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Full text of "Columbia Theological Seminary Vantage: Course catalog series 1975"

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WELCOME TO COLUMBIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



This booklet is one of five in the Columbia catalog series. In 
this volume detailed information will be found about Columbia's 
academic program. Requirements for admission and for completion 
of the various first and advanced professional degrees are given 
along with a complete listing of course descriptions. 

The other four volumes in the series provide an introduction 
to Columbia, financial information and rosters of faculty and stu- 
dents, a history of the seminary and a listing of its established en- 
dowments and endowment opportunities, and an introduction of 
the faculty. A list of the entire series with a directory for corre- 
spondence is found at the end of this volume. 




C. Benton Kline, Jr. 
President 



Columbia Theological Seminary, a seminary of the Presbyterian Church, U.S., 
owned and controlled by the Synods of Florida, Mid South and Southeast through 
a Board of Directors. It is an accredited member of the Association of Theological 
Schools. 



Columbb 

Theological 

6eminary 



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COLUMBIA THEOLOGIAL SEMINARY 
DECATUR, GEORGIA 30031 

Vol. 69, No. 4 / May, 1975 
Eugene H. Tennis, Editor 

Published 7 times a year 

Jan., Feb., Apr., May, July, Oct., Nov. 

Second class postage paid 
at Decatur, Georgia 30030. 



ACADEMIC AND COURSE INFORMATION 
1975-76 

FACULTY 

BIBLICAL AREA 

PROFESSORS Charles B Cousar, Ludwig R. Dcwitz (on leave 1974-75), lames H. 
Gailey (chairman), Keith F. Nickle (beginning September 1975), J. Will Ormond, 
Ronald S Wallace 

VISITING INSTRUCTORS: Kenneth Morris (Summer 1974, Spring, Summer 1975), R. 
Eugene Randolph (Winter 1975), Arthur W. Wainwright (Fall 1974) 

HISTORICAL-DOCTRINAL AREA 

PROFESSORS: Shirley C. Guthrie, Jr. (chairman), C. Benton Kline, Ronald S. Wallace 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Frederick O. Bonkovsky (on leave Fall 1975), T. Erskine Clarke, 
Catherine Gunsalus Gonzalez (on leave Spring 1976) 

sTANT PROFESSOR: Eduard N. Loring (resigning June 1975) 

VISITING INSTRUCTORS: William M. Frierson (Fall 1974), Elias S. Hardge (Winter 
1975), Joseph L. Roberts (Winter 1975) 

PASTORAL AREA 

PROFESSORS: Wade P. Huie, Jr. (on leave 1975-76), Thomas H. McDill, Jack B. Mc- 
Michael, Theron S. Nease, Hubert V. Taylor (on leave Winter, Spring 1975), Don 
M. Wardlaw 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Oscar J. Hussel (beginning September 1975), Jasper N. Keith 

VISITING INSTRUCTORS: Katherine Imogene Bennett (Spring 1975), Harry A. Fifield 
ter I975), Oscar J. Hussel (Fall 1974, Winter 1975 , Sara P. Little Winter 
1975), John H. Patton (Winter 1975), Eleanor Joyce Rimes (Winter 1975) 



ADMINISTRATION 

PRESIDENl C. Benton Kline. |r 

DEAN OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS ( haries B. ( ousai 

DEAN Of MINISTRY DEVELOPMENT [ack B. McMichael 

DIRECTOR OF SUPERVISED MINISTRY Jasper N Keith, Jr. 

DIRECTOR. OF IN-CAREER D.MIN Wade P Huie. |r 

DEAN OF STUDENTS r Erskine Clarke 

LIBRARIAN ..Harold B Prince 

ASSOCIATE LIBRARIAN Glenn K. Wittig 

TREASURER f Sidney And( 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT Eugene H lennis 



PURPOSE AND PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

Columbia Theological Seminary is an instrument of the Church, and 
its purpose and programs are formed in relation to the mission of the 
Church. Since the work of the Church is dependent in large degree upon 
its leaders, the seminary is a graduate professional school engaged in 
preparing men and women for Church leadership. As such it is an edu- 
cational institution, preparing persons for encounter with the intellectual 
problems of our world in such a way that they will be worthy of the 
respect of those to whom they witness. At the same time, it is also a 
professional school and, thus, focuses on the competences and skills 
necessary to the practice of ministry. In each dimension of its life, the 
seminary seeks to facilitate the personal growth of students, and, thereby, 
to deepen their love for Christ, to encourage them in spiritual maturity, 
and to inspire them with a zeal for service. 

To accomplish its task, Columbia provides a community setting for 
theological education. In this context courses of study leading to both 
basic and advanced professional degrees are offered. The Master of 
Divinity and the Doctor of Ministry (in-course) are the first professional 
degrees. Advanced degrees are the Master of Theology, Doctor of Min- 
istry (in-career) and the Doctor of Sacred Theology. In addition, oppor- 
tunity is given some students to select particular courses for a non- 
degree program of study. 



ATLANTA THEOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION 

Through the Atlanta Theological Association, Columbia enjoys aca- 
demic and professional affiliations with Candler School of Theology, 
Erskine Theological Seminary, and Interdenominational Theological 
Center, and with the Georgia Association for Pastoral Care and the 
Urban Training Organization of Atlanta. The association develops and 
coordinates educational programs and resources of these member insti- 
tutions, which include approximately 800 students, 85 faculty, and 
250,000 volumes. (Students and scholars also have access to the holdings 
of sixteen libraries in the Atlanta-Athens area which comprise the Uni- 
versity Center in Georgia.) Among significant and promising cooperative 
endeavors are, in addition to the Doctor of Sacred Theology and Doctor 
of Ministry (in-career) degree programs, cross registration, sharing of 
faculty, library and lectureship resources, interseminary courses, and ex- 
perimental programs in various academic disciplines and professional 
specializations. 



CURRICULUM 

rhe teaching program at Columbia is arranged in foui arc. is Biblical, 
historical-doctrinal, pastoral, and supervised ministry, studies in each of 
these areas are < ombined with interdis< iplinary studies jn the < urrit ulum 
tor the first professional degrees. While classroom instruction is basi< to 
these first degree programs, their goal is to equip students to continue 

their education independently. The resources of the library, the Strut ture 
Of Course work. and reading courses encourage early realization of that 
goal. 

Studies In the BIBLICAL area seek to help the students understand 
and interpret an ancient book, the Bible, in a world where people go to 

the moon. To do this these studies are concerned with developing tools 
and skills to understand the ancient world, its language, history, and 
thought, and tools and skills to grasp the meaning of the Bible tor con- 
temporary people. Greek and Hebrew are required so that students can 
gain facility in handling the original Biblical languages and in under- 
standing the text in its native tongue. Courses in the area provide an 
opportunity for interpreting the text and for experience in articulating 
the message in a theological fashion. 

HISTORICAL-DOCTRINAL studies help students understand the past 
so that they can understand the present and how we got here. Students 
engaged in these studies also struggle to form their own theology and to 
discover what it means for them to be Christian today. Since Columbia 
stands within the Reformed tradition, historical-doctrinal studies are 
concerned not only with right thinking, but also with the relation of 
Christian faith and doctrine to real life. Therefore, studies in this area 
engage students in consideration of the social, political, economic, and 
cultural life of today. In historical-doctrinal studies students acquire the 
tools they will need throughout their lives for dealing theologically with 
themselves and the world around them, tools that will enable graduates 
to lead the church in a prophetic and reconciling way as it works out its 
mission in the world around it. 

The PASTORAL area centers on the functioning of the person as a 
minister, and its concern is to train students to be ministers and to lead 
other persons in ministering. Studies in this area consider the dynamics 
of the minister's role as leader of worship, preacher, pastor, teacher, and 

administrator. Since we do not fully know today the shape of the ministr\ 
of tomorrow, the concern of these studies is to train students to under- 
stand the issues involved, to help them see their own strengths and 
weaknesses, and then to develop a flexibility that will enable them to 
take their Biblical and theological understanding and deal with whatever 
issues they face during their ministry. 



SUPERVISED MINISTRY serves an integrative function for the curricu- 
lum at Columbia. Through its structure students are involved in the ac- 
tual practice of ministry under competent supervision. In experiential, 
relational, inductive learning experiences, the student explores within a 
peer group the forms, styles, contents, and concepts of ministry. Not only 
does the student put into practice what has been learned through stud- 
ies in the Biblical, historical-doctrinal, and pastoral areas, but these 
studies are integrated with the practice of ministry and the personhood 
of the student. 

Columbia's faculty recognizes that the method of teaching also makes 
a significant contribution to learning. Consequently, a variety of teach- 
ing methods are employed. Team teaching, which enables the professors 
themselves to participate more fully in the learning process, and which 
effectively brings different kinds of competence together in the class- 
room, is widely used. Because small groups are a part of most courses, 
creative interchange between student and student and between student 
and professor is the mark of instruction at Columbia. 

Schedule 

Columbia operates on the quarter system. Each quarter consists of 
nine to ten weeks for classes and one week for examinations. The semi- 
nary functions on a full schedule during the fall, winter, and spring 
quarters, and offers during the summer an eight-week course in begin- 
ning Greek and a four-week program of advanced level courses. The 
curriculum for first professional degree students is designed for those 
beginning their work in the fall quarter. Students entering at another 
quarter will experience difficulties in scheduling their courses and may 
find that they cannot complete their required work in the usual nine 
quarters. 

Admission 

Admission to the basic degree programs at Columbia Seminary — 
M.Div. and D.Min. (in-course) — requires a four-year degree from an 
accredited university or college of arts and sciences, or its equivalent. 
Students without four years of pre-seminary preparation are not eligible 
to earn degrees at the seminary and are not encouraged to apply for 
admission. When requested to do so by presbyteries of the Presbyterian 
Church in the United States, students without a university or college 
degree may be accepted for a special course of study. 

A major in one of the liberal arts fields is most helpful as prepara- 
tion for theological studies. Basic courses in philosophy, European and 
American history, psychology, sociology, and English grammar and lit- 
erature form the foundation for seminary studies. Students with inade- 
quate backgrounds in these areas may be required to take remedial work 
or select particular electives within the seminary curriculum. 

Entering M.Div and D.Min. (in-course) students are required to have 
a reading knowledge of New Testament Greek. For those students who 
are not prepared in Greek the seminary offers a non-credit course, B021, 
in its summer language school. 



Admission Prot edure 

Students desiring admission to the basic degree programs 01 special 
programs should request an application foi admission from the di recto i 
of admissions. In addition to the completed application form, students 
should furnish the additional items indicated on thai form. Applicants 
who have taken the Graduate Record Exam or tests given by career and 
guidance centers should have test scores sent to the director of admis- 
sions. An interview with a member of the admissions committee follow 
ing submission of the application is encouraged and may be required. 

The normal deadline for applications for the basic degree is as fol- 
lows: for the fall quarter, July 1; for the winter quarter, November 1; 
tor the spring quarter, February 1; for the summer language school, 
May 15. 

Students admitted to the seminary will be provided a health form to 
be filled out by a physician and an application for seminary housing. 

Columbia Fellowships 

Qualified men and women who would like to explore the possibility 
of entering the ministry may apply for a Columbia Fellowship for study 
at Columbia Theological Seminary. These fellowships, which are valued 
up to $2,820, are for persons who have shown academic and leadership 
abilities and who want to examine the ministry as a possible career 
choice. The fellowships are for one year only. After their exploratory 
year recipients are free to continue studying at Columbia, to change to 
another institution, or to choose another career. 

