given to Professor 
Cajori amid applause which made the welkin ring. (I'll bite; what's the welkin?) 
One suggestion for next year — if the young — ah — women would shave before 
they attend this function, it would be more in keeping with the standard of our 



girls! 



P. S. — Mrs. Argo will be at home next vear. 



200 




This ball was different from any other colonial ball for this reason. Gen- 
erally the vice-president, who is one of our girls, manages it but this year, owing 
to an upheaval, compared to which the Mexican situation resembled a five-for-a- 
cent toy torpedo, the vice-president was a man. Hence speculation was rife as to 
whether Mr. Hall would don velvet coat and powdered wig or whether the 
president would descend from her lofty eminence and take charge. To our dis- 
appointment it was the president who led the grand march. Otherwise the ball 
was much as usual except that our enterprising photographer was able to obtain 
a picture of the masculine element looking in at the window. No, Harley, we 
did not print that picture. The minuet was good, the costumes were pretty and 
the dining room tables were more effective than ever before so that altogther 
this ball deserves its place in the annals of C. C. history. 




/ (*& r* 




®lj? AU-Qtolkg* f trntr 

Place — Garden of the Gods. 
Time — All day. 

We fooled a joke on the weather man this year. Thinking that we would 
be as unobservant of the Sabbath as is our custom he sent the usual George- 
Washington-crossing-the-Delaware-river weather on the 22nd. We rested this 
Sunday as we should have done, and when the next day dawned seventy degrees 
warmer, we all scurried toward the Garden to enjoy an excellent picnic prepared 
for us by Count John Herron. 



program 

First — 10:00 a. m. — Bicycle Race. 

Second — 10:00-11 :30 a. m. — Hunting Tags. 

Third — Qualifying Race of Girls for Class Relay Team. 

Fourth — Class Relay Dash. 

lunch 12:00 to 1:30. 
Fifth — 1 :00-l :30 p. m. — Short Talks. Pres. Slocum, Dr. Cajori, "Eve" Jackson. 
Sixth — 1 :30 p. m. — Sophomore and Freshman Class Event. 
Seventh — 2:30 p. m. — Girls' Baseball Game. 
Eighth — Senior Dramatic Play. 
Ninth — Tug of War. Sophomores and Freshmen. 
Tenth — Sextette from Lucia. 

202 




GUj? Sarbrat? 



The barbecue given under the auspices of the Sophomore Class last 
Halloween evening was distinctly different from any previous barbecue. From 
the Miltonic Hell of the year before the college was escorted among the grue- 
some shades of the Greek Hades, the many original stunts and the excellent 
"eats" made the entire affair worthy being called "the best ever." 

Manager: — Frank Evans. 

program 

1. Real Music Funk's Orchestra 

2. Ghosts Assemble Class of 1916 

3. Eat 'Em Up, Tigers C. C. vs. U. of C. 

4. "Welcome" Frank Hall 

5. "Barbecue Sense" President Slocum 

6. "There's a Reason" "Lester" 

7. "Barbecue Nonsense" Dean Cajori 

8. Mono — Plain Aviation The High Flyers 

9. "Colorado" Everybody 

10. For That Hungry Feeling Sophomore Hashers' Union 



203 




"Don't miss the merry-go-round! All aboard!" "Bring your children to 
see the baby show!" "Honk-honk!" "Art gallery, best ever! See yourself as 
you see others!" "Popcorn, peanuts, gum, taffy! Two for a nickel!" "Feed 

the giraffes! Look out for the Tigers!" "Let the !" 

Sudden silence. The side shows and criers were hushed as the spectators 
gathered to witness the most remarkable circus ever presented. The main features 
were top-notch stunts, ranging from vaudeville and wild west to the height of 
tragedy. And that minstrel show! Well, if one can judge from the hilarity 
and applause it surely was some circus. 



OFFICIAL PICTURE 
Aprii 1st. Taken for Leslie's Weekly. 



204 




For three years previous to the season of 1914 the football team had been 
the guest of business men in town at a banquet given in their honor at the 
Antlers hotel. This year the men of the college themselves undertook to give 
the banquet and through the activity of Doc Robinson and the loyal support 
the men of the college gave him it was a unique success. We dare not maintain 
that our seventy-five-cent dinner could compare in any way with that served to 
the team in former years by the business men at the rate of a dollar and a half 
to three dollars a plate, yet all were satisfied. Wherein then lay the success of 
the banquet? Was it the jokes? Certainly not. Was it the display of "pep?" 
That was not all. There were some good yells and they were strong and en- 
thusiastic. But there was none of that noisiness which is associated with such 
demonstrations. The speeches were unusual, exceedingly so, and although the 
speakers spoke from their hearts with intense earnestness, there still remains 
another reason for the success of the banquet. It can only be attributed to the 
gathering together of two hundred college men to express by their presence their 
enduring loyalty to the college and its best interests. The atmosphere they thus 
created is alone responsible for the great success of a banquet, which will have 
few equals as they are continued from year to year : 

(HoaatB 

Mandolin Duet Hall, Jackson 

Toastm aster, Everett B. Jackson 

Ideals Coach Claude J. Rothgeb 

The Town A. W . Henderson 

View Points Dean E. S. Parsons 

Music The Quartet 

The State Roger H. Motten 

Yesterday Glen n A. B owers 

Tomorrow Harry S. Kramer 

Mandolin Duet Hall, Jackson 

The College President William F. Slocum 

Our Colorado All of Us 

205 



Qklnrato (ttnlbg? nurtures 

Tuesdays at 8:15 P. M. 

PERKINS HALL 

^abjrfta 

1. Arbitration and The Hague Conference February 10 

President Slocum. 

2. American Forestry and the Practice of Forestry February 17 

Professor Terry 

3. German Industrial Education February 24 

Dean Parsons. 

4. Irrigation in Colorado March 3 

Mr. Fred L. Lucas of Denver. 

5. The Process of Adaptation to High Altitude March 10 

Professor Schneider. 

6. Spanish-American Poets March 17 

Professor Hills. 

7. Zend's Paradoxes March 31 

Dean Cajori. 

8. The Service of Economics April 7 

Professor Persons. 

9. Recent Advances in Surgery April 14 

Dr. L. W. Bortree of Colorado Springs. 

10. Munich April 21 

Dean Parsons. 

In May, Professor Moore, the exchange professor from Harvard, will 
give a series of lectures. 



206 




CalendaR 



APRIL comes in with its 
smears and tiles. Min- 
ers furnish us with 
smears and Easter with the 
tiles. Alpha Tau vanishes and 
Phi Delta Theta appears. Yes, 
they'll still let you look at 
them. Hagerman Hall gives 
best of the year at the San 
Luis school. Pops take a car 
ride to Manitou and Unappy 
club decides not to pledge this 
year. Pearsons put on their 
idea of a play — nothing that 
would do for Vassar — and °a 
few days later Y. M. has stag 
social. How could it be social 
if it were stag? It's good for 
the men to have a little misery 
dealt them. "Say, Jim, didn't 
I get any mail ? Gee, I fussed 
that Jane for half an hour yes- 
terday." Dramatic club puts 
on best performance of its his- 
tory which is going some. 
Suffragettes bust into Student 
Commission. No Pankhurst 
methods necessary. Here's 
where we get even with the 
weather and have an all-col- 
lege picnic with the laying of 
the corner stone for the new 
gym. Say, that was some lay- 
ing — good line of speeches and 
the best dog fight of the year. 



APRIL 



5 Miners defeat 
Tigers. 

Phi Delta In- 
stallation. 

H a g e r m an 
Hall dance. 

9 Agitation be- 
gun for col- 
1 e g e prin- 
shop. 



11 Unappy club 

decades not to 
pledge. 

12 P e a r s o n's 
Play. 



15 Stag Y. 31. C. 
A. social. 

19 D r amatic 
Club func- 
tion. 



22 Glee- club 
concert. 

23 Student Com- 
mission dis- 
cussed. 

Constitutional 
amendments. 



21 All-Co liege 
picnic. 

1/ a y i n g of 
corner stone 
of g y m- 
nasiuni. 

25 Estes Park 
supper. 



26 51 i n e r v a 
breakfast for 
Contemporary 
and Hypatia. 
German play. 

30 1914'« annual 
out. 



Estes Park convention oc- 
cupies attention of girls and 
Minerva takes Contemporary 
and Hypatia up the Canon for 
breakfast. They said they 
hadn't eaten anything before 
they came. German Club 
sneaks co-ed play over the 
footlights. Nein, wir kann not 
Dutch speaken. Glee Club 
Concert takes place and we get 
a chance to hear what our 
men sound like when they are 
really trying to sing and are 
not just practising the way 
they do all the rest of the 
year. On the whole we think 
strangers would be impressed, 
if not by the quality at least 
by the quantity and earnest- 
ness of the performers. Stu- 
dent Commission gets tired 
of running the college on 
nothing a year and discusses 
ways and means with the re- 
sult that the price of admis- 
sion to this show is raised a 
dollar a year. Ouch ! Still you 
must admit that it's cheap 
at the price. 1914 Annual 
comes out. It wasn't worth 
missing our dinners to read it, 
still they did pretty well. Wait 
till ours comes out though ! 
Nix on bum poetry and leaky 
covers. 



209 



MAY 



TWO or three dandelions 
are seen on the campus 
and 1916 smashes 1915's 
newly formed precedent by re- 
fusing to go after them so Be- 
mis restaurant is unable to 
serve greens this year. Blue- 
beard appears to welcome 
large number of husky high 
school athletes. Chilly con- 
ference workers set up gen- 
uine training-table grub to 
earn money for the new gym. 
Combination of C. C. spirit 
and good management count- 
eracts dampening influence of 
weather and makes high school 
day a success. Unusual rush 
on chapel seats, the day we be- 
come immortalized in the mov- 
ies as we march from Palmer. 
Overjoyed by busting into the 
limelight, C. C. hands it to the 
Mormons on the diamond. 
Despite the agitation of the 
weather, the May festivw i> 
festivalled and some reckless 
revellers stay out till nine-thir- 
ty. Prexy busts into Dean of 
College Presidents class and 
Tigers play as much of game 
as peevish Aggies can stand. 
Phi Gams join In Bad club 
with expensive (and agreea- 



1 I) a n tl elions 
are out. 

2 High - school 
pan-pan. 

3 High - school 
(lay. 

4 "Ath letio" 
Greek dances 
for Minerva 
alumnae. 

9 Moving; pic- 
tures taken of 
procession to 
chapel. 

10 C. C. defeats 
Mormons i n 

. baseball. 

May festival. 

11 Prexy be- 
comes Dean 
o f Amherst 
G r a d u ates 
who hold Col- 
lege Presiden- 
cies. 

15 Contemporary 
e n t e r tains 
Minerva and 
Hypatia a t 
Whittenberg- 
ers. 

IG Aps and Pear- 
son's ladies 
night. 

M c G r e g o r 
masked ball. 

19 T i g 
swamp 
gies. 

Phi Gam for- 
mal. 

