(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Columbia Theological Seminary Course Catalog 1990-1991"

COLUMBI 
THEOLOGICAL 

E M I NARY 

Decatur, Georgia 
1990-1991 Catalog 



COLUMBIA 
THEOLOGICAL 
SEMI NARY 

701 Columbia Drive 

Box 520 

Decatur, Georgia 30031 



Nonprofit Organization 

U.S. postage paid 

at Decatur, Georgia 30031-0520 



Columbia Theological Seminary is a seminary of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) 
controlled through a Board of Directors. It is an accredited member of the Association 
of Theological Schools and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Welcome 1 

Columbia Seminary - Purpose, Role, History, and Location 2 

Admissions Information 6 

Academic Information 9 

Basic Degrees 9 

Advanced Degrees 17 

Continuing Education 23 

Lay Institute of Faith and Life 23 

Asian Ministries Center 24 

Related Academic Programs 24 

Special Emphases 26 

Support Facilities 29 

Curriculum and Courses 31 

Academic Notes 77 

Awards and Scholarships 82 

Student Information 86 

Student Organizations and Activities 91 

Support of Columbia 93 

Board of Directors 94 

Administration 96 

Faculty 99 

Students 108 

Calendar 145 

Index 147 



/ 





WELCOME TO COLUMBIA 
THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

A Seminary of Uncommon Quality 

That's Columbia. 

- a quality faculty with superb scholarly competence, a passion for 
teaching, a strong commitment to the church, and a pastoral concern for 
students. 

- a quality student body with an eagerness to learn and a desire to 
become faithful and effective leaders in the church. 

- a quality curriculum combining basic traditional disciplines with 
exciting and creative innovations - all designed to prepare men and women 
for ministry. 

- a quality program of continuing education designed to help min- 
isters and laity keep growing in their understanding of the faith and in- 
crease their competence in ministry. 

- a quality administrative team dedicated to high standards of ex- 
cellence in providing support for the teaching ministry of the seminary. 

I'm sure you'll find that reflected in the pages of this catalog, but 
even more, you'll find it when you visit our campus and talk with members 
of the Columbia community. A warm welcome and a stimulating challenge 
await you. 

Douglas W. Oldenburg 
President 



COLUMBIA SEMINARY 

PURPOSE 

The purpose of Columbia Seminary is to 

educate qualified men and women for the ordained ministry and for 

other forms of ministry, 
assist in continuing personal and professional growth and development, 
serve as a theological resource for clergy and laity. 

The seminary seeks to prepare the people of God to bear witness to 
the creative power, redemptive promises, reconciling love, and transform- 
ing justice of God. This purpose will be fulfilled as the faculty and admin- 
istration of the seminary are faithful and obedient to Jesus Christ, the living 
Lord, as he is known from the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments 
and witnessed to in the confessions of the Reformed tradition. 

In regard to race, ethnic and national origin, age, gender, and physical 
impairment, Columbia Seminary seeks to be intentionally inclusive in its 
student body, faculty, staff, language, books and other educational ma- 
terials, as well as in the community and worship life of the seminary. We 
understand this to be a proper response to the justice commanded by Jesus 
Christ. 

ROLE 

The task of the seminary is to enable ministers and lay leaders thankfully 
and obediently to recognize — and help the church to recognize — the pres- 
ence of the living God who continues to work in and through changing 
circumstances and to proclaim God's kingdom of love and justice. The 
seminary will fulfill this task in the following ways: 

1. In ministering to the church in our nation by helping ministers to 
understand compassionately the feelings of loss and threat with 
which many church members face the changing world and by equip- 
ping ministers to enable church members to see how the work of 
God's love and justice in other parts of the world benefits them, 
too, and how they may face both the dangers and the possibilities 
of a changing world with openness and hope. 

2. In training for discipleship in a changing world ministers equipped 
to help the church become a community of faithful and obedient 
disciples, who, grounded in an understanding of the Scriptures, 
have the courage and hope — and realistic and effective programs 
and strategies — to join the world-transforming work of God. 

3. In preparing ministers and lay leaders to be models of faithful, 
obedient Christian life in the context of all the problems and pos- 
sibilities of our changing world. 

4. In providing increased resources for dialogue with secular disci- 
plines, since ministers increasingly need to be conversant with sec- 



ular disciplines to deal with the theological and ethical questions 
they raise; 

dialogue with other Christian traditions since ministers need to 
understand and learn from other Christian traditions as well as from 
the unique contribution their own tradition offers to the ecumenical 
church; 

dialogue with other religions since ministers need to understand 
what their non-Christian neighbors believe and be able, without 
compromising their Christian faith, to enter into open conversation 
with them. 

5. In implementing a structured program of continuing education that 
provides a solid base for equipping ministers and lay people to 
bring the abiding truth of Christian tradition to bear on new times, 
places, and situations. 

6. In identifying, in partnership with the governing bodies and other 
church agencies, areas where there is need for specialized education 
to equip ministers and lay people for particular forms of ministry. 
Some of these may be the traditional forms of youth work, music, 
evangelism, stewardship, or overseas mission; other needs may 
arise from particular issues, such as economic justice, peacemaking, 
or medical ethics. 

7. In cooperating with the church's governing bodies by supple- 
menting the work of the congregations training lay leaders for their 
responsibilities in their particular congregations and assisting in- 
dividuals who wish to grow in faith. 

8. In developing research and resource facilities that use the latest 
forms of media. 

9. In using joint ecumenical resources, such as the Atlanta Theological 
Association, the University Center of Georgia, and overseas 
churches and institutions, to provide students with ecumenical dia- 
logue and experiences. 

HISTORY 

The first permanent location of the seminary was in Columbia, South 
Carolina, in 1828, a principal cultural, intellectual, and population center 
of the Southeast. 

The first idea of a theological school for the South was planted by the 
Presbytery of Hopewell (Georgia) as early as 1817, but it was not until 1824 
that a constitution for "The Classical, Scientific, and Theological Institution 
of the South" was adopted by the Presbytery of South Carolina, and the 
members of the presbytery were authorized to act as the Board of Trustees 
for that institution. 

In 1827 the Board recommended to the Synod that the constitution be 
altered to make the institution solely a theological seminary. (There had 



been great opposition to the proposed literary department being in com- 
petition with the College of South Carolina.) The official name of the sem- 
inary became The Theological Seminary of the Synod of South Carolina 
and Georgia; it soon became known as Columbia Theological Seminary — 
a name which was accepted as permanent in 1925. The revised constitution 
was adopted by the synod in 1828, and it was resolved to get the seminary 
into operation immediately. 

The Reverend Thomas Goulding, pastor of the Presbyterian Church in 
Lexington, Georgia, was elected the first Professor of Theology in December 
of 1828, and he gathered five students for instruction in the manse. Fol- 
lowing completion of arrangements in Columbia, South Carolina, they 
moved to a campus there in January of 1830. 

That same year, the Reverend George Howe, a New Englander, was 
elected by the synod as instructor in languages. The following year he 
became Professor of Biblical Literature, and, shortly, librarian, overseeing 
the growth of the seminary's library from the original 300 books collected 
by the presbyteries in 1829 to more than 3,000 by 1836. Dr. Howe also 
organized the first curriculum for the seminary, apparently modeling it 
after those of Princeton Seminary and Andover Theological Seminary. He 
served nearly 50 years until his death in 1883. 

In 1857 the Synod of Alabama adopted the seminary as "our own, 
placing its name among those of the institutions which we call 'ours/ and 
which we are to cherish and care for, support, help, and encourage as our 
own." Florida (as part of the Synod of South Georgia and Florida) joined 
in 1884, with Mississippi completing the five-synod structure in 1925. 

Among the buildings on the Columbia campus was the little chapel — 
formerly a carriage house — where Woodrow Wilson was to be "reborn 
for eternity," and where the Book of Church Order (Presbyterian Church 
U.S.) was written. 

By the 1920s, the population of the Southeast — and of Presbyterians 
in the area — was shifting, and the centers of influence were moving with 
it. Atlanta had been a transportation center since the 1880s, and was de- 
veloping as a commercial, industrial, and also an educational and cultural 
center. Certain Atlanta Presbyterians and leaders of the seminary were 
convinced of the city's leadership of the New South and its advantages for 
the seminary — and of the seminary for the city. In 1924, the Board of 
Directors agreed (after two previous refusals in 1887 and 1904), and the 
decision was made to move to Atlanta, if a campaign for the new facilities 
and endowment could be successfully completed in the Synod of Georgia. 
Launched in 1925, the campaign had a goal of $500,000 which was promptly 
subscribed. In that success the cooperation of the city's 14,193 Presbyterians 
in the 74 churches played the determining part. 

The move of the seminary from Columbia, South Carolina, to Decatur, 
Georgia, was guided by Richard T. Gillespie, who served as president from 
1925 to 1930. He provided the leadership which led to the development of 
the new facilities. 



In 1927 the seminary transferred its Columbia traditions and ministry, 
its students and faculty, and its books and equipment to a 57-acre Decatur, 
Georgia, site on the outskirts of Atlanta, joining Candler School of Theology 
and another 11 of the current 23 institutions of higher education in the 
greater Atlanta area. 

The early years in Decatur were difficult ones for Columbia. For a time, 
especially with the coming of the Great Depression, the future of the in- 
stitution seemed uncertain. In 1932, however, Dr. J. McDowell Richards 
was elected president. Under his able leadership, the seminary experienced 
its greatest growth. The endowment was increased by over five million 
dollars. The present library, Richards Center, Florida Hall, three student 
apartment buildings, and 13 faculty homes were built. The faculty was 
increased from six to 21 full-time members, and the student body quad- 
rupled. Following President Richards 7 retirement, Dr. C. Benton Kline 
served as president from 1971 until the end of 1975, when he resigned to 
return to active teaching. Dr. J. Davison Philips, pastor of the Decatur 
Presbyterian Church, assumed the presidency on January 1, 1976, and 
retired exactly 11 years later. 

Until June 1983 Columbia Seminary was an instrument of the Presby- 
terian Church U.S. but with special relationship to the Synods of Florida, 
Mid-South and Southeast. The Plan of Government, under which the semi- 
nary operates, defines the rights and responsibilities of both the seminary 
and the synods. In June 1983 Columbia became a seminary in the reunited 
Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Its synod ties are with the newly established 
synods of South Atlantic and Living Waters. 

On January 1, 1987, Douglas Oldenburg, pastor of the Covenant Pres- 
byterian Church in Charlotte, NC, became the seventh president. 

LOCATION 

Columbia Seminary is situated on a gently-rolling, wooded site in sur- 
burban Atlanta. On its spacious 57-acre campus are Campbell Hall, the 
school's academic and administrative center, as well as the library, student 
center, dormitories, apartments, faculty homes, and recreational facilities. 
A continuing education center was completed early in 1989. 

Nearby is the eastern terminus of the metropolitan area's rapid transit 
system, MARTA, which serves as a gateway to the sights and sounds of 
the capital city of the Southeast. Atlanta offers Columbia's students a va- 
riety of cultural, artistic, intellectual and athletic opportunities. 

The seminary's setting also provides a wide range of opportunities for 
participation in the ongoing life of the church. Greater Atlanta Presbytery 
is composed of 116 congregations with more than 45,000 members. 

Finally, the metropolitan area functions as an invaluable learning lab- 
oratory for the seminary community. It offers students a broad range of 
options for contextual learning as well as supervised ministry and clinical 
pastoral education placements. 



ADMISSIONS 
INFORMATION 

ADMISSIONS PROCEDURE FOR REGULAR DEGREE STUDENTS 

Students desiring admission to basic degree programs or special pro- 
grams should request an application from the Office of Admissions. In 
addition to the completed application form, a student must furnish tran- 
scripts, references, and a letter of endorsement from one's home church. 
Test scores from the Graduate Record Examinations General Test may also 
be requested. An interview with a member of the Admissions Committee 
is required. This interview is best done on campus. 

Due to the sequential nature of required courses, no applicants will be 
admitted to basic degree programs other than in July or September except 
by action of the faculty. 

Students admitted to the seminary will be provided a health form to 
be filled out by a physician and an application for seminary housing. 

Certain students are required to have a reading knowledge of Greek. 
(See page 77 for details.) Such students who request permission to begin 
without the Greek requirement can only be admitted by special action of 
the faculty, and this may involve additional semesters in residence. An 
entering student who has not completed the Greek language requirement 
may be denied admission or placed on probation. 

Students desiring admission to an advanced degree program may secure 
applications from the Director of Advanced Studies. Ordinarily, a basic 
divinity degree is required for entrance into the Master of Theology, the 
Doctor of Ministry, or the Doctor of Sacred Theology programs. 

Specific admissions requirements for each degree are found below in 
the Academic Information Section. 

SPECIAL, UNCLASSIFIED, AND OCCASIONAL STUDENTS 

Students meeting requirements for admission to the basic degree pro- 
gram but not wishing to work toward a degree may be admitted as special 
students to take courses for credit. Their program of study must be ap- 
proved by the Dean of Faculty. 

Students who do not meet admissions requirements may be admitted 
for a period of up to one academic year as an unclassified student. 

Occasional students may be admitted by the Dean of Faculty to take 
courses of particular interest, if prerequisites for each course are satisfied. 
Course selection must be approved by the Dean of Faculty. 



AUDITORS 

Regular students, spouses of students, and other members of the com- 
munity are invited to audit courses, with the permission of the instructor 
and provided space is available in the course. Registration as an auditor 
must be made through the Office of the Registrar during registration. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Students in good standing in other accredited seminaries may be ad- 
mitted after transcripts have been evaluated and their applications ap- 
proved by the Admissions Committee. These students must secure a letter 
from their dean indicating that they are students in good standing. Transfer 
students into the M.Div. program are expected to spend a minimum of 
three 14-week regular load semesters in residence. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

All international students are expected to have the written recommen- 
dation of their denomination. A statement of the student's plans for future 
work in the student's home country is required, as is a statement of avail- 
able finances for their study. Normally, international students are accepted 
only for graduate work beyond the M.Div. level. Students whose native 
language is not English must include, with the regular application data, 
the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores. (See below.) 
Application should be made to the Director of International Theological 
Education. 



ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE 

All U.S. students (citizens or with permanent resident visas) for whom 
English is a second language must take the TOEFL exam before admission 
and enrollment for credit. Those seeking admission must score at least 550 
and those wishing to take courses as an occasional student for credit must 
score at least 500. Students who score close to these levels may take courses 
for credit for one semester but must retake and pass the required level 
before further work will be allowed. Students may audit courses as occa- 
sional students without taking the TOEFL. 

International students for whom English is a second language and who 
are applying for admission to a degree program must have a score of 500 
on the TOEFL before admission and enrollment for credit. Those inter- 
nationals coming on special scholarships for a non-degree course of study 
at Columbia will be evaluated by the International Theological Education 
Committee for English proficiency to match the nature of their study at 
Columbia. 

Students needing additional proficiency in English will be encouraged 
to take courses in English as a second language in the Atlanta area. 



CONFERENCES FOR PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 

Columbia Seminary sponsors two conferences on ministry each spring 
and fall. During these conferences, men and women from any denomi- 
nation who are exploring their call to ministry are invited to attend classes, 
meet in faculty homes, talk with students, staff and faculty, and worship 
with the seminary community. All persons who are considering the pos- 
sibility of a church vocation, whether college students or those currently 
engaged in other careers, are invited to participate in the conference of 
their choice. The dates for this year's conferences are November 9-11, 1990, 
and February 22-24, 1991. For futher information, write to the Director of 
Admissions, Columbia Seminary, Box 520, Decatur, GA 30031-0520. 





8 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

Columbia offers courses of study leading to both basic and advanced 
degrees. The Master of Arts in Youth Ministry and the Master of Divinity 
are the basic professional degrees. The Master of Arts in Theological Studies 
is also a basic theological degree, but academic rather than professional in 
orientation. The advanced degrees are the Master of Theology, the Doctor 
of Ministry and the Doctor of Sacred Theology. Men and women from all 
denominations are eligible to apply for any of these degrees. 



BASIC DEGREES 



Admission 



Admission to the basic degree programs at Columbia Seminary usually 
requires a four-year degree from an accredited university or college of arts 
and sciences, or its equivalent. Students without four years of pre-seminary 
preparation are not eligible to earn degrees at the seminary except by special 
action of the faculty. When requested to do so by presbyteries of the 
Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), Columbia may accept students without a 
university or college degree for a special course of study. 

A major in one of the liberal arts fields is most helpful as preparation 
for theological studies. Basic courses in philosophy, European and Amer- 
ican history, psychology, sociology, and English grammar and literature 
form the foundation for seminary studies. Students with inadequate back- 
grounds in these areas may be required to take remedial work or select 
particular electives within the seminary curriculum. 

Students entering Columbia Theological Seminary are required by the 
seminary's Plan of Government to take the pledge given below. The use 
of such a pledge was begun at Princeton Seminary around 1817 and con- 
tinues, in some form, in most American Presbyterian seminaries. 

In reliance on God's grace, I promise that as long as I am a student at Columbia 
Theological Seminary, I will be a diligent student and a responsible member 
of the seminary community as I seek to grow in academic excellence, spiritual 
maturity and Christian discipleship in preparation for the service of God in 
the Church of Jesus Christ for the sake of its mission to the world. 

MASTER OF DIVINITY DEGREE 

Students admitted to the Master of Divinity degree program choose 
either a three component (year) program leading to the Master of Divinity 
degree or a four component (year) program leading to the Master of Divinity 
degree with an intern year. The first two components of both involve a 
common program. The academic courses and supervised ministry in these 
initial components are designed to assist the student in developing intel- 
lectual tools and professional skills to begin the practice of ministry. At 



9 



the end of the second component, students, together with their peers and 
faculty, engage in a process of professional evaluation. 

Students pursuing the three component Master of Divinity degree move 
directly to the final component. Students in the four component program 
proceed to two further components, the first of which includes a twelve- 
month period of supervised ministry in an approved setting. The final, on- 
campus component involves, in addition to academic course work, a sem- 
inar enabling students to reflect on their period of supervised ministry. 

The term "components" is used rather than "years" since the amount 
of time a student takes to complete the component may be more or less 
than an academic year. The A and B components represent the initial 
common program for the first professional degrees. The C component 
follows the professional assessment and represents the final stage leading 
to the Master of Divinity degree. For students in the four component 
program, the D component designates the 12-month period of supervised 
ministry, and the final component is the C on-campus component. 

Requirements for the M.Div. Degree 

1. There must be on file with the seminary a complete and official 
transcript of credits showing graduation with a bachelor's degree from an 
accredited university or college of liberal arts and sciences, or its equivalent 
as well as a completed health form and standardized test results. 

2. The student must achieve competency in writing and speech. 

3. The student must be admitted to degree candidacy at the end of 
the B component. To qualify for candidacy, the student must be engaged 
in or have satisfied all the academic and supervised ministry requirements 
for the A and B components (as outlined on page 12) together with enough 
electives to total 74 credits. The overall grade average must be C or better. 

4. The candidate must satisfactorily complete all the requirements of 
the C component (as outlined on page 13) with a total of 104 credits, not 
counting Greek language credits. 

5. The overall grade point average must be 2.3 or better. 

6. The student must pass an approved Bible content exam and a stand- 
ard English Test. 

7. The student must be in residence for at least six long semesters and 
in the sixth semester a student must be registered for at least ten hours. 
(Exception to this policy can be granted only by faculty vote on a written 
request made to the Dean of Faculty). 

8. The faculty must be satisfied that the conduct and attitude of the 
candidate is becoming a minister of the Gospel and that he or she gives 
promise of useful service in the ministry or other church vocation. 

9. All bills to the seminary must be paid and assurance given that all 
open accounts in the community and elsewhere have been satisfied. Stu- 



10 



dents with education loans must agree to make prompt and regular pay- 
ments. 

Professional Assessment and Admission to Degree Program 

The admission to degree candidacy for the M.Div. degree emerges from 
the professional assessment and must be approved by the faculty. Profes- 
sional assessment is a major review of the student's potential for ministry 
that occurs after the completion of the major requirements of the A and B 
components. This assessment usually will be scheduled in the spring term 
of the B component and is a condition for the student's beginning work 
in the C component. Detailed guidelines for the assessment process are 
given to the student well in advance, including criteria, data to be consid- 
ered, composition of the assessment committee, intent of the interview, 
and possible recommendations to the faculty which might ensue. 

Every M.Div. degree student must meet the professional assessment 
requirement. Admission to candidacy by a presbytery or appropriate 
church body must be substantially completed before the student is eligible 
for an assessment. This form of denominational endorsement can be 
waived only under extraordinary circumstances and then only by a formal 
request to the faculty made before February 15 of the student's B com- 
ponent. 

At the professional assessment, among other questions, questions of 
conduct and attitude shall be addressed, and any recommendations or 
stipulations arising from this will be reviewed by the faculty prior to award- 
ing the M.Div. degree. 

Awarding the Master of Divinity Degree 

Students who have completed all requirements for the Master of Di- 
vinity degree shall be recommended to the Board of Directors in one of 
three ways: 

1. with the notation that the faculty is satisfied that the student's 
conduct and attitude are appropriate for the ordained Gospel ministry; 

2. with the notation that at this time the faculty does not commend 
the student's conduct or attitude as appropriate for the ordained Gospel 
ministry but the faculty considers the student as having promise of useful 
service in the church; 

3. with the notation that at the time of graduation the faculty does 
not commend the student's conduct and attitude as appropriate for the 
ordained Gospel ministry. 

Minister to Youth Specialization or Joint Degree Program 

Students in the M.Div. program can take course work and supervised 
ministry that will provide them with the basic concepts and skills to engage 
in ministry with youth. It is possible to complete the M. A. in Youth Ministry 



11 



in one academic year beyond the M.Div. Students seeking admission into 
the M.A. in Youth Ministry degree program with an M.Div. from another 
accredited seminary will be expected to complete 30 credit hours, including 
a summer supervised ministry component. Other course requirements are 
dependent upon the applicant's past professional and academic work. 

Certified Minister of Christian Education 

Students in the M.Div. program can take a set of Christian education 
courses within their elective hours that will lead them to certification by 
their denomination, following their ordination, as a minister of Christian 
education. Students interested in this speciality should see the Dean of 
Faculty. 

Certificate in Gerontology 

Students in the M.Div. program may use elective credits for courses in 
gerontology offered by Columbia and by Georgia State University, which 
lead to a certificate in gerontology awarded by Georgia State. For further 
information see the Dean of Faculty. 

MASTER OF DIVINITY CURRICULUM 



A COMPONENT 










Summer 




Credits 


Winter 




Credits 


B021 


Essentials of Greek 


6 
Credits 


P143 
Spring 


Worship 
Electives 


1 
2 


Fall 


3 
Credits 


B141 
B153 
HD121 
PI 12 


Old Testament Survey 
New Testament Exegesis 
Church History 
The Church's Ministry — 

An Introduction 
Elective or Remedial Course 


3 
2 
5 

3 
2 


B154 
B161 
HD122 
HD181 

P151 


New Testament Exegesis 
New Testament Survey 
Church History 
Church and Contemporary 

Society 
Worship and Preaching 


2 
3 
4 

3 
3 




15 


15 


B COMPONENT 










Summer 




Credits 


Winter 




Credits 


SM210 


Supervised Ministry 


6 


HD241 


Alternative Context 
for Ministry 


4 


Fall 




Credits 


Spring 




Credits 


B222 
HD233 
P222 
P232 


Hebrew 

Christian Theology 
Ministry of Teaching 
Ministry to Persons 
(with praxis) 


4 
3 
3 

5 


B233 

HD234 

HD272 


Old Testament Exegesis 
Christian Theology 
Christian Ethics 
Electives 


3 
4 

3 

5 




15 



15 
P232 Ministry to Persons may be taken in the Spring Semester. 



12 



PROFESSIONAL ASSESSMENT 



Prior to completion of the B component, a professional assessment is held for each student. 
This is a major review of the student's potential for ministry and results in recommendations 
for further work at the B component level or admission to candidacy for the M.Div. degree 
and the C or D component. 



C COMPONENT 

Summer Credits Winter 

Free time or independent study Elective 



Credits 
3 



Fall 



Credits Spring 



Credits 



B373 
P381 
1343 

1373 


Biblical Theology, Old Testament 
The Practice of Ministry 
Theology and Preaching 
Evangelism and Mission 
Electives 


3 
3 

2 
2 
4 


B374 
P382 


Biblical Theology, 

New Testament 

The Practice of Ministry 

Electives 


3 

3 
8 




14 



14 

The Master of Divinity degree requires 104 credits, plus Greek (6) including at least 3 elective credits in 
each of the three areas of the curriculum. 

D COMPONENT - optional 

This component is an optional intern year. For more information, see page 10. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 

The purpose of this program is to provide systematic study of the 
Christian faith for people who are not preparing for ordination to profes- 
sional Christian ministry. It is designed for students who want to broaden 
and deepen their understanding of the faith so that they can be more 
knowledgeable and effective Christians as lay people in the church and in 
their lay vocations, and for others who are preparing for further academic 
work in a theological discipline (toward a Ph.D., for instance). The Master 
of Arts in Theological Studies will not qualify persons for the ordained 
ministry, since this program does not include training in the practice of 
ministry or in other areas prerequisite for ordination. The seminary expects 
with this program not only to offer advanced study in theological disciplines 
to lay people in the church, but also to enrich the seminary community by 
the presence and challenge of students who bring to it the questions and 
demand for excellence of searching, thinking, non-professional Christians. 

Students, after consultation with the director of the Master of Arts in 
Theological Studies program, select one of the following five fields for 
specialization: Old Testament, New Testament, church history, theology, 
or ethics. A faculty advisor from the field of specialization is assigned by 
the director and the Dean of Faculty to provide guidance in the selection 
of courses and to coordinate the giving of the comprehensive examinations. 



13 



Proficiency in Hebrew or Greek is a requirement for Old Testament or New 
Testament specialization. 

General Requirements for the M.A. in Theological Studies Degree 

1. Students must earn a total of 52 credits. This shall include at least 
one basic survey course in each of the five fields of specialization; an 
additional course in three of the five fields; a minimum of 17 credits in the 
chosen field of specialization; and a minimum of nine credits in a cognate 
field. Other requirements may be established by the Area in which the 
field of specialization falls. 

2. Students must pass a written comprehensive examination designed, 
administered, and graded by faculty members in the field of specialization. 
The purpose of the examination is to test the student's capacity to function 
knowledgeably and critically in the field of specialization, to relate meth- 
odology and content from the cognate field to the field of specialization, 
and to think and write clearly. The examination normally comes at the 
conclusion of the student's course work and usually involves three or more 
months of preparatory study. A thesis may be substituted for the written 
exam in exceptional cases. 

3. All work must be completed within five years from the date of 
admission. 

Details of the program are available from the Director of the Master of 
Arts in Theological Studies, Columbia Seminary, Box 520, Decatur, Georgia 
30031-0520. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN YOUTH MINISTRY 

The purpose of this program is to equip persons for competent lead- 
ership in ministry with youth. It is designed to develop: 

1. ability to discuss the meaning of the Scriptures and creeds and the 
heritage of the church. 

2. ability, through teaching and relationships, to make creative ap- 
plication to scripture and heritage, to the problems of persons, and to the 
crises of society; to place contemporary issues in historical perspective; to 
help people deepen their relationships to God; and to witness to one's 
faith and commitment. 

3. ability to perceive persons and situations accurately and sympa- 
thetically. 

4. ability to use and mediate in a variety of social processes, including 
conflict, in ways that contribute to wholeness. 

5. ability to see educational mission within the larger context of the 
congregation's total ministry. 

6. ability to use sound educational theory in practice, and to evaluate 
one's performance on the basis of educational perspectives. 



14 



7. ability to work effectively and harmoniously with others — profes- 
sional and lay — in developing and achieving educational objectives. 

The program is meant for persons who are not considering ordination 
but who want a broad background in theological studies with strong em- 
phasis on the theory and practice of ministry with youth in congregational, 
camp, and para-parochial settings. 

Requirements for the M.A. in Youth Ministry Degree 

1. A four-year degree from an accredited university or college of arts 
and sciences or its equivalent is required. Applicants with a major in re- 
ligion or in Christian education may request advanced credit for a particular 
course based upon equivalency of educational accomplishment. Advanced 
credit decisions are made on an individual basis and are based upon as- 
sessment of major goals of the particular course. 

2. A total of 66 semester credits is required. Course work is spread 
across four departments: Biblical, Historical-Doctrinal, Practical Theology, 
and Supervised Ministry. Usually 12 hours are required in the Biblical area, 
18 in the Historical-Doctrinal area; 22 in the Practical Theology area, in- 
cluding nine specifically in Youth Ministry, 12 in Supervised Ministry, and 
from two to seven elective hours. 

3. All degree work must be completed within four years from the date 
of admission. 

For further information, write to Director of Youth Ministry Program, 
Columbia Seminary, Box 520, Decatur, GA 30031-0520. 

Requirements for M.A. in Youth Ministry for persons having Master of 
Divinity degree (or equivalent) 

A student seeking admission into the M.A. in Youth Ministry degree 
with a Master of Divinity from another accredited seminary will be expected 
to complete 30 credit hours. Course requirements are dependent upon the 
applicant's past professional and academic work. 






■■-ifffr -v 

I 



' »■ .■■''' : 



EU Jrif 




15 



MASTER OF ARTS IN YOUTH MINISTRY CURRICULUM 



FIRST YEAR 



Fall 

B141 Old Testament Survey 
HD121 Church History 
P222 Ministry of Teaching 
P625 Basic Ministry with Youth 
Electives 



Credits 

3 
5 
3 
3 
0-2 



Winter 

P142 Worship with Youth 

Spring 

B161 New Testament Survey 
HD 181 Church and Contemporary Society 
P232 Ministry to Persons (with praxis) 
P623 Child and the Church 
or 

P527 Adult Education 
Electives 



3 
3 

5 
3 

3 
0-2 



Summer 

SM212 Supervised Ministry 
or 

CPE in Adolescent Placement 



6 
6 



SECOND YEAR 



Fall 

HD233 Christian Theology 
P224 Program and Leadership 
P626 Advanced Ministry with Youth 
SM213 Supervised Ministry 
Electives 



3 
2 
3 
3 
0-3 



Winter 

Bible Elective 



Spring 

HD234 Christian Theology 
HD272 Christian Ethics 
SM214 Supervised Ministry 
Bible Elective 
Electives 



4 

3 

3 

3 

0-2 



16 



ADVANCED DEGREES 

Columbia offers three programs leading to advanced degrees. Each 
builds on the M.Div. degree and, in the case of the D.Min. and S.T.D. 
programs, also on necessary ministry experience which has ensued since 
the reception of the M.Div. degree. 

In addition to the resources of the faculty and library on Columbia's 
campus, graduate students are expected to draw upon the resources of the 
Atlanta area. The S.T.D. and D.Min. programs are administered by the 
Graduate Professional Studies Committee of the Atlanta Theological As- 
sociation, which coordinates and augments the resources of Candler School 
of Theology of Emory University, the Interdenominational Theological Cen- 
ter, Columbia, Erskine Theological Seminary in Due West, SC, and Lu- 
theran Theological Southern Seminary in Columbia, SC. Th.M. degree 
students may also include in their program studies at these other semi- 
naries. 

The resources of the Atlanta community are also available to Columbia 
graduate students. Accredited programs of clinical pastoral education and 
pastoral counseling are available in many settings. The Urban Training 
Organization of Atlanta provides resources in the area of urban problems 
and urban ministries. Numerous national and regional offices of denom- 
inational and interdenominational agencies are located in Atlanta. Other 
educational opportunities are available at Emory University, Georgia State 
University, and colleges in the area. 

For students desiring to graduate in any advanced degree program at 
the spring commencement, March 1 is the deadline for provisional approval 
of the thesis or dissertation by the project committee, and April 15 is the 
deadline for final approval of the completed project. 

MASTER OF THEOLOGY 

The Master of Theology (Th.M.) degree program has three purposes: 
for advanced study in an area of ministry, especially by persons in pastoral 
ministry; as preparation for entering teaching or as a step toward a Ph.D.; 
and as preparation for a specialization in ministry (pastoral counseling, for 
example). 

Admission 

Application for admission to the Th.M. program is made through the 
office of the Director of Advanced Studies. The M.Div. degree from an 
accredited seminary or divinity school, or its academic equivalent, is re- 
quired. In certain cases a Master of Arts or a Master of Theological Studies 
degree in the appropriate area may be accepted as a prerequisite and ad- 
ditional preparatory work may be required. Ordinarily, a B average in an 
applicant's college and seminary program is considered a minimum stand- 
ard for admission. Except for the Th.M. in pastoral counseling, a knowledge 
of both the Hebrew and Greek languages is prerequisite for the program. 



17 



If an applicant's M.Div. course required less than these two languages, the 
student may substitute an approved language for one of the Biblical lan- 
guages. 

Admission to Candidacy 

Students seeking a Th.M. degree must be admitted to candidacy by 
vote of the faculty. Application involves the proposal of a thesis committee 
composed of a chairperson from the area of concentration and one other 
member of the faculty and the proposal of a thesis topic previously ap- 
proved by the chairperson. This information must be given in writing to 
the Advanced Studies Committee prior to October 15. The faculty meeting 
early in November is the deadline for the formal admission to candidacy 
if the student expects to receive the degree at commencement the following 
spring. 

