(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Combined catalog. Vol. 1, College Park, University of Maryland"

o*^ 



COMBINED CATALOG 

Volume One 

College Park 
University of Maryland 




1966-1968 



COMBINED CATALOG 

SERIES 1966-1968 



Volume One 



COLLEGE PARK 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



The 1966-1968 Series of University of Maryland Catalogs is published 
in a two-volume set of combined catalogs. Volume One contains catalogs 
pertaining to academic imits located on the College Park Campus. Volume 
Two contains catalogs pertaining to academic units located on the Baltimore 
Campus. This is Volume One. 



Catalogs in this volume are located 
ill this order: 



Adventure in Learning 
{General Information) 

College of Agriculture 

College of Arts and Sciences 

College of Business 
and Public Administration 

College of Education 

College of Engineering 

College of Home Economics 

College of Physical Education, 
Recreation and Health 

Graduate School Announcements 

Summer School 

University College 



An Adventure in Learning 

A GUIDE TO THE UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



The University of Maryland 



VOLUME 23 AUGUST 31, 1966 NUMBER 3 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BULLETIN is published three times in July, 
August and September; twice in January, March. May, June and December; and 
once in February, April, October and November. Published twenty-three times. 
Re-entered as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of August 24, 
1912, and second class postage paid at College Park, Maryland. 




This publication is an introduction to the opportunities and 
requirements of the University of Maryland. The primary purpose 
of the University is to help students to develop their talents and 
capabilities. For those who enroll, it can be an exciting adventure 
in learning. 

We are constantly seeking ways to improve the quality of the 
University as the quantity increases. One way is to attract able, serious 
and well prepared students. Your attention is invited to the compre- 
hensive educational program of the University at College Park, Balti- 
more and Catonsville. We welcome your interest. 



Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 
President of the University 



Board of Regents 

and 

Maryland State Board of Agriculture 

CHAIRMAN 

Charles P. McCormick 

McCormick and Company, Inc., 414 Light Street, Baltimore, 21202 

VICE-CHAIRMAN 

Edward F. Holter 

Farmers Home Administration, Room 412 Hartwick Building, 

4321 Hartwick Road, College Park, 20740 

SECRETARY 

B. Herbert Brown 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore, 21201 

TREASURER 

Harry H. Nuttle 
Denton, 21629 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

Louis L. Kaplan 

The Baltimore Hebrew College, 5800 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore, 21215 

ASSISTANT TREASURER 

Richard W. Case 

Smith, Somerville and Case, 1 Charles Center — 17th Floor, 

Baltimore, 21201 

Hon. Mary Arabian 

Municipal Court of Baltimore City, Baltimore, 21201 

Dr. William B. Long 
Medical Center, Salisbury, 21801 

Thomas W. Pangborn 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown, 21740 

Thomas B. Symons 

7^70 Columbia Ave., College Park, 20740 

William C. Walsh 

Liberty Trust Building, Cumberland, 21501 



University Calendar, 1966-67 

FALL SEMESTER, 1966 

SEPTEMBER 

12-16 Monday-Friday — Fall Semester Registration 
19 Monday — Instruction begins 

NOVEMBER 

23 Wednesday, after last class — Thanksgiving recess begins 
28 Monday, 8:00 A. M. — Thanksgiving recess ends 

DECEMBER 

21 Wednesday, after last class — Christmas recess begins 

JANUARY 

3 Tuesday, 8:00 A. M. — Christmas recess ends 
16 Monday — Pre-exam Study Day 
17-24 Tuesday-Tuesday — Fall Semester Examinations 

SPRING SEMESTER, 1967 

JANUARY 

30-Feb. 3 Monday-Friday — Spring Semester Registration 

FEBRUARY 

6 Monday — Instruction begins 

22 Wednesday — Washington's Birthday, holiday 

MARCH 

23 Thursday, after last class — Easter recess begins 
28 Tuesday, 8:00 A. M. — Easter recess ends 

MAY 

10 Wednesday— AFROTC Day 

24 Wednesday — Pre-exam Study Day 

25-June 2 Thursday-Friday — Spring Semester Examinations 

30 Tuesday — Memorial Day, holiday 
JUNE 

3 Saturday — Commencement Exercises 

SUMMER SESSION, 1967 

JUNE ^ . 

26-27 Monday-Tuesday— Registration, Summer Session 

28 Wednesday — Instruction begins 
JULY 

4 Tuesday — Independence Day, holiday 
8 Saturday — Classes (Tuesday schedule) 

AUGUST 

18 Friday — Summer Session Ends 

SHORT COURSES, SUMMER, 1967 

JUNE 

12-17 Monday-Saturday — Rural Women's Short Course 

AUGUST 

7-11 Monday-Friday — 4-H Club Week 

SEPTEMBER 

5-8 Tuesday-Friday — Firemen's Short Course 



Contents 



A Message from the President 2 

University Calendar 4 

To the Applicant for Admission 7 

The University Heritage n 

You are the Vital Factor 1q 

Admission to the University 22 

The Honors Program j^ 

Physical Education jo 

Air Force ROTC Instruction I9 

Where Will I Live? 21 

How Much WiH It Cost? 23 

Extracurricular, Social and Religious Life 26 

Academic Standards 28 

Student Life Information 29 

General Education Program 31 



THE UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 

College of Agriculture 32 

College of Arts and Sciences 35 

College of Business and Public Administration 38 

College of Education a\ 

College of Engineering 43 

College of Home Economics 45 

College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 47 

School of Pharmacy 49 

School of Nursing ^2 

University College 53 



APPENDICES 

Appendix A. Fees and Expenses 55 

Appendix B. Honors, Awards, Scholarships and Grants-m-Aid 60 



X 



\ 



sss«^^^^^^^. 



^ 



^^J'-^'j'h;: 



•^ 



^w 



*. 






^,.^^': 



■ mit^Sft' 



To the Applicant for Admission 

TfflS BOOKLET IS THE ALL-PURPOSE, GENERAL INFORMATION BOOKLET 

of the University. 

It contains the information you need 

► to arrange your high school curriculum for acceptance by the 
various colleges of the University 

► to select a course of study at the University 

► to apply for admission 

► to matriculate 

Adventure in Learning also covers fees and expenses, housing, scholar- 
ships and loans. 

The course catalog of the College of your choice will be made available 
to you after you enter the University. 

OR 

You may consult reference copies in your high school Ubrary, principal's 
omce or office of the guidance counselor. Course catalogs usually require 
mterpretation for new freshman students and should, therefore, be used in 
consultation with the high school guidance counselor or principal. 

You may obtain a catalog for the Baltimore County Campus (UMBC) 
located near CatonsviUe, by writing to the Registrar, University of Marv- 
2T228 °'^ <^o^ty, 5401 Wilkins Avenue, Baltunore, Maryland 

Professional school catalogs are available by writing to the office of the 
appropnate dean on the Baltimore campus. 

Prospective part-time and evening adult education students may obtain 
the appropnate course catalog or brochure by writing to the Dean Uni- 
versity College, University of Maryland at CoUege Park. 

Prospective graduate students may obtain the Graduate Catalog bv 
ColkVpark^ °^ ^^^ Graduate School, University of Maryland at 

Prospective summer students may write to the Director of the Summer 
U^ch \5 ''°^'^' Summer School Catalog— usually available after 

The University Heritage 

Few INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING IN THE UNITED STATES HAVE 

adminp?'win°fi "^r"^^ ^ ^''^°'^ ^' ^^' University of Maryland. Students 
itT^f ^""^ ^^^ institution stressing programs of educational ex- 

State P''''''"'^ ^'^^^ research, and rendering important services to the 

Just 31 years after the signing of the Declaration of Independence there 
was estabhshed m Baltimore a CoUege of Medicine, the fifS sucS meScL 



school in the United States. The College began with no visible assets save 
determination, enthusiasm and skill, and the first seven students enrolled 
received their lectures in the homes of their professors. One member of the 
faculty, Dr. John Shaw, died as a result of exposure suffered while working 
winter nights in a dilapidated structure that was the college's home in 1 808. 
The other two members of the faculty, Dr. John Beal Davidge and Dr. 
James Cocke, were extremely skillful researchers — professionally outstand- 
ing in that day and even more so from the perspective of today. 

In 1812 the State Legislature authorized the College of Medicine to 
annex a Faculty of Divinity, a Faculty of Law, and a Faculty of Arts and 
Sciences. Together these four colleges became the University of Maryland. 
The college of Divinity and the undergraduate college of Arts and Sciences 
developed slowly, but highly successful departments of Dentistry and 
Pharmacy were added, along with a Training School for Nurses. The pro- 
fessional schools of Medicine, Law, Dentistry and Pharmacy were among 
the half-dozen first of their kind to be established in America, and through- 
out most of the Nineteenth Century and into the Twentieth Century they 
were recognized among the foremost schools in each profession. 

Meanwhile, on the old ross borough estate near v^ashington, 
D.c, a group of wealthy planters were pioneering in an attempt to develop 
agriculture into an academic discipline. 

The Maryland Agricultural College, again one of the two or three first in 
the country, was established in 1856 on the Ross Borough Estate, just north 
of Washington. Because it was primarily a school for planters' sons, it suf- 
fered greatly during the Civil War, but in 1864 it became a land-grant 
institution and slowly emerged again, not only as the primary spokesman 
for the farming interests of the State but as an outstanding undergraduate 
college. In 1920 the College of Agriculture at College Park was consolidated 
with the University of Maryland in Baltimore. The merged institution con- 
tinued under the name of the University of Maryland. 

Another division of the University is located on the Eastern Shore. 
Since its founding in 1886 as the Delaware Conference Academy, Mary- 
land State College has progressed through several designations. Having 
passed, in 1926, into complete control of the State with the University of 
Maryland as administrative agency, the College, in 1948 was named 
Maryland State College, a division of the University of Maryland, with 
Dr. John Taylor Williams as President. 

The instructional program of the College embraces 24 curricular offer- 
ings in nine departments — Agriculture, Business, Home Economics, 
Mechanic Arts, English and Languages, Music, Natural Sciences and 
Mathematics, Physical Education and Social Sciences. Cooperative bac- 
calaureate and graduate programs exist in nursing and graduate instruction 
is offered in evening classes leading to advanced degrees in Education. 

President Williams has declared that "in giving recognition to the de- 
mands of present day society, Maryland State College is a community of 
dedicated teachers, a wide-awake student body, a strong, virile Alumni 
Association and an alert, purposeful Board of Regents who have devoted 

8 



themselves to a thoughtfully planned program of higher eduction, from 
which the citizens of Maryland may receive increasing benefits." 

^TT^R^T ^^"^P"^— The University of Maryland— Baltimore County 
(UMBC)— began operation in September, 1966. It will accommodate 
commutmg students, primarily from the Baltunore metropoUtan area and 
offer courses inAgnculture, Arts and Sciences, Business and PubUc Ad- 
mmistration, Education, Engineering, Home Economics, Physical Educa- 
tion Recreation and Health, Nursing and Pharmacy. Late itemoon and 
evenmg programs are being developed. 

This, of course, forms only the briefest outline of the 157-year history of 
the Umversity. ^ 

Although the University is a State institution quite large in physical plant 
student enrolhnent, the number of courses and degrees offered, and services 
performed. Its objectives remain constant and form a base for all educa- 
tional activity. Simply stated they are: (1) to prepare students in the arts, 
the humanities, the pure and appUed sciences, agriculture, business and 
pubhc admmistration, home economics, industry, and for the professions- 
(2) to contribute to the civic, ethical, moral, cultural, spiritual, and general 
weltare; (3) to provide general education in its broadest sense, both formal 
and mformal, for all students who enroll; (4) to develop those ideals and 
bner relationships among students which characterize cultured individuals- 
^ I /2^'^°° « ^ systematic research and to promote creative scholarship' 
and (6) to offer special, continuation, and extension education in commum- 
ties where it is feasible to do so. 

The government of the University is vested in a Board of Regents each 
member of which is appointed by the Governor of the State to serve a term 
of seven years. The administration of the University is vested in the Presi- 
dent. The following is a listing of the major administrative divisions on 
both campuses: 

AT COLLEGE PARK 

College of Agriculture University College 

College of Arts and Sciences Graduate School 

College of Busmess and Pubhc School of Library and Information 

Administration Services 

rr.^u^^ r.t j=A *• Department of Air Science 

College of Education Phe Library 

College of Engineering, the Glenn Computer Science Center 
L. Martin Institute of Technology Summer School 

College of Home Economics Agricultural and Home Economics 

Extension Service 
College of Physical Education, Rec- Agricultural Experiment Station 
reation and Health Agricultural Services and Controls 

{A School of Architecture will open in 
1968.) 

AT BALTIMORE 

School of Dentistry School of Nursing University Hospital 

Schoo of Law School of Pharmacy Psychiatric Institute 

School of Medicine School of Social Work 



The university's educational and research programs are en- 
hanced by its participation in the activities of the Southern Regional Educa- 
tion Board. The SREB is a public agency supported by the states of 
Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, 
Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, 
Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia. Through the agency of 
the SREB, these states work together to advance higher education and to 
improve the economy of the region. 

One program under the Southern Regional Education Board encourages 
arrangements between institutions whereby high cost educational programs 
are shared. For example, during the past 15 years Maryland residents have 
been provided veterinary medical training through a cooperative arrange- 
ment with the University of Georgia, and with the Tuskegee Institute. Medi- 
cal and dental education arrangements have been effected with Meharry 
Medical College. The University's School of Dentistry, in a similar manner, 
provides for contract students from certain states where schools of dentistry 
have not been established. A cooperative program in Forestry has been 
arranged with North CaroUna State. The usual State participation involves 
paying the out-of-state fee. 

You are the Vital Factor 

Where do you fit in.^ you are the basic, vital factor in the uni- 
versity's educational program. It is with you in mind that the citizens of 
this State (your parents) contribute toward the establishment of a well- 
equipped University. Much has been done to provide the means for you 
to acquire an excellent education. You will have an opportunity to fulfill 
this obligation by diligent application in your studies. 

If you are a high school student, or graduate, you are trying, certainly, 
to decide ( 1 ) whether or not to spend the next four years of your life at 
a college or university and (2) which institution and which course of study 
is the right one for you. 

First you should know that the administration and faculty of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland will make every attempt to help you find the answers to 
these questions. Through personal counseling, letters, and transmittal of 
information dealing with the academic program, the University attempts to 
present to the prospective student as complete a picture of its activities as 
possible. The University is willing to go all the way for you, both during 
your period of decision and (if accepted for admission) during your aca- 
demic tenure. Now, here is what the University expects of you. 

The University expects you to be a good student; it expects you to be a 
conscientious student. Even though the University is concerned with a large 
number of students, emphasis remains on the individual. An estimate of the 
value of the individual at the University was given by the President of the 
University, Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, in an address entitled "A Quantity of 
Quality." 

10 






V '."^"Vi- :■' ' rt 



•^^■»- , 







m-'i'-'i. 






ft ^ 



8 



%- 



i'/.'- 



^ 





><' / 






•iw*'i» 



During the last few decades we have been witnessing a social 
revolution with the individual as the center, and it is extremely 
important that this revolution have a clear objective. Otherwise, 
it could very easily result in a widespread conviction that every 
one should share and share alike the benefits of a free society re- 
gardless of their capacity, effort, initiative, and ambition. Among 
other things this would lead to the weakening of higher education 
by the admission and retention of all comers to the campuses of 
the colleges and universities, and the reduction of our program 
to a low common denominator. This would be a disservice to 
society We must therefore strive to direct the revolution toward 
the recognition of individual differences while assuring each in- 
dividual of the opportunity to go as far along various courses as 
his talents and energies will permit. 
As President Elkins has stated, there are wide and unpressively deep 
educational opportunities offered to each individual at the University ot 
Maryland, but it is up to each individual to prove his own worth and to 
develop his talents according to his own special capabilities. 

When you visit the campus of the university of Maryland at 
either College Park or Baltimore, you will recognize a number of major 
construction projects at various stages of completion. In anticipation ot 
greatly increased enrollments, this condition is expected to continue tor at 
least another decade. 

The University possesses some 5,000 acres of land. The main campus 
at College Park encompasses about 500 acres with 800 additional acres 
adjacent to it available for agricultural research and teaching. At College 
Park the principal buildings are designed in a Georgian Colonial style 
On the Baltimore City campus, located in the vicimty of Lombard and 
Green Streets, are situated a number of buildings including the onginal 
School of Medicine building constructed in 1812, the Out-Patient Depart- 
ment, the University Hospital, the Psychiatric Institute, the Frank C^Bress- 
ler Building, the Dental School Building, Pharmacy School and Nursing 
School Buildings, the School of Law Building, the Gray Laboratory, the 
Baltimore Union, and the recently acquired Redwood Hall and Howard 
Hall The UMBC campus occupies approximately 450 acres of land in 
Catonsville, Baltimore County. A classroom buildmg and multi-purpose 
building will be in use and the library under construction dunng the tall 
of 1966 while intensive planning is being earned forth on future science 
and arts buildings. 

The University offices are open Monday through Friday only (8:30 a.m. 
to 4:45 p.m.). 



12 



Admission to the University 

Now YOU ARE LIKELY TO ASK THIS QUESTION: WHO MAY BE ADMITTED 

to the University? 

The University says officially: "Admission from secondary school is 
based upon evidence indicating the applicant's probable success in the pro- 
gram of his choice." 

By the word "evidence" the University means that: 

1) you must be a graduate of an accredited secondary school; 

2) your principal or headmaster should recommend you for entrance to 
the University, attesting to your character and ability; 

3 ) you have completed the high school subjects required for the college 
and curriculum which you wish to enter; 

4) you have completed the tests of the American College Testing Pro- 
gram' and have had the results submitted to the Counseling Center of 
the University. 

5) your scholastic average in major subjects in your last two years m high 
school has been satisfactory. 

Actually, during your high school years, you have been preparing for the 
University. You should have maintained a good scholastic record and 
planned your curriculum so that you will have at graduation the required 
number of units to begin your college program. 

All applicants for admission, who do not qualify as Maryland residents, 
as defined in the Appendix, must also have the results of the American Col- 
lege Testing Program and complete high school records submitted to the 
Admissions Office. Only a limited number of well-qualified out-of-state ap- 
plicants can be considered for admission since first preference is given to 
Maryland residents. 

Advanced Placement Program 
Students entering the University from secondary school may obtain ad- 
vanced placement and college credit on the basis of their performance in 
the College Board Advanced Placement examinations. These examina- 
tions are normally given to eligible high school seniors during the May 
preceding matriculation in college. 

For achievement of a score of five or four on a given examination, the 
student will be granted Advanced Placement and the credit equivalent of two 
semester courses in that field; for achievement of a score of three. Ad- 
vanced Placement and the credit equivalent of either one or two semester 
courses, depending upon the field of the examination, will be granted. Stu- 
dents earning this credit and placement need not do additional work in the 
subject. 

The program allows students a maximum of thirty hours credit, which 
may be used to meet major, minor, or elective requirements; or, where ap- 
propriate. General Education requirements. Included in the University's 
program are Advanced Placement examinations in the following areas: 
Biology, Chemistry, Classics, English, History, Mathematics, and Physics. 

'Consult your high school counselor for information about the American College 
Testing Program. 

13 



Questions about the program may be addressed to the Director of Ad- 
missions and Registrations, College Deans, or the Director of General Edu- 
cation. For detailed information about examinations and procedures in 
taking them, write to Director of Advanced Placement Program, College 
Entrance Examination Board, 475 Riverside Drive, Nev/ York, New York 
10027. 



Pre-College Summer Session 

Any Maryland resident whose scholastic average in major subjects for 
his junior year in high school and the first semester of the senior high school 
year falls below the C level will be required to attend the University Pre- 
College Summer Session. 

The Pre-College Summer Session is held at College Park, Maryland, and 
is preceded by a brief orientation period. During this session, which runs 
concurrently with the regular University Summer Session, students will be 
required to take a full academic workload, including English 1. A special 
program of advisement and counseling as well as reading and study skills 
instruction will be provided. Alternatives to this special session, and the 
achievement required to remain in the University, have been explained to 
Maryland high school principals and counselors and are contained in a 
special brochure sent to students required to attend the Pre-College Sum- 
mer Session. 

A student whose average falls below C as noted above must have ffls 

APPLICATION AND HIGH SCHOOL RECORD INCLUDING HIS FIRST SEMESTER 
SENIOR GRADES IN THE ADMISSIONS OFFICE AT COLLEGE PaRK BY OR BE- 
FORE May 1, 1967 to be considered for admission. The American Col- 
lege Test results for students with less than C average must be received by 
May 19, 1967. 

How about Mathematics? 

All programs in the University require some college work in mathe- 
matics. The student who plans to go to college should be sure to take 
College Preparatory Mathematics for three and preferably four years. 
Some programs in the University, for example Engineering, require from 
three and one-half to four years of College Preparatory Mathematics. 

Courses in General Mathematics, Commercial Mathematics, and Shop 
Mathematics are not considered as College Preparatory Mathematics. 

How about English? 

A considerable portion of the work in English during the freshman year 
at the University is devoted to expository writing. The high school student 
should therefore get as much preparation as possible in composition. The 
student who passes the English Classification test in the top ten percent of 
his entering class will be placed in an advanced English grouping. 

14 



Where do you apply? 

The Office of Admissions is chiefly responsible for advising prospective 
students prior to application for admission and for processing applications 
when submitted. All inquiries concerning undergraduate work, therefore, 
should be submitted to: 

DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS 
NORTH ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 20740 

In your first letter of inquiry you should state your educational back- 
ground and your expected date of graduation from secondary school, your 
educational objectives, and the date of your expected entrance to the Uni- 
versity. You should request application forms for admission. It is not es- 
sential that you receive a course catalog for the College in which you are 
mterested prior to your registration. Maryland high schools are supphed 
with appUcation blanks upon request. Therefore your high school counselor 
may have application blanks on hand. 

Part I of your application, accompanied by a $10 application fee, should 
be returned to the Office of Admissions at any time after October 1 of your 
senior year in high school. The fee should be in the form of a check made 
payable to the University of Maryland and is non-refundable under any 
circumstance. The fee will be applied in Ueu of the matriculation fee pro- 
vided the apphcant enrolls for the term appUed for on his application. 
Applicants who have been enrolled with the University of Maryland in its 
Evening Division at College Park or Baltimore, or at one of its off-campus 
centers are not required to pay the fee since they have already paid a 
matriculation fee. 

In presenting your address, you must include your zip code. Failure 
to do so will cause considerable delay. 

Deadlines for Applications 

FALL SEMESTER 

Ail applications for full-time undergraduate admission for the Fall 
Semester at the College Park campus must be received by the University 
on or before June 1. Any student registered for nine or more semester 
hours of work is considered a full-time student. 

Under unusual circumstances, appUcations will be accepted between 
June 1 and July 15. Apphcants for full-time attendance filing after June 
1 will be required to pay a non-refundable $25 late fee to defray the cost 
of special handling of applications after that date. This late fee is in ad- 
dition to the $10 application fee. 

All imdergraduate applications, both for full-time and part-time atten- 
dance, and all supporting documents for an application for admission, must 
be received by the appropriate University office by July 15. This means 
that the applicant's educational records, (except current summer school 
grades) ACT scores (in the case of new freshmen) and medical examina- 
tion report must be received by July 15. 

15 



SPRING SEMESTER 

The deadline for the receipt of applications for the Spring Semester is 
January 1. 

Orientation Programs 

I. THE OFFICIAL NEW FRESHMEN ORIENTATION AND REGISTRATION PROGRAM 

Upon final admission to the University you will receive materials per- 
taining to your participation in The Official New Freshmen Orientation 
and Registration Program for the University of Maryland. The program 
is operated at the College Park Campus during the months of June, July, 
and August. You will attend with a group of your future classmates. 
During the two days here, you will engage in the following: 

1. Formal and informal discussions about University life, the standards 
the University will expect from you and what you can expect from it. 

2. A personal conference with a faculty adviser in your college who 
will assist you in selecting and registering for Fall semester courses. 

3. A personalized introduction to campus facilities, sources of help for 
the problems the typical freshman must face, and oui-of-class op- 
portunities. 

4. Payment of Fall Semester bills and purchase of your text books if 
you so desire. 

II. NEW STUDENT WEEK 

During the last three days of Fall Registration week, students and 
faculty combine their efforts to plan a program of value and interest for 
you. The President of the University delivers his personal message to new 
students and their parents and greets each new student. Outstanding facul- 
ty personnel participate in a series of programs designed to initiate the 
academic year. Social programs are planned to help you further your con- 
tacts with your classmates. Student governing bodies present programs to 
further acquaint you with the structure of student government and you have 
an opportunity to meet the people who represent you. Representatives 
of rehgious groups and other student organizations are available to 
explain the nature of their programs. A special program for parents is 
planned for the evening of the first day of New Student Week. 

The Transfer Student 

A student must be in good standing as to scholarship and character to 
be eligible for transfer to the University. Advanced standing is assigned to 
a transfer student from an accredited institution under the following con- 
ditions: (1) A minimum of one year of resident work or not less than 30 
semester hours (including the meeting of all University and curricular re- 
quirements) is necessary for a degree; (2) The University reserves the 
right to make the assignment of transfer credit conditional upon the stu- 

16 



dent's making a satisfactory record during his first semester at the Uni- 
versity; (3) The University reserves the right to revoke advanced standing 
if the transfer student's progress is at any time unsatisfactory. The transfer 
student may obtain a course catalog from the dean of the college in which 
he will enroll. 

The Special Student 

An applicant who is twenty-one years of age and who has not com- 
pleted the subjects required for admission may be admitted to such 
courses as he seems qualified to take. A special student is ineligible to 
matriculate for a degree until he has satisfied the entrance requirements. 
A special student may also be one who meets entrance requirements but 
who does not wish to pursue a program of study leading to a degree. 

The Foreign Student 

The foreign student applying for admission to the undergraduate schools 
of the University of Maryland should make application at least six months 
in advance of the term for which he is applying. He will be required to 
submit an application for admission on a form furnished upon request by 
the Admissions Office of the University, and ofl&cial copies of his secondary 
school preparation, certificates of completion of state secondary school 
examinations, and records of college or university studies completed in 
schools in the United States or elsewhere. He will also be required to 
furnish proof of his ability to read, write, speak, and understand EngUsh 
sufficiently well to pursue satisfactorily an approved course of study in one 
of the colleges of the University. Arrangements can be made through the 
oflice of the Foreign Student Adviser for administering an English test to 
prospective students both in the United States and in countries abroad. 

The foreign student accepted for admission to the University will receive 
the Immigration 1-20 form needed to secure a student visa from the Ameri- 
can consul. 

Every foreign student is expected to notify the Foreign Student Adviser 
as to the approximate date of his arrival at the University and arrange to 
see him as soon as possible after arrival. The ofl&ce of the Adviser is lo- 
cated in the North Administration Building, Room 222. 



The Honors Program 

In order to challenge the capacities of the superior student, 
the College of Arts and Sciences has instituted both General and Depart- 
mental Honors. General Honors, as its name suggests, enlarges the breadth 
of the student's generalized knowledge; Departmental Honors increases 
the depth of his knowledge of his major discipline. Each year a selected 
group of entering Freshmen are invited into the General Honors Program 
on the basis of their high school records and standings, together with their 
scores in tests such as ACT, SAT, and CEEB. The General Honors student, 

17 



after acceptance, must maintain a cumulative grade point average of at 
least 3.0 for continuance in the Program; he is permitted to drop General 
Honors, if he so wishes, at the end of any semester. The General Honors 
Program accepts the basic thesis of a generalized liberal education, and in 
addition emphasizes the possibilities of interrelatedness among branches of 
knowledge and the toleration of different points of view. Always the 
attempt is to urge the student toward an independent yet responsible mode 
of inquiry among the general ideas which underlie human culture. 

During his first two years at the University, the student registers in 
General Honors sections of General Education required courses. Such sec- 
tions are kept small, the work is adjusted to the natural speed of the group, 
and wherever possible, a discussional method is employed in the classroom. 
Beginning on the Sophomore level and continuing through the Senior level, 
special General Honors seminars and coUoquia of an experimental and 
interdisciplinary nature are arranged for the GH student. Some of these 
courses may be taken as substitutes for General Education required courses, 
others may not, but in any case all are taken on a voluntary basis. 

The Departmental Honors Programs ordinarily begin in the Junior year, 
although a few Programs begin as early as the Freshman year. Alinost 
every Department in the College maintains an Honors Program for its 
majors. Although many General Honors students choose to enter Depart- 
mental Honors, there is no requirement either that the General Honors 
student should continue into Departmental Honors, or that the Depart- 
mental Honors student should be exclusively recruited from the ranks of 
the General Honors students. Very broadly, it is required that a student, if 
he wishes to enter Departmental Honors, should have a 3.0 grade point 
average in all of his academic subjects and at least a 3.5 average in his 
major. Entrance is by invitiation from the Departmental Honors Com- 
mittee, and successful completion of the Program is noted by the phrase 
"Graduated with Honors (or High Honors)" on the student's diploma 
and on all official transcripts of his University record. 

Departmental Honors Programs differ widely in structure, but all require 
of the student an Honors thesis and an oral examination. Departmental 
Honors work is characterized by independent readings and research, small 
seminars or colloquia, and by a marked intensification of effort in the major 
discipline. Such work is, in effect, a preparation for graduate school, and 
successful participants in such Programs are encouraged to continue toward 
the higher degrees. 

The work of the Honors Programs is coordinated by a Director of 
Honors Programs and is overseen by an Honors Committee composed of 
representatives from each department of the College. For further informa- 
tion concerning the Honors Programs, write the Director of Honors Pro- 
grams, Office of the Dean of Arts and Sciences. 



18 



Physical Education and Health 

The university is concerned with the physical fitness of each 
student. Therefore, all undergraduate men and women students, classified 
academically as freshmen registered for more than six semester hours of 
credit, are required to enroll in and successfully complete two prescribed 
courses in Physical Education for a total of two semester hours of credit. 
These courses must be taken by all eligible students during their first year 
of attendance at the University whether they intend to graduate or not. A 
health course of two semester hours' credit is required of all undergraduate 
men and women. 



Air Force ROTC Instruction 

The university of Maryland operates one of the largest air 
Force Reserve Ofiicer Training Units in the United States. ROTC is offered 
on a completely elective basis. Its curriculum is generalized, consisting of 
courses designed to produce citizens and ofl&cers with well-rounded back- 
grounds. 

Two Programs Offered 

The University offers incoming students a choice of a two-year or a 
four-year program. Successful completion of either program qualifies the 
student for a commission in the Air Force upon graduation. 

I. the two-year program: Students who have at least two years of 
college remaining before the award of their degree (either at the bacca- 
laureate or the graduate level) are eligible to apply for the two-year pro- 
gram. Although the two-year program is designed particularly for junior 
college students and other male students who transfer to Maryland from 
colleges without an ROTC program, it is open to all eligible men attending 
the University of Maryland. Evaluation of candidates is completed during 
the first semester of the sophomore year, since each student must meet 
physical and mental standards set by the Air Force. Also, the law requires 
that students in this program attend a six-week field training course at a 
designated Air Force Base during the summer preceding initial entry into 
the two-year academic portion. Many of the young men starting college at 
the University of Maryland will not be able to select this program because 
of their need to earn money in the summer months to remain in college. 
Those in this category may choose the four-year program. 

II. THE four-year PROGRAM: A general military course (formerly 
basic course), comprising the first two years, is offered for freshmen and 
sophomores. The Professional Officer Course (formerly the advanced 
course), comprising the last two years, is for those students who have suc- 
cessfully completed the general military course. Admission into the Pro- 
fessional Officer Course is available to selected students only. An advanced 
student in the four-year program must attend four weeks of summer train- 

19 



ing at an active Air Force Base during the summer after completing his 
junior year of college. Whenever necessary, however, this training may be 
delayed until the summer following the senior year. The law provides that 
only ROTC cadets in the four-year program are eligible for consideration 
for the full scholarships available each year. 

Financial Assistance For A F ROTC Students 

I. FULL scholarships: This program will provide full scholarships for 
2,000 cadets in the four-year AFROTC program in 1966-67 on a nation- 
wide basis. Cadets receive money for tuition, fees, books, and laboratory 
expenses for up to eight semesters. In addition, they will receive retainer 
pay of $50 per month. This year the Air Force will award all scholarships 
to juniors and seniors presently in the AFROTC program. 

II. PARTIAL scholarship: (Retainer Pay): All juniors and seniors in 
the Professional Officer Course not selected for full scholarships will 
receive retainer pay of $40.00 per month for 10 months in the junior year 
and 10 months in the senior year. Payment is made quarterly. This al- 
lowance of $400 per year is paid in addition to any benefits authorized by 
the GI Bill of Rights. 

AFROTC Flight Instruction Program 

Under the Flight Instruction Program, senior AFROTC cadets who 
desire to become pilots in the United States Air Force are given the op- 
portunity to obtain training leading to a Private Pilots license in a light 
airplane. They are given 361/2 hours of flight instruction by a civilian fly- 
ing school under contract to the Air Force. In addition, they receive 35 
hours of ground instruction by members of the Department of Air Science. 

AIR SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 

THE CURRICULUM 

TWO COURSES 

Air Science is divided into two parts: the first two years are called the 
General Military Course and the last two years are called the Professional 
Officer Course. 

FRESHMAN YEAR, AS 11 AND AS 12 

These courses meet twice each week throughout the year. One hour 
per week is in the classroom and one hour is used for Leadership Labor- 
atory (practical training or drill). Academic material covered includes: 
Causes of World Conflict; The Role of Military Power in Conflict; Respon- 
sibility of Air Force Officers; and Military Systems of the World. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR, AS 21 AND AS 22 

These courses meet twice each week throughout the year. One hour per 
week is in the classroom and one hour is used for Leadership Laboratory 

20 



(practical training or drill). Academic material covered includes: Study 
of World Military Forces; Political-military Issues; and Trends and Impli- 
cation of World Military Power. 

JUNIOR YEAR, AS 101 AND AS 102 

This course, entitled The Growth and Development of Aerospace Power, 
requires three class hours and one hour Leadership Laboratory per week. 
It is a survey course about the Nature of War; Development of Air Power 
in the United States; Mission and Organization of the Defense Depart- 
ment; Air Force Concepts, Doctrine, and Employment; Astronautics and 
Space Operations; and Future Development of Aerospace Power. The 
United States space programs, vehicles, systems, and problems of space 
exploration are also studied. 

SENIOR YEAR, AS 103 AND AS 104 

This course is called The Professional Officer. It requires three class 
hours and one hour Leadership Laboratory per week. Course material 
includes the Military Justice System; Advanced Leadership Theory, Func- 
tions and Practices; Management Principles and Functions; and Problem 
Solving. 



Where Will I Live? 

Residence Halls 

Trained personnel are employed by the university to assist 
students to administer the residence halls program. These members of 
the staff, living in the various residence units, are interested in helping stu- 
dents to derive the maximum benefit from the academic, cultural, social 
and athletic opportunities which are available in group living. 

If the student desires hving accommodations in a residence hall, he must 
complete the following steps : 

1. Apply for admission to University. 

2. Receive notification of admission to University and submit Housing 
AppUcation, enclosed with admission letter. 

3. Receive additional information about: (a) room assignment priority, 
(b) conditions of residence hall contract, (c) University rules and 
regulations, (d) room deposit, and (e) room equipment. 

Only single undergraduate students may live in the residence halls. 
Women students applying for housing for the first time and women stu- 
dents being readmitted to the University who will be 21 years of age or 
older at the time of registration for classes will not be given residence hall 
accommodations. There are no age restrictions for men in the residence 
halls. Both men and women students who elect to five off-campus may do 
so. The selection and choice of an off-campus facility are the responsibility 
of the student and his parents or guardian. 

21 



Off-Campus Housing 

Upperclassmen and veteran male undergraduate students are allowed 
to live in houses oflf-campus. Graduates and new undergraduate women 
21 years of age or older must live off-campus. A list of rooms, apartments 
and houses available to all persons associated with the University is located 
in the Housing Office on the third floor of the North Administration Build- 
ing. Most of the off-campus houses have double rooms with twin beds and 
provide linens and towels. Some require that you furnish your own bed 
linens. The price for a person in a double room is about $25 a month. 
Single rooms rent from $30-$ 50 per month. 

Family Housing Units 

The University maintains a limited number of unfurnished married hous- 
ing units on the campus. Efficiency units for families with no children rent 
for $42.50 per month and consist of a living room-bedroom combination, 
kitchen and bath. One bedroom units are for families with one child and 
rent for $45.50 per month. 

To be eligible, undergraduate students must take at least 1 5 hours credit 
per semester. Graduate students, other than those with teaching fellowships 
and assistantships, must take 10 hours credit per semester. To be eligible 
a student's income must not exceed $4,500 per year. Units are not avail- 
able to families with more than one child, and the child cannot be over 
five years of age. A student must be officially admitted to the University 
before his application can be considered active. Applications for these 
units may be obtained from the Housing Office. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

The statements in this booklet are for information only. 
The provisions of this publication do not form a contract between 
the student and the University of Maryland. 

Official notice concerning student life, grading systems and 
other regulations are to be found in the publication University 
General and Academic Regulations, made available to all incom- 
ing students. 

The University reserves the right to change any provision or 
requirement at any time within the student's term of residence. 
The University further reserves the right, at any time, to ask a 
student to withdraw when it considers such action to be in the 
best interests of the University. 



22 



Lord Calvert Apartments 

The Lord Calvert Apartments in College Park were acquired by the 
University to alleviate the critical need for housing for married students. 
Intended primarily as a housing facility for married graduate teaching as- 
sistants who are employed in the instructional programs at College Park, 
the Lord Calvert complex offers units with one bedroom and dining alcove; 
one bedroom and dining room, and two-bedroom units with dining rooms. 



How Much Will It Cost? 

The following table presents established charges for attend- 

ing the University of Maryland in the undergraduate programs offered on 
the College Park campus. 

Fees for Undergraduate Students 

First Second 

Maryland Residents Semester Semester Total 

FIXED CHARGES $140.00 $130.00 $270.00 

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS FEE 12.00 12.00 24.00 

ATHLETIC FEE 20.00 . . . 20.00 

STUDENT ACTTVrriES FEE 12.00 . . . 12.00 

SPECIAL FEE 75.00 . . . 15.00 

RECREATIONAL FACILfriES FEE 25.00 ... 25.00 



Total for Residents 


$224.00 


$142.00 


$366.00 


Residents of the District of 
Columbia, Other States and 
Countries 


TUmON FEE FOR NON-RESIDENT 

STUDENTS 


. . $200.00 


$200.00 


$400.00 


Total for Non-Residents 


$424.00 


$342.00 


$766.00 







Board and Lodging 

BOARD $220.00 $220.00 $440.00 

LODGING 

MARYLAND RESIDENTS $160.00 $160.00 $320.00 

OTHER STATES AND COUNTRIES $210.00 $210.00 $420.00" 

'All students who live in the residence halls must take their meals in the 
University Dining Halls. 

For complete information concerning fees see Appendix A. 

How About Grants and Scholarships? 

For promising young men and women who might not otherwise be 
able to provide themselves an opportunity for higher education, a number 
of grants and scholarships are available. New students must apply before 

23 



March 15. Students already enrolled may apply before May 1. All re- 
quests for information concerning these awards should be directed to: 

DIRECTOR, STUDENT AID 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 20740 

In deciding whether you are eligible to receive a grant or a scholarship, 
the Committee considers such qualifications as leadership, character, 
achievement, and participation in student activities, as well as academic 
ability and financial need. Recipients must register for a minimum of four- 
teen semester hours of credit. 

You should know of the major groupings of grants and scholarships. 
These are: 

FULL UNIVERSITY scHOLARSfflPS — covcring board, lodging, fixed charges, 
fees and books; 

UNIVERSITY GRANTS — awarded to deserving and qualified secondary 
school graduates covering fixed charges only; 

GENERAL ASSEMBLY GRANTS — for fixed charges only, awarded by mem- 
bers of the State Legislature, three for each Senator and one for each mem- 
ber of the House of Delegates, only to persons in the county or in the 
legislative district of Baltimore City which the Delegate or Senator 
represents; 

SPECIAL ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS — awarded to students of exceptional 
academic ability; 

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANTS — awarded to Students of excep- 
tional financial need from funds made available from the Federal govern- 
ment. Awards range from $200 to $800 per year and must be matched by 
other institutional aid. 

ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS — Supported by incomc from funds 
especially established for this purpose; 

TEACHER EDUCATION GRANTS — for fixed charges only, available to Mary- 
land residents who agree to teach in Maryland public school for two years; 

GENERAL STATE TUITION SCHOLARSHIPS — for fixed chargcs Only, awarded 
by the State Scholarship Board on the basis of an examination. 

Can You Work Your Way Through College? 

A number of students are employed on a part-time basis by the Uni- 
versity, others work in various capacities in shops and stores located in the 
College Park area. If you seek employment while pursuing a regular pro- 
gram of instruction, you should consult the Ofiice of Student Aid which 
maintains a listing of available jobs within the University and in nearby 
commerical areas, including holiday and summer employment. 

Are Loans Possible? 

Several loans are made available by private organizations to worthy 
students in financial need. 

24 



M h «^- 





Under provisions of United Student Aid Funds, qualified students may 
borrow up to $1000 per year from home-town banks. 

Under the will of Catherine Moore Brinkley, a loan fund is available for 
worthy students who are natives and residents of Maryland. 

Under provisions of the National Defense Education Act, loans are avail- 
able to qualified students in amounts not to exceed $1000 per year. 

Teacher Education? 

In order to provide a greater supply of qualified teachers for the public 
schools of Maryland, residents of Maryland may have fixed charges 
remitted while pursuing successfully a teacher preparation program. 

The following conditions pertain to the administration of the program: 

1. The student must be a resident of the State of Maryland as defined 
in this publication. This resident status must be maintained in order 
to continue the effectiveness of the agreement. 

2. The student must be a citizen of the United States of America. 

3. The student must be regularly admitted to the University for the 
pursuit of a baccalaureate degree. 

4. The student must be enrolled as a full-time student pursuing a cur- 
riculum leading to teacher certification in accordance with University 
regulations. Fifteen semester hours of credit shall constitute a full- 
time schedule for persons who have their fixed fees remitted at the 
University of Maryland. 

Each applicant eligible to participate in the reimbursed program will be 
required to sign a pledge to teach in the public schools of Maryland for a 
period of two years, immediately following graduation. A reimbursement 
agreement must be signed to cover the contingency of not satisfying the 
teaching requirement. A more detailed explanation is available upon 
request. 

Persons enrolled in the summer session or in any of the later afternoon 
and evening programs are not covered by this fee remission program. 

Extra-curricular, Social and Religious Life 

Organized student activities are recognized and encouraged 
as aids in the development of leadership and citizenship skills. There are 
over three hundred officially recognized special interest clubs, civic groups, 
service organizations, professional organizations, recreational organiza- 
tions, religious clubs and musical clubs available for students at College 
Park. You may be interested in joining one of the many preforming groups 
or the staff of one of the student publications. You may be also interested in 
affiliating with one of the social fraternities or sororities or taking part in a 
resident hall dormitory government, or interested in becoming a member 
of a club or society which has a primary interest in the informal investi- 
gation of an academic specialty. Also available is an extensive intramural 
athletic program, both for men and women. 

26 



The Student Government Association represents all students under an 
approved constitution and by-laws. The Student Government Association 
has represented on its Cabinet four at-large members, the president and 
vice-president of the Residence Hall Council, the president of Inter-Frater- 
nity Council, the president of Pan-hellenic Council, president of the Uni- 
versity Commuters Association, president of Associated Women Students, 
Men's League, and the four class presidents. Other branches of the Student 
Government are the Legislature and the Student Courts, both making 
major contributions to the functioning of Student Government at the 
University. 

The University Band is under the supervision of the Department of Music 
and is composed of four groups : the Marching Band, the Symphonic Band, 
the Air Force ROTC Band, and the Pep Band. 

Sx student communications and pubHcations media are operated with 
faculty guidance and the general supervision of the Committee on Student 
Publications and Communications. They are: The Diamondback, the 
campus newspaper; The Terrapin, the student yearbook; The M Book, 
the student handbook; Argus and Calvert Review, campus literary maga- 
zines; and WMUC, the campus radio station. 

Athletics and Recreation 

The University recognizes the importance of the physical development 
of all students and, in addition to the required physical education for fresh- 
men and sophomores, sponsors a comprehensive intercollegiate and intra- 
mural program. Students are encouraged to participate in competitive 
athletics and to learn the skill of games that may be carried on after leaving 
college. The intramural program, which covers a large variety of sports, is 
conducted by the Physical Education Department for both men and women. 

The Council on Intercollegiate Athletics sponsors and supervises a full 
program of intercollegiate athletics in every form necessary to meet the 
needs of the student body. This program is an integral feature of University 
life. Each student is encouraged to participate in the program, either as an 
athlete or as a spectator. A strong intercollegiate program creates the in- 
centives for extensive participation in the intramural program and, further, 
the program furnishes a rallying point of common interest for students, 
alumni, and faculty. 

The University is a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference, the Na- 
tional Collegiate Athletic Association, the United States Intercollegiate 
Lacrosse Association, the Intercollegiate Amateur Athletic Association of 
America, and cooperates with other national organizations in the promo- 
tion of amateur athletics. 

The University has an activities building which contains a modem gym- 
nasium, a swimming pool, training faciUties for indoor sports, physical 
education laboratories, and an arena; also a large armory; a modem 
stadium with a running track; a number of athletic fields; tennis courts; 
golf course; baseball diamonds; and a gymnasium and swimming pool for 
women. 

27 



To Round Out Your Experiences 

The Student Government Association's cultural committee, University 
Theatre and musical groups present a broad program of musical, cul- 
tural and dramatic programs. Recent talent brought to the campus by these 
groups were: the Robert Shaw Chorale, Carlos Montoya, the Music of 
Richard Rodgers, Stan Getz, The Establishment, Kia Winding, Ferrante 
and Teicher and Hal Holbrook. Contemporary entertainment is presented 
throughout the year by various student organizations. Also available in the 
Student Union is an extensive film series, both classical and foreign, a 
speaker series, dances and special programs. The National Symphony 
presents a series of concerts during the year. 

Campus or class-wide social events are associated with Homecoming 
and the Freshman, Sophomore, Junior and Senior Proms. Name bands 
such as Les and Larry Elgart, Warren Covington, Tommy Dorsey and 
Lester Lanin have appeared at these affairs. 

Fraternities, sororities, and residence halls also sponsor social events 
throughout the year, including exchange socials and open houses from 
time to time. 

The All-Faiths Memorial Chapel is one of the most beautiful structures 
of its kind in the nation. Within its shelter are housed the ofl&ces of chap- 
lains, representing the denominational bodies, and there are many oppor- 
tunities for you to consult with the ministers of your faith. Chances are that 
you will want to join a religious club such as the Baptist Student Union, 
Canterbury Association (Episcopal), Christian Fellowship (non-denomin- 
ational). Christian Science, Diogenes Society (Unitarian), Ethos (Eastern 
Orthodox), Hillel Foundation (Jewish), Lutheran Students Association, 
Newman Club (Roman Catholic). Westminster Foundation (Presbyter- 
ian), and the Wesley Foundation (Methodist). 



Academic Standards 

The student who maintains at least a "c" average in academic 
subjects is proceeding satisfactorily toward graduation. The student who 
does not maintain this average is falling behind. 

The regulations governing minimum requirements for retention and 
graduation are printed in a separate publication. University General and 
Academic Regulations. Every student should familiarize himself with these 
regulations. If a cumulative grade point average is not maintained, as 
defined in the regulation, the student is placed on probation or is dismissed. 

High school students who have an average of less than "C" in their 
academic subjects, as specified by the Director of Admissions, will be re- 
quired to attend the Pre-CoUege Summer Session prior to acceptance by the 
University of Maryland. 



28 



Student Life Information 

Health Services 

The university recognizes its responsibility for safeguarding 
the health of its students. All new, full-time, graduate and undergraduate 
students are required to submit a record of a current, thorough physical 
examination prior to their admission, and to pay the annual Health Service 
Fee. A new, well-equipped and staffed health services facility is available 
for the treatment of sick or injured students who have paid the Health 
Service Fee. 

In addition, excellent commercial accident and sickness insurance spon- 
sored by the University is available. This insurance is voluntary for domestic 
students; however, all foreign students are required to have this type of 
insurance in reasonable amounts. 

All dormitories, off-campus houses, sorority and fraternity houses, the 
Food Service and certain other areas are inspected periodically by the Stu- 
dent Health Service to make certain that proper sanitary conditions are 
maintained. 

University Counseling Center 

The Counseling Center is a University-wide service available to all 
students. It is devoted to counseling of students, consultations with 
faculty and others concerned with student welfare, and is involved in re- 
search, teaching and counselor training. The staff of the Center is composed 
of psychologists and educational specialists particularly trained to accom- 
plish these purposes. 

The Counseling Center assists students interested in gaining a better 
understanding of themselves and/or resolving concerns of a vocational or 
educational nature. Both individual and group methods of counseling 
are used. Where psychological testing is appropriate in the counseling 
of students, tests of ability, interest and personality are employed. 

Through its Reading and Study Skills Laboratory, the Center provides an 
extensive program for students motivated to improve their reading and 
listening skills, study methods, vocabulary and/or spelling. 

Students are entitled to the services of the Center without charge since 
they annually pay an advisory and testing fee at the time of registration. 

The Counseling Center is located in the Shoemaker Building. 

Placement and Credentials Service 

The Univerdiy's Placement Service fosters student career development. 
The Service is the primary center through which students and alumni may 
contact prospective employers in a wide variety of fields about employment. 

The Placement and Credentials Services are located in the Shoemaker 
Building. 

29 



University Post Office 

The University operates an ofl&ce located in the Service Building, for the 
reception and dispatch and delivery of the United States mail, including 
parcel post items and inter-office communications. This office is not a part 
of the U. S. postal system and no facilities are available for the reception 
or transmission of postal money orders. All registered and insured mail 
must be picked up at the United States Post Office in the City of College 
Park. The campus post office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday 
thru Friday. Resident students' mail will be delivered directly to the dormi- 
tories. All communications addressed to non-resident and/or commuting 
students must be mailed to their home addresses as there is no provision in 
the University Post Office for handling mail for these students. 

The Student Union 

The enlarged and improved Student Union has much to offer the student 
and faculty in facilities and services. 

The cafeteria, with seating for approximately 450, offers a complete line 
of hot lunches and dinners served daily from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. and 
4:45 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The remodeled snack bar serves breakfast and 
light lunches plus snacks throughout the day from 7:00 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. 

The Student Supply Store makes available for University personnel all 
classroom needs in texts and suppUes plus an assortment of clothing, cards, 
novelties and jeweh-y. 

The tobacco shop can fill almost any smoking need. Candy and personal 
articles are available here. 

During out-of-class hours students enjoy functions and activities spon- 
sored by the Student Union Board. These activities include an up-to-date 
and popular selection of films shown Friday through Sunday even- 
ings in the air-conditioned ballroom and a selected number of classical 
films shown on Thursdays, twice monthly. A Speakers Series brings many 
well-known personalities to the campus; the SpotUght Series brings 
favorite musical and comedy attractions. There are opportunities to 
meet University faculty members during one of the monthly Student- 
Faculty Coffee Hours. Students examine the monthly art exhibit in the 
Fine Arts Lounge where student and faculty works as well as works of 
other well-known exhibitors are on view. One of the most popular activities 
sponsored by the Student Union Board are the twice monthly dances. These 
feature favorite bands and the dress is generally casual. 

You may find relaxation on one of the Union's 16 automatic ten pin 
bowUng lanes which are open from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. daily and 
slightly later on the weekends. Or perhaps you might enjoy a game of 
billiards in the new 12 table billiard room. Chess and bridge are also avail- 
able; these University clubs meet regularly in the Union. 

There is a check cashing facility in the main office where personal checks 
up to $10.00 may be cashed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 3:00 
p.m. for a small service charge. Ditto or mimeographing needs may be 

30 



obtained here for a nominal cost. A Union poster service, providing a 
variety in printed signs, may also be utilized for a small cost. Student 
tickets for campus events are available in the Union ticket booth, located 
in the main lobby. 

University-recognized organizations or clubs may meet in any of the 
many rooms of varying size; a reservation form should be completed in the 
Union Office several days in advance. Light refreshment is available, but 
no food may be brought into the building. 

The Student Union also has for use outside of the building at a small 
rental fee, such items as 16mm sound movie projectors, screens, P.A. sys- 
tems, sUde projectors, certain kitchen equipment such as three and five 
gallon thermos jugs, and silver service. 

The hours of operation listed here for any of the facilities of the Student 
Union are subject to change without notice depending on the needs of 
operating efficiency. 



General Education Program 

A COLLEGE EDUCATION IMPLIES SOMETHING MORE THAN A TECHNICAL 

training in a field of specialization. In order that each graduate may gain a 
liberal education as well as a speciaHzed one, the University has established 
a General Education Requirement. This requirement consists of 34 semes- 
ter hours of credit in six areas: English (9 hr.). Fine Arts or Philosophy 
(3 hr.), History (6 hr.), Mathematics (3 hr.). Science (7 hr.), and Social 
Science (6 hr.). There is a wide choice in specific courses which may be 
used to satisfy requirements in all of the six areas except EngUsh. Physical 
Education and Health requirements for all students are taken in addition to 
this 34-hour group of courses. 

It should be emphasized that the 34 semester hours of General Educa- 
tion courses constitute a minimum University requirement, applicable to all 
students who entered college after June 22, 1964. Individual Colleges 
within the University may add supplementary requirements. 

The General Education Program is designed to be spread out over the 
four years of college. No General Education course requires any 
prior college course as a prerequisite. Thus, a student may (within limits 
of his particular curriculum) satisfy a General Education requirement 
with any available course for which he is eligible by advanced credit, place- 
ment examination, department evaluation, and class standing. 



31 




COLLEGE 



O F 



AGRICULTURE 



The college of agriculture offers a number of curriculums to 
prepare students for a wide variety of rewarding careers. These curricu- 
lums prepare the student for useful, informed citizenship with a basic 
understanding of science in general and the science of agriculture in par- 
ticular. All four-year programs lead to the Bachelor of Science degree. 

Modern agriculture is a highly complex and extremely efficient industry 
which includes supplies and services used in agricultural production, the 
production process itself, and the marketing, processing and distnbution of 
food and related products to meet the needs and wants of consumers. 

Instruction in the College of Agriculture emphasizes the fundamental 
sciences and associated areas of knowledge that its graduates must use in 
the agriculture of the future. When necessary, course programs in special- 
ized areas may be tailored to fit the needs of the student. 

Previous trainmg in agriculture is not a prerequisite for enrollment. 
Career opportunities for men and women with rural, suburban, or urban 
backgrounds are numerous in agriculture and its allied industries. 

Graduates of the College of Agriculture have a broad base for reward- 
ing careers and continued learning after college in business, production, 
teaching, research, extension and other professional fields. Students may 
major in Agricultural Chemistry, Agricultural Economics, Agricultural 
Engineering, Agricultural and Extension Education, Agronomy, Animal 
Science, Botany, Dairy Science, Entomology, Food Science, Horticulture, 
Poultry Science, General Agriculture and Pre-Professional Programs. Some 
of the careers which graduates of specific curriculums may select are: 

ANIMAL, PLANT AND SOIL SCIENCE. Animal, plant and soil scientists 
utilize the principles of nutrition, physiology, breeding and selection, man- 
agement, sanitation, and insect and disease control in producing quality 



32 



plants and animals in sufficient quantities and varieties to meet effectively 
and efficiently the needs of consumers. Curriculums in animal, plant and 
soil science combine a sound basis in fundamentals with specialized area 
options to prepare individuals for the wide range of careers in the many 
aspects of the production, management, sales, research, teaching and 
extension. 

FOOD SCIENCE. The food scientist applies the fundamentals of chemistry, 
physics, microbiology, sanitation, nutrition, management, and quality con- 
trol to the problems of procurement, processing, packaging and marketing 
of nutritious and aesthetically satisfying foods. Graduates in food science 
are trained in the basic sciences and associated subjects for careers in pro- 
duction, management, research, product development, quality control, 
teaching, extension, marketing, human nutrition and personnel relations in 
the food processing industry. 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS. The agricultural economist deals with the 
application of economic principles to the many facets of the total business 
of agriculture and other industries and occupations. He applies a knowl- 
edge of economics, mathematics, statistics, business management, finance, 
accounting, and agricultural science to the challenging opportunities found 
in the agricultural supply and service, production, and marketing indus- 
tries. He may become a professional manager, and apply his knowledge to 
the fields of production economics, the agricultural marketing system, the 
operation of supply firms or service organizations. He may become a 
market analyst, researcher, teacher, extension worker, agricultural statis- 
tician, agricultural credit speciaUst, foreign trade representative, or one of 
a growing list of professional occupations in government and industry which 
utilize his knowledge. As agriculture becomes more scientific, more efficient, 
more specialized, more competitive, the agricultural economist will be 
faced with an increasingly important future role. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING. The agricultural engineer is primarily 
concerned with that area of bio-engineering for controlling or modifying 
natural environment for the economic production and processing and 
utilization or marketing of plant and animal products. Agricultural engi- 
neers integrate the physical, mathematical and engineering sciences with 
their many applications in agriculture. Careers for graduates are found in 
the design or manufacturing of farm machinery or in sales and service 
positions in farm machinery distribution; in soil and water conservation 
engineering including water resources development; in the electrification, 
automation and mechanization of farmstead systems; in the development or 
adaptation of new materials or new designs in farm structures; systems for 
handling agricultural materials; and in the processing of agricultural 
products. 

AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION. The agricultural and exten- 
sion educator has a broad general training in agriculture with basic work 
in natural sciences, social sciences, humanities and specialized courses in 
education methods. A variety of educational career opportunities in voca- 
tional agriculture, county agricultural extension work, government business, 
industry, college and other related fields are available. 

33 



HORTICULTURAL EDUCATION. This cumculum is designed to develop a 
basic understanding of the art and the science of horticulture and to meet 
the requirements for teacher certification in Maryland. 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS: 

PRE-VETERiNARY SCIENCE. This program is designed for students desiring 
to prepare for the professional course in veterinary medicine. A combined 
degree is available to students in pre-veterinary science. A student who has 
completed 90 academic semester credits at the University of Maryland and 
who has completed 30 additional academic semester credits at the Uni- 
versity of Georgia or at any accredited veterinary school is eligible to make 
application for the Bachelor of Science degree from the University of 
Maryland. 

PRE-FORESTRY. This program is designed for students who may 
want to pursue two years of basic study in preparation for transfer to a 
standard forestry curriculum in another institution. 

PRE-THEOLOGiCAL. This program is designed for students who desire 
some basic background education in agriculture as preparation for the 
ministry. 

A Two- Year Program in Agriculture is offered for students who wish to 
spend only a limited time beyond high school to prepare for a specialized 
occupation. Courses are offered at less than the baccalaureate level. Stu- 
dents interested in this program should write to the Institute of Applied 
Agriculture. 

HONORS PROGRAM. The College of Agriculture initiated its Honors Pro- 
gram in 1963, in recognition of superior scholarship for excellent students. 

TYPICAL PROGRAM FOR THE FRESHMEN YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

English English 

Social Science or Mathematics Mathematics 

Agriculture Social Science 

Botany Zoology 

Agriculture elective Agriculture elective 

Health Physical Education 
Physical Education ROTC (Optional) 
ROTC (Optional) 

RECOMMENDED PREPARATION IN HIGH SCHOOL 

English 4 units 

Mathematics {College Preparatory) 2 units 

{Algebra 1 unit and Plane Geometry 1 unit — Agricultural Engi- 
neering and Agricultural Chemistry require 2 additional units) 

Biological and Physical Sciences 3 units 

History and Social Sciences 2 units 

Two units of foreign language are recommended for students planning 
to major in Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural Chemistry, Botany and 
Entomology. 

34 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

WiTfflN THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES STUDENTS CAN OBTAIN 

both a liberal education, in which ideas are cultivated and enjoyed for their 
own sake, and a more concentrated education, which falls within one or 
more of the basic disciplines and which points toward a career. The Col- 
lege seeks to develop graduates who can deal intelligently with the prob- 
lems they will be confronting in the second half of the twentieth century. 
It tries to provide for its students a general education which will be a con- 
tinuing source not only of material well-being but of genuine personal 
satisfaction. 

The areas of concentration available within the College lead to the 
degrees of Bachelor of Arts and of Bachelor of Science. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Areas OF concentration leading to the degree of bachelor of 
Arts are in the arts, the humanities, and the social sciences. 

Concentration in these areas is the normal preparation for the student 
who plans to go to law school; to a post-graduate or professional school 
of business administration, library science, or social service; or to a theo- 
logical seminary. 

The student interested in research (university, government, business and 
industry) or in college teaching in these areas of concentration will find 
here the undergraduate preparation necessary for the graduate work re- 
quired by these careers. 

By including the appropriate courses in education, a student in some 
of these areas can qualify for pubUc school teaching. For students inter- 
ested in foreign service, the foreign area programs combine intensive study 
of a language with study of the civilization of the area. Other careers in 
government and business are open to the student in the College of Arts 
and Sciences who selects appropriate areas of specialization. 

Specialized programs are also offered in the fine arts (art, drama, music) 
and in speech therapy. 

FOUR YEAR BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE PROGRAMS 

American Studies Foreign Area Studies {French, 

^f^ German, Latin American, 

Comparative Literature Russian, Spanish) 

Economics* French 

English Geography' 



'Also available are a degree in Art Education offered by the College of Education, 
and a program in Practical Art offered by the College of Home Economics. 

'Programs in these fields are also offered in the college of Business and Public 
Administration. 

35 



German Psychology 

Government and Politics* Russian 

Greek Sociology and Anthropology 

History (including also a program in 

Latin Crime Control) 

Music (see also Bachelor of Spanish 

Music degree) Speech (including also programs in 
Philosophy Dramatic Art and in Speech 

Therapy) 

PRE-LAW. A three-year program, followed by three years of Law at the 
University of Maryland Law School, leads to the B.A. and LL.B. degrees. 
Pre-law students may also follow any of the four-year programs and earn 
the Bachelor of Arts degree before entering law school. 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC. Four-year program leading to the Bachelor of Music 
degree. Professional training in theory-composition, history-literature, and 
applied music (voice or instrument). 

TYPICAL PROGRAM FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR 

Typical program for the freshman year for students following a program 
leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree: 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 

English Public Speaking 

Science or Mathematics Science or Mathematics 

Foreign Language Foreign Language 

Fine Arts or Philosophy Social Science 

Physical Activities Elective 

Science & Theory of Health Physical Activities 

RECOMMENDED PREPARATION IN HIGH SCHOOL 

English 4 units 

Mathematics 3 or 4 units of College 

Preparatory Mathematics 

Biological and Physical Sciences 1 or more units 

History and Social Sciences J or more units 

Foreign Languages and Latin 2 or more units 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Areas of concentration leading to the degree of bachelor 
of Science are in the physical sciences, in the biological sciences, and in 
mathematics. 

Concentration in these areas prepares the student for specialized posi- 
tions in industry and government. He can also gain the preparation 
necessary for admission to the professional schools of medicine and den- 
tistry or for admission to graduate work leading to advanced degrees in 

36 



Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics, and the Biological Sciences. Research 
(industry, government, university) and college teaching are among 
the possibilities open to the student who successfully completes an under- 
graduate and graduate program in mathematics or one of the basic sciences. 

FOUR YEAR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAMS 



Astronomy 

Botany^ 

Chemistry 

Mathematics 

Microbiology 



Physics 

Psychology 

Zoology 

General Biological Sciences 

General Physical Sciences 



PRE-MEDiCAL AND PRE-DENTAL PROGRAMS. There are three-year programs 
meeting minimum requirements for medical school or dental school. A 
four-year program in any of the major fields in the College of Arts and 
Sciences leading to a B. A. or B. S. degree can prepare a student for pro- 
fessional schools. Only exceptionally mature students with consistently high 
academic records should consider the three-year pre-medical curriculum. 



TYPICAL PROGRAM FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Public Speaking 

Mathematics 

Science (one or more of the 

introductory courses) 
Social Science 

Science & Theory of Health 
Physical Activities 



SECOND SEMESTER 

English 

Mathematics 

Science (continued) 

American Government 

Public Speaking 

Elective 

Physical Activities 



For the pre-medical and pre-dental student 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Philosophy or Public Speaking 

Mathematics 

Chemistry 

Zoology 

Science & Theory of Health 

Physical Activities 



SECOND SEMESTER 

English 
Mathematics 
Chemistry 
Zoology 
Physical Activities 



RECOMMENDED PREPARATION IN HIGH SCHOOL 

English 4 units 

Mathematics 4 units of College 

Preparatory Mathematics 
Biological and Physical Sciences 1 or more units, including 

Chemistry and Physics, if 
possible 

History and Social Sciences 1 or more units 

Foreign Languages and Latin 2 or more units 

'A curriculum in Botany is also offered in the College of Agriculture. 

37 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS 
AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Four-year programs leading to the bachelor of science degree 
are offered by the College of Business and Public Admmistratiori^Studens 
may complete the four-year program in a shorter period «* /^"^^^ J'y ^^ 
tending summer sessions. They may choose their programs of study from 
the offerings of the following departments: Department of Busmess Ad- 
rninisS Department of Economics, Department of Geography, De- 
partment of Government and Politics, Department of Information Sys- 
tems Management and Department of Journalism. 

Students expecting to enroll in the College of Business and PubUc Ad- 
ministration at the University of Maryland should pursue the pre-college 
program ?nhi^ school. Those who follow the commercial studies curri- 
culum in high school are usually not prepared to meet the requirements of 
the College The College recommends the following preparation in high 
school: 

recommended preparation in high school 

Fnolivh ^ units. 

f^;lZa>ics ::::: 3 or more units ol ColleifPre. 

paratory Mathematics; includ- 
ing a minimum of 2 units of 
Algebra and 1 of Geometry. 

History and Social Sciences 1 or more units. 

Natural Science 2 or more units. 

Foreign Languages 2 or more units. 

DEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

Before concentrating in any of the College's special fields of study, 
all students follow during their first two years an educational program 
that provides a foundation upon which to base advanced work m the 
management or social sciences or in journalism. The first two years 
constitute, therefore, a major part of the general education that the Uni- 
versity offers and an opportunity to learn something of the nature ot ditter- 
ent professional and scholarly fields. 

With the exceptions noted below, all departments within the College re- 
quire the following as a part of the freshman-sophomore program of study: 

English ^ semester hours 

Mathematics ^ 

History ^ 

Social Science " 

Natural Science 7-5 

Fine arts and philosophy 3 

Economics " 

By way of exception, the Departments of Geography and Journalism 
require a minimum of three hours of mathematics. Majors in Government 
and Politics and in the general program in Geography are required to have 
at least 12 hours of a foreign language. 

38 



Students must also meet University requirements in health and physical 
activities. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION. Programs: General Program in Business Ad- 
ministration; Accounting; Finance; Marketing; Personnel & Industrial Re- 
lations; Production Management; Statistics; Transportation. 

Upon completion of requirements for the degree, students following any 
of these programs will have had the advantage of a broad general educa- 
tion, a firm understanding of the internal characteristics and external rela- 
tionships of business, and a professional training focused upon one of the 
major lines of managerial activity. 

All students in business administration follow the same course of study 
for the first two years. In addition to the general requirements cited above, 
students take courses in speech, business enterprise, and accounting during 
the freshman-sophomore years. The junior-senior years are devoted to 
the requirements of the major plus such complementary courses as are 
deemed desirable for the completion of a sound general education. 

Students who major in one of the areas of business administration often 
enter business or government immediately after graduation, but their un- 
dergraduate programs also prepare them for graduate study in business. 

ECONOMICS. Students wishing to major in economics and to earn the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science may register in the College of Business and 
Public Administration, the College of which the Department of Economics 
is administratively a part. (Under a slightly different set of requirements, 
students may major in economics in the College of Arts and Sciences.) 
The first two years are devoted to the general requirements plus an addi- 
tional course in economics and electives. The junior-senior years are de- 
voted to the requirements of the major, and to elective courses. An honors 
program in economics is available to students who demonstrate the capacity 
for outstanding achievement. 

Students majoring in economics may look forward to careers in business 
and government and, after graduate study, to college teaching and to re- 
"^earch in many different types of organization. 

GEOGRAPHY. Programs: General Program in Geography; Cartography; and 
Urban Geography. 

Three programs of study are offered by the Department of Geography 
to students in the College of Business and Public Administration. The 
same programs are available — under a sUghtly different set of requirements 
— in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

All majors in geography devote the first two years to the general re- 
quirements and to certain courses in geography. Majors may follow a 
general program or may concentrate in the area of urban geography or 
cartography. All geography majors are required to complete 8 hours of 
science, and general geography majors must complete 12 hours of foreign 
language. Graduates usually enter teaching, industry, and agencies of state, 
local or national government. 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS. Programs: General Program in Government 
and Politics; International Affairs; and Public Administration. 

39 



Three programs of study are offered by the Department of Govermnent 
and Politics to students in the College of Business and Public Administra- 
tion: (1) a general program in government and politics, (2) a program 
in international affairs, and (3) a program in public administration. (Un- 
der a slightly different set of requirements the general program and the in- 
ternational affairs program are offered also to students in the College of 
Arts and Sciences. The pubUc administration program is available only 
in the College of Business and Public Administration.) In all three pro- 
grams, the first two years are devoted to the general requirernents, along 
with additional courses in government and poUtics and elective courses. 
All students are required to complete at least 12 hours of a foreign lan- 
guage. Majors may concentrate in the general program, in international 
affairs, or in public administration. The junior-senior years are devoted 
to the advanced government and politics courses and to courses con- 
sidered complementary to a particular program. Graduates enter upon 
careers in national, state and local and international organizations and, 
especially after graduate studies, in teaching. 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT. This department offers a program 
conceived to meet the needs of the rapidly expanding area of information 
technology as related to business management and to the areas of social 
science offered as a part of the College curriculum. In addition to the 
general requirements previously outlined, the program requires a second 
year of college mathematics. Supporting courses in accounting and in 
statistics are required. Courses in integrated data processing and in other 
aspects of computer utilization are features of the program. 

Industry and government offer an increasing number and variety of op- 
portunities to graduates of college programs in this new field, 

JOURNALISM. Students aspiring to become reporters, commentators, editors 
and publishers may follow the program in journalism. Opportunity is also 
provided to prepare for careers in the advertising aspects of journalism, as 
well as in photo-journalism, public relations, and radio-television. 

Students pursuing a major in this department devote the first two years 
to meeting the general requirements, along with 3 hours of journalism and 
certain electives. The junior-senior years are devoted to advanced journal- 
ism courses and to courses complementary to this area of study. 

THE PRE-LAW PROGRAM. Students majoring in general business may, upon 
completion of 90 semester hours, apply for admission to the University of 
Maryland Law School. Upon completion of one year of law school, they 
are awarded the B.S. degree. With the completion of two additional years 
of law, they receive the Bachelor of Laws degree. Apart from the pre-law 
program, students who complete the four-year program with majors in 
business administration, economics, or government and politics are eligible 
to apply for admission to law school. 

Additional Information 

High school counselors and others desiring more specific information on 
the programs of the College of Business and PubUc Administration are 
invited to direct queries to the Assistant Dean, College of Business and 
Public Administration, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

40 




COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

The college of education offers curriculum leading to ca- 
reers in teaching on all levels and in most specialities of education. This 
wide diversity of choices provides desirable flexibility and breadth. All cur- 
riculums are four-year programs and lead to full certification as a teacher 
and a Bachelor of Science or Arts degree. The specific curriculums are: 

ACADEMIC EDUCATION (SECONDARY SCHOOLS). English, foreign languages, 
mathematics, social sciences, science, speech. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION (SECONDARY SCHOOLS; OFFERED BY THE COL- 
LEGE OF agriculture) 

ART EDUCATION (SECONDARY AND ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS) 

BUSINESS EDUCATION (SECONDARY SCHOOLS) 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (NURSERY SCHOOL, KINDERGARTEN AND 
PRIMARY grades) 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS; GRADES 1-6) 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION (SECONDARY SCHOOLS; VOCATIONAL OR GEN- 
ERAL) 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION (SECONDARY SCHOOLS; INDUSTRIAL ARTS OR VO- 
CATIONAL-INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION) 

EDUCATION FOR INDUSTRY (a NON-TEACHING PROGRAM WHICH PREPARES 
STUDENTS FOR EDUCATIONAL, SUPERVISORY OR MANAGEMENT POSITIONS 
IN INDUSTRY) 



41 



library science 

music education (elementary and secondary schools; vocal or 
instrumental) 

physical education and health education, in cooperation with 
college of physical education, recreation and health (second- 
ary and elementary schools) 

special education* 

Majors in English, social sciences, language, and art receive the B. A. 
degree. Majors in mathematics may receive either degree. Majors in all 
other fields receive the B. S. degree. 



SPECIAL FACILITIES AND PROGRAMS 

All departments except Industrial Education are housed in the new 
Education building, a modern facility planned specifically for teacher 
education. 

The Science Teaching Center maintains an up-to-date collection of sci- 
ence teachmg materials and publications. The Institute for Child Study 
offers leadership to child study groups in Maryland and throughout the 
United States. The Industrial Education building offers modem shop and 
laboratory facilities. The Nursery-Kindergarten Laboratory School offers 
observation and participation experiences to students in the early child- 
hood program as well as to students in other fields. Area public schools 
are also used extensively. A Bureau of Educational Research and Field 
Services offers consultant assistance to the schools of the state. 

TYPICAL PROGRAM FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR 
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 

English Social Science 

Art or Music Science 

Mathematics or Science Speech 

Social Science Elective or Language 

Physical Education Physical Education 

Elective or Language Health 

Science & Theory of Health 

RECOMMENDED PREPARATION IN HIGH SCHOOL 

Four units of English and one unit of social science, natural science 
and mathematics are required. For some major fields two units of math- 
ematics are required. Additional units in mathematics, natural science 
social sciences, and foreign language are desirable for a program that per- 
mits the greatest amount of flexibility in meeting the requirements of vari- 
ous College of Education curricula. Fine arts, trade and vocational sub- 
jects are acceptable as electives. 

'Not a four-year program— provides an additional area for certification only. 

42 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Glenn L. Martin Institute of Technology 

Four-year programs lead to the bachelor of science degree in 
aerospace, chemical, civil, electrical and mechancil engineering, and in 
fire protection. Each program integrates these elements : ( 1 ) basic science 
including mathematics, physics, chemistry; (2) engineering science in- 
cluding mechanics of solids and fluids, engineering materials, thermo- 
dynamics, electricity and magnetism; (3) professional studies in areo- 
space, chemical, civil, electrical or mechanical engineering; (4) liberal 
ARTS AND social SCIENCES in General Education Program; (5) certain 
other required subjects including health and physical activities. 

Each program lays a broad base for continued learning after college in 
professional practice, in business or industry, in public service, or in grad- 
uate study and research. 

The following is representative of work performed by engineering grad- 
uates. 

the aerospace engineer deals with problems related to transporting 
people and things by air and through space. Aerodynamics, thermodynam- 
ics, and the mechanics of fluids and soUds are among his engineering 
sciences. He may apply them in some phase of planning or producing air- 
planes, missiles, or rockets, or devising means to sustain and control their 
flight. 

THE CHEMICAL ENGINEER applies chemistry to development and eco- 
nomic production of industrial chemicals, fuels, modem synthetics and 
certain alloys. He also applies mechanics, thermodynamics, reaction 
kinetics and aspects of nuclear science to unit operations and processes 
which are fundamental in the design and operation of the chemical indus- 
tries. 

THE CIVIL ENGINEER is primarily a planner, a designer, a builder, and a 
manager of public works and private enterprise. His professional service 
plays a major role in designing, supervising construction, or managing vir- 
tually every large building, bridge, dam, highway, railway, airport, water 
supply, waste disposal system, city plan, industrial plant, public works 
project, etc. 

THE ELECTRICAL ENGINEER puts mathematics and the physical sciences 
to practical use in designing systems to generate, transmit, distribute, and 
use electrical energy; to transmit and receive "intelligence," as for example 
by telephone, radio, radar, television and computers; and to regulate and 
control mechanical and industrial processes by electronics and servo- 
mechanisms. 

THE MECHANICAL ENGINEER figures ways to transmit power economically 
by heat or by mechanical systems. He applies the mechanics of fluids and 
solids, thermodynamics, and an understanding of the behavior of engineer- 
ing materials under different conditions. As a professional engineer he 
devises processes for industrial production. As an industrial agent he 
serves as a supervisor, manager, or sales representative. 

43 



GRADUATES IN FIRE PROTECTION are concemed with scientific and tech- 
nical problems of preventing loss of life and property by fire, explosion, 
and related hazards; and they serve industry, public agencies, and insur- 
ance companies professionally. 

RECOMMENDED PREPARATION IN HIGH SCHOOL 

If you wish to become a professional engineer you should enroll in an 
academic program in high school. Subjects that are recommended for ad- 
mission total sixteen units as follows: 

SUBJECTS RECOMMENDED 

English 4 units 

Mathematics (college preparatory) 4 

History and social sciences 2 

Physical sciences 2 

Foreign language — (German, French or Russian) 2 

Other academic subjects 2 

TYPICAL PROGRAM FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR 

All engineering students enroll in essentially the same subjects during 
their first year in college as follows: 

SEMESTER 

General Education Courses^ 3 3 

Elementary Mathematical Analysis; Calculus 4 4 

General Chemistry 4 4 

Introductory Engineering Science; Mechanics 4 4 

Health 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 

The numbers are "semester-credits." A student should plan to devote each 
week, on the average, three hours of elective work for each semester-credit 
on his schedule. 

Each student in the College of Enginering will select his major-Une de- 
partment — aerospace, chemical, civil, electrical, or mechanical engineering, 
or fire protection — before he begins his sophomore year's work. There- 
after he will pursue the approved program of his department which leads 
to the bachelor's degree. 

Advanced engineering students who show promise of creativity and 
leadership in engineering, in the engineering sciences, and in teaching and 
research, are encouraged to continue in a program of graduate study lead- 
ing to master's and doctor's degrees. There is an acute shortage of en- 
gineers with earned doctor's degrees. There are challenging opportunities 
for able men with such top-level preparation. The time to plan and to 
begin working for these top-level opportunities is while you are in high 
school. Your parents and your teachers can help provide the opportunity 
— after that your education is up to you. Plan to make the best of it! 

'Selected from English composition, Literature, Government & Politics, Sociology, 
Psychology 

44 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

The primary function of home economics is to relate the 
contributions of the physical, biological, and social sciences and art in the 
approach to the study of all phases of home and family life as applicable 
to individual famiUes and to agencies serving families. 

The educational program of the College of Home Economics is planned 
to help students function effectively as individuals, as family members, and 
as responsible citizens; to prepare men and women for positions for which 
home economics is a major or minor preparation. Entering freshmen may 
enroll without specifying a major area; however, a choice must be made 
by the beginning of the fourth semester. 

Graduates of the College are prepared to enter one of three broad 
areas of employment: educational-community-family life, technical, and 
commercial consumer service. The various programs of study have certain 
common courses with possible options and electives to meet needs of 
students. The major curricula include: general and family life; home 
economics education and extension; applied design; food, nutrition, institu- 
tion administration; and textiles and/or clothing. 

general and family life. This program enables a student to build a 
broad background as well as a speciafized emphasis in the areas related 
to both professional and personal aspects of Home Economics. Careers 
in family service agencies and consumer education, in addition to 
personal, family, and community living, are the foci of students in this 
program. 

education and extension. This program is designed for students who are 
preparing to teach home and family living or to become home economics 
extension agents. Both programs include study in all phases of home 
economics and the allied sciences along with specified professional train- 
ing. 

FOOD, nutrition, INSTITUTION ADMINISTRATION. Students learn the scien- 
tific principles underlying food selection, purchase, preparation, and ser\'- 
ice for home and institution use. Food and nutrition are applied sciences; 
therefore, courses in chemistry, physiology, microbiology, psychology, and 
economics are essential to their understanding. Graduates in this area are 
employed in consumer education departments of business firms, communi- 
cation areas, and state or community programs. Opportunities in food 
service include hospitals, schools and colleges, and commercial institutions. 

HOUSING AND APPLIED DESIGN. This program permits a choice from four 
areas of specialization: art in advertising, in housing and interior design, 
and in costume. A major in this area provides background for employment 
in advertising and in the designing and merchandising of fashion and 
home furnishings. 

TEXTILES AND CLOTHING. Thcsc curricula promote understanding of tex- 
tiles, fashion, and clothing design and construction in relation to technolog- 
ical and social developments influencing consumer choices. Graduates have 
positions in merchandising, fashion design and promotion, textile testing, 
and research. 

45 



cMafki 



^H^ 



(^'uh 



^-^ 



•^//a 



>>? 



'O, 



% 



.'S', 



eit. 



^'^e, 



''^hu 



'P 



% 



% 



'6 



% 



•>// 




ry:i 






cigcovvoT^: 



-OS 



FIRST SEMESTER 

English Composition and 

Literature 
American Government 
Family Life 
Design Fundamentals 
Science & Theory of Health 
Physical Activities 
General Chemistry or other 

Laboratory Science 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Math 

Sociology of American Life 

Consumer Textiles or 

Basic Foods 
Speech 

Physical Activities 
General Chemistry, Other 

Laboratory Science, elective 



RECCOMMENDED PREPARATION IN HIGH SCHOOL 

Four units of English and one unit each of social sciences, natural 
sciences, and mathematics are required. Additional units in the above 
areas, especially mathematics, and in home and family living are desirable. 



46 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, 
RECREATION, AND HEALTH 

Four year programs leading to the bachelor of science degree: 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION. The cumculum provides an adequate background 
in general education and scientific areas closely related to this field. De- 
velopment of skills in a wide range of motor activities is emphasized. Many 
vocational opportunities are available in public and private schools, or- 
ganized camping, youth and adult organizations which offer a program of 
physical activity. 

DANCE. With the increasing recognition of the importance and scope of 
dance in educational programs, the need for teachers adequately trained 
in dance exceeds the number available. The professional curriculum in 
dance is constructed to meet the steadily rising demand for personnel quali- 
fied to teach dance in college, secondary, elementary schools, in camps, 
recreational agencies and in preparation for dance therapy. 

RECREATION. Through area courses in sports, swimming and dance, speech 
and drama, music, arts and crafts, nature lore and camping, and those 
courses in the major field itself, program planning, organization and admin- 
istration, leadership techniques, etc. students are qualified to accept leader- 
ship positions in hospitals, industry, churches, public departments, with 
the armed forces, or with the many public and private agencies. 

HEALTH EDUCATION. A healthy nation is not primarily the responsibility of 
physicians and druggists but of the people themselves. This means that 
people need to know how to live healthfully and to utilize available health 
facilities — that is they all need health education. Persons qualified to 
teach health are needed in schools, colleges, community health agencies 
and hospitals. Students interested in qualifying for supervisory or college- 
level positions are encouraged to plan on doing graduate work either in 
school health or public health education. 

47 



PHYSICAL THERAPY. Physical therapy is one of the professions which has 
come into prominence as the scope of medical care has expanded. The 
modern concept of the rehabilitation of acute and chronically disabled 
persons has created an increasing demand for physical therapy service. It 
offers careers for both men and women who are interestd in becoming 
members of a service which assists the ill and handicapped achieve maxi- 
mum restoration of physical function. 

The University of Maryland offers a course of physical therapy leading 
to the Bachelor of Science degree and to a certificate to proficiency in 
physical therapy. 

RECOMMENDED PREPARATION IN HIGH SCHOOL 

In addition to the four units of English and one unit each of Social and 
Natural Sciences, it is especially desirable for students to have at least 
one unit each in Biological and Physical Science and three years of college 
preparatory mathematics. Any experience in music, drama, camping, play- 
ground and recreational activities, and group leadership also will be help- 
ful. In addition, participation in school programs of health and safety ed- 
ucation and in physical education and athletics are desirable. 

SPECIAL FACILITIES 

The facilities on the campus include five gymnasia, two swimming pools, 
a physical fitness research laboratory, tennis courts, sports fields, golf 
driving range and golf course, dance studio, and an excellent hbrary. The 
Washington YMCA camp. Camp Letts, also is used for certain activities. 

Students also are encouraged to use the excellent facilities of the Library 
of Congress, National Archives and the National Institutes of Health 
library facilities. 

EXPERIENCES 

In addition to classroom and laboratory work, opportunities for teach- 
ing on and off campus and participating in field experience are provided. 
Membership in professional groups such as Phi Alpha Epsilon, Aqualiners, 
Dance Club and Gymkana troupe is encouraged as well as participation in 
other campus activities. In each of the fields of specialization in this Col- 
lege unique opportunities in dance, sports, recreation, musical and drama- 
tics organizations exist in the environs of Washington and Baltimore. 

TYPICAL PROGRAM FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR 

FIRST SEMESTER. English; Social Science; Speech; Introduction to Physical 
Education, Recreation and Health; Rhythmic Analysis and Movement; 
Sport Skills and Gymnastics; Basic Body Controls (Women); R.O.T.C. 
(Men — optional). 

SECOND SEMESTER. Zoology; Mathematics, Social Science; Modern Dance 
Techniques (Women); Skills in Square and Social Dance; Sport Skills and 
Gymnastics; R.O.T.C. (Men — optional). 

48 




i 



THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

The profession of pharmacy merits and invites the serious con- 
sideration of meticulous and careful individuals who wish to pursue a 
career of dedicated service. 

The educational program of the School of Pharmacy is designed to train 
young women and men for the efficient, ethical practice of pharmacy; to 
instruct students in cultural and scientific subjects as well as in administra- 
tive and managerial methods for the orderly development of members of a 
profession and citizens in a democracy; to guide students into productive 
scholarship and research for the increase of knowledge and techniques in 
the heahng arts of pharmacy. 

The five-year curriculum at the University of Maryland leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy consists of two years of pre- 
professional training available at College Park and three years of the 
pharmacy program offered in Baltimore. Students from other accredited 
universities or colleges offering appropriate courses may be admitted 
directly to the professional program at Baltimore, if admissions require- 
ments are met. 

Strong encouragement is given to superior students to continue their 
education beyond the bachelor degree so that they may prepare for teach- 
ing and/or research positions. 

Scholarships for students enrolled in the pre-professional program at 
College Park are described in the section "Endowed Scholarships and 
Grants." 

The School of Pharmacy, a member of the American Association of 
Colleges of Pharmacy, is accredited by the American Council on Phar- 
maceutical Education. 

The prime opportunities available to pharmacists are in the fields of 
community and hospital pharmacy. 

49 



The practice of community pharmacy requires the skills and knowledge 
of the professional man and the operational activities of the business man 
in preparing and servicing the medicaments and other health supplies of 
the community. 

The hospital pharmacist utilizes his training in procuring, preparing, 
distributing and controlling the drug supplies and adjunct materials of his 
institution. 

Pharmaceutical manufacturers employ pharmacists as analysts of raw 
materials and finished products, as supervisors in the manufacturing plants 
and as medical sales representatives. 

Opportunities are also available to pharmacy graduates in various local 
and federal agencies. 

An academic program in high school is prerequisite to enrollment in 
the Pharmacy School. Academic subjects which are recommended and 
required for admission to the Pre-Professional Program at College Park are: 

Subject Recommended Required 

English . 4 units 4 units 

College Preparatory Mathematics — including 
algebra ( 1 ) , plane geometry ( 1 ) and addi- 
tional units in advanced algebra, solid 
geometry, trigonometry, or advanced math- 
ematics 4 2 

Physical Sciences (Chemistry and Physics) .2 1 

History and Social Sciences 2 1 

Biological Sciences 1 

Foreign Language — German or French .2 

Unspecified academic subjects 1 8 

Total Ti" 16 

FRESHMAN PROGRAM AT COLLEGE PARK 

All Students enroll for the following pre-professional courses during their 

first year in college: 

Semester 
Courses I W 

General Chemistry 4 4 

English Composition 3 

Introduction to Mathematics 3 3 

or or 

Introductory and Elementary Mathematical 

Analysis 3 4 

General Zoology 4 

General Botany 4 

Elective (Social Science)' 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Health 2 



Total 17 or 18 15, 16, 17 or 18 

' Social Science Electives 
G. and P. 1, American Government Sociology 1, Introduction 

Psychology 1, Introduction to Sociology 

to Psychology Anthropology 2, Introduction 

to Anthropology 
50 













THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 



The school of nursing offers both general and fundamental 
education for students who wish to prepare for professional nursing- (A) 
A generic four-year college program planned for students who have no 
previous expenence or knowledge in nursing; and (B) A program for 
registered nurses who have completed a three-year nursing program and 
who desire to bring up to full collegiate level their basic nursing prep- 
aration. Both programs lead to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Nursing. 

Beginning students in nursing spend the first two academic years on 
the College Park Campus or Baltimore County Campus. Students from 
other accredited colleges may be admitted directly to the Baltimore Campus 
providmg they meet admission requirements. Students in the registered 
graduate nurse program attend classes selected by the advisor on either 
campus. 

In association with the Graduate School of the University, the School 
01 JNursing prepares professional nurses who hold Bachelor of Science 
Degrees in Nursing with a "B" or better average as administrators i^ 
nursing and as instructors, supervisors, and clinical speciahsts in medical- 
surgical nursing, obstetrical nursing, pediatric nursing, general psychiatric 
nursing, public health nursing and nursing of children with psychiatric 
disorders. Masters students take most of their work on the Baltimore 
Campus. 

All programs presently being offered by the School of Nursing are 
accredited by the National League for Nursing. 

51 



The facilities for instruction used by the School of Nursing include 
the various colleges and professional schools of the University and the 
University Hospital. Other facilities include the Baltimore City Health 
Department, Maryland State Health Department, the State Department 
of Mental Hygiene, Montebello State Hospital, Baltimore City Hospitals, 
and The Children's Guild. Other accredited hospitals are utilized for 
resident training in Administration in Nursing and Practice Teaching. 

TYPICAL PROGRAM FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR 
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 

English English 

Sociology Government and Politics 

Zoology Chemistry 

Chemistry Speech 

Speech Nursing 

Physical Activities Physical Activities 

Algebra 

RECOMMENDED PREPARATION IN HIGH SCHOOL 

English f years 

Mathematics ^ years 

History and Social Sciences .... 2 years 

Foreign Language 2 years or more 

Science 2 years {including 1 unit of Physics, 

and 1 unit of Biology or Chemistry) 

Walter Reed Army Medical Center and Other Related 
Approved Military Facilities 

Through a contractural arrangement between the University of Mary- 
land School of Nursing and the Office of The Surgeon General, United 
States Army, the facilities of the School of Nursing, University of Mary- 
land have been extended to include the Walter Reed Army Medical 
Center and other military bases and welfare agencies. These clinical facili- 
ties will be utiUzed by the Faculty of the School of Nursing, University 
of Maryland, to provide learning experiences for those students who 
have been subsidized through the United States Army and who plan to 
remain in the military service following graduation. 

Students who have two years of lower division work in regionally ac- 
credited four year colleges or universities may transfer to the University 
of Maryland School of Nursing provided they meet the standards of the 
University of Maryland. All major professional or upper division learning 
experiences in the major of nursing, will be under the direction of the 
Dean, Clinical-specialists Department Heads, and Faculty of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland School of Nursing. 

For further information write to: 

The Dean, School of Nursing 
University of Maryland 
624 W. Lombard Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 
52 



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

Based on the philosophy that continuing education is essential 
to meet the demands of today's complex society, in contrast to the usual 
practice of bringing the student to the University, University College makes 
educational opportunities available for adult students at hours and locations 
smtaole to their needs. 

Specifically the CoUege has a three-fold purpose: (1) To extend the 
taci ities of the University by offering college credit evening courses for 
adults on campus and off campus throughout the State, the District of 
Columbia and various overseas centers; (2) To offer the Bachelor of 
Arts degree in General Studies for qualified adult students; and (3) To ar- 
range special programs to meet the specific educational needs of adult 
groups The recently completed Center of Adult Education, embodying 
specially designed facilities, provides a climate for adult learning in a 
residential setting. ^ 

A ^^^ overseas programs are offered m cooperation with the U S 
Armed Forces to military and civilian personnel and their dependents 
stationed in twenty-five foreign countries on four continents. The College 
does not offer correspondence courses. 

Undergraduate courses are offered in the arts and sciences, business 
administration and education. Graduate courses in government aud politics 
are offered at the Pentagon Center, and graduate courses in education 
are offered m the eyenmg on the Baltimore Campus and at Maryland State 
College, Prmcess Anne, Maryland. 

The General Studies curriculum provides opportunities for programs 
m the humanities social sciences and business, with concentrations of 
to^, ^° such fields as commerce, EngHsh, government and politics, his- 
tory, philosophy, psychology, and sociology. 

eithTr'^T' '^^'! have never attended a college or university must have 
ei her an acceptable high school diploma or the high school equivalent 
Students who have attended another college or university must be in good 
academic standing m order to enroll in University College. For further 
rft^w nT ^^?^'.ssio° requirements, see the University College 

catalog or a College advisor. Graduate courses are open only to students 

Sgi°stra7ion °'^^"''"^^^^'^ ^° ^^^ Graduate School prior to the date of 

cen^erf ^"iS! l^T^T^^I programs are offered each year at the foUowing 
centers m the State of Maryland and the District of Columbia: 

BoU.TAif pZ^Base MoS^/^",i'^"H^% ,• P^hi" TeSrges County Police 

CoUegl Park Cammi^ Montgomery County Police Tolchester Missile Site 

D.C. RecrlaUon Dent National Bureau of Standards Walter Reed Army 



53 



In addition, during the 1965-66 school year, courses offered primarily 
for teachers in service were given in the following counties throughout 
the State: 



Talbot 
Washington 
Wicomico 
Worcester 



For further information, see the University College catalog which may be obtained by writing the 
Dean, University College, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740. 



Allegany 


Charles 


Montgomery 


Anne Arundel 


Dorchester 


Prince George's 


Baltimore 


Frederick 


Queen Anne's 


Calvert 


Harford 


Somerset 


Caroline 


Kent 


St. Mary's 




APPENDIX A 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

GENERAL 

exact'^immmI'n?T.°^h^ °"^^'? '^°"''^ ^^""^^^ P^Vable to the University of Maryland for the 
OrnluTr yf- . charges. In cases where students have been awarded General Assembly 
Grants or University Grants, the amount of such grants will be deducted from the bin 

to Dav\hSuIl'.m^n,?nf.'i?h^^''J^ ^^ ^^V'""^ ?^ registration, and students should come prepared 
hasTeen made ^ ^'^"' ° '^"'^"'' '^'" ^' ^'^'"'"'^ '° "'^^^" ""^'^ such payment 

fr.„J^^ University reser^^es the right to make such changes in fees and other charges as may be 
poSbir'"^"^' °"^^ '''''^ ^^°'' ^'" ^' '""'^^ ^° ^^^P ^he cost to tSe studfnt as Tow as 

o cf„!?° degree will be conferred, nor any diploma, certificate, or transcript of record issued to 
a student who has not made satisfactory settlement of his account. 

EXPLANATION OF FEES 

thP nl?t^?^''^^^'°" ^" ^°,' '^^ undergraduate colleges and the summer session partially defrays 
the cost of processing applications for admission to these divisions of the University If a stu- 

f!e l^'r^t ^?' 'I' 'u"^ ^°' ^."^'^.^ ^' "PP"^^- '^' ^'' '^ ^'^"Pted in lieu of the matriculation 
?oll.i^i I ' ^ho have enrolled with the University of Maryland in its Evening Division a" 

?£^^LhJ.\^^^T°'\°' ^' °"' f "' off-campus centers are not required to pay tl^ fee 
since they have already paid a matriculation fee. 

The Fixed Charges Fee is not a charge for tuition. It is a charge to help defray the cost 
^L°^fh^''"^ }^' University's physical plant, to pay administrative and clerical expenS 
teaching Jupplies^ ° " ' ^""''^ °°' ^' ^"'"^"^ '^ ^ '^^^^ °* ^^^^^'^^ personneT and 

t,-,r,«I^^ Instnactional Materials Fee represents the average of laboratory fees assigned to full- 
e^oi^ed ?n^'h.^".'/' ''"""^Tu ^r'^T^ '':^-^,'T' P^^^-'''"^ undergraduate%tudents !n^ s Cdents 
ftr^w- TaI^^^"?'",!'" ^^]?°°' '^'" ^^ ^'"^'1 f°^ individual laboratory fees, and not the In- 
Sm h^"h ll^/'f,["'' '^"- ^""1™" undergraduate students subject to the fees set for h below 
Sh 1 S a' fP^'T"'" 1?.^"'^.^''° ^'" ^^ b'"^*! t^'c Instructional Materials Fee: 
Math. 1, $45; Applied Music, $40; and P. E. 8 Riding Class, $26. 

All cSf.^/'''^'''' f-J^ "^^J^^^ ^°L ^^^ '"PP°''^ °* ^^^ Department of Intercollegiate Athletics. 
ihL^lt ! ^""t ^ '^"'''^ ^"'^ ?" f'u'lents are encouraged to participate in all of the activities of 
this department and to attend all contests in which they do not participate. 

.^JP^f f ^"''^P* Activities Fee is a mandatory fee included at the request of the Student Gov- 
ernment Association. It covers class dues and is used in sponsoring various student activities 
student publications and cultural programs. ^'uucm dcuviues, 

'it^^^^Af^-^'^'^l ^fi- '^ "^ed to pay interest on and amortize the cost of construction of the 
Student Union Building, the Activities Building, and the Swimming Pool. 

r.r.r.J^^ Recreational Facilities Fee is paid into a fund which will be used to expand the 
recreational facilities on the College Park campus, especially the Student Union Building. 

ft.li ,ru"-tinTie undergraduate students who register for the second semester but who were not 
.Vii I'T undergraduate students in the first semester are required to pay the following addi- 
tional fees: Athletic Fee, $10.00; Student Activities, $8.00; Special Fee! $7.50; Recreational 
racilities Fee, $12.50. 



55 



DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Effective immediately is the following definition of "resident" and "non-resident": 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the time of their 
registration their parents have been domiciled in the State of Maryland for at least six months. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his first registration 
in the University and may not thereafter be changed by him unless, in the case of a minor, 
his parents move to and become legal residents of Maryland by maintaining such residence 
for at least six months. However, the right of the minor student to change from a non-resident 
status to resident status must be established by him prior to the registration period set for 
any semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their registration they have 
been domiciled in Maryland for at least six months provided such residence has not been 
acquired while attending any school or college in Maryland or elsewhere. Time spent on active 
duty in the armed services while stationed in Maryland will not be considered as satisfying 
the six months period referred to above except in those cases in which the adult was 
domiciled in Maryland for at least six months prior to his entrance into the armed service and 
was not enrolled in any school during that period. 

The word "domicile" as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent place of abode. 
For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be maintained. 

FEES FOR RESIDENTS AND NON-RESIDENTS 

FEES FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDE^^^S: 
MARYLAND RESTOENTS 

Fixed Charges 

Instructional Materials 

Athletic Fee 

Student Activities Fee 

Special Fee 

Recreational Facilities Fee 

$224.00 $142.00 $366.00 

RESroENTS OF THE DISTRICT OF COLin^BU, 
OTHER STATES AND COUNTRIES 

Tuition Fee for Non-Resident Students $200.00 $200.00 $400.00 



First 


Second 




Semester 


Semester 


Total 


$140.00 


$130.00 


$270.00 


12.00 


12.00 


24.00 


20.00 




20.00 


12.00 




12.00 


15.00 




15.00 


25.00 




25.00 



Total Fee for Non-Resident Students $424.00 $342.00 $766.00 

BOARD AND LODGING 

Board $220.00 $220.00 $440.00 

Dormitory Room 

Maryland Residents $160.00 $160.00 $320.00 

Other States and Countries $210.00 $210.00 $420.00 

The above fees do not apply to the temporary Veteran's Housing Units. The rates for 
these family units are as follows: two-room apartment $42.50 per month, three-room apartment 
$45.50 per month. 

SPECIAL FEES 

UNDERGRADUATE APPLICATIONS 

The deadline for the receipt of applications for the Spring Semester is January 1. 

All applications for full-time undergraduate admission for the Fall Semester at the Col- 
lege Park campus must be received by the University on or before June 1. Any student 
registering for nine (9) or more semester hours of work is considered a full-time student. 

Under unusual circumstances, applications will be accepted between June 1 and July 15. 
Applicants for full-time attendance filing after June 1 will be required to pay a non-refundable 
$25.00 late fee to defray the cost of special handling of applications after that date. This 
late fee is in addition to the $10.00 application fee. 

56 



All undergraduate applications, both for full-time and part-time attendance, and all sup- 
porting documents for an application for admission must be received by the appropriate Uni- 
versity office by September 1. This means that the applicant's education records (except cur- 
rent summer school grades) ACT scores (in the case of new freshmen) and medical examina- 
tion report must be received by July 15. 

Application Fee (see "Explanation of Fees," page 56) $ 10.00 

Late Application Fee 25.00 

Matriculation Fee 10.00 

Graduation Fee for Bachelor's degree* 10.00 

Room Deposit Fee payable upon application for dormitory room 50.00 

(To be deducted from the first semester room charges at registration.) 
Vehicle Registration Fee, each vehicle 5.00 

(Payable each academic year by all students registered for courses on the College 

Park campus and who drive on the campus.) 

Practice Teaching Fee 24.00 

Special Fee for students requiring additional preparation in Mathematics, per semester 45.00 

(Required of students whose curriculum calls for Math. 10 or 18 and who fail in 

qualifying examination for these courses.) 
Special Guidance Fee per semester (for students who are required or who wish to take 

advantage of the effective study course, and/or the tutoring service oflFered by 

the Office of Intermediate Registration) 15.00 

Fees for Auditors are exactly the same as fees charged to students registered 

for credit with the exception that the non-resident fee will not be charged in the 

case of students not registering for credit in any courses. 

Special students are assessed fees in accordance with the schedule for the 

comparable undergraduate or graduate classification. 



LABORATORY AND OTHER FEES 

Paid by all students except full-time undergraduate students who are assessed the Instruc- 
tional Materials Fee 

LABORATORY FEES PER SEMESTER COURSE: 



AGRICULTURE 

Agricultural and Extension 

Education $35.00 

Agricultural Engineering 3.00 

Animal Science 3.00 

Botany 5.00-6.00-10.00 

Entomology 3.00 

Horticulture 5.00 

ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Art 15.00-20.00 

Astronomy 3.00-10.00 

Chemistry 12.00-20.00 

Computer Science 10.00-15.00 

Microbiology 15.00-20.00 

Music 5.00-40.00 

Physics (Lectures and 

demonstrations) 2.00- 3.00 

Introductory 3.00 

All other 10.00 



Psychology 4.00-5.00-6.00 

Speech (Depending on 

laboratory) 1.00-2.00-3.00-5.00-10.00 
Radio and Stagecraft 2.00 

Zoology 12.00 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 7.50-10.00 

Journalism 3.00- 6.00 

Office Management and 

Techniques 7.50-10.00 

Statistics 10.00 

EDUCATION (Depending on 

Laboratory) 1.00-2.00-5.00-24.00 

Industrial Education 5.00- 7.50 

ENGINEERING 

Chemical Engineering 8.00-10.00 

Electrical Engineering 5.00-10.00 

Mechanical Engineering 3.00- 6.00 

HOME ECONOMICS (Depending 

on Course) 1.00-3.00-10.00 



MISCELLANEOUS FEES AND CHARGES 

Part-time Undergraduate Students: 

Fee per credit hour 18.00 

Auxilian- Facilities fee per semester payable at each registration 3.00 

Vehicle Reg. Fee 5.00 

(The term "part-time students" is interpreted to mean undergraduate students 
taking 8 semester credit hours or less. Students carrying 9 semester hours are 
considered to be full time and must pay the regular full-time fees.) 



•An additional late application fee of $10.00 will be assessed against students who fail to 
applv for graduation within the first eight weeks of a regular semester or the first three weeks 
of a' sumrner session. Students who apply after the end of the twelfth week of a regular 
academic semester and those who apply after the end of the fourth week of a summer session 
will be required to wait for the next academic semester in order to obtain a diploma. 

57 



Late Registration Fee 20.00 

(All students are expected to complete their registration, including the filing of 
class cards and payment of bills, on the regular registration days. Those who 
do not complete their registration during the prescribed days must pay this fee.) 

Fee for change in registration 5.00 

Fee for failure to report for medical examination appointment 2.00 

Special Examination Fee — to establish college credit — per semester hour 5.00 

Transcript of Record Fee (one transcript furnished without charge) 1.00 

Property Damage Charge: Students will be charged for damage to propety or equip- 
ment. Where responsibility for the damage can be fixed, the individual student 
will be billed for it; where responsibility caniKit be fixed, the cost of repairing the 
damage or replacing equipment will be prorated. 

Library Charges: 

Fine for failure to return book from General Library before expiration of loan 

period per day $ .05 

Fine for failure to return book from Reserve Shelf before expiration of loan period: 

First hour overdue .25 

Each additional hour overdue .05 

In case of loss or mutilation of a book, satisfactory restitution must be made. 
In the event it becomes necessary to transfer uncollected charges to the Cashier's office, 
an additional charge of $1.00 is made. 

TEXTBOOKS AND SUPPLIES 

Textbooks and classroom supplies: These costs vary with the course pursued, but 

will average per semester 50.00 

FEES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Fee per semester hour 24.00 

Application Fee, payable at time of first application for admission to the Graduate 

School 10.00 

Graduation Fee Master's Degree'" 10.00 

Graduation Fee for Doctor's Degree" 50.00 

Infirmary Fee 5.00 

Vehicle Registration Fee 5.00 

Foreign Language examination 6.00 

Testing Fee (Education Majors) 5.00 

Notes: Fees in the Graduate School are the same for all students, whether or not they 
are residents of the State of Maryland. 

All fees, except Graduation Fee, are payable at the time of registration for 

each semester. 
Graduation Fee must be paid prior to graduation. 
No provision for housing students is made by the University. 
Graduate students entering in February pay an Infirmary fee of $2.50. 

FEES FOR OFF-CAMPUS COURSES 

Matriculation Fee (payable once, at time of first registration by all students — full 
time and part time, candidates for degrees, and non-candidates). 

For Undergraduates $ 10.00 

For Graduates 10.00 

Fee for all students — limit 6 hours. For exceptional adult students taking off-campus 

courses the limit may be increased to 9 hours. Charge per credit hour 15.00 

Laboratory Fees: A laboratory fee, to cover cost of materials used, is charged in 
laboratory courses. Fees vary with the course and can be ascertained in any case 
by inquiry to the Dean of University College. 



"An additional late application fee of $10.00 will be assessed against students who fail 
to apply for graduation within the first eight weeks of a regular semester or the first three 
weeks of a summer session. Students who apply after the end of the twelfth week of a 
regular academic semester and those who apply after the end of the fourth week of a 
summer session will be required to wait for the next academic semester in order to obtain a 
diploma. 

58 



WITHDRAWAL AND REFUND OF FEES 

Any student compelled to leave the University at any time during the academic year 
should file an application for withdrawal, bearing the proper signature, in the Office of the 
Registrar. If this is not done, the student will not be entitled, as a matter of course, to a 
certificate of honorable dismissal, and will forfeit his right to any refund to which he would 
otherwise be entitled. The date used in computing refunds is the date the application for 
withdrawal is filed in the office of the Registrar. 

In the case of a minor, withdrawal will be permitted only with the written consent of 
the student's parent or guardian. 

Students withdrawing from the University will be credited for all academic fees charged 
to them in accordance with the following schedule: 

Period from Date Instruction Begins Refundable 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks 

The Application Fee, Matriculation Fee and Vehicle Registration Fee are not return- 
able in any instance. 

No part of the charges for room and board is refundable except where the student official- 
ly withdraws from the University or where he is given permission by the appropriate officials 
of the University to move from the residence halls and/or to discontinue dining hall privileges. 
In these cases, the refund will be computed by deducting ten percent of the charge for the 
semester as a service charge and the remainder will be pro rated on a weekly basis. No room 
and/or board refunds will be made after the fourteenth week of the semester. ID Cards with 
dining hall validation issued to boarding students must be surrendered at the Auditor's Office 
in the Administration Building on the day of withdrawal before any refund will be processed. 

In computing refunds to students who have received the benefit of scholarships and 
loans from University Funds, the computation will be made in such a way as to return the 
maximum amount to the scholarship and loan accounts without loss to the University. 

No refund of the Athletic, Student Activity, Special, Recreational Facilities, Infirmary, 
and Advisory and Testing Fees is made to students who withdraw at the close of the first 
semester. 

No refunds of Fixed Charges, Lodging. Tuition, Laboratory Fees. Instructional Materials 
Fee, etc., are allowed when courses are dropped, unless the student withdraws from the 
University. 

When regularly enrolled part time students in off-campus instruction officially drop 
a course or courses and continue with one or more courses, they may receive a refund of 80% 
for the dropped courses if they are officially dropped prior to the third meeting of the class 
or classes. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Students and alumni may secure transcripts of their scholastic records from the Office 
of the Registrar. No charge is made for the first copy; for additional copies, there is a 
charge of $1.00 for each transcript. Checks should be made payable to the University of 
Maryland. Transcripts of records should be requested at least one week in advance of the 
date when the records are actually needed. No transcript of a student's record will be fur- 
nished any student or alumnus whose financial obligations to the University have not been 
satisfied. 



59 



APPENDIX B 



HONORS, AWARDS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AIDS 



HONORS, AWARDS 

scHOLARsrap HONORS — Final honors for excellence in scholarship are awarded to one- 
fifth of the graduating class in each College, "high honors" are awarded to the upper half 
of this group; "honors" to the lower half. To be eligible for honors, a student must com- 
plete at least two years of resident work (60 semester hours) at the University with an 
average of B (3.0) or higher. 

MILTON ABRAMOwrrz MEMORIAL PRIZE IN MATHEMATICS — A prize is awarded annually to 
a junior or senior student majoring in mathematics who has demonstrated superior compe- 
tence and promise for future development in the field of mathematics and its applications. 

THE ALCOA FOUNDATION TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION AWARD tO an Outstanding SenlOf 

student majoring in transportation. 

ALPHA CHI SIGMA AWARD — The Alpha Rho Chapter of the Alpha Chi Sigma Honorary 
Fraternity offers annually a year's membership in the American Chemical Society to the senior 
majoring in Chemistry or Chemical Engineering whose average has been above 3.0 for 
three and one-half years. 

ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA AWARD — Presented to the senior member of the group who has 
maintained the highest average for three and a half years. She must have been in attendance 
in the institution for the entire time. 

ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA SENIOR CERTIFICATE AWARD — Senior members of Alpha Lambda 
Delta, honorary scholastic society for women, who have maintained an average of 3.5, 
receive this certificate. 

ALPHA ZETA MEDAL — TTie Professional Agricultural Fraternity of Alpha Zeta awards 
annually a medal to the agricultural student in the freshman class who attains the highest 
average in academic work. 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN ANNUAL GRADUATE PRIZE. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF AERONAiTFics AND ASTRONAUTICS AWARD — Free memberships in 
the Institute for one year and cash prizes for the best paper presented at a Student Branch 
meeting and for the graduating aeronautical senior with the highest academic standing. 

AMERICAN iNSTrruTE OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERS AWARD — A certificate, pin, and magazine 
subscription are awarded to the junior member of the Student Chapter who attained the 
highest overall scholastic average during his freshman and sophomore years. 

AMERICAN iNSTrrtrrE OF CHEMISTS AWARD — Presented for outstanding scholarship in 
chemistry and for high character. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS AWARD — The Maryland Section of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers awards annually the first year's dues of an associate membership 
in the Society to a senior member of the Student Chapter on recommendation of the faculty 
of the Department of Civil Engineering. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS AWARD — Presented to the Senior member 
who contributed most to the local chapter. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TESTING MATERIALS — A Student membership prize is awarded to 
an engineering senior in recognition of superior scholastic ability and demonstrated interest 
in engineering materials and their evaluation. 

