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Full text of "Columbia Theological Seminary Course Catalog 2000-2001"

COLUMBIA 




COLUMBIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

701 Columbia Drive 

Box 520 

Decatur, Georgia 30031 

www.CTSnet.edu 

Nonprofit Organization 

U.S. postage paid 

at Decatur, Georgia 30031-0520 



Columbia Theological Seminary is accredited by the Association of Theological Schools in the 
United States and Canada and the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges 
and Schools to award Master of Divinity, Master of Arts, Master of Theology, Doctor of Ministry, 
and Doctor of Theology degrees. 

The regulations, requirements, and general information included in this catalog are official for 
the 2000-2001 academic year but subject to revision at any time. 

Printed June 2000 



Contents 



Welcome l 

Statement of Mission 2 

History of the Seminary 4 

Degree Programs 5 

Master of Divinity 5 

Master of Arts in Theological Studies 11 

Master of Theology 12 

Doctor of Ministry 13 

Doctor of Theology 17 

Related Academic Programs and Resources 21 

John Bulow Campbell Library 21 

Columbia Bookstore 21 

Related Academic Programs 22 

Programs in Other Locations 23 

Admissions Information 25 

Admissions Procedures for Basic Degree Students 25 

Admissions Procedures for Advanced Degree Students 27 

Application Information for International Students 29 

Non-Degree Enrollment and Auditors 30 

Housing 30 

Hospitalization Insurance 31 

Financial Aid 32 

Scholarships 33 

Tuition and Fees 35 

Refund Policies 36 

Columbia in Service to the Church and its Ministry 39 

Continuing Education 39 

Lay Institute of Faith and Life 39 

Center for New Church Development 40 

International Theological Education 40 

Evangelism Emphasis 41 

Christian Spirituality Emphasis 41 

Columbia Colloquium 42 

Smyth Lectures 43 



Community Life 44 

Yearly Schedule 44 

Orientation 44 

Community Worship and Convocations 44 

Student Organizations and Activities 45 

Placement 46 

Awards and Prizes 47 

Graduate Fellowships 48 

Prizes, Awards, and Fellowships for 1999 49 

Curriculum and Courses 51 

Biblical Area Courses 53 

Historical-Doctrinal Area Courses 58 

Practical Theology Area Courses 63 

Interdisciplinary Courses 71 

Supervised Ministry Courses 73 

Th.D. and D.Min. Courses 76 

Academic Notes and Policies 79 

Faculty 85 

Staff 98 

Support of Columbia Seminary 101 

Students 106 

Calendar 144 
Index 



Welcome 



I am delighted to be writing this letter of 
welcome as Columbia's new president. Having 
served in the parish for a number of years, I have 
seen the vitality of the church that is supported 
by her seminaries, a vitality that finds its 
beginning in what God has done and is doing. 
Columbia is a seminary that celebrates its 
Presbyterian heritage and embraces the Reformed 
tradition by serving the body of Christ as we 
move into the new century. 

The church faces new challenges and 
opportunities as it continues to proclaim the 
Gospel of Jesus Christ and exhibit the reign of 
God to a hungry world. Columbia's legacy is to 
contribute to the well-being of the church 
through its teaching and living the Gospel. Columbia strives to be faithful, as John 
Calvin understood faith: "God's benevolence toward us, founded upon the truth of 
the freely given promise in Christ, both revealed to our minds and sealed upon our 
hearts through the Holy Spirit." 

Columbia's response to God's benevolence is to form pastors who will lead the 
church in its mission, and it is more. Columbia's response is also to edify pastors 
who are actively serving the church, and it is more. Columbia's response is also to 
equip laity for ministry in the world, and it is more. Columbia Theological Seminary 
responds to God's benevolence by engaging minds and enriching faith through all 
who come here and depart to serve. 

I invite you to come share in what God is doing at Columbia Theological Seminary. 




Laura S. Mendenhall 
President 



Statement of Mission 

Columbia Theological Seminary is 
an educational institution of the Presbyterian Church (USA), and a 
community of theological inquiry 
and formation for ministry 
in the service of the Church 
of Jesus Christ. 

At Columbia, people of faith seek to witness 
to God's creative power, 
redemptive action, 
transforming justice, 
and reconciling love, 
in a pluralistic society and 
interdependent world. 

We understand Christian faith to include 
worship of God, 
faithfulness to Jesus Christ, 
cultivation of the mind, 
disciplines of the Christian life, 
ministries of proclamation, nurture, 
compassion, and justice, 
expression of faith through the arts, 
and participation in the life of the Church. 

Our special mission in the service of the Church, 
and especially the Presbyterian Church (USA), is 
to educate women and men for leadership 
in ordained and lay ministries; 
to offer first degree, graduate degree, 
and continuing education programs; 
and to provide theological resources 
for the denomination, 
for the ecumenical church, 
and for persons with a variety of 
theological concerns. 

Because we are an education institution, 
our calling is 
to prepare persons to lead congregations 

in worship, witness, mission, and service; 
to pursue learning that joins 
mind and heart; 
to develop personal and professional skills 

for leadership in the church; 
to learn 
from the world-wide Church, 
from education, the arts, politics, 
economics, and science, 



and from those outside the centers 
of power and influence; 
to consider critically from the perspective 
of the Christian faith, 

ideological, technical, and scientific assumptions 

- including our own - 
about the human situation. 

Because we are a confessional community of the Church, we 
live under the authority of Jesus Christ 
as witnessed to 
in the scriptures of the Old and New Testaments, 
in the Church throughout the ages, 
and in the Reformed tradition and 
its confessions; 
affirm the worship of God as a vital and 
central feature of our life together 
and celebrate the goodness of God 
in all creation; 
believe in Christ's lordship over the 

whole world; 
articulate an evangelical understanding 
of life rooted in the rule 
of God's justice and love; 
listen with openness 
to voices of hopelessness and hope 

around and within us; 
acknowledge our own brokenness 
and need for redemption; 
commit ourselves 
to diversity and inclusivity, 
to ecumenicity, 

and to discerning the ongoing manifestations of 
God's presence in human affairs; 
nurture a personal and corporate faith 
which takes responsibility 
for our choices 
amid the political realities, 
the social institutions, 
and the global context 
in which we live. 
In carrying out our mission, 
we seek to be faithful to the gospel, 
and to become a living expression of 
the Body of Christ in the world. 



3 



A Brief History of the Seminary 

From its founding in Lexington, Georgia, in 1828, Columbia Theological Seminary has 
nurtured, and has been nurtured by, the Presbyterian Church in the South. This connec- 
tion has existed throughout its history and remains a cherished tradition. While Colum- 
bia now enjoys an outstanding national and international reputation, it also faithfully 
upholds its historic covenants with the Synods of Living Waters and South Atlantic. 

The first permanent location of the seminary was Columbia, South Carolina, in 
1830. The school became popularly known as Columbia Theological Seminary, and 
the name was accepted as permanent in 1925. 

The decade of the 1920's saw a shift in population throughout the Southeast. At- 
lanta was becoming a commercial and industrial center and growing rapidly in its 
cultural and educational opportunities. Between 1925 and 1930, President Richard T. 
Gillespie provided the leadership which led to the development of the present facili- 
ties on a 57-acre tract in Decatur, Georgia. 

The early years in Decatur were difficult. The future of the institution was uncer- 
tain. However, in 1932, Dr. J. McDowell Richards was elected president; under his 
leadership the seminary experienced substantial growth. 

Dr. C. Benton Kline served five years as president following Dr. Richards' retirement 
in 1971. In January 1976, Dr. J. Davison Philips assumed the presidency. He retired 
11 years later, passing the mantle of leadership to Dr. Douglas W. Oldenburg who, in 
January 1987, became the seminary's seventh president. In June 1998, Dr. Oldenburg 
was elected moderator of the 210th General Assembly of the PC (USA). Dr. Laura S. 
Mendenhall became Columbia's eighth president in August 2000. 




Degree Programs 

Columbia offers courses of study leading to both basic and advanced degrees. 
The Master of Divinity is the basic professional degree. The Master of Arts in Theo- 
logical Studies is also a basic theological degree, but academic rather than profes- 
sional in orientation. The advanced degrees are the Master of Theology, the Doctor 
of Ministry, and the Doctor of Theology. Men and women from all denominations 
are eligible to apply for any of these degrees. 

Master of Divinity 

Introduction 

Columbia Theological Seminary's seal carries the motto, noi\±£va<; kou 
bi&aGKdXovq, the Greek words for pastors and teachers. They are taken from the 
Letter to the Ephesians in which it is written, "The gifts he gave were that some 
would be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, some pastors and teachers, to 
equip the saints for the work of ministry, for building up the body of Christ" 
(Ephesians 4:11-12 NRSV). Since its inception in 1828, Columbia has seen its role as 
training persons for leadership in the church. The Master of Divinity degree is of- 
fered as a basic theological degree for those who seek to serve as the pastors, proph- 
ets, evangelists, and teachers and other leaders of the church of Jesus Christ. 

The curriculum offered to M.Div. students emerges from the seminary's identity 
as a community of memory and hope. The seminary finds its identity as part of the 
people of God stretching back thousands of years. It thus aims to lead students to a 
fresh critical appropriation of the Christian tradition for themselves and for the sake 
of the church they serve. The seminary is also a community that finds its identity in 
hope, in the promises of God, in the world that God will bring about, and in the 
opportunities still ahead for the work of the church in the Missio Dei. The curriculum 
thus also aims at nurturing students' hope and engaging their imaginations for mis- 
sion in a church and world in crisis. 

The Christian ministry needs persons who are possessed with a deep, informed, 
and personal faith and who are equipped with skills and imagination to lead the 
people of God in acts of compassion, proclamation, praise, confession, celebration, 
justice, reconciliation, and healing. Teaching and learning at Columbia exist for the 
purpose of equipping and forming the people who equip the saints to engage in the 
work of ministry. 

The Common Core 

Students in the M.Div. program take 22 prescribed course units of the total 31 
units required to complete the degree. The required elements of the curriculum, called 
the common core, form the basis for a shared vocabulary and set of experiences for 
all students as they progress through the programs and into their ministries. These 
elements include foundational courses in the content and interpretation of the Bible, 
biblical languages, church history, theology and ethics, and the practices of the church 
and its ministry. In order to assist in the task of integrating the knowledge learned in 



seminary with one's own life in the Christian faith and one's understanding of the 
church as the community of faith, the curriculum also incorporates integrative semi- 
nars and experiential learning into the common core and electives and seeks to put 
to good use the rich resources of learning environments - such as the congregation 
and the hospital - beyond the traditional academy. 

A student's time on the Columbia campus begins with "Baptism and Evangelical 
Calling," an integrative seminar which poses the questions, "What does it mean to 
be a Christian?" and "How is one incorporated into the church, the body of Christ?" 
The next semester features "The Eucharist and the Church's Mission," which exam- 
ines the nature of the church and its practices and makes extensive use of field expe- 
riences in actual congregations. In these seminars, students are guided by faculty 
from a variety of disciplines to look at their own identities, experiences, and tradi- 
tions and those of others through a range of perspectives. Students also are enabled 
to reflect on the experience of the people of God in diverse settings in the required 
units of Alternative Context, Supervised Ministry, and Pastoral Care. Students study- 
ing for ordination are also required to take a course in polity prior to graduation that 
addresses the denominational context in which they intend to minister. 

Integrative Seminars 

Integrative seminars are offered both as required and elective course units in the 
curriculum. They are called integrative because they are structured to bridge disci- 
plines and gaps between theory and practice. They take three basic forms. First, some 
integrative seminars approach a single subject, such as sexuality or suffering, from a 
variety of perspectives - biblical, ethical, pastoral - with the aim of understanding 
the subject from a more fully informed theological viewpoint. Second, other integra- 
tive seminars take on a specific task that requires students and faculty alike to bridge 
disciplines to answer the task. One such task might be to produce a supplemental 
worship resource for a multicultural congregation, wherein all seminar members 
would need to draw on all aspects of theological and ministerial education to com- 
plete the task. Finally, some integrative seminars are organized around the principle 
of learning by doing specific acts of ministry and then engaging in disciplined reflec- 
tion on the practices as a group. For example, a group of students and professors 
might engage in church-based work with mentally ill persons, meet to read, com- 
pare their experiences, support and challenge one another, and reflect theologically 
on their findings. 

The Elective System 

The elective portion of the M.Div. curriculum is important, for it is here that per- 
sons preparing for the ministry take responsibility for their vocations as practical 
theologians. The elective elements of the curriculum are offered to allow students to 
prepare for specialized vocations, to adapt the Columbia education to the needs of 
service in a particular denomination, to follow interests created by prior coursework 
or life experience, and to work through the meaning of the Christian faith in specific 
contexts. Columbia takes the interests and experiences of its students, and the diver- 
sity of ministries in which they will serve, seriously by making room for a large 
number of electives in its curriculum. Students are required to take at least eight 
elective units composed of courses and integrative seminars. 



Elective courses and integrative seminars are the place in the curriculum where 
students carefully exercise choice in order to prepare for a lifetime of ministry. A 
holistic ministry necessitates that ministers be people of personal integrity and faith, 
be well equipped in a variety of disciplines, approaches, and skills, and be able to 
relate them to social and church contexts. Different electives make different contri- 
butions to the formation of students as ministers. In addition to a title, each of the 
elective units in the curriculum carries a designation of which dominant pedagogi- 
cal objectives are met by the course. These objectives and their respective designa- 
tions are as follows: 

Knowledge of Tradition {K} 

Electives with this designation aim at increasing the student's knowledge of the 
Christian tradition and its significant conversation partners by means of their 
texts, patterns of thought, and /or practices. 

Experiencing God's People in Context {C} 

Electives with this designation place a student in a community of God's people in 

order to study how it celebrates and lives its faith. 

Spiritual Formation {SF} 

Electives with this designation provide a context within which a student may grow 

in Christian faith, discipline, and leadership to equip others in ecclesial piety. 

Clarifying Personal Beliefs {CB} 

Electives with this designation enable a student to examine, articulate, and pro- 
fess his or her faith. 

Theological Reflection {T} 

Electives with this designation equip a student to interpret contemporary life in 

light of the gospel. 

Missional Leadership {ML} 

Electives with this designation prepare students to guide Christian communities 
in worship, ministry, and mission and develop the students' ability to reflect criti- 
cally on their work. 

The aim of a ministry equipped for Christian leadership, whose members possess 
ethical and religious integrity and the intellectual skills for critical and constructive 
leadership in both the church and social contexts, requires that persons studying to 
be ministers attend to all the aspects of learning and formation that aim entails. The 
pedagogical objectives and their designations serve as a guide to students in the 
process of seeking balance in their preparation as leaders in the church. As a further 
discipline of balance, the total number of a student's elective units (seminars, courses, 
and practicums) should include selections from each of the six pedagogical objec- 
tives for ministry. Students should note, however, that this requirement does not 
impose unrealistic limits on their choice of electives since many offerings will meet 
multiple objectives. 



Advising 

A theologically educated person is more than a person who has had a series of 
courses in theologically related subjects. An important part of the curriculum is what 
students do to integrate their studies and experiences in their own lives. Faculty 
members assist in this process of integration and formation by serving as advisers to 
students. Faculty advisers participate in the selection of courses each semester a stu- 
dent is at Columbia. Course selection is made as the result of conversation between 
the student and adviser that takes into account areas of past experience, identified 
weaknesses, and the assessments of teachers and ministry supervisors. Early in the 
first year of studies, students undergo an individual supervised ministry assessment 
with the Director of Supervised Ministry. The director makes a joint recommenda- 
tion to the student and adviser about the student's contextual learning about minis- 
try. Approximately two-thirds of the way through the program, another occasion 
allows students and faculty to reflect upon the student's gifts and preparation for 
ministry. This time is called the mid-course assessment and is described below. 

Further Theological Study Beyond the Basic Degree 

A Master of Divinity program does not equip students with everything they will 
need to know for effective and faithful ministry. Students are equipped with initial, 
essential tools to enable them to begin the practice of ministry. The search for faithful 
answers to the challenges of the Christian life today requires an ethic of learning for 
the faith, which creates the expectation that graduates will return to this and other 
places of group learning for regular additional study. Further knowledge, additional 
insight into the life of faith, and strengthened practice for faithful leadership will 
require of graduates that they engage in regular, disciplined theological study at 
various stages in their ministries. 

Length of Program 

The Master of Divinity curriculum is designed so that a full-time student can 
complete the requirements for the degree in three years. The program may be length- 
ened by a variety of factors, including internships conducted during seminary and a 
student's family responsibilities. All work must be completed within six years from 
the date of matriculation. 

Requirements for the Master of Divinity Degree 

1. There must be on file with the seminary a complete and official transcript of cred- 
its showing graduation with a bachelor's degree from an accredited university or 
college of liberal arts and sciences or its equivalent as well as a completed health 
form and standardized test results. 

2. The student will be tested for and must achieve competency in English writing 
and speech. Test fees, where applicable, are the responsibility of the student. 

3. The student must be admitted to degree candidacy through the successful comple- 
tion of the mid-course assessment. 

4. The candidate must satisfactorily complete all the requirements of the degree with 
a total of 31 units. 



5. The overall grade point average (GPA) must be 2.30 or better. 

6. The student must pass an approved Bible content exam. 

7. The student must lead community worship at least once during the senior year. 

8. The student must be in residence for at least six long semesters on the Decatur 
campus (excluding transfer students). An exception to this policy can be granted 
only by faculty vote on a written request made to the Dean of Faculty. 

9. The faculty must be satisfied that the candidate has sustained a sound moral and 
religious character in seminary life and gives promise of useful service in the min- 
istry or other church vocations. 

10. All bills to the seminary must be paid and assurance given that all open accounts 
in the community and elsewhere have been satisfied. Students with education 
loans must agree to make prompt and regular payments. 

Mid-Course Assessment 

Admission to candidacy for the degree emerges from the mid-course assessment 
and must be approved by the faculty. The mid-course assessment is a major review 
of the student's potential for ministry that occurs after the completion of the major- 
ity of the common core coursework and the supervised ministry experience. This 
assessment is usually scheduled in the spring term of the second year for full-time 
students. Detailed guidelines for the assessment process are given to the student 
well in advance, including criteria, data to be considered, composition of the assess- 
ment committee, intent of the interview, and possible recommendations to the fac- 
ulty which might ensue. 

Every M.Div. degree student must meet the mid-course assessment requirement. 
A student seeking ordination shall have established a working relationship with the 
appropriate ecclesiastical body in order to be eligible for an assessment. 

At the mid-course assessment, questions of personal and professional growth shall 
be addressed, among other issues, and any recommendations or stipulations arising 
from this will be reviewed by the faculty prior to awarding the M.Div. degree. 

Certified Minister of Christian Education 

A student in the M.Div. program can take courses which will lead to certification 
as a minister of Christian education. Students interested in this specialty should see 
the Dean of Faculty. 

The Master of Divinity Degree and Graduate Study for Teaching 

Students who are committed to the ministry of teaching at the college or graduate 
level may find the M.Div. program suitable to their preparation for that ministry. 
Students considering further graduate study are encouraged to explore with the Dean 
of Faculty the ways in which their programs can meet the dual demands of educa- 
tion for service in the church and academy. 



The Columbia Calendar and Unit System 

Academic work for the M.Div. is offered in two long semesters in the fall and spring, 
in a January intensive term, and - for Greek language school and supervised ministry 
experiences - during the summer. Each long semester is constituted of six weeks of 
classes, followed by a reading and exam week at midterm, followed by another six 
weeks of classes and a reading and exam period. The reading/exam weeks enable 
students to complete the work for half term courses before beginning another such 
course and to catch up on reading for courses which continue through the semester. 

Courses, practicums, and seminars which meet all semester for three hours a week 
are assigned one unit of credit. Those which meet for three hours a week for half the 
term are given one half unit of credit. The half term courses allow students to take 
more subjects in a given term, without increasing the number of classes a student 
will carry simultaneously. Because of the time commitment involved, Greek School 
and Supervised Ministry 210 each earn two units of credit. Students may take only 
four subjects at any given time. 

Visual Representation of the Curriculum 

This representation is a calendar of courses for students who are able to complete 
the M.Div. in three years. Specific course prerequisites are listed with the course de- 
scriptions. Students are required to take 22 required course units and nine elective 
course units. The elective designations in the chart below indicate times when elec- 
tives may be taken. 



Year 


Summer 


Fall 


January 


Spring 




Essentials of Greek 


Old Testament Survey 


Elective 


New Testament Survey 




(2 units) 


New Testament 




Worship and Preaching 


One 




Exegesis 
Baptism and Evangelical 

Calling 
Elective 




The Eucharist and the 

Church's Mission 
Church History 




Supervised Ministry: 


Essentials of Hebrew 


Alternative 


Old Testament 




Congregation 


Christian Theology I 


Context 


Exegesis 


Two 


(2 units) 


Pastoral Care or Elective 
Elective 




Christian Theology II 

Polity 

Pastoral Care or Elective 




Optional: Clinical 


Christian Education 


Elective 


American Religion and 




Pastoral Education 


Ethics 




Cultural History (1/2 unit) 


Three 


(2 units) 


Elective 




World Christianity (1/2 unit) 




or Advanced 


Elective 




Final Things 




Supervised 






Elective 




Ministry 






Elective 



10 



Master of Arts in Theological Studies 

The purpose of this two-year flexible degree program is to provide theological 
studies for those exploring career options, preparing for doctoral studies, church 
leadership positions, or specialized forms of lay ministry, or for those investigating 
the relationships between a profession and theological issues or faith and the mod- 
ern world. This program is not designed to prepare persons for the practice of or- 
dained ministry. However, it may be useful for practicing ministers in traditions that 
do not require a degree in divinity for ordination, but who nevertheless wish to de- 
velop their formal knowledge of theology. 

Students, after consultation with the director of the M.A.(T.S.) program and after 
earning eight units with a 2.30 GPA, select one of the following five fields of special- 
ization: Old Testament, New Testament, Theology, Church History, Ethics. A faculty 
adviser from the area of specialization is assigned by the director for consultation in 
the selection of courses and the required Independent Study in the specialization, 
which includes a major paper. Proficiency in Hebrew or Greek is a requirement for 
the Old Testament or New Testament specialization. 

General Requirements for The Master of Arts in Theological Studies 
Degree 

1. Students must earn a total of 16 units with a 2.30 GPA, including a 1 unit re- 
search/constructive Independent Study in the major. Students must enroll in the 
M.A.(T.S.) Seminar in the first year of studies, take at least one basic course in 
three of the five fields of specialization, take an additional course in two of the 
five fields, and take a minimum of five courses in the chosen field of specializa- 
tion and three courses in a cognate field. Other course requirements may be es- 
tablished by the area in which the specialization falls. No more than three Practical 
Theology area courses may be counted as electives in the degree program. 

2. Students must successfully complete a one unit independent study in the field of 
specialization. It is expected that the adviser will be the faculty member with 
whom this independent study is done. The purpose of the required Independent 
Study and the research paper is to provide students with the opportunity to ex- 
plore in depth a critical issue in the field and to bring analytical and constructive 
skills to bear on the issue. Following the reading of the paper, the student and the 
adviser will discuss the paper. 

3. If a student's GPA is below 2.30 upon completion of five units, the student will be 
placed on academic probation. If a cumulative GPA of 2.30 or above has not been 
attained after eight units, the student will be dropped from the program. At least 
three of the five basic courses must be completed within the first eight units. 

4. All work must be completed within five years from the date of matriculation. 

Details of the program are available from the director of the Master of Arts in 
Theological Studies Program. 



11 



Certification in Christian Education 

A student in the M.A.(T.S.) program can take courses which will lead to certifica- 
tion in Christian education. Students interested in this specialty should see the Dean 
of Faculty. 

Advanced Degrees Introduction 

Columbia offers three programs leading to advanced degrees. Each builds on the 
M.Div. degree and, in the case of the D.Min. and Th.D. programs, also on necessary 
ministry experience which has ensued since the reception of the M.Div. degree. 

In addition to the resources of the faculty and library on Columbia's campus, 
graduate students are expected to draw upon the resources of the Atlanta area. The 
Th.D. and D.Min. programs are administered by the Graduate Professional Studies 
Committee of the Atlanta Theological Association, which coordinates and augments 
the resources of Candler School of Theology of Emory University, the Interdenomi- 
national Theological Center, Columbia, Erskine Theological Seminary in Due West, 
South Carolina, and Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary in Columbia, South 
Carolina. Th.M. degree students may also include in their program studies at these 
other seminaries. 

The resources of the Atlanta community are also available to Columbia graduate 
students. Accredited programs of clinical pastoral education and pastoral counsel- 
ing are available in many settings. The Urban Training Organization of Atlanta pro- 
vides resources in the area of urban problems and urban ministries. Numerous 
national and regional offices of denominational and interdenominational agencies 
are located in Atlanta. Other educational opportunities are available at Emory Uni- 
versity, Georgia State University, and colleges in the area. 

Master of Theology 

The Master of Theology (Th.M.) degree program has three purposes: for advanced 
study in an area of ministry, especially by persons in pastoral ministry; as prepara- 
tion for entering teaching or as a step toward a Ph.D.; and as preparation for a spe- 
cialization in ministry. 

Requirements for the Degree 

In order to qualify for the Th.M. degree, a student must complete the following 
within five years: 

1. Twenty-four semester credits of academic work at the advanced level (courses 
numbered in the 600's) with grades that average not less than 3.00. This academic 
work shall involve at least 15 hours taken through regular residential courses at 
Columbia Seminary. 

2. One of the following options: a) an acceptable thesis which shall constitute six 
additional credits, and an oral examination which shall be given after the thesis 
has been completed, or b) two courses (three credits each) which require a major 



12 



research paper. A grade of 3.00 or higher must be earned in each course. To select 
this option, a student must file a Th.M. Research Course Option Form with the 
Registrar by November 1. 

A written statement of the topic and proposal for research, together with the names 
of the faculty members serving on the thesis committee must be submitted to the 
Advanced Degrees Committee for approval. This statement must be submitted no 
later than the November meeting of the Advanced Degrees Committee in the aca- 
demic year in which the student anticipates graduation. The topic and proposal must 
have been previously approved by the student's thesis committee. February 1 is the 
deadline for provisional approval of the thesis by the project committee, and March 
1 is the deadline for final completion of the project. 

Any student enrolled in the Master of Theology degree program will be assessed 
an administrative fee of $50 for each half of the year in which that student does not 
register for credit hours through course work or thesis research. 

Concentration 

Each student will concentrate in one of the following areas: biblical studies, his- 
torical-doctrinal studies, or practical theology studies. At least 12 course credits must 
be taken in the area of concentration. Within that area at least nine credits, in addi- 
tion to the six credits for the thesis or research courses, must be taken in a chosen 
field (e.g., Old Testament or theology or evangelism). At least six course credits must 
be taken outside the area of concentration. 

All course credit must ordinarily be in 600 or 700 level courses. Up to three credits 
of lower level course work may be counted if there is prior approval by the thesis 
committee (if appointed) or the Director of Advanced Studies and the Dean of Fac- 
ulty. 

Doctor of Ministry 

Aims of the Program 

The Doctor of Ministry is designed for persons now engaged in ministry in the 
North American setting, who have completed basic theological studies (usually the 
Master of Divinity degree) and at least three years of full-time service in the practice 
of ministry. Qualified students from other countries may, in certain instances, be 
admitted under special arrangements with officials of their church. 

The program cultivates "doctors" in the sense of teachers of ministry to others. It 
provides an advanced, yet flexible, course of graduate study for those whose voca- 
tion as ministers of the people of God in the church of Jesus Christ implies their 
further disciplined reflection upon, and possibly their further specialization within, 
their own ministry. By helping people integrate ministerial theory and practice with 
basic faith commitments, the program strengthens ministers to exercise a critical kind 
of teaching role in the church and to increase their competency and faithfulness in 
practice. 



13 



The program focuses on the critical engagement between the biblical, historical, 
theological, and pastoral disciplines of ministry together with the social and person- 
ality sciences and their attendant practices. 

Because the program seeks to help the student strengthen a holistic ministry in 
community, the program is largely generalist in character, involving questions of 
personal ministerial identity and of the nature of the church and its mission in a 
postmodern world. A doctoral project requires students to focus this integrated ap- 
proach in a particular context. 

There are, in addition to the regular generalist program, possibilities for different 
approaches in 1) Gospel and Culture, 2) Christian Spirituality, 3) Cross-Cultural Min- 
istries, 4) Pastoral Counseling, and 5) New Church Development. 

Administration 

The program operates under the supervision of the Advanced Degrees Commit- 
tee of the seminary and is administered by a faculty member serving as Director of 
Advanced Studies. The program cooperates with the other member schools of the 
Atlanta Theological Association. 

Students enter the program either through an Atlanta-based Introductory Semi- 
nar or through a Introductory Seminar offered in a location outside the Atlanta area. 
Students may also take courses in other schools of the Atlanta Theological Associa- 
tion. 

Advising 

Each student is guided by an advisory committee of two faculty members. The 
primary adviser helps the student develop a plan of study. The primary and second- 
ary advisers comprise the doctoral committee which administers the qualifying ex- 
amination, assists the student in developing a project proposal, and evaluates the 
written project report. 

Degree Requirements 

The program requires 36 hours in which a student must maintain a 3.00 average. 
Students normally complete the program within four years. Extensions require the 
permission of the director and the Advanced Degrees Committee. All work must be 
completed within six years of entrance. Any student enrolled in the Doctor of Minis- 
try degree program will be assessed an administrative fee of $50.00 for each half of 
the year in which that student does not register for credit hours through course work, 
supervised ministry, or doctoral project research work. 

The faculty must be satisfied that the candidate shall have sustained a sound moral 
and religious character in ministry. 



14 



The 36-hour program comprises: 

An Introductory Seminar (six semester hours), required at the outset of the pro- 
gram. Students take part in an intensive seminar to explore interdisciplinary 
perspectives around contemporary issues of ministry and professional develop- 
ment. In this seminar students begin interdisciplinary integration and clarify an 
operative theory of ministry to guide their development of a study plan. 

Elective Courses (18 semester hours). The program requires an interdiscipli- 
nary plan of study involving the integration of three dimensions: 1) the bibli- 
cal and theological norms of Christian faith, 2) perspectives on the 
contemporary human situation, and 3) the practices of ministry and church 
mission. In consultation with an adviser, each student draws up a course of 
study to achieve the aims of both the student and the doctoral program. 

A Doctoral Practicum (six semester hours), a supervised activity in ministry. 
This practicum, often done in clinical pastoral education or preaching, can also 
take place in settings as diverse as business, governmental, community, or 
church agencies where appropriate supervision and learning opportunities with 
peers are available. In any case, the practicum takes place outside the student's 
ordinary work situation, providing new perspectives on self, theology, profes- 
sion, and the needs and challenges of other persons and institutions. 

A Doctoral Project Development and Design Workshop (non-credit). Toward 
the end of the program coursework, each student participates in a doctoral 
project development and design seminar to foster integration and to prepare 
for qualifying examinations and subsequent project proposal development and 
writing. 

A Doctor of Ministry Project (six semester hours). Elements of the course of 
study converge in the doctor of ministry project. The student must complete a 
project and a written project report that interprets this project to the seminary 
community and the larger church. The student should start thinking about the 
proposal for the project early in the program so the project can be an integrat- 
ing focus for the student's entire course of study. Proposals must be approved 
by the Advanced Degrees Committee no later than May 1 of the year prior to 
their anticipated graduation. The successful completion of a qualifying exami- 
nation will enable the student to proceed. Ordinarily, the project is conducted 
in the student's usual ministerial setting. February 1 is the deadline for provi- 
sional approval of the written draft by the project committee and March 1 is 
the deadline for final completion of the project. 

Gospel and Culture Approach 

The Gospel and Culture program has been designed by a group of Columbia fac- 
ulty members who have identified a number of critical issues and questions that 
requires serious reflection and action. Through the Introductory Seminar, the vari- 
ous elective classes, the doctoral practicum, and the doctoral project, students will 
work with a faculty group representing a rich blend of diverse theological and cul- 
tural perspectives. Students will be challenged to develop their own analyses and 
directions for the faithful ministry of the church in a context variously described as 
post-enlightenment, post-modern, post-Christian. 

15 



In the initial Introductory Seminar, and then in subsequent studies, students and 
faculty will be engaged with the writings and the analyses of sociologists, philoso- 
phers, cultural anthropologists, and historians. Participants will reflect in some depth 
upon the concrete manifestations of culture - the art and artifacts, the products, tech- 
nologies, entertainments, institutions, and movements that characterize daily life. 
They will examine the major fault lines within the church about the meaning of Chris- 
tian faith and the ways Christians are reading the signs of the time theologically. 
Finally, students will be asked to think through their practice of ministry in the light 
of their studies and to develop a doctoral project which will both strengthen their 
own ministry and make a critical and constructive contribution to the faith and prac- 
tice of the church. 

All classes will be taught in intensive two-week courses at the seminary over a 
three- to four-year period, but students will do most of their studies, their doctoral 
practicum, and doctoral project in their own ministry setting in consultation with 
the faculty. 

Christian Spirituality Approach 

A student may choose to undertake a specialization through interdisciplinary stud- 
ies centered upon the church's theology and practice of Christian spirituality. This 
program, which has the same general aims and degree requirements listed previously 
for the more general program, is designed to explore God's relationship to persons, 
the community of faith, and the world, including the ethical and social dimensions of 
spirituality. Through the Introductory Seminar, the various elective classes, the doc- 
toral practicum, and the doctoral project, students will be enabled to bring their minds 
to bear more effectively on matters of the heart and to gain resources to foster spiritual 
renewal not only in the lives of individuals, but also in the life of congregations. Stud- 
ies and doctoral projects will be rooted in congregational life. 

Students will undertake studies of the history of spirituality, the biblical resources 
in Israel's prayers, and the practices of the New Testament community. Issues of 
spirituality in a post-enlightenment, post-modern culture, discovery of issues of spiri- 
tuality for children, and resources for the practices of retreats and small groups for 
spiritual direction will be among the other explorations and research undertaken. 
Time for worship, community building, and spiritual retreats will be an integral part 
of the program itself. 

The Introductory Seminar and most of the classes will be taught at the seminary 
over a three- to four-year period, but students will do most of their further studies, 
their doctoral practicum, and doctoral project in their own ministry setting in con- 
sultation with the faculty. 

Cr oss-Cultural Approach 

The Cross-Cultural approach is designed to respond to the urgency of living and 
ministering in a culturally diverse and religiously plural context. The program seeks 
to foster critical thinking and develop a theology of cross-cultural understanding 
that will inform and reform the practice of ministry in the life of congregations. 



16 



The program design is framed under the following cross-cultural perspectives: 1) 
it observes the particularities of cultural and religious groups, and their interaction 
among each other; 2) it seeks to facilitate and to encourage the encounter between 
diverse cultural and religious groups and the multifaceted dominant culture; and 3) 
it aims to develop a Christian theology and practice of ministry that is informed by 
diverse cultural and religious dynamics. 

Pastoral Counseling Approach 

A student concentrating in pastoral studies may elect the field of pastoral care or 
a specialization in pastoral counseling. The beginning of the latter program requires 
the successful completion of a non-credit year of C.P.E. in an institution accredited 
by the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education. 

The normal curriculum for students in the pastoral counseling specialization in- 
volves two years of participation in a pastoral counseling practicum at an Atlanta 
area training center accredited by the American Association of Pastoral Counselors. 
During the time in the practicum, the student will also take three of the four courses 
in the Th.D. curriculum and the D.Min. Introductory Seminar on ministry. The su- 
pervision provided by the practicum allows the student to apply for membership in 
the American Association of Pastoral Counselors. The six credits from the practicum 
may be applied to the required credits for academic work. 

New Church Development Approach 

This specialization focuses on the formation of new churches. Qualified candi- 
dates will be recruited from the PC (USA) and other denominations. This specializa- 
tion aims to equip church leaders in the development mission of starting new 
congregations for the twenty-first century. Equipping present and future ethnically 
and linguistically diverse new church development leaders is a key facet of the 
program's aim. 