Requirements for the Degree 

In order to qualify for the Th.M. degree, a student must complete the 
following within five years (six years for Pastoral Counseling): 

1. at least 24 semester credits of academic work at the advanced level 
(courses numbered in the 600's) with grades that average not less than B. 
This academic work shall involve at least 15 hours taken through regular 
residential courses at Columbia Seminary. 

2. an acceptable thesis, which shall constitute six additional credits. 

3. an oral examination, which shall be given after the thesis has been 
completed. 

Concentration 

Each student will concentrate in one of the following areas: 

1. Biblical studies, 

2. Historical-doctrinal studies, 

3. Practical Theology studies 

At least 12 course credits must be taken in the area of concentration. 
Within that area at least nine credits, in addition to the six credits for the 
thesis, must be taken in a chosen field (i.e., Old Testament or theology or 
evangelism). At least six course credits must be taken outside the area of 
concentration in one or both of the other areas. 

All course credit must be in 600 or 700 level courses. However, up to 
three credits of lower level course work may be counted if there is prior 
approval by the thesis committee (if appointed) or the Director of Advanced 
Studies and the Dean of Faculty. 

Pastoral Counseling Specialization 

A student concentrating in pastoral studies may elect the field of pastoral 
care or may elect a specialization in pastoral counseling. The beginning of 
the latter program requires the successful completion of a non-credit intern 



18 



year in an institution accredited by the Association for Clinical Pastoral 
Education. 

By the end of the first year, a student adjudged sufficiently competent 
by the multidisciplinary professional committee is admitted to the coun- 
seling practicum for counseling supervision in a center accredited by the 
American Association of Pastoral Counselors. Sufficient supervision is pro- 
vided through the counseling practicum to qualify one for application as 
a Member in the American Association of Pastoral Counselors. Six credits 
from the Practicum (P638) may be applied to the required 24 credits of 
academic work. 

DOCTOR OF MINISTRY 

The Doctor of Ministry degree program for the working minister has 
been established by the schools participating in the Atlanta Theological 
Association. The program has been designed to continue the education of 
persons for their practice of ministry in the church and in related institu- 
tional settings. It provides an advanced, yet flexible, education for those 
whose vocation as servants of people and servants of Jesus Christ implies 
their further disciplined reflection upon, and possibly their further spe- 
cialization within, their own ministry. 

Students apply for admission in a particular school of the Atlanta The- 
ological Association but may take advanced courses in any ATA school. 

Admission 

Each applicant should hold an M.Div. or equivalent degree from an 
accredited seminary or divinity school, with a superior academic record 
and/or superior professional performance, and should have at least one 
year, preferably three or more, of professional experience since receiving 
the basic degree. 

Each applicant must submit a personal statement of not more than ten 
double-spaced pages giving biographical data, academic and ministry 
achievements, interests, goals, and personal purposes for the D.Min. pro- 
gram that illustrate continued development. 

Advanced standing on the basis of post-M.Div. courses in other pro- 
grams will be determined by the Dean of Faculty. 

Program of Study 

Although it may be spread over a period up to four years, the program 
of study requires participation in the equivalent of more than a full year 
of academic and clinical courses. The doctoral project is executed after the 
completion of these courses and usually as part of the ongoing professional 
work of the minister. 

Thirty-six semester credits are required, distributed as follows: 

Six credits for the core seminar in contemporary ministry and career 
assessment; 



19 



Six credits for an approved ministry-under-supervision experience 
equivalent to approximately 400 hours; 

Eighteen credits of advanced courses; 

Six credits for the doctoral project. 

To assist both personal development and also course and project plan- 
ning, each student secures a faculty adviser and a doctoral committee. 
After completion of course work and before the execution of the doctoral 
project, the student will take an examination covering a range of subjects 
designated by his or her doctoral committee. 

For further information and application forms, write to Director of Ad- 
vanced Studies, Columbia Theological Seminary, Box 520, Decatur, Georgia 
30031-0520. 

DOCTOR OF SACRED THEOLOGY IN PASTORAL COUNSELING 

This degree is offered through the Atlanta Theological Association by 
the Candler School of Theology, Columbia Theological Seminary, and the 
Interdenominational Theological Center. The program of study is con- 
ducted under the direction of the S.T.D. Committee of the Atlanta Theo- 
logical Association. The S.T.D. Committee has responsibility for approving 
admission to the program, establishing curriculum offerings, and certifying 
candidates for the award of the degree. Students may register for courses 
at any of the ATA seminaries. 

Aims of the Program 

The purpose of the Doctor of Sacred Theology in pastoral counseling 
is to prepare clergy to serve as pastoral counselors in a local church or on 
the staff of a community counseling center, to serve as consultants to other 
clergy, and to offer training in pastoral care and counseling. The program 
is designed to prepare persons for the specialized ministry of pastoral 
counseling at a doctoral level of competence and for membership at the 
Fellow level in the American Association of Pastoral Counselors. The de- 
gree is intended to be an equivalent of the Ph.D. but is designed for those 
whose interest in pastoral counseling is primarily professional and theo- 
logical. 

Program of Study 

The studies included within the program will help the student gain an 
advanced understanding of appropriate theological and theoretical con- 
cepts; learn under qualified supervision the application of these concepts 
in pastoral counseling and how to promote professional integration of 
theory and skills in both pastoral counseling and pastoral guidance; and 
design and execute a research project appropriate to the student's profes- 
sional practice which will give evidence of creative ability to contribute to 
this aspect of pastoral counseling. 



20 



Course Work and Practicum 

In carrying out this program, which should not exceed six years, the 
student must enroll for a minimum of 30 semester hours of academic course 
work and 18 semester hours of clinical supervision through the Pastoral 
Counseling Practicum. 

Core Seminars (three credits per semester: ATA463; ATA471; ATA473; 
ATA475) are required in the first four semesters of studies. The student 
ordinarily enters the pastoral counseling practicum when entering the pro- 
gram of studies and continues until judged competent as a counselor. The 
clinical setting for supervision is the Pastoral Counseling Service of the 
Georgia Association for Pastoral Care. 

Each student admitted to the program shall have one member of the 
pastoral counseling faculty as advisor. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

Upon completion of these 48 credits with a B average, the student may 
apply to take the Comprehensive Examination, which tests the competence 
in both the content and performance of pastoral counseling. The content 
areas in which the student will be examined include: 

a) Theology, with the foci upon theological method and pastoral the- 
ology; 

b) Psychology, including theories of personality and development, psy- 
chodynamics of behavior and of religious experience, and theories 
of counseling and psychotherapy; 

c) Pastoral care, including history of pastoral care, ministerial role, 
guidance at the passage points of life, ministry in crisis situations, 
and referrals; 

d) social and cultural studies which pertain to pastoral counseling; 

e) a related area of the student's choice. 

The performance areas in which the student will be examined include: 

a) evaluation interviewing, 

b) pastoral counseling, 

c) supervision, 

d) professional maturity within the role of pastoral counselor, 

e) ability to relate pastoral counseling to the total ministerial role. 

Dissertation 

Following satisfactory performance in the Comprehensive Examination, 
the student will then engage in an approved research project which dem- 
onstrates ability to utilize theological and theoretical knowledge in relation 
to some problem of his or her professional practice, and which contributes 



21 



useful findings and insights to this area of theological investigation. The 
student will prepare a dissertation and undergo an oral examination on 
the project/dissertation. Students who do not register for course work, 
clinical work, ATA489 or ATA496 in any long semester will be required to 
take ATA000. 

The dissertation carries 6 credits and completes the 54 credits required 
in this program. 

Professional Certification 

The supervision in pastoral counseling, which is an integral part of the 
S.T.D. degree program, is provided according to the standards of the Amer- 
ican Association of Pastoral Counselors and the American Association of 
Marriage and Family Therapists. It may be used, therefore, to meet the 
requirements for counseling supervision of both the A.A.P.C. and the 
A.A.M.F.T. 

Admission 

Applicants must hold the Master of Divinity or equivalent degree with 
a superior academic record from an accredited institution and must have 
had post-seminary professional experience in which significant learning 
and professional promise were evident. In addition, applicants must have 
significant experience in ministry (approximately three years' full-time em- 
ployment after completion of the first theological degree) and in clinical 
pastoral education (usually four consecutive units). 

The admission process includes: 

a) an assessment of applicant's academic grades and professional per- 
formance, 

b) a statement of purpose, 

c) references and other materials supplied with the application, 

d) a personal interview with the director of the program, and 

e) one or more personal interviews with the pastoral counseling faculty 
and appropriate officers of the school to which application is being 
made. 

The deadline for receipt of all application material is February 15 of the 
year for which fall semester admission is requested. 

A student who, though otherwise acceptable, has not had courses in 
personality development and pastoral care equivalent to those taught in 
the participating seminaries of the ATA, must take these courses without 
credit during the first year of residence. 

Application forms and further general information about the S.T.D. in 
Pastoral Counseling program may be obtained from: Dr. John H. Patton, 
Director, Doctoral Program in Pastoral Counseling; or from the Director 



22 



for Advanced Studies, Columbia Theological Seminary, Box 520, Decatur, 
Georgia 30031-0520 — Telephone 404/378-8821. 

CONTINUING EDUCATION 

Continuing education opportunities for ministers and church profes- 
sionals are a vital part of Columbia Seminary. These non-credit events are 
essential to spiritual, academic, and professional growth. Several different 
types of opportunities are offered: 

1. Large, established, on-campus events offer a variety of courses, 
together with daily chapel services. The major events are the Sum- 
mer Session, held the first two full weeks in July, and the January 
Seminars for Ministers early in January. The Columbia Forum is a 
third but somewhat different continuing education event. 

2. Throughout the year small events, centered around one activity or 
subject, are held both on and off campus. Examples are a study/ 
retreat at the beach, a week spent in work and dialogue at Koinonia 
and Habitat for Humanity, contemplative weeks at retreat centers 
for men and women, a seminar on religion and the arts, and retreat 
style "conversations" with outstanding religious leaders in the new 
continuing education center on campus. 

3. Overseas travel/study trips are a regular part of the continuing 
education program. In 1990 the scheduled trips are: a week in 
Jamaica at the United Theological College, a Presbyterian Heritage 
trip to Scotland, and a week with Border Ministries. 

4. Individual study is available to ministers who wish to spend time 
on the campus, working in the library and consulting with a faculty 
member. The Director of Continuing Education will make arrange- 
ments for this kind of on-campus directed study. 

5. Directed readings on particular subjects provide "at-home" con- 
tinuing education. A list of subjects is available from the continuing 
education office. Once the subject is selected, books will be sent 
on that subject from the seminary library. The reading lists are 
designed by faculty members from Columbia, Union Theological 
Seminary in Richmond, and Louisville Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary. 

A calendar of events for 1990/91 is available upon request. For more 
information on continuing education opportunities, write the Director of 
Continuing Education, Columbia Seminary, Box 520, Decatur, GA 
30031-0520. 



LAY INSTITUTE OF FAITH AND LIFE 

In 1987 Columbia Seminary established the Lay Institute of Faith and 
Life to equip laity for ministry in the church and in the world. Courses 
offered include biblical studies, theology, church history, ethics, family life, 
church leadership, and spiritual formation. The Institute also coordinates 



23 



weekend seminars, workshops, conferences, and laity renewal events both 
on and off campus. It works with presbyteries and local congregations to 
provide church officer training in faith development and leadership skills. 

Twice yearly the Institute sponsors at the seminary the Lay School of 
Bible and Theology. Similar Lay Schools in various formats are offered in 
presbyteries and congregations. For further information, write to Lay In- 
stitute of Faith and Life, Columbia Theological Seminary, Box 520, Decatur, 
GA 30031-0520. 



ASIAN MINISTRIES CENTER 

In 1987 an Asian Ministries Center was established to assist the seminary 
in meeting the needs of the growing Asian Christian communities in the 
Southeast in training ministers and lay leaders, in providing opportunities 
for continuing education, in sponsoring a variety of exchange programs 
with churches in Asia, and in broadening our international perspectives 
in relation to the churches and countries of Asia. 

An Advisory Council, composed of three members from the Asian 
communities of the Southeast and three members from Columbia Seminary 
faculty, oversees the work of the center. Also, as staff to the Synods of 
South Atlantic and Living Waters, the director relates the judicatory con- 
cerns and programs to the work of the Center. For further information, 
write to the Director of Asian Ministries Center, Columbia Theological 
Seminary, Box 520, Decatur, GA 30031-0520. 



RELATED ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

In addition to Basic and Advanced Degree Programs and Continuing 
Education, Columbia Seminary offers a wide variety of academic oppor- 
tunities. Some of these are in relationships with other educational insti- 
tutions; others are special emphases of Columbia. 

ATLANTA THEOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION 

Through the Atlanta Theological Association (ATA), Columbia enjoys 
academic and professional affiliations with Candler School of Theology, 
Erskine Theological Seminary, Interdenominational Theological Center, 
Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary, Georgia Association for Pastoral 
Care, and Urban Training Organization of Atlanta. The association devel- 
ops and coordinates educational programs and resources of these member 
institutions, which include approximately 1,600 students, 100 faculty, and 
a combined library collection of 600,000 volumes. (Students and scholars 
also have access to the holdings of 16 libraries in the Atlanta-Athens area 
which comprise the University Center of Georgia.) Among significant and 
promising cooperative endeavors, in addition to the Doctor of Sacred The- 
ology and Doctor of Ministry degree programs, are cross registration, shar- 
ing of faculty, library and lectureship resources, interseminary courses and 



24 



experimental programs in various academic disciplines and professional 
specializations. 

UNIVERSITY CENTER OF GEORGIA 

Columbia Seminary is a founding institution of the metropolitan Atlanta 
consortium of institutions of higher education, called the University Center 
of Georgia (UCG). The institutions included are Agnes Scott College, At- 
lanta College of Art, Atlanta University Center, Columbia Theological Sem- 
inary, Emory University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia State 
University, Kennesaw College, Mercer University Atlanta, Oglethorpe Uni- 
versity, Southern Technical Institute, and the University of Georgia. 

The areas of cooperation are broad and provide the student with ex- 
ceptional opportunities across a spectrum of disciplines from science to art. 

CROSS REGISTRATION AT AREA SCHOOLS 

Columbia students may cross register for courses at a variety of insti- 
tutions in the Atlanta area through the Columbia registrar and at no ad- 
ditional charge. Students may cross register locally at Candler School of 
Theology and the Interdenominational Theological Center and institutions 
of the University Center of Georgia. 

Columbia students may also cross register at two theological schools 
farther away, namely, Erskine Theological Seminary in Due West, SC, and 
the Presbyterian School of Christian Education in Richmond, VA. Such 
cross registration is especially encouraged during the January Term or in 
the Summer Session. 

CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION 

Clinical pastoral education is a first-hand learning experience under 
certified supervision which provides theological students and pastors with 
opportunities for intensive study of pastoral relationships and which seeks 
to make clear in understanding and practice the resources, methods, and 
meanings of the Christian faith as expressed through pastoral care. Co- 
lumbia's membership in the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education 
means that its students will be given priority of choice in institutions 
elected, especially those listed within the Southeast. 

APPALACHIAN MINISTRIES EDUCATIONAL RESOURCE 

Columbia Seminary is a member of the AMERC consortium. AMERC 
provides specialized training for students preparing for ministry in the 
Appalachian Church and other missional settings, with particular attention 
to small town and rural congregations. Through its three educational pro- 
grams — an eight-week summer course, a three-week January travel sem- 
inar, and a supervised rural residency, AMERC provides students with 
opportunities to learn about the Appalachian region, its people and history, 
its culture and religion, and its needs and issues for ministry. Students 



25 



study models for ministry currently in use and those expected to be more 
effective in the future. During the summer course, in addition to the con- 
centrated academic program, students are assigned to field placement sites 
as participant-observers. On the travel seminar, the class visits various 
types of Appalachian ministries alternating between the northern, south- 
ern, and central portions of Appalchia (which covers parts of 13 states). 



THE MIDEAST SEMINAR 

A summer travel seminar is sponsored jointly by Columbia Theological 
Seminary, Candler School of Theology at Emory University, and Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, KY, consisting of a three-week 
study trip to Israel, Jordan, and Greece. The program, subsidized by a 
private foundation, is directed by Dr. Max Miller, Professor of Old Tes- 
tament Studies at Candler. It is limited to 20 participants — five students 
from each of the schools plus five lay persons selected from positions of 
leadership in the Southeast. 

The program has two purposes: to provide an in-depth study tour of 
the area which stands at the center of our Biblical heritage and which plays 
such a crucial role in current international affairs; to provide a situation in 
which the leaders of tomorrow's church can get to know each other today 
and develop close bonds of understanding and friendship. At the same 
time there is opportunity for extended interchange between the students 
preparing for professional careers in the church and lay persons who are 
already playing key roles in business and community affairs. Professor 
James Newsome is Columbia's representative for the program. 

NATIONAL CAPITAL SEMESTER FOR SEMINARIANS 

Columbia Seminary is a participating institution in the National Capital 
Semester for Seminarians, organized by Wesley Theological Seminary, 
Washington, DC. The program provides an opportunity for seminary stu- 
dents to spend a semester in Washington for study and involvement in 
the processes of government and the concerns of the churches. The design 
includes an interaction/reflection seminar, supervised study, and the op- 
portunity to elect other courses in Washington institutions. For informa- 
tion, see the Dean of Faculty. 



SPECIAL EMPHASES 

INTERNATIONAL THEOLOGICAL EDUCATION 

Columbia Seminary is committed to the task of preparing students for 
ministry in a world that is shrinking rapidly and where preoccupation with 
parochial concerns is no longer an option. A varied program of international 
education has emerged from serious, cross-cultural dialogue with church 
leaders in other parts of the world — in particular, the Caribbean. During 



26 



the 1988-89 academic year, over 60 percent of the second year M.Div. 
students participated in one of Columbia's international programs. These 
include: 

• an international component for the second year course, "Al- 
ternative Context For Ministry." Students may choose to take 
this course in an international setting during the Winter Term. 
During the 1990 Winter Term three different international al- 
ternative contexts for ministry were offered: Central America, 
the Caribbean (Jamaica), and Eastern Europe (Hungary). 

• a three-week Mideast Seminar. 

• a week-long continuing education event in the spring for pas- 
tors, held on the campus of the United Theological College of 
the West Indies, Kingston, Jamaica. 

• supervised ministry placements for Columbia students in Car- 
ibbean churches under the supervision of experienced Carib- 
bean pastors. 

• Columbia students studying or working in Barbados, Costa 
Rica, England, Germany, Jamaica, Japan, Scotland, and Switz- 
erland. 

• international students, faculty, and pastors from four conti- 
nents working and studying on the Columbia campus. 

• a three-week seminar held each year on the Columbia campus 
for Korean pastors. This seminar is sponsored jointly by Co- 
lumbia, the Presbyterian Church of Korea, and the Division of 
International Missions, Presbyterian Church (USA). 

Some of these programs are part of a program co-ordinated by the 
Atlanta Theological Association. Others reflect cooperative efforts with the 
Presbyterian Church (USA), or with an overseas denomination or theo- 
logical institution. 

For further information, write to the Director of International Theolog- 
ical Education, Columbia Theological Seminary, Box 520, Decatur, GA 
30031-0520. 

THE COLUMBIA FORUM 

Each year, during the last week of January, Columbia sponsors a four- 
day forum built around a guest preacher and two significant lectureships. 
The activities include, in addition to three worship services and two sets 
of three lectures, a variety of formal and informal occasions with the lead- 
ers. Special events for alumni/ae are also planned during this week. 

One lectureship is the Thomas Smyth Foundation Lectures, begun 
through a bequest of the Rev. Thomas Smyth, pastor of the Second Pres- 
byterian Church of Charleston, SC, from 1831 to 1873. Since 1911 distin- 
guished scholars from the United States and abroad have presented lectures 



27 



on a variety of themes and issues. Recent Smyth Lecturers have been Dr. 
Jaroslav Pelikan, Dr. Austin C. Lovelace, Dr. Krister Stendahl, Dr. Jan M. 
Lockman, Rev. C. Frederick Buechner, Dr. Walter Brueggemann, Dr. Jose 
Miguez-Bonino, Dr. Carl S. Dudley, Dr. Leander Keck, Dr. Hendrikus 
Berkhof, Dr. Thomas G. Long, Dr. Phyllis Trible, Dr. Robert McAfee 
Brown, and Dr. Archie Smith, Jr. 

The other lectureship, the Alumni/ae Lectures, brings to the campus 
theologians and ministers who address the seminary community, gradu- 
ates, and interested pastors during the annual Columbia Forum. Recent 
speakers have been Dr. Wallace M. Alston, Jr., Dr. John H. Leith, Dr. 
William V. Arnold, Dr. Neely C. McCarter, Dr. Orlando Costas, the Rev. 
Stuart McWilliam, Dr. Donald P. Buteyn, Dr. Leighton Ford, Dr. Fred B. 
Craddock, the Rev. Will Campbell, Dr. Paolo Ricca, Dr. James A. Sanders, 
Mr. Doug Marlette, Mr. Gustav Niebuhr, and Dr. Jack Stotts. 

Currently, both series, together with a guest preacher and colloquia, 
are offered during the Columbia Forum, following the January Term. Re- 
cent preachers have been Dr. Douglas W. Oldenburg, Dr. W. Frank Har- 
rington, the Rev. Joanna Adams, and the Rev. Barbara Lundblad. The Rev. 
Craig Mason and Dr. Gary Demarest were the preachers for 1990. 

For further information, write to the Vice President for Development/ 
Seminary Relations, Columbia Theological Seminary, Box 520, Decatur, 
GA 30031-0520. 

EVANGELISM EMPHASIS 

In 1981 Columbia Seminary began an emphasis in evangelism which 
includes classroom instruction, consultation and model building in con- 
gregations and presbyteries, along with training conferences. This em- 
phasis has been made possible, in part, through a grant from The Outreach 
Foundation. Also in 1981 Peachtree Presbyterian Church of Atlanta estab- 
lished the Peachtree Chair of Evangelism and Church Growth, providing 
Columbia with a continuing evangelism emphasis. 

The professor of evangelism and church growth provides consultation 
on church growth and outreach to individual congregations and offers to 
interested presbyteries workshops and conferences in effective evangelism 
for both clergy and lay persons. 

For further information, write to Evangelism Emphasis, Columbia The- 
ological Seminary, Box 520, Decatur, GA 30031-0520. 



28 



SUPPORT FACILITIES 

THE JOHN BULOW CAMPBELL LIBRARY 

At the heart of the educative effort of the seminary is the library. Named 
for John Bulow Campbell, an Atlanta benefactor and member of Columbia's 
Board of Directors during the 1930s, the library is an integral part of the 
teaching program. It seeks to extend the work of the classroom in breadth 
and depth, to provide for student and faculty research, and to encourage 
reading beyond course requirements. 

The collection includes books, periodicals, church records, tapes, cas- 
settes, and microfilms. It is a well-balanced selection of older and more 
modern works and is particularly strong in Biblical studies, Biblical ar- 
chaeology., patristics, the Reformation, pastoral counseling, and Presby- 
terianism. Reformation sources include the Calvin and Melachthon sections 
of the Corpus Reformatorum and the Weimer edition of Luther. This spec- 
ialized collection, together with the ATA theological libraries and the UCG 
general collections, provides an outstanding resource for Columbia stu- 
dents. 

SEMINARY ARCHIVES 

The primary focus of the seminay archives, housed in the library, is 
the history and development of Columbia Seminary. Documents related 
to the founding of a Presbyterian seminary in the South in the nineteenth 
century are located here. The archive also intends to be the place of record 
for all Columbia Seminary publications. 

TELEVISION 

Columbia has videotaping facilities on its campus. Videotaping is used 
in a variety of ways in classroom instruction and in preaching practicums. 
Plans for developing a Media Center are underway. 

THE COLUMBIA BOOKSTORE 

The seminary bookstore, located in the Richards Center, provides 
books, materials, and supplies at a discount for students to begin collecting 
for their own theological library and for persons working toward advanced 
degrees to continue that process. The bookstore also serves pastors, lay- 
persons, and churches all over the Southeast. Its inventory includes a wide 
selection of standard and current books in the historical-doctrinal area, the 
pastoral area, and in Bible and homiletics, including many commentaries 
on the Old and New Testaments. Greater discounts are offered during 
special sales. The bookstore is open from 10:30 to 2:30, Monday through 
Friday, with special hours during campus events. 



29 



p 






* 




30 



CURRICULUM AND 
COURSES 

The teaching program at Columbia is arranged in four areas: Biblical, 
historical-doctrinal, practical theology, and supervised ministry. Studies in 
each of these areas are combined with the interdisciplinary studies in the 
curriculum for the first professional degrees. While classroom instruction 
is basic to these first degree programs, their goal is to equip students to 
continue their education independently. The resources of the library, the 
structure of course work, and independent study courses encourage early 
realization of that goal. 

Studies in the BIBLICAL area seek to help the students understand and 
interpret an ancient book, the Bible, in a modern world. To do this, these 
studies are concerned with developing tools and skills to understand the 
ancient world, its language, history, and thought, and tools and skills to 
grasp the meaning of the Bible for contemporary people. Greek and Hebrew 
are required so that students can gain facility in handling the original 
Biblical languages and in understanding the text in its native tongue. 
Courses in the area provide an opportunity for interpreting the text and 
for experience in articulating the message in a theological fashion. 

HISTORICAL-DOCTRINAL studies help students understand the past 
so that they can understand the present and how we got here. Students 
engaged in these studies also struggle to form their own theology and to 
discover what it means to be Christian in today's world. Since Columbia 
stands within the Reformed tradition, historical-doctrinal studies are con- 
cerned not only with right thinking, but also with the relation of Christian 
faith and doctrine to all the arenas of life. Therefore, studies in this area 
engage students in consideration of the social, political, economic, and 
cultural life of today in the United States and across the world. In historical- 
doctrinal studies students acquire the tools they will need throughout their 
lives for dealing theologically with themselves and the world around them, 
tools that will enable graduates to lead the church in a prophetic and 
reconciling way as it works out its mission in the world. 

The PRACTICAL THEOLOGY area centers on the functioning of the 
theologian as a minister, and its concern is to train students to be ministers 
and to lead other persons in ministering. Studies in this area consider the 
dynamics of the minister's role as pastor, evangelist, leader of worship, 
preacher, teacher, and administrator. Since we do not fully know today 
the shape of the ministry of tomorrow, the concern of these studies is to 
train students to understand the issues involved, to help them see their 
own strengths and weaknesses, and then to develop a flexibility that will 
enable them to take their Biblical and theological understanding and deal 
with whatever issues they face during their ministry. 

SUPERVISED MINISTRY serves an integrative function for the curric- 
ulum. Through its structure students are involved in the actual practice of 



31 



ministry under competent supervision. Through experiential, relational, 
and inductive learning, the student explores within a peer group the forms, 
styles, contents, and concepts of ministry. Not only does the student put 
into practice what has been learned through studies in the Biblical, his- 
torical-doctrinal, and pastoral areas, but these studies are integrated with 
the practice of ministry and the personhood of the student. 

Columbia's faculty recognizes that the method of teaching also makes 
a significant contribution to learning. Consequently, a variety of teaching 
methods is employed. Team teaching, which enables the professors them- 
selves to participate more fully in the learning process, and which effec- 
tively brings different kinds of competence together in the classroom, is 
widely used. Because small groups are a part of most courses, creative 
interchange between student and student and between students' peers and 
professors is the mark of instruction at Columbia. Field trips, simulations, 
seminars and use of audio-visuals (especially video) are also examples of 
a wide variety of teaching methods. 

The faculty reserves the right to modify individual course requirements 
within a degree program. Such changes will be effective the next time such 
courses are offered or at a later date as determined by the faculty. Degree 
programs and their major requirements will remain unchanged for students 
entering that program, but changes may be made at any time to be effective 
for all entering students in the next academic year. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Listed on the following pages are the courses taught by the faculty of 
Columbia Theological Seminary. Changes in faculty situations and in stu- 
dent needs inevitably will necessitate modification from term to term re- 
sulting in the failure to offer some electives and the substitution of others. 

The letter in the course designation is determined by the area in which 
it is offered: B for Biblical; HD for Historical-Doctrinal; P for Practical The- 
ology; I for Interdisciplinary; and SM for Supervised Ministry. Courses 
whose numbers are prefaced by ATA are offered by the Atlanta Theological 
Association. The hundred's digit refers to the level of the course and 
whether it is required for the basic degree program or elective: 

100s are required courses for A component students. 

200s are required courses for B component students. 

300s are required courses for C component students. 

500s are elective courses designed primarily for A and B component 
students but open to advanced students by permission of the instruc- 
tor. 

600s are elective courses designed for advanced students (C component 
and graduate students) but open to others when prerequisites are 
met, when space is available, and by permission of the instructor. 

700s are off-campus electives at advanced level. 

800s are honors courses. 



32 



The teen's digit identifies the particular academic discipline within the 
area, except in Interdisciplinary and Supervised Ministry courses. 

BIBLICAL AREA 

FACULTY: Walter Brueggemann, Charles B. Cousar, Beverly R. Gaventa, 
David M. Gunn (Chairperson), David P. Moessner, James D. Newsome 

Required courses for M.Div. and, as marked, for M.A. in Youth Ministry. 

B141 SURVEY OF THE OLD TESTAMENT Newsome 

A study of the Old Testament with special attention to its literary devel- 
opment and theological content, as viewed against the background of the 
history and religion of ancient Israel. Also required for M.A. in Youth 
Ministry. 

Fall 3 credits 

B153 EXEGESIS OF THE NEW TESTAMENT - I 

Cousar, Gaventa, Moessner 

An introduction to exegetical methods in the study of the New Testament. 
The Greek text of Philippians is read and interpreted. 

Fall 2 credits 

B154 EXEGESIS OF THE NEW TESTAMENT - II 

Cousar, Gaventa, Moessner 

A second-level course in exegesis concentrating on selected passages from 
the Greek text of Matthew or Luke. 
Prerequisite: B153 

Spring 2 credits 

B161 SURVEY OF THE NEW TESTAMENT Cousar, Gaventa, Moessner 

A study of the New Testament books with special attention to their literary 

character and their theological content, as viewed in light of the history 

and development of the early church. Also required for M.A. in Youth 

Ministry. 

Spring 3 credits 

B222 ESSENTIALS OF HEBREW Newsome 

An intensive study of the essential elements of Hebrew grammar, syntax, 
and vocabulary preparatory to reading and studying exegetically the He- 
brew Old Testament. 
Fall 4 credits 



33 



B223 ESSENTIALS OF HEBREW Gunn 

The goal is to learn basic elements of Hebrew and to use the tools which 
enable the reader of the English Bible to draw upon the original Hebrew 
when formulating an understanding of the text. Particular texts studied 
will include the stories of Dinah (Gen. 34), Tamar (Gen. 38), Jeptha's daugh- 
ter (Judges 11, 12) Bathsheba and Tamar (2 Sam. 11-13). 

4 credits 

B224 ESSENTIALS OF HEBREW AND EXEGESIS OF RUTH AND 

OTHER STORIES Gunn 

The initial goal is to learn basic elements of Hebrew and to use the tools 
which enable the reader of the English Bible to draw upon the original 
Hebrew when formulating an understanding of the text. The second goal 
is a close reading of the Book of Ruth together with some other stories of 
women — Dinah (Gen. 34), Tamar (Gen. 38), Rahab (Josh. 2), Bathsheba 
and Tamar (2 Sam. 11-13). Finally, the course seeks to develop imaginative 
and sensitive ways of reading (exegesis) that pay attention both to literary 
features of the narratives and to the concerns and commitments which we 
bring to the stories as readers in the church. 

7 credits 

*B231 OLD TESTAMENT EXEGESIS: REPRESENTATIVE TEXTS 

Newsome 

A reading and exegesis of selected Old Testament passages which are 
significant for an understanding of the nature of ancient Hebrew literature 
and the faith of Israel. Special attention will be given to their relevance to 
Christian theology and to their use in the preaching and teaching ministry 
of the Church. Prerequisite: B222 
Fall 3 credits 

*B232 OLD TESTAMENT EXEGESIS: SAUL AND DAVID Gunn 

A close reading of selected passages from I & II Samuel and I Kings, in 
the context of an overview of the story of Saul and David as a whole. An 
understanding of narrative technique leads to a heightened awareness of 
the theological impact of Old Testament storytelling. 
Prerequisite: B222 3 credits 

*B234 OLD TESTAMENT EXEGESIS: ESTHER OR RUTH Gunn 

A close reading of a short story, with attention to significant features of 
the Hebrew text. Careful exploration of literary aspects (e.g. structure, plot, 
character, point of view, wordplay, allusion) facilitates a deeper awareness 
of the theological impact of Old Testament storytelling. Feminist criticism 
provides an important focus for the course. 
Prerequisite: B222 3 credits 

^Students in the B component are required to take one of these courses. 
Another may be taken as an elective. 