APPLEMAN-NORTON AWARD IN BOTANY — The Department of Botany offers a scholarship 
award of $100 in honor of Emeritus Professors C. O. Appleman and J. B. S. Norton to a 
senior major in Botany who is considered worthy on the basis of demonstrated ability and 
excellence in scholarship. The scholarship is awarded by the Committee on scholarships 
upon the recommendation of a committee of the faculty of the Department of Botany. 

60 



ASSOCIATED WOMEN STUDENTS AWARDS — Presented for outstanding achievement, character, 
and service to the University. 

DAVID ARTHUR HERMAN MEMORIAL AWARD — This award is offered by the family of David 
Arthur Berman to the highest ranking junior in the Department of Chemical Engineering 
who is also a member of Tau Beta Pi. 

DINAH BERMAN MEMORIAL MEDAL — The Dinah Berman Memorial Medal is awarded 
annually to the sophomore who has attained the highest scholastic average of his class in 
the College of Engineering. This medal is given by Mr. Benjamin Berman. 

B'NAi b'rith AWARD — The B'nai B'rith Women of Prince Georges County present a Book 
Award for excellence in Hebrew Studies. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION AWARD OF MERIT to a Student in Business Education in recognition 
of outstanding achievement as a student. 

CITIZENSHIP PRIZE FOR MEN — President Emeritus H. C. Byrd of the Class of 1908, an- 
nually presents this award to the member of the senior class who, during his collegiate career, 
has most nearly typified the model citizen and who has done most for the general advance- 
ment of the interests of the University 

CITIZENSHIP PRIZE FOR WOMEN — This prizc is presented annually as a memorial to Sally 
Sterling Boyd, by her children, to that member of the senior class who best exemplifies the 
enduring qualities of the pioneer woman. These qualities typify self dependence, courtesy, ag- 
gressiveness, modesty, capacity to achieve objectives, willingness to sacrifice for others, strength 
of character, and those other qualities that enabled the pioneer woman to play such a funda- 
mental part in the building of the nation. 

THE CARROLL E. COX GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP AWARD in Botany to the Outstanding graduate 
student in the Department of Botany during the last year. 

BERNARD L. CROZiER AWARD — The Maryland Association of Engineers awards a cash 
prize of twenty-five dollars to the senior in the College of Engineering who, in the opinion 
of the faculty, has made the greatest improvement in scholarship during his stay at the Uni- 
versity. 

viRGiNU DARE AWARD — The Virginia Dare Extract Company awards annually a plaque 
and $25.00 to the outstanding student in ice cream manufacturing with an overall good 
standing in dairy. 

THE DANFORTH Fou>fDATiON AND THE RALSTON PURINA AWARDS — The Danforth Founda- 
tion and the Ralston Purina Company of St. Louis offer two summer awards to outstanding 
men students in the College of Agriculture, one for a student who has successfully completed 
his junior year, the other for a student who has successfully completed his freshman year. The 
purpose of these awards is to bring together outstanding young men for leadership training. 

The Danforth Foundation and the Ralston Purina Company of St. Louis offer two sum- 
mer awards to outstanding Home Economics women students, one to a junior and one to a 
freshman. The purpose of these is to bring together outstanding young women for leadership 
training. 

THE DELMARVA TRAFFIC CLUB AWARD to a junior studcnt majoriug in transportation whose 
residence is on the Maryland Eastern Shore. 

DELTA DELTA DELTA MEDAL — This sorority awards a medal annually to the woman who 
attains the highest average in academic work during the sophomore year. 

DELTA GAMMA SCHOLARSHIP AWARD — This award is offered to the woman member of 
the graduating class who has maintained the highest average during three and one-half years 
at the University. 

DELTA SIGMA PI SCHOLARSHIP KEY — This award is offered to a member of the graduating 
class who has maintained the highest scholastic average for the entire four-year course in 
the College of Business and Public Administration. 

NATHAN L. DRAKE AWARD — Presented by the Alpha Rho Chapter of Alpha Chi Sigma to 
the most promising student who is majoring in chemistry and has completed the sophomore 
year. 

61 



EDUCATION ALUMNI AWARD — Presented to the outstanding senior man and senior woman 
in the College of Education. 

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT SHORT FICTION AWARD — The English Department awards an annual 
prize of one hundred dollars provided by an anonymous donor, to the undergraduate or grad- 
uate student who has written and submitted for the judgment of a faculty committee the best 
piece of short fiction during the current school year. 

GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY prize to the Outstanding first year graduate student in physics 
and to the outstanding first year graduate student in astronomy. 

GODDARD MEDAL — The James Douglass Goddard Memorial Medal is awarded annually 
to the resident of Prince Georges County, born therein, who makes the highest average in 
his studies and who at the same time embodies the most manly attributes. The medal is 
given by Mrs. Anne G. Goddard James of Washington, D.C. 

CHARLES B. HALE DRAMATIC AWARDS — The University Theatre recognizes annually the 
man and woman members of the senior class who have done most for the advancement of 
dramatics at the University. 

HAMILTON AWARD — This award is offered by the Hamilton Watch Company to the grad- 
uating senior in the College of Engineering who has most successfully combined proficiency in 
his major field of study with achievements — either academic, extra-curricular, or both — in 
the social sciences or humanities. 

THE HASKiNS AND SELLS FOUNDATIONS, INC., AWARD to the senior student in the College 
of Business and Public Administration concentrating in accounting who has demonstrated 
excellent ability in this field of study. 

HOME ECONOMICS ALUMNI AWARD — Presented to the student outstanding in application 
of home economics in her present living and who shows promise of carrying these into her 
future home and community. 

INSTSTUTE OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING AWARD — The Washington Sec- 
tion of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers defrays the expenses of a year's 
membership as an associate in the Institute for the senior doing the most to promote Student 
Branch activities. 

JOE ELBERT JAMES MEMORIAL AWARD — Gold watch annually awarded to the graduating 
senior in horticulture on basis of scholarship and promise of future achievement. 

LEiDY CHEMICAL COMPANY AWARD to an Outstanding student majoring in chemistry. 

MARYLAND-DELAWARE PRESS ASSOCIATION ANNUAL CITATION — Presented to the Outstanding 
senior in journalism. 

MARYLAND RECREATION AND PARKS SOCIETY AWARD to an Outstanding scnlor majoring in 
recreation. 

men's LEAGUE AWARD to the male senior who gave the most to sports. 

men's league CERTIFICATES — Offered for outstanding achievement, character, and service 
to the University. 

men's league CUP — This award is offered by the Men's League to the graduating male 
senior who has done the most for the male student body. 

MOTOR FLEET SUPERVISORS AWARD to a studcnt majoriug in transportation in the College 
of Business and Public Administration. 

NATIONAL SOCIETY OF FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEERS AWARDS — Presented to the most out- 
standing senior and sophomore in the Fire Protection curriculum. 

NoxzEMA CHEMICAL COMPANY SCHOLARSHIP AWARD to an Undergraduate student in chem- 
istry. 

OMicRON Nu SORORITY MEDAL — This honorary sorority awards a medal annually to the 
freshman woman in the College of Home Economics who attains the highest scholastic 
average during the first semester. 



62 



PHI BETA KAPPA JUNIOR AWARD — An award to be presented to the junior initiate into Phi 
Beta Kappa who has attained the highest academic average. 

PHI BETA KAPPA— LEON P. SMITH AWARD— The award of the Gamma of Maryland Chap- 
ter of Phi Beta Kappa is presented to the graduating senior with the highest cumulative 
scholastic average whose basic course program has been in the liberal studies. 

PHI CHI THETA KEY— The Phi Chi Theta Key is awarded to the outstanding graduating 
senior woman in the College of Business and Public Administration on the basis of scholarship 
activities, and leadership. ' 

PHI DELTA KAPPA AWARD — Presented to an outstanding man in the graduating class of the 
College of Education. 

PHI SIGMA AWARDS for Outstanding achievement in the biological sciences to an under- 
graduate student and a graduate student. 

* T."r^^,^'^'^i.^^^,"-°^ NATIONAL MEDAL OF MERIT AWARDS— Offered by the National Council 
of Pi Delta Epsilon to the outstanding senior woman and the outstanding senior man in 
Journalism activities. 

PI DELTA EPSILON AWARD for Outstanding service to communications in the field of broad- 
castmg. 

PI DELTA EPSILON AWARD for Outstanding service to communications in the field of 
Business. 

PI DELTA EPSILON AWARD to the Outstanding freshman in the field of communications. 

PI DELTA EPSILON AWARD for Outstanding service to communications in the field of edi- 
torial journalism. 

PI TALI SIGMA AWARD — An annual handbook award to the most outstanding sophomore 
m mechanical engineering on the basis of scholastic average and instructors' ratings. 

PILOT FREIGHT CARRIERS, INC., AWARD to the scnior Student in the College of Business 
and Public Administration who has majored in Transportation and who has demonstrated 
competence m this field of study. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS SOCIETY OF AMERICA— The Baltimore Chanter of PRSA presents an 
annual citation to the outstanding senior majoring in public relations. 

SIGMA ALPHA OMICRON AWARD — This award is presented to a senior student majoring in 
Microbiology for high scholarship, character and leadership. 

THE SIGMA CHAPTER, PHI DELTA GAMMA AWARD to an Outstanding woman who has com- 
pleted the requirements for the doctoral degree. 

ALGERNON SYDNEY SULLIVAN AWARD— The New York Southern Society, in memory of its 
first president, awards annually medallions and certificates to one man and one woman of 
the graduating class and one non-student who evince in their daily life a spirit of love for and 
helpfulness to other men and women. 

TAU BETA PI AWARD— The Maryland Beta Chapter of Tau Beta Pi Association, national 
engineering honor society, awards an engineer's handbook to the junior in the College of 
Engineering who during his sophomore year has made the greatest improvement in scholarship 
over that of his freshman year. 

WALL STREET JOURNAL STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT AWARD — Awarded annually to the grad- 
uatmg senior who has maintained the highest scholastic achievement in the field of financial 
administration. The award consists of a silver medal embedded in clear plastic and one year's 
subscription to the Wall Street Journal. 

THE ARTHUR YOUNG AND CO. FOUNDATION, INC., AWARDS to exceptional Senior students 
concentrating m accounting who are registered in the College of Business and Public Ad- 
ministration. 



63 



AIR FORCE ROTC AWARDS 

AFROTC ANGEL FLIGHT AWARD presented to the outstanding member of the AFROTC 
Angel Flight. 

AIR FORCE TIMES AWARD presented to the Senior Cadet at each detachment who has 
distinguished himself by/contributing materially to constructive public attention for his Cadet 
Corps. < 

ALUMNI ctrp presented to the outstanding Flight in the Corps of Cadets. 

ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY' AWARD presented to the Advanced Cadet selected by the Arnold Air 
Society as the cadet who has contributed the most to the advancement of AFROTC through 
activities of the Arnold .Air Society. 

CHICAGO TRiBLTNE ROTC AWARDS presented to freshmen and sophomores who display 
highest leadership and officer potential. 

DISABLED AMERICAN VETERANS GOLD CUP awarded to the Senior Cadet who has displayed 
outstanding leadership, scholarship, and citizenship. 

DISTINGUISHED AFROTC CADET AWARDS presented to thosc seniors who possess outstanding 
qualities of leadership and high moral character and who meet the prescribed standings in 
their academic and military studies. 

GENERAL DYNAMICS* AWARD presented to the Sophomore Cadet displaying outstanding 
leadership and scholarship qualities and who has been selected for Advanced AFROTC. 

governor's CUP presented to the outstanding Squadron Commander in the Corps of 
Cadets. 

PERSHING rifles REGIMENTAL AWARDS presented to the outstanding members of the Per- 
shing Rifles Regiment and Pershing Rifles Squadron. 

RESERVE officers assocution AWARDS presented to the outstanding junior and senior 
cadets of the Cadet Corps. 

SCABBARD AND BLADE coBLENTZ MEMORIAL CUP awarded to the Outstanding commander 
in the Corps of Cadets. ■ 

SOCIETY of AMERICAN MiLFTARY ENGINEERS AWARDS presented to a junior and a senior 
cadet displaying outstanding scholastic achievement and leadership and majoring in the 
field of engineering. 

ATHLETIC AWARDS 

ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE AWARD — A plaque is awarded each year to a senior in each 
conference school for excellence in scholarship and athletics. 

THE ALviN L. AUBiNOE BASKETBALL TROPHY — This trophy is offered by Alvin L. Aubinoe 
for the senior who has contributed most to the squad. 

THE ALViN L. AUBINOE FOOTBALL TROPHY — This trophy is offered by Alvin L. Aubinoe 
for the unsung hero of the current season. 

THE ALviN L. AUBINOE TRACK TROPHY — This trophy is offered by Alvin L. Aubinoe for 
the senior who has contributed most to the squad during the time he was on the squad. 

JOHN T. BELL SWIMMING AWARD — To the year's outstanding swimmer or diver. 

LOUIS w. BERGER TROPHY — Presented to the outstanding senior baseball player. 

WILLIAM p. COLE, IH, MEMORIAL LACROSSE AWARD — This award, offered by the team- 
mates of William P. Cole, III, and the coaches of the 1940 National Champion team, is 
presented to the outstanding midfielder. 

THE GEORGE c. COOK MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP TROPHY — Awarded annually to a member 
of the football team with the highest scholastic average. 

64 



JOE DECKMAN-SAM siLBER TROPHY — This trophy is offered by Joseph H. Deckman and 
Samuel L. Silber to the most improved defense lacrosse player. 

GEARY F. EPPLEY AWARD — Offered by Benny and Hotsy Alperstein to the graduating male 
senior althlete who, during his three years of varsity competition, lettered at least once and 
attained the highest over-all scholastic average. 

HALBERT K. EVANS MEMORIAL TRACK AWARD — This award, given in memory of "Hermie" 
Evans, of the Class of 1940, by his friends, is presented to the following graduating senior 
trackman. 

HERBERT H. GOODMAN TROPHY — Thls trophy is offered by Herbert K. Goodman to the 
most outstanding wrestler of the year. 

CHARLES LEROY MACKERT TROPHY — This trophy is offered by William K. Krouse to the 
Maryland student who has contributed most to wrestling while at the University. 

MARYLAND RING — The Maryland Ring is offered as a memorial to Charles L. Linhardt, 
of the Class of 1912, to the Maryland man who is adjudged the best athlete of the year. 

CHARLES P. MC CORMICK TROPHY — This trophy is offered by Charles P. McCormick to 
the senior letterman who has contributed most to swimming during his collegiate career. 

ANTHONY c. NARDo MEMORIAL TROPHY — This trophy is awarded to the best football 
lineman of the year. 

ED'WTN POWELL TROPHY — This trophy is offered by the Class of 1913 to the player who 
has rendered the greatest service to lacrosse during the year. 

SILVESTER WATCH FOR EXCELLENCE IN ATHLETICS — A gold watch, given in houor of 
former president of the University, R. W. Silvester, is offered annually to "the man who 
typifies the best in college athletics." 

TEKE TROPHY — This trophy is offered by the Maryland Chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon 
Fraternity to the student who during his four years at the University has rendered the 
greatest service to football. 

ROBERT E. THEOFELD MEMORIAL — This trophy is presented by Dr. and Mrs. Harry S. 
Hoffman and is awarded to the golfer who most nearly exemplifies the competitive spirit and 
strong character of Robert E. Theofeld, a former member of the boxing team. 

MUSIC AWARDS 

ASSISTANT director's AWARD to the Outstanding member of the Symphonic Band. 

DIRECTORS AWARD to the concert band member who demonstrated the most improvement 
in musicianship during the year. 

KAPPA KAPPA psi AWARD to the most Outstanding band member of the year. 

SIGMA ALPHA IOTA ALUMNAE AWARD for Outstanding musical performance. 

SIGMA ALPHA IOTA DEAN'S HONOR AWARD for service and dedication. 

SIGMA ALPHA IOTA HONOR CERTIFICATE to the scnior with the highest scholastic average. 

SIGMA ALPHA IOTA LEADERSHIP AWARD based On personality, student activities, fraternity 
service, and scholarship. 

TAU BETA SIGMA AWARD to the Outstanding band sorority member of the year. 

Awards are presented to the members of the University Bands, the University Orches- 
tras, and the Men's and Women's Glee Clubs who serve faithfully throughout the year. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT AWARDS 

Keys are awarded to the members of the Executive Committee of the Student Govern- 
ment Association, Men's League, Association of Women Students, and other organizations 
who faithfully perform their duties throughout the year. 

65 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS-IN-AID 

All requests for information concerning scholarships and grants-in-aid should be addressed 
to the Director of the Office of Student Aid, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 
Regulations and procedures for the award of scholarships are formulated by the Committee 
on Financial Aids. 

The Board of Regents of the University authorizes the award of a limited number of 
scholarships each year to deserving students. Applicants are subject to the approval of the 
Director of Admissions insofar as qualifications for admission to the University are concerned. 
All recipients are subject to the academic and non-academic regulations and requirements 
of the University. 

Scholarships and grants are awarded to young men and women based upon apparent 
academic ability and financial need. In making awards, consideration is given to character, 
achievement, participation in student activities and to other attributes which may indicate 
success in college. It is the intent of the Committee to make awards to those qualified who 
might not otherwise be able to provide for themselves an opportunity for higher education. 

The recipient of the scholarship or a grant is expected to make at least normal progress 
toward a degree. Normal progress toward a degree is defined by the Academic Probation Plan. 

The Committee on Financial Aids reserves the right to review the scholarship program 
annually and to make adjustments in the amounts and recipients of awards in accordance with 
the funds available and scholastic attainment. 

The types of scholarships, grants and loan funds available follow: 

FULL SCHOLARSHIPS 

The University awards fifty-six full scholarships covering board, lodging, fixed charges, 
fees and books. Not more than twenty of these scholarships may be held by out-of-state 
students and at least twelve are reserved for women. Scholastic achievement and participation 
in student activities are given primary consideration in the award of these scholarships. 

Ul^VERSmr GRANTS 

The University awards to deserving and qualified secondary school graduates a limited 
number of grants covering fixed charges only. 

GENERAL ASSEMBLY GRANTS 

These grants are for fixed charges and are awarded by members of the Legislature, three 
for each Senator and one for each member of the House of Delegates. They may be awarded 
by a member of the House of Delegates or by a Senator only to persons in the county or 
in the legislative district of Baltimore City which the Delegate or Senator represents. Awards 
of such grants are subject to approval by the Committee on Scholarships and by the Director 
of Admissions as to qualifications for admission. 

SPECIAL ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS 

A limited number of scholarships is awarded each year to students of exceptional 
academic ability out of funds derived from campus enterprises. The amount of these 
scholarships varies depending upon the extent of need. 

TEACHER EDUCATION GRANTS 

The General Assembly of Maryland provides grants equivalent to fixed charges to 
Maryland residents pursuing teacher education curricula on a full-time basis. Recipients agree 
to teach in Maryland public schools for at least two years immediately following graduation. 
The agreement form must be signed by the student arid countersigned by the parent, guardian 
or other responsible adult. 

GENERAL STATE TUITION SCHOLARSHIPS 

The General Assembly of Maryland provides a number of limited tuition scholarships 
to students entering college for the first time. These scholarships may be used in any approved 
institution of higher education within the State. At the University of Maryland, they cover 
the item listed as fixed charges. Awards are made by the State Scholarship Board based 
upon financial need and the results of a competitive examination. 

66 



ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS 

The University has a number of endowed scholarships and special grants. These are 
paid for by income from funds especially established for the purpose. Brief descriptions 
of these awards follow: 

ALBRIGHT SCHOLARSHIP — The Victor E. Albright Scholarship is open to graduates of 
Garrett County high schools who were bom and reared in that county. 

ALCOA FOUNDATION TRAFFIC SCHOLARSHIP — An award of $500 is given to an outstanding 
junior student majoring in Transportation in the College of Business and Public Administration. 

ALPHA PHI OMEGA (epsilon mu CHAPTER) SCHOLARSHIP — This Scholarship is awarded 
annually to a freshman student having a background in the Boy Scouts of America. 

ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP — The General Alumni Council of the University Alumni Associa- 
tion provides eleven scholarships in the amount of $250 each to be awarded respectively to 
schools or colleges represented on the Alumni Council. The awards are based on scholar- 
ship, leadership and need. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY SCHOLARSHIPS — A limited number of 
scholarships are available to residents of Montgomery County. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY SCHOLARSHIPS — The Alumni Associa- 
tion of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland makes available annually 
scholarships to qualified pre-pharmacy students on the basis of worthiness, moral character, 
scholastic achievement and the need for financial assistance. These scholarships are open 
only to residents of the State of Maryland. Each scholarship not exceeding $500.00 per 
academic year is applied in partial defrayment of fees and expenses at College Park. 

ALUMNI BAND SCHOLARSHIP — A limited number of awards to freshmen are sponsored by 
the University of Maryland Band Alumni Organization. Recipients are recommended by the 
Music Department after a competitive audition held in the spring. 

ETHEL R. ARTHUR MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP — This memorial scholarship fund has been 
established by Irving J. Cohen, M.D. At least one $250.00 award is made each year by the 
Scholarship Committee. A preference is given to students from Baltimore. 

ALVIN L. AUBiNOE STUDENT AID PROGRAM — Scholarship grants up to $500 per school year 
to students in engineering, preferably those studying for careers in civil engineering, 
architecture or light construction. 

BALTIMORE PANHELLENic ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIP — A scholarship is awarded annually 
by the Baltimore Panhellenic Association. This scholarship will be awarded to a student 
entering the junior or senior class, who is an active member of a sorority, who is out- 
standing in leadership and scholarship and who needs financial assistance and is recom- 
mended by the Office of the Dean of Women. 

BALTIMORE suNPAPERS SCHOLARSHIP IN JOURNALISM — The Board of Trustees of the 
A. S. Abell Foundation, Inc., contributes funds to provide one or more $500 scholarships to 
students majoring in editorial journalism. 

BAYSHORE FOODS, INC. SCHOLARSHIP — A grant of $500 is made available annually by J. Mc- 
Kenny Willis and Son., Inc., Grain, Feed and Seed Company of Easton, Maryland, to an out- 
standing student in vocational agriculture in Talbot County who will matriculate in the College 
of Agriculture. This grant is assigned by the Committee on Scholarships in accordance with 
the terms of the award. 

SAMUEL WOLFE BLANKMAN GRANT — The sum of $100 is awarded each year to a foreign 
student on the basis of worth and need to be determined by the Committee on Scholarships. 
The student must be a permanent resident of a country other than the United States, its 
possessions, or Canada. He may be a member of any college or school in the University. 



67 



BORDEN AGRicuLTxmAL AND HOME ECONOMICS SCHOLARSHIPS — A Borden Agricultural 
Scholarship of $300 is granted to that student in the College of Agriculture who has had 
two or more of the regularly listed courses in dairying and who, upon entering the senior 
year of study, has achieved the highest average grade of all other similarly eligible students 
in all preceding college work. 

A Borden Home Economics Scholarship of $300 is granted to that student in the College 
of Home Economics who has had two or more of the regularly listed courses in foods and 
nutrition and who, upon entering the senior year of study, has achieved the highest average 
grade of all other similiarly eligible students in all preceding college work. 

COLORTONE GRAPHIC ARTS AND PUBLICATION SCHOLARSHIP A Scholarship of $500.00 Is 

made available annually by the Colortone Press, Inc., of Washington, D. C, to a senior 
recommended by the Department of Journalism and Public Relations and majoring in public 
relations. The recipient is also offered an opportunity of a supervised internship during the 
summer preceding his senior year. 

GEORGE c. COOK SCHOLARSHIP — A full scholarship is made available by the Maryland 
Educational Foundation in memory of the late George C. Cook. The scholarship shall be 
administered under the same rules as a University Scholarship. Preference shall be given 
to students interested in a career in business administration or marketing. 

DR. ERNEST N. CORY SCHOLARSHIP — This award is made annually to an outstanding junior 
or senior recommended by the College of Agriculture, preferably one majoring in Entomology. 
The amount of the award will vary depending upon the earnings of a trust fund established 
in honor of Dr. Ernest N. Cory upon his retirement. 

DAIRY TECHNOLOGY SCHOLARSHIP AND GRANTS — The Dairy Technology Society of Mary- 
land and the District of Columbia provides a limited number of scholarships and grants-in- 
aid for students majoring in Dairy Products Technology. These awards are available both 
to high school graduates entering the University as freshmen and to students who have 
completed one or more years of their University curriculum. The purpose of these awards 
is to encourage and stimulate interest in the field of milk and milk products. The awards 
are based on scholarship, leadership, personality, need, experience, interest in and willingness 
to work in the field of dairy technology. These awards are made by the Committee on 
Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid in cooperation with the Dairy Technology Society. 

DELMARVA TRAFFIC CLUB SCHOLARSHIP — An award of $250 is given to a junior or senior 
student from the Delmarva Peninsula majoring in Transportation in the College of Business 
and Public Administration. 

DOUGLAS AIRCRAFT COMPANY SCHOLARSHIP — An $800.00 Scholarship to be awarded to 
an outstanding and deserving senior student in aeronautical, electrical, or mechanical engi- 
neering in this order of preference. Candidates recommended by the University must be citizens 
of the United States and have the approval of the Scholarship Board of the Douglas Aircraft 
Company. Preference should also be given to students who indicate a willingness to accept 
employment in California. 

EXEL SCHOLARSHIP — A Substantial grant for endowed scholarships was made by Deborah 
B. Exel. These awards are made by the Committee on Scholarships to worthy students in 
accordance with the general principles underlying the award of all other scholarships. 

FIRE RESEARCH AND ACTUARIAL ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIPS — Fifteen Awards are made an- 
nually for room, board, tuition, and fees to outstanding high school students enrolling in the 
Fire Protection Curriculum of the College of Engineering. Students residing in eleven states 
in the Conference area and the District of Columbia are eligible for these scholarships. Em- 
ployment obligations are required. Recipiertts of scholarships are selected by the Scholarship 
Committee of the Inter-Regional Insurance Conference in cooperation with the Faculty 
Committee on Scholarships. 

ANNE ARUNDEL COtJNTY VOLUNTEER FIREMEN'S ASSOCIATION GRANT — This $300 is awarded 

to a high school graduate who will enroll in the Fire Protection Curriculum in the College 
of Engineering. The award will be available to the recipient for normal period of time to 
complete the program being pursued. This grant is provided by the Anne Arundel County 
Volunteer Fireman's Association and the College of Engineering. 

BALTIMORE COUNTY VOLUNTEER FIREMAN'S ASSOCIATION GRANT This $350 annual grant 

is awarded to a student who will enroll in the Fire Protection Curriculum in the College of 
Engineering. The award is normally for four years and is awarded to a student of high 
scholastic ability with a reputation of good character and outstanding fire service interest. 
This grant is provided by the Baltimore County Volunteer Fireman's Association. 

68 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA FIRE FIGHTERS ASSOCIATION GRANT — A $150.00 grant is awarded 
to a student who has completed his freshman year or has advanced standing in the Fire 
Protection Curriculum. The award is made in cooperation with Fire Protection Department 
of the College of Engineering. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA FIRE FIGHTERS ASSOCIATION, I.A.F.F. GRANT — This award is made 

to a student who has completed his freshman year in the Fire Protection Curriculum of the 
College of Engineering. The award will be in the amount of $150.00 per year to be applied 
to the expense of fixed charges, tuition and fees. This award is made in cooperation with the 
Fire Fighters Association and the Fire Protection Department of the College of Engineering. 

LADIES AUXILIARY TO THE MARYLAND STATE FIREMEN'S ASSOCUTION GRANT This $500 

grant is awarded to an outstanding high school graduate who will enroll in the Fire Protection 
Curriculum in the College of Engineering. The award is available to the recipient for the 
normal period of time to complete the program being pursued. This grant is provided by 
the Ladies Auxiliary of the Maryland State Firemen's Association and the College of 
Engineering. 

MARYLAND STATE FIREMEN'S ASSOCIATION GRANT — A $300 Scholarship is awarded annually 
to an outstanding high school student who enrolls in the Fire Protection Curriculum of the 
College of Engineering. This scholarship is for four years and is awarded to a student of 
high scholastic ability with a reputation of good character and outstanding fire service interest. 
The award is provided by the Maryland State Firemen's Association. 

NATIONWIDE FOUNDATION FIRE SAFETY SCHOLARSHIP — The cxpensc of fixed chargcs, 
tuition and fees, not to exceed $600.00 per year, for a maximum period of two years is 
awarded to a student who is entering his junior year of study in the Fire Protection Cur- 
riculum of the College of Engineering. This award is made in cooperation with the Director 
of Safety of The Nationwide Insurance Company and The Fire Protection Department of 
the College of Engineering. 

PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY VOLUNTEER FIREMEN'S ASSOCIATION GRANT — An annual Scholar- 
ship of $300 is awarded to an outstanding high school student who enrolls in the Fire Pro- 
tection Curriculum of the College of Engineering. The award is based on high scholastic 
ability, good character and outstanding fire service interest. The award is provided by the 
Prince Georges Volunteer Firemen's Association. 

FOOD FAIR STORES FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS — Each year a number of scholarships is 
made available by the Food Fair Stores Foundation to students from Anne Arundel, Balti- 
more, Harford, Prince Georges, Washington, Frederick, Montgomery, and Talbot counties 
and Baltimore City. Students receiving these scholarships may pursue any of the four-year 
curriculums of the University. The scholarships are for $250 for an academic year. 

VICTOR FRENKiL SCHOLARSHIP — A Scholarship of $250 is granted annually by Mr. Victor 
Frenkil of Baltimore to a student from Baltimore City in the freshman class of the University. 

FUTURE NURSES CLUBS SCHOLARSHIP — A limited number of $300.00 scholarships are made 
available by the Future Nurses Clubs of Maryland which are sponsored by the Women's 
Auxiliary of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland and the Maryland League 
of Nursing. These scholarships are available to freshmen students from Maryland preparing 
for nursing. 

GAMMA PHI BETA ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP — Two annual Scholarships are available to 
teachers employed in the teaching field. The awards pay tuition costs of graduate course 
designed for training teachers of gifted children. The awards are made available by the 
Washington Alumnae Chapter of the Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. Recipients are recommended 
by the Coordinator of Special Education on the basis of scholarship and need. 

GENERAL MOTORS SCHOLARSHIP — This Scholarship granted annually to any young mai> or 
young woman who is an outstanding individual entering the freshman year. The amount of 
the stipend depends upon the demonstrated need of the individual. The College Scholarship 
Service evaluates the financial need in each case. 

GODDARD MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP — Four $500 Scholarships are available annually under 
the terms of the James and Sarah E. R. Goddard Memorial Fund established through the 
wills of Morgan E. Goddard and Mary Y. Goddard. In granting these awards the Com- 
mittee on Scholarships will consider outstanding scholastic achievement and financial need. 
Each award will be made on a year-to-year basis depending upon the accomplishment of 
the student. 

69 



GORDON-DAVIS LINEN SUPPLY SCHOLARSHIP — ^Thc Gordon-Davis Linen Supply Company 
provides a fund to be granted to worthy students by the Committee on Scholarships and 
Grants-in-Aid. 

ROSE L. GRANT SCHOLARSHIP — At least $500.00 each year is made available to be awarded 
by the Scholarship Committee in accordance with its established principles. 

JOHN WILLIAM GUCKEYSON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP — A Scholarship of $100.00 is granted 
annually by Mrs. Hudson Dunlap as a memorial to John William Guckeyson, an honored 
Maryland alumnus. 

JAMES HARTIN ENGINEERING SCHOLARSHIP AND DONALD PETER SHAW MEMORIAL SCHOLAR- 
SHIP — These two scholarships of $300.00 each are made available annually by Mr. & Mrs. 
David C. Hartin. The first is awarded to a male student in the College of Engineering and 
the second to a male student in any college other than Education, or to a female student in 
Nursing. These awards will be made annually by the Scholarship Committee to worthy 
students who are helping to earn their own college expenses. 

HASKINS AND SELLS pouNDATiON, INC. AWARD — A Scholarship of $500 is provided for an 
exceptional senior student majoring in accounting in the College of Business and Public 
Adniinistration. 

WILLIAM RANDOLPH HEARST FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS — These Scholarships are made 
available through a gift of the Baltimore News American, one of the Hearst newspapers, in 
honor of William Randolph Hearst. Scholarships up to $1000 are awarded annually to under- 
graduates pursuing a program of study in journalism. Scholarships up to $1000 are awarded 
annually for graduate study in history. These scholarships are awarded by the Committee 
on Scholarships and Grant-in-Aid in cooperation with the Department of History and 
Journalism. 

IOTA LAMBDA SIGMA (nu CHAPTER) SCHOLARSHIP — This Scholarship is awarded annually 
to a male student who wishes to enroll or is enrolled in the Industrial Education curriculum. 
The student must be a resident of the State of Maryland and signify his intention of teaching 
in Maryland. The amount of the scholarship is $200.00. 

KAPPA ALPHA THETA ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP — An annual award of $500 is made available 
to a senior or graduate student studying speech therapy, by the Washington Alumni Chapter 
of the Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority. The recipient shall be recommended by the head of 
the Speech Department. 

KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA NURSING SCHOLARSHIP — This $100.00 Scholarship is made available 
annually by the Gamma Psi chapter of the Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority to a worthy 
student preparing for a career in nursing. Preference for the award shall be given to an 
entering student from Maryland and she shall have a preference for its continuance while she 
is a student at College Park. 

VENiA M. KELLER GRANT — The Maryland State Council of Homemakers* Clubs makes 
available this grant of $100 which is open to a Maryland young man or woman of promise 
who is recommended by the College of Home Economics. 

KiWANis SCHOLARSHIP — The J. S. Ray Memorial Scholarship covering tuition is awarded 
by the Prince Georges Kiwanis Club to a male resident of Prince Georges County, Maryland, 
who, in addition to possessing the necessary qualifications for maintaining a satisfactory 
scholarship record, must have a reputation of high character and attainment in general all- 
around citizenship. 

SAMUEL J. LEFRAK SCHOLARSHIP — A Scholarship in honor of Geary F. Eppley, Dean of 
Men Emeritus, has been established by an alumnus Mr. Samuel J. Lefrak, President of the 
Lefrak Organization, Forest Hills, New York. The award of $1,000 is made to a deserving 
sophomore who excels in both athletics and scholarship, to be used during his last two 
years at the University. 

LEiDY CHEMICAL FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP — A Scholarship of $500.00 is granted annually 
to a graduate or undergraduate student preparing for a career in the general field of chemis- 
try. The award is made by the Committee on Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid in cooperation 
with the Department of Chemistry. 

70 



estabSJ SrlZh ^fl^^^ncYJ^TTth^^i^^'' scholarships, several in number, were 
CongressmanCha?^esJ £S^m whosei^^^^^^^^ L.nthicum, widow of the late 

land for many years They are erkmed to wLL ^^'' ^'°"' ^^^ ^°"'^*' ^'^^"^^ of Mary- 
of the State of Maryland a'ndwh^o have atiSorv^wilf .X"nf "'^ ^T'? ^^? ^'^ ^^^'^^^^^ 
a reputation for splendid character a^'cSS^'anX^tt^elS^Sn t'^'^'^r^'"'' 

comp"2rin"IhTLYor au"7DS'T2^2;^^^^^^^^^ 'iZ'V rf'^^l' ^° •^^-^^-- ^^o 
mended by the Music Department Sr a^oLpIS' audTtL'^rt^^e^pri^^^^^^^^ '^ ^^^°'"- 

a .im^d number rawa^s'^^TT.^y ^aleVlnled ^v't^a °' •^^^'^'^l: H^"^" "^^ y- 
cants who show promise in spor£ other San football ^°'"'"'«^^ °° Scholarship to appli- 

arshirin'^;^siSg''Edra°UorA?ira7c?e';- "^T." ^^ .''f "1° P™^'^^ ^ $^00 annual schol- 
Conumttee on slo^^^X .^L^iS^ £^;^££^;^S^J^ ^^^ ^V the 

provirrn-S? S"y':a^%;TtL"eSoTSr;rv1rS^°;r'^P ^°' °^ ^^^"^^ ^^ ^^^ " 
are awarded by the Committee nn^r.t.«?o k- ! ^' promismg young men. These grants 
visions of the FoundauS^ Scholarships to applicants who qualify under the pro- 

made'SabTe brth''e''MaS'con?um^rK"-^ scholarship fund of $500.00 per year is 
student or divided^nd^ ^.'^S'.'ZZlIr^^l ^r^ar? mi^d??J ^^a^tsfde^ 

of Maryland ^ "^ scholarships are open only to residents of the State 

able each?ear t^nrn^- "^^ Tl^^ scholarships-A number of scholarships are made avail- 
priferential cons?deSn'"?o M^T '"f '"'"'^"^ '^' ?°''' °f furthering their education, with 
fn the almU forces and the ^"^^^^^^^ '""" '" '' " '""" """'' '"'"'"' '''^'' 

wom^n°s[u'Jen?rthTb°a'sro7VhII''t^°'?t''; ^°'''^ Scholarship is awarded annually to a 

Colle°Ee 'of °Hn^. ''^^^^'' T^''^ '•' P'-^^^^ed annually to the sophomore student in the 
man yea? Economics who attained the highest scholastic average during £er fre^! 

providerTn^allv^SI-^','- s°.^i^ty SCHOLARSHIP-The Peninsula Horticultural Society 
of Maryland fmm th. f^c^^'^'Ik^ '° '^^ "?°'' deserving junior or senior student, a resident 

subK'-^ic^a;^aittra?pfy^r^^^^^ 

of the'luSfo^y'^af Lfa"trn'e?7h7hi/ht?''''^'^ ?• ^^^'^''' '°. »^^ ^^<i^"« ^^o at the end 
basic c^ursrpSSam'is'S'hlerL'^tulie"' '"""'''"' ^^^^^^^ ^° "^^^^^ -"-« -^ -hose 

young" e^enSt fh."^!;^^'""'"^, "'"'^'^ ""'"^^^ °f ^100 scholarships are available to 
o? wlhTr dnrino .^! f 1°^^°""°'^ '^'ass and who have achieved an academic average of 3 5 



71 



PILOT FREIGHT CARRIERS, INC., AWARD — A $500 award is made to a senior student in the 
College of Business and Public Administration who has majored in transportation and who 
has demonstrated competence in the field of study. The award is made through the College 
of Business and Public Administration. 

read's DRUG STORES FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS — The Read's Drug Stores Foundation 
contributes annually several scholarships to pre-pharmacy students on the basis of worthiness, 
scholastic achievement, moral character and the need for financial assistance. Each scholar- 
ship not exceeding $500.00 per academic year is applied to defray partially the fees and ex- 
penses at College Park, Maryland. Recipients must have been residents of the State of Mary- 
land for at least one year prior to the awarding of the scholarship. 

MARY ELIZABETH ROBY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP — An endowed Scholarship has been estab- 
lished by the University Park Republican Women's Club. Limited awards are made to women 
entering the junior or senior years who are studying in the field of political science. A pref- 
erence is given to residents of Prince Georges County. 

DR. FERN DUEV SCHNEIDER GRANT — A $100.00 grant is available to a foreign woman 
student enrolled in the College of Education, and who has completed at least one semester in 
residence at the University. Funds for the grant are contributed by the Montgomery and 
Prince Georges County Chapters of the Delta Kappa Gamma Society. 

THE SEARS ROEBUCK FOUNDATION GRANTS — Eight grants of $300 each are provided by the 
Sears Roebuck Foundation to the sons of Maryland residents engaged in agricultural pursuits 
who enroll in the freshman class of the College of Agriculture. One $300 grant is awarded 
each year to the sophomore student in the College of Agriculture who has proved to be the 
outstanding student holding a Sears Roebuck grant during the previous year. These grants 
are awarded annually by the Committee on Scholarships. 

A limited number of similar grants from the Sears Roebuck Foundation are also available 
for students in the College of Home Economics. 

SOUTHERN STATES COOPERATIVE SCHOLARSHIPS — Two Scholarships are awarded each year 
to sons of Southern States members — one for outstanding work in 4-H Club and the other 
for outstanding work in FFA. The amount of each scholarship is $300 per year and will con- 
tinue for four years. These scholarships are awarded by the Committee on Scholarships and 
Grants-In-Aid in cooperation with the College of Agriculture. 

ADELE H. STAMP SCHOLARSHIP — This scholarship of $250.00 is awarded annually to a 
sophomore who is an active sorority member t)r pledge, who is outstanding in leadership and 
scholarship and who needs financial assistance. Funds for this scholarship are provided by 
the University of Maryland Panhellenic Association. The recipient is recommended by the 
office of the Dean of Women. 

STEEL CLUB OF BALTIMORE SCHOLARSHIP — This is a renewable scholarship of $500.00 
per year. Male residents of Maryland who have expressed their intention of entering the 
steel industry on completion of their formal education are eligible. 

STEEL SERVICE CENTER SCHOLARSHIP — A renewable scholarship of $350.00 per year is 
made available by various steel clubs of Baltimore. The award is made in accordance with 
the general principles underlying all other scholarships. 

JANE G. s. TALIAFERRO SCHOLARSHIP — Under the terms of the will of the late Janie G. S. 
Taliaferro a bequest has been made to the University of Maryland to provide scholarship 
aid to worthy students. The income of the estate amounting to $350 annually is used as a 
scholarship to a worthy young man or young woman who qualifies. 

R. M. WATKINS SCHOLARSHIP — This scholarship is made available under the same terms 
and conditions as a Full University Scholarship from funds provided by the Maryland Edu- 
cational Foundation. 

WESTERN ELECTRIC SCHOLARSHIP — Two Scholarships are awarded to students in the 
College of Engineering. The amount of the scholarship covers cost of tuition, books and 
fees not to exceed $800 nor to be less than $400. 

WESTiNGHOUSE AIR ARM DIVISION SCHOLARSHIP — The Westinghouse Electric Corporation 
has established a scholarship to encourage outstanding students of engineering and the physical 
sciences. The scholarship is awarded to a sophomore student and is paid over a period of 



72 



three years in six installments of $250. Students in electrical or mechanical engineering, engi- 
neering physics or applied mathematics are eligible for the award. Selection of the recipient 
is based on achievement as reflected by scholastic standing and general college record. The 
award is made by the Committee on Scholarships and Grants-In-Aid in cooperation with the 
College of Engineering. 

women's club of bethesda scholarship — Two $250.00 scholarships have been made 
available to young women residents of Montgomery County by the Women's Club of Bethesda. 
Recipients must be accepted in the College of Education or the College of Nursing. 

THE ARTHLTR YOUNG AND CO. FOUNDATION, INC. SCHOLARSHIP — The Arthur Young and Co. 
Foundation, Inc., makes available a scholarship of $750 for an exceptional senior student 
concentrating in accounting who is registered in the College of Business and Public Admin- 
istration. This award is made by the Committee on Scholarships and Grants-In-Aid to coop- 
eration with the College of Business and Public Administration. 



STUDENT LOANS 

NDEA STUDENT LOANS — Loan funds are available under provision of the National De- 
fense Education Act. The borrower must sign a note for the loan and agree to interest and 
repayment terms established by the University. Repayment of the loan begins nine months after 
the borrower ceases to be a full time student and must be completed within ten years there- 
after. No interest is charged on the loan until the beginning of the repayment schedule. In- 
terest after that date is to be paid at the 3 percent per annum. 

The National Defense Education Act contains a provision which provides that up to 
fifty percent of a student loan plus interest may be cancelled in the event the borrower be- 
comes a full time elementary or secondary school teacher. Such cancellation is to be at the 
rate of 10 percent a year to five years. 

NURSING STiTOENT LOANS — Loans up to $1000 per year are available under provisions of 
the Nurses Training Act of 1964. The borrower must be a full-time student in pursuit of a 
baccalaureate or graduate degree in nursing, and able to establish financial need. Repayment 
begins one year after the borrower ceases to be a full-time student and must be completed 
within ten years thereafter. No interest is charged until the beginning of the repayment 
schedule. Interest after that date is to be paid at the rate of three percent per annum, or 
the "going Federal rate," whichever is greater. 

Up to fifty percent of the loan plus interest may be cancelled in the event that the bor- 
rower is employed full-time as a nurse in a public or nonprofit institution or agency. Such 
cancellation is at the rate of ten percent per year. In the event of total or permanent disability 
or death, the borrower's obligation is automatically cancelled. 

CATHERINE MOORE BRINKLEY LOAN FUND — Under the will of Catherine Moore Brinkley, 
a loan fund is available for worthy students who are natives and residents of Maryland. 

JOSEPH w. KINGHORN AND MORLEY A. JULL FUNDS — Memorial trust funds have been es- 
tablished in honor of Joseph W. Kinghom, first graduate of the University of Maryland 
Poultry Department. These funds are available as loans to students enrolled in the Poultry 
Department. 

EDNA B. MC NAUGHTON MEMORIAL LOAN FUND — This fund has been established by Mrs. 
W. B. Clayton in memory of Edna B. McNaughton. who initiated and developed the pro- 
gram in Early Childhood Education at the University of Maryland. Priority is given to 
students enrolled in this program. 

PHI DELTA GAMMA LOAN FUND — This fund has been established under essentially the same 
terms and conditions as the NDEA loans. Recipients must be recommended by the Sigma 
Chapter of the Phi Delta Gamma Sorority. 

JAN STEVEN AND SIDNEY RAPKE MEMORIAL LOAN FUND — This fund has been established 
in memory of Jan Steven Rapke by his parents. Short-term, interest free loans are available 
to students in good standing to meet personal emergencies as they arise. It is the wish of 
the donors that the fund be administered with a minimum of formality. 

73 



uhfiTED STUDENT AID FUNDS — Loans up to $1,000.00 per year are available from many 
banks to students at the University. Maximum interest on such loans is 6 per cent simple. 
Monthly installments are usually not less than $25 nor more than $100. Repayment begins ten 
months after the student ceases to be a full time student. 

SIEGFRIED E. wEisBERGER, JR. MEMORIAL FUND — A memorial trust fuud has been estab- 
lished in honor of Siegfried Weisberger, Jr., a Freshman student in Agriculture in 1958-59. 
Under terms of this loan, students in Agriculture may borrow money without interest for short 
term needs. 



PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT 

UNIVERSITY EMPLOYMENT — The University offers dining hall and dormitory workshops 
permitting selected Maryland residents to earn part or all of their board and room. Other 
jobs on campus pay hourly rates according to the skill and education required. 

OFF-CAMPUS EMPLOYMENT — A file of off<ampus part-time jobs is maintained. Most of 
these are with local stores and business firms. 

COLLEGE WORK-STUDY PROGRAM — Eligible Students may seek employment under pro- 
visions of Title 1-C of the Economic Opportunity Act. Part-time employment during the 
school year plus full-time employment during the summer may be combined with scholarships 
and loans to provide educational opportunities to qualified students. 



FOR ADDITIONAL 


INFORMATION . . . 


Admission 


. .DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS 
NORTH ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 


Housing 


. DIRECTOR, HOUSING OFFICE 

NORTH ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 


Scholarships and Grants-in-aid 
Loans and Student Employment 


DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF STUDENT AID 
NORTH ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 


Student Life Information 


EXECUTIVE DEAN FOR STUDENT 

LIFE 

NORTH ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 


Counseling 


UNIVERSITY COUNSELING CENTER 
SHOEMAKER BUILDING 


Specific Program Information . 


. OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF THE 
RESPECTIVE COLLEGES 




TO COMPLETE THE MAIL ADDRESS 
FOR THESE OFFICERS ADD: 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 

20740 



74 



CATALOG OF THE 

COLLEGE 

OF 

AGRICULTURE 

1966-68 



THE 
UNIVERSITY 

OF 
MARYLAND 



Volume 22 September 1, 1965 Number 3 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BULLETIN is published four times in September; 
three times in January, March and May; and two times in August, October. Novem- 
ber, December, February, April, June and July. Re-entered at the Post Office at 
College Park, Maryland, as second class mail under the Act of Congress on 
August 24, 1912. Published twenty-nine times. 



Contents 



University Calendar 

Board of Regents 

Officers of The University 

Standing Committees, Faculty 

Senate 
The College 
General Information 

Special Advantages 

Coordination of Agricultural 
Work 

Facilities and Equipment 

Cost 

Air Science 

Scholarships and Grants- 
in-Aid 



GENERAL 

iv Student Organizations 
vi Student Judging Teams 

vii Additional Information 

Awards 

xi Academic Information 
1 Admission 

1 Junior Standing 

2 Requirements for 

Graduation 

2 Honors Program 

3 Student Advisers 

3 Electives 

4 Field and Laboratory 

Practice 
4 Freshman Year 



COURSE OFFERINGS 

Agriculture 34 Animal Science 

Agricultural Economics 35 Botany 

Agricultural and Extension Entomology 

Education 39 Food Science 

Agricultural Engineering 42 Horticulture 
Agronomy — Crops and Soils 

and Geology 44 



9 
9 
9 
9 

10 
10 



REQUIRED COURSES 




Agriculture Curriculum 


11 


Botany 


25 


University Requirements 


11 


Conservation and Resource 




College Requirements 


11 


Development 


26 


Agriculture — General 


12 


Entomology 


27 


Agricultural Economics 


13 


Food Science 


28 


Agricultural Chemistry 


15 


Horticulture 


29 


Agricultural and Extension 




Special Curricula 


31 


Education 


15 


Pre-Forestry 


31 


Agricultural Engineering 


17 


Pre-Theological 


31 


Agronomy — Crops and Soils 


20 


Pre-Veterinary 


32 


Crops 


21 


Special Students 


33 


Soils 


22 


Two- Year Program 


33 


Animal Science 


23 







49 

55 
61 
64 
65 



Agriculture Experiment Station 
Agriculture Extension Service 
Service and Control Programs 



Faculty of the College 

Supervising Teachers in Agricultural Education 



70 

71 

72 



76 



III 



University Calendar, 1965-66 

(TENTATIVE) 

FALL SEMESTER, 1965 
SEPTEMBER 

13-17 Monday through Friday — Fall Semester Registration 
20 Monday — Instruction begins 
NOVEMBER 

24 Wednesday, after last class — Thanksgiving recess begins 
29 Monday, 8:00 A.M. — Thanksgiving recess ends 

DECEMBER 

22 Wednesday, after last class — Christmas recess begins 
JANUARY 

3 Monday, 8:00 A.M. — Christmas recess ends 
17 Monday — Pre-exam Study Day 

18-24 Tuesday-Monday — Fall Semester Examinations 

SPRING SEMESTER, 1966 
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 

31-4 Monday through Friday — Spring Semester Registration 

7 Monday — Instruction begins 

22 Tuesday — Washington's Birthday, holiday 
MARCH 

25 Friday — Maryland Day, not a holiday 
APRIL 

7 Thursday, after last class — Easter recess begins 

12 Tuesday, 8:00 A.M. — Easter recess ends 
MAY 

11 Wednesday— AFROTC Day 

25 Wednesday — Pre-exam Study Day 

26-June 3 Thursday through Friday — Spring Semester Examinations 

29 Sunday — Baccalaureate Exercises 

30 Monday — Memorial Day, holiday 
JUNE 

4 Saturday — Commencement Exercises 

SUMMER SESSION, 1966 
JUNE 

20-21 Monday, Tuesday — Registration, Summer Session 

22 Wednesday — Instruction begins 

25 Saturday — Classes (Monday schedule) 
JULY 

4 Monday — Independence Day, holiday 

9 Saturday — Classes (Tuesday schedule) 
AUGUST 

12 Friday — Summer Session Ends 

SHORT COURSES, SUMMER, 1966 
JUNE 

13-17 Monday through Friday — Rural Women's Short Course 
AUGUST 

1-5 Monday through Friday — 4-H Club Week 
SEPTEMBER 

6-9 Tuesday through Friday — Fireman's Short Course 



JV 



University Calendar, 1966-67 

(TENTATIVE) 

FALL SEMESTER, 1966 
SEPTEMBER 

12-16 Monday-Friday — Fall Semester Registration 
19 Monday — Instruction begins 

NOVEMBER 

23 Wednesday, after last class — Thanksgiving recess begins 
28 Monday, 8:00 A. M. — Thanksgiving recess ends 

DECEMBER 

21 Wednesday, after last class — Christmas recess begins 
JANUARY 

3 Tuesday, 8:00 A. M. — Christmas recess ends 
18 Wednesday — Pre-exam Study Day 
19-25 Thursday-Wednesday — Fall Semester Examinations 

SPRING SEMESTER, 1967 
JANUARY 

31 -Feb. 3 Tuesday-Friday — Spring Semester Registration 
FEBRUARY 

6 Monday — Instruction begins 

22 Wednesday — Washington's Birthday, holiday 
MARCH 

23 Thursday, after last class — Easter recess begins 
28 Tuesday, 8:00 A. M. — Easter recess ends 

MAY 

10 Wednesday— AFROTC Day 

24 Wednesday — Pre-exam Study Day 

25-June 2 Thursday-Friday — Spring Semester Examinations 

28 Sunday — Baccalaureate Exercises 

30 Tuesday — Memorial Day, holiday 
JUNE 

3 Saturday — Commencement Exercises 

SUMMER SESSION, 1967 

JUNE 

19-20 Monday-Tuesday — Registration, Summer Session 

21 Wednesday — Instruction begins 

24 Saturday — Classes (Monday schedule) 
JULY 

4 Tuesday — Independence Day, holiday 
8 Saturday — Classes (Tuesday schedule) 

AUGUST 

11 Friday — Summer Session Ends 

SHORT COURSES, SUMMER, 1967 
JUNE 

12-17 Monday-Saturday — Rural Women's Short Course 
AUGUST 

7-11 Monday-Friday— 4-H Club Week 
SEPTEMBER 

5-8 Tuesday-Friday — Firemen's Short Course 



Board of Regents 

and 

Maryland State Board of Agriculture 

CHAIRMAN 

Charles P. McCormick 

McCormick and Company, Inc., 414 Light Street, Baltimore, 21202 

VICE-CHAIRMAN 

Edward F. Holter 

Farmers Home Administration, Room 412 Hartwick Bldg., 

4321 Hartwick Road, College Park, 20740 

SECRETARY 

B. Herbert Brown 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore, 21201 

TREASURER 

Harry H. Nuttle 
Denton, 21629 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

Louis L. Kaplan 

The Baltimore Hebrew College, 5800 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore, 21215 

ASSISTANT TREASURER 

Richard W. Case 

Smith, Somerville and Case, 1 Charles Center — 17th Floor, 

Baltimore, 21201 

Dr. William B. Long 
Medical Center, Salisbury, 21801 

Thomas W. Pangborn 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown, 21740 

Thomas B. Symons 

7410 Columbia Ave., College Park, 20740 

William C. Walsh 

Liberty Trust Building, Cumberland, 21501 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 
4101 Greenway, Baltimore, 21218 

VI* 



Officers Of The University 

Central Administrative Officers 



PRESIDENT 

Wilson H. E\k\m—B.A., University of Texas, 1932; M.A., 1932; B.Litt Oxford Uni- 
versity, 1936; D.Phil., 1936. 

VICE PRESIDENT, BALTIMORE CAMPUSES 

Albin O. Kuhn— S.5., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D.. 1948. 
VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

R. Lee Hornbake— 5.5., California State College, Pennsylvania, 1934; M A Ohio 
State University, 1936; Ph.D., 1942. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS 

Walter B. Waetjen— fi.5., Millersville State College, Millersville, Pennsylvania, 1942; 
M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1947; Ed.D., University of Maryland. 1951. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT 

Frank L. Bentz, Jr. — B.S.. University of Maryland, 1942; Ph.D., 1952. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR RESEARCH 

Justin Williams— ^.5., State Teachers College, Conway, Arkansas, 1926; M.A. State 
University of Iowa, 1928; Ph.D., 1933. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
Robert A. Beach, Jr., A.B., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1950; M.S., Boston Uni- 
versity, 1954. 

ASSISTANT, PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 

Robert E. Kendig— /I.fi., College of William and Mary, 1939; M.A., George Wash- 
ington University, 1965. 

ASSISTANT TO THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 
Leslie R. Bundgaard— fl.5., University of Wisconsin, 1948; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., 
Georgetown University, 1954. 

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 

C. Wilbur Cissel— fi.^.. University of Maryland, 1932; M.A., C.P.A., 1939. 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 

James T. Frye — B.S., University of Georgia, 1948; M.S., 1952. 

COMPTROLLER AND BUDGET OFFICER 

Harry D. Fisher — B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; C.P.A., 1948. 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATIONS 

G. Watson Algire— fi.^.. University of Maryland, 1930; M.S., 1931. 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND REGISTRAR 

James P. Hill— fi.5.. Temple University, 1939; Ed.M., 1947; Ed.D., University of 
Michigan, 1963. 

DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI AFFAIRS 

J. Logan Schutz— fl.5., University of Maryland. 1938; M.S., 1940. 

vii 



DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS 

William W. Cobey — A.B., University of Maryland, 1930. 

DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL 

George W. Fogg — B.A.. University of Maryland, 1926; M.A., 1928. 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL 

James D. Morgan— B.5., University of Maryland. 1949; M.B.A., 1950. 

DIRECTOR AND SUPERVISING ENGINEER, DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL 

PLANT 

George O. Weber — B.S., University of Maryland, 1933. 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND SUPERVISING ENGINEER, PHYSICAL PLANT 

(Baltimore) 

George W. Morrison— B.5., University of Maryland, 1927; E.E., 1931. 

Emeriti 

PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

Harry C. Byrd — B.S., University of Maryland. 1908; LL.D., Washington College, 
1936; LL.D., Dickinson College, 1938; D.Sc, Western Maryland College, 1938. 

DEAN OF WOMEN EMERITA 

Adele H. Stamp — B.A., Tulane University, 1921; M.A., University of Maryland, 
1924. 

DEAN OF MEN EMERITUS 

Geary F. Eppley— B.5., University of Maryland, 1920; M.S., 1926. 



Deans of the Schools and Colleges 

DEAN OF AGRICULTURE 

Gordon M. Cairns— B.5., Cornell University, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D. 1940. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Charles Manning— B.5., Tufts College, 1929; M.A., Harvard University, 1931; Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina, 1950. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 
Donald W. O'Connell— B./l., Columbia University, 1937; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., 1953. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

John J. Salley — D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1951; Ph.D., University of 
Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 1954. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Vernon E. Anderson — B.S., University of Minnesota, 1930; M.A., 1936; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Colorado, 1942. 

ACTING DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Russell B. Allen — B.S.. Yale University, 1923; Registered Professional Engineer. 

via 



DEAN OF FACULTY— UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY 

Homer W. Schamp, Jr. — A.B., Miami University, 1944; M.Sc, University of Michi- 
gan, 1947; Ph.D., 1952. 

DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Ronald Bamford — B.S., University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S., University of Ver- 
mont, 1926; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1931. 

ACTING DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 
Erna R. Chapman— B.5., University of Maryland, 1934: M.S., 1939. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

William P. Cunningham — A.B., Harvard College, 1944; LL.B., Harvard Law School, 
1948. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Paul Wasserman— B.B./i., College of the City of New York, 1948; M.S. (L.S.), 

Columbia University, 1949; M.S. (Economics) Columbia University, 1950; Ph.D., 

University of Michigan, 1960. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND DIRECTOR OF MEDICAL 
EDUCATION AND RESEARCH 

William S. Stone— fi.5., University of Idaho, 1924; M.S., 1925; M.D., University of 
Louisville, 1929; Ph.D., {Hon.), University of Louisville, 1946. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Florence M. Gipe — B.S., Catholic University of America, 1937; M.S., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1940; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Noel E. Foss—Ph.C, South Dakota State College, 1929; B.S..1929; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1932; Ph.D., 1933. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION AND 
HEALTH 

Lester M. Fraley— 5.^., Randolph-Macon College, 1928; M.A., 1937; Ph.D., Pea- 
body College, 1939. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 

Verl S. Lewis — A.B., Huron College, 1933; M.A., University of Chicago, 1939; 
D.S.W., Western Reserve University, 1954. 

DEAN OF UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

Ray W. Ehrensberger— 5./4., Wabash College, 1929; M.A., Butler University, 1930; 
Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1937. 

Directors of Educational Services and Programs 

ACTING DEAN FOR STUDENT LIFE 

Francis A. Gray — B.S., University of Maryland, 1943. 

DEAN OF WOMEN 

Helen E. Clarke — B.S., University of Michigan. 1943; M.A., University of Illinois, 
1951; Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1960. 

ix 



DIRECTOR, AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE 

Edward W. Aiton — B.S., University of Minnesota, 1933; M.S., 1940; Ed.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1956. 

DIRECTOR, AGRICULTURE EXPERIMENT STATION 

Irvin C. Haut— B.5.. University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 
1930; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1933. 

ACTING DIRECTOR, COMPUTER SCIENCE CENTER 
John P. Menard — B.A., San Michael's College, 1954 

DIRECTOR, COUNSELING CENTER 

Thomas Magoon — B.A., Dartmouth, 1947; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1951; 
Ph.D., 1954. 

DIRECTOR, GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Gayle S. Smith— B.5., Iowa State College, 1948; M. A., Cornell University, 1951; 
Ph.D., 1958. 

DIRECTOR, INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH 

Robert E. McClintock — B.S., University of South Carolina, 1951; M.A., George Pea- 
body College, 1952; Ph.D., 1961. 

DIRECTOR OF LIBRARIES 

Howard Rovelstad— J5./i., University of Illinois, 1936; M.A., 1937; B.S.L.S., Colum- 
bia University, 1940. 

DIRECTOR OF NATURAL RESOURCES INSTITUTE 

L. Eugene Cronin — A.B., Western Maryland College, 1938; M.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1943; Ph.D., 1946. 

DIRECTOR OF PROFESSIONAL AND SUPPORTING SERVICES, UNIVERSITY 

HOSPITAL 
George H. Yeager — B.S., University of West Virginia, 1925; M.D., University of 

Maryland, 1929. 

DIRECTOR OF STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

Lester M. Dyke— B.5., University of Iowa, 1936; M.D., 1926. 

DIRECTOR OF THE SUMMER SESSION 

Clodus R. Smith— B.5., Oklahoma State University, 1950; M.S., 1955; Ed.D., Cornell 
University, 1960. 

HEAD, DEPARTMENT OF AIR SCIENCE 

Vernon H. Reeves — B.A., Arizona State College, 1936; M.A., Columbia University, 
1949. 

Division Chairmen 

CHAIRMAN OF THE DIVISION OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

John E. Faber— 5.5., University of Maryland, 1926; M.S., 1927; Ph.D., 1937. 

CHAIRMAN OF THE LOWER DIVISION 

Charles E. White— S.5., University of Maryland, 1923; M.S., 1924; Ph.D., 1926. 

CHAIRMAN OF THE DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 
Harold C. Hoffsommer— B.5., Northwestern University, 1921; M.A., 1923; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1929. 



STANDING COMMITTEES, FACULTY SENATE 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE AND WELFARE 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS AND SCHOLASTIC STANDING 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

COMMITTEE ON SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS, CURRICULA AND COURSES 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RESEARCH 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARIES 

COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION 

COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, ACADEMIC FREEDOM 
AND TENURE 

COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS, AND SALARIES 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 

COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 

COMMITTEE ON COUNSELING OF STUDENTS 

COMMITTEE ON THE FUTURE OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Adjunct Committees of the General Committee on Student 
Life and Welfare 
STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
FINANCIAL AIDS AND SELF-HELP 
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 
RELIGIOUS LIFE 

STUDENT HEALTH AND SAFETY 
STUDENT DISCIPLINE 
BALTIMORE CAMPUS, STUDENT AFFAIRS 



XI 



The College 



The college of agriculture offers an educational program 
designed to prepare students for careers in agricultural sciences, agricul- 
tural technology and agricultural business. Students receive a basic funda- 
mental and cultural education, correlated with technical agricultural courses 
and related sciences. 

The College of Agriculture is the oldest division of the University of Mary- 
land at College Park. The institution was chartered in 1856 under the 
name of the Maryland Agricultural College. For three years the College 
was under private management. When Congress passed the Land Grant 
Act in 1862, the Generaf Assembly of Maryland accepted it for the State 
and named the Maryland Agricultural College as the beneficiary. When 
the institution was merged in 1920 with the University of Maryland in 
Baltimore, the College of Agriculture took its place as one of the major 
divisions of this larger, more comprehensive organization. 

In addition to teaching, the College of Agriculture includes the Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station and the Extension Service. They were estab- 
lished as the result of acts passed by Congress in 1887 and 1914 respec- 
tively. A more complete description of these two services appears later in 
this bulletin. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Graduates of the College of Agriculture are trained for employment in 
scientific areas related to agriculture, in agricultural business and industry 
or with a local, state or Federal agency. Curricula in the College of Agri- 
culture provide for broad training in cultural and scientific courses as 
well as in courses related to various areas of agricultural specialization. 
Programs are offered for: (1) those planning to pursue the agricultural 
sciences and who plan to do graduate study; (2) those planning to 
pursue the business activities in agricultural and related industries, and (3) 
those planning to pursue the technology of animal and plant production, the 
engineering, chemistry, and food processing of agricultural products as 
well as teaching, research and extension in agriculture. 

Many professors conduct research studies in their respective disciplines. 
Through these studies the frontiers of knowledge are constantly being ex- 
tended. These new findings are incorporated in courses thereby enriching 
the instruction in a dynamic agriculture. 

The close relationship of extension specialists and extension agents with 
farmers and farm families enables workers in the College to evaluate the 
agricultural situation. New agricultural problems are brought to the atten- 

/ 



General Information 

tion of the research worker and new developments are presented to farmers 
and their families. 

The coordination of teaching, research and extension provides effective 
educational opportunities for students in the College. Many professors 
contribute to the research and extension programs concerned with agricul- 
ture and food production, the development of new varieties and processing 
procedures, as well as adjustments in agricultural production and marketing. 

Workers in the College of Agriculture, through regulatory and service 
activities, are constantly working with actual problems associated with the 
improvement and maintenance of standards for farm products. Regulatory 
and control work extends over a wide range of activities and concerned 
with reducing losses due to insect pests and diseases; preventing and con- 
trolling serious outbreaks of diseases and pests of animals and plants; 
analyzing fertihzer, feed and lime for guaranteed quality; and analyzing 
and testing germination quality of seeds to insure better seeds for farm 
planting. Marketing services include Federal-state inspection, fresh egg 
law, dairy inspection, seed inspection, weight and measures and market 
news service. 

Special Advantages 

The University of Maryland is within a few miles of the Agricultural 
Research Center of the United States Department of Agriculture. This 
is the largest, best manned, and best equipped agriculture research agency 
in the world. Also, the University of Maryland is within a few miles of the 
Washington, D. C, offices of the Department of Agriculture and other 
government departments, including the Library of Congress. Students 
can easily visit these agencies and become acquainted with their work. 
Such contacts have proved valuable to many University of Maryland grad- 
uates. 

Also, it is not uncommon for men from these agencies to speak before 
classes at the University and to be guest speakers at student club meetings 
and otherwise take part in student activities. No other college of agricul- 
ture in the United States is physically located to offer like opportunities to 
its students. 

Coordination of Agricultural Work 

The strength of the College of Agriculture of the University of Maryland 
lies in the close coordination of the instructional, research, extension, and 
regulatory functions within the individual departments, between the several 
departments, and in the institution as a whole. Instructors in the several 
departments are closely associated with the research, extension and regula- 
tory work being carried on in their respective fields, and in many cases, 
devote a portion of their time to one or more of these types of activities. 
Close coordination of these four types of work enables the University to 



General Information 

provide a stronger faculty in the College of Agriculture, and affords a 
higher degree of specialization than would otherwise be possible. It 
insures instructors an opportunity to keep informed on the latest results of 
research, and to be constantly in touch with current trends and problems 
which are revealed in extension and regulatory activities. Heads of depart- 
ments hold staff conferences to this end, so that the student at all times 
is as close to the developments in the frontiers of the several fields of 
knowledge as it is possible for an organization to put him. 

Facilities and Equipment 

In addition to buildings, laboratories, libraries, and equipment for effective 
instruction in the related basic sciences and in the cultural subjects, the 
University of Maryland is provided with excellent facilities for research and 
instruction in agriculture. University farms, totaling more than 2,000 acres, 
are operated for instructional and investigational purposes. One of the 
most complete and modern plants for dairy and animal husbandry work in 
the country, together with herds of the principal breeds of dairy and beef 
cattle, and other livestock, provides facilities and materials for instruction 
and research in these industries. Excellent laboratory and field facilities are 
available in the Agronomy Department for breeding and selection in farm 
crops, and for soils research. The Poultry Department has a building for 
laboratories and classrooms, a plant comprising twenty acres, and flocks 
of the important breeds of poultry. A research farm is available for experi- 
mental testing under field conditions. The Horticulture Department is 
housed in a separate building, and has ample orchards, gardens and green- 
houses for its various lines of work. A research farm is located near Salis- 
bury where experimental work is carried on in the area of intense produc- 
tion. The Botany Department has excellent facilities available in labora- 
tories, greenhouses, and field space for research in most phases of botany, 
especially in plant pathology, plant physiology, cytology and cytogenetics. 
A powerful X-ray machine, ultra centrifuge, and an electron microscope are 
the major pieces of equipment available; facilities for use of radio-isotopes 
are available for both teaching and research. 



Costs 

Actual annual costs of attending the University include: $270.00 fixed 
charges; $96.00 special fees; $440.00 board; $320.00 lodging for Maryland 
residents, or $420.00 for residents of other states and countries. A charge 
of $400.00 is assessed to all students who are non-residents of the State 
of Maryland. 

A matriculation fee of $10.00 is charged all new students. A fee of $10.00 
must accompany a prospective student's application for admission. If a 
student enrolls for the term for which he applied, the fee is accepted in 
lieu of the matriculation fee. 



General Information 

An Adventure in Learning, the undergraduate catalog of the University, 
contains a detailed statement of fees and expenses and includes changes 
in fees as they occur. A copy may be requested from the Catalog Mailing 
Office, North Administration Building, University of Maryland at College 
Park, Maryland 20742. 

Air Science 

Starting in September 1965, the Air Science programs at the University 
are all-voluntary. A two year program and a four year program are avail- 
able. These programs are designed to fit the needs of eligible college male 
students who begin higher education at either a junior college or a four 
year college. The successful completion of either program qualifies the 
student for a reserve commission in the United States Air Force upon 
graduation. 

For further details concerning Air Science, refer to University General 
and Academic Regulations, a publication available to all undergraduate 
students. 

Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid 

A limited number of scholarships are available for agricultural students. 
These include awards granted by the Sears Roebuck Foundation, the 
Borden Company, Dr. Ernest N. Cory Trust Fund, the Danforth Founda- 
tion, the Ralston Purina Company, Southern States Cooperative, Inc., J. 
McKenny Willis and Sons, Dairy Technology Society of Maryland and 
District of Columbia, Kroeger Company and Peninsula Horticultural So- 
ciety. 

These scholarships and grants-in-aid are awarded by the Faculty Com- 
mittee in accordance with the terms of the respective grants. More detailed 
information about these awards is contained in the publication An Adven- 
ture in Learning. 

Student Organizations 

Students find opportunity for varied expression and growth in the several 
voluntary organizations sponsored by the College of Agriculture. These 
organizations are: Agricultural Economics Club, Agricultural Engineering 
Club, Block and Bridle Club, Collegiate 4-H Club, Dairy Science Club, 
Student Institute of Food Technology, Future Farmers of America, Agron- 
omy Club, Poultry Science Club, and the Veterinary Science Club. 

Alpha Zeta is a national agricultural honor fraternity. Members are chosen 
from students in the College of Agriculture who have met certain scholas- 
tic requirements and displayed leadership in agriculture. 

The Agricultural Student Council is made up of representatives from the 
various student organizations in the College of Agriculture. Its purpose 



General Information 

is to coordinate activities of these organizations and to promote work 
which is beneficial to the College. 

Student Judging Teams 

The College of Agriculture sponsors judging teams for dairy cattle, dairy 
products, horticultural products, livestock, meats and poultry. Team mem- 
bers are selected from students taking courses designed especially to train 
them for this purpose. Teams are entered in major contests where the 
students compete with teams from other state universities or agricultural 
colleges. 

For Additional Information 

Detailed information concerning the American Civilization Program, fees 
and expenses, scholarships and awards, student life, and other material of a 
general nature, may be found in the University publication titled An Ad- 
venture in Learning. This publication may be obtained on request from 
the Catalog Mailing Office, North Administration Building, University of 
Maryland at College Park, 20742. A detailed explanation of the regulations 
of student and academic life, may be found in the University publication 
titled, University General and Academic Regulations. 

Requests for course catalogs for the individual schools and colleges should 
be directed to the deans of these respective units, addressed to: 

COLLEGES LOCATED AT COLLEGE PARK: 

Dean 

(College in which you are interested) 
The University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 

PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS LOCATED AT BALTIMORE: 

Dean 

(School in which you are interested) 
The University of Maryland 
Lombard and Greene Streets 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 21201 

Awards 

ALPHA ZETA MEDAL 

The honorary agricultural fraternity of Alpha Zeta awards annually a 
medal to the agricultural student in the freshman class who attains the 
highest average record in academic work. The presentation of the medal 
does not elect the student to the fraternity, but simply indicates recogni- 
tion of high scholarship. 



Awards 

appleman-norton award 

This award is made annually to a senior for excellence in botany. 

CARROLL E. COX AWARD 

This cash award is made annually to the most outstanding graduate student 
in the Department of Botany. 

NATIONAL BLOCK AND BRIDLE AWARD 

The National Block and Bridle awards annually a plaque to the member 
of the Block and Bridle Club who has done the most for the local club 
during the year. 

NATIONAL PLANT FOOD INSTITUTE AWARD 

National Plant Food Institute awards annually the Agronomy Achieve- 
ment Award to the outstanding junior or senior student in Agronomy. 
The amount of award is $200. 

VIRGINIA DARE AWARD 

The Virginia Dare Extract Company awards annually a plaque and 
$25.00 to the outstanding student in ice cream manufacturing with an 
overall good standing in dairy. 

EDGAR P. WALLS AWARD 

Dr. Edgar P. Walls awards annually a gold watch to the senior domg 
outstanding work in horticultural processing. 



Academic Information 

Admission 

FALL SEMESTER 

All applications for full-time undergraduate admission for the Fall Semes- 
ter at the College Park Campus must be received by the University on 
or before June 1. Any student registering for nine or more semester 
hours of work is considered a full-time student. 

Under unusual circumstances, application will be accepted bewteen June 
1 and July 1. Applicants for full-time attendance filing after June I 
will be required to pay a non-refundable $25.00 late fee to defray 
the cost of special handling of applications after that date. This late fee 
is in addition to the $10.00 application fee. 

All undergrauate^ applications, both for full-time and part-time attendance, 
and all supporting documents for an application for admission must be 
received by the appropriate University office by September 1 . This means 
that the applicant's educational records, ACT scores (in the case of 
new freshmen) and medical examination report must be received by 
July 15. 

SPRING SEMESTER 

The deadline for the receipt of applications for the Spring Semester is 
January 1. 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

The application deadlines and fees do not apply to students registering 
in the evening classes offered by the University College. 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Application for admission to the Graduate School must be made by 
September 1 for the fall term and by January 1 for the spring term on 
blanks obtained from the Office of the Graduate School. Admission to 
the summer session is governed by the date listed in the Summer School 
catalog. The summer session deadline date is generally June 1. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

The high school or preparatory school student who intends to apply for 
admission to the University should plan his secondary school program 
carefully. He should select a program that will prepare him adequately 
to begin college work at the college level. He should allow for the fact 
that his interests may change by selecting a secondary school program 
that will enable him, when he enters the University, to have a maximum 
freedom of choice among the various curricula offered at the University. 



Academic Information 

Every candidate for admission to the University must noramlly present 
sixteen units of high school subjects. It is required that seven of the 
minimum sixteen units be in college preparatory subjects as follows: 

English 4 units 

Mathematics (preferably algebra) 1 unit 

History or Social Sciences 1 unit 

Biological or Physical Sciences 1 unit 

The other units should be chosen to give the student as strong a prepara- 
tion as possible for his work at the University. At least twelve of the units 
presented should be in college preparatory courses in academic subjects. 
Although there is no entrance requirement in foreign languages, two or 
more units are highly desirable for many programs and are suitable for 
all programs. Likewise it is desirable that each student offer two units 
in history or social sciences, and two units in the biological and physical 
sciences. It is strongly recommended that all students present a unit of 
plane geometry in addition to the one or two units of algebra. 

It is recommended that the preparatory program in high school include: 

English 4 units 

Mathematics (college preparatory) 2 units 

(Agricultural Engineering and Agricultural 
Chemistry — 2 additional units) 

Biological and physical sciences 3 units 

History or social sciences 2 units 

Two units of foreign language are recommended for students in Agricul- 
tural Engineering, Agricultural Chemistry, Botany and Entomology. 

Deviation from these recommendations is permitted, but should be under- 
taken only upon competent advice. An unwise selection of preparatory 
courses can effectively prevent the student from pursuing certain curricula 
at the University or materially increase the time necessary to complete 
a particular curriculum. Every prospective applicant should be certain that 
his preparation in mathematics is adequate for any program he might 
conceivably wish to enter. A special fee will be charged for all remedial 
work in mathematics with the exception of the course in solid geometry. 

A well-planned program of college preparatory work contributes much 
to the success of a student in his college work. This fact has an important 
bearing in estimating whether a candidate for admission is likely to be suc- 
cessful in his work at the University. 

Junior Standing 

To earn junior standing a student must complete 56 semester hours of 
academic credit with an average grade of "C" (2.0) or better. 

Detailed regulations pertaining to junior standing are presented in full 
in the publication, University General and Academic Regulations. 

8 



Academic Information 

Requirements for Graduation 

Each student must acquire a minimum of 120 semester hour credits in 
academic subjects. In addition requirements in health and physical educa- 
tion must be satisfied. 

Honors Program 

The Honors Program of the College of Agriculture is made up of De- 
partmental Honors Programs. The objective of the program is to recog- 
nize superior scholarship and to provide an opportunity for the excel- 
lent student to pursue more deeply those things which intrigue him or 
to partake more widely of those things which will add to his usefulness 
as a member of society. Honors Programs will be administered by De- 
partmental Honors Committees and will be supervised by a College Com- 
mittee on Honors Programs. All students in the College of Agriculture, 
who are in the top 20 percent of their class at the end of their first year, 
will automatically be considered for admission into the Honors Program. 
Of this group, no more than 50 percent will be admitted. Admission of 
students, who are sophomores or first semester juniors, will be considered 
upon application from any such student who stands in the upper 20 per- 
cent of his class. While application will be considered until the student 
enters his sixth semester, early participation in the program is highly 
preferable. Students admitted to the program enjoy some academic 
privileges. On the basis of the student's performance, during his partici- 
pation in the Honors Program, the department may recommend the can- 
didate for the appropriate degree without departmental honors, for the 
appropriate degree with (departmental) Honors, or for the appropriate 
degree with (departmental) High Honors. Successful completion of 
the Honors program will be recognized by a citation in the Commence- 
ment Program and by an appropriate entry on the student's record and 
diploma. 

Student Advisers 

Each student in the College of Agriculture is assigned to a faculty adviser, 
either departmental or general. Departmental advisers consist of heads 
of departments or persons selected by them to advise students with cur- 
ricula in their respective departments. General advisers are selected for 
students who have no definite choice of curriculum in mind, or who wish 
to pursue the general curriculum in agriculture. 

Electives 

The electives in the suggested curricula which follow affords opportunity 
for those who so desire to supplement major and minor fields of study or 
to add to their general education. 

With the advice and consent of those in charge of his registration, a stu- 
dent may make such modifications in his curriculum as are deemed ad- 
visable to meet the requirements of his particular need. 



Academic Information 

Field and Laboratory Practice 

The head of each department will help to make available opportunities for 
practical or technical experience along his major line of study for each 
student whose major is in that department and who is in need of such 
experience. For inexperienced students in many departments this need 
may be met by one or more summers spent on a farm. 

Freshman Year 

The program of the freshman year in the College of Agriculture is simi- 
lar for all curricula of the College. Its purpose is to afford the student an 
opportunity to lay a broad foundation in subjects basic to agriculture and 
the related sciences, to articulate beginning work in college with that 
pursued in high or preparatory schools, to provide opportunity for wise 
choice of programs in succeeding years, and to make it possible for a 
student before the end of the year to change from one curriculum to an- 
other, or from the College of Agriculture to a curriculum in some other col- 
lege of the University with little or no loss of credit. 

Students entering the freshman year with a definite choice of curriculum 
in mind are sent to departmental advisers for counsel as to the wisest selec- 
tion of freshman electives from the standpoint of their special interests 
and their probable future programs. Students entering the freshman year 
with no definite curriculum in mind, are assigned to a general adviser, 
who assists with the choice of freshman electives and during the course of 
the year acquaints the students with opportunities in the upper curricula 
in the College of Agriculture and in the other divisions of the University. 
If by the close of the freshman year a student makes no definite choice of 
a specialized curriculum, he continues under the guidance of his general 
adviser in the General Agriculture curriculum. 



10 



Required Courses 



AGRICULTURE CURRICULUM 

All students in the College of Agriculture are required to complete a series 
of courses to satisfy University requirements. College requirements and 
departmental requirements. The remaining courses needed to complete 
a program of study are elected by the student with the approval of his 
adviser. 



University Requirements 

Eng. 1 or 21 — Composition or Honors Composition 

Eng. 3 4 — World Literature 

Social Science 

History 

Mathematics 

Fine Arts or Philosophy 

Hea. 5 — Science and Theory of Health 

Physical Education 

Air Science (Optional) 



Semester 
Credit Hours 

3 
6 
6 

6 

3 
3 
2 
2 



College of Agriculture Requirements 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 8 

Speech 7 — Public Speaking 2 

Agr. 1 — Introduction to Agriculture 1 

ELECT two of THE FOLLOWING: 

Bot. 1 — General Botany (4) 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology (4) 

Microb. 1 — General Microbiology (4) 
Students failing to pass the pre-registration test in mathematics 
will be required to take Math. 1. (Special fee, $45.00) 

Students expecting to pursue the curriculum in either Agricultural 

Chemistry or Agricultural Engineering should, if qualified, 

take Math. 18 or 19. If not qualified they should take 

Math. 1. 

Department Requirements 74 

Required courses are determined by the department for each specific curriculum 
and elective courses are approved by the adviser of the student's program. 

A program of courses for the freshman year is essentially the same for 
all students. However, there are some variations in several curricula. 



// 



General Agriculture Curriculum 

r-Semester- 
Freshmen / ii 

Eng. 1 or 21 — Composition or Honors Composition 3 

Social Science 3 3 

Agri. 1 — Introduction to Agriculture 1 

Bot. 1 — General Botany 4 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 4 

An. Sc. 1 — Principles of Animal Science 3 

Agron. 1 — Crop Production 3 

Mathematics - ■ 3 

Health 2 

Arts or Philosophy 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Air Science (optional) 



AGRICULTURE— GENERAL 

The general agricultural curriculum provides for the development of a 
broad understanding in agriculture. 

The flexibility of this curriculum permits selection of electives that will 
meet individual vocational plans in agriculture and agriculturally related 
business and industry. 

University Requirements (see page 1 1 ) 

College of Agriculture Requirements (see page 11) 

Semester 

General Agricultural Requirements Credit Hours 

A. E. 107 — Financial Analysis of the Farm Business 3 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management 3 

R. Ed. 1 14 — Rural Life and Education 3 

Agr. Engr. 56 — Introduction to Farm Mechanics 2 

Agr. Engr. 1 — Introduction to Agricultural Engineering 4 

Agron. 10 — General Soils 4 

Agron. 107 — Cereal Crop Production 3 

Agron. 108 — Fora*ge Crop Production 3 

Agron. 151 — Cropping Systems 2 

An. Sc. 1 — Principles of Animal Science 3 

An. Sc. 10 — Feeds and Feeding 3 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants 4 

An. Sc. 40 — Dairy Production 3 

Ent. 20 — Insect Pests of Agricultural Crops 4 

Hort. 5 or 58 — General Horticulture 3 

An. Sc. 62 — Commercial Poultry Management 3 

Elect either of the following pairs of courses: 

Micro. 1 and Bot. 117 6 

B. A. 20, 21 — Principles of Accounting 6 

Electives 20 

12 



Agricultural Economics 
AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

This curriculum combines training in the business, economic, and inter- 
national aspects of agricultural production and marketing with the bio- 
logical and physical sciences basic to agriculture. Programs are available 
for students in agricultural economics, agricultural business and in the 
area of international agriculture. Students desiring to enter agricultural 
marketing or businesses affiliated with agriculture may elect the agricul- 
tural business option, and students interested in foreign service may elect 
the international agriculture option. Students interested primarily in the 
broad aspects of production and management as it relates to the opera- 
tion of a farm business may elect the agricultural economics option. In 
these programs, students are trained for employment in agricultural busi- 
ness and industry; for position sin sales or management, with local, state, 
or federal agencies; and as extension workers, college teachers, researchers, 
farm operators or farm managers. 

Courses for the freshman and sophomore years are essentially the same 
for all students. In the junior year the student elects the agricultural eco- 
nomics, agricultural business or international agricultural option according 
to his particular interest. Courses in this Department are designed to pro- 
vide training in the application of economic principles to the production, 
processing, distribution, and merchandising of agricultural products as 
well as the inter-relationship of business and industry associated with agri- 
culture in a dynamic economy. The curriculum includes courses in gen- 
eral agricultural economics, marketing, farm management, prices, land 
economics, agricultural policy, and international agricultural economics. 

University Requirements (see page 1 1 ) 

College of Agriculture Requirements (see page 11) 

Semester 
Required of all students Credit Hours 

A. E. 50 — Elements of Agricultural Economics 3 

A. E. 51 — Marketing of Agricultural Products 3 

A. E. 106 — Prices of Agricultural Products 3 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management 3 

A. E. 112 — Agricultural Policy and Programs 3 

A. E. 114 — World Agricultural Production and Trade 3 

A. E. 199— Seminar 1 

Econ. 31, 32 — Principles of Economics 3 

Math. 10 or equivalent — Introduction to Mathematics 3 

Agron. 1 — Crop Production 3 

Agron. 10 — General Soils 4 

B. A. 130 — Elements of Business Statistics I 3 

An. Sci. 10 — Feeds and Feeding 3 

Select in consultation with adviser at least 21 credit hours in option chosen of which 
a minimum of six credit hours must be in Agricultural Economics and/or Econom- 
ics. 

13 



Agricultural Economics 

Agricultural Economics Option 

A. E. 107 — Financial Analysis of the Farm Business 3 

A. E. Ill — Economics of Resource Development 3 

Econ. 130 — Mathematical Economics 3 

Econ. 131 — Comparative Economic Systems 3 

Econ. 132 — Advanced Economic Principles 3 

Econ. 140 — Money and Banking 3 

Agr. Engr. 1 — Introduction to Agricultural Engineering 4 

An. Sci. 1 — Principles of Animal Science 3 

Geog. 10 — General Geography 3 

Soc. 1 1 3 — The Rural Community 3 

Math. 1 1 — Introduction to Mathematics 3 

Eiectives 18 

Agricultural Business Option 

A. E. 115 — Marketing Animals and Animal Products 3 

A. E. 116 — Marketing Plant Products 3 

A. E. 103 — Economics of Agricultural Cooperation 3 

A. E. 104 — Economics of Agricultural Transportation 3 

A. E. 119 — Foreign Agricultural Economies 3 

Econ. 132 — Advanced Economic Principles 3 

Econ. 140 — Money and Banking 3 

B. A. 20, 21 — Principles of Accounting 6 

B. A. 131 — Elements of Business Statistics 11 3 

B. A. 140 — Business Finance 3 

B. A. 150 — Marketing Management 3 

B. A. 15 1 — Advertising 3 

B. A. 1 80 — Business Law 3 

Geog. 10 — General Geography 3 

Math. 1 1 — Introduction to Mathematics 3 

One course in Technology of Marketing 

(Animal Science or Horticulture) 

Eiectives 18 

International Agriculture Option 

A. E. 11 1 — Economics of Resource Development 3 

A. E. 119 — Foreign Agricultural Economies 3 

Econ. 130 — Mathematical Economics 3 

Econ. 131 — Comparative Economic Systems 3 

Econ. 132 — Advanced Economic Principles 3 

Econ. 140 — Money and Banking 3 

Foreign Language 6 

Math. 1 1 — Introduction to Mathematics 3 

Geog. 10 — General Geography 3 

Geog. 41 — Introductory Climatology 3 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants 4 

Bot. 1 17 — General Plant Genetics 2 

Agr. Engr. 1 — Introduction to Agricultural Engineering 4 

Ent. 1 — Introductory Entomology 3 

Geol. 1 — Geology 3 

Eiectives 17 

14 



Agricultural and Extension Education 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

This curriculum insures adequate instruction in the fundamentals of both 
the physical and biological sciences. It may be adjusted through the 
selection of electives to fit the student for work in agricultural experiment 
stations, soil bureaus, geological surveys, food laboratories, fertilizer in- 
dustries and those handling food products. 

University Requirements (see page 11) 

College of Agriculture Requirements (see page 1 1 ) 

Semester 
Agricultural Chemistry Requirements Credit Hours 

Chem. 15 — Qualitative Analysis 4 

Chem. 21 — Quantitative Analysis 4 

Chem. 35 — Elementary Organic Lecture 2 

Chem. 36 — Elementary Organic Laboratory 2 

Chem. 37 — Elementary Organic Lecture 2 

Chem. 38 — Elementary Organic Laboratory 2 

Chem. 123 — Advanced Quantitative Analysis or. 4 

Chem. 150 — Organic Quantitative Analysis 2 

Agron. 10 — General Soils 4 

Bot. 1 — General Botany 4 

Geol. 1 — Geology 3 

Math. 20 — Calculus I 4 

Math. 21— Calculus II 4 

Modern Languages 12 

Phys. 20 — General Physics 5 

Phys. 21 — General Physics 5 

Speech 7 — Public Speaking 2 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 4 

Electives in Biology 6 

Electives in Agricultural Chemistry 11 

AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION 

This Department combines a broad general training in agriculture with 
basic work in the natural sciences, the social sciences and the humanities. 

Programs are available for students in agricultural education and agri- 
cultural extension education. The agricultural education curriculum is de- 
signed primarily for persons who wish to prepare for teaching agriculture in 
secondary schools. The agricultural extension curriculum is designed 
primarily for persons who desire to prepare to enter the Cooperative Ex- 
tension Service. By completing six semester hours of physics, agricultural 
education majors may also qualify for certification to teach general science 
in the pubUc schools of Maryland. Either option may lead to a variety of 
other educational career opportunities in agricultural business and industry, 
pubUc service, the communications industry, and to research and college 
teaching. Students interested in rural ministry often select this curriculum. 



15 



Agricultural and Extension Education 

In addition to the regular entrance requirements of the University, in- 
volving graduation from a standard four-year high school, students elect- 
ing either curriculum must present evidence of having acquired adequate 
agricultural experience after reaching the age of fourteen years, or plan to 
secure it prior to graduation. 

In order to be admitted to student teaching or to extension field experi- 
ence, each of which normally is taken in the senior year, a student must 
have a 2.3 grade point average or higher. 

Students in the agricultural education curriculum are expected to partici- 
pate in the Collegiate Chapter of the Future Farmers of America in order 
to gain needed training to serve as advisers of high school chapters of the 
FFA upon graduation. 

University Requirements (see page 11) 

College of Agriculture Requirements (see page 11) 

Semester 

DtPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS, BOTH OPTIONS Credit Hours 

An. Sc. 1 — Principles of Animal Science 3 

An. Sc. 10 — Feeds and Feeding 3 

Agron. 1 — Crop Production, or 

Agron. 108 — Forage Crop Production 3 

Agron. 10 — General Soils 4 

Ag. Engr. 1 — Introduction to Agricultural Engineering 4 

Ag. Econ. 107 — Financial Analysis of the Farm Business, or 

Ag. Econ. 108 — Farm Management 3 

R. Ed. 101 — Teaching Materials and Demonstrations 2 

R. Ed. 1 14— Rural Life in Modern Society 3 

Ent. 20 — Insect Pests of Agricultural Crops 4 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants 4 

Hort. 1 1 — Greenhouse Management, or 

Hort. 58 — Vegetable Production, or 

Hort. 62 — Plant Propagation 3 

English 14 — Expository Writing 3 

Agricultural Education Option 

R. Ed. 103— Student Teaching 5 

R. Ed. 104— Student Teaching 1-4 

R. Ed. 107 — Introduction to Agricultural Education 2 

R. Ed. 109 — Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture 3 

R. Ed. Ill — Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Groups 1 

Ed. 1 10 — Human Development & Learning 6 

Ed. 1 1 1 — Foundations of Education 3 

Ag. Engr. 56 — Introduction to Farm Mechanics 2 

Ag. Engr. 104 — Farm Mechanics 2 

Approved Electives 12 



16 



Agricultural Engineering 

Agricultural Extension Option 

R. Ed. 150 — Extension Education 2 

R. Ed. 160 — Extension Communications 2 

R. Ed. 161 — 4-H Organization and Procedure 2 

R. Ed. 121 — Directed Experience in Extension Education 1-5 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Phychology 3 

Psych. 21 — Social Psychology 3 

Psych. 110 — Educational Psychology 3 

Ag. Econ. Ill — Economics of Resource Development 3 

Approved Electives 18 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

This Department oflfers an educational program in agricultural engineer- 
ing technology for students in the College of Agriculture. These subjects 
may be grouped under five general classifications, farm power and ma- 
chinery, farm structures, soil and water conservation engineering, farm 
electrification, and mechanics and equipment for agricultural materials 
handling and processing. The technological aspects covered in these 
courses are designed to complement the education received by students in 
other departments of the College of Agriculture. 

Agricultural engineering, in the broadest sense, is the science of com- 
bining forces and materials of nature for the benefit of agriculture; as 
implied, an understanding of soil, plant, and animal sciences is the basis 
for intelligent applications of engineering principles in all phases of the 
agricultural industry. Because interrelated applications of all branches 
of engineering are found in agriculture, or even on a single, diversified 
farm, education for the profession is necessarily founded on a broad base 
of mathematical, physical and engineering science complemented by basic 
agricultural sciences. Although boundaries between generally recognized 
fields of engineering overlap in agricultural applications, the scope of the 
field together with personal preference generally leads to specialization 
in one of the four major areas of the profession. 

The field of farm power and machinery offers opportunities to agricultural 
engineers specifically interested in agricultural mechanization. The farm 
equipment industry employs many graduates who conceive, design, de- 
velop, and test new power units and machines. Others are employed in 
distribution: sales, sales promotion or service. 

Electric power and processing is concerned with productive applications 
of electricity in farm production and in other phases of the agricultural 
industry. Electricity is used not only for light and power but also for 
heating and coohng processes and for automatic control and operation 
of equipment. Agricultural engineers with such interests are employed by 
electric power suppliers and crop processing organizations. 

11 



Agricultural Engineering 

Farm structures specialists are interested in farm buildings for structural 
design and functional use. Environmental requirements of animal shelters, 
crop storage and processing structures include control of temperature, 
humidity, and air movement for efficient utilization. Design must accom- 
modate heat and moisture of respiration from animal or vegetable origin. 
Manufacturers and fabricators of structural units and facilities employ 
agricultural engineers for research and educational programs to promote 
their products. 

Agricultural engineers specializing in soil and water control and conser- 
vation utilize hydraulics in irrigation, drainage, and soil erosion. Knowl- 
edge of how water flows over or through soil or infiltrates into soil are the 
tools of the engineer, but use of these tools is influenced by soil-moisture- 
plant relationships. 

Farm management companies employ engineers to design soil and water 
conservation and other engineering systems for farms under their super- 
vision or for individual farmers. Other sources of employment include 
contracting, farm management, irrigation equipment design or sales and 
service, and related enterprises. 

State and federal institutions and agencies conduct programs of educa- 
tion and research in all areas of agricultural engineering. Research 
findings are frequently established in the agricultural industry through 
programs of action agencies such as the Agricultural Extension Service 
or the Soil Conservation Service. The agencies offer many opportunities 
for work in the field. 

University Requirements (see page 11) 

College of Agriculture Requirements (see page 11) 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

f— Semester-^ 
Freshman Year / // 

Agr. 1 — Introduction to Agriculture 1 

Agr. Engr. 1 — Introduction to Agricultural Engineering ., . 4 

An. Sc. 1 — Principles of Animal Science 3 

Chem. 1 — General Chemistry . . 4 

E. S. 1 — Engineering Graphics . . 3 

Eng.l — Composition 3 

Health Education 2 

Math. 19 — Elementary Analysis ' 4 

Math. 20— Calculus 1 4 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Speech . . 3 

Total 16 17 



'Students who are not prepared to schedule Math. 19 based on the ACT test scores 
are advised to schedule Math. 1. (Special fee, $45.00). 

18 



! 



Agricultural Engineering 



Agricultural Sciences 

Agr. 1 — Introduction to Agriculture 

Agron. 1 — Crop Production 

Agron. 10 — General Soils 

An. Sc. 1 — Principles of Animal Science 

Agron. 117 — Soil Physics (optional with Series A Tech. elec- 
tives) 

Agricultural Engineering 

Agr. Engr. 1 — Introduction to Agricultural Engineering 

Agr. Engr. 86 — Agricultural Engineering Shop Techniques. . . . 

Agr. Engr. 143 — Agricultural Power and Machinery Analysis 

Agr. Engr. 144 — Design of Operational Systems for Agriculture 

Agr. Engr. 145 — Soil and Water Conservation Engineering. . . . 

Agr. Engr. 189 — Senior Problem 

Basic Sciences 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 

Math. 19 — Elementary Analysis ' 

Math. 20, 21, 22— Calculus I, II, III 

Math. 66 — Differential Equations for Scientists & Engrs 

Phys. 20, 21 — General Physics 



General Engineering 

E. S. 1 — Engineering Graphics 

E. S. 10 — Introductory Mechanics 

E. S. 20 — Mechanics of Materials 

E. S. 21 — Dynamics 

C. E. 90 — Surveying I 

C. E. 102 or M. E. 102— Fluid Mechanics 

E.N.E.E. 60, 61, 62, 63 — Principles of Electrical Engr. 
M. E. 1 — Thermodynamics 

TECHNICAL ELECTIVES 

Students will select Series A, B, or C. 
Series A 



C. E. 151 — Materials of Engineering. 
C. E. 160, 161— Structural Design . . 
C. E. 162, 163 — Structural Analysis . 



Note: Student selecting Series A to take Agron. 117. 



Series B 
E. S 
C. 
M 
M 
M 



30 — Materials Science 

E. 160 — Structural Design 

E. 101 — Dynamics of Machines. 
E. 103 — Materials Engineering . 
E. 106 — Transfer Processes . . . 



Approved Electives 



1 
3 
4 
3 

(3) 



8 

4 
12 

3 
10 



' Students who are not prepared to schedule Math. 19 based on the ACT test scores 
are advised to schedule Math. 1. (Special fee, $45.00). 



19 



Agronomy — Crops, Soils, and Geology 

Series C 

E. S. 30 — Materials Science 3 

C. E. 160 — Structural Design 4 

E.N.E.E. 122 — Engineering Electronics 4 

E.N.E.E. 123— Laboratory 1 

Approved Electives 3 

Note: Student selecting Series C will take E.N.E.E. 90, 91, 120, 121 in lieu of 
E.N.E.E. 60, 61, 62, 63. 



AGRONOMY— CROPS, SOILS, AND GEOLOGY 

The Department of Agronomy offers instruction in production and breeding 
of forage crops, cereal crops, and tobacco; weed control; turf management; 
soil chemistry; soil fertility; soil physics; soil mineralogy; soil classification; 
and soil conservation. A technical or a general curriculum may be elected 
by a student in either crops or soils. A turf option is available in the general 
crops curriculum and a soil conservation option is available in the general 
soils curriculum. The technical curricula provide training in basic courses 
which will increase the student's understanding of the applied crops and 
soils courses. Training in these basic courses is required for advanced 
work in agronomy and is desired by many employers of students gradu- 
ating in agronomy. 

General curricula in crops and soils permit the student to confine his train- 
ing to applied courses but students following these curricula are encour- 
aged to elect some of the basic courses included in the technical curricula. 

Depending on the electives chosen, students graduating in agronomy are 
well prepared for advanced study, trained for general farming, farm man- 
agement, specialized seed production, extension work, soil conservation, 
or employment with commercial seed, fertilizer, chemical, or farm equip- 
ment companies. Turf specialists are in demand by park and road com- 
missions, golf courses, and turf and landscape companies. 

Students interested in geology have an excellent opportunity to prepare for 
advanced work in this field. Basic courses in mathematics, chemistry, and 
physics are as necessary for outstanding geologists as they are for other 
scientists and engineers. Although relatively few courses are offered in 
geology at the present time, these courses provide the students with a good 
geology background while they are taking the general courses required of 
all the University of Maryland students as well as the basic courses neces- 
sary for excellence in geology. By the proper selection of courses listed 
under the soils technical electives (which can be substituted for other de- 
partmental required courses) the student can obtain outstanding under- 
graduate training for advanced work in geology. 

Additional information on opportunities in agronomy and geology may be 
obtained by writing to the Department of Agronomy, 

20 



Agronomy— Crops, Soils, and Geology 
CROPS 

University Requirements (see page 11) 

College of Agriculture Requirements (see page 11) 

Departmental Requirements (Crops) rlT/w^'^ 

Agron. 10-General Soils . . "^'"^i' ^^"" 

Agron. 103— Crop Breeding 2 

Agron. 107^CereaI Crop Production ..... 3 

Agron. 108— Forage Crop Production 3 

Agron. 151— Cropping Systems 2 

Agron. 154- Weed Control ....'... 3 

Agron. — Advanced Soils Courses 6 

Bot. 1 1— Plant Taxonomy 3 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants 4 

Bot. 117 — General Plant Genetics or 

Zool. 6 — Genetics 2 4 

Technical and General Courses for Crops Students 

(see explanation and lists below) 30 

Electives .. 

Technical Crops Curriculum 

A minimum of 20 of the 30 hours of technical and general courses re- 
quired above must be selected from the technical courses; if the studem 
desires to take more than 30 hours of technical courses they can be used 
as part of his 12 hours of electives or they can be substituted for other 
advhJr Agronomy requirements with permission of the crops 

General Crops and Turf Management Curricula 

cZsef fr^'r^M'f Crops Curriculum except that the 20-hour minimum of 
aSemen/nn^ ^"f ^^ ^/""P '^^^^ "°^ ^PP^^' ^^^^^^^ts in the turf man- 

agement option must elect Agron. 109— Turf Management, Hort. 20— In- 
troduction to the Art of Landscaping, and Hort. 107-Woody Plant Ma- 

Technical Courses Which May be Selected by the 
Crops Student 

Agr. 100 

Bot. 101, 110, 111 

Chem. 15, 19, 31, 33, 35, 36, 37, 38, 161, 163 

C. S. 12, 20, 100 

Math. 3, 10, 11, 14, 15, 18, 19, 20, 21 22 133 

Phys. 1, 2, 10, 11 

General Courses Which May be Selected by the Crops Student 
A. E. 50, 108 
Agr. Engr. 1, 56, 123 
An. Sc. 1, 10, 40, 118 

21 



Agronomy — Crops, Soils, and Geology 

Ent. 1, 4, 20 

Geog. 30, 40, 41 

Geol. 1, 2 

Hort. 5, 20, 58, 107 

Zool. 1 

Agron. — Soils or crops courses not previously required (10 hrs.) 

SOILS 

University Requirements (see page 11) 

College of Agriculture Requirements (see page 11) 

Semester 
Departmental Requirements (Soils) Credit Hours 

Agron. 10 — General Soils 4 

Agron. 107 — Cereal Crop Production 3 

Agron. 108 — Forage Crop Production 3 

Agron. 114 — Soil Classification and Geography 4 

Agron. 1 16 — Soil Chemistry 3 

Agron. 117 — Soil Physics 3 

Agron. — Additional Advanced Soils courses 6 

Technical and general courses for soils students 

(see explanation and lists below) 36 

Electives 12 

Technical Soils Curriculum 
A minimum of 30 of the 36 semester hours of technical and general courses 
required above must be selected from the technical group. If the student 
desires to take more than 36 semester hours of technical courses they can 
be used as part of his 12 hours of electives or they can be substituted for 
other Department of Agronomy requirements with permission of the soils 
adviser. 

General Soils and Soil Conservation Curricula 
Same as Technical Soils Curriculum except that the 30-hour minimum of 
courses from the technical group does not apply. Students in soil conser- 
vation must elect Agron. 113 — ^oil Conservation, Geol. 1 — Geology, and 
Bot. 10 — Principles of Conservation. 

Technical Courses Which May be Selected by the 
Soils and Geology Students 

Agr. 100 

Bot. 101 

Chem. 15, 19, 31, 33, 35, 36, 37, 38 

C. S. 12, 20, 100 

Math. 3, 10, 11, 14, 15, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 66, 133 

Phys. 1, 2, 10, 11, 20, 21 

Geog. 30 40, 41, 146 (Geology students only) 

Geol. 1, 2, 119 (Geology students only) 

Zool. 2, 6, 118, 190 (Geology students only) 

22 



Animal Science 



General Courses Which May be Selected by the 
Soils Student 

A. E. 50, 108 

Agr. Engr. 1, 56, 123 

An. Sc. 1, 10 

Bot. 10, 11, 20, 102, 103, 117 

Ent. 1, 20 

Geog. 30, 40, 41, 146 

Geol. 1, 2 

Hort. 5, 20, 58 

Zool. 1, 2, 6 

Agron. — Any advanced agronomy courses not previously 
required (10 credit hrs.) 



ANIMAL SCIENCE 

The curriculum in animal science offers a broad background in general 
education, basic sciences, agricultural sciences and the opportunity for a 
student to emphasize that phase of animal agriculture in which he is 
specifically interested. Each student will be assigned to an adviser according 
to the program he plans to pursue. 

Objectives 

In addition to fulfilling the requirements of the University and the Col- 
lege of Agriculture, the following specific objectives have been established 
for the program in animal science: 

1. To acquaint students with the role of animal agriculture in our cul- 
tural heritage. 

2. To prepare students for careers in the field of animal agriculture. These 
include positions of management and technology associated with ani- 
mal, dairy, or poultry production enterprises, positions with marketing 
and processing organizations, as well as in other allied fields such as 
feed, agricultural chemicals and equipment. 

3. To prepare students for entrance to veterinary schools. 

4. To prepare students for graduate study and subsequent careers in 
teaching, research and extension, both public and private. 

5. To provide essential courses for the support of other academic pro- 
grams of the University. 

University Requirements (see page 11) 

College of Agriculture Requirements (see page 11) 

23 



Botany, Conservation and Resource Development 

University Requirements (see page 11) 

College of Agriculture Requirements (see page 1 1 ) 

Semester 
Department of Botany Requirements Credit Hours 

Bot. 2 — General Botany 4 

Bot. 1 1 — Plant Taxonomy 3 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants 4 

Bot. 101— Plant Physiology 4 

Bot. 102— Plant Ecology 3 

Bot. 103 — Plant Ecology Laboratory 1 

Bot. 1 1 1 — Plant Anatomy 3 

Bot. 1 17 — General Plant Genetics 2 

Bot. 199 — Seminar 2 

Modern Language, preferably German 12 

Math. 10, 11 — Introduction to Mathematics 6 

Microb. 1 — General Microbiology 4 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 4 

Phys. 10, 1 1 — Fundamentals of Physics 8 

Botany electives or related courses 10 

Electives 12 

The major student, with the approval of his advisor, will elect additional 
courses in Botany and related subjects to provide the best possible basic 
training and preparation in the area of his special interest. Students con- 
templating graduate work are strongly advised to take Calculus, Math. 
14, 15 and Organic Chemistry, Chem. 31, 33 as a part of their under- 
graduate program. 



CONSERVATION AND RESOURCE 
DEVELOPMENT 

The development and use of natural resources (including water, soil, 
minerals, fresh water and marine organisms, wildlife, air and human 
resources), are essential to the full growth of an economy. 

The curriculum in Conservation and Resource Development (adminis- 
tered by the Botany Department), is designed to instill concepts of the 
efficient development and judicious use of natural resources. The study 
of the problems associated with the use of natural resources will acquaint 
students with their role in economic development, cultural heritage, and 
their necessary consideration in future expansion. 

Students will prepare for professional and administrative positions in 
land and water conservation projects, for careers in operational, adminis- 
trative, educational and research work in land use, rural area development, 
water resources, recreational area development and management, or for 
graduate study in any of several areas within the biological sciences. 

26 



Conservation and Resource Development, Entomology 

Students will pursue a broad education program and then elect subjects 
concentrated in a specific area of interest. A student will be assigned an 
adviser according to his area of interest. 

Students will be encouraged to obtain summer positions which will give 
them technical laboratory or field experience in their chosen interest area. 

University Requirements (see page 11) 

College of Agriculture Requirements (see page 11) 

Semester 
Conservation and Resource Development Requirements Credit Hours 

Agr. 100 — Introductory Agricultural Biometrics 3 

Agr. Engr. 1 — Introduction to Agricultural Engineering 4 

Agron. 10 — General Soils 4 

Bot. 2 — General Botany 4 

Bot. 10 — Principles of Conservation 3 

Bot. 11— Plant Taxonomy (or Bot. 153) 3(2) 

Bot. 102— Plant Ecology 2 

Bot. 103 — Plant Ecology Laboratory 1 

Ent. 1 — Introductory Entomology 3 

Geog. 10 — General Geography 3 

Geol. 1 — Geology 3 

Math. 10, 11 — Introduction to Mathematics (or Math. 18, 19) 3,3 

Micro. 1 — General Microbiology 4 

Zool. 2— Animal Phyla 4 

Zool. 121 — Animal Ecology 3 

Electives 27 



ENTOMOLOGY 

This curriculum prepares students for work in various types of entomo- 
logical positions. Professional entomologists are engaged in fundamental 
and applied research, regulatory and control services with state and federal 
agencies, commercial pest control, sales and developmental programs 
with chemical companies and other commercial organizations, consulting 
work, extension work, and teaching. 

A student wishing an undergraduate minor in entomology should take the 
introductory course (Ent. 1 ) and after consultation with the heads of 
both the major and minor departments will select courses that will con- 
tribute most to the end he has in view. 

Most of the first two years of this curriculum is devoted to obtaining the 
essential background. In the junior and senior year there is opportunity 
for some specializing. Students contemplating graduate work are strongly 
advised to elect courses in physics, modem language, and biometrics. 

27 



Entomology, Food-Science 

University Requirements (see page 11) 

College of Agriculture Requirements (see page 11) Semester 

Department of Entomology Requirements Credit Hours 

Ent. 1 — Introductory Entomology 

Ent. 20— Insect Pests of Agricultural Crops ^ 

Ent_ 105 — Medical Entomology 

Ent. 120— Insect Taxonomy and Biology J 

Ent. 122— Insect Morphology 

Ent. 123— Insect Physiology 

Ent. 198 — Special Problems 

Ent. 199 — Seminar 

Bot. 1 l^Plant Taxonomy 

Bot. 20— Diseases of Plants 

Chem. 31-33— Elements of Organic Chemistry o 

Math. 10, 1 1— Introduction to Mathematics J 

Micro. 1 — General Microbiology ■ ■ ■ ■ ^ 

Zool. 2— The Animal Phyla or Zool. 1 1 8— Invertebrate Zoology 4 

Zool. 6 — Genetics _ 

Electives 



FOOD SCIENCE 

Food Science applies the fundamentals of the physical and biological sci- 
ences to the problems of procurement, preservation, processing, packaging 
and marketing foods in a manner that would satisfy man s needs both 
nutritionally and aesthetically. 