20 M o v i e s of 
Pike's Peak 
come to town. 

22 Sophs enter- 
tain Seniors. 

23 Tigers win 
over Mines. 

24 S. G. Ban- 
quet. 

H a g er man 
Hall open- 

house. 

23 E n gin eers 
Ladies night. 

26 Tigers defeat 

D. U. 

27 Student Com- 
mission elec- 
tion. 

28 E o w e 1 1 of 
Harvard 
speaks. 

30 W e Beat 
Boulder. 

31 Contemporary 
function. 
Exam. week 
begins. 



Ag- 



ble) formal. "Foolish osten- 
tation to give such elaborate 
favors." (Not a quotation 
from anyone who was pres- 
ent. ) Sophomores stage elab- 
orate entertainment for Se- 
niors in the Jungle, Tigers 
wallop Miners and girls put 
on according to Hoyle Ban- 
quet. We know it was all 
right because it was Student 
Government's annual — 11-of- 
a-time. Hag. Hall loosens up 
and shows ladies its interior. 
How the dear creatures do 
love the weather bureau ! 
Things begin to double up on 
us. Engineers slip in a Ladies 
Night, Tigers land on D. U. 
and the campus throws up its 
hat and plunges headlong into 
politics, and campus baseball. 
Peace is eventually restored 
and we all get together again 
at the Boulder game which re- 
sults in a glorious C. C. vic- 
tory. Contemporary defies 
exam hoodoo by holding their 
function just before exams. 
That was the only reason for 
flunking that wasn't given. 
Now come late hours and 
early cokes but Prexy is about 
to twenty-five so we should 
be perturbed. 



211 



JUNE 



FACULTY betake them- 
selves to police protection 
and Senior men to Bemis. 
Can the German Band play 
the "March of the Valkure?" 
No, but it can play "Waiting 
for the Robert E. Lee" and it 
does till Prexy offers the per- 
formers a free drink to move 
on. Shakespeare certainly dis- 
approves of the Seniors at- 
tempting to do nothing much 
and sends gentle rain in large 
quantities. Seniors fool one 
over on little William and 
have it in Cogswell. If Shake- 
speare didn't turn in his grave 
it was because Bacon wrote 
the play. But at that every- 
body enjoyed it. Yes indeed 
they did. It was easy to tell 
which of the performers were 
the engaged people. Say, you 
know those Delta Phi boys? 
Well, they must be dandy bluf- 
fers for they won the schol- 
arship cup. Phi Gamma Delta 
was next. Sigma Chi shines 
in baseball and wins league 
pennant. Charles Carson 
makes seditionary speech and 
nearly rakes up the late un- 
pleasantness but such is our 
pacific disposition that we take 
in the oratory and pass up the 



3 D a is 
tain 
Bemis. 



enter- 
$ in 



i S t a r v a I ion 
Army Band. 

Dais initia- 
tion. 



Senior play 
in Cogswell 



9 Delta Phi 
Theta wins 
the scholar- 
ship cup. 



11 Prexy's twen- 
ty-fifth an- 
niversary. 

Com mence- 
m e n t exer- 
cises held in 
the Burns. 



12 E v ery-body 
sroes home. 
Senior girls 
hold howl. 



213 



"damned Yankee" stuff with a 
sweet smile. Prexy receives 
non-flattering portrait and 
Mrs. Prexy is comforted by 
one of them useful aids to en- 
tertaining, an electric player 
piano, warranted to drown all 
remarks on the weather or 
suggestions for a Junior prom. 
Oh, glorious day, Prexy is 
twenty-fiving. Ob, you deco- 
rations, decorating and deco- 
rators ! Oh, you speeches ! 
Oh, you processions ! Oh, you 
presentations ! But after 
awhile it is all over and we 
are all glad that Prexy has 
been with us twenty-five years 
and hope he may be with us 
two hundred and fifty more. 
Everybody goes home and the 
heavens weep to see them 
leave. Also some of the leav- 
ers weep ; some because they 
are all "thoo" and will never 
come again as studes ; some 
because they are parting from 
him and letters are so unsat- 
isfactory. The Senior Girls 
gather in the common-room on 
the last night of all and tell 
all the proposals they have 
had during their college 
course. This is what is known 
as the howl. What if you 
haven't had any ? Help, some- 
somebody, quick ! 



VACATION 



WINTER has its hot- 
dog sandwiches and 
summer has its hot dog 
days. We exhaust the sand- 
wiches and the days exhaust 
us. Now is the time when we 
lie by the purling brook study- 
ing for September cons. Our 
interest in athletics is confined 
to learning a new tatting stitch 
and we are productive of an 
awful run on best sellers. The 
foregoing is the traditional 
vacation, here follows the aw- 
ful reality. 

The high mogul of this pub- 
lication gets a job in one of 
our leading beaneries and the 
assistant moguls (masculine) 
get jobs on railroads, in pho- 
tographers or on ranches while 
the ladies (God bless 'em' 
take courses in Domestic 
Science or teach school. So 
fleet the golden hours away. 
The six best tellers spread the 
news of the June engagements. 
Some of us pretended to be 
surprised ; some of us pretend- 
ed not to be, but at any rate we 
all knew what made the 
Seniors howl. Letters from 
separated lovers keep boys in 
gray earning their salary. The 
former Frosh weary friends 
and relatives by telling how its 
done in old C. C. The State 



JUNE 

13 Emery and 
Jackson gel a 
J<>1>. 

14 W i 1 1 i a m s 

starts spiel- 
ing. 
17 E ngagements 
come out. 

23 Miss Schuy- 
ler starts 
domestic sci- 
ence. 

30 Lloyd begins 
work at tile 
Cave of the 
Winds. 



JUEY 

4 College cele- 
brates frag- 
ment tar ily. 
12 Bowers en- 
joys an even- 
ing at Salt 
Air. 



Pow- 

birth- 

A r g o 



18 Netta 
ell's 
day. 

24 Bill 

makes a date 
to meet "him" 
on the 

bridge. 

30. Miss Carley 
decides not 
to marry if it 
means she has 
to cook. 



AUGUST 

10 Everett Jack- 
son tours the 
state on his 
wheel. 

14 Mr. Molten 
and Miss Bar- 
clay get mar- 
ried. 

17 Oil Cary gets 
married. 

20 Bowers visits 
Routt County. 

25 Jackson rides 
two hundred 
and seventy 
miles in one 
day to reach 
Tort Collins. 



SEPTEMBER 

1 Shan K i v e 

begins. 
4 F r a ternities 

prepare t o 

rush. 



(with the aid of the summer 
campaign men) prepares to 
send her fairest, best and 
greenest to the shadow of 
Pikes Peak. 

Mr. Bowers takes pleasant 
trip to Salt Lake and practises 
the latest steps at the Salt 
Air Pavilion. We hear that 
the damsel was fair and that 
Mr. Motten was shocked. 
Everett Jackson follows his 
heart by devious routes to 
Fort Collins. During his 
journey he encounters several 
C. C. friends and finds them 
all busy. At Steamboat 
Springs he leaves his money 
in the bath-house. This leads 
to complications when he 
starts to buy a friend a drink. 
Miss Zirkle becomes our lead- 
ing society reporter at a few 
mountain resorts but decides 
Journalism is not for her when 
she gets stung on a chance 
for a scoop. Bill Argo's ar- 
tistic development is assisted 
by house-painting and land- 
scape gardening especially 
among the flowers of youth 
and beauty who visit Colo- 
vado Springs in the summer. 
Any rumors about Lloyd's 
being lazy that may have got 
around during the year are 
dispelled when he works two 
whole weeks at the Cave of 
the Winds. 



215 



SEPTEMBER 



JUST as we are beginning to 
realize that we are at home, 
September and time to pack 
our trunks arrives and before 
we know it, we are doing busi- 
ness at the old stand. Y. W. 
Cabinet prepares for the shock 
of busting into college life by 
house party but the rest of us 
must just struggle along as 
best we can. It seems good to 
see all our old friends and 
what we've run up against in 
the way of Freshmen and for 
these two reasons Y. W. re- 
ceives the girls and the Y. M. 
and Y. W. entertain every- 
thing appertaining to the col- 
lege. The flag rush is (strange 
to say) won by the Sopho- 
mores. The Tiger team starts 
training without even waiting 
for the smokers to be over. 
Everybody appears to be 
dreadfully busy but somehow 
the campus lawns get cut and 
so the classes elect officers. 
Miss Loomis arranges social 
schedule "tentatively" and it 
gradually hardens into place. 
Prexy receives Seniors, Rothy 
a fine (Fine Dope). Kinni- 
kinnick's approaching demise 
hastened by Tiger. Inconsid- 
erate Seniors anticipate cogi- 



5-8 Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet 
house-party. 

9 Y. W. C. A. 

reception for 
new girls. 



12 S o » homores 
win flag-rush. 

Y. M. and Y. 

W. reception. 

Tiger team 
begins train- 
ing. 

13 Y. M. stag 
reception. 

Lawns of 
Campus cut. 



elect 



17 Juniors 
officers. 

18 Social sched- 
ule placed 
tentatively. 



20 Prexy enter- 
tains Seniors. 

Rothy fined 
for speeding. 

K i nnikinnick 
dying. 

27 Tigers crush 
Terrors. 

Juniors and 
Freshmen en- 
tertained by 
Prexy. 



30 Town girls 
organize. 

Seniors take 
u n e x pected 
Piker's day. 



tating Faculty and take early 
Piker's Day. Absolutely noth- 
ing happens. Prexy doubles 
upon Juniors and Frosh and 
saves us money. We need it 
for the Annual. Town girls 
elect officers and choose spon- 
sors to educate Freshmen. 

The Tigers roll up their 
sleeves and go after Terrors 
right. For the first game of 
the season things look pretty 
good. The fraternities start 
putting pins on the Freshmen 
and each bunch gets the best 
Freshmen on the campus. 
Kappa Sigs start to buy a 
house but owner takes a look 
at the crowd and decides her 
old home is too dear to be 
turned over to a "passel" of 
boys some of whom carry 
matches and say "sugar!" 
Some of them say worse than 
"sugar" when this happens 
but who can blame them? It's 
sure hard to be hunting a 
house when all the rest are 
toting the Freshmen around 
and showing them "our 
house, the best on earth." 
The Kin expires more or less 
gracefully, leaving all it has 
to the Tiger, thereby showing 
a really Christian spirit. 



217 



OCTOBER 



THE month of nut-brown 
ale and frosty air is upon 
us. The frosty air ar- 
rives duly but the nut-brown 
ale doesn't get this side of 
Kansas. Still no body misses 
it for the Sophomores have 
their barbecue, but hush, Regi- 
nald, do we not anticipate? 
Surely other things happened 
during this month of nut- 
brown ale. No, no. I insist, 
nix on the nut-brown ale.' 
Well, we started off right with 
the first college sing on Palmer 
steps. It seemed pretty good 
to get together again and hear 
all the old college songs for the 
first time this year. The sing 
more or less prepared us to 
separate ourselves from A 
GREAT BIG DOLLAR and 
we were consoled by the fact 
that Xmas was a long way off. 
Juniors begin suggesting Ju- 
nior plays and peeve Seniors 
by occupewing their pies in 
chapel. Cranky Senior men 
stay outside and precipitate 
near-fight between lower 
classes. Hypatia entertains 
new-girls and the sight of the 
Freshmen caps so excites the 
football team that they wallop 
Alumni. Next week they lay 



Sins on Pal- 
mer steps. 