34 



B373 OLD TESTAMENT THEOLOGY Brueggemann 

An investigation of major theological themes within the traditions of the 
Old Testament. Special attention will be devoted to fresh methods of re- 
lating the biblical material to contemporary understandings of the nature 
of human life. 3 credits 

B374 NEW TESTAMENT THEOLOGY Cousar, Moessner 

The nature of New Testament "theology," the uses of texts in constructive 
theology, and the unity and diversity of the New Testament will be in- 
vestigated in the light of the primary theological claims of the New Tes- 
tament writings. Prerequisites: B153, B154, B161 3 credits 

Elective Courses 

General and Background 

B514 INTERTESTAMENTAL PERIOD Newsome 

A seminar devoted to the investigation of the history of the Jewish people 
from the return from exile to the birth of Christ. Emphasis will be upon 
the literature (both canonical and non-canonical) of this period against the 
background of social, economic, political, and cultural events. Attention 
will also be given to the rise of Jewish sects. 
Prerequisite: B141 2 credits 

B617 APOCALYPTIC Newsome 

An exploration of Jewish and Christian apocalyptic, both canonical and 
extra-canonical, in the effort to understand the world view and theological 
outlook of those groups and individuals responsible for this distinctive 
literature. 2 or 3 credits 

B619 GOD THE FATHER: BIBLICAL AND 

THEOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES Gunn, Stevenson-Moessner 

This seminar will consider how the image of God as father functions in 
the Bible and in the life and worship of the Church today. It will seek to 
understand the feminist critique of this language and to explore possible 
responses. 

3 credits 

Ancient Languages 

B021 ESSENTIALS OF GREEK Staff 

An intensive study of the essential elements of Koine Greek grammar, 
syntax, and vocabulary preparatory to reading the Greek New Testament. 
Required of all students not having taken Greek in college. 

Summer Session Only 6 credits 



35 



B526 TRANSLATING THE GREEK LECTIONARY Cousar 

This is a second-level course in the use of the Greek language, emphasizing 
vocabulary building, syntax, and translation. 2 credits 

B527 GREEK READING Moessner 

A course designed to build upon elementary Greek grammar and basic 
exegesis in preparation for additional courses in exegesis, for biblical elec- 
tives, and, in time, for ordination exams. 
Prerequisite: B153 2 credits 

B620 HEBREW READING Gunn, Newsome 

Rapid reading of selections from the Hebrew Old Testament with a view 
to increasing facility in the use of the language; emphasis on grammatical 
structures and vocabulary. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 2 or 3 credits 

B623 ARAMAIC Newsome 

A study of the essential elements of Palestinian Jewish Aramaic as these 
relate to the Aramaic portions of Ezra and Daniel and to the Aramaic 
elements in the New Testament. 
Prerequisite: B222 3 credits 

Old Testament Based on Hebrew Text 

B631 OLD TESTAMENT EXEGESIS: JEREMIAH Gunn 

A close reading of selected passages from the Book of Jeremiah, with special 
attention to the way the prophet's distinctive proclamation is mediated 
through conventional language and literary forms and the power of poetry. 
Prerequisite: BN222 3 credits 

B632 EXEGESIS OF ISAIAH 40-55 Gunn 

A close reading of selected passages (including the "servant songs") from 
Isaiah 40-55 (Deutero-Isaiah), with special attention to the way the proph- 
et's distinctive proclamation is mediated through conventional literary 
forms, traditions of myth and history and, above all, the power of poetry. 

3 credits 

B633 OLD TESTAMENT EXEGESIS: AMOS Newsome 

The Hebrew text of the Book of Amos will be examined in the effort to 

identify major theological themes and literary forms. 

Prerequisite: B222 3 credits 



36 



B635 AUTHORS, TEXTS, AND READERS: CONTEMPORARY 

APPROACHES TO BIBLICAL INTERPRETATION Gunn 

This seminar will delineate some of the major ways of reading the Bible 
today and attempt to chart the relationship between them. It will relate 
these interpretive strategies to contemporary critical theory, including fem- 
inist theory. The primary (but not exclusive) focus will be on Old Testament 
narrative, using particular biblical texts (from Genesis, Judges, Samuel, and 
Daniel) and particular works of criticism by way of illustration. 
Prerequisites: B141, B153, B154, B222/223, and permission of instructor 

2 or 3 credits 

B639 BIBLICAL RESEARCH SEMINAR: THE SERVANT OF THE 

LORD Gunn, Moessner 

The seminar's work will center on the "servant songs" of the Book of Isaiah 
and the way these texts have meaning through their relationships with 
each other, with their immediate context in chapters 40-55, and with other 
Old and New Testament texts - for example, stories of Moses, Samson and 
Elijah, the Gospel passion narratives, and Acts. This discussion of "inter- 
textuality" will raise important questions of interpretive method in exe- 
gesis. Other subjects will be the center in future years. 2 or 3 credits 

Old Testament Based on English Text 

B542 PSALMS AS THE VOICE OF FAITH Brueggemann 

This course will consider the theological resources in the book of Psalms. 
Attention will be given to recent critical scholarship, to the interface of 
worship and theology, and to Israel's relentless articulation of new char- 
acterizations of God. 2 credits 

B544 PSALMS Brueggemann 

This course will explore the faith resources offered in the book of the 
Psalms, with special attention given to the points of contact between the 
poems and current life-situations. This will be done by considering the 
God who is addressed in the Psalms, the difference these prayers make in 
one's daily life and the interrelatedness of the Psalms to daily pastoral 
crises and to use in liturgical settings. 2 credits 

B545 INTRODUCTION TO THE HEBREW PROPHETS Newsome 

An overview of the prophetic tradition within ancient Israel in which special 
attention is given to the theological themes of the several books of the 
prophetic corpus of the Old Testament. The cultural context in which 
individual prophetic personalities lived and worked is also examined for 
insights into the form and content of the prophetic message. 

2 or 3 credits 



37 



B546 OLD TESTAMENT WISDOM LITERATURE: WISDOM AND THE 
FEMININE Gunn 

An exploration of the way women are portrayed and of feminine imagery 
generally in the wisdom literature, especially the Book of Proverbs 1-9 and 
in related literature, including the Wisdom of Solomon, Ecclesiasticus and 
key New Testament texts. Issues discussed will include: the poetry of 
Scripture, meaning and metaphor, sophia and logos, and current feminist 
criticism of the Bible. 2 or 3 credits 

B640 POWER AND PROVIDENCE IN THE BOOKS OF SAMUEL 

Brueggemann 

A study of I and II Samuel, paying attention to the literary techniques and 
strategies of the text, and to the theological resources in the narrative. The 
interface to ministry will be concerned wih the odd convergence of cunning 
political power and the inscrutable purpose of God, asking how that same 
convergence is at work in our social context. 3 credits 

B644 THE BOOK OF ISAIAH Brueggemann 

This course will pursue the new canonical questions about the theological 
cohension of First, Second and Third Isaiah to seek to understand how, if 
they are held together, they demonstrate a theology of the City (of Jeru- 
salem). 2 credits 

B645 MESSAGE OF THE PSALMS Newsome 

A study of the Psalms from various perspectives: historical, exegetical and 
homiletical. Designed to make the literature available to the pastor as a 
worshiper, scholar and preacher. 3 credits 

B646 PENTATEUCH Brueggemann 

This course will review recent scholarship on the Pentateuch and consider 
the Pentateuch as the foundational document of Jewish and Christian faith. 
Consideration of critical methods which serve the theological-interpretive 
task will be considered. 3 credits 

B647 FROM DEUTERONOMY TO KINGS: A VIEW FROM THE 

WILDERNESS Gunn 

A brief survey of current work on the composition and purpose of the 
great Deuteronomistic History" prefaces an attempt at a new and integrated 
reading. This core section of the O.T. issues a radical challenge to church 
and nation today. 2 or 3 credits 

B648 KING DAVID IN HISTORY, LITERATURE AND ART Gunn 

This seminar investigates the figure of David in the Bible (including N.T.) 
and beyond: topics include (amongst others) medieval theology and art, 
reformation politics, renaissance sculpture, nineteenth century preaching, 
and modern drama. A study of the use and abuse of the Bible. 

2 or 3 credits 



38 



B649 MEANING IN BIBLICAL NARRATIVE: THE BOOK OF JUDGES 

Gunn 

A literary study of the Book of Judges, paying attention to features such 
as character, plot, point of view, repetition, redundancy, informational 
gaps, reporting and reported speech, and irony. The course will explore 
some of the individual stories of Judges, consider the Book of Judges as a 
whole, and ask how it relates to its (canonical) literary context. This will 
lead to the unfolding of theological dimensions of the book and raise major 
questions about how readers find meaning in narrative texts. Feminist 
criticism will be a significant focal point. 2 or 3 credits 

New Testament Based on Greek Text 

B551 EXEGESIS OF THE FOURTH GOSPEL Cousar, Moessner 

An exegetical study of the gospel with emphasis on structure, historical 
background and dominant motifs. Analysis of selected sections of the Greek 
text. Prerequisites: B153, B154 3 credits 

B552 GOSPEL OF JOHN O'Day 

This course is an exegesis of the Gospel of John. Students may work with 
either the English or Greek text. Learning objectives are: sharpening of 
exegetical skills; familiarity with critical issues in Fourth Gospel interpre- 
tation; familiarity with distinctive traits of the Fourth Gospel, the Johannine 
portrait of Jesus, and Johannine theology; reflection on the theological and 
pastoral possibilities of the Fourth Gospel narrative. 

3 credits 

B553 EXEGESIS OF GALATIANS Cousar 

An analysis and interpretation of the Greek text of Galatians. 
Prerequisite: B153 3 credits 

B651 THE GOSPEL OF JOHN Cousar 

This course will be based on the English text of John, but will be structured 
so that those wishing to use the Greek text will be able to do so. We shall 
engage in a literary and theological study of the Gospel with an eye toward 
preaching. 3 credits 

B652 EXEGESIS OF ROMANS Cousar, Gaventa 

An interpretation of the Epistle to the Romans, within the framework of 

Paul's theology. 

Prerequisite: B153 3 credits 

B653 EXEGESIS OF EPHESIANS Cousar 

Ephesians is a "masterly statement on the work of God in the world and 
church, expressed not by the passion of polemic or in the logic of argu- 



39 



mentation but by prayerful meditation" (Luke Johnson). The course will 
be organized to allow those wishing to to work from the English text. 

3 credits 

B656 THE TASK OF BEING THE CHURCH IN THE WORLD Daniel 

An exploration of the General Epistles of James, 1 and 2 Peter, and Jude 
focusing on the ways in which the Christian faith is to be lived in the world 
and asking, "How does the gospel relate to the ongoing life of the world? 
How does the Christian survive and function in a world of diverse values, 
learning from and engaging critically those values? How is the church to 
be the church in the world?" The course will explore the struggles of the 
early church reflected in these texts and find light for our own time. 

2 credits 

New Testament Based on English Text 

B567 CORINTHIAN CORRESPONDENCE Gaventa 

This is an exegetical course emphasizing Paul's controversy with the Cor- 
inthian Christians and the continuing significance of that controversy for 
the Christian faith. 3 credits 

B569 GENERAL EPISTLES Staff 

A study of the English text of the Epistles of James, I, II Peter and Jude in 
their historical setting and present relevance. 2 credits 

B665 EPISTLE TO THE ROMANS Cousar, Gaventa 

A study of Paul's Letter to the Romans, in the context of Pauline theology. 
Particular emphasis will be given to application to current ministry. 

3 credits 

B667 ACTS OF THE APOSTLES Moessner 

A careful reading in the English text of the fulfillment of the history of 
salvation through the unfolding drama of the eschatalogical split of Israel 
into the messianic remnant and the "hardened" people of God. Special 
emphasis on the relation of the Church to the Jewish people and preaching 
from the Acts today. 2 or 3 credits 

B668 GOSPEL OF LUKE Daniel 

A study in English of the Gospel of Luke with particular emphasis given 
to lectionary passages with concern for theology and praxis. 3 credits 

B762 WITHOUT LUKE? Ormond 

If the Gospel of Luke were missing from the canon, what treasures of 
Christian tradition and faith would be lacking? This course will make a 



40 



study of the Gospel of Luke with particular attention to passages which 
are unique to Luke's Gospel. For example, what contributions to our un- 
derstanding of Jesus Christ are made by Luke's birth narrative, Lukan 
parables, resurrection account, and reference to the ascension? 3 credits 

B769 THE PREACHER AND THE GOSPEL OF JOHN Ormond 

A study of the Gospel of John from the point of view of the preacher. 
Attention will be given to the overall structure, unique featues, and themes 
of the Gospel of John. 3 credits 

Biblical Theology 

B671 OLD TESTAMENT THEOLOGY: THE GOD OF THE OLD 

TESTAMENT Gunn 

Grounded in the study of representative texts, this course seeks to build 
up a picture of the God who emerges from the pages of the Old Testament. 
God and justice, judgment and love, the limitations of God, God and the 
feminine are among themes explored. 2 or 3 credits 

B672 THEOLOGY AND NARRATIVE IN THE ACTS OF THE 

APOSTLES Gaventa 

This course explores the relationship between Luke's narrative and his 
theology, giving attention to their implications for preaching and teaching 
from Acts today. 3 credits 

B675 ROOTS OF NEW TESTAMENT CHRISTOLOGY Moessner 

A seminar devoted to reading texts in translation from the intertestamental 
period which describe Jewish hopes and expectations for a Messiah or 
'Anointed One.' Particular attention will be focused on the ways New 
Testament texts both reflect and reject Jewish hopes and to the issues 
confronted in preaching these texts in a Judeo-Christian context today. 
Prerequisites: B141, B161; B514 strongly recommended 3 or 4 credits 

B676 THEMES IN PAULINE THEOLOGY Cousar, Gaventa 

Selected themes in the theology of Paul will be investigated in depth. The 
course will be structured as a seminar with student opportunity for en- 
gaging the rest of the class in a vigorous learning experience. 
Prerequisite: B161 3 credits 

B677 MIRACULOUS AND MUNDANE: 

TEXT, REVELATION, AND INTERPRETATION Gunn 

Based on close reading of selected Old Testament texts, the course will 
outline a way of organizing our understanding of God in the Old Testament 
by starting from the texts of common human experience rather than those 
of miracles and great marvels (the "mighty acts of God"): Ruth, Song of 



41 



Songs, Esther, Jephthah's daughter, Rachel and Leah, the marriage of 
Hosea are some of the starting points. Though Hebrew is not required, 
some knowledge would be an advantage. 3 credits 

B678 THEOLOGY OF THE CROSS IN THE NEW 

TESTAMENT Cousar 

A seminar providing an opportunity for interested students to engage in 
research of an important New Testament theme. The primary concerns are 
exegetical. 3 credits 

B679 STUDY IN OLD TESTAMENT THEOLOGY Brueggemann 

The course is concerned with the primary theological tensions that are 
present in the traditions of the Old Testament. Major attention will be 
given to Israel's understanding of God as it is articulated in aniconic and 
iconic tradition. 3 credits 

B775 PREACHING AND TEACHING THE 

MIRACLE STORIES Daniel 

This course is an exploration of the form, function, and theological import 
of miracle stories in Synoptic Gospels and Acts with a view to discovering 
their importance for teaching and preaching. The hermeneutical issues 
involved in reclaiming these stories will be explored from a number of 
different perspectives. 3 credits 

Independent Studies 

The following courses provide an opportunity to engage in individualized 
work on various problems in the Biblical area under the supervision of an 
instructor. 

B692 EXEGETICAL RESEARCH IN 

OLD TESTAMENT Brueggemann, Gunn, Newsome 

Any term Up to 4 credits 

B693 RESEARCH IN OLD TESTAMENT CRITICISM OR 

THEOLOGY Brueggemann, Gunn, Newsome 

Any term Up to 4 credits 

B695 EXEGETICAL RESEARCH IN 

NEW TESTAMENT Cousar, Gaventa, Moessner 

Any term Up to 4 credits 

B696 RESEARCH IN NEW TESTAMENT CRITICISM OR 

THEOLOGY Cousar, Gaventa, Moessner 

Any term Up to 4 credits 



42 



HISTORICAL-DOCTRINAL AREA 

FACULTY: Frederick O. Bonkovsky (Chairperson), Glenn R. Bucher, Rob- 
ert Leon Carroll, T. Erskine Clarke, Catherine Gunsalus Gonzalez, Justo 
Luis Gonzalez, Shirley C. Guthrie, Jr., Douglas W. Oldenburg, James 
A. Overbeck, Robert S. Smith, George W. Stroup, William A. Thurston. 

Required courses for M.Div. and, as marked, for M.A. in Youth Ministry. 

HD121 THE CHURCH THROUGH THE REFORMATION 

PERIOD C. Gonzalez 

An introduction to the history of the Church, including its doctrine, struc- 
ture, and interaction with the surrounding culture. The period from the 
close of the New Testament times through the seventeenth century will 
be studied. Also required for M.A. in Youth Ministry. 
Fall 5 credits 

HD122 THE MODERN CHURCH Clarke, C. Gonzalez 

This course is a continuation of HD121. A major focus will be on the 
religious history of the United States. Special attention will be given to the 
relationship between religion and culture in American life. 
Spring 4 credits 

HD181 CHURCH AND CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY Thurston & Staff 

A study of the values, systems and structures which form the context for 
ministry in the United States and the world today to provide insights and 
skills for contemporary Christian witness. Also required for M.A. in Youth 
Ministry. Prerequisite: PI 12 
Spring 3 credits 

HD233-234 CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY Guthrie, Stroup 

A study of the Christian faith from the perspective of the classical and 
contemporary Reformed tradition in conversation with other theological 
traditions. Attention is given both to the development of doctrine and to 
its interpretation for the life and ministry of the church in the modern 
world. Also required for M.A. in Youth Ministry. 
Prerequisites: HD121, HD122 

Fall 3 credits 

Spring 4 credits 

HD241 ALTERNATIVE CONTEXT FOR MINISTRY Staff 

A combined academic and experiential course to deepen experience and 
understanding of a significantly different cultural context and the mission 
of the Church in that context. Also to provide opportunity for theological 
reflection on the experience and its implications for ministry. In 1989-90 



43 



the contexts were the inner city of Atlanta, Appalachia, the Caribbean, 
Central America (Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Guatemala), and Hungary. 
Prerequisite: HD181 

Winter 4 credits 

HD272 CHRISTIAN ETHICS Bonkovsky 

A study of the Biblical, theological and philosophical foundations of Chris- 
tian ethics for guidance in Christian decision-making. Also required for 
M.A. in Youth Ministry. 
Prerequisite: HD181 
Spring 3 credits 

Elective Courses 

General 

HD511 HISTORY OF THE DEVOTIONAL TRADITION 

OF THE CHURCH C. Gonzalez 

A consideration of the classic literature from various movements within 
the church's history that have stressed the devotional life, including forms 
of monasticism, certain of the mystics, and later authors from both Prot- 
estant and Roman Catholic circles. 2 credits 

HD610 INTRODUCTION TO THE AMERICAN CONTEXT Clarke 

This course is designed to provide internationals a deeper understanding 
of American religious, social, and cultural traditions, to give them a his- 
torical and social context for their studies in the U.S., to help them place 
their theological studies in the larger context of American society and to 
explore the complex relationships between religion and culture in American 
life. 3 credits 

Historical Studies 

HD521 REFORMED CHURCHES IN THE 

BRITISH ISLES Overbeck 

Emphasis will be given to a survey of the history of Protestantism in Scot- 
land, England and Ireland from 1560 to the present, with special attention 
to the history of Presbyterianism and origins of the Presbyterian movement 
in the British Isles. 2 or 3 credits 

HD524 THE LIBERAL TRADITION IN AMERICAN RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Clarke 

A seminar which explores the history of religious liberalism in the U.S. 

2 or 3 credits 



44 



HD525 ISSUES IN AMERICAN CULTURE Clarke 

A seminar on major cultural developments in the U.S. since World War 
II. Special attention is given to the implications for the life and work of the 
church. 2 credits 

HD526 CONTEMPORARY RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS Clarke 

A seminar on contemporary movements in American religion, with special 
emphasis on cults, sects, and para-church groups. 3 credits 

HD528 EUROPEAN CHURCH IN AN AGE OF 

REVOLUTION Overbeck 

Beginning with the French Revolution of 1789, the course will investigate 
the ways Christian churches have responded to and have been changed 
by revolutions. A working definition of revolution (political, social, eco- 
nomic or intellectual) will be sought. Understanding the role of churches 
in contemporary revolutions will be one objective. 2 credits 

HD620 A HISTORY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

(U.S.A.) Clarke 

A study of the ways Presbyterians in the U.S.A. have developed in relation 
to a changing society. Special attention will be given to developments in 
theology, social concerns, and institutional structures. 
Prerequisite: HD122 3 credits 

HD621 PERSPECTIVES ON THE MODERN EUROPEAN 

REFORMED CHURCH Overbeck 

The course will survey the establishment, development, character, and 
general history of European Reformed churches in France, Switzerland, 
Germany, Holland, Italy and Hungary. The origins, development, and 
operation of the World Alliance of Reformed Churches will be examined. 

2 credits 

HD623 ENGLISH PURITANISM Overbeck 

The primary objective of this course is to trace the origins of English and 
Scottish Presbyterianism - the foundation of American Presbyterianism. 
Beginning with Henry VIII in 1531, the course considers the Elizabethan 
Settlement, the concern for a thorough going reformation of the church, 
the demands made on James I (for instance, a new translation of the Bible), 
the English Civil War, the Westminster Assembly and Confession. "When 
England was Presbyterian ,, is the subtitle of the study. 2 or 3 credits 

HD624 FROM DIXIE TO THE SUNBELT Clarke 

A course intended to provide an understanding of the historical and social 
context for ministry in the "New South." It is designed to help explore the 
particular histories, traditions, and social forces which shape communities. 

3 credits 



45 



HD625 REVIVALISM IN AMERICA Overbeck 

A study of revivalism in American church history from Jonathan Edwards 
through Billy Graham and the Jesus Movement, the course will focus on 
the techniques of revivalism, i.e., camp meetings, emotional preaching and 
Gospel music. Denominations which have especially benefited from reviv- 
alism will be emphasized. 2 or 3 credits 

HD626 AMERICAN CIVIL RELIGION Overbeck 

An investigation of the relationship between American politics, history and 
religion (particularly Protestant Christianity). 2 or 3 credits 

HD628 FAITH AND WEALTH IN ANCIENT CHURCH /. Gonzalez 

Dealing with the first four centuries of the Christian era, this course will 
examine Christian understandings of wealth, property, poverty and related 
issues against the backdrop of Greco-Roman views on the same matters. 

2 credits 

HD629 HISTORY OF FUNDAMENTALISM Clarke 

A seminar on the history of Fundamentalism in the U.S. 

Prerequisite: HD122 2 or 3 credits 

Doctrinal Studies 

HD531 THE THEOLOGY OF CALVIN 

C. Gonzalez, Guthrie, Kline, Stroup 

A seminar which concentrates on the Institutes. Each year a different section 
will be studied and compared with the subsequent development of Re- 
formed theology. 2 credits 

HD533 INTRODUCTION TO THEOLOGY Guthrie 

An introduction to the study of theology in preparation for Reformed 
Theology in the second year, dealing with the methodology, language and 
content of systematic theology. 2 or 3 credits 

HD630 JUSTIFICATION: CONTEMPORARY INTERPRETATION Stroup 

John Calvin describes justification as "the main hinge on which religion 
turns." What is justification, and how does the church today make this 
central doctrine intelligible? Attention will be given to New Testament texts 
and to discussions of the doctrine in classical theology. One major issue 
will be the hermeneutical question of how to interpret justification today. 

3 credits 



46 



HD631 NARRATIVE THEOLOGY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR 

MINISTRY Stroup 

A seminar on the recent proposals concerning the use of narrative in the- 
ology. The course is in two parts; the first examines some components of 
narrative theology, and the second explores the implications of narrative 
theology for areas of the church's life such as homiletics, Christian edu- 
cation, and pastoral care. 3 credits 

HD633 THE THEOLOGIES OF SCHLEIERMACHER AND 

KIERKEGAARD C. Gonzalez 

A lecture course in which we will study the thought of these two major 
19th century theologians. Special attention will be given to comparing the 
structure of their theologies and to their influence on 20th century thought. 
Prerequisites: HD121-122 3 credits 

HD634 THE THEOLOGY OF KARL BARTH Guthrie 

A seminar which studies intensively a section of the Church Dogmatics. 
Prerequisites: HD233-234 2 credits 

HD635 CONTEMPORARY CHRISTOLOGY Stroup 

A seminar on some of the major issues in contemporary Christology, with 
special focus on the interpretation of the incarnation, atonement and res- 
urrection. 2 credits 

HD636 THEOLOGICAL METHOD Kline 

A seminar dealing with recent literature on theological method. 2 credits 

HD637(737) THE THEOLOGY OF PAUL TILLICH Kline 

A study of one or more sections of Systematic Theology in the context of 
classical Christian theology and contemporary theological thought. 
Prerequisites: HD233-234 or permission of the instructor 3 credits 

HD638 THE THEOLOGY OF STEWARDSHIP Hall 

A comprehensive course of lectures and seminars on the biblical and the- 
ological metaphor of "the steward," designed to reflect on its potential as 
an appropriate symbol of human identity and vocation in a world con- 
fronted by such critical issues as injustice, the lack of peace, and the deg- 
radation of creation. 3 credits 

HD639 THE THEOLOGY OF JURGEN MOLTMANN Guthrie 

A seminar dealing with major themes in Moltmann's theology. 
Prerequisites: HD233-234 2 credits 



47 



HD737 THEOLOGICAL THEMES FOR CONTEMPORARY MINISTRY 

Kline 

A seminar discussing the theological roots of such ministry themes as 
worship, evangelism, stewardship, interfaith dialogue, moral discourse. 

3 credits 

HD546 THEOLOGY OF LITURGY C. Gonzalez 

A lecture and discussion course on the doctrinal significance of liturgical 
practice: the liturgical year, the sacraments, parts of worship, etc. Special 
attention will be given to the interpretation of Biblical texts within the 
liturgical setting in which they are to be employed. 3 credits 

HD641 CONTEMPORARY THEOLOGY Guthrie, Stroup 

This seminar will cover selected topics having to do with the nature of 
human identity, the individual's relation to community, the significance 
of memory, and what it is in human beings which accounts for the search 
for transcendence. Prerequisites: HD233-234 2 or 3 credits 

HD643 THE THEOLOGY OF WORK Kline 

A study of employment, jobs, careers, leisure, unemployment, retirement, 
and other issues of the workplace. A focus on ministry of the church to 
people in relation to the world defined by work. 3 credits 

HD644 PREACHING AT THE OCCASION OF THE 

SACRAMENTS C. Gonzalez 

A seminar-workshop concerned with the relationship of preaching and the 
sacraments. Particular attention will be given to the hermeneutical signif- 
icance of the sacraments in Biblical interpretation, as well as to the theo- 
logical significance of preaching on sacramental occasions. 2 credits 

HD645 PROVIDENCE Stroup 

An examination of what some contemporary theologians have said about 
God's relation to the world and God's presence and activity in history. 

2 or 3 credits 

HD646 FAITH AND RIGHTEOUSNESS: A THEOLOGY OF H. 

RICHARD NIEBUHR Kline 

A seminar on the theological and ethical writings of H. Richard Niebuhr. 
Prerequisite: HD233-234 or permission of instructor 3 credits 

HD647 LIBERATION THEOLOGY Guthrie 

A study of various theologies written from the perspective of the people 
who are oppressed and excluded. Special attention is given to theologies 
coming from the "third world" and from blacks. 
Prerequisites: HD233-234 2 credits 



48 



HD648 THEORIES OF JUSTICE Guthrie 

A seminar to explore the meaning of justice, expecially with regard to the 
question of what basic economic goods and services should be distributed. 
Various conservative and liberal classical views will be studied and eval- 
uated from the perspective of Christian faith. 2 credits 

HD649 CONFESSIONAL LITERATURE OF THE 

REFORMED CHURCHES Guthrie, Stroup 

A seminar making a comparative study of the Reformed Confessions of 

the sixteenth, seventeenth, and twentieth centuries. 

Prerequisites: HD233-234 4 credits 

HD744 LITURGICAL PREACHING C. Gonzalez 

A seminar-workshop concerned with the relationship of preaching and the 
sacraments. Particular attention will be given to the hermeneutical signif- 
icance of the sacraments in Biblical interpretation, as well as to the theo- 
logical significance of preaching on sacramental occasions. The significance 
of the liturgical year will also be considered. 3 credits 

ATA451 INTERSEMINARY SEMINAR Interseminary Staff 

An occasional seminar (composed of students and professors from Colum- 
bia, Candler School of Theology, the Interdenominational Theological Cen- 
ter) to study a current theological issue or theologian. 3 credits 

Philosophical Studies 

HD551 PHILOSOPHICAL INTRODUCTION Kline 

A study of philosophical questions, terminology, and systems as they relate 
to the theological formulations of the church. 2 credits 

HD651 THEOLOGICAL HERMENEUTICS Stroup 

A seminar on the philosophical and theological hermeneutics of Paul Ri- 
coeur. Special attention will be given to Ricoeur's early work on evil and 
his more recent work on metaphor and biblical texts. 3 credits 

HD652 THEOLOGY AND LANGUAGE Kline 

A seminar dealing with classical and contemporary issues about language 
in theology. Topics will include such items as analogy, symbol, existence, 
analysis, story, metaphor, experience. 
Prerequisites: HD233-234 2 credits 



49 



Mission and Ecumenics 

HD562 CHRISTIAN UNITY: THE ECUMENICAL MOVEMENT Brown 

A study of the Ecumenical Movement including the following subjects: the 
Biblical and theological basis for unity, history of the worldwide Christian 
movement, unity and mission, the national and world Councils of 
Churches, local participation in the movement toward unity. 

2 or 3 credits 

HD563 AREA STUDIES — ASIA, AFRICA, LATIN AMERICA Staff 

A seminar which deals with the history, distinctive characteristics, and 
present status of Christianity in a specific geographic area against the back- 
ground of the political, social and economic situation. Will focus on op- 
portunities for mission, current issues and ecumenical relationships. Each 
year the seminar is offered, a different geographical area will be considered. 

2 or 3 credits 

HD565 CROSS CULTURAL COMMUNICATION Staff 

An introductory course in the communication of the Gospel across cultural 
boundaries both abroad and within the United States. The seminar will 
deal with the nature of culture, communication and listening skills, inter- 
cultural awareness, and handling cultural conflict and culture shock. De- 
signed for those interested in working with and understanding cultures 
and sub-cultures different from our own in this increasingly pluralistic 
world. 2 credits 

HD662 CHRISTIAN ENCOUNTER WITH OTHER 

RELIGIONS AND CULTS Brown 

A seminar dealing with the relationship of the Christian faith to living 
religions of today. Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam and the religions of China 
will be explored. Will focus on the relationship between the lordship of 
Jesus Christ and issues of religious pluralism, dialogue, and the impact of 
Eastern religious cults on American life. 3 credits 

HD663 CHRISTIANITY AND REVOLUTION IN CHINA Brown 

A case study of Christianity in a Marxist Society which will deal with the 
rise of Christianity and Communism in the world's oldest and most pop- 
ulous country. Emphasis will be on the reemergence of the church in a 
post-Maoist China. Implications for the mission of the church in the U.S. 
and the Third World are a major focus. 2 or 3 credits 



50 



HD664 CONTEMPORARY ROMAN CATHOLIC 

THEOLOGY C. Gonzalez 

A view of recent developments in Roman Catholic theology based partic- 
ularly upon the documents of the Second Vatican Council and the writings 
of other Catholic theologians since then. 
Prerequisites: HD121-122 4 credits 

HD665 U.S. AS A FOREIGN MISSION FIELD Brown 

The focus of the seminar will be Lesslie Newbigin's thesis that Western 
civilization is in crisis and that the church should be called to a "missionary 
encounter" with our own culture. Texts will be Newbigin's The Other Side 
of 1984 and Foolishness to the Greeks. 2 credits 

Ethics and Society 

HD570 CRISIS ETHICS Staff 

A seminar to discuss if our post-1945 knowledge of the Holocaust has 
fundamentally changed ethics and theology. The crises of Christianity and 
Western culture represented in Hiroshima and Auschwitz will also be stud- 
ied. 3 credits 

HD574 SOCIETY, PERSONALITY, AND ETHICS Thurston, Patton 

This course introduces the insights of both social science (sociology, psy- 
chology and cultural anthropology), and social ethics into the roles of 
religion in the human situation. It examines the moral values, assumptions 
and reasoning of various arguments concerning the relation of religion to 
culture. This examination considers: 1) the social functions of religion in 
structuring human personality and society; 2) the social and psychological 
dynamics of religious and socio-cultural change; 3) the individual and cul- 
tural meanings of religion; and 4) the effects of modern pluralism on both 
religious and secular thought and action. Finally, the course concludes 
with an assessment of the critical dialogue between social science, social 
ethics and theology on the subject of morality and society. 3 credits 

HD576 BIBLICAL ETHICS Bonkovsky 

In whatever activities persons are involved, public or private (e.g., religion, 
politics, marriage, sex, economics, war), the commands of God reach us. 
A study of Biblical Ethics thus centers on the authority they bring to our 
lives and the directions in which we are led. 
Prerequisites: Previous work in Bible and in ethics 3 credits 

HD579 BIO-MEDICAL ETHICS Bonkovsky 

Christian teaching is brought to bear on selected issues, such as abortion, 
genetic manipulation, and death policy. 2 credits 



51 



HD670 CRISIS ETHICS Bonkovsky 

A course which considers post-1945 knowledge of the Holocaust and how 
such knowledge fundamentally shapes ethics, theological reflection, and 
the life of religious and secular communities. The crises of Christianity, 
western culture, and the human enterprise represented in Auschwitz and 
Hiroshima will be studied. Course will include input from and discourse 
with non-Christian as well as Christian prespectives. Course will meet off 
campus as well as on in order to experience other communities of moral 
discourse. Open to all students, but prior consultation with instructor is 
advisable. 2 credits 

HD672 ETHICS IN LIBERATION THEOLOGY: Blacks' and Women's 

Thurston 

The seminar will investigate critically the theological and ethical issues 
underlying radical moral arguments for blacks' and women's liberation in 
the United States. Particular attention is given to the different meanings 
of: moral community, liberation, immorality of oppression, moral agency, 
and the ethic of means to attain the liberation of African Americans and 
women. The course, to a limited extent, will explore also the interrelation- 
ship between these liberation movements and struggles for national lib- 
eration in the Third World. 