To be eligible applicants must be a citizen of the United States or 
Canada. They must have received a bachelor's degree not more than 
three years prior to the application or have academic standing as a grad- 
uating senior. The fellowships will be awarded to persons having high 
academic achievement and leadership abilities. 

All recipients are required to enroll full-time for one academic year 
at Columbia Seminary. 

Five awards will be made for full room, board, tuition and fees with 
a maximum grant of $2,820. 

Application for a Columbia Fellowship is made through the Office 
of Development at Columbia Seminary. Selection is made by the Colum- 
bia Seminary faculty on the recommendation of the Selection Commit- 
tee. Applications must be received no later than March 15. Announce- 
ment of the awards will be made on April 15. 

Special and Unclassified Students 

Students meeting requirements for admission to the basic degree pro- 
gram but not wishing to work toward a degree may be admitted as 
special students to take courses tor credit. Iheir program of stuck must 
be approved by the dean of academic affairs. 

Unclassified students ma\ be admitted to take a course of particular 
interest for credit, if prerequisites for the course are satisfied 



Auditors 

Regular students, spouses of students, and other members of the 
community are invited to audit courses, with the permission of the in- 
structor and provided space is availiable in the course. Registration as an 
auditor must be made through the office of the dean of academic af- 
fairs at the regular time for registration. 

Transfer Students 

Students in good standing in other accredited seminaries may be 
admitted after transcripts have been evaluated and their applications 
approved by the admissions committee Ordinarily more than one year 
in residence is required for the M.Div. and more than two years in 
residence for the D.Min. (in-course). 

Introductory Term 

An orientation program is required of all entering students during the 
days preceding the regular opening of the seminary in the fall. It offers 
an opportunity for new students to get acquainted with one another and 
with student body leaders and members of the faculty. Tests are ad- 
ministered to help students identify and understand particular strengths 
and deficiencies of preparation for theological instruction. This program 
is without extra expense to the students, except for a charge for board 
and housing. 

Returning students are also required to participate in the introductory 
term. Second-year students are involved in an introduction to the urban 
community; third-year students participate in a management workshop. 

Grading 

At the close of each quarter grades are given according to the fol- 
lowing system. A grade report is sent to each student and his presbytery. 
For A and B component students and special students: 
A excellent, 3 quality points per hour 

B+ very good, 2.5 quality points per hour 

B good, 2 quality points per hour 

C+ average, 1.5 quality points per hour 

C satisfactory, 1 quality point per hour 

D+ unsatsfactory, 0.5 quality points per hour 

D inferior, quality points per hour 

E conditioned, quality points per hour 

F failure, minus 1 quality point per hour 

For C, D, and E component students: 

H honors, for work of exceptionally distinguished quality 

S satisfactory, for work which represents sufficient mas- 

tery of the content of the course to merit recommen- 
dation for graduation 
U unsatisfactory, for work which represents insufficient 

mastery of the content of the course to merit recom- 
mendation for graduation 



For Th.M., S.T.D., and D Mm. (in i areer) students: 
A excellent, J quality points per hour 

B good, 2 quality points per hour 

C passing! 1 quality point per hour 

F failure, minus ] quality point per hour 

Any A or B component student who fails to make a C average any 
quarter except the first places himself/herself on probation for the next 
quarter mm\ if he/she fails to bring his/her average up during that 
quarter, he she will be dropped as a student. In the event the student's 
overall average is C or better, he/she will be permitted to remain as a 
student tor another quarter on probation. 

C, D, and E component students must have satisfactory or honors 
marks in all required courses, electives, and supervised ministry which 
make up the hours required for the degree. A U may be remedied by (1) 
further work on the course, (2) repeating the course, (3) taking an elec- 
tive course relating to the area of deficiency. A U given for unexcused 
late work shall normally require additional work. Any student whose 
work is unsatisfactory will be placed on probation, and if he/she fails 
to show improvement in the next quarter, he/she will be dropped as a 
student. 

Graduation Honors 

Students whose work in the judgment of the faculty shows dis- 
tinguished quality will be awarded the degree "with distinction". 




Reading Room ot the I Bu/ow Campbell Library 



FIRST PROFESSIONAL DEGREES 

Master of Divinity Degree and 
Doctor of Ministry Degree (in-course) 

Beginning in September of 1972, Columbia initiated a revised program 
leading to the Master of Divinity degree with an additional two com- 
ponents leading to the Doctor of Ministry degree (in-course). The first 
two components of these degrees involve a common program. The 
academic courses and supervised ministry in these initial components 
are designed to assist the student in developing intellectual tools and 
professional skills to begin the practice of ministry. At the end of the 
second component, students, together with their peers, engage in a 
process of professional evaluation leading to admission to degree can- 
didacy. The strength and areas of growth of the student are assessed so 
as to lead him or her, together with an appropriate committee, to de- 
termine whether he or she should proceed toward the Master of Divinity 
degree or toward the Doctor of Ministry degree (in-course). 

Students pursuing the Master of Divinity degree move to a third 
component, composed primarily of an interdisciplinary seminar on min- 
istry and further academic work. Students qualifying for the Doctor of 
Ministry degree (in-course) proceed to two further components, the 
first of which includes a twelve-month period of supervised ministry in 




an approved setting. The final, on-campus component involves, in addi- 
tion to academic work ,\n interdisciplinary seminar on ministry enabling 
the student to reflect on his or her period ot supervised ministr\ and to 
complete a written project ot substantial scope. 

The term components is used rather than \ nee the amount 

ot time a student takes to complete the component may be more o: 
than an academic year. The A and B components represent the initial 
common program tor the first professional degrees. The C component 
follows the professional assessment and represents the final stage lead- 
ing to the Master of Divinity degree. For students admitted to the Doctor 
of Ministry degree (in-course) at the time of the professional assessment, 
the D component designates the twelve-month period of supervised 
mimstr\ and the E component the final, on campus element. 

Requirements for the M. Div. Degree 

1. There must be on file with the seminary a complete and official 
transcript of credits showing graduation with a bachelor's degree from 
an accredited university or college of liberal arts and sciences, or its 
equivalent. 

The student must be admitted to degree candidacy at the end of 
the B component. To quality for candidacy the student must have satis- 
fied all the academic and supervised ministry requirements for t: 
and B components <as outlined on pages 24 and 25), together with 
enough electives to total 104 credits. The overall grade average must be 
C or better. 

3. The candidate must satisfactorily complete all the requirements of 
the C component as outlined on pages 24 and 25 

4. The student must pass a Bible content exam administered bv mem- 
bers of the Biblical Area. 

5. The faculty must be satisfied that the conduct and attitude of the 
candidate is becoming a minister of the Gospel and that he or she gives 
promise of useful service in the ministry or other Church vocation. 

6. All bills to the seminary must be paid and assurance given that all 
open accounts in the community and elsewhere have been satisfied. 

Requirements for the D.Min. Degree tin-cou: 

1. There must be on file with the semmar\ a complete and official 
transcript of credits showing graduation with a bachelor's degree from 
an accredited university or college of liberal arts and sciences or its 
equivalent. 

The student must be admitted to degree candidacy at the end ot 
the B component. To qualify for candidacv the student must have 
tied all the academic and supervised ministry requirements tor the A 
and B components (as outlined on pages 24 ani ^er with 

enough electives to total 104 credits. Ti II grade 

B or better. 



3. The candidate must satisfactorily engage in a twelve-month period 
of supervised ministry for which a total of 32 hours credit is given. 

4. The candidate must satisfactorily complete all other requirements 
of the D and E components (as outlined on pages 24 and 25. 

5. The student must pass a Bible content exam administered by 
members of the Biblical Area. 

6. The faculty must be satisfied that the conduct and attitude of the 
candidate is becoming a minister of the Gospel and that he or she gives 
promise of useful service in the ministry or other Church vocation. 

7. All bills to the seminary must be paid and assurance given that 
all open accounts in the community and elsewhere have been satisfied. 

Professional Assessment 

The Professional Assessment is a major review of the student's poten- 
tial for ministry that occurs after the completion of the major require- 
ments of the A and B components. This assessment will usually be sched- 
uled in the spring quarter of the B component or the following 
September and is a condition for the student's beginning work in either 
the C or D components. Detailed guidelines for the assessment process 
are given to the student well in advance, including criteria, data to be 
considered, composition of the assessment committee, intent of the 
interview, and possible recommendations to the faculty which might 
ensue. 

The admission to candidacy for either the M.Div. or D.Min. (in- 
course) degrees emerges from the professional assessment and must 
be approved by the faculty. 

Community Worship 

The seminary community gathers for worship every day of regular 
classes to express its thanksgiving for and need of God's grace in the 
church and in the world. 

Graduating students in the C and E components are required to lead 
worship and preach for the community ordinarily on Tuesday evenings. 
The experience is evaluated by a group of students and faculty. 

Flexibility 

Students who have strong backgrounds in certain particular fields of 
the curriculum, or who demonstrate unusual proficiency in their work, 
are given opportunities for special placement or for independent work. 
Requests for flexibility in a student's program should be made to the 
dean of academic affairs. Three opportunities for flexibility are available: 

1. Students may be permitted advanced placement in the A and B 
components if they can satisfactorily demonstrate that they have already 
achieved the objectives of a given course. This means that they may be 
exempt from the course and permitted to take an advanced course in 
the area. 

2. Academically qualified students may be permitted to engage in 
independent study as a route to the establishment of competence in a 
required course. 



10 



3. Students may be allowed to determine their own course ol study 

in any area or arras leading to Comprehensive examinations which 
would test their competence in A and B components. No credits would 
In 1 awarded until the comprehensive examinations have been passed. 
Only two chances to pass the examination are allowed. 

Independent Resean h 

Students are encouraged to design and pursue their own program ol 

independent research as a part of the elective offerings. Contracts may 
be drawn up with faculty members teaching in the area of the Student's 
interest for reading courses and research projects. The nature and ex- 
tent of the work projected and completed determine the amount ol 
credit given. Such courses provide students the opportunity to investi- 
gate areas of specialized interest in which no regular electives are 
ottered. 

Clinical Pastoral Education 

Clinical pastoral education is a first-hand learning experience under 
certified supervision which provides theological students and pastors 
with opportunities for intensive study of pastoral relationships, and 
which seeks to make clear in understanding and practice the resources, 
methods, and meanings of the Christian faith as expressed through pas- 
toral care. Columbia's membership in the Association for Clinical Pas- 
toral Education means that its students will be given priority of choice 
in institutions elected, especially those listed within the Southeast 
Region. 

Students in the M.Div. and D.Min. degree programs may elect to take 
a unit of Basic CPE (SM 510). Persons in the Th.M. and the S.T.D. in pas- 
toral counseling are required to take four units of Advanced CPE. And 
persons in the D.Min. (in-career) may elect a quarter of CPE to satisfy 
the clinical requirement of that degree. These clinicals are coordinated 
by the Director of Supervised Ministry. 

Radio and Television 

On its own campus Columbia has video taping facilities. Video tap- 
ing is used in a variety of ways in classroom instruction and in preaching 
practicums. Columbia's facilities also allow limited work in experimen- 
tation with television production. 