Tag clay. 



en- 
new 



3 Hypatia 
tertains 
girls. 

F r e s h m an 
eaps here. 

Juniors oc- 
eupy Senior 
seats at 
ehapel . 

4 Tigers wallop 
alumni. 

Prexy enter- 
tains Sopho- 
mores. 

Frate rnity 
night. 

10 D r amatic 
Club presents 
"Cricken on 
the Hearth." 

11 C. C. defeats 
W y o m i n g 
49-0. 

13 8 us gestions 
for Junior 
play are of- 
fered. 

17 Contemporary 
enter tains 
new girls. 

Tennis tour- 
nament com- 
mences. 

Freshmen re- 
minded o i 
their caps. 

18 Mormons de- 
feat Tigers 
7-6. 

F r at entity 
night. 



H Minerva 
tertains 
girls. 



en- 
new 



25 Seniors give 
I n s i g n i a 
party. 

Fire drills 
are held in 
the Halls. 

Juniors take 
n o n - fussing 
hike. 

31 Insignia day. 
Juniors 
choose Tre- 
lawney of the 
Wells. 

Sop homore 
barbecue. 



it over Wyoming about forty- 
nine times while on the same 
day, Sophomores stage first 
non-fussing hike of the age 
showing good spirit if it had 
been any other day than the 
date of a football game. More 
suggestions for a Junior play. 
Senior hats arrive and so does 
Utah later returning with the 
Tigers scalp. More sugges- 
tions for Junior play. Sug- 
gestions for Junior play pre- 
vail during this month of nut- 
brown — Can't you shut up 
about that nut-brown ale ? 
Contemporary entertains new 
girls and Seniors insig at 
dandy party. Some class to 
those movies. Say, where do 
you suppose that John Herro:. 
got all that experience t Fire 
drills as thickly populated as 
usual and Junior hike hiked 
despite weather. More sugges- 
tions for a Junior play but no 
one seems able to pipe the Pi- 
per and Trelawney of the 
Wells is chosen for the fourth 
and last time. Now comes the 
last ring on the Tiger's tale, 
the ne plus ultra of College 
affairs, the last sweet thing in 
barbecues. We have to admit 
that their stunts including that 
of 1917, their speeches and 
their eats made a fitting climax 
to the month of nut-br — Good 
night ! 



219 



NOVEMBER 



THE barbecue still echoes 
down the halls of time 
and Sophomores pay for 
railroad ties ; also as high as 
five dollars for valuable. cow- 
barn. Well it was cheaper 
than a law-suit. Aps and 
Pearsons fix it so no young 
lady can go to two ladies' 
nights by putting their fussing 
stunt the same Friday. Never 
mind. I might not have got 
to go had it been otherwise. 
Perkins organ has pneumonia 
and might have died but Bill 
Argo's heroic efforts change 
pneu. to asthma. Phi Gams 
have open house despite Tim 
Lynch's graduation. Tigers 
are defeated by Miners but 
forget this in the great grief 
of a former student's death. 

In the middle of the week 
of prayer our Philippine Am- 
bassador pays the campus a 
short visit. Tigers show what 
they are and leave D. U. gasp- 
ing on the field. All the clubs 
start in to eat. Aps have a 
stag banquet, the Engineers 
give the ladies refreshments, 
the girls glee club feeds itself 



1 Tatting move- 
ment among 
girls. 

C. C. ties 
with Boulder, 

5 M id-semester 
reports out. 



Prexy leaves 
for the East. 
Sophs pay for 
railroad ties 
and cow-barn. 

7 Aps and Pear- 
son's Ladies 
night. 

Organ in Per- 
k i n s has 
asthma. 



8 P h i (Jam 
open-house. 

M i n e rs de- 
f e a t Tigers 
17-14. 

9-15 Week of 
Prayer. 

S e 1 domridge 
returns from 
Philippines. 



13 Finals in Ten- 
n i s tourna- 
ment — Cajori 
wins. 

15 C. C. beats D. 
V 21-0. 

Nigh t-shirt 
parade. 

Prat ernity 
night. 



19 Aps stag 
banquet. 

21 E n g i neers 
L a d i e s' 
Night. 



22 Juniors give 
Trelawney of 
the Wells. 

26 51 i n e r v a 
Function. 



!* Thanks g i v- 
ing Day. 

C. C. beats 
Emporia, 49 
to 0. 

Kramer 
elected foot- 
ball captain 
for 1914 



and Minerva feeds the young 
men. But before this happens 
comes the best event of the 
year so far — the Junior play. 
That was a good show. 1916 
surely will have to be the ring- 
tailed wonder of the Rocky 
Mountains to beat them. 1914 
calendars come out and bang 
goes seventy-five more cents. 
Well, never mind, that's a 
present for Aunt Susan any- 
how. She sent me a pair of 
knit bedroom slippers last 
year and I guess this is good 
enough for her. We have al- 
ready mentioned that Minerva 
functioned. Well, it was the 
same as usual and we all gave 
thanks when it was over. 
That's why it came the night 
before Thanksgiving so we 
could remember it with our 
other blessings and not have 
to put it in a column by itself. 
Another thing we were thank- 
ful for was that C. C. waled 
Emporia. And (Greatest tri- 
umph of all for the Juniors) 
Pop Young made the foot ball 
team at the University of 
Washington. As the Football 
team is strong for fair hair 
they take a chance on another 
blonde captain 



221 



DECEMBER 



HERE beginneth what 
would have been a sec- 
ond flood had it been 
rain instead of snow. The 
storm was longer than Prexy's 
ethical the morning you 
planned to spend next hour 
studying for a trig, exam and 
by the time it was over, Colo- 
rado Springs had temporarily 
vanished. Girls halls put on 
snow party the first night. 
Half the college have chapel 
the next morning and classes 
are dismissed that afternoon. 
The storm continues, the girls 
halls nearly run out of food so 
Kappa Sigs kindly relieve the 
strain by putting on a little 
dinner. Koch bends the 
springs of the only cab in 
town and earns V. C. as chief 
rescuer. Classes are held any- 
where but in Palmer ; coal 
runs out and Prexy at last 
runs in having rested at Li- 
mon for quite some time. He 
at once starts coal campaign 
and faith ! the men respond 
loyally hauling in 18 tons. Aps 
defeat Pearsons in annual de- 
bate and both societies com- 
bine to make the first annual 
football banquet the best event 
of that nature that has ever 
been pulled off. The Other 
Wise Man (We are glad to 
hear that there was another, it 



3 Storm begins. 

fi B o u 1 d e r 
«• h a n g e s 
hands. 

Prater n i t y 
night. 



9 Prexy back 
from eastern 
Colorado. 

Aps beat 
Pearson's in 
the annual 

debate. 



10 First annual 
football ban- 
quet. 

11 Classes held 
in dormito- 
ries, gym and 
Perkins. 



12 The Other 
Wise Man is 
presented by 
the Girls 
Dramatic 
Club. 

Coal haulers 
dine at 
Bemis. 



13 High school 
Y. M. C. A. 
banquets at 
Bemis. 

Frater n 
night. 

18 Senior 
pan. 



i t y 



19 Chri s t m a s 
vacation be- 
gins. 

31 Student Vol- 
unteer Con- 
ference in 
Kansas City. 



encourages us to hope that we 
may at last find one) is given 
instead of Eager Heart by the 
Girls Dramatic. Young men 
enjoy Bemis food so much 
that our coal haulers come 
to Bemis for supper. Classes 
in dormitories, gym, and tat- 
ting still continue. Motten 
puts tatting in class with 
chewing gum and hunts a fool- 
killer but they are all busy. 
(Lucky for him!). High 
School Y. M.'s get a look at 
our college girls when they 
banquet at Bemis and are 
waited on by charitable co-eds. 
I believe all the Seniors de- 
cided to come up here next 
year. It's hard to tell whether 
Bemis is a girls hall or not 
what with the coal-haulers, 
the high school Christians 
aforementioned, the Annual 
Board and the Phi Gams who 
ran out of coal. Still, we 
don't mind. Come again gen- 
tlemen. The Seniors are so 
pleased with the effect of their 
insignia movies that they re- 
peat them for a Senior pan- 
pan. Two or three in different 
parts of the audience seemed 
to be amused so the Seniors 
are to be congratulated. 
Christmas and bankruptcy ap- 
proach with equal strides and 
vacation commences. 



222 



JANUARY 



VACATION is chiefly oc- 
cupied with society and 
Student Volunteer Con- 
ference but everybody stops to 
celebrate the Eve of victory 
when Eve Jackson wins the 
Rhodes Scholarship hands 
down. Prexy gets on anoth- 
er board. He must have 
enough to build a house with. 
This time it was the National 
Peace Conference. Monocles 
and mustaches come in to- 
gether. Personally I prefer 
monocles as they are easier to 
remove. Mustaches deserve 
more mention. They are of 
three kinds visible, invisible 
and near visible. The growers 
of the visible refuse to mingle 
with "oi polloi" ; the wearers 
of the near-visible struggle on 
manfully and the growers of 
the invisible decide to wait till 
next year. Exams come and 
nobody has time to shave. 
There are the usual groans 
and execrations but as usual 
we all get through and will 
soon forgive the faculty. So- 
phomores celebrate the end of 
exams by a class scrap which 
is neither according to Hoyle 
or the Queensbury rules, see 
Knock It for details. "Nix 



5 Small-pox. 

Eve Jackson 
wins Rhodes 
Scholarship. 

Vrex mounts 
National 
Peace Board. 

Caesar Davis 
returns t o 
college. 



9 Ground bro- 
ken for new 
shops. 

10 Prater n it y 
night. 

Monocles and 
mustaches. 



16 Mid - year 
exams begin. 

23 S o phomores 
banquet in 
peace. 



26 New Semester 
begins. Soph- 
omores break 
up chapel 
meeting. 

27 Stag ball. 



30 Clark lectures 
begin. 

Social sched- 
ule arranged. 

31 Frater n i t y 
night. 



on red-headed class presi- 
dents," say I. Stag Ball comes 
off on schedule time. Cakes 
were the best part of that. 
Sophomores sulk in their tents 
while the other classes sell 
Clark lecture tickets as if their 
little hearts would break. Se- 
niors and Juniors tie and Se- 
niors win when tie is played 
off. Freshmen were third. 
Our society events are doped 
out for the coming semester 
and consistent fussers make 

mem, "Ask to go 

to March, April, June dance, 
Ap, Pearsons banquet. All Col- 
lege picnic, etc." Faithful 
fussers groan when Clark lec- 
tures begin but most of them 
come to the scratch manfully 
and halls are deserted in the 
evenings which is quite as it 
should be. A report that the 
Red Robe is immoral results in 
the best turn-out of the year 
and though the play was harm- 
less, owing to Mr. Clark's 
skill, no one was disappointed. 
To clear the high-brow atmos- 
phere induced by three days of 
unmitigated classicism fra- 
ternities give dances and Feb- 
ruary dribbles in. 