Opportunities for careers in food science exist in areas of meats, milk and 
milk products, fruits and vegetables, poultry and eggs, sea food, baby foods, 
confections, pet foods, cereals, flavors and colors, etc. Specific positions m 
Industry, Universities, and Government, include product development, 
production, engineering, research, quaUty control, techmcal service, tech- 
nical sales, and teaching. 

University Requirements (see page 11) 

College of Agriculture Requirements (see page 11) 

(Both Bot. 1 and Zool. 1 required) 



Curriculum Requirements 

Production course^ 

Micro 1— General Microbiology ^ 

Micro. 131 — Applied Microbiology | 

Phys. 10 — Fundamentals of Physics ^ 

An. Sc. 15— Fundamentals of Nutrition 3 

Chem. 31, 33 — Elements of Organic Chem 3.3 

Food 153 — Experimental Food Science 3 

Agr. Engr. 1 13— Mechanics of Food Processing 4 

Fd. Sc. 1 — Introduction to Food Science 3 

2An. Sc. 1, Agron. 1, Hort. 5, Hort. 58, or Agr. Engr. 1. 

28 



Semester 
Credit Hours 
3 



Food-Science, Horticulture 

Fd. Sc. 102, 103 — Principles of Food Processing 3, 3 

Fd. Sc. 1 1 1— Food Chemistry 3 

Fd. Sc. 112 — Analytical Quality Control 3 

Ed. Sc. 113 — Statistical Quality Control 3 

Fd. Sc. 131 — Food Product Research and Development 3 

Fd. Sc. 199 — Seminar 1 

Electives 21 

HORTICULTURE 

The Department of Horticulture offers instruction in pomology (fruits), 
olericulture (vegetables), floriculture (flowers), and ornamental horti- 
culture, and processing of horticultural crops. These courses prepare 
students to enter commercial production and the horticultural industries 
such as fruit and vegetable processing, seed production and retail florists 
and nurseries. Students are likewise prepared to enter the allied industries 
as horticultural workers with fertilizer companies, equipment manufactur- 
ers, and others. Students who wish to enter specialized fields of research 
and teaching may take advanced work in the Department. 

The new curriculum. Horticultural Education, is designed for persons who 
wish to prepare for teaching horticulture in the secondary schools. It pro- 
vides basic training in horticulture and includes the necessary courses for 
teacher certification. 

The Department of Horticulture is a cooperating department in the new 
curriculum Food Science. 

POMOLOGY AND OLERICULTURE CURRICULUM 

University Requirements (see page 11) 

College of Agriculture Requirements (see page 11) 

Semester 

Department of Horticulture Requirements Credit Hours 

Hort. 5, 6 — Tree Fruit Production 3,2 

Hort. 58 — Vegetable Production 3 

Hort. 59 — Berry Production 3 

Hort. 62 — Plant Propagation 3 

Hort. 101 — Technology of Fruits 3 

Hort. 103 — Technology of Vegetables 3 

Hort. 161 — Physiology of Maturation and Storage of 

Horticultural Crops 2 

Hort. 199— Seminar 1 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants 4 

Bot. 101— Plant Physiology 4 

Bot. 117 — General Plant Genetics 2 

Agron. 10 — General Soils 4 

Ent. 20 — Insect Pests of Agricultural Crops 4 

Elect one of the following courses: 

Bot. 125 — Diseases of Fruit Crops (2) 
Bot. 126 — ^Diseases of Vegetable Crops (2) 

A minimum of 3 additional Horticultural credits 3 

Electives 31 

29 



Horticulture Curricula 

FLORICULTURE AND ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE 
CURRICULUM 

University Requirements (see page 11) 

College of Agriculture Requirements (see page 11) 

Semester 
Department of Horticulture Requirements Credit Hours 

Hort. 1 1 — Greenhouse Management 3 

Hort. 12 — Greenhouse Management Laboratory 1 

Hort. 16 — Garden Management 2 

Hort. 17 — Flower Production Laboratory 1 

Hort. 20 — Introduction to the Art of Landscaping 3 

Hort. 56 — Basic Landscape Composition 2 

Hort. 62 — Plant Propagation 3 

Hort. 100 — Principles of Landscape Design 3 

Hort. 105 — Technology of Ornamentals 3 

Hort. 107, 108— Woody Plant Materials 3, 3 

Hort. 162 — Fundamentals of Greenhouse Crop Production .... 3 

Hort. 199— Seminar 1 

Bot. 1 1 — Plant Taxonomy 3 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants 4 

Bot. 101 — Plant Physiology 4 

Bot. 117 — General Plant Genetics 2 

Bot. 123 — Diseases of Ornamental Crops 2 

Agron. 10 — General Soils 4 

Ent. 116 — Insect Pests of Ornamentals and Greenhouse Plants. 3 

Electives 25 

HORTICULTURAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

University Requirements (see page 11) 

College of Agriculture Requirements (see page 11) 

Department of Horticulture Requirements 

Hort. 1 1 — Greenhouse Management 3 

Hort. 12 — Greenhouse Management Laboratory 1 

Hort. 16 — Garden Management 2 

Hort. 17 — Flower Production Laboratory 1 

Hort. 20 — Introduction to the Art of Landscaping 3 

Hort. 56 — Basic Landscape Composition 2 

Hort. 62 — Plant Propagation 3 

Hort. 100 — Principles of Landscape Design 3 

Hort. 105 — Technology of Ornamentals 3 

Hort. 199 — Seminar 1 

Bot. 1 1— Plant Taxonomy 3 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants 4 

Bot. 101— Plant Physiology 4 

Agron. 10 — General Soils 4 

Ent. 116 — Insect Pests of Ornamentals and Greenhouse Plants. . 3 

Ed. 1 1 1 — Foundations of Education 3 

R. Ed. 109 — Teaching Secondary Agriculture 3 

R. Ed. 101 — Teaching Materials and Demonstrations 2 

R. Ed. 103— Student Teaching 5 



30 



Special Curricula 

Semester 

Department of Horticulture Requirements {Continued) Credit Hours 

R. Ed. 104 — Student Teaching 1-4 

R. Ed. 107 — Introduction to Agricultural Education 2 

R. Ed. 1 1 1 — Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Groups 1 

Elect one of the following courses: 

Psych 110 — Educational Psychology (3) 

Ed. 110 — Human Development and Learning (6) 

A minimum of 12 additional Agricultural credits 12 

Approved Electives 0-6 

Total 124 



SPECIAL CURRICULA 

pre-foresYry students 

The College of Agriculture is glad to cooperate with any student who 
wishes to attend the University to pursue courses which may be trans- 
ferred to a standard forestry curriculum in another institution. The pro- 
gram which a student follows depends to some extent upon the forestry 
college he plans to enter. All pre-forestry students in the College of 
Agriculture are sent to the Department of Botany of the University for 
counsel and advice in these matters. 

For residents of Maryland who have completed two years of pre-forestry 
and have satisfied requirements comparable to those at the University of 
Maryland and have been accepted in the School of Forestry at North Caro- 
lina State University, the University of Maryland will pay the non-resident 
fee for a period of two years. 

PRE-THEOLOGICAL STUDENTS 

The College of Agriculture is glad to cooperate with the officers of any 
theological seminary who desire to urge its prospective students to pursue 
courses in agriculture as a preparation for the rural ministry. Such pre- 
theological students may enroll for a semester or more or for the usual 
four year training of the College. In either case they should enroll as 
members of the general curriculum in the College of Agriculture. 

The electives of this curriculum may be used for such pre-theological 
requirements as seem desirable. Elections may be made from any of the 
offerings of the University such as history, political science, philosophy, 
agricultural economics, rural sociology, modern language, EngUsh, eco- 
nomics, rural sociology, natural science, education and the like. Stu- 
dents desiring to pursue a pre-theological program in the College of Agri- 
culture of the University of Maryland, should consult with the president 
or admisisons officer of the theological seminary which they expect to 
attend. 

31 



Special Curricula 



PRE-VETERINARY STUDENTS 



This program is designed for students desiring to prepare for the profes- 
sional course in veterinary medicine. 

A combined degree is available to students in pre-veterinary science. A 
student who has completed 90 academic semester credits at the University 
of Maryland and who has completed 30 additional academic semester 
credits at the University of Georgia or at any accredited veterinary school 
is eligible to make application for the Bachelor of Science degree from 
the University of Maryland. 

Students wishing to apply for the combined degree must fulfill University 
and College requirements as set forth on page 1 1 and must also complete 
additional credits in Animal Science. 

The State of Maryland has entered a regional agreement with the State 
of Georgia which makes ten spaces a year available in the School of 
Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia. The spaces are to be filled 
on a competitive basis from among qualified applicants. 

Candidates, to be considered qualified, must have: 

a. Completed the curriculum shown below with grades not less than "C" 
in any subject. 

b. Taken the veterinary medical aptitude test; and 

c. Must be a bona fide resident of Maryland. 

All requirements must be completed by June prior to the September in 
which the student desires to matriculate in veterinary college. The pre- 
veterinary curriculum can be completed in two years but may be extended, 
thus making it possible for the applicant to select desirable electives. 

After the names of the candidates have been received, a Georgia Board 
of Admissions will assemble at the University of Maryland and will inter- 
view each candidate and receive the transcript and all pertinent docu- 
ments relating to him. The selection will be made by the Office of Ad- 
missions, University of Georgia. 



The pre-veterinary curriculum should contain: 



Semester 
Credit Hours 



Biological Sciences 12 

Botany (4) 

Zoology (8) 
English and Speech 12 



32 



Special Curricula 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

Physical Sciences 30 

Inorganic Chemistry (8) 

Organic Chemistry (8) 

Mathematics (6) 

Physics (8) 

Animal Science 9 

Genetics 3 

Nutrition 3 

Social Science-^ 3 

History 6 

Physical Education 2 

Health 2 

Air Science Optional 



3This credit may be satisfied by examination at the University of Georgia. 
SPECIAL STUDENTS IN AGRICULTURE 

Mature students may, with the consent of the Dean, register as special 
students and pursue a program of studies not included in any regular 
curriculum, but arranged to meet the needs of the individual. All Uni- 
versity fees for these special students are the same as fees for regular 
students. 

TWO-YEAR PROGRAM INSTITUTE OF APPLIED AGRICULTURE 

The programs of study offered by the Institute will assist men and women 
interested in preparing for specific jobs in the broad fields of appUed science 
and business in agriculture. Courses taken in these programs are not trans- 
ferable for degree credits at the University of Maryland. However, students 
satisfactorily completing two years of study will be awarded an appropriate 
certificate. For additional information write: Director, Institute of Applied 
Agriculture. 



33 



Course Offerings 



The University reserves the right to withdraw or discontinue any course 
for which an insufficient number of students have registered to warrant 
giving the course. In such an event, no fee will be charged for transfer 
to another course. 

Courses are designated by numbers as follows: 

1 to 99: courses for undergraduates. 

100 to 199: courses for advanced undergraduates and graduates. (Not 
all courses numbered 100 to 199 may be taken for graduate credit.) 

200 to 299 : courses for graduates only. 

A course with a single number extends through one semester. A course 
with a double number extends through two semesters. 

Courses not otherwise designated are lecture courses. The number of 
credit hours is shown by the arabic numeral in parentheses after the title 
of the course. 

A separate schedule of courses is issued each semester, giving the hours, 
places of meeting, and other information required by the student in making 
out his program. Students obtain these schedules when they register. 



AGRICULTURE 

Agr. 1. Introduction to Agriculture. (1) 

First semester. Required of all beginning freshmen and sophomores in agri- 
culture. Other students must get the consent of the instructor. A series of lec- 
tures introducing the student to the broad field of agriculture. (Poffenberger.) 

Agr. 100. Introductory Agricultural Biometrics. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Introduction 
to fundamental concepts underlying the application of biometrical methods to 
agricultural problems with emphasis on graphical presentation of data, descrip- 
tive statistics, chi-square and t-tests, and linear regression and correlation. 

Agr, 200. Agricultural Biometrics. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequi- 
site, Agr. Biom. 100 or equivalent. A continuation of Agr. 100 with emphasis 
on analysis of variance and co-variance, multiple and curvilinear regression, 
sampling, experimental design and miscellaneous statistical technique as ap- 
plied to agricultural problems. 

Agr. 202, 203. Advanced Biological Statistics. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, approval of instructor. An advanced 
course dealing with specialized experimental designs, sampling techniques and 
elaborations of standard statistical procedures as applied to the animal and 
plant sciences. 

34 



Agricultural Economics 

Agr. 210. Experimental Procedures in the Agricultural 
Sciences. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, permision of instructor. Organization of research 
projects and presentation of experimental results in the field of agricultural 
science. Topics included will be: sources of research financing, project outline 
preparation, formal progress reports, public and industrial supported research 
programs, and popular presentation of research data. (Haut.) 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 



Professors: Beal, Curtis, Smith and Walker. 

Associate Professors: Foster, Ishee, McDonald, Moore, Schermer- 
horn and Wysong. 

Assistant Professor: Bender. 

Visiting Professor: Evans. 



A. E. 50. Elements of Agricultural Economics. (3) 

Second semester. An introduction to economic principles of production, mar- 
keting, agricultural prices and incomes, farm labor, credit, agricultural policies, 
and government programs. (Wysong.) 

A. E. 51. Marketing of Agricultural Products. (3) 

First semester. The development of marketing, its scope, channels, and agen- 
cies of distribution, functions, costs, methods used and services rendered. 

(Schermerhorn.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

A. E. lOOSF AND A. E. lOlSF. Agricultural Estimating 

Methodology. (3) (3) (Not for Grad. Credit) 

First and second semesters, respectively. The history, organization and admin- 
istration of, and services provided by the Statistical Reporting Service of the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture and the survey sampling methods used by that 
agency for computing the Departments official statistics on crops, livestock and 
livestock products, production, agricultural prices and farm employment. Em- 
phasis is on statistical procedures used for preparing approximately 350 reports 
issued annually by the Crop Reporting Board of the U. S. Statistical Reporting 
Service. (Designed especially for foreign students in FAO and AID-Program 
of Technical Cooperation but very beneficial to any student interested in the 
area.) (Guellow.) 

A. E. 103. Economics of Agricultural Cooperation. (3) 

Second semester. A course in the development, expansion and consolidation of 
the cooperative method of business. Modern business organization and operat- 
ing principles and practices related to farmer cooperatives are stressed. 

(Smith.) 

35 



Agricultural Economics 

A. E. 104. Economics of Agricultural Transportation. (3) 

First semester. The course deals with the unique nature of agriculture in broad 
perspective as it relates to economics of transportation of the products in- 
volved. It includes the development of agricultural transportation, effect of 
legislation and regulation upon this development, and growth of the intercarrier 
competition. Theories of rate making and classification of carriers are dis- 
cussed from the standpoint of the efi'ect of transportation costs and methods 
upon plant and industry location in agriculture. (Smith.) 

A. E. 106. Prices of Agricultural Products. (3) 

Second semester. An introduction to agricultural price behavior. Emphasis 
is placed on the use of price information in the decision-making process, the 
relation of supply and demand in determining agricultural prices, and the rela- 
tion of prices to grade, time, location, and stages of processing in the market- 
ing system. The course includes elementary methods of price analysis, the con- 
cept of parity, and the role of price support programs in agricultural de- 
cisions. (Bender.) 

A. E. 107. Financial Analysis of the Farm Business. (3) 

First semester. Application of economic principles to develop criteria for a 
sound farm business, including credit source and use, preparing and filing 
income tax returns, methods of appraising farm properties, the summary and 
analysis of farm records, leading to effective control and profitable operation 
of the farm business. (Wysong.) 

A. E. 108. Farm Management. (3) 

Second semester. The organization and operation of the farm business to 
obtain an income consistent with family resources and objectives. Principles 
of production economics and other related fields are applied to the individual 
farm business. Laboratory period will be largely devoted to field trips and 
other practical exercises. (Ishee.) 

A. E. 109. Introduction TO Econometrics IN Agriculture. (3) 

First semester. An introduction to the application of econometric techniques 
to agricultural problems with emphasis on the assumptions and computational 
techniques necessary to derive statistical estimates, test hypotheses, and make 
predictions with the use of single equation models. Includes linear and non- 
linear regression models, internal least squares, discriminant analysis and factor 
analysis. (Suttor) 

A. E. 111. Economics of Resource Development. (3) 

First semester. Economic, political, and institutional factors which influence 
the use of land resources. Application of elementary economic principles in 
understanding social conduct concerning the development and use of natural 
and man-made resources. (Tuthill.) 

A. E. 112. Agricultural Policy and Programs. (3) 

First semester. A study of public policies and programs related to the prob- 
lems of agriculture. Description, analysis and appraisal of current policies 
and programs will be emphasized. (Beal.) 

A. E. 114. World Agricultural Production and Trade. (3) 

First semester. World production, consumption, and trade patterns for agri- 
cultural products. International trade theory applied to agricultural products. 
National influences on international agricultural trade. (Foster.) 

36 



Agricultural Economics 
A. E. 115. Marketing Animals and Animal Products. (3) 

First semester. Principles, functions, methods and channels of marketing ani- 
mals and animal products including livestock and livestock products, dairy 
animals and dairy products, and poultry and poultry products. Application of 
basic principles of economics and marketing in a study of the role of the mar- 
keting system and development of measures of performance. (Smith.) 

A. E. 116. Marketing Plant Products. (3) 

Second semester. Principles, functions, methods and channels of marketing plant 
products including fruits, vegetables, horticultural specialties, grain and tobacco. 
Analyses of supply, demand, prices, grading, regulatory activities, and govern- 
ment programs and services. (Staff.) 

A. E. 119. Foreign Agricultural Economies. (3) 

Second semester. Analysis of the agricultural economy of selected areas of the 
world. The interrelationships among institutions and values, such as govern- 
ment and religion, and the economics of agricultural organization and produc- 
tion. (Foster.) 

A. E. 198. Special Problems. (1-2) (2 cr. max.) (Not for grad. cr.) 
First and second semesters and summer. Concentrated reading and study in 
some phase or problem in agricultural economics. (Staff.) 

A. E. 199. Seminar. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters. Students will obtain experience in the selection, 
preparation and presentation of economic topics and problems which will be 
subjected to critical analysis. (Wysong.) 

For Graduates 
A. E. 200. Application of Econometrics in Agriculture. (3) 

First semester. Tools for analyzing demand and price behavior of agricultural 
products. Theories of least squares, estimation of structural economic rela- 
tions in simultaneous equation systems, identification problems, and non-linear 
estimation techniques. (Ishee) 

A. E. 201. Advanced Theory and Practice of International 
Agricultural Trade. (3) 

Second semester. Advanced theory, policies and practice in international trade 
in agricultural products. Includes principal theories of trade and finance, 
agricultural trade policies of various countries, and the mechanics of how 
trade is conducted. (Moore.) 

A. E. 202. Market Structure in Agriculture. (3) 

First semester. This course centers on the concept of market structure analy- 
sis, with application of principles developed to agricultural industries. The 
dimension of market structure is analyzed along with its impact on conduct and 
performance. Considerable time is spent on policy issues and the application 
of the antitrust laws to agricultural industries. (Moore.) 

A. E. 208. Agricultural Price and Income Policy. (3) 

Second semester. The evolution of agricultural policy in the United States, 
emphasizing the origin and development of governmental programs, and their 
effects upon agricultural production, prices and income. (Beal.) 

37 



Agricultural Economics 

A. E. 210. Rural Taxation and Public Functions. (3) 

Second semester. Theory and practical problems in rural taxation. Major 
types of taxes are considered m detail. The tax system as it affects farmers 
and rural areas will be discussed. Major functional responsibilities of the 
different levels of governments are studied, with emphasis upon public services 
to rural areas and equal tax effort for support of equal functional programs. 

(Walker.) 

A. E. 212. Agriculture in World Economic Development. (3) 

First semester. Theories and concepts of what makes economic development 
happen. Approaches and programs for stimulating the transformation from a 
primitive agricultural economy to an economy of rapidly developing commer- 
cial agriculture and industry. Analysis of selected agricultural development pro- 
grams in Asia, Africa and Latin America. (Foster.) 

A. E. 214. Advanced Agricultural Marketing. (3) 

Second semester. Advanced study of the complex theoretical, institutional and 
legal factors governing both domestic and foreign agricultural trade, with par- 
ticular attention given to policies and practices affecting cost and price. 

(Beal.) 

A. E. 216. Economics of Agricultural Production. (3) 

First semester. Study of the more complex problems involved in the long- 
range adjustments, organization and operation of farm resources, including the 
impact of new technology and methods. Applications of the theory of the 
firm, linear programming, activity analysis, and input-output analysis. 

(Ishee.) 

A. E. 218. Agricultural Economics Research Techniques. (3) 

First semester. Emphasis is given to philosophy and basic objectives of research 
in the field of agricultural economics. The course is designed to help students 
define a research problem and work out logical procedures for executing re- 
search in the social sciences. Attention is given to the techniques and tools 
available to agricultural economists. Research documents in the field will be 
appraised from the standpoint of procedures and evaluation of the research. 

(Wysong.) 

A. E. 219. Advanced Land Economics. (3) 

Second semester. Application of micro and macro economic principles to the 
analyses of special problems related to land such as public direction of land 
use, tenure arrangements, conservation, and land reform movements. 

(Wysong.) 

A. E. 220. International Impacts of Selected 
Agricultural Forces. (3) 

Second semester. Selected agricultural forces (such as pressure of popula- 
tion on food supply) and their impacts on the political, social, and economic 
development of the world. (Foster.) 

A. E. 300. Special Topics in Agricultural Economics. (3) 

First and second semester. This course is designed to offer students special 
subject matter in the field of Agricultural Economics. Subject matter taught 
in this course will be varied and will depend on the persons available for 

38 



Agricultural and Extension Education 

teaching unique and specialized phases of Agricultural Economics. The course 
will be taught by the staff or visiting Agricultural Economists who may be 
secured on lectureship or visiting professor basis. (Staff.) 

A. E. 301. Special Problems in Agricultural Economics. (1-2) 

(4 cr. max.) 

First and second semesters and summer: Intensive study and analysis of spe- 
cific problems in the field of agricultural economics, which will provide in- 
formation in depth in areas of special interest to the student. (Staff.) 

A. E. 302. Seminar. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters: Students will participate through study of prob- 
lems in the field, reporting to seminar members and defending positions 
adopted. Outstanding leaders in the field will present ideas for analyses and dis- 
cussion among class members. Students involved in original research will 
present progress reports. Class discussion will provide opportunity for con- 
structive criticism and guidance. (Curtis.) 

A. E. 399. Research. (6 hrs. M.S.; additional 6 hrs. Ph.D.) 

First, second semesters and summer: Advanced research in agricultural eco- 
nomics. Credit according to work accomplished. (Staff.) 



AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION 

Professor: Cardozier. 
Assistant Professor: Johnson. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 
R. Ed. 101. Teaching Materials and Demonstrations. (2) 

First semester. Principles and practices of the demonstration method; con- 
struction and use of visual aids in teaching agriculture. 

R. Ed. 103. Student Teaching. (5) 

First semester. Prerequisite, satisfactory academic average and permission of 
instructor. Fulltime student teaching in an off-campus student teaching center 
under an approved supervising teacher of agriculture. Participating experience 
in all aspects of the work of a teacher of agriculture. (Cardozier.) 

R. Ed. 104. Student Teaching. (1-4) 

First semester. Prerequisite, satisfactory academic average and permission of in- 
structor. Fulltime observation and participation in work of teacher of agri- 
culture in off-campus student teaching center. Provides students opportunity 
to gain experience in the summer program of work, to participate in opening 
of school activities, and to gain other experience needed by teachers. 

(Cardozier.) 

39 



Agricultural and Extension Education 

R. Ed. 107. Introduction to Agricultural Education. (2) 

An overview of the job of the teacher of agriculture; examination of agricul- 
tural education programs for youth and adults. 

R. Ed. 109. Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture. (3) 

First semester. A comprehensive course in the work of high school depart- 
ments of vocational agriculture. It emphasizes particularly placement, super- 
vised farming programs, the organization and administration of Future Farmer 
activities, and objectives and methods in all-day instruction. (Cardozier.) 

R. Ed. 111. Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Groups. (1) 

First semester. Characteristics of young and adult farmer instruction in agri- 
culture. Determining needs for and organizing a course; selecting materials for 
instruction; and class management. Emphasis is on the conference method of 
teaching. (Smith.) 

R. Ed. 121. Directed Experience in Extension Education. (1-5) 

Prerequisite, satisfactory academic average and permission of instructor. Full- 
time observation and participation in selected aspects of extension education 
in an approved training county. (Johnson.) 

R. Ed. 161. 4-H Organization and Procedure. (2) 

A study of the youth phase of cooperative extension work. Emphasis is placed 
on the philosophy, objectives, organization, leadership development and meth- 
ods used in conducting 4-H Club work at the local and county level. 

(Johnson.) 

R. Ed. 198. Special Problems. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, approval of staff. (Staff.) 

R. Ed. 199. Seminar in Agricultural Education. (1) 

Examination of current literature, reports and discussions of problems, trends, 
and issues in agricultural education. (StaflF.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
R. Ed. 114. Rural Life in Modern Society. (3) 

Examination of the many aspects of rural life that effect and are affected by, 
changes in technical, natural and human resources. Emphasis is placed on the 
role which diverse organizations, agencies, and institutions play in the educa- 
tion and adjustment of rural people to the demands of modern society. 

R. Ed. 150. Extension Education. (2) 

Second semester. The Agricultural Extension Service as an educational agency. 
The history, philosophy, objectives, policy, organization, legislation and meth- 
ods used in extension work. (Johnson.) 

R. Ed. 160. Extension Communications. (2) 

First semester. An introduction to communications in teaching and within 
an organization, including barriers to communication, the diffusion process 
and the application of communication principles person to person, with groups 
and through mass media. (Johnson.) 

40 



Agricultural and Extension Education 
R. Ed. 170, 171. Conservation of Natural Resources. (3, 3) 

Laboratory fee, $35.00. Designed primarily for teachers. Study of state's 
natural resources — soil, water, fisheries, wildlife, forests, and minerals — natural 
resources problems and practices. Extensive field study. First course con- 
centrates on subject matter; second includes methods of teaching conservation. 
Courses taken concurrently in summer season. 

R. Ed. 180, 181. Critique in Rural Education. (1, 1) 

Summer session only. Current problems and trends in rural education. 

For Graduates 
R. Ed. 200. Research Methods in Rural Education. (2-3) 

First semester. The scientific method, problem identification, survey of re- 
search literature, preparing research plans, design of studies, experimentation, 
analysis of data, and thesis writing. (Cardozier.) 

R. Ed. 201 Rural Community Analysis. (3) 

Analysis of structure and function of rural society and application of social 
understandings to educational processes. (Smith.) 

R. Ed. 204. Developing Rural Leadership. (2-3) 

Theories of leadership are emphasized. Techniques of identifying formal and 
informal leaders and the development of rural lay leaders. 

R. Ed. 207, 208. Special Topics in Rural Education. (2, 2) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. (Staff.) 

R. Ed. 209. Rural Adult Education. (2) 

Second semester. Principles of adult education applied to rural groups. Un- 
derstanding adult motivation, ability and behavior. Effective methods of 
planning, organizing and conducting rural adult educational programs. 

R. Ed. 215. Supervision of Student Teaching. (1) 

Summer session. Identification of experiences and activities in an effective 
student teaching program, responsibilities and duties of supervising teachers, 
and evaluation of student teaching. (Cardozier. > 

R. Ed. 217. Program Planning and Evaluation in 
Agricultural Education. (2-3) 

Second semester. Analysis of community agricultural education needs, selec- 
tion and organization of course content, and criteria and procedures for evaluat- 
ing programs. (Staff.) 

R. Ed. 225. Program Development in Extension Education. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, R. Ed. 150 or equivalent. Principles and pro- 
cedures of program planning and development in extension education. 

(Johnson.) 

R. Ed. 240. Agricultural College Instruction. (1) 

(Cardozier.) 

41 



Agricultural Engineering 

R. Ed. 301. Special Problems. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, approval of staff. (Staff.) 

R. Ed. 302. Seminar in Rural Education. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters. Problems in the organization, administration, and 
supervision of the several agencies of rural education. Investigations, papers, 
and reports. (Staff.) 

R. Ed. 399. Research. (1-6) 

(Staff.) 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Professors: Green, Burkhardt. 

Associate Professors: Geinger, Winn and Harris. 

Assistant Professor: Matthews. 

Agr. Engr. 1. Introduction to Agricultural Engineering. (4) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. 
Applications of mathematics, physics, and engineering techniques in the solu- 
tion of agricultural engineering problems. Studies will include farm power and 
machinery, farm structures and electrification and soil and water conserva- 
tion, (Matthews.) 

Agr. Engr. 56. Introduction to Farm Mechanics. (2) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. A study of the hand tools and power equipment and 
their safe use as it applies to mechanized farms. Principles and practice in 
arc and gas welding, cold metal and sheet metal work are provided. Also, 
tool fitting, woodworking, plumbing, blue print reading and use of concrete. 

(Gienger.) 

Agr. Engr. 86. Agricultural Engineering Shop Techniques. (1) 

Second semester. One laboratory per week. Agricultural Engineering majors 
only. Shop techniques and procedures used in construction of experimental 
agricultural machinery and equipment. Operation principles of power and. hand 
tools. A term problem to develop plans and techniques for construction, to 
select materials and to construct an assigned unit will be required. 

(Burkhardt.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates 
Agr. Engr. 104. Farm Mechanics. (2) 

First semester. Two laboratory periods a week. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Avail- 
able only to seniors in agricultural education. This course consists of labo- 
ratory exercises in practical farm shop and farm equipment maintenance, 
repair, and construction projects, and a study of the principles of shop organiza- 
tion and administration. (Gienger.) 

42 



Agricultural Engineering 
Agr. Engr. 113. Mechanics of Food Processing. (4) 

First semester. Three lectures and one laboratory. Prerequisite, Physics 1 or 
10. Applications in the processing and preservation of foods of power trans- 
mission, hydraulics, electricity, thermodynamics, refrigeration, instruments and 
controls, materials handling and time and motion analysis. (Matthews.) 

Agr. Engr. 123. Agricultural Production Equipment. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite, Agr. 
Engr. 1. Principles of operation and functions of power and machinery units 
as related to tillage; metering devices; cutting, conveying and separating units; 
and control mechanisms. Principles of internal combustion engines and power 
unit components. (Matthews.) 

Agr. Engr. 124. Agricultural Materials Handling and 
Environmental Control. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite, 
Agr. Engr. 1. Characteristics of construction materials and details of agri- 
cultural structures. Fundamentals of electricity, electrical circuits, and elec- 
trical controls. Materials handling and environmental requirements of farm 
products and animals. (Matthews.) 

Agr. Engr. 143 Agricultural Power and Machinery 
Analysis. (4) 

First semester. TTiree lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites, 
Agr. Engr. 1, E.S. 21 and M.E. 1. Analysis of power units and equipment used 
for agricultural production with emphasis on functional design requirements. 
Fundamentals of power transmission, principles of internal combustion engines 
and force analysis. (Harris.) 

Agr. Engr. 144. Design of Operational Systems for 
Agriculture. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite, 
Math. 21 and Phys. 21. Principles and engineering requirements of agricultural 
environmental control. Included are studies of controlling heat and moisture 
produced by animals and crops, static loading of farm structures and electrical 
components as related to environment and materials handling. (Harris.) 

Agr. Engr. 145. Soil and Water Conservation Engineering. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, C.E. 90 and M. E. 

102. Applications of engineering and soil sciences in erosion control, drain- 
age, irrigation and watershed management. Principles of agricultural hydrology 
and design of water control and conveyance systems. (Green.) 

Agr. Engr. 189. Senior Problem. (2) 

Prerequisite, approval of Department. Students will select individual projects, 
prepare design, conduct, experiment or analyze experimental data and present 
both an oral and written report to Departmental faculty. (Staff.) 

Agr. Engr. 198. Special Problems in Farm Mechanics. (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, approval of Department. Not accept- 
able for majors in agricultural engineering. Problems assigned in proportion 
to credit. (Gienger.) 

43 



Agronomy — Crops, Soils and Geology 

For Graduates 
\gr. Engr. 201. Special Topics in Agricultural Engineering. (3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. 
Timely topics in specialized areas of agricultural engineering will be selected 
as needed by graduate students; for example, Instrumentation for Agricultural 
Engineering Research. (Stafif.) 

Agr. Engr. 301. Special Problems in Agricultural 
Engineering. (1-6) 

First and second semesters. Summer session. Work assigned in proportion to 
amount of credit. (Staff.) 

Agr. Engr. 302. Seminar. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. (Harris.) 

Agr. Engr. 399. Research. (1-6) 

Credit according to work accomplished. (Staff.) 



AGRONOMY— CROPS, SOILS, AND GEOLOGY 

Professors: Miller, Rothgeb and Street. 

Associate Professors: Axley, Clark, Decker, Kresge and Strickling. 

Assistant Professors: Beyer, Deal, Colby, Fanning, Fernow, 
Newcomer and Siegrist. 

CROPS 

Agron. 1. Crop Production. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Culture, use, 
improvement, adaptation, distribution, and history of field crops. (Clark.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Agron. 103. Crop Breeding. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-67.) Prerequisite, Bot. 117 or 
Zool. 6. Principles and methods of breeding annual self and cross-pollinated 
plants and perennial forage species. (Beyer.) 

Agron. 104. Tobacco Production. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. A study of the 
history, adaptation, distribution, culture, and improvement of various types of 
tobacco, with special emphasis on problems in Maryland tobacco production. 
Physical and chemical factors associated with yield and quality of tobacco 
will be stressed. (Street.) 

Agron. 107. Cereal Crop Production. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-67.) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. Study of the principles and 
practices of corn, wheat, oats, barley, rye, and soybean production. (Rothgeb.) 

44 



Agronomy — Crops, Soils and Geology 
Agron. 108. Forage Crop Production. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
Bot. 1. Study of the production and management of grasses and legumes for 
quality hay, silage, and pasture. (Decker.) 

Agron. 109. Turf Management. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1967-68.) Two lectures a week. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 1. A study of principles and practices in management of turf for 
lawns, golf courses, athletic fields, playgrounds, airfields, and highway planting. 

(Deal.) 

Agron. 151. Cropping Systems. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 1 or equivalent. 
The coordination of information from various courses in the development of 
balanced cropping systems, appropriate to different objectives in various areas 
of the state and nation. (Clark.) 

Agron. 152. Seed Production and Distribution. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-67.) One lecture and one labo- 
ratory period a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 1 or equivalent. A study of seed 
production, processing, and distribution; federal and state seed control pro- 
grams; seed laboratory analysis; release of new varieties; and maintenance of 
foundation seed stocks. (Newcomer.) 

Agron. 154. Weed Control. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1967-68.) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 1 or equivalent. A study of the 
use of cultural practices and chemical herbicides in the control of weeds. 

(Colby.) 

For Graduates 
Agron. 201. Advanced Crop Breeding. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1967-68.) Two lectures a week. Pre- 
requisite, Agron. 103 or equivalent. Genetic, cytogenetic, and statistical theories 
underlying methods of plant breeding. A study of quantitative inheritance, 
herterosis, heritability, interspecific and intergeneric hybridization, polyploidy, 
sterility mechanisms, inbreedng and outbreeding, and other topics as related to 
plant breeding. (Beyer.) 

Agron. 204. Technic in Field Crop Research. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-67.) Two lectures a week. 
Field plot technic, application of statistical analysis to agronomic data, and 
preparation of the research project. 

Agron. 205. Advanced Tobacco Production, (2) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1967-68) Two lectures a week. Pre- 
requisite, permission of instructor. A study of the structural adaptation and 
chemical response of tobacco to environmental variations. Emphasis will be 
placed on the alkaloids and other unique components. (Street.) 

Agron. 207. Advanced Forage Crops. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-67.) Two lectures a week. Pre- 
requisites, Bot. 101, Chem. 31, or equivalent, or permission of instructor. 

45 



Agronomy — Crops, Soils and Geology 

A fundamental study of physiological and ecological responses of grasses and 
legumes to environmental factors, including fertilizer elements, soil moisture, 
soil temperature, air temperature, humidity, length of day, quality and intensity 
of light, wind movement, and defoliation practices. Relationship of these 
factors to life history, production, chemical and botanical composition, 
quality, and persistance of forages will be considered. (Decker.) 

Agron. 208. Research Methods. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, permission of staff. Development of research 
viewpoint by detailed study and report on crop research of the Maryland 
Experiment Station or review of literature on specific phases of a problem. 

(Staff.) 

Agron. S210. Cropping Systems. (1) 

Summer session only. An advanced course primarily designed for teachers of 
vocational agriculture and county agents. It deals with outstanding problems 
and the latest developments in the field. 
Additional courses under CROPS AND SOILS. 

SOILS 

Agron. 10. General Soils. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisite, Chem. 1 or permission of instructor. A study of the fundamentals 
of soils including their origin, development, relation to natural sciences, effect 
on civilization, physical properties, and chemical properties. (Kresge.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Agron. SI 10. Soil Management. (1) 

Summer session only. An advanced course primarily designed for teachers of 
vocational agriculture and county agents dealing with factors involved in man- 
agement of soils in general and of Maryland soils in particular. Emphasis is 
placed on methods of maintaining and improving chemical, physical, and bio- 
logical characteristics of soils. (Strickling.) 

Agron. 111. Soil Fertility Principles. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-67.) Three lectures a week. 
Prerequisite, Agron. 10. A study of the chemical, physical, and biological 
characteristics of soils that are important in growing crops. Soil deficiencies of 
physical, chemical, or biological nature and their correction by the use of lime, 
fertilizers, and rotations are discussed and illustrated. (Strickling.) 

Agron. 112. Commercial Fertilizers. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Agron. 10 or permis- 
sion of instructor. A study of the manufacturing of commerical fertilizers and 
their use in soils for efficient crop production. (Axley.) 

Agron. 113. Soil Conservation. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-67.) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 10 or permission of instruc- 
tor. A study of the importance and causes of soil erosion, and methods of soil 
erosion control. Special emphasis is placed on farm planning for soil conser- 
vation. The laboratory period will be largely devoted to field trips. 

46 



Agronomy — Crops, Soils, and Geology 
Agron. 114. Soil Classification and Geography. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequi- 
site, Agron. 10, or permission of instructor. A study of the genesis, morphol- 
ogy, classification and geographic distribution of soils. The broad principles 
governing soil formation are explained. Attention is given to the influence of 
geographic factors on the development and use of the soils in the United States 
and other parts of the world. The laboratory periods will be largely devoted 
to the field trips and to a study of soil maps of various countries. 

(Fanning.) 
Agron. 116. Soil Chemistry. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-67.) One lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 10, or permission of instructor. 
A study of the chemical composition of soils; cation and anion exchange; acid, 
alkaline and saline soil conditions; and soil fixation of plant nutrients. Chemical 
methods of soil analysis will be studied with emphasis on their relation to 
fertilizer requirements. (Axley.) 

Agron. 117. Soil Physics. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1967-68.) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 10 and a course in physics, or 
permission of instructor. A study of physical properties of soils with special 
emphasis on relationship to soil productivity. (Strickling.) 

Agron. 119. Soil Mineralogy. (4) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1967-68.) Two lectures and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. A study of 
the fundamental laws and forms of crystal symmetry and essentials of crystal 
structure; structure, occurrence, association and use of minerals; and determina- 
tion of minerals by means of their morphological chemical and physical 
properties. Particular attention is given to soil-forming minerals. Laboratory 
periods will be devoted to a systematic study of about 75 minerals. 
Additional courses under CROPS AND SOILS. (Siegrist.) 

For Graduates 
Agron. 250. Advanced Soil Mineralogy. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-67.) Three lectures a week. Pre- 
requisites, Agron. 10, Agron. 119 and permission of instructor. A study of the 
structure physical-chemical characteristics and identification methods of soil 
minerals, particularly clay minerals, and their relationship to soil genesis and 
productivity. (Fanning.) 

Agron. 251. Advanced Methods of Soil Investigation. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1967-68.) Three lectures a week. 
Prerequisites, Agron. 10 and permission of instructor. An advanced study of 
the theory of the chemical methods of soil investigation with emphasis on prob- 
lems involving application of physical chemistry. (Axley.) 

Agron, 252. Advanced Soil Physics. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1967-68.) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 10 and permission of instructor. 
An advanced study of physical properties of soils with special emphasis on rela- 
tionship to soil productivity. (Strickling.) 

47 



Agronomy — Crops, Soils and Geology 

Agron. 253. Advanced Soil Chemistry. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Offered 1966-67.) One lecture and two lab- 
oratory periods a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. A continuation 
of Agron. 116 with emphasis on soil chemistry of minor elements necessary 
for plant growth. (Axley.) 

Additional courses under CROPS AND SOILS. 



CROPS AND SOaS 

For Advanced Undergraduates 
Agron. 198. Special Problems in Agronomy. (1) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Agron. 10, 107, 108 or permission of instructor. 
A detailed study, including a written report of an important problem in agro- 
nomy. (Staff.) 

Agron. 199. Senior Seminar. (1) 

First semester. Reports by seniors on current scientific and practical publications 
pertaining to agronomy. (Miller.) 

For Graduates 
Agron. 260. Recent Advances in Agronomy. (2-4) 

First semester. Two hours each year. Total credit four hours. Prerequisite, per- 
mission of instructor. A study of recent advances in agronomy research. 

(Staff.) 

Agron. 302. Agronomy Seminar. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters. Total credit toward M. S. 2; toward Ph.D., 6. 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. (Staff.) 

Agron. 399. Research. 

First and second semesters. Credit according to work done. (Staff.) 

GEOLOGY 

Geol. 1. Geology. (3) 

First and second semester. Three lectures or two lectures and one laboratory 
each week. A study dealing primarily with the principles of dynamical and 
structural geology. Designed to give a general survey of the rocks and minerals 
composing the earth; the movement within it; and its surface features and the 
agents that form them. (Fernow.) 

Geol. 2. Historical and Stratigraphic Geology. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures or two lectures and one laboratory each week. 
Prerequisite, Geol. 1. A study of the earth's history as revealed through the 
principles of stratigraphy and the processes of physical geology, with emphasis 
on the formations and the geologic development of the North American con- 
tinent. (Fernow.) 



48 



i 



Animal Science 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Geol. 119. Soil Mineralogy. (4) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1967-68.) Two lectures and two lab- 
oratory periods a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. A study of the 
fundamental laws and forms of crystal symmetry and essentials of crystal 
structure; structure, occurrence, association and use of minerals; and deter- 
mination of minerals by means of their morphological, chemical and physical 
properties. Particular attention is given to soil-forming minerals. Laboratory 
periods will be devoted to a systematic study of about 75 minerals. (Siegrist.) 

ANIMAL SCIENCE 

ANIMAL: 

Professors: Foster and Green. 

Associate Professors: BuRic, Leffel and Young. 

DAIRY: 

Professor: Davis. 

Associate Professors: Hemken, Stewart, Williams and Vandersall. 

Lecturer: Plowman. 

POULTRY: 

Professors: Shaffner and Combs. 

Associate Professors: Quigley, Creek and Wilcox. 

VETERINARY SCIENCE: 

Professor: DeVolt. 

Assistant Professor: Brown. 

An. Sc. 1. Principles of Animal Science. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one, two-hour laboratory period per week. 
A comprehensive course, including the development of animal science, its con- 
tributions to the economy, characteristics of animal products, factors of efficient 
and economical production and distribution. (Young.) 

An. Sc. 10. Feeds and Feeding. (3) 

First semester. Credit not allowed for An. Sc. major. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 1 and 3. Elements of nutri- 
tion, source, characteristics and adaptability of the various feedstuffs to the 
several classes of livestock. A study of the composition of feeds, the nutrient 
requirements of farm animals and the formulation of economic diets and rations 
for livestock. (Leffel.) 

49 



Animal Science 

An, Sc. 20. Fundamentals of Animal Production. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. This course 
deals with the adaptation of beef cattle, sheep, swine and horses to significant 
and specific uses. Breeding, feeding, management practices and criteria for 
evaluating usefulness are emphasized. (Young.) 

An. Sc. 21. Seminar. (1) 

First semester. One lecture per week. Reviews, reports and discussions of 
pertinent subjects in Animal Science. (Staff.) 

An. Sc. 22. Livestock Evaluation. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Pre- 
requisite, An. Sc. 20 or permission of instructor. A study of type and breed 
characteristics of beef cattle, sheep and swine and of the market classes of 
livestock which best meet present day demands. One field trip of about two 
days duration is made during which students participate in the Annual East- 
ern Intercollegiate Livestock Clinic. (Buric.) 

An. Sc. 40. Dairy Production. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequi- 
site, An. Sc. 1. A comprehensive course in dairy breeds, selection of dairy 
cattle, dairy cattle nutrients, feeding and management. (Hemken.) 

An. Sc. 41. Dairy Cattle Type Appraisal. (1) 

Second semester. Freshmen, by permission of instructor. Two laboratory pe- 
riods. Analysis of dairy cattle type with emphasis on the comparative judging 
of dairy cattle. (Stewart.) 

An. Sc. 61. Advanced Poultry Judging. (1) 

First semester. Prerequisite, An. Sc. 1. One lecture or laboratory period per 
week. The theory and practice of judging and culling by physical means is 
emphasized, including correlation studies of characteristics associated with pro- 
ductivity. Contestants for regional collegiate judging competitions will be 
selected from this class. 

An. Sc. 62. Commercial Poultry Management. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, An. Sc. 1. A symposium of finance, investment, 
plant layout, specialization, purchase of supplies and management problems in 
baby chick, egg, broiler and turkey production; foremanship, advertising, sell- 
ing, by-products, production and financial records. Field trips required. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
An. Sc. 109. Fundamentals of Nutrition. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Org. Chem. 31. A 
study of the fundamental role of all nutrients in the body, including their 
digestion, absorption, and metabolism. Dietary requirements and nutritional 
deficiency syndromes of laboratory and farm animals and man will be con- 
sidered. This course will be for both graduate and undergraduate credit, with 
additional assignments given to the graduate students. (Combs.) 

50 



Animal Science 
An. Sc. 110. Applied Animal Nutrition. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequi- 
site, Math. 10, An. Sc. 15 or permission of instructor. A critical study of those 
factors which influence the nutritional requirements of ruminants, swine and 
poultry. Practical feeding methods and procedures used in formulation of 
economically efficient rations will be presented. (Vandersall.) 

An Sc. 116. Anatomy of Domestic Animals. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods per week. A syste- 
matic comparative study of the pig, ruminants and fowl, with special emphasis 
of those systems important in animal production. Prerequisite, Zoology 1. 

(Brown.) 

An. Sc. 117. Introduction to Diseases of Animals. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. This 
course gives basic instruction in the nature of disease: including causation, 
immunity, methods of diagnosis, economic importance, public health aspects 
and prevention and control of the common diseases of sheep, cattle, swine, 
horses and poultry. Prerequisite, Micro. 1 and Zoology 1. (Brown.) 

An. Sc. 118. Wildlife Management. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory. An introduction to the 
interrelationships of game birds and mammals with their environment, popula- 
tion dynamics and the principles of wildlife management. (Flyger.) 

An. Sc, 120. Advanced Livestock Judging. (2) 

First semester. Two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, An. Sc. 22 
and permission of instructor. An advanced course in the selection and judging 
of purebred and commercial meat animals. The most adept students enrolled 
in this course are chosen to represent the University of Maryland in Inter- 
collegiate Livestock judging contests. (Buric.) 

An. Sc. .121. Meats. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Pre- 
requisite. An. Sc. 20. Registration limited to 14 students. A course designed 
to give the basic facts about meat as a food and the factors influencing ac- 
ceptability, marketing, and quality of fresh meats. It includes comparisons of 
charcteristics of live animals with their carcasses, grading and evaluating 
carcasses as well as wholesale cuts, and the distribution and merchandizing of 
the nation's meat supply. Laboratory periods are conducted in packing houses, 
meat distribution centers, and retail outlets. (Buric.) 

An. Sc. 122. Livestock Management. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
Ag. Sc. 109. Application of various phases of animal science to the manage- 
ment and production of beef cattle, sheep and swine. (Foster.) 

An. Sc. 123. Livestock Management. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequi- 
site, An. Sc. 122. Applications of various phases of animal science to the man- 
agement and production of beef cattle, sheep and swine. (Leflfel.) 

51 



Animal Science 

An. Sc. 130. Principles of Breeding. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, Zoology 6 or 
Bot. 117. Graduate credit (1-3 hours) allowed with permission of instructor. 
The practical aspects of animal breeding, heredity, variation, selection, develop- 
ment, systems of breeding and pedigree study are considered. (Green.) 

An. Sc. S131. Special Topics in Animal Science. (1) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Summer session only. This course is 
designed primarily for teachers of vocational agriculture and Extension Service 
personnel. One primary topic, to be selected mutually by the instructor and 
students, will be presented each session. 

An, Sc. 140. Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one three-hour laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisite, Zoology 102 or 104. Anatomy and physiology of the reproductive 
process and artificial insemination of cattle. (Williams.) 

An. Sc. 141. Physiology of Milk Secretion. (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and one three-hour laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisite, Zoology 102 or 104. The anatomy and growth of the mammary 
gland and the metabolism and physiology of biosynthesis in the ruminant. 

(WilUams.) 

An. Sc. 142. Dairy Cattle Breeding. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Pre- 
requisites, An. Sc. 40, Zoology 6 or Bot. 117. A specialized course in breed- 
ing dairy cattle. Emphasis is placed on methods or evaluation and selection, 
systems of breeding and breeding programs. (Plowman.) 

An. Sc. S143. Advanced Dairy Production. (1) 

Summer session only. An advanced course primarily designed for teachers of 
vocational agriculture and county agents. It includes a study of the newer 
discoveries in dairy cattle nutrition, breeding and management. 

An. Sc. 161. Poultry Genetics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, An. Sc. 1 and Zoology 6. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period per week. Inheritance of factors related to egg and 
meat production and quality are stressed. An experiment utilizing procedures 
of pedigree matings will be performed in the laboratory. (Wilcox.) 

An. Sc. 162. Avian Physiology. (2) 

First semester. One three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites. 
Zoology 102 or 104 and An. Sc. 116. The basic physiology of the bird is dis- 
cussed, excluding the reproductive system. Special emphasis is given to physio- 
logical differences between birds and other vertebrates. (Wilcox.) 

An. Sc. S163. Poultry Breeding and Feeding. (1) 

Summer session only. This course is designed primarily for teachers of voca- 
tional agriculture and extension service workers. The first half will be devoted 
to problems concerning breeding and the development of breeding stock. The 
second half will be devoted to nutrition. (Combs, Wilcox.) 

An. Sc. S164. Poultry Products and Marketing. (1) 

Summer session only. This course is designed primarily for teachers of voca- 
tional agriculture and county agents. It deals with the factors affecting the 

52 



Animal Science 

quality of poultry products and with hatchery management problems, egg and 
poultry grading, preservation problems and market outlets for Maryland 
poultry. (Helbacka.) 

An. Sc, 165. Physiology OF Hatchability. (1) 

Second semester. One, three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, 
Zoology 102 or 104. The physiology of embryonic development as related to 
principles of hatchability and problems of incubation encountered in the hatch- 
ery industry are discussed. (Shaffner.) 

An. Sc. 170. Poultry Hygiene. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Pre- 
requisites, Microb. 1 and An. Sc. 1. Virus, bacterial and protozoon diseases; 
parasitic diseases, prevention, control and eradication. (DeVolt.) 

An. Sc. 171. Avian Anatomy. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite, Zoo- 
logy 1. Gross and microscopic structure, dissection and demonstration. 

(DeVolt.) 

An. Sc. 198. Special Problems In Animal Science (1-2) (4 cr. max.) 

First and second semester. Prerequisite, approval of staff. Work assigned in 
proportion to amount of credit. A course designed for advanced undergrad- 
uates in which specific problems relating to animal science will be assigned. 

(Staff.) 

An. Sc. 199. Seminar. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, permission of staff. Presentation and 
discussion of current literature and research work in animal science. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 
An. Sc. 200. Electron Microscopy. (3) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and two laboratory periods per week. 
Theory of the electron microscope, preparation of specimens, manipulations 
and photography. (Chang.) 

An. Sc. 220. Advanced Breeding. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, An. Sc. 130 or equiva- 
lent and Biological Statistics. This course deals with the more technical phases 
of heredity and variation; selection indices; breeding systems; inheritance in 
farm animals. (Green.) 

An. Sc. 221. Energy and Protein Nutrition. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Chem. 31 and 33, or equivalent. An. Sc. 110, 
or permission of Instructor. Three lectures per week. A study of animal 
energetics and the basic descriptions of animals relative to the requirements 
for energy and protein. Literature dealing with nutrition research techniques 
and energy and protein utilization and requirements is surveyed. 

(Leffel, Combs.) 



53 



Animal Science 

An. Sc. 240. Advanced Ruminant Nutrition. (3) 

First semester. Two, one-hour lectures and one, two-hour laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite, permission of department. Biochemical physiological and bac- 
teriological aspects of the nutrition of ruminants and other animals. 

(Vandersall.) 

An. Sc. 241. Research Methods. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
permission of instructor. The application of biochemical, physio-chemical and 
statistical methods to problems in biological research. (Keeney.) 

An. Sc. 242. Experimental Mammalian Surgery, I. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Zool. 102 or 104. Permission of instructor. A 
course presenting the fundamentals of anesthesia and the art of experimental 
surgery, especially to obtain research preparation. (Stewart.) 

An. Sc. 243. Experimental Mammalian Surgery, II. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, An. Sc. 242. Permission of Instructor. A 
course emphasizing advanced surgical practice to obtain research preparations, 
cardiovascular surgery and chronic vascularly isolated organ techniques, experi- 
ence with pump oxygenator systems, profound hypothermia, hemodialysis, in- 
fusion systems, implantation and transplantation procedures are taught 

(Stewart.) 

An. Sc. 261. Physiology of Reproduction. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, 
Zoology 104 or its equivalent. The role of the endocrines in reproduction is 
considered. Fertility, sexual maturity, egg formation, ovulation and the physi- 
ology of oviposition are studied. Comparative mammalian functions are dis- 
cussed. (Shaflfner.) 

An. Sc. 262. Poultry Literature. (1-4) 

First and second semesters. Readings on individual topics are assigned. Writ- 
ten reports required. Methods of analysis and presentation of scientific 
material are discussed. (Staff.) 

An. Sc. 263. Poultry Nutrition Laboratory. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one laboratory period per week. To acquaint 
graduate students with common basic nutrition research techniques useful in 
conducting experiments with poultry. Actual feeding trials with chicks as well 
as bacteriological and chemical assays will be performed. (Creek.) 

An. Sc. 264. Vitamins. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one two-hour lab per week. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 161. Advanced study of the fundamental role of vitamins in nutrition, 
including their chemical properties, absorption, metabolism, storage, excretion 
and deficiency syndromes. A critical study of the biochemical basis of vitamin 
function, interrelationships of vitamins with other substances, and of certain 
special laboratory techniques. (Combs.) 

An. Sc. 265. Mineral Metabolism. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years (offered 1966). Two lectures per week. 
Prerequisites, Chem. 161, 163. The role of minerals in metabolism with special 
emphasis on the needs of man and animals. (Creek.) 

54 



Botany 
An. Sc. 301. Special Problems in Animal Science (1-2) (4 cr. max.) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, approval of staff. Work assigned in 
proportion to amount of credit. Problems will be assigned which relate spe- 
cifically to the character of work the student is pursuing. 

An. Sc. 302. Seminar. (1) 

First and second semester. Students are required to prepare papers, based upon 
current scientific publications relating to Animal Science, or upon their research 
work, for presentation before and discussion by the class; (1) Recent advances; 
(2) Nutrition; (3) Physiology; (4) Biochemistry. 

An. Sc. 399. Research. (1-12) 

First and second semesters. Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. 
Students will be required to pursue original research in some phase of animal 
science, carrying the same to completion, and report the results in the form of 
a thesis. 



BOTANY 

Professors: Krauss, Bamford, Gauch, D. T. Morgan, Sisler and 
Weaver. 

Associate Professors: Brown, Galloway, Kantzes, Krusberg, Lockard, 
Mans, O. D. Morgan, Paterson and Rappleye. 

Assistant Professors: Klarman, Terborgh, Harrison, Bean, 
and Patterson. 

Instructor: Edwards. 

BoT. 1. General Botany. (4) 

First and second semesters. Summer session. Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week. Laboratory fee, $6.00. General introduction to botany, touch- 
ing briefly on all phases of the subject. Emphasis is on the fundamental bio- 
logical principles of the higher plants. 

BoT. 2. General Botany. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequi- 
site, Bot. 1 or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $6.00. A brief evolutionary study of 
algae, fungi, liverworts, mosses, ferns and their relatives, and the seed plants, 
emphasizing their structure, reproduction, habitats, and economic importance. 

BoT. 10. Principles of Conservation. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. A study of the principles of econom- 
ical use of our natural resources, including water, soil, plants, minerals, wildlife 
and man. 

Bot. 11. Plant Taxonomy. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
Bot. 1, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $6.00. An introductory study of plant 
classification, based on the collection and identification of local plants. 

55 



Botany 

BoT. 20. Diseases of Plants. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
Bot. 1, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $6.00. An introductory study of the 
symptoms and causal agents of plant diseases and measures for their control. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Bot. 110. Plant Microtechnique. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
Bot. 1, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $6.00. An introductory study of plant 
classification, based on the collection and identification of local plants. Exam- 
inations, including the preparation of temporary and permanent mounts, and 
photomicrography. (Paterson.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Bot. 195. Tutorial Readings in Botany. (Honors Course) (2 or 3) 

Prerequisite, admission to the Department of Botany Honors Program. A re- 
view of the literature dealing with a specific research problem in preparation 
for original research to be accomplished in Botany 196. Papers will be as- 
signed and discussed in frequent sessions with the instructor. 

Bot. 196. Research Problems in Botany. (Honors Course) (2 or 3) 

Prerequisite, Bot. 195. Laboratory fee, $10.00. The candidate for Honors will 
pursue a research problem under the direction and close supervision of a mem- 
ber of the faculty. 

Bot. 199. Seminar. (1) 

First and second semesters. Two semester hours maximum credit. Prerequi- 
site, permission of instructor. Discussion and readings on special topics, cur- 
rent literature, or problems and progress in all phases of botany. Minor ex- 
perimental work may be pursued if facilities and the qualifications of the 
students permit. For seniors only, majors and minors in botany or biological 
science. (Brown.) 

PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Bot. 101. Plant Physiology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
Botany 1, General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry or the consent of the in- 
structor. Laboratory fee, $6.00. A survey of the general physiological activities 
of plants. (Krauss.) 

Bot. 102. Plant Ecology. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. A study of the different plant succes- 
sions and vegetational climaxes and their correlation with the climatic, soil, 
and biotic factors of the environment. (Brown.) 

Bot. 103. Plant Ecology Laboratory. (1) 

Prerequisite, Bot. 102 or its equivalent or concurrent enrollment therein. One 
three-hour laboratory period a week. Laboratory fee, $6.00. The application 
of field and other methods to these qualitative and quantitative study of vege- 
tation and environmental factors. (Brown.) 

56 



Botany 
BoT. 200. Plant Biochemistry. (2) 

First semester. (Not offered 1967-68.) Prerequisites, Bot. 101 and ele- 
mentary organic chemistry, or equivalent. A study of the important substances 
in the composition of the plant body and the chemical changes occurring 
therein. (Galloway.) 

BoT. 201. Plant Biochemistry Laboratory. (2) 

First semester. (Not offered 1967-68.) Two laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, Bot. 200 or concurrent registration therein. Laboratory fee. $10.00. 
Application of apparatus and techniques to the study of the chemistry of plant 
materials. (Galloway, Gauch.) 

BoT. 202. Plant Biophysics. (2) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1966-67.) Prerequisite, Bot. 101 and intro- 
ductory physics, or equivalent. An advanced course dealing with the operation 
of physical phenomena in plant life processes. (Galloway.) 

Bot. 203. Biophysical Methods. (2) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1966-67.) Two laboratory periods a week. 
Laboratory course to accompany Bot. 202. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

(Galloway, Gauch.) 

Bot. 204. Growth and Development. (2) 

First semester. (Not offered 1966-67.) Prerequisite, 12 semester hours of 
plant science. A study of current developments in the mathematical treatment 
of growth and the effects of radiation, plant hormones, photoperiodism, and in- 
ternal biochemical balance during the development of the plant. (Krauss.) 

Bot. 205. Mineral Nutrition of Plants. (2) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1967 68.) Reports on current literature are 
presented and discussed in connection with recent advances in the mineral 
nutrition of plants. (Paterson.) 

Bot. 209. Physiology of Algae. (2) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1967-1968.) Prerequisite, Bot. 201, the equiva- 
lent in allied fields, or permission of the instructor. A study of the physiology 
and comparative biochemistry of the algae. Laboratory techniques and recent 
advances in algal nutrition, photosynthesis, and growth will be reviewed. 

(Krauss.) 

Bot. 210. Physiology of Algae-Laboratory. (1) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1967-1968.) One laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisites, previous or concurrent enrollment in Bot. 209, and permission of in- 
structor. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Special laboratory techniques involved in 
the study of algal nutrition. (Krauss.) 

Bot. 219. Advanced Plant Ecology. (2) 

Fall semester. (Not offered 1967-68.) Prerequisite, Bot. 102 or equivalent 
and permission of instructor. Discussion of current developments in ecology, 
with emphasis on quantitative and radioecological techniques and the energy 
exchanges in ecological systems. Field trips and problems will be arranged. 
Lab fee, $10.00. (Brown, Terborgh.) 

57 



Botany 

PLANT MORPHOLOGY, CYTOLOGY AND TAXONOMY 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Box. in. Plant Anatomy. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
Bot. 110, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. The origin and development of 
the organs and tissue systems in the vascular plants. (Rappleye.) 

BoT. 113. Plant Geography. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 1, or equivalent. A study of plant distribution 
throughout the world and the factors generally associated with such distribu- 
tion. (Brown.) 

BoT. 115. Structure of Economic Plants. (3) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1967-68.) One lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. IH. Laboratory fee, $5.00. A detailed 
microscopic study of the anatomy of the chief fruit and vegetable crops. 

(Rappleye.) 

BoT. 116. History and Philosophy of Botany. (1) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1966-67.) Prerequisites, 20 semester hours 
credit in biological sciences, including Bot. 1 or equivalent. Discussion of the 
development and ideas and knowledge about plants, leading to a survey of 
contemporary work in botanical science. (Bamford.) 

Bot. 117. General Plant Genetics. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 or equivalent. The basic principles of 
plant genetics are presented; the mechanics of transmission of the hereditary 
factors in relation to the life cycle of seed plants, the genetics of specialized 
organs and tissues, spontaneous and induced mutations of basic and economic 
significance, gene action, genetic maps, the fundamentals of polyloidy, and 
genetics in relation to methods of plant breeding are the topics considered. 

(Mans, D. T. Morgan.) 

Bot. 136. Plants and Mankind. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 or equivalent. A survey of the plants which 
are utilized by man, the diversity of such utilization, and their historic and 
economic significance. (Rappleye.) 

Bot. 151S. Teaching Methods in Botany. (2) 

Summer session. Four two-hour laboratory demonstration periods per week 
for eight weeks. Prerequisite, Bot. 1, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 
A study of the biological principles of common plants, and demonstrations, 
projects, and visual aids suitable for teaching in primary and secondary schools. 

(Lockard.) 

Bot. 153. Field Botany and Taxonomy. (2) 

Summer session. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 or General Biology. Four two-hour 
laboratory periods a week for eight weeks. Laboratory fee, $5.00. The identi- 
fication of trees, shrubs, and herbs, emphasizing the native plants of Maryland. 
Manuals, keys, and other techniques will be used. Numerous short field trips 
will be taken. Each student will make an individual collection. (Brown.) 

58 



Botany 
BoT. 161. Systematic Botany. (2) 

Fall semester. (Not offered 1966-67.) Two two-hour laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisite, Bot. 11 or equivalent. An advanced study of the prin- 
ciples of systematic botany. Laboratory practice with difficult plant families 
including grasses, sedges, legumes, and composites. Field trips arranged. Lab 
Fee $6.00. (Brown.) 

For Graduates 

Bot. 211. Cytology. (4) 

First semester. (Not offered 1967-68.) Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, introductory genetics. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 
A detailed study of the chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis, and the relation 
of these to current theories of heredity and evolution. 

(Bamford, D. T. Morgan.) 

Bot. 212. Plant Morphology. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites. 
Bot. 11, Bot. Ill, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. A comparative study 
of the morphology of the flowering plants, with special reference to the phylo- 
geny and development of floral organs. (Rappleye.) 

Bot. 215. Plant Cytogenetics. (3) 

First semester. (Not offered 1966-67.) Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisite, introductory genetics. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 
An advanced study of the current status of plant genetics, particularly gene 
mutations and their relation to chromosome changes in corn and other favor- 
able materials. (D. T. Morgan, Mans.) 



PLANT PATHOLOGY 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Bot. 122. Research Methods in Plant Pathology. (2) 

First semester. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equiva- 
lent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Advanced training in the basic research techniques 
and methods of plant pathology. (Klarman.) 

Bot. 123. Diseases of Ornamental Plants. (2) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1966-67.) Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. 
Symptoms, control measures, and other periment information concernmg the 
diseases which affect important ornamental plants grown in the eastern states. 

(Klarman.) 

Bot. 124. Diseases of Tobacco and Agronomic Crops. (2) 

First semester. (Not oflf^ered 1967-68.) Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. 
The symptoms and control of the diseases of tobacco, forage crops and cereal 
grains. (O. D. Morgan.) 



59 



Botany 

BoT. 125. Diseases of Fruit Crops. (2) 

First semester. (Not offered 1966-67.) Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. 
Symptoms and control of the diseases affecting fruit production in the eastern 
United States. (Weaver.) 

BoT. 126. Diseases of Vegetable Crops. (2) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1967-68.) Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equiva- 
lent. The recognition and control of diseases affecting the production of im- 
portant vegetable crops grown in the eastern United States. (Kantzes.) 

BoT. 128. Mycology. (4) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1967-68.) Laboratory fee, $6.00. An intro- 
ductory study of the morphology, classification, life histories, and economics 
of the fungi. (Paterson.) 

BoT. 152S. Field Plant Pathology. (1) 

Summer session. Daily lecture for three weeks. Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equiva- 
lent. Given in accordance with demand. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Not offered 
1964.) A course for county agents and teachers of vocational agriculture. Dis- 
cussion and denomination of the important diseases in Maryland crops. 

For Graduates 

Bot. 221. Plant Virology. (3) 

First semester. (Not offered 1967-68.) Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 20 and Bot. 101 or equivalent. Laboratory 
fee, $10.00. Consideration of the biological, biochemical and biophysical as- 
pects of plant viruses and virus diseases. (Sisler.) 

Bot. 223. Physiology of Fungi. (2) 

First semester. (Not offered 1967-1968.) Prerequisites, Organic Chemistry and 
Bot. 101 or the equivalent in bacterial or animal physiology. A study of various 
aspects of fungal metabolism, nutrition, biochemical transformations, fungal 
products, and mechanism of fungicidal action. (Sisler.) 

Bot. 224. Physiology of Fungi Laboratory. (1) 

First semester. (Not offered 1967-1968.) One laboratory period per week.) 
Prerequisite, Bot. 223 or concurrent registration therein. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 
Application of equipment and techniques in the study of fungal physiology. 

(Sisler.) 

Bot. 226. Plant Disease Control. (3) 

First semester. (Not offered 1966-67.) Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. 
An advanced course dealing with the theory and practices of plant disease con- 
trol. (Staff.) 

Bot. 241. Plant Nematology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
Botany 20 or permission of instructor. (Not offered 1966-67.) Laboratory 
fee, $10.00. The study of plant-parasitic nematodes, their morphology, anatomy, 
taxonomy, genetics, physiology, ecology, host-parasite relations and control. 
Recent advances in this field will be emphasized. (Krusberg.) 

60 1 



Entomology 
BoT. 301. Special Problems in Botany. (1 to 3) 

First and second semester. Credit according to time scheduled and organiza- 
tion of course. Maximum credit toward an advanced degree for the individual 
student at the discretion of the Department. This course may be organized 
as a lecture series on a specialized advanced topic, or may consist partly, or 
entirely, of experimental procedures. It may be taught by visiting lecturers, 
or by resident staff members. Problems or topics may be in: 1 — Physiology; 
2 — Ecology; 3 — Pathology; 4 — Mycology; 5 — Nematology; 6 — Cytology; 7 — 
Cytogenetics; 8 — Morphology; 9 — Anatomy; or 10 — Taxonomy. (Staff.) 

BoT. 302. Seminar in Botany. ( 1 ) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Discus- 
sion of special topics and current literature in all phases of botany. (Staff.) 

BoT. 399. Research. 

Credit according to work done. A minimum of 6 credit hours is required for 
the M. S. degree, and an additional minimum of 12 hours is required for the 
Ph.D. degree. Students must be qualified to pursue with profit the research to 
be undertaken. (Staff.) 



ENTOMOLOGY 

Professors: Bickley and Jones. 

Associate Professors: Harrison and Messersmith. 

Lecturer: Haviland. 

Ent. 1. Introductory Entomology. (3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite, one semester of college zoology. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The 
position of insects in the animal kingdom, their gross structure, classification into 
orders and principal families and the general economic status of insects. A 
collection of common insects is required. 

Ent. 4. Beekeeping. (2) 

First semester. A study of the life history, behavior and seasonal activities 
of the honeybee, its place in pollination of flowers with emphasis on plants of 
economic importance and bee lore in literature. 

Ent. 20. Insect Pests of Agricultural Crops. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisites, Zool. 1 and Bot. 1. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The recognition, biology, 
and control of insects injurious to fruit and vegetable crops, field crops and 
stored products. 

Ent. 100. Advanced Apiculture. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, Ent. 4. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The theory and practice of apiary 
management. Designed for the student who wishes to keep bees or requires 
a practical knowledge of bee management. 

61 



Entomology 

Ent. 105. Medical Entomology. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisite, Ent. 1 or consent of the Department. Laboratory fee, $3.00. A 
study of insects and related arthropods that affect the health and comfort of man 
directly and as vectors of disease. In discussion of the control of such pests 
the emphasis will be upon community sanitation. (Messersmith.) 

Ent. 116. Insect Pests of Ornamentals and Greenhouse 
Plants. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisites, Bot. 1 and Zool. I. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The recognition, biology, 
and control of insects injurious to plants grown in ornamental plantings, nur- 
series, and under glass. (Haviland.) 

Ent. 119. Insect Pests of Domestic Animals. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisite Ent. 1, or consent of the Department. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The 
recognition, biology, and control of insects and related arthopods injurious to 
horses, cattle, hogs, sheep, goats, and poultry. 

Ent. 120. Insect Taxonomy and Biology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, Ent. 1. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Introduction to the principles of 
systematic entomology and the study of all orders and the important families 
of insects; immature forms considered. (Bickley.) 

Ent. S121. Entomology for Science Teachers. (4) 

Summer. Five lectures and five two-hour laboratory periods a week. Labora- 
tory fee, $3.00. This course will include the elements of morphology, taxonomy 
and biology of insects using examples commonly available to high school 
teachers. It will include practice in collecting, preserving, rearing and experi- 
menting with insects insofar as time will permit. 

Ent. 122. Insect Morphology. (4) 

First semester. (Not offered 1966-67.) Two lectures and two three-hour 
laboratory periods a week. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisite, Ent. 1. A 
basic study of insect form, structure and organization in relation to function. 

*Ent. 123. Insect Physiology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Laboratory fee, $15.00. Prerequisites, Ent. 1, Chem. 31 or equivalent. Lectures 
and laboratory exercises on the cuticle, growth, endocrines, muscles, circulation, 
nerves, digestion, excretion and reproduction in insects. (Jones.) 

Ent. 198. Special Problems. (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Credit and prerequisites, to be determined by the 
Department. Investigations of assigned entomological problems. (Staff.) 

Ent. 199. Seminar. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, senior standing. Presentation of origi- 
nal work, reviews and abstracts of literature. (Staff.) 



^Effective 1967-68. 

62 



Entomology 



For Graduates 



Ent. 205. Insect Ecology. (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite, consent of the Department. Laboratory fee, $3.00. A study of 
fundamental factors involved in the relationship of insects to their environment. 
Emphasis is placed on the insect as a dynamic organism adjusted to its sur- 
roundings. (Harrison.) 

Ent. 206. Culicidology. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. One lecture and one three-hour laboratory 
period a week. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The classification, distribution, ecology, 
biology, and control of mosquitoes. (Bickley.) 

Ent. 208. Toxicology of Insecticides. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory 
period a week. Lab fee, $15.00. Prerequisite, Chem. 31 or permission of instruc- 
tor. A study of the physical, chemical and biological properties of insecticides. 
Emphasis is placed on the relationship of chemical structure to insecticidal 
activity and mode of action. Mechanisms of resistance are also considered. 

(StafJ.) 

Ent. 209. Advances in Insect Physiology. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Ent. 123 
or consent of instructor. Lectures on current literature with reading assign- 
ments and discussion. (Jones.) 

Ent. 210. Entomological Topics. (Credit arranged) 

First and second semesters. One lecture or one two-hour laboratory a week 
for each credit hour. Prerequisite, consent of Department. Lectures, group 
discussions or laboratory sessions on selected topics such as: Aquatic Insects, 
Biological Control of Insects, Entomological Literature, Forest Entomology, 
History of Entomology, Insect Biochemistry, Insect Embryology, Immature 
Insects, Insect Behavior, Principles of Economic Entomology, Insect Communi- 
cation, Principles of Entomological Research. (Staff and visiting lecturers.) 

Ent. 301. Advanced Entomology. (1-6) 

Credit and prerequisites to be determined by the Department. First and second 
semesters. Studies of minor problems in morphology, taxonomy and applied 
entomology, with particular reference to the preparation of the student for 
individual research. (Staff.) 

Ent. 399. Research. 

First and second semesters. Required of graduate students majoring in ento- 
mology. This course involves research on an approved project. A dissertation 
suitable for publication must be submitted at the conclusion of the studies 
as a part of the requirement for an advanced degree. (Staff.) 



63 



Food Science 
FOOD SCIENCE 

Professors: Foster (Animal Science) 

Davis, Arbuckle and Keeney (Dairy Science) 
Stark'^ and Kramer (Horticulture) 
Shaffner (Poultry Science) 

Associate Professors: Buric (Animal Science) 

King and Mattick (Dairy Science) 
Wiley (Horticulture) 
Helbacka (Poultry Science) 

Assistant Professor: Katz (Dairy Science) 

Fd. Sc. 1. Introduction to Food Science. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. An introductory 
course to orient the student in the broad field of food science. Includes a 
historical and economic survey of the major food industries, composition and 
nutritive value, quality aspects, spoilage, preservation, sanitation, standards 
and regulation of foods. (Mattick.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Fd. Sc. 102. Principles of Food Processing — I. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. A study of the 
basic methods by which foods are preserved (unit operations). Effect of raw 
product quality and the various types of processes on yield and quality of the 
preserved products. (Wiley.) 

Fd. Sc. 103. Principles of Food Processing — II. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. A detailed study of food processing 
with emphasis on line and staff operations, including physical facilities, utilities, 
pre- and post-processing operations, processing line development and sanitation. 

(Mattick.) 

Fd. Sc. 111. Food Chemistry. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites, 
organic chemistry. The application of basic chemical and physical concepts to 
the composition and properties of foods. Emphasis will be on the relationship 
of processing technology on the keeping quality, nutritional value and ac- 
ceptability of foods. (King.) 

Fd, Sc. 112. Analytical Quality Control. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Instrumental and 
sensory measurement of food quality attributes including appearance, Theologi- 
cal, flavor, and microbiological evaluations, and their integration into grades 
and standards of quality. (Kramer.) 



^Chairman of Curriculum. 

64 



Food Science 
Fd. Sc. 113. Statistical Quality Control. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Statistical methods 
for acceptance sampling of supplies and raw materials, in-plant and finished 
product inspection, water, fuel, and waste control, production, transportation, 
inventory and budget controls. (Kramer.) 

Fd. Sc. 125. Meat and Meat Processing. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Physical and 
chemical characteristics of meat and meat products, meat processing, methods 
of testing and product development. 

Fd. Sc. 131. Food Product Research and Development. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures, one laboratory per week. A study of the 
research and development function for improvement of existing products and de- 
velopment of new, economically feasible and marketable food products. Appli- 
cation of chemical-physical characteristics of ingredients to produce optimum 
quality products, cost reduction, consumer evaluation, equipment and package 
development. (Staff.) 

Fd. Sc. 156. Horticultural Products Processing. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Laboratory fee 
$5.00. Commerical methods of canning, freezing, dehydrating, fermenting, and 
chemical preservation of fruit and vegetable crops. (Wiley.) 

Fd. Sc. 160. Technology of Market Eggs and Poultry. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. A study of the 
technological factors concerned with the processing, storage, and marketing of 
eggs and poultry and the factors affecting their quality. (Helbacka.) 

Fd. Sc. 182. Dairy Products Processing. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Method of pro- 
duction of fluid milk, butter, cheese, condensed and evaporated milk and milk 
products and ice cream. (Mattick.) 

Fd. Sc. 198. Special Problems in Food Science. (2, 2) (4 cr. max.) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, approval of staff. Designed for 
advanced undergraduates in which specific problems in food science will be 
assigned. (Staff.) 

Fd. Sc. 199. Seminar. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters. Presentation and discussion of current literature 
and research in food science. (Staff.) 

Mechanics of Food Processing 

See Agricultural Engineering, Agr. Eng. 113. 

Experimental Food Science 

See Food and Nurtition, Food 153. 

For Graduates 
See course offerings in Animal Science and in Horticulture. 



65 



Horticulture 
HORTICULTURE 

Professors: Stark, Haut, Kramer, Link, Reynolds, Scott, Shanks and 
Thompson. 

Associate Professors: Wiley and Snyder. 

Assistant Professors: Angell, Baker and Soergel. 

HoRT. 5. Tree Fruit Production. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite Bot. 1. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. 
A detailed study of the principles and practices in fruit production, harvesting, 
and storage, with emphasis on the apple. One field trip required. (Thompson.) 

HoRT. 6. Tree Fruit Production. (2) 

Second semester. (Offered 1967-68.) Two lectures per week. Prerequisite 
Hort. 5. A study of the principles and practices in fruit production, harvesting, 
and handling of deciduous tree fruit crops other than the apple. (Thompson.) 

HoRT. 11. Greenhouse Management. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite Bot. 1. A study of the 
construction and operation of structures for forcing horticultural crops and the 
principles underlying the regulation of plant growth under greenhouse con- 
ditions. (Shanks.) 

HoRT. 12. Greenhouse Management Laboratory. (1) 

First semester. One two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite or concurrent 
Hort. 11. Demonstration and application of practices in the commercial pro- 
duction of greenhouse crops. (Shanks.) 

HoRT. 16. Garden Management. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite Bot. 1. The planting 
and care of ornamental plants on the home grounds and a study of commonly 
used species of annuals and herbaceous perennials. (Link.) 

HoRT. 17. Flower Production Laboratory. (1) 

Second semester. One two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite or concurrent 
Hort. 11 or 16. Demonstration and application of practices in the production 
of garden and greenhouse plants. (Link.) 

HoRT. 20. Introduction to the Art of Landscaping. (3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures per week. The theory and general 
principles of landscape design with their application to public and private areas. 

(Soergel.) 

HoRT. 30. Elements OF Forestry. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1967-68.) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period per week. Prerequisite Bot. 1. Not open to freshmen. A 
general survey of the field of forestry, including timber values, conservation, 
protection, silviculture, utilization, mensuration, engineering, recreation and 
lumbering. Principles and practices of woodland management. 

66 



Horticulture 
HoRT. 56. Basic Landscape Composition. (2) 

First and second semesters. Two laboratory periods per week. The introduction 
of landscaping presentation technique, supplemented by problems in basic 
composition. (Soergel.) 

Hort. 58. Vegetable Production. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequi- 
site, Bot. 1. A study of the principles and practices of commercial vegetable 
production. (Reynolds.) 

HoRT. 59. Berry Production. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
Bot. 1. A study of the principles and practices involved in the production of 
small fruits including grapes, strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, and cran- 
berries. (Angell.) 

HoRT. 62. Plant Propagation. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite Bot. 1. A study of the 
principles and practices of the propagation of plants. (Baker.) 

HoRT. 63. Flower Store Management. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-67.) Two lectures and labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisite, Hort. 11. Laboratory fee, $5.00. A study 
of the operation and management of a flower store. Laboratory period devoted 
to principles and practice of floral arrangements and decoration. (Link.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates 
Hort, 100. Principles of Landscape Design. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite 
Hort. 20 and Hort. 56. A consideration of design criteria and procedure as 
applied to residential properties. (Soergel.) 

Hort. 152. Advanced Landscape Design. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-67.) One lecture and two 
laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite Hort. 100, prerequisite or concurent 
Hort. 108. The design of public and private areas with the major emphasis 
on plant materials. (Soergel.) 

Hort. 153. Landscape Construction. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1967-68.) One lecture and two 
laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite Hort. 100. An introductory study and 
application of location methods, construction details, and construction tech- 
niques of the various landscape objects such as walks, walls, benches, roads. 

(Soergel.) 

Hort. 199. Seminar. (1) 

Second semester. Oral presentation of the results of investigational work by 
reviewing recent scientific literature in the various phases of horticulture. 

(Staff.) 



67 



Horticulture 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
HoRT. 101. Technology of Fruits. (3) 

First semester. (Offered 1966-67.) TTiree lectures per week. Prerequisite 
Hort. 6; prerequisite or concurrent Bot. 101. A critical analysis of research 
work and application of the principles of plant physiology, chemistry, and 
botany to practical problems in commercial production. (Thompson.) 

HoRT. 103. Technology of Vegetables. (3) 

Second semester. (Offered 1967-68.) Three lectures per week. Prerequisite 
Hort. 58; prerequisite or concurrent Bot. 101. A critical analysis of research 
work and application of the principles of plant physiology, chemistry, and 
botany to practical problems of commercial vegetable production. (Reynolds.) 

HoRT. 105. Technology of Ornamentals. (2) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite or concurrent Bot. 101. 
A study of the physiological processes of the plant as related to the growth, 
flowering and storage of ornamental plants. (Link.) 

HoRT. 107, 108. Woody Plant Materials. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Bot. 11. A field and laboratory 
study of trees, shrubs, and vines used in ornamental plantings. (Baker.) 

HoRT. 114. Systematic Horticulture. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. A study of 
the origin, taxonomic relationship and horticultural classification of fruits and 
vegetables. (Angell.) 

HoRT. SI 15. Truck Crop Management. (1) 

Summer session only. Primarily designed for teachers of vocational agricul- 
ture and extension agents. Special emphasis will be placed upon new and im- 
proved methods of production of the leading truck crops. Current problems 
and their solution will receive special attention. 

HoRT. SI 24. Tree and Small Fruit Management. (1) 

Summer session only. Primarily designed for vocational agriculture teachers 
and county agents. Special emphasis will be placed upon new and improved 
commercial methods of production of the leading tree and small fruit crops. Cur- 
rent problems and their solution will receive special attention. 

HoRT. S125. Ornamental Horticulture. (1) 

Summer session only. A course designed for teachers of agriculture and ex- 
tension agents to place special emphasis on problems of the culture and use 
of ornamental plants. 

Hort. 161. Physiology of Maturation and Storage of 
Horticultural Crops. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-67.) Two lectures a week. 
Prerequisite, Bot. 101. Factors related to maturation and application of scien- 
tific principles to handling and storage of horticultural crops. (Scott.) 

HoRT. 162. Fundamentals of Greenhouse Crop Production. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite Hort. 11. This course 
deals with a study of the commerical production and marketing of ornamental 
plant crops under greenhouse, plastic houses and out-of-door conditions. 

(Shanks.) 

68 



* 



Horticulture 
HoRT. 163. Production and Maintenance of Woody Plants. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1967-68). Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite or concurrent Hort. 62; 108. A study 
of the production methods and operation of a commerical nursery and the 
planting and care of woody plants in the landscape. (Link.) 

HoRT. 198. Special Problems. (2, 2) (4 cr. max.) 

First and second semesters. Credit arranged according to work done. For 
major students in horticulture or botany. Four credits maximum per student. 

(Staff.) 

Also see Food Science 102, 112, 113, 156 

For Graduates 
HoRT. 201, 202. Experimental Pomology. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. A systematic review of 
scientific knowledge and practical observations as applied to commercial prac- 
tices in pomology. (Thompson.) 

Hort. 203, 204, 205. Experimental Olericulture. (2, 2, 2) 

First semester and in sequence. Prerequisite, Bot. 101, a systematic review of 
scientific knowledge and practical observation as applied to commercial prac- 
tices in olericulture. (Reynolds, Snyder.) 

HoRT. 206. Experimental Floriculture. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. A systematic review of scientific knowl- 
edge and practical observation as applied to commercial practices in flori- 
culture. (Link.) 

Hort. 207. Methods of Horticultural Research. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and one four-hour laboratory period a week. 
A critical study of research methods which are or may be used in horticulture. 

(Scott.) 

Hort. 210. Experimental Processing. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. A systematic review 
of scientific knowledge and practical observations as applied to commercial 
practices in processing. (Kramer.) 

Hort. 302. Advanced Seminar. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters. Oral reports with illustrative material are required 
on special topics or recent research publications in horticulture. Three credit 
hours maximum allowed toward the M.S. degree or six credits maximum 
toward the Ph.D. degree. (Staff.) 

Hort. 399. Advanced Horticultural Research. (2-12) 

First and second semesters. Credit granted according to work done. (Staff.) 



69 



The Agricultural Experiment Station 

THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

Irvin C. Haut, Ph.D., Director 

The Agricultural Experiment Station serves Maryland agriculture in much 
the same manner as research laboratories serve large corporations. 
Maryland agriculture comprises over thirty thousand individual busi- 
nesses, and there is neither sufficient capital, nor income so that each 
one of these can conduct research. Yet the problems which face a bio- 
logical undertaking such as farming, are as numerous and perplexing 
as the problems of any business. Certainly our production of food would 
be much more costly if it were not for the research results that have 
been obtained by the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

The station is a joint federal and state undertaking. Passage of the Hatch 
Act of 1887, which made available a grant in aid to each state for the 
purpose of estabUshing an agricultural experiment station, gave a great 
impetus to the development of research work in agriculture. This work 
was further encouraged by the passage of the Adams Act in 1906, the 
Purnell Act in 1925, the Bankhead-Jones Act in 1935, and the Flannagan- 
Hope Act of 1946. 

The work of the Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station, which is 
supported by these Acts and by State appropriations, centers at College 
Park. On the University campus are laboratories for studying insects and 
diseases, soil fertility, botanical problems, and others. This is also the 
location of the livestock and dairy barns with their experimental herds. 
About eight miles from the campus at College Park, near Beltsville, the 
Plant Research Farm of about 500 acres is devoted to work connected 
with soil fertility, plant breeding and general crop production problems. 
An experimental farm near Upper Marlboro is devoted to the problems 
of tobacco growing and curing. A farm near Salisbury is devoted to solu- 
tion of the problems of producers of broilers and of vegetable crops in the 
southern Eastern Shore area. Two experimental farms are operated near 
Ellicott City; one is devoted to livestock problems and the other to dairy 
cattle nutrition and forage research. Also tests of various crop and soil 
responses are distributed throughout the state. These different locations 
provide the opportunity to conduct experiments under conditions existing 
where the results will be put into practice. The solution of many difficult 
problems in the past has given the Station an excellent standing with 
farmers of the state. 



70 



4 



Agricultural Extension Service 

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE 

Edward W. Aiton, Director 
Roy W. Cassell, Assistant Director 

Cooperative Extension work in agriculture and home economics, estab- 
lished by state and federal laws in 1914, extends practical agricultural 
and home information beyond the classrooms of the University of Mary- 
land to young people, farmers, homemakers, and people in businesses 
relating to agriculture and home economics. 

The educational endeavors of the Cooperative Extension Service are fi- 
nanced cooperatively by the federal, state, and county governments. In 
each county there is a competent staff of Extension agents assigned to con- 
duct educational work in rather specific program areas consistent with the 
needs of the people in the county and as funds permit. The county staff 
is supported by a staff of speciahsts located at the University, and through 
their mutual efforts they assist local people in seeking solutions to problems. 

This work is conducted under a Memorandum of Understanding between 
the Cooperative Extension Service of the University and the United States 
Department of Agriculture. The Maryland Cooperative Extension Service 
functions as the educational arm of the United States Department of Agri- 
culture and the University of Maryland. 

The Cooperative Extension Service works in close harmony and associa- 
tion with all rural groups and organizations. In addition to the work on the 
farms and in the farm homes, the Extension program is aimed at the many 
rural, non-farm, and urban clientele who service the agricultural industries 
of the state including consumers. 

In addition to work with adults, thousands of boys and girls gain leadership 
knowledge and experience and are provided practical educational instruc- 
tion in 4-H Clubs and other youth groups. Through the many diversified 
activities, the boys and girls gain valuable experience from instruction and 
training and are afforded an opportunity to develop self-confidence, per- 
severance, and citizenship. 

The Cooperative Extension Service in cooperation with the College of Agri- 
culture and the Experiment Station arranges and conducts short courses, 
workshops, and conferences in various fines, many of which are held at the 
University. Some of these activities have been held regularly over a period 
of years and others are added as the need and demand develop. Short 
courses have been held in recent years for the following groups: rural 
women, 4-H Club boys and girls, nurserymen, florists, poultry industry 
fieldmen, poultry products marketing, beekeepers, greenkeepers, sanitarians, 
conservation, dairy herd improvement supervisors, feed manufacturers and 
distributors, and dairy marketing technicians. 



71 



Service and Control Programs 

SERVICE AND CONTROL PROGRAMS 

Charles P. Ellington, Director 

The state law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of Mary- 
land shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. While the 
Service and Control programs are part of the University, they are designed 
primarily to carry out the functions of the State Board of Agriculture. Num- 
erous services are performed which result in the improvement and main- 
tenance of high standards in production, processing and distribution of farm 
products. In addition, many control or regulatory activities are authorized 
by state law and are carried out by the following departments of the State 
Board of Agriculture: 

DAIRY INSPECTION 

The Maryland law relating to the weighing, sampling, and testing of milk 
became effective June 1, 1965. 

The purposes of the law are: (a) To insure producers who sell milk that 
samples, weights, and tests used as the basis of payment for such products 
are correct; (b) To insure dealers who purchase milk and cream that their 
agents correctly weigh, sample, and test these products; (c) To insure cor- 
rectness of tests made for official inspections or for public record. To achieve 
these purposes the law requires the licensing of all dealers who purchase 
milk and cream from producers, and the licensing of all persons sampling, 
weighing and testing milk and cream when the results serve as a basis of 
payment to producers. 

Duties of the dairy inspection force deal with the calibration of glassware 
used in testing milk and cream; examination of all weighers, samplers, and 
testers and the issuance of licenses to those satisfactorily passing the exara- 
ination; and inspection of the pertinent activities of weighers, samplers, 
testers and dairy plants. 

DEPARTMENT OF MARKETS 

Activities of the Department of Markets serve to insure a fair and equitable 
treatment of the farmer in all dealings which he may have concerning the 
marketing of his products. In the performance of these responsibilities, the 
Department conducts market surveys, compiles and disseminates marketing 
information and market data, operates a market news service, provides an 
agricultural inspection and grading service, maintains a consumer informa- 
tion service and enforces the agricultural marketing laws of the state. The 
control work of the department is carried out under the authority of various 
state laws relating to the marketing of farm products. A close working re- 
lationship is maintained with other specialists in the Extension Service, the 
Maryland Crop Reporting Service, and the Consumer and Marketing 
Service of the United States Department of Agriculture. The voluntary 

72 



Service and Control Programs 

cooperation in these various activities brings to bear on agricultural market- 
ing problems an effective combination of research, education and service. 

The passage of the Federal Agricultural Research and Marketing Act gave 
additional impetus to the study and solution of agriculture's marketing 
problems. The Department of Markets is largely responsible for develop- 
ing the state program under Title II of this act. 

Information and assistance in all phases of marketing is available to all in- 
terested persons. Marketing specialists hold meetings and demonstrations 
in local communities. Field offices are located in Baltimore, Salisbury, Han- 
cock and Pocomoke. 

MARYLAND LIVESTOCK SANITARY SERVICE 

The Livestock Sanitary Service is charged with the responsibility of pre- 
venting the introduction of diseases of animals and poultry from outside of 
the state and with control and eradication of such diseases within the state. 
The Service cooperates with the State Department of Health in the suppres- 
sion of diseases of animals and poultry which affect public health. 

Control projects in tuberculosis, Johne's disease, hog cholera, brucellosis 
are conducted in cooperation with the Department of Agriculture. The field 
force of state employed veterinarians is augmented by a number of federal 
veterinarians in the conduct of these control programs. Programs designed 
to control rabies, pullorum in poultry, and many other disease conditions 
are also conducted by the Livestock Sanitary Service. 

Facilities for the diagnosis of a wide variety of diseases are furnished in the 
main laboratory at College Park and in the branch laboratories at Salisbury, 
Preston, Centreville, Bel Air, Frederick, Hagerstown and Oakland. 

SEED INSPECTION 

The Seed Inspection Service administers the state seed law; inspects 
seeds sold throughout the state; collects seed samples for laboratory exam- 
ination; reports the results of the examinations to the parties concerned; 
publishes summaries of these reports which show the relative reliability 
of the label information supplied by wholesale seedsmen; cleans and treats 
tobacco seed intended for planting in the state; makes analyses, tests, 
and examinations of seed samples submitted to the laboratory; and advises 
seed users regarding the economic and intelligent use of seeds. The 
Service also cooperates with the Consumer and Marketing Service of the 
Department of Agriculture in the enforcement of the Federal Seed Act. 

The work of the Seed Inspection Service is not restricted to the enforce- 
ment of the seed law however, for state citizens may submit seed samples 
to the laboratory for analysis, test or examination. Specific information 
regarding suitability for planting purposes of lots of seeds is thus made 
available to individuals without charge. The growth of this service has 
been steady since the establishment of the laboratory in 1912. Most 

73 



Service and Control Programs 

Maryland citizens, urban and rural, are directly interested in seeds for 
planting in flower beds, lawns, gardens, or fields. 

STATE HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

In 1916 several sections of existing law were combined and re-enacted with 
such changes in the wording as were necessary to bring them into conform- 
ity with the reorganization of the Maryland State College of Agriculture and 
Experiment Station and its Board of Trustees. Subsequently all regulatory 
functions including newly enacted Articles in regard to the bee diseases and 
mosquitoes were transferred to the State Board of Agriculture. 

Work in this field is designed to control insects and plant diseases and 
to protect the public in the purchase of products of nurserymen and 
florists. A considerable part of the time of the staff is occupied by 
inspection of orchards, crops, nurseries, greenhouses, and floral estab- 
lishments. Cooperation with the federal government in the inspection 
and certification of materials that come under quarantine regulations is 
another major function of the Department. The Department enforces 
the provisions of the Apiary Law, including inspection of apiaries. Other 
work of this Department includes control and eradication of diseases of 
strawberries and other small fruits, diseases of apples and peaches, inspec- 
tion and certification of potatoes and sweet potatoes for seed, control of 
white pine blister rust, Dutch elm diseases, and oak wilt. 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF DRAINAGE 

The State Department of Drainage was established in 1937. Its duties 
are to promote and encourage the drainage of agricultural lands in the 
state, to correlate the activities of the local drainage organizations in the 
state and to cooperate with state and federal agencies in the interest 
of a permanent program of improved drainage. 

STATE INSPECTION SERVICE 

Feeds, Fertilizer, Agricultural Liming Materials and Pesticides 

The protection of consumers and manufacturers of agricultural products 
against fraudulent practices, makes certain speciaHzed laws necessary. These 
are classified as correct labeling laws, and are enforced by the State Inspec- 
tion Service. Included in this legislation are the Feed, FertiUzer, Agricul- 
tural Liming Materials, and Pesticide Laws. 

Work of enforcing these laws is divided into five distinct phases: First, the 
commodities concerned must be registered under acceptable brand names, 
and with proper labels; second, official samples must be collected by in- 
spectors from all parts of the state; third, chemical and physical examina- 
tions must be made to establish that professed standards of quality are being 
met; fourth, results must be assembled, pubhshed and made available to all 
interested persons; and fifth, the prosecution of those responsible for 
flagrant violations. 

74 



Service and Control Programs 

Hundreds of tests also are made annually on feed, fertilizer, and lime 
samples submitted by state purchasers. No charge is made for this service. 

Throughout its existence, this Department has cooperated with compar- 
able federal agencies in every possible way. In this activity it has attained 
not only state-wide, but also a nationally recognized reputation for accu- 
racy, timeliness, and unbiased fair treatment of the consumer and manu- 
facturer alike. 

The facilities of the Department are at all times available to supply the 
manufacturer with technical advice, and to safeguard him from unfair 
competition. 

SOIL CONSERVATION 

In 1937 the Maryland Legislation established the State Soil Conservation 
Committee as an agency of the State Board of Agriculture. The same act 
also enabled the organization of the Soil Conservation Districts in Maryland. 
The twenty-four Districts that have been organized in Maryland include all 
the land in the state. 

The State Committee is charged with the responsibility of coordinating the 
efforts of the Districts and encouraging the appUcation of soil and water 
conservation practices. 

The Committee receives applications for funds for watershed work under 
the Federal Watershed Protection and Flood Prevention Act (PL 566). 



75 



The 1966-68 Faculty 



Administrative Officers 

CAIRNS, Gordon M., Dean of Agriculture and Professor of Dairy Husbandry 
B.S., Cornell University, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D., 1940. 

POFFENBERGER, Paul R., Assistant Dean-Instruction, and Professor of Agricul- 
tural Economics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1935; M.S., 1937; Ph.D., American University, 1953. 

HAUT, Irvin C, Director of Experiment Station and Professor of Horticulture 
B.S., University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 1930; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1933. 

AITON, Edward W., Director of Extension 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1933; M.S., 1940; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 
1956. 

ELLINGTON, Charles P., Director of Service and Control Programs and Extension 
Assistant Professor of Agronomy 

B.S. . University of Georgia, 1950; M.S., University of Maryland, 1952; Ph.D., 

Pennsylvania State University, 1964. 

Faculty 

ANGELL, Frederick, Assistant Professor of Vegetable Crops 

B.S., Southern Illinois University, 1960; M.S., 1961; Ph.D., University of Wis- 
consin, 1965. 

ARBUCKLE, Wendell S., Professor of Dairy Science 

B.S., Purdue University, 1933; A.M., University of Missouri, 1937; Ph.D., 1940. 

AXLEY, John H., Associate Professor of Soils 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1937; Ph.D., 1945. 

BAILEY, Martin G., Extension Assistant Professor and Extension Supervisor, 
Agriculture 

B.S., Hampton Institute, 1937; M.Ed., Cornell University, 1955. 

BAKER, Robert L., Assistant Professor of Ornamental Horticulture 
A.B., Swarthmore College, 1959; M.S., University of Maryland, 1962; Ph.D., 
1965. 

BAMFORD, Ronald, Professor of Botany and Dean of the Graduate School 

B.S., University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S., University of Vermont, 1926; Ph.D., 
Columbia University, 1931. 

BANDEL, V. Allan, Assistant Professor of Soils 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1959; M.S., 1962; Ph.D., 1965. 

BEAL, George M., Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., Utah State College, 1934; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1938; Ph.D., 1942. 

BEAN, George A., Assistant Professor of Botany 

B.S., Cornell University, 1958; M.S., University of Minnesota, 1960; Ph.D., 1963. 

76 



Faculty 

BEITER, Robert J., Instructor of Agricultural Economics 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1957. 

BENDER, Filmore E., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., University of California, 1961; M.S., North Carolina State College, 1964; 
Ph.D., 1965. 

BENTZ, Frank L., Jr., Associate Professor of Soils and Assistant to the President 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; Ph.D., 1952. 

BEYER, Edgar H., Assistant Professor of Agronomy 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1958; M.S., Purdue University, 1962; Ph.D., 1964. 

BICKLEY, William E., Professor and Head of Entomology 

B.S., University of Tennessee, 1934; M.S., 1936; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1940. 

BISSELL, Theodore L., Extension Associate Professor of Entomology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1920; M.S., Cornell University, 1936. 

BRENNAN, Melvin C, Instructor, Visual Aids 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1952. 

BRODIE, Herbert L., Extension Instructor of Agricultural Engineering 
B.S.A.E., Rutgers State University, 1964. 

BROWN, Albert C, Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science 
V.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1959. 

BROWN, Russell G., Associate Professor of Botany 

B.S., West Virginia University, 1929; M.S., 1930; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1934. 

BUCKEL, W. Max, Extension Assistant Professor and Extension Supervisor, Agri- 
culture 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; M.S., Michigan State University, 1959. 

BURIC, John, Associate Professor of Animal Science 

B.S., West Virginia University, 1948; M.S., University of Maryland, 1952; Ph.D., 
University of Illinois, 1960. 

BURKHARDT, George J., Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1933; B.S.M.E., 1934; M.S., 1935. 

BYRD, Bruce W., Jr., Assistant Professor of Agronomy 

B.S., Clemson College, 1958; M.S., 1960; Ph.D., North Carolina State College, 
1963. 

CAIN, Jarvis L., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., Purdue University, 1955; M.S., Ohio State University, 1956; Ph.D., 1961. 

CALDWELL, Billy E., Agronomist 

B.S., North Carolinia State College, 1955; M.S., 1959; Ph.D., Iowa State Uni- 
versity, 1963. 

77 



Faculty 

CARDOZIER, Virgus R., Professor and Head of Agricultural and Extension Edu- 
cation 

B.S., Louisiana State University, 1947; M.S., 1950; Ph.D., Ohio State Univer- 
sity, 1952. 

CASON, James L., Associate Professor of Dairy Science 

B.S., Louisiana Polytechnic Institute, 1948; M.S., Michigan State College, 1950; 
Ph.D., North Carolina State College, 1956. 

CASSELL, Roy, Extension Associate Professor and Assistant Extension Director 
B.S., West Virginia University, 1951; M.S., 1961; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 
1962. 

CHANCE, Charles M., Extension Associate Professor, Dairy Science 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1941; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1948; 
Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1952. 

CLARK, Neri A., Associate Professor of Agronomy 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1954; Ph.D., 1959. 

COLBY, Sterling R., Assistant Professor of Agronomy 

B.S., Cornell University, 1956; M.S., Purdue University, 1961; Ph.D., 1964. 

COMBS, Gerald F., Professor of Poultry Science 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1940; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1948. 

CONAWAY, Charlotte A., Extension Assistant Professor and Assistant State 4-H 
Club Agent 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1947; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1957. 

CREEK, Richard D., Associate Professor of Poultry Science 
B.S., Purdue University, 1951; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1955. 

CROTHERS, John L., Jr., Extension Assistant Professor, Department of Markets 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1949; M.S., 1954. 

CURTIS, John M., Professor and Head of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., North Carolina State College, 1947; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., University of Mary- 
land. 1961. 

DAVIS, Richard F., Professor and Head of Dairy Science 

B.S., University of New Hampshire, 1950; M.S., Cornell University, 1952; Ph.D., 
1953. 

DEAL, Elwyn E., Assistant Professor of Agronomy 

B.S., University of Georgia, 1958; M.S., 1960; Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1963. 

DECKER, Morris A., Jr., Associate Professor 

B.S., Colorado A. & M., 1949; M.S., Utah State College, 1950; Ph.D., University 
of Maryland 1953. 

DENGLER, Harry W., Extension Associate Professor, Forestry 
B.S., Syracuse University, 1935. 

78 



Faculty 

DEVOLT. Harold M., Professor of Avian Pathology 
D.V.M.. 1923: M.S., Cornell University, 1926. 

DITMAN, Lewis P.. Research Professor of Entomology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1926; M.S., 1929; Ph.D., 1931. 

DOETSCH, Raymond N.. Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1942; M.S., University of Indiana, 1944; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1948. 

EDWARDS. Barbara H., Instructor of Botany 

A.B., George Washington University, 1960; M.A., 1963. 

EVANS, James G., Sr., Visiting Professor of Agricultural Economics 
B.A., Simpson College, 1921; M.A., University of Illinois, 1924. 

FANNING, Delvin S., Assistant Professor of Soil Mineralogy 

B.S., Cornell University, 1954; M.S., 1959; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1964. 

FARWELL, Sanford, Extension Instructor and Exhibits Specialist 
B.A., Rhode Island School of Design, 1954. 

FELTON, Kenneth E.. Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering 

B.S.A., University of Maryland, 1950; B.S.C.E., 1951; M.S.. Pennsylvania State 
University, 1962. 

FERGUSON, James Riley, Extension Associate Professor of Animal Science 
B.S., Colorado A. Sc M., 1941; M.S., Cornell University, 1951; Ph.D., 1953. 

FERNOW, Leonard R.. Assistant Professor of Geology 
B.S., Cornell University, 1956; M.S., 1957; Ph.D.. 1961. 

FOSTER, John E., Professor and Head of Animal Science 

B.S., North Carolina State College, 1926; M.S., Kansas State College, 1927; 
Ph.D., Cornell University, 1937. 

FOSTER, Phillips W., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., Cornell University, 1953; M.S., University of Illinois, 1956; Ph.D., 1958. 

GALLOWAY, Raymond A., Associate Professor of Plant Physiology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1956; Ph.D., 1958. 

GAUCH, Hugh G., Professor of Plant Physiology 

B.S., Miami University, 1935; M.S., Kansas State College, 1937; Ph.D., University 
of Chicago, 1939. 

GIENGER, Guy W., Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1933; NLS.. 1936. 

GODFREY, Edward F.. Extension Assistant Professor of Poultrv' Science 

B.S., Universitv of New Hampshire, 1949; M.S.. Ohio State University, 1950; 
Ph.D.. 1952. 

GOUIN, Francis R., Extension Instructor in Ornamental Horticulture 

B.S., University of New Hampshire, 1962; M.S., University of Maryland, 1965. 

79 



Faculty 

GOODWIN, Edwin E., Assistant Professor of Animal Science 

B.S., Louisiana State University, 1946; M.S., Cornell, 1948; Ph.D., Washington 
State University, 1955. 

GOYEN, Loren F., Assistant Professor and Assistant State 4-H Club Agent 
B.S., Kansas State University, 1951; M.S., University of Maryland, 1959. 

GRAHAM, Castillo, Associate Professor of Entomology 

B.S., Mississippi A. & M. College, 1927; M.S., University of Maryland, 1930; 
Ph.D., 1932. 

GREEN, Robert L., Professor and Head of Agricultural Engineering 

B.S.A.E., University of Georgia, 1934; M.S., Iowa State College, 1939; Ph.D., 
Michigan State University, 1953. 

GREEN, Willard W., Professor of Animal Science 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1933; M.S., 1934; Ph.D., 1939. 

HAMILTON, Arthur B., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics and Rural 
Civil Defense Program Leader 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1929; M.S., 1931. 

HARDING, Wallace C, Jr., Extension Assistant Professor of Entomology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; M.S., 1956; Ph.D., 1961. 

HARRIS, Wesley L., Associate Professor in Agricultural Engineering 

B.S.A.E., University of Georgia, 1953; M.S., 1958; Ph.D., Michigan State Uni- 
versity, 1960. 

HARRISON, Floyd P., Associate Professor of Entomology 

B.S., Louisiana State University, 1951; M.S., 1953; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1955. 

HARRISON, George K., Assistant Professor of Botany 

B.A., Western Maryland College, 1935; M.S., University of Maryland, 1956; 
Ph.D., 1958. 

HATZIOLOS, Basil C, Associate Professor of Pathology 

D.V.M., Veterinary School of Alfort, France, 1929; DR. VET. IN AN. HUS., 
Veterinary School of Berlin, Germany, 1932. 

HAVILAND, Elizabeth E., Lecturer in Entomology 
A.B., Wilmington (Ohio) College, 1923; M.A., Cornell University, 1926; M.S., 
University of Maryland, 1936; Ph.D., 1945. 

HA WES, Russell C, Professor of Marketing 

B.S., Rhode Island State College, 1921; M.S., University of Rhode Island, 1942. 

HAWKINS, Ezelle M., Extension Assistant Professor and Community Development 
Specialist 

B.S., Prairie View A & M College, 1938; M.S., Cornell University, 1965. 

HAWKINS, Joyce R., Extension Assistant Professor and Extension Supervisor, Home 
Economics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1956; M.S., 1962. 

80 



Faculty 

HELBACKA, Norman V., Associate Professor, Poultry Science 
B.S., University of Minnesota, 1952; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1956. 

HEMKEN, Roger W., Associate Professor of Dairy Science 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1950; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1957. 

HILBERT, Lavonia, Extension Associate Professor and Clothing Specialist 
B.S., West Virginia University, 1937; M.A., Columbia University, 1946. 

HOECKER, Harold H., Extension Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics 
B.S., Iowa State College, 1941. 

HOLLIS, William L., Research Associate Professor of Vegetable Crops 

B.S., University of Delaware, 1952; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1957. 

HOYERT, John H., Associate Professor of Agronomy 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., 1951. 

HUNTER, Herman A., Extension Assistant Professor of Vegetable Crops 
B.S., Clemson College, 1923; M.S., University of Maryland, 1926. 

ISHEE, Sidney, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., Mississippi State College, 1950; M.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1952; 
Ph.D., 1957. 

JOHNSON, Carl N., Extension Assistant Professor of Landscape Gardening 
B.S., Michigan State College, 1947. 

JOHNSON, Robert B., Associate Professor of Veterinary Physiology 
A.B., University of South Dakota, 1939. 

JOHNSON, ROBERT L., Assistant Professor of Agricultural and Extension Edu- 
cation 

B.S., University of Nebraska, 1951; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1956; Ph.D., 

1958. 

JONES, Jack Colvard, Professor of Entomology 

B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1942; Ph.D., Iowa State College, 1950. 

KANTZES, James G., Associate Professor of Plant Pathology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1957. 

KARLANDER, Edward P., Research Associate — Plant Physiology 

B.S., University of Vermont, 1960; M.S., University of Maryland, 1962; Ph.D., 
1964. 

KATZ, Ira, Assistant Professor, Dairy Science 

B.S., University of Georgia, 1957; M.S., University of Maryland, 1959; Ph.D., 
1962. 

KEENEY, Mark, Professor of Dairy Science 

B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1942; M.S., Ohio State University, 1948; Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania State College, 1950. 

SI 



Faculty 

KING, Raymond L., Associate Professor of Dairy Science 
A.B., University of California, 1955; Ph.D., 1958. 

KLARMAN, William L., Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology 

B.S., Eastern Illinois State College, 1957; M.S., University of Illinois, 1960; 
Ph.D., 1962. 

KRAMER, Amihud, Professor of Horticulture 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1942. 

KRAUSS, Robert W., Professor of Plant Physiology and Head, Department of 
Botany 

A.B., Oberlin College, 1947; M.S., University of Hawaii, 1949; Ph.D.. University of 
Maryland, 1951. 

KRESGE, Conrad B., Associate Professor of Soils 
B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1953; M.S., 1956; Ph.D., 1959. 

KRESTENSEN, Elroy R., Assistant Professor of Entomology 

B.S., University of Florida, 1949; M.S., 1951; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1962. 

KUHN, Albin O., Professor of Agronomy and Vice-President, Baltimore Campuses 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

KRUSBERG, Loren R., Associate Professor of Plant Pathology 

B.S., University of Delaware, 1954; M.S., North Carolina State College, 1956; 
Ph.D., 1959. 