Palestinian Arc haeology and History 

Columbia Seminary is associated with the Institute for Mediterranean 
Studies of Berkeley, California, which sponsors an annual Near Eastern 
Archaeological Seminar. Students who participate in this seminar will 
>pend eight weeks in the Near East taking courses in Palestinian archae- 
ology and history. The program includes three weeks of actual digging 
at an ancient site m Palestine, students will be given academic credit 
provided they successfully complete the course program and submit the 
necessary transcript. For further details, contact Professor lames H. 
Gailey, Jr. 



11 




I* 



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ADVANCED PROFESSIONAL DECREES 

Columbia otters three degree programs which lead to professional 
decrees. The emphasis of the programs is the practice ol ministry. I he 
academic expectations are ot the same level as programs emphasizing 
research, hut the purpose ot t In- programs is to prepare outstanding stu- 
dents tor ettechve service ,\nd leadership in the parish, in some related 
ministry, o\^ the mission neld, or In the development ot some new form 

of mmistr\ 

In addition to the resources of the faculty and library on Columbia's 
campus, graduate students are able to draw upon the resources ot the 
Atlanta area Ihe S. T. D. program mm\ D.Min. (in-career) programs are 
administered by the (Graduate Professional Studies Committee of the 
Atlanta Theological Association, which coordinates and augments the 
resources of Candler School of Theology, Emory University, the Inter- 
denominational Theological Center, and Columbia. Th.M. students may 
also include in their program studies at these other seminaries. 

The resources of the Atlanta community are also available to Col- 
umbia graduate students. Pastoral counseling programs in several set- 
tings are made available through the Georgia Association for Pastoral 
Care. The Urban Training Organization of Atlanta provides resources in 
the area of urban problems and urban ministries. Numerous national and 
regional offices of denominational and interdenominational agencies are 
located in Atlanta. Other educational opportunities are available at 
Emory University, Georgia State University, and colleges in the area. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

Students whose native language is not English must include with 
regular application data evidence of a score of 500 or more on the Test 
of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Overseas students are expect- 
ed to have the written recommendation of their denomination. Also, 
a statement of the student's plans for future work in his native country 
is required. All students are expected to provide a statement ot available 
finances for their graduate study. Columbia Seminary does not provide 
scholarships to individuals for graduate study. 

MASTER OF THEOLOGY 
Admission 

Admission to study in the Th.M. program is granted by the dean ot 
ministry development and the admissions committee of the faculty. Ap- 
plication is made through the Office of Ministry Development. The 
M.Div. degree or its academic equivalent is required. Except for the 
Th.M. in pastoral counseling or pastoral supervision, courses in Hebrew 
and Greek are prerequisite. If a student's M.Div. course required less 
than the two Biblical languages, he or she may substitute another ap- 
proved language 1 tor one ot them. In addition, each applicant is expected 
resent evidence of achievement and competence as a student Rare- 
ly can a student be expected to do satisfactory graduate work it he 01 
she has not maintained at least tl f* average in ( ollege and seminary work 



1 I 



Admission to Candidacy 

Students seeking a Th.M. in Biblical, Historical-Doctrinal, or Pastoral 
Studies must be admitted to candidacy by vote of the faculty, proper 
application having been made in writing to the advanced studies com- 
mittee. The faculty meeting in November is the deadline for admission 
to candidacy if the student expects to receive the degree the following 
June. 

In addition to regular tuition fees, Th.M. students must pay a thesis 
fee as follows: $25.00 to accompany the application for admission to 
candidacy, and $25.00 at the beginning of the fall quarter each year 
thereafter until the degree is received. Failure to pay the continuation 
fee will constitute withdrawal from the program. 

Requirements for the Degree 

In order to quaiify for the Th.M. degree, the student must complete 
the following within five years: 

1. at least 30 hours of academic credit at the advanced level (cours- 
es numbered in the 500s or 600s) with grades that average not 
less than B. This academic work shall involve at least three aca- 
demic quarters in partial residence. 

2. an acceptable thesis. 

3. an oral examination which will be given after the thesis has been 
completed 

Specialization 

Each student seeking the Th.M. degree will concentrate his or her 
studies in one of the following fields: Biblical studies, historical-doctrinal 
studies, pastoral studies, pastoral counseling, or pastoral supervision. At 
least fifteen hours of advanced level work must be taken in the field in 
which the student concentrates. At least eight hours of advanced level 
work must be taken outside the area of concentration. Credit for work 
taken at the basic level (courses numbered lower than 500) must be 
approved prior to taking the course by the faculty advisor, the dean of 
ministry development, and the dean of academic affairs. In no case shall 
more than six hours of basic level work be counted toward the degree. 

The Th.M. in pastoral counseling and the Th.M. in pastoral supervis- 
ion have additional requirements as follows: 

Pastoral Counseling 

The first year of this program requires the successful completion of 
an intern year in one of the institutions accredited by the Association 
for Clinical Pastoral Education. 

By the end of the first year, if the student is adjudged sufficiently 
mature and competent by a multidisciplinary professional committee, he 
or she is admitted to the counseling practicum for counseling super- 
vision in the Georgia Association of Pastoral Counseling and Referral 
Service under the supervision of Professor Theron Nease and Chaplain 
Calvin Kropp. Most of the counseling supervision occurs in centers es- 



14 



tablished b> the Georgia Association foi Pastoral Care. Sufficient super 
vision of counseling, intake, etc., is provided to qualify the candidate tor 
membership in the American Association oi Pastoral Counselors, Inc. 

The second yeai of study the student begins a program of academic 
work which consists of K) houis at a B average. A research project pom 
pletes the requirements for the degree. 

Pastoral Supers i^ion 

This degree program has been developed tor those students seeking 

to become certified chaplain supervisors. An intern year must be SU< - 
cessfully completed in one of the affiliate institutions of the Association 
tor Clinical Pastoral Education. The total number of academic hours re- 
quired is thirty at a B average. 

In addition, a residency year must also be satisfactorily completed. 
The residency year may be elected in any institution accredited by the 
Association for Clinical Pastoral Education, Inc. Certification as acting 
C.P.E. supervisor by any region of the Association for Clinical Pastoral 
Education will complete the requirements for the degree. 

THE DOCTOR OF MINISTRY— IN CAREER 

A Doctor of Ministry degree program for the working minister has 
now been formulated by the schools participating in the Atlanta Theo- 
logical Association. The program has been designed to continue the 
education of persons for their practice of ministry in the church and in 
related institutional settings. It provides an advanced, yet flexible, edu- 
cation for those whose vocation as servants of people and servants of 
Jesus Christ implies their further disciplined reflection upon, and possibly 
their further specialization within, their own ministry. 

Admission 

Each applicant should hold an M.Div. or equivalent degree with a 
superior academic record and/or superior professional performance, and 
should have at least one year, preferably three, of professional experi- 
ence since receiving the basic degree. 

Each applicant should submit a personal statement of not more than 
ten double-spaced pages giving biographical data, academic and minis 
try achievements, interests, goals, and personal purposes for the D.Min. 

program that will illustrate continued development. 

Advanced standing, on the basis of post-M.Div. courses in other pro- 
grams, will be determined by the ATA D.Min. Field Committee and 
Columbia Seminary after admission. 

Program of Study 

Although it may be spread over a period up to tour \e,us the pro 

uram of study requires participation in the equivalent oi <i mil ye< 
academic and clinical courses. The doctoral project is executed after the 



15 



completion of these courses and usually as part of the ongoing profes- 
sional work of the minister. 

Forty-eight (48) hours of work are required, distributed as follows: 

Twenty-four (24) hours in advanced courses, including optional 

clinical experiences. 

Eight (8) hours clinical experience (equivalent to one full-time 

quarter). 

Eight (8) hours core work in contemporary ministry and career 

assessment. 

Eight (8) hours doctoral project. 

To assist both personal development and also course and project 
planning, each student secures a faculty adviser and a doctoral commit- 
tee. After completion of course work and before the execution of the 
doctoral project, the student will take an examination covering a range 
of subjects designated by his doctoral committee. 

For further information and application forms, write to office of 
ministry development, Columbia Theological Seminary, Decatur, Georgia 
30031. 

DOCTOR OF SACRED THEOLOGY IN PASTORAL COUNSELING 

This degree is offered through the Atlanta Theological Association by 
the Candler School of Theology, Columbia Theological Seminary, and 
the Interdenominational Theological Center. It is administered by the 
Atlanta Theological Association which has responsibility for approving 
admissions to the program, establishing curriculum offerings, and cer- 
tifying candidates for the award of degrees. 

The S. T. D. program focused on pastoral counseling concentrates 
upon the counseling, guidance, and consultation aspects of the min- 
ister's professional function. The more specialized nature of the program 
is reflected in admission requirements and the program of studies. 

The purpose of the Doctor of Sacred Theology in pastoral counseling 
is to prepare clergy to serve as pastoral counselors in a local church or 
on the starf of a community mental health center, to serve as consul- 
tants to their fellow clergy, and to offer training in pastoral care and 
counseling at various levels. The program is designed to prepare stu- 
dents for membership as Fellows in the American Association of Pas- 
toral Counselors. 

Admission 

Applicants must hold the Master of Divinity or equivalent degree 
from an accredited institution. The admission process will include: 1) an 
assessment of the applicant's academic grades and professional perform- 
ance, 2) his statement of purpose, 3) references and other materials sup- 
plied with the application, and 4) a personal interview with the S. T. D. 
dean of the school to which he applies. The applicant is required to have 
attained satisfactory grades in a Biblical language, or in another discipline 



16 



which is relevanl to his program. Possible options would include a non- 
Biblical language, statistics, computer programming, tests jiu\ measure- 
ments, or another Special skill. 

In addition, applicants to the pastoral counseling doctoral program 
must have significant experence as pastor of a church (approximate!) 

three years in a church after seminary), in clinical pastoral education 
(usually tour consecutive units), and one or more personal interviews 
with the pastoral counseling and other faculties. 

A student who, though otherwise acceptable, has not had courses in 
personality development and pastoral care equivalent to those taught in 
the participating seminaries of the Atlanta Theological Association, must 
take these courses without credit during the first two quarters of his 
residence. 

Each student admitted to the program shall have one member of the 
pastoral counseling faculty as his adviser. 

Program of Study 

The program of study consists of 48 quarter hours of course work, 
including 12 quarter hours in the core seminar, and 24 quarter hours 
of pastoral counseling practicum (8 hours credit per quarter). 

The studies included within the program shall guide the student (1) 
to an advanced understanding of appropriate theological and theoretical 
concepts, (2) to apply, under qualified supervision, these concepts in 
pastoral counseling, and to promote professional integration of theory 
and skills in both pastoral counseling and pastoral guidance, and (3) to 
design and execute an appropriate research project which will give evi- 
dence of his creative ability to contribute to this aspect of applied 
theology. 

When the student has completed at least 72 quarter hours of work, 
he may apply to take the comprehensive examination which shall test 
his competence in both content and performance areas of pastoral 
counseling. 

Requirement^ 

In order to qualify for the S. T. D. degree in pastoral counseling the 
student must complete the following within six calendar years after his 
admission to the program: 

1. Residence and Grade Requirements. At least 48 quarter hours ol 
course work must be completed with A dnc\ B grades. At least 24 
quarter hours of pastoral counseling practicum must be complet- 
ed with a satisfactory grade. Admission to the pastoral counseling 
practicum will be granted when the student is considered to I 
pastoral c ounsHor in training. 