22 5 



FEBRUARY 



FEBRUARY is the short- 
est month but that does 
not keep it from being 
busy. The town girls slip in 
a masquerade in the very first 
week and perhaps that is the 
reason why a day of prayer 
follows so soon. Hagerman 
Hall decides this is their cue 
and gives a dance, following 
it up by an open house a week 
later. Brains step in ahead of 
brawn and campus is dazzled 
by rays of golden keys. "You 
know, I would be Phi Beta 
Kappa, too, if it wasn't for my 
math." Juniors regret wasted 
hours and Sophomores and 
Freshmen decide that they 
still have plenty of time. Hy- 
patia gives one of their classy 
musical feeds taking a chance 
on the thirteenth. Colonial 
ball comes oft nearer George's 
birthday than usual and is at- 
tended (outside) by usual 
masculine mob. French play 
mystifies large non-collegiate 
audience and all college picnic 
occurs the next day but one. 
Despite the weather, studes 
gambol over rocks and in- 
dulge in wonderful baseball. 
All the girls are marvelous 
pitchers, some positively qual- 
ifying as unique. Both sides 
won. 

As if Liberal Arts and En- 
gineering didn't deal us 



1 Hall girls re- 
seated in din- 
ing room. 

Seniors win 
in ticket sell- 
ing: contest. 



6 Town girls 
give mas- 
querade. 

7 Hage r m a n 
hall dance. 



8 Day of pray- 
er for col- 
leges. 

13 Hypatia func- 
tion. 



14 Hage r m a n 
Hall open 
house. 

20 Colonial ball. 



21 French play. 

22 Washington's 
birthday. 



23 All - College 
picnic. 

24 New Depart- 
ment of Bus- 
iness Science 
established. 



25 Stunt night 
at Hag. Hall. 
Charges with- 
drawn by 
Boulder. 



28 German play. 



enough misery, a new school 
of business science is formed 
with Mr. Persons at the head 
thereby insuring its success. 
German play being so intelligi- 
ble that half the audience can 
follow it without the assist- 
ance of the other half, proves 
a great success. 

The echoes of Hagerman 
Hall stunt night disturb neigh- 
bors till late but this time the 
police are not called into ac- 
tion and the militia, exhausted 
by the late war are left to 
slumber. Thus has the sooth- 
ing influence of Matron Bow- 
ers permeated the erstwhile 
dare-devil atmosphere of Hag- 
erman. Persistent peevishness 
of C. C. at last leads Boulder 
to deny having said anything 
at all or meaning anything if 
they did say it and both pa- 
pers extend olive branch in 
forgive-and-forget editorials. 
It's funny about February ; 
we remember in looking back 
on it that it was just the busi- 
est little month that ever got 
by with only twenty-eight days 
but just what made it so busy 
is hard to tell. I guess it must 
have been the day of prayer. 
Anyway it zvas a lively month 
and everybody drew a long 
breath when it was safely over 
and no cases of nervous pros- 
tration had occurred. 



227 



MARCH 



MOTTEN takes a shot at 
President of Athletic 
Conference. Fraterni- 
ties clench fists and refuse 
Commons later yielding to the 
best interests of the College. 
Engineers get greedy and Cut- 
ler must go. Girls Dramatic 
gives party. Wonder some of 
us aren't grey-headed getting 
our bids out. The play was 
good, better, best and the eats 
were extra (fine). Art Gal- 
lery displays three portraits, 
two water-colors, one Turkish 
rug, three geraniums and a 
palm rented from th" Pike's 
Peak Floral. Athletes get 
recognized as such by Sigma 
Delta Psi. Everett Jackson 
gets the mumps (Yes, Walt, 
Jud, et al, he had a swell 
time). Hypatia invites Con- 
temporary and Minerva to 
celebrate St. Patrick and a 
few days later the rest of the 
college does the same. Fran- 
ces Adams does not get the 
mumps. Seniors desert Bake- 
speare-Shacon and elect Elec- 
tra by a leading Greek Dram- 
atist. Lest D. U. be discour- 
aged by continuous defeat, C. 
C. lets them win one debate. 
Hagerman Hall differs more 
than it did last year and spring 
vacation is upon us. Some- 
time during the last week- 
Everett appears, but Frances 



2 Motten tlert- 
ed President 
of Rocky 
Mountain Col- 
legiate Con- 
ference. 

3 Agitation for 
Men's Com- 
mons! 



5 Anno u n e e- 
ment that 
Cutler will be 
discontinued. 

7 I)r a in a t I c 
Funetion. 



9 College Art 
gallery open- 
ed to public. 

IV A n n ii a I 
Spring Ban- 
quet of Den- 
ier Alumni 
Association. 



13 Colorado Col- 
lege granted 
charter of 
Sigma Delta 
Psi. 

H y pat ia en- 
t e r tains Mi- 
nerva a n d 
Co it empo- 
rary. 



14 P r a t e rnity 
night. 

17 Seniors 
choose Elec- 
tra for Senior 
play. 



19 D. U. debate 
in Denver — 
C. C. loses. 

H a g e r man 
Hall pan-pan. 

21 Spri n g v a- 
cat ion c o m- 
menees. 



26-30 Sigma Chi 
House party. 

31 College opens 
again. 



has disappeared. Still she 
says that she has not got 'em. 
Vacation and coin are spent 
and even Solomon in all his 
glory was not arrayed like the 
college when school comes 
again. Enterprising College 
women go up Williams' and 
down Queen's arriving in 
Colorado Springs at two P. 
X. with frozen feet. The pa- 
pers were mistaken in the 
number of deaths. Avarice 
at last overcomes sentiment 
and lady sells her dear home 
to Kappa Sigma. It is a good, 
a fine, nay, even a beautiful 
house with mahogany floors 
and hardwood furniture or 
perhaps it is the other way 
around. Anyway which ever 
it is, it's unusual, and has nine- 
teen rooms. Think of that! 
Nineteen ! the Kappa Sigs wax 
proud and not even the fact 
that the Delta Phis move at 
the same time reduces their 
self-esteem. They have a 
right to be proud too. The 
Delta Phis' new house is also 
a nice one. Seeing it's the 
Delta Phis, it must be the size 
of the new house that causes 
them to get lost on the way up- 
stairs and wind up in the cel- 
lar. It couldn't be any thing 
else with Delta Phi unless it 
is the strong coffee. The next 
film will be the 1915 annually 
bored. 



229 




t **^^*5?w4ft 






'Pikes Peak through the Keyhole, Qarden of the Gods 



Wjra 



ffl 






I ' i ;. ■"■'■! , 



•JPH^s 



■• -"V ■■■■'"'•■ 

BwSf 



KB 






■'- / 



■ - 



'..■-.»:■■ 



j gj Hi 



■ 







Lester, old boy, you've sweated and toiled; you've worked for many a day, you've 
earned your "bones," you've paid for your Kale ; you've never stopped to play, you've swept 
the mud off'n the floor, you've made the windows glisten, you've let in the air at the lec- 
tures bare which made the people listen. Your face is black but your heart is gold, the colors 
of our Mater dear, and that's why, old boy, if you don't care, if you don't give a dram, 
we'll dedicate a book to you, a book of fun and play, that's filled with the little quips of life 
that make easier our steady strife, our toil for our daily hay. As your ready morning 
smile makes the day more worth while, we hope that the cranks of the following book as 
you have done without beguile, will bring an occasional smilish look and make the whole 
a bit worth while. 



231 



Aa Htruirii from tljc (!Pua& 

Kappa S>iguta 

Look jungleward not hallward; look cardward not churchward; look 
drugward not classward and take a chance. 

Cards, cigarettes and class — now abideth these three, but the greatest of 
these is class. This is to say that the Kappa Sigs are adept fussers of a par- 
ticular type. From a certain angel-faced Junior who openly compliments all his 
girl friends to a little black Irishman who proposes to every (classy) freshman 
girl. They fill the jungle (by night) the halls, the drug — everywhere but the class 
room. They have recently purchased a house with oak floors and mahogany 
furniture in one of the best locations in the city, therefore their hat-size has 
increased unto the third and fourth generation. 

j^iguta (Chi 

Automobiles and C. sweaters just live in their backyard. Hi dwells in their 
front yard and between live the Sigma Chis. They are cheerful, indolent and 
weird being much given to unnecessary cold-chills. Most of the frats are jealous 
of each other but the Sigma Chis totally ignore the rest feeling that they can 
afford to since they possess all might, majesty, dominion and glory inherent within 
themselves. They are in the college world but not of it "seemingly misunder- 
standing certain rules." They are also particularly nice to Prexy, feeling that 
"Do as you would be done by" is or ought to be Prexy's motto." 

•pijt (Samuta Srlta 

We are the Fraternity in Colorado College. We admit it ourselves. We 
leave minor details to be admitted by others as done best by us, such as pledg- 
ing, telling humorous ("Containing pathos") jokes — not witty ones, having the 
one sacred campus canine and laying stress upon the most essential things of 
character development. Oh, we're the coming fraternity, we Fijis — and the 
other pseudo fraternities at present existing can just watch us come — we'll get 
there yet. 

irlta $l}i (Hhrta 

He came to College for an education and worked to get it. He joined the 
Y. M. C. A. and was an earnest Christian worker. His morals were above 
reproach inasmuch as he eschewed bad language and cigarettes, neither looked 
he upon the wine when it was red. In short he led a highly estimable life. 
Now he has his reward, he is married. 

P. S.- — He's not a member of the "Beta Chapter." 

Jllji Irlta Sbrta 

If you want to become a past master in the art of politics, or wish to know 
how to fuss getting profitable returns in the shape of offices and function bids or 
how to impress one and all with the latest clothes and manners ; or how to get 
through college — not studies — with flying colors — go to the Alpha Taus — I mean 
the I 'hi Delts. 

232 




1111111 



ae/i 




**tLA 


















Dear Doctor : 

Previous to taking your mil tonic 
(course) I was for years troubled with 
insomnia. After thrice weekly applica- 
tion for fourteen weeks I am able to sleep 
soundly through all kinds of lectures and 
recitations. 



pfturra Wt ffirft Wnt of tltc Annual, ano tltr Sraann 

1. Dean Cajori tangoing at the El Paso Club ball. 

(Wouldn't pass censorship board.) 

2. Johnny Herron behind his mustache. 

(Consideration for our readers.) 

3. M. O. H. smashing homes. 

(By request.) 

4. Mimmack not chewing gum. 

(Wasn't any.) 

5. The faculty coming home from their regular Saturday party 

(Guess ! ) 

6. Koch rescuing Dr. Jenkins from a snowdrift. 

(Koch beat the kodak.) 