Doctor of Theology in Pastoral Counseling 

This degree is offered through the Atlanta Theological Association by Columbia 
Theological Seminary, the Candler School of Theology, and the Interdenominational 
Theological Center. The program of study is conducted under the direction of the 
Th.D. Committee of the Atlanta Theological Association. The Th.D. Committee has 
responsibility for approving admission to the program, establishing curriculum of- 
ferings, and certifying candidates for the awarding of the degree. Students may reg- 
ister for courses at any of the Atlanta ATA seminaries. 

Aims of the Program 

The purpose of the Doctor of Theology in pastoral counseling is to prepare minis- 
ters to serve as pastoral counselors in a local church or on the staff of a community 
counseling center, to serve as consultants to other clergy, and to offer training in 
pastoral care and counseling. The program is designed to prepare persons for the 
specialized ministry of pastoral counseling at a doctoral level of competence and for 
membership at the Fellow level in the American Association of Pastoral Counselors. 
The degree is intended to be comparable to the Ph.D., but it is designed for those 
whose interest in pastoral counseling is primarily professional and theological. 

17 



Program of Study 

The studies included within the program will help the student gain an advanced 
understanding of appropriate theological and theoretical concepts; learn under quali- 
fied supervision the application of these concepts in pastoral counseling and how to 
promote professional integration of theory and skills in both pastoral counseling 
and pastoral guidance; and design and execute a research project appropriate to the 
student's professional practice which will give evidence of creative ability to con- 
tribute to this aspect of pastoral counseling. 

Course Work and Practicum 

In carrying out this program, which should not exceed six years, the student must 
enroll for a minimum of 54 semester hours of academic course work including clini- 
cal supervision through the Pastoral Counseling Practicum. Any student enrolled in 
the Doctor of Theology degree program will be assessed an administrative fee of 
$50.00 for each semester in which that student does not register for credit hours 
through course work, clinical work, or doctoral project supervision. 

Introductory seminars (three credits per semester: ATA463, ATA471, ATA473, 
ATA475) are required in the first four semesters of studies. The student ordinarily 
enters the pastoral counseling practicum when entering the program of studies and 
continues in the practicum for four consecutive semesters. One of the student's Quali- 
fying Examinations, the Performance Exam in the practice of pastoral counseling, is 
taken after the student completes four semesters in the practicum. The clinical set- 
ting for supervision is the Pastoral Counseling Service of the Georgia Association for 
Pastoral Care. 

Each student admitted to the program shall have one member of the pastoral 
counseling faculty as adviser. 

Qualifying Examinations 

Upon completion of 54 credits with at least a B average, the student may apply to 
take the Comprehensive Examination, which tests the student's competence in both 
the content and performance of pastoral counseling. The content areas in which the 
student will be examined include: 

I. Personal and Interpersonal Dimensions of Pastoral Counseling 

Exam 1. Therapeutic relationships and process in relation to personality, de- 
velopmental theories, psychopathology, and the psychological understanding 
of religion. 

Exam 2. Family theory and therapy, related social psychological understand- 
ings of therapeutic process, and either theory of group process or of consulta- 
tion and supervision. 

Exam 3. Pastoral theological methodology, theological anthropology and re- 
lated theological issues, and the relation of theology to the human sciences. 



18 



II. Socio-cultural Dimensions of Pastoral Counseling 

Exam 4. Pastoral counseling as a profession in relation to other professions; its 
relation to class, race, and gender; its relation to contemporary family, work, 
and religion; its participation in larger cultural and religious traditions under- 
stood through such disciplines as cultural anthropology, cultural criticism, and 
feminist theory. 

III. Ecclesiological and Ethical Dimension of Pastoral Counseling 

Exam 5. Pastoral counseling in relation to the history and contemporary theory 
and practice of pastoral care; theology and ethics of pastoral counseling as a 
specialized form of the church's ministry. 

Dissertation 

Following satisfactory performance in the Qualifying Examination, the student 
will then engage in an approved research project and write a dissertation. 

Application forms and further general information about the Th.D. in pastoral 
counseling program may be obtained from the Director of the Th.D. Program or the 
Director of Advanced Studies. 




19 



Related Academic Programs 
and Resources 

The John Bulow Campbell Library 

The library, named for John Bulow Campbell, an Atlanta benefactor and member 
of Columbia's Board of Trustees during the 1930s, is an integral part of the educa- 
tional program of the seminary. Through its collection and services, the library sup- 
ports the teaching and learning in the degree programs of the seminary. The library 
offers resources to extend the work of the classroom in breadth and depth, to pro- 
vide for student and faculty research, and to encourage reading beyond course 
assignments. 

The library collection includes books, periodicals, church records, video and au- 
dio cassettes, and microforms. It is a well balanced selection of older and contempo- 
rary works in the field of theological studies. It is particularly strong in biblical studies; 
contemporary theology, especially in the Reformed tradition; American 
Presbyterianism; and practical theology. Special collections related to Asian Chris- 
tianity and religious art are also significant aspects of the library's holdings. 

This specialized theological collection is supplemented and enriched by the col- 
lections in the libraries of the Atlanta Theological Association (ATA) and the Atlanta 
Regional Consortium for Higher Education (ARCHE), to which students and faculty 
have ready access. The enhanced library holdings thus provide an outstanding re- 
source for Columbia students in the basic and advanced degree programs, for Co- 
lumbia faculty in their teaching and research, and for visiting scholars. 

The library houses the collection and affords spaces for consulting reference tools, 
for study and reading, viewing advanced media materials, and for the use of copiers 
and microform readers. A computer center supplies word processing facilities which 
are open to all students, faculty, and staff who are authorized users. A notable fea- 
ture of the library is the Griffith's Children's Library, unique to theological libraries. 

The C. Benton Kline, Jr. Special Collections and Archives 

Documents and memorabilia related to the history and development of Colum- 
bia Theological Seminary are preserved in the seminary archives located in the li- 
brary. The archive collection is designated as the place of record for all seminary 
publications. 

The Columbia Bookstore 

The seminary bookstore, located in the Richards Center, provides books and sup- 
plies at a discount for basic degrees students who wish to begin building their own 
theological libraries and for persons working toward advanced degrees who are con- 
tinuing that process. The bookstore also serves pastors, laypersons, and churches all 
over the Southeast. Its inventory includes a wide selection of standard and current 
books in the historical-doctrinal area, spirituality, practical theology, Bible, and homi- 



21 



letics. In addition, the bookstore offers commentaries on the Old and New Testa- 
ments and books related to women's studies, African American studies, world mis- 
sions, and evangelism. The bookstore is ordinarily open from 10:30 to 2:30, Monday 
through Friday, with special hours during campus events. 

Related Academic Programs 

In addition to the basic and advanced degree programs, Columbia Seminary of- 
fers a wide variety of academic opportunities. Some of these are offered in relation- 
ship with other educational institutions; others are special emphases of Columbia. 

Atlanta Theological Association 

Through the Atlanta Theological Association (ATA), Columbia enjoys academic 
and professional affiliations with Candler School of Theology, Erskine Theological 
Seminary, Interdenominational Theological Center, and Lutheran Theological South- 
ern Seminary. The association develops and coordinates educational programs and 
resources of these member institutions, which include approximately 1,600 students, 
200 faculty, and a combined library collection of 600,000 volumes. Among significant 
and promising cooperative endeavors, in addition to the Doctor of Theology and 
Doctor of Ministry degree programs, are cross registration, sharing of faculty, library 
and lectureship resources, inter-seminary courses, and experimental programs in 
various academic disciplines and professional specializations. 

Atlanta Regional Consortium for Higher Education 

Columbia Seminary is a founding institution of the metropolitan Atlanta consor- 
tium of institutions of higher education called ARCHE. The institutions included are 
Agnes Scott College, Atlanta College of Art, Clark Atlanta University, Emory Uni- 
versity, Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia State University, Institute of Paper 
Science and Technology, Interdenominational Theological Center, Kennesaw State 
College, Mercer University Atlanta, Morehouse College, Morehouse School of Medi- 
cine, Morris Brown College, Oglethorpe University, Southern College of Technology, 
Spelman College, and the University of Georgia. 

The areas of cooperation are broad and provide the student with exceptional op- 
portunities across a spectrum of disciplines from science to art. 

Cross-Registration at Area Schools 

Columbia students may cross-register for courses at schools which belong to ei- 
ther the Atlanta Theological Association or the Atlanta Regional Consortium for 
Higher Education. Forms for cross-registration are available in the registrar's office 
at each school. 

Students may cross-register for a course on a space-available basis. A student may 
cross-register for a maximum of two courses per term, and the combined load may 
not exceed the full-time allowable load on the home campus. Students register and 
pay regular tuition and fees to the home institution. 



22 



Cross-Registration at Theological Institutions of the Presbyterian Church 
(USA) 

A policy of reciprocal cross-registration at the 10 theological institutions of the 
Presbyterian Church (USA) is designed to strengthen the theological education of 
persons preparing for ministry in the denomination. This policy permits Presbyte- 
rian students registered in master's degree programs to take courses at any of the 
other institutions without paying additional tuition. Tuition for a course is charged 
at the home school. Additional information is available in the Registrar's Office. 

Clinical Pastoral Education 

Clinical pastoral education is a first-hand learning experience under certified su- 
pervision which provides theological students and pastors with opportunities for 
intensive study of pastoral relationships and which seeks to make clear in under- 
standing and practice the resources, methods, and meanings of the Christian faith as 
expressed through pastoral care. Columbia's membership in the Association for Clini- 
cal Pastoral Education means that its students will be given priority of choice in 
institutions elected, especially those listed within the Southeast. 

Programs in Other Locations 

Appalachian Ministries Educational Resource Center 

Columbia Seminary is a member of the Appalachian Ministries Educational Re- 
source Center (AMERC) a seminary consortium which provides specialized theo- 
logical education for students interested in the Appalachian region or rural ministry. 
Through its educational programs, normally offered in the summer and January terms, 
students have the opportunity to learn about Appalachia, its people and history, its 
values and religion, and its needs and issues for ministry. Classroom and field expe- 
riences are both integral to the AMERC educational process. Information about 
AMERC courses is available through the Office of Supervised Ministry. 

The Mid-East Seminar 

A summer travel seminar is sponsored by Columbia Theological Seminary con- 
sisting of a three-week study trip to Israel, Jordan, and Greece. The program, subsi- 
dized by a private foundation, is directed by Dr. Max Miller, Professor of Old 
Testament Studies at Candler School of Theology. It is limited to five students from 
each of the schools and five lay persons selected from positions of leadership in the 
Southeast. 

The program has two purposes: to provide an in-depth study tour of the area 
which stands at the center of our biblical heritage and plays such a crucial role in 
current international affairs and to provide a context in which the leaders of 
tomorrow's church can get to know each other and develop close bonds of under- 
standing and friendship. At the same time there is opportunity for extended inter- 
change between the students preparing for professional careers in the church and 
lay persons who are already playing key roles in business and community affairs. 



23 



National Capital Semester for Seminarians 

Columbia Seminary is a participating institution in the National Capital Semester 
for Seminarians, organized by Wesley Theological Seminary, Washington, DC. The 
program provides an opportunity for seminary students to spend a semester in Wash- 
ington for study and involvement in the processes of government and the concerns 
of the churches. The design includes an interaction /reflection seminar, supervised 
study, and the opportunity to select other courses in Washington institutions. For 
detailed information, contact the Office of Academic Affairs. 

Urban Training Organization of Atlanta 

Urban Training Organization of Atlanta (UTOA) serves as a resource in the theo- 
logical education of students from Columbia Seminary and other Atlanta seminaries 
by providing opportunities for students to be involved with community organizers, 
social ministry agencies, and congregations involved in social service in Atlanta. 
Urban clinicals, including field experiences and peer reflection groups, are available 
for academic credit. UTOA is also significantly involved with M.Div. students in the 
Alternative Context for Ministry course for those in the Atlanta placement. For more 
information, contact the Office of Supervised Ministry. 



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24 



Admissions Information 

Admissions Procedures for Basic Degree Students 

Admission to the Master of Divinity Program 

Students desiring admission to the Master of Divinity program should request an 
application from the Office of Admissions. Students must meet the following re- 
quirements for admission: 

1 . A student must furnish: a) a completed application form, b) supplemental forms, 
c) transcripts, d) references on forms produced by Columbia, and e) a letter of 
endorsement from one's home church. Test scores from the Graduate Record 
Examinations General Test are not required but may be requested in some cir- 
cumstances. 

2. An interview with a member of the Admissions Committee is required. This 
interview is best done on campus. 

3. Admission to the M.Div. program ordinarily requires a four-year baccalaure- 
ate degree from an accredited university or college of arts and sciences or its 
equivalent. Students with degrees from unaccredited educational institutions 
must furnish test scores from the Graduate Record Examinations General Test 
with their applications. Students without a bachelor's degree are not eligible 
to enter the M.Div. program at the seminary except by special action of the 
faculty. When requested to do so by presbyteries of the Presbyterian Church 
(USA) or other denominations, Columbia may accept students without a uni- 
versity or college degree for a special course of study. 

Students in the Master of Divinity program are encouraged either to have a read- 
ing knowledge of Greek prior to matriculation or to begin their studies with the 
Summer Greek School prior to the first fall semester. 

Students admitted to the seminary will be given an application for seminary hous- 
ing and a health form to be filled out by a physician. 

Students in good standing in other accredited seminaries may be admitted after 
transcripts have been evaluated and their applications approved by the Admissions 
Committee. Such students must secure a letter from their academic dean indicating 
that they are students in good standing. Students in the M. Div. degree program may 
receive no more than 15 units credit for work completed at another Association of 
Theological Schools (ATS) accredited seminary. 

Normally, international students (persons who are not U.S. citizens or permanent 
residents) are accepted only for graduate work beyond the M.Div. level. 

All U.S. students (citizens or with permanent resident visas) for whom English is 
a second language must pass the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) 
before admission and enrollment for credit can be attained. Those seeking admis- 
sion must score at least 220 (new format) or 550 (old format). Students who score 
close to this level may take courses for credit for one semester but must retake the 
exam and attain the required score before further work may be undertaken. 



25 



Admission to the Master of Arts in Theological Studies Program 

Students desiring admission to the Master of Arts in Theological Studies program 
should request an application from the Office of Admissions. Students must meet 
the following requirements for admission: 

1 . A student must furnish: a) a completed application form, b) supplemental forms, 
c) transcripts, and d) references on forms provided by Columbia. Test scores 
from the Graduate Record Examinations General Test are not required but may 
be requested in some circumstances. 

2. An interview with a member of the Admissions Committee is required. This 
interview is best done on campus. 

3. Admission to the M.A.(T.S.) program requires a four-year baccalaureate degree 
from an accredited university or college of arts and sciences or its equivalent. 

A student may transfer no more than five units in the five fields of the program 
from institutions outside the Atlanta Theological Association or from work completed 
prior to admission to the program. No transfer credit may be obtained for work done 
more than 36 months before admission. Occasional Students subsequently admitted 
to the program may receive up to two units of credit for previous work taken in the 
past 36 months. 

All U.S. students (citizens or with permanent resident visas) for whom English is 
a second language must pass the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) 
before admission and enrollment for credit can be attained. Those seeking admis- 
sion must score at least 220 (new format) or 550 (old format). Students who score 
close to this level may take courses for credit for one semester but must retake the 
exam and attain the score level before further work may be undertaken. 

Visiting Columbia Seminary 

Those who are interested in applying for admission to a basic degree program are 
strongly encouraged to visit the seminary before or during the application process. Pro- 
spective students and their spouses may arrange visits which include a tour of the cam- 
pus, appointments with admissions and financial aid staff, conversations with faculty 
and students, and observing classes. Housing and meals at the seminary are provided 
during the visit. Arrangements for visiting can be made through the Admissions Office. 

Conferences for Prospective Students 

Columbia Seminary sponsors two conferences on ministry each spring and fall. Dur- 
ing these conferences, men and women from any denomination who are exploring their 
call to ministry are invited to attend classes, meet in faculty homes, talk with students, 
staff, and faculty, and worship with the seminary community. The conferences are de- 
signed to provide a retreat atmosphere where participants can reflect upon questions of 
call and vocation in addition to gathering specific information about the seminary. All 
persons who are considering the possibility of a church vocation, whether college stu- 
dents or those currently engaged in other careers, are invited to participate in the confer- 
ence of their choice. The dates for this year's conferences are November 3-5, 2000, and 
February 23-25, 2001. For further information, write to the Director of Admissions. 

26 



Admissions Procedures for Advanced Degree Students 

Admission to the Master of Theology Program 

Application for admission to the Master of Theology program is made through 
the Office of Advanced Studies. Students must meet the following requirements for 
admission: 

1. The M.Div. degree from an accredited seminary or divinity school, or its aca- 
demic equivalent, is required. In certain cases a Master of Arts or a Master of 
Theological Studies degree in the appropriate area may be accepted as a sub- 
stitute, but additional preparatory work may be required. 

2. Ordinarily, a B average in an applicant's college and seminary program is con- 
sidered a minimum standard for admission. Applicants should have official 
transcripts of all work since high school sent directly from the institution. 

3. A knowledge of both the Hebrew and Greek languages is a prerequisite for the 
program. If an applicant's M.Div. course did not require these, the student 
may substitute an approved language for one of the biblical languages. 

4. Students must submit three letters of recommendation (on forms provided by 
Columbia Theological Seminary): one academic reference from a seminary or 
other graduate school professor and two character references from persons 
who are familiar with the applicant's ministry. 

5. All applications for the Th.M. must be filed by May 1 for the following aca- 
demic year. Applications after May 1 will be considered if space is available. 
Applications from International students must be filed by February 1 for the 
following academic year. 

6. Applicants who receive notice of admissions prior to February 15 must indi- 
cate to the Director by March 15 whether or not they will accept admission; 
applicants who receive notification after February 15 must indicate their deci- 
sion within 30 days. 

7. Th.M. students may only begin their course of study in the fall semester. 

All U.S. students (citizens or with permanent resident visas) for whom English is 
a second language must pass the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) 
before admission and enrollment for credit can be attained. Those seeking admis- 
sion must score at least 220 (new format) or 550 (old format). Students who score 
close to this level may take courses for credit for one semester but must retake the 
exam and attain the required score before additional work may be undertaken. 

International students applying to the Master of Theology Program must follow 
the guidelines given under Application Information for International Students. 

Admission to the Doctor of Ministry Program 

Admission to the Doctor of Ministry degree program requires a Master of Divin- 
ity or equivalent degree with a superior academic record (a B average or higher) 
from a school of theology accredited by the Association of Theological Schools (or an 
equivalent accrediting body outside the United States and Canada) and at least three 
years of full-time work with demonstrated superior professional performance. 

27 



To be considered for the Doctor of Ministry degree program, applicants must sup- 
ply the Office of Advanced Studies with the following: 

1. Application for admission, including a personal statement. 

2. Official transcripts of all work since high school sent directly from the institution. 

3. Three letters of recommendation (on forms provided by Columbia Theologi- 
cal Seminary): one academic reference from a seminary or other graduate school 
professor and two character references from persons who are familiar with the 
applicant's ministry. 

4. A personal interview with the Director of Advanced Studies may be requested. 

All U.S. students (citizens or with permanent resident visas) for whom English is 
a second language must pass the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) 
before admission and enrollment for credit can be attained. Those seeking admis- 
sion must score at least 220 (new format) or 550 (old format). 

International students applying to the Doctor of Ministry Program must follow 
the guidelines given under Application Information for International Students. 

With prior approval of the student's adviser and the Dean of Faculty, a student 
may receive up to six semester hours of transfer credit from another accredited, de- 
gree granting institution. An official transcript of this course work must be forwarded 
to the Office of Advanced Studies. Each course must be at the graduate level and the 
grade must be at least a B (3.0 on a scale of 4.0). 

Students may receive advanced standing credit of up to six semester hours (with 
the Dean of Faculty's approval) for clinical or academic work taken before admis- 
sion into the program, provided the above policies for transfer credit are observed. A 
course submitted for advanced standing must have been taken no more than five 
years before entrance into the program. Students may not receive credit for academic 
work applied toward another degree. 

For application forms and further information, contact the Office of Advanced 
Studies. 

Admission to the Doctor of Theology in Pastoral Counseling Program 

Applicants must hold the Master of Divinity or equivalent degree with a superior 
academic record from an accredited institution and must have had post-seminary 
professional experience in which significant learning and professional promise were 
evident. In addition, applicants must have significant experience in ministry (usu- 
ally three years of full-time employment after completion of the first theological de- 
gree) and in clinical pastoral education (usually four consecutive units). 

The admission process includes: 

1. an assessment of the applicant's academic record and professional experience. 

2. a statement of purpose. 

3. references and other materials supplied with the application. 

4. an interview with the inter-seminary admissions committee. 

28 



The deadline for receipt of all application materials is February 15 of the year for 
which fall semester admission is requested. 

A student who, though otherwise acceptable, has not had courses in personality de- 
velopment and pastoral care equivalent to those taught in the participating seminaries 
of the ATA must take these courses without credit during the first year of residence. 

Application forms and further general information about the Th.D. in Pastoral 
Counseling program may be obtained from the Director of Th.D. Program or the 
Director of Advanced Studies. 

Application Information for International Students 

Normally, international students (persons who are not U.S. citizens or permanent 
residents) are accepted only for graduate work beyond the M.Div. level. All interna- 
tional students are expected to have the written recommendation of their denomina- 
tion. A statement of the student's plans for future work in the student's home country 
is also required. 

Persons from non-English-speaking countries must furnish with the application 
recent evidence of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a score of 
at least 220 (new format) or 550 (old format). 

Upon admission, and before the visa process can begin, persons must show proof of 
full financial resources to cover tuition, travel, and living expenses for the entire period 
of study in the United States. 1-20 and visa documents will not be processed until this 
completed certificate has been approved. International students are required to carry the 
school-sponsored hospitalization insurance for themselves and all accompanying fam- 
ily members that meets the approval of the Immigration and Naturalization Service. No 
applicant should come to Atlanta until a formal letter from the Admissions Committee 
informing the applicant of admission to the program has been received. 

In addition to the above, international students applying to the Doctor of Minis- 
try Program must meet additional regulations which are available upon request. They 
include the following: 

1. A minimum of 16 months in the Atlanta area (beginning in fall semester) is 
required to complete program components through the qualifying examina- 
tions and approval of project proposal. 

2. Letters of approval, with detailed plans for a specific project in ministry, from 
the student's church authorities. 

3. The applicant must identify two persons holding doctoral degrees, resident in 
the country in which the applicant ministers, who are familiar with the minis- 
try of the applicant and are willing to serve as members of his or her doctoral 
committee. This committee advises the applicant regarding a course of study 
and supervises and evaluates his/her doctoral project. 

International students coming on special scholarships for a non-degree course of 
study at Columbia will be evaluated by the International Theological Education 
Committee for English proficiency to match the nature of their study at Columbia. 
Students needing additional proficiency in English will be encouraged to take courses 
in English as a second language in the Atlanta area. 



29 



All applications for international students should be sent to the Director of Inter- 
national Theological Education. 

Non-Degree Enrollment and Auditors 

Students meeting requirements for admission to a basic degree program but not 
wishing to work toward a degree may be enrolled as Occasional Students to take 
courses for credit. Their program of study must be approved by the Dean of Faculty. 

Students who do not meet admissions requirements may be enrolled for a period 
of up to one academic year as Unclassified Students. 

Occasional Students may be admitted by the Dean of Faculty to take courses of 
particular interest if prerequisites for each course are satisfied. Their course selec- 
tions must be approved by the Dean of Faculty, and their status must be renewed 
each academic term. Students for whom English is a second language and who wish 
to take courses for credit as Occasional Students must score at least 220 (new format) 
or 550 (old format) on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Students 
may audit courses as Occasional Students without taking the TOEFL. 

Persons taking courses at Columbia for the purposes of transferring credit back to the 
school in which they are enrolled in a degree program must complete an application as 
an Occasional Student. The application must also include either a letter of good standing 
from the Dean or an official transcript of work completed at their home institution. They 
should also make sure that their school will accept the credit from Columbia. 

Regular students, spouses of students, and other members of the community are 
invited to audit courses with the permission of the instructor and as space is avail- 
able. Registration as an auditor must be made through the Office of the Registrar. 
Auditors are advised to follow the following procedures: 

1. Request a class schedule from the Office of the Registrar (404/687-4576). 

2. Select the class to be audited. 

3. Secure permission from the professor of that class (404/378-8821). Permission 
of the professor and available space are required for auditing classes. 

4. Contact the Office of the Registrar to fill out an Occasional Student application 
form and a registration form. Pending the Dean's approval registration will be 
complete. 

Note: Cost for auditing a course is one-half the cost of regular tuition for a three- 
credit /one-unit course. Current students taking a full-load may audit a class for no 
charge pending professor's permission. 

Housing 

Seminary housing is reserved for full-time basic degree students. Housing appli- 
cation forms are distributed by the Office of Admissions when applicants are ac- 
cepted. Application for housing should be made as early as possible following 
acceptance. All inquiries about housing should be directed to the Business Office. 



30 



A limited number of seminary housing units are accessible to the physically handi- 
capped. The Business Office should be contacted about such housing. 

A student who has entered into a lease agreement for a seminary housing unit for 
a term, but who has not yet occupied the unit, is responsible for payment in full 
unless written notice that the unit will not be used is given to the Vice President for 
Business and Finance at least two weeks before the first day of classes. In that case, 
no rent will be charged for that term. In other cases, a refund amount may be given 
upon the initiative of Columbia. 

Single Students 

Both single rooms and suites are available in the seminary's residence halls. While 
there are several unfurnished single rooms in Florida Hall, most single rooms on 
campus are fully furnished except for linens. Virtually all single rooms in Simons- 
Law Hall have connecting baths. Suites of two rooms with private bath are either 
fully furnished or unfurnished. 

Students who live in single rooms and suites are required to participate in the 
seminary's standard board plan (18 meals per week). 

Single students also have access to efficiency apartments (mentioned below) if 
such units are not assigned to married students. 

Married Students without Children 

While married students without children are welcome to live in suites, most pre- 
fer to reside in efficiency apartments which include cooking facilities. Students liv- 
ing in efficiencies need not participate in the standard board plan. 

Students with Children 

One, two, three, and four bedroom apartments are available for students with 
children. Most of these apartments are equipped with washer/dryer hook-ups. The 
seminary does not provide refrigerators in these apartments. 

Hospitalization Insurance 

Each basic degree student is required to carry some form of hospitalization insur- 
ance acceptable to the seminary. Students may purchase group insurance which is 
offered to the student body, or they may purchase insurance through other sources. 
Presbyterian students who are inquirers or candidates of their presbyteries' Com- 
mittees on Preparation for Ministry are eligible to participate in the major medical 
plan of the Board of Pensions of the Presbyterian Church (USA). 

Any student who has not shown proof of coverage to the Office of Student Life by 
the Monday following the first week of an academic term will be automatically en- 
rolled in the policy offered by the seminary. The insurance premium will be charged 
to the student's account. 

An international student and all accompanying family members in the United 
States on J or F visas enrolled in any program of the seminary are required to carry 
the school-sponsored hospitalization insurance approved by the Immigration and 
Naturalization Service. Once a student is accepted and confirmation of arrival in the 



31 



United States is made, the insurance application will be submitted and charged to 
the student's account. Insurance is renewed on an annual basis and remains in effect 
as long as the student is enrolled at the seminary. 

Financial Aid 

The seminary grants financial aid to eligible full-time basic degree students. Eli- 
gibility is based upon need as determined by the seminary's financial aid policies. 
Students applying for financial aid complete a Columbia Seminary financial aid ap- 
plication, which provides an estimate of their income and expenses, and a Free Ap- 
plication for Student Aid (FAFSA) form. The difference between a student's income 
and expenses, as calculated from the established expense norms, constitutes the fi- 
nancial need of the student. After financial need is calculated, financial aid is awarded 
in the form of work-study and a grant. 

Students who withdraw from the seminary or become part-time students during 
a term forfeit their right to financial aid for the term in which such action is taken. 

New students planning to attend Greek School must submit the seminary's fi- 
nancial aid application form and mail the FAFSA by June 1. New students entering 
in the fall must submit the financial aid application forms and mail the FAFSA by 
August 1. Students entering in the winter term or spring semester must apply for 
financial aid no later than four weeks prior to the first day of classes. 

Returning students are required to complete and mail the FAFSA by April 21 and 
return the seminary's financial aid application by April 28. 

All students should submit applications as early as possible since awards are made 
as applications are received and are contingent upon the availability of funds. 

Persons interested in more detailed information about the basic degree financial 
aid program offered by Columbia Seminary should contact the Financial Aid Office. 

A limited amount of financial aid is available for advanced degree students. In- 
formation on such aid is available in the Advanced Studies Office. 

Federal Stafford Loan Program 

The Federal Stafford Loan Program is made available under the Higher Educa- 
tion Act of 1965 and regulated through federal and state agencies of Departments of 
Education so as to comply with subsequent amendments governing Title IV monies. 
This program is designed to provide loans to students enrolled in education beyond 
high school. Institutions such as Columbia Seminary assist students with the appli- 
cation process by determining the student's eligibility and need for the loan and by 
certifying the student's satisfactory participation in the course of education for which 
the monies are borrowed. The loans to students are made primarily by commercial 
lending institutions. The Stafford Loan Program provides preferable interest rates 
and delays repayment of loans until after the student graduates or terminates the 
course of studies. An eligible student enrolled at Columbia may seek a loan within 
the state of Georgia or from a lending institution within the student's legal state of 
residence. Information pertaining to application procedures and policy regulations 
for a Stafford Loan at Columbia may be obtained from the Financial Aid Office. 



32 



To maintain eligibility for loans and deferment of prior loans, a student in an 
eligible degree program must continue to be classified as at least half-time and be 
making Satisfactory Academic Progress as determined by the seminary's Satisfac- 
tory Academic Progress Policy. Copies of this policy are available from the Registrar's 
Office and the Financial Aid Office. 

If a recipient of Title IV funds does not complete the period of enrollment for 
which a loan application was certified and a portion of the loan funds was applied to 
seminary fees, the seminary must refund to the Title IV programs the amount deter- 
mined by the pro rata refund calculation defined by the Higher Education Amend- 
ments of 1992. The pro rata refund calculation applies to a recipient who withdraws 
on or before 60 percent of the student's initial academic term at the seminary has 
been completed. If the pro rata refund policy does not apply, the larger of the amounts 
determined by using the Federal Refund Policy and the published seminary refund 
policy must be returned to the lender in accordance with federal regulations. 

Veterans Administration Benefits 

Certification for V.A. benefits is handled through the Office of Student Life. 

Scholarships 
Columbia Scholarships 

Qualified men and women planning to attend seminary are encouraged to apply 
for a Columbia Scholarship. This scholarship is for persons accepted into the M.Div. 
program who have exhibited exceptional academic and leadership abilities during their 
undergraduate studies and in community involvement and church commitments. 

The Admissions Committee may award up to six Columbia Scholarships for Greek 
School and the following academic year. The scholarship covers tuition, room, and 
board at the single student rate. A Columbia Scholarship may be used for expenses 
while in residence at the seminary as well as for SM210 and 1241. 

A Columbia Scholarship will be renewed for succeeding years if the recipient 
maintains full-time status, retains a 3.60 cumulative grade point average, and con- 
tinues to show outstanding potential for ministry. 

Applicants must be citizens of the United States or Canada. A scholarship application 
and a personal interview are ordinarily required. Application is made through the Office 
of Admissions. A scholarship application must be received no later than March 15. An- 
nouncement of Columbia Scholarship awards will normally be made by April 15. 

Recipients who show need over and above a Columbia Scholarship Award may 
be granted financial aid. Such financial aid will include a work-study assignment. 

Those applying for Columbia Scholarships will automatically be considered for 
other scholarships and financial aid if they are not awarded Columbia Scholarships. 

Honor Scholarships 

A number of Honor Scholarships have been established at the seminary for full- 
time M.Div. students. Several are awarded annually by the Admissions Committee to 
first year students on the basis of academic achievement, leadership in the church and 
on campus, and demonstration of outstanding promise for the ordained ministry 

33 



An Honor Scholarship covers tuition for Greek School and the following academic 
year. The scholarship will be renewed for succeeding years if the recipient maintains 
full-time status, retains a 3.40 cumulative grade point average, and continues to show 
outstanding potential for ministry. The scholarship may be used for tuition while in 
residence at the seminary as well as for SM210 and 1241. 

Application is made through the Office of Admissions. A scholarship application 
and a personal interview are ordinarily required. A scholarship application must be 
received no later than March 15. Announcement of Honor Scholarship awards will 
normally be made by April 15. 

Recipients who show need over and above an Honor Scholarship award may be 
granted financial aid. Such financial aid will include a work-study assignment. 

Merit Scholarships 

A number of Merit Scholarships are given each academic year to full-time M.Div. 
students. They vary in amount from $1,000 to full tuition for the fall, winter, and 
spring terms. 

Merit Scholarships for entering students are awarded annually by the Admissions 
Committee on the basis of academic achievement, leadership ability, and potential for 
ministry. These scholarship are not automatically renewed in succeeding years. 

Merit Scholarships are also awarded each spring to returning M.Div. students. 
The awards are made by the Basic Degrees Committee based upon the same criteria 
used for entering students. 

Merit Scholarships may be used for tuition while in residence at the seminary as 
well as for SM210 and 1241. A recipient who shows need over and above a Merit 
Scholarship award may be granted financial aid. Such financial aid will include a 
work-study assignment. 

Racial/Ethnic Scholarships 

Eligible full-time basic degree students are awarded Racial/Ethnic Scholarships 
at the beginning of each academic year. 

Columbia Friendship Circle Scholarships 

A number of scholarships are funded annually by the Columbia Friendship Circle. 
These scholarships are awarded to PC(USA) M.Div. degree students by the Basic 
Degrees Committee upon nomination by the President and Dean of Students in con- 
sultation with the Development Office. 

The following criteria are used in making nominations: The student must be a 
second or third year student (fourth year if the student has been involved in a year- 
long internship); have demonstrated both a strong commitment to God's call and 
diligence in studies at Columbia Seminary; be a parent with family responsibilities; 
and have demonstrated financial need. 



34 



Recipients who show need over and above the Columbia Friendship Circle Schol- 
arship may be eligible for additional financial aid. Such financial aid will include a 
work-study assignment. 

Tuition, Fees, And Other Charges 
Effective July 1, 2000 

Master of Divinity and Master of Arts Degree Candidates 

Tuition 

$ 730 Per unit 

365 Audit fee per unit 

1,460 Essentials of Greek (Summer Greek School) 

Supervised Ministry Fees 
$ 730 Per unit 

Other Fees 

$ 125 1241 Alternative Context, Atlanta (plus 1 unit course fee) 

250 1241 Alternative Context, Other U.S. (plus 1 unit course fee) 

550 1241 Alternative Context, International (plus 1 unit course fee) 

Advanced Degree Candidates and Occasional Students 

Tuition 

$ 280 Per credit hour 

140 Audit fee per credit hour 

1,460 Essentials of Greek (Summer Greek School) 

Supervised Ministry Fees 

$ 600 SM610, SM680, SM681, SM682, SM683, SM684, SM685 

Other Fees 

$ 800 ATA401 Seminar on Ministry 

400 ATA401e (First Session) 

400 ATA401e (Second Session) 

800 ATA496 Doctoral Project 

100 D.Min. and Th.M. extension fee (first time) 

200 D.Min. and Th.M. extension fee (second time) 

50 Administrative and library fee (Advanced degree candidates only; 

does not apply to students enrolled in courses) 

15 Thesis binding (per copy) 

For all students 

Other Fees 

$ 30 Application fee 

20 Occasional student application fee 

50 Late registration fee (does not apply to D.Min. doctoral practicums 

and doctoral projects or to Th.M. thesis registration) 
100 Commencement fee 



35 



Board 

$ 591 Essentials of Greek (Summer Greek School) 

1,212 Fall or spring term 

328 Winter term 

Housing 

Residence Halls 

361-391 Single room, Summer Greek School 

763-825 Single room, fall or spring term 

191-206 Single room, winter term 

518-570 Suite, Summer Greek School 

1060-1163 Suite, fall or spring term 

265-290 Suite, winter term 

330-371 Efficiency units per month 

Village Apartments, per month 

508-531 4 Bedrooms 

464-508 3 Bedrooms 

392-464 2 Bedrooms 

351 1 Bedroom 

Payment of Fees 

Tuition, fees, room, and board must be paid to the Business Office by the deadline 
set at the beginning of each term. 