Prerequisites: Previous work in theology or ethics, or permission 
of instructor 3 credits 

HD673 ETHICS FOR BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL LIFE Bonkovsky 

A seminar to reflect on critical ethical issues which Christians and others 
face in their interactions with the worlds of business and the professions. 
Actual cases and contexts will be studied. Students will lead the seminar 
at several points. 

Prerequisites: HD181 or HD272 or experience in moral discourse or the 
professional world. 2 credits 

HD674 POLITICAL ETHICS IN THE REFORMED TRADITION: 

BARTH, NIEBUHR, AND MOLTMANN Thurston 

A seminar which studies critically the ethical-political thought of Karl Barth, 
Reinhold Niebuhr, and Jurgen Moltmann. It investigates their convergent 
and divergent understandings of Christian social responsibility in the di- 
vine-human enterprise of making an inclusive community of freedom, 
justice and peace in the world. It intends to serve students in developing 
moral arguments, from the standpoint of the "Reformed Tradition," with 
respect to contemporary issues of justice. 
Prerequisite: previous work in theology and ethics 3 credits 



52 



HD675 ETHICS AND URBAN LIFE Bonkovsky 

Consideration of ethical issues in the history and current life of American 
cities, especially Atlanta, Georgia. A central, organizing theme is the re- 
lation of sub-sections of the city to the interests of the broader urban 
community. Prerequisite: Previous work in ethics and permission of the 
instructor 3 credits 

HD676 ETHICS AND INTERNATIONAL POLICY Bonkovsky 

Consideration of the ways in which nations and other international actors, 
such as churches and multi-national corporations, act, with special atten- 
tion to the values which do and may influence behavior. 
Prerequisite: Previous work in ethics 2 or 3 credits 

HD677 THE THEOLOGY AND ETHICS OF 

MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. Thurston 

Examines critically the political theology and ethics of Martin Luther King, 
Jr. which inform his conception and strategy of racial justice. Particular 
attention is given to King's understanding of moral community, racial and 
social justice, immorality of racial oppression, moral agency, and the ethic 
of means to attain racial justice. The course will also explore the primary 
moral arguments of justice which compete with that of King with respect 
to the problematic of racial oppression. 
Prerequisite: Previous work in theology or ethics 3 credits 

HD678 ETHICAL THINKERS Bonkovsky 

A study of the writings of several recent ethicists with special attention to 
their methods and sources in "doing ethics." Thinkers may include Bon- 
hoeffer, Brunner, Frankena, Gustafson, Haering, H.R. Niebuhr, and Ram- 
sey. 
Prerequisite: Previous work in ethics 3 credits 

HD679 BIO-MEDICAL ETHICS Bonkovsky 

Exploration of pressing issues in contemporary American bio-medicine and 
medical care. Emphasizes moral discourse between ethics and medicine as 
well as within the medical sector. Students will need to interact thoughtfully 
with medical professionals and in medical settings. The course meets off 
campus as well as on campus. Students will want to become knowledgeable 
in a specific issue as well as gain more general exposure. 
Prerequisites: HD181 or HD272 or the equivalent 3 credits 

HD770 SOCIOLOGICAL STUDY OF THE CHURCH 

AND THE COMMUNITY Staff 

This course will focus on the interaction between the church and the com- 
munity through an analysis of the setting in which the church functions. 

3 credits 



53 



HD776 BIBLICAL ETHICS AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES Bonkovsky 

The Bible is normative for Judean-Christian communities, but the nature 
of Scriptural authority is hotly debated and diversely understood. Partic- 
ipants will survey various ways in which Biblical ethics is done and reflect 
on such contemporary issues as abortion or nuclear weapons in terms of 
how Scripture can give guidance to the communities of discourse and to 
pastor-theologians. 

3 credits. 

HD790 CHRISTOLOGY AT THE CROSSROADS Wells 

This course will examine the Christologies of contemporary western the- 
ologians, the response of Latin American theologies, and the relevance of 
the two types for a constructive Caribbean Christology. The student will 
be encouraged to articulate a personal Christology which is relevant to 
ministry in Jamaica. 3 credits 

INDEPENDENT STUDIES 

The following courses provide an opportunity to engage in individualized 
work on various topics in the Historical-Doctrinal Area under the super- 
vision of an instructor. 

HD691 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN HISTORY Clarke, Gonzalez 

Any term Up to 4 credits 

HD693 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN THEOLOGY Guthrie, Stroup 

Any term Up to 4 credits 

HD695 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PHILOSOPHY Kline 

Any term Up to 4 credits 

HD696 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN MISSION AND 

ECUMENICS Brown 

Any term Up to 4 credits 

HD697 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ETHICS Bonkovsky, Bucher, Thurston 
Any term Up to 4 credits 

HD698 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN AFRICAN AMERICAN THOUGHT 

AND PRAXIS Thurston 

Any term Up to 4 credits 



54 



PRACTICAL THEOLOGY AREA 

FACULTY: Robert Leon Carroll, Jr., Brian H. Childs (Chairperson), Philip 
R. Gehman, Douglas W. Hix (on sabbatic leave 1990-91), Wade P. Huie, 
Jr., Oscar J. Hussel, Ben C. Johnson, Sara Covin Juengst, Jasper N. 
Keith, Jr., John H. Patton, Robert H. Ramey, Jr., Lucy A. Rose, Jeanne 
Stevenson-Moessner, Christine Wenderoth. 

Required courses for M.Div. degree and, as marked, for M.A. in Youth 
Ministry 

PI 12 BECOMING A MINISTER TO PERSONS Staff 

This course seeks to enable students to grow in their understanding of 
persons and the nature of ministry. It provides a foundation for other 
disciplines within the pastoral field. Topics considered are the church's 
ministry, personal development, and community life. 
Fall 3 credits 

P143 INTRODUCTION TO WORSHIP Rose 

An introduction to the history, theology, and practice of worship in the 
Reformed and other traditions. 

Winter 1 credit 

P151 WORSHIP AND PREACHING Huie, Rose 

An introduction to the preaching ministry of the Church with the prepa- 
ration and delivery of sermons and with some attention to the practical 
concerns of worship, e.g., prayers, music, funerals. 
Prerequisites: B153, PI 12, P143 

Spring 3 credits 

P222 THE MINISTRY OF TEACHING Hussel 

An introduction to the teaching ministry of the church, including the phi- 
losophy and structure of Christian education, and the place of educational 
work in the life of the congregation. Attention will be given to the involve- 
ment of the pastor in education and the development of an educational 
style of ministry. Required for M.A. in Y.M. 
Prerequisite for Master of Divinity: PI 12 
Fall 3 credits 

P232 MINISTRY TO PERSONS Childs, Keith 

The course seeks to provide an understanding of pastoral care as a ministry 
of the church. Specific themes and skills related to the pastoral care of 
persons in their life experiences are explored through classroom presen- 
tations, verbatim materials, and literature. This course includes intensive 



55 



involvement in ministry to persons in a clinical setting, plus seminars. 
Prerequisite for Master of Divinity: P112 Required for M.A.Y.M. 

Fall or Spring 5 credits 

P381-382 CHURCH AND MINISTRY Ramey and Staff 

A consideration of the theory and practice of the church and its ministry 
in terms of the nature of church and of ministry in context, polity, and 
leadership skills. Students will be assigned to a congregation and make 
other observation visits. Non-Presbyterian students will study the polity 
of their denomination and administration of their sacraments in approved 
courses at other ATA schools or with a minister (chosen by Columbia) of 
their denomination. 
Prerequisites: SM210, HD233-234 
Fall and Spring 3 credits each semester 

Other Required Courses of M.A. in Youth Ministry 

P142 WORSHIP WITH YOUTH Staff 

A study of the foundations and purposes of worship and application, in 

a variety of ways, with youth. 

Winter 3 credits 

P224 EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM AND LEADERSHIP 

DEVELOPMENT— YOUTH Hussel 

General models of planning and decision making are examined and applied 
in ministry with youth through leadership recruitment, development and 
support and through knowledge of basic denominational programs and 
resources. 2 credits 

*P527 ADULT EDUCATION IN THE CONGREGATION Hussel 

A study of adults as learners and of forms of education for participation 

in the life and mission of the church and for the Christian life. 

Spring 3 credits 

P620 CHRISTIAN EDUCATION AND OLDER ADULTS Staff 

An exploration of the world of gerontology and Christian education. 
Prerequisite: P222 2 or 3 credits 

*P623 THE CHURCH AND THE CHILD Wenderoth 

The specialized needs of children (considered developmentally, sociolog- 
ically, and anthropologically) will be the central focus, but these will be 
considered within a broader understanding of Christian education as a 
discipline of practical theology. 3 credits 

*One or the other is required. 



56 



P624 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Wenderoth 

An examination and comparison of the developmental theories of Erikson, 
Piaget, Kohlberg, Fowler, Gilligan, Kegan, Levinson, and others, with a 
particular eye to how developmental theories can be applied to faith and 
religious development. 
Prerequisite: P222 3 credits 

P625 BASIC MINISTRY WITH YOUTH Staff 

A beginning exploration into the sociological and psychological basis for 
ministry for and with adolescents, including theoretical issues, examination 
of successful models, developmental concerns and resources available. 

3 credits 

P626 ADVANCED MINISTRY WITH YOUTH Staff 

Continues the exploration into ministry with/for youth. Specialized con- 
cerns such as spiritual formation, evangelism, stewardship, confirmation, 
juvenile delinquency are developed as well as continuing the dialogue for 
a wholistic understanding of youth ministry. 
Prerequisites: P222, P625 3 credits 

Elective Courses 

General 

P505 PRINCIPLES OF WRITING Archer 

A course designed to help the student become more confident and effective 
in writing tasks. It will review the basics of composition and common 
problems in grammar and usage, but will also help the student understand 
and develop the writing process, viewing it as both a critical and creative 
activity. Writing assignments from the students' concurrent courses will 
provide the basis for activities and discussion. The lecture/workshop format 
will allow time for general discussion and for individual help. Throughout, 
the concept of writing as ministry will be explored. non-credit 

P513 PERSONS AND MINISTRY Staff 

The issues of adulthood, vocation, parenting, and aging are studied as 
these relate to ministry. The course builds on the foundation provided by 
PI 12 and seeks to deepen understanding of ministry to persons in their 
development. Prerequisite: PI 12 2 credits 



57 



P515 FEMININE FOOTSTEPS IN THE PARISH: THE IMPACT OF 
WOMEN'S STUDIES IN THE GOSPEL MINISTRY 

S tevenson-Moess ner 

This introductory survey on the impact of Women's Studies in Religion as 
it affects the gospel ministry will include these materials: feminist her- 
meneutics; doctrinal considerations; partnership (male/female) in ministry; 
the male predicament in the midst of church change; practical, spiritual, 
and sociological aspects of women in ministry; forgiveness and reconcili- 
ation. 3 credits 

P516 WOMEN AND MINISTRY Stevenson-Moessner 

A comprehensive seminar covering the variety of women in a congrega- 
tional setting, highlighting women as recipients and initiators of ministry, 
and discussing such topics as self-esteem and spirituality. "Women" in- 
clude missionaries, two-thirds-world women, parishioners, and the female 
cleric; there will be a particular emphasis on the role of the spouse of a 
male minister. The seminar will address these questions: What is a useful 
ministry with women? What kind of caring is most helpful to the women 
in crises, including faith crises? Additional requirements for advance degree 
programs. 2 or 3 credits 

Christian Education 

P522 TEACHING WITH IMAGINATION Juengst 

This course will help students develop a more imaginative approach to 
teaching by experiencing a variety of teaching methods. Attention will be 
given to understanding how our theology affects our methodology. 

2 or 3 credits 

P524 EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM AND LEADERSHIP 

DEVELOPMENT Hussel 

General models of planning will be examined and applied for education 
in the congregation. Leadership recruitment, development and support are 
stressed and specific methods considered. Planned choice of curriculum 
and educational resources is included, with examination of specific re- 
sources. 
Fall 2 credits 

P525 FAITH DEVELOPMENT ACROSS THE LIFE CYCLE Wenderoth 

Faith development throughout the human life cycle will be explored using 
Fowler's schema as well as his antecedents and critics. The class will explore 
implications for pastoral counseling and Christian nurture in the congre- 
gation. 
Prerequisites: PI 12, P222 2 or 3 credits 



58 



P527 ADULT EDUCATION IN THE CONGREGATION Hussel 

A study of the adult and of adult education for participation in the life and 

mission of the church and for the Christian life. 

Prerequisites: PI 12, P222 3 credits 

P623 THE CHURCH AND THE CHILD Wenderoth 

The specialized needs of children (considered developmentally, sociolog- 
ically, and anthropologically) will be the central focus, but these will be 
considered within a broader understanding of Christian education as a 
discipline of practical theology. 3 credits 

P625 BASIC MINISTRY WITH YOUTH Staff 

A beginning exploration into the sociological and psychological basis for 
ministry for and with adolescents, including theoretical issues, examination 
of successful models, developmental concerns and resources available. 

3 credits 

P626 ADVANCED MINISTRY WITH YOUTH Staff 

Continues the exploration into ministry with/for youth. Specialized con- 
cerns such as spiritual formation, evangelism, stewardship, confirmation, 
juvenile delinquency are developed as well as continuing the dialogue for 
a wholistic understanding of youth ministry. 
Prerequisites: P222, P625 3 credits 

P724 THE MINISTRY OF THE CHURCH AND OLDER ADULTS 

Crossley 

This course will begin the exploration into the world of older adults in the 
American context, taking special note of the implications for the ministry 
of the Church. 3 credits 

Pastoral Care and Counseling 

P531 PASTORAL CARE AND THEOLOGY Childs 

Through lectures and reading seminars the literature in the field of pastoral 
care will be examined. Models for doing pastoral care and theological 
groundings of the pastoral approaches will be explicated. 
Prerequisite: P232 2 or 3 credits 

P531a PASTORAL CARE IN FILM AND LITERATURE Childs 

The empirical and rational ways of knowing are important ones used in 
pastoral care and pastoral theology. An intuitive way of knowing is also a 
way of knowing and one seemingly underdeveloped for most pastoral care 
persons. Experiencing art is one way to understand the intuitive way of 



59 



knowing. This course will investigate the limits and possibilities of intuitive 
knowing through the experience of film and literature. Along with reading 
in the history of art in the Christian Church, the course will concern itself 
with contemporary film and literature. 
Prerequisite: P232 2 or 3 credits 

P532 PASTORAL CARE IN CRISIS SITUATIONS Quids 

Examination of forms of crisis experience in modern life from psychological, 
sociocultural and theological perspectives. Theologically grounded ap- 
proaches to crisis ministry compared with current secular models of crisis 
intervention. 
Prerequisite: P232 2 or 3 credits 

P533 PASTORAL CARE IN PRIMARY MOMENTS Patton 

Lectures and case studies dealing with selected primary moments in the 
developmental process and some common critical incidents that call for 
pastoral care to developing persons. 
Prerequisite: PI 12 2 or 3 credits 

P534 PASTORAL CARE OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY LIFE 

Childs, Patton 

This course focuses on current developments and issues in marriage and 
family life as these relate to ministry. Various types of ministry to marriage 
and family life will be explored. Particular attention will be given to a 
theological understanding of marriage and family life. 
Prerequisite: PI 12 2 or 3 credits 

P535 MARRIAGE ENRICHMENT Keith 

A seminar for couples, discussing issues in contemporary Christian mar- 
riage and engaging in enrichment experiences, in order to strengthen the 
participants' marriages and prepare them for ministry to other marriages. 

2 or 3 credits 

P536 PASTORAL CARE OF CHILDREN AND FAMILIES Staff 

A seminar discussing the illnesses of children, family dynamics and pas- 
toral care of each plus clinical experience. In 1986 the location was Scottish 
Rite Hospital with Chaplain Imogene Bennett. 
Prerequisite: P232 3 credits 

P537 MINISTRY TO DEVELOPMENTALLY DISABLED PERSONS Keith 

A seminar discussing the disabilities and handicaps, personal and family 
dynamics, and enlightened treatment of the developmentally disabled per- 
sons plus clinical experience at a retardation center. 
Prerequisite: P232 3 credits 



60 



P538 MINISTRY TO DEEPLY TROUBLED PERSONS Keith 

A seminar discussing the dynamics and behaviors of deeply troubled per- 
sons, plus clinical experience in a mental health facility. 
Prerequisite: P232 3 credits 

P539 PASTORAL CARE AND THE AGING PROCESS Keith 

This course explores a variety of issues relating to the aging process and 
older adults. Community resources for the care of the aged are identfied. 
Specific proposals for parish programs are developed. Throughout the 
course theological dimensions of the aging process are sought. Includes a 
clinical component. 
Prerequisite: P232 3 credits 

P630 SPECIAL ISSUES IN PASTORAL CARE AND COUNSELING 

Childs 

An advanced seminar identifying and discussing the major special issues 
confronting pastoral care-giving in contemporary society. Such issues as 
violence, addiction, homosexuality, pandemic disease will be raised. Spe- 
cial projects will be generated from student and social issues raised ac- 
cording to the needs of the time. 
Prerequisite: P232 2 or 3 credits 

P630a TOWARD A PASTORAL CARE OF WOMEN Stevenson-Moessner 

The goal of this seminar is to respond more appropriately to the distinctive 
physical and psychological pain of women through the medium of pastoral 
care. Questions of personal identity and intimacy as well as female cyclical 
theories will be examined. Concepts of "caring" and "mothering," voca- 
tional motivations, therapeutic alignment with dominant systems, a wom- 
an's role as counselor/counselee and disciplines of support will be 
discussed. 2 or 3 credits 

P631 THEOLOGICAL DIMENSIONS OF PASTORAL CARE Patton 

This course will explore theological dimensions of pastoral care, along with 
certain understandings from psychodynamic theories and family systems 
theory, as one foundation for parish ministry. Particular attention will be 
given to the use of community resources and consultation. Primarily for 
D.Min. and Th.M. degree students; others must secure permission of the 
professor. 3 credits 

P631a FROM PASTORAL EXPERIENCE TO THEOLOGY Patton 

A seminar which focuses on theological reflection on one's pastoral ex- 
perience in order to develop a type of experiential theology. 
Prerequisite: P232 and HD234 3 credits 



61 



P632 SEMINAR IN FAMILY LIFE Keith 

This course seeks to provide an in-depth understanding of the literature, 
theories, and concepts of family life. Major resources to be considered will 
be psychological, sociological, and theological. 2 or 3 credits 

P633 THE DEVLOPMENT OF MODERN PASTORAL CARE Keith 

This course will research the literature, study the personalities, and con- 
sider the historical context of the pastoral care movement in the U.S. in 
the 20th century. 2 or 3 credits 

P634 SYSTEMS OF FAMILY PASTORAL COUNSELING Childs 

A survey and seminar exploring the various systems of family evaluation 
and therapy. Special emphasis will be placed upon the works of major 
theorists and clinicians (Minuchin, Bowen, Ackerman and Haley). The 
theological evaluation of family life and dysfunction will explored. For 
Th.M. and S.T.D. students; others must secure permission of the professor. 

3 credits 

P635 ETHICAL DILEMMAS IN PASTORAL CARE Patton 

Lectures and case studies are used to explore the boundaries of pastoral 
care and ethics. Issues such as abortion, sexuality, work and play, com- 
mitment to causes, use of economic resources, social responsibility, life 
and death, etc. will be considered. 2 or 3 credits 

P636 PASTORAL COUNSELING OF THE INDIVIDUAL Childs 

Theory and practice of time-limited, individual pastoral counseling. Basic 
principles of psychological and theological diagnosis; treatment planning; 
and treatment managment. Cases investigated will be those typically en- 
countered in the parish. Case studies, lectures, role playing, verbal reports 
will be used. Theological rationale of pastoral counseling will be explored. 
Prerequisite: P232 3 credits 

P637 PASTORAL CARE AND GRIEF Keith 

A study of the pastoral care response in situations of loss, the dimensions 
of the grief process, and the dynamics of personality involved in grief. 
Events of pastoral care in grief will be shared by the participants. For Th.M. 
and D.Min. students; others must secure permission of professor. 

3 credits 

P638 GRADUATE COUNSELING PRACTICUM Staff 

Graduate students in the pastoral counseling program are admitted to work 
under supervision at one of the several local pastoral counseling centers 
until the counseling center certifies achievement of the required level of 



62 



performance. At that time the student will be granted six credits. (Tuition 
for the course is paid directly to the counseling center at a rate established 
by Columbia and the center.) It is expected that upon completion of the 
practicum a student will have sufficient supervision to apply for member- 
ship in the American Association of Pastoral Counseling, Inc. Limited to 
students in the Th.M. in Pastoral Couseling. (Students may register for 
P638a, P638b, P638c for 2 credits per semester.) 
Prerequisite: Oral Examination by professors and supervisors 6 credits 

P639 PRINCIPLES OF PASTORAL SUPERVISION Keith 

This course will research philosophies of education, theories of learning 
and methods of supervision for a ministry of pastoral supervision. (Stu- 
dents may register for P639a, P639b, for 3 credits each semester.) 
Fall and Spring 6 credits 

P639a MEN AND WOMEN IN TRAVAIL AND TRANSITION: 
CONSIDERATIONS IN PASTORAL COUNSELING 

Stevenson-Moessner 

A seminar to discuss issues of men's and women's development, crises, 
and changes that are pertinent to parish work and pastoral care. 3 credits 

P734 MARRIAGE AND FAMILY COUNSELING THEORY Hightower 

This course will survey theory and practice of marriage and family coun- 
seling with particular attention to how this discipline can be used by the 
parish minister. Emphasis will be placed on case material presented by 
students and the application of theory to these cases. 3 credits 

P735 PASTORAL CARE: AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH Close 

A look at some of the right brain approaches to pastoral care and counseling: 
rapport building, metaphor, therapeutic rituals and ceremonies, guided 
meditation and behavioral assignments. 3 credits 

Worship 

P541 PRACTICUM IN WORSHIP AND PREACHING Huie, Rose 

This course is designed to further learning, growth, and competence in 
leading worship and preaching, with an emphasis on practice with the use 
of video. Plenaries meet for one hour a week with readings and discussions 
of key issues with special attention given to those chosen by the class. 
Small group lab sessions provide work with video where students tell 
stories, preach sections of sermons, work on communication skills, and 
lead selected acts of worship. Prerequisites: P143, P151 or equivalent 

2 credits 



63 



P542 WORSHIP IN THE REFORMED TRADITION Staff 

A study of the history, theology, and practice of worship in the Reformed 
tradition. The development of worship from the New Testament to the 
current day will be surveyed, with particular attention to the Reformed 
tradition in Europe and North America. Reformed views of Word and 
Sacrament will be examined, and lab exercises in the conduct of various 
worship services will be given. 
Spring 2 credits 

P544 HYMNOLOGY Davies 

A workshop series to examine the history, theology, musicianship, pastoral 
dynamics, and aesthetic dimension of hymns in general, with special ref- 
erence to selected hymns from the new Presbyterian Hymnbook. The course 
is designed to help students be more intentional in their choice of hymns 
for worship. Students will be helped to write their own hymns during the 
course. 2 credits 

P644 RENEWING WORSHIP THROUGH NEW LITURGICAL 

RESOURCES Huie 

The focus of this class is on the four liturgical resources recently produced 
by the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) on the Sunday service with the Lord's 
Supper, baptism, marriage, and the funeral, evaluating them in their ecu- 
menical context from theological, historical, and pastoral perspectives, and 
thus enriching our understanding of and leadership in worship. 
Prerequisite: P143, P151, or equivalent 3 credits 

Preaching 

P551 TASTING SERMONS Huie 

A seminar to study and discuss contemporary sermons by reading or lis- 
tening/viewing on tape. Beginning with sermons in The Twentieth Century 
Pulpit, a variety of types and styles of sermons which represent various 
denominations and different groups are tasted. 2 credits 

P552(652) DEVELOPING YOUR OWN PREACHING STYLE Rose 

A seminar in which students will (1) explore a variety of sermon types, 
designs, and techniques, (2) evaluate sermons of historical and contem- 
porary preachers, and (3) preach three sermons of their own. P652 requires 
additional work. 
Prerequisite: P151 2 credits 

P553 SITUATIONAL PREACHING Huie 

A seminar-workshop in the composition and delivery of sermons with 
particular attention given to situational issues in ministry - pastoral crises, 



64 



ethical issues, liturgical settings, and so forth. Video will be used to improve 

communication skills and to give opportunity to experiment with various 

styles. 

Prerequisite: P151 or equivalent 2 or 3 credits 

P654 PREACHING WORKSHOP AND SEMINAR Rose 

Students will explore a variety of sermon types, designs, and techniques, 
evaluate sermons of historical and contemporary preachers, preach three 
sermons of their own, and use video to work on communication skills. 

3 credits 

P658 CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO PREACHING Staff 

Recent developments in contemporary preaching, such as inductive and 
narrative preaching, will be critically examined in terms of theory and 
practice. 3 credits 

P659 PREACHING ON SPECIAL OCCASIONS Huie 

Designed to explore the significance of special occasions in ministry and 
how to address them in preaching. Some examples: rites like baptisms and 
funerals, festivals of the Christian year like Ascension and All Saints, and 
church seasons like missions and stewardship. Reading and lectures, writ- 
ing and delivering sermons. 
Prerequisites: P143, P151, or equivalents 3 credits 

P752 THE ART AND SCIENCE OF PREACHING WEEK IN AND 

WEEK OUT Crawford 

The burden of preaching too often drains the minister of imagination, 
passion, and exegetical skill. This course is designed to address these three 
issues as a way of reinvigorating the pastor's major calling. 3 credits 

Communication 

P560 THE MINISTER AS A SPEAKER Taylor 

A study of the principles of healthy and effective vocal expression and the 
application of these to speech in pulpit, committee meeting, and confer- 
ence. 3 credits 

P565 COLUMBIA CHOIR Davies 

A course for students interested in learning about church music through 
singing in a choir. A variety of musical styles will be offered each semester. 
May be taken for a maximum of 2 semesters for credit. 

1 credit per semester 



65 



P567 INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC IN WORSHIP Davies 

Students will be helped to develop their own philosophy on the use of 
music in worship, and, at the same time, will have the opportunity of 
learning to read music and use this skill in the playing of handbells. 

2 credits 

Evangelism 

P571 CONTEMPORARY DISCIPLESHIP Johnson 

The aim of this course is the development of a meaningful Christian lifestyle 
patterned on the biblical record of the life and ministry of Jesus. The course 
aims to enrich the lives of students and also to provide a model for dis- 
cipleship training in the local congregation. 3 credits 

P572 INTRODUCTION TO EVANGELISM Johnson 

An examination of the meaning of evangelism from both theological and 
historical perspectives, with a focus on pastoral ministry. 3 credits 

P573 EVANGELISM FOCUS Johnson 

A course to train students to lead and participate in a week-end event of 
witnessing, teaching, and preaching. Requires involvement in a week-end 
event in a congregation. P571 recommended. 2 credits 

P574 ON DISCERNING GOD'S WILL Johnson 

This course will endeavor to help each student answer the crucial question 
"How can I discern God's will?" The course will consist of student research, 
input and grappling with existential personal issues. 2 credits 

P575 PASTOR AS EVANGELIST Johnson 

This course will offer a positive, wholistic description of evangelism. It will 
explore the various pastoral roles with their evangelistic dimension. This 
course is especially helpful for juniors who are preparing for SM210. 

2 or 3 credits 

P576 SPIRITUAL FORMATION IN PREPARATION FOR MINISTRY 

Davies, Ramey 

Provides a setting for spiritual growth, offers instruction in prayer, provides 
structured group experiences and mutual support, and aims to strengthen 
ministerial formation. Recommended for first year students. 2 credits 

P671 TOWARD A THEOLOGY OF EVANGELISM Johnson, Wenderoth 

Beginning with a study of key theological categories — Revelation, Salva- 
tion, the Spiritual Presence, Salvation and the Church — students will work 



66 



toward developing evangelistic methods appropriate in a variety of con- 
temporary situations. 3 credits 

P672 C. JUNG AND SPIRITUALITY Johnson 

A seminar which investigates the seminal categories in the thought of Carl 
Jung and the implications of his thought for developing Christian spirit- 
uality. 2 or 3 credits 

P673 AN INTRODUCTION TO PASTORAL SPIRITUALITY AND 

SPIRITUAL DIRECTION Johnson 

This course will develop the thesis that the call of God and the minister's 
response to it are the dynamic elements which constitute vital spirituality. 
It will focus on the minister as a spiritual person and the functions of 
ministry as an expression of this identity. The course will expose each 
minister to a variety of ways of revitalizing his/her relation with God. 

3 credits 

P674 CREATING EFFECTIVE EVANGELISTIC MODELS Johnson 

An examination of the principles required to create and evaluate effective 
models of evangelism. Enables the student to create an effective evangelistic 
emphasis which is contextually informed and theology faithful. 2 credits 

P675 THEOLOGY AND PRACTICE OF EVANGELISM 

IN THE LOCAL CHURCH Johnson 

An exploration of the essential ingredients of evangelism and the theolog- 
ical assumptions which undergird it. This approach emphasizes both the- 
ological commitment and practical methods. 3 credits 

P676 STAGES OF FAITH AND EVANGELISM Johnson 

The aim of this course is to develop a holistic understanding and practice 
of evangelism in pastoral ministry. Holistic refers both to the whole person 
and the whole life span. Using Fowler's "Stages of Faith" model, the class 
will explore its implications for evangelism. Practical application to the 
student's life and ministry will be stressed. 3 or 4 credits 

P677 PASTORAL SPIRITUALITY Johnson 

This course will explore the spirituality of the pastor and how it impacts 
his or her ministry. It will deal with two fundamental aspects of pastoral 
life, spirituality as being and spirituality as doing. It will provide a theo- 
logical understanding and practical directives for the development of a 
distinctive pastoral spirituality. 2 credits 



67 



P678 EVANGELISM AND SPIRITUAL DIRECTION Johnson 

The goal of this course is to enable each student to understand the Biblical 
and theological foundations for evangelism and spiritual development; to 
appropriate the style and skills of spiritual direction for the evangelistic 
task; and to develop basic skills in helping persons begin and continue 
their spiritual journey. The class will consist of lecture, discussion, pre- 
senting verbatims, and reports on the assigned texts. Through these various 
learning opportunities the goal is for each student to develop both a passion 
for and skills in enabling persons to begin a vital life of faith. 

2 or 3 credits 

P679 THEOLOGY FOR CHRISTIAN SPIRITUALITY AND 

EVANGELISM ]ohnson 

This course will deal with re-visioning the theological categories that inspire 
and inform an adequate spirituality and evangelism. It will suggest practical 
implications for developing an effective outreach and spiritually renewed 
persons and congregations. 3 credits 

P771 THEOLOGY AND PRACTICE OF EVANGELISM Johnson 

This course will explore the theological basis of evangelism, the analysis 
of a congregation, and the development of effective plans for doing evan- 
gelism in the local congregation. 3 credits 

P773 AN INTRODUCTION TO PASTORAL SPIRITUALITY AND 

SPIRITUAL DIRECTION Johnson 

This course will develop the thesis that the call of God and the minister's 
response to it are the dynamic elements which constitute vital spirituality. 
It will focus on the minister as a spiritual person and the functions of 
ministry as an expression of this identity. The sessions, the discussions, 
and the assignments will expose each minister to a variety of ways of 
revitalizing his/her relationship with God. Spiritual direction can then be 
most profitably explored after one has come to grips with one's own de- 
velopment. 3 credits 

Church Administration 

P582 CREATIVE CHURCH ADMINISTRATION Ramey 

A course which enables students to administer churches creatively, in- 
cluding administering human, physical and financial resources. 3 credits 

P584 BUILDING CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY THROUGH SMALL 

GROUPS Ramey 

A course which deals with the dynamics and philosophies of various small 
groups in the church and explores ways to start and maintain such groups. 

3 credits 



68 



P681 LEADERSHIP SKILLS FOR EFFECTIVE MINISTRY Ramey 

A course which studies the biblical principles of servant leadership and 
analyzes students' leadership styles. It also suggests concrete ways that 
students can initiate servant leadership in the church and provides op- 
portunities for them to develop their leadership skills. 3 credits 

P682 MANAGING CONFLICT IN THE LOCAL CHURCH Ramey 

A course which relates Biblical, theological, and sociological understand- 
ings of conflict of the various forms of conflict in the life of the Church by 
study of the basic approaches to conflict management and analysis by 
students of their own style of management. Learning techniques will in- 
clude role plays of high conflict meetings, simulation games, and case 
studies of conflict situations. 3 credits 



P683 MULTIPLE STAFF MINISTRY Ramey 

A study of the meaning and forms of multiple staff ministry, situations in 
which it is taking place, factors in good staff relationships and their im- 
plementation, and personnel administration. 2 credits 

P684 BUILDING CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY THROUGH SMALL 

GROUPS Ramey 

This course deals with the dynamics and philosophies of various small 
groups in the church and explores ways to start and maintain such groups. 