7. The annual board talking about the editor. 

(No way of photographing their language.) 

8. Glen Christy and Miss Hyde boarding the train. 

(Didn't wish to create a false impression.) 



^nnljnntnrra 

{A Portion of /bid's Famous Drama) 

PROLOGUE 
Scene: — At the Banquet Table of the Sophomores. 
Hank Frail (addressing classmates): 

Fellow Epicureans, the turkey's gone 

And the potato, too, has went. 

Now turn your thoughts to graver things. 

When last our noble c'mission met 

And counselled for our Mater's good 

They decreed that bloody duel 

Twixt Frosh and Soph would bring 

New born pep to our languid youths. 

Therefore soon at unexpected time 

Those Freshmen dogs will be sic'd 

Upon us. Perforce we'll light. ( Beholding loquacious comrade) 

Speak, fellow comrade. 

234 



PARADOS 
Gwendoline Meeley: 

"Perforce we'll fight" is timely spoken. 

Let us forelock opportunity and Monday 

In the morning be prepared to fight. 

Protecting by brainy brawn and posted comrade 

Our noble colors pinned on lofty pole (makes weepy motion) 

For if we don't, mean things those upper classmen 

They'll make us. 

FIRST STASIMON 
(Semi-chorus of fellow classmates reasoning out loud.) 
Yea we'd better else be forced 
To join in fair combat unprepared 
By wile and broken precedents. 
Yea, leader, now noble, lead us on. 

[Exit being led.] 
FIRST EPISODE 
Scene: — Ai Campus Pole in Front of Palmer. 
Macamon (on Pole): 

Say ! yonder comes a servant from the hall 
With visage dire. What hap are we to hear ? 
(Enter manservant.) 
Roger Mercury : 

How can yc boys be so untrue 
To campus rules and precedents ! 
Come, Mac, down ; and fools, avaunt ! 
Macamon : 

Eh, boys ! 
Chorus : 

No-yes-well-yes it matters not. 
We'll westward ho to Cutler pole and there 
Meet the brawny Frosh, we'll do as well. 

SECOND STASIMON 
Alas ! what O Zeus, whence our aid in woe ? 
What rescue from calamities, falling now upon our school? 
Did some one appear with tidings that 
That Freshmen men should without consent 
Leave a meeting held in the interest of our school? 
Certain is it, friends, certain ! Ay and yet 
That is not all nor is it worst of calamities. 
That morning neath the shade of Cutler pole 
There was beneath the blue and white 
A man on sturdy cross piece found. 
Long objection was made thereto with no avail 
And naught did stop the combat till the time 
When it seemed imperious that rules be observed 
And the man from the pole was taken. —Continued on Page 243 

233 



" 2frar to 5faturf " 

OJljr fflljtatltng ftlougli log 

He had put his hand to the plow and now he was going to face the music. 

— Noyes. 

®lirg Iflust IGrao Siutblr Hjiura 

I want it to be said of you students that he is a man of honor, that he 
is a woman of honor. — Prexy. 

So $mt S»uuuiiBP %t fflraut 3t ? 

(Reading Scenario) There are forty beautiful girls in this chorus. It 
would be hard to get characters in this play but the Girls Dramatic Club might 
stage it. — J] T oody. 

%t Has a 3Jark of All Sraora 
(Speaking of Doctor Faustus). Some mendicant tailor had tinkered it up. 
— Noyes. 

(ZUiia IJaa Not Arrorbiug to Uiotib 
At the foot of the stairs Macbeth met Clytemnestra. — Noyes. 

Another Hloui ! 

When I was your age I, too, was a crude westerner. — Dr. Jenkins. 

t^c'a a iFatt 

(Speaking of As You Like It) Now in the next scene we find Touch- 
down. — Dean Parsons. 

iFtr ! W\t ! 
She was womanly only when she was painting. — Dean Parsons. 

(Eljmre (Sofiatjj 

liaup $on Ijrard : 

That Miss Loomis went on a house party during the Easter vacation ! 

That because three girls lost their privileges half the men of Kappa Sig 
failed to get dates for a dance until the sixtieth second of the eleventh hour? 

That there were several broken hearts resulting from the Sigma Chi 
house party? 

That Beta Theta Pi is smiling on Delta Phi and the chief rushing card 
of that organization may blossom from a bluff to a reality? 

That three girls high in student government went to moving pictures 
one night unchaperoned? 

That the men of Hagerman Hall have boycotted hall girls? 

That Miss Canon was carried down from the top of Queens canon after 
four days' exposure to starvation and cold? 

That over fifty people believed themselves to be the object of Prexy's 
ire when he descended from the pulpit and requested two young men to leave 
chapel for whispering. 

236 



Srljola, Wuv Kfmtar ! 




Behold ! the speaker points with pride. 
He has a freshman by his side 
To whom with awe he doth confide, 
"THIS is OUR house!" 

Phi Gam is gone, the Phi Delts bow. 
They have the freshman with them now. 
"There are other houses we'll allow 
But— THIS is OUR house!" 

With Delta Phi he has a date 
"Behold the windows all are plate, 
There are four baths we'd like to state." 
"THIS is OUR house!" 



With Kappa Sig he's next in tow. 
It seems the houses larger grow. 
"There are nineteen rooms in this, you know, 
"THIS is OUR house!" 

He wonders then if Sigma Chi 
Will buy a mansion broad and high 
With twenty rooms and porte cochere, 
Garage and hard wood floors rare. 
So they may say with increased chest, 
Quite sure that their house is best, 
"THIS is OUR house!" 



§>ome papular ICtra 

"Delicious refreshments were served after the pan-pan." 

"I'm sorry Miss Loomis won't allow you girls to go in cabs to the function." 

"We're glad to come to the commons for our meals, even for breakfast." 

"O, I thought you assigned this other chapter for our lesson." 

"That's just as far as I got." 

"The freshmen enjoy the Thursday evening talks with the dean." 

"It was a production that would have been a credit to professionals." 

"The bi-weekly meeting of the Y. M. C. A. was very well attended." 

"We rarely miss a vesper service." 

"I don't approve of class fights." 

"The humorous section of the Nugget is amusing." 

"When the new gym is completed, the juniors will have a prom." 



237 



En 2iaula-$r iFitBBPra : Han't 

Admit that you have any brains. 

Approve of anything about the college. 

Wear your old clothes to school. Save them for Sundays. 

Ea ©ffirr-irrkpra : Han't 

Wait till the week before election to start in speaking to everybody on the 
campus. 

Neglect your friends for the crowd. 

Think that you have it cinched because you are an athlete. 

Think that it's no use to get a stand in with the girls "because nobody can 
tell how a girl is going to vote." 

(Ha i£ngan,ro (UanulrB : Han't 

Hold a tete-a-tete on the public thoroughfare. It blocks the traffic and 
is unkind, unnecessary and uncalled for. 

Walk hand-in-hand up the Canon road on Sunday afternoon. The An- 
nual Board may get hold of it. 

Feel hurt if the announcement of your engagement fails to surprise any- 
body when you have been going together steadily for three years. 

(Ha ttjr HtBrnganrb : Han't 

Give up hope. Unlikelier things have happened. 

(Ho tljr iflarultu, : Han't 

For heaven's sake think that C. C. needs a higher standard of scholarship. 
Express your opinions of this annual where the Sophomores can hear you. 

(Hn tljr §>anl)amorr (EIubb : Han't 

Criticise this Annual till you have tried to get one out yourselves. We 
could do better next year, too. 

So tljr OTorlii at ffiarnr : Han't 

Ever ask what has become of us. We are never coming back. 




g gttoetttgements g 

THE ADVERTISERS IN THE NUGGET ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR 
ITS SUCCESS. & ^* Show your loyalty by patronizing tfyem 



4fl0tt?m£?& ICxmrrtrka — iExpurgatri for % -Nugget 

This hall as dull as a tomb is. 
To live here a fearful doom is. 

I'd jungle at night 

But it gives me a fright 
I'm dreadfully afraid of ** ** ** 

If you think they've no pep ; — well — 
Give ear to the story I'll tell. 

When the team went away 

The students they say 
Cried loudly C. C. give 'em * 

Fussing's dull — the rules she disregards 
And with games the conversation interlards. 

The house president doesn't see 

Few things it seems to me 
Give as much amusement as a pack of ** 

Smiling, dancing as only a Parisian can go 
(You'd have laughed if you'd seen the man go) 

This sweet girl from down town 

Made the chaperone frown 
At the frat dance by tripping the *** 

His departure crushed the little senior's bliss 
"Student volunteer farewell, your face I'll miss." 

"Will you drop me a tear 

When I lie upon my **** ? 
And he pressed upon her lips a farewell ******. 



** ** ** The dark. 

* An overwhelming defeat. 

** Missionary envelopes. 



*** Two-step minuet. 
**** Burial couch. 
***** Lemon drop. 



239 



240 



The Pike's Peak Nugget Advertiser 




C 



1 B 



Coll 



entral Dusmess L^ollege 

and Training School for Commercial 1 eacners 

The $est School of Its Kind in the West. ^Uhis is the verditl of the employers of the 
many students rvho have graduated during the past ten years 

UR STENOGRAPHERS' OFFICE PRACTICE, COST ACCOUNTING, Special CIVIL SERVICE 
DEPARTMENT, the STENOTYPE, and our HIGHLY QUALIFIED CORPS OF INSTRUCTORS 
are a few of the factors contributing to the success of this popular school. 

You cannot afford to neglect the practical side of your education when a few months 
of special training in the CENTRAL BUSINESS COLLEGE will not only enable you to in- 
crease pour salary from 25 per cent, to 50 per cent., but will also place you in direct line 
of promation to the very highest executive positions in the business world. 

Call or write for full information in regard to our courses of study and methods of instruction. 




Central Business College ^ 



J. N. NUTTER, Principal 

18-20 South Tejon Street. Phone 1745 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 



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241 



OUR OFFICE NEVER CLOSES 



ALL KINDS OF HEAVY TRANSFER 



We Move, Pack, Store and Ship Household Goods. We can 

check your baggage from residence 

to destination 



FIRE-PROOF STORAGE IN A 
FIRE-PROOF WAREHOUSE 



CARRIAGES, BUSSES AND 
BAGGAGE WAGONS 



The Wandell & Lowe $ office, 22 N . Tejon st. 

Transfer and Storage Co. * phones Main 8 and 97 



American Plan, $2.50 per day up 

European Plan, $1.00 per day up 


Stye flnzn %attl 

INortn Tejon and Cache ; 
la Poudre Streets J 


Special Attention to banquets 
New {Ball Room for 
Fraternity 'Dances 


M. E. Shoot 
Proprietor 



® \\t Aaauratu:? fairings 
ani iEnatt Aaanriatton 

4% 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS 
MONEY LOANED ON REAL ESTATE 

Edgar T. Ensign . . . President 
IRA HARRIS .... Vice-President 
Chas E. Lynde, Lilla B. Ensign, D. S. Gilmore 
HAROLD W. LOOMIS . . . Secretary 













S3 


ken you come to 
College, ask us for * 
Rooms or Houses 


The Chas. T. Fertig 

Insurance ana 

Investment 

Company 

29 North Tejon Street 
Coloraao Springs 








Insure your Fraternity 
Houses and Household < 
Goods with us 



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242 The Pike's Peak Nugget Advertiser 

Like Good Things to Eat? s a f wT s c e oiregrstu- 

dent with a puny appetite ? But let it be discriminating. 