Refund Policies 
Tuition 

Subject to the following schedule, students are entitled to refunds upon dropping a 
course or withdrawing from school with approval from the seminary. A course is 
considered dropped or a student is considered to have withdrawn from the semi- 
nary at the time the Registrar receives written notice to that effect. 

A. Fall and spring term classes (full- term): 

By the end of the: 

First week 100% 

Second week 80% 

Fourth week 50% 

Sixth week 25% 

After sixth week 0% 

B. Classes less than nine weeks and greater than five weeks in duration: 

By the end of the: 

Third day of class 100% 

Second week 50% 

Third week 25% 

After third week 0% 



36 



C. Winter term classes and other classes three to five weeks in duration: 

By the end of the: 

Second day of class 100% 

Fifth day of class 50% 

After fifth day of class 0% 

D. Two week classes: 

By the end of the: 

First day of class 100% 

Third day of class 50% 

After third day of class 0% 

No refund of course supervision fees or of clinical pastoral education fees will be made. 

Room and Board 

A student who has entered into a lease agreement for a seminary housing unit for 
a term or semester is responsible for payment in full unless written notice that the 
unit will not be used is given to the Vice President for Business and Finance at least 
two weeks before the first day of classes. In that case, a 100 percent refund will be 
made. In other cases, a refund amount may be given upon the initiative of the semi- 
nary. A minimum charge of one month's rent will be assessed as a penalty for break- 
ing a lease. 

A student who otherwise is required to be on the seminary's board plan, but who 
has a sufficient medical reason for withdrawing from board status, may be granted a 
full refund if a written request is made to the Vice President for Business and Fi- 
nance at least one week before the first day of classes. The seminary's Vice President 
for Business and Finance will determine the validity of an exemption from the board 
plan, in consultation with the seminary's Food Service Director. 

If a student withdraws or drops out of school, he or she must vacate seminary 
housing and cease using its dining facilities or be held liable for room and board 
charges beyond his or her last date of attendance. 

Financial Assistance 

A student who withdraws from the seminary or becomes a part-time student for- 
feits any financial assistance (scholarships and financial aid) previously awarded for 
the term in which such action occurs. 



37 



i ^ 



Columbia in Service to the 
Church and Its Ministry 

Columbia's mission is to serve as a theological resource not only to students within 
its degree programs, but also to pastors, lay people, and the church itself. Through 
its ongoing programs and special events, the seminary offers opportunities for people 
throughout the church to grow in faith and service. 

Continuing Education 

Continuing education opportunities for ministers and church professionals are a 
vital part of Columbia Seminary. These non-credit events are essential to spiritual, 
academic, and professional growth. Several different types of opportunities are 
offered. 

Large, established, on-campus events offer a variety of courses. The major events 
are the Summer Session in July, the January Seminars, and the Columbia Colloquium 
held in April. Throughout the year, small events, centered around one activity or 
subject, are held both on and off campus. Examples are contemplative weeks at re- 
treat centers for men and women, leadership formation seminars, workshops for the 
major transitions encountered in ministry and a seminar on worship and music. An 
overseas travel and study trip to Jamaica and Cuba is also a regular part of the con- 
tinuing education program. 

The Guthrie Scholars Program is a learning opportunity offered twice a year on 
an application basis. Guthrie Scholars are invited to the campus to pursue a topic of 
their choice that engages a pressing issue of the church from a Reformed perspec- 
tive. All costs, except travel, are covered by the seminary. Application may be made 
through the Continuing Education Office. 

Individual study is available to ministers who wish to spend time on the campus 
working in the library and consulting with a faculty member. The Director of Con- 
tinuing Education will facilitate this kind of on-campus directed study. Directed read- 
ings on particular subjects provide "at-home" continuing education. A list of subjects 
is available from the Continuing Education Office. Once the subject is selected, books 
on that subject will be sent from the seminary library. The reading lists are designed 
by faculty members from Columbia. 

A calendar of events for 2000-2001 is available upon request. For more information 
on continuing education opportunities, write the Director of Continuing Education. 

Lay Institute of Faith and Life 

Columbia Seminary established the Lay Institute of Faith and Life in 1987 to equip 
laity for ministry in the world and in the church. The institute offers courses, semi- 
nars, retreats, and workshops designed to help Christian lay people become better 
theologians and more faithful followers of Christ in all of life — home, work place, 
church, community, world. 



39 



Among the programs at the Lay Institute are Lay Schools of Bible and Theology 
offered at the seminary in the fall and winter and the Summer Lay Scholars Week 
each August. Courses offered include biblical studies, theology, church history, eth- 
ics, and spiritual formation. Students may earn certificates in the areas of spiritual 
formation and practical Christianity. The Institute also offers courses taught in Week- 
end Lay Schools and other formats to presbyteries and local churches. The Institute's 
staff is available to consult with presbyteries and congregations in all areas of lay 
education. For more information about the Institute and its programs, write to the 
Lay Institute of Faith and Life. 

Center for New Church Development 

Columbia Theological Seminary established the Center for New Church Develop- 
ment in 1997. The Center has a three-fold focus: teaching, research, and consultation 
with clergy and laity involved in the mission of beginning new congregations. 

The Center provides programs, basic and advanced degree courses, and confer- 
ences. These learning opportunities are open to Columbia students, new church de- 
velopment pastors and their spouses, potential new church development pastors and 
church leaders who assist the nurture of new congregations. 

The Center is currently conducting an extensive ecumenical study of new church 
development and new church leadership. This research will explore the effect of new 
church development on denominational membership growth, provide an empirical 
basis for a profile of a new church development pastor, and focus on different pro- 
files of new church development leadership that may exist within racially and ethni- 
cally diverse communities. 

For more information, contact the Center for New Church Development. 

International Theological Education 

Columbia Seminary is committed to the task of preparing students for ministry in 
a world that is shrinking rapidly and where preoccupation with parochial concerns 
is no longer an option. A varied program of international education has emerged 
from serious, cross-cultural dialogue with church leaders in other parts of the world. 
Historically, more than 70 percent of the second year M.Div. students have partici- 
pated in one of Columbia's international programs. These programs include: 

1. An international component for the second year course, "Alternative Context 
For Ministry." Students may choose to take this course in an international set- 
ting. During the 1999-2000 academic year three international alternative con- 
texts for ministry were offered: Mexico, Jamaica, and Central Europe. 

2. A three-week Middle East Seminar in late May and early June. 

3. Supervised ministry placements for Columbia students in Caribbean churches 
under the supervision of experienced Caribbean pastors. 



40 



4. Exchange programs and internships in England, Germany, Jamaica, Kenya, 
South Africa, Korea, Scotland, and Switzerland. 

5. A joint Doctor of Ministry program with the United Theological College of the 
West Indies. Many of the classes are held in Kingston, Jamaica. 

6. International students, faculty, and pastors working and studying on the Co- 
lumbia campus. 

7. A week-long continuing education event in the spring for pastors held on the 
campus of the United Theological College of the West Indies, Kingston, Ja- 
maica. 

8. A program on the church in China that sends members of the Columbia com- 
munity to China, brings Chinese church leaders to the seminary, and orga- 
nizes international conferences on the church in China. 

9. A January pilgrimage to the Holy Land. 

10. A travel seminar to South Africa, summer 2000, on "Race and Religion" in 
conversation with the theological faculty at the University of the Western Cape 
and the University of Stellenbosch. 

Some of these programs are part of a program coordinated by the Atlanta Theo- 
logical Association. Others reflect cooperative efforts with the Presbyterian Church 
(USA) or with overseas denominations or theological institutions. For further infor- 
mation, write to the Director of International Theological Education. 

Evangelism Emphasis 

In 1981 Columbia Seminary initiated a program in evangelism. Under the direc- 
tion of the Peachtree Professor of Evangelism and Church Growth, a program of 
courses for basic and advanced degree students has been developed which focuses 
on the church's evangelistic mission in the rapidly changing context of North America. 
Students wishing to emphasize evangelism and mission are urged to include an in- 
ternship (from one summer to one year) in a teaching congregation with strong 
missional commitments. In addition to course offerings, the program director works 
with the Thompson Scholars Program, a continuing education opportunity which 
brings to the campus pastors from the PC (USA). The 10-day intensive study experi- 
ence prepares evangelism leaders for the future. 

Christian Spirituality Emphasis and Certificate 

Columbia offers study and growth opportunities in the spiritual life. Christian 
spirituality explores the relationship with God - how it is initiated, affirmed, and 
nurtured. Spiritual development demands that hard, ethical questions about the liv- 
ing of faith in a changing world are asked. 

To respond to the growing interest to Christian spirituality, Columbia offers a 
Certificate in Spiritual Formation, designed for both lay people and ministers who 
want to encourage spiritual growth. While the work is challenging, no specific de- 
gree is required as a prerequisite. The program is designed to be completed in a 



41 



three-year period. Courses are offered in one-week segments throughout the year, 
with a total of six elective courses required. The following is a visual representation 
of the curriculum for the Certificate in Spiritual Formation over a three-year cycle: 



Fall 


Spring 


Summer 


Immersion Week 
Prayer in Many Forms 


Immersion Week 
History of Christian Spirituality 


Spirituality and the 
Formation of Community 


Immersion Week 
New Testament Spirituality 


Immersion Week 
Spirituality of Compassion 


Literature and Practice of 
Spiritual Direction 


Immersion Week 
Reformed Spirituality 


Immersion Week 

Personality and Spirituality 

Group Spiritual Direction 


Teaching Spiritual Formation 
Preparation for Practicum 



Since 1995 Columbia Seminary has had a program in spiritual formation for min- 
isters and lay leaders. Basic degree students may participate in offerings of the Spiri- 
tual Formation program. While a student might complete most components of the 
Spiritual Formation program while at seminary, at least one major component in the 
design of the Spiritual Formation program, the Practicum, is located in the student's 
first ministry setting following graduation. This program provides structure and re- 
sources to help seminarians nurture their understanding, experience, and practice of 
the Christian life as they prepare for the ministries to which God is calling them. 

Columbia's Doctor of Ministry program offers a specialization in Christian Spiri- 
tuality. Those enrolled in the program will explore their own journeys of faith and 
also the relation between spirituality, ministerial identity, and the church's life and 
mission in the world. This degree offers opportunities for personal spiritual growth 
and the development of leadership skills for directing retreats, workshops, and schools 
of prayer. 

The Journeyers newsletter provides information on the spirituality emphasis and 
includes book suggestions, continuing education events, and renewal opportunities. 
A subscription is free. 

Columbia Colloquium 

Designed for both clergy and laity, Columbia's Colloquium is a major annual event 
which examines the life of the church. The three-day event takes place each April. 
Activities include worship services, lectures, and formal and informal occasions for 
visiting with guest speakers, faculty members, and friends. The Alumni /ae Associa- 
tion Banquet occurs during this time. Colloquium 2000, April 24-26, focused on wor- 
ship and music in the twenty-first century and featured Thomas Troeger, Don Saliers, 
and Marva Dawn. Colloquium 2001 will focus on how religion continues to shape 
the common good. 



42 



Smyth Lectures 

The Smyth Lectures at Columbia were begun in 1911 by the bequest of the Rev. 
Thomas Smyth, D.D., pastor of Second Presbyterian Church in Charleston, South 
Carolina. The aim was to establish "a course of lectures on the fundamental prin- 
ciples of the Christian faith." 

Dr. Patrick D. Miller, the Charles T. Haley Professor of Old Testament Theology, 
Princeton Theological Seminary, delivered the lectures in October 1999. His lectures 
explored the Ten Commandments as the foundation and framework for biblical ethics. 

The Smyth Lectures are presented to the seminary community and are open to 
all ministers and lay people who wish to attend. The dates for the next Smyth Lec- 
tures are October 10-12, 2000, when the lecturer will be Dr. M. Thomas Thangaraj, 
the D.W. and Ruth Brooks Associate Professor of World Christianity at Candler School 
of Theology at Emory University. Dr. Thangaraj's topic will be "What in the World 
is World Christianity?" 




43 



Community Life 



Many networks of relationships and organizations, both formal and informal, 
shape the community at Columbia. The life of the seminary is as easily celebrated 
over a cup of coffee as it is in the ceremony of graduation. The following paragraphs 
briefly describe some of the structured events and organizations in which students 
participate during the academic year. 

Yearly Schedule 

The academic year is composed of two long semesters of 14 weeks each and a short 
January term. During the summer the seminary offers a full program of supervised min- 
istry, an eight-week course in beginning Greek, and a four-week summer session de- 
signed primarily for D.Min. students and ministers interested in continuing education. 

Orientation 

An orientation program which is required of all entering basic degree students and 
international students is held during the days preceding the regular opening of the semi- 
nary in the fall. It offers an opportunity for new students to get acquainted with one 
another and with student body leaders and members of the faculty. Assessment tests are 
administered to help new and transfer students understand how their particular educa- 
tional backgrounds and experiences have prepared them for theological education. 

Returning basic degree students are also required to participate in the orientation 
days which include activities such as a debriefing of the summer supervised ministry 
or intern programs, a discussion of procedures for receiving a call from a congrega- 
tion, preparation for ordination examinations, and consultation with faculty advisors. 

Community Worship and Convocations 

The seminary community gathers for worship each regular class day to express 
its thanksgiving for and need of God's grace, to hear God's word, and to pray for the 
church and the world. Students in their final year of the Master of Divinity program, 
faculty, staff, others from the seminary community, and invited guests lead worship 
for the community. 

The sacrament of the Lord's Supper is celebrated each Friday. Included in wor- 
ship each Wednesday is a forum which leads the Columbia community into consid- 
eration of significant issues for the church in the world, exposes it to persons from 
other traditions and parts of the earth, or directs it in spiritual formation. A majority 
of the forums are designed and led by student organizations. 

In addition to regular worship services, the seminary community gathers for con- 
vocations and other special services several times during the year. At opening con- 
vocation in the fall and at graduation each spring, students are recognized for 
outstanding academic work and for service to the church through the presentation 
of awards, prizes, and fellowships. The descriptions of these awards are given below 
along with a listing of recent recipients. 



44 



Student Organizations and Activities 

Student Coordinating Council 

The Student Coordinating Council is the student government association of the 
seminary. It was established to initiate discussion and decisions within the student 
body, to respond to the needs of the student community, to coordinate student and 
community activities, and to oversee the work of the various student organizations. 
It represents the interests of the entire seminary community, i.e., students on and off 
campus, international students, and student families. 

Barnabas Fellowship 

The purpose of the Barnabas Fellowship is to foster Christian fellowship and 
service within the seminary community, inspired and informed by the ministry of 
Barnabas (Acts 11:22-26). The fellowship aims to "exhort one another to remain faithful 
to the Lord with steadfast devotion"; explore the missional vocation of the church 
and each Christian; and provide opportunities for Christian fellowship and growth. 

Fellowship for Theological Dialogue 

This society was established for the purpose of encouraging every student to the 
highest possible scholarship. Membership is open to all students and faculty on a 
voluntary basis. Lectures, informal discussions with visiting lecturers, symposia by 
members of the faculty, and other meetings are sponsored in the interest of theologi- 
cal scholarship. 

Imago Dei 

This organization's mission is to promote and support the welfare of gay, lesbian, 
bisexual, and transgendered people and their friends in the seminary, the church 
catholic, and the community at large. 

Korean-American Student Association 

This association seeks to address the needs and concerns of Korean- American 
students and to serve as a voice and channel of communication on their behalf within 
the larger seminary community. 

Society for Missionary Inquiry 

This society was founded in 1832 and has been an instrument through the years 
to promote an active interest in missions among the students and throughout the 
church. This group provides hospitality for international students and visitors on 
the Columbia campus. Through the work of the society a number of students have 
responded to the challenge of international missions. 

Spouses of Seminarians 

This is an organization primarily for the spouses of regularly enrolled students. Spouses 
of students, spouses of faculty and staff, and other invited persons meet together for 
study and for the sharing of mutual concerns and interests. The Spouses of Seminarians 
organization also sponsors a number of events for the entire Columbia community. 



45 



Women's Issues in Ministry 

This organization offers support for women students as well as opportunities for 
dialogue about issues which are of particular concern for women in ministry. Activi- 
ties include annual retreats and opportunities to attend conferences and workshops 
which focus on women's issues for ministry. 

Athletic Program 

Athletic activities are available and open to all students and their families. These 
activities include volleyball, football, basketball, soccer, softball, tennis, aerobics, ping 
pong, and golf. 

Supply Preaching 

Columbia Seminary works with local congregations in making arrangements for 
student supply preaching. Students are generally assigned on a rotating basis to 
churches that have requested supply ministers. 

Student Handbooks 

Complete information for basic degree students on matters such as housing, stu- 
dent services, and seminary policies and procedures can be found in the Student 
Handbook which is published each year. More detailed information for Th.M., D.Min., 
and Th.D. students can be found in the handbooks for those particular programs. 

Placement 

The seminary's students find a wide range of ministry options available to them 
at graduation. While the majority of basic degree graduates accept calls to congrega- 
tional ministries, others discover that their gifts and interests lead them into differ- 
ent avenues of Christian service to the church and world. These avenues include 
further graduate study in one of the traditional theological disciplines, international 
missions, clinical pastoral education, service in a social ministry agency, chaplaincy 
in hospitals, schools, or the military services, campus ministry, teaching, and minis- 
try in denominational staff positions. 

A comprehensive placement program helps students explore their ministerial 
options. Workshops assist students as they prepare for denominational exams, com- 
pose personal information forms, prepare for interviews, negotiate calls, and plan 
for continuing education. Columbia's students consistently surpass the national av- 
erages on ordination exams. 

The seminary maintains close ties with congregations seeking pastors and other call- 
ing agencies. Descriptive files are kept on a wide variety of ministry opportunities. An- 
nually a senior profile booklet is distributed throughout the church. In addition, individual 
personal information forms are sent to congregations and agencies that request them. 
Each year many pastor nominating committees come to campus to interview seniors. As 
a result of these efforts, graduates ordinarily receive calls in a timely manner. 

The seminary's placement services are also available to its advanced degree stu- 
dents and alumni /ae. 



46 



Awards and Prizes 

Through the gifts of alumni /ae and friends of the seminary, several prizes and awards 
have been established to recognize the outstanding academic achievements of students. 

The Wilds Book Prize was established by Louis T. Wilds of Columbia, South Carolina, 
in 1917. In 1992, an addition to the fund was made by Mary Scott Wilds Hill, Annie 
Edmunds Wilds McLeod, Murphey Candler Wilds, and their children in memory of 
their parents and grandparents, Laura Candler Wilds and Louis T. Wilds, Jr. The fund 
provides a cash award to the graduating M.Div. student selected by the faculty for the 
highest distinction in his or her academic work over the entire seminary program. 

The Lyman and Myki Mobley Prize in Biblical Scholarship has been established in memory 
of Donald Lyman Mobley '77 and Myki Powell Mobley (Candler School of Theology 
'77). It is given each year to the student or faculty member doing exemplary work in the 
field of biblical scholarship as it relates to the worship and work of the church. 

The Paul T Fuhrmann Book Prize in Church History was established in 1962 by an 
alumnus of the seminary to honor the late Dr. Paul T. Fuhrmann, former professor of 
church history. The award is made annually to the student who has shown the most 
outstanding achievement in church history. 

The Florrie Wilkes Sanders Prize in Theology is given by the family of Florrie Wilkes 
Sanders of Atlanta, Georgia. It is awarded each year to the student presenting the 
best paper showing sound theological scholarship and relevance to the needs of 
Christian people in the contemporary world. Special attention is given to papers 
relating theology to the education, professions, and avocations of lay people. 

The Emma Gaillard Boyce Memorial Award is made annually by the Rev. David Boyce, 
an alumnus of the seminary, in honor of his mother, a devoted music teacher, choir 
director, church musician, and minister's wife. It is awarded to the student writing 
the best paper on the creative use of music in worship. 

Abdullah Awards of three types are made available each year by the Rev. Gabriel 
Abdullah, an alumnus of the seminary. One is given for the best paper setting forth a 
plan for the teaching of Bible in the public schools; the second is for the best paper 
designing a program for the development of moral and spiritual values in the public 
schools; and the third is for the best paper on the subject, "How to make the church 
school hour the most interesting hour of the week." 

The Indiantown Country Church Award was established by the family of Mr. and 
Mrs. R. W. Stuckey in their honor to highlight the work of ministry in churches in 
rural areas. The prize is awarded annually to a student who has done outstanding 
work in the summer in a rural ministry. 

The Ludwig Richard Max Dewitz Biblical Studies Award is a cash award given along 
with a copy of the Hebrew Old Testament to the basic degree student who prepared 
the best Old Testament exegesis during the academic year. A judging committee of 
professors of Old Testament nominates a person to the faculty for election. 

The Samuel A. Cartledge Biblical Studies Award is given to the basic degree student 
who prepared the best New Testament exegesis during the academic year. A cash 
award is given along with a copy of the Greek New Testament. A judging committee 
of professors of New Testament nominates a person to the faculty for election. 

47 



The Presbyterian Women of the Presbytery of St. Andrew Preaching Award is given for 
the best sermon preached by a student during the academic year. 

James T and Celeste M. Boyd Book Fund Award is presented to a graduating senior 
as a means of encouraging and helping establish a personal theological library of 
books and resources. 

The C. Virginia Harrison Memorial Fund Award is presented to a rising senior who is 
conscientious, responsible, hard working, and in need of financial assistance. The presi- 
dent, in consultation with the secretary to the president, selects the recipient of this award. 

The Columbia Leadership Award is given to a graduating senior who shows promise of 
providing outstanding leadership to the church. The recipient will have demonstrated 
unusual leadership qualities at Columbia as well as spiritual depth and integrity. 

The William Dudley Fund Award is presented to two Master of Divinity seniors who 
have evidenced achievement, interest, and commitment in evangelism and church 
growth. The award is to be used within a five-year period for continuing education or 
graduate study in evangelism and church growth at Columbia Seminary 

The Harold J. Riddle Memorial Book Award is presented to one or more seniors, se- 
lected by the faculty in consultation with the pastoral care faculty, who show highest 
distinction in the field of pastoral care, especially in the area of terminally ill patients. 

The Florie S. Johnson Award was established by the family of Florie S. Johnson in 
memory of their mother, who was a devoted teacher committed to lay ministry 
through the Church of Jesus Christ. The award is given to a senior who presents the 
best paper setting forth a plan for pastoral care to the aging and who shows promise 
of providing such ministry in a parish setting. 

The George and Sally Telford Award is designed to recognize each year an outstand- 
ing graduate in the Doctor of Ministry program. The award will be granted to a 
graduating D.Min. student who shows exceptional ability for congregational leader- 
ship with an emphasis on social justice issues and vision for the church. 

Graduate Fellowships 

Each year the seminary awards one or more fellowships to outstanding gradu- 
ates completing the M.Div. degree. The purpose of these fellowships is to recognize 
superior intellectual achievement demonstrated during the course of the regular semi- 
nary program and to provide a modest support for graduate work beyond the first 
professional degree. They must be used toward an accredited master's degree or 
doctoral graduate degree program in which the recipient engages in the scholarly 
pursuit of an academic theological discipline. 

The Harvard A. Anderson Fellowship was established in 1983 by the Rev. and Mrs. 
Harvard A. Anderson of Orlando, Florida. This fellowship is awarded to the gradu- 
ate determined by the faculty to have the greatest potential for future academic 
achievement. 

The Fannie Jordan Bryan Fellowships were established through a generous legacy 
left to Columbia Theological Seminary by the late Mrs. Fannie Jordan Bryan of Co- 
lumbia, South Carolina. 



48 



The Columbia Friendship Circle Graduate Fellowship is awarded to outstanding gradu- 
ates who have completed the Master of Divinity degree. The purpose of the fellow- 
ship is to recognize superior achievement and to provide support for further study. 

The Columbia Graduate Fellowships were initiated by the Class of 1941. 

The Anna Church Whitner Memorial Fellowships are given periodically from a legacy 
left to the seminary in 1928 by the late William C. Whitner of Rock Hill, South Caro- 
lina, in memory of his mother. 

Emma Gaillard Boyce Graduate Fellowship was established through a legacy left to 
Columbia Theological Seminary by the late Mrs. Emma Gaillard, and is awarded to 
a graduating senior or clergyperson who enrolls in a graduate program of music 
and /or worship. 



Prizes, Awards, and Fellowships for 1999 



Wilds Book Prize 
Meda Stamper 



Paul T Fuhrmann Book Prize in Church 

History 

Meda Stamper 

Indiantown Country Church Award 
Joel Thornton 

Ludwig Richard Max Dewitz Old 
Testament Studies Award 
Susan Buell 

Presbyterian Women of the Presbytery of 
St. Andrew Preaching Award 
Lance Mullins 

The Florrie Wilkes Sanders Prize in 

Theology 

Bradford Ableson 

James T and Celeste M. Boyd Memorial 
Book Fund Awards 
Melanie Mitchell 
Victor Feliberte-Ruberte 

The C. Virginia Harrison Memorial Fund 

Award 

Keith Morrison 



Columbia Seminary Leadership Award 
Shannon Kershner 

William Dudley Award for Evangelism and 
Church Growth 
Maxine Edwards 
Mickey Shealy 

The Lyman and Myki Mobley Prize in 
Biblical Scholarship 
Meda Stamper 

Harold J. Riddle Memorial Book Award 
Caroline Kelly 

Harvard A. Anderson Fellowship 
Bradford Ableson 

George and Sally Telford Award 
Meda Stamper 

Columbia Graduate Fellowships 
Richard Floyd 
Anna McArthur 

Columbia Friendship Circle Graduate 

Fellowship 

Gerone Lockhart 



49 



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Curriculum and Courses 

The teaching program at Columbia is arranged in four areas: biblical, historical- 
doctrinal, practical theology, and supervised ministry. Interdisciplinary courses, which 
combine studies in two or more of these areas, are also taught in the degree pro- 
grams. While classroom instruction is foundational to all degree programs, the goal 
is to equip students to continue their education independently. The resources of the 
library, the structure of course work, and independent study courses encourage real- 
ization of that goal. 

Biblical area studies seek to provide students with the necessary skills and tools to 
interpret the Bible with faithfulness, integrity, and imagination for a world that is 
much different from that in which the books of the Bible were written. To this end, 
biblical area courses focus on the languages (Hebrew and Greek), history, cultures, 
and world views of the ancient Mediterranean peoples, in order to clarify how the 
Bible spoke to those to whom it was first addressed. At the same time, biblical area 
courses give students the opportunity to practice appropriate and creative means of 
hearing Scripture anew today, in our own cultural and historical contexts, so that it 
may continue to speak to us and to our world in fresh and powerful ways. 

Historical-Doctrinal area studies help students understand the past as a means of 
comprehending the present. Students engaged in these studies also struggle to form 
their own theology and to discover what it means to be Christian in today's world. 
Since Columbia stands within the Reformed tradition, historical-doctrinal studies 
are concerned not only with right thinking, but also with the relation of Christian 
faith and doctrine to all arenas of life. Therefore, studies in this area engage students 
in consideration of the social, political, economic, and cultural life of today in the 
United States and across the world. In historical-doctrinal studies students acquire 
the tools they will need throughout their lives for dealing theologically with them- 
selves and the world around them, tools that will enable graduates to lead the church 
in a prophetic and reconciling way as it works out its mission in the world. 

Practical Theology area studies center on the functioning of the theologian as a min- 
ister with a concern to train students to be ministers and to lead other persons in 
ministering. Studies in this area consider the dynamics of the minister's role as pas- 
tor, evangelist, leader of worship, preacher, teacher, and administrator. Since the shape 
of the ministry of tomorrow is not fully known, the concern of these studies is to 
train students to understand the issues involved, to help them see their own strengths 
and weaknesses, and then to develop a flexibility that will enable them to take their 
biblical and theological understanding and deal with whatever issues they face dur- 
ing their ministry. 

Supervised Ministry serves an integrative function for the curriculum. Students are 
involved in the actual practice of ministry under competent supervision. Through 
experiential, relational, and inductive learning, students explore the forms, styles, 
contents, and concepts of ministry. Not only do the students put into practice what 
has been learned through studies in the biblical, historical-doctrinal, and practical 
theology areas, but these studies are integrated with the practice of ministry and the 
personhood of each student. 



51 



Courses of Instruction 

Listed on the following pages are the courses taught by the faculty of Columbia 
Theological Seminary in 1998-99 and 1999-00. Changes in faculty situations and in 
student needs inevitably will necessitate modification of course offerings from term 
to term. 

The faculty reserves the right to modify individual course requirements within a 
degree program. Such changes will be effective the next time such courses are of- 
fered or at a later date as determined by the faculty. Degree programs and their ma- 
jor requirements will remain unchanged for students entering that program, but 
changes may be made at any time to be effective for all entering students in the next 
academic year. 

The designation of units within the course descriptions listed below applies to 
students within the M.Div. and M.A.(T. S.) programs. For further details on the unit 
system, see the Columbia Calendar and Unit System on page 10. Students in ad- 
vanced degree programs use the credit system. A one unit course ordinarily is equal 
to three credits. 

Descriptions of courses which can be taken as electives within the new M.Div. 
curriculum contain pedagogical objective designations within brackets (e.g., {K, T, 
ML}). These letters correspond to the six pedagogical objectives which are described 
on page 7. 

The letter in the course designation is determined by the area in which it is of- 
fered: B for Biblical; HD for Historical-Doctrinal; P for Practical Theology; I for Inter- 
disciplinary; and SM for Supervised Ministry. Courses whose numbers are prefaced 
by ATA are offered by the Atlanta Theological Association. The hundred's digit re- 
fers to the level of the course and whether it is required for the Master of Divinity 
degree program or elective: 

100s are required courses ordinarily taken in the first year of study. 

200s are required courses ordinarily taken in the second year of study. 

300s are required courses ordinarily taken in the third year of study. 

500s are elective courses designed primarily for first and second year students but open to 
advanced students by permission of the instructor. 

600s are elective courses designed for advanced students (third year and graduate students) 
but open to others when prerequisites have been met, space is available, and permission 
has been given by the instructor. 

700s are off-campus electives at advanced level. 

The middle digit of a course number identifies the particular academic discipline within 
the area, except in Interdisciplinary and Supervised Ministry courses. 



52 



Biblical Area 



Faculty: Walter Brueggemann, Charles B. 
Cousar, Elizabeth Johnson (chair), 
Kathleen O'Connor, Stanley P. Saunders, 
Christine Roy Yoder 

Required Courses for the M.Div. Degree 



B021 Essentials of Greek 

Staff 

This course provides an intensive study of the 
essential elements of Koine Greek grammar, 
syntax, and vocabulary preparatory to read- 
ing the Greek New Testament. Required of all 
students who have not taken Greek in college 
or passed the Greek qualifying exam. 
Summer Session Only 6 credits/2 units 



B141 Survey of the Old Testament 

O'Connor /Yoder 

This course provides a study of the Old Testa- 
ment with special attention to its literary de- 
velopment and theological content as viewed 
against the background of the history and re- 
ligion of ancient Israel. 
Fall 3 credits/1 unit 

B153 Exegesis of the New Testament 

Cousar or Saunders or Beth Johnson 
The Greek text of a Pauline letter is read and 
interpreted in the introductory course in New 
Testament exegesis. Particular attention is 
given to the methods and resources of exege- 
sis and to the letter's place in the Pauline 
corpus. 
Fall 3 credits/1 unit 

B161 Survey of the New Testament 

Beth Johnson/Saunders 

This course examines the various types of lit- 
erature in the New Testament, with special at- 
tention to the literary character and theological 
content of books. Documents are viewed in 
light of first-century history and culture. 
Spring 3 credits/1 unit 



B222 Essentials of Hebrew 

Yoder 

This course provides an intensive study of the 
essential elements of Hebrew grammar, syn- 
tax, and vocabulary preparatory to reading 
and studying exegetically the Hebrew Old 
Testament. 
Fall 3 credits/1 unit 

B233 Exegesis of the Old Testament 

Brueggemann or O'Connor or Yoder 
The class will read and exegete selected Old 
Testament passages which are significant for 
an understanding of the nature of ancient He- 
brew literature and the faith of Israel. Special 
attention will be given to the relevance of these 
texts for Christian theology and to their use in 
the preaching and teaching ministry of the 
church. Prerequisite: Hebrew language course. 
Spring 3 credits/1 unit 

Elective Courses 
General and Background 

B514 Intertestamental Period 

Staff 

This seminar is devoted to the investigation 
of the history of the Jewish people from the 
return from exile to the birth of Christ. Em- 
phasis will be upon the literature (both canoni- 
cal and non-canonical) of this period against 
the background of social, economic, political, 
and cultural events. Attention will also be 
given to the rise of Jewish sects. Prerequisite: 
Old Testament Survey. {K, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

B614 Reading Biblical Narrative 

O'Connor 

The purpose of this course will be to explore 
several short Old Testament narratives while 
discussing and developing sensitivity to such 
storytelling strategies as character development, 
narrative voice, plot, repetition, suspense, nar- 
rative gaps and timing, irony, and ambiguity. 
Similarities to and differences from modern 
Western stories will also be explored. {K} 
3 credits/1 unit 



53 



B615 New Testament Ethics 

Saunders 

This seminar explores the moral world of the 
first Christians, focusing on such issues as so- 
cial power in community, sexuality, the rela- 
tions between men and women, and the 
relations between Christians and the non- 
Christian world. Attention will be directed to 
passages from the letters of Paul and selected 
Gospel texts, exploring ways these texts can 
help shape a distinctively Christian ethos in 
the modern world. Prerequisites: New Testa- 
ment exegesis and New Testament survey. {K, 
T,ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 



sis, for biblical electives, and for ordination 

exams. Prerequisite: New Testament Exegesis. 