LADSON, Thomas A., Head of Veterinary Science and Director of the Live Stock 
Sanitation Service 

D.V.M., University of Pennsylvania, 1939. 

LANGSDALE, Elizabeth, Extension Assistant Professor and Home Furnishing Spec- 
ialist 
B.S., Illinois State University, 1938; M.E., Pennsylvania State University, 1954. 

LANGFORD, George S., Professor of Entomology and State Entomologist 

B.S., Clemson College, 1921; M.S., University of Maryland, 1924; Ph.D., Ohio 
State University, 1929. 

LEFFEL, Emory C, Associate Professor of Animal Science 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.S., 1947; Ph.D., 1953. 

LESSLEY, Billy V., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics 

A.S., Arkansas Polytechnic College, 1955; B.S., University of Arkansas, 1957; 
M.S., 1960; Ph.D., University of Missouri, 1965. 

LEVRING, Tore, Visiting Professor of Algal Physiology 
B.S., University of Lund, 1934; M.S., 1936; Ph.D., 1940. 

LIDEN, Conrad H., Assistant Professor, Administrative Assistant to the Dean 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; M.S., 1949. 

82 



Faculty 

LINK, Conrad B., Professor of Floriculture 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1933; M.S., 1934; Ph.D., 1940. 

LOAR, Margaret T., Extension Professor, Assistant State Leader, Extension Home 
Economics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1941. 

LOCKARD, J. David, Associate Professor of Botany and Education 

B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1951; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University, 1955; 
Ph.D., 1962. 

MANESS, James C, Instructor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., University of Georgia, 1958; M.S., Cornell University, 1960. 

MANS, Rusty J., Associate Professor of Botany 

B.S., University of Florida, 1952; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., Western Reserve University, 
1959. 

MARSHALL, J. Paxton, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics and Ex- 
tension Assistant Director, Programs 

B.S., University of Kentucky, 1957; M.A., Michigan State University, 1957; Ph.D., 

1961. 

MATTHEWS, Floyd V., Jr., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering 

B.S.A.E., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 1950; M.S., Oklahoma State University, 
1951. 

MATTHEWS, William A., Associate Professor of Vegetable Crops 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1928; M.S., University of Maryland, 1930. 

MATTICK, Joseph F., Associate Professor of Dairy Science 
B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1942; Ph.D., 1950. 

McDonald, Russell F., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 
B.S., Ohio State University, 1950; M.S., 1958; Ph.D., 1959. 

McKEE, Claude C, Associate Professor of Agronomy 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., 1959. 

MCLUCKIE, Virginia, Extension Associate Professor and Home Economist 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1941; M.S., 1953. 

MEADE, John A., Associate Professor of Agronomy 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1953; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., Iowa State College, 1958. 

MENZER, Robert E., Assistant Professor of Entomology 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1960; M.S., University of Maryland, 1962; Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin, 1964. 

MERRICK, Charles P., Extension Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
B.S.C.E., University of Maryland, 1933. 

MESSERSMITH, Donald H., Associate Professor of Entomology 

B.Ed., University of Toledo, 1951; M.S., University of Michigan, 1953; Ph.D., 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1962. 

83 



Faculty 

MEYER, Amos R., Extension Associate Professor of Marketing 
B.S., Ohio State University, 1940. 

MILLER, Frederick P., Assistant Professor of Soils 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1958; M.S., 1961; Ph.D., 1965. 

MILLER, James R., Professor and Head of Agronomy 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; M.S., 1953; Ph.D., 1956. 

MOHANTY, Sashi B., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Virology 

B.V.SC. & A.H., Bihar University, India; M.S., 1961; Ph.D., University of Mary- 
land. 

MOLINE, Waldemar J., Assistant Professor of Agronomy 

B.S., Wisconsin State University, 1959; M.S., University of Minnesota, 1961; Ph.D., 
Iowa State University, 1965. 

MOORE, John R., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1951; M.S., Cornell University, 1955; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin, 1959. 

MORGAN, Delbert T., Jr., Professor of Botany 
B.S., Kent State University, 1940; M.A., Columbia University, 1942; Ph.D., 1948. 

MORGAN, Omar D., Jr., Associate Professor of Plant Pathology 

B.Ed., Illinois State Normal University, 1940; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1950. 

MORRIS, John L., Extension Associate Professor of Dairy Science 
B.S., Iowa State College, 1943; M.S., University of Delaware, 1958. 

MURRAY, Ray A., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., University of Nebraska, 1934; M.A., Cornell University, 1938; Ph.D., 1949. 

NANTZ, Evelyn R., Extension Assistant Professor and Home Management 
Specialist 

B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1939; M.S., 1958. 

NEWCOMER, Joseph L., Assistant Professor of Agronomy 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; M.S., 1955. 

NICHOLSON, James L., Extension Assistant Professor of Poultry Science 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1951. 

OSBURN, Donald E., Extension Assistant Professor and Assistant 4-H Club Agent 
B.S., West Virginia University, 1956; M.S., 1959. 

PATERSON, Robert A., Associate Professor of Botany 

B.A., University of Nevada. 1949; M.A., Stanford University, 1951; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1957. 

PATTERSON, Glenn W., Assistant Professor of Plant Physiology 

B.S., North Carolina State University, 1960; M.S., University of Maryland, 1963; 
Ph.D., 1964. 

84 



Faculty 

PHEIL, Judith A. (Mrs.), Extension Assistant Professor, and Food and Nutrition 
Specialist 

B.S., Hood College, 1931. 

PLOWMAN, Robert D., Lecturer in Dairy Science 
B.S., Utah State College, 1951; M.S., University of Minnesota, 1955; Ph.D., 1956. 

PLUMER, Gilbert J., Associate Professor of Veterinary Science 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1949; D.V.M., New York State Veterinary College, 
Cornell University, 1953. 

QUIGLEY, George D., Associate Professor of Poultry Science and Director Institute 
of Applied Agriculture 

B.S., Michigan State College, 1925. 

RAPPLEYE, Robert D., Associate Professor of Botany 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1941; M.S., 1947; Ph.D., 1949. 

REBERT, Bumell K., Extension Instructor, Marketing 
B.S., Elizabethtown College, 1947. 

REYNOLDS, Charles W., Professor of Vegetable Crops 

B.A., University of Alabama, 1941; B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1947; 
M.S., 1949; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1954. 

ROGERS, Benjamin L., Extension Associate Professor of Pomology 

B.S., Clemson College, 1943; M.S., University of Minnesota, 1947; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1950. 

ROTHGEB, Russell G., Professor of Agronomy 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1924; M.S., Iowa State College, 1925; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1928. 

SCHERMERHORN, Richard W., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 
B.S., University of Georgia, 1958; M.S., 1959; Ph.D., Oregon State University, 
1962. 

SCOTT, Leland E., Professor of Horticultural Physiology 

B.S., University of Kentucky, 1927; M.S., Michigan State College, 1929; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1943. 

SEELEY, Donald J., Instructor in Dairy Science 
B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1950. 

SHAFFNER, Clyne S., Professor and Head of Poultry Science 

B.S., Michigan State College, 1938; M.S., 1940; Ph.D., Purdue University, 1947. 

SHANKS, James B., Professor of Floriculture 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1939; M.S., 1946; Ph.D., 1949. 

SHORB, Mary S., Research Professor of Poultry Science 

B.S., College of Idaho, 1928; Sc.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1933. 

SHRIVER, David, Assistant Professor of Entomology 
B.S., University of Maryland. 1960; M.S., 1963. 

85 



Faculty 

SIEGEL, Malcolm R., Research Associate — Plant Pathology 

B.S., University of Connecticut, 1955; M.S., University of Delaware, 1959; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1963. 

SIEGRIST, Henry G., Jr., Assistant Professor of Geology 

B.A., Lehigh University, 1965; M.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1959; Ph.D., 
1961. 

SISLER, Hugh D., Professor in Plant Pathology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1949; M.S., 1951; Ph.D., 1953. 

SMITH, Clodus R., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Extension Education 
and Director of Summer School 

B.S., Oklahoma A & M College, 1950; M.S., 1955; Ed.D., Cornell University, 1960. 

SMITH, Harold D., Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.A., Bridgewater College, 1943; M.S., University of Maryland, 1947; Ph.D., 
American University, 1952. 

SNYDER, Robert J., Associate Professor of Vegetable Crops 

B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1949; M.S., 1951; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 
University, 1955. 

SOERGEL, Kenneth P., Assistant Professor of Landscape Gardening 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1961; M.L.A., Harvard University, 1963. 

SOROKIN, Constantino A., Research Associate — Plant Physiology 

A.B., Don Institute, 1927; M.A., Academy of Sciences (Moscow), 1936; Ph.D., 
University of Texas, 1955. 

STADELBACHER, Glen J., Extension Assistant Professor of Horticulture 

B.S., Southern Illinois University, 1958; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1962. 

STARK, Francis C, Professor and Head of Horticulture 
B.S., Oklahoma A. & M., 1940; M.S., University of Maryland, 1941; Ph.D., 1948. 

STEINHAUER, Allen L., Associate Professor of Entomology 

B.S., University of Manitoba, 1953; M.S., Oregon State College, 1955; Ph.D., 
1958. 

STEVENS, George A., Extension Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 
B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 1941; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1957. 

STEWART, Larry E., Instructor of Agricultural Engineering 

B.S.A.E., West Virginia, 1960; M.S., 1961. 
STEWART, Wolcott E., Associate Professor of Dairy Science 

B.S., Cornell University, 1953; M.S., 1956; Ph.D., 1957. 
STOUT, Ernest R., Research Associate — Botany 

B.S., Appalachian State Teachers College, 1961; Ph.D., University of Florida, 

1965. 

STREET, Orman E., Professor of Agronomy 

B.S., South Dakota State College, 1924; M.S., Michigan State College, 1927; Ph.D., 
1933. 

86 



Faculty 

STRICKLING, Edward, Associate Professor of Soils 
B.S., Ohio State University, 1937; Ph.D., 1949. 

SUPPLEE, William C, Research Associate of Poultry Science 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1926; M.S., 1927; Ph.D., 1931. 

SUTTOR, Richard E., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics 
B.S., South Dakota Univerity, 1960; Ph.D., Iowa State University, 1965. 

TAYLOR, M. Hal, Extension Instructor of Poultry Science 
B.S., Kansas State University, 1962; M.S., 1964. 

TERBORGH, John, Assistant Professor of Botany 
A.M., Harvard University, 1960; Ph.D., 1963. 

THOMPSON, Patrick H., Assistant Professor of Entomology 

B.S., Auburn University, 1955; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1962; Ph.D., 1964. 

TODD, Hermann S., Instructor in Horticulture 
B.S., Ohio State University, 1937. 

TUTHILL, Dean P., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., Cornell University, 1949; M.S., University of Illinois, 1954; Ph.D., 1958. 

TWIGG, Bernard A., Extension Associate Professor 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., 1959. 

VANDERSALL, John H., Associate Professor of Dairy Science 
B.S., Ohio State University, 1950; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1959. 

WALKER, William P., Professor of Agricultural Economics 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1921; M.S., 1924. 

WEAVER, Leslie O., Extension Professor of Plant Pathology 

B.S.A., Ontario Agricultural College, 1934; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1943. 

WELLING, M. Gist, Extension Associate Professor and Assistant Director, Field 
Operations 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; M.S., Cornell University, 1957. 

WILCOX, Frank H., Associate Professor of Poultry Science 

B.S., University of Connecticut, 1951; M.S., Cornell University, 1953; Ph.D., 1955. 

WILEY, Robert C, Associate Professor of Horticulture Processing 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1949; M.S., 1950; Ph.D., Oregon State College, 
1953. 

WILLIAMS, Walter L., Associate Professor of Dairy Science 
B.S., University of Missouri, 1952; Ph.D., 1955. 

WILSON, W. Sherard, Extension Professor and State 4-H Club Agent 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1932. 

WINN, Paul N., Research Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1947; M.S., 1958. 

87 



Faculty 

WOOD, Francis E., Instructor of Entomology 
B.S., University of Missouri, 1958; M.S., 1962. 

WYSONG, John W.. Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 
B.S., Cornell University, 1953; M.S., University of Illinois, 1954; Ph.D., Cornell 
University, 1957. 

YOUNG, Edgar P., Associate Professor of Animal Science 
B.S., Ohio State University, 1954; M.S., 1956; Ph.D., 1958. 

Emeriti 

CORY, Ernest N., Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

B.S., Maryland Agricultural College, 1909; M.S., 1913; Ph.D., American Uni- 
versity, 1926. 

DEVAULT, Samuel H., Professor of Agricultural Economics and Marketing, 
Emeritus 

A.B., Carson-Newman College, 1912; A.M., University of North Carolina, 1915; 
Ph.D., Massachusetts State College, 1931. 

KEMP, William B., Director of Experiment Station, Emeritus 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1912; Ph.D., American University, 1928. 

NORTON, John B. S., Professor of Botany, Emeritus 

B.S., Kansas State College, 1896; M.S., 1900; Sc.D., (Hon.), University of Mary- 
land. 

NYSTROM, Paul E., Director of Extension and Professor of Agricultural Econom- 
ics, Emeritus 

B.S., University of California, 1928; M.S., University of Maryland, 1931; M.P.A.. 

Harvard University, 1948; D.P.A., 1951. 

SYMONS, Thomas B., Dean of Agriculture, Emeritus 

B.S., Maryland Agricultural College, 1902; M.S., Maryland State College, 1905; 
D.Agr., University of Maryland, 1918. 

■^SUPERVISING TEACHERS OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

BAER, Wilfred O., B.S., The Pennsylvania State University, 1942; M.S., 1952 
Sudlersville High School, Sudlersville, Maryland. 

BEVARD, Carl W., B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; M.Ed., 1953 
Glenelg High School, Glenelg, Maryland. 

BURLIN, Walter W., B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; M.S., University of Dela- 
ware, 1958. 
Bel Air High School, Bel Air, Maryland. 

COBB, Robert A., B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 
North Harford High School, Pylesville, Maryland. 



■"Teachers of vocational agriculture who supervise student teachers during the student 
teaching period in cooperation with the Department of Agricultural and Extension 
Education. 

88 



Faculty 

COOPER, Elmer T., B.S., University of Maryland, 1956; M.S., 1965. 
North Harford High School, Pylesville, Maryland. 

MILLER, Harry T., B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; M.S., 1952 
Frederick High School, Frederick, Maryland. 

REMSBURG. George C, B.S., University of Maryland, 1939; M.S., 1951 
Walkersville High School, Walkersville, Maryland. 

SCOTT, Joseph K., B.A., Bridgewater College, 1935; xM.S., Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute, 1940 

Williamsport High School, Williamsport, Maryland. 

THOMPSON, Harold H., B.S., University of Maryland, 1946; M.S., 1960. 
Mt. Airy High School, Mt. Airy, Maryland. 

THOMPSON. John L., B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; M.S., 1959 
Linganore High School, Frederick Maryland. 

TOLLEY, Leonard E., B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1951; M.S., University 
of Maryland, 1965. 

Damascus High School, Damascus, Maryland. 



89 



CATALOG OF THE 

COLLEGE OF 

ARTS AND 

SCIENCES 

1965-1967 



THE 
UNIVERSITY 

OF 
MARYLAND 



Volume 22 September 1, 1965 Number 3 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BULLETIN is published four times in September; 
three times in January, March and May; and two times in August, October, Novem- 
ber, December, February, April, June and July. Re-entered at the Post Office at 
College Park, Maryland, as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress on 
August 24, 1912. Published twenty-nine times. 



• :<SiM*.a^.S1 




*x. 




SiV 



I .^ 



Contents 



General 



University Calendar iv 

Board of Regents vi 

OflScers of the University vii 

Standing Committees, Faculty 

Senate xi 

General Information 1 

History 1 

Application Information -___ 1 

Requirements for Admission 2 

Costs 2 

Degrees 2 

Residence 3 

For Additional Information 3 

Academic Information 3 



General Requirements for 

Degrees 3 

General Education 

Requirements 4 

College Requirements 6 

Junior Requirements 8 

Normal Load 9 

Advisers , 9 

Electives in Other Schools 

and Colleges 9 

Air Science 9 

Certification of High School 

Teachers 9 

Honors 10 



Programs and Course Offerings 



American Studies H 

Art 12 

Astronomy 18 

Botany 21 

Chemistry 22 

Classical Languages and 

Literatures 30 

Comparative Literature 32 

Computer Science 35 

Economics 36 

English Language and 

Literature 37 

Foreign Languages and 

Literatures 42 

Chinese 45 

French 45 

German 49 

Hebrew 51 

Italian 52 

Russian 52 

Spanish 53 

General Biological Sciences — . 57 

Faculty Listing 



General Physical Sciences 58 

Geography 58 

Government and Politics 59 

History 60 

Mathematics 70 

Microbiology 84 

Molecular Physics 88 

Music 89 

Applied Music 96 

Philosophy 97 

Physics and Astronomy 102 

Pre-Professional Curricula 112 

Pre-Dentistry 113 

Pre-Law 114 

Pre-Medicine 115 

Related Professions 116 

Psychology 117 

Sociology 125 

Anthropology 132 

Speech and Dramatic Art 133 

Zoology 143 



151 



III 



University Calendar, 1965-66 

(TENTATIVE) 

FALL SEMESTER, 1965 
SEPTEMBER 

13-17 Monday through Friday — Fall Semester Registration 
20 Monday — Instruction begins 
NOVEMBER 

24 Wednesday, after last class — Thanksgiving recess begins 
29 Monday, 8:00 A.M. — Thanksgiving recess ends 

DECEMBER 

22 Wednesday, after last class — Christmas recess begins 
JANUARY 

3 Monday, 8:00 A.M. — Christmas recess ends 
17 Monday — Pre-exam Study Day 

18-24 Tuesday-Monday — Fall Semester Examinations 

SPRING SEMESTER, 1966 
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 

31-4 Monday through Friday — Spring Semester Registration 

7 Monday — Instruction begins 

22 Tuesday — Washington's Birthday, holiday 
MARCH 

25 Friday — Maryland Day, not a holiday 
APRIL 

7 Thursday, after last class — Easter recess begins 

12 Tuesday, 8:00 A.M. — Easter recess ends 
MAY 

11 Wednesday— AFROTC Day 

25 Wednesday — Pre-exam Study Day 

26-June 3 Thursday through Friday — Spring Semester Examinations 

29 Sunday — Baccalaureate Exercises 

30 Monday — Memorial Day, holiday 
JUNE 

4 Saturday — Commencement Exercises 

SUMMER SESSION, 1966 
JUNE 

20-21 Monday, Tuesday — Registration, Summer Session 

22 Wednesday — Instruction begins 

25 Saturday — Classes (Monday schedule) 
JULY 

4 Monday — Independence Day, holiday 

9 Saturday — Classes (Tuesday schedule) 
AUGUST 

12 Friday — Summer Session Ends 

SHORT COURSES, SUMMER, 1966 
JUNE 

13-17 Monday through Friday — Rural Women's Short Course 
AUGUST 

1-5 Monday through Friday — 4-H Club Week 
SEPTEMBER 

6-9 Tuesday through Friday — Fireman's Short Course 



IV 



University Calendar, 1966-67 

(TENTATIVE) 

FALL SEMESTER, 1966 

SEPTEMBER 

12-16 Monday-Friday — Fall Semester Registration 
19 Monday — Instruction begins 

NOVEMBER 

23 Wednesday, after last class — Thanksgiving recess begins 
28 Monday, 8:00 A. M. — Thanksgiving recess ends 

DECEMBER 

21 Wednesday, after last class — Christmas recess begins 
JANUARY 

3 Tuesday, 8:00 A. M. — Christmas recess ends 
18 Wednesday — Pre-exam Study Day 
19-25 Thursday-Wednesday — Fall Semester Examinations 

SPRING SEMESTER, 1967 
JANUARY 

31 -Feb. 3 Tuesday-Friday — Spring Semester Registration 
FEBRUARY 

6 Monday — Instruction begins 

22 Wednesday — Washington's Birthday, holiday 
MARCH 

23 Thursday, after last class — Easter recess begins 
28 Tuesday, 8:00 A. M. — Easter recess ends 

MAY 

10 Wednesday— AFROTC Day 

24 Wednesday — Pre-exam Study Day 

25-June 2 Thursday-Friday — Spring Semester Examinations 

28 Sunday — Baccalaureate Exercises 

30 Tuesday — Memorial Day, holiday 
JUNE 

3 Saturday — Commencement Exercises 

SUMMER SESSION, 1967 
JUNE 

19-20 Monday-Tuesday — Registration, Summer Session 

21 Wednesday — Instruction begins 

24 Saturday — Classes (Monday schedule) 
JULY 

4 Tuesday — Independence Day, holiday 
8 Saturday — Classes (Tuesday schedule) 

AUGUST 

11 Friday — Summer Session Ends 

SHORT COURSES, SUMMER, 1967 

JUNE 

12-17 Monday-Saturday — Rural Women's Short Course 
AUGUST 

7-11 Monday-Friday— 4-H Club Week 
SEPTEMBER 

5-8 Tuesday-Friday — Firemen's Short Course 



Board of Regents 

and 

Maryland State Board of Agriculture 

CHAIRMAN 

Charles P. McCormick 

McCormick and Company, Inc., 414 Light Street, Baltimore, 21202 

VICE-CHAIRMAN 

Edward F. Holter 

Farmers Home Administration, Room 412 Hartwick Bldg., 

4321 Hartwick Road, College Park, 20740 

SECRETARY 

B. Herbert Brown 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore, 21201 

TREASURER 

Harry H. Nuttle 
Denton, 21629 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

Lours L. Kaplan 

The Baltimore Hebrew College, 5800 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore, 21215 

ASSISTANT TREASURER 

Richard W. Case 

Smith, Somerville and Case, 1 Charles Center — 17th Floor, 

Baltimore, 21201 

Dr. William B. Long 
Medical Center, Salisbury, 21801 

Thomas W. Pangborn 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown, 21740 

Thomas B. Symons 

7410 Columbia Ave., College Park, 20740 

William C. Walsh 

Liberty Trust Building, Cumberland, 21501 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 
4101 Greenway, Baltimore, 21218 

vi 



Officers Of The University 

Central Administrative Officers 

PRESIDENT 

Wilson H. Elkins,— B./l., University of Texas. 1932: M.A.. 1932; B.Utt., Oxford Uni- 
versity, 1936; D.Phil., 1936. 

VICE PRESIDENT. BALTIMORE CAMPUSES 

Albin O. Kuhn— fi.5.. University of Maryland. 1938; M.S.. 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

R. Lee Hornbake — B.S.. California State College. Pennsylvania, 1934: M.A., Ohio 
State University, 1936; Ph.D.. 1942. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS 

Walter B. Waetjen — B.S., Millersville State College, Millersville, Pennsylvania, 1942; 
M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1947; Ed.D.. University of Maryland. 1951. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT 

Frank L. Bentz. Jr.— B.5., University of Maryland, 1942; Ph.D., 1952. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR RESEARCH 

Justin Williams — A.B., State Teachers College, Conway, Arkansas, 1926; M.A., State 
University of Iowa, 1928; Ph.D., 1933. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
Robert A. Beach, Jr., A.B., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1950; M.S., Boston Uni- 
versity, 1954. 

ASSISTANT, PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 

Robert E. Kendig — A.B., College of William and Mary, 1939; M.A., George Wash- 
ington University, 1965. 

ASSISTANT TO THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

Leslie R. Bundgaard— B.5., University of Wisconsin, 1948; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., 
Georgetown University, 1954. 

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 

C. Wilbur Cissel— fi./4., University of Maryland, 1932; M.A., C.P.A., 1939. 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
James T. Frye — B.S., University of Georgia, 1948; M.S., 1952. 

COMPTROLLER AND BUDGET OFFICER 

Harry D. Fisher— B.5., University of Maryland, 1943; C.P.A., 1948. 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATIONS 

G. Watson Algire— 5./1., University of Maryland, 1930; M.S., 1931. 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND REGISTRAR 

James P. Hill— B.5., Temple University, 1939; Ed.M., 1947; Ed.D., University of 

Michigan, 1963. 

DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI AFFAIRS 

J. Logan Schutz— B.5., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1940. 

vii 



DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS 

William W. Cobey — A.B., University of Maryland, 1930. 

DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL 

George W. Fogg — B.A., University of Maryland, 1926; M.A., 1928. 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL 

James D. Morgan— B.5., University of Maryland, 1949; M.B.A., 1950. 

DIRECTOR AND SUPERVISING ENGINEER, DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL 
PLANT 

George O. Weber — B.S., University of Maryland, 1933. 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND SUPERVISING ENGINEER, PHYSICAL PLANT 

(Baltimore) 

George W. Morrison — B.S., University of Maryland, 1927; E.E., 1931. 



Emeriti 

PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

Harry C. Byrd— fl.5., University of Maryland, 1908; LL.D., Washington College, 
1936; LL.D., Dickinson College, 1938; D.Sc., Western Maryland College, 1938. 

DEAN OF WOMEN EMERITA 

Adele H. Stamp — B.A., Tulane Universitv, 1921; M.A., University of Maryland, 
1924. 

DEAN OF MEN EMERITUS 

Geary F. Eppley— B.5., University of Maryland, 1920; M.S.. 1926. 



Deans of the Schools and Colleges 

DEAN OF AGRICULTURE 

Gordon M. Cairns— B.5., Cornell University, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D. 1940. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Charles Manning— B.5., Tufts College, 1929; M.A., Harvard University, 1931; Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina, 1950. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 
Donald W. O'Connell— fi..4., Columbia University, 1937; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., 1953. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

John J. Salley—D. D.5., Medical College of Virginia, 1951; Ph.D., University of 
Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 1954. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Vernon E. Anderson — B.S., University of Minnesota, 1930; M.A., 1936; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Colorado, 1942. 

ACTING DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Russell B. Allen — B.S.. Yale University, 1923; Registered Professional Engineer. 

via 



DEAN OF FACULTY— UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY 

Homer W. Schamp, Jr. — A.B., Miami University, 1944; M.Sc, University of Michi- 
gan, 1947: Ph.D.. 1952. 

DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Ronald Bamford — B.S., University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S., University of Ver- 
mont, 1926; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1931. 

ACTING DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 
Erna R. Chapman— 5.5.. University of Maryland, 1934; M.S., 1939. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

William P. Cunningham — A.B., Harvard College, 1944; LL.B., Harvard Law School, 

1948. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Paul Wasserman— S.B.^., College of the City of New York, 1948; M.S. (L.5.), 

Columbia University, 1949: M.S. (Economics) Columbia University, 1950; Ph.D., 

University of Michigan, 1960. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND DIRECTOR OF MEDICAL 

EDUCATION AND RESEARCH 
William S. Stone— 5.5., University of Idaho, 1924; M.S., 1925; M.D., University of 

Louisville, 1929; Ph.D., (Hon.), University of Louisville, 1946. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Florence M. Gipe — B.S., Catholic University of America, 1937; M.S., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1940; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Noel E. Foss— P/i.C, South Dakota State College, 1929; B.S.,1929: M.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1932; Ph.D., 1933. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION AND 
HEALTH 

Lester M. Fraley— B./i., Randolph-Macon College, 1928; M.A., 1937; Ph.D., Pea- 
body College, 1939. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 

Verl S. Lewis — A.B., Huron College, 1933; M.A., University of Chicago, 1939; 
D.S.W., Western Reserve University, 1954. 

DEAN OF UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

Ray W. Ehrensberger — B.A., Wabash College, 1929; M.A., Butler University, 1930; 
Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1937. 

Directors of Educational Services and Programs 

ACTING DEAN FOR STUDENT LIFE 

Francis A. Gray — B.S., University of Maryland, 1943. 

DEAN OF WOMEN 

Helen E. Clarke — B.S., University of Michigan, 1943; M.A., University of Illinois, 
1951; Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1960. 

ix 



DIRECTOR, AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE 

Edward W. Aiton — B.S., University of Minnesota. 1933; M.S., 1940; Ed.D.. Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1956. 

DIRECTOR, AGRICULTURE EXPERIMENT STATION 

Irvin C. Haut — B.S., University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 
1930; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1933. 

ACTING DIRECTOR, COMPUTER SCIENCE CENTER 
John P. Menard — B.A., San Michael's College, 1954 

DIRECTOR, COUNSELING CENTER 

Thomas Magoon — B.A., Dartmouth, 1947; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1951; 
Ph.D., 1954. 

DIRECTOR, GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Gayle S. Smith— 5.5., Iowa State College, 1948; M. A., Cornell University, 1951; 
Ph.D., 1958. 

DIRECTOR, INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH 

Robert E. McClintock — B.S., University of South Carolina, 1951; M.A., George Pea- 
body College, 1952; Ph.D., 1961. 

DIRECTOR OF LIBRARIES 

Howard Rovelstad— B./4., University of Illinois, 1936; M.A., 1937; B.S.L.S., Colum- 
bia University, 1940. 

DIRECTOR OF NATURAL RESOURCES INSTITUTE 

L. Eugene Cronin — A.B., Western Maryland College, 1938; M.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1943; Ph.D., 1946. 

DIRECTOR OF PROFESSIONAL AND SUPPORTING SERVICES, UNIVERSITY 

HOSPITAL 
George H. Yeager — B.S., University of West Virginia, 1925; M.D., University of 

Maryland, 1929. 

DIRECTOR OF STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

Lester M. Dyke — B.S., University of Iowa, 1936; M.D., 1926. 

DIRECTOR OF THE SUMMER SESSION 

Clodus R. Smith— B.5., Oklahoma State University, 1950; M.S., 1955; Ed.D., Cornell 
University, 1960. 

HEAD, DEPARTMENT OF AIR SCIENCE 

Vernon H. Reeves — B.A., Arizona State College, 1936; M.A., Columbia University, 
1949. 

Division Chairmen 

CHAIRMAN OF THE DIVISION OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

John E. Faber— 5.5., University of Maryland, 1926; M.S., 1927; Ph.D., 1937. 

CHAIRMAN OF THE LOWER DIVISION 

Charles E. White— B.5., University of Maryland, 1923; M.S., 1924; Ph.D., 1926. 

CHAIRMAN OF THE DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 
Harold C. Hoffsommer— fi.5.. Northwestern University, 1921; M.A., 1923; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1929. 

X 



STANDING COMMITTEES, FACULTY SENATE 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE AND WELFARE 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS AND SCHOLASTIC STANDING 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

COMMITTEE ON SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS. CURRICULA AND COURSES 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RESEARCH 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARIES 

COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION 

COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL ETHICS. ACADEMIC FREEDOM 
AND TENURE 

COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS. PROMOTIONS AND SALARIES 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 

COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 

COMMITTEE ON COUNSELING OF STUDENTS 

COMMITTEE ON THE FUTURE OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Adjunct Committees of the General Committee on Student 
Life and Welfare 
STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
FINANCIAL AIDS AND SELF-HELP 
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 
RELIGIOUS LIFE 

STUDENT HEALTH AND SAFETY 
STUDENT DISCIPLINE 
BALTIMORE CAMPUS, STUDENT AFFAIRS 



XI 



The College 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The college of arts and sciences offers its students a liberal 
education. It seeks to develop graduates who can deal intelligently with 
the problems which confront them and whose general education will be a 
continuing source not only of material profit but of genuine personal satis- 
faction. It also offers each student the opportunity to concentrate in the field 
of his choice; this element of depth serves both as an integral part of his 
education and as a foundation for further professional training or pursuits. 

History 

This College is an outgrowth of the Division of Language and Literature 
and the Division of Applied Science and the later School of Liberal Arts 
of Maryland State College. In 1921 the School of Liberal Arts and the 
School of Chemistry were combined and other physical and biological 
sciences were brought into the newly formed College of Arts and Sciences. 
In later reorganizations some departments have been added and some 
transferred to the administrative control of other colleges. 

Application Information 

FALL SEMESTER. All applications for full-time undergraduate admission for 
the Fall Semester at the College Park campus must be received by the Uni- 
versity on or before July 15. Any student registering for nine or more 
semester hours of work is considered a full-time student. 

Under unusual circumstances, applications will be accepted between July 
15 and September 1. Applicants for full-time attendance filing after July 
15 will be required to pay a non-refundable $25.00 late fee to defray 
the cost of special handling of applications after that date. This late fee 
is in addition to the $10.00 application fee. 

All undergraduate applications, both for full-time and part-time attend- 
ance, and all supporting documents for an application for admission must 
be received by the appropriate University office by September 1. This 
means that the applicant's educational records, ACT scores (in the case 
of new freshmen) and medical examination report must be received by 
September 1. 

SPRING SEMESTER. The deadline for the receipt of applications for the 
spring semester is January 1. 

UNIVERSITY college. The appHcation deadUnes and fees do not apply to 
students registering in the evening classes offered by the University College. 

graduate SCHOOL. Application for admission to the Graduate School must 
be made by September 1 for the fall term and by January 1 for the spring 
term on blanks obtained from the Office of the Graduate School. Admission 



General Information 

to the summer session is governed by the date listed in the Summer School 
catalog. The summer session deadline date is generally June 1 . 

Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission to the College of Arts and Sciences are, 
in general, the same as those for admission to the other colleges and schools 
of the University. Application must be made to the Director of Admis- 
sions, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

The student who intends to pursue a program of study in the College of 
Arts and Sciences should include the following subjects in his high school 
program: English, four units; college preparatory mathematics (algebra, 
plane geometry), three or four units; foreign language, two or more units; 
biology, chemistry, or physics, two units; history and social sciences, one or 
more units. 

The student who wishes to major in chemistry, mathematics, physics, 
botany, microbiology, zoology, or who wishes to follow a pre-medical or 
pre-dental program, should include four units of college preparatory mathe- 
matics (algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry, and more advanced mathe- 
matics, if available). He should also include chemistry and physics. 

Costs 

Basic annual costs of attending the University for full-time undergraduate 
students on the College Park campus are as follows: 



Fixed charges 
Special fees 
Non-resident tuition 
Board 
Lodging 

A fee of $10.00 must accompany a prospective student's application for 
admission. If the student enrolls for the term for which he appUed, the fee 
is accepted in lieu of the matriculation fee. 

Degrees 

Students of this College who satisfactorily complete curricula with majors 
in departments of the humanities or social sciences are awarded the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts.^ Those who satisfactorily complete curricula with 
majors in the Department of Mathematics or the biological and physical 

'The Departments of Economics, Geography, and Government and Politics, 
although administratively in the College of Business and Public Administration, 
offer courses for Arts and Sciences students. Majors may be elected in these de- 
partments as in those of the departments administred by the College of Arts and 
Sciences. 



Maryland residents 


Non-residents of Maryland 


$270.00 


$270.00 


96.00 


96.00 




400.00 


440.00 


440.00 


320.00 


420.00 



Academic Information 

sciences are awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science.- Those who com- 
plete satisfactorily a special professional program in the Department of 
Music are awarded the degree of Bachelor of Music. 

Residence 

The last thirty semester hours credit of any curriculum leading to a 
baccalaureate degree in the College of Arts and Sciences must be taken in 
residence in this University. 

For Additional Information 

Detailed information concerning admission, fees and expenses, scholarships 
and awards, student life, and other material of a general nature may be 
found in the University publication titled An Adventure in Learning. This 
publication may be obtained on request from the Catalog Mailing Office, 
North Administration Building, University of Maryland, College Park. 
A detailed explanation of the regulations of student and academic life 
may be found in the University pubHcation titled University General and 
Academic Regulations. 

Requests for course catalogs for the individual schools and colleges should 
be directed to the deans of these respective units, addressed to: 

COLLEGES LOCATED AT COLLEGE PARK: 

Dean 

(College in which you are interested) 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Maryland 20742 

PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS LOCATED AT BALTIMORE: 

Dean 

(School in which you are interested) 

University of Maryland 

Lombard and Greene Streets 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

General Requirements for Degrees 

The baccalaureate degree from the College of Arts and Sciences may be 
conferred upon a student who has satisfied the following requirements: 

1. University (General Education) requirements. 

2. College of Arts and Sciences requirements. 



- The Department of Botany, although administered by the College of Agriculture, 
offers courses for Arts and Sciences students. A major may be elected in this de- 
partment as in those of the departments administrated by the College of Arts and 
Sciences. 

3 



Academic Information 

General Education Requirements 

A college education implies something more than an adequate technical 
training in the student's field of specialization. In order that each graduate 
with a Bachelor's degree may gain a liberal education as well as a specialized 
one, the University has established a General Education Requirement. This 
requirement consists of 34 semester hours of credit in six general fields. 
There is a wide choice in specific courses which may be used to satisfy re- 
quirements in all of the six fields except EngUsh. Physical Education and 
Health requirements for all students are taken in addition to this 34-hour 
group of courses. 

1. The General Education courses are as follows: 

In English (9 hours): Engl. 1 — Composition; Engl. 3 and 4 — World Lit- 
erature. 

In Fine Arts or Philosophy (3 hours), three-credit courses in five depart- 
ments are available, as follows: ART COURSES: 10 — Introduction to Art; 
60 or 61 — History of Art; 65 or 66 — Masterpieces of Painting; 67 or 68 — 
Masterpieces of Sculpture; 70 or 71 — Masterpieces of Architecture; 80 — 
History of American Art. DANCE COURSES: 32 — Introduction to Dance; 
182 — History of Dance; 184 — Theory and Philosophy of Dance. MUSIC 
COURSE: 20— Survey of Music Literature. SPEECH COURSES: 16— 
Introduction to the Theatre; 114 — The Film as an Art Form. PHILOSO- 
PHY COURSES: 1— Introduction to Philosophy; 41— Elementary Logic 
and Semantics; 45 — Ethics; 52 — Philosophy in Literature; 53 — Philosophy 
of Religion; 147 — Philosophy of Art; 152 — Philosophy of History; 154 — 
Political and Social Philosophy, 

In History (6 hours), the student is required to distribute his work between 
United States and non-United States fields, with three hours in each. Rec- 
ommended courses in United States History are: 21 — History of the United 
States to 1865; 22 — History of the United States since 1865; 23 — Social 
and Cultural History of Early America; 24 — Social and Cultural History 
of Modern America; or 29 — The United States in World Affairs. For the 
exceptionally well-prepared student, however, 100-level (junior or senior) 
courses which have no prerequisite are also available. In non-United States 
History, recommended courses are: 31 or 32 — Latin American History; 
41 or 42 — Western Civilization; 51 or 52 — The Humanities; 53 or 54 — 
History of England and Great Britain; 61 or 62 — Far Eastern Civilization; 
or 71 or 72 — Islamic Civilization. Here also the well-prepared student may 
use non-prerequisite courses at the 1 00 level to satisfy the requirement. 

In Mathematics (3 hours), any course carrying credit of three or more 
hours for which the student is eligible will satisfy this University require- 
ment. (Note, however, that some curricula require higher-numbered se- 
quences than those for which the student is eligible at the time of his admis- 
sion; while other sequences may be open only to students registered in speci- 
fied curricula. ) Students in science curricula will usually satisfy this require- 
ment automatically. 



Academic Information 

In Science (7 hours), students are required to take one course in a physical 
science and one course in a biological science; one of these must be a lab- 
oratory (4-hour) course. The physical sciences for this purpose are Astron- 
omy, Chemistry, Geology, and Physics; biological sciences are Botany, En- 
tomology, Microbiology, and Zoology. Students whose curricula include 
seven or more hours of physical or biological science are not required to 
take additional courses to meet this distribution requirement. The non- 
science student may register for a basic course or any higher course for 
which he is eligible (by placement, prerequisite, and class standing). 

In Social Science (6 hours), two courses may be chosen from five fields: 
Anthropology 1 — Introduction to Anthropology; Economics 31 — Principles 
of Economics, or Economics 37 — Fundamentals of Economics; Govern- 
ment and Politics 1 — American Government, or Government and Politics 
3 — Principles of Government and Politics; Psychology 1 — Introduction to 
Psychology; or Sociology 1 — Introduction to Sociology. 

2. It should be emphasized that the 34 semester hours of General Educa- 
tion courses constitute a University requirement, applicable to all students 
receiving a Bachelor's degree from the University of Maryland. Individual 
Colleges within the University may add to, though they may not reduce, 
these requirements. For example, students in the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences pursuing a B.A. or B.S. degree are required to take a total of twelve 
hours of Mathematics and Science. Different curricula may specify one or 
more courses among the options. For example, students in the pre-medical 
program must offer Philosophy 1 to satisfy the Fine Arts requirement. 

3. In certain of the six fields, the student's level of placement (by exami- 
nation or departmental evaluation) may modify the requirement. In His- 
tory, students with unusually good high school preparation (as indicated by 
placement tests) may satisfy the requirement with two courses in the non- 
United States field, if they wish. 

In general, appropriate Honors or pre-Honors courses may replace General 
Education courses, for eligible students. For example, students with high 
placement scores in English may substitute Engl. 21 (Honors Composition) 
for the ordinary requirement of Engl. 1. Honors and pre-Honors equiv- 
alents for General Education courses are specified in the several college 
catalogs. 

4. The General Education Program is designed to be spread out over the 
four years of college. No General Education course requires credit in any 
prior college course as a prerequisite. Thus, a student may (within limits 
of his particular curriculum) satisfy a General Education requirement in 
each category with any designated course for which he is eligible by place- 
ment examination, department evaluation, and class standing. Most courses 
numbered 1 to 10 may be taken by freshmen; most courses between 1 1 and 
99 require sophomore (or honors) standing. Courses at the 100 level are 
normally for juniors or seniors: that is, they require that a student have 
earned 56 hours of college credit while in good academic standing. Ex- 
ceptions are as explicitly stated in the catalogs of the several colleges. 



Academic Information 

SPECIAL NOTE FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS. The foreign Student is required to 
take a special classification test in English before registering for the required 
Enghsh courses. He may be required to take Foreign Language 1 and 2 — 
English for Foreign Students — before registering for English 1 . 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION. All undergraduate men and women students who are 
registered for more than eight semester hours of credit are required to enroll 
in and successfully complete two prescribed courses in physical education 
for a total of two semester hours of credit. The successful completion of 
these courses is required for graduation. These courses must be taken by all 
eligible students during the first two semesters of attendance at the Uni- 
versity, whether they intend to graduate or not. Men and women who have 
reached their thirtieth birthday are exempt from these courses. The thirtieth 
birthday must precede the Saturday of registration week. Students who are 
physically disqualified from taking these courses must enroll in adaptive 
courses for which credit will be given. A transferring student who can meet 
the academic requirements of his college and the requirements of the Uni- 
versity by completing 30 academic hours will not be required to register 
for physical education. Students with military service may receive credit 
for these courses by applying to the Director of the Men's Physical Educa- 
tion Program. Students majoring or minoring in physical education, recrea- 
tion, or health education may meet these requirements by enrolling in special 
professional courses. 

HEALTH EDUCATION. All frcshmcn students are required to complete satis- 
factorily one semester of Health Education (Hea. 5) for graduation. Stu- 
dents who have reached their thirtieth birthday are exempt from this re- 
quirement. Transfer students who do not have credit in this course, or its 
equivalent, must complete this requirement. 

IMPLEMENTATION. The requirements of the General Education Program 
apply to students who enrolled for the first time in college on or after June 
22, 1964. Students who began college work prior to that time will refer to 
descriptions of the American Civilization Program in earUer published 
College catalogs or in University General and Academic Regulations. Ques- 
tions about any aspect of the program may be addressed to the advisers, 
college deans, or the Director of General Education. 

College Requirements 

1. FOREIGN LANGUAGE. Students in the College of Arts and Scicnccs must 
follow one of the following options in foreign language : 

a. They may take twelve semester hours in a classical language. 

b. Students who begin a modern foreign language in the University 
must successfully complete the study of that language in any 
authorized sequence, through Course 7 in all languages or Course 
8 in German. 

c. Students who continue in the University a language studied for 
two or more years in secondary school may choose, in French, 



Academic Information 

German, or Spanish, between enrollment in Course 5 or the taking 
of a placement examination^ (students beginning in Courses 5, 6, 
or 7 must continue in any authorized sequence through Course 7 
plus three additional hours; those beginning a course higher than 
Course 7 must take a total of six hours in the appropriate 
courses). In modem languages other than French, German, 
or Spanish (i.e., languages which do not have a Course 5), all 
students must take a placement examination.^ 

The languages which may be offered to meet this requirement are Chinese, 
French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Latin, Russian, and Spanish. 

German 9 may not be taken to meet the College requirement of 12 hours 
of language unless the student has finished German 7 or German 8. 
Students who wish to offer a foreign language not included in this list 
should consult the Head of the Foreign Language Department for a recom- 
mendation to the Dean. 

Foreign students may satisfy this requirement by offering twelve hours 
of English in addition to the regular English requirement. The special 
course in English for foreign students (Foreign Language 1, 2) may be 
included in the additional hours of English. (This option may not be used 
by pre-medical students.) A foreign student may not meet the foreign lan- 
guage requirement by taking freshman or sophomore courses in his native 
language. 

Normally a student shall not be permitted to repeat a foreign language 
course below Course 9 for credit if he has successfully completed a higher 
numbered course than the one he wishes to repeat. 

2. NATURAL SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS. Twelve scmcstcr hours are re- 
quired, except for candidates for the Bachelor of Music degree (who must 
satisfy the minimum General Education requirement, however). The sci- 
ence courses elected require the approval of the Dean; departments in which 
courses may be selected are the same as those listed under the General 
Education requirement (pp. 4-5). 

3. SPEECH. Normally, students in the arts area take speech 1(3 hours), 
while those in the science area take Speech 7 (2 hours). In certain special- 
ized programs other courses may be required. The foreign student should 
register for Speech 3 — Fundamentals of General American Speech — rather 
than for the speech course normally required in his curriculum. 

4. MAJOR AND MINOR REQUIREMENTS. Specific descriptions of the depart- 
mental, inter-departmental, or pre-professional majors are found, in alpha- 
betical order, along with the course offerings in the second section of this 



3 A placement test is given during registration week for students wishing to pursue 
a modern language they have studied in high school. 



Academic Information 

catalog. The general College regulations controlling majors (and minors) 
are as follows. 

During his sophomore year, each student should choose a field of concen- 
tration (major). He may make this choice as early as he wishes; however, 
once he has earned 56 hours of acceptable credit he must choose a major 
before his next registration. 

In the program leading to the B.A. degree, the student must also have 
a secondary field of concentration (minor). The courses constituting 
the major and the minor must conform to the requirements of the de- 
partment in which the major work is done. 

The student must have an average of not less than "C" in the introductory 
courses in the field in which he intends to major. 

A major shall consist, in addition to the underclass departmental require- 
ments, of 24-40 hours, of which at least twelve must be in courses 
numbered 100 or above, and at least twelve of which must be taken in 
the University of Maryland. 

A minor in programs leading to the B.A. degree shall consist of a co- 
herent group of courses totaling 18 semester hours in addition to the 
requirements listed above. At least six of the 18 hours must be in a 
single department in courses numbered 100 or above. The courses 
comprising the minor must be chosen with the approval of the major 
department. Except in certain specialized curricula approved by the Dean, 
not more than nine hours of the minor may be taken in courses outside of 
the College of Arts and Sciences. 

No minor is required in programs leading to the B.S. degree, but the 
student must take supporting courses in science or other fields as speci- 
fied by his major department. 

The average grade of the work taken for the major must be at least 
"C"; some departments will count toward satisfaction of the major re- 
quirement no course completed with a grade of less than "C." The 
average grade of the work taken in the major and minor combined must 
be at least "C." A general average of "C" in courses taken at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland is required for graduation. 

Courses taken to fulfill the requirements in General Education may not be 
used toward major or minor requirements. 

Junior Requirements 

To attain junior standing, a student must acquire a minimum of 56 
academic semester hours with an average grade of at least "C" in the 
freshman and sophomore years. See University General and Academic 
Regulations for full statement of rules pertaining to junior standing. 

8 



Academic Information 



Normal Load 



The normal load for students in this college is 15 semester hours credit 
per semester, exclusive of the required work in physical activities and health. 

A student must have the approval of his adviser and dean to take more 
than the normal program prescribed in his curriculum. 

Advisers 

Each freshman in this College will be assigned to a faculty adviser who 
will help the student, during his first year, to select his courses and to 
determine what his field of major concentration should be. 

The student at the sophomore level and above will be advised by a fac- 
ulty member in his major department. Students following the three-year 
programs in Dentistry, Law, and Medicine will be advised by special 
advisers for these programs. 

Electives in Other Schools and Colleges 

A limited number of courses taken in other colleges and schools of the Uni- 
versity may be counted for elective or minor credit toward a degree in the 
College of Arts and Sciences. The number of credits which may be ac- 
cepted from the various colleges and schools is as follows: College of Edu- 
cation — 24; all other colleges or independent departments — 20. The com- 
bined credits from other colleges and schools shall not exceed 20 (or 24 if 
courses in education are included). For the combined degree programs in 
Dentistry, Law, or Medicine the first year of professional work must be 
completed. 

Air Science 

Starting in September 1965, the Department of Air Science will offer two 
all-voluntary programs in Air Force ROTC at the University of Maryland. 
Successful completion of either the 2-year or the 4-year program qualifies 
a student for a commission in the United States Air Force upon graduation. 
No Air Science course under the 100 level may be included in the 120 hours 
required for graduation. 

Selected students who wish to do so may, with proper approval, carry Ad- 
vanced Air Science courses as electives during their junior and senior years. 
Financial assistance is provided for students in the Advanced program. 
Specific information on either the two-year or the four-year program is in- 
cluded in the University General and Academic Regulations. 

Certification of High School Teachers 

If courses are properly chosen in the field of education, a prospective 
high school teacher can prepare for high school positions, with a major 



Academic Information 

and minor in one of the departments of this College. A student who 
wishes to work for a teacher's certificate must consult his adviser before 
his junior year. Such a student should, at the same time, consult an adviser 
in the appropriate curriculum in the College of Education. 

Honors 

The Honors Program of the College is made up of the Departmental Honors 
Program and the General Honors Program. The over-all aim of the College 
Honors Program is to recognize and encourage superior scholarship. Its 
more particular aim is to provide qualified students with a maximum oppor- 
tunity for intensive and often independent study. 

1. The General Honors Program is administered by the Director of the 
Arts and Sciences Honors Programs and by the College Honors Committee 
which also acts as an advisory and regulatory body for all Honors Programs 
within the College. Admission to the General Honors Program shall ordin- 
narily be at the beginning of the first or second semester of the student's 
freshman year. Students are selected on the basis of American College Test 
scores, rank in high school, and several other factors dealing with academic 
prowess in high school. Students in the General Honors Program are offered 
a variety of special sections and special courses in all of their freshman 
subjects. The classes are as small as possible and the instruction allows for 
a more intensive analysis of the material. 

2. The Departmental Honors Program is administered by an Honors 
Committee within each department. Admission to the Departmental Honors 
Program shall ordinarily be at the beginning of the first or second semester 
of the student's junior year. As a rule, only students with a cumulative grade 
point average of at least 3.0 will be admitted. A comprehensive examina- 
tion over the field of his major program is given to a candidate near the end 
of his senior year. On the basis of the student's performance on the Honors 
Comprehensive Examination and in meeting such other requirements as may 
be set by the Departmental Honors Committee, the faculty may vote to 
recommend the candidate for the appropriate degree (B.A., B.Mus., or 
B.S.) without departmental honors; for the appropriate degree with (depart- 
mental) honors; or for the appropriate degree with (departmental) 
HIGH HONORS. Succcssful Candidacy will be symbolized by appropriate 
announcement in the Commencement Program and by citation on the 
student's academic record and diploma. 

Students in the General and Departmental Honors Programs enjoy some 
academic privileges similar to those of graduate students. 



10 



Programs and Course Offerings 

Courses numbered from 1 to 99 are open to undergraduate stu- 
dents who meet the stated prerequisite and curriculum requirements. 

Courses numbered from 100 to 199 are open to juniors and seniors with 
the stated prerequisites. Under some conditions, second-semester sopho- 
mores may register for 100-Ievel courses with Dean's approval. Graduate 
students may take 100-level courses for credit, subject to departmental and 
Graduate School regulations. 

Courses numbered 200 and above are for graduate students only, except in 
exceptional cases approved by the Dean of Arts and Sciences and the Dean 
of the Graduate School. 



AMERICAN STUDIES 

Committee on American Studies: Associate Professor Beall, Executive 
Secretary. 

Professors: Giffin, Hoffsommer, Murphy and Plischke. 

American Studies is a major program leading to a B.A. degree; it also pro- 
vides for graduate work on the M.A. and Ph.D. level. 

The student who majors in American Studies has the advantage of being 
taught by cooperating specialists from various departments. The student 
majoring in American Studies will obtain his courses principally from the 
offerings of the Departments of EngUsh, History, Government and Politics, 
and Sociology. In planning a curriculum, the student is required to concen- 
trate in one of the four departments. The program must include 42 semester 
hours of work from the departments participating in the program. These 
credits constitute collectively a major and a minor. At least 20 of these 42 
hours must be in 100-level courses. The work should be so distributed that 
the student will take at least nine hours in each of three of the four cooper- 
ating departments, including the department of his concentration. No course 
with a grade less than "C" may be used to satisfy major requirements. 

In his junior year, each major student is required to take American Studies 
127, 128 — Culture and the Arts in America. In his senior year, each major 
student is required to take a conference course, American Studies 137, 138, 
in which the study of American civilization is brought to a focus. During 
the course, the student analyzes eight or ten important books which reveal 
fundamental patterns in American life and thought and receives incidental 
training in bibliographic matters, in formulating problems for special in- 
vestigation, and in group discussion. 

Freshmen who are interested in this program should consult with their 
lower division adviser. Upperclassmen should consult with the Execu- 
tive Secretary of the American Studies curriculum, Associate Professor 
Beall. 

// 



Art 

Suggested sample curriculum for American Studies majors: 

Junior year: American Studies 127, 128 — Culture and the Arts in America 
(3, 3); Hist. 52— The Humanities (3); Hist. 105, 106— Social and Eco- 
nomic History of the United States (3, 3); Engl. 150,^ 151 — American 
Literature (3, 3); G. & P. 144 — American Political theory (3); and 
electives (9). 

Senior year: American Studies 137, 138 — Conference course in American 
Studies (3,3); G. & P. 1 74— Political Parties (3); Phil. 1 05— Philosophy in 
America (3); Anth. 105— Cultural Anthropology (3); Anth. 125— Cul- 
tural History of the Negro (3); Hist. 133, 134 — History of Ideas in Amer- 
ica (3, 3); and electives (6). 

Amer. Stud. 127, 128. Culture and the Arts in America. (3,3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing. A study of American institutions, the intellectual 
and aesthetic climate from the colonial period to the present. 

Amer. Stud. 137, 138. Conference Course in American 
Studies. (3, 3) 

Four American classics (drawn from fields of the Department of English, 
Government and Politics, History, and Sociology, which cooperate in the 
program) are studied each semester. Specialists from the appropriate depart- 
ments lecture on these books. Through these books and the lectures on them, 
the student's acquaintance with American culture is brought to a focus. 

For Graduates 

Amer. Stud. 201, 202. Seminar in American Studies. (3, 3) 

(Beall) 

Amer, Stud. 399. Thesis Research. (1-6) 



ART 

Professor and Head: Levitine. 
Professors: Lembach and Maril. 

Associate Professor: De Leiris. 

Assistant Professors: Denny, Grossman, Grubar, Jamieson, Longley, 

O'CONNELL, StITES. 

Lecturer: O'Connor. 

Instructors: Freeny and Sullivan. 

Two majors are offered in Art: Art History and Studio. The major in Art 
History is committed to the study and scholarly interpretation of existing 
works of art, from the prehistoric era to our times, while the Studio major 
stresses the student's direct participation in the creation of works of art. 

12 



Art 

In spite of this difference, both majors are rooted in the concept of art as 
a humanistic experience, and share an essential common aim: the develop- 
ment of aesthetic sensitivity, understanding, and knowledge. For this rea- 
son, students in both majors are required to progress through a "common 
curriculum," which will ensure a broad grounding in both aspects of art; 
then each student will move into a "specialized curriculum" with advanced 
courses in his own major. Maximum allowable credits in either major is 42. 

COMMON CURRICULUM: 

Art 10, Introduction to Art (3); Art 12, Design I (3); Art 16, 
Drawing I (3); and Art 60 and 61, History of Art (3, 3). 

SPECIALIZED CURRICULUM: 

Art History major: Art 80, History of American Art (3) ; four courses 
in over 100 level in History of Art (12). In addition, one advanced 
course in Studio work is required. Total credits for Art History 
major: 33. 

Studio major: Art 17, Painting I (3); Art 26, Drawing II (3); Art 
118, Sculpture 1 (3); Art 119, Printmaking I (3); Art 126, Drawing 
III (3); plus one course at the 100 level (3). In addition, one ad- 
vanced course in Art History is required. Total credits for Studio 
major: 36. 

No course with a grade less than "C" may be used to satisfy major re- 
quirements. 

Art 10. Introduction To Art. (3) 

Basic tools of understanding visual art. This course stresses major approaches 
such as techniques, subject matter, form, and evaluation. Architecture, sculp- 
ture, painting, and graphic arts will be discussed. Required of all Art Majors 
in the first year. (Levitine, Staff) 

Art 12. Design I. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite or concurrent registration, Art 10. Principles 
and elements of design including basic composition, line, color theory, perspec- 
tive, and three-dimensional space. (Staff) 

Art 16. Drawing I. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite or concurrent registration. Art 10. An 
introductory course with a variety of media and related techniques. Problems 
based on still life, figure, and nature. (Staff) 

Art 17. Painting I. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisites, Art 10, 12, 16. Basic tools and language 
of painting. Oil and watercolor. (Grossman, Maril, Staff) 

Art 26. Drawing II. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisites, Art 10, 12, 16. Original compositions from 
the figure and nature, supplemented by problems of personal and expressive 
drawing. (Staff) 

13 



Art 

Art 27. Architectural Presentation. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisites, Art 10, 12, 16. Technique of wash and 
watercolor in architectural, interior, and landscape architectural rendering. 

(Stites) 

Art 40. Fundamentals of Art Education. (3) 

Two hours of laboratory and two hours of lecture per week. Fundamental 
principles of the visual arts for teaching on the elementary level. Elements and 
principles of design and theory of color. Studio practice in different media. 

(Lembach, Longley) 

Art 60, 61. History of Art. (3, 3) 

A survey of western art as expressed through architecture, sculpture and paint- 
ing. First semester, prehistoric times to Renaissance; second semester, from 
Renaissance to the present. (Staflf) 

Art 65, 66. Masterpieces of Painting. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Sophomore standing. A study of the contributions of a few 
major painters, ranging from Giotto to Picasso. (Levitine, Staff) 

Art 67, 68. Masterpieces of Sculpture. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Sophomore standing. A study of the contributions of a few 
major sculptors, ranging from Polykleitos to Moore. (Levitine, Staff) 

Art 70, 71. Masterpieces of Architecture. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Sophomore standing. A study of great architecture from Stone- 
henge to Dulles Airport. (Stites) 

Art 80. History of American Art. (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the United States from the Colonial 

period to the present. This course may be elected under Group II of the 

American Civilization program by students who first registered prior to 

June 22, 1964. (Grubar) 

Art 117. Painting II. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisites, Art 17, 26. Original compositions based 
upon nature, figure, and still life, supplemented by expressive painting. Choice 
of media. Different sections of course may be taken for credit. 
117-a. Oil painting and related media. (Maril) 

117-b. Watercolor and casein. (Grossman) 

117-c. Plastic media, such as encaustic and ploymer tempera. (Jamieson) 

117-d. Mural painting. The use of contemporary synthetic media. (Jamieson) 

Art 118. Sculpture I. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, Art 26. (For students majoring in Art 
History, by permission of Department.) Volumes, masses, and planes, based 
on the use of plastic earths. Simple armature construction and methods of 
casting. Laboratory Fee $15.00. (Freeny) 

Art 119. Printmaking I. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, Art 26. (For students majoring in Art 
History, by permission of Department.) Basic printmaking technique in re- 
lief, intaglio, and planographic media. Laborary Fee $20.00. (O'Connell) 

14 



Art 

Art 126. Drawing III. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, Art 26. Emphasis on understanding organic 
form, as it is related to study from the human figure and to pictorial composition. 

(Jamieson) 

Art 127. Painting III. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, Art 117. Creative painting for advanced 
students. Problems require a knowledge of pictorial structure. Development of 
personal direction. Choice of media. (Grossman, Maril) 

Art 128. Sculpture II. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, Art 118. Different sections of course may 

be taken for credit. 

128-a. Nature as a point of reference with potentiality of developing ideas 
into organic and architectural forms. Laboratory Fee $15.00. (Freeny) 

128-b. May be taken after 128-a. Problems involving plastic earths and other 
material capable of being modeled or cast. Choice of individual style 
encouraged. (Freeny) 

Art 129. Printmaking II. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, Art 119. One print media including exten- 
sive study of color processes. Individually structured problems. Laboratory 
Fee $20.00. (O'Connell) 

Art 137. Painting IV. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, Art 127. Creative painting. Emphasis on 
personal direction and self-criticism. Group seminars. 

(Grossman, Jamieson, Maril) 

Art 138. Sculpture III. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, Art 128. Problems and techniques of newer 
concepts, utilizing various materials, such as plastics and metals. Technical 
aspects of welding stressed. (Freeny) 

Art 139. Printmaking III. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, Art 129. 

139-a. Contemporary experimental techniques of one print medium with 
group discussions. (O'Connell) 

139-b. Continuation of 139-a. May be taken for credit after 139-a. 

(O'Connell) 

Art 160, 161. Classical Art. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the Classical cultures. First semester 
will stress Greece; second semester, Rome. (Staff) 

Art 162, 163. Art of the East. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting. First semester will stress India; second 
semester, China and Japan. (Staff) 

Art 164. Early Christian and Byzantine Art. (3) 

Architecture, sculpture, painting, and mosaic of early Christian Rome, the 
Near East, and the Byzantine Empire. (Staff) 

15 



Art 

Art 166, 167. Medieval Art. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the Middle Ages. First semester will 
stress Romanesque; second semester, the Gothic period. (Denny) 

Art 168, 169. Renaissance Art in Italy. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting from 1400 to the High Renaissance in the 
16th century. (O'Connor) 

Art 170. Northern European Painting in the 15th and 16th 
Centuries. (3) 

Painting in Flanders and related northern European areas, from Van Eyck to 
Brueghel and Durer. (Denny) 

Art 172, 173. European Baroque Art. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting of the major European centers in the 17th 
century. (De Leiris) 

Art 174, 175. French Painting. (3, 3) 

French painting from the 15th through the 18th century, from Fouquet to 
David. (Levitine) 

Art 176, 177. 19th Century European Art. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in European Art from Neo-Classicism to 
Impressionism. (De Leiris) 

Art 178, 179. 20th Century Art. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting from the late 19th century to our day. 

(O'Connor) 

Art 192, 193. Directed Studies in Studio Art. (2 or 3, 2 or 3) 

For advanced students, by permission of Department Head. Course may be 
repeated for credit if content differs. (Staff) 

Art 194, 195. Directed Studies in Art History. (2 or 3, 2 or 3) 

For advanced students, by permission of Department Head. Course may be 
repeated for credit if content differs. (Staff) 

For Graduates 

The requirements of students will determine which courses will be offered. 

Art 200, 201. Painting. (3, 3) 

Specific projects to be developed. Conferences arranged. 

(Grossman, Jamieson, Maril) 

Art 202, 203. Painting. (3, 3) 

Individual projects growing in complexity. Seminars. 

(Grossman, Jamieson, Maril) 
Art 211. Printmaking. (3) 

Advanced problems. Relief process. (O'Connell) 

Art 212. Printmaking. (3) 

Advanced problems. Intaglio process. (O'Connell) 

16 



Art 

Art 213. Printmaking. (3) 

Advanced problems. Lithographic process. (O'Connell) 

Art 214. Seminar in Printmaking. (3) 

(O'Connell) 

Art 221, 222. Experimentation in Sculpture. (3, 3) 

Independent research stressed. (Freeny) 

Art 223. Materials and Techniques in Sculpture. (3) 

For advanced students. Methods of armature building, casting, and the use of 
a variety of stor^e, wood, metal, and plastic materials. (Freeny) 

Art 224. Sculpture — Casting and Foundry. (3) 

The traditional methods of plaster casting and the more complicated types in- 
volving metal. Cire perdue, sandcasting and newer methods such as cold metal 
process. (Freeny) 

Art 226. Drawing. (3) 

Sustained treatment of a theme chosen by student. Wide variety of media. 

(Jamieson) 

Art 227. Drawing. (3) 

Traditional materials and methods including Oriental, Sumi ink drawing and 
techniques of Classical European masters. (Jamieson) 

Art 228. Drawing. (3) 

Detailed anatomical study of the human figure and preparation of large scale 
mural compositions. (Jamieson) 

Art 229. Drawing and Painting. (3) 

Preparation and execution of a wall decoration. (Jamieson) 

Art 240, 241. Advanced Problems in Art Education. (3, 3) 

An integrated series of problems determined by the student's professional needs. 

(Lembach) 

Art 250. American Colonial Art. (3) 

The arts during the exploration period and Colonial development. (Grubar) 

Art 255. Seminar in 19th Century American Art. (3). 

Problems in architecture, sculpture and painting from the end of the Colonial 
period until 1860. (Grubar) 

Art 261. Seminar in Romanticism. (3) 

Problems derived from the development of Romantic Art during the 18th and 
19th centuries. (Levitine) 

Art 263. Seminar in 19th Century European Art. (3) 

Problems derived from the period starting with David and ending with Cezanne. 

(De Leiris) 

Art 266. Seminar in Contemporary Art. (3) 

Problems of Western art from 1900 to the present. (O'Connor) 

17 



Astronomy 

Art 268. Seminary in Literary Sources of Art History. (3) 

Art historical sources from Pliny to Malraux. (Levitine) 

Art 292, 293. Directed Graduate Studies in Studio Art. (3, 3) 

For advanced graduate students by permission of Head of Department. Course 
may be repeated for credit if content differs. (Staff) 

Art 294, 295. Directed Graduate Studies in Art History. (3, 3) 

For advanced graduate students, by permission of Head of Department. Course 
may be repeated for credit if content differs. (Staff) 

Art 399. Thesis Research. (1-6) 



ASTRONOMY 

Professor and Head: Laster. 

Professor and Director of Astronomy: Westerhout. 

Professors: Musen (P.T.) and Opik. 

Associate Professors: Erickson, Smith and Van Wijk. 

Assistant Professor: Bell. 

Lecturer: Chou (P.T.) 

The requirements for a major in Astronomy are designed to provide a 
solid background in related fields and a broad program of study in the 
fundamentals of Astronomy. The program is designed to prepare stu- 
dents for graduate work as well as for positions in governmental and 
industrial laboratories and observatories. 

Students who enter the University intending to major in Astronomy are 
urged to take during the first two years the same introductory physics and 
mathematics courses recommended for physics majors (see requirements 
for physics majors). If their schedule permits they should also take the 
introductory astronomy course Astr. 1, 2 — or Astr. 10 — (3). Alternatively, 
Astr. 10 may also be taken during the fall term of the junior year. 

In addition, astronomy majors are required to take the following courses: 
Phys. 127, 128— Elements of Mathematical Physics (4, 4); Astr. 100 — 
Observational Astronomy (3) and one other astronomy course at the 100 
level; and one 3-credit mathematics course approved by the department 
adviser (which is usually Math. 110 — Advanced Calculus, or Math. 162 — 
Applied Mathematics I). 

Recommended course programs are available from the Department of 
Physics and Astronomy. Students may major in Astronomy only if a grade 
"C" is attained in each semester of the elementary physics and astronomy 
courses and in each of the required mathematics courses. 

18 



Astronomy 

Students who wish to be recommended for graduate work must maintain 
a "B" average and should take as many as possible of the following 
courses: one additional astronomy course at the 100 level, Phys. 118, 
119 — Modern Physics (3, 3), and Phys. 120 — Nuclear Physics (4), or 
Phys. 116 — Fundamental Hydrodynamics (3), and at least two additional 
mathematics courses, usually Math. 114 — Differential Equations (3), and 
Math. Ill — Advanced Calculus (3), or Math. 116 — Complex Variables, 
or Math. 1 30— Probability (3). 

HONORS IN astronomy: The honors program offers to students of excep- 
tional ability and interest in astronomy an educational program with a 
number of special opportunities for learning. Honors sections are offered 
in several courses, and there are many opportunities for part-time research 
participation which may develop into full-time summer projects. An honors 
seminar is offered for advanced students; credit may be given for inde- 
pendent work or study; and certain graduate courses are open for credit 
toward the bachelor's degree. 

Students for the Honors Program are accepted by the Department's Hon- 
ors Committee on the basis of recommendations from their advisers and 
other faculty members. A final written and oral comprehensive examina- 
tion in the senior year concludes the program which may lead to gradu- 
ation "with Honors (or High Honors) in Astronomy." 

Astr. 1. Introduction to Astronomy. (3) 

Every semester. An elementary course in descriptive astronomy, especially 
appropriate for non-science students. Coordinates, time, sun, moon, planets, 
stars and nebulae, galaxies, evolution. The course is illustrated with slides and 
demonstrations of instruments. Lecture demonstration fee $3.00 

(Smith, Chou) 

AsTR. 2. Introduction to Modern Astronomy. (3) 

Spring semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Astr. 1. An elementary 
course in modern astronomy elaborating on some of the topics which could only 
be mentioned briefly in Astronomy 1. Appropriate for non-science students. 
Lecture demonstration fee $3.00 (Smith) 

Astr. 5. Astronomy Laboratory. (1) 

Fall and spring semesters. Two hours of Laboratory per week. Prerequisite, 
previous or concurrent enrollment in Astr. 1 or 10. Laboratory fee $10.00. 
Exercises in the use of celestial coordinates, measurement of position, deter- 
mination of time of day and night; study of photographs of stars, nebulae and 
galaxies, and spectra; photoelectric photometry; demonstration of astronomical 
instruments, daytime and nighttime observations if weather permits. Appropriate 
for non-science majors. (Van Wijk) 

Astr. 10. Descriptive and Analytical Astronomy. (3) 

Fall semester. Three lectures per week. A general survey course intended for 
science majors. Prerequisite, concurrent or previous enrollment in Math. 20. 
This introductory course will deal with the sun and the solar system, stars and 
astro-physics, stellar systems and cosmology. It should not be taken by students 
who have already taken Astr. 1 and 2. Lecture demonstration fee $3.00. 

(Van Wijk, Erickson) 

19 



Astronomy 

AsTR. 100, Observational Astronomy. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two hours of laboratory work per week. 
Prerequisite, Math 21 and at least 12 credits of introductory physics and as- 
tronomy courses. Laboratory fee, $10. Introduction to the methods of astro- 
nomical photometry and spectroscopy. (Van Wijk) 

Astr. 101. Introduction to Galactic Research. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Math 21 and at least 12 
credits of introductory physics and astronomy courses. Stellar motions, meth- 
ods of galactic research, study of our own and nearby galaxies, clusters of 
stars. (Van Wijk) 

AsTR. 102. Introduction to Astrophysics. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, previous or concurrent 
enrollment in Physics 119 or consent of the instructor. Spectroscopy, structure 
of the atmospheres of the sun and other stars. Observational data and curves 
of growth. Chemical composition. (Bell) 

Astr. 110. Introduction to Radio Astronomy. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Math 21 and at least 12 credits of 
introductory physics and astronomy courses. Characteristics of extraterrestrial 
radio noise, sources of radio emission, our own and external galaxies, the sun, 
radio telescopes, and basic observational techniques. (Westerhout) 

AsTR. 124. Celestial Mechanics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Physics 127 or consent of instructor. Celes- 
tial mechanics, orbit theory, equations of motion. (Musen) 

AsTR. 150. Special Problems in Astronomy. 

Given each semester. Prerequisite, major in physics or astronomy and/or 
consent of adviser. Research or special study. Credit according to work done. 

(Staff) 

AsTR. 190. Honors Seminar. 

Credit according to work done, each semester. Enrollment is limited to students 
admitted to the Honors Program in Astronomy. (Staff) 

AsTR. 200. Dynamics of Stellar Systems. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Physics 200 or Astr. 
101. Theory of stellar encounters. Study of the structure and evolution of 
dynamical systems encountered in astronomy. (Van Wijk) 

Astr. 202. Stellar Interiors. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, Math 1 14 and Physics 1 19 or consent of 
instructor. A study of stellar structure and evolution. (Bell) 

Astr. 203. Stellar Atmospheres. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Physics 212 or consent of the instructor. 
Observational methods, line formation, curve of growth, equation of transfer, 
stars with large envelopes, variable stars, novae, magnetic fields in stars. 

(BeU) 

20 



Botany 

AsTR. 204. Physics of the Solar System. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Physics 119. A survey of the problems 
of interplanetary space, planetary structure and atmosphere, physics of the 
earth's upper atmosphere, motions of particles in the earth's magnetic field. 

(Opik) 

AsTR. 210. Galactic Radio Astronomy. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, Physics 119, Astr. 101 and 110 or 
consent of the instructor. Theory and observations of the continuum and 21 cm 
line emission from the Galaxy; galactic structure and the sources of radio 
emission. (Westerhout) 

Astr. 212. Physics of the Solar Envelope. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, Physics 119, Astr. 102 and 110 or 
consent of the instructor. Physics of solar phenomena, such as solar flares, 
structure of the Corona and the Chromosphere; radio emission from the sun. 

(Erickson) 

Astr. 214. Interstellar Matter. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, previous or concurrent enrollment in 
Physics 213, Astr. 101 or Astr. 102 or consent of instructor. A study of the 
physical properties of interstellar gas and dust. (Smith) 

Astr. 230. Seminar. (1) 

Seminars on various topics in advanced astronomy are held each semester, with 
the contents varied each year. One credit for each seminar each semester. 

(Staff) 

Astr. 248, 249. Special Topics in Modern Astronomy. 

Credit according to work done each semester. Prerequisite, consent of in- 
structor. (Staff) 

Astr. 399. Research. 

Credit according to work done, each semester. Laboratory fee, $10 per credit 
hour. Prerequisite, an approved application for admission to candidacy or 
special permission of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. (Staff) 



BOTANY 

Botany is recognized as either a major or minor field in Arts and Sciences, 
leading to the B.S. (and with some majors the B.A.) degree. The Botany 
Department is administered by the College of Agriculture, but students 
register for botany courses and major or minor in this subject just as if the 
Department were in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Freshmen should consult their lower division adviser and also the Botany 
Department adviser in planning the major program. The four lower divi- 
sion courses, Bot. 1, 2 — General Botany; Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants; and 
Bot. 11 — Plant Taxonomy (total 15 credit hours) should be taken during 
the first two years. Sufficient upper division courses to give a total of 36 
credit hours in botany must be taken. Included in these will be Bot. 101 — 

21 



Chemical Physics and Chemistry 

Plant Physiology; Bot. 110 — Plant Microtechnique; Bot. Ill — Plant An- 
atomy; Bot. 102 — Plant Ecology; Bot. 117 — General Plant Genetics; and 
electives. 

The botany electives chosen depend in part on the student's chief interest. 
To support the courses in botany, major students are required to take Chem. 
1, 3 — General Chemistry; Math. 10, 11 — Introduction to Mathematics (or 
Math. 18, 19) as a minimum; Phys. 10, 11 — Fundamentals of Physics; 
Zool. 1 — General Zoology; Microb. 1 — General Microbiology; and 12 
hours of a modern language, preferably German. Chem. 31, 33 — Organic 
Chemistry; and Math. 14, 15 — Calculus, are strongly recommended. Other 
courses to meet the requirements of the major are to be chosen with the aid 
of a faculty adviser. Descriptions of courses in botany will be found in the 
catalog of the College of Agriculture. Additional information about the 
curriculum in botany may be obtained at the departmental office. 



CHEMICAL PHYSICS 

(See Molecular Physics, p. 88.) 

CHEMISTRY 

Laboratory fees in chemistry are $12.00 per laboratory course per semester 
except for Chemistry 270, for which the fee is $20.00. 

Professor and Head: White. 

Professors: Jaquith, Lippincott, Mason,^ Pratt, Purdy, Reeve, Rol- 
LiNsoN, Svirbely, Vanderslice,^ Veitch and Woods. 

Research Professor: Bailey. 

Associate Professors: Atkinson, Gordon, Grim, Henery-Logan, Kasler, 
Pickard, Stewart and Stuntz. 

Assistant Professors: Bellama, Boyd, Carruthers, Huheey, Krisher,^ 
Miller, Lakshmanan, Spivey, Staley and Weissman.'* 

The science of chemistry is so broad that completion of a well-planned 
course of undergraduate study is necessary before speciaUzation. The curr 
riculum outlined below describes such a course of study. The sequence of 
courses given should be followed as closely as possible. All of the chemistry 
courses listed are required. The electives must include four lecture credits 



4 Member of the Institute for Molecular Physics. 

22 



Chemistry 

selected from among Chem. 125, Chem. 143, Chem. 195, Math. 66, or an 
advanced course in mathematics or physics that has Math. 21 as a pre- 
requisite. The electives must also include Chem. 144 or Chem. 186 or 
Chem. 199H; Chem. 199H can be elected only by students in the chemistry 
honors program, and must be taken in the second semester of the senior 
year. Further information concerning the honors program in chemistry may 
be obtained from the Chemistry Department Honors Committee. 

First Year 



First Semester 



Chemistry 5 

Mathematics 18 3 

English 1 or 21 3 

General Education 3 

Health 5 2 

Physical Education 1 



Second Semester 

4 Chemistry 15 4 

Mathematics 19 4 

English 3 3 

General Education 3 

Speech 7 2 

Physical Education 1 



16 



17 



Second Year 



Chemistry 35. 2 

Chemistry 40 . . . ! 1 

Mathematics 20 . 4 

Physics 20 5 

English 4 3 



15 



Chemistry 37 2 

Chemistry 42 1 

Chemistry 21 4 

Mathematics 21 4 

Physics 21 5 



16 



Third Year 



Chemistry 187 3 

Chemistry 182 1 

Chemistry 141 2 

German 1 3 

General Education 3 

Elective 3 



15 



Chemistry 189 3 

Chemistry 184 1 

Chemistry 148 2 

German 2 3 

General Education 3 

Electives 4 



16 



Fourth Year 



Chemistry 123 3 

German 6 3 

General Education 3 

Electives 8 



17 



Chemistry 101 3 

German 8 3 

Electives 9 



15 



23 



Chemistry 

Chem. 1, 3. General Chemistry. (4, 4) 

Two lectures, one quiz, and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Pre- 
requisite, 1 year high school algebra or equivalent. (Staff) 

Chem. 5. Advanced General Chemistry. (4) 

First semester. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisite, high school chemistry, placement in mathematics group I or II, 
and permission of the Chemistry Department. An advanced course in general 
chemistry for chemistry majors, which must be followed by Chem. 15. 

(Staff) 

Chem. 11, 13. General Chemistry. (3, 3) 

Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. An abbreviated 
course in general chemistry for students in home economics and pre-nursing. 
This course is open only to students registered in home economics and pre-nurs- 
ing. (Staff) 

Chem. 15. Qualitative Analysis. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 3 or Chem. 5. (Staff) 

Chem. 17. Equilibrium and Stoichiometry. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 3. A systematic 
study of the equilibria and stoichiometry involved in acid-base, precipitation, 
complex formation, and oxidation-reduction reactions. Not open to students 
with credit in Chem. 19 or 21. (Staff) 

Chem. 19. Elements of Quantitative Analysis. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 3. An introduction to the basic theory and techniques of volumetric and 
gravimetric analysis. Primarily for students in engineering, agriculture, pre- 
medical, and pre-dental curricula. (Stuntz) 

Chem. 21, Quantitative Analysis. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 15. An intensive study of the theory and techniques of in- 
organic quantitative analysis, covering primarily volumetric methods. Required 
of all students majoring in chemistry. (Stuntz) 

Chem. 23. Inorganic Structure and Chemical Bonding. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 17, 19, or 21. 
Atomic structure, elementary molecular structure, chemical bonding from val- 
ence bond approach and from molecular orbital approach, bonding in coordina- 
tion compounds, and the ionic bond. (Staff) 

Chem. 31, 33. Elements of Organic Chemistry. (3, 3) 

Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 3, 5, or 13. Organic chemistry for students in agriculture, bacteriology, 
and home economics. (Reeve) 

24 



Chemistry 
Chem. 35, 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry. (2, 2) 

Chem. 37, summer session. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 3, 5. 
A course for chemists, chemical engineers, pre-medical students, and pre-dental 
students. (Staff) 

Chem. 36, 38. Elementary Organic Laboratory. (2, 2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 3 or 5; Chem. 
35, 37 must be taken concurrently. (Woods) 

Chem. 40, 42. Organic Chemistry Laboratory for Chemistry 
Majors. (1, 1) 

One three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 3 or 5; Chem. 
35, 37 must be taken concurrently. (Staff) 

Chem. 8L General Biochemistry. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Prerequisites, Chem. 33, or Chem. 37, 38. This course is designed primarily for 
students in home economics. (Henery-Logan) 

Chem. 101. Inorganic Chemistry. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 187. (Staff) 

Chem. 102. Inorganic Preparations. (2) 

Second semester. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 123. (Boyd) 

Chem. 111. Chemical Principles. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 3, or equivalent. Not open to students seeking a major in the physical 
sciences, since the course content is covered elsewhere in their curricula. A 
course in the principles of chemistry with accompanying laboratory work con- 
sisting of simple quantitative experiments. (Credit applicable only toward degree 
in College of Education.) (Jaquith) 

Chem. 115. A Survey of Organic Chemistry. (3) 

Summer School only. Open ONLY to registrants in the National Science 

Foundation Summer Institute. Five one-hour lectures per week; five three-hour 

laboratory periods per week. A systematic survey of compounds of carbon 

at the elementary level. (Staff) 

Chem. 123. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 189 or concurrent registration therein. A continuation of Chem. 21. in- 
cluding volumetric, gravimetric, electrometric, and colorimetric methods. Re- 
quired of all students majoring in chemistry. (Purdy) 

Chem. 125. Instrumental Analysis. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and six hours of laboratory per week. Pre- 
requisite, Chem. 189. A study of the application of physicochemical methods 
to analytical chemistry. Techniques such as polarography, potentiometry, con- 
ductivity and spectrophotometry will be included. (Purdy) 

25 



Chemistry 

Chem. 141, 143. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (2, 2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 37, 38. An advanced study of the 
compounds of carbon. (Reeve) 

Chem. 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory. (2-4) 

Two or four three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 
37, 38. (Pratt) 

Chem. 148. The Identification of Organic Compounds. (3) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 141. The 
systematic identification of organic compounds. (Pratt) 

Chem. 150. Organic Quantitative Analysis. (2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 19 or 21, and 
consent of the instructor. The semi-micro determination of carbon, hydrogen, 
nitrogen, halogen and certain functional groups. (Kasler) 

Chem. 161, 163. Biochemistry. (2, 2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem 33, or Chem. 37. This course is 
designed primarily for students in agriculture, bacteriology, or chemistry, and 
for those students in home economics who need a more extensive course in 
biochemistry than Chem. 81. (Henery-Logan) 

Chem. 162, 164. Biochemistry Laboratory. (2, 2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 33 or 
Chem. 38. (Henery-Logan) 

Chem. 182, 184. Physical Chemistry Laboratory for Chemistry 
Majors. (1, 1) 

One three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 19 or 21; 
Chem. 187, 189 must be taken concurrently. (Staff) 

Chem. 186. Advanced Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 184, 
Chem. 189. (Staff) 

Chem. 187, 189. Physical Chemistry. (3, 3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 17, 19 or 21; Phys. 21; Math. 21; 
or consent of instructor. A course primarily for chemists and chemical engi- 
neers. This course must be accompanied by Chem. 188, 190. (Svirbely) 

Chem. 188, 190. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (2,2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. A laboratory course for chemical 
engineering students taking Chem. 187, 189. Students who have had Chem. 19, 
21, or equivalent, cannot register for this course. (Staff) 

Chem. 192, 194. Glassblowing Laboratory. (1, 1) 

One three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

(Carruthers) 

Chem. 195. Advanced Physical Chemistry. (2) 

Prerequisite, Chem. 189. Quantum chemistry and other selected topics. 

(Staff) 
Chem. 199H. Special Projects. (2) 

Honors projects for undergraduate students. (Staff) 

26 



Chemistry 

For Graduates 
Chem. 201. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures per week. (Staff) 

Chem. 202, 204. Advanced Inorganic Laboratory. (2, 2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. (Boyd) 

Chem. 203. The Chemistry of the Rarer Elements. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures per week. (White) 

Chem. 205. Radiochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Rollinson) 

Chem. 206, 208. Spectrographic Analysis. (1, 1) 

One three-hour laboratory period per week. Registration limited. Prerequi- 
sites, Chem. 184 and consent of the instructor. (White) 

Chem. 207. Chemistry of Coordination Compounds. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Rollinson) 

Chem. 209. Non-Aqueous Inorganic Solvents. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Jaquith) 

Chem. 210. Radiochemistry Laboratory. (1-2) 

One or two four-hour laboratory periods per week. Registration limited. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 205 (or concurrent registration therein), and consent of in- 
structor. (Lakshmanan) 

Chem. 211. Chemistry of Organometallic Compounds. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Grim) 

Chem. 213. Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 201, 203 or equivalent. An exam- 
ination of some current topics in modern inorganic chemistry. (Staff) 

Chem. 221, 223. Chemical Microscopy. (2, 2) 

One lecture and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Registration lim- 
ited. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Chem. 221 is a prerequisite for Chem. 
223. A study of the use of the microscope in chemistry. Chem. 223 is de- 
voted to study of the optical properties of crystals. (Stuntz) 

Chem. 225. Advanced Instrumental Analysis. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and six hours of laboratory per week. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 189, 190 or concurrent registration therein. An intensive 
study of physicochemical methods as applied to analytical chemistry. Labora- 
tory work will include experiments in such fields as polarography, coulometry 
and amperometry, potentiometry and spectrophotometry, nephelometry. 

(Purdy) 

Chem. 226. Selected Topics in Analytical Chemistry. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Prerequisites, Chem. 125, 225, or consent of instructor. A study of advanced 
methods with emphasis on the modern techniques of analytical chemistry. 

(Purdy) 

27 



Chemistry 

Chem. 240. Organic Chemistry of High Polymers. (2) 

Two lectures per week. An advanced course covering the synthesis of monomers, 
mechanisms of polymerization, and the correlation between structure and prop- 
erties in high polymers. (Bailey) 

Chem. 241. Stereochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Woods) 

Chem. 243. Molecular Orbital Theory. (2) 

Two lectures per week. A partial quantitative application of molecular orbital 
theory and symmetry to the chemical properties and reactions of organic 
molecules. Prerequisites, Chem. 143 and Chem. 189. (Staley) 

Chem, 245. The Chemistry of the Steroids. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Pratt) 

Chem. 249. Physical Aspects of Organic Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Woods) 

Chem. 251. The Heterocyclics. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Pratt) 

Chem. 254. Advanced Organic Preparations. (2-4) 

Two or four three-hour laboratory periods per week. (Pratt) 

Chem. 258. The Identification of Organic Compounds, an 

Advanced Course. (3) 

One lecture and two to four three-hour laboratory periods per week. Pre- 
requisite, Chem. 141, 143 or concurrent registration therein. (Pratt) 

Chem. 261, 263. Advanced Biochemistry. (2, 2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 143 or consent of instructor. 

(Veitch) 

Chem. 262, 264. Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory. (2, 2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, consent of in- 
structor. (Veitch) 

Chem. 265. Enzymes. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 163. (Veitch) 

Chem. 266. Biological Analysis. (2) 

Second semester. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, 
Chem. 19, 33. A study of analytical methods applied to biological material. 

Chem. 267. The Chemistry of Natural Products. (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 143. The chemistry and physio- 
logical action of natural products. Methods of isolation, determination of 
structure, and synthesis. (Henery-Logan) 

CThem. 268. Special Problems in Biochemistry. (2-4) 

Two to four three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 161, 
162 and consent of instructor. (Veitch) 

28 



Chemistry 
Chem. 269. Advanced Radiochemistry. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 205 or consent 
of instructor. Utilization of radioisotopes with special emphasis on applications 
to problems in the life sciences. (Lakshmanan) 

Chem. 270. Advanced Radiochemistry Laboratory. (1-2) 

Second semester. One or two four-hour laboratory periods per week. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 210 and 269 (or concurrent registration in Chem. 269) and 
consent of instructor. Registration limited. Laboratory training in utilization 
of radioisotopes with special emphasis on applications to problems in life 
sciences. (Lakshmanan) 

Chem. 271. Special Topics in Biochemistry. Biochemistry of 
Lipids. (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 163. Classification and chemistry 
of lipids, lipopensis and energy metabolism of lipids, structural lipids, and en- 
docrine control of lipid metabolism in mammals. (Lakshmanan) 

Chem. 273. Specul Topics in Biochemistry. Comparative 

Biochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 163. Energy sources and micro- 
nutrient requirements, gluconeogenesis, osmoragulation, nitrogen metabolism, 
detoxication and excretion, and comparative endocrinology. Deals with chor- 
dates only. (Lakshmanan) 

Chem. 281. Theory of Solutions. (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 307 or equivalent. (Svirbely) 

Chem. 285. Colloid Chemistry. (2) 

Prerequisite, Chem. 189 or equivalent. Two lectures per week. (Pickard) 

Chem. 287. Infra-Red and Raman Spectroscopy. (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Lippincott) 

Chem. 295. Heterogeneous Equilibria. (2) 

Prerequisite, Chem. 189 or equivalent. Two lectures per week. (Pickard) 

Chem. 299. Reaction Kinetics. (3) 

Three lectures per week. (Svirbely) 

Chem. 303. Electrochemistry. (3) 

Prerequisite, Chem. 307 or equivalent. Three lectures per week. (Atkinson) 

Chem. 304. Electrochemistry Laboratory. (2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

(Svirbely) 

Chem. 307. Chemical Thermodynamics. (3) 

Prerequisite, Chem. 189 or equivalent. Three lectures per week. (Staff) 

Chem. 311. Physicochemical Calculations. (2) 

Prerequisite, Chem. 189 or equivalent. Two lectures per week. (Stewart) 



29 



Classical Languages and Literatures 

Chem. 313. Molecular Structure. (3) 

Three lectures per week. (Staff) 

Chem, 317. Chemical Crystallography. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A detailed treat- 
ment of single crystal X-ray methods. (Stewart) 

Chem. 319, 321. Quantum Chemistry. (3, 3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite for Chem. 319 is Chem. 195. Prerequi- 
site for Chem. 321 is Chem. 319 or Physics 212. (Weissman, Vanderslice) 

Chem. 323. Statistical Mechanics and Chemistry. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 307 or equivalent. (Mason) 

Chem. 351. Seminar. (1) 



Chem. 399. Research. 



(Staflf) 
(Staff) 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

Professor and Head: Avery. 

Assistant Professor: Hubbe. 

Instructor: Macro. 

Major in Latin: Latin 1, 2, 3, and 4 or their equivalent must have 
been completed before a student may begin work on a major in Latin. A 
student majoring in Latin will then begin his concentration with Latin 5. 
A major consists of a minimum of twenty-four hours beginning with Latin 
5, twelve hours of which must be taken in 100-level courses. A major stu- 
dent who has taken Latin 1, 2, 3, and 4 may use credit so obtained to ful- 
fill the twelve-hour foreign language requirement of the College of Arts and 
Sciences. Those registering initially for Latin 5 must fulfill this requirement 
in another foreign language, preferably Greek. No course with a grade less 
than "C" may be used to satisfy major requirements. 

No placement tests are given in the Classical Languages. The following 
schedule will apply in general in determining the course level at which 
students will register for Latin and Greek. AH students whose stage of 
achievement is not represented below are urgently invited to confer with 
the Head of the Department. 

Students offering or 1 unit of Latin will register for course 1 . 
Students offering 2 units of Latin will register for course 3, 
Students offering 3 units of Latin will register for course 4, 
Students offering 4 units of Latin will register for course 5. 

No credit will be given for less than two semesters of Elementary Latin 
or Greek except as provided below in the course description of Latin 1,2. 

30 



Classical Languages and Literatures 



LATIN 



Latin 1,2. Elementary Latin. (3, 3) 

A student who has had two units of Latin in high school may register for Latin 1 
for purposes of review, but not for credit; however, he may, under certain con- 
ditions, register for Latin 2 for credit with departmental permission. 

(Hubbe and Staff) 

Latin 3. Intermediate Latin (Caesar). (3) 

Prerequisite, Latin 1, 2 or equivalent. (Macro and Staff) 

Latin 4. Intermediate Latin (Cicero). (3) 

Prerequisite, Latin 3 or equivalent. (Macro and Staff) 

Latin 5. Vergil's Aeneid. (3) 

Prerequisite, Latin 4 or equivalent. (Avery) 

Latin 5L Horace. (3) 

Prerequisite, Latin 5 or equivalent. (Avery) 

Latin 52. Livy. (3) 

Prerequisite, Latin 51 or equivalent. (Avery) 

Latin 6L Pliny's Letters. (3) 

Prerequisite, Latin 52 or equivalent. (Avery) 

Latin 70. Greek and Roman Mythology. (3) 

Taught in English, no prerequisite. Cannot be taken for language credit. This 
course is particularly recommended for students planning to major in Foreign 
Languages, English, History, the Fine Arts, and Journalism. (Macro) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Prerequisite for 100 level courses, Latin 61. 
Latin 101. Catullus and the Roman Elegiac Poets. (3) 



Latin 102. Tacitus. (3) 
Latin 103. Roman Satire. (3) 
Latin 104. Roman Comedy. (3) 
Latin 105. Lucretius. (3) 



(Avery) 
(Avery) 
(Avery) 
(Avery) 
(Avery) 



Latin 111. Advanced Latin Grammar. (3) 

Prerequisite, three years of college Latin or equivalent. An intensive study of 
the morphology and syntax of the Latin language supplemented by rapid 
reading. (Avery) 

31 



Comparative Literature 

Latin 199. Latin Readings. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. The reading of one or more selected Latin 
authors from antiquity through the Renaissance. Reports. May be repeated 
with different content. (Avery) 

For Graduates 
Latin 210. Vulgar Latin Readings. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An intensive review of the phonology, 
morphology, and syntax of Classical Latin, followed by the study of the de- 
viations of Vulgar Latin from the classical norms, with the reading of illustra- 
tive texts. The reading of selections from the Peregrinato ad loca sancta and 
the study of divergences from classical usage therein, with special emphasis on 
those which anticipate subsequent developments in the Romance Languages. 
Reports. (Avery) 

GREEK 

Greek 1, 2. Elementary Greek. (3, 3) 

(Hubbe) 
Greek 3. Intermediate Greek (Xenophon). (3) 

Prerequisite, Greek 1, 2 or equivalent. (Hubbe) 

Greek 4. Intermediate Greek (Homer). (3) 

Prerequisite, Greek 3 or equivalent. See Greek 6. (Hubbe) 

Greek 5. Herodotus. (3) 

Prerequisite, Greek 4 or equivalent. (Hubbe) 

Greek 6. The New Testament. (3) 

Prerequisite, Greek 3 or equivalent. Greek 6 will be substituted for Greek 4 
upon demand of a sufficient number of students. (Hubbe) 

Greek 51, Euripides. (3) 

Prerequisite, Greek 5 or equivalent. (Hubbe) 

Geeek 52. Plato. (3) 

Prerequisite, Greek 51 or equivalent. (Hubbe) 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

Professor and Head: Aldridge. 

Professors: Cooley, Goodwyn, Jones, Levitine, Montano and Prahl. 

Associate Professor: Friedman. 

Assistant Professor: Evans. 

All literature courses numbered 100 or above in the departments of 
Classics, Foreign Languages and English as well as courses in Compara- 

32 



Comparative Literature 

tive Literature are accepted for a major in comparative literature. Stu- 
dents with this major must have a knowledge of at least one approved 
foreign language demonstrated by successful completion of a course num- 
bered 100 or above in that language. 

Of the possible 24-40 hours offered as a major, the following courses 
are required: 

Comparative Literature 101-102 and 150. 

Six hours of other comparative Hterature courses. 

Course work may not be limited to the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 
Latin 70 is highly recommended. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

CoMP. Lit. 101, 102. Introductory Survey of Comparative 
Literature. (3, 3) 

First semester. Survey of the background of European literature through study 
of Greek and Latin literature in English translations, discussing the debt of 
modern literature to the ancients. Second semester: study of medieval and 
modern continental literature. (Friedman) 

CoMP. Lit. 103. The Old Testament as Literature. (3) 

A study of sources, development and literary types. (Evans) 

Comp. Lit. 105. Romanticism in France. (3) 

First semester. Lectures and readings in the French romantic writers from 
Rousseau to Baudelaire. Texts are read in English translations. (Parsons) 

CoMP. Lit. 106. Romanticism in Germany. (3) 

Second semester. Continuation of Comp. Lit. 105. German literature from 
Buerger to Heine in English translations. (Prahl) 

CoMP, Lit. 107. The Faust Legend in English and German 
Literature. (3) 

Second semester. A study of the Faust legend of the Middle Ages and its 
later treatment by Marlowe in Dr. Faustus and by Goethe in Faust. (Prahl) 

CoMP. Lit. 112. Ibsen. (3) 

First semester. A study of the life and chief work of Henrik Ibsen with special 
emphasis on his influence on the modern drama. 

CoMP, Lit. 114. The Greek Drama. (3) 

First semester. The chief works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aris- 
tophanes in English translations. Emphasis on the historic background, on dra- 
matic structure, and on the effect of the Attic drama upon the mind of the civi- 
lized world. (Prahl) 

Comp. Lit. 125. Literature of the Middle Ages. (3) 

Narrative, dramatic, and lyric literature of the Middle Ages studied in trans- 
lation. (Cooley) 

33 



Comparative Literature 

CoMP. Lit. 130. The Continental Novel. (3) 

The novel in translation from Stendhal through the Existentialists, selected from 
literatures of France, Germany, Italy, Russia, and Spain. (Friedman) 

CoMP. Lit. 135. Dante and the Romance Tradition. (3) 

A reading of the Divine Comedy to enlighten the discovery of reality in western 
literature. (Montano) 

CoMP. Lit. 140. Literature of the Far East. (3) 

Classics of the Oriettt in translation. (Evans) 

CoMP, Lit. 150, Conference Course in Comparative Literature. 
(3) 

Second semester. A tutorial type discussion course, correlating the courses in 
various literatures which the student has previously taken with the primary 
themes and masterpieces of world literature. This course is required of under- 
graduate majors in comparative literature, but must not be taken until the final 
year of the student's program. (Friedman) 

For Graduates 

CoMP. Lit. 201. Problems in Comparative Literature. (3) 

Second semester. A research seminar for M.A. candidates only. (Friedman) 
CoMP. Lit. 225. The Medieval Epic. (3) 

First semester. A comparative interpretation of Beowulf, the Waltharius, the 
Chanson de Roland, the Nibelungenlied, and the Cid. (Jones) 

CoMP. Lit. 226. The Medieval Romance. (3) 

Second semester. An interpretation of the principal works of the genre. 

(Jones) 

Comp. Lit. 230. Problems of the Baroque in Literature. (3) 

First semester. The passage from Mannerism to the most characteristic theo- 
retical and creative manifestations of Baroque. (Montano) 

CoMP. Lit. 240. Literary Criticism: Ancient and Medieval. (3) 
First semester. From Aristotle to the fifteenth century. (Montano) 

CoMP. Lit. 241. Literary Criticism: Renaissance and Modern. (3) 
Second semester. From Petrarch to the present. (Montano) 

Comp. Lit. 258. Folklore in Literature. (3) 

A study of folk heroes, motifs, and ideas as they appear in the world's master- 
pieces. (Goodwyn) 

CoMP. Lit. 268. Seminar in Literary Sources of Art History. (3) 

Second semester. Art historical sources from Pliny to Malraux. (Same as Art 
268.) (Levitine) 

CoMP. Lit. 301. Seminar in Themes and Types. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, one year's graduate work in literature and the 
kiKtwledge of one language other than English. Intensive study of fundamental 
motifs and trends in western literature. (Aldridge) 

34 



Computer Science 
COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Research Professor: Rheinboldt. 
Associate Director and Instructor: Menard. 
Associate Professors: Glasser and Schweppe. 
Research Associate Professor: Rosenfeld. 
Assistant Professor: Austing. 
Research Assistant Professor: Ortega. 
Instructors: Chappell and Lindamood. 

The courses in Computer Science are designed to offer students in all fields 
an introduction to the academic discipline concerned with the use of com- 
puters. This area of study includes the development of algorithms to solve 
problems, the learning of languages suitable for stating algorithms, the 
translation of such algorithms into machine instructions, the efficient use 
of structured data, the techniques of solving numeric and non-numeric 
problems with the aid of computers, the mathematical theory of machines, 
and other related topics. As yet there is no degree program in Computer 
Science, but it is expected that students from many disciplines will wish to 
incorporate these courses into their studies. 

The Computer Science Center is an interdisciplinary academic department 
of the University which reports directly to the Vice President for Academic 
Affairs and thus is not part of any school or college. The descriptions of 
courses in Computer Science are entered in the catalog of the College of 
Arts and Sciences for the convenience of students and faculty of the Col- 
lege. 

The Center is charged with the triple function of providing a centralized 
computing service for all academic activities of the University, building an 
educational program in computer science, and conducting an active research 
program in the computer and computer related sciences. For further in- 
formation please contact the Computer Science Center. 

C. S. 12. Introductory Algorithmic Methods. (3) 

Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, Math. 
11 or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Designed for students not major- 
ing in mathematics, the physical sciences, or engineering. Study of the algo- 
rithmic approach in the analysis of problems and their computational solution. 
Definition and use of a particular algorithmic language. Computer projects 
based on elementary algebra and probability; linear equations and matrices: 
and the ordering, searching, sorting, and manipulating of data. 

C. S. 20. Elementary Algorithmic Analysis. (3) 

Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, Math. 
20, or concurrent registration therein, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

35 



Economics 

Concept and properties of an algorithm, language and notation for describing 
algorithms, analysis of computational problems and development of algorithms 
for their solution, use of specific algorithmic languages in solving problems from 
numerical mathematics, completion of several projects using a computer. 

C. S. 21. Numerical Calculus Laboratory I. (1 or 2) 

Two hours laboratory per week for each credit hour. Prerequisite, Math 21 
or concurrent registration therein, and C. S. 20; or equivalents. Laboratory fee, 
$10.00 for one credit, $15.00 for two credits. Laboratory work in the develop- 
ment of algorithmic solutions of problems taken from numerical calculus with 
emphasis on efficiency of computation, and the control of errors. Basic one- 
credit laboratory includes completion of several machine projects on material 
related to Math. 21. Second credit involves more comprehensive projects based 
on similar or related material. 

C. S. 22. Numerical Calculus Laboratory IL (1 or 2) 

Two hours laboratory per week for each credit hour. Prerequisite, Math. 22 
or concurrent registration therein and C. S. 20, or equivalents. Laboratory fee, 
$10.00 for one credit, $15.00 for two credits. Laboratory work in the develop- 
ment of algorithmic solutions of problems taken from numerical linear algebra 
with emphasis on efficiency of computation and the control of errors. Basic 
one-credit laboratory includes completion of several machine projects on ma- 
terial related to Math. 22. Second credit involves more comprehensive proj- 
ects based on similar or related material. 

C. S. 100. Language and Structure of Computers. (3) 

Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, 
C. S. 12 or C. S. 20 or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Logical basis of 
computer structure, machine representation of numbers and characters, flow of 
control, instruction codes, arithmetic and logical operations, indexing and indi- 
rect addressing, input-output, push-down stacks, symbolic representation of pro- 
grams and assembly systems, subroutine linkage, macros, interpretive systems, 
and recent advances in computer organization. Several computer projects to 
illustrate basic concepts. 

C. S. 110. Special Computational Laboratory. (1 or 2) 

Two hours laboratory per week for each credit hour. Prerequisite, C.S. 12 or 
equivalent. Laboratory fee, $10.00 for one credit, $15.00 for two credits. Ar- 
ranged for special groups of students to give experience in developing algorithmic 
solutions of problems or using particular computational systems. May be taken 
for cumulative credit up to a maximum of six hours where different material is 
covered. 



ECONOMICS 

Students registered in the College of Arts and Sciences may major in eco- 
nomics. During the freshman and sophomore years prospective economics 
majors should consult with their lower division adviser in Arts and Sciences 
concerning preparation for the major. Normally Econ. 4 — Economic De- 
velopments (3) is taken during the freshman year and Econ. 31, 32 — Prin- 
ciples of Economics (3, 3) during the sophomore year. 

36 



English Language and Literature 

Juniors and seniors are advised by the faculty of the Department of Eco- 
nomics, which is administered in the College of Business and Public Admin- 
istration. In addition to the nine lower division credits listed above, eco- 
nomics majors must complete a minimum of 27 credits with an average 
grade of not less than "C." Econ. 102 — National Income Analysis (3); 
Econ. 132 — Advanced Economic Principles (3); and B.A. 130 — Business 
Statistics I (3), are required. Other courses to meet the requirements of the 
major are to be selected with the aid of a faculty adviser. Descriptions of 
courses in economics will be found in the catalog of the College of Business 
and Public Administration. Additional information about the curriculum in 
economics may be obtained at the departmental office. 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professor and Head: Murphy. 

Professors: Bode, Cooley, Harman (Emeritus), Manning, McMana- 

WAY (P.T.), MiSH AND ZeEVELD. 

Associate Professors: Andrews, Barnes, Beall, Brown, Fleming, 
Gravely, Hovey, Lutwack, Myers, Portz, G. Smith, Thorberg, Ward 
AND Weber. 

Assistant Professors: Birdsall, Brosnahan, Bryer, Cooper, Coulter, 
Duffy, Herman, S. Holton, Houppert, Jellema, Kenney, Kinnaird, 
Lawson, Martin, McMillan, Panicil\s, Rodgers, Schaumann, D. 
Smith and Wilson. 

Lecturers: Fletcher (Visiting), Logan and Orr. 

Instructors: Buhlig, Carlson, Cate, Crozier, Dachslager, Demaree, 
Dunn, Eikel, B. Feldmann (p.t.), Fitzmaurice, Forman (p.t.), 
Gadziola, Grimes, M. Holton, Horrell, Howard, James, Johnson, 
Jones (p.t.), Karr, Landon, Moreines, Nelson, Schaefer (p.t.), 
C. Smith (p.t.), Stevenson, Stone, Trousdale, Walt, Whaley, 
WiLAN (p.t.) and Wright. 

A major program in English must include 24 hours chosen from courses in 
several groups, as follows : 

1. Three hours in language (Engl. 8, 101, 102, 104, 105, 107). 

2. Six hours in major figures (Engl. 104. 115, 116, 121). 

3. Nine hours in survey or type courses (six hours from Engl. 110, 
111, 112, 113, 120, 122, 123, 125, 126, 129, 130, 134, 135; 
55 or 56; three hours from Engl. 139, 140, 141, 143, 144, 145, 
157). 

4. Six hours in American literature (Engl. 148, 150, 151, 152, 155, 
156). 

37 



English Language and Literature 

No course with a grade less than "C" may be used to satisfy major re- 
quirements. 

In selecting minor or elective subjects, students majoring in English, par- 
ticularly those who plan to do graduate work, should give special considera- 
tion to courses in French, German, Latin, philosophy, and history. 

honors: The Department of EngUsh offers an honors program, primarily 
for majors but open to others with the approval of the departmental honors 
committee. Interested students should ask for detailed information from an 
English Department adviser no later than the beginning of their junior year. 

Eng. 1 or 21 is prerequisite to courses numbered 3 through 56. 

Eng. 1. Composition. (3) 

Required of freshmen. See Eng. 21. The study and applicatipn of rhetorical 
principles in expository prose; frequent themes. (Barnes, Herman, Staff) 

Eng. 3. World Literature. (3) 

Fulfills part of the general education requirement. See Eng. 33. Homer to the 
Renaissance, foreign classics being read in translation. (Cooley, McMillan, Staff) 

Eng. 4. World Literature. (3) 

Fulfills part of the general education requirement. See Eng. 34. Shakespeare to 
the present, foreign classics being read in translation. (Cooley, McMillan, Staff) 

Eng. 7. Technical Writing. (2) 

(Coulter, Walt) 

Eng. 8. Introduction to English Grammar. (3) 

A brief review of traditional English grammar, and an introduction to structural 
grammar, including phonology, morphology, and syntax. (James, Crozier) 

Eng. 9. Introduction to Narrative Literature. (3) 

Prerequisite, Eng. 1 or 21. An intensive study of representative stories, with lec- 
tures on the history and technique of the short story and other narrative forms. 

(Staff) 

Eng. 10. Composition and Literary Types. (3) 

Not open to students who have taken Eng. 21. A study of literary genres with 
writing based on the readings. (Barnes, Staff) 

Eng. 12. Introduction to Creative Writing. (3) 

Additional prerequisite, sophomore standing and departmental permission. 

(Jellema, Lawson, Schaumann) 

Eng. 14. Expository Writing. (3) 

(Barnes, Staff) 

Eng. 15. Readings in Biography. (3) 

An analytical study in the form and technique of biographical writing in Europe 
and America. (Ward) 

38 



English Language and Literature 
Eng. 21. Honors Composition. (3) 

May be elected by eligible students in place of Eng. 1 to satisfy general education 
requirement. Survey of principles of composition, rhetoric, and techniques of 
research; readings in essays, short stories, poetry; frequent themes. 

(Thorberg, Staff) 

Eng. 33. Honors World Literature. (3) 

May be elected by eligible students in place of Eng. 3 to satisfy general educa- 
tion requirement. Homer to the Renaissance, foreign classics being read in 
translation. (Cooley, Staff) 

Eng. 34. Honors World Literature. (3) 

May be elected by eligible students in place of Eng. 4 to satisfy general educa- 
tion requirement. Shakespeare to the present, foreign classics being read in 
translation. (Cooley, Staff) 

Eng. 55. English Literature from the Beginnings to 1800. (3) 

(Cooper, Staff) 

Eng. 56. English Literature from 1800 to the Present. (3) 

(Cooper, Staff) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Eng. 3-4 (or 33-34) are prerequisites to courses numbered 101 through 
199. 

Eng. 101. History of the English Language. (3) 

(Herman, James) 

Eng. 102. Old English. (3) 

(Brosnahan) 

Eng. 104. Chaucer. (3) 

(Cooley, Brosnahan) 

Eng. 105. Introduction to Linguistics. (3) 

Same as Foreign Language 101. (Miller) 

Eng. 107. American English. (3) 

(Herman) 

Eng. ho, 111. Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama. (3, 3) 

(Zeeveld) 

Eng. 112, 113. Literature of the Renaissance. (3, 3) 

(Zeeveld, Cooper) 

Eng. 115, 116. Shakespeare. (3, 3) 

(Zeeveld, Cooper, Houppert, D. Smith, Logan) 

Eng. 120. English Drama from 1660 to 1800. (3) 

(Ward) 

Eng. 121. Milton. (3) 

(Murphy, Mish) 

39 



English Language and Literature 

Eng. 122. Literature of the Seventeenth Century, 1600-1660. (3) 

(Murphy, Mish) 

Eng. 123. Literature of the Seventeenth Century, 1660-1700. (3) 

(Wilson) 

Eng. 125, 126. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (3, 3) 

(Myers) 

Eng. 129, 130. Literature of the Romantic Period. (3, 3) 

(Weber, Kinnaird, G. Smith) 

Eng, 134, 135. Literature of the Victorian Period. (3, 3) 

(Brown, Fletcher) 

Eng. 139, 140. The English Novel. (3, 3) 

(Ward, Kenney) 

Eng. 141. Major British Writers. (3) 

Two writers studied intensively each semester. (Fleming, Panichas, Fletcher) 

Eng. 143. Modern Poetry. (3) 

(Fleming, Jellema) 

Eng. 144. Modern Drama. (3) 

(Weber) 

Eng. 145. The Modern Novel. (3) 

(Andrews, Panichas) 

Eng. 148. The Literature of American Democracy. (3) 

(Barnes) 

Eng. 150, 151. American Literature. (3, 3) 

(Gravely, Hovey, Thorberg, Bryer, Lawson) 

Eng. 152. The Novel in America. (3) 

A historical survey of the development of the American novel from its 
eighteenth century beginnings to the twentieth century. (Hovey, Thorberg) 

Eng. 155, 156. Major American Writers. (3, 3) 

Two writers studied intensively each semester. 