3 credits 

P685 ACTIVATING THE LOCAL CONGREGATION Ramey 

A course which examines the varied strategies currently being used to 
activate churches, including goal setting by the congregation, creative pro- 
gram development, spiritual formation, renewal through worship, chang- 
ing structures, and leadership development. 3 credits 

P686 SPIRITUAL FORMATION Ramey 

A course which studies and applies experientially the traditional ways 
persons grow in grace through prayer, meditation, journal keeping, read- 
ing devotional classes, worship, spiritual direction, and participation in 
the community of faith; also studies ways to give authentic spiritual di- 
rection to a congregation. 3 or 4 credits 

P687 MINISTRY IN THE SMALL CHURCH Ramey 

A course designed to enable students to study, value, and lead small 
churches. 3 credits 



69 



P688 THE MINISTER AS SPIRITUAL DIRECTOR Ramey 

This course studies the relationship between the minister's own spiritual 
growth and competence to guide others in their spiritual journeys. 

2 or 3 credits 

P781 DOING MINISTRY TODAY Harrington 

A study of the basic tasks in parish life: preaching, nurture, stewardship, 
administration and pastoral care, looked at in terms of the emerging culture 
in the USA. 3 credits 

P785 ENABLING MINISTRY OF LAITY Smith 

This course will relate biblical, theological, historical, and sociological un- 
derstandings of factors which either liberate or restrain laity for ministry 
within and without the local church. Students will study methods for 
enabling laity to identify and claim their particular areas of ministry. Par- 
ticipants will analyze how their own theological assumptions and styles of 
pastoral leadership inhibit or encourage a cooperative ministry by the laity. 
The course will explore methods for deveolping small covenant groups for 
laity support and accountability within the local church structure. 

3 credits 

Independent Studies 

The following courses are designed for students who are interested in 
further study beyond the regular course offerings in the Practical Theology 
Area. Permission of the instructor is required. 

P690 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN STEWARDSHIP Johnson, Ramey 

Any term Up to 4 credits 

P691 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN MINISTRY Ramey 

Any term Up to 4 credits 

P692 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN CHRISTIAN 

EDUCATION Hussel 

Any term Up to 4 credits 

P693 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PRACTICAL THEOLOGY 

AND COUNSELING Childs, Keith, Stevenson-Moessner 

Any term Up to 4 credits 

P694 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN WORSHIP Huie, Rose 

Any term Up to 4 credits 

P695 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PREACHING Huie, Rose 

Any term Up to 4 credits 

P696 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SPIRITUAL 

FORMATION Johnson, Ramey 

Any term Up to 4 credits 



70 



P697 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN EVANGELISM 

AND CHURCH GROWTH Johnson 

Any term Up to 4 credits 

P698 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN POLITY AND 

ADMINISTRATION Ramey 

Any term Up to 4 credits 

P699 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN NEW OR SMALL 

CHURCH DEVELOPMENT Ramey 

Any term Up to 4 credits 

INTERDISCIPLINARY COURSES 

Required courses for M.Div. 

1343 THEOLOGY AND PREACHING Huie, Rose and 

Biblical or Historical-Doctrinal Staff 

An integrative course to enable students to understand the exegetical, 
theological, and contextual — personal and social — dimensions of the act of 
preaching and to practice these skills. 
Fall 2 credits 

1373 EVANGELISM AND MISSION Brown, Johnson 

A course to provide an introduction to the understanding and practice of 
evangelism and mission for those engaged in ministry in local congrega- 
tions. The course includes cross-cultural evangelism, ecumenical and in- 
ternational dimensions of mission, strategies for communicating the gospel, 
changing patterns of world mission, and a forward look at evangelism and 
mission in the emerging Church. 
Fall 2 credits 

1402 EVALUATION AND PROJECTION OF MINISTRY 

DEVELOPMENT Carroll 

At the conclusion of the intern year students evaluate their intern expe- 
rience in terms of personal growth, professional behavior, and develop- 
ment skills; integrate emerging understandings of the form and nature of 
ministry into a theory of ministry, and prepare a plan for future devel- 
opment in ministry. Required of all year-long interns. 
Summer See SM414 

Elective Courses 

1521 WOMEN IN TRAVAIL: CONSIDERATIONS OF THE FEMININE 
IN PASTORAL CARE AND COUNSELING Stevenson-Moessner 

A seminar to discuss two books (Feminine Psychology, Karen Horney, M.D., 
and Toward a New Psychology of Women, Jean Baker Miller, M.D.) and a 
collection of articles regarding feminine psychology. This material will be 
correlated with a standard text in pastoral care. 3 credits 



71 



1601 FROM TEXT TO SERMON Huie and Biblical Area Staff 

A laboratory course using one particular book of the Bible where students 

work from particular texts to written sermons. 

Prerequisites: B153, B154, P151 3 credits 

1604 HOMOSEXUALITY: PASTORAL AND THEOLOGICAL 

PERSPECTIVES Childs, Stroup 

An interdisciplinary seminar which examines homosexuality in light of 
recent psychobiological and clinical research and biblical and theological 
scholarship. Attention will be given to the general nature of sexuality; the 
various social interpretations of homosexuality; and the assessment of dif- 
ferent forms of homosexuality in the Bible, Christian theology, and the 
history of the Church. Prerequisite: HD233 or 234 and P232 3 credits 

1609 PREACHING FROM THE OLD TESTAMENT Newsome 

This seminar will examine methods by which the Old Testament is to be 
interpreted to contemporary congregations. 3 credits 

1691 INTERDISCIPLINARY INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

up to 4 credits 

SUPERVISED MINISTRY 

Required courses for M.Div. 

SM210 SUPERVISED MINISTRY: CONGREGATION Carroll and Staff 

This required experience of supervised ministry in a congregation is in- 
tended to enrich the curriculum both by helping the student integrate 
previous studies and by raising questions for future courses. For a period 
of 10 weeks (minimum), the intern serves with a congregation, engages in 
a broad range of pastoral functions, and engages in a structured process 
of theological reflection with a supervising pastor and lay committee. Stu- 
dents are assisted in securing a placement within their denomination. 
Prerequisites: HD181, P112, P151 
Summer 6 credits 

Required Courses for M.A. in Youth Ministry 

SM212 SUPERVISED MINISTRY: YOUTH Carroll 

The concepts and methods learned in Year One are experienced and tested 
in the variety of activities related to youth ministry in a congregation within 
one's denomination or in other settings. Both CPE and international place- 
ments are available. 

Summer 6 credits 



72 



SM213-214 SUPERVISED MINISTRY: YOUTH Carroll 

Working a limited number of hours weekly in a congregation or other 
setting — from September through May — students will reflect upon their 
work experiences and upon issues, such as administration, leadership, 
styles, staff relationships. 
Fall and Spring 3 credits each term 

Elective Courses 

SM414 SUPERVISED MINISTRY: THE INTERN YEAR Carroll 

This twelve-month internship, encouraged for all M.Div. students, is to 
foster growth in ministerial identity and competence. The context for the 
Intern Year may be in a congregation of one's denomination, a social 
agency, an international setting, or other placement appropriate for the 
individual's educational and vocational goals. The internship is supervised 
by an experienced, ordained minister utilizing an action-reflection process 
for learning. Components of this internship outside the ministry context 
include (a) the pre-internship seminar, (b) a two-week interdisciplinary 
course (on campus in January), and (c) a one-week "Evaluation and Pro- 
jection" course (1402, on campus in August). 

Prerequisite: Completion of A and B Components, or permission of In- 
structor and Dean of Faculty. 
Twelve-month period 11 credits 

SM610 CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION UNIT 

Columbia Theological Seminary is a member of the Association for Clinical 
Pastoral Education. A student may participate in a unit of Basic CPE in 
those institutions accredited by ACPE. 

Any term, usually Summer 6 credits* 

SM611-612-613-614 CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION 

INTERNSHIP 

Students may participate in units of Advanced CPE in institutions ac- 
credited by ACPE. 

Twelve-month period 20 credits* 

(non-credit for Th.M. students) 

SM615 SUPERVISED URBAN CLINICAL UNIT 

This course involves a full-time ministry experience which is designed to 
help one function more effectively in an urban context. Students are placed 
in one of several urban ministry settings. An action-reflection process of 
learning is utilized. Supervision is provided by both field supervisors and 
staff persons of the Urban Training Organization of Atlanta. 
Any term, usually Summer 6 credits 



73 



SM616 SUPERVISED URBAN INTERN YEAR Carroll 

An intern year supervised by the Urban Training Organization of Atlanta. 
The course involves the various components outlined under SM414 and 
SM615. 

Prerequisite: Completion of A and B Components, or permission of In- 
structor and Dean of Faculty. 20 credits* 

SM620 SUPERVISED CONGREGATIONAL UNIT Carroll 

This ten-week internship in a congregational context provides one with 
the opportunity to focus on either a selected area of ministry chosen for 
concentrated experience (e.g., worship, social ministry, Christian educa- 
tion, etc.), or a broad range of experience in a congregation which will 
develop further one's sense of pastoral identity. 

Prerequisite: Completion of A and B Components, or permission of In- 
structor and Dean of Faculty. 6 credits 

SM691 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SUPERVISED MINISTRY Carroll 
Any term up to 4 credits 

*The total number credits required for the M.Div. degree cannot be reduced 
by more than six credits for these SM electives, but the other credits may 
be applied in another degree program. 

S.T.D. AND D.MIN. COURSES 

The S.T.D. and D.Min. programs consist primarily of advanced courses 
provided by participating schools in the Atlanta Theological Association. 
The 600 level courses in this catalog, together with advanced courses at 
the Candler School of Theology, Erskine Theological Seminary, and the 
Interdenominational Theological Center are open to students in these pro- 
grams. The following includes other courses specifically developed for the 
S.T.D. and D.Min. programs. 

ATA401 SEMINAR ON MINISTRY Hix and Staff 

Basic seminar on ministry theory and career analysis required of all D.Min. 
students. 6 credits 

ATA402 EXPERIENCE IN SUPERVISED MINISTRY A.T.A. Staff 

Provides an experience, under supervision, in some aspect of ministry. 
May be designed by student in consultation with Director of Advanced 
Studies or done as CPE unit. Required of all D. Min. students. 6 credits 

ATA403 PROJECT PROPOSAL WORKSHOP Hussel 

A workshop presenting the theory of dissertation construction, developing 
one's project proposal, and understanding use of the library in dissertation 
research. Required of Columbia D.Min. students. 

End of January no credit 

End of July 



74 



ATA463 THE DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN PASTORAL 

COUNSELING A.T.A. Staff 

Modern history of pastoral counseling; its roots in theology, psychoanal- 
ysis, existential and humanistic psychology. 
Required of all Th.M. (pastoral counseling) and S.T.D. students. 3 credits 

ATA471 SEMINAR IN PERSONALITY THEORY A.T.A. Staff 

Contemporary personality theories are reviewed to assess their relevancies 

for pastoral counseling. 

Required of Th.M. (pastoral counseling) and S.T.D. students. 3 credits 

ATA473 DIAGNOSIS AND CHANGE A.T.A. Staff 

The process of change is considered from both pastoral and psychological 

perspectives. 

Required of S.T.D. students. 3 credits 

ATA475 PASTORAL THEOLOGICAL METHOD A.T.A. Staff 

Seeks to develop a pastoral theology consistent with both systematic the- 
ology and pastoral practice. 
Required of S.T.D. students. 3 credits 

ATA477 SEMINAR IN PASTORAL SUPERVISION A.T.A. Staff 

Provides doctoral students in pastoral counseling with the experience of 
pastoral supervision under the guidance of clinical supervisors. Acquaints 
students with the expanding literature on pastoral supervision from a va- 
riety of disciplines. Students may register for ATA477 and ATA477b. 

3 credits 

ATA478 GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY 

In this year long course, the dynamics of groups are considered, both 
theoretically and experientially for the purpose of developing broader pas- 
toral counseling. 6 credits 

ATA479 ETHICAL AND THERAPEUTIC PERSPECTIVES ON 

MODERN MARRIAGE Patton 

The purpose of the course is to become familiar with and discuss critically 
some of the contemporary literature on the Christian ethics of marriage 
and the theory and practice of marital therapy. Students will read, discuss 
the literature, and write a journal-article length paper on how a Christian 
ethical perspective and a therapeutic perspective inform the way one un- 
derstands marriage and how ethical and therapeutic perspectives may or 
may not correct and inform each other. 3 credits 



75 



ATA481 PASTORAL COUNSELING RESEARCH SEMINAR 

A.T.A. Staff 

A seminar on research methodology in pastoral counseling and pastoral 
theology for S.T.D. and Th.M. students. The seminar is required for S.T.D. 
students in their second and third years in the program. It is recommended 
that Th.M. students in pastoral counseling take at least one year of the 
seminar. (S.T.D. students will register for ATA481a, ATA481b, ATA481c, 
ATA481d for a total of 6 semester credits). 3 credits per year 

ATA485 COUNSELING PRACTICUM Patton and Staff 

In each term the student engages in from two to four hours of counseling 
per week under supervision. Assigned readings and appropriate didactic 
materials are included. (Students will register for ATA485a, ATA485b, 
ATA485c, and ATA485d for a total of 18 semester credits.) 
Required of S.T.D. students 9 credits per year 

ATA489 DIRECTED STUDY 

To fill out areas of knowledge not covered by course work, at recommen- 
dation of the advisor. Credit as assigned 



ATA496 DOCTORAL PROJECT 
Required of all D.Min. and S.T.D. students. 



6 credits 



ATA000 ADMINISTRATIVE FEE 

Required for S.T.D. students not registered for course work, clinical work 
or doctoral project supervision in any long semester. Non credit 




76 



ACADEMIC NOTES 

YEARLY SCHEDULE 

The academic year is composed of two long semesters of 14 weeks each 
and a short January term. During the summer the seminary offers a full 
program of supervised ministry, independent study under the guidance 
of a member of the faculty, an eight-week course in beginning Greek, and 
a four-week summer session designed primarily for D.Min. students and 
ministers interested in continuing education. The sequential nature of the 
curriculum for M.Div. degree students makes it essential that they begin 
their work with the summer course in beginning Greek (or with the fall 
term if they have already mastered basic Greek grammar). 

COMMUNITY WORSHIP 

The seminary community gathers for worship every day of regular 
classes to express its thanksgiving for and need of God's grace and to pray 
for the church and the world. 

WEDNESDAY FORUMS 

Included in the worship of each Wednesday of class weeks is a forum 
which leads the Columbia community into consideration of significant is- 
sues for the church in the world, or exposes it to persons from other 
denominations and parts of the earth, or directs it in spiritual formation. 
A majority of the forums are designed and led by student organizations. 

ORIENTATION 

An orientation program which is required of all entering students is 
held during the days preceding the regular opening of the seminary in the 
fall. It offers an opportunity for new students to get acquainted with one 
another and with student body leaders and members of the faculty. Tests 
are administered to help new and transfer students identify and understand 
particular strengths and deficiencies of preparation for theological instruc- 
tion. 

Returning students are also required to participate in the orientation 
days, including a debriefing of the summer supervised ministry or intern 
program, a discussion of procedures for receiving a call to a congregation, 
presbytery relationships, and the like. 

SUMMER GREEK SCHOOL 

Entering students in the M.Div. degree program are required to have 
a reading knowledge of New Testament Greek. For those students who 
are not prepared in Greek, the seminary offers a six credit course, B021, 
during the summer. The course runs for an eight-week period and meets 



77 



daily, usually each morning, Monday through Friday, for three hours, with 
small group afternoon tutorial sessions. Students who have successfully 
completed two years of Greek in college or who pass a Greek qualifying 
examination are exempted from B021. 

FLEXIBILITY BY ADVANCED PLACEMENT AND SPECIAL STUDIES 

Students who have strong backgrounds in certain particular fields of 
the curriculum, or who demonstrate unusual proficiency in their work are 
given opportunities for special placement or for independent work. Re- 
quests for flexibility in a student's program should be made to the Dean 
of Faculty. Two opportunities for flexibility are available. 

1. Students may be permitted advanced placement in the A and B 
components if they can satisfactorily demonstrate that they have already 
achieved the objectives of a given course. This means that they may be 
exempt from the course and permitted to take an advanced course in the 
area. 

2. Academically qualified students may be permitted to engage in 
special study as a route to the establishment of competence in a required 
course rather than taking one or several required courses. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Students are encouraged to design and pursue their own program of 
independent research and study as a part of the elective offerings. Contracts 
may be drawn up with faculty members teaching in the area of the student's 
interest for reading courses and research projects. The nature and extent 
of the work projected and completed determine the amount of credit given. 
Such courses provide students the opportunity to investigate areas of spec- 
ialized interest in which no regular electives are offered. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

Students in the Master of Divinity degree program who enter the C 
component with a cumulative grade point average of 3.3 and a 3.6 average 
in the proposed area of study may enter the Honors Program. Waiver of 
these requirements is by vote of the entire faculty in the proposed area of 
study. Students choose to work in the Biblical, historical-doctrinal or prac- 
tical theology areas and with a particular professor. The program consists 
of guided study in both long semesters for a total of 8 credits. For additional 
information, see the chairperson of the area of interest. 

CREDIT VALUATION AND COURSE LOAD 

While the educational progress of the student cannot be ultimately 
measured by the number of credits earned, a system of course valuation 
is necessary to assure balance in the curriculum. Columbia estimates a 
semester credit as approximately 42 to 45 working hours, except for certain 
supervised ministry and clinical programs whose work investment is de- 



78 



termined by the contract for the particular course. The satisfactory com- 
pletion of a course, however, is determined not by time invested but goals 
and objectives achieved. 

Each student is required to consult with his or her faculty advisor before 
registering for courses. The standard number of credits a student in basic 
degree programs may take in the 14- week terms is 16. A student with a B 
average may take no more than 17 credits. In the January term a student 
may register for no more than three credits unless taking HD241. 

The M.Div. degree normally requires three full academic years in res- 
idence, plus a summer term for SM210. The Master of Arts in Theological 
Studies and the Master of Arts in Youth Ministry usually require two full 
academic years. Advanced degrees involve the student in part-time study 
for a minimum of two years. 

GRADING 

At the close of each term grades are given to basic degree students 
according to the following four quality points system. A grade report is 
sent to each student and denominational supervisor, if applicable. For A 
through D component students, special, Master of Arts in Theological 
Studies, Master of Arts in Youth Ministry, unclassified and occasional 
students, the criteria for grading are creativity, mastery of material, skill 
in organizing and expressing ideas, and the ability to relate to other learn- 
ings. The grading system is: 

Outstanding 

Superior 

Very Good 

Good 

Slightly above standard 

Standard 

Slightly below standard 

Below standard 

Serious deficiencies 

Unacceptable 

An E is given when a portion of the course requirements — such as a 
major paper, an examination or a project — is unacceptable to the instruc- 
tor. Unless such work is completed in acceptable form within the time 
extension, the E becomes a final grade of F. An F is given when the total 
work of the course is unacceptable or when work is not completed within 
the term or within an approved extension. 

C component students may choose to take up to six elective credits for 
H/S/U, with the permission of the instructor, if permission is granted at 
the beginning of the term. 

H honors, for work of exceptionally distinguished qual- 

ity. 

S satisfactory, for work which represents sufficient mas- 

tery of the content of the course to merit recommen- 
dation for graduation. 

79 



A 


4.0 


A- 


3.7 


B + 


3.3 


B 


3.0 


B- 


2.7 


C + 


2.3 


c 


2.0 


c- 


1.7 


D 


1.0 


F 


0.0 



u 


unsatisfactory, for work which represents insufficient 




mastery of the content of the course to merit recom- 




mendation for graduation. 


ForTh.M., S.T.D., 


, and D.Min. students: 


A 4.0 


excellent 


B 3.0 


good 


C 2.0 


passing 


F 1.0 


failure 


PROBATION 





An entering student may be placed on probation due to deficiencies in 
the student's undergraduate preparation. In addition, any student who 
fails to make a 2.5 average in any term or whose cumulative grade point 
average falls below 2.3 will be placed on academic probation for the next 
term. 

UNACCEPTABLE WORK 

A U may be remedied by further work in the course, by repeating the 
course, or by taking an elective course relating to the area of deficiency. 
A U given for unexcused late work shall normally require additional work. 
A student whose work is unsatisfactory will be placed on probation. If the 
U is not removed by the next term, the student will be dropped from 
school. 

APPEALS 

Appeal of a grade given for work in a course or for the entire course 
may be made: first, with the instructor; second, if necessary with the Dean 
of Faculty; third, as a last appeal, by a written statement sent through the 
Dean of Faculty to the faculty. 

Appeal of probation may be made to the Judicial Commission of the 
faculty through the Dean of Faculty. 

Appeal of dismissal from the seminary, a faculty decision, may be made 
to the Board by giving written notice to the president of the seminary. 

TEMPORARY GRADES 

Two temporary notations may be given in certain cases. "In Progress" 
(IP) is used for courses which last more than one term. "Incomplete" (Inc.) 
is used for late work when a written excuse has been approved by the 
professor and the Dean of Faculty. Further provisions for the "Incomplete" 
can be found in the Student Handbook. Neither temporary notaion carries 
credit. 

STUDENT HANDBOOK 

Additional information for basic degree students will be found in the 
Student Handbook. 



80 



ORDINATION EXAMS 

Students who become candidates for ordination in the Presbyterian 
Church (USA) are required to take written examinations in the areas of 
Bible, theology, worship and sacraments, and polity. There is ample op- 
portunity within the regular seminary curriculum to take course work prep- 
aratory to the exams. Special tutorial sessions with professors are offered 
in the fall semester during the week in which exams are given, and students 
taking exams are excused from classes that week. 

SENIOR WORSHIP 

Students in the C component are required to lead worship and preach 
for the community. The experience is reviewed on videotape and is eval- 
uated by a group of students and faculty. Students in the A component 
give written response to a required number of services as part of their work 
inP151. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

Basic degrees students who have earned at least a 3.6 grade point 
average on course work will, with the approval of the faculty, be awarded 
the degree "with distinction/' 




81 



AWARDS AND 
SCHOLARSHIPS 

AWARDS AND PRIZES 

Through the gifts of alumni and friends of the seminary, several prizes 
and awards have been established to recognize outstanding academic 
achievements by basic professional degree students. 

The Wilds Book Prize, initially established by Louis T. Wilds of Columbia, 
South Carolina, provides a cash award to the graduating student selected 
by the faculty for the highest distinction in his or her academic work over 
the entire seminary program. 

The Lyman and Myki Mobley Prize in Biblical Scholarship has been estab- 
lished in memory of Donald Lyman Mobley (Columbia class of 1977) and 
Myki Powell Mobley (Candler School of Theology, class of 1977). It is given 
each year to the student or faculty member doing exemplary work in the 
field of Biblical scholarship as it relates to the worship and work of the 
church. 

The Paul T. Fuhrmann Book Prize in Church History was established in 
1962 by an alumnus of the seminary to honor the late Dr. Paul T. Fuhrmann, 
former Professor of Church History. The award is made annually to the 
student who has shown the most outstanding achievement in church his- 
tory. 

The Florrie Wilkes Sanders Prize in Theology is given by the family of Florrie 
Wilkes Sanders of Atlanta, GA. It is awarded each year to the student 
presenting the best paper showing sound theological scholarship and rel- 
evance to the needs of Christian people in the contemporary world. Special 
attention is given to the papers relating theology to the education, profes- 
sions and avocations of lay people. 

The Emma Gaillard Boyce Memorial Award is made annually by the Rev. 
David Boyce, an alumnus of the seminary, in honor of his mother, a de- 
voted music teacher, choir director, church musician and minister's wife. 
It is awarded to the student writing the best paper on the creative use of 
music in worship. 

Two Abdullah Awards are available each year by the Rev. Gabriel Ab- 
dullah, an alumnus of the seminary. One is given for the best paper setting 
forth a plan for the teaching of Bible in the public schools; the second for 
the best paper designing a program for the development of moral and 
spiritual values in the public schools. 

The Indiantown Country Church Award was established by the family of 
Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Stuckey in their honor to highlight the work of ministry 
in churches in rural areas. The prize is awarded annually to a student who 
has done outstanding work in the summer in a rural ministry. 



82 



The Ludwig Richard Max Dewitz Biblical Studies Award is a cash award to 
the student who prepared the best Old Testament exegesis during the 
academic year. A judging commitee of professors of Old Testament nom- 
inates a person to the faculty for election. 

The Samuel A. Cartledge Biblical Studies Award. A cash award and a copy 
of the Greek New Testament, the latter provided by the American Bible 
Society, is awarded to the student who prepared the best New Testament 
exegesis during the academic year. A judging committee of professors of 
New Testament exegesis nominates a person to the faculty for election. 

The Presbytery of St. Andrew Women of the Church Preaching Award is given 
for the best sermon preached by a student during the academic year. 

James T. and Celeste M. Boyd Book Fund Award. This award is presented 
to a graduating senior as a means of encouraging and helping establish a 
personal theological library of books and resources. 

The C. Virginia Harrison Memorial Fund Award is presented to a rising 
senior who is conscientious, responsible, hard working, and in need of 
financial assistance. The President, in consultation with the secretary to 
the President, shall select the recipient of this award. 

COLUMBIA SCHOLARSHIPS 

Qualified men and women planning to attend seminary or seeking to 
explore the possibility of entering the ministry may apply for a Columbia 
Scholarship for study at Columbia Theological Seminary. These one-year 
scholarships are for persons who have exhibited significant academic and 
leadership abilities during their undergraduate studies and in community 
involvements and church commitments. 

Up to eight awards may be made each year to M. Div. applicants by 
the Admissions Committee. The amount of the scholarship is established 
by the Admissions Committee and will be standard for each recipient 
assuming room and board on campus. In the case of a recipient who 
chooses to live off campus, a lump sum stipend beyond tuition shall be 
awarded. In 1990-91 each grant will be for $7,200. An additional $850 grant 
will be made for those who attend Greek School. 

Columbia Scholarship recipients who show financial need over and 
above the Columbia Scholarships award may be granted financial aid up 
to $2,500. Such financial aid will include a service scholarship. 

To be eligible for a Columbia Scholarship, applicants must be citizens 
of the United States or Canada. A scholarship application and a personal 
interview are required. All recipients are required to enroll full-time for 
one academic year at the seminary. 

Application for a Columbia Scholarship is made through the Office of 
Admissions at Columbia Seminary. Applications must be received no later 
than March 15. Announcement of the awards will normally be made by 
mid- April. 



83 



All those applying for a Columbia Scholarship will automatically be 
considered for regular admission and financial aid if they are not awarded 
a scholarship. 

HONOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

A number of Honor Scholarships have been established at Columbia 
Theological Seminary for M.Div. candidates and are awarded annually on 
the basis of a student's academic achievement, leadership in the church 
and on campus, and demonstration of exceptional promise for the ordained 
ministry. Recipients of Honor Scholarships are selected by the Basic De- 
grees Academic Standards Committee each spring. Honor Scholarship re- 
cipients who show need over and above the Honor Scholarship award 
(which may cover tuition for up to nine months) may be granted financial 
aid. Such financial aid will include a service scholarship. The Honor Schol- 
arships are: the Rev. Vernon S. Broyles, Jr., Scholarship; the Rev. George 
Henry Cornelson Scholarship; the Rev. Harry Keller Holland Scholarship; 
the Rev. John L. Newton Scholarship; and the J. M. Tull Scholarship. 

COLUMBIA FRIENDSHIP CIRCLE SCHOLARSHIPS 

A number of scholarships are funded annually by the Columbia Friend- 
ship Circle. These scholarships are awarded to M.Div. degree students by 
the Basic Degrees Academic Standards Committee upon nomination by 
the President and Dean of Students with consultation from the Develop- 
ment Office. In 1990-91 each grant will be for $4,400. 

The following criteria will be used in making nominations: 

a. The student will be a second or third year student (fourth year if 
the student has been involved in a year-long internship). 

b. The student will have demonstrated both a strong commitment 
to his/her call and diligence in his/her studies at Columbia Sem- 
inary. 

c. The student will be a parent with family responsibilities. 

d. The student will have demonstrated financial need. 

Recipients who show need over and above the Columbia Friendship Circle 
Award may be eligible for additional financial aid. Such financial aid will 
include a service scholarship. 

GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS 

The Seminary awards each year one or more fellowships to outstanding 
graduates completing the M.Div. degree. The purpose of these fellowships 
is to recognize superior intellectual achievement demonstrated during the 
course of the regular seminary program and to provide a modest support 
for graduate work beyond the first professional degree. They must be used 
toward an accredited master's degree or doctoral graduate degree program 
in which the recipient engages in the scholarly pursuit of an academic 
theological discipline. 



84 



The Fannie Jordan Bryan Fellowships were established through a generous 
legacy left to Columbia Theological Seminary by the late Mrs. Fannie Jordan 
Bryan of Columbia, South Carolina. The Columbia Graduate Fellowships were 
initiated by the senior Class of 1941 and continue to be funded through 
the operating expense budget of the seminary. The Anna Church Whitner 
Memorial Fellowships are given periodically from a legacy left to the seminary 
in 1928 by the late William C. Whitner, of Rock Hill, SC, in memory of his 
mother. 

A new graduate fellowship was established during 1983 by the Reverend 
and Mrs. Harvard A. Anderson of Orlando, FL. This fellowship is awarded 
to the graduate determined by the faculty to have the greatest potential 
for future academic achievement. 




85 



STUDENT INFORMATION 

HOUSING 

Applications for seminary housing should be made as early as possible 
following acceptance. All inquiries about housing should be directed to the 
Business Office. 

Unmarried Students 

Dormitory housing is available for unmarried students. Most of the 
rooms are for single occupancy; many of them have connecting baths. All 
rooms are fully furnished with the exception of linens. Laundry facilities 
are provided. Students who live in dormitory rooms participate in the 
standard board plan. 

Married Students Without Children 

Suites of two rooms with private bath are available for married students 
without children. These suites are ordinarily fully furnished with the ex- 
ception of linens. However, a limited number are unfurnished. Laundry 
facilities are provided. Students who live in suites participate in the stand- 
ard board plan. Either the standard board plan or a modified board plan 
is available for spouses. 

In addition to the suites mentioned above, the seminary has a limited 
number of efficiency units which include cooking facilities. Students in 
these units need not participate in the standard board plan. 

Students With Children 

One, two, and three bedroom unfurnished apartments are available to 
students with children. The rent for these apartments is below market rates 
and varies depending on the size of apartment. 

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

Columbia Seminary grants financial assistance to basic degree students 
who are taking 11 or more credit hours and to a limited number of graduate 
students. All financial aid is based upon need as determined through an 
application for financial aid. 

Columbia Seminary complies with The Association of Theological 
Schools' regulation that financial aid of a specific nature is not discussed 
until after a student has been admitted. However, general policies are 
outlined in Columbia's financial aid brochure, and financial aid applications 
are made available to applicants for admission to Columbia's basic degree 
programs. If the GAPSFAS statement and other pertinent data are given 
to the Director of Admissions during the admissions process, an estimate 
of financial aid may be provided applicants at the time of their acceptance. 



86 



Returning students are required to complete the financial aid application 
before June 1. Other requests for financial aid for any school year must be 
made by August 15. Students entering Columbia in the winter term or 
spring semester must submit requests for financial aid within the first week 
of the term. 

Students applying for financial assistance complete a financial aid ap- 
plication that provides an estimate of both their income and expenses. The 
difference between the student's income and the established norms con- 
stitutes the determined need of the student for financial aid. After financial 
need is calculated, financial aid is provided in the form of a service schol- 
arship and a grant-in-aid. A Columbia service scholarship is the first portion 
of every financial aid award. 

The amounts of a service scholarship and a grant-in-aid are determined 
by the Financial Aid Committee after the applications are completed. The 
financial aid is credited to the student's account in the Business Office and 
is awarded on a prorated basis as follows: 44 percent fall semester; 12 
percent winter term; 44 percent spring semester. Financial aid is first ap- 
plied against seminary charges for tuition, rent, board, and fees. The aid 
is subject to proportional adjustment in case of withdrawal from seminary. 
Most students who come to Columbia Seminary without a large indebt- 
edness find that they can complete their seminary education without crip- 
pling financial worries. 

Financial aid awards during the 1990-91 academic year will range up to 
$4,800 for single students, $5,500 for married students without children, 
and $6,800 for students with children. 

Persons interested in more detailed information about the financial as- 
sistance offered by Columbia Seminary should contact the Office of Ad- 
missions and Financial Aid. 

STAFFORD LOAN PROGRAM 

The Stafford Loan (formerly Guaranteed Student Loan) Program is 
made available under the Higher Education Act of 1965 and regulated 
through federal and state agencies of Departments of Education so as to 
comply with subsequent amendments governing Title IV monies. This 
program is designed to provide loans to students enrolled in education 
beyond high school. Institutions such as Columbia Seminary assist students 
with the application process by determining the student's eligibility and 
need for the loan and by certifying the student's satisfactory participation 
in the course of education for which the monies are borrowed. The loans 
to students are made primarily by commercial lending institutions. The 
Stafford Loan Program provides preferable interest rates and delays re- 
payment of loan until after the student graduates or terminates from the 
course of studies. An eligible student enrolled at Columbia may seek a loan 
within the state of Georgia or from a lending institution within his/her 
legal state of residence. Information pertaining to application procedures 
and policy regulations for a Stafford Loan at Columbia may be obtained 
from the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid. 