{K} 

3 credits/1 unit 



B621 Hebrew Reading 

Yoder 

This course is devoted to reading selected texts 
from the Hebrew Old Testament with a view 
to increasing a student's facility in the use of 
the language. Special emphasis is placed on 
grammatical structures and vocabulary. Per- 
mission of the instructor is required. {K} 
3 credits/1 unit 



B616 Women and the Old Testament 

O'Connor 

This course takes as its starting point contem- 
porary discussions about the relationship of 
the Bible to the diverse lives of women. It stud- 
ies selected Old Testament texts as well as in- 
ternational feminist scholarship to investigate 
the Old Testament as both problem and re- 
source for believing women. It seeks ways of 
reclaiming texts for mission /ministry. {K, T, 
ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 

B619 Old Dangerous Texts for New 
Dangerous Times 

Brueggemann 

This study will be focused on ways in which 
to respond to the new interpretive situation 
in which the U.S. church finds itself. A histori- 
cal approach will be taken to theological-in- 
terpretive methods and models in Old 
Testament theology. Specific texts will be stud- 
ied with attention to the capacity of the church 
to re-discern and re-imagine the character of 
the God of biblical texts. {K, T, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 

Ancient Languages 

B527 Greek Reading 

Cousar /Saunders 

This course is designed to build upon elemen- 
tary Greek grammar and basic exegesis in 
preparation for additional courses in exege- 



B622 Biblical Aramaic 

Staff 

A study of the grammatical and syntactical 
features of biblical Aramaic with a view to 
translating portions of the Old Testament writ- 
ten in the Aramaic language (Daniel 2:4-7:28, 
Ezra 4:8-6:18, 7:12-26). Prerequisite: Introduc- 
tory Hebrew. {K} 
3 credits/1 unit 

Old Testament Based on Hebrew Text 



B633 "If You Would Hear My Voice": 
Exegesis of Deuteronomy 

O'Connor 

This course engages in exegesis and close 
reading of the book of Deuteronomy. It attends 
to the book's rhetorical strategies and its po- 
litical and theological intentions. It asks how/ 
if the book is helpful in faith contexts today. 
Prerequisite: Hebrew language course. {K, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 



B634 Jeremiah and the God Who Weeps 

O'Connor 

This course offers a close reading of the book 
of Jeremiah. It places the book within the his- 
tory and tradition of Hebrew prophecy and 
analyzes the book as theological and political 
literature, centering on Israel's experience of 
exile. It seeks to find in the book theological 
resources for local faith communities. Prereq- 
uisite: Hebrew language course. {K, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 



54 



Old Testament Based on English Text 

B542 Jeremiah 

Brueggemann 

This course will consider the book of Jeremiah 
as it emerged from the poetry of a person to a 
canonical resource for an exilic community. 
Attention will be given to the ways in which 
the book may be a theological resource for the 
contemporary church in the United States in 
its situation of disestablishment. {K, SF, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 



B647 The Wisdom Literature 

O'Connor 

This course examines the books of Proverbs, 
Job, and Qoheleth as theological resources for 
mission/ministry today. It places these books 
in the context of other ancient Near Eastern 
literature and briefly considers the Song of 
Songs, Sirach, and Wisdom of Solomon. The 
course pays special attention to creation 
themes and to the enigmatic character of fe- 
male wisdom. Prerequisite: Old Testament 
Survey. {K, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 



B543 Isaiah 

Brueggemann 

This course will be concerned with the exposi- 
tory resources in the book of Isaiah in relation 
to the current crisis in the church. Attention 
will be paid to the ferment of the "canonical" 
in current scholarship and to the 
"Christological openings" the church regu- 
larly finds in the book. {K, SF, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 

B544 Psalms 

Brueggemann 

This course will explore the faith resources 
offered in the book of the Psalms, with spe- 
cial attention given to the points of contact 
between the poems and current life situations. 
This will be done by considering the God who 
is addressed in the Psalms, the difference these 
prayers make in one's daily life, and the in- 
terrelatedness of the Psalms to daily pastoral 
crises and use in liturgical settings. {K, SF, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 

B646 Pentateuch 

Brueggemann 

This course will review recent scholarship on 
the Pentateuch and consider the Pentateuch 
as the foundational document of Jewish and 
Christian faith. Consideration of critical meth- 
ods which serve the theological-interpretive 
task will be considered. (K, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 



B648 Lamentation and Weeping in the 
Old Testament 

O'Connor 

This course studies Psalms of lament, 
Jeremiah's confessions, and the book of Lam- 
entations as a resource for mission/ministry 
today. {K, T, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 



B649 God in the Whirlwind: The Book 
of Job and the Practice of Ministry 

O'Connor 

This class will explore the Book of Job in close 
readings and consider it from numerous theo- 
logical perspectives. The course will address 
relationships of the book's theological visions 
to the practice of ministry. {K, T, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 

New Testament Based on Greek Text 

B552 Gospel of John 

Cousar 

The purpose of this course is to engage in a 
literary and theological study of the Gospel 
of John with an eye toward its use in preach- 
ing and ministry. The structure of the course 
will allow students to work with either the 
Greek or English text. Prerequisite: New Tes- 
tament exegesis. {K, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 



55 



B651 The Gospel According to Matthew 

Saunders 

This course provides students with an oppor- 
tunity for detailed examination of Matthew, 
the favorite Gospel of the early church, with 
particular emphasis on ways contemporary 
Christians, especially those dealing with fear, 
violence, and rapid cultural transition, might 
read, and be read 1 by, this version of the Jesus 
Story. Prerequisites: Greek, New Testament 
exegesis. {K, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

B669 The Shorter Letters of Paul 

Cousar 

This course examines exegetically Philemon 
and Philippians. Prerequisite: Greek, New Tes- 
tament exegesis. {K, T, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 

New Testament Based on English Text 

B662 The Gospel Parables 

Staff 

The course will be concerned with the follow- 
ing: the nature of the parable form; the his- 
tory of the interpretation of the parables; the 
meaning of the parables in the context of Jesus' 
ministry and in the theology of the individual 
Evangelists; literary criticism and the repre- 
sentation of the meaning of the parables. Pre- 
requisite: New Testament Survey or its 
equivalent. {K, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

B663 Colossians and Ephesians 

Staff 

A literary, exegetical, and theological study of 
Colossians and Ephesians and their relation- 
ship to the Pauline corpus. Greek is not re- 
quired but will be useful. {K, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

B665 Epistle to the Romans 

Cousar 

This course investigates the Letter to the Ro- 
mans in the context of Pauline theology. Spe- 
cial attention is given to the rhetorical 
strategies employed in the letter and to the 
critical theological issues raised. While the 
class sessions are primarily based on the En- 
glish text, students wishing to pursue the 



Greek text are given a chance to do so. Pre- 
requisite: prior New Testament study. {K, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

B667 Second Corinthians 

Beth Johnson 

An exegetical investigation of the letter with 

special attention to issues of pastoral identity 

and money. {K, T} 

3 credits/1 unit 

B668 First Corinthians 

Staff 

This course will combine a chapter by chap- 
ter interpretation with a thematic treatment 
of such topics as unity and division, sexual 
morality, the Lord's Supper, the gift of the 
Spirit, and death and resurrection. Attention 
will be given to Pauline perspectives and cul- 
turally (e.g., Paul's and North American cul- 
ture) contextual exegesis with a focus on 
contemporary issues such as pluralism, sexual 
liberation, political infighting, individualism 
versus communalism, and problems of pas- 
toral ministry. {K, T, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 

Biblical Theology 

B573 Old Testament Theology 

Brueggemann 

This course is an investigation of major theo- 
logical themes within the traditions of the Old 
Testament. Special attention will be devoted 
to fresh methods of relating the biblical mate- 
rial to contemporary understandings of the 
nature of human life. {K, CB, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

B673 Women's Experience in Early 
Christianity 

Beth Johnson 

This course will examine early Christian lit- 
erature to see what we might reconstruct of 
women's experience in the primitive church 
from what authors say to and about them. We 
will pay particular attention to theological 
uses of texts that address the role and status 
of women in family, church, and society. Pre- 
requisites: Survey of the New Testament {CB, 
ML,T} 
3 credits/1 unit 



56 



B574 New Testament Theology 

Staff 

The nature of New Testament theology, the use 
of texts in constructive theology, and the unity 
and diversity of the New Testament will be 
investigated in the light of the primary theo- 
logical claims of the New Testament writings. 
Prerequisites: New Testament Survey and 
New Testament Exegesis. {K, CB, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

B670 Interpretive Methods, the Bible, 
and the Church 

Yoder 

This course considers various methods for in- 
terpreting Old Testament texts, including lit- 
erary, historical, and ideological criticisms. 
Particular attention is given to the role of the 
reader and community, the nature of text, and 
the possible contributions of each method to 
the teaching and preaching ministries of the 
church. Prerequisite: Old Testament Survey. 
(CB, ML, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

B671 Rebuilding Our House: 

Community and Theology in the 
Post-Exile 

Yoder 

This course explores the socio-historical and 
theological world of the Jewish people in the 
post-exile (539-331 BCE) through consider- 
ation of biblical texts and non-canonical re- 
sources of the period. Emphasis is placed upon 
the redefinition of the community, the role of 
the temple, issues of idolatry and purity, and 
the threat of "foreign" women. Consideration 
is given to how the post-exile may challenge 
and inform our understandings of the contem- 
porary church and the practice of ministry. 
Prerequisite: Old Testament Survey. {K, CB, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

B674 New Testament Spirituality 
Seminar 

Saunders 

This seminar will explore a number of topics 
and issues pertaining to the retrieval of the 
spirituality of the earliest Christians for the 
church today. Focus will be given to the inter- 
section of culture and spirituality, central theo- 
logical convictions, the experience of the 



Spirit, and the ways life in the Spirit involved 
conflict with the powers. The seminar will 
move toward ways of learning from and ap- 
propriating the spiritual traditions of the first 
Christians in the life of the church today. Pre- 
requisite: New Testament Survey and New 
Testament Exegesis. {K, T, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 

B675 The Eschatological Body: 

Eschatology, Mission, and Church 
in the New Testament 

Saunders 

This course explores the eschatological con- 
victions and practices of the earliest Chris- 
tians, especially with reference to their 
understandings of their mission and the na- 
ture of the church. We will also attempt to dis- 
cern what has led to the current confusion and 
embarrassment about eschatology in mainline 
churches, and examine ways of re-appropri- 
ating within our own setting the "last days" 
convictions and practices of the earliest Chris- 
tians. Prerequisite: New Testament Survey and 
New Testament Exegesis. {K, T, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 

B678 Paul for the North American 
Church 

Cousar 

This course looks at the major theological 
themes characteristic of the undisputed letters 
of Paul, the literary contexts in which they 
arose, and their possible significance for shap- 
ing the life of the church today. The course 
functions as a seminar and focuses on critical 
texts in the letters and their interpretation. {K, 
T,ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 

B679 Interpretation of the Gospel of 
Mark 

Saunders 

This course will explore the nature of Mark's 
parabolic presentation of the story of Jesus, 
using some of the more recent literary and 
sociological approaches. Students may expect 
to pursue a reading of the Greek text along- 
side critical engagement with some of the 
more recent interpretations of Mark. Prereq- 
uisite: New Testament exegesis. {K, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 



57 



Independent Studies 

The following courses provide an opportu- 
nity to engage in individualized work on vari- 
ous problems in the Biblical Area under the 
supervision of an instructor. 



B691 Independent Study in Languages 
of Antiquity 

Staff 

Any term up to 3 credits/1 unit 

B692 Exegetical Research in Old 
Testament 

Brueggemann or O'Connor or Yoder 
Any term up to 3 credits/1 unit 



B693 Research in Old Testament 
Criticism or Theology 

Brueggemann or O'Connor or Yoder 
Any term up to 3 credits/1 unit 

B695 Exegetical Research in New 
Testament 

Cousar or Saunders or Beth Johnson 
Any term up to 3 credits/l unit 



B696 Research in New Testament 
Criticism or Theology 

Cousar or Saunders or Beth Johnson 
Any term up to 3 credits/1 unit 



Historical Doctrinal Area 



Faculty: Carlos Cardoza-Orlandi (chair), T. 
Erskine Clarke, Mark Douglas, Margit 
Ernst, Catherine G. Gonzalez, Charles E. 
Raynal, Marcia Y. Riggs, George W. Stroup 

Required Courses for the M.Div. 
Degree 



HD120 Introduction to Church History 

Gonzalez 

This course is an introduction to the history 
of the church, including its doctrine, structure, 
and interaction with the surrounding culture. 
We will also deal with the understanding of 
the life of faith in the different periods. 
3 credits/1 unit 

HD233 Christian Theology I 

Staff 

This course is an introduction to the basic doc- 
trines of Christian faith. 
3 credits/1 unit 

HD234 Christian Theology II 

Staff 

This course is the continuation of HD233. At- 
tention is given to the distinctive shape of clas- 
sical and contemporary Reformed theology 
within larger Christian tradition, and to the 
contribution of black, evangelical, feminist 



and Latin American liberation theological per- 
spectives to the life and ministry of the church 
in our context. 
3 credits/1 unit 

HD372 Christian Ethics 

Douglas/Riggs 

This course is a study of the biblical, theologi- 
cal, and philosophical foundations of Chris- 
tian ethics for guidance in Christian decision 
making. 
3 credits/1 unit 

HD320 American Religious and Cultural 
History 

Clarke 

This course is a study of the history of reli- 
gion in the United States. Special attention is 
given to the complex relationship of religion 
to U.S. culture. 
1 1/2 credits/ 1/2 unit 

HD360 Introduction to World Christianity 

Cardoza-Orlandi 

A survey of the expansion and transformation 
of Christianity. Topics such as feminist theolo- 
gies, inculturation, inter-faith dialogue, envi- 
ronmental issues, and justice and peace are 
considered. 
1 1/2 credits/ 1/2 unit 



58 



Elective Courses 
General 

HD610 Introduction to U.S. Religion and 
Cultural History 

Clarke 

This course is designed to provide interna- 
tional students with a deeper understanding 
of American religious, social, and cultural tra- 
ditions; to give them a historical and social 
context for their studies in the U.S.; to help 
them place their theological studies in the 
larger context of American society; and to ex- 
plore the complex relationships between reli- 
gion and culture in American life. 
3 credits/1 unit 



images, concepts, and convictions that have 
shaped Christian theology through the cen- 
turies. {K, C, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

HD619 Black Church Studies Seminar 

Riggs, Clarke 

A topical seminar exploring historical and con- 
temporary aspects of the black religious ex- 
perience in the United States. Topics such as 
black women and religion, the civil rights 
movement, and models of religious ethical 
leadership in the black church tradition will 
be covered. {K, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

Historical Studies 



HD613 Cultural Anthropology for Cross- 
Cultural Mission and Ministry 

Cardoza-Orlandi 

This course explores the dynamics of cross- 
cultural, intercultural, and interfaith mission 
and ministries using cultural anthropology as 
a theoretical tool. Theoretical and experiential 
material is integrated with theological per- 
spectives in an attempt to develop a theology 
for cross-cultural mission and ministry. {K, C, 
T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

HD615 American Cultural Issues 

Clarke 

The purpose of this course is to explore the 
character of contemporary U.S. culture from 
a historical perspective. Critical social and 
cultural issues provide the primary focus of 
the seminar, especially as these issues have 
influenced and continue to influence the min- 
istry of the church. {K, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

HD618 Jesus In Celluloid 

Dietrich 

This seminar studies some of the ways in 
which Jesus has been depicted in film. Among 
the films to be studied are: The Gospel Accord- 
ing to St. Matthew, Jesus Christ Superstar, The 
Last Temptation of Christ, and Jesus of 
Montreal. They will be discussed in conver- 
sation with scripture and with the important 



HD626 Irenaeus and His Theological 
Descendants 

Gonzalez 

This seminar will study the writings of 
Irenaeus and the influence of his theology on 
later writers in the twentieth century. {K, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

Doctrinal Studies 

HD530 Christian Doctrine 

Staff 

This course studies some particular doctrine 
of the Christian faith from the perspective of 
classical and contemporary Reformed theol- 
ogy in conversation with other theological tra- 
ditions. Attention is given both to the 
development of the doctrine and to its inter- 
pretation for the life and ministry of the church 
in the modern world. {K, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 



HD531 The Theology of Calvin 

Staff 

This seminar is an in-depth study of one or 
more books of the Institutes of the Christian 
Religion in the context of classical Christian 
theology, the development of Reformed the- 
ology, and contemporary theological thought. 
{K,T} 
3 credits/1 unit 



59 



HD532 Reformed Theology: Its Shape 
and Development 

Stroup 

This seminar will examine the development 
of Reformed theology from the early sixteenth 
century to the present. Attention will be given 
to major Reformed theologians (e.g., Calvin, 
Edwards, Schleiermacher, Barth, and 
Moltmann) and to significant Reformed docu- 
ments, such as creeds and confessions. A cen- 
tral task of the seminar will be the 
identification of the continuities and endur- 
ing convictions of Reformed theology as well 
as subsequent changes and developments. {K, 
CB} 
3 credits/1 unit 

HD533 Introduction to Theology 

Stroup 

Theological reflections on the nature of faith. 
What is faith? Is it a universal phenomena? 
Do all people have some kind of faith? Read- 
ings from Calvin, Kierkegaard, Barth, and 
Tillich {K, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

HD633 The Theologies of Schleiermacher 
and Kierkegaard 

Gonzalez 

We will study some of the major writings of 
these two nineteenth-century theologians. 
Special attention will be given to comparing 
the structure of their theologies and to their 
influence on twentieth-century thought. {K, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

HD634 The Life and Work of Karl Barth 

Guthrie/Busch/Ernst 

This seminar studies intensively a section of 

Barth's Church Dogmatics. Prerequisites: 

systematic theology sequence or Practice of 

Theology I & II. {K, T} 

3 credits/1 unit 



HD635 Post-Modernism and Christian 
Theology 

Stroup 

This seminar examines the major themes and 
voices in recent discussions about Post-Mod- 
ernism and its implications for theology. Par- 



ticular attention will be given to Derrida and 
Foucault. Theological topics to be discussed 
are: the nature of theological identity, the role 
of doctrine, self-identity, and sexuality. {K, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

HD636 Reading Paul Tillich 

Staff 

This course will be an introduction to the life 
and work of Paul Tillich as a Neo-Reformed 
theologian. It will examine the significant 
theological, philosophical, and cultural influ- 
ences upon his life as well as his impact as a 
"theologian of culture." It will also consider 
ways in which he anticipated some of the 
transformations we now experience in a post- 
Christian reality. {K, CB, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

HD637 The Theology of Paul Tillich 

Kline 

This seminar is a study of one or more sections 
of systematic theology in the context of classi- 
cal Christian theology and contemporary theo- 
logical thought. It involves close reading of the 
text and response both in brief weekly papers 
and two or more larger critical studies. Prereq- 
uisites: systematic theology sequence, Practice 
of Theology I & II, or permission of the instruc- 
tor. {K, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

HD638 Christology 

Stroup 

This course undertakes an examination of the 
understanding of Jesus Christ in Christian the- 
ology. Who is Jesus of Nazareth in the faith of 
the church, and what does the church mean 
when it calls him "Lord and Savior?" Atten- 
tion will be given to the topics of incarnation, 
atonement, and resurrection and to the impli- 
cations of Christology for discipleship, mis- 
sion, and ecclesiology. {K, T, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 

HD639 Meet the Niebuhrs 

Douglas 

Perhaps no two American theologians have 
influenced twentieth-century theology and 
ethics more than the brothers Reinhold and 



60 



H. Richard Niebuhr. From power politics to 
the practice of piety, from the meaning of love 
to language of ministry, from the doctrine of 
sin to the concept of responsibility, their work 
serves as a series of landmarks for discussions 
and debates in American theology. Each 
brother's theological ethics will be explored 
by comparing their respective positions on 
important themes and issues. {K, CB, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

HD644 Caribbean Theology 

Staff 

This course is a study of the theological work 
being done by Caribbean Christians to inter- 
pret the revelations and discern the purposes 
of God within their particular historical, eth- 
nic, political, and cultural context. The course 
includes an immersion experience in Jamaica 
or Cuba, lectures by Caribbean theologians 
and church leaders, and reading of represen- 
tative texts in preparation for writing a paper 
entitled "Caribbean Theology: An Apprecia- 
tion and Critique." {K, C, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

HD645 Church in China 

Cardoza-Orlandi, Raynal 

Examines the history, theology, and the con- 
temporary context of the church in China with 
particular emphasis given to issues of gospel 
and culture. {K, C, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

Philosophical Studies 

HD551 Philosophical Introduction 

Kline 

This course is an introduction to philosophy 
through its history and an exploration of the 
relation of philosophy to theology. It is rec- 
ommended for first-year students who have 
not had a course in introduction to philoso- 
phy in college. {K, CB, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 



Mission, Ecumenics, World 
Christianity, and World Religions 

HD561 World Religions and the Global 
Church 

Cardoza-Orlandi 

This course provides an introduction to Hin- 
duism, Buddhism, and Islam and their histori- 
cal and contemporary relationship to 
Christianity. Lectures and class discussions 
will explore the religious, theological, and 
missiological interpretations of the encounters 
of these religions with different Christian tra- 
ditions (Roman Catholic, Orthodox, Protes- 
tant, and Pentecostal). {K, C, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

HD564 Faces of Protestantism in Latin 
America 

Cardoza-Orlandi 

This course explores the history, development, 
diversity, and similarities of Protestantism in 
Latin America and the Caribbean. The course 
studies the dynamics of these protestantisms 
with Latin American liberation theology, the 
emergence of Amerindian and Afro-diaspora 
religions, and the question of authentic Chris- 
tianity in the Latin American and Caribbean 
context. {K, C, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

HD664 Social Theory for Ministry and 
Mission 

Cardoza-Orlandi 

This course will examine two major social 
theorists, Max Weber and Clifford Geertz, to 
discern ways in which their insights into the 
nature of leadership, authority, organizational 
and community development, and so-called 
local knowledge can inform our ministries and 
mission. Particular attention will be paid to 
ways in which these thinkers might help 
bridge differences between elites and non- 
elites and among persons of different cultural 
backgrounds and practices. {K, C, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 



61 



HD666 Theologies from the Underside: 
Finding God Among the Poor of 
the Earth 

Cardoza-Orlandi 

This course explores the birth and develop- 
ment of Third World theologies, particularly 
in Africa, India, and Latin America. Students 
and faculty discuss issues of contextualization, 
ecology, inculturation, interfaith dialogue, and 
the preferential option for the poor through 
the readings of Merci Oduyoye, John S. Pobee, 
Aylward Shorter, M.M. Thomas, Stanley 
Samartha, Gustavo Gutirrez, Ruben Alves, 
Elsa Tamez, and others. {K, C, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 



regarding issues such as affirmative action, 
AIDS and drug testing, health care and wel- 
fare reform. {K, CB, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

HD672 Figures and Themes in Liberation 

Ethics 
Riggs 

This course examines the ethical content of the 
writings of various liberation theologians and 
ethicists and /or the ethical dimensions of top- 
ics relevant to struggles for liberation. {K, CB, 
T} 
3 credits/1 unit 



Ethics and Society 

HD576 The Bible and Christian Ethical 
Reflection 

Riggs, Saunders 

This course examines the writings of biblical 
scholars and Christian ethicists for their un- 
derstanding of the relationship between the 
Bible and ethics. Students will develop their 
understanding of that relationship as well as 
models for the use of the Bible in Christian 
ethical reflection in the church. {K, CB, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 



HD670 Love and Justice 

Douglas 

Christians are called to practice agape. They 
are also called to pursue justice. But how are 
love and justice related? Are love and justice 
opposed? Do they function in separate 
spheres? Are they the same thing? Or are they 
in dialectic tension with one another? This 
class explores the many ways love and justice 
have been related to each other, placing spe- 
cial emphasis on the role each concept plays 
in the church's attempts to address social prob- 
lems. {K, CB, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 



HD673 The Church as Community of 
Moral Discourse 

Riggs 

This course explores questions of how the 
church can engage purposefully in ethical re- 
flection upon contemporary social problems 
and issues. The objective of the course is to 
guide students in preparing models of pasto- 
ral-prophetic ministry for the local church. The 
seminar's format will include lectures, discus- 
sion, and group case analysis. {K, T ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 



HD674 The Church, Ethics, and Economic 
Life 

Douglas 

In an age when money means power, the lan- 
guage of the market dominates society, and 
most alternatives to capitalism have either 
failed or are floundering, how should the 
church think about money, business, and its 
prophetic role in society? This class concen- 
trates on the following questions; can the 
church afford not to think of itself as a busi- 
ness? Or would thinking of itself as a busi- 
ness mean it no longer could think of itself as 
a church? {K, T, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 



HD671 Theories of Justice and Social 
Policy 

Riggs 

The focus of this seminar is the critical analy- 
sis of classical and contemporary theories of 
justice and their implications for social policy 



HD677 Feminist/Womanist Ethics 

Riggs 

This seminar examines historical, sociological, 
and theological bases of feminist and 
womanist ethics. The course will explore ques- 
tions which compare and contrast feminist 



62 



and womanist understandings of the nature 
of gender oppression, socio-religious ethical 
issues in the analysis of sexism, and the pur- 
pose and tasks of a movement against sexist 
oppression. {T, CB} 
3 credits/1 unit 



HD678 Readings in Contemporary 
Christian Ethics 

Riggs 

This seminar studies the writings of several 
recent ethicists with special attention to their 
methods and sources in "doing ethics." The 
seminar will also examine, in the writings of 
contemporary ethicists, perennial themes, 
such as the relationship between love and jus- 
tice, particularism and universalism, religion 
and morality, and personal and social ethics. 
{K,CB,T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

Independent Studies 

The following courses provide an opportu- 
nity to engage in individualized work on vari- 
ous topics in the Historical-Doctrinal Area 
under the supervision of an instructor. 

HD691 Independent Study in History 

Clarke or Gonzalez 

Any term up to 3 credits/1 unit 



HD692 Independent Study in Theological 
German, French, or Spanish 

Staff 

Any term up to 3 credits/1 unit 

HD693 Independent Study in Theology 

Ernst or Stroup 

Any term up to 3 credits/1 unit 

HD694 Independent Study in Christianity 
and World Religions 

Cardoza-Orlandi 

Any term up to 3 credits/1 unit 

HD695 Independent Study in Philosophy 

Staff 

Any term up to 3 credits/1 unit 

HD696 Independent Study in Mission, 
Ecumenics, and World 
Christianity 

Cardoza-Orlandi 

Any term up to 3 credits/1 unit 

HD697 Independent Study in Ethics 

Riggs 

Any term up to 3 credits/1 unit 

HD698 Independent Study in Media, 
Theology, and Culture 

Staff 

Any term up to 3 credits/1 unit 



Practical Theology Area 



Faculty: Charles L. Campbell (chair), R. Leon 
Carroll, Ronald H. Cram, Anna Carter Flo- 
rence, Philip R. Gehman, Darrell L. Guder, 
J. William Harkins, Sharon L. Mook, D. 
Cameron Murchison, Rodger Nishioka, 
John H. Patton, Brian Wren 

Required Courses for M.Div. Degree 



P151 The Ministry of Worship and 
Preaching 

Campbell, Florence 

This course provides an introduction to the 

preaching and worship ministry of the church, 



focusing on the preparation and delivery of 
sermons within the context of Christian wor- 
ship and on the history, theology, and prac- 
tice of worship in the Reformed and other 
traditions. Prerequisites: Greek, enrollment in 
New Testament exegesis. 
3 credits/1 unit 



P232 Introduction to Pastoral Care 

Patton, Staff 

This course presents pastoral care as a ministry 
of the church expressed in crisis intervention, in 
sustaining, guiding, reconciling and healing 
encounters, and in ordinary conversations. 
3 credits/1 unit 



63 



P322 



Cram 



Introduction to the Theory and 
Practice of Christian Education 



The church is called by God to be in a con- 
stant process of reformation and renewed mis- 
sion. What are possible relations between our 
understandings of God, mission, and educa- 
tion in today's church? Students will analyze 
selected contemporary educational theories 
and practices, become familiar with basic edu- 
cational concepts, and begin to develop their 
own practical approaches as practical theolo- 
gians to Christian religious education in the 
church. 
3 credits/1 unit 

Elective Courses 
General 

P505 Writing Workshop 

D. Campbell 

This course is designed to help students be- 
come more competent and effective writers at 
Columbia and in ministry. Students will re- 
view basics of grammar and composition and 
practice writing and editing in a workshop 
format. The power and function of written lan- 
guage in ministry is a central theme through- 
out the course. 
non-credit 



P605 E.S.L. Writing Class 

Staff 

This class is specifically designed for students 
who have English as a second language and 
aims to equip them with the skills they need 
to study in any of the programs at Columbia. 
The class includes work on listening, speak- 
ing, and reading, but the emphasis is on writ- 
ten work. All E.S.L. students are strongly 
encouraged to take this class. 
non-credit 

Evangelism and Church Growth 

P610 Bridging Gospel and Culture: The 
Transcultural Gospel in Home 
Mission Cultural Contexts 

Wood 

This course will explore the bridges between 

gospel and culture from a missiological per- 



spective and will explore the transcultural as- 
pects of the gospel. Particular emphasis will 
be placed on exploring cultural bridges which 
are faithful missional forms of gospel witness 
relevant to particular communities. (New 
Church Development D.Min. specialization 
required course #1) This course is open to non- 
specialization students with permission of 
professor. 
3 credits 



P611 



Wood 



Frontiers in Mission Strategy: 
Mission Strategy Planning in 
Local, Regional and National 
Contexts 



The course will examine strategies of holistic 
church development and new church devel- 
opment in particular. Missional planning in 
local, regional and national contexts will be 
viewed through a case study method which 
critiques the church development /new church 
development strategy theologically and de- 
mographically. (New Church Development 
D.Min. specialization required course #2) This 
course is open to non-specialization students 
with permission of professor. 
3 credits 



P612 The North American Mission 
Field as the Context for 
Evangelistic Ministry 

Guder 

This course provides an overview of the con- 
temporary religious situation in North 
America, with a focus upon the implications 
of this rapidly changing context for evange- 
listic mission. Diverse response in terms of 
evangelistic theology and strategy are ana- 
lyzed. {ML, T, CB} 
3 credits/1 unit 



P613 The Missional Practice of the 
Christian Life 

Guder 

This course develops a missional understand- 
ing of the disciplines and practices of the 
Christian life. Particular attention is given to 
the concept of baptism as general ordination 
to ministry, and thus to the apostolate of the 
laity as the central form of Christian mission 
in the world. {ML, CB} 
3 credits/1 unit 



64 



P614 Ecumenical Perspectives on the 
Church's Mission (Geneva) 

Guder 

The contemporary discussion of the global 
mission of the church is the theme of encoun- 
ters with resource persons from major agen- 
cies of the ecumenical movement in Geneva, 
in particular the World Council of Churches 
and the World Alliance of Reformed Churches. 
{ML/T,Q 
3 credits/1 unit 



P618 Seminar in Evangelism and 
Church Growth 

Guder 

This course examines current issues and theo- 
logical approaches that relate significantly to 
the church's evangelistic mandate. The semi- 
nar is offered in the spring to advanced stud- 
ies. The projected theme for 2000 is "Missional 
Theology Beyond the Boundaries of North 
Atlantic Culture." (ML, T, CB} 
3 credits/1 unit 



P615 Leadership for Evangelism and 
Church Growth in North 
American Congregations 

Wood 

This course will examine crucial selections 
from the literature in the field. Each partici- 
pant will learn to analyze a congregation, de- 
velop a plan, train leadership, and give 
guidance to effective growth. The class ses- 
sions will exhibit a shared style of learning and 
a high level of participation and student lead- 
ership. {K, T, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 

P616 Theology of Evangelistic Ministry 

Guder 

This course guides students through an inves- 
tigation of diverse theological approaches to 
the evangelistic ministry and outreach of the 
contemporary church in North America. Un- 
derstanding the church's identity and task as 
the Mission of God (Missio Dei), evangelistic 
ministry will be explored as the center of that 
mission. The course equips students to critique 
theologically various popular evangelistic 
methods. {ML, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

P617 Strategies for Missional 
Transformation 

Guder 

In order to link the theology of evangelistic 
ministry with the pastoral practice, this course 
examines both the theory and the methods of 
congregational formation which foster 
missional transformation. Special emphasis is 
placed upon ministry in small groups, study- 
ing the Bible missionally, and missional voca- 
tion as the fundamental understanding of 
Christian life and practice. {ML, T, CB} 
3 credits/1 unit 



P619 The Minister as Evangelist 

Guder 

The apostolic, prophetic, pastoral, and teach- 
ing dimensions of the office of ministry are 
integrated around the central task of evange- 
listic ministry, in order to develop a theology 
of the minister as evangelist to and within the 
congregation. {SF, ML, CB} 
3 credits/1 unit 

Christian Education 

P522 Teaching with Imagination 

Cram/Nishioka 

This course will help students develop a more 
imaginative approach to teaching by experi- 
encing a variety of teaching methods. Atten- 
tion will be given to understanding how our 
theology affects our methodology. {T, ML} 
2 or 3 credits/1 unit 

P523a and b Literature for Christian 
Children 

Cram 

This course will provide the student an op- 
portunity to read widely in the area of 
children's literature, and to evaluate these re- 
sources theologically and educationally. This 
course will be of special interest to caregivers 
of children, persons who seek to establish a 
children's resource center in the local church, 
and teachers. This course is offered in coop- 
eration with the Griffith Children's Library. {T, 
K,ML} 

1 1/2 credit/1/2 unit or both sessions 3 credits/ 
1 unit 



P526 



Cram 



Parenting and the Moral Lives of 
Children 



How do Christian parents today provide ap- 
propriate moral education for their children? 



65 



This class will suggest different hands-on ap- 
proaches appropriate for elementary-aged 
children. {K, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 

P527 Teaching the Bible Through 
Liberative Pedagogy 

Nishioka 

Too often, children, youth, young adults, and 
adults experience Bible study as "giving the 
correct answers" and "keeping questions and 
ideas to one's self." In other words, they ex- 
perience the teaching of the Bible to be oppres- 
sive rather than liberating. Participants in this 
course will begin with a basic understanding 
of effective teaching methods and develop- 
mental theory and will then explore and prac- 
tice how to teach the Bible. 
3 credits/1 unit {K, CB, T} 

P623 The Spiritual Lives of Children 

Cram 

The child is actively making meaning in a web 
of complex social relationships among house- 
hold members, in the school, on the play- 
ground, in the band, among friends and foes, 
at the doctor's office, in the grocery store, and 
in front of the television. This course will focus 
on contextual constructive theological contri- 
butions of children, with an emphasis on prac- 
tical implications for the local church. Human 
development, theological reflection, and learn- 
ing theory will be emphasized. {C, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 



P624 Advanced Seminar in the Theory 
of Religious Education 

Cram 

Intended for D.Min. and Th.M. students or for 
those who have completed P222, this course 
will attend specifically to radical approaches 
in adult education, the intersection of femi- 
nist studies and education, post-modern edu- 
cational praxis, and cultural pluralism. {K, T, 
ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 

P625 Ministry with Second Generation 

Asian- Americans 
Nishioka 

Challenges abound for pastors and educators 
serving second generation Asian- American 



congregations. This course will examine the 
particular context of ministry in Asian- Ameri- 
can congregations with specific attention paid 
to youth and young adult ministry, the Asian 
vs. American cultures, and resolving conflicts 
in family and church situations. 

1 2 / 2 credits/ 1 / 2 unit {ML, C, K} 

P626 Youth and Young Adult Ministry 

Nishioka 

Designed especially for those who will carry 
responsibility for youth and young adult min- 
istry in the congregation, this course begins 
with an exploration of the youth sub-culture 
today and its implications for ministry. Other 
topics to be explored include the particular 
developmental challenges of youth and young 
adults, ministry with young people in crisis, 
changing family patterns and emerging new 
strategies in ministry with youth. The course 
will also focus on young adults and how 
churches are faithfully reaching out and in- 
cluding these "Gen Xers" in their congrega- 
tion. 
3 credits/1 unit {K, CB, T} 

P627 Transforming the Confirmation 
Journey 

Nishioka 

For most early adolescents, the confirmation 
journey is the end of their relationship to the 
church rather than the beginning. Today pas- 
tors and educators must seek new ways of 
marking this important step in a young 
person's life. Participants in this course will 
explore the various meanings of confirmation 
and will critique a variety of current models 
and methods. Students will be helped to de- 
termine the best approach to confirmation in 
their future congregation. 