(Manning, Gravely, Lutwack, Portz) 

Eng. 157. Introduction to Folklore. (3) 

(Birdsall, McMillan) 

Eng. 160. Advanced Expository Writing. (3) 

(Myers, Horrell, Stevenson) 

Eng. 170. Creative Writing. (3) 

(Fleming) 

40 



English Language and Literature 

Eng. 17L Advanced Creative Writing. (3) 

(Fleming) 

Eng. 172. Playwriting. (3) 

(Fleming) 

Eng. 190, 191. Honors Conference and Reading (1, 1) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, candidacy for honors in English. Candidates will 
take Eng. 190 in their junior year and Eng. 191 in their senior year. (Staff) 

Eng. 199. Senior Proseminar in Literature. (3) 

Open only to seniors. First semester. Required of candidates for honors and 
strongly recommended to those who plan to do graduate work. Individual 
reading assignments; term paper. (Staff) 

For Graduates 

Eng. 201. Bibliography and Methods. (3) 

(Mish, Hovey) 

Eng. 202. Middle English. (3) 

(Cooley, Brosnahan) 

Eng. 204. Seminar in Medieval Literature. (3) 

(Cooley, Brostiahan) 

Eng. 206, 207. Seminar in Renaissance Literature. (3, 3) 

(McManaway, Zeeveld) 

Eng. 210. Seminar in Seventeenth-Century Literature. (3) 

(Mish) 

Eng. 212, 213. Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Literature. (3, 3) 

(Myers) 

Eng. 214, 215. Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Literature. (3, 3) 

(Brown, Kinnaird, Fletcher) 

Eng. 216, 217. Literary Criticism. (3, 3) 

(Lutwack) 

Eng. 218. Seminar in Literature and the Other Arts. (3) 

(Myers) 

Eng. 225, 226. Seminar in American Literature. (3, 3) 

(Bode, Hovey) 

Eng. 227, 228. Problems in American Literature. (3, 3) 

(Aldridge) 

Eng. 230. Special Studies in English Literature to 1600. (3) 

(Cooley, Cooper) 

41 



Foreign Languages and Literatures 

Eng. 232. Special Studies in English Literature, 1600-1800. (3) 

(Mish, Myers) 

Eng. 235. Special Studies in 19th Century English Literature. 
(3) 

(Brown, G. Smith) 

Eng. 237. Special Studies in American Literature. (3) 

(Lutwack, Portz) 

Eng. 241, 242. Studies in Twentieth-Century Literature. (3, 3) 

(Bode, Hovey) 

Eng. 399. Thesis Research. (1-6) 

Arranged. (Staff) 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 



Associate Professor and Acting Head: Parsons. 

Professors: Bingham, Goodwyn, Jones, Nemes, Prahl, Quynn, Rand 
and Zucker (emeritus). 

Visiting Professors: Bettex and Iwry. 

Associate Professors: Alter, Dobert, Gramberg, Hering, Kramer 
(emeritus), Mendeloff, Parsons, Rosenfield and Rovner. 

Assistant Professors: Bridgers, Boyd, Chen, Demaitre, Greenberg, 
Haberl, Hall, Hitchcock, Kelly, Miller, Moeller, Norton, Ros- 
WELL, Vassylkivsky, Vogelgesang and Zimmerman. 

Lecturer: C. Johnson. 

Instructors: Ambler, Ament (p.t.), Armstrong, Barrabini, J. Cap 
(p.T.), Christov, L. Clemens (p.t.), S. Clemens (p.t.). Cook (p.t.), 
Fink, Font, D. Gray (p.t.), W. Gray, Hall, Herdoiza, Irwin (p.t.), 
Jacobs, Johnson, Juran, Kemner, Knoche, Lemaire (p.t.), Meyer, 
Moncayo, Motta, Panico, Rentz, Rodriguez, Saenz (p.t.), Salgado, 
Sonntag, Sprout, Stern, Suzynszki, Tuniks, Wegimont and Wilts. 

MAJORS: Two types of undergraduate majors are offered in French, Ger- 
man, Russian, or Spanish: one for the general student or the future teacher, 
and the other for those interested in a rounded study of a foreign area for 
the purpose of understanding another nation through its hterature, history, 
sociology, economics, and other aspects. Both of these majors confer the 

42 



Foreign Languages and Literatures 

B.A. degree. (The Department also offers M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in lan- 
guage and literature, but not in area study.) 

An undergraduate major in either language and literature or area requires 
a total of 33 hours, with a "C" average, above the basic Arts and Sciences 
College foreign language requirement. 

LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE MAJOR: Course 11 is a prerequisite 
to this major unless waived by the Head of Department. Specific minimum 
requirements in the program in French, German, or Spanish are: three 
semester courses in advanced language (two to be selected from courses 
12, 80, 81 and one from courses 103, 104); two semesters of the survey of 
literature (courses 75, 76 or 77, 78); four semester courses selected from 
literature courses numbered 100 to 199; and Comparative Literature 101 
and 102^ — a total of 33 hours. Requirements for a language major in Rus- 
sian comprise: three semesters of advanced Russian (courses 12 or 13, 71 
or 72, and 80 or 81 ), plus two semesters of the survey of Uterature, Russian 
75 and 76; four semesters in 100-level courses; and Comparative Literature 
101 and 102^ — a total of 33 hours. 

FOREIGN AREA MAJOR: The area study major in French, German, 
Russian, or Spanish endeavors to provide the student with a knowledge of 
various aspects of the country whose language he is studying. Specific re- 
quirements in this major are: five semester courses in advanced language 
(courses 12, 71, 72, 80, 81); two semester courses in civilization (courses 
171, 172 or 173, 174); two semester courses in literature numbered 100 
to 199; and Comparative Literature 101 and 102^ — a total of 33 hours. 

HONORS IN FRENCH, GERMAN OR SPANISH: A student whose ma- 
jor is in French, German, or Spanish and who, at the time of application, 
has a general academic average of 3.0 to 3.5 in his major field, may apply 
to the Chairman of the Honors Committee for admission to the Honors 
Program of the Department. Honors work normally begins in the first 
semester of the junior year, but a qualified student may enter as early as the 
sophomore year or as late as the second semester of the junior year. Honors 
students are required to take two courses from those numbered 195, 196, 
197 and the seminar numbered 199, as well as to meet other requirements 
for a major in Foreign Languages. There will be a final comprehensive ex- 
amination, covering the honors reading list, which must be taken by all 
graduating seniors who are candidates for honors. Admission of students 
to the Honors Program, their continuance in the program, and the final 
award of honors are the prerogative of the Departmental Honors Com- 
mittee. 



5 In all language major programs the Head of the Department has authority to 
relieve a student of the requirement in Comparative Literature 101 and 102 provided 
that the student takes a comparable course or courses in Comparative Literature. 
English or his major language at the 100-level as a substitution with the approval of 
the Head of Department. 

43 



Foreign Languages and Literatures 

ELEMENTARY HONORS: Course 3 in French, German, and Spanish is 
limited to specially approved candidates who have passed Course 1 with 
high grades, and will allow them to by-pass Course 6 to complete their re- 
quirement by completing Course 7. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES: At the beginning of each semester a 
placement examination is given for those students who wish to continue in 
the University a foreign language which they have studied for two or more 
years in high school (French, German, Spanish).'' Such students have the 
option of enrolling in Course 5 or taking a placement examination. Stu- 
dents with two or more years of high school language may not take Courses 
1 or 2 in that language for credit unless there has been a six year lapse of 
time between their last high school course in that language and the date of 
their matriculation at the University. Students with only one year of high 
school language may take Courses 1 and 2 in that language for credit. Stu- 
dents with two or more years of high school language who place in Course 

5 must complete in addition Courses 6, 7 and 11 or 12; those who place in 

6 must complete 7 and 11 or 12; those who place in 7 or higher may fulfill 
the College requirement by taking any 2 courses above Course 6. In Ger- 
man the course sequence is 5, 6, 7, 8 or 9. German 9 is not to be taken to 
meet the college requirement unless the student has completed German 7. 

Transfer students with college credit have the option of continuing at the 
level for which they are theoretically prepared, or placement examination, 
or electing Course 5. If a transfer student takes Course 5 for credit, he may 
retain transfer credit only for the equivalent of Course 1. A transfer stu- 
dent placing lower than his training should warrant may ignore the place- 
ment but does so at his own risk. 

If a student has received a "D" in a course, advanced and completed the 
next higher course, he cannot go back and repeat the original "D." 

No credit will be given, even elective, for a single semester of language 1. 

A student whose native language is taught at the University may not meet 
the college requirement by taking Courses 1, 2, 6, 7, 80 and 81. There is 
a special option by which foreign students may offer a combination of For- 
eign Language 1 and 2 (English for Foreign Students) and 12 hours of 
other English courses to satisfy both the Arts and Sciences English and For- 
eign Language requirements. This option may not be used by pre-medical 
students. 

The Civilization courses (171, 172) cannot be used toward the foreign 
language requirement except by students who begin language at the Uni- 
versity with a fifth semester course (8) or higher. 

Foreign Language 1-2. English for Foreign Students. (3, 3) 

An introduction to English usage, adapted to the needs of the non-English-speak- 
ing student. Pronunciation, spelling, syntax; the differences between English 
and various other languages are stressed. (Bridgers) 



" Students who have studied Chinese, Hebrew, Italian or Russian apply to the 
Department for special examination, since there is no Course 5 in these languages, 

44 



Foreign Languages and Literatures 
Foreign Language 101. Introduction to Linguistics. (3) 

Introduction to the basic concepts of modern descriptive linguistics. Phonology, 
morphology, syntax. Examinations of the methods of comparative linguistics, 
internal reconstruction, dialect geography. (Miller) 

Foreign Language 102. Phonetics and Phonemics. (3) 

Training in the identification, description, and symbolization of various sounds 
found in language. Study of scientific techniques for classifying sounds into 
units which are perceptually relevant for a given language. (Miller) 

Foreign Language 140. Oral Practice in Modern Foreign Lan- 
guages (French, German, Russian or Spanish). (3) 

Development of fluency in modern foreign languages, stress on correct sen- 
tence structure and idiomatic expression. Especially designed for teachers, or 
for practice in speaking the language. (Rovner, Staff) 

Foreign Language 171. Advanced French Phonetics. (3) 

First semester. Pronunciation of modern French. The sounds and their pro- 
duction, the stress group, intonation. Attention is called to Ed. 142 and Ed. 143. 

(Hall) 

CHINESE 

Chinese 1-2. Elementary Chinese. (3, 3) 

Three recitations and one laboratory period per week. Elements of pronuncia- 
tion, simple ideograms, colloquial conversation, translation. (Chen) 

Chinese 6-7. Intermediate Chinese. (3, 3) 

Three recitations per week; additional electronic laboratory in Chinese 6. Pre- 
requisite, Chinese 2 or equivalent. Reading of texts designed to give some 
knowledge of Chinese life, thought, and culture. (Chen) 

Chinese 101-102. Reading from Chinese History. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Chinese 7 or equivalent. Based on an anthology of historians 
from the Chou to the Ching dynasties. (Chen) 

Chinese 171-172. Chinese Civilization. (3, 3) 

This course supplements Geog. 134 and 135, Cultural Geography of East Asia. 
It deals with Chinese literature, art, folklore, history, government, and great 
men. Second semester: developments in China since 1911. The course is given 
in English translation. (Chen) 

FRENCH 

French 0. Elementary French for Graduate Students. 
(0 OR audit) 

Intensive elementary course in the French language designed particularly for 
graduate students who wish to acquire a reading knowledge. (Hall) 

French 1-2. Elementary French. (3, 3) 

Each semester; given as intensive course in summer sesion. Two recitations 
and two audio-lingual drills per week. Study of linguistic structure and develop- 
ment of audio-lingual and writing ability. (Cap, Staff) 

45 



Foreign Languages and Literatures 

French 3. Elementary French, Honors Course. (3) 

Two recitations and two audio-lingual drills per week. Enrollment limited to 
specially approved candidates from French 1. Students taking this course will 
normally continue in French 7. (Alter) 

French 5. Review of Elementary French. (3) 

Two recitations and two audio-lingual drills per week, or three recitations and 
one audio-lingual drill, depending on circumstances. Enrollment limited to 
students who, having taken placement examinations, have failed to qualify for 
French 6. (Gray, Staff) 

French 6-7. Intermediate French. (3, 3) 

Three recitations per week; additional electronic laboratory in French 6. Given 
as intensive course in summer session. Prerequisite: French 2 or equivalent, 
or French 5, except that recommended students may enter French 7 from 
French 3. Study of linguistic structure, further development of audio-lingual 
and writing ability, and reading of literary texts with discussion in French. 
Usually there will be an honors section for qualified students. (Johnson) 

French 10. Scientific French. (3) 

Prerequisite: French 7. Reading of technical and scientific prose with some at- 
tention to audio-lingual and linguistic objectives. (Johnson, Barrabini) 

French IL Introduction to French Literature. (3) 

Prerequisite: French 7. Required of all students who continue in advanced 
courses of Department, with the exception of superior students who are per- 
mitted to bypass an introduction to French literature. May be taken concur- 
rently with French 12. (Staff) 

French 12. Conversation and Composition. (3) 

Prerequisite: French 7. A practical language course recommended for all 
students continuing in French. May be taken concurrently with French 11. 

(Vassylkivsky) 

For Advanced Undergraduates 
French 41. French Phonetics. (3) 

Prerequisite: French 7 or equivalent. Elements of French phonetics, diction 
and intonation. (Hall) 

French 71-72. Review Grammar and Composition. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite: French 11 and 12 or equivalent. For students who, having a 
good knowledge of French, wish to become more proficient in the written and 
spoken language. (Bingham, Barrabini) 

French 75-76. Survey of French Literature. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite: French 11 or equivalent. An elementary survey of the chief 
authors and movements in French literature. (Quynn, Rosenfield) 

French 80-81. Advanced Conversation. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite. French 11 and 12 or consent of instructor. For students who 
wish to develop fluency and confidence in speaking the language. (Alter) 

46 



Foreign Languages and Literatures 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
French lOL Applied Linguistics. (3) 

The nature of Applied Linguistics and its contributions to the effective teaching 
of foreign languages. Comparative study of English and French, with emphasis 
upon points of divergence. Analysis, evaluation and construction of related 
drills. (Mendeloff) 

French 103-104. Advanced Composition. (3, 3) 

Translation from English into French, free composition, practical study of 
syntactical structure. (Alter) 

French 107. Introduction to Medieval Literature. (3) 

French literary history from the ninth through the fifteenth century, selected 
readings from representative texts. (Mendeloff) 

French 111. French Literature of the Sixteenth Century. (3) 

The Renaissance in France; humanism; Rabelais and Calvin; the Pleiade; 
Montaigne. (Quynn) 

French 115-116. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century. 
(3,3) 

First semester: Descartes, Pascal, Comeille, Racine. Second semester: the 
remaining great classical writers, with special attention to Moliere. 

(Quynn, Rosenfield) 

French 125-126. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century. 
(3,3) 

First semester: development of the philosophical and scientific movement; 

Montesquieu. Second semester: Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau. 

(Bingham, Rosenfield) 

French 131-132. French Literature of the Nineteenth Century. 
(3, 3) 

First semester: drama and poetry from Romanticism to Symbolism. Second 
semester: the major prose writers of the same period. (Alter, Zimmerman) 

French 141-142. French Literature of the Twentieth Century. 
(3,3) 

First semester: drama and poetry from Symbolism to the present time. Second 
semester: the contemporary novel. (Alter) 

French 171-172. French Civilization. (3, 3) 

French life, customs, culture, traditions. First semester: the historical deve'op- 
ment. Second semester: present-day France. (Cap) 

French 195, 196, 197. Honors Reading Course. (3, 3, 3) 

Supervised readings to be taken normally only by students admitted to Honors 
Program: 195 is poetry; 196 is the novel; 197 is drama. (Staff) 

French 199. Honors Seminar. (3) 

Required of all students in the Honors Program. Other students will be ad- 
mitted on special recommendation. Conducted in French. Discussion of a cen- 
tral theme with related investigations by students. (Staff) 

47 



Foreign Languages and Literatures 

For Graduates 

The requirements of students will determine which courses will be offered. 

French 20L The History of the French Language. (3) 

(Mendeloflf) 

French 203. Comparative Romance Linguistics. (3) 

Same as Spanish 203. (Mendeloff) 

French 207. Elementary Old French. (3) 

(Mendeloff) 

French 208. Old French Phonology and Morphology. (3) 

(Staff) 

French 209. Medieval French Culture. (3) 

(Staff) 

French 210. Elementary Old Provencal. (3) 

(Staff) 

French 211-212. Seminar in French Classicism. (3, 3) 

(Quynn) 

French 220-221. The Age of Enlightenment. (3, 3) 

(Bingham) 

French 230. Seminar in Romanticism. (3) 

(Quynn) 

French 235-236. The Realistic Novel in the Nineteenth Century. 
(3, 3) 

(Alter) 

French 243-244. The Contemporary French Theater. (3, 3) 

(Alter) 

French 245-246. Seminar in the Contemporary Novel. (3, 3) 

(Alter) 

French 251-252. The History of Ideas in France. (3, 3) 

(Rosenfield) 

French 271-272. Advanced Writing and Stylistics. (3, 3) 

(Alter) 

French 281-282. Reading Course. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 

French 291-292. Seminar. (3, 3) 

Topic to be determined. (Staff) 



48 



Foreign Languages and Literatures 
French 399. Research. (1-6) 

Credits determined by work accomplished. Guidance in the preparation of mas- 
ter's and doctoral theses. Conferences. (Staff) 

GERMAN 

German 0. Elementary German for Graduate Students. 
(0 OR audit) 

Intensive elementary course in the German language designed particularly for 
graduate students who wish to acquire a reading knowledge. (Boyd) 

German 1-2. Elementary German. (3, 3) 

Each semester; given as intensive course in summer sesion. Three recitations 
and one audio-lingual drill per week. Study of linguistic structure. Extensive 
drill in pronunciation and conversation. (Roswell, Haberl) 

German 3. Elementary German, Honors Course. (3) 

Three recitations and one audio-lingual drill per week. Enrollment limited to 
specially approved candidates from German 1. Student taking this course will 
normally continue in German 7. (Roswell) 

German 5. Review of Elementary German. (3) 

Three recitations and one audio-lingual drill per week. Limited to students who, 
having taken placement examination, have failed to qualify for German 6. 

(Sonntag) 

German 6-7. Intermediate Literary German. (3, 3) 

Three recitations per week; additional electronic laboratory in German 6. Given 
as intensive course in summer session. Prerequisite: German 2 or equivalent, or 
German 5, except that recommended students may enter German 7 from German 
3. Usually there will be an honors section for qualified students. 

(Boyd, Moeller) 

German 8. Scientific German. (3) 

Prerequisite: German 6. Reading of technical and scientific prose. (Moeller) 

German 9. Conversation and Composition. (3) 

Prerequisite: German 7, or 6 with consent of the instructor. A practical lan- 
guage course recommended for all students continuing in German. 

(Demaitre, Staff) 

For Advanced Undergraduates 
German 71-72. Review Grammar and Composition. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite: German 7, or equivalent. A thorough study of the more detailed 
points of German grammar with ample practice in composition. 

(Vogelgesang) 

German 75-76. Survey of German Literature. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite: German 7, or equivalent. A survey of the chief authors and move- 
ments in German literature. (Roswell) 

49 



Foreign Languages and Literatures 

German 80-8 L Advanced Conversation. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite: German 7 and 9, or consent of instructor. For students who wish 
to develop fluency and confidence in speaking the language. (Dobert) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
German 103-104. Advanced Composition. (3, 3) 

Translation from English into German, free composition, letter writing. 

(Jones, Staff) 

German 125-126. German Literature of the Eighteenth 
Century. (3, 3) 

The main works of Klopstock, Wieland, Lessing, Herder, Goethe, Schiller. 

(Hering, Staff) 

German 131-132. German Literature of the Nineteenth 
Century. (3, 3) 

Study of the literary movements from romanticism to naturalism. 

(Prahl, Staff) 

German 141-142. German Literature of the Twentieth 
Century. (3, 3) 

Prose and dramatic writings from Gerhart Hauptmann to the present. Modern 
literary and philosophical movements will be discussed. (Dobert, Staff) 

German 171-172. German Civilization. (3, 3) 

Study of the literary, educational, artistic traditions; great men, customs, and 
general culture. (Dobert, Staff) 

German 191. Bibliography and Methods. (3) 

Second semester. Especially designed for German majors. (Staff) 

German 195-196-197. Honors Reading Course. (3, 3, 3) 

Supervised reading to be taken normally only by students admitted to Honors 
Program: 195 is poetry; 196 is the novel; 197 is the drama. (Staff) 

German 199. Honors Seminar. (3) 

Required of all students in the Honors Program. Other students will be ad- 
mitted on special recommendation. Conducted in German. Discussion of a 
central theme with related investigations by students. (Staff) 

For Graduates 
The requirements of students will determine which courses will be offered. 

German 201. History of the German Language. (3) 

(Jones) 
German 203. Gothic. (3) 

(Jones) 
German 204. Old High German. (3) 

(Jones) 

50 



Foreign Languages and Literatures 
German 205. Middle High German. (3) 



(Jones) 

(Jones) 

(Hering) 

(Hering) 

(Prahl) 



German 207. Literature of Old High German and 
Middle High German. (3) 

German 211-212. Literature of the Sixteenth and 
Seventeenth Centuries. (3, 3) 

German 224-225. Goethe and His Time. (3, 3) 

German 226. Schiller. (3) 

German 230. German Romanticism. (3) 

(Prahl) 

German 234. The German Drama of the Nineteenth Century. (3) 

(Dobert) 

German 250. The German Lyric. (3) 

(Hering) 

German 281-282. Reading Course. (3, 3) 

(Dobert) 

German 291-292. Seminar. (3, 3) 

Topic to be determined. (Staff) 

German 399. Research. (1-6) 

Credits determined by work accomplished. Guidance in preparation of master's 
and doctoral theses. Conferences. (Staff) 

HEBREW 

Hebrew 1-2. Elementary Hebrew. (3, 3) 

Elements of grammar; pronunciation and conversation; exercises in translation. 

(Greenberg) 

Hebrew 6-7. Intermediate Hebrew. (3, 3) 

Three recitations per week; additional electronic laboratory in Hebrew 6. Pre- 
requisite, Hebrew 2 or equivalent. Texts designed to give some knowledge of 
Hebrew life, thought, and culture. (Greenberg) 

Hebrew 12-13. Conversation and Composition. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Hebrew 7 or equivalent. A practical language course recommended 
for all students continuing with Hebrew. (Greenberg) 

Hebrew 75-76. Survey of Hebrew Literature. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Hebrew 7 or equivalent. (Greenberg) 

51 



Foreign Languages and Literatures 

Hebrew 101. The Hebrew Bible. (3) 

Reading of selected portions of the Pentateuch. (Greenberg) 

Hebrew 102. The Hebrew Bible. (3) 

Reading of selected portions of the Prophets. (Greenberg) 

Hebrew 103. Modern Hebrew Literature. (3) 

The period of the Haskalah (Enlightenment). (Greenberg) 

Hebrew 104. Modern Hebrew Literature. (3) 

The period of the Tehiah (Modern Revival). (Greenberg) 

ITALIAN 

Italian 1-2. Elementary Italian. (3, 3) 

Three recitations and one laboratory hour per week. Elements of grammar and 
exercises in translation. (Motta) 

Italian 6-7. Intermediate Italian. (3, 3) 

Three recitations per week; additional electronic laboratory in Italian 6. Pre- 
requisite, Italian 2 or equivalent. Reading of texts designed to give some knowl- 
edge of Italian life, thought, and culture. (Motta) 

Italian 75-76. Survey of Italian Literature. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Italian 7 or equivalent. Basic survey of history of Italian litera- 
ture. (Motta) 

RUSSIAN 

Russian 1-2. Elementary Russian. (3,3) 

Three recitations and one laboratory hour per week. Elements of grammar, 
pronunciation and conversation; exercises in translation. (Hitchcock, Staff) 

Russian 6-7. Intermediate Russian. (3, 3) 

Three recitations per week; additional electronic laboratory in Russian 6. Pre- 
requisite, Russian 2 or equivalent. Reading of texts designed to give some 
knowledge of Russian life, thought and culture. (Hitchcock, Staff) 

Russian 10. Scientific Russian. (3) 

Prerequisite, Russian 7 or equivalent. Reading of technical and scientific prose. 

(Hitchcock) 

Russian 12-13. Conversation and Composition. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Russian 7 or equivalent. A practical language course recom- 
mended for all students continuing in Russian. (Hitchcock) 

Russian 71-72. Review Grammar and Composition. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Russian 7 or equivalent. Designed to give a thorough training in 
the structure of the language; drill Ln Russian composition. 

(Hitchcock, Staff) 

52 



Foreign Languages and Literatures 

Russian 75-76. Survey of Russian Literature. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Russian 7 or equivalent. An elementary survey of Russian litera- 
ture. (Hitchcock) 

Russian 80-8 L Advanced Conversation. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Russian 12, 13, or consent of instructor. For students who wish 
to develop fluency and confidence in speaking the language. (Hitchcock, Staff) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Russian 103-104. Advanced Composition. (3, 3) 

(Hitchcock) 

Russian 125. Russian Literature of the 18th Century. (3, 3) 

(Hitchcock) 

(Hitchcock) 

(Hitchcock) 

(Hitchcock) 

(Hitchcock) 



Russian 135. Modern Russian Poetry. (3) 
Russian 136. Modern Russian Drama. (3) 
Russian 137. Modern Russian Fiction. (3) 
Russian 141, 142. Soviet Russian Literature. (3, 3) 

SPANISH 



Spanish 1-2. Elementary Spanish. (3, 3) 

Each semester; given as intensive course in summer session. Three recitations 
and one laboratory hour per week. Study of linguistic structure and develop- 
ment of audio-lingual and writing ability. (Rovner, Staff) 

Spanish 3. Elementary Spanish, Honors Course. (3) 

Three recitations and one laboratory hour per week. Enrollment limited to 
specially approved candidates from Spanish 1. Students taking this course will 
normally continue in Spanish 7. (Rovner) 

Spanish 5. Review of Elementary Spanish. (3) 

Three recitations and one laboratory hour per week. Enrollment limited to 
students who, having taken the placement examination, have failed to qualify 
for Spanish 6. (Rentz, Staff) 

Spanish 6-7. Intermediate Spanish. (3, 3) 

Three recitations per week; additional electronic laboratory in Spanish 6. Given 
as intensive course in summer session. Prerequisite: Spanish 2 or equivalent, 
or Spanish 5, except that recommended students may enter Spanish 7 from 
Spanish 3. Study of linguistic structure, further development of audio-lingual 
and writing ability, and reading of literary texts with discussion in Spanish. 
Usually there will be an honors section for qualified students. 

(Font, Armstrong) 



53 



Foreign Languages and Literatures 

Spanish 1L Introduction to Spanish Literature. (3) 

Prerequisite, Spanish 7. Required of all students who continue in advanced 
courses of Department, with the exception of superior students who are per- 
mitted to bypass an introduction to Spanish literature. Conducted in Spanish. 
Reading of literary texts, discussion, and brief essays. (Panico) 

Spanish 12. Review of Oral and Written Spanish. (3) 

Prerequisite, Spanish 7. A practical language course recommended for all stu- 
dents continuing in Spanish. May be taken concurrently with Spanish 11. 

(Panico) 

For Advanced Undergraduates 
Spanish A\~A2. Spanish Phonetics. (1, 1) 

Prerequisite, Spanish 7 or equivalent. Descriptive study of the Spanish sound 
system. Practice in phonetic perception, transcription and articulation. Par- 
ticular attention to sentence phonetics; juncture, rhythm, stress, pitch. 

(Mendeloflf) 

Spanish 51-52. Commerical Spanish. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Spanish 12 and consent of instructor. Designed to give a knowl- 
edge of correct Spanish usage, commercial letters and business forms. Funda- 
mental principles of Spanish shorthand wUl be included if warranted by the 
interest and ability of the class. (Rovner, Mur) 

Spanish 71-72. Review Grammar and Composition. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Spanish 11 and 12 or equivalent. Intended to give an intensive 
and practical drill in Spanish composition. (Armstrong) 

Spanish 75-76. Survey of Spanish Literature. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Spanish 11 or equivalent. Basic survey of the history of Spanish 
literature. (Parsons, Rand) 

Spanish 77-78. Survey of Spanish-American Literature. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Spanish 11 or equivalent. Basic survey of the history of Spanish- 
American literature. (Rovner) 

Spanish 80-81. Advanced Conversation. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Spanish 11 and 12 or consent of instructor. For students who 
wish to develop fluency and confidence in speaking the language. (Nemes) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Spanish 101. Applied Linguistics. (3) 

Nature of Applied Linguistics and its contribution to the effective teaching of 
foreign languages. Comparative study of English and Spanish with emphasis 
upon points of divergence. Analysis, evaluation, and construction of related 
drills. (Mendeloff) 

Spanish 103-104. Advanced Composition. (3, 3) 

Training in self-expression in Spanish, free composition, writing and speaking. 

(Panico) 

54 



Foreign Languages and Literatures 
Spanish 107. Introduction to Medieval Literature. (3) 

Spanish literary history from the eleventh through the fifteenth century. Se- 
lective readings from representative texts. (Mendeloff, Parsons) 

Spanish IIL Poetry of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Centuries. (3) 

Renaissance, mystics, and baroque poetry. (Goodwyn, Rand) 

Spanish 112. Prose of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Centuries. (3) 

Selected readings in the pastoral, sentimental, picaresque novel and in the 
Romances of Chivalry. (Goodwyn) 

Spanish 113. Drama of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Centuries. (3) 

Selected plays of Lope de Vega, Calderon de la Barca, Tirso de Molina, and 
others. (Parsons, Rovner) 

Spanish 114. Lope de Vega. (3) 

Selected works of Lope de Vega. (Parsons, Rovner) 

Spanish 115-116. Cervantes. (3, 3) 

Drama, Exemplary Novels and Don Quixote. (Goodwyn, Rand) 

Spanish 125. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (3) 

Reform and neo-classicism: Feijoo and Luzan. (Goodwyn) 

Spanish 131. Nineteenth Century Fiction. (3) 

Reading of some of the significant novels of the nineteeneth century. 

(Parsons, Rand) 

Spanish 135. Modern Spanish Poetry. (3) 

Significant poets of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. (Nemes, Rand) 

Spanish 136. Modern Spanish Drama. (3) 

Significant plays of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. (Parsons, Rand) 

Spanish 141-142. Literature of the Twentieth Century. (3, 3) 

First semester: Modem Spanish thought in the Generation of 1898 and after. 
Second semester: the contemporary Spanish novel. (Rand) 

Spanish 161. Spanish-American Fiction. (3) 

The novel and short story from the Wars of Independence to the present and 
their reflection of society in the Hispanic republics of the Western Hemisphere. 

(Nemes, Rovner) 

Spanish 162. Spanish- American Poetry. (3) 

Representative poetry after 1 800 and its relation to European trends and writers. 

(Nemes, Rovner) 

Spanish 163. Spanish- American Essay. (3) 

Social and political thought from Bolivar to Vasconcelos and its relationship 
to social and political conditions in Spanish America. (Nemes, Rovner) 

55 



Foreign Languages and Literatures 
Spanish 171-172. Spanish Civilization. (3, 3) 

A survey of two thousand years of Spanish history, outlining the cultural heri- 
tage of the Spanish people, their great men, traditions, customs, art and litera- 
ture, with special emphasis on the interrelationship of social and literary his- 
tory. (Rand) 

Spanish 173-174. Latin-American Civilization. (3, 3) 

Introductory survey of the cultures of Latin America; the historical-political 
background and the dominating concepts in the lives of the people. 

(Nemes, Rovner) 

Spanish 195-196-197. Honors Reading Course. (3, 3, 3) 

Supervised reading to be taken normally only by students admitted to Honors 
Program: 195 is poetry; 196 is the novel; 197 is the drama. (StaflF) 

Spanish 199. Honors Seminar. (3) 

Required of all students in the Honors Program. Other students will be ad- 
mitted on special recommendation. Conducted in Spanish. Discussion of a 
central theme with related investigations by students. (Staff) 

For Graduates 
The requirements of students will determine which courses will be offered. 

Spanish 201. The History of the Spanish Language. (3) 

(Mendeloff) 

Spanish 203. Comparative Romance Linguistics. (3) 

(Mendeloff) 

Spanish 207. Medieval Spanish Literature. (3) 

(Mendeloff, Parsons) 

Spanish 215-216. Seminar: The Golden Age in Spanish 
Literature. (3, 3) 

(Goodwyn, Parsons, Rovner) 
Spanish 233. The Novel of the Nineteenth Century. (3) 

(Goodwyn, ParsorK) 
Spanish 234. The Drama of the Nineteenth Century. (3) 

(Goodwyn, Parsons) 

Spanish 237-238. Seminar in Hispanic Poetry 
(Ninteenth and Twentieth Centuries). (3, 3) 

(Nemes, Rand, Goodwyn) 
Spanish 241-242. Spanish Prose of the Twentieth Century. (3, 3) 

(Rand) 
Spanish 245. The Drama of the Twentieth Century. (3) 

(Rand) 

56 



General Biological Sciences 

Spanish 263. Colonial Spanish- American Literature. (3) 

(Nemes) 

Spanish 264. National Spanish-American Literature, 
Seminar. (3) 

(Nemes) 

Spanish 281-282. Reading Course. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 

Spanish 291-292. Seminar. (3, 3) 

Topic to be determined. (Staff) 

Spanish 399. Research. (1-6) 

Credits determined by work accomplished. Guidance in the preparation of 
master's and doctoral theses. Conferences. (Staff) 

GENERAL BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

The program has been prepared for the student who is interested in biology 
but whose interest has not yet centered in any one of the biological sciences. 
It is suitable for the pre-dental or pre-medical student who plans to earn 
the B.S. degree before entering professional school. The program includes 
work in botany, entomology, microbiology, and zoology, and introduces 
the student to the general principles and methods of each of these biological 
sciences. The student may then emphasize one of these areas in completing 
his program. 

By proper selection of courses during the junior and senior years, a student 
may concentrate his work sufficiently in one area of biology to be able to 
continue graduate work in that field. However, a student who is planning 
to do graduate work should major in one specific field of biology. 

The student following this program must meet the general requirements for 
a degree in the College of Arts and Sciences. He should select French or 
German to meet the foreign language requirements and Speech 7 (or Speech 
1 ) to fulfill the requirement in speech. 

Required introductory courses in the biological sciences: Bot. 1; Ent. 1; 
Microb. 1; Zool. 1. These courses must be passed with an average grade of 
at least "C." The pre-professional student must take Zool. 2 as well. 

Required supporting courses in mathematics and physical sciences: Math. 
10, 11; Chem. 1, 3; Phys. 10, 11. The student working in most areas of 
biology will also need a year of organic chemistry (Chem. 31, 33, or Chem. 
35, 36, 37, 38). Additional work in chemistry may also be required by the 
student's adviser, in accordance with the needs of the student's field of 
emphasis. The pre-professional student must include Chem. 35, 36, 37, 38 
in his program. 

Advanced courses in the biological sciences : The student must complete at 
least 30 semester hours of advanced work selected from the fields of botany, 

57 



General Physical Sciences and Geography 

entomology, microbiology, and zoology. Of these credits at least 18 must 
be at the 100 level and taken in at least two of the four departments. The 
following courses in psychology may be counted as part of the required 30 
semester hours but may not be used to satisfy the requirement of 1 8 semes- 
ter hours at the 100 level: Psych. 106, 136, 145, 180, 181, 195. 

A junior or senior following this curriculum will be advised by the depart- 
ment in which he plans to do the most work. 

GENERAL PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

This program has been prepared for the student who desires an introduc- 
tion to the physical sciences but whose interest has not yet centered in any 
one field of the physical sciences. The program includes work in chemistry, 
mathematics, and physics, and permits the student to emphasize one of these 
fields without having to meet the full requirements for a major in one spe- 
cific field. The program is not recommended for students who may later do 
graduate work in mathematics or in one of the physical sciences. 

The student following this program must meet the general requirements for 
a degree in the College of Arts and Sciences. He should select French, Rus- 
sian or German to meet the foreign language requirement and Speech 7 (or 
Speech 1 ) to fulfill the requirement in speech. 

Required introductory courses in mathematics and the physical sciences: 
Math. 19; Chem. 1, 3; Phys. 10, 11 (or 20, 21 or 15, 16). These courses 
must be passed with an average grade of at least "C" for the student to be 
eligible to continue with the program. 

Advanced courses in mathematics and the physical sciences: The student 
must complete at least 36 semester hours of advanced work selected from 
the Departments of Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics. Of these credits 
at least 1 8 must be at the 1 00 level and taken in at least two of the three de- 
partments with no less than three the second department. The student 
should normally take Calculus (Math. 20, 21) inasmuch as practically all 
the advanced work in mathematics and physics requires calculus. 

GEOGRAPHY 

Geography is a recognized major field in Arts and Sciences leading to the 
B.A. degree, although the Department is administered by the College of 
Business and Public Administration. Freshmen and sophomores wishing 
to major in geography should consult their lower division advisers and the 
Department of Geography. The following courses are required for a major: 
Geog. 10 and 11 — General Geography (3, 3); Geog. 30 — Principles of 
Morphology (3); Geog. 35 — Map Interpretations and Map Problems 
(3); Geog. 40 — Principles of Meteorology (3); Geog. 41 — Introductory 
Climatology (3); Geog. 170— Local Field Course (3); Geog. 199— Un- 
dergraduate Thesis Research (3); and 15 hours in other geography courses 

58 



Government and Politics 

numbered 100 to 198. Descriptions of courses in geography will be found 
in the catalog of the College of Business and PubUc Administration. 

The following supporting courses in science are required: Bot. 1 (4); 
Chem. 1 (4); Agron. 114 (4). The following supporting courses are also 
required: Bot. 1 Ts (2); Econ. 31 and 32 (3, 3); Soc. 105 (3). Certain of 
these courses are applicable to the minor. Please consult Senior Adviser, 
Department of Geography. 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

Although this Department is administered by the College of Business and 
Public Administration, government and politics is a recognized major field 
for students in the College of Arts and Sciences, leading to the B.A. degree. 
Freshmen wishing to major in government and politics should consult their 
Lower Division advisers about preparation for the major; additional infor- 
mation about the government and politics program may be obtained at the 
Departmental office. 

Arts and Sciences students may pursue the general G. & P. curriculum or 
the more specialized International Affairs curriculum. (Only BPA stu- 
dents may pursue a specialized curriculum in Public Administration.) 

Government and Politics majors must take a minimum of 36 semester 
hours in Government and Politics and may not count more than 42 hours 
in G. & P. toward graduation. No course with a grade less than "C" may 
be used to satisfy major requirements. 

The Government and Politics fields are as follows: (1) American Govern- 
ment and Politics; (2) Comparative Government; (3) International 
Affairs; (4) Political Theory; (5) Public Administration; (6) Public 
Law; and (7) Public Policy and Political Behavior. 

All G. & P. majors are required to take G. & P. 1 — American Government 
(3); G. & P. 3— Principles of Government and Politics (3); G. & P. 20— 
Introduction to Political Behavior (3); and G. & P. 141 — History of Politi- 
cal Theory (3) or G. & P. 142 — Recent Political Theory (3). They must 
also take one G. & P. course from three separate fields exclusive of PoUti- 
cal Theory. In addition (a) G. & P. majors (general) must take at least 
15 G. & P. semester hours at the 100 level; (b) G. & P. majors taking the 
International Affairs curriculum must complete at least 15 semester hours 
at the 100 level in international affairs and comparative government courses, 
including G. & P. 101 — International Political Relations (3). 

All students majoring in G. & P. (general) must take a minimum of 12 
semester hours in one foreign language. Students majoring in G. & P. 
with specialization in International Affairs must take a minimum of 12 
semester hours in one foreign language above the first year elementary 
course. (The first year elementary requirement may be waived by high 
school credit or placement tests.) 

59 



History 

All students majoring in G. & P. must fulfill the requirements of a minor. 
The general requirement is the completion of 18 semester hours from 
approved Arts and Sciences departments other than G. & P. At least 
six of the 18 hours must be taken at the 100 level from a single depart- 
ment. Students majoring in G. & P. with specialization in International 
Affairs may choose to take all minor courses in geographical area studies 
or may take them all on a departmental basis. 

Descriptions of courses in government and politics will be found in the 
catalog of the College of Business and Public Administration. 



fflSTORY 

Professor and Head: S^iannon. 

Professors: Bauer, Cole, Gordon, Jashemski, Koch, Land, Merrill, 
Prange, Sparks and Stromberg. 

Visiting Professor: Main. 

Associate Professors: Callcott, Conkin, Glad and Rivlin. 

Assistant Professors: Breslow, Folsom, Giffin, Greenberg, Robert- 
son, Silbey and Yaney. 

Lecturers: Beveridge, Dyson, Isaacs, Matossian, Piazza and Wein- 
stein. 

Instructor: Van Ness. 

The Department of History recognizes that the study of history supplies 
the general student with the cultural background for the several fields 
of knowledge. At the same time the curriculum provides preparation for 
those entering specific fields of professional activity: (1) the teaching 
of history and the social sciences at the secondary level, (2) journalism, 
(3) research and archival work, (4) the diplomatic service. In addition, 
the curriculum offers adequate preparation and training for those who 
intend to pursue graduate study. 

The program of the undergraduate student majoring in history is planned 
to insure a diversification of courses with the aim of familiarizing the 
student with the subject matter and disciplines of the broad fields of 
history. A faculty adviser, designated by the Department, will assist 
each undergraduate major in planning his program and in selecting 
courses to meet both major and minor requirements. The student will 
be expected to confer at regular intervals with his faculty adviser re- 
garding the progress of his studies. 

Undergraduate history majors must meet the following departmental 
requirements : 

60 



History 

1. Prerequisites for majors are Hist. 21, 22 (Hist. 23, 24 may be 
substituted in special cases) and Hist. 41, 42. 

2. Every major is required to complete a minimum of 27 additional 
semester hours in the series. Hist. 31 to Hist. 199. 

3. Every history major is required to complete the proseminar 
course, Hist. 199, three semester hours. 

4. The remaining 24 hours of major work in advanced courses 
must show the following minimum distribution: (a) 9 hours 
in American history (including Latin American and Canadian) 
and (b) nine hours in European and Asian history. 

5. No course with a grade less than "C" may be used to satisfy major 
requirements. 

6. Completion of the minor. 

The undergraduate major will, during his junior year, file with his faculty 
adviser a minor sequence. The minor requirement may be satisfied by 
( 1 ) a single sequence of 1 8 semester hours in any one of several related 
departments such as goverrmient and politics, economics, sociology, phil- 
osophy, literature, and geography; or (2) a split minor sequence to 
include two departments, provided a minimum of nine hours is offered in 
each department, a total of 18 hours. In certain cases, and only on the 
basis of an approved written application, the student may offer a com- 
bination social science minor sequence of at least 18 hours or a combina- 
tion humantities minor sequence of at least 18 hours. In aU cases the 
minor sequence must include at least six semester hours of 100-level 
work in a single department. The average grade in the minor must be 
"C" or better. 

HONORS IN HISTORY: Students who major in history may apply for 
admission to the History Honors Program during the second semester of 
their sophomore year. Those who are admitted to the program substitute 
discussion courses and a thesis for some of their required lecture courses, 
and they take an oral and written comprehensive examination prior to grad- 
uation. Successful candidates are awarded either honors or high honors in 
history. 

The History Department offers pre-honors work in American history (His- 
tory 57, 58) and pre-honors sections in Western Civilization (History 41, 
42). Students in these sections meet in a discussion group instead of at- 
tending lectures. They read widely and do extensive written work on their 
own. Pre-honors sections are open to any student, subject only to the in- 
structor's approval. Students who intend to apply for admission to the His- 
tory Honors Program should take as many of them as possible during their 
freshman and sophomore years. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS IN HISTORY: The 

courses with numbers up to 100 (except History 57 and 58) are particularly 

61 



History 

recommended to students seeking to meet the General Education require- 
ments. These courses are especially designed for the student who v/ishes to 
enrich his knowledge and understanding of a particular society or culture in 
a comparatively broad chronological framework, even though he might have 
no professional interest in history. They may be taken during the sopho- 
more, junior or senior years. 

Students with an exceptionally good background in history may substitute 
100-level courses where there are no stated prerequisites. 

Hist. 21. History of the United States to 1865. (3) 

A survey of the history of the United States from colonial times to the end 
of the Civil War. Emphasis on the establishment and development of American 
institutions. (American History Staff) 

Hist. 22. History of the United States since 1865. (3) 

A survey of economic, social, intellectual, and political developments since the 
Civil War. Emphasis on the rise of industry and the emergence of the United 
States as a world power. (American History Staff) 

Hist. 23. Social and Cultural History of Early America. (3) 

A study of the social and cultural history of the United States as a predomi- 
nantly agricultural society. Examination of how the social milieu shapes the 
cultural development of the nation and its institutions. 

(American History Staff) 

Hist. 24. Social and Cultural History of Modern America. (3) 

A study of the social and cultural history of the United States as a society in 
transition. Examination of the social and cultural changes that accompanied 
industrial and scientific development. (American History Staff) 

Hist. 29. The United States in World Affairs. (3) 

A study of the United States as an emerging world power and the American 
response to changing status in world affairs. Emphasis on the relationship 
between internal and external development of the nation. 

(American History Staff) 

Hist. 31, 32. Latin American History. (3, 3) 

A survey of the history of Latin America from colonial origins to the present, 
covering political, cultural, economic, and social development, with special 
emphasis upon relations with the United States. First semester: Colonial Latin 
America. Second semester: the Republics. (Latin American History Staff) 

Hist. 41, 42. Western Civilization. (3, 3) 

This course is designed to give the student an appreciation of the civiliza- 
tion in which he lives in its broadest setting. The study begins with the col- 
lapse of classical civilization and comes to the present. 

(European History Staff) 

Hist. 51, 52. The Humanities. (3, 3) 

In surveying history from prehistoric times to the present, man's cultural de- 
velopment is emphasized. The course is a study of the achievements of the 
various civilizations which have contributed to the common cultural heritage 

62 



History 

of western civilization. It is designed as an introductory course in history 
which will make a more direct contribution to the other liberal art fields. First 
semester, to the Renaissance. Second semester, since the Renaissance. 

(Jashemski) 

Hist. 53, 54. History of England and Great Britain. (3, 3) 

A history of the development of British life and institutions. Open to all 
classes. Especially recommended for English majors and minors and pre-law 
students. First semester, to 1485. Second semester, since 1485. (Gordon) 

Hist. 57. Pre-Honors Colloqium in Early American History. (3) 

Selected readings in modern American history with emphasis on independent 
discussion and writing. May be taken for credit by students exempt from Amer- 
ican history. Permission of instructor required. (American History Staff) 

Hist. 58. Pre-Honors Colloqium in Modern American History. 

(3) 

Selected readings in modern American history with emphasis on independent 
study, discussion and writing. May be taken for credit by students exempt 
from American history. Permission of instructor required. 

(American History Staff) 

Hist. 61, 62. Far Eastern Ovilization. (3, 3) 

This course seeks to give the student an understanding of a great civilization 
radically different from our own, and an appreciation of the complex problems 
of the Far East and of American policy there. The approach is interdisciplinary 
within an historical framework. (Folsom) 

Hist. 71, 72. Islamic Civilization. (3, 3) 

This course seeks to give the student an insight into a cultural heritage that 
dominates the lives of over four hundred million people today. The study 
covers Islam in Spain, North Africa, Africa below the Sahara, India, and 
Indonesia as well as the Middle East. The approach is humanistic within an 
historical framework. (Rivlin) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
AMERICAN HISTORY 
Hist. 101. American Colonial History. (3) 

The settlement and development of colonial America to the middle of the 
eighteenth century. (Land) 

Hist. 102. The American Revolution. (3) 

The background and course of the American Revolution through the formation 
of the Constitution. (Staff) 

Hist. 103. The Formative Period in America, 1789-1824. (3) 

The evolution of the Federal government, the origins of political parties, prob- 
lems of foreign relations in an era of international conflict, beginnings of the 
industrial revolution in America, and the birth of sectionalism. (Staff) 

Hist. 105. Social and Economic History of the United States 
TO 1865. (3) 

A synthesis of American life from Independence through the Civil War. 

(Staff) 

63 



History 

Hist. 106. Social and Economic History of the United States 

Since the Civil War. (3) 

The development of American life and institutions, with emphasis upon the 
period since 1876. (Staff) 

Hist. 114. The Middle Period of American History, 1824-1860. 
(3) 

An examination of the political history of the United States from Jackson to 
Lincoln with particular emphasis on the factors producing Jacksonian democ- 
racy. Manifest Destiny, the Whig Party, the anti-slavery movement, the Re- 
publican Party, and secession. (Sparks) 

Hist. 115. The Old South. (3) 

Prerequisite, six credits of American history. A study of the institutional and 
cultural life of the ante-bellum South with particular reference to the back- 
ground of the Civil War. (Callcott) 

Hist. 116. The Civil War. (3) 

Military aspects; problems of the Confederacy; political, social, and economic 
effects of the war upon American society. (Sparks) 

Hist. 118, 119. Recent American History. (3, 3) 

Party policies, domestic issues, foreign relations of the United States since 1890. 
First semester, to 1929. Second semester, since 1929. (Merrill, Glad) 

Hist. 121. History of the American Frontier. (3) 

The Trans-Allegheny West. The westward movement into the Mississippi 
Valley. (Staff) 

Hist. 124. Reconstruction and the New Nation, 1865-1896. (3) 

Prerequisite, six credits of American history, or permission of instructor. 
Problems of construction in both South and North. Emergence of big business 
and industrial combinations. Problems of the farmer and laborer. (Staff) 

Hist. 127, 128. Diplomatic History of the United States. (3, 3) 

A historical study of the diplomatic negotiations and foreign relations of the 
United States. First semester, from the Revolution to the Civil War. Second 
semester, from the Civil War to the present. (Cole) 

Hist. 129. The United States and World Affairs. (3) 

A consideration of the changed position of the United States with reference, 
to the rest of the world since 1917. (Cole) 

Hist. 133, 134. The History of Ideas in America. (3, 3) 

A history of basic beliefs about religion, man, nature, and society. Consent 
of the instructor is required for H. 134. (Conkin) 

Hist. 135, 136. Constitutional History of the United States. 

(3,3) 

A study of the historical forces resulting in the formation of the Constitution, 
and development of American constitutionalism in theory and practice there- 
after. ^Staff) 

64 



History 

Hist. 141, 142. History of Maryland. (3,3) 

First semester, a survey of the political, social and economic history of colonial 
Maryland. Second semester, Maryland's historical development and role as a 
state in the American Union. (Staff) 

Hist. 147. History of Mexico and the Caribbean. (3) 

The history of Mexico and the Caribbean with special emphasis upon the 
independence period and upon relations between ourselves and our nearest Latin 
American neighbors. (Staff) 

Hist. 148. History of Canada. (3) 

Prerequisites, H. 41, 42, or H. 53, 54. A history of Canada, with special 
emphasis on the nineteenth century and upon Canadian relations with Great 
Britain and the United States. (Gordon) 

Hist. 149. History of Brazil. (3) 

The history of Brazil with emphasis on the national period. (Giffin) 

Hist. 150. History of Argentina and the Andean Republics. (3) 

The history of the nationalist period of selected South American countries. 

(Staff) 

EUROPEAN HISTORY 

Hist. 151. History of the Ancient Orient and Greece. (3) 

A survey of the ancient civilizations of Egypt, the Near East, and Greece, with 
particular attention to their institutions, life, and culture. (Jashemski) 

Hist. 153. History of Rome. (3) 

A study of Roman civilization from the earliest beginnings through the Republic 
and down to the last centuries of the Empire. (Jashemski) 

Hist. 155, 156. History of Medieval Europe. (3, 3) 

A study of medieval government, society, and thought from the collapse of 
classical civilization to the Renaissance. (Robertson) 

Hist. 157. The Age of Absolutism, 1648-1748. (3) 

Europe in the Age of Louis XIV and the Enlightened Despots. (Staff) 

Hist. 158. The Old Regime and The French Revolution, 
1748-1815. (3) 

Europe in the era of the French Revolution. (Staff) 

Hist. 159, 160. History of European Ideas. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, H. 41, 42 or H. 53, 54, or the equivalent. Beginning with a 
review of the basic Western intellectual traditions as a heritage from the 
Ancient World, the courses will present selected important ciirrents of thought 
from the scientific revolution of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries down 
to the twentieth century. First semester, through the eighteenth century. Second 
semester, nineteenth and twentieth centuries. (Stromberg) 

Hist. 161. The Renaissance and Reformation. (3) 

Prerequisite, H. 41, 42, or 53, or the permission of the instructor. The culture 
of the Renaissance, the Protestant revolt and Catholic reaction through the 
Thirty Years' War. (Breslow) 

65 



History 

Hist. 163, 164. History of the British Empire. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, H. 41, 42, or H. 53, 54. First semester, the development of 
England's Mercantilist Empire and its fall in the war for American Independ- 
ence (1783). Second semester, the rise of the Second British Empire and the 
solution of the problem of responsible self-government (1783-1867), the evo- 
lution of the British Empire into a Commonwealth of Nations, and the de- 
velopment and problems of the dependent Empire. (Gordon) 

Hist. 165. Constitutional History of Great Britain. (3) 

A survey of constitutional development in England with emphasis on the real 
property aspects of feudalism, the growth of the common law, the development 
of Parliament, and the expansion of liberties of the individual. (Gordon) 

Hist. 166. Tudor-Stuart England. (3) 

An examination of the political, religious and social forces in English life from 
1485-1714 with special emphasis on Tudor government, the English Reforma- 
tion, the Elizabethan era, Puritanism, and the English revolution. (Breslow) 

Hist. 167, 168. History of Russia. (3,3) 

A history of Russia from earliest times to 1917. (Yaney) 

Hist. 169, 170. Europe in the Nineteenth Century, 1815-1919. 
(3,3) 

Prerequisites, H. 41, 42, or H. 53, 54. A study of the political, economic, 
social and cultural development of Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the 
First World War. (Bauer) 

Hist. 171, 172. Europe in the World Setting of the Twentieth 
Century. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, H. 41, 42, or H. 53, 54. A study of political, economic, and 
cultural developments in twentieth century Europe with special emphasis on 
the factors involved in the two World Wars and their global impacts and 
significance. (Prange) 

Hist. 173. The Soviet Union. (3) 

A history of the Bolshevik Revolution and the founding of the Soviet Union; 
the economic policy and foreign policy of the U.S.S.R. to the present. 

(Yaney) 

Hist. 175. Modern France. (3) 

A survey of French history from 1815 to the present. The emphasis is upon 
such topics as the population problem, the economic and social structure of 
French society, and the changing political and cultural values of this society in 
response to recurrent crises through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

(Greenberg) 

ASIAN HISTORY 

Hist. 181, 182. The Middle East. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, six hours from the following groups of courses: H. 41, 42; 
H. 51, 52; or H. 53, 54. A survey of the historical and institutional develop- 
ments of the nations of this vital area. The Islamic Empires and their cultures; 
impact of the west; breakup of the Ottoman Empire and rise of nationalism; 
present day problems. (Rivlin) 

66 



History 
Hist. 183. The Contemporary Middle East. (3) 

H. 181 or 182 recommended though not required. The development of middle 
eastern institutions in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries with reference to 
the emergence of contemporary states and their place in world affairs. (Rivlin) 

Hist. 187, 188. History of China. (3,3) 

A history of China from earliest times to the present. The emphasis is on the 
development of Chinese institutions that have molded the life of the nation and 
its people. (Folsom) 

Hist. 189. History of Japan. (3) 

A history of Japan from earliest to modem times. Emphasis is placed on the 
evolution of institutions and thought. (Folsom) 

Hist. 195, 196. Honors Colloquium. (3, 3) 

Enrollment limited to students admitted by the departmental Honors Commit- 
tee. Reading in sources and secondary work centering about the development 
of the modern world. Discussions of reading and written work in weekly semi- 
nar meetings. (Staff) 

Hist. 198. Honors Thesis. (3) 

Limited to students who have completed H. 195. Normally repeated for a 

total of six hours credit during the senior year by candidates for honors in 

history. (Staff) 

Hist. 199. Proseminar in Historical Writing. (3) 

Discussions and research papers designed to acquaint the student with the 
methods and problems of research and presentation. The student will be en- 
couraged to examine those phases of history which he regards as his specialties. 

(Staff) 

For Graduates 

Hist. 300. Historiography: Techniques of Historical Research 
AND Writing. (3) 

(Staff) 

Hist. 301. Readings in Colonial American History. (3) 

(Land) 

Hist. 302. Seminar in Colonl\l American History. (3) 

(Land) 



(Staff) 



Hist. 303. Readings in the American Revolution and the 
Formative Period. (3) 

Hist. 304. Seminar in the American Revolution and the 
Formative Period. (3) 

(Staff) 

Hist. 305. Readings in American Social and Economic History. ( 3 ) 

(Staff) 

67 



History 

Hist. 306. Seminar in American Socul and Economic History. (3) 

(Staff) 

Hist. 313. Readings in Southern History. (3) 

(CaUcott) 

Hist. 314. Seminar in Southern History. (3) 

(Callcott) 

Hist. 315. Readings in the Middle Period and Civil War. (3) 

(Sparks) 

Hist. 316. Seminar in the Middle Period and Civil War. (3) 

(Sparks) 

Hist. 317. Readings in Reconstruction and the New Nation. (3) 

(Staff) 

Hist. 318. Seminar in Reconstruction and the New Nation. (3) 

(Staff) 

Hist. 323. Readings in Recent American History. (3) 

(Merrill, Glad) 

Hist. 324. Seminar in Recent American History. (3) 

(Merrill, Glad) 

Hist. 327. Readings in the History of American Foreign Policy. 

(3) 

(Cole) 

Hist. 328. Seminar in the History of American Foreign Policy. 

(3) 

(Cole) 

Hist. 333. Readings in American Intellectual History. (3) 

(Conkin) 

Hist. 334. Seminar in American Intellectual History. (3) 

(Conkin) 

Hist. 336. Seminar in American Constitutional and Political 
History. (3) 

(Staff) 

Hist. 342. Seminar in the History of Maryland. (3) 

(Staff) 

Hist. 345. Readings in Latin American History. (3) 

(Griffin) 

Hist. 346. Seminar in Latin American History. (3) 

(Griffin) 

68 



History 

(Jashemski) 
(Jashemski) 
(Robertson) 



Hist. 351. Seminar in Greek History. (3) 

Hist. 353. Seminar in Roman History. (3) 

Hist. 355. Readings in Medieval History. (3) 

Hist. 356. Seminar in Medieval History. (3) 

(Robertson) 

Hist. 359. Readings in Modern European Intellectual History. 
(3) 

(Stromberg) 

Hist. 360. Seminar in Modern European Intellectual History. 
(3) 

(Stromberg) 

Hist. 361. Readings in the History of the Renaissance and Re- 
formation. (3) 

(Breslow) 

Hist. 363. Readings in the History of Great Britain and the 
British Empire-Commonwealth. (3) 

(Gordon) 

Hist. 364. Seminar in the History of Great Britain and the 
British Empire-Commonwealth. (3) 

(Gordon) 

Hist. 366. Seminar in Tudor and Stuart England. (3) 

(Breslow) 

Hist. 368. Seminar in Russian History. (3) 

(Yaney) 

Hist. 369. Readings in Nineteenth Century Europe. (3) 

(Bauer) 

Hist. 370. Seminar in Nineteenth Century Europe. (3) 

(Bauer) 

Hist. 371. Seminar in the History of World War I. (3) 

(Prange) 

Hist. 372. Seminar in the History of World War II. (3) 

(Prange) 

Hist. 381. Readings in Middle Eastern History. (3) 

(Rivlin) 

Hist. 382. Seminar in Middle Eastern History. (3) 

(Rivlin) 

Hist. 387. Readings in Chinese History. (3) 

(Folsom) 

69 



Mathematics 

Hist. 388. Seminar in Chinese History. (3) 

(Folsom) 

Hist. 390. The Teaching of History in Institutions of Higher 

Learning. ( 1 ) 

(Staff) 

Hist. 399. Thesis Research. (1-6) 

(Staff) 

MATHEMATICS 

Professor and Head: Cohen. 

Professor and Associate Head: Brace. 

Professors: Douglis, Goldhaber, Good, Horvath, Hummel, Jackson, 
KuRODA, J. Lehner, Martin,* Mayor, Reinrart, Richeson, Stell- 
macher and Walsh. 

Associate Professors: Auslander, Correl, Ehrlich, Freeman, Gold- 
berg, Greenberg, Harris, Karp, Kleppner, G. Lehner, Pearl, Sagle, 
Syski and Zedek. 

Assistant Professors: Bucy, Daniel, Dyer, Garstens, Gulick, Helzer, 
Kirwan, Maltese, McGuinness, Mikulski, Mount joy, Nieto, Osborn, 
Roselle, Sedgewick, Shepherd, Strauss, Tulley, Warner, Whitley 
and Willke. 

Visiting Assistant Professor: Beardon. 

Instructors: Bari, Bernhardt, Brown (p.t.), (Turrier, Garrett, Kil- 
bourn, Kozakoff, Lepson, Mar, McClay, Sorenson, Vanderslice 
and Zemel. 

The Mathematics Department Colloquium meets frequently throughout 
the academic year for reports on current research by the resident staff, 
visiting lecturers, and graduate students. In addition, the Institute for 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics Colloquium meets at frequent 
intervals for reports on research in those fields. All colloquium meetings 
are open to the public. 

The local chapter of Pi Mu Epsilon, national honorary mathematics fra- 
ternity, meets regularly for the discussion of mathematical topics of in- 
terest to the undergraduates. Its programs are open to the public. 

MATHEMATICS MAJOR: The program in mathematics leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Mathematics offers training in the funda- 
mentals of mathematics in preparation for graduate work or teaching, or 
for positions in governmental or industrial laboratories. 



* Member of the Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics. 

70 



Mathematics 

A student intending to major in mathematics must complete the introduc- 
tory sequence: Math. 19, 20, 21, 22, or the corresponding honors se- 
quence: Math, 19H, 21H, 22H. In addition, the normal requirements for 
a mathematics major include 23 credit hours of upper division (100-level) 
work and at least 22 credit hours of supporting courses. 

The upper division work in mathematics must normally include Math. 
110 — Advanced Calculus (4), and one of the algebra courses: Math. 
100 — Vectors and Matrices (3), Math. 103 — Introduction to Abstract 
Algebra 1 (3), Math. 104 — Introduction to Abstract Algebra II (3). 
The remaining courses must be selected from at least three of the five 
groups: I, Algebra, Number Theory and Foundations; II, Analysis; III, 
Geometry and Topology; IV, ProbabiUty and Statistics; V, Numerical 
Mathematics. 

Supporting courses must include Physics 20, 21 (5,5) or Physics 15, 16, 

17 (4, 4, 4), and an additional twelve credit hours of which at least six 
must be in one department at the 100 level. 

The foreign language requirement should be satisfied by either German, 
French, or Russian. 

Each student's program must be approved by his Mathematics Department 
Adviser. 

A student must maintain a "C" average in aU mathematics courses to con- 
tinue as a mathematics major. No grade below "C" can be used to meet 
the mathematics course requirements listed above, and a student must 
repeat any upper division mathematics course in which he has received 
a grade below "C," unless he has permission from his adviser to drop 
this course from his major program. 

HONORS IN MATHEMATICS: The honors program is designed for 
students showing exceptional ability and interest in mathematics. Its aim 
is to give a student the best possible mathematical education. Participants 
are selected by the Honors Committee of the Department of Mathematics 
on the basis of recommendations from high school teachers and members 
of the faculty. 

Wherever possible, honors students are placed in special mathematics 
courses, or in special sections of regular courses. Independent work is 
encouraged and can be done in place of formal course work. A final 
written and oral comprehensive examination in mathematics is given at 
the end of the program. 

INTRODUCTORY MATHEMATICS COURSES: Beginning students 
normally enroll in one of the courses Math. 3, 10, 18, or 19. A student 
may enroll in Math. 10, 18, or 19 if he has the necessary high school 
mathematics and a suitable score on the mathematics section of the general 
classification test. Students whose curriculum calls for Math. 10 or Math. 

18 and who do not have the necessary prerequisites should enroll in 
Math. 1. 

71 



Mathematics 

In general, students should enroll in only one of the course sequences 
Math. 10, 11, 14, 15 or Math. 18, 19, 20, 21, 22. In case this rule is 
not followed, proper assignment of credit wiU be made upon application 
to the Department of Mathematics. 

Math. 1. Review of High School Algebra. (0) 

Recommended for students who fail the qualifying examination for Math. 10 
and 18. Special fee of $45. (Sorensen) 

Math. 3. Fundamentals of Mathematics. (4) 

This course, open to all students, is designed to provide an introduction to 
mathematical thinking and to develop an appreciation of the role of mathe- 
matics in human culture. (Douglis) 

Math. 10, 11. Introduction to Mathematics. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, II'^ years of college preparatory mathematics and satisfactory per- 
formance on the ACT mathematics test, or Math. 1. Open to students not ma- 
joring in mathematics or the physical or engineering sciences. Logic, sets, 
counting, probability; sequences, sums; elementary algebraic and transcendental 
functions and their geometric representation; systems of linear equations, vec- 
tors, matrices. (Good) 

Math. 14, 15. Elementary Calculus. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 11 or equivalent. Open to students not majoring in mathe- 
matics or the physical or engineering scigfices. Basic ideas of differential and 
integral calculus; elementary techniques and applications. (Correl) 

Math. 18. Introductory Analysis. (3) (2 lectures, 2 drill periods 

per week.) 

Prerequisite, 2^/^ years of college preparatory mathematics and an appropriate 
score on the ACT mathematics test, or Math. 1. An introductory course for 
students not qualified to start Math. 19. Real numbers, functions, coordinate 
systems. Trigonometric functions. Plane analytic geometry. (Richeson) 

Math. 19. Elementary Analysis. (4) (3 lectures, 2 drill periods per 
week, ) 

Prerequisite, 3% years of college preparatory mathematics and an appropriate 
score on the ACT mathematics test, or Math. 18. Vectors and analytic geom- 
etry in three dimensions. Linear transformations and applications to geometry. 
Review of real numbers, coordinate systems, trigonometric functions, determi- 
nants. (Jackson) 

Math. 19H. Elementary Analysis (Honors). (5) 

See Math. 22 H. (Ehrlich) 

Math. 20. Calculus I. (4) (3 lectures, 2 drill periods per week.) 

Prerequisite, Math. 19 or equivalent. Functions, limits, continuity. Integration, 
differentiation and applications. Basic properties of the elementary functions. 

(Jackson) 

72 



Mathematics 
Math. 21, Calculus II. (4) (3 lectures, 2 drill periods per week.) 

Prerequisite, Math. 20 or equivalent. Methods of integration. Arc length, 
velocity, and acceleration. Tangents and normals to space curves. Improper 
integrals, sequences, and infinite series. (Jackson) 

Math. 21H. Calculus (Honors). (5) 

See Math. 22 H. 

Math. 22. Calculus III. (4) (3 lectures, 2 drill periods per week.) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Basic concepts of linear algebra, mat- 
rices, and determinants. Calculus of functions of vectors. Implicit function 
theorem. Surface integrals. Classical theorems of Green, Gauss, and Stokes. 

(Jackson) 

Math. 22H. Calculus (Honors). (5) 

The three honors sections. Math. 19 H, 21 H, and 22 H are open to selected 
students upon approval by the mathematics department. A student who com- 
pletes these three semester courses will have a knowledge of the material cov- 
ered in the regular sections of Math. 19, 20, 21 and 22. Senior staff members 
of the mathematics department will teach these sections. Students may transfer 
out of the honors sections at any time. A mathematics department adviser 
will help the student who has completed part of the honors course determine 
the proper regular course to enter. (Ehrlich) 

Math. 30. Elements of Mathematics. (4) 

Prerequisite, one year of college preparatory algebra. Required for majors 
in elementary education, and open only to students in this field. Topics from 
algebra and number theory, designed to provide insight into arithmetic: induc- 
tive proof, the natural number system based on the Peano axioms; mathematical 
systems, groups, fields; the system of integers; the system of rational numbers; 
congruence, divisibility; systems of numeration. (Garstens) 

Math. 31. Elements of Geometry. (4) 

Prerequisite, Math. 30 or equivalent. Structure of mathematics systems, al- 
gebra of sets, geometrical structures, logic, measurement, congruence, similarity, 
graphs in the plane, geometry on the sphere. (Garstens) 

Math. 66 (64). Differential Equations for Scientists and Engi- 
neers. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. The field of directions and graphic solu- 
tions of first order differential equations. The simplest methods of numerical 
solution. Systems of differential equations. Introduction to Fourier series, and 
applications. (Stellmacher) 

ALGEBRA AND NUMBER THEORY 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Math. 100. Vectors and Matrices. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or Math. 15. Algebra of vector spaces and matrices. 
Recommended for students interested in the applications of mathematics. 

(Pearl) 

73 



Mathematics 

Math. 103. Introduction to Abstract Algebra. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 22 or equivalent. Integers; groups, rings, integral domains, 
fields. (Ehrlich) 

Math. 104. Introduction to Linear Algebra. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 103 or consent of instructor. An abstract treatment of 
finite dimensional vector spaces. Linear transformations and their invariants. 

(Ehrlich) 

Math. 106. Introduction to Number Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 22. Integers, divisibility, Euclid's algorithm, diophantine 
equations, prime numbers, congruences, reciprocity law of quadratic residues, 
quadratic fields, binary quadratic forms. (Kuroda) 

For Graduates 
Math. 200. Abstract Algebra I. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 104 or equivalent. Elementary properties and examples 
of groups and rings, homomorphism theorems; integral domains, elementary 
factorization theory. Groups with operators; isomorphism theorems, normal 
series, Jordan-Holder Theorem, direct products, Krull-Schmidt Theorem. 

(Goldhaber) 

Math. 201. Abstract Algebra II. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 200 or consent of instructor. Field theory, Galois theory. 
Commutative ideal theory. Multilinear algebra. (Goldhaber) 

Math. 202. Linear Algebra. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 201 or consent of instructor. Linear manifolds, the lattice 
sub-spaces, projectives, dualities, the ring of endomorphisms, the full linear 
group and its subgroups. (Pearl) 

Math. 203. Galois Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 201 or consent of instructor. Field extensions, automor- 
phisms of a field, the Galois group of a polynomial equation, solvability by 
radicals, recent developments in Galois theory. (Kuroda) 

Math. 204, 205. Topological Groups. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An introductory course in abstract groups, 
topological spaces, and the study of collections of elements enjoying both these 
properties. The concept of a uniform space will be introduced and studied. 
The representation problem will be considered together with the subject of 
Lie groups. (Pearl) 

Math. 206. Number Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Foundations, linear and higher congru- 
ences, law of reciprocity, quadratic forms, sieve methods, elements of additive 
number theory and density, distribution of prime numbers and L-functions, 
discussion of unsolved problems. (Kuroda) 

74 



Mathematics 
Math. 208. Ring Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite. Math. 201 or consent of instructor. According to the needs of 
the class, emphasis will be placed on one or more of the following: ideal theory, 
structure theory of rings with or without minimum condition, division rings, 
algebras, non-associative rings. (Goldhaber) 

Math. 209. Group Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 201 or consent of instructor. According to the needs of 
the class, emphasis will be placed on one or more of the following aspects of 
discrete group theory: finite groups, abelian groups, free groups, solvable or 
nilpotent groups, groups with operators, groups with local properties, groups 
with clan conditions, extensions. (Rosenfeld) 

Math. 271. Selected Topics in Algebra. (3) 

(Arranged.) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff) 

ANALYSIS 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Math. 110. Advanced Calculus. (4) 

Prerequisite, Math. 22. A rigorous development of many topics from classical 
analysis such as the Stieltjes integral, surface integrals, sequences and series of 
functions, introduction to the Dirichlet integral. (A special section of Math. 
110 for honors students will be provided.) (Strauss) 

Math. 111. Advanced Calculus. (4) 

Prerequisite, Math. 110 or equivalent. Calculus of functions of several variables. 

(Harris) 

Math. 112. Infinite Processes. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Construction of the real numbers from 
the rational numbers, sequences of numbers, series of positive and arbitrary 
numbers, infinite products, conditional and absolute convergence, sequences and 
series of functions, uniform convergence, integration and differentiation of 
series, power series, and analytic functions. Fourier series, elements of the theory 
of divergent series, extension of the theory to complex numbers and functions. 

(Kirwan) 

Math. 113. Introduction to Complex Variables. (4) 

Prerequisite, Math. 110. The algebra of complex numbers, analytic functions, 
mapping properties of the elementary functions. Cauchy's theorem and the 
Cauchy integral formula. Taylor and Laurent series. Residues. (Hummel) 

(Credit will be given for only one of the courses Math. 113 and Math. 163.) 

Math. 114. Differential Equations. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 110. A general introduction to the theory of differential 
equations. Constructive methods of solution leading to existence theorems and 
uniqueness theorems. Other topics such as systems of linear equations, the 
behavior of solutions in the large, the behavior of solutions near singularities, 
periodic solutions, stability, and Sturm-Liouville Problems. (Auslander) 

75 



Mathematics 

Math. 117. Introduction to Fourier Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 113. Fourier series, Fourier and Laplace transforms. 

(Maltese) 

Math. 118. Introduction to Real Variables. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 110. The Lebesgue integral. Fubini's theorem. Converg- 
ence theorems. The Lp spaces. (Freeman) 

Math. 119. Several Real Variables. (3) 

A brief review of scalar and vector valued functions of several real variables 
(as done in Math. 22). Implicit function theorem, change of variable theorem 
for multiple integrals, a detailed study of surfaces and surface integrals in 
n-dimensional Euclidean space, including Integration by parts. Applications 
to Partial Differential Equations and Potential Theory. 

Math. 162. Analysis for Scientists and Engineers I. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or consent of instructor. Calculus of functions of several 
real variables; limits, continuity, partial differentiation, multiple integrals, line 
and surface integrals, vector-valued functions, theorems of Green, Gauss and 
Stokes. Physical applications. (This course cannot be counted toward a major 
in mathematics. Credit will be given for only one of the courses Math. 22 and 
Math. 162.) (Sedgewick) 

Math. 163. Analysis for Scientists and Engineers II. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 162 or 22 or consent of instructor. The complex field. In- 
finite processes for real and complex numbers. Calculas of complex func- 
tions. Analytic functions and analytic continuation. Theory of residues and 
application to evaluation of integrals. Conformal mapping. (This course can- 
not be counted toward a major in mathematics. Credit will be given for only 
one of the courses Math. 113 and Math. 163.) (Sedgewick) 

Math. 164. Analysis for Scientists and Engineers III. (3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 64 and Math. 163, or consent of instructor. Fourier and 
Laplace transforms. Evaluation of the complex inversion integral by the theory 
of residues. Applications to systems of ordinary and partial differential equa- 
tions. (Stellmacher) 

For Graduates 
Math. 215, 216. Advanced Differential Equations. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 104, 286. Existence and uniqueness theorems. Linear 
systems. Autonomous systems in the plane. Nonlinear systems. Asymptotic 
behavior of solutions. (Auslander) 

Math. 218, 219. Functional Analysis. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 286, 287. Normed linear spaces including Banach and 
Hilbert spaces, linear operators and their spectral analysis with applications 
to differential and integral equations. (Goldberg) 

Math. 272. Selected Topics in Analysis. (3) 

(Arranged.) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff) 

Math. 278. Advanced Topics in Complex Analysis. (3) 

(Arranged.) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff) 

76 



Mathematics 
Math. 280, 281. Linear Spaces. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 218. Linear topological spaces, locally convex spaces, 
duality theory, distributions. (Brace) 

Math. 286. Real Analysis I. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 110. Sets. Metric spaces. Lebesgue measure and integra- 
tion. Differentiation. Introduction to Banach and Hilbert spaces. (Douglis) 

Math. 287. Complex Analysis I. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 110. Linear transformations, analytic functions, conformal 
mappings, Cauchy's theorem and applications, power series, partial fractions 
and factorization, elementary Riemann surfaces, Riemann mapping theorem. 

(J. Lehner) 

Math. 288. Complex Analysis II. (3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 286, 287. Topics in conformal mappings, normal families, 
Picard's theorem, classes of univalent functions, extremal properties, variational 
methods, elliptic functions, Riemann surfaces. (Zedek) 

Math. 289. Real Analysis II. (3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 286, 287. General topology, measure theory. Lp spaces, 
Fourier transforms, locally compact spaces. (Douglis) 

GEOMETRY AND TOPOLOGY 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Math. 120. Introduction to Geometry I. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 22 or equivalent. Axiomatic development of plane geome- 
tries, Euclidean and non-Euclidean. Groups of isometrics and similarities. 

(Reinhart) 

Math. 121. Introduction to Geometry II. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 120. Non-Euclidean transformation groups, the Erlangen 
program, projective planes, cubics and quartics. (Reinhart) 

Math. 122, Introduction to Point Set Topology. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 110 or 146, or equivalent. Connectedness, compactness, 
transformations, homeomorphisms; application of these concepts to various 
spaces, with particular attention to the Euclidean plane. (KJeppner) 

Math. 123. Introduction to Algebraic Topology. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 122 and 103, or equivalent. Chains, cycles, homology 
group for surfaces, the fundamental group. (G. Lehner) 

Math. 124. Introduction to Projective Geometry. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 22 or equivalent. Recommended for students in the College 
of Education. Elementary projective geometry, combining synthetic and alge- 
braic approaches, projective transformations, harmonic division, cross ratio, 
projective coordinates, properties of conies. (Correl) 

Math. 126. Introduction to Differential Geometry. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 22 or equivalent. The differential geometry of curves and 
surfaces, curvature and torsion, moving frames, the fundamental differential 
forms, intrinsic geometry of a surface. (Jackson) 

77 



Mathematics 

Math. 128. Euclidean Geometry. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 22 or equivalent. Recommended for students in the College 
of Education. Axiomatic method, models, properties of axioms; proofs of some 
basic theorems from the axioms; modern geometry of the triangle, circle, and 
sphere. (Correl) 

For Graduates 
Math. 220. Differential Geometry of Curves and Surfaces. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 110 or equivalent. Classical theory of curves and surfaces, 
geometry in the large, the Gauss-Bonnet Theorem, surfaces of constant curva- 
ture. (Jackson) 

Math. 221. Differentiable Manifolds. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Differentiable manifolds, embeddings in 
Euclidean space, vector and tensor bundles, vector fields, differentiable fields, 
Riemann matrices. (Reinhart) 

Math. 222. Differential Geometry. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 220 or 221. Connections, curvature, torsion; sympletic, 
contact, and complex structures. (Reinhart) 

Math. 223, 224. Algebraic Topology. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 100 and 123, or consent of instructor. Homology, coho- 
mology, and homotopy theory of complexes and spaces. (G. Lehner) 

Math. 225, 226. Set Theoretic Topology. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, concurrent enrollment in Math. 286, or equivalent. Foundations 
of mathematics based on a set of axioms, metric spaces, convergence and con- 
nectivity properties of point sets, continua, and continuous curves; the topology 
of the plane. (Correl) 

Math. 227, 228. Algebraic Geometry. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Prime and primary ideals in Noetherian 
rings, Hilbert Nulstellensatz, places and valuations, fields of definition. Chow 
points, bi-rational correspondences, Abelian varieties, Picard varieties, algebraic 

groups. (Mountjoy) 

Math. 229. Differential Topology. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 221. Characteristic classes, cobordism, differential struc- 
tures on cells and spheres. (Reinhart) 

Math. 273. Selected Topics in Geometry and Topology. (3) 

(Arranged.) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff) 

PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Math. 130. Introduction to Probability Theory I. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 110, or equivalent. Sample space, events, probability and its 
basic properties. Independence and conditioning, random variables, distribu- 
tion functions (continuous and discrete); typical distributions, expectations, 
moments, generating functions; transformations of random variables, limit 
theorems. (Syski) 

78 



Mathematics 
Math, 131. Introduction to Probability Theory II. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 130. Elementary stochastic processes. Renewal process, 
random walk, discrete Markov chains, birth processes, birth and death processes, 
stationary processes. (Daniel) 

Math. 132. Introduction to Statistics. (3) 

(3 lectures and 1 hour of laboratory a week.) 

Prerequisite, Math. 130. Sampling distributions, elements of point and set esti- 
mation, maximum likelihood principle, testing statistical hypotheses, standard 
tests, Neyman-Pearson lemma and problems of optimality of tests, linear hypoth- 
eses, sequential methods. (Mikulski) 

Math. 133. Applied Probability and Statistics I. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 15 or 21. Intended for students with major other than mathe- 
matics. Probability concepts in finite sample spaces, generalizations to con- 
tinuous case (intuitive approach), random variables and distribution functions, 
standard distributions, expectations, moments and generating functions, limit 
theorems. (Willke) 

Math. 134. Applied Probability and Statistics II. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 133. Sampling distributions, estimation methods, standard 
procedures in testing statistical hypotheses, testing location and scale para- 
meters, tests of independence and goodness of fit, elements of variance and 
regression analysis. (Willke) 

For Graduates 
Math. 230, 231. Probability Theory. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, Math. Ill and 130, or consent of instructor. Foundations of prob- 
ability theory. Fields of events, probability space and probability measure. 
Random variables and convergence of random variables. Induced probability 
spaces. Expectations and moments. Distribution functions and their transforms. 
Consistency theorem. Laws of large numbers and central limit problem. Con- 
ditioning. Measurability and separability of stochastic processes. Stationary 
processes, harmonic analysis, Markov processes, Kolmogorov equations, dif- 
fusion theory. Martingales. (Syski) 

Math. 232. Applied Stochastic Processes. (3) 

Prerequisites, Math. HI and 130, or consent of instructor. Basic concepts of 
stochastic processes, stationary processes. Markov chains and processes (dis- 
crete and continuous parameter). Birth and death processes. Applications 
from theories of queueing, storage, inventory, noise, epidemics and others. 
This course is recommended for graduates from Physics, Engineering, Biology 
and Social Sciences. (Bucy) 

Math. 235, 236. Testing Statistical Hypotheses. (4, 4) 

Prerequisites, Math. 130 and 132. (Recommended to be concurrent with Math. 
230, 231.) 3 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory per week. Statistics decision 
problems. Uniformly most powerful tests. Exponential families of distributions, 
concepts of similarity and tests with Neyman-structure. Unbiased tests. In- 
variance and almost invariance. Elements of non-parametric inference. Linear 
hypotheses. Large sample methods. (Mikulski) 

79 



Mathematics 

Math. 275. Selected Topics in Probability. (3) 

(Arranged.) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff) 

Math. 276. Selected Topics in Statistics. (3) 

(Arranged.) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff) 



FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Math. 146. Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 22 or consent of instructor. Sets, relations, mappings. Con- 
struction of the real number system starting with Peano postulates; algebraic 
structures associated with the construction; Archimedean order, sequential 
completeness and equivalent properties of ordered fields. Finite and infinite 
sets, denumerable and non-denumerable sets. (Cohen) 

Math. 147. Set Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 22 or consent of instructor. Set Algebra, cardinal arith- 
metic, axiom of choice, Zorn's lemma, well-ordering principle, transfinite in- 
duction, ordinal arithmetic, continuum hypothesis. (Karp) 

Math. 148. Introduction to Mathematical Logic. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 146 or 147 or 103. Prepositional calculus, predicate logic, 
axiomatic set theory, paradoxes. (Not open to students with credit for Math. 
144.) (Karp) 

For Graduates 
Math. 244. Mathematical Logic. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 148. Completeness of first-order predicate logic and appli- 
cations, recursive functions, Godel's incompleteness theorem. (Karp) 

Math. 277. Selected Topics in Mathematical Logic. (3) 

(Arranged.) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff) 



MATHEMATICAL METHODS 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Math. 158. Games and Linear Relations. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 22; Math 100 recommended. Theory of games, minimax 
theorem, theory of linear programming, simplex method, systems of linear 
inequalities and the nature of their solutions, geometrical interpretations. 

(Pearl) 
Math. 212. Special Functions. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 287 or consent of instructor. Gamma-function, Riemann 
zeta-function, hypergeometric functions, confluent hypergeometric functions and 
Bessel functions. (Stellmacher) 

80 



Mathematics 
Math. 252. Variational Methods. (3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 257 and Math. 258. The Euler-Lagrange equation, minimal 
principles in mathematical physics, estimation of capacity, torsional rigidity and 
other physical quantities; symmetrization, isoperimetric inequalities, estimation 
of eigenvalues, the minimax principle. (Trytten) 

Math. 257. Operators on Normed Spaces. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 111. An introduction to linear analysis, in particular to 
those concepts and methods important in modern applied mathematics. Among 
the topics to be covered are linear spaces, norms and inner products, linear 
operators, eigenvalues, basic inequalities. (Nieto) 

Math. 258. Introduction to Partial Differential Equations. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 111. General introduction to the field of partial differ- 
ential equations. Among the topics to be discussed are typical boundary 
and initial value problems of mathematical physics and an indication of the 
main methods of solution, relations to difference equations and integral equa- 
tions. (Nieto) 

Math. 259. Introduction to Continuum Mechanics. (3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 100 and Math. 258 or consent of instructor. Solid and 
fluid continua, general analysis of stress and strain, equilibrium of elastic 
bodies, equation of motion for fluid bodies, stress-strain relations, equations 
of perfect fluids and formulation of viscous flow problems. (Bragg) 

Math. 261, 262. Fluid Dynamics. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 259 or consent of instructor. A mathematical formulation 
and treatment of problems arising in the theory of incompressible, compress- 
ible and viscous fluids. (Mackie) 

Math. 263. Linear Elasticity. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 259. Linear elastic behavior of solid continuous media. 
Topics covered include torsion and flexure of beams, plane strain and plane 
stress, vibration and buckling problems, variational principles. Emphasis is 
placed on formulation and technique rather than on specific examples. 

(Bragg) 

Math. 264. Non-linear Elasticity. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 259. Fundamentals of non-linear elasticity, finite deforma- 
tions, rubber elasticity, small deformations superimposed on finite deforma- 
tions. (Bragg) 

Math. 265. Partial Differential Equations. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 258. Two variables, Cauchy's problem, characteristics, 
Riemann's method, properties of the Riemann function, quasi-linear equations 
and canonical hyperbolic systems, wave equation in n-dimensions, method of 
Hadamard and Riesz, Euler-Poisson equation and the singular problems, Huy- 
ghen's principle. (Stellmacher) 

Math. 266. Elliptic Differential Equations. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 258. The equations of Laplace and Poisson, flux, the theo- 
rems of Gauss and Green, potentials of volume and surface distributions, har- 
monic functions, Green's function and the problems of Dirichlet and Neu- 

81 



Mathematics 

mann; linear elliptic equations with variable coeflficients, in particular the equa- 
tions of Stokes and Beltrami; fundamental solutions, the principle of the maxi- 
mum, and boundary value problems; introduction to the theory of non-linear 
equations. (Stellmacher) 

Math. 274. Selected Topics in Applied Mathematics. (3) 

(Arranged.) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff) 

NUMERICAL MATHEMATICS 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Math. 170. Introduction to Numerical Analysis. (4) 

(3 lectures and 2 laboratory periods per week.) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or Math. 15. Introduction to numerical methods, errors, 
interpolations, differences, numerical differentiation and integration, iterative 
solution of equations, least squares, elements of numerical approximation. 

(Rheinboldt) 

Math. 171. Numerical Methods in Linear Algebra. (4) 

(3 lectures and 2 laboratory periods per week.) 

Prerequisites, Math. 100 or 104, Math. 110, Math. 170. Numerical solution of 
linear equations, direction methods, iterative methods, eigenvalue problems and 
their numerical solution, errors connected with numerical work in linear 
algebra. (Rheinboldt) 

Math. 172. Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential 
Equations. (4) 

(3 lectures and 2 laboratory periods per week.) Prerequisites, Math. 22 or 162, 
and Math. 171. The methods of Euler, Runge, Kutta, and other single-step 
methods, multistep methods, discretization errors, stability problems. 

(Rheinboldt) 

Math. 173. Numerical Methods for Scientists and Engineers. (4) 

(3 lectures and 2 laboratory periods per week.) Prerequisites, Math. 22 or 162, 
and Math. 64. Interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, numeri- 
cal solution of polynomial and transcendental equations, least squares, systems 
of linear equations, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, errors 
in numerical calculations. (Rheinboldt) 

For Graduates 

Math. 255, 256. Advanced Numerical Methods in Differential 
Equations. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 257 and Math. 258. Approximation methods for boundary 
value, initial value and eigenvalue problems in both ordinary and partial dif- 
ferential equations, including finite differences and methods involving approxi- 
mating functions. (Rheinboldt) 

Math. 267, 268. Modern Numerical Mathematics. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 170 and Math. 257. Review of classical numerical analysis, 
matrix computations in particular numerical evaluation of eigenvalues, iterative 

82 



Mathematics 

techniques from a viewpoint of linear analysis; introduction to numerical ap- 
proximations; error analysis in numerical computation. The course will involve 
laboratory work in the Computer Science Center. (Rheinboldt) 

Math. 269. Advanced Mathematical Programming. (3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 158 and Math. 257. Linear inequalities and related sys- 
tems and their applications to linear programming, convex functions and gen- 
eralized programming problems, topics in non-linear and dynamic programming. 

(Rheinboldt) 

COURSES FOR TEACHERS OF MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE 

Math. 181. Introduction to Number Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instructor. De- 
signed primarily for those enrolled in programs with emphasis in the teaching 
of mathematics and science. Not open to students seeking a major directly 
in the physical sciences, since the course content is usually covered elsewhere 
in their curriculum. Axiomatic developments of the real numbers. Elementary 
number theory. 

Math. 182. Introduction to Algebra. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instructor. Designed 
primarily for those enrolled in programs with emphasis in the teaching of 
mathematics and science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in the 
physical sciences, since the course content is usually covered elsewhere in their 
curriculum. Modern ideas in algebra and topics in the theory of equations. 

Math. 183. Introduction to Geometry. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instructor. Designed 
primarily for those enrolled in programs with emphasis in the teaching of mathe- 
matics and science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in the 
physical sciences, since the course content is usually covered elsewhere in their 
curriculum. A study of the axioms for Euclidean and non-Euclidean geom- 
etry. 

Math. 184. Introduction to Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instructor. Designed 
primarily for those enrolled in programs with emphasis in the teaching of mathe- 
matics and science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in the physi- 
cal sciences, since the course content is usually covered elsewhere in their cur- 
riculum. A study of the limit concept and the calculus. (Previous knowledge 
of calculus is not required.) 

Math. 185. Selected Topics for Teachers of Mathematics. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instructor. 

Math. 189. National Science Foundation Summer Institute for 
Teachers of Science and Mathematics. Seminar. (1-3) 

Lectures and discussions to deepen the student's appreciation of mathematics as 
a logical discipline and as a medium of expression. Special emphasis on topics 
relevant to current mathematical curriculum studies and revisions. 

83 



Microbiology 

SEMINARS, SELECTED TOPICS, RESEARCH 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Math. 190. Honors Seminar. (2) 

Prerequisite, permission of the departmental Honors Committee. Reports by 
students on mathematical literature; solution of various problems. (Karp) 

Math. 191. Selected Topics in Mathematics. (Credit according to 

work done) 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Topics of special interest to ad; 
vanced undergraduate students will be offered occasionally under the general 
guidance of the departmental Committee on Undergraduate Studies. Honors 
students register for reading courses under this number. (Staff) 

For Graduates 
Math. 298. Proseminar in Research. (1) 

Prerequisite, one semester of graduate work in mathematics. A seminar devoted 
to the foundations of mathematics, including mathematical logic, axiom sys- 
tems, and set theory. (Auslander) 

Math. 399. Research. 

(Arranged.) (Staff) 



MICROBIOLOGY 

Professor and Head: Faber. 

Professor: Hansen, Pelczar, Doetsch and Laffer. 

Associate Professor: Hetrick. 

Assistant Professors: MacQuillan and Roberson. 

Lecturer: Stadtman. 

The Department of Microbiology has as its primary^ aim providing the 
student with thorough and rigorous training in microbiology. This entails 
knowledge of the basic concepts of bacterial cytology, physiology, tax- 
onomy, and genetics, as well as an understanding of the biology of 
infectious disease, immunology, general virology, and various applica- 
tions of microbiological principles to public health and industrial arts. 
In addition, the Department pursues a broad and vigorous program of 
basic research, and encourages original thought and investigation in the 
above mentioned areas. 

The Department also provides desirable courses for students majoring in 
allied departments who wish to obtain vital, supplementary information. 
Every effort has been made to present the subject matter of Microbiology 
as a basic core of material that is pertinent to all biological sciences. 

B4 



Microbiology 

MICROBIOLOGY CURRICULUM: The field of microbiology is too vast 
in scope to permit specialization during undergraduate study. Accordingly, 
the curriculum outlined below, which leads to a B.S. degree, includes the 
basic courses in microbiology and allied fields. 

A student planning a major in microbiology should consult his adviser 
during the first year. The supporting courses should be chosen only 
from the biological or physical sciences. 

No course with a grade less than "C" may be used to satisfy major require- 
ments. 

The Department has an Honors Program and information concerning this 
program may be obtained from the Department. 

Courses required in major, and supporting courses: Microb. 1 — General 
Microbiology (4), Microb. 60 — Microbiological Literature (1), Microb. 
81 — Applied Microbiology (4), Microb. 101 — Pathogenic Microbiology 
(4), Microb. 103 — Serology (4), Microb. Ill — General' Virology (4), 
Microb. 151 — Microbial Physiology (4), Microb. 160 — Systematic Bac- 
teriology (2); Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry (4, 4), Chem. 31, 33— Ele- 
ments of Organic Chemistry (3, 3), Chem. 19 — Elements of Quantitative 
Analysis (4) or Math. 14, 15 — Elementary Calculus (3, 3), Chem. 161, 
163 — Biochemistry (2, 2), Math. 10, 11 — Introduction to Mathematics 
(3, 3), Phys. 10, 11— Fundamentals of Physics (4, 4). 

Microb. 1. General Microbiology. (4) 

First and second semesters. Summer session. Two lectures and two two-hour 
laboratory periods a week. Laboratory fee, $15.00. The physiology, culture 
and differentiation of microorganisms. Fundamental principles of microbiology 
in relation to man and his environment. (Pelczar) 

Microb. 60. Microbiological Literature. (1) 

Second semester. One lecture period a week. Prerequisite, a major in micro- 
biology. Introduction to periodical literature, methods, interpretation and pre- 
sentation of reports. (Doetsch) 

Microb. 81. Applied Microbiology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite. Microb. 1. Laboratory fee, $15.00. The application of micro- 
organisms and microbiological principles to milk, dairy products, and foods, 
industrial processes; soil; water and sanitation operations. (Roberson) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Microb. 101, Pathogenic Microbiology. (4) 

First semester. Two lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, Microb. 1. Laboratory fee, $15.00. The role of microorganisms in the 
diseases of man and animals with emphasis upon the differentiation and culture 
of microorganisms, types of disease, modes of disease transmission, prophylactic, 
therapeutic and epidemiological aspects. (Faber) 

85 



Microbiology 

MiCROB. 103. Serology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, Microb. 101. Laboratory fee, $15.00. Infection and resistance; 
principles and types of immunity; hypersensitiveness. Fundamental techniques 
of major diagnostic immunological reactions and their application. 

(Roberson) 

Microb. 104. History of Microbiology. (1) 

First semester. One lecture period a week. Prerequisite, a major or minor in 
microbiology. History and integration of the fundamental discoveries of the 
science. The modern aspects of cytology, taxonomy, fermentation, and immu- 
nity in relation to early theories. (Doetsch) 

Microb. 108. Epidemiology and Public Health. (2) 

Second semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, Microb. 1. History, 
characteristic features, and epidemiology of the important communicable dis- 
eases, public health administration and responsibilities; vital statistics. 

(Faber) 

Microb. 111. General Virology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, Microb. 101 or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $15.00. Basic concepts 
regarding the nature of viruses and their properties, together with techniques for 
their characterization and identification. (Hetrick) 

Microb. 121. Advanced Methods. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $15.00. The application 
of quantitative techniques for measurement of enzyme reactions, mutations, 
fermentation, analyses, and other physiological processes of microorganisms. 

(Hansen, Pelczar) 

Micros. 135. Applied Microbiology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, Microb. 1, Chem. 31, and Chem. 33. Laboratory fee, $15.00. 
Introduction to the chemical activities of microorganisms and their industrial 
application. (MacQuillan) 

Microb. 151. Microbial Physiology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, 8 credits in microbiology and Chem. 31, 33, or equivalent. Lab- 
oratory fee, $15.00. Aspects of the growth, death, and energy transactions of 
microorganisms are considered, as well as the effects of the physical and 
chemical environment on them. (MacQuillan) 

Microb. 160. Systematic Bacteriology. (2) 

First semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, 8 credits in micro- 
biology. History of bacterial classification; genetic relationships; international 
codes of nomenclature; bacterial variation as it affects classification. (Hansen) 

Microb. 171. Cytology of Bacteria. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, Microb. 1, microbiology major and consent of instructor. Lab- 
oratory fee, $15.00. A consideration of morphology, differentiation, and cyto- 
chemistry of the eubacterial organism. (Doetsch) 

86 



Microbiology 
MiCROB. 181. Microbiological Problems. (3) 

First and second semesters. Summer session. Prerequisite, 16 credits in micro- 
biology. Registration only upon the consent of the instructor. Laboratory fee, 
$15.00. This course is arranged to provide qualified majors in microbiology and 
majors in allied fields an opportunity to pursue specific microbiological problems 
under the supervision of a member of the Department. (Faber) 

For Graduates 
MiCROB. 201. Medical Mycology. (4) 

First semester. Two lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite. 30 credits in microbiology and allied fields. Laboratory fee, $15.00. 
Primarily a study of the fungi associated with disease and practice in the 
methods of isolation and identification. (Laffer) 

MiCROB. 202. Genetics of Microorganisms. (2) 

Second semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, consent of in- 
structor. An introduction to genetic principles and methodology applicable to 
microorganisms. Spontaneous and induced mutation, interaction between 
clones. (Hansen) 

Microb. 204. Bacterial Metabolism. (2) 

First semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, 30 credits in micro- 
biology and allied fields, including Chem. 161 and 162. Bacterial nutrition, 
enzyme formation, metabolic pathways and the dissimilation of carbon and 
nitrogen substrates. (MacQuillan) 

MiCROB. 206, 208. Special Topics. (1-4, 1-4) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, 20 credits in microbiology. Presenta- 
tion and discussion of fundamental problems and special subjects in the field 
of microbiology. (Staff) 

MiCROB. 210. Virology and Tissue Culture. (2) 

Second semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, Microb. 101 or 
equivalent. Characteristics and general properties of viruses and rickettsiae. 
Principles of tissue culture. (Hetrick) 

MiCROB. 211, Virology and Tissue Culture Laboratory. (2) 

Second semester. Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
Microb. 101 or equivalent. Registration only upon consent of instructor. Lab- 
oratory fee, $20.00. Laboratory methods in virology and tissue culture. 

(Hetrick) 

MiCROB. 214. Advanced Bacterial Metabolism. (1) 

Second semester. One lecture period a week. Prerequisite, Microb. 204 and 
consent of instructor. A discussion of recent advances in the field of bacterial 
metabolism with emphasis on metabolic pathways of microorganisms. 

(Pelczar) 

MiCROB. 280. Seminar-Research Methods. (1) 

First semester. Discussions and reports prepared by majors in microbiology 
engaged in current research; presentation of selected subjects dealing with recent 
advances in microbiology. (Staff) 

87 



Molecular Physics 

MiCROB. 282. Seminar-Microbiological Literature. (1) 

Second semester. Presentation and discussion of current literature in micro- 
biology. (Staff) 

MiCROB. 399. Research. 

First and second semesters. Summer session. Credits according to work done. 
Laboratory fee, $15.00. The investigation is outlined in consultation with and 
pursued under the supervision of a senior staff member of the Department. 

(Staff) 



MOLECULAR PHYSICS 

The Institute for Molecular Physics, a department in the College of Arts 
and Sciences, comprises a faculty interested in theoretical and experi- 
mental studies in the general area of molecular interaction. The Institute 
thus serves as an ideal place to bring together physicists and chemists to 
work on problems of mutual interest to the advantage of both, and the fac- 
ulty is made up of members of each of these disciplines. Since the faculty 
of the Institute feels strongly that students should fulfill the undergraduate 
requirements in one of the traditional departments to insure a broad back- 
ground in a fundamental subject, no undergraduate degree is offered. Mem- 
bers of the Institute teach both undergraduate and graduate courses in the 
Department of Chemistry and the Department of Physics and Astronomy 
and supervise thesis research of graduate students in these departments. 
The Institute also participates in a graduate degree program in Chemical 
Physics which is jointly administered by the Institute, the Department of 
Chemistry, and the Department of Physics and Astronomy. This program 
is described in the Graduate School catalog. 



88 



Music 

MUSIC 

Professor and Head: Ulrich. 

Professors: Grentzer, McCorkle and Trimble. 

Associate Professors: Berman, Dunham, Johnson and Springmann. 

Assistant Prefessors: Bernstein, deVermond, Diemer (p.t.), Eisen- 

STADT, Garvey, Gordon, Haley, Head, Heim, McClelland, Meyer, 

Montgomery, Nossaman, Pennington and Traver. 

Visiting Assistant Professors: Pearlman and Shelley. 

Instructors: Fanos, Gallagher, Lundstrom, Morrison, Olson, Pay- 

ERLE, SkIDMORE, TaTNALL, WaCHHAUS AND WaKEFIELD. 

The functions of the Department are (1) to help the general student de- 
velop sound critical judgment and discriminating taste in the art of music; 
(2) to provide professional training based on a foundation in the liberal 
arts; (3) to prepare the student for graduate work in the field; and (4) to 
prepare him to teach in the public schools. To this end, two degrees are 
offered: the Bachelor of Music, with a major in theory and composition, 
history and literature, or applied music; and the Bachelor of Arts, with a 
major in music. The Bachelor of Science degree, with a major in music 
education, is offered in the College of Education; this program, however, is 
administered within the Music Department. 

Courses in music theory, literature, and applied music are open to all stu- 
dents who have completed the specified prerequisites or their equivalents. 
The University Bands, Chamber Chorus, Choir, Madrigal Singers, Men's 
Glee Club, Orchestra, and Women's Chorus, as well as the smaller en- 
sembles, are likewise open to qualified students. 

THE BACHELOR OF MUSIC DEGREE: The curriculum leadmg to the 
degree of Bachelor of Music is designed for students who wish to prepare 
for music teaching on the college level. A list of specific courses is avail- 
able in the Departmental office. The course requirements in the three major 
areas may be summarized as follows: 

Theory and History and Applied 



Major in 


Composition 


Literature 


Music 


Academic courses: 












Specified '^ 


43 sem. 


hrs. 


43 sem. 


hrs. 


43 sem. hrs 


Unspecified 


8 




8 




9 


Theory and Literature: 












Lower Division 


27 




23 




23 


Upper Division 


16 




22 




13 


Applied Music: 


26 




24 




32 



''As specified in the General Education requirements and College requirements de- 
scribed elsewhere in this Bulletin. B.Mus. candidates will satisfy the General Edu- 
cation requirements in Fine Arts with Music 1; credit hours for this requirement are 
included under Theory and Literature — lower division — below. B.Mus. Candi- 
dates are not required to satisfy the College requirement, Speech 1. 

89 



Music 

In addition, eight semester hours in ensemble courses, health, and physical 
activities. 

THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE: The curriculum leading to the 
Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in music is designed for students 
whose interests are cultural rather than professional. The departmental re- 
quirements include nineteen semester hours in music theory, eighteen se- 
mester hours in music history and literature, ten semester hours in applied 
music, in addition to not more than eight semester hours in the larger en- 
sembles. A list of specific courses is available in the Departmental office. 

Music 1. Introduction to Music. (3) 

Second semester. Open only to music or music education majors; other students 
take Music 20. Music 1 and 20 may not both be counted for credit. Three 
lectures per week. A study of the forms and styles of music, leading to an 
intelligent appreciation of the art and providing a foundation for more ad- 
vanced courses in the Department of Music. (Henderson) 

Music 4. Men's Glee Club. (1) 

Open to any student who can qualify. May be taken until a total of eight 
semester hours of credit has been earned; the music studied will cover a cycle 
of about eight semesters. (Traver) 

Music 5. Women's Chorus. (1) 

Open to any student who can qualify. May be taken uittil a total of eight 
semester hours of credit has been earned; the music studied will cover a cycle 
of about eight semesters. (Traver) 

Music 6. Orchestra. (1) 

Open to any student who can qualify. May be taken until a total of eight 
semester hours of credit has been earned; the music studied will cover a cycle 
of about eight semesters. (Head) 

Music 7, 8. Theory of Music. (3, 3) 

Two lectures and three laboratory hours per week. A fundamental course in the 
elements of music. Study of rhythms, scales, chord structures, and tonalities 
through ear training, sight singing, and keyboard drill. The student must achieve 
a grade of "C" in Music 8 in order to register for Music 70. (Payerle) 

Music 9. Chamber Music Ensemble. (1) 

This course does not fulfill the ensemble requirements of the various curricula. 
Three laboratory hours per week. Rehearsal and performance of selected works 
for small ensembles of strings, winds, and piano or small vocal ensembles. May 
be repeated for credit; the music studied will cover a cycle of about six se- 
mesters. (Staff) 

Music 10. Band. (1) 

Open to any student who can qualify. May be taken until a total of eight se- 
mester hours of credit has been earned; the music studied will cover a cycle of 
about eight semesters. (Henderson, Ostling) 

90 



Music 

Music 15. Chapel Choir. (1) 

Open to all students in the University, subject to the Director's approval. May 
be taken until a total of eight semester hours of credit has been earned. 

(Springmann) 

Music 16. Fundamentals for the Classroom Teacher. (3) 

Open to students majoring in elementary education or childhood education; 
other students take Music 7. Music 7 and 16 may not both be counted for 
credft. The fundamentals of music theory and practice, related to the needs 
of the classroom and kindergarten teacher, and orgaitized in accord with the 
six-area concept of musical learning. (Fanos and Staff) 

Music 20, Survey of Music Literature. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Open to all students except music and music education 
majors, and may be taken by students who qualify to select courses within 
Group 11 of the American Civilization Program. Music 1 and 20 may not both 
be taken for credit. A study of the principles upon which music is based, and 
an introduction to the musical repertoires performed in America today. 

(Gordon) 

Music 21, 22. Class Voice. (2, 2) 

Four hours per week. A laboratory course in which a variety of voices and 
vocal problems are represented. Principles of correct breathing as applied to 
singing; fundamentals of tone production and diction. Students are taught to 
develop their own voices. Repertoire of folk songs and songs of the Classical 
and Romantic periods. (Nossaman) 

Music 23, 24. Class Piano. (2, 2) 

Four hours per week. Functional piano training for beginners. Development of 
techniques useful for school and community playing. Basic piano techniques; 
chord, arpeggio, and scale techniques; melody and song playing; simple ac- 
companiments, improvisation for accompaniments and rhythms; sight reading 
and transposition, and playing by ear^ Music 24, continuation of Music 23; 
elementary repertoire is begun. (deVermond) 

Music 31, 32, Advanced Class Voice. (2, 2) 

Four hours per week. Prerequisite, Music 22 or equivalent vocal training. Con- 
tinuation of Music 22, with more advanced repertoire for solo voice and small 
ensembles. A special section for music-education majors will include the study 
of methods and materials for teaching class voice. (Pennington) 

Music 33, 34, Advanced Class Piano. (2, 2) 

Prerequisite, Music 24 or equivalent piano training. Four hours per week. 
Advanced keyboard techniques. Continuation of skills introduced in Music 24; 
transposition, modulation, and sight reading; methods of teaching functional 
piano. Music 34, development of style in playing accompaniments and in playing 
for community singing. More advanced repertoire. (deVermond) 

Music 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68. Class Study of Orchestral and 

Band Instruments. (2 each course) 

First and second semesters alternately. Open only to majors in music education 
(instrumental option). Four laboratory hours per week. A study of the in- 
struments with emphasis on ensemble training. The student will acquire an 

91 



Music 

adequate playing technique on two to four instruments, and an understanding 
of the acoustical and construction principles of the others. Music 61, Violin; 
Music 62, Cello and Bass; Music 63, Clarinet; Music 64, Flute, Oboe, Bassoon, 
and Saxophone; Music 65, Cornet; Music 66, Horn, Trombone, Euphonium, 
and Tuba; Music 67, Percussion; Music 68, Advanced Strings. (Staff) 

Music 70, 71. Advanced Theory of Music. (4, 4) 

Prerequisite, Music 8 with a grade of at least "C." Three lectures and two lab- 
oratory hours per week. An integrated course of wrJtten harmony, keyboard 
harmony, and ear training. Continuation of the principles studied in Music 8 
Harmonic progressions; Music 70, eighteenth-centry chorale style; Music 71, 
nineteenth-century styles including chromatic and modulatory techniques. 
Realization of figured basses, and composition in the smaller forms. Advanced 
study of solfege, with drill in melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic dictation. Ap- 
plication of harmonic principles to the keyboard. (Payerle and Staff) 

Music 80. Class Study of String Instruments. (2) 

First semester. Open only to majors in music education (vocal option). Four 
laboratory hours per week. Basic principles of string playing, and a survey of 
all string instruments. (Berman) 

Music 81. Class Study of Wind and Percussion Instruments. (2) 

Second semester. Open only to majors in music education (vocal option). 
Four laboratory hours per week. A survey of wind and percussion instru- 
ments with emphasis on ensemble training. The student will acquire an ade- 
quate playing technique on one instrument and gain an understanding of the 
acoustical and construction principles of the others. (Ostling) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Music 120, 121. History of Music. (3,3) 

Prerequisites, Music 1 or 20 and junfor standing. A study of muafical styles 
from their origins in western Europe to their present-day manifestations. The 
interaction of music and other cultural activities. Music 120, the Greek period 
to Bach; Music 121, Bach to the present. (Bernstein) 

Music 125. Honors Reading Course. (2-3) 

Prerequisites, Junior standing and consent of Honors Committee. Selected read- 
ings in the history, literature, and theory of music. The course may be repeated 
for credit at the discretion of the Committee. (Staff) 

Music 130, 131. Music Literature Survey for the Non-Major. (3, 
3) 

Either semester may be taken separately. Prerequisite, Music 20 or the equiva- 
lent. Open to all students except music and music-education majors. Selected 
compositions are studied from the standpoint of the informed listener. Music 
130, choral music, opera, and art song; Music 131, orchestral, chamber, and 
keyboard music. (Pennington, Gordon) 

Music 141. Musical Form. (3) 

Prerequisite, Music 70, 71. A study of the organizing principles of musical 
composition, their interaction in musical forms, and their functions in different 
styles. (Staff) 

92 



Music 

Music 143, 144. Composition. (2, 2) 

Prerequisite, Music 70, 71. Principles of musical composition, and their appli- 
cation to the smaller forms. Original writing in nineteenth and twentieth cen- 
tury musical idioms for various media. (Trimble) 

Music 145, 146. Counterpoint. (2, 2) 

Prerequisite, Music 70, 71. A course in eighteenth century contrapuntal tech- 
niques. Study of devices of imitation in the invention and the choral prelude. 
Original writing in the smaller contrapuntal forms. (Trimble) 

Music 147, 148. Orchestration. (2, 2) 

Prerequisite, Music 70, 71. A study of the ranges, musical functions, and tech- 
nical characteristics of the instruments, and their color possibilities in various 
combinations. Practical experience in orchestrating for small and large en- 
sembles. (Trimble) 

Music 150. Keyboard Harmony. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite, 
Music 70, 71. The application to the piano keyboard of the harmonic prmciples 
acquired in Music 70, 71. Harmonization of melodies, improvisation and accom- 
panying, playing from dictation, and transposition. (Haley) 

Music 160, 161. Conducting. (2, 2) 

Music 160 or equivalent is prerequisite to Music 161. A laboratory course in 
conducting vocal and instrumental groups. Baton technique, score reading, re- 
hearsal techniques, tone production, style, and interpretation. Music of all 
periods will be introduced. (Traver) 

Music 164. Solo Vocal Literature. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Music 120, 121, or the equivalent. The study 
of solo vocal literature from the Baroque cantata to the art song of the present. 
The Lied, melodic, vocal chamber music, and the orchestral song are examined. 

