(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Columbia Theological Seminary Bulletin: Course Catalog 1967-1968"

Catalog 1967-1968 




COLUMBIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Decatur Georgia 




Columbia Theological Seminary, a seminary of the Presbyterian Church, 
U.S., is operated and controlled by the Synods of Alabama, Florida, Geor- 
gia, Mississippi and South Carolina through a Board of Directors. It is an 
accredited member of the American Association of Theological Schools. 



DIRECTORY FOR CORRESPONDENCE 



Address inquiries to the following at 

Columbia Seminary, Decatur, Georgia 30031 



Concerning general information about the Seminary, gifts and bequests or 
scholarships The Rev. J. McDowell Richards 

President 

Concerning admission The Rev. James T. Richardson 

Director of Admissions 

Concerning field education, summer school or student employment 

The Rev. O. H. Lyon 
Dean of Students 

Concerning business matters and housing The Rev. F. S. Anderson 

Treasurer 

Concerning transcripts and academic records The Rev. F. B. Gear 

Dean of Instruction 

Concerning graduate studies The Rev. S. A. Cartledge 

Dean of the Graduate Department 

Concerning alumni matters or public relations The Rev. S. A. Bacon 

Assistant to the President 



COLUMBIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY BULLETIN 

Volume LX January, 1967 No. 1 

Published five times a year by Columbia Theological Seminary, Box 520, Decatur, 
Georgia 30031. Entered as second-class matter, May 9, 1928, at the Post Office 
at Decatur, Ga., under the Act of Congress of August 24, 1912. Second-class 
postage paid at Decatur, Georgia. 



CONTENTS 



f^\^i^?-r^ r J 




History, Location and Campus 5 

Directors, Administration and Faculty 9 

General Information 17 

Support of the Seminary 29 

Degrees and Courses 35 

The New Curriculum 41 

1966 Graduates and Students 72 

Calendar 84 

Campus Map 86 

Index 87 

3 



ii;-j 










sir 

1 



i 



Entrance to John Bulow Campbell Library. 



Air view of campus. 



:"::.:.:m .^v-m.- vS; W'^m^"'> 






V'^r 




m 



, ; ' -I, 








V 

*:.:-lSWBaWiv:.'.s'i 



HISTORY, 



LOCATION 



AND CAMPUS 



:.jf^'\ : J 






On December 15, 1828, the Synod of South Carolina and Georgia, rep- 
resenting Presbyterianism from North Carolina to the Mississippi, inaug- 
urated this institution by electing the Rev. Thomas Goulding, D.D., as its 
first professor. For two years Dr. Goulding taught a small group of students 
in the Presbyterian Manse at Lexington, Georgia. 

In 1830 the Seminary was moved to Columbia, South Carolina, and the 
faculty complemented by the election of Dr. George Howe and Dr. Aaron 
W. Leland. Located in the center of South Carolina's capital, the Columbia 
campus was most attractive. The old chapel there was particularly interesting 
by reason of its history as well as its origin. Used originally as the carriage 
house of a Southern gentleman, this little building was later dedicated to a 
sacred purpose. It is remembered as the place where Woodrow Wilson was 
"reborn for eternity" and where the Presbyterian, U.S. Book of Church 
Order was written. There, also the first classes of Winthrop College, now 
located at Rock Hill, South Carolina, were held. 

Early in the Twentieth Century a strong conviction developed in the 
Columbia territory that a re-location of the institution was necessary. At the 



time of the location in Columbia that city was near the center of the Pres- 
byterian population of the Southeast. The original purpose for founding 
Columbia had been "To light up another sun which shall throw farther West 
the light of the Gospel." Now with the development of the Gulf States and 
the shifting of the center of Presbyterianism in the area it seemed wise to 
move the Seminary so as to better accomplish not only the founding purpose 
but the greater goal of the proclamation of the Gospel to the whole world. 

In the fall of 1924 the controlling Synods of Alabama, Florida, Georgia 
and South Carolina, on recommendation of the Board of Directors, decided 
to move the Seminary to Atlanta. Immediately following this decision the 
Synod of Mississippi accepted the invitation of her sister synods to unite in 
the ownership and control of the Seminary. 

Atlanta Presbyterians provided a fifty-seven acre campus upon the hills 
of Decatur. During the presidency of Dr. R. T. Gillespie two theological 
buildings and four faculty homes were erected. A library, an additional 
wing to the administration building, a student center, four apartment dormi- 
tories, and thirteen faculty homes have been added in recent years. 

Atlanta and the suburban community of Decatur have grown rapidly in 
recent years. Decatur is now a city of over 22,000 and Greater Atlanta's 
population exceeds a million. 



ATLANTA TODAY 

Atlanta today is the largest city in the Southeast, the industrial center 
and transportation hub of the whole South. Because of its size and im- 
portance as a key city Atlanta offers many opportunities for enrichment in 
all fields of academic and personal growth to Columbia students. The 
National League Braves, NFL Falcons and Atlanta Soccer team bring the 
excitement of professional sports to the city. As a prominent business 
center it offers a wide variety of sources of employment for students and 
their wives. 

Atlanta has its own symphony orchestra. There is also a community 
orchestra and chorus. Seasons of grand and light opera, popular concerts, 
and artists'-series are held throughout the year. The Metropolitan Opera 
Company visits Atlanta annually for a week of performances. There are 
community theatre groups with resident directors and also three community 
ballet groups. Experimental drama groups and small art galleries abound. 
The Atlanta Art Association galleries are among the finest in the South. They 
house a large collection of their own, offer lectures and concerts, have an 
art school and play host to many traveling exhibitions. Increasing commu- 
nity support and interest has led to the construction of new performance 
facilities for many of these groups, including in 1966-67 a new civic audi- 
torium and a new cultural center. 




f 






"... 




/^-^iiiifiififpi 







4.> - -/*> 

Si** 4 v 

Downtown Atlanta 



Atlanta is also a center of activity and growth for the Presbyterian 
Church. There are 671 Presbyterian Churches with a membership over 
147,000 in an area easily accessible to Columbia students for their field 
education on weekends. Nine boards and agencies of the Presbyterian Church, 
U.S. have offices in the new Presbyterian Center in Atlanta. Churches and 
agencies of other denominations and ecumenical councils and groups in 
Atlanta provide Columbia students opportunity for broader contact and 
experience. 

Atlanta is an educational center. The Greater University Center, includ- 
ing Emory University, Agnes Scott College, Georgia Tech, The University 
of Georgia, Oglethorpe University, Georgia State College, the Atlanta Art 
Association and Columbia Seminary is a significant cooperative venture in 
the field of higher education. Students and professors share in the use of 
the library facilities of each of these institutions with the help of a union 
card catalogue. Students in one institution are permitted to take courses in 
member institutions. Distinguished lecturers are provided by the University 
Center each year. The school systems of the area provide elementary and 
secondary education for over a quarter of a million students, and teaching 
positions for many wives of seminary students. 



COLUMBIA'S CAMPUS 

Virginia Orme Campbell Administration Building 

This building contains administrative and faculty offices, classrooms, 
speech and homiletics laboratory and dormitory facilities. The Chapel is 
located in the north wing. 

John Bulow Campbell Library 

The Library, an integrated part of the teaching program, has a collection 
of books and a program of services that extend the work of the classroom 
in breadth and depth, provide adequately for student and faculty research, 
and stimulate reading beyond course requirements. The Library is housed 
in an air-conditioned Gothic building. Its book collection numbers more than 
70,000 volumes and is increasing at a rate of approximately 2,000 volumes 
per year. It includes a well-balanced selection of older critical works and 
commentaries along with more modern critical and exegetical works. Impor- 
tant Reformation sources are well represented; the collection includes the 
Calvin and Melanchthon sections of Corpus Reformatorum, the Weimar 
edition of Luther's works, and the Vienna and Berlin Corpuses. Complete 
files of many important scholarly journals are available. The Susan V. Rus- 
sell Tape Collection of some 500 sermons, lectures, and worship services is 
an important aid in homiletics and speech courses. 

Student Center 

The air-conditioned Student Center, erected in 1961, houses the dining 
hall, several lounges, a game room, classrooms, offices and a book store. 

Dormitories 

Housing for single students and married students without children is 
provided in SIMONS-LAW and FLORIDA HALLS. Simons-Law Hall, one 
of the original buildings on the Decatur campus, was completely remodeled 
and refurnished in 1964. Florida Hall was erected in 1961. Rooms with con- 
necting baths are available for single students. Suites with a living room, bed 
room and bath are furnished for married students. 

"The Village" 

On the western side of the campus apartments for student families are 
provided in FRIENDSHIP HALL and two other buildings. A separate build- 
ing in the area contains laundry facilities. 

Mission Haven 

The Women of the Church of Columbia's five supporting synods have 
provided funds to build and maintain eight apartments which serve as homes 
for missionaries on furlough. 

Recreation Facilities 

An athletic field for intra-mural sports, three tennis courts and a volley 
ball court are located on the campus. Limited indoor recreational facilities 
are provided in the Student Center. 

8 



DIRECTORS, 



ADMINISTRATION 




AND FACULTY 



No educational institution can be stronger than its faculty. 

In a theological seminary it is vitally important that those who teach 
be thoroughly equipped for their task by scholarship. Equally necessary is 
that insight into the life and work of the church which can only be gained 
by practical experience. It is essential to the effective performance of their 
task that they be men of sincere Christian faith and character, deeply dedi- 
cated to the furtherance of the Gospel. 

We believe that the teaching staff of Columbia Theological Seminary 
possesses these qualifications in unusual measure. The degrees earned by its 
members attest their academic preparation. A list of the ways in which they 
have served the church would be equally impressive. Representing varied 
backgrounds in this country and abroad, and trained in many of the great 
universities of the world, they are alike in being committed to the Reformed 
Faith. A distinguished visitor has aptly described the group as characterized 
by unity, diversity, and harmony. 

In addition to the twenty-four men who comprise its regular faculty, the 
seminary makes use of the wealth of talent available in the churches and 
colleges of greater Atlanta. The staff of the Georgia Association of Pastoral 
Care contributes instruction and clinical training for the total pastoral 
responsibilities of the "shepherd of the flock." Visiting professors come yearly 
both from this area and from distant points. Further stimuli are provided by 
distinguished lectures brought to the campus through the cooperative pro- 
gram of the Greater University Center of Georgia. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

The Rev. J. Davison Philips Chairman 

The Rev. J. Phillips Noble Vice Chairman 

The Rev. William A. Adams Secretary 

Term To Expire 1967 

The Rev. Simril F. Bryant Tuscaloosa, Alabama 

Julian R. Alford Tallahassee, Florida 

The Rev. Oswald Delgado Winter Park, Florida 

The Rev. Wallace M. Alston Decatur, Georgia 

Graham Hicks Natchez, Mississippi 

The Rev. E. G. Beckman Hemingway, South Carolina 

Dr. Douglas Jennings Bennettsville, South Carolina 

Term To Expire 1968 

The Rev. David Edington, Jr Mobile, Alabama 

The Rev. J. Phillips Noble Anniston, Alabama 

Armlon Leonard Miami, Florida 

The Rev. William A. Adams Athens, Georgia 

The Rev. J. Davison Philips Decatur, Georgia 

The Rev. Erskine L. Jackson Koscuisko, Mississippi 

Erst Long Ripley, Mississippi 

The Rev. T. W. Horton, Jr Charleston, South Carolina 

Patrick C. Smith Columbia, South Carolina 

Term To Expire 1969 

Dr. Frank B. Davis Auburn, Alabama 

The Rev. C. Charles Benz, Jr Jacksonville, Florida 

The Rev. Alton Glasure St. Petersburg, Florida 

Harllee Branch, Jr Atlanta, Georgia 

The Rev. Harry A. Fifield Atlanta, Georgia 

The Rev. J. P. F. Stevenson Clarksdale, Mississippi 

The Rev. Marc C. Weersing Clinton, South Carolina 

Arthur Magill Mauldin, South Carolina 

Executive Committee 

The Rev. J. Davison Philips, Chairman 
The Rev. William A. Adams The Rev. E. G. Beckman 

Julian R. Alford The Rev. Harry A. Fifield 

The Rev. J. Phillips Noble 

Investment Committee 

William C. Wardlaw, Jr. 
The Rev. F. Sidney Anderson The Rev. J. Davison Philips 

The Rev. P. D. Miller The Rev. J. McDowell Richards 

10 




Left: President Richards 
Below: Professors Cousar and 
Gailey with student Charles 
Swann; Professor McDill. 




ADMINISTRATION 

The Rev. J. McDowell Richards, D.D., LL.D President 

The Rev. Stephen Allan Bacon, B.D. . . . Assistant to the President 

The Rev. Olof Halvard Lyon, B.D Dean of Students 

The Rev. Samuel A. Cartledge, Ph.D. . Dean, Graduate Department 

The Rev. Felix B. Gear, Ph.D., D.D Dean of Instruction 

The Rev. James T. Richardson Director of Admissions 

The Rev. Francis Sidney Anderson, Th.M Treasurer 

The Rev. Harold B. Prince, M.A., M.L Librarian 

Mrs. John A. Hare, M.L Acting Head Librarian 

Mrs. Thomas C. Flanagan, Jr., M.L. . . Assistant Librarian-Cataloguer 

Mrs. Carroll Cason Finance Officer 

The Rev. Harold V. Wright . Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

Mrs. Hall Harmon Secretary to the President 

Mrs. Walter Wood, Jr. . . Secretary to the Assistant to the President 

Mrs. Harold V. Wright Secretary to the Dean of Students 

Mrs. Calvin M. Cheney .... Secretary to the Dean of Instruction 

Mrs. Don L. Fisher Cashier and Mail Clerk 

Mrs. Ross Hightower Library Assistant 

Mrs. Noble W. Pilcher . . . Secretary, Department of Pastoral Care 
Mrs. Sidney Berry Faculty Secretary 



11 



FACULTY 

THE REV. JAMES McDOWELL RICHARDS, D.D., LL.D. 

PRESIDENT AND PROFESSOR OF PASTORAL THEOLOGY 

A.B., Davidson College; M.A., Princeton University; A.B., M.A., 
Oxford University; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; D.D., Da- 
vidson College; L.L.D., King College. 

THE REV. JAMES BENJAMIN GREEN, D.D., LL.D. 

PROFESSOR EMERITUS 

A.B., University of Nashville; Graduate of Union Theological Semi- 
nary; D.D., Presbyterian College; LL.D., Southwestern College. 

THE REV. MANFORD GEORGE GUTZKE, Ph.D., D.D. 

PROFESSOR EMERITUS 

A.B., M.A., Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., Columbia Univer- 
sity; D.D., Austin College. 

THE REV. WILLIAM CHILDS ROBINSON, Th.D., D.D. 

PROFESSOR OF CHURCH HISTORY, CHURCH POLITY, 
AND APOLOGETICS 

A.B., Roanoke College; M.A., University of South Carolina; B.D., 
Columbia Theological Seminary; Th.M., Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary; Th.D., Harvard University; D.D., Roanoke College. 

THE REV. SAMUEL ANTOINE CARTLEDGE, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF NEW TESTAMENT LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, AND EXEGESIS 

A.B., M.A., University of Georgia; B.D., Columbia Theological Semi- 
nary; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

THE REV. CECIL ASBURY THOMPSON, S.T.M., D.D. 

PROFESSOR OF MISSIONS, EVANGELISM AND RURAL CHURCH WORK 

A.B., University of Florida; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; 
S.T.M., Biblical Seminary, New York; D.D., Davidson College. 

THE REV. FELIX BAYARD GEAR, Ph.D., D.D. 

J. B. GREEN PROFESSOR OF SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 

A.B., Davis and Elkins College; B.D., Union Theological Seminary; 
Th.M., Princeton Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of Edin- 
burgh; D.D., Davis and Elkins College. 

THE REV. HUBERT VANCE TAYLOR, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF PUBLIC SPEECH AND MUSIC 

A.B., Lafayette College; B.Mus., Westminster Choir College; B.D., 
Columbia Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

THE REV. HAROLD BAILEY PRINCE, M.A., M.L. 

LIBRARIAN 

A.B., M.A., University of South Carolina; M.L., Emory University; 
B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary. 

12 



THE REV. THOMAS HALDANE McDILL, B.D., M.A. 

PROFESSOR OF PASTORAL THEOLOGY AND COUNSELING 

A.B., Erskine College; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; M.A., 
University of Chicago. 

THE REV. JAMES HERBERT GAILEY, JR., Th.D. 

PROFESSOR OF OLD TESTAMENT LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, AND EXEGESIS 

A.B., Davidson College; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; Th.M., 
Th.D., Princeton Theological Seminary. 

THE REV. SHIRLEY CAPERTON GUTHRIE, JR., Th.D. 

PROFESSOR OF SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 

A.B., Austin College; B.D., Princeton Theological Seminary; Th.D., 
University of Basel. 

THE REV. WADE PRICHARD HUIE, JR., Ph.D. 

PETER MARSHALL PROFESSOR OF HOMILETICS 

A.B., Emory University; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
New College, University of Edinburgh. 

THE REV. PAUL TRAUGOTT FUHRMANN, Th.D., Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF CHURCH HISTORY 

CI. Lie. Turin Classical Gymnasium-Lyceum V. Alfieri; Lie. Theology; 
Independent School of Theology at Neuchatel; Th. D., Drew Theo- 
logical Seminary; Ph.D., Drew University. 

THE REV. LUDWIG RICHARD MAX DEWITZ, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF OLD TESTAMENT LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, AND EXEGESIS 

B.D., University of London; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 
THE REV. CHARLES BLANTON COUSAR, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF NEW TESTAMENT LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, AND EXEGESIS 

A.B., Davidson College; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
King's College, University of Aberdeen. 

THE REV. DEAN GREER McKEE, Th.D., D.D. 

PROFESSOR OF BIBLICAL EXPOSITION 

A.B., Parsons College; S.T.B., S.T.M., and Th.D., The Biblical Semi- 
nary; D.D., Parsons College. 

THE REV. RONALD STEWART WALLACE, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF BIBLICAL THEOLOGY 

B.Sc, M.A., Ph.D., University of Edinburgh. 
THE REV. OLOF HALVARD LYON, B.D. 

DEAN OF STUDENTS AND DIRECTOR OF FIELD EDUCATION 

A.B., Georgia State College; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary. 

13 



THE REV. J. WILL ORMOND, Th.M., D.D. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF BIBLICAL EXPOSITION 

B.A., University of Alabama; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; 
Th.M., Princeton Theological Seminary; Graduate study at the Univer- 
sity of Glasgow, Scotland; D.D., Southwestern at Memphis. 

THE REV. THERON S. NEASE, B.D. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PASTORAL, THEOLOGY AND COUNSELING 

B.A., Austin College; B.D., Austin Presbyterian Seminary; Graduate 
study at Princeton Theological Seminary. 

THE REV. A. MILTON RIVIERE, B.D. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

B.A., Wheaton College; B.D., Princeton Theological Seminary; Graduate 
study at Teachers College, Columbia University. 

THE REV. DON M. WARDLAW, Ph.D. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF HOMILETICS 

B.A., Columbia University; B.D., Union Theological Seminary, Virginia; 
Ph.D., University of Aberdeen. 

THE REV. STUART BARTON BABBAGE, Th.D., Ph.D. 

VISITING PROFESSOR OF PRACTICAL APOLOGETICS AND CHURCH HISTORY 

A.B., University of New Zealand; M.A., University of New Zealand, 
Ph.D., University of London; Th.D., Australian College of Theology. 



THE REV. PHILIP EDGCUMBE HUGHES, D.Litt., Th.D. 

VISITING PROFESSOR OF NEW TESTAMENT 

A.B., M.A., and D.Litt., University of Cape Town; B.D. 
of London; Th.D., Australian College of Theology. 



University 



THE REV. PATRICK DWIGHT MILLER, D.D. 

VISITING PROFESSOR OF HOMILETICS 

B.A., D.D., Davidson College; B.D., Th.M., Union Theological Semi- 
nary, Richmond, Virginia. 




Ormond 



Riviere 



VISITING INSTRUCTORS 

THE REV. CHARLES VINCENT GERKIN, B.D. 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, THE GEORGIA ASSOCIATION FOR PASTORAL CARE, 
INC.; CHIEF CLINICAL CHAPLAIN SUPERVISOR, HENRY W. GRADY ME- 
MORIAL HOSPITAL, ATLANTA,' VISITING PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL PASTORAL 
TRAINING. 

A.B., Washburn Municipal University; B.D., Garret Theological Semi- 
nary; Graduate Study, Northwestern University; Chaplain Supervisor, 
Council for Clinical Training, Inc.; Fellow, American Association of 
Pastoral Counselors, Inc. 

JOHN A. TUMBLIN, JR., Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY, AGNES 
SCOTT COLLEGE*, VISITING PROFESSOR OF MISSIONS 

B.A., Wake Forest College; M.A., Ph.D., Duke University. 
THE REV. DAVID MYLES ABERNATHY, S.T.M. 

DIRECTOR, DEPT. OF EDUCATION, PROTESTANT RADIO AND TELEVISION 

center; VISITING PROFESSOR of radio and television. 

A.B., High Point College; B.D., Emory University; S.T.M. , Union 

Theological Seminary (N. Y.); Diploma, RCA Institutes, (TV. Y) 

THE REV. HARRY BLACK BEVERLY, Th.D. 

ASSOCIATE PASTOR, TRINITY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, ATLANTA; VISITING 
PROFESSOR OF HOMILETICS. 

A.B., University of Florida; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; 
Th.D., University of Basel. 

THE REV. JOE E. CALDWELL, B.D., M.A. 

DIRECTOR, PASTORAL COUNSELING SERVICE OF THE GEORGIA ASSOCIATION 
FOR PASTORAL CARE, INC.; VISITING PROFESSOR OF PASTORAL COUNSELING. 

A.B., Lenoir Rhyne College; B.D., Duke University Divinity School; 
M.A., Northwestern University; Chaplain Supervisor, Council for Clini- 
cal Training, Inc.; Fellow, American Association of Pastoral Counselors, 
Inc. 

MRS. MARVIN B. SLEDD, A.B. 

DIRECTOR OF CHILDREN'S WORK, DECATUR PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, DE- 
CATUR, GEORGIA; VISITING PROFESSOR OF CHILDREN'S WORK. 

A.B., Agnes Scott College. 
THE REV. FREDERICK W. WIDMER, Th.D. 

MINISTER OF EDUCATION, FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, ATLANTA, GEOR- 
GIA; VISITING PROFESSOR OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION. 

B.A., Wheaton College; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; Th.M., 
Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary; Th.D., Union Theological 
Seminary, Richmond, Virginia. 

THE REV. EDGAR M. GRIDER, B.D. 

ASSISTANT MINISTER AND MINISTER OF COMMUNITY, CENTRAL PRESBY- 
TERIAN CHURCH, ATLANTA, GEORGIA; VISITING PROFESSOR OF EVANGELISM. 

A.B., Princeton University; B.D., Yale Divinity School. 

15 



MINISTERS' WEEK 

October 23-27, 1967 

Smyth Lectures — "The Art of Adoration" 
THE REV. HORTON DA VIES, Ph.D., D.D. 

PROFESSOR OF RELIGION, PRINCETON UNIVERSITY 

Alumni Lectures — "Paul and Corinth" 
THE REV. WILLIAM CHILDS ROBINSON, JR., D. Theol. 

PROFESSOR OF NEW TESTAMENT, PERKINS SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 



PERMANENT FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Academic Affairs . McKee, Cartledge, Cousar, Gear, Huie, Lyon, Riviere 

Academic Awards Prince, Gailey, Robinson, Wallace 

Administrative Richards, Anderson, Gear, Lyon 

Admissions Bacon, McDill, Richardson 

Campus Life . Taylor, Cousar, Dewitz, Miller, Nease, Richardson, Thompson 

Library Guthrie, Hughes, Ormond, Wardlaw 

Special Lectures and 

Publications .... Gailey, Babbage, Bacon, Fuhrmann, Wardlaw 



STAFF OF THE GEORGIA ASSOCIATION 
FOR PASTORAL CARE 

Charles V. Gerkin, A.B., B.D., Executive Director 

Henry M. Bruen, Jr., A.B., B.D. John Patton, A.B., B.D., A.M. 