Right here you can get such delicious lunches and "swell" candy and cakes, that it's a 
shame to impose anything else on the inner man. 

Before your hike, get your lunch here, and you'll never regret it. This applies especially 
to the girls, for you know, "the way to a man's heart is through his stomach." 

Watch our ads in each Friday's "Tiger" for special prices on candy, and bakery goods on Saturday 



W. N. Burgess 



Phone Main 83 VY . 1Y. JD UI KCOO 112-114 N. Tejon Street 



Whom will we find in the Twenty-first century Garden of Eden? 
That's easy. History repeats itself. Adam(s) and "Eve." 



A. B. C. (copying notes hurriedly) — Helicon— Mountain trout served to 
the Muses. 



Cameras, Kodaks and Supplies 

WE DO ALL KINDS OF PHOTOGRAPHIC WORK 
EXCEPT PORTRAITURE 



QTTTW A T?T "RPHQ COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS 

O 1 J-j VV ±\1\ 1 .DJ\UO., 17 North Tejon St., Colorado Springs 



Why We Win Out 

With us an order for photographs is not a 
completed order until the customer 
is entirely satisfied 

J» 8 h o S n°e ut M h I ej 67 n 8 Street ^ Bingham Studio 



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The Pike's Peak Nugget Advertiser 243 

§>0pt|0tttnrr0 - Conti nned. 

SECOND EPISODE 
Scene: — Meeting of Men in Chapel. 
Jaxon : 

Assembled are we, gentlemen, that unbiased 

We may judge the propriety of the course 

Which nineteen sixteen took last Monday morn. 
Faj : 

Worthy president, to me it seems these men are guilty 

Guilty they are of sundry crimes but worst of all 

If insubordination to faculty and student body rules. 
Demi-Chorus of upperclassmen : 

Yea. 
Other Demi-Chorus of underclassmen : 

Nay 
(Several more men say same thing as Faj in different words.) 

(Enter Comet driven by Kingart.) 
Kingart : 

In prepared speech these men have discoursed. 

Long hours they have toiled, but I 

In unprepared speech now make harangue 

And declaim them fools and asses 

And what is more that they are wrong. Continued on page 260 




T'S JUST LIKE NEW! 



Your TAILOR MADE SUIT, EVENING GOWN 
OR OTHER DRESS can be nicely cleaned or 
pressed by our process, and made to look like new again. 

Our method removes the soil, wrinkles, stains and creases. 
It brightens the colors, freshens the fabric, and really renews 
the life of the garment to an appreciable degree. 

Nothing too dainty for us to dry clean successfully and 
satisfactorily. 



"The PANTATORIUM 17East *S 



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244 



The Pike's Peak Nugget Advertiser 




rTll A • TT . 1 ■ In the Heart of the City, Facing Beautiful Acacia Park. 

' : |~1 f^ L\ f*£\ f*l Q I O I (~M w Every Modern Convenience. Especially Equipped for 

1UV/ XA-V/dV/XC* llVLVyl 6X9 College Functions and Fraternity Dances. Eoropean 

COLORADO SPRINGS' NEWEST HOTEL W P1 an $1.00 and up. J. W. Atkinson, Managing Director 




The Hamilton 
Jewelry Co. 

Largest and Best Equipped 
Jewelry Store in El Paso Co. 



<J Expert Manufacturing 
and Repairing Depart- 
ment. Special attention 
given to Fraternity Jew- 
elry of all kinds. Only 
jewelers in the city who 
employ a skilled designer. 

Handsome College and 
Fraternity Shields at 
$4.50 while they last 



€| Expert Optician always at 
your service. Lenses ground 
while you wait. 



>> 



THE HAMILTON JEWELRY CO. "The College Shop 

h. a. hamilton e. e. taliaferro established 1879 telephone 806 12 north tejon stret 

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245 




Our Young Men's Department 
is a Store in Itself. 

You'll find here the most complete assort- 
ment of young men's clothes in all the town. 
Our one aim is to give you the greatest value 
for your purchase, whether it be large or 
small. We do not influence you to buy 
anything you do not fancy. 
Rather, we aim to treat you as you like to 
be treated in service, in value and lowest 
prices. 
We will appreciate your visit to our store. 



11 
S. Tejon 




\ Correct Dress for Men> 



Phone 82 



117 North Tejon Street 



Ihe 

Elite Laundry 

and Cleaning 
Company 



THE OUT WEST TENT 
1 and AWNING CO. 

^ Outdoor and Camp Life Outfitters 

Pack and Book Bags, Chemistry Aprons, Paper 

Bags, Bed Rolls, Tents, Camp Stoves, 

Hammocks, Folding Cots 

and Tables 



We Rent Complete 
Camp Outfits 



USj4 North Tejon St. 
Phone Main 1261 



YES! 



We Frame 
Pictures 



The Hedrick 

Wall Paper and 

Paint Co. 



Phone 1284 



212 N. Tejon St. 



E. C. WOODWARD 



■tj Assayer and -y 
^ Chemist re 



26 E. KIOWA ST. Telephone 315 



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The Pike's Peak Nugget Advertiser 








&V > 



I* l M 




jO be successful, it 
is very necessary 
to look successful. 
Step into smartly-tailored. 
Perkins-Shearer suit, and 
lo! it is accomplished 

REGAL SHOES 

MANHATTAN SHIRTS 

KNOX HATS 



Perkins -Sn 



earer 



Co. 



"The College Man's Store" 



•ervice 



Quality 
Courtesy 



We maintain 
these six 



Reasonable Prices 
Accommodating 

Completeness or Stock 



principles at J^kc Pads ~WoO(l DrU2 Co. 

both of our m^H^RUi a.Ajril 



stores 



t* c. Opera House Block 

1 Wo Stores: _, ,„, ,„„ 

Phones 491-492 



Acacia Hotel Bldg. 
Phones 872-873 



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The Pike's Peak Nugget Advertiser 247 






The Store A#ractive 

Particularly So to College People 

THE MURRAY 
=DRUG CO.= 



ON THE CORNER JUST OPPOSITE THE CAMPUS 




"CROM early morning till late at 
night, every day in the year, we 
are at your service. 
fc£ With us College trade does pay, 
and it pays to treat you right. 
*£ \W e particularly invite tne patron- 
age of new students and those who 
are not already patrons. 



" Meet at Murray s 



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248 



The Pike's Peak Nugget Advertiser 



Original *MtiW&W 



The heartiest of good wishes to all of you Colorado College students. 

Just remember, if you will, that here, at home, and every where, Original 'IfUlflittflf 
Table Water and Ginger Champagne, is the best ever— sparkling, delightful, and absolutely 
natural. 

Boost for Original IflaiUfoU A word from you will help your very good friend, 

The Manitou Springs Mineral Water Company. 



Original ""Illaflittnf 



Frank F. Crump 

Retail Florist 




511 East Columbia St. 

Phone Main 500 No down town store 



OU will be wise to make 
your purchases of Milli- 
nery and Beautiful 
Novelties at i^ilmier'.s, where 
10 years of strict adherence to 
the highest merchandising 
standards have built up a repu- 
tation unrivaled. 



Phone Main 760 



6 East Pikes Peak 
Aveune 

LADIES' HATTER 



ENGRAVING 



EMBOSSING 



PRINTING 



The VanNortwick & Sherlock 
Engraving Company 



#* 



DANCE PROGRAMS, FRATERNITY 
and SOCIETY STATIONERY 
A SPECIALTY 



1627-43 Lawrence St. (55 King Block) 
DENVER, COLO. 



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249 




2k Students' 

Photographic Shop 

THE POPULAR PLACE FOR 

YOUR INDIVIDUAL and 

GROUP PICTURES 

"Every Photograph an Advertisement for the 
Studio" is our motto. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. 

Moderate prices. 

Discount to students. 



The 

Emery 

Studio 



Corner 

Cascade ana Kiowa 

Phone Main 41 



n 



Choice Candies 

{]f Our Delicious fresh-made 
candies never disappoint. 

Dern s Chocolates, 

caramels and other confections 
are made from best materials hy 
skilled workmen in a sanitary 
shop. W e use the purest sugar •. 
rich cream, fruits, nuts and spices* 
Always delightfully satisfying. 

The Sweetest Girl you ever knew prefers 
our candy to any other — 

SHE KNOWS 

Buy her a box We -will send it Postpaid 

DERNJoVbICO. 



26 S. Tejon St. 



COFFEE 
* Phone Main 575 



For the College Girl 

THIS SEASON WE HAVE MADE 
MORE EXTENSIVE PREPAR- 
ATIONS FOR THE COLLEGE GIRL'S 
WANTS THAN EVER BEFORE 
—Every department shows that the 
College Girls' requirements have been 
well remembered and prepared for. 
The Suit Department shows an unusual 
good variety of suitable and practical 
garments for her. The Millinery De- 
partment is well prepared to take care 
of her wants — both knit and muslin 
underwear departments are ready with 
unusual good qualities. The Glove, 
Hosiery, Ribbon and Neckwear Depart- 
ments are ready with good suggestions 
— and the White Goods, Dress Goods 
and Wash Goods Departments are pre- 
pared to meet every demand. 

You are cordially incited to visit this store and in- 
spe£l the stocks that give you large varieties to seleil 
from, and assure you of good quality. 

GIDDINGS y KIRKWOOD 



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The Pike's Peak Nugget Advertiser 




N0S.5&7 YV HUERFANO ST COLORADO SPRINGS. COLO, 



PETE 



COLLEGE SHOE SHOP 

OPPOSITE CAMPUS 



DAVE 



THE COLLEGE TAILOR 

OPPOSITE CAMPUS 



Coed (telling about play rehearsal) — "And you know she had to propose 
to the leading man and Mr. Howe told her to go right over and throw her arms 
around his neck so she did and the man sat there like an image and said, 'What 
do I do with my hands ?' " 

W. C. A. (after annual dope) — Do tell me who it was? 

Coed — Oh, I couldn't. 

W T . C. A. — Was it in the French play ? 

Coed — Oh, my gracious, no ! Charlie Emery's the leading man in that. 



{Beautiful Colletlion of Oriental Jlrts 
Furniture, Curios, Hand 
Painted China, etc. 