2 V 2 credits/ 1 /! unit {K, CB, T} 



P629 Christian Education in a 
Changing World 

Cram, Nishioka 

This course will address the question, "How 
does the Church educate people to discern 
what God is calling them to do and be in new, 
complex, and challenging contexts?" Through 
readings, field explorations, and creating their 
own curriculum resources, students will ex- 
plore and construct Christian educational re- 



66 



sponses to this changed and changing world. 
This course is joint offering with the Candler 
School of Theology and the Inter-denomina- 
tional Theological Center, (limit 6 and permis- 
sion of instructor required) 
3 credits/1 unit {T, CB, ML} 

Pastoral Care and Counseling 



P539 



Pastoral Care and the Aging 
Process 



Staff 

This course explores a variety of issues relat- 
ing to the aging process and older adults. 
Community resources for the care of the aged 
are identified. Specific proposals for parish 
programs are developed. Throughout the 
course, theological dimensions of the aging 
process are sought. The course includes a clini- 
cal component. {C, T, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 



P633 The Development of Modern 
Pastoral Care 

A.T.A. Staff 

This course will research the literature, study 
the personalities, and consider the historical 
context of the pastoral care movement in the 
U.S. in the 20 th Century. For Th.M., Th.D., or 
D.Min. students; others must secure permis- 
sion from the professor. {K, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 



P534 Pastoral Care of Marriage and 
Family Life 

Patton or Staff 

This course focuses on current developments 
and issues in marriage and family life as these 
relate to ministry. Various types of ministry 
to marriage and family life will be explored. 
Particular attention will be given to the rela- 
tion of the student's own family to his or her 
ministry to the families of others and to a theo- 
logical understanding of marriage and fam- 
ily life. [T, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 



P634 



Mook 



Family Systems in the 
Congregation 



attention will be given to exploring the 
student's own family system and understand- 
ing how this system, as well as the systematic 
dynamics of the congregation, impact the role 
and functioning of the person as pastor. Issues 
around personal and professional boundaries 
will be addressed specifically. Limit of 8 stu- 
dents. Prerequisites: at least two of the follow- 
ing: SM210, P232, or one unit of CPE. {K, T, 
ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 



P636 Pastoral Counseling in the Parish 

Patton or Staff 

This course will explore the theory and prac- 
tice of time-limited, individual pastoral coun- 
seling, including basic principles of 
psychological and theological diagnosis, treat- 
ment planning, and treatment management. 
Cases investigated will be those typically en- 
countered in the parish. Case studies, lectures, 
role playing, and verbal reports will be used. 
The theological rationale of pastoral counsel- 
ing will be explored. Prerequisite: Hospital 
practicum or CPE. {K, T, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 



P638 Crisis Counseling 

Staff 

Basic texts in crisis counseling will be used in 
a seminar format. Training in crisis counsel- 
ing will be required with one of the following 
local organizations: DeKalb Rape Crisis Train- 
ing; Women's Resource Center of DeKalb 
County; Georgia Council on Child Abuse. This 
course is designed to equip future ministers 
with appropriate crisis intervention and refer- 
ral skills and to foster theological reflection on 
the issues raised. Prerequisite: Basic unit of 
CPE, introductory pastoral care course, or per- 
mission of the instructor. {K, T, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 



Principles of Pastoral Supervision 



Using the basics of family systems theories, 
students will learn about the dynamics within 
families and within congregations. Particular 



P639 

Staff 

This course will research philosophies of edu- 
cation, theories of learning, and methods of 
supervision for a ministry of pastoral super- 
vision. For advanced degree students by per- 
mission of the professor. 
3 credits/1 unit 



67 



Worship 

P544 Music for Ministers 

Remington 

This course is designed to give future minis- 
ters an introduction to the place of music in 
worship and provide an understanding of how 
music is chosen, presented, and how it shapes 
the faith of the people of God. In addition, the 
task of the church music program, its functions, 
and the pastor's relation to the music program 
will be examined. Examples of hymns and an- 
thems will be played and discussed. {K, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 

P545 Columbia Choir 

Remington 

This course is for students who are interested in 
learning about church music through singing in 
a choir. A variety of musical styles will be of- 
fered each semester. The full choir meets weekly 
for rehearsals, and sectionals meet an additional 
half-hour per week as needed. The choir sings 
in chapel on a regular basis with one major con- 
cert per year. A simple audition may be required 
when taking the course for credit. {ML} 
1 1/2 credits/1/2 unit 

P546 Conducting Christian Worship 

Wren 

This course will develop skills for designing 
and leading public worship in reformed an kin- 
dred traditions. Modules include: nature, pur- 
pose and history of Christian worship; liturgical 
models (word and table, revivalist, contempo- 
rary, seeker-oriented, etc.); cross cultural per- 
spectives; time and space (including seating 
and acoustics); public presentation of scripture; 
visual, sonic, and kinesthetic languages in wor- 
ship; and worship in today's culture. Practical 
work includes worship preparation, leadership, 
and evaluation, and training in how to conduct 
services such as infant and adult baptisms, 
communions, weddings, and funerals /memo- 
rial services. Prerequisites: 1110 and 1111. 
3 credits/1 unit {K, ML} 



P641 Hymnody, Music and 
Congregational Song 

Wren/Rem ington 

This course explores the theological impor- 
tance of congregational song, how music has 
meaning, the appeal of different musical styles 



(including classic, taize and contemporary), 
and what pastors need to know about the 
training and skills of musicians; music in the 
small church; hymnody and psalmody; the 
role and workings of particular musical instru- 
ments; children's and youth choirs and music 
programs; and how to introduce new songs. 
3 credits/1 unit. {K, ML} 

Preaching 



P650 Twentieth-Century Preaching: 
Theory and Practice 

Campbell 

Students will examine the homiletical theory 
and practice of several important twentieth- 
century preachers and will explore influential 
trends in contemporary homiletics. Building 
on reading and class discussion, students will 
develop a theology of preaching and preach 
two sermons in class. Prerequisite: P151. (C, 
SF, ML} 
3 credits/ 1 unit 

P651 Preaching Workshop 

Campbell 

This one-half unit seminar will provide stu- 
dents an opportunity to do practical work on 
their preaching and explore their homiletical 
"growing edges." Each student will preach 
three sermons and receive critique form other 
students and the professor. In addition, stu- 
dents will prepare a plan for their continued 
growth as preachers. Prerequisite: P151. {C, 
ML,T} 
1 1/2 credits/1/2 unit 

P653 The Preacher and the Poet 

Florence 

This course will explore preaching as an act 
of poetic imagination. In a postmodern world 
at odds with the claims of the gospel, how can 
our preaching invite listeners to imagine an 
alternative reality? Can an image be more 
powerful than a description? Students will 
consider the poet's art-language, imagination, 
experience, form as a resource for preaching. 
Includes a workshop with a working poet, and 
the preaching of two sermons. Prerequisite: 
P151 {ML, CB, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 



68 



P654 The Testimony of Preaching 

Women in America: 1636 to the 
Present 

Florence 

Is there a "women's preaching tradition" in 
America? This course argues that there is, and 
that one key of its identity is the ancient prac- 
tice of "testimony." Through the study of his- 
tory more than 350 years of rich evidence for 
preaching women in this country and theol- 
ogy, students will work toward the construc- 
tion of a biblical model for a women's 
preaching tradition based on testimony. In- 
cludes the preaching of two sermons. Prereq- 
uisite: P151 {K, CB, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 



P656 Principalities, Powers, and 
Preaching 

Campbell 

This course will consider the homiletical sig- 
nificance of what the New Testament calls the 
"Principalities and Powers." Biblical texts, li- 
turgical materials, theological literature, con- 
temporary films, and the daily newspaper will 
serve as resources for exploring the nature of 
the "Principalities and Powers" and their sig- 
nificance for Christian preaching. Prerequisite: 
P151.{CB,T,ML} 
3 credits/ 1 unit 



P657 Preaching and Worship in the 
Small Church 

Campbell, Murchison 

Taught each year with the support of the 
Presbytery of Greater Atlanta, this year-long 
directed study/ seminar is designed for stu- 
dents who are serving as pulpit supplies or 
part-time pastors in small churches. Building 
on the ministry that the students are perform- 
ing in the churches, the seminar explores the 
character of ministry in the small church, fo- 
cusing in particular on worship and preach- 
ing. Students not only have the chance to 
discuss issues related to their ongoing minis- 
try, but also receive feedback on their worship 
leadership and their sermons. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. {C, SF, ML} 
3 credits/ 1 unit 



story sermons that are organized around a 
plot. Students will evaluate narrative sermons, 
read homiletical theory, and prepare at least 
two narrative sermons. Prerequisite: Worship 
and Preaching or its equivalent. {CB, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 



P659 Preaching and Youth 

Florence 

How can the church engage its youth in 
preaching, and what prophetic word do our 
young people bring to the ministry of procla- 
mation: This course explores the relationship 
between preaching and youth, focusing on the 
ways in which our interpretation of Scripture 
and preaching of the Gospel are affected by 
the particular needs, social location, and gifts 
of young people. Students will prepare ser- 
mons for a variety of preaching contexts, from 
traditional congregations to retreat settings. 
Prerequisite: P151 {ML, T, CB} 
3 credits/1 unit 

Spirituality 

P576 Spiritual Formation 

Staff 

This course, based on Reformed spirituality, 
seeks to ground students in a vital spiritual- 
ity that will lead to a vital ministry. It provides 
opportunities in and out of class for students 
to practice the particular disciplines that 
undergird the Reformed faith. {K, SF, CB} 
3 credits/1 unit 

P675 Further Reaches of Prayer 

Staff 

Many of us need to discover that prayer is 
more than words — asking and receiving. 
Prayer, in the classical sense, encompasses all 
the forms of our transacting with God. This 
course will explore a number of those modes 
frequently ignored and neglected. {SF, CB, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

Ministry and Church 
Administration 



P658 Narrative Preaching 

Campbell 

This seminar focuses on narrative preaching, 

which includes both story-sermons and non- 



P583 Korean-American Ministry 

Staff 

The course will examine the distinctiveness of 

Korean- American ministry and culture, thus 



69 



preparing students better to deal with the 
unique needs, problems, and aspirations of the 
Korean-American community in the United 
States. Students will become cognizant of ac- 
culturation patterns so that they can minister 
to Korean-American immigrants effectively. 
{ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 



F681 Congregational Leadership and 
Church Administration 

Murchison/Forney 

This course focuses on personal and organi- 
zational issues that affect leadership and ad- 
ministration in the congregational setting. It 
addresses issues such as effective time man- 
agement in ministry, personal financial plan- 
ning, ongoing spiritual development, 
organizational dynamics, power and author- 
ity, communication, problem-solving, conflict 
and negotiation, coordinating personnel and 
members in mission and ministry, steward- 
ship, and church financial management. {C, 
SF, T, ML} 
1 unit/3 credits 



P683 Ministry Through the Year 

Murchison 

This course utilizes the framework of the li- 
turgical calendar to orient participants to some 
of the primary components of ministry that 
occur over the course of a year of congrega- 
tional ministry. It considers the special wor- 
ship ministry pastors are called upon to lead 
and the major roles of pastoral leadership that 
typically are associated with various periods 
of the year, including stewardship, officer edu- 
cation, confirmation, and ministry in the pub- 
lic domain. {K, ML, CT} 
3 credits/1 unit 



P687 Reflective Practice: Congregation 
and Minister 

Carroll 

This course is designed for M.Div. students 
who have completed or who are currently 
engaged in a congregation-based internship 
(SM210 or SM620). The intent of the course is 
to assist students to develop a model of min- 
istry which is connected to their experiences 
in the congregation, making extensive use of 
case material developed out of the students' 
experiences in the congregation. {C, CB, T, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 



Independent Studies 

The following courses are designed for stu- 
dents who are interested in further study be- 
yond the regular course offerings in the 
Practical Theology Area. Permission of the in- 
structor is required. 



P691 Independent Study in Evangelism 
and Church Growth 

Guder 

Any term up to 3 credits/1 unit 

P692 Independent Study in Christian 
Education 

Cram 

Any term up to 3 credits/1 unit 

P693 Independent Study in Practical 
Theology and Counseling 

Patton or Staff 

Any term up to 3 credits/1 unit 

P694 Independent Study in Worship 

Staff 

Any term up to 3 credits/1 unit 

P695 Independent Study in Preaching 

Campbell or Florence 

Any term up to 3 credits/1 unit 

P696 Independent Study in 
Communication 

Staff 

Any term up to 3 credits/1 unit 

P697 Independent Study in Spirituality 

Staff 

Any term up to 3 credits/1 unit 

P698 Independent Study in Ministry 
and Administration 

Murchison 

Any term up to 3 credits/1 unit 

P699 Independent Study in New 
Church Development 

Wood 

Any term up to 3 credits/1 unit 



70 



Interdisciplinary Courses 



Required courses for M.Div. or 
M.A.(T.S.) Degree 

IlOO M.A.CT.S.) Seminar 

Gonzalez 

This seminar is designed to assist entering 
M.A.(T.S.) students to focus on the vocational 
or personal goals they have for the degree. The 
M.A.(T.S.) Seminar is required for entering, 
full-time M.A.(T.S.) students. Those who are 
part-time are expected to enroll in the semi- 
nar after they have taken at least two courses, 
but before they complete five courses. 
1 unit 



IllO Baptism and Evangelical Calling 

Staff 

This interdisciplinary course enables students 
to understand the Christian identity of all 
those incorporated through baptism into 
Christ and Christ's community in the world. 
Specific attention will be given to discerning 
how God's grace has been at work in a 
student's own baptism and personal history 
and to discerning the particular gifts of God 
given to each of us for Christian life and min- 
istry. 
Fall 1 unit 



1111 The Eucharist and the Church's 

Mission 

Staff 

This interdisciplinary course seeks to exam- 
ine the ministry of the church as it relates to 
the Lord's Supper and the programs of a par- 
ticular congregation. From this base the course 
seeks to learn how the church may participate 
in the Missio Dei in denominational and ecu- 
menical efforts. Specific areas to be addressed 
include ways in which the Lord's Supper in- 
forms and empowers evangelism, a ministry 
of compassion, and the church's commitment 
to justice, peace, and stewardship of creation 
and life. 
Spring 1 unit 



1241 Alternative Context for Ministry 

Carroll, Clarke, Staff 

This course is a combined academic and ex- 
periential study which seeks to deepen expe- 
rience and understanding of a significantly 
different cultural context and the mission of 
the church in that context. It also provides an 
opportunity for theological reflection on the 
experience and its implications for ministry. 
During the 1999-2000 academic year, the con- 
texts were the inner city of Atlanta, Appala- 
chia, Mexico, Central Europe, and Jamaica. 
Winter 3 credits/1 unit 



1310 Final Things 

Staff 

This course is designed to help students cross 
the boundary from being theology students 
to being theological practitioners by focusing 
on two things. The first is that they know who 
they are theologically. The second is that they 
be able to integrate what they have learned 
and believe in settings where the boundaries 
between theory and practice are either artifi- 
cial or without meaning. The class will give 
attention to the intersection of formulating a 
credo and working through an issue in minis- 
try. 
Spring and Fall 1 unit 

Elective Courses 



1602 Preaching the Pauline Epistles 

Cousar, Campbell 

In this interdisciplinary seminar, students ex- 
amine Paul's understanding of preaching and 
explore the challenges and possibilities of 
preaching from the Pauline epistles. In addi- 
tion to readings and exegesis, students preach 
two sermons in class. {K, T, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 



1603 Theology of the Grotesque in the 
Fiction of Flannery O'Connor 

Dietrich/Stroup 

This course investigates the comic grotesque 
(hideously beautiful, beautifully hideous) in 
Flannery O'Connor's fiction and looks into the 



71 



expression of the repressed and the possibil- 
ity of rebirth and transformation. Special em- 
phasis will be placed on O'Connor's 
Christology. {SF, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 



Human Sexuality 



1605 

Staff 

This seminar examines issues related to hu- 
man sexuality from the perspectives offered 
by biblical theology, Christian tradition, and 
contemporary human sciences. Issues to be 
addressed will include the following: human 
sexual development, gender identification, 
marriage and family, church statements re- 
garding sexuality, sexual abuse, sexual dys- 
function, and reproductive ethics. 
Presentations by selected authorities in the 
field of sexology will be included. {K, T, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 

1607 Money Matters in Ministry 

Murchison 

This course explores the ways in which finan- 
cial pressures bear on the lives of people in 
North American culture. It will examine how 
churches in this setting can minister to their 
members with a credible theology of money. 
It will give special attention to ethical issues 
of money facing pastors, as well as examin- 
ing major resources of the Christian tradition 
for faithful response to the economic issues 
facing the church and its members. 
3 credits 



1616 Reading Theologically: Keeping 
up with Media as a Discipline of 
Ministry 

Dietrich 

Barth's claim that we must preach (and 
teach and pastor) with the Bible in one hand 
and the day's newspaper in the other is not 
yet obsolete. A visit to any newsstand 
confirms that we are in the midst of an 
explosion of print media. How do we look at 
the print media? Can we read a Spin 
magazine interview with gospel eyes? Why 
should we even try? This course attempts to 
grapple with these questions and others like 
them. {CB, T, ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 



1618 Presbyterian History and Polity 

Clarke/Murchison 

This course combines a study of Presbyterian 

history with a study of the polity of the Pres- 



byterian Church (USA). Special attention will 
be given to the history of polity and to the 
theological debates and missiological commit- 
ments that have influenced the present polity 
of the Presbyterian Church (USA). (K, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 

1617 Sin and Evil in Modern Fiction 
and Film 

Dietrich 

Students will look at selected 20 th century nov- 
els, as well as film versions of some of them, 
in search of provisional answers to questions 
like: Can we understand evil apart from a no- 
tion of good? To what extent is evil social and/ 
or personal? Can sin or evil ever be comic? 
Authors studied may include Flannery 
O'Connor, Nathanael West, Jay Mclnerney, 
Shusako Endo, Russell Banks, and Iris 
Murdoch. {T,CB} 
3 credits/1 unit 



1620 Narrative, Self, and Other: 

Wellness and Pastoral Care for, 
and by, Men in Ministry 

Harkins 

This course will explore the relationship be- 
tween physical, emotional, and spiritual well- 
being in men. Particular emphasis will be 
given to the ways in which we care for our- 
selves, even as we care for others. Content and 
pedagogy will draw upon personal theologi- 
cal narrative, spirituality, ethics, systems 
theory, and pastoral care. We will utilize read- 
ings from each of these areas, as well as film 
and fiction. Participants will engage in the 
construction of a religious autobiography, at- 
tend an overnight mountain retreat and par- 
ticipate in weekly class sessions. 
3 credits/1 unit {CB, SF} 



622 "Love Your Enemies" 

Saunders, Loring 

This course will explore what the New Testa- 
ment says about the gospel as practices of hos- 
pitality and solidarity, especially as this might 
find expression on the streets of urban Atlanta. 
Requirements: Work with New Testament 
texts, reading and engagement with second- 
ary sources, serving breakfasts at Butler Street 
CME Church, a 24-hour street tour of Atlanta, 
engagement with strangers and enemies. Pre- 
requisites: NT Survey, Exegesis. {CB, ML, T} 
3 credits/1 unit 



72 



1623 The Historical Jesus 

Cousar/Stroup 

This course addresses the place of the histori- 
cal Jesus in the theology of the church and in 
the life of faith. Particular attention is given 
to the various "quests" for the Jesus history, 
including the work of the Jesus Seminar, and 
to the relation of faith and history in the 
"quests." {K, T, CB} 
3 credits/1 unit 



1624 Preaching from the Old Testament 

Campbell, O'Connor 

This course will explore issues and possibili- 
ties in preaching from the Old Testament. We 
will focus on selected texts of various genres 
and their contributions to the faith struggles 
in the contemporary church. Prerequisites 
P151,B141 {K,T,ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 



1666 Apocalypse Now! 

Campbell, Saunders 

This seminar explores the Apocalypse of John 
(Revelation) as literature of prophetic discern- 
ment, judgment, and hope for Christian com- 
munities oppressed or seduced by imperial 
power and piety. We will read the Apocalypse 
in community, looking especially for the mod- 



els it offers for doing liturgy and proclama- 
tion as forms of social formation and resis- 
tance. {K,C,SF,CB,T,ML} 
3 credits/1 unit 



1710 Tutorials in Cross-Cultural 
Studies 

Riggs, Staff 

A topical seminar in which students and a 
professor study in depth a core theoretical 
concept and /or issue that will undergird the 
development of cross-cultural theologies that 
are interdisciplinary in content as well as 
methodologically. The course is ordinarily 
designed as an intensive reading course with 
dialogical discussion of the readings and a fi- 
nal paper integrating the conceptual and/or 
methodological insights of the topic into their 
theological reflection. Topic for spring, 2001: 
The Social Construction of Race, Gender, and 
Class. This is a Doctor of Ministry course and 
Master of Divinity students may register with 
permission of instructor. 
3 credits/1 unit 



1691 Interdisciplinary Independent 

Study 

Staff 

Any term up to 3 credits/1 unit 



Supervised Ministry 



Required Courses for M.Div. Degree 



SM210 Congregation-Based Internship 
(Basic) 

Carroll, Staff 

For a minimum of 10 full-time weeks (or its 
equivalent), the student engages in the minis- 
try of a teaching congregation, serving in a 
broad range of pastoral functions, and engag- 
ing in a structured process of theological re- 
flection with a supervising pastor and lay 
committee. Prerequisites: The Eucharist and 
the Church's Mission, Worship and Preaching. 
Summer (full-time); or Fall/Spring (part-time) 2 
units 

Elective Courses 

SM213 Internship in Youth Ministry 

Carroll 

This internship engages the student in minis- 
try with adolescents. Typically the intern is 



placed in a congregation or other youth min- 
istry organization where supervision is pro- 
vided by a pastor, educator, or other 
experienced youth ministry professional. {C, 
ML} 

Summer (full-time) or Fall/Spring (part-time) 1 
or 2 units 



SM414 Intern Year: Congregation 

Carroll 

This full-time internship provides an in-depth 
experience in the life and ministry of a teach- 
ing congregation over the course of a full year. 
An experienced pastor and a lay committee, 
utilizing an action-reflection process for learn- 
ing, supervises the ministry of the intern. Stu- 
dents may elect to earn one additional unit by 
taking an approved two-week course during 
the January term. Prerequisite: completion of 
at least 20 units. {C, ML} 
12 months (full-time) 2 units, plus option ofl 
additional unit for January elective 



73 



SM415 Intern Year: Urban Ministry 

Carroll 

The student serves for a full year in one or 
more ministry settings, seriously engaging the 
realities of the city, especially in ministry with 
the poor. The internship seeks to develop in- 
sights and skills needed for ministry in the 
urban context. Students may elect to earn one 
additional unit by taking an approved two- 
week course during the January term. Prereq- 
uisite: completion of at least 20 units. {C, ML} 
12 months (full-time) 2 units, plus option ofl 
additional unit for January elective 

SM416 Intern Year: International 

Carroll 

The student engages for 12 months in the min- 
istry of the church in another nation. Place- 
ments may be with congregations, colleges, or 
other institutions approved by the Office of 
Supervised Ministry. Supervision is provided 
by a theologically trained church leader from 
the host country and by a consultant familiar 
with the student's home context. Prerequisite: 
completion of at least 20 units. {C, ML} 
12 months (full-time) 2 units, plus option ofl 
additional unit for January elective 

SM417 Intern Year: Campus Ministry 

Carroll 

The student is engaged in a full year in minis- 
try in a college or university context, working 
with a church-related agency of campus min- 
istry to serve students, faculty, and /or admin- 
istrative personnel. Supervision is provided 
by an experienced campus minister or other 
approved clergy. Prerequisite: completion of 
at least 20 units. {C, ML} 
12 months (full-time) 2 units, plus option ofl 
additional unit for January elective 

SM418 Intern Year: Independent Study 

Carroll 

This independent study is available to stu- 
dents seeking to gain significant experiences 
of ministry under supervision in specialized 
areas not designated above in other yearlong 
internships. Prerequisite: completion of at 
least 20 units. {C, ML} 
12 months (full-time) 2 units, plus option ofl 
additional unit for January elective 



SM610 Practicum in Clinical Pastoral 
Education (Basic Unit) 

Staff 

CPE brings students into supervised encoun- 
ters with people in order to develop pastoral 
identity and skills, interpersonal competence, 
and enhanced abilities for theological reflec- 
tion. Clinically trained supervisors provide 
educational leadership. CPE placement may 
be only in hospitals, congregations, prisons, 
and other institutions accredited by the Asso- 
ciation for Clinical Pastoral Education. This 
course is one of several options for meeting 
the D.Min. requirement for Supervised Min- 
istry. {C, T, ML} 
Any term, usually Summer 6 credits/2 units 

SM611 Clinical Pastoral Education 
(Advanced Unit) 

Staff 

Additional units of CPE build upon the teach- 
ings of the final unit and provide pastoral edu- 
cation over a period of a full-year. Prerequisite: 
Basic unit of CPE. Note: The maximum num- 
ber of units one may apply to the M.Div. de- 
gree is four. Additional units earned may be 
applied to another degree program. {C, T, ML} 
12-month period 6 credits/2 units applicable to 
M.Div. 



SM615 Internship in Urban Ministry 
(Basic) 

Carroll 

The student is placed in one of several minis- 
try settings seriously engaged in realities of 
the city, especially in ministry to the poor. The 
internship seeks to develop insights and skills 
needed for effectiveness in the urban context. 
{C, ML} 

Summer (full-time) 2 units; 
Fall or Spring (part-time) 1 unit per semester 

SM617 Internship in Campus Ministry 
(Basic) 

Carroll 

This internship provides a basic introduction 
to ministry in the context of a college or uni- 
versity community. Campus chaplain or pas- 
tor of campus-related congregation provides 
supervision. {C, ML} 
Summer (full-time) 2 units; 
Fall or spring (part-time) 1 unit per semester 



74 



SM620 Congregation-Based Internship 
(Advanced) 

Carroll 

This internship provides the student with the 
opportunity to gain congregational experience 
beyond what is required in SM210. One may 
concentrate on a specialization, e.g., Christian 
education, pastoral care, social ministry, or 
seek a broad range of experience. The course 
helps to develop further one's identity and 
competence in ministry. Prerequisites: SM210 
and completion of at least 20 units. {C, ML} 
Summer (full-time) 2 units 
Fall/Spring (part-time) 1 unit per semester 

SM660 Internship in Criminal Justice 

Carroll 

The student is placed in a prison or other in- 
stitution to provide ministry to persons who 
are or have been incarcerated. Orientation and 
supervision are provided by a chaplain or 
other professional working in the institution 
where the student is placed. {C, ML} 
Summer (full-time) 2 units 
Fall or Spring (part-time) 1 unit per semester 

SM690 Supervised Ministry: Independent 
Study 

Carroll 

Summer (full-time) 2 units 

Fall or Spring (part-time) 1 unit per semester 

D.Min. Courses 



SM682 Practicum in Christian 
Spirituality 

Carroll 

This course is recommended for D.Min. stu- 
dents in the Christian Spirituality specializa- 
tion. It involves engagement in a ministry of 
the church related to spiritual formation, su- 
pervision by an approved supervisor, and 
sharing issues and concerns in a peer group 
with an action-reflection process. 
6 credits 



SM683 Practicum in Gospel and Culture 

Carroll 

This course is recommended for eligible 
D.Min. students in the Gospel and Culture 
specialization. It is designed to meet the ma- 
jor challenges of this specialization and will 
involve students in a ministry of the church 
with particular aspects of modern culture. Stu- 
dents will work with a peer group and an ap- 
proved supervisor in an action-reflection 
process. 
6 credits 



SM684 Practicum in Cross Cultural 
Context 

Carroll 

This practicum is recommended for D.Min. 
students in the Cross-Cultural specialization. 
Students from different cultures work in pairs 
to experience the ministry of their colleague. 
6 credits 



SM680 Practicum: General 

Carroll 

This doctoral practicum, designed by the stu- 
dent and approved supervisor, may be done 
in a variety of contexts. It emphasizes minis- 
try with a focus different from those below in 
SM 681-685. Students engage in a ministry of 
the church, usually outside the student's nor- 
mal setting for ministry, and utilize an action- 
reflection learning process with a peer group 
and an approved supervisor. 
6 credits 



SM681 Practicum in Preaching 

Carroll 

D.Min. students work with a peer group and 
an approved supervisor to evaluate their own 
preaching, learn from the preaching of others, 
and utilize a variety of preaching resources. 
6 credits 



SM685 Practicum in Graduate Counseling 

Staff 

Graduate students in the pastoral counseling 
program are admitted to work under supervi- 
sion at one of the local pastoral counseling cen- 
ters accredited by the American Association of 
Pastoral Counselors until the counseling cen- 
ter certifies achievement of the required level 
of performance. At that time the student will 
be granted six credits. It is expected that upon 
completion of the practicum a student will have 
sufficient supervision to apply for membership 
in the American Association of Pastoral Coun- 
selors. Limited to students in the D.Min. in 
Pastoral Counseling. Prerequisite: Oral exami- 
nation by professors and supervisors. 
6 credits 



75 



Th.D. and D.Min. Courses 



The Th.D. and D.Min. programs consist pri- 
marily of advanced courses provided by par- 
ticipating schools in the Atlanta Theological 
Association. The 600 level courses in this cata- 
log, together with advanced courses at the 
Candler School of Theology Erskine Theologi- 
cal Seminary, and the Interdenominational 
Theological Center, are open to students in 
these programs. The following list includes 
other courses specifically developed for the 
Th.D. and D.Min. programs. 

ATA401 Seminar on Ministry 

Staff 

This basic seminar on ministry theory and ca- 
reer analysis is required for all D.Min. students. 
6 credits 



ATA403 Project Proposal Workshop 

Staff 

This workshop focuses on the theory of disser- 
tation construction. It also assists students in 
developing project proposals and understand- 
ing the use of the library for dissertation re- 
search. Required of Columbia D.Min. students. 
End of January or end of July no credit 

ATA463 The Development of Modern 
Pastoral Counseling 

A.T.A Staff 

The modern history of pastoral counseling is 
examined, including its roots in theology, psy- 
choanalysis, existential, and humanistic psy- 
chology. Th.D. core course. 
3 credits 



ATA471 Human Being in Context 

A.T.A. Staff 

Theological and psychological theories of 
personhood are examined to assess their rel- 
evance for pastoral counseling. Th.D. core 
course. 
3 credits 



ATA473 Transformation and Change 

A.T.A. Staff 

The process of transformation and change is 
considered from both theological and psycho- 
logical perspectives. Th.D. core course. 
3 credits 



ATA475 Pastoral Theological Method 

A.T.A. Staff 

The methodologies of theology and of pasto- 
ral care are examined as a means of assisting 
students in developing a pastoral theological 
method appropriate to the ministry of pasto- 
ral counseling. Th.D. core course. 
3 credits 



ATA477 Seminar in Pastoral Supervision 

A.T.A. Staff 

This seminar provides doctoral students in 
pastoral counseling with the experience of 
pastoral supervision under the guidance of 
clinical supervisors. It acquaints students with 
the expanding literature on pastoral supervi- 
sion from a variety of disciplines. Students 
may register for ATA477 and ATA477b. 
3 credits 



ATA478 Group Therapy: Theory, Process, 
and Application 

Staff 

This course is designed to provide a broad 
overview of group therapy permitting mo- 
ment by moment and longer term 
conceptualizations of what happens in group 
therapy, how this affects individuals in the 
group, and how we may use this effect thera- 
peutically. 
6 credits per year 

ATA481 Pastoral Counseling Research 
Seminar 

A.T.A. Staff 

This seminar focuses on research methodol- 
ogy in pastoral counseling and pastoral the- 
ology. At least two semesters of the seminar 
are required for Th.D. students, and they may 
choose to take two additional semesters of this 
course instead of registering for three semes- 
ter hours of ATA496, Doctoral Project research. 
D.Min. students in pastoral counseling may 
also register for the course. (Th.D. students 
will register for ATA481a, ATA481b, ATA481c, 
ATA481d for a total of six semester credits). 
3 credits per year 



76 



ATA485 Counseling Practicum 

Patton and Clinical Staff 

In each term the student engages in two to four 
hours of counseling per week under supervi- 
sion. Assigned readings and appropriate di- 
dactic materials are included. Students will 
register for ATA485a "The Theory and Tech- 
nique of Individual Counseling," ATA485b 
"Assessment and Treatment from the Perspec- 
tive of Ego Psychology and Object Relations 
Theory," ATA485c "Professional Develop- 
ment: Working with Disorders of the Self," and 
ATA485d "Professional Development: The 
Therapist's Self" for a total of 18 semester cred- 
its. Required of Th.D. students. 
9 credits per year 



ATA489 Directed Study 

A.T.A. Staff 

Taken at recommendation of the adviser. 

Credit as assigned 

ATA496 Doctoral Project 

A.T.A. Staff 

Required of all D.Min. students. May be 

elected by Th.D. students instead of three of 

the hours available in ATA 481. 

6 credits 




77 























81 


] 


-, 


ft 








I'M 



Academic Notes and Policies 

The following information pertains to students enrolled in Columbia's academic 
degree programs. Additional policies and information related to a particular degree 
program may be found in the student handbook for that program. 

Basic Degree Students 

Summer Greek School 

Entering students in the M.Div. degree program are encouraged to have a reading 
knowledge of New Testament Greek. For those students who are not prepared in 
Greek, the seminary offers a two-unit course, B021, during the summer. The course 
runs for an eight- week period and meets each weekday morning for two hours, with 
small group afternoon tutorial sessions. Students who have successfully completed 
two years of Greek in college or who pass a Greek qualifying examination are ex- 
empt from B021. 

Advanced Placement and Special Studies 

Students who have strong backgrounds in particular fields of the curriculum or 
who demonstrate unusual proficiency in their work are given opportunities for spe- 
cial placement or for independent work. Requests for flexibility in a student's pro- 
gram should be made to the Dean of Faculty. Two opportunities for flexibility are 
available: 

1. Students may be permitted advanced placement if they can satisfactorily demonstrate 
that they have already achieved the objectives of a given course. This means that they 
may be exempt from the course and permitted to take an advanced course in the area. 

2. Academically qualified students may be permitted to engage in special study as a route 
to the establishment of competence in a required course rather than taking one or sev- 
eral required courses. 

Honors Program 

Students in the Master of Divinity degree program who pass their mid-course 
assessment with a cumulative grade point average of 3.30 and a 3.60 average in the 
proposed area of study may enter the Honors Program. Waiver of these require- 
ments is by vote of the entire faculty in the proposed area of study. Students may 
choose to work in the biblical, historical-doctrinal, or practical theology areas and 
with a particular professor. The program consists of guided study in both long se- 
mesters for a total of two units. For additional information, see the chairperson of 
the area of interest. 

Ordination Exams 

Students in the Master of Divinity degree program who become candidates for 
ordination in the Presbyterian Church (USA) are required to take written examina- 
tions in the areas of Bible, theology, worship and sacraments, and polity. There is 
ample opportunity within the regular basic degree curriculum to take course work 
preparatory to the exams. 

79 



Grading for Basic Degree Students 

At the close of each term, grades are given to students according to the following 
four-quality points system. A grade report is sent to each student and denomina- 
tional supervisor, if applicable. For Master of Divinity, Master of Arts in Theological 
Studies, Unclassified, Special, and Occasional students, the criteria for grading are 
creativity, mastery of material, skill in organizing and expressing ideas, and the abil- 
ity to relate to other teachings. The grading system is: 



A 


4.0 


Outstanding 


A- 


3.7 


Superior 


B+ 


3.3 


Very good 


B 


3.0 


Good 


B- 


2.7 


Slightly above standard 


C+ 


2.3 


Standard 


C 


2.0 


Slightly below standard 


C- 


1.7 


Below standard 


D 


1.0 


Serious deficiencies 


F 


0.0 


Unacceptable 



An E is given when a portion of the course requirements such as a major paper, an 
examination or a project is unacceptable to the instructor. Unless such work is com- 
pleted in acceptable form within the time extension, the E becomes a final grade of F. 
An F is given when the total work of the course is unacceptable or when work is not 
completed within the term or by the conclusion of an approved extension. 

Third year students may choose to take up to two units for H/S/U, with the 
permission of the instructor, if permission is granted at the beginning of the term. 

H honors, for work of exceptionally distinguished quality. 

S satisfactory, for work which represents sufficient mastery of the content of the course to 
merit recommendation for graduation. 

U unsatisfactory, for work which represents insufficient mastery of the content of the course 
to merit recommendation for graduation. 

Temporary Grades for Basic Degree Students 

Two temporary notations may be given in certain cases. "In Progress" (IP) is used 
for courses or independent studies that are designed to cover more than one term. 
"Incomplete" (Inc.) is used for late work when a written excuse has been approved 
by the professor and the Dean of Faculty. Neither temporary notation carries credit. 

Students are responsible for completing all incomplete work, including SM210 
and independent studies, within the specific time set in the granted request. These 
times cannot be set beyond the first class day of the winter term for the incomplete 
work of the fall semester, the first class day of the second week of the spring semes- 
ter for incomplete work of the winter term, June 1 for incomplete work of the spring 
semester, and the first class day of the fall semester for incomplete work of the sum- 
mer term. For lengthy illnesses or similar reasons, a longer period may be estab- 



80 



lished, but ordinarily with a reduction of load in the following term. Failure to com- 
plete the work within the time limit will result in a grade of F (or U) for the portion of 
the course for which the extension was granted. Extension request forms may be 
secured from the Office of the Dean of Faculty. The Registrar is instructed to turn 
incompletes into F's or U's if the deadline for completing the work has passed. In the 
case of coursework designed to extend more than one term, all of the above rules 
apply in the final term for this work. 

Unacceptable Work 

A U given to a basic degree student may be remedied by further work in the 
course, by repeating the course, or by taking an elective course relating to the area of 
deficiency. A U given for unexcused late work shall normally require additional work. 
A student whose work is unsatisfactory will be placed on probation. If the U is not 
removed by the next term, the student will be dropped from school. 

Probation 

An entering basic degree student may be placed on probation due to deficiencies 
in the student's undergraduate preparation. In addition, any student who fails to 
make a 2.50 average in any term or whose cumulative grade point average falls be- 
low 2.30 will be placed on academic probation for the next term. 

Advanced Degree Students 

Grading for Advanced Degree Students 

The grading scale for Th.M, Th.D., and D.Min. students is: 



A 


4.0 


B- 


2.7 


A- 


3.7 


C+ 


2.3 


B+ 


3.3 


C 


2.0 


B 


3.0 


F 


0.0 



A 3.00 average is required to remain in an advanced degree program. A grade of 
C represents marginal work. A grade of F in any course or seminar ordinarily results 
in termination from an advanced degree program. 