2. Comprehensive Examination. The content areas in which the stu- 
dent shall be examined shall include- theoh using upon 



17 



theological method and pastoral theology; psychology, including 
theories of personality and development; psychodynamics of be- 
havior and of religious experience; and theories of counseling and 
psychotherapy; sociology, including personality and culture, group 
dynamics, sociology of religion, marriage and family dynamics; 
pastoral care, including history of pastoral care, ministerial role, 
guidance at the passage points of life, ministry in crisis situations 
and referrals; and supervision, as a definable type of learning, 
interprofessional understanding of supervision, pastoral identity 
and authority in supervision. 

The performance areas in which the student shall be examined 
shall include evaluation interviewing, pastoral counseling, super- 
vision, professional maturity within the role of pastoral counselor, 
and ability to relate pastoral counseling to the total ministerial 
role. 

3. Admission to Candidacy. The student may apply for admission to 
candidacy after he passes the comprehensive examination. 

4. The Research Project. The student shall engage in an approved 
research project which will demonstrate his application of theo- 
logical and theoretical knowledge to issues of a professional 
character and his ability to contribute useful material and con- 
cepts to this area of theological investigation. He shall make a 
written report of his project and be subject to an oral examination 
on his project. Upon successful completion of the project, he 
shall be certified to the Graduate Professional Studies Committee 
as having passed all requirements for the degree. 

Further inquiries about the S. T. D. degree in pastoral counseling 
should be addressed to the Director, Graduate Professional Studies, 
Room 7, Theology Building, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, 30322. 
Telephone: (404) 377-2411, extension 7632. 




18 



COURSES 

BIBLICAL AREA 

FACULTY: Charles B. Cousar, Ludwig R. Dewitz, lames H. Gailey, Keith 
F. Nickle, I. Will Ormond, Ronald S. Wallace 

VISITING INSTRUCTORS Kenneth Morris, R. Eugene Randolph, Arthur 
\\ Wain\A right 

Required Courses for M.Div. and D.Min. (in-course) 

B151 EXEGESIS OF GALATIANS Cousar, Nickle 

An analysis and interpretation of the Greek text of Galatians in order to 
give training in methods of exegesis and to ascertain the meaning of the 
epistle today. 
Fall 4 hours 

B152 THE SYNOPTIC GOSPELS Ormond, Nickle, Randolph 

A study of the formation of the gospel tradition, an investigation of the 
structure, content, and theology of the Gospel of Mark, and an exegesis 
of selected passages of the Greek text of Mark. 
Winter 5 hours 

B153 PAULINE LITERATURE Ormond, Cousar, Nickle 

A study of the English text of the principal Pauline letters in their his- 
torical context and present relevance, and an exegesis of selected 
passages from the Greek text. 
Spring 5 hours 

B221-B222 ESSENTIALS OF HEBREW Dewitz, Gailev 

An intensive study of the essential elements of Hebrew grammar, syntax, 
and vocabulary preparatory to reading and studying exegetically the 
Hebrew Old Testament. 

Fall 4 hours 

Winter 2 hours 

B241 THE HISTORICAL BOOKS OF THE OLD TESTAMENT 

( \ailey, Dew itz 

A study of the general character and content of Genesis through II Kirv^ 
an investigation of the development of the books from oral tradition to 
written form; and a consideration of the theological significance of cer- 
tain aspects of Israel's life and thought. 

Winter 4 hours 

2 PROPHETIC LITERATURE Dewit/. (,a//e\ 

Emphasis on the content of the books of the prophets in their historical 
setting, on the development and character of the prophetic mo\ement 
in Israel, on exegesis of selected passages in the Hebrew text, on Old 
Testament prophetk literature as Christian Scriptui 
Spring 4 hours 



19 



Elective Courses* 

General and Background 

B411 EARLY CHRISTIAN LITERATURE Nickle 

Readings selected from the Apostolic Fathers, the New Testament 
Apocrypha or the Patristic period. Readings will be studied for their 
theology and their contribution to the developing Christian movement. 
Specific readings will vary each quarter the course is offered. 

4 hours 

B413 INTRODUCTION TO BIBLICAL INTERPRETATION Wallace 

A basic discussion of the nature and history of Biblical interpretation, of 
how our doctrine of Holy Scripture affects an approach to this task, 
of how to approach the interpretation of various types of Biblical writing, 
of how we find the meaning and message of the text in the context of 
the Church and world of today. 

2 hours 

B514 HISTORY OF BIBLICAL INTERPRETATION Nickle 

A study of major schools and individuals who have made particularly 
significant contributions to the ways the church used sacred texts. Specific 
readings will vary each quarter the course is offered and may range 
from the use of Hebrew Scriptures by the primitive church to modern 
methods of Biblical interpretation. 

4 hours 

B515 (B415) BIBLICAL APOCALYPTIC LITERATURE Nickle 

A review of the cultural and literary background out of which apocalyp- 
tic literature emerged. Exegetical analysis of typical apocalyptic texts. 
An overview of apocalyptic theology and its relation to contemporary 
concerns. 

4 hours 

B516 SEMINAR IN EXEGESIS AND HERMENEUTICS Staff 

The aim of this seminar is to survey relevant articles in recent theological 
literature dealing with problems of the historico-grammatical approach 
to Biblical passages and the hermeneutical possibilities arising out of 
such study. 

3 hours 



*Electives carrying a 400 level number are designed for A and B component students 
only and require three hours work per week for each credit hour. Electives carrying a 
500 or 600 level number are designed for students who have completed the admission 
to degree candidacy or who are graduate students. They require four hours work per 
week for each credit hour. Electives with two numbers are open to all students. 



20 



■\m ient Languages 

B021 ESSENTIALS OF GREEK Morris 

An intensive study of the essential elements of Koine Greek grammar, 
syntax, and vocabulary preparatory to reading the Greek New Testament. 
Required of all students not having taken Greek in college. 
Summer session only No Credit 

B520 (B420) HEBREW READING Dewitz or Gaile) 

Rapid reading of selections from the Hebrew Old Testament with a view 
to increasing facility in the use of the language; emphasis on grammatu al 
structures and vocabulary. 

7 hour 

B525 (B425) GREEK READING Cousar or Nickle 

The reading of a variety of New Testament passages in order to help the 
student increase his facility with the Greek language. 

7 hour 

B527 RAPID READING OF THE GREEK NEW TESTAMENT Cousar 

The rapid reading of the whole Greek New Testament for five hours, or 
of the Gospels for two hours, or of the Gospels and Acts for three hours, 
or of the Gospels, Acts, and the Pauline Epistles for four hours. The stu- 
dent reads on his own and takes a final reading examination. 
Any quarter 2-5 hours 

B623 BIBLICAL ARAMAIC Ga/7ey 

A study of the Aramaic language and the reading of portions of the Old 
Testament in Aramaic. Primarily for graduate students. 

4 hours 

Old Testament Based on Hebrew Text 

B531 EXEGESIS OF JOB Ga/7ey 

Selections of the material will be studied exegetically in the total context 
of the wisdom tradition. 

3 hours 

B532 (B432) EXEGESIS OF HOSEA Dewitz 

The exegetical study of three selected chapters. 

2 hours 

B533 (B433) EXEGESIS OF ISAIAH 1-39 Gaite) 

This course concentrates on the translation and exegesis of Isaiah 6-9 in 
the context of the total message of the prophet. 

I hours 

B534 EXEGESIS OF ISAIAH 40-55 life) 

Selections of the material will be studied exegetically. and the theolog) 
of the prophet will be surveyed. 

1 hours 



21 



B537 EXEGESIS OF MICAH Cailey 

An opportunity for students to explore in depth the social and theologi- 
cal concerns of a Hebrew prophet. Participants will be expected to make 
use of the Hebrew text while seeking application to contemporary prob- 
lems of church and state. 

2 or 3 hours 

B538 (B438) EXEGESIS OF PSALMS Dewitz 

This course focuses on the translation and exegesis of psalms selected 
from their genres, i.e., hymns, laments, wisdom, and royal psalms. 

2 or 3 hours 

Old Testament Based on English Text 

B440 GENESIS 1-11 Dewitz 

A theological and critical study of the early chapters of Genesis in the 
light of the interpretation in the New Testament, with a view to finding 
the meaning for preaching today. 

2 hours 

B443 HEBREW PATRIARCHS Wallace 

A critical and theological study of the Hebrew Patriarchs with the help 
of traditional and modern scholarship, and with a view to finding the 
meaning for preaching today. 

2 hours 

B444 I AND II SAMUEL Wallace 

A theological and critical study of portions of the books of Samuel with 
the help of tradition and critical scholarship with a view of finding the 
meaning for preaching today. 

2 hours 

B445 THE BOOK OF DANIEL Wallace 

A theological and critical study of the Book of Daniel with the help of 
traditional and modern scholarship with a view to finding its meaning 
for preaching today. 

2 hours 

B446 ELIJAH AND ELISHA Wallace 

A theological and critical study of I Kings 17 to II Kings 10, with the help 
of traditional and modern scholarship, and with a view to finding the 
meaning for preaching today. 

2 hours 

B447 THE BOOK OF EXODUS Wallace 

A theological and critical study of the main passages in the Book of 
Exodus with the help of traditional and modern scholarship, and with a 
view to finding the meaning for preaching today. 

2 hours 



22 





I 



I 



\ 






MASTER OF DIVINITY AND DOCTOR 

Required Courses for b< 



A COMPONENT 




Fall + 


B151 


Galatians** 


HD111 


Early & Medieval Church 


P111 


Becoming a Minister to Persons 




Winter 


B152 


Synoptic Gospels 


HD112 


Reformation & Modern Church 


P121 


Ministry of Teaching 


SM111 


Supervised Ministry 


and 


and 



hrs. 
4 
5 
4 

5 

4 
3 



HD171a Christian Ethics 

Spring 
B153 Pauline Literature 5 

HD113 American Religious History 4 

P141 Worship with Preaching 4 

HD171b Christian Ethics 

and and 3 

SM112 Supervised Ministry 

Summer 
SM210 Supervised Ministry (Parish) 8 



-f Beginning students with an insufficient background in Philosophy will take HD45 

* Students are required to take at least two Pastoral Area courses during the B con 

** A reading knowledge of Biblical Greek is a prerequisite for A component course 



For Completion of M.Div. Degree 

hours 

A Component required courses (see above) 44 

B Component required courses (see above) 36 

A and B Component electives 16 

Summer Supervised Ministry: Parish (SM210) 8 
Admission to degree candidacy 

C COMPONENT 

P511 Church Structures for Ministry and Mission 4 

1511-512 Interdisciplinary Seminar in Ministry 8 

Biblical Electives 6 

Historical-Doctrinal Electives 6 

Pastoral Electives 6 

Free Electives 6 






24 



RY (IN-COURSE) PROGRAMS 
/) Mm Degrees 



B COMPONENT 



Fall 



B221 Hebrew 
HD231 Reformed Theology 

— Pastoral Course* 

or 

SM211 Supervised Ministry* 

or 212 

Winter 
B222 Hebrew 

B241 O.T. Historical Books 
HD232 Retormed Theology 

— Pastoral Course* 

or 
s\^ J 1 1 Supervised Ministry* 
or 212 

Spring 
B232 Prophetic Literature 
HD271 Christian Ethics 

— Pastoral Course* 

or 
SM211 Supervised Ministry* 
Of 212 

ADMISSION TO DEGREE CANDIDACY 



hrs 

4 

4 

3 



uarter. 