(Pennington) 

Music 165. Keyboard Music. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Music 120, 121, or the equivalent. The history 
and literature of harpsichord, organ, and piano music from the Baroque period 
to the present. Suites, sonatas, and smaller forms are studied with emphasis 
on changes of style and idiom. (Bernstein) 

Music 166. Survey of the Opera. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Music 120, 121, or the equivalent. A study of 
the music, librettos, and composers of the standard operas. (Bernstein) 

Music 167. Symphonic Music. (3) 

First semester. Summer session. Prerequisite, Music 120, 121, or the equivalent. 
The study of orchestral music from the Baroque period to the present. The 
concerto, symphony, overture, and other forms are examined. (McCorkle) 

Music 168. Chamber Music. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Music 120, 121, or the equivalent. The history 
and literature of chamber music from the early Baroque period to the present. 
Music for trio sonata, string quartet and quintet, and combinations of piano 
and string instruments is studied. (Ulrich) 

93 



Music 

Music 169. Choral Music. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Music 120, 121, or the equivalent. The history 
and literature of choral music from the Renaissance to the present, with dis- 
cussion of related topics such as Gregorian chant, vocal chamber music, etc. 

(McCorkle) 

Music 175. Canon and Fugue. (3) 

Prerequisite, Music 146 or the equivalent. Composition and analysis of the 
canon and fugue in the styles of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth cen- 
turies. (Trimble) 

Music 180. Acoustics for Musicians. (3) 

Prerequisites, Music 71 or the equivalent, and senior or graduate standing in 
music. The basic physics of music, acoustics of musical instruments and music 
theory, physiological acoustics, and musico-architectural acoustics. 

(Henderson) 

For Graduates 
Music 200. Advanced Studies in the History of Music. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Music 120, 121, and consent of instructor. A criti- 
cal study of one style period (Renaissance, Baroque, etc.) will be undertaken. 
The course may be repeated for credit, since a different period will be chosen 
each time it is offered. (Bernstein, McCorkle) 

Music 201. Seminar in Music. (3) 

Prerequisites, Music 120, 121, and consent of instructor. The work of one 
major composer (Bach, Beethoven, etc.) will be studied, with emphasis on 
musicological method. The course may be repeated for credit, since a different 
composer will be chosen each time it is offered. (Bernstein, McCorkle) 

Music 202. Pro-Seminar in the History and Literature of 
Music. (3) 

Prerequisite, Music 121. An introduction to graduate study in the history and 
literature of music. Bibliography and methodology of systematic and historical 
musicology. (Bernstein) 

Music 203. Seminar in Musicology. (3) 

Prerequisite, Music 121. An intensive course in one of the areas of musicology 
such as performance practices, history of music theory, history of notation, or 
ethnomusicology. Since a cycle of subjects will be studied, the course may be 
repeated for credit. (Bernstein, McCorkle) 

Music 204. American Music. (3) 

Prerequisite, Music 121. A lecture course in the history of American art music 
from Colonial times to the present. (McCorkle) 

Music 206. Advanced Modal Counterpoint. (3) 

Prerequisite, Music 146 or the equivalent. An intensive course in the composi- 
tion of music in the style of the late Renaissance. Analytical studies of the 
music of Palestrina, Lasso, and Byrd. (Trimble) 

94 



Music 
Music 207. The Contemporary Idiom. (3) 

Prerequisite, Music 144 or the equivalent. Composition and analysis in the 
twentieth-century styles, with emphasis on techniques of melody, harmony, and 
counterpoint. (Trimble) 

Music 208. Advanced Orchestration. (3) 

Prerequisite, Music 148 or the equivalent. Orchestration projects in the styles 
of Debussy, Ravel, Stravinsky, Schoenberg, Bartok, and others. (Trimble) 

Music 209. Seminar in Musical Composition. (3) 

Prerequisite, Music 144 or the equivalent. An advanced course in musical 
composition. (Trimble) 

Music 210. Factors in Musical Learning. (3) 

Prerequisite, Music 121 and at least one course in psychology. The psychology 
of intervals, scales, rhythms, and harmony. Musical hearing and creativity. The 
psychology of musical ability. The theory of functional music. Musical tests 
and measurements. (Staff) 

Music 211. Special Studies in Music. (3) 

Prerequisite, Music 121 or the equivalent. Conference course in problems in 
music history, literature, and theory. May be repeated for credit. (Staff) 

Music 212, 213, Interpretation, Performance, and Analysis of 
THE Standard Repertoire. (2-4, 2-4). 

Prerequisite, consent of graduate faculty in the Department. A seminar in analy- 
sis and interpretation for the graduate performer, with advanced instruction at 
the instrument of the works studied. In Music 213 a seminar paper and a full 
length recital are required. Special fee of $40.00 per semester for each course. 

(Staff) 

Music 215. Aesthetics of Music. (3) 

Prerequisites, Music 121 or the equivalent and at least one course in aesthetics. 
A consideration of the principal theories of aesthetics as they relate to music. 
A study of writings in the field from Pythagoras to Langer. (Staff) 

Music 218. Teaching the Theory, History, and Literature of 
Music. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A course in teaching methodology, with 
emphasis on instruction at the college level. (Ulrich) 

Music 300, 301. Doctoral Seminar in Music Literature. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, at least 12 graduate hours in music history and literature. An 
analytical survey of the literature of music: Section 1, keyboard music; Section 
2, vocal music; Section 3, string-instrument music; Section 4, wind-instrument 
music. Required of all candidates for the D.M.A. degree in Literature-Per- 
formance. (Heim and Staff) 

Music 305. Doctoral Seminar in Music. (3) 

Prerequisites, at least 12 graduate hours in music history and a familiarity 
with musicological methods and bibliography. A study of topics in music his- 
tory and theory based on original research in the subject areas. Required of 
all candidates for the Ph.D. degree. May be repeated for credit. 

(McCorkle and Staff) 

95 



Applied Music 

Music 306. Advanced Composition. (3) 

Prerequisite, Music 209 or the equivalent, and permission of the instructor. 
Conference course in composition in the larger forms. (Trimble) 

Music 312, 313, 314. Interpretation, Performance, and 
Pedagogy. (4, 4, 4) 

Prerequisite, consent of the Graduate Music faculty. A seminar in pedagogy 
and the pedagogical literature for the doctoral performer, with advanced in- 
struction at the instrument, covering appropriate compositions. Required of 
all candidates for the D.M.A. degree in Literature-Performance. In Music 
313 a lecture recital will be required, and in Music 314 a seminar paper and 
full-length recital. Special fee of $40.00 for each course. (Staff) 

Music 399. Thesis Research. (3-6) 

Research in Theory or History and Literature of Music, and Musical Composi- 
tion. May be repeated for credit. (Staff) 



APPLIED MUSIC 

Course number. A new student or one taking applied music for the first 
time at this University should register for Music X. He will receive the 
proper classification at the end of his first semester in the Department. 
Special fee of $40.00 per semester for each applied-music course. 

Section number: Every student taking an applied-music course should, 
in addition to registering for the proper course number, indicate the instru- 
ment chosen by adding a section number as follows: 

Sec. 1, Piano Sec. 10, Bassoon 

Sec. 2, Voice Sec. 11, Horn 

Sec. 3, Violin Sec. 12, Trumpet 

Sec. 4, Viola Sec. 13, Trombone 

Sec. 5, Cello Sec. 14, Tuba 

Sec. 6, Bass Sec. 15, Euphonium 

Sec. 7, Flute Sec. 16, Organ 

Sec. 8, Oboe Sec. 17, Percussion 

Sec. 9, Clarinet Sec. 18, Saxophone 

Music 12, 13. Applied Music. (2-4 hours each course) 

Freshman course. One hour lesson and six practice hours per week if taken 
for two hours credit; or one hour lesson and fifteen practice hours per week 
if taken for four hours credit. The four-hour course is for piano majors in 
the B. Mus. curriculum only. Special fee of $40.00 per semester. (Staff) 

Music 52, 53. Applied Music. (2-4 hours each course) 

Sophomore course. Prerequisite, Music 13 on the same instrument. One hour 
lesson and six practice hours per week if taken for two hours credit; or one 
hour lesson and fifteen practice hours per week if taken for four hours credit. 
The four-hour course is for instrumental majors in the B. Mus. curriculum 
ODly. Special fee of $40.00 per semester. (Staff) 

96 



Philosophy 
Music 112, 113. Applied Music. (2-4 hours each course) 

Junior course. Prerequisite, Music 53 on the same instrument. One hour 
lesson and six practice hours per week if taken for two hours credit; or one 
hour lesson and fifteen practice hours per week if taken for four hours credit. 
The four-hour course is for instrumental majors in the B. Mus. curriculum 
only. Special fee of $40.00 per semester. (Staff) 

Music 152, 153. Applied Music. (2-4 hours each course) 

Senior course. Prerequisite, Music 113 on the same instrument. One hour 
lesson and six practice hours per week if taken for two hours credit; or one 
hour lesson and fifteen practice hours per week if taken for four hours credit. 
The four-hour course is for instrumental or vocal majors in the B. Mus. cur- 
riculum only. Special fee of $40.00 per semester. (Staff) 

PHILOSOPHY 

Professor and Head: Schlaretzki. 

Visiting Professor: Brodbeck. 

Associate Professor: Pasch. 

Visiting Associate Professors: Alexander and Wieman. 

Assistant Professors: Brown and Celarier. 

Lecturers: Goldstone, Kress, Roelofs and Varnedoe. 

The undergraduate course offerings of the Department of Philosophy are, 
as a group, intended both to satisfy the needs of persons wishing to make 
philosophy their major field and to provide ample opportunity for other 
students to explore the subject. In general, the study of philosophy can 
contribute to the education of the university student by giving him 
experience in critical and imaginative reflection on fundamental concepts 
and principles, by acquainting him with some of the philosophical beUefs 
which have influenced and are influencing his own culture, and by 
familiarizing him with some classic philosophical writings through careful 
reading and discussion of them. Courses designed with these objectives 
primarily in mind are Philosophy 1 (Introduction to Philosophy), 
Philosophy 41 (Elementary Logic and Semantics), Philosophy 45 
(Ethics), Philosophy 53 (Philosophy of Religion), and the lustorical 
courses 101 through 105. 

For students interested particularly in philosophical problems arising 
within their own special disciplines, a number of appropriate courses are 
available: Philosophy 52 (Philosophy in Literature), Philosophy 130 
(The Conflict of Ideals in Western Civilization), Philosophy 141 
(Philosophy of Language), Philosophy 147 (Philosophy of Art), Philoso- 
phy 152 (Philosophy of History), Philosophy 154 (Political and Social 
Philosophy), Philosophy 156 (Philosophy of Science), and Philosophy 176 
(Induction and Probability). 

97 



Philosophy 

The departmental requirements for a major in philosophy are as follows: 

( 1 ) a total of at least 27 hours in philosophy, not including Philosophy 1 ; 

(2) Philosophy 45, 101, 102, and 104, and either 41 or 155; 

(3) a grade of "C" or better in each course counted toward the fulfillment 
of the major. 

Students who plan to undertake graduate studies in philosophy are urged 
to include Philosophy 155, 169, and 171 in their programs. 

For students of exceptional ability and interest in philosophy the Depart- 
ment offers an Honors Program. Information regarding this special 
curriculum may be obtained from the departmental advisers. 

Phil. 1. Introduction to Philosophy. (3) 

An introduction to some of the main problems of philosophy, and to some 
of the main ways of dealing with these problems. (Staff) 

Phil. 41. Elementary Logic and Semantics. (3) 

An introductory study of logic and language, intended to help the student 
increase his ability to employ language with understanding and to reason cor- 
rectly. Topics treated include the use and abuses of language, techniques for 
making sound inferences, and the logic of science. (Staff) 

Phil. 45. Ethics. (3) 

An introduction to moral philosophy, including a critical examination of some 
important classic and contemporary systems of ethics, such as those of Aristotle, 
Kant, Mills, and Dewey. (Staff) 

Phil. 52. Philosophy in Literature. (3) 

Second semester. Reading and philosophical criticism of novels and dramas con- 
taining ideas significant for ethics, social policy, and religion. (Staff) 

Phil. 53. Philosophy of Religion. (3) 

First semester. This course seeks to provide the student with the means by 
which he may approach intelligently the main problems of religious thought: 
the nature of religious experience, the forms of religious expression, the con- 
flicting claims of religion and science, and the place of religion in the com- 
munity and in the life of the individual. (Brown, Roelofs) 

Phil. 101. Ancient Philosophy. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Phil. 1 and either one additional course in phil- 
osophy or senior standing. A history of Greek thought from its beginnings to 
the time of Justinian. The chief figures discussed: The Presocratic philosophers, 
Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, the Stoic philosophers, and Plotinus. 

(Celarier, Varnedoe) 

Phil. 102. Modern Philosophy. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Phil. 1 and either one additional course in 
philosophy or senior standing. A history of philosophical thought in the West 
during the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. The chief figures discussed: Bacon, 
Galileo, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. (Staff) 

98 



Philosophy 
Phil. 103. Nineteenth Century Philosophy. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Phil. 1 and either one additional course in 
philosophy or senior standing. A survey of philosophy in the nineteenth century 
through a consideration of such writers as Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, 
Spencer, Marx, Comte, Mill, Mach, and Bradley. (Staff) 

Phil. 104. Twentieth Century Philosophy. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Phil. 1 and either one additional course in philo- 
sophy or senior standing. A survey of philosophy in the twentieth century 
through a consideration of representative figures in England, Europe, and 
America. Among the theories to be studied are logica^ atomism (Russell, 
Wittgenstein), positivism (Carnap, Ayer), existentialism and phenomenology 
Sartre, Husserl), naturalism and realism (Dewey, Santayana). (Brown) 

Phil. 105. Philosophy in America. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Phil 1. A survey of philosophical thought in 
America from the eighteenth century to the present. Special attention is given 
to Edwards, Jefferson, Emerson, Royce, Peirce, James, and Dewey. 

(Schlaretzki) 

Phil. 120. Oriental Philosophy. (3) 

Prerequisite, one course in philosophy. Not offered on College Park campus. 
An examination of the major philosophical systems of the East, attempting to 
discover the relations between these and important ideas of Western thought. 

Phil. 123, 124. Philosophies Men Live By. (3, 3) 

Not offered on College Park campus. An exploration of the fundamental beliefs 
which determine what men make of their lives and of the world they live in. 
Classic statements of these beliefs by great philosophers will be chosen for class 
discussion on the basis of their significance for the problems confronting modern 
man. 

Phil. 130. The Conflict of Ideals in Western Civilization. (3) 

First semester. A critical and constructive philosophical examination of the 
assumptions, goals, and methods of contemporary democracy, fascism, socialism, 
and communism, with special attention to the ideological conflict between the 
U.S.A. and the U.S.S.R. (Staff) 

Phil. 141. Philosophy of Language. (3) 

Prerequisite, Phil. 41. An inquiry into the nature and function of language and 
other forms of symbolism. (Kress) 

Phil. 147. Philosophy of Art. (3) 

An examination of the fundamental concepts in art and in esthetic experience 
generally. Readings from the works of artists, estheticians, critics and phi- 
losophers. (Brown) 

Phil. 151. Ethical Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Phil. 45. Contemporary problems having to do with the meaning 
of the principal concepts of ethics aiKi with the nature of moral reasoning. 

(Schlaretzki) 

Phil. 152. Philosophy of History. (3) 

First semester. An examination of the nature of historical knowledge and 
historical explanation, and of theories of the meaning of world history. 

(Staff) 

99 



Philosophy 

Phil. 154. Political and Social Philosophy. (3) 

Second semester. A systematic treatment of the main philosophical issues 
encountered in the analysis and evaluation of social (especially political) 
institutions. (Schlaretzki) 

Phil. 155. Symbolic Logic. (3) 

Phil. 41 or Math. 3 recommended but not required. An introduction to the 
concepts and techniques of modern formal logic by means of matrix and 
axiomatic developments of the sentential calculus and an examination of the 
first-order predicate calculus in a system of natural deduction. (Pasch) 

Phil. 156. Philosophy of Science. (3) 

Prerequisites, Phil. 41 and either 101 or 102; or consent of instructor. An 
inquiry into the relations of the sciences, the nature of observation, hypotheses, 
verification, experiment, measurement, scientific laws and theories, the basic 
concepts and presuppositions of science, and the relations of science to society. 

(Staff) 

Phil. 157. Theory of Meaning. (3) 

Prerequisites, Phil. 41 and 102. A study of theories about the meaning of 
linguistic expressions, including the verification theory and the theory of meaning 
as use. Among topics to be considered are naming, referring, synonomy, inten- 
sion and extension, and ontological commitment. Such writers as Mill, Frege, 
Russell, Lewis, Carnap, Wittgenstein, Austin, and Quine will be discussed. 

(Staff) 

Phil. 169. Topics in Contemporary Philosophy. (3) 

Prerequisite, Phil. 102. An intensive examination of contemporary problems and 
issues. Source material will be selected from recent books and articles. May 
be repeated for credit when the topics dealt with are different. (Staff) 

Phil. 170. Metaphysics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Phil. 101 and 102. Phil. 41 recommended. A study 
of some central metaphysical concepts (such as substance, relation, causality, 
and time) and of the nature of metaphysical thinking. (Pasch) 

Phil. 171. Theory of Knowledge. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Phil. 101 and 102. Phil. 41 recommended. The 
origin, nature, and validity of knowledge will be considered in terms of some 
philosophic problems about perceiving and thinking, knowledge and belief, 
thought and language, truth and confirmation. (Pasch) 

Phil. 175. Topics in Symbolic Logic. (3) 

Prerequisite, Phil. 155. May be repeated for credit when the topics dealt with 
are different. (Staff) 

Phil. 176. Induction and Probability. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A study of inferential forms, with emphasis 
on the logical structure underlying such inductive procedures as estimating and 
hypothesis-testing. Decision-theoretic rules relating to induction will be con- 
sidered, as well as classic theories of probability and induction. (Staff) 

Phil. 180. The Philosophy of Plato. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Phil. 101 and 102. A critical study of selected 
dialogues. (Celarier) 

100 



Philosophy 
Phil. 181. The Philosophy of Aristotle. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Phil. 101 and 102. A critical study of selected 
portions of Aristotle's writings. (Celarier) 

Phil. 182. Medieval Philosophy. (3) 

Prerequisite, Phil. 101 or 102. A history of philosophic thought in the West 
from the close of the Classical period to the Renaissance. Based on readings 
of the Stoics, early Christian writers, Neoplatonists, later Christian writers and 
Schoolmen. (Celarier) 

Phil. 184. The Continental Rationalists. (3) 

Prerequisites, Phil. 101 and 102. A critical study of the systems of some of the 
major 17th and 18th century rationalists, with special reference to Descartes, 
Spinoza, and Leibniz. (Staff) 

Phil. 185. The British Empiricists. (3) 

Prerequisites, Phil. 101 and 102. A critical study of selected writings of Locke, 
Berkeley, and Hume. (Staff) 

Phil. 186. The Philosophy of Kant. (3) 

Prerequisites, Phil. 101 and 102. A critical study of selected portions of Kant's 
writings. (Staff) 

Phil. 190. Honors Seminar. (3) 

Each semester. Open to honors students in philosophy and, by permission of 
the instructoi, to honors students in other departments. Research in selected 
topics, with group discussion. May be repeated for credit when the topics 
dealt with are different. (Staff) 

Phil. 191, 192, 193, 194. Topical Investigations. (1-3) 

(Staff) 
Phil. 255. Seminar in the History of Philosophy. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff) 

Phil. 256. Seminar in the Problems of Philosophy. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff) 

Phil. 260. Seminar in Ethics. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Schlaretzki) 

Phil. 261. Seminar in Esthetics. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Brown) 

Phil. 270. Seminar in Metaphysics. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff) 

Phil. 271. Seminar in Theory of Knowledge. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Pasch) 

Phil. 292. Selected Problems in Philosophy. (1-3) 

Each semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff) 

Phil. 399. Research in Philosophy. (1-12) 

Each semester. (Staff) 

101 



Physics and Astronomy 



PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 

Professor and Chairman: Laster. 

Professors: Day, Estabrook, Ferrell, Friedman (p.t.), Griem, Hay- 
ward (P.T.), Holmgren, Hornyak, MacDonald, F. McDonald (p.t.), 
Marion, Musen (p.t.), Myers, Rado (p.t.), Slawsky (p.t.), Snow, 
Stern, Sucher, Weber, Westerhout and Yodh. 

Research Professors: Mason,^ Montroll,^ Opik, Pai,® Tidman,^ 
Schamp,^ Vanderslice^ and Weske.^ 

Visiting Professors: Eden and Horie. 

Associate Professors: Alley, Bennett (p.t.), Detenbeck, J. R. Dixon 
(p.t.). Earl, Erickson, Falk, Glasser, Glover, Greenberg, Misner, 
Oneda, Prange, Pugh, Smith, Steinberg, Van Wijk, Wall, Zipoy and 
G. Zorn. 

Research Associate Professors: Benesch,^ Faller ^ and Wilkerson.^ 

Visiting Associate Professors: Eberhagen and Komesaroff. 

Assistant Professors: Anderson, Armstrong, Bardasis, Bettinger, 
Beall, Bell, Bhagat, Block, Condon, DeSilva, DiLavore, Dorf- 
man,^ Dragt, Fivel, Click, Gutsche (p.t.), Hagge (p.t.), Kacser, 
Kehoe, Kim, Koch, Leibowitz, Pati, Whatley, Woo, Woods, Zapolsky 
and B. S. Zorn. 

Research Assistant Professors: Charatis, De Rocco,*^ Guernsey,® 
Krisher,^ Koopman,^ and Lashinsky.^ 

Visiting Assistant Professors: Guss and Young. 

Research Associates: Beres, Burn, Carmeli, Clem, W. G. Dixon, Kor- 
enmann, Kunze, Lincke, Poultney, Rabinovitch, Resnikoff, Rich- 
ard, Saiedy and White. 

Visiting Lecturers: Fichtel and Meckler. 

The physics curriculum for the B.S. degree is designed for students who de- 
sire education in the fundamentals of physics in preparation for graduate 
work or teaching, or for positions in governmental and industrial labor- 
atories. Students who enter the University intending to major in physics are 
urged to take, during the first two years, the introductory courses Physics 
15, 16, 17, 18, and 60, 61. For students who enter the physics major in 
their junior year, however, Physics 20, 21, 60, 104, 105 and 106 may be 
substituted for the Physics 15-61 sequence. All students should accompany 



8 Member of the Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 
8 Member of the Institute of Molecular Physics 



102 



Physics and Astronomy 

these basic courses with Math. 19, 20, 21, and 22 (4, 4, 4, 4), (or the cor- 
responding honors courses) and one advanced mathematics course. Physics 
majors are encouraged to try to enroll in the accelerated honors sections of 
all of these courses when they are qualified. 

After completion of the courses mentioned above, the Physics majors will 
be required to take the following courses: Physics 127, 128 — Elements of 
Mathematical Physics (4, 4), Physics 118 — Introduction to Modern Phys- 
ics (3), and Physics 119 — Modern Physics (3); and at least two semesters 
of advanced laboratory courses (e.g., Physics 100, 109, 110, 140, 141, or 
190). Supporting courses must include at least one additional mathematics 
course approved by the physics adviser (which is usually Mathematics 110 
or Mathematics 162). At least 38 credits in physics normally are required. 

The departmental requirement is at least a "C" in each semester of the first 
year of the introductory course. Students who wish to be recommended 
for graduate work must maintain a "B" average and should also include as 
many as possible of the following courses: Physics 120 — Nuclear Physics 
(4), Physics 122 — Properties of Matter (4), Physics 140, 141 — Atomic 
and Nuclear Physics Laboratory (3, 3), Physics 144, 145 — Methods of 
Theoretical Physics (4, 4), and Mathematics 110, 111 — Advanced Cal- 
culus (4, 4). 

Recommended course programs are available from the Department. 

HONORS IN PHYSICS: The honors program offers to students of excep- 
tional ability and interest in physics an educational program with a number 
of special opportunities for learning. Honors sections are offered in sev- 
eral courses, and there are many opportunities for part-time research par- 
ticipation which may develop into full-time summer projects. An honors 
seminar is offered for advanced students; credit may be given for inde- 
pendent work or study; and certain graduate courses are open for credit 
toward the bachelor's degree. 

Students for the Honors Program are accepted by the Department's Honors 
Committee on the basis of recommendations from their advisers and other 
faculty members. A final written and oral comprehensive examination in 
the senior year concludes the program which may lead to graduation "with 
Honors (or High Honors) in Physics." 

CHEMICAL PHYSICS: See Molecular Physics, page 88. 

Phys. 1. Elements of Physics: Mechanics, Heat, and Sound. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, successful passing of the qualifying ex- 
amination in elementary mathematics. Lecture demonstration fee, $3.00. The 
first half of a survey course in general physics. This course is for the general 
student and does not satisfy the requirements of the professional schools. (Alley) 



103 



Physics and Astronomy 

Phys. 2. Elements of Physics: Magnetism, Electricity, and 
Optics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 1. Lecture demonstration fee, $3.00. 
The second half of a survey course in general physics. This course is for the 
general student and does not satisfy the requirements of the professional schools. 

(Alley) 

Phys. 3. Introduction to Physics. (4) 

Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite, qualification 
to enter Math. 10. Intended for students majoring in neither the physical nor 
biological sciences. A study of the development of some of the basic ideas of 
physical science. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Beall) 

Phys. 10, 11. Fundamentals of Physics. (4, 4) 

Three lectures, one recitation, and one two-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite, entrance credit in trigonometry or Math. 11 or concurrent enroll- 
ment in Math 18. Lecture demonstration and laboratory fee, $10.00 per se- 
mester. A course in general physics treating the fields of mechanics, heat, 
sound, electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics. This course satisfies 
the minimum requirements of medical and dental schools. 

(Yodh, Koch, Estabrook, Stern, and Staflf) 

Phys. 15, 16. Introductory Physics: Mechanics, Fluids, Heat, and 
Sound. (4, 4) 

Three lectures and two demonstration periods a week. Prerequisites, a high 
school physics course and concurrent enrollment in Math. 18, 19, or consent 
of instructor. Lecture demonstration fee, $3.00 per semester. The first half 
of a broad, detailed introduction to physics, intended primarily for physics 
majors and other students with superior backgounds in mathematics and the 
sciences. (Whatley, Leibowitz, Wall) 

Phys. 17. Introductory Physics: Electricity and Magnetism. (4) 

Three lectures and two demonstration periods a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 15, 
16 and previous or concurrent enrollment in Phys. 60 and Math. 20. Lecture 
demonstration fee, $3.00. The third quarter of a broad, detailed introduction 
to physics, intended primarily for physics majors and other students with su- 
perior backgrounds in mathematics and the sciences. (Hornyak) 

Phys. 18. Introductory Physics: Optics and Modern Physics. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and two demonstration periods a week. Pre- 
requisites, Phys. 17 and previous or concurrent enrollment in Phys. 60 and 
Math. 21, or consent of instructor. Lecture demonstration fee, $3.00. The last 
quarter of a broad, detailed introduction to physics, intended primarily for 
physics majors and other students with superior backgrounds in mathematics 
and the sciences. (Hornyak) 

Phys. 20. General Physics: Mechanics, Heat, and Sound. (5) 

Three lectures, two recitations and one two-hour laboratory period a week. 
Math. 20 to be taken concurrently. Lecture demonstration and laboratory fee, 
$10.00. The first half of a course in general physics. Required of all students 
in the engineering curricula. 

(Day, Eastabrook, Five!, Kacser, MacDonald, and Staflf) 

104 



Physics and Astronomy 

Phys. 21. General Physics: Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics. 

(5) 

Three lectures, two recitations, and one two-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite, Phys. 20. Math. 21 to be taken concurrently. Lecture demonstra- 
tions and laboratory fee, $10.00. The second half of a course in general 
physics. Required of all students in the engineering curricula. 

(Day, Eastabrook, Fivel, Kacser, MacDonald, and Staff) 

Phys. 50, 51. Intermediate Physics. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 11 or 21. 

(Whatley) 

Phys. 52. Heat. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 11 or 21. Math. 
20 is to be taken concurrently. (Schamp) 

Phys. 53. Nuclear Physics and Radioactivity. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 11 or 21. (Young) 

Phys. 54. Sound. (3) 

(Will be given only with sufficient demand.) Three lectures a week. Pre- 
requisite, Phys. 11 or 21. Math. 21 is to be taken concurrently. (Myers) 

Phys. 60, 61. Intermediate Physics Experiments. (2, 2) 

Four hours of laboratory work per week. Prerequisite, Phys. 11 or 21 or con- 
current enrollment in Phys. 17 or Phys. 18. Laboratory fee, $10.00 per semes- 
ter. Selected experiments. (Block, Poultney) 

Phys. 100. Advanced Experiments. (2 credits per semester) 

Four hours of laboratory work per week. Prerequisite, four credits of Phys. 
60 or consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $10.00 per semester. Selected fun- 
damental experiments in electricity and magnetism, elementary electronics, and 
optics. (Glover, Pugh) 

Phys. 102. Optics. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 11 or 21 and 
Math. 21. It is suggested, but not required, that Phys. 60 or Phys. 100 be taken 
concurrently with this course. Geometrical optics, optical instruments, wave 
motion, interference and diffraction, and other phenomena in physical optics. 

(Erickson) 

Phys. 103. Applied Optics. (3) 

(Will be given only with sufficient demand.) Three lectures a week. Pre- 
requisite, Phys. 102. A detailed study of physical optics and its applications. 

(Alley) 

Phys. 104, 105. Electricity and Magnetism. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 11 or 21; Math. 21. Electrostatics, 
direct current and alternating current circuitry, electomagnetic effects of steady 
currents, electromagnetic induction, radiation, development of Maxwell's equa- 
tions, Poynting vector, wave equations, and electronics. (Steinberg) 

105 



Physics and Astronomy 

Phys. 106, 107. Theoretical Mechanics. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 51 or consent of instructor. A de- 
tailed study of Newtonian mechanics. Dynamics, the motion of rigid bodies, 
oscillation problems, etc., are studied. Lagrange's equation of the first kind and 
the Hamilton-Jacobi equation are introduced. (Marion) 

Phys. 109. Electronic Circuits. (4) 

Second semester. Three hours of lecture and two of laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite, Physics 100 and concurrent enrollment in Physics 105 or Physics 
128. Theory of semi-conductor and vacuum tube circuits. Laboratory fee, 
$10.00. Application in experimental physics. (Condon) 

Phys. 110. Special Laboratory Projects in Physics. (1, 2, or 3) 

Two hours laboratory work a week for each credit hour. One to three credits 
may be taken concurrently each semester. (Will be given only with sufficient 
demand.) Prerequisite, Phys. 100 and consent of adviser. Laboratory fee, $10.00 
per credit hour. Selected advanced experiments. (Glover, Pugh) 

Phys. 111. Physics Shop Techniques. (1) 

First semester. One three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite, Phys. 100 
or consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Machine tools, design and 
construction of laboratory equipment. (Horn) 

Phys. 114, 115. Introduction to Biophysics. (2, 2) 

(Will be given only with sufficient demand.) Two lectures a week. Pre- 
requisites, intermediate physics and Math. 21. A study of the physical principles 
involved in biological processes, with particular emphasis on current research 
in biophysics. (Montroll) 

Phys. 116, 117. Introduction to Fluid Dynamics. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 106 and Math. 21. Kinematics of 
fluid flow, properties of incompressible fluids, complex variable methods of 
analysis, wave motions. (Koopman) 

Phys. 118. Introduction to Modern Physics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, general physics and integral calculus, 
with some knowledge of difi"erential equations and a degree of maturity as 
evidenced by having taken one or more of the courses Phys. 50 through Phys. 
110. Introductory discussion of special relativity, origin of quantum theory, 
Bohr atom, wave mechanics, atomic structure, and optical spectra. 

(Myers, Zom) 

Phys, 119. Modern Physics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 118. A survey of nuclear physics, 
x-rays, radioactivity, wave mechanics, and cosmic radiation. 

(Bardasis, Zom) 

Phys. 120. Nuclear Physics. (4) 

Four lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 119. An introduction to nuclear 
physics at the pre-quantum-mechanics level. Properties of nuclei; radioactivity; 
nuclear systematics; nuclear moments; the shell model, interaction of charged 
particles and gamma rays with matter; nuclear detector; accelerators; nuclear 
reactions; beta decay; high energy phenomena. (Holmgren) 

106 



Physics and Astronomy 
Phys. 121. Neutron Physics and Fission Reactors. (4) 

Four lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 120. Neutron diffusion and reactor 
physics. (Marion) 

Phys. 122. Properties of Matter. (4) 

Each semester. Four lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 119 or equivalent. 
Introduction to solid state physics. Electro-magnetic, thermal, and elastic 
properties of metals, semiconductors and insulators. (Glover, E. Stern) 

Phys. 123. Introduction to Atmospheric and Space Physics. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Physics 127 and Physics 
118 or consent of instructor. Motions of charged particles in magnetic fields, 
aspects of plasma physics related to cosmic rays and radiation belts, atomic 
phenomena in the atmosphere, thermodynamics and dynamics of the atmos- 
phere. (Bettinger, Laster) 

Phys. 126. Kinetic Theory of Gases. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 107 and Math. 21. Dynamics of 
gas particles, Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, diffusion, Brownian motion, etc. 

(Mason) 

Phys. 127, 128. Elements of Mathematical Physics. 

Mechanics, Potential Theory, and Electromagnetic Waves (4, 4). First and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, Physics 18 and Mathematics 21, or consent of 
instructor. A careful study of mathematical approaches used in mechanics, elec- 
tricity and magnetism, and physical optics. (Dragt) 

Phys. 130, 131. Basic Concepts of Physics. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, junior standing. Lecture demonstration 
fee, $2.00 per semester. A primarily descriptive course intended mainly for 
those students in the liberal arts who have not had any other course in physics. 
This course does not satisfy the requirements of professional school nor serve 
as a prerequisite or substitute for other physics courses. The main emphasis 
in the course will be on the concepts of physics, their evolution and their re- 
lations to other branches of human endeavor. (Armstrong) 

Phys. 140, 141. Atomic and Nuclear Physics Laboratory. (3, 3) 

One lecture and four hours of laboratory a week. Prerequisites, two credits of 
Phys. 100 and consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $10.00 per semester. 
Classical experiments in atomic physics and more sophisticated experiments in 
current techniques in nuclear physics. Enrollment is limited to ten students. 

(Earl) 

Phys. 144, 145. Methods of Theoretical Physics. (4, 4) 

Prerequisite, Physics 127, 128. A survey of basic ideas in thermodynamics and 
statistical mechanics. An introduction to electrodynamics, quantum mechanics, 
and relativity. Primary emphasiss will be placed upon the mathematical methods 
involved in understanding those topics. (Ferrell, Griem) 

Phys. 150. Special Problems in Physics. 

Prerequisite, major in physics and consent of adviser. Research or special 
study. Credit according to work done. Laboratory fee, $10.00 per credit 
hour when appropriate. (Staff) 

107 



Physics and Astronomy 

Phys. 152. Introduction to Thermodynamics and Statistical 
Mechanics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Mathematics 21, Physics 18 or 51, or 
consent of the instructor. Introduction of basic concepts in thermodynamics 
and statistical mechanics. (Bhagat) 

Phys. 190. Independent Studies Seminar. 

Credit according to work done, each semester. Enrollment is limited to students 
admitted to the Independent Studies Program in Physics. (Staff) 

For Graduates 

Of the courses which follow, 200, 201, 204, 205, 212, 213, 234, 235, 252, 
253, 254, 255 and 258 are given every year; all others will be given accord- 
ing to demand. 

Phys. 200, 201. Theoretical Dynamics. (3, 3) 

Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite, Physics 127 or equivalent. This 
basic course for graduate study in physics covers advanced classical mechanics, 
hydrodynamics, elasticity, thermodynamics, and statistical mechanics. It is 
normally taken concurrently with Physics 204, 205. (Myers, Glick, Misner) 

Phys. 202, 203. Advanced Dynamics. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 200. A detailed study of advanced 
classical mechanics. (Myers) 

Phys. 204, 205. Electrodynamics. (3, 3) 

Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite, Physics 128 or equivalent. This 
basic course for graduate study in physics covers electrodynamics and relativity. 
It is normally taken concurrently with Physics 200, 201. 

(Sucher, Woods, Zipoy) 

Phys. 206. Kinetic Theory of Plasmas. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite, Physics 204, 205. Knowledge 
of complex variable theory is also desirable. A detailed study of plasma physics. 

(Tidman) 

Phys. 207. Plasma Physics. (3) 

Prerequisite, Physics 204, 205. Orbit theory, transport processes, radiation, 
waves, stability theory. (Griem) 

Phys. 208. Thermodynamics. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. The first and 
second laws of thermodynamics are examined and applied to homogeneous and 
non-homogeneous systems, calculations of properties of matter, the derivation 
of equilibrium condition and phase transitions, the theory of irreversible proc- 
esses. (Schamp) 

Phys. 210. Statistical Mechanics. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 119 and Phys. 
201, 205. A study of the determination of microscopic behavior of matter 
from microscopic models. Microcanonical, canonical, and grand canonical 
models. Applications to solid state physics and the study of gases. 

(Dorfman, Montroll) 

108 



Physics and Astronomy 
Phys. 212, 213. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. (4, 4) 

Four lectures per week. Prerequisite, Phys. 200 or an outstanding undergrad- 
uate background in physics. A study of the Schroedinger equation, matrix 
formulations of quantum mechanics, approximation methods, scattering theory, 
etc., and applications to solid state, atomic, and nuclear physics. 

(Zapolsky, Falk, Weber) 

Phys. 214. Theory of Atomic Spectra. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 213. A study of atomic spectra and 
structure — one and two electron spectra, fine and hyperfine structure, line 
strengths, line width, etc. (Wilkerson) 

Phys. 215. Theory of Molecular Spectra. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 214. The structure and properties of 
molecules as revealed by rotational, vibrational, and electronic spectra. 

(Vanderslice) 

Phys. 216, 217. Molecular Physics. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 213. Molecular theory of gases and 
liquids, ensemble theory, analysis of empirical models for molecular interactions, 
theory of Coulomb interactions between charge distribution. (Benesch) 

Phys. 218, 219. X-Rays and Crystal Structure. (3, 3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. A detailed study of crystal 
structure of solids and of x-rays. (Glover) 

Phys. 220. Application of X-Ray and Electron Diffraction 
Methods. (2) 

Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, concurrent enrollment in Phys. 
218. The investigation of crystal structure, using x-rays and electron diffrac- 
tion. (E. Stem) 

Phys. 221. Upper Atmosphere and Cosmic Ray Physics. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 200 or consent of instructor. Struc- 
ture of the atmosphere, rocket and satellite experiments, primary and secondary 
cosmic rays, origins of cosmic rays, geomagnetic theory. (Laster) 

Phys. 222, 223. Boundary-Value Problems of Theoretical Physics. 
(2,2) 

Prerequisite, Phys. 205. (Falk) 

Phys. 224, 225. Supersonic Aerodynamics and Compressible Flow. 
(2,2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. (Pai) 

Phys. 226, 227. Theoretical Hydrodynamics. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. A detailed study of advanced 
fluid dynamics. (Burgers) 

Phys. 228. Symmetry Problems in Physics. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Physics 213. A study of general methods 
of classification of physical systems by their symmetries and invariance prop- 
erties, especially in quantum field theory applications. (Pati) 

109 



Physics and Astronomy 
Phys. 230, Seminar. 

Seminars on various topics in advanced physics are held each semester, with 
the contents varied each year. One credit for each seminar each semester. 

(Staff) 

Phys. 231. Applied Physics Seminar. 

(One credit for each semester.) (Staff) 

Phys. 232, 233. Hydromechanics Seminar. (1, 1) 

One meeting a week. (Staff) 

Phys. 234, 235. Theoretical Nuclear Physics. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 120; co-requisite, Physics 254. Nuclear 
properties and reactions, nuclear forces, two, three, and four body problems, 
nuclear spectroscopy, beta-decay, and related topics. (MacDonald, Beres) 

Phys. 236. Theory of Relativity. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 200. A study of Einstein's special 
theory of relativity and some consequences, and a brief survey of the foundations 
of general relativity. (Weber, Misner) 

Phys. 238. Quantum Theory — Selected Topics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 213. 

Phys. 239. Elementary Particles. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 254. Survey of elementary particles 
and their properties, quantum field theory, meson theory, weak interactions, 
possible extensions of elementary particle theory. (Day, Snow) 

Phys. 240, 241. Theory of Sound and Vibrations. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. A detailed study of acoustics 
and the theory of vibrations. (Weber, Zipoy) 

Phys. 242, 243. Theory of Solids. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Co-requisite, Phys. 254. Prop- 
erties of metals lattice vibrations and specific beats, Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac, 
and Bose-Einstein statitics, free electron gas theories, band theory of metals. 

(Prange) 

Phys. 245. Special Topics in Applied Physics. 

(2 credits each semester.) Two lectures a week. (Staff) 

Phys. 246, 247. Special Topics in Fluid Dynamics. (2, 2) 

Prerequisites, advanced graduate standing and consent of the instructor. 

(Burgers) 

Phys. 248, 249. Special Topics in Modern Physics. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff) 

Phys. 252, 253. Nuclear Structure Physics. (3, 3) 

Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite, Phys. 120 or equivalent; co-requisite, 
Phys. 212, 213 or consent of instructor. Nuclear structure and nuclear reactions. 
Two-body scatterings; nucleon-nucleon forces and the deuteron. Neutron scatter- 

no 



Physics and Astronomy 

ing; the optical model. Reasonance reactions, phase-shift analysis, positions and 
properties of energy levels; the shell model. Direct reactions. Electromagnetic 
transitions. Photoreactions. The design of experiments; the extraction of para- 
meters from experimental data and the comparison with nuclear models. 

(Marion, Holmgren) 

Phys. 254. Advanced Quantum Mechanics. (3) 

Prerequisite, Physics 213. Relativistic wave equations, second quantization in 
many body problems and relativistic wave equations, Feynman-Dyson perturba- 
tion theory, applications to many body problems, applications to quantum 
electrodynamics, elements of renormalization. (Ferrell, Kim) 

Phys. 255. Advanced Quantum Mechanics. (3) 

Second Semester. Prerequisite, Physics 254. Renormalizations of Lagrangian 
Field Theories, Lamb Shift, Positronium fine structure, T. C. P. invariance, con- 
nection between spin and statistics, broken symmetries in many body problems, 
soluble models, analyticity in perturbation theory, simple applications of dis- 
persion relations. (Kim) 

Phys. 257. Theoretical Methods in Elementary Particles. (3) 

First Semester. Co-requisite, Physics 255. (Sucher, Oneda) 

Phys. 258. Quantum Field Theory. (3) 

Second Semester. Co-requisite, Physics 255. Introduction to Hilbert space, gen- 
eral postulates of relativistic quantum field theory, asymptotic conditions, ex- 
amples of local field theory, Jost-Lehmann-Dyson representation and applications, 
generalized free field theory, general results of local field theory — TCP theorem, 
spin statistics connections, Borchers' theorems, Reeh-Schlieder theorem. 

(Greenberg, Oneda) 

Phys. 260. High Energy Physics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Co-requisite, Phys. 254, or consent of instructor. Nuclear 
forces are studied by examining interactions at high energies. Meson physics 
scattering processes, and detailed analysis of high energy experiments. (Snow) 

Phys. 262, 263. Aerophysics. (3, 3) 

Three lectures. Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. (Pal) 

Phys. 399. Research. 

Credit according to work done, each semester. Laboratory fee, $10.00 per 
credit hour. Prerequisite, an approved application for admission to candidacy 
or special permission of the Department. (Staff) 

(For Astronomy curriculum, see under ASTRONOMY, p. 18.) 

Special Physics Courses for High School Science Teachers 
TTie courses in this section were especially designed for high school 
teachers and are not applicable to B.S., M.S., ov Ph.D. degrees in physics 
without special permission of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. 
However, these courses can be included as part of a physics minor or as 
electives. No prerequisites are required. 

/// 



Pre-Professional Curricula 

Phys. 118A. Atoms, Nuclei, and Stars. (3) 

Three lectures per week. An introduction to basic ideas of the constitution and 
properties of atomic and subatomic systems and of the overall structure of the 
universe. (Detenbeck) 

Phys. 122A. Properties of Materials. (3) 

Three lectures per week. An introduction to the study of solid state physics 
and the properties of fluids. (E. Stem) 

Phys. 160A. Physics Problems. (1, 2 or 3) 

Lectures and discussion sessions arranged. (Di Lavore) 

Phys. 170A. Applied Physics. (3) 

Three lectures per week. (Homyak) 

Phys. 199. National Science Foundation Summer Institute for 
Teachers of Science Seminar. (1) 

Arranged during summer session. Enrollment limited to participants in the 
N.S.F. Summer Institute. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Detenbeck, Staff) 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

Within the College of Arts and Sciences there are a number of programs 
developed to prepare the pre-professional student. These curricula, some 
rather general and others quite specific, are designed to give the student the 
best background to succeed in his advanced training, to fill undergraduate 
requirements of many professional schools, and to fit in with the require- 
ments established by the organizations associated with the respective pro- 
fessions. 

Pre-professional programs require that the student maintain a grade point 
average somewhat higher than the minimum for graduation. The student 
may fulfill requirements by majoring in almost any discipline in the College, 
provided the specific requirements of the pre-professional program are met. 
The successful completion of the pre-professional program does not guar- 
antee admission to professional school. Each school has its own admissions 
requirements and criteria, generally based upon the grade point average in 
the undergraduate courses, the scores in aptitude tests (Medical College 
Admission Test, Law Admission Test, or Dental Aptitude Test) , a personal 
interview, and letters sent by the "Evaluation Committee" of the College. 
For the specific admissions requirements, the student is urged to study the 
catalog of the professional school of his choice. 

Although completion of the Bachelor's degree is a normal prerequisite for 
admission, three professional schools of the University of Maryland in 
Baltimore — Dentistry, Law, and Medicine — have arrangements whereby a 
student who meets requirements detailed below may be accepted for pro- 
fessional school after three years (90 academic hours). For the students to 
be eligible for the "combined degree," the final thirty hours prior to entry 

112 



Pre-Professional Curricula 

into the Schools of Dentistry, Law, and Medicine must be taken in residence 
in the College of Arts and Sciences. (A combined degree program in Law 
is also available in the College of Business and Public Administration: for 
details see BPA catalog.) After the successful completion of thirty hours of 
work in professional school, the student may be eligible for a Bachelor's 
degree from the College of Arts and Sciences (Arts-Dentistry, Arts-Law, 
or Arts-Medicine). 

PRE-DENTISTRY 

The pre-dental program is based upon requirements established by the 
Council of Dental Education of the American Dental Association, and the 
requirements for a degree from the College of Arts and Sciences following 
either the regular four-year program or the combined "Arts-Dentistry" pro- 
gram. The program is designed to prepare the student for the Dental Apti- 
tude Test, normally taken in the spring of the sophomore year. 

The minimum requirements for entry into dental school for either the three- 
year program (90 academic hours) or the four-year program (120 aca- 
demic hours) are: 

General Education requirements 34 hours 

College requirements 

Foreign Language 12 

Speech 2 14 hours 

plus 

Major variable 

Minor (or supporting courses) variable 

Dental Association requirements 

Chemistry — organic 8 

inorganic 8 

Zoology 8 

Mathematics 6 

Physics 8 38 hours 

Electives — to complete the 90 or 120 hours required. 
Required Health and Physical Education. 

Four-Year Program. A student applies to Dental School in his senior year, 
on the basis of completing the usual degree requirements for the B.A. or 
B.S. degree from the College of Arts and Sciences, by majoring in the field 
of his choice and including in his course work the science courses specifical- 
ly prescribed by dental schools. 

Three-Year Arts-Dentistry Program. Students whose performance during 
the first two years in residence at College Park is exceptional may be en- 
couraged to seek admission to the University of Maryland Dental School at 
the end of their third year (90 academic hours). No undergraduate major 
is required for this program: the work of the first year of dental school is 
considered as the major; but students will select a minor (supporting 
courses) from one of the following combinations: zoology, six hours above 
the 100 level; microbiology, eight hours above the 100 level; Chem. 19 plus 

113 



Pre-Professional Curricula 

three hours above the 100 level in any science; Chem. 161, 162, 163, and 
164; or nine hours above the 100 level in any one department of the arts, 
humanities, or social sciences. 

Students accepted in the combined Arts-Dentistry program may receive the 
B.S. degree (Arts-Dentistry) after satisfactory completion of the first year 
of dental school, upon recommendation by the Dean of the Dental School 
and approval by the College of Arts and Sciences. Applications for the 
diploma are made during the summer following the first year of dental 
school, and the degree is awarded with the August graduates. 

Schedule. The pre-dental student, regardless of degree sought, includes in 
his first-year schedule Chem. 1, 3; Zool. 1,2; Engl. 1, 3; Math. 10, 11 (or 
18, 19); Health 5; and Physical Education. His second year includes 
Chem. 35, 36, 37, 38; foreign language; general education requirements; 
and major-minor requirements. A student hoping for three-year accept- 
ance would substitute Phys. 10, 11 for foreign language in his sophomore 
year. 

PRE-LAW 

Although some law schools will consider only applicants with a B.A. or B.S. 
degree, others will accept appUcants who have successfully completed a 
three-year program of academic work. Most law schools do not prescribe 
specific courses which a student must present for admission, but do require 
that the student follow one of the standard programs offered by the under- 
graduate college. Many law schools require that the applicant take the Law 
Admissions Test in the academic year preceding his entry into professional 
school. 

Four-Year Program. The student who plans to complete the requirements 
for the B.A. or B.S. degree before entering law school should select a major 
field of concentration. The pre-law student ordinarily follows a Bachelor 
of Arts program with a major in American Studies, English, American and 
English history, economics, political science (government and politics), 
psychology, sociology or speech; a few pre-law students follow a Bachelor 
of Science program. 

Three-Year Arts-Law Program. The student who plans to enter law school 
at the end of his third year should follow the general B.A. program during 
his first two years. During his junior year, he will complete the require- 
ments for a minor (18 semester hours) in one of the fields of concentra- 
tion. His program during the first three years should include all of the basic 
courses required for a degree from the College of Arts and Sciences (in- 
cluding the 18 hour minor) and all College and University requirements. 
The academic courses must total 90 hours, and must be passed with a 
minimum average of 2.0. 

Students with exceptional records who are accepted to the School of Law 
of the University of Maryland under the Arts-Law program may receive a 
B.A. degree (Arts-Law) after satisfactory completion of the first year of 

114 



Pre-Professional Curricula 

law school, upon reconunendation by the Dean of the Law School and ap- 
proval by the College of Arts and Sciences. Applications for the diploma 
are made during the summer following the first year of law school (or after 
30 credit hours are completed), and the degree is awarded with the 
August graduates. 

PRE-MEDICINE 

The pre-medical program is based upon the requirements established by 
the Association of American Medical Colleges and the requirements for a 
degree from the College of Arts and Sciences, either with the four-year de- 
gree program or with the combined "Arts-Medicine" program. The cur- 
riculum is designed to prepare the student for the Medical College Admis- 
sion Test, which is normally taken in the spring of the junior year. 

The minimum requirements for entry into medical school for either the 
three-year program (90 academic hours) or the four-year program (120 
academic hours) are: 

General Education requirements^" 34 hours 

College requirements 

Foreign Language 12 

Speech 2 14 hours 

plus 

Major variable 

Minor (or supporting courses) variable 

Medical School requirements 

Chemistry — general inorganic 8 

organic 8 

quantitative 4 

Zoology 16 

(In addition to Zool. 1 
and 2, strongly recommended 
are two of genetics, 
embryology, comparative 
anatomy) 
Mathematics 6 

Physics 8 50 hours 

Electives — to complete the 90 or 120 hours required. 
Required Health and Physical Education. 

Four-Year Program. No specific major is required for favorable consid- 
eration by a medical school admissions committee. By intelligent planning 
starting in the sophomore year, the student can meet the above require- 
ments as well as requirements of most majors in the College of Arts and 
Sciences. The student is urged to work closely with his pre-medical ad- 
viser for this planning. A student who enters the pre-medical program late 
in his college career may find an additional year of study necessary (either 
as a special student or as a regular undergraduate). 



10 Pre-medical students must offer Philosophy 1 to fulfill the Fine Arts requirement 
of the General Education program. 

115 



Pre-Professional Curricula 

Three-Year Arts-Medicine Program. After completion of his first year of 
pre-medical study, an exceptional student may be encouraged to seek ad- 
mission to the University of Maryland School of Medicine at the end of his 
third year (90 hours). During his next two years he will need to complete 
all requirements listed above, with the exception of the major and the 
regular minor. Four additional hours at the 100 level in appropriate sci- 
ence courses will satisfy the minor requirement. 

Students accepted in the combined Arts-Medicine program may receive the 
B.S. degree (Arts-Medicine) after satisfactory completion of their training 
in the basic sciences at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (30 
hours), upon recommendation of the Dean of the School of Medicine and 
approval by the College of Arts and Sciences. The degree is normally 
awarded in August following the second year of medical school. 

Schedule. The pre-medical student normally includes in his first-year 
schedule Chem. 1, 3; Zool. 1, 2; Engl. 1, 3; Math. 10, 11 (or 18, 19); 
Health 5; and Physical Education. Academically strong students may take 
an additional course in their second semester. His second year includes 
Chem. 35, 36, 37, 38; foreign language; General Education requirements; 
Zool. 5, 6; and/or major requirements. His third year includes Phys. 10, 
1 1 ; foreign language, General Education requirements, major requirements 
and minor (supporting course) requirements. Chem. 19 would be taken 
during the third year of the three-year applicant and during the fourth year 
of the four-year student. The fourth year is devoted to completion of the 
General Education requirements and major and minor (supporting course) 
requirements. 

RELATED PROFESSIONS 

Academic preparation for several professions related to dentistry or medi- 
cine is available through the College of Arts and Sciences. For require- 
ments of professional schools in dental hygiene, optometry, osteopathy, etc., 
see catalogs of the specialized schools; representative catalogs are available 
in the Office of the Dean. 

Medical Technology. The Department of Microbiology offers a program 
consisting of a major in microbiology with electives in zoology which pre- 
pares a student for employment in various laboratory positions in industry 
or government, or for graduate work. This major also qualifies a student 
for the intern hospital training required for certification or registration as 
medical technologist (MT); a student who earns a B.S. degree in micro- 
biology is not eligible for the registry examination without the necessary 
hospital training. A student interested only in certification as a medical 
technologist may complete in three years the requirements for admission to 
a hospital training school by proper planning of his program. After one 
further year of hospital training, he would be eligible for the examination 
given by the Registry of Medical Technologists. 

Veterinary Medicine. The pre-veterinary program is administered by the 
College of Agriculture. 

116 



Psychology 
PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor and Head: Andrews. 

Professors: Battig, Brady (p.t), Daston, Edgerton (p.t), McGinnies, 
Waldrop. 

Associate Professors: Anderson, Bartlett, Gollub, Heermann, Pum- 
roy, Walder and Yarczower. 

Assistant Professors: Fretz, Golann, Higgs, Hodos (p.t.), Johnson, 
McIntire, O'Brien, Steinman, Turnage, Vetter, Ward. 

The Department of Psychology is classed in both the Division of Biological 
Sciences (B.S. degree) and the Division of Social Sciences (B.A. degree) 
and offers academic programs related to both of these fields. The under- 
graduate curriculum in psychology provides an organized study of the be- 
havior of man in terms of the biological conditions and social factors which 
influence such behavior. In addition, the undergraduate program is ar- 
ranged to provide a level of learning that will equip qualified students to 
pursue further study of psychology and related fields in graduate and pro- 
fessional schools. 

Students who are interested in the biological aspects of behavior tend to 
choose a program leading to the B.S. degree, while those interested pri- 
marily in the social factors of behavior tend to choose a program leading 
to the B.A. degree. The choice of program is made in consultation with, 
and requires the approval of, the academic adviser. 

Departmental requirements are the same for the B.S. and the B.A. degree. 
A minimum of 28 hours of psychology is required, including Psychology 
1, 90, 150 and two from 145, 146, and 147. The additional courses will 
be chosen in discussion with the adviser. 

A minor program of 18 hours is organized to supplement the work in the 
major. For the B.S. degree supporting courses in the physical and bio- 
logical sciences and mathematics will be chosen, in consultation with the 
adviser, to constitute a coherent set of courses. Ordinarily these courses will 
include at least three semester courses of science and mathematics at the 
advanced level. A minimum of two semester courses must be laboratory 
courses. In addition to these 18 hours of supporting courses, the College 
of Arts and Sciences requires 12 hours of science and mathematics and 
these latter requirements are to be chosen in accordance with rules estab- 
lished by the College. For the B.A. degree the minor program will ordi- 
narily consist of courses in the social sciences, although mathematics and 
other sciences may be included. Choice of the minor program is made in 
consultation with and requires the approval of the adviser. A minimum 2.0 
grade average is required in the minor. No student who has ever received 
a second grade lower than a "C" in Psychology 1, 90 or any 100-level 
courses in psychology, wiU be certified for graduation in psychology. 

117 



Psychology 

HONORS: The Department of Psychology also offers a special program 
for the superior student which emphasizes independent study and research. 
Students may be eligible to enter the Honors Program who have a 3.3 grade 
average in all courses or the equivalent, who are in their junior or the first 
half of their senior year, and who demonstrate interest and maturity indica- 
tive of success in the program. Students should consult their adviser or the 
Departmental Honors Committee for further information. 

Psych, 1. Introduction to Psychology. (3) 

A basic introductory course, intended to bring the student into contact with the 
major problems confronting psychology and the more important attempts at 
their solution. (Staff) 

Psych. 5. Personality and Adjustment. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. I. Introduction to the psychology of human personality and 
adjustment, with a view toward increasing self-understanding and developing an 
appreciation of the mental health movement and each individual's stake in it. 

(Staff) 

Psych. 21. Social Psychology. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 1. Personality and behavior as influenced by culture and 
interpersonal relations. Social influences on motivation, learning, memory, and 
perception. Attitudes, public opinion, propaganda, language and communication, 
leadership, ethnic differences, and group processes. (Staff) 

Psych. 25. Child Psychology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 1. Behavioral analysis of normal develop- 
ment and normal socialization of the growing child. Leading theories of child 
nature and care, and their implications. (Staff) 

Psych. 26. Developmental Psychology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 1. Biological basis of behavioral develop- 
ment in relation to genetic, constitutional, anatomical, physiological, and en- 
vironmental factors. Emphasis upon both phylogenetic and ontogenetic research 
findings in biological psychology. (Brady, Hodos) 

Psych. 90. Statistical Methods in Psychology. (3) 

First and second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 1 and Math. 1, 5, or 10 or 
equivalent. A basic introduction to quantitative methods used in psychological 
research; measures of central tendency, of spread, and of correlation. 

(Staff) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Graduate credits will be assigned only for students certified by the Depart- 
ment of Psychology as qualified for graduate standing. 

Psych. 110. Educational Psychology. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 1 or equivalent. Researches on fundamental psychological 
problems encountered in education. Measurement and significance of individual 
differences; learning, motivation, transfer of training, and the educational im- 
plications of theories of intelligence. (Staff) 

118 



Psychology 
Psych. 122. Advanced Social Psychology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Psych. 21 and 90 or consent of instructor. A 
systematic review of researches and points of view in regard to major problems 
in the field of social psychology. (McGinnies, Higgs, Ward) 

Psych. 123, Language and Social Communication. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 21, senior standing, and consent of in- 
structor. The nature and significance of verbal and non-verbal communication 
in social psychological processes including examination of relevant theoretical 
approaches to symbolic behavior. (McGinnies, Higgs, Ward> 

Psych. 131. Abnormal Psychology. (3) 

Prerequisite, two courses in psychology, including Psych. 5. The nature, diag- 
nosis, etiology, and treatment of mental disorders. (Staff) 

Psych. 136. Applied Experimental Psychology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 1 or consent of instructor. A study of 
basic human factors involved in the design and operation of machinery and 
equipment. Organized for students in engineering, industrial psychology, and 
the biological sciences. (Anderson) 

Psych. 145. Experimental Psychology: Sensory Processes. (4) 

Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Psych. 
90. Laboratory fee per semester, $4.00. Primarily for students who major or 
minor in psychology. A systematic survey of the laboratory methods, and tech- 
niques applied to sensory and perceptual processes. (Anderson, Steinman) 

Psych. 146. Experimental Psychology: Learning, Motivation and 
Problem Solving. (4) 

Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 90. Laboratory fee, $4.00 per semester. Primarily for students who 
major or minor in psychology. The experimental analysis of learning and moti- 
vational processes. (Yarczower, Gollub, Turnage) 

Psych. 147. Experimental Psychology: Social Behavior. (4) 

Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 21 and Psych. 90 or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $4.00 per semester. 
A laboratory course dealing with methods of studying behavior in the social con- 
text. Topics will include social perception and motivation, small groups, com- 
munication and persuasion. Consideration will be given to the techniques in- 
volved in laboratory experimentation, field studies, attitude scale construction, 
and opinion surveys. (McGinnies, Higgs, Ward) 

Psych. 148. Psychology of Learning. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 145 and permission or Psych. 146. Review 
and analysis of the major phenomena and theories of hum^n and animal learn- 
ing, including an introduction to the fields of problem solving, thinking and rea- 
soning behavior. (Stjiif) 

Psych. 150. Tests and Measurements. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 90. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Critical survey of measuring 
devices used in counseling, educational and industrial practice with an emphasis 
on the theory, development and standardization. Laboratory work will incor- 

119 



Psychology 

porate training in methodology of test development together with appropriate 

practice in the use of selected tests. (Waldrop, Bartlett) 

Psych. 151. Psychology of Individual Differences. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 150. Problems, theories, and researches related to psycho- 
logical diflkrences among individuals and groups. 

(Waldrop, Heermann, Johnson) 

Psych. 161. Industrial Psychology. (3) 

Prerequisite, 6 hours in psychology. A course designed to aid in the understand- 
ing of the problems of people in a variety of work situations; serving as an intro- 
duction to such technical problems as personnel selection interviewing, morale 
supervision and management, and human relations in industry. Lecture, discus- 
sion and laboratory. (Bartlett, Heermann, O'Brien) 

Psych. 180. Physiological Psychology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 145 or 146. An introduction to research 
on the physiological basis of human behavior, including considerations of sen- 
sory phenomena, motor coordination, emotion, drives, and the neurological basis 
of learning. (Brady, Mclntire, Hodos) 

Psych. 181. Animal Behavior. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A study of animal behavior, 
including considerations of social interactions, learning, sensory processes, 
motivation, and experimental methods, with a major emphasis on mammals. 

(Mclntire) 

Psych. 191. Senior Seminar. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, senior standing and consent of the instructor. 
The historical and theoretical roots of the science of psychology. Analysis of 
current psychological theories and their related research. (Staff) 

Psych. 194. Independent Study in Psychology. (1-6) 

Prerequisites, senior standing and written consent of individual faculty super- 
visor. Integrated reading under direction leading to the preparation of an ade- 
quately documented report on a special topic. (Staff) 

Psych. 195. Minor Problems in Psychology. (1-6) 

Prerequisite, written consent of individual faculty supervisor. An individual- 
ized course designed to allow the student to pursue a specialized topic or re- 
search project under supervision. (Staff) 

For Graduates 

(All the following courses require consent of the instructor. Not all of the 
graduate courses are offered every year. The times specified for each course 
are given as estimates.) 

Psych. 200. Proseminar: Professional Aspects of Psychological 
Science. (1) 

Prerequisite, consent of faculty adviser. Survey of professional problems in 
psychology, including considerations of contemporary developments, profes- 
sional ethics, literature resources, formulation of critical research problems, 
and discussion of the major institutions requiring psychological services. 

(Staff) 

120 



Psychology 
Psych. 201, Sensory and Perceptual Processes. (3) 

Alternate years. Prerequisites, Psych. 180 and 211. The contemporary experi- 
mental and theoretical literature on selected problems in sensation and per- 
ception. (Anderson, Steinman) 

Psych. 203, 204. Graduate Seminar. (2, 2) 

Surveys of contemporary American and foreign research literature in specialized 
fields of psychology. (Staff) 

Psych. 205, 206. Historical Viewpoints and Current Theories in 
Psychology. (3, 3) 

Alternate years. Prerequisite, Psych. 212. A study of the philosophical and 
scientific background of modern psychology, together with a review of its major 
systematic viewpoints and issues. (Battig) 

Psych. 207. Conditioning and Learning. (3) 

Alternate years. Prerequisite, Psych. 212. The literature on the experimental 
analysis of behavior, with examination of basic experiments and contemporary 
theories related to them. (Staff) 

Psych. 208. Verbal Behavior. (3) 

Alternate years. Prerequisite, Psych. 123 and 212. Analysis of such topics as 
verbal learning, psycholinguistics, concept formation, and thinking. 

(Battig, Turnage) 

Psych. 211, 212. Advanced General Psychology. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 145 or 146. A systematic review of the more fundamental 
investigations upon which modern psychology is based. (Staff) 

Psych. 213. Advanced Laboratory Techniques. (1-3) 

Methodology of the automatization of research techniques and apparatus; ap- 
paratus design and construction; telemetric and digital techniques; logical 
block circuitry. Laboratory fee, $5.00 per credit hour. (Staff) 

Psych. 214. Comparative Psychology. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 181 and 212. The experimental literature on the behavior 
of infra-human organisms. Special topics. (Yarczower, Mclntire) 

Psych. 215. Advanced Psychophysiology. (3) 

Alternate years. An advanced seminar dealing with special selected topics in 
the area of psychophysiology. (Brady, Hodos, Mclntire) 

Psych. 216. Seminar in Psychopharmacology. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of graduate study in psychology and consent of the in- 
structor. A critical review and detailed analysis of the literature and problems 
related to the effects of drugs on animal and human behavior. Designed for 
advanced graduate students in experimental psychology and clinical psychology. 

(Brady, Gollub) 

Psych. 220. Psychological Concepts in Mental Health. (3) 

Prerequisite, advanced standing. Concepts in mental health, their theoretical 
status, experimental evidence, and current use. (Golann) 

121 



Psychology 

Psych. 221. Seminar in Counseling Psychology. (3) 

Selected problems in counseling psychology. (Fretz, Waldrop) 

Psych. 222. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. (3) 

Selected problems in clinical psychology. (Pumroy, Daston, Walder) 

Psych. 223. Seminar in Community Mental Health. (3) 

Selected problems in mental health psychology. (Golann) 

Psych. 224. Seminar in Student Personnel. (2) 

(Same as Ed. 228.) Prerequisite, permission of instructor. The seminar is 
designed to acquaint the student with student personnel functions at the collegi- 
ate level. Attention is devoted to the historical antecedents of student personnel 
activities, the range of services, their functions, responsibilities, interrelationships 
and projected future status. Resource personnel presently engaged in student 
personnel services will participate as needed. (Staff) 

Psych. 225, 226. Measurement and Evaluation. (4, 4) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 150. Theory and logic of the methodology of evaluation. 
Laboratory practice in methods of appraisal. Survey of available testing instru- 
ments and techniques. Laboratory fee of $6.00 each semester. 

(Daston, Pumroy, Walder) 

Psych. 229. Seminar in Industrial Psychology. (3) 

An advanced seminar covering specialized topics such as morale and motiva- 
tion, labor relations, consumer motivations, man-machine systems, quantita- 
tive and qualitative personnel requirements inventory, job evaluation, environ- 
mental conditions and safety, occupational choice and classification, and the 
interview. (Edgerton, Bartlett, Heermann, O'Brien) 

Psych. 230. Seminar in Engineering Psychology. (3) 

Alternate years. An advanced seminar covering the analysis of factors, variables, 
and characteristics of systems which aflfect human performance and efficiency. 

(Anderson) 

Psych. 231. Training Procedures in Industry. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 148 or equivalent. A consideration of psychological prin- 
ciples and methods for improving job performance; skill development laboratory 
in application of methods and techniques is provided. 

(Edgerton, Bartlett, Heermann, O'Brien) 

Psych. 232. Personnel Selection and Job Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 161 or equivalent. Psychological measurement as applied 
to the analysis of job requirements and the development and use of perform- 
ance criteria and predictors. (Edgerton, Bartlett, Heermann, O'Brien) 

Psych. 233. Social Organization in Industry. (3) 

Analysis of management organizations as social structures, and the application 
of concepts and methods of social psychology to problems of conflict, coopera- 
tion, and leader-group relations. (Edgerton, O'Brien) 

122 



Psychology 
Psych. 240. Interview and Questionnaire Techniques. (3) 

Psychological concepts and methods in the use of interview, questionnaire, and 
inventory procedures for the measurement, prediction and alternation of be- 
havior. (Staff) 

Psych. 241. Persuasion and Attitude Change. (3) 

Consideration of the communication process and the various media of mass 
communication. Factors related to the effectiveness of communication and per- 
suasion are analyzed in the light of experimental evidence, and various strategies 
and techniques of persuasion are reviewed. (McGinnies) 

Psych. 242. Seminar in Social Psychology. (3) 

Analysis and discussion of contemporary systematic positions in social psy- 
chology. Review of research methods in the area as well as theories and prob- 
lems of current importance. (Higgs, McGinnies, Ward) 

Psych. 243. Seminar in Small Group Behavior. (3) 

Review of current approaches to small group behavior, including problem- 
solving, communication, leadership, and conformity. (Ward) 

Psych. 252, 253. Advanced Statistics. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 90. Detailed study of the fundamentals of statistical infer- 
ence, experimental design, and the analysis of regression and correlation con- 
cepts and techniques; a basic course for research students in the behavioral 
sciences. (Staff) 

Psych. 254. Factor Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 253. Analysis of major developments in factor theory as 
applicable to the behavioral sciences, including computational methods and re- 
search implications. (Andrews) 

Psych. 255. Seminar in Psychometric Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 253. Study of psychophysical methods, scaling techniques, 
and the statistical methods of pattern analysis. (Staff) 

Psych. 256. Mental Test Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 253. Development of test theory from psychophysics and 
measurement theory. Consideration of formal and applied problems involved 
in developing and utilizing psychological tests and measurements. Special at- 
tention is given to problems of reliability, validity, and prediction. 

(Bartlett, Heermann) 

Psych. 257. Seminar in Quantitative Psychology. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 253. An advanced seminar covering special topics in sta- 
tistical and mathematical methods and models in psychology. (Staff) 

Psych. 258. Development of Predictors. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 253. Review of statistical theory and practices in the design, 
development and analysis of techniques of prediction in the behavioral sciences, 
with special attention to the formal and practical problems of criteria for pre- 
diction. (Andrews, Bartlett, Heermann) 

123 



Psychology 

Psych. 260. Occupational Development and Choice. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 220. Theoretical and research literature on occupational be- 
havior. (Waldrop, Fretz) 

Psych. 261, 262. Modification of Human Behavior: Research Meth- 
ods AND Practices. (3, 3) 

The experimental and applied methods available for the induction of behavior 
change, with emphasis on their relationship to community mental health (first 
semester); process, outcome, and theory in their application to counseling and 
psychotherapy (second semester). (Daston, Walder) 

Psych. 263, 264. Modification of Human Behavior: Laboratory 
and Practicum. (3, 3) 

Application of methods relevant to behavior change in counseling and psycho- 
therapy. Individual supervision and group consultation. Laboratory fee, $6.00 
per semester. (Pumroy) 

Psych. 265. Advanced Developmental Psychology. (3) 

Empirical, experimental and theoretical literature related to developmental 
process:es. (Waldrop, Pumroy) 

Psych. 266. Theories of Motivation. (3) 

Alternate years. Current treatments of motivational concepts, and analysis of 
the causal antecedents to behavior. (Staff) 

Psych. 267. Theories of Personality. (3) 

Scientific requirements for a personality theory. Postulates and relevant re- 
search literature for several current personality theories. (Daston, Walder) 

Psych. 269. Practicum in Community Mental Health Consulta- 
tion. (3) 

Directly supervised fieldwork in mental health consultation. (Golann) 

Psych. 270. Advanced Abnormal Psychology. (3) 

Alternate years. Deviant behaviors and their etiology and taxonomy. 

(Daston, Walder) 
Psych. 271. Appraisal of Disabilities. (3) 

Human disabilities and their psychological appraisal. (Daston, Waldrop) 

Psych. 272. Individual Clinical Diagnosis. (3) 

Alternate years. Prerequisite, Psych. 226. Case study of emotionally disturbed 
individuals with a variety of psychological techniques. (Staff) 

Psych. 274. Evaluation and Change in Educational Skills. (3) 

Methods for the enhancement of reading and other educational skills. (Staff) 

Psych. 285, 286. Research Methods in Psychology. (1-3, 1-3) 

Research is conducted on several problems each semester, in a variety of fields 
of psychology, and under the supervision of various members of the faculty. 

(Staff) 

Psych. 288, 289. Special Research Problems. (1-4, 1-4) 

Supervised research on problems selected from the areas of experimental indus- 
trial, social, quantitative, or mental health psychology. (Staff) 

Psych. 399. Research, (credit arranged) 

(Staff) 
124 



Sociology 

SOCIOLOGY 

Professor and Head: Hoffsommer. 

Professors: Janes and Lejins. 

Associate Professors: Anderson, Cussler, Hirzel and Shankweiler. 

Assistant Professors: Coates, Di Bella, Franz, Harper, Henkel, Jones, 

MOTZ, POWNALL, PRICE AND WILLIAMS. 

Instructors: Doerr, Gordon (p.t.) and Toland. 

SOCIOLOGY MAJOR: the major in sociology leads to the B.A. degree. 
It offers a liberal education and at the same time provides a background 
for those professional fields which focus on an understanding of human 
relationships. A major requires 30 semester hours in sociology. 

Courses required of all sociology majors are Soc. 1, 2, 95, 186 and 196. If 
used as a General Education requirement, Soc. 1 may not be counted for 
Sociology major credit. Several areas of emphasis within the sociology 
major are available, some with additional requirements: (1) General So- 
ciology, (2) Community Studies (rural, urban and suburban groups and 
their populations), (3) Social Institutions (structure and function of social 
institutions including family, religious, economic, governmental and educa- 
tional), (4) Social Psychology, (5) Intercultural Sociology, (6) Industrial 
and Occupational Sociology, (7) Sociology-Education, (8) Anthropology, 
(9) Crime Control Curriculum (a four year pre-professional program in 
the field of crime and delinquency and their control), and (10) Pre-profes- 
sional Social Work Curriculum (prepares the student for admission to grad- 
uate study in a School of Social Work, and provides qualifications for cer- 
tain social work positions for which post-graduate professional education is 
not required). A statement of course requirements and recommended 
courses for the above areas is available in the departmental office. 

No course with a grade of less than "C" may be used to satisfy major re- 
quirements. 

Students interested in an honors program should check their eligibility with 
the Department. 

Sociology 1 or its equivalent is prerequisite to all other courses in Sociology. 
Soc. 1. Introduction to Sociology. (3) 

This course is one of a group of four courses within Elective Group I of the 
American Civilization Program. It may also be taken by students who qualify 
by tests to select substitute courses in the program (provided the student has not 
taken the course as his Group I elective). Sociological analysis of the American 
social structure; metropolitan, small town, and rural communities; population 
distribution, composition and change; social organization. 

(Hirzel, Price, Toland, Staflf) 

125 



Sociology 

Soc. 2. Principles of Sociology. (3) 

Prerequisite, sophomore standing. The basic forms of human association 
and interaction; social processes; institutions; culture, human nature and per- 
sonality. (Cussler, Motz, Franz, Jones, Toland) 

Soc 13. Rural Sociology. (3) 

First semester. Rural life in America; its people, social organization, culture 
patterns, and problems. (Hoflfsommer, Hirzel, Henkel) 

Soc. 14. Urban Sociology. (3) 

Second semester. Urban growth and expansion; characteristics of city popula- 
tions; urban institutional and personality patterns; relations of city and country. 

(Cussler, Gordon) 

Soc. 51. Social Pathology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. Personal-social disorganization 
and maladjustment; physical and mental handicaps; economic inadequacies; 
programs of treatment and control. (Shankweiler, Franz, Di Bella) 

Soc. 52. Criminology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. Criminal behavior and the 
methods of its study; causation; typologies of criminal acts and offenders; 
punishment, correction, and incapacitation; prevention of crime. 

(Lejins, Pownall, Toland) 

Soc. 62. Social Institutions. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. Nature and function of social 
institutions; the perpetuation of behavior through customs and social norms; 
typical contemporary American institutions. (Price) 

Soc. 64. Courtship and Marriage. (3) 

Prerequisite, sophomore standing. A sociological study of courtship and mar- 
riage including consideration of physiological and psychological factors. Inter- 
cultural companions and practical consideration. Designed for students in the 
lower division. (Shankweiler, Motz, Harper) 

Soc. 71. Dynamics of Social Interaction. (3) 

Prerequisite, Soc. 1 or equivalent. Social psychology of groups like committees, 
teams, clubs, sects, social movements, crowds and publics. Origin of the social 
self; role behavior, inter-group and intra-group relations. (Cussler, Staff) 

Soc. 95. Introductory Statistics for Sociology. (3) 

(Two lectures and two hours drill per week.) Prerequisite, Math. 10 or equiva- 
lent. Elementary descriptive and inferential statistics. Measures of central 
tendency and variation, non-parametric and parametric measures of association 
and correlation, one-way analysis of variance, hypothesis testing, point and 
interval estimates. Required of all Sociology majors. (Henkel, Jones, Staff) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Soc, 102. Intercultural Sociology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 2. On the basis of a comparative study of 
customs, individual and group behavior patterns and institutions, this course 
studies the ideologies of America and other modern societies. (Staff) 

126 



Sociology 
Soc. 111. Sociology of Occupations and Careers. (3) 

First semester. The sociology of work and occupational life in modern society. 
Changing occupational ideologies, values and choices. Occupational status 
systems and occupational mobility. The social psychology of career success. 

(Coates, Jones) 

Soc 112. Rural-Urban Relations. (3) 

First semester. The ecology of population and the forces making for change in 
rural and urban life; migration, decentralization and regionalism as methods 
of studying individual and national issues. Applied field problems. 

(Cussler, Jones) 

Soc 113. The Rural Community. (3) 

Second semester. A detailed study of rural life with emphasis on levels of living.v 
the family, school, and church and organizational activities in the fields of 
health, recreation, welfare, and planning. (Hoffsommer, Hirzel, Henkel) 

Soc 114. The City. (3) 

First semester. The rise of urban civilization and metropolitan regions; 
ecological process and structure; the city as a center of dominance; social prob- 
lems, control and planning. (Cussler, Hirzel) 

Soc 115. Industrial Sociology. (3) 

The sociology of human relations in American industry and business. Complex 
industrial and business organization as social systems. Social relationship within 
and between industry, business, community, and society. (Coates, Jones) 

Soc 116. Military Sociology. (3) 

Social change and the growth of military institutions. Complex formal military 
organizations. Military organizations as social systems. Military service as an 
occupation or profession. The sociology of military life. Relations between 
military institutions, civilian communities and society. (Coates) 

Soc. 118. Community Organization. (3) 

First semester. Community organization and its relation to social welfare; 
analysis of community needs and resources; health, housing, recreation; com- 
munity centers; neighborhood projects. (Di Bella) 

Soc 121. Population. (3) 

First semester. Population distribution and growth in the United States and the 
world; population characteristics of the United States; resulting population 
problems and policies. (Hirzel) 

Soc 122. Population. (3) 

Second semester. Trends in fertility and mortality, migrations, population esti- 
mates and the resulting problems and policies. (Hirzel) 

Soc. 123. Ethnic Minorities. (3) 

First semester. Basic social processes in the relations of ethnic groups within 
the State; immigration groups and the Negro in the United States; ethnic 
minorities in Europe. (Lejins) 

127 



Sociology 

Soc. 131. Introduction to Social Service. (3) 

First and second semesters. General survey of the field of social-welfare activ- 
ities; historical development; growth, functions, and specialization of agencies 
and services, private and public. (Di Bella) 

Soc. 136. Sociology of Religion. (3) 

First semester. Varieties and sources of religious experience. Religious institu- 
tions and the role of religion in social life. (Anderson) 

Soc. 141. Sociology of Personality. (3) 

First semester. Development of human nature and personality in contemporary 
social life; processes of socialization; attitudes, individual differences, and social 
behavior. (Motz, Cussler) 

Soc. 144. Collective Behavior. (3) 

Second semester. Social interaction in mass behavior; communication processes; 
structure and functioning of crowds, strikes, audiences, mass movements, and 
the public. (Cussler) 

Soc. 145. Social Control. (3) 

First semester. Forms, mechanisms, and techniques of group influence on human 
behavior; problems of social control in contemporary society. (Motz) 

Soc. 147. Sociology OF Law. (3) 

First semester. Law as a form of social control; interrelation between legal and 
other conduct norms as to their content, sanctions, and methods of securing 
conformity; law as an integral part of the culture of the groups; factors and 
processes operative in the formation of legal norms as determinants of human 
behavior. (Lejins) 

Soc. 153. Juvenile Delinquency. (3) 

First semester. Juvenile delinquency in relation to the general problem of crime; 
analysis of factors underlying juvenile delinquency; treatment and prevention. 

(Lejins) 

Soc. 154. Crime and Delinquency Prevention. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 52 or Soc. 153 or consent of instructor. 
Methods and programs in prevention of crime and delinquency. (Lejins) 

Soc. 155. Treatment of Criminals and Delinquents in the Com- 
munity. (3) 

Prerequisite, Soc. 52, 153, or consent of instructor. Analysis of the processes 
and methods in the modification of criminal patterns of behavior in a com- 
munity setting. (Lejins, Pownall) 

Soc. 156. Institutional Treatment of Criminals and Delinquents. 
(3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 52 or Soc. 153 or consent of instructor. 
History, organization and functions of penal and correctional institution! for 
adults and juveniles. (Lejins, Pownall) 

Soc. 161. The Sociology of War. (3) 

Second semester. The origin and development of armed forces as institutions; 
the social causes, operations and results of war as social conflict; the relations 
of peace and war and revolution in contemporary civilization. (Coates) 

128 



Sociology 
Soc. 164. The Family and Society. (3) 

Study of the family as a social institution; its biological and cultural founda- 
tions, historic development, changing structure and function; the interactions 
of marriages and parenthood, disorganizing and reorganizing factors in present 
day trends. (Shankweiler, Harper, Motz) 

Soc. 166. Interviewing and Problem Solving in Social Work. (3) 

Prerequisite, Soc. 131 (may be taken concurrently). The principles of interview- 
ing and other diagnostic techniques as applied to social problems with particular 
reference to family and child behavior. (Di Bella) 

Soc. 171. Family and Child Welfare. (3) 

First semester. Programs of family and child welfare agencies; social services 
to families and children; child placement; foster familes. (Di Bella) 

Soc. 173. Social Security. (3) 

First semester. The social security program in the United States; public assist- 
ance; social insurance. (Di Bella) 

Soc. 174. Public Welfare. (3) 

Second semester. Development and organization of the public welfare move- 
ment in the United States, social legislation, interrelations of federal, state, and 
local agencies and institutions. (Di Bella) 

Soc. 180. Small Group Analysis. (3) 

Analysis of small group structure and dynamics. Review of research on small 
groups in factories, military service, schools and communities. Presentation of 
techniques used in the study of small groups. (Franz) 

Soc. 186. Sociological Theory. (3) 

Development of the science of sociology; historical backgrounds; recent theories 
of society. Majors in sociology should take this course in their senior year. 

(Janes, Motz, Hirzel) 

Soc. 191. Social Field Training. (1-3) 

Prerequisites, for social work field training, Soc. 131; for crime control field 
training, Soc. 52 and 153. Enrollment restricted to available placements. 
Supervised field training in public and private social agencies. The student will 
select his particular area of interest and be responsible to an agency for a 
definite program of in-service trainmg. Group meetings, individual confer- 
ences, and written program reports will be a required part of the course. 

(Staff) 

Soc. 195. Intermediate Statistics for Sociologists. (3) 

Prerequisite, Soc. 95 or equivalent and six additional credits in Sociology. Inter- 
mediate correlation techniques, analysis of variance, sampling, additional non- 
parametric techniques, additional topics in inferential statistics. Required of all 
candidates for the M.A. degree. (Henkel, Staflf) 

Soc. 196. Senior Seminar. (3) 

Required of and open only to senior majors in sociology. Scope, fields, and 
research methods of sociology; practical applications of sociological knowledge. 
Individual study and reports. Sociology majors who expect to graduate in 
mid-year should take this course in the preceding spring semester. 

(Hoffsommer, Cussler) 

129 



Sociology 



For Graduates 



With the exception of Soc. 201, 285, 290, and 291, individual courses 
numbered 200 to 299 will ordinarily be offered in alternate years. 

Soc. 201. Methods of Social Research. (3) 

First semester. Selection and formulation of research projects; methods and 
techniques of sociological investigation and analysis. Required of graduate 
majors in sociology. (Hoffsommer) 

Soc. 214. Survey of Urban Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Soc. 14 or 114 or equivalent. Theoretical approaches of Sociology 
and other social sciences to urbanism, urbanization, and urban phenomena. 
Selected approaches: Chicago School; metropolitan region; demography, institu- 
tions. (Janes, Hirzel, Staff) 

Soc. 215. Community Studies. (3) 

First semester. Intensive study of the factors affecting community development 
and growth, social structure, social stratification, social mobility and social in- 
situtions; analysis of particular communities. (Staff) 

Soc. 216. Sociology of Occupations and Professions. (3) 

Second semester. An analysis of the occupational and professional structure of 
American society, with special emphasis on changing roles, functions, ideologies 
and community-relationships. (Coates) 

Soc. 217. Seminar in Field Work Urban Research. (3) 

Prerequisite, Soc. 214. Methods of research in Sociology applied to the urban 
and metropolitan community, reviews of needed research, reviews of contem- 
porary research; the design and execution of field studies. (Hirzel, Staff) 

Soc. 221. Population and Society. (3) 

Second semester. Selected problems in the field of population; quantitative and 
qualitative aspects; American and world problems. (Hirzel) 

Soc. 230. Comparative Sociology. (3) 

Second semester. Comparison of the social institutions, organizations, patterns 
of collective behavior, and art manifestations of social values countries. (Staff) 

Soc. 241. Personality and Social Structure. (3) 

First semester. Comparative analysis of the development of human nature, per- 
sonality, and social traits in select social structures. (Cussler) 

Soc. 246. Public Opinion and Propaganda. (3) 

Second semester. Processes involved in the formation of mass attitudes; agencies 
and techniques of communication; quantitative measurement of public opinion. 

(Motz) 

Soc, 250. Formal Organization. (3) 

An introduction to the study of organizations, the nature of organizations, 
types of organizations, determinants and consequences of organizational growth, 
determinants and consequences of growth for administrative staff, determinants 
of effectiveness and research in organizations. (Price) 

130 



Sociology 
Soc. 253. Advanced Criminology, (3) 

First semester. Survey of the principal issues in contemporary criminological 
theory and research. (Lejins) 

Soc, 254. Seminar: Criminology. (3) 

Second semester. Selected problems in criminology. (Lejins) 

Soc. 255. Seminar: Juvenile Deliquency. (3) 

First semester. Selected problems in the field of juvenile delinquency. (Lejins) 

Soc, 256. Crime and Delinquency as a Community Problem. (3) 

Second semester. An intensive study of selected problems in adult crime and 
juvenile delinquency in Maryland. (Lejins) 

Soc, 257. Social Change and Social Policy. (3) 

First semester. Emergence and development of social policy as related to social 
change; policy-making factors in social welfare and social legislation. (Price) 

Soc. 262. Family Studies. (3) 

Second semester. Case studies of family situations; statistical studies of family 
trends, methods of investigation and analysis. (Shankweiler) 

Soc. 263, Marriage and Family Counseling. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 64 or 164 or consent of instructor. A 
sociological analysis of an emerging, family-centered profession. Designed for 
advanced sociology majors or allied fields, for use in vocations such as teaching, 
medicine, the ministry and others embodying the role of guidance. 

(Shankweiler) 

Soc, 264. The Sociology of Mental Health. (3) 

First semester. A study of the sociological factors that condition mental health 
together with an appraisal of the group dynamics of its preservation. (Staff) 

Soc. 271. Theory of Social Interaction. (3) 

Second semester. Positions of major sociologists and social psychologists as to 
how the individual interacts with various groups and the issues involved. 
Trends in recent interaction theory. (Cussler) 

Soc. 282. Sociology Methodology. (3) 

Second semester. Logic and method of sociology in relation to the general theory 
of scientific method; principal issues and points of view. (Henkel) 

Soc. 286. Development of European and American Sociological 
Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Soc. 186 or equivalent. Review of systematic sociological theories 
(such as Positivism, Organicism, Conflict, etc.) from the early 19th Century 
to the present. A review of the emerging self-evaluation of Sociology. (Staff) 

Soc. 287. Seminar: Sociological Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Soc. 186 or equivalent. Systematic examination of contemporary 
sociological theories such as structural functionalism and social action. Special 
reference is given to the relevance of each theory to the conduct of sociological 
investigation. (Janes) 

131 



Anthropology 

Soc. 291. Special Social Problems. (Credit to be determined) 

Individual research on selected problems. (Staff) 

Soc. 295. Advanced Statistics for Sociologists. (3) 

Prerequisite, Soc. 195 or equivalent. Advanced treatment of inferential statistics, 
sampling, research design, non-parametric techniques, scaling. Required of all 
candidates for the Ph.D. degree. (Henkel, Staff) 

Soc. 399. Thesis Research. (Credit to be determined) 

(Thesis Adviser) 



ANTHROPOLOGY 

Courses in Anthropology may be regarded as constituting an inde- 
pendent minor in some programs leading to the B.A. degree or may, at 
the discretion of the Department of Sociology, be counted toward the 
major in Sociology. 

Anthropology 1 or its equivalent is prerequisite to all other courses in 
Anthropology. 

Anth. 1. Introduction to Anthropology: Archeology and Physi- 
cal Anthropology. (3) 

May be taken for credit in the General Education Program. General patterns 
of the development of human culture; the biological and morphological aspects 
of man viewed in his cultural setting. (Anderson, Williams, and Staff) 

Anth. 2. Introduction to Anthropology: Cultural Anthropology 
and Linguistics. (3) 

Social and cultural principles as exemplified in ethnographic descriptions. The 
study of language within the context of Anthropology. 

(Anderson, Williams, and Staff) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Anth. 105. Cultural Anthropology. (3) 

A survey of the simpler cultures of the world, with attention to historical pro- 
cesses and the application of anthropological theory to the modem situation. 

Anth. 106. Archeology. (3) 

A survey of human cultural developments as revealed by archeological methods, 
with materials to be drawn from selected areas of both Old and New Worlds. 

Anth. 124. The Culture of the American Indian. (3) 

A study of type cultures, cultural processes, and the effects of acculturation on 
selected tribes of Indians in the Americas. (Anderson, Williams) 

Anth. 125. Cultural History of the Negro. (3) 

The cultures of Africa south of the Sahara and the cultural adjustments of 
the Negro in North and South America. (Anderson) 

132 



Speech and Dramatic Art 

For Graduates 
Anth. 224. Race and Culture. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Race and culture in contemporary 
society; mobility and the social effects of race and culture contacts and 
intermixture. (Anderson) 



SPEECH AND DRAMATIC ART 

Professor and Head: Strausbaugh. 

Professor: Hendricks. 

Associate Professors: Aylward, Batka, Linkow, Niemeyer, Pugliese 
and Weaver. 

Associate Research Professor: Causey. 

Assistant Professors: Baker, Craven, Doudna, Frank, Meersman, 
Provensen, Schmitt, Starcher and Wolfe. 

Instructors: Carter, Fitzgerald, Fussell, Gossage, Kanstoroom, 
McCain, Menser, Navratil and Schlesinger. 

Lecturers: Hedlund and Speuhler. 

The courses in this Department have two main functions: (1) to pro- 
vide training in basic oral communication skills to meet the general needs 
of undergraduates of the University; (2) to provide integrated specialized 
training for students who wish to major or minor in speech. 

A major may be taken in the Speech Department in one of two general 
areas, the speech arts or the speech sciences. The speech arts include 
theater, radio and television, public speaking, and oral interpretation; the 
speech sciences include phonetics, semantics, speech pathology, and audiol- 
ogy. The undergraduate program provides a level of training that will pre- 
pare students to enter several professional fields. Specifically, these fields 
are: (1) teaching speech and dramatic art or directing these activities; (2) 
radio and television; (3) speech and hearing science. In addition, adequate 
preparation and training for graduate work is provided. Programs for 
various concentrations may be obtained from the departmental office or 
advisers. 

Minors in speech are adapted to meet the needs of students majoring 
in English, the social sciences, journalism and public relations, elementary 
education, nursery school-kindergarten education, pre-law, and pre-minis- 
try fields. 

Prerequisites for all majors in speech are Speech 1, 2, 3, or 4, and Zool. 
1. Major requirements: 30 hours of courses in speech with 15 hours of 

133 



Speech and Dramatic Art 

courses numbered 100 and above, in either the speech arts or speech 
sciences. No course with a grade less than "C" may be used to satisfy major 
requirements. 

Specific requirements for professional training in speech and hearing 
therapy include completion of the general requirements for speech majors 
with the following additions: Zool. 14, 15; Psych. 1, 5, 131; a minimum 
of 21 hours of speech sciences at the 100 level. 

The Department offers an Honors Program. Information may be obtained 
from the departmental advisers. 

Qualified students, depending upon specialized interests, are invited to 
participate in the activities of the University Theater, Radio-Television 
Workshop, and the Calvert Debate Club. 

♦Speech 1. Public Speaking. (3) 

Prerequisite for advanced speech courses. Laboratory fee, SLOO. The prepara- 
tion and delivery of short original speeches; outside readings; reports, etc. 
It is recommended that this course be taken during the freshman year. Speech 
1 and Speech 7 may not both be used for credit. (Linkow, Staff) 

Speech 2. Advanced Public Speaking. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 1 or 7. A study of rhetorical principles and models of 
speech composition in conjunction with the preparation and presentation of 
specific forms of public address. (McCain, Staff) 

Speech Clinic. No credit. 

Remedial work in minor speech defects. The work of the clinic is conducted in 
individual conferences and in small group meetings. Hours arranged by consulta- 
tion with the respective speech instructor. (Staff) 

Speech 3. Fundamentals of General American Speech. (3) 

Training in auditory discrimination of speech sounds, rhythms and inflections 
of general American speech. Analysis of the physiological bases of speech 
production and the phonetic elements of speech reception. This course is re- 
quired of majors in speech and hearing science and recommended for foreign 
students and majors in nursery and elementary education. (Hendricks, Staff) 

Speech 4. Voice and Diction. (3) 

First and second semesters. Emphasis upon the improvement of voice, articula- 
tion, and phonation. May be taken concurrently with Speech 1. (Starcher, Staff) 

♦Speech 7. Public Speaking. (2) 

Laboratory fee, $1.00. The preparation and delivery of speeches on technical 
and general subjects. Speech 7 and Speech 1 may not both be used for credit. 

(Strausbaugh, Staff) 

Speech 8. Acting. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Basic principles of histrionic practice. 

(Meersman) 



* Speech 3 should be substituted for non-English speaking students. 

134 



Speech and Dramatic Art 
Speech 10. Group Discussion. (2) 

A study of the principles, methods, and types of discussion, and their applica- 
tion in the discussion of contemporary problems. (Linkow, Staff) 

Speech 11, 12. Debate. (2, 2) 

Pre-Law students may take Speech 11, 12, instead of Speech 1 or Speech 7. 
A study of the principles of argument, analysis, evidence, reasoning, fallacies, 
briefing, and delivery, together with their application in public speaking 

(Fitzgerald) 

Speech 13. Oral Interpretation. (3) 

The oral interpretation of literature and the practical training of students in 
the art of reading. (Provensen) 

Speech 14. Stagecraft. (3) 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. Fundamentals of technical production. Emphasis on 
construction of scenery. (Gossage) 

Speech 16. Introduction to the Theatre. (3) 

A general survey of the fields of the theatre. (Pugliese) 

Speech 17. Make-up. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Laboratory fee. 
$2.00. A lecture-laboratory course in the theory and practice of stage make-up, 
covering basic requirements as to age, type, character, race, and period. 

(Schmitt) 

Speech 21. Fundamentals of Speech Communication. (3) 

First and second semesters. A study of oral communicative behavior, including 
problems and processes of symbolizations, aspects of oral language, the in- 
volvement of the talker and listener, kinds of signals, and self-revelation 
through speech. (McCain) 

Speech 22. Introduction to Radio and Television. (3) 

Prerequisite for all courses in radio. The development, scope, and influence of 
American broadcasting and telecasting, including visits to local radio and 
television stations, with guest lecturers from Radio Station WTOP and tele- 
vision stations. (Batka) 

Speech 23. Parliamentary Law. (1) 

A study of the principles and application of parliamentary law as applied to 
all types of meetings. Thorough training in the use of Robert's Rules of Order. 

(Strausbaugh) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Speech 102. Radio Production. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Speech 22 and consent of instructor. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00. A study of the multiple problems facing the producer. Special 
emphasis is given to acoustic setup, casting, "miking," timing, cutting and the 
coordination of personnel factors involved in the production of radio programs. 

(Schlesinger) 

135 



Speech and Dramatic Art 

Speech 105. Speech-Handicapped School Children. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 3 for undergraduates. The occurrence, identification and 
treatment of speech handicaps in the classrooms. An introduction to speech 
pathology. (Craven) 

Speech 106. Clinical Practice. (1 to 5 Credits, up to 9) 

Summer session. Prerequisite, Speech 105. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours 
per semester. May be repeated for a total of 9 semester hours credit. Labora- 
tory fee, $1.00 per hour. Clinical practice in various methods of corrective 
procedures with various types of speech cases in the University clinic, Veterans 
hospitals, and public schools. (Craven) 

Speech 107. Advanced Oral Interpretation. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 13. Emphasis upon the longer reading. 
Program planning. (Provensen) 

Speech 108. Educational Phonetics. (3) 

This course is designed to relate phonetic science to the classroom. An ex- 
tensive coverage of broad transcription of General American speech. Students 
having credit for Speech 3 or any previous phonetics course are not eligible for 
this course. (Hendricks) 

Speech 109. Speech and Language Development of Children. (3) 

Second semester. Admission by consent of instructor. An analysis of normal 
and abnormal processes of speech and language development in children. 

(Hendricks) 

Speech 110. Advanced Group Discussion. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 10. Required in speech curriculum and elective in other 
curricula. An examination of current research and techniques in the discussion 
and conference, including extensive practice in this area. (Linkow) 

Speech HI. Seminar. (3) 

Prerequisites, senior standing and consent of instructor. Present-day speech 
research. (Strausbaugh, Staff) 

Speech 112. Phonetics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 3 or consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, 
$3.00. Training in the recognition and production of the sounds of spoken 
English, with an analysis of their formation. Practice transcription. Mastery of 
the international phonetic alphabet. (Baker) 

Speech 113. Play Production. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 16 or consent of instructor. Development 
of procedure followed by the director in preparing plays for public performance. 

(Meersman) 

Speech 114. The Film as an Art Form. (3) 

Laboratory fee, $10.00. A study of the motion picture as a developing form of 
entertainment, communication, and artistic expression. A series of significant 
American and foreign films are viewed to illustrate the artistic, historical and 
sociological trends of the twentieth century. (Niemeyer) 

136 



Speech and Dramatic Art 
Speech 115. Radio and Television in Retailing. (3) 

First semester. Limited to students in the College of Home Economics. Pre- 
requisite, Speech 1 or 7. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Writing and production of 
promotional programs for the merchandising of wearing apparel and home- 
furnishings. Collaboration with the Washington and Baltimore radio stations and 
retail stores. (Schlesinger) 

Speech 116. Radio and Television Announcing. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Speech 4 and 22 or consent of instructor. Labora- 
tory fee, $2.00. The theory and application of all types of announcing. (Batka) 

Speech 117, Radio and Television Continuity Writing. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 22 or consent of instructor. A study of the 
principles, methods and limitations of writing for radio and television. Applica- 
tion will be made in the writing of general types of continuities and commercials. 

(Schlesinger) 

Speech 120. Speech Pathology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 105. Laboratory fee, $3.00. A continuation 
of Speech 105, with emphasis on the causes and treatment of organic speech 
disorders. (Carter) 

Speech 124, 125. American Public Address. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 1 or 7. The first semester covers the period from colonial 
times to the Civil War period. The second semester covers from the Civil War 
period through the contemporary period. (Staff) 

Speech 126. Semantic Aspects of Speech in Human Relations. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, one course in public speaking. An analysis of 
speech and language habits from the standpoint of general semantics. 

(Hendricks) 

Speech 127. Children's Dramatics. (3) 

Principles and methods necessary for staging children's productions on the 
elementary school level. Major emphasis on creative dramatics; the application 
of creative dramatics in the school room, and the values gained by the child in 
this activity. Students will conduct classes in formal and creative dramatics 
which will culminate in children's programs. (Pugliese) 

Speech 129, 130. Play Directing. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 8 or consent of instructor. A lecture-laboratory course 
dealing with the fundamentals of script cutting, pacing, movement, blocking, and 
rehearsal routine as applied to the directing of plays. (Pugliese, Meersman) 

Speech 131. History of the Theatre. (3) 

First semester. A survey of the dramatic production from early origin to 1800. 

(Niemeyer) 

Speech 132. History of the Theatre. (3) 

Second semester. A survey of dramatic production from 1800 to the present. 

(Niemeyer) 

137 



Speech and Dramatic Art 

Speech 133. Communication Processes in Conferences. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, one course in public speaking. Limited to stu- 
dents at the off-campus centers. Group participation in conferences, methods 
of problem solving, semantic aspects of language and the function of confer- 
ences in industry and government. (Linkow) 

Speech 135. Instrumentation in Speech and Hearing Science. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 3. Laboratory fee, S2.00. The use of 
electronic equipment in the measurement of speech and hearing. (Linkow) 

Speech 136. Principles of Speech Therapy. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 120. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Differential diagnosis of speech 
and language handicaps and the application of psychological principles of 
learning, motivation and adjustment in the treatment of speech disorders. 

(Craven) 

Speech 138. Methods and Materials in Speech Correction. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 120 or the equivalent. Laboratory fee, S3. 00. The design 
and use of methods and materials for diagnosis, measurement, and retraining of 
the speech-handicapped. (Craven) 

Speech 139. Theatre Workshop. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 8 or 14. A laboratory course designed to provide the 
student with practical experience in all phases of theatre production. 

(Strausbaugh) 

Speech 140. Principles of Television Production. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 22. Laboratory fee, $5.00. A study of the theory, methods, 
techniques, and problems of television production and direction. Units of 
study covering television cameras and lenses, lighting theory and practices, 
scenery and properties, costumes and makeup, graphic arts and special effects 
are included. Observation of production procedures at nearby television stations. 
Application will be made through crew assignments for University-produced 
television programs. (Aylward, Wolfe) 

Speech 141. Introduction to Audiometry. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 3. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Analysis of various 
methods and procedures in evaluating hearing losses. Required for students 
whose concentration is in speech and hearing therapy. (Doudna) 

Speech 142. Speech Reading and Auditory Training. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 3. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Methods of 
training individuals with hearing loss to recognize, interpret and understand 
spoken language. Required for students whose concentration is in speech and 
hearing therapy. (Doudna) 

Speech 146. Television News and Public Affairs. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 117 or Journalism 101. Training in' pre- 
sentation of television news, interviews, discussions, and forums. 

(Schlesinger) 

138 



Speech and Dramatic Art 
Speech 147. Analysis of Broadcasting Processes and Results. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 22 or consent of instructor. Survey of the 
more common analytic approaches, methods, and results in the field of radio 
and television. (Aylward) 

Speech 148. Television Direction, (3) 

Second semester. Two hour lecture, three hour laboratory. Prerequisites, Speech 
22, 140. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Principles of television direction including 
analysis of script, casting, rehearsing, production, and video control. (Aylward) 

Speech 149, Television Workshop, (3) 

Second semester. Two hour lecture, four hour laboratory. Prerequisites, Speech 
22, 140 and 148, or consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Aylward) 

Speech 150. Radio and Television Station Management. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 22 or consent of instructor. Broadcasting 
regulations, licenses, personnel functions, sales, advertising, and program and 
station promotion. (Batka) 

Speech 161. Ancient Rhetoric, (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 2 or 1 1 . The theories of speechmaking and 
speech composition as propounded by the classical rhetoricians. Special attention 
is given to Plato, Aristotle, Socrates, Cicero, Quintillian and St. Augustine. 

(McCain) 

Speech 163, Materials and Programs for the Development of 
Listening, (3) 

Second semester. The study of research findings, listening tests, materials, equip- 
ment, and programs which can be used to develop listening skills. (Frank) 

Speech 164. Persuasion in Speech. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 2 or 11. A study of the bases of persuasion 
with emphasis on recent experimental developments in persuasion, (Weaver) 

Speech 171, Styles and Theories of Acting, (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 8 or consent of instructor. The study and 
application of historical styles and theories of acting. (Pugliese) 

Speech 175. Stage Design and Lighting. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 14 or consent of instructor. The theory ol 
stage design and lighting. Making of plans and lighting plots as coordinate 
elements of scenic art. (Schmitt) 

Speech 180, Honors Seminar, (3) 

For Honors students only. Readings, symposiums, visiting lecturers, discussions, 

(Staff) 

For Graduates 

The department maintains a reciprocal agreement with the Veterans Ad- 
ministration whereby clinical practice may be obtained at the Audiology 
and Speech Pathology Clinic, Veterans Administration Hospital, 50 Irving 
St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

139 



Speech and Dramatic Art 

Speech 201. Special Problems Seminar. (A. through K.) (1, 3) 

(6 hrs. applicable toward M. A. degree.) Prerequisites, 6 hours in speech 
pathology and consent of instructor. A. Stuttering; B. Cleft Palate; C. Delayed 
Speech; D. Articulation; E. Cerebral Palsy; F. Voice; G. Special Problems of the 
Deaf; H. Foreign Dialect; I. Speech Intelligibility; J. Neurophysiology of Hear- 
ing; K. Minor Research Problems. (Hendricks) 

Speech 202. Techniques of Research in Speech and Hearing. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, 12 hours in speech pathology and audiology. 
Analysis of research methodology including experimental techniques, statistical 
analysis and preparation of reports for scientific investigations in speech and 
hearing science. Required of candidates for Master's degree in speech and 
hearing therapy. (Staff) 

Speech 203. Experimental Phonetics. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 112. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The application of experimental 
methods in quantitative analysis of the phonetic elements of speech. 

(Baker) 

Speech 204. Applied Phonetics. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 112 or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Application of 
phonetic analysis to communication systems and clinical analysis in speech and 
hearing. (Baker) 

Speech 205. Descriptive Phonetics. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 112 or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Application of 
phonetic analysis in the transcription of dialects. (Baker) 

Speech 206. Diagnostic Procedures in Speech Pathology. (3) 

Prerequisite, 6 hours of speech pathology. A study of diagnostic tools and 
methods in the analysis of various types of speech disorders. 

(Hendricks, Staff) 

Speech 207. Advanced Principles of Speech and Hearing 
Therapy. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 136 or equivalent, and 6 hours of speech and hearing 
pathology. A review of learning principles as applied to the training of the 
speech and hearing handicapped. (Hendricks) 

Speech 208. Quantitative Methods In Speech and Hearing 
Science. (3) 

An analysis of current procedures used in quantifying phenomena observed in 
Speech and Hearing Science. A minimum of 12 hours credit in Speech and 
Hearing is a prerequisite for this course. (Staff) 

Speech 210. Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing. (3) 

Prerequisite, 6 hours in speech pathology and audiology and consent of instruc- 
tor. Laboratory fee, $3.00. A study of anatomy and physiology of the auditory 
and speech mechanisms. (Carter) 

Speech 211. A, B, C, D. Advanced Clinical Practice, 
(1, 3 up to 12) 

(6 hours applicable toward M.A. degree.) Prerequisite, 12 hours in speech 
pathology and audiology. Laboratory fee, $1.00 per hour. Supervised training 
in the application of clinical methods in the diagnosis and treatment of speech 
and hearing disorders. (Craven) 

140 



Speech and Dramatic Art 
Speech 212. Advanced Speech Pathology. (3) 

Prerequisites, 6 hours in speech pathology and consent of instructor. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. Etiology and therapy for organic and functional speech disorders. 

(Carter) 

Speech 214. Clinical Audiometry. (3) 

Prerequisites, 3 hours in audiology and consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, 
$3.00. Testing of auditory acuity with pure tones and speech. (Doudna) 

Speech 216. Communication Skills for the Hard-of-Hearing. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, 3 hours in audiology and consent of instructor. 
Speech reading, auditory training, and speech conservation problems in the 
rehabilitation of the hard-of -hearing. (Doudna) 

Speech 217. Hearing Aid Selection for the Acoustically 
Handicapped. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 214. Laboratory fee, $3.00. A laboratory course in modern 
methods of utilizing electronic hearing aids. (Staff) 

Speech 218. Speech and Hearing in Medical Rehabilitation and 
Special Education Programs. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, 6 hours in speech pathology and audiology and 
consent of instructor. Administrative problems involved in the organization and 
operation of speech and hearing therapy under the different types of programs. 

(Hendricks) 

Speech 219, Speech Disorders of the Brain-Injured. (3) 

Prerequisites, 6 hours in speech pathology and audiology and consent of instruc- 
tor. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Methods of evaluation and treatment of children and 
adults who have suffered injury to brain tissue, with subsequent damage to 
speech and language processes. (Hendricks) 

Speech 220. Experimental Audiology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, 6 hours in audiology. Laboratory fee, $3.00. A 
study of experimental techniques in the mvestigation of problems in audiology 
and psychoacoustics. (Causey) 

Speech 221. Communication Theory and Speech Hearing 
Problems. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, 6 hours in speech pathology and audiology and 
consent of instructor. Analysis of current theories of communication as they 
apply to research and therapy in speech and hearing. (Hendricks) 

Speech 222. Advanced Bio-Acoustics. (3) 

Prerequisite, 6 hours of audiology. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Laboratory re- 
search methods in the study of hearing mechanisms in animals. (Spuehler) 

Speech 223. Advanced Psycho-Acoustics. (3) 

Prerequisite, 6 hours of audiology. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Research methodo- 
logy in the study of human hearing. (Causey) 

Speech 224. The Preparation of Speech and Hearing Scientists 
IN Institutions of Higher Learning. (3) 

Prerequisite, 6 hours of audiology and 6 hours of speech pathology. A review 
of problems involved in the training of personnel who expect to take teaching 
and research positions at university and college level. (Hendricks) 

141 



Speech and Dramatic Art 

Speech 225. Advanced Semantics. (3) 

Prerequisite. 3 hours of semantics. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Advanced study of 
the effects of language in human perception. (Hendricks) 

Speech 226. Language Problems of the Exceptional Child. (3) 

Prerequisite. 6 hours of speech pathology. A survey of special language prob- 
lems of the mentally retarded, brain-injured, hard-of-hearing and deaf children. 