87 



VETERANS ADMINISTRATION BENEFITS 



Life. 



Certification for V.A. benfits is handled through the Office of Student 



HOSPITALIZATION INSURANCE 

Each student is required to have some form of hospitalization insurance 
acceptable to the seminary. Students may purchase group insurance which 
is offered to the student body, or they may purchase insurance through 
other sources. Presbyterian students who are inquirers or candidates of 
their presbyteries' Committees on Preparation for Ministry are eligible to 
participate in the major medical plan of the Board of Pensions of the 
PC(USA). 




88 



STATEMENT OF CHARGES - EFFECTIVE JUNE 1, 1990 

TUITION 

Per credit hour $ 188 

Eleven credits or more (per term) 1,974 

Summer Greek school 730 

Audit fee per credit hour 94 

D.Min. and Th.M. Extension Fee (first time) 100 

D.Min. and Th.M. Extension Fee (second time) 200 

BOARD 

Summer Greek School 450 

Fall term 918 

Winter term 249 

Spring term 918 

ROOM 

Single student, single room, summer Greek school 282 

Single student, single room, fall or spring term 589 

Single student, single room, winter term 161 

Suite, summer Greek school 404 

Suite, fall or spring term 819 

Suite, winter term 224 

OTHER HOUSING - monthly rates 

Efficiency units, Florida Hall or Simons Law Hall 257 

Village Apartments: 4 bedroom, units 3-6 368 

3 bedroom, units 15, 16, 35-42 397 

3 bedroom, units 9, 25-26 361 

3 bedroom, unit 1 350 

2 bedroom, units 31-34 361 

2 bedroom, units 2, 10-14 328 

2 bedroom, units 19-22, 27-30 307 

1 bedroom, units 23 and 24 273 

SUPERVISED MINISTRY FEES 

P232 Ministry to Persons (with praxis) 161 

SM210 and SM210C each 564 

SM212 564 

SM213 and SM214 each 282 

SM414 (including 5 credits of course work) 1,504 

SM610 and SM615 each 564 

SM611-614 1,880 

SM616 1,880 

SM620 564 

ATA402 Experience in Supervised Ministry 500 

OTHER FEES 

ATA000 Administrative Fee 50 

ATA401 Seminar on Ministry 800 

ATA496 Doctoral Project 700 

HD241 Alternative Context, Atlanta (plus 4 credit course fee) 100 

HD241 Alternative Context, Other U.S. (plus 4 credit course fee) 200 



89 



HD241 Alternative Context, International (plus 4 credit course fee) 400 

Thesis Binding (per copy) 25 

Application Fee 30 

Occasional Student Application Fee 15 

Diploma Fee 25 



All fees and charges listed are subject to change. 
REFUND POLICY 

Tuition 

1. A student who has paid tuition fees in advance and decides not to 
attend a semester or term is entitled to a 100 percent refund if a written 
request is received by Columbia by the end of the first week of the 
term. After that date, no refund is due, but an amount may be given 
upon the initiative of Columbia. 

2. A student dropping a course during the "course addition" period (the 
first week of a long semester and the first two days of a winter or 
summer term) is entitled to a full tuition refund. 

3. A student dropping a course during the "course drop" period (the first 
six weeks of a long semester and the first week of a short winter or 
summer term) is entitled to a one- third refund of the tuition involved. 

4. A student allowed to withdraw from a course or a student leaving 
school for any reason without formal "dropping" or approved with- 
drawal is not entitled to any refund. 

Written requests for refunds should be made to the Registrar, Room 113, 
Campbell Hall and received before the deadlines stated above. 

Room 

A student who has received notice of a specific housing assignment for 
a term or semester is responsible for payment in full unless a written request 
is made to the Vice President for Business and Finance, Room 106, Camp- 
bell Hall at least one week before the first day of classes. In that case, a 
100 percent refund will be made. In other cases an amount may be given 
upon the initiative of Columbia. 

Board 

A student who has applied for board and has a sufficient reason for 
withdrawing from board status will be granted a full refund if a written 
request is made to the Vice President for Business and Finance, Room 106, 
Campbell Hall at least one week before the first day of classes. 

All fees and charges are subject to change. 



90 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 
AND ACTIVITIES 

Student Coordinating Council 

The Student Coordinating Council was established to initiate discussion 
and decisions within the student body, to respond to the needs of the 
student community, and to coordinate student and community activities. 
It represents the interests of the entire seminary community, i.e., students 
on and off campus, families of students, and all members of the seminary 
community. 

Society for Missionary Inquiry 

This society was founded in 1832 and has been an instrument through 
the years to promote an active interest in missions among the students 
and throughout the church. The society brings outstanding speakers before 
the student body. Another work of this group is in providing hospitality 
for international students and visitors on the Columbia campus. Through 
the work of the society a number of students have responded to the chal- 
lenge of international missions. 

Fellowship for Theological Dialogue 

This society was established for the purpose of encouraging every stu- 
dent to the highest possible scholarship. Membership is open to all students 
and faculty on a voluntary basis. Lectures, informal discussions with vis- 
iting lecturers, symposia by member of the faculty, and other meetings are 
sponsored in the interest of theological scholarship. 

Peace Source 

The Peace Source is a group of people concerned with peace, justice, 
and freedom who explore these concerns through study and involvement 
within community and world. 

Women Students of Columbia 

This organization began soon after women began to enroll as students 
at Columbia Seminary. Women students organize for support as well as 
dialogue about issues which are of particular concern for women in min- 
istry. Activities include annual retreats, sponsorship of women's caucus 
during the Columbia Forum, and opportunities to attend conferences and 
workshops which focus on women's issues for ministry. 

Spouses of Seminarians 

This is an organization primarily for the spouses of regularly enrolled 
students. Spouses of students, spouses of faculty and staff, and other 
invited persons meet together for study and for the sharing of mutual 



91 



concerns and interests. The Spouses of Seminarians also sponsor a number 
of events for the entire Columbia community. 

Student Athletic Program 

Athletic activities are available and open to all students and their fam- 
ilies. These activities include volleyball, football, basketball, soccer, softball, 
tennis, ping pong, pool, and golf. 

Student Supply Preaching 

Columbia Seminary works with local congregations in making arrange- 
ments for student supply preaching. Students are generally assigned on a 
rotating basis to churches that have requested supply ministers. 




92 



SUPPORT OF COLUMBIA 

SEMINARY 

The mission of Columbia Theological Seminary is to prepare good min- 
isters of Jesus Christ to proclaim the Gospel and to serve the Church, the 
community, and the world. The seminary is also committed to the mission 
of nurturing those already ordained through continuing education and 
serving as a resource center for the entire Church. 

Columbia Seminary's supporting synods have historically stated, and 
repeatedly confirmed, their intentions to be responsible for the enabling 
support of the Seminary. It costs over $13,000 a year to educate each 
student, but less than 5 percent of the current operating budget comes 
from benevolence monies provided by the synods. 

In recent years student fees provide for about 25 percent of the budget 
while an additional approximately 25 percent comes from individual annual 
gifts. A growing endowment provides approximately 35 percent of the 
annual budget. The balance of 15 percent comes from miscellaneous 
sources. 

Although gifts from the supporting synods for the operating budget 
have decreased in recent years, Columbia Seminary is greatly indebted to 
the synods for their endorsement and assistance in increasing the Semi- 
nary's endowment through the Capital Funds Campaigns. 

One of the best ways a person can invest in the vital ministry of Co- 
lumbia Seminary is by contributing to the annual giving program or by 
establishing a permanently endowed scholarship or memorial fund. 

ALUMNI/AE ASSOCIATION 

Columbia's alumni/ae hold their annual meeting on the seminary cam- 
pus during the Columbia Forum, following the January term. Stimulating 
presentations on ministry are offered, classes hold yearly reunions, the 
Alumni/ae Council and officers are elected, and retiring professors are 
honored. 

COLUMBIA FRIENDSHIP CIRCLE 

Columbia Friendship Circle (CFC) is an association of more than 6,000 
women throughout the PC(USA) who assist the seminary in three ways: 
by praying for the seminary and telling its story in their local areas; by 
encouraging young men and women to consider the ministry and Columbia 
Seminary; and by providing financial assistance to the seminary each year 
by supporting a particular project. During the past several years CFC has 
raised over $25,000 each year to support such projects as scholarship aid 
for students and Columbia Scholarships. 



93 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Mr. John A. Conant Chair 

Dr. William T. Bryant Vice Chair 

Dr. Mary Virginia Allen Secretary 

Mrs. Peggy M. Rowland Assistant Secretary 

Term to Expire 1990 

The Rev. Joanna Adams Decatur, GA 

Dr. Mary Virginia Allen Decatur, GA 

The Rev. Warner Durnell Nashville, TN 

Mrs. Elizabeth G. McCallen Memphis, TN 

Mr. James P. McLain Atlanta, GA 

Dr. Margaret Greer Miller Maitland, FL 

Dr. J. Phillips Noble Decatur, GA 

Mr. William J. Noonan Pensacola, FL 

Mr. William Scheu Jacksonville, FL 

Mrs. Martha Tissington Mobile, AL 

Term to Expire in 1991 

Mrs. Ann D. Cousins Atlanta, GA 

Mrs. Florence Davis Nashville, TN 

Dr. Jey Deifell Clearwater, FL 

The Rev. C. Jarred Hammet Camden, SC 

The Rev. Edward Hopper Lexington, KY 

Dr. James A. Nisbet Denver, NC 

Mr. William John Park Greenwood, SC 

Mrs. Lois B. Stone Sarasota, FL 

Mrs. Emily Wood Winter Park, FL 

Vacancy 

Term to Expire in 1992 

The Rev. William R. Barron Knoxville, TN 

Mr. Thomas W. Brown Lake City, FL 

Mr. John A. Conant Atlanta, GA 

Dr. Howard Edington Orlando, FL 

Dr. John R. Harris Miami Shores, FL 

Dr. T. Fleetwood Hassell Charleston, SC 

Dr. Thomas W. Horton Rock Hill, SC 

Mrs. Gay Love Atlanta, GA 

Mrs. Betty Simmons Jackson, MS 

Dr. G. Dana Waters, III Birmingham, AL 

At Large Members 

Mr. Howell F. Adams, Jr Atlanta, GA 

Dr. William T. Bryant, Jr Nashville, TN 

Mr. Howard Ector Marietta, GA 

Mrs. Florida Ellis Atlanta, GA 

Mr. Lawrence Gellerstedt, Jr Atlanta, GA 

Mr. J.C. "Bud" Shaw Cartersville, GA 

Mr. John H. Weitnauer, Jr Decatur, GA 



94 



COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Columbia Theological Seminary 

1990-91 

Executive 

John A. Conant, Chair 
William T. Bryant, Vice Chair 
Mary Virginia Allen, Secretary 
Howell Adams 
Warner Durnell 
Florida Ellis 
John Weitnauer 



Academic Affairs 

Florida Ellis, Chair 

Joanna Adams 

Mary Virginia Allen 

William T. Bryant 

Howard Edington 

C. Jarred (Jerry) Hammet 

Margaret Greer Miller 

Lois Stone 

Martha B. Tissington 

Dana Waters 

Business Management 

Howell Adams, Chair 
Tom Brown 
John Harris 
Edward Hopper 
Thomas W. Horton, Jr. 
J. Phillips Noble 
William J. Noonan 



Planning and Development 
John H. Weitnauer, Chair 
Ann D. Cousins 
Florence Davis 
Howard Ector 
Gay Love 
James P. McLain 
William J. Park 
Emily Wood 

Lawrence Gellerstedt, Jr. 
J.C. (Bud) Shaw 

Student Life 

Warner Durnell, Chair 

William Barron 

Jey Deifell 

T. Fleetwood Hassell 

Elizabeth G. (Betty) McCallen 

James A. Nisbet 

William E. Scheu 

Betty Simmons 



Investment 

J. Phillips Noble, Chair 
Samuel E. Allen 
John M. Bragg 
Robert B. Lang 
Julian LeCraw 
John H. McDonald 

Ex Officio 
President Douglas W. Oldenburg 
Treasurer John W. Gilmore 
Chair John A. Conant 

Vice-President, Development/Seminary Relations 
James F. Dickenson 



95 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

Douglas W. Oldenburg, D.D President 

Peggy M. Rowland Administrative Assistant 

ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

Glenn R. Bucher, Ph. D Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Elsie D. Urie Registrar and Administrative Assistant 

Cornell P. Carter, B.A. Assistant to the Office of Academic Affairs 

Douglas W. Hix, Ph. D Director of Advanced Studies 

Pat D. Hix Secretary 

Sara C. JuengSt, M.Div Director of Continuing Education 

Diane Bodnar Secretary 

RobertS. Smith, D.Min., J.D Director of Lay Institute of Faith and Life 

Carlene Bailey Secretary 

Yong Jun Kim, B.D Director of Asian Ministries Center 

Secretary 
Robert Leon Carroll, Jr., M.Div Director of Supervised Ministry 

Barbara S. Brooks Secretary 

James A. Overbeck, Ph.D Librarian 

Christine Wenderoth, Ph.D. Associate Librarian 

Ruthanne M. Strobel, M.A. Technical Services Librarian 

Colleen HiggS, B.S. Circulation Librarian 

Nancy M. Hendrix, B.S. Reclassification Librarian 

Ira Lois Brown, M.A.T.S. Reclassification Cataloger 

Ann A. Titshaw Secretary, Pastoral Care 

Nan B. Johnson Secretary, Evangelism 

Tempie Alexander Secretary 

STUDENT LIFE 

Philip R. Gehman, D.Min Vice President for Student Life 

Fran Ruthven, M.Div. Associate Dean of Students 

Ruth E. Shannon Administrative Assistant 

Rebecca Skillern Parker, M. Div Director of Admissions and Financial Aid 

Jewel E. Kirkus Financial Aid Officer and Secretary 

BUSINESS AND FINANCE 

John W. Gilmore, M.Div., J.D., C.P.A Vice President for Business and Finance 

Betty M. Cason Assistant Treasurer 

Suanne SauerBrun, B.A. Bookstore Manager 

Marilyn Ault Bookkeeper 

Charlotte MozingO Secretary 

A. Cecil Moore, Jr., B.D Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

Michael Lawrence, Alexander Oliver, Eula Mae Oliver Maintenance 

DEVELOPMENT AND SEMINARY RELATIONS 

James F. Dickenson, M.Div Vice President for Development 

and Seminary Relations 

Frank T. Willey, M.Div. Regional Director of Development 

Juliette J. Harper, B.A. Director of Publications and Publicity 

Barbara Poe Administrative Assistant 

Maria Badre, Elizabeth B. Burgess Secretaries 

Bonneau H. Dickson, M.Div. Field Representative 

Frank Alexander, Ph.D. Field Representative 

96 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 






]ames F. Dickenson, M.Div, 

Vice President for 

Developmen t/Sem ina ry 

Relations 



John W. Gilmore, M.Div., 

J.D., C.P.A. 
Vice President for Business 

and Finance 



Yongjun Kim, B.D. 

Director of Asian Ministries 

Center 






Frank Alexander, Ph.D. 
Field Representative 



Betty M. Cason 
Assistant Treasurer 



Bonneau H. Dickson, M.Div. 
Field Representative 







Juliette J. Harper, B.A. 

Director of Publications and 

Publicity 



Cecil Moore, B.D. 

Superintendent of Buildings 

and Grounds 



Rebecca S. Parker, M.Div. 

Director of Admissions and 

Financial Aid 






Fran Ruthven, M.Div. 
Associate Dean of Students 



Suanne B. SauerBrun, B.A. 
Bookstore Manager 



Frank T. Willey, M.Div. 

Regional Director of 

Development 



97 




98 



FACULTY 



DOUGLAS W. OLDENBURG, D.D. 

President 

B.S., Davidson College; B.D., Union Theological Seminary; S.T.M., 
Yale University Divinity School; D.D., Davis and Elkins College; 

D.D., St. Andrews Presbyterian College 








FREDERICK OTTO BONKOVSKY, Ph.D. 

Professor of Christian Ethics 

B.S., Muskingum College; M.Div., Yale Divinity School; Certificate, 
Free University, Berlin; Ph.D., Harvard University 



WALTER BRUEGGEMANN, Ph.D. 

Professor of Old Testament 

A.B., Elmhurst College; B.D., Eden Theological Seminary; Th.D., 
Union Theological Seminary; Ph.D., St. Louis University 





GLENN R. BUCHER, Ph.D. 
Dean of Faculty 
Professor of Social Ethics 

B.A., Elizabethtown College; M.Div., Union Seminary (Columbia 
University); Ph.D., Boston University 



THOxMAS ERSKINE CLARKE, Th.D. 

Professor of American Religious History 

A.B., University of South Carolina; B.D., Columbia Theological 
Seminary; Th.M., Th.D., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 




99 




CHARLES BLANTON COUSAR, Ph.D. 

Samuel A. Cartledge Professor of New Testament Language, 
Literature, and Exegesis 

A.B., Davidson College; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., University of Aberdeen 



BEVERLY ROBERTS GAVENTA, Ph.D. 

Professor of New Testament 

B.A., Phillips University; M.Div., Union Theological Seminary; 

Ph.D., Duke University 





CATHERINE GUNSALUS GONZALEZ, Ph.D. 

Professor of Church History 

B.A., Beaver College; S.T.B., Boston University School of Theology; 
Ph.D., Boston University 



DAVID MILLER GUNN, Ph.D. 
Professor of Old Testament Language, Literature, 

and Exegesis 

B.A., M.A., University of Melbourne; B.D., University of Otago; 

Ph.D., University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne 





SHIRLEY CAPERTON GUTHRIE, JR., D. Theol. 

/. B. Green Professor of Systematic Theology 

A.B., Austin College; B.D., Princeton Theological Seminary; 
D. Theol., University of Basel 



100 



WADE PRICHARD HUIE, JR., Ph.D. 

Peter Marshall Professor of Homiletics 

A.B., Emory University; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; 

Ph.D., University of Edinburgh 





OSCAR J. HUSSEL, Ed.D. 

Professor of Christian Education 

B.S., University of Cincinnati; M.A., McCormick Theological 
Seminary; Ed.D., Columbia University and 
Union Theological Seminary (NYC) 



BEN CAMPBELL JOHNSON, Ph.D. 

Peachtree Professor of Evangelism and Church Growth 

B.A., Asbury College; B.D., Asbury Theological Seminary; 

Th.M., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; 

D.Min., San Francisco Theological Seminary; 

Ph.D., Emory University 





JASPER NEWTON KEITH, JR., S.T.D. 

Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling 

A.B., Mercer University; M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 

Seminary; Certified Supervisor, Association for 

Clinical Pastoral Education; S.T.D., Columbia Theological Seminary 



JAMES D. NEWSOME, JR., Ph.D. 

Professor of Old Testament Language, 
Literature, and Exegesis 

B.A., Millsaps College; B.D., Th.M., Columbia Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 







101 




JOHN HULL PATTON, Ph.D. 

Professor of Pastoral Theology and Director of S.T.D. 
Program 

B.A., B.D., Emory University; Ph.D., University of Chicago 



ROBERT H. RAMEY, JR., D.Min. 

Professor of Ministry 

B.A./B.S., Hampden-Sydney College; B.D., Th.M., D.Min., Union 
Theological Seminary in Virginia; D.D., Hampden-Sydney College 





GEORGE W. STROUP, Ph.D. 

Professor of Theology 

B.A., Rice University; B.D., Yale University; 
M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 



BRIAN H. CHILDS, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Pastoral Theology and Counseling 

B.A., Maryville College; 
M.Div., Th.M., Ph.D., Princeton Theological Seminary 





PHILIP R. GEHMAN, D.Min. 

Dean of Students 

A.B., Wheaton College; M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary; 
D.Min., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 



102 



DOUGLAS W. HIX, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Pastoral Studies and Director of 

Advanced Studies 

B.A, Davidson College; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; 

Ph.D., Duke University 





DAVID P. MOESSNER, D. Theol. 

Associate Professor of New Testament Language, 
Literature, and Exegesis 

A.B., Princeton University; M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary; 
B.A., M.A., University of Oxford Honours School of Theology; 
D. Theol., University of Basel 



JAMES A. OVERBECK, Ph.D. 

Librarian and Associate Professor of Church History 

B.A., Carthage College; M.A., University of Chicago Graduate 
Library School; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago Divinity School 





ROBERT LEON CARROLL, JR., M.Div. 

Assistant Professor and Director of Supervised Ministry 

B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



B.A. 



SARA COVIN JUENGST, M.Div. 

Director of Continuing Education 

Erskine College; M.A., Presbyterian School of Christian 
Education; M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 




* 



103 




LUCY A. ROSE, D.Min. 

Assistant Professor of Preaching and Worship 

B.A., Agnes Scott College; M.A., Emory University; D.Min., Union 
Theological Seminary in Virginia; Th.M., Duke University 



ROBERT SYME SMITH, D.Min., J.D. 

Director of Lay Institute of Faith and Life 

A.B., Princeton University; M.A., George Washington University; 
J.D., Harvard Law School; M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary; 

D.Min., Lexington Theological Seminary 





WILLIAM A. THURSTON, M.Div. 

Assistant Professor of Ethics and Society 

B.A., University of Illinois; M.Div., Emory University: Candler 
School of Theology; Ph.D. (candidate) Emory University 



CHRISTINE WENDEROTH, Ph.D. 

Associate Librarian and Assistant Professor of Practical 

Theology 

B.A., Oberlin College; M.S.L.S., University of North Carolina- 
Chapel Hill; M.A., Ph.D., Emory University 





FRANK BARRY DAVIES, D.Min. 

Instructor in Church Music 

B.A., Birmingham University*; L.R.A.M., Royal Schools of Music; 

L.T.C.L., Trinity College; M.Div., D.Min., Columbia Theological 

Seminary 

*Postgraduate Certificate in Education, London University 



104 



JUSTO LUIS GONZALEZ, Ph.D. 

Adjunct Professor of Church History 

Bachiller en Ciencias Instituto de Maranao, Cuba; Bachiller en Letras 

Instituto de Maranao, Cuba; S.T.B., Seminario Evangelico de 

Teologia, Matanzas, Cuba; S.T.M., Yale Divinity School; 

M.A., Ph.D., Yale University 





JEANNE STEVENSON-MOESSNER, D.Theol. 

Adjunct Professor of Practical Theology 

A.B., Vanderbilt University; M.A., Princeton Theological Seminary; 
D.Theol., University of Basel 



VISITING PROFESSORS 

George Thompson Brown, Th.D. 
C. Benton Kline, Jr., Ph.D. 
Sara Little, Ph.D. 
Wayne H. Merritt, Ph.D. 
J. Will Ormond, Ph.D. 
Hubert V. Taylor, Ph.D. 
Bela P. Toth, Ph.D. 



VISITING INSTRUCTORS 
Emily Archer, M.A. 
Henry T. Close, Th.M. 
W. Dudley Crawford, M.Div. 
Ronald C. Crossley, Ph.D. 
F. Harry Daniel, Ph.D. 
Penny Hill, M.Div. 
Beth Knight, Ph.D. 
Albert Wells, M.Div. 



105 



PROFESSORS EMERITI 

C. BENTON KLINE, JR., Ph.D. 

President Emeritus 

A.B., College of Wooster; B.D., Th.M., Princeton Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Yale University 

JAMES DAVISON PHILIPS, Ph.D. 

President Emeritus 

A.B., Hampden-Sydney College; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., University of Edinburgh, D.D., Presbyterian College; D.D., Hampden- 
Sydney College 

MANFORD GEORGE GUTZKE, Ph.D. 

A.B., M.A., Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., Columbia University; 
D.D., Austin College 

SAMUEL ANTOINE CARTLEDGE, Ph.D. 

A.B., M.A., University of Georgia; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago 

JACK BRAME McMICHAEL, Ed.D. 

A.B., East Texas State Teachers College; M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary; 
Ed.D., Columbia University 

RONALD STEWART WALLACE, Ph.D. 

B.Sc, M.A., Ph.D., Universtiy of Edinburgh 

HUBERT VANCE TAYLOR, Ph.D. 

A.B., Lafayette College; B.Mus., Westminster Choir College; B.D., Columbia 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Northwestern University 

JAMES HERBERT GAILEY, JR., Th.D. 

A.B., Davidson College; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; Th.M., Th.D., 
Princeton Theological Seminary 

HAROLD BAILEY PRINCE, M.L. 

A.B., M.A., University of South Carolina; M.L., Emory University; B.D., 
Columbia Theologial Seminary 

LUDWIG RICHARD MAX DEWITZ, Ph.D. 

B.D., University of London; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 

J. WILL ORMOND, Ph.D. 

A.B., University of Alabama; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; 
Th.M., Princeton Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of Glasgow; 
D.D., Southwestern at Memphis 

F. SIDNEY ANDERSON, Th.M. 

B.A., Hampden-Sidney College; B.D., Th.M., Columbia Theological Seminary 



106 



ADJUNCT PROFESSORS IN SUPERVISED MINISTRY 

COUNSELING PRACTICUM SUPERVISORS 

Charles Helms, S.T.D. 
Gerald P. Jenkins, D.Min. 
Calvin W. Kropp, S.T.D. 
William R. Phillips, Th.M. 



CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION 

Calvin J. Banks, M.Div. 
Imogene Bennett, B.R.E., D.Min. 
Dean C. Bridges, M.Div. 
Donald H. Cabaniss, B.D., M.Ed. 
O.L. Delozier, Jr., B.D. 
Franklin D. Duncan, Ph.D. 
Kerry Duncan, M.Div. 
G. Robert Gary, M.Div. 



SUPERVISORS 

C. Fred Hall, D.Min. 
Eugene T. Locke, D.Min. 
Robert R. Morris, Th.M. 
Stephen W. Overall, M.Div. 
Dorothy Dale Owen, M.Div. 
Eugene Robinson, D.Min. 
James F. Shumake, M.Div. 
Frank D. Weathersby, B.D. 



SUPERVISING PASTORS FOR SUMMER ASSISTANTS 1989 



William Arthur 
M.L. Andrews 
Thomas Bagley 
Harry H. Barrow 
Ronald Botsford 
Jeff Clayton 
Samuel Cooper 
Chris Curvin 
Perky Daniel 
James Foil, Jr. 
Sarah Foulger 
Michal Hall 
Sid Harmon 
Robert Henderson 
Lee Holliday 
Joseph Johnson 
Ray Jones, III 
Samuel Kang 
Gary Kelly 
John Larson 



Eugene Lassiter, Jr. 
James Montgomery 
Stephen Montgomery 
Al Myers 
Jeffrey Newlin 
Agnes Norfleet 
Roger Quillin 
Harold Reagan 
Buddy Roberts 
Gary Scheidt 
Lynn Shurley, Jr. 
Stephen Sloop, Jr. 
J. Richard Stanford 
Gibson Stroupe 
William Thompson 
Mary Lynn Tobin 
Stephen Vance 
Donald Wade 
Donn Wright 
Sharon Youngs 



SUPERVISING PASTORS FOR INTERNS 1989 

J. Lawrence Cuthill Stewart Miller 

Robert Dunham David Pollitt 

H. Fleet Powell, Jr. Abel Sanchez 

Raymond Guterman William B. Wade, Jr. 

David McDonald John R. Wall 



107 



STUDENTS 



GRADUATING CLASS OF 1989 



DOCTOR OF SACRED THEOLOGY 
Louis Richard Lotham 

DOCTOR OF MINISTRY (In Ministry) 



Joe Boone Abbott 
Stephen Lee Birch 
Murray Neil Breland 
Carl Wayne Chrisner 
Dent Catron Davis III 
William J. Donaldson, Jr. 
Robert Curtis Fussell III 
John H. Haberer, Jr. 
David Lippincott Hale 
Larry Joseph Handman 
John Richard Hobson 
Amos A. Hood, Jr. 
Martin Montgomery Huggins 
Ramon Eugene Hunt 
John Michael Kelley 
Philip Emmanuel Makari 
Steve Allen Mays 



Thomas Otto Mueller 
Nelle Rodgers Mulligan 
Marion Thomas Norwood, Jr. 
Wendell Bramblett Phillips, Jr. 
M. Daniel Philpot 
Michael Dale Rainey 
Eugene Robinson, Jr. 
Samuel F. Rutland III 
Frank Richardson Sells 
Angus Robertson Shaw III 
Jerry Wayne Shirley 
Dorodolu Oludotun Sholeye 
Thomas Richard Smiley 
Charles Alex Steele 
Jane Lindsay Searjeant Watt 
Rabbi Chaim Joseph Wender 
David Foster Whiteley 



DOCTOR OF MINISTRY (In Sequence) 
Charles Jefferies White 



MASTER OF THEOLOGY 

R. Jerome Boone 
S. Harry Cain 

MASTER OF DIVINITY 

Jeffrey Ray Allen 
Kristofer Michael Allison 
Brent Barton Bissette 

with distinction 
Charles R. Boyette, Jr. 
Gusten Ray Brainerd 
William Jay Connolly 
Jean Leighton Davidson 

with distinction 
Richard Irvin Deibert 

with distinction 
E. Peter Denlea 
Susan Lynn Denne 



Adolfo Ruiz Contreras 



Sue Dobbs 

Robert Milton Early 

Jerome Joseph Ferrari 

with distinction 
Judith Anne Gabel 
Robin Sumner Gantz 
Ann Folkes Graham 

with distinction 
Jacqueline Anderson Griffeth 
Charles Ransom Hasty, Jr. 
Kenneth Langston Holt, Jr. 
Myung Bae (Daniel) Kim 
Jeffrey Brooks Lewis 



108 



Arvie Leon Maynard 
James Douglas Nelson 
Edward Schley Pease 
Karen Thea Petersohn 
Edwin Hoyt Pettus 
Carolyn Alethea Robinson 

with distinction 
William H. Rogers, Jr. 
Alisun Ruff 
James Fred Scaife 
Allard Gaines Smith, Jr. 
Bradley Donald Smith 
Emily Elisabeth Smith 



Stevan Alan Snipes 
Maetta Murdock Snyder 

with distinction 
Ian Robert Walfrid Stake 
Augusta Boyd Vanderbilt 
Bradley Knox Walker 
Thomas Worth Walker 

with distinction 
Laurie Lee Wallace 

with distinction 
George Timothy Womack 
Alan Duncan Wright 

with distinction 



MASTER OF ARTS (Youth Ministry) 
Barbara Elaine Benton 



Ian Hugh Merton Graham 



*'€3 




i 



109 



PRIZES AND AWARDS — 1989 

WILDS BOOK PRIZE Alan Wright 

PAUL T. FUHRMANN BOOK PRIZE IN CHURCH 

HISTORY Aaron Erickstaedt 

FLORRIE WILKES SANDERS PRIZE IN THEOLOGY Laurie Wallace 

PRESBYTERY OF ST. ANDREW WOMEN OF THE CHURCH 

PREACHING AWARD Karen Edwards 

SAMUEL A. CARTLEDGE NEW TESTAMENT EXEGESIS AWARD 

Timothy Beal 

LUDWIG RICHARD MAX DEWITZ OLD TESTAMENT STUDIES AWARD 

Thomas Walker 

COLUMBIA GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP Richard Deibert 

COLUMBIA FRIENDSHIP CIRCLE GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP 

Laurie Wallace 

HARVARD A. ANDERSON FELLOWSHIP Thomas Walker 

JAMES T. AND CELESTE M. BOYD MEMORIAL BOOK 

FUND AWARD Brent Bissette 

Jean Davidson 



110 



1989-90 SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS 

BLUE SCHOLARSHIPS Clover Beal 

Glenn Gilstrap 

Margaret Northern 

Catherine Taylor 

BROYLES SCHOLARSHIPS Thomas Beal 

Karen Edwards 
Beecher Mathes 

COLUMBIA SCHOLARSHIPS Kelly Allen 

Rob Campbell 

Kyle Fedler 

Sally Foster 

Scott Lawson 

Neal Neuenschwander 

Lori Pistor 

Linda Sherer 

CORNELSON SCHOLARSHIPS Carol Boggs 

Jane Huffstetler 
Lucy Turner 

HOLLAND SCHOLARSHIP Marybeth Asher 

HUSSEL SCHOLARSHIP Susan Newton 

NEWTON SCHOLARSHIPS Aaron Eickstaedt 

D. Raye Jones 
Lynette Solomon 

TULL SCHOLARSHIPS Polly Deppen 

Tod Linafelt 

Betty Tourville 

Dorinda Trouteaud 



111 



1989-90 ROLL OF STUDENTS 

ADVANCED DEGREE STUDENTS 

DOCTOR OF SACRED THEOLOGY 



Mary Crist Brown 
Decatur, Georgia 

Paula Ellen Buford 
Decatur, Georgia 

Arthur Gower Crosswell 
Milton, Florida 



Larry Gregory Easterling 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Richard Thomas Gillespie 
Decatur, Georgia 

Gerry Keith Hearn 
College Park, Georgia 



B.A., Agnes Scott College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.S., Georgia Southern College 
M.Div., Southwestern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., St. Andrews Presbyterian College 
D.Min., Union Theological Seminary in 
Virginia 

B.A., M.S.Ed., University of Kentucky 
M.Div., Duke University 

B.A., University of South Florida 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.S., Eastern Michigan University 
M.Div., Colgate Rochester Divinity School 