)sen from P221, P231, P241, and P261) and either SM211 or SM212 

rea. 



For Completion of D.Min. Degree 

A Component required (our-- 

B Component required courses 1st i 

A and B Component electives 

Summer Supervised Ministry: Parish SM210 

Admission to degree Candida* \ 

D COMPONEN1 

11-312-313-314 Supervised Ministry Intern Year 
Electives 



hours 

44 

1.. 
8 



12 



E COMPOMM 
P511 
1521 



Church Structures tor Ministry jnd Mi 
Interdisciplinary Seminar in Ministry 
Biblical Elective- 
Historical-Doc tnnal Flee lives 
iral Flee ti. 



25 



B542 JEREMIAH Wallace 

A theological and critical study of the main passages of the Book of 
Jeremiah with the help of traditional and modern scholarship with a view 
to finding their meaning for preaching today. 

3 hours 
New Testament Based on Greek Text 

B456 EXEGESIS OF THE ACTS OF THE APOSTLES Nickle 

A study of its literary structure and content, use of the Hebrew Scrip- 
tures, relation to the author's gospel, search for the author's plan and 
purpose highlighting his major theological emphases. Analysis of selected 
sections of the Greek text. 

3 hours 

B551 (B441) EXEGESIS OF THE GOSPEL OF JOHN Cousar or Nickle 
An exegetical study of the gospel with emphasis on structure, historical 
background and dominant motifs. Analysis of selected sections of the 
Greek text. Investigation of its relationship to the synoptic tradition. 

3 hours 

B552 EXEGESIS OF ROMANS Cousar 

An interpretation of the Epistle to the Romans, within the framework of 
Paul's theology. 

Prerequisite: B151 4 hours 

B553 EXEGESIS OF HEBREWS Nickle 

A study of its literary structure and content, use of the Old Testament, 
relation to other New Testament literature, and its theological vision. 
Analysis of selected sections of the Greek text. 

3 hours 

B557 (B458) EXEGESIS OF THE PARABLES OF JESUS Wainwright 

An exegetical study of Jesus' parables with emphasis on the literary 
structure, current discussion of interpretation, and dominant theological 
motifs. 

3 hours 

B559 (B459) EXEGESIS OF THE SERMON ON THE MOUNT Morris 
An interpretation of Matthew 5-7, with special attention to the parallels 
in other gospels and the theological issues emerging. 

3 hours 

New Testament Based on English Text 

B463 GOSPEL OF MARK Ormond 

A study of the Gospel of Mark emphasizing the structure, content, and 
message of the book. Attention is given to methodology in Biblical study. 

4 hours 

B561 (B461) EPISTLE TO THE EPHESIANS Wallace 

A critical and theological study with the help of traditional and modern 
scholarship with a view to finding the meaning for preaching today. 

3 hours 



26 



B562 THE GOSPEL OF LUKE Ormond 

A study of the English text of the Gospel according to Luke emphasizing 

me structure, content, and message of the book. Attention is given to 
Luke as historian and theologian. 

4 hours 

B566 (B46b) ACTS OF THE APOSTLES Ormond 

The structure, content, and message of the Book of Acts will be consid- 
ered in its historical setting. Insights thus gained will be related to the 
mission of the Church in the world today. 

3 hours 

B569 (B469) GENERAL EPISTLES Ormond 

A study of the English text of the Epistles of James; I, II Peter; I, II, III 
John, and Jude in their historical setting and their present relevance. 

3 hours 

Biblical Theology 

B571 (B471) OLD TESTAMENT THEOLOGY Dewitz 

A study of the literature and traditions of the Old Testament, based on 
W. Eichrodt, Theology of the Old Testament. 

2 hours 

B572 (B472) ROLE OF THE AFTERLIFE IN THE HISTORY OF ANCIENT 
ISRAEL Dewitz 

This course is a theological pursuit of the ways in which the thought of 
the hereafter is developed in the Old Testament, leading to the New 
Testament doctrine of the resurrection of the body. 

2 hours 

B5~6 THEMES IN PAULINE THEOLOGY Cousar or Nickle 

Selected themes in the theology of Paul wil be investigated in depth. The 
course will be structured as a seminar with student opportunity for en- 
gaging the rest of the class in a vigorous learning experience. 

3 hours 

B577 CHRISTOLOGY OF THE NEW TESTAMENT Ormond 

A study of the various approaches to Christology throughout the 
Testament, with special concern for the distinctive traditions in writers 
within the canon 

3 hours 

B578 TRENDS IN CONTEMPORARY NEW TESTAMENT STUDIES 

Cougar 
A consideration of the issues which have arisen in the Bultmannian and 

Bultmanman era of New Testament scholarship. 

i hours 



27 



Independent Studies 

The following courses provide an opportunity to engage in individual- 
ized work on various problems in the Biblical Area under the supervision 
of an instructor. 

B592 (B492) EXEGETICAL RESEARCH IN OLD TESTAMENT 

Dewitz or Galley 
Any quarter Up to 5 hours 

B593 (B493) RESEARCH IN OLD TESTAMENT CRITICISM OR 

THEOLOGY Dewitz or Galley 

Any quarter Up to 5 hours 

B595 (B495) EXEGETICAL RESEARCH IN NEW TESTAMENT 

Gousar or Nlckle 
Any quarter Up to 5 hours 

B596 RESEARCH IN NEW TESTAMENT CRITICISM OR THEOLOGY 

Gousar, Nickle or Ormond 
Any quarter Up to 5 hours 

Interdisciplinary 

1504 FROM TEXT TO SERMON Huie and Ormond 
A laboratory course using one particular book of the Bible where stu- 
dents work from particular texts to completed sermons. 

3 hours 

1505 CHURCH AND STATE: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY 
APPROACH Gousar and Guthrie 

An exegetical and theological study of the relationship between church 
and state in order to understand and evaluate the contemporary Ameri- 
can situation. 

3 hours 

HISTORICAL-DOCTRINAL AREA 

FACULTY: Frederick O. Bonkovsky, T. Erskine Clarke, Catherine Gun- 
salus Gonzalez, Shirley C. Guthrie, Jr., C. Benton Kline, Eduard 
N. Loring, Ronald S. Wallace 

VISITING INSTRUCTORS: William M. Frierson, Elias S. Hardge, Joseph 
L. Roberts 

Required Courses for M.Div. and D.Min. (in-course) 

HD111 HISTORY OF THE CHURCH IN THE EARLY AND MEDIEVAL 
PERIODS Gonzalez 

A study of the Church from her beginnings in the Graeco-Roman world 
to her rise to power in the middle ages, the course is designed to help 
students explore the relationship of spiritual authority and ecclesiastical 
power, theology and culture, and faith and the Christian life. 
Fall 5 hours 



28 



HD112 HISTORY OF THE CHURCH IN THE REFORMATION AND 

MODERN PERIODS Gonzalez 

A study of the Church from its division and reconstitution in the six- 
teenth century to its encounter with modern secular ideologies in the 
twentieth century, the course is designed to help students struggle with 
the problem of Christian divisions and the task of the church in "a 
world come of age." 
\\ inter 4 hours 

HD171 CHRISTIAN ETHICS Bonkovsky 

In Christian ministry one meets, deals with, and works through values, 
systems, and structures. By considering these, ethics provides insights 
and skill for contemporary Christian witness. Normally this course must 
be taken in conjunction with SM111-112. 
Winter & Spring 2 hours 

HD113 AMERICAN RELIGIOUS HISTORY Loring 

An introduction to the history of the life and thought of the churches 
in America, the course is designed to enable students to bring an his- 
torical understanding to the crises they will face in the ministry, and to 
come to an awareness of the relationship of religion and culture in 
American life. 
Spring 4 hours 

HD231-232 REFORMED THEOLOGY Guthrie and Kline 

An attempt to understand the mission of the Church and faith and life 

of individual Christians in today's world through a study of classical and 

contemporary Reformed theology in conversation with other theological 

traditions. 

Fall 4 hours 

Winter 4 hours 

HD271 CHRISTIAN ETHICS Bonkovsky and Guthrie 

A study of the Biblical, theological, and philosophical foundations of 
Christian ethics for guidance in Christian decision-making. 
Spring 4 hours 

Elective Courses* 

Histori( a/ Studies 

HD510 <HD410) NORTH AFRICAN THEOLOGY, AD. 150-550 

izalez 

A seminar in which we will study the writings of the major theologians 
of this early Western form of Christian thought. Study will toe us on 
Tertullian, Cyprian, Augustine, and the controversies after Augustine. \\< l 
will consider the social and political context ol the church In North 
Africa as well as the theological content of the material 
Prerequisite: HD111 I hours 



29 



HD512 (HD412) THE TWELFTH CENTURY Gonzalez 

A seminar in which we will look at the movements and the significant 
theological writings of this turning point in the Western church, includ- 
ing the writings of Bernard, Abelard, and Peter Lombard. The crusades, 
monasticism, education, architecture, the papacy, and other elements 
of society underwent transformation in this century that would become 
obvious in the following centuries. 
Prerequisite: HD112 3 hours 

HD520 (HD420) A HISTORY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, U. S. 

Clarke 
A study of the ways Presbyterians in the South have developed in rela- 
tion to a changing society. Special attention will be given to develop- 
ments in theology, social concerns, and institutional structures. 
Prerequisite: HD113 3 hours 

HD521 (HD421) THE CITY IN AMERICAN RELIGIOUS THOUGHT 

Clarke 
A study of the changing and recurring interpretations of the city in 
American Religious thought. Beginning with the Puritians and moving 
through evangelicals and social reforms to Harvey Cox and his critics, 
we will explore how various images of the city have influenced American 
Christians. 
Prerequisite: HD113 3 hours 

HD523 (HD423) THE SOUTHERN RELIGIOUS TRADITION Loring 

In this study, the role of the Church, the minister, and the Southern 
tradition will be analyzed and interpreted. Seeking to locate and under- 
stand the liabilities and strengths of the Southern religious heritage for 
today, we will deal with materials from the nineteenth and twentieth 
centuries as the South developed unique religious and cultural character- 
istics. 
Prerequisite: HD113 3 hours 

HD525 (HD425) ISSUES IN AMERICAN CULTURE Clarke 

A study of critical cultural issues with special emphasis on technology 
and its influences on contemporary American life. 

2 hours 



*Electives carrying a 400 level number are designed for A and B component students 
only and require three hours work per week for each credit hour. Electives carrying a 
500 or 600 level number are designed for students who have completed the admission 
to degree candidacy or who are graduate students. They require four hours work per 
week for each credit hour. Electives with two course numbers are open to all students. 



30 



HD528 (HD428) THE BLACK CHURCH EXPERIENCE Hardge and 

Roberts 

A study of the development and witness of the Black Church in America, 
with particular attention to its common life and worship. 

2 hours 

HD529 (HD429) THE CHURCH AND WOMEN Gon/ahv 

A seminar in which we will study the place women have held in the 
Church throughout its history, and the attitude of the Church toward 
women. We will also discuss the present situation of women in the 
Church and view theologically the questions that are being raised by 
and about women. 