Donald Cabaniss, A.B., B.D., M.Ed. Milton P. Snyder, A.B., B.D. 

Joe E. Caldwell, A.B., B.D., M.A. William B. Touchberry, A.B., B.D. 

J. D. Chelette, A.B., B.D. James L. Travis, A.B., B.D. 

J. Gabriel Clark, A.B., B.D. Douglas C. Turley, Jr., A.B., B.D., 

Henry T. Close, A.B., B.D., Th.M. Th.M. 

Baxter Cochran, A.B., B.D. E. Augustus Verdery, A.B., B.D., 

John Crow, A.B., B.D. Th.M., Th.D. 

O. L. DeLozier, Jr., A.B., B.D. Ronald A. Wilkins, Jr., A.B., B.D. 

George Dominick, A.B., B.D. Chappell Wilson, A.B., B.D. 

Jap Keith, Jr., A.B., B.D. 



16 







GENERAL 



INFORMATION 



Columbia Seminary is a graduate professional school and students in their 
life of preparation here are faced with disciplines involving research, explora- 
tion, self-examination, intellectual struggle and growth. The process is fre- 
quently painful and students inevitably experience discouragement and 
impatience in the same way that students do in any other field of graduate 
study. They can constantly refresh their spirits in the many opportunities 
that exist for private and public worship and this is recognized as being a 
most important element of the student's preparation for his ministry. But it 
still must be confessed that there are times when only faithful and even 
dogged obedience to their calling to be good students will help them carry 
on when a happier kind of inspiration fails them. It is the feeling of the 
administration and faculty that adequate preparation for the ministry grows 
out of honest examination of facts in all areas of human experience and 
that God is most effectively served by those men and women who apply 
themselves to their tasks as students with diligence and integrity. Intellectual 
attainments will go hand in hand with spiritual growth in adequate prepara- 
tion for the ministry and neither can be gained without real devotion to God. 



17 



ADMISSION 

College Preparation 

Admission to the B.D. and M.C.E. programs at Columbia Seminary re- 
quires a four year degree from an accredited university or college of arts and 
sciences or its equivalent. Students without four years of pre-seminary prepa- 
ration are not eligible to earn degrees at the Seminary and are not encouraged 
to apply for admission. 

Entering B.D. students are required to have a reading knowledge of New 
Testament Greek. For those students who are not prepared in Greek the 
Seminary offers non-credit courses in its Summer Language School. 

A major in one of the liberal arts fields is most helpful and certain 
courses are essential in preparing for seminary studies. Philosophy is neces- 
sary as a foundation for theological thought. A knowledge of European and 
American history is essential for Church History. A basic understanding of 
psychology provides the background needed for studies in Pastoral Care and 
Counseling. The knowledge of English grammar and literature is needed for 
all seminary studies because the minister must be able to communicate with 
the people whom he serves. With these needs in mind the seminary recom- 
mends the work below as a minimum in pre-seminary work. These sug- 
gestions are in line with recommendations made by the American Association 
of Theological Schools and the General Assembly of our Church. The sug- 
gestions should be carefully studied by all candidates for the ministry who 
have not completed their college training. 

English 6 semesters Psychology 1 semester 

Philosophy 3 semesters Foreign Language 4 semesters 

Bible or Religion 2 semesters Natural Science 2 semesters 

History 3 semesters Social Science 2 semesters 

Admission Procedure 

Students desiring admission to the B.D., M.C.E. or special programs 
should request an application for admission from the Director of Admissions. 
In addition to the completed application form students should furnish the 
Director of Admissions the additional items indicated on that form. 

Admission procedure for the Th.M. program may be found on page 38. 

Students admitted to the Seminary will be provided a health form to be 
filled out by their physician and an application for Seminary housing. 

Pledge 

The Board of Directors requires each student to subscribe to the following 
declaration: 

"Deeply impressed with a sense of the importance of improving in 
knowledge, prudence and piety, in my preparation for the Gospel ministry, 
I solemnly promise, in a reliance on divine grace, that I will faithfully and 
diligently attend on all the instructions of this Seminary, and that I will 
conscientiously and vigilantly observe all the rules and regulations speci- 
fied in the plan for its instruction and government, so far as the same re- 
lates to the students; and that I will obey all the lawful requisitions, and 
readily yield to all the wholesome admonitions of the professors and direc- 
tors of the Seminary while I shall continue a member of it." 

18 



Transfer 

Students in good standing in other accredited seminaries may be ad- 
mitted after transcripts have been evaluated and their applications approved 
by the Admissions Committee. Ordinarily more than one year in residence 
is required for graduation. 



ORIENTATION PROGRAM 

Columbia believes that everything possible should be done to help new 
students make a quick and easy adjustment to theological study, and to help 
them adopt sound methods of study as early as possible. With this purpose 
in view, an orientation program has been arranged and is required of all 
new students during the days preceding the regular opening of the Seminary 
in the fall. This program is without extra expense to the students except 
for a charge for board. 

Columbia's program offers an opportunity for new students to get ac- 
quainted with one another and with student body leaders and members of 
the faculty before the "rush" of routine work starts. Instruction concerning 
the use of a theological library as a means of saving time and effort later 
and suggestions regarding the most effective methods of approach to theologi- 
cal studies are given. A battery of tests similar to those used in other educa- 
tional institutions are administered in the orientation program to help stu- 
dents identify and understand particular strengths and deficiencies of prepa- 
ration for theological instruction. 



ADVANCED STANDING 

The faculty of Columbia Seminary is concerned to give more latitude to 
exceptional students who have shown unusual proficiency in advanced work 
in religious or Biblical studies at the college level. Provision is made, there- 
fore, for such students to pursue a more flexible schedule of study in lieu 
of normal requirements. Students interested in this program of independent 
study should consult with the Dean of Instruction, and the Dean, with the 
Department concerned, will provide a method of testing so as to ascertain 
the student's qualifications for independent study. Upon successfully satis- 
fying the requirements for independent study, the student will then be per- 
mitted to enter upon his special work under the guidance of the Professor 
concerned and will be expected to pass an examination, or to present a 
suitable research paper at the end of the quarter. This latitude applies to 
exceptional students in all courses of instruction. 

19 



THE HONORS PROGRAM 

In order to provide qualified students in their third year with an op- 
portunity for independent and intensive study in one field, the Honors Pro- 
gram is open to students who have an over-all B+ average and who have 
demonstrated superior abilities in the field of their interest. Honors studies 
are open in any of the departments of the curriculum with the consent of 
the supervising professor or professors and the approval of the department. 
A student who participates in the Honors Program must maintain a B+ 
average both in the required and Honors courses. At the close of the year 
he is expected to stand an examination upon his entire Honors work. The 
student will be excused from certain required work. He will receive 10 hours 
credit each quarter for his Honors studies. 



THE SCHEDULE 

Columbia operates on the Quarter System. Each quarter consists of 
approximately ten weeks for classes and one week for examinations. Co- 
lumbia ordinarily gives work only during the fall, winter, and spring quar- 
ters. The curriculum is designed for those beginning their work in the fall 
quarter. Students entering at another quarter will experience difficulties in 
scheduling their courses and may find that they cannot complete their re- 
quired work in the usual nine quarters. 

The simple unit of credit, the quarter hour, makes it easy for credits 
from Columbia to be transferred to other graduate schools. Columbia's work 
is accepted at full credit by leading graduate schools throughout the world 
as a basis for advanced theological study. 



EXAMINATIONS AND GRADING 

At the close of each quarter written examinations are held on the sub- 
jects studied during the quarter. In certain instances the professors may 
require a term paper or papers in lieu of an examination. 

Comprehensive examinations are also required of- all students, including 
transfers, in English Bible and the Historical-Doctrinal field. 

At the close of each quarter grades are given according to the following 
system. A report of his grades is sent to each student and his presbytery. 

A, excellent, 3 quality points per hour. 
B+, very good, 2.5 quality points per hour. 

B, good, 2 quality points per hour. 

C+, average, 1.5 quality points per hour. 

C, satisfactory, 1 quality point per hour. 

D+, unsatisfactory, 0.5 quality points per hour. 

D, inferior, quality points per hour. 

E, conditioned, quality points per hour. 

F, failure, minus 1 quality point per hour. 

20 



Any student who fails to make a C average in any quarter except the 
first quarter of his first year will be placed on probation for the next quarter, 
and if he fails to bring his average up during that quarter, he will be dropped 
as a student. In the event that the student's overall average is C or better, he 
will be permitted to remain as a student for another quarter on probation. 

A student who fails to complete satisfactorily all of his academic work 
will not be eligible for scholarship aid during the following quarter unless 
special providential circumstances lead the faculty to make an exception in 
his case. 



DISTINCTIONS 

Students who have secured an aggregate of 412 quality points in the 
140 hours of work required for the B.D. degree graduate "Summa Cum 
Laude." The distinction of "Magna Cum Laude" is awarded to those who 
have earned 391 quality points; and those who have 362 quality points are 
graduated "Cum Laude." In each of these cases the appropriate distinction 
is recorded upon the student's diploma. 

These academic honors are subject to revision or forfeiture if the stu- 
dent's field or clinical education is plainly unsatisfactory in the judgment of 
the faculty. 



SUMMER READING PROGRAM 

The faculty not only desires that students become competent in the 
daily work of the Church, but also seeks to aid students in learning to read 
and study in the midst of a busy parish program. In addition the faculty is 
concerned that Columbia students broaden their perspectives and fields of 
learning. Therefore each student is required to read an assigned number of 
books during the summer between his first and second years and between his 
second and third years. The list of books is drawn up by the faculty and a 
report on the reading is required at the opening of the new school year. 



SUMMER LANGUAGE SCHOOL 

July 1 8 - September 2, 1967 
July 16 -August 31, 1968 

A reading knowledge of New Testament Greek is required for admission 
to the B.D. program. Students who have not satisfactorily completed two 
years of college Greek or in some other way prepared themselves so as to 
pass the Seminary's qualifying examination should plan to attend the Sum- 
mer Language School the summer before their first year at Columbia. 

Courses 101 and 102, Elements of Hebrew, will also be taught if 10 or 
more students desire to enroll for them. 

21 



The work in both Hebrew and Greek will be of an intensive nature. The 
classes will meet for two hours a day six days a week. The study of one 
language will occupy the full time of the student. 

Application for the Summer Language School should be made to the 
Dean of Students and a preference for either Greek or Hebrew should be 
indicated. The tuition for the School is $90. 



FIELD EDUCATION 

The Field Education Program consists of two basic requirements. First, 
during each school year each student will be involved in supervised small 
group experiences designed to assist him in understanding the local church, 
the local community and the Church-at-large. Second, each student is re- 
quired to participate in two summers of approved field education, preferably 
one summer in a local pastorate as student assistant or supply pastor, and the 
other summer in some specialized ministry, such as clinical pastoral educa- 
tion, inner-city work, camps and conferences, special service in World Mis- 
sions or Church Extension, or National Parks Service. Satisfactory fulfillment 
of this Field Education Program is required for graduation. 

Within the Seminary's geographical area there are numerous oppor- 
tunities for second and third year students to work within the church situ- 
ations during the school year where they may earn income to help meet 
personal expenses. The Field Education Department is responsible for ap- 
proving and supervising all such student employment. Experience in supply 
preaching, teaching in the local church, and various kinds of student as- 
sistantships play an improtant part in the preparation for his ministry after 
graduation. 



ADDITIONAL SUPERVISED EDUCATION 

Intern Years 

Qualified students may take a theological internship of from nine to 
fifteen months between their second and third years at the Seminary. This 
period of off-campus study and practical experience is under both faculty 
direction and local supervision. Though not a required part of the curricu- 
lum, the faculty encourages students to take advantage of internships as a 
means to further relate theological studies to the life and work of the church, 
to gain a more objective appraisal of themselves and their need for further 
study, and to gain skills which may not be attained through classroom work. 
A specified program of reading is planned with a member of the faculty 
before the internship begins, and periodic reports by both the intern and 
his supervisor are required. 

Clinical Pastoral Education 

Clinical pastoral education is a first hand learning experience under 
accredited supervision which provides theological students and pastors with 

22 



opportunities for intensive study of pastoral relationships, and which seeks 
to make clear in understanding and practice the resources, methods and 
meanings of the Christian faith as expressed through pastoral care. Colum- 
bia's membership in the Council for Clinical Training, Inc., means that its 
students will be given priority of choice in institutions elected and reduction 
of training fees. 

Columbia has taken major initiative in the organization of the Georgia 
Association for Pastoral Care, Inc. The incorporating institutions in addition 
to Columbia are the Candler School of Theology of Emory University, 
Emory University Medical School, the Interdenominational Theological 
Center, and the Greater Atlanta Council of Churches. The purposes of this 
Association are for pastoral service and training with the conviction that 
the best possible service affords the most adequate training for theological 
students. The major institutions for training are the Georgian Clinic, Henry 
W. Grady Memorial Hospital, Emory University Hospital, Georgia Baptist 
Hospital, Youth Development Center, Milledgeville State Hospital, and the 
Pastoral Counseling Center, Central Presbyterian Church, Atlanta. Second 
year students are required to have training under supervision in one of these 
institutions with staff members of the Association serving the Seminary in the 
capacity of guest instructors. Additional elective work is also available in 
these centers. The Association is an affiliate of the Council for Clinical 
Training, Inc., the Institute for Pastoral Care, Inc., and the Southern Baptist 
Association for Clinical Pastoral Education, Inc. 

Radio and Television 

Facilities and staff for instruction of students from Columbia Theological 
Seminary, the Candler School of Theology and the Interdenominational 
Theological Center are provided in the Department of Education of the 
Protestant Radio and Television Center, a fully-equipped interdenomina- 
tional center producing materials for the mass media. The work of the sev- 
eral schools at the Center is coordinated by the Reverend David Abernathy, 
S.T.M., who also offers specialized mass media courses on an interseminary 
basis. (See courses 465, 467, 468 in this catalog.) Columbia Seminary's 
pioneering use of the Center's video tape equipment for instruction in 
homiletics has received nation-wide attention. 

Palestinian Archaeology and History 

Columbia Seminary is associated with the Institute for Mediterranean 
Studies of Berkeley, California which sponsors an annual Near Eastern 
Archaeological Seminar. Students who participate in this Seminar will spend 
eight weeks in the Near East taking courses in Palestinian Archaeology and 
History. The program includes three weeks of actual digging at an ancient 
site in Palestine. Students will be given academic credit provided they suc- 
cessfully complete the course program and submit the necessary transcript. 
For further details contact Professor James H. Gailey, Jr. 



23 



EXPENSES 



Tuition and all fees, with the exception of apartment rent, are payable 
by the first day of each quarter. Apartment rent is charged at the end of 
every month. Charges for board are subject to change. 

Tuition for less than 10 quarter hours is $15.00 per quarter hour. The 
fee for auditing courses is $7.50 per quarter hour. 



UNMARRIED STUDENTS 

TUITION $512.00 

Payable $171 fall and winter 
quarters, $170 spring quarter 



ROOM RENT 


120.00 


Payable $40 each quarter 




BOARD 


386.25 


Payable $128.75 each quarter 






$1,018.25 



Other Expenses 

Each student is required to have some form of hospitalization insurance 
acceptable to the faculty. Students may purchase the insurance which is 
normally offered to the student body or they may purchase insurance 
through other sources. 

Each student is required to pay any fees incurred in connection with 
clinical pastoral education. The fee for the Hospital Practicum is $15.00. 

All graduating students will be required to pay a Diploma Fee of $10.00. 

The amount of money needed for books, travel, recreation and incidental 
expenses will vary according to the habits of the student. A branch of the 
Presbyterian Book Store is operated on campus and students receive dis- 
counts on purchases made there. 



HOUSING 



Unmarried Students 



Dormitory housing is available for unmarried students. Most of the 
rooms are for double occupancy, many of them have connecting baths. All 
rooms are fully furnished with the exception of linens. Laundry facilities are 
provided. All students living in the dormitories are expected to eat in the 
Seminary dining hall. 

24 



Married Students Without Children 

Suites of two rooms with private bath are available for married students 
without children. These suites are fully furnished with the exception of 
linens. Laundry facilities are provided. There are no facilities for cooking. 
The rent for these suites is $80.00 per quarter. Wives of students living in 
these suites are expected to eat in the Seminary dining hall. The charge for 
the evening meal weekdays and Saturday dinner is $57.75 plus $1.74 Geor- 
gia Sales Tax per quarter. 

Married Students With Children 

One, two and three bedroom unfurnished apartments are available for 
married students with children. The rent for these apartments is from $44 
to $64 per month depending on the size of the apartment. Applications for 
apartments should be made as early as possible. 



FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 



Scholarships 

A number of scholarships are available, the amount granted to be deter- 
mined by consideration of other available resources and the quality of work 
done by the student. Application should be addressed to the President of 
the Seminary. Scholarships are credited to the student's account in equal 
quarterly installments. 

Recipients are ordinarily expected to work for the Seminary, usually in 
the library, dining hall or on the grounds. 

Scholarships are not available for ordained ministers doing graduate 
work. 



Loans To Candidates 

Loans up to but not to exceed $200.00 a year are provided by the 
General Assembly's Board of Christian Education when actually needed. 
Payments of this loan are in two installments: one in November and one in 
February. Application is to be made through the Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Ministerial Candidates in the student's home presbytery. 

Once a need is established, the Seminary may also assist with loans 
from its own funds. It should be noted by the student that both need and 
satisfactory academic progress are required for a loan and that, in every 
case, satisfactory plans have to be made for repayment of loans. 

Supply Preaching 

Second and third year students may expect to receive some remuneration 
for supply preaching, supervised by the Field Education Office. 

25 



Student family in Friendship Hall apartment. 



SOCIETY FOR THEOLOGICAL SCHOLARSHIP 

A student society "for the purpose of encouraging in every student the 
highest possible scholarship in all departments of instruction." Membership 
is open to all students and faculty on a voluntary basis. Lectures, informal 
discussions with visiting lecturers, symposia by members of the faculty and 
other meetings are sponsored in the interest of Christian scholarship. 



SOCIETY OF MISSIONARY INQUIRY 

The Society was founded in 1832 and has been an instrument through 
the years to promote an active interest in world missions among the, student 
body and throughout the Church. It annually conducts one of the largest 
missions conferences for youth in the nation. The Society regularly brings 
outstanding speakers before the student body. The program of the Society 
has helped Columbia Seminary provide a large number of world missionaries. 

THE CHOIR 

The Seminary Choir has gained recognition throughout the Southeast by 
its annual visits to churches in the supporting synods, its services for the 
Columbia Friendship Circle Pilgrimage, and its recordings. It assists from 
time to time with the worship services of the campus community. Member- 
ship in it provides valuable training for our students. Dr. Hubert Vance 
Taylor, the director, was for many years the director of music for the 
Protestant Radio and Television Center where he prepared broadcasts for 
the Protestant Hour, the National Radio Pulpit, and the Upper Room Radio 
Parish. For more than twenty years he was Minister of Music, Central 
Presbyterian Church, Atlanta. 

26 



WIVES' CLUB 

This club is patterned after the Women of the Church with the purpose 
of providing spiritual development and Christian fellowship. Membership 
includes the wives of Seminary students, faculty and staff. Single girls and 
wives of missionaries are invited as honorary members. General meetings 
and circle Bible studies are held monthly. In addition, each quarter a faculty 
member offers an evening course for wives. 



STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

A Board of Student Publications, selected from the student body, provides 
an opportunity for written discussion of important issues. The publications 
staff publishes the semi-weekly VIEWPOINT on a variety of subjects and 
a quarterly magazine discussing key issues. Both students and faculty are 
encouraged to contribute to these publications. 



STUDENT RECREATION 

Columbia Seminary encourages its students to take advantage of the 
recreational facilities provided on campus and in the surrounding communi- 
ty. Three all-weather tennis courts, a volley ball court and an athletic field 
are a part of the campus. Recreation lounges are provided in the Student 
Center and local golf courses are easily accessible. Both intra-mural and 
individual competition is conducted in various recreational activities. The city 
recreation center and the Y.M.C.A. provide additional facilities for student 
use. 



CHURCH VOCATIONS WEEK-END 

During each academic year a Church Vocations Week-end is conducted 
offering college men an opportunity to think together about the nature of 
the Christian ministry and to see first hand the place of the Seminary in 
training men for service in the Church. Both students who are undecided 
about their life's work and those who definitely intend to enter some form of 
Church vocation are invited to attend. 



ANNUAL MISSIONS CONFERENCE 

Each year the Society of Missionary Inquiry sponsors a missions con- 
ference at the Rock Eagle Conference Grounds near Eatonton, Georgia. 
The conference is one of the largest in the nation for high school and 
college students. From this conference, now in its 13th year, have come 
candidates for mission service who after further training have gone to all 
but one of our mission fields. 

27 



Continuing Education discussion with Professor Guthrie. 

CONTINUING EDUCATION 

Each quarter groups of twelve ministers each are invited to participate in 
periods of independent study in the Seminary library. The individual study 
of these men is supplemented by seminars led by the faculty and designed 
to bring the men up to date on developments and books in the various fields 
of theological study. In addition to this program of individual study, special 
periods of study on a particular subject with seminars and lectures on that 
subject supplementing individual study are also held from time to time. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The program of the Alumni Association is directed by the Alumni 
Council which is composed of executive officers elected by the Association 
and an appointed representative from each Synod in the General Assembly. 
The annual meeting of the Association is one of the principal events of 
Ministers' Week each fall. In addition, local meetings are planned for synods 
and presbyteries during the year. 

Since 1940 the Association has supported the Alumni Fellowship Fund 
enabling 57 graduates to be named Alumni Fellows and assisting financially 
with their post-graduate study. A recent project of the Association was the 
endowment of the James McDowell Richards Chair of Biblical Exposition. 



OTHER MEETINGS 

In addition to its own regularly planned conferences the Seminary serves 
as host each year to many other groups. Committees of the General As- 
sembly often meet on the campus. The Women of the Church hold Synodical 
Conferences and Area Training meetings here annually. During the summer 
the Christianity and Health Workshop uses the facilities of the Seminary. 
During the academic year the Seminary provides housing for high school 
students participating in the program of the Synod of Georgia Vocational 
Guidance Center. 

28 



SUPPORT 



OF THE 







SEMINARY 



Costs for a year's education exceed student fees by almost $2,000 for 
each student at Columbia Seminary. This $2,000 is part of the Church's 
annual investment in those men and women who have dedicated their lives 
to places of full-time service in the Church. Through the budgeted benevo- 
lences of the five supporting synods, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi 
and South Carolina, from the investment of endowed funds, and by special 
gifts of friends Columbia Seminary meets its expenses. 

Gifts to Columbia provide many things. Scholarships not only help stu- 
dents pay their bills, but also remind them of the interest and concern of 
men and women in the Church and thus encourage them in their studies. 
Fellowships and Academic Awards not only provide special educational op- 
portunities but also stimulate excellence of preparation in basic studies. Gifts 
to endowment not only honor and perpetuate the interest of Christian friends, 
but also underwrite day-to-day expenses and provide for increased service 
through growth and development of facilities and program. 

The task of theological edcuation is a responsibility Columbia shares 
with the whole Church. On the following pages we acknowledge the par- 
ticular ways Christian men and women have aided us in fulfilling our role in 
theological education. Many friends, through small and large gifts, have 
faithfully supported Columbia and here we mention gifts that have exceeded 
$500. The list also gives a picture of opportunities for other donors to share 
in the important work of preparing men and women for places of Christian 
service, both with their gifts now and through their wills. 



29 



COLUMBIA FRIENDSHIP CIRCLE 

Columbia Friendship Circle is an organization of more than 12,000 
friends of the Seminary who carry out an annual program with a three-fold 
purpose: 1. They seek to understand the work of the Seminary and pray 
for its mission; 2. They encourage able young men in their homes and 
communities to consider the Gospel Ministry as they plan their life's work; 
3. They sustain their interest in the work of the Seminary by an annual 
membership gift. 