Course Completion for Doctor of Ministry Students 

If a course has assignments which require work to be completed after the last 
class meeting, the student may have up to 60 days to complete the work. Under 
unusual circumstances the student may petition the professor for an extension of an 
additional 30 days. After that period has expired, the student is assigned a grade of 
F if the professor has not received the assignment. 



81 



All Degree Students 

Moral Conduct 

The faculty and the Board of Trustees of Columbia Theological Seminary reserve 
the right to refuse to grant a degree to any individual in any degree program whose 
moral conduct raises serious questions about that person's personal integrity or fit- 
ness for service in the Christian church. Persons are accepted into degree programs 
with the requirement that should they become the subject of criminal, civil, or eccle- 
siastical proceedings they will report the fact of those proceedings and their out- 
comes to the Judicial Commission of the faculty. The determination of when not to 
award a degree based upon moral failings of the candidate is the sole and exclusive 
province of the institution, represented by its faculty and Board of Trustees. 

Independent Study 

Students in all degree programs are encouraged to design and pursue their own 
program of independent research and study as a part of the elective offerings. Con- 
tracts for reading courses and research projects may be drawn up with faculty mem- 
bers teaching in the area of the student's interest. Such courses provide students the 
opportunity to investigate areas of specialized interest in which no regular electives 
are offered. 

Credit Valuation and Course Load 

While the educational progress of the student cannot be ultimately measured by 
the number of credits earned, a system of course valuation is necessary to assure 
balance in the curriculum. Columbia estimates a semester credit as approximately 
42 to 45 working hours, except for certain supervised ministry and clinical programs 
whose work investment is determined by the contract for the particular course. Units 
are equivalent to 150 hours. The satisfactory completion of a course, however, is 
determined not by time invested but by goals and objectives achieved. 

Appeals 

Appeal of a grade given for work in a course or for the entire course may be 
made: first, with the instructor; second, with the Dean of Faculty; third, as a last 
appeal, by a written statement sent through the Dean of Faculty to the faculty. 

Appeal of probation may be made to the Judicial Commission of the faculty 
through the Dean of Faculty. 

Appeal of suspension or dismissal from the seminary may be made to the Board 
of Trustees by giving written notice to the president. 



82 








fc 




* 



m 



\ 





Faculty 



Laura S. Mendenhall 2000* 

President 

B.A. Austin College; M.A. Presbyterian School of Christian 

Education; M.Div. San Francisco Theological Seminary; D.Min. 

Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary; Litt.D. Austin College. 

Her current research interests include: the role of the sacraments in the 
life of the Church, the use of daily prayer in structuring Christian 
community, and strategies for faithful proclamation on the subject of 
Christian stewardship. 





Walter Brueggemann 1986 

William Marcellus McPheeters Professor of Old Testament 

A.B. Elmhurst College; B.D. Eden Theological Seminary; Th.D. 

Union Theological Seminary; Ph.D. St. Louis University 

He is interested in interpretive issues that lie behind efforts at Old 
Testament theology. They include the relation of the Old Testament to 
the Christian canon, the Christian history of doctrine, Jewish-Christian 
interactions, and the cultural reality of pluralism. 



Thomas Erskine Clarke 1973 

Professor of American Religious History 

A.B. University of South Carolina; B.D. Columbia Theological 

Seminary; Th.M., Ph.D. Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 

His area of study is U.S. religious history, with special attention to the 
relationship of religion to its social /cultural context and to the history 
of religion in the South. He directs Columbia's international program. 





Charles Blanton Cousar 1960 

Samuel A. Cartledge Professor of New Testament Language, Literature, 

and Exegesis 

A.B. Davidson College; B.D. Columbia Theological Seminary; 

Ph.D. University of Aberdeen 

His area of current study involves a literary and theological 
consideration of New Testament texts, with a special interest in the 
interpretation of the letters of Paul. 



The date after each name indicates the year service at Columbia Seminary began. 



85 



Catherine Gunsalus Gonzalez 1974 

Professor of Church History 

B.A. Beaver College; S.T.B. Boston University School of 

Theology; Ph.D. Boston University 

She is particularly interested in the history of liturgy and how it displays 
the situation and the theology of the people; the history of women in 
the life of the church; and the effects on the church of the assimilation 
of new cultural groups within its life. 




1 




Darrell L. Guder 1997 

Peachtree Professor of Evangelism and Church Growth 
Ph.D. University of Hamburg 

His interests lie in the area of evangelism as domestic missiology. He is 
involved in international theological education and in questions 
concerning gospel and culture. 



E. Elizabeth Johnson 1998 

/. Davison Philips Professor of New Testament Language, Literature, 

and Exegesis 

B.G.S. Ohio University; M.Div, Ph.D. Princeton Theological 

Seminary 

She is interested in the ways the church uses the Bible to think about its 
faith and life. She is particularly drawn to the Pauline letters and how 
they invite us to engage in substantive theological reflection about who 
God is and what Jesus' death and resurrection mean for human life 
and society. 





D. Cameron Murchison, Jr. 1996 

Professor of Ministry 

B.A. Rhodes College; B.D. Union Theological Seminary in 

Virginia; M.Phil., Ph.D. Yale University 

He is interested in theological reflection which draws on all areas of 
the theological curriculum to envision ministry more imaginatively and 
to practice ministry more discerningly in areas such as stewardship, 
polity, vocation, church leadership, and congregational education. 



86 



Kathleen M. O'Connor 1995 

Professor of Old Testament Language, Literature, and Exegesis 
B.A. College of New Rochelle; M.A. Providence College; Ph.D. 
Princeton Theological Seminary 

She is interested in the ways local contexts are influencing 
interpretations of the Bible around the globe. She is particularly 
fascinated by feminist theologies, reader response criticism, and literary 
theories, especially relating to the power of symbol and metaphor. Her 
current research is in the books of Jeremiah and Lamentations. 





John Hull Patton 1965 

Professor of Pastoral Theology and Director ofTh.D. Program 

B.A., B.D. Emory University; Ph.D. The University of Chicago 

His current interests are in pastoral counseling, pastoral care of marriage 
and family, and in the study of interpretive methods for dealing with 
the taped and written texts of pastoral relationships. He is a certified 
supervisor of pastoral counseling, marriage and family therapy, and 
clinical pastoral education. 



George W. Stroup 1986 

/. B. Green Professor of Theology 

B.A. Rice University; B.D., S.T.M. Yale University; M.A., Ph.D. 

Vanderbilt University 

He is a seventeenth-century Calvinist whose research interests are 
contemporary and constructive theology, including hermeneutics, 
Christology, and the role of narrative in theology. 





Brian A. Wren 2000 

John and Miriam Conant Professor of Worship 

B.A; M.A., D.Phil. Oxford University, England 

He is interested in how public worship can be faithful to tradition, yet 
at home in a multimedia culture; how liturgical speech can be clear, 
memorable, and just; the theological importance of congregational song; 
and new directions in hymnody and hymn-writing. 



87 



Charles L. Campbell 1991 

Associate Professor of Homiletics 

B.A. Hendrix College; D.Min. Union Theological Seminary in 

Virginia; S.T.M. Yale University; Ph.D. Duke University 

He is interested in the biblical, theological, and ethical dimensions of 
preaching and worship. More specifically, his work focuses on the 
Christological and ecclesiological aspects of preaching and on the 
implications of character ethics and contemporary Radical Reformation 
ethics for preaching. 








AM 



Robert Leon Carroll, Jr. 1983 

Associate Professor of Supervised Ministry 

B.S. University of Southern Mississippi; M.Div. Columbia 

Theological Seminary 

His interests include congregational studies, social ministry, especially 
in the context of the urban church, and pastoral supervision. 



Carlos R Cardoza-Orlandi 1994 

Associate Professor of World Christianity 

B.G.S. University of Puerto Rico; M.Div. Evangelical Seminary 

of Puerto Rico; Th.M., Ph.D. Princeton Theological Seminary 

His research interests include historical, religious, and missiological 
interpretations of the encounter of religions especially in Latin American 
and the Caribbean; the globalization of Christianity and its challenges 
to the Christian church; and themes, theories, and theology in the study 
of religion. 




ik 




Ronald H. Cram 1991 

Associate Professor of Christian Education 

B.A. California State University, Long Beach; M.A., Ph.D. 

Princeton Theological Seminary 

His current research and teaching interests include the religious 
education of children, ritual and religious education, moral education 
and the practices of Christian faith, religious education in an era of 
"expanding religion," teaching strategies for adult learners, and 
reflective practice in religious education. 




Philip R. Gehman 1985 

Dean of Students 

A.B. Wheaton College; M.Div. Columbia Theological Seminary; 

D.Min. Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 

His current interests include the creation of a community environment 
in which theological education may flourish, educational administration 
and leadership, the preparation for ministry and call processes of the 
PC(USA), and effective student transition into the practice of ministry. 



Rodger Yutaka Nishioka 2000 

Associate Professor of Christian Education 

B.A. Seattle Pacific University; M.A.(T.S.) McCormick 

Theological Seminary 

His broader focus is on equipping pastors for their role as teachers and 
leaders in the educational ministry of the church. He brings particular 
interest in building a congregation's youth ministry and is currently 
researching what attracts young adults to the church. 



Charles E. Raynal III 1999 

Director of Advanced Studies and Associate Professor of Theology 
B.A. Davidson College; B.D. Union Theological Seminary in 
Virginia; M.A., Ph.D. Yale University 

His areas of interest include pastoral ministry and Reformed theology 
which can nurture the life of the church through preaching, teaching, 
pastoral care, and mission in and for the world. 






Marcia Y. Riggs 1991 

Associate Professor of Christian Ethics 

A.B. Randolph-Macon Woman's College; M.Div. Yale Divinity 

School; Ph.D. Vanderbilt University 

Her current interests are in the areas of: descriptive ethical analysis 
addressing the relationship between social processes of oppression and 
socio-religious ethical praxis; ethical discourse which bridges the gap 
between womanist religious scholarship and the practice of ministry in 
the church; moral foundations for public policy; and, the church and its 
role in social justice ministry. 



89 



Stanley P. Saunders 1991 

Associate Professor of New Testament 

B.A. San Jose Bible College; M.Div. Emmanuel School of 

Religion; Ph.D. Princeton Theological Seminary 

His research and teaching interests focus on early Christian 
understandings of "the last days," the nature of the Church, spirituality, 
and ecclesial self-definition, with a special interest in the Gospel 
according to Matthew. 





Sharon L. Mook 1999 

Assistant Professor of Pastoral Theology and Care 

B.S. Slippery Rock University; M.Div. Princeton Theological 

Seminary; D.Min. Southern Methodist University; Ph.D. Luther 

Seminary 

Her interests include the process of healing and reconciliation, with 
particular concern for the care of clergy and clergy families; the 
formation of well-grounded pastoral identities; and the interaction of 
personal histories and social, economic, and cultural contexts in pastoral 
care and counseling. 



Mark Douglas 1999 

Assistant Professor in Christian Ethics 

B.A. Colorado College; M.Div, Th.M. Princeton Theological 

Seminary; Ph.D. University of Virginia 

His current research and teaching interests include ethics in neo- 
orthodox theologies, medical and business ethics, the American 
philosophical tradition of pragmatism, and the role of religion in 
political philosophy. 





Anna Carter Florence 1998 

Assistant Professor in Preaching and Worship 

B.A. Yale University; M.Div, Ph.D. Princeton Theological 

Seminary 

She is interested in historical, theological, aesthetic, and performative 
dimensions of preaching and in reflecting on the theories and practices 
that emerge when preaching engages other fields and different 
traditions. Her current research focuses on testimony, feminist theology, 
the role of experience in preaching, and the history of preaching women. 



90 



Christine Roy Yoder 1998 

Assistant Professor in Old Testament Language, Literature, and 

Exegesis 

B.A. Swarthmore College; M.Div., Ph.D. Princeton Theological 

Seminary 

Her research interests include creation theology, wisdom literature, the 
socio-historical and theological dynamics of the post-exilic period, 
women in the Bible, and the history and methodology of biblical 
interpretation. 





Margit Ernst 1999 

Instructor of Theology 

Dipl. Theo. University of Goettingen, Germany; Ph.D. candidate, 

University of Goettingen, Germany 

Her current research and teaching interests focus on rediscovering the 
meaning of the principle "Reformed but always being reformed by the 
Word of God" in view of contemporary challenges of the church. 



John William Harkins III 1999 

Instructor in Pastoral Theology and Care 

B.A. Rhodes College; M.Div. Vanderbilt University Divinity 

School, Ph.D. Candidate, Vanderbilt University 

He is interested in applications of pastoral theology, care, and counseling 
to both congregational life and clinical settings. Research interests 
include psychoanalytic theory, marriage and family therapy, and 
psychological /religious dimensions of literature and film. 





# 



M. Tim Browning 1995 

Director of the John Bulozv Campbell Library 

B.A. Barton College; M.Div. Lexington Theological Seminary; 

M.S.L.S. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

He is interested in the information needs and library usage patterns of 
church members and ministers and also in the history of the Christian 
Church (Disciples of Christ). 



91 



Richard S. Dietrich 1992 

Director of the Lay Institute of Faith and Life 

B.A. Carleton College; M.A. Tulane University; D.Min. Union 

Theological Seminary in Virginia 

It is in the lives of Christian lay people that faith and culture meet. He 
is interested in how lay people have lived and continue to live faithfully 
in their various cultures - at home, at work, in their communities, at 
church. 





David G. Forney 1999 

Associate Dean of Faculty 

B.S.C.E. University of Kansas; M.Div Princeton Theological 

Seminary; Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin 

His research interests include research methodologies and the ways of 
knowing, particularly in the area of hermeneutics. His interest in 
institutional research focuses on organizational theory and the loosely 
coupled systems that interlace a seminary together internally and 
externally with its constituencies. 



Julie A. Johnson 1995 

Director of Certificate Program in Christian Spirituality 

B.A. Purdue University; M.Div. Princeton Theological Seminary; 

D.Min. Columbia Theological Seminary 

Her interest is in the area of Christian spirituality with a emphasis on 
spiritual formation and spiritual leadership for clergy and layleaders. 





Rebecca Skillern Parker 1988 

Director of Continuing Education 

B.A. Rhodes College; M.Div. Yale Divinity School 

She is interested in the experience of the holy and how it is engaged 
especially through Bible study, prayer, and rituals of the church. The 
church and its renewal are also of keen interest. 



92 



H. Stanley Wood 1997 

Director of the Center for New Church Development 
B.A. San Diego State University; M.Div., Th.M. Princeton 
Theological Seminary; D.Min. Fuller Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D. University of Aberdeen 

His research and teaching interests focus on new church development, 
evangelism and church development, church renewal, and the study 
of demographics in relation to ministry. 





93 



Adjunct/ Visiting Professors 



James Andrews, B.D. 
Steven Bechtler, Ph.D. 
Dana Campbell, M.Ed. 
Jerry A. Gladsen, Ph.D. 
Joan Gray, M.Div. 
Shirley Guthrie, Ph.D. 
Joyce Holly day, M.Div. 
Wade P. Huie, Ph.D. 
Rodney Hunter, Ph.D. 



C. Benton Kline, Ph.D. 
Calvin W. Kropp, Th.D. 
Wayne Merritt, Ph.D. 
Porter Remington, M.M. 
Iwan Russell-Jones, Ph.D. 
Dorinda Trouteaud, Th.M. 
Thomas W. Walker, Ph.D. 
Edward Wimberly, Ph.D. 



Clinical Pastoral Education Supervisors 



Robin Booth 
Robin C. Brown-Haithco 
Charles A. Carpenter 
Franklin D. Duncan 
Kerry Duncan 
Brenda K. Green 
Jasper N. Keith, Jr. 
Eugene T. Locke 
Ronald W. Lovelace 



Janet M. Lutz 
Robert R. Morris 
Thomas N. Mozley III 
Miriam A. Needham 
Dorothy Dale Owen 
Teresa Elaine Snorton 
Elwood H. Spackman, Jr. 
Joseph W. Whitwell, Jr. 



Supervising Pastors and Congregations 
for Parish-Based Internships 1999 



Joel Alvis 
Elizabeth Ayscue 
Harry Barrow 
Sidney Batts 
John Bell 

Frank Blankenship 
Richard Boyce 
James Brewer-Calvert 
Currie Burris 
James Byrd 
Mary Jane Cornell 
Douglas Cushing 
Achim Daffin 
Kermit Dancy 
Ernest Davis 
David Delph 
Joe Donaho 
Tyler Downing 
Eve Earnest 
John Frye, Jr. 
Lewis Galloway 
Paul Hooker 
David Hunter 
Walter Jones 
Jasper Keith 



St. Luke's Presbyterian Church, Dunwoody, Georgia 

Clifton Presbyterian Church, Maxwelton, West Virginia 

Newnan Presbyterian Church, Newnan, Georgia 

Government Street Presbyterian Church, Mobile, Alabama 

First Presbyterian Church, Columbus, Georgia 

St. Marks Presbyterian Church, Altamonte Springs, Florida 

First Presbyterian Church, Belmont, North Carolina 

First Christian (Disciples of Christ) Church, Decatur, Georgia 

Clifton Presbyterian Church, Atlanta, Georgia 

Lithia Springs Church of God, Lithia Springs, Georgia 

Druid Hills Presbyterian Church, Atlanta, Georgia 

Tyger River Presbyterian Church, Moore, South Carolina 

Park Circle Presbyterian Church, North Charleston, South Carolina 

Mt. Jefferson Presbyterian Church, West Jefferson, North Carolina 

First Presbyterian Church, Atlanta, Georgia 

First Presbyterian Church, Thomaston, Georgia 

Eastminster Presbyterian Church, Columbia, South Carolina 

Eastminster Presbyterian Church, Stone Mountain, Georgia 

First Presbyterian Church, Atlanta, Georgia 

Eastminster Presbyterian Church, Columbia, South Carolina 

Shandon Presbyterian Church, Columbia, South Carolina 

Rock Spring Presbyterian Church, Atlanta, Georgia 

Stellenbosch United Church, Stellenbosch, South Africa 

Alpharetta Presbyterian Church, Alpharetta, Georgia 

Decatur Presbyterian Church, Decatur, Georgia 



94 



Chang-In-Kim 
Yong-Ho Kim 
Martin Lifer 
James Mbugua 
Willa McKay 
Nancy Mikoski 
Glen Miles 
John Mingus 
Stephen Montgomery 
William Nisbet 
Agnes Norfleet 
Clifford Nunn 
Lonnie Oliver 
Paul Osborne 
Sung Joo Park 
Richard Pearson 
Christopher Price 
John Ragsdale 
Robert Reno 
James Richardson 
Timothy Rogers-Martin 
Carrie Scott 
David Schieber 
Glenna Shepherd 
Gary Speich 
Patricia Snyder 
Roderick Stone 
Earl Smith 
Nibs Stroupe 
Alastair Symington 
Catherine Taylor 
B. J. Virgil 
George Walker 
Julian Walthall 
Theodore Wardlaw 
Dana Waters 
Scott Weimer 



Kwang Sung Presbyterian Church, Seoul, Korea 

Elim Church of Korean Presbyterian Church, Marietta, Georgia 

Parkway Presbyterian Church, Cumming, Georgia 

Presbyterian Church of East Africa Nyahururu Parish, Nyahururu, Kenya 

United Reform Church, Bellville, South Africa 

Central Presbyterian Church, Atlanta, Georgia 

Sandy Springs Christian Church, Atlanta, Georgia 

Pilgrim United Church of Christ, Chattanooga, Tennessee 

St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, Tucker, Georgia 

Columbia Presbyterian Church, Decatur, Georgia 

North Decatur Presbyterian Church, Decatur, Georgia 

Gentilly Presbyterian Church, New Orleans, Louisiana 

New Life Presbyterian Church, College Park, Georgia 

Central Presbyterian Church, Atlanta, Georgia 

Hanbit Presbyterian Church, Atlanta, Georgia 

Westminster Presbyterian Church, Sacramenta, California 

St. Luke's Presbyterian Church, Dunwoody, Georgia 

Geneva Presbyterian Church, Jacksonville, Florida 

First Presbyterian Church, Jefferson City, Tennessee 

Fort Hill Presbyterian Church, Clemson, South Carolina 

Columbia Presbyterian Church, Decatur, Georgia 

Ray Thomas Memorial Presbyterian Church, Marietta, Georgia 

Advent Presbyterian Church, Cordova, Tennessee 

Christ Covenant Metro Community Church, Decatur, Georgia 

Hermitage Presbyterian Church, Hermitage, Tennessee 

Idlewild Presbyterian Church, Memphis, Tennessee 

Oglethorpe Presbyterian Church, Atlanta, Georgia 

Lakeview Presbyterian Church, St. Petersburg, Florida 

Oakhurst Presbyterian Church, Decatur, Georgia 

Troon Parish, Church of Scotland, Troon Scotland 

Church of the New Covenant, Doraville, Georgia 

Zion Missionary Baptist Church, Jackson, Georgia 

Douglas and Bethlehem Presbyterian Churches, Meherrin, Virginia 

Central Presbyterian Church, Mobile, Alabama 

Central Presbyterian Church, Atlanta, Georgia 

South Highland Presbyterian Church, Birmingham, Alabama 

North Avenue Presbyterian Church, Atlanta, Georgia 



Supervisors and Institutiions for Internships 
in Specialized Ministries 1999 



Robert Dunham 
Elizabeth Inman 
Dale Kraus 
Dorinda Trouteaud 



University Presbyterian Church, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 
Agnes Scott College, Decatur, Georgia 
Villages of East Lake Community, Atlanta, Georgia 
Calvin Camp and Conference Center, Hampton, Georgia 



95 



Professors Emeriti 

C. Benton Kline, Jr. 
President Emeritus 

A.B. College of Wooster; B.D., Th.M. Princeton Theological Seminary; Ph.D. Yale 

University 

James Davison Philips 

President Emeritus 

A.B. Hampden-Sydney College; B.D. Columbia Theological Seminary; Ph.D. University 
of Edinburgh; D.D. Presbyterian College; D.D. Hampden-Sydney College 

F. Sidney Anderson, Jr. 

B.A. Hampden-Sydney College; B.D., Th.M. Columbia Theological Seminary 

George Thompson Brown 

B.S. Davidson College; Th.M. Princeton Theological Seminary; B.D., Th.D. Union 
Theological Seminary in Virginia 

Ludwig Richard Max Dewitz 

B.D. University of London; Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University 

James Herbert Gailey, Jr. 

A.B. Davidson College; B.D. Columbia Theological Seminary; Th.M., Th.D. Princeton 
Theological Seminary 

Shirley Caperton Guthrie, Jr. 

A.B. Austin College; B.D. Princeton Theological Seminary; Dr. Theol. University of Basel 

Douglas W. Hix 

B.A. Davidson College; B.D. Columbia Theological Seminary; Ph.D. Duke University 

Wade Prichard Huie, Jr. 

A.B. Emory University; B.D. Columbia Theological Seminary; Ph.D. University of 
Edinburgh 

Oscar J. Hussel 

B.S. University of Cincinnati; M.A. McCormick Theological Seminary; Ed.D. Columbia 
University and Union Theological Seminary 

Ben Campbell Johnson 

B.A. Asbury College; B.D. Asbury Theological Seminary; Th.M. Southern Baptist 
Theological Seminary; D.Min. San Francisco Theological Seminary; Ph.D. Emory 
University. 

Jasper Newton Keith, Jr. 

A.B. Mercer University; M.Div. Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Th.D. Columbia 
Theological Seminary 

James D. Newsome, Jr. 

B.A. Millsaps College; B.D., Th.M. Columbia Theological Seminary; Ph.D. Vanderbilt 
University 



96 



Douglas W. Oldenburg 

B.S. Davidson College; B.D. Union Theological Seminary in Virginia; S.T.M. Yale 
University Divinity School; D.D. Davis and Elkins College; D.D. St. Andrews 
Presbyterian College; LL.D. Davidson College 

J. Will Ormond 

A.B. University of Alabama; B.D. Columbia Theological Seminary; Th.M. Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D. University of Glasgow; D.D. Southwestern at Memphis 

Harold Bailey Prince 

A.B., M.A. University of South Carolina; M.L. Emory University; B.D. Columbia 
Theological Seminary 



Robert H. Ramey, Jr. 

B.A./B.S. Hampden-Sydney College; B.D., Th.M. 
Virginia; D.D. Hampden-Sydney College 



D.Min. Union Theological Seminary in 



Hubert Vance Taylor 

A.B. Lafayette College; B.Mus. Westminster Choir College; B.D. Columbia Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D. Northwestern University 

Ronald Stewart Wallace 

B.Sc, M.A., Ph.D. University of Edinburgh 




97 



Staff 



Office of the President 

Laura S. Mendenhall, President 
Linda Moore, Administrative Assistant 

Office of Academic Affairs 

T. Erskine Clarke, Acting Dean of Faculty 
David Forney, Associate Dean of Faculty 
Linda G. Sabo, Registrar 
Stoncil Boyette, Systems Coordinator 
Porter Remington, Seminary Musician 
Dana Campbell, Instructor of Writing 
Jane Gleim, Administrative Assistant 

Office of Advanced Studies 

Charles E. Raynal III, Director 

Michael Medford, Administrative Assistant 

Office of Supervised Ministry 

Robert Leon Carroll, Jr., Director 
Rhonda Weary, Staff Associate 

Office of Continuing Education 

Rebecca Skillern Parker, Director 
Azizi Awolana, Staff Associate 

Lay Institute of Faith and Life 

Richard S. Dietrich, Director 

Linda Morningstar, Associate Director 

Charlotte Kuehn, Staff Associate 

International Theological Education 
Program 

T. Erskine Clarke, Director 

D. Cameron Murchison, Jr., Associate 

Director 
Bonnie Shoemaker, Administrative Assistant 

Christian Spirituality Program 

Julie Johnson, Director 

Audrey Edmondson, Staff Associate 

Center for New Church 
Development 

H. Stanley Wood, Director 
Staff Associate 



John Bulow Campbell Library 

M. Tim Browning, Director of the Library 
Clayton H. Hulet, Reference Librarian 
Randy Tyndall, Media Specialist 
Linda K. Davis, Special Collections Librarian 
Barbara Sims-King, Serials /Inter library 

Loan Assistant 
Mary Martha Riviere, Circulation Librarian 
Licia F. Duncan, Systems Librarian 
Carol Wade, Acquisitions Assistant 
Rachael Glass, Cataloging Assistant 
Kyle Segars, Copy Cataloger 
Processing Assistant 
Joan Speaks, Library Staff Associate 
Tammy Johnson, Technical Services 

Librarian 

Faculty Support Staff 

Debbie Hitchcock, Staff Associate for 

Pastoral Care 
Tempie Alexander, Secretary 

Office of Student Life 

Philip R. Gehman, Vice President for 
Student Life and Dean of Students 

Ernestine B. Cole, Associate Dean of 
Students 

Administrative Assistant 

Office of Admissions 

Ann Clay Adams, Director of Admissions 
Jewel E. Kirkus, Staff Associate 

Office of Financial Aid 

Robin S. Dietrich, Director 

Office of Business and Finance 

Martin Sadler, Vice President for Business 

and Finance 
Holly Caswell, Assistant Treasurer 
Marilyn Ault, Bookkeeper 
Leisa McDonald, Facilities Coordinator 
Judy Graves, Staff Associate 

Bookstore 

Bookstore Manager 



98 



Buildings and Grounds 

A. Cecil Moore, Jr., Superintendent 
Betty Cook, Housekeeper 
Lillie Cook, Housekeeper 
Eloise Hancock, Housekeeper 
Golden Griffieth, Maintenance 
Larry Griffin, Maintenance 
Alexander Oliver, Maintenance 

Office of Development and 
Seminary Relations 

Richard T. DuBose, Vice President of 

Development and Seminary Relations 
Michael Carey, Director of Gift Planning 
Juliette J. Harper, Director of Publications 
and Publicity 



Angus McQueen, Director of Development 

Services 
James Speed, Director of Alumni/ Alumnae 

and Church Relations 
Caitlin Way, Director of the Annual Fund 
Elizabeth Orth, Administrative Assistant 
Barbara G. Poe, Alumni /Alumnae and 

Church Relations Assistant 
Diane Thome, Gift Records Coordinator 
Kristen Anderson, Prospect Researcher 
Julia Greene, Staff Associate for 

Development 
Anni Magyary, Staff Associate for 

Publications and Publicity 
Receptionist 
Bonneau H. Dickson, Field Representative 




99 



r^ftttr J$l 



A 4 1 









Support of Columbia Seminary 

Since 1828, the mission of Columbia Theological Seminary has been to prepare 
ministers to proclaim the Gospel. In addition to providing the initial preparation for 
ministry, we are committed to nurturing those already ordained through continuing 
education and serving as a resource and intellectual center for the entire church. 

Support from individuals, churches, church-related organizations, and founda- 
tions (in the form of new gifts, gifts to endowment, and endowment income from 
previous gifts) account for 71.6 percent of the seminary's annual budget. The re- 
mainder comes from tuition and fees (16 percent), revenue from continuing educa- 
tion and other seminary programs (10.4 percent), and the Theological Education Fund 
of the Presbyterian Church (USA) (2 percent). 

The seminary is deeply grateful to those churches and individuals who continue 
to support Columbia with their many gifts of financial support and their prayers. 
Columbia is also indebted to its supporting synods for their endorsement and assis- 
tance in increasing the seminary's endowment through capital fund campaigns. 

Columbia Friendship Circle 

The Columbia Friendship Circle consists of thousands of Presbyterian Women 
throughout the church who provide invaluable service to the seminary by praying 
for the seminary and telling its story; encouraging promising men and women to 
consider the ministry and Columbia Seminary; visiting Columbia Seminary regu- 
larly and participating in the life of the school; and providing financial assistance to 
the seminary in response to specific needs each year. 

Columbia is most grateful for the support it receives from the Columbia Friend- 
ship Circle, now more than $30,000 annually. 

Alumni/ Alumnae Association 

All alumni /alumnae of Columbia Seminary are members of the Alumni /Alum- 
nae Association. They are represented by an Alumni/ Alumnae Council. Classes hold 
yearly reunions during the Columbia Colloquium, a special lecture series for alumni/ 
alumnae and other clergy. 

A highlight of this annual meeting is the presentation of the Distinguished Ser- 
vice Awards. These awards, based on nominations from Columbia alumni /alum- 
nae, are presented to alumni /alumnae who have distinguished themselves in faithful 
service to ministry and the church. The 1999 recipients were J. Eade Anderson '50 
and James O. Speed '57. 



101 



ALUMNI/ AE ASSOCIATION COUNCIL OFFICERS 
Executive Committee 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Past President 



Ford F. G'Segner '70 
Steve Sloop '68 
Debbie Wells '91 
Trisha Senterfitt '93 



ALUMNI/ AE ASSOCIATION COUNCIL MEMBERSHIP 



Class of 2000 



Robert S. Dendy '57 
J. Gary Waller '59 
Stephen A Bacon '61 
Stephen J. Sloop, Jr. '68 
Ford F. G'Segner '70 



David J. Bailey '82 
Harry Barrow '74 
Jan L. Blissit '86 
James E. Bowden '64 
Bert K. Carmichael '67 



Class of 2001 



Ronald A. Botsford '71 
Francis M. Burriss '83 
Mary Amos '84 
Paul H. Lang '92 
Eleana Manuel Garrett '95 



Lamar Potts '74 
James T. Richardson '65 
Clyde Wiley '80 
Billy Wade '80 
Debbie Wells '91 



Sid Burgess '90 
Kevin Campbell '98 
Bill Crosland '52 
Joan Gray '76 
Luke Harkey '74 



Class of 2002 



Ray Howe '62 
Jackie Lindberg '97 
Jake Marshall '93 
Steve Vance '81 




102 



Board of Trustees 



Dr. Joanna M. Adams 

Chair 
Mr. David Quattlebaum 

Vice Chair 



The Rev. David B. Cozad 

Secretary 
Ms. Linda Wells 

Assistant Secretary 



Synod of South Atlantic 

Mr. Howell E. Adams, Jr. (2001) 

Atlanta, Georgia 
Mr. James Adams (2002) 

Toccoa, Georgia 
Mr. John G. Aldridge (2002) 

Atlanta, Georgia 
Dr. John N. Bartholomew (2002) 

Jacksonville, Florida 
Mrs. Frankie Calcote (2000) 

Charleston, South Carolina 
Dr. Franklin D. Colclough (2000) 

Florence, South Carolina 
Mrs. Ann D. Cousins (2001) 

Atlanta, Georgia 
The Rev. David Cozad (2000) 

Sarasota, Florida 
Dr. Richard M. Cromie (2001) 

Palm Beach, Florida 
Dr. Charles Heyward (2002) 

St. James Island, South Carolina 
Mr. Dennis Love (2002) 

Atlanta, Georgia 
Dr. Margaret Greer Miller (2000) 

Orlando, Florida 
Mr. William S. Morris III (2001) 

Augusta, Georgia 
Mrs. Jean Norman (2000) 

Pensacola, Florida 
Mr. Robert Pattillo (2000) 

Atlanta, Georgia 
Dr. William Pender (2002) 

Rock Hill, South Carolina 
Mr. David Quattlebaum (2001) 

Greenville, South Carolina 
Mr. Jefferson V. Smith (2001) 

Greer, South Carolina 
Mr. John H. Weitnauer, Jr. (2000) 

St. Simons Island, Georgia 
Mrs. Sue Wieland (2002) 

Atlanta, Georgia 



Synod of Living Waters 
Mrs. Suzanne Benton (2001) 

Birmingham, Alabama 
Dr. William T. Bryant (2000) 

Franklin, Tennessee 
Dr. Vernon Hunter (2000) 

Mobile, Alabama 
Mrs. Betty Nichols (2000) 

Jackson, Mississippi 
Dr. Lena Pruitt (2002) 

Tuscaloosa, Alabama 
Mr. Thomas Yount (2001) 

Nashville, Tennessee 

At Large 

Dr. Joanna M. Adams (2000) 

Atlanta, Georgia 
Mr. John A. Conant (2001) 

Atlanta, Georgia 
Mrs. Florida S. Ellis (2002) 

Atlanta, Georgia 
Dr. James S. Lowry (2002) 

New Bern, North Carolina 
Mr. William E. Scheu (2001) 

Jacksonville, Florida 
Mr. Dae Y. Shin (2000) 

Tampa, Florida 
Mr. Frank Skinner (2002) 

Atlanta, Georgia 
Mrs. Rosalyn H. White (2000) 

Washington, D.C. 
Dr. Laura S. Mendenhall (President) 

Decatur, Georgia 
The Rev. J. Daniel Montanez (Student) 

Lawrenceville, GA 



103 






.*M 



Students 



Graduating Class of 1999 



Doctor of Theology 

Paul Leon Fulks, Jr. 
Russell Siler Jones 

Doctor of Ministry 

Bradford Edward Ableson 
Catherine Louise Allsbury 
Philip Rick Baggett 
David Calvin Campbell 
William Donald Coker 
Pamela Patrick Cole 
Tom Edward Diamond 
Sandra Mae Fox 
Gary William Fulton 
George Gitonga Gitahi 
Donald Yates Gordon 
Kathleen Ann Hall 
William Stephen Hannah 
Timothy Wilson Hobbs 
Kenneth Gene Jarvis 
Gloria Elaine Jennings 
Ines Jimenez-Dietsch 
Dallas Ray Jones 
Seung-Tae Lee 
Frederick Owen Lewis 
Henry Joseph Martin 
Doris Harper Mattison 
Ann Brightwell McCord 
Amy Parsons Morgan 
Linda Stack Morgan 
Herman Terris Neuman 
John Paul Oliver 
Denver Craig Rikard 
Scott Anthony Rollins 
William Robert Sharman III 
John Benson Sloan 
Bradley Donald Smith 
Young E. Song 

Diana Lee Spangler-Crawford 
Dennis Ray Tedder 
Steven Jay Voris 
Davis Ronald Watson 
Yvonne Dianne Wright 

Master of Theology 

Robert Hunter Craig 
Li-Shu Huang 



Sunghake Kim 

Jae Gwang Lee 

Timothy Sanders Mallard 

Zsolt Otvos 

Timothy Matthew Slemmons 

Jose Luis Velazco M. 