3 hours 

Doctrinal Studies 

HD531 CALVIN: THE ETHICAL & CULTURAL ATTITUDES OF THE 
CHRISTIAN Wallace 

Calvin's view of the life and attitudes of the Christian in the world, as 
outlined in the third book of the Institutes. 

3 hours 

HD532 CALVIN: CHURCH, SOCIETY, AND STATE Wallace 

A study of Calvin's teaching based mainly on the fourth book of the 
Institutes, taking account of his other writings and the Genevan and six- 
teenth-century background. 

3 hours 

HD533 (HD433) THE THEOLOGY OF SCHLEIERMACHER Gonzalez 
A lecture course in which we will study the thought of this major 19th 
century theologian. Special attention will be given to the structure of his 
theology as an example of a way in which theology can be done. 

3 hours 

HD534 THE THEOLOGY OF KARL BARTH Guthrie 

A seminar which studies intensively a section of the Ghurch Dogmatics. 

Limit: 15 
3 hours 

HD535 (HD435) THE THEOLOGY OF KIERKEGAARD Con/aUv 

A lecture course in which we will study the thought of this major 19th 
century theologian. Special attention will b.e given to the structure of his 
theology as an example of a way in which theology can be done. 

I hours 

HD537 THE THEOLOGY OF TILLICH Kline 

A Mudy of the theology of Paul Tillich in the light of classical Christian 
theology and contemporary theologk al thought. 
Prerequisite- HD231-232 Limit:15 

I hour** 



II 



HD539 THE CHRISTOLOGY OF JURGEN MOLTMANN Guthrie 

A seminar dealing with Moltmann's understanding of the death and 
resurrection of Christ. 

3 hours 

HD540 (HD440) THE THEOLOGY AND PRACTICE OF PRAYER Wa//ace 
A study of prayers and the theology of prayer in texts selected from the 
Bible, the church fathers, the reformers, and the writers of devotional 
classics. 

3 hours 

HD543 (HD443) THE DOCTRINE OF THE HOLY SPIRIT Guthrie 

A study of the doctrine of the Holy Spirit in contemporary theology to 
discover the place of the Spirit in the church's life today. 

3 hours 

HD554 (HD444) THE LORD'S SUPPER Wa//ace 

A study of the relevant Biblical texts, of the aspects of Biblical and dog- 
matic theology involved in the interpretation of the texts, of the history 
and modern discussion of the doctrine and practice. 

3 hours 

HD545 (HD445) BAPTISM Wa//ace 

A study of the relevant Biblical texts, of the aspects of Biblical and dog- 
matic theology involved in the interpretation of the texts, of the history 
and modern discussion of the doctrine and practice. 

3 hours 

HD546 (HD446) THEOLOGY OF LITURGY Gonzalez 

A lecture and discussion course on the doctrinal significance of liturgi- 
cal practice: the liturgical year, the sacraments, parts of worship, etc. 
Special attention will be given to the interpretation of Biblical texts 
within the liturgical setting in which they are to be employed. 

3 hours 

HD547 LIBERATION THEOLOGY Guthrie 

A study of the writings of Gustavo Gutierrez and Frederick Herzog with 
a concern to understand and evaluate liberation theology. 

3 hours 

HD548 THEOLOGICAL SCIENCE Wallace 

A study of current writings on the nature of theology and dogmatics, on 
the problems of theological knowledge and thinking, and on the use of 
theological language and imagery. 

2 hours 

HD549 THE CONFESSIONAL LITERATURE OF THE REFORMED 

CHURCHES Guthrie 

A seminar making a comparative study of the Reformed Confessions of 
the sixteenth, seventeenth, and twentieth centuries. 

3 hours 



32 




L 




Philosophical Studies 

HD451 HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY Frierson 

A study of philosophical questions, terminology, and systems as they 
relate, in particular, to the various theological formulations of the 
Church through the centuries. 

Required of first year students with little or no background in phi- 
losophy. 

3 hours 

HD552 THEOLOGY AND LANGUAGE Kline 

An exploration of the nature of religious language and problems of 
theological expression. 

3 hours 

HD554 THE PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION Kline 

A study of classical and contemporary explorations of the nature of 
religion, religious knowledge, the existence and nature of God, and the 
relation of God to the world. 
Prerequisite: HD451 or its equivalent 

3 hours 

Mission and Ecumenics 

HD561 (HD461) SEMINAR ON INTERNATIONAL MISSION 
A seminar covering motives, methods, and issues in international mis- 
sions, at home and overseas. 

3 hours 

HD564 (HD464) CONTEMPORARY ROMAN CATHOLIC THEOLOGY 

Gonzalez 
A view of recent developments in Roman Catholic theology, based 
particularly upon the documents of the Second Vatican Council and the 
writings of Karl Rahner. 
Prerequisite: HD112 

3 hours 

Ethics and Society 

HD571 (HD471) THE CHRISTIAN, CHURCH, AND SOCIETY Bonkovsky 
Examination of the ways in which certain Christians and churches have, 
do and may seek to minister and witness. 

3 hours 

HD572 (HD472) ETHICS AND INTERNATIONAL POLICY Bonkovsky 
Consideration of the ways in which nations and other international actors 
(e.g. churches, multi-national corporations) act, with special attention 
to the values which do and may influence behavior. 

3 hours 

HD573 (HD473) ETHICAL ISSUES IN CIVIL SOCIETY Bonkovsky 

Utilization of Biblical, theoretical, empirical, etc., data in consideration 
of several important issues such as economics, money, obligations, am- 
nesty, censorship, pornography, etc. 

3 hours 



34 



HD574 BIO-MEDICAL AND SEXUAL ETHICS Bonkovsky 

Christian teaching is brought to bear on certain selected issues including, 
e.g. abortion, genetic manipulation, death policy, and the sexual revo- 
lution. 

I hours 

HD575 ETHICS AND URBAN LIFE Bonkovsk) 

Consideration of ethical issues in the history and current life of Ameri- 
can cities, especially Atlanta, Georgia. A central, organizing theme is the 
relation of sub-sections of the city to the interests of the broader urban 
community. (Requires permission of the instructor.) 

) hours 

HD576 (HD476) BIBLICAL ETHICS Bonkovsky 

In whatever activities persons are involved, public or private (e.g. re- 
ligion, politics, marriage, sex, economics, war), the commands of God 
reach us. A study of Biblical Ethics thus centers on the authority they 
bring to our lives and the directions in which we are led. 

3 hours 

INDEPENDENT STUDIES 

The following courses provide an opportunity to engage in individual- 
ized work on various topics in the Historical-Doctrinal Area under the 
supervision of an instructor. 

HD591 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN HISTORY Clarke, Gonzalez 

or Loring 
Any quarter 2-4 hours 

HD593 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN DOCTRINE Guthrie, Kline 

or Wallace 
Any quarter 2-4 hours 

HD595 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PHILOSOPHY Kline 

Any quarter 2-4 hours 

HD596 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN MISSION AND ECUMENICS 

Gonzalez 
Any quarter 2-4 hours 

HD597 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ETHICS Bonkov^\ 

Any quarter 2-4 hours 

Interdisciplinary 

1501 CHURCH AND STATE: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH 

Cou^jr and Guthrie 
An exegetical and theological study of the relationship between church 
jnd Mate in order to understand and evaluate the contemporary Ameri- 
c an situation. 

4 hour** 



\S 



PASTORAL AREA 

FACULTY: Wade P. Huie, Jr., Oscar J. Hussel, Jasper N. Keith, Thomas 
H. McDill, Jack B. McMichael, Theron S. Nease, Hubert V. Taylor, 
Don M. Wardlaw 

VISITING INSTRUCTORS: Katherine Imogene Bennett/Harry A. Fifield, 
Sara P. Little, John H. Patton, Eleanor Joyce Rimes 

Required Courses for M.Div. and D.Min. (in-course) 

Pill BECOMING A MINISTER TO PERSONS Nease, Keith, McDill, 

Taylor and Wardlaw 
This course assists in understanding the nature of persons and the de- 
velopment of personality as these relate to Christian ministry. It involves 
an introduction to the entire pastoral area, this particular requirement 
constituting an introduction to other subjects in the pastoral field and 
their relatedness to other theological study. We shall explore concepts 
of Christian ministry, Biblically and historically based, related to an 
understanding of personhood and interpersonal relationships. 
Fall 4 hours 

P121 THE MINISTRY OF TEACHING Hussel and McMichael 

An introduction to the teaching ministry of the church. Sessions include 
the philosophy of Christian education and the place of educational work 
in the life of present congregations, large and small. Basic methodologies 
of teaching will be explored. Assigned reading, papers, observation in 
churches, and examinations are essential aspects of learning in this 
course. 
Winter 3 hours 

P141 THE MINISTRY OF WORSHIP WITH PREACHING - I Wardlaw, 

Huie and Taylor 
An introduction to the meaning and practice of Reformed worship sets 
the context for the study of preaching. A nine-hour worship workshop, 
combining worship experiences and plenary presentations, comprises 
the bulk of the orientation to worship. Concentration on preaching 
begins with a study of texts selected for preaching later in the quarter. 
Emphasis is placed on hearing the text not only in light of its original 
setting, but also in light of the worshiping congregation and the person 
of the preacher. Each student preaches the sermon he/she has prepared 
during the quarter before professor and peers at the end of the quarter. 
Spring 4 hours 

P221* PLANNING THE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM IN THE 

CONGREGATION Hussel 

Beginning with the intentional nature of education, general models of 
planning will be examined and applied for education locally. Diversity 
of congregations, analysis of leadership needs, choosing curriculum, 
support of teachers and evaluation in terms of the mission of the church 
will be given special attention. 

3 hours 



36 



P231* THE MINISTRY OF PAS I ORAL CARE McDill 

Anticipating a ministry to persons in normal and abnormal situations, 
including gross crises, students will be exposed to persons in extreme 
situations. Psychodynamic and theological investigations will accompany 
the discussions of verbatim material reported. 

3 hours 

P241* THE MINISTRY OE WORSHIP WITH PREACHING - II Wardlaw, 

Huie and Taylor 
This course builds upon insights and experience gained in P141 and su- 
pervised ministry during the previous summer. The preaching compo- 
nent involves the student first in a series of exercises before video cam- 
eras to enhance his/her self-image as a communicator as a prelude to 
preaching a sermon at a local church before a selected group of lay 
people and fellow students. The worship component picks up on stu- 
dents' felt needs with a series of lectures culminating in the student 
preparing three worship services in detail. 

3 hours 

P261* COMMUNICATION IN THE CHURCH Taylor 

This course investigates communication theory and its application in the 
Church in order to identify and employ communication processes in 
contexts ranging from person-to-person encounters to institutional struc- 
tures. 

3 hours 

P511 CHURCH STRUCTURES FOR MINISTRY AND ADMISSION 

McMichael, Bonkovsky and Hussel 
This course is designed to help students struggle with the Church as an 
institution and as an agent for ministry and mission. (Foci include polity, 
denominational and congregation organization, church administration, 
etc.) D.Min. (in-course) students are given the opportunity to reflect on 
the Church's structures experienced during their intern year, 
fa// 4 hours 



•Students are required to take at least two of these courses during the B component 
and may take others as electives. 




37 



Elective Courses* 

General 

P512 PREACHING AND PASTORAL CONCERNS Huie and Nease 

A seminar to study pastoral problems such as guilt, conflict, anxiety, 
success, parenthood, etc., as a background for the preparation of ser- 
mons that speak to the needs of people. 