Each year several hundred members make a pilgrimage to the Seminary 
during which a project for the coming year is adopted. In recent years 
Columbia Friendship Circle has had as its projects the providing of Friend- 
ship Hall, an apartment dormitory; the equipment for the Seminary kitchen; 
and the remodeling and refurnishing of Simons-Law Dormitory; and the 
establishment of a fund to expand the Continuing Education Program. 



THOMAS SMYTH FOUNDATION LECTURERS 

Through a generous bequest of Rev. Thomas Smyth, D.D., who was for 
years the pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church of Charleston, South 
Carolina, a lectureship bearing the name of its founder was established at 
Columbia Seminary in 1911. Each year a distinguished scholar is invited to 
deliver a series of lectures to the seminary community. 



ACADEMIC AWARDS 

The Fannie Jordan Bryan Fellowships 

Established by the will of the late Mrs. Fannie Jordan Bryan of Colum- 
bia, South Carolina, to promote interest in scholarship among students and 
to provide better trained leaders for the Church. Stipends make possible a 
year of graduate studies in seminaries and universities in America and 
abroad. 



The Alumni Fellowship Fund 

Established by the Senior Class of 1941 and supported by the Alumni 
Association to promote the welfare of their Alma Mater and of the Church. 
Two fellowships are usually awarded annually. 

The Anna Church Whitner Memorial Fellowship 

Established in 1928 by the late William C. Whitner, LL.D., of Rock Hill, 
South Carolina, in memory of his mother, an earnest, consecrated and de- 
voted Christian. Eight Whitner fellows have been able to pursue advanced 
studies in American and European universities. 

30 



Indiantown Church Award 

Established by the Indiantown Presbyterian Church in Hemingway, 
South Carolina, to encourage interest in and promote the development of 
Country Church work. In explaining the motive for their action, the donors 
have written: "This award is made available with the hope and prayer that 
more of our worthy young men may catch a vision of the possibilities of 
the Country Church, and dedicate the ministry of their lives to rural areas." 

This prize is awarded annually to the third year student who makes the 
most outstanding record of work in a rural church or field during the sum- 
mer months between his second and third years in the institution. 

James Robertson Howerton Award 

Dr. J. R. Howerton was one of the ablest and most useful of the Colum- 
bia alumni. He served as pastor of some of our strongest churches, taught at 
Stillman and later at Washington and Lee, established Montreat, and pub- 
lished two very thoughtful books. Columbia is happy to have his name and 
influence commemorated in a cash award to the student writing the best 
paper in Presbyterian History and Polity. 

Wilds Book Prize 

Established by Louis T. Wilds, Esq., ruling Elder of the First Presby- 
terian Church, Columbia, South Carolina, to provide an annual book prize 
for a student elected by the faculty for distinction in his academic work. 

Paul T. Fuhrmann Book Prize 

The Paul T. Fuhrmann Book Prize in Church History was established 
in 1962 by an alumnus of the Seminary for the purpose of stimulating 
Christian scholarship. The award is made annually to a student who has 
shown outstanding achievement in Church History. 



SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS 

The Thomas M. Barbee Scholarship Fund 

This endowment of $68,000 was established in 1952 by the late Reverend 
Thomas M. Barbee, D.D., of Mexico, Missouri, to provide several generous 
scholarships for students who agree to serve in rural fields for as much as 
five years after graduation from Columbia Seminary. 

Second Presbyterian Church Education Scholarships 

In 1821 The Education Society of The Second Presbyterian Church of 
Charleston, S. C. was organized "to assist in educatiing some pious promis- 
ing young men of talent preparatory to a course of theological studies or in 
maintaining them at the Theological Seminary." More than $70,000.00 has 
been sent to Columbia Seminary to help worthy theological students com- 
plete their education at this historic School of The Prophets. Scholarships 
are provided each year by the faithful women of The Second Presbyterian 
Church of Charleston, S. C. 

31 



The George Henry Cornelson, D.D., Scholarship Fund 

In March 1959 the Bailey Foundation of Clinton, S. C, established an 
endowment of $25,000.00 to provide scholarships in memory of the late 
Rev. George Henry Cornelson, D.D. A native of South Carolina, Dr. Cor- 
nelson graduated from Columbia Seminary in 1895, having previously earn- 
ed his B.A. at Davidson College, which later conferred upon him his honor- 
ary degree. He was distinguished as a presbyter, a pastor, and a preacher, 
and served at various times as pastor of churches in Arkansas, South Caro- 
lina, North Carolina, Tennessee and Louisiana. His last pastorate was in 
the First Presbyterian Church of New Orleans, La. Preference in the award 
of scholarships will be given to students who will lend their efforts to the 
need of industrial communities. 

The William V. Gardner Scholarship 

Established by the Berean Bible Class of the First Presbyterian Church 
in Atlanta in honor of Dr. William V. Gardner, pastor of that church from 
1936-1952, and for many years Chairman of the Board of Directors of 
Columbia Seminary. 



The Edgar Watkins Scholarship 

Established by the Berean Bible Class of the First Presbyterian Church 
in Atlanta in honor of Judge Edgar Watkins, eminent lawyer, civic leader, 
Elder in the Presbyterian Church for over forty years and teacher of the 
Berean Bible Class for over twenty years. 



Other Scholarship Funds 

The J. Frank Alldis Scholarship 
The Mary and Catherine Alldis Schol- 
arship 
The Frances Daniel Anderson Memo- 
rial Scholarship 
The Susie Butler Anderson Scholarship 
— Georgia Society of the Dames of 
the Court of Honor 
The Agnes Barden Scholarship 
The David A. Beatie Scholarship 
The W. D. and Nellie M. Beatie 

Scholarship Fund 
The Annie Newton Bennett and Rev. 
John Newton Memorial Scholarship 
The Dr. Joseph Davis Bennett Me- 
morial Scholarship 
The Captain Blair Scholarship 
The David Marion Boozer Memorial 

Scholarship 
The Dr. and Mrs. John T. Brantley 

Scholarship 
The Mr. and Mrs. L. M. Brown Me- 
morial Scholarship 
The "Brother Bryan" Scholarship 
The Mary Carmichael Scholarship 
The Chattanooga Scholarship 
The Habersham Clay Memorial Schol- 
arship 
The Rosa Scott Coleman Memorial 

Scholarship 
The Mrs. A. V. Cooper Scholarship 



The William Hawkins Corley Memo- 
rial Scholarship 

The Mr. and Mrs. Oscar L. Cowan 
Memorial Scholarship 

The Bobby Crook Memorial Scholar- 
ship Fund 

The Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Cunningham 
Scholarship 

The Annie Finklea Davison Memorial 
Scholarship 

The Decatur Women of the Church 
Scholarship Fund 

The William A. Elliott Memorial 
Scholarship 

The First Presbyterian Church of 
Marietta, Ga. Scholarship 

The First Presbyterian Church of 
Rome, Ga. Scholarship 

The Maude Garland Scholarship 

The J. Wilder Glover Memorial Schol- 
arship 

The LeRoy Gresham Scholarship 

The Dr. and Mrs. George Manford 
Gutzke Scholarship Fund 

The George R. Hairston, Jr., Memori- 
al Scholarship 

The Ridgley Hall Scholarship 

The Joseph E. Hannah Memorial 
Scholarship 

The C. Virginia Harrison Scholarship 

The Harriett Tucker Hawkins Me- 
morial Scholarship 



32 



The Rev. Fred J. Hay and Mildred J. 
Hay Scholarship 

The Frederick J. Hay and Annie Rich- 
ards Hay Scholarship 

The Mr. W. M. and Kate C. Hagood 
Memorial Scholarship 

The Lottie and Loudie Hendrick 
Scholarship 

The Robert M. Hitch Scholarship 

The Little Fritz Lee Howard Memorial 
Scholarship 

The Independent Presbyterian Church 
of Savannah, Georgia Scholarship 

The Carson Gillespie Jenkins Memori- 
al Scholarship 

The Deen Jones Scholarship 

The Dr. and Mrs. Berthold S. Kennedy 
Scholarship 

The Robert King Memorial Scholar- 
ship Fund 

The King's Daughters Sunday School 
Class Scholarship 

The Rev. James Garland Lane Me- 
morial Scholarship Fund 

The Aaron W. Leland Memorial 
Scholarship Fund 

The James Lindsey Memorial Scholar- 
ship Fund 

The J. K. Livingston Scholarship 

The Ryan McDonald Scholarship 
Fund 

The Peter G. McEachern Memorial 
Scholarship 

The W. H. Mcintosh Memorial Schol- 
arship 

The Dr. W. J. McKay Memorial 
Scholarship 

The Elizabeth McFadden McLaurin 
Scholarship 

The Mr. and Mrs. S. L. McNair Me- 
morial Scholarship 

The Claude C. Mason, Jr., Scholarship 
Fund 

The Men's Bible Class Scholarship, 
First Presbyterian Church, Augusta. 
Georgia 

The Candler A. Murphey Scholarship 

The Rev. and Mrs. C. D. Murphy 
Scholarship 



The Newton-Morris Scholarship Fund 

The James H. Owens Scholarship 

The Elizabeth Ross Parkhill Memorial 
Scholarship, First Presbyterian 
Church, Jacksonville, Florida 

The P. D. Patrick Scholarship 

The George H. Pendleton Memorial 
Scholarship 

The Persian Scholarship 

The J. Davison Philips Scholarship 

The Rankin Scholarship 

The Cantey Venable Reed Scholarship 

The Mrs. J. Rupert Rees Scholarship 

The Reid Memorial Scholarship 

The John G. Richards Memorial 
Scholarship 

The Edward Thomas Robinson Me- 
morial Scholarship 

The James Russell Scholarship 

The John Munn and Elizabeth Eccles 
Saunders Scholarship 

The Slack Scholarship 

The Louise Maytag Smith Scholarship 
Fund 

The John D. Snyder Memorial Schol- 
arship 

The John H. Spencer Memorial Schol- 
arship 

The Thomas Harper Spencer Scholar- 
ship 

The Leila A. Thornton Scholarship 

The Leila A. Thornton and W. A. 
Austell Scholarship 

The Thornwell Scholarship 

The Harry and Jessie W. Watters Me- 
morial Scholarship 

The Manford Leighton Wilkinson Me- 
morial Scholarship Fund 

The Josiah James Willard Memorial 
Scholarship 

The Lawson Williams Scholarship 

The Rev. James A. Wilson Memorial 
Scholarship 

The J. W. Woolfolk Memorial Schol- 
arship 

The S. R. Wynkoop Scholarship 

The Martha Moss Yater Memorial 
Scholarship Fund 



ENDOWMENT FOR TEACHING 



The Cartledge Chair of New Testa- 
ment 

The C. Darby Fulton Chair of Mis- 
sions 

The J. B. Green Chair of Theology 



The Peter Marshall Chair of Homi- 
letics 

The Department of Pastoral Counsel- 
ing 

The J. McDowell Richards Chair of 
Biblical Exposition 



MEMORIAL FUNDS 



The Major Frank Leland Anderson 

Memorial Fund 
The Emily Deal Birdsong Memorial 

Fund 



The John Marshall Blakely Travel 

Fund 
The David Brainerd Missionary Fund 



33 



The Dr. Frank C. Brown Memorial 

Fund 
The J. Bulow and Virginia Orme 

Campbell Memorial Fund 
The Laura B. Campbell Fund 
The Dr. Thomas Chason Memorial 

Fund 
The Katherine Golucke Conyers Me- 
morial Endowment Fund 
The Dr. and Mrs. W. L. Cooke Fund 
The Rev. John Cousar Memorial Fund 
The James M. Daniel Memorial Fund 
The Elton Payne "Bokey" Daniels 

Memorial Fund 
The James Miller Davison Memorial 

Fund 
The Dempster-Cruikshank Memorial 

Fund 
The Joe Dixon Memorial Fund 
The Carlyle Fraser Memorial Fund 
The Richard T. Gillespie Memorial 

Fund 
The J. Frank Hall and Dorothy Hall 

Gilleylen Memorial Fund 
The C. W. Grafton Memorial Fund 
The Dr. William Thomas Hall Me- 
morial Fund 
The Herbert and Gertrude Halverstadt 

Memorial Fund 
The J. M. Harris Memorial Fund 
The John T. Henderson Endowment 

Fund 
The Lula Tatum Hunter Memorial 

Fund 
The Mrs. Claude M. Hutchinson Me- 
morial Fund 
The Mr. and Mrs. James Caller Jones- 
Memorial Fund 
The John King Memorial Fund 
The Dr. Joseph Pelham Knight Me- 
morial Fund 
The Mr. and Mrs. Robert Jackson 

Knight Memorial Fund 
The Kenneth Marion Littlejohn Me- 
morial Fund 



The John Beverly McDaniel Memorial 
Fund 

The Rev. and Mrs. D. McL. McDon- 
ald Memorial Fund 

The Rev. James D. McDowell Me- 
morial Fund 

The Rev. and Mrs. Neill Mclnnis Me- 
morial Fund 

The Thomas S. and William M. Mc- 
Pheeters Memorial Fund 

The Dr. and Mrs. F. L. Martin Fund 

The Rev. and Mrs. Curtis J. Mathews 
Memorial Fund 

The Hall T. McGee Memorial Fund 

The Rev. and Mrs. William T. Mul- 
cay Fund 

The Vera Bowen Munson Endowment 
Fund 

The Oberg Endowment Fund 

The Mrs. S. R. Parker Endowment 
Fund 

The Harry F. Petersen, Jr. Memorial 
Fund 

The Volney Graham Philips Memorial 
Endowment Fund 

The Captain D. Townsend Pope Me- 
morial Fund 

The Charles Malone and Janie Mc- 
Dowell Richards Memorial Fund 

The Edna Eddings Robinson Memori- 
al Fund 

The Dr. J. Holmes Smith Memorial 
Fund 

The Smyth Library Fund 

The Sarah Catherine Stamper Memori- 
al Fund 

The R. Earle Statham Memorial Fund 

The James and Katherine Jackson 
Vance Memorial Fund 

The William Clarke Wardlaw Memori- 
al Fund 

The Sadie Wells Memorial Fund 

The Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Whitten and 
J. H. Whitten, Jr. Memorial Fund 

The H. Lane Young Memorial Fund 



STUDENT LOAN FUNDS 



The J. Blanton Belk Loan Fund 
The Margaret Bensell Loan Fund 
The Kekomoisa Bryan Loan Fund 
The J. M. Dixon, Senior Loan Fund 
The Jasper N. Dorsey Loan Fund 
The Elizabeth W. Hamilton Loan 

Fund 
The Jennie L. Hamilton Loan Fund 
The Rev. and Mrs. Joseph E. Hannah 

Loan Fund 
The Alice Allgood Henderson (Mrs. 

W. M. Crawford) Loan Fund 
The Miss Margaret Dora Henderson 

Loan Fund 
The Ives Loan Fund 
The Mr. and Mrs. Paul Kuhns Loan 

Fund 



The Mrs. P. M. McGoldrick Loan 
Fund 

The James Bailey Magruder, Senior 
and Junior Loan Fund 

The Luther H. Maxwell Loan Fund 

The Moody-Sterling Memorial Loan 
Fund for Clinical Pastoral Educa- 
tion 

The Naomi Mitchell Simons Memorial 
Loan Fund 

The Helen Penniman Warren Memori- 
al Loan Fund 

The Brown Williams Student Aid 
Fund 

The Maybelle Winton Loan Fund 

The Louise Woodward Loan Fund 

The Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Wright Loan 
Fund 



34 



DEGREES 
AND 

COURSES 



mmmM 




The basic academic program at Columbia Seminary leads to the standard 
degree traditionally offered by seminaries of all denominations, the Bachelor 
of Divinity. The curriculum for this degree provides required course work 
to help the student begin to understand the Bible, the history of the life and 
thought of the church, the people to whom he will minister and the work of 
the church today with special emphasis on the work of a local pastor. The 
Presbyterian Church has traditionally expected its pastors to be educationally 
well prepared and this curriculum seeks to start the students on a path lead- 
ing toward that goal. Though the basic studies are designed primarily for men 
and women who plan to serve in pastoral positions in local churches, gradu- 
ates of the seminary find themselves well equipped by their studies to pursue 
further graduate work or to enter into specialized ministries. In order to 
provide opportunities for students to pursue areas of special interest twenty 
percent of the academic credit required for graduation is received through 
elective studies and students suitably prepared may do honors work in their 
third year. 

Columbia also offers courses of study leading to the Th.M. and M.C.E. 
degrees. The Master of Theology program is designed for students holding 
the B.D. degree who wish to increase their understanding of some particular 
area of theological studies. The goal of such studies would ordinarily be 
increased proficiency as a pastor, for the program is not especially designed 
for those who desire to pursue doctoral studies. The student seeking the 
Th.M. degree may concentrate his studies in any area of Columbia's academic 
curriculum or may pursue a special program of clinical and academic studies 
leading to a Th.M. degree in Clinical Pastoral Care. 

The Master of Christian Education program is designed for those stu- 
dents who have received a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or 
university and wish to prepare for place of leadership in the educational 
program of the Church such as a Director or Minister of Christian Education. 
The two year course of studies for this degree includes basic courses in each 
area of theological studies plus additional specialized work in Christian 
Education. 



35 



BACHELOR OF DIVINITY 

The standard degree of the Seminary is the Bachelor of Divinity (B.D.). 
Its requirements are as follows: 

1. There must be on file with the Seminary a complete and official transcript 
of credits showing graduation with a bachelor's degree from an accredited 
university or college of liberal arts and sciences, or its equivalent. 

2. The candidate must satisfactorily complete all academic requirements of 
the Seminary. These include the required courses together with enough 
electives to bring the total of credits to 145, and other academic require- 
ments such as summer reading, senior preaching and comprehensive 
examinations. These requirements may not be completed in less than 
nine quarters. The candidate must achieve an overall average of C for 
the Seminary course. 

3. The requirements of the Seminary's department of Field Education must 
be satisfactorily completed. 

4. The faculty must be satisfied that the conduct and attitude of the 
candidate is becoming a minister of the Gospel and that he gives promise 
of useful service in the ministry or other Church vocation. 

5. All bills to the Seminary must be paid and assurance given that all open 
accounts in the community and elsewhere have been satisfied. 

Outline of Courses 

An outline of courses in the new curriculum is found on page 42. Courses 
in the old curriculum for the Senior Year are: 

Fall Quarter Winter Quarter Spring Quarter 

240 Hist 4 hrs. 153 B. E 4 hrs. 133 N. T 4 hrs. 

305 Theo 3 hrs. 427 Ch. Adm. . . 2 hrs. or 

452 Horn 2 hrs. 495 Worship ... 4 hrs. 134 N. T 4 hrs. 

473 Missions . . 3 hrs. 306 Ch. Ethics . 4 hrs. 

**10 hrs. 401 C. E 2 hrs. 



**12 hrs. 



**10 hrs. 



In addition to the above list of required courses each candidate for the B.D. 
Degree will be required to take at least one course (two quarter hours) in Hospital 
Pastoral Care. Ordinarily, the student will take this during the spring quarter of 
his junior year or during any one of the three quarters of his middle year. 

** Normally students will choose elective courses to bring their schedule to no less 
than 15 quarter hours. 



36 




A*Si^' 




T-V training in cooperation with the Protestant Radio and TV Center. 

ENGLISH COURSE 

Students from the five Synods supporting Columbia Seminary who are 
received by their presbyteries under the extraordinary case clause of the 
Book of Church Order may be granted a Diploma from the Seminary upon 
the completion of 140 hours of work with a minimum of a C average after a 
period of nine quarters in residence at the Seminary. Students who take the 
English Course are permitted to omit Hebrew, and when they do not have 
the necessary preparation in Greek, they are permitted to omit certain 
courses in New Testament exegesis. They must satisfy all other requirements 
of the Seminary. 

Application for admission to the English Course must be accompanied 
by a written request from the student's presbytery, and the Seminary re- 
serves the right to apply any tests of the student's ability which may be help- 
ful in determining the suitability of the course for him. 



WORLD MISSIONS CANDIDATES 

So that their one-year program of study may be planned to give them the 
best preparation for their missionary service, all world missions candidates 
are required to confer with the Professor of Missions and the Dean of In- 
stuction concerning the particular courses they will take. 



UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS 

In some instances students not enrolled in a regular program of study 
will be allowed to take courses at the Seminary as special students. A tran- 
script of courses completed will be granted to such students. 



37 



MASTER OF THEOLOGY 

The degree of Master of Theology (Th.M.) is granted to a student who 
has spent a year or more in graduate study, has completed satisfactorily at 
least thirty-five hours of work in residence with grades that average at least 
B, has presented an acceptable thesis, and has passed a final oral examina- 
tion. The work for the degree must be completed within three academic years 
after the student has been admitted to candidacy. 

Specialization 

A student may specialize in any subdivision of the three major fields of 
the curriculum. Fifteen hours must be taken in the field of specialization, and 
an additional ten hours must be taken either in that field or in related courses. 
Ten hours must be taken in courses approved for graduate study outside the 
department of specialization. A student intending to specialize in the area 
of pastoral care and counseling is required to have clinical training with the 
Council for Clinical Pastoral Training, Inc., as specified by the Professor of 
Pastoral Counseling. 

Admission To Study In The Graduate Department 

Admission to study in the graduate department is granted by the Dean of 
the Graduate Department and the Admissions Committee of the faculty, 
proper application having been made through the Dean. The B.D. degree or 
its academic equivalent and courses in Hebrew and Greek are prerequisite. If 
a student's B.D. course required less than the two biblical languages, he may 
substitute an approved language for one of them. Those students who plan 
to do their major work in the Old or New Testament departments must be 
able to handle the appropriate language with ease. In addition each applicant 
is expected to present evidence of achievement and competence as a student. 
Rarely can a student be expected to do satisfactory graduate work if he has 
not maintained at least a B average in his college and seminary work. Tests 
to determine aptitude and psychological fitness are required and must be 
taken during the orientation period. 

Admission to Candidacy 

Admission to candidacy is by vote of the faculty, proper application hav- 
ing been made in writing to the Committee on Graduate Work. The faculty 
meeting in October is the deadline for admission to candidacy if the student 
expects to receive his degree the following May. 

Costs 

In addition to tuition, which is the same as for the B.D. program, Gradu- 
ate Students will be charged a thesis fee to be paid as follows: $25.00 to 
accompany the application for admission to candidacy; and $25.00 at the 
beginning of the fall quarter each year thereafter until the degree is received. 
Failure to pay the fee will constitute withdrawal from the program. 

Association With Emory University 

Students working for their Th.M. at Columbia may, with the approval of 
their sponsoring professor and the Dean of the Graduate Department, take 
courses offered by the Candler School of Theology of Emory for full resi- 
dence credit. This working agreement appreciably widens the offerings of 
both schools. No extra fees are charged; the student pays the regular fees to 
the school in which he is enrolled. 

38 



TH.M IN CLINICAL PASTORAL CARE 



In addition to the Th.M. in Pastoral Theology a program in Clinical 
Pastoral Care is designed primarily to enable the parish minister to accom- 
plish his work of shepherding more effectively. At the same time, this pro- 
gram should be regarded as prerequisite to either military or institutional 
chaplaincies. 

The requirements for admission and graduation pertain to this degree as 
for the same degree in any other field with the exception of the thesis and 
the inclusion of clinical training, research requirement and pastoral coun- 
seling. 

For this degree an intern year is required in one of the institutions of the 
Georgia Association for Pastoral Care, Inc., or in an institution accredited 
by the Council for Clinical Training, Inc. The Association is an affiliate of 
the Council, and the Seminary is an active member of the Council. 

Having completed this year satisfactorily, the student will then continue 
his program in residence to complete satisfactorily the required thirty-five 
hours of academic work as specified for other major fields. In addition the 
student will participate in the graduate practicum in pastoral counseling and 
will work under qualified supervision in the Counseling Center, Central 
Presbyterian Church, a part of the Pastoral Counseling Service, Georgia As- 
sociation for Pastoral Care, Inc. 

In lieu of a thesis, a student will be assigned a research project by the 
Department of Pastoral Care which must be completed to the satisfaction 
of the Department. 



Left: Professor Thompson. 