(Staff) 

Speech 227. Experimental Design In Speech and Hearing 
Science. (3) 

A seminar devoted to planning and conducting experiments in speech and hear- 
ing science. Each student is required to present three pilot studies for discussion. 
Two hours classwork, two hours laboratory. Permission of instructor required. 
Lab. fee of $10.00. (Staff) 

Speech 240. Seminar in Broadcasting. (3) 

First semester. Studies of various aspects of broadcasting. (Aylward) 

Speech 241. Special Problems in Broadcasting. (3) 

Second semester. An experimental laboratory course for the development of 
new ideas in broadcasting. (Batka) 

Speech 248. Advanced Television Direction. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 148 or consent of instructor. Principles 
of television direction as applied to dramatic programs, together with a con- 
sideration of the specific aesthetic values of the television medium. (Aylward) 

Speech 260. Speech and Drama Programs in Higher Education. (3) 

First semester. A study of current theories and practices in speech education. 

(Frank) 

Speech 261. Introduction to Graduate Study in Speech. (3) 

First semester. (Weaver) 

Speech 262. Special Problems in General Speech. (3) 

First semester. (Weaver) 

Speech 263. Rhetorical Theories of Style. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 124, 125, or 161, or consent of instructor. 
Examination of selected theories of style drawn from the fields of rhetoric and 
literature, and analysis of model speeches. (Staff) 

Speech 264. Interpersonal Communication. (3) 

Second semester. Problems and processes of symbolic representation in speech, 
the effects of language on communication, semantic redundancy, and interaction 
between meaning and the structure of oral language. (Weaver) 

Speech 270. Seminar: Studies in Theatre. (3) 

First semester. Research projects adapted to individual backgrounds and special 
work. (Meersman) 

Speech 271. The Theory of Pre-Modern Dramatic Production. (3) 

Second semester. An historical survey of production styles. (Pugliese) 

142 



Zoology 
Speech 272. Special Problems in Drama. (3) 

Second semester. The preparation of adaptations and other projects in 
dramaturgy. (Pugliese) 

Speech 273. Theories of the Drama. (3) 

Advanced study of the identification and development of dramatic form from 
the early Greek drama to contemporary forms; the esthetics of theatre arts; 
and dramatic criticism. (Meersman) 

Speech 290. Independent Study. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An individual course designed for intensive 
study or research of problems in any one of the three areas of drama, general 
speech, or radio/tv. (Staff) 

Speech 301. Independent Study in Speech and Hearing 
Science. (1-6) 

Student-selected topic of investigation. A proposed topic must be approved prior 
to registration. In addition to a formal report an oral presentation of the re- 
sults will be required. May be repeated. Prerequisite, 30 hours of graduate 
study in speech and hearing science. (Staff) 

Speech 399. Thesis Research. (1-6) 

(Staff) 

ZOOLOGY 

Professor and Head: Anastos. 

Professors: Bernstein, Burhoe (Emeritus), Crenshaw, Haley and 
Schoenborn. 

Research Professors, Part-time: Glinos, Humphrey and Sadun. 

Associate Professors: Brown, Grollman, Highton, Jachowski, Linder, 
Ramm and Stross. 

Associate Professors: Brinkley, Eisenberg, R. Ficken, Gainer, Gold- 
man, Keller, Nelson, Potter and Schmittner. 

Research Assistant Professor: Elbl. 

Research Associates: Doss, Farr (p.t.), M. Ficken (p.t.), T. Kauf- 
mann, McIntosh (p.t.), and Morse. 

Instructors: Anderson, Glover, Grismer, Hunt, T. S. Kaufman, 
Lane, Mackison, Marshall, McLaughlin, Mozdzen, Myton, Resau 
AND Stewart. 

All Zoology courses with laboratory have a laboratory fee of $12.00 per 
course per semester. 

The Department of Zoology offers a program leading to a B.S. with a major 
in Zoology. A core of required courses and restricted electives in zoology, 
as well as supporting courses in other fields, provides an introduction to, 

143 



Zoology 

and an appreciation of, the broad field of zoology. Through selection of 
additional elective courses to complete the required 34 credit hours in 
zoology, the student may explore in greater depth some phase of zoology 
which is of particular interest to him. Copies of suggested curricula for 
students interested in preparation for graduate study in various phases of 
zoology or in premedical, predental and biological technician training are 
available from the departmental ofl&ce. 

All majors are required to complete a minimum of 34 hours in zoology with 
an average grade of "C." Required courses include Zool. 1, 2, 5, 6 and 
one course from each of the following groups: Group I, Zool. 102, 103, 104, 

105, 108, 109; Group II, Zool. 110, 118, 120, 127, 129; Group III, Zool. 

106, 121, 128, 130, 182, 190. 

Supporting courses must include Math. 10, 11, Introduction to Mathematics 
(3, 3), or Math. 19, Elementary Analysis (4); Phys. 10, 11, Fundamentals 
of Physics (4, 4);Chem. 1, 3, General Chemistry (4, 4);Chem. 31, 33 (6) 
or Chem. 35, 36, 37, 38, Organic Chemistry (8); and one of the following 
courses or course sequences: Math. 14, 15 (6) or Math. 20, 21, Calculus 
(8); Chem. 19, Quantitative Analysis (4); Bot. 2 (4); or Microb. 1 (4). 
It is strongly recommended that the supporting courses in chemistry and 
mathematics be completed as early in the curriculum as possible. Students 
desiring to enter graduate study in certain areas of zoology are advised to 
take biochemistry, physical chemistry, statistics or advanced mathematics 
as a part of their undergraduate training. 

HONORS: The Department of Zoology also offers a special program for 
the exceptionally talented and promising student. The Honors Program em- 
phasizes the scholarly approach to independent study rather than adherence 
to a rigidly prescribed curriculum. Information regarding this progam may 
be obtained from the departmental office or from the Chairman of the 
Zoology Honors Program. 

For Undergraduates 
Zool. 1. General Zoology. (4) 

Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a week. Zool. 1 and 2 
satisfy the freshman premedical requirement in general biology. An introduc- 
tion to the modern concepts of biological principles and animal life. Emphasis 
will be placed upon the functional aspects of living systems with a survey of 
the physical and chemical bases of all life processes. (Linder, Brown) 

Zool. 2. The Animal Phyla. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, Zool. 1 or Bot. 1. A study of the anatomy, classification and life 
histories of representative animals, invertebrates and vertebrates. (Highton) 

Zool. 5. Comparative Vertebrate Morphology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, Zool. 1 and 2 or equivalent. A comparative study of the evolution 
of vertebrate organ systems supplemented by laboratory dissection and demon- 
strations. (Eisenberg) 

144 



Zoology 
ZooL. 6. Genetics. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures, one discussion period, and one two-hour lab- 
oratory period a week. Prerequisite, one course in zoology or botany. A con- 
sideration of the basic principles of heredity. (Crenshaw) 

ZooL. 14. Human Anatomy and Physiology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, Zool. 1. For students who desire a general knowledge of human 
anatomy and physiology. (Grollman) 

ZooL. 15. Human Anatomy and Physiology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, Zool. 14. A continuation of Zool. 14. (Schoenborn) 

ZooL. 55S. Development of the Human Body. (2) 

Summer session. Five lectures a week. A study of the main factors affecting 
the growth and development of the child with special emphasis on normal de- 
velopment. (Staff) 

Zool. 75. History of Zoology. (1) 

First semester. One lecture a week. Prerequisites, a general Grade Point 
Average (GPA) of 3.2 and a GPA in biological subjects of 3.5 or permission of 
the instructor. A course in the history of the development of Zoology involv- 
ing the historical figures, experiments and ideas which contributed to modern 
concepts. (Linder) 

Zool. 76. Zoological Literature. (1) 

Second semester. One lecture a week. Prerequisites, a general Grade Point 
Average (GPA) of 3.2 and a GPA in biological subjects of 3.5, or permission 
of the instructor. Discussion of zoological literature, its use and significance. 

(Staff) 

Zool. 77. Basic Study in Zoology. (1-4) 

Prerequisites, a general Grade Point Average (GPA) of 3.2 and a GPA in 
biological subjects of 3.5 or permission of the instructor. Independent study, 
with supporting laboratory experiments, of the basic disciplines in zoology. 
Repeatable up to 8 hours credit. (Staff) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Zool. 102. Vertebrate Physiology. (4) 

First semester. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisites, one year of zoology and one semester of organic chemistry. An 
intensive study of nerve, muscle, sensory receptors and the central nervous 
system. (Gainer) 

Zool. 103. Biophysics. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, one year of biology 
and one year of either physics or physical chemistry, or permission of the 
instructor. A course designed to acquaint the student with the scope of bio- 
physics and to provide an introduction to the analysis of cells and tissues as 
physical-chemical systems. (Goldman) 

145 



Zoology 

ZooL. 104. Vertebrate Physiology. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisites, one year of zoology and one semester of organic chemistry. An 
intensive study of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, renal and respiratory 
systems, and an introduction to endocrinology, basal metabolism and reproduc- 
tive physiology. (GroUman) 

ZooL. 105. General Endocrinology. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures each week. Prerequisites, one year of zoology 
and one semester of organic chemistry. The study of the functions and the 
functioning of the endocrine organs of animals, with special reference to the 
vertebrates. (Brinkley) 

ZooL. 106. Genetic Systems. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, a course in genetics, 
one year of organic chemistry and Math. 1 1 or equivalent. A detailed descrip- 
tion of the interactions of the genetic system. (Keller) 

ZooL. 108. Animal Histology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, one year of zoology. A microscopic study of tissues and organs 
of vertebrates with special emphasis on the mammal. Practice in elementary 
histotechnique will be included. (Schmittner) 

ZooL. 109. Animal Cytology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, two years of zoology and organic chemistry, or permission of 
the instructor. A study of cellular structure with particular reference to the 
morphology and physiology of cell organoids and inclusions. (Brown) 

ZooL. 110. General Parasitology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, two years of zoology and one year of chemistry, or permission of 
the instructor. A consideration of the phenomenon of parasitism through a 
study of the structure, function and host relationships of parasitic organisms. 

(Jachowski) 

ZooL. 118. Invertebrate Zoology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, one year of zoology. An advanced course dealing with the 
phylogeny, morphology and embryology of the invertebrates, exclusive of 
insects. (Under) 

ZooL. 120. Vertebrate Embryology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, one year of zoology. Principles of developmental dynamics includ- 
ing organization, differentiation, morphogenesis, and developmental physiology. 

(Ramm) 

ZooL. 121. Animal Ecology. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite, one year of zoology. The environment and its control of animal 
abundance, organization of populations, and the biology of communities will be 
studied. (Stress) 

146 



Zoology 
ZooL. 127. Ichthyology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one two-hour and one three-hour laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisites, Zool. 1, 2 and 5 or equivalent. A course in 
anatomy, embryology, distribution, habits and taxonomy of marine and fresh 
water fish. (Nelson) 

ZooL. 128. Zoogeography. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Zool. 1, 2, and 5 or 
equivalent. Principles governing the geographical distribution of animals, with 
particular emphasis on vertebrates. (Highton) 

ZooL. 129. Vertebrate Zoology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, two years of zoology or permission of instructor. The identifica- 
tion, classification, habits and behavior of vertebrates. (Ficken) 

ZooL. 130. Hydrobiology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, one year of biology or permission of instructor. Study of aquatic 
animals and conditions of existence in water. Selected examples are used to 
illustrate the influence of environment on productivity of aquatic communities. 

(Stross) 

ZooL. 150. Special Problems in Zoology. (1 or 2) 

Prerequisites, major in zoology or biological sciences, a minimum of 3.0 cumu- 
lative average in the biological sciences, and consent of instructor. Research or 
integrated reading in zoology. A student may register several times and receive 
up to 8 semester hours of credit. (Staff) 

ZooL. 15 IH. Honors Seminar. (1) 

First and second semesters. One discussion period a week. Prerequisite, par- 
ticipation in honors program. Guided discussion of topics of current interest. 
Repeatable to total of 4 hours credit. (Staff) 

ZooL. 152H. Honors Independent Study. (1-4) 

Prerequisite, participation in honors program. Study of classical material by way 
of guided independent study and laboratory experiments. Repeatable to a total 
of 12 hours credit. (Staff) 

ZooL. 153H. Honors Research. (1-2) 

Prerequisite, participation in honors program. A laboratory research problem 
which is required each semester during honors participation and culminates in 
an honors thesis. Repeatable to a total of 8 hours credit. (Staff) 

ZooL. 182. Ethology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, two years of zoology, including a course in comparative anatomy, 
or permission of instructor. The function, causation, and evolution of behavior. 
Laboratory analysis of the behavior of several species. (Ficken) 

ZooL. 190. Evolution. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, a course in genetics or 
permission of instructor. A consideration of current thought in regard to the 
origin and evolution of living organisms. (Crenshaw) 

w 



Zoology 

For Graduates 

ZooL. 201. Comparative Physiology. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisites, one year of zoology, one year of organic chemistry and one semes- 
ter of physiology. The study of the differences and similarities in the functioning 
of organs of species of the animal kingdom. (Brinkley) 

ZooL. 203. Advanced Embryology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory a week. Prerequisites, 
a course in embryology and a course in physiology. The biochemical basis of 
development. (Ramm) 

Zool. 204. Cellular Physiology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, a course in physiology and one year of organic chemistry. The 
principles of general and cellular physiology as found in animal life. 

(Schoenborn) 

ZooL. 205. Comparative Invertebrate Endocrinology. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, one year of organic 
chemistry, a course in endocrinology and a course in physiology, or permission 
of the instructor. A systematic approach to the structure and physiology of 
neuro-endocrine systems of invertebrates. (Linder) 

ZooL. 206. Electrophysiology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, a course in physiology, one year of physics, and permission of the 
instructor. A course concerned with electrical phenomena occurring in living 
matter and with the effect of electrical currents on cells, with special emphasis 
on nerves and muscles. (Gainer) 

Zool. 207. Zoology Seminar. (Arranged) 

One seminar a week for each credit hour. 1. cytology; 2. embryology; 3. fish- 
eries; 4. genetics; 5. parasitology; 6. physiology; 7. systematics; 8. ecology; 
9. behavior; 10. recent advances; and 11. endocrinology. (Staff) 

ZooL. 208. Special Problems in Zoology. (Arranged) 

1. cytology; 2. embryology; 3. fisheries; 4. genetics; 5. parasitology; 6. physi- 
ology; 7. systematics; 8. ecology; 9. behavior; 10. general; and 11. endocri- 
nology. ~ (Staff) 

ZooL. 210. Systematic Zoology. (4) 

First semester. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 
The principles and methods involved in the classification of animals, with em- 
phasis on population dynamics and spveciation. Methods of evaluating taxo- 
nomic data, principles of zoological nomenclature, field and museum techniques, 
and the factors influencing the distribution of animals are also stressed. 

(Highton) 

ZooL. 211, 212. Lectures in Zoology. (1-3, 1-3) 

One, two, or three lectures a week. Advanced lectures by outstanding authori- 
ties in their particular field of zoology. As the subject matter is continually 
changing, a student may register several times, receiving credit for several 
semesters. (Visiting Lecturers) 

148 



Zoology 
zool. 215. sociobiology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, a course in behavior and permission of the instructor. The course 
will deal with the description and analysis of animal social organizations, the 
adaptive nature of animal societies, the effects of early experience, and the role 
of communication in the integration of animal groups. (Eisenberg) 

ZooL. 216. Physiological Cytology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, one year of biochemistry and physics, a course in physiology, or 
permission of the instructor. A study of the structure and function of cells by 
chemical, physical and microscopic methods. (Brown) 

Zool. 220. Population Genetics. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, a course in genetics. The role of mutation, selection, migration, 
inbreeding, and stochastic process in evolution. (Highton) 

Zool. 223. Analysis of Animal Structure, (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory a week. Prerequisite, 
a course in embryology. The experimental basis of developmental mechanics. 

(Ramm) 

Zool. 234. Experimental Mammalian Physiology. (4) 

First semester. Two four-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, a course 
in physiology and one year of chemistry above general chemistry. The theory, 
use and application to research of instrumentation normally found in the 
physiology laboratory with an introduction to surgical techniques on both 
large and small animals. (GroUman) 

Zool. 235. Comparative Behavior. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, usually a course in behavior and one in physiology, and permis- 
sion of the instructor. Orientation and migration, communication, coding, brain 
and behavior, biological rhythms, and hormones and behavior are the main 
subjects that will be considered. (Staff) 

Zool. 236. Mammalian Physiology, (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, a course in physiology. Advanced study 
of the functioning of the organs of mammalian species. (Staff) 

Zool. 237. Comparative Vertebrate Endocrinology. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, one semester of bio- 
chemistry, physiology and endocrinology. Study of the differences and simi- 
larities in the structure and functioning of the endocrine organs of the verte- 
brate species. (Brinkley) 

Zool. 240. Analysis of Animal Populations. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, a course in ecology or permission of instructor. An advanced 
course in animal ecology with a focus on population. Studies of growth and 
regulation of animal populations are emphasized. (Stross) 

149 



Zoology 

ZooL. 245. Biology of Birds. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, a course in vertebrate zoology or permission of instructor. Empha- 
sis will be on ecology, behavior, anatomy, systematics, and reproductive physio- 
logy, plus field studies of local birds. (Ficken) 

ZooL. 250. Experimental Parasitology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, a course in parasitology and permission of the instructor. Experi- 
ments will be performed utilizing living parasites in laboratory animals to illus- 
trate various aspects of the host-parasite relationship. (Jachowski) 

Zool. 251. Helminthology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, two years of zoology and permission of the instructor. A study 
of the classification, structure and biology of the helminths. (Haley) 

Zool. 252. Protozoology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, one year of zoology and permission of the instructor. A study of 
the classification, structure and biology of the protozoa. (Staff) 

Zool, 253. Physiology of Symbiosis. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, one year of biochemistry and permission of instructor. A consid- 
eration of the biology of symbiotic organisms, especially the physiological con- 
cert existing between host and symbiont. (Staff) 

Zool. 260. Quantitative Zoology. (4) 

First semester. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisites, Math. 19 or equivalent and permission of the intructor. A con- 
sideration of the statistical techniques of principal importance in the analysis 
of biological data. (Keller) 

Zool. 300. Advanced Topics in Parasitology. (Arranged) 

Prerequisites, advanced graduate standing and permission of the instructor. The 
content of the course changes frequently and students may register for it several 
times. The course will consist of critical discussions of the published literature 
and current problems in parasitology. 1. host-parasite relationships; 2. ecology 
of parasites; 3. immunity to parasites; and 4. physiology of parasites. 

(Staff) 

Zool. 399. Research. (Arranged) 

Work on thesis project only. 1. cytology; 2. embryology; 3. fisheries; 4. genetics; 
5. parasitology; 6. physiology; 7. systematics; 8. ecology; 9. behavior; 10. inverte- 
brate zoology; and 11. endocrinology. (Staff) 



150 



The 1965-67 Faculty 

Administrative Officers 

MANNING, Charles, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and Professor of 
English 

B.S., Tufts College, 1929; M.A., Harvard University, 1931; Ph.D., University of 

North Carolina, 1950. 

LAFFER, Norman C, Assistant Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and 
Professor of Microbiology. 

B.S., Allegheny College, 1929; M.S., University of Maine, 1932; Ph.D., University 

of Illinois, 1937. 

BOYD, Alfred C, Jr., Assistant to the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

B.S., Canisius College, 1951; M.S., Purdue University, 1953; Ph.D., 1957. 

HOUPPERT, Joseph W., Assistant to the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 
and Assistant Professor of English. 

Ph.B., University of Detroit, 1955; M.A., University of Michigan, 1957; Ph.D., 

1964. 

NORTON, Ann E., Assistant to the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and 
Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., Syracuse University, 1945; M.A., 1947. 

Faculty 

ALDRIDGE, Alfred Owen, Professor and Head of Comparative Literature 

B.S., Indiana University, 1937; M.A., University of Georgia, 1938; Ph.D., Duke 
University, 1942; Docteur de I'Universite de Paris, 1956. 

ALEXANDER, Peter, Visiting Associate Professor of Philosophy 
B.Sc, University of London, 1940; B.A., 1947. 

ALLEY, Carroll O., Jr., Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of Richmond, 1948; M.A., Princeton University, 1951; Ph.D., 
1962. 

ALTER, Jean V., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 

License, Universite de Bruxelles, 1948; Docteur de I'Universite, Universite de 
Paris, 1951; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1956. 

AMBLER, Anne J., Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Oberlin College, 1962; M.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1964. 

AMENT, Marion N., Instructor of Foreign Languages 
A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1944. 

ANASTOS, George, Professor and Head of Zoology 

B.S., University of Akron, 1942; M.A., Harvard University, 1947; Ph.D., 1949. 

ANDERSON, Frank G., Associate Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Cornell University, 1941; Ph.D., University of New Mexico, 1951. 

151 



Faculty 

ANDERSON. J. Robert. Assistant Professor of Physics 
B.S.. Iowa State University. 1955; Ph.D., 1963. 

ANDERSON. Judith S., Instructor of Zoology 
B.A., Drew University, 1961. 

ANDERSON. Nancy S., Associate Profesor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Colorado, 1952; M.A., Ohio State University, 1953; Ph.D., 

1956. 

ANDREWS, Mary L., Associate Professor of English 

B.S., New York University, 1929; M.A., 1935; Ph.D., 1941. 

ANDREWS. Thomas G., Professor and Head of Psychology 

B.A., University of Southern California, 1937; M.A., University of Nebraska, 
1939; Ph.D., 1941. 

ARMSTRONG, Douglas H., Instructor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., Middlebury College, 1949; M.A., 1955. 

ARMSTRONG, James C, Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., Duke University, 1953; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1960. 

ATKINSON, Gordon, Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Lehigh University, 1952; Ph.D., Iowa State University, 1956. 

AUSLANDER, Joseph, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1952; M.S., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1953; Ph.D., 1957. 

AVERY, William T., Professor and Head of Classical Languages and Literatures 
B.A., Western Reserve University, 1934; M.A., 1935; Ph.D., 1937; Fellow of the 
American Academy in Rome, 1937-39. 

AYLWARD, Thomas J., Associate Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1947; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., 1960. 

BAILEY, William J., Research Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1943; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1946. 

BAKER, Donald J., Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.S., Ohio State University, 1954; M.A., 1956; Ph.D., 1962. 

BARDASIS, Angelo, Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., Cornell University, 1957; M.S., University of Illinois, 1959; Ph.D., 1962. 

BARI, Ruth L., Instructor of Mathematics 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1939; M.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1943. 

BARNES, Jack C, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Duke University, 1939; M.A., 1947; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1954. 

BARRABINI, Micheline, Instructor of Foreign Languages 
License es-Lettres, University of Aix-en-Provence, 1955. 

152 



Faculty 

BARTLETT, Claude J., Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Denison University, 1954; M.A., Ohio State University, 1956; Ph.D., 1958. 

BATKA, George F., Associate Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.A., Wichita University, 1938; M.A., University of Michigan, 1941. 

BATTIG, William F., Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1951; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1953; Ph.D, 
1955. 

BAUER, Richard H., Professor of History 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1924; M.A., 1928; Ph.D., 1935. 

BEALL, Edgar F., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., University of California (Berkeley), 1958; Ph.D., 1962. 

BEALL, Otho T., Jr., Associate Professor of English and Executive Secretary of 

American Studies 

B.A., Williams College, 1930; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1933; Ph.D, Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1952. 

BEARDON, Alan Frank, Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Queen Mary College, London University, 1961; Ph.D., London University, 
1964. 

BEAUCHAMP, Virginia W., Instructor of English 

B.A., University of Michigan, 1942; M.A., 1948; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 
1955. 

BELL, Roger A., Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.Sc., University of Melbourne, 1957, Ph.D., Australian National University, 1962. 

BELLAMA, Jon Michael, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., Allegheny College, 1960; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1965. 

BENESCH, William M., Associate Professor of Molecular Physics 

B.A., Lehigh University, 1942; M.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1950; Ph.D., 
1952. 

BENNETT, Lawrence H., Associate Professor of Physics 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1951; M.S., University of Maryland, 1955; Ph.D., Rutgers 
University, 1958. 

BERES, William Philip, Research Associate in Physics 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1959; Ph.D., 1964. 

BERMAN, Joel H., Associate Professor of Music 

B.S., Julliard School of Music, 1951; M.A., Columbia University, 1953; D.M.A., 
University of Michigan, 1961. 

BERNHARDT, Miriam E., Instructor of Mathematics 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1953. 

153 



Faculty 

BERNSTEIN, Emil O., Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.A., Syracuse University, 1951; M.S., 1953; Ph.D., University of California (Los 
Angeles), 1956. 

BERNSTEIN, Melvin, Assistant Professor of Music 

A.B., Southwestern at Memphis, 1947; B.Mus., 1948; M.Mus., University of 
Michigan, 1949; M.A., University of North Carolina, 1954; Ph.D., 1964. 

BETTEX, Albert, Visiting Professor of Foreign Languages 
Ph.D., University of Basel, 1933. 

BETTINGER, Richard T., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., Syracuse University, 1955; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1965. 

BEVERIDGE, Charles E., Lecturer in History 

A.B., Harvard University, 1956; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1959. 

BHAGAT, Satindar T., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., Jammu and Kashmir University, 1950; M.Sc, University of Delhi, 1953; 
Ph.D., 1956. 

BINGHAM, Alfred J., Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Yale University, 1933; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1939. 

BIRDSALL, Esther K., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Central Michigan College, 1947; M.A., University of Arizona, 1950; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1958. 

BLOCK, Barry, Assistant Professor of Physics 

M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1957; Ph.D., 1962. 

BODE, Carl, Professor of English 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1933; M.A., Northwestern University, 1938; Ph.D., 
1941; Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature of the United Kingdom. 

BOJARSKY, Edmund A., Instructor of English 
B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1949; M.A., 1950. 

BOYD, Alfred C, Jr., Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Assistant to the Dean 
of the College of Arts and Sciences 

B.S., Canisius College, 1951; M.S., Purdue University, 1953; Ph.D., 1957. 

BOYD, Ursel D., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

Ll.B., Washington University, 1954; M.A., University of Maryland, 1960; Ph.D., 
1963 

BRACE, John W., Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Swarthmore College, 1949; M.A., Cornell University, 1951; Ph.D., 1953. 

BRADY, Joseph V., Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Fordham University, 1943; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1951. 

BRESLOW, Marvin A., Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., University of Nebraska, 1957; M.A., Harvard University, 1958; Ph.D., 1963. 

154 



Faculty 

BRIDGERS, Furman A., Foreign Student Adviser and Assistant Professor of Foreign 
Languages 

B.A., Duke University, 1925; M.A., University of Chicago, 1928. 

BRINKLEY, Howard J., Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.A., West Virginia University, 1958; M.S., University of Illinois, 1960; Ph.D., 
1963. 

BRODBECK, May, Visiting Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., New York University, 1941; M.A., State University of Iowa, 1945; Ph.D., 
1947. 

BROSNAHAN, Leger N., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Georgetown University, 1951; M.A., Harvard University, 1952; Ph.D., 1958. 

BROWN, John H., Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., Princeton University, 1952; M.A., 1957; Ph.D., 1959. 

BROWN, Joshua R. C, Associate Professor of Zoology 
B.A., Duke University, 1948; M.A., 1949; Ph.D., 1953. 

BROWN, Margaret L., Instructor of Mathematics 
B.S., Columbia University, 1943; M.A., 1948. 

BROWN, Samuel E., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Indiana University, 1934; M.A., 1946; Ph.D., Yale University, 1955. 

BRYER, Jackson R., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A,Amherst College, 1959; M.A., Columbia University, 1960; Ph.D., University 
of Wisconsin, 1965. 

BUCY, Richard S., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1957; Ph.D., University of California 
(Berkeley), 1963. 

BUHLIG, Paul, Jr., Instructor of English 

B.S.S., Georgetown University, 1950; M.A., University of California (Berkeley), 
1954. 

BURHOE, Sumner O., Professor Emeritus of Zoology 

B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1925; M.S., Kansas State College, 1926; Ph.D., 
Harvard University, 1937. 

BURN, Brian, Research Associate in Physics 

B.Sc, Otego University, 1959; M.Sc, 1960; Ph.D., Cambridge University, 1964. 

CALLCOTT, George H., Associate Professor of History 

B.A., University of South Carolina, 1950; M.A., Columbia University, 1951; Ph.D , 
University of North Carolina, 1956. 

CAP, Jeannine, Instructor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., Temple University, 1964. 

155 



Faculty 

CAP, Jean-Pierre, Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Temple University, 1957; M.A., 1960; M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 
1960. 

CARLSON, G. Bert, Jr., Instructor of English 

A.B., Upsala College, 1957; M.A., University of Iowa, 1962. 

CARMELI, Moshe, Research Associate in Physics 

M.Sc, The Hebrew University, 1960; D.Sc, Israel Institute of Technology, 1964. 

CARRUTHERS, John T., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

CARTER, John Francis, Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.S., Maryland State Teachers College (Frostburg), 1953; M.A., University of 
Maryland, 1958. 

CATE, Allen G., Instructor of English 

B.A., Rutgers University, 1960; M.A., Duke University, 1962. 

CAUSEY, George D., Associate Research Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; M.A., 1951; Ph.D., Purdue University, 1954. 

CELARIER, James L., Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., University of Illinois, 1956; M.A., 1958; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 
1960. 

CHEN, Chunjen C, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.S., Cornell University, 1919; M.S., University of Maryland, 1920. 

CHIEFFO, Clifford, Instructor in Art 

B.S., Southern Connecticut State College, 1959; M.A., Columbia University, 1963. 

CHOU, Kyong Choi, Visiting Lecturer in Astronomy 

B.Sc, Chosun Christian University, 1953; B.A., Tusculum College, 1955; M.S., 
University of Pennsylvania, 1959; Ph.D., 1962. 

CHRISTOV, Gabriella T., Instructor of Foreign Languages 

Licenza Liceale, Liceo A. D'Oria, Geona, 1945; Dottore in Lettere, University 
of Genoa, 1950. 

CLEM, John Richard, Research Associate in Physics 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1960; M.S., 1962; Ph.D., 1965. 

CLEMENS, Lucienne C, Instructor of Foreign Languages 
B.A.E., California College of Arts and Crafts, 1938. 

CLEMENS, Siegfried M., Instructor of Foreign Languages 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1961. 

COATES, Charles H., Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.S., United States Military Academy, 1924; M.A., Louisiana State University, 
1952; Ph.D., 1955. 

COHEN, Leon W., Professor and Head of Mathematics 

A.B., Columbia University, 1923; A.M., 1925; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1928. 

156 



Faculty 

COLE, Mildred B., Lecturer in Mathematics 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1943; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1951. 

COLE, Wayne S., Professor of History 

B.A., Iowa State Teachers College, 1946; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1948; 
Ph.D., 1951. 

CONDON, Paul E., Assistant Professor of Physics 

A.B., Harvard College, 1955; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1961. 

CONKIN, Paul K., Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Milligan College, 1951; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 1953; Ph.D., 1957. 

CONNORS, Philip L, Research Associate in Physics 

B.S., University of Notre Dame, 1959; M.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1962; 
Ph.D, 1965. 

COOK, Mary S., Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Denison University, 1934; M.A., Western Reserve University, 1937. 

COOLEY, Franklin D., Professor of English 

B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1927; M.A., University of Maryland, 1933; 
Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1940. 

COOPER, Sherod M., Jr., Assistant Professor of English 

B.S., Temple University, 1951; M.A., 1953; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 
1963. 

CORREL, Ellen, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S.. Douglass College, Rutgers University, 1951; M.S., Purdue University, 1953; 
Ph.D., 1957. 

COSENTINO, Gloria, Instructor of Music 

B.S. in Mus. Ed., Duquesne University, 1952; M. Mus., 1962. 

COULTER, John L., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., The American University, 1934; M.A., University of North Carolina, 1936. 

CRAVEN, Dorothy D., Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.S., Missouri State Teachers College, 1945; M.A., State University of Iowa, 1948. 

CRENSHAW, John W., Jr. Professor of Zoology 

B.A., Emory University, 1948; M.S., University of Georgia, 1951; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Florida, 1955. 

CROWCROFT, Harry G., Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 
B.S., Western Illinois University, 1959; M.S., 1961. 

CROZIER, Alice E., Instructor of English 

B.A., St. Joseph's College (Maine), 1942; M.A., The Catholic University of 
America, 1953. 

CURRIER, Albert W., Instructor of Mathematics 

B.A., State University of Iowa, 1954; M.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1959. 

157 



Faculty 

CUSSLER, Elise B., Lecturer in Mathematics 

B.S., New York State College for Teachers, 1925; M.S., Syracuse University, 1937. 

CUSSLER, Margaret T., Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.A., New York St&te Teachers College (Albany), 1933; M.A., Radcliffe College, 
1941; Ph.D., 1943. 

CUSTER, Melanie, Instructor of English 
B.A., Radcliffe College, 1961. 

DACHSLAGER, Earl L., Instructor of English 

B.A., University of Arizona, 1959; M.A., University of Maryland, 1963. 

DANIEL, Klaus H., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., University of Cologne, 1954; M.A., University of Gottingen, 1957; M.A., 
University of California (Berkeley), 1959; Ph.D., 1961. 

DASTON, Paul G., Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Northwestern University, 1948; M.A., Michigan State University, 1950; 
Ph.D., 1952. 

DAY, Thomas B., Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of Notre Dame, 1952; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1957. 

de LEIRIS, Alain, Asociate Professor of Art 

B.F.A., Rhode Island School of Design, 1948; A.M., Harvard University, 1952; 
Ph.D., 1957. 

DEMAITRE, Ann, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Columbia University, 1950; M.A., University of California (Berkeley), 1951; 
M.S., Columbia University, 1952; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1965. 

DEMAREE, Constance H., Instructor of English 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1944; M.A., 1945. 

DENNY, Don, Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A., University of Florida, 1959; M.A., Institute of Fine Arts, New York 
University, 1961. 

de ROCCO, Andrew G., Assistant Professor of Molecular Physics 

B.S., Purdue University, 1951; M.S., University of Michigan, 1953; Ph.D., 1956. 

de SILVA, Alan W., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of California (Los Angeles), 1954; Ph.D., University of California 
(Berkeley), 1961. 

DETENBECK, Robert Warren, Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of Rochester, 1954; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1962, 

de VERMOND, Mary F., Assistant Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Howard University, 1942; M.A., Columbia University, 1948; Ed.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1959, 

158 



Faculty 

di BELLA, Edward, Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.S., Washington University, 1936; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., The Catholic University of 
America, 1963. 

DIEMER, Emma Lou, Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M., Yale University, 1949; M.M., 1950; Ph.D., Eastman School of Music, 1960. 

di LAVORE, Philip, III, Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., Dakota Weslcyan University, 1954; M.S., University of Michigan, 1961; 
Ph.D., 1965. 

DIXON, Jack R., Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., Western Reserve University, 1948; M.S., 1950; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1956. 

DIXON, W. Graham, Research Associate in Physics 

B.A., Cambridge University, 1962; Ph.D., Churchill College, Cambridge Uni- 
versity, 1965. 

DOBERT, Eitel W., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Geneva, 1932; M.A., University of Maryland, 1949; Ph.D., 
1954. 

DOERR, Paul L., Instructor of Sociology 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1928; M.A., 1963. 

DOETSCH, Raymond N., Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1942; M.S., Indiana University, 1943; Ph.D,, University 
of Maryland, 1948. 

DORFMAN, J. Robert, Assistant Professor of Physics 
A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1957; Ph.D., 1961. 

DOSS, Mildred A., Research Associate in Zoology 

B.A., University of New Mexico, 1925; B.S., University of Illinois, 1928. 

DOUDNA, Mark E., Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.S., Ohio State University, 1948; M.A., 1956; Ph.D., 1962. 

DOUGLIS, Avron, Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., University of Chicago, 1938; M.S., New York University, 1948; Ph.D., 1949. 

DRAGT, James Alexander, Assistant Professor of Physics 

A.B., Calvin College, 1957; Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley), 1963. 

DUECKER, Heyman C, Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.S., Marion College, 1950; M.S., University of Toledo, 1956; Ph.D., University 
of Maryland, 1964. 

DUFFY, John J., Assistant Professor of English 

B.S.S., Georgetown University, 1957; M.A., University of Vermont. 1958; Ph.D., 
Syracuse University, 1964. 

159 



Faculty 

DUNHAM, Richard L., Associate Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1947; M.Mus., University of Michigan, 1949; 
Ph.D., 1961. 

DUNN, Norma E., Instructor of English 

B.A., Madison College, 1946; M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1953. 

DYER, Thomas H. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., United States Naval Academy, 1924. 

DYSON, Lowell K., Lecturer in History 

B.S., Iowa State University, 1952; M.A., Columbia University, 1959. 

EARL, James A., Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1953; Ph.D., 1957. 

EBERHAGEN, Arndt, Visiting Associate Professor of Physics 
B.S., Gottingen University, 1951; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., 1955. 

EDEN, Richard John, Visiting Professor of Physics 

B.A., University of Cambridge, 1943; M.A., 1947; Ph.D., 1951. 

EDGERTON, Harold A., Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Kansas State Teachers College, 1924; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1928. 

EGAN, Howard L., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Washington University, 1960; M.A., 1962; Ph.D, 1965. 

EHRLICH, Gertrude, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Georgia State College for Women, 1943; M.A., University of North Carolina, 
1945; Ph.D., University of Tennessee, 1953. 

EIKEL, Elizabeth M., Instructor of English 
B.A., Tulane University, 1952; M.A., 1954. 

EISENBERG, John P., Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.S., Washington State University, 1957; M.A., University of California (Berke- 
ley), 1959; Ph.D., 1962. 

EISENSTADT, Beula B., Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., Queens College, 1949; M.A., Columbia University, 1954. 

ELBL, Alena, Research Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1954; M.S., 1958; Ph.D., 1964. 

ERICKSON, William G., Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.A., University of Minnesota, 1951; M.A., 1955; Ph.D., 1956. 

ESTABROOK, Gaylord B., Professor of Physics 

B.S., Purdue University. 1921; M.S., Ohio State University, 1922; M.S., The Johns 
Hopkins University, 1930; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1932. 

EVANS, Marilyn Jane, Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature and Chinese 
A.B., Middlebury College, 1958; Ph.D., Yale University, 1965. 

160 



Faculty 

FABER, John E., Professor and Head of Microbiology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1926; M.S., 1927; Ph.D., 1937. 

FALK, David S., Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., Cornell University, 1954; M.S., Harvard University, 1955; Ph.D., 1959. 

FANOS, Stavroula, Instructor of Music 

B.Mus.Ed., Oberlin Conservatory, 1957; M.Ed., University of Maryland, 1963. 

FARR, Marion Margaret, Research Associate in Zoology 
A.B., Syracuse University, 1925; M.A., 1929. 

FELDMANN, Barbara W., Instructor of English 

B.A., Mount Mercy College, 1961; M.A., University of Maryland, 1964. 

FERRELL, Richard A., Professor of Physics 

B.S., California Institute of Technology, 1948; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., Princeton Uni- 
versity, 1952. 

FICKEN, Millicent S., Research Associate in Zoology 
B.S., Cornell University, 1955; Ph.D., 1960. 

FICKEN, Robert W., Assistant Professor of Zoology 
B.S., Cornell University, 1953; Ph.D., 1960. 

FINK, Beatrice C, Instructor of Foreign Languages 

Certificate Institut d'Etudes Politiques, 1952; B.A., Bryn Mawr College, 1953; 
Certificate Institut d'Etudes Politiques, 1954; M.A., Yale University, 1956. 

FIROUZABADI, Ahmad, Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 

B.S., University of Tehran, 1954; M.S., University of Maryland, 1960. 

FITZGERALD, Jon M., Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.A., Michigan State University, 1963; M.A., Bowling Green State University, 
1964. 

FITZMAURICE, James E., Instructor of English 

B. S., Saint Peter's College, 1954; M. A., University of California (Los Angeles), 
1962. 

FIVEL, Daniel I., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1953; Ph.D., 1959. 

FLEMING, Rudd, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1930; M.A., Cornell University, 1932; Ph.D., 1934, 

FLETCHER, Ian, Visiting Lecturer in English 
Ph.D., University of Reading, 1965. 

FOLSOM, Kenneth E., Assistant Professor of History 

A.B., Princeton University, 1943; A.B., University of California (Berkeley), 1955; 
M.A., 1957; Ph.D., 1964. 

FONT, Marie T., Instructor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., Universidad de Oriente (Cuba), 1960. 

161 



Faculty 

FORMAN, Gail I., Instructor of English 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1961; M.A., 1964. 

FRANK, Allan D., Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1953; M.S., 1954. 

FRANZ, Jacob G., Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Southwestern Oklahoma State Teachers College, 1935; M.A., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1939; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1960. 

FREEMAN, Robert S., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., New York University, 1947; Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley), 
1959. 

FREENY, Ralph D., Instructor of Art 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1959. 

FRETZ, Bruce R., Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Gettysburg College, 1961; M.A., Ohio State University, 1963; Ph.D., 1965. 

FRIEDMAN, Herbert, Professor of Physics 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1936; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1940. 

FRIEDMAN, Melvin J., Associate Professor of Comparative Literature 

B.A., Bard College, 1949; M.A., Columbia University, 1951; Ph.D., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1954. 

FUKUTOMI, Hiroshi, Research Associate in Chemistry 

Graduate in Chemistry, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 1952; Ph.D., 1960. 

FUNG, David Ping-Chi, Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.S., University of British Columbia, 1959; Ph.D., University of Windsor, 1964. 

FUSSELL, Lois Ann, Instructor in Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.A., Louisiana State University, 1962; M.A., 1964. 

GADZIOLA, David S., Instructor of English 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1961. 

GAINER, Harold, Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.S., City College of New York, 1956; Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley) 
1959. 

GALLAGHER, Charles C, Jr., Instructor of Music 
B.Mus., University of Michigan. 1950; M.Mus., 1952. 

GARRETT, Marie K., Instructor of Mathematics 
A.B., George Washington University, 1928. 

GARSTENS, Helen M., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., Hunter College, 1932. 

GARVEY, Evelyn F., Assistant Professor of Music 

B.S., Temple University, 1943; M.M., Eastman School of Music, 1946. 

162 



Faculty 

GERSTER, Dale E., Visiting Lecturer in Physics 
A.B., Transylvania College, 1936. 

GIFFIN, Donald W., Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., University of California (Santa Barbara), 1950; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 
1956; Ph.D., 1962. 

GLAD, Paul W., Associate Professor of History 

B.S., Purdue University, 1947; M.A., Indiana University, 1949; Ph.D., 1957. 

GLASSER, Robert G., Associate Professor of Physics 

A.B., University of Chicago, 1948; B.S., 1950; M.S., 1952; Ph. D., 1954. 

GLICK, Arnold J., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1955; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1961. 

GLINOS, Andre D., Research Professor of Zoology 

Doctor of Medicine, National University of Athens, 1941. 

GLOVER, Edward L., Assistant Instructor of Zoology 

B.S., Atlantic Christian College, 1962; M.S., University of Maryland, 1965. 

GLOVER, Rolfe E., Ill, Associate Professor of Physics 

A.B., Bowdoin College, 1948; B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1948; 
Ph.D., University of Gottingen, 1953. 

GOLANN, Stuart E., Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Queens College, 1957; M.A., University of North Carolina, 1959; Ph.D., 
1961. 

GOLDBERG, Seymour, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., Hunter College, 1950; M.A., Ohio State University, 1952; Ph.D., University 
of California (Los Angeles), 1958. 

GOLDHABER, Jacob K., Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1944; M.A., Harvard University, 1945; Ph.D., University 
of Wisconsin, 1950. 

GOLDMAN, Lawrence, Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.S., Tufts University, 1958; Ph.D., University of California (Los Angeles), 1964. 

GOLDSTONE, Peter J., Lecturer in Philosophy 
B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1961. 

GOLLUB, Lewis R., Associate Professor of Psychology 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania, 1955; Ph. D., Harvard University, 1958. 

GOOD, Richard A., Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Ashland College, 1939; M.A., University of Wisconsin, 1940; Ph. D., 1945. 

GOODWYN, Frank, Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Texas College of Arts and Industries, 1939; M.A., 1940; Ph.D., University of 
Texas, 1946. 

163 



Faculty 

GORDON, Donald C, Professor of History 

B.A., College of William and Mary, 1934; M.A., Columbia Teachers College, 
1938; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1947. 

GORDON, Evelyn W., Instructor of Sociology 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1962; M.A., 1963. 

GORDON, Gilbert, Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Bradley University, 1955; Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1959. 

GORDON, Stewart L., Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., Kansas University, 1953; M.A., 1954; D.M.A., Eastman School of Music, 
1965. 

GOSSAGE, Forest D., Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1957; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1961. 

GRAMBERG, Eduard, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 
Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley), 1956. 

GRAVELY, William H., Jr., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., College of William and Mary, 1925; M.A., University of Virginia, 1934; 
Ph.D., 1953. 

GRAY, Diane D., Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Mount Holyoke, 1948; M.A., University of Kansas, 1951. 

GRAY, William L., Instructor of Foreign Languages 

A.B., Middlebury College, 1955; A.M., Middlebury Graduate School in France, 
1956. 

GREENBERG, Leon, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1953; M.A., Yale University, 1955; 
Ph.D., 1958. 

GREENBERG, Louis M., Assistant Professor of History 

A.B., Brooklyn College, 1954; M.A., Harvard University, 1957; Ph.D., 1963. 

GREENBERG, Meyer, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Yeshiva University, 1934; M.A., Jewish Institute of Religion, 1944; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1956. 

GREENBERG, Oscar Wallace, Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., Rutgers University, 1952; M.S., Princeton University, 1954; Ph.D., 1956. 

GRENTZER, Rose Marie, Professor of Music 

B.A., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1935; B.A., 1936; M.A., 1939. 

GRIEM, Hans R.. Professor of Physics 

Arbitur, Max Planck Schule, 1949; Ph.D., Universitat Kiel, 1954. 

GRIM, Samuel O., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Franklin and Marshall College, 1956; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1960. 

164 



Faculty 

GRIMES, Katherine H., Instructor of English 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1953; M.A.. 1954. 

GRISMER, Margaret J., Instructor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Akron, 1947; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1949. 

GROLLMAN, Sidney, Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1947; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., 1952. 

GROSSMAN, Morton, Asistant Professor of Art 
B.A., Queens College, 1948. 

GRUBAR, Francis S., Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1948; M.A., 1949; M.A., The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1952. 

GULICK, Sidney L., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Oberlin College, 1958; M.A., Yale University, 1960; Ph.D., 1963, 

GUSS, Donald Eugene, Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., South Dakota State College, 1952; M.A., Washington University (St. Louis), 
1954; Ph.D., 1961. 

GUTSCHE, Graham, Visiting Lecturer in Physics 

B.S., University of Colorado, 1950; M.S., University of Minnesota, 1952; Ph.D., 
The Catholic University of America, 1960. 

HABERL, Franz P., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Ursinus College, 1959; M.A., Cornell University, 1961; Ph.D., 1964. 

HAGGE, Donald E., Visiting Lecturer in Physics 

A.B., University of California (Berkeley), 1958; Ph.D., 1963. 

HALEY, A. James, Professor of Zoology 

B.S., University of New Hampshire, 1949; M.S., 1950; Sc.D., The John Hopkins 
University, 1955. 

HALEY, Kathleen, Assistant Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Michigan State University, 1949; M.Mus., 1951; D.M.A., University of 
Michigan, 1964. 

HALL, Douglas R., Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1952; M.A., University of Maryland, 1959. 

HALL, Thomas W., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1938; M.A., Middlebury College, 1950; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1958. 

HAMER, Justin C, Research Associate in Chemistry 

M.S., Pacific Union College, 1949; Ph.D., University of Mexico, 1962. 

HANSEN, Janet C, Research Associate of Zoology 

B.S., Oregon State University, 1956; M.S., University of Minnesota, 1957; Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin, 1964. 

165 



Faculty 

HANSEN, P. Arne, Professor of Microbiology 

B.Ph., University of Copenhagen, 1922; M.S., 1926; Ph.D., Cornell University, 
1931. 

HARPER, Glenn A., Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.S., Purdue University, 1958; M.S., 1961. 

HARRIS, Reece Thomas, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Reed College, 1955; M.A., University of Illinois, 1956; Ph.D., 1959. 

HAYWARD, Raymond W., Professor of Physics 

B.S., Iowa State College, 1943; Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley), 1950. 

HEAD, Emerson W., Assistant Professor of Music 
B.Mus., University of Michigan, 1957; M.Mus., 1961. 

HEDLUND, James L., Lecturer in Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.A., State University of Iowa, 1950; M.A., 1951; Ph.D., 1953. 

HEERMAN, Emil F., Associate Professor and Assistant Head of Psychology 

B.A., University of Cincinnati, 1952; M.A., Ohio State University, 1957; Ph.D., 
1959. 

HEIM, Norman, Asistant Professor of Music 

B.Mus.Ed., Evansvillle College, 1951; M.Mus., Eastman School of Music, 1952; 
D.M.A., 1962. 

HELZER, Garry A., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Portland State College, 1959; M.A., Northwestern University, 1962; Ph.D., 
1964. 

HENDRICKS, Richard, Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.A., Franklin College, 1937; M.A., Ohio State University, 1939; Ph.D., 1956. 

HENERY-LOGAN, Kenneth R., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.Sc, McGill University, 1942; Ph.D., 1946. 

HENKEL, Ramon E., Assistant Professor of Sociology 

Ph.B., University of North Dakota, 1958; M.A., University of Wisconsin, 1961. 

HENKELMAN, James M., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Miami University, 1954; M.Ed.. 1955; Ed.D., Harvard University, 1965. 

HERDOIZA, Eulalia J., Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Manuela Canizares, 1945; M.A., University of Maryland, 1960. 

HERING, Christoph A., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 
Ph.D., University of Bonn, 1950. 

HERMAN, Harold J., Assistant Professor of English 
A.B., University of Maryland, 1952; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1960. 

HETRICK, Frank M., Associate Professir of Microbiology 

B.S., Michigan State University, 1954; M.S., University of Maryland, 1960; Ph.D., 
1962. 

166 



Faculty 

HIGGS, William J., Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Nebraska, 1960; M.A., University of Illinois, 1964; Ph.D., 1965. 

HIGHTON, Richard T., Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.A., New York University, 1950; M.S., University of Florida, 1953; Ph.D., 1956. 

HINDS, George, Research Associate in Physics 

A.B., Bowdoin College, 1955; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1965. 

HIRZEL. Robert K., Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Pennsylvania State College, 1946; M.A., 1950; Ph.D., Louisiana State Uni- 
versity, 1954. 

HITCHCOCK, Donald, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1952; M.A., Harvard University, 1954; Ph.D., 1965. 

HODOS, William, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Brooklyn College, 1955; M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1957; Ph.D., 1960. 

HOFFSOMMER, Harold C, Professor and Head of Sociology 

B.A., Northwestern University, 1921; M.A., 1923; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1929. 

HOLMGREN, Harry D., Professor of Physics 

B. of Physics, University of Minnesota, 1949; M.A., 1950; Ph.D., 1954. 

HOLTON, William M., Instructor of English 

B.A., Dartmouth College, 1954; L.L.B., Harvard University, 1957; M.A., Yale 
University, 1959. 

HOLTON, Sylvia W., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Radcliffe College, 1958; M.A., Wayne State University, 1959; Ph.D., Yale 
University, 1963. 

HORAK, Milan, Research Associate in Chemistry 

R.N.Dr., Charles University (Prague), 1950; C.Sc, Chemical Institute, Czecho- 
slovak Academy of Sciences, 1955. 

HORIE, Hisashi, Visiting Professor of Physics 

B.Eng., Tokyo Imperial University, 1945; B.Sc, University of Tokyo, 1949; 
D.Sc, 1954. 

HORNYAK, William Frank, Professor of Physics 

B.E.E., College of the City of New York, 1944; M.S., California Institute of 
Technology, 1946; Ph.D., 1949. 

HORRELL, Joyce T., Instructor of English 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1960; M.A., 1963. 

HORVATH, John, Professor of Mathematics 
Ph.D., University of Budapest, 1947. 

HOUPPERT, Joseph W., Assistant Professor of English and Assistant to the Dean 
of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Ph.B., University of Detroit, 1955; M.A., University of Michigan, 1957; Ph.D., 
1964. 

167 



Faculty 

HOVEY, Richard B., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., University of Cincinnati, 1942; M.A., Harvard University, 1943; Ph.D., 1950. 

HOWARD, John D., Instructor of English 

B.A., Washington College, 1956; M.A., University of Maryland, 1962. 

HU, Margaret T. W., Instructor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., Ginling College, 1943. 

HUBBE, Rolf O., Assistant Professor of Classical Languages and Literatures 
B.A., Hamilton College, 1947; M.A., Princeton University, 1950; Ph.D., 1950. 

HUHEEY, James E., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Cincinnati, 1957; M.S., University of Illinois, 1959; Ph.D., 1961. 

HUMMEL, James A., Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., California Institute of Technology, 1949; M.A., Rice Institute, 1953; Ph.D., 
1955. 

HUMPHREY, Philip S., Research Professor of Zoology 

B.A., Amherst College, 1949; M.S., University of Michigan, 1951; Ph.D., 1955. 

HUNT, Lois T., Instructor of Zoology 

B.A., University of Kansas, 1958; M.S., University of Washington, 1961. 

HURWITZ, Peter Alan, Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1961; M.S., Brandeis University, 
1964. 

HYAMS, Ivan J., Research Associate in Chemistry 
B.S., London University, 1961; Ph.D., 1964. 

IRWIN, Gabriele I., Instructor of Foreign Languages 
Arbitur, Bavink Gymnasium, 1959. 

ISAACS, Ernest J., Lecturer in History 

B.A., University of Colorado, 1951; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1957. 

IWRY, Samuel, Visiting Professor of Foreign Languages 
Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1951. 

JACHOWSKI, Leo A., Jr., Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Michigan, 1941; M.S., 1942; Sc.D., The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1953. 

JACKSON, Stanley B., Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Bates College, 1933; M.A., Harvard University, 1934; Ph.D., 1937. 

JACOBS, Judith E., Instructor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., Bryn Mawr College, 1962. 

JAMES, Edward F., Instructor of English 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1954; M.A., 1955. 

168 



Faculty 

JAMIESON, Mitchell, Assistant Professor of Art 
Corcoran School of Art, 1940. 

JANES, Robert W., Professor of Sociology 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1938; M.A., 1939; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1942. 

JAQUITH, Richard H., Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1940; M.S., 1942; Ph.D., Michigan State Uni- 
versity, 1955. 

JASHEMSKI, Wilhelmina, Professor of History 

B.A., York College, 1931; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1933; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1942. 

JELLEMA, Roderick H.. Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Calvin College, 1951; Post Graduate Diploma, University of Edinburgh, 
1954; Ph.D., 1962. 

JOHNSON, Cecile Juliette, Lecturer in Foreign Languages 
M.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1934. 

JOHNSON, Janet W., Assistant Professor of Psychology 

A.B., George Washington University, 1951; A.M., 1956; Ph.D., 1962. 

JOHNSON, Jerry K., Instructor of English 
B.A., Washington University, 1956; M.A., 1963. 

JOHNSON, Roy Hamlin, Associate Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Eastman School of Music, 1949; M.Mus., 1951; D.M.A., 1960. 

JOHNSON, William H., Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Princeton University, 1956; M.A., Cornell University, 1962. 

JONES, Arthur R., Jr., Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Louisiana State University, 1959; M.A., 1962; Ph.D., 1964. 

JONES, Derek, Post-Doctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

B.Sc, University College of Swansea, 1962; Ph.D., 1965. 

JONES, Donald G., Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1957; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1961. 

JONES, Edward T., Instructor of English 

B.A., Juniata College, 1960; M.A., University of Maryland, 1963. 

JONES, George F., Professor of Foreign Languages 

A.B., Emory University, 1938; M.A., Oxford University, 1943; Ph.D., Columbia 
University, 1951. 

JURAN, Sylvia L., Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Minnesota, 1951; M.A., Columbia University, 1961. 

KACSER, Claude, Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., Oxford University, 1955; M.A., 1959; Ph.D., Magdalen College, 1959. 

169 



Faculty 

KANSTOROOM, Emily S., Instructor of Speech 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1960; M.A.. 1962. 

KARP, Carol R., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Manchester College. 1948; M.A., Michigan State University, 1950; Ph.D. 
University of Southern California, 1959. 

KARR, Judith, Instructor of English 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1957; M.A., 1962. 

KASLER, Franz J., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
Doktorandum, University of Vienna, 1956; Ph.D., 1959. 

KAUFMAN, Thomas S., Instructor of Zoology 

B.A., University of Akron, 1961; M.S., University of Maryland, 1965. 

KAUFMAN, Tohko Y., Research Associate in Zoology 

B.A., Tsuda College (Tokyo), 1940; M.S., Hebrew University (Jerusalem), 1955; 
Ph.D., University of Munich, 1960. 

KEHOE. Brandt, Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., Cornell University, 1956; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1959; Ph.D., 1962. 

KELLER, Edward C, Jr., Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1956; M.S., 1959; Ph.D., 1961. 

KELLY, Vincent B., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Manhattan College, 1955; M.A.. Hunter College, 1958; B.L., Universidad 
de San Marco, 1960; M.A.T., Indiana University, 1963; Ph.D., 1965. 

KEMNER, Margarethe M., Instructor of Foreign Languages 

Abitur, Annette-v.-Droste Hulshoff Munster, 1944; M.A., University of Detroit, 
1954; M.A., University of Oklahoma, 1962. 

KENNETT, Lee, Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., University of North Carolina, 1952; M.A., University of Mississippi, 
1956; Ph.D., University of Virginia, 1962. 

KENNEY, Blair Gates, Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Vassar College, 1955; Ph.D., Radcliflfe-Harvard, 1961. 

KILBOURN, George L., Jr., Instructor of Mathematics 
B.E., Yale University, 1954; B.S., 1950. 

KIM, Jung Soo, Reserach Associate in Mathematics 

B.S., Seoul National University, 1949; M.A., University of Maryland, 1961; Ph.D., 
1962. 

KIM, Young Suh, Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1958; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1961. 

KINNAIRD, John William, Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., University of California (Berkeley), 1944; M.A., Columbia University, 1949; 
Ph.D., 1959. 

170 



Faculty 

KIRWAN, William E., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., University of Kentucky, 1960; M.S., Rutgers University, 1962; Ph.D., 1964. 

KISTLER, Robert C, Instructor of Sociology 

B.A., Southern Missionary College, 1948; M.A., Andrews University, 1960. 

KLABOE, Peter, Research Assistant in Chemistry 

Cand.Mag., University of Oslo, 1952; Cand. Real., 1956; Ph.D., University of 
Oklahoma, 1960. 

KLEPPNER, Adam, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Yale University, 1953; M.A., University of Michigan, 1954; Ph.D., Harvard 
University, 1960. 

KNOCHE, Walter, Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Marquette University, 1961; M.A., Ohio State University, 1963; Ph.D., 1964. 

KNOPFEL, Hanspeter, Research Associate in Chemistry 
Ph.D., Federal Institute of Technology (Zurich), 1963. 

KOCH, Adrienne, Professor of History 

B.A., Washington Square College, New York University, 1933; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1934; Ph.D., 1942. 

KOCH, John Frederick, Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., New York University, 1958; Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley), 
1962. 

KOLB, John R., Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 

A.A., Frostburg State Teachers College, 1959; A.B., University of Maryland, 1961. 

KOMESAROFF, Max Myer, Visiting Associate Research Professor of Astronomy 
B.Sc, University of Melbourne, 1953. 

KOR, Sushil K., Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.Sc, University of Allahabad, 1952; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., 1957. 

KORENMAN, Victor, Research Associate in Physics 

B.A., Princeton University, 1958; A.M., Harvard University, 1959; Ph.D., 1965. 

KOZAKOFF, Emily G., Instructor of Mathematics 
B.S., University of Miami, 1960; M.S., 1961. 

KRESS, Jerry R., Lecturer in Philosophy 

B.A., Pacific Lutheran University, 1961; M.A., University of Michigan, 1962. 

KRISHER, Lawrence C, Assistant Professor of Molecular Physics 

A.B., Syracuse University, 1955; A.M., Harvard University, 1957; Ph.D., 1959. 

KUNZE, Hans-Joachim D., Research Associate in Physics 
Diplom-Physiker, Technische Hochschule, 1961; Ph.D., 1964. 

KURODA, Sigekatu, Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., University of Tokyo, 1928; D.Sc, University of Tokyo, 1945. 

171 



Faculty 

LAFFER, Norman C, Professor of Microbiology and Assistant Dean of the College 
of Arts and Sciences 

B.S., Allegheny College, 1929; M.S., University of Maine, 1932; Ph.D., University 

of Illinois, 1937. 

LAKSHMANAN, Sitarama, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Annamalai University (India), 1946; M.A., 1949; Ph.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1954. 

LAND, Aubrey C, Professor of History 

B.Ed., Southern Illinois University, 1934; M.A., State University of Iowa, 1938; 
Ph.D., 1948. 

LANDON, Philip J., Instructor of English 

B.A., University of Massachusetts, 1956; M.A., University of Maryland, 1964. 

LANE, Richard M., Instructor of Zoology 

B.S., Loyola College (Baltimore), 1959; M.S., University of Maryland, 1964. 

LASTER, Howard J., Professor and Head of Physics and Astronomy 
A.B., Harvard University, 1951; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1957. 

LAWSON, Lewis A., Assistant Professor of English 

B.S., East Tennessee State College, 1957; M.A., 1959; Ph.D., University of Wis- 
consin, 1964. 

LEHNER, Guydo R., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Loyola University, 1951; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1953; Ph.D., 1958. 

LEHNER, Joseph, Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., New York University, 1938; M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1939; Ph.D., 
1941. 

LEIBOWITZ, Jack R., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., New York University, 1951; M.S., 1953; Ph.D., Brown University, 1962. 

LEJINS, Peter P., Professor of Sociology 

Magister Philosophiae, University of Latvia, 1930; Magister luris, 1933; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago, 1938. 

LEMAIRE, Leo R., Instructor of Foreign Languages 
Abitur, Hussel Realgymnasium, 1926. 

LEMBACH, John, Professor of Art 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1934; M.A., Northwestern University, 1937; Ed.D., 
Columbia Teachers College, 1946. 

LENCHEK, Allen Martin, Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of Chicago, 1957; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1962. 

LEPSON, Inda, Instructor of Mathematics 

B.A., New York University, 1941; M.A., Columbia University, 1945. 

LEVITINE, George, Professor and Head of Art 

M.A., Boston University, 1946; Ph.D., Harvard University, 1952. 

112 



Faculty 

LINCKE, Reimer P. H., Research Associate in Physics 

Vordiplom, Kiel University, 1957; M.S., University of Maryland, 1959; Ph.D., 

1965. 
LINDER, Harris J., Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.S., Long Island University, 1951; M.S., Cornell University, 1955; Ph.D., 1958. 

LINKOW, Irving, Associate Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.A., University of Denver, 1937; M.A., 1938. 

LIPPINCOTT, Ellis R., Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Earlham College, 1943; M.S., The Johns Hopkins University, 1944; Ph.D., 
1947. 

LOGAN, Terence P., Lecturer in English 

B.A., Boston College, 1959; M.A., University of Wisconsin, 1961. 

LONGLEY, E. L., Jr., Assistant Professor of Art and Education 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1950; M.A., Columbia University, 1953. 

LOUNSBURY, Myron O., Lecturer in English 

B.A., Duke University, 1961; M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1962. 

LUNDSTROM, Margit, Instructor of Music 

B.A., Columbia Union College, 1964; M.Mus., University of Maryland, 1965. 

LUTWACK, Leonard I., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Wesleyan University, 1939; M.A., 1940; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1950. 

MacDONALD, William M., Professor of Physics 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1950; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1955. 

MAC QUILLAN, Anthony M., Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

B.S.A., University of British Columbia, 1956; M.S., 1958; Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin, 1962. 

MACRO, Anthony David, Instructor of Classical Languages 
B.A., Oxford University, 1961; M.A., 1964. 

MAIN, Jackson T., Visiting Professor of History 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1939; M.A., 1940; Ph.D., 1949. 

MALTESE, George J., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., Wesleyan University, 1953; Ph.D., Yale University, 1960. 

MANNING, Charles, Professor of English and Dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences 

B.S., Tufts College, 1929; M.A., Harvard University, 1931; Ph.D., University of 

North Carolina, 1950. 

MAR, Shuh-yin, Instructor of Mathematics 

B.A., Ginling College (Nanking), 1928; M.S., Mount Holyoke College, 1932. 

MARIL, Herman, Professor of Art 

Graduate, Maryland Institute of Fine Arts, 1928. 

173 



Faculty 

MARION, Jerry B., Professor of Physics 

B.A., Reed College, 1952; M.S., Rice Institute, 1953; Ph.D., 1955. 

MARSHALL, Joseph A., Instructor of Zoology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1960. 

MARTENS, Henrik H., Visiting Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S.E.E., Cooper Union School of Engineering, 1956; Ph.D., New York Uni- 
versity, 1962. 

MARTIN, Minerva L., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., University of Alabama, 1931; M.A., Louisiana State University, 1937; Ph.D., 
1940. 

MARTIN, Monroe H., Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1928; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1932. 

MASON, Edward A., Professor of Molecular Physics 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1947; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1951. 

MATOSSIAN, Mary Kilbourne, Lecturer in History 

B.A., Stanford University, 1951; M.A., American University (Beirut), 1952; 
Ph.D., Stanford University, 1955. 

MAYOR, John R., Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Knox College, 1928; M.A., University of Illinois, 1929; Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin, 1933. 

McCain, Raymond R., Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.A., Louisiana State University, 1961; M.A., 1962. 

McCLAY, Mary B., Instructor of Mathematics 

B.Ed., Eastern Illinois State Teachers College, 1937; M.S., University of Illinois, 
1941. 

McClelland, Louise, Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., College of Wooster, 1957; M.A., Columbia University, 1959; Diploma, 
Vienna State Academy of Music, 1963. 

McCORKLE, Donald M., Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Bradley University, 1951; M.A., Indiana University, 1953; Ph.D., 1958. 

McCRORY, Raymond M., Lecturer in Chemistry 
B.S., University of Texas, 1955; Ph.D., 1962. 

McDonald, Frank B., Professor of Physics 

B.S., Duke University, 1948; M.S., University of Minnesota, 1952; Ph.D., 1955. 

McGINNIES, Elliott M., Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Buffalo, 1943; M.A., Brown University, 1944; Ph.D., Harvard 
University, 1948. 

174 



Faculty 

McGUINNESS, David J., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 1962; M.S., Case Institute of Technology, 
1964; Ph.D., 1965. 

McINTIRE, Roger W., Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Northwestern University, 1958; M.A., Louisiana State University, 1960; 
Ph.D., 1962. 

McINTOSH, Allen, Research Associate in Zoology 

B.S., Mississippi A & M College, 1920; M.S., University of Minnesota, 1927; 
D.Sc, University of Miami, 1959 (Honorary). 

McLaughlin, Patricia J., Instructor of Zoology 

B.A., Gettysburg College, 1956; M.S., University of Washington, 1961. 

McMANAWAY, James G., Professor of English 

B.A., University of Virginia, 1919; M.A., 1920; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1931. 

McMillan, Douglas J., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., DePaul University, 1954; M.A., University of Maryland, 1960; Ph.D., 1963. 

MEERSMAN, Roger L., Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.A., St. Ambrose College, 1952; M.A., University of Illinois, 1959; Ph.D., 1962. 

MENDELOFF, Henry, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1936; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., The Catholic 
University of America, 1960. 

MENSER, Betty C, Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.A., Allegheny College, 1955; M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1958. 

MERRILL, Horace S., Professor of History 

B.E., River Palls State College, 1932; Ph.M., University of Wisconsin, 1933; 
Ph.D., 1942. 

MEYER, Charlton, Assistant Professor of Music 
B.Mus., Curtis Institute, 1952. 

MEYER, Henri P., Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Wooster College, 1954; M.A., University of Maryland, 1962. 

MIKULSKI, Piotr W., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

M.S., Main School of Planning and Statistics (Warsaw), 1952; Ph.D., University 
of California (Berkeley), 1961. 

MILANS, Everett D., Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 
A.B., George Washington University, 1936; A.M., 1947. 

MILLER, Robert L., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Wayne State University, 1952; M.A., University of Michigan, 1954; Ph.D., 
1963. 

MILLER, Russell H., Instructor of English 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1962; M.A., University of Maryland, 1965. 

175 



Faculty 

MISH, Charles C, Professor of English 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1936; M.A., 1946; Ph.D., 1951. 

MISNER, Charles W., Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of Notre Dame, 1952; M.A., Princeton University, 1954; Ph.D., 

1957. 

MOELLER, Hans-Berhard, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Knox College, 1960; M.A., University of Southern California (Los Angeles), 
1962; Ph.D., 1963. 

MOLNAR, Eniko L, Instructor of English 

B.A., Trinity College (Washington), 1962; M.A., University of North Carolina, 
1963. 

MONCAYO, Abelardo, Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Colegio Americano de Quito, 1954; Licenciado, Central University of 
Ecuador, 1961. 

MONTANO, Rocco, Professor of Comparative Literature and Italian 
Dottore in Lettere e Filosofia, University of Naples, 1938. 

MONTGOMERY, William L., Assistant Professor of Music 

B.Mus.Ed., Cornell College, 1953; M.Mus., The Catholic University of America, 
1957. 

MOREINES, Harvey, Instructor of English 

A.B., Brooklyn College, 1958; M.A., University of Maryland, 1962. 

MORI, Yoshihiro, Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.S., Nagoya University, 1953; Ph.D., 1955; D.Sc, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 
1964. 

MORRISON, Bruce, Instructor of Music 

B.Mus.Ed., Northwestern University, 1959; M.Mus., 1960. 

MORSE, Douglass H., Research Associate in Zoology 

B.S., Bates College, 1960; M.S., University of Michigan, 1962; Ph.D., Louisiana 
State University, 1965. 

MOTTA, Mary Carmel, Instructor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., Rosary College, 1960; M.A., Middlebury College, 1963. 

MOTZ, Annabelle B., Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1941; M.A., University of Chicago, 1943; Ph.D., 
1950. 

MOZDZEN, Birgit E., Instructor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Illinoiss, 1961; M.S., University of Maryland, 1964. 

MURPHY, Charles D., Professor and Head of English 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1929; M.A., Harvard University, 1930; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1940. 

176 



Faculty 

MUSEN, Peter, Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
Mathematics, University of Belgrade, 1935; Ph.D., 1937. 

MYERS, Ralph B., Professor of Physics 

B.A., Cornell University, 1934; M.A., 1935; Ph.D., 1937. 

MYERS, Robert Manson, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Vanderbilt University, 1941; M.A., Columbia University, 1942; M.A., Harv- 
ard University, 1943; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1948. 

MYTON, Becky A. T., Instructor of Zoology 

B.S., Allegheny College, 1963; M.S., University of Maryland, 1965. 
NAGARAJAN, G., Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.S., St. Joseph's College (India), 1955; M.A., Annamali University, 1957; M.S., 

1958; Ph.D., 1961. 

NANNEY, Thomas R., Visiting Assistant Professor in Chemistry 

B.S., University of North Carolina, 1953; Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 
1962. 

NAVRATIL, Carol M., Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.A., The Catholic University of America, 1960; M.A., University of Maryland, 
1964. 

NELSON, Elizabeth J., Instructor of English 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1944; M.A., Mills College, 1949; M.A., University 
of Maryland, 1957. 

NEMES, Graciela P., Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.S., Trinity College (Vermont), 1942; M.A., University of Maryland, 1946; 
Ph.D., 1952. 

NIEMEYER, G. Charles, Associate Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.S., DePauw University, 1933; M.A., Northwestern University, 1935; Ph.D., Yale 
University, 1942. 

NIETO, Jose I., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

M.S., National University of Colombia, 1956; Ph.D., University of Heidelberg, 
1959. 

NOACK, Manfred G., Research Associate in Chemistry 

Intermediate Exam., Hochschule Munchen, 1959; Ph.D., Technische Hochschule 
Munchen, 1964. 

NORTON, Ann E., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages and Assistant to the 
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 
B.A., Syracuse University, 1945; M.A., 1947. 

NOSSAMAN, Audrey, Assistant Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Westminster Choir College, 1947. 
O'BRIEN, Robert B., Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Ohio State University, 1949; M.A., Northwestern University, 1952; Ph.D., 

Wayne State University, 1965. 

O'CONNELL, George D., Assistant Professor of Art 
B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1950; M.S., 1951. 

w 



Faculty 

O'CONNOR, Francis V., Visiting Lecturer of Art 

B.A., Manhattan College, 1959; M.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1960; Ph.D., 
1964. 

OLSON, Orrin, Instructor of Music 

B.A., Sacramento State College, 1960; M.Mus., Indiana University, 1961. 

ONEDA, Sadao, Associate Professor of Physics 

B.Sc, Tokyo University, 1946; M.Sc, 1948; Ph.D., Nagoya University, 1953. 

OPIK, Ernst J., Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

Cand. Astro., Moscow Imperial University, 1916; D. Phil. Nat., University of 
Estonia, 1923. 

ORR, Robert H., Lecturer in English 

B.A., University of Alabama, 1958; M.A., Cornell University, 1961. 

OSBORN, John E., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1958; M.S., 1963; Ph.D., 1965. 

OSTLING, Acton E., Jr., Assistant Professor of Music and Assistant Director of 
University Bands 

B. Mus., University of Michigan, 1958; M.Mus., 1959. 

PANICHAS, George A., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., American International College, 1951; M.A., Trinity College (Connecticut), 
1952; Ph.D., The University of Nottingham, 1961. 

PANICO, Marie J., Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Queens College, 1958; M.A., University of Maryland, 1960. 

PARSONS, Arthur C, Associate Professor and Acting Head of Foreign Languages 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1926; M.A., 1928. 

PATI, Jogesh, Assistant Professor of Physics 

I.Sc, Utkal University, 1953; B.Sc, Ravenshaw College, 1955; M.Sc, Delhi Uni- 
versity, 1957; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1960. 

PASCH, Alan, Associate Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., University of Michigan, 1949; M.A., New School for Social Reserach, 
1952; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1955. 

PAYERLE, Laszlo, Instructor of Music 

B.Mus., University of Maryland, 1960; M.Mus., University of Texas, 1962. 

I'EACH, Gillian, Research Associate in Physics 

B.Sc, Royal Holloway College, London University, 1957; Ph.D., 1960. 

PEARL, Martin M., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1950; M.A., University of Michigan, 1951; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1955. 

PEARLMAN, Leonard, Visiting Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., University of Manitoba, 1949; M.D., 1953; Diploma, Vienna State Academy 
of Music, 1956. 

178 



Faculty 

PELCZAR. Michael J., Jr., Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D., State University of Iowa, 
1941. 

PENNINGTON, Kenneth D., Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., Friends University, 1949; B.Mus., 1950; M.A., New York University, 1953; 
D.Mus., Indiana University, 1961. 

PETRUCCI, Serigo, Visiting Research Assistant in Chemistry 

Licentiate Scientific Lyceum (Tripoli), 1949; D.Sc, University of Rome, 1954. 

PIAZZA, Richard M. D., Lecturer in History 

B.A., Brown University, 1959; M.A., Northwestern University, 1961, 

PICKARD, Hugh B., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., Haverford College, 1933; Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1938. 

PORTZ, John, Associate Professor of English 

B.S., Duke University, 1937; M.A., Harvard University, 1941; Ph.D., 1958. 

POTTER, Jane H., Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Chicago, 1942; M.S., 1948; Ph.D., 1949. 

POULAKIDAS, Andreas K., Instructor of English 

M.Th., National Capodestrian University (Athens), 1959; M.A., Arizona State 
University, 1962. 

POULTNEY, Sherman K., Research Associate in Physics 

B.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 1958; M.A., Princeton University, 1960; 
Ph.D., 1962. 

POWNALL, George A., Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.S., Illinois State Normal University, 1952; M.S., 1957; Ph.D., University of 
Illinois, 1963. 

PRAHL, A. J., Professor of Foreign Languages and Associate Dean of the Graduate 
School 
M.A., Washington University, 1928; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1933. 

PRANGE, Gordon W., Professor of History 

B.A., University of Iowa, 1932; M.A., 1934; Ph.D., 1937. 

PRANGE, Richard E., Associate Professor of Physics 
M.S., University of Chicago, 1955; Ph.D., 1957. 

PRATT, Ernest F., Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., University of Redlands, 1937; M.S., Oregon State College, 1939; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1942. 

PRATT, Yolanda Tota, Research Associate in Chemistry 

A.B., Cornell University, 1938; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1942. 

PRICE, James L., Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1950; M.A., University of Illinois, 1954; Ph.D., Co- 
lumbia University, 1962. 

179 



Faculty 

PROVENSEN, Hester B., Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
LL.B., George Washington University, 1926; M.A., Emerson College, 1948. 

PUGH, Howel Griffith, Associate Professor of Physics 

B.A., University of Cambridge, 1955; M.A., 1961; Ph.D., 1961. 

PUGLIESE, Rudolph E., Associate Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.A., Miami University, 1947; M.A., The Catholic University of America, 1949; 
Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1961. 

PUMROY, Donald K., Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Iowa, 1949; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1951; Ph.D., Uni- 
vefsity of Washington, 1954. 

PURDY, William C, Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., Amherst College, 1951; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1955. 

QUYNN, William R., Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Virginia, 1922; M.A., 1923; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1934. 

RABINOVITCH, Kopel, Research Associate in Physics 

M.Sc, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 1957; Ph.D., 1963. 

RADO, George T., Professor of Physics 

S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1939; S.M., 1941; Ph.D., 1943. 

RAMM, Gordon M., Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.A., University of Buffalo, 1949; M.A., 1950; Ph.D., New York University, 1954. 

RAND, Marguerite C, Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Pomona College, 1919; M.A., Stanford University, 1922; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago, 1951. 

REEVE, Wilkins, Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology, 1936; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1940. 

REINHART, Bruce L., Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Lehigh University, 1952; M.A., Princeton University, 1954; Ph.D., 1956. 

RENTZ, Marie S., Instructor of Foreign Languages 

A.B., Woman's College, University of North Carolina, 1947; M.A., Duke Uni- 
versity, 1951. 

RESAU, Robert D., Instructor of Zoology 
B.S., King's College (New York), 1963. 

RESNIKOFF, Marvin, Research Associate in Physics 

B.A., University of Michigan, 1959; M.S., 1961; Ph.D., 1965. 

RICHARD, Jean-Paul, Research Associate in Physics 

B.A., Universite Laval, 1956; B.S., 1960; Ph.D., Universite de Paris, 1963. 

180 



Faculty 

RICHESON, Allie W., Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., University of Richmond, 1918; M.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1925; 
Ph.D., 1928. 

RIVLIN, Helen A., Associate Professor of History 

B.A., University of Rochester, 1949; M.A., Radcliffe College, 1950; Ph.D., Oxford 
University, 1953. 

ROBERSON, Bob S., Assistant Professor of Microbiology 
B.A., University of North Carolina, 1951; Ph.D., 1960. 

ROBERTSON, J. Righton, Jr., Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., University of the South, 1954; M.A., Emory University, 1960; Ph.D., 1963. 

RODBERG, Leonard S., Associate Professor of Physics 

B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1954; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 1956. 

RODGERS, Mary C, Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Notre Dame College (Ohio), 1957; M.A., Western Reserve University, 1962; 
Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1964. 

RODRIGUEZ, Paul V., Instructor of Foreign Languages 

Bachiller, Instituto Hispano-Marrogui, 1934; Maestro de Primera Ensenanca, 
Escuela Normal de Melilla, 1941. 

ROELOFS, Charles R., Jr., Lecturer in Philosophy 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1953; B.D., Yale University Divinity School, 
1956; M.A., Harvard University, 1965. 

ROLLINSON, Carl L., Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Michigan, 1933; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1939. 

ROOS, Philip G., Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1960; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1964. 

ROSELLE, David P., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., West Chester State College, 1961; Ph.D., Duke University, 1965. 

ROSENFELD, Maxine S., Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 
B.S., Wilson Teachers College, 1937. 

ROSENFIELD, Leonora C, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., Smith College, 1930; M.A., Columbia University, 1931; Ph.D., 1940. 

ROSWELL, May M., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Dublin, 1936; M.A., University of Maryland, 1957; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Dublin, 1958; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1961. 

ROVNER, Philip, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., The George Washington University, 1948; M.A., 1949; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1958. 

181 



Faculty 

RUBINSTEIN, Nathan, Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 
B.S., Long Island University, 1959. 

SADUM, Elvio H., Research Professor of Zoology 

B.S., Livorno University, 1936; Bi.Med., Pisa University, 1939; M.A., Harvard 
University, 1942; Sc.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1948. 

SAENZ, Pilar G., Instructor of Foreign Languages 

Licenciada en Filosofia y Letras, University of Madrid, 1953; M.A., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1957. 

SAGLE, Arthur A., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., University of Washington, 1956; M.S., 1957; Ph.D., University of California 
(Los Angeles), 1960. 

SAIEDY, Fuad, Research Associate in Physics 

B.Sc, London University, 1956; D.I.C., Imperial College, London University, 
1957; Ph.D., 1960. 

SALGADO, Maria A., Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Florida State University, 1958; M.A., University of North Carolina, 1960. 

SCHAEFER, Thomas R., Instructor of English 

B.A., Beloit College, 1957; M.A., University of Wisconsin, 1960. 

SCHAMP, Homer W., Jr., Professor and Director of Molecular Physics 

A.B., Miami University, 1944; M.S., University of Michigan, 1947; Ph.D., 1952. 

SCHAUMANN, Herbert, Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Westminster College, 1931; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1935. 

SCHIRRMACHER, Mildred D., Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 
B.A., University of Oklahoma, 1926; M.S., University of Chicago, 1929. 

SCHLARETZKI, Walter E., Professor and Head of Philosophy 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1941; M.A., University of Illinois, 1942; Ph.D., Cornell 
University, 1948. 

SCHLESINGER, Sarah M., Instructor of Speech 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1962; M.A., 1963. 

SCHLIEDER, Siegfried, Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics 

Vordiplom, Georg-August Universitat, 1950; Diplom, 1953; Doktor, 1959. 

SCHMITT, Charles J., Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.A., Montana State University, 1953; M.A., University of Wisconsin, 1956; 
M.F.A., 1959. 

SCHMITTNER, Stella M., Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.S., Colorado College, 1957; M.S., University of Georgia, 1959; Ph.D., 1963. 

SCHOENBORN, Henry W., Professor of Zoology 

A.B., DePauvi' University, 1933; Ph.D., New York University, 1939. 

182 



Faculty 

SCHROEDER, Rudolph A., Visiting Research Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., North Dakota Agricultural College, 1952; M.S., 1953; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1957. 

SEDGEWICK, Rose, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Ph.B., Brown University, 1925; M.A., 1927; Ph.D., 1929. 

SHANKWEILER, Paul W., Associate Professor of Sociology 

Ph.D., Muhlenberg University, 1919; M.A., Columbia University, 1921; Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina, 1934. 

SHANNON, David Allen, Professor and Head of History 

B.S., Indiana State Teachers College, 1941; Ph.M., University of Wisconsin, 1946; 
Ph.D., 1951. 

SHELLEY, Shirley J., Visiting Assistant Professor of Music and Music Education 
B.Mus., University of Michigan, 1944; M.Mus., 1947. 

SHEPHERD, Julius C, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
A.B., East Carolina College, 1944; M.A., 1947. 

SIAHATGAR, Sedegh, Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 
B.S., Teheran Institute of Technology, 1956; M.S., 1961. 

SILBEY, Joel H., Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1955; M.A., University of Iowa, 1956; Ph.D., 1963. 

SINCLAIR, Alan Campbell E., Research Associate in Physics 

B.A., Cambridge University, 1961; Ph.D., Bristol University, 1965. 

SKIDMORE, William R., Instructor of Music 
B.Mus., University of Illinois, 1963. 

SLAWSKY, Zaka I., Professor of Physics 

B.S., Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute, 1933; M.S., California Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1935; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1938. 

SMITH, Charles W., Instructor of English 

B.S., Frostburg State Teachers College, 1957; M.A., University of Maryland, 1965. 

SMITH, Denzell S., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A.,University of Minnesota, 1950; M.A., 1954; M.A., 1958; Ph.D., 1965. 

SMITH, Elske van Panhuys, Associate Professor of Astronomy 
A.B., Radcliffe College, 1950; A.M., 1951; Ph.D., 1955. 

SMITH, Gayle S., Associate Professor of English and Director of General Education 
B.S., Iowa State College, 1948; M.A., Cornell University, 1951; Ph.D., 1958. 

SMITH, Russell I., Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 
B.S., Ohio State University, 1933. 

SNOW, George A., Professor of Physics 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1945; M.A., Princeton University, 1947; 
Ph.D., 1949. 

183 



Faculty 

SONNTAG, Guenter W., Instructor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1960; M.A., 1962. 

SORENSEN, Shirley C, Instructor of Mathematics 
B.S., Wilson Teachers College, 1945. 

SPARKS, David S., Professor of History 

B.A., Grinnell College, 1944; M.A., University of Chicago, 1945; Ph.D., 1951. 

SPIVEY, Howard Olin, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Kentucky, 1954; M.A., Harvard University, 1956; Ph.D., 1963. 

SPRINGMANN, Fague K., Associate Professor of Music 
B. Mus., Westminster Choir College, 1939. 

SPROUT, Monique, Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Paris, 1946; B.A., Columbia Union College, 1956. 

SPUEHLER, Henry E., Lecturer in Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.S., Purdue University, 1953; M.A., 1954; Ph.D., 1956. 

STADTMAN, Earl R., Lecturer in Microbiology 

B.S., University of California (Berkeley), 1942; Ph.D., 1949. 

STALEY, Stuart W., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Williams College, 1959; M.S., Yale University, 1961; Ph.D., 1964, 

STARCHER, E. Thomas, Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.A., University of Southern California, 1940; M.A., University of Arkansas, 1948. 

STEELY, Lewis R., Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 

B.S., Wilson Teachers College, 1937; M.A., The Catholic University of America, 
1945. 

STEINBERG, Phillip M., Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of Cincinnati, 1954; Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1959. 

STEINMAN, Robert M., Assistant Professor of Psychology 

D.D.S., St. Louis University, 1948; M.A., New School for Social Research, 1962; 
Ph.D., 1964. 

STEINMETZ, Karl, Research Associate in Chemistry 

Dipl. Chem. Technische Hochschule Branschweig (Germany), 1961; Dr. rer. nat., 
1963. 

STELLMACHER, Karl L., Professor of Mathematics 
M.D., University of Gottingen, 1933; Ph.D., 1936. 

STERN, Edward A., Professor of Physics 

B.S., California Institute of Technology, 1951; Ph.D., 1955. 

STERN, Monique, Instructor of Foreign Languages 
Licence-Des., University of Paris, 1962. 

184 



Faculty 

STEVENSON, Barbara H., Instructor of English 

B.A., University of California (Los Angeles), 1938; M.A., University of Cali- 
fornia (Berkeley), 1939. 

STEWART, Bemice C, Instructor of Zoology 

B.S., Lewis and Clark College, 1949; M.S., University of Seattle, 1952. 

STEWART, James M., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Western Washington College, 1953; Ph.D., University of Washington, 1958. 

STITES, M. Elizabeth, Assistant Professor of Art 
B.Arch., New York University, 1940. 

STONE, Martha C, Instructor of English 

B.S., Southeast Missouri State College, 1927; M.A., University of Missouri, 1929. 

STRAUSBAUGH, Warren L., Professor and Head of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.S., Wooster College, 1932; M.A., State University of Iowa, 1935. 

STRAUSS, Aaron S., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Case Institute of Technology, 1961; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1962; 
Ph.D., 1964. 

STROMBERG, Roland N., Professor of History 

B.A., University of Kansas City, 1939; M.A., The American University, 1945; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

STROSS, Raymond G., Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Missouri, 1952; M.S., University of Idaho, 1954; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1958. 

STUNTZ. Calvin P., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.A., University of Buffalo, 1939; Ph.D., 1947. 

SUCHER, Joseph, Professor of Physics 

B.S., Brooklyn College, 1952; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1958. 

SULLIVAN, Noreen, Instructor of Art 

B.A., Trinity College, 1958; M.A., Northwestern University, 1963. 

SUSZYNSKI, Olivia C, Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Hunter College, 1953; M.A., New York University, 1955. 

SVIRBELY, William J., Professor of Chemistry 

B.S„ Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1931; M.S., 1932; D.Sc, 1935. 

SYSKI, Ryszard, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., University of London, 1954; Ph.D., Chelsea College, 1960. 

TATNALL, Anne, Instructor of Music 

B.A., University of Delaware, 1961; M.A., Smith College, 1963. 

TEWARI, Paramhans, Research Associate in Chemistry 
M.S., Lucknow University, 1952; Ph.D., 1957. 

185 



Faculty 

THORBERG, Raymond, Associate Professor of English 

B.A.. University of Alaska, 1939; M.A., University of Chicago, 1946; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1954. 

TOLAND, John I., Instructor of Sociology 

B.A., University of Tulsa, 1956; M.A., University of Maryland, 1958. 

TRAVER, Paul, Assistant Profesor of Music 

B.Mus., The Catholic University of America, 1955; M.Mus., 1957. 

TRIMBLE, Lester, Professor of Music 

B.A., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1947; M.F.A., 1948. 

TROUSDALE, Marion S., Instructor of English 

B.A., University of Michigan, 1951; M.A., University of California (Berkeley), 
1955. 

TULLEY, Patricia, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., Vassar College, 1955; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1958; Ph.D., 1962. 

TUNIKS, Galina, Instructor of Foreign Languages 
B.S.L., Georgetown University, 1954. 

TURNAGE. Thomas W., Assistant Professor of Psychology 
A.B., University of California (Berkeley), 1958; Ph.D., 1962. 

TURNER, David J., Research Associate in Chemistry 
B.S., University of London, 1958; Ph.D., 1962. 

ULRICH, Homer, Professor and Head of Music 
M.A., University of Chicago, 1939. 

URBANSKI, Tadeusz, Visiting Professor of Chemistry 

M.S., Institute of Technology Politechnika (Poland), 1924; Ph.D., 1932; D.Sc. 
1933; NSF Senior Foreign Scientist Fellow. 

VANDERSLICE, Betty R., Instructor of Mathematics 

B.A., Upsla College, 1945; M.A., University of Maryland, 1948. 

VANDERSLICE, Joseph T., Professor of Molecular Physics 

B.S., Boston College, 1949; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1953. 

VAN NESS, James S., Instructor of History 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1954; M.A., 1962. 

VAN WIJK, Uco, Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.S., Harvard University, 1948; Ph.D., 1952. 

VARNEDOE, Samuel L., Jr., Lecturer in Philosophy 

B.A., University of North Carolina, 1959; M.A., New School for Social Research, 
1962. 

VASSYLKIVSKY, Eugenia, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
B.S., Columbia University, 1954; M.A., 1958; Ph.D., 1964. 

186 



Faculty 

VEITCH, Fletcher P.. Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1931; M.S., 1933; Ph.D., 1935. 

VETTER, Harold J., Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Buffalo, 1949; M.A., 1952; Ph.D., 1955. 

VOGELGESAND, Ernst, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

Abitur, Oberschule Aschaffenburg, 1951; M.A. equivalent, Tulane University, 1962. 

WALBESSER, Henry H., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., State University of New York, 1950; M.A., University of Maryland, 1960; 
Ph.D., 1965. 

WALDER, Leopold O., Associate Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Boston University, 1949; M.A., University of Hawaii, 1951; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Iowa, 1954. 

WALDROP, Robert S., Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Oklahoma, 1934; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1948. 

WALL, Nathan Saunders, Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S.. Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1949; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 1954. 

WALSH, Joseph Leonard, Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Harvard University, 1916; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1917; Ph.D., Har- 
vard University, 1920. 

WALT, James, Instructor of English 

B.A., University of Minnesota, 1936; M.A., University of Michigan, 1937; Ph.D., 
1955. 

WARD, Charles D., Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Pomona College, 1958; M.A., University of North Carolina, 1962; Ph.D., 
1963. 

WARD, Kathryn M. Painter, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., The George Washington University, 1935; M.A., 1936; Ph.D., 1947. 

WARNER, Charles R., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., University of Toronto, 1955; M.S., University of Rochester, 1957; Ph.D., 
1962. 

WEBER, Joseph, Professor of Physics 

B.S., United States Naval Academy, 1940; Ph.D., The Catholic University of 
America, 1951. 

WEBER, Kurt, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Williams College, 1930; B.A., Oxford University, 1932; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1933; Ph.D., 1940. 

WEAVER, Carl H, Associate Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.A., Bluffton College, 1936; M.A., Ohio State University, 1950; Ph.D., 1957. 

187 



Faculty 

WEGIMONT, Pierre, Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Faculte Notre-Dame de la Paix, 1948; Docteur en droit, Universite Libre 
de Bruxelles, 1962. 

WEINSTEIN, Allen, Lecturer in History 

B.A., City College of New York, 1960; M.A., Yale University, 1962. 

WESTERHOUT, Gart, Professor of Physics and Astronomy and Director of As- 
tronomy 

B.S., University of Leiden, 1950; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1958. 

WHALEY, Betty F., Instructor of English 

B.A., University of North Carolina, 1942; M.A., University of Maryland, 1961. 

WHATLEY, Linda S., Research Assistant Professor in Chemistry 

B.A., Newcomb College, Tulane University, 1957; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 
1962. 

WHATLEY, Malcolm C, Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., Southwestern University, 1956; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1958; Ph.D., 
1962. 

WHITE, Charles E., Professor and Head of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1923; M.S., 1924; Ph.D., 1926. 

WHITE, John Arnold, Research Associate in Physics 

B.A., Oberlin College, 1954; M.S., Yale University, 1955; Ph.D., 1959. 

WHITLEY, Robert J., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., San Diego State College, 1959; M.S., 1961; Ph.D., New Mexico State 
University, 1964. 

WIEMAN, Robert M., Visiting Associate Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Central Methodist College, 1942; M.A., University of California, 1947; 
Ph.D., 1955. 

WILAN, Richard A., Instructor of English 

B.A., Amherst College, 1957; A.M.T., Harvard University, 1958. 

WILLIAMS, Aubrey W., Jr., Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., University of North Carolina, 1955; M.A., 1957; Ph.D., University of 
Arizona, 1964. 

WILLKE, Thomas A., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., Xavier University, 1954; M.S., Ohio State University, 1956; Ph.D., 1960. 

WILLOTT, W. Brian, Research Associate in Physics 

B.A., Cambridge University, 1961; M.A., 1965; Ph.D., 1965. 

WILSON, Gayle E., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Wayne State University, 1960; M.A., University of Rochester, 1963; Ph.D., 
1965. 

WILTS, Ommo, Instructor of Foreign Languages 

M.A., equivalent. University of Kiel, 1965; Ph.D., 1965. 

188 



Faculty 

WOLFE, G. Joseph, Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.S., Eastern Illinois University, 1955; M.A., State University of Iowa, 1959; 
Ph.D., 1964. 

WOO, Ching-Hung, Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., Louisiana Technological Institute, 1958; M.S., University of California 
(Berkeley), 1959; Ph.D., 1962. 

WOODS, Edward James, Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.Sc, Queen's University, 1957; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1962. 

WOODS, G. Forrest, Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1934; B.A., 1935; M.S., Harvard University, 1937; 
Ph.D., 1940. 

WRTGHT, William C, Instructor of English 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1958. 

YANEY, George L., Assistant Professor of History 

B.Mgt.E., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1952; M.A., University of Colorado. 
1956; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1961. 

YARCZOWER, Matthew, Associate Professor of Psychology. 

B.B.A., College of the City of New York, 1953; M.A., University of Maryland, 
1955; Ph.D., 1958. 

YODH, Gaurang B., Professor of Physics 

B.Sc, University of Bombay, 1948; M.Sc, University of Chicago, 1951: Ph.D.. 
1955. 

YOUNG, Frank C, Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1957; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1962. 

ZAPOLSKY, Harold D., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., Shimer College, University of Chicago, 1954; Ph.D.. Cornell University, 
1962. 

ZEDEK, Mishael, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

M.S., Hebrew University (Jerusalem), 1952; Ph.D., Harvard University, 1956. 

ZEEVELD, W. Gordon, Professor of English 

B.A., University of Rochester, 1924; M.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1929; 
Ph.D., 1936. 

ZEMEL, Jacqueline, Instructor of Mathematics 

B.S., Queen's College, 1949; M.A., Syracuse University, 1951. 

ZIMMERMAN, Melvin, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.S.S., City College of New York, 1950; Master of Foreign Studies, University of 
Maryland (Paris), 1958; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1964. 

ZIPOY, David M., Associate Professor of Physics 
B.S., University of Minnesota, 1954; Ph.D., 1957. 

189 



Faculty 

ZORN. Bice Sechi, Research Assistant Professor in Physics 
Dottore in Fisica, Universita di Cagliari, 1951. 

ZORN, Gus Tom, Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1948; M.S., University of New Mexico, 1953; 
Ph.D., University of Padua, 1954. 



190 



CATALOG OF THE 

COLLEGE OF 

BUSINESS AND 

PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 

1966-68 



THE 
UNIVERSITY 

OF 
MARYLAND 



Volume 22 January 7, 1966 Number 13 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BULLETIN is published four times in September; 
three times in January. March and May. and two times in August. October. Novem- 
ber. December. February. April. June and July. Re-entered at the Post OflRce at 
College Park. Maryland, as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress on 
August 24, 1912. Published twenty-nine times. 



Contents 



GENERAL 



University Calendar iv 

Board of Regents vi 

Officers of Administration . vii 
Chairmen, Standing Commit- 
tees, Faculty Senate xi 

The College 1 

Organization 1 

Academic Information 2 

General Information 2 



Degrees 3 

Graduation Requirement 3 

Junior Standing 3 

Senior Residence Requirement 4 

Air Science Instruction 4 

Costs 4 

Admission 5 

Honors, Awards and 

Scholarships 6 



CURRICULA AND REQUIRED COURSES 



Business Administration 9 
The General Curriculum 

in Administration 11 

Accounting 12 

Finance 13 

Insurance and Real 

Estate 14 

Marketing 14 

Personnel and Industrial 

Relations 15 

Production Management 16 

Statistics 17 

Transportation 18 

Combined Business Ad- 
ministration and Law 

Program 19 
Master of Business 

Administration 19 



II. 
III. 
IV. 
V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

1. 



Economics 29 

Geography 38 

Government and Politics 49 
Journalism and Public 

Relations 60 

Information Systems 

Management 57 

Bureau of Business and 
Economic Research 65 

Bureau of Governmental 
Research 65 

Affiliated Governmental 

Organizations 66 

Maryland County Com- 
missioners Association 66 
Maryland Municipal 
League 66 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



Business Administration 20 

Economics 31 

Geography 43 

Government and Pohtics 51 

Faculty 



Journalism and Public 
Relations 

Information Systems 
Management 



61 

58 

70 
Hi 



University Calendar, 1965-66 

(TENTATIVE) 

FALL SEMESTER, 1965 
SEPTEMBER 

13-17 Monday through Friday — Fall Semester Registration 
20 Monday — Instruction begins 
NOVEMBER 

24 Wednesday, after last class — Thanksgiving recess begins 
29 Monday. 8:00 A.M. — Thanksgiving recess ends 

DECEMBER 

22 Wednesday, after last class — Christmas recess begins 
JANUARY 

3 Monday, 8:00 A.M. — Christmas recess ends 
17 Monday — Pre-exam Study Day 

18-24 Tuesday-Monday— Fall Semester Examinations 

SPRING SEMESTER, 1966 
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 

31-4 Monday through Friday — Spring Semester Registration 

7 Monday — Instruction begins 

22 Tuesday — Washington's Birthday, holiday 
MARCH 

25 Friday — Maryland Day, not a holiday 
APRIL 

7 Thursday, after last class — Easter recess begins 

12 Tuesday, 8:00 A.M. — Easter recess ends 
MAY 

11 Wednesday— AFROTC Day 

25 Wednesday — Pre-exam Study Day 

26-June 3 Thursday through Friday — Spring Semester Examinations 

29 Sunday — Baccalaureate Exercises 

30 Monday — Memorial Day, holiday 
JUNE 

4 Saturday — Commencement Exercises 

SUMMER SESSION, 1966 
JUNE 

20-21 Monday, Tuesday — Registration, Summer Session 

22 Wednesday — Instruction begins 

25 Saturday — Classes (Monday schedule) 
JULY 

4 Monday — Independence Day, holiday 

9 Saturday — Classes (Tuesday schedule) 
AUGUST 

12 Friday — Summer Session Ends 

SHORT COURSES, SUMMER, 1966 
JUNE 

13-17 Mondav through Fridav — Rural Women's Short Course 
AUGUST 

1-5 Monday through Friday — 4-H Club Week 
SEPTEMBER 

6-9 Tuesday through Friday — Fireman's Short Course 

iv 



University Calendar, 1966-67 

(TENTATIVE) 

FALL SEMESTER, 1966 
SEPTEMBER 

12-16 Monday-Friday — Fall Semester Registration 
19 Monday — Instruction begins 

NOVEMBER 

23 Wednesday, after last class — Thanksgiving recess begins 
28 Monday, 8:00 A. M. — Thanksgiving recess ends 

DECEMBER 

21 Wednesday, after last class — Christmas recess begins 
JANUARY 

3 Tuesday. 8:00 A. M. — Christmas recess ends 
18 Wednesday — Pre-exam Study Day 
19-25 Thursday-Wednesday — Fall Semester Examinations 

SPRING SEMESTER, 1967 
JANUARY 

31 -Feb. 3 Tuesday-Friday — Spring Semester Registration 
FEBRUARY 

6 Monday — Instruction begins 

22 Wednesday — Washington's Birthday, holiday 
MARCH 

23 Thursday, after last class — Easter recess begins 
28 Tuesday, 8:00 A. M. — Easter recess ends 

MAY 

10 Wednesday— AFROTC Day 

24 Wednesday — Pre-exam Study Day 

25-June 2 Thursday-Friday — Spring Semester Examinations 

28 Sunday — Baccalaureate Exercises 

30 Tuesday — Memorial Day, holiday 
JUNE 

3 Saturday — Commencement Exercises 

SUMMER SESSION, 1967 
JUNE 

19-20 Monday-Tuesday — Registration. Summer Session 

21 Wednesday — Instruction begins 

24 Saturday — Classes (Monday schedule) 
JULY 

4 Tuesday — Independence Day. holiday 
8 Saturday — Classes (Tuesday schedule) 

AUGUST 

1 1 Friday — Summer Session Ends 

SHORT COURSES, SUMMER, 1967 

JUNE 

12-17 Mondav-Saturday — Rural Womens Short Course 
AUGUST 

7-11 Monday-Friday— 4-H Club Week 
SEPTEMBER 

5-8 Tuesday-Friday — Firemen's Short Course 



Board of Regents 

and 

Maryland State Board of Agriculture 

CHAIRMAN 

Charles P. McCormick 

McCormick and Company, Inc., 414 Light Street, Baltimore, 21202 

VICE-CHAIRMAN 

Edward F. Holter 

Farmers Home Administration, Room 412 Hartwick Bldg., 

4321 Hartwick Road, College Park, 20740 

SECRETARY 

B. Herbert Brown 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore, 21201 

TREASURER 

Harry H. Nuttle 
Denton, 21629 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

Louis L. Kaplan 

The Baltimore Hebrew College, 5800 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore, 21215 

ASSISTANT TREASURER 

Richard W. Case 

Smith, Somerville and Case, 1 Charles Center — 17th Floor, 

Baltimore, 21201 

Dr. William B. Long 
Medical Center, Salisbury, 21801 

Thomas W. Pangborn 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown, 21740 

Thomas B. Symons 

7410 Columbia Ave., College Park, 20740 

William C. Walsh 

Liberty Trust Building, Cumberland, 21501 

Mrs. John L, Whitehurst 
4101 Greenway. Baltimore, 21218 

vi 



Officers Of The University 

Central Administrative Officers 

PRESIDENT 

Wilson H. Elkins, — B.A., University of Texas, 1932; M.A., 1932; B.Utt., Oxford Uni- 
versity, 1936; D.Phil., 1936. 

VICE PRESIDENT, BALTIMORE CAMPUSES 

Albin O. Kuhn— B.5., University of Maryland, 1938; MS., 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

R. Lee Hornbake — B.S., California State College, Pennsylvania, 1934; M.A., Ohio 
State University, 1936; Ph.D., 1942. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS 

Walter B. Waetjen — B.S., Millersville State College, Millersville, Pennsylvania, 1942; 
M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1947; Ed.D., University of Maryland. 1951. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT 

Frank L. Bentz, Jr.— B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; Ph.D., 1952. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR RESEARCH 

Justin Williams — A.B., State Teachers College, Conway, Arkansas, 1926; M.A., Slate 
University of Iowa, 1928; Ph.D., 1933. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
Robert A. Beach, Jr., A.B., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1950; M.S., Boston Uni- 
versity, 1954. 

ASSISTANT, PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 

Robert E. Kendig — A.B., College of William and Mary, 1939; M.A., George Wash- 
ington University, 1965. 

DF"'":tOR of FINANCE AND BUSINESS 

C. Wilbur Cissel—B.A., University of Maryland. 1932; M.A., C.P.A., 1939. 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
James T. Frye — B.S.. University of Georgia, 1948; M.S., 1952. 

COMPTROLLER AND BUDGET OFFICER 

Harry D. Fisher— B.5., University of Maryland. 1943; C.P.A.. 1948. 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATIONS 

G. Watson Algire— 5.^., University of Maryland. 1930; M.S., 1931. 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND REGISTRAR 

James P. Hill— S.5., Temple University, 1939; Ed.M.. 1947; Ed.D., University of 

Michigan, 1963. 

DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI AFFAIRS 

J. Logan Schutz— 5.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S.. 1940. 

vii 



DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS 

William W. Cobey — A.B., University of Maryland, 1930. 

DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL 

George W. Fogg— B. A.. University of Maryland, 1926; M.A., 1928. 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL 

James D. Morgan— B.5., University of Maryland, 1949; M.S. A., 1950. 

DIRECTOR AND SUPERVISING ENGINEER, DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL 
PLANT 

George O. Weber — B.S., University of Maryland, 1933. 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND SUPERVISING ENGINEER, PHYSICAL PLANT 

(■Baltimore) 

George W. Morrison — B.S., University of Maryland, 1927; E.E., 1931. 



Emeriti 

PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

Harry C. Byrd — B.S., University of Maryland, 1908; LL.D., Washington College, 
1936: LL.D., Dickinson College, 1938; D.Sc. Western Maryland College, 1938. 

DEAN OF WOMEN EMERITA 

Adele H. Stamp — B.A., Tiilane University, 1921; M.A., University of Maryland, 
1924. 

DEAN OF MEN EMERITUS 

Geary F. Eppley — B.S., University of Maryland, 1920; M.S.. 1926. 



Deans of the Schools and Colleges 

DEAN OF AGRICULTURE 

Gordon M. Cairns— B.5., Cornell Univjersity, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D. 1940. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Charles Manning— B.5., Tufts College, 1929; M.A., Harvard University, 1931; Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina, 1950. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 
Donald W. O'Connell- B./I., Columbia University, 1937; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., 1953. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

John J. Salley—D. D.5., Medical College of Virginia, 1951; Ph.D., University of 
Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 1954. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Vernon E. Anderson — B.S., University of Minnesota. 1930; M.A., 1936; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Colorado, 1942. 

ACTING DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Russell B. Allen — B.S.. Yale University, 1923; Registered Professional Engineer. 

viii 



DEAN OF FACULTY— UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY 

Homer W. Schamp, Jr. — A.B., Miami University, 1944; M.Sc, University of Michi- 
gan, 1947; Ph.D., 1952. 

DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Ronald Bamford — B.S.. University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S., University of Ver- 
mont, 1925; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1931. 

ACTING DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Erna R. Chapman — B.S., University of Maryland, 1934: M.S., 1936. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

William P. Cunningham — A.B., Harvard College, 1944; LL.B., Harvard Law School, 
1948. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES 
Paul Wasserman— B.B.^., College of the City of New York, 1948; M.S. (L.S.), 

Columbia University, 1949: M.S. {Economics) Columbia University, 1950; Ph.D., 

University of Michigan, 1960. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND DIRECTOR OF MEDICAL 
EDUCATION AND RESEARCH 

William S. Stone— B.5., University of Idaho, 1924; M.S., 1925; M.D., University of 
Louisville, 1929; Ph.D., {Hon.), University of Louisville, 1946. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Florence M. Gipe — B.S., Catholic University of America, 1937; M.S., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1940; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Noel E. Foss—Ph.C, South Dakota State College, 1929; B.S.,1929; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1932; Ph.D., 1933. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION AND 
HEALTH 

Lester M. Fraley— B.^., Randolph-Macon College, 1928; M.A., 1937; Ph.D., Pea- 
body College, 1939. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 

Verl S. Lewis— /4.B., Huron College, 1933; M.A., University of Chicago, 1939; 
D.S.W., Western Reserve University, 1954. 

DEAN OF UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

Ray W. Ehrensberger— S./i., Wabash College, 1929; M.A., Butler University, 1930; 
Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1937. 

Directors of Educational Services and Programs 

EXECUTIVE DEAN FOR STUDENT LIFE 

Leslie R. Bundgaard- B.5., University of Wisconsin, 1948; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., 
Georgetown University, 1954. 

DEAN OF WOMEN 

Helen E. Clarke— B.5., University of Michigan, 1943; M.A., University of Illinois. 
1951; Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University. 1960. 

ix 



DIRECTOR. AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE 

Edward W. Aiton— B.5., University of Minnesota, 1933; M.S., 1940; Ed.D., Uni- 
versity oi Maryland, 1956. 

DIRECTOR. AGRICULTURE EXPERIMENT STATION 

Irvin C. Haul — B.S., University of Idaho. 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 
1930: Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1933. 

ACTING DIRECTOR. COMPUTER SCIENCE CENTER 

John P. Menard— B. A., St. Michael's College, Vt., 1954. 

DIRECTOR. COUNSELING CENTER 

Thomas Magoon — B.A., Dartmouth, 1947; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1951; 
Ph.D., 1954. 

DIRECTOR. GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Gayle S. Smith— B.5., Iowa State College, 1948; M. A., Cornell University, 1951; 
Ph.D., 1958. 

DIRECTOR, INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH 

Robert E. McCIintock — B.S., University of South Carolina, 1951; M.A., George Pea- 
body College, 1952; Ph.D., 1961. 

DIRECTOR OF LIBRARIES 

Howard Rovelstad— B./i., University of Illinois, 1936; M.A., 1937; B.S.L.S., Colum- 
bia University, 1940. 

DIRECTOR OF NATURAL RESOURCES INSTITUTE 

L. Eugene Cronin — A.B., Western Maryland College, 1938: M.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1943; Ph.D., 1946. 