Neal Walter Kuhlhorst 
Lawrenceville, Georgia 

Tore-Kristian Lang 
Fredrikstad, Norway 



Maake S. Jonathan Masango 
Parkview, South Africa 



George H. Sparks 
Dalton, Georgia 

Wilson Glenn Van Winkle 
Marietta, Georgia 

Jerry Ray Wright 
Decatur, Georgia 

DOCTOR OF MINISTRY 

Paul Weaver Abell 
Boca Raton, Florida 



B.S., Indiana University 
M.Div., Louisville Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary 

Candidatur Theologiae, Det Teologiske 

Menighetsfakultetet 
S.T.M., Wartburg Theological Seminary 

Dip., Federal Theological Seminary, South 

Africa 
M.A.T.S., Columbia Theological Seminary 
M.A., Presbyterian School of Christian 

Education 

B.C.E., Georgia Institute of Technology 
M.Div., Virginia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Lee College 

M. Div., Candler School of Theology of 
Emory University 

A.B., Erskine College 
M.Ed., University of Georgia 
M.Div., Erskine Theological Seminary 



B.S., Pikeville College 
M.Div., Louisville Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary 



112 



Ralph J. Aker 
Orlando, Florida 



G. Morrell Aldridge 

Alexander City, Alabama 



Dougald Wilfred Alexander 
Clarendon, Jamaica 



Herbert Jeffrey Bailey 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Thomas Joe Baughman 
Beaufort, South Carolina 

David Cobb Beavers 
Roswell, Georgia 

Carol Till Bender 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

John Charles Berghorst 
Havertown, Pennsylvania 

Edwin D. Bernard 
Texarkana, Texas 



Floyd Lee Berrier 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

Daniel Mclntyre Berry 
Hampton, Virginia 

Sue Miller Beverly 

Hardinsbury, Kentucky 

William Herbert Bland 
Sanford, North Carolina 



Janice Lenore Blissit 
Union Point, Georgia 

Ronald Lee Bowie 
Dallas, Texas 

Thomas J. Bowman 

Darlington, South Carolina 



B.A., Morris Brown College 

M.Ed., Tuskegee Institute 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Sam ford University 
M.Div., New Orleans Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A. Theoi, University of the West Indies, 

Jamaica 
Dip., United Theological College of the West 

Indies, Jamaica 

B.S., Jacksonville State University 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at 
Emory University 

B.A., Ohio State University 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.A., Vanderbilt University 
Th.M., Dallas Theological Seminary 

B.A., Witithrop College 

M.Div., Erskine Theological Seminary 

B.A., Central College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.C.S., Strager Junior College 

B.S., Un ivers ity of Ten nessee 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

A.B., High Point College 

M.Div., Wesley Theological Seminary 

B.A., Davidson College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.S., M.E., University of Kentucky 
M.Div., Lexington Theological Seminary 

B.S., M.C.E., North Carolina State 

University 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Mercer University 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.S., University of Georgia 
M.Div., Louisville Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., University of South Carolina 
M.Div., Interdenominational Theological 
Center 



113 



Timothy J. Bowman 

Summerville, South Carolina 



John Ebenezer Boyd, Jr. 
Concord, North Carolina 



John Wesley Brock 
Jackson, Alabama 

Harold Berger Brown, Jr. 
Naples, Florida 



John Malcolm Brownlee 
Riverdale, Georgia 



John Carlton Bryan 
Augusta, Georgia 



James Walter Calhoun 
Albertville, Alabama 



Gary Clark Christensen 
Duluth, Georgia 



Huw Christopher 
Wrightsville Beach, 
North Carolina 



David Lee Clark 
Doraville, Georgia 



Prince Fitz- Albert Clemmings 
Westmoreland, Jamaica 



Mary Boyd Click 

Eden, North Carolina 



Bonnie Wade Conner 
St. Augustine, Florida 



B.A., University of South Carolina 
M.Div., Interdenominational Theological 
Center 

B.A., Catawba College 
M.Div., Lutheran Theological Southern 
Seminary 

B.S., Auburn University 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

A.B., University of Tennessee at 

Chattanooga 
M.Div., Duke University 

B.A., Washington and Lee University 
B.D., Union Theological Seminary in 

Virginia 
S.T.M., Yale University 

B.A., Emory University 
M.Div., Southwestern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.S., Troy State University 
M.A., M.Div., Church of God School of 
Theology 

A.B., Georgia State University 
M.Div., Lutheran Theological Southern 
Seminary 

B.A., University of Wales, South Wales and 

Monmouthshire 
B.D., University of Wales, Cardiff 
Th.M., Union Theological Seminary in 

Virginia 

B.A., Mercer University 

M.R.E., Southern Baptist Theological 

Seminary 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at 

Emory University 

B.A. Theol., University of the West Indies, 

Jamaica 
Dip., United Theological College of the West 

Indies, Jamaica 

B.A., University of North Carolina at 

Chapel Hill 
M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in 

Virginia 

B.S., Stetson University 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at 
Emory University 



114 



Edwin Mark Cooley 
Anderson, South Carolina 

Samuel Morgan Cooper 
Walterboro, South Carolina 

Gary Lynn Coppedge 
Decatur, Georgia 



James William Corbett 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Wallace Franklin Covington 

Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina 

Gordon Earl Cowans 
Kingston, Jamaica 



Maxima Saavedra Childers Cox 
Great Falls, Montana 



Richard Robert Crowe 
Charleston Heights, 
South Carolina 

James Cecil-Coley Dant 
Marietta, Georgia 



William Aldridge Dantzler 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Curry Watkins Davis, Jr. 
Leeds, Alabama 



Ernest William Davis 
Dunwoody, Georgia 



Mark William Deaton 

Charleston, South Carolina 

Thomas Goldsmith Dendy 
Spartanburg, South Carolina 



B.B.A., Texas Technological College 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

A.B., Erskine College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.A., Carson-Newman College 

M.Div., Louisville Presbyterian Theological 

Seminary 
M.A., Presbyterian School of Christian 

Education 

B.A., University of Alabama 
M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Belhaven College 

M.Div., Fuller Theological Seminary 

B.Sc, University of the West Indies, 

Jamaica 
M.Comm., University of Melbourne, 

Australia 
Dip., United Theological College of the West 

Indies 

B.Hum., Universidad Boliviana "Gabriel 

Rene Moreno," Bolivia 
B.Th., Church of God Spanish Institute of 

Ministry 
M.Div., Church of God School of Theology 

B.A., Stetson University 
Th.M., New Orleans Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.S., Georgia State University 
M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Presbyterian College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., University of California, Santa 

Barbara 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.S., Toccoa Falls College 

M.A., Presbyterian School of Christian 

Education 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Davidson College 
M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in 
Virginia 

B.A., Emory and Henry College 
M.Div., Erskine Theological Seminary 



115 



Joseph Jeffery Dorociak 
Germantown, Tennessee 



Valerie June Duff 

Uddingston, Scotland 

Scott Douglas Dunbar 
Stone Mountain, Georgia 

Kenneth Alan Dunivant 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Harry Dee Durbin 
Bemis, Tennessee 



Stephen Lane Dutton 
Birmingham, Alabama 



Steven Phillip Eason 

Morganton, North Carolina 

Jeffrey George Ebert 
Lancaster, Pennsylvania 

Annette Coker Edwards 

McClellanville, South Carolina 



Webster Sterling Edwards 
Kingston, Jamaica 



Virginia Simmons Ellis 
St. Petersburg, Florida 

Tex Lee Ergle 

Anniston, Alabama 



Saul J. Espino 

Fort Gordon, Georgia 



William Earl Etheridge 
Alexander City, Alabama 



Gordon Courtney Evans 
St. Catherine, Jamaica 



B.S., Francis Marion College 
M.Div., Gordon-Conwell Theological 
Seminary 

Cert., St. Colm's College, Edinburgh 



B.A., Emory University 
M.Ed., Georgia State University 

B.S., Athens State College 
M.Div., Vanderbilt University 

B.S., Union University 
M.Ed., Memphis State University 
M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Campbellsville College 
M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., East Carolina University 
M.Div., Duke University 

B.A., Hanover College 
M.Div., Gordon-Conwell Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Baptist College at Charleston 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at 
Emory University 

Dip., University oof London, England 
Dip., United Theological College of the West 

Indies 
M.A., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.A., Agnes Scott College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.S., University of North Alabama 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at 
Emory University 

B.S., University of Texas at El Paso 

M.S., Barry College 

M.Div., Garrett Theological Seminary 

B.A., University of Alabama in Huntsville 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at 
Emory University 

B.A., University of the West Indies 
Dip., United Theological College of the West 
Indies 



116 



Mahlon Scott Felkins 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Steven Merle Fettke 
Lakeland, Florida 



Vincent Fletcher 
Trelawny, Jamaica 



Henry James Flowers 
Augusta, Georgia 

Samuel Donald Fortson 
Charlotte, North Carolina 

Emily Barker Fox 

Fayetteville, North Carolina 

Mervin John Fry 

Coatesville, Pennsylvania 

Raymond Wesley Gamble 
Palm City, Florida 

Bobby Dean Gayton 
Conyers, Georgia 

Gregory Earle George 

Panama City Beach, Florida 

James Anthony Gibson, Jr. 
Fairfield, Alabama 



Milton Randall Gill 
Weirsdale, Florida 

Caroline Burgin Gourley 
Statesville, North Carolina 

Stephen Elwood Graves 
St. Cloud, Florida 

John Frank Green 
Tampa, Florida 



A.B., Birmingham Southern College 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at 
Emory University 

B.A., Northwestern State College 
M.Div., Southwestern Baptist Theological 

Seminary 
Th.M., Columbia Theological Seminary 

Lct.Th., University of the West Indies 
B.A.Theol., University of the West Indies 
Dip., United Theological College of the West 
Indies 

B.A., Georgia Southwestern College 
M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Covenant College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.S., Un iversity of Ten nessee 
M.Div., Vanderbilt University 

B.A., Harvard College 

M.Div., Harvard Divinity School 

M.Phil., Union Theological Seminary 

B.A., Houghton College 
M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in 
Virginia 

B.A., M.A., Alabama Christian School of 

Religion 
M.S., Troy State University 

B.A., Mobile College 
M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., University of Alabama at Birmingham 
M.Div., New Orleans Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.S., University of Maryland 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

A.B., Queens College 
M.Div., Duke University 

B.A., Eckerd College 

M.Div., San Francisco Theological Seminary 

B.A., University of South Florida 
M.Div., Interdenominational Theological 
Center 



117 



Thomas Ward Hagood 
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 



Prue McGee Hammett 

Sullivan's Island, South Carolina 

Bryant Christopher Harris 
Charlotte, North Carolina 

William Calvin Hayes 

Wentworth, North Carolina 

Helen Hardesty Helms 
Charlotte, North Carolina 



John Michael Helms 
Hartwell, Georgia 



Gregory Edward Henley 
Clinton, South Carolina 



Tantsi Nathaniel Hercules 
Atlanta, Georgia 

John Loritts Herndon 
Huntsville, Alabama 

John Knight Hill 
Macon, Georgia 

Larry Hill 

Hephzibah, Georgia 

Charles Edward Hodges 
Waleska, Georgia 

James Charles Horn 

Wynnewood, Pennsylvania 

Robert Milton Home 
Decatur, Georgia 

Leonard Ambers Howard 
Montgomery, Alabama 

Daniel Wesley Jacobs 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.A., M.A., Samford University 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at 

Emory University 
M.A., University of Alabama 

A.B., University of California 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.A., Old Dominion University 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Erskine College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., University of Florida 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at 
Emory University 

B.S., Samford University 
M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Eton College 

M.Div., Th.M., Princeton Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Allen University 
M.Div., Interdenominational Theological 
Center 

B.S., Livingstone College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Mercer University 
M.Div., Yale Divinity School 

B.A., Johnson C. Smith University 
M.Div., Interdenominational Theological 
Center 

B.A., Valdosta State College 
M.Div., Oral Roberts University 

B.S., Muskingum College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.S., Centenary College 
B.D., Th.M., Columbia Theological 
Seminary 

B.S., M.S., Troy State University 
M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Morris Brown College 
M.Div., Interdenominational Theological 
Center 



118 



Stephen Howard Janssen 
Yardley, Pennsylvania 

Howard Kee Johnston 
Clinton, South Carolina 

James Willard Johnston 
Sumter, South Carolina 



Thomas Price Johnston 
Gadsden, Alabama 



Ray Glenn Jones 

Bay Minette, Alabama 

Rodolfo Alfonso Juan 
Manila, Philippines 

Joseph Eugene Jursa 
Orange Park, Florida 

Fred Larkin Keith 
Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina 

Mark Lawrence Knisley 
Kingsport, Tennessee 

Klaus Oskar Richard Koch 
St. Petersburg, Florida 

Glen Allen Krans 
Goose Creek, South Carolina 

Laurie Ann Kraus-Neale 
Miami, Florida 

John Mark Kuehnert 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Maclean Kumi 

Ghana, West Africa 

Mark Stephen Lacey 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Robert Harry LaForce 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Colin Macrae Lambert 
Annapolis, Maryland 



A.B., Grove City College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.A., Columbus College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.S., University of South Carolina 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at 
Emory University 

B.A., Athens State College 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at 
Emory University 

B.S., Furman University 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Philippine Christian University, 

Philippines 
B.D., Union Theological Seminary 

B.S., Florida Institute of Technology 
M.Div., Asbury Theological Seminary 

B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.S., East Tennessee State University 
M.Div., Louisville Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., University of Florida 
M.Div., Lutheran Theological Southern 
Seminary 

B.A., Concordia Senior College 
M.Div., Concordia Seminary 

B.A., Wheaton College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.S., Concordia Senior College 
M.Div., Concordia Seminary 

B.A., University of Ghana 

Th.M., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Huntingdon College 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at 
Emory University 

B.A., Barrington College 
M.Div., Gordon-Conwell Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Howard University 
M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 



119 



Robert Eugene Lee 

Greensboro, North Carolina 

Errol Emanuel Leslie 

Savanna-La-Mar, Jamaica 

Arthur Morgan Lindsay 
Hampton, South Carolina 

Laurel Marlene Link 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 



James Henry Logan 

Charlotte, North Carolina 



B.A., Evangel College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., University of the West Indies 

Dip., University College of the West Indies 

B.S., Davidson College 
B.D., Th.M., Union Theological Seminary 
in Virginia 

B.A., Wake Forest University 

M.A., University of North Carolina at 

Greensboro 
M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological 

Seminary 

B.A., Kenyon College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 



Thomas Earl Lord 
Martinez, Georgia 

Roger Charles Mackey 
Goose Creek, South Carolina 

Samuel Preston Marshall III 
Oxford, Mississippi 



Albert Franklin Masters 
York, South Carolina 

Samuel Ruff Matthews 
Lawrenceville, Georgia 

Robert Hilton McBride 
Lexington, South Carolina 

Karen Turner McClellan 
Levittown, Pennsylvania 

Malcolm Sidney McCollum, Jr. 
Clinton, Mississippi 

William Alexander McCutchen 
Charlotte, North Carolina 



Richard Dean McKinnie 
Tampa, Florida 



B.A., Carson Newman College 
M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Barrington College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis 

M.Div., Louisville Presbyterian Theological 

Seminary 
Ed.D., Mississippi State University 

B.S., University of North Carolina 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

A.B., Piedmont College 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at 
Emory University 

B.S., The Citadel 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Westminister College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.A., University of Florida 
M.Div., Gordon-Conwell Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Presbyterian College 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 
M.C.E., Presbyterian School of Christian 
Education 

B.S., Lamburth College 

M.Div., St. Paul School of Theology 



120 



Bryant McLendon 
London, Kentucky 

James Eugene McNaull 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Joseph Henry McNeill 
Lancaster, South Carolina 



Asa Monroe Meadows 
Marietta, Georgia 

Gerald Jess Metzdorf 
Dublin, Georgia 

John Locke Milholland 
Statesville, North Carolina 

Glenn Ithamar Miller 

Summerville, South Carolina 



William Everett Mills, Jr. 
Etowah, Tennessee 



Kay Moser Misenheimer 
Knoxville, Tennessee 



James Guyburn Mishoe 
Charleston, South Carolina 



Stephen Richey Montgomery 
Norcross, Georgia 

Robert Leland Morgan 
Rochester, New York 



Robert Renly Morris 

Stone Mountain, Georgia 

Thomas Otto Mueller 
Albany, Georgia 

Walter Mueller 

Maple Glen, Pennsylvania 



A.B., Erskine College 

M.Div., Erskine Theological Seminary 

A.B., University of South Carolina 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Baptist College at Charleston 
M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.B.A., Marshall University 
B.D., Th.M., Columbia Theological 
Seminary 

B.S., Toccoa Falls Bible College 
M.Div., Southwestern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.S., Western Carolina University 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.S., Tusculum College 

B.D., Yale University Divinity School 

S.T.M., New York Theological Seminary 

B.A., Belhaven College 

M.A., Vanderbilt University 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., King College 

M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in 
Virginia 

A.B., W off or d College 
B.D., Candler School of Theology at Emory 
University 

B.A., The College of booster 

M.Div., Yale University Divinity School 

A.B., University of Chicago 
B.D., Austin Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., University of Florida 
M.Div., Th.M., Columbia Theological 
Seminary 

B.S., Arkansas Polytechnic College 
M.Div., Reformed Theological Seminary 

A.B., Upsala College 

M.Div., Reformed Episcopal Seminary 

Th.M., Princeton Theological Seminary 



121 



James Henry Murray 
Kingston, Jamaica 



Daniel Allan Nail 
Zionsville, Indiana 

Stephen Richard Negley 
Seffner, Florida 

Mwandiwona Jonathan Nkuchwayo 
Atlanta, Georgia 



Robert Joel Norris 

Charleston Heights, South 
Carolina 

David W. Omerod 
Ocala, Florida 

Robin Shane Owens 

Gastonia, North Carolina 

Mack Reitzel Painter 
Enid, Oklahoma 

Jun Ro Park 

Decatur, Georgia 

Francis Marion Parr 
Columbus, Georgia 

Margaret Barnes Peery 
Matthews, North Carolina 



William Harrison Phares, Jr. 
Birmingham, Alabama 

James Stacey Phillips 
Tupelo, Mississippi 

Charles Frederick Pieplow 
Birmingham, Alabama 

John David Pierce 
Marietta, Georgia 

Andral Bratton Plexico 
Mebane, North Carolina 



Ord., St. Peter's Theological College, 

Jamaica 
Dip., St. Augustine's College Canterbury, 

England 

B.S., Un iversity of Flordia 

M.Div., Colu?nbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., University of South Florida 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., United College of Zimbabwe 
M.Div., Interdenominational Theological 

Center 
M.S.W., Atlanta University 

A.B., Central Wesley an College 
M.Div., Asbury Theological Seminary 

B.S.Ed., Ohio University 

M.Div., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

B.A., Presbyterian College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Catawba College 

M.Div., Lancaster Theological Seminary 

B.A., M.A., Chonnam University, Korea 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., St. Andrews Presbyterian College 
M.Div., Duke University 

B.A., Queens College 
M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in 
Virginia 

B.A., University of Alabama at Birmingham 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at 
Emory University 

B.S., Mississippi College 
M.Div., New Orleans Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Concordia Senior College 
M.Div., Concordia Seminary 

B.A., Berry College 

M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

A.B., Presbyterian College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



122 



George Harvey Porter 
Stone Mountain, Georgia 

Barry Kenneth Pridham 
Montego Bay, Jamaica 

Michael Corrick Quicke 
Griffin, Georgia 

Roger Paty Rabey 

Banner Elk, North Carolina 

Richard Nelson Ralls 
Bessemer, Alabama 

Youl Rhee 

Mountlake, Washington 



Shirley Arlene Richards 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Albert Ronald Richardson 
Tupelo, Mississippi 



Robert Paul Richardson 
Wallingford, Pennsylvania 

James Wilson Roberts 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Leslie Gordon Robinson 
Denmark, South Carolina 

William Cullens Robinson 
Charlotte, North Carolina 

William Fredrick Rose 
Shelby, North Carolina 

Mary Kepler Sapp 
Nagoya, Japan 

John Arthur Schmidt 

Warminster, Pennsylvania 



A.B., Samford University 
B.D., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Mount Allison University, Canada 
M.Div., Atlantic School of Theology, 
Canada 

L.Th., Berea Theological College, South 

Africa 
M.Div., Church of God School of Theology 

B.A., Furman University 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.A., William Jewell College 

B.D., Andover Newton Theological School 

Dip., Korea Duck Song Presbyterian 

Seminary, Korea 
Dip., Holiness Theological Seminary, Korea 
Dip., Korean Bible College, Korea 
Th.M., Korea Presbyterian Theological 

Seminary, Korea 

B.A., East Texas Baptist College 
M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Mississippi State University 
M.R.E., Southwestern Baptist Theological 

Seminary 
M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 

Seminary 

B.A., University of Akron 
M.Div., Louisville Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Samford University 
M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Augusta College 
M.Div., Southwestern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

A.B., East Carolina University 
M.Div., Duke University 

A.B., Davidson College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.A., M.A., Wheaton College 



B.A., Hastings College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 



123 



Robert Michael Scotland 
Greenwood, South Carolina 



Timothy Nathan Setzer 
Augusta, Georgia 

Mary Louise Sferre 

South Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida 



Anne Carter Shelley 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 



James Chester Shelton 
Charlotte, North Carolina 



Lynn Edwin Shurley, Jr. 
Sylacauga, Alabama 

Douglas Thomas Simmons 
Cairo, Georgia 

Soon Byung Son 
Decatur, Georgia 

Robert Alfred Stauffacher 
Spanish Fort, Alabama 

Kenneth Phillip Stealing 
Fayetteville, North Carolina 

William Merritt Steinbrook 
Piano, Texas 

Mary Steves 

South Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida 

Bruce Wilson Stewart 
Montgomery, Alabama 

Alvin Macon Stinson 
Huntsville, Alabama 



Alvin Emanuel Stone 
Kingston, Jamaica 



B.A., M.Ed., South Carolina State College 
M.Div., Interdenominational Theological 
Center 

B.A., Berkshire Christian College 
M.C.E., Reformed Theological Seminary 

B.A., St. Rose College 
M.A., Seton Hall University 
M.S.W., Syracuse University 

B.A., University of South Carolina 
M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in 

Virginia 
Th.M., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.A., Mount Union College 
M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 
M.Div., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

B.A., Millsaps College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.S., Georgia Southern College 
M.Div., Reformed Theological Seminary 

B.A., Han Nam University, Korea 
M.Ed., Korea University, Korea 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Western Illinois University 
M.Div., Louisville Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary 

B.S., Trenton State College 
M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Oklahoma State University 
M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.S., Seton Hall University 
M.S.W., Syracuse University 

B.A., M.A., Alabama Christian School of 
Religion 

B.A., Alabama College 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at 
Emory University 

Ord., St. Peter's Theological College, 

Jamaica 
Dip.Theoi, University of London, England 
M.Div., Howard University 



124 



John Burwell Stone 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 



Philip Harbin Summerlin 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 

Charles Allen Summers 
Davidson, North Carolina 



James Allen Summey 
Concord, North Carolina 



Bruce Davis Taylor 

Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina 

Paula Jeanne Teague 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Sally-Lodge Henderson Teel 
Biloxi, Mississippi 

Darrell Arthur Thompson 
Lancaster, South Carolina 



Roger Kirk Thompson 
Birmingham, Alabama 



Carlton Manning Thornton 
Homewood, Alabama 

George Richard Troost 
Rockledge, Florida 



Coit Ray Troutman 

Summerville, South Carolina 



William Sherrill Troutman 
Shelby, North Carolina 

Janice Louise Tucker 

Charlotte, North Carolina 



George Lewis Tumlin 
Marietta, Georgia 



B.A., Baptist College at Charleston 
M.Ed., University of South Carolina 
M.Div., Gordon-Conwell Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Abilene Christian University 
S.T.B., Harvard Divinity School 

B.A., Davidson College 
M.Div., Louisville Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Gardner-Webb College 
M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Trinity College 
M.Div., Duke University 

B.A., Guilford College 

M.Div., Earlham School of Religion 

B.A., Coker College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Augusta College 
M.Div., New Orleatis Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., McMurry College 
M.Th., Perkins School of Theology of 
Southern Methodist University 

B.A., Lee College 

M.Div., Church of God School of Theology 

B.A., University of North Carolina at 

Chapel Hill 
M.T.S., Candler School of Theology at 

Emory University 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Wake Fores t Un ivers ity 
M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., John J. Pershing College 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.S., Wingate College 
M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Baptist College at Charleston 
M.Div., New Orleans Baptist Theological 
Seminary 



125 



Davette Lois Turk 
Jacksonville, Florida 

Richard Martin Turk 
Jacksonville, Florida 

Margaret Teresa Turney-Ayer 
Acworth, Georgia 



Peniamina Vilitai Vai 



Stephen Ridings Vance 
Jacksonville, Florida 

Thomas Ronald Vaughan 
Hickory, North Carolina 

Billy Earl Vaughn 

Barnwell, South Carolina 



John Kie Vining 

Stone Mountain, Georgia 

Clarence Arthur Wall 
Grifton, North Carolina 



John Gary Waller 
Decatur, Georgia 

Harold Robert Warren 
Lake Wales, Florida 

Donald Scott Weimer 
Bradenton, Florida 



Albert Norman Wells 

Sunset Beach, North Carolina 

Dennis Gerard Whitaker 
Charlotte, North Carolina 



David Allen White 
Johnson City, Tennessee 



B.A., Villanova Utiiversity 
M.A., LaSalle College 

A.B., St. Mary's Seminary and University 
Th.M., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.A., University of South Florida 
M.M., Indiana University 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology of 
Emory University 

Cert., Malua Theological College, Western 

Samoa 
B.D., Pacific Theological College, Fiji 

Islands 

B.A., Hanover College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Harding College 
M.Div., M.A., Duke University 

B.A., Carson-Newman College 
M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.S., Lee College 

M.A., Assemblies of God Theological 
Seminary 

B.S., Campbell University 
M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Huntingdon College 

B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary 

Th.M., Duke University 

B.A., M.A., University of South Florida 
M.Div., University of the South 

B.A., University of Kansas 

M.Div., Trinity Evangel istical Divinity 

School 
Th.M., Princeton Theological Se??iinary 

B.S., Auburn University 

B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary 

Ph.D., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.A., University of North Carolina at 

Chapel Hill 
M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological 

Seminary 

B.A., Kentucky Wesleyan College 
M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 



126 



Clyde McPherson Wiley 
Lithonia, Georgia 

Ben William Wilson 
Iva, South Carolina 

Carol Anne Wood 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Kenneth Earl Woodard 
Newell, North Carolina 

Gerald Edward Worrell 
Charlotte, North Carolina 



Brian Maurice Wyatt 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Roderick Zak 
Orlando, Florida 

Thomas Richard Zehnder 
Orlando, Florida 

MASTER OF THEOLOGY 

Frank Charles Aichinger 
Sumter, South Carolina 

Herschel Allen, Jr. 
Dunwoody, Georgia 

Mary Gillespie Amos 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Brant Dale Baker 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

Todd Douglas Baucum 
Memphis, Tennessee 

Henley Dwight Bernard 
Kingston, Jamaica 



Vincent Peter Castellani 
Athens, Tennessee 

Joon Man Choi 
Seoul, Korea 



B.S., University of Florida 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Erskine College 

M.Div., Erskine Theological Seminary 

B.S., East Carolina University 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., King College 

M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in 
Virginia 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and 

State University 
M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological 

Seminary 

B.A., Birmingham-Southern College 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at 
Emory University 

B.S., Spring Hill College 
M.Div., Interdenominational Theological 
Center 

B.A., B.D., Concordia Seminary 



B.A., University of Virginia 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.A., Davidson College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Mary Baldwin College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Claremont McKenna College 
M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.S., Liberty University 

M.Div., Memphis Theological Seminary 

B.A., University of the West Indies, Jamaica 
Dip., United Theological College of the West 
Indies, Jamaica 

B.A., East Coast Bible College 

M.Div., Church of God School of Theology 

B.A., Yonsei University, Korea 
M.Div., Th.M., Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary, Korea 



127 



Joong Ho Chong 
Seoul, Korea 



Reginald Davis 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Robert Alva Deen III 
Decatur, Georgia 



Michael Lee Dusing 
Lakeland, Florida 



John Samuel Eddinger 
Snellville, Georgia 



Douglas Edwin Edwards III 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Marvin Browning Fergus 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Robert Leroy Griffin 
Clarkston, Georgia 

Jeonghoon Han 

Durham, North Carolina 

Jesse William Hegler 
Dalton, Georgia 

Guy Allen Helms 
Suwanee, Georgia 

Karen Adele Johnson 
Clarkston, Georgia 

Rhona Mitchell Jones 
Durham, England 



Seung Joong Joo 
Seoul, Korea 



Charles Kibicho Kariuki 
Nairobi, Kenya 



B.E., Kyungpook National University, 

Korea 
M.Div., Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 

Korea 

B.A., Berea College 

M.Div., University of the South 

B.S., Fort Hays State University 
M.C.M., Southern Baptist Theological 

Seminary 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at 

Emory University 

B.A., Southeastern College of the Assemblies 

of God 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at 

Emory University 

B.A., Wake Forest University 
M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Hendrix College 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at 
Emory University 

B.A., University of Georgia 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at 
Emory University 

B.A., Belhaven College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

Th.B., Yonsei University, Korea 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Presbyterian College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Covenant College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Flagler College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Middlesex, England 
Education Certificate, Moray House, 

Scotland 
Theological Certificate, 

Westminster College, Cambridge, England 

B.A., Soong Sil University, Korea 
M.Div., Th.M., Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary, Korea 

B.D., St. Pauls United Theological College, 
Kenya 



128 



Tae-Hyung Ko 
Seoul, Korea 

Hang Ja Kwon Koo 
Seoul, Korea 



Bjoern Dieter Kranefuss 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Joseph S. Lee 
Decatur, Georgia 

Timothy Mix Leslie 
Chipley, Florida 

David Wayne Lovelace 
Newnan, Georgia 

Robert Kim Mclntire 
Smyrna, Georgia 

David William McKee 
Stone Mountain, Georgia 

William Glen McKinney 
Chicago, Illinois 

William Franklin McKissack, III 
Atlanta, Georgia 

John McLean, Jr. 
Augusta, Georgia 

Douglas Stanford McLeroy 
Ft. Leonard Wood, Missouri 



Michael St. Aubin Miller 
Kingston, Jamaica 

Richard Montgomery Nelson 
Decatur, Georgia 

Joseph Emanuel Nichols 
St. Michael, Barbados 



Scott Christian Opsahl 
Snohomish, Washington 



B.Poli.Sci., Yonsei University, Korea 
M.Div., Presbyterian Theological Seminary 

B.A., Wookmyung Women's University, 

Korea 
M.Div., Erskine Theological Seminary 

Theolog. Examen, Universitaet Hamburg, 
Germany 

B.S., California State University, 

Northridge 
M.Div., International Theological Seminary 

B.A., Belhaven College 

M.Div., Reformed Theological Seminary 

B.A., Emory and Henry College 
M.Div., The Protestant Espiscopal 
Theological Seminary in Virginia 

B.S., North Georgia College 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at 
Emory University 

B.A., Florida Presbyterian College 
M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in 
Virginia 

B.A., University of South Alabama 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Presbyterian College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Georgia State University 

M.Div., Southwestern Baptist Theological 

Seminary 
D.Min., Perkins School of Theology of 

Southern Methodist University 

B.A., University of the West Indies, Jamaica 
Dip., United Theological College of the West 
Indies, Jamaica 

B.A., Presbyterian College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., University of the West Indies, Jamaica 
Dip., United Theological College of The West 
Indies, Jamaica 

B.A., University of Washington 
M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 



129 



Stephen Russell Paine 
APO Miami, Florida 

Justin Leonard Peart 
Kingston, Jamaica 



Gregory Rolan Perry 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Martha Jane Petersen 
Atlanta, Georgia 



Samuel Henry Pope 
Lake Charles, Louisiana 



Randy Edward Prunty 
Decatur, Georgia 



Diane Lovin Ragsdale 
Rochester, New York 

Carol Shuler Rahn 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Charles Wiley Roberts 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Frances Jean Ruthven 
Decatur, Georgia 

John Guilds Seabrook, Jr. 
Huntsville, Alabama 

Derek Adolphus Stapleton 
St. George, Barbados 

Lane Adams Stokes 
East Point, Georgia 

Daniel Susanto 
Jakarta, Indonesia 

Paola Tognina 

Poschiavo, Switzerland 

Jill Denise Ulrici 

Brooklyn, New York 



B.A., Lee College 

M.Div., Church of God School of Theology 

College Diplo?na, Union Theological 

Seminary, Jamaica 
Diploma, University of London, England 
B.A., University of West Indies, Jamaica 

B.S., Louisiana State University 
M.Div., Reformed Theological Seminary 

B.A., Agnes Scott College 

B.S.N., Cornell University - New York 

Hospital School of Nursing 
D.Min., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Davidson College 
M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in 
Virginia 

B. A., Gardner-Webb College 
M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

A.B., Georgia Southern College 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.S., Cornell University 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Arkansas State University 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., University of Georgia 

M Div., Harvard Divinity School 

B.A., Wofford College 

M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

G.O.E., Codrington College, Barbados 

B.Min., Huron College 

S.T.M., Christian Theological Seminary 

B.S., University of Georgia 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology at 
Emory University 