Below: Professors McKee and Wallace. 





39 



MASTER OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

The requirements for the degree of Master of Christian Education 
(M.C.E.) are: 

1. A bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university. 

2. A reading knowledge of at least one foreign language. 

3. A minimum of 90 quarter hours, 15 of which may be devoted to an 
acceptable research project. The following requirements shall be met: 



Biblical Area 






18 


hours 


Orientation to Biblical Studies 


6 


hours 






Additional Old Testament 


6 


hours 






Additional New Testament 


6 


hours 






Historical-Doctrinal Area 






19 


hours 


History of Life and Thought 










of the Church 


12 


hours 






American Christianity 


3 


hours 






Christian Ethics 


4 


hours 






Pastoral Area 






25 


hours 


Minister and His People 


5 


hours 






Ministry of Worship 


2 


hours 






Ministry of Teaching 


3 


hours 






Ministry of Pastoral Care 


4 


hours 






Teaching Practicum 


2 


hours 






Elective in Christian Education 


9 


hours 







4. The faculty must be satisfied that the conduct and attitude of the 
candidate is becoming a servant of the Church and that he gives 
promise of useful service in a Church vocation. 

5. All bills to the Seminary must be paid and assurance given that all 
open accounts in the community and elsewhere have been satisfied. 

(Note: Mission candidates will be required to take at least 15 hours of 
Missions.) 

Students working toward the M.C.E. degree may be allowed to transfer 
credit from other approved institutions, but in no case can a student earn 
this degree who has not spent at least a full year in residence. 

Students will ordinarily be expected to participate in supervised field 
education as a part of their prescribed program. 

The degree will be awarded upon the satisfactory completion of the 
course of study outlined above, upon the successful demonstration of a 
sufficient grasp of the major fields of study by an oral or written examina- 
tion, and by giving evidence of adequate ability to do field education. 

Students enrolling in this course must be properly recommended for 
admission by competent authorities in their denomination, must submit 
transcripts showing their college credits and degrees, and must be accepted 
by the Admissions Committee of the faculty. Application blanks will be 
sent upon request. 



40 



THE NEW CURRICULUM 



In 1965 the Faculty approved a plan for a new curriculum which began 
with the entering class in the fall of 1966. The general three year program 
of required work is outlined below, followed by descriptions of the courses. 
In the new curriculum 140 hours will be required for graduation instead of 
145 in the old curriculum. 112 of these hours are in designated areas with 
28 hours normally allowed for electives according to the student's needs and 
interests. A schedule of electives is now in process of being worked out so as 
to provide balance and enrichment to the curriculum. A plan of continual 
evaluation and revision is also part of this new program. 

The Faculty has tried to preserve the best of the former curriculum but 
to begin the development of a new curriculum which better relates to the 
changing patterns of college and university education and to the needs of the 
Church as it is called to serve in the contemporary world. In this development 
the Faculty continually seeks a curriculum which reflects faithfulness to the 
Gospel and serves as a context in which both faculty and students grow in 
spiritual maturity. 

One aim of the new curriculum is a better integration of material which 
has tended to be fragmentized. The four traditional fields are combined into 
three major areas of study: Biblical, Historical-Doctrinal, Pastoral, with all 
three related to Field Education. Combining the Historical and Doctrinal into 
one area should assist the student in studying history theologically and 
theology historically. The Biblical Area combines in the same course the 
study of the Bible in Hebrew or Greek with its study in English, introductory 
and critical questions with biblical theology. Since the candidate for the B.D. 
degree makes use of one of the original languages every quarter at Semi- 
nary, he must have a reading knowledge of biblical Greek at the beginning 
of his first year. Special provision is made for Christian education and non- 
degree students. 

A variety of teaching methods seeks to utilize in a better way the gifts 
of different faculty members and to meet the needs of different students with 
varying abilities and academic backgrounds. Emphasis is given to team teach- 
ing and small group work, providing opportunity for close faculty-student 
relationships. Students who are weak in particular areas receive special help 
through the small group approach. Students who demonstrate unusual pro- 
ficiency in particular areas are given a more flexible schedule of study in 
place of normal requirements. Third year students who qualify can par- 
ticipate in the Honors Program which gives opportunity for independent and 
intensive study in one field. 

Field education is integrated with other areas of the curriculum so that 
both faculty and students can more readily relate their studies on the campus 
with what is happening in the Church and the community and the world. The 
resources of the churches and other institutions and agencies in Greater At- 
lanta can contribute much to a theological education adequate for the day 
in which the Church is called to serve. 



41 



3 



a 

s 

3 



;v>«nm»-< 



so o M 

«i co cfl O 

:§:§:§§ 



-<t^NN 



"I 



S3 

it 

« 2 



^trT'* 



<§8 

gag a 

fill i 



S3 



s£ 



rfvo^v© 



0) 

! 

x>a 

.as § 

0<& 



Hn fl-g 

5>C/3 



3 

P 

a 

s 

a 



B. 



all 



•s 



sag 






o 
u 

o 



l! 



bo 60 

o o 

•3*3 8- g J 
« t> *a a ^a 






vovom 



hi 

In 

^ w .a 

.2 o © 
"S'S.S 

3 Hi 

p 

^S I-. feO 

0^3 a 
£ fa IB 

8 £# 

w 

en 



'« a£ 

sis 
£ 

Q 
W 



ails 

***** 

"s | 

•a 

■s 



■<* "ten 

Si 1 

M 2 S 5 o 

2 a H, 2 

°.l i'l 
Sill 



H 2 



»S 



^-TfCN 



.52 



a §6 



►j: 



a* 



a a> «« 

Qfc a'C 

a £# 

ffi 



6 

I 
o 

i 

2 



Z 

! 

| 



cxra 
QpQ 



5 <u o 
^.§•3 

■;°& 

•Sis 
**{ 

a** 

^ © «-i 

|s| 

o o « 
«o a 

"*.a * 
a S* - 

0«w bo 

•«a 






« a a 

25 ti 



-° § w 

a^ " 

.aa^ a 

o g ed 

|«a 

.a 13 «« 

a »i3 
fc-a_- 

03 «4 ^ 

-I 






o,; 






U 



5 a Bb 



so 



42 



BIBLICAL AREA 

First Year 

ORIENTATION TO BIBLICAL STUDIES fall quarter, 6 hours. 

McKee*, Cousar, Dewitz, Gailey, Ormond 
Method in study of the Bible; the structure of biblical history; the ancient world, 
its life and thought; an introduction to biblical criticism and the contemporary 
hermeneutical task. 

THE ACTS AND GALATIANS winter quarter, 3 hours. 

McKee*, Cartledge, Cousar, Ormond 
The book of Acts is studied as background for the letters of Paul and the be- 
ginnings of the Church. The Greek text of Galatians is read, analyzed, and inter- 
preted in order to give training in the proper methods of exegesis and to ascertain 
the meaning of the Epistle for the Church today. 

THE SYNOPTIC GOSPELS spring quarter, 6 hours. 

Cousar*, Cartledge, McKee, Ormond 
A study of the structure, content, and theology of the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, 
and Luke; the formation of the gospel-tradition; and the nature of history in the 
Gospels. Selected passages from the Gospel of Mark are read in Greek and studied 
exegetically each week in seminars. 

Second Year 

ESSENTIALS OF HEBREW fall quarter, 6 hours. 

Gailey*, Dewitz 
An intense study of the essential elements of Hebrew grammar, syntax, and vocab- 
ulary preparatory to reading and studying exegetically the Hebrew Old Testament. 

THE HISTORICAL BOOKS OF THE OLD TESTAMENT 

Dewitz*, Gailey, McKee winter quarter, 6 hours. 

A study of the general character and content of Genesis through II Kings; an in- 
vestigation of the development of the books from oral tradition to written form; 
the exegesis of selected portions of the Hebrew text; and a consideration of the 
theological significance of certain aspects of Israel's life and thought. 

PAULINE LITERATURE AND THEOLOGY spring quarter, 3 hours. 

Ormond*, Cartledge, Cousar, Wallace 
An examination of the letters of Paul, with special consideration of the Epistle to 
the Romans. Attention is given to the exegesis of selected passages leading to an 
understanding of Pauline theology. 

Third Year 

JOHANNINE LITERATURE AND THE GENERAL EPISTLES 

fall quarter, 4 hours. 
A consideration of the literature attributed to John, together with the non-Pauline 
epistles. The Fourth Gospel and the Epistle to the Hebrews are selected for in- 
tensive study both in the English and Greek texts. 

PROPHETIC LITERATURE winter quarter, 4 hours. 

Emphasis on the content of the books of the prophets in their historical setting, 
on the development and character of the prophetic movement in Isreal, on exegesis 
of selected passages in the Hebrew text, on Old Testament prophetic literature as 
Christian Scripture. 

THE PSALMS AND WISDOM LITERATURE spring quarter, 2 hours. 
A study of the background, character and message of the poetic and wisdom 
literature. Intensive study of selected portions and the use of these materials in 
the worship and teaching of the Church today. 

*Lead Teacher 

43 



HISTORICAL-DOCTRINAL AREA 



First Year 

HISTORY OF THE LIFE AND THOUGHT OF THE CHURCH 

Guthrie*, Fuhrmann, Lyon, McKee, Thompson, Wallace 
A study of the life and thought of the Church against the background of the per- 
sonalities and events, the philosophy and art and literature, the political and social 
movements, and the development of the natural sciences in the history of Western 
civilization. Throughout an attempt is made through lectures and seminar discus- 
sions of primary sources to understand how the Church's experience in the past 
helps us faithfully and relevantly to relate the Christian Gospel to the whole of 
man's life in the world today. 

I. THE EARLY CHURCH fall quarter, 4 hours. 

The historical framework of the early Church — personalities, events and 
movements — as a background for a study of the encounter of the Hebraic- 
Christian and classical Graeco-Roman traditions in the development of the 
life and thought of the ancient Church. 

II. THE MEDIEVAL CHURCH AND THE REFORMATION 

winter quarter, 4 hours. 
The development of the Church in the Medieval and Reformation periods; 
of the forces and causes that led to the Reformation of the sixteenth century 
and of the doctrine that found expression in that movement. 

III. THE POST-REFORMATION CHURCH spring quarter, 4 hours. 

An overall view of post-Reformation Christianity including such develop- 
ments as Protestant orthodoxy, denominationalism and missions; Roman 
Catholic reaction, expansion and renewal; the response of the Church to 
sociological, philosophical, scientific and nationalistic developments. 

Second Year 

REFORMED THEOLOGY fall and winter quarters, 5 hours each quarter. 

Gear*, Guthrie, Wallace 
A study of Reformed Theology as contained in the writings of Calvin, classical 
confessional statements of Reformed doctrine, and contemporary Reformed theo- 
logians. 

CHRISTIAN ETHICS spring quarter, 4 hours. 
Guthrie*, and another to be announced 
An investigation of the biblical-theological foundation of the Christian ethic in 
conversation with alternative ethical approaches, and on this basis a study of the 
concrete ethical problems involved in sex and marriage and social, political, and 
economic structures. 

AMERICAN CHRISTIANITY spring quarter, 3 hours. 

To be announced 
A study of the various theological and cultural factors which influenced the de- 
velopment of the American Church, and which define the unique problems and 
opportunities of the American Church in the present. Special attention given to the 
history of the Presbyterian Church. 

Third Year 

THE MISSION OF THE CHURCH IN THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD 

The primary emphais of studies in Historical-Doctrinal area during the first two 
years has been on where the Church has been and where it is now in terms of its 
thought and life. Courses in the third year point more toward where the Church 
is to move, especially in terms of its mission to the world today and tomorrow. 

*Lead Teacher 

44 



I. MISSIONS AND ECUMENICS fall quarter, 4 hours. 

A study of the modern missionary movement; the encounter of the Christian 
faith and other religions; an understanding of the problems involved in re- 
lating the Christian Gospel to non-Western cultures; the problem and promise 
of the diversity and unity of the various Protestant denominations, and of 
Protestantism and Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy; the par- 
ticular task of the missions program of the Presbyterian Church, U.S. at 
home and abroad, and the development of a concern for this world-wide 
responsibility. 

II. CONTEMPORARY THEOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY 

winter quarter, 4 hours. 
A study of the various attempts to express the truth of the Christian faith 
and ways to communicate that truth in the language and thought-forms of 
our own time. Special attention is given to the more critical theological is- 
sues confronting the contemporary Church. 

HI. CHRISTIANITY AND SOCIETY spring quarter, 3 hours. 

A consideration of the society — cultural, political, economic — in which the 
Church is called to witness. In the light of his biblical and theological in- 
sights, the student is encouraged to grapple with the problems of modern 
American life as reflected in contemporary cultural expressions and in 
various sociological studies. 



PASTORAL AREA 

First Year 

INTERPRETING THE MINISTRY 

The Church and its ministry is explored in terms of its nature and function. The 
role of the ordained minister as person, pastor, preacher, teacher, and leader of 
the congregation's worship and work is studied in the light of his responsibility 
for enabling the Church to fulfill its ministry and mission in the world today. 
Professors in the Pastoral Area lecture according to their fields of specialized 
competence and all are involved in leading small seminar sections. The course as 
developed in the fall quarter serves as the basis for other aspects of the course 
which continues through the Second Year. 

I. INTERPRETING THE MINISTRY: THE MINISTER AND HIS PEOPLE 
TODAY fall quarter, 5 hours. 

McDill*, Hum, McCarter, Miller, Richards, Taylor, Thompson 
An investigation of the doctrine of the Church, its mission and its ministry, 
the nature of man and the development of personality from theological and 
psychological perspectives, the structures of contemporary society; and the 
dynamics and methods of communicating the Gospel in today's world. 

II. INTERPRETING THE MINISTRY: WORSHIP AND PREACHING 

Hum*, Miller, Taylor winter quarter, 5 hours. 

A study of the ministry of public worship, with concern for understanding 
the nature of worship and the specialized task of preaching. Emphasis is 
given to the use of Scripture in preaching and preparation for leading in 
public prayer and praise. 

HI. INTERPRETING THE MINISTRY: TEACHING spring quarter, 3 hours. 
McCarter*, McDill, Taylor 
A study of the origin and basis of the teaching ministry, a consideration of 
the elements and forms of this ministry, and experiments in the art of teach- 
ing. 

PRACTICUM IN PREACHING spring quarter, 1 hour. 

Huie*, Miller, Taylor 
The preparation and delivery of Sermons to small sections of students involving 
evaluation by students, a professor of preaching, and a professor from another 
field, with electronic equipment aiding in further self -evaluation. 

*Lead Teacher 

45 



Second Year 

IV. INTERPRETING THE MINISTRY: PASTORAL CARE 

McDill*, Nease fall or winter or spring quarter, 4 hours. 

A study of the nature of the ministry of pastoral care with particular at- 
tention to the pastor's role as a counselor and as a minister in crisis situa- 
tions. Lectures and seminars on the campus are integrated with work in one 
of the hospitals affiliated with the Georgia Association for Pastoral Care, 
Inc. Nationally accredited chaplains supervise the students' visitation and 
counseling of patients and lead in seminars for understanding a ministry in 
crisis situations. 

PRACTICUM IN PREACHING fall or winter or spring quarter, 1 hour. 

Huie*, Miller, Taylor, Wardlaw 
Opportunity for preaching before small groups of students with procedure of 
evaluation similar to one described in the first year. 

PRACTICUM IN SPEECH fall or winter or spring quarter, 1 hour. 

Taylor 
Guidance in public reading of Scripture and the delivery of sermons. 

Third Year 

THE WORK OF THE MINISTRY 

winter and spring quarters, 4 hours each quarter. 
The study of "Interpreting the Ministry" during the first two years leads naturally 
to a study of "The Work of the Ministry" in which the student will be engaged 
after graduation. A study of Presbyterian polity serves as the basis for dealing 
with the organization and administration of the local church, including worship, 
evangelism, missions, Christian education, pastoral care, stewardship, and other 
aspects of the church's work. Particular attention is given to the administration of 
the sacraments and to specialized ministries other than pastorate. 

PRACTICUM IN PREACHING fall or winter or spring quarter, 2 hours. 
Preaching before sections of the class with particular concern for understanding 
one's theology and psychology of preaching, developing balance and variety in 
sermons, and preparing to preach on such special occasions as evangelistic services, 
funerals, television, etc. 

PRACTICUM IN TEACHING fall or winter or spring quarter, 2 hours. 
Preparation of teaching plans and experiments in teaching various types of ma- 
terials so that the student himself may acquire both skill in the art of teaching 
and knowledge of teaching-learning theories. 

FIELD EDUCATION 

The Field Education Program requires the participation of students in the 
work of the church both during the three academic and the two summers of their 
seminary studies. The program for each of the three academic years is described 
below. The summer program involves one summer in a local pastorate as student 
assistant or supply pastor and the other summer preferably in some specialized 
ministry. Further information may be found in the general information section 
of this catalog or obtained from the Director of Field Education. 

First Year 

This experience in Field Education is designed to introduce each first year stu- 
dent to the local Church from an alert pastor's prospective. The class is divided 
into small groups under the supervision of professors in the Pastoral Area. Each 
group is assigned to one of the churches in the Atlanta area for the purpose of 
studying the worship and work of the congregation and understanding the role of 
the pastor in relation to the congregation and the community. 

Recreation and audio-visual workshops will also be provided during the year. 

46 



Second Year 

In the second year an attempt is made to understand the dynamics present in 
local community hfe where the congregation must function as the Church. Pro- 
fessors from the Biblical and Historical-Doctrinal Areas supervise this investigation 
by the second year students in the context of small groups. Visits are made to 
institutions and agencies in the community with the expectation of seeing the 
relevance of seminary studies to the individual and corporate life of people and 
the involvement that the Church is to have in the community. 

Third Year 

In the third year the focus is on the life of the Church-at-large. The program of 
the Presbyterian Church, U.S. is presented through visits to boards and agencies 
of our denomination and consultation with staff members. A study is also made 
of the resources of interdenominational relationships and organizations. 

In the Spring Quarter consideration is given to the place of presbytery exam- 
ination in our Church and preparation for it. 



47 



THE OLD CURRICULUM 

On the pages that fallow are the course descriptions for the old curricu- 
lum. This is the curriculum under which students graduating in 1967 and 
1968 will complete their work. It also indicates for graduate students the 
elective courses Which the faculty anticipates teaching during 1967-68. All 
courses for first and second year students have been deleted, as students 
beginning their studies at Columbia in 1966 and 1967 will follow the new 
curriculum described on the preceding pages. 



Group 1 



BIBLICAL FIELD 



The Church has always emphasized the importance of the original lang- 
uage of Holy Scripture in theological education. "The Old Testament in 
Hebrew, and the New Testament in Greek, being immediately inspired by 
God, the Church is finally to appeal unto them." Therefore, the ^rninary 
endeavors to fit the students for the ministry to use intelligently and ef- 
fectively the original languages in interpreting the Sacred Oracles. 

A. OLD TESTAMENT LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, AND 

EXEGESIS 

All candidates for the B.D. degree are required to take 18 hours in the 
Old Testament department of which 12 hours are in specified required 
courses, 101, 102, and 104. In addition 6 hours of Old Testament exegesis 
must be elected. 

Students who desire to study Biblical Archaeology may register for certain 
courses in this field offered at the Candler School of Theology at Emory 
University. 

Also, upon payment of necessary costs and completion of required work 
qualified students may participate in and receive up to nine hours elective 
credit for work done in the Near Eastern Archaeological Seminar (see 
page 23.) 

101 and 102. Elements of Hebrew. — 

The class begins the study of the language with orthography, followed in due 

course with etymology and syntax, and finally with translation from me Old 

Testament. The Hebrew Bible and a satisfactory Lexicon are required before 

the end of the course. 

Summer Language School. Gailey and Dewitz 

105. Introduction to Exegesis and Study of Deuteronomy. — 

A study of techniques and principles of exegesis as applied to the Book of 
Deuteronomy. The introductory questions relating to the Book and to the Pen- 
tateuch will be discussed. 
Elective, spring quarter ; three hours Gailey and Dewttz 

106. Exegesis of Prophetic and Poetic Writing. — 
Exegesis of selected passages from the Psalms and Prophets. 

Elective, spring quarter, three hours Gailey and Dewitz 

48 



107. Hebrew-Greek Rapid Reading. — 

This course consists of the translation of selected passages from the Old Testa- 
ment with their parallels in the Septuagint. It aims at increasing the student's 
ability to use the Biblical languages with greater facility. 
Elective, hours to be arranged Dewitz 

109. Biblical Aramaic. — 

The grammar of the Aramaic lanuguage will be presented and portions of the 
Old Testament in Aramaic will be read together with selections from other 
Aramaic literature. 
Elective, limited to qualified students, hours to be arranged 

Gailey and Dewitz 

110. Syriac. — 

A study of Syriac Grammar and the reading of suitable texts. 

Elective, spring quarter, two hours Gailey 

110A. Arabic.— 

This course is primarily intended for graduate students of Emory University and 
Columbia Seminary who are specializing in the field of Old Testament. Stress 
will be laid on Elementary Grammar and selected portions of the Qur'an will 
be read. 

Elective, hours to be arranged Dewitz 

HOB. Akkadian.— 

This course is primarily intended for graduate students of Emory University 
and Columbia Seminary who are specializing in the field of Old Testament. The 
course will consist of Elementary Grammar, introduction to Cuneiform writing 
and translation of selected texts from the Gilgamesh Epic and the Annals of 
Assyrian Kings. 

Elective, hours to be arranged Dewitz 

111. An Introduction to the Textual Criticism of the Old Testament. — 

Study of material necessary for the establishing of a critical text of the Old 
Testament, including the Massoretic text, the critical apparatus of the Kittel 
Bible, the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Septuagint and other versions. Projects will be 
undertaken to help students gain facility in textual study. 
Elective, limited to qualified students, fall quarter, even years Gailey 

112. History of Ancient Mesopotamia. — 

This course is primarily intended for graduate students of Emory University and 
Columbia Seminary who are specializing in the field of Old Testament. The 
cultural and political history of Mesopotamia will be reviewed from the be- 
ginning of the third Millenium to the end of the first Millenium B.C. with 
special reference to the Old Testament. 
Elective, hours to be arranged Dewitz 

114-120. Exegesis of Selections from the Old Testament. — 

Introduction and reading of selections from various books of the Old Testament 

will be scheduled from time to time as agreed upon. 

Elective, hours to be arranged Gailey and Dewitz 

124. The Ancient Greek Translations of the Old Testament. — 

An introduction to the Old Greek Translation commonly known as the 

Septuagint together with an introduction to the work of Origen and other 

Greek translations of the Old Testament, and a discussion of the canon of 

the Old Testament. Selected portions will be studied. 

Elective, limited to qualified students, hours to be arranged Gailey 

49 



B. NEW TESTAMENT LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, AND 

EXEGESIS 

The requirement in this department for Seniors in the B.D. program (old 
curriculum) is either N.T. 133, the Synoptic Gospels, or N.T. 134, the Gospel 
of John, or N.T. 135, Acts, four hours, spring quarter. 

126 - 127. Beginners* Greek. — 

An intensive study of the basic grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of Koine Greek 
in preparation for reading and exegeting the Greek New Testament. 

Summer Language School, non-credit Cartledge and Cousar 

128. Advanced Greek Reading. — 

This course involves the reading of a variety of New Testament passages and 
is designed to aid the student in building a substantial vocabulary and increas- 
ing his facility in the Greek language. 

