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Full text of "Combined catalogs"

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olume 5 




MAY 15, 1952 No. 2 






COMBINED 
CATALOGS 

1952-19S3 
ISSUE 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

General Information 7 

Agriculture, College of 49 

Arts and Sciences, College of 137 

Business and Public Administration, College of 255 

Education, College of 321 

Glenn L. Martin College of Engineering and Aeronautical Sciences 389 

Home Economics, College of 443 

Military Science, College of 473 

Physical Education, Recreation and Health, College of 489 

Special and Continuation Studies, College of 531 

Summer School 617 

Graduate School 671 

Dentistry, School of 787 

Law, School of 821 

Medicine, School of 841 

Pharmacy, School of 933 

Nursing, School of 961 

Records and Statistics 996 

Honors, Medals and Prizes 1028 

Student Enrollment, Summary of _ 1036 

General Index 1038 



IMPORTANT — The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded 
as an irrevocable contract between the student and the University of Mary- 
land. The University reserves the right to change any provision or require- 
ment at any time within the student's term of residence. The University 
further reserves the right at any time to ask a student to withdraw when it 
considers such action to be in the best interests of the University. 



See Outside Back Cover for List of Separate Catalogs 



V^olume 5 May 15, 1952 Number 2 

A UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND PUBLICATION 

is published four times in January, February, March and April ; three times in May ; once 
in June and July ; twice in August, September, October and November ; and three times 
in December. 

Re-entered at the Post Office in College Park, Maryland, as second class mail matter 
under the Act of Congress of August 24, 1912. Harvey L. Miller, Director of Publications, 
University of Maryland, Editor. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

AND 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE Term 

Expires 
William P. Cole, Jr., Chairman, 100 West University Parkway, 

Baltimore 1958 

Louis L. Kaplan, 1201 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 1961 

J. Milton Patterson, Treasurer, 120 West Redwood Street, Balti- 
more 1953 

E. Paul Knotts, Denton, Caroline County 1954 

B. Herbert Brown, President, Baltimore Institute, 12 W. Madison 

St., Baltimore 1960 

Harry H. Nuttle, Denton, Caroline County 195? 

Philip C. Turner, 2 East North Avenue, Baltimore 1959 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, 4101 Greenway, Baltimore 1956 

--Charles P. McCormick, McCormick & Company, Baltimore 1957 

Arthur 0. Lovejoy, 827 Park Avenue, Baltimore 1960 

Edward P. Holter, Middletown, Md 1959 

Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for 
terms of nine years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law. Executive 
Officer of the Board. 

The State law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of 
Maryland shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 

A regular meeting of the Board is held the last Friday in each month, 
except during the months of July and August. 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

President Byrd, Chairman Miss Preinkert, Secretary 

Col. Ambrose Dr. Faber Mr. Morrison 

Dean Bamford Mr. Fogg Dean Mount 

Mr. Benton Dean Foss Dr. Nystrom 

Dr. Bishop Dean Fraley Miss Preinkert 

Mr. Brigham Miss Gipe Dean Pyle 

Dr. Brueckner Dr. Gwin Dr. Ray 

Mr. Buck Mr. Haszard Dean Robinson 

President Byrd Dr. Haut Dean Smith 

Dean Cairns Dean Howell Dean Stamp 

Mr. Cissell Dr. Huff Dean Steinberg 

Dean Cotterman Dr. Hoffsommer Dr. White 

Dean Devilbiss Miss Helen I. Smith (Act'g) Dean Wylie 

Dean Eppley Dr. Long Dr. Zucker 

EDUCATIONAL COUNCIL 

The President, Dean of the Faculty, Chairman, Deans op Colleges, 
Chairmen of Academic Divisions, Heads of Educational Departments, 
Director of Admissions, Registrar. 

1 



OFFICERS OF THE ADMINISTRATION 

H. C. Byrd, LL.D., D.Sc, President of the University 

Harold F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Dean of the Faculty 

Ronald Bamford, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School 

Gordon M. CAraNS, Ph.D., Dean of College of Agriculture 

Leon P. Smith, Ph.D., Dean of College of Arts and Sciences 

— J. Freeman Pyle, Ph.D., Dean of College of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration 
J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Dean of School of Dentistry 

Wilbur Devilbiss, Ed.D., Dean of College of Education, Director of 

Summer School 

^S. S. Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Dean of College of Engineering 

M. Marie Mount, M.A., Dean of College of Home Economics 

Rogi:r Howell, LL.B., Ph.D., Dean of School of Law 
H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Dean of School of Medicine 
——Joseph R. Ambrose, Col. U. S. A. F., Dean of College of Military Science 

and Professor of Air Science and Tactics 
— - L . M. Fraley, Ph.D., Dean of College of Physical Education, Recreation 
and Health 
Florence M. Gipe, M.S., R.N., Dean of School of Nursing 
Noe:l E. Foss, Ph.D., Dean of School of Pharmacy 

R ay W. Ehrensberger, Ph.D., Dean of College of Special and Continuation 
Studies 

<}eary F. Eppley, M.S., Dean of Men, Director of Student Welfare 

Adelb H. Stamp, M.A., Dean of Women 

Edgar F. Long, Ph.D., Dean of Students 

G. Watson Algire, M.S., Director of Admissions 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar 

Paul E. Nystrom, Director of Instruction, College of Agriculture 

James M. Gwin, Ph.D., Director of the Agricultural Extension Service 

Irvin C. Haut, Ph.D., Director of Agricultural Experiment Station 

James M. Tatum, B.S., Director of Athletics 

George O. Weber, B.S., Business Manager (on military leave) 

George W. Morrison. B.S., Actiner Busine?s Manager 

Chart,f<5 L. Benton. M.C. C.P.A., Comptroller 

W. J. Httff. Ph.D.. D.Sci.. Director nf the Ene-inpering- Experiment Station 

George H. Buck, Ph.B., Director. University Hospital 

Howard Rovelstad, M.A.. B.S.L.S.. Director of Libraries 

Harry A. Bishop, M.D., Medical Director 

George W. Fogg, M.A., Director of Personnel 

Frank K. Haszard, B.F.S., Director of Procurement and Supply 

Harvey L. Miller, Col., U. S. M. C. (Ret,), Director of Publications and 

Publicity 
David L. Brigham, B.S., General Alumni Secretary 
Lt. Col. Douglas M. Peck, U. S. A. F., Commandant of Cadets 

CHAIRMEN OF THE ACADEMIC DIVISIONS 

Dr. Charles E. White, Professor of Chemistry, Chairman, The Lower 
Division 

Dr. John E. Faber, Professor of Bacteriology, Chairman, The Division of 
Biological Sciences 

Dr. Augustus J. Prahl, Professor of Foreign Languages, Acting Chair- 
man, The Division of Humanities 

Dr. Wilbert J. Huff, Professor of Chemical Engineering, Chairman, The 
Division of Physical Sciences 

Dr. Harold C. Hoffsommer, Professor of Sociology, Chairman, The Division 
of Social Sciences 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Admission, Guidance, and Adjustment 

Chairman Reid; Messrs. Cairns, Eppley, Hodgins. Long, Quigley, 
Robinson, Schindler, D. D. Smith, Manning, Weigand, White; Mmbs. 
Crow, Preinkert, Stamp. 

Coordination of Agricultural Activities 

Chairman Cairns; Messrs. Ahalt, Bopst, Brueckner, Carpenter, 
Cory, Cox, Foster, Gwin, Haut, Holmes, Jull, Kuhn, Magruder, 
Nystrom, Pou. 

Council on Intercollegiate Athletics 

Chairman Eppley; Messrs. Ambrose, Cory, Faber, Supplee, Tatum; 
President of the Student Government Assoctation and the Chairman 
OF THE Alumni Council, ex-offido. 

Educational Standards, Policies and Coordination 

Chairman Cotterman; Messrs. Bamford, Cairns, Devilbiss, Drake, 

HOFFSOMMER, KUHN, MARTIN, McCARTHY, ShREEVE, L. P. SMITH, StRAHORN, 

Wylie; Mmes. Mitchell, Wiggins. 

Special and Adult Education 

Chairman Epirensberger; Messrs. Ambrose, Brechbill, Burdette, 
Drazek, Manning, Reid. 

Honors Programs 

Chairman Cotterman; Messrs. Devilbiss, Hoffsommer, Smith, 

ZUCKER. 

Libraries 

Chairman Corcoran; Messrs. Aisenberg, Baylis, Brown, Foster, 
Hackman, Hall, Invernezzi, Parsons, Reeve, Rovelstad, Slama, 
Spencer; Mmes. Harman, Ida M. Robinson, Wiggin. 

Publications and Catalog 

Chairman Cotterman; Messrs. Ball, Bamford, Crowell, Devilbiss, 
DuRFEE, Fogg, Gwin, Haut, Howell, Miller, Pyle, Reid, Robinson, Smith, 
Wylie, Zucker; Mmes. E. Frothingham, Mount, Preinkert. 

Public Functions and Public Relations 

Chairman Pyle; Messrs. Ambrose, Brigham, Cory, Ehrensberger, 
Eppley, Fogg, Gewehr, Howell, Miller, Morrison, Randall, Reid, 
Robinson, Shreeve, Wylie; Mmes. Mount, Preinkert, Stamp. 

Religious Life Committee 

Chairman Shreeve; Messrs. Daiker, Gewehr, Hamilton, Randall, 
Reid, Scott, White; Mmes. Bryan, McNaughton. 

Scholarships and Student Aid 

Chairman Cotterman; Messrs. Eppley, Long, Reid, Steinmeyer; 
Mmes. Mount, Stamp. 

Student Life 

Chairman Reid; Messrs. Allen, Bowers, Eppley, James, Kramer, 
Newell, Outhouse, Strausbaugh, Tatum, White; Mmes. Binns, Harman, 
Preinkert, Stamp. 

3 



Poullry Range 



Aplory 



Cottage 



VF-I3- _VF-I2 



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' 1 N D E X 

^ Arts and Sciences 

Ar Armory 

B .Music 

^B Chemistry Annex 

IB Administration 

C Chemistry (new) 

Col Coliseum 

D Dairy 

DD Psychology 

DW Dean of Women 

E Agronomy, Botany, 

Physics 

F" Horticulture 

J^F Mathematics 

G Gymnasium 

CG Mathematics 

" Home Economics 

HH Seminar 

' Agric. Eng. and 

Industrial Education 

"' Engr. Classroom Bldg. 

K Zoology 

1' Library 

M Morrill Hall 

N Geography 

O Symons Hall (Agric.) 

P Poultry 

Q Business and Public 

Administration 

R Classroom Building 

S Engr. Lab. Building 

T...„ Education 

U Wind Tunnel 

W Women's Field House 

X Animal Husbandry 

t Pavilion 

Y Chapel 
Z Physics 




•*f 



1952 1 


iULY 


AUGUST 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


8 M T W T F 8 


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8 M T W T F 8 


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7 
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1953 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


MAY 


JUNE 


8 M T W T F 8 


8 M T W T F S 


8 M T W T F S 


8 M T W T F S 


8 M T W T F 8 


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.. ..!.. .. 


JULY 


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SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


8 M T W T F" S 


8 M T W T F S 


8 M T W T F 8 


8 M T W T F 8 


S M T W T F 8 


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1954 


JANUARY 


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JUNE 


S M T W T F S 


8 M T W T F 8 


8 M T W T F S 


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BASTEB SUNDAYS: April 13, 1952; April 6. 1953; April 18. 1954. 

CALENDAR — 1952-1953 

COLLEGE PARK 



1952 

September 16-19 
September 22 
October 16 
November 26 
December 1 
December 20 "•**" 

1953 

January 5 ""^'^ 
January 20 
January 20 
January 21-28 



First Semester 



Tuesday-Friday 

Monday 

Thursday 

Wednesday after last class 

Monday, 8 a. m. 

Saturday after last class 



Monday, 8 a. m. 
Tuesday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday-Wednesday, inc. 



Registration, first semester 
Instruction begins 
Convocation, faculty and students 
Thanksgiving recess begins 
Thanksgiving recess ends 
Christmas recess begins 



Christmas recess ends 
Inauguration Day, holiday 
Charter Day 
First semester examinations 




Second 

Tuesday-Friday 

Monday 

Monday 

Wednesday 

Thursday after last class 

Tuesday, 8 a. m. 

Thursday 

Saturday 

Thursday-Friday, inc. 

Sunday 

Saturday 



Semester 

Registration, second semester 

Instruction begins 

Washington's Birthday holiday 

Maryland Day 

Easter recess begins 

Easter recess ends 

Military Day 

Memorial Day, holiday 

Second semester examination! 

Baccalaureate exercises 

Commencement exercises 



Summer Session, 1953 



Juno 22 
June 23 
July 31 



June 16-20 
July 7-10 
AuKUst 3-8 
September 1-4 



Monday 
Tuesday 
Friday 



Registration, summer session 
Summer session begins 
Summer session ends 



Short Courses 



Monday-Saturday 
Tuesday-Friday 
Monday-Saturday 
Tuesday-Friday 



Rural Women's Short Course 

Maryland Congress of Parents and Teachers 

4-H Club Week 

Firemen's Short Course 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 

THE University of Maryland, in addition to being a State 
University, is the "Land-Grant" institution of Maryland. 
The University is co-educational in all of its branches. 

College Park 

The undergraduate colleges and the Graduate 
School of the University of Maryland are located 
at College Park, Prince George's County, Mary- 
land, on a beautiful tract of rolling, wooded land, 
less than eight miles from the heart of the 
Nation's capital, Washington, D. C. This near- 
ness to Washington, naturally is of immeasur- 
able advantage to students because of the un- 
usual library facilities afforded by the Library of Congress and the libraries 
of Government Departments; the privilege of observing at close range 
sessions of the United States Supreme Court, the United States Senate 
and the House of Representatives; the opportunity of obtaining almost 
without effort an abundance of factual data which is constantly being 
assembled by the numerous agencies of the Federal Government. 

The University is served by excellent transportation facilities, including 
the main line of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, the Washington street 
car system, and several bus lines. The campus fronts on the Baltimore- 
Washington Boulevard, a section of U. S. Route No. 1, which makes the 
University easily accessible by private travel. 

College Park, and the adjacent Calvert Hills and College Heights, con- 
stitute a group of fine residential communities close to the University 
campus, where are located the homes of many of the members of the faculty 
and staff, and where students who prefer to live off campus may find de- 
sirable living accommodations at reasonable rates. 

Baltimore 

The professional schools of the University — Dentistry, Law, Medicine, 
Nursing, and Pharmacy — the University Hospital, and the Baltimore Pro- 
gram of the College of Special and Continuation Studies are located in a 
group of splendid buildings, most of them erected in recent years, at or 
near the adjacent corners of Lombard and Greene and Redwood Streets, 
Baltimore, Maryland. 

Baltimore, a thriving, modern industrial city of more than a million in- 
habitants, has an old-established culture represented by outstanding educa- 
tional institutions, libraries, museums, parks, public buildings, and places 
of historical interest. 



8 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Baltimore is justly proud of its well earned reputation as a center of the 
highest type of professional education, and no finer location could be chosen 
by a young man or young woman desiring to prepare for a professional 
career. 

BRIEF HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY 

While its advancement in recent years, both in the matter of physical 
plant facilities and educational standards has been especially rapid, the 
University has behind it a long and honorable record. 

The history of the present University is the history of two institutions: 
the old privately-owned and operated University of Maryland in Baltimore 
and the Maryland State College (formerly Maryland Agricultural College) 
at College Park. These institutions were merged in 1920. 

In 1807 the College of Medicine of Maryland was organized, the fifth 
medical school in the United States. The first class was graduated in 1810. 
A permanent home was established in 1814-1815 by the erection of the 
building at Lombard and Greene Streets in Baltimore, the oldest struc- 
ture in America devoted to medical teaching. Here was founded one of the 
first medical libraries (and the first medical school library) in the United 
States. In 1812 the General Assembly of Maryland authorized the College 
of Medicine of Maryland to "annex or constitute faculties of divinity, law, 
and arts and sciences," and by the same act declared that the "college or 
faculties thus united should be constituted an university by the name and 
under the title of the University of Maryland." By authority of this act, 
steps were taken in 1813 to establish "a faculty of law," and in 1823 a 
regular school of instruction in law was opened. Subsequently there were 
added: in 1882 a Department of Dentistry which was absorbed in 1923 by 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery (founded in 1840, the first dental 
school in the world); in 1889 a School of Nursing; and in 1904 the Mary- 
land College of Pharmacy (founded in 1841, the third oldest pharmacy 
college in the United States). 

The Maryland State College was chartered in 1856 under the name of 
the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural college in the 
Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was under private man- 
agement. In 1862 the Congress of the United States passed the Land Grant 
Act. This act granted each State and Territory that should claim its bene- 
fits a proportionate amount of unclaimed western lands, in place of scrip, 
the proceeds from the sale of which should apply under certain conditions 
to the "endowment, support, and maintenance of at least one college where 
the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical 
studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning 
as are related to agriculture and the mechanical arts, in such a manner as 
the Leg^islatures of the States may respectively prescribe, in order to pro- 
mote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the 
several pursuits and professions of life." This grant was accepted by the 
General Assembly of Maryland, and the Maryland Agricultural College was 
named as the beneficiary of the grant. Thus the College became, at least 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



9 



in part, a State institution. In the fall of 1914 control was taken over 
entirely by the State. In 1916 the General Assembly granted a new charter 
to the College, and made it the Maryland State College. 

In 1920, by an act of the State Legislature, the University of Maryland 
was merged with the Maryland State College, and the resultant institution 
was given the name "University of Maryland." 

THE UNIVERSITY YEAR 

The University year is divided into two semesters of approximately seven- 
teen weeks each, and a summer session of six weeks. 



ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY 

The government of the University is, by law, vested in a Board of 
Regents, consisting of eleven members appointed by the governor of the 
State, each for term of nine years. The administration of the University 
is vested in the president. The deans, directors and other principal oflBcers 
of the University form the Administrative Board. This group serves in an 
advisory capacity to the president. 

Following is a list of the administrative divisions of the University: 

At College Park 



College of Agriculture 
College of Arts and Sciences 
College of Business and Public 

Administration 
College of Education 
Glenn L. Martin College of En- 
gineering and Aeronautical 
Sciences 
College of Home Economics 
College of Military Science 



College of Physical Education, 
Recreation and Health 

College of Special and Continua- 
tion Studies 

Graduate School 

Summer School 



Agricultural Experiment Station 
Agricultural and Home Economics 
Extension Service 



At Baltimore 

School of Pharmacy 
University Hospital 
Maryland State Board of Agri- 
culture 



School of Dentistry 
School of Law 
School of Medicine 
School of Nursing 

State- Wide Activities 

The Agricultural and Home Economics Extension Service maintains local 
representatives in every county of the State. These representatives. County 
Agents and Home Demonstration Agents, provide expert assistance to 
farmers and farm families in their areas and, when necessary, call upon 
the large staff of specialists at the headquarters of the Extension Service 
at College Park. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The Live Stock Sanitary Service, which is charged with responsibility for 
the control and eradication of diseases of live stock and poultry, maintains 
local veterinary inspectors throughout the State, in addition to specialists 
and laboratory technicians at the main laboratory at College Park and the 
branch laboratories in Salisbury, Centerville and Baltimore. 

PHYSICAL FACILITIES— GROUNDS, BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

College Park 

Grounds. The University grounds at College Park comprise approxi- 
mately 1150 acres. A broad rolling campus is surmounted by a commanding 
hill which overlooks a wide area and insures excellent drainage. Most of 
the buildings are located on this eminence and the adjacent grounds are 
laid out attractively in lawns and terraces ornamented with trees, shrub- 
bery and flower beds. Below the hill and along either side of the Wash- 
ington-Baltimore Boulevard lie the drill grounds and athletic fields. 

Approximately 500 acres are used for research and teaching in horti- 
culture, agriculture, dairying, livestock and poultry. An additional five 
hundred acres of land provided for plant research work are located at the 
Hopkins and Nash farms, five miles northwest of College Park and in 
various other localities. 

Buildings. The buildings of beautifully designed Georgian colonial motif 
comprise about fifty principal structures and an additional fifty for 
supplemental utility, providing facilities for the varied activities carried on 
at College Park. 

Administration and Instruction. This group consists of the following: 
The Administration Building, which accommodates the offices of the Presi- 
dent, Dean of Men, Business Manager, Comptroller, Director of Personnel, 
Registrar, Directors of Admissions, Procurement and Supply, and Cashier, 
as well as Student Supply Store and University Post Office. 

Symons Hall, which houses the office of the Dean of the College of Agri- 
culture, the offices of the Agricultural and Home Economics Extension 
Service and the offices of the Director of the Agricultural Experiment 
Station, and the departments of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural 
Education, Animal Husbandry, and Poultry, as well as Official Publications 
and general publicity. 

Other buildings whose space is principally devoted to the College of 
Agriculture are: Horticulture Building, Agricultural Engineering Building, 
Agronomy and Botany Building, Dairy Building, Apiary, and the new 
Plant Laboratory, which includes greenhouses. The dairy barns, livestock 
barns, poultry and other Experiment Station farm buildings are, for the 
most part, adjacent to the campus. 

The Arts and Sciences Building, Glenn L. Martin Engineering and Aero- 
nautical Sciences Buildings, Education Building, Business and Public Ad- 
ministration Building and Home Economics Building, as the names imply, 
house the various colleges. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 11 

The Armory, one of the finest structures of its kind in the country; the 
Ritchie Coliseum, seating 4,500, used for indoor sports events; the Gym- 
nasiurti; the Women's Field House and the Byrd Stadium providing for 
8,000 spectators are utilized principally by the College of Military Science 
and the College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health. The 
Geography Building, Zoology Building and Classroom Building, Dean 
of Women's Building, Library, Morrill Hall, and the Home Economics 
Practice House, complete the principal structures in this group. 

A new Chemistry Building and a new Physics Building have recently 
been completed and provide suitable classrooms and laboratories for the indi- 
cated sciences. 

New Byrd Stadium, on the west side of the campus seats close to 50,000. 
Suitable parking areas adjoin the stadium. A new addition has been com- 
pleted for the Women's Field House which includes a modern swimming 
pool for recreation of women students. 

A new interdenominational Chapel provides facilities for on-campus 
religious services and quarters for the clergy. It is a memorial to former 
Maryland "gold star" students who gave their lives in World Wars I and II 
and in Korea. The main chapel seats 1,250. 

Ten temporary frame classroom buildings serve the present overflow 
from Zoology, Psychology and Mathematics and provide a Recreation build- 
ing for day students, headquarters for all student publications, and class- 
rooms and play areas for the Nursery School. 

A Shop Building is being jointly used by the Industrial Education and 
Agricultural Engineering departments. 

Housing. The Womeyi's Dormitories are Anne Arundel Hall, Margaret 
Brent Hall, and New Dormitories No. 2 and No. 3. In addition, there are 
four smaller units at present providing housing for sorority groups. 

Men's Dormitories. Calvert and Silvester Halls are the only two named 
dormitories of a group of ten separate buildings housing men students. 

A Temporary Housing Project provides facilities for 1,100 male students 
in nine dormitories and 104 veteran families in thirteen family units. 

Experiment Station. The headquarters for the Agricultural Experiment 
Station are in the new Agricultural Building. The laboratories and green- 
houses for this research work are located in several buildings on the campus. 

The Live Stock Sanitary Service is located in a group of buildings about 
a mile east of the main campus, near the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 
Station. The Grayson Laboratory and Isolation Building to be devoted 
to research in respiratory diseases of horses, has been recently completed 
as an additional facility. 

Service Buildings. This group includes the Central Heating Plant, 
Service Building, the Infirmary, and the Dining Hall. 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The Fire Service Extension Building, completed in 1946, is located south 
of the Byrd Stadium on the boulevard. It houses the Fire Extension 
Service offices as well as the College Park Volunteer Fire Department. 

Historical Building. Rossborough Inn. This historic Inn, built in 1798, 
is the oldest building on the campus and for many years housed the Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. Entirely restored, it is now one of the most 
beautiful and interesting buildings on the campus. Rossborough Inn houses 
the oflSces of the Alumni Secretary. 

U. S. Government Buildings. United States Bureau of Mines. The 
Eastern Experiment Station of the United States Bureau of Mines is 
located on the University grounds. The general laboratories are used for 
instruction purposes in College of Engineering as well as by the United 
States Government for experimental work. The building contains a geo- 
logical museum and a technical library. United States Fish and Wildlife 
Service Laboratory. The technological research laboratory building of the 
U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service is located on the University campus. It 
contains laboratories for research in fisheries dealing with chemical, 
chemical engineering, bacteriological, nutritional, and biological subjects. 
Through a cooperative arrangement with the University it is possible for 
students to do graduate work using the facilities of these laboratories. 

Baltimore 
The group of buildings located in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene 
Streets provides available housing for the Baltimore division of the Uni- 
versity. The group comprises the original Medical School Building, erected 
in 1814; the Old Hospital, now used as an out-patient department; the New 
University Hospital with approximately 450 beds; the Frank C. Bressler 
Research Laboratory; the Dental and Pharmacy Building; the Nurses' 
Home; the Law School Building; Davidge Hall, which houses the Medical 
library; the Administration Building; and Gray Laboratory. A Psychiatric 
Institute Building in the process of construction will provide 90 additional 
beds for psychiatric cases plus 200 additional general hospital beds. 

LIBRARY FACILITIES 

Libraries are located at both the College Park and Baltimore divisions 
of the University. 

The General Library at College Park, completed in 1931, is an attractive 
and well equipped structure. The main reading room on the second floor 
seats 250 and has about 5,000 reference books and bound periodicals on 
open shelves. The five-tier stack room and basement are equipped with 
carrels and desks for use of advanced students. The Library Annex, a 
temporary, two-story building located just west of the main building, is 
used for reserve book reading and seminars. The Annex accommodates 
about 350 people. About 30,000 of the 175,000 volumes on the campus 
are shelved in the Chemistry, Engineering, Entomology and Mathematics 
Departments, the Graduate School, and other units. Over 1,700 periodicals 
are currently received. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 13 

Facilities in Baltimore consist of the libraries of the School of Dentistry, 
containing 14,000 volumes; the School of Law, 27,000 volumes; the School 
of Medicine, 32,000 volumes; the School of Nursing, 2,000 volumes; and 
the School of Pharmacy, 11,000 volumes. The Medical Library is housed 
in Davidge Hall ; the remaining four libraries have quarters in the buildings 
of their respective schools, where they are readily available for use. Facili- 
ties for the courses in Arts and Sciences are offered jointly by the libraries 
of the Schools of Dentistry and Pharmacy. 

The libraries of the University total in the aggregate over 255,000 bound 
volumes. The General Library is a depository for publications of the 
United States Government and numbers some 75,000 documents in its 
collection. 

The University Library System is able to supplement its reference ser- 
vice by borrowing material from other libraries through Inter-Library Loan 
or Bibliofilm Service, or by arranging for personal work in the Library of 
Congress, the United States Department of Agriculture Library, and other 
agencies in Washington. 

ADMISSION PROCEDURE 

Undergraduate Schools: Applicants for admission to the College of Ag^ri- 
culture, Arts and Sciences, Business and Public Administration, Education, 
Engineering, and Home Economics should communicate with the Director of 
Admissions, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

Graduate School: Those seeking admission to the Graduate School should 
address the Dean of the Graduate School, University of Maryland, College 
Park. 

Professional Schools: Information about admission to the professional 
schools in Baltimore may be had by writing to the dean of the college con- 
cerned or to the Director of Admissions of the University. 

Applicants from Secondary Schools: Procure an application blank from 
the Director of Admissions. Fill in personal data requested and ask your 
principal or headmaster to enter your secondary school record and mail 
the blank to the Director of Admissions. 

To avoid delay, it is suggested that applications be filed not later than 
July 1 for the fall semester, and January 1 for the spring semester. 
Applications from students completing their last semester of secondary 
work are encouraged. If acceptable, supplementary records may be sent 
upon graduation. 

Applicants from Other Colleges and Universities: Secure an application 
blank from the Director of Admissions. Fill in personal data requested 
and ask secondary school principal or headmaster to enter secondary school 
record and send the blank to the Director of Admissions. Request the 
Registrar of the College or University attended to send a transcript to 
the Director of Admissions, College Park, Maryland. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Time of Admission: New students should plan to enter the University at 
the beginning of the fall semester if possible. Students, however, will 
be admitted at the beginning of either semester. 

ADMISSION OF FRESHMEN 

Admission by Certificate: Graduate of accredited secondary schools of 
Maryland or the District of Columbia will be admitted by certificate upon 
the recommendation of the principal. Graduates of out-of-state schools 
should have attained college certification marks, such marks to be not less 
than one letter or ten points higher than the passing mark. 

SUBJECT REQUIREMENTS 

In selecting students more emphasis will be placed upon good marks and 
other indications of probable success in college rather than upon a fixed 
pattern of subject matter. 

English 4 units required for all divisions of the University. 

Mathematics SV2 units, including Solid Geometry, required for 

Engineering, Mathematics and Physics, 

For all Colleges, use one unit of Algebra and 
Plane Geometry is desirable. A unit of Algebra 
will be needed by Business and Public Adminis- 
tration students and by most Education, Home 
Economics and Arts students. 

Social Science; Natural 

and Biological Science 1 unit from each group is required; two are 

desirable. 

Foreign Languages Those who will follow the professions, enter 

journalism, foreign trade or service, study the 
humanities or do research, should have a good 
foundation in one or more, but none is required. 

Electives Fine Arts, trade and vocational subjects are 

acceptable. 

Transfer Students: Only students in good standing as to scholarship and 
conduct are eligible to transfer. Advanced standing is assigned to transfer 
students from accredited institutions under the following conditions: 

1. A minimum of one year of resident work or not less than 30 semester 
hours is necessary for a degree. 

2. The University reserves the right at any time to revoke advanced 
standing if the transfer student's progress is unsatisfactory. 

Special Students. Applicants who are at least twenty-one years of age, 
and who have not completed the usual preparatory course, may be admitted 
to such courses as they seem fitted to take. Special students are ineligible 
to matriculate for a degree until entrance requirements have been satisfied. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 15 

Unclassified Students: Applicants who meet entrance requirements but 
who do not wish to pursue a program of study leading to a degree are 
eligible for admission to pursue courses for which they have met 
prerequisites. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS FOR MEN AND WOMEN 

All undergraduate men and women students classified academically as 
freshmen or sophomores, who are registered for more than six semester 
hours of credit, are required to enroll in and successfully complete four 
prescribed courses in physical education for a total of four semester hours 
of credit. The successful completion of these courses is a requirement for 
graduation. These courses must be taken by all eligible students during 
the first two years of attendance at the University, whether they intend 
to graduate or not. Men and women who have reached their thirtieth 
birthday are exempt from these courses. Students who are physically 
disqualified from taking these courses, must enroll in adaptive courses for 
which credit will be given. Transfer students who do not have credit in 
these courses, or their equivalent, must complete them or take them until 
graduation, whichever occurs first. Students with military service may 
receive credit for these courses by applying to the Air Force R. 0. T. C. 
Records Office. 

Required Uniform 

A regulation uniform as prescribed by the College of Physical Education, 
Recreation, and Health is required for both men and women. 

Required Equipment 

Students will be required to provide individual equipment for certain 
elective courses such as archery, badminton, golf, and tennis. 

HEALTH EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS FOR WOMEN 

All freshmen women who are registered for more than six semester hours 
of credit must enroll in and successfully complete the prescribed courses in 
health education for four semester hours of credit. Transfer students who 
do not have credit in these courses, or their equivalent, must complete 
them or take them until graduation, whichever occurs first. Women who 
have reached their thirtieth birthdays are exempt from these courses. 

REQUIREMENTS IN MILITARY INSTRUCTION 

All male students unless specifically exempted under University rules are 
required to take elementary military training for a period of two years. 

This training includes two hours of regularly scheduled drill per week at 
11.00 hours on Tuesdays and Thursdays and other drill formations at 
such times as designated by the PAS&T. 

The successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for graduation 
but it must be taken by all eligible students during the first two years of 
attendance at the University, whether they intend to graduate or not. 
Transfer students who do not have the required two years of military train- 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

ing will be required to complete the course or take it until graduation, 
whichever occurs first. 

Any male student in any undergraduate curriculum of the University 
who is accepted for such training may pursue an advanced course in this 
field which will lead to a reserve or regular commission in the United 
States Air Force. This advanced training may be carried as an integral 
part of the student's academic program. 

BASIC AIR FORCE R. O. T. C. EXEMPTIONS 

1. Students who have completed the course in other senior units of the 
Q. S. A. F., Army or Naval R. 0. T. C. will receive credit. 

2. Students holding commissions in the Reserve Corps of the Army, 
Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard or Air Force will receive credit. 

3. Students who have served in the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Coast 
Guard or Air Force for a period of time long enough to be considered 
equivalent to the training received in the A. F. R. 0. T. C. program will 
receive credit. Short periods of service in any of the branches named 
above will be evaluated and allowed as credit toward completion of the 
course. 

4. Graduate students will be exempt. 

5. Students classified as "Special Students" who are registered for less 
than seven semester hours will be exempt. 

6. Students who have passed their thirtieth birthday before starting the 
course will be exempt from any part of the course not already completed. 

7. Students who are not citizens of the United States or one of its 
territorial possessions will be exempt. 

THE PROGRAM IN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

Because the University feels that it is vital for every student to under- 
stand this country better, it has established a very comprehensive program 
of American studies. Work in American Civilization is offered at three 
distinct academic levels. The first level is required of all freshmen or 
sophomores at the University of Maryland and is described below. 

The second level is for undergraduate students wishing to carry a major 
in this field (see catalog for the College of Arts and Sciences). The third 
level is for students desiring to do graduate work in this field (see Catalog 
for the Graduate School). 

Courses in the American Civilization Program Required of 
All Freshmen and Sophomores 

All students (unless specific exceptions are noted in printed curricula) 
are required to take twelve semester hours of English (for sequence and 
descriptions, see the offerings of the Department of English), three semester 
hours of sociology (Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life), three semester 
bourse of government (G. & P. 1 — American Government), and six semes- 
ter hours of history (H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization). 



GENERAL INFORMATION 17 

These several courses are planned as parts of a whole that is designed 
to acquaint students with the basic facts of American history, with the 
fundamental patterns of our social, economic, political, and intellectual de- 
velopment, and with the riches of our cultural heritage. 

DELINQUENT STUDENTS 

A student must attain passing marks in fifty per cent of the semester 
hours for which he is registered, or he is automatically dropped from the 
University. The Registrar notifies the student, his parent or guardian, 
and the student's dean of this action. A student who has been dropped 
for scholastic reasons may appeal in writing to the Committee on Admis- 
sion, Guidance, and Adjustment for reinstatement. The Conmiittee is em- 
powered to grant relief for just cause. A student who has been dropped 
from the University for scholastic reasons, and whose petition for reinstate- 
ment is denied, may again petition after a lapse of at least one semester. 

The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal 
of a student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of 
scholarship, or whose continuance in the University would be detrimental 
to his or her health, or to the health of others, or whose conduct is not 
satisfactory to the authorities of the University. Students of the last class 
may be asked to withdraw even though no specific charge be made against 
them. 

According to University regulations, excessive absence from any course 
is penalized by failure in that course. Students who are guilty of per- 
sistent absence from any course will be reported to the President or to his 
appointed representative for final disciplinary action. 

General FEES AND EXPENSES 

All checks or money orders should be made payable to the University of 
Maryland for the exact amount of the charges. 

In cases where students have been awarded Legislative Scholarships or 
University Grants, the amount of such scholarship or grant will be deducted 
from the bill. 

All fees are due and payable at the time of registration, and students 
should come prepared to pay the full amount of the charges. No student 
will be admitted to classes until such payment has been made. Veterans are 
required to comply with these conditions if the University does not have in 
its possession at the time of registration an approved Certificate of Eligi- 
bility and Entitlement from the Veterans Administration. 

The University reserves the right to make such changes in fees and other 
charges as may be found necessary, although every effort will be made to 
keep the costs to the student as low as possible. 

No degree will be conferred, nor any diploma, certificate, or transcript 
of a record issued to a student who has not made satisfactory settlement 
of his account. 



18 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



The University will award to all World War II Veteran Students ap- 
proved by the Veterans Administration for the educational benefits under 
Public Laws 16 or 346, a scholarship whenever the total charges excluding 
room and board, but including textbooks and supplies, exceeds the $500 
allotment per academic year payable to the University by the Federal Gov- 
ernment. The amount of such scholarship shall be the difference between 
such total charges as above defined and the maximum amount payable by 
the Veterans Administration during the veteran student's period of eligi- 
bility. 

RESIDENTS, NON-RESIDENTS 

Fees for Graduate Students First Second 

Maryland Residents Semester Semester 

Fixed Charges $ 82.00 $83.00 



Athletic Fee 

Special Fee 

Student Activities Fee 

Use of Student Union, Physical Educa- 
tion, Post Office and Similar Facilities 

Infirmary Fee 

Advisory and Testing Fee 

Residents of the District of Columbia, 
Other States and Countries 

Tuition Fee for Non-Resident Students. 



15.00 
15.00 
10.00 

15.00 
5.00 
1.00 



Total 
$165.00 
15.00 
15.00 
10.00 

15.00 
5.00 
1.00 



$143.00 

Semester 
$ 75.00 



$83.00 $226.00 



Semester 
$ 75.00 



Total 
$150.00 



Total for Non-Resident Students $218.00 



$158.00 



$376.00 



Board and Lodging 

Board $170.00 $170.00 $340.00 

Dormitory Room $60-$70 $60-$70 $120-$140 



Total, Room and Board $230-$240 $230-$240 $460-$480 

The above fees do not apply to the temporary Veterans' Housing Units. 
The rates for these Units are as follows: 
Dormitory Unit, $50 per semester. 

Family Units: Two-room apartment, $33 month; three-room apartment, 
$36 month. 

The Fixed Charges Fee is not a charge for tuition. It is a charge to help defray the 
cost of operating the University's physical plant and other various services which ordinarily 
would not be included as a cost of teaching personnel and teaching supplies. Included in 
these costs would be janitorial services, cost of heat, electricity, water, etc., administrative 
and clerical cost, maintenance of buildings and grounds, maintenance of libraries, cost of 
University publications. Alumni Office, the University Business and Financial Offices, the 
Registrar's Office, the Admissions Office, and any other such services as are supplemental 
and necessary to teaching and research are supported by this fee. 

The Athletic Fee is charged for the support of the Department of Intercollegiate 
Athletics. All students are eligible and encouraged to participate in all of the activities of 
this department and to attend all contests in addition to those in which they participate. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



19 



The Special Fee is used for University projects that have direct relationship to student 
welfare, especially athletics and recreation. This fee now is allotted to a fund for construction 
of a new combination Physical Education Building and Auditorium, and to constructing a 
swimming pool and a student union. 

The Student Activities Fee is a mandatory fee included at the request of the Student 
Government Association. It covers subscription to the Diamondback, student newspaper ; the 
Old Line, literary magazine ; the Terrapin, yearbook ; class dues ; and includes financial sup- 
port for the musical and dramatic clubs. 

The Infirmary Fee does not include expensive drugs or special diagnostic procedures. 
Expensive drugs will be charged at cost and special diagnostic procedures, such as X-Ray, 
Electrocardiographs, Basal Metabolic Rates, etc., will be charged at the lowest cost prevailing 
in the vicinity. 

* Students entering the University for the second semester will pay the foUowinfr addi- 
tional fees : Athletic, $7.50 ; Special, $7.50 ; Student Activities, $8.00 ; Infirmary, $2.50 ; 
Post Office Fees, $1.00 ; Advisory and Testing Fee, 50(^. 

SPECIAL FEES 

Matriculation Fee for undergraduates, payable at time of first regis- 
tration in the University $10.00 

Diploma Fee for Bachelor's degree 10.00 

Cap and Gown Fee for Bachelor's degree 2.50 

Engineering College Fee, Per Semester 3.00 

Home Economics College Fee, Per Semester 10.00 

Physical Education for Women; Fee Per Semester (to be charged 

for any woman registered in any course or combination of courses 

in Physical Education involving the use of the Swimming Pool) . . 

Fees for Auditors are exactly the same as fees charged to students 

registered for credit. 

LABORATORY AND OTHER FEES 
Laboratory Fees Per Semester Course 

Agricultural Engineering. . $3.00 

Bacteriology $10.00 and 20.00 

Botany 5.00 

Chemical Engineering 8.00 

Chemistry 10.00 

Education (Depending on 

Laboratory) 

$1.00, $2.00, $3.00, 6.00 

Practice Teaching 30.00 

Dairy 3.00 

Electrical Engineering 4.00 

Entomology 3.00 

Home Economics — 

(Non-Home Ec. Students) 
Practical Art, Crafts, Tex- 
tiles and Clothing 3.00 

Foods and Home Manage- 
ment (each) 7.00 



3.00 



Horticulture $5.00 

Industrial Education 5.00 

Journalism 3.00 

Mechanical Engineering. . . . 3.00 

Music 80.00 

(Applied Music only) 
Physics — 

Introductory 3.00 

All Other 6.00 

Psychology 4.00 

Office Techniques and 

Management 7.50 

Speech — 

Radio and Stagecraft 2.00 

All Other 1.00 

Statistics 3.50 

Zoology 8.00 



20 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Miscelleaneous Fees and Charges 

Fee for part-time students per credit hour 10.00 

(The term "part-time students" is interpreted to mean under- 
graduate students taking 6 semester credit hours or less. 
Students carrying more than 6 semester hours pay the regular 
fees.) 

Late Registration Fee 5.00 

(All students are expected to complete their registration, includ- 
ing the filing of class cards and payment of bills, on the regular 
registration days.) Those who do not complete their registra- 
tion during the prescribed days will be charged a fee of $5.00. 

Fee for change in registration 3.00 

Fee for failure to report for medical examination appointment. .. . 2.00 

Special Examination Fee — to establish college credit — per semester 
hour 5.00 

Makeup Examination Fee — (for students who are absent during 
any class period when tests or examinations are given) 1.00 

Transcript of Record Fee 1.00 

Property Damage Charge — Students will be charged for damage 
to property or equipment. Where responsibility for the damage 
can be fixed, the individual student will be billed for it; where 
responsibility cannot be fixed, the cost of repairing the damage 
or replacing equipment will be pro-rated. 

Library Charges: 

Fine for failure to return book from general library before ex- 
piration of load period per day .05 

Fine for failure to return book from Reserve Shelf before expira- 
tion of loan period — 

First hour overdue 25 

Each additional hour overdue 05 

In case of loss or mutilation of a book, satisfactory restitution 
must be made. 

Text Books and Supplies 

Text books and classroom supplies — These costs vary with the course 
pursued, but will average per semester 35.00 

Fees for Graduate Students 

Fee for students carrying 10 or more semester credit hours 100.00 

Fee per semester hour for students carrying less than 10 semester 

credit hours 10.00 

Matriculation Fee, payable only once, at time of first registration. . 10.00 



GENERAL INFORMATION 21 

Diploma Fee for Master's Degree 10.00 

Cap and Gown Fee for Master's Degree 2.75 

Graduation Fee for Doctor's Degree 35.00 

Cap and Gown Fee for Doctor's Degree 3.75 

Notes: Fees in the Graduate School are the same for all students, 
whether residents of the State of Maryland or not. 
All fees, except Diploma Fee and Graduation Fee, are pay- 
able at the time of registration for each semester. 
Diploma Fee and Graduation Fee must be paid prior to 

graduation. 
No provision for housing graduate students is made by the 

University. 
Medical attention is not provided for graduate students, 
consequently, no Infirmary Fee is charged. 

Fees for OflF-Campus Courses 

Matriculation Fee (payable once, at time of first registration by all 
students — full time and part time; candidates for degrees, and 
non-candidates) : 

For Undergraduates 10.00 

For Graduates 10.00 

Fee for all students — limit 6 hours. For exceptional adult students 
taking off-campus courses the limit may be increased to 9 hours. 
Charge per credit hour 10.00 

Laboratory Fees — A laboratory fee, to cover cost of materials 
used, is charged in laboratory courses. These fees vary with the 
course and can be ascertained in any case by inquiry of the Dean 
of the College of Special and Continuation Studies. 

WITHDRAWAL AND REFUND OF FEES 

Any student compelled to leave the University at any time during the 
academic year, should file an application for withdrawal, bearing the proper 
signatures, in the office of the Registrar. If this is not done, the student 
will not be entitled, as a matter of course, to a certificate of honorable dis- 
missal, and will forfeit his right to any refund to which he would other- 
wise be entitled. The date used in computing refunds is the date the appli- 
cation for withdrawal is filed in the office of the Registrar. 

In the case of a minor, withdrawal will be permitted only with the written 
consent of the student's parent or guardian. 

Students withdrawing from the University will receive a refund of all 
charges, except board, lodging, deposits for room reservation and advanced 
registration, less the matriculation fee in accordance with the following 
schedule: 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Percentage 
Period from Date Instruction Begins Refundable 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks 

Board and lodging are refunded only in the event the student withdraws 
from the University. Refunds of board and lodging are made on a pro-rata, 
weekly basis. Dining Hall cards issued to boarding students must be sur- 
rendered at the Dining Hall office the day of withdrawal. 

No refunds of fixed charges, tuition, laboratory fees, etc., are allowed when 
courses are dropped, unless the student withdraws from the University. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the 
time of their registration their parents have been domiciled in this State 
for at least one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of 
his first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed 
by him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become 
legal residents of this State by maintaining such residence for at least one 
full year. However, the right of the minor student to change from a non- 
resident status to resident status must be established by him prior to the 
registration period set for any semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their regis- 
tration they have been domiciled in this State for at least one year provided 
such residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college 
in Maryland or elsewhere. 

The word domicile as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent 
place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be 
maintained. 

The following interpretations or modifications of the above rules shall 
apply: 

(a) The domicile of the wife shall be that of her husband, except in the 
case of a minor supported by her parents, in which event the marital status 
will not be considered in determining the residence status. 

(b) Should the parents be separated, the domicile of the parent who 
furnishes the support shall determine the residence status of the child. 

(c) Should the support of a minor not be furnished by the parents or 
guardians, the domicile of the person who furnishes the entire support 
shall determine the residence status of the child. 

(d) Should the support for a student be derived from a trust fund estab- 
lished specifically for his support and education, the domicile of the person 
who established the fund during the full year previous thereto shall de- 
termine the residence status of the student. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 23 

(e) Should the parent or other person responsible for a student be re- 
quired to leave this State for business or military reasons, he shall not be 
deprived of his right to claim residence status if it is evident that he in- 
tends to return to this State upon the completion of the special business 
or military assignment. 

(f ) The non-resident status of an adult may be changed upon proof that 
he has purchased and has maintained a home in Maryland for at least one 
full year; that he has become a registered voter of this State; and that 
he intends to make this State his domicile. These facts must be established 
prior to the registration period of the semester for which this change of 
status is requested. 

REGULATION OF STUDIES 

Schedule of Courses. A semester time schedule of courses, giving days, 
hours, and rooms, is issued as a separate pamphlet at the beginning of each 
semester. Classes are scheduled beginning at 8:00 A.M. 

Definition of Credit Unit. The semester hour, which is the unit of credit 
in the University, is the equivalent of a subject pursued one period a week 
for one semester. Two or three periods of laboratory or field work are 
equivalent to one lecture or recitation period. 

Examinations. Examinations are held at the end of each semester in 
accordance with the official schedule. Students are required to use pre- 
scribed type of book in final examination and tests if requested by instructor. 

Marking System: The following symbols are used for marks: A, B, C, 
and D, passing; F, Failure; I, Incomplete. 

Mark A denotes superior scholarship; mark B, good scholarship; mark C, 
fair scholarship; and mark D, passing scholarship. 

In computing scholastic averages, numerical values are assigned as fol- 
lows: A— 4; B— 3; C— 2; D— 1; F— 0. 

A scholastic average of C is required for graduation and for junior 
standing. The C average will be computed on the basis of the courses re- 
quired by each student's curriculum. The average of transfer students and 
of those seeking combined degrees vnW be computed only on the courses 
taken in residence in the University of Maryland and in satisfaction of the 
non-professional curriculum requirements of the college granting the degree. 
An over-all average will also be computed to include all courses taken in 
the University as a basis for the award of honors and such other uses as 
may be deemed appropriate. If a course is repeated, the final mark in the 
course is used in determining credit and in computing the over-all average. 
Academic Regulations. A separate pamphlet is published each year list- 
ing the regulations which govern the academic work and other activities 
of students. REPORTS 

Written reports of grades are sent by the Registrar to parents or 
guardians of minor students who are not veterans at the close of each 
semester. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

JUNIOR STANDING 

For junior standing, the requirements shall be, in addition to the required 
military and physical education, fifty-six (56) semester hours of academic 
credit, the whole program to be completed with an average grade of C. 

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES 

The University confers the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor 
of Science, Master of Education, Master of Arts, Master of Arts in Amer- 
ican Civilization, Master of Science, Master of Business Administration, 
Master of Foreign Study, Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Education, Civil 
Engineer, Mechanical Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Chemical Engineer, 
Bachelor of Laws, Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Dental Surgery, and 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy. 

Students in the two-year and three-year curriculums are awarded 
certificates. 

No baccalaureate degree will be awarded to a student who has had less 
than one year of resident work in this University. The last thirty semester 
credits of any curriculum leading to a baccalaureate degree must be taken 
in residence at the University of Maryland. Candidates for the bacca- 
laureate degree in combined curriculums at College Park and Baltimore 
must complete a minimum of thirty semester credits at College Park. 

An average mark of C (2.0) is required for graduation. The C average 
will be computed on the basis of the courses required by each student's 
curriculum. The average of transfer students and of those seeking com- 
bined degrees will be computed only on the courses taken in residence in 
the University of Maryland and in satisfaction of the non-professional 
curriculum requirements of the college granting the degree. An over-all 
average will also be computed to include all courses taken in the University 
as a basis for the award of honors and such other uses as may be deemed 
appropriate. 

The requirements for graduation vary according to the character of work 
in the different colleges and schools. Full information regarding specific 
college requirements for graduation will be found in the college sections 
of the catalog. 

Each candidate for a degree must file in the office of the Registrar eight 
weeks prior to the date he expects to graduate, a formal application for a 
degree. Candidates for degrees must attend a convocation at which degrees 
are conferred and diplomas are awarded. Degrees are conferred in absentia 
only in exceptional cases. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Students and alumni may secure transcripts of their scholastic records 
from the Office of the Registrar. No charge is made for the first copy; 
for each additional copy, there is a charge of $1.00. Checks should be made 
payable to the University of Maryland. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 25 

Transcripts of records should be requested at least one week in advance 
. of the date when the records are actually needed. 

■ • No transcript of a student's record will be furnished any student or 
alumnus whose financial obligations to the University have not been satisfied. 

STUDENT HEALTH AND WELFARE 

The University recognizes its responsibility for safeguarding the health 
of its student body and takes every reasonable precaution toward this 
end. All new undergraduate students will be given a thorough physical 
examination at the time of their entrance to the University. A well- 
equipped infirmary is available for the care of the sick or injured students. 
A small fee is charged undergraduate students for this infirmary service, 
but does not include expensive drugs and special diagnostic procedures. 
Infirmary Service 

1. All undergraduate students may receive dispensary service and 
medical advice at the infirmary during regular office hours established by 
the physician in charge. 

2. A registered nurse is on duty at all hours in the Infirmary. Students 
are required to report illnesses during doctors' office hours unless the case 
is an emergency. 

3. Students not residing in their own homes may, upon order of the 
University physician, be cared for in the Infirmary to the extent of the 
facilities available. Students living off the campus will be charged a sub- 
sistence fee. In case of illness requiring a special nurse, special medical 
attention, expensive drugs, X-rays and a special test, the expense must be 
borne by the student. 

4. Students living in dormitories, fraternity houses, sorority houses, or 
"off campus" houses who are too ill to go to the Infirmary must notify 
the housemother, proctor or householder who in turn will notify the In- 
firmary. This will be done in all cases, except emergencies, during the 
doctors' office hours. 

5. When a student is admitted to the Infirmary and the illness is of a 
serious nature, parents will be promptly informed of the admission and of 
the progress of the student's condition. Visiting hours are 10 A. M. to 
11 A. M. and 7 P. M. to 7:30 P. M. daily. Each patient is allowed only 
three visitors at one time. No visitor may see any patient until permission 
is granted by the doctor or nurse in charge. 

6. Hospitalization is not available at the Infirmary for faculty, graduate 
students or employees. Emergency dispensary service, however, is avail- 
able for faculty, graduate students and employees who are injured in 
University service or University activities. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Public Health 

All dormitories, "off campus" houses, sorority and fraternity houses are 
inspected periodically by the student Health Service to insure that proper 
sanitary conditions are maintained and that kitchens meet the prescribed 
standards for cleanliness and sanitation. All food handlers will be ex- 
amined in accordance with directives issued by the Student Health Service. 

LIVING ARRANGEMENTS 
Dormitories 

1. Room Reservations. All new students desiring to room in the dormi- 
tories should request room application cards by so indicating on their appli- 
cations for admission. The Director of Admissions will refer these to the 
offices of the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women. Application cards or 
blanks will be sent to applicants and should be returned promptly. A fee of 
$15.00 will be requested which will be deducted from the first semester 
charges when the student registers. A room is not assured until notice is 
received from the Dean concerned. Room reservations not claimed by 
freshmen or upper-classmen on their respective registration days will be 
cancelled. A room will be held by special request until after classes begin 
providing the dormitory office is notified by the first day of registration. 
Room reservation fees will not be refunded if the request is received latei 
than August 15 for the first semester or January 15 for the second semester. 

2. Applications for rooms are acted upon only when a student has been 
fully admitted academically to the University. 

3. Reservations by students in attendance at the University will be 
made at least two weeks before the close of the preceding semester. New 
students are urged to attend to their housing arrangments about three 
months in advance of registration. It is understood that all housing and 
board arrangements which are made for the fall semester are binding for 
the spring semester. Room and board charges will begin with the even- 
ing meal prior to the first day of registration and include the last day of 
classes for each semester with the exception of the Christmas recess and 
the Easter recess. Students unable to make other arrangements for the 
holidays may consult with the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women for 
assistance. All freshmen except those who live at home, are required to 
room in the dormitories when accommodations are available. 

Equipment 

Students assigned to dormitories should provide themselves with sufficient 
single blankets, at least two pairs of sheets, a pillow, pillow cases, towels, 
a laundry bag, a waste paper basket, a desk blotter and some bureau scarves. 

The individual student must assume responsibility for all dormitory 
property assigned to him. Any damage done to the property other than 
that which would result from ordinary wear and tear will be charged to 
the student concerned. It is therefore advisable to protect desk tops with 
blotters and bureaus with bureau scarves. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 27 

Each student will be furnished a key for his room for which a deposit 
of $1.00 will be made. This deposit will be returned in exchange for the 
key at the end of the year. 

Laundry. The University does not provide laundry service and each 
student is responsible for his or her own laundry. There are several 
reliable laundry concerns in College Park; or if a student prefers, he may 
send his laundry home. Students may, if they wish, do their own laundry 
in the laundry room in each dormitory, not including bed linen. 

Personal baggage sent via the American Express and marked with a 
dormitory address will be delivered when the student concerned notifies 
the College Park express office of his arrival. 

OFF-CAMPUS HOUSES 

1. Men: Only upper-classmen, veterans and those freshmen who can- 
not be accommodated are allowed to live in houses off the campus. A list 
of "off campus" rooms is available in the Office of the Dean of Men. 

2. Women: All housing arrangements for women students must be 
approved by the Office of the Dean of Women. 

3. Undergraduate women students who cannot be accommodated in the 
women's dormitories are referred to private homes which are registered 
in the Office of the Dean of Women as "Off-Campus Houses for Under- 
graduate Women." The householders in these homes agree to maintain 
the same rules and regulations as in the dormitories but business arrange- 
ments are made entirely between the student and the householder. Students 
and their parents should plan to see these accommodations personally and 
talk with the householder before making final arrangements. No woman 
student should enter into an agreement with a householder without first 
ascertaining at the Office of the Dean of Women that the house is on the 
approved list. No "off campus" householder should accept a deposit with- 
out first checking with the Office of the Dean of Women as to the eligi- 
bility for housing of the applicant, which depends on the waiting lists 
from the various areas. 

Meals 

All students who live in permanent University dormitories must board at 
the University Dining Hall. 

Other students may make arrangements to board by the semester at 
the Dining Hall, eat at the University Cafeteria, or at eating establish- 
ments in College Park. A few "off-campus" houses provide board as well 
as room. 

Estimated Expenses of "OfiF-Campus" Residence 

Most of these houses have only double rooms with twin beds. The stu- 
dents provide their own linens as in the dormitory. Price per person for 
room is about $20.00 a month, all rooms being registered with the rent 
control board. 



28 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

No rebate is made for meals not eaten at the University Dining Hall 
or in other places where board is paid in advance. Therefore, with care, 
students may save enough money on their meals to make up for the differ- 
ence in rent between the off-campus houses and the dormitory. Some even 
find this less expensive. 

Girls may find desirable rooms in good homes where they can earn their 
room and board by applying to the Office of the Dean of Women. 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF WOMEN 

The Office of the Dean of Women exists for the purpose of furnishing 
friendly counsel and helpful guidance to women students. The staff is 
ever ready to assist in the student's adjustment to college and in realizing 
her basic needs. This may include advice in personal problems, in meeting 
financial obligations, in finding and adjusting to her housing, and in orient- 
ing her to her new environment. In addition, the Office of the Dean of 
Women coordinates women's activities, handles matters of chaperonage 
at social functions, regulates sorority rushing in cooperation with Pan- 
hellenic Association and advises the Women's Student Government Asso- 
ciation. It has supervision over all housing accommodations for women 
students, whether on or off campus. A personal interview with one of the 
members of this Department is required of every woman student on enter- 
ing and on leaving the University in order that the Office may be of greater 
service to the students. All women students are invited to avail them- 
selves of the services of this Department. 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF MEN 

The Office of the Dean of Men exists for the purpose of furnishing 
friendly counsel and helpful guidance to male students in connection with 
any of their personal problems, especially those relation to social adjust- 
ment, financial need, employment, housing, etc. This office also handles 
for male students matters of discipline and infringement of University 
regulations. 

UNIVERSITY COUNSELING CENTER 

The services in the Deans' offices are closely coordinated with the activi- 
ties of the University Counseling Bureau, maintained by the Department 
of Psychology. This Bureau is provided with a well-trained technical staff 
and is equipped with an extensive stock of standardized tests of aptitude, 
ability, and interest. Assistance is available in diagnosing reading and 
study deficiencies. By virtue of payment of the annual "Advisory and Test- 
ing Fee," students are entitled to the services of the University Counceling 
Bureau without further charge. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT AID 

Under an act of the Legislature, the University may award such scholar- 
ships, and accept gifts for scholarships, as it may deem wise, and consistent 
with prudent financial operations. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 29 

All scholarships for the undergraduate departments of the University at 
College Park are awarded by the Faculty Committee on Scholarships. All 
scholarship applicants are subject to the approval of the Director of Ad- 
missions insofar as qualifications for admission to the University are con- 
cerned. All holders of scholarships are subject to the educational standards 
of the University, and to deportment regulations and standards. 

Scholarships are awarded on the basis of apparent qualifications for 
leadership. In making scholarship awards, consideration is given to parti- 
cipation in the various student activities, and to other outstanding attributes 
that indicate future possibilities as a leader, as well as to scholastic achieve- 
ment, character, and all other factors which distinguish the most worthwhile 
students. It is the intention that scholarships shall be provided for young 
men and women who have characteristics which make them outstanding 
among their fellows, who might not otherwise be able to provide for them- 
selves an opportunity for advanced education. 

The types of scholarships and loan funds available are as follows: 

Full Scholarships 

The University awards 36 full scholarships, 24 for men and 12 for 
women, covering board, lodging, fixed charges, and fees for which graduates 
of Maryland high and preparatory schools only are eligible. These scholar- 
ships are similar to those which the State provides and pays for at private 
colleges in the State, except that the State makes no special appropriation 
therefor. 

General Assembly Scholarships 

These scholarships are for fixed charges only and are awarded by mem- 
bers of the Legislature, three for each Senator and one for each member 
of the House of Delegates. These scholarships may be awarded by a mem- 
ber of the House of Delegates of a Senator only to persons in the county or 
legislative district of Baltimore City which the Delegate or Senator repre- 
sents. Awards of such scholarships are subject to approval by the Faculty 
Committee on Scholarships and by the Director of Admissions as to quali- 
fications for Admission. 

University Grants 

The University awards to deserving and outstanding secondary school 
graduates a limited number of scholarships covering fixed charges only. 

District of Columbia Scholarships 

District of Columbia students for many years have been granted a favored 
position with regard to non-resident tuition charges. This favored posi- 
tion has been discontinued, which means that District of Columbia students 
now pay considerably higher costs to attend the University. In view of this, 
and in further view of the increased costs to students from other localities, 



30 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

and in line with action by several other universities and colleges which 
have increased tuition costs, the University has established 20 scholarships 
for the students from the District of Columbia and other states. 

Endowed Scholarships 

The University has a few endowed scholarships and special awards. 
These are paid for by income from funds especially established for this 
purpose. Brief descriptions of these awards follow: 

Albright Scholarship 

A scholarship, known as the Victor E. Albright Scholarship, is open to 
graduates of Garrett County High Schools who were born and reared in 
that County. Application should be made to the high school principals. 

Alumni Scholarships 

The alumni have established a limited number of scholarships. These 
scholarships are awarded by the Faculty Committee to the most outstand- 
ing applicants. 

Scholarships by Baltimore Merchants 

Baltimore merchants, through the Retail Merchants Association of Balti- 
more, have provided two scholarships of $300 each for residents of the 
State of Maryland who have completed the junior year of the Practical Art 
curriculum in the College of Home Economics. Each recipient must have 
shown proficiency and interest in merchandising. 

Borden Agricultural and Home Economics Scholarships 

A Borden Agricultural Scholarship of $300 is granted to that student in 
the College of Agriculture who has had two or more of the regularly listed 
courses in dairying and who, upon entering the senior year of study, has 
achieved the highest average grade of all other similarly eligible students 
in all preceding college work. 

A Borden Home Economics Scholarship of $300 is granted to that student 
in the College of Home Economics who has had two or more of the regu- 
larly listed courses in food and nutrition and who, upon entering the senior 
year of study, has achieved the highest average grade of all other similarly 
eligible students in all preceding college work. 

W. Atlee Burpee Company Scholarship Award in Horticulture 

A scholarship award of $100, open to upper class students in Horticulture 
at the University of Maryland, has been established by the W. Atlee Burpee 
Company, Seed Growers, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Clinton, Iowa. 
Its purpose is to encourage and stimulate interest in flower and vegetable 
growing. The award is made on the basis of scholarship, experience, and 
interest in research. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 31 

The Danforth Foundation and the Ralston Purina Scholarships 

The Danforth Foundation and the Ralston Purina Company of St. Louis 
offer two summer scholarships to outstanding students in the College of 
Agriculture, one for a student who has successfully completed his Junior 
year; the other for a student who has successfully completed his Freshman 
year. The purpose of these scholarships is to bring together outstanding 
young men for leadership training. 

The Danforth Foundation and the Ralston Purina Company of St. Louis 
offer four summer scholarships to outstanding Home Economics Students, 
two to Juniors and two to Freshmen. The purpose of these scholarships 
is to bring together outstanding young women for leadership training. 

Dairy Technology Scholarships 

The Dairy Technology Society of Maryland and District of Columbia has 
established a limited number of $150 scholarships for students majoring in 
Dairy Products Technology. These scholarships are available both to high 
school graduates entering the University as freshmen and to students 
who have completed one or more years of their University curriculum. The 
purpose of these scholarships is to encourage and stimulate interest in the 
field of milk and milk products. The awards are based on scholarship, 
leadership, personality, need, experience, interest in and willingness to work 
in the field of dairy technology. The Dairy Technological Society cooper- 
ates with the Scholarship Committee of the University in making these 
awards. 

Exel Scholarships 

The largest grant for endowed scholarships was made by Deborah B. 
Exel. These scholarships are awarded by the Faculty Committee in accord- 
ance with the general principles underlying the award of all other scholar- 
ships. 

William Randolph Hearst Scholarships 

These scholarships have been established through a gift of the Baltimore 
News-Post, one of the Hearst newspapers, in honor of William Randolph 
Hearst. The undergraduate scholarship of $400 annually is open to the 
graduate of any high school in America. The graduate scholarship of $600 
annually is open to the graduate of any college or university in America. 
These scholarships are awarded for special work in the University's pro- 
gram of American civilization. 

The Hecht Company Merchandising Award 

Three hundred dollars is offered by The Hecht Company of Washington 
to a resident of Maryland, or the District of Columbia, who is interested 
in merchandising as a career. The student must have completed the junior 
year of the Practical Art curriculum in the College of Home Economic! 
and have met other specific requirements. 



,32 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Home Economics Scholarships 

Two thousand dollars has been made available for Home Economics 
Scholarships by Marie Mount. 

Kiwanis Scholarship 

A Kiwanis Memorial Scholarship of $200 per year is awarded by the 
Prince George County Kiwanis Club to a resident of Prince Georges County, 
Maryland, who in addition to possessing the necessary qualifications for 
maintaining a satisfactory scholarship record, must have a reputation for 
high character and attainment in general all-around citizenship. 

National Association of Thoroughbred Breeders' Scholarship 

The national association of thoroughbred horse breeders offers a scholar- 
ship to a bona fide member of the Future Farmers of America of Maryland 
who plans to enter the College of Agriculture. Applications for this award 
will be judged on a comparative basis. The amount of this scholarship is 
$400 — $200 for the first year, $100 for the second year, and $100 for the 
third year, providing the the student remains in school and in good academic 
standing. 

Helen Aletta Linthicum Scholarships 

These scholarships, several in number, have been established through the 
benefaction of the late Mrs. Helen Aletta Linthicum, widow of the late 
Congressman Charles J. Linthicum, who served in Congress from the 
Fourth District of Maryland for many years. These scholarships are known 
as the Helen Aletta Linthicum scholarships. They are granted only to 
worthy young men and women who are residents of the State of Maryland 
and who have satisfactory high school records, forceful personality, a 
reputation for splendid character and citizenship, and the determination to 
get ahead. 

"M" Club Scholarships 

The "M" Club of the University of Maryland provides each year a limited 
number of partial scholarships. These scholarships are awarded by the 
faculty committee to the most outstanding applicants. 

Dr. Frank C. Marino Scholarship 

Dr. Frank C. Marino has established a $200 annual scholarship in 
Nursing Education. As vacancies in this scholarship occur, it is awarded 
by the Scholarship Committee to a student who demonstrates special in- 
terest and promise in this field. 
Maryland Educational Foundation Scholarships 

The Maryland Educational Foundation provides funds each year for the 
education of several outstanding young men. These scholarships are 
awarded by the Faculty Committee to the most outstanding applicants. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 33 

National Executive Housekeepers Association Scholarship 

Five hundred dollars has been made available by the National Executive 
Housekeepers Association for scholarships to students majoring in House- 
keeping Administration. 

The Sears Roebuck Foundation Scholarships 

Ten scholarships of $200 each are granted by the Sears Roebuck Founda- 
tion to the sons of farmers in the State of Maryland who enroll in the 
freshman class of the College of Agriculture of this University. One $200 
scholarship is granted each year to the sophomore student in the College 
of Agriculture who proved to be the outstanding student on a Sears 
Roebuck scholarship the previous year. These scholarships are awarded 
by the Faculty Committee in accordance with the terms of the grant, 

A limited number of similar scholarships from the Sears Roebuck Foun- 
dation are also available for students in the College of Home Economics. 

J. McKenny Willis & Son Scholarship 

A scholarship of $500 is granted annually by J. McKenny Willis & Son, 
Inc., Grain, Feed and Seed Company of Easton, Maryland, to an outstand- 
ing student in vocational agriculture in Talbot County who will matriculate 
in the College of Agriculture in the University. This scholarship is awarded 
by the Faculty Committee in accordance with the terms of the grant. 

Application blanks for this scholarship may be procured at the Office 
of the County Superintendent of Schools of Talbot County. 

Washington Flour Scholarship 

This scholarship was made available by the Wilkins-Rogers Milling Com- 
pany of Washington, D. C, for Freshmen in the College of Home Economics, 
covers all fees and books for one year, and is open to any student a resident 
of the District of Columbia, of Prince George's or Montgomery Counties 
in Maryland, or Arlington or Fairfax Counties, or Alexandria in Virginia. 
It is awarded annually by the Faculty Committee in accordance with the 
general principles underlying the award of all other scholarships. 

Loan Funds 

A. A. U. W. Loan. The College Park Branch of the American Associa- 
tion of University Women maintains a fund from which loans are made to 
women students of junior or senior standing who have been in attendance 
at the University of Maryland for at least one year. 

American Bankers Association Scholarship Loan Fund. A loan fund of 
$250 for one year only limited to students in the senior year or in graduate 
work in banking, economics, or related subjects in classes of senior grade 
or above. 

Catherine Moore Brinkley Loan Fund. Under the provisions of the will 
of Catherine Moore Brinkley, a loan fund has been established, available 
for worthy students who are natives and residents of the State of Mary- 
land, studying mechanical engineering or agriculture at the University of 
Maryland. 



34 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Home Economics Loan Fund. A loan fund, established by the District of 
Columbia Home Economics Association, is available for students majoring 
in Home Economics. 

The Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority Loan. Annually a Sigma Delta loan 
of one hundred dollars, without interest, is made to a woman student regis- 
tered in the University of Maryland. 

The Henry Strong Educational Foundation 

From this fund, established under the will of General Harry Strong 
of Chicago, an annual allotment is made to the University of Maryland at 
College Park for scholarship loans available for the use of young men and 
women students under the age of twenty-five. Recommendations for the 
privileges of these loans are limited, in most part, to students in the junior 
and senior years. Only students who through stress of circumstances re- 
quire financial aid and who have demonstrated excellence in educational 
progress are considered in making nominations to the secretary of this fund. 

Student Employment and Senior Placement. 

A considerable number of students earn some money through employ- 
ment while in attendance at the University. No student should expect, 
however, to earn enough to pay all of his expenses. The amounts vary, 
but some earn from one-fourth to three-fourths of all the required funds. 

Generally the first year is the hardest for those desiring employment. 
After one has demonstrated that he is worthy and capable, there is much 
less difficulty in finding work. 

The University assumes no responsibility in connection with employment. 
It does, however, make every effort to aid needy students. The nearby 
towns and the University are canvassed, and a list of available positions 
is placed at the disposal of the students. Applications for employment should 
be made to the Director of Student Welfare. 

A Placement Service is also maintained to assist graduating seniors in 
finding employment. 

Procedures in Applying for Scholarships and Student Aid 

All requests for information concerning scholarships and student aid 
should be addressed to the Chairman of the Scholarship Committee, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. Regulations and procedures 
for the award of scholarships are formulated by this committee. 

ATHLETICS AND RECREATION 

The University recognizes the importance of the physical development 
of all students, and besides the required physical education for freshmen 
and sophomores sponsors a comprehensive intercollegiate and intramural 
program. Students are encouraged to participate in competitive athletics 
and to learn the skill of games that may be carried on after leaving college. 
The intramural program which covers a large variety of sports is conducted 
by the Physical Education Department for both men and women. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 35 

A full program in intercollegiate athletics is sponsored under the super- 
vision of the Council on Intercollegiate Athletics. The University is a 
member of the Southern Conference, the National Collegiate Athletics 
Association, the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association, Inter- 
collegiate Amateur Athletic Association of America, and cooperates with 
other national organizations in the promotion of amateur athletics. 

Excellent facilities are available for carrying on the activities of the pro- 
gram in physical development. The University has two modem gymnasia, 
a coliseum, a large armory, a modem stadium, a number of athletic fields, 
tennis courts, baseball diamonds, running tracks and the like, constituting 
the major portion of the equipment. 

EXTRA-CURRICULAR STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The following description of student activities covers those of the under- 
graduate divisions of College Park. The descriptions of those in the Balti- 
more divisions are included elsewhere. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 
Regulation of Student Activities. The association of students in organ- 
ized bodies for the purpose of carrying on voluntary student activities in 
orderly and productive ways, is recognized and encouraged. All organized 
student acMvities are under the supervision of the Student Life Committee. 
Such organizations are formed only with the consent of the Student Life 
Committee and the approval of the President. Without such consent and 
approval no student organization which in any way represents the Univer- 
sity before the public, or which purports to be a University organization 
or an organization of University students, may use the name of the Uni- 
versity in connection with its own name, or in connection with its members 
as students. 

Student Government. The Student Government Association consists of 
the Executive Council, the Women's League, and the Men's League, and 
operates under its own constitution. Its officers are a president, a vice- 
president, a secretary, a treasurer, president of Women's League, and 
president of Men's League. 

The Executive Council is the over-all student governing body and per- 
forms the executive duties incident to managing student affairs and works 
in cooperation with the Student Life Committee. 

The Women's League, in cooperation with the Office of the Dean of Women, 
handles matters pertaining to women students. 

The Men's League, in cooperation with the Office of the Dean of Men, 
handles matters pertaining to men students. 

The Student Life Committee, a faculty committee appointed by the Presi- 
dent, keeps in close touch with all activities and conditions, excepting class- 
room work, that effect the student, and acting in an advisory capacity, 
endeavors to improve any unsatisfactory conditions that may exist. 



36 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

A pamphlet entitled Academic Regulations, issued annually and dis- 
tributed to the students in the fall, contains full information concerning 
student matters as well as a statement of the rules of the University. 

Eligibility to Represent the University. Only students in good standing 
are eligible to represent the University in extra-curricular activities. In 
addition, various student organizations have established certain other re- 
quirements. To compete in varsity athletics a student must pass the 
required number of hours as determined by the Athletic Board. 

Discipline. In the government of the University, the President and 
faculty rely chiefly upon the sense of responsibility of the students. The 
student who pursues his studies diligently, attends classes regularly, lives 
honorably and maintains good behavior meets this responsibility. In the 
interest ,of the general welfare of the University, those who fail to main- 
tain these standards are asked to withdraw. Students are under the direct 
supervision of the University only when on the campus, attending an 
approved function or representing the University, but they are responsible 
to the University for their conduct wherever they may be. 

HONORS AND AWARDS 

Scholarship Honors. Final honors for excellence in scholarship are 
awarded to one-fifth of the graduating class in each college. First honors 
are awarded to the upper half of this group; second honors to the lower 
half. To be eligible for honors, at least two years of resident work must 
be completed, and the average must be B (3.00) or higher. 

The Goddard Medal. The James Douglas Goddard Memorial Metal is 
awarded annually to the resident of Prince George's County, bom therein, 
who makes the highest average in his studies and who at the same time 
embodies the most manly attributes. The medal is given by Mrs. Anne K. 
Goddard James of Washington, D. C. 

Grange Award. The Maryland State Grange makes an annual award to 
the senior who has excelled in leadership and scholastic attainment and has 
contributed meritorious service to the College of Agriculture. 

The Alpha Chi Sigma Award. The Maryland, Alpha Rho Chapter, of 
the Alpha Chi Sigma Fraternity awards annually a year's membership in 
the American Chemical Society to the senior in the Department of Chemis- 
try or the Department of Chemical Engineering with the highest scholastic 
average based on three and one-half years, provided the average is above 
3.00. 

Sigma Chi Cup. Sigma Chi Fraternity offers annually a cup to the man 
in the freshman class who makes the highest scholastic average during the 
first semester. 

Alpha Zeta Medal. The Honorary Agricultural Fraternity of Alpha Zeta 
awards annually a medal to the agricultural student in the freshman class 
who attains the highest average record in academic work. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 37 

Dinah Herman Memorial Medal. The Dinah Berman Memorial Medal is 

awarded annually to the sophomore who has attained the highest scholastic 
average of his class in the College of Engineering. The medal is given by 
Benjamin Berman. 

Delta Delta Delta Medal. This sorority awards a medal annually to the 
girl who attains the highest average in academic work during the sopho- 
more year. 

Omicron Nu Sorority Medal. This sorority awards a medal annually to 
the freshman girl in the College of Home Economics who attains the 
highest scholastic average during the first semester. 

Bernard L. Crozier Award. The Maryland Association of Engineers 
awards a cash prize of $25.00 annually to the senior in the College of 
Engineering who, in the opinion of the faculty, has made the greatest 
improvement in scholarship during his stay at the University. 

Alpha Lambda Delta Award. The Alpha Lambda Delta Award is given 
to the senior member of the group who has maintained the highest average 
for the past three and one-half years. She must have been in attendance 
in the institution for the entire time. 

American Society of Civil Engineers Award. The Maryland Section 
of the American Society of Civil Engineers awards annually a junior mem- 
bership in the American Society of Civil Engineers to the senior in the 
Department of Civil Engineering who has the highest scholastic standing. 

Tau Beta Pi Award. The Maryland Beta Chapter of Tau Beta Pi awards 
annually an engineers' handbook to the junior in the College of Engineering 
who, during his sophomore year, has made the greatest improvement in 
scholarship over that of his freshman year. 

Sigma Alpha Omicron Award. This is awarded to the senior student 
majoring in Bacteriology for high scholarship, character and leadership. 

Delta Gamma Scholarship Award is offered to the woman member of the 
graduating class who has achieved the highest scholastic average for her 
entire course. 

The Charles B. Hale Dramatic Awards. The University Theatre recog- 
nizes annually the man and woman members of the senior class who have 
done most for the advancement of dramatics at the University. 

Rabbi Edward L. Israel Interfaith Scholarship of $300 is awarded by the 
B'nai B'rith Lodges of Maryland and Washington, D. C, to the student in 
the junior class who has done most to improve interfaith relations on the 
campus. 

William S. Rosenbaum Memorial Foundation Award, Barbarossa Lodge 
133, Knights of Pythias, Philadelphia, for excellence in Hebrew Studies, $25. 

Alpha Rho Chapter of Alpha Chi Sigma Award. To the senior in Chemis- 
try or Chemical Engineering whose average is above 3.00 for three and one- 
half years. A membership in the American Chemical Society. 



38 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award. The New York Southern Society 
awards annually medallions and certificates to one man and one woman of 
the graduating class and one non-student who evince in their daily life a 
spirit of love for and helpfulness to other men and women. 

This award is made in memory of the first president of the New York 
Southern Society. 

CITIZENSHIP AWARDS 

Citizenship Prize for Men. An award is presented annually by President 
H. C. Byrd, a graduate of the Class of 1908, to the member of the seinor 
class who, during his collegiate career, has most nearly typified the model 
citizen, and has done most for the general advancement of the interests 
of the University. 

The Sally Sterling Byrd Medal. This medal is presented by the family 
of the late Sally Sterling Byrd of Crisfield, Maryland, to the University of 
Maryland to be awarded to that girl member of the Senior Class who best 
exemplifies the enduring qualities of the pioneer woman. These qualities 
should typify self dependence, courtesy, aggressiveness, modesty, capacity 
to achieve objectives, willingness to sacrifice for others, strength of char- 
acter, and those other qualities that enabled the pioneer woman to play 
such a fundamental part in the building of the Nation. 

MILITARY AWARDS 
Mahlon N. Haines '94 Trophy. This is offered to the colonel of the win- 
ning group. 

Military Department Award. Gold second lieutenant's insignia to the 
colonel of the winning group. 

The Governor's Cup. This is offered each year by His Excellency, the 
Governor of Maryland, to the best drilled squadron. 

The Alumni Cup. The Alumni offer each year a cup to the commanding 
officer of the best drilled flight. 

Scabbard and Blade. This cup is offered to the commander of the 
winning flight. 

The Meeks Trophy is awarded to the member of the varsity A. F. R. O. 
T. C. Rifle Team who fired the high score of each season. 

A Gold Medal is awarded to the member of the Freshman Rifle Team who 
fired the high score of each season. 

Pershing Rifle Medals are awarded to each member of the winning squad 
in the squad drill competition. 

Pershing Rifle Medals are awarded to the three best drilled students in 
Pershing Rifles. 

Mehring Trophy Rifle Competition. A gold Medal is awarded to the 
student firing highest score in this competition. 

Air Force Association Medal. A silver medal awarded to the outstanding 
first- and second-year student in the advanced Air R. 0. T. C. course based 



GENERAL INFORMATION 39 

on scholastic grades, both general and military, individual characteristica 
and the performance during the period of summer camp. 

Arnold Society Cup, awarded to the second-year advanced student who 
has done the most to advance the Air Force R. 0. T. C. interests and 
activities on the campus. 

ATHLETIC AWARDS 

Silvester Watch for Excellence in Athletics. A gold watch is offered 
annually to "the man who typifies the best in college athletics." The 
watch is given in honor of a former President of the University, R. W. 
Silvester. 

Maryland Ring. The Maryland Ring is offered by Charles L. Linhardt 
to the Maryland man who is adjudged the best athlete of the year. 

Edwin Powell Trophy. This trophy is offered by the class of 1913 to 
the player who has rendered the greatest service to lacrosse during the year. 

Louis W. Berger Trophy. This trophy is awarded to the outstanding 
senior baseball player. 

The Tom Birmingham Memorial Trophy. To the outstanding member of 
the boxing team, awarded by Major Benny Alperstein and Major Hotsy 
Alperstein in memory of the late Tom Birmingham, '37. 

The Dixie Walker Memorial Trophy. Offered by Theta Chi Fraternity in 
memory of Dixie Walker. Award for the boxer who shows the most im- 
provement over preceding years. 

The Teke Trophy. This trophy is offered by the Maryland Chapter of 
Tau Kappa Epsilon Fraternity to the student who during his four years 
at the University has rendered the greatest service to football. 

Charles Leroy Mackert Trophy. This trophy is offered by William E. 
Krouse to the Maryland student who has contributed most to wrestling 
while at the University. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT AWARDS 

Medals are awarded to members of the Executive Committee of the 
Student Government Association who faithfully perform their duties 
throughout the year. 

RELIGIOUS INFLUENCES 

The University recognizes its responsibility for the welfare of the stu- 
dents, not solely in their intellectual growth, but as humans personalities 
whose development along all lines, including the moral and religious, is 
included in the educational process. Pastors representing the major de- 
nominational bodies assume responsibility for work with the students of 
their respective faiths. A new chapel, one of the most beautiful structures 
of its kind, for use of all faiths, is on the campus. Church attendance is 
encouraged. 

Religious Life Committee. A faculty committee on religious affairs and 
social service has as its principal function the stimulation of religious 



40 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

thought and activity on the campus. It brings noted speakers on religious 
subjects to the campus from time to time. The committee cooperates with 
the Student Religious Council and the student pastors and assists the 
student denominational clubs in every way that it can. Opportunities are 
provided for students to consult with pastors representing the denomina- 
tions of their choice. 

While there is no attempt to interfere with anyone's religious beliefs, 
the importance of religion is recognized officially and religious activities 
are encouraged. 

Denominational Clubs. Several religious clubs have been organized 
among the students for their mutual benefit and to undertake certain types 
of service. This year the list includes the Baptist Student Union, the 
Canterbury Club (Episcopal), the Albright-Otterbein Club (Evangelical 
United Brethren), the Christian Science Club, the Friends' University 
Group, Greek Orthodox Club, the Hillel Foundation (Jewish), the Lutheran 
Club, the Newman Club (Catholic), Maryland Christian Fellowship, the 
Pre-theological Group, the Religious Philosophy Study Group, the Wesley 
Foundation (Methodist), and the Westminster Foundation (Presbyterian). 
These clubs meet regularly for worship and discussion, and occasionally for 
social purposes. A pastor or a member of the faculty serves as adviser. 

FRATERNITIES, SORORITIES, SOCIETIES AND CLUBS 
General Statement 

Fraternities and sororities, as well as all other clubs and organizations 
recognized by the University, are expected to conduct their social and 
financial activities in accordance with the rules of good conduct and upon 
sound business principles. Where such rules and principles are observed, 
individual members will profit by the experience of the whole group, and 
thereby become better fitted for their life's work after graduation. Rules 
governing the different activities will be found in the list of Academic 
Regulations. 

Honorary Fraternities. Honorary fraternities and societies in the Uni- 
versity at College Park are organized to uphold scholastic and cultural 
standards. These are Phi Kappa Phi, a national honorary fraternity open 
to honor students, both men and women, in all branches of learning; Sigma 
Xi, an honorary scientific fraternity; Omicron Delta Kappa, men's national 
honor society, recognizing conspicuous attainment in non-curricular activi- 
ties and general leadership; Mortar Board, the national senior honor society 
for women recognizing service, leadership and scholarship: Alpha Lambda 
Delta, a national freshmen women's scholastic society requiring a 3.5 aver- 
age; Phi Eta Sigma, national freshman honor society for men. 

A group of national honorary fraternities encouraging development in 
specialized endeavor are: Tau Beta Phi, general engineering honor society; 
Omicron Nu, women's home economics honor society; Beta Gamma Sigma, 
men's and women's commerce honor society; Sigma Pi Sigma, men's and 



GENERAL INFORMATION 41 

women's physics honor society; Phi Alpha Theta, men's and women's 
history honor society. 

The national professional fraternities which encourage high scholarship, 
professional research and advancement of professional ethics are: Alpha 
Zeta, men's professional agricultural fraternity; Phi Delta Kappa, men's 
professional education fraternity; Beta Alpha Psi, men's professional ac- 
counting fraternity; Iota Lambda Sigma, men's professional industrial edu- 
cation fraternity; Alpha Chi Sigma, men's professional chemistry fraternity; 
Delta Sigma Pi, professional commerce fraternity. 

The national recognition societies which promote achievement in various 
fields of activity are: Scabbard and blade, men's military society; Pershing 
Rifles, men's military society; Pi Delta Epsilon, men's and women's college 
journalism society; Alpha Kappa Delta, men's sociology society; Pi Sigma 
Alpha, men's and women's political science society; National Collegiate 
Players, men's and women's dramatics society. 

Sigma Alpha Omicron is a bacteriology honor society. The Arnold 
Society is an honorary Air Force R. 0. T. C. society and the Varsity "M" 
Club is an honorary athletic organization. 

Fraternities and Sororities. There are twenty-two national fraternities, 
three local fraternities and fifteen national sororities at College Park. These 
in the order of their establishment at the University are: Kappa Alpha, 
Simga Nu, Phi Sigma Kappa, Delta Sigma Phi, Alpha Gamma Rho, Theta 
Chi, Phi Alpha, Tau Epsilon Phi, Alpha Tau Omega, Phi Delta Theta, 
Lambda Chi Alpha, Sigma Alpha Mu, Alpha Epsilon Pi, Phi Kappa Sigma, 
Sigma Chi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Tau Kappa Epsilon, Zeta Beta Tau, 
Dalta Tau Delta, Sigma Pi, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Phi Kappa Tau, national 
fraternities; Alpha Omicron Pi, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Kappa Delta, Delta 
Delta Delta, Alpha Xi Delta, Phi Sigma Sigma, Alpha Delta Pi, Sigma 
Kappa, Gamma Phi Beta, Alpha Epsilon Phi, Pi Beta Phi, Delta Gamma, 
Kappa Alpha Theta, Alpha Gamma Delta, Alpha Chi Omega, and Sigma 
Delta Tau, national sororities; Gamma Sigma, local sorority; Alpha Alpha, 
Delta Epsilon Kappa, and Phi Kappa Gamma, local fraternities. 

Clubs and Societies. Many clubs and societies, with literary, art, cultural, 
scientific, social and other special objectives are maintained in the Univer- 
sity. Some of these are purely student organizations; others are conducted 
jointly by students and members of the faculty. The list follows: 

Civic anl Service Organizations. Interfraternity Council, Panhellenic 
Council, Interfraternity Pledge Council, Independent Students' Association, 
Daydodgers' Club, Student Unit of the American Red Cross, Latch Key, 
Alpha Phi Omega (national service fraternity), Chinese Student Club, 
Graduate Club, Gate and Key Club (a fraternity service organization), 
and Islamic Association. 

Subject-Mattel- Organizations. Agricultural Council, Engineering Coun- 
cil, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, American Society of Civil 
Engineers, Student Affiliate of the American Chemical Society, Farm 



42 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Economics Club, Block and Bridle Club, Student Port of Propellor Club, 
Plant Industry Club, Home Economics Club, Physical Education Majors 
Club, American Institute of Electrical Engineers and Institute of Radio 
Engineers, Industrial Education Association, Childhood Education Club, 
American Institute of Chemical Engineers, Finance Club, Society for Ad- 
vancement of Management, Marketing Club, Accounting Club, Maryland 
Poultry Science Club, Business Education Club, Economics Seminar Club, 
Federated Arts Club, Philosophy Club, and Institute of Aeronautical 
Sciences. 

General Organizations. Student Grange, International Relations Club, 
Future Farmers of America, Sociology Club, Fi-ench Club, German Club, 
Spanish Club, Collegiate 4-H Club, Women's Recreation Association, Cosmo- 
poliatn Club, International Club, Russian Club, and Public Relations Club. 

Recreational Organizatioyis. Rossborough Club (large campus dances). 
University Theatre, Men's Glee Club, Women's Chorus, Clef and Key, 
Riding Club, Terrapin Trail Club, Gymkana Club, Swimming Club, Camera 
Club, Ballroom Dance Club (instructional group), Radio Club, Chess Club, 
Art Club, Authorship Club, University Orchestra, Sailing Club, Judo Club, 
Modern Dance Club, Ski Club, Astronomy Club, Model Airplane Club, and 
Maryland Flying Association. 

UNIVERSITY AND A. F. R. O. T. C. BANDS 

The University of Maryland Student Band and the A. F. R. O. T. C. 
Band are two separate musical organizations at the University, existing 
for the purpose of furthering the musical knowledge of interested students. 
The A. F. R. 0. T. C. Band functions under the Military Department. The 
Student Band is under the direction of the Music Department and is 
assisted by the Military Department. Students are not required to be 
members of the University of Maryland Band to be eligible for the Air 
Force R. 0. T, C. Band. The instruction of both bands is conducted by 
an experienced bandmaster. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Four student publications are conducted under the guidance of a faculty 
adviser and the general supervision of the Student Publications Board. 

The Diamondback, a newspaper, summarizes the University news, and 
provides a medium for the discussion of matters of interest to the students 
and the faculty. 

The Terrapin, the annual, is a reflection of campus activities, serving to 
commemorate the principal events of the college year. 

The Old Line, is a literary, humorous and art magazine, published period- 
ically. 

The "M" Book, a handbook issued for the benefit of incoming students, 
is designed to acquaint them with general University life. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 43 

UNIVERSITY POST OFFICE 

The University operates an office for the reception, dispatch and delivery 
of United States mail, including Parcel Post packages, and for inter-office 
communications. This office is located in the basement of the Adminis- 
tration Building. The campus post office is not a part of the United States 
Postal System and no facilities are available for sending or receiving postal 
money orders. Postage stamps, however, may be purchased. United States 
mail is received at 8:30 A. M. and 2:00 P. M. and dispatched at 11:15 A. M. 
and 4:15 P. M. daily, except that on Saturdays mail is dispatched at 11:15 
A. M. only. 

Each student in the University is assigned a Post Office box at the time 
of registration, for which a small fee is charged. Also, boxes are provided 
for the various University offices. 

One of the major reasons for the operation of the Post Office is to pro- 
vide a convenient method by which Deans, teachers and University officials 
may communicate with students. Students are therefore expected to call 
for their mail daily, if possible, in order that such communications may 
come to their attention promptly. 

STUDENTS' SUPPLY STORE 

For the convenience of students, the University maintains a Students' 
Supply Store, located in the basement of the Administration Building, 
where students may obtain at reasonable prices text books, classroom mate- 
rials and equipment. The store also carries jewelry, stationery, fountain 
pens and novelty items. 

This store is operated on a basis of furnishing students needed books 
and supplies at as low a cost as practicable, and profits, if any, are turned 
into the general University treasury to be used for promoting general 
student welfare. The store is an integral part of the University and is 
owned by the State of Maryland. 

Because of heavy demand for text books at the beginning of each semester 
the Students' Supply Stoi'e operates a temporary annex on the campus. 
Location of this annex is posted at registration. 

ALUMNI 

The Alumni Council, composed of three representatives from each School 
and College in the University — one from "M" Club and one from each 
area Alumni Club — coordinates all general alumni interests and activities. 
The Council membership includes three representatives from each of the 
organized alumni associations for the Schools of Agriculture, Arts and 
Sciences, Business and Public Administration, Dentistry, Education, Engi- 
neering, Home Economics, Law, Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy. 

Council activities include the alumni publication Maryland, a scholarship 
program, and an annual Homecoming affair at College Part. Membership 
in the University of Maryland Alumni Association is automatically ob- 



44 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

tained through affiliation with one of the school organizations. Each 
School and College Alumni Association exerts an active interest in the 
welfare of its respective graduates and the University of Maryland. Ob- 
jectives of the general Association include the promotion of the interests 
and welfare of the University of Maryland and efforts to further mutually 
beneficial relations between the University of Maryland, the people of 
the State, and the alumni. 

"Maryland" Magazine 
Maryland, a bi-monthly magazine, issued by the Alumni Association, is 
primarily an alumni publication. However, it publishes also articles of 
general interest, feature articles written by faculty members and alumni, 
campus news, and sports news. It is of reader interest to the alumni as 
well as the student body, next of kin of students, faculty members and 
Maryland residents in general. The magazine's circulation includes the 
exchange list of numerous universities. Maryland is edited and published 
by the University's Department of Publications. 

THE ACADEMIC DIVISIONS 

The academic divisions at the University of Maryland are constituted 
for the purpose of drawing into closer relationship the scholars among both 
students and faculty in related departments of study who are faced with 
common problems and the need for an exchange of experience in reference 
to progress underway which is of common interest extending beyond the 
bounds of individual departments. 

In addition to the functions of coordinating the work of related depart- 
ments and stimulating scholarship in a broad subject field, it is more par- 
ticularly the duty of divisions, through their chairmen, to sanction needed 
interdepartmental cooperative projects; check and report possible duplica- 
tion of effort; and in general, to serve as advisory bodies to the General 
Administrative Board. 

The chairmen of the divisions are chosen by the General Administrative 
Board, of which body they are members. 

Five academic divisions have been established in the University to date. 
These are: 

The Lower Division 

The Division of Biological Sciences 

The Division of Physical Sciences 

The Division of Humanities 

The Division of Social Sciences 
At the present time these divisions are constituted as follows: 

THE LOWER DIVISION 
Chairman, Dr. Charles E. White, Professor of Chemistry 

Student programs in Freshman and Sophomore years of the University 
are under the general oversight of a faculty committee known as the Lower 



GENERAL INFORMATION 45 

Division Committee. The members of this committee are especially selected 
because of their interest in student growth and devlopment in Freshman 
and Sophomore years. They are drawn from the faculties of all of the 
departments in the University whose responsibility it is to offer courses to 
students in these years. 

It is the function of the Lower Division Committee to consider the gen- 
eral problem of courses which should be open to students in Freshman and 
Sophomore years; the articulation of these courses in terms of the curricula 
needs of the several colleges; and, in general, to stimulate interest in learn- 
ing and teaching at this level. 

THE DIVISION OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 
Chairman, Dr. John E. Faber, Professor of Bacteriology 

The Division of Biological Sciences includes the departments of Bacteri- 
ology, Botany, Entomology, Zoology and Genetics, and representatives of 
other departments interested in this field. 

THE DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 
Acting Chairman, Dr. Augustus J. Prahl, Professor of Foreign 

Languages 

The Division of Humanities includes the departments of Art, Classical 
Languages and Literature, English Language and Literature, Foreign 
Languages and Literature, Music, Practical Art, Philosophy, Speech, and 
representatives of other departments interested in this field. 

THE DIVISION OF PHYSICAL SCIENCES 
Chairman, Dr. Wilbert J. Huff, Professor of Chemical Engineering 

The Division of Physical Sciences includes the departments of Astronomy, 
Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, Physics, and representatives of other 
departments interested in this field. 

THE DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 
Chairman, Dr. Harold C. Hoffsommer, Professor of Sociology 

The Division of Social Sciences includes the departments of Economics, 
Agricultural Economics, History, Home Management, Government and Poli- 
tics, Psychology, Sociology, and representatives of other departments in- 
terested in this field. 

CURRICULA AND PROGRAMS 

AT COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 

College of Agriculture. The College of Agriculture offers curricula lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of Science in General Agriculture; Agri- 
cultural Chemistry: Agricultural Economics and Marketing; Agricul- 
tural Education and Rural Life; Agriculture-Engineering; Agronomy 



46 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

(crops and soils) ; Animal Husbandry; Botany (plant cytology, morph- 
ology and taxonomy; plant pathology; and plant physiology and ecology) ; 
Dairy (dairy husbandry and dairy products technology); Entomology; 
Horticulture (pomology and olericulture, floriculture and ornamental 
horticulture and commercial processing of horticultural crops) ; and 
Poultry Husbandry. 

College of Arts and Sciences. The College of Arts and Sciences pro- 
vides liberal training leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science. Curricula are offered in Art, Bacteriology, Medical 
Technology, Chemistry, English, Foreign Languages (French, German, 
Spanish, Russian and Hebrew), History, Mathematics, Physics, General 
Physical Sciences, Philosophy, Pre-dental, Pre-law, Pre-medical, Pre- 
nursing. Psychology, Sociology, Social Service, Crime Control, Speech, 
Zoology, and Fisheries Biology. 

The College of Arts and Sciences offers combined degrees with the 
Schools of Medicine, Law, and Nursing. 

College of Business and Public Administration. The College of Business 
and Public Administration offers curricula leading to a Bachelor of Science 
degree in Business Organization and Administration, Public Administra- 
tion, Economics, Geography, Government and Politics, Journalism, and 
Office Techniques and Management. 

College of Education. The College of Education offers curricula leading 
to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. Curricula 
are offered in Academic Education, Art Education, Business Education, 
Dental Education, Elementary Education, Home Economics Education, 
Industrial Education, Music Education, Nursery School-Kindergarten 
Education, Nursing Education, Physical Education, Health Education, and 
Recreation. 

The Glenn L. Martin College of Engineering and Aeronautical Sciences. 

The Glenn L. Martin College of Engineering and Aeronautical Sciences 
offers curricula leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in Aeronautical 
Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineer- 
ing, Mechanical Engineering and Metallurgy. 

College of Home Economics. The College of Home Economics offers 
curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in General Home 
Economics, Foods and Nutrition, Home Economics Education, Institution 
Management, Home Economics Extension, Textiles and Clothing, and Prac- 
tical Art. 

College of Military Science. The College of Military Science offers the 
curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. This curriculum 
is especially designed for those who wish to follow a career in the Armed 
Forces. The Air Force Reserve Officers' Training Corp established by the 
Air Force in cooperation with the University is a major department in this 
College. Two years of training in this type of citizenship, Air Force 



GENERAL INFORMATION 47 

science and tactics, are required of all male students under the age of 
thirty years. Any male student in any undergraduate curriculum of the 
University who is accepted for such training may pursue an advanced course 
in this field which will lead to a reserve or regular commission in the 
United States Air Force. 

College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health. The College of 
Physical Education, Recreation and Health offers curricula leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Education, in Recreation and in 
Health. In addition this College conducts the required physical activities 
program of the freshman and sophomore years designed to correct and 
improve the physical development of all students. 

College of Special and Continuation Studies. The College of Special and 
Continuation Studies provides a limited program of late afternoon and 
evening and Saturday morning courses both on and off campus for mature 
students who have full-time employment or who, for other reasons, cannot 
follow a full-time program of studies at College Park. These studies are 
offered at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. This College 
also conducts a special program for high school graduates whose secondary 
school preparation may be deficient in certain minor details. 

Summer School. The Summer School of six weeks duration provides 
programs of study to persons who find it convenient to attend the Uni- 
versity during the summer months. Instruction is offered in most of the 
departments of the University. In the College of Education the offerings 
are considerably expanded. Teachers in service and other persons who are 
employed during the regular school year find a wide variety of courses 
available. 

Graduate School. The Graduate School has general jurisdiction over the 
graduate courses offered in the departments of the University at College 
Park and Baltimore. Through a program of inter-departmental coopera- 
tion under the immediate direction of this School, the University confers 
the degrees of Master of Arts, Master of Science, Master of Arts in 
American Civilization, Master of Business Administration, Master of Edu- 
cation, Master of Foreign Study, Doctor of Education, and Doctor of Phi- 
losophy. The graduate faculty includes all members of the various faculties 
who give instruction in approved graduate courses. 

AT BALTIMORE 

The Schools of Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy offer 
curricula leading to professional degrees in their respective fields. 

CATALOGS 

See separate catalog listings on back cover. 



College of 

AGRICULTURE 

STAFF 

Many of the members of the Instructional staff are also on the staff of the 

Extension Service, or the Experiment Station staff, or both. Lists of 

the staffs of these two agencies appear elsewhere in this publication. 

Gordon M. Cairns, Ph.D., Dean of Agriculture 

Paul E. Nystrom, DPA., Director of Instruction 

Thomas B. Symons, D.Agr., Dean of Agriculture Emeritus 

George J. Abrams, M.S., Assistant Professor of Apiculture, 

Arthur M. Ahalt, M.S., Professor and Head of Agricultural Education. 

Charles 0. Appleman, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Physiology Emeritus. 

Wendell S. Arbuckle, Ph.D., Professor of Dairy Manufacturing. 

John H. Axley, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Soils. 

Ronald Bamford, Ph.D., Professor and Head of Botany. 

George M. Beal, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Economics and Marketing. 

Frank L. Bentz, B.S., Assistant. 

William E. Bickley, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Luther B. Bohanan, M.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics 

and Marketing. 
Harry A. Borthwick, Ph.D., Lecturer in Plant Physiology. 
Richard E. Brown, M.S., Instructor in Dairy Husbandry. 
Russell G. Brown, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 
Arthur L. Brueckner, V.M.D., Professor of Veterinary Science. 
Ambrose W. Burger, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agronomy. 
John Buric, M.S., Instructor of Animal Husbandry. 
David J. Burns, M.S., Instructor Agriculture Economics & Marketing. 
Ray W. Carpenter, A.B., Professor and Head of Agricultural Engineering. 
Russell L. Childress, Ph.D., Associate Pi-ofessor of Agricultural Economics 

and Marketing. 
John M. Coffin, V.M.D., Associate Professor of Veterinary Science. 
Gerald F. Combs, Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 
Edgar A. Corbin, M.S., Instructor in Dairy Manufacturing. 
Pardon W. Cornell, M.S., Associate Professor of Ornamental Horticulture. 
Ernest N. Cory, Ph.D., Professor and Head of Entomology. 
Harold F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Education. 

49 



60 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Carroll E. Cox, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Harry W. Dengler, B.S., Associate Professor of Forestry. 

Harold M. Devolt, D.V.M., Professor of Poultry Pathology. 

Willie M. Dugger, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant Physiology. 

Matthew F. Ellmore, M.S., Instructor of Dairy Husbandry. 

Humphrey Finney, Lecturer in Animal Husbandry. 

John E. Foster, Ph.D., Professor and Head of Animal Husbandry. 

Hugh G. Gauch, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Physiology. 

Guy W. Gienger, M.S., Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

Willard W. Green, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

Arthur B. Hamilton, M.S., Associate Professor of Argicultural Economics 
and Farm Management. 

Irvin C. Haut, Ph.D., Professor and Head of Horticulture. 

Elizabeth E. Haviland, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Harry J. Hofmeister, B.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineer- 
ing. 

Walter F. Jeffers, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology, 

Morley a. Jull, Ph.D., Professor and Head of Poultry Husbandry. 

Mark Keeney, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Dairy Manufacturing. 

Malcolm H. Kekr, M.S., Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

Robert W. Krauss, Ph.D., Research Associate in Plant Physiology. 

Albin 0. KuHN, Ph.D., Professor and Head of Agronomy. 

Conrad Liden, M.S., Assistant Professor of Agronomy. 

Conrad B. Link, Ph.D., Professor of Floriculture. 

Ellis Martin, B.S., Laboratory Assistant in Agricultural Engineering. 

Joseph F. Mattick, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Dairy Manufacturing. 

Delbert T. Morgan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Omar D. Morgan, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Samuel C. Munson, M.S., Lecturer in Entomology. 

Ray a. Murray, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural Education. 

Constantine Nikiforoff, Ph.D., Lecturer in Soils. 

Joseph W. Nisonger, B.S., Instructor of Dairy Manufacturing. 

John B. S. Norton, D.Sc, Professor of Botany Emeritus. 

Paul E. Nystrom, D.P.A., Professor and Head of Agriculture Economies 
and Marketing. 

James B. Outhouse, M.S., Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry. 
Paul R. Poffenberger, M.S., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 

and Marketing. 
John W. Pou, Ph.D., Professor and Head of Dairy 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 61 

George D. Quigley, B.S., Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

Robert D. Rappleye, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Reginald L. Reagan, Associate Professor of Veterinary Virology. 

Thomas S. Ronningen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agronomy. 

Reecb I. Sailer, Ph.D., Lecturer in Entomology. 

Leland E. Scott, Ph.D., Professor of Horticultural Physiology. 

Clyne S. Shaffner, Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

James B. Shanks, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Floriculture. 

Joseph C. Shaw, Ph.D., Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 

Howard H. Shepard, Ph.D., Lecturer in Entomology. 

Mark M. Shoemaker, M.L.D., Associate Professor of Landscape Gardening. 

Stanley C. Shull, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 

and Marketing. 
Francis C. Stark, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Vegetable Crops. 
Orman E. Street, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agronomy. 
Edward Strickling, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Soils. 
Arthur H. Thompson, Ph.D., Professor of Pomology. 
Herman S. Todd, B.S., Instructor in Horticulture 
William P. Walker, M.S., Professor of Agricultural Economics. 
Edgar P. Walls, Ph.D., Professor of Canning Crops. 
Leslie O. Weaver, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

*CRITIC TEACHERS IN AGRICULTURE 

W. Hablem Biggs, Hagerstown Vocational Center, Hagerstown, Md. 

H. Palmer Hopkins, North Harford School, Pylesville, Md. 

Sydney T. Lawler, Sherwood High School, Sandy Springs, Md. 

Glenn W. Lewis, Easton High School, Easton, Md. 

Leib McDonald, Sparks High School, Sparks, Md. 

William W. Miles, Damascus High School, Damascus, Md. 

E. Kenneth Ramsburg, Boonsboro High School, Boonsbore, Md. 

Georg^; C. Remsberg, Walkersville High School, Walkersville, Md. 

Joseph K. Scott, Williamsport High School, Williamsport, Md. 

Max a. Smith, Clarksville High School, Clarksville, Md. 

Warren C. Smith, Frederick High School, Frederick, Md. 



* Teachers of Vocational Agriculture who supervise student teachers in Agriculture 
during the practice teaching period. 



52 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Gordon M. Cairns, Ph.D., Dean 
Paul E, Nystrom, D.P.A., Director of Instruction 

THE College of Agriculture offers both general and spe- 
cialized training for students who wish to prepare for 
professional work in the broad field of agricultural endeavor. 
Student programs are arranged with a view to 
correlating technical work with related sciences 
and cultural subjects. Education m fundamentals 
receives special attention. Accordingly, young 
men and women are given a basic general educa- 
tion while they are being instructed in the various 
branches of agriculture. In addition to offering 
this opportunity for thorough grounding in the 
related basic natural and social sciences, it is 
an objective of the College to provide trained 
personnel for agricultural and allied industries. This personnel is recruited 
from rural and urban areas. Farm-reared students enter either general 
or specialized curricula; city-reared students tend to follow the specialized 
programs. 

History 

The College of Agriculture is the oldest division of the University of 
Maryland at College Park. The institution was chartered in 1856 under 
the name of the Maryland Agricultural College. For three years the 
College was under private management. When Congress passed the Land 
Grant Act in 1862, the General Assembly of Maryland accepted it for the 
State and named the Maryland Agricultural College as the beneficiary. 
When the institution was merged in 1920 with the University of Mary- 
land in Baltimore, the College of Agriculture took its place as one of the 
major divisions of this larger, more comprehensive organization. 

In addition to teaching, the College of Agriculture includes the Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station and the Extension Service. They were 
established as the result of acts passed by Congress in 1887 and 1914 
respectively. A more complete description of these two services appear 
later in this bulletin. 

General 

The College provides curricula for those who wish to engage in general 
farming, livestock production, dairying, poultry husbandry, fruit or vege- 
table growing, floriculture or ornamental horticulture, field crop produc- 
tion, or in the highly specialized scientific activities connected with these 
industries. It prepares men to serve as farm managers, for positions with 
commercial concerns related to agriculture, for responsible positions as 
teachers in agriculture colleges and in departments of vocational agricul- 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 53 

ture in high schools or as investigators in experiment stations, for extension 
work, for regulatory activities, and for service in the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. 

Through research the frontiers of knowledge relating to agriculture and 
the fundamental sciences underlying it are constantly being extended and 
solutions for important problems are being found. Research projects in 
many fields are in progress. Students taking courses in agriculture from 
instructors who devote part time to research, or are closely associated with 
it, are kept in close touch with the latest discoveries and developments in 
the investigations under way. The findings of these research scientists 
provide valuable information for use in classrooms, and make instruction 
virile and authentic. The results of the most recent scientific investigations 
are constantly before the student. 

Close contact of workers in the College with the problems of farmers 
and their families in all parts of the State, through the county agents, 
home demonstration agents, and specialists brings additional life to resident 
instruction in the College of Agriculture. These contacts operate in two 
ways: problems confronting rural people are brought to the attention of 
research workers and the instructional staff, and results of research are 
taken to farmers and their families in their home communities through 
practical demonstrations. Hence the problems of the people of the State 
contribute to the strength of the College of Agriculture, and the College 
helps them in the improvement of agriculture and rural life. 

Through their regulatory functions, certain trained workers in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture are continually dealing with the actual problems asso- 
ciated with the improvement and maintenance of the standards of farm 
products and animals. Regulatory and control work extends over a wide 
range of activities and is concerned with reducing the losses due to insect 
pests and diseases; preventing and controlling serious outbreaks of diseases 
and pests of animals and plants; analyzing fertilizers, feed, and limes for 
guaranteed quality; and analyzing and testing germination quality of seeds 
to insure better seeds for farm planting. 

These fields contribute largely to agricultural education, as standardiza- 
tion and education go hand in hand in the development of an industry. 
Direct contact on the part of professors in their respective departments 
with the problems and methods involved makes for effective instruction. 

Special Advantages 

The University of Maryland is within a few miles of the Beltsville Re- 
search Center of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. This is the largest, 
best manned, and best equipped agriculture research agency in the world. 
Also, the University of Maryland, is within a few miles of the Washing- 
ton, D. C, offices of the U. S. Department of Agriculture and other govern- 
ment departments, including the Library of Congress. Students can easily 



54 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

visit these agencies and become acquainted with their work and the men 
who conduct this work. Such contacts have already proved valuable to 
many University of Maryland graduates. 

Also, it is not uncommon for men from these agencies to speak before 
classes at the University and to be guest speakers at student club meet- 
ings and otherwise take part in student activities. No other college of agri- 
culture in the United States is physically located to offer like opportunities 
to its students. 

Coordination of Agricultural Work 

The strength of the College of Agriculture of the University of Maryland 
lies in the close coordination of the instructional, research, extension, and 
regulatory functions within the individual departments, between the several 
departments, and in the institution as a whole. Instructors in the several 
departments are closely associated with the research, extension and regula- 
tory work being carried on in their respective fields, and in many cases, 
devote a portion of their time to one or more of these types of activities. 
Close coordination of these four types of work enables the University to 
provide a stronger faculty in the College of Agriculture, and affords a 
higher degree of specialization than would otherwise be possible. It in- 
sures instructors an opportunity to keep informed on the latest results 
of research, and to be constantly in touch with current trends and problems 
which are revealed in extension and regulatory activities. Heads of de- 
partments hold staff conferences to this end, so that the student at all times 
is as close to the developments in the frontiers of the several fields of 
knowledge as it is possible for organization to put him. 

In order that the work of the College shall be responsive to agricultural 
interests and shall adequately meet the needs of the several agricultural 
industries in the State, and that the course of instruction shall at all times 
be made most helpful for students who pursue them, Advisory Councils 
have been constituted in the major industries of agriculture. The Coun- 
cils are composed of leaders in the respective lines of agriculture in Mary- 
land, and the instructional staff of the College of Agriculture has the benefit 
of their counsel and advice. By this means the College, the industries, and 
the students are kept abreast of developments. 

Facilities and Equipment 

In addition to buildings, laboratories, libraries, and equipment for effec- 
tive instruction in the related basic sciences and in the cultural subjects, 
the University of Maryland is provided with excellent facilities for research 
and instruction in agriculture. University farms, totaling more than 1,500 
acres, are operated for instructional and investigational purposes. One of 
the most complete and modern plants for dairy and animal husbandry work 
in the country, together with herds of the principal breeds of dairy and 
beef cattle, and other livestock, provides facilities and materials for instruc- 
tion and research in these industries. Excellent laboratory and field facili- 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 65 

ties are available in the Agronomy Department for breeding and selection 
in farm crops, and for soils research. The Poultry Department has a build- 
ing for laboratories and classrooms, a plant comprising thirty-four acres, 
and flocks of all the important breeds of poultry. The Horticulture Depart- 
ment is housed in a separate building, and has ample orchards and gardens 
for its various lines of work. 

Departments and Curricula 

Departments in the College of Agriculture and their curricula are as 
follows: Agricultural Economics and Marketing; Agricultural Educa- 
tion and Rural Life; Agricultural Engineering; Agronomy (including 
crops and soils); Animal Husbandry; Botany (including plant morphology 
and taxonomy, plant pathology, and plant physiology and ecology); Dairy 
(including dairy husbandry and dairy products technology); Entomology 
(including bee culture) ; Horticulture (including pomology, olericulture, 
floriculture, ornamental horticulture and commercial processing) ; Poultry 
Husbandry; Veterinary Science. In addition, there are curricula in Agri- 
cultural Chemistry and General Agriculture. Courses of study may also 
be arranged for any who desire to return to the farm after one or more 
years of training in practical agricultural subjects. 

Admission 

All students desiring to enroll in the College of Agriculture must apply 
to the Director of Admissions of the University of Maryland at College 
Park. 

In selecting students more emphasis will be placed upon good marks and 
other indications of probable success in college rather than upon a fixed 
pattern of subject matter. In general, 4 units of English and 1 unit each 
of Social, Biological and Natural Sciences are required. One unit each of 
Algebra and Plane Geometry are necessary for certain curricula and desir- 
able for all. While Foreign Language is desirable for certain programs, 
no Foreign Language is required for entrance. Fine Arts, Trade and Voca- 
tional subjects are acceptable as electives. 

General Information 

For information in reference to the University grounds, buildings, equip- 
ment, library facilities, requirements in American Civilization, definition 
of resident and non-resident, regulation of studies, degrees and certificates, 
transcripts of records, student health and welfare, living arrangements in 
the dormitories, off-campus housing, meals. University Counseling Service, 
scholarships and student aid, athletics and recreation, student government, 
honors and awards, religious denominational clubs, fraternities, sororities, 
societies and special clubs, the University Band, student publications, Uni- 
versity Post Office and Supply Store, write to the Director of Publications 
for the General Information Issue of the Catalog. 



56 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Costs 

Actual annual costs of attending the University include: $165.00 fixed 
charges; $61.00 special fees; $340.00 board; $120.00 to $140.00 room; and 
laboratory fees which vary with the laboratory courses pursued. A matricu- 
lation fee of $10.00 is charged for all new students. An additional charge of 
$150.00 is assessed students not residents of the State of Maryland. 

For a more detailed statement of these costs, write to the Director of Publi- 
cations for a copy of the "General Information Issue" of the Catalog. 

Military Instruction 

All male students unless specifically exempted under University rules are 
required to take basic Air Force R. 0. T. C. training for a period of two 
years. The successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for gradu- 
ation, but it must be taken by all eligible students during the first two years 
of attendance at the University, whether they intend to graduate or not. 
Transfer students who do not have the required two years of military train- 
ing will be required to complete the course or take it until graduation, 
whichever occurs first. 

Selected students who wish to do so may carry advanced Air Force R. O. 
T. C. courses during their junior and senior years which lead to a regular 
or reserve commission in the United States Air Force. 

Junior Requirements 

A student must acquire a minimum of 56 credits exclusive of the require- 
ments in basic military science, hygiene, and physical activities with an 
average grade of at least C in the freshman and sophomore years before 
being permitted to begin advanced work. 

Requirements for Graduation 

Each student must acquire a minimum of 124 semester hour credits in 
academic subjects other than basic military science and physical activities- 
Men must acquire in addition 12 hours in basic military science and 4 
hours in physical activities. Women must acquire in addition 4 hours in 
hygiene, and 4 hours in physical activities. 

Scholarships for Agricultural Students 

A limited number of scholarships are available for agricultural students. 
These include scholarships granted by the Sears Roebuck Foundation, the 
Bord'-n '^^mpany, the Danforth Foundation, the Ralston Purina Company, 
the Thoroughbred Breeders and J. McKenny Willis and Sons. 

These scholarships are awarded by the Faculty Committee in accordance 
with the terms of the respective grants. More detailed information about 
these scholarships is contained in the General Information Catalog. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 57 

AWARDS 
Grange Award 

The Maryland State Grange makes an annual award to the senior who 
has excelled in leadership and scholastic attainment and has contributed 
meritorious service to the College of Agriculture. 

Alpha Zeta Medal 

The Honorary Agricultural Fraternity of Alpha Zeta awards annually 
a medal to the agricultural student in the freshman class who attains the 
highest average record in academic work. The mere presentation of the 
medal does not elect the student to the fraternity, but simply indicates 
recognition of high scholarship. 

Farm and Laboratory Practice 

The head of each department will help to make available opportunities 
for practical or technical experience along his major line of study for each 
student whose major is in that department and who is in need of such 
experience. For inexperienced students in many departments this need 
may be met by one or more summers spent on a farm. 

Student Organizations 

Students find opportunity for varied expression and growth in the 
several voluntary organizations sponsored by the College of Agriculture. 
These organizations are: Agricultural Economics Club, Block and Bridle 
Club, Collegiate 4-H Club, Future Farmers of America, Plant Industry 
Club, Riding Club, Student Grange, Alpha Zeta. and the Agricultural 
Student Council. 

Membership in these organizations is voluntary and no college credits 
are given; yet much of the training obtained is fully as valuable as that 
acquired from regularly prescribed courses. All of these organizations 
have regnlar meetings, arrange special programs and contribute to the 
extra-curricular life of the students. 

The Agricultural Economics Club is a forum for students and faculty 
in the field of Agricultural Economics. The Block and Bridle Club is com- 
posed of students interested in livestock; it conducts a Student Livestock 
Judging Contest in the fall and a Student Fitting and Showing Contest 
in the spring on the campus. The Collegiate 4-H Club is composed of for- 
mer members and others interested in Agricultural Extension work. 

The Future Farmers of America foster an interest in Vocational Agri- 
culture and the Collegiate Chapter serves as host to high school chapters 
in the State at their judging contests held at the University. Students 
interested in Agronomy, Botany and Horticulture are brought together in 
meetings of the Plant Industry Club to consider important phases of plant 
science and industry as well as for social activity. 



68 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Students who enjoy horseback riding are brought together in the Riding 
Club; this organization sponsors an annual Horse Show in cooperation 
with other riding enthusiasts in the vicinity of the University. The 
Student Grange represents the great national farmers' fraternity of the 
Order of Patrons of Husbandry and emphasizes training for rural leadership. 

Membership in Alpha Zeta, national agricultural honor fraternity, is 
chosen from students in the College of Agriculture who have met certain 
scholastic requirements and displayed leadership in agriculture. 

The Agricultural Student Council is made up of representatives from 
the various student organizations in the College of Agriculture. Its pur- 
pose is to coordinate activities of these organizations and to promote work 
which is beneficial to the College. 

Student Judging Teams 

The College of Agriculture sponsors teams to judge dairy cattle, dairy 
products, horticultural products, livestock, meats and poultry. Team mem- 
bers are selected from students taking courses designed especially to train 
them for this purpose. The College of Agriculture enters teams at major 
shows where the students compete with teams from other state universities 
or agricultural colleges. 

Student Advisers 

Each student in the College of Agriculture is assigned to a faculty 
adviser, either departmental or general. Departmental advisers consist of 
heads of departments or persons selected by them to advise students with 
curricula in their respective departments. General advisers are selected for 
students who have no definite choice of curriculum in mind, or who wish 
to pursue the general curriculum in agriculture. 

Electives 

The electives in the suggested curricula which follow affords opportunity 
for those who so desire to supplement major and minor fields of study or to 
add to their general training. 

With the advice and consent of those in charge of his registration, a 
student may make such modifications in his curriculum as are deemed 
advisable to meet the requirements of his particular need. 

Freshman Year 

The program of the freshman year in the College of Agriculture is the 
same for all curricula of the College. Its purpose is to afford the student 
an opportunity to lay a broad foundation in subjects basic to agriculture 
and the related sciences, to articulate beginning work in college with that 
pursued in high or preparatory schools, to provide opportunity for wise 
choice of programs in succeeding years, and to make it possible for a student 
before the end of the year to change from one curriculum to another, or 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



59 



from the College of Agriculture to the curriculum in some other college 
of the University with little or no loss of credit. 

Students entering the freshman year with a definite choice of curriculum 
in mind are sent to departmental advisers for counsel as to the wisest 
selection of freshman electives from the standpoint of their special interests 
and their probable future programs. Students entering the freshman year 
with no definite curriculum in mind, are assigned to a general adviser, who 
assists with the choice of freshman electives and during the course of the 
year acquaints the students with the opportunities in the upper curricula 
in the College of Agriculture and in the other divisions of the University. 
If by the close of the freshman year a student makes no definite choice of 
a specialized curriculum, he continues under the guidance of his general 
adviser in the General Agriculture Curriculum. 



Agriculture Curriculum 
Freshman Year 

Engr. 1, 2 — Composition and Readings in American Literature. 

G. & P. 1 — American Government 

Soc. 1 — Sociologry of American Life 

A. S. 1. 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 

Hea. 2, 4 — Hygiene (Women) 

R. Ed. 1 — Introduction to Agriculture 

••Math. — Basic Mathematics 

•Elect either of the following pairs of courses : 

Bot 1, General Botany and Zool. 1, General Zoology 

Chem. 1, 3, General Chemistry 

Elect one of the following each semester : 

Modem Language 

tMath 5, 6 or 10, 11, or 10, 13 

Physics, 1, 2 — Elements of Physics 

A. H. 1 — Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry 

Agron. 1 — Crop Production 



Semester — t 
/ // 

3 8 

3 



•• An examination in Mathematics will be given at an announced date during the first 
semester ; students passing this test will not be required to take Math. 0. 

• Both pairs of courses are required for graduation from the College of Agriculture. 

t Students who expect to pursue the curriculum in Agricultural Chemistry or Agricultural 
Engineering must be prepared to elect Math. 14, 15 and 17. 



60 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Agriculture — General 

This curriculum is designed for persons wishing to return to the farm, 
enter work allied to farming, for those seeking a general rather than a 
specialized knowledge of the field of agriculture and for those preparing to 
work in any general field in agriculture. 

By proper use of the electives allowed in this curriculum, a student may 
choose a field of concentration in agriculture and at the same time elect 
courses that contribute to a liberal education. 



General Agriculture Curriculumf 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature ; or 

Eng. 5, 6 — Composition and English Literature 

H. B, 6 — History of American Civilization 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 

P. H. 1 — Poultry Production 

Dairy 1 — Fundamentals of Dairying 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 

Physical Activities 

Total 

Junior Year 

Zool. 104 — Genetics 

Hort. 5 — Fruit Production, or Hort. 58 — Vegetable Production 

Ent. 1 — Introductory Entomology, or Ent. 10 — Applied Entomology. 

Agron. 10 — General Soils 

Agr. Engr. 101 — Farm Machinery 

Agr. Engr. 102 — Gas Engines, Tractors and Automobiles 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 

Biological or Physical Science Sequence 

Electives 

Total 

Senior Year 

A. E. 100 — Farm Economics 

A. E. 107 — Analysis of the Farm Business 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management 

Agron. 151 — Cropping Systems 

R. Ed. 114 — Rural Life and Education 

Electives 

Total 



Semestei 
I 



II 



19 



3 






3 




3 


3 


3 


6 


8 


19 


18 


3 




3 






3 




2 




3 


9 


7 


15 


15 



t If A. H. 1 and Agron. 1 are not elected in the Freshman year they must be elected 
in subsequent years. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 61 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

This curriculum insures adequate instruction in the fundamentals of both 
the physical and biological sciences. It may be adjusted through the selec- 
tion of electives to fit the student for work in agricultural experiment 
stations, soil bureaus, geological surveys, food laboratories, fertilizer in- 
dustries and those handling food products. 

Agricultural Chemistry Curriculum 

I — Semester — » 

Sophomore Year I II 

Ens:. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature : or 

Eng'. 5, 6 — Composition and English Literature 3 8 

Chem. IB, 17 — Qualitative Analysis 3 3 

Math. 20, 21— Calculus 4 4 

Bet. 1 — General Botany 4 .... 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology .... 4 

Speech 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 1 1 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men ) 3 S 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 19 19 

Junior Year 

Chem. 35, 37 — Elementary Organic Lecture 2 2 

Chem. 36, 38 — Elementary Organic Laboratory 2 2 

Chem. 21, 22 — Quantitative Analysis 4 4 

Modern Language 3 8 

Geol. 1 — Geology 3 

Agron. 10 — General Soils .... 4 

Electives in Biology 3 3 

Totel 17 18 

Senior Year 

H. B, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 8 

Modern Language 3 8 

Phys. 20, 21 — General Physics 6 5 

Electives in Agricultural Chemistry 6 6 

Total 17 17 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND MARKETING 

The curriculum in agricultural economics and marketing is designed to 
prepare students for the following types of positions: On the farm as farm 
operators and farm managers; with farm organizations, such as the 
Farm Bureau and farmers' cooperatives; with private and corporate busi- 
ness concerns; and positions with state and federal agencies, such as col- 
lege teachers, agricultural extension workers, and research with federal 
and state agencies. 

The courses in this department are designed to provide fundamental 
training in the basic economic principles underlying farming. The curricu- 



62 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

lum includes courses in farm management, general agricultural economics, 
marketing, finance, prices, taxation, and land economics to give the student 
the foundation needed to meet the production and distribution problems 
confronting the individual farmer in a progressive rural community. 

Farming is a business, as well as a way of life, and as such demands for 
its successful conduct the use of business methods; the keeping of farm 
business records, analyzing the farm business, and of organizing and 
operating the farm as a business enterprise. It requires knowledge of farm 
resources and taxation, methods of financing agricultural production and 
marketing, including agencies involved, services rendered and the cost of 
getting products from the producer to the consumer through cooperative 
and private types of organization. 

Agricultural Economics and Marketing Curriculum* 

f — Semester^-^ 

SophoTnore Year I II 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature ; or 

Ens:. 5, 6 — Composition and English Literature 3 3 

H. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization 8 S 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 4 4 

Math. 6 — General Mathematics 3 .... 

Econ. 37 Fundamentals of Economics .... 3 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 17 17 

Junior Year 

A. E. 100 — Farm Economics 3 

A. E. 101 — Marketing of Farm Products 3 

A. E. 107 — Analysis of the Farm Business 3 .... 

A. E. 104 — Farm Finance 3 

B. A. 130 — Elements of Business Statistics 8 

Speech 1, 2— Public Speaking 2 2 

P. H. 1 — Poultry Production 3 

Agron. 10 — General Soils 4 .... 

Electives 4 7 

Total 19 18 

Senior Year 

A. E. 103 — Cooperation in Agriculture 3 

A. K 106 — Prices of Farm Products 3 

Agr. Engr. 101 — Farm Machinery 3 .... 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management .... 3 

Soc. 113 — The Rural Community 3 

A. H. 110 — Feeds and Feeding 3 

A. E. Ill — Land Economics 3 .... 

A. B. 110 — Seminar 1 1 

Electives B 8 

Total 18 18 

• If A. H. 1 and Agron. 1 are not elected in the Freshman year, they must be elected 
In subBcquent yesrs. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 68 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 

The primary objective of this curriculum is to prepare for teaching 
secondary vocational agriculture, work as county agents and allied lines of 
the rural education services. Graduates from this curriculum are in demand 
in rural businesses, particularly of the cooperative type. A number have 
entered the Federal service. Others are engaged in teaching and research 
in agricutural colleges. Quite a few have returned to the farm as owner- 
managers. 

Courses in extension methods are included in agricultural education. 
They are especially designed for students who wish to train for extension 
work, as well as others who wish to learn more about how the extension 
service operates. Agricultural education majors, as well as others, are urged 
to take these courses if they can possibly fit them into their curriculum. 

In addition to the regular entrance requirements of the University, involv- 
ing graduation from a standard four-year high school, students electing 
the agricultural education curriculum must present evidence of having 
acquired adequate farm experience after reaching the age of fourteen years. 

Students with high average may upon petition be relieved of certain 
requirements in this curriculum, when evidence is presented that either 
through experience or previous training a prescribed course is non-essential. 
Or they may be allowed to carry an additional load. 

All students following this curriculum are required to attend meetings 
of the Collegiate Chapter of the Future Farmers of America during their 
junior and senior years in order to gain needed training to serve as ad- 
visers of high school chapters of FFA upon graduation. All Agricultural 
Education majors are urged to become members of the FFA and to par- 
ticipate in the activities of the organization. 

Agricultural Education Curriculum* 

I — Semester — » 

Sophomore Year I H 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature ; or 

Eng:. 5, 6 — Composition and English Literature 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 

P. H. 1 — Poultry Production 

Dairy 1 — Fundamentals of Dairy Husbandry 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 

Physical Activities 

Total 19 1» 



3 


8 


3 


8 


4 


4 


3 


.... 




8 


2 


2 


3 


3 


1 


1 



• If A. H. 1 and Agron. 1 are not elected in the Freshman year, they must be elected 
in subsequent years. 



64 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

I — Semester — > 

Junior Year I II 

Restricted Science Electives 3 3 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants 3 .... 

Ent. 1 — Introductory Entomology or Ent. 10 — Applied Entomology.... 3 .... 

A. H. 110— Feeds and Feeding 3 

Agrom. 10 — General Soils .... 4 

A. Engr. 101 — Farm Machinery 3 

R. Ed. 107 — Observation and Analysis of Teaching 3 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management .... 8 

Econ. 47 — Fundamentals of Economics .... 3 

H. D. Ed. 100, 101 — Principles of Human Development I and II 3 3 

Total 18 19 

Senior Year 

A. Engr. 102 — Gas Engines, Tractors and Automobiles .... 3 

R. Ed. 109 — Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture 3 

R. Ed. Ill — Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Groups 1 

tR. Ed. 103 — Practice Teaching 5 

R. Ed. 101 — Teaching Farm Practicums and Demonstrations 2 

A. Engr. 104 — Farm Mechanics 2 

R. Ed. 112 — Departmental Management 1 

R. Ed. 114 — Rural Life and Education 8 

Hort. 58 — Vegetable Production 3 

Electives 3 6 

Totel 16 16 



t Majors in agricultural education will also be required to take R. Ed. 104, Practice 
Teaching, four credits (or its equivalent), to be arranged in a four-week period prior to the 
opening of the University of Maryland in the fall of their senior year. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

The department offers to students of agriculture training in those agri- 
cultural subjects which are based upon engineering principles. These sub- 
jects may be grouped under three heads: farm machinery and farm power, 
farm buildings, and farm drainage. 

Five- Year Program in Agriculture — Engineering 

For those students who wish to specialize in the application of engineer- 
ing principles to the physical and biological problems of agriculture there 
is offered a combined program, extending over a five-year period, arranged 
jointly by the College of Agriculture and the College of Engineering, and 
leading to a degree from each of these colleges. 

This program prepares graduates to enter state, federal or commercial 
fields of activity in such work as soil and water conservation, rural electrifi- 
cation, design and sale of farm machinery and structures, and in the develop- 
ment of new uses for farm products and the profitable utilization of farm 
wastes and by-products. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 65 

To be properly trained in these fields a student needs a broader knowl- 
edge of basic and applied engineering principles than could be provided in a 
four-year course in agrriculture. He also needs a broader training in the 
fundamentals of agriculture than a standard four-year course in engineer- 
ing could furnish. 

Upon completion of the normal four-year course of study the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture is granted. For the fifth year the 
student registers in the College of Engineering, and at the end of that year, 
upon satisfactory completion of the required course of study, receives a 
degree in civil, electrical, mechanical or chemical engineering. 

Curriculum in Agriculture — Engineering „ . 

Freshman Year / // 

Enj. 1, 2 — Composition and Reading in American Literature 3 8 

Speech 7 — Public Speaking 2 

•Math. 14 — Plane Trigonometry 2 

•Math. 16 — College Algebra 3 

Math. 17 — Analytic Geometry 4 

Chem. 1, 8 — General Chemistry 4 4 

Dr. 1, 2 — Engineering Drawing . ■. 2 2 

Engr. 1 — Introduction to Engineering 1 .... 

R. Ed. 1 — Introduction to Agriculture 1 .... 

A. S. 1, 2 — Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 20 19 

For the students whose final objective is a degree in Civil Engineering, 
the balance of the curriculum is: 

Sophomore Year (Civil Engineering Option) 

G. & P. 1 — American Government 3 .... 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life .... 3 

Math. 20, 21 — Calculus 4 4 

Phys. 20, 21 — General Physics 5 5 

Mech. 1 — Statics and Dynamics .... 3 

Surv. 2 — Plane Surveying 3 .... 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 19 19 



• A qualifying test is given during registration to determine whether the student is ade- 
quately prepared for Math. 14 and 15. A student failing this test is required to take Math. 1, 
Introductory Algebra, without credit, and is not eligible to take Math. 14 concurrently. 



66 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Junior Year (Civil Engineering Option) 

Enff. S, 4 — Composition and World Literature ; or 

Ene. S, 6 — Composition and Enzlish Literature 

Speech 108 — Public Speaking 

Dr. 3 — Advanced Engineering Drawing 

Geol. 2 — Engineering Geology 

Mech. 60 — Strength of Materials 

Mech. 63 — Materials of Engineering 

Bot. 1 — General Botany 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 

Agr. Engr. 101 — Farm Machinery 

Agr. Engr. 107 — Farm Drainage 

Agr. Engr. 106 — ^Farm Mechanics 

Electiyes 

Total 

Fourth Year (Civil Engineering Option} 

C. E. 50 — Fluid Mechanics 

Surv. 100 — Advanced Surveying 

Surv. 101 — Curves and Earthwork 

C. E. 100 — ^Theory of Structures 

M. E. 60 — Principles of Mechanical Engineering 

E. E. 60 — Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering 

Agr. Engr. 102 — Gas Engines, Tractors and Automobiles. 

Agr. Engr. 106 — Farm Buildings 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management 

Electives 

Total 

Fifth Year (Civil Engineering Option) 

H. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization 

Econ. 87 — Fundamentals of Economics 

Engr. 100 — Engineering Contracts and Specifications 

Eng. 7 — Technical Writing 

Bact. 66 — Lectures in Sanitary Bacteriology 

C. E. 101— Soil Mechanics 

C. E. 102— Structural Design 

C. E. 108 — Concrete Design 

C. E. 104— Water Supply 

C. E. 106 — Sewerage 

C. E. 106 — Elements of Highways 

Total 



-Semester — > 
/ // 



19 



20 



20 



20 



8 


3 


3 






2 




2 


2 




3 


.... 


6 






6 


3 






8 




8 



19 



For the student whose final objective is a degree in Mechanical Engineer- 
ing, the balance of the curriculum is: 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 67 

I — Semester — > 

Sophomore Year (Mechanical Engineering Option) j jj 

G. &. P. 1 — American Government 3 .... 

Soc 1 — Sociology of American Life .... 8 

Math. 20, 21— Calculus 4 4 

Phys. 20, 21 — General Physics 6 6 

Surv. 1 — Plane Surveying .... 2 

Dr. 8 — Advanced Engineering Drawing 2 

Shop 1 — ^Machine Shop Practice 2 .... 

Shop 2 — Machine Shop Practice 1 

Shop 3 — Manufacturing Processes .... 1 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 8 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 20 20 

Junior Year (Mechanical Engineering Option) 

Eng. 8, 4 — Composition and World Literature ; or 

Eng. 6, 6 — Composition and English Literature 8 8 

Math. 64 — Differential Equations for Engineers 8 .... 

Mech. 2 — Statics and Dynamics 6 .... 

Mech. 62 — Strength of Materials S 

Bot. 1 — General Botany 4 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology .... 4 

Agr. Engr. 101 — Farm Machinery 8 .... 

Agr. Engr. 107 — Farm Drainage .... 2 

Agr. Engr. 106 — Farm Mechanics .... 2 

Elective 3 8 

Total 21 19 

Fourth Year (Mechanical Engineering Option) 

E. E. 61, 52 — Principles of Electrical Engineering 4 4 

M. E. 63 — Metallography 8 

M. E. 64— Fluid Mechanics 8 

M. E. 100 — Thermodynamics 3 

Agr. Engr. 102 — Gas Engines, Tractors and Automobiles 8 

Agr. Engr. 105 — Farm Buildings 2 .... 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management .... 8 

inectives 11 4 

Total 20 20 

Fifth Year (Mechanical Engineering Option) 

Engr. 100 — Engineering Contracts and Specifications .... 2 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

M. E. 101— Heat Transfer 2 

M. E. 102 — Heating and Air Conditioning 3 .... 

M. E. 103 — Refrigeration 8 

M. E. 104, 105 — Prime Movers 4 4 

M. E. 106, 107 — Mechanical Engineering Design 4 4 

M. E. 108, 109 — ^Mechanical Laboratory 2 2 

ToUl 18 18 

For the student whose final objective is a degree in Electrical or Chemical 
Engineering, curricula corresponding to the foregoing will be arranged. 



68 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

AGRONOMY 

The Department of Agronomy offers instruction in crop production, crop 
breeding, soil chemistry, soil physics, soil fertility, soil classification, and 
soil conservation. These courses prepare students to enter various types 
of private, commercial, state, and federal agronomic positions. By careful 
election of courses the student may lay a foundation for either advanced 
study or for employment upon graduation with the B.S. degree. Op- 
portunities for advanced students are shown in the Graduate School cata- 
logue. Depending on the electives chosen, students graduating with the 
B.S. degree are trained for general farming, farm management, specialized 
seed production, county agent work, soil conservation work, or employment 
with commercial seed companies, fertilizer companies or equipment manu- 
facturers. 

Crop Production Curriculum* 

/ — Semester — ^ 
Sophomore Year I II 

Eng:. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature ; or 

Eng. 5, 6 — Composition and English Literature 3 3 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 4 4 

Ent. 1 — Introductory Entomology 3 .... 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics .... 3 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking 2 2 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 I 

Total 19 19 

Junior Year 

Agron. 30 — Cereal Crop Production 8 .... 

Agron. 31 — Forage Crop Production .... 3 

Agron. 153 — Selected Crop Studies 2 

Zool. 104 — Genetics 3 

Agron. 10 — General Soils 4 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology .... 4 

Bot. 101 — Plant Physiology 4 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants 3 

Electives 4 B 

Total 17 18 



• If A. H. 1 and Agron. t are not elected in the Freshman year, they must be elected 
in subsequent years. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 69 

t — Semester — > 

Senior Year I II 

Agron. 103 — Crop Breeding 2 .... 

Agron. 151 — Cropping Systems .... 2 

Agron. 152 — Seed Production and Distribution 3 

A. E. 103 — Farm Management 3 

Agr. Engr. 101 — Farm Machinery 3 

Agr. Engr. 107 — Farm Drainage .... 2 

Agron. 114 — Soil Classification 3 .... 

A. H. 110 — Feeds and Feeding 3 

Agron. 101 — Senior Seminar in Crops .... 1 

Electives 5 5 

Total 16 16 

Students specializing in crop breeding will elect Math. 10, Algebra (3), or 
Math. 13, Elements of Mathematical Statistics (3) in the junior year. 

Soils Curriculum 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature ; or 

Kng. 5, 6 — Composition and English Literature 3 3 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking 2 2 

Bot. 1 — General Botany .... 4 

Physics 10, 11 — Fundamentals of Physics 4 4 

Agron. 10 — General Soils 4 .... 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 20 20 

Junior Year 

A. Engr. 107 — Farm Drainage .... 2 

Agron. 1 — Crop Production 3 

Agron. 112 — Commercial Fertilizers .... 3 

Agron. 116 — Soil Investigation Methods 3 .... 

Agron. 114 — Soil Classification 3 .... 

Bot. 101— Plant Physiology 4 .... 

Chem. 5 or 15, 17 — Qualitative Anaylsis 3 0-3 

Chem. 35 — Organic Chemistry ■ . • . 2 

Chem. 36 — Elementary Organic Chemistry Laboratory 2 

Electives 3 3-6 

Total 16 18 



70 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

I — Semester — > 
Senior Year I II 

Agrron. 113 — Soil Conservation .... 3 

Agrron. 151 — Cropping Systems 2 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management , .... 3 

Agron. 1 17 — Soil Physics .... 3 

Agron. Ill— Soil Fertility 3 

Chem. 19 — Quantitative Analysis .... 4 

Zool. 2 — Fundamentals of Zoology 4 .... 

Electives 9 

Total 16 15 

Students wishing to specialize in soil mapping and farm planning phases 
of soil conservation will follow the soils curriculum except that Physics 
10, 11, and Chem. 5, 15, 17, 19, 35, 36 will not be required. Agron. 30, 31, 
105, A.H. 1, 110, Dairy 1, and a course in physics (if the student does not 
have credit for physics in high school) will be required. Suggested elec- 
tives are Econ. 37, P.H. 1, Hort. 5, 58, Ag, Eng. 101, Agron. 115, Bot. 20, 
Ent. 1, and Bact. 1. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

The curriculum in Animal Husbandry is organized for the purpose of 
preparing students for various phases of work in the field of animal indus- 
try as: operators and managers of livestock farms, as investigators and 
research workers in Federal, State and private institutions, and as workers 
in specialized fields where a knowledge of the livestock industry is necessary. 

By proper use of electives, the student may equip himself to become a 
county agricultural agent; to meet the requirements of positions with cer- 
tain types of private and cooperative business concerns; or, with more 
technical and specialized training, to become qualified for instructional 
work in colleges, for investigational work in State and Federal experiment 
stations or in commercial research laboratories. Students who desire to 
enter the field of teaching or highly specialized research should elect the 
more scientific courses offered by this and by other departments. 

Animal Husbandry Curriculum* 

Sophomore Year 

Bnff. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature; or 

Eng. 5, 6 — Composition and English Literature 3 8 

Chem. 31. 33 — Elements of Organic Chemistry 2 2 

Chem. 32, 34 — Elements of Organic Laboratory 1 1 

Bot. 1 — General Botany 4 .... 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology .... 4 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 3 .... 

A. H. 30 — Types and Breeds of Livestock .... 3 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking 2 2 

A. S. 3. 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 i 

Total 19 19 

• Students planning this curriculum should elect A. H. 1 the first semester and Dairy 1 
the leeond aemester of the freshman year. 



/ 


// 


3 


3 


3 






8 


3 






8 




8 


3 




3 






3 


S 


3 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 71 

I — Semester — \ 
Junior Year 

H. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization 

V. S. 101 — Comparative Anatomy and Physiology 

V. S. 102 — Animal Hygiene 

A. H. 110 — Feeds and Feeding 

A. H. 120 — Principles of Breeding 

••A. H. 131— Sheep Production 

♦•A. H. 133 — Horse Production 

Zool. 104 — Genetics 

Agron. 1 — Crop Production 

Electivea 

Total 18 18 

Senior Year 

A. H. Ill — Animal Nutrition 8 

••A. H. 180— Beef Cattle Production 3 

••A. H. 132 — Swine Production 3 

A. H. IBO — Livestock Markets and Marketing 2 .... 

A. H. 160 — Meat and Meat Products 3 

AgT. Eng. 101 — Farm Machinery 3 .... 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management 3 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology 4 

Agron. 10 — General Soils 4 .... 

A. H. 170, 171— Seminar 1 1 

Electivcfl 3 4 

Total •*16 ••15 



•• Only two production courses are required for graduation. The student may choose 
any two of these four courses to fulfill this requirement. 

BOTANY 

The department offers three major fields of work: plant morphology and 
taxonomy; plant pathology; or plant physiology and ecology. The required 
courses for the freshman and sophomore years are the same for all 
students. In the junior and senior years, the student elects botany courses 
to suit his particular interest. Courses are required in other subjects to 
contribute toward a broad cultural education, and to support the courses 
selected in the chosen field of botany. 

Through cooperation with the College of Education, students who wish 
to meet the requirements for the state high school teacher's certificates, 
may elect the necessary work in education. 

The curriculum as outlined, provides a complete survey of the field of 
botany for prospective high school teachers, and lays a good foundation for 
graduate work in botany in preparation for college teaching and for research 
in state or federal experiment stations, or in private research laboratories. 

Students are also afforded an opportunity for training for other vocations 
involving various botanical applications, such as extension work, and 
positions with seed companies, canning companies and other commercial 
concerns. 



72 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Botany Curriculum ^Semestei x 

Sophomore Yea/r I II 

Ensr. 8, 4 — Composition and World Literature ; or 

Eng;. 6, 6 — Composition and English Literature 3 8 

Modem Language S 8 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants 3 .... 

Bot. 2 — General Botany 4 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 4 4 

Speech 1, 2— Public Speaking 2 2 

A. S. 3. 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 8 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 19 20 

Junior Year 

H. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 8 

Modern Language 8 8 

Phys. 10, 11 — Fundamentals of Physics 4 4 

Bot. 101— Plant Physiology 4 .... 

Bot. 11— Plant Taxonomy 8 

Bot. 110 — Plant Microtechnique .... 8 

Bact. 1 — Bacteriology 4 .... 

Electivea 3 8 

Total 21 19 

Senior Year 

Bot. 112— Seminar 1 1 

Bot. Ill — Plant Anatomy 3 

Bot. 102— Plant Ecology 8 

Bot. 115 — Structure of Economic Plants 8 

Bot. 116 — History and Philosophy of Botany 1 

Zool. 104— Genetics 3 

Botany Electives 3-8 2-6 

Electivea 5-0 7-4 

Total 16 16 

Students specializing in Plant Morphology or Plant Taxonomy will elect 
Bot. 114 and Bot. 128; those specializing in Plant Pathology will elect Bot. 
122, Ent. 1, and two of the following: Bot. 123, Bot. 124, Bot. 125, Bot. 126; 
those specializing in Plant Physiology will elect Organic Chemistry, Chem. 
31, 32, 33, 34. 

DAIRY 

The Dairy Department offers instruction in two major lines of work; 
dairy husbandry and dairy technology. In the dairy husbandry curriculum, 
students are given technical and practical training in the breeding, feeding, 
management, and selection of dairy cattle and in milk production. With 
suitable choice of courses, students are qualified as operators of dairy 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



73 



farms, for breed promotion and sales work, for employment with private 
and cooperative business organizations, and for county agent work. The 
dairy technology curriculum is designed to prepare students for practical 
and scientific work concerned with the processing and distribution 
of milk, manufacture and handling of butter, cheese, ice cream, and 
other products, in dairy plant operation and management, and in dairy 
inspection. Students satisfactorily majoring in dairy technology are 
qualified for the many technical and applied positions in the various 
branches of the dairy industry. 

By careful election of courses in either curriculum the student may lay a 
foundation for advanced study, for instructional work in colleges, and for 
research in experiment stations or commercial laboratories. The suggested 
curricula will be modified to meet the special needs of individual students. 



Dairy Husbandry Curriculum* 

Sophomore Year 

Entr- 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature ; or 

Eng. B, 6 — Composition and English Literature 

Chem. 81, 33 — Elements of Organic Chemistry 

Chem. 32, 34 — Elements of Organic Chemistry Laboratory. 

Bot. 1 — General Botany 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology 

Dairy 20 — Dairy Breeds and Selection 

Agron. 10 — General Soils 

A. S. 8, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 

Physical Activities 

Total 

Junior Year 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 

Agron. 1 — Crop Production 

A. H. 110 — Feeds and Feeding 

A. H. 120 — Principles of Breeding 

Bact. 133 — Dairy Bacteriolgy 

Dairy 30 — Dairy Cattle Judging 

Dairy 101 — Dairy Production 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking 

Zool. 104— Genetics 

Electives 

Total 



Semester — < 
/ II 



2 
8 
3 

18 



2 
3 
2 

8 

19 



* Students planning to pursue this curriculum should elect Dairy 1 the second semester 
of the freshman year. If A. H. 1 is not elected in the freshman year it must be taken in 
subsequent years. 



74 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Senior Year 

Agr. Ehisrr. 101 — Farm .Machinery 

A. E. 108 — Farm Management 

Eicon. 37 — ^Fundamentals of Economics 

V. S. 101 — Comparative Anatomy and Physiology. 

V. S. 102 — Animal Hygiene 

A. H. Ill — Animal Nutrition 

Dairy 105 — Dairy Cattle Breeding 

Electives 

Total 



-Semester — > 
/ // 





8 




8 


3 






8 


8 


.... 


3 


.... 


4 


6 



16 



16 



Dairy Technology Curriculum* 
Sophomore Year 

Eng. 8, 4 — Composition and World Literature ; or 

Eng. 5, 6 — Composition and English Literature 

Chem. 19 — Quantitative Analysis 

Chem. 31, 33 — Elements of Organic Chemistry 

Chem. 32, 34 — Elements of Organic Chemistry Laboratory. 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology 

Hot. 1 — General Botany 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 

A. S. 8, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 

Physical Activities 

Total 

Junior Year 

H. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization 

Bact. 133 — Dairy Bacteriology 

Dairy 40 — Grading Dairy Products 

Dairy 108 — Dairy Technology 

Dairy 110 — Butter and Cheese Making 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking 

Econ. 87 — ^Fundamentals of Econmics 

Electivea 

Total 

Senior Year 

Dairy 109 — ^Market Milk 

Dairy 111 — Concentrated Milk Products 

Dairy 112 — Ice Cream 

Dairy 114 — Special Laboratory Methods 

Dairy 115 — Dairy Inspection 

Dairy 116 — Dairy Plant Management 

Electtves 

Total 



18 



10 



16 



4 
3 
1 

18 



S 

4 
4 

8 

4 

18 



♦ Students planning to pursue this curriculum should elect Dairy 1 in the freshman year. 
Those interested in the business rather than the technical phases of dairy technology may 
•abstltutc approved courses in business and economics for Chem. 19, 31, 32, 33, 84. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 75 

ENTOMOLOGY 

This curriculum, which trains students for work in various types of 
private, commercial, state and federal entomological positions, includes 
basic courses in Entomology and related fields. Most of the first two 
years is devoted to obtaining this essential background. In the junior and 
senior years the student, besides the required courses, has 18 credit hours 
of electives. Non-required courses in Entomology and related subjects are 
available to broaden the scope of the training. 

A student wishing an undergraduate minor in Entomology should take 
the introductory course (Ent. 1) and after consultation with the heads of 
both the major and minor departments select courses that will contribute 
most to the end he has in view. 

Entomology Curriculum* ^Semester— ^ 

Sophomore Year I 11 

Enr. 8. 4 or 5. 6 8 S 

H. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization 8 8 

Cbem. 1, 8 — General Chemistry 4 4 

Ent. 2 — Insect Morpholoiry 8 ... . 

Ent. 8 — Insect Taxonomy 8 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking 2 2 

M. S. 8, 4— Elementary R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 8 

Physical Activities 1 1 

ToUl 19 1» 

Junior Year 

Chem. 31, 83 — Elements of Organic Chemistry 2 2 

Chem. 82, 84 — Elements of Organic Chemistry Lab 1 1 

Bot. 1 — General Botany 4 .... 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology .... 4 

Ent. 103. 104— Insect Pests 8 S 

Phy. 1, 2 — Elements of Physics 8 > 

Foreign Language 8 S 

Electivea 8 8 

Total 19 19 

Senior Year 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants 8 .... 

Ent 106 — Medical Entomology 8 .... 

Ent. 101 — Economic Entomology 8 .... 

tEnt. 110, 111— Special Problems 1 1 

Ent. 112 — Seminar 1 1 

Foreign Language '. 8 S 

Electives 6 8 

Total 17 16 

* Students planning to pursue this curriculum should elect Ent. 1 the second seoiester 
of the Freshman year. 

t Students may satisfy this requirement in one semester, if their schedule permits, or 
•xp«Bd the work and credits upon departmental approval. 



76 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

HORTICULTURE 

The Department of Horticulture offers instruction in pomology (fruits), 
olericulture (vegetables), floriculture (flowers) and ornamental gardening, 
and processing of horticultural crops. These courses prepare students to 
enter commercial production and the horticultural industries such as fruit 
and vegetable processing and seed production. Students are likewise pre- 
pared to enter the allied industries as horticultural workers with fertilizer 
companies, equipment manufacturers, and others. Students who wish to 
enter specialized fields of research and teaching may take advanced work in 
the department. A minimum of 24 credit hours in horticultural courses is 
required for graduation. 

Pomology and Olericulture Curriculum r— Semester ^ 

Sophomore Year I II 

En^r. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature ; or 

Engr. 5, 6 — Composition and English Literature 3 3 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 4 4 

Bot. 20— Diseases of Plants 3 

Hort. 5, 6 — Fruit Production 3 2 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Electives 2 

Total 20 18 

Junior Year 

Bot. 101— Plant Physiology 4 

Bot. Ill — Plant Anatomy 3 

Agron. 10 — General Soils 4 .... 

Hort. 58 — Vegetable Production 3 

Hort. 59— Small Fruits 3 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking 2 2 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics. , .... 3 

*Electives 5 6 

Total 18 17 

Senior Year 

Bot. 125 — Diseases of Fruit Crops 2 .... 

or 

Bot. 126 — Diseases of Vegetable Crops .... 2 

Hort. 101, 102— Technology of Fruits 2 2 

or 

Hort. 103, 104 — ^Technology of Vegetables 2 2 

Zool. 104 — Genetics 3 

Bot. llB — Structure of Economic Plants 3 

Hort. 118, 119— Seminar 1 1 

♦Electives 8 9 

Total 16 17 

• Electives must include a minimum total of seven credits from the following courses : 
Hort. 11, 22, 62, 106, 107, 108, 114, 116, 122. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



77 



Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture Curriculum 

Sophomore Year 

Engr. 8, 4 — Composition and World Literature ; or 

Engr. B, 6 — Composition and English Literature , 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization , 

Chem. 1, 8 — General Chemistry 

Bot. 11 — Plant Taxonomy 

Bot. 20 — Diseases of Plants 

Hort. 22 — Landscape Gardening 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 

Physical Activities 

Total , 

Junior Year 

Bot. 101— Plant Physiology 

Hort. 62— Plant Propagation , 

Hort. 107. 108— Plant Materials 

Bot. Ill — Plant Anatomy 

Econ. 87 — Fundamentals of Economics 

Agron. 10 — General Soils 

Bot. 123 — Diseases of Ornamental Plants 

•Electives 

Total 

Senior Year 

Hort. 16 — Garden Flowers 

Hort. 118, 119— Seminar 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking 

•Electives 

Total 

•Required of students specializing in floriculture: 

Hort. 11 — Greenhouse Management 

Hort. 150, IBl— Commercial Floriculture 

Zool. 104 — Genetics 

'Required of students specializing in landscape and ornamental 
horticulture : 

Art. 1 — Charcoal Drawing 

Ind. Ed. 41 — Architectural Drawing 

Hort. 152, 153 — Landscape Design 

Dr. 1 — Engineering Drawing 

Surv. 1 — Plane Surveying 

Hort. 159 — Nursery Management 

or 

Hort. 160 — Landscape Maintenance 



-Semester — ^ 
/ // 



3 
4 

3 
2 
3 
1 

19 



3 
3 

4 

2 

19 



1 

2 

14 

17 



17 



Suggested Electives in Landscape and Ornamental Horticulture Option ; 
Art 2, 9, 100, 101 ; Engr. 100 ; For. 1. 



78 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Commercial Processing of Horticultural Crops Curriculum 

Sophomore Year 

Enff. 8, 4 — Compofition and World Literature; or 

Eng. 6, 6 — Ck)mposition and English Literature 

Hist. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization 

Chem. 81, 88 — Elements of Organic Chemistry 

Chem. 82, 84 — Elements of Organic Laboratory 

Phyi. 1, 2— EHements of Physics 

Hort. 61 — Processing Industries 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology 

A. S. 8, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T* S. (Men) 

Physical Aetiyities 

Total 

Junior Year 

Speech 1 — Public Speaking 

Agron. 10 — General Soils 

Econ. 87 — Fundamentals of Elconomics 

Hort. 166, 166 — Commercial Processing 

Bot. 101— Plant Physiology 

Bact. 181 — Food Bacteriology 

Hort. 68 — Vegetable Production 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 

Agr. Engr. Ill — Fundamentals of Food Processing Plants 

Agr. Engr. 112 — Machinery and Equipment for Horticultural Processing 
Electives 

Total 

Senior Year 

Hort. 108, 104 — ^Technology of Vegetables 

Hort. 121— Plant Operations 

Hort. 128 — Grading and Judging of Canned and Frozen Products 

Hort. 124 — Quality Control 

A. E. 105 — Food Products Inspection 

Hort. 118, 119 — Seminar 

and one of the following options: 

MANAGEMENT 
Econ. 160 — Labor Economics 

B. A. 160 — Market Management 

B. A. 160 — Personnel Management 

Electives 

TECHNOLOGY 

Chem. 19 — Quantative Analysis 

Bact. 62 — Sanitary Bacteriology 

Hort. 126 — Nutritional Analyses of Processed Crops 

Electivefl 



■Semester — < 


/ 


// 


3 


8 


3 


8 


2 


2 


1 


1 


8 


8 


.... 


2 


4 


.... 


8 


3 


1 


1 



20 



18 



2 
18 



18 





8 


8 


2 


4 




4 


.... 




S 




4 


8 


.... 




2 


2 


3 


20 


19 



16 



2 
3 
2 

16 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 79 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

The curriculum in Poultry Husbandry is designed to give the student a 
thorough knowledge of subject matter necessary for poultry raising; the 
marketing, distribution, and processing of poultry products; poultry im- 
provement work; and as a basis for graduate training for teaching and 
research in poultry husbandry. 

The suggested curriculum will be modified to meet the special needs of 
individual students. Superior students, definitely anticipating preparation 
for a professional career in poultry husbandry, will be expected to take 
a language. However, all students majoring in poultry husbandry will be 
required to complete 24 semester hours in poultry husbandry. 

Poultry Cnrriculum* ^Semetter—. 

Sophomore Year I U 

Enc 8, 4 or 6. 6 » t 

Gbem. 1. 8 — General Chemistry 4 4 

P. H. 8— Poultry Biolosry 2 

Speech 1. 2 — Public Speaking 2 2 

H. 6, 6 — ^History of American CiTilisation S S 

Hath. 8 — General Mathematics 8 .... 

M. S. 8. 4— ElemenUry R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 8 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 19 18 

Junior Year 

P. H. 101— Poultry Nutrition 8 

P. H. 102— Physiology of Hatchability 8 

P, H. 100— Poultry Breeding 2 

••Zool. 20 — ^Vertebrate Embryology • • • • 4 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology 4 .... 

Zool. 104 — Genetics 8 .... 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics .... 8 

B. A. ISO — Elements of Business Statistics 3 

Electivea 4 6 

ToUl 17 17 



• Students planning to pursue this curriculum should elect P. H. 1 the first semester 
of the Freshman Year. If Agron. 1 is not elected the Freshman Year it must be elected in 
subsequent year. 

** Reqaired of students specializing in poultry genetics, physiology, or nutrition. 



80 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

t — Semester — \ 
Senior Year I II 

P. H. 104 — ^Technology of Market Eggs and Poultry 3 .... 

A. E. 117 — Economics of Marketing Eggs and Poultry 3 

V. S. 108— Avian Anatomy 3 

V. S. 107— Poultry Hygiene 3 

P. H. 103 — Commercial Poultry Management .... 3 

P. H. 107 — Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems 2 .... 

Agr. Engr. 101 — Farm Machinery (3) "1 

or (.3-2 

Agr. Engr. 105— Farm Buildings (2) J 

Electives 6-7 10 

Total 17 19 

Pre-Forestry Students 

The College of Agriculture is glad to cooperate with any student who 
wishes to attend the University to pursue courses which may be transferred 
to a standard forestry curriculum in another institution. The program 
which a student follows depends to some extent upon the forestry college 
he plans to enter. All pre-forestry students in the College of Agriculture 
are sent to the Head of the Department of Botany of the University for 
counsel and advice in these matters. 

Pre-Theological Students 

The College of Agriculture is glad to cooperate with the officers of any 
theological seminary who desire to urge its prospective students to pursue 
courses in agriculture as a preparation for the rural ministry. Such pre- 
theological students may enroll for a semester or more or for the usual 
four year training of the College. In either case they should enroll as 
members of the general curriculum in the College of Agriculture. 

The electives of this curriculum may be used for such pre-theological 
requirements as seem desirable. Elections may be made from any of the 
offerings of the University such as history, political science, philosophy, 
agricultural economics, rural sociology, modern language, English, economics, 
psychology, sociology, natural science, education and the like. Students 
desiring to pursue a pre-theological program in the College of Agriculture 
of the University of Maryland, should consult with the president or admis- 
sions officer of the theological seminary which they expect to attend. 

Pre- Veterinary Students 

The College of Agriculture is glad to cooperate with any student who 
wishes to attend the University to pursue preparation for the study of 
Veterinary Science. The curriculum which a student will follow will depend 
to some extent upon the Veterinary College which he plans to enter. All 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 8l 

Pre- Veterinary students in the College of Agriculture are sent to the Head 
of the Department of Veterinary Science of the University for counsel and 
advice in these matters. 

Special Students in Agriculture 

Mature students may, vnth consent of the Dean, register as special 
students and pursue a program of studies not included in any regular 
curriculum, but arranged to meet the needs of the individual. All university 
fees for these special students are the same as fees for regular students. 

There are many young farmers who desire to take short intensive courses 
in their special lines of work during slack times on the farm. Arrangements 
have been made to permit such persons to register at the office of the Dean 
of the College of Agriculture and receive cards granting them permission 
to visit classes and work in the laboratories of the different departments. 
This opportunity is created to aid florists, pouitrymen, fruit-growers, 
gardeners, or other especially interested persons who are able to get away 
from their work at some time during the year. 

The regular charges are $10.00 for matriculation and $2.00 per credit 
hour per month for the time of attendance. One matriculation is good for 
any amount of regular or intermittent attendance during a period of four 
years. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

The University reserves the right to withdraw or discontinue any course 
for which an insufficient number of students have registered to warrant 
giving the course. In such an event, no fee will be charged for transfer to 
another course. 

Courses are designated by numbers as follows: 

1 to 99: courses for undergraduates. 

100 to 199: courses for advanced undergraduates and graduates. (Not 
all courses numbered 100 to 199 may be taken for graduate credit.) 

200 to 299: courses for graduates only. 

A course with a single number extends through one semester. A course 
with a double number extends through two semesters. 

Courses not otherwise designated are lecture courses. The number of 
hours' credit is shown by the arable numeral in parentheses after the title 
of the course. 

A separate schedule of courses is issued each semester, giving the hours, 
places of meeting, and other information required by the student in making 
out his program. Students obtain these schedules when they register. 



82 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND MARKETING 

Professors Nystrom, De Vault, (emeritus), Beal, Walker; Associate Profes- 
sors Hamilton, Poffenberger, Shull, Childress; Assistant Professors 
Bohanan, Smith; Instructor Bums. 

For Adyanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

A. E. 100. Farm Economics (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 31, 
32, or Econ. 37. 

A general course in agricultural economics, with special reference to 
population trends, the factors in agricultural production, agricultural wealth, 
land tenure, farm labor, agricultural credit, the tariff, price movements, and 
marketing. (Shull.) 

A. E. 101. Marketing of Farm Products (3) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 31, 32, or Econ. 37. 

The development of marketing, its scope, channels, and agencies of dis- 
tribution, functions, costs, methods used, and services rendered. (Shull.) 

A. E. 103. Cooperation in Agriculture (3) — First semester. 

Historical and comparative development of farmers' cooperative organiza- 
tions; reasons for failure and essentials to success; commodity develop- 
ments; operative practices; banks for cooperatives; present trends. 

(Poffenberger.) 

A. E. 104. Farm Finance (3) — Second semester. 

A study of credit principles as applied to private and cooperative farm 
businesses and the agencies extending farm credit. The needs for and benefits 
of farm insurance, including fire, crop, livestock, and life insurance. 

(Poffenberger.) 

A. E. 105. Food Products Inspection (2) — Second semester. One lecture 
and one laboratory period a week. 

This course is designed to give students primary instruction in the 
grading, standardizing and inspection of fruits and vegetables, dairy prod- 
ucts, poultry products, meats, and other food products. Theoretical instruc- 
tion will be given in the form of lectures, while the demonstrational and 
practical work will be conducted through laboratories and field trips to 
Washington, D. C, and Baltimore. (Staff.) 

A. E. 106. Prices of Farm Products (3) — Second semester. 
A general course in prices, price relationships, and price analysis, with 
emphasis on prices of agricultural products. (Poffenberger.) 

A. E. 107. Analysis of the Farm Business (3) — First semester. 
A concise, practical course in the keeping, summarizing, and analyzing 
of farm accounts. (Hamilton, Larsen.) 

A. E. 108. Farm Management (3) — Second semester. 
A study of the organization and operation of farms from the standpoint 
of efficiency, selection of farms, size of farms, leasing systems, and factors 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 83 

affecting profits. Students will make an analysis of the actual farm busi- 
ness and practices of different types of farms, and make specific recom- 
mendations as to how these farms may be organized and operated ai 

successful businesses. (Hamilton.) 

A. E. 109. Research Problems (1-2) — First and second semesters. 
With the permission of the instructor, students will work on any research 
problems in agricultural economics. There will be occasional class meetings 

for the purpose of making reports on progress of work. (Staff.) 

A. E. 110. Seminar (1, 1) — First and second semesters. 
Students will prepare and present reports on economic literature and 
current agricultural economic problems. (Hamilton.) 

A. E. III. Land Economics (3) — First Semester. 

A study of the principles, problems and policies in the utilization of land 
with special emphasis on agricultural land. (Bohanan.) 

A. E. 114. Foreign Trade in Farm Products (3) — Second semester. 

Trends in world trade for agricultural products; the position of the United 
States in world trade of argicultural products; farm relief measures and 
international trade; reciprocal trade agreements; postwar developments. 

(ShuU.) 

A. E. 115. Marketing of Dairy Products (3) — First semester. 

A study of principles and practices in the marketing of milk and manu- 
factured dairy products, including the influence of significant geographical 
and institutional relationships on costs and methods of distribution. (Beal.) 

A. E. 116. Marketing of Fruits and Vegetables (3) — Second semester. 

A study of principles and practices in the marketing of fresh and processed 
fruits and vegetables, including the influence of significant geographical and 
institutional relationships on costs and methods of distribution. (Childress.) 

A. E. 117. Economics of Marketing Eggs and Poultry (3) — Second 
Semester. 

This course embraces the economic phases of eg^ and poultry marketing. 
Supply and demand factors, including trends, will be discussed along with 
marketing methods, marketing costs and margins, market facilities, trans- 
portation, government grading, storage and efficiency in marketing. Con- 
sumer preference, acceptance and purchases will be related to consumer 
income, pricing of competitive products, and display methods. (Smith.) 

See Poultry Husbandry, P. H. 104. 

Technology of Market Eggs and Poultry. 

Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems. See Poultry Husbandry, 
P. H. 107. 

Market Milk. See Dairy 109. 

Livestock Markets and Marketing. See Animal Husbandry, A. H. 150. 



84 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Meat and Meat Products. See Animal Husbandry, A. H. 160. 
Economics of Cooperatives. See Economics, Econ. 151. 

Advertising Programs and Campaigns. See Business Administration, 
B. A. 151. 

Retail Store Management. See Business Administration, B. A. 154. 

For Graduates 

A. E. 200, 201. Special Problems in Farm Economics (2,2) — First and 
second semesters. 

An advance course dealing extensively with some of the economic prob- 
lems affecting the farmer, such as land values, taxation, credit, prices, 
production adjustments, transportation, marketing, and cooperation. 

(Staff.) 

A. E. 203. Research — Credit according to work accomplished. 

This course will consist of special reports by students on current economic 
subjects, and a discussion and criticism of the same by the members of the 
class and instructional staff. (Staff.) 

A. E. 202. Seminar (1, 1) — First and second semesters. 

Students will be assigned research in agricultural economics under the 
supervision of the instructor. The work will consist of original investiga- 
tion in problems of agricultural economics. (Staff.) 

A, E. 205. Special Problems in Dairy Marketing (2) — Second semester. 
Prerequisite, A, E. 115 or equivalent. 

An advanced course dealing with complex economic problems in dairy 
marketing which have developed because of the seasonal production and 
perishability of milk, its multiple uses, and the competitive structure of 
the industry. (Beal.) 

A. E. S207. Farm Business Analysis (1) — Summer session only. 
An advanced course dealing with farm records and accounts. Designed 
especially for teachers of agriculture and county agents, (Hamilton.) 

A. E. 208. Agricultural Policy (3) — Second semester. 

The evolution of agricultural policy in the United States, emphasizing 
the origin and development of governmental programs, and their effects 
upon agricultural production, prices and income. (Beal.) 

A. E. 210. Agricultural Taxation (2) — First semester. 

Principles, theory and practical problems of taxation applied to the field 
of agriculture; trends in farm taxes; farm tax burdens; equalizing and 
reducing farm tax burdens; taxation of farm cooperatives; forest lands 
and interstate agricultural commerce; application of income taxes and sales 
taxes to farmers; taxation of agriculture in foreign countries. (Walker.) 

A. E. 211. Functional Aspects of Farm Taxation (3) — Second semester. 
Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 85 

Taxation policies and inter-governmental allocations and grants-in-aid 
as they affect public services for rural people, with special emphasis on 
public education, public highways, public welfare, social security, public 
debt; and governmental research, extension, and regulatory activities di- 
rectly concerning agriculture. (Walker.) 

A. E. 215. Advanced Agricultural Cooperation (3) — First semester. 

An appraisal of agricultural cooperation as a means of improving the 
financial status of farmers. More specifically, the course includes a critical 
analysis and appraisal of specific types and classes of cooperatives. 

(Poffenberger.) 

A. E. 216. Advanced Farm Management (3) — Second semester. 

An advanced course in farm organization and management which applies 
the economic principles of farm production to the operation of farms of 
different sizes, types, operations, and geographical locations. Consideration 
is also given to adjustments which have taken place in farming in specific 
areas and probable changes in the future. ( ) 

A. E. S216 A-B. Advanced Farm Management (1, 1) — Summer session 
only. 

An advanced course in farm organization and management, especially 
designed for teachers of vocational agriculture. (Hamilton.) 

A. E. 218. Agricultural Economics Research Techniques (2) — Second 
semester. 

A study and an appraisal of agricultural economics research techniques. 
Experience is given in outlining and conducting research projects. A critical 
appraisal is made of methods of analysis and the presentation of results. 

(Childress.) 

A. E. 219. Advanced Land Economics (3) — First Semester. 

A critical analysis of the principles and problems in using and controlling 
land resources, including a review of land policies, is given, with special 
consideration being placed on the problems of submarginal lands, range 
lands, and water resources. Conservation of various land resources is 
appraised; problems of landed property are presented; and criteria es- 
sential to the development of a sound land policy are studied. (Bohanan.) 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 

Professors Ahalt, Cotterman, Associate Professors Murray, Evans 

R. Ed. 1. — Introduction to Agriculture (1) — First semester. Required 
of all beginning freshmen and sophomores in Agriculture. Other students 
must get the consent of the instructor. 

A series of lectures introducing the student to the broad field of agri- 
culture. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

R. Ed. 101. Teaching Farm Practicums and Demonstrations (2) — First 
semester. Two laboratory periods a week. 



86 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

This course is designed to assist the student in relating the learning 
acquired in the several departments with the problems of doing and demon- 
strating which he faces in the field and in the classroom as a teacher of 
agriculture. Deficiencies are checked and corrected by laboratory practice. 

(Murray.) 

R. Ed. 103. Practice Teaching (5) — First semester. Open only to stu- 
dents majoring in Agricultural Education who have a satisfactory scholastic 
average. 

Under the direction of a critic teacher the student is required to analyze 
and prepare special units of subject matter in agriculture, plan and teach 
lessons, supervise farming programs of students and otherwise perform 
the duties of a high school teacher of vocational agriculture. Not less than 
125 clock hours, exclusive of observation, shall be required. (Ahalt.) 

R. Ed. 104. Practice Teaching (1-4) — First and second semesters. Regis- 
tration concurrent or after R. Ed. 103. 

To provide students an opportunity to gain experience in project super- 
vision, the opening of school, and in other teaching activities not generally 
a part of R. Ed. 103. (Ahalt.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
R. Ed. 107. Observation and Analysis of Teaching in Agriculture (3) — 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 
This course deals with an analysis of pupils learning in class groups. 

(Ahalt, Murray.) 

R. Ed. 109. Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture (3) — First 
semester. 

A comprehensive course in the work of high school departments of 
vocational agriculture. It emphasizes particularly placement, supervised 
farming programs, the organization and administration of Future Farmer 
activities, and objectives and methods in all-day instruction. 

(Ahalt, Murray.) 

R. Ed. 111. Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Groups (1) — First 
semester. 

Charactertistics of young and adult farmer instruction in agriculture. 
Determining needs for and organizing a course; selecting materials for 
instruction; and class management. Emphasis is placed on the conference 
method of teaching. (Murray.) 

R. Ed. 112. Departmental Management (1) — Second semester. One lab- 
oratory period a week. Prerequisites, R. Ed. 107, 109. 

The analysis of administrative programs for high school departments of 
vocational agriculture. Investigations and reports. (Ahalt, Murray.) 

R. Ed. 114. Rural Life and Education (3) — Second semester. 
An intensive study of the educational agencies at work in rural communi- 
ties, stressing an analysis of school patronage areas, the possibilities of 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 87 

normal life in rural areas, early beginnings in rural education, and the 
conditioning effects of educational offerings. (Ahalt.) 

R. Ed. 150. Extension Education (2) — Second semester. 

The Agricultural Extension Service as an educational agency. The his- 
tory, philosophy, objectives, policy, organization, legislation and methods 
used in extension work. ( ) 

R. Ed. 160. Agricultural Information Methods (2) — First semester. 

General introduction to agricultural public relations programs, including 
writing for and use of newspapers, magazines, direct mail, radio, and tele- 
vision; and production and use of visual aids such as photographs, slides, 
exhibits, and posters. (Evans.) 

For Graduates 

R. Ed. 201, 202. Rural Life and Education (3, 3)— First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, R. Ed. 114 or equivalent. 

A sociological approach to rural education as a movement for a good life 
in rural communities. (Ahalt.) 

R. Ed. 207, 208. Problems in Vocational Agriculture (2, 2)— First and 
second semesters. 

In this course special emphasis is placed upon the current problems facing 
teachers of vocational agriculture. It is designed especially for persons 
who have had several years of teaching experience in this field. 

(Ahalt, Murray.) 

R. Ed. 8207 A-B. Problems in Teaching Vocational Agriculture (1-1)— 
Summer session only. 

A critical analysis of current problems in the teaching of vocational agri- 
culture with special emphasis upon recent developments in all-day programs. 

R. Ed. S208 A-B. Problems in Teaching Farm Mechanics (1-1)— Sum- 
mer session only. 

This course deals with the latest developments in the teaching of Farm 
Mechanics. Various methods in use will be compared and studied under 
laboratory conditions. 

R. Ed. S209 A-B. Adult Education in Agriculture (1-1)— Summer ses- 
sion only. 

Principles of adult education as applied to rural groups, especially young 
and adult farmers. Organizing classes, planning courses and instructional 
methods are stressed. 

R. Ed. S210 A-B. Land Grant College Education (1-1) — Summer session 
only. 

Development of Land Grant Colleges and Experiment Stations and the 
role they have played in improving conditions in rural communities. 



88 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

R. Ed. S211 A-B. Agricultural Extension Service Education (1-1) — 

Summer session only. 

Development of the extension service. Types of demonstrations and in- 
struction used. The role of the County Agricultural and Home Demonstra- 
tion Agents and 4-H Clubs in the development of rural society. 

R. Ed. S212 A-B. Educational Functions of Rural Institutions (1-1) — 

Summer session only. 

The part rural institutions have played in starting, developing and sup- 
porting education for rural areas, with special emphasis on the various 
phases of agricultural education. 

R. Ed. S213 A-B. Supervision and Administration of Vocational Agri- 
culture (1-1) — Summer session only. 

Administrative and supervisory problems in Vocational Agriculture in- 
cluding scheduling, local administrative programs, supervisor-teacher re- 
lationships, organizational problems and the responsibilities of county super- 
intendents and principals in the progi-am. 

R. Ed. 215. Supervision of Student Teaching (1) — Arranged. 

A workshop concerning the role of the critic teacher in checking progress, 
supervising and grading student teachers. Particular emphasis will be 
given to the region-wide program in training teachers of vocational agri- 
culture, including the evaluation of beginning teachers. (Ahalt.) 

R. Ed. 220. Field Problems in Rural Education (1-3) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, six semester hours of graduate study. 

Problems accepted depend upon the character of the work of the student 
and the facilities available for study. Periodic conferences required. Final 
report must follow accepted pattern for field investigations. 

(Ahalt, Murray.) 

R. Ed. 240. Agricultural College Instruction (1) — Second semester. 
Open to graduate students and members of the faculty in the College of 
Agriculture. 

A seminar type of course consisting of reports, discussions, and lectures 
dealing with the techniques and procedures adapted to teaching agricul- 
tural subjects at the college level. (Cotterman, Ahalt.) 

R. Ed. 250. Seminar in Rural Education (1-1) — First and second 
semesters. 

Problems in the organization, administration, and supervision of the 
several agencies of rural education. Investigations, papers, and reports. 

(Staff.) 

R. Ed. S250 A-B. Seminar in Rural Education (1) — Summer session 
only. 

Current problems of teaching agriculture are analzyed and discussed. 
Students are asked to make investigations, prepare papers and make reports. 

R. Ed. 251. Research — Credit hours according to work done. (Staff.) 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 89 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Carpenter; Associate Professor Gienger; Assistant Professor 

Hofmeister 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Agr. Engr. 101 — Farm Machinery (3) — First semester. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. 

A study of the economics, design and adjustments of modem horse and 
tractor-drawn machinery, including applications of electricity to farm 
operations. Laboratory work consists of detailed study of actual machines, 
their calibration, adjustment, and repair. (Gienger.) 

Agr. Engr. 102. Gas Engines, Tractors and Automobiles (3) — Second 
semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 

A study of the design, operation, and repair of the internal combustion 
engines, tractors, and automobiles used in farm practice. (Carpenter.) 

Agr. Engr. 104. Farm Mechanics (2) — First semester. Two laboratory 
periods a week. 

This course consists of laboratory exercises in practical farm shop and 
farm equipment repair and construction projects, and a study of the prin- 
ciples of shop organization and administration. It is available only to 
seniors in agricultural education. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Gienger.) 

Agr. Engr. 105. Farm Buildings (2) — First semester. 
A study of all types of farm structures; also of farm lighting, heating, 
water supply and sanitation systems. (Carpenter.) 

Agr. Engr. 106. Farm Mechanics (2) — Second semester. Two labora- 
tory periods a week. 

Laboratory exercises covering practical projects in farm shop work and 
in the repair and construction of farm equipment. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

(Gienger.) 

Agr. Engr. 107. Farm Drainage (2) — Second semester. One lecture 
and one laboratory period a week. 

A study of farm drainage systems, including theory of tile under-drainage, 
the depth and spacing of laterals, calculation of grades, methods of con- 
struction, and the use of engineering instruments. A smaller amount of 
time will be spent upon drainage by open ditches, and the laws relating 
thereto. (Carpenter.) 

Agr. Engr. 111. Fundamentals of Food Processing Plants (3) — First 
semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 

A study of mechanical principles and of mechanical appliances and 
accessories, such as boilers, pumps, motors, refrigeration units, controls, 
etc., adapted to food processing plants. (Hofmeister.) 

Agr. Engr. 112. Machinery and Equipment for Horticultural Processing 
(2) — Second semester. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisite, Agr. Engr. 111. (Hofmeister.) 



90 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

This course covers the design, operation and maintenance of the mechines 
and equipment used in the commercial processing of fruits and vegetables. 

AGRONOMY— CROPS AND SOILS 

Professor Kuhn; Associate Professors Axley and Street; Assistant Profes- 
sors Burger, Liden, Ronningen and Strickling; Lecturer Nikiforoff; 

Assistant Bentz. 

A. CROPS 

Agron. 1. Crop Production (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. 

Culture, use, improvement, adaptation, distribution, and history of field 
crops. 

Agron. 30. Cereal Crop Production (3) — First semester. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. 

Study of the principles and practices of com, wheat, oats, barley, rye 
and buckwheat production. 

Agron. 31. Forage Crop Production (3) — Second semester. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. 

Study of the production and management of grasses and legumes for 
quality hay, silage and pasture. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Agron. 101. Senior Seminar in Crops (1) — Second semester. Prerequi- 
site, Agron. 1, 30, and 31. 

Reports by seniors on current scientific and practical publications per- 
taining to crops. (Ronningen.) 

Agron. 153. Selected Crop Studies (2-4) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Agron. 1, 30, 31. 

Advanced individual study of field crops of special interest to the student. 

(Staff.) 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Agron. 103. Crop Breeding (2) — First semester. Prerequisite, Zool. 104. 

The principles of breeding as applied to field crop plants and methods used 

in plant improvement. (Ronningen.) 

Agron. 105. Tobacco Production (2) — First semester. Two lectures a 
week. Prerequisite, Agron. 1. 

A study of the history, adaptation, distribution, culture, and improvement 
of various types of tobacco, with special emphasis on problems in Maryland 
tobacco production. (Street.) 

Agron. 106. Tobacco Production (2) — Second semester. Two lectures a 
week. Prerequisite, Agron. 105. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 91 

A study of the physical and chemical factors associated with yield and 
quality of tobacco, stress being placed on the importance of soil, climate and 
fertilizers. (Street.) 

Agron. 151. Cropping Systems (2) — Second semester. 

The coordination of information from various courses in the development 
of balanced cropping systems, appropriate to different objectives in various 
areas of the State and Nation. (Kuhn.) 

Agron. 152, Seed Production and Distribution (3) — Second semester. 
Two lectures and one laboratory (2 hours) period a week. Prerequisite, 
Agron. 1. 

A study of seed production, processing, and distribution; Federal and 
State seed control programs; seed laboratory analyses; release of new 
varieties and maintenance of foundation seed stocks. The course will also 
include identification and classification of weeds and their seeds or fruits, 
and principles of weed eradication and control. (Liden.) 

For Graduates 

Agron. 201. Crop Breeding (2-4) — Second semester. Prerequisite, per- 
mission of instructor. (Not offered 1952-53.) 

Similar to Agron. 103, but better adapted to graduate students and offer- 
ing a wider range of choice of material to suit special cases. (Ronningen.) 

Agron. 203. Crop Seminar (1, 1) — First and second semesters. 

Presentation of original work or review of literature on agronomic topics. 

(Staff.) 

Agron. 204. Technic in Field Crop Research (2) — First semester. 

Field plot technic, application of statistical analysis to agronomic data, 
and preparation of the research project. (Kuhn.) 

Agron. 205. Advanced Tobacco Production (2) — Second semester. Two 
lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 

A study of principles and problems relating to tobacco research and pro- 
duction. (Street.) 

Agron. 206, 207. Recent Advances in Crop Production (2, 2) — First 
semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 

A study of recent advances in research techniques and findings pertaining 
to crop production. (Agron. 206 not offered in 1952-53.) 

(Kuhn, Street, Ronningen, Burger.) 

Agron. 208. Research Methods (2-4) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
permission of staff. 

Development of research viewpoint by detailed study and report on crop 
research of the Maryland Experiment Station or review of literature on 
specific phases of a problem. (Staff.) 



92 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Agron. 209. Research in Crops (1-8) — First and second semesters. 

Credit according to work accomplished. With approval or suggestion of 
the Professor in charge of his major work the student will choose his own 
problem for study. (Staff.) 

Agron. S210. Cropping Systems (1) — Summer session only. 

An advance course primarily designed for teachers of vocational agri- 
culture and county agents. It deals with outstanding problems and the 
latest developments in the field. (Kuhn.) 

B. SOILS 

Agron. 10. General Soils (4) — First and second semesters. Three lec- 
tures and a two-hour laboratory period each week. Prerequisite, Chem. 1 
or permission of instructor. 

A study of the fundamentals of soils including their origin, development, 
relation to natural sciences, effect on civilization, physical properties, and 
chemical properties. (Strickling.) 

NOTE: No credit will be allowed for this course if student has credit 
for Soils 1. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Agron. SllO. Soil Management (1) — Summer school only. 

An advanced course primarily designed for teachers of Vocational Agri- 
culture and County Agents dealing with factors involved in management of 
soils in general and of Maryland soils in particular. Emphasis is placed 
on methods of maintaining and improving chemical, physical, and biological 
characteristics of soils. Illustrations with conservation practices receive 
particular attention. (Strickling.) 

Agron. 111. Soil Fertility Principles (3) — First semester. Three lec- 
tures a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 10. 

A study of the chemical, physical, and biological characteristics of soils 
that are important in growing crops. Soil deficiencies of physical, chemical, 
or biological nature and their correction by the use of lime, fertilizers, and 
rotations are discussed and illustrated. (Strickling.) 

NOTE: No credit will be allowed for this course if student has credit 
for Soils 2. 

Agron. 112. Commercial Fertilizers (3) — Second semester. Three lec- 
tures a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 10. 

A study of the manufacturing and distribution of commercial fertilizers. 

(Axley.) 

Agron. 113. Soil Conservation (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and 
one three-hour laboratory a week. 

A study of the importance and causes of soil erosion, and methods of soil 
erosion control. Special emphasis is placed on farm planning for soil con- 
servation. The laboratory period will be largely devoted to field trips. 

(Bentz.) 

NOTE: No credit will be allowed for this course if student has credit 
for Soils 112. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 93 

Agron. 114. Soil Classification (3) — First semester. Two lectures and 
one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 10. 

A study of the genesis, morphology and classification of soils. The broad 
principles governing soil formation are explained. The laboratory period 
will be largely devoted to field trips. (Nikiforoff.) 

NOTE: No credit will be allowed for this course if student has credit 
for Soils 102. 

Agron. 115. Soil Geography (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and 
one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 114, or 
Geog. 30, 40, and 41, or permission of instructor. 

A study of the influence of geographic factors on the development and 
location of soils in the United States and the world. The laboratory periods 
will be used largerly for a study of various maps of the world and field 
trips. (Nikiforoff.) 

NOTE: No credit will be allowed for this course if student has credit 
for Soils 103. 

Agron. 116. Soil Investigation Methods (3) — First semester. One hour 
lecture, one two-hour laboratory, and one three-hour laboratory a week. 

A study of chemical methods of soil analysis and their relation to ferti- 
lizer requirements of the soil. (Axley.) 

NOTE: No credit will be allowed for this course if student has credit 
for Soils 51. 

Agron. 117. Soil Physics (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 10 and a course in 
Physics, or permission of instructor. 

A study of physical properties of soils with special emphasis on relation- 
ship to soil productivity. (Strickling.) 

Agron. 118. Special Problem in Soils (1) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, Agron. 10 and permission of instructor. 
A detailed study, including a written report, of an important soils problem. 

(Staff.) 
For Graduates 

Agron. 250. Soil Minerology (3) — First semester. Three one-hour lec- 
tures a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 10 and permission of instructor. 

A study of the identification of soil minerals and their relationship to 
soil formation, classification, and productivity. ( ) 

NOTE: No credit will be allowed for this course if student has credit 
for Soils 203. 

Agron. 251. Advanced Methods of Soil Investigation (3) — Second semes- 
ter. Three one-hour lectures a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 10 and permis- 
sion of instructor. 



94 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

An advanced study of the theory of chemical methods of soil investigation 
with emphasis on problems involving application of physical chemistry. 

(Axley.) 

NOTE: No credit will be allowed for this course if student has credit 
for Soils 202. 

Agron. 252. Advanced Soil Physics (3) — Second semester. Two lectures 
and one three-hour laboratory a week. Prerequisites, Agron. 10 and per- 
mission of instructor. 

An advanced study of physical properties of soils with special emphasis 
on relationship to soil productivity. (Strickling.) 

Agron. 253, 254. Soil Research Technique (2, 2) — First and second 
semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, per- 
mission of instructor. 

An advanced laboratory study of chemical methods of soil analyses and 
their relationship to fertilizer requirements of the soil. (Axley.) 

NOTE: No credit will be allowed for this course if student has credit 
for Soils 212, 213. 

Agron. 255. Soil Seminar (1, 1) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, permission of instructor. (Staff.) 

Agron. 256. Soil Research (1-12) — First and second semesters. (Staff.) 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Professors Foster, Green; Associate Professors Outhouse, Kerr; 
Instructor Buric; Lecturer Finney 

A. H. 1. Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry (3) — First semester. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period a week. 

A study of the general problems in breeding, feeding, management and 
marketing of beef cattle, sheep, swine and horses. Practice is given in the 
selection of animals to meet market demands. Field trips may be made to 
near-by farms and packing plants. 

A. H. 30. Types and Breeds of Livestock (3) — Second semester. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, A. H. 1. 

A study of the various types and breeds of livestock, their development, 
characteristics and adaptability. Practice is given in selection according 
to standards of excellence. 

A. H. 90. Livestock Judging (2) — Second semester. Two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, A. H. 30 or permission of instructor. 

Training is given in the judging of beef cattle, sheep, swine and horses 
Occasional trips are made to farms where outstanding herds and flocks are 
maintained. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE '" •■' 95 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

A. H. 100. Advanced Livestock Judging (2) — First semester. Two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, A. H. 90 and permission of in- 
structor. 

An advanced course in the selection and judging of purebred and com- 
mercial meat and work animals. The most adept students enrolled in this 
course are chosen to represent the University of Maryland in intercollegiate 
livestock judging contests. (Outhouse, Buric.) 

A. H. 110. Feeds and Feeding (3) — First semester. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 1, 3. 

Elements of nutrition; source, characteristics, and adaptability of the 
various feeds to the several classes of livestock; feeding standards; the 
calculation and compounding of rations. (Outhouse.) 

A. H. 130. Beef Cattle Production (3)— First semester. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, A. H. 1, A. H. 110. 

Principles and practices underlying the economical production of beef 
cattle, including a study of the breeds and their adaptability; selection, 
breeding, feeding, management and marketing of purebred and conmiercial 
herds. (Foster.) 

A. H. 131. Sheep Production (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, A. H. 1, A. H. 110. 

Principles and practices underlying the economical production of sheep, 
including a study of the breeds and their adaptability; selection, breeding, 
feeding, management and marketing of purebred and commercial flocks. 

(Outhouse.) 

A. H. 132. Swine Production (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, A. H. 1, A. H. 110. 

Principles and practices underlying the economical production of swine, 
including a study of the breeds and their adaptability; selection, breeding, 
feeding, management and marketing of purebred and commercial herds. 

(Kerr.) 

A. H. 133. Horse Production (3) — First semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, A. H. 1, A. H, 110. 

Principles and practices underlying the economical production and use of 
draft horses and light horses; selection, breeding, feeding and management 
of draft and light horses. (Outhouse, Finney.) 

A. H. 135. Light Horse Production (1) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
A. H. 1. 

Included is a study of the organization of the light horse farm, proper 
methods of feeding and training, control of disease, treatment and care 
of injuries, sale of surplus stock. (Finney.) 



96 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

A. H. 140. Livestock Management (3) — Second semester. One lecture 
and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, A. H. 1. 

A course designed to familiarize students with various systems of live- 
stock farming, together with practical methods of handling and managing 
livestock. Practice and training in the feeding, fitting and preparation of 
animals for show and work purposes and commercial meat production. 

(Buric.) 

A. H. 160. Meat and Meat Products (3) — Second semester. One lecture 
and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, A. H. 1. 

Designed to give information on the processing and handling of the na- 
tion's meat supply. A study of the physical and structural qualities which 
affect the value of meat and meat products. Trips are made to packing 
houses and meat distributing centers. (Kerr.) 

A. H. 170, 171. Seminar (1, 1) — First and second semesters. Prerequi- 
site, permission of instructor. 

Advanced undergraduates will be required to review literature, present 
reports and discuss assigned topics relating to Animal Husbandry. (Staff.) 

A. H. 172, 173. Special Problems in Animal Husbandry (1-2, 1-2)— First 

and second semesters. Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 

A course designed for advanced undergraduates in which specific problems 
relating to Animal Husbandry will be assigned. (Staff.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

A. H. 111. Animal Nutrition (3) — First semester. Prerequisites, Chem. 
31, 32, 33, 34; A. H. 110. Graduate credit allowed, with permission of 
instructor. 

Processes of digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients; nutri- 
tional balances; nature of nutritional requirements for growth, production 
and reproduction. (Shaw.) . 

A. H. 120. Principles of Breeding (3) — Second semester. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Zool. 104. Graduate credit 
(1-3 hours), allowed with permission of instructor. 

The practical aspects of animal breeding, heredity, variation, selection, 
development, systems of breeding, and pedigree study are considered. 

(Green.) 

A. H. 150. Livestock Markets and Marketing (2) — First semester. Pre- 
requisite, A. H. 1. Graduate credit allowed, with permission of instructor 

History and development of livestock markets and systems of market- 
ing; trends of livestock marketing; effect of changes in transportation and 
refrigeration facilities; the merchandising of meat products. (Kerr.) 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 97 

For Graduates 
A. H. 200, 201. Special Problems in Animal Husbandry (1-2, 1-2)— 

First and second semesters. Work assigned in proportion to amount of 
credit. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 

Problems will be assigned which relate specifically to the character of 
work the student is pursuing. (Staff.) 

A. H. 202, 203. Seminar (1, 1) — First and second semesters. 

Students are required to prepare papers based upon current scientific 
publications relating to Animal Husbandry or upon their research work, for 
presentation before and discussion by the class. (Staff.) 

A. H. 204. Research (1-6) — First and second semesters. Credit to be 
determined by amount and character of work done. 

With the approval of the head of the department, students will be required 
to pursue original research in some phase of Animal Husbandry, carrying 
the same to completion, and report the results in the form of a thesis. 

(Staff.) 

A. H. 205. Advanced Breeding (2) — Second semester. Prerequisites, 
A. H. 120 or equivalent and Biological Statistics. 

This course deals with the more technical phases of heredity and varia- 
tion; selection and selection indices; breeding systems; inheritance in farm 
animals. (Green.) 

A. H. 206. Advanced Livestock Management (3) — First semseter. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, permission of 
instructor. 

An intensive study of the newer developments in animal breeding, animal 
physiology, animal nutrition, endocrinology and other closely allied fields 
as they apply to the management and commercial production of livestock. 

(Staff.) 

A. H. S230. Beef Cattle (1) — Summer session only. 

This course is designed primarily for teachers of Vocational Agriculture 
and Extension Service Workers. (Foster.) 

BOTANY 

Professors Bamford, Jeffers, Gauch, Cox, Weaver, Appleman (emeritus), 
Norton (emeritus); Associate Professor Brown; Assistant Professors 
D. T. Morgan, O. D. Morgan, Dugger, Rappleye; Research Associate 

Krauss. 

Bot. 1. General Botany (4) — First and second semesters. Two lectures 
and two laboratory periods a week. 

General introduction to botany, touching briefly on all phases of the 
subject. Emphasis is on the fundamental biological principles of the higher 
plants. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Bot. 2. General Botany (4) — Second semester. Two lectures and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. 



98 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

A brief evolutionary study of algae, fungi, liverworts, mosses, ferns and 
their relatives, and the seed plants emphasizing their structure, reproduc- 
tion, habitats, and economic importance. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Bet. 11. Plant Taxonomy (3) — Second semester. One lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot, 1, or equivalent. 

A study of the principles of plant classification, based on the collection 
and identification of local plants. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Bot. 20. Diseases of Plants (3) — First semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1, or equivalent. 

An introductory study of the symptoms and causal agents of plant dis- 
eases and measures for their control. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Bot. 110. Plant Microtechnique (3) — Second semester. One lecture and 
two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. 

Principles and methods involved in the preparation of permanent micro- 
scope slides of plant materials. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Rappleye.) 

Bot. 112. Seminar (1) — First and second semesters. Prerequisite, per- 
mission of instructor. 

Discussion of special topics, current literature, problems and programs in 
all phases of botany. For seniors only, majors and minors in botany or 
biological science. (Brown.) 

A. Plant Physiology 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bot. 101. Plant Physiology (4) — First semester. Two lectures and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 1 and General Chemistry. 

A survey of the general physiological activities of plants. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. (Gauch, Dugger.) 

Bot. 102. Plant Ecology (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 11, or equivalent. 

A study of plants in relation to their environments. Plant successions and 
formations of North America are treated briefly and local examples studied. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Brown.) 

For Graduates 

Bot. 201. Plant Biochemistry (4) — First semester. Two lectures and 
two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 101 and elementary 
organic chemistry, or equivalent. 

A study of the important substances in the composition of the plant body 
and the chemical changes occurring therein. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

(Gauch.) 

Bot. 202. Plant Biophysics (2) — Second semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 
101 and introductory physics, or equivalent. (Not offered 1952-1953.) 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 99 

An advanced course dealing with the operation of physical phenomena 
in plant life processes. (Dugger.) 

Bot. 203. Biophysical Methods (2) — Second semester. Two laboratory 
periods a week. Laboratory course to accompany Bot. 202. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. (Not offered 1952-1953.) (Dugger.) 

Bot. 204. Growth and Development (2) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
12 semester hours of plant science. (Not offered 1952-1953.) (Dugger.) 

Bot. 205. Mineral Nutrition of Plants (2) — Second semester. 
Reports on current literature are presented and discussed in connection 
with recent advances in the mineral nutrition of plants. (Gauch.) 

Bot. 206. Research in Plant Physiology — Credit according to work done. 

Students must be qualified to pursue with profit the research to be under- 
taken. (Gauch, Dugger.) 

Bot. 207. Special Topics in Plant Physiology (2) — Second semester. 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 

This course, on highly specialized subjects, will usually be presented by a 
specialist who is available at a neighboring institution. ( .) 

Bot. 208. Seminar in Plant Physiology (1) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 

Discussion of special topics in plant physiology. (Gauch, Dugger.) 

B. Plant Morphology and Taxonomy 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Bot. 111. Plant Anatomy (3) — First semester. One lecture and two 

laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 110, or equivalent. 
The origin and development of the organs and tissue systems in the 

vascular plants. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Rappleye.) 

Bot. 113. Plant Geography (2) — First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 1, 
or equivalent. 

A study of plant distribution throughout the world and the factors gener- 
ally associated with such distribution. (Brown.) 

Bot. 114. Advanced Plant Taxonomy (2) — First semester. Two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 11, or permission of instructor. Study 
of difficult plant groups, especially grasses, sedges, legumes, and com- 
posites, with emphasis on native plants. Laboratory fee $5.00 (Brown.) 

Bot. 115. Structure of Economic Plants (3) — Second semester. One lec- 
ture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 111. 

A detailed microscopic study of the anatomy of the chief fruit and 
vegetable crops. Laboratory fee, $5.00, (Rappleye.) 



100 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Bot. 116. History and Philosophy of Botany (1) — P^rst semester. Pre- 
requisite, 15 semester hours of botany. 

Discussion of the development of ideas and knowledge about plants, lead- 
ing to a survey of contemporary work in botanical science. (Bamford.) 

Bot. 117. Plant Breeding (2) — Second semester. Prerequisites, Zool. 104 
or equivalent. 

A survey of the fundamental principles to modern plant breeding. The 
analysis of hybrid vigor, its application to economic plants, the relation of 
chromosomes to plant improvement, economically valuable mutations and 
similar topics will be considered, (D. T. Morgan.) 

Bot. 133. Bryophytes and Pteridophytes (3) — Second semester. One lec- 
ture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 1 and Bot. 2, 

or equivalent. (Not offered 1952-1953.) 

The morphology, taxonomy and ecology of the Bryophytes and Pterido- 
phytes. Field study and collections will be made in local areas. Laboratory 

fee, $5.00. 

Bot. 135. Aquatic Plants (3) — First semester. One lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 and Bot. 11, or equivalent. 

(Not offered 1952-1953.) 

A study of the taxonomy and ecology of aquatic plants, especially those 
of importance in fisheries and wild life management. Field trips and col- 
lections will be made. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Bot. 1518. Teaching Methods in Botany (2) — Summer. Five two-hour 
laboratory and demonstration periods per week; 10:00-11:00; E-807. Pre- 
quisite, Bot. 1, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00, (Not offered 1952-1953.) 

A study of the biological principles of common plants, and demonstra- 
tions, projects, and visual aids suitable for teaching in primary and 
secondary schools. 

For Graduates 

Bot. 211. Cytology (4) — Second semester. Two lectures and two labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 110 and Zool. 104 (Genetics) or 
equivalent. 

A detailed study of the chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis, and the rela- 
tion of these to current theories of heredity and evolution. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. (Bamford, D. T. Morgan,) 

Bot. 212. Plant Morphology (3) — First semester. One lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 11, Bot. Ill, or equivalent. 

A comparative study of the morphology of the flowering plants, with 
special reference to the phylogeny and development of floral organs. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Rappleye.) 

Bot. 213. Seminar in Plant Cytology and Morphology (1) — First and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 101 

Discussion of special topics in plant morphology, anatomy, and cytology. 

(D. T. Morgan, Rappleye.) 

Bot. 214. Research in Plant Cytology and Morphology — Credit accord- 
ing to work done. (Bamford, D. T. Morgan, Rappleye.) 

Bot. 215. Plant Cytogenetics (3) — First semester. Two lectures and onb 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Zool. 104, Bot. 211. 

An advanced study of the current status of plant genetics, particularly 
gene mutations and their relation to chromosome changes in com and other 
favorable genetic materials. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (D. T. Morgan.) 

Bot. 219. Special Topics in Plant Morphology and Cytology (2) — First 
semester. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 

This course treats specialized subjects very intensively. It will usually 
be given by a lecturer from a neighboring institution. ( .) 

C. Plant Pathology 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bot. 122. Research Methods in Plant Pathology (2) — First or second 
semester. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or 
equivalent. 

Advanced training in the basic research techniques and methods of plant 
pathology. Laboratory fee, $5.00 each semester. (Cox.) 

Bot. 123. Diseases of Ornamental Plants (2) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. (Not offered 1952-1953.) 

Symptoms, control measures, and other pertinent information concerning 
the diseases which affect important ornamental plants grown in the eastern 
states. (Jeffers.) 

Bot. 124. Diseases of Tobacco and Agronomic Crops (2) — First semes- 
ter. Prerequisite, Bot. 20 or equivalent. 

The symptoms and control of the diseases of tobacco, forage crops and 
cereal grains. (0. D. Morgan.) 

Bot. 125. Diseases of Fruit Crops (2) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
Bot. 20, or equivalent. (Not offered 1952-1953.) 

Symptoms and control of the diseases affecting fruit production in the 
eastern United States. (Weaver.) 

Bot. 126. Diseases of Vegetable Crops (2) — Second semester. Prerequi- 
site, Bot. 20, or equivalent. 

The recognition and control of diseases affecting the production of im- 
portant vegetable crops grown in the eastern United States. (Cox.) 

Bot. 128. Mycology (4) — Second semester. Two lectures and two labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 2, or equivalent. 

An introductory study of the morphology, classification, life histories, 
and economics of the fungi. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Jeffers.) 



102 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Bot. 152S. Field Plant Pathology (1)— Summer. Daily lecture first 
three weeks, 11:00; E-307. Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. Labora- 
tory fee, $5.00. 

A course for county agents and teachers of vocational agriculture. Dis- 
cussion and demonstration of the important diseases in Maryland crops. 

(Cox and Staff.) 
For Graduates 

Bot. 221. Virus Diseases (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 20 and Bot. 101. 

Consideration of the physical, chemical and physiological aspects of plant 
viruses and plant diseases. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (0. Morgan.) 

Bot. 222. Plant Nematology (2). Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. 

(Not offered 1952-1953.) 

A detailed study of the nematodes which cause plant diseases, especially 
their life history, plant symptoms and control measures. ( .) 

Bot. 225. Research in Plant Pathology — Credit according to work done. 

(Staff.) 

Bot. 226. Plant Disease Control (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 
20, or equivalent. 

An advanced course dealing with the theory and practices of plant disease 
control. (Cox.) 

Bot. 228. Special Topics in Plant Pathology (2) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, permission of instructor. 

This course on very specialized phases of plant pathology will usually be 
given by a lecturer from a neighboring institution. ( .) 

Bot. 229. Seminar in Plant Pathology (1) — First and second semesters. 

Discussion on the advanced technical literature of plant pathology. 

(Jeffers, Cox.) 

DAIRY 

Professors Pou, Arbuckle and Shaw; Assistant Professors Mattick and 
Keeney; Instructors Ellmore, Nisonger, Corbin and Brown 

A. DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Dairy 1. Fundamentals of Dairying (3) — Second semester. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. 

This course is designed to cover the entire field of dairying. The content 
of the course deals with all phases of dairy cattle feeding, breeding and 
management and the manufacturing, processing, distributing and marketing 
of dairy products. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Pou, Mattick.) 

Dairy 20. Dairy Breeds and Selection (2) — First semester. One lecture 
and one laboratory period a week. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 103 

A detailed study of the dairy breeds, factors which have contributed to 
the success of failure of modem breeding establishments and standards of 
excellence in the Selection of breeding cattle. (Brown.) 

Dairy 30. Dairy Cattle Judging (2) — Second semester. Two laboratory 
periods a week. 

This course offers complete instruction in the selection and comparative 
judging of dairy cattle. Trips to various dairy farms for judging practice 
will be made, (Pou.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Dairy 100. Dairy Cattle Management (1) — First semester. One labora- 
tory period a week. Prerequisite, Dairy 1. 

A management course designed to familiarize students with the practical 
handling and management of dairy cattle. Students are given actual prac- 
tice and training in the University dairy barns. (EUmore.) 

Dairy 101. Dairy Production (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Dairy 1, A. H. 110. 

A comprehensive course in dairy cattle feeding, breeding and herd man- 
agement. (Pou, Ellmore.) 

Dairy 105. Dairy Cattle Breeding (3) — First semester. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Dairy 1, Zool. 104, A. H. 
120. 

A specialized course in breeding dairy cattle. Emphasis is placed on 
methods of sire evaluation systems of breeding, breeding programs, and 
artificial breeding techniques. (Pou, Ellmore.) 

Dairy 120, 121. Dairy Seminar (1, 1) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisites, students majoring in dairy production. Dairy 101; students 
majoring in dairy products technology. Dairy 108. 

Presentation and discussion of current literature and research work in 
dairying. (Staff.) 

Dairy 124. Special Problems in Dairying A (1-4) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, Dairy 101. Credit in accordance with the amount 
and character of work done. 

Special problems will be assigned which relate specifically to the work 
the student is pursuing. (Staff.) 

B. DAIRY TECHNOLOGY 

Dairy 40. Grading Dairy Products (2) — Second semester. Two labora- 
tory periods a week. 

Market grades and the judging of milk, butter, cheese, and ice cream. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Arbuckle.) 

Dairy 41. Advanced Grading of Dairy Products (1) — First semester 
Prerequisite, Dairy 40. 



104 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

An advanced course in grading and judging of milk, butter, cheese, and 
ice cream. Open to students who participate in training for intercollegiate 
dairy products judging contests. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Arbuckle.) 

Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Dairy 108. Dairy Technology (4) — First semester. Two lectures and 
two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Dairy 1, Bact. 133, Chem. 1, 3. 

Composition standards for milk and milk products, critical interpretation 
and application of practical factory methods of analyses for fat and solids; 
quality tests. Laboratory fee, $3.00 (Keeney, Corbin.) 

Dairy 109. Market Milk (4) — First semester. Two lectures and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Dairy 1, Bact. 133, Chem. 1, 3. 

Commercial aspects of the market milk industry relating to transportation, 
processing, and distribution; operation of a market milk plant; quality 
problems; chocolate milk, buttermilk and cottage cheese. Laboratory fee, 
$3.00. (Arbuckle, Nisonger.) 

Dairy 110. Butter and Cheese Making (3) — Second semester. One lec- 
ture and one five-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Dairy 1, 
Bact. 1, Chem. 1, 3. (Alternate years, given in 1952-1953.) 

Commercial methods of manufacturing butter and cheese. Consideration 
is given to the physical, chemical, and biological factors involved; procedures 
of manufacture; quality control. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Mattick.) 

Dairy 111. Concentrated Milk Products (3) — Second semester. One lec- 
ture and one five-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Dairy 108, 
114. (Alternate years, not given in 1952-1953.) 

Theories and practice of manufacturing condensed and evaporated milk 
and milk powder; plant processes; quality factors; utilization. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. (Mattick.) 

Dairy 112. Ice Cream Making (4) — Second semester. Two lectures and 
two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Dairy 108. 

The ice cream industry; commercial methods of manufacturing ice cream; 
fundamental principles; ingredients; controlling quality. Laboratory fee, 
$3.00. (Arbuckle, Nisonger.) 

Dairy 114. Special Laboratory Methods (4) — Second semester. Two lec- 
tures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Dairy 108, Bact. 
133, Chem. 19, 31, 32, 33, 34. 

Application of analytical methods to milk, milk products and milk con- 
stituents. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Keeney.) 

Dairy 115. Dairy Inspection (2) — First semester. One lecture and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Dairy 109. 

Study and interprettion of dairy ordinances and standards; application to 
farm and plant inspection. (Corbin.) 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 105 

Dairy 116. Dairy Plant Management (3) — Second semester.. Three lec- 
ture periods a week. Prerequisites, at least three advanced dairy products 
technology courses. 

Principles of dairy plant management, record systems; personnel, plant 
design and construction; dairy machinery and equipment. (Nisonger.) 

Dairy 124. Special Problems in Dairying B (1-4) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisites, Dairy 108, 109. Credit in accordance with the 
amount and character of work done. 

Special problems will be assigned which relate specifically to the work the 
student is pursuing. (Staff.) 

For Graduates in Dairy Husbandry and Dairy Technology 

Dairy 201. Advanced Dairy Production (3) — First semester. Prerequi- 
site, Dairy 101 or equivalent. 

A study of the newer discoveries in animal nutrition, breeding, and 
management. Readings and assignments. ( ) 

Dairy S201. Advanced Dairy Production (1) — Summer session only. 

An advanced course primarily designed for teachers of vocational agricul- 
ture and county agents. It includes a study of the newer discoveries in 
dairy cattle nutrition, breeding and management. 

Dairy 202. Advanced Dairy Technology (3) — First semester. Prerequi- 
site, Dairy 108, 114 or equivalent. 

Milk and milk products from physico-chemical and bio-chemical points 
of view, with attention directed to hydrogen ion concentration, electrometric 
titration, oxidation-reduction, electrometric conductivity, buffer system of 
milk, milk enzymes. 

Dairy 203. Physiology of Milk Secretion (3) — Second semester. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, A. H. Ill; Chem. 
31, 32, 33, 34, or permission of instructor. 

A study of the anatomy, evolution and metabolism of the mammary 
gland, including hormonal control, theories of milk secretion, and factors 
affecting the amount and composition of milk. (Shaw.) 

Dairy 204. Special Problems in Dairying (1-5) — First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, permission of Professor in charge of work. Credit in 
accordance with the amount and character of work done. 

Methods of conducting dairy research and the presentation of results 
are stressed. A research problem which relates specifically to the work the 
student is pursuing will be assigned. (Staff.) 

Dairy 205. Seminar (1, 1) — First and second semesters. 
Assigned readings on current literature on timely topics; preparation and 
presentation of reports for classroom discussion. (Staff.) 



106 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Dairy 206. Animal Nutrition Seminar (1) — Second semester. Prerequi- 
site, permission of instructor. 

Discussion of special topics and recent advances in the nutrition and 
physiology of farm animals. (Shaw.) 

Dairy 208. Research (3-8) — First and second semesters. Credit to be 
determined by the amount and quality of work done. 

Original investigation by the student of some subject assigned by the 
Major Professor, the completion of the assignment and the preparation of 
a thesis in accordance with requirements for an advanced degree. (Staff.) 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Professor Cory; Associate Professor Bickley; Assistant Professors Abrams, 
Haviland; Lecturers Munson, Sailer, Shepard. 

Ent. 1. Introductory Entomology (3) — First and second semester. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, one semester of 
college Zoology. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

The position of insects in the animal kingdom, their gross structure, 
classification into orders and principal families and the general economic 
status of insects. A collection of common insects is required. 

Ent. 2. Insect Morphology (3) — First semester. One lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Ent. 1. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Intensive study of the external structures and less intensive study of the 
internal anatomy of representative insects with special reference to those 
phases needed for work in insect taxonomy and biology. 

Ent. 3. Insect Taxonomy (3) — Second semester. One lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Ent. 2. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Intensive study of the classification of all orders and the important 
families based on individual collections supplemented by typical material 
from the department collection. 

Ent. 4. Beekeeping (2) — First semester. 

A study of the life history, behavior and seasonal activities of the honey- 
bee, its place in pollination of flowers with emphasis on plants of economic 
importance and bee lore in literature. 

Ent. 10. Applied Entomology (3)— (Not offered in 1951-1952). 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Ent. 100. Advanced Apiculture (3) — Second semester. One lecture and 
two three-hour laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Ent. 4. Laboratory fee, 
$3.00. 

The theory and practice of apiary management. Designed for the stu- 
dent who wishes to keep bees or requires a practical knowledge of bee 
management. (Abrams.) 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 107 

Ent. 101. Economic Entomology (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, con- 
sent of the department. 

An intensive study of the theory and problems of applied entomology, 
including life history, ecology, behavior, distribution, parasitism and control. 

Ent. 103, 104. Insect Pests (3, 3). Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Not offered 
in 1952-1953.) 

A comprehensive study of the principal pests of crops, livestock, the 
household, man and forests. (Cory.) 

Ent. 105. Medical Entomology (3) — First semester. Two lectures and 
one two-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Ent. 1, or consent of 
the department. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

A study of insects and related anthropods that affect the health and com- 
fort of man directly and as vectors of disease. In discussions of the control 
of such pests the emphasis will be upon community sanitation. (Bickley.) 

Ent. 106. Advanced Insect Taxonomy (3) — First semester. Two three- 
hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Ent. 3. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Principles of systematic entomology and intensive study of limited groups 
of insects, including immature forms. (Bickley.) 

Ent. 107. Insecticides (2) — Second semester. Prerequisite, Ent. 1 and 
Elementary Organic Chemistry. 

The development and use of contact and stomach poisons, fumigants and 
other important chemicals, with reference to their chemistry, toxic action, 
compatibility, and host injury. Recent research emphasized. (Shepard.) 

Ent. 109. Insect Physiology (2) — Second semester. Two lectures and 
occasional demonstrations. Prerequisite, consent of the department. 

The functioning of the insect body with particular reference to blood, 
circulation, digestion, absorption, excretion, respiration, reflex action and 
the nervous system, and metabolism. (Munson.) 

Ent. 110, 111. Special Problems (1, 1) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisites, to be determined by the department. 

An intensive investigation of some entomological problem, preferably 
of the student's choice. Required of majors in entomology. 

(Cory and Staff.) 

Ent. 112. Seminar (1, 1) — First and second semesters. Prerequisite, 
senior standing. 

Presentation of original work, reviews and abstracts of literature. 

(Cory and Staff.) 

Ent. 113. Entomological Literature (1) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
senior standing. 

A study of entomological publications and good scientific writing. Prepa- 
ration of bibliographies. (Bickley.) 



108 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Ent. 114. Insect Pests of Greenhouses (3) — Second semester. Two lec- 
tures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Ent. 1 or 
consent of the department. Laboratory fee, ?3.00. 

The identification, life history and habits of insects affecting plants raised 
under glass; recognition of early injury and methods of control applicable 
under these specialized conditions will be considered. (Haviland.) 

For Graduates 

Ent. 201. Advanced Entomology — Credit and prerequisites to be deter- 
mined by the department. First and second semesters. 

Studies of minor problems in morphology, taxonomy and applied ento- 
mology, with particular reference to the preparation of the student for 
individual research. (Cory and Staff.) 

Ent. 202. Research — First and second semesters. 

Required of graduate students majoring in Entomology. This course 
involves research on an approved project. A dissertation suitable for pub- 
lication must be submitted at the conclusion of the studies as a part of the 
requirements for an advanced degree, (Cory and Staff.) 

Ent. 203. Advanced Insect Morphology (2) — Second semester. One lec- 
ture and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Insect structure with special reference to function. Emphasis on internal 
anatomy. Given in preparation for advanced work in physiology or research 
in morphology. (Bickley.) 

Ent. 205. Insect Ecology (2) — First semester. One lecture and one 
three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, consent of the depart- 
ment. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

A study of fundamental factors involved in the relationship of insects to 
their environment. Emphasis is placed on the insect as a dynamic organism 
adjusted to its surroundings. ' (Sailer.) 

Ent. 206. Bionomics of Mosquitoes (2) — Second semester. One lecture 
and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

The classification, distribution, ecology, biology, and control of mosquitoes. 

(Bickley.) 
FORESTRY 
Associate Professor Dengler 

For. 1. Introduction to Forestry (2) — Second Semester. Prerequisite, 
Hot. 1. 

A general survey of the field of forestry, including woodland values, con- 
servation, protection, reproduction, management, utilization, mensuration, 
engineering, recreation, lumbering, and forest wildlife management. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 109 

For. 102. Farm Forestry (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, junior 
standing. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory. 

Principles and practices of farm woodland management; establishment, 
protection, care, measurement, and utilization of the farm woods and hill- 
culture tree crops; practical field work. 

HORTICULTURE 

Professors Haut, Kramer, Link, Scott, Stark, Thompson, Walls; Associate 
Professors Cornell, Shanks, Shoemaker; Instructor Todd 

Hort. 1. General Horticulture (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. 

A general basic course planned to give the student a background of 
methods and practices used in production of horticultural crops. 

Hort. 5, 6. Fruit Production (3, 2) — First and second semesters. One or 
two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. 

A study of commercial varieties and the harvesting, grading, and storage 
of fruits. Principles and practices in fruit tree production. 

Hort. 11. Greenhouse Management (3) — Second semester. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. 
A detailed study of greenhouse construction and management. 

Hort. 16. Garden Flowers (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. 

The various species of annuals, herbaceous perennials, bulbs, bedding 
plants, and roses and their cultural requirements. 

Hort. 22. Landscape Gardening (2) — First semester. 
The theory and general principles of landscape gardening and their 
application to private and public areas. 

Hort. 56. Landscape Ornamentals and Floriculture (3) — Second semes- 
ter. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 

A course dealing with the basic principles in the use of trees, shrubs, 
broad-leaved evergreens, annual and perennial flowering plants in orna- 
mental plantings. Designed for any students wishing a broad coverage 
in this field. 

Hort. 58. Vegetable Production (3) — Second semester. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 1 and Agron. 10. 

A study of the principles and practices of commercial vegetable 
production. 

Hort. 59. Small Fruits (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. 

A study of the principles and practices involved in the production of 
small fruits including grapes, strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, black- 
berries, and cranberries. 



110 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Hort. 61. Processing Industries (2) — Second semester. 

Early history and development of the various types of preservation of 
horticultural crops, such as canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling or brin- 
ing. The relative importance of these methods on state, national and world- 
wide bases are emphasized. 

Hort. 62. Plant Propagation (3) — First semester. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. 
A study of principles and practices of propagation of horticultural plants, 

Hort. 63. Flower Store Management (3) — Second semester. Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Hort. 11. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00, 

A study of the operation and management of a flower store. Laboratory 
period devoted to principles and practice of floral arrangements and 
decoration. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Hort. 118, 119. Seminar (1, 1) — First and second semesters. 

Oral presentation of the results of investigational work by reviewing 
recent scientific literature in the various phases of horticulture. (Staff.) 

Hort. 121. Plant Operations (2) — First semester. One lecture and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Agr. Engr. Ill, 112, Hort. 155. 

Course deals with arrangement of machinery and equipment in proper 
sequence to insure the most economical operation of commercial processing 
plants, providing for continuous flow through the factory. Field trips to 
commercial plants included. (Walls.) 

Hort. 152. Landscape Design (3) — First semester. One lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Hort. 22, Eng. D. 1, Art 1, 
Surv. IH, Ind. Ed. 41. Prerequisite or Concurrently Hort. 107, 108. 

A consideration of the principles of landscape design supplemented by 
direct application in the drafting room. (Shoemaker.) 

Hort. 153. Landscape Design (3) — Second semester. Three laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, Hort. 152. 

Advanced landscape design. (Shoemaker.) 

Hort. 160. Landscape Maintenance (3) — Second semester. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites or concurrently, Hort. 
107, 108. (Cornell.) 

A study of the planting and maintenance of turf, ornamental shrubs and 
trees. Basic principles of park and estate maintenance included. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Hort. 101, 102. Technology of Fruits (1, 2) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisites, Hort. 6; Bot. 101. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 111 

A critical analysis of research work and application of the principles of 
plant physiology, chemistry, and botany to practical problems in commercial 
production. (Haut.) 

Hort. 103, 104. Technology of Vegetables (2, 2) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisites, Hort. 58; Bot. 101. 

For a description of these courses see the general statement under Hort. 
101, 102. (Stark.) 

Hort. 105. Technology of Ornamentals (2) — First semester. Prerequisites, 
Bot. 101; Hort. 107. 

A study of the physiological plant processes as related to the growth, 
flowering, and storage of floriculture and ornamental plants. (Link.) 

Hort. 106. World Fruits and Nuts (2) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Bot. 1. 

A study of the tropical and subtropical fruits and nuts of economic 

importance. (Haut.) 

Hort. 107, 108. Plant Materials (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisites, Bot. 1, Bot. 11. 

A field and laboratory study of trees, shrubs, and vines used in orna- 
mental plantings. (Cornell.) 

Hort. 114. Systematic Pomology (3) — First semester. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Hort. 5, 6. 

A study of the origin, history, taxonomic relationships, and description 
of fruits. (Haut.) 

Hort. S115. Truck Crop Management (1) — Summer session only. 

Primarily designed for teachers and vocational agriculture and extension 
agents. Special emphasis will be placed upon new and improved methods 
of production of the leading truck crops. Current problems and their solu- 
tion will receive special attention. 

Hort. 116. Systematic Olericulture (3) — First semester. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Hort. 58. 

A study of the classification and nomenclature of vegetable crops. 

(Walls.) 

Hort. 122. Special Problems (2, 2) — First and second semesters. Credit 
arranged according to work done. For major students in horticulture or 
botany. (Staff.) 

Hort. 123. Grading and Judging of Canned and Frozen Products (2) — 

First semester. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequi- 
sites, Hort. 58, 155, 156. 

Factors considered in grading. Actual grading of principal products and 
critical appraisal for quality improvement. 



112 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Hort. 124. Quality Control (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Hort. 123. 

This course covers the control of quality in canned and frozen vegetables 
and fruits, dealing with proper harvesting, grading of raw products and 
various phases of preparation and handling, as well as the evaluation of 
varieties. 

Hort. S124. Tree and Small Fruit Management (1) — Summer session 
only. 

Primarily designed for vocational agriculture teachers and county agents. 
Special emphasis will be placed upon new and improved commercial methods 
of production of the leading tree and small fruit crops. Current problems 
and their solution will receive special attention. 

Hort. S125. Ornamental Horticulture (1) — Summer session only. 

A course designed for teachers of agriculture, home demonstration agents 
and county agents. Special emphasis will be given to the development of 
lawns, flowers and shrubbery to beautify rural homes. 

Hort. 126. Nutritional Analyses of Processed Crops (3) — Second semes- 
ter. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 
33 and 34, Bot. 101, Hort. 123. 

A study and laboratory practice of standard methods for determining 
mineral, vitamin, carbohydrate, protein and other food values of various 
fruit and vegetable products. 

Hort. 150, 151. Commercial Floriculture (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 1, 
Hort. 11. 

Growing and handling bench crops and potted plants, and the marketing 
of cut flowers. (Link.) 

Hort. 155. Commercial Processing I (3) — First semester. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 32, 34, Hort. 61. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

The fundamentals of canning, freezing, and dehydration of horticultural 
crops. (Walls.) 

Hort. 156. Commercial Processing II (2) — Second semester. One lecture 
and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Hort. 155. 

A continuation of Commercial Processing I. Also includes actual work 
in laboratory of manufacture of jams, jellies, conserves, preserves, mar- 
malades, and juices. (Walls.) 

Hort. 159. Nursery Management (3) — Second semester. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites or concurrently, Hort. 62, 
107, 108. 

A study of all phases of commercial nursery management and operations. 

(Cornell.) 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 113 

For Graduates 

Hort. 201, 202. Experimental Pomology (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. 

A systematic review of scientific knowledge and practical observations as 
applied to commercial practices in pomology. ( .) 

Hort. 203, 204. Experimental Olericulture (2, 2) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. 

A systematic review of scientific knowledge and practical observations as 
applied to commercial practices in olericulture. (Stark.) 

Hort. 205. Experimental Pomology (3) — Second semester. 

This course is a continuation of Hort. 201, 202. (Scott and Haut.) 

Hort. 206. Horticulture Cyto-genetics (3) — Second semester. Prerequi- 
sites, Zool. 104, Bot. 101, Bot. 201, or equivalents. 

A course dealing with the field of cyto-genetics in relation to horticulture. 

( .) 

Hort. 207. Methods of Horticultural Research (3) — Second semester. 
One lecture and one four-hour laboratory period a week. 

A critical study of research methods which are or may be used in 
horticulture. (Scott.) 

Hort. 208. Advanced Horticultural Research (2 to 12) — First and second 
semesters. Credit granted according to work done. (Staff.) 

Hort. 209. Advanced Seminar (1, 1) — First and second semesters. Five 
credit hours for five semesters can be obtained. 

Oral reports with illustrative material are required on special topics or 
recent research publications in horticulture. (Haut and Staff.) 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

Professors Jull, Shaffner, Combs; Associate Professor Quigley. 

P. H. 1. Poultry Production (3) — First semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. 

This is a general comprehensive course covering all phases of modem 
poultry husbandry practices, including breeds, incubation, brooding, housing, 
feeding, culling, marketing, caponizing, and the economics of production and 
distribution of poultry products. 

P. H. 2. Poultry Biology (2) — Second semester. 

This course is designed to provide basic information as a foundation for 
other courses. The zoological classification of and structural differences 
among domestic birds are considered in their relation to food production. 
Special emphasis is given to turkey production. 



114 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

P. H. 59. Advanced Poultry Judging (1) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
P. H. 1. One lecture or laboratory period per week. 

Theory and practice of judging and culling by physical means. Correla- 
tion studies of characteristics associated with productivity. 

Contestant for regional collegiate judging competitions will be selected 
from this class. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

P. H. 100. Poultry Breeding (2) — Second semester. Prerequisites, 
P. H. 1 or 2. 

The inheritance of morphological and physiological characters of poultry 
are presented. Inheritance of factors related to egg and meat production 
and quality are stressed. Breeding plans are discussed. (Jull.) 

P. H. 101. Poultry Nutrition (3) — ^First semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. 

Nutritive requirements of poultry and the nutrients which meet those 
requirements are presented. Studies are made of various nutritional dis- 
eases commonly encountered under practical conditions. (Combs.) 

P. H. 102. Physiology of Hatchability (3) — Second semester. Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period a week. 

The physiology of embryonic development as related to principles of 
hatchability and problems of incubation encountered in the hatchery in- 
dutry are discussed. Laboratory exercises stressing fundamentals of hatch- 
ability are assigned. (Shaffner.) 

P. H. 103. Commercial Poultry Management (2) — Second semester. 
Prerequisite, ten hours of poultry husbandry, including P. H. 1. 

A symposium on finance, investment, plant layout, specialization, pur- 
chase of supplies, and management problems in baby chick, egg, broiler, and 
turkey production; foremanship, advertising, selling, by-products, produc- 
tion and financial records. Field trips required. (Quigley.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

P. H. 104. Technology of Market Eggs and Poultry (3) — First semester. 
Two lectures and one laboratory per week. 

A study of the technological factors concerned with the processing, 
storage, and marketing of eggs and poultry, also factors affecting their 
quality and grading. ( ) 

A. E. 117. Economics of Marketing Eggs and Poultry (3) — Second 
semester. Three lectures per week. (See Agricultural Economies A. E. 117.) 

Poultry Hygiene, see Veterinary Science, V. S. 107. 
Avian Anatomy, see Veterinary Science, V. S. 108. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 115 

P. H. 107. Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems (2) — First 
semester. 

Relation of poultry to agriculture as a whole and its economic importance. 
Consumer prejudices and preferences, production, transportation, storage, 
and distribution problems are discussed. Trends in the industry, surpluses 
and their utilization, poultry by-products, and disease problems, are pre- 
sented. Federal, state, and private agencies servicing the poultry industry 
and function performed by each agency are discussed. (Staff.) 

P. H. 108. Special Poultry Problems (1-2) — First and second semesters. 

For senior poultry students. The student will be assigned special prob- 
lems in the field of poultry for individual study and report. The poultry 
staff should be consulted before any student registers for this course. 

(Staff.) 

P. H. Sill — Poultry Breeding and Feeding (1) — Summer session only. 

This course is designed primarily for teachers of vocational agriculture 
and extension service workers. The first half will be devoted to problems 
concerning breeding and the development of breeding stock. The second 
half will be devoted to nutrition. 

P. H. S112. Poultry Products and Marketing (1) — Summer session only. 

This course is designed primarily for teachers of vocational agriculture 
and county agents. It deals with the factors affecting the quality of poul- 
try production and with hatchery management problems, egg and poultry 
grading, preservation problems and market outlets for Maryland poultry. 

For Graduates 

P. H. 201. Advanced Poultry Genetics (3) — First semester. Prerequi- 
site, P. H. 100 or equivalent. 

This course serves as a foundation for research in poultry genetics. Link- 
age, crossing-over, inheritance of sex, the expression of genes in develop- 
ment, inheritance of resistance to disease, and the influence of the environ- 
ment on the expression of genetic capacities are considered. (Jull.) 

P. H. 202. Advanced Poultry Nutrition (3) — Second semester. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, P. H. 101 or 
equivalent. 

A fundamental study of the dietary role of proteins, minerals, vitamins, 
and carbohydrates is given as well as a study of the digestion and meta- 
bolism of these substances. Deficiency diseases as produced by the use of 
synthetic diets are considered. (Combs.) 

P. H. 203. Physiology of Reproduction of Poultry (3) — First semester. 
Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, P. H. 102 or 
its equivalent. 

The role of the endocrines in reproduction, especially with respect to egg 
production, is considered. Fertility, sexual maturity, broodiness, molting, 



116 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

egg formation, ovulation, deposition of egg envelopes, and the physiology of 
oviposition are studied. (Shaffner.) 

P. H. 204. Poultry Seminar (1) — First and second semesters. 
Oral reports of current researches by staff members, gn'aduate students, 
and guest speakers are presented. (Staff.) 

P. H. 205. Poultry Literature (1-4) — First and second semesters. 

Readings on individual topics are assigned. Written reports required. 
Methods of analysis and presentation of scientific material are discussed. 

(Staff.) 

P. H. 206. Poultry Research (1-6) — First and second semesters. Credit 
in accordance with work done. 

Practical and fundamental research with poultry may be conducted under 
the supervision of staff members toward the requirements for the degrees 
of M.S. and Ph.D. (Staff.) 

P. H. 207. Poultry Research Techniques (2) — First semester. One lec- 
ture and one laboratory period a week. 

To acquaint graduate students with common basic research techniques 
useful in conducting experiments with poultry or poultry products. Meth- 
ods of arranging and conducting an experiment, of interpreting results 
(including the use of statistics), of writing and publishing experimental 
results, of using laboratory equipment (pH meter, colorimeter, microscope, 
etc.), of purchasing equipment, and of using scientific periodicals are con- 
sidered. Actual laboratory experiments with poultry are included. (Staff.) 

VETERINARY SCIENCE 

Professors Brueckner and De Volt; Associate Professors Coffin and Reagan 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

V. S. 101. Comparative Anatomy (3) — First semester. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. 

Normal structure of the domesticated animals; normal physiological 

activities; interrelationship of structure and function. (Cofliin.) 

V. S. 102. Animal Hygiene (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. 

Nature of disease; immunity; prevention, and control; common diseases 
of farm animals. (Coffin.) 

V. S. 103. Regional Comparative Anatomy (2) — First semester. One 
lecture and one laboratory period a week. 

Structure and function of the feet of domestic species. Common diseases 
and abnormalities of the feet; their correction and prevention. (Coffin.) 

V. S. 104. Advanced Regional Comparative Anatomy (2) — Second semes- 
ter. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, V. S. 103. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 117 

Advanced studies of the anatomy and physiology of the feet of domesti- 
cated animals. Advanced and detailed studies of abnormalities and diseases 
of the feet; their prevention and correction. (Coffin.) 

V. S. 107. Poultry Hygiene (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and 
one laboratory a week. Prerequisites, Bact. 1; P. H. 1. (De Volt.) 

Virus, bacterial, and protozoon diseases; parasitic diseases; prevention, 
control, and eradication. 

V. S. 108. Avian Anatomy (3) — First semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratory a week. Prerequisite, Zool. 1. 

Gross and microscopic structure, physiological processes; dissection and 
demonstration. (DeVolt.) 

For Graduates 

V. S. 201. Animal Disease Problems (2-6) — First and second semesters. 
Credit in accordance with work done. Prerequisite, veterinary degree or 
consent of staff. 

Laboratory and field work by assignment. (Staff.) 

y. S. 202. Animal Disease Research (2-6) — First and second semesters. 
Credit in accordance with work done. Prerequisite, veterinary degree or 
consent of staff. 

Studies of practical disease phases. (Staff.) 

V. S. 203-204. Electron Microscopy (2-2) — First and second semesters. 
One lecture and one laboratory period a week. 

Theory of the electron microscope, preparation of specimens, manipula- 
tions, photography. (Reagan and Brueckner.) 



118 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

AGRICULTURAL, EXTENSION, RESEARCH AND 
REGULATORY AGENCIES 



EXTENSION SERVICE 
Administrative Staff 

College Park 

James M. Gwin, Ph.D., Director of Extension. 

T. B. Symons, Director, Emeritus. 

Venia M. Kellar, Assistant Director, Emeritus. 

Ernest N. Cory, Ph.D., Professor and Head, Entomology, State Ento- 
mologist, Assistant Director. 

John W. Magruder, M.S., Professor and County Agent Leader. 
, Mrs. Florence W. Low, Professor and Home Demonstration Agent 
Leader. 

Arthur E. Durfee, M.S., Professor and Assistant County Agent Leader. 
\ Dorothy Emerson, Professor, Girls' Club Leader. 

Mylo S. Downey, M.A., Professor, Boys' Club Leader. 

Elliott M. Elliott, Auditor. 

Cooperative Extension work in agriculture and home economics, estab- 
lished by State and Federal Laws in 1914, is designed to assist the people 
of the State with their agricultural and homemaking problems. Most of 
the work is carried on in the local communities, on the farms and in the 
homes throughout the State. It is conducted under a Memorandum of 
Understanding between the Extension Service of the University of Maryland 
and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

The Federal Government, the State, and the Counties contribute to the 
support of the Extension Service in Maryland. There is a County Exten- 
sion Service in each county, with a County Agricultural Agent and Home 
Demonstration Agent in charge, and assistants where funds permit and the 
work requires. Backed by a staff of Specialists at the University, these 
Agents are in close contact with local people and their problems. 

Practically every phase of agriculture and home life comes within the 
scope of Extension work. The Extension Service teaches largely by demon- 
strations and carries the scientific and economic results of the Experi- 
ment Station and Department of Agriculture to rural people in ways that 
they understand and use. 

In Maryland, the Extension Service works in close association with all 
rural groups and organizations. It assists especially in promoting better 
marketing of farm products and encourages the marketing of home supplies 
by rural women. Work with women is one of the most extensive phases of 
extension education, including both the practical problems of the home and 
the cultural, economic, and community activities in which present-day women 
are engaging. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 119 

In addition to work with adults, thousands of boys and girls are developed 
as leaders and given practical education in 4-H Clubs. Through their 
diversified activities, the boys and girls are given a valuable type of in- 
struction and training, and are afforded an opportunity to develop self- 
confidence, perseverence and citizenship. 

Extension Short Courses 

The Extension Service arranges and conducts short courses in various 
lines, most of which are held at the University. Some of these courses 
have been held regularly over a period of years and others are added as 
the need and demand develop. 

Canners' Short Course 

For many years a short course has been held each year to aid canners 
in keeping abreast of the latest developments in their industry. It is 
usually held in February. 

Rural Women's Short Course 

In response to requests of rural women for special training in a variety 
of subjects, the Rural Women's Short Course was inaugurated in 1922. 
Attendance at the course, extending for one week, has grown steadily, 
reaching more than one thousand women at recent sessions. The program 
offered has been broadened through the years and attracts women from all 
counties in the State. The third week in June is the date usually selected. 

Other Short Courses 

Courses for nurserymen, florists, poultry flock selection agents, bee- 
keepers, greenkeepers, sanitarians, and cow testers are among those held 
in recent years. Announcement of such courses is made to those who may 
be interested. 

Boys and Girls' Club Week 

Members and leaders of boys' and girls' 4-H Clubs come to the University 
for a week each year, usually in August. Class work and demonstrations 
are given by specialists, and a broad program of education, inspiration and 
recreation is provided. 

EXTENSION SERVICE STAFF* 
Subject Matter Specialists 

George J. Abrams, M.S., Assistant Professor, Apiculture. 
Clementine B. Anslinger, A.B., Assistant, Marketing. 
Eileen 0. Armstrong, B.J., Assistant Professor, Information Specialist. 
Ronald Bamford, Ph.D., Dean, Graduate School, Professor and Head, 

Botany and Plant Pathology. 
George M. Beal, Ph.D., Professor, Agricultural Economics and Marketing. 

• Many of the members of the Extension Service staff are also on the Instrtictional staff, 
or th« Bzperiment Station ttaff, or both. Lists of the staffs of these two agencies appe«r 
•Isewher* in this publication. 



I 



120 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

^ — -, Assistant Professor, 4-H Club Work. 



Frank L. Bentz, B.S., Assistant Professor, Agronomy. 

William E. Bickley, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Theodore L. Bissell, M.S., Associate Professor, Extension Entomology. 

Maurice Bridgman, Assistant Professor, Markets. 

Russell G. Brown, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Botany. 

Fred L. Bull, B.S., Professor, Soil Conservation. 

John Buric, M.S., Instructor, Animal Husbandry. 

George J. Burkhardt, M.S., Professor, Agricultural Engineering. 

Thomas L. Butler, B.S., Assistant Professor, Markets. 

Ray W. Carpenter, A.B., Professor and Head, Agricultural Engineering, 
State Drainage Engineer. 

Russell L. Childress, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Agricultural Eco- 
nomics and Marketing. 

Gerald F. Combs, Ph.D., Professor, Poultry. 

Pardon W. Cornell, M.S., Associate Professor, Ornamental Horticulture. 

Carroll E. Cox, Ph.D., Professor, Plant Pathology. 

Harry W. Dengler, B.S., Associate Professor, Forestry. 

Donald W. Dickson, B.S., Instructor, Information and Publication. 

Charles 0. Dunbar, B.S., Associate Professor, Horticulture. 

Rudolph S. Forrester, Assistant Professor, Marketing. 

John E. Foster, Ph.D., Professor and Head, Animal Husbandry. 

Martin E. Gannon, M.S., Assistant Professor, Animal Husbandry. 

Guy W. Gienger, M.S., Associate Professor, Agricultural Engineering. 

Castillo Graham, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Field Entomologist. 

Arthur B. Hamilton, M.S., Associate Professor, Agricultural Economics 
and Farm Management. 

Wallace C. Harding, B.S., Instructor, Entomology. 

Irvin C. Haut, Ph.D., Director of Experiment Station and Professor and 
Head, Horticulture. 

Elizabeth E. Haviland, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Russell C. Hawes, M.S., Professor, Marketing. 

Harold H. Hoecker, B.S., Assistant Professor, Marketing. 

Louis C. Holland, Assistant Professor, Marketing. 

Mabel G. Howell, B.S., Instructor, Marketing. 

Walter F. Jeffers, Ph.D., Professor, Plant Pathology. 

Carl N. Johnson, B.S., Assistant Professor, Landscape Gardening. 

Morley a. Jull, Ph.D., Professor and Head, Poultry Husbandry. 

Malcolm Ke31R, M.S., Associate Professor, Animal Husbandry. 

Albert V. Krbwatch, M.S., E.E., Professor, Agricultural Engineering, 
Rural Electrification. 

Albin 0. KuHN, Ph.D., Professor and Head, Agronomy. 

George S. Langford, Ph.D., Professor, Entomology. 

Robert M. Lee, B.S., Instructor, Entomology. 

Conrad B. Link, Ph.D., Professor, Floriculture. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 121 

-Margaret T. Loar, B.S., Associate Professor and District Agent, County 

Home Demonstration Work. 
John E. Mahonby, B.S., Assistant Professor, Marketing. 
Arthur F. Martin, B.S., Assistant Professor, Marketing. 
Ellis Martin, B.S., Assistant, Agricultural Engineering. 
Florence H. Mason, B.S., Professor, Home Furnishing, District Agent. 
William A. Matthews, M.S., Associate Professor, Vegetable Crops and 

Markets. 
Charles E. McCain, Assistant Professor, Marketing. 
Harold S. McConnell, M.S., Associate Professor, Entomology. 
Charles P. Merrick, B.S., Associate Professor, Drainage Engineering, 
Amos R. Meyer, B.S., Associate Professor, State Department of Markets. 
Omar D Morgan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. 
John L. Morris, B.S., Associate Professor, Dairy. 
Joseph L. Newcomer, B.S,, Instructor, Agronomy. 
Paul E. Nystrom, D.P.A., Director of Instruction and Professor and 

Head, Agricultural Economics and Marketing. 
James B. Outhouse, M.S., Associate Professor, Animal Husbandry. 
Charles W. Porter, B.A., Assistant Professor, Marketing. 
Walter B. Posey, M.S., Professor, Tobacco. 
John W. Pou, Ph.D., Professor and Head, Dairy. 
George D. Quigley, B.S., Associate Professor, Poultry Husbandry. 
BURNELL K. Rebert, B.S., Instructor, Marketing. 
Wade H. Rice, B.S., Associate Professor, Poultry. 
J. R. SCHABINGER, M. A., Assistant Professor, Dairy Husbandry, Adv. 

Registry Testing. 
Clyne S. Shaffner, Ph.D., Professor, Poultry. 
James B. Shanks, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Floriculture. 
Helen Shelby, M.S., Associate Professor, Clothing. 
Mark M. Shoemaker, M.L.D., Associate Professor, Landscape Gardening. 
Helen I. Smith, M.A., Associate Professor, Home Management. 
Stanley P. Stabler, B.S., Assistant Professor, Agronomy. 
Francis C. Stark, Jr., Ph.D., Professor, Vegetable Gardening. 
George A. Stevens, M.S., Instructor, Agricultural Economics 

and Marketing. 
Perry F. Twining, B.S., Associate Professor, Poultry. 
Joseph M. Vial, B.S., Professor, Animal Husbandry. 
Albert F. Vierheller, M.S., Associate Professor, Horticulture. 
Edgar P. Walls, Ph.D., Professor, Canning Crops. 
Edwin J. Weatherry, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Dairy Husbandry. 
Leslie 0. Weaver, Ph.D., Professor, Plant Pathology, State Pathologist. 
Boyd T. Whittle, M.S., Associate Professor, Animal Husbandry. 
Walter S. Wilson, B.S., Associate Professor, Assistant Boys' Club 

Leader. 



122 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

County Agents (Field) 

County Name and Title Headquarters 

Allegany Ralph F. McHenry, B.S., 

Associate Professor Cumberland 

Anne Arundel... Stanley E. Day, B.S., 

Associate Professor Annapolis 

Baltimore Horace B. Derrick, B.S., 

Associate Professor Towson 

Calvert Robert M. Hall, A.B. 

Associate Professor Prince Frederick 

Caroline Francis M. Rogers, B.S., 

Associate Professor Denton 

Carroll Landon C. Burns, B.S., 

Associated Professor Westminster 

Cecil Raymond G. Mueller, B.S., 

Assistant Professor Elkton 

Charles Paul D. Brown, B.S., 

Associate Professor La Plata 

Dorchester Harry W. Beggs, B. S., 

Associate Professor Cambridge 

Frederick Henry R. Shoemaker, M.A., 

Associate Professor Frederick 

Garrett John H. Carter, B.S. 

Associate Professor Oakland 

Harford Henry M, Carroll, B.S. 

Associate Professor Bel Air 

Howard Warren G. Myers, B.S. 

Associate Professor EUicott City 

Kent James D. McVean, B.S. 

Associate Professor Chestertown 

Montgomery Otto W. Anderson, M.S. 

Associate Professor Rockville 

Prince Georges. . Percy E. Clark, B.S., 

Associate Professor Upper Marlboro 

Queen Annas James W. Eby, B.S. 

Associate Professor Centreville 

St. Marys Joseph J. Johnson, 

Associate Professor Leonardtown 

Somerset Clarence Z. Keller, B.S., 

Associate Professor Princess Anne 

Talbot Rudolph S. Brown, B.S., 

Associate Professor Easton 

Washington Mark K. Miller, B.S., 

Associate Professor Hagerstown 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 123 

Wicomico James P. Brown, B.S., 

Associate Professor Salisbury 

Worcester Robert T. Grant, B.S., 

Associate Professor Snow Hill 

Assistant County Agents 

Allegany Joseph M. Steger, B.S., Instructor Cumberland 

Anne Arundel 

and Calvert.. W. B. Vanderford, B.S., Instructor Annapolis 

B Itimore ^Frank R. McFarland, Jr., B.S., Asst. Prof Towson 

|W. Max Buckel, B.S., Instructor Towson 

Carroll Westminster 

Cecil Robert G. Miller, B.S., Instructor Elkton 

Charles and 

St. Mary's William E. Garvey, Jr., M.S., 

Instructor Leonardtown 

Dorchester and 

Talbot Cambridge 

Frederick Roy D. Cassell, B.S., Instructor Frederick 

Garrett James A. McHenry, B.S., Instructor Oakland 

Harford B. Wayne Kelly, B.S., Instructor Bel Air 

Howard Ellicott City 

Kent Stanley B. Sutton, Instructor Chestertown 

Montgomery (Roscoe N. Whipp, B.S., Instructor Rockville 

] Joseph B. Morris, B.S., Instructor Rockville 

Prince Georges. . Upper Marlboro 

Queen Anne's . . . 

Washington .... RoscoE Brown, Jr., Assistant Professor. .. .Hagerstown 
Wicomico Leroy E. Wheatley, B.S., Instructor Salisbury 

Local Agents — Negro Work 

District Agent.. . Martin G. Bailey, B.S., Instructor Seat Pleasant 

Anne Arundel 

and Calvert. . . John R. Jennings, B.S., Instructor Huntingtown 

Caroline and 

Dorchester . . . Elliot Robbins, B.S., Instructor Federalsburg 

Charles Milbourne Hull, B.S., Instructor Bryan's Road 

Montgomery .... Onnie L. Privette, B.S., Instructor Rockville 

Prince George's. . James R. Taylor, B.S., Instructor Upper Marlboro 

St. Mary's Ryland Holmes, B.S., Instructor Lexington Park 

Somerset and 

Wicomico .... Louis H. Martin, Instructor Princess Anne 



124 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

County Home Demonstration Agents (Field) 

Allegany Evelyn Hutson, B.S., Assistant Prof essor .. Cumberland 

Anne Arundel... Miriam F. Parmenter, B.S. 

Associate Professor Annapolis 

Baltimore Anna Trbntham, B.S., Associate Professor Towson 

Baltimore City. . Margaret O. Hollow ay, B.S., 

Associate Professor Baltimore 

Calvert Mrs. Florence E. Buchanan, B.S., 

Associate Professor Prince Frederick 

Caroline Bessie M. Spafford, B.S., Associate Prof essor ... Denton 

Carroll Evelyn D. Scott, B.S., Associate Professor. .Westminster 

Cecil Martha Lumpkin, M.S., Assistant Professor Elkton 

Charles Mrs. Anna S. Wills, B.S., 

Associate Professor La Plata 

Dorchester Hattie E. Brooks, A.B., 

Associate Professor Cambridge 

Frederick Beatrice Fehr, M. A., Associate Professor Frederick 

Garrett Ethel Grove, M.S., Associate Professor Oakland 

Harford Virginia L. McLuckie, B.S., 

Associate Professor Bel Air 

Hovirard Catherine E. Cleveland, M.A., 

Associate Professor Ellicott City 

Kent Jane C. Boyd, B.S., Assistant Professor Chestertov^^n 

Montgomery Edythe M. Turner, B.S., Associate Professor. .Rockville 

Prince Georges.. Ethel M. Regan, B.S., Associate Professor. .Hyattsville 

Queen Annes Ruby Brant, B.S., Associate Professor Centreville 

St. Marys Ethel M. Joy, A.B., Associate Professor. . . Leonardtovirn 

Somerset Mrs. Regenia M. Fullor, B.S., 

Associate Professor Princess Anne 

Talbot Margaret Smith, B.S., 

Associate Professor Easton 

Washington .... Ardath E. Martin, B.S., 

Associate Professor Hagerstown 

Wicomico Nell G. Grim, M.S., Associate Professor Salisbury 

Worcester Snow Hill 

Assistant County Home Demonstration Agents 

Allegany Thelma Allin, B.S., Instructor Cumberland 

Anne Arundel. . . Mrs. Joan G. Moreland, Instructor Annapolis 

Baltimore Margaret N. White, B.S., Instructor Towson 

Carroll Barbara A. Young, B.S., Instructor Westminster 

Dorchester Dorothy Fox (Mrs.), Instructor (Part time) .Cambridge 

Frederick Betsy J. Lovington, B.S., Instructor Frederick 

Harford Bel Air 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 125 

^Mrs. Gladys Hinenburg, B.S., Instructoi- Rockville 

Montgomery -^Wrs. Irma Bell, B. S., Instructor Rockville 

Prince George's. Jane M. Cole, B.S., Instructor Hyattsville 

Washington Margaret Watson, B.S., Instructor Hagerstown 

Wicomico Evelyn Barker, B.S., Instructor Salisbury 

Home Demonstration Agent 

At Large June A. Robertson (Mrs.), B.S College Park 

Local Home Demonstration Agents — Negro Work 

St. Marys Evelyn G. Ashley (Mrs.), B.S., 

Instructor Lexington Park 

Charles Naomi Turner, B.S., Instructor Bryan's Road 

Dorchester and 

Caroline Beatrice A. Bianchi, M.A., Instructor Easton 

Montgomery Ethel L. Bianchi, B.S., Instructor Rockville 

Somerset and 

Wicomico Mrs. Omega M. Jones, A.B., Instructor. . .Princess Anne 

Prince George's.. Hattie G. Holmes (Mrs.), B.S., 

Instructor Upper Marlboro 

THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

Irvin C. Haut, Ph.D., Director 

The Agricultural Experiment Station is for Maryland agriculture what 
the research laboratories ai'e for large corporations. Maryland agriculture 
is made up of forty thousand small individual businesses, and there is not 
sufficient capital, or sufficient income so that each one of these can con- 
duct research. Yet the problems w^hich face a biological undertaking such 
as farming, are as numerous and perplexing as the problems of any busi- 
ness. Certainly our production of food would be much more costly if it were 
not for the research results that have been obtained by the Agricultural 
Experiment Station. 

The station is a joint Federal and State undertaking. Passage of the 
Hatch Act in 1887, which made available a grant in aid to each state for 
the purpose of establishing an agricultural experiment station, gave a 
great impetus to the development of research work in agriculture. This 
work was further encouraged by the passage of the Adams Act in 1906, 
the Purnell Act in 1925, the Bankhead-Jones Act in 1935, and the 
Flannagan-Hope Act of 1946. 

The work of the Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station which is 
supported by these Acts and by State appropriations centers at College 
Park. On the University Campus are to be found laboratories for study- 
ing insects and diseases, soil fertility problems, botanical problems, and 
others. This is also the location of the livestock and dairy bams with their 



126 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

experimental herds. About eight miles from the campus at College Park, 
near Beltsville, the Plant Research Farm of about 500 acres is devoted to 
work connected with soil fertility, plant breeding and general horticultural 
problems. An experimental farm near Upper Marlboro is given over ex- 
clusively to the problems of tobacco growing and curing. A farm near 
Salisbury is devoted to solution of the problems of producers of broilers and 
of vegetable crops in the southern Eastern Shore area. Near Ellicott City 
a farm of 234 acres is devoted to livestock problems. Also tests of various 
crop and soil responses are distributed throughout the State. These different 
locations give a chance to conduct experiments under conditions which exist 
where the results will be put into practice. 

The Station, in general, exists as the "trouble-shooter" for Maryland 
farmers. The solution of many difficult problems in the past has given the 
Station an excellent standing with farmers of the State. 

AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF* 

Irvin C. Haut, Ph.D., Director of Experiment Station 
William B. Kemp, Director of Experiment Station Emeritus 

Agricultural Economics and Marketing 

Paul E. Nystrom, D.P.A Professor and Head, 

Agricultural Economics and Marketing 
George M. Beal, Ph.D Professor, 

Agricultural Economics and Marketing 

Arthur B. Hamilton, M.S Associate Professor, 

Agricultural Economics and Farm Management 
Paul R. Poffenberger, M.S Associate Professor, 

Agricultural Economics and Marketing 
Stanley C. Shull, Ph.D Associate Professor, 

Agricultural Economics and Marketing 
William P. Walker, M.S Professor, 

Agricultural Economics and Marketing 
LiTTHER B. Bohanan, M.S Assistant Professor, 

Agricultural Economics and Marketing 

Fred E. Hulse, M.S Research Assistant 

Harold D. Smith, M.S Assistant Professor, 

Agricultural Economics and Marketing 

David J. Burns, M.S Insti'uctor, Agricultural Economics and 

Marketing 



• Many of the members of the Experiment Station staff are also on the Instructional 
staff or the Extension Service Staff, or both. Lists of the staffs of these two agencies appear 
elsewhere in this publication. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 127 

Agricultural Engineering 

Ray W. Carpenter, A.B., LL.B., Professor and Head, 

Agricultural Engineering, State Drainage Engineer 

George J. Burkhardt, M.S Professor, 

Agricultural Engineering 

Albert V. Krewatch, M.S Professor, Agricultural Engineering 

Harry J. Hoffmbister, B.S Assistant Professor, 

Agricultural Engineering 

Paul N. Winn, Jr., B.S Assistant Professor, 

Agricultural Engineering 
Agricultural Education 

Ray a. Murray, Ph.D Associate Professor, Agricultural Education 

Agronomy 

Albin 0. KuHN, Ph.D Professor and Head, Agronomy 

Walter B. Posey, M.S Professor, Tobacco 

Russell G. Rothgeb, Ph.D Professor, Crops 

John H. Axley, Ph.D Associate Professor, Soils 

Orman E. Street, Ph.D Associate Professor, Tobacco 

Ambrose W. Burger, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Crops 

Conrad H. Liden, M.S Assistant Professor, Crops 

Thomas S. Ronnigen, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Crops 

Howard B. Winant M.S Assistant Professor, Soils 

Joseph L. Newcomer, B.S Instructor, Crops 

Agronomy — Seed Inspection 

Forrest S. Holmes, M.S Chief Seed Inspector 

Animal Husbandry 

John E. Foster, Ph.D Professor and Head, Animal Husbandry 

WiLLARD W. Green, Ph.D Professor, Animal Husbandry 

Malcolm H. Kerr, M.S Associate Professor, Animal Husbandry 

James B. Outhouse, M.S Associate Professor, Animal Husbandry 

John Buric, M.S Instructor, Animal Husbandry 

Animal Pathology 

Arthur L. Brueckner, B.S., V.M.D Director, LSSS 

Harold M. DeVolt, M.S., D.V.M Professor, Pathology 

Leo J. PoELMA, M.S., D.V.M Professor, Pathology 

Cornelia M. Cotton, Ph.D Cooperative Agent 

Botany, Plant Physiology, and Pathology 

Ronald Bamford, Ph.D Professor and Head, Botany 

Carroll E. Cox, Ph.D Professor, Plant Pathology 

Hugh G. Gauch, Ph.D Professor, Plant Physiology 

Walter F. Jeffers, Ph.D Professor, Plant Pathology 



I 



128 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Leslie O. Weaver, Ph.D Professor, Plant Pathology, 

State Pathologist 

Willie M. Dugger, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Plant Physiology 

Delbert T. Morgan, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Botany 

Omar D. Morgan, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Plant Pathology 

Robert D, Rappleye, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Botany 

James G. Kantzes Instructor, Plant Pathology 

Robert W. Krauss, Ph.D., Research Associate, Plant Physiology 

Dairy Husbandry 

John W. Pou, Ph.D Professor and Head, Dairy Husbandry 

Wendell S. Arbuckle, Ph.D Professor, Dairy Manufacturing 

Joseph C. Shaw, Ph.D Professor, Dairy Husbandry 

Mark Keeney, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Dairy Manufacturing 

Matthew F. Ellmore, M.S Instructor, Dairy Husbandry 

Richard E. Brown, M.S Instructor, Dairy Husbandry 

Edgar A. Corbin, M.S Instructor, Dairy Husbandry 

Emory Leffel, M.S Instructor, Dairy Husbandry 

Entomology 

Ernest N. Cory, Ph.D Professor and Head, Entomology, 

State Entomologist 

William E. Bickley, Ph.D Associate Professor, Entomology 

Lewis P. Ditman, Ph.D Associate Professor, Entomology 

Harold S. McConnell, M.S Associate Professor, Entomology 

George J. Abrams, M.S Assistant Professor, Apiculture 

Elizabeth E. Haviland, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Entomology 

Horticulture 

Irvin C. Haut, Ph.D Professor and Head, Horticulture 

Amihud Kramer, Ph.D Professor, Horticulture 

Conrad B. Link, Ph.D Professor, Floriculture 

Leland E. Scott, Ph.D Professor, Horticultural Physiology 

Francis C. Stark, Jr., Ph.D Professor, Vegetable Crops 

Edgar P. Walls, Ph.D Professor, Canning Crops 

Arthur H. Thompson, Ph.D., Professor, Pomology 

Pardon W. Cornell, M.S.. .Associate Professor, Ornamental Horticulture 

William A. Matthews, M.S Associate Professor, Vegetable Crops 

James B. Shanks, Ph.D Associate Professor, Floriculture 

Herman Todd, B.S Instructor 

Clifford K. Evers, B.S Instructor 

Poultry 

MORLEY A. JuLL, Ph.D Professor and Head, Poultry Husbandry 

Gerald F. Combs, Ph.D Professor, Poultry Nutrition 



I 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 129 

Mary Juhn, Ph.D Research Professor, Poultry Physiology 

Clynb S. Shaffner, Ph.D Professor, Poultry Physiology 

Mary Shorb, Ph.D Professor, Poultry Nutrition 

Georgb D. Quigley, B.S Associate Professor, Poultry Husbandry 

DEPARTMENT OF MARKETS 

Symons Hall, College Park, Maryland 

Paul E. Nystrom, Head, Department of Agricultural Economics and 

Marketing. 

All of the activities of the Department of Markets are geared to the 
importance in modern agriculture of the problems of marketing farm 
products. The Department endeavors to serve the every-day needs of the 
farmer in marketing his products and to insure a fair and equitable treat- 
ment of the farmer in all dealings which he may have concerning the 
marketing of his products. In the performance of these responsibilities, 
the Department carries out programs in extension marketing, conducts 
market surveys, compiles and disseminates marketing information and 
market data, operates a market news service, provides an agricultural in- 
spection and grading service, maintains a consumer information service 
and enforces and interprets the agricultural marketing laws of the state. 
The regulatory aspects of the Department's functions are carried out as 
the agent of the State Board of Agriculture under the authority of various 
State laws relating to the marketing of farm products. A close working 
relationship is maintained with other specialists in the Extension Service, 
all departments of the Agricultural Experiment Station, the Maryland 
Crop Reporting Service, and the Production and Marketing Administration 
of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. The voluntary and dynamic co- 
operation of the personnel in these various activities brings to bear on 
agricultural marketing problems an effective combination of research, educa- 
tion, and service. 

The passage of the Federal Agricultural Research and Marketing Act 
gave additional impetus to the study and solution of agriculture's market- 
ing problems. The Department of Markets is largely responsible for 
developing the State program under Title II of this act. 

Information and assistance in all phases of marketing is available to all 
interested persons. When a sufficient number of individuals is interested, 
marketing specialists hold meetings and demonstrations in local com- 
munities. Field offices are located in Baltimore, Salisbury, Hancock, Hagers- 
town and Pocomoke. Department headquarters is at the University of 
Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

Market Price Reporting 

Daily market reports covering 100 farm products are issued in cooperation 
with the U. S. Department of Agriculture whose nation-wide teletype 



130 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

facilities are utilized in this service. These reports contain information 
on market conditions, prices of crops, livestock, and other agricultural 
products. The information in these reports is published in local news- 
papers, broadcast over national radio stations in the State and mailed in 
mimeograph form to anyone requesting it. 

A weekly Retail Market Report is issued in Baltimore, which gives 
current retail prices for approximately 100 commodities including fruits, 
vegetables, meats and dairy products. 

Marketing Information Service 

In addition to the daily market reports, a periodic analysis of the agri- 
cultural marketing situation is prepared at the headquarters in College 
Park. This report contains information on market supplies, quality, price 
trends, storage holdings, and movement of farm products. Other periodic 
information available in the marketing information series includes the 
monthly truck crop news; the monthly poultry letter, weekly crop and 
weather report; truck receipts in Baltimore City of fresh fruits and vege- 
tables, issued daily with a monthly summary; and a weekly report of the 
volume of broilers moved from farms to market in the Delmarva Peninsula. 

Grading and Inspection Service 

Any Maryland producer or handler of farm products may avail himself 
of the official federal-state grading service that is maintained by the de- 
partment. Thoroughly trained and federally licensed inspectors are em- 
ployed to perform this official grading service. Products graded and 
inspected include apples, peaches, tomatoes, potatoes, sweet potatoes, can- 
nery tomatoes, cannery peas, cannery corn, dairy products, poultry and 
eggs and other farm products. The State Department of Markets also issues 
final inspection and certification for the Seed Certification Board on Irish 
and sweet potatoes and tomato seed stock. Maryland canners frequently 
base their prices to farmers on the grades established by the grading and 
inspection service rendered by the department. Established U. S. grades 
and standards are usually used in this grading program, however, special 
grades and standards of quality may be used if the grower or processor so 
desires. 

General Marketing Services 

Through its Extension activities, the department endeavors to bring 
about a better understanding by producers, handlers and consumers regard- 
ing: (1) costs of distribution; (2) important changes in market outlets 
and consumer demand; (3) importance of efficiently producing high-quality 
products; (4) advantages of standardizing and grading; (5) the place that 
various marketing agencies play in the marketing system and the essen- 
tials for their success; (6) interpretation and utilization of marketing 
information and (7) the various phases and channels of the marketing 
system. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 131 

These problems are handled in various ways including the holding of 
meetings with growers and distributors throughout the State, planning 
and conducting short courses and special schools, conducting of various 
grading and inspection demonstrations, and giving assistance on marketing 
facilities such as farm markets and auctions. 

Consumer Marketing Information 

The Department maintains a full-time office in the city of Baltimore for 
the purpose of providing continuous consumer information. This service pro- 
vides the consumer with information concerning best buys of perishable 
produce, and methods of utilizing surplus products. This service aids in 
the prompt movement of perishable produce at times of surplus produc- 
tion and market gluts. A weekly retail price report is issued as a part of 
this service in addition to a specially prepared radio script and press re- 
leases on best buys. This program is conducted in close cooperation with 
the Home Demonstration Agent of Baltimore City. 

Regulatory and Control Activities 

From time to time the state has passed laws relative to the marketing 
of farm products which provide certain standards and controls deemed 
necessary for the common good of both the producer and the consumer. 
The department acts as the agent of the State Board of Agriculture in the 
enforcement of these laws which include (1) the Maryland Apple Grading 
Law, (2) the Maryland Fresh Egg and Egg Grading Law, (3) Poultry Sale 
and Transportation Law, (4) Cantaloupe Maturity Law, (5) the Trademark 
Law and (6) the Grading and Inspection Laws. In the enforcement of 
these various laws the Department endeavoi's to make an educational ap- 
proach in which the cooperation of growers and handlers is solicited before 
resorting to legal action. 

STATE HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 
College Park, Maryland 

E. N. Cory, State Entomologist. 

L. O. Weaver, State Plant Pathologist. 

I. C. Haut, State Hoyticulturist. 

In 1896 the subject of nursery inspection was given consideration under 
Article 48, of the Code of Public General Laws, under the title "Inspec- 
tion" as designated by Chapter 290 of the "Acts of the General Assembly 
of Maryland on 1896." In 1898 certain sections of Article 48 were repealed 
and reenacted with amendments, under a new sub-title, "State Horticultural 
Department," and eight new sections were added thereto. In 1916 the 
sections were again reenacted with such changes in the wording as were 
necessary to bring them into conformity with the reorganization of the 
Maryland State College of Agriculture and Experiment Station and its 
Board of Trustees. Subsequently all regulatory functions including newly 



132 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

enacted Articles in regard to bee diseases, mosquitoes, and aerial spraying, 
were transferred to the State Board of Agriculture under Chapter 391 of 
the "Acts of the General Assembly." 

Work in this field is designed to control insects and plant diseases and 
to protect the public in the purchase of products of nurserymen and 
florists. A considerable part of the time of the staff is occupied by inspec- 
tion of orchards, crops, nurseries, greenhouses, and floral establishments. 
Cooperation with the Federal Government in the inspection and certification 
of materials that come under quarantine regulations is another major 
function of the department. The department enforces the provisions 
of the Apiary Law, including inspection of apiaries. All activities pertain- 
ing to control of insects is conducted under the direction of Dr. E. N. Cory, 
State Entomologist. Activities of the department in the field of plant 
disease control are under direction of Dr. L. 0. Weaver, State Plant Path- 
ologist. This service includes control and eradication of diseases of straw- 
berries and other small fruits, diseases of apples, peaches, etc., inspection 
and certification of potatoes and sweet potatoes for seed, control of white 
pine blister rust, Dutch elm disease, etc. 

DAIRY INSPECTION SERVICE 
Dairy Building, College Park, Maryland 

W. S. Arbuckle, Chief Examiner 
Jack S. Conrad, Assistant Inspector 
Harold A. Newlander, Assistant Inspector 

The Maryland Dairy Inspection Law became effective June 1, 1935. How- 
ever, the present activities of the Dairy Inspection Service are based on 
Article 43 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, Chapter 403 of the Laws of 
Maryland, 1941. The dairy department, functioning under the Agricultural 
Experiment Station of the University of Maryland, is charged with the 
administration of this law. 

The purposes of the Dairy Inspection Law are as follows: (a) To insure 
producers who sell milk and cream by measure, weight and butterfat test, 
that samples, weights and tests used as the basis of payment for such 
products are correct; (b) To insure dealers who purchase milk and cream 
that their agents shall correctly weigh, sample, and test these products; 
(c) To insure correctness of tests made for official inspections or for public 
record. To achieve these purposes the law requires the licensing of all 
dealers who purchase milk and cream from producers, whether the purchases 
are by measure, weight, or test, and the licensing of all persons sampling, 
weighing and testing milk and cream when the results of such samples, 
weights, and tests are to serve as a basis of payment to producers. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 133 

Duties of the Dairy Inspection Service, resulting from enforcement of 
the Inspection Law, deal with the calibration of that glassware used in 
testing milk and cream and the rejection of inaccurate items; examination 
of all weighers, samplers, and testers and the issuance of licenses to those 
satisfactorily passing the examination; and inspection of the pertinent 
activities of weighers, samplers, testers and dairy plants. 

The Dairy Inspection Law benefits the entire dairy industry by preventing 
unfair competition and unfair trade practices which result from improper 
methods of weighing, sampling and testing milk and cream, and the use of 
inaccurate and improper equipment. Also, requirements governing the 
accuracy of scales, construction of weigh tanks, and proper procedures 
result in greater efficiency and thus less loss to dealers and producers 
alike. The licensing of weighers, samplers, and testers assures both the 
producer and the dealer that the men engaged in such work are competent. 

The Dairy Inspection Law is administered on an educational basis with 
the view of promoting the mutual interests of dairy producers, dealers, and 
manufacturers. It is the belief of the administrating agency that since the 
producers of milk and cream and the dealers in these products both benefit 
by the law, they also should share in the responsibility for its enforcement. 
Such a responsibility involves close cooperation and harmony between all 
groups affected by the law. 

During 1951, 107 permits were issued to dealers as follows: 4 plants in 
Class A (buying less than 500 pounds of milk daily); 19 in Class B (buying 
from 500 to 2,000 pounds of milk daily) ; 59 in Class C (buying from 2,000 
to 40,000 pounds of milk daily) ; and 25 in Class D (buying more than 40,000 
pounds of milk daily). In addition, 317 licenses were issued to testers and 
138 licenses issued to weighers and samplers, 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF DRAINAGE 

College Park, Maryland 

Ray W. Carpenter, State Drainage Engineer. 

The State Department of Drainage was established in 1937. Its duties 
are to promote and encourage the drainage of agricultural lands in the 
State, to correlate the activities of the local drainage organizations in the 
State and to cooperate with State and Federal agencies in the interest of 
a permanent program of improved drainage. 

STATE INSPECTION AND REGULATORY SERVICE 
Chemistry Building, College Park, Maryland 

Feeds, Fertilizers, Agricultural Liming Materials, Insecticides 
and Fungicides 

L. E. BOPST, State Chemist R. G. Fuerst, Chemist 

W. C. SUPPLEE, Chemist Cecil Pinkerton, Chemist 



134 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

A. B. Heagy, Chemist W. J. Footen, Inspector 

H. R. Walls, Microscopist R. W. Neal, Jr., Inspector 

R. E. Baumgardneb, Chemist E. M. Zentz, Inspector 

J. E. Schueler, Chemist F. G. Baggs, Clerk 

N. S. Chapman, Chemist 
The protection of consumers and ethical manufacturers of agricultural 
products against fraudulent practices, makes certain specialized statutes 
necessary. These laws are classified as correct labeling acts, and are en- 
forced by the State Inspection and Regulatory Service. Included in this 
legislation are the State Feed, Fertilizer, Agricultural Liming Materials, 
and Insecticide and Fungicide laws. 

Work of enforcing these laws is divided into five distinct phases: First, 
the commodities concerned inust be registered under acceptable brand names, 
and with proper labels; second, official samples must be collected by the 
Department's inspectors from all parts of the state; third, chemical and 
physical examinations must be made to establish that professed standards 
of quality are being met; fourth, results must be assembled and published 
in concise and understandable form, with the reports made available to all 
interested persons; and fifth, the prosecution of those responsible for 
flagrant violations. 

Hundreds of tests also are made annually on feed, fertilizer, and lime 
samples submitted by state purchasers. No charge is made for this service. 
Throughout its existence, this Department has cooperated with comparable 
federal agencies in every possible way. In this activity it has attained not 
only state-wide, but also a nationally-recognized reputation for accuracy, 
timeliness, and unbiased fair treatment of the consumer and manufacturer 
alike. 

The facilities of the Department are at all times available to supply the 
manufacturer with technical advice and to safeguard him from unfair 
competition. 

For its entire program of service and protection, the Department relies 
in large measure upon education, from the standpoint of both buyer and 
seller. However in those rare instances when this policy is unheeded, back- 
ing by the courts, both federal and state, can be depended upon for enforce- 
ment assistance. 

SEED INSPECTION SERVICE 

Agronomy-Botany-Physics Building, College Park, Maryland 

F. S. Holmes, Inspector Olive M. Kelk, Analyst 

Ruth W. Caldwell, Assistant Analyst 

Ellen P. Emack, Assistant Analyst 
Anna H. Ferguson, Assistant Analyst 

The Seed Insnection Service, a division of the Agricultural Experiment 
Station, administers the State seed law; inspects seeas sold throughout the 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 135 

State; collects seed samples for laboratory examination; reports the results 
of these examinations to the parties concerned; publishes summaries of 
these reports which show the relative reliability of the label information 
supplied by wholesale seedsmen; cleans and treats tobacco seed intended for 
planting in the State; makes analyses, tests, and examinations of seed 
samples submitted to the Laboratory; and advises seed users regarding the 
economic and intelligent use of seeds. The Service also cooperates with 
the Production and Marketing Administration of the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture in the enforcement of the Federal Seed Act in 
Maryland. 

Two and a half million dollars worth of seeds are planted annually in 
Maryland. Perhaps twenty-five percent of the field seeds and ninety per- 
cent of the vegetable seeds planted in the State pass through trade channels 
and are thus subject to the seed law. The work of the Seed Inspection Service 
is not restricted to the enforcement of the seed law, however, for State 
citizens may submit seed samples to the Laboratory for analysis, test, or 
examination. Specific information regarding suitability for planting pur- 
poses of lots of seeds is thus made available to individuals without charge. 
The growth of this service has been steady since the establishment of the 
Laboratory in 1912. Most Maryland citizens, city and country, are directly 
interested in seeds for planting in flower-beds, la\\Tis, gardens, or fields. 

MARYLAND LIVESTOCK SANITARY SERVICE 

Arthur L. Brueckner, Director 

J. Walter Hastings, Sr., Assistant Director 

Leo J. PoELMA, Chief of Laboratories 

The Live Stock Sanitary Service is organized under the State Board of 
Agriculture and is charged with the responsibility of preventing the in- 
troduction of diseases of animals and poultry from outside of the state and 
with control and eradication of such diseases within the state. The service 
is further charged with the responsibility of cooperating with the State 
Department of Health in the suppression of diseases of animals and poultry 
which affect the public health. 

Control projects in bovine tuberculosis, Johne's disease, and bovine 
brucellosis are conducted in cooperation with the Bureau of Animal In- 
dustry of the United States Department of Agriculture. The field force 
of state employed veterinarians is augmented by a number of federal 
veterinarians in the conduct of these control programs. The control of 
swine brucellosis, pullorum disease in poultry, rabies, and many other dis- 
ease conditions is conducted by the state without outside assistance. 

Facilities for the diagnosis of a wide variety of diseases are furnished 
in the main laboratory at College Park and in the branch laboratories at 
Salisbury, Centreville, Bel Air, Frederick, and Hagerstown. Virtually 
every part of the state is in easy reach of these opportunities for help. 



136 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Research studies are conducted mainly at the College Park laboratory, 
but some field investigations are also made from branch laboratories. Some 
projects are partly supported by federal funds appropriated through the 
Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station. From these research studies 
come information concerning control by sanitary measures, by vaccination, 
and by drug treatment which saves breeders and owners vast sums. 

Members of the staff give instruction in animal and poultry diseases in 
the University of Maryland particularly to students in agriculture. Appro- 
priate subjects are also presented to farmers' clubs and industry groups in 
the state. 

MARYLAND LIVESTOCK SANITARY SERVICE STAFF 

Arthur L. Brueckner, B.S., V.M.D., 

Director and Professor of Veterinary Science 

J. Walter Hastings, Sr., V.M.D Assistant Director 

Leo J. PoELMA, M.S., D.V.M Chief of Laboratories 

Harold M. DbVolt, B.S., M.S., D.V.M Professor of Poultry Pathology 

Paul A. Hansen, Ph.D Professor of Veterinary Bacteriology 

Professor of Veterinary Physiology 

Charles R. Davis, M.S., D.V.M., 

Supervisor, Maryland Poultry Improvement Plan 

Clyde L. Everson, D.V.M Associate Professor of Animal Pathology 

Irwin M. Moulthrop, D.V.M In Charge, Salisbury Laboratory 

William Robert Teeter, B.S,, D.V.M In charge, Hagerstown and 

Frederick Laboratories 

F. George Sperling, V.M.D In Charge, Bel Air Laboratory 

Robert J. Byrne, D.V.M., In Charge, Centreville Laboratory 

Associate Professor, Brucellosis Research 

Cornelia M. Cotton, Ph.D Cooperative Agent, Brucellosis Research 

Edward M. Sacchi, D.M.V Associate Professor, Mastitis Research 

Reginald L. Reagan Associate Professor of Veterinary Virology 

John M. Coffin, V.M.D Associate Professor of Veterinary Science 

Jacob C. Siegrist, D.V.M Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science 

James W. Crowl, D.V.M Associate Professor of Veterinary Science 

Clarence E. Gibbs, D.V.M Associate Professor of Veterinary Science 

Mahlon H. Trout, D.V.M Associate Professor of Veterinary Science 

Charles R. Lockwood, D.V.M Associate Professor of Veterinary Science 

George W. Green, Jr., D.V.M Associate Professor of Veterinary Science 

Robert E. Gibbs, V.M.D Associate Professor of Veterinary Science 

Robert B. Shillinger, V.M.D. . . Associate Professor of Veterinary Science 

Robert B. Johnson, A.B Assistant Professor of Veterinary Physiology 

Raymond C. Wiley, Ph.D Associate Professor of Veterinary Toxicology 



College of 

ARTS and SCIENCES 

STAFF 

Leon Perdue Smith, Ph.D., Dean 

Charles Manning, Ph.D., Assistant Dean 

Francis R. Adams, M.A., Instructor of English. 

Alfred 0. Aldridgb, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Mary H. Aldridgb, M.S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

J. Frances Allen, M.S., Instructor of Zoology. 

George Anastos, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Frank G. Anderson, Acting Assistant Professor of Sociology. 

George L. Anderson, M.A., Instructor of English. 

Mary Lee Andrews, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Thomas G. Andrews, Ph.D., Professor and Head of Psychology. 

Merle Ansberry, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Speech. 

John H. Applegrath, M.S., Instructor of Zoology. 

Arthur W. Ayers, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Thomas J. Aylward, M.A., Instructor of Speech. 

Betty B. Baehr, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Instructor of Library Science. 

Byron Baer, B.S., Assistant in Chemistry. 

William L. Bailey, M.A., Visiting Professor of Sociology. 

Cecil R. Ball, M.A., Associate Professor of English. 

A D v.T.y. B. Ballman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Jack C. Barnes, M.A., Instructor of English. 

Roscoe G. Bartlett, Jr., M.S., Instructor of Zoology. 

James L. Bates, Ph.D., Instructor of History. 

George Batka, M.A., Assistant Professor of Speech. 

Richard H. Bauer, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

Charles A. Baylis, Ph.D., Professor and Head of Philosophy. 

Otho T. Beall, M.A., Instructor of English. 

Alfred W. Becker, M.A., Instructor of Foreign Languages. 

Marie M. Bestul, M.A., Instructor of Sociology. 

Warren Bezanson, M.A., Instructor of English. 

Alfred Bingham, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages. 

Marie Boborykine, M.A., Instructor Part-time of Foreign Languages. 

Carl Bode, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Jean M. Boyer, M.A., Instructor of Mathematics. 

George P. Brewster, Jr., B.S., Instructor of Mathem \tics. 

Ferdinand G. Brickwedde, Ph.D., Professor Part-tin e of Physics. 

George M. Brown, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chennstry. 

Irwin C. Brown, Ph.D., Lecturer of Geology. 

Summer O. Burhoe, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

John T. Carruthers, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

137 



138 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Velma L. Charlesworth, B.S.E. and L.S., Instructor of Library Science. 

Charles N. Cofer, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

Franklin D. Cooley, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Charles B. Cooper, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

John M. Coppinger, M.A., Instructor of Speech. 

John L. Coulter, M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Dieter Cunz, Ph.D., Professor of Foreign Languages. 

Constance Demaree, M.A., Instructor of English. 

Henri deMarne, B.A., Instructor of Foreign Languages. 

Charles S. Dewey, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Robert E. Dewey, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 

Shirley Wagner Dinwiddie, M.A., Instructor of English. 

Eitel W. Dobert, B.A., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages. 

Raymond N. Doetsch, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. 

Nathan L. Drake, Ph.D., Professor and Head of Chemistry. 

Ray Ehrensberger, Ph.D., Professor and Head of Speech. 

Richard L. Eiserman, M.A., Instructor of Mathematics. 

John E. Faber, Jr., Ph.D., Professor and Head of Bacteriology. 

John A. Facey, M.A., Instructor of Mathematics. 

WiLUAM F. Falls, Ph.D., Professor of Foreign Languages. 

E. James Ferguson, Ph.D., Instructor of History. 

RUDD Fleming, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Wesley M. Gewehr, Ph.D., Professor and Acting Head of History. 

Richard A. Good, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Frank Goodwyn, Ph.D., Professor of Foreign Languages. 

Donald C. Gordon, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

Frank A. Grant, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

William Gravely, M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Meyer Greenberg, B.A., Instructor Part-time of Foreign Languages. 

Donald Greenspan, M.S., Instructor of Mathematics. 

Sidney Grollman, M.S., Instructor of Zoology. 

Francis S. Grubar, B.A., Instructor of Art. 

Ray C. Hackman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Dick W. Hall, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

William L. Hall, M.A., Instructor of Speech. 

Ludwig Hammerschlag, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages. 

R. Justus Hanks, M.A., Instructor of History. 

PouL Arne Hansen, Ph.D., Professor of Veterinary Bacteriology. 

Susan Harman, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Charujs a. Haslup, M.Ed., Instructor of Music. 

Isabella M. Hayes, B.A., B.L.S., Instructor of Library Science. 

Roy K. Heintz, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Richard Hendricks, M.A., Instructor of Speech. 

Harold C. Hoffsommer, Ph.D., Professor and Head of Sociology. 

Lois Holladay, B.A., B.L.S., Instructor of Library Science. 

Thomas P. Imsb, M.A., Instructor of Sociology. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 139 

Richard Iskraut, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Stanley B. Jackson, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Milton P. Jarnagin, Ph.D., Instructor of Mathematics. 

WiLHEMiNA Jashemski, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

Charles A. Johnson, Ph.D., Instructor of History. 

Montgomery Johnson, Ph.D., Professor Part-time of Physics. 

Helen R. Kahn, M.A., Instructor of English. 

Mary A. Kemble, M.A., Instructor of Music. 

Earle H. Kennaryd, Ph.D., Professor Part-time of Physics. 

Barry G. King, Ph.D., Lecturer in Zoology. 

Charles F. Kramer, M.A., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages. 

Aaron D. Krumbein, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Norman C. Laffer, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Bacteriology. 

Robert L. Landers, Instructor of Music. 

Peter Lejins, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology. 

Irving Linknow, M.A., Assistant Professor of Speech. 

Robert A. Littleford, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Richard Lowitt, Ph.D., Instructor of History. 

Benjamin Lucas, Jr., M.A., Instructor of Sociology. 

Geoffrey S. S. Ludford, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Leonard I. Lutwack, Ph.D., Instructor of English. 

Charles Manning, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Herman Maril, Assistant Professor of Art. 

Charles P. Martin, M.A., Instructor of English. 

Minerva Martin, Ph.D., Instructor of English. 

Monroe H. Martin, Ph.D., Professor and Head of Mathematics. 

Lylb Mayer, M.A., Instructor of Speech, 

Henry B. McDonnel, Dean and Professor of Chemistry (emeritus). 

Vernon L. McKinstry, Assistant in Physics. 

Hugh B. McLean, B.S., Instructor of Mathematics. 

James McManaway, Ph.D., Lecturer in English. 

J. Howard McMillen, Ph.D., Professor Part-time of Physics. 

Esther K. McQuade, Instructor of Speech. 

Earl F. Meeker, M.A., Instructor of Speech. 

John F. Mehegan, M.A., Instructor of Mathematics. 

Bruce L. Melvin, Associate Professor of Sociology. 

Jessie W. Menneken, M.A., Instructor of Mathematics. 

Horace S. Merrill, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

Frances Miller, M.A., Instructor of English. 

Charles C. Mish, Ph.D., Instructor of English. 

Emory A. Mooney, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Raymond Morgan, Ph.D., Professor and Head of Physics. 

Annabelle B. Motz, Ph.D., Instructor of Sociology. 

Charles D. Murphy, Ph.D., Professor and Acting Head of English. 

Ralph Myers, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Graciela p. Nemes, B.A., Instructor of Foreign Languages. 



140 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

William L. Neumann, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

Charles Niembyer, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Speech. 

Ann E. Norton, M.A., Instructor of Foreign Languages. 

Arthur C. Parsons, M.A., Assistant Professor of Foreigrn Languages. 

Michael J. Pelczar, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Norman E. Phillips, Ph.D., Professor and Head of Zoology. 

Virginia Phillips, B.A., B.A. in L.S., Instructor of Library Science. 

Hugh B. Pickard, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

John Portz, M.A., Instructor of English. 

Augustus J. Prahl, Ph.D., Professor of Foreign Languages. 

Gordon W. Prange, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Ernest F. Pratt, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Hester B. Provenson, M.A., Assistant Professor of Speech. 

Rudolph E. Pugliese, M.A., Instructor of Speech. 

William Quynn, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages. 

Marguerite Rand, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages. 

B. Harlan Randall, B.Mus., Professor of Music. 

E. WiLKiNS Reeve, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

O. E. Reynolds, Ph.D., Lecturer in Zoology. 

John M. Robinson, Ph.D., Instructor of Philosophy. 

Marguerite Robison, M.A,, Instructor of English. 

Julian Roebuck, M.A., Instructor of Sociology. 

Carl L. Rollinson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Westervelt B. Romaine, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Music. 

Lenora Rosbnpield, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages. 

Sherman Ross, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Norman R. Roth, Ph.D., Instructor of Sociology. 

Howard Rovelstad, B.S. in L.S., M.A., Associate Professor of Library 

Science. 
Philip Rovner, B.A., M.A., Instructor of Foreign Language. 
Herbert Schaumann, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 
John F. Schmidt, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology. 
Paul W. Shankweiler, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology. 
Julius C. Shepherd, M.A., Instructor of Mathematics. 
Maurice R. Siegler, B.S., Associate Professor of Art. 
Dbnzel D. Smith, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 
Gerald A. Smith, M.A., Instructor of English. 
Leon P. Smith, Ph.D., Professor of Foreign Languages. 
Henry J. Soulen, Assistant Professor of Art. 
David S. Sparks, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 
Guilford L. Spencer, Ph.D., Instructor of Mathematics. 
Jesse W. Sprowls, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 
Robert A. Spurr, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
E. Thomas Starcher, M.A., Instructor of Speech. 
M. Elizabeth Stites, B. of Arch., Instructor of Art. 
Martha Stone, M.A., Instructor of English. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 141 

Enoch F. Story, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Warren L. Strausbaugh, M.A., B.S., Associate Professor of Speech. 

Kenneth T. Stringer, M.S., Instructor of Zoology. 

Roland N. Stromberg, M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

Calvin F. Stuntz, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

WiLUAM J. SviRBELY, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Frances Triggs, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology and Assistant 

Director of Counseling Center. 
H. David Turner, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Instructor of Library Science, 
A. Mary Urban, B.A., B.A. in L.S., Instructor of Library Science. 
Fletcher P. Veitch, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
John C. Wangler, M.S., Assistant in Chemistry. 
Kurt Weber, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Josephine A. Wedemeyer, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Instructor of Library Science. 
Fred W. Wellborn, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

James P. Wharton, A.B. (Col. U. S. A., Ret.), Professor and Head of Art. 
Charles E. White, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 
Raymond C. Wiley, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
Norman Z. Wolfsohn, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
G. Forrest Woods, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
W. Gordon Zeeveld, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 
A. E. ZUCKER, Ph.D., Professor and Head of Foi-eign Languages. 



142 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Leon Pehidue Smith, Ph.D., Dean 
Charles Manning, Ph.D., Assistant Dean 

THE college of Arts and Sciences offers its students a 
liberal education. It seeks to develop graduates who can 
deal intelligently with the problems which confront them 
and whose general education will be a continuing 
source not only of material profit, but of genuine 
personal satisfaction. It also offers each student 
the opportunity to concentrate in the field of his 
choice; this element of depth serves both as an in- 
tegral part of his liberal education and as a foun- 
dation for further professional training or pursuits. 
Students in other colleges of the University are 
offered training in fundamental courses that serve 
as a background for their professional education. 
The new program in American Civilization is open to all students of the 
University as well as to those in Arts and Sciences. 
Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission to the College of Arts and Sciences are, 
in general, the same as those for admission to the other colleges and schools 
of the University. Application must be made to the Director of Admissions, 
University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

In selecting students more emphasis will be placed on good marks and 
other indications of probable success in college than on any fixed pattern 
of subject matter. In general, four units of English and one unit each of 
Social and Natural Sciences are required. One unit of Algebra and one 
of Plane Geometry are desirable. Foreign Language entrance units, although 
highly desirable for certain programs, are not required. Units in Fine Arts 
and in Trade and Vocational subjects are acceptable as electives. 

For admission to the pre-medical curriculum, two years of any one foreign 
language are recommended. A detailed statement of the requirements for 
admission to the School of Medicine and the relation of these to the pre- 
medical curriculum may be obtained by writing the Director of Admissions. 
For a more detailed statement of admission requirements and policies write 
to the Director of Publications, University of Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland, for a copy of the "General Information Issue" of the Catalog. 

Actual annual costs of attending the University include: $165 fixed 
charges; $61 special fees; $340 board; $120 to $140 room rent; and labora- 
tory fees which vary with the laboratory courses pursued. A matriculation 
fee of $10 is charged all new registrants. An additional charge of $150 is 
assessed students who are not residents of the State of Maryland. 

For a more detailed statement of these costs write to the Director of 
Publications, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, for a copy of 
the "General Information Issue" of the Catalog. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 143 

Military Instruction 

All male students, unless specifically exempted under University regula- 
tions, are required to take basic Air Force R. O. T, C. training for a period 
of two years. The successful completion of this course is a prerequisite 
for graduation and it must be taken by all eligible students during the first 
two years of attendance at the University, whether they intend to graduate 
or not. Transfer students who have not fulfilled this requirement will com- 
plete the course or take it until graduation, whichever occurs first. 

Selected students who wish to do so may, with proper approval, carry 
during their Junior and Senior years advanced Air Force R. 0. T. C. courses 
which lead to a regular or reserve commission in the United States Air 
Force. 

For further details concerning the requirements in Military Instruction 
write to the Director of Publications, University of Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland, for a copy of the "General Information Issue" of the Catalog. 

Degrees 

The degrees conferred on students who have met the requirements pre- 
scribed by the College of Arts and Sciences are Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science. 

Students of this College who complete satisfactorily curricula with majors 
in departments of the Humanities or Social Sciences are awarded the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts.* Those who complete satisfactorily curricula with 
majors in departments of Biological or Physical Sciences are awarded the 
degree of Bachelor of Science.f 

Students who complete satisfactorily the prescribed combined program 
of Arts and Sciences and Medicine, or of Arts and Sciences and Dentistry, 
will be granted the degree of Bachelor of Science on the recommendation 
of the Dean of the School of Medicine, or of the Dean of the School of 
Dentistry. This program consists of a minimum of 90-100 semester hours 
(exclusive of the required courses in military science, hygiene, and physical 
activities) in the College of Arts and Sciences and a minimum of 30 semes- 
ter hours (usually the first year's program) in the School of Medicine, or 
in the School of Dentistry. 

Students who complete satisfactorily the prescribed combined program 
of Arts and Sciences and Law will be granted the degree of Bachelor of 



* The departments of Economics, Geography, and Government and Politics, although 
administratively in the College of Business and Public Administration, offer courses for 
Arts and Sciences students. Majors may be elected in these departments as in those of the 
other departments of the Division of Social Sciences which are administered by the (College 
of Arts and Sciences. 

t The departments of Botany and Entomology, although administered by the College of 
Agriculture, offer courses for Arts and Sciences students. Majors may be elected in these 
departments as in those of the other departments of the Division of Biological Science* 
administered by the College of Arts and Sciences. 



144 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND . 

Arts on the recommendation of the Dean of the School of Law. This pro- 
gram consists of a minimum of 90 semester hours (exclusive of the required 
courses in military science, hygiene, and physical activities) in the College 
of Arts and Sciences and a minimum of 30 semester hours (the first year's 
program or its equivalent) in the School of Law. 

Students who complete satisfactorily the prescribed combined program 
of Arts and Sciences and Nursing will be granted the degree of Bachelor 
of Science on the recommendation of the Director of the School of Nursing. 
This program consists of a minimum of 60 semester hours (exclusive of the 
required courses in hygiene and physical activities) in the College of Arts 
and Sciences and of the full nursing curriculum prescribed by the School 
of Nursing. The pre-nursing curriculum must be completed in the College 
of Arts and Sciences before completion of the nursing course in Baltimore. 

Residence 

The last thirty semester hours credit of any curriculum leading to a 
baccalaureate degree in the College of Arts and Sciences must be taken in 
residence in this University. 

Students working for one of the combined degrees must earn the last 
30 semester hours credit of the arts program in residence, in the College of 
Arts and Sciences, College Park. 

General Requirements for Degrees 

The baccalaureate degree from the College of Arts and Sciences may b« 
conferred upon a student who has satisfied the following requirements: 

1. University requirements. 

2. College of Arts and Sciences requirements: 

A minimum of 120 semester hours credit in academic subjects other than 
military science is required for a bachelor's degree. Men must acquire in 
addition 12 semester hours in military science, and four semester hours in 
physical activities. Women must acquire in addition four semester hours 
in hygiene and four semester hours in physical activities. 

Junior Requirements 

A student must acquire a minimum of 56 semester hours with an average 
grade of at least C in the Freshman and Sophomore years before he will 
be permitted to begin advanced work on his major and minor. 

The following minimum requirements should be fulfilled, as far as pos- 
sible, before the beginning of the Junior year and must be completed before 
graduation : 

1. English — English 1, 2, and 3, 4 or 5, 6: twelve semester hours. 

n. Foreign Language — twelve semester hours in one language. Students 
wishing to enroll in a language they have studied in high school will be 
given a placement test; if it is considered advisable for a student to repeat 
courses which duplicate his entrance units, half credit only will be granted 
for these courses. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 145 

III. Social Studies — Government and Politics 1, three semester hours; 
Sociology 1, three semester hours; History 5 and 6, six semester hours: 
twelve semester hours. 

IV. Speech — two to four semester hours in accordance with the particu- 
lar curriculum. 

V. Natural Science and Mathematics — twelve semester hours. Science 
courses will be elected from those departments offering majors in the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences. 

VI. Military Science for Men — twelve semester hours. Required fresh- 
man and sophomore years. 

VII. Hygiene for Women — four semester hours. Required freshman year. 

VIII. Physical Activities for Men and Women — four semester hours. 
Required freshman and sophomore years. 

3. Major and Minor Requirements — When a student has completed satis- 
factorily the requirements of the freshman and sophomore years he will 
select a major in one of the departments of an upper division and for 
graduation will complete a departmental major and a minor. The courses 
constituting the major and the minor must conform to the requirements 
of the department in which the major work is done. 

The student must have an average of not less than C in the introductory 
courses in the field in which he intends to major. 

A major shall consist, in addition to the underclass departmental require- 
ments, of 24-40 hours, of which at least twelve must be in courses numbered 
100 or above. 

A minor shall consist of a coherent group of courses totalling 18 semester 
hours in addition to the requirements listed above. At least six of the 18 
hours must be in a single department in courses numbered 100 or above. 
The courses comprising the minor must be chosen with the approval of the 
major department. 

The average grade of the work taken in the major field must be at least 
C, and the average grade of the work taken in the major and minor fields 
combined must be at least C. A general average of C in courses taken 
at the University of Maryland is required for graduation. 

Ortiflcation of High School Teachers 

If courses are properly chosen in the field of education, a prospective 
high school teacher can prepare for high school positions, with a major 
and a minor in one of the departments of this College. A student who 
wishes to work for a teacher's certificate should consult his advisor before 
the junior year. 

ElcctiTea in Other Colleges and Schools 

X limited number of courses taken in other colleges and schools of the 
University may be counted for elective or minor credit toward a degree in 
the College of Arts and Sciences. 



146 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The number of credits which may be accepted from the various colleges 
and schools is as follows: 

College of Agriculture — 20. 

College of Business and Public Administration — 20. 
College of Education — 24. 
College of Engineering — 20. 
College of Home Economics — 20. 

School of Law — In the combined program the first year of law must be 
completed. 

School of Medicine — In the combined program the first year of medicine 
must be completed. 

School of Nursing — In the combined program the three years of nursing 
must be completed. 

Normal Load 

The normal load for students in this college is 15 semester hours credit 
per semester, exclusive of the required work in physical activities, military 
science, and hygiene. 

Juniors and seniors are not permitted to register for more than 18 hours 
unless they have a "B" average for the preceding semester and the approval 
of the Dean of the College. 

Advisers 

Each freshman and sophomore in this college will be assigned to a faculty 
adviser who will help the student, during his first two years, to select his 
courses and to determine what his field of major concentration should be. 

Juniors and seniors will consider the head of their major department, or 
his designated assistant, their adviser, and should consult him about the 
arrangements of their schedules of courses. 

Work in the Freshman and Sophomore Years 

The work of the first two years in the College of Arts and Sciences is 
designed to give the student a basic general education, and to prepare him 
for concentration in the latter part of his course. 

It is the student's responsibility to develop in these earlier years such 
proficiency in basic subjects as may be necessary for his continuation in 
the field of his special interest. Personal aptitude and a general scholastic 
ability must also be demonstrated, if permission to pursue a major study 
is to be obtained. 

The student should follow the curriculum for which he is believed to be 
best fitted. It will be noted that a core group of studies is required of all 
students who are candidates for a bachelor's degree. These subjects should 
be taken, when possible, during the Freshman and Sophomore years. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



147 



GENERAL CURRICULUM 

The following curriculum gives the subjects required of students in the 
departments of the Humanities and the Social Studies. Students wishing 
to major in one of the Physical or Biological Sciences will find the require- 
ments in the curriculums listed under the respective headings, found on 
subsequent pages. Students wishing to major in Sociology or Crime Con- 
trol will find the requirements listed under the section on the Social Sciences. 

/ — Semester — \ 
Freshman Year I II 

Ens. 1, 2 — Composition and Readings in American Literature 3 8 

G. & P. 1 — American Government (or Sociology of American Life) .... 3 .... 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life (or American Government) .... I 

•Foreigm Language 3 3 

Mathematics or Natural Science S I 

L. S. 1, 2 — Library Science 1 1 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking 2 2 

A. S. 1, 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 8 

He. 2, 4 — Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 18-20 18-20 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 OP 6, 6 — Ck)mpo8ition and Readings in English or in World 

Literature S 8 

Hist. B, 6 — History of American Civilization 8 8 

Foreign Language (Continued) 3 8 

Natural Science or Mathematics 3 8 

Elective 8 8 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 8 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Totol 1»-19 16-1» 

I. AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

Now, more perhaps than ever before, it is vitally important to understand 
this country and to use the best experience of the past to help solve the 
massive problems of America's present and future. Believing this, the Uni- 
versity has set up one of the most comprehensive programs in American 
studies to be found any^vhere. The program begins with required courses 
on the freshman and sophomore level, includes a major for juniors and 
seniors, and also provides for graduate work on the M.A. and Ph.D. level. 
(For information concerning the graduate program, see the graduate 
catalog.) 

Since America is many-sided, the student who majors in American Civiliza- 
tion has the advantage of being taught by cooperating specialists from 
various departments. The Committee in charge of the program represents 
the departments of English, History, Government and Politics, and Sociology. 
Members of the committee ser\'e as official advisers to students electing to 
work in the field. 

*A placement test is given during Registration Week for students wishing to pursue a 
language they have studied in hish school. 



148 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

For the student who plans to go (for example) into teaching, law, 
journalism, government work, library work, or business, the study of 
American Civilization is a good basis. Although the main aims of the 
program for majors are cultural rather than professional — designed to 
produce better citizens and broader minds — the program still offers a firm 
foundation for a number of different kinds of careers. 

The program is intended to have generous breadth, but the danger of 
securing breadth without depth is offset by the requirement of an area of 
concentration. Studies in American Civilization are supplemented by studies 
in source cultures and interacting cultures; however, in choosing a curricu- 
lum, students are required to concentrate in one of the four departments 
primarily concerned with the program. Elective courses are, with the aid 
of an official adviser, chosen from courses offered in the humanities, in 
the social sciences, or in education. Normally, most elective courses are in 
history, English, foreign languages, comparative literature, economics, 
sociology, political science, and philosophy; but it is possible for a student 
to fulfill the requirements of the program and to elect as many as thirty 
semester hours in such subjects as art and psychology provided that such 
work fits into a carefully planned program. 

In his senior year, each major is required to take a conference course in 
which the study of American civilization is brought to a focus. During 
this course, the student analyzes eight or ten important books which reveal 
fundamental patterns in American life and thought and receives incidental 
training in bibliographical matters, in formulating problems for special 
investigation, and in group discussion. 

Freshmen and sophomores who are interested in concentrating in Amer- 
ican Civilization should consult with their Lower Division Adviser. Upper- 
classmen should consult with the Executive Secretary of the American Civil- 
ization curriculum. Professor Bode. The course of study for each student will 
be planned according to both the student's individual needs and the requisites 
for a unified program of American studies. A student following this 
curriculum must elect at least 18 hours of work at the 100 level in at least 
two of the four departments represented in the program. 

II. THE HUMANITIES 
Art 

Two types of majors are offered in art: Art Major A for those who take 
the art curriculum as a cultural subject and as preparation for a career for 
which art is a necessary background; Art Major B for those who prepare 
themselves for creative work on a professional basis. 

In both types the student begins with the basic courses, and moves to 
more advanced study of the theory of design and of the general principles 
involved in visual expression. A large amount of study takes the form 
of actual practice of drawing and painting. The student, in this way, gains 
a knowledge of the vocabulary of drawing and painting, and of the methods 
and procedures underlying good quality of performance. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 149 

Art Major B emphasizes the development of craftsmanship and the cre- 
ative faculty. Art Major A, while including the basic studio courses, neces- 
sarily places emphasis on the general history, composition, and art appre- 
ciation, with subsequent choices of special art epochs for greater detailed 
study. 

Art History and Art Appreciation are of special interest to students 
majoring in English, History, Languages, Philosophy, or Music. It is sug- 
gested that they schedule Art 9, 10, and 11, Historical Survey of Painting, 
Sculpture, and Architecture, and History of American Art, as excellent 
supplementary study for a fuller understanding of their major. Art 100-101 
is recommended for English, Languages, Philosophy, Home Economics, and 
Education majors. Art 10, History of American Art, is advised for majors 
in the American Civilization courses. Home Economics and Horticulture 
majors are encouraged to schedule basic art courses as a useful means 
of training observation and developing understanding of, and proficiency 
in, the visual arts. 

English 

Students majoring in English, particularly those who plan to do graduate 
work, are urged to take work in foreign language in addition to that re- 
quired for graduation. In selecting minor or elective subjects, it is recom- 
mended that students give special consideration to the following: French, 
German, philosophy, history, and fine arts. 

Students who major in English must choose 21 hours of the possible 
24-40 hours required of a major from courses in several groups, as follows: 

1. Three hours in language (Eng. 8, 101, 102, 104). 

2. Six hours in major figures (Eng. 104, 112, 115, 116, 121, 155, 156). 

3. Six hours in survey or type courses (Eng. 106, 110, 111, 112, 113, 120, 
122, 123, 125, 126, 129, 130, 134, 135, 139, 140, 143, 144, 145, 157). 

4. Six hours in American literature (Eng. 148, 150, 151, 155, 156). 

Foreign Languages and Literature 

The underclass department requirements which must be satisfied before a 
student can begin work toward a major are the courses numbered 1, 2, 4, 
and 5 (or 1, 2, 6, and 7). 

Two types of majors are offered in French, German, or Spanish: one for 
the general student or the future teacher, and the other for those interested 
in a rounded study of a foreign area for the purpose of understanding 
another nation through its literature, history, sociology, economics, and 
other aspects. 

Literature and Language Major: Language and literature as such are 
stressed in the first type of major. Specific minimum requirements beyond 
the first two years are a semester each of intermediate and advanced con- 
versation (Fr. Ger., or Span. 8 or 9 and 81 or 82), a semester of grammar 
review (Fr., Ger., or Span. 71), six hours of the introductory survey of 



150 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

literature (Fr., Ger., or Span. 75 and 76), any twelve hours in literature 
courses numbered 100 or above — a total of 26 semester hours. Beyond 
this minimum further courses in the Department are desirable and as 
electives work in American and in Comparative Literature is strongly 
recommended; Comparative Literature 101 and 102 are required. 

Foreign Area Major: The area study major endeavors to provide the 
student with a knowledge of various aspects of the country whose language 
he is studying. Specific minimum requirements beyond the first two years 
are ten hours of conversation, Civilization (Fr., Ger., or Span. 161 and 
162), three hours of Advanced Composition (Fr., Ger., or Span. 121) and 
six hours in literature courses numbered 100 or above — a total of 25 semes- 
ter hours. In addition the student takes, as a minor, twenty to thirty-six 
hours in geography, history, political science, sociology, or economics, dis- 
tributed through these fields in consultation with advisers in the Foreign 
Language Department. The student is urged to take some elective work 
in American and in Comparative Literature. 

Special Honors: The distinction of special honors in French, German, 
or Spanish is awarded to majors who, in addition to fulfilling the above- 
mentioned requirements, have completed certain special readings and passed 
a comprehensive examination in their field of concentration. The purpose 
of honors in languages is (1) to encourage independent reading and (2) 
to coordinate the knowledge afforded by the various individual courses 
which constitute the major curricula. The work leading to honors is done 
in conferences between students and professors. It should be begun early in 
the student's collegiate career, and in no case may students declare their 
candidacy for honors later than the beginning of their senior year. 

Philosophy 

The department's undergraduate courses are designed to help students 
attain philosophical perspective, clear understanding, and sound criticaJ 
evaluation concerning the nature of man, his place in the universe, and the 
significance of the principal types of human experiences and activities. 

To those students who seek a broad, liberal, and cultural background of 
knowledge, but because of specialized studies have only a minimum of 
free electives, the department offers Philosophy 1, Philosophical Perspectives 
on nature, man, religion, and knowledge, and Philosophy 2, Philosophical 
Perspectives on morality, government, education, and art. For the general 
picture, both courses are recommended; each, however, is available sepa- 
rately, and either may be taken first. 

To students in other fields who wish to explore the philosophy of their 
subjects, the department offers a choice among a group of specifically 
related courses: 52, Philosophy in Literature; 53, Philosophy of Religion; 
151, Ethics; 153, Philosophy of Art; 154, Political and Social Philosophy; 
155, Logic; 156, Philosophy of Science. 



\ 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 151 

To students of literature, history, or the history of ideas, the department 
offers historical courses in ancient, medieval, modern, recent, and contempo- 
rary, Oriental, and American philosophy. The last course is particularly 
relevant for students of American Civilization. 

Philosophy 155, Logic is recommended in the Arts-Law curriculum and 
the Government and Politics program. 

Philosophy 1 or 2 or 154 is required in the Journalism program. 

Minors in philosophy are especially suitable for students majoring in 
English, Literature, the Social Sciences, American Civilization, Psychology, 
and in the pre-Ministry and pre-Lay fields. Interested students should con- 
sult with the chairman of the department. 

Majors in philosophy will include in their program, 101, Ancient Phi- 
losophy; 102, Modern Philosophy; 112, Recent and Contemporary Philoso- 
phy; 151, Ethics, and a selection of at least four other semester courses 
in the department. These will normally include one semester of Topical 
Investigations, the topic to be chosen in consultation with the department 
chairman to meet the student's special interests and needs. 

SPEECH AND DRAMATIC ART 

The courses in this department have two main functions: (1) to pro- 
vide work in public speaking and allied fields which will meet the needs 
of all students in the university; (2) to provide an integrated unit of work 
which will allow a student to major in Speech. A major shall consist 
of a minimum of 30 hours of which 15 hours must be in courses numbered 
100 and above. Prerequisites for Speech majors are Speech 1, 2, 3, 4. Speech 
5, 6 is recommended as an additional prerequisite for those students who 
have not demonstrated effective platform speaking. In meeting the Arts and 
Sciences Natural Science requirement it is recommended that Speech majors 
elect Zoology 1, 16. A student majoring in Speech may concentrate in: (a) 
public speaking; (b) drama; (c) speech sciences; (d) radio. 

in. THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 
Economics 

Economics is a recognized major field in Arts and Sciences leading to 
the A.B. degree. Although this department is administered by the College 
of Business and Public Administration, Arts and Sciences students may 
register for its courses. They may also major in the subject from a liberal 
arts rather than a business administration point of view. For further in- 
formation concerning the courses offered in Economics, see the catalog of 
the College of Business and Public Administration. Freshmen and sopho- 
mores wishing to major in Economics should ask their Lower Division 
adviser about preparation for the major. Juniors and seniors majoring in 
Economics are advised by the faculty of the Economics Department. 



152 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Geography 

Geography is a recognized major field in Arts and Sciences leading to 
the A.B. degree. Although this department is administered by the Col- 
lege of Business and Public Administration, Arts and Sciences students 
may register for its courses. They may also major in the subject from a 
liberal arts rather than a business administration point of view. For 
further information concerning the courses offered in Geography, see the 
catalog of the College of Business and Public Administration. Freshmen 
and sophomores wishing to major in Geography should ask their Lower 
Division adviser about preparation for the major. Juniors and seniors 
majoring in Geography are advised by the faculty of the Geography 
Department. 

Government and Politics 

Governments and Politics is a recognized major field in Arts and Sciences 
leading to the A.B. degree. Although this department is administered 
by the College of Business and Public Administration, Arts and Sciences 
students may register for its courses. They may also major in the sub- 
ject from a liberal arts rather than a business administration point of 
view. For further information concerning the courses offered in Gov- 
ernment and Politics, see the catalog of the College of Business and 
Public Administration. Freshmen and sophomores wishing to major in 
Geography should ask their Lower Division adviser about preparation for 
the major. Juniors and seniors majoring in Geography are advised by the 
faculty of the Geography Department. 

History 

The study of history is basic for the cultural background of all fields of 
knowledge. In addition, the Department of History offers a curriculum 
which is designed to assist students who wish to prepare themselves for 
entering several fields of professional activity. Specifically these fields are 
(1) teaching history and the social sciences at the secondary level; (2) the 
field of journalism, which requires a broad historical background; (3) re- 
search and archival work; (4) the diplomatic service. In addition, the 
department offers adequate preparation and training for those who intend 
to pursue higher degrees and prepare themselves for teaching at the col- 
lege level. 

Undergraduate history majors must complete the following departmental 
requirements : 

1. Every major is required to complete a minimum of 24 semester 
hours in advanced courses, with the following exceptions: (a) the 
total may be reduced by 3 credit hours for those students who, in 
addition to the prerequisites, have taken 6 credits in other courses 
under the 100 level; and (b) the total may be reduced by 6 credit 
hours for those who, in addition to the prerequisites, have com- 
pleted 12 semester hours in courses under the 100 level. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 153 

2. No less than 15 nor more than 18 semester hours in advanced courses 
should be taken in any one field of history, e. g., European, Amer- 
ican, or Latin American. 

3. Prerequisites for majors in history are History 5 and 6 (required of 
all college students) and History 1 and 2. 

4. All majors are required to take the proseminar during their senioi 
year. 

5. No grades of "D" in the major field will be counted toward com- 
pleting the major requirements for graduation. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

The Department of Psychology is classed in both the Division of Social 
Sciences (for the B.A. degree) and the division of Biological Sciences (for 
the B.S. degree) and offers educational programs related to both of these 
fields. The functions of the undergraduate curriculum in Psychology are 
to provide an organized study of the behavior of man, in terms of the 
biological conditions and social factors which influence such behavior. In 
addition, the undergraduate program in Psychology is arranged to provide 
a level of training that will equip the students to enter certain professional 
pursuits which require a background in this field. It is important to note, 
however, that the undergraduate degree in Psychology is not in itself 
recognized as carrying any professional status. 

The departmental requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts are as 
follows : 

Psych. 1. Introduction to Psychology (3). 

Psych. 4. General Psychology (3). 

Psych. 106. Statistical Methods in Psychology (3). 

Psych. 121. Social Psychology (3). 

Psych. 145. Introduction to Experimental Psychology (4). 

Psych. 150. Tests and Measurements (3). 

And 6 hours from any two of the following courses: 

Psych. 126. Developmental Psychology (3). 

Psych. 128. Human Motivation (3). 

Psych. 142. Techniques of Interrogation (3). 
Plus 6 additional hours in other courses in Psychology, making a total of 
31 hours. 

The departmental requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Sciences 
are the same as the above with the following exceptions: 

Psych. 126. Developmental Psychology (3) is substituted for Psych. 
121, Social Psychology (3). 



154 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The particular three courses from which 6 hours of work may be chosen 
are: 

Psych. 180. Physiological Psychology (3). 

Psych. 181. Animal Behavior (3). 

Psych. 195. Minor Problems in Psychology (3). 

In addition to the general University requirements and those of the 
College of Arts and Sciences, as well as the above requirements in the 
Department of Psychology, the student will take a minimum of 18 hours 
in a minor curriculum and must include at least 6 hours of courses in the 
100 series in a single department. The minor program will be organized for 
each student with the approval of the Department of Psychology. For 
the Bachelor of Arts degree the minor program will ordinarily consist of 
courses in the Social Sciences. For the Bachelor of Sciences degree the 
minor program will ordinarily consist of courses in the Biological and 
Physical Sciences, with at least 6 hours in the 100 series in Zoology. 

For students who plan to enter graduate and professional work in Psy- 
chology, it is recommended that among their minor or elective programs 
they take courses in Mathematics, Zoology, and Physics. 

SOCIOLOGY 

The student majoring in Sociology will gain a liberal education as well 
as develop toward a professional field of specialization which is focused on 
an understanding of human relationships. In view of the basic nature of 
human relationships in all lines of activity, many of the courses in sociology 
are designed so as to be available to students of other specialized interests. 
The course offerings in the department include the major basic areas in 
the field of sociology such as The Community, Criminology, Cultural Anthro- 
pology, The Family, Industrial Sociology, Rural Sociology, Population, 
Urban Sociology, Social Problems, Social Psychology, Social Theory, and 
Social Welfare. A considerable degree of specialization is possible within 
each of these fields. The student who majors in sociology may acquire either 
a comprehensive view of the entire field by selecting a range of courses from 
several of these basic areas or he may concentrate in any one of them. In 
any event, the student majoring in Sociology will consult the head of that 
department as to the appropriate advisor within the department for the 
selected area of specialization. 

Departmental requirements for all who major in Sociology consist of a 
minimum of 30 semester hours of Sociology (including Sociology 1) of 
which 12 hours must be in courses numbered 100 or above. Only credit 
with a grade of C or more can be counted as a part of the major require- 
ment. The following sociology courses are required: 

Sociology 1 — The Sociology of American Life (University require- 
ment) 

Sociology 2 — Principles of Sociology 

Sociology 183 — Social Statistics 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 155 

Sociology 186 — Sociological Theory 
Sociology 196 — Senior Seminar 
The curriculum for the first two years for all majors in Sociology is as 
follows : cr X 

Freshman Year I II 

EnK. 1. 2 — Composition and Readings in American Literature 3 8 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life S 

G. & P. 1 — American Government , . . , 8 

Foreign Langrnage 3 3 

•Mathematics or Natural Science 3 or 4 3 or 4 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking 2 2 

L. S. 1, 2 — Library Science 1 1 

A. S. 1, 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 8 

Hea. 2, 4 — Hygiene I, II (Women) 2 2 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Totel 18-20 18-20 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6 — Composition and Readings in World or English 

Literature 3 3 

Hist. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 8 

Foreign Language 3 3 

•Mathematics or Natural Science 3 or 4 3 or 4 

••Soc. 2 — Principles of Sociology 3 3 

tElective 3 

A. S. 8, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Total 16-20 16-20 

• In the Crime Control Curriculum, the student will take Zool. 1 in his first semester 
freshman year and then take the sequence Zool. 14, 15 in the sophomore year. This will 
leave space for an elective in the second semester of the freshman year which ordinarily 
will be Soc. 2. 

• If the student fulfills his requirements in the natural sciences (12 credit hours) in 
three semesters, he will have another elective in the second semester of his sophomore year 
which probably will be selected from his major or minor field. 

••In the Crime Control Curriculum the student will take Psych. 1 instead of Soc. 2 
since he will have taken this latter subject in the second semester of his freshman year, 
t In the Crime Control Curriculum the student will take Soc. 52. 

The student seeking to specialize in any of the areas mentioned, including 
the curricula indicated below, or seeking a comprehensive view of the whole 
field of sociology will, with the aid of his advisor, select the remainder of 
his required courses in those areas which best meet his needs. Students 
who wish to qualify for public school teaching along with the major in 
sociology should consult their advisor no later than their sophomore year 
in order to arrange their minor sequence in the field of education. Students 
specializing in Preprofessional Social Work or Crime Control will find their 
junior and senior year curricula listed below. It is recommended that stu- 
dents interested in these, as well as other areas of sociology, consult with 
the departmental advisors before their junior year. 



156 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Preprofessional Social Work Curriculum 

This curriculum comprises a four-year preprofessional program in the 
College of Arts and Sciences with a major in sociology and supporting 
subjects, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. The curriculum combines 
a liberal education with a sound foundation for the general field of social 
service and provides: (1) preprofessional preparation for students plan- 
ning to pursue graduate professional study in social service; (2) a back- 
ground for responsible civic leadership in the field of social welfare for 
students who are not planning a professional social service career, but who 
as citizens will be active in various programs of social welfare and com- 
munity betterment; (3) basic training for students who may go immediately 
upon graduation from college into certain social service positions for which 
graduate professional education is not required. Completion of this cur- 
riculum with the B.A. degree meets the educational qualifications for many 
beginning positions in public welfare, public assistance, social services to 
individual and families, social security, and other areas of social service. 

The first three years of this curriculum are devoted to a broad liberal 
education with emphasis on the study of the fundamentals of human asso- 
ciation, social motivation, and societal organization. The fourth year in- 
cludes an introduction to the basic principles, methods, and organization of 
the social service. Flexibility to meet the varying interests and needs of 
individual students is provided by the electives in the junior and senior years. 

I — Semester — ^ 
Junior Year I II 

Soc. 13 or 14 — Rural Sociology (or Urban Sociology) 3 .... 

Soc 62 — Criminology 8 

Soc. 131 — Introduction to Social Service 3 .... 

Soc. 186 — Sociological Theory .... 8 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 3 .... 

G. & P. 4 or 5 — State Government or Municipal Gov't and Admin 3 .... 

Electives in related subjects 3 9 

Total IB 16 

Senior Year 

Soc 118 — *Community Organization .... 3 

Soc. 171— ♦Family and Child Welfare 3 

Soc 173 — Social Security 3 .... 

Soc 174— »Public Welfare 8 

Soc 183 — Social Statistics 3 .... 

Soc. 191 — Social Field Training (if available, otherwise substitute.... 

elective) 3 or 3 

Soc. 196 — Senior Seminar 8 

Electives in related subjects 3 or 3 

ToUl 16 16 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AXD SCIENCES 157 

Crime Control Curriculum 

This curriculum comprises a four-year preprofessional program in the 
College of Arts and Sciences, with a major in sociology and a minor in 
psychology, leading to the degi'ee of Bachelor of Arts. The curriculum com- 
bines a liberal education with basic training for the field of crime and 
delinquency prevention and control. It is designed specifically for students 
preparing for positions in correctional and penal institutions, institutions 
for juveniles, juvenile courts, probation and parole services, the so-called 
"area projects," research in juvenile delinqunecy and criminology, and 
similar positions. 

t — Semester — \ 
Junior Year I II 

Soc. 61 — Social Pathology 3 

Soc. 131 — Introduction to Social Service 3 .... 

Soc. 163 — Juvenile Delinquency 3 .... 

Soc. 164 — •Crime and Delinquency Prevention .... 3 

Soc. 183 — Social Statistics 3 

Soc. 186 — Sociological Theory 8 

B. A. 10 — Organization and Control 2 

Econ. 87 — Fundamentals of Economics .... 8 

Psych. 6 — Mental Hygiene .... 8 

Psych 126 — Child Psychology 3 

Electives 6 

ToUl 17 17 

Senior Year 

Soc 114— The City 3 

Soc 118 — 'Community Organization .... 3 

Soc 146 — Social Control 3 .... 

Soc 166 — 'Institutional Treatment of Criminals and Delinquents .... 8 

Soc. 191 — Social Field Training (if available, otherwise substitute.... 

elective) 3 or 3 

Soc. 196 — Senior Seminar 8 

Psych. 131 — Abnormal Psychology 3 .... 

Psych. 160 — Tests and Measurements 8 .... 

Psych. 161 — Psychological Techniques in Personnel Administration or a 

8 hours electiye in Psychology .... 8 

Electives . . ■ . or .... 

Total 16 16 

• Supervised field trips and observation of the functioning of representative agencies, 
institutions, and organizations are required in connection with these courses. 

IV. THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 
GENERAL BIOLOGICAL CURRICULUM 

A curriculum has been prepared for students who are interested in 
biology, but whose interests are not centralized in any one of the biological 
sciences. The courses as outlined include work in Bacteriology, Botany, 
Entomology, and Zoology, and introduce the student to the general prin- 
ciples and methods of each of these biological sciences. 



158 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



By the proper selection of courses during the junior and senior years, a 
student may concentrate his work sufficiently in any of the fields of study 
to be able to continue in graduate work in that field. Also by a proper 
selection of electives, the educational requirements of the State Department 
of Education for certification can be met. A student who wishes to work 
for a certificate must plan his entire program before the beginning of his 
junior year. 

This curriculum requires the completion of at least 45 credits in the 
biological sciences which collectively constitute a major and a minor. Of 
these credits at least 18 must be at the 100 level and taken in at least two 
of the four departments. 

A junior or senior following this curriculum will be advised by the de- 
partment in which he plans to do the most work. 

General Biological Sciences Curriculum 

I — Semester — ^ 
Freshman Year I II 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 3 3 

See. 1 — Sociology of American Life 3 .... 

G. & P. 1 — American Government 3 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 4 

Bot. 1 — General Botany 4 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 4 4 

Sp. 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 1 1 

A. S. 1, 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Hea. 2, 4 — Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 18-19 18-19 

Sophomore Yea/r** 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6 — Composition and World or English Literature 3 3 

tH. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

Ent. 1 — Introductory Entomology 3 .... 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology 4 

Math. 10, 11 — Algebra, Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry 3 3 

Foreigrn Language 3 3 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 16-19 17-20 



•* Students who wish to emphasize certain phases of the biological sciences should elect 
Chemistry 31, 32, 33, 34, or Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38, as directed by their advisor. 

t A student may be advised to postpone History 5, 6 to the junior year in order that 
2ie may elect a second course in the biological sciences which he intends to emphasize. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 159 

c — Semester — i 

Junior Year I II 

Phys. 10, 11 — Mechanics and Heat, Sound Optics, Magnetism and 

Electricity 4 4 

Foreign Language (Continued) 3 3 

JElectives (Biological Sciences) 6 6 

Electives 2 2 

Total 15 15 

Students who wish to obtain a teacher's certificate must elect H. D. Ed. 100-101 during 
their junior year. 

Senior Year 

JElectives (Biological Sciences) 6 6 

Electives 6 6 

Total 15 15 



t Psychology 126, 180, 181, 195 may be counted as part of the required 45 credits in 
biological sciences, but these courses may NOT be used to satisfy the requirement of 18 
credits at the 100 level in two of the four departments. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

The Department of Bacteriology functions with three purposes in view. 
One of these is to provide fundamental training for those students who 
choose bacteriology as a major subject. Two major fields of study are pro- 
vided: (1) applied bacteriology, in preparation for such positions as dairy, 
sanitary, or agricultural bacteriologists in federal, state, and commercial 
laboratories, and (2) medical bacteriology, or the more recently recognized 
specialty of medical technology in relation to hospital, public health, and 
clinic laboratories. The second objective of the department is to provide 
desirable courses for those students who are majoring in closely allied 
departments and desire vital supplementary information. Every effort has 
been made to plan these courses so that they satisfy the demands of these 
related departments as well as the needs of those students who have chosen 
bacteriology as a major. The third purpose of the department is to encour- 
age and foster original thought in the pursuit of research. 

Bacteriology Curriculums 

The field of bacteriology is too vast in scope to permit specialization in 
the early stages of undergraduate study. Accordingly, the applied curri- 
culum outlined below includes the basic courses in bacteriology and allied 
fields. 

The course in Advanced General Bacteriology (Bad. 5) is required for all 
bacteriology majors, and should follow General Bacteriology (Bact. 1). 
Bacteriology 5 is not required as a prerequisite for upper division courses 
for majors in other departments provided the student has been introduced 
to certain aspects of bacteriology, or their equivalent, pertinent to their 
specialty. Bacteriology 1, however, is required. 



160 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The sequence of courses in the following curriculum should be pursued 

as closely as possible, although it is realized that some deviation may be 
necessary. Sufficient latitude is provided in the senior year for the student 
to obtain several courses that are correlated with his particular interests. 
All students planning a major in Bacteriology should consult the Head 
of the Department during the first year concerning his particular field of 
study his choice of a minor. The minor should be chosen only from the 
biological or physical sciences. Chemistry, as outlined below, is the pre- 
ferred minor. 

Applied Bacteriology Curriculum ^ Semestei > 

Freshman Year I II 

EnfiT. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 3 8 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life I .... 

G. A P. 1 — American Government .... i 

Sp. 18, 19— Introductory Speech 1 1 

Chem. 1, 8 — General Chemistry 4 4 

Math. 10— Algebra 8 

Math. 11 — Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry .... 8 

A. S. 1. 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 8 8 

Hea. 2. 4 — Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Physical Activities 1 I 

Total 17-18 17-18 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 8, 4 or 6, 6 — Composition and World or English Literature 8 8 

French or German* 8 8 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology 4 .... 

Bact. 6 — Advanced General Bacteriology .... 4 

Chem. 81. 82, 88, 84 — Elements of Organic Chemistry 8 8 

Hist. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization 8 S 

A. S. 8, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 8 8 

Physical Activities I I 

ToUl 17-20 17-20 

Junior Year 

French or German (Continued) • 3 8 

Physics 10, 11 — Fundamentals of Physics 4 4 

Bact. 101 — Pathogenic Bacteriology 4 .... 

Bact. 53 — Sanitary Bacteriology 4 

Chem. 161, 162, 163, 164 — Biochemistry 4 4 

Electives 3 8 

ToUl 18 18 

Senior Year 

Bact 60 — Journal Club 1 1 

Bact. 103— Serology * 

Bact. 161— Systematic Bacteriology 4 .... 

Elective* 9 • 

Total i* 1* 

• Fr. or Ger. 6, 7 — Intermediate Scientific French or German required. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



161 



Medical Technology Curriculum 

This is a professional curriculum intended for those students who desire 
to prepare for technical work in hospital, clinical, and public health labora- 
tories. Specialization in the field of Medical Technology begins in the 
sophomore year and becomes more intense during the junior year. Em- 
phasis in this curriculum is upon fundamental courses in Bacteriology, 
Chemistry, and Zoology. 

The student who follows this curriculum is encouraged to avail himself of 
opportunities to work in medical laboratories during the summer months. 
The optimum plan shall be to place the prospective technologist in a labora- 
tory as an apprentice as soon as his training permits. 

I — Semester — ^ 
Freshman Year I II 

Eag. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life 3 .... 

G. & P. 1 — American Government .... 3 

Sp. 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 1 1 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 4 4 

Math. 10 — Algebra 3 

Math. 11 — Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry .... 3 

A. S. 1, 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Hea. 2, 4 — Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 17-18 17-18 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6 — Composition and World or Ehiglish Literature 3 3 

French of German* 3 8 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology i 

Bact. 6 — Advanced General Bacteriology .... 4 

Chem. 31, 82, 38, 34 — Elements of Organic Chemistry 3 8 

Physics 10, 11 — Fundamentals of Physics 4 4 

A. S. 8, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 8 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 18-21 18-21 

Junior Year 

French or German (Continued) • 3 8 

Hist. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 8 8 

Bact. 101 — Pathogenic Bacteriology 4 .... 

Bact. 103— Serology 4 

Chem. 161, 162, 163, 164— Biochemistry 4 4 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 4 .... 

Zool. 106 — Histological Technique 3 

Total 18 17 



• Ft. or Ger. 6, 7 — Intermediate Scientific French or German required. 



162 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

I — Semester — s 
Senior Year I II 

Bact. 106 — Clinical Methods 4 

Bact. 68 — Sanitary Bacteriology .... 4 

Bact. 108 — Epidemiology and Public Health .... % 

Bact. 188 — Dairy Bacteriology 4 .... 

Zool. 14, 15 — Human Anatomy and Physiology 4 4 

Electiyes 4 4 

ToUl 1« 1« 

BOTANY 

Botany is a recognized major field in Arts and Sciences leading to the 
B.S. degree. Although this department is administered by the College of 
Agriculture, students may register for its courses and major in the subject 
just as if it were a department of the College of Arts and Sciences. For 
further information about the department see the catalog of the College of 
Agriculture. Freshmen and sophomores wishing to major in Botany should 
ask their Lower Division adviser about preparation for the major. Juniors 
and seniors majoring in Botany are advised by the faculty of the Botany 
Department. 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Entomology is a recognized major field in Arts and Sciences leading to 
the B.S. degree. Although this department is administered by the College 
of Agriculture, students may register for its courses and major in the sub- 
ject just as if it were a department of the College of Arts and Sciences. 
For further information about the department see the catalog of the 
College of Agriculture. Freshmen and sophomores wishing to major in 
Entomology should ask their Lower Division adviser about preparation for 
the major. Juniors and seniors majoring in Entomology are advised by 
the faculty of the Entomology Department. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

The Department of Psychology is classed in both the Division of Biological 
Sciences and the Division of Social Sciences, and offers educational pro- 
grams related to both these fields. 

Further details on the two available undergraduate curricula in Psy- 
chology are given on pages 153-154. 

ZOOLOGY 

The Department of Zoology offers courses which train the student for 
professional work in several fields: teaching in college and secondary 
schools, research and regulatory work in the biological bureaus of the 
United States Government, work in the biological departments of state 
and city governments, and research in industrial laboratories. 

Two courses of study have been established as described below. In each 
of these curricula the fundamental courses are included and ample oppor- 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



163 



tunity is offered for the election of additional courses in the Department 
of Zoology or related departments so that the student may plan his training 
toward the particular professional work in which he is interested. 

A grade of "D" in a course in zoology will not be counted toward com- 
pleting the major requirements for graduation. 

Zoology Curriculum „ a 

f o6m08t0t* s 

Freshman Year / // 

Ens. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature g I 

Sec. 1 — Sociology of American Life S .... 

G. A P. 1 — American Goyernment I 

Zool. 2, 8 — Fundamentals of Zoology 4 4 

Chem. 1, S — General Chemistry 4 4 

A. S. 1, 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) I S 

Hea. 2, 4 — Hygiene (Women ) 2 2 

Phyaical Activities 1 l 

Total 17-18 17-18 

Sophomore Year 

Ens. 8, 4 or 6. 6 — Composition and World or English Literature 3 8 

H. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization 8 8 

ZooL 6 — Comparative Vertebrate Morphology 4 .... 

Zool. 20 — Vertebrate Elmbryology .... 4 

Math. 10, 11 — Algebra, Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry 8 8 

Eleetivea 8 8 

A. S. 8, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T, C. (Men) 8 8 

Physical Activities 1 1 

ToUl 17-20 17-«8 

Junior Year 

•Zool. 108 — Animal Histology 4 

•Zool. 106 — Histological Technique .... 8 

Zool. 104 — Genetics 3 

Zool. 121 — Principles of Animal Ecology .... 3 

Phys, 10, 11 — Mechanics and Heat; Sound, Optics, Magnetism and 

Electricity 4 4 

Foreign Language 8 8 

Electives (Zoology) or 4 or 3 

Electives 3 8 

Total 17 16 

Senior Year 

Zool. 102 — General Animal Physiology .... 4 

Speech 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 1 1 

Foreign Language (Continued) 3 8 

Elective (Zoology) 4 

Electives 8 8 

Total 16 16 



n«et OB*. 



164 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Fisheries Biology 

The aquatic resources of Maryland offer an excellent opportunity for 
the study of Fishery Biology and Marine Zoology. The Chesapeake Bay 
and its tributaries, representing many habitats, constitute an excellent 
laboratory for training in these fields and commercial fisheries of the state 
offer additional opportunity for studies in methods, management and 
conservation. 

The following curriculum prepares the student for specialization in this 
field. In addition to the courses as outlined, which he will complete at 
College Park, he is expected to spend part of his summers in study or 
practical work on the Chesapeake Bay. 

The minor field of study for this curriculum will depend upon the specific 
phase of Fishery Biology in which the student is primarily interested. A 
selection of courses to complete the minor reqxiirements will be made by the 
student in consultation with his adviser. The minor may be selected from 
Chemistry, Botany, Entomology, or Bacteriology, depending upon the stu- 
dent's objective. All students in Fishery Biology are required to complete, 
from electives. Chemistry 5 and Chemistry 19 at some time during their 
course. 



Fishery Biology Curriculum r—Semestei , 

Freshman Year I II 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 3 8 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life 3 .... 

G. & P. 1 — American Government .... 3 

Zool. 2, 3 — Fundamentals of Zoology 4 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 4 

Sp. 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 1 

A. S. 1, 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 

Hea. 2, 4 — Hygiene (Women) 2 

Physical Activities 1 

Total 18-19 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 8, 4 or 5, 6 — Composition and World or English Literature 8 

H. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 

Math. 10, 11 — Algebra, Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry 8 

Zool. B — Comparative Vertebrate Morphology 4 

Zool. 20 — Vertebrate Embryology 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T, C. (Men) 3 

Physical Activities 1 

Electives 4 

Total 18-21 18-21 



18-19 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 165 

I — Semester — s 
Junior Yea/r I II 

German* 3 3 

Pbys. 10, H — Mechanics and Heat; Sound, Optics, Magnetism and 

Electricity 4 4 

Zool. 102 — General Animal Physiology .... ,4 

Zool. 118 — Invertebrate Morphology 4 .... 

Zool. 121 — Principles of Animal Elcology .... t 

Zool. 127— Ichthyology 4 

Electives 3 4 

ToUl 18 18 

Senior Year 

German (Continued) • 8 3 

Zool. 125, 126 — Fishery Biology and Management 3 3 

Electives 12 12 

ToUl 18 18 

• G«r. 6, 7 re<n>ired. 

V. THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES 
Curriculum for General Physical Sciences , 

This general curriculum is offered for students who desire a basic 
knowledge of the physical sciences without immediate specialization in 
any one of them. By proper selection of courses in the latter semesters, a 
student may concentrate in the field of his choice. A number of selections 
are possible and there is considerable freedom in the choice of electives. 

Thirty-six hours in addition to underclass departmental requirements in 
the three departments of Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics are re- 
quired. Of these 36 hours, 18 hours must be of 100 level and taken in at 
least two of the three departments. 

(This curriculum represents only two of the possible selections of courses 
open to a student majoring in General Physical Science. Beginning students 
who want to select this field as a major should consult their advisor before 
making up their schedules.) 

Freshman Year 

Chem 1, S — General Chemistry 1 

or I 4 4 

Phys. 10, 11 — Fundamentals of Physics J 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and Readings in American Literature 3 8 

Math. 14, 15. 17 — Plane Trigonometry, College Algebra and Geometry. 5 4 

G. & P. 1 — American Government S .... 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life .... 8 

A. S. 1, 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Hea. 2, 4— Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 17-18 17-18 



166 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Sophomore Year 

Chem 1, t — General Chemistry. 



Chem. 11, 82, 88. 84 — Elements of Organie Chemistry and Laboratory 
Phyt. SO, (1 — Applied Mechanics 



Phys. 10, 11 — Fundamentals of Physics 

Enr. 8, 4— Composition and Readings in World Literature. 



Eng. 8, 6 — Composition and Reading, mainly in English Literature. 

Sp. 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 

Math. 20, 21— Calculus 

A. S. 8, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 

Physical Activities 



Semester — > 
/ // 

4-8 4-8 



1 1 

4 4 

3 8 

1 1 



ToUl 



ie-19 



16-19 



Junior Year 

Foreign Language 

H. 6. 6 — History of American Civilization. 

Electives 

Elective* in Physical Sciences 



Tout. 



17 



Students who wish to obtain a teacher's certificate must elect H. D. Ed. 100-101 during 
their Junior year. 

Senior Year 

Foreign Language (Continued) 3 8 

Electives in Physical Sciences 4 4 

Electives 8 8 

Total 16 18 



Chemistry 

The science of chemistry is so vast in scope that completion of a well- 
planned course of undergraduate study is necessary before specialization. 
The curriculum outlined below describes such a course of study. The se- 
quence of courses given should be followed as closely as possible; it is real- 
ized, however, that some deviation from this sequence may be necessary 
toward the end of the prog^'am. All of the courses in chemistry listed, un- 
less otherwise designated, are required of students majoring in chemistry. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



167 



Chemistry Curriculum ^Semestei — > 

Freshman Year I II 

Ghent. 1, S — G«neral Chemistry 4 4 

Enir. 1, 2 — Composition and Readings in American Literature S ■ 

Math. 14 — Plane Trigonometry 2 .... 

Math. 16 — College Algebra S 

Math. 17 — Analytic Geometry .... 4 

G. & P. 1 — American Government t .... 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life .... I 

A. S. 1. 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 8 t 

Hea. 2, 4 — Hygiene (Women) 2 t 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 18-19 

Sophomore Year 

Chem. 16, 17 — Qualitative Analysis 8 

Chem. 85, 37— Elementary Organic Chemistry 2 

Chem. 86, 88 — Elementary Organic Laboratory 2 

Speech 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 1 

*(jerman 3 

Math. 20, 21— Calculus 4 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T, C. (Men) 3 

Physical Activities 1 

Total 16-19 

Junior Year 

Chem. 21, 28 — Quantitative Analysis 4 

Chem. 141, 148 — Advanced Organic Chemistry 2 

Chem. 142^Advanced Organic Laboratory 2 

or 

Chem. 160 — Organic Quantitative Analysis 2 

Chem. 144 — Advanced Organic Laboratory 

or 

Chem. 150 — Organic Quantitative Analysis .... 

••Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and Readings in World Literature 3 

**Eng. 6, 6 — Composition and Readings, Mainly in English Literature... 3 

'German (Continued ) 3 

Phy». 20, 21 t 

Total 19 

Senior Year 

H. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization I 

Chem. 101 — Advanced Inorganic Chemistry .... 

Chem. 187, 189 — Physical Chemistry 8 

Chem. 188, 190 — Physical Chemistry Laboratory 2 

Chem. 146 — The Identification of Organic Compounds 2 

Elective* in Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Physics, or Mathematics . . 5-8 

Total 16-18 16-li 



17-18 



i 
t 
t 

1 
8 
4 
8 

1 

16-19 



8 
t 
8 
S 

6-8 



* Ger. 6, 7 required. 
•• Elect one. 



168 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Mathematics 

This curriculum offers training in the fundamentals of Mathematics in 
preparation for teaching, industrial work, or graduate work in Mathematics. 

Students majoring in mathematics who complete freshman and sophomore 
courses in mathematics with distinction are eligible to try for honors in 
mathematics. To receive the honors degree in mathematics, a student must: 
1. Complete the curriculum in mathematics with an average grade of B in 
all subjects; 2. Pass an honors examination in mathematics at the end of 
the senior year; 3. Write a satisfactory thesis on an assigned topic in 
mathematics in the senior year. Students who wish to try for honors in 
mathematics should consult the Head of the department at the conclusion 
of their sophomore year. 

No grade of D in the major field will be counted toward completion of 
the requirements for graduation in the mathematics curriculum. An average 
grade of C is required in the minor. 

The mathematics curriculum offers two options depending on the choice 
of electives in the Junior and Senior years. 

Pure Mathematics option. Electives in mathematics must include three 
hours in each of the fields of algebra and geometry. 

Applied Mathematics option. Electives in mathematics must include 
six hours in the fields of algebra and geometry, and at least six hours 
in the field of applied mathematics. Minor electives will be selected from 
the Physical Sciences or Engineering in consultation with the Head of the 
department of Mathematics. 

Mathematics Curriculum 

t — Semester — \ 

Freshman Year I II 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and Readings in American Literature 3 S 

Speech 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 1 1 

French or German 3 8 

G. & P. 1 — American Government S .... 

See. 1 — Sociology of American Life .... 8 

Math. 14 — Plane Trigonometry 2 .... 

Math. IB-— College Algebra 8 .... 

Math. 17 — Analytic Geometry .... 4 

A. S. 1. 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 S 

Hea. 2, 4 — Hygiene (Women) 2 t 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 18 or 19 17 or 18 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



169 



-Semester — ^ 



Sophomore Year I 

Ener. 8, 4 or 6, 6 — Composition and Readings in World or English 

Literature 3 

French or German (continued) 3 

Math. 20, 21— Calculus 4 

Phys. 20. 21 — General Physics 5 

H. B, 6 — History of American Civilization (Women) 3 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 

Physical Activities 1 

Total 19 

Junior Year 

Math. 110, 111 — Advanced Calculus 3 

Electives — Mathematics 8 

Electives — Minor 3-6 

Electives 3 

H. B, 6 — History of American Civilization (Men> 3 

Elective (Women) 3 

Total 15-18 

Senior Year 

Math. 114 — Differential Equations 3 

Electives — Mathematics 3 

Electives — Minor 3 

Electives 6 

Total IB 



// 

3 

3 
4 
5 
3 
3 
1 



3 

3 

3-6 
3 

3 



15-18 



Physics 

The physics curriculum is designed for students who desire training in 
the fundamentals of physics in preparation for teaching or graduate work, 
and for positions in governmental, industrial, and biophysical laboratories. 

Courses comprising the minor may be selected in any allied field in accord- 
ance with the needs of the student. 



Physics Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and Readings in American Literature 8 

Sp. 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 1 

Math. 14, 15, 17 — Plane Trigonometry, College Algebra, Analytic 

Geometry 5 

G. & P. 1 — American Government 3 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life .... 

Foreign Language or Physics 3-4 

A. S. 1. 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 

Hea. 2, 4 — Hygiene (Women) 2 

Physical Activities 1 

Total 18-20 



3 

3-4 
3 
2 
1 



17-19 



170 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



I — Semester — > 

Sophomore Year I II 

Eng. 8, 4 or 6, 6 — Composition and Readings in World or English 

Literature 8 8 

Math. SO. 21— Differential and Integral Calculua 4 4 

Foreign Language (Continued) 3 8 

Physics 4-6 4-6 

H. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization (Women) 8 8 

A. S. 8, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 18-19 18-19 

Junior Year 

H. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization (Men) 8 8 

Physics 6 i 

Foreign Langague (Continued). Mathematics, or Chemistry 6-7 6-7 

Eleetives 3 8 

Total 17-18 17-18 

Senior Year 

Chemistry. Engineering, Mathematics and Physics 16-17 16-17 

ToUl 16-17 16-17 



VI. PRE-PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 
COMBINED PROGRAM IN ARTS AND SCIENCES AND LAW 

The School of Law of the University requires at least three years of 
academic credit for admission to the school. Many students plan to take 
a four-year program for the degree of Bachelor of Arts before entering 
law school. Such students may select any appropriate subject for their 
major. 

The University offers also a combined program in arts and sciences and 
law leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws. Stu- 
dents pursuing this combined program will spend the first three years in 
the College of Arts and Sciences at College Park. During this period they 
will complete a prescribed curriculum in prelegal studies for a total of 90 
semester hours in addition to the requirements in physical activities and 
military science, and they must complete the requirements for graduation, 
as indicated below. If students enter the combined program with advanced 
standing, at least the third full year's work — i. e., 30 semester hours of 
credit — must be completed in residence at College Park. After the success- 
ful completion of one year of full-time law courses in the School of Law 
in Baltimore (or the equivalent in semester hours of work in the Evening 
Division of the School of Law), the degree of Bachelor of Arts may be 
awarded on the recommendation of the Dean of the School of Law, pro- 
vided the student has earned at least a total of 120 credits exclusive of 
military science and physical activities with at least a C average in his 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



171 



work at College Park and at last a C average in 30 semester hours of 
work in Baltimore. The degree of Bachelor of Laws may be awarded upon 
the completion of the combined program. The completion of a year's work 
in the Law School in Baltimore constitutes a major, and the student is 
required to complete a satisfactory minor at College Park, Recommended 
fields for the minor are English, Economics, Government and Politics, His- 
tory, Philosophy, Psychology, and Sociology. There are required courses 
in the sophomore year in some of these fields. Students should use the 
electives available during that year to meet these requirements. 



// 



Arts-Law Curriculum , — Semest 

Freshman Year I 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and Reading in American Literature S 

Science or Mathematics t 

G. & P. 1 — American Government ] 

and I 3 

Soc 1 — Sociology of American Life J 

Foreign Language I 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking t 

L. S. 1, 2 — Library Methods 1 

A. S. 1. 2— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 

Physical Activities 1 

Hea. 2, 4 — Hygiene (Women) 2 

Total 18-19 18-1» 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and Readings in World Literature "I 

or I 3 3 

Eng. B, 6 — Composition and Readings in English Literature J 

Science and Mathematics 3 

Hist. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 

Foreign Language (continued) 3 

A. S. 8, 4— Basic R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 

Physical Activities 1 

Totol 16-19 

Junior Year 

'Minor 6 or 9 

Electivea 9 or 6 

Total 16 



8 
8 
8 
8 

1 

18-19 



6 or 9 
9 or 6 



IS 



* The selection of courses for the minor must meet the approval of the •tudent'a advlaor. 



172 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

COMBINED PROGRAM IN ARTS AND SCIENCES AND DENTISTRY 

The School of Dentistry of the University requires at least two years 
of academic credit for admission. Many students plan to take a four-year 
program for the degree of Bachelor of Sciences before entering the School 
of Dentistry. Such students may select any appropriate subject for their 
major. 

The University offers also a combined program in Arts and Sciences and 
Dentistry leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Sciences and Doctor of 
Dental Surgery. Students pursuing this combined program will spend the 
first three years in the College of Arts and Sciences at College Park. 
During this period they will complete a prescribed curriculum in pre- 
dental studies for a total of 90 semester hours in addition to the require- 
nients for graduation, as indicated below. If students enter the combined 
program with advanced standing, at least the third full year's work — i. e., 
30 semester hours of credit — must be completed in residence in College 
Park. After the successful completion of one year of full-time dental 
courses in the School of Dentistry in Baltimore, the degree of Bachelor of 
Sciences may be awarded on the recommendation of the Dean of the School 
of Dentistry, provided the student has earned at least a total of 120 semes- 
ter hours credit exclusive of military science and physical activities with 
at least a "C" average in his work at College Park and at least a "C" 
average in his work in Baltimore. The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery 
may be awarded on completion of the combined program. The completion 
of a year's work in the School of Dentistry in Baltimore constitutes a 
major, and the student is required to complete a satisfactory minor at Col- 
lege Park. Recommended fields for the minor are those sciences basic to 
the study of dentistry. There are required courses in the sophomore year 
in some of these fields. Students should use the electives available during 
that year to meet such prerequisite requirements. 

Arts-Dentistry Curriculum 

f — Semester — \ 

Freshman Year I II 

Ene. 1, 2 — Composition and Readings in American Literature 3 3 

Zool. 2, 3 — Fundamentals of Zoology 4 4 

. Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 4 4 

Math. 10, 11 — Algebra, Trigonometry, Analytic Geometry 3 8 

Speech 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 1 1 

Physical Activities 1 1 

A. S. 1. 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Hea. 2, 4 — Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

ToUl .......... ^ 18-19 18-19 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 173 

r — Semester — ^ 
Sophomore Year I II 

Ensr. 3, 4 or 5, 6 — Composition and World or English Literature 3 3 

See. 1 — Sociology of American Life ] 

and I 3 3 

G. & P. 1 — American Government 

Chem. 35, 36, 37, 38 — Organic Chemistry 4 4 

Phys. 10, 11 — Fundamentals of Physics 4 4 

♦Modern Language 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Total 18-21 18-21 

Junior Year 

Modern Language (continued) 3 3 

H. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

Approved Minor Courses 9 9 

Electives 3 3 

Totel 18 18 

Senior Year 

The curriculum of the first year of the School of Dentistry of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland is accepted by the College of Arts and Sciences as 
the fourth year (major sequence) of academic work toward the degree of 
Bachelor of Sciences. 

If at the end of the junior year the student decides to postpone his 
entrance to the School of Dentistry and to remain in the College of Arts 
and Sciences and complete work for the Bachelor's degree, he may choose 
a major and minor in any of the departments in which he has completed 
the necessary underclass requirements. The general nature of the first 
three years of this curriculum and the generous electives of the third year 
make possible for the student a wide choice of departments in which he 
may specialize. In general the electives of the third year will be chosen 
as for a major in some particular department. 

COMBINED PROGRAM IN ARTS AND SCIENCES AND MEDICINE 

This course, which consists of three years of study in the College of 
Arts and Sciences, is recommended for admission to the School of Medicine 
of the University of Maryland. It also meets the requirements prescribed 
by the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical Association. 

This curriculum also offers to the student a combined program leading to 
the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Medicine. The preprofes- 
sional training is taken in residence in the College of Arts and Sciences at 
College Park and the professional training in the School of Medicine in 
Baltimore. 



•Fr. or Ger. 6, 7 — Intermediate Scientific French or German recommended. 



174 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Students who have completed the combined program of Arts and Sciences 
and Medicine may, on recommendation of the Dean of the School of 
Medicine, be granted the degree of Bachelor of Science by the College of 
Arts and Sciences. To qualify for this degree at least 90 semester credits 
exclusive of required work in military science and physical education in this 
college and the first year of the School of Medicine must have been com- 
pleted so that the quantitative requirements of 120 semester hours are met. 
The qualitative grade requirements of the University must also be fulfilled. 
The degree will be granted at the commencement following the completion 
of the student's second year in medical school. 

A student may enter this combined curriculum with advanced standing, 
but the last year of the preprofessional training, consisting of a minimum 
of 30 credits, exclusive of physical training and military instruction, must be 
completed at College Park and the professional training must be completed 
in the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. 

Students who expect to qualify for the combined degree must complete 
the work as outlined in the curriculum. Changes may be made only when 
authorized by the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Permission 
to continue in the pre-medical curriculum is granted only to students 
who have demonstrated, on the basis of their previous academic records, 
that they are fully qualified to carry the work included in this course. 

Arts-Medical Curriculum „ 

I — Semester — \ 

Freshman Year* I II 

Ensr. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature S S 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life 

O. A. P. 1 — American Government 

Zool. 2. 8 — Fundamentals of Zoology 

Math. 10, 11 — Algebra, Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry 

Ghem. 1, 8 — General Chemistry 

A. S. 1. 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 



Hea. 2. 4 — Hygiene (Women) 
Physical Activities 



ToUl 2^-21 2<>-21 



* Students who wish to consider a possible major in the Physical Sciences should elect 
Modern Language in the freshman year in place of Math. 10 and II, and should elect 
Math. 14, 16, 17 in the sophomore year. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 176 

I — Semester — > 
Sophomore Year** I It 

Enff. 3, 4 or 5, G — Composition and World or English Literature 3 3 

Zool. 6 — Comparative Vertebrate Morphology 4 

Zool. 20 — Vertebrate Embryology 4 

Chem. 36, 36, 37, 38 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 4 4 

Foreign Language 3 3 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 16-18 16-18 

Junior Year 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology . . I 

Phys. 10, 11 — Mechanics and Heat ; Sound, Optics, Magnetism and 

Electricity 4 4 

H. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

Foreign Language (Continued) 3 8 

Spe«ch 18. 19 — Introductory Speech 1 1 

Elective* (Sciences) 7 4 

Total 18 18 

Senior Year 

The curriculum of the first year of the School of Medicine of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland is accepted by the College of Arts and Sciences as 
the fourth year (major sequence) of academic work toward the degree. 

If at the beginning of the Senior Year the student decides to postpone 
his entrance to Medical School and to remain in the College of Arts and 
Sciences and complete work for the Bachelor's Degree, he may choose a 
major in any department in which he has completed the necessary under- 
class requirements. Because of the general nature of the first three years 
of his curriculum, the student has open to him a wide choice of departments 
in which he may specialize. 



•• students who wish to consider a possible major in any of the following subjects 
should postpone English 3, 4 or B, G to the junior year and elect the courses listed below 
during the sophomore year. 

Bacteriology: Bacteriology 1, 5. 

History : History 5, 6. 

Psychology: Psychology 1, 4. 

Sociology: Sociology 2 and Psychology 1. 
Students who wish to consider a possible major in American Civilization, Biological 
Sciences, English, Foreign Language, Philosophy, or Zoology need make no changes in the 
•ophomore year but must choose the proper electives in the junior year. 



176 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

FIVE-YEAR COMBINED ARTS AND SCIENCES AND NURSING 

The first two years of this curriculum, comprising a minimum of 60 
semester hours exclusive of hygiene and physical activities, are taken in 
the College of Arts and Sciences at College Park and the professional 
training is taken in the School of Nursing of the University in Baltimore 
or in the Training School of Mercy Hospital, Baltimore. 

In addition to the Diploma in Nursing, the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Nursing may, on the recommendation of the Director of the School of 
Nursing, be granted at the end of the professional training. Full details 
regarding the nursing curriculum may be found in the catalog of the 
School of Nursing. 

A student may enter this combined curriculum with advanced standing 
but the last year of pre-professional training, consisting of a minimum of 
30 credits, exclusive of hygiene and physical activities, must be completed 
in College Park and the professional training must be completed in one 
of the schools indicated above. To qualify for the combined degree the 
student must complete the required work at College Park before com- 
pleting the professional training in Baltimore. 

In order to receive the Bachelor of Science degree the student must 
obtain at least a C average in the work taken at College Park and at least 
a C average in the work taken at the School of Nursing. 

(NOTE — No new students will be accepted in this curriculum, 
since the four-year curriculum has been established in the 
School of Nursing:. Students interested should write for the 
School of Nursing Catalog.) 

Arts-Nursing Curriculum ^ Semester > 

Freshman Year I II 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 3 B 

Sec. 1 — Sociology of American Life 8 .... 

G. & P. 1 — American Government .... 8 

♦Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 4 4 

Foreign Language 3 8 

Speech 1, 2 — Introductory Speech 2 2 

♦♦Math. — Basic Mathematics (recommended) 

Hea. 2, 4 — Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 18 18 



♦ Students may elect Zoology 1 and Bacteriology 1 during the freshman year and 
Chemistry 1, 3 the sophomore year. 

♦♦ An examination in Mathematics is given during the registration period ; students 
passing this test need not take Math. 0. Students who do not pass the Mathematics exami- 
nation should elect Zoology 1 and Bacteriology 1 during the freshman year and postpone 
Chemistry 1, 3 to the sophomore year. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 177 

/ — Semester — \ 

Sophomore Year I II 

Eng. 8, 4 or B, 6 — Composition and World or English Literature 3 3 

H. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 4 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology .... 4 

Foreign Language (continued) 3 3 

t Approved Electives 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Totml 17 17 



t Recommended electives: Bacteriology 5, 52; Chemistry 15, 19; Econ. 37; History 51, 52; 
Psychology 1, 2, 4 ; Sociology 2, 5, 13, 14, 51, 62, 64 ; Zoology 3. A student's choice of electives 
must be approved by her advisor. 

AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

Committee on American Civilization Curriculum: Professor Bode, 

Executive Secretary; Professors Burdette, Gewehr, 

Hoffsommer, Murphy. 

Amer. Civ. 137, 138. Conference Course in American Civilization (3, 3). 

First and second semesters. 

Four American classics (drawn from the fields of the departments of 
English, Government and Politics, History, and Sociology, which cooperate 
in the program) are studied each semester. Specialists from the appro- 
priate departments lecture on these books. For this academic year the 
classics are: Franklin's Autohiography, De Tocqueville's Democracy in 
America, Schlesinger's The Age of Jackson, and Thoreau's Walden; for the 
second semester, Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Auto- 
biography of Lincoln Steffens, the Lynds' Middletown, and Myrdal's An 
Am,erican Dilemma. Through these books and the lectures on them, the 
student's acquaintance with American culture is brought to a focus. 

This course is required for seniors majoring in the American Civilization 
program. The course also counts as major credit in any of the four co- 
operating departments; a student may take either or both semesters. 

(Bode and cooperating specialists.) 

The student majoring in American Civilization can obtain his other 
courses prinscipally from the offerings of the four cooperating departments 
(English, History, Government and Politics, Sociology). 

ART 

Professor Wharton; Associate Professor Siegler; Assistant Professor 
Maril; Instructors Grubar and Stites. 

Art 1. Charcoal Drawing (Basic Course — Antique) (3) — Three two- 
hour laboratory periods per week. 



178 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Drawing from casts, preparatory to Life and Portrait drawing and paint- 
ing. Stress is placed on fundamental principles, such as the study of rela- 
tive proportions, values, and modeling, etc. 

Art 2. Charcoal Drawing (3) — Three two-hour laboratory periods per 
week. 

Drawing from model, (head and figure) with emphasis on structure and 
movement. (Siegler.) 

Art 3, 4. Rendering (1, 1) — One two-hour laboratory period per week. 

Methods of rendering architectural and landscape architectural drawings. 
Included are: techniques of monotone wash, water color, pencil, pen and 
ink, and the use of perspective and shades and shadows. (Stites.) 

Art 5, 6. Still-life (3, 3) — One lecture hour and five laboratory hours 
per week. 

First half semester devoted to elementary theory and practice of drawing 
and color. Methods of linear and tonal description with emphasis on per- 
spective and form principles. Second half semester, elementary theory and 
practice oil painting. Elementary theory and practice of composition in- 
troduced and utilized. Second semester, more advanced problems. 

(Wharton.) 

Art 7, 8. Landscape Painting (3, 3) — Three two-hour laboratory periods 
per week. 

Drawing and painting; organization of landscape material with emphasis 
on compositional structure. (Maril.) 

Art 9. Historical Survey of Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture (3). 

An understanding of the epochs in the advance of civilization from 
Pre-historic times to the Renaissance, as expressed through painting, 
sculpture, and architecture. (Grubar and Stites.) 

Art 10. History of American Art (1). 

A resume of the development of painting, sculpture, and architecture in 
this country and how American Art was influenced by social, political, 
religious, and economic forces, here and abroad. (Grubar.) 

Art 11. Historical Survey of Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture (3). 

This is designed to continue the survey begun in Art 9. The course is 
concerned with the development of painting, sculpture, and architecture 
from the Renaissance to the present day. (Grubar and Stites.) 

Art 13, 14. Elementary Sculpture (2, 2) — Two two-hour laboratory 
periods per week. 

Study of three-dimensional form compositions in round and bas-relief. 
Mediums used: clay, plasteline. (Maril.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 179 

Art 100, 101. Art Appreciation (2, 2). 

This course enables students to get a basis for understanding works of 
art. It investigates the organic form and backgrounds of painting, sculpture, 
and architecture. (Maril and Grubar.) 

Art 102, 103. Creative Painting (3, 3) — Three two-hour laboratory 
periods per week. Prerequisites, Art 1, 2, 5, 6. 

Assignments of pictorial compositions aimed at both mural decoration 
and easel picture problems. The formal values in painting are integrated 
with the student's own desire for personal expression. (Maril.) 

Art 104, 105. Life Class (Drawing and Painting) (3, 3)— Three two- 
hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Art 1 and 5. 

Careful observation and study of the human figure for construction, 
action, form, and color. (Siegler.) 

Art 106, 107. Portrait Class (Drawing and Painting) (3, 3)— One lec- 
ture hour and five laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites, Art 1 and 5. 
Thorough draftmanship and study of characterization and design stressed. 

(Wharton.) 

Art. 108, 109. Modern European Art (2,2). 

A survey of the development in various schools of Modem Art. Works 
of art analyzed according to their intrinsic values and in their historical 
background. Collections of Washington and Baltimore are utilized. 

(Grubar.) 

Art 113, 114. Illustration (3, 3) — Two three-hour laboratory periods 
per week. Prerequisites, Art 1, 5, 104. 

This course is designed for the purpose of channeling fine art training 
into practical fields, thereby preparing the student to meet the modern 
commercial advertising problems. Special emphasis will be placed upon 
magazine and book illustrating, outdoor poster display, and calendar ad- 
vertising, along with cover and jacket designs. (Stites.) 

Art 115, 116. Still Life Painting (Advanced) (3, 3)— Two three-hour 
laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Art 6. 

This course is for those who have completed Art 6 and wish to specialize 
in Still Life Painting. (Wharton.) 

Art 154, 155. Life Drawing and Painting (Advanced) (3, 3) — Three two- 
hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Art. 105. 

This course is for those who have completed Art 105 and wish to develop 
greater proficiency in the use of the figure in creative work. (Siegler.) 

Art 156, 157. Portrait Painting (Advanced) (3, 3) — Two three-hour 
laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Art 106, 107. 

This course is for those who have completed 106, 107 and wish to 
specialize in portraiture. (Wharton.) 



180 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Art 170, 171. History of Ancient Painting (2, 2) — Prerequisite, Art 9. 

A study of the development of painting and related arts from the pre- 
historic to the Roman period. (Grubar.) 

Art 174. History of Ancient Architecture (2) — First semester. Pre- 
requisite, Art 9. 

The evolution of architectural styles from prehistoric through Roman 
periods including the practical, structural, artistic, and cultural aspects. 

(Stites.) 

Art 180. History of Medieval Architecture (2) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Art 9. 

A continuation of Art 174 including the evolution of architectural styles 
from the Early Christian through the Gothic period. (Stites.) 

Art 188, 189. History of 16th and 17th Century Painting (2, 2)— Pre- 
requisite, Art 9. 

A study of the development of painting and related arts. The first 
semester study will center on Italian painting in the 16th and 17th centuries 
and the emergence of Baroque style. During the second semester, the 
painting of France, Spain, England, and the Low Countries will be con- 
sidered. (Grubar.) 

ASTRONOMY 

Astr, 1, 2. Astronomy (3, 3)— (Not offered 1952-1953). 

An elementary course in descriptive astronomy. 

Astr. 5. Navigation (3) — Prerequisite, Math. 14 and 16. 

The theory and practice of navigation. (Not offered 1952-1953.) 

BACTERIOLOGY 

Professors Faber, Hansen, Pelczar; Visiting Professors Smadel, Warren; 

Associate Professor Laffer; Assistant Professor Doetsch; 

Lecturer Kent. 

Bact. 1. General Bacteriology (4) — First and second semesters.. Two 
lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 

The physiology, culture and differentiation of bacteria. Fundamental 
principles of microbiology in relation to man and his environment. Labora- 
tory fee, $10.00. (Pelczar.) 

Bact. 5. Advanced General Bacteriology (4) — Second semester. Two 
lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Bact. 1 
and Chem. 3. 

Emphasis will be given to the fundamental procedures and techniques 
used in the field of bacteriology. Lectures will consist of the explanation 
of various laboratory procedures. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Laffer.) 

Bact. 51. Household Bacteriology (3) — Second semester. Two lecture 
and one two-hour laboratory periods a week. For home economics students 
only. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 181 

Morphology and physiology of the bacteria, yeasts, and molds. Applica- 
tion of the effect of chemical and physical agents in the control of microbial 
growth. Relationship of microbiology to home sanitation, food preservation 
and manufacture; personal and community hygiene. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

(Doetsch.) 

Bact. 52. Sanitary Bacteriology (2) — Second semester. Two lecture 
periods a week. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. 

This course comprises only the lectures of Bact. 53. (Laffer.) 

Bact. 53. Sanitary Bacteriology (4) — Second semester. Two lecture and 
two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bact. 5. 

Bacteriological and public health aspects of water supplies and sewage 
disposal, restaurant and plant sanitation, insect and rodent control, and 
waste disposal. Occasional field trips. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Laffer.) 

Bact. 55. Sanitary Bacteriology for Engineers (2) — First semester. One 
lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week. For junior and senior 
students in engineering only. 

Discussion of the fundamental principles of bacteriology and their rela- 
tionship to water supply, sewage disposal, and other sanitary problems. 
Demonstration of these principles in the laboratory. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

(Laffer.) 

Bact. 60, 62. Bacteriological Literature (1, 1) — First and second semes- 
ters. One lecture period a week. Prerequisite, a major in bacteriology with 
junior standing. Introduction to periodical literature, methods, interpreta- 
tion and presentation of reports. (Doetsch.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bact. 101. Pathogenic Bacteriology (4) — First semester. Two lecture 
and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bact. 5. 

The role of microorganisms in the diseases of man and animals with 
emphasis upon the differentiation and culture of bacterial species, types of 
disease, modes of disease transmission; prophylactic, therapeutic and 
epidemiological aspects. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Faber.) 

Bact. 103. Serology (4) — Second semester. Two lecture and two two- 
hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bact. 101. 

Infection and resistance; principles and types of immunity; hypersensi- 
tiveness. Fundamental techniques of major diagnostic immunological 
reactions and their application. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Faber.) 

Bact. 104. History of Bacteriology (1) — First semester. One lecture 
period a week. Prerequisite, a major or minor in bacteriology with senior 
standing. 

History and integration of the fundamental discoveries of the science. 
The modern aspects of cytology, taxonomy, fermentation, and immunity 
in relation to early theories. (Doetsch.) 



182 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Bact. 105. Clinical Methods (4) — First semester. Two lecture and two 
two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bact. 101. 

A practical course designed to integrate clinical laboratory procedures 
in terms of hospital and public health demands. Examination of sputum, 
feces, blood, spinal fluids, urine, etc. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Faber.) 

Bact. 108. Epidemiology and Public Health (3) — Second semester. Three 
lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, Bact. 101. 

History, characteristic features, and epidemiology of the important com- 
municable diseases; public health aspects of man's struggle for existence; 
public health administration and responsibilities; vital statistics. (Faber.) 

Bact. 131. Food Bacteriology. (4) — First semester. Two lecture and two 
two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bact. 5. 

The relationship of microorganisms to fresh and preserved food, the use 
of microorganisms in the preparation of foods, and methods of control of 
these organisms. Discussion of the pure food laws. Demonstration of the 
fundamental principles involved and the methods used in the examination of 
different types of foods. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Laffer.) 

Bact. 133. Dairy Bacteriology (4) — First semester. Two lecture and 
two two-hours laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bact. 5. 

Relation of bacteria, yeasts, and molds to milk, cream, butter, ice cream, 
cheese, and other dairy products. Standard methods of examination, public 
health requirements, plant sanitation. Occasional inspection trips. Labora- 
tory fee, $10.00. (Doetsch.) 

Bact. 135. Soil Bacteriology (4) — Second semester. Two lecture and two 
two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bact. 5. 

The role played by microorganisms in the soil; nitrification, denitrification, 
nitrogen-fixation, and decomposition processes; cycles of elements; relation- 
ships of microorganisms to soil fertility. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Hansen.) 

Bact. 161. Systematic Bacteriology (4) — First semester. Two lecture 
and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 16 credits in 
bacteriology. 

History of bacterial classification; genetic relationships; international 
codes of nomenclature; bacterial variation as it affects classification. Labora- 
tory fee, $10.00. (Hansen.) 

Bact. 181. Bacteriological Problems (3) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisites, 16 credits in bacteriology. Registration only upon the con- 
sent of the instructor. 

This course is arranged to provide qualified majors in bacteriology and 
majors in allied fields an opportunity to pursue specific bacteriological 
problems under the supei'vision of a member of the department. Labora- 
tory fee, $10.00. (Staff.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 183 

For Graduates 

Bact. 201. Advanced Pathogenic Bacteriology (4) — First semester. Two 
lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 30 credits 
in bacteriology and allied fields, including Bact. 103. 

Primarily a study of the fungi associated with disease and practice in the 
methods of isolation and identification. Discussion of the rickettsiae and 
viruses. Practice in the preparation of materials for examination with the 
electron microscope. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Laffer.) 

Bact. 204. Bacterial Metabolism (2) — First semester. Two lecture periods 
a week. Prerequisite, 30 credits in bacteriology and allied fields, including 
Chem. 161 and 162. 

Bacterial enzymes, nutrition of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria, 
bacterial growth factors, dissimilation of carbohydrate and nitrogenous sub- 
strates. (Pelczar.) 

Bact. 206, 208. Special Topics (1, 1) — First and second semesters. One 
lecture period a week. Prerequisite, 20 credits in bacteriology. 

Presentation and discussion of fundamental problems and special subjects 
in the field of bacteriology. (Staff.) 

Bact. 210. Virology (1) — Second semester. One lecture period a week. 
Prerequisite, Bact. 101 or equivalent. 

Characteristics and general properties of viruses and rickettsiae. 

(Warren.) 

Bact. 211. Virology Laboratory (2) — Second semester. One lecture and 
one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bact. 101 or equiva- 
lent. Registration only upon consent of instructor. 

Laboratory methods in virology. Laboratory fee $20.00 (Smadel.) 

Bact. 214. Advanced Bacterial Metabolism (1) — Second semester. One 
lecture period a week. Prerequisite, Bact. 204 and consent of instructor. 

A discussion of recent advances in the field of bacterial metabolism with 
emphasis on metabolic pathways of microorganisms. (Pelczar.) 

Bact. 231. Advanced Food Bacteriology (4) — Not offered 1951-52. First 
semester. Two lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, 30 credits in bacteriology including Bact. 131. 

The role of microorganisms in food handling and processing with emphasis 
upon commercial and factory aspects. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Laffer.) 

Bact. 280. Seminar-Research Methods (1) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 

Discussions and reports prepared by majors in bacteriology engaged in 
current research; presentations of selected subjects dealing with recent 
advances in microbiology. (Staff.) 



184 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Bact. 282. Seminar-Bacteriological Literature (1) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Presentation and dis- 
cussion of current literature in microbiology. 

Bact. 291. Research — First and second semesters. 

Credits according to work done. The investigation is outlined in con- 
sultation with and pursued under the supervision of a senior staff member 
of the department. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Staff.) 

BOTANY 

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences may select Botany as a 
major field, and may also take courses in this department for elective credit. 
For a description of courses, see the catalog of the College of Agriculture. 

CHEMISTRY 

Professors Drake, Svirbely, White, Woods; Research Professor Bailey; 
Associate Professors Pickard, Pratt, Reeve, Rollinson, Spurr, Story, Stuntz, 
Veitch, Wiley; Assistant Professors Aldridge, Brown, Carruthers, Dewey. 
Laboratory fees in Chemistry are $10.00 per laboratory course per 
semester. 

A. Analytical Chemistry 

Chem. 15, 17. Qualitative Analysis (3, 3) — Two lectures and one three- 
hour laboratory period the first semester; one lecture and two three-hour 
laboratory periods the second semester. Prerequisite, Chem. 3. 

Chem. 19. Quantitative Analysis (4) — First and second semesters. Two 
lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 1, 3. 

Chem. 21, 23. Quantitative Analysis (4, 4) — First and second semesters. 
Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 15, 17. 

This course includes a study of the principal operations of volumetric 
and gravimetric analysis. Required of all students majoring in Chemistry. 

Chem. 166, 167. Food Analysis (3, 3) — First and second semesters. One 
lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, 
Chem. 19, 31, 32, 33, 34. 

The qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis of essential food constitu- 
ents. The qualitative determination of trace elements is emphasized. For 
students in agriculture, home economics, and bacteriology. 

Chem. 206, 208. Spectrographic Analysis (1, 1) — One three-hour labora- 
tory period per week. Registration limited. Prerequisites, Chem. 188, 190, 
and consent of the instructor. (White.) 

Chem. 221, 223. Chemical Microscopy (2, 2) — First and second semesters. 
One lecture and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Registration 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 185 

limited. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Chem. 221 is a prerequisite for 
Chem. 223. 

A study of the principles of microscopic analysis. Chem. 223 is devoted 
to the study of the optical properties of crystals. (Stuntz.) 

Chem. 225. Polarography (2) — Two lectures per week. 

A course designed to present the fundamental principles of electrometric 
methods in general and to show the technique and application of polarogra- 
phy in the various branches of chemistry. 

Chem. 226, 228. Advanced Quantitative Analysis (2, 2) — First and 
second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequi- 
site, consent of instructor. 

A study of advanced methods chosen to meet the needs of the individual. 

(Stuntz.) 

Chem. 266. Biological Analysis (2) — Second semester. Two three-hour 
laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 19, 31, 32, 33, 34. 

(Wiley.) 
B. Biochemistry 

Chem. 41. The Chemistry of Textiles (4) — Second semester. Two lec- 
tures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 

31, 32, 33, 34. 

A chemical study of the principal textile fibers. 

Chem. 81. General Biochemistry (2) — First semester. Two lectures per 
week. Prerequisites, Chem. 31, 32, 33, 34, or Chem. 35, 36, 37, 38. 

This course is designed primarily for students in home economics. 
Chem. 82 MUST be taken concurrently. 

Chem. 82. General Biochemistry Laboratory (2) — First semester. Two 
three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 32, 34, or 
Chem. 36, 38. 

A course designed to accompany Chem. 81. 

Chem. 161, 163. Biochemistry (2, 2) — First and second semesters. Two 
lectures per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 31, 33, or Chem. 35, 37. 

This course is designed primarily for students in agriculture, bacteriology, 
or chemistry, and for those students in home economics who need a more 
extensive course of biochemistry than is offered in Chem. 81, 82. 

Chem. 162, 164. Biochemistry Laboratory (2, 2) — First and second sem- 
esters. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 

32, 34, or Chem. 36, 38. 

Chem. 261, 263. Advanced Biochemistry (2, 2) — First and second semes- 
ters. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 141, 143, or consent of 
the instructor. (Veitch.) 



186 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Chem. 262, 264. Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory (2, 2) — First and 
second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequi- 
site, consent of the instructor. (Veitch.) 

Chem. 265. Enzymes (2) — First semester. Two lectures per week. 
Prerequisites 161, 163. (Veitch.) 

Chem. 268. Special Problems in Biochemistry (2-4) — First and second 
semesters. Two to four three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequi- 
sites, Chem. 161, 162, and consent of the instructor. (Veitch.) 

C. Inorganic and General Chemistry 

Chem. 1, 3. General Chemistry (4, 4) — First and second semesters. Two 

lectures, one quiz, and two two-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Chem. 5. Introductory Qualitative Analysis (3) — Second semester. One 
lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 3. 

Chem. 11, 13. General Chemistry (3, 3) — Two lectures and one three- 
hour laboratory period per week. 

An abbreviated course in general chemistry especially designed for 
students in home economics. This course is open only to students registered 
in Home Economics. 

Chem. 101. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (2) — Second semester. Two 
lectures per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 23, 37, 38. 

(One or more courses of the group 201-239 will be offered each semester 

depending on demand.) 

Chem. 201, 203. The Chemistry of the Rarer Elements (2, 2) — First and 
second semesters. Two lectures per week. (White.) 

Chem. 202, 204. Advanced Inorganic Laboratory (2, 2) — First and sec- 
ond semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Chem. 205. Radiochemistry (2) — Two lectures per week. (RoUinson.) 

Chem. 207. Chemistry of Coordination Compounds (2) — Two lectures 
per week. (Rollinson.) 

Chem. 209. Non- Aqueous Inorganic Solvents (2) — First or second semes- 
ter. Two lectures per week. (Story.) 

Chem. 210. Radiochemistry Laboratory (1 or 2) — One or two three-hour 

laboratory periods per week. Registration limited. Prerequisites, Chem. 
205 (or concurrent registration therein), and consent of instructor. 

(Rollinson.) 

Chem. 239. Physical Techniques in Chemistry (2) — A survey of the tools 
available for the solution of chemical problems by means of physical tech- 
niques. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 187 

D. Organic Chemistry 

Chem. 31, 33. Elements of Organic Chemistry (2, 2) — First and second 
semesters. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 1, 3. 

Organic chemistry for students in agriculture, bacteriology, and home 
economics. 

Chem. 32, 34. Elements of Organic Laboratory (1, 1) — PMrst and second 
semesters. One three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites, 
Chem. 31, 33, or concurrent registration therein. 

Chem. 35, 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry (2, 2) — First and second 
semesters. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 1, 3. 

A course for chemists, chemical engineers, and premedical students. 

Chem. 36, 38. Elementary Organic Laboratory (2, 2) — First and second 
semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, 
Chem. 85, 37, or concurrent registration therein. 

Chem. 141, 143. Advanced Organic Chemistry (2, 2) — First and second 
semesters. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 37, 38. 
An advanced study of the compounds of carbon. 

Chem. 142, 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory (2, 2) — First and second 
semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prereqmsites, 
Chem. 37, 38. 

Chem. 146, 148. The Identification of Organic Compounds (2, 2)— First 
and second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 141, 143, or concurrent registration therein. 

The systematic identification of organic compounds. 

Chem. 150. Organic Quantitative Analysis (2) — First and second semes- 
ters. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, consent 
of the instructor. 

The semi-micro determination of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, halogen 
and certain functional groups. (Aldridge.) 

This course may be substituted for either Chem. 142 or Chem. 144 in the 
chemistry major curriculum. 

(One or more courses from the following group, 240-253, will customarily 
be offered each semester.) 

Chem. 240. Organic Chemistry of High Polymers (2) — First semester. 

An advanced organic course covering the synthesis of monomers, mecha- 
nisms of polymerization, and the correlation between structure and 
properties in high polymers. 

Chem. 241. Stereochemistry (2) — Two lectures per week. (Woods.) 

Chem. 243. The Chemistry of Petroleum Compounds (2) — Second se- 
mester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, 141, 143, 187, 189. 



188 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Chem. 245. The Chemistry of the Steroids (2) — Two lectures per week. 

(Pratt.) 

Chem. 249. Physical Aspects of Organic Chemistry (2) — Two lectures 

per week. (Woods.) 

Chem. 251. The Heterocylics (2) — Two lectures per week. (Pratt.) 

Chem. 253. Organic Sulfur Compounds (2) — Two lectures per week. 

(Dewey) 

Chem. 254. Advanced Organic Preparations (2 to 4) — First and second 
semesters. Two to four three-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Chem. 258. The Identification of Organic Compounds, an Advanced 
Course (2 to 4) — First and second semesters. Two to four three-hour lab- 
oratory periods per week. (Pratt.) 

Chem. 260. Advanced Organic Laboratory (1 or 2) — First and second 
semesters. One or two three-hour laboratory periods per week. 

An orientation course desig^ned to demonstrate a new student's fitness to 
begin research in organic chemistry. (Pratt.) 

E. Physical Chemistry 

Chem. 181, 183. Elements of Physical Chemistry (2, 2) — First and second 
semesters. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 1, 3; Phys. 1, 2; 
Math. 10, 11; Chem. 19. 

A course intended primarily for premedical students and students in the 
biological sciences. This course must be accompanied by Chem. 182, 184. 

Chem. 182, 184. Elements of Physical Chemistry Laboratory (1, 1) — 

First and second semesters. One three-hour laboratory period per week. 
May be taken ONLY when accompanied by Chem. 181, 183. 

The course includes quantitative experiments illustrating the principles 
studied in Chem. 181, 183. 

Chem. 187, 189. Physical Chemistry (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 19 or 21; Phys. 20, 21; 
Math. 20, 21; or consent of instructor. 

A course primarily for chemists and chemical engineers. This course must 
be accompanied by Chem. 188, 190. 

Chem. 188, 190. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2) — First and second 
semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. 
A laboratory course for students taking Chem. 187, 189. 

Chem. 192, 194. Glassblowing Laboratory (1, 1) — First and second se- 
mesters. One three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, consent 
of instructor. (Carruthers.) 

The common prerequisites for the following courses are Chem. 187, 189, 
and Chem. 188, 190, or their equivalent. One or more courses of the group, 
281-313, will be offered each semester depending on demand. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 189 

Chem. 281, 283. Theory of Solutions (2, 2) — First and second semesters. 
Two lectures per week. Prereqxiisite, Chem. 307. (Svirbely.) 

Chem. 285. Colloid Chemistry (2) — Two lectures per week. (Pickard.) 

Chem. 287. Infra-red and Raman Spectroscopy (2) — Second semester. 
Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Spurr.) 

Chem. 289. Selected Topics in Advanced Colloid Chemistry (2) — First 
or second semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 285. 

(Pickard.) 

Chem. 295. Heterogenous Equilibria (2) — Two lectures per week. 

(Pickard.) 

Chem. 299. Reaction Kinetics (3) — Three lectures per week. (Svirbely.) 

Chem. 303. Electrochemistry (3) — Three lectures per week. (Pickard.) 

Chem. 304. Electrochemistry Laboratory (2) — Two three-hour labora- 
tory periods per week. Prerequisite, consent of insrtuctor. (Svirbely.) 

Chem. 307. Chemical Thermodynamics (3) — Three lectures per week. 

(Svirbely.) 

Chem. 311. Physicochemical Calculations (2) — Offered in summer session 
only. (Pickard.) 

Chem. 313, 315. Molecular Structure (2, 2) — First or second semester. 
Two lectures per week. (Brown, Spurr.) 

Chem. 321. Quantum Chemistry (3) — Three lectures per week. Prerequi- 
site, Chem. 307. (Brown.) 

Chem. 323. Statistical Mechanics and Chemistry (3) — Three lectures per 
week. Prerequisite, Chem. 307. (Brown.) 

F. Seminar and Research 

Chem. 351. Seminar (1) — First and second semesters. (Staff.) 

Chem. 360. Research — First and second semesters, summer session. 

(Staff.) 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

Professors Aldridge, Falls, Goodwyn, Harman, Murphy, Prahl, Zucker; 

Lecturer McManaway; Associate Professors Cooley, Manning, Mooney, 

Weber, Zeeveld; Assistant Professors Andrews, Gravely, Parsons. 

Requirements for major include Comparative Literature 101, 102. Com- 
parative Literature courses may be counted toward a major or minor in 
English when recommended by the student's major adviser. 

Comp. Lit. 1. Greek Poetry (2) — First semester. 

Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, with special emphasis on the literary form 
and the historical and mythological background. 



'190 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Comp. Lit. 2. Later European Epic Poetry (2) — Second semester. 

Virgil's Aeneid, Dante's Divine Comedy, Nibelungenlied and other Euro- 
pean epics, with special emphasis on their relationship to and comparison 
with the Greek epic. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Comp. Lit. 10 L Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature (3) — 

First semester. (Zucker.) 

Comp. Lit. 102. Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature (3) — 

Second semester. (Zucker.) 

Comp. Lit. 103. The Old Testament as Literature (2) — Second semester. 

(Zucker.) 
Comp. Lit. 105. Romanticism in France (3) — First semester. (Parsons.) 

Comp. Lit. 106. Romanticism in Germany (3) — Second semester. 

(Prahl.) 

Comp. Lit. 107. The Faust Legend in English and German Literature 
(3) — First semester. (Prahl.) 

~Comp. Lit. 108. Some Non-English Influences on American Literature 

(3) — First semester. (Zucker.) 

Comp. Lit. 112. Ibsen (3) — First semester. (Zucker.) 

Comp. Lit. 114. The Greek Drama (3)— First semester. (Prahl.) 

Comp. Lit. 125. Literature of the Middle Ages (3) — Narrative, dramatic, 
and lyric literature of the Middle Ages; studies in translation. (Cooley.) 

In addition, the following courses will count as credit in Comparative 
Literature: 

English Language and Literature — Eng. 104; Eng. 113; Eng. 121; Eng. 
129, 130; Eng. 144; Eng. 145; Eng. 155, 156; Eng. 157. 

Foreign Languages and Literatures — Span. 109. 

Speech and Dramatic Art — Speech 131, 132. 

For Graduates 
Comp. Lit. 258. Folklore in Literature — (3) — Second semester. 

(Goodwyn.) 

The following courses will count as credit in Comparative Literature: 
English Language and Literature— Eng. 201; Eng. 204; Eng. 206, 207; 
Eng. 216, 217; Eng. 227, 228. 

Foreign Languages and Literatures — Ger. 204; Ger. 208. 

ECONOMICS 

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences may select Economics as 
a major field, and may also take courses in this deartment for elective 
credit. For a description of courses, see the catalog of the College of 
Business and Public Administration. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES "^ 191 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professors Aldridge, Bode, Harman, Murphy; Lecturer McManaway; Asso- 
ciate Professors Ball, Cooley, Manning, Mooney, Weber, Zeeveld; Assistant 
Professors Andrews, Coulter, Fleming, Gravely, Schaumann, Ward; In- 
structors Adams, Anderson, Barnes, Beall, Bezanson, da Ponte, Demaree, 
Dinwiddle, Kahn, Lutwack, M. Martin, C. Martin, Miller, Mish, Portz, 
Robison, Smith, Stone; Graduate Assistants Adams, Ellsworth, Harmon, 

Herrnstadt, Mangold. 

Eng. 1, 2. Composition and American Literature (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. Required of freshmen. Both courses offered each semester, 
but may not be taken concurrently. 

Grammar, rhetoric, and the mechanics of writing; frequent themes. 
Readings are in American literature. (Ball and Staff.) 

Eng. 3, 4. Composition and World Literature (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, Eng. 1, 2. Eng. 3, 4, or Eng. 5, 6, or an accept- 
able combination of the two, are required of sophomores. Credit will not be 
given for more than six hours of work in 3, 4 and 5, 6. 

Practice in composition. An introduction to world literature, foreign 
classics being read in translation. (Cooley and Staff.) 

Eng. 5, 6. Composition and English Literature (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, Eng. 1, 2. Eng. 3, 4, or Eng. 5, 6, or an acceptable 
combination of the two, are required of sophomores. Credit will not be given 
for more than six hours of work in 3, 4 and 5, 6. 

Practice in composition. An introduction to major English writers. 

(Zeeveld and Staff.) 

Eng. 7. Technical Writing (2) — First and second semesters. Prerequi- 
site, Eng. 1, 2. 

For students desiring practice in writing reports, technical essays, or 
popular essays on technical subjects. (Coulter, Bezanson.) 

Eng. 8. College Grammar (3) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, Eng. 1, 2. 

An analytical study of Modem English gn^ammar, with lectures on the 
origin and history of inflectional and derivational forms. (Harman.) 

Eng. 9. Introduction to Narrative Literature (3) — Second semester. 
Prerequisite, Eng. 1, 2. 

An intensive study of representative stories, with lectures on the history 
and technique of the short story and other narrative forms. (Harman.) 

Eng. 10. Practice in Composition (2) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, Eng. 1, 2. 

For students desiring practice ip writing essays and reports on non- 
technical subjects. (Coulter.) 



192 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Eng. 12. Introduction to Creative Writing (2) — First and second semes- 
ters. Prereqmsite, Eng. 1, 2. 

Intended primarily for sophomores and juniors of demonstrated ability. 

(C. Martin.) 

Eng. 14. Expository Writing (3) — Not offered on College Park campus. 
Prerequisite, Eng. 1, 2. Credit will not be given for Eng. 7 or Eng. 10 in 
addition to Eng. 14. 

Methods and problems of exposition; practice in several kinds of informa- 
tive writing, including the preparation of technical papers and reports. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Eng. 101. History of the English Language (3) — Second semester. 
An historical and critical survey of the English language; its nature, ori- 
gin, and development. (Harman.) 

Eng. 102. Old English (3) — First semester. 

Readings in Old English. The sounds, morphology, and syntax of Old 
English with particular reference to the development of Modern English. 

(BaU.) 

Eng. 103. Beowulf (3) — Second semester. 

A literary and linguistic study of the Old English epic. (Ball.) 

Eng. 104. Chaucer (3) — First semester. 

A literary and language study of the Canterbury Tales, Troilus and 
Criseyde, and the principal minor poems. (Harman.) 

Eng. 106. English and Scottish Ballads (3)— Not offered in 1952-53. 
An introduction to the ballads in Child's edition. Attention given to 
analogues, imitations, American collections, and collecting. (Cooley.) 

Eng. 110, 111. Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (3, 3) — First and second 

semesters. 

The most important dramatists of the time, other than Shakespeare. 

(Zeeveld.) 

Eng. 112. Poetry of the Renaissance (3)— Not offered in 1952-53. 
The chief poets from Skelton to Jonson, with particular attention to 
Spenser. (Zeeveld.) 

Eng. 113. Prose of the Renaissance (3) — Not offered in 1952-53. 
The chief prose writers from More to Bacon. (Zeeveld.) 

Eng. 115, 116. Shakespeare (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Twenty-one important plays. (Zeeveld.) 

Eng. 120. English Drama from 1660 to 1800 (3) — Second semester. 
The important dramatists from Etherege to Sheridan, with emphasis upon 
the comedy of manners. (Weber.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 193 

Eng. 121. Milton (3) — Second semester. 

The poetry and the chief prose works. (Murphy.) 

Eng. 122. Literature of the Seventeenth Century, 1600-1660 (3)— First 
semester. 
The major non-dramatic writers (exclusive of Milton). (Murphy.) 

Eng. 123. Literature of the Seventeenth Century, 1660-1700 (3)— Not 
offered in 1952-53. 

The Age of Dryden, with the exception of the drama. (Aldridge.) 

Eng. 125, 126. Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. 

Special attention to major writers and to the historical and philosophical 
background. (Aldridge.) 

Eng. 129, 130. Literature of the Romantic Period (3, 3) — First and sec- 
ond semesters. 

A study of the major poets of the period, including Coleridge, Wordsworth, 
and Byron in the first semester, and Shelley and Keats in the second 
semester. (Weber.) 

Eng. 134, 135. Literature of the Victorian Period (3, 3) — First and sec- 
ond semesters. 

The chief writers of prose and poetry from the close of the Romantic 
period to the end of the nineteenth century. (Cooley, Mooney.) 

Eng. 139, 140. The English Novel (3, 3)— Not offered first semester 
1952-53. 

The development of the novel; readings in the major novelists of the 
eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. (Aldridge, Mooney.) 

Eng. 143. Modern Poetry (3) — First semester. 

The chief British and American poets of the twentieth century. 

(Murphy.) 
Eng. 144. Modern Drama (3) — First semester. 
The drama from Ibsen to the present. (Weber.) 

Eng. 145. The Modern Novel (3) — Second semester. 

Major English and American novelists of the twentieth century. 

(Andrews.) 
Eng. 148. The Literature of American Democracy (3) — Not offered in 
1952-53. 
Literature which relates closely to the democratic tradition. 

Eng. 150, 151. American Literature to 1900 (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. 

Representative American poetry and prose from colonial times to 1900, 
with special emphasis on the literature of the nineteenth century. 

(Gravely, Manning.) 



194 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Eng. 155, 156. Four Major American Writers (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. 
Two writers studied intensively each semester. (Gravely, Manning.) 

Eng. 157. Introduction to Folklore (3) — First semester. 

Historical background of folklore studies; growth of the field; types of 
folklore. Emphasis upon American folklore: ballads; folk songs; folk 
tales; regional customs and beliefs. (Cooley.) 

Eng. 170. Creative Writing (2) — First semester. Prerequisite, permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

Eng. 171. Advanced Creative Writing (2)— Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, permission of the instructor. 

Eng. 172. Playwriting (2) — Second semester. Prerequisite, permission 
of the instructor. 

Analysis of plays, and practice in writing at least one short play. 

(Fleming.) 
For Graduates 

Eng. 200 — Research (3-6) — Arranged. Credit in proportion to work done 
and results accomplished. (Staff.) 

Eng. 201. Bibliography and Methods (3) — First semester. 

An introduction to the principles and methods of research. (Mooney.) 

Eng. 202. Middle English (3) — First semester. 

A study of selected readings of the Middle English period with reference 
to etymology, morphology, and syntax. (Harman.) 

Eng. 203. Gothic (3) — Second semester. 

Forms and sjmtax, with reading from the Ulfilas Bible; correlation of 
the Gothic speech sounds with those of Old English. (Harman.) 

Eng. 204. Medieval Romances (3)— Not offered in 1952-53. 
The Middle English metrical and prose romances and their sources, with 
emphasis on the Arthurian cycle. (Cooley.) 

Eng. 206, 207. Seminar in Renaissance Literature (3, 3) — First and sec- 
ond semesters. (McManaway.) 

Eng. 210. Seminar in Seventeenth-Century Literature (3) — Second 
semester. (Murphy.) 

Eng. 212, 213. Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Literature (3, 3) — First 
and second semesters. (Aldridge.) 

Eng. 214, 215. Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Literature (3) — First 
and second semesters. (Cooley, Mooney, Weber.) 

Eng. 216, 217. Literary Criticism (3, 3)— Not offered in 1952-53. 
The practice and theory of criticism from Plato to the present time. 

(Murphy.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 195 

Eng. 225, 226. Seminar in American Literature (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. (Bode.) 

Eng. 227, 228. Problems in American Literature (3, 3) — Not offered in 
1952-53. 

Eng. 230. Studies in American Language (3) — Not offered in 1952-53. 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences may select Entomology as a 
major field, and may also take courses in this department for elective credit. 
For a description of courses, see the catalog of the College of Agriculture. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

Professors Zucker, Falls, Prahl, Cunz, L. P. Smith, Goodwyn, Miller (abroad 
as Associate Director of C.S.C.S. European Program); Associate Professors 
Kramer, Quynn, Bingham; Assistant Professors Parsons, Schweizer, Rand, 
Rosenfield, HammericElag, Dobert; Adjunct Professor Juan Ramon Jimenez; 
Instructors Nemes, de Marne, Norton, Boborykine, Becker, Rovner; Part- 
time Instructor Greenberg; Graduate Assistants Hall, Heverly, Maidanek. 

At the beginning of each semester a placement examination is given for 
all students who have had some foreign language in high school and wish 
to do further work in that language. By this means the Department 
assigns each student to the suitable level of instruction. 

No credit will be given for less than two semesters of elementary 
language. 

A student whose native language is taught at the University may not 
meet the language requirement by taking Freshman or Sophomore courses 
in his language. 

Foreign students may substitute for the 12-hour foreign language re- 
quirement 12 additional hours of English. They are advised to take 
Foreign Language 1, 2, English for Foreign Students, for their first year 
and English 10, Practice in Composition, plus a 3-hour course in literature 
during their second year. These courses should be taken concurrently with 
Freshman and Sophomore English. 

Attention is called to the courses in Comparative Literature on pages 
60 through 61. 

Foreign Language 1, 2. English for Foreign Students (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. 

An introduction to English usage, adapted to the needs of the non- 
English-speaking student. Pronunciation, spelling, syntax; the differences 
between English and various other languages are stressed. (Kramer.) 

French 

French 1, 2. Elementary French (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Students who offer two units in French for entrance, but whose preparation 
is not adequate for second-year French, receive half credit for this course. 

(Bingham and Staff.) 



196 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Elements of grammar; pronunciation and conversation; exercises in 
translation. 

French 3. Elementary Conversation (1) — First and second semesters. 
Open to all students who have completed their first-year French. Qualified 
students who had the grade A or B in French 1 may take this course in 
conjunction with French 2. 

A practice course in simple spoken French. 

French 4, 5. Intermediate Literary French (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, French 1 and 2 or equivalent. Students who have 
taken French 6 and 7 cannot receive credit for French 4 and 5. 

Translation and exercises in pronunciation. Reading of texts designed to 
give some knowledge of French life, thought and culture. 

French 6, 7. Intermediate Scientific French (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, French 1 and 2 or equivalent. Second-year French 
for students specializing in the sciences. Students who have taken French 
4 and 5 cannot receive credit for French 6 and 7. 

Translation and exercises in pronunciation. Reading of scientific texts. 

French 8, 9. Intermediate Conversation (2, 2) — First and second semes- 
ters. Admission by consent of instructor. 

Practical exercises in conversation, based on material dealing with French 
life and customs. 

French 17. Grammar Review (3) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, French 4, French 6, or permission of instructor. Recommended 
for students who expect to major or minor in French. 

An intensive review of the elements of French grammar; verb drill; com- 
position. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

French 51, 52. The Development of the French Novel (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. 

Introductory study of the history and growth of the novel in French 
literature; of the lives, works and influence of important novelists. Reports. 
French 51 covers the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, French 52 the 
nineteenth. 

French 53, 54. The Development of the French Drama (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. 

Introductory study of the French drama. Tianslation, collateral reading, 
reports. French 53 covers the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, French 
54 the nineteenth. 

French 55, 56. The Development of the Short Story in French (3, 3)— 

First and second semesters. 

A study of the short story in French literature; reading and translation 
of representative examples. French 55 covers up to the nineteenth century, 
French 56 the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 197 

French 71, 72. Intermediate Grammar and Composition (3, 3) — First 
and second semesters. Prerequisite, French 17 or equivalent. 

This course, more advanced than the Grammar Review (French 17), 
is designed for students who, having a good general knowledge of French, 
wish to become more proficient in the written and spoken language. 

French 75, 76. Introduction to French Literature (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, second-year French or equivalent. 

An elementary survey of the chief authors and movements in French 
literature. 

French 80, 81. Advanced Conversation (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

This course is intended for students who have a good general knowledge 
of French, and who wish to develop fluency and confidence in speaking the 
language. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

French 100. French Literature of the Sixteenth Century (3) — First 
semester. 

Beginning and development of the Renaissance in France; humanism; 

Rabelais and Calvin; the Pleiade; Montaigne. (Falls.) 

French 101, 102. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century (3, 3) — 

First and second semesters. 

First semester: the first sixty years of the century, with special atten- 
tion to Descartes, Pascal, and Corneille, including Racine. Second semester: 
the remaining great classical writers, with special attention to Moliere. 

(Quynn, Rosenfield.) 

French 103, 104. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3, 3)— 

First and second semesters. 

First semester: continuation of traditional literary forms; beginning and 
development of the philosophical and scientific movement; Montesquieu. 
Second semester: Voltaire, Diderot, Rosseau. (Falls, Bingham.) 

French 105, 106. French Literature of the Nineteenth Century (3, 3) — 
First and second semesters. 

First semester: drama and poetry from Romanticism to Symbolism. 
Second semester: the major prose writers of the same period. 

(Bingham, Quynn.) 

French 107, 108. French Literature of the Twentieth Century (3, 3)— 

First and second semesters. 

First semester: drama and poetry from Symbolism to the present time. 
Second semester: the contemporary novel. (Falls.) 

French 121, 122. Advanced Composition (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. 



198 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Translation from English into French, free composition, letter writing. 

(Falls.) 

French 161, 162. French Civilization (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 

French life, customs, culture, traditions. First semester: the historical 
development of the nation and its people. Second semester: present-day 
France. (Rosenfield.) 

French 171. Practical French Phonetics (3) — First semester. 
A study of the pronunciation of modern French. The sounds and their 
production, the stress group, intonation. Practical exercises. (L. P. Smith.) 

French 199. Rapid Review of the History of French Literature (1) — 

Second semester. Especially designed for French majors. 

Weekly lectures stressing the high points in the history of French 
literature. (Falls.) 

For Graduates 

The requirements of students will determine which courses will be offered. 
French 201. Research — Credits determined by work accomplished. 
Guidance in the preparation of master's and doctoral theses. Confer- 
ences. (Staff.) 

French 203, 204. Georges Duhamel: Poet, Dramatist, Novelist (2, 2)— 

First and second semesters. (Falls.) 

French 205, 206. French Literature of the Middle Ages (3, 3)- -First and 
second semesters. (L. P. Smith.) 

French 207, 208. The French Novel in the First Half of the Nineteenth 
Century (2, 2) — First and second semesters. (Falls.) 

French 209, 210. The French Novel in the Second Half of the Nineteenth 
Century (2, 2) — First and second semesters. (Falls.) 

French 211. Introduction to Old French (3). (L. P. Smith.) 

French 215, 216. Moliere (3, 3) — First and second semesters. (Quynn.) 

French 221, 222. Reading Course — (Arranged). 

Designed to give the graduate student a background of a survey of 
French literature. Extensive outside readings, with reports and periodic 
conferences. (Staff.) 

French 230. Introduction of European Linguistics (3). (L.P.Smith). 

French 251, 252. Seminar (3, 3) — Required of all graduate majors in 
French. (Staff.) 

German 

German 1, 2. Elementary German (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Students who offer two units for entrance in German, but whose preparation 
is not adequate for second-year German, receive only half credit for this 
course. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 199 

Elements of grammar; pronunciation and conversation; exercises in trans- 
lation. (Cunz and Staff.) 

German 3. Elementary Conversation (1) — First and second semesters. 
Open to all students who have completed their first-year German. Qualified 
students who had the grade A or B in German 1 may take this course in 
conjunction with German 2. 

A practice course in simple spoken German. 

German 4, 5. Intermediate Literary German (3, 3)— First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, German 1, 2, or equivalent. Students who have 
taken German 6 and 7 cannot receive credit for German 4 and 5. 

Reading of narrative prose designed to give some knowledge of German 
life, thought and culture. Translation, grammar review, pronunciation. 

German 6, 7. Intermediate Scientific German (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite German 1, 2, or equivalent. Students who have 
taken German 4 and 5 cannot receive credit for German 6 and 7. Second- 
year German for students specializing in the sciences. 

Reading of technical and scientific prose, with some grammar review. 

German 8, 9. Intermediate Conversation (2, 2) — First and second semes- 
ters. Admission by consent of instructor. 

The aim of this course is to help the student acquire the ability to speak 
and understand simple colloquial German. 

German 17. Grammar Review (3) — First and second semesters. For 
students who enter with three or more units in German, but who are not 
prepared to take German 71. Recommended to students who wish to major 
or minor in German. 

Intensive review of the elements of German grammar with ample prac- 
tice in sentence structure. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

German 61, 62. German Phonetics (1, 1) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite German 1, 2, or equivalent. 

A practical course in the pronunciation of German; study of phonetics, 
oral exercises and ear training. 

German 71, 72. Review Grammar and Composition (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, German 4, 5, or equivalent. This course 
is required of students preparing to teach German. 

A thorough study of the more detailed points of German grammar with 
ample practice in composition work. 

German 75, 76. Introduction to German Literature (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, German 4, 5, or equivalent. 

An elementary survey of the most outstanding authors and movements 
in German literature. 



200 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

German 80, 81. Advanced Conversation (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

This course is intended for students who have a general knowledge of 
German, and who wish to develop fluency and confidence in speaking the 
language. Reading of German newspapers. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

German 101, 102. German Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3, 3) — 

First and second semesters. 

The main works of Klopstock, Wieland, Lessing, Herder, Goethe, Schiller. 

(Prahl, Schweizer.) 

German 103, 104. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century (3, 3) — 

First and second semesters. 

Outstanding works of Kleist, Grillparzer, Grabbe, Hebbel, Ludwig, Stifter, 
Keller, Anzengruber. 

German 105, 106. Modern German Literature (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. 

Prose and dramatic writings from Gerhart Hauptmann to the present 
time (1890-1950). (Prahl, Hammer schlag.) 

German 107, 108. Goethe's Faust (2, 2) — First and second semesters. 
First and second parts of the drama. (Zucker.) 

Attention is called to Comparative Literature 106, Romanticism in Ger- 
many, and Comparative Literature 107, The Faust Legend in English and 
German Literature. 

German 121, 122. Advanced Composition (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, German 71, 81, or consent of instructor. 

Translations from English and German, free composition, letter writing. 

(Kramer, Cunz.) 

German 161, 162. German Civilization (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. 

Survey of German geography, history, government, literature, folklore, 
and thought; with special emphasis on the inter-relationship of social and 
literary history. (Cunz.) 

German 199. Rapid Review of the History of German Literature (1)-— 

Second semester. Especially designed for German majors. 

Weekly lectures stressing the leading concepts in the history of German 
literature. (Schweizer.) 

For Graduates 

The requirements of students will determine which courses will be offered. 
German 201. Research — Credits determined by work accomplished. 
Guidance in the preparation of master's and doctoral theses. Confer- 
ences. (Staff.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 201 

German 202, 203. The Modern German Drama (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. (Zucker.) 

German 204. Schiller (3). (Prahl.) 

German 205. Goethe's Works Outside of Faust (2). (Zucker.) 

German 206. The Romantic Movement (3). (Prahl.) 

German 208. The Philosophy of Goethe's Faust (3). (Zucker.) 

German 221, 222. Reading Course — (Arranged). 

Designed to give the graduate student a background of a survey of 
German literature. Extensive outside reading, with reports and periodic 
conferences. (Staff.) 

German 230. Introduction to European Linguistics (3). (L. P. Smith.) 

German 231. Middle High German (3). (Schweizer.) 

German 251, 252. Seminar (3, 3) — Required of all graduate majors in 
German. (Staff.) 

Spanish 

Spanish 1, 2. Elementary Spanish (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Students who offer two units in Spanish for entrance, but whose prepara- 
tion is not adequate for second-year Spanish, receive only half credit for 
this course. 

Elements of grammar; pronunciation and conversation; exercises in trans- 
lation. (Parsons and Staff.) 

Spanish 3. Elementary Conversation (1) — First and second semesters. 
Open to all students who have completed their first-year Spanish. Qualified 
students who had the grade A or B in Spanish 1 may take this course in 
conjunction with Spanish 2. 

A practice course in simple spoken Spanish. 

Spanish 4^^ Intermediate Spanish (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, Spanish 1, 2, or equivalent. 

Reading of texts designed to give some knowledge of Spanish and Latin- 
American life, thought and culture. Translation, grammar review, exer- 
cises in pronunciation. 

Spanish 8, 9. Intermediate Conversation (2, 2) — First and second semes- 
ters. Admission by consent of instructor. 

The aim of this course is to help the student acquire the ability to 
speak and understand everyday colloquial Spanish. 

Spanish 17. Grammar Review (3) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, Spanish 4, or consent of instructor. Recommended for students 
who expect to major or minor in Spanish. 

An intensive review of the elements of Spanish grammar; verb drills; 
composition. 



202 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Spanish 51, 52. Business Spanish (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, second-year Spanish or equivalent. 

Designed to give a knowledge of correct Spanish usage; commercial 
letters. 

Spanish 61, 62. Spanish Phonetics (1, 1) — First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, Spanish 1, 2, or equivalent. 

A practical course in the pronunciation of Spanish; study of phonetics, 
oral exercises, and ear training. 

Spanish 71, 72. Review Grammar and Composition (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, Spanish 4, 5, or equivalent. 

This course is more advanced than Spanish 17, and is designed to give 
the students a thorough training in the structure of the language. It is 
also intended to give an intensive and practical drill in Spanish composition. 

Spanish 75, 76. Introduction to Spanish Literature (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, Spanish 4, 5, or equivalent. 

An elementary survey of the history of Spanish literature. 

Spanish 80, 81. Advanced Conversation (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, Spanish 8, 9, or consent of instructor. 

This course is intended to give the student the ability to speak fluently 
about subjects of general interest. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Spanish 101. Epic and Ballad (3) — First semester. 

The legendary and heroic matter of the Spanish-speaking world, viewed 
in the historical and folklorist context through an extensive study of its 
written and oral manifestations. (Goodwyn, Parsons.) 

Spanish 104. The Drama of the Golden Age (3) — First semester. 

Selected plays of Lope de Vega, Calderon de la Barca, Tirso de Molina 
and others. Outside readings, reports. (Goodwyn, Parsons.) 

Spanish 108. Lope de Vega (3) — First semester. 

Selected dramatic and non-dramatic works of Lope de Vega. Outside 
readings, reports. (Parsons.) 

Spanish 109. Cervantes (3) — Second semester. 

Selected works of Cervantes; plays, exemplary novels, and Don Quixote. 
Outside readings, reports. (Goodwyn, Rand.) 

Spanish 110. Modern Spanish Poetry (3) — First semester. 

Significant poems of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

(Rand, Jimenez.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 203 

Spanish 111. Modern Spanish Novel (3) — Second semester. 
Readings of some of the significant novels of the nineteenth and twentieth 
centuries. Outside readings, reports. (Parsons.) 

Spanish 112. Modern Spanish Drama (3) — Second semester. 
Significant plays of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Outside 
readings, reports. (Rand.) 

Spanish 115. Modern Spanish Thought (3) — First semester. 
The generation of 1898 and other significant and interpretative writings 
of the twentieth century. (Rand.) 

Spanish 121, 122. Advanced Composition (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. 

Training in self-expression in Spanish, free composition, letter writing. 

(Bingham, Nemes.) 

Spanish 151. Spanish-American Fiction (3) — First semester. 
The novel and short story from the Wars of Independence to the present 
and their reflection of society in the republics of the Western Hemisphere. 

(Bingham.) 

Spanish 152. Spanish-American Poetry (3) — Second semester. 
Representative poetry after 1800 and its relation to European trends and 
writers. (Bingham.) 

Spanish 153. Spanish-American Essay (3) — First and second semesters. 
Social and political thought from Bolivar to Vasconcelos and its relation- 
ship to social and political conditions in Spanish America. (Bingham.) 

Spanish 161, 162. Spanish Civilization (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. 

Introductory study of the literary, educational, artistic traditions; great 
men, customs, and general culture. (Goodwyn, Jimenez.) 

Spanish 163, 164. Latin-American Civilization (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. 

Introductory study of the cultures of Latin America, as expressed in its 
literary masterpieces. Lectures on the historical-political background and 
the dominating concepts in the lives of the people. (Goodwyn.) 

Spanish 199. Rapid Review of the History of Spanish Literature (1) — 

Second semester. Especially designed for Spanish majors. 

Weekly lectures stressing the leading concepts in the history of Spanish 
literature. (Parsons.) 

For Graduates 

The requirements of students will determine which courses will be offered. 
Spanish 201. Research — Credits determined by work accomplished. 
Guidance in the preparation of master's and doctoral theses. Confer- 
ences. (Staflf.) 



204 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Spanish 202. The Golden Age in Spanish Literature (3). (Goodwyn.) 

Spanish 203, 204. Spanish Poetry (3, 3). (Goodwyn.) 

Spanish 207. The Spanish Mystics (3). (Goodwyn.) 

Spanish 211. Introduction to Old Spanish (3). (Parsons.) 

Spanish 221, 222. Reading Course — (Arranged). Designed to give the 
graduate student a background of a survey of Spanish literature. Exten- 
sive outside readings, with reports and periodic conferences. (Staff.) 

Spanish 230. Introduction to European Linguistics (3). (L. P. Smith.) 

Spanish 251, 252. Seminar (3, 3) — Required of all graduate majors in 
Spanish. (Staff.) 

Russian 

Russian 1, 2. Elementary Russian (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 

Elements of grammar; pronunciation and conversation; exercises in 
translation. (Boborykine.) 

Russian 3. Elementary Conversation (1) — First and second semesters. 
Open to all students who have completed their first-year Russian. Qualified 
students who had the grade A or B in Russian 1 may take this course in 
conjunction with Russian 2. 

A practice course in simple spoken Russian. 

Russian 4, 5. Intermediate Russian (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, Russian 1 and 2, or equivalent. 

Translation and exercises in pronunciation; reading of texts designed to 
give some knowledge of Russian life, thought and culture. 

Russian 8, 9. Intermediate Conversation (2, 2) — First and second semes- 
ters. Admission by consent of instructor. 

An intermediate practice course in spoken Russian. 

Russian 71, 72. Review Grammar and Composition (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, first and second-year Russian. 

This course is designed to give the student a thorough training in the 
structure of the language. It is also intended to give an intensive and prac- 
tical drill in Russian composition. 

Russian 75, 76. Introduction to Russian Literature (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, second-year Russian or equivalent. 
An elementary survey of Russian literature. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Russian 101, 102. Contemporary Russian Literature (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. 

The works of some outstanding authors, such as Maxim Gorky, Alexei 

Tolstoy, P. Romanov, M. Zoshchenko, M. Sholokhov. (Boborykine.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 205 

Russian 103, 104. Russian Literature of the Nineteenth Century (3, 3)— 

First and second semesters. 

Selected writings of Pushkin, Gogol, Lermontov, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, 
Leo Tolstoy, Chekhov. (Boborykine.) 

Hebrew 

Hebrew 1, 2. Elementary Hebrew (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 

Elements of grammar; pronunciation and conversation; exercises in trans- 
lation. 

Hebrew 3. Elementary Conversation (1) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
Hebrew 1 and consent of instructor. 
A practice course in simple Hebrew. 

Hebrew 4, 5. Intermediate Hebrew (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, Hebrew 1 and 2 or equivalent. 

Reading of texts designed to give some knowledge of Hebrew life, thought, 
and culture. Translation; conversation; exercises in pronunciation. 

Hebrew 8, 9. Intermediate Conversation (2, 2) — First and second semes- 
ters. Admission by consent of instructor. 

An intermediate practice course in spoken Hebrew. 

Hebrew 75, 76. Introduction to Hebrew Literature (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, second-year Hebrew or equivalent. 

An elementary survey of Hebrew literature. (Greenberg.) 

Portuguese 

Portuguese 1, 2. Elementary Portuguese (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. 

Elements of grammar; pronunciation and conversation; exercises in trans- 
lation. 

Portuguese 3. Elementary Conversation (1) — Prerequisite, Portuguese 1 
and consent of instructor. 

A practice course in simple Portuguese. 

Italian 

Italian 1, 2. Elementary Italian (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Also recommended to advanced students in French and Spanish. 

Elements of grammar; pronunciation; exercises in translation. 

Italian 3. Elementary Conversation (1) — Prerequisite, Italian 1 and 
consent of instructor. 

A practice course in simple Italian. 



206 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

GEOGRAPHY 

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences may select Geography as a 
major field, and may also take courses in this department for elective credit. 
For a description of courses, see the catalog of the College of Business and 
Public Administration. 

GEOLOGY 

Irwin C. Brown, Lecturer 

Geol. 1. Geology (3) — Prerequisite, Chem. 1, 3. 

A study dealing primarily with the principles of dynamical and structural 
geology. Designed to give a general survey of the rocks and minerals com- 
posing the earth; the movement within it; and its surface features and the 
agents that form them. 

Geol. 2. Engineering Geology (2). 

The fundamentals of geology with engineering applications. 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences may select Government 
and Politics as a major field, and may also take courses in this department 
for elective credit. For a desci'iption of courses, see the catalog of the 
College of Business and Public Administration. 

HISTORY 

Professors Gewehr, Chatelain, Prange, Wellborn; Associate Professors 

Bauer, Merrill; Assistant Professors Crosman, Gordon, Jashemski, Neumann, 

Sparks, Stromberg; Instructors Bates, Ferguson, Hanks, Lowitt; Graduate 

Assistants MacKellar, Malin. 

H. 1, 2. History of Modern Europe (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
The basic course, prerequisite for all advanced courses in European History. 

A study of European History from the Renaissance to the present 
day. (Bauer, Prange, Stromberg.) 

H. 5, 6. History of American Civilization (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Required for graduation of all students who entered the University 
after 1944-45. Normally to be taken in the sophomore year. 

(Stromberg and Staff.) 

H. 51, 52. The Humanities (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 

In surveying history from prehistoric times to the present, man's cultural 
development is emphasized. The course is a study of the achievements 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 207 

of the various civilizations which have contributed to the common cultural 
heritage of western civilization. The political, social, and economic set- 
tings of the various civilizations are presented in chronological order. The 
characteristic achievements of each period in philosophy, religion, litera- 
ture, art, science, and music enrich this background. By presenting actual 
masterpieces in literature, art, and music, it is hoped that imagination, 
appreciation, and critical judgment will be stimulated. This course is 
designed as an introductory course in history which will make a more direct 
contribution to the other liberal art fields. (Jashemski.) 

H. 53, 54. History of England and Great Britain (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. (Gordon.) 

A history of the development of British life and institutions. Open to 
all classes. Especially recommended for English majors and minors. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
A. American History 

H. 101. American Colonial History (3) — First semester. Prerequisites, 
H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. 

The settlement and development of colonial America to the middle of the 
eighteenth century. (Ferguson.) 

H. 102. The American Revolution (3) — Second semester. Prerequisites, 
H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. 

The background and course of the American Revolution through the for- 
mation of the Constitution. (Ferguson.) 

H. 105. Social and Economic History of the United States to 1865 (3) — 

First semester. Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. 

A synthesis of American Life from its independence through the Civil 
War. (Chatelain.) 

H. 106. Social and Economic History of the United States since the Civil 

War (3) — Second semester. Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. 

The development of American life and institutions, with emphasis upon 
the period since 1876. (Chatelain.) 

H. 114. The Middle Period of American History 1824-1860 (3)— First 
semester. Prerequisites H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. 

An examination of the political history of the U. S. from Jackson to 
Lincoln with particular emphasis on the factors producing Jacksonian de- 
mocracy, Manifest Destiny, the Whig Party, the anti-slavery movement, 
the Republican Party, and secession. ' (Sparks.) 

H. 115. The Old South (3)— First semester. Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or 
the equivalent. 



208 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

A study of the institutional and cultural life of the ante-bellum South 
with particular reference to the background of the Civil War. (Bates.) 

H. 116. The Civil War (3) — Second semester. Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or 
the equivalent. 

Military aspects; problems of the Confederacy; political, social, and eco- 
nomic effects of the war upon American society. (Sparks.) 

H. 117. The New South (3) — First semester. Prerequisites H. 5, 6, or 
the equivalent. 

The South's place in the Nation from Appomattox to the present with 
special reference to regional problems and aspirations. (Bates.) 

H. 118, 119. Recent American History (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisites, H, 5, 6, or the equivalent. 

Party politics, domestic issues, foreign relations of the United States since 
1890. First semester, through World War I. Second semester, since World 
War I. (Merrill.) 

H. 121, 122. History of the American Frontier (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. 

A study of the influence of the westward movement in shaping American 
institutional development. First semester, the trans- Alleghany West; sec- 
ond semester, the trans-Mississippi West. (Gewehr.) 

H. 123. The New West (3) — Second semester. Prerequisites H. 5, 6, 
or the equivalent. 

Regional pecularities and national significance of the Plains and Pacific 

Coast areas from 1890 to the present. (Bates.) 

H. 124. Reconstruction and the New Nation 1865-1896 (3) — Second se- 
mester. Prerequisites H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. 

Problems of reconstruction in both South and North. Emergence of Big 
Business and industrial combinations. Problems of the farmer and laborer. 

(Merrill.) 

H. 127, 128. Diplomatic History of the United States (3, 3)— First and 

second semesters. Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. 

An historical study of the diplomatic negotiations and foreign relations 
of the United States. First semester, from the Revolution to the Civil 
War; second semester, from the Civil War to the present. (Wellborn.) 

H. 129. The United States and World Affairs (3)— (Offered in Summer 
Session 1952) — Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. 

A consideration of the changed position of the United States with refer- 
ence to the rest of the world since 1917. (Wellborn.) 

H. 133, 134. The History of American Ideas (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 209 

An intellectual history of the American people, embracing such topics as 
religious liberty, democracy, and social ideas. (Ferguson.) 

H. 135, 136. Constitutional History of the United States (3, 3) — First 
and second semesters. Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. H, 135 
prerequisite for H. 136. 

A study of the historical forces resulting in the formation of the Con- 
stitution, and the development of American constitutionalism in theory and 
practice thereafter. (Gewehr.) 

Amer. Civ. 137, 138. Conference Course in American Civilization (3, 3) 

— First and second semesters. 

The student's acquaintance with American Civilization is brought to a 
focus through the analytical study of eight to ten important books, such 
as Tocqueville, Democracy in America, Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter, 
Veblen, The Theory of the Leisure Class, and Myrdal, An American Dilemma. 
Specialists from related departments participate in the conduct of the 
course. (Bode.) 

H. 141, 142. History of Maryland (3, ) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. 

First semester, a survey of the political, social and economic history of 
colonial Maryland. Second semester, Maryland's historical development 
and role as a state in the American Union. (Chatelain.) 

H. 145, 146. Latin- American History (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisites, 6 hours of fundamental courses. 

A survey of the history of Latin America from colonial origins to the 
present, covering political, cultural, economic, and social development, with 
special emphasis upon relations with the United States. (Crosman.) 

H. 147. History of Mexico (3) — First semester. 

The history of Mexico with special emphasis upon the independence 
period and upon relations between ourselves and the nearest of our Latin- 
American neighbors. (Crosman.) 

B. European History 
H. 151. History of the Ancient Orient and Greece (3) — First semester. 
A survey of the ancient empires of Egypt, the Near East, and Greece, 
with particular attention to their institutions, life, and culture. (Jashemski.) 

H. 153. History of Rome C3) — Second semester. 

A study of Roman civilization from the earliest beginnings through the 
Republic and down to the last centuries of the Empire. (Jashemski.) 

H. 155. Medieval Civilization (3) — First semester. Prerequisites, H, 1, 

2, or H. 53, 54, or the permission of the instructor. 

A survey of Medieval life, culture, and institutions from the fall of the 
Roman Empire to the thirteenth century. (Jashemski.) 



210 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

H. 161. The Renaissance and Reformation (3) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisites, H. 1, 2, or 53, 54, or the permission of the instructor. 

The culture of the Renaissance, the Protestant revolt and Catholic reac- 
tion through the Thirty Years War. (Jashemski.) 

H. 166. Revolutionary and Napoleonic Europe (3) — Second semester. 
Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, or H. 53, 54. 

The Old Regime in France and Europe; the changes effected by the 
French Revolution; the Napoleonic regime and the balance of power 
1789-1815. (Bauer.) 

H. 171, 172. Europe in the Nineteenth Century, 1815-1919 (3, 3)— First 

and second semesters. Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, or H. 53, 54. 

A study of the political, economic, social, and cultural development of 
Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the First World War. (Bauer.) 

H. 175, 176. Europe in the World Setting of the Twentieth Century (3, 

3) — First and second semesters. Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, or H. 53, 54. 

A study of political, economic, and cultural developments in twentieth 
century Europe with special emphasis on the factors involved in the two 
World Wars and their global impacts and significance. (Prange.) 

H. 185, 186. History of the British Empire (3, 3)— First and second 
semesters. Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, or H. 53, 54. 

First semester, the development of England's Mercantilist Empire and 
its fall in the war for American Independence (1783); second semester, the 
rise of the Second British Empire and the solution of the problem of re- 
sponsible self-government (1783-1867), the evolution of the British Empire 
into a Commonwealth of Nations, and the development and problems of the 
dependent Empire. (Gordon.) 

H. 187. History of Canada (3)— (Not offered in 1952-1953). First 
semester. Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, or H. 53, 54. 

A history of Canada, with special emphasis on the nineteenth century 
and upon Canadian relations with Great Britain and the United States. 

(Gordon.) 

H. 189. Constitutional History of Great Britain (3) — Second semester. 
A survey of constitutional development in England with emphasis on the 
real property aspects of feudalism, the growth of the common law, the 
development of Parliament, and the expansion of the liberties of the 
individual. (Gordon.) 

H. 191. History of Russia (3) — ^First semester. Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, 
or the equivalent. 
A history of Russia from the earliest times to the present day. (Bauer.) 

H. 192. Foreign Policy of the USSR (3) — Second semester. Prerequi- 
site, H. 191. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 211 

A survey of Russian foreign policy in the historical perspective, with 
special emphasis on the period of the USSR. Russian aims, expansion, and 
conflicts with the western powers in Europe, the Near and Middle East, and 
the Far East will be studied. (Bauer.) 

H. 195. The Far East (3)— (Not offered in 1952-1953). 

A survey of institutional, cultural and political aspects of the history 
of China and Japan, and a consideration of present-day problems of the 
Pacific area. (Gewehr.) 

H. 199. Proseminar in Historical Writing (3) — First and second semes- 
ters. 

Discussions and term papers designed to acquaint the student with the 
methods and problems of research and presentation. The students will be 
encouraged to examine those phases of history in which they are most 

interested. Required of history majors in senior year. (Stromberg.) 

For Graduates 

H. 200. Research (3-6) — Credit proportioned to amount of work. Ar- 
ranged. 

H. 201. Seminar in American History (3) — First and second semester. 

(Staff.) 

H. 205, 206. Topics in American Economic and Social History (3, 3) — 

First and second semesters. 

Readings and conferences on the critical and source materials explaining 
our social and economic evolution. (Chatelain.) 

H. 208. Topics in Recent American History (3) — First and second 
semesters. 

Selected readings, research, and conferences on important topics in 
United States History from 1900 to the present. (Merrill.) 

H. 211. The Colonial Period in American History (3) — First semester. 

Readings and conferences designed to familiarize the student with some 
of the sources and the classical literature of American Colonial History. 

(Ferguson.) 

H. 212. Period of the American Revolution (3) — Second semester. 

Readings and conferences designed to familiarize the student with some 
of the critical literature and sources of the period of the American Revo- 
lution. (Ferguson.) 

H. 215. The Old South (3) 

Readings and conferences designed to familiarize the student with some 
of the standard sources and the classical literature of the ante-bellum 
South. (Gewehr.) 



212 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

H. 216. The American Civil War (3) 

Readings and conferences on the controversial literature of the Civil 
War. Attention is focused upon the conflicting interpretations and upon 
the social and economic impact of the war on American society. Oppor- 
tunity is also given to read in the rich source material of this period. 

(Merrill.) 

H. 217. Reconstruction and Its Aftermath (3) 

A seminar on problems resulting from the Civil War. Political, social, 
and economic reconstruction in South and North; projection of certain post- 
war attitudes and problems into the present. (Merrill.) 

H. 221, 222. History of the West (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 

Readings and conferences designed to give the student an acquaintance 
with some of the more important sources and some of the most significant 
literature of the advancing American frontier. (Gewehr.) 

H. 233, 234. Topics in American Intellectual History (3, 3) 

Readings and conferences on selected phases of American thought, with 
emphasis on religious traditions, social and political theory, and develop- 
ment of American ideas. (Ferguson.) 

H. 245. Topics in Latin American History (3) — Selected readings, re- 
search, and conferences on important topics in Latin American History. 

(Crosman.) 

H. 250. Seminar in European History (3) — First and second semesters. 

(Bauer.) 

H. 251. Topics in Greek Civilization (3) — Readings and conferences 
designed to acquaint the students with selected topics in Greek and 
Hellenistic history, such as the growth of democracy in Athens (with 
special attention to the nature of democracy in fifth-century Athens), and 
the development of federalism during the Hellenistic period. Time will 
also be devoted to the contributions of the Greeks in philosophy, literature, 
art, and architecture. Special attention will be given to the study and 
evaluation of the source material in this field. (Jashemski.) 

H. 253. Topics in Roman History (3) — Readings and conferences de- 
signed to acquaint the student with selected topics in Roman history, such 
as the development of the Roman constitution, the growth of democracy 
in Rome, Roman provincial administration, the nature of Roman imperial- 
ism, and Roman law. Special attention will be given to the study and 
evaluation of the source material in this field. (Jashemski.) 

H. 255. Medieval Culture and Society (3) 

Readings and conferences designed to acquaint the student with the im- 
portant literature and interpretations on such topics as feudalism, the 
medieval Church, schools and universities, Latin and vernacular literature, 
art and architecture. (Jashemski.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 213 

H. 282. Problems in the History of World War II (3) — Investigation of 
various aspects of the Second World War, including military operations, 
diplomatic phases, and political and economic problems of the war and its 
aftermath. (Prange.) 

H. 285, 286. Topics in the History of Modern England and Greater 
Britain (3, 3) 

Readings and conferences on the documentary and literary materials 
dealing with the transformation of England and the growth and evolution 
of the British Empire since 1763. (Gordon.) 

H. 287. Historiography (3) — Arranged. 

Readings and occasional lectures on the historical writing, the evolution 
of critical standards, the rise of auxiliary sciences, and the works of se- 
lected masters. (Sparks.) 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Professor Rovelstad; Instructors Baehr, Charlesworth, Hayes, Holladay, 
Phillips, Turner, Urban and Wedemeyer. 

L. S. 1, 2. Library Methods (1, 1) — First and second semesters. 

Library Science 1 and 2 are required of all students in general Arts and 
Science, Pre-Law and Pre-Nursing curriculums. 

These introductory courses are intended to help students to use libraries 
with greater facility and effectiveness. Instruction, given in the form of 
lectures and practical work, is designed to interpret the library and its 
resources to the students. The courses consider the classification of books 
in libraries, the card catalog, periodical literature and indexes, and certain 
essential reference books which will be found helpful throughout the college 
course and in later years. 

L. S. lOlS. School Library Administration (3). 

The organization and maintenance of effective library service in the 
modem school. Planning and equipping library quarters, purpose of the 
library in the school, standards, instruction in the use of books and libraries, 
training student assistants, acquisition of materials, repair of books, pub- 
licity, exhibits, and other practical problems. 

L. S. 102S. Cataloging and Classification (3). 

Study and practice in classifying books and making dictionary catalog 
for school libraries. Study of simplified forms as used in the Children's 
Catalog, Standard Catalog for High School Libraries, and Wilson printed 
cards. 

L. S. 103S. Book Selection for School Libraries (3). 

Principles of book selection as applied to school libraries. Practice in 
the effective use of book selection aids and in the preparation of book 
lists. Evaluating of publishers, editions, translations, format, etc. 



214 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

L. S. 104S. Reference and Bibliography for School Libraries (4). 

Evaluation, selection, and use of standard reference tools, such as en- 
cyclopedias, dictionaries, periodical indexes, atlases, and yearbooks, for 
school libraries. Study of bibliographical procedures and forms. 

L. S. 111. Introduction to Fundamentals of Special Library Service (3). 

An introductory course to library methods as applied to an organization 
in which the primary function of the library is bibliographic control of 
material pertinent to the specialized field of the organization. A course 
planned to train in general library methods a person who already is a 
specialist in some particular phase of library service. 

MATHEMATICS 

Professors Martin, Hall, Jackson, Weinstein*; Associate Professors Diaz*, 

Vanderslice; Assistant Professors Good, Ludford, Wolfsohn; Instructors 

Boyer, Brewster, Eisenman, Facey, Greenspan, Jarnagin, McLean, Mehegan, 

Menneken, Shepherd, Spencer. 

The Colloquium meets weekly for reports on the research of the faculty 
and graduate students, and for expository lectures on papers published in 
current mathematical journals. 

The Mathematics Club meets once a month under the direction of Pro- 
fessor Hall for the discussion of mathematical topics of interest to the 
undergraduate. 

The following courses are open to students who offer at least one unit 
of algebra for entrance: Math. 1, 5, or 10. 

The foUovsdng courses are open to students who offer two or more units 
of algebra for entrance: Math. 14, 15. 

Students are enrolled in Math. 5, 10, or 15 provided they pass the Mathe- 
matics section of the general classification test given to incoming students 
during registration. Students who fail this test should enroll in Math. if 
their curriculum calls for Math. 5 or 10, and in Math. 1 if their curriculum 
calls for Math. 15. Students taking Math. 1 are not eligible to take Math. 
14 concurrently. 

In general students should enroll in only one course in the groups below. 
In case this rule is not followed credit will be assigned as indicated. 
Math. 5, 10, 15. Credit on only one course. 
Math. 11, 14. Math. 11— 1^/2 credits; Math. 14—2 credits. 
Math. 11, 17. Math. 11— 1 1/2 credits; Math. 17—4 credits. 
Math. 11, 14, 17. Math. 11—0 credit; Math. 14—2 credits; Math. 17, 
4 credits. 

The department strongly recommends that a student who receives a 
grade of D in a course in mathematics repeat the course to raise his grade 
before going on to a more advanced course. 



• Member of the Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 215 

Math. 0. Basic Mathematics (0) — First and second semesters. Required 
of students whose curriculum calls for Math. 5 or 10 and who fail the quali- 
fying examination for these courses. 

The fundamental principles of algebra. (Menneken and Staff.) 

Math. 1. Introductory Algebra (0) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, one unit of algebra. Required of students whose curriculum calls 
for Math. 15 and who fail the qualifying examination for this course. 

A review of the topics covered in a second course in algebra. 

(Menneken and Staff.) 

Math. 2. Solid Geometry (0) — First and second semesters. Prerequi- 
site, one unit each of algebra and plane geometry. Open to students who 
enter deficient in solid geometry. 

Lines, planes, cylinders, cones, the sphere and polyhedra, primary em- 
phasis on mensuration. Intended for engineers and science students. 

(Brewster and Staff.) 

Math. 5. General Mathematics (3) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, one unit of algebra. Open only to students in the College of 
Business and Public Administration, the College of Agriculture, and the 
Department of Industrial Education. Note regulation above in case student 
enrolls in more than one of the courses. Math. 5, 10, 15. 

Fundamental operations, fractions, ratio and proportion, linear equations, 
exponents, logarithms, percentage, trade discount, simple interest, bank 
discount, true discount, and promissory notes. (Shepherd and Staff.) 

Math. 6. Mathematics of Finance (3) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, Math 5 or equivalent. Required of students in the College 
of Business and Public Administration, and open to students in the College 
of Arts and Sciences only for elective credit. 

Line diagrams, compound interest, simple interest, ordinary annuities, 
general annuities, deferred annuities, annuities due, perpetuities, evalua- 
tion of bonds, amortization, and sinking funds. (Shepherd and Staff.) 

Math. 10. Algebra (3) — First and second semesters. Prerequisite, one 
unit each of algebra and plane geometry. Open to biological, premedical, 
predental, and general Arts and Sciences students. Note regulation above, 
in case student enrolls in more than one of the courses. Math. 5, 10, 15. 

Fundamental operations, factoring, fractions, linear equations, exponents 
and radicals, logarithms, quadratic equations variations, binomial theorem, 
theory of equations. (Wolfsohn and Staff.) 

Math. 11. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry (3) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, Math. 10 or equivalent. Open to biological, pre- 
medical, predental, and general Arts and Science students. This course is 
not recommended for students planning to enroll in Math. 20. Note regu- 
lation above, in case student enrolls in both Math. 11 and 14, or in both 
Math 11 and 17. 



216 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Trigonometric functions, identities, addition formulas, solution of tri- 
angles, coordinates, locus problems, the straight line and circle, conic sec- 
tions, graphs. (Wolfsohn and Staff.) 

Math. 13. Elements of Mathematical Statistics (3) — Second semester. 
Prerequisite, Math. 10 or equivalent. 

Frequency distributions, averages, moments, measures of dispersion, 
the normal curve, curve fitting, regression and correlation. (Good.) 

Math. 14. Plane Trigonometry (2) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 15 or concurrent enrollment in Math. 15. Open to students 
in engineering, education, and the physical sciences. Note regulation above, 
in case student enrolls in both Math. 11 and 14. 

Trigonometric functions, identities, the radian, graphs, addition formulas, 
solution of triangles, trigonometric equations. (Good and Staff.) 

Math. 15. College Algebra (3) — First and second semesters. Prerequi- 
site, high school algebra completed, and plane geometry. Open to students 
in engineering, education, and the physical sciences. Note regulation above, 
in case student enrolls in more than one of the courses. Math. 5, 10, 15. 

Fundamental operations, variation, functions and graphs, quadratic equa- 
tions, theory of equations, binomial theorem, complex numbers, logarithms, 
determinants, progressions. (Good and Staff.) 

Math. 16. Spherical Trigonometry (2) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisites, solid geometry and Math. 14. 

The solution of spherical triangles, with applications to the terrestrial 
and astronomical triangles. (Brewster and Staff.) 

Math. 17. Analytic Geometry (4) — Three lectures and two one-hour drill 
periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, Math. 14 and 15, 
or equivalent. Open to students in engineering, education, and the physical 
sciences. Note regulation above, in case student enrolls in both Math. 11 
and 17. 

Coordinates, locus problems, the straight line and circle, graphs, trans- 
formation of coordinates, conic sections, parametric equations, transcen- 
dental equations, solid analytic geometry. (Hall and Staff.) 

Math. 20, 21. Calculus (4, 4) — Three lectures and two one-hour drill 
periods a week, first and second semesters, second and first semesters. 
Prerequisite, Math. 17 or equivalent. Open to students in engineering, 
education, and the physical sciences. 

Limits, derivatives, differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, 
rates, curvature, kinematics, integration with geometric and physical appli- 
cations, partial derivatives, space geometry, multiple integrals, infinite 
series. (Vanderslice and Staff.) 

Math. 64. Differential Equations for Engineers (3) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Required of students 
in mechanical and electrical engineering. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 217 

DiflFerential equations of the first and second order with emphasis on 
their engineering applications. (Ludford and Staff.) 

A. Algebra 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 100, 101. Higher Algebra (3, 3)— (Not offered 1951-1952.) Pre- 
requisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. 

Selected topics in algebra will be taken up from a point of view designed 
to strengthen and deepen the grasp of the subject. (Good.) 

Math. 102. Theory of Equations (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 
21 or equivalent. 

Solution of algebraic equations, symmetric functions. (Good.)' 

Math. 103. Introduction to Modern Algebra (3) — First semester. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. 

Linear dependence, matrices, groups, vector spaces. (Wolfsohn.) 

Math. 106. Introduction to the Theory of Numbers (3) — Second semester. 
Prerequisite, Math 21 or equivalent. 

Integers, divisibility, Euclid's algorithm, Diophantine equations, prime 
numbers, Moebius function, congruences, residues. (Good.) 

For Graduates 

Math. 200, 201. Modern Algebra (3, 3) — Prerequisite, Math. 103 or con- 
sent of instructor. 

Matrices, groups, rings, fields, algebraic numbers, Galois theory. (Good.) 

Math. 202. Matrix Theory (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 
103 or consent of instructor. 

The theory of vectors and matrices with applications. (Good.) 

Math. 204, 205. Topological Groups (3, 3) — Prerequisite, consent of in- 
structor. 

An introductory course in abstract groups, topological spaces, and the 
study of collections of elements enjoying both these properties. The con- 
cept of a uniform space \vill be introduced and studied. The representation 
problem will be considered together with the subject of Lie groups. 

(Hall, Good.) 

Math. 271. Selected Topics in Algebra (3) — (Arranged). 

B. Analysis 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 110, 111. Advanced Calculus (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. 

Limits, continuous functions, differentiation and intergration with appli- 
cation to mechanics, infinite series, Fourier series, functions of several 



218 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

variables, differential equations with applications to mechanics and physics, 
multiple integrals, the theorems of Gauss and Stokes, the calculus of 
variations. (Jackson.) 

Math. 114, 115. Differential Equations (3, 3) — Prerequisite, Math. 21 
or equivalent. 

Ordinary differential equations, symbolic methods, successive approxi- 
mations, solutions in series, orthogonal functions, Bessel functions, Stur- 
mian theory. Partial differential equations of first and second order, 
characteristics, boundary value problems, Pfaffians, systems of equations, 
applications. (Spencer.) 

Math. 116, 118. Introduction to Complex Variable Theory (3, 3)— Pre- 
requisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Open to students in engineering and 
the physical sciences. Graduate students in mathematics should enroll in 
Math. 210, 211. 

Fundamental operations in complex numbers, differentiation and inte- 
gration, sequences and series, power series, analytic functions, conformal 
mapping, residue theory, special functions. (Spencer.) 

Math. 117. Fourier Series (3) — Prerequisite, Math. 114 or equivalent. 

Representation of functions by series of orthogonal functions. Applica- 
tions to the solution of boundary value problems of some partial differential 
equations of physics and engineering. (Vanderslice.) 

Math. 119, 120. Intermediate Dififerential Equations (3, 3) — Second and 

first semesters. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Existence theorems. Continuous groups of transformations and the 
transformation theory of differential equations. Series solutions. Definite 
integral solutions. Sturmian theory. Integral equations. Classification 
of second order equations. Characteristics. Method of Fourier series. 
Method of Fourier and Laplace integrals. Difference equations. Elements 
of potential theory. Variational methods of solution. (Spencer.) 

For Graduates 

Math. 210, 211. Functions of a Complex Variable (3, 3) — Prerequisite, 

Math. Ill or equivalent. 

Complex numbers, infinite series, Cauchy-Riemann equations, conformal 
mapping, complex integral, the Cauchy theory, the Weierstrass theory, 
Riemann surfaces, algebraic functions, periodic and elliptic functions, the 
theorems of Weierstrass and Mittag-Leffler. (Martin.) 

Math 213, 214. — Functions of a Real Variable (3, 3) — Prerequisite, Math. 
Ill or equivalent. 

The real number system, point sets, the Heine-Borel theorem, continuous 
functions, derivatives, infinite series, uniform convergence, the Riemann 
integral, Jordan content, the Lebesgue integral, Fourier series. (Hall.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 219 

Math. 215, 216. Advanced Differential Equations (3, 3) — Prerequisite, 
Math. Ill and 116, or 210. 

Existence and uniqueness theorems for systems of ordinary differential 
equations and for partial differential equations. Characteristic theory. 
Reduction to normal forms, the method of finite differences. (Martin.) 

Math. 272. Selected Topics in Analysis (3) — (Arranged). 

C. Geometry and Topology 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 122, 123. Elementary Topology (3, 3)— Prerequisite, Math. 21 or 
equivalent. 

Open and closed sets. Elementary topology of the straight line and 
the Euclidean plane. The Jordan Curve Theorem and its applications. 
Simple connectivity. (Hall.) 

Math. 124, 125. Introduction to Projective Geometry (3, 3) — Prerequi- 
site, Math. 21 or equivalent. 

Elementary projective geometry largely from the analytic approach, pro- 
jective transformations, cross ratio, harmonic division, projective coordi- 
nates, projective theory of conies, Lagfuerre's definition of angle. (Jackson.) 

Math. 126, 127. Introduction to Differential Geometry and Tensor 
Analysis (3, 3) — Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. 

The differential geometry of curves and surfaces with the use of vector 
and tensor methods, curvature and torsion, moving frames, curvilinear 
coordinates, the fundamental differential forms, covariant derivatives, 
intrinsic geometry, curves on a surface, applications to problems in dy- 
namics, mechanics, electricity, and relativity. (Vanderslice.) 

Math. 128, 129. Higher Geometry (3, 3)— Prerequisite, Math. 21 or 
consent of instructor. Math. 128 is not a prerequisite for Math. 129. Open 
to students in the College of Education. 

This course is designed for students preparing to teach geometry in 
high school. The first semester is devoted to the modem geometry of 
the triangle, circle and sphere. In the second semester emphasis is placed 
on the axiomatic development of Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry. 

(Boyer.) 
For Graduates 

Math. 220, 221. Differential Geometry (3, 3)— Prerequisite, Math. Ill 
and 134, or consent of instructor. 

Curves and surfaces, geometry in the large, the Gauss-Bonnet formula, 
ovaloids, surfaces of constant curvature. (Jackson.) 

Math. 222. Foundations of Geometary (3) — Prerequisite, Math. 124 or 
consent of instructor. 



220 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The course will develop the elements of projective geometry from the 
postulational point of view, laying emphasis on the logical basis of the 
results obtained. Desargues configuration, and Pappus configuration, per- 
spectivities, conies, and construction of coordinate systems will be among 
the topics studied. (Jackson.) 

Math. 223, 224. Combinatorial Topology (3, 3) — Prerequisite, Math. 103 
and 111, or equivalent. 

Homology and homotopy theory of complexes developed from a group 
theoretic basis. (Wolfsohn.) 

Math. 225, 226. Set-theoretic Topology (3, 3)— Prerequisite, Math. Ill 
or equivalent. 

Foundations of mathematics based on a set of axioms, metric spaces, 
convergence and connectivity properties of point sets, continua and con- 
tinuous curves, the topology of the plane. (Hall.) 

Math. 227. Tensor Analysis (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 
Ill and 134, or equivalent. 

Algebra and calculus of tensors, Riemannian geometry and its extensions, 
differential invariants, applications to physics and engineering, the theory 
of relativity. (Vanderslice.) 

Math. 273. Selected Topics in Geometry and Topology (3) — (Arranged) 

D. Applied Mathematics 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 130, 131. Analytic Mechanics (3, 3) — Prerequisite, Math 21 or 
equivalent. 

Statistics, kinematics, dynamics of a particle, elementary celestial me- 
chanics, Lagrangian equations for dynamical systems of one, two, and three 
degrees of freedom, Hamilton's principle, the Hamilton-Jacobi partial dif- 
ferential equation. (Ludford.) 

Math. 132, 133. Advanced Mathematics for Engineers and Physicists 

(3, 3) — Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. 

An introduction to advanced mathematical methods and their application 
to the technical problems of physics and engineering. Topics include 
Fourier series, matrices, ordinary and partial differential equations of 
applied mathematics, numerical methods, Bessel functions, complex vari- 
ables, operational calculus. (Vanderslice.) 

Math. 134. Vector Analysis (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 
21 or equivalent. 

Algebra and calculus of vectors and applications. Includes introductory 
differential geometry. (Vanderslice.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 221 

Math. 135. Numerical Analysis (3) — Prerequisite, Math. 114 or equiva- 
lent. 

Survey of high-speed calculators; applicability of numerical techniques. 
Evaluation of errors in extended calculations; round-off and truncation 
errors. Finite differences; smoothing; divided differences; central differ- 
ences; uniform intervals. Newton's interpolation formula; inverse inter- 
polation. Numerical differentiation and integration. Systems of simultane- 
ous equations. Solution of typical problems. (Polachek.) 

For Graduates 

Math. 230, 231. Applied Mathematics (3, 3) — Prerequisite, Math. Ill 
and 114, or equivalent. 

The subject material for this course will be chosen from the fields of 
dynamics, elasticity, hydrodynamics. (Weinstein.) 

Math. 232, 233. Partial Differential Equations of Mathematical Physics 

(3, 3) — Prerequisite, Math. Ill and 114, or equivalent. 

The characteristic properties of elliptic, paz'abolic, and hyperbolic partial 
differential equations with special reference to problems in potential theory, 
the flow of heat, hydrodynamics and elasticity. (Diaz.) 

Math. 234. Potential Theory (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 
Ill or equivalent. 

The equations of Laplace and Poisson, flux, the theorems of Gauss and 
Green, potential of volume and surface distributions, harmonic functions, 
Green's function, the problem of Dirichlet and Neumann, introduction to 
the linear integral equations of potential theory. (Ludford.) 

Math. 235. Advanced Numerical Analysis (3) — Prerequisite, Math. 114 
and 135, or equivalent. 

ReAdew of numerical differentiation and integration, solution of ordinary 
differential equations. Construction of multivariate tables. Properties of 
elliptic, hyperbolic and parabolic partial differential equations. Conversion 
of partial differential equations to system of difference equations; determi- 
nation of mesh sizes and convergence. The relaxation method of R. V. 
Southwell. Integral equations. Solution of typical pi-oblems. (Polachek.) 

Math. 236. Mathematical Theory of Hydrodynamics (3) — Second semes- 
ter. Prerequisite, Math. 116 or equivalent. 

Equation of continuity, rotational and irrotational flows, Bernoulli's 
theorem, Helmholtz's theory of vorticity, flux of momentum; the plane 
motion of an incompressible perfect fluid, including stream function, com- 
plex potential, Joukowski's theory, the formula of Blasius, Karman's vortex 
street. Prandtl's theory of a finite wing, and an introduction to the theory 
of viscous fluids. (Ludford.) 



222 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Math. 237. Mathematical Theory of Elasticity (3) — Prerequisite, Math. 
Ill or equivalent. 

Stress and strain, deformation of columns, bending torsion, and flexure of 
beams, Euler-Bernoulli formulas. Saint- Venant's Principle, Airy's function, 
strain and potential energy, buckling problems, minimum principles, Betti's 
reciprocity law. (Weinstein.) 

Math. 238. Mathematical Theory of Continuous Media (3) — Prerequi- 
site, Math. 134 or consent of instructor. 

Kinematics of continuous media, conservation of mass, momentum and 
energy, thermodynamics, heat conduction, elastic bodies, plates and shells, 
fluid mechanics (non-linear theory), rarefied gases, viscous fluids, plasticity. 

Math. 239. Mathematical Theory of Electricity and Magnetism (3) — 

Prerequisite, Math. 134 or consent of instructor. 

Maxwell's equations, electrostatics, condensers, dielectrics, conductors and 
potential distributions, electric current, linear conductors, flow in two and 
three dimensions, magnetostatics, electromagnetic inductance, transients, 
alternating currents, stress and energy, electromagnetic forces and energy; 
plane, cylindrical and spherical electromagnetic waves, radiation. 

Math. 240. Advanced Numerical Analysis (3) — Prerequisite, Math. 235. 

General methods of solving problems. Existence and uniqueness theorems 
for difference equations associated with partial differential equations. Sta- 
bility of solutions. Perturbation. Iterative procedures. Steepest descent. 
Eigenvalue problems. (Clippinger.) 

Math. 274. Selected Topics in Applied Mathematics (3) — (Arranged). 

E. Reasearch 

For Graduates 

Math. 298. Proseminar in Research (1) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
one semester of graduate work in mathematics. 

The student is initiated into the techniques of mathematical research 
by reporting on original research papers appearing in the mathematical 
literature. At the discretion of the senior staff member in charge, original 
problems, lying within the scope of the student's training, will be assigned, 

(Spencer.) 

Math. 300. Research — (Arranged). 

MUSIC 

Professor Randall; Assistant Professor Romaine; Instructors Kemble, 

Haslup, and Landers. 

Music 1. Music Appreciation (3) — First semester. 

A study of all types of classical music (not including opera) from the 
time of Haydn, with a view to developing the ability to listen and enjoy. 

(Randall.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 223 

Music 2, 3. History of Music (1, 1) — First and second semesters. 
A course in the history of music covering the development of all forms 
of music (not including opera) from the Greeks to the present. (Haslup.) 

Music 4. Men's Glee Club (1) — First and second semester. 

A total of six credits may be earned. (Randall.) 

Music 5. Women's Chorus (1) — First and second semesters. 

A total of six credits may be earned. (Randall.) 

Music 6. Orchestra (1) — First and second semesters. (Power.) 

Music 7. Fundamentals of Music (2) — First and second semesters. 

This course is a prerequisite to Harmony and includes a study of major 
and minor scales, intervals, basic piano techniques, sight singing, simple 
musical form and theory. A student must achieve a grade of B in order 
to continue with the study of Harmony. (Haslup.) 

Music 8. Solfeggio and Ear Training, I (2) — First and second semesters. 
Three times a week. 

This course aims to develop facility in singing at sight and the ability 
to sing with good intonation. The aural study of the melodic and rhythmic 
patterns in Solfeggio is also included. (Kemble.) 

Music 9. Elementary Instrument Ensemble (1) — First and second semes- 
ters. Two times a week. 

This course is designed to give practical ensemble experience to those 
students of musical instruments who have not had sufficient training for 
performance with the Band or Orchestra. (Power.) 

Music 10. Band (1) — First and second semesters. 

For discussion of Student and R. O. T. C. Bands, see page 42. A total 
of six credits may be earned. (Landers.) 

Music 11. Solfeggio and Ear Training, II (2) — First and second semes- 
ters. Three times a week. 

This course is a continuation of the study of Solfeggio and Ear Training, 
I. More difficult music is used and special emphasis is placed on part 
singing. (Kemble.) 

Music 50. Elementary Conducting (2) — First and second semesters. 

The student develops a technique of the baton based on the fundamental 
meter designs. Choral and simple orchestra numbers are conducted. 
Euryhthmics are applied to develop a sense of rhythm through muscular 
coordination. Accompanying is also a feature of the course. (Romaine.) 

Music 66. Survey of the Opera (3) — Second semester. 

The object of this course is to acquaint the student with the librettos, 
music, and the composers of the standard operas. (Randall.) 



224 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Music 70. Harmony, I (3) — First and second semesters. Prerequisite, 
Fundamentals of Music. 

Music theory is reviewed and a study is made of harmonic prog^ressions, 
triads, dominant seventh and ninth chords in root position, and inversions. 
The course continues through altered and mixed chords to modulation. 

(Kemble.) 

Music 71. Harmony, II (3) — Second semester. 

This course is a continuation of Harmony, I. It includes the study of 
modulation and the enharmonic intervals. Analysis, simple harmonizations, 
and original compositions are a part of the course. (Romaine.) 

Music 80. Instruments of the Orchestra (Strings) (2) — First and second 
semesters. (Kemble.) 

A study is made of the techniques of the string instruments through 
practical experience. 

Music 81. Instruments of the Band (2) — First and second semesters. 

A study is made of the techniques of the wind and percussion instru- 
ments through practical experience. (Kemble.) 

Music 110. History of American Music (2) — Second semester. 

This course, designed to be an integral part of the American Civilization 
program, reviews the development of music in the United States from 
Colonial days to 1800, 1800 to the Civil War, and 1865 to the present. 
Phases of our musical history which are studied include: Early Hymn 
Writers, Stephen Foster, the Negro Spiritual, and Twentieth Century 
Music. (Haslup.) 

Music 120. Advanced History and Appreciation of Music (3) — First 

semester. Prerequisites, History of Music 2 and 3. 

The aim of this course is an extensive study of the evolution of forms 
and styles of musical composition as illustrated in the music of various 
periods. (Romaine.) 

Music 150. Harmony, III (3) — First semester. 

The practical application to the piano keyboard of the harmonic prin- 
ciples acquired in Harmony I and II are applied in this course. Its pro- 
cedures include harmonization of melodies, improvisations and accompani- 
ments, playing at dictation, and transposition. (Romaine.) 

Music 151. Harmony, IV (3) — Second semester. 

This course aims to develop a feeling for musical form and a technique 
for writing and arranging music for voices, piano, and groups of instru- 
ments. (Romaine.) 

Music 160. Advanced Choral Conducting, Materials, and Methods (2) — 

First semester. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 225 

Prerequisite, Elementary Conducting. It aims to improve conducting 
technique through practical chorus experience, to learn methods of vocal 
procedures, and to make a survey of choral literature. (Romaine.) 

Music 161. Advanced Orchestral Conducting, Materials and Methods 

(2) — Second semester. Prerequisite, Elementary Conducting. 

Conducting and arranging for the orchestra, band, and instrumental en- 
sembles are developed through practical experience. Methods of instruc- 
tion and a survey of instrumental literature are made. (Powders.) 

Music 12, 52, 112, 152. Piano (1, 1, 1, 1) — Fifteen private lessons in 
Applied Music. (One-half hour.) 

The instructor and place will be assigned by the Music Department, 
Bldg. B. There will be a special fee of $30.00 per course for these 
private lessons. 

Music 72, 92, 172, 192. Piano (1, 1) — Fifteen private lessons in Applied 
Music. (One-half hour.) 

The instructor and place will be assigned by the Music Department, 
Bldg. B. There will be a special fee of $30.00 per course for these private 
lessons. 

Music 13, 53, 73, 93. 113, 153, 173, 193 Voice (1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,)— Fifteen 
private lessons in Applied Music. (One-half hour.) 

The instructor and place will be assigned by the Music Department, Bldg. 
B. There will be a special fee of $30.00 per course for these private lessons. 

Music 14, 54, 74, 94, 114, 154, 174, 194 Instruments (1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1)— 

Fifteen private lessons in Applied Music. (One-half hour.) 

The instructor and place will be assigned by the Music Department, Bldg. 
B. There will be a special fee of $30.00 per course for these private lessons. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Professor Baylis; Assistant Professor Dewey; Instructor Robinson. 

Phil. 1. Philosophical Perspectives (3) — Each semester. 

A critical survey of representative philosophical beliefs concerning the 
nature of reality and concerning the nature and function of scientific knowl- 
edge and religion. (Baylis, Robinson.) 

Philosophy 1 and Philosophy 2 survey diflferent philosophical fields. 
Either may be taken first or alone. 

Phil. 2. Philosophical Perspectives (3) — Each semester. 

A critical survey of representative philosophical beliefs concerning the 
nature and function of morality, government, education, and art. 

(Dewey, Baylis.) 

Phil. 52. Philosophy in Literature (3) — Second semester. 

Reading and philosophical criticism of novels and dramas containing 
ideas significant for ethics, social policy, and religion. (Dewey.) 



226 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Phil. 53. Philosophy of Religion (3) — First semester. 
A critical and constructive study of the nature of religion, of its various 
forms and manifestations, and of its functions in human life. (Baylis.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Phil. 101. Ancient Philosophy (3) — First semester. 

A history of Greek Thought from its beginnings to the close of the Clas- 
sical period. Based upon reading in the Pre-Socratic philospohers, Socrates, 
Plato, and Aristotle. (Robinson.) 

Phil. 102. Modern Philosophy (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, Phil. 
101. 

A history of philosophical thought in the West during the 16th, 17th, 
and 18th Centuries. Based upon readings in Bacon, Descartes, Locke, 
Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. (Robinson.) 

Phil. 111. Medieval Philosophy (3)— (Not offered in 1952-1953). Pre- 
requisite, Phil 101. 

A history of philosophical thought in the West from the close of the 
Classical period to the Renaissance. Based upon readings in the Stoics, 
early Christian writers, Neoplatonists, later Christian writers and School- 
men. (Robinson.) 

Phil. 112. Recent and Contemporary Philosophy (3) — First semester. 
Prerequisite, Phil. 101 and 102, or the written permission of the instructor. 

An examination of some of the main trends in philosophical thought in 
the West since the 19th Century. (Dewey.) 

Phil. 120. Oriental Philosophy (3)— Second semester. (Offered in 1952- 
1953 and alternately with Phil. 160.) 

A survey of the religious and philosophical thought of the Orient to the 
present time. The survey will cover Indian thought as expressed in the Rig- 
Veda, the Upanishads, Buddhism and the Six Brahminical systems; and 
Chinese thought as expressed in the writings of Confucius, Lao-tse, and 
their disciples. Particular attention will be given to the development of 
Chinese individualism and democratic ideals from Mencius to the present 
day, and to the conflict of these ideals with Communistic thought. 

(Robinson.) 

Phil. 121. American Philosophy (3) — Second semester. (Offered in 1952- 
1953, and alternately with Phil. 153.) 

The main tendencies in American philosophy including Puritanism, The 
Enlightenment, Trancendentalism, Idealism, Pragmatism, and Realism. 

(Dewey.) 

Phil. 130. The Conflict of Ideals in Western Civilization (3) — (not offered 
in 1952-53). 

Critical and constructive study, from a broad philosophical perspective, 
of some of the most important contemporary conflicts of social ideals. In 
the light of the best philosophical knowledge the assumptions, goals, and 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 227 

methods of democracy, fascism, socialism and communism will be examined 
with special attention given to the idealogical conflict between the U. S. 
and Russia. (Dewey.) 

Phil. 151. Ethics (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, Phil. 2 or one year 
of philosophy. 

Good and bad; right and wrong; moral and immoral. Free will, de- 
terminism and moral responsibility. The nature and ground of moral 
obligation. Critical evaluation of the chief rival theories as to the correct 
principles of wise choice. (Dewey.) 

Phil. 153. Philosophy of Art (3)— Second semester, (Offered in 1953- 
1954, and alternatively with Phil. 121.) 

Classical and contemporary theories of art. The nature of art and 
beauty; their relations and their function in society. The nature of esthetic 
experience. Standards of criticism. (Dewey.) 

Phil. 154. Political and Social Philosophy (3) — Second semester. 

Classical and contemporary theories of the nature and functions of the 
state. The bearings of philosophical principles on contemporary problems 
of government and international relations. Human rights, social control, 
and individual freedom. (Dewey.) 

Phil. 155. Logic (3) — Second semester. 

A study of the conditions of effective thinking and clear communication, 
and, in contrast, of the sources of fallacies in ambiguity, irrelevancy or 
inconsistency. Examination of the basic principles of (1) semantics: the 
relations between language and meaning; (2) deductive reasoning: making 
explicit the implications of the relevant data; and (3) inductive reasoning: 
the formulation and confirmation of probable conclusions on the basis of 
experience and experiment. Practical illustrations and applications through- 
out. (Recommended in the junior year of the Arts-Law curriculum and 
the Government and Politics program.) (Baylis.) 

Phil. 156. Philosophy of Science (3) — First semester. 

An inquiry into the nature of observation, experiment, induction, measure- 
ment, explanation, causation, scientific concepts, and the use of mathematics. 

(Robinson.) 

Phil. 160. Metaphysics (3)— Second semester. (Offered in 1953-1954 
and alternatively with Phil. 120.) Prerequisite, Phil. 101 and 102, or the 
written permission of the instructor. 

An inquiry into the nature of metaphysical thought, based upon the 
study of outstanding works in the field. (Robinson.) 

Phil. 191, 192, 193, 194. Topical Investigations (1, 3)— Each semester. 

Tutorial course. Independent study under individual guidance. Topics 
selected by students in conference with the department chairman. Re- 
stricted to advanced students with credit for at least 12 units of philosophy. 

(Staff.) 



228 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

For Graduates 

Graduate instruction in the Department of Philosophy is carried on mainly 
by independent investigation of special topics under individual supervision. 
Any of the courses listed below may be elected more than once. Course 
selections require the approval of the department chairman. 

Phil. 201. Research in Philosophy (3) — Each semester. 
Selected projects in historical research under individual guidance. (Staff.) 
Phil. 203. Selected Problems in Philosophy (3) — Each semester. 
Intensive study of selected topics in systematic philosophy under individual 
supervision. (Staff.) 

Phil. 205. Seminar in the History of Philosophy (3) — Second semester. 

A special topic will be selected for each year, e. g., Plato, Aristotle, Kant, 
British Empiricists, Russell. Topic for 1952-1953: David Hume. (Dewey.) 

Phil. 206. Seminar in the Problems of Philosophy (3) — First semester. 

A special topic will be selected each year, e. g., Symbolic Logic, Philo- 
sophical Analysis, Perceptual Knowledge. Topic for 1952-1953: Philosoph- 
ical Method. (Robinson.) 

PHYSICS 

Professors Morgan, Myers; Part-time Professors Brickwedde, Johnson, 

Kennard, McMillen; Associate Professor Iskraut; Assistant Professors 

Grant, Krumbein, Cooper. 

Phys. i. Elements of Physics: Mechanics, Heat, and Sound (3) — First 
semester. Two lectures, and one recitation a week. The first half of a 
survey course in general physics. This course is for the general student 
and does not satisfy the requirements of the professional schools. Pre 
requisite, successful passing of the qualifying examination in elementary 
mathematics. Lecture demonstration fee, $3.00. (Morgan.) 

Phys. 2. Elements of Physics: Magnetism, Electricity, and Optics (3) — 

Second semester. Two lectures and one recitation a week. The second half 
of a survey course in general physics. This course is for the general student 
and does not satisfy the requirements of the professional schools. Pre- 
requisite, Phys. 1. Lecture demonstration fee, $3.00. (Morgan.) 

Phys. 10. Fundamentals of Physics: Mechanics, Heat, and Sound (4) — 

First semester. Two lectures, one recitation, and one three-hour laboratory 
period a week. The first half of a course in general physics. This course 
together with Phys. 11, satisfies the minimum requirements of medical and 
dental schools. Prerequisite, entrance credit in trigonometry or Math. 11 
or concurrent enrollment in Math. 14 and 15. Lecture demonstration and 
laboratory fee, $6.00. (Cooper and Staff.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 229 

Phys. 11. Fundamentals of Physics: Optics, Magnetism, Electricity, and 
Modern Physics (4) — Second semester. Two lectures, one recitation, and one 
three-hour laboratory period a week. The second half of a course in general 
physics. Prerequisites, Phys. 10, or 20. Lecture demonstration and labora- 
tory fee, $6.00. (Cooper and Staff.) 

Phys. 20. General Physics: Mechanics and Heat (5) — First and second 
semesters. Two lectures, two recitations and one three-hour laboratory 
period a week. The first half of a course in general physics. Required of 
all students in the engineering curricula. Math. 20 is to be taken concur- 
rently. Lecture demonstration and laboratory fee, $6.00. 

(Iskraut and Staff.) 

Phys. 21. General Physics: Sound, Optics, Magnetism, and Electricity 

(5) — First and second semesters. Two lectures, two recitations, and one 
three-hour laboratory period a week. Two second half of a course in general 
physics. Required of all students in the engineering curricula. Prerequi- 
site, Phys. 20. Math. 21 is to be taken concurrently. Lecture demon- 
stration and laboratory fee, $6.00. (Iskraut and Staff.) 

Phys. 50, 51. Intermediate Mechanics (2, 2) — First and second semes- 
ters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 11, or Phys. 21. (Morgan.) 

Phys. 52. Heat (3) — First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequi- 
site, Phys. 11 or 21. Math. 20 is to be taken concurrently. (Cooper.) 

Phys. 53. Nuclear Physics and Radioactivity (3) — Second semester. 
Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 11 or Phys. 21. 

An intermediate course in the phenomena associated with the atomic 
nucleus. Special emphasis will be placed on the radiations emitted. 

Phys. 54. Sound (3) — Second semester. Three lectures a week. Pre- 
requisite, Phys. 11 or 21. Math, 21 is to be taken concurrently. 

Phys. 60. Intermediate Physics Experiments. 3 hours laboratory work 
for each credit hour. One or more credits may be taken concurrently. Pre- 
requisites, Phys. 11 or 21. Laboratory fee, $6.00 per credit hour. 

(Krumbein.) 
A. General Physics 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Phys. 100. Advanced Experiments. Three hours laboratory work for 
each credit hour. One or more credits may be taken concurrently. Pre- 
requisites, Phys. 52 or 54. Laboratory fee, $6.00 per credit hour. 

(Krumbein.) 

Phys. 102. Optics (3) — Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prere- 
requisites, Phys. 11 or 21 and Math 21. (Myers.) 

Phys. 104. Electricity and Magnetism (4) — First semester. Four lec- 
tures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 11 or 21 and Math. 21. (Grant.) 



230 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Phys. 106, 107. Theoretical Mechanics (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 51 and Math. 21, or 
consent of instructor. (Morgan.) 

Phys. 112, 113. Modern Physics (2, 2) — First and second semesters. 
Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 104. (Myers.) 

Phys. 120, 121. Experimental Nuclear Physics (3, 3) — Two lectures 
and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 113 and two credits of 
Phys. 100. (Johnson.) 

Phys. 126. Kinetic Theory of Gasses (3) — Prerequisites, Phys. 107 
and Math. 21, or equivalent. 

For Graduates 

Of the courses which follow, 200, 201, 212, and 213 are given every year; 
all others will be given according to the demand. 

Phys. 200, 201. Introduction to Theoretical Physics (5, 5) — Five lectures 
a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, advanced standing in 
physics and mathematics. (Myers.) 

Phys. 202, 203. Advanced Dynamics (2, 2) — Two lectures a week. Pre- 
requisite, Phys. 200. (Bershader.) 

Phys. 204. Electrodynamics (4) — Four lectures a week, second semester. 
Prerequisite, Phys. 201. (Iskraut.) 

Phys. 206. Physical Optics (3)— Prerequisite, Phys. 201. (Myers.) 

Phys. 208, 209. Thermodynamics (2, 2)— Prerequisite, Phys. 201 or 
equivalent. (Betchov.) 

Phys. 210, 211. Statistical Mechanics and the Kinetic Theory of Gases 

(2, 2) — Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 112 and 201. (Newell.) 

Phys. 212, 213. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics (3,3) — Three lec- 
tures a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. 

Phys. 214, 215. Theory of Atomic Structure and Spectral Lines (2, 2) — 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 213. (McMillen.) 

Phys. 216, 217. Molecular Structure (2, 2) — Two lectures a week. Pre- 
requisite, Phys. 213. (Brickwedde.) 

Phys. 222, 223. Boundary-Value Problems of Theoretical Physics (2, 2) 

— Prerequisite, Phys. 201. 

Phys. 228, 229. The Electron (2, 2)— Prerequisites, Phys. 204 and Phys. 
213. (Johnson.) 

Phys. 230. Seminar (1) — First and second semesters. 

Phys. 234, 235. Nuclear Physics (2, 2)— Prerequisite, Phys. 213. 

(Johnson.) 
Phys. 236. Theory of Relativity (3)— Prerequisite, Phys. 200. (Iskraut.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 231 

Phys. 238. Quantum Theory — selected topics (3) — Prerequisites, Phys. 
236 and 212. (Iskraut.) 

Phys. 242, 243. Theory of Solids (2, 2) — Two lectures a week. Prerequi- 
site, Phys. 213. (Myers.) 

Phys. 248, 249. Special Topics in Modern Physics (2, 2) — Two lectures 
a week. Prerequisite, Calculus and consent of instructor. 

Phys. 250. Research — Credit according to work done. Laboratory fee, 
$6.00 per credit hour. 

B. Applied Physics 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Phys. 101. Laboratory Arts (1) — Four hours laboratory a week, second 
semester. Prerequisite, 2 credits Phys. 100. Laboratory fee, $6.00. 

(Morgan.) 

Phys. 103. Applied Optics (3) — First semester. Three lectures a week. 
Prerequisite, Phys. 102. 

Phys. 105. Electricity and Magnetism (2) — Two lectures a week, sec- 
ond semester. Prerequisite, Phys. 104. (Grant.) 

Phys. 108. Physics of Vacuum Tubes (3) — First semester. Three lec- 
tures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 104. (Grant.) 

Phys. 109. Electronic Circuits (5) — Second semester. Five lectures a 
week. Prerequisite, Phys. 105. (Grant.) 

Phys. 110. Applied Physics Laboratory (1, 2 or 3) — Three hours labora- 
tory work for each ceredit hour. One to three credits may be taken con- 
currently. Prerequisites, Phys. 52 or Phys. 54, and one credit in Phys. 100. 
Laboratory fee, $6.00. 

Phys. 116, 117. Fundamental Hydrodynamics (3, 3) — Three lectures a 
week. Prerequisites, Phys. 107 and Math. 21. 

For Graduates 

Phys. 218, 219. X-Rays and Crystal Structure (3, 3)— Three lectures a 
week. (Morgan.) 

Phys. 220. Application of X-Ray and Electron Diffraction Methods (2) — 

Two laboratory periods a week. (Morgan.) 

Phys. 224, 225. Supersonic Aerodynamics and Compressible Flow (2,2) — 

Prerequisite, Phys. 201. (McMillen.) 

Phys. 226, 227. Theoretical Dynamics (3, 3)— Prerequisite, Phys. 201. 

Phys. 232, 233. Hydromechanics Seminar (1,1). (Kennard.) 

Phys. 240, 241. Theory of Sound and Vibrations (3, 3) — Prerequisite, 
Phys. 201. (McMillen.) 



232 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Phys. 244, 245. Aerophysics (2, 2) — Prerequisite, consent of the instruc- 
tor. (Seeger.) 

Phys. 246, 247. Special Topics in Fluid Dynamics, (2, 2) — Prerequisite, 
Advanced graduate standing and consent of the instructor. (McMillen.) 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors Andrews, Gofer, Smith, Sprowls; Associate Professors Ayers, 
Hackman, Ross; Assistant Professor Heintz. 

Psych. 1 and 4 are the underdepartmental requirements for all students 
majoring in Psychology. 

Psych. 2 and 5 are presented as general surveys of an introductory nature 
and are organized primarily as elective courses for students in other de- 
partments. 

Departmental requirements toward the B.A. degree in the Social Sciences: 
1, 4, 106, 121, 145, 150; plus 6 hours from the following group of courses, 
126, 128, and 142; plus 6 additional hours in Psychology and/or other de- 
partments selected in conference with the student's major advisor. 

Departmental requirements toward the B.S. degree in the Biological 
Sciences: 1, 4, 106, 126, 145, and 150; plus 6 additional hours from the 
following group of courses, 180, 181, and 195; plus 6 additional hours in 
Psychology and/or other departments selected in confemece with the 
student's major advisor. 

Psych. 1 Introduction to Psychology (3) — ^First and second semesters. 

(Heintz and Staff.) 

Not open to Freshmen. 

A basic introductory course, intended to bring the student into contact 
with the major problems confronting psychology and the more important 
attempts at their solution. 

Psych. 2. Applied Psychology (8) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requiste. Psych. 1. (Ayers.) 

Application of research methods to basic human problems in business 
and industry, in the professions, and in other practical concerns of every- 
day life. 

Psych. 4. General Psychology (3) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 1. 

Primarily for students in the College of Arts and Sciences who major 
or minor in psychology. A systematic survey of the field of psychology 
with particular emphasis on research methodology. Consideration of in- 
dividual differences, motivation, sensory and motor processes, learning, 
emotional behavior and personality. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 233 

Psych. 5. Mental Hygiene (3) — First and second semesters. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 1. (Sprowls.) 

The more common deviations of personality; typical methods of ad- 
justment. 

For AdTanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Graduate credit will be assigned only for students certified by the 
Department of Psychology as qualified for graduate standing. 

Psych. 106. Statistical Methods in Psychology (3) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 1. (Hackman.) 

A basic introduction to quantitative methods used in psychological re- 
search; measures of central tendency, of spread, and of correlation. Majors 
in Psychology must take this course in the junior year. 

Psych. 110. Advanced Educational Psychology (3) — First semester. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 1 or H. D. Ed 101. (Heintz.) 

Researches on fundamental psychological problems encountered in edu- 
cation; measurement and significance of individual differences, learning, 
motivation, transfer of training, and the educational implications of 
theories of intelligence. 

Psych. 121. Social Psychology (3) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 1. (Heintz.) 

Psychological study of human behavior in social situations; influence of 
others on individual behavior, social conflict and individual adjustment, 
communication and its influences on normal social activity. 

Psych. 122. Advanced Social Psychology (3) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 121 and consent of instructor. (Heintz.) 

A systematic review of researches and points of view in regard to major 
problems in the field of social psychology. 

Psych. 125. Child Psychology (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 1. (Heintz.) 

Behavioral analysis of normal development and normal socialization of 
the growing child. 

Psych. 126. Developmental Pyschology (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 1. (Heintz.) 

Genetic approach to human motivation and accomplishment. Research 
on simpler animal forms, the child, the adolescent and the adult in terms 
of the development of normal adult behavior. 

Psych. 128. Human Motivation (3) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 121. (Cofer.) 

Review of research literature dealing with determinants of human per- 
formance, together with consideration of the major theoretical contribu- 
tions in this area. 



234 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Psych. 129. Psychological Aspects of Literature (3) — First semester. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 131 or permission of instructor. (Sprowls.) 

The familiar rubrics of dynamic psychology are studied in the light of 
literary products. Emphasizes the significance of psycho-social forces as 
functional determinants of well known literary personalities. 

Psych. 131. Abnormal Psychology (3) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, three courses in Psychology. Two lectures, one clinic. 

(Sprowls.) 

The nature, occurrence, and causes of marked psychological abnormali- 
ties, with emphasis on clinical rather than theoretical aspects. 

Psych. 136. Applied Experimental Psychology (3) — First semester. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 1 or consent of instructor. (Ross.) 

A study of basic human factors involved in the design and operation of 
machinery and equipment. Of special interest to students in industrial 
psychology. 

Psych. 140. Psychological Problems in Advertising (3) — First semester. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 1. (Hackman.) 

Psychological problems that arise in connection with the production and 
field-testing of advertising; techniques employed in attacking these prob- 
lems through research. 

Psych. 142. Techniques of Interrogation (3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, Psych. 121. (Hackman.) 

The interview, the questionnaire, and other methods of obtaining evidence 
on human attitudes and reactions, as viewed in the light of modern research 
evidence. 

Psych. 145. Introduction to Experimental Psychology (4) — First and sec- 
ond semester. One lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 4. Laboratory fee per semester, $4.00 (Ross.) 

Primarily for students who major or minor in psychology. A systematic 
survey of the laboratory methods and techniques as applied to human be- 
havior and their application in field work. Emphasis is placed on individual 
and group participation in experiments use of data and preparation of 
reports. 

Psych. 150. Tests and Measurements (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 106. Laboratory fee, $4.00. (Smith.) 

Critical survey of predictors used in vocational and educational orienta- 
tion and in industrial practice, with emphasis on development and standardi- 
zation. Laboratory practice in the use and interpretation of test and non- 
test predictors. 

Psych. 155. Psychological Techniques in Vocational Counseling (3) — 
Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 150. (Smith.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 235 

A survey course, intended for those who wish to qualify for junior posi- 
tions involving a knowledge of counseling, but who are unable to undertake 
graduate study. 

Psych. 161. Psychological Techniques in Personnel Administration (3) — 

Second semester. Prerequisite, 6 hours in Psychology. (Ayers.) 

A survey course, intended for those who plan to enter some phase of 
personnel work, but who do not plan to undertake graduate study. 

Psych, 167. Psychological Problems in Aviation (3) — (Not offered 1952- 
1953.) — First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 1. 

Techniques in selection and training of aircraft pilots; researches on 
special conditions encountered in flight. 

Psych. 180. Physiological Psychology (3)— First semester. Prerequi- 
site, Psych. 145. (Andrews, Ross.) 

An introduction to research on the physiological bases of human behavior, 
including considerations of sensory phenomena, motor coordination, emotion, 
drives, and the neurological basis of learning. 

Psych. 181. Animal Behavior (3) — (Same as Zool. 181.) — Second semes- 
ter. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Ross.) 

A study of animal behavior, including considerations of social interac- 
tions, learning, sensory processes, motivation, and experimental methods, 
with a major emphasis on mammals. 

Psych. 191, 192. Advanced General Psychology (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, 15 hours of Psychology including Psych. 145 and 
consent of instructor. (Ross, Cofer.) 

A systematic review of the more fundamental investigations upon which 
modern psychology is based. Intended primarily for exceptional senior 
majors and for graduate students. 

Psych. 194. Independent Study in Psychology (1-3) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisites, senior standing and written consent of individual 
faculty supervisor. (Staff.) 

Integrated reading under direction, leading to the preparation of an 
adequately documented report on a special topic. 

Psych. 195. Minor Problems in Psychology (1-3) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, written consent of individual faculty supervisor. 

(Staff.) 

An individualized course designed to allow the student to pursue a spe- 
cialized topic or research project under supervision; also designed to allow 
groups of students to work under supervision in a topical area not included 
in the courses offered at the graduate level. 

Psych. 198. Proseminar: Professional Aspects of Psychological Science 

(3) — Second semester. Prerequisites, senior standing and consent of 
faculty advisor. (Staff.) 



236 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Survey of professional problems in Psychology, including considerations 
of contemporary developments, professional ethics, literature resources, 
formulation of critical research problems, and discussion of the major in- 
stitutions requiring psychological services. 

For Graduate Students 

Psych. 202. Seminar in Advanced Experimental Psychology (3) — (Not 
offered 1952-1953). First semester. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 

(Andrews.) 

Psych. 203, 204. Graduate Seminar (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

Psych. 205, 206. Historical Viewpoints and Current Theories in Psychol- 
ogy (3, 3) — First and sceond semesters. (Hackman, Cofer.) 

Psych. 210. Occupational Information (3)— (Not offered 1952-1953). 
Second semester. (Ayers.) 

Physch. 211. Job Analysis and Evaluation (3) — First semester. Pre- 
requisite, permission of instructor. (Ayers.) 

Psych. 220, 221. Counseling Techniques (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Smith.) 

Psych. 222. Rehabilitation Techniques (3)— (Not offered 1952-1953). 
Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 220. 

Psych. 223. Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Difficulties (3) — Second 
semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 220. 

Psych. 225. Participation in Counseling Center (3) — Second semester. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 220. (Smith.) 

Psych. 230. Determinants of Human Efficiency (3) — Second semester 

(Ayers, Hackman.) 

Psych. 231. Training Procedures in Industry (3) — First semester. 

(Ayers.) 

Psych. 233. Social Organization in Industry (3) — Second semester. 

(Ayers.) 

Psych. 235. Psychological Aspects of Management-Union Relations (3) — 

Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Ayers.) 

Psych. 240. Interview and Questionnaire Techniques (3) — Second semes- 
ter. (Heintz.) 

Psych. 241. Controlled Publicity (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, con- 
sent of instructor. (Hackman.) 

Psych. 250. Mental Test Theory (3)— (Not offered 1952-1953). First 
semester. Prerequisite Psych. 253. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 237 

Psych. 251. Development of Predictors (3)— (Not offered 1952-1953}. 
Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 253. 

Psych. 252, 253. Advanced Statistics (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, Psych. 106. (Hackman, Andrews.) 

Psych. 255. Seminar in Psychometric Theory (3) — First semester. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 253. (Andrews, Hackman.) 

Psych. 260, 261. Individual Tests (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Laboratory fee, $4.00. Prerequisite, Psych. 150. 

Psych. 262. Appraisal of Personality (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
Psych, 150. 

Psych. 264, 265. Projective Tests (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Laboratory fee, $4.00. (Gofer.) 

Psych. 266, 267. Theories of Personality and Motivation (3, 3)— First 
and second semesters. (Gofer.) 

Psych. 270. Advanced Abnormal Psychology (3) — (Not offered 1952- 
1953). Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 131. (Gofer.) 

Psych. 271. Special Testing of Disabilities (3) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 270. 

Psych. 272, 273. Individual Clinical Diagnosis (3, 3) — First and second 

semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 260. (Gofer.) 

Psych. 278. Seminar in Clinical Psychology for Teachers (3) — Second 
semester. (Sprowls.) 

Psych. 280. Advanced Psychophysiology (3) — First semester. Prerequi- 
site, consent of instructor. (Andrews.) 

Psych. 290, 291. Graduate Research (Credit arranged) — First and second 
semesters. (Staff.) 

SOCIOLOGY 

Professors Hoffsommer, Lejins; Visiting Professor Bailey; Associate Pro- 
fessors Matthews, Melvin, Shankweiler; Assistant Professors DeHart, 
Schmidt; Instructors Bestul, Imse, Lucas, Motz, Roebuck, Roth. 

Sociology 1 or its equivalent is prerequisite to all other courses in 
sociology. 

Sociology 2, 183, 186 and 196 or their equivalents are required for an 
undergraduate major in sociology. 

Soc. 1. Sociology of American Life (3) — First and second semesters. 

Sociological analysis of the American social structure; metropolitan, 
small town, and rural communities; population distribution, composition 
and change; social organization. (Hoffsommer and Staff.) 



238 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Soc. 2. Principles of Sociology (3) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, Soc. 1 or sophomore standing. 

The basic forms of human association and interaction; social processes; 
institutions; culture; human nature and personality. (Bailey, Schmidt.) 

Soc. 5. Anthropology (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1. 

Introduction to anthropology; origins of man; development and trans- 
mission of culture; backgrounds of human institutions. (Anderson.) 

Soc. 13. Rural Sociology (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1. 
Rural life in America; its people, social organization, culture patterns, 
and problems. (Hoifsommer.) 

Soc. 14. Urban Sociology (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1. 
Urban growth and expansion; characteristics of city populations; urban 
institutional and personality patterns ; relations of city and country. 

(Bailey.) 

Soc. 51. Social Pathology (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1 
and sophomore standing. 

Personal-social disorganization and maladjustment; physical and mental 
handicaps; economic inadequacies; programs of treatment and control. 

(Shankweiler.) 

Soc. 52. Criminology (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1 and 
sophomore standing. 

Criminal behavior and the methods of its study; causation; typologies 
of criminal acts and offenders; punishment, correction, and incapacitation; 
prevention of crime. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 62. Social Institutions (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1 
and sophomore standing. 

Nature and function of social institutions; the perpetuation of behavior 
through customs and societal norms; typical contemporary American 
institutions. (Melvin.) 

Soc. 64. Marriage and the Family (3) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, Soc. 1 and sophomore standing. 

Functions of the family; marriage and family adjustments; factors affect- 
ing mate selection, marital relations, and family stability in contemporary 
social life. (Shankweiler.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Sociology 1 or its equivalent and junior standing are prerequisite to 
courses numbered 100 to 199. 

Soc. 105. Applied Anthropology (3) — Second semester. 

Examination and critical analysis of recent applications of anthropo- 
logical methods and data in the fields of administration, industrial relations, 
and social and cultural adjustment. (Anderson.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 239 

Soc. 112. Rural-Urban Relations (3) — First semester. 

The ecology of population and the forces making for change in rural and 
urban life; migration, decentralization and regionalism as methods of 
solving individual and national problems. (Melvin.) 

Soc. 113. The Rural Community (3) — Second semester. 

A detailed study of rural life with emphasis on levels of living, the 
family, school, and church and organizational activities in the fields of health, 
recreation, welfare, and planning. (Hoffsommer.) 

Soc 114. The City (3) — First semester. 

The rise of urban civilization and metropolitan reg^ions ; ecological process 
and structure; the city as a center of dominance; social problems, control, 
and planning. (Bailey.) 

Soc. 115. Industrial Sociology (3) — Second semester. Social organiza- 
tion of American industry; functions of members of industrial organiza- 
tion, status, social structure, patterns of interaction, and relations of indus- 
try and society. (Imse.) 

Soc. 118. Community Organization (3) — Second semester. 

Community organization and its relation to social welfare; analysis of 
community needs and resources; health, housing, recreation; conununity 
centers; neighborhood projects. (Bailey.) 

Soc 121, 122. Population (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 

Population distribution, composition, and growth in North America and 
Eurasia; trends in fertility and mortality; migrations; population prospects 
and policies (Imse.) 

Soc 123. Ethnic Minorities (3) — First semester. 

Basic social processes in the relations of ethnic groups within the state; 
immigration groups and the Negro in the United States; ethnic minorities 
in Europe. (Lejins.) 

Soc 124. The Culture of the American Indian (3) — Second semester. 

A study of type cultures; cultural processes; and the effects of accultura- 
tion on selected tribes of Indians in the Americas. (Anderson.) 

Soc 131. Introduction to Social Service (3) — First semester. Prerequi- 
site, Soc. 51 or permission of instructor. 

General survey of the field of social-welfare activities; historical develop- 
ments; growth, functions, and specialization of agencies and services, pri- 
vate and public. (Roth.) 

Soc 136. Sociology of Religion (3) — First semester. 

Varieties and sources of religious experience. Religious institutions and 
the role of religion in social life. (Bailey.) 



240 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Soc. 141. Sociology of Personality (3) — First semester. 

Development of human nature and personality in contemporary social 
life; processes of socialization; attitudes, individual differences, and social 
behavior. (Motz.) 

Soc. 144. Collective Behavior (3) — Second semester. 

Social interaction in mass behavior; communication processes; structure 
and functioning of crowds, strikes, audiences, mass movements, and the 
public. (Motz.) 

Soc. 145. Social Control (3) — First semester. 

Forms, mechanisms, and techniques of group influence on human be- 
havior; problems of social control in contemporary society. (Motz.) 

Soc. 147. Sociology of Law (3) — First semester. 

Law as a form of social control; interrelation between legal and other 
conduct norms as to their content, sanctions, and methods of securing con- 
formity; law as an integral part of the culture of the group; factors and 
processes operative in the formation of legal norms; legal norms as de- 
terminants of human behavior. (Lejins.) 

Soc 153. Juvenile Delinquency (3) — First semester. 

Juvenile delinquency in relation to the general problem of crime; analysis 
of factors underlying juvenile delinquency; treatment and prevention. 

(Lejins.) 

Soc 154. Crime and Delinquency Prevention (3) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Soc. 52 or Soc. 153 or consent of instructor. (Offered in alternate 
years with Soc. 156.) (Lejins.) 

Mobilization of community resources for the prevention of crime and 
delinquency; area prog^rams and projects. 

Soc 156. Institutional Treatment of Criminals and Delinquents (3) — 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 52 or Soc. 153 or consent of instructor. 
(Offered in alternate years with Soc. 154.) 

Organization and functions of penal and correctional institutions for 
adults and juveniles. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 161. The Sociology of War (3) — First semester. 

The origin and development of armed forces as institutions; the social 
causes, operations and results of war as social conflict; the relations of 
peace and war and revolution in contemporary civilization. (Bailey.) 

Soc 171. Family and Child Welfare (3) — First semester. 
Programs of family and child welfare agencies; social services to families 
and children; child placement; foster families. (Shankweiler.) 

Soc 173. Social Security (3) — First semester. 

The social security program in the United States; public assistance; 
social insurance. (Staff.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 241 

Soc. 174. Public Welfare (3) — Second semester. 

Development and organization of the public welfare movement in the 
United States; social legislation; interrelations of federal, state, and local 
agencies and institutions. (Roth.) 

Soc. 183. Social Statistics (3) — First and second semesters. 
Collection, statistical analysis, and interpretation of social data; problems 
of quantitative measurement of social phenomena. (Imse.> 

Soc. 185. Advanced Social Statistics (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Soc. 183, or equivalent. 

Provides refined statistical research methods for advanced students in 
the social sciences. Sampling theory, specialized correlation technique, 
tests of significance, and other procedures. (Imse.) 

Soc. 186. Sociological Theory (3) — First and second semesters. 
Development of the science of sociology; historical backgrounds; recent 
theories of society. (Bailey.) 

Soc. 191. Social Field Training (1-3) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisites: For social work field training, Soc. 131; for crime control field 
training, Soc. 52 and 153. Enrollment restricted to available placements. 

Supervised field training in public and private social agencies. The 
student will select his particular area of interest and be responsible to an 
agency for a definite program of in-service training. Group meetings, 
individual conferences, and written progress reports will be required part 
of the course. (Lejins, Roth.) 

Soc. 196. Senior Seminar (3) — Second semester. Required of and open 
only to senior majors in sociology. 

Scope, fields, and methods of sociology; practical applications of sociolog- 
ical knowledge. Individual study and reports. (Hoffsommer.) 

For Graduates 

Prerequisites for entrance upon graduate study leading to an advanced 
degree with a major in sociology: either (1) an undergraduate major 
(totaling at least 24 semester hours) in sociology or (2) 12 semester hours 
of sociology (including 6 semester hours of advanced courses) and 12 addi- 
tional hours of comparable work in economics, political science, or psy- 
chology. Reasonable substitutes for these prerequisites may be accepted 
in the case of students majoring in other departments who desire a graduate 
minor or several courses in sociology. 

With the exception of Soc. 201, 285, and 291, individual courses numbered 
200 to 299 will ordinarily be offered in alternate years. 

Soc. 201. Methods of Social Research (3) — First semester. 

Selection and formulation of research projects; methods and techniques 
of sociological investigation and analysis. Required of graduate majors 
in sociology. (Hoffsommer.) 



242 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Soc. 215. Community Studies (3) — First semester. 

Intensive study of the factors affecting community development and 
growth, social structure, social stratification, and social institutions; analy- 
sis of particular communities. (Hoffsommer.) 

Soc. 221. Population and Society (3) — Second semester. 

Selected problems in the field of population; quantitative and qualitative 
aspects; American and world problems. (Staff.) 

Soc. 224. Race and Culture (3) — Second semester. 

Race and culture in contemporary society; mobility and the social effects 
of race and culture contacts and intermixture. (Staff.) 

Soc. 241. Personality and Social Structure (3) — Second semester. 

Comparative analysis of the development of human nature, personality, 
and social traits in select social structures. (Staff.) 

Soc. 246. Public Opinion and Propaganda (3) — Second semester. 

Processes involved in the formation of mass attitudes; agencies and 
techniques of communication; quantitative measurement of public opinion. 

(Motz.) 

Soc. 253. Advanced Criminology (3) — First semester. 

Survey of the principal issues in contemporary criminological theory and 
research. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 254. Seminar: Criminology (3) — Second semester. 

Selected problems in the field of criminology. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 255. Seminar: Juvenile Delinquency (3) — First semester. 

Selected problems in the field of juvenile delinquency. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 256. Crime and Delinquency as a Community Problem (3) — Second 
semester. 

An intensive study of selected problems in adult crime and juvenile de- 
linquency in Maryland. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 257. Social Change and Social Policy (3) — First semester. 
Emergence and development of social policy as related to social change; 
policy-making factors in social welfare and social legislation. (Staff.) 

Soc. 262. Family Studies (3) — Second semester. 

Case studies of family situations; statistical studies of family trends; 
methods of investigation and analysis. (Shankweiler.) 

Soc 282. Sociological Methodology (3) — Second semester. 

Logic and method of sociology in relation to the general theory of scien- 
tific method; principal issues and points of view. (Staff.) 

Soc. 285. Seminar: Sociological Theory (3) — First semester. 
Critical and comparative study of contemporary European and American 
theories of society. (Bailey.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 243 

Soc. 290. Research in Sociology (Credit to be determined) — First and 
second semesters. (Thesis Advisor.) 

Soc 291. Special Social Problems (Credit to be determined) — First and 
second semesters. 

Individual research on selected problems. (Staff.) 

SPEECH AND DRAMATIC ART 

Professor Ehrensberger; Associate Professors Ansberry, Strausbaugh; 

Assistant Professors Provensen, Niemeyer, Batka, Hendricks, Linkow; 

Instructors Mayer, Coppinger, Pugliese, Starcher, Aylward, Meeker, Mc- 

Quade, Hall; Assistant Works. 

Speech 1, 2. Public Speaking (2, 2) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite for advanced speech courses. Speech I prerequisite for Speech II. 

The preparation and delivery of short original speeches; outside readings; 
reports; etc. It is recommended that this course be taken during the 
freshman year. Laboratory fee $1.00 each semester. 

(Strausbaugh and Staff.) 

Speech Clinic — No credit. 

Remedial work in minor speech defects. The work of the clinic is con- 
ducted in individual conferences and in small group meetings. Hours ar- 
ranged by consultation with the respective speech instructor. 

(Ansberry and Staff.) 

Speech 3. Fundamentals of Speech (3) — First semester. 

Study in the bases and mechanics of speech. This course is designed for 
students who expect to do extensive work in speech. May be taken 
concurrently with Speech 1, 2. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 4. Voice and Diction (3) — Second semester. 
Emphasis upon the improvement of voice, articulation, and phonation. 
May be taken concurrently with Speech 1, 2. (Mayer and Staff.) 

Speech 5, 6. Advanced Public Speaking (2, 2) — First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, Speech 1, 2, or consent of the instructor. 

Advanced work on basis of Speech 1, 2. Special emphasis is placed 
upon speaking situations the students will face in their respective vocations. 

(Strausbaugh and Staff.) 

Speech 7. Public Speaking (2) — Second semester. Limited to freshman 
engineering students. The preparation and delivery of speeches, reports, 
etc., on technical and general subjects. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

(Linkow and Staff.) 

Speech 8, 9. Acting (3, 3) — First and second semesters. Admission by 
consent of instructor. 

Basic principles of histrionic practice. (Niemeyer.) 



244 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Speech 10. Group Discussion (2) — First and second semesters. 

A study of the principles, methods, and types of discussion, and their 

application in the discussion of contemporary problems. 

(Hendricks and Staff.) 

Speech 11, 12. Debate (2, 2) — First and second semesters. 

A study of the principles of argument, analysis, evidence, reasoning, 
fallacies, briefing, and delivery, together with their application in public 
speaking. (Hall.) 

Speech 13. Oral Interpretation (3)— First semester. 
The oral interpretation of literature and the practical training of students 
in the art of reading. (Provensen.) 

Speech 14. Stagecraft (3)— First semester. 

Fundamentals of technical production. Emphasis on construction of 
scenery. Laboratory fee, $2.00. (Meeker.) 

Speech 15. Stagecraft (3)— Second semester. 

Technical production. Emphasis on stage lighting. Prerequisite, Speech 14. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. (Meeker.) 

Speech 16. Introduction to the Theatre (3) — First semester. 
A general survey of the fields of the theatre. Prerequisite for all courses 
in Drama. (Mayer.) 

Speech 17. Make-up (2) — Second semester. One lecture and one lab- 
oratory a week. (Mayer.) 

A lecture-laboratory course in the theory and practice of stage make-up, 
covering basic requirements as to age, type, character, race, and period. 
Laboratory fee $2.00. 

Speech 18, 19. Introductory Speech (1, 1) — First and second semesters. 

This course is designed to give those students practice in public speak- 
ing who cannot schedule Speech 1, 2. Speech 18 prerequisite for Speech 19. 
Laboratory fee $1.00 for each semester. (Strausbaugh and Staff.) 

Speech 22. Introduction to Radio and Television (3) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite for all courses in Radio. 

The development, scope, and influence of American broadcasting and tele- 
casting, including visits to local radio and television stations, with guest 
lecturers from Radio Station WTOP and Television Station WTOP-TV. 

(Batka.) 

Speech 23. Parliamentary Law (1) — First and second semesters. 

A study of the principles and application of parliamentary law as applied 
to all types of meetings. Thorough training in the use of Robert's Rules 
of Order. (Strausbaugh.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 245 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Speech 101. Radio Speech (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 4. 

The theory and application of microphone techniques. Practice in all 
types of radio speaking. Laboratory fee $2.00. (Batka.) 

Speech 102. Radio Production (3) — Second semester. 

A study of the multiple problems facing the producer. Special emphasis 
is given to acoustic setup, casting, "miking", timing, cutting, and the co- 
ordination of personnel factors involved in the production of radio pro- 
grams. Admission by consent of instructor. Laboratory fee $2.00. 

(Batka.) 

Speech 103, 104. Speech Composition and Rhetoric (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. 

A study of rhetorical principles and models of speech composition in 
conjunction with the preparation and presentation of specific forms of public 
address. (Staff.) 

Speech 105. Pathology (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 112. 

The causes, nature, symptoms, and treatment of common speech disorders. 

(Ansberry.) 

Speech 106. Clinic (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 105, 120. 

A laboratory course dealing with the various methods of correction plus 
actual work in the clinic both on and off the campus. (Ansberry.) 

Speech 107. Advanced Oral Interpretation (3) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Speech 13. 

Emphasis upon the longer reading. Program planning. (Provensen.) 

Speech 108. Public Speaking (2) — Second semester. Limited to Junior 
Engineers. Prerequisite, Speech 7. 

Continuation of Speech 7 with emphasis upon engineering projects that 
fall within student's own experience. (Linkow and Staff.) 

Speech 109. Speech Seminar for Senior Engineers (2) — Prerequisite, 

Speech 7, 108. (Linkow.) 

Speech 110. Teacher Problems in Speech (3) — Second semester. For 
students who intend to teach. 

Everyday speech problems that confront the teacher. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 111. Seminar (3) — First and second semesters. Required of 

speech majors. Present-day speech research. (Ehrensberger.) 

Speech 112. Phonetics (3) — First semester. 

Training in the recognition and production of the sounds of spoken 
English, with an analysis of their formation. Practice in transcription. 
Mastery of the international phonetic alphabet. (Ansberry.) 



246 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Speech 113. Play Production (3) — Second semester. 

Development of procedure followed by the director in preparing plays 
for public performance. (Meeker.) 

Speech 114. Costuming (3) — First semester. One lecture and two labora- 
tories a week. (Not offered 1952-53.) 

Consideration of the use of color, line, and texture in designing, con- 
structing, and adapting costumes for the stage. (Meeker.) 

Speech 115. Radio in Retailing (3) — First semester. Limited to stu- 
dents in the College of Home Economics. Prerequisites, Speech 1, 2. 
English 1, 2. Junior standing. Laboratory fee $2.00. 

Writing and production of promotional programs for the merchandising 
of wearing apparel and housefurnishings. Collaboration with Washington 
and Baltimore radio stations and retail stores. (Batka.) 

Speech 116. Radio Announcing (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Speech 101. 

The theory and application of all types of announcing. Laboratory fee 

$2.00. (Batka.) 

Speech 117. Radio Continuity Writing (3) — First semester. 

A study of the principles and methods of writing for broadcasting. 
Application will be made in the writing of the general types of continuity. 
Admission by consent of instructor. (Coppinger.) 

Speech 118. Advanced Radio Writing (3) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Speech 117. 

Advanced work with emphasis upon the dramatic form. Admission by 
consent of instructor. (Coppinger.) 

Speech 119. Radio Acting (3) — Second semester. 

A workshop course designed to give the student practice in radio acting. 
Admission by consent of instructor. (Coppinger.) 

Speech 120. Speech Pathology (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
Speech 105. 

A continuation of Speech 105, with emphasis on the causes and treatment 
of organic speech disorders. (Ansberry.) 

Speech 121. Stage Design (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 
14, 15. 

The planning of stage settings and the application of the principles of 
design to the dramatic production. Admission by consent of the instructor. 

(Meeker.) 

Speech 122, 123. Radio Workshop (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 

A laboratory course dealing with all phases of producing a radio pro- 
gram. Admission by consent of instructor. Laboratory fee $2.00 each 
semester. (Batka.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 247 

Speech 124, 125. American Public Address (3, 3) — ^First and second 
semesters. 

The first semester covers the period from Colonial times to the Civil War 
period. The second semester covers fi-om the Civil War period through the 
contemporary period. (Staff.) 

Speech 126. Semantic Aspects of Speech Behavior (3) — Second semester. 
An analysis of speech and language habits from the standpoint of Gen- 
eral Semantics. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 127, 128. Military Speech and Commands (4) — First and second 
semesters. Limited to students in the College of Military Science and 
Tactics. (Coppinger.) 

The preparation and delivery of lectures dealing with military subjects. 
Effective execution of field orders, commands, etc. Extensive use of voice 
recordings. (Coppinger.) 

Speech 129, 130. Play Directing (2, 2) — Admission by consent of in- 
structor. 

A lecture-laboratory coui-se dealing -with the fundamentals of script cut- 
ting, pacing, movement, blocking, and rehearsal routine as applied to the 
directing of plays. (Coppinger.) 

Speech 131. History of the Theatre (3) — First semester. 

A survey of dramatic production from early origins to 1800. (Niemeyer.) 

Speech 132. History of the Theatre (3) — Second semester. 

A survey of dramatic production from 1800 to the present. (Niemeyer.) 

Speech 133. Staff Reports, Briefings, and Visual Aids (3) — Second semes- 
ter. Limited to the students in the College of Military Science. Prerequi- 
sites, Speech 5 and 6. 

Lecture and laboratoiy course dealing with the techniques used in military 
briefings, staff reports and the use of visual aids. (Aylward.) 

For Graduates 

Speech 200. Thesis (3-6) — Off-campus. Credit in proportion to work 
done and results accomplished. (Ehrensberger.) 

Speech 201. Special Problems (2-4) — Off-campus. Arranged. 

(Ehrensberger.) 

Speech 210. Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing (3) — Off- 
campus. 

A study of the anatomy and physiology of the auditory and speech 
mechanisms. (Glorig.) 

Speech 211. Advanced Clinical Practice (3) — Off-campus. 
A comprehensive survey of the entire field of present-day clinical prac- 
tice. (Glorig.) 



248 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Speech 212. Advanced Speech Pathology (3)— Off-campus. 

Etiology and therapy for organic and functional speech disorders. 

(Senft.) 

Speech 213. Speech Problems of the Hard of Hearing (3)— Off-campus. 
Correction of abnormal speech habits and instruction in speech conserva- 
tion. (Senft.) 

Speech 214. Clinical Audiometry (3)— Off-campus. 

Testing of auditory acuity vi^ith pure tones and speech. (Hayes.) 

Speech 215. Auditory Training (3)— Off-campus. 

Orientation and adjustment of patients in the use of hearing aids. (Faille.) 

Speech 216. Speech Reading (3)— Off-campus. 

A course of training designed to present the fundamentals of speech 
reading. (Bartlett.) 

Speech 217. Selection of Prosthetic Appliances for the Acoustically 
Handicapped (3) — Off-campus. 

A laboratory course in modern methods of utilizing electronic hearing 
aids. (Hayes and Staff.) 

Speech 218. Problems of Hearing and Deafness (3)— Off-campus. 
The adjustment of the individual with a hearing impairment socially, 
emotionally, and vocationally. (Cornell.) 

ZOOLOGY 

Professors Phillips and Burhoe; Lecturers King and Reynolds; Associate 

Professors Littleford and Anastos; Instructors Allen, Bartlett, 

Grollman, and Stringer. 

Zool. 1. General Zoology (4) — First and second semesters. Two lectures 
and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 

This course, which is cultural and practical in its aim, deals with the 
basic principles of animal life. Typical invertebrates and a mammalian 
form are studied. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

Zool. 2, 3. Fundamentals of Zoology (4, 4) — First and second semesters. 
Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. This course satis- 
fies the freshman premedical requirements in general biology. Freshmen 
who intend to choose zoology as a major should register for this course. 
Zoology 1 or 2 is a prerequisite for Zoology 3. Students who have com- 
pleted Zoology 1 may register for Zoology 3 but not for Zoology 2. 

A thorough study of the anatomy, classifications, and life histories of rep- 
resentative animals. During the first semester emphasis is placed on in- 
vertebrate forms and during the second semester upon vertebrate forms 
including the frog. Laboratory fee, $8.00 each semester. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 249 

Zool. 5. Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (4) — First semester. Two 
lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, one 
year of Zoology. 

A comparative study of selected organ systems in certain vertebrate 
groups. Laboratory fee $8.00. 

Zool. 14, 15. Human Anatomy and Physiology (4, 4) — First and second 
semesters. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, one course in zoology. Zoology 14 is a prerequisite for Zoology 15. 

For students who desire a general knowledge of human anatomy and 
physiology. Laboratory fee $8.00 each semester. 

Zool. 16. Human Physiology (4) — First semester. Two lectures and 
two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Not open to freshmen. 
An elementary course in physiology. Laboratory fee $8.00. 

Zool. 20. Vertebrate Embryology (4) — Second semester. Two lectures 
and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, one year of 
Zoology. 

Basic principles of early development of the vertebrates with special 
emphasis on the development of the chick to the end of the fourth day and 
early mammalian embryology. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

Zool. 53. Physiology of Exercise (2) — Second semester. Two lectures 
a week. Prerequisite, Zoology 15. 

A detailed consideration of the mechanism of muscular contraction; the 
metabolic, circulatory, and the respiratory responses in exercise; and the 
integration by means of the nervous system. Open only to students for 
whom this is a required course. 

Zool. 55. Development of the Human Body (2) — First semester. Two 
lecture periods a week. 

A study of the main factors affecting the growth and development of 
the child with especial emphasis on normal development. Open only to 
students for whom this is a required course. 

Zool. 75, 76. — Journal Club (1, 1) — First and second semesters. One lec- 
ture period a week. Prerequisite, a major in Zoology. 

Reviews, reports, and discussions of current literature. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Zool. 101. Mammalian Anatomy (3) — Second semester. Three three- 
hour laboratory periods a week. Registration limited. Permission of the 
instructor must be obtained before registration. Recommended for pre- 
medical students, and those whose major is zoology. 

A course in the dissection of the cat or other mammal. By special per- 
mission of the instructor a vertebrate other than the cat may be used 
for study. Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Stringer.) 



250 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Zool. 102. General Animal Physiology (4) — Second semester. Two lec- 
tures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, one 
year of Zoology and one year of chemistry. 

The general principles of physiological functions as shown in mammals 
and lower animals. Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Phillips.) 

Zool. 104. Genetics (3) — First semester. Three lecture periods a week. 
Prerequisite, one course in Zoology or Botany. Recommended for pre- 
medical students. 

A consideration of the basic principles of heredity. (Burhoe.) 

Zool. 106. Histological Technique (3) — Second semester. One lecture 
and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, one semester 
of Zoology. Permission of the instructor must be obtained before regis- 
tration. 

The preparation of animal tissues for microscopical examination. Labora- 
tory fee, $8.00. (Stringer.) 

Zool. 108. Animal Histology (4) — First semester. Two lectures and two 
three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, one year of Zoology. 

A microscopic study of tissues and organs selected from representative 
vertebrates, but with particular reference to the mammal. Laboratory 
fee, $8.00. (Stringer.) 

ZooL 110. Parasitology (4) — First semester. Two lectures and two 
three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, one year of Zoology. 

A study of the taxonomy, morphology, physiology and life cycles of ani- 
mal parasites. Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Anastos.) 

Zool. 114. Field Zoology (4) — Second semester. Two lectures and two 
three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, one year of Zoology. 

This course consists in collecting and studying both land and aquatic 
forms of nearby woods, fields, and streams, with emphasis on the higher 
invertebrates and certain vertebrates, their breeding habits, environment, 
and modes of living. Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Littleford.) 

Zool. 116. Protozoology (4) — Second semester. Two lectures and two 
three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, one year of zoology 
and permission of the instructor. 

The taxonomy, morphology, physiology, and distribution of the unicellular 
animal organisms. Emphasis will be upon the free living forms. Labora- 
tory fee, $8.00. (Anastos.) 

Zool. 118. Invertebrate Zoology (4) — First semester. Two lectures and 
two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, one year of 
Zoology. 

An advanced course dealing with the taxonomy, morphology, and embry- 
ology of the invertebrates, exclusive of insects. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

(Allen.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 251 

Zool. 121. Principles of Animal Ecology (3) — Second semester. Two 
lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, one 
year of Zoology and one year of Chemistry. 

Animals are studied in relation to their natural surroundings. Biological, 
physical and chemical factors of the environment which affect the growth, 
behavior, habits, and distribution of animals are stressed. Laboratory fee, 
$8.00. (Allen.) 

Zool. 125, 126. Fishery Biology and Management (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a 
week. Laboratory fee, Zool. 125, $8.00. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

A study of the biology and economic development of fresh and salt water 
forms. Particular attention is given to practical applications in fisheries 
work. The first semester of the course deals with problems relating to 
fin fishes. The second semester considers shell fish and other invertebrates 
of economic importance. (Allen.) 

Zool. 127. Ichthyology (3) — First semester. One lecture and two three- 
hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Zoology 5 and 20. 

A course in the anatomy, embryology, distribution, habits, and taxonomy 
of fish. Particular attention is given to the general taxonomy of North 
American fishes with especial reference to local forms from both fresh and 
salt waters. (Littleford.) 

Zool. 130. Aviation Physiology (3) — Second Semester. Two lectures and 
one demonstration a week. Prerequisite, one course in Physiology and i>er- 
mission of the instructor. 

A general course in applied physiology with special reference to physio- 
logical problems arising in aviation, including consideration of: respiration 
at high altitude, the design and use of O2 equipment, the eflfects of mechani- 
cal forces such as radial and linear acceleration, protective devices, and 
various influences of pressure change on mammalian organisms. 

(Reynolds.) 

Zool. 132. Applied Physiology (3) — First semester. Two lectures and 
one demonstration a week. Prerequisite, one course in physiology and 
permission of the instructor. 

In this course, applied physiology will be developed through analysis of 
problems to be selected from the following fields: illumination; heating, 
cooling, and ventilation; pressurization (aircraft, underwater operations, 
caissons); design of working spaces and machinery; sanitation; design of 
industrial operations and efl^ciency; transportation; control of atmospheric 
contaminants and occupational stresses; and safe practice, protective devices, 
and equipment. (King.) 

ZooL 181. Animal Behavior (3) — (Same as Psych. 181) — Second semes- 
ter. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 



» 



252 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

A study of animal behavioi% including considerations of social interactions, 
learning, sensory processes, motivation, and experimental methods, with a 
major emphasis on mammals. (Ross.) 

For Graduates 

Zool. 200. Marine Zoology (4) — First semester. Two lectures and two 
three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Zoology 121. 

A course in the environmental characteristics of salt waters. Particular 
attention is given to brackish water environments such as the Chesapeake 
Bay. The laboratory work in the course is concerned with a study of 
local plankton forms and the methods used in investigation and identifica- 
tion of plankton. Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Allen.) 

Zool. 201. Microscopical Anatomy (4) — Second semester. Two lectures 
and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Zoology 108. 

A detailed study of the morphology and activity of cells composing 
animal tissues with specific reference to the vertebrates. Laboratory work 
includes the preparation of tissues for microscopic examination. Labora- 
tory fee $8.00. ( ) 

Zool. 202. Animal Cytology (4) — First semester. Two lectures and two 
three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Zoology 108. 

A study of cellular structure with particular reference to the morphology 
aii physiology of cell organoids and inclusions. Laboratory is concerned 
V. ith methods of studying and demonstrating the above materials. Labora- 
tory fee $8.00. ( ) 

Zool. 203. Advanced Embryology (4) — Second semester. Two lectures 
and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Zoology 20. 

Mechanics of fertilization and growth. A review of the important con- 
tributions in the field of experimental embryology. Laboratory fee $8.00. 

(Burhoe.) 

Zool. 204. Advanced Animal Physiology (4) — First semester. Two lec- 
tures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Zoology 
102. 

The principles of general and cellular physiology as found in animal life. 
Laboratory fee $8.00. (Phillips.) 

Zool. 205. Hydrobiology (4) — Second semester. Two lectures and two 
three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Zoology 121, Chem. 
3, Physics 11. 

A study of the biological, chemical, and physical factors which determine 
the growth, distribution, and productivity of microscopic and near micro- 
scopic organisms in marine and freshwater environments with special refer- 
ence to the Chesapeake Bay region. Laboratory fee $8.00. (Littleford.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 253 

Zool. 206. Research (credit to be arranged) — First and second semesters. 
Laboratory fee $8.00 each semester. (Staff.) 

Zool. 207. Zoology Seminar (1) — First and second semesters. One 
lecture a week. (Staff.) 

Zool. 208. Special Problems in General Physiology (3) — First or second 
semester. Hours and credits arranged. Prerequisite, Zool. 102. Labora- 
tory fee $8.00. (Phillips.) 

Zool. 215. Fishery Technology (4) — Second semester. Two lectures and 
two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

The technological aspects of netting and collection of fish and other 
fishery resources, methods of handling the catch, marketing of fishery prod- 
ucts, and recent advances in the utilization of fishery products. 

(Littleford.) 

Zool. 220. Advanced Genetics (4) — First semester. Two lectures and 
two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Zool. 104. 

A consideration of salivary chromosomes, the nature of the gene, chromo- 
some irregularities, polyploidy, and mutations. Breeding experiments with 
Drosophila and small mammals will be conducted. Laboratory fee $8.00. 

(Burhoe.) 



ColUgeZof 

BUSINESS AND 
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

STAFF 

J. Freeman Pyle, Ph.D., Dean 

James H. Reid, M.A., Assistant Dean 

Anderson, James R., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geography 

Anderson, Thornton H., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Government and 

Politics 
Ash, Willard 0., M.A., Assistant Professor of Statistics 
Baginski, Leonilla E., B.S., Instructor of Office Techniques 
Biggs, William E., M.A., LL.B., Instructor of Government and Politics 
Burdette, Franklin L., Ph.D., Professor and Head of Department of 

Government and Politics 
Calhoun, Charles E., M.B.A., Professor of Finance 
Clemens, Eli W., Ph.D., Professor of Business Administration 
Cole, David M., M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Economics 
Cook, J, Allen, Ph.D., Professor of Marketing 
Cover, John H., Ph.D., Professor and Director of Bureau of Business and 

Economic Research 
Cronin, Charles F., M.B.A., C.P.A., Assistant Professor of Accounting 
Crowell, Alfred A., M.S.J., Professor and Head of Department of Jour- 
nalism and Public Relations 
Daiker, John A., M.B.A., C.P.A., Assistant Professor of Accounting 
Danegger, Alfred, B.S., Instructor of Press Photography, University 

Photographer 
Deshler, Walter W., B.S., Instructor (P.T.) of Geography 
Dillard, Dudley, Ph.D., Professor and Head of Department of Economics 
Dixon, Robert G., Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Government and 

Politics 
DoziER, Craig L. M.A., Instructor of Geography 
Edelson, Charles B., M.B.A., Instructor of Accounting 
Firman, David, M.A., Instructor (P.T.) of Geography 
Fisher, Allan J., Ph.D., Professor of Accounting and Finance 
Fleming, William R., M.B.A., C.P.A., Assistant Professor of Accounting 
Frederick, John H., Ph.D., Professor of Transportation and Foreign Trade 
GoosTREE, Robert E., Ph.D., Instructor of Government and Politics 

255 



256 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Grayson, Henry W., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics 

Gruchy, Allan G., Ph.D., Professor of Economics 

Hale, John I., LL.B., M.S. (Retired, Captain USN), Associate Professor 
of Business Administration 

Hester, Donald C, M.A., Instructor of Government and Politics 

HOTTEL, William, Lecturer of Journalism 

Hu, Charles Y., Ph.D., Professor of Geography 

Joerg, Wolfgang L. G., Ph.D., Professor (P.T.) of Geography 

Johnson, Richard B., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Government and 
Politics 

Karinen, Arthur E., M.A., Assistant Professor of Gegoraphy 

Krimel, Donald W., Ph.M., Associate Professor of Public Relations 

Lee, LeRoy L., A.M., C.P.A., Instructor of Accounting 

Lemons, Hoyt, Ph.D., Lecturer in Geography 

McBryde, F. Webster, Ph.D., Lecturer in Geography 

McLarney, William J., M.A., Associate Professor of Industrial Manage- 
ment 

Measday, Walter S., B.A., Instructor of Economics 

Mounce, Earl W., M.A., LL.M., Professor of Law and Labor 

Nelson, Boyd L., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

NiGRO, Michael F., B.S., Instructor of Office Techniques 

Norton, Hugh S., M.A., Instructor of Economics 

O'Neill, Jane H., B.A., Instructor of Office Techniques 

Padgett, Edward R., M.A., Instructor of Government and Politics 

Patrick, Arthur S., M.A., Associate Professor of Office Management and 
Business Education 

Patton, Donald, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geography 

Plischke, Elmer, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Government and Politics 

Pyle, J. Freeman, Ph.D., Professor and Dean of College of Business and 
Public Administration 

Raines, Irving L, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marketing 

Ray, Joseph M., Ph.D., Professor of Government and Politics 

Reid, James H., M.A., Professor and Assistant Dean of College of Business 
and Public Administration 

Richard, Donald L., B.S., C.P.A., Instructor of Business Administration 
Robinson, Edward A., M.A., Instructor of Economics 
Root, Franklin R., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics 
Starr, Joseph R., Ph.D., Professor of Government and Politics 
Steinmeyer, Reuben G., Ph.D., Professor of Government and Politics 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 257 

Sweeney, Charles T., M.B.A., C.P.A., Professor of Accounting 
Sylvester, Harold F., Ph.D., Professor of Personnel Administration 
Taff, Charles A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Transportation 
Thatcher, Lionel W., Ph.D., Professor and Head of Department of Busi- 
ness Organization and Administration 
Thomas, Benjamin F., M.A., Instructor of Office Techniques and Manage- 
ment 
Treeing, Harry M., B.S., Assistant Instructor of Economics 
Van Royen, William, Ph.D., Professor and Head of Department of 

Geography 
Watson, J. Donald, Ph.D., Professor of Finance 
Wedeberg, Sivert M., M.A., C.P.A., Professor of Accounting 

MEMBERS TEACHING ABROAD 

Baker, Roscoe, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Government and Politics 

Calhoun, William P., M.A., Instructor of Geography 

Delamater, Lloyd A., M.A., Instructor of Economics 

DOOLEY, William E., M.S., Instructor of Geography 

Hall, John D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Government and Politics 

HiGGiNS, T. F., M.S., Instructor of Geography 

Kessler, William C, Ph.D., Professor of Economics 

Lambert, W. C. Breckenridge, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Government 

and Politics 
Newcomer, Richard S., M.A., Instructor of Government and Politics 
Nieuwejarr, Otto, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics 
Parr, John S., Ph.D., Instructor of Government and Politics 
Richardson, Francis S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Business Adminis- 
tration 
Schwartz, David S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Personnel Management 
Smith, Harrison, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Government and Politics 
Totten, Donald E., M.S., Instructor of Geography 
Whitney, Donald J., M.A., Instructor of Government and Politics 



258 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

John Freeman Pyle, Ph.D., Dean 
James H. Reid, M.A., Assistayit Dean 

THE University of Maryland is in an unusually favorable 
location for students of Business, Government and 
Politics, Economics, Public Administration, Geography, Journ- 
alism and Public Relations, Foreign Service and 
International Relations. Downtown Washington 
is only twenty-five minutes away in one direction, 
while the Baltimore business district is less than 
an hour in the other. There is frequent trans- 
portation service from the University gates to 
each city. Special arrangements are made to 
study commercial, manufacturing, exporting, and 
importing agencies and methods in Baltimore. 
Assistance is given qualified students who wish to 
obtain a first-hand glimpse of the far-flung economic activities of the 
national government or to utilize the libraries, government departments, 
and other facilities available in Washington. 

ORGANIZATION 

The College comprises seven departments, two bureaus of research, and 
one institute. 

I. Department of Business Organization and Administration 

1. Accounting and Statistics 

Financial Administration 

Industrial Administration 

Insurance and Real Estate 

Marketing Administration 

(a) Advertising 

(b) Foreign Trade and International Finance 

(c) Retail Store Management 

(d) Sales Management 

6. Personnel Administration 

7. Transportation Administration 

(a) Airport Management 

(b) Traffic Management 

8. Public Utilities and Public Administration 
II. Department of Economics. 

III. Department of Foreign Service and International Relations 

IV. Department of Geography 

V. Department of Government and Politics 
VI. Department of Journalism and Public Relations 



2. 

3. 
4. 
5. 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 259 

VII. Department of Office Techniques and Management 

1. Office Management 

2. Office Techniques 

VIII. Bureau of Business and Economic Research 
IX. Bureau of Government Research 
X. Institute of World Economics and Politics 

Aims 

The College of Business and Public Administration offers training designed 
to prepare young men and women for service in business firms, govern- 
mental agencies, cooperative enterprises, labor unions, small business units, 
and other organizations requiring effective training in administrative skills 
and techniques, and for the teaching of business subjects, economics, geog- 
raphy, government and politics, and journalism and public relations in high 
schools and colleges. It supplies scientific training in administration to 
students and prospective executives on a professional basis comparable to 
university training in the other professional fields. Administration is re- 
garded as a profession, and the College of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration prepares its students for this profession by offering courses of 
instruction which present general principles and techniques of manage- 
ment and administration and brings together in systematic form the ex- 
periences and practices of business firms and governmental units. This 
plan of education does not displace practical experience, but supplements 
and strengthens it by shortening the period of apprenticeship otherwise 
necessary, and by giving a broad and practical knowledge of the major 
principles, policies, and methods of administration. 

During the first half of the college study program the student secures 
a broad foundation upon which to base the professional and the more 
technical courses offered in the last half of the course. The managerial 
and operating points of views are stressed in the advanced courses in pro- 
duction, marketing, labor, finance, real estate, insurance, accounting, secre- 
tarial training and pu"blic administration. The purpose of the training 
offered is to aid the student as a prospective executive in developing his 
ability to identify and to solve administrative and managerial problems; 
and to adjust himself and his organization, policies, and practices to chang- 
ing social, political and economic situations. 

The aim of the college is to present and illustrate such sound principles 
of management as are applicable to both big business and small business. 
Large-scale business, because of its possible economies, will be expanded in 
some industries under certain well-known conditions. There are, on the 
other hand, industries and many situations which still call for the small 
business. If these small-scale businesses are to be operated with profit to 
the owners and with satisfactory and economical service to the public, it is 
imperative that authentic principles of administration be applied to them. 
Sound principles of ethical conduct are emphasized at all times throughout 
the various courses. 



260 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The primary aim of collegiate education for government and business ser- 
vice is to train for effective management. The College of Business and Pub- 
lic Administration, University of Maryland, was established to supply 
effective training in administration to the young men and women whose 
task will be the guiding of the more complex business enterprises and gov- 
ernmental units resulting from industrial, social and political development 
and expansion. This statement does not mean that the graduate may expect 
to secure a major executive position upon graduation. He will, on the con- 
trary, usually be required to start near the well publicized "bottom" of the 
ladder and work his way up through a number of minor positions. He 
will, however, be able to move up at a faster rate if he has taken full ad- 
vantage of the opportunities offered by the college in developing his talents 
and in acquiring technical and professional information, point of view, 
skills, and techniques. 

Graduation Requirement 

A minimum of 120 semester hours of credit in courses suggested by the 
College in addition to the specified courses in military science, physical 
activities and hygiene are required for graduation. The student is required 
to have a "C" average for all courses used in meeting the quantitative 
graduation requirements. The time required to complete the requirements 
for the bachelor's degree for the average student is eight semesters. A 
superior student, by carrying more than the average load- can complete 
the work in a shorter period of time. 

Degrees 

The University confers the following degrees on students of Business 
and Public Administration: Bachelor of Science, Master of Business Ad- 
ministration, Master of Arts, and Doctor of Philosophy. The College has a 
number of graduate assistantships in Business Administration, Economics, 
Geography, Journalism and Public Relations, and Government and Politics 
available for qualified graduate students. Application for these assistant- 
ships should be made directly to the Dean of the College of Business and 
Public Administration. (See bulletin of Graduate School for graduate rules 
and regulations.) 

Each candidate for a degree must file in the office of the Registrar on a 
date announced for each semester a formal application for a degree. 
Candidates for degrees must attend a convocation at which degrees are 
conferred and diplomas are awarded. Degrees are conferred in absentia 
only in exceptional cases. 

Junior Requirement 

To be classified as a junior a student must have earned 56 semester hours 
of his freshman and sophomore requirements with an average of at 
least "C", plus the required work in military science, hygiene and physical 
activities for the freshman and sophomore years. If a student has better 
than a "C" average and lacks a few credits of having the total of 56 he 



BUSINESS A\D PUBLIC ADMIMSTRATIOX 261 

may be permitted to take certain courses numbered 100 and above providing 
he has the prerequisites for these courses and the consent of the Dean. 

Senior Residence Requirement 

After a student has earned acceptable credit to the extent of 90 semester 
hours exclusive of the required work in military science, physical activi- 
ties, and hygiene, either at the University of Maryland or elsewhere, he 
must earn a subsequent total of at least 30 semester hours with an average 
grade of "C" or better at the University of Maryland. Xo part of these 
credits may be transferred from another institution. Specific requirements 
for graduation in the selected curriculum must be met. 

Programs of Stady 

The College offers programs of study in economics, business administra- 
tion, secretarial training, public administration, government and politics, 
geography, journalism and public relations, and some combination curricu- 
lums, e.g., business administration and law, commercial teaching and indus- 
trial education. Research is emphasized throughout the various programs. 

Professional Objectives 

The executive manager or administrator in modern business enterprises 
and governmental units and agencies should have a clear understanding of: 

(a) the business organizations and institutions which comprise the 
modern business world; 

(b) the political, social, and economic forces which tend to limit or to 
promote the free exercise of his activities; and 

(c) the basic principles which underlie the efficient organization and 
administration of a business or governmental enterprise. 

In addition, the executive or the prospective executive should: 

(a) be able to express his thoughts and ideas in correct and concise 
English; 

(b) have a knowledge of the fundamental principles of mathematics and 
the basic sciences. 

(c) have a knowledge of the development of modem ci\'ilization through 
a study of history, government, economics, and other social studies subjects; 

(d) have a sympathetic understanding of people gained through a study 
of psychology', sociology, and philosophy. 

If the executive is to be successful in solving current business and govern- 
mental problems, he should be skilled in the scientific method of collecting, 
analyzing, and classifying pertinent facts in the most significant manner, 
and then, on the basis of these facts, be able to draw sound conclusions and 
to formulate general principles which may be used to guide his present and 
future professional or vocational conduct. In other words, probably the 
most important qualities in a successful executive are: 



262 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

(a) the ability to arrive at sound judgments; 

(b) the capacity to formulate effective plans and policies, and the 
imagination and ability to devise organizations, methods, and procedures 
for executing them. 

Facilities Furnished 

The teaching staff and the curriculums of the College of Business and 
Public Administration have been selected and organized for the purpose of 
providing a type of professional and technical training that will aid the 
capable and ambitious student in developing his potential talents to their full 
capacity. 

The college study programs on both the undergraduate and graduate 
levels presuppose effective training in English, history, government, lan- 
guage, science, and mathematics.* The program of study for any indi- 
vidual student may be so arranged as to meet the needs of those preparing 
for specific lines of work, such as accounting, advertising, banking, foreign 
trade, industrial administration, marketing administration, personnel ad- 
ministration, real estate practice, insurance, government employment, secre- 
tarial work, teaching, and research. 

Advisory Councils 

In order to facilitate the prompt and continuous adjustment of courses, 
curriculums, and instructional methods to provide the training most in de- 
mand by industry and commerce; and in order constantly to maintain instruc- 
tion abreast of the best current practice, the advice and suggestions of 
business men and public officials are constantly sought from outstanding 
leaders in each major field of business activity. Each council has its own 
particular interest to serve, such as advertising, marketing, public relations, 
or finance; and the viewpoint and suggestions of these business men are 
proving to be invaluable in developing the instructional and research pro- 
grams of the College. 

Military Instruction 

All male students unless specifically exempted under University rules are 
required to take basic air force ROTC training for a period of two years. The 
successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for graduation but it 
must be taken by all eligible students during the first two years of attendance 
at the University, whether they intend to graduate or not. Transfer students 
who do not have the required two years of military training will be required 
to complete the course or take it until graduation whichever occurs first. 

Selected students who wish to do so may carry advanced Air Force ROTC 
courses during their Junior or Senior years which lead to a regular or 
reserve commission in the United States Air Force. 



• The major portion of this training is usually secured in the four years of hiffh school 
and the first two years of college. 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 263 

General Information 

For information in reference to the University grounds, buildings, equip- 
ment, library facilities, requirements in American Civilization, definition 
of resident and non-resident, regulation of studies, degrees and certificates, 
transcripts of records, student health and welfare, living arrangements in 
the dormitories, off-campus housing, meals, University Counseling Service, 
scholarships and student aid, athletics and recreation, student government, 
honors and awards, religious denominational clubs, fraternities, societies 
and special clubs, the University band, student publications. University 
Post Office and Supply Store, write to the Director of Publications for the 
General Information issue of the Catalog. 

Costs 

Actual annual costs of attending the University include: $165.00 fixed 
charges: $61.00 special fees; $340.00 board; $120.00 to $140.00 room; and 
laboratory fees which vary with the laboratory course pursued. A matricu- 
lation fee of $10.00 is charged all new students. An additional charge of 
$150.00 is assessed students not residents of the State of Maryland. 

For a more detailed statement of costs, write to the Director of Publica- 
tions for a copy of the "General Information Issue" of the Catalog. 

Admissions 

All students desiring to enroll in the College of Business and Public Ad- 
ministration must apply to the Director of Admissions of the University of 
Maryland at College Park. 

In selecting students more emphasis will be placed upon good marks and 
other indications of probable success in college rather than upon a fixed pat- 
tern of subject matter. In general, four units of English and one unit each 
of Social Studies and Natural Sciences are required. One unit each of 
Algebra and Plane Geometry is desirable. While Foreign Language is de- 
sirable for certain programs no Foreign Language is required for entrance. 
Fine Arts, Trade and Vocational subjects are acceptable as electives. 

For a more detailed statement of admissions, write the Director of Pub- 
lications for a copy of the "General Information Issue" of catalog. 

STUDY PROGRAMS IN THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND 
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

A student in the College can so arrange his grouping and sequence of 
courses as to form a fair degree of concentration in one of the Departments. 
When, however, he wishes to become a specialist in any one of the depart- 
ments, he should plan to continue his studies on to the graduate level, work- 
ing toward either the Master's or the Doctor of Philosophy degree. 



264 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

I. BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

Business organizations are set up primarily for the purpose of producing 
and distributing goods and services. Modern business administration re- 
quires a knowledge of and skill in the use of effective tools for the control 
of organizations, institutions, and operations. The curriculums of the 
Department of Business Organization and Administration emphasize the 
principles and problems of the development and the use of policies and 
organizations, and the methods, techniques and procedures of execution, 
in other words, the essence of Administration and Management. 

Study Programs in the Department 

Study programs in Business Administration furnish an opportunity for 
a small amount of concentration in one of the major sections during the 
undergraduate period. The basis of these curriculums is the general study 
program. 

The following study programs will aid the thoughtful student in plan- 
ning his concentration according to his natural aptitudes and the line of 
his major interest: 

The programs of study in the Department of Business Organization and 
Administration are so arranged as to facilitate concentrations according to 
the major functions of business organization. This plan is not, however, 
based on the assumption that these major divisions are independent units, 
but rather that each is closely related and dependent on the others. Every 
student in Business Administration, therefore, is required to complete satis- 
factorily a minimum number of required basic subjects in economics and in 
each of the major functional fields. Each graduate upon completion of 
the requirements for the bachelor's degree finds himself well grounded in 
the theory and practice of administration. There are five commonly rec- 
ognized major business functions, viz: production, marketing, finance, labor 
relations, and control. 

The function of control may be thought of as comprising two sectors, 
viz. internal and external. Internal control has to do with men, materials, 
and operations. External control is secured through the force of laws and 
courts, board and commission decisions, also through the influence of custom 
and public opinion. Management endeavors to make adequate adjustments 
to these forces. Courses in law and public administration, for example, 
aid in giving the student an understanding of the problems, devices, and 
methods of external or "social" control. 

Freshman and Sophomore Requirements 

During the first half of the program of study each student in the 
Department of Business Organization and Administration is expected to 
complete the following basic subjects, except as indicated in a particular 
curriculum : 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 265 

Rtquirad Course* : Semeattr Hourt 

BnsrliBh, Composition and American and World Literature 12 

Mathematics, Math. 6 and 6 6 

Economic Geography 1, 2 4 

ESconomic Developments 4, 6 4 

Organization and Control 10, 11 4 

Government and Politics 1 8 

Sociology of American Life 1 8 

History of American Civilization B, 6 6 

Military Training and Physical Activities for Men 16 

Hygiene and Physical Activities for Women 8 

Accounting 20, 21 8 

Speech 18, 19 2 

Principles of Economics 31, 32 6 

Total specified requirements 66-74 

A minimum of forty per cent of the total number of credits required for 
graduation must be in subjects with designations other than Business Ad- 
ministration; forty per cent of the required 120 semester hours of academic 
work must be in Business Administration subjects, the other twenty per 
cent may be in either group or comprise a combination of the two groups 
of subjects. A "C" average in the Business Administration courses is 
required for graduation. 

Freshmen who expect to make a concentration in foreign trade, or who 
plan to enter public service abroad, should elect an appropriate foreign 
language. 

Junior and Senior Requirements 

During the junior and senior years each student in the department is 
required to complete in a satisfactory manner the following specified 
courses unless the particular curriculum being followed provides otherwise : 

Econ. 140 — Money and Banking 8 

B. A. 140 — Financial Management 8 

Econ. IBO — Marketing Principles and Organization 8 

B. A. 160 — Marketing Management 8 

Econ. 160 — Labor Economics 8 

B. A. 160 — Personnel Management 8 

B. A. 180 — Elements of Statistics 8 

B. A. 180, 181— Business Law I, II 8 

Total 29 

The remaining credits for the juniors and seniors may be used to meet 
the requirements for one of the special concentration programs, for example, 
in Public Administration, Foreign Service, Commercial Teaching, and 
in the fields of Business Administration, such as: Accounting and Statis- 
tics, Production Administration, Marketing, Advertising, Retailing, Pur- 
chasing, Foreign Trade, Transportation, Labor Relations, Real Estate, 
Insurance, Investment and General Finance. Juniors and seniors may 
elect appropriate Secretarial Training courses. 



266 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Combined Administration and Law Program 

When a student elects the combination Administration-Law curriculum, 
he must complete in a satisfactory manner the specific requirements listed 
for the first three years of the general curriculum in administration plus 
enough electives to equal a minimum of 92 credits exclusive of military 
science, physical activities and hygiene, with an average grade of at least 
"C." The last year of college work before entering the Law School must be 
done in residence at College Park. The Bachelor of Science degree from the 
College of Business and Public Administration is conferred upon the com- 
pletion of the first year in the Law School with an average grade of "C" 
or better, and the recommendation of the Dean of the Law School. Business 
Law cannot be used as credit in this combined curriculum. 

Master of Business Administration 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Business Administration are ac- 
cepted in accordance with the procedures and requirements for the Graduate 
School. See Graduate School, Section II. 

The General Curriculum in Administration 

This curriculum is set up on an eight semester basis which corresponds 
to the traditional four-year course that leads to a bachelor's degree. A 
student may complete the full course in a shorter period of time by attend- 
ing summer sessions. A superior student may, however, complete the course 
in a shorter period of time by carrying a heavier load each semester. 

,- — Semester — ^ 
Freshman Year I II 

Geog. 1, 2— Economic Resourcef? 2 2 

EV;on. 4, 6 — Economic Developments 2 2 

Ens;. 1, 2 — Composition and Readings in American Literature 8 t 

B. A. 10, 11 — Organization and Control 2 2 

Mathematics 5 and 6 3 8 

G. & P. 1 American Government (or Sociology of American Life) 8 .... 

See. 1 — Sociology of American Life (or American Government) .... 8 

A. S. 1. 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 8 

P. B. 42, 44— Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Total 18-19 18-19 

Sophomore Yea/r 

Eng. 3, 4, or 5, 6 — Composition and World or English Literature 3 3 

Eicon. 81, 82 — Principles of Economics 8 S 

B. A. 20, 21 — Princlt>les of Accounting 4 4 

Speech 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 1 1 

H. B, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 8 

Electives (Girls) 8 8 

A. S. 8, 4— basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 8 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Total 17-18 17-lt 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 267 

r — Semester — \ 
Junior Year I II 

Eicon. 140 — Money and Banking ' • • • • 

B. A. 140 — Financial Management — • • 

B. A. 130 — Elements of Business Statistics 3 

Econ. 150 — Marketing Principles and Organization 3 .... 

B. A. 150 — Marketing Management • • • . 8 

Econ. 160 — Labor Economics 8 — • 

B. A. 160 — Personnel Management • • • • 8 

Electives in Bus. & Pub. Adm., Economics, or other approved subjects 8 6 

Total IB IB 

Senior Year 

B. A. 180, 181— Business Law I, II 4 4 

Econ. 131 — Comparative Economic Systems 8 .... 

Econ. 171 — Economics of American Industries or 

B. A. 184— Public Utilities 3 

Econ. 142 — Public Finance and Taxation 3 .... 

B. A. 189 — Government and Business .... 8 

Electives in Bus. & Pub. Adm., Economics, or other approved subjects 6 6 

Total 16 1« 

Electives may be chosen under the direction of a faculty advisor from 
courses in Accounting, Statistics, Geography, Public Utilities and Public Ad- 
ministration, Secretarial Training, or other courses that will aid the student 
in preparing for his major objective. The electives indicated in the General 
Course are provided so that students can arrange their schedules, under 
the guidance of a faculty adviser, in such a way as to secure a concentration 
or major when desired in: 

1. Accounting and Statistics 5. Marketing Administration 

2. Financial Administration 6. Personnel Administration 

3. Industrial Administration 7. Transportation Administration 

4. Insurance and Real Estate 8. Public Utilities and Public Ad- 

ministration 

1. Accounting and Statistical Control Study Program 

Internal control in modern business and governmental organizations is a 
major over-all administrative function. The rapid growth in size and com- 
plexity of current governmental units and business enterprises has empha- 
sized the importance of the problems of control in management. In order 
to control intelligently and effectively the manifold activities of these 
units, it is necessary to establish an organization, formulate policies, and 
develop methods of procedures. In order to perform satisfactorily these 
managerial activities, it is necessary to have pertinent facts concerning 
the operations of the various units, divisions, and departments. It is the 
function of the accounting and statistical departments to secure, analyze, 
classify, and interpret these facts. 



268 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



This study program is designed to give the student a broad training in 
administrative control supplemented by specific technical training in the 
problems, procedures, methods and techniques of accounting and statistics. 
If the program is followed diligently, the student may prepare himself for a 
career as a public accountant, tax specialist, cost accountant, auditor, budget 
officer, comptroller, credit manager, or treasurer. 

Provision for practical experience. Arrangements have been made with 
firms of certified public accountants in Baltimore, New York and the Dis- 
trict of Columbia for apprenticeship training in the field of public account- 
ing. This training is provided between semesters of the senior year (ap- 
proximately January 15 to February 15), and for the semester immedi- 
ately following graduation. A student may also elect to take one semester 
of apprenticeship training before graduation. 

The following study program provides courses for those wishing to 
concentrate in this important field: 

Students who select a concentration in accounting and statistics follow 
the general study program in the freshman and sophomore years. 



/ — Semester — ^ 

Junior Year I II 

B. A. 110, 111 — Intermediate Accounting 8 S 

B. A. 121 — Cost Accounting .... 4 

B. A. 123 — Income Tax Accounting 4 .... 

B. A. 130 — Elements of Business Statistics 8 

Econ. 140 — Money and Banking 3 .... 

B. A. 140 — Financial Management .... 8 

Econ. 150 — Marketing Principles and Organization 3 .... 

B. A. 150 — Marketing Management 8 

Elective 3 

Total 16 16 

Senior Year 

Econ. 160 — Labor Economics 8 .... 

B. A. 160 — Personnel Management .... 8 

B. A. 124, 126 — Advanced Accounting Theory and Practice 3 8 

B. A. 122 — Auditing Theory and Practice 8 

B. A. 127 — Advanced Auditing Theory and Practice .... 8 

B. A. 180, 181 — Business Law 4 4 

Electives 8 8 

Total 16 16 

The student interested in this field may select such electives, with the 

aid of his adviser, from the following list of subjects such courses as will 
best meet his needs: 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 269 

B, A. 116 — Public Budgeting (3) B. A. 220 — Managerial Accounting (3) 

B. A. 118 — Governmental Accounting (3) B. A. 221, 222— Seminar in Accounting 
B. A. 125— C. P. A. Problems (3)* (arranged) 

B. A. 129— Apprenticeship in Accounting B. A. 226— Accounting Systems (3) 

(0) B. A. 228 — Research in Accounting 
B. A. 132, 133— Advanced Business Statis- (arranged) 

tics (3, 3) B. A. 229 — Studies of special problems in 
B. A. 141— Investment Management (3) the fields of Statistical Control 

(arranged) 



Econ. 131 — Comparative Economic Systems 

(3) 
Econ. 132 — Advanced Economic Principles 

(3) 
Econ. 134 — Contemporary Economic Thought 

(3) 
Econ. 142 — Public Finance and Taxation 



B. A. 143— Credit Management (3) 

B. A. 148 — Advanced Financial Management 

(3) 
B. A. 149 — Analysis of Financial Statements 

(3) 
B. A. 165 — OflBce Management (3) 
B. A. 166 — Business Communications (3) 
B. A. 184— Public Utilities (3) (3) 

B. A. 210 — Advanced Accounting Theory 

(2-3) 

2. Financial Administration 

A nation with a highly developed industrial system requires an effective 
financial organization. Production and marketing activities of business 
enterprises must be financed; a large volume of consumer purchases depend 
on credit; and the activities of local, state, and federal governments depend, 
in large part, on taxation and borrowing. To meet these needs a com- 
plicated structure of financial institutions, both private and public, has 
evolved together with a wide variety of financial instruments. The methods 
used are equally varied and complicated. Since the financing service is so 
pervasive throughout our economic life and because it is an expense which 
must be borne by the ultimate purchaser, the management of the finance 
function is endowed with a high degree of public interest. 

This study program is designed to give the student fundamental informa- 
tion concerning financing methods, institutions, and instruments; and to 
aid him in developing his ability to secure and evaluate pertinent facts, and 
to form sound judgments with reference to financial matters. Through a 
wise selection of subjects the student who selects this curriculum may 
prepare himself for positions in the commercial, savings, and investment 
banking fields, investment management; corporate financial management; 
real estate financing; and insurance. A student may qualify himself to 
enter government service, e.g., in departments regulating banking opera- 
tions, international finance, the issuance and sales of securities, and a num- 
ber of financial corporations owned and operated or controlled by the 
government. 

Students wishing to form a concentration in Financial Administration 
should follow the general study program for the freshman and sophomore 
years, the program for the junior and senior years is outlined as follows: 



• C. p. A. Problems is recommended for students who plan to go into public accounting. 
Such students should plan their study program so as to meet the professional examination 
requirements of the State in which they expect to take the examination or to practice. 



270 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

( — Semester — ^ 
Junior Year I II 

Econ. 140 — Money and Banking 3 .... 

B. A. 140 — Financial Management .... 3 

B. A. 130 — Elements of Business Statistics 3 

B. A. 110-111 — Intermediate Accounting 3 3 

B. A. 166 — Business Communications 3 .... 

Econ. 150 — Marketing Principles and Organization 3 .... 

B. A. 150 — Marketing Management .... 3 

Electives in Economics, Government and Politics, and Business and 

Public Administration 3 4 

Total 15 16 

Senior Year 

B. A. 180, 181 — Business Law 4 4 

B. A. 141 — Investment Management 3 .... 

B. A. 143 — Credit Management 3 

B. A. 160 — Personnel Management .... 3 

Econ. 160 — Labor Economics 3 .... 

B. A. 148 — Advanced Financial Management .... 3 

Electives 3 6 

Total 16 16 

Selection of electives may be made with the aid of the adviser from the 
following list of subjects: 

B. A. 123 — Income Tax Accounting (4) B. A. 249 — Studies of Special Problems in 

B. A. 147 — Business Cycle Theory (3) the Field of Financial Administration 

B. A. 149 — Analysis of Financial Statements (arranged) 

(3) Econ. 141 — Theory of Money, Credit and 

B. A. 165— Office Management (3) Prices (3) 

B. A. 184 — Public Utilities (3) Econ. 142 — Public Finance and Taxation 

B. A. 190— Life Insurance (3) (3) 

B. A. 191 — Property Insurance (3) Econ. 149 — International Finance and Ex- 

B. A. 196— Real Estate Finance (3) change ((3) 

B. A. 240 — Seminar in Financial Organiza- Econ. 241 — Seminar in Money, Credit and 

tion and Management (3) Prices (arranged) 

3. Industrial Administration 

This curriculum is designed to acquaint the student with the problems of 
organization and control in the field of industrial management. Theory and 
practice with reference to organization, policies, methods, processes, and 
techniques are surveyed, analyzed, and criticized. The student is required 
to go on inspection trips, and when feasible is expected to secure first-hand 
information through both observation and participation. He should be 
familiar with the factors that determine plant location and layout, types 
of buildings, and the major kinds of machines and processes utilized; he 
should understand effective methods and devices for the selection and 
utilization of men, materials and machines. 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 271 

The courses, in addition to those required of all students in the college, 
which will aid the undergraduate student in preparing himself for a useful 
place in this field of effort are: 

•B. A. 121 — Cost Accounting (4) 'B. A. 169 — Industrial Management (3) 

B. A. 122, 127 — Auditing (3, 3) B. A. 170 — Transportation Services and 

B. A. 132, 133 — Advanced Business Statis- Regulation (3) 

tics (3, 3) B. A. 171 — Industrial and Commercial 

B. A. 153 — Purchasing Management (3) Traffic Management (3) 

•B. A. 163— Industrial Relations (3) B. A. 172— Motor Transportation (3) 

B. A. 165 — Office Management (3) *B. A. 1?7— Motion Economy and Time 

B. A. 166 — Business Communications (3) Study (3) 
•B. A. 167 — Job Evaluation and Merit *B. A. 178 — Production Planning and Con- 
Rating (2) trol (2) 

4. Insurance and Real Estate 

Today both insurance and real estate are fields which prefer university 
trained persons. In insurance, opportunities are available in the home 
offices and in the field to persons who will ultimately specialize in life, 
property, or casualty insurance. In real estate, a group of specialists — 
real estate brokers, appraisers, property managers, and persons handling 
the financing of real estate — are now recognized. A proper arrangement of 
courses by a student will provide academic preparation toward the exami- 
nations for Chartered Life Underwriter (C.L.U.), Chartered Property Casu- 
alty Underwriter (C.P.C.U.), and new professional requirements in real 
estate. Also, from a purely personal or family viewpoint these courses can 
be of immense value. 

Students who select a concentration in insurance and real estate should 
follow the general study program for the freshman and sophomore years. 
The program for the junior and senior years is outlined below. 

r — Semes ter — > 
Junior Year I II 

Econ. 140 — Money and Banking 3 .... 

B. A. 140 — Financial Management .... 3 

B. A. 130 — Elements of Business Statistics 3 .... 

Econ. 150 — Marketing Principles and Organization 3 .... 

B. A. 150 — Marketing Management .... 3 

B. A. 190 — Life Insurance 3 .... 

B. A. 191 — Property Insurance .... 3 

B. A. 195— Real Estate Principles 3 

B. A. 196— Real Estate Finance 3 

Elective 8 

Total 15 15 



• These courses are specific requirements for students concentrating in Industrial 
Adminiitration. 



272 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

( — Semester — > 
Senior Year I II 

B. A. 180, 181 — Business Law 4 4 

Econ. 160 — Labor Economics 3 .... 

B. A. 160 — Personnel Management 8 

B. A. 141 — Investment Management 8 .... 

B. A. 194 — Insurance Agency Management 3 .... 

B. A. 197 — Real Estate Management .... 3 

Electives 3 6 

Total 16 16 

Selection of electives may be made with the aid of the adviser from the 
following and other subjects: 

Soc. 114— The City (3) B. A. 147— Business Cycle Theory (8) 

Soc. 173 — Social Security (3) B. A. 151 — Advertising Programs and Cam- 
Econ. 141— Theory of Money. Credit, and paigns (2) 

Prices (3) B, A. 165— Office Management (3) 

E>:on. 142 — Public Finance and Taxation B. A. 166 — Business Communications (3) 

(3) B. A. 189 — Business and Government (3) 
B. A. 123 — Income Tax Accounting (3) 

5. Marketing Administration 

Modem business administration is concerned largely with marketing 
activities. Buying and selling of products and services comprise the major 
portion of the time and energies of a large group of our population. The 
ideals of our system of private property, individual initiative and free 
enterprise are closely related to present-day marketing organization and 
practice. Effective solutions of the problems of marketing are necessary 
to the success of the individual business enterprise and for the welfare of 
the consumer. If the costs of distribution are to be reduced or kept from 
rising unduly, it is necessary that careful study be made of the organiza- 
tion, policies, methods, and practices of advertising, selling, purchasing, 
merchandising, transportation, financing, storing, and other related mar- 
keting activities, and appropriate action taken by qualified technicians 
and executives. 

The purpose of the marketing administration program is to give the 
student an opportunity to analyze, evaluate and otherwise study the prob- 
lems connected with marketing institutions, organizations, policies, methods, 
and practices. The student who elects this field of concentration may 
develop his aptitudes, on the technical level, for research, selling, buying, 
and preparing advertising copy, and on the administrative level develop his 
abilities for organizing, planning, and directing the various activities in 
the field of marketing. 

Thoughtful selection of courses from the following lists, in addition to 
those required of all students in business administration, will aid the 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 



273 



student in preparing himself for an effective position in the field of market- 
ing. He may form a concentration in : 

a. General Marketing d. Retail Store Management 

b. Advertising e. Sales Management 

c. Foreign Trade and International Finance 



B. A. 132, 133 — Advanced Business Sta- 
tistics (3, 3) 
*B. A. 143— Credit Management (3) 

B. A. 147— Business Cycle Theory (3) 
•B. A. 151 — Advertising Programs and 

Campaigns (3) 
*B. A. 152 — Copy Writing and Layout (3) 
•B. A. 153 — Purchasing Management (3) 
•B. A. 154— Retail Store Management (3) 
B. A. 155 — Problems in Retail Merchan- 
dising (3) 
B. A. 166— Office Management (3) 
B. A. 166 — Business Communications (3) 
B. A. 170 — Transportation Services and 

Regulation (3) 
B. A. 171 — Industrial and Commercial 
Traffic Management (3) 

For those especially interested in 
from the following courses: 

tEcon. 136 — International Economic Policies 
and Relations (3) 
Econ. 137 — Economic Planning and Post- 
war Problems (3) 
tEcon. 149 — International Finance and Ex- 
change (3) 
B. A. 151 — Advertising Programs and Cam- 
paigns (3) 
tB. A. 157— Foreign Trade Procedure f3) 
tB. A. 170 — Transportation Services and 

Regulation (3) 
tB. A. 173— Overseas Shipping (3) 
B. A. 189 — Government and Business (3) 
Be. Geog. 4 — Regional Geography of the 
Continents (8) 
Geog. 100, 101 — Regional Geography of the 
United States and Canada (3, 8) 



B. A. 172— Motor Transportation (3) 

.' :1 
B. A. 190— Life Insurance (3) 

B. A. 191 — Property Insurance (3) ' 

B. A. 195— Real Estate Principles (3) 
B. A. 250 — Problems in Sales Management 

(3) 
B. A. 251 — Problems in Advertising (3) 
B. A. 252— Problems in Retail Store Man- 
agement (31 
B. A. 257 — Seminar in Marketing Manage- 
ment (arranged) 

B. A. 258 — Research in Marketing 
(arranged) 

B. A. 259— Studies of Special Problems in 
the field of Marketing Policies, Manage- 
ment and Administration (arranged) 

B. A. 299— Thesis (3-6 hours) (arranged) 

foreign trade, selections may be made 

Geog. 102 — The Geography of Manufactur- 
ing in the United States and Canada (3) 

Geog. 110, 111— Latin America (3, 8). 

Geog. 115 — Peoples of Latin America (2) 

Geog. 120 — Economic Geography of Eur- 
ope (3) 

Geog. 122 — Economic Resources and De- 
velopment of Africa (3) 

Geog. 130-131 — Economic and Political 
Geog. of Southern and Eastern Asia 
(3, 3) 

Geog. 180, 181 — Principles of Geography 
(3, 3) 

Geog. 260-261— Problems in the Geog. of 
Europe and Africa (3, 3) 



• These courses are specific requirements for students taking a concentration in Marketing 
Management. 

t These courses are specific requirements for students taking a concentration in Foreign 
Trade and International Finance. 



274 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



6. Personnel Administration and Labor Economics 

Recent development of large scale operation on the part of both private 
enterprise and government has emphasized the g^rowing vital importance 
of personnel relationships. Successful operation depends on har- 
monious cooperation between employer and employee. The interests of the 
public, the owners, and the management, as well as those of the employees, 
may be greatly aifected by the solutions evolved in any given case of 
personnel relationship. The growth of large-scale, centrally controlled labor 
organizations and the increased participation of governmental agencies in 
labor disputes have created problems for which business management, union 
officials, and government representatives have been, on the whole, ill- 
prepared to solve satisfactorily. The government, the unions, and business 
need men and women qualified to deal effectively with these problems. They 
should have broad training and technical information in the fields of business 
and public administration, economics, and psychology, together with suitable 
personalities. They must be able to approach these problems with an open 
mind, unbiased by personal and class prejudices. 

Personnel administration which has to do with the direction of human 
effort, is concerned with securing, maintaining, and utilizing an effective 
working force. People adequately trained in personnel administration find 
employment in business enterprises, governmental departments, govern- 
mental corporations, educational institutions and charitable organizations. 

A student may select from the following courses those which will, in 
addition to those required of all students in business administration, best 
prepare him for the kind of personnel work he wishes to enter. 



•B. A. 163— Industrial Relations (3) 

•B. A. 164 — Recent Labor Legislation and 

Court Decisions (3) 
•B. A. 167 — Job Evaluation and Merit 

Ratinsr (2) 
•B. A. 169 — Industrial Management (3) 
G. & P. Ill — Public Personnel Adminis- 
tration (3) 
Psych. 2 — Applied Psychology (3) 
Psych. 121 — Social Psychology (3) 
Psych. 161 — Psychological Techniques in 
Personnel Administration (3) 

7. Transportation Administration 

The problems of transportation administration are complex and far reach- 
ing. The student preparing for this type of work should be well grounded in 
economics, government, and business administration, as well as being pro- 
ficient in the use of the technical tools of the profession. Rail, highway, 
water, and air transportation are basic to our economic life, in fact, to qur 



G. & P. 214— Problems in Public Person- 
nel Administration (arranged) 

B. A. 262 — Seminar in Contemporary 
Trends in Labor Relations (3) 

B. A. 265— 

B. A. 266 — Research in Personnel Manage- 
ment (arranged) 

B. A. 267— 

B. A. 269 — Studies of Special Problems in 
Employer-Employee Relationships 
(arranged) 

B. A. 299 — Thesis, 3-6 hours (arranged) 

B. A. 299 — Thesis (arranged) 



• TTiese courses are specific requirements for those students taking a concentration in 
Personnel Administration and Labor Economics. 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 276 

very existence. This curriculum gives considerable emphasis to air trans- 
portation. 

The following courses, in addition to those required of all students in the 
Department of Business Organization and Administration, will aid the 
student in preparing himself for a useful place in the fields of air, water, 
highway, and railway transportations. Airport management is a rapidly 
growing new business activity. (To major in Transportation Administra- 
tion the student must complete 15 hours of the courses listed below) : 

B. A. 157— Foreign Trade. B. A. 173— Overseas Shipping (3) 

B. A. 170 — Transportation Services and B. A. 174 — Commercial Air Transportation 

Regulation (3) (3) 

B. A. 171 — Industrial and Commercial B. A. 175 — Airline Administration (8) 

Traffic Management (3) B. A. 176— Problems in Airport Manage- 
B. A. 172— Motor Transportation (3) ment (3) 

Other courses may be selected with the approval of the adviser for the 
curriculum. 

8. Public Utilities and Public Administration 

The trend toward increased governmental participation in the fields of 
our economic, political, and social life has been developing for a number 
of years. Our government has now become the largest "business" enter- 
prise in the country. In addition to the Federal Government, State and 
Local Government agencies have called upon the universities to aid in train- 
ing young men and women for effective public service. To many individuals, 
and particularly to those of superior mental ability, the intangible personal 
rewards of government service are highly attractive. Few fields of human 
endeavor bring men into direct contact with so many fascinating and im- 
portant problems and so early in their careers. 

The curriculum in Public Utilities and Public Administration is designed 
to provide specialized training in public utilities and related fields in govern- 
ment and private enterprise as well as training in the broader field of 
government service in general. 

Pursuant to these purposes the public utilities course is designed as a 
core course which will at once afford specialized training in a limited field 
and broader training in several fields. Public utility problems are treated 
as case studies in the larger fields of economic theory, management, regu- 
lation, accounting, finance, taxation, constitutional and administrative law, 
and government control. The course is therefore a means of integrating 
several fields of study. Also, considered essential to the purpose of the 
curriculum are courses in accounting, finance, law and certain advanced 
survey courses. 

The student is advised to round out his particular curriculum with one 
or more of the general courses listed as electives and with other more spe- 
cialized courses in public utilities, accounting, finance, transportation, public 
administration or perhaps some other fields. 



276 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Students following this curriculum take the general study program for 
the freshman and sophomore years. The program for junior and senior 
years is outlined as follows: 



Semester- 



Junior Year 

B. A. 130 — Elements of Business Statistics 

Econ. 140 — Money and Banking 

Econ. 150 — Principles of Marketing 

Econ. 160 — Labor Economics 

B. A. 140 — Financial Management 

B. A. 170 — Transportation I, Services and Regulations. 
Electives 

Total 

Senior Year 

B. A. 184— Public Utilities 

B. A. 189 — Government and Business 

Econ. 171 — Economics of American Industries 

G. & P. 181 — Administrative Law 

G. & P. 110 — Principles of Public Administration 

B. A. 180, 181— Business Law 

Electives 

Total 



16 



// 



15 



16 



Selection of electives can be made from the following courses: 



B. A. 110, lll^Intermediate Accounting 

B. A. 116— Public Budgeting 

B. A. 118 — Governmental Accounting 

B. A. 123 — Income Tax Accounting 

B. A. 126 — Advanced Accounting Theory 

and Practice 
B. A. 132-133 — Advanced Business Statis- 
tics 
B. A. 157— Foreign Trade 
B. A. 171 — Industrial and Commercial 

Traffic Management 
B. A. 172 — Motor Transportation 
B. A. 173 — Overseas Shipping 
B. A. 174 — Commercial Air Transportation 
B. A. 175 — Airline Administration 
B. A. 221, 222 — Seminar in Accounting 
B. A. 240 — Seminar in Financial Organ- 
ization and Management 



B. A. 284— Seminar in Public Utilities 

Econ. 132 — Advanced Economic Principles 

Econ. 141 — Theory of Money, Credit, and 
Prices 

Econ. 142 — Public Finance and Taxation 

Econ. 149 — International Finance and Ex- 
change 

Econ. 241 — Seminar in Money, Credit and 
Prices 

Econ. 270 — Seminar in Economics and 
Geography of American Industries 

G. & P. 4 — State Government and Ad- 
ministration 

G. & P. 5 — Local Government and Ad- 
ministration 

G. & P. 110— Principles of Public Adminis- 
tration 

G. & P. 131-132 — Constitutional Law 



Other specialized courses, including certain courses in the Departments 
of Government and Politics and Business Organization, may be selected 
with the consent of the advisor. 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 277 

II. ECONOMICS 

The program of studies in the field of Economics is designed to meet the 
needs of students who wish to concentrate either on a major or minor scale 
in this division of the Social Sciences. Students who expect to enroll in 
the professional schools and those who are planning to enter the fields of 
Business or Public Administration, or Foreign Service, or Social Service 
Administration, will find courses in economics of considerable value to them 
in their later work. A student of economics should choose his courses to 
meet the requirements for his major objective, or the Master of Arts, or a 
Doctor of Philosophy degree. (He should consult the bulletin of the 
Graduate School for the general requirements for the advanced degrees.) 

Requirements for an Economics Major 

A student majoring in Economics is required to complete satisfactorily 
120 semester hours of work in addition to the required work in military 
science, hygiene and physical activities. A general average of at least "C" 
is required for graduation. A student must maintain at least an average 
grade of "C" in his major and minor in order to continue in his chosen field. 

The specific requirements for the Economics Major are: 

I. Econ. 4, 5, 31 and 32 — a total of 10 semester hours of specifically 
required courses in Economics. B.A. 20, 21 (Principles of Accounting) 
are recommended, and B. A. 130 (Statistics) is required. Other courses 
in Economics to meet the requirements of a major are to be selected with 
the aid of a faculty adviser. 

II. Social Studies — American Government (3) ; Sociology of American 
Life (3) ; History of American Civilization (6) — a total of 12 semester hours. 

III. English — 12 semester hours, comprising Eng. 1, 2, and 3, 4; or 5, 6; 
Speech — 2 to 4 semester hours; Speech 18 and 19, 2 semester hours. 

IV. Foreign Language and Literature, 12 semester hours in one language. 
Candidates for the Ph.D. degree are requested to have a reading knowledge 
of two modern foreign languages, normally French and German. 

V. Natural Science and Mathematics, 12 semester hours. 

VI. Military Science, Hygiene, and Physical Activities. The present 
University requirement is 16 semester hours in Military Science and Phys- 
ical Activities for all able-bodied male students; women students are re- 
quired to take 8 semester hours credit in hygiene and physical activities. 

A student who elects economics as a major must have earned 10 semester 
hours credit in the prerequisite courses in economics prior to his beginning 
the advanced work of the junior year. These are normally taken during 
the freshman and sophomore years and must be completed with an average 
grade of not less than "C". The major sequences are not completed until 
at least 26 and not more than 40 credits, in addition to the required 
prerequisite courses, are satisfactorily earned, that is, with an average grade 
of at least "C". 



278 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

A minor in economics consists of the 10 prerequisite credits mentioned 
above plus at least 18 additional credits in economics. 

As many as 24 additional semester hours may be taken by the economics 
students from Business and Public Administration courses. 

The specific courses comprising the student's program of studies should 
be selected with the aid of a faculty adviser in terms of the student's 
objective and major interest. 

Study Program for Economics Majors Semester 

Freshman Year I II 

Speech 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 1 1 

Econ. 4, 6 — Economic Developments 2 2 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Mathematics 5. 6 or 10 and 11 8 i 

G. & P. 1 — American Government (or Sociology of American Life) ... 3 .... 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life (or American Government) .... 3 

Foreign Language 3 8 

A. S. 1, 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

P. E. 42. 44— Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Total 18—19 18—19 

Sophomore Year 

Econ. 31, 32 — Principles of Economics 3 8 

Eng. 3, 4, or 5, 6 — Composition and World Literature 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Natural Science (or B. A. 20, 21) 3 3 

H. 5, 6 — -History of American Civilization 3 8 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Total 16—19 16—19 

Junior Year 

Econ. 140 — Money and Banking 8 .... 

Econ. 150 — Marketing Principles and Organization 3 .... 

B. A. 130 — Elements of Business Statistics .... 8 

Econ. 160 — Labor Economics 8 

Econ. 131 — Comparative Economic Systems .... 8 

Electives in Economics, Government and Politics, and Business Ad- 
ministration* 6 9 

Total ". 15 15 

* Other electives may be selected with the approval of the Head of the Department of 
Economics. Normally these electives must be on the Junior and Senior level. 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 279 

f — Semester — ^ 
Senior Year I II 

Econ. 132 — Advanced Economics Principles 3 .... 

Econ. 134 — Contemporary Economic Thought .... 3 

Econ. 171 — Economics of American Industries or 

B. A. 184— Public Utilities 3 

Econ. 142 — Public Finance and Taxation 3 .... 

Electives in Economics, Government and Politics and Business 

Administration* 6 12 

Total 15 15 

III. FOREIGN SERVICE AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

If the student expects to enter the foreign service he should be well 
grounded in the language, geography, history, and politics of the region of 
his anticipated location as well as in the general principles and practices 
of organization and administration. It should be recognized that only a 
limited training can be secured during the undergraduate period. When 
more specialized or more extensive preparation is required, graduate work 
should be planned. The individual program, in either instance, however, 
should be worked out under the guidance of a faculty adviser. The follow- 
ing study program is offered as a guide in the selection of subjects. 

I — Semester — ^ 
Freshman Year I II 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 3 3 

G. & P. 1 — American Government 3 .... 

Sbc. 1 — Sociology of American Life 3 

Foreign Language ( Selection ) 3 3 

Geog. 1, 2 — Economic Resources 2 2 

Econ. 4, 5 — Economic Developments 2 2 

Mathematics 5, 6 3 3 

A. S. 1. 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

P. E. 42, 44 — Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Total 19-20 19-20 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4, or 5, 6 — Composition and World or English Literature 3 3 

Foreign Language (Continuation of Freshman year selection) 3 3 

Econ. 31, 32 — Principles of Economics 3 3 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

G. & P. — Comparative Government, selection in accordance with the 

student's need 2 2 

Sp. 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 1 1 

A. S. 3. 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Total 16-19 16-19 



* Other electives may be selected with the approval of the Head of the Department of 
Economics. Normally these electives must be on the Junior and Senior level. 



280 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



I — Semester — » 
Junior Year ^ " 

Econ. 150 — Marketing Principles and Organization 3 . . • • 

Econ. 140 — Money and Banking 8 .... 

Econ. 160 — Labor Economics • • • • * 

G. & P. 101 — International Political Relations • • • • ' 

B. A. 130 — Elements of Business Statistics 3 • • • • 

Econ. 131 — Comparative Economic Systems . . . • 8 

Ec. Geog. — Selection of Regional division to fit student's needs 3 3 

Electives to meet student's major interest 3 3 

Total 15 IB 

Senior Year 

G. & P. 102 — International Law ■ • • • 3 

G. & P. 106 — American Foreign Relations ■ . . • 8 

G. & P. 131 — Constitutional Law 8 .... 

B. A. 189 — Government and Business 3 .... 

Ec. 132 — Advanced Economic Prin., or Ec. 134, Contemporary Econ. 

Thought 8 

G. & P. 181 — Administrative Law 3 3 

Econ. 136 — International Economic Policies and Relations 3 .... 

Econ. 149 — International Finance and Exchange 8 

Electives to meet the needs of the student's major interest 3 3 

Total 15 16 

Suggested electives: 

American History 108, 127, 129, 133, 135, 145, and 146. 

European History 175, 176, 179, 180, 185, 186, and History 191— History of Russia; 

History 195— The Far East. 
Government and Politics 7, 8, 9, 10, 105, 106, and 154. 

IV. GEOGRAPHY 

Agriculture, industry, trade, social customs and politics of a given geo- 
graphical region are influenced to a great extent by the natural resources 
of that area. Climatic conditions, topography, soils, mineral deposits, water 
power, and other physical factors largely determine the economic possi- 
bilities of a country. The characteristics of the philosophy, political ideals 
and degrees of technological maturity of the people within a given geo- 
graphical unit, in turn determine in large measure the degree of effective- 
ness with which the natural resources are utilized. The standard of living, 
the purchasing power, and the political outlook of the inhabitants of a 
country are, in the main, the result or the expression of the interrelation- 
ship existing between the people and their physical environment. 

This curriculum is designed to aid the student in securing the facts con- 
cerning the major geographical areas of the world and in studying and 
analyzing the manner in which these facts affect economic, political, and 
social activities. The student interested in international trade, international 
political relations, diplomacy, overseas governments, and national aspira- 
tions will find the courses in this department of great practical value. 
Work is offered on both the undergraduate and the graduate levels. 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 281 

Students who expect to enroll in the engineering and professional schools 
and those who are planning to enter the fields of Business and Public Ad- 
ministration, or Foreigrn Service, will find courses in geography of material 
value to them in their later work. Openings exist for well-trained geog- 
raphers in government service, in universities, colleges, and high schools, 
as well as in private business. A student of geography should choose his 
courses to meet the requirements for his major objective, be it an under- 
graduate major or minor, or a Master of Arts, or a Doctor of Philosophy 
degree. He should consult the bulletin of the Graduate School for the 
general requirements for the advanced degrees. 

Requirements for an Undergraduate Major in Geography 

A student majoring in geography is required to complete satisfactorily 
120 semester hours of work in addition to the required work in military 
science, hygiene, and physical activities. A general average of at least 
"C" is required for graduation. A student must maintain at least an 
average grade of "C" in his major and minor in order to continue in his 
chosen field. 

The specific requirements for the geography major are: 

I. Geog. 10 and 11 (3,3), or equivalent; Geog. 30 (3); Geog. 35 (3); 
Geog. 40 and 41 (3,3); Geog. 170 (3) and 18 hours in other Geography 
courses numbered 100 to 199, of which 6 hours must be in non-regional 
courses; a total of 39 hours in geography. 

II. Social Sciences— G. & P. 1 (3); Econ. 31 and 32 (3,3); History 5 
and 6 (3, 3); Soc. 1 and 5 (3, 3) and at least one other course in sociology 
to be selected with the aid of the faculty adviser (3); a total of 24 semester 
hours. 

III. Natural Sciences — Botany 1 and 113 or 102 (4, 2 or 3); Agron. 
115 (3); Chem. 1 (4). Total of 13 (14) semester hours. 

IV. English— Eng. 1 and 2 (3,3) and 3, 4, or 5, 6 (3,3); Speech 18, 19 
(1,1); a total of 14 semester hours. 

V. Foreign Language and Literature — 12 semester hours in one lan- 
guage, unless an advanced course is taken. 

VI. Military Science, Hygiene, and Physical Activities. The present 
University requirement is 16 semester hours in Military Science and Physi- 
cal Activities for all able-bodied male students. Women students are 
required to take 8 semester hours credit in hygiene and physical activities. 

A student who elects geography as a major must have earned eighteen 
semester hours credit in the prerequisite courses in geography prior to 
beginning the advanced work of the junior year. These are normally taken 
during the freshman and sophomore years and must be completed with an 
average grade of not less than "C". 



282 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

A minor in geography should consist of Geog. 10 and 11 (3,3), Geog. 30 
(3) and such other courses as the major adviser deems suitable. 

For the guidance of those who expect to do graduate work in geography, 
it should be emphasized that the Department of Geography is particularly 
interested in the appraisal of natural resources in relation to economic, 
social and political developments; it aims to encourage study of the natural 
resource base of the culture of an area. This necessitates, on the one hand, 
an elementary knowledge of certain of the physical sciences as a basis for 
the physical aspects of geographic study and resource analysis. On the 
other hand, a certain amount of knowledge of economics, of sociology and 
of political organization is necessary in order to understand stages of re- 
source utilization and the social consequences. 

The specific courses comprising the student's program of studies should 
be selected with the aid of a faculty adviser from the Department of Geog- 
raphy in terms of the student's objective and major interests. 

Suggested Study Program for Geography Majors: 

/ — Semester — ^ 
Freshman Year I II 

Geog. 10, 11 — General Geography 3 3 

Chem. 1 — Introductory Chemistry 4 .... 

Bot. 1 — General Botany .... 4 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life .... 3 

G. & P. 1 — American Government 3 .... 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Hist. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

A. S. 1, 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

P. E. 42, 44 — Hygiene ^Women) 2 2 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Total 19 20 19-20 

Sophomore Year 

Geog. 30 — Principles of Morphology 3 .... 

Geog. 35 — Map Reading and Interpretation .... 3 

Geog. 40 — Principles of Meteorology 3 .... 

Geog. 41 — Introductory Climatology .... 3 

Econ. 31, 32 — Principles of Economics 3 3 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6 — Composition and Readings in Literature 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Total 16-19 16-19 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 283 

t — Semester — \ 
Junior Year I II 

Speech 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 1 1 

Bot. 113— Plant Geography 2 

Agron. 115 — Soil Geography .... 3 

Soc. 5 — Anthropology .... 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Geog. — Selection to fit student's needs 6 3 

Electives, with adviser's consent 3 3 

Total 15 16 

Senior Year 

Soc. — Selection to fit student's needs .... 3 

Geog. 170 — Local Field Course 3 

Geog. — Selection to fit student's needs. 6 3 

Electives, with adviser's consent 6 6 

Total 15 12 

V. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 
Government and Politics Major and Minor Requirements 

In this course of study, the following conditions are to be observed: 

(1) G. & P. 1, American Government, or its equivalent, is prerequisite 
to all other courses offered by the Department. Persons taking this 
course of study must complete G. & P. 1 with a grade of "C" or better. 

(2) In this curriculum, at least 36 hours of Government and Politics, includ- 
ing G. & P. 1, must be completed. No Government and Politics course 
with a grade of less than "C" may be counted as a part of these 36 hours. 

(3) The electives of the junior and senior years are to be chosen from the 
list suggested below, unless consent to take other courses is obtained from 
the Head of the Department. Electives in Government and Politics and 
in related fields are to be chosen to make an integrated course of study. 

-' — Semestei — \ 
Freshman Year I II 

G. & P. 1 — American Government 3 .... 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life .... 3 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Math. 5, 6 or 10, 13 — Mathematics 3 3 

Econ. 4, 5 — Economic Developments 2 2 

Speech 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 1 1 

Foreign Language 3 3 

A. S. 1, 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

P. E. 42, 44— Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Physical Activities (Men and Women ) 1 1 

Total 18-19 18-19 



284 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



I — Semester — > 

Sophomore Year I II 

G. & P. 4 — State Government and Administration 3 .... 

G. & P. 6 — Local Government and Administration or Psychology 1 or 

Sociology 62 (Criminology) 8 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6 — Composition and World or English Literature 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 8 

Econ. 31, 32 — Principles of Economics 3 8 

H. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Total 16-19 16-19 

Junior Year 

G. & p. 7 or 9, 8 or 10 — Comparative Government 2 2 

G. & P. 110 — Public Administration 3 .... 

G. & P. 141 — History of Political Theory 3 

G. & P. 174— Political Parties 3 

G. & P. 124 — Legislatures and Legislation 3 

G. & P. —(Elective) 3 

Electives 6 9 

Total 17 17 

Senior Year 

G. & P. 101 — International Relations 8 .... 

G. & P. 131-132 — Constitutional Law 3 8 

One full year of advanced Economics or B. A. courses 3 3 

Electives 6 9 

Total 15 15 

Suggested electives: Any G. & P. courses not required above. Any 
history courses related to the student's integrated course of study. 

Econ. 142 — Public Finance and Taxation B. A. 164 — Labor Legislation and Court 
Econ. 131 — Comparative Economic Systems Decisions 

Econ. 132 — Advanced Economic Principles B. A. 130 — Elements of Business Statistics 

Econ. 134 — Contemporary Economic Philosophy 155 — Logic 

Thought Psychology 121, 122 — Social Psychology 

Econ. 140 — Money and Banking Sociology 52 — Criminology 

Econ. 160 — Labor Economics Sociology 147 — Sociology of Law 

B. A. 180, 181 — Business Law Sociology 186 — Sociological Theory 

B. A. 189 — Government and Business 



VI. JOURNALISM AND PUBLIC RELATIONS 

The Department of Journalism and Public Relations offers two profes- 
sional majors: one in journalism, the other in public relations. The jour- 
nalism major is for students who plan to enter some phase of editorial 
work upon graduation, and the public relations major is for those who will 
work in public relations, public information, or on company publications. 

The first two years of study are the same in both the journalism and 
public relations majors, giving the student a broad education. The last 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 285 

two years contain technical courses and electives. The electives are chosen, 
under the direction of the head of the department, to aid the student pro- 
fessionally; they are not to be chosen from background or cultural courses 
that could not help him vocationally. In a word, electives should meet 
individual needs. 

Students who cannot use a typewriter effectively are advised to take 
0. T. 1, Principles of Typing. Women students are advised to enroll in 
both typing and shorthand, in order to take advantage of job-placement 
opportunities requiring secretarial ability in addition to preparation in 
either journalism or public relations. Home economics helps the women 
journalists in editing social news sections, so it makes a good elective. 

The internship consists of 480 hours of supervised work, usually 40 hours 
a week for three months, spent on a newspaper or in some editorial capacity, 
by the journalism major, or in a public relations office by the public rela- 
tions major. This is full time work away from the campus, preferably done 
between the junior and senior years. The internship, formerly a required 
course, is optional extracurricular activity, without credit. The faculty 
urges the student to obtain this experience and to work on the student 
publications. 

Journalism Study Program 

f — Semester— ■ . 
Freshman Year I II 

Kng. 1, 2 — -Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life 3 .... 

G. & P. 1 — American Government ■ • .... 3 

Geog. 1, 2 — Ilconomic Resources (or Foreign Language) 2-3 2-3 

•Econ. 4, 5 — Economic Development (or Foreign Language) 2 2 

Hath. 5, 6 — General Mathematics and Mathematics of Finance (or a 

Natural Science) 3 3 

Speech 18, 19 — Introductory Speech or Speech 1 and 2 1-2 1-2 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Hygrfene (Women) 2 2 

A. S. 1, 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Total 17-18 17-18 

Sophomore Year I II 

Journ. 10 — News Reporting 1 3 .... 

Journ. 12 — Newsroom Problems .... 3 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6 — Composition and World or English Literature 3 3 

Hist. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

Econ. 31, 82 — Principles of Economics 3 3 

B. A. 10, 11 — Organization and Control (or continuation of a Foreign 

Language) 2-3 2-3 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

A. S. 8, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Total 15-18 18-19 

• Student takes Geog. 1, 2 and Econ. 4, 5, or foreign language. He may elect to delay 
either Geog. or Econ. to get typing in freshman year. ^•- 



286 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

1. If a foreign langauge is elected, 12 semester hours' credit in one 
language must be earned in order to count toward a degree. 

2. If a science is elected, 6 to 8 hours must be earned. 

t — Semester — ^ 
Junior Year 

Journ. 11 — News Reporting II 

Journ. 160 — News Editing I 

Journ. 165— Feature Writing 

Journ. 175— Reporting of Public Affairs 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology 

Phil. 1 or 2 or 154— Philosophical Prespectives (1-2) or Political and 

Social Philosophy 

Electives— Students should select electives that correlate vocationally 

with journalism or public relations, e. g.. business, government, 

5 11 

economics, etc 

„ , . 17 17 

Total 

Senior Year 

B. A. 189 — Business and Government 

Q 

Journ. 181— Press Photography 

2 
Journ. 184— Picture Editmg 

2 
Journ. 191— Law of the Press 

Journ. 192 — History of American Journalism 

Electives— (See electives note for junior year) 

„ . 17 17 

Total 

Public Relations Major Requirements 

Requirements for the first two years of the public relations program 
are the same as those of the journalism program (see above). 

The following is the curriculum taken in the junior and senior years by the 
average male public relations student who plans to work for a public 
relations firm or in a public relations department of a company. 

Courses marked * are elective (the others are required). Electives, 
chosen under the direction of the head of the department, should help the 
student vocationally. For instance, the student hoping to enter government 
information service should choose his electives from government and 
politics and other offerings of the University, so as to obtain some knowl- 
edge of the field in which he hopes to do public relations work. 

It is almost essential that women hoping to do public relations work 
also be able to qualify as secretaries, so that typing and shorthand should 
be elected in this curriculum. 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 287 

I — Semester — \ 
Junior Year I Jt 

Journ. 160 — News Editing 1 3 

Journ. 165 — Feature Writing 3 .... 

Journ. 166 — Publicity Techniques 3 

Journ. 170 — Public Relations 3 .... 

G. & P. 178— Public Opinion 3 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology 3 

Phil. 1 or 2 or 154 — Philosophical Perspectives (1, 2) or Political and 

Social Philosophy • ■ • • 3 

*Econ. 150 — Marketing Principles and Organization 3 .... 

*B. A. 150 — Marketing Management • • • ■ 3 

Electives 0-3 6-12 

Total 15-18 15-18 

Senior Year 

Journ. 171 — Industrial Journalism 2 .... 

Journ. 181— Press Photography 3 .... 

Journ. 184 — Picture Editing .... 2 

Journ. 191 — Law of the Press .... 2 

Journ. 194 — Public Relations Ethics 2 .... 

Journ. 195— Seminar in Public Relations .... 2 

*B. A. 151 — Advertising Programs and Campaigns 2 .... 

*B. A. 152 — Advertising Copy writing and Layout .... 2 

*B. A. 189 — Business and Government 3 .... 

Electives 7-11 10-12 

Total 15-18 16-18 

VII. OFFICE TECHNIQUES AND MANAGEMENT 

1. Office Management 

With the rapidly mounting volume of office work now being done, and the 
rapid increase in the number of office workers required to do it, effective 
office management and supervision is needed. Despite the current popular 
opinion that the office manager needs to know only a number of systems 
and machines, there is an ever-growing group of executives who believe 
that the management and supervision of an office is quite as important a 
job as the management of a factory or any other industrial enterprise. 
Many instances may be cited where the managers of offices have, by a 
consistent and logical use of scientific management principles, saved as 
much as $100,000 a year for their companies. 

Any young man or woman entering business today need have no hesitancy 
in preparing himself for the position of office manager, for that position 
has proved a stepping stone to positions of great responsibility for many of 
our present leading executives. 

The student interested in this field will find the following required courses 
with the suggested electives selected under the guidance of the adviser, 
a valuable aid in preparing for positions in this field. 



288 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Office Administration Study Program 
Freshman Year 



Geog. 1, 2 — Economic Resources 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature. 

B. A. 10, 11 — Organization and Control 

Math. 5 — General Mathematics 

Math. 6 — Mathematics of Finance 

G. & P. 1 — American Government 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life 

O. T. 1 — Principles of Typewriting 

O. T. 2 — Intermediate Typewriting 

A. S. 1, 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 

P. E. 42, 44 — Hygiene (Women) 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 



Semester — > 
/ // 



Total. 



18-19 



18-19 



Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature.. 

Econ. 31, 32 — Principles of Economics 

B. A. 20, 21 — Principles of Accounting 

Speech 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 

H. B, 6 — History of American Civilization 

O. T. 10 — Office Typewriting Problems 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men), 
Physical Activities (Men and Women) 



Total. 



17-19 15-18 



Junior Year 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology. 



Econ. 140 — Money and Banking 

Econ. IBO — Principles of Marketing 

Econ. 160 — Labor Economics 

O. T. 112— Filing 

B. A. 121 — Cost Accounting 

B. A. 130 — Elements of Business Statistics. 

B. A. 150 — Marketing Management 

B. A. '60 — Personnel Management 

O. T. Ill — Office Machines 

Electives 



Total 





4 




8 




3 




8 




8 


2 




16 


16 



Senior Year 

B. A. 165 — Office Management 

B. A. 166 — Business Communications 

B. A. 169 — Industrial Management 

B. A. 180, 181 — Business Law 

B. A. 168 — Advanced Office Management 

Electives in Accounting, Marketing, Real Estate, Insurance, Finance, 
and Transportation 

ToUl 



16 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 289 

2. Office Techniques 

In order to meet the growing demand for college trained secretarial and 
office personnel, the College of Business and Public Administration is offer- 
ing to both men and women a program of secretarial training courses. 
The Secretarial Curriculum provides students with the opportunity to obtain 
the essential background for stenographic, executive and administrative 
positions. One of the best methods of assuring success in one's chosen 
profession is through the medium of specialized secretarial service. To this 
end the courses have been designed. The major objectives of the College 
will be maintained and emphasized throughout the presentation of the 
program of studies. The purpose of this curriculum is not only to furnish 
merely technical or vocational training, but also, to aid the student in 
developing his natural aptitudes for secretarial and administrative positions. 
The development of the student's capacity to plan, organize, direct, and 
execute is the guiding principle followed in this curriculum. This program 
of study will appeal to the young man or woman who is ambitious, nat- 
urally capable, and willing to work. It will also appeal to those who 
realize that positions in secretarial service require much more than merely 
skill in typewriting and stenography. These are essential tools, but knowl- 
edge and skill in other subjects are as important for the more responsible 
positions. 

Placement Examination 

Students with one or more years of college, high school, or equivalent 
training in shorthand and /or typewriting are required to take a placement 
examination in those subjects prior to, or at the time of, their first registra- 
tion in a shorthand or typewriting course at the University. 

Based on the results of this examination, the student may be exempt 
from certain of the beginning courses in either, or both, shorthand and 
typewriting. Credit will be given only for the work done in residence. 

Record of Competency 

Students must make grade of "C" in each course in the Office Techniques 
sequence before they may progress to the next advanced course. 

Senior Requirement 

A vocational level of competency in business skills is imperative at the 
time of graduation. As a requirement for graduation, students following 
the secretarial curriculum must either take 0. T. 16 and 0. T. 17 (or 
0. T. 18) within the six-month period preceding graduation, or take a 
proficiency examination on the material covered in these courses within this 
six-month period. 

The following program of study is designed to give the capable student 
an opportunity to develop his potential aptitudes to an effective end. 



290 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



( — Semester — \ 

Freshman Year I II 

Engr. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 3 3 

G. & P. 1 — American Government 3 .... 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life .... 3 

Geog. 1, 2 — Economic Resources 2 2 

Econ. 4, 5 — Economic Developments 2 2 

Math. 5, 6 — General Mathematics and Mathematics of Finance 3 3 

O. T. 1 — Principles of Typewriting* 2 

O. T. 2 — Intermediate Typewriting 2 

A. S. 1, 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

P. E. 42, 44— Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Physical Activities ( Men and Women) 1 1 

Total 18-19 18-19 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature 3 3 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

Econ. 31, 32 — Principles of Economics 3 8 

O. T. 12, 13— Principles of Shorthand I, II 4 4 

O. T. 10 — Office Typewriting Problems 2 

Speech 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 1 1 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Total 17-20 15-18 

Junior Year 

B. A. 10, 11 — Organization and Control 2 2 

B. A. 20, 21 — Principles of Accounting 4 4 

O. T. 16 — Advanced Shorthandt 3 

O. T. 17 — Gregg Transcription! 2 

B. A. 166 — Business Communications .... 3 

O. T. Ill— Office Machines 3 

O. T. 112— Filing 2 

Econ. 140 — Money and Banking .... 3 

Electives 2 2 

Total 16 16 

Senior Year 

O. T. 110 — Secretarial Work 3 

O. T. 114— Secretarial Office Practice 3 

B. A. 165 — Office Management 3 

B. A. 180, 181 — Business Law 4 4 

Econ. 160 — Labor Economics 3 .... 

Suggested Elective— Gregg Shorthand Dictation (S. T. 18) 3 

Electives .... 6 

Econ. 150 — Marketing Principles and Organization 3 .... 

Total 16 15 



• O. T. 1 should be completed prior to enrollment in Principles of Shorthand 1 (O. T. 12). 
t O. T. 16, Advanced Shorthand, and O. T. 17, Gregg Transcription must be taken 
concurrently. 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 291 

Combined Secretarial Training and Business Teaching Curriculum 

Capable students may elect courses offered by the College of Education 
in such a manner as to qualify themselves for commercial teaching in high 
schools. 

Requirements to teach business subjects: Twenty semester hours of 
prescribed courses in education are required for certification to teach busi- 
ness subjects in Maryland, and 24 semester hours in the District of 
Columbia. 

VIII. BUREAU OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC RESEARCH 

The Bureau of Business and Economic Research is recognized as the 
laboratory for the practical study of business and economic problems. As 
such, it has three principal functions: first, to train students in the field of 
business and economic research; second, to disseminate information con- 
cerning business and economic conditions in Maryland; and third, to make 
available the facilities and to give active research assistance to interested 
business firms, governmental units, and citizen groups. 

Through the facilities of the Bureau qualified interested students can 
obtain practical experience in research work. This involves the application 
of techniques and principles studied in the classroom to actual business and 
governmental problems. 

The Bureau — through its direct contact with business, government, labor 
and the professions and in its research into problems in these fields — serves 
as an important source of information relative to business and economic 
conditions and developments in this region. This information is made avail- 
able, in part, by means of Bureau publications and, in part, by direct inquiry 
to the Bureau. This service is supplemented by active cooperation with 
individual business firms and citizen organizations within the state who 
request assistance in the study of specific problems which are recognized 
as having an important bearing upon community welfare. The Bureau wel- 
comes the opportunity to be of real service to such organizations. 

IX. BUREAU OF GOVERNMENT RESEARCH 

The Bureau of Government Research was organized in 1947, then called 
the Bureau of Public Administration. It is closely allied, both in function 
and personnel, with the Department of Government and Politics. The 
Department of Government and Politics is the teaching agency; the Bureau 
of Goverment Research is the research agency. The Bureau's activities 
relate primarily to the problems of state and local government in Mary- 
land. The Bureau engages in research and publishes research findings 
with reference to local, state and national government. It undertakes sur- 
veys and off"ers its assistance and services to units of government in Mary- 
land. Finally, it serves as a clearing house of information for the benefit 
of Maryland state and local government. The Bureau furnishes an op- 



292 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

portunity for qualified interested students to secure practical experience 
in research in government problems. 

X. INSTITUTE OF WORLD ECONOMICS AND POLITICS 

The Institute of World Economics and Public Affairs is an administrative 
agency of the University responsible for fostering, establishing and cor- 
relating existing instruction, research, and extension on International Eco- 
nomic and Political Relations. 

The main objectives of the Institute's program are concerned with de- 
veloping and promoting research; organizing and correlating programs of 
study and instruction on and off campus; advise and make recommenda- 
tions with reference to new and revised courses designed to prepare per- 
sonnel for effective service with Government and Business Agencies in the 
fields of International Economic and Political Relations. 

The Institute is designed to correlate and supplement existing facilities 
rather than to create a new and competing academic agency. It operates 
in large measure, through and with other relevant divisions and depart- 
ments of the University. Among these are the Departments of Business 
Organization and Administration, Economics, Geography, Government and 
Politics, History, Journalism and Public Relations, Modern Languages, and 
the Bureaus of Business and Economic Research, and Government Research. 

The Director of the Institute is the Chairman of the Advisory Council. 
This Advisory Council comprises representatives of each of the Depart- 
ments concerned and selected representatives of Government and Business. 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 293 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

The University reserves the right to withdraw or discontinue any course 
for which an insufficient number of students have registered to warrant 
giving the course. In such an event, no fee will be charged for transfer to 
another course. 

Courses are designated by numbers as follows: 
1 to 99: courses for undergraduates. 
100 to 199: courses for advanced undergraduates and graduates. (Not 

all courses numbered 100 to 199 may be taken for graduate credit.) 
200 to 299: courses for graduates only. 
A course with a single number extends through one semester. A course 
with a double number extends through two semesters. 

Courses not otherwise designated are lecture courses. The number of 
hours' credit is shown by the arable numeral in parentheses after the title 
of the course. 

A separate schedule of courses is issued each semester, giving the hours, 
places of meeting, and other information required by the student in making 
out his program. Students obtain these schedules when they register. 

BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

Professors Thatcher, Calhoun, Clemens, Cook, Cover, Fisher, Frederick, 

Mounce, Pyle, Reid, Sweeney, Sylvester, Watson, Wedeberg; Associate 

Professors Hale, McLarney, Raines; Assistant Professors Ash, Cronin, 

Daiker, Fleming, Nelson, Taff ; Instructors Edelson, Lee, Richard. 

B.A. 10, 11. Organization and Control (2,2) — First and second semes- 
ters. Required in all Bus. Adm. curriculums. 

A survey course treating the internal and functional organization of a 
business enterprise. B.A. 11 includes industrial management, organization 
and control. 

B.A. 20, 21. Principles of Accounting (4, 4) — First and second semesters. 
Required in all Business Administration curriculums. Prerequisite, Sopho- 
more standing. 

The fundamental principles and problems involved in accounting for 
proprietorships, corporations and partnerships. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

B.A. 110, 111. Intermediate Accounting (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, a grade of B or better in B.A. 21 for majors in account- 
ing, or consent of instructor. 

A comprehensive study of the theory and problems of valuation of assets, 
application of funds, corporation accounts and statements, and the inter- 
pretation of accounting statements. 



294 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

B.A. 116. Public Budgeting (3) — Prerequisites, B.A. 21 and Econ. 32. 

A study of budgetary administration in the United States, including sys- 
tems of financial control and accountability, the settlement of claims, cen- 
tralized purchasing and the reporting of financial operations. 

B.A. 118. Governmental Accounting (3) — Prerequisite, B.A. Ill, or con- 
sent of instructor. 

The content of this course covers the scope and functions of governmental 
accounting. It considers the principles generally applicable to all forms 
and types of governmental bodies and a basic procedure adaptable to all 
governments. 

B.A. 121. Cost Accounting (4) — Prerequisite, a grade of B or better in 
B.A. 21 for majors in accounting, or consent of instructor. 

A study of the fundamental procedures of cost accounting, including 
those for job order, process and standard cost accounting systems. 

B.A. 122. Auditing Theory and Practice (3) — First semester. Prerequi- 
site, B.A. 111. 

A study of the principles and problems of auditing and the application of 
accounting principles to the preparation of audit working papers and 
reports. 

B.A. 123. Income Tax Accounting (4) — Prerequisite, a grade of B or 
better in B.A. 21 for majors in accounting, or consent of instructor. 

A study of the important provisions of the Federal Tax Law, using illus- 
trative examples, selected questions and problems, and the preparation of 
returns. 

B.A. 124, 126. Advanced Accounting (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, B.A. 111. 

Advanced accounting theory applied to specialized problems in partner- 
ships, estates and trusts, banks, mergers and consolidations, receiverships 
and liquidations; also budgeting and controllership. 

B.A. 125. C.P.A. Problems (3)— Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 124, 
or consent of instructor. 

A study of the nature, form and content of C.P.A. examinations by means 
of the preparation of solutions to, and an analysis of, a large sample of 
C.P.A. problems covering the various accounting fields. 

B.A. 127. Advanced Auditing Theory and Practice (3) — Second semester. 
Prerequisite, B.A. 122. 

Advanced auditing theory, practice and report writing. 

B.A. 129. Apprenticeship in Accounting (0) — Prerequisites, minimum of 
20 semester hours in accounting and the consent of the accounting staff. 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 295 

A period of apprenticeship is provided with nationally known firms of 
certified public accountants from about January 15 to February 15, and for 
a semester after graduation. 

B.A. 130. Elements of Business Statistics (3) — Prerequisite, junior 
standing. Required for graduation. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

This course is devoted to a study of the fundamentals of statistics. 
Emphasis is placed upon the collection of data; hand and machine tabula- 
tion; graphic charting; statistical distribution; averages; index numbers; 
sampling; elementary tests of reliability; and simple correlations. 

B.A. 131. Statistics Laboratory. Laboratory hours and credit to be ar- 
ranged. Prerequisite, B.A. 130. (By approval, open to graduate students 
for work on thesis.) 

Through this course the Bureau of Business and Economic Research 
offers the student an opportunity to do practical work in statistics, business, 
and economics, under the direction of the Bureau staff. 

B.A. 132, 133. Advanced Business Statistics (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, B.A. 130. Laboratory fee, $3.50 for each course. 

The use of statistical methods and techniques in economic studies and in 
the fields of business and public administration. Advanced methods of 
correlation and other selected techniques are applied to statistical analyses 
of economic fluctuations, price changes, cost analysis, and market demand 
indexes and functions. 

B.A. 140. Financial Management (3) — Prerequisite, B.A. 21 and Econ. 
140. 

This course deals with principles and practices involved in the organiza- 
tion, financing, and reconstruction of corporations; the various types of secur- 
ities and their use in raising funds, apportioning income, risk, and control; 
intercorporate relations; and new developments. Emphasis on solution of 
problems of financial policy faced by management. 

B.A. 141. Investment Management (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
B.A. 140. 

A study of the principles and methods used in the analysis, selection, and 
management of investments; investment programs, sources of investment 
information, security price movements, government, real estate, public utility, 
railroad, and industrial securities. 

B.A. 142. Banking Policies and Practices (3) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 140. 

A study of the organization and management of the Commercial Bank, 
the operation of its departments, and the methods used in the extension 
of commercial credit. 

B.A. 143. Credit Management (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
B.A. 140. 



296 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

A study of the nature of credit and the principles applicable to its exten- 
sion for industrial, commercial, and consumer purposes; the organization 
and management of a credit department, and the collection of accounts. 

B.A. 147. Business Cycles (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 140 
and senior standing. 

A study of the causes of depressions and unemployment, cyclical and 
secular instability, theories of business cycles, and the problem of controlling 
economic instability. 

B.A. 148. Advanced Financial Management (3) — Prerequisite, B.A. 140. 

Advanced course designed for students specializing in finance. Emphasis 
is placed upon the techniques employed by corporation executives in their 
application of financial management practice to selected problems and 
cases. Critical classroom analysis is brought to bear upon actual methods 
and techniques used by corporations. 

B.A. 149. Analysis of Financial Statements (3) — Prerequisites, B.A. 21, 
B.A. 140. 

Analysis of financial statements for the guidance of executives, directors, 
stockholders, and creditors, valuation of balance sheet items; determination 
and interpretation of ratios. 

B.A. 150. Marketing Management (3) — Prerequisite, Econ 150. 

A study of the work of the marketing division in a going organization. 
The work of developing organizations and procedures for the control of 
marketing activities are surveyed. The emphasis throughout the course is 
placed on the determination of policies, methods, and practices for the effec- 
tive marketing of various forms of manufactured products. 

B.A. 151. Advertising Programs and Campaigns (3) — First semester. 
Prerequisite, B.A. 150. 

Deals with the fundamental principles of advertising. Covers the organi- 
zation and carrying through of advertising campaigns and programs, the 
selection of ideas, types of appeal and different media, and the method of 
judging the effectiveness of advertising. 

B.A. 152. Advertising Copy Writing and Layout (3) — Second semester. 
Prerequisite, B.A. 151. 

Studies the practices and techniques of copy writing and layout that are 
useful for those who expect to prepare advertising or to direct the actual 
production of advertising. Covers the most essential principles of various 
kinds of copy writing. Surveys the process of production from the original 
idea to the published advertisement, and analyzes methods of testing its 
effectiveness. 

B.A. 153. Purchasing Management (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
B.A. 150. 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 297 

Studies the problems of determining the proper sources, quality and quan- 
tity of supplies, and of methods of testing quality; price policies, price fore- 
casting, forward buying, bidding and negotiation; budgets and standards of 
achievement. Particular attention is given to government purchasing, and 
methods and procedures used in their procurement. 

B.A. 154. Retail Store Management (3) — First semester. Prerequi- 
site, B.A. 150 and senior standing. 

Retail store organization, location, layout and store policy; pricing poli- 
cies, price lines, brands, credit policies, records as a guide to buying; pur- 
chasing methods; supervision of selling; training and supervision of retail 
sales force; and administrative problems. 

B.A. 155. Problems in Retail Merchandising (3) — Prerequisite, B.A. 
154. 

Designed to develop skill in the planning and control of merchandise 
stocks. Deals w^ith buying policies, pricing, dollar and unit control pro- 
cedures, mark-up and mark-down policies, merchandise budgeting, and the 
gross margin-expense-net earnings relationships. 

B.A. 157. Foreign Trade Procedure (3) — Prerequisite, B.A. 150 and 
senior standing. 

Functions of various exporting agencies; documents and procedures used 
in exporting and importing transactions. Methods of procuring goods in 
foreign countries; financing of import shipments; clearing through the 
customs districts; and distribution of goods in the United States. 

B.A. 160. Personnel Management (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 160. 

This course deals with the problems of directing and supervising em- 
ployees under modern industrial conditions. Two phases of personnel 
administration are stressed, the application of scientific management and 
the importance of human relations in this field. 

B.A. 163. Industrial Relations (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 
160 and senior standing. 

A study of the development and methods of organized groups in industry 
with reference to the settlement of labor disputes. An economic and legal 
analysis of labor union and employer association activities, arbitration, 
mediation, and conciliation; collective bargaining, trade agreements, strikes, 
boycotts, lockouts, company unions, employee representation, and injunc- 
tions. 

B.A. 164. Recent Labor Legislation and Court Decisions (3) — Prerequi- 
site, B.A. 160 and senior standing. 

Case method analysis of the modern law of industrial relations. Cases 
include the decisions of administrative agencies, courts and arbitration 
tribunals. 

B.A. 165. Office Management (3) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, junior standing. 



298 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Considers the application of the principles of scientific management in 
their application to office work. 

B.A. 166. Business Communications (3) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, junior standing. 

The principles of effective written communication in business — formal and 
informal reports, including digesting of information, organizing for pre- 
sentation, methods of handling various types of information, and physical 
set-up; the various types of business letters; special consideration will be 
given to application letters. 

B. A. 167. Job Evaluation and Merit Rating (2) — Prerequisite B. A. 160. 

The investigation of the leading job evaluation plans used in industry, 
study of the development and administrative procedures, analyzing jobs and 
writing job descriptions, setting up a job evaluation plan, and relating job 
evaluation to pay scales. Study of various employee merit rating pro- 
grams, the methods of merit rating, and the uses of merit rating. 

B.A. 168. Advanced OflSce Management (3) — Second semester. Prerequi- 
site, B.A. 165 and senior standing. 

A study of the policies, systems, practices used to promote the effective 
utilization of the office functions. Among the subjects studied will be organ- 
ization, standards determination, procedures, scheduling, layout, and process 
charting. The above techniques will be used in analyzing, evaluating, and 
improving the office methods found in several actual business cases. 

B. A. 169. Industrial Management (3) — Second semester. Prerequisites, 
B. A. 11 and 160. 

Studies the operation of a manufacturing enterprise. Among the topics 
covered are product development, plant location, plant layout, production 
planning and control, methods analysis, time study, job analysis, budgetary 
control, standard costs, and problems of supervision. An inspection trip 
to a large manufacturing plant is made at the latter part of the semester. 

B. A. 170. Transportation Services and Regulation (3) — Prerequisite, 
Econ. 32 or 37. 

A general course covering the five fields of transportation, their develop- 
ment, services and regulation. (This course is a prerequisite for all other 
transportation courses.) 

B. A. 171. Industrial and Commercial Traffic Management (3) — Pre- 
requisite, B. A. 170. 

Covers the details of classification and rate construction for ground and 
air transportation. Actual experiences in handling tariffs and classifica- 
tions is provided. It is designed for students interested in the practical 
aspects of shipping and receiving and is required for all majors in Trans- 
portation Administration. 

B. A. 172. Motor Transportation (3) — Prerequisite, B. A. 170. 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 299 

The place of the motor transport industry, development, uses in distribu- 
tion, competitive situations, organization, regulation. 

B. A. 173. Overseas Shipping (3) — Prerequisite, B. A. 170. 

The ocean carrier, development of services, types, trade routes, company 
organization, ship brokers and freight forwarders, the American Merchant 
Marine as a factor in national activity. 

B. A. 174. Commercial Air Transportation (3) — Prerequisite, B.A. 170. 

The air transportation system of the United States: airways, airports, 
airlines. Federal regulation of air transportation. Problems and services 
of commercial air transportation: economics, equipment, operations, financ- 
ing, selling of passenger and cargo services. Air mail development and 
services. 

B. A. 175. Airline Administration (3) — Prerequisite, B.A. 174. 

Practices, systems and methods of airline management; actual work in 
handling details and forms required in planning and directing maintenance, 
operations, accounting and traffic transactions, study of airline operations 
and other manuals of various companies. 

B. A. 176. Problems in Airport Management (3) — Prerequisite, B.A. 174. 

Airports classified, aviation interests and community needs, airport plan- 
ning, construction, building problems. Airports and the courts. Manage- 
ment, financing, operations, revenue sources. 

B. A. 177. Motion Economy and Time Study (3) — Prerequisite B. A. 169. 

A study of the principles of motion economy, simo charts, micromotion 
study, the fundamentals of time study, job evaluation, observations, stand- 
ard times, allowances, formula construction, and wage payment plans. 

B. A. 178. Production Planning and Control (2) — Prerequisite B. A. 169. 

An analysis of the man-, material-, and machine requirements for pro- 
duction according to the several types of manufacture. The development 
and application of inventory records, load charts, production orders, sched- 
ules, production reports, progress reports and control reports. One lecture 
period and one laboratory period each week. 

B. A. 179. Problems in Supervision (3) — Prerequisite B. A. 169. 

A case study course of supervisory problems divided into difficulties with 
subordinates, with associates and with superiors. The purposes of the 
course are to apply general principles of industrial management to concrete 
cases and to extract principles from a study of cases. 

B.A. 180, 181. Business Law (4, 4) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, senior standing. Required in all Bus. Adm. curriculums. 

Legal aspects of business relationships, contracts, negotiable instru- 
ments, agency, partnerships, corporations, real and personal property, and 
sales. 



300 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

B. A. 184. Public Utilities (3) — Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37 and senior 
standing. 

Using the regulated utilities industries as specific examples attention is 
focused on broad and general problems in such diverse fields as constitu- 
tional law, administrative law, public administration, government control 
of business, advanced economic theory, accounting, valuation and deprecia- 
tion, taxation, finance, engineering and management. 

B.A. 189. Business and Government (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 32 or 37. Senior standing. 

A study of the role of government in modem economic life. Social control 
of business as a remedy for the abuses of business enterprise arising from 
the decline of competition. Criteria of and limitations on government regu- 
lation of private enterprise. 

B.A. 190. Life Insurance (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 
or 37. 

A general survey of life insurance: Its institutional development, selection 
of risks, mathematical calculations, contract provisions, kinds of policies, 
their functional uses, industrial and group contracts, internal management 
problems, and government supervision. 

B.A. 191. Property Insurance (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 
32 or 37. 

A study of the insurance coverages written to protect business and per- 
sonal risks arising from such hazards as fire, windstorm, ocean and inland 
transportation, fidelity, and liability. 

B.A. 194. Insurance Agency Management (3) — First semester. Pre- 
requisite, B.A. 190 or 191. 

This course deals with selected advanced topics and special coverages in 
life, old age, fire, transportation, and casualty insurance of interest to the 
insurance representative. Students are to write a report on some topic in- 
volving investigation and research. 

B.A. 195. Real Estate Principles (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 32 or 37. 

The course covers the nature and uses of real estate, real estate as a busi- 
ness, basic legal principles, construction problems and home ownership, city 
planning, and public control and ownership of real estate. 

B.A. 196. Real Estate Finance (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 32 or 37. 

This course includes various methods and techniques in the appraisal of 
real estate, in the financing of real estate operations, and in the super- 
vision of real properties. 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 301 

B.A. 197. Real Estate Management (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
B.A. 195 or 196. 

Selected advanced problems in real estate brokerage, community develop- 
ment, property valuations, governmental powers, sources and placement of 
capital funds, and management of rental buildings. Students are to write 
a report on some topic involving investigation and research. 

For Graduates 

B. A. 210. Advanced Accounting Theory (2-3) — Prerequisite B. A. Ill 
and graduate standing. 

B. A. 220. Managerial Accounting (3). 

B. A. 221, 222. Seminar in Accounting — (Arranged.) 

B. A. 226. Accounting Systems (3). 

B. A. 228. Research in Accounting — (Arranged.) 

B. A. 229. Studies of Special Problems in the Fields of Control and 
Organization — (Arranged. ) 

B. A. 240. Seminar in Financial Management (1-3) — Prerequisites, Ec. 
140, B. A. 21, B. A. 140. 

B. A. 249. Studies of Special Problems in the Field of Financial Adminis- 
tration — (Arranged.) 

B. A. 250. Problems in Sales Management (3). 

B. A. 251. Problems in Advertising (3). 

B. A. 252. Problems in Retail Store Management (3). 

B. A. 257. Seminar in Marketing Management — (Arranged.) 

B. A, 258. Research Problems in Marketing — (Arranged). 

B. A. 262. Seminar in Contemporary Trends in Labor Relations — 
(Arranged.) 

B. A. 265. Development and Trends in Industrial Management (3). 

B. A. 266. Research in Personnel Management — (Arranged.) 

B. A. 267. Research in Industrial Relations — (Arranged.) 

B. A. 269. Studies in Special Problems in Employer-Employee Relation- 
ships — (Arranged. ) 

B. A. 270. Seminar in Air Transportation (3). 

B. A. 271. Theory of Organization (3). 

B. A. 277. Seminar in Transportation (3). 

B. A. 280. Seminar in Business and Government Relationships — (Ar- 
ranged.) 

B. A. 284. Seminar in Public Utilities (3). 



302 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

B. A. 290. Seminar in Insurance (3). 
B. A. 295. Seminar in Real Estate (3). 
B. A. 299. Thesis — (Arranged.) 

ECONOMICS 

Professors Dillard, Gruchy; Associate Professor Grayson; Assistant Pro- 
fessors Cole, Root; Instructors Norton, Robinson, Measday, Trebing. 

Econ. 4, 5. Economic Developments (2, 2) — First and second semesters. 
Freshman requirements in Business Administration Curriculums. 

An introduction to modern economic institutions — their origins, develop- 
ment, and present status. Commercial revolution, industrial revolution, and 
age of mass production. Emphasis on developments in England, Western 
Europe and the United States. (Dillard and Staff.) 

Econ. 31, 32. Principles of Economics (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, sopohomore standing. Required in the Business Administra- 
tion Curriculums. 

A general analysis of the functioning of the economic system. A con- 
siderable portion of the course is devoted to a study of basic concepts and 
explanatory principles. The remainder deals with the major problems of 
the economic system. (Cole and Staff.) 

Econ. 37. Fundamentals of Economics (3) — First and second semesters. 
Not open to students who have credit in Econ. 31 and 32. Not open to 
freshmen or to B. P. A. students. 

A survey study of the general principles underlying economic activity. 
Designed to meet the needs of special technical groups such as students of 
Engineering, Home Economics, Agriculture and others who are unable to 
take the more complete course provided in Economics 31 and 32. (Staff.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Econ. 131. Comparative Economic Systems (3) — First and second se- 
mesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. 

An investigation of the theory and practice of various types of economic 
systems. The course begins with an examination and evaluation of the 
capitalistic system, and is followed by an analysis of alternative types of 
economic systems such as fascism, socialism, and communism. (Gruchy.) 

Econ. 132. Advanced Economic Principles (3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32. Required for Economics majors. 

This course is an analysis of price and distribution theory with special 
attention being paid to recent developments in the theory of imperfect 
competition. (Grayson.) 

Econ. 134. Contemporary Economic Thought (3) — Second semester. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 32 and senior standing. 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 303 

A survey of recent trends in American, English, and Continental Eco- 
nomic thought with special attention being given to the work of such 
economists as W. C. Mitchell, J. R. Commons, T. Veblem, W, Sombart, J. A. 
Hobson and other contributors to the development of enconomic thught 
since 1900. (Gruchy.) 

Econ. 136. International Economic Policies and Relations (3) — First se- 
mester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. 

A descriptive and theoretical analysis of international trade. Full con- 
sideration is given to contemporary problems facing international trade 
and to the impact of governmental policy upon international commercial 
relations. (Root.) 

Econ. 137. The Economics of National Planning (3)— First semester. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. 

An analysis of the principles and practice of economic planning with 
special reference to the planning problems of Great Britain, Russia, and 
the United States. (Gruchy.) 

Econ. 140. Money and Banking (3) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 32 or 37. 

A study of the organization, functions, and operation of our monetary, 
credit, and banking system; the relation of commercial banking to the 
Federal Reserve System; the relation of money and credit to prices; domestic 
and foreign exchange, and the impact of public policy upon banking and 
credit. (Staff.) 

Econ. 141. Theory of Money, Credit, and Prices (3) — Second semester. 
Prerequisites, Econ. 32 and 140. 

A study of recent developments in the theory of money and credit, of 
domestic and international price problems, and of monetary and credit 
policies in their relation to the problem of full employment. (Dillard.) 

Econ. 142. Public Finance and Taxation (3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. 

A study of government fiscal policy with special emphasis upon sources 
of public revenue, the tax system, government budgets, and the public 
debt. (Grayson.) 

Econ. 149. International Finance and Exchange (3) — Second semester. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 140, Econ. 136 and 141 recommended. 

This course considers the theory and practice of international finance and 
exchange. The increased importance of public authority in foreign trade, 
international policies, and finance is given due emphasis. (Root.) 

Econ. 150. Marketing Principles and Organization (3) — First and sec- 
ond semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. 

This is an introductory course in the field of marketing. Its purpose is 
to give a general understanding and appreciation of the forces operating, 



304 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

institutions employed, and methods followed in marketing agricultural 
products, natural products, services, and manufactured goods. 

(Reid and Staff.) 

Econ. 160. Labor Economics (3) — First and second semesters. Prerequi- 
site, Econ. 32 or 37. (Measday, Norton, Robinson.) 

The historical development and chief characteristics of the American labor 
movement are first surveyed. Present-day problems are then examined in 
detail: wage theories, unemployment, social security, labor organization, 
and collective bargaining. 

Econ. 170. Monoply and Competition (3) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 32 or 37. 

Growth of large-scale production, development of industrial combinations, 
the economies of vertical and horizontal combination, the anti-trust acts, 
and some conclusions as to policy in relation to competition and monoply. 
Problems of small business. 

Econ. 171. Economics of American Industries (3) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. 

A study of the technology, economics and geography of twenty representa- 
tive American industries. (Clemens.) 

For Graduates 

Econ. 200. Micro-Economic Analysis (3) — Second semester. Prere- 
quisite, Econ. 132. 

Price, output, and distribution analysis as developed by Chamberlin, 
Triffin, Hicks, and others; econometric methods, including Leontief input- 
output techniques of inter-industry analysis. Considerable attention is 
given to contributions in periodicals. (Grayson.) 

Econ. 202. Macro-Economic Analysis (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 132. 

National income accounting; determination of national income and em- 
ployment especially as related to the modern theory of effective demand; 
consumption function; multiplier and acceleration principles; the role of 
money as it affects output and employment as a whole; cyclical fluctuations. 

(Dillard.) 

Econ. 230. History of Economic Thought (3) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 132 or consent of instructor. 

A study of the development of economic thought and theories including 
the Greeks, Romans, canonists, mercantilists, physiocrats, Adam Smith, 
Malthus, Ricardo. Relation of ideas to economic policy. (Dillard.) 

Econ. 231. Economic Theory in the Nineteenth Century (3) — Second 
semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 230 or consent of the instructor. 

A study of various nineteenth and twentieth century schools of economic 
thought, particularly the classicists, neo-classicists, Austrians, German his- 
torical school, American economic thought, and the socialists. (Dillard.) 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 305 

Econ. 232, 233. Seminar in Economic Theory (3, 3)— First and second 
semesters. 

A study of recent developments in the field of economic theory in the 
United States and abroad. (Gruchy.) 

Econ. 236. Seminar in International Economic Relations (3) — (Ar- 
ranged.) A study of selected problsms in International Economic Rela- 
tions. (Root.) 

Econ. 237. Seminar in Economic Investigation (3). 

Econ. 240. Comparative Banking Systems (3). 

Individual research under faculty guidance of special problems in the 
field of government finance and taxation. 

Econ. 270. Seminar in Economics and Geography of American Indus- 
tries (3) — (Arranged.) (Clemens.) 

Econ. 299. Thesis— (Arranged.) 

GEOGRAPHY 

Professors Van Royen, Hu, ; Consulting Professor Joerg; 

Lecturers with rank of Professor Lemons, McBryde; Assistant Professors 

Anderson, Karinen, Patton; Instructors Dozier, Deshler, Firman; Research 

Associate Battersby; Research Assistants Allen, Kelley. 

Geog. 1, 2. Economic Resources (2, 2) — ^First and second semesters. One 
lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week for Geog. 1; two lecture 
periods for Geog. 2. Freshman requirement in the Business Administration 
Curriculums. 

General comparative study of the geographic factors underlying produc- 
tion economics. Emphasis upon climate, soils, land forms, agricultural 
products, power resources, and major minerals, concluding with brief sur- 
vey of geography of commerce and manufacturing. (Patton and Staff.) 

Geog. 4. Regional Geography of the Continents I. The New World (2) 

— First semester. 

Study of the Americas vdth emphasis upon human geography and the 
underlying physical factors. Discussion of some of the major problems 
arising therefrom. Of particular value to students in the field of education. 

Geog. 5. Regional Geography of the Continents II. The Old World (2) 

— Second semester. 

Study of Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia with emphasis on human 
geography and the underlying physical factors. Discussion of some of the 
major problems resulting therefrom. Intended especially for students and 
teachers in the field of education. 

Geog, 10, 11. General Geography (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 
Required of all majors in geography, and recommended for all minors. 



306 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Introduction to geography as a field of study. A survey of the content 
of geography, with emphasis on social geography. The philosophy, tech- 
niques, and applications of geography and its significance for the under- 
standing of world problems. 

Geog. 30. Principles of Morphology (3) — First semester. 

A study of the physical features of the earth's surface and their 
geographic distribution, including subordinate land forms. Major morpho- 
logical processes, the development of land forms, and the relationships 
between various types of land forms and land use problems. (Van Royen.) 

Geog. 35. Map Reading and Interpretation (3) — First and second se- 
mesters. 

Designed to familiarize the student with various types of maps, their 
functions and limitations. Introduction to map projections and their 
adaptability to different purposes. Emphasis upon characteristics and 
interpretation of topographic maps. (Karinen.) 

Geog. 40. Principles of Meteorology (3) — First semester. 

An introductory study of the weather. Properties and conditions of 
the atmosphere, and methods of measurement. The atmospheric circula- 
tion and conditions responsible for various types of weather and their 
geographic distribution patterns. Practical applications. (Anderson.) 

Geog. 41. Introductory Climatology (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite 
Geog. 40, or permission of the instructor. 

Climatic elements and their controls, the classification and distribution 
of world climates, and relevance of climatic differences to human activ- 
ities. (Anderson.) 

Geog. 50. Problems of Cartographic Representation (3) — First or sec- 
ond semester. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory a week. Pre- 
requisite Geog. 30 and 35, or equivalent. 

Introduction to theory of projections. Study of principles and problems 
of representation of natural features according to map scales, and of 
generalization and symbolization; also of classification, representation, and 
generalization of cultural features, including place-name selection. 

(Davies, Geological Survey.) 

Geog. 90. Problems of Cartographic Procedure (3) — First or second 
semester. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory a week. Prerequi- 
site Geog. 30. 

Study of compilation methods and their relationship to drafting and 
reproduction methods, including basic concepts of compilation, criteria used 
in the selection of methods of transfer, relationships of reproduction meth- 
ods to the degree of accuracy, drafting methods in compilation and in color- 
separation work, and analysis of type styles and their uses. 

(Skop, Army Map Service.) 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 307 

Geog. 100, 101. Regional Geography of the United States and Canada 
(3, 3) — First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Geog. 1, 2, or Geog. 
10, 11, or permission of the instructor. 

A study of regional diversity of the natural and human resources of 
the two countries, and the economic activities and settlement patterns of 
the population. (Anderson.) 

Geog. 105. Geography of Maryland (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
permission of instructor. 

An analysis of the physical environment, natural resources, and position 
of the state in relation to its agriculture, industry, transport, and trade. 
Field trips when possible. (Anderson.) 

Geog. 110, 111. Latin America (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 

Regional geography of the Latin American republics; an analysis of the 
physical environment and the natural resources, and a survey of the his- 
torical and cultural development. (McBryde.) 

Geog. 120. Economic Geography of Europe (3) — First semester. 
The natural resources of Europe in relation to agricultural and industrial 
development and to present-day economic and national problems. 

(Van Royen.) 

Geog. 122. Economic Recources and Development of Africa (3) — Second 
semester. 

The natural resources of Africa in relation to agricultural and mineral 
production; the various stages of econonrco development and the potentialities 
of the future. (Van Royen.) 

Geog. 123. Problems of Colonial Geography (3) — First or second 
semester. 

Problems of development of colonial areas, with special emphasis upon 
the development of tropical regions and the possibilities of white settle- 
ment in the tropics. 

Geog. 130, 131. Economic and Political Geography of Southern and East- 
ern Asia (3, 3) — First and second semesters. 

A study of China, Japan, India, Burma, Indo-China, and the East Indies; 
natural resources, population, and economic activities. Comparisons of phys- 
ical and human potentialities of major regions and of their economic, social, 
and political development. (Hu.) 

Geog. 134, 135. Cultural Geography of East Asia (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. 

A comprehensive and systematic survey of the geographical distribution 
and interpretation of the major racial groups and cultural patterns of 
China, Japan, and Korea. Special emphasis will be placed on the unique 
characteristics of the peoples of these areas, their basic cultural institu- 
tions, outlooks on life, contemporary problems, and trends of cultural change. 



308 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Designed especially for students of the social sciences, and those preparing 
for careers in foreign service, foreign trade, education, and international 
relations. (Hu.) 

Geog. 140. Soviet Lands (3) — First or second semester. 

The natural environment and its regional diversity. Geographic factors 
in the expansion of the Russian State. The geography of agricultural 
and industrial production, in relation to available resources, transportation 
problems, and diversity of population. 

Geog. 146. The Near East (3) — First semester. 

The physical, economic, political, and strategic geography of the lands 
between the Mediterranean and India, 

Geog. 150. Problems of Map Evaluation I. Topographic Maps (3) — 

First or second semester. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory a 
week. Prerequisite, Geog. 30. 

Review of status of topographic mapping with consideration of important 
schools of topographic concepts and practices. Theoretical and practical 
means of determining map reliability and utility, including studies of map 
coverage. Emphasis on methods of preparation of data for compilation 
purposes, including a study of types of source materials. Methods of map 
cataloging and bibliography are given brief consideration. 

(Davies, Geological Survey.) 

Geog. 151. Problems of Map Evaluation II. Non-topographic Special- 
use Maps (3) — First or second semester. Two-hour lecture and two hours 
laboratory a week. Prerequisite, Geog. 150. 

Deals exclusively with non-topographic special-use maps used in the 
fields of geology, pedology, climatology, forestry and botany, geography, 
economics, agricultural economics, demography, transportation and com- 
munication, military science, and certain other special fields. Each type 
is studied from the viewpoint of history, basic criteria upon which the 
selection of features and scales is determined, methods of representation 
and preparation, interpretation, and availability of source materials. Field 
trips when possible. (Brierly, Army Map Service.) 

Geog. 152. Problems and Practices of Photo Interpretation (3) — First 
or second semester. Two-hour lecture and two hours laboratory a week. 
Prerequisite, Geog. 31, or equivalent. 

Reading and interpretation of aerial photographs with emphasis on topo- 
graphic features. Study of limitations of photo interpretations. Interpre- 
tations of soil, geologic, vegetation, and military data. 

Geog. 154, 155. General Cartography and Graphics (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. One lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, Geog. 30 or consent of instructor. 

Problems and techniques of compilation, design, construction, and repro- 
duction of the various types of maps and graphic materials. Laboratory 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 309 

exercises are directed primarily toward the solution of actual cartographic 
problems encountered by the geographer. (Karinen.) 

Geog. 158. Elementary Toponymy (3) — First or second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Geog. 30 and one foreign language. 

Problems of place-name analysis as related to cartography, especially 
those involved in making and interpreting foreign maps, the langauge as- 
pects of gazetteers, and the problems of compilation of cartographic dic- 
tionaries. The course will close with a review of the linguistic aspects of 
air charts, hydrographic charts, and the International Map of the World. 

(Aiken, Army Map Service.) 

Geog. 160. Advanced Economic Geography I. Agricultural Resources 

(3) — First semester. Prerequisite, Geog. 1 and 2, or Geog. 10 and 11. 

The nature of agricultural resources, the major types of agricultural 
exploitation in the world, and the geographic distribution of certain major 
crops and animals in relation to the physical environment and economic 
geographic conditions. Main problems of conservation. (Van Royen.) 

Geog. 161. Advanced Economic Geography II. Mineral Resources (3) — 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Geog. 1 and 2, or Geog. 10 and 11. 

The nature and geographic distribution of the principal power, metallic, 
and other minerals. Economic geographic aspects of modes of exploita- 
tion. Consequences of geographic distribution and problems of conserva- 
tion. (Van Royen.) 

Geog. 170. Local Field Course (3) — First semester. 

Training in geographic field methods and techniques. Field observation 
of land use in selected rural and urban areas in eastern Maryland. One 
lecture per week with Saturday and occasional weekend field trips. Pri- 
marily for undergraduates. (Karinen.) 

Geog. 180, 181. History, Nature and Methodology of Geography (3, 3) — 

First and second semesters. 

A comprehensive and systematic study of the history, nature, and basic 
principles of geography, with special reference to the major schools of 
geographic thought; a critical evaluation of some of the important geo- 
graphical works and methods of geographic research. (Hu.) 

Geog. 190. Political Geography (3) — Second semester. 
Geographical factors in national power and international relations. 
"Geopolitics" and "geostrategy." 

Geog. 195. Geography of Transportation (3) — Second semester. 

The distribution of transport routes on the earth's surface; patterns of 
transport routes; the adjustment of transport routes and media to condi- 
tions of the natural environment; transportation centers and their dis- 
tribution. (Patton.) 



310 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Geog. 197. Urban Geography (3) — First semester. 

Origins of cities, followed by a study of the elements of site and loca- 
tion with reference to cities. The patterns and functions of some major 
world cities will be analyzed. Theories of land use differentiation within 
cities will be appraised. (Patton.) 

Geog. 199. Topical Investigations (1 to 3) — First and second semesters. 

Independent study under individual guidance. Choice of subject matter 
ploitation of mineral resources, and land utilization. Prerequisite, Geog. 
raphy. Restricted to advanced undergraduate students with credit for at 
least 24 hours of geography. (Staff.) 

Geog. 200. Field Course (3) — Field work in September, conferences and 
reports during first semester. 

Practical experience in conducting geographic field studies. Intensive 
training in field methods and techniques and in the preparation of reports. 
For graduate students in geography. Open to other students by special 
permission of the head of the Department of Geography. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

Geog. 210, 211. Seminar in the Geography of Latin America (3, 3) — 

First and second semesters. 

An analysis of recent changes and trends in industrial development, ex- 
ploitation of mineral resources, and land utilization. Prerequisite, Geog. 
110, 111 or consent of instructor. (McBryde.) 

Geog. 220, 221. Seminar in the Geography of Europe and Africa (3, 3) 

— First and second semesters. 

Analysis of special problems concerning the resources and development 
of Europe and Africa. Prerequisite, Geog. 120 or 122, or consent of in- 
structor. (Van Royen.) 

Geog. 230, 231. Seminar in the Geography of China (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. 

Analysis of problems concerning the geography of China, with emphasis 
on techniques peculiar to Chinese geographical research. (Hu.) 

Geog. 240, 241. Seminar in the Geography of the U. S. S. R. (3, 3)— 

First and second semesters. 

Investigation of special aspects of Soviet geography. Emphasis on the 
use of Soviet materials. Prerequisite, reading knowledge of Russian and 
Geog. 140, or consent of instructor. 

Geog. 246. Seminar in the Geography of the Near East (3) — First and 
second semesters. 

Geog. 250. Seminar in Cartography (credit arranged) — First or second 
semester. 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 311 

The historical and mathematical background of cartographic concepts, 
practices, and problems, and the various philosophical and practical ap- 
proaches to cartography. Discussions will be supplemented by the presen- 
tation of specific cartographic problems investigated by the students. 

(Karinen and Davies.) 

Geog. 260. Advanced General Climatology (3) — First semester. Pre- 
requisite Geog. 42, or consent of instructor. 

Advanced study of elements and controls of the earth's climates. Prin- 
ciples of climatic classification. Special analysis of certain climatic types. 

(Lemons.) 

Geog. 261. Applied Climatology (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite 
Geog. 42, or consent of instructor. 

Study of principles, techniques, and data of micro-climatology, physical 
and regional climatology relating to such problems and fields as trans- 
portation, agriculture, industry, urban planning, human comfort, and 
regional geographic analysis, (Lemons.) 

Geog. 262, 263. Seminar in Meteorology and Climatology (3, 3) — First 
and second semesters. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Selected topics in meteorology and climatology chosen to fit the indi- 
vidual needs of advanced students. (Lemons.) 

Geog. 280. Geomorphology (3) — Second semester. 

An advanced comparative study of selected geomorphic processes and 
land forms; theories of land forms evolution and geomorphological prob- 
lems. (Van Royen.) 

Geog. 290, 291. Selected Topics in Geography (1 to 3)— First and sec- 
ond semesters. 

Readings and discussion on selected topics in the field of geography. 
To be taken only with joint consent of adviser and head of the Depart- 
ment of Geography. (Staff.) 

Geog. 292, 293. Dissertation Research (Credit to be arranged) — First 
and second semesters and summer. 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

Professors Burdette, Ray, Starr, and Steinmeyer; Associate Professor 

Plischke; Assistant Professors Anderson, Dixon, and Johnson; Instructors 

Biggs, Goostree, Hester, and Padgett. 

G. and P. 1. American Government (3) — Each semester. 

This course is designed as the basic course in government for the Ameri- 
can Civilization program, and it or its equivalent is a prerequisite to all 
other courses in the Department. It is a comprehensive study of govern- 
ments in the United States — national, state, and local — and of their adjust- 
ment to changing social and economic conditions. 



312 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

G. and P. 4. State Government and Administration (3) — First semester. 
Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. 

A study of the organization and functions of state government in the 
United States, with special emphasis upon the government of Maryland. 

G. and P. 5. Local Government and Administration (3) — Second semes- 
ter. Prerequisite G. & P. 1. 

A study of the organization and functions of local government in the 
United States, with special emphasis upon the government of Maryland 
cities and counties. 

G. and P. 7. The Government of the British Commonwealth (2) — First 
semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. 

A study of the governments of the United Kingdom and the British 
Dominions. 

G. and P. 8. The Governments of Continental Europe (2) — Second semes- 
ter. Prerequisite G. & P. 1, 

A comparative study of the governments of France, Switzerland, Italy, 
Germany, and the Scandinavian countries. 

G. and P. 9. The Governments of Latin America (2) — First semester. 
Prerequisite G. & P. 1. 

A comparative study of Latin American governments, with special em- 
phasis on Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico. 

G. and P. 10. The Governments of Russia and the Far East (2) — Second 
semester. Prerequisite G. & P. 1. 

A study of the governments of Russia, China, and Japan. 
G. & P. 97. Major Foreign Governments (3). 

An examination of characteristic governmental institutions and political 
processes in selected major powers, such as Britain, Russia, France, Ger- 
many, Italy, Japan, and China. Students may not receive credit in this 
course and also obtain credit in G. & P. 7, 8, or 10. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

G. and P. 101. International Political Relations (3) — First semester. 
Prerequisite G. & P. 1. 

A study of the major factors underlying international relations, the 
influence of geography, climate, nationalism, and imperialism, and the 
development of international organization, with emphasis on the United 
Nations. 

G. and P. 102. — International Law (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite 
G. & P. 1. 

Fundamental principles governing the relations of states, including mat- 
ters of jurisdiction over landed territory, water, airspace, and persons; 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 313 

treatment of aliens; treaty-making; diplomacy; and the laws of war and 
neutrality. 

G. and P. 105. Recent Far Eastern Politics (3) — First semester. Pre- 
requisite G. & P. 1. 

The background and interpretation of recent political events in the Far 
East and their influence on world politics. 

G. and P. 106. American Foreign Relations (3) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite G. & P. 1. 

The principles and machinery of the conduct of American foreign rela- 
tions, with emphasis on the Department of State and the Foreign Service, 
and an analysis of the major foreign policies of the United States. 

G. and P. 110. Principles of Public Administration (3) — First semester. 
Prerequisite G. & P. 1. 

A study of public administration in the United States, giving special 
attention to the principles of organization and management and to fiscal, 
personnel, planning, and public relations practices. 

G. and P. 111. Public Personnel Administration (3) — First semester. 
Prerequisite G. & P. 110 or B. A. 160. 

A survey of public personnel administration, including the development 
of merit civil service, the personnel agency, classification, recruitment, 
examination techniques, promotion, service ratings, training, discipline, 
employee relations, and retirement. 

G. and P. 112. Public Financial Administration (3) — Second semester. 
Prerequisite G. & P. 110 or Econ. 142. 

A survey of governmental financial procedures, including processes of 
current and capital budgeting, the administration of public borrowing, the 
techniques of public purchasing, and the machinery of control through pre- 
audit and post-audit. 

G. and P. 124. Legislatures and Legislation (3) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite G. & P. 1. 

A comprehensive study of legislative organization, procedure, and prob- 
lems. The course includes opportunities for student contact with Congress 
and with the legislature of Maryland. 

G. and P. 131, 132. Constitutional Law (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite G. & P. 1. 

A systematic inquiry into the general principles of the American con- 
stitutional system, with special reference to the role of the judiciary in 
the interpretation and enforcement of the federal constitution; the position 
of the states in the federal system; state and federal powers over commerce; 
due process of law and other civil rights. 



314 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

G. and P. 133. Administration of Justice (3) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite G. & P. 1. 

An examination of civil and criminal court structure and procedures in 
the United States at all levels of government, virith special emphasis upon 
the federal judiciary. 

G. and P. 141. History of Political Theory (3) — First semester. Prerequi- 
site G. & P. 1. 

A survey of the principal political theories set forth in the works of 
writers from Plato to Bentham. 

G. and P. 142. Recent Political Theory (3) — Second semester. Prerequi- 
site G. & P. 1. 

A study of 19th and 20th century political thought, with special emphasis 
on recent theories of socialism, communism, and fascism. 

G. and P. 144. American Political Theory (3) — First semester. Prerequi- 
site G. & P. 1. 

A study of the development and growth of American political concepts 
from the colonial period to the present. 

G. and P. 154. Problems of World Politics (3) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisite G. & P. 1. 

A study of governmental problems of international scope, such as causes 
of war, problems of neutrality, and propaganda. Students are required 
to report on readings from current literature. 

G. and P. 174. Political Parties (3) — First semester. Prerequisite G. & 
P. 1. 

A descriptive and analytical examination of American political parties, 
nominations, elections, and political leadership. 

G. and P. 178. Public Opinion (3) — First semester. Prerequisite G. & P. 1. 

An examination of public opinion and its effect on political action, with 
emphasis on opinion formation and measurement, propaganda, and pressure 
groups. 

G. and P. 181. Administrative Law (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite 
G. & P. 1. 

A study of the discretion exercised by administrative agencies, including 
analysis of their functions, their powers over persons and property, their 
procedures, and judicial sanctions and controls. 

G. & P. 197. Comparative Governmental Institutions (3) — Second semes- 
ter. Prerequisite G. and P. 1. 

A careful study of major political institutions, such as legislatures, 
executives, courts, administrative systems, and political parties, in selected 
foreign governments. 

American Civilization 137, 138. Conference in American Civilization 

(3, 3) — First and second semesters. 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 315 

The student's acquaintance with American Civilization is brought to a 
focus through the analytical study of eight to ten important books, such 
as Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America, Nathaniel Hawthorne, 
The Scarlet Letter, Thorstein Veblen, The Theory of the Leisure Class, and 
Gunnar Myrdal, An American Dilemma. Specialists from related depart- 
ments participate in the conduct of the course. 

For Graduates 

G. and P. 201. Seminar in International Political Organization (3). 

A study of the forms and functions of various international organizations. 

G. and P. 202. Seminar in International Law (3). 

Reports on selected topics assigned for individual study and reading in 
substantive and procedural international law. 

G. and P. 205. Seminar in American Political Institutions (3). 
Reports on topics assigned for individual study and readings in the back- 
ground and development of American government. 

G. and P. 207. Seminar in Comparative Governmental Institutions (3). 

Reports on selected topics assigned for individual study and reading in 
governmental and political institutions in governments throughout the 
world. 

G. and P. 211. Seminar in Federal-State Relations (3). 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the field 
of recent federal-state relations. 

G. and P. 213. Problems of Public Administration (3). 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the field 
of public administration. 

G. and P. 214. Problems of Public Personnel Administration (3). 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the field 
of public personnel administration. 

G. and P. 215. Problems of State and Local Government in Maryland 
(3). 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study in the field of Maryland 
state and local government. 

G. and P, 216. Government Administrative Planning and Management 
(3). 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in administra- 
tive planning and management in government. 

G. and P. 217. Government Corporations and Special Purpose Authori- 
ties (3). 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the use of 
the corporate form for governmental administration. The topics for study 
will relate to the use of the corporate form as an administrative technique, 



316 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAXD 

as in the cases of the Ter.r.essee VaDev Authority, the Port of New York 
Authority, and local housing authorities. 

G. and P. 221. Seminar in Public Opinion (3). 

Reports on topics assigr.ed for ir.di%'idual study and reading in the field 
of public opinion. 

G. and P. 223. Seminar in Leg-islatures and Legislation (3). 
Pvepcrts on ::pi:s assigned for indi-.-idu£i srudy and reading about the com- 
position and organization of legislatures and about liie legislative process. 

G. and P. 224. Seminar in Political Parties and Politics (3). 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the fields 
of political organization and action. 

G. and P. 223. Man and the State (3). 

Individual reading and reports on such recurring concepts in political 
theory as i:'::er:y, equality, justice, natural law and natural rights, private 

property, sovereignty, nationalism,, and the organic state. 

G. and P. 231. Seminar in Public Law (3). 

Reports or. topics assigned ::r ir. liviiuai study and reading in the fields 
01 constitutrona^ anc aorr.".r.istrative .av,'. 

G. and P. 251. Bibliography of Gorernment and Politics (3). 

Stirvey of the literarure of the various fields of government and politics 

and instructicn in the use of government documents. 

G. and P. 261. Research in Government and Politics (3). 

Credit according to vrork accomplished. 

G. and P. 2S1. Departmental Seminar (No Credit). 

Tories as selected by the graouate stair of the department. Registration 
for t"': si-rnesters required o: aii dictoral candidates. Conducted by the 
entire departmental staf ir. :ui: meeting. 

G. and P. 299. Thesis Course (Arranged). 

JOURNALISM AND PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Professor Crov.-eli; Associate lo-fes? r Krin^el; Instructor Danegger; 

L.:v-oe: H:::eL 

Journ. 10. News Reporting I (3) — First semester. Two lectures, two 
laboratory periods each week. Prereqtii sites, Eng. 1, 2. 

Ftmdamentals of professional reporting. Laboratory time spent in 
writing news-story exercises assigned by instructor. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Journ. 11. News Reporting II (3) — First semester. Two lectures, two 
laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite, Joum. 10. 

More specialized types of news stories. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 



BUSIXESS AXD PUBLIC ADMIXISTRATIOX 317 

Journ. 12. Newsroom Problems (3) — Second semester. Prerequisite, 
sophomore standing. 

Journ. 160. News Editing I (3) — First semester. Two lectures, two 
laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite, Journ. 11. 

Copy editing, proofreading. Laboratory time spent in preparing assign- 
mants made by instructor. Laboratory fee, §3.00. 

Journ. 161. News Editing II (3) — Second semester. Two lectures, two 
laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite, Journ. 160. 
Headwriting, makeup. Laboratory fee, §3.00. 

Journ. 165. Feature Writing (3) — First semester. Two lectures, two 
laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite, Journ. 11. 
Production of newspaper features. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Journ. 166. Publicity Techniques (3) — Second semester. Two lectures, 
two laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite, Journ. 11. 
Techniques and media used in professional publicity work. 

Journ. 170. Public Relations (3) — First semester. Prerequisite, Journ. 
11. 

Survey of media used in public relations; objectives, principles, methods. 

Journ. 171. Industrial Journalism (2) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
Journ. 11. 

Introduction to problems of company publications. 

Journ. 17.5. Reporting of Public Affairs (3) — Second semester. Two lec- 
tures per week and laboratory. Prerequisite, Journ. 11. 

Advanced reporting covering city, county, federal beats. Student spends 
four to six hours per week attending sessions of courts, councils, com- 
missions, writing up news and features. Laboratory fee, S3. 00. 

Introduction to newsroom problems, ethics of journalism. 

Journ. 181. Press Photography (3) — First and second semesters.. One 
lecture, six laboratory hours each week. Prerequisite, at least junior stand- 
ing in journalism or public relations major. 

Shooting, developing, printing of news and feature pictures. Speed 
Graphic cameras provided by University. Student pro\'ides supplies needed 
in the course. 

Journ. 184. Picture Editing (2) — First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, Journ. 181. 

Handling of pictures for the press. 

Journ. 191. Law of the Press (2) — Second semester. Prerequisite, senior 
standing. 

Introduction to laws of libel, right of privacy, fair comment and criticism, 
privilege, Maryland press statutes. 



318 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Journ. 192. History of American Journalism (2) — First semester. Pre- 
requisite, senior standing. 

Evolution of American newspaper from its beginning, 

Journ. 194. Public Relations Ethics (2) — First semester. Prerequisite, 
senior standing. 

The role of management in formulating standards of ethics, practices, 
policies in professional public relations. 

Journ. 195. Seminar in Public Relations (2) — Second semester. For 
public relations majors in senior year. 

Simple research problems in public relations. 

OFFICE TECHNIQUES AND MANAGEMENT 

Associate Professor Patrick; Instructors O'Neill, Thomas, Baginski 

and Nigro. 

O. T. 1. Principles of Typewriting (2) — First and second semesters. 
Five laboratory periods per week. Laboratory fee, $7.50. 

The goal of this course is the attainment of the ability to operate the 
typewriter continuously with reasonable speed and accuracy by the use of 
the "touch" system. This course should be completed prior to enrollment in 
0. T. 12, Principles of Shorthand. 

O. T. 2. Intermediate Typewriting (2) — First and second semesters. Five 
periods per week. Laboratory fee, $7.50. Prerequisite, minimum grade of 
"C" in 0. T. 1 or consent of instructor. 

The aim of this course is to teach the fundamentals of letter writing and 
to continue the development of speed typing. Problems in business letter 
styles and forms, arrangement of letters, tabulation, and exercises for 
improving stroking skill will be used. 

O. T. 10. Office Typewriting Problems (2) — First and second semesters. 
Five periods per week. Laboratory fee, $7.50. Prerequisite, minimum grade 
of "C" in 0. T. 2 or consent of instructor. 

In this course the aims are to develop the highest degree of accuracy and 
speed possible for each student and to teach the advanced techniques of 
typewriting with special emphasis on production. 

O. T. 12, 13. Principles of Shorthand (4, 4) — First and second semesters. 
Five periods per week. Prerequisite, O. T. 1, and consent of instructor. 

This course aims to develop the mastery of the principles of Gregg Short- 
hand. The reading approach is used, stressing reading and writing from 
copy and dictation. 

*0. T. 16. Advanced Shorthand (3) — First semester. Five periods per 
week. Prerequisite, minimum grade of "C" in O. T. 13 and O .T, 2 or 
consent of instructor. 



• O. T, 10 should be completed prior to enrollment in Advanced Shorthand (O. T. 16) ; 
O, T. Ifi, Advanced Shorthand, and O. T. 17, Gregg Transcription, must be taken concurrently. 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 319 

Advanced principles and phrases of shorthand; dictation covering vocabu- 
laries of representative businesses; development of dictation skill to maxi- 
mum for each individual. 

O. T. 17. Gregg Transcription (2) — First semester. Four periods per 
week. Laboratory fee, $7.50. Prerequisite, minimum grade of "C" in 0. T. 
13 and O. T. 2 or consent of instructor. This course is to be taken concur- 
rently with 0. T. 16. 

A course in intensive transcriptional speed building, and in the related 
skills and knowledges. 

O. T. 18. Gregg Shorthand Dictation (3) — Second semester. Five periods 
per week. Prerequisite, minimum grade of "C" in O. T. 16 and 0. T. 17, 
or consent of instructor. 

A special course in shorthand speed building with emphasis placed on 
the development of a special shorthand vocabulary. 

O. T. 110. Secretarial Work (3) — First semester. Six periods per week. 
Prerequisite, 0. T. Ill and 0. T. 112 or consent of instructor. 

This course is designed to cover specific and general information in addi- 
tion to the stenographic skills needed by a secretary. Units will be as- 
signed on communication procedures and cost, installation and revision of 
files, selection of office equipment and supplies, editorial duties, compilation 
of statistical data, and use of reference books. It is assumed that steno- 
graphic skills are obtained from other sources. 

0. T. 111. Office Machines (3) — First and second semesters. Six periods 
per week. Prerequisites, 0. T. 2 and junior standing. Laboratory fee, $7.50. 

A course designed to give the students training in the use of modern 
office devices — duplicators, calculators, voice writing machines, and other 
common office equipment. Some attention is given to supervision of small 
groups of office workers. 

0. T. 112. Filing (2) — First and second semesters. Prerequisite, junior 
standing. Laboratory fee, $7.50. 

The development of the principles, procedures, and systems of filing with 
the use of laboratory sets. Particular emphasis will be placed on how 
each system may be used. 

0. T. 114. Secretarial Office Practice (3) — First and second semesters. 
Six times per week. Prerequisite, senior standing and completion of 0. T. 110. 

The purpose of this course is to give laboratory and office experience to 
senior secretarial students. A minimum of 90 hours of office experience 
under supervision is required. In addition, each student will prepare a 
\vritten report on an original problem previously approved. 




THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 

College Park, Md. 



College of 

EDUCATION 

STAFF 

Wilbur Devilbiss, Ed.D., Dean 

Arthur Ahalt, M.A., Professor and Head, Agricultural Education, 

Walcott H. Beatty, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education, Institute 
for Child Study. 

Henry Brechbilx,, Ph.D., Professor of Education and Assistant Dean. 

Glen D. Brown, M.A., Professor and Head, Department of Industrial 
Education. 

Marie D. Bryan, M.A., Associate Professor of Education. 

Richard H. Byrne, M.A., Associate Professor of Education. 

Mary Carl, Ph.D., Assistant Professor and Educational Adviser, Baltimore 
'^^ Division, College of Special and Continuation Studies. 

Harold F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

Vienna Curtiss, M.A., Professor and Head, Department of Practical Arts. 
VOMarie Denecke, M.A., Assistant Professor of Education. 

Wilbur Devilbiss, Ed.D., Professor of Education and Dean. 

Glenn C. Dildine, Ph.D., Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study. 

Stanley J. Drazek, Ph.D., Assistant Dean, College of Special and Con- 
tinuation Studies. 

Rosemary Flannery, B.S., Instructor in Nursery School-Kindergarten 
^^^ Education. 

[_^ Florence M. Gipe, M.S., R.N., Ed.D., Dean, Division of Nursing Education 
and Nursing Service, University Hospital. 
Christine Glass, M.A., Instructor in Nursery School-Kindergarten Educa- 
tion. 

Ira J. Gordon, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Education, Institute for 
Child Study. 

John D. Greene, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Education, Institute for 
Child Study. 

Ruth E. Henry, B.A., Instructor in Nursery School-Kindergarten Educa- 
tion. 

R. Lee Hornbake, Ph.D., Professor of Industrial Education. 
Mary F. Kemble, M.S., Instructor in Music and Music Education. ' 
John J. Kurtz, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education, Institute for 
Child Study. 

Harry B. McCarthy, D.D.S., M.A., Director of Clinics, School of Dentistry. 

321 j: -.^ 



I 



y 



322 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Laitra p. MacCartney, Instructor in Nursery School-Kindergarten Edu- 
cation. 

Edna B. McNaughton, M.A., Professor of Nursery School-Kindergarten 
Education. 

Donald Maley, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Industrial Education. 

Jack L. Mason, M.A., Graduate Assistant, Institute for Child Study. 

Nancy C. Mellon, B.S., Instructor in Nursery School-Kindergarten Edu- 
cation. 

John W. Meracle, B.A., Graduate Assistant, Institute for Child Study. 

Madelaine J. Mershon, Ph.D., Professor of Education, Institute for 
Child Study. 

Dorothy R. Mohr, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Physical Education. 

H. Gerthon Morgan, Ph.D., Professor of Education, Institute for Child 
Study. 

John R. Moyer, B.A., Research Assistant, Institute for Child Study. 

Clarence A. Newell, Ph.D., Professor of Educational Administration. 

Arthur S. Patrick, M.A., Associate Professor of Business Education. 

Hugh Perkins, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education, Institute for 
Child Study. 

Alice M. Powejll, B.A., Instructor in Nursery School-Kindergarten Edu- 
cation. 

Daniel A. Prescott, Ed.D., Professor of Education and Director, Institute 
for Child Study. 

Olive Renfro, M.Ed., Graduate Assistant, Institute for Child Study. 

Alvin W. Schindler, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

Harry E. Seidel, B.S., Research Assistant, Institute for Child Study. 

Corrine Shulman, B.S., Instructor in Nursery School-Kindergarten Edu- 
cation. 

Mabel S. Spencer, M.S., Assistant Professor of Home Economics Edu- 
cation. 

Margaret A. Stant, B.S., Instructor in Nursery School-Kindergarten 
Education. 

Charles T. Stewart, M.A., Instructor in Education. 

Carl Tatum, M.Ed., Graduate Assistant, Institute for Child Study. 

Fred Thompson, M.A,, Fellow, Institute for Child Study. 

William F. Tierney, M.A., Instructor in Industrial Education. 

James A. Van Zwoll, Ph.D., Professor of School Administration. 

Walter B. Waetjen, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Education, Institute 
for Child Study. 

Gladys A. Wiggin, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

Albert W. Woods. M.Ed.. Associate Professor of Physical Education. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



323 



CRITIC 

Margaret A. Adams 
Henry Agusiewicz 
Helen P. Anderson 
Ralph L. Angel 
Helen Woodburn Annis 
Alma Barker 
Anne Marie Barkley 
Neita Barrison 
Raymond Wesley Bates 
Ruth Bartilson 
Frances L, Bell 
Albert W. Bender 
Dennis F. Blizzard 
Margaret E. Blizzard 
Samuel Bohince 
Jessie E. Bolton 
Hannah E. Bonnbll 
William F. Brennan 
Homer C. Brooks, Jr. 
Harry M. Brown 
Avery Browning 
Harriet Bundick 
Edmund T. Burke 
Grace M. Butcher 
William J. Callaghan 
Marie M. Carillo 
Joseph Carlo 
Lonnie C. Carton 
Lois Marshall Chapin 
Gladys M. Clarkson 
Cathrine W. Cockburn 
luciel v. coggiano 
Julian Colangelo 
Marguritb H. Collier 
Gilbert D, Conn 
Reno A. Continetti 
Guy F. Cook 
Laurel Cook 
Claire Cox 
John M. Cox 
Arnold J. Croddy 
James G. Cross 
E. L. M. Davidson 
Charles DeManss 
Helen S. Dettborn 
Louise Dickson 



TEACHERS— 1950-51 

William J. Donahue 
Leroy Clark Doolittle 
Theordore Downing 
Truman L. Doyle 
Florence N. Duke 
Nora Dunn 
Mearle D. Duvall 
Dorothy F. Edgerton 
Thaddeus H. Elder, Jr. 
Merle Eubanks 
Robert P. Farny 
Ray F. Fehrman 
Charles T. Futrell 
Olive Gambrill 
Ruth Gee 
Dale E. Gerster 
James S. Goodman 
Ruth Finzel Grahame 
Helena J. Haines 
Maynard Haithcook 
Thaddeus J. Hajdasz 
Charles S. Hamm 
Regina R. Hammel 
Caroline E. Hardy 
William A. Hargrave, Jr. 
Louise P. Harmon 
Robert N. Hart 
Gertrude E. Harvey 
Gordon Haywood 
Carl F. Heintel 
Charles E. W. Hook 
Phyllis L. Houck 
Helen Frances Housman 
Rose M. Hranac 
Harry T. Hughes 
Maryanne Hurley 
Angie L. Hyde 
Warren S. Jackson 
Evelyn R. Jarrell 
Albert Johnson 
Keifer Ray Johnson 
Daniel M. Jones 
w. h. judkins 
Florence S. Kaplan 
Marianna T. Keenb 
George Anna Kbmerer 



324 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Ray M. Kipp 
Franklin B. Klasb 
Lucy Knox 
Charles H. Kolb 
Doris Helen Kolb 
Ann Kupka 
Mary F. Lacey 
Irene W. Lapp 
John A, Larson 
Maryjane Edwards Linn 
June E. Kippy 
Herman Littman 
Claire Livesay 
Charles E. Lugar 
Mattie L. Lynch 
Alma C. Lyons 
Helen Manley 
Julia D. Marshall 
Mary L. E. Matassa 
Thelma H. McAdoo 
Mary E. McCarthy 
Richard Mentzer 
Margaret T. Merrick 
William G. Miles 
Harold C. Moser 
Fred Mulvey 
Joseph M. Murphy 
Margaret R. Myerly 
Ira E. Nedrow 
James P. Norris 
Anne H. Nowland 
estellb g. nuttall 
William A. Odell 
Sara W. Owen 
Howard B. Owens 
Daniel Palumbo 
Charles C. Parker 
Lois P. Parker 
Vera Parker 
Ethel A. Parsons 
M. Bernice Payne 
Naomi Gillispie Payne 
Mary H. Phillips 
Elizabeth Plimpton 
Samuel W. Pursell 
Kathleen P. Rehanek 
Ester H. Regan 
Ralph L. Rennard, Jr. 



Robert W. Risk 
Mildred Robertson 
Wallace R. Roby 
Edgar I. Ross, Jr. 
Mary J. Rudy 
Fred J. Sacco 
Alfred A. Sadusky 
Halford B. Sanders 
WiLLARD D. Saul 
Flora E. Schroyer 
Ruth W. Seabold 
Carey K. Sentz 
Evelyn E. Shank 
Helen C. Shaw 
F. Faye Sherry 
Harold Showacre 
June Rose Simmons 
Olive P. Simpson 
Carl T, Skidmore 
Phyllis M. Skinner 
Charlotte Spencer 
William H. Standiford 
Virginia K. Stanton 
Audrey L. Steele 
Harry V. Stipe 
Helen P. Sullivan 
loran l. sween 
Ruth Trundle 
Solomon G. Tyler 
Margaret K. Unger 
Marjorie L. Van Dien 
John Wakefield 
Randolph P. Walker 
Gertrude E. Walter 
Thomas V. Warthen 
Marry Warren 
Mary V. Whaley 
Margaret H. Wharton 
Otis C. White 
Louise S. Whitney 
Harold C. Wickard 
Francis P. Williams 
Joseph S. Wilson 
Gertrude C. Worsley 
William B. Yarnall 
Jambs F. Zimmerman 
Irving S. Zorb 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



325 




COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Wilbur Dbvilbiss, Ed.D., Deem 
Henry Brechbill, Ph.D., Assistant Dean 

THE College of Education meets the needs of the following 
classes of students: (1) undergraduates preparing to 
teach in secondary, nursery, kindergarten, nursing, and dental 
schools; (2) present or prospective elementary 
teachers who wish to supplement their training; 
(3) students preparing for educational work in 
the trades and industries; (4) students preparing 
to become home demonstrators, club or com- 
munity recreation leaders, and (in cooperation 
with the Department of Sociology) social work- 
ers: (5) graduate students preparing for teach- 
ing, supervisory, or administrative positions; (6) 
students whose major interests are in other fields, 
but who desire courses in education. 

SPECIAL FACILITIES AND ACTIVITIES 

Research and Teaching Facilities 

Because of the location of the University in the suburbs of the nation's 
capital, unusual facilities for the study of education are available to its 
students and faculty. The Library of Congress, the library of the U. S. 
Office of Education, and special libraries of other government agencies are 
accessible, as well as the information services of the National Education 
Association, American Council on Education, U. S. Office of Education, 
and other institutions, public and private. The school systems of the 
District of Columbia, Baltimore, and the counties of Maryland offer 
generous cooperation. 

The Institute for Child Study 

The Institute for Child Study carries on the following activities: (1) it 
undertakes basic research in human development; (2) it digests and 
synthesizes research findings from the many sciences that study human 
beings; (3) it plans, organizes, and provides consultant service programs of 
direct child study by in-service teachers in individual schools or in municipal, 
county or state systems; (4) it offers field training to a limited number of 
properly qualified doctoral students, preparing them to render expert 
consultant service to schools and for college teaching of human develop- 
ment. Inquiries should be addressed to Director, Institute for Child Study. 

The Workshop on Child Development and Education 

The College of Education operates a Workshop on Child Development 
and Education for six weeks each summer. Requiring full-time work of 
all participants, it provides opportunities for (1) study and synthesis 



326 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

of scientific knowledge about children and youth; (2) training in the 
analysis of case records; (3) training for study-group leaders for in- 
service child study programs; (4) planning in-service programs of child 
study for teachers and pre-service courses and laboratory experiences for 
prospective teachers; (5) analysis of the curricular, guidance, and school 
organization implications of scientific knowledge about human develop- 
ment and behavior. Special announcements of the Workshop are avail- 
able about March 15 of each year and advance registration is required 
because the number of participants must be limited. Inquiries should be 
addressed to the Director, Workshop on Child Development and Education. 

The University of Maryland Nursery-Kindergarten School 

The University of Maryland has a nursery-kindergarten school on the 
campus in which students majoring in nursery-kindergarten school educa- 
tion may receive training and practical experience. This school is a co- 
operative effort which is operated jointly by the parents and the College of 
Education. 

Professional and Pre-professional Organizations 

The College of Education sponsors two professional organizations: 
Phi Delta Kappa, the national professional fraternity for men in Educa- 
tion, and Iota Lambda Sigma, the national honorary fraternity in Industrial 
Education. Both fraternities have large and active chapters and are 
providing outstanding professional leadership in their fields of service. 

The College of Education also sponsors the Harold Benjamin Chapter 
of the Future Teachers of America, a department of the National Educa- 
tion Association. This chapter is open to undergraduate students on the 
College Park campus. 

Courses Outside of College Park 

Through the College of Special and Continuation Studies a number of 
courses in education are offered in Baltimore and elsewhere. These courses 
are chosen to meet the needs of groups of students in various centers. 
In these centers, on a part-time basis, a student may complete a part of 
the work required for a bachelor's degree. Graduate courses in education 
are offered in Baltimore. 

Announcements of such courses may be obtained by addressing requests 
to the Dean, College of Special and Continuation Studies, College Park, 
Maryland. 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 

Requirements for Admission 

All students desiring to enroll in the College of Education must apply 
to the Director of Admissions of the University of Maryland at College Park. 

In selecting students more emphasis will be placed upon good marks and 
other indications of probable success in college rather than upon a fixed 
pattern of subject matter. In general, 4 units of English and 1 unit each 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 327 

of Social and Natural Sciences are required. One unit each of Algebra and 
Plane Geometry is desirable. While Foreign Language is desirable for 
certain programs, no Foreign Language is required for entrance. Fine 
Arts, Trade and Vocational subjects are acceptable as electives. 

Candidates for admission whose high school records are consistently low 
are strongly advised not to seek admission to the College of Education, 

General Information 

For information in reference to the University grounds, buildings, equip- 
ment, library facilities, requirements in American Ci\ilization, definition 
of resident and non-resident, regulation of studies, degrees and certificates, 
transcripts of records, student health and welfare, living arrangements in 
the dormitories, off-campus housing, meals. University Counseling Service, 
scholarships and student aid, athletics and recreation, student government, 
honors and awards, religious denominational clubs, fraternities, societies 
and special clubs, the University band, student publications, University Post 
Office and Supply Store, write to the Director of Publications for the General 
Information issue of the Catalog. 

Military Instruction 

All male students, unless specifically exempted under University rules, 
are required to take basic Air Force R. O. T. C. training for a period of 
two years. The successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for 
graduation but it must be taken by all eligible students during the first two 
years of attendance at the University, whether they intend to graduate or 
not. Transfer students who do not have the required two years of military 
training will be required to complete the course or take it until graduation, 
whichever occurs first. 

Selected students who wish to do so may carry advanced Air Force R. 0. 
T. C. courses during their junior and senior years which lead to a regular 
or reser\-e commission in the United States Air Force. 

For further details concerning the requirements in Military Instruction, 
write the Director of Publications for a copy of "General Information 
Issue" of the Catalog. 

Physical Education and Health 

All undergraduate students classified academically as freshmen and sopho- 
mores, irrespective of their physical condition, who are registered for more 
than six semester hours, are required to complete four prescribed courses in 
physical education. These courses must be taken by all eligible students 
during the first two years of attendance at the University, whether they 
intend to graduate or not. Transfer students who do not have credit in 
these courses or their equivalent, must complete them or take them until 
graduation, whichever occurs first. Students with military service may 
receive credit for these required courses by applying to the Dean of the 
College of Air Science. 



328 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Guidance in Registration 

At the time of matriculation each student is tentatively assigned to 
a member of the faculty who acts as the student's personal adviser. The 
choice of subject areas within which the student will prepare to teach 
will be made under faculty guidance during the first year in the Intro- 
duction to Education course required of all freshmen. Thereafter, the 
student will advise regularly with the faculty member responsible for 
his teaching major. While it may be possible to make satisfactory adjust- 
ments as late as the junior year for students from other colleges who have 
not already entered upon the sequence of professional courses, it is highly 
desirable that the student begin his professional work in the freshman 
year. Students who intend to teach (except Vocational Agriculture) 
should register in the College of Education, in order that they may have 
continuously the counsel and guidance of the faculty which is directly re- 
sponsible for their professional preparation. Students in Physical Educa- 
tion may register in either the College of Education or the College of 
Physical Education. 

Junior Status 

The first two years of college work are preparatory to the professional 
work of the junior and senior years. To be eligible to enter the piro- 
fessional courses, a student must have attained junior status. (See 
Academic Regulations.) 

Certification of Teachers 

The State Department of Education certifies to teach in the approved 
high schools of the State only graduates of approved colleges who have 
satisfactorily fulfilled subject-matter and professional requirements. Spe- 
cifically it limits certification to graduates who "rank academically in the 
upper four-fifths of the class and who make a grade of C or better in 
practice teaching." The several high school curricula of the College of 
Education fulfill State Department requirements for certification. (See 
also Elementary Education.) 

From the offerings in education, the District of Columbia requirement 
of 24 semester hours of professional courses may be fully met. Students 
intending to qualify as teachers in Baltimore, Washington, or any other 
city or state should, in their junior year, obtain a statement of certifi- 
cation requirements in such area and be guided thereby in the selection 
of courses. Advisers will assist in obtaining and utilizing such information. 

Degrees 

The degrees conferred upon students who have met the conditions 
prescribed for a degree in the College of Education are Bachelor of Arts 
and Bachelor of Science. Majors in English, social sciences, language and 
art receive the B.A. degree. Mathematics majors may receive either de- 
gree. All others receive the B.S. degree. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 329 

Costs 

Actual annual costs of attending the University include: $165.00 fixed 
charges; $61.00 special fees; $340.00 board; $120.00 to $140.00 room; and 
laboratory fees, which vary vsdth the laboratory courses pursued. A ma- 
triculation fee of $10.00 is charged all new students. An additional charge 
of $150.00 is assessed students not residents of the State of Maryland. 

For a more detailed statement of these costs, write to the Director of 
Publications for a copy of the "General Information Issue" of the Catalog. 

GRADUATE STUDIES 
Graduate Status 

For graduate study in education a student must have earned at least 
16 semester credits in education at the undergraduate level, and hold a 
bachelor's or master's degree from a college or university of recognized 
standing. The committee on masters' programs may interpret this require- 
ment so that foundation work in fields other than education may be accepted 
in cases of graduate students not preparing for school work. The student 
must also satisfy the graduate Dean as to his ability to do graduate work. 

Registration 

A graduate student in education must matriculate in the Graduate 
School. Application for admission to the Graduate School should be made 
prior to dates of registration on blanks obtained from the office of the 
Dean of the Graduate School. For further instructions a student should 
consult the Graduate School catalog. 

Masters' Degrees 

A graduate student in education may matriculate for a Master of Edu- 
cation or a Master of Arts degree. For requirements for these degrees, 
the student should consult both the Graduate School catalog and the 
duplicated material issued by the education faculty. On matriculation, 
the student should select a faculty adviser of professorial rank. 

Doctors' Degfrees 

Programs leading to a Doctor of Philosophy or a Doctor of Education 
degree in education are administered for the Graduate School by the 
department of education. For requirements of these degrees, the student 
should consult both the Graduate School catalog and the statement of 
policy relative to doctoral programs in education. If the student has not 
already made arrangements with a member of the faculty to advise him, 
he should consult with the chairman of the education Committee on 
Candidacy regarding a proper adviser. 



330 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

CURRICULA AND REQUIRED COURSES 

The undergraduate curricula in the College of Education with advisers 
for each curriculum are as follows: 

Academic Education 

English — Marie D. Bryan, Room T-110 

Foreign Languages — Marie D. Bryan 

Mathematics — Henry Brechbill, Room T-114 

Natural Sciences — Henry Brechbill 

Social Sciences — Alvin W. Schindler, Room T-117 

Speech — Warren Strausbaugh, Room R-106 

Agricultural Education (under the College of Agriculture) 
Arthur M. Ahalt, Room 0-137 

Art Education 

Vienna Curtiss, Room H-103 

Business Education 

Arthur S. Patrick, Room Q-245 

Dental Education 

Harry B. McCarthy (School of Dentistry, Baltimore) 

Elementary Education 
Alvin W. Schindler 
Marie Denecke, Room T-120 

Home Economics Education 

Mabel Spencer, Room T-110 

Industrial Education 

Glen D. Brown, Room T-111 
R. Lee Hornbake, Room T-111 

Music Education 

Mary F. Kemble, Music Building 

Nursery School-Kindergarten Education 
Edna B. McNaughton, Building HH 

Nursing Education 

Florence M. Gipe (Baltimore) 

Physical Education (Men) 
Lester M. Fraley, Room G-102 
Albert W. Woods, G-101 

Physical Education (Women) 

Dorothy F. Deach, Women's Field House 
Dorothy R. Mohr, Women's Field House 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 331 

General Requirements of the College 

A total of 120 semester hours in addition to the University require- 
ment in military science and physical education is required for graduation 
in the College of Education. In no case shall the total number of semester 
hours required for graduation be less than 128. 

The following minimum requirements are common to all curricula: 
English — 12 semester hours; social studies — 12 semester hours, as follows: 
Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life; G & P 1 — American Government; 
and H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization; science or mathematics — 
6 semester hours; education — 20 semester hours; speech — 3 semester hours; 
physical education and military science as required by the University. 

Marks in all required upper division courses in education and in subjects 
in major and minor fields must be C or higher. A general average of C or 
higher must be maintained. In order to be admitted to a course in student 
teaching a student must have a grade point average of 2.275. 

Exceptions to curricular requirements and rules of the College of 
Education must be recommended by the student's adviser and approved 
by the Dean. 

Students who are not enrolled in the College of Education but who are 
preparing to teach must meet all curricular and scholastic requirements 
of the College of Education. 

Majors and Minors. 

Students select a teaching major: for example, social science, art, 
music, physical education. Those electing the academic curriculum will 
ordinarily select both a teaching major and a teaching minor, and students 
in other curricula may select minors if they so desire. Advisers may waive 
the requirement for a minor when necessary to permit the development of 
an approved area such as psychology, human development, or sociology. 

Students selecting an academic major and an academic minor, or those 
selecting onp- special teaching field such as industrial education need to 
take only one methods course: for example, Ed. 140 or Ind. Ed. 140. Stu- 
dents who select an academic major and a special fields minor, or vice versa, 
must take methods courses in both the major and minor fields, and should 
divide their practice teaching between the two fields. 

Academic Education 

Students enrolled in this curriculum will meet the above minimum 
requirements in English and social science, plus the following: 

(1) Foreign language for candidates for the bachelor of arts degree: 
12 semester hours provided the student enters with less than three 
years of foreign language credits; 6 semester hours, if he enters 
with three years of such credits. No foreign language is required 



332 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

of any student who enters with four years of language credits nor 
of candidates for the bachelor of science degree unless specified in 
the curriculum. (See "Degrees" above.) 

(2) Science or mathematics, 12 semester hours. 

(3) Education, 21 semester hours. 

(4) Speech, 4 semester hours. 

All students who elect the academic education curriculum will fulfill 
the preceding general requirements and also prepare to teach one or more 
school subjects which will involve meeting specific requirements in par- 
ticular subject matter fields. 

The specific requirements by subject fields are as follows: 

English. A major in English requires 36 semester hours as follows: 

Composition and Literature 12 semester hours 

American Literature, Advanced 3 semester hours 

Blectives 21 semester hours 

A minor in English requires 26 semester hours. It includes the 15 
semester hours prescribed for the major and 11 hours of electives. 

Electives must be chosen with the approval of the adviser who will guide 
the student in terms of College of Education records and recommendations 
of the English Department. 

Social Sciences. For a major in this group 36 semester hours are re- 
quired, of v/hich at least 18 hours must be in history, including 6 hours in 
American history and 6 hours in European history. Six of the 18 hours 
must be in advanced courses. For a minor in the group, 24 hours are 
required, of which 18 are the same as specified above. 

History (including one year each of American and 

European History) 18 semester hours 

Economics, sociology, government, consumer 
education, or geography 6 semester hours 

Electives in social sciences 12 semester hours 

For a minor, the requirements are the same less the electives. 

Foreign Languages. All students preparing to teach French, German, or 
Spanish are required to take Comparative Literature 101 and 102 and are 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 333 

strongly advised to take the review course for majors. Further courses in 
comparative literature along with work in European or Latin American 
history are also recommended. 

Specific minimum requirements in the three languages are a semester 
each of intermediate and advanced conversation (Fr., Ger., or Sp. 8 and 80), 
a semester of grammar review, six hours of introductory survey of the 
literature (Fr., Ger., Sp. 75 and 76), one semester of a Life and Culture 
Course (Fr., Ger., or Sp. 161 or 162) and six hours in literature courses 
numbered 100 or above. If a foreign language is offered as a second field, 
all major requirements must be met. 

Mathematics. A major in mathematics requires 36 semester hours as 
follows: Math. 2, 14, 15, 17, 20, 21, and elective credits in mathematics. 

For a minor, the requirements are: Math. 2, 14, 15, 17, 20, 21, and five 
elective credits in mathematics. 

The following courses are recommended for electives in mathematics: 
Math. 13, 16, 102, 103, 124, 125. 

Students who pass an attainment examination with a satisfactory grade 
are excused from the requirement in Solid Geometry. 

Science. In general science a major of 40 semester hours and a minor of 
30 semester hours are offered, each including one full year of elementary 
courses in chemistry, physics, and biology (zoology and botany) . 

Other courses will be chosen subject to the approval of the student's 
major adviser and of the science department in which his interest lies., 

Minors of 20 semester hours are offered in chemistry, in physics, and in 
biological sciences. A minor in biology must be supported by a one-year 
course in chemistry. A minor in physics must be supported by a one- 
year course in chemistry. A minor in chemistry must be supported by a 
one-year course in physics. 

If a major in general science is accompanied by a minor in chemistry, 
physics, or biology, the same credits may be applied to both, provided that 
they number not less than 52 semester hours in natural sciences. 

Speech. A minor of 22 semester hours is oflfered in Speech. The mini- 
mum requirements for this minor are 12 semester hours in addition to the 
10 semester hours of departmental requirements in Speech 1, 2, 3, and 4. 
The 12 semester hours above the departmental requirement must include 
6 hours of courses numbered 100 or higher. It is the policy of the depart- 
ment to build a program of study in anticipation of the needs of prospec- 
tive teachers, supervisors, correctionists, dramatic coaches, and other 
specialists in the general field of speech. All programs for the minor must 
be approved by the departmental adviser. 



334 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Academic Education Curricnlum , — S«m4$t0r — < 

Freshman Year I II 

*Ed. 2 — Intrcxlaction to Education 2 .... 

Enff. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature S 8 

*Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life 8 .... 

Speech 1. 2— Public Speaking 2 2 

*Q. ft P. 1 — American Government .... 8 

A. S. 1. 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 8 8 

P. E. 1. 8 (Men) : P. E. 2, 4 (Women) 1 1 

Hea. 2, 4 — Personal and Community Health (Women) 2 2 

Major and Minor Requirements 4 6 

Total 1«-18 1*-18 

Sophomore Year 

Enff. 8, 4 — Composition and World Literature, or 8 8 

Eng. 6, 6 — Composition and English Literature 8 8 

H. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization 8 8 

A. S. 8. 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 8 8 

P. E. 6. 7 (Men) ; P. E. 6. 8 (Women) 1 1 

Major and Minor Requirements 6 S 

Total 16-18 16-18 

Junior Year 

H. D. Ed. 100, 101 — Principles of Human Development 3 8 

Major and Minor Requirements, Elective* 18 IS 

ToUl 16 16 

Senior Year 

*Ed. 140 — Curriculum, Instruction and Observation SI 

•Ed. 130 (or 131)— Theory of the Junior (or Senior) High School 2 1 

*Ed. 160 — Educational Measurement 2 1 .... 

•Ed. 149— Methods and Practice of Teaching 9J 

'Major and Minor Requirements, Electivea 16 

Ttetal 16 16 

Agricultural Education 

This curriculum is designed to prepare students for teaching vocational 
agriculture in high schools. To obtain full particulars on course require- 
ments, the student should consult the bulletin of the College of Agriculture. 

Art Education 

This curriculum is planned to meet the growing demand for special 
teachers and supervisors in art activity. Emphasis is placed upon ways to 
draw out and develop the creative inclinations of beginners; to integfrate 
art and other areas of study; to utilize art in solving social problems. 
General requirements are the same as for the academic curriculum. 

The curriculum for Art majors follows: 



* May be taken either semester. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



336 



Art Education Curriculum 
Freshman Year 

*E>d. 2 — Introduction to Education 

EnK- li 2 — Composition in American Literature 

Soe. 1 — SocioIoKT of American Life 

O. A P. 1 — American Government 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking 

Pr. Art 1— DeBi»n 

Pr. Art 2 — Survey of Art History 

Hea. 2, 4 — Personal and Community Health (Women) . 

A. S. 1, 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 

P. B. 1. S (Men) ; P. E. 2, 4 (Women) 

**Math. 0— Basic Mathematics 

Elective* 



Totel 



Sophomore Year 

Ens. 8, 4 — Composition and World Literature 

Chem. 11, 18 — General Chemistry 

Pr. Art 20 — Costume Design 

Pr. Art 80 — IVpoffraphy and Lettering 

Or. 2 — Simple Crafts 

Cr. 8— Block Print and Silk Screen 

Cr. 20 — Ceramics 

Cr. 80— Metalry 

Pr. Art. 8 — Creative Art Inspired by Primitive Art. 

Pr. Art 4 — Three-dimensional Design 

A. S. 8, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 

P. B. B, 7 (Men) ; P. E. 6, 8 (Women) 

Klectives or General Requirements 



ToUl 

Junior Year 

H. D. Ed. 100. 101 — Principles of Human Development. 

Pr. Art 140, 141 — Interior Design 

Pr. Art. 21 — Action Drawing 

Cr. 6 — Puppetry 

Cr. 40— Weaving 

H. 6, 6 — American History 

Pr. Art — Professional Lectures 

Electives, Minor, or General Requirements 



Total 

Senior Year 

Ed. 140 — Cnrriculura, Instruction and Observation in Art 

Pr. Art 182 — Advertising Layout 

Pr. Art. 100 — Mural Design 

Ed. 160 — Educational Measurements 

Ed. 130 (or 131)— Theory of the Junior (or Senior) High School. 

Ed. 149— Methods and Practice of Teaching 

Electives In Crafts and Practical Art Courses, or Minor 



Total 



Semester — > 


/ 


// 


2 


(2) 


3 


8 




8 


8 




2 


2 




3 


2 




2 


2 


(3) 


(8) 


1 


1 







2 


4 



17-18 

8 

8 
8 



16-18 

8 
1 

2 

2 
8 

7 
18 



16 



18-19 





2 


2 




2 






2 


(3) 


(8) 


1 


1 


2 


2 



16-18 



8 



7 

18 



2 
15 



••An examination in mathematics will be given to freshmen during the fall semester; 
thosfl who pass will not be required to take Math. 0. 



336 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A minimum of 24 semester hours constitutes a minor in art for which the 
following courses are required: Pr. Art 1, Pr. Art 2. Electives may be 
selected from the student's chosen field of concentration — advertising, cos- 
tume, interior, ceramics, metalry, or weaving — and from courses selected 
in consultation with the student's adviser. For teaching, Ed. 140— Curricu- 
lum, Instruction, and Observation in Art should be included as well as 
electives chosen from among the following courses: Cr. 2, 3, 5, 20, 30, 40, 
198; Pr. Art 3, 4, 20, 21, 30, 38, 132, 140, 141. 

Business Education 

Two curricula are offered for the preparation of teachers of business 
subjects. The General Business Education Curriculum qualifies for teach- 
ing all business subjects except shorthand. Providing thorough training 
in general business, including economics, it leads to teaching positions on 
both junior and senior high school levels. By the proper selection of elec- 
tives, persons following this curriculum may also qualify as teachers of 
social studies. 

The Secretarial Education course is adapted to the needs of those who 
wish to become teachers of shorthand as well as other business subjects. 



General Business Education Curriculum , — Semester — < 

Freshman Yea/r I 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 3 

G. & P. 1 — American Government , 3 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life 

Math. 5 — General Mathematics 3 

Math. 6 — Mathematics of Finance .... 

Geog. 1, 2 — Economic Resources 2 

O. T. 1 — Principles of Typewriting .... 

Ed. 2 — Introduction to Education 2 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking 2 

A. S. 1, 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 

Hea. 2, 4 — Personal and Community Health (Women) 2 

P. E. 1, 8 (Men) ; P. E. 6, 8 (Women) 1 

Total 18-19 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature • — 3 3 

Hist. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

Econ. 81, 82 — Principles of Economics 3 3 

B. A. 20, 21 — Principles of Accounting 4 4 

O. T. 2 — Intermediate Typewriting 2 .... 

O. T. 10 — OflBce Typewriting Problems .... 2 

A. S. 8. 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 8 

P. E, 5. 7 (Men) ; P. E. 6, 8 (Women) 1 1 

Total 1«-1» 16-19 



II 

3 

8 

2 
2 

2 
3 

2 
1 

13-19 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



337 



Junior Year 

B. A. 180, 181 — Business Law 

B. A. 166 — Business Communications 

H. D. Ed. 100, 101 — Principles of Human Development 

B. E<L 100 — ^Techniques of Teaching Office Skills 

O. T. 112— Filing 

O. T. Ill — Office Machines 

B. A. 10, 11 — Organization and Control 

Econ. 140 — Money and Banking 

Econ. 160 — Marketing and Organization 

Total 

Senior Year 

Ed- 140 — Curriculum, Instruction and Observation 

Ed. 160 — Educational Measurements 

Ed. 130 (or 131) — Theory of the Junior (or Senior) High School. 

Ed. 149 — Methods and Practice of Teaching 

B. A. 166 — Office Management 

Electivea and Requirements 

Total 



Seinester — • 
/ // 

4 4 

8 

3 8 

2 



17 



16 



17 



16 



Secretarial Education Curriculum 
Freshman Year 

Same aa General Business Curriculum 



Sophomore Year 

Eng. 8, 4— <3omposition and World Literature, or 8 

Eng. 5, 6 — Composition and English Literature 3 

Hist. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization 8 

O. T. 12, 13 — Principles of Shorthand L II 4 

O. T. 2 — Intermediate Typewriting 2 

O. T. 10 — Office Typewriting Problems 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 3 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 

P. B. 5, 7 (Men) ; P. E. 6, 8 (Women) 1 

Total 16-19 

Junior Yea/r 

H. D. Ed. 100, 101 — Principles of Human Development 3 

B. A. 180, 181 — Business Law 4 

B. Ed. 100 — Techniques of Teaching Office Skills 2 

O. T. 16 — Advanced Shorthand 3 

O. T, 17 — Transcription 2 

B. A. 20, 21 — Principles of Accounting 4 

O. T. 112— FiUng 

Electivee .... 

Total 18 



16-19 



4 
2 
8 

1« 



338 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

I — Semester — . 

Senior Year I II 

O. T. Ill — Office Machines 3 

O. T. 110 — Secretarial Work 3 

B. A. 165 — Office Management 3 

B. A. 166 — Business Communications 3 .... 

Ed. 140 — Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Business Subjects .... f3 

Ed. 150 — Educational Measurements .... J 2 

Ed. 130 (or 131)— Theory of the Junior for Senior) High School 12 

Ed. 149 — Methods and Practice of Teaching (9 

Electives and Requirements 3 



Total 15 16 

Childhood Education 

The childhood education curriculum has as its goal the preparation of 
nursery school and kindergarten teachers. It is also planned to further 
the personal development of the student and to give training in home- 
making. 

Observation and student teaching are done in the University Nursery 
School and Kindergarten on the campus. Children in the Nursery School 
are from 2-5 years, and in the Kindergarten, 5-6. 

Graduates receive a B.S. degree and meet the requirements for certifica- 
tion for teaching kindergarten and nursery school in Maryland. 

Childhood Education Curriculum 

t — Semester — \ 
Freshman Year I II 

*Ed. 2 — Introduction to Education 2 .... 

*C. Ed. 2 — Orientation, Observation, and Record Taking .... 2 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life 3 .... 

G. & P. 1 — American Government .... 3 

Speech 4 — Voice and Diction .... 3 

Foods 1 — Introductory Foods 3 .... 

Hea. 2, 4 — Personal and Community Health 2 2 

P. E. 2, 4 1 1 

Electives 2 2 

Total 16 16 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature, or 

Eng. 5, 6 — Composition and English Literature 3 3 

Zool. 16 — Human Physiology 4 

Nut. 10 — Elements of Nutrition .... 3 

P. E. 6, 8 1 X 

♦Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology .... 3 

Electives 7 5 

Total 15 IB 

•May be taken either semester. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 339 

I — Semester — n 
Junior Year I H 

C. Ed. 100 — Child Development I — Infancy 3 

C. Ed. 101— Child Development II— Early Childhood 3 

C. Ed. 140 — Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Nursery 

School 3 

C. Ed. 150 — Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Kindergarten.. .... 3 

C. Ed. 115 — Children's Activities and Activities Materials 3 .... 

C. Ed. 116 — Creative Expression .... 3 

C. Ed. 149 — Teaching Nursery School 4 

C. Ed. 159 — Teaching Kindergarten .... 4 

Hist. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

Zool. 55 — Development of the Human Body 2 .... 

Total 18 16 

Senior Year 

C. Ed. 102— Child Development III— The Child From Five to Ten 2 

S. Ed. 145 — Guidance in Behavior Problems 3 .... 

C. Ed. 149— Teaching Nursery School 4 

C. Ed. 159 — Teaching Kindergarten .... 4 

Sci. Kd. 1 — Science for the Primary Grade .... 2 

Hea. Ed. 114 — Health Education for Elementary School 2 .... 

Nut. Ill— Child Nutrition 2 

Electives 5 8 

Total 16 16 

Dental Education 

In cooperation with the School of Dentistry, the College of Education 
offers a curriculum in dental education leading to the Bachelor of Science 
degree, with course work offered in the Baltimore Center only. This 
curriculum is designed to prepare superior graduates of the Dental School 
for positions as teachers of dentistry. Details of the program may be 
obtained from the Dean of the School of Dentistry or of the College of 
Education. Persons entering the program must be approved by the Com- 
mittee on Admissions of the Dental School. 

Dental Education Curriculum 

For students who are dental school graduates with the degree of Doctor 
of Dental Surgery (acquired since 1936-37, after six years of study) and who 
have the approval of the Committee on Admissions of the Dental School: 

Ninety-six (96) semester hours (or the equivalent of three years of 
work) may be credited for the dental school work provided none of the 
dental school marks was lower than "B". 

The additional 32 semester hours, as follows, are required: 

Academic subjects 12 

Education 20 

History of Dental Education 2 

Educational Psychology 4 

Educational Measurement 2 

Methods of Teaching Vocational Subjects 2 



340 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Organization and Management of Vocational Classes . . 2 
Electives 8 

Elementary Education 

This curriculum is open only to persons who have completed a two- or 
three-year curriculum in a Maryland State Teachers College or other 
accredited teacher education institution and whose records give evidence 
of ability and character essential to elementary teaching. Such persons 
will be admitted to advanced standing and classified provisionally in appro- 
priate classes. 

Credit for extension courses given by other institutions may be accepted 
in an amount not exceeding 30 semester hours. The last 30 semester hours 
of work preceding the conferring of the degree must be taken in the 
University of Maryland, 

State Department of Education requirements provide that a teacher in 
service may present for certificate credit not more than six semester hours 
of credit completed during a school year. The College of Education assumes 
no responsibility in this connection, but candidates are advised to observe 
this regulation. 

Elementary Education Curriculum 

For gn'aduates of two year normal schools. 

Credits 

Credit for normal school work, not more than 64 

Requirements 

Education 4 

English (not including freshman English) 10 

*Natural science (chemistry, physics, botany, zoology, 

bacteriology, entomology, general science) 10 

Social science (history, government, sociology, 

economics, geography) 12 

fElectives 28 

For graduates of three year normal schools. 

Credit for normal school work, not more than 96 

Requirements 

Education 2 

English (not including freshman and sophomore English) 6 

*Natural science (as above) 6 

Social science (as above) 12 

fElectives 6 



*Not more than four semester hours of Science Education and other approved substitu- 
tions for regular science courses will be counted toward meeting the natural science 
requirements. 

flf a student is not allowed full credit for normal school work by the Director of 
Admissions, he must take additional electives in the amount needed to complete 128 semester 
hours of work. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 341 

Home Economics Education 

The Home Economics Education curriculum is designed for students who 
are preparing to teach vocational or general home economics or to engage 

in any phase of home economics work which requires a knowledge of 

teaching methods. It includes studies of all phases of home economics and 

the allied sciences, with professional training for teaching these subjects. 
A student majoring in this curriculum may also qualify for a science minor. 

Home Economics Education Curriculum , — Semester — \ 

Freshman Year I II 

Ed. 2 — Introduction to Education 2 .... 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 8 8 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life 8 

G. & P. 1 — American Government . • • . 8 

Speech 1. 2 — Public Speaking 2 2 

H. E. 1 — Home Economics Lectures 1 . • • ■ 

Pr. Art 1— Design 8 .... 

♦Math. O or Elective 

Hea. 2, 4 — Personal and Community Health 2 2 

P. E. 2, 4 1 1 

Tex. 1— Textiles 8 

Total 17 17 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 8, 4 — Composition and World Literature, or 8 8 

Eng. 5, 6 — Composition and English Literature 8 S 

H. 6, 6 — History of American Civilization 8 I 

Chem. 11, 13 — General Chemistry 8 8 

Pr. Art 20 — Costume Design .... 8 

Clo. 20A or B— Clothing 8 

Foods 2, 3— Foods 3 8 

P. B. 6. 8 1 1 

Nut. 110 Nutrition 8 

Total 19 19 

Junior Year 

H. E. Ed. 140 — Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation .... 8 

H. D. Ed. 100, 101 — Principles of Human Development 3 8 

Home Mgt. 160. 161 — Home Management 8 8 

Foods 101 — Meal Service 2 

Clo. 22 — Clothing Construction 2 

Pr. Art 2 — Survey of Art History 2 

Pr. Art 140 — Interior Design 1 .... 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 8 

Zool. 16 — Human Physiology 4 .... 

Bot. 1 — General Botany .... 4 

Total 16 17 



• Not required of students who pass the qualifying examination which is given during 
the first semester. Prerequisite for chemistry. 



342 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

I — Semester — \ 

*Senior Year I II 

H. B. Ed. 102 — Problems in Teaching Home Economics f 3 

H. E. Ed. 149 — Teaching: Secondary Vocational Home Economics .... J 9 

Ed. 150 — Educational Measurement 1 2 

Home Mgt. 152 — Practice in Management of the Home .... I 3 

Bact. 61 — Housdiold Bacteriology 8 .... 

Electives 13 

Total 16 17 



•Subjects in the senior year will be so arranged that the two semesters may be inter- 
changed. 

Industrial Education 

Three curriculums are administered by the Industrial Education Depart- 
ment: (1) Industrial Arts education, (2) Vocational-Industrial education, 
and (3) Education for Industry. The overall offering includes both under- 
graduate and graduate programs leading to the degrees of: Bachelor of 
Science, Master of Education, Master of Arts, Doctor of Education and 
Doctor of Philosophy. 

The industrial arts education curriculum prepares people to teach in- 
dustrial arts at the secondary school level. It is a four-year program 
leading to a Bachelor of Science degree. While trade or industrial ex- 
perience contributes significantly to the background of the industrial arts 
teacher, previous work experience is not a condition of entrance into this 
curriculum. Students who are enrolled in the curriculum are encouraged 
to obtain work in industry during the summer months. Industrial arts 
as a secondary school subject area is a part of the general education pro- 
gram characterized by extensive shopwork and laboratory experiences. 

The vocational-industrial curriculum may lead either to certification as 
a vocational-industrial teacher with no degree involved or to a Bachelor 
of Science degree including certification. The University of Maryland is 
designated as the institution which shall offer the "Trade and Industrial" 
certification courses and hence the courses which are offered are those re- 
quired for certification in Maryland. The vocational-industrial curriculum 
requires trade competence as specified by the Maryland State Plan for 
Vocational Education. A person who aspires to take the certification 
courses should review the State plan and he may well contact Maryland 
State Department of Education officials. If the person has in mind teach- 
ing in a designated city or county he may discuss his plans with the 
vocational-industrial official of that city or county inasmuch as there are 
variations in employment and training procedures. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



343 



Industrial Arts Education 
Freshman Year 

Bd. 2 — Introduction to Education 

EnK- 1. 2 — Composition and American Literature , 

Speech 1, 2 — Public Speaking; 

S«e. 1 — Sociolory of American Life 

G. A P. 1 — American Gorernment 

Ind. Ed. 1 — Mechanical Drawing 

Ind. Ed. 21 — Mechanical Drawing 

Ind. Ed. 2 — Elementary Woodworking 

Ind. Ed. 22 — Machine Woodworking I 

Ind. Bd. 12— Shop Calculations 

A. S. 1, 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 

P. E. 1, 3 — Physical Activities 

I 

Total 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 8, 4 — Composition and World Literature, or 

Eng. 5, C — Composition and English Literature 

His. 6, C — History of American Civilization 

Ind. Ed. 23 — Arc and Gas Welding 

Ind. Ed. 110— Foundry 

Ind. Ed. 41 — Architectural Drawing 

Ind. Bd. 67— Cold Metal Work 

Ghcm. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 

Math. 10— Algebra 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Fore* R. O. T. C. (Men) 

P. E. 6, 7— Physical Activities 

Total 

Junior Year 

H. D. Ed. 100, 101 — Principles of Human Development... 

Ind. Bd. 26— Art Metal Work I 

Ind. Ed. 28 — Electricity I 

Ind. Bd. 69 — Machine Shop Practice I 

Ind. Bd. 24— Sheet Metal Work 

Ind. Ed. 160 — Essentials of Design 

Ind. Ed. 166 — Educational Foundations of Industrial Arts. 

Ind. Ed. 48 — Electricity II 

Phya. 1, 2 — Elements of Physics 

Ind. Ed. 164 — Shop Organization and Management 

Bleotivea 

ToUl 



Semester — n 



18 



18 



// 

s 
i 



18 



2 
3 
8 

1 

19 



19 



2 
2 
S 
2 

4 

18 



344 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Senior Year* 

Ed. 150 — Educational Measurement p .... 

Ed. 130 (or 131) — Theory of the Junior (or Senior) High School [2 

Ind. Ed. 140 — Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — 

Ind. Education f3 .... 

Ind. Ed. 149 — Methods and Practice of Teaching [9 

**Ind. Ed. 89 — Machine Shop Practice II 2 

find. Ed. 31 — Mechanical Drawing .... 2 

Jlnd. Ed. 42 — Machine Woodworking II 2 

Ed. 161 — Guidance in Secondary Schools 2 

Ind. Ed. 105— General Shop 2 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Elconomics .... 3 

Electives .... 3 

Total 16 16 



Vocational-Industrial Certification 

A total of 240 clock hours of instruction is required for vocational-in- 
dustrial teacher certification. The courses listed below are currently re- 
quired: . 

Ind. Ed. 50— Methods of Teaching 

Ind. Ed. 60 — Observation and Demonstration Teaching 

Ind. Ed. 164 — Shop Organization and Management 

Ind. Ed. 168 — Trade or Occupational Analysis 

Ind. Ed. 169 — Course Construction 

Ind. Ed. 170— Principles of Vocational Education, or 

Ind. Ed. 171 — History of Vocational Education 
"The remainder of the 240 clock hours are to be met through elective 
industrial education courses offered by the University of Maryland and 
approved by the State supervisor of industrial education." ***Among the 
courses from which electives may be chosen there are: 

Ind. Ed. 150 — Training Aids Development 

Ind. Ed. 157 — Tests and Measurements 

Ind. Ed. 161 — Principles of Vocational Guidance 

Ind. Ed. 165 — Modem Industry 

Ind. Ed. 167 — Problems in Occupational Education 



•Subjects in the senior year will be so arranged that the two semesters may be inter- 
changed. 

♦♦Ceramics accepted as a substitute. 

t Photography accepta(d as a substitute. 

tAutomotives accepted as a substitute. 

♦♦♦Maryland (State Department of Education) The Maryland State Plan for Vocational 
Education. 1947—1952, p. 108. 

N. B. The present State plan is in process of revision. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 345 

**Ind. Ed. 220 — Organization, Administration and Supervision of Vo- 
cational Education 

Ind. Ed. 240 — Research in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education 

Ind. Ed. 248 — Seminar in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education 

Ed. 150 — Educational Measurement 

Ed. 160 — Educational Sociology 

Ed. 161 — Guidance in Secondary Schools 

Ed. 261 — Counseling Techniques 

Ed. 262 — Occupational Information 

Ed. 269 — Seminar in Guidance 
A person in vocational-industrial education may use his certification 
courses tow^ard a Bachelor of Science degree. In doing so the general 
requirements of the College of Education must be met. A maximum of 
twenty semester hours of credit may be earned through examination in 
the trade in which the student has competence. Prior to taking the ex- 
amination, the student shall provide documentary evidence of his ap- 
prenticeship or learning period and journeyman experience. For further 
information about credit by examination refer to the Academic Regulations 
of the University of Maryland. 

Education for Industry 

The Education for Industry curriculum is a four-year program leading 
to a Bachelor of Science degree. The purpose of the program is to pre- 
pare persons for jobs within industry and, as such, it embraces four major 
areas of competence, (a) technical competence, (b) human relations and 
leadership competence, (c) communications competence, and (d) social and 
civic competence. The student who is enrolled in this curriculum is re- 
quired to obtain work in industry in accordance with the plan described 
in the course, Industrial Education 124a, b. 

I — Semester — \ 
Freshman Year I II 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 3 3 

See. 1 — Sociology of American Life 3 .... 

G. & P. 1 — American Government ij.sc' ' .... 3 

Ind. Ed. 1 — Mechanical Drawing I i. ,'. .i'.'l . j'*' 2 .... 

Ind. Ed. 12— Shop Calculations 3 

Ind. Ed. 21 — Mechanical Drawing II .... 2 

Ind. Ed. 22 — Machine Woodworking I 2 .... 

Ind. Ed. 23— Arc and Gas Welding 1 

Ind. Ed. 69 — Machine Shop Practice I .'. 2 

Ind. Ed. 110 — Foundry 1 

Sp. 7 — Public Speaking 2 .... 

A. S. 1, 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

P. E. 1, 3 — Physical Activities 1 1 

Math. 10 — Algebrii or 

Math. 15 — College Algebra . . . i ' 3 



Total , ^ 19 19 

**A course bearing a "200" number is open only to graduate students. 



346 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



( — Semester — \ 

Sophomore Year J H 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature or 

Ene> 5. 6 — C!ompo8ition and English Literature 3 3 

Ind. Ed. 24— Sheet Metal Work 2 

B. A. 10, 11 — Organization and Control 2 2 

Phys. 1, 2 — Elements of Physics (Mechanics, Heat and 

Sound) — (Magnetism, Electricity and Optics) — or 

Phys. 10, 11 — Fundamentals of Physics (Mechanics and Heat) — (Sound, 

Optics, Magnetism and Electricity) 3 or 4 3 or 4 

Math. 11 — Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry or 

Math. 14— Plane Trigonometry 2 or 3 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

P. E. 5, 7— Physical Activities 1 1 

H. 5 — History of American Civilization .... 3 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 8 

Total 16, 17 or 18 18 or 19 

Junior Year 

H. 6 — History of American Civilization 3 .... 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology 3 .... 

Psych. 2 — Applied Psychology .... 3 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 4 4 

Econ. 160 — Labor Ek^nomics 3 .... 

*Ind. Ed. 124a — Organized and Supervised Work Experience 3 

Ind. Ed. 143, 144— Industrial Safety Education 2 2 

B. A. 160 — Personnel Management .... 3 

Soc. 115 — Industrial Sociology .... 3 

Electives 3 3 

Total 21 18 

Senior Year 

B. A. 163— Industrial Relations 3 

B. A. 167 — Job Evaluation and Merit Rating 2 

•Ind. Ed. 124b — Organized and Supervised Work Experience 3 .... 

Ind. Ed. 164 — Shop Organization and Management .... 2 

Ind. Ed. 165 — Modem Industry 2 

Ind. Ed. 168 — Trade or Occupational Analyses 2 

Psych. 121 — Social Psychology .... 3 

Electives • • 5 8 

Total 15 15 



*Must be pursued concurrently with the regular Summer Sessions between the sophomore 
and junior and the junior and senior years respectively. 



Music Education 

The Music Education curriculum affords pre-service preparation in the 
specialized field of Music Education and leads to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Education with a Public School Music major. The curriculum 
provides training in both the choral and instrumental fields of music and is 
planned to meet the growing demand for special teachers and supervisors 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



347 



in Public School Music. By proper selection of subjects, persons may also 
qualify in other academic subjects. Six semester hours of science or mathe- 
matics must be elected to meet the College requirements in this area. 

A major in music education includes 33 semester hours of music and 20 
semester hours of applied music. A minor in the field may be secured with 
23 hours of music and 10 hours of applied music. A curriculum for a 
major in music education •will be found below. A minor in the field must 
include Mus. 2, 3, 7, 8, 11, 50, 70, 71, 80, 81, 120, and 10 hours of applied 
music as needed; Ed. 140 in music, and practice teaching which is divided 
between the student's major and minor fields. 



Music Education Curriculum „ 

/ — Semester — \ 

Freshman Year I II 

Ed. 2 — Introduction to Education 2 .... 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 3 8 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life 3 .... 

G. & P. 1 — American Government .... 3 

Mus. 7 — Fundamentals of Music 2 .... 

Mus. 8, 11— Solfeggio and Ear Training I, II 2 2 

Mus. 70 — Harmony I 3 

A. S. 1. 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. or R. O. T. C. Band (Men) 3 3 

P. E. 1, 3— (Men) ; P. E. 2. 4 (Women) 1 1 

Hea. 2, 4 — Personal and Community Health (Women) 2 2 

Applied Music as needed — Mus. 12, 52, 13, 63, 4, 6, 6, 9. 10 (one 

credit each) 2 2 

Total 16-18 15-17 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature, or 

Eng. 5, 6 — Composition and English Literature 3 3 

H. B, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

Mus. 2, 8 — History of Music 2 

Mus. 71 — Harmony 11 8 .... 

Mus. 80 — Instruments of the Orchestra (Strings) 2 

Mua. 14 — String Class 1 

Mus. 81 — Instruments of the Bands (Winds and Percussion) .... 2 

Mus. 14 — Woodwind Class .... 1 

Mus. 14 — Brass Class .... 1 

A. S. 8. 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. or R. O. T. C. Band (Men).. 3 8 

P. B. 5, 7— (Men) ; P. E. 6, 8 (Women 1 1 

Requirements (Mathematics or Science) 3 8 

Applied Music as needed — Mus. 72, 92, 73, 93, 54, 74, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10 (one 

credit each) 1 1 

Total 17-20 17-20 



348 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Junior Year 

Speech 4 — Voice and Diction 

H. D. Ed. 100. 101 — Principles of Human Development 

Mus. 50 — Elementary Conducting 

Mus. 120 — Advanced History and Appreciation of Music 

Mus. 150— 151— Harmony III, IV 

Mus. 160 — Advanced Choral Conducting, Materials, and Methods 

Mus. 161 — Advanced Orchestral Conducting, Materials, and Methods.... 

Electives 

Applied Music as needed— Mus 112, 152, 113, 153, 94, 114, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10 
(one credit each) 

Total 

Senior Year 

Ed. 140 — Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation 

Ed. 150 — Educational Measurement 

Ed. 130 (or 131) — Theory of the Junior (or Senior) High School 

Ed. 149 — Methods and Practice of Teaching 

Electives 

Applied Music as needed— Mus. 172, 173, 154, 174, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10 (one., 
credit each) 

Total 



/ 


// 




8 


3 


3 


2 




3 




3 


3 


. . . . 


2 




2 


3 


3 


2 


2 



16 



18 



Nursing Education 

By cooperative arrangement between the School of Nursing and the 
College of Education, a curriculum is provided for persons who desire to 
become clinical instructors in schools of nursing. The total number of 
credits required for graduation in this curriculum is 128, of which the 
last 30 hours of work must be taken in the University of Maryland. Students 
eligible for this curriculum must have completed a three-year course in 
nurses' training, successfully passed the Maryland State Board examina- 
tion, and qualified as registered nurses. 

Nursing Education Curriculum Credits 

Credit for Nurses Training 30 to 42* 

General Requirements 

English 12 

Social Science (Soc. 1, G & P 1, H. 5 and H. 6); 12 

Education 

Ed. 100-History of Education (or nursing education 

when offered) „ 2 

Ed. 90-Development and Learning (or H. D. Ed, 100 and 101) 3 

Ed. 150-Educational Measurements , 2 

Ed. 140-Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation-Nursing 3 

•Depending on completion of Graduate Nurse Qualifying Examination of the National 
League of Nursing Education. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 349 

Ed. 160-Educational Sociology 2 

Ed. 148-Methods and Practice of Teaching-Nursing Education 6 

N. Ed. 5, 6-Teaching of Nursing Arts 6 

P. E. 160-Therapeutics 3 

Physical Education as required by the University 

Science 

Bact. 1-General Bacteriology 3 

Bact. 101-Pathogenic Bacteriology 3 

Chem. 1, 3-General Chemistry 6 

Electives (In sociology, psychology, education, science, and other areas 
upon approval of adviser.) 

Physical Education and Health Education 

For detailed information on these curricula and courses, see College of 
Physical Education, Recreation and Health catalog. 

Curricula for Physical Education and Health Education 

The curricula in Physical Education and Health Education are designed 
to prepare students for teaching and for work involving educational tech- 
niques in these fields. 

The Health Education and Physical Education curricula lead primarily 
to teaching and supervising such work in schools and colleges. 

All applicants must be free of handicapping physical defects and be 
approved by the medical director and by the Dean of College of Physical 
Education, Recreation and Health. 

Any student enrolled in the College of Education who meets the above re- 
quirements may develop a minor in one of these areas by completing 20 
hours of work in that area and 4 hours in a cognate area as described below, 
and as planned in consultation with his adviser and with written approval 
of the Dean of the College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health. 

MEN 

Physical Education Curriculum 

I — Semester — \ 

Freshman Year I II 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life 3 .... 

G. & P. 1 — American Government .... 3 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology .... 4 

Sp. 4 — Voice & Diction 3 .... 

Sp. 10 — Group Discussion .... 2 

P. E. 30 — Introduction to Physical Education, Recreation, and Health 3 

P. E. 40— Basic Body Controls 1 

P. E. 50 — Rhythmic Analysis and Movement 1 .... 

P. E. 60 — Basic Rhythm Skills 1 

P. E. 61, 63— Sport Skills and Gymnastics 2 2 

A. S. 1, 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C 3 3 

Total 19 18 



350 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature. 
Hist. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization. 
Zool. 14, 15 — Human Anatomy and Physiology. 

Phys. 1 — Elements of Physics 

Hea. 40 — Personal and Community Health 

P. E. 65, 67 — Sport Skills and Gymnastics... 
A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C 



Total 



Junior Year 

H. D. Ed. 100, 101 — Principles of Human Development I, U... 

P. E. 100 — Scientific Bases of Movement 

P. E. 101, 103 — -Organization and Officiating in Intramurals. . . 
P. E. 113, 115 — Methods and Materials for Secondary Schools. 

P. E. 123 or 125 — Coaching Athletics 

P. E. 180 — Measurement in Physical Education and Health... 

Hea. 50— First Aid and Safety 

Electives 



Total 

Senior Year 

p. E. 140 — Curriculum, Instruction and Observation 

P. E. 160 — Scientific Bases of Movement Applied 

P. E. 190 — Administration and Supervision of Physical Education, 

Rec. & Hea 

Ed. 149 — Methods and Practice of Teaching (see note below) 

Electives 



-Semester — ^ 
/ // 



17 



12 



Total 



15 



NOTE: Ed. 149 may be scheduled either semester. P. E. 140 and P. E. 160 must be scheduled 
concurrently. 



WOMEN 



Freshman Year 



Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 

See. 1 — Sociology of American Life 

G. & P. 1 — American Government 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 

Sp. 4 — Voice and Diction 

Sp. 10 — Group Discussion 

P. E. 30 — Introduction to Physical Education, Recreation, and Health. 

E. 40 — Basic Body Controls 

E. 50 — Rhythmic Analysis and Movement 

E. 60— Basic Rhythm Skills 

E. 52 — Dance Techniques 

E. 62, 64 — Elementary Techniques of Sports and Gymnastics 



Total 16 16 

NOTE: P. E. 72 and/or 74 may be required depending upon swimming ability of student. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 351 

I — Semester — \ 

Sophomore Year I II 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature 3 8 

History B, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

Zool. 14, 15 — Human Anatomy and Physiology 4 4 

Phys. 1 — Elements of Physics 3 .... 

Hea. 40 — Personal and Community Health .... 3 

P. E. 54 — Dance Techniques 1 .... 

P. E. 56 — Methods and Materials in Dance .... 2 

P. E. 66, 68— Techniques of Sports 2 2 

P. E. 82, 84— Officiating 1 1 

Total 17 18 

NOTE: P. E. 76 may be required depending upon swimming ability of student. 

Junior Year 

H. D. Ed. 100, 101 — Principles of Human Development I, II 3 3 

P. E. 78— Methods of Teaching Aquatics 2 

P. E. 100 — Scientific Bases of Movement 4 .... 

P. E. 114, 116 — Methods and Materials for Secondary Schools 3 3 

P. E. 124. 126— Methods and Materials in Team Sports 2 2 

P. E. 180 — Measurement in Physical Education and Health 3 .... 

Hea. 50— First Aid and Safety 2 

Electives 3 

Total 15 15 

Senior Year 

p. E. 140 — Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation .... 3 

P. E. 160 — Scientific Bases of Movement Applied 3 

P. E. 190 — Administration and Supervision of Physical Education, Rec. 

& Hea 3 

Ed. 149 — Methods and Practice of Teaching (see note below) .... 9 

Electives 13 

Total 16 15 

NOTE: When Ed. 149 is taken, P. E. 140 and P. E. 160 must also be scheduled concurrently. 

MEN 
Health Education Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature I 8 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life 3 .... 

G. & P. 1 — American Government .... S 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology .... 4 

Sp. 4 — Voice and Diction 3 .... 

Sp. 10 — Group Discussion .... 2 

P. E. 30 — Introduction to Physical Education, Recreation and Health.. 3 

P. E. 61, 63 — Sport Skills and Gymnastics 2 2 

A. S. 1, 2 — Basic Air Force R. O. T. C 3 3 

Totel 17 18 



352 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Sophomore Year 

Ene- 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature 

Hist. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 

Zool. 14, 16 — Human Anatomy and Physiology 

Hea. 40 — Personal and Community Health 

Hea. 50 — First Aid and Safety 

P. E. 65, 67 — Sport Skills and Gymnastics 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C 

Electives 

Total 

Junior Year 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology 

Nut. 10 — Elements of Nutrition 

P. E. 180 — Measurement in Physical Education and Health 

Hea. 110 — Health Service and Supervision 

Hea. 120 — Teaching Health 

Bact. 5 — Advanced General Bacteriology 

H. D. Ed. 100, 101 — Principles of Human Development I, H 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology 

Psych. 5 — Mental Hygiene 

Electives 

Total 

Senior Year 

p. E. 140 — Curriculum, Instruction and Observation 

P. E. 190 — Administration and Supervision of Physical Education, 

Recreation, and Health 

Ed. 149 — Methods and Practice of Teaching 

Electives 

Total 



■Semester — ^ 


/ 


II 


3 


a 


3 


s 


4 


4 




3 




2 


2 


2 


3 


3 



17 



20 





3 




4 


3 


3 


3 


.... 


, . 


8 


2 


2 


17 


18 



WOMEN 



Freshman Year 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life 

G. & P. 1 — American Government 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 

Sp. 4 — Voice and Diction 

Sp. 10 — Group Discussion 

P. E. 30 — Introduction to Physical Education, Recreation and Health. 

P. E. 40— Basic Body Controls 

P. E. 62, 64 — Elementary Techniques of Sports and Gymnastics 

Electives 

Total 



15 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 353 

I — Semester — \ 

Sophomore Year I II 

Ensr. 8, 4 — Composition and World Literature 3 3 

Hist. B, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 8 

Zool. 14, IB — Human Anatomy and Physiology 4 4 

Hea. 40 — -Personal and Community Health .... 3 

P. E. 66, 68 — Techniques of Sports 2 2 

Nut. 10 — Elements of Nutrition 3 

Electives 3 . . • ■ 

Total 15 18 

Junior Year 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology 4 .... 

Bact. B — Advanced General Bacteriology .... 4 

P. E. 180 — Measurement in Physical Education and Health 3 .... 

Hea. 110 — Health Service and Supervision 2 .... 

Hea. 120 — Teaching Health 3 

H. D. Ed. 100, 101 — Principles of Human Development I, 11 3 3 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology 3 .... 

Psych. 5 — Mental Hygiene .... 3 

Electives 2 3 

Total 17 16 

Senior Year 

Hea. BO — First Aid and Safety 2 .... 

P. E. 140 — Curriculum, Instruction and Observation