DIRECTOR OF PROFESSIONAL AND SUPPORTING SERVICES, UNIVERSITY 

HOSPITAL 
George H. Yeager — B.S., University of West Virginia, 1925; M.D., University of 

Maryland. 1929. 

DIRECTOR OF STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

Lester M. Dyke— B.5., University of loua, 1936; M.D., 1926. 

DIRECTOR OF THE SUMMER SESSION 

Clodus R. Smith— B.5., Oklahoma State University, 1950; M.S., 1955; Ed.D., Cornell 
University, 1960. 

HEAD. DEPARTMENT OF AIR SCIENCE 

Vernon H. Reeves — B.A., Arizona State College, 1936; M.A., Columbia University, 
1949. 

Division Chairmen 

CHAIRMAN OF THE DIVISION OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

John E. Faber— fi.5.. University of Maryland, 1926; M.S., 1927; Ph.D., 1937. 

CHAIRMAN OF THE LOWER DIVISION 

Charles E. White— 5.5., University of Maryland, 1923; M.S., 1924; Ph.D., 1926. 

CHAIRMAN OF THE DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Harold C. Hoffsommer— fi.S., Northwestern University, 1921; M.A., 1923; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1929. 



STANDING COMMITTEES, FACULTY SENATE 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE AND WELFARE 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS AND SCHOLASTIC STANDING 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

COMMITTEE ON SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS, CURRICULA AND COURSES 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RESEARCH 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARIES 

COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION 

COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, ACADEMIC FREEDOM 
AND TENURE 

COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS AND SALARIES 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 

COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 

COMMITTEE ON COUNSELING OF STUDENTS 

COMMITTEE ON THE FUTURE OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Adjunct Committees of the General Committee on Student 
Life and Welfare 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

FINANCIAL AIDS AND SELF-HELP 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

STUDENT HEALTH AND SAFETY 

STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

BALTIMORE CAMPUS, STUDENT AFFAIRS 



XI 



The CoUege 

The university of Maryland is favorably located for the accom- 
modation of students interested in business and public administration. Stu- 
dents interested in economics, political science, journalism and geography, 
other disciplines taught within the College, find a similarly distinct advan- 
tage in being at College Park. Downtown Washington is only 25 minutes 
away in one" direction, while the Baltimore business district is less than an 
hour in the other. There is frequent transportation service from College 
Park to each city. Qualified students may obtain a firsthand view of the far- 
flung economic and political activities of the national government, and may 
utilize the libraries and other facilities available in Washington. 

The College's six instructional departments offer a broad range of cur- 
ricula in professional fields and in social science disciplines. The sepa- 
rate programs of study frequently draw upon courses in complementary 
fields within the College. The six departments and the major depart- 
mental offerings are: 

I. Department of Business Administration 

1. The General Curriculum in Business Administration 

2. Accounting 

3. Finance 

4. Insurance and Real Estate 

5. Marketing 

6. Personnel and Industrial Relations 

7. Production Management 

8. Statistics 

9. Transportation 

iO. Combined Business Administration and Law 

II. Department of Economics 

III. Department of Geography 

1. General Curriculum in Geography 

2. Urban Geography 

3. Cartography 

IV. Department of Government and Politics 

1. General Curriculum in Government and Politics 

2. International Affairs 

3. Public Administration 

V. Department of Journalism 

VI. Department of Information Systems Management 

VII. Bureau of Business and Economic Research 

VIII. Bureau of Governmental Research 

IX. Affiliated Governmental Organizations 

1. Maryland Municipal League 

2. State Association of County Commissioners of Maryland 



General Information 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Detailed information concerning the General Education Program, fees 
and expenses, scholarships and awards, student life, and other material 
of a general nature, may be found in the University publication titled 
An Adventure in Learning. This publication may be obtained on request 
from the Catalog Mailing Office, North Administration Building, 
University of Maryland at College Park 20740. A detailed explanation of 
the regulations of student and academic life may be found in the University 
publication titled. University General and Academic Regulations. This 
is mailed in September and February of each year to all new undergrad- 
uate students. 

Requests for course catalogs for the individual schools and colleges should 
be directed to the deans of these respective units, addressed to: 

COLLEGE LOCATED AT COLLEGE PARK: 

Dean 

(College in which you are interested) 
The University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20740 

PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS LOCATED AT BALTIMORE: 

Dean 

(School in which you are interested) 
The University of Maryland 
Lombard and Greene Streets 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

GENERAL EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM : 

A college education implies something more than an adequate techincal 
training in the student's field of specialization. In order that each graduate 
with a Bachelor's degree may gain a liberal education as well as a special- 
ized one, the University has established a General Education Requirement. 
This requirement consists of 34 semester hours of credit in six general fields. 
There is a wide choice in specific courses which may be used to satisfy 
requirements in all of the six fields except English. Physical Education and 
Health requirements for all students are taken in addition to this 34-hour 
group of courses. Although the courses in the General Education Program 
are prescribed generally, some choice is permitted, especially for students 
who demonstrate in classification tests good previous preparation in one 
or more of the required subjects. For a more complete description of the 
program refer to General and Academic Regulations, pages 27-30. 



Academic Information 
ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

Degrees 

The University confers the following degrees on students completing pro- 
grams of study in departments of the College: Bachelor of Science, Master 
of Business Administration, Master of Arts, and Doctor of Philosophy. 
Each candidate for a degree must file in the Office of the Registrar on a 
date announced for each semester a formal application for a degree. Candi- 
dates for degrees must attend a convocation at which degrees are conferred 
and diplomas are awarded. Degrees are confirmed in absentia only in excep- 
tional cases. 



Graduation Requirements 

A minimum of 120 semester hours of credit with an average of "C" in 
courses suggested by the College in addition to the specified courses in 
physical activities and health are required for graduation. A minimum of 
57 hours of the required 120 hours must be in upper division courses, with 
the exception that the student may, with the consent of the Dean, offer cer- 
tain lower division courses in mathematics, natural science, and foreign 
language in partial fulfillment of the requirement. Usually the departments 
within the College will require that the student have, in addition to an 
overall "C" average, an average of "C" or better in those courses compris- 
ing the student's major area of study. The time normally required to com- 
plete the requirements for the bachelor's degree is eight semesters. 

Junior Standing 

To earn junior standing a student enrolled prior to June, 1965, 
must complete 56 semester hours of academic credit with an average 
grade of "C" (2.0) or better. In computing this average, the follow- 
ing provisions apply: all academic courses carrying one or more credits 
which have been taken up to the time of computation shall be included; 
courses carrying "O" credit shall not be included; courses with grade "F" 
shall be included; courses in physical education required of all University 
students, and the health course required of all students shall not be included. 

Students enrolled during or after the summer session of academic year 
1965-1966: Students in this category must achieve the minimum require- 
ments for retention and graduation set forth in the General and Academic 
Regulations, 1965-67, pages 45, 49. Copies of this publication are available 
from the Director of Admissions and Registrations, North Administration 
building. 

Detailed regulations pertaining to junior standing are presented in full in 
the publication, General and Academic Regulations. 



Academic Information 

Senior Residence Requirement 

After a student has earned acceptable credit to the extent of 90 semester 
hours exclusive of the required work in physical activities, and hygiene, 
either at the University of Maryland or elsewhere, he must earn a subsequ- 
ent total of at least 30 semester hours with an average grade of "C" or 
better at the University of Maryland. No part of these credits may be trans- 
ferred from another institution. Specific requirements for graduation in the 
selected curriculum must be met. 



Air Science Instruction 

Air Science is offered at the University of Maryland on a completely elec- 
tive basis. The Department of Air Science offers a 2-year and a 4-year 
program, either of which qualifies a student for a commission in the United 
States Air Force on graduation. Financial assistance is provided for stu- 
dents in the Advanced program. 

Selected students who wish to do so may, with proper approval, carry as 
electives during their junior and senior years Advanced Air Science courses 
which lead to a commission in the United States Air Force. For further 
details concerning Air Science, refer to General and Academic Regulations, 
a publication available to all entering undergraduate students. 



Costs 

Actual annual costs of attending the University include $250.00 fixed 
charges; $96.00 special fees; $420.00 board; $320.00 lodging for 
Maryland residents, or $420.00 for residents of other states and coun- 
tries. A matriculation fee of $10.00 is charged all new students. A charge 
of $400.00 is assessed to all students who are non-residents of the State 
fo Maryland. 

A fee of $10.00 must accompany a prospective student's application for 
admission. If a student enrolls for the term for which he applied, the 
fee is accepted in lieu of the matriculation fee. 

An Adventure in Learning, the undergraduate bulletin of the University, 
contains a detailed statement of fees and expenses and includes changes 
in fees as they occur. A copy may be requested from the Catalog Mailing 
Office, North Administration Building, University of Maryland at College 
Park 20740. 



Admission 
ADMISSION 

FALL SEMESTER 

All applications for full-time undergraduate admission for the Fall Semes- 
ter at the College Park campus must be received by the University on or 
before June 1- Any student registering for nine or more semester hours 
of work is considered a full-time student. 

Under unusual circumstances, application will be accepted between June 1 
and September 1. Applicants for full-time attendance filing after June 1 
will be required to pay a non-refundable $25.00 late fee to defray the cost 
of special handling of applications after that date. This late fee is in 
addition to the $10.00 application fee. 

All undergraduate applications, both for full-time and part-time attend- 
ance, and all supporting documents for an application for admission must 
be received by the appropriate University ofl&ce by July 15. This means 
that the applicant's educational records, ACT scores (in the case of new 
freshmen )and medical examination report must be received by August 1. 

SPRING SEMESTER 

The deadUne for the receipt of applications for the Spring Semester is 
January 1. 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

The application deadlines and fees do not apply to students registering in 
the evening classes offered by the University College. 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Application for admission to the Graduate School must be made by Sep- 
tember 1 for the fall term and by January 1 for the spring term on blanks 
obtained from the Office of the Graduate School. Admission to the sum- 
mer session is governed by the date listed in the Summer School catalog. 
The summer session deadline date is generally June 1 . 

Entrance Requirements 

Requirements for admission to the College are those of the University. 

To assure a likelihood of success in the College, it is recommended that the 
student have four units of EngUsh, three or more units of College Prepara- 
tory Mathematics — including a minimum of two units of Algebra and one 
unit of Geometry, one or more units of History and Social Science, two or 
more units of Natural Science, and two or more units of Foreign Language. 
Students expecting to enroll in the College of Business and Public Admin- 
istration should pursue the pre-college program in high school. 



Honors, Awards, and Scholarships 

FINANCIAL AID AND ASSISTANCE 

The College has a number of graduate assistantships in the Departments 
of Business Administration, Economics, Geography, Journalism, and Gov- 
ernment and Politics, and in the Bureau of Business and Economic Re- 
search and the Bureau of Governmental Research. Applications for as- 
sistantships should be made directly to the Dean of the College of Business 
and PubUc Administration. (See the Graduate School Catalog for rules 
and regulations). 

HONORS, AWARDS AND SCHOLARSfflPS 

The Dean's List of Distinguished Students 

Any student who has passed at least 12 hours of academic work in the 
preceding semester, without failure of any course, and with an average 
grade on all courses of at least 3.5 will be placed on the Dean's List of 
Distinguished Students. 

Beta Gamma Sigma 

The Alpha of Maryland Chapter of Beta Gamma Sigma was chartered in 
1940. The purpose of this honorary society is to encourage and reward 
scholarship and accomplishment among students of commerce and bus- 
iness administration; to promote the advancement of education in the 
art and science of business; and to foster integrity in the conduct of bus- 
iness operations. Chapters of Beta Gamma Sigma are chartered only in 
schools holding membership in the American Association of Collegiate 
Schools of Business. Third and fourth year students in business adminis- 
tration are eligible; if in his third year, a student must rank in the highest 
four percent of his class, and if in his fourth year, he must rank in the 
highest ten percent in order to be considered for selection. 

The Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key 

This is awarded annually to the student who has maintained the highest 
scholastic standing during the entire course of study in business adminis- 
tration or economics. Delta Sigma Pi was founded at New York University 
on November 7, 1907. The Gamma Sigma of Maryland chapter was char- 
tered at the University of Maryland in 1950. Delta Sigma Pi is a profes- 
sional fraternity organized to foster the study of business in universities; 
to encourage scholarship, social activity, and the association of students 
for their mutual advancement by research and practice; to promote closer 
affiliation between the commercial world and students of commerce; and 
to further a high standard of commercial ethics and culture, as well as 
the civic and commercial welfare of the community. Members are selected 
from the College of Business and Public Administration on the basis of 
leadership, scholastic standing and promise of future business success. 



Honors, Awards, and Scholarships 

Kappa Tau Alpha 

The Maryland chapter of Kappa Tau Alpha was chartered in 1961. 
Founded in 1910, this national honorary society has 39 chapters at uni- 
versities offering graduate or undergraduate preparation for careers in 
professional journaUsm. It is dedicated to recognition and promotion of 
scholarship in journalism. Among its activities is an annual award for 
an outstanding piece of published research in joumaUsm and mass com- 
munications. 

Maryland-Delaware Press Association Annual Citation 
This award is presented to the outstanding senior in journalism. 

Phi Chi Theta Key 

The Phi Chi Theta Key is awarded to the outstanding graduating senior 
woman in Business Administration or Business Education Administration 
on the basis of scholarship, activities, and leadership. 

Public Relations Society of American Annual Citation 

The Baltimore Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America awards 
an annual citation to the top graduating senior in JoumaUsm who has an 
interest in public relations. 

The Wall Street Journal Student Achievement Award 

This is awarded annually to the graduating senior who has maintained 
the highest scholastic achievement in the field of financial administra- 
tion. The award consists of a silver medal and one year's subscription to 
The Wall Street Journal. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Alcoa Foundation Scholarship in the amount of $500 is awarded 
to a junior majoring in Transportation with a special interest in industrial 
traffic management. 

The Alumni Association of the University provides a scholarship of $250. 

The Baltimore Sunpapers Scholarships in Journalism are awarded to two 
deserving students. The scholarships, in the amount of $500 each, are con- 
tributed by the Board of Trustees of the A. S. Abell Foundation, Inc., and 
are awarded to seniors majoring in editorial journalism. 

The Baltimore News-American provides two $500 journalism scholarships. 
The Delmarva Traffic Club makes available a scholarship of $250 for an 
outstanding transportation student in the junior class making his home on 
the Delmarva peninsula. 



Honors, Awards, and ScHOLARSfflPS 

Federal Government Accountants Association of Washington awards a 
scholarship in the amount of $300 to a full-time undergraduate majoring 
in accounting. 

The Haskins & Sells Foundation, Inc., makes available a scholarship of 
S500 for an exceptional senior student concentrating in accounting who 
is registered in the College of Business and PubUc Administration. In 
addition to the cash award, a token award in the form of an inscribed 
silver medallion will be given to each award winner. 

The Maryland Association of Certified PubUc Accountants, Inc., awards 
a scholarship in the amount of $200 to a Maryland resident majoring in 
accounting. 

Motor Fleet Supervisors Institute — A $250 award is made to a member 
of the junior class majoring in Transportation with an interest in motor 
transportation who has shown in three years of training an apparent abil- 
ity to succeed. This award is made through the College of Business and 
Public Administration. 

The Montgomery County Press Association's $200 journalism scholarship 
is awarded to a student of that county. 

Pilot Freight Carriers, Inc., Winston-Salem, North Carolina, provides a 
$500 award to a senior in the College who is concentrating in Transporta- 
tion with a major interest in motor transportation. 

The Arthur Young and Co. Foundation, Inc., makes available certain 
funds for awards for superior senior students concentrating in accounting 
who are registered in the College. 



8 



Required Courses 

I. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Business organizations are set up primarily for the purpose of producing 
and distributing goods and services. Modem business administration re- 
quires a knowledge and understanding of organizational structures, opera- 
tions and environments. The curricula of the Department of Business Ad- 
ministration emphasize the principles and problems involved in the de- 
velopment of organizations and in the formulation and implementation of 
their policies. 

STUDY PROGRAMS IN THE DEPARTMENT 

The programs of study in the Department of Business Administration are 
so arranged as to facilitate concentrations according to the major functions 
of business management. This plan is not, however, based on the view 
that these major divisions are independent units, but rather that each is 
closely related to and dependent on the others. Every student in Business 
Administration is required to complete satisfactorily a minimum number of 
required basic subjects in the arts, sciences, and humanities as prerequi- 
sites to work in the major management fields. 

FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE REQUIREMENTS 

English 1, 3, and 4 (or 21, 3 and 4) 9 hours 

Math 10 and 11 (or 19 and 20) 6(8) 

Speech 1 3 

History (Unless exempt student must take at least 3 hours of 

American History) 6 

B. A. 10 3 

Economics 4 (students electing to take a foreign language may 

exempt this course) 3 

B. A. 20 and 21 6 

Economics 31 and 32 6 

Two science courses (one biological and one physical, and at least one of 
which must be a lab science) selected from the following: 

Physical Astronomy 3 

Geology 3 

Physics 3 

Chemistry 4 

Biological Botany 4 

Zoology 4 

Microbiology 4 7-8 

A social science course (Econ. 31 may be used for 3 hours of the 6 hour 
social science requirement) selected from the following: 

G. and P. 1 3 

Psychology 1 3 

Sociology 1 3 

Anthropology 1 3 3 



Business Administration 

A fine arts requirement of 3 hours of which the following are representative: 

Philosophy 1, 41, 45, 53 3 

Art 10, 60, 61, 80 3 

Music 20 3 

Speech 16 3 3 

Electives (chosen with approval of adviser) 6- 9 ' 

Health 5 (men and women) 1 sem. (2 cr.) 

P. E. (men and women) 2 semesters 



*Students who wish to elect a foreign language must take nine semester 
hours of the language in order to obtain credit. Such students may substitute 
the first semester of foreign language for the Econ. 4 requirement, and the 
other semesters for two free electives. Students planning to major in Sta- 
tistics should take Math. 14 and 15. 



A TYPICAL PROGRAM FOR FIRST TWO YEARS FOR THOSE 

STUDENTS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS 

ADMINISTRATION: 





Freshman 


Year 




EngUshl (or 21) 


3 


English 3 


3 


B.A. lOorSp. 1 


3 


Sp. 1 or B.A. 10 


3 


Math. 10 (or 19) 


3 


Math. 11 (or 20) 


3 


Econ. 4 


3 


Health 5 


2 


Fine Arts, Social Science, 




Fine Arts, Social Science, 




or Natural Science ' 


3-4 


or Natural Science ' 


3-4 


P.E. 


1 


P.E. 


1 



16-17 



15-16 



Sophomore Year 



English 4 
B.A. 20 
Econ. 31 

History (American) 
Fine Arts, Social Science, 
or Natural Science ' 



3 


Elective 


3 


3 


B.A. 21 


3 


3 


Econ. 32 

History (other than 


3 


3 


American History) 

Fine Arts, Social Science, 


3 


3-4 


or Natural Science ' 


3-4 



15-16 



15-16 



' Requirement is 3 hours of Fine Arts. 3 hours of Social Science, and 7 or 8 hours of 
Natural Science. 



10 



Business Ax)ministration 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR REQUIREMENTS 

During the junior and senior years each student is required to complete 
the following specified courses: 

B.A. 130 — Business Statistics I 3 

B.A. 140 — Business Finance 3 

B.A. 149 — Marketing Principles and Organization 3 

B.A. 168 — Management and Organization Theory 3 

B.A. 180 — Business Law 3 

B.A. 199 — Business Policies 3 



Total 18 

In addition to the above, two 100 level courses must be taken in Econom- 
ics, at least one of which must be: Econ. 102, National Income Analysis: 
Econ. 132, Advanced Economic Principles; Econ. 140, Money and Bank- 
ing; or Econ. 148, International Economics. 

At least 48 hours of the 120 semester hours of academic work required 
for graduation must be in the Business Administration subjects. In addi- 
tion to the requirement of an overall average of "C" in academic subjects, 
an average of "C" in Business Administration subjects is required for grad- 
uation. Electives in the curricula of the Department may, with the con- 
sent of the advisor, be taken in any department of the university if the 
student has the necessary prerequisites. 

THE GENERAL CURRICULUM IN 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The General Curriculum in Business Administration is designed for those 
who desire a broad program in management. The curriculum contains a 
relatively large number of elective courses. Selection is subject to approval 
by an advisor and must contribute to a program of courses closely bal- 
anced between (1) a functional field, (2) the various basic areas of man- 
agement and (3) non-business fields. 

Students selecting this curriculum will take the basic courses required for 
all students in the Department of Business Administration. In addition, 
students will take: 

( 1 ) The following required courses : 

B.A. 150 — Marketing Management 3 s.h. 

B.A. 160 — Personnel Management I or B.A. 163 

Labor Relations 3 s.h. 

B.A. 170 — Principles of Transportation 3 s.h. 

B.A. 189 — Business and Government 3 s.h. 

B.A. 198 — Structure and Operations of Industries 3 s.h. 



15 s.h. 



U 



Business Administration 

(2) three semester hours from the following: 

B.A. 110 — Intermediate Accounting (3) 

B.A. 148 — Advanced Financial Management (3) 

B.A. 167 — Operations Research I (3) 
B.A. 184— Public Utilities (3) 



3 s.h. 



Total 18 s.h. 

Thus, the upper division requirements are: 

Junior-senior requirements of all departmental students 18 s.h. 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 18 s.h. 
Electives in 1 00 level economics courses at least one of 

which must be Econ. 102, 132, 140, or 148 6 s.h. 

Electives to complete 120 s.h. required for graduation 18 s.h. 



Total junior-senior year requirements 60 s.h. 

ACCOUNTING 

Accounting, in a limited sense, is the analysis, classification, and recording 
of financial events and the reporting of the results of such events for an 
organization. In a broader sense, accounting consists of all financial devices 
for planning, controlling and appraising performance of an organization. 
In this broader sense, accounting includes among its many facets financial 
planning, budgeting, accounting systems, financial management controls, 
financial analysis of performance, financial reporting, internal and external 
auditing and taxation of business. 

The accounting curriculum provides an educational foundation for careers 
in accounting, and a foundation for future advancement in other manage- 
ment areas whether in private business organizations, government agencies, 
or public accounting firms. Students who select this curriculum will com- 
plete the freshman and sophomore requirements for all students in the 
Department of Business Administration. 

Course requirements for the junior and senior years are: 

( 1 ) the junior-senior requirements for all students in the Department of 
Business Administration, 

(2) the following accounting courses: 

B.A. 110,111 — Intermediate Accounting 6 

B.A. 121 — Cost Accounting 4 

B.A. 123 — Income Tax Accounting 4 

and 9 semester hours from the following: 

B.A. 118 — Governmental Accounting 3 

B.A. 119— Budgeting and Control 3 

12 



Business Administration 

B.A. 120 — Accounting Systems 3 

B.A. 122 — Auditing Theory and Practice 3 

B.A. 124, 126 — Advanced Accounting 3, 3 

B.A. 125— C.P.A. Problems 3 

B.A. 127 — Advanced Auditing Theory and Practice 3 

B.A. 128 — Advanced Cost Accounting 2 
Note: B.A. 120 and 124 are offered only in the summer session. 

Thus, the upper division requirements for accounting majors are: 

Junior-senior requirements of all departmental students. 18 s. h. 

Junior-senior accounting requirements (minimum) 23 s. h. 
Electives in 100 level economics courses at least one of 

which must be Econ. 102, 132, 140, or 148 6 s. h. 
Electives (to complete 120 semester hours required for 

graduation) 13 s. h. 



Total Junior-senior year requirements 60 s. h. 

The maximum number of semester hours of credit for accounting courses 
that may be counted toward the graduation requirement is thirty-five. 
If thirty-five semester hours are taken toward graduation, either B.A. 
118 or 119 must be included. 

For graduates of the University of Maryland, the educational requirement 
of the Maryland State Board of Public Accountancy for taking the C.P.A. 
examination without practical experience total thirty-eight semester hours 
of accounting courses plus eight semester hours of business law. Students 
wishing to satisfy the Board's requirements must successfully complete all 
accounting courses except B.A. 118, 1 19, and 128. Also they must success- 
fully complete B.A. 181 and 182, as well as the required B.A. 180, to 
satisfy the Board's business law requirements. Only thirty-two semester 
hours of the Board's accounting requirements may be credited toward grad- 
uation requirements. Thus, a student wishing to satisfy both the graduation 
requirements and the requirements of the Board to sit for the C.P.A. exam- 
ination without experience must take six semester hours of accounting 
courses beyond the maximum that may be credited for graduation. This 
can be done only by attending one summer session, for B.A. 120, 124, and 
182 are offered only during the summer. Students not wishing to satisfy 
the Board's requirements to sit for the C.P.A. examination without experi- 
ence are eligible to take the examination after obtaining two years of prac- 
tical experience satisfactory to the Board. 

A student planning to take the C.P.A. examination in a State other 
than Maryland should determine the course requirements, if any, for 
such State, and arrange his program accordingly. 

FINANCE 

The curriculum in finance is designed to acquaint the student with 
financing methods and institutions and to familiarize him with the basic 

13 



Business Administration 

principles of financial analysis as used in managerial decision-making. 
Career destinations in the general area of finance include those in cor- 
porate financial management; investment management; the banking fields 
and insurance. Careers are also open in government service, for exam- 
ple, in regulatory agencies and international finance. 

Students selecting this curriculum will take, in addition to the courses 
required for all students in the Department of Business Administration: 

(1) The following required courses 

B.A. 110, 111 — Intermediate Accounting 6 s. h. 

B.A. 141 — Security Analysis 3 s. h. 

B.A. 143 — Credit Management 3 s. h. 

B.A. 148 — Advanced Financial Management 3 s. h. 



Total 15 s. h. 

and 

(2) three semester hours from the following: 

Econ. 142 — Public Finance (3) 1 

Econ. 147 — Business Cycles (3) ( 

B.A. 167 — Operations Research I (3) j- 3 s. h. 

B.A. 184— Public Utilities (3) 

B.A. 196 — Urban Land Management (3) J 



Total 18 s. h. 

Thus, the upper division requirements are: 

Junior-senior requirements of all departmental students 18 s. h. 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 18 s. h. 
Electives in 100 level economics courses at least one of 

which must be Econ. 102, 132, 140, or 148 6 s. h. 
Electives to complete 120 semester hours required for 

graduation 18 s. h. 



Total Junior-senior year requirements 60 s. h. 

INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE 

Students interested in insurance or real estate may concentrate either in 
General Business or Finance and plan with their advisers a group of elec- 
tives to meet their specialized needs. Courses offered in insurance and 
real estate include risk management, principles of risk and insurance, real 
estate principles, and urban land management. 

MARKETING 

Marketing involves the functions performed in getting goods and services 
from producers to users. Career opportunities exist in manufacturing, 

14 



Business Administration 

wholesaling and retailing and include sales administration, marketing 
research, advertising and merchandising. 

Students preparing for work in marketing research are advised to elect 
additional courses in Statistics. 

In addition to the courses taken by all students in the Department of Busi- 
ness Administration, the marketing program consists of; 

(1) the following required courses: 

B.A. 150 — Marketing Management 

B.A. 151 — Advertising 

B.A. 154 — Retail Management 

B.A. 156 — Marketing Research 



Total required 



3 s.h. 

3 s.h. 

3 s.h. 

3 s.h. 

12 s.h. 



and 



(2) six semester hours from the following: 

B.A. 143 — Credit Management (3) 

B.A. 132 — Sample Surveys in Business and 

Economics (3) 
B.A. 153 — Purchasing Management (3) 
B.A. 157 — International Marketing (3) 
B.A. 158 — Advertising Management (3) 
B.A. 171 — Traffic and Physical Distribution 

Management (3) 
B.A. 167 — Operations Research I (3) 
B.A. 101 — Electronic Data Processing (3) 
Joum. 152 — Advertising Copy and Layout (3) 

Total 

Thus, the upper division requirements are: 

Junior-senior requirements of all departmental students 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 

Electives in 100 level economics courses at least one of 

which must be Econ. 102, 132, 140, or 148 
Electives to complete 120 semester hours required for 

graduation 

Total, Junior-senior year requirements 



[ 6 s.h. 



18 s.h. 



18 s.h. 
18 s.h. 

6 s.h. 

18 s.h. 

60 s.h. 



PERSONNEL AND LABOR RELATIONS 

Personnel administration has to do with the direction of human effort. 
It is concerned with securing, maintaining, and utilizing an effective 
working force. People professionally trained in personnel administration 



15 



Business Administration Curriculum 

tind career opportunities in business, in government, in education insti- 
tutions, and in charitable and other organizations. 

(1) The required courses are: 

B.A. 160 — Personnel Management I 3 s.h. 

B.A. 161 — Personnel Management II 3 s.h. 

B.A. 163 — Labor Relations 3 s.h. 

B.A. 164 — Labor Legislation 3 s.h. 



Total required 12 s.h. 

and 
(2) six hours from the following: 

B.A. 131— Business Statistics II (3) 
B.A. 132 — Sample Surveys in 

Business and Economics (3) I 6 s.h. 

B.A. 167 — Operations Research 1(3) 
B.A. 169 — Production Management (3) 
B.A. 189 — Business and Government (3) 

Total 

Thus, the upper division requirements are: 

Junior-senior requirements of all departmental students 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 

Electives in 1 00 level economics courses at least one of 

which must be Econ. 102, 132, 140, or 148 
Electives to complete 120 semester hours required for 

graduation 

Total, Junior-senior year requirements 60 s.h. 

PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT 

This curriculum is designed to acquaint the student with the problems of 
organization and control in the field of production management. Theory 
and practice with reference to organization, policies, methods, processes 
and techniques are surveyed, analyzed, and evaluated. 

The courses in addition to those required of all students in the Department 
of Business Administration are: 

(1) The following required courses: 

B.A. 121 — Cost Accounting 4 s.h. 

B.A. 160 — Personnel Management I 3 s.h. 

B.A. 169 — Production Management 3 s.h. 

B.A. 165 — Advanced Production Management 3 s.h. 



18 


s.h. 


18 


s.h. 


18 


s.h. 


6 


s.h. 


18 


s.h. 



and 
16 



Total required 13 s.h. 



Business Administration Curriculum 



(2) six hours from the following: 

B.A. 134 — Statistical Quality Control (3) 
B.A. 153 — Purchasing Management (3) 
B.A. 163— Labor Relations (3) 
B.A. 167 — Operations Research I (3) 
B.A. 171 — Traffic and Physical Distribution 
Management (3) 

Total 
Thus, the upper division requirements are: 



6 s.h. 



19 s.h. 



Junior-senior requirements of all departmental students 18 s.h. 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 19 s.h. 
Electives in 100 level economics courses at least one of 

which must be Econ. 102, 132, 140, or 148 6 s.h. 
Electives to complete 120 semester hours required for 

graduation 17 s.h. 



Total Junior-senior year requirements 



60 s.h. 



STATISTICS 

Statistics consists of a body of methods for utilizing probability theory 
in decision-making processes. Important statistical activities ancillary 
to the decision-making process are the systematization of quantitative 
data and the measurement of variability. Some specialized areas within 
the field of statistics are: sample surveys, forecasting quality control, 
design of experiments, Bayesian decision processes, actuarial statistics, 
and data processing. Statistical methods — for example, sample survey 
techniques — are widely used in accounting, marketing, industrial manage- 
ment and government appUcations. 

An aptitude for appUed mathematics and a desire to understand and 
apply scientific methods to significant problems are important prerequi- 
sites for the would-be statistician. 

Students planning to major in statistics should take Math. 14 and 15. 

Students selecting this curriculum will take, in addition to the courses 
required for all students in the Department of Business Administration: 

(1) the following required courses: 

B.A. 131 — Business Statistics II 3 s.h. 

B.A. 132 — Sample Surveys in Business and Economics 3 s.h. 

B.A. 134 — Statistical QuaUty Control 3 s.h. 

B.A. 101 — Electronic Data Processing 3 s.h. 



12 s.h. 



17 



Business Administration Curriculum 

and 

(2) six semester hours from the following: 

B.A. 102 — Electronic Data Processing 

Applications (3) 
B.A. 135 — Statistical Analysis and Forecasting (3) 
B.A. 167 — Operations Research 1(3) 
Math. 133— Applied Probability and Statistics I (3) 



6 s.h. 



18 


s.h. 


18 


s.h. 


6 


s.h. 


18 


s.h. 



Total 18 s.h. 

Thus, the upper division requirements are: 

Junior-senior requirements of all departmental 

students 
Junior-senior curriculum concentration 
Electives in 100 level economics courses at least one of 

which must be Econ. 102, 132, 140, or 148 
Electives to complete 120 s.h. required for graduation 

Total junior-senior requirement 60 s.h. 

TRANSPORTATION 

Transportation involves the movement of persons and goods in the satis- 
faction of human needs. The curriculum in transportation includes an 
analysis of the services and management problems, such as pricing, fi- 
nancing, and organization, of the five modes of transport — air, motor, 
pipelines, railroads, and water — and covers the scope and regulation of 
transportation in our economy. The effective management of transpor- 
tation involves a study of the components of physical distribution and 
the interaction of procurement, the level and control of inventories, ware- 
housing, material handling, transportation, and data processing. 

The curriculum in transportation is designed to prepare students to assume 
responsible positions with carriers, governmental agencies, and traffic and 
physical distribution management in industry. 

Course requirements are, in addition to the junior-senior requirements for 
all students in the Department of Business Administration: 

(1) the required following courses: 

B.A. 170 — Principles of Transportation 3 s.h. 
B.A. 171 — Traffic and Physical Distribution 

Management 3 s.h. 

B.A. 172 — Motor Transportation 3 s.h. 

B.A. 174 — Commercial Air Transportation 3 s.h. 

B.A. 175 — Advanced Transportation Problems 3 s.h. 

Total 15 s.h. 

18 



Business Administration Curriculum 



and 

(2) three semester hours to be selected from the following: 

B.A. 173 — Water Transportation 

B.A. 176 — Urban Transport and Urban 

Development (3) \ ^ ^•^* 

B.A. 157 — International Marketing ( 3 ) 
B.A. 184— PubHc UtiUties (3) J 



1 



Total required 18 s.h. 

Thus, the upper division requirements are: 

Junior-senior requirements of all departmental 

students 18 s.h. 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 18 s.h, 

Electives in 100 level economics courses at least one of 

which must be Econ. 102, 132, 140, or 148 6 s.h. 

Electives to complete 120 s.h. required for graduation 18 s.h. 



Total junior-senior year requirements 60 s.h. 

COMBINED BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND 
LAW PROGRAM 

The Department of Business Administration offers a combined Business 
Administration-Law Curriculum in which the student completes three 
years in the General Curriculum in Business Administration in the 
department and a fourth year of work in the Law School of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Admission to the Law School is contingent upon 
meeting the applicable standards of that school. Individual students are 
responsible to secure from the Law School its current admission require- 
ments. The student must complete all the courses required of students 
in the Department plus the courses normally required for the General 
Curriculum in Business Administration through the junior year, plus 
enough electives to equal a minimum of 90 semester hours; an average 
grade of "C" or better must be earned. No business law course can be 
included in the 90 hours. The last year of college work before entering 
the Law School must be completed in residence at College Park. At 
least 30 hours of work must be in courses numbered 100 or above. 

The Bachelor of Science degree from the College of Business and Public 
Administration is conferred upon students who complete the first year 
in the Law School with an average grade of "C" or better. 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Business Administration are ac- 
cepted in accordance with the procedures and requirements for the 
Graduate School. (See the Graduate School Announcements, Section II.) 

19 



Business Administration 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Professors: Taff, Clemens, Cook, Fisher, Gentry, Nelson, and 
Wright. 

Associate Professors: Anderson, Ashman, Dawson, and Spivey. 

Assistant Professors: Baker, Bartlett, Brunner, Carroll, Clickner, 
Culbertson, Daiker, Edelson, Hermanson, Hille, Himes, Nash, 
Olson, Paine, Ryans, Schellenberger, Smerk, Spychalski, Suel- 
FLOW, Tosi. 

Instructors: Donnelly, Frey, Hise, Ivancevich, McCaul, Marthinuss, 
Neffinger, Pisani, Rosen, Sherman, Strawser, Webb. 

B.A. 10. Business Enterprise. (3) 

A survey course covering the internal and functional organization of a business 
enterprise, its organization and control. 

B.A. 20, 21. Principles of Accounting. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, sophomore standing. The principles of accounting for business 
enterprise and the use of accounting data in making business decisions. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
B.A. 100. Office Operations and Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing. Deals with the principles of scientific management 
as they apply to the examination, improvement, installation, and operation of 
the most effective paperwork methods and systems that a given organization 
can use to achieve its objectives. Procedure flow analysis and form design for 
control of paperwork; process, work distribution, and layout charts, distribution 
of authority and responsibility for office activities are among the areas con- 
sidered. 

B.A. 101. Electronic Data Processing. (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing, Math. 11 or the equivalent Laboratory fee, $10.00. 
The electronic digital computer and its use as a tool in processing data. The 
course includes the following areas: (1) organization of data processing sys- 
tems, (2) environmental aspects of computer systems, (3) fundamentals of 
programming using a common problem-oriented language, and (4) management 
control problems and potentials inherent in mechanized data processing systems. 

B.A. 102. Electronic Data Processing Applications. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 101. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Intensive study of computer 
applications using a problem-oriented language. Introduction of computer meth- 
ods for the solution of business problems. Laboratory exercises in program- 
ming and development of computer techniques. 

B.A. 103. Introduction to Systems Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 102. Math. 15 or the equivalent. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 
The use of the computer in management and the operation of business. The 
course includes the following areas: (1) the principles of systems analysis, (2) 
recent applications and innovations of the systems concept, (3) design and im- 

20 



Business Administration 

plementation of computer systems, including such techniques as mathematical 
programming, simulation, business games, and network analysis, (4) laboratory 
use of a digital computer in the application of these techniques. 

B.A. 110, 111. Intermediate Accounting. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 21. A comprehensive study of the theory and problems of 
valuation of assets, application of funds, corporation accounts and statements, 
and the interpretation of accounting statements. 

B.A. 112. Records Management. (2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, junior standing. Laboratory fee, $7.50. 
Specific management methods and techniques that have proved valuable in the 
creation, use, maintenance, protection and disposition of records are studied. 

B.A. 118. Governmental Accounting. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 21. The content of this course covers the scope and func- 
tions of governmental accounting. It considers the principles generally appli- 
cable to all forms and types of governmental bodies and a basic procedure 
adaptable to all governments. 

B.A. 119. Budgeting and Control. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 21. The use of financial data in controlling an enterprise. 
Budgetary formulation, execution and appraisal. The use of accounting in mana- 
gerial decision making. 

B.A. 120. Accounting Systems. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 20. A study of the factors involved in the design and instal- 
lation of accounting systems: the organization, volume and types of transac- 
tions, charts of accounts, accounting manuals, the reporting system. Offered 
only in Summer School. 

B.A. 121. Cost Accounting. (4) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 21. A study of the fundamental procedures of cost account- 
ing, including those for job order, process and standard cost accounting systems. 

B.A. 122. Auditing Theory and Practice. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 111. A study of the principles and problems of auditing and 
application of accounting principles to the preparation of audit working papers 
and reports. 

B.A. 123. Income Tax Accounting. (4) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 21. A study of the important provisions of the Federal Tax 
Laws, using illustrative examples, selected questions and problems, and the 
preparation of returns. 

B.A. 124. Advanced Accounting. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 111. Advanced Accounting theory applied to specialized 
problems in partnerships, ventures, consignments, installment sales, insurance, 
statement of affairs, receiver's accounts, realization and liquidation reports, and 
application of mathematics to accounting problems. Offered only in Summer 
School. 

B.A. 125. C.P.A. Problems. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. Ill, or consent of instructor. A study of the nature, form 
and content of C.P.A. examinations by means of the preparation of solutions 

21 



Business Administration 

to, and an analysis of, a large sample of C.P.A. problems covering the various 
accounting fields. 

B.A. 126. Advanced Accounting. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 111. Home office and branch accounting, parent and sub- 
sidiary accounting, and foreign exchange. 

B.A. 127. Advanced Auditing Theory and Practice. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 122. Advanced auditing theory and practice and report 
writing. 

B.A. 128. Advanced Cost Accounting. (2) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 121. A continuation of basic cost accounting with special 
emphasis on process costs, standard costs, joint costs and by-product costs. 

B.A. 129. Apprenticeship in Accounting. (0) 

Prerequisites, minimum of 20 semester hours in accounting and the consent of 
the accounting staff. A period of apprenticeship is provided with nationally 
known firms of certified public accountants from about January 15 to February 
15, and for a semester after graduation. 

B.A. 130. Business Statistics I. (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing. Laboratory fee, $10.00. An introductory course. 
Emphasis is placed upon statistical inference. Topics covered include statistical 
observations, frequency distributions, averages, measures of variability, ele- 
mentary probability, sampling, distributions, problems of estimation, simple 
tests of hypotheses, index numbers, time series, graphical and tabular presenta- 
tion. Selected applications of the techniques are drawn from economics, indus- 
trial management, marketing and accounting. 

B.A. 131. Business Statistics II. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A., 130. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Estimation, tests of hypotheses, 
decision making, regression and correlation, contingency tables, analysis of 
variance, programming statistical problems for high speed computers. 

B.A. 132. Sample Surveys in Business and Economics. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 130. Laboratory fee, $10.00. A general course in scientific 
sample survey techniques. Review of elementary probability, characteristics 
of good estimators, errors of observation, simple random sampling, stratified 
random sampling, cluster sampling, comparison of various sample designs, 
cost functions, examples of actual survey practices. 

B.A. 134. Statistical Quality Control. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 130. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Statistical fundamentals, theory 
construction and use of control charts, acceptance sampling by attributes and 
variables, work sampling and other industrial applications of statistics. 

B.A. 135. Statistical Analysis and Forecasting. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 130 or permission of instructor. Laboratory fee, $10.00. A 
course exploring the usefulness of statistical methods in economic prediction. 
Various forecasting techniques in current use are examined. Major topics re- 
ceiving detailed attention are the analysis of trends, seasonal patterns, cycles, 
and economic relationships. Some emphasis is placed on the predictive attributes 
of anticipations data, purchase plans, and other psychological variables. Con- 
siderable attention is also given to the logical aspects of the forecasting prob- 
lem as distinct from its statistical side. 

22 



Business Administration 
B.A. 140. Business Finance. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 21. This course deals with principles and practices involved 
in the organization, financing, and rehabilitation of business enterprises; the 
various types of securities and their use in raising funds, apportioning income, 
risk, and control; intercorporate relations; and new developments. Emphasis 
on solution of problems of financial policy faced by management. 

B.A. 141. Security Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 140. A study of the principles and methods used in the 
analysis, selection, and management of investments, investment programs, 
sources of investment information, security price movements, government, real 
estate, public utility, railroad and industrial securities. 

B.A. 143. Credit Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 140. A study of the nature of credit and the principles 
applicable to its extension and redemption for mercantile and consumer pur- 
poses; sources of credit information and analysis of credit reports; the organ- 
ization and management of a credit department for effective control. Recent 
developments and effective legal remedies available. 

B.A. 148. Advanced Financial Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 140. An advanced course in finance. Emphasis is placed 
upon the techniques employed by executives in their application of financial 
management practice to selected problems and cases. Critical classroom analy- 
sis is brought to bear upon actual methods and techniques used by business 
enterprises. 

B.A. 149. Marketing Principles and Organization. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. This is an introductory course in the field of 
marketing. Its purpose is to give a general understanding and appreciation 
of the forces operating, institutions employed, and methods followed in market- 
ing agricultural products, natural products, services, and manufactured goods. 

B.A. 150. Marketing Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 149. A study of the work of the marketing division in a 
going organization. The work of developing organizations and procedures for 
the control of marketing activities are surveyed. The emphasis throughout the 
course is placed on the determination of policies, methods, and practices for 
the effective marketing of various forms of manufactured products. 

B.A. 151. Advertising. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 149 or consent of instructor. A study of the role of advertis- 
ing in the American economy; the impact of advertising on our economic and 
social life, the methods and techniques currently applied by advertising prac- 
titioners, the role of the newspaper, magazine, and other media in the develop- 
ment of an advertising campaign, modem research methods to improve the 
effectiveness of advertising, and the organization of the advertising business. 

B.A. 153. Purchasing Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 149. Determining the proper sources, quality and quantity 
of supplies, and methods of testing quality; price policies, price forecasting, for- 
ward buying, bidding and negotiation; budgets and standards of achievement. 
Attention is given to government purchasing and methods and procedures used 
in their procurement. 

23 



Business Administration 

B.A. 154. Retail Management. (3) 

Prerequisite. B.A. 20 and 149. Retail store organization, location, layout and 
store policy; pricing policies, price lines, brands, credit policies, records as a 
guide to buying; purchasing methods; supervision of selling; training and super- 
vision of retail sales force; and administrative problems. 

B.A. 156. Marketing Research Methods. (3) 

Prerequisites, B.A. 130 and B.A. 149. This course is intended to develop skill 
in the use of scientific methods in the acquisition, analysis and interpretation 
of marketing data. It covers the specialized fields of marketing research, the 
planning of survey projects, sample design, tabulation procedure and report 
preparation. 

B.A. 157. International Marketing. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 149. Functions of various exporting agencies; documents and 
procedures used in exporting and importing transactions. Methods of procuring 
goods in foreign countries; financing of import shipments; clearing through the 
customs districts; and distribution of goods in the United States. 

B.A. 158. Advertising Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 149. This course is concerned with the way in which business 
firms use advertising as a part of their marketing program. The case study 
method is used to present advertising problems taken from actual business 
practice. Cases studied illustrate problems in demand stimulation, media selec- 
tion, advertising research, testing, and statistical control of advertising. 

B.A. 160. Personnel Management I. (3) 

This course deals with the problems of directing and supervising employees under 
modern industrial conditions. Two phases of personal administration are stressed, 
the application of scientific management and the importance of human relations 
in this field. 

B.A. 161. Personnel Management II. (3) 

Prerequisite or Corequisite, B.A. 160. Job evaluation and merit rating and other 
personnel management techniques generally employed in business. 

B.A. 163. Labor Relations. (3) 

A study of the development and methods of organized groups in industry with 
reference to the settlement of labor disputes. An economic and legal analysis 
of labor union and employer association activities, arbitration, mediation, and 
conciliation; collective bargaining, trade agreements, strikes, boycotts, lockouts, 
company unions, employee representation, and injunctions. 

B.A. 164. Labor Legislation. (3) 

Case method analysis of the modern law of industrial relations. Cases include the 
decisions of administrative agencies, courts and arbitration tribunals. 

B.A. 165. Advanced Production Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 169. A study of typical problems encountered by the factory 
manager. The objective is to develop the ability to analyze and solve problems 
in management control of production and in the formulation of production 
policies. Among the topics covered are plant location, production planning and 
control, methods analysis and time study. 

24 



Business Administration 

B.A. 166. Business Communications. (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing. A systematic study of the principles of effective 
written communications in business. The fundamental aim is to develop the 
ability to write clear, correct, concise, and persuasive business letters and 
reports. 

B.A. 167. Operations Research I. (3) 

Prerequisite. B.A. 130 or consent of instructor. The philosophy, methods, and 
objectives of operations research. Basic methods are examined and their appli- 
cation to functional areas of business are covered. 

B.A. 168. Management and Organization Theory. (3) 

The development of management and organization theory, nature of the man- 
agement process and function and its future development. The role of the 
manager as an organizer and director, the communication process, goals and 
responsibilities. 

B.A. 169. Production Management. (3) 

Studies the operation of a manufacturing enterprise, concentrating on the econ- 
omies of production. Introduces a grounding in analytical method early so that 
the broad problem areas of system design, operation, and control can be based 
upon the analytical method. 

B.A. 170. Principles of Transportation. (3) 

A general course covering the five fields of transportation, their development, 
service and regulation. 

B.A. 171. Traffic and Physical Distribution Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing. Examines the management aspects of the business 
firm in moving their raw materials and finished goods, through traffic, ware- 
housing, industrial packaging, material handling, and inventory. A systematic 
examination of the trade-off possibilities and management alternatives to mini- 
mize cost of product flow and maximizing customer service is provided. 

B.A. 172. Motor Transportation. (3) 

Prerequisite. B.A. 170. The development and scope of the motor carrier in- 
dustry, different types of carriers, economics of motor transportation, services 
available, federal regulation, highway financing, allocation of cost to highway 
users, highway barriers. 

B.A. 173. Water Transportation. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 170. Water carriers of all types, development and types of 
services, trade routes, inland waterways, company organization, the American 
Merchant Marine as a factor in national activity. 

B.A. 174. Commercial Air Transportation. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 170. The air transportation system of the United States: 
airways, airports, airlines. Federal regulation of air transportation. Problems 
and services of commercial air transportation; economics, equipment, opera- 
tions, financing, selling of passenger and cargo services. Air mail development 
and services. 

B.A. 175. Advanced Transportation Problems. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 170. A critical examination of current government trans- 
portation policy and proposed solutions. Urban and intercity managerial trans- 
port problems are also considered. 

25 



Business Administration 

B.A. 176. Urban Transport and Urban Development. (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing. An analysis of the role of urban transportation 
in present and future urban development. The interaction of transport pricing 
and service, urban planning, institutional restraints, and public land uses, is 
studied. 

B.A. 180. Business Law. (3) 

Legal aspects of business relationships, contracts, negotiable instruments, agency, 
partnership, corporations, real and personal property, and sales. 

B.A. 181. Business Law. (3) 

Legal aspects of business relationships, contracts, negotiable instruments, agency 
partnerships, corporations, real and personal property, and sales. 

B.A. 182. Advanced Business Law. (3) 

Designed primarily for CPA candidates. Legal aspects of wills, insurance, 
torts and bankruptcy. Offered only in Summer School. 

B.A. 184. Public Utilities. (3) 

Prerequisites, Econ. 32 or 37. Using the regulated industries as specific exam- 
ples attention is focused on broad and general problems in such diverse fields 
as constitutional law, administrative law, public administration, government 
control of business, advanced economic theory, accounting, valuation and 
depreciation, taxation, finance, engineering and management. 

B.A. 189. Business and Government. (3) 

Prerequisites, Econ. 32 or 37. A study of the role of government in modern 
economic life. Social control of business as a remedy for the abuses of busi- 
ness enterprise arising from the decline of competition. Criteria of limitations 
on government regulation of private enterprise. 

B.A. 190. Risk Management. (3) 

Designed to acquaint the student with the nature and significance of risk in 
business enterprise. The problems relating to both pure and speculative risk in 
business are considered; and methods of solution involving risk assumption 
transfer, reduction, and the use of insurance are analyzed as aids in manage- 
ment decision making. 

B.A. 191. Principles of Risk and Insurance. (3) 

Emphasizes the use of insurance in resolving problems involving personal and 
business risks. Life, accident and health, fire and casualty, automobile, and 
marine insurance are examined as means of dealing with these risks. The theory 
and legal aspects of insurance are considered, as well as the quantitative meas- 
urement of risks. 

B.A. 195. Real Estate Principles. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. This course covers the nature and uses of real 
estate, real estate as a business, basic legal principles, construction problems and 
home ownership, city planning, and public control and ownership of real 
estate. 

B.A. 196. Urban Land Management. (3) 

Covers the managerial and decision making aspects of urban land and property. 
Included are such subjects as land use and valuation matters. 

26 



Business Administration 
B.A. 198. Structure and Operations of Industries. (3) 

Prerequisite, senior standing. The impact of technology and production policies 
on the economic, financial, marketing, and locational policies of representative 
industries. A background course for students in industrial and financial man- 
agement, business economics, general business, and related areas. 

B.A. 199. Business Policies. (3) 

Prerequisite, senior standing. A case study course in which the aim is to have 
the student apply both what he has learned of general management principles 
and their specialized functional applications of the overall management func- 
tion in the enterprise. 

For Graduates 
B.A. 210. Advanced Accounting Theory. (3) 
B.A. 220. Managerial Accounting. (3) 
B.A. 221, 222. Seminar in Accounting. (1-6) 
B.A. 226. Accounting Systems. (3) 
B.A. 228. Research in Accounting. (1-6) 
B.A. 229. Management Planning and Control. (1-6) 
B.A. 230. Advanced Business Statistics. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 130 or consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Bayesian 
decision processes and other statistical methods applicable to the operations 
of the business firm and the analysis of the economy. Methodological topics 
include a consideration of utility, expected values, estimation of probabilities, 
opportunity loss and cost of uncertainty, sampling, sequential decision pro- 
cedures, and selected topics from classical statistics. Applications are made to 
the problems of inventory control, production, investment, and other business 
functions. 

B.A. 231. Theory of Survey Design. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 131 or B.A. 132. or consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, 
$10.00. Theory of sampling from finite populations developed for various types 
of survey designs. Equi-probability selection methods. Unequal probabilities 
of selection. Consideration of the characteristics of particular types of estima- 
tors as well as cost functions in developing optimum designs. 

B.A. 234. Managerial Analysis I. (3) 

Required of M.B.A. candidates. 

The utilization of the scientific method in decision making. Various method- 
ologies are utilized in order to evaluate and interpret findings for management 
action. 

B.A. 235. Managerial Analysis II. (3) 

Designed to enable the student to go into greater depth in the use of analytical 
techniques. Where feasible, data processing is applied, and simulated experi- 
ences are provided. The aim is to encourage the development of the perceptive 
approach to complex business situations. 

27 



Business Administration 

B.A. 237. Management Simulation I. (3) 

Laboratory fee, $10.00. Application of management principles to the solution 
of complex business problems. This is accomplished in conjunction with the 
use of computer facilities at the Computer Science Center on the campus. 

B.A, 240. Seminar in Financial Management. (1-6) 

M.B.A. candidates must take B.A. 220 or B.A. 240. 

B.A. 242. FiNANCL^L Administration. (3) 

The role of the financial manager in executive decision making. Financial 
planning, analysis, and control in such areas as the allocation of financial 
resources within the firm, forecasting and budgeting, cost and profit controls, 
capital budgeting and the bases for investment decisions, alternative sources 
of short-term and long-term financing and financial problems of growth. 

B.A. 245. Research in Finance. (1-6) 

B.A. 249. Problems in Financial Administration. 

B.A. 250. Problems in Sales Management. (1-6) 

B.A. 251. Problems in Advertising. (1-6) 

B.A. 252. Problems in Retail Management. (1-6) 

B.A. 257. Seminar in Marketing Management. (3) 

B.A. 258. Research Problems in Marketing. (1-6) 

B.A. 259. Business Logistics. (3) 

Involves the optimization of human and material resources by their proper 
application at the right time and place to support the business enterprise. 
Consideration is given to analysis of material and manpower requirements, 
production planning and scheduling, acquisition, inventory control, and distri- 
bution. The role of advanced planning and forecasting is considered in mini- 
mizing costs and securing the best combination of resources. Impact of tech- 
nology upon the utilization of resources is considered. 

B.A. 262. Seminar in Labor Relations. (1-6) 

B.A, 264. Behavioral Factors in Management. (3) 

Required of M.B.A. candidates. 

A critical analysis of the impact of the behavioral sciences on traditional 
concepts of management as process and as organization. Included within the 
area of analysis are such subjects as human motivation, human relations, 
morale, status, role, organization, communication, bureaucracy, the executive 
role, leadership, and training. 

B.A. 265. Development and Trends in Production 
Management. (3) 

B.A. 266. Personnel Research: Manpower Procurement and 
Development. (1-6) 

B.A. 267. Personnel Research: Manpower Compensation and 
Evaluation. (1-6) 

B.A. 269. Application of Behavioral Science to Business. (1-6) 

Designed to enable the student to go into greater depth in the design and imple- 
mentation of behavioral science research in business. 

28 



Business Administration 

B.A. 270. Research in Transportation. (1-6) 

B.A. 271. Theory of Organization. (3) 

B.A. 272. Seminar in Management of Physical Distribution. (3) 

B.A. 275. Special Studies in Transportation. (3) 

B.A. 277. Seminar in Transportation. (3) 

B.A. 280. Seminar in Business and Government. (3) 

B.A. 281. Private Enterprise and Public Policy. (3) 

Examines the executive's social and ethical responsibilities to his employees, 
customers, and to the general public. Consideration is given to the conflicts 
occasioned by competitive relationships in the private sector of business and 
the effect of institutional restraints. The trends in public policy and their 
future effect upon management are examined. For comparative purposes, sev- 
eral examples of planned societies are considered. 

B.A. 282. Product, Production and Pricing Policy 

(3) Required of M.B.A. Candidates. 

The application of economics theory to the business enterprise in respect to 
the determination of policy and the handling of management problems with 
particular reference to the firm producing a complex line of products. Nature 
of competition. Pricing policy. Interrelationship of production and marketing 
problems. Basic types of cost. Control systems. Theories of depreciation and 
investment and the impact of each upon costs. 

B.A. 283. Management Policy Formulation. (3) 

Affords an insight into the problems confronting top management. A complex 
management game supplemented by the case method, provides a simulated 
environment required for dynamic decision-making policy formulation. 

B.A. 284. Seminar in Public Utilities. (1-6) 
B.A. 290. Seminar in Insurance. (3) 
B.A. 295. Seminar in Real Estate. (3) 
B.A. 399. Thesis. (1-6) 

II. ECONOMICS 

The program of studies in economics is designed to meet the needs of 
students who wish to concentrate either on a major or minor scale in this 
division of the social sciences. Students who expect to enroll in the pro- 
fessional schools and those who are planning to enter the fields of business, 
public administration, foreign service, or social service administration 
will find courses in economics of considerable value to them in their later 
work. A student of economics should choose courses to meet the require- 
ments for his major objective. If he expects to pursue graduate study, he 
should consult Graduate School Announcements for the general require- 
ments for advanced degrees. 

29 



Economics 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ECONOMICS MAJOR 

In addition to the University requirements in General Education (see 
page 2), the student majoring in economics is required to complete a 
minimum of 36 semester hours in economics with an average grade of 
not less than "C." Required courses are Econ. 4, 31, 32, 102, and 132, 
and B.A. 130 (Statistics). A student will normally have earned nine semes- 
ter hours credit in the lower division courses in economics prior to begin- 
ning advanced work in the junior year. These lower division courses must be 
completed with an average grade of not less than "C." Economics 102 
and 132 are normally taken in the junior year since they provide a theoreti- 
cal foundation for other economics courses. 

Other courses in economics to meet the requirements of the major are to be 
selected with the aid of a faculty adviser. Business Administration courses 
which may count as economics credit are B.A. 130, 131, 132, 134, 135, 
164, and 184. 

Economics majors enrolled in the College of Arts and Sciences must, of 
course, fulfill all of the specific requirements of that College; these 
include, for example, work in a foreign language and 7-8 semester hours 
of credit in natural science. All economics majors must take six semester 
hours of mathematics. 

Economics majors enrolled in the College of Business and Public Admin- 
istration may elect to take a foreign language or, in lieu of foreign language, 
may take B.A. 10 and Geog. 15. 

Economics majors are free to choose electives in other colleges of the 
University and are encouraged to study broadly in the social sciences, 
philosophy, mathematics, statistics, and accounting. Economics majors 
planning to do graduate work are advised to develop proficiency in mathe- 
matics through the calculus and in a foreign language. 

An economics honors program is open to economics majors entering their 
junior year. Students must have an academic average of at least 3.0 to be 
eUgible for admittance to this program, 

SUGGESTED STUDY PROGRAM FOR ECONOMICS MAJOR 

r-Semester—^ 

Freshman Year I II 

Eng. 1 — Composition and American Literature 3 

Math. 10, 1 1 or 19, 20 3-4 3-4 

Econ. 4 — Economic Developments 3 

Social Science Elective 3 3 

Fine Arts or Philosophy Elective 3 

Foreign Language or B.A. 10 and Elective 3 3 

Hea. 5 — Science and Theory of Health (men and women) . 2 

Physical Activities (men and women) 1 1 

Free Elective 3 



Total 18-19 16-17 

30 



Economics 

r-Semester—^ 

Sophomore Year I '' 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition & World Literature 3 3 

Econ. 31, 32 — Principles of Economics 3 3 

Foreign Language or Geog. 15 and elective 3 3 

Natural Science (one biological and one physical) 3-4 3-4 

History 3 3 

Total 15-16 15-16 

Junior Year 

Econ. 102 — National Income Analysis 3 

Econ. 132 — Intermediate Price Theory 3 

Econ. 140 — Money and Banking 3 

Econ. 160 — Labor Economics 3 

B.A. 130 — Business Statistics I 3 

Econ. 131 — Comparative Economic Systems 3 

Electives in Economics and other subjects ' 6 6 

Total 15 15 

Senior Year 

Econ. 148 — International Economics 3 

Econ. 142 — Public Finance and Taxation 3 

Electives in Economics and other subjects* 12 12 

Total 15 15 



ECONOMICS 

Professors: Dillard, Cumberland, Gruchy, O'Connell, Schultze, 
AND Ulmer. 

Associate Professors: Bergmann, Dodge, Knight, Weinstein and Won- 

NACOTT. 

Assistant Professors: J. Q. Adams, R. F. Adams, Bennett, Canter- 
bery, Dorsey, Green, Hexter, Hinrichs, Mayor, Meyer, Snow. 

Instructors: Bailey, Chase, Furey, Hamilton, Peake, Van Beek, Wein- 

TRAUB. 

Lecturers: Amuzegar, Conrad, Day, Gibney, Gramley, Measday, 
Mueller, Spiegel. 

Econ. 4. Economic Developments. (3) 

First and second semesters. Freshman requirement in business administration 
curriculums. An introduction to modern economic institutions — their origins, 



' Normally these electives must be on the junior-senior level. 

31 



Economics 

development, and present status. Commercial revolution, industrial revolution, 
and age of mass production. Emphasis on developments in England, Western 
Europe and the United States. (Dillard, Snow, StaflF.) 

EcoN. 31, 32. Principles of Economics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. Required in the 
business administration curriculums. In Econ. 31 basic concepts, the monetary 
system, the national accounts, national income analysis, and business cycles are 
introduced. In Econ. 32 emphasis is placed on price theory, distribution, inter- 
national trade, and economic development. (Staff.) 

Econ. 37. Fundamentals of Economics. (3) 

First and second semesters. Not open to students who have credit in Econ. 31 
and 32. Not open to freshmen or to B.P.A. students. A survey of the gen- 
eral principles underlying economic activity; analysis of leading economic prob- 
lems in the modern world. This is the basic course in economics for students 
who are unable to take the more complete course provided in Econ. 31 and 32. 

(Ulmer, Canterbery.) 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Econ. 102. National Income Analysis. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32. Required for economics 
majors. An analysis of national income accounts and the level of national 
income and employment. (Mayor.) 

Econ. 103. American Economic Development. (3) 

First and second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A study of long-term 
trends in the American economy. The transplantation of economic institutions 
from western Europe; the take-off period in United States economic growth; 
trends in productivity, prices, national income, savings and investment. The 
welfare state and the mixed economy. (Bailey.) 

Econ. 105. Introduction to Economic Development of Under- 
developed Areas. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. An analysis of the 
economic and social characteristics of underdeveloped areas. Recent theories of 
economic development; obstacles to development; policies and planning for 
development. (Hinrichs, J. Q. Adams.) 

Econ. 106. Economic Development of Selected Areas. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 105. Institutional characteristics of a specific area are dis- 
cussed and alternative strategies and policies for development are analyzed. 

(Bennett.) 

Econ. 130. Mathematical Economics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Econ. 102 and 132 and one year of mathematics. 
A course designed to enable economics majors to understand the simpler aspects 
of mathematical economics. Those parts of the calculus and algebra required 
for economic analysis will be presented. (Ulmer, Hexter.) 

Econ. 131. Comparative Economic Systems. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. An investigation of 
the theory and practice of various types of economic systems. An examination 

32 



Economics 

and evaluation of the capitalistic system followed by an analysis of alternative 
types of economic systems such as fascism, socialism, and communism. 

(Gruchy, Dodge, Amuzegar.) 

EcoN. 132. Intermediate Price Theory. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32. Required for economics 
majors. This course is an analysis of price and distribution theory with special 
attention to recent developments in the theory of imperfect competition. 

(Knight, Day, Hexter.) 

EcoN. 134. Contemporary Economic Thought. (3) 

Prerequisites, Econ. 32 and senior standing. Graduate students should take 
Econ. 232. A survey of recent trends in American, English, and Continental 
economic thought with special attention to the work of such economists as 
W. C. Mitchell, J. R. Commons, T. Veblen, W. Sombart, J. A. Hobson and 
other contributors to the development of economic thought since 1900. 

(Gruchy.) 

Econ. 137. The Economics of National Planning. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37 and senior standing. An analysis of the principles 
and practice of economic planning with special reference to the planning prob- 
lems of western European countries and the United States. (Gruchy.) 

Econ. 138. Economics of the Soviet Union. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. An analysis of the organization, 
operating principles and performance of the Soviet economy with attention to 
the historical and ideological background, planning, resources, industry, agri- 
culture, domestic and foreign trade, finance, labor, and the structure and growth 
of national income. (Dodge.) 

Econ. 140. Money and Banking. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A study of the rela- 
tion of money and credit to economic activity and prices; the impact of public 
policy in financial markets and in markets for goods and services; policies, 
structure, and functions of the Federal Reserve System; organization, operation, 
and functions of the commercial banking system, as related particularly to 
questions of economic stability and public policy. (Bennett, Meyer, Staff.) 

Econ. 141. Theory of Money, Prices and Economic Activity. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 140. A theoretical treatment of the in- 
fluence of money and financial markets on economic activity and prices, and 
of the effects of monetary policy on the markets for goods and services; the 
role of money in the classical and Keynesian macro-systems; topics of theoret- 
ical interest in monetary policy formation and implementation. 

Econ. 142. Introduction to Public Finance. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite. Econ. 32 or 37. A study of the 
issues in mobilizing resources to meet public wants through federal, state, and 
local governments; principles and policies of taxation, debt management, and 
governmental expenditures and their effects on resource allocation, stabilization 
of income and prices, income distribution and economic growth. 

(Hinrichs, Dorsey, Meyer.) 

Econ. 143. Theory of Public Finance. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite. Econ. 142 and 102, or consent of instructor. 
Advanced analysis of the theory and practice of public finance, including taxa- 
tion, debt management, expenditures, and fiscal policy. (Hinrichs.) 

33 



Economics 

EcoN. 144. State and Local Public Finance. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. Principles and problems of governmental finance 
with special reference to state and local jurisdictions. Topics to be covered 
include taxation, expenditures, and intergovernmental fiscal relations. 

(R. F. Adams.) 

EcoN. 147. Business Cycles. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 140. A study of the causes of depressions 
and unemployment, cyclical and secular instability, theories of business cycles, 
and the problem of controlling economic instability. (Mayor.) 

Econ. 148. International Economics. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A descriptive and 
theoretical analysis of international trade; balance of payments accounts; the 
mechanism of international economic adjustment; comparative costs; economics 
of customs unions. (Wonnacott, Canterbery.) 

Econ. 149. International Economic Policies. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 148. Contemporary balance of pay- 
ments problems; the international liquidity controversy; investment, trade and 
economic development; evaluation of arguments for protection. (Wonnacott.) 

Econ. 160. Labor Economics. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. The historical devel- 
opment and chief characteristics of the American labor movement are first 
surveyed. Present-day problems are then examined in detail: wage theories, 
unemployment, social security, labor organization, and collective bargaining. 

(Knight, Dorsey, Weinstein.) 

Econ. 161. Current Problems in Labor Economics. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 160. A detailed examination of current problems in labor 
economics including; labor market and manpower problems, unemployment 
compensation and social security, wage theories, and productivity analysis. 

(Weinstein, Dorsey.) 

Econ. 170. Industrial Organization. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. Changing structure of the American economy; 
price policies in different industrial classifications of monopoly and competi- 
tion in relation to problems of public policy. (Snow.) 

Econ. 171. Economics of American Industries. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A study of the technology, 
economics and geography of representative American industries. (Measday.) 

Econ. 196, 197. Honors Seminar. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Normally taken in the junior year. Prerequisite, 
candidacy for honors in Economics. Selected topics are investigated, and 
written reports are submitted. (Gruchy.) 

Econ. 198. Independent Honors Study. (3) 

First semester. Normally taken in the senior year. Prerequisites, Economics 
196, 197 and candidacy for honors in Economics. Integrated reading under staff 
direction, leading to the preparation of a thesis in Economics 199. (Staff) 

Econ. 199. Honors Thesis. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Economics 198 and candidacy for honors in 
Economics. General supervision will be provided through assembled meetings 
with the professor in charge of the course. (Staff.) 

34 



Economics 

For Graduates 

EcoN. 200. Micro-Economic Analysis. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 132. A critical analysis of the theory of 
economic decision-making in the firm, household, and indusry in perfect and 
imperfect competition; price, output, distribution and the theory of general 
equilibrium. Review of recent contributions. (Ulmer, Weinstein.) 

Econ. 201. Advanced Micro-Economic Analysis. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 200 or consent of instructor. Continua- 
tion of Econ. 200 with particular attention to recent developments in linear 
programming, game theory, activity analysis, welfare economics, input-output 
analysis, and micro-dynamic models. (Ulmer.) 

Econ. 202. Macro-Economic Analysis. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 102. National income accounting; deter- 
mination of national income and employment especially as related to the 
modern theory of effective demand; consumption function: multiplier and 
acceleration principles; the role of money as it affects output and employment 
as a whole. (Schultze, Bergmann.) 

Econ. 203. Seminar in American Economic Development. (3) 

Prerequisite, Graduate standing. Selected topics in the long-term movements of 
the American economy. 

Econ. 204. Origins and Development of Capitalism. (3) 

First semester. Study of the transition from feudalism to capitalism and the 
subsequent development of leading capitalist institutions in industry, agriculture, 
commerce, banking, and the social movement. (Dillard.) 

Econ. 205. Economic Development of Underdeveloped Areas. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 105, or Econ. 102 and Econ. 132, or con- 
sent of instructor. Principles and problems of economic developments in 
underdeveloped areas; policies and techniques which hasten economic 
development. (Bennett.) 

Econ. 206. Seminar in Economic Development. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 205 or consent of instructor. Problems 
and policies of economic development in specified under-developed areas. 

(Bennett.) 

Econ. 207. Money and Finance in Economic Development. (3) 

(Hinrichs.) 

Econ. 211. Quantitative Economics I. (3) 

Prerequisites, Econ. 102, 132, and a year of college mathematics. Not 
open to students who have credit in Econ. 130, Mathematical Economics. The 
use of mathematics in the formulation and derivation of economic theories and 
the construction of economic models. Calculus and matrix algebra required 
for economics will be taught as needed. (Green, Hexter.) 

Econ. 212. Quantitative Economics II. (3) 

Prerequisite. Econ. 211 and one year of Statistics. Required of all Ph.D. 
majors in Economics. Theory of probability and mathematical statistics as a 
foundation for empirical economic studies. (Bergmann.) 

35 



Economics 

EcoN. 214. Advanced Mathematical Economics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, either one year of calculus or Econ. 130. 
Model-building and mathematical derivation of micro- and macro-economic 
theories. Further topics in differential and difference equations and in matrix 
algebra introduced as required. (Ulmer.) 

Econ. 217. Econometrics I. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 212. A first course in the principles of econometrics. 

(Green, Hexter.) 

Econ. 218. Econometrics II. (3) 

Prerequisite Econ. 217 or equivalent. Advanced theory and applications of 
econometrics. Supervised research. (Green.) 

Econ. 220. Regional Analysis and Location Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Graduate standing, permission of the instructor. Location theory 
and the spatial distribution of economic activity. The application to regional 
and interregional problems of analytic methods, such as input-output techniques, 
linear programming, social accounts, gravity models, industrial complex analysis, 
money flows, and balance of payments. 

Econ. 230. History of Economic Thought. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 132 or consent of instructor. A study of the 
development of economic thought and theories including the Greeks. Romans, 
canonists, mercantilists, physiocrats, Adam Smith, Malthus, Ricardo. Rela- 
tion of ideas to economic policy. (Dillard, Spiegel.) 

Econ. 231. Economic Theory in the Nineteenth Century. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 230 or consent of the instructor. A study 
of various nineteenth and twentieth century schools of economic thought, par- 
ticularly the classicists, neo-classicists, Austrians, German historical school, 
American economic thought and the socialists. (Dillard, Spiegel.) 

Econ. 232, 233. Seminar in Institutional Economic Theory. (3, 3) 

A study of the recent developments in the field of institutional economic 
theory in the United States and abroad. (Gruchy.) 

Econ. 234. Economic Growth in Mature Economies. (3) 

Analysis of policies and problems for achieving stable economic growth in 
mature economics such as the United States, the United Kingdom, and the 
Scandinavian countries. (Gruchy.) 

Econ. 235. Advanced International Economics. (3) 

First semester. General equilibrium and disequilibrium in the world economy; 
international mechanism and adjustment; price, exchange rate, and income 
changes. Commercial policy and the theory of customs unions. (Wonnacott.) 

Econ. 236. Seminar in International Economic Relations. (3) 

Second semester. A study of selected problems in international economic 
relations. (Wonnacott.) 

Econ. 237. Selected Topics in Economics. (3) 

Econ. 238. Seminar in Economic Development of the 
Soviet Union. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 138 or consent of instructor. Measurement and evaluation 
of Soviet economic development including interpretation and use of Soviet 
statistics, measurement of national income and rates of growth, fiscal and 

36 



Economics 

monetary policies, investment and technological change, planning and eco- 
nomic administration, manpower and wage policies, foreign trade and aid, and 
selected topics in Bloc development. (Dodge.) 

EcoN. 240. Monetary Theory and Policy, (3) 

First semester. An adequate knowledge of micro- and macro-economics is 
assumed. Theory of money, financial assets, and economic activity; review 
of classical, neo-classical and Keynesian contributions; emphasis on post- 
Keynesian contributions, including those of Tobin, Patinkin, Gurley-Shaw, Fried- 
man, and others. (Gramley.) 

Econ. 241. Seminar in Monetary Theory and Policy. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 240 or consent of instructor. Theory of 
the mechanisms through which central banking affects economic activity and 
prices; formation and implementation of monetary policy; theoretical topics 
in monetary policy. (Gramley.) 

Econ. 242. Advanced Theory of Public Finance. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 143 or consent of instructor. Theories of 
taxation, debt management, and fiscal policy. Students are assumed to have a 
working knowledge of micro- and macro-economic analysis. (Hinrichs, Dorsey.) 

Econ. 243. Seminar in Public Finance. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 242. Theory of public expenditures with 
special attention to recent contributions; economic analysis of the theory and 
practice of public finance in various settings. (Schultze.) 

Econ. 247. Economic Growth and Instability. (3) 

Second semester. An analytical study of long-time economic growth in relation 
to short-term cyclical instability. Attention is concentrated on the connection 
between accumulation of capital and the capital requirements of secular 
growth and business cycles. Earlier writings as well as recent growth models 
are considered. (Schultze, Mayor.) 

Econ. 248 The Economics of Technical Change. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A study of the determinants and impact 
of inventions and innovations. Attention is given to the qualitative and quan- 
titative aspects of technical change, both at the micro-economic and macro- 
economic levels, and under different conditions of economic development. 

Econ. 260. Seminar in Labor Economics, (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 160 or consent of instructor. Theories of wage determina- 
tion, including analysis of wage structures and wage-price spiral; organiza- 
tion of labor markets, including factors influencing labor mobility and 
unemployment. (Knight.) 

Econ, 261, Selected Topics in Labor Economics, (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 160 or consent of instructor. A detailed analysis of selected 
topics in labor economics, including organization of labor markets, manpower 
utilization and development, labor force analysis, labor mobility and theories 
of unemployment. (Weinstein, Dorsey.) 

Econ. 270. Advanced Industrial Organization, (3) 

(Mueller, Snow.) 

Econ, 399, Thesis. 

(Arranged.) 

37 



Geography 

III. GEOGRAPHY 

Geography embraces both physical and social science aspects, and in 
geographical research these two aspects are related constantly. The geog- 
rapher studies man's physical environment — landforms, climate, nature 
and distribution of physical resources, etc. — and its relationships to man's 
major economic and other activities, particularly as they find expression 
in the landscape. He is especially interested in the regional diversity of 
the world in its various and changing patterns and the physical and socio- 
economic causes which contribute to such diversity. 

Thus a geographer should have a background in certain aspects of the 
physical and of the social sciences. This is reflected in both the under- 
graduate and graduate programs of study. First hand observation is also 
still of prime importance to the modern geographer, as it was to the old 
"scientific travel geographer," and parts of many types of geographical 
research work are carried out in the field. Therefore, a certain amount 
of training in field observation is essential for the geographer. Major tools 
in his work are air photographs and many different types of maps. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR AN UNDERGRADUATE MAJOR 
IN GEOGRAPHY 

There are 3 different undergraduate programs in geography: 

1. The general program. This program prepares a student for work 
as a geographer in Federal and State government, business and 
various kinds of teaching, and for later advanced work in geog- 
raphy. 

2. The urban geography program- This program prepares a student 
for work as a geographer in State, County, Municipal 
and other planning agencies. 

3. The cartography program. This program prepares a student for 
work as a cartographer in Federal and State government, plan- 
ning and private business. 

The curriculum for an undergraduate major in geography is designed to 
give the student an understanding of the geographic factors that play a 
major role in creating differences between geographic regions and coun- 
tries, and to show how such factors may affect economic, social, and po~ 
litical activities. The student will be taught the fundamentals of map 
making, field work, and geographic analysis. Special orientation toward 
the work of a geographer in urban and suburban planning or toward car- 
tography is possible within the framework of the undergraduate major. 

Openings for well trained geographers exist in many branches of the 
Federal government and of State governments, in planning agencies, in 
private business, and in high schools, colleges and universities. For the 

38 



Geography 

higher positions in government and planning, study toward an M.A. may 
be^ desirable. Colleges and universities generally require M.A. and Ph.D. 
degrees. 

A student majoring in geography is required to complete satisfactorily 
120 semester hours of work in addition to the required work in hygiene, 
and physical activities. A general average of at least "C" is required for 
graduation. Only courses in which the student receives a grade of "C" 
or above will be counted toward the major. 

The specific requirements for the geography major are: 

I. Geog. 10 and 11 (3, 3) or equivalent; Geog. 30 (3); Geog. 35 (3); 
Geog. 40 and 41 (3, 3); Geog. 170 (3) and 18 hours in other geography 
courses numbered 100 to 199, of which 6 hours must be in non-regional 
courses; a total of 39 hours in geography. 

II. Social Sciences— G. & P. 1 (3); Econ. 31 and 32 (3,3); Hist. (3,3); 
one course in U.S. history, one in another area; Soc. 105 (3); a total of 
18 semester hours. 

III. Natural Sciences and Mathematics — Botany 1 and 113 or 102 (4, 2 
or 3); Agron. 114 or equivalent (4); Chem. 1 (4); Math. 3 (4) or Math 
10 (3). Total of 18 or 19 semester hours. 

IV. English and Speech— Eng. 1 (3) and 3, 4, (3, 3); Speech 1 (3) or 
7 (2); a total of 11 or 12 semester hours. 

V. Foreign Language and Literature — 12 semester hours in one language, 
unless an advanced course is taken. 

VI. Fine Arts or Philosophy — Phil. 41 (3), a total of 3 hours. 

VII. Hygiene, and physical activities. The present University requirement 
is 4 semester hours in physical activities and health education. 

A student who elects geography as a major must have earned eighteen 
semester hours credit in the prerequisite courses in geography prior to 
beginning the advanced work of the junior year. These are normally taken 
during the freshman and sophomore years. Only courses in which the 
student receives a grade of "C" or above will be counted toward the major. 

A minor in geography should consist of Geog. 10 (3), Geog. 30 (3), 
Geog. 40 (3) and such other courses as the major adviser deems suitable. 

The specific courses comprising the student's program of studies should be 
selected with the aid of a faculty adviser from the Department of Geog- 
raphy in terms of the student's objective and major interest. 



39 



Geography 

RECOMMENDED STUDY PROGRAM FOR GEOGRAPHY MAJORS 



Freshman Year 

Geog. 10, 11 — General Geography 

Chem. 1 — General Chemistry 

Bot. 1 — General Botany 

Speech 1 or 7 — Public Speaking 

G. & P. 1 — American Government 

Eng. 1 — (or 21) Composition 

Foreign Language 

Phil. 41 — Elementary Logic and Semantics. 

Heal. 5 — Health Education 

Physical Activities (men and women 



r-Semester- 
I II 



4 

2-3 



TotaL 



17 18-19 



Sophomore Year 

Geog. 30 — Principles of Morphology 

Geog. 35 — Map Reading and Interpretation 

Geog. 40 — Principles of Meteorology 

Geog. 41 — Introductory Climatology 

Hist. — One U. S. history and one other area 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature. . . 

Foreign Language 

Math. 3 or 10 — Fundamentals of Mathematics or 
Introduction to Mathematics 



3 
3 
3 

3-4 



Total 



18-19 



15 



Junior Year 



Bot. 113 — .Plant Geography 

Agron. 114 — Soil Classification and Geography 

Soc. 105 — Cultural Anthropology 

Econ. 31, 32 — Principles of Economics 

Geog. — Selection to fit student's needs 

Electives, with adviser's consent 



Total 



17 



16 



Senior Year 



Geog. 170 — Local Field Course 3 

Geog. 199 — Thesis Research for undergraduate majors in 

geography 3 

Geog. — Selection to fit student's needs 6 3 

Electives, with adviser's consent (one of which should be a 

Social Science) 6 3 

Total 15 9 



40 



Geography 

SUGGESTED STUDY PROGRAM FOR URBAN GEOGRAPHY 

In recent years there has been an increased demand in the field of Urban 
and Suburban Planning for persons with basic preparation in Geography, 
including work in cartography and urban geography, and with supporting 
preparation in Business Administration, Economics, Government and 
Politics, and Sociology. The following program has been organized in 
response to this demand, and in consultation with leading members of 
planning organizations in this part of the country. The program corre- 
sponds closely to the general geography major, but most elective hours 
are assigned to specific courses. 

Attention is drawn to the fact that for this course of study no foreign 
language is required, but that persons wishing to pursue later a course 
toward the M.A. degree in geography must at that time offer 12 credit 
hours of an approved foreign language, or pass an examination. 

r-Seinester—<, 
Freshman Year I U 

Geog. 10, 1 1 — General Geography 3 3 

Geog. 30 — Principles of Morphology 3 

Geog. 35 — Map Reading and Interpretation 3 

Chem. 1 — General Chemistry 4 

Bot. 1 — General Botany 4 

G. & P. 1 — American Government 3 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life 3 

Eng. 1 — Composition 3 

Phil. 41 — Elementary Logic and Semantics 3 

Hea. 5 — Health Education 2 

Physical Activities (men and women) 1 1 



Total 17 19 



Sophomore Year 

Geog. 40 — Principles of Meteorology 3 

Geog. 41 — Introductory Climatology 3 

Econ. 31, 32 — Principles of Economics 3 3 

Hist. — One U. S. history and one other area 3 3 

Soc. 13 — Rural Sociology 3 

Soc. 14 — Urban Sociology 3 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature 3 3 

Speech 1 or 7 — Public Speaking 2-3 

Math. 3 or 10 — Fundamentals of Mathematics or 

Introduction to Mathematics 3-4 



Total _ _ 18-19 17-18 



41 



Geography 

/—Semester—^ 
Junior Year / // 

Geog. 100 — Regional Geography of Eastern Anglo-America 3 

Geog. 155 — Problems and Practices of Photo Interpretation 3 

Geog. 195 — Geography of Transportation 3 

Geog. 197 — Urban Geography 3 

Agron. 114 — Soil Classification and Geography 4 

B. A. 130 — Business Statistics 1 3 

Econ. 142 — Public Finance and Taxation 3 

B.A. 176 — Urban Transport and Urban Development 3 

Soc. 121 — Population 3 

Electives, with adviser's consent 2 

Total 15 15 

Senior Year 

Geog. 154, 155 — General Cartography and Graphics 3 3 

Geog. 170 — Local Field Course 3 

B. A. 195 — Real Estate Principles 3 

G. & P. 161 — Metropolitan Administration 3 

Soc. 1 14 — The City 3 

Geog. 199 — Thesis Research for undergraduate majors in 

geography 3 

Electives, with adviser's consent 5 

Total 15 11 

Electives during the Junior and Senior years should be chosen from among 
the following courses: Geog. 160 — Advanced Economic Geography I. 
Agricultural Resources (3); Geog. 161 — Advanced Economic Geography 
II. Mineral Resources (3); Geog. 198 — Topical Investigations (1-3); 
B.A. 170 — Transportation Services and Regulations (3); B.A. 184 — 
Public Utilities (3); B.A. 180, 181— Business Law (4, 4); Econ. ISO- 
Marketing Principles and Organization (3); Econ. 171 — Economics of 
American Industries (3); Econ. 137 — The Economics of National 
Planning (3); G. & P. 112 — Public Financial Administration 
(3); G. & P. 181— Administrative Law (3); Soc. 1 1 2— Rural-Urban 
Relations (3); Soc. 115 — Industrial Sociology (3); Soc. 183 — Social Sta- 
tistics (3). 

SUGGESTED STUDY PROGRAM FOR CARTOGRAPHY 

There is a steady demand from Federal government, local government, 
planning agencies, and private firms for well trained geographic cartog- 
raphers. A good geographic cartographer should understand the prin- 
ciples of geography and geographic research, as much cartographic work 
deals with the research that is necessary even before the first sketch of a 
map can be made. He should understand the principles and some of the 
problems of modem map making, general graphic presentation, and meth- 
ods of reproduction; he should be able to do satisfactory cartographic 
drafting. The suggested program is essentially similar to that for the 

42 



Geography 

undergraduate major except that students specializing in the cartographic 
side of geography may, with the consent of the Senior Adviser, enroll for 
Econ. 37 (3) instead of Econ. 31 and 32 (3, 3). Moreover, the Senior 
Adviser may also release such students from the requirement to take Soc. 
105. 

The student should take as many of the courses from Geog. 150 to and 
including Geog. 155 as are available during his upper classman years. 
Courses outside of geography, which can be expected to be most useful 
to his future cartography career, should be chosen in consultation with 
the Senior Adviser. 



GEOGRAPHY 

Professors: Hu, Van Royen. 

Associate Professors: Ahnert, Chaves and Deshler. 

Assistant Professors: Anderson, Gordon, Mika, Schmieder and Wiedel. 

Lecturers: Groves, Volk. 

Instructor: Kinerney. 



Geog. 10, 11. General Geography. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Geog. 10 is suggested for students of Arts and 
Sciences. Education and those who desire a preparation for further study in 
geography. It also will serve as a preparation for the regional studies. Geog. 
10 and 11 are required of all majors in geography and are recommended for 
minors. First part: an introduction to the various subdivisions of geography, 
to the nature and use of maps, to major principles and basic terminology. 
Second part: a study of the philosophy, techniques, aspects of literature and 
applications of geography. (Deshler and others.) 

Geog. 15. Introductory Economic Geography. (3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period 
per week. A study of physical and economic factors that underlie production. 
The roles of climate, soils, and landforms; the nature and geographic distribu- 
tion of agricultural, power and mineral resources, and the nature and uses of 
cartographic materials. (Staff.) 

Geog. 20, 21. Economic Geography. (3, 3) 

(Not offered on College Park campus.) 

Geog. 30. Principles of Morphology. (3) 

First semester. A study of the physical features of the earth's surface and their 
geographic distribution, including subordinate land forms. Major morphologi- 
cal processes, the development of land forms, and the relationships between var- 
ious types of land forms and land use problems. (Ahnert.) 



43 



Geography 

Geog. 35. Map Interpretation and Map Problems. (3) 

First and second semesters. Interpretation of land forms and man-made features 
on American and foreign maps. Functions, use, and limitations of various 
types of maps, with emphasis upon topographic maps. Problems of use and in- 
terpretation. (Ahnert.) 

Geog. 40. Principles of Meteorology. (3) 

First and second semesters. An introductory study of the weather. Properties 
and conditions of the atmosphere, and methods of measurement. The atmos- 
pheric circulation and conditions responsible for various types of weather and 
their geographic distribution patterns. Practical applications. (Kinerney.) 

Geog. 41. Introductory Climatology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Geog. 40, or permission of the mstructor. Cli- 
matic elements and their controls, the classification and distribution of world 
climates and relevance of climatic differences to human activities. (Chaves.) 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Geog 100. Regional Geography of Eastern Anglo- America. (3) 

Prerequisite, Geog. 10 or Geog. 15, or permission of the instructor. A study 
of the cultural and economic geography and the geographic regions of eastern 
United States and Canada, including an analysis of the significance of the 
physical basis for present-day diversification of development, and the historical 
geographic background. 

Geog. 101. Regional Geography of Western Anglo- America. (3) 

Prerequisite, Geog. 10 or Geog. 15, or permission of the instructor. A study 
of western United States, western Canada, and Alaska along the lines men- 
tioned under Geog. 100. 

Geog. 103. Geographic Concepts and Source Materials. (3) 

A comprehensive and systematic survey of geographic concepts designed ex- 
clusively for teachers. Stress will be placed upon the philosophy of geography 
in relation to the social and physical sciences, the use of the primary tools of 
geography, source materials, and the problems of presenting geographic prin- 
ciples. 

Geog. 104. Geography of Major World Regions. (3) 

A geographic analysis of the patterns, problems, and prospects of the world's 
principal human-geographic regions, including Europe, Anglo-America, the 
Soviet Union, the Far East, and Latin America. Emphasis upon the causal 
factors of differentiation and the role geographic differences play in the in- 
terpretation of the current world scene. This course is designed especially for 
teachers. 
Geog. 105. Geography of Maryland and Adjacent Areas. (3) 

An analysis of the physical environment, natural resources, and population in 
relation to agriculture, industry, transport, and trade in the state of Maryland 
and adjacent areas. 

Geog. 110. Economic and Cultural Geography of Caribbean 
America. (3) . , ^- ■ , . a 

An analysis of the physical framework, broad economic and historical trends, 
cultural patterns, and regional diversification of Mexico, Central America, the 
West Indies, and parts of Colombia and Venezuela. (Chaves.) 

44 



GeCMjRAPHY 

Geog. 111. Economic and Cultural Geography of South 
America. (3) 

A survey of natural environment and resources, economic development and 
cultural diversity of the South American republics, with emphasis upon prob- 
lems and prospects of the countries. (Chaves.) 

Geog. 120. Geography of Europe. (3) 

First and second semesters. Agricultural and industrial development of Europe 
and present-day problems in relation to the physical and cultural setting of the 
continent and its natural resources. (Van Royen, Ahnert.) 

Geog. 122. Economic Resources and Development of Africa. (3) 

The natural resources of Africa in relation to agricultural and mineral produc- 
tion; the various stages of economic development and the potentialities of the 
future. (Deshler.) 

Geog. 125. Geography of Asia. (3) 

Lands, climates, natural resources and major economic activities in Asia (except 
Soviet Asia). Outstanding differences between major regions. (Hu.) 

Geog. 130. Economic and Political Geography of Eastern 
Asia. (3) 

Study of China, Korea, Japan, the Philippines; physical geographic setting; pop- 
ulation; economic and political geography. Potentialities of major regions and 
recent developments. (Hu.) 

Geog. 131. Economic and Political Geography of South and 
Southeast Asia. (3) 

Study of the Indian subcontinent, Farther India, Indonesia: physical geographic 
setting; population; economic and political geography. Potentialities of various 
countries and regions and their role in present Asia. (Hu.) 

Geog. 134. Cultural Geography of China and Japan. (3) 

Survey of geographical distribution and interpretation of cultural patterns of 
China and Japan. Emphasis on basic cultural institutions, outlook on life, unique 
characteristics of various groups. Trends of cultural change and contemporary 
problems. (Hu.) 

Geog. 140. Geography of the Soviet Union. (3) 

The natural environment and its regional diversity. Geographic factors in the 
expansion of the Russian state. The geography of agricultural and industrial 
production, in relation to available resources, transportation problems, and 
diversity of population. (Anderson.) 

Geog. 146. Regional Geomorphology, (3) 

Regional and comparative morphology, with special emphasis upon Anglo- 
America. (Ahnert.) 



45 



Geography 

Geog. 150. History and Theory of Cartography (3) 

The development of maps throughout history. Geographical orientation co- 
ordinates, and map scales. Map projections, their nature use and limitations^ 
Principles of representation of features on physical and cultural maps. Modern 
uses of maps and relationships between characteristics of maps and use types. 

Geog 151, 152. Cartography and Graphics Practicum. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. One hour lecture and two two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Techniques and problems of compilation, design, and construc- 
tion of various types of maps and graphs. Relationships between map making 
and modern methods of production and reproduction. Trips to representative 
plants. Laboratory work directed toward cartographic problems encountered 
in the making of nontopographic maps. (Wiedel. ) 

Geog. 153. Problems of Cartographic Representation and 

^^Tw^^hours lecture and two hours laboratory a week. Study of cartographic 
compilation methods. Principles and problems of symbolization classification 
and representation of map data. Problems of representation of features at dif- 
ferent scales and for different purposes. Place-name selection and lettering; 
stick-up and map composition. 

Geog 154. Problems of Map Evaluation. (3) , , ^ , . . 

Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory a week. Schools of topographic 
concepts and practices. Theoretical and practical means of determining map 
reliability, map utility, 'and source materials. Nature, status, and problems o 
topographic mapping in different parts of the world. Non-topographic special 
use maps. Criteria of usefulness for purposes concerned and of ^^1'^''^^]'^^^^ ^ 

Geog 155. Problems and Practices of Photo Interpretation (3) 

Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Interpretation of 
aerial photographs with emphasis on the recognition of landforms of different 
types and man-made features. Study of vegetation, soil, and other data tha. 
mav be derived from aerial photographs, lypes of aerial photographs and limi- 
tations of photo interpretation. (Ahner .) 

Geog. 160. Advanced Economic Geography I. Agricultural 

^^'Hr^t'^femeit^er, alternate years. Prerequisite, Geog. 10 or Geog. 15 The nature 
of agricultural resources, the major types of agricultural exploitation in the 
world, and the geographic distribution of certain major crops and animals in re- 
lation to physical environment and economic geographic conditions Mam prob- 
lems of conservation. <Van Royen.) 

Geog. 161. Advanced Economic Geography II. Mineral 

^^'STmester, alternate years. Prerequisite, Geog. 10 or Geog 15^ The nature 
and geographic distribution of the principal power, metallic and other minerals. 
Economic geographic aspects of modes of exploitation. Consequences of geo- 
graphic distribution and problems of conservation. (Van Royen.) 

Geog. 170. Local Field Course. (3) , ^ . c- ^ «k 

First semester. Training in geographic field methods and techniques. Field ob- 

46 



Geography 

servation of land use in selected rural and urban areas in eastern Maryland. 
One lecture per week with Saturday and occasional weekend field trips. Pri- 
marily for undergraduates. (Ahnert.) 

Geog. 180. Scientific Methodology and History of Geography. (3) 

First semester. For undergraduate and graduate majors in Geography. May be 
taken also by students with a minimum of nine hours in systematic and six hours 
in regional geography. A comprehensive and systematic study of the history, 
nature, and basic principles of geography, with special reference to the major 
schools of geographic thought; a critical evaluation of some of the important 
geographical works and methods of geographic research. (Hu.) 

Geog. 190. Political Geography. (3) 

Geographical factors in national power and international relations; an analysis 
of the role of "geopolitics" and "geostrategy," with special reference to the cur- 
rent world scene. (Chaves.) 

Geog. 195. Geography of Transportation. (3) 

The distribution of transport routes on the earth's surface; patterns of transport 
routes; the adjustment of transport routes and media to conditions of the natural 
environment centers and their distribution. 

Geog. 197. Urban Geography. (3) 

Origins of cities, followed by a study of elements of site and location with 
reference to cities. The patterns and functions of some major world cities will 
be analyzed. Theories of land use differentiation within cities will be ap- 
praised. (Mika.) 

Geog. 198. Topical Investigations. (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Independent study under individual guidance. Re- 
stricted to advanced undergraduate students with credit for at least 24 hours 
in geography, and to graduate students. Any exception should have the approval 
of the Head of the Department. (Staff.) 

Geog. 199. Undergraduate Thesis Research. (3) 

Directed regional or systematic study involving several subfields of geography, 
including cartographic presentation, and usually requiring field work; and lead- 
ing to an undergraduate thesis. (Limited to undergraduate majors in geography). 

(Hu.) 

For Graduates 
Geog. 200. Field Course. (3) 

Field work in September, conferences and reports during first semester. Prac- 
tical experience in conducting geographic field studies. Intensive training in field 
methods and techniques and m the preparation of reports. For graduate students 
in geography. Open to other students by special permission of the Head of the 
Department of Geography. (Staff.) 

Geog. 210, 211. Seminar in the Geography of Latin 
America. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Geog. 110. Ill or consent of in- 
structor. An analysis of recent changes and trends in industrial development, 
exploitation of mineral resources, and land utilization. (Chaves.) 

47 



Geography 

Geog. 220, 221. Seminar in the Geography of Europe 
AND Africa. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Geog. 120 or 122, or consent of 
instructor. Analysis of special problems concerning the resources and develop- 
ment of Europe and Africa. (Van Royen, Deshler.) 

Geog. 230, 231. Seminar in the Geography of East Asia. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Analysis of problems concerning the geography of 
East Asia with emphasis on special research methods and techniques applicable 
to the problems of this area. (Hu.) 

Geog. 240, 241. Seminar in the Geography of the U.S.S.R. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Investigation of special aspects of Soviet geography. 
Emphasis on the use of Soviet materials. Prerequisite, reading knowledge of 
Russian and Geog. 140, or consent of instructor. (Anderson.) 

Geog. 246. Seminar in the Geography of the Near East. (3) 
First and second semesters. 

Geog. 250. Seminar in Cartography. (Credit arranged) 

First or second semester. The historical and mathematical background of carto- 
graphic concepts, practices, and problems, and the various philosophical and 
practical approaches to cartography. Discussions will be supplemented by the 
presentation of specific cartographic problems investigated by the students. 



Geog. 260. Advanced General Climatology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Geog. 41, or consent of instructor. Advanced study 
of elements and controls of the earth's climates. Principles of climatic classi- 
fication. Special analysis of certain climatic types. 

Geog. 261. Applied Climatology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Geog. 41, or consent of instructor. Study of 
principles, techniques, and data of micro-climatology, physical and regional 
climatology relating to such problems and fields as transportation, agriculture, 
industry, urban planning, human comfort and regional geographic analysis. 

Geog. 262, 263. Seminar in Meteorology and Climatology. (3,3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Selected topics 
in meteorology and climatology chosen to fit the individual needs of advanced 
students 

Geog. 280. Geomorphology. (3) 

Second semester. An advanced comparative study of selected geomorphic proc- 
esses and land forms, theories of land forms evolution and geomorphological 
problems. (Van Royen.) 

Geog. 290, 291. Selected Topics in Geography. (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Readings and discussion on selected topics in the 
field of geography. To be taken only with joint consent of adviser and Head of 
the Department of Geography. (Staff.) 

Geog. 399. Dissertation Research. (Credit to be arranged) 

First and second semesters and summer. (Staff.) 

48 



Government and Politics 

IV. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

The Department of Government and Politics offers programs designed to 
prepare students for government service, politics, foreign assignments, and 
intelligent and purposeful citizenship. 

Business and Public Administration students may major in Government 
and Politics. At the Junior/Senior level they may pursue the general 
G. & P. curriculum or they may pursue a more specialized curriculum 
either in International Affairs or in Public Administration. 

Government and Politics majors must take a minimum of 36 semester hours 
in G. & P. courses and may not count more than 42 hours in G. & P. to- 
ward graduation. No course in which the grade is less than "C" may be 
counted as part of the major work. 

The Government and Politics fields are as follows: (1) American Govern- 
ment and Politics; (2) Comparative Government; (3) International Af- 
fairs; (4) Political Theory; (5) Public Administration; (6) Public Law; 
and (7) Public Policy and Political Behavior. 

All G. & P. majors are required to take G. & P. 1, 3, 20, and 141 or 142 
(Political Theory). They must take one G. & P. course from three sepa- 
rate G. & P. fields as designated by the Department; and in addition: (a) 
G. & P. majors (general) must take at least 15 G. & P. semester hours 
at the 100 level; (b) G. & P. majors taking the International Affairs 
curriculum must complete at least 15 semester hours at the 100 level in 
International Affairs and Comparative Government courses, including G. & 
P. 101; (c) G. & P. majors taking the PubUc Administration curriculum 
must complete at least 15 semester hours at the 100 level in Public Admin- 
istration, including G. & P. 110. 

All students majoring in G. & P. (general) or G. & P. with specialization 
in Public Administration must take a minimum of 12 semester hours in 
one foreign language. Students majoring in G. & P. with specialization in 
International Affairs must take a minimum of 12 semester hours in one 
foreign language above the first year elementary course. (The first year 
elementary requirement may be waived by high school credit or placement 
tests). 

All students majoring in G. & P. must fulfill the requirements of a minor, 
which involves the completion of 1 8 semester hours from approved Depart- 
ments other than G. & P. At least six of the 18 hours must be taken 
at the 100 level from a single Department. Students majoring in G. & P. 
with specialization in International Aflairs may choose to take all minor 
courses either in geographical area studies or on a Departmental basis: 
geographical area minors may be chosen, with the consent of the depart- 
mental adviser, from the following: Africa, East Asia, Europe, Latin Amer- 
ica, the Middle East, and the Soviet Union. G. & P. general majors and 
G. & P. majors specializing in Public Administration may not minor in 
geographical area studies. 

49 



Government and Politics 

FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE REQUIREMENTS 



Courses 


Hours 


Econ. 31, 32 


6 


English 1, 3, 4 

Fine Arts or Philosophy 

Foreign Language 

(International Affairs students must have 12 
foreign language credits above the first year 
elementary level.) 

G. & P. 1, 3, 20 


9 
3 

12 

9 


History 
Math. 10, 11 


6 

6 


Science (One Physical Science and one Biological Science) 
Social Science (to fulfill Gen. Educ. Program requirement) 
Speech 1 


7 

3 
3 



JUNIOR AND SENIOR REQUIREMENTS FOR THE 
G. & P. GENERAL CURRICULUM 



64 



fields 



Courses 
G. & P. 141 or 142 (Political Theory) 
One course from each of three G. & P. 

as designated by the Department 
Additional 100-level G. & P. courses 

(May not all be taken in International 

Affairs/Comparative Government, or all in 

Public Administration) 
Requirements for minor 
Statistics 
Electives recommended by adviser 



Hours 
3 

9 

15 



18 

3 

12 



60 



' See catalog of College of Arts and Sciences for requirements for G. & P. majors in 
A. & S. 

All students must meet University requirements in Physical Education and Health 
Education. 



50 



Government and Politics 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR REQUIREMENTS FOR THE G. & P. 
INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS CURRICULUM 

Courses Hours 

G. & P. 141 or 142 (Political Theory) 3 
One course from each of three G. & P. fields 

as designated by the Department 9 
Additional 100-level International Affairs and Comparative 

Government courses including G. & P. 101 15 
Requirements for minor 

(Departmental or Geographical Area Studies) 18 

Statistics 3 

Electives recommended by adviser 12 



60 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR REQUIREMENTS FOR THE G. & P. 
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION CURRICULUM 

Courses Hours 

G. & P. 141 or 142 (PoUtical Theory) 3 
One course from each of three G. & P. fields 

as designated by the Department 9 
Additional 100-level PubUc Administration courses 

including G. & P. 110 15 

Requirements for minor 18 

Statistics 3 

Electives recommended by adviser 12 



60 



GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

Professors: Plischke, Anderson, Burdette, Dillon, and Harrison. 

Associate Professors: Byrd, Hathorn, Hsueh, Jacobs, and McNelly. 

Assistant Professors: Alperin, Claude, Conway, Cox, Koury, O'Don- 
nell, Onyewu, Piper, Terchek, and Wolfe. 

Lecturers: Barber, Frederickson, Larson, Ratchford, Soles, and 

ZiMRING. 

G. & P, 1. American Government. (3) 

This course is designed as the basic course in government and it or its equivalent 
is a prerequisite to other courses in the Department. It is a comprehensive 
study of government in the United States — national, state, and local. 

G. & P. 3. Principles of Government and Politics. (3) 
A study of the basic principles and concepts of political science. 

51 



Government and Politics 

G. & P. 20. Introduction to Political Behavior. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. Development, concepts, and techniques of the beha- 
vioral approach to political science. Comparison with traditional approaches. 

G. & P. 40. Political Ideologies. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A survey and analysis of the leading ideologies of the 
modern world, including anarchism, communism, socialism, fascism, national- 
ism, and democracy. 

G. & P. 60. State and Local Government. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the functioning and problems of state and 
local goverimient in the United States, with illustrations from Maryland juris- 
dictions. 

G. & P. 97. Governments and Politics of Europe. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A comparative study of the political systems of the 
United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, and other selected European coun- 
tries. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
G. & P. 101. International Political Relations. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the major factors underlying international 
relations, the methods of conducting foreign relations, the foreign policies of 
the major powers, and the means of avoiding or alleviating international con- 
flicts. 

G. & P. 102. International Law. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the basic character, general principles, and 
specific rules of international law, with emphasis on recent and contemporary 
trends in the field and its relation to other aspects of international affairs. 

G- & P. 103. Contemporary African Politics. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A survey of contemporary developments in the interna- 
tional politics of Africa, with special emphasis on the role of an emerging Africa 
in world affairs. 

G. &. P. 104. Inter- American Relations. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. An analytical and historical study of the Latin- American 
policies of the United States and of problems in our relations with individual 
countries, with emphasis on recent developments. 

G. & P. 105. Recent Far Eastern Politics. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. The background and interpretation of recent political 
events in the Far East and their influence on world politics. 

G. & P. 106. American Foreign Relations. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. The principles and machinery of the conduct of Amer- 
ican foreign relations, with emphasis on the Department of State and the Foreign 
Service, and an analysis of the major foreign policies of the United States. 

G. & P. 107. Contemporary Middle Eastern Politics. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A survey of contemporary developments in the inter- 
national politics of the Middle East, with special emphasis on the role of 
emerging Middle East nations in world affairs. 

52 



Government and Politics 
G. & P. 108. International Organization. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the objectives, structure, functions, and 
procedures of international organizations, including the United Nations and such 
functional and regional organizations as the Organization of American States. 

G. & P. 109. Foreign Policy of the U.S.S.R. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the development of the foreign policy of 
the Soviet Union, with attention paid to the forces and conditions that make 
for continuities and changes from Tsarist policies. 

G. & P. lip. Principles of Public Administration. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of public administration in the United States, 
giving special attention to the principles of organization and management and 
to fiscal, personnel, planning, and public relations practices. 

G. & P. ill. Public Personnel Administration. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 110 or B. A. 160. A survey of public personnel adminis- 
tration, including the development of merit civil service, the personnel agency, 
classification, recruitment, examination techniques, promotion, service ratings, 
training, discipline, employee relations, and retirement. 

G. & P. 112. Public Financial Administration. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 110 or Econ. 142. A survey of governmental financial 
procedures, including processes of current and capital budgeting, the administra- 
tion of public borrowing, the techniques of public purchasing, and the machinery 
of control through pre-audit and post-audit. 

G. & P. 113. Governmental Organization and Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 110. A study of the theories of organization and manage- 
ment in American government with emphasis on new trends, experiments, and 
reorganizations. 

G. & P. 120. Problems in Political Behavior. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. The problem approach to political behavior with 
emphasis on theoretical and empirical studies on selected aspects of the political 
process. 

G. & P. 124. Legislatures and Legislation. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A comprehensive study of legislative organization, 
procedure, and problems. The course includes opportunities for student con- 
tact with Congress and with the Legislature of Maryland. 

G. & P. 131. Introduction to Constitutional Law. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A systematic inquiry into the general principles of the 
American constitutional system, with special reference to the role of the 
judiciary in the interpretation and enforcement of the federal constitution. 

G. & P- 132. Civil Rights and the Constitution. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 131. A study of civil rights in the American constitu- 
tional context, emphasizing freedom of religion, freedom of expression, minority 
discrimination, and the rights of defendants. 

G. & P. 133. The Judicial Process. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. An examination of judicial organization in the United 
States at all levels of government, with some emphasis on legal reasoning, 
legal research, and court procedures. 

53 



Government and Politics 

G. & P. 141. History of Political Theory, (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A survey of the principal political theories set forth 
in the works of writers from Plato to Bentham. 

G. & P. 142. Recent Political Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of 19th and 20th century political thought, 
with special emphasis on recent theories of socialism, communism, and fascism, 

G. & P. 144. American Political Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the development and growth of American 
political concepts from the colonial period to the present. 

G. & P. 145. Russian Political Thought. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A survey and analysis of political ideas in Russia and 
the Soviet Union from early times to the present. 

G. & P. 154. Problems of World Politics. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. i. A study of governmental problems of international 
scope, such as causes of war, problems of neutrality, and propaganda. Stu- 
dents are required to report on readings from current literature. 

G. & P. 160. State and Local Administration. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the administrative structure, procedures, 
and policies of state and local governments with special emphasis on the state 
level and on intergovernmental relationships, and with illustrations from Mary- 
land governmental arrangements. 

G. & P. 161. Metropolitan Administration. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. An examination of administrative problems relating to 
public services, planning, and coordination in a metropolitan environment. 

G. & P. 171. Problems of American Public Policy. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. The background and interpretation of various factors 
which affect the formation and execution of American public policy. 

G. & P. 174. Political Parties. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A descriptive and analytical examination of American 
political parties, nominations, elections, and political leadership. 

G. & P. 178. Public Opinion. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. An examination of public opinion and its effect on 
political action, with emphasis on opinion formation and measurement, propa- 
ganda, and pressure groups. 

G. & P. 181. Administrative Law. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the discretion exercised by administrative 
agencies, including analysis of their functions, their powers over persons and 
property, their procedures, and judicial sanctions and controls. 

G. & P. 191. Government and Administration of the Soviet 

Union. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the adoption of the communist philosophy 
by the Soviet Union, of its governmental structure, and of the administration 
of government policy in the Soviet Union. 

54 



Government and Politics 
G. & P. 192. Government and Politics of Latin America. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A comparative study of the governmental systems 
and political processes of the Latin American countries, with special emphasis 
on Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico. 

G. & P. 193. Government and Politics of Asia. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 97, or G. & P. 105, or Hist. 61, or Hist. 62, or Hist. 187, 
or Hist. 188, or Hist. 189. A comparative study of the political systems of 
China, Japan, India, and other selected Asian countries. 

G. & P. 194. Government and Politics of Africa. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A comparative study of the governmental systems 
and political processes of the African countries, with special emphasis on the 
problems of nation-building in emergent countries. 

G. & P. 195. Government and Politics of the Middle East. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A comparative study of the governmental systems and 
political processes of the Middle Eastern countries, with special emphasis on 
the problems of nation-building m emergent countries. 

G. & P. 197. Comparative Political Systems. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 97 and at least one other course in comparative govern- 
ment. A study, along functional lines, of major political institutions, such as 
legislatures, executives, courts, bureaucracies, public organizations, and political 
parties. 

For Graduates 

G. & P. 201. Seminar in International Political Organization. (3) 
A study of the forms and functions of various international organizations. 

G. & P. 202. Seminar in International Law. (3) 

Reports on selected topics assigned for individual study and reading in sub- 
stantive and procedural international law. 

G. & P. 203. Functional Problems in International Relations. (3) 

An examination of the major substantive issues in contemporary international 
relations, involving reports on selected topics based on individual research. 

G. & P. 204. Area Problems in International Relations. (3) 

An examination of problems in the relations of states within a particular geo- 
graphic area, such as Europe, Asia and the Far East, Africa and the Middle 
East, and the Western Hemisphere. Individual reporting as assigned. 

G- & P. 205. Seminar in American Political Institutions. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the background 
and development of American government. 

G. & P. 206. Seminar in American Foreign Relations. (3) 

Reports on selected topics assigned for individual study and reading in Amer- 
ican foreign policy and the conduct of American fo