Elective, spring quarter, two hours Cousar 

129. Advanced Greek Grammar. — 

A study of the grammar of New Testament Greek, to aid students in gram- 
matical interpretation of the Greek New Testament 

Elective, fall quarter, two hours 



130. Romans. — 

Elective, fall quarter, four hours 

132. Revelation. — 
Elective, fall quarter, four hours 

133. The Synoptic Gospels. — 

Required, Senior year, spring quarter, four hours 

134. The Gospel of John.— 

Required, Senior year, spring quarter, four hours 

135. Acts.— 

Required, Senior year, spring quarter, four hours 

136. First Corinthians. — 
Elective, fall quarter, two hours 

137. Galatians. — 

Elective, spring quarter, odd years, two hours 

138. Ephesians. — 

Elective, winter quarter, even years, two hours 

139. The Pastoral Epistles.— 

Elective, winter quarter, odd years, two hours 

140. First Peter. — 

Elective, winter quarter, three hours 



Cartledge 

Cousar 

Cartledge 

Cartledge 

Cousar 

Hughes 

Cartledge 

Cartledge 

Cousar 

Cartledge 

Hughes 



141. Second Corinthians. — 
Elective, fall quarter, four hours 



Hughes 



50 



142. James. — 

Elective, fall quarter, two hours Hughes 

143. Advanced Textual Criticism. — 

Some practice in handling manuscripts, collating and evaluating their texts, 
and a study of some of the more detailed theories in the field. 

Elective, spring quarter, two hours Cartledge 

144. Philippians. — 

Elective, spring quarter, two hours Hughes 

145. The Johannine Epistles. — 

Elective, spring quarter, even years, two hours Cartledge 

146. Modern Literature. — 

Qualified students are allowed to take this reading course to familiarize them- 
selves with some of the books and technical journals in the New Testament and 
general Biblical feld written in recent years. Instead of meeting class, the stu- 
dent will hand in written critiques of each book. The course may be taken 
any quarter for any unit of credit up to a maximum of five hours. 

Elective, any quarter Cousar 

147. Rapid Reading of the Greek New Testament. — 

Qualifed students may read the complete Greek New Testament for a credit 
of five hours. Such rapid reading is of great value in building a vocabulary 
and becoming familiar with the atmosphere and idioms of New Testament 
Greek. 

Elective, any quarter Cartledge 

148. New Testament Research. — 

Qualified students will be allowed to work on various problems in the New 
Testament field under the supervision of the professor, submitting their find- 
ings in the form of term papers. Credit given will depend upon the amount 
of work done, up to a maximum of five hours. 

Elective, any quarter Cartledge, Cousar and Hughes 

149. Colossians. — 

Elective, winter quarter, three hours Hughes 

C. BIBLICAL EXPOSITION AND THEOLOGY 

153. The Church Epistles of Paul. — 

A study of the Pauline epistles, Romans through II Thessalonians to integrate 
the interpretation of the Christian life under the New Covenant in the power 
of the Holy Spirit. 
Required, Senior year, winter quarter, four hours Ormond 

1 54. The Major Prophets. — 

Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Daniel will be studied to note the functions of 
the prophet in the life of God's people, and the content of their message as a 
revelation of the will of God. 
Elective, schedule to be arranged 

51 



155. The Minor Prophets. — 

The last twelve books in the Old Testament canon will be studied by expository 
method, noting especially the message of the prophets as a revelation of the 
will of God. 

Elective, schedule to be arranged 

157L. The Gospel by Luke. — 

A study of the English text of the Gospel by Luke with emphasis on the structure, 

content and message of the book. 

Elective, fall quarter, three hours Ormond 

157M. The Gospel by Matthew. — 

An intensive study of the first gospel with major attention to method of study 
and teaching. The aim is to master the structure and content of the book. 

Elective, schedule to be arranged, three hours McKee 

159. Jeremiah. — 

A study in the life and times of one of the great prophets of Israel with an 

evaluation of his message for the world of today. 

Elective, two hours, schedule to be arranged Richards 

165. The Inter-Testament Period. — 

Why did Christ come when He did? How was it "the fulness of time?" How did 

Assyria and Babylonia, Egypt and Persia, Greece and Rome contribute to His 

coming and the spread of the Gospel? What was going on in those centuries 

between the Old and New Testaments? This course is important background 

for understanding both Testaments. 

Elective, schedule to be arranged, three hours McKee 

B411. Historical Geography. — 

Why did the Lord choose Canaan for Abraham? How did climate, mountains, 
rivers, and other features of geography play a part in God's revelation and in 
making men of faith? To understand "The Book" its reader should travel the 
highways and byways of Palestine, roam the streets of Jerusalem, look down 
into Jacob's well and sail on the blue Galilee. The camera will take us there. 
Elective, first year, winter quarter, three hours McKee 

168. Method in Bible Study.— 

If the Bible is the Word of God and the Holy Spirit its interpreter, how can 
we approach it so that we ourselves or anyone else does not hinder the Word 
in speaking to us? This course seeks to develop creative skill in independent, 
first-hand study of the Scriptures. Selected books and passages are used. Of 
special value to ministers, teachers, and missionaries. One of the following 
ordinarily prerequisite — 151, 152, 157M. 
Elective, schedule to be arranged, three hours McKee 

408. Teaching the Bible. — 

If the Bible is to fulfill its purpose in the Church it is not enough that it be 
preached, it must be taught. If the minister is to fulfill his function in the 
Church it is not enough that he preach, he must teach. Above all, he must be 
skilled in teaching the Bible. This is just as true for Directors of Christian Edu- 
cation and for missionaries. This is a course in practice teaching in which 
members of the class will teach selected books or passages from the Bible 
followed by an evaluation by the class and the professor. 
Elective, schedule to be arranged, two hours; one or more of courses 151, 
152 or 157M prerequisite McKee 

52 



174. Exposition of Hebrews. — 

An intensive study of the epistle to the Hebrews noting especially the exhorta- 
tion toward the function of faith in the realization of the New Covenant 

Elective, two hours 

175. The Hebrew Patriarchs. — 

A discussion of the theological and practical interpretation of stories of the 
Patriarchs in the Book of Genesis. 

Elective, fall quarter, two hours Wallace 

176. The Book of Daniel. — 

A discussion of the theological and practical interpretation of the Book of 
Daniel. 

Elective, winter quarter, two hours Wallace 

177. The Role of the Hereafter in Ancient Israel. — 

A systematic study of Jewish concept regarding the hereafter in the first Mil- 
lennium B.C. Early popular practices are investigated in the light of Biblical 
and archaeological evidence. The impact of Yahwism is studied in its negative 
and positive reaction to the estate of the dead. Finally, relevant texts from 
writings of the intertestamental period, including materials from Qumran, are 
examined. 

Elective, hours to be arranged Dewttz 

178. Old Testament Theology. — 

This course will follow mainly W. Eichrodt's "Theology of the Old Testa- 
ment." The unity of theological concepts in the Old Testament will be dis- 
cussed in their relationship to the world outside Israel, in the light of interpre- 
tations within Israel, and as inseparable part of New Testament fulfilment. 

Elective, two hours, hours to be arranged Dewttz 

179. The Foundation of Biblical Ethics.— 

A study of the Biblical themes and doctrines basic to the commands of God 
in both Old and New Testament. 

Elective, winter quarter, three hours Wallace 

181. New Testament Theology. — 

This course seeks to survey various theological problems and themes as they 
are raised by the New Testament writers. Primary attention will be given to 
the treatment of individual passages of Scripture and to a consideration of how 
those passages have been interpreted and related to the whole Biblical context 
in the life of the Church. 

Elective, hours to be arranged Cousar 

182. Biblical Interpretation. — 

The problems involved in Biblical interpretation. The approach to the various 
literary forms found in the Bible, with selected examples. An outline of the 
history of interpretation. 

Elective, spring quarter, three hours Wallace 

53 



183. Mediation. — 

A Biblical study of the role of the mediator in the relations between God and 
man, in the establishing and renewing of the Covenant, especially of the of- 
fices of prophet, priest and king, and of the mediatoral work and significance 
of Jesus Christ. 

Elective, winter quarter, three hours Wallace 

184. Pauline Theology. — 

A course on the Theology of the Apostle Paul. 

Elective, fall quarter, three hours Wallace 

190-193. Near Eastern Archaeological Seminar. — 
For a description of these courses see page 23. 
Elective, summer, up to nine hours 



Group 2 

HISTORICAL FIELD 

CHURCH HISTORY AND HISTORICAL THEOLOGY 

The Church is the people of God gathered around the Messiah. She 
is the listening, worshipping and witnessing community living under the 
Reign of Grace and looking for the Reign of Glory. As she was founded, 
so has she been carried onward by the Mighty acts of God in Christ Jesus. 
Across the ages she is advancing with the Bible as her guide and her am- 
munition. 

The Church appears in various forms under different cultures among 
sundry peoples and in changing epochs. The history of the Church treats of 
her missionary work, her doctrine and her worship, her organization and 
her vindication. In addition to the account of these several phases in the 
general course, institutions receive special attention in the course on Pres- 
byterian history and polity, defense against opposing views in Apologetics, 
and Christian missions in courses in that department. 

Where possible, the courses are listed under the three periods of Church 
History. Other courses appear under historical surveys of particular themes. 

EARLY CHURCH 

213. The Apostolic Fathers. — 

A study of the life, the thought, and the polity of the Church in this early 

formative period, based upon the writings of the Apostolic Fathers. Particular 

attention is given to the crucial issue as to whether the Church, in developing 

into the Church of Catholic tradition, remained true to the religion of the New 

Testament. Textbooks: text of the Apostolic Fathers, preferably Lightfoot's 

1-volume Apostolic Fathers'. Torrance on Grace in the Apostolic Fathers, Vokes 

on Didache, Meecham on Diognetus; Lawson, Introduction to the Apostolic 

Fathers. 

Elective, two hours Fuhrmann or Robinson 

54 



214. The Ecumenical Councils. — 

Each student makes a special study of a council; final conclusions by the class 

and the professors. Hefele and the Sources will be used. 

Elective, two hours Robinson or Fuhrmann 



MEDIEVAL CHURCH 

221. History of Christian Doctrine in the Medieval Church. — 

The further development of church doctrine in the Middle Ages leading to 
scholasticism as well as mystical presentations. Seeberg, History of Doctrines, U. 

Elective, two hours Robinson or Fuhrmann 

222. The Roman Catholic Church. — 

The purpose of the course is to show how the religion and the institutions of 
the Romans passed into the Roman Church and were therein preserved to 
this day. 
Elective, two hours Fuhrmann 

225. The Thought of Augustine. — 

This course will deal with the main works of St Augustine, his essential posi- 
tion in Philosophy and Theology and his influence in the history of the Christ- 
ian Church. 
Elective, two hours Fuhrmann 

227. English Church History. — 

Elective, two hours Babbage or Robinson 

MODERN CHURCH HISTORY 

231. History of Christian Thought in the Reformation and 
Modern Church. — 

Textbook: A History of Christian Thought, Vol. n, by Neve: Barth, Protestant 
Thought: from Rousseau to Ritschl. 

Elective, two hours Robinson 

232. Readings in the History of the Reformation. — 
Textbook: History of the Reformation, Merle D'Aubigne. 

Elective, two hours Robinson or Fuhrmann 

233. Seminar in Calvin. — 

Elective, two hours Fuhrmann, McKee or Robinson 

233A. The Thought of Luther.— 

The course will give particular attention to the early works of Luther. 

Elective, two hours Fuhrmann 

234. Seminar in Far el, Bucer and Calvin. — 

Elective, seminar, spring quarter, two hours Fuhrmann 

55 



235. Puritanism. — 

An inquiry into the insights and emphasis of historic Puritanism. 

Elective, two hours Babbage 

23 5 A. History of English Theology Since the Reformation. — 

Elective, two hours Babbage 



236. Theology of Vatican II. — 

A detailed study of the official documents which issued from the Second Vatican 
Council, with an evaluation of their significance as a contribution to contemporary 
ecumenical theology. 

Elective, winter quarter, two hours Hughes 



238. History of Religion in America. — 

With the help of such studies in American Civilization as those by Wertenbaker, 
in New England by Perry Miller, and in the Churches by W. W. Sweet, an elec- 
tive is offered in the life and thought of the American Churches. Text: C. E. 
Olmsted, History of Religion in the United States. 

Elective, three hours Robinson 



239. Southern Presbyterian Worthies and Their Works. — 

Following the lines marked out in Dr. J. M. Wells' Sprunt Lectures, this course 
provides for the study of the life and writings of selected leaders of our Church 
such as Dabney, Girardeau, Thornwell, Palmer, Baker, Woodrow, Peck, S. 
Robinson, W. W. Moore, R. C. Reed. 

Seminar, hours to be arranged Robinson 

PARTICULAR THEMES 

240. Presbyterianism. — 

The nature and ecumenicity of the primitive Church are treated in lectures on 
Understanding the Church. The Presbyterianism of the Reformation and Modern 
History is dealt with by the use of McNeill's The History and Character of 
Calvinism. The Presbyterianism of our Church is studied in our Book of Church 
Order. Term papers are presented on one of the means of grace. 

Required, Senior year, fall quarter, four hours Robinson and Fuhrmann 

241. Presbyterian Polity. — 

A further study in the Book of Church Order and proposed revisions in greater 
detail. 

Elective, two hours Robinson 

242. Philosophy of History. — 

A study of the concepts of history held at different epochs of mankind — follow- 
ing the lines of classic scholarship. 

Elective, two hours Fuhrmann 

56 



243. Church and State — 

An investigation of the relationships between Church and State in early Chris- 
tianity, the Middle Ages and Early Protestantism. 

Elective, two hours Fuhrmann 

244. History of the Doctrine of the Atonement. — 

A course in which each student reports the doctrine of the atonement taught 
by a representative of each of the four Great Christian syntheses, the Greek, 
the Latin, the Protestant, and the Modernist. 

Seminar Robinson 

245. History of the Doctrine of the Holy Spirit. — 

The subject is traced through the Bible and the history of the Christian Church. 
Elective, three hours Robinson 

246. History of the Doctrine of Justification. — 

The history of the cardinal article of Protestantism is studied with the help of 
Schrenk in TWNT, the Reformers, E. Boehl, J. Buchanan, G. C. Berkouwer, and 
others in class recitation and seminar reports. 

Elective, three hours Robinson 

247. Christological Eschatology. — 

As Christ is our ground of forgiveness so He is our hope of glory. In Him, in 
His coming to earth and His reign at God's right hand, all our hopes gather. 
Using the professor's Sprunt Lectures as a guide, the class follows the Christolog- 
ical approach in studying eschatology. 

Elective, two or three hours Robinson 

248. Historical and Theological Studies by Warfield. — 

The writings of the great Princetonian are used for seminar studies and these 
on such subjects as: Augustine, Calvin, the Meaning of the Reformation, the 
Westminister Confession, Revelation, the History of the Doctrine of the Trinity, 
Christology, Perfectionism. 

Elective, two hours Robinson 

249. The Enlightenment. — 

This course will pay particular attention to the Reformed scholars and theolog- 
ians who wanted their people to be enlightened and up-to-date, men such as 
Zwingli (founder of the Reformed Church), Calvin (organizer of the Reformed 
Church and one of the fathers of the Enlightenment), John Le Clerk (1657-1736 
who edited the Universal Library) and to the spread of education (Latin human- 
itas) in the eighteenth century. 

Textbooks: K. R. Hagenbach, A. Vinet, and K. Barth on the Church in the 
18th Century. 

Elective, two hours Fuhrmann 



57 



Group 3 

DOCTRINAL FIELD 

A. DOGMATIC THEOLOGY 

HD421. Devotional Classics. — 

A consideration of certain Christian classics exhibiting an expression of spiritual 
awareness and depth, characterizing religion of the spirit. The approach of the 
soul towards the Divine, with its definite, conscious experience of the Divine 
presence, distinguishes this literature. 

Elective, first year, winter quarter, three hours Fuhrmann 

HD451. History of Philosophy. — 

The various theological formulations of the Church through the centuries have 
been couched in the terminology of the philosophers; often a conscious synthesis 
with philosophical systems has been created. Theological students, then, must know 
philosophical thought, its history and systems. This course is designed especially 
for first year students who have not made this study previously. 

Elective, winter quarter, three hours Fuhrmann 

305. Development of Contemporary Theological Thought. — 

The theology of the great contemporary theologians is studied in light of the 
history of 19th century theology beginning with Schleiermacher. All students will 
read selected primary sources from both the 19th and 20th centuries, and each 
student will work on an individual project specializing in some aspect of one 
of the leading thinkers of this period. 

Required, senior year, fall quarter, three hours Guthrie 

306. The Christian Ethic. — 

An investigation of the Biblical-theological presuppositions of the Christian ethic 
and a study of the Christian answer to the problem of knowing and obeying 
the command of God. Attention is given also to the contrast between Christian 
and various alternative ethical approaches. After three hours of lectures each 
week on the theology of the Christian ethic, the fourth hour is given to small 
group discussions of readings on concrete ethical problems. 

Required, senior year, spring quarter, four hours Guthrie 

308A. The Lord's Supper. — 

A study of the relevant Biblical texts, of the aspects of Biblical and Dogmatic 
theology involved in the interpretation of the texts, of the history and modern 
discussion of the doctrine and practice. 

Elective, fall quarter, three hours Wallace 

308B. Baptism. — 

A study of the relevant Biblical texts, of the aspects of Biblical and Dogmatic 
theology involved in the interpretation of the texts, of the history and modern 
discussion of the doctrine and practice. 

Elective, spring quarter, three hours Wallace 

310. Theological Sources of Calvin. — 

Students will be introduced to the Dynamism of Luther and to the original ma- 
terials which Calvin used in building his Institutes-such as elements from the 

58 



Roman Law, from the Church Fathers, from Peter Lombard and others. The 
course will consider also the theology of Zwingli with special attention paid to 
his ontology, Farel's resurrection of Israel's Prophetism, the nature of Pre- 
calvinian French Protestant Theology. The earlier statements of Calvin will 
be explained in the light of their circumstances and understood in terms of 
his purpose. 

Elective, two hours Fuhrmann 

311. The Theology of Jesus' Parables. — 

An analysis of each parable of Jesus on the basis of Calvin's Expositions, ap- 
plication to the present situation and final sum of Thought of the Parables 
as a whole. 

Elective, two hours Fuhrmann 

312. The Theology of the Great Creeds. — 

The vital statements of the Apostolic, Nicene, Quicunque, Augsburg and La 
Rochelle Creeds will be studied with special reference to the struggles of the 
Church. 

Elective, two hours Fuhrmann 

3 1 6A-C. Theology of Paul Tillich.— 

The study of the theology of Paul Tillich in the light of classical Christian theology 
and contemporary theological thought. These courses are recommended only for 
students who are acquainted with modern theology. 

316A. This course will be the study of Volume I of Tillich's Systematic 
Theology. In addition to using this volume, other works of Tillich will 
be assigned for reading. 
Elective, fall quarter, two hours Gear 

316B. This course is a continuation of the study of Tillich's system in 
Volume II of Systematic Thelogy. 
Elective, winter quarter, two hours Gear 

316C. This course consists of the study of Volume III of Systematic 
Theology. 
Elective, spring quarter, two hours Gear 

317. The Theology of Karl Barth.— 

A seminar which studies intensively a section of the Church Dogmatics. Enroll- 
ment is limited to 15. 
Elective, two hours Guthrie 

325. The Theology of Reinhold Niebuhr. — 

This if, a seminar to investigate the contribution of Reinhold Niebuhr to the 
life of the American Church. Special attention is given to Niebuhr's concern for 
realistic and responsible Christian action in dealing with political and social 
problems. Students read selected sections of Niebuhr's works and write papers 
to prepare them for participation in the seminar discussions. Enrollment limited 
to 15. 
Elective, two hours Guthrie 

326. The Theology of Dietrich Bonhoeffer.— 

This is a seminar to investigate the contribution of Bonhoeffer to contemporary 
theology, especially in the light of his concern for a "nonreligious" or "worldly" 
interpretation of the Christian faith and life. Students are assigned readings 
and papers to prepare them for participation in the seminar discussions. Enroll- 
ment limited to 15. 

Elective, two hours Guthrie 

59 



327. The Theology of Rudolf Bultmann. — 

This course takes the form of a seminar to investigate the contribution of Bult- 
mann in the areas of Biblical studies and theology. Certain problems and em- 
phases will be studied through assigned readings in Bultmann and his critics 
and through the presentation of papers by members of the class. Due to the 
nature of the course, the enrollment will be limited. 
Elective, winter quarter, two hours McCarter and Cousar 

328. lnterseminary Seminar. — 

This is a seminar offered conjointly by Columbia Seminary, the Candler School 
of Theology, and the Interdenominational Theological Center of Atlanta Uni- 
versity, to provide students with the opportunity for theological study and dis- 
cussion across denominational and racial lines. Five students from each seminary 
are admitted to the seminar each year, with preference given to middlers. The 
group works through a study book in doctrinal theology or ethics, and each 
student is responsible for preparing at least one paper to be read to the seminar. 
Elective, spring quarter, two hours 

Guthrie (Columbia), T. H. Runyon (Candler), M. Watson (ITC) 



Group 4 

PASTORAL FIELD 

A. THE TEACHING MINISTRY 

The Church, according to Scripture, is a school. The responsibility for 
the teaching ministry of the Church belongs to the whole congregation; 
nevertheless, the minister as the teaching elder has a position of leadership 
in this task. He is charged by the Book of Church Order "to catechise the 
children and youth and to oversee the educational program of the church.** 

To help equip the seminary graduate for this aspect of his ministry, two 
basic courses are required of all students. The first, No. 400, seeks to intro- 
duce the student to the nature of the teaching iriinistry while the second, 
No. 401, deals with the practical aspects of the ministry in the local church. 

Elective courses are offered to assist interested students in pursuing a 
deeper understanding of the teaching ministry. 

401. The Organization and Administration of Christian Education. — 

This course is designed to prepare ministers for their role in dealing practically 
and effectively with the organization and administration of the total program 
of Christian education. While the major emphasis will rest upon the curriculum 
of the Presbyterian Church, U. S., other resources will be used in the study 
of such problems as the relation of Church and home, the criteria for evaluating 
curricula, and the teaching-learning process. 
Required, Senior year, spring quarter, two hours Riviere 

403. Theology and the Teaching Ministry. — 

This seminar seeks to explore the relation of theology to Christian education by 
focusing on some particular doctrine and studying its relation to the content, 
methods and purposes of Christian education. Reading and research include the 
works of theologians and educators. Prerequisite: Course No. 400. 

Elective, three hours Riviere 

60 



404. The Bible and the Teaching Ministry. — 

This seminar investigates the relation between revelation and education, differ- 
ing views of revelation and their influence on Christian education's theory and 
practice, the place of the Bible in a curriculum, the use of non-Biblical materials 
in teaching the Bible, the use of the Bible with all age groups. Prerequisite: 
Course No. 400. 
Elective, two hours Riviere 

405. Teaching and Learning the Christian Faith. — 

This course deals with the human processes of teaching and learning as they 
relate to the Christian faith. The attempt is made to understand the teaching- 
learning process from a theological point of view; this in turn is related to 
psychological insights and to methods. The course involves the students in 
practice teaching. Enrollment limited. 

Elective, three hours Riviere 

406. The Growth of Persons. — 

In light of the fact that the church seeks to teach all men — children, youth, and 
adults — a study is made of the psychological development of the personality as 
it relates to the Christian doctrine and man and to the practical problems of 
teaching various age groups. 
Elective, three hours Riviere 

408. Teaching the Bible — 

If the Bible is to fulfill its purpose in the Church it is not enough that it be 
preached, it must be taught. If the minister is to fulfill his function in the 
Church it is not enough mat he preach, he must teach. Above all, he must be 
skilled in teaching the Bible. This is just as true for Directors of Christian Edu- 
cation and for missionaries. This is a course in practice teaching in which 
members of the class will teach selected books or passages from the Bible 
followed by an evaluation by the class and the professor. 
Elective, schedule to be arranged, two hours; one or more of courses 151, 
152 or 157M prerequisite McKee 

410. Developing Leadership in the Local Church. — 

Recognizing that competent and dedicated lay leaders are an essential element in 
the work of the church, this seminar concentrates on the functional nature of 
leadership roles, equips the student to analyze the leadership needs of a local 
church, and considers various methods of enlisting and training individuals. 
Elective, winter quarter, two hours Riviere 

415. Research in Christian Education. — 

This course is designed for advanced students who wish to do individual or 

group research in some area of Christian education, the philosophy of education, 

the relation of psychology to Christian education or the sociological aspects of 

Christian education. 

Elective, schedule and hours to be arranged Riviere. 