3 hours 

P519 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MINISTRY 

A study of some particular form of ministry under the direction of a 

visiting leader. 

Christian Education 

P427 ADULT EDUCATION IN THE CONGREGATION Hussel 

Students will focus on adult education for participation in the life and 
mission of the church, the Christian life, and will be concerned with 
equipping adults for service roles in the congregation and higher courts 
of the church. 

3 hours 

P521 (P421) IMPROVING TEACHER EFFECTIVENESS Hussel 

The focus is on increasing the effectiveness of teaching in the congrega- 
tion. The pastor's role in teacher training, recruitment of leaders, teach- 
ing skills development, evaluation of teaching and teacher development 
programs will be considered. A major ingredient of the course is an 
INSTROTEACH workshop. 

3 hours 

P523 (P423) CHRISTIAN EDUCATION AND THE CHILD Hussel 

Students will explore the development needs of the growing child, the 
place of the child in the congregation and its life, and the principles of 
elementary curriculum organization, with observation and experience in 
childhood and intergenerational teaching situations. 

3 hours 

P525 (P425) YOUTH MINISTRY IN THE CHURCH Bennett 

A seminar in which students design specific content around three areas: 
the philosophy of youth ministry appropriate to the nature of the church 
and to the needs of young people, skills in youth programming, and 
resources. 

2 hours 



*Electives carrying a 400 level number are designed for A and B component students 
only and require three hours work per week for each credit hour. Electives carrying a 
500 or 600 level number are designed for students who have completed the admission 
to degree candidacy or who are graduate students. They require four hours work per 
week for each credit hour. Electives with two course numbers are open to all students. 



38 



Pastoral Care and Counseling 

P531 THEOLOGY AND PASTORAL COUNSELING Nease 

This course will seek to understand basic theological prim iples as they 
are demonstrated in actual pastoral counseling situations. The design of 
the study will be to begin to relate theological (Biblical and systematic) 
understanding to actual pastoral functioning. Students will be asked to 
present pastoral situations emerging from their experience for discussion 

3 hours 

P533 REFORMED THEOLOGY AND PASTORAL PSYCHOLOGY Mi Dill 
Various psychological theories of human personality are examined from 
a pastoral theological perspective. A critical evaluation from a Reformed 
theological viewpoint is expected from the students. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the professor. 3 hours 

P537 THEOLOGY OF HUMAN PERSONALITY McDill 

The discussions and research of this course will be devoted to a con- 
sideration of the sciences of personality and a theological interpretation 
of these sciences. This study is designed to give the student a compre- 
hension of the psychodynamics of personality from both a scientific and 
a theological understanding in order to equip him/her for a more ef- 
fective ministry as a theologian, pastor, and preacher. 

3 hours 

P538 PASTORAL CARE IN CRISIS AND CONFLICT Patton 

Both theological and psychological perspectives on crisis and conflict 
are explored as contributions to the practice of pastoral care. The course 
is designed both for the specialist in pastoral care and for the student 
preparing for the parish ministry. 

3 hours 

P539 (P439) PASTORAL CARE OF MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY 

Nease 
This course will attempt to deal with current developments in marriage 
and family living as they relate to ministry. The need for insight on the 
part of the pastor will be a primary goal for the course. A variety of 
topics will be considered and a paper will be required. 

] hours 

P631 RESEARCH IN PASTORAL CARE Mi Dill 

This course will examine research projects that have been conducted in 
various disciplines, with special reference to the methodology employed 
and their relevance for pastoral care. Requirements include seminal 
presentations of research projects and a term paper that seeks to deal 
with the role of research in pastoral care. 

* hours 



19 



P632 RESEARCH IN PASTORAL COUNSELING McDill 

The student will be expected to examine the literature in the field of 
pastoral counseling and will spend some time on problems of research 
in cases studies. 

3 hours 

P633 RESEARCH IN PASTORAL PSYCHOLOGY McDill 

This is a course of directed study in the sciences , of man with special 
emphasis on psychological theories of personality. The work will be 
patterned to meet the needs of graduate students pursuing major studies 
in this field. 

3 hours 

P634 PSYCHOPATHOLOGY AND PASTORAL COUNSELING Nease 

This course is designed to enable students to understand the various 
forms of psychopathology with which the pastoral counselor is faced. 
Several schools of dynamic psychology are examined for the ways in 
which pathology is described and how it is rooted in human life. 

3 hours 

P638 GRADUATE COUNSELING PRACTICUM Staff 

In 1955, Columbia Seminary initiated a program in pastoral counseling to 
serve the community and to provide a means of training pastors by 
supervision in pastoral counseling. This program constituted the initial 
core of the Georgia Association for Pastoral Counseling and Referral 
Service, an incorporation involving, in addition to Columbia, the Met- 
ropolitan Atlanta Council of Churches, Candler School of Theology and 
the Medical School of Emory University, and the Interdenominational 
Theological Center. From the campus of Columbia, the Center moved 
to the Central Presbyterian Church of Atlanta in 1960, and since that 
time, to six well-defined counseling locations. Graduate students in the 
pastoral counseling program are admitted to these centers to work with 
people in trouble, referred primarily by pastors, under careful super- 
vision. For the completion of the graduate degree in pastoral counseling, 
it is expected that a student will have sufficient supervision, in addition 
to other requirements, to qualify him for accreditation with the Ameri- 
can Association of Pastoral Counselors, Inc. Limited to pastoral counsel- 
ing majors only. 

Prerequisite: Oral examination by a multidisciplinary group comprised 
of pastors, theological professors, psychiatrists, psychologists, lawyers, a 
variable group meeting once each quarter. 

Non-credit 



40 



P639 (.ROUP DYNAMICS AND PASTORAI COUNSELING 

M( Dill and Scase 
In cooperation with the Druid Hills Presbyterian Church of Atlanta, 
specialized instruction is ottered in the field of group processes and 
dynamics, plus individual (are And staff participation, rhis four-quartei 
sequence involves intensive study in various problems of modern urban 
living. In addition to seminar discussion, observations of individual and 
group counseling, it is expected that each student will, under super- 
vision, function as a group counselor. 

Prerequisite: An intern year in clinical pastoral education in the Geor- 
gia Association tor Pastoral Care. Limit:! 

3 hours 

\\ or.sh/p 

P541 SPECIAL WORSHIP SERVICES Huie 

A seminar-laboratory course in which we seek to understand the mean- 
ing of special occasions for worship such as baptism, communion, fu- 
nerals, weddings, etc., and learn creative and effective ways of leading 
them. 

3 hours 

P544 (P444) THE HYMNS OF THE CHURCH Taylor 

To enable the pastor to plan intelligent use of the Church's musical heri- 
tage through an understanding of its historical development and effec- 
tive practice. Attention is given to both texts and tunes of hymns as well 
as to some of the choral and instrumental masterworks these have in- 
spired. 

3 hour^ 

P548 tP448) REVITALIZING WORSHIP IN THE CONGREGATION 

W'ardlaw 
The study begins with an examination of the critical issues involved in 
the average congregation's need for revitalized worship. Next, we ex- 
plore and design a 12 hour introductory course in worship for a congre- 
gation. There follows the study of a layout in detail of a two-year plan 
for teaching and involving a congregation in worship. Special emphasis 
here is on the development of liturgical teams of lay people who help 
plan and lead worship. The course culminates with a paper exploring 
the roots of an issue about worship vital to the student and his congre- 
gation. 

J hours 
Preaching 

P551 THE INDICATIVE AND THE IMPERATIVE IN PREACHING 

Wardlan 

We begin by Studying the relationship between the indicative dnd the 

imperative in the New Testament Hie Study broadens to examine how 
such theologians as Barth, Bultmann, Bonhoeffer, Niebuhr. Brunner. 



41 



Tillich, Moltmann, and such ethicists as Richard Niebuhr, Ramsey, 
Lehmann, Fletcher, Robinson and Gustafson describe and work with 
that relationship. The course culminates in the examination of several 
sermons for the manner in which indicative and imperative interrelate. 

3 hours 

P552 VARIETY IN PREACHING Huie 

A laboratory course in the approach to and preparation of a variety of 
types of sermons such as communion, funeral, doctrinal, evangelistic, 
biographical, multi-media. 

3 hours 

P553 (P453) STUDIES IN HISTORY OF PREACHING Wallace 

This course studies aspects of the history and development of preaching 
from the Old Testament to the early eighteenth century observing 
its place in the life of the Church, its form, and themes. Students evalu- 
ate and prepare a paper on some modern preacher, or some modern 
development in preaching against this historical background. 

2 hours 

P555 CONTEMPORARY PREACHING Huie 

A seminar that focuses on issues in contemporary preaching and on 
the messages and methods of selected contemporary preachers. 

3 hours 

Communication 

P560 (P460) THE MINISTER AS A SPEAKER Taylor 

A study of the principles of healthy and effective vocal expression and 
the application of these to speech in pulpit, committee meeting, and 
conference. 

2 hours 

P562 STUDIES IN COMMUNICATION THEORY AND PREACHING 

Taylor 
To investigate the relationship of rhetorical theory to preaching through 
the works of such representative theorists as Aristotle, Augustine, George 
Campbell and Kenneth Burke. 

3 hours 

P564 (P464) CREATIVE WRITING AND THE LITERARY ARTS 

Ward I aw 
A study of how to communicate effectively Biblical revelation to people 
who have either lost touch with or been dulled by traditional thought 
forms and language of the Church. A study of the style and content of 
contemporary poets, novelists and dramatists as a prelude to practicing 
one's own expression through exercises in creative writing. Final exam: 
a sermon. 

3 hours 



42 



Evangelism 

P571 (P471) EVANGELISM 

This course studies the theological basis for evangelism, a comprehen- 
sive program tor commitment, and ways to enable the laity to support 
the outreach of the Church. 

i hours 

Church Administration 

P582 ADMINISTRATION IN THE CHURCH M< Michael 

Students will become familiar with the functions of administration, such 
as goal setting, planning, organizing and supervising, and the applica- 
tion of these activities to an executive in the Church. 

3 hours 

P583 MULTIPLE MINISTRY AND STAFF McMichael 

Students will investigate the meaning of multiple ministry, situations in 
which multiple ministry is taking place, factors in good staff relations, 
staff work in the contemporary church and personnel administration. 

3 hours 

Independent Studies 

The following courses are designed for advanced students who are in- 
terested in further study beyond the regular course offerings in the 
Pastoral Area. 