Special Jlttention to College Women 
We Offer a Ten Per Cent. Discount to Students 



SJapatt Art Qltfmpattg <& Japanese Goods 

of EXCLUSIVE DESIGNS in EMBROIDERED WAIST PA TTERNS, KIMONOS, 
MANDARIN COATS AND DRAWN WORK 



The Burns Building 

27 East P'u\es Peak Avenue 



Telephone Jttain 1059 



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The Pike's Peak Nugget Advertiser 251 



Oh, that we were able by a printed page to give you 
an idea of the excellence of the hour you devote to 

THE WONDERFUL 
CAVE of THE WINDS 

MANITOU, COLORADO 

In Which Colorado Possesses the Most Unique and Inspiring Natural 

Wonder of America 
And It Has Taken One Hundred Thousand Years to Create It 

THE CAVE is not one large, gloomy, dark cavern, but is made up 
of numerous large Rooms, connected by narrow passages. Have you 
ever explored natural underground Caves? Probably not. Can you 
imagine their appearance! You can't even guess. 

NATURE'S STUDIO 

This is Nature's Studio or "dark room;" and here in the numerous 
Rooms and Halls, hundreds of feet from the last rays of Daylight, are 
developed most beautiful Colors, as seen on the walls, as well as rare 
Crystallized forms; from the exquisite "Cypress Slender" flowering- 
Alabaster to the immense Carbonate Stalactites, six feet long, all hang- 
ing attached to the Ceiling. 

CAVE NOTES 

Temperature 53 degrees in summer, 52 in winter. 

Wraps are not needed; leave them with lady in reception room. 

Competent Guides conduct every party the entire underground trip. 

A stringent Law of the State prohibits breaking the formation. It 
makes no exception of "accidents." Please keep the hands down. 

Visiting parties exclusively of ladies — we address particularly 
ladies traveling alone — will receive our most scrupulous care and 
politeness. 

Visitors do not carry Hand Lamps in the Cave of the Winds. 

Our Carriage Road is the "Famous Temple Drive" which is Free 
to the Public. 

Open Nights, Open Sundays, Open Every Day in the Year. 
ADMISSION, ONE DOLLAR 



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The Pike's Peak Nugget Advertiser 



The Place for OUTDOOR GOODS! 




ackinaws, Sweaters, Hiking Clothes, Base 
Ball, Foot Ball and Supplies for Sportsmen 



The W. I. Lucas Sporting Goods Co. 

119 N. Tejon No Better Goods at Any Price Phone 900 



Miss Stuntz (asked for Maeterlinck's life) — I don't know anything about 
it as he isn't dead yet. 

Mr. Motten — Did you look in the Warner Library? 
Ditty — I couldn't find it in the city directory. 




EUROPEAN PLAN 



Alta Vista Hotel 

Colorado Springs 
Colorado 



Popular Price Restaurant in con- 
nection. Special attention to 
rates, $1.00 and up Banquets and Dinner Parties 



The Colorado Investment ■» Realty Co. 

Real Estate and Insurance 



6% 



No. 7 North Tejon Street 

Colorado Springs, Colo. First Mortgage Loans 



Telephone Main 7 



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253 



GOWDY 

PRINTER 

Books Pamphlets Programs 

Office Stationery [Anything you want] 

ENGRAVER 

Copper Plate and Steel Die. 
Invitations <£ Announcements 
At Homes, Cards, Stationery^ 

nlain nr- <sf am-n^A \ We have the diesfor the College] 
plain Or Stamped [ ana > a U fraternities and Societies! 




NORTH 
TEJON 
STREET 



"THE BITTERNESS OF A CHEAP JOB IS REMEMBERED 
LONG AFTER ITS LOW PRICE IS FORGOTTEN" 



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The Pike's Peak Nugget Advertiser 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heating Co. 

( Incoporaied ) 

WE invite you to ask for estimates 
on any PLUMBING WORK you may 
require, — from the largest to the small- 
est job. 



Phone Main 48 



313 North Tejon Street 



The Dickinson Hardware 
Company 



Hardware 



*« 



Phone Main 465 



107 North Tejon St. 



Call 
at 



Bissell s Pharmacy 

for Soda Water 
Cigars ana 
Stationery 



Phone 980 



Corner Dale and 
Weber Streets 



lhe Cnssey £y Fowler 

Lumber Company 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Lumber, Sash, Doors 
Lime and Cement 

Building Paper 119 to 123 W Vermijo Ave. 
and Plastering Hair Colorado Springs 



©ffirr (IlrlppbDnr IBB Straifcrnrp Qfekpfpm? 1141 



1. 3. IGaut 

iftunrral Stmtor 



11H £fartb Nruaoa 

Anemic (Moraon $mittn;0, (Solo. 



Pictures 



Fine Framing 



Turner Art Shop 

Chas. W. Pitman 



126 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Red 13 



Thos. McCarthy 
Res. Phone 1960 



Thos. Crandall 

Res. Phone 2014 



McCarthy & Crandall 
Plumbing and Heating Co. 



SEWERAGE- 

Estimates Cheerfully Furnished 

302 N. Tejon Street 
Office Phone 1262 Colorado Springs, Colo. 



BONDS 



STOCKS 



OTIS & CO 

MEMBERS NEW YORK 
STOCK EXCHANGE 



DIRECT PRIVATE WIRES 
TO ALL, EXCHANGES 



125-127 EAST PIKES PEAK AVE. 



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The New Brunswick Amusement Co. 




Strictly First-CIass 

Pool 
Billiards 

(30 Tables) 

Cigars Tobacco 
Music 



G. M. Boyles, 'Proprietor 
Main 1110 
\ Main 908 
Residence Phone 1108 



Phones : 



14 E. Pikes Peak Ave. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 




Phones Main 350-351 



Wills, Spackman 
& Kent 



Real Estate 
Mortgages and 
Insurance 



Gazette Building 

Colorado Springs 



"The Name, the Place and the Goods" 



A. C. Harwood 

214, : 2 North Tejon Street 
Colorado Springs 

Wall Paper Paints Glass 

Clean Towels Sterilized Razors Clean Barbers 

Sanitary Head Rests The Very Best in the City 

'Uhe Place for Exclusive People 

Campbell's 

Sanitary Barber 
Shop 



JOHN C. CAMPBELL 

Proprietor 
12 South Tejon Street 
Phone Main 490 



Electric Hair Dryer 

Appointments Made 
for Outside Work 



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256 



The Pike's Peak Nugget Advertiser 




If you are anxious 



to secure your households Really 
Pure Food Products, remember 
none come as near perfection as 
goods put up by the Sprague- 
Warner Grocery Company, of Chicago, and 

Kranrl^rl ''RATA VTA" 4* f A Complete Line may be found at "I 

branded &i\ iavia & [ the Busy Grocery conducted by J 

The Hemenway Grocery Company 

Colorado Springs, Colorado ^t jt Sole Agents 



Everything First-Class 
and Sanitary 



Geo. R. Handley 
Proprietor 



College Men! 

Try the VIOLET RAY MASSAGE 

Busy Corner 
Barber Shop 



104 E. Pikes Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs 



Colorado Teachers Agency 

FRED DICK, Ex-State Superintendent, Manager 

We can assist competent teachers to 

desirable positions, which has 

been fully demonstrated 

by twenty years of 

successful ex- 

Qive us a trio] perience 

1315 California 

Street Denver, Colorado 



TYPEWRITERS ^OFFICE SUPPLIES 




r%^ 



' 'The 

Typewr i ter 

Man' ' 



Main 1017 



125 N. Tejon St. 



No. 5130 Clothcraft 



A BETTER BLUE SERGE SPECIAL 

$15 



Guaranteed 
All Wool and 
Fast Color 



from year to year, 
you see one of them 



Our buying orders for this 
" 5130 Clothcraft Special " 
have doubled and redoubled 
You will understand why when 



Agents for Hole-Proof 
Hosiery — 6 pairs, 6 months 
— no holes 




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257 



L 
I 

N 
D 

Q 

U 
I 

s 

T 

C 
R 
A 
C 
K 
E 
R 

C 
O 




The Shields-Metzler 
Grocery Co. 



K 
U 
N 
E 
R 

P 
I 
C 

K 
L 
E 

C 
O 



Colorado Springs 
Colorado 



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258 



The Pike's Peak Nugget Advertiser 













"Nearest to Everything " 

•>N^r» tandish 


Special 

Attention to 

Ladies 

Traveling 

Alone 






VJ -^Hotel 








LOCATION— SERVICE— PRICES RIGHT 


Special 

Rates to 

Students 






1524-30 California St. S. C. Hoover 

Denver Proprietor 













WM. BANNING, Proprietor 



Telephone Main 31 



Union Ice & Coal Co. 

Artificial Ice and 
Cold Storage 



105 W. Vermijo Ave. 
5 N, Tejon Street 



Best Grades of Coal, 
Grate Wood and Kindling 



CHAS. P. BENNETT 
President 



H. N. SHELLENBERGER 
Vice-President 



The 



Bennett-Shellenberger 
Realty Co. 



REAL ESTATE 
INSURANCE 
and LOANS 



5 East Pikes Peak 
Avenue 
Colorado Springs 




F you'll weigh "THE 

PENNELL 

WAY" when 
needing L U M B E R— you'll 

profit greatly phone Main 102 

The Pikes Peak Floral Co. 

Cut Flowers 

Decorations and 
Designs 

Blooming Plants 

Telephone 599 

104 North Tejon Street Colorado Springs 




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259 

1111111111 



265 Rooms 



100 En Suite 
with 'Private Bath 



MANITOU, COLORADO 



The Center of All the 
Scenic Attractions of 
the "Pikes "Peak 
'Region 



The E. E. Nichols 

Hotel Company 

Proprietors 



Protect Your Homes with 

Burrowes Rustless 
Fly Screens 



F. A. SPERRY 
Agent 



Colorado Springs 
Colorado 



Corner opposite Post Office Colorado Springs 

The D. Y. Butcher Drug Co. 
Drugs 

Kodaks and Supplies 
Developing, Printing, Enlarging 

The Yates & McClain Realty Company 

Wholesale Land "Dealers 

Colorado Springs 

Colorado 

The Best, Cleanest and Most Up-to-Date 
"Dairy Plant in the City 

THE SINTON 
DAIRY 



"Dairy "Plant : 
419 South El Paso 



We are indebted to the following 
Professional ^HCen : 



F. C. Chamberlain, M. D., D. D. S. 
Anna D. Chamberlain, D. D. S. 
Deane S. Chamberlain, D. D. S. 



ira. (Etjambn-lattt 

&uitt 12 Sank Slork 
$ljonr Main 792 

SrHtbrmrr $ Ijonr fHain 3083-11 



Dr. W. K. Sinton 



Dr. W. W. Flora 



ira. Linton & iFlora 
Urttttsta 

Soout TDD. Exrljanup National Sank Slug. 
GMrurtonf 761 



fljone fflain 514 

ir. <&. % iHitrhcU 

IrttttBt 



612 Exrljangr 
Special attention given to National Sank 

Pyorrhea and Prophylaxis Smloing 



Pljnnp fHatn 803 

ir. W. M. SUtsntt 
irttttat 

g>mte 662-604 

iExrljangr National Sank Slog. 



■piion? lUatn 1647 

A. (£. irtfhaua 
Dentist 

616 lExrljangp National Sank Smloing 



Phone Main 442 

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The Pike's Peak Nugget Advertiser 



^OpllfltttlirfH— Continued. 