B. PASTORAL CARE 

427. Church Administration. — 

As the student approaches the acceptance of a call to the regular pastorate, it 
is important that he be as fully acquainted as possible with the complex tasks 
which will confront him in his work. This course is designed to provide him 
with guidance in his personal life, his responsibilities with his congregation and 
community, and his relationship to the program of his denomination. Much at- 
tention is given to the practical duties and administrative work of the pastor 
in the regular program of the church. 
Required, Senior year, winter quarter, two hours McDill and Miller 

61 



429. The Literature of Pastoral Theology. — 

This course is designed especially for graduate students but may be given to 
qualified members of the Senior class. There will be no regular class work but 
a large amount of reading will be assigned. Students will be expected to prepare 
written reviews of the books read and to write an appropriate term paper. The 
course may be taken in any quarter and for any unit of credit up to a maxi- 
mum of five hours. 

Elective, hours to be arranged McDill 

432. Pastoral and Theological Perspectives on Alcohol Addiction. — 

This course is offered at the Georgian Clinic, a facility of the Alcoholic Rehabili- 
tation Service, Georgia Department of Public Health, and an affiliate of the 
Georgia Association for Pastoral Care. Involved is a study of research in the 
problems of addiction, observations of therapeutic processes, seminar discussions 
of the theological implications of this work and pastoral procedures in the care 
of problem drinkers. 

Elective, each quarter, hours to be arranged Dominick 

433. Contemporary Schools of Psychoanalytical Thought: 
Implications for Pastoral Care. — 

Several of the contemporary schools of psychoanalytical thought will be surveyed 
with emphasis on understanding of basic theory, of human behavior, the nature 
of man, and human relationships. Areas concerning what is curative and des- 
tructive in interpersonal relationships will be compared. Various schools will be 
studied for the purpose of evaluating implications for Pastoral Care. 

Elective, fall quarter, even years, two hours Gerkin 

434. Theological Research in the Care of Mentally III Persons. — 

This course has as its main objective the coordination of theological concerns and 

the behavioral sciences. In addition, skills will be developed for pastoral care of 

the mentally ill persons in a local parish. Course work will be in the Georgia 

Mental Health Institute. 

Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the B.D. program and permission 

of one of the professors of pastoral care. 

Elective, winter quarter, three hours Bruen 

437. Pastoral Care of Delinquent Children and Adolescents. — 

Current literature on the development of children and adolescents will be ex- 
amined with the intent of gaining an understanding of the social and individual 
factors contributing to personality maladjustment. Special attention will be given 
to the theological question of sickness or sin involved in case studies. The de- 
sign of this instruction is to aid the pastor in the prevention of delinquent prob- 
lems and to equip him to work more effectively in his pastoral ministry when 
such problems exist. 

Elective, fall quarter, odd years, two hours Gerkin 

438. Critical Incidents in Pastoral Care. — 

This course will consist of a combination of lectures and case studies dealing 
with common critical incidents in pastoral care. An outline to the pastoral ap- 
proach to crisis ministry together with detailed discussion of such problems as 
bereavement, ministry to the dying, and unmarried mother, suicide, acute mar- 
riage problems, and recognizing serious mental illness will be included. Require- 
ments will include reading, term paper and case studies. 

Elective, winter quarter, three hours Gerkin 

62 



439. Pastoral Care and Moral Behavior. — 

The basic principle of this course involves the spiritual growth of the individual 
Christian. The pastoral counselor is constantly confronted with the question of 
the direction his people shall take in countless matters of a moral nature. In 
order that the student may develop methods of moral guidance based on Chris- 
tian teachings, this course is offered. 

Elective, spring quarter, even years McDill 



440. Psychology and Theology. — 

Modern psychology has dealt with many of the concepts relating to personality 
that are an integral part of Christian theology. This course is for the purpose 
of making a critical study of psychological theory and practice from the stand- 
point of Calvinistic theology. 

Elective, spring quarter, three hours, even years McDill and Gear 



441. Research in Pastoral Care. — 

This study will involve a large amount of reading in the field of pastoral 
care. Designed for graduate students in this field, research projects will be de- 
vised to meet individual needs. 

Elective, fall quarter, odd years, three hours McDill 



442. Research in Pastoral Counseling. — 

The student will be expected to examine the literature in the field of pastoral 
counseling and will spend some time on problems of research in case studies. 
This course is arranged for graduate students in this department. 

Seminar, winter quarter, three hours, even years McDill 



443. Research in Pastoral Psychology. — 

This is a course of directed study in the sciences of man with special emphasis 
on psychological theories of personality. The work will be patterned to meet 
the needs of graduate students pursuing major studies in this field. 

Seminar, spring quarter, three hours, even years McDill 

444. Seminar in Pastoral Counseling Methods. — 

This is a clinical seminar in pastoral counseling methods using interview material 
presented by students. Those enrolled should be functioning in some pastoral 
capacity in order that verbatim reports of pastoral conversations may be pre- 
sented for group discussion. Correlary reading is required. Preference will be 
given to graduate students and enrollment limited to ten persons. Basic courses 
430 and 431 or equivalents are prerequisites. 

Seminar, Spring quarter, two hours Gerkin 

445. Group Counseling with Alcoholics. — 

In cooperation with the Georgian Clinic, a state hospital for alcoholic rehabilita- 
tion, specialized instruction is given in the field of group processes and dy- 
namics. The course involves intensive study in the field of alcoholism and 
group counseling plus observation of group psychotherapy. Only graduate stu- 
dents majoring in the field of pastoral counseling may take this seminar. 

Seminar, each quarter, two hours McDill 

63 



446. Seminar in Hospital Pastoral Care. — 

In cooperation with the affiliated institutions of the Georgia Association for 
Pastoral Care, Inc., a program for training students as pastors in crisis situations 
has been established. This program includes seminars under the supervision of 
nationally accredited chaplains, parallel reading, supervised visitation, counseling 
of patients and appropriate academic papers. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of junior year requirements. 

Required, any quarter, two hours 

447. Clinical Pastoral Training. — 

Columbia Theological Seminary is an active member of the Council for Clinical 
Training, Inc. A student may participate in the program of clinical training in any 
of the accredited institutions which include mental hospitals, general hospitals, 
and a few inner city programs in urban parishes. This program will require the 
full time of the student for one quarter. 

The fees for one quarter of clinical training are $5.00 for registration and 
$95.00 for training, or a total of $100.00. After the first quarter of clinical train- 
ing, students electing other non-consecutive quarters will have a fee of $75.00, and 
for consecutive quarters for advanced training (e.g., internships and residencies), 
$50.00 per quarter. 

For the academically oriented Th.M. degree, one quarter of clinical training is 
required. For the clinically oriented Th.M. degree, an intern year is required. 

Although a student may elect to take more than one quarter of clinical train- 
ing, a maximum of eight hours of academic credit is allowed for elective courses 
in institutional seminars or clinical training for the B.D. degree. Clinical training 
academic credit is not allowed for the Th.M. degree. 

Prerequisites: consent of the professor of pastoral care and of a representative 
of the Council for Clinical Training. 

Elective, any quarter, maximum of eight hours academic credit. 

448. Clinical Introduction to Pastoral Care. — 

Significant research indicates that human nature and personality are best com- 
prehended by study and observation of persons with functional mental illness. 
For this reason, pastoral care procedures are enhanced by supervised experience 
in the care of the mentally ill. To provide more opportunities for students to 
have such training, this elective is provided on six Mondays of each quarter at 
the State Hospital at Milledgeville, Georgia. Requirements include verbatim 
reports of patient contacts, an evaluation of pastoral work in the institution at 
the beginning of the fourth and sixth weeks, and a paper on the theological im- 
plications of some aspect of the hospital and/or mental illnesses. 

This course may be taken in lieu of the required hospital orientation course 
No. 446. 

Prerequisites: Completion of one full year of seminary education, approval 
of a member of the staff of the Georgia Association for Pastoral Care, and the 
professor of pastoral counseling. 

Elective, each quarter, Wo hours 

449. Graduate Counseling Practicum. — 

Th.M. students majoring in Pastoral Counseling are required to schedule a 
total of 300 hours in the Counseling Center of the Seminary at the Central 
Presbyterian Church in Atlanta for graduation. This work is supervised in a 
practicum under the oversight of the Professional Advisory Board of the Geor- 
gia Association for Pastoral Care, Inc. 

Hours to be arranged. No academic credit. Caldwell 

64 



C. HOMILETICS 

452. Advanced Homiletics. — 

This course is conducted in seminar sections and is designed to assist the stu- 
dent in working out a theology of preaching which will serve as the basis for 
considering such matters as the relation of preaching to the various theological 
disciplines, the treatment of various types of Biblical materials, the develop- 
ment of his own style of preaching, planning the preaching schedule, problems 
of communication, and methods of continual self-evaluation. 

Required, Senior year fall quarter, two hours Huie, Miller and Wardlaw 

Senior Preaching. — 

Each member of the Senior Class conducts at least one service for the seminary 
community at a morning or evening service in the chapel. The evaluation ses- 
sion is conducted by a committee of students and faculty members representing 
different departments. Though no credit hours are given, this requirement must 
be fully satisfied for graduation. 
Required, Senior year, no credit 

455. Sermon Workshop. — 

This course is designed to assist the student in planning his preaching, choosing 

texts, structuring, writing, illustrating sermons. The plan is to deal with all 

areas of the sermon from exegesis to delivery. Special attention will be given 

to areas of particular interest or need for the individual participants in the 

seminar. 

Elective, two class hours, three hours credit Huie or Wardlaw 

456. The Preaching of the Reformers. — 

The preaching of the sixteenth century is examined within its historical context, and 
from the point of view of its relevance, form, content, style and doctrinal basis. 
Elective, two class hours, three hours credit Wallace 

457. Preaching and the World. — 

The primary purpose of this seminar course is to help the student to relate his 
preaching to persons in a relevant and intelligible way. Attention will be given 
to the problem of biblical preaching which seeks to utilize psychology, theology, 
literature, history, experience in its proclamation. The course is designed to af- 
ford an opportunity for experience in making homiletical use of varied reading 
material in understanding ourselves and our culture and in communicating the 
message of the biblical witness to the contemporary world. The depth of in- 
vestigation will vary from T. S. Eliot's works to The Atlanta Constitution. 

Elective, two class hours, three hours credit Beverly 

462. Research in Homiletics. — 

This course is designed for advanced students who are interested in further in- 
vestigation of the literature in the field. Projects will be devised to meet indivi- 
dual needs. 

Elective, schedule to be arranged Huie and Wardlaw 



D. RADIO AND TELEVISION 

465. Introduction to Christian Communication. — 

The principles of communication and the use of mass media in the parish ministry. 
An interseminary course, offered by the Department of Education at the Protestant 
Radio and Television Center. Admission by consent of the instructor only. 

Elective, two hours Abernathy 

65 



466. Introduction to Radio and Television. — 

Students will write, video-tape, and evaluate their own programs and prepare 
for ministry through these media. The facilities of the Protestant Radio and 
Television Center are used. Course limited to students approved by the Speech 
and Homiletics departments. 

Elective, two hours, schedule to be arranged Huie, Taylor and Wardlaw 

467. Radio Broadcasting. — 

Principles and practice of writing and producing religious materials for broad- 
cast. This interseminary course leads to the production of several types of pro- 
grams acceptable to the radio industry. Open to third year and graduate students 
by permission only. 

Elective, two hours, fall quarter Abernathy 

468. Television Production. — 

Study and practice in the development of an idea into a completed telecast. The 
roles of the minister and the Church in television are emphasized in this inter- 
seminary course. Open to third year and graduate students by permission only. 

Prerequisite: Course No. 466. 

Elective, two hours, spring quarter Abernathy 



E. EVANGELISM AND MISSIONS 

This department is designed in all its courses to create a desire in the 
heart of every student to win souls for Christ. It is also planned with a view 
to instructing every student in every phase of evangelism so that he will be 
able to train the lay leadership of his church in this primary work of the 
Church. All courses are planned on an intensely practical basis, and stu- 
dents are encouraged to participate in the various types of evangelism dur- 
ing their entire seminary training. 

The courses in missions are designed to inform, to train, and challenge 
the student to become missionary minded in his or her ministry whether 
serving in the church at home or abroad. The pastor or D. C. E. here in the 
home church should be training the church membership to support through 
every way the missionary enterprise. The pastor should become a recruiter 
for the missionary cause. These courses are also designed to challenge the 
student to consider the call to Home or World Missions. All candidates 
and appointees will receive training in how to become an effective mis- 
sionary. 

Certain other related courses in other fields of study such as Bible, Theol- 
ogy, Christian Education, Pastoral Counselling will be suggested to all candi- 
dates and appointees for their course of study by the Missions Professor 
or Dean. 

470. Principles and Methods of Evangelism. — 

A survey of the various New Testament and present day types of Evangelism: 
Preaching Evangelism, Visitation Evangelism, Personal Evangelism, etc. The 
course seeks to instill, to instruct, and to inform the future minister in all 
phases of evangelistic endeavor and how to develop an adequate program of 
evangelism in the life of his own church and people. It includes instruction con- 
cerning the preparation of local churches for seasons of evangelistic services, 
revival, and the assimilation of new converts as well as procedure and content 
of communicant instructions. 

Elective, winter quarter, three hours Thompson 

66 



47 1 . Evangelistic Preaching. — 

This course involves a study of the evangelist himself, the evangelistic sermon, 
the nature of evangelistic preaching, mass evangelism, pastoral evangelism, re- 
vival, and the preparation and the participation of the pastor and church in 
evangelistic services. The course seeks to develop both a desire for and skill 
in the matter of evangelistic preaching. (470 Principles and Methods is a sug- 
gested prerequisite and Homiletics 451 is a prerequisite or the consent of the 
professor should be secured.) 
Elective, two hours Thompson 

472. Research Seminar in Evangelism. — 

A special seminar for seniors and graduate students in the field of evangelism. 
Various directed studies and projects on the level of the local parish, Presbytery, 
Synod, and General Assembly will be undertaken. Studies in surveys, statistics, 
Sunday School work, professions of faith, losses of membership, etc. will be 
made. These studies will be made in cooperation with the General Assembly's 
Division of Evangelism, local pastors, and the Department of Evangelism of the 
Seminary. Prerequisite: 470 Evangelism. 

Hours and schedule to be arranged Thompson 

473. Introduction and Survey of Christian Missions. — 

The philosophy and program of Christian Missions at home and abroad and a 
brief but comprehensive historical survey of missions through the centuries is 
covered in this course. Contemporary missions in all the areas served by the 
Presbyterian Church U. S. is studied as well as all the various isms and other 
religions faced on the mission field are given detailed study. The course also 
gives special attention to the matter of developing an adequate program of mis- 
sions within the local church. The aim and desire is to instill and develop a 
missionary mind and heart in all future ministers and missionaries wherever 
they are to serve. Prerequisite for all other courses in Missions. 
Required, senior year, fall quarter, three hours Thompson 

474. Missionary Principles. — 

A survey of the principles, procedures, policies and problems of the contemporary 
missionary endeavor of the Presbyterian Church in the United States as re- 
flected in the operations of the Board and of the Missions in the several fields. 
Significant differences in principles and practices of other boards and missions 
will be pointed out for comparison and evaluation. Study will be made of the 
various forms and expressions of Missions: evangelistic, educational, medical, 
agricultural, audio-visual, etc. Special attention will be given to the emergence of 
indigenous national churches and the problems of Church-Mission relationships. 
( Suggested Prerequisite— 47 3 . ) 
Elective, winter quarter, three hours Thompson 

474F. Missions in the Book of Acts. — 

A study of the Acts of the Apostles with special attention to the beginnings 

of the Church's outreach in the world, the method's employed, the principles 

reflected, the results obtained, the place of the Holy Spirit in the life and witness 

of the Church, and the significance of the Acts as a handbook of Missions for 

today. 

Elective, three hours Thompson 

475. Seminar in Missionary Anthropology and Research. — 

An advanced course of directed reading, research, and creative study in cultural 
and missionary anthropology. A survey of the resources available to the present 
day missionary in understanding the peoples to whom he will seek to communi- 
cate the Gospel. Occasional class meetings to discuss and share the results of 
individual study. Each student will work in his particular field of special interest. 
Other courses in missions or former missionary experience are prerequisite. The 
course is of special value to missionaries on furlough and all seeking appoint- 
ment to missionary service. 
Elective, three hours. Tumblin 

67 



476. Advanced Missions Seminar — Area Studies. — 

Directed reading and research in various areas of Missionary endeavor, religious 
problems, principles, etc. Each student will confer with the professor in advance 
as to the particular research topic to be undertaken and will then launch into 
his own research and study. Conferences and seminar sessions of the whole 
class will be held occasionally. The final research results and paper will be 
shared with the whole group. For Missionary appointees, and those considering 
world mission service. Prerequisites: Missions 473, 474, 475, or the approval 
by the professor concerned. 

Elective, hours to be arranged Thompson 

478. Evangelism and Persons. — 

The intent of this course is to focus on person-to-person evangelical procedures. 
In addition to lectures and reading, clinical work on the part of students will be 
required and evaluated. 

Elective, winter quarter, three hours McDill and Nease 



F. WORK OF THE CHURCH 

480. The Parish Ministry. — 

A thorough study and survey of Church and the Community is essential if the 
minister is to communicate adequately as preacher, pastor and administrator. Types 
of communities and their sociological nature, the changes and trends in people, 
problems, program, etc., are all considered. The manner and method of minister- 
ing to the needs of the people both within and without the church are presented. 
Urban, industrial, and rural church work is covered. 

Elective, spring quarter, three hours Thompson 

481. Seminar in Rural Church and Community. — 

This is an advanced course or seminar for students desiring further work in 
this field. The schedule will be arranged at hours to suit instructor and class 
so as to give the major time to various field trips, research, directed reading, 
practical projects, and papers. Various leaders in Rural and Community Leader- 
ship will also be used as consultants and special lecturers. Prerequisite No. 480. 

Elective, two hours, schedule to be arranged Thompson 

484. Evangelism In the Inner-City. — 

Through lectures, reading and field exposure the students will become acquainted 
with the inner-city as viewed from various disciplines: sociology, politics, welfare, 
economics, as well as the theological discipline. The focus of the course will be on 
the needs of persons and communities in the inner-city, what evangelism is in that 
context, and the various forms and expressions evangelism takes in the inner-city. 

Elective, winter quarter, three hours Grider 



G. PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Audio-equipped studios and practice booths are provided for student use 
at the Seminary and video-tape equipment is used in courses conducted at 
the Protestant Radio and Television Center. Students are required to re- 
cord their sermons and some of their speech work. A fine library of re- 
corded sermons by great contemporary preachers is maintained for stu- 
dent use. 

68 



Basic courses in speech are conducted with one hour of lecture and one 
hour of laboratory work in small speech sections each week. 

492. Voice and Diction. — 

A study of the principles of pronation, resonation, and articulation. Special at- 
tention is given to individual problems. 

Elective, two hours, schedule to be arranged Taylor 

493. The Creative Delivery of Sermons. — 

Practice in the delivery of sermons with special attention to the principles of 
communication. Course 466 is a prerequisite. 

Elective, two hours, schedule to be arranged Taylor 

H. WORSHIP 



495. Worship.— 

The theory and pn 
The Book of Comm 

Required, Senior year, winter quarter, four hours Taylor 



The theory and practice of public worship with an introduction to the use of 
The Book of Common Worship and The Hymnbook. 



Group 5 



PRACTICAL APOLOGETICS 



CHRISTIANITY AND LITERATURE 

500. American Literature. — 

An analysis of contemporary American literature in the light of Christian 
theology with particular reference to such writers as William Faulkner, John 
Steinbeck, J. D. Salinger, and Ernest Hemingway. 

Elective, three hours Babbagb 

501. English Literature. — 

An analysis of contemporary English literature in the light of Christian 
theology with particular reference to such writers as H. G. Wells, James Joyce, 
D. H. Lawrence and Graham Greene. 

Elective, three hours Babbagb 

502. Russian Literature. — 

An analysis of Russian literature in the light of Christian theology with particular 
reference to the work of Dostoievsky, Tolstoy, and Pasternak. 

Elective, three hours Babbagb 

69 



503. Drama.— 

An analysis of American and English drama in the light of Christian theology 
with particular reference to such authors as Tennessee Williams and Arthur 
Miller in America and John Osborne and Arnold Wesker in England. 

Elective, three hours Babbage 

504. Tragedy.— 

An analysis of the concept of tragedy in the light of Christian theology with 
particular reference to classical Greek and Shakespearean tragedy. 

Elective, two hours Babbage 

HD481. Christianity and Modern American Drama. — 

An analysis of American Drama in the twentieth century from O'Neill to Albee 
with special reference to what drama tells us about our human situation. 

Elective, first year, winter quarter, two hours Babbage 

CHRISTIANITY AND THE SCIENCES 

509. Science and Religion. — 

A discussion of the rise of modern science, with particular reference to its presup- 
positions and implications for faith. 

Elective, three hours Babbage 

510. History. — 

A discussion of the Christian interpretation of history. 

Elective, three hours Babbage 

CHRISTIANITY AND ETHICS 

511. Medicine. — 

A discussion of medical moral problems in the light of Christian theology. 
Elective, two hours Babbage 

512. Sex.— 

A discussion of sex in the light of Christian theology with particular reference 
to the mores of contemporary society. 

Elective, two hours Babbage 

CHRISTIANITY AND OTHER FAITHS 

513. Marxism. — 

A discussion of Marxism in the light of the Christian faith. 

Elective, two hours Babbage 

514. Existentialism. — 

A discussion of Existentialism in the light of the Christian faith. 

Elective, three hours Babbage 

515. Eastern Religions. — 

A discussion of Eastern Religions in the light of the Christian faith. 

Elective, three hours Babbage 

70 



Group 6 



THE HONORS PROGRAM 

The following course designations are provided for the registration and 
enrollment of students who participate in the Honors Program and for the 
recording of their grades. The letters "a," "b," or "c," following the course 
number will indicate respectively the fall, winter or spring quarter's work. 

610. Honors Work in Biblical Studies. — 

620. Honors Work in Church History. — 

630. Honors Work in Theology. — 

640. Honors Work in Pastoral Counseling. — 

650. Honors Work in Homiletics. — 



71 



GRADUATING CLASS OF 1966 
MASTER OF THEOLOGY 



ROBERT GRAY BARRON 
CARTER EUGENE BEARDEN 
FREDERIC RUDOLPH DINKINS 
CHARLES DWELLE ELYEA, JR. 
EDWARD HENEGAR 
WILLIAM ROSS JOHNSTON 
JOHN HARDEN LAW 



DONALD C. MURPHY 

ROBERT LEE MYERS 

SAMUEL ROSCOE NETTLES, JR. 

WILLIAM ROWE PHILLIPS 

ROBERT HAROLD TEED 

ELWOOD DOUGLAS VAUGHAN, JR. 