Sarjana Psikologi, University of Indonesia 
S.Th., Jakarta Theological Seminary 

Lie, Facolta Valdese di Teologia, Italy 



B.S., Medical College of Georgia 
M.Div., Yale Divinity School 



130 



\ 



Andrew Jackson Livick Waskey 
Dalton, Georgia 



Otis Lee Weldon 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Thomas Richard Williams 
Songkhla, Thailand 

Totok Soemartha Wiryasaputra 
Yogyakarta, Indonesia 

Grace Tsyr-En Wu 
Kaohsiung, Taiwan 

Christopher Edward Zorn 

Sherrill's Ford, North Carolina 



B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi 
M.Div., Austin Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Birmingham Bible College 
M.Div., Interdenominational Theological 
Center 

B.A., Samford University 
M.Div., Southwestern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.Th., M.Div., Duta Wacana Seminary, 
Indonesia 

M.Div., Tainan Theological College and 
Seminary, Taiwan 

B.A., Mercer University 

D.Min., Columbia Theological Seminary 



BASIC DEGREE STUDENTS 

MASTER OF DIVINITY 
C COMPONENT 



Name 
Home Town 



College 
Presbytery or Denomination 



Lucy Robertson Aldridge 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Roy Tiller Bain 
LaGrange, Georgia 

Susan Lynn Boardman 
Lakeland, Florida 



Carol Ann Boggs 

Spartanburg, South Carolina 



L. Harry Brazell 
Ellaville, Georgia 

Stephen Speed Bryant 
Nashville, Tennessee 

Sidney M. Burgess 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Sara Bedon Burress 
Tupelo, Mississippi 



B.A., Converse College 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., LaGrange College 
United Church of Christ 

B.A., Eckerd College 
A. A. /R.N. , Manate Community College 
Tampa Bay 

B.A., University of South Carolina 
M.Ed., Converse College 
Foothills 

B.A., Mercer University 
United Methodist 

B.A., University of Mississippi 
Middle Tennessee 

B.A., Samford University 
Sheppards and Lapsley 

B.S., Mississippi State University 
Greater Atlanta 



131 



Robert Fleming Chastain 
Decatur, Georgia 

Tae Su Cheong 

Hickory, North Carolina 

Elizabeth Mangum Deibert 
Atlanta, Georgia 



Kevin Alfred Dorsett 
Dade City, Florida 

Karen Suzanne Edwards 
Tarboro, North Carolina 

Thomas R. Evans III 
Kennesaw, Georgia 

William Mark George 
Conyers, Georgia 

David J. Gibbs 
Midland, Michigan 

Mary Stewart Hall 
Griffin, Georgia 



Wilbur Hugh Howie, Jr. 
Oxford, Mississippi 



Jane A. Huffstetler 
Pine Bluff, Arkansas 

Tully Jay Hunter 

Greenville, South Carolina 



Dolores DeLand Ingraham 
Tallahassee, Florida 

J. Todd Jenkins 
Valdosta, Georgia 

Gloria Elaine Jennings 
Augusta, Georgia 



D. Raye Jones 
Decatur, Georgia 

James Timothy Kiser 

Altamonte Springs, Florida 

Lori Knight-Whitehouse 
Savannah, Georgia 



B.B.A., Georgia State University 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., East Coast Bible College 
Western North Carolina 

B.M.Ed., University of North Carolina, 
Chapel Hill 
Coastal Carolina 

B.A., University of South Florida 
Tampa Bay 

B.A., Wake Forest University 
New Hope 

B.B.A., Kennesaw College 
Cherokee 

B.S., Georgia State University 
Greater Atlanta 

B.S., Western Michigan University 
Lake Huron 

B.S., Presbyterian College 

M.A., Presbyterian School of Christian 

Education 

Greater Atlanta 

B.A., Mississippi College 
M.S., University of Southern California 
St. Andrew 

B.M., M.M., Baylor University 
Arkansas 

B.A., Texas Tech University 
M.A., Clemson University 
Foothills 

B.A., Florida State University 
Florida 

B.A., Valdosta State College 
Flint River 

B.F.A., University of Georgia 
M.A.T.S., Columbia Theological Seminary 
Northeast Georgia 

B.A., M.Ed., University of South Carolina 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., Eckerd College 
Central Florida 

B.A., University of South Carolina 
Savannah 



132 



Zeta Touchton Lamberson 
Marietta, Georgia 



Amanda Beth Lape-Freeberg 
Orr's Island, Maine 

Donald Ridgley Lawson 
Inverness, Flordia 

Natalie Jean Lester 
Lajolla, California 

Helene Hibbard Loper 
Norcross, Georgia 

Robert Earl Madsen 
Stone Mountain, Georgia 

John Alexander McLean 
Camden, South Carolina 

Michael Luis Murdock 
Charlotte, North Carolina 

Laura DuPre Newsome 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Richard Brantley Newsome 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Laura Lee Norris 
Decatur, Alabama 

David Alvah Pearce 
Montgomery, Alabama 



Robert Edwin Reese 
Milton, Florida 

Martha Cross Sexton 
Columbia, South Carolina 



Robert John Sherman 
St. Augustine, Florida 

Brian Jungshik Shin 

Columbia, South Carolina 

Tommy Register Sikes 
Decatur, Georgia 

Earl Joseph Smith 
Brandon, Florida 



B.S., Presbyterian College 

M.A., Presbyterian School of Christian 

Education 

Trinity 

B.A., Clark University 
Transylvania 

B.S., West Chester State University 
Tampa Bay 

B.A., St. Andrews Presbyterian College 
United Church of Christ 

B.S., Emory University 
Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) 

A.B., Georgia State University 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., Hendrix College 
Providence 

B.S.M.E., University of Tennessee 
Charlotte 

B.A., Agnes Scott College 
Greater Atlanta 

B.S., Vanderbilt University 
Greater Atlanta 

B.S., Auburn University 
North Alabama 

B.A., Mercer University 
M.Miss., Reformed Theological Seminary 
Sheppards and Lapsley 

B.A., Univers ity of Wes t Florida 
Florida 

A.B., Smith College 

M.Ed., University of South Carolina, Columbia 
Trinity 

B.A., Flagler College 
St. Augustine 

B.B.E., Western Bible College 
Trinity 

B.S., Un ivers ity of Georgia 
Greater Atlanta 

B.S., Tulane University 
Tampa Bay 



133 



Lynette Davies Solomon 
Dallas, Texas 

Holly Scott Tickle 

St. Augustine, Florida 

Dorinda Ellen Trouteaud 
Roswell, Georgia 



James Richard Weldon, Jr. 
Jacksonville, Florida 

Nathan Ray Wheeler 
Warner Robins, Georgia 



B.A., Austin College 
Grace 

B.A., Flagler College 
St. Augustine 

B.A., College of Wooster 
M.A., University of Detroit 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., University of North Florida 
St. Augustine 

B.E.E.T., Southern Technical Institute 
Flint River 



INTERNS 

Shawn E. Barkley 
Richmond, Kentucky 

Colleen Bolkcom Allison 
Lakeland, Florida 



Laura Beth Carlson-Aull 
Greer, South Carolina 



Sharon Kay Core 
Decatur, Georgia 

Scott Arthur Ellington 
Decatur, Georgia 

Elizabeth Lynn Hoskins 
Rock Hill, South Carolina 

Jeffrey Lamar Hutcheson 
Forest Park, Georgia 



Keith Lentz Riddle 

Charleston, South Carolina 

Mark Kenan Schumann 
St. Petersburg, Florida 

Jonathan Carl Wallace 
Springfield, Virginia 



B.A., Western Kentucky University 
Translyvania 

B.B.A., Stetson University 
M.S., Florida State University 
Tampa Bay 

B.S., University of Illinois 
M.A., University of Denver 
Foothills 

B.A., Agnes Scott College 
Greater Atlanta 

B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
Church of God 

B.S., Clemson University 
Providence 

A.B., University of Georgia 
M.S., Auburn University, Montgomery 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., W off or d College 
Charleston-Atlantic 

B.A., University of Central Florida 
Tampa Bay 

B.B.A., College of William and Mary 
National Capitol 



B COMPONENT 

Nan Morgan Adams 
Jacksonville, Florida 

Matthew Todd Allison 
Lakeland, Florida 



B.S., Un iversity of Florida 
Florida 

B.S., Florida Southern College 
Tampa Bay 



134 



Clover Lee Beal 
Seattle, Washington 

Timothy Kandler Beal 
Seattle, Washington 

Pamela Marie Bolerjack 
Point Lookout, Missouri 

Harris Neal Brown 
Atlanta, Georgia 

James Elliott Caprell 
Wellford, South Carolina 

Lorna D. Clark 

St. Simons Island, Georgia 



Mark Phillip Clark 
Hot Springs, Arkansas 



Deborah M. Conner 

Huntington Beach, California 

David John D'Alessio 

Murrels Inlet, South Carolina 

Mary Piatt D'Alessio 

Murrels Inlet, South Carolina 

Aaron David Eickstaedt 
The Woodlands, Texas 

Michael Lee Fitze 

Hanahan, South Carolina 



Timothy Sean Foster 
Bartlett, Tennessee 

Susan T. Friedl 
Duluth, Georgia 

Judith Ann Fulp 

Kannapolis, North Carolina 

Glenn Alan Gilstrap 
Taylors, South Carolina 

Dana Steffee Hughes 
Decatur, Georgia 

Elizabeth Emma Inman 
Greensboro, North Carolina 



B.A., Seattle Pacific University 
Seattle 

B.A., Seattle Pacific University 
Seattle 

B.A., School of the Ozarks 
Arkansas 

B.A., Faith College 

African Methodist Episcopal 

B.A., Wofford College 
Foothills 

B.B.A., Georgia State University 
M.P.A., Georgia Southern College 
Southern Baptist 

B.A., University of Arkansas, Little Rock 
J.D., University of Arkansas 
Mission 

B.A., San Francisco State College 
Los Ranchos 

B.S., University of Rhode Island 
New Harmony 

B.A., College of Notre Dame 
New Harmony 

B.A., Austin College 
Grace 

B.A., University of South Carolina 
M.A., College of Charleston 
Charleston- Atlantic 

B.S., Mississippi State University 
Memphis 

B.S., East Carolina University 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., Pfeiffer College 
Charlotte 

B.A., Furman University 
Foothills 

B.A., Georgia State University 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., University of North Carolina, 
Chapel Hill 
Salem 



135 



Sharon Ann Israel 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Thomas Franklin Keller 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Danny Thomas Klein 
Chesapeake, Virginia 

Edward Richard Knight 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Kenneth Stewart Letterman 
Lawton, Oklahoma 

Tod Alan Linafelt 
Beaver, Pennsylvania 

Sally Louise Lorey 

Stone Mountain, Georgia 

Charles William McConnell 
Miramar, Florida 

Sam Evans McGregor 
Hopkins, South Carolina 

Eric Todd Myers 

Orangeburg, South Carolina 



Charles Livingston Newton II 
Marietta, Georgia 



Margaret Robinson Northen 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Paul Eugene Osborne 
Richmond, Virginia 



William Lawson Piatt 
Shelby, North Carolina 

James Clifford Ramsey 
Beaver, Pennsylvania 

George Woodbury Rinker 
Augusta, Georgia 

Karen Lorraine Rogers 
Shreveport, Louisiana 

Paul Michael Saleeby 
Jacksonville, Florida 



B.A., University 6f South Florida 
M.Ed., Ph.D., Georgia State University 
Evangelical Lutheran Church in America 

B.A., Wittenberg University 
Pittsburgh 

B.S., Jimmy Swaggert Bible College 
Assemblies of God 

B.S., University of Tennessee 
Greater Atlanta 

B.S., Stetson University 
Indian Nations 

B.A., Eckerd College 
Beaver-Butler 

B.S., University of Alabama 
Greater Atlanta 

B.S., Florida International University 
Tropical Florida 

B.S., Clemson University 
Trinity 

B.M., Shenandoah College and Conservatory of 
Music 
Charleston- Atlantic 

B.A., Davidson College 
J.D., University of Alabama 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., Vanderbilt University 
Sheppards and Lapsley 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College 
M.A., Presbyterian School of Christian 

Education 

fames 

B.A., Emory and Henry College 
Western North Carolina 

B.S.J., Ohio University 
Beaver-Butler 

B.S./B.A., Presbyterian College 
Northeast Georgia 

B.A., Grove City College 
Pines 

B.A., University of Florida 
St. Augustine 



136 



Jac Tyson Saltzgiver 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 



B.A., Wake Forest University 
Non-denominational 



Margaret Schipper Reed 
Jacksonville, Florida 



Beth Ann Shannon-Faulk 
Raeford, North Carolina 

Peter David Shelly 
Canyon, Texas 

Catherine Elizabeth Taylor 
Mobile, Alabama 

Elizabeth Ann Tourville 
Lithonia, Georgia 

Lucy Exum Turner 
Decatur, Georgia 



Robert Foster Veazey 
Montgomery, Alabama 

John David White 
Aiken, South Carolina 

Deborah Dunlap Zarrett 
Stone Mountain, Georgia 



B.A., Brown University 
Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin 
St. Augustine 

B.A., Meredith College 
Coastal Carolina 

B.A., University of Texas , Austin 
Palo Duro 

B.A., Duke University 
South Alabama 

B.A., American International College 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., Agnes Scott College 
M.B.A., University of Southern Mississippi 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., University of Alabama 
Sheppards and Lapsley 

B.S., University of South Carolina 
Trinity 

B.A., Simmons College 
Greater Atlanta 



A COMPONENT 

Kelly Sue Allen 
St. Louis, Missouri 

Marybeth Asher 

Ormond Beach, Florida 

Roy Horton Bailey III 
Pendleton, South Carolina 

David Scott Bowerman 
Peachtree City, Georgia 

Robert Howe Campbell 
Memphis, Tennessee 

Tae Ho Cheong 
Corona, New York 

P. David Clapp 
Jupiter, Florida 

Kay Anne Davis 

Three Rivers, Michigan 



A.B., Washington University in St. Louis 
Giddings-Lovejoy 

B.S., Un ivers ity of Texas 
Mission 

B.S., Clemson University 
Foothills 

B.A., Mars Hill College 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., Rhodes College 
Memphis 

B.S., Kon-Kuk University 
New York City 

B.S., Un iversity of Ten nessee 
Tropical Florida 

B.A., Central Michigan University 
M.S.W., Western Michigan University 
Lake Michigan 



137 



Polly Kinser Deppen 
Bristol, Virgina 

Mark P. Downs 

Chesterfield, Missouri 

Philip A. Dunford 

Bakersville, North Carolina 

Paul Wylder Evans 
Gainesville, Georgia 

Kyle David Fedler 
Chamblee, Georgia 

Sara Verner Foster 

Beaufort, South Carolina 

R. Douglas Graulich 
Albany, New York 



N. Austin Gray 
Sugar Hill, Georgia 

Linda White Hawthorne 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Ann Houston Kelly 
Greenwood, Mississippi 

Paul Hollingsworth Lang 
Greenville, South Carolina 

Scott Allan Lawson 

Columbia, South Carolina 

Lisa M. Majoros 
Atlanta, Georgia 

M. Beecher Mathes 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Michael Eugene Maxfield 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Norman H. McCrummen III 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Allison Foster Moody 
Salisbury, North Carolina 

Kevin David Morris 
Sarasota, Florida 

Neal A. Neuenschwander 
Marietta, Georgia 



B.A., Indiana University 
Abingdon 

B.A., Westminster College 
Giddings-Lovejoy 

B.A., Centre College 
Western North Carolina 

B.A., Belhaven College 
Northeast Georgia 

B.A., Colorado College 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., Presbyterian College 
Greater Atlanta 

B.S., Colorado State University 
M.B.A., State University of New York, Albany 
Albany 

B.S., North Georgia College 

Evangelical Lutheran Church in America 

B.A., Our Lady of the Lake 
M.A., Ph.D., Un ivers ity of Texas 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., University of Mississippi 
St. Andrew 

B.A., Furman University 
Foothills 

B.A., University of South Carolina, Columbia 
Trinity 

B.A., Davidson College 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., Salem College 
Sheppards and Lapsley 

B.S.E., Un iversity of Florida 
Eastern Virginia 

B.S., Samford University 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Alabama 
Greater Atlanta 

B.S., University of Southern Mississippi 
Salem 

B.S., Western Carolina University 
Peace River 

B.S., Vanderbilt University 
Greater Atlanta 



138 



Susan Moorefield Newton 
Columbia, South Carolina 

Michael D. O'Neil 
Fort Worth, Texas 

William F. Owens 

Gastonia, North Carolina 

William L. Perman 
Seattle, Washington 

Paul H. Pingel 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Lori E. Pistor 
Dallas, Texas 



Thomas Scot Pritchard 
Decatur, Georgia 

David Michael Satterfield 
Bristol, Tennessee 

Linda Janette Sherer 
Sharon, South Carolina 

Jeffrey A. Sockwell 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

Walter Brown Tennyson, Jr. 
Napa, California 

Lisa Faye Traynham 

Honea Path, South Carolina 

Andrew Iverson Walton 
Lawton, Oklahoma 

Hosea Lorenzo Williams II 
Stone Mountain, Georgia 



B.A., Presbyterian College 
Trinity 

B.A., Austin College 
Grace 

B.A., St. Andrews Presbyterian College 
Western North Carolina 

B.A., Seattle Pacific University 
Seattle 

B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
Evangelical Lutheran Church in America 

B.A., Trinity University 
M.Ed., North Texas State University 
Grace 

B.S., Presbyterian College 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., King College 
Holston 

B.A., Erskine College 
Providence 

B.S., Appalachian State University 
Charlotte 

B.A., University of California, Los Angeles 
Flint River 

B.A., Presbyterian College 
Trinity 

B.S., Georgia Southern College 
Indian Nations 

B.A., Morehouse College 
Baptist 



MASTER OF ARTS IN THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 



Sylvia S. Babu 
Bangalore, India 



Lucille McCrary Bagwell 
Gainesville, Georgia 

Ae-Young Chung 
Decatur, Georgia 



I.Sc, Wilson College (Bombay) 
M.B.B.S.(M.D.) f Christian Medical College 
Am.Bd. ofPeds., Tulane University School 

of Medicine 
M.P.H., Johns Hopkins University School 

of Medicine 

Church of South India 

B.S., University of Georgia 
Southern Baptist 

B.Agr., Kyungpouk National University 
Korean Presbyterian 



139 



John William Daniels 
Morrow, Georgia 

Kemira G. Denlea 

Stone Mountain, Georgia 

Joe Vernon Dobson, Jr. 
Bossier City, Louisiana 

Jonathan S. Fennell 
Austell, Georgia 



Marian A. Haynes 
Decatur, Georgia 

Nancy McDaniel Hendrix 
Braselton, Georgia 

Grace Ann Cameron Hood 
Bartow, Florida 

William Robert Jordan 
Decatur, Georgia 

Daniel F. Kendrick 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Tammy Laneigh Lane 
Kingstree, South Carolina 

Elton Bruce Mather 

Avondale Estates, Georgia 



Gayle Annette McFarland 
Decatur, Georgia 

Christopher W. Miles 
Decatur, Georgia 

Elizabeth Louise Nuernberger 
Charleston, South Carolina 

Carolyn Oberkirch 
Atlanta, Georgia 



Christopher Ann Paton 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Julie Lehman Poulos 
Richmond, Virginia 

Joan Wilson Quattrocchi 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.A., Flagler College 
Roman Catholic 

B.A., Stetson University 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., Arkansas College 
Pines 

B.A., Southeastern College of the Assemblies of 
God 
Assemblies of God 

B.S., Un iversity of Missouri 
Missionary Baptist 

B.S., Oklahoma State University 
United Methodist 

B.A., Belhaven College 
Greenbrier 

B.B.A., University of Georgia 
Southern Baptist 

B.A., University of Georgia 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., University of South Carolina 
New Harmony 

A.B., Georgia State University 
J.D., University of Georgia 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., Rhodes College 
Greater Atlanta 

B.B.A., University of Georgia 
Southern Baptist 

B.A., Muhlenberg College 
Charleston-Atlantic 

A.B., Mt. St. Agnes College 
M.Ed., Loyola College 
Roman Catholic 

B.A., M.A., Wayne State University 
Evangelical Lutheran Church in America 

B.A., Davidson College 
Non-Denominational 

B.A., Mercer University 
Roman Catholic 



140 



Marva S. Sanders 
Decatur, Georgia 

Michael W. Walters 
Lafayette, Georgia 

James H. Wright 
Woodstock, Georgia 



Kenneth Laurin Young 
Loganville, Georgia 



B.A., Spelman College 
M.S.W., Ph.D., Atlanta University 
Baptist 

B.S., Florida State University 
Southern Baptist 

B.A., David Lipscomb College 
M.A., Middle Tennessee State University 
Church of Christ 

B.A., Fur man University 
Pentecostal Holiness 



MASTER OF ARTS IN YOUTH MINISTRY 



April Hi-Jung Choi 
St. Petersburg, Florida 

Fitzgerald M. Cook 
Decatur, Georgia 

Roy McLaughlin 

Stone Mountain, Georgia 

Judy Ellen Moore 
Duluth, Georgia 

Jane Margaret Thomas 
Huntsville, Alabama 

Robert DeWayne Wells 
Mableton, Georgia 



B.A., University of South Florida 
Korean Presbyterian Church 

B.A., Taylor University 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., Mercer University 
Baptist 

B.S., University of Minnesota 
Greater Atlanta 

B.A., University of Alabama in Huntsville 
North Alabama 

B.S., East Coast Bible College 
Church of God 



MASTER OF DIVINITY /MASTER OF ARTS 
IN YOUTH MINISTRY 



William Sidney Smith 
Albertville, Alabama 



B.A., Jacksonville State University 
North Alabama 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 



Dalva S. Ferraz 
Minas Gerais, Brazil 



Rubens Ferraz 

Minas Gerais, Brazil 



Stuart Robert Fulton 
Glasgow, Scotland 



Uniao de Negocies Administrativos of Belo 

Horizonte 
Edward Lane Bible Institute 

Presbyterian Church in Brazil 

Catholic University of Belo Horizonte 
Edward Lane Bible Institute 
Presbyterian Church in Brazil 

B.A., University of Sheffield 
Church of Scotland 



141 



Lowell John Gretebeck 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.A., Carthage College 

M.B.A., American Graduate School of 

International Management 

Evangelical Lutheran Church in America 



Robert Earl McDaniel 
Cusseta, Georgia 

Patricia C. Parker 
Decatur, Georgia 



UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS 

B.A., University of Georgia 
United Methodist 



Agnes Scott College 
Southern Baptist 



OCCASIONAL STUDENTS 



Michael K. Adams 

Thomas M. Baughn 

Martha L. Bount 

Bruce G. Boak 

Michael T. Carey 

Arthur Carson, Jr. 

Almeta Kay Crowley Chance 

Deborah H. Chilton 

Lawrence C. Clarke 

Terry Lee Collier 

William (Tony) Collins 

Larry Crossland 

Daryl R. Curtis 

James E. Doffin 

Barbara D. Douglas 

William D. Epps 

Craven Glenn Ford 

Octavius A. Gaba 

David Alan Galloway 

William W. Gaskill 

David G. Graham 

James H. Graves 

Gee Glenn Grayson 

Samuel L. Green 

Adrian Hainline, Jr. 

Jong Heon Ham 

Eleanor Hammer 

Dwight E. Haymon 

Robert W. Henderson 

Mary Alice Henning 

James E. Hinshaw 

David R. Johnson 



Joong Soo Kim 
John Byeongsoo Kim 
Danna Lee Larson 
Linda C. May 
Olin W. McBride 
Sallie T. McDaniel 
James McDonald 
Leslie G. McKoy 
David V. Miller 
Agnes W. Norfleet 
Julius R. Nyaga 
Nancy L. Oliver 
Jynean S. Palmer 
Howard L. Plummer 
Laura Dorsey Rains 
Thomas N. Rains 
Beverly A. Richardson 
Joseph B. Rightmyer 
William H. Rogers 
Ron Edward Schultz 
Dale L. Shaw 
Clarence Shelby 
Miriam Ray Shelton 
Dean R. Strong 
Dale D. Strong 
Sheryl Veness-Marshall 
Marcia L. Wadsworth 
Christine Wenderoth 
Philip A. Williams 
Emily R. Wojtczak 
Emmitt E. Young 
Phillip Dale Young 



142 



SUMMER GREEK SCHOOL 1989 



Kelly Sue Allen 
Marybeth Asher 
Roy Bailey 

David Scott Bowerman 
Robert Howe Campbell 
Tae Ho Cheong 
Daryl R. Curtis 
Kay A. Davis 
Polly Kinser Deppen 
Mark P. Downs 
Philip A. Dunford 
Kyle David Fedler 
Sarah Verner Foster 
Susan Thorne Friedl 
R. Douglas Graulich 
N. Austin Gray 
Linda White Hawthorne 
Laura A. Holland 
Ann Houston Kelly 
John Ryeongsoo Kim 
Paul Hollingworth Lang 
Scott Allen Lawson 
Sally Louise Lorey 
Elizabeth Marie Majoros 
Isaac Mann 
M. Beecher Mathes 



Michael Eugene Maxfield 
Norman H. McCrummen III 
Gayle Annette McFarland 
Martha Mercure 
K. Lynn Miller 
Allison Foster Moody 
Kevin D. Morris 
Neal A. Neuenschwander 
Susan M. Newton 
Michael D. O'Neil 
William F. Owens 
Jynean S. Palmer 
Patricia C. Parker 
David Alvah Pearce 
Paul H. Pingel 
Lori E. Pistor 
Thomas Scot Pritchard 
Margaret Schipper Reed 
Frances Jean Ruthven 
Linda J. Sherer 
William S. Smith 
Jeffrey A. Sockwell 
Walter B. Tennyson, Jr. 
Lisa Faye Traynham 
Andrew Iverson Walton 
Christine Wenderoth 




143 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION 
OF STUDENT BODY 



Alabama — 43 
Arkansas — 2 
California — 3 
Florida — 52 
Georgia — 154 
Illinois — 1 
Indiana — 1 
Kentucky — 3 
Louisiana — 3 
Maine — 1 
Maryland — 1 
Michigan — 2 



Mississippi — 8 
Missouri — 4 
Montana — 1 
New York — 4 
North Carolina — 54 
Oklahoma — 3 
Pennsylvania — 13 
South Carolina — 55 
Tennessee — 14 
Texas — 8 
Virginia — 7 
Washington — 5 



OTHER COUNTRIES 



Barbados — 2 
Brazil — 2 
England — 1 
India — 1 
Indonesia — 2 
Italy — 1 
Jamaica — 13 
Japan — 1 
Kenya — 1 



Korea — 5 
Norway — 1 
Philippines — 1 
Scotland — 2 
South Africa — 1 
Switzerland — 1 
Taiwan — 1 
Thailand — 1 
West Africa — 1 




. >'/ 



144 



CALENDAR 1990-1992 



1990-91 



1991-92 



SUMMER 






Greek School 


July 2-August 24 


July 1-August 23 


Summer Term 


July 9-20 


July 8-19 




July 23- August 5 


July 22-August 2 


FALL 






Planning Retreat 


August 29-30 


August 28-29 


Labor Day 


September 3 


September 2 


Orientation 


September 4-5 


September 3-4 


Classes begin 


September 6 


September 5 


Opening Convocation/ 


September 12 


September 11 


Honors Day 






Senior Ordination Exams 


November 2-3 


November 1-2 


Thanksgiving Holiday 


November 22-23 


November 28-29 


Classes End 


December 7 


December 6 


Reading Day 


December 10 


December 9 


Exams 


December 11-14 


December 10-13 


Final papers due 


December 14 


December 13 


WINTER 






A Component/ Alternative January 3 


January 6 


Contexts begin 






Seminars for Ministers/ 


January 8-10 


January 7-9 


Continuing Education 






Doctor of Ministry classes 


January 15 


January 13 


Martin Luther King 


January 14 


January 20 


Birthday Holiday 






Doctor of Ministry 


January 25 


January 24 


classes end 






A Component/ Alternative 


January 24 


January 24 


Contexts end 






A Component exams 


January 25 


January 27 


Columbia Forum 


January 28-31 


January 27-30 


SPRING 






Bible Content Exam 


February 1 


February 7 


Classes begin 


February 4 


February 3 


Senior Ordination Exams 


February 15-16 


February 14-15 


Spring Break 


April 8-12 


April 6-10 


Classes end 


May 10 


May 8 


Reading Day 


May 13 


May 11 


Exams 


May 14-17 


May 12-15 


Evaluation Day 


May 16 


May 14 


Commencement 


May 19 


May 11 



145 




* 
m ■ 

5 5 

m ■ 




| : 






146 



INDEX 



Academic Information 


9 


Greek School 


77 


Administration 


96 


History of Columbia 


3 


Admissions Procedure 


6 


Housing 


86 


Alumni/ae Association 


93 


International Students 


7 


Asian Ministries Center 


24 


Lay Institute of Faith and Life 


23 



Atlanta Theological Association 24 
Auditors 7 

Awards and Prizes 82, 110 

Board of Directors 94 

Bookstore 29 

Calendar 145 

Clinical Pastoral Education 25 

Columbia Friendship Circle 93 



Lectures 27 

Library 29 

Master of Arts in Theological 
Studies (M.A.T.S.) 13, 14 

Master of Arts in Youth 

Ministry (M.A.Y.M.) 14-16 



Master of Divinity 
(M.Div.) 

Master of Theology 



9-13 



Conferences for Prospective 
Students 8 


(Th.M.) 
Occasional Students 


17-19 
6 


Continuing Education 


23 


Ordination Exams 


81 


Courses of Instruction 


31-76 


Orientation 


77 


Curriculum 


31 


Professional Assessment 


11 


Doctor of Ministry 




Roll of Students 


112-144 


(D.Min.) 


19, 20 


Scholarship Funds 


83-84 


Doctor of Sacred Theology 
(S.T.D.) 


20 


Special Students 


6 


Faculty 
Fellowships 
Financial Information 


99-107 

84 
89, 90 


Student Loans 
Student Organizations 
Support 


87 

91, 92 

93 


Grading System 


79, 80 


Transfer Students 


7 



Graduating Class-1989 108, 109 



Unclassified Students 6 



147 





148 





149 






ft 

1 

i 



% \ 



tin - 




it; fit 


11 


niu 




till It 


II 


■i >i it 


if 




11 


'! •» 


!• 


»* ' 


It 




II 


l$l Iff 


It 


■ 1 


II 






*** 



I 






150 



1-85 




sr 



1* 



Stone 



Itr 



Coiiegt 



I-285 



Avon 



dale 



Mall 



J2 

e 

3 



I-20 



Notes: 

Commerce Dr. becomes S. Columbia Dr. after E. College Ave. 

There is no westbound exit at Columbia Dr. on I-20. 

The distance on Memorial Dr. from I-285 to Columbia Dr. is 2.3 miles. 



TEAR OFF AND SEND FOR FURTHER INFORMATION 






BUSINESS REPLY MAIL 



FIRST CLASS PERMIT NO. 192, DECATUR, GA. 



POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY 

OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS 
Columbia Theological Seminary 
P.O. Box 520 
Decatur, Georgia 30031-9954 



NO POSTAGE 

NECESSARY 

IF MAILED 

IN THE 

UNITED STATES 



TEAR OFF AND SEND FOR FURTHER INFORMATION 



I would like to learn more about Columbia. 

Please send me information on the following degree programs: 

□ Master of Divinity □ Master of Theology 

□ M.A. in Youth Ministry □ Doctor of Ministry 

□ M.A. Theological Studies □ Doctor of Sacred Theology 

in Pastoral Counseling 
Name 

(please print) 

College or Seminary 

Degree 



Graduation date 
Denomination 



School address 



Street 











( ) 


City 




State 


Zip 


Phone 


Permanent address 












Street 






( ) 



City 

Anticipated date of enrollment 



State 



Zip 



Phone 



DIRECTORY FOR COMMUNICATING 
TELEPHONE 404/378-8821 

Address inquiries to the following at Columbia Seminary, Decatur, GA 30031-0520, 
or call 404/378-8821. 

Concerning general matters about the seminary 
Douglas W. Oldenburg, President 

Concerning transcripts, academic records, curriculum, and faculty 
Glenn R. Bucher, Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Concerning business matters and housing 
John Gilmore, Vice President for Business and Finance 

Concerning basic degree admissions and financial aid 

Rebecca S. Parker, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid 

Concerning supervised ministry 

Leon C. Carroll, Director of Supervised Ministry 

Concerning scholarships and placement 

Philip R. Gehman, Vice President for Student Life 

Concerning development/seminary relations, annual fund gifts, wills and bequests, church 
relations, living endowment, student preaching 
James F. Dickenson, Vice President for Development/Seminary Relations 

Concerning alumni/ae and Columbia Friendship Circle 
Frank Willey, Regional Director/Development 

Concerning public relations, publications, campus events 
Juliette J. Harper, Director of Publications and Publicity 

Concerning advanced degrees 

Douglas W. Hix, Director of Advanced Studies 

Concerning continuing education 
Sara C. Juengst, Director of Continuing Education 

Concerning lay education 

Robert S. Smith, Director of Lay Institute of Faith and Life 



NOTICE OF NONDISCRIMINATORY POLICY 
AS TO STUDENTS 

Columbia Theological Seminary admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic 
origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made avail- 
able to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national 
and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship 
and loan programs and other school-administered programs. In regard to compliance with 
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, Columbia Theological Seminary 
does not discriminate on the basis of handicap in admission to or access to or treatment or 
employment in its programs and activities.