Hank Frail (with red aura) : 

Men, I come here this morning knowing not 
What is. Like true man I'll take my cure 
If cure I need, which I do not. 

I'm not to blame. Them fellows right there (points to Sophs) 
Has always backed me and their condescension 
Of the classes action I've always asked 
But never in my life did I say in mean purport 
That the commission should be in hell. 
But where's them girls ? I want them here 
That they, too, may condemn or acquit me 
As to them seems best. But they have sympathie. 
THIRD EPISODE 

Gwendoline Meeley (blubbering) : 

I feel some shame, classmates, if I seem 

To over weary you with many tears ; 

But hard compulsion forces me to this 

Therefore, bear with me. Sorrows come by night 

As well as day and I have been seemed a liar . (Tears) 

To you nobles, classmates, I appeal and query 

Has not my visage the semblance of an honest man 

And yet, they say I lie ! ■ — 



[Exodus.] 



Licensed Embalmers 



Phone Main 1243 



The Fairleys & Law 
Undertaking Co. 



Office, 218-220 

East Pikes Peak Avenue 



Colorado Springs 



Whitney & Grimwood 

BooJ^s, Stationery 
and Art 



0. C. BECK, Proprietor 



Telephone Main 1258 



Dale Street Feed and 
Fuel Company 

Hay, Grain, Fuel, Flour 



Canon City, Maitland, 
Lignite Coal. Coke 
and Wood 



328 East Dale Street 
Colorado Springs 



The Seldomridge Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in 

Flour, Feed, Grain 
Hay and Seeds 



PICTURE FRAMING 1$ ENGRAVING 108 S. Tejon Street 

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Colorado Springs 



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261 




COLLEGE STUDENTS 
WE INVITE YOU TO VISIT OUR STORE FOR GIFTS AND REPAIRING 

THE JOHNSON JEWELRY CO., 26 E. Pikes Peak Avenue 







JOvrwrw ycund Xacud 



We Deliver 

Goods Free Stftoru, 91tcu/n, 5102 

of Charge 717-719 16 fyS/JwUU 



Pictorial 
Review 
fj)^nAk^.eoVLOd<X Patterns 



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The Pike's Peak Nugget Advertiser 



OLORADO 
COLLEGE 



FOUNDED IN COLORADO SPRINGS, 
COLORADO, IN THE YEAR EIQH- 
TEEN HUNDRED and SEVENTY-FOUR 



Colorado College 

offers advantages of the same 
grade as those in the best Eastern 
institutions 



For information concerning Course of Study, 
Rooms and Board, etc., apply to 
WILLIAM F. SLOCUM. President 



College of Arts an d Sciences 

For information concerning all Courses of Study, apply to 

EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean 



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263 



Department of Engineering 

For information concerning Electrical, Civil and 
Irrigation Engineering, apply to 
FLORIAN CAJORI, Dean 



Department of Forestry 

General Courses in the College Laboratories and 
Field Work at Manitou Park, the Forest 
Reserve of the School 

For information, apply to 
WILLIAM C. STURGIS, Dean 



The School of M u s 1 c 

Courses in Vocal and Instrumental Music, Com- 
position and Orchestration 

For information, apply to 
EDWARD D. HALE, Dean 



Department of Business 
Administration ana Banking 

Courses designed to meet the needs of students 
planning to enter Business, Banking, the 
Consular Service and the like 

For information, apply to 
WARREN M. PERSONS, Dean 



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The Pike's Peak Nugget Advertiser 



When In Denver 1 



Stop at the New 




uditorium Hotel 

FOURTEENTH AND STOUT STREETS 



Conducted in a Manner to Commend Itself 
to Every Reader or this Publication 

Rates, $1.00 Per Day ana Upward 



No Bar, and No Liquors Sold 
in Dining Room 

WATSON BROS., Owners 



Wm. D. Tudor 



Jenks Tudor 



Tudor Coal Co. 

Wholesalers and Retailers of 

All the Best Grades of Coal 
Wood, Kindling 



Office: 

1 16 East Cucharras Street 



Phone main 676 



Attention 
Fraternities ! 

Let us estimate your PLUMBING 
and HEATING WORK. 

Special attention to Repair Work. 

Barnes & Marden * Th pium b3s 



206 N. Tejon Street 



Phone 13 



reams and Ices 
Fresh Butter 

Made Right and Delivered 
Promptly 



A.L.MOWRY 



1 1 5 E. Cache la Poudre 
Phone 1 184 



E. Evans-Carrington & Sons 

T. BERNARD CARRINGTON, Manager 

Morticians 



Private 

Ambulance 

Service 



317 North Tejon Street 
Phone 413 



The A. P. C. 

Candy Store 

Ice Cream, Candies 

Fruits and Cigars. 

All Kinds of Fountain 

Drinks 222 N. Tejon Street 

College students are invited to visit 
our Shop when in search of Attractive 
Graduation Gifts. 

Some inexpensive chafing dishes 
and attractive lunch cups and trays 
should appeal to the average Co-ed 
who enjoys the friendly "spreads" so 
typical of college life. 

The Perkins Crockery Co. 

120 North Tejon Street 

Telephone Main 771 George H. Brown, Mgr. 



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265 




| IJotMg ill? n a Christian JWnriattott 1 

Corner of Bijou Street and Nevada Avenue Colorado Springs, Colorado 

SPECIAL RATES TO COLLEGE STUDENTS — JOIN NOW 



Ihe Up-to-Date | 

Christian 

Club 



GYMNASIUM 

SWIMMING POOL 

GAME ROOM 

BIBLE CLASSES 

PRACTICAL TALKS 

TENNIS COURTS, &?c. 



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The Pike's Peak Nugget Advertiser 



Telephones 
Main 46 and 91 



Office, 29 Nj>rth 
'Cejon Street 



The El Paso Ice and 
Coal Company 



JHCanufaElurers of 
"Pure Distilled Water 

Ice 



Coal 



The Middlesworth Fruit 
Company 

Expert Crop 
Distributors 



Let Us Know What You Grow 

'The Hastings-Allen 

Realty and Building 



lompany 



110 

North 
Tejon Street 



Colorado Springs 



G 



enuine Turkey Creek 
Pinion Wood for the 
Fireplace 



Colorado Springs Fuel Co. 

112 E. Pikes Peak Ave. Phone 230 



You >\'ill Like Trading at 



Daniels gives you good goods with the test of 
service at prices that will please you. Every- 
thing carried in stock to Furnish the Home 
Complete. 

106-8 N. "Uejon Street Phone 2£ain 645 



Class 1914 

We thank y° u f or $ owr patronage 
of the four years past, and wish 
.you success in the years to come. 

The Whitaker 
Shoe Company 

HEADQUARTERS for LUNCHES and 
SHORT ORDERS 

College 
Inn 



WM. A. GRINDLEY 



Proprietor 



Strictly First- Class 



Private Dining Rooms 



The 



McRae Restaurant 

Largest Restaurant in 
the Ciy 



105 East Pikes Peak 
Avenue 



Colorado Springs 
Colorado 



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j'.; 










■iiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu 


'','''/,,. 




IIIIIOIIIH 




c 



fix 
) 

ILLUSTRATORS 

i vi* 1 c?T/ >w, 'M'tr i 'P c! 

l/l!jolCjrl£jKo 




BARCLAY BLOCK 



PHONE CHAMPA 288 



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268 



The Pike's Peak Nugget Advertiser 




^ r u n ks 
traveling 
Bags * 
Suit Cases 

Fancy Leather 
Goods • Fine 
Stationery • • 

We are the only 
shopinColorado 
Springs selling 
the' Never Break' 
Trunks-a guar- 
antee with 
every trunk 

The Henley Leather Goods Co. Burn8 ffi£I 

Think " HiltbrandY 

When You Want " The Best of Things Musical" 

Best assortment or Musical 
Instruments, Sheet Music 
ana Books in trie city 
at lowest prices 

J. D. HILTBRAND * "B&JfEftSi 



Phone 917 



Geo. R. Bergen 

Optometrist and <7£anufacluring 
Optician 



601-603 Exchange National Bank Building 



Everything First-Class {Baths 

and Modern 



Williams & Counts 

(Barber Shop 



Let the Qirl at the 

Busy Corner Cigar Stand 

AMY L. BUSCH, Proprietor 

Furnish the BEST of CIGARS 

CIGARETTES and 

TOBACCOS 

For Your Frat and 

Club Smokers She Always Pleases 

Have the Fellows Meet You at 




ucfyer's 

Restaurant 



1 06 ) 2 East Pikes Peak A venue 

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11 East Pikes Peak 

Avenue Colorado Springs 



For GOOD COAL 

and Quick Delivery 



I See 

The Monument 
Valley Fuel Co. 



THOS. N. CHAPMAN, Manager Telephone Main 446 

The Hallett & Baker Undertaking Co. 

Funeral Directors 
126 N. Cascade Ave. Colorado Springs 

IXL-It Is Good 

The IXL Creamery Co. 

<JtiCanufaclurer of Fancy 
Creamery Butter 




The Pike's Peak Nugget Advertiser 



269 



Sommers' Market= Quality Market Goods 




4irihnt~.-^Bfc».*-.- w" ^a'i \ j«HNAIttuVfl 


¥;,. 


113 1 

South Tejon 
Street 




Phone, Main 

fe 114 


! 







See the New $100 Victrola 

We Have a Complete Stock of 
EDISON and VICTOR 
Phonagraphs and 
Records 
Also Checkering Pianos, Vose, Emerson, Crown- 
Price & Teeple, and All Musical Instruments 
and Sheet Music. Largest Stock in the City at 
Oldest Music House — 

The Hext Music Company 
See ®Ij£ iEmpJTBH First 

It's Just One Good Program 

After Another, Showing 

All the Big Features 

and Keystone 

Comedies 



208 North Tejon Street 



Phone Main 906 



The Whitney Electric Co. 
" ^Uhe Quality Shop" 



Ask Any Fraternity Man 



A Parlor for 
Ladies as 
well as for 
Gentlemen — 
2%]A North 
Tejon Street 

The Lightning Shoe Repair Shop 

A Free Shine with Every Pair of Half Soles and Heels 




The Tigers' 
Shop 



Modern 

Strictly First- 

Class 



James Howard 

Barber Shop 



19 East Bijou Street 



Colorado Springs 



A Full Line of Stamped Goods, Embroidery Threads, 

Ready-Made Waists, Neckwear. Free Lessons 

in Crochet and Embroidery 

Hunt & VanNice 

Jlrt Needlework and 
Jlrt T>ry Qoods 



The Store That 
Pleases You "All Ways" 



11 N. Tejon Street 



13 North Tejon St. 



Next to Hunt & VanNice 



Sty? IGuxunj 

A Home-Made Bakery Line 
A Refreshment Parlor 
and Hughes' Choklets 



In the above lines we have endeavored to get the best 
obtainable. We think we have, but want your opinion. 



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