James E. Victor, Jr. 

Master of Divinity 

David Howard Bonds 

Janice Marie Clark 

John Robert Cook 

Carol Leavitt DiGiusto 

Cynthia Creighton Dixon 

Maxine Hankins Edwards 

Victor Alejandro Feliberty-Ruberte 

Karla Lee Fleshman 

Norman Stephen Floeck 

Richard Aubrey Floyd 

Lauren Louise Furr-Vancini 

Jamie Ann Gabler 

William E. Garrison 

Susannah Addie Hager 

Jennifer Boyce Ham 

Ralph William Hawkins 

Noelle Lynn Henry 

Joseph Miller Hinds III 

Jennifer Murray Horton 

Guy Elmer Jennings III 

Caroline Mayes Kelly 

Gregory Johnson Kershner 

Shannon Johnson Kershner 

Ok-Kee Kim 

Sue Helen Kim 

David Scott Lindsay Jr. 

Gerone Hamilton Lockhart 

Garry N. Lowe 

Robert Frederick Lohmeyer 

Anna Hinton McArthur 

Keith Allison Miller 

Melanie Grace Mitchell 

Lance Franklin Mullins 

Wendy Diane Neff 

Juliann Virginia Pugh 

Dennis Earl Reid 

David R. Richardson 

Ronald Emerson Sabo 

LaDonna Kathryn Loescher Scruggs 



105 



Jeremy Kyle Segars 
Erin Colleen Sharp 
Russell Michael Shealy 
Stephanie Medlin Shelby 
Meda Ann Ashley Stamper 
Joel Patrick Thornton 
Julie Anne Walkup 
Mary Elizabeth Yarborough 



Master of Arts in Theological 
Studies 

Virginia Claire Gartrell 




106 



1999-00 Academic Scholarship Recipients 



Dr. Vernon S. Broyles, Jr. Scholarships 

David Bender Karen Ricks 

Rebecca Davis Rix Threadgill 

Betsy Flory 

John Bulow Campbell Scholarships 

Andrew Foster Connors Rebekah Shaffer 

Laurel Nelson Robert Williamson 



George Henry Cornelson Scholarships 

Phillip Dennis Jonathan Kaplan 

Christopher Denny Amy Lehr 

Jennifer Fouse Vickie Traynum 

The Reverend Harry Keller Holland Scholarship 

Caroline Rhoads 

Honor Scholarships 

Joshua Braley Peggy McClure 

/. Erskine Love, Jr. Merit Scholarships 

Stephanie Boardman Todd Sutton 

Florence Hill Morris Memorial Scholarships 

Robert Alexander Katherine Foster Connors 

Hunter Camp Craig Neely 

Jonathan Carroll Jannan Wertzberger 



John L. Newton Scholarships 

Keith Abramowski 
Elizabeth Brunt 
Diane Freelander 

John I. Smith Scholarships 

Anne Apple 
Margaret Beamguard 
Susanna Hendy 
Bettina Kilburn 

Smith-Thompson Scholarships 

Joseph Albright 
Cynthia Montgomery 
Richard Olson 

J.M. Tull Scholarships 

Amy Erickson 
Richard Holmes 
David Knauert 



Timothy Reynolds 
Ashley Seaman 



Robert Laukoter 
Clayton Rascoe 
Lee Read 
Christine Tiller 



Sarah Parker 
David Rice 



Daniel Smead 
Jennifer Stone 
Elizabeth Walker 



107 



1999-2000 Students Enrolled in Degree Programs 
Doctor of Theology 



Jeanie Marie Griffin 
Decatur, Georgia 

Gerry Keith Hearh 
Inkster, Michigan 



Elizabeth Emma Inman 
Decatur, Georgia 

Dennis Justin Jarvis 
Tunnel Hill, Georgia 

Josephine Elizabeth Kee-Rees 
Decatur, Georgia 

Gyeong Kim 

Decatur, Georgia 



Insook Lee 

Decatur, Georgia 



Albert Benjamin Moravitz 
Marietta, Georgia 

Francesca Debora Nuzzolese 
Decatur, Georgia 

Susan Braatz Pendleton 
Atlanta, Georgia 



David Stewart Shew 
Decatur, Georgia 

Paul Russell Thim 
Decatur, Georgia 

Elizabeth Denham Thompson 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Janet Deitrich Williams 
Doraville Georgia 



B.S., Flagler College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.S., Eastern Michigan University 
M.Div., Colgate Rochester Divinity School/Bexley Hall/ 
Crozer Theological Seminary 

B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Western New Mexico University 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 

B.S., Centenary College 

M.Div, Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 

B.A., Han Nam University 

M.Div., Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary 

Th.M., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 

B.A., M.A., Sogan University 

Ed.S., University of Georgia 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Newberry College 

M.Div., Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary 

B.D., Baptist Theological Seminary ofRuschliken 
Th.M., Melbourne College of Divinity 

B.A., University of Southern California 

M.S., Columbia University School of Social Work 

M.P.H., University of Hawaii 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 

A.B., Hampshire College 

M.Div., Union Theological Seminary, New York 

B.A., Swarthmore College 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 

B.S., Baylor University 

M.Div., Beeson Divinity School of Samford University 

B.A., University of Georgia 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



108 



Doctor of Ministry 

Taeho Ahn 

Leonia, New Jersey 



John W. Ailstock 

Hagerstown, Maryland 



B.A., Seoul National University, Korea 

M.Div., Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Korea 

Th.M., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.A., College of Charleston 

J.D., University of South Carolina 

M.Div., Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary 



Dougald Wilfred Baconfield Alexander Dip., B.A.T., United Theological College of the West Indies 
St. James, Jamaica 



James Avery Alexander 
Newnan, Georgia 



B.A., Oklahoma City University 

M.Div., Interdenominational Theological Center 



Emily Jane Anderson 
Tampa, Florida 

John H. Anderson 

Hattiesburg, Mississippi 



B.A., Vanderbilt University 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.S., Alcorn State University 
J.D., University of Mississippi 
M.Div., Reformed Theological Seminary 



Louie Verner Andrews 
San Angelo, Texas 



B.A., King College 

M.A., Presbyterian School of Christian Education 

M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 



Daniel Mark Andriacco 
Cincinnati, Ohio 



B.A., University of Cincinnati 
M.A., Athenaeum of Ohio 



Jimmy Robert Asbell, Jr. 
Macon, Georgia 

Stephen Warren Austin 
Stone Mountain, Georgia 

Sandra Kay Avent 
Atlanta, Georgia 



Charles O. Ayars 

Massapequa, New York 



B.A., Wofford College 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 

B.A., Point Loma College 

M.Div., San Francisco Theological Seminary 

B.S., Tennessee State University 

M.Div., Interdenominational Theological Center 

Th.M., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 

A.A., Palomar Junior College 

B.A., United States International Univeristy 

M.Div., Fuller Theological Seminary 



Eugen Graybill Bach, Jr. 
Decherd, Tennessee 



B.A., King College 

M.Div., Erskine Theological Seminary 



Brant Dale Baker 
Mobile, Alabama 



B.A., Claremont McKenna College 
M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 
Th.M., Columbia Theological Seminary 



109 



Royce Windham Ballard 
Metairie, Louisiana 



B.A., Samford University 

M.Div., New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary 



Edna Jacobs Banes 
Alexandria, Virginia 



B.S., Presbyterian College 

M.S., University of Nebraska at Omaha 

M.Div., Virginia Theological Seminary 



Marcus Raymond Barber 
Horn Lake, Mississippi 



B.S., Central Oklahoma State University 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



James Warren Barnum 
Wantagh, New York 

Cynthia Dawn Whisnant Basher 
Birmingham, Alabama 



B.S., Taylor University 

M.Div., Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary 

B.A., Wingate College 

M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 



Glenn Thomas Batten 

Elizabethtown, North Carolina 



B.A., St. Andrews Presbyterian College 
M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 



Eric Arthur Dean Bell 
Birmingham, Alabama 



B.S., University of Alabama at Birmingham 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 



Fyfe Blair 

Aberdeen, Scotland 



B.A., University of Edinburgh 
B.D., University of Aberdeen 



John Gloman Blewitt 
Cardiff, Maryland 



B.A., Westminster College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 



David Lewis Boumgarden 
Naperville, Illinois 



B.A., Michigan State University 

M.Div., Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary 



Frances Wood Bragan 

West Columbia, South Carolina 



B.S., Southern Wesley an University 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Garry Keith Brantley 
Hoover, Alabama 



B.A., M.A., M.Div., Southern Christian University 



Lloyd Vernon Braswell 
Durham, North Carolina 



B.A., Wingate College 

M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary 



Beverly Ann Brigman 
Decatur, Georgia 



B.S., Georgia State University 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Edward Johnson Britt 
Nashville, Tennessee 



B.A., M.A., Scarritt College 

M.Div., Vanderbilt University Divinity School 



Mark R. Broadhead 
Tallahassee, Florida 



B.A., Stetson University 

M.Div., Lancaster Theological Seminary 



Brad Terry Bromling 
Bellevue, Washington 



B.A., Freed-Hardeman University 
M.A., Southern Christian University 



110 



John Milla Brown, Jr. 
Forsyth, Georgia 



B.A., University of Georgia 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 



Walter M. Brown, Jr. 
Athens, Georgia 



B.S.W., Georgia State University 

M.Div., Interdenominational Theological Center 

Th.M., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 



Monica Georgia Burgher 
Portland, Jamaica 



B.Sc, M.Sc, Philadelphia College of Bible 



Robert McCurry Burns 
Pearl, Mississippi 



B.S., University of New Orleans 

M.Div., New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary 



Ella Franklin Busby 

Florence, South Carolina 



M.Div., Interdenominational Theological Center 



Carlton P. Byrd 

Madison, Tennessee 



B.A., Oakwood College 

B.S., Andrews University 

M.Div., Seventh Day Adventist Theological Seminary 



Carol Jaynes Byrd 

Denver, North Carolina 



B.A., Berea College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Charis M. Caldwell 
Edwards, Colorado 



B.A., Mary Baldwin College 

M.Phil., St. Andrews University 

M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 



Kathryn Johnson Cameron 
Nellysford, Virginia 



B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

M.Div., Yale University Divinity School 

M.R.E., Presbyterian School of Christian Education 



Vincent Leroy Campbell 
Kingston, Jamaica 



B.A., M.A., University of the West Indies 



Alan L. Carden 

Madison, Mississippi 



B.M., Mississippi College 

M.C.M., M.R.E., New Orleans Baptist Theological 
Seminary 



William E. Carpenter 
Dunwoody, Georgia 



B.A., Lambuth College 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 

M.A., West Georgia College 



James Alan Carr 

Clayton, North Carolina 



B.A., University of North Carolina at Charlotte 
M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 



Samuel David Carriker 

Cleveland, North Carolina 



B.A., University of North Carolina at Charlotte 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Janet Nolting Carter 
Topeka, Kansas 



A.B., Duke University 

M.S.Ed., University of Pennsylvania 

M.Div., McCormick Theological Seminary 



111 



Gray Vaughan Chandler 

Fayetteville, North Carolina 



B.G.S., Virginia Commonwealth University 
M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 



Robert Fleming Chastain 
Florence, South Carolina 



B.B.A., Georgia State University 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Beverly Lynn Cheyney 

Santa Monica, California 



B.A., Wheaton College 

M.Div., Fuller Theological Seminary 



Valerie Chillis 

Marietta, Georgia 



B.S., Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University 
M.Div., Howard University School of Divinity 



Hyun Sung Cho 

New Canaan, Connecticut 



Dip., Presbyterian College, Korea 

M.Div., New Brunswick Theological Seminary 



Sung Yun Cho 

Jacksonville, Florida 



B.A., Korean Christian Seminary, Korea 
M.A., Pacific Christian College 
M.Div., Fuller Theological Seminary 



David Alexander Choate 
Pickerington, Ohio 



B.A., University of Cincinnati 

M.Div., Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary 



Elsa Lanetta Clarke 
St. Mary, Jamaica 



Cert., United Theological College of the West Indies 



Winston Sylvester Clemetson 
Kingston, Jamaica 



B.A., Calabar Theological College, Jamaica 
M.Div., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary 



Todd Andrew Collier 
Savannah, Georgia 



B.S., University of Central Oklahoma 
M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 



Dennis Robert Coon 
Richland, Iowa 



B.A., M.A., University of Northern Iowa 
M.Div., St. Paul School of Theology 



Joseph A. Cordero 
Pearland, Texas 



B.A., University of Alabama 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Mary Jane Cornell 
Decatur, Georgia 



B.A., Agnes Scott College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



David Bruce Cozad 
Sarasota, Florida 



B.A., Eckerd College 

M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 

M.S. P., Florida State University 



John Gordon Crawford 
Nashville, Tennessee 



B.S., Union University 

M.Div., Vanderbilt University Divinity School 



William Patten Caraganos Crawford 
Larchmont, New York 



B.A., Westminster College 

M.Div., M.S.T., Union Theological Seminary, New York 



Lisa Gayle Danielson 
Sidney, Ohio 



B.S., Illinois State University 

M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 



111 



Charles Gregory Darden 
Germantown, Tennessee 



A.B., LaGrange College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Darlene Elizabeth Davis 
Largo, Florida 



B.A., Mercyhurst College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 



Edward C. Dawkins 

Fair Oaks Ranch. Texas 



B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 



Clark Gregory DeLoach III 
Marietta, Georgia 



B.S., Shorter College 

M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 



Susan L. Denne 

Rock Hill, South Carolina 



B.A., Oglethorpe University 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Christopher Wright Denson 
Hokes Bluff, Alabama 



B.A., Birmingham Southern College 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 



Tom Edward Diamond 
Jacksonville, Florida 



B.S., Florida Memorial College 

M.Div., Colgate Rochester Divinity School/Bexley Hall/ 
Crozer Theological Seminary 



Sue Rodelius Dickson 
El Paso, Texas 



B.A., Indiana University 

M.Div., University of Dubuque Theological Seminary 



Lemuel Tyler Downing III 
Lilburn, Georgia 



A.B., Davidson College 

M.A., Virginia Commonwealth University 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Barbara L. Drake 

Birmingham, Alabama 



B.S., M.A., University of Alabama 
M.Div., Asbury Theological Seminary 



Alfred Gordon Drummond 
Perth, Scotland 



Dip., Bible Training Institute 
B.D., Glasgow Univeristy 



John Edmund Dukes 
Monroe, Georgia 



B.A., Auburn University 

M.Div., University of the South School of Theology 



Priscilla Bingham Durkin 
Wadesboro, North Carolina 



B.A. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
M.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro 
M.Div., Wesley Theological Seminary 



Neal Christopher Earley 
Apilion, Nebraska 



B.A., Columbia College 

M.Div., Union Theological Seminary, New York 



Janice Lynne Edmiston 
Arlington, Virginia 



B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
M.Div., Andover Newton Theological School 



Harry S. Edmonds 

Farmington, Missouri 



B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary 
Th.M., Austin Presyterian Theological Seminary 



113 



Joan Pierce Egerton 

Charleston, South Carolina 



B.A., Queens College 

M.A., The Citadel 

M.A.T.S., Union Theological Seminary, New York 



Pamela Parker Eliason 

Charlotte, North Carolina 



B.A., Catawba College 

M.S.W., Washington University 

M.Div., Union Theological Seminary, New York 



Richard Reece Elrod 
Cullman, Alabama 



B.A., Gardner-Webb University 

M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary 



Chris William Erdman 
Sharon, Pennsylvania 

David Walter Farmer 
Jasper, Georgia 



B.S., Colorado State University 
M.Div., Fuller Theological Seminary 

B.S., Lewis and Clark College 
M.Div., Fuller Theological Seminary 



J. Frederick Fife 

Harrison, Tennessee 



B.A., Huntingdon College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Carol Carpenter Fisher 
Mebane, North Carolina 



B.A., Randolph-Macon Women's College 

M.A., Presbyterian School of Christian Education 

M.Div., Union Theological Seminary, Virginia 



Carlton Fisher, Jr. 

Wetumpka, Alabama 



B.A., Georgia State University 

M.Div., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary 



Mitchell Wayne Flora 

Winterville, North Carolina 



B.A., Lee College 

M.Div., Church of God School of Theology 



John Mark Forrester 
Nashville, Tennessee 

Robert Godfrey Foster 
Kingston, Jamaica 



B.A., Trevecca Nazarene College 

M.Div., Vanderbilt University Divinity School 

Dip., Union Theological Seminary, Jamaica 
S.T.M., Christian Theological Seminary 



John Lennig Frye, Jr. 

Columbia, South Carolina 

William Oliver Gafkjen 

Duncansville, Pennsylvania 

Lemuel Garcia- Arroyo 
Kingsville, Texas 

Eleana Manuel Garrett 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.A., Davidson College 

M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 

B.A., St. Olaf College 

M.Div., Luther Theological Seminary 

Dip., Universidad Nacional Autonoma De Mexico 
M.Div., Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary 

B.A., College of St. Francis 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Michael W. Garrett 
Denver, Colorado 



B.S., James Madison University 

M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 



114 



Allan Mitchell Gathercoal 
Norcross, Georgia 

Thomas Andrew Gay 
Cowan, Tennessee 

Diana Clare Gibson 

Menlo Park, California 

Thomas Lester Gibson 
Boone, North Carolina 

Thomas Earl Gilmore 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Douglas Ray Gilreath 
Cleveland, Georgia 

Ronald Jerald Gilreath 
Atlanta, Georgia 



Edward R. Glaize 

Montgomery, Alabama 

David L. Goebel 
Burlely, Idaho 

Christine Marie Gooden-Benguche 
East Coast Demerara, Guyana 

Stuart Randolph Gordon 
Carthage, North Carolina 

Mark Andrew Graham 
Roanoke, Virginia 

Gerald Leonard Gray 
Chesapeake, Virginia 

Brenda Knight Green 
Union City, Georgia 



Georgia C. Griffin 
Atlanta, Georgia 



Thomas Lionel Griffis 

Franklin, North Carolina 



B.A., Azusa Pacific University 
M.A., Fuller Theological Seminary 

B.A., University of Memphis 

M.Div., Methodist Theological School in Ohio 

B.A., University of California at Riverside 
M.Div., San Francisco Theological Seminary 

B.A., Furman University 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 

B.A., Birmingham Baptist Bible College 
B.Th., Birmingham Theological Seminary 

B.S., Kennesaw State College 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 

B.A., Methodist College 

M.A., Presbyterian School of Christian Education 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Huntingdon College 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 

B.A., Wheat on College 

M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 

Dip., Moneague Teachers College 

B.A., Dip., United Theological College of West Indies 

A.B., Davidson College 

M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 

B.A., College of William and Mary 

M.Div., Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary 

B.S., Voorhes College 

M.Div., Interdenominational Theological Seminary 

B.S.Ed., University of Georgia 

M.A.C.E., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 

B.A., Emmanuel College 

J.D., Boston College Law School 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 

B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 
M.A., Wake Forest University 



115 



Gregory Erwin Griffith 
Hoosick, New York 

Guy Davis Griffith 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

Charles Jarred Hammet, Jr. 
Summerton, South Carolina 



B.A., Hiram College 

M.Div., Andover Newton Theological School 

B.A., American University 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.A., Wofford College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Charles Samuel Haun 
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 



B.A., Carson-Newman College 

M.Div., Vanderbilt University Divinity School 

M.A., University of Tennessee 



Pamela Cunningham Hawkins 
Nashville, Tennessee 



B.A., Duke University 

M.S., Vanderbilt University 

M.Div., Vanderbilt University Divinity School 



Suzan Kay Hawkinson 
Seabrook, Texas 

Huibing He 

Norcross, Georgia 

Stephen James Heinzel-Nelson 
Allentown, New Jersey 



B.A., Macalester College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.D., M.Div., Nanjing Theological Seminary, China 



B.A., Cornell University 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 



Fred Buis Hembree, Jr. 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 



B.A., Scarritt College 

M.Div., Vanderbilt University Divinity School 



James Boren Higgins 
Morrow, Georgia 



B.A., Illinois Wesleyan University 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 



Madison Maxwell Highfill 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



B.A., King College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Ronald Reins Hilliard 

Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 



B.S., Florida Atlantic University 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Sylvan Herbert Michael Hinds 
Kingston, Jamaica 



Dip., B.A., United Theological College of the West Indies 



Dennis Robert Hitchman 
Marietta, Georgia 



B.S., Brenau College 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 



Thomas Keith Hoffmann 
Durant, Oklahoma 



B.A., M.Div., Oral Roberts University 



Robyn Ramer Hogue 

University Place, Washington 



B.A., Whitworth College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 



116 



Mary Louise Howson 
Newtown, Connecticut 



B.A., Mount Holyoke College 
M.A.T., Wesleyan University 
M.Div., Yale University Divinity School 



Michael James Hoyt 
Churchville, Virginia 



B.S., Presbyterian College 

M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 



David Lindsay Hudson 
Venice, Florida 



B.A., Wake Forest University 

M.Div., Th.M., Princeton Theological Seminary 



Eugene W. Huffstutler, Jr. 
New Orleans, Louisiana 



B.A., Baylor University 

M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 



Barbara Elizabeth Averett Ingram 
Concord, North Carolina 



B.A., Pfeiffer College 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 



Lowell D. Ingram 

Mendenhall, Mississippi 



B.S., Mississippi State University 

M.Div., New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary 



Michael Dwayne Jackson 
Madisonville, Tennessee 



B.A., University of Tennessee 
M.Div., Asbury Theological Seminary 



Brian Keith Jensen 
Salem, Ohio 



B.S., University of Iowa 

M.Div., Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary 



Louise Stowe Johns 

Rock Hill Centre, New York 



B.A., Oklahoma City University 

M.R.E., M.Div., Drew University Theological School 



Michael Egerton Johnson 
Kingston, Jamaica 



Dip., B.A.T., United Theological College of the West Indies 
Dip., Bethlehem Teacher's College 



Patricia Sue Johnson 
Fremont, Ohio 



B.A., Mercer University, Atlanta 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Hugh Colson Jones 

Niagara Falls, Canada 



B.A., Mount Allison University 

M.A., McMaster University 

M.Div., Knox College, University of Toronto 



David Moncrief Jordan 

Rockingham, North Carolina 



B.A., Furman University 

M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 



Walter Stephens Jordan, Jr. 
Jackson, Mississippi 



B.A., Mississippi College 

M.Div., New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary 



Douglass DePass Key 

Laurinburg, North Carolina 



B.S., Clemson University 

M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 



Chang Hwan Kim 
Alpharetta, Georgia 



B.A., M.Div., Chongshin College, Korea 



Gyeon Mok Kim 
Auburn, Alabama 



B.A., Soong Sil University 

M.Div., Korean Presbyterian Seminary 

Th.M., Columbia Theological Seminary 



117 



Jong Hoon Kim 

College Point, New York 

Jung Moon Kim 

Rutherford, New Jersey 

Sirrano Anthony Kitson 
Kingston, Jamaica 



B.A., Keimyung University, Korea 
M.Div., New York Theological Seminary 

B.A., Soon Sil University, Korea 

M.Div., Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Korea 

Dip., United Theological College of the West Indies 
B.Th., University of the West Indies 



Leslie Anna Klingensmith 
Alexandria, Virginia 



B.A., University of Oklahoma 

M.Div., Duke University Divinity School 



Lewis Timothy Kola 
Decatur, Georgia 

Jeffrey K. Krehbiel 

Wilmington, Delaware 



B.A., American Baptist College 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 

B.A., Hope College 

M.Div., McCormick Theological Seminary 



Roger Courtney Krueger 
Pendleton, South Carolina 



B.A., Furman University 

M.Div., Duke University Divinity School 



Dong-Shin Kwag 

North Hills, New York 

Kiho Kye 

Ridgewood, New Jersey 



B.A., Yonsei University, Korea 
M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.A., Hankuk Univeristy, Korea 

M.Div., Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Korea 

Th.M., Princeton Theological Seminary 



Robert Glenn Lam 
Commerce, Texas 



B.A., North Texas State University 

M.Div., Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary 



James Bruce Lancaster 
Decatur, Alabama 



B.B.A., Northeast Louisiana University 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Paul Hollingsworth Lang 
Greenville, North Carolina 



B.A., Furman University 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Laury W. Larson 

Shaker Heights, Ohio 



B.S., Illinois State University 
M.A., John Carroll University 
M.Div., University of Dubuque Theological Seminary 



Mark Douglas Larson 

Charlotte, North Carolina 



B.A., University of Wisconsin at Eau Claire 
M.Div., Duke University Divinity School 



P. Joseph Lawrence 
St. James, Jamaica 



Louise Upchurch Lawson 
Memphis, Tennessee 



B.Sc, Veerasaiva College, India 

B.D., Serempore University United Theological College, India 

M.A., Karnataka University, India 

B.A., Duke University 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 



118 



Anne Reid Ledbetter 
Wilmington, Delaware 

Hee Soo Lee 
Seoul, Korea 



B.A., Austin College 

M.Div., Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary 

Th.B., Mok Won Methodist College 

M.Div., Korean Presbyterian Theological Seminary 



K. Aaron Lee 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Dirk McCoy Lesnett 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



B.S., Wayne State University 

M.Div., San Francisco Theological Seminary 

B.A., Grove City College 

M.Div., Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary 



Benjamin Earl Vaughn Lett 
Macon, Georgia 

Thomas Griffith Lewis 
Commerce, Georgia 



B.A., University of Alabama 

M.Div., Interdenominational Theological Center 

B.A., Emory University 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 



David Maish Liddle, Jr. 
Indianapolis, Indiana 



Allen E. Likkel 

Seattle, Washington 



B.A., Northwestern University 

M.A., University of Iowa 

M.Div., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

A.B., Calvin College 

M.Div., Calvin Theological Seminary 



Allen Yin-Jun Lin 
Piano, Texas 



B.A., University of Alabama 

M.Div., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary 



Craig Jonathan Lindsey 
Skaneateles, New York 

Lewis Edward Logan 
Savannah, Georgia 



Carlos A. Tamayo Lopez 
Matanzas, Cuba 



B.A., College ofWooster 

M.Div., Union Theological Seminary, New York 

B.A., Morehouse College 

M.Div., Th.M., Candler School of Theology at Emory 
University 

B.Th., Evangelical Theological Seminary, Cuba 



Jonathan Waylon Lovelady 
Waynesboro, Virginia 



B.A., Lee College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Stotrell George Lowe 
Kingston, Jamaica 



Dip.Th., United Theological College of the West Indies 
S.T.M., University of the West Indies 



Frederick C. Lubs 
Clinton, Iowa 



B.S., Purdue University 

M.Div., Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 



Richard Graham Lund 
Rice Lake, Wisconsin 

Grant A. MacLean, Jr. 
Coeeur D'Alene, Idaho 



B.A., Pacific Lutheran University 

M.Div., Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary 

B.A., Stanford University 

M.Div., McCormick Theological Seminary 



119 



Tom Louis MacMillan 
Fort Myers, Florida 

Michael Benjamin Mann 
Gadsden, Alabama 



Carl Beason Marshall 
Monticello, Georgia 



Kathi Elaine Martin 

Stone Mountain, Georgia 

Frank De Maycock 
Prosser, Washington 

Eustace St. Orban McCollin-Moore 
St. George, Barbados 



James Walborn McCormack 
Fairview, Pennsylvania 

Anthony Wilton McDade 
Statesville, North Carolina 

Jerry Wayne McElhinny 

Fayetteville, North Carolina 

Sidney Anthony McGill 
St. Ann, Jamaica 

Paige Maxwell McRight 
Rock Hill, South Carolina 

Johannes Andemiacel Mengsteab 
Hyattsville, Maryland 



John Steven Midkiff 
Griffin, Georgia 

David Blake Miller 

State College, Pennsylvania 

Jose Daniel Montanez 
Chamblee, Georgia 



B.A., DePauw University 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.A., Florida State University 

J.D., University of Florida 

M.A., Asbury Theological Seminary 

M.Div., Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary 

B.A., University of Alabama 

M.S., University of Southern California 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.S., New Jersey Institute of Technology 
M.Div., Interdenominational Theological Center 

B.A., Biola University 

M.Div., Fuller Theological Seminary 

Dip., Chambers Career School, England 

Dip., London University 

M.Div., University of Manitoba, St. John's College 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University 
M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.A., Furman University 

M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 

B.A., West Virginia State College 
M.Div., Reformed Theological Seminary 

B.S., Tuskegee University 

M.A., Caribbean Graduate School of Theology 

B.A., Agnes Scott College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.A., Concordia College 
M.Div., Concordia Seminary 
Th.M., Western Theological Seminary 

B.A., Stetson University 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 

B.A., Goshen College 

M.Div., Associated Mennonite Biblical Seminary 

B.A., California State University 
M.A., Fuller Theological Seminary 



120 



Alton Evans Moore, Jr. 
Equality, Alabama 



B.A., Scarritt College 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 



Terry Lynn Moore 

Oak Ridge, North Carolina 



A.B., Pfeiffer College 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 



James Albert Moran 
Hermitage, Tennessee 



B.S., Presbyterian College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Janice Hodges Moss 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.A., Huntingdon College 

M.Div., Interdenominational Theological Seminary 



J. Aaron Nagel 

Grand Rapids, Michigan 



B.S., University of South Florida 

D.Min., Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary 



David Stephen Naglee 
Douglasville, Georgia 



B.A., LaGrange College 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 



Kong Suk NamKung 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



B.A., Methodist College 

M.Div., Duke University Divinity School 



Vivian V. V. Napier 
Florence, Mississippi 



M.A. Mississippi State University 
M.Div., Unity School of Christianity 



Paul Stephen Nazarian 
Monroe, Louisiana 



B.A., University of California at Davis 
M.Div., San Francisco Theological Seminary 



Yvette Maud Noble-Bloomfield 
Kingston, Jamaica 



Dip., United Theological College of the West Indies 
B.A., University of the West Indies 



Agnes Winston Norfleet 
Atlanta, Georgia 



A.B., Davidson College 

M.Div., Union Theological Seminary, Virginia 



James Franklin Norris III 
Estill, South Carolina 



B.A., College of Charleston 

M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary 



Brian L. Nott 

Cantonment, Florida 



B.A., University of West Florida 

M.Div., New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary 



Michael Bruce Oliver 
Jacksonville, Alabama 



B.A., Jacksonville State University 

M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 



Rhonda Jean O'Reilly 
Cincinnati, Ohio 



B.A., Indiana University 

M.Div., McCormick Theological Seminary 



Hector Ortiz 

Houston, Texas 



B.A., Texas Tech University 

M.A., Ashland Theological Seminary 



John Stephen Park 
Fort Wayne, Indiana 



B.A., Georgia State University 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



111 



Kenneth Leon Payne 
Luverne, Alabama 

Andrew H. Permenter 
Dalton, Georgia 

Walter Ward Peters 

Westminster, Maryland 

Thomas Michael Pipkin 
Tucker, Georgia 

Judith Ellen Rarick 

Grandview, Missouri 

George Moyer Rawn 

Morristown, Tennessee 

Michael B. Regele 
Irvine, California 

Jeanne Carette Reynolds 
Rabun Gap, Georgia 

Barbara Rhodes 

Centre Hall, Pennsylvania 



B.A., Alabama Christian College 

M.A., Alabama Christian School of Religion 

B.A., Georgia State University 
M.Div., Oral Roberts University 

B.A., Baylor University 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., University of Colorado 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.S., California State University, Los Angeles 
M.Div., Fuller Theological Seminary 

B.A., Emory and Henry College 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 

B.A., Seattle Pacific College 
M.Div., Fuller Theological Seminary 

B.F.A., University of Florida 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.S., James Madison University 
M.Div., Eastern Mennonite Seminary 



Kimberly Clayton Richter 
Asheville, North Carolina 



B.A., Birmingham Southern College 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



James Windsor Riley 
Carmel, Indiana 



B.A., Gordon College 

M.Div., Fuller Theological Seminary 



Andrew Ritchie 

Edinburgh, Scotland 



B.D., University of Edinburgh 



Eugene Edward Roberts 
Fairport, New York 



B.A., Hope College 

M.Div., New Brunswick Theological Seminary 



Mark Alan Robertson 
Decatur, Georgia 



B.S., Washington and Lee University 
M.Div., Regent College 



George Oliver Rogers 
Conyers, Georgia 



B.A., Pikeville College 

M.Div., Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary 



Charles Louis Rolen 
Kennesaw, Georgia 



B.A., Louisiana College 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 



Scott Anthony Rollins 
Cleveland, Tennessee 



B.A., Milligan College 

M.Div., Emmanuel School of Religion 



122 



David Allison Roquemore 
West Lafayette, Indiana 



B.A., Wofford College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 



Jeffrey Len Ross 

Cedartown, Georgia 



A.S., Abraham Baldwin Agricutural College 

B.S., West Georgia College 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 



John Alter Mendel Rottenberg 
Walden, New York 



B.A., Haverford College 

M.Div., San Francisco Theological Seminary 



Carol Benz Scott 
Marietta, Georgia 



B.A., Tufts University 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 



Edwin James Searcy B.A., University of British Columbia 

Surrey, British Columbia, Canada M.Div., Vancouver School of Theology 



Sandra P. Shawhan 

Cottontown, Tennessee 



B.A. Lambuth University 

M.A., Ohio State University 

M.Div., Vanderbilt University Divinity School 



Myung Dong Shin 

Fort Lee, New Jersey 



B.Min., Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Korea 
M.Div., New York Theological Seminary 



Sheldon Rene Shipman 

Charlotte, North Carolina 



B.A., University of North Carolina at Charlotte 
M.Div., Hood Theological Seminary 



Amy Sass Sigmon 
Belleair, Florida 



B.A., Bryn Mawr College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 



Lawrence McBride Sigmon 
Belleair, Florida 



B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 



Tommy Register Sikes 
Madison, Mississippi 



B.S., University of Georgia 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Reginald Dale Simmons 
Aiken, South Carolina 



B.S., North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State 

University 
J.D., American Univeristy 
M.Div., Erskine Theological Seminary 



James Douglas Simpson 
Alpharetta, Georgia 



B.Sc, University of Dundee 
B.D., University of Aberdeen 



Richard M. Simpson 

Holden, Massaschusetts 



A.B., Georgetown University 
M.Div., Drew Theological Seminary 
Th.M., Princeton Theological Seminary 



Timothy Frederick Simpson 
Richmond, Virginia 



B.A., M.A., Liberty University 

M.Div., Th.M., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Scott Gerald Slater 

Washington, District of Columbia 



B.L.A., University of Florida 
M.Div., Protestant Episcopal Theological Seminary 
in Virginia 



123 



Earl Joseph Smith 

St. Petersburg, Florida 

Ruth Miller Snyder 

Matthews, North Carolina 

John William Sonnenday III 
McLean, Virginia 

Betsy L. Steier 

Port St. Lucie, Florida 

Douglas Ray Stephenson 
Jonesboro, Georgia 

Susan R. Street-Beavers 
Lawrence, Indiana 



B.S., Tulane University 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Davidson College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.A., Carleton College 

M.Div., Union Theological Seminary, New York 

B.A., Eastern Kentucky University 
M.Div., Lexington Theological Seminary 

B.B.A., Sam Houston State College 
M.Div., Asbury Theological Seminary 

B.A., Oklahoma State University 
B.A., Oklahoma Baptist University 
M.Div., Phillips Theological Seminary 



Maria Alene Stroup 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Augustus Ernest Succop III 
Charlotte, North Carolina 

Dana Willis Sutton 

Huntington, West Virginia 

Bruce D. Swanson 
Portland, Oregon 

Mary Lynne Venema Swierenga 
Vienna, Virginia 



B.A., Flager College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

A.B., Davidson College 

M.Div., Yale University Divinity School 

B.A., Youngstown State University 

M.Div., Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary 

B.S., Pacific Lutheran Seminary 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Calvin College 

M.Div., Wesley Theological Seminary 



Catherine Elizabeth Taylor 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.A., Duke University 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



James Michael Thomas 
Bartlett, Tennessee 



B.G.S., University of Kentucky 

M.Div., Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary 



Richard Ellsworth Thomas 
Accokeek, Maryland 



B.A., Boston University 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Keith Jon Thompson 