JACK HILL WARD 



BACHELOR OF DIVINITY 



DAVID B. ANTONSON 
JOE PACK ARNOLD 
WILLIAM VAN ARNOLD, Cum 

Laude and with Honors in 

Pastoral Counseling 
SAMUEL D. AUSTIN 
SIDNEY TAYLOR AYER, JR. 
WOODROW WILSON BENTON, 

JR., Magna Cum Laude and with 

Honors in New Testament 
JOSEPH WILSON BERRY, JR. 
WILLIAM KENDRICK BORDEN 
THOMAS ERSKINE CLARKE, Cum 

Laude and with Honors in New 

Testament 
WILLIS VAN CORNELIUS, SR. 
ROBERT PRIDGEN CRUMPLER 
FINIS JENNINGS DAKE, JR. 
FELIX HARRY DANIEL, Magna 

Cum Laude and with Honors in 

Theology 
JOHN JEY DEIFELL, JR., Cum 

Laude and with Honors in Theology 
MICHAEL GENE DiPALMA 
THOMAS TALBOT ELLIS, JR. 
PAUL BUCHER FOWLER, Cum 

Laude and with Honors in New 

Testament 
JOHN SCHOLZ FRANKLIN 
GEORGE FRANCIS GANEY, JR. 
LYONEL WAYMAN GILMER 
MARK ELIAS GUTZKE, Cum Laude 
DAVID SCOTT HARGROVE 
JOSEPH SHERWOOD HARVARD, 

III, Cum Laude and with Honors in 

New Testament 
BILL HARVILLE 
WILLIAM GIFFORD HAY 



G. JAN HINNEN 
CLIFFORD WILLIAM HULL 
SONNY CHU-LIANG LAI 
CHARLES NOEL LANDRETH 
EDUARD NUESSNER LORING, Cum 

Laude and with Honors in Theology 
JAMES STALLWORTH LOWRY 
DAVID SIDNEY McCARTY, JR. 
FRANKLIN MARION McCRAVEN 
ELLIOTT WATSON McELROY, Cum 

Laude and with Honors in Theology 
CHARLES EDWIN McGOWAN, 

Magna Cum Laude and with Honors 

in New Testament 
PERRY NATHAN MILLER 
DEWEY DWIGHT MURPHY 
CURTIS ALSON MURRAY 
LONNIE ALFRED PRIEST 
J. D. REVIS 

PRESTON ORR SARTELLE, JR. 
ROBERT ROPER SCALES, III 
ARTHUR MICHAEL SCHNEIDER, 

III 
WILLIAM ALEXANDER SHUMATE 
DONALD WAYNE SMITH 
WILLIAM TED SMITH, JR. 
FREDERIC DeLONG THOMPSON, 

JR. 
LEWIS EARL TROTTER 
W. JACK TURPIN, JR. 
THOMAS HOWELL UPCHURCH 
EARL MONROE VAUGHAN 
VICTOR HUGO WALLACE 
*WILLIAM WALKER WESTLUND 
JAMES R. WILBURN 
LINWOOD GIBSON WILKES 
ISAAC NEWTON WILSON, JR. 
STEPHEN BRADLEY WOODWARD 
DANIEL ELLIOTT YOUNGBLOOD 



DIPLOMA 



ROBERT L. CATLIN 
JOHN R. DODD 



JACK F. SPEARS 
DAVID L. WILLIAMS 



EVELYN CAROL FARMER 
EUJAH KIM 



MASTER OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

RUTH WILLIE SUGGS 



♦Degree Awarded Fall 1966 



72 



AWARDS MADE IN 1965-66 

ALUMNI FELLOWSHIPS 

WILLIAM VAN ARNOLD JOHN JEY DEIFELL, JR. 

WOODROW WILSON BENTON, JR. JOSEPH SHERWOOD HARVARD, III 
CHARLES EDWIN McGOWAN 

FANNIE JORDAN BRYAN FELLOWSHIPS 
FELIX HARRY DANIEL ELLIOTT WATSON McELROY 

PAUL T. FUHRMANN BOOK PRIZE 

JOHN JEY DEIFELL, JR. 

JAMES ROBERT HOWERTON AWARDS 

JOHN SCHOLZ FRANKLIN ROBERT HAROLD HOREL 

WILDS BOOK PRIZE 
FELIX HARRY DANIEL 

TRAV RADIO AWARD 

DANIEL ELLIOTT YOUNGBLOOD 

TRAV TELEVISION AWARD 

DANIEL ELLIOTT YOUNGBLOOD 

AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY AWARD 
LOREN DALE PUGH 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 
WORKING TOWARD THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF THEOLOGY 

Calendar Year 1966 

*ELIEZER NAVA ARTE AG A, B.D., Colonia Alamos, Mexico 

University of Mexico, Presbyterian Seminary, Coyoacan 
JOSEPH ARTHUR, B.A., B.D., Toccoa Falls, Georgia 

Seattle Pacific College, Bethel Theological Seminary 
*CARTER EUGENE BEARDEN, B.A., B.DC, Atlanta, Georgia 

Baylor University, New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary 
*DONALD LOUIS BELL, B A., B.D. Birmingham, Alabama 

Baylor University, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary 
GERALD LEE BELL, JR., B.S., B.D., Th.M., Columbia, South Carolina 

University of Tennessee, Columbia Theological Seminary, Princeton 
Theological Seminary 
DAVID RAY BLACK, A.B., B.D., Austin, Texas 

Northwestern University, Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary 
* WILBUR MALCOLM BOICE, A.B., B.D., Decatur, Georgia 

University of North Carolina, Princeton Theological Seminary 
WILLIAM PORTER BOYLE, A.B., B.D., Nashville, Tennessee 

Davidson College, Union Theological Seminary (Virginia) 
SCOBIE CLOVIS BRANSON, B.A., B.D., Monroeville, Alabama 

Birmingham Southern College, Candler School of Theology 
HENRY MUNRO BRUEN, JR., A.B., B.D., Decatur, Georgia 

Princeton University, Princeton Theological Seminary 
RALEIGH HUGH BURNS, B.A., B.D. Piedmont, Alabama 

Presbyterian College, Columbia Theological Seminary 
CHARLES WILLIAM CASTLES, A.B., B.D., Macon, Georgia 

Florida Southern College, Columbia Theological Seminary 
♦Admitted to candidacy •./:,., 

73 



♦JAMES GABRIEL CLARK, A.B., B.D., Kingsport, Tennessee 

Vanderbilt University, Candler School of Theology 
*DONALD EDMUND DAVIS, A.B., B.D. Miami, Florida 

University of Akron, United Theological Seminary 
BURRELL DAVID DINKINS, A.B., B.D., Decatur, Georgia 

Asbury College, Candler School of Theology 
CANTEY CHINA DuBOSE, JR., B.A., B.D., Atlanta, Georgia 

Presbyterian College, Columbia Theological Seminary 
HUGH LEE EICHELBURGER, JR., A.B., B.D., Greenwood, South Carolina 

Presbyterian College, Columbia Theological Seminary 
♦PINCKNEY CHAMBERS ENN1SS, JR., B.S., B.D., Decatur, Georgia 

Davidson College, Columbia Theological Seminary 
♦LEWIS WESLEY FOWLER, JR., A.B., B.D. Jennings, Louisiana 

Vanderbilt University, Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 
JOHN DARCY GUEDES, A.B., B.D. Orlando, Florida 

Westmont College, Columbia Theological Seminary 
MARTIN LUTHER HARKEY, JR., B.E.E., B.D., Decatur, Georgia 

University of Virginia, Columbia Theological Seminary 
CHARLES RANSOM HASTY, B.A., B.D., Macon, Georgia 

Davidson College, Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 
ROBERT LEE HAUSS, A.B., B.D. Chamblee, Georgia 

Wittenberg University, Hamma School of Theology 
CHARLES GORDON HELMS, A.B., B.D., Atlanta, Georgia 

Davidson College, Union Theological Seminary (New York) 
♦EDWARD HENEGAR, A.B., B.D. Isom, Kentucky 

University of Tennessee, Columbia Theological Seminary 

♦STEPHEN McQUEEN HUNTLEY, JR., A.B., B.D., Williston, Florida 

Davidson College, Columbia Theological Seminary 
♦ALVIN SAYER JEPSON, A.B., B.D., Atlanta, Georgia 

Seattle Pacific College, Fuller Theological Seminary 

ROBERT EUGENE JOHNSTON, A.B., B.D., Statesville, North Carolina 

Davidson College, Columbia Theological Seminary 
CALVIN WALTER KROPP, B.S., M.B.A., B.D., Chicago Illinois 

Northwestern University, Columbia Theological Seminary 
WILLIAM CHANDLER LANIER, A.B., B.D., Jerusalem, Israel 

University of Georgia, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 
CYRUS STEVENS MALLARD, JR., A.B., B.D., Atlanta, Georgia 

Presbyterian College, Columbia Theological Seminary 
♦CHARLES THEODORE McKEE, A.B., B.D., Republic of the Congo. Africa 

Davidson College, Columbia Theological Seminary 
DAN McRIGHT, A.B., Candor, North Carolina 

Davidson College, University of Glasgow 
ROBERT RENLY MORRIS, A.B., B.D., Jacksonville, Florida 

University of Florida, Columbia Theological Seminary 
♦WYTHE MUNFORD PEYTON, JR., B.S., B.D., Decatur, Georgia 

The Citadel, Columbia Theological Seminary 
♦WILLIAM ROWE PHILLIPS, A.B., B.D., Spring Garden, Alabama 

Birmingham Southern College, Candler School of Theology 
WALTER EDWARD POND, JR., A.B., Atlanta, Georgia 

Newberry College, Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary 
IKE GARBER POWELL, A.B., B.D., Decatur, Georgia 

Duke University, Candler School of Theology 
ANGEL REYNOSO-MACIAS (diploma) Veracruz, Mexico 

Juarez Preparatory Institute. Presbyterian Theological Seminary of Mexico 



♦Admitted to candidacy 

74 



♦LAWRENCE HUBBARD RICHARDS, B.A., B.D., Baghdad, Iraq 

Houghton College, Columbia Theological Seminary 

♦RICHARD EDWARD SANNER, B.S., M.S., B.D., Atlanta, Georgia 

Georgia Institute of Technology, Columbia Theological Seminary 

JAMES BRINKLEY SHERWOOD, A.B., B.D., Decatur, Georgia 

Davidson College, Columbia Theological Seminary 

JACK EDWIN STEARNS, B.S., B.D., Carlisle, Pennsylvania 

Lebanon Valley College, Fuller Theological Seminary 
♦JERRY LEE TABLER, B.S., B.D., Jackson, Georgia 

University of Louisville, Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary 

♦LEONARD JACKSON TAYLOR, B.S., B.D., Comer, Georgia 

Georgia Institute of Technology, Columbia Theological Seminary 

♦ROBERT DANIEL TAYLOR, JR., A.B., B.D.. Lookout Mtn., Tennessee 

Belhaven College, Columbia Theological Seminary 

EARL THOMAS TROGLIN, A.B., B.D., Atlanta. Georgia 

Mercer University, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 
*ELWOOD DOUGLAS VAUGHAN, JR., B.A., B.D., Donalds, South Carolina 
Hampden-Sydney College, Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 

JOE WARLICK WHITWELL, JR., B.A., B.D., Senatobia, Mississippi 

Millsaps College, Candler School of Theology 
♦ALEX WASHINGTON WILLIAMS, B.A., B.D., Decatur, Georgia 

Emory University, Columbia Theological Seminary 
GLEN EARL WILLIAMSON, B.A., B.D., Wildwood, Florida 

Florida State University, Columbia Theological Seminary 
EUGENE DANIEL WITHERSPOON, JR., A.B., B.D., Atlanta, Georgia 

Davidson College, Union Theological Seminary (Virginia) 



CLASS OF 1967 

HOWARD SPIVEY ALLEN, B.S., Belzoni, Mississippi 

Mississippi State University, Central Mississippi Presbytery 
SAMUEL WALLER ANDERSON, JR., Knoxville, Tennessee 

Washington & Lee University, University of Tennessee 
CHARLES COKE ANSLEY, A.B., B.S., M.S., M.B.E. Sautee, Georgia 

University of Miami, University of Florida, Columbia Theological Seminary 
DAN CLINTON ARMSTRONG, B.S., Columbia, South Carolina 

University of Tennessee, Congaree Presbytery 
ROSS ALVIN BAIR, A.B., Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 

University of Miami, Everglades Presbytery 

WILLIAM ROWAN BARRON, B.A., Eufaula, Alabama 

Davidson College, East Alabama Presbytery 

WILLIAM ALLEN BLAIR, B.A., Cordova, Alabama 

Belhaven College, Birmingham Presbytery 

JACK WAYNE BOWLING, A.B., Smyrna, Georgia 

King College, Cherokee Presbytery 

JEROME WARREN BROCK, B.S., Clinton, Tennessee 

University of Tennessee, Knoxville Presbytery 

JOHN CULLEN BRYAN, A.B., Moss Point, Mississippi 

Southwestern at Memphis, South Mississippi Presbytery 

WILLIAM CLIFFORD CANADY, JR., A.B., Miami, Florida 

Presbyterian College, Everglades Presbytery 



♦Admitted to candidacy 

75 



BERT KINARD CARMICHAEL, III, A.B., 

Mercer University, Augusta-Macon Presbytery 

JAMES HAROLD DAUGHDRILL, JR., A.B., 
Emory University, Atlanta Presbytery 

LANIER NOBLE ELLIS, A.B., 

Belhaven College, Presbyterian 

JAMES LEROY FISHEL. A.B. 

Davis and Elkins College, Potomac Presbytery 

THOMAS CARLTON FLANAGAN, JR., B.S., 

Davidson College, Cherokee Presbytery 

CLARENCE DUNCAN FOUSE, JR., A.B. 

Stetson University 

JOHN FRANK FOY, B.S., 

North Carolina State College, Presbyterian 

CLAUDE DAVIS GAMBLE, JR., A.B., 

Georgia State College, Atlanta Presbytery 

JOSEPH EARNEST GAMBLE, A.B., 

Howard College, Birmingham Presbytery 

CARLISLE PATRICK GRIFFIN, JR., B.A. 

Presbyterian College, East Alabama Presbytery 

JAMES DOUGLAS HECK, A.B., 

Wheaton College, Everglades Presbytery 

CHARLES WILTON HICKS, JR., A.B., 

Howard College, Baptist 

JAMES CLAUDE HICKS, JR., A.B., 

University of Florida, Everglades Presbytery 

ROSS THOMAS HIGHTOWER, B.S., 

Middle Tennessee State College, North Alabama Presbytery 

TAYLOR McFARLAND HILL, JR., A.B., 

Davidson College, Hanover Presbytery 

ROBERT HAROLD HOREL, B.S. 

Georgia Southern College, Savannah Presbytery 

DAVID JOHN KEYSER, B.S., 

The Citadel, Westminster Presbytery 

HENRY THOMAS KNOX, JR., A.B., 

Presbyterian College, Southwest Georgia Presbytery 

PAUL DAVID KOOISTRA, A.B., 

University of Minnesota, Duluth Presbytery 

LUTHER EYER KRAMER, III, A.B., 

Florida State University, Westminster Presbytery 

JONATHAN MILLER LISTON, A.B., 
King College, Presbyterian 

JAMES OLIVER MANER, B.S., 

University of Mississippi, Presbyterian 

ASA MONROE MEADOWS, B.B.A., 

Marshall College, Orange Presbytery 

GEORGE WASHINGTON MITCHELL, B.S., 

Memphis State University, Memphis Presbytery 

ROBERT OLIVER MOSS, III, A.B.. 

Davidson College, Atlanta Presbytery 

WILLIAM GERALD MOTHERSHEAD, B.S., 

Mississippi Southern College, Louisiana Presbytery 

ARNOLD KENNETH NEWMAN, A.B., 
Maryville College, Knoxville Presbytery 



Jackson, Georgia 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Birmingham, Alabama 

Pikesville, Maryland 

Marietta, Georgia 

Miami, Florida 

Bradenton, Florida 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Birmingham, Alabama 

Eufaula, Alabama 

Miami, Florida 

Lithonia, Georgia 

Miami, Florida 

Florence, Alabama 
;ry 

Hopewell, Virginia 

Garden City, Georgia 

Dade City, Florida 

Moultrie, Georgia 

Duluth, Minnesota 

Sarasota, Florida 

Bristol, Tennessee 

Lincoln, Alabama 

South Hill, Virginia 

Memphis, Tennessee 

West Point, Georgia 

Baton Rouge, Louisiana 

Vancouver, Washington 



76 



Asheville, North Carolina 
Pensacola, Florida 



Greenville, South Carolina 

Oak Ridge, Tennessee 

Decatur, Georgia 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 

Decatur, Georgia 



HERMAN GUDGER NICHOLS, JR., A.B., 

University of North Carolina, Presbyterian 
THOMAS ROBERT PATETE, A.B., 
Belhaven College, Florida Presbytery 

ROBERT PRESSLEY PIEPHOFF, A.B. 

Presbyterian College, Enoree Presbytery 

GEORGE KLINE PRESTON, III, B.S., 

University of Tennessee, Knoxville Presbytery 

LOREN DALE PUGH, A.B., 

Georgia State College, Atlanta Presbytery 

ROBERT RONALD RAGON, B.S., 

University of Chattanooga, Knoxville Presbytery 

PETER DuBOSE RHODES, B.I.E. 

Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta Presbytery 

GEORGE DAVID RUSSELL, A.B. Waynesville, North Carolina 

King College, Asheville Presbytery 

RICHARD MARK SLYMAN, A.B. Bristol, Tennessee 

King College, Holston Presbytery 
GLENN WILLARD SMALL, JR., A.B. Virginia Beach. Virginia 

Hampden-Sydney College, Norfolk Presbytery 

RICHARD PARKS STONE, B.S., Dade City, Florida 

North Carolina State College, Westminster Presbytery 

ROBERT HARVEY WALKUP, Columbia, South Carolina 

University of South Carolina, Congaree Presbytery 

THOMAS DONNELL WARTERS, A.B., 

Oglethorpe University, Atlanta Presbytery 

WORTH NELSON WATTS, 

Guilford College, Orange Presbytery 

THOMAS ALBERT WEAVER, II, A.B., 

Belhaven College, Florida Presbytery 

KENNETH DOUGLAS WILSON, A.B., 

Belhaven College, Florida Presbytery 



Atlanta, Georgia 

Greensboro, North Carolina 

Pensacola, Florida 

Warrington, Florida 



CLASS OF 1968 



Columbia, South Carolina 



JOHN SPRATT BACOT, B.S., 

The Citadel, Congaree Presbytery 

JOHN PERSONS BALDWIN, B.S., 

University of Georgia, Southwest Georgia Presbytery 

HENRY CALDWELL BATES, A.B., Asheville 

University of Georgia, Asheville Presbytery 

DWIGHT SMITH BAYLEY, B.A. 

St. Andrews Presbyterian College, Suwannee Presbytery 

CLARENCE PAUL BENNETT, JR., B.S., South Charleston 

Florida State University, Presbyterian 

JOHN CARL BOYER, B.A., 

Presbyterian College, South Carolina Presbytery 

WALTER JACK BUNKLEY, JR., A.B. 

Oglethorpe University, A.R.P. Church 

RICHARD WILLIAM CALDWELL, B.A., 

Wheaton College, Everglades Presbytery 

ROBERT LEON CARROLL, JR., B.S., 

University of Mississippi, South Mississippi Presbytery 

JAMES MITCHELL COCKERHAM, B.A., Columbus 

Mississippi State University, St. Andrew Presbytery 



Albany, Georgia 

j North Carolina 

Jacksonville, Florida 

West Virginia 

Edwardsville, Illinois 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Miami, Florida 

Laurel, Mississippi 

Mississippi 



77 



Albany, Georgia 

Tifton, Georgia 

Saluda, South Carolina 

Birmingham, Alabama 

Chester, South Carolina 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 

Perry, Georgia 

Lake Worth, Florida 

Montgomery, Alabama 

Lithonia, Georgia 

Atlanta, Georgia 



WALTER HEATH CODDINGTON 

Southwest Georgia Presbytery 
JOSEPH HUNTER COLEMAN, B.A., 

Presbyterian College, Southwest Georgia Presbytery 
JACOB ALLEN DERRICK, A.B., 

Erskine College, Second Presbytery 
RICHARD EDWARD DOUGHTY, A.B., 

Wheaton College, Birmingham Presbytery 

MORRIS JOSEPH EHRLICH, III, B.A., 

The Citadel, Bethel Presbytery 
PHILIP RUDOLPH GEHMAN, B.A., 

Wheaton College, Knoxville Presbytery 
ROBERT LEROY GRIFFIN, B.A. 

Belhaven College, Augusta-Macon Presbytery 

JAMES HENRY HALSTEAD, A.B., 

Marshall University, Everglades Presbytery 
EMORY LANGSTON HAYGOOD, B.A., 

Belhaven College, East Alabama Presbytery 

CHARLES WILTON HICKS, JR., A.B. 
Howard College, Baptist 

BILL WAYNE HUIE, B.A., 

Georgia State College, Baptist 

ARTHUR HALL JONES, JR., A.B., Lookout Mountain, Tennessee 

University of Chattanooga, Knoxville Presbytery 

WILLIAM GRAY KARNES, B.S., Murfreesboro, Tennessee 

Middle Tennessee State College, Nashville Presbytery 

BARRY WAYNE KIGER Columbia, South Carolina 

University of South Carolina, Jacksonville State College, Congaree Presbytery 

ROGER CHARLES MACKEY, B.A. 

Barrington College, Presbyterian 
HOMER HARRISON MORGAN, JR., B.A., 

Tampa University, Westminster Presbytery 

EDWIN LEROY MORRISON, A.B., 

Wheaton College, Seattle Presbytery 

HENRY JOSEPH MUELLER, A.B., 

Belhaven College, South Mississippi Presbytery 

ODACIR HECKE de OLIVEIRA, Certificate 

Jose Manuel Da Conceicao, Ponta Grossa Presbytery 

JOHN NICHOLSON PAYNE, B.S., 

Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta Presbytery 

JOSEPH DARRELL RENFRO, B.A., Mountain Home, North Carolina 

University of North Carolina, Asheville Presbytery 

JAN McAFEE RHODES, A.B. Decatur, Georgia 

Presbyterian College, Atlanta Presbytery 

WILLIAM EDWARD RIDDLE, JR., Orlando, Florida 

Riverside (California) City College, St. Johns Presbytery 

JOSE RAMON RIVERA Caparra Heights, Puerto Rico 

Panama National University, Augusta-Macon Presbytery 

BILLY EUGENE RUFUS, A.B. Atlanta, Georgia 

Belhaven College, Central Mississippi Presbytery 

GRADY ERSKINE SIMPSON, Orlando, Florida 

Rollins College, St. Johns Presbytery 

THOMAS AUSTIN S1ZEMORE, JR., B.S., Decatur, Georgia 

Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta Presbytery 

WILLIAM RIG BY STEPP, B.S., Columbus, Mississippi 

Belhaven College, St. Andrew Presbytery 



New Bergen, New Jersey 

Tampa, Florida 

Renton, Washington 

Bay Springs, Mississippi 

Guarapuava, Parana, Brazil 

Decatur, Georgia 



78 



CHARLES EDWARD SWANN, B.S., Columbus, Georgia 

Mississippi Southern College, Southwest Georgia Presbytery 

CURRY NED VAUGHAN, JR., B.S., Hinesville, Georgia 

United States Military Academy, Savannah Presbytery 



A.B., 



ROBERT MARTIN WALLACE, JR. 

Erskine College, First Presbytery 

HUBERT GOLDEN WARDLAW, JR., B.A., 

Presbyterian College, Harmony Presbytery 

DAVID LEWIS WATERS, B.A., North Charleston 

Presbyterian College, Charleston Presbytery 

MICHAEL EDWARD WILLIAMS, A.B., 

Davidson College, Atlanta Presbytery 

DONALD DIXON WOOD, A.B., 

Central Wesleyan College, Wesleyan Methodist 



Huntersville, North Carolina 



Kingstree, South Carolina 



South Carolina 



Atlanta, Georgia 



Colfax, North Carolina 



CLASS OF 1969 

JEFFERSON KIRKSEY AIKEN, JR., B.S. 

Louisiana State University, Louisiana Presbytery 
JUVENTINO RAMIREZ BALLESTEROS, B.A., M.A. 

Bob Jones University. Enoree Presbytery 
JAMES BOYCE BANKHEAD, JR., A.B. 

Presbyterian College, Bethel Presbytery 
KENNETH LEE BERRYMAN 

Inter-American University, Presbyterian 
DONALD GRAHAM BUCHANAN, JR., B.A. 

King College, Abingdon Presbytery 
ROE MAXWELL CALLAWAY, JR., A.B. 

Presbyterian College, Savannah Presbytery 
RANDOLPH THOMAS CHEELY 

Wheaton College, Hanover Presbytery 
LESTER HAMILTON COMEE, JR., B.A. 

Wake Forest College, Suwannee Presbytery 
RICHARD ALEXANDER CURNOW, JR., B.A. 

Belhaven College, Presbyterian 
RICHARD ERNEST DAVIS, B.S.A. 

University of Georgia, Baptist 
WILLIAM EDWIN DUDLEY, B.S. 

Auburn University, East Alabama Presbytery 
MARION THOMAS DUNLAP, B.S. 