P591 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN MINISTRY Keith 

Any quarter 1-5 hours 

P592 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN CHRISTIAN EDUCATION Hussel or 

McMichael 
Anv quarter 1-5 hours 

P593 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PASTORAL THEOLOGY AND 

COUNSELING McDill or Nease 

Any quarter 1-5 hours 

P594 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN WORSHIP Huie, Taylor or Wardlaw 

Any quarter 1-5 hours 

P595 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PREACHING Huie, Taylor or Wardlaw 
Any quarter 1-5 hours 

P596 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SPEECH AND COMMUNICATIONS 

Taylor or Wardlaw 
Anv quarter f-5 hours 

P597 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN EVANGELISM 

Any quarter f-5 hours 

P598 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN POLITY AND CHURCH 

ADMINISTRATK >N McMii had 

■\n\ quarter f-5 hours 



43 



Interdisciplinary 

1504 FROM TEXT TO SERMON Huie and Ormond 

A laboratory course using one particular book of the Bible where stu- 
dents work from particular texts to completed sermons 

3 hours 

INTERDISCIPLINARY SEMINARS IN MINISTRY 

Required Courses for M.Div. and D.Min. (in-course) 

1511-512 INTERDISCIPLINARY SEMINAR IN MINISTRY 
This course is designed to help the student develop and articulate his/ 
her own theory of ministry in the light of Biblical, historical, theological, 
personal, and social concerns. Field involvement is an integral com- 
ponent of this seminar so as to provide the student an opportunity 
evaluate his/her theory in light of practice. Required of all C component 
students. 
Winter and Spring 8 hours 

1521-522-523 INTERDISCIPLINARY SEMINAR IN MINISTRY 

This course is designed for students who have completed a twelve-month 

internship in the D.Min. (in-course) program. The course seeks to help 

them reflect on their exprience in such a way as to develop their own 

theory of ministry in the light of Biblical, historical, theological, personal, 

and social concerns. Requirements for course include the successful 

completion of a doctoral project. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring 8 hours 

SUPERVISED MINISTRY 

Required Courses for M.Div. and D.Min. (in-course) 

SM111-112 SUPERVISED MINISTRY: HOSPITAL AND URBAN 
This course involves a two-quarter sequence and must be taken each 
quarter in conjunction with HD171. The sequence involves initial ex- 
periences in ministry in institutional and urban settings under approved 
supervision. Both quarters are required of all A component students. 
Winter and Spring 4 hours 

SM210 SUPERVISED MINISTRY: PARISH 

This educational program is designed to provide experiential, relational, 
inductive learning in the practice of ministry in, to, with, and through 
the church under the supervision of an experienced Minister of the 
Word. Supervising pastors and teaching congregations are chosen on 
the basis of their commitment to participate in the professional educa- 
tion of the ministry as well as the opportunities for learning afforded by 
their setting and context for ministry. The student is expected to be 
involved in broad dimensions of ministry including preaching, program, 
administration, and pastoral care. Supervisors and placements are ap- 
proved by the Office of the Dean of Ministry Development and the 
First Professional Degree Committee. 
Summer 8 hours 



44 



5M211 SUPERVISED MINISTRY: HOSPITAL 

This course includes an intensive involvement in ministry to persons in 

a clinical setting together with seminars to reflect on the nature of that 

involvement. Supervision and placement are provided through a< i redited 

CPE Centers in the metropolitan Atlanta area. 

Fall. Winter, or Spring 4 hours 

5M212 SUPERVISED MINISTRY: URBAN 

This course involves supervised work in an urban agency, with appro- 
priate reading and reflection seminars. Supervision and placements are 
arranged through the Urban Training Organization of Atlanta. 

Winter 4 hours 

SM311-312-313-314 SUPERVISED MINISTRY. INTERN YEAR 
A twelve-month period of supervised ministry in a setting consistent 
with the student's vocational goals and approved by the Office of the 
Dean of Ministry Development is required of all candidates for the 
D.Win, (in-course) degree. The essential purpose of this internship is 
minister-formation under competent supervision. Supervisors and con- 
texts of learning are chosen on the basis of commitments to and op- 
portunities for a student's learning the work of ministry. An additional 
academic component is also required. It is further expected that the 
Biblical, historical-doctrinal, and pastoral concepts of ministry will be 
integrated with the practice of ministry engaged in during the internship. 
Twelve-month period 32 hours 

Elective Courses 

SM510 CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION 

Columbia Theological Seminary is a member of the Association for Clin- 
ical Pastoral Education. A student may participate in a unit of Basic 
CPE in those institutions accredited by ACPE. Placements are coordinated 
b\ the Director of Supervised Ministry. 
Any quarter, usually Summer 8 hours 

SM511-512-513-514 CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION INTERNSHIP 
Students may participate in units of Advanced CPE in institutions ac- 
credited by ACPE. Placements are coordinated by the Director of Super- 
vised Minist 

Twelve-month period 8 hours per quarter 

(non-c redit tor Th 

SM515 SUPERVISED URBAN CLINICAL 

Through the Urban Training Organization of Atlanta, students negotiate 
work placements and serve under both field supervisors and supervisors 
from the staff of UTOA. Learning contracts with UTOA are coordinated 
through the Direc tor of Supervised Ministry. 

quarter, usually Summer 8 hours 

-P-518-519 SUPERVISED URBAN INTERN YEAR 
An intern year negotiated with the Urban Training Organization of At- 
lanta may be coordinated through the Director of Supervised Ministry. 
etve-month period 12 hours 



4^ 



S.T.D. AND D.MIN. (IN-CAREER) COURSES 

The S.T.D. and D.Min. (in-career) programs consist of advanced courses 
provided by participating schools in the Atlanta Theological Association. 
The 500 level courses in this catalog, together with advanced courses 
at the Candler School of Theology and the Interdenominational Theo- 
logical Center, are open to students in these programs. The following 
list includes other courses specifically developed for the S.T.D. and 
D.Min. (in-career) programs. 

ATA401 SEMINAR ON MINISTRY 

Basic seminar on ministry theory and career analysis required of all 

D.Min. (in-career) students. 8 hours 

ATA462 THE DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN PASTORAL COUNSELING 
Modern history of pastoral counseling, its roots in theology, psycho- 
analysis, existential and humanistic psychology. 

4 hours 
ATA485 COUNSELING PRACTICUM 

In each quarter the student engages in from two to four hours of coun- 
seling per week under supervision. Assigned readings and appropriate 
didactic materials are included. (Students will register for ATA485a, 
ATA485b, ATA485c, and ATA485d for a minimum total of 24 quarter 
hours.) 

8 hours 
ATA489 DIRECTED STUDY 

For D.Min. and S.T.D. use. 

Credit as assigned 
ATA490 S.T.D. DOCTORAL PROJECT SEMINAR 

6 hours 
ATA492 S.T.D. DOCTORAL PROJECT SEMINAR 

6 hours 
ATA494 S.T.D. DOCTORAL PROJECT SEMINAR 

6 hours 
ATA496 DOCTORAL PROJECT SEMINAR 

Credit as assigned up to 8 quarter hours. For D.Min use. In cases where 
the project so registered extends over several terms, the student enrolls 
successively in ATA496a, ATA496b, ATA496c, and ATA496d. 

up to 8 hours 

ATA497 S.T.D. DOCTORAL PROJECT SEMINAR 

9 hours 



ATA498 LIBRARY USE 



No credit 



ATA499 DOCTORAL PROJECT SUPERVISION 

For S.T.D. and D.Min. (in-career) students who have previously regis- 
tered for the maximum number of credit hours allowed for the doctoral 
project. 

No credit 



46 



CALENDAR 1975-76 ACADEMIC YEAR 
Summer Language School July 7 -Aug. 29, I975 

FALL QUARTER 

f a< ulty-Student Retreat 

Introductory Term & Registration Sept. 1 7-24 

Classes Begin Sept 25 

Registration for Winter Quarter Nov. 17 

Thanksgiving Vacation Nov. 27-30 

Reading Day Dec. 8 

Exams Dec. 9-12 

Christmas Vacation Begins Dec. 13 

WINTER QUARTER 

Classes Begin Jan. 5, 1976 

Registration tor Spring Quarter Feb. 23 

Reading Day Mar. 8 

Exams Mar. 9-11 

Spring Vacation Begins Mar. 12 

SPRING QUARTER 

Classes Begin Mar. 22 

Good Friday Holiday Apr. 16 

Registration for Summer Quarter May 17 

Senior Exams May 27-28 

Day May 

Exams June M 

Commencement June 



47 



INDEX 



Administration 




1 


Supervised Ministry 


44 


Admission 


4, 5 


Theology 29, 


31, 39 


Advanced Professional 






Worship 


36, 41 


Degrees 




13 


Curriculum Areas 




Archaeological Seminar 




11 


Biblical 


3 


Atlanta Theological Association 2 


Historical-Doctrinal 


3 


Auditors 




6 


Pastoral 


3 


Calendar 




47 


Supervised Ministry 


4 


Clinical Pastoral Education 




11 


Doctor of Ministry 




College Preparation 




4 


(in-career) 


15, 46 


Components 




9 


Doctor of Ministry 




Course Descriptions 


19-46 


(in-course) 


8, 9 


Biblical Area 




19 


Doctor of Sacred Theology 




Christian Education 


36, 


38 


(S.T.D.) 


16, 46 


Church Administration 




43 


Faculty 


1 


Church History 




28 


Fellowships 


5 


Communication 


37, 


42 


First Professional Degrees 


8 


Doctrinal Studies 




31 


Flexibility of Placement 


10 


Elective Courses 


20, 


38 


Grading System 


6 


Ethical Studies 


29, 


34 


Graduation Honors 


7 


Evangelism 




43 


Independent Research 


11 


Historical-Doctrinal 






International Students 


13 


Area 


28, 


35 


Introductory Term 


6 


Homiletics 


36, 


41 


Master of Divinity 




Independent 






(M.Div.) 


8, 9 


Studies 28, 


35, 


43 


Master of Theology 




Interdisciplinary 






(Th.M.) 


13 


Courses 


28, 


44 


Professional Assessment 


10 


Languages 


19, 


21 


Purpose 


2 


Mission and Ecumenics 




34 


Radio and Television 


11 


New Testament 




26 


Schedule 


4 


Old Testament 




19 


Special and Unclassified 




Pastoral Area 




36 


Students 


5 


Pastoral Care & 






Summer Greek Language 




Counseling 


39, 


46 


School 


4 


Philosophical Studies 




34 


Supervised Ministry 


4 


Preaching 


36, 


41 


Transfer Students 


6 


Psychology 


39, 


40 


Worship Service 


10 



48 



mmm 



DIRECT* >RY FOR ( ORRESPi MMDENK I 

Address inquiries to t ht* following at c olumbia Seminar) 
Decatur, Georgia, W031 

erning general information about the Seminary, guts and bequests 
( Benton Kline Jr President 

Com erning Admission 
Eugene h rennis, Executive Directoi of Development 

Concerning scholarships <md financial aid 
T. Erskine Clarke, Dean of Students 

■ rning supervised ministry, student preaching .unl clinical placement 
lasper N. Keith, |r.. Directoi ol Supervised Ministry 

Ceming business matters .\nc\ housing 

f Sidney Anderson, Treasurer 

Concerning transcripts, academic records, curriculum and faculty 
Charles B. Cousar, Dean of Academic Affairs 

Concerning graduate studies, continuing education and graduate placement 
Jack B. \U Michael, Dean of .Ministry Development 

rning the In-Career Doctor of Ministry 
Wade P. Huie, Jr., Director of In-Career Doctor of Ministry 

Concerning alumni matters, church relations, campaigns and publications 
Office of Development 

Eugene H. Tennis, Executive Director of Development 
Director of Seminary Relations 



COLUMBIA CATALOG SERIES 

Annual Publications 

1. Calendar Administration & Faculty Roster Financial Information Roll of Students 
— November 
Academic Information Course Descriptions- Ma\ 

Periodic Publications 

3. Introducing Columbia Theological Seminary 

4. History Memorials Resources and Opportunities 

5. Faculty Introductions 



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20031 




Columbia Theological Seminary 




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