Wilmington, North Carolina 



B.A., Texas Christian University 

M.Div., Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary 



Larry Dean Thorson 
Dallas, Texas 



B.S., Liberty University 

M.A., Fuller Seminary 

M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 



124 



Dorinda Ellen Trouteaud 
Stone Mountain, Georgia 



B.A., College o/Wooster 

M.A., University of Detroit 

M.Div., Th.M., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Richard M. Turk 

Jacksonville, Florida 



B.A., St. Mary's University 

M.Th., Princeton Theological Seminary 



Augusta Boyd Vanderbilt 
Newport News, Virginia 



B.A., Eckerd College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



John Patrick Vaughn 

Charleston, South Carolina 



B.S., Lander University 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 



Christine B. Vogel 

Highland Park, Illinois 



B.A., Binghamton University 

M.Div., McCormick Theological Seminary 



Stephen Michael Walsh 
Wahiawa, Hawaii 



B.A., University of Southern California 
M.B.A., Pepperdine University 
M.Div., Fuller Theological Seminary 



Douglas Randal Walton 
Helena, Alabama 



B.A., Samford University 

M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 



Edward Lewis Warner 
East Point, Georgia 



B.A., Rutgers State University 
M.Div., General Theological Seminary 



William P. Warnock, Jr. 
Braselton, Georgia 



B.A., University of Georgia 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 



David Marshall Watson 
Arcadia, California 



B.A., California State University, Northridge 
M.Div., Fuller Theological Seminary 



Harvey Darrell Watson 
Gray, Georgia 



B.A., Mars Hill College 

M.S. W., M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 



Donald A. Wehmeyer 
Merida, Mexico 



B.S., University of Oklahoma 

M.Div., Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary 



David Loring Welch 
Douglasville, Georgia 



B.A., Vanderbilt University 

M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 



James R. Weldon 
Acworth, Georgia 



B.A., University of North Florida 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Kathleen L. Weller 

Washington, Indiana 



B.A., Trinity University 

M.Div., McCormick Theological Seminary 



Byron Harvey Wells 
Woodstock, Georgia 



B.A., North Carolina State University 
M.Div., Lexington Theological Seminary 



William Arthur Wendt 
Mondovi, Wisconsin 



B.A., University of Florida 

M.Div., Wartburg Theological Seminary 



125 



Craig Sinclair Williams 

Trabuco Canyon, California 

Gregory V. Wilson 

Lawrenceville, Georgia 

James Ronald Wilson 
Hartselle, Alabama 



Daniel Soo M. Woo 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Robert M. Wooten 
Indialantic, Florida 



Lemuel David Wyly III 

Williamston, North Carolina 

J. Larry Yarborough, Jr. 
Lawrenceville, Georgia 

Jae Ho Yee 

Houston, Texas 



B.A., California State Univeristy at Fullerton 
M.Div., Fuller Theological Seminary 

B.A., Colorado Baptist College 

M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 

B.A., Samford University 

M.Div., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Th.M., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.Th., Hankuk Theological College, Korea 
M.Div., Howard University School of Divinity 

B.A.E., University of Florida 

M.S., Florida International University 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 

B.A., Georgia Institute of Technology 
M.Div., Duke University Divinity School 

B.A., Samford University 

M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 

M.Div., Houston Graduate School of Theology 



Darrell H. Young 

Rochester, New York 

Adrian Lee Zehmer 

Monroe, North Carolina 

Peter Stuart Zinn 

Lawrenceburg, Kentucky 

Master of Theology 

David M. Anderson, Jr. 
Smyrna, Georgia 

Kevin Michael Campbell 
Raeford, North Carolina 

Steven Bernard Crymes 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 

Ramona Best Davidson 
Austell, Georgia 

Robert P. Debelak, Jr. 
Cleveland, Tennessee 



B.A., State University of New York 
M.Div., San Francisco Theological Seminary 

B.A., James Madison University 

M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 

A.B., Whitman College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 



B.S., Emmanuel College 

M.AXT.S.), Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Brewton-Parker College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Chicago Baptist Institute 

M.Div., Interdenominational Theological Center 

B.A., Agnes Scott College 

M.AXT.S.), Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.S., East Coast Bible College 

M.Div., Church of God School of Theology 



126 



Stephen Gerald deClaisse-Walford 
Stone Mountain, Georgia 



M.A.(T.S.), Fuller Theological Seminary 



Barbara Deemer Douglass 
Dunwoody, Georgia 

David E. Ezekiel 

Weogufka, Alabama 

Evelyn Medora Gifford 
Decatur, Georgia 

Festus Kaburu Gitonga 
Nanyuki, Kenya 

Alan Kyle Henderson 
Decatur, Georgia 



B.A., Hollins College 

M.AXT.S.), Columbia Theological Seminary 

A.B., Samford University 

M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 

A.B., Occidental College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Nairobi University 

B.D., St. Paul United Theological College 

B.S., North Carolina State University 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Jeffrey Cecil Holley 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

Karen Rembert Holley 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

Seong Chan Kim 
Seoul, Korea 



B.A., Lee College 

M.Div., Church of God School of Theology 

B.S., Lee College 

M.Div., Church of God School of Theology 

B.S., Han Yang University 

M.Div., New Brunswick Theological Seminary 



Woocheol Kim 

Lynchburg, Virginia 



B.A., Seoul National University, Korea 
M.Div., Presbyterian College and Theological Seminary, 
Korea 



Heemoon Lee 

Anniston, Alabama 



B.A., University of Minnesota 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Peter Loment 

Budapest, Hungary 

Mark Edwin Montfort 
Atlanta, Georgia 



Dip., Theological Academy of the Reformed Church, Hungary 



B.A., University of Florida 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Retief Muller 

Wapadrand, South Africa 



B.A., B.D., University of Pretoria 



Hyoung-Sin Park 
Atlanta, Georgia 



William Blount Robinson 
Charlotte, North Carolina 

Tom Sacon 

Yokohama, Japan 



B.A., Yonsei University, Korea 

M.Div., Seoul Theological University 

M.T.S., Candler School of Theology at Emory University 

B.S., Presbyterian College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Gakushuin University 

B.D., M.Div., Tokyo Union Theological Seminary 



127 



Jung Yn Shin 

Nashville, Tennessee 



B.A., Seattle Pacific University 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Zeb D. Smith, Jr. 
Decatur, Georgia 



B.A., Furman University 

B.S., Emmanuel College 

M.Div., Erskine Theological Seminary 



Sasan Tavassoli 

Kennesaw, Georgia 



B.A., Washington Bible College 
M.A.(TS.), Reformed Theological Seminary 



David Alan Torrey 
Marietta, Georgia 



B.S., Presbyterian College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



James E. Victor, Jr. 

Stone Mountain, Georgia 



B.A., Cornell University 

M.Div., Virginia Union University School of Theology 



John David White 

Cayce, South Carolina 



B.S., University of South Carolina 

M. Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Michael Roger Wilson 
Norcross, Georgia 



B.A., Dickinson College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 



Edna Karolien Zwerver 

Workum, The Netherlands 



Propaedeutic Degree, University of Groningen, The 
Netherlands 



Master of Divinity 



Thomas Keith Abramowski 
Gadsden, Alabama 



A.B., Davidson College 
North Alabama* 



Joseph Edwin Albright 
New Smyrna, Florida 



B.A., Flagler College 
St. Augustine 



Robert Meredith Alexander 
Evansville, Indiana 



B.S., B.A. North Carolina State University 
M.A., Presbyterian School of Christian Education 
Ohio Valley 



Eston Jennings Allen 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.A., Mercer University 

Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 



Edward Gillespie Amos 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.A., Presbyterian College 
Greater Atlanta 



Rachel Allane Anderson 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.S., James Madison University 
Greater Atlanta 



Anne H. K. Apple 
Mobile, Alabama 



B.A., Rhodes College 
South Alabama 



Laurie Ann Armstrong 
Decatur, Georgia 



B.A., George Mason University 
Greater Atlanta 



TC(USA) Presbytery or Denomination 



128 



Michael Reaves Bailey 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.A., Furman University 
Greater Atlanta 



Rachael E. Banzhoff 
Valrico, Florida 



B.A., George Washington University 
Tampa Bay 



Doris Jean Barton 
Decatur, Georgia 



B.A., Jersey City State College 
African Methodist Episcopal 



Margaret Frampton Beamguard 
Charleston, South Carolina 



B.S., Clemson University 
Cherokee 



Kathryn A. Summers Bean 
Decatur, Georgia 



B.A., Duke University 
Greater Atlanta 



Blair Henderson Beaver 

Laurel Hill, North Carolina 



B.A., St. Andrews Presbyterian College 
Costal Carolina 



David Michael Bender 

North Wilkesboro, North Carolina 



B.A., Clemson University 
M.A., Wake Forest University 
J.D., Wake Forest University School of Law 
Salem 



Russell Vincent Benton 

Charlotte, North Carolina 



B.A., University of North Carolina at Charlotte 
Charlotte 



Kathryn Gordon Blocher 

Black Mountain, North Carolina 



B.A., Presbyterian College 
B.S., Western Carolina University 
Western North Carolina 



Stephanie Elizabeth Boardman 
Williamsburg, Virginia 



B.A., College of William and Mary 
Eastern Virginia 



Jeffrey Lewis Bohon 

Lawrenceville, Georgia 



B.M.E., Florida State University 
Greater Atlanta 



John Middleton Boulware 
Matthews, North Carolina 



B.S., Wingate College 
Charlotte 



Karen Olita Bounds 
Decatur, Georgia 



B.A., University of Texas at Arlington 
Central Florida 



Joshua Bertrand Braley 
Archer, Florida 



B.A., University of Florida 
St. Augustine 



Mark Bradshaw-Miller 
Carmel, Indiana 



B.S., Hanover College 
Whitewater Valley 



Michael Anthony Brazelle 
Richmond, Virginia 



B.A., Bob Jones University 
Greater Atlanta 



129 



Donald Edward Brown 

Gross Pointe Farms, Michigan 



B.A., Wayne State University 
Detroit 



Ingrid Elizabeth Brunt 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.S.E.D., Univeristy of Georgia 
M.E., University of Virginia 
M.S. Lehigh University 
Greater Atlanta 



William Hunter Camp II 
Jefferson, North Carolina 



B.A., Flagler College 
Salem 



William Lee Campbell 
Lithia Springs, Georgia 



B.A., Lee University 
Pentecostal 



Jonathan Eric Carroll 
Chesapeake, Virginia 



B.A., King College 
Holston 



Brandi Richelle Casto 
Greer, South Carolina 



B.S., Presbyterian College 
Foothills 



Mina Ashley Chae 
Suwanee, Georgia 



B.A., Baylor University 
Greater Atlanta 



Kathy Kyung Ah Ko Chung 
Piano, Texas 



B.A., University of Texas 
Grace 



Cynthia Denise Clark 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.B.A., Georgia State University 
Baptist 



Lattie Floyd Collins 
Dahlonega, Georgia 



B.A., East Tennessee State University 
South Alabama 



Louise McLarty Cooper 
Cedartown, Georgia 



A.B., LaGrange College 
Cherokee 



Bea Edwards Copeland 
Ellijay, Georgia 



B.B.A., University of Georgia 
Greater Atlanta 



Mark Vince Cox 

Woodstock, Georgia 



B.S., Atlanta Christian College Presbyterian Church in America 
Greater Atlanta 



Kathleen Noel Crighton 
Roswell, Georgia 



A.B., Syracuse University 
M.B.A., Tulane University 
Greater Atlanta 



Christopher Lyle Crotwell 
Nesbit, Mississippi 



B.A., Rhodes College 
St. Andrew 



Thomas Richard Daniel 
Decatur, Georgia 



B.A., Davidson College 
Greater Atlanta 



130 



Emily Rebecca Davis 
Talledega, Alabama 



B.S., University of Alabama 
M.A., University of Alabama at Birmingham 
Sheppards and Lapsley 



Phillip Darey Dennis 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.A., Davidson College 
Greater Atlanta 



Christopher Franklin Denny 
Sumter, South Carolina 



B.A., Presbyterian College 
New Harmony 



Ellen Marie Dunn 

Simpsonville, South Carolina 



B.A., Presbyterian College 
Foothills 



Margaret Wallace Eanes 
Marietta, Georgia 



B.A., Hollins College 
Greater Atlanta 



Sherry Bohlen Edwards 
Decatur, Georgia 



B.S., Southern Illinois University 
Greater Atlanta 



Paris LaMont Eley 
Decatur, Georgia 



B.A., University of North Carolina at Charlotte 
Baptist 



Amy Christine Erickson 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.A., Bates College 
Disciples of Christ 



Lisa Rene Eye 

Knoxville, Tennessee 



B.A., University of Richmond 
M.A. Presbyterian School of Christian Education 
East Tennessee 



Jane Elise Fahey 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.A., Rhodes College 
J.D., William and Mary School of Law 
Greater Atlanta 



Laurie Anne Fields 

Indianapolis, Indiana 



B.A., College ofWooster 
Whitewater Valley 



Betsy Taylor Flory 
Lithonia, Georgia 



B.V.A., Georgia State University 
United Church of Christ 



Adam Sanders Flynt 
Smyrna, Georgia 



B.S., B.A. University of Florida 
Greater Atlanta 



Gordon Arnold Foltz 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



B.A., West Virginia State College 
West Virginia 



Andrew Carey Foster Connors 
Bynum, North Carolina 



B.A., Duke University 
New Hope 



Katherine Anne Foster Connors 
Bynum, North Carolina 



B.A., Wesleyan University 
New Hope 



Jennifer Elaine Fouse 

Great Falls, South Carolina 



B.S., Presbyterian College 
Providence 



131 



Barbara Thompson Francis 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



A. A., University of North Carolina at Wilmington 
Coastal Carolina 



Diane Freelander 
Acworth, Georgia 



B.S., University of Redlands 
Cherokee 



Andrew Joseph Gans 
Conyers, Georgia 



B.A., Southern Methodist University 
Greater Atlanta 



Larry J. Green 

Charleston, South Carolina 



B.A., College of Charleston 
M.Ed., The Citadel 
South Alabama 



Dorie Lee Griggs 

Dunwoody, Georgia 



B.A., University of Richmond 
Greater Atlanta 



John Robert Gross 
Buford, Georgia 



B.A., Abilene Christian University 
M.A., Southern Christian University 
Churches of Christ 



Laura Christine Gurley 
Decatur, Georgia 



B.A., University of North at Greensboro 
M.A., Union Theological Seminary and Presbyterian 
School of Christian Education 



Joseph Kirkland Hall IV B.A., Davidson 

Charlotte, North Carolina Charlotte 



Wade Connelly Halva 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



B.A., College ofWooster 
New Hope 



Susan Lazar Haynes 
Roswell, Georgia 



B.B.A., Georgia State University 
Cherokee 



Mary Alice Haynie 

Madison, New Jersey 



B.S. Salem College 
Newton 



Emily H. Heath 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.A., Emory University 
Greater Atlanta 



Susanna Clare Hendy 
Radlett, England 



B.A., Nene College, University of Leicester 
Coastal Carolina 



Vernon Blaine Hill 
Lynchburg, Virginia 



B.A., Hampden-Sydney College 
The Peaks 



Richard Barclay Holmes 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.A., University of South Carolina 
Greater Atlanta 



Joseph Hsieh 

Houston, Texas 



B.A. University of Texas 
New Covenant 



132 



David Bradley Hyers 

Elizabethtown, Tennessee 



B.A., Presbyterian College 
Holston 



Stephen Thomas Jackson 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Barry Dean Jenkins 

Douglasville, Georgia 

Carol Elaine Johnson 
Menands, New York 



B.S., University of Georgia 
Greater Atlanta 

B.S., Kennesaw State College 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., Empire State College (SUNY) 
Albany 



Carol Osner Johnson 
Atlanta, Georgia 



A.B.J. , University of Georgia 
Greater Atlanta 



Walter Lee Johnson, Jr. 
Decatur, Georgia 

Barbara Jordan 

Neptune Beach, Florida 



B.A., Emory University 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., Eckerd College 
St. Augustine 



Jonathan Kaplan 

Easley, South Carolina 



A.B., University of North Carolina 
Foothills 



Sharon Joy Kartsounes 
Flushing, Michigan 

Bettina Baechtold Kilburn 
Roswell, Georgia 



B.A., Spring Arbor College 
Lake Huron 

B.S., Fairfield University 
M.D., Boston University School of Medicine 
Greater Atlanta 



Frances Brown King 

Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 



B.A., University of South Carolina, Coastal Carolina 
New Harmony 



David Cromwell Knauert 
Clark, Colorado 



B.A., Harvard College 
Bible Church 



Lisa Kublius Kraus 

Moscow, Pennsylvania 



B.A. Maryzuood University 
Greater Atlanta 



David Y. Kwon 

Alpharetta, Georgia 

Robert Steven Laukoter 
Dallas, Texas 



B.A., University of Washington 
Olympia 

B.S.,M.B.A., University of Texas 
New Covenant 



Connie Sadler Lee 
Gainesville, Florida 



B.A., Bethune Cookman College 
Pentecostal 



Sun Bong Lee 

Alpharetta, Georgia 



B.A., Kon-Kuk University, Korea 
Greater Atlanta 



133 



Sung Ho Lee 

Tampa, Florida 



B.A., University of South Florida 
Tampa Bay 



Amy Yarman Lehr 

Greenville, South Carolina 



B.A., Washington and Lee University 
Foothills 



Margie Elizabeth Lewis 
Marietta, Georgia 



B.S., Tift College 
M.Ed., Valdosta State College 
Cherokee 



Janet Lorraine Looby 
Acworth, Georgia 



B.S., Jones College 
Cherokee 



Ruth Lynn Lovell 

Memphis, Tennessee 



B.A., University of Tennessee 
Memphis 



Jonathan Edward Mack 

Fort Walton Beach, Florida 



B.S., University of Texas 
Florida 



Catherine Clark Manson 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.A., Newcomb College ofTulane University 
Greater Atlanta 



Daniel Wayne Matthews 
Loganville, Georgia 



B.S., Georgia State University 
Greater Atlanta 



Peggy Allison McClure 
Birmingham, Alabama 



B.A., M.A., University of Alabama 
J.D., Cumberland School of Law 
Sheppards and Lapsley 



Frank Green McDonald 
Acworth, Georgia 



B.S., Colorado State University 
M.A., Pepperdine University 
M.A., Baylor University 
Disciples of Christ 



Nam Gi Min 

North Miami Beach, Florida 



B.A., Yeungnam University, Korea 
M.P.A.,Texas A&M University 
Tropical Florida 



Sandra Elaine Monroe 
Forsyth, Georgia 



B.S., Central Michigan University 
M.A., Western Michigan University 
Ed.S., University of Georgia 
Flint River 



Cynthia McPheters Montgomery 
Tucker, Georgia 



B.A., Rhodes College 

J.D., University of Florida College of Law 
Central Florida 



Gregory Owen Moore 
Lilburn, Georgia 



B.B.A., Valdosta State University 
Greater Atlanta 



Sidney Keith Morrison 

Matthews, North Carolina 



B.S., Austin Peay State University 
M.A., Tennessee Technological University 
Charlotte 



134 



Kathy Eileen Muder 

New Wilmington, Pennsylvania 

Craig Randolph Neely 
Vandalia, Ohio, 



B.A. Westminster College 
Shenango 

B.A., Miami University 
M.S. Wright State University 
Miami 



Laurel Danielle Nelson 
Longmont, Colorado 



B.A., Beloit College 
Plains and Peaks 



George Hayes Noble 

Columbia, South Carolina 



B.A, University of South Carolina 
Trinity 



Rodney Edwin Norris 

Columbia, South Carolina 



B.S. Francis Marion University 
Trinity 



Richard Lee Olson 

Starkville, Mississippi 



B.S., University of Washington 
M.S., Eastern Washington University 
Ph.D., Texas A&M University 
St. Andrew 



David Bradley Parker 
Overland Park, Kansas 



B.S., Sterling College 
Greater Atlanta 



Sarah Elizabeth Parker 
Manhattan, Kansas 



B.A., Sterling College 
Northern Kansas 



Jeanette Pinkston 

Stone Mountain, Georgia 



Luke Anthony Ponder 
Silverhill, Alabama 



B.A., Stillman College 
M.A., University of Cincinnati 
African Methodist Episcopal 

B.S., University of South Alabama 
South Alabama 



Fred James Powell 

Durham, North Carolina 



B.A., Winthrop College 
New Hope 



Richard Gillespie Proctor 
Tallahassee, Florida 



B.A., Florida State University 
Episcopalian 



Ian Case Punnett 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.A., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
Greater Atlanta 



Joan Martin Quinn 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Clayton Thomas Rascoe 
Apex, North Carolina 



B.S., Juniata College 
Trinity 

B.S., Appalachian State University 
New Hope 



Carol Lee Read 

Charlottesville, Virginia 



B.S., College of William and Mary 
M.A., Presbyterian School of Christian Education 
Shenandoah 



135 



Dennison Parker Read 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.A., The Citadel 
Greater Atlanta 



Timothy Aaron Reynolds 
Hermitage, Tennessee 



B.A., University of Tennessee 
Middle Tennessee 



Caroline Torrey Rhoads 
Boston, Massachusetts 



B.A., North Carolina State University 
New Hope 



David Allen Rice 
Decatur, Georgia 



B.A., North Park College 
M.M., Northwestern University 
Greater Atlanta 



Karen Teresa Ricks 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.A., DePauw University 
M.S., Indiana State University 
Greater Atlanta 



Arthur Nelson Robin 
Marietta, Georgia 



B.S., Georgia State University 
Greater Atlanta 



Jason Scott Robbins 

Charlotte, North Carolina 



B.A., North Carolina State University 
Greater Atlanta 



Annette Carlton Rogers 
Easley, South Carolina 



B.A., Davidson College 
M.S.W., University of South Carolina 
Foothills 



Ashley Elizabeth Seaman 
Decatur, Georgia 



B.A., Agnes Scott College 
Greater Atlanta 



Benjamin Douglas Seller 
Tempe, Arizona 



B.A., Arizona State University 
Grand Canyon 



Rebekah Sue Shaffer 

San Luis Obispo, California 



B.A., Eckerd College 
Santa Barbara 



Daniel Paul Smead 
Morrow, Georgia 



B.A., Oregon/Atlanta Bible College 
Church of God 



Carolyn Thompson Smith 
Mount Berry, Georgia 



B.S., Berry College 
M.S., University of Alabama 
Cherokee 



Thomas Oscar Smith 
Lithonia, Georgia 



B.A., Berry College 
Greater Atlanta 



Claire Dempsey Snedeker 
Roswell, Georgia 



B.S., Stetson University 
M.A., Georgia State University 
Greater Atlanta 



Ki Ho Song 

Smyrna, Georgia 



B.A., Seoul Theological Seminary, Korea 
Korean Presbyterian Church in America 



136 



Bryan Craig Stamper 
Ocoee, Florida 



B.B.A., University of Florida 
Central Florida 



Jennifer Ann Stone 

Starkville, Mississippi 



B.S., Oberlin College 
M.S., Mississippi State University 
Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 
St. Andrew 



Todd William Sutton 
Washington, D.C. 



B.A. University of Michigan 
National Capital 



Susan Patricia Takis 
Alpharetta, Georgia 



B.A., Furman University 
M.F.A., Southern Methodist University 
Greater Atlanta 



David Leath Taylor 
Salem, Virgina 



B.A., King College 
The Peaks 



James Heizer Thomas III 
Ft. Thomas, Kentucky 



B.A., Emory University 
Disciples of Christ 



Janie Lowe Thomas 
Macon, Georgia 



B.S.N. , Hunter College 
Missionary Baptist 



Ollie Pvix Threadgill 
Fairhope, Alabama 



B.A., Davidson College 
South Alabama 



Janelle Leigh Tibbetts 
Burbank, California 



B.S., California State University, Northridge 
San Fernando 



Christine Louise Tiller 
Norcross, Georgia 



B.S., California Institute of Technology 
M.S.E., Johns Hopkins University 
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 
Greater Atlanta 



Vickie Hatem Traynum 
Shelby, North Carolina 



B.A., Gardner-Webb 
Southern Baptist 



Pamela Diane Stark Troy 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.A. Sterling College 
M.A. Fort Hays State University 
Episcopalian 



Jerry Lee Utt II 

Versailles, Kentucky 



B.A., University of Kentucky 
Transylvania 



Nicholas Harvey Vanderslice 
Marietta, Georgia 



B.A., University of Georgia 
Cherokee 



Susan Webb Verbrugge 
Duluth, Georgia 



B.A., Wake Forest University 
Greater Atlanta 



137 



Carol Scott Wade 

Avondale Estates, Georgia 

Elizabeth Guillan Walker 

Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania 



B.A., Agnes Scott College 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., Denison University 

M.A.(T.S.), Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary 
Philadelphia 



Jan Emma Warren-Taylor 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.S., LeTourneau University 
Greater Atlanta 



Andrew Baker Waters 
Athens, Georgia 



B.A., Wofford College 
Northeast Georgia 



Connie Stoutt Weaver 

Morganton, North Carolina 



B.S., University of Tennessee 
Western North Carolina 



Paul Dudley Weaver 

Charleston, South Carolina 



B.A., Maryville College 
Charleston-Atlantic 



Kirsten Lisa Weeks 

Lookout Mountain, Georgia 



B.A., University of North Carolina 
East Tennessee 



James Walter Wells, Jr. 
Alpharetta, Georgia 



B.E., Vanderbilt University 
M.B.A., University of Alabama 
Greater Atlanta 



Jannan Renee Wertzberger 
Houston, Texas 



B.A., University of Texas 
Mission 



William Wain Wesberry 

Batesbury-Leesville, South Carolina 



B.A., Presbyterian College 
Trinity 



James Gregory White 
Douglasville, Georgia 



B.S., Eee University 

Water of Life Christian Church 



Michael Eugene Williams 
Asheville, North Carolina 



B.S., Illinois State University 
M.A., Presbyterian School of Christian Education 
Western North Carolina 



Robert Elmore Williamson, Jr. 
Clemson, South Carolina 



B.S., Clemson University 
Foothills 



Chandler Michael Willis 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 



B.S., Louisiana State University 
South Louisiana 



Sandra Shea Wilmesherr 

Monongahela, Pennsylvania 



B.S., Averett College 
M.A., Columbia Theological Seminary 
Florida 



Rachel Elizabeth Winter 
Birmingham, Alabama 



B.A., Maryville College 
Sheppards and Lapsley 



138 



Patrick James Woolsey 
Old Hickory, Tennessee 

Ashley Freeman Wright 
Memphis, Tennessee 

John Mark Wright 

Memphis, Tennessee 

Brian Christopher Wyatt 
Columbia, South Carolina 

Yuching Eunice Yang 

Stone Mountain, Georgia 



B.A., Trevecca Nazarene College 
Nazarene 

B.A., Eckerd College 
Memphis 

A.B., Davidson College 
Memphis 

B.A., Furman University 
Trinity 

B.S., University of South Carolina 
M.P.A., Georgia State University 
Greater Atlanta 



Lucy Karen Youngblood 
Anderson, South Carolina 



B.A., University North Carolina at Greensboro 
Foothills 



Master of Arts in Theological Studies 

B.A., Georgetown University 



Dedera Nesmith Baker 
East Point, Georgia 

Anglea Marie Boyd 
Norcross, Georgia 

Susan Darr Buell 
Atlanta, Georgia 

David Charles Dault 
Decatur, Georgia 

Linda Karen Davis 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Leviticus Alonza Laing 
Ellenwood, Georgia 

Nathan Cinclair Lane 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

Audrey Edmundson Lenhart 
Woodbridge, Virginia 

Elizabeth Ann Moss 
Decatur, Georgia 

Joshua Franklin Rice 

Lawrenceville, Georgia 

Elizabeth Sager Sharp 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.B.A., Columbia State University 



B.A., Southern Methodist University 
M.A., Columbia University 

B.A., University of the South 



B.A., Greensboro College 

M.L.I. S., University of South Carolina 

B.S., Atlanta Christian College 



B.A., Lee University 



B.A., Davidson College 



B.S., University of St. Francis 



B.A., Lee University 



B.S.N., University of Michigan 

M.S.N., Yale University 

D.R.P.H., Johns Hopkins University 



139 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS 



United States 

Alabama-29 

Arizona-1 

California-7 

Colorado-4 

Conneticut-2 

Delaware-2 

District of Cloumbia-2 

Florida-26 

Georgia-165 

Hawaii- 1 

Idaho-2 

Illinois-2 

Indiana-9 

Iowa-2 

Kansas-3 

Kentucky-3 

Louisiana-4 

Maryland-6 

Massechusetts-2 



Michigan-4 

Mississippi-11 

Missouri-2 

Nebraska-1 

New Jersey-6 

New York-12 

North Carolina-52 

Ohio-8 

Oklahoma-1 

Oregon-1 

Pennsylvania- 13 

South Carolina-31 

Tennessee-30 

Texas-15 

Virginia-20 

Washington-4 

West Virginia-1 

Wisconson-2 



Other Countries 

Barbados-l 

Canada-2 

Cuba-1 

England- 1 

Guyana-1 

Hungary-1 

Jamaica-13 



Japan-1 

Kenya-1 

Korea-2 

Mexico-1 

The Netherlands-1 

Scotland-3 

South Africa- 1 



INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM SCHOLARS 



Joonbum Chun 
Karen Francis 
Festus Gitonga 
Zita Hegyi 
Gyeong Kim 
Seong Chan Kim 
Sukjoo Kim 
Woo Cheol Kim 
Insook Lee 
Retief Muller 
Samuel Mwaniki 
Francesca Nuzzolese 
Tom Sakon 
Klara Valentova 
Szerena Vass 



Korea 

Jamaica 

Kenya 

Hungary 

Korea 

Korea 

Korea 

Korea 

Korea 

South Africa 

Kenya 

Italy 

Japan 

Czech Republic 

Hungary 



140 



Calendar 2000-2002 





2000-2001 


2001-2002 TENTA 


Summer 






Greek School 


July 5 - August 25 


July 2 - August 24 


Summer Terms 


July 10-21 


July 9-20 




July 24-August 4 


July 23-August 3 


Fall 






Planning Retreat 


August 29-30 


August 28-29 


Labor Day 


September 4 


September 3 


Orientation / Registration 


September 5-6 


September 4-5 


Classes begin 


September 7 


September 6 


Opening Convocation /Honors Day 


September 13 


September 12 


Senior Ordination Exams 


September 15-16 


September 22-23 


Smyth Lectures 


October 10-12 


October 9-11 


Reading /Exam Week 


October 23-27 


October 22-26 


Conference on Ministry 


November 3-5 


November 2-4 


Thanksgiving Holiday 


November 23-24 


November 22-23 


Classes end 


December 8 


December 7 


Reading /Exam Week 


December 11-15 


December 10-14 


Winter 






Alternative Context/ 






M.Div. Electives Begin 


January 8 


January 7 


Doctor of Ministry classes begin 


January 8 


January 7 


Martin Luther King, Jr., Holiday 


January 15* 


January 14 


Doctor of Ministry Classes End 


January 19 


January 18 


M.Div. Electives end 


January 26 


January 25 


Alternative Context Ends/ 


January 26 


January 25 


M.Div. Exam Day 






Spring 






Bible Content Exam 


February 2 


February 1 


Classes begin 


February 5 


February 4 


Senior Ordination Exams 


February 16-17 


February 15-16 


Conference on Ministry 


February 23-25 


February 22-24 


Reading /Exam Week 


March 19-23 


March 18-22 


Spring Break 


April 2-6 


April 1-5 


Good Friday 


April 13 


March 29 


Columbia Colloquium 


April 23-25 


April 22-24 


Classes end 


May 11 


May 10 


Reading /Exam Week 


May 14-18 


May 13-17 


Baccalaureate 


May 18 


May 17 


Commencement 


May 19 


May 18 



*A11 classes meet on Saturday, January 13. 



141 



Index 



Admissions: 

Doctor of Ministry 27 

Doctor of Theology 28 

Master of Arts in Theological 

Studies 26 

Master of Divinity 25 

Master of Theology 27 

International Students 29 

Advanced Placement 79 

Advising: 

Master of Divinity 8 

Doctor of Ministry 14 

Alumni/ Alumnae Association 101 

Auditors 30 

Awards 47 

Biblical Area 51 

Board of Trustees 103 

Center for New Church 

Development 40 

Certification in Christian 

Education 12 

Certified Minister of Christian 

Education 9 

Christian Spirituality Emphasis 

and Certificate 41 

Clinical Pastoral Education 23 

Colloquium 42 

Continuing Education 39 

Convocations 44 

Curriculum, Visual Representation ... 10 

Doctor of Ministry 13 

Christian Spirituality Approach .... 16 

Cross-Cultural Approach 16 

Gospel and Culture Approach 15 

New Church Development 

Approach 17 

Pastoral Counseling Approach 17 



Doctor of Theology in Pastoral 

Counseling 17 

Elective System: 

Master of Divinity 6 

Doctor of Ministry 15 

Fellowships 48 

Financial Aid and Assistance 32, 37 

Grading 80, 81 

Greek School, Summer 79 

Historical Doctrinal Area 51 

Housing 30 

Independent Study 82 

Insurance 31 

Lay Institute of Faith and Life 39 

Master of Arts in Theological 

Studies 11 

Master of Divinity 5 

Master of Theology 12 

Mid-Course Assessment 9 

Moral Conduct 82 

Non-Degree Enrollment 30 

Ordination Exams 79 

Orientation 44 

Placement 46 

Practical Theology Area 51 

Probation 81 

Refund Policies 36 

Room and Board 37 

Scholarships 33 

Smyth Lecture 43 

Student Organizations and 

Activities 45 

Supply Preaching 46 

Supervised Ministry 51 

Tuition and Fees 35 



144 



TEAR OFF AND SEND FOR FURTHER INFORMATION 



I would like to learn more about Columbia. 

Please send me information on the following degree programs: 

□ Master of Divinity □ Master of Theology 

□ M.A. Theological Studies □ Doctor of Ministry 

□ Doctor of Theology 



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(please print) 

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Degree 



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Street 



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Denomination 



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City 

Permanent address 



State 



Zip 



Street 



Phone 



( ) 



City State 

Anticipated date of enrollment 

CATA01 



Zip 



Phone 




Notes: 

Commerce Dr. becomes S. Columbia Dr. after E. College Ave. 

There is no westbound exit at Columbia Dr. on 1-20. 

The distance on Memorial Dr. from 1-285 to Columbia Dr. is 2.3 miles. 



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Decatur, Georgia 30031-9954 



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Directory for Communicating 

Telephone 404/378-8821 
Fax 404/377-9696 
www.CTSnet.edu 

Please address inquiries to the following people at Columbia Theological Seminary, P.O. Box 520, 
Decatur, Georgia 30031-0520. 

Concerning general matters about the seminary 
Douglas W. Oldenburg, President 

Concerning transcripts, academic records, curriculum, and faculty 
T. Erskine Clarke, Acting Dean of Faculty 

Concerning business matters, campus events, and housing 
Martin Sadler, Vice President for Business and Finance 

Concerning basic degree admissions 
Ann Clay Adams, Director of Admissions 

Concerning financial aid 

Robin S. Dietrich, Director of Financial Aid 

Concerning supervised ministry and internships 
R. Leon Carroll, Director of Supervised Ministry 

Concerning placement 

Philip R. Gehman, Vice President for Student Life 

Concerning development/seminary relations, wills and bequests, church relations, planned giving, 
alumni /alumnae, annual fund gifts, scholarships, and student preaching 
Richard T. DuBose, Vice President for Development and Seminary Relations 

Concerning public relations, and publications 

Juliette J. Harper, Director of Publications and Publicity 

Concerning advanced degree programs 

Charles E. Raynal III, Director of Advanced Studies 

Concerning continuing education 

Rebecca S. Parker, Director of Continuing Education 

Concerning lay education 

Richard Dietrich, Director of Lay Institute of Faith and Life 



Notice of Nondiscriminatory Policy as to Students 

Columbia Theological Seminary admits students of any race, color, national, and ethnic ori- 
gin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to 
students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of gender, handicap, race, national, 
and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admission policies, scholarship and 
loan programs, and other school-administered programs.