North Carolina State, North Alabama Presbytery 
ARVEL BERT EDWARDS, A.B. 

King College, Member of Abingdon Presbytery 

HENRY ALAN ELMORE, B.S.I.E. 

Clemson College, Presbyterian 
GEORGE JOHNSON EVANS, B.A. 

Southwestern at Memphis, Florida Presbytery 



Baton Rouge, Louisiana 

Los Angeles, California 

Chester, South Carolina 

Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 

Wytheville, Virginia 

Fort Stewart, Georgia 

Hopewell, Virginia 

Jacksonville, Florida 

Jackson, Mississippi 

Gainesville, Georgia 

Opelika, Alabama 

Huntsville, Alabama 

Jewell Ridge, Virginia 

Charlotte, North Carolina 
Gulf Breeze, Florida 



♦RUFUS WRIGHT EVANS, B.S. 

Toccoa Falls Bible Institute, Presbyterian 
DONALD MARK GREEN 

Everglades Presbytery 
FORD FRANCIS GSEGNER, B.S. 

North Georgia College, Athens Presbytery 
WILLIAM BENJAMIN HART, A.B. 

Wheaton College, Everglades Presbytery 



Lumberton, North Carolina 

Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 

Marietta, Georgia 

Miami, Florida 



♦Withdrew 



79 



CHARLES HURST HORNE, B.S.E.E. Greenwood, South Carolina 

Clemson University, New Orleans Presbytery 

WILLIAM CHARLES HUNT, JR., B.A. Vicksburg, Mississippi 

Southwestern at Memphis, Tulane University, Presbyterian 

ALEXANDER McARTHUR IRVIN, B.SJ. Miami, Florida 

University of Florida, Everglades Presbytery 

ERVIN RALPH JOSLIN Augusta, Georgia 

Georgia Southern College, Augusta-Macon Presbytery 

REX HART KING Germantown, Tennessee 

Memphis State University, Presbyterian 

CECILIO NICOLAS LAJARA, B.A. 

University of Puerto Rico, Presbyterian 

PAUL WAYNE LEE, A.B. 

Belhaven College, Memphis Presbytery 

PHILIP WAYNE LEFTWICH, B.A. 
Oglethorpe College, Presbyterian 

DARRELL ALLEN MONROE, JR., A.B. 

Clemson University, St. John's Presbytery 

MYRON CLYDE MOORE, B.I.E. 

Georgia Institute of Technology, Westminster Presbytery 

JOSEPH CHARLES MORECRAFT, A.B. 

King College, Kanawha Presbytery 

THOMAS ANDREW POOLE, B.A. 

Emory University, Presbyterian 

PAUL DAVID REYNOLDS, A.B. 

Georgia State College, Atlanta Presbytery 

HENRY ALVIN ROBERTS, JR., B.S. 

Kansas State Teachers College, Presbyterian 

PAUL MARSHALL ROSE, A.B. 
Bryan College, Presbyterian 

JOHN PRENTIS SARTELLE, A.B. 

King College, Abingdon Presbytery 

CARL LINCK SCHLICH, B.S. 

Troy State College, Atlanta Presbytery 

CHARLES FERRIS SCOTT, B.S., M.A. 

University of Tennessee, Young Life Institute, Suwannee Presbytery 

WILLIAM HERMAN SERJAK 

University of Miami, Presbyterian 

WILLIAM BENJAMIN SHIELDS, B.A. 

Elon College, Orange Presbytery 

GRADY ERSKINE SIMPSON 

Rollins College, St. John's Presbytery 

WILLIAM CHARLES SMITH, A.B. 

Wofford College, Harmony Presbytery 

JAMES BURTON STANFORD, III, B.A. 

Presbyterian College, Atlanta Presbytery 

ELMER LARCUS STEPHENS 

Immanuel Bible College, Baptist 

JOHN FREDERICK TOLSON 



Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 

Jackson, Tennessee 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Daytona Beach, Florida 

Brandon, Florida 

Texas City, Texas 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Decatur, Georgia 

Augusta, Georgia 

Miami, Florida 

Bristol, Tennessee 

Loxley, Alabama 

Jacksonville, Florida 
\ Presbytery 

Enon Valley, Pennsylvania 

Burlington, North Carolina 

Orlando, Florida 

Manning, South Carolina 

Decatur, Georgia 

Jonesboro, Georgia 



Bradenton, Florida 



Arizona State College, William Carey College, Presbyterian 



MORSE DeWITT UpDeGRAFF, B.A. 

Belhaven College, Southwest Georgia Presbytery 

HAROLD LEON VAUGHN, JR., B.A. 
Belhaven College, Florida Presbytery 

WILLIAM WARREN WALLACE, JR., A.B. 

Central Wesleyan College, Wesleyan Methodist 



Columbus, Georgia 



Pensacola, Florida 



Central, South Carolina 



80 



WORKING TOWARD THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF 
CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

HARRIETT ANNE CORDLE, B.A., Charlotte, North Carolina 

University of North Carolina at Greensboro 
HAN OK KIM, B.A. Kwangju, Korea 

Chonnam National University 
JUDITH LYNN McGEARY, BA., Memphis, Tennessee 

Southwestern at Memphis 
MARTHA VIRGINIA ROSS, B.A., Roanoke, Virginia 

Agnes Scott College 
ESTHER LEEYAN SUN, A.B. Pusan, Korea 

Chen-chi University 
SARAH FRANCES WARWICK, B.S. Valdosta, Georgia 

Florida State University 
LINWOOD GIBSON WILKES, A.B., B.D. Hopewell, Virginia 

Hampden-Sydney College, Columbia Theological Seminary, 

Hanover Presbytery 

NANCY MARY WILSON, A.B., Corinth, Mississippi 

King College 

MISSION TRAINING 

LYNN LANE FLANAGAN, A.B., M.L.S., Marietta, Georgia 

North Georgia College, Emory University 
JAMES LAWRENCE NICKLES, B.S. Seneca, South Carolina 

Clemson University 

UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS 

DURWOOD LEE BALLARD, JR., B.S. Augusta, Georgia 

Wheaton College, Brethren Church 
HUGH BLAKE BRADLEY, B.A., B.D. Nashville, Tennessee 

Davidson College, Columbia Theological Seminary, member of 

Atlanta Presbytery 
LEONARD GRIFFIN BOSWELL, A.B., M.R.E. Atlanta, Georgia 

Davidson College, Columbia Theological Seminary, member of 

Christian Education 
FRED MILTON CLINE, B.A, B.D. Atlanta, Georgia 

McPherson College, Bethany Theological Seminary, Presbyterian 
CLARENCE GUNN DURHAM, A.B., B.D. Nashville, Tennessee 

Emory University, Columbia Theological Seminary, member of 

Savannah Presbytery 
VICTOR HUBERT GRAMOUNT, JR., A.B. Atlanta, Georgia 

Emory University, Atlanta Presbytery 
ANN SHEARMAN GUEDES Nashville, Tennessee 

Missionary 
BILLY EDWARD JACKSON, B.S. Mableton, Georgia 

Florence State College, Baptist 
KENNETH M. KEPLER, B.A., B.Th., M.Th. Nashville, Tennessee 

Princeton University, Princeton Theological Seminary, 

Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary 
JOHN PAUL LINGLE, A.B. Greensboro, North Carolina 

Lenoir Rhyne College, Lutheran 
ROBERT LANCASTER MONTGOMERY, B.A., 

B. D., Th.M. Nashville, Tennessee 

Southwestern at Memphis, Columbia Theological Seminary, 

Princeton, Kanawha Presbytery 

81 



MATILDE MACIAS de REYNOSO 

University of Mexico 
RAY MELVIN STOVER, A.B., B.D. 



Houghton College, Columbia Theological Seminary 
HAROLD LOWELL THOMAS, B.A., B.D. 

Westminster College, Columbia Theological Seminary 



Veracruz, Mexico 



Coatesville, Pennsylvania 



Decatur, Georgia 



SUMMER SCHOOL 1966 



DURWOOD LEE BALLARD, JR., B.S. 
JAMES BOYCE BANKHEAD, JR., A.B. 
HENRY CALDWELL BATES, A.B. 
KENNETH LEE BERRYMAN 
JOHN CARL BOYER, B.A. 
ROE MAXWELL CALLAWAY, JR., A.B. 
LESTER HAMILTON COMEE, JR., B.A. 
RICHARD ALEXANDER CURNOW, JR., 
RICHARD ERNEST DAVIS, B.S.A. 
BURRELL DAVID DINKINS, A.B., B.D. 

WILLIAM EDWIN DUDLEY, B.S. 
MARION THOMAS DUNLAP, B.S. 
HENRY ALAN ELMORE, B.S.I.E. 
GEORGE JOHNSON EVANS, B.A. 
PAUL LESLIE GARBER, JR. 
JAMES HENRY HALSTEAD, A.B. 
CHARLES WILTON HICKS, JR., A.B. 
CHARLES HURST HORNE, B.S.E.E. 
BILL WAYNE HUIE, B.A. 
WILLIAM CHARLES HUNT, JR., B.A. 
ALEXANDER McARTHUR IRVIN, B.S.J. 
ERVIN RALPH JOSLIN 
REX HART KING 
CECILIO NICOLAS LAJARA, B.A. 
PHILIP WAYNE LEFTWICH, B.A. 
DARRELL ALLEN MONROE, JR., A.B. 
MYRON CLYDE MOORE, B.I.E. 
HOMER HARRISON MORGAN, B.A. 
JOSEPH DARRELL RENFRO, B.A. 
JOSE RAMON RIVERA 
HENRY ALVIN ROBERTS, B.S. 
HENRY E. ROBERTS 
CARL LINCK SCHLICH, III, B.S. 
CHARLES FERRIS SCOTT, B.S., M.A. 

WILLIAM HERMAN SERJAK 
WILLIAM BENJAMIN SHIELDS, B.A. 
WILLIAM CHARLES SMITH, A.B. 
HAROLD LEON VAUGHN, JR., B.A. 
HAROLD PAGE WILLIAMS, B.A., M.R.E. 



Wheaton College 

Presbyterian College 

University of Georgia 

Inter-American University 

Presbyterian College 

Presbyterian College 

Wake Forest College 

B.A. Belhaven College 

University of Georgia 

Asbury College 

Candler School of Theology 

Auburn University 

North Carolina State 

Clemson College 

Southwestern at Memphis 

Emory University 

Marshall University 

Howard College 

Clemson University 

Georgia State College 

Southwestern at Memphis 

University of Florida 

Georgia Southern College 

Memphis State University 

University of Puerto Rico 

Oglethorpe College 

Clemson University 

Georgia Institute of Technology 

Tampa University 

University of North Carolina 

Panama National University 

Kansas State Teachers College 

Candler School of Theology 

Troy State College 

University of Tennessee 
Young Life Institute 

University of Miami 

Elon College 

Wofford College 

Belhaven College 

Stetson University 
New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary 



82 



INTERN STUDENTS — NOT IN RESIDENCE 

JAMES DOUGLAS BLAIR, III, B.A. Nashville, Tennessee 

Peabody College, Nashville Presbytery 
Serving internship in the First Presbyterian Church, 
Huntsville, Alabama. 

MARION BENJAMIN BOOZER, A.B. Gaffney, South Carolina 

Presbyterian College, Enoree Presbytery 
Serving internship in the Thunderbolt Presbyterian Chapel, 
Savannah, Georgia. 

JOHN BRETT FENWICK, B.S. Vicksburg, Mississippi 

Mississippi State University, Central Mississippi Presbytery 
Serving Internship in the First Presbyterian Church, 
Albemarle, North Carolina. 

SAMUEL WARD HALE, A.B. Glade Valley, North Carolina 

King College, Norfolk Presbytery 
Serving internship in the Faith Presbyterian Church, 
Huntsville, Alabama. 

JAMES ROBERT HARDY, JR., A.B. Pascagoula, Mississippi 

Belhaven College, Central Mississippi Presbytery 
Serving internship in the Woodville Presbyterian Church. 
Woodville, Mississippi. 

WILLIAM GUY PHIPPS, A.B. Davy, West Virginia 

King College, Bluestone Presbytery 

Serving internship in the Forest Hill Presbyterian Church, 
Charlotte, North Carolina. 

HENRY DOBBS POPE, A.B. Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 

Southwestern at Memphis, East Alabama Presbytery 
Serving internship in the Lakewood Presbyterian Church. 
Huntsville, Alabama. 

GEORGE DOUGLAS SLAGLE. A.B. Franklin, North Carolina 

King College, Asheville Presbytery 

Serving internship in the Woodlawn Presbyterian Church. 
Birmingham, Alabama. 

STEPHEN JAMISON SLOOP, JR., A.B., Atlanta, Georgia 

Belhaven College, Central Mississippi Presbytery 
Serving internship in the Warrington Presbyterian Church, 
Warrington, Florida. 

JOHN EARL WESTLUND, A.B. Nitro, West Virginia 

King College, Presbyterian 

Serving internship in the Morningside Presbyterian Church, 
Camden, South Carolina. 



83 



CALENDAR 



Winter Quarter 1966-67 

January 2, 1967 
January 27-29 
March 3-6 
March 13 - 16 
March 17 - 21 



Class work resumed 2:00 P.M. 

Vocations Week-end 

Reading Period 

Examinations 

Spring Recess 



Spring Quarter 

March 22, 1967 
March 26 
April 4 
April 20 
May 5 - 7 
May 9 

May 26 - 30 
May 27 - 30 
May 31 - June 3 
June 3-5 



Class work resumed 8:00 A.M. 

Easter 

Honors Day 

Columbia Friendship Circle Pilgrimage 

Rock Eagle Missions Conference 

Meeting of the Board of Directors 

Senior Examinations 

Reading Period 

Junior and Middler Examinations 

Commencement 



Baccalaureate Sermon: Dean C. Benton Kline, Jr., Agnes Scott College 

Sermon before the SMI: Keith R. Crim, Associate Book Editor, John Knox Press 

Commencement Address: Charles L. Weltner, Attorney 



Summer 1967 

July 18 - September 2 
July 19 - 21 



Summer Language School 
Christianity and Health Workshop 



Fall Quarter 1967-68 



13 



13 



September 6 
September 11 
September 11 
September 12 
September 13 
October 23 - 27 
October 24 
November 23 - 26 
December 2, 4, 5 
December 6 - 9 
December 9 



Faculty Retreat 

Orientation Period (Comprehensive Exams) 

Registration of new students 

Registration of returning and graduate students 

Opening Exercises 

Ministers' Week 

Alumni Luncheon 1:00 P.M. 

Thanksgiving Holidays 

Reading Period 

Examinations 

Christmas Holidays begin 12:30 P.M. 



Winter Quarter 

January 2, 1968 
January 26 - 28 
March 7 - 9 
March 11-14 
March 15 - 18 



Class work resumed 2:00 P.M. 

Vocations Week-end 

Reading Period 

Examinations 

Spring Recess 



84 



Spring Quarter 

March 19 
April 2 
April 14 
April 18 
May 14 
May 24 - 28 
May 25 - 28 
May 29 - June 1 
June 1 - 3 



Class work resumed 8:00 A.M. 

Honors Day 

Easter 

Columbia Friendship Circle Pilgrimage 

Meeting of the Board of Directors 

Senior Examinations 

Reading Period 

Junior and Middler Examinations 

Commencement 



Summer 1968 

July 16 - August 31 



Summer Language School 



1967 



JANUARY 


s 


M T W T F 


S 


i 


2 3 4 5 6 


7 


8 


9 lO 11 12 13 


14 


13 


16 17 18 \p 20 


21 


22 


23 24 25 26 27 


28 


29 


30 31 





FEBRUARY 


s 


M T W T F 


S 




12 3 


4 


5 


6 7 8 9 10 


11 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 


18 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 


25 


26 


27 28 





MAY 


s 


M T W T F 


S 




12 3 4 5 


6 


7 


8 9 lO 11 12 


13 


14 


15 16 17 18 19 


20 


21 


22 23 24 25 26 


27 


28 


29 30 31 






SEPTEMBER 




S 


M T W T F 


S 




1 


2 


3 


4 5 6 7 8 


9 


10 


11 12 13 14 15 


16 


17 


18 19 20 21 22 


23 


24 


25 26 27 28 29 


30 



JUNE 


s 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


9 


lO 


1 1 


12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 28 29 


30 





OCTOBER 


s 


IV1 T W T F 


S 


i 


2 3 4 5 6 


7 


8 


9 lO 11 12 13 


14 


15 


16 17 18 19 20 


21 


22 


23 24 25 26 27 


28 


29 


30 31 





MARCH 


s 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 






1 2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 8 9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 29 30 


31 




JULY 


s 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 
8 


2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 


9 


lO 


11 12 13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 26 27 


28 


29 


30 


31 










NOVEMBER 


s 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 






1 2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 8 9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 29 30 







APRIL 


s 


m 


T W T 


F 


S 
1 


2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 


8 


9 


lO 


11 12 13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 26 27 


28 


29 


30 
















AUGUST 






S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 






12 3 


4 


5 


f» 


7 


8 9 lO 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


27 


2H 


29 30 31 









DECEMBER 




S 


M T W T F 


S 




1 


2 


3 


4 5 6 7 8 


9 


lO 


11 12 13 14 15 


16 


1 7 


18 19 20 21 22 


23 


24 


25 26 27 28 29 


30 


31 







1968 



JANUARY 


S M T W T 


F S 


12 3 4 


5 6 


7 8 9 lO 11 


12 13 


14 15 16 17 18 


19 20 


21 22 23 24 25 


26 27 


28 29 30 31 




MAY 


S M T W T 


F S 


1 2 


3 4 


5 6 7 8 9 


10 11 


12 13 14 15 16 


17 13 


19 20 21 22 23 


24 25 


26 27 28 29 30 


31 


SEPTEMBER 


S M T VV T 


F S 


12 3 4 5 


G 7 


8 9 lO 11 12 


13 14 


.1.5 IS 17 18 19 


20 21 


22 23 24 25 25 


27 28 


29 30 





FEBRUARY 


S M T W T 


F 


S 


1 


2 


3 


4 5 6 7 8 


9 


10 


11 12 13 14 15 


16 


17 


18 19 20 21 22 


23 


24 


25 26 27 28 29 






JUNE 






S IVI T W T 


F 


S 
1 


2 3 4 5 6 


7 


8 


9 lO 11 12 13 


14 


15 


16 17 18 IT 20 


21 


22 


23 24 25 26 27 


:;s 


29 


30 








OCTOBER 


S M T W T 


F 


S 


12 3 


4 


5 


G 7 8 9 lO 


11 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 


18 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 


25 


23 


27 23 29 30 31 







MARCH 


s 


M 


T W T 


F 
1 


S 
2 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 


lO 


11 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


2S 27 23 


29 


SO 


31 












JULY 


s 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 




1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 10 11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 31 






NOVEMBER 


s 


M 


T W T 


F 
1 


S 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 


lO 


11 


12 13 14 


1 5 


is 


17 


111 


19 20 21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 27 28 


29 


30 



APRIL 


s 


M 


T W T 


F 


5 




1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 lO 11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


7.1 


22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


;:H 


29 


30 







AUGUST 


s 


M T W T F S 




12 3 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 10 


n 


12 13 14 15 16 17 


is 


19 20 21 22 23 24 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


25 


DECEMBER 


s 


IYI T W T F S 


i 


2 3 4 5 6 7 


-i 


9 lO li 12 13 14 


15 


16 17 18 19 20 21 


22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 


29 


30 31 







85 






1 1 — Faculty Residence — 






1. 


Administration Building 


16. 


"The Village" — Student Apartments 


2. 


Library 


17. 


Dr. Guthrie 


3. 


Florida Hall 


18. 


Dr. Fuhrmann 


4. 


Student Center 


19. 


Dr. Gailey 


5. 


Si.iions-Law Hall 


20. 


Dr. Taylor 


6. 


Dr. Gear 


21. 


Dr. McKee 


7. 


Dr. Robinson 


22. 


Prof. Riviere 


8. 


Dr. Cousar 


23. 


Dr. Babbage 


9. 


President Richards 


24. 


Dr. Wardlaw 


10. 


Dr. Cartledge 


25. 


Dr. Huie 


11. 


Mr. Bacon 


26. 


Mr. Prince 


12. 


Dr. Hughes 


27. 


Prof. Nease 


13. 


Dr. Thompson 


28. 


Dr. Dewitz 


14. 


Dean Lyon 


29. 


Columbia Presbyterian Church 


15. 


Mission Haven 







INDEX 



Academic Awards 


30, 73 


Degree Requirements 


36ff 


Accreditation 


1 


Directory for Correspondence 


2 


Administration 


11 


Directory of Students 


73ff 


Admission 


18 


Distinctions 


21 


Advanced Standing 


19 






Aid to Students 


25 


Emory University 
English Course 


7,38 
37 


Alumni Association 


28 


Entrance Requirements 


18 


Apartments 


25 


Evangelism and Missions 


66ff 


Atlanta 


6 


Examinations 


20 






Expenses and Fees 


24 


Bachelor of Divinity 


36,42 






Biblical Area 


43, 48ff 


Faculty 


12ff 


Board (food service) 


24 


Faculty Committees 


16 


Board of Directors 


10 


Fees and Expenses 
Field Education 


24 
22, 46 






Financial Assistance 


25 


Calendar 


84, 85 






Campus 


8 


General Information 


17ff 


Choir 


26 


Grading System 


20 


Christian Education 


60 


Graduate Studies 


38 


Church History 


54fi 


Graduating Class of 1966 


72 


Church Vocations Week-end 


27 


Greek 


50 


Clinical Training 


22, 39, 64 






College Preparation 


18 


Hebrew 


48 


Columbia Friendship Circle 
Continuing Education 


30 
28 


Historical-Doctrinal Area 
History of the Seminary 
Homiletics 


44 

5 

65 


Course Descriptions 


43ff 


Honors Program 


20, 71 


Counseling 


62 


Housing 


24, 25 



FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

fill in the reverse side of this form and send it to 

The Rev. Steve A. Bacon 
Columbia Seminary 
Decatur, Georgia 30031 



87 



INDEX (Continued from Page 87) 



Intern Years 


22 


Library 


8 


Loans 


25 


Location of the Seminary 


6 


Map of Campus 


86 


Master of Christian Education 


40 


Master of Theology 


38 


Memorial Funds 


33, 34 


Ministers' Week 


16 


Mission Haven 


8 


Missions and Evangelism 


66ff 


Missions Candidates 


37 


Missions Conference 


27 



Near Eastern Archaeological Seminar 23 
New Curriculum 41 

New Testament 50 



Radio and Television 


23, 66 


Reading, Summer 


21 


Recreation, Student 


27 


Roll of Students 


73-83 


Schedule 


20 


Scholarship Funds 


31-33 


Scholarships 


25 


Smyth Lecturers 


30 


Society for Theological Scholarships 26 


Society of Missionary Inquiry 


26 


Speech 


68 


Student Loan Funds 


34 


Student Publications 


27 


Student Recreation 


27 


Summer Language School 


21 


Summer Reading Program 


21 


Supervised Education 


22 


Supply Preaching 


25 



Television and Radio 65, 66 

Theology 58ff 

Th.M. 38 



Old Testament 


48 


Th.M. in Clinical Pastoral Care 


39 


Orientation Program 


19 


Transfer 


19 


Pastoral Area 


45 






Pastoral Care 


62 


Unclassified Students 


37 


Practical Apologetics 


69 


University Center 


7 


Presbyterian Center 


7 






Pledge by Students 


18 


Wives' Club 


27 


Publications, Student 


27 


Worship 


69 



For additional information fill in the form below and return to The Rev. 
Steve A Bacon, Columbia Seminary, Decatur, Georgia 30031. 

NAME 

ADDRESS 



ZIP_ 



□ I would like more information about opportunities for service in 
the Church. 

□ I am considering enrolling at Columbia, please send me an applica- 
tion form. 

□ I would like more information about presenting the work of Colum- 
bia to a local congregation. My particular concern is for the 
group. 

□ I am concerned about Columbia's needs for financial support. My 
particular interest is 



Please send me additional information. 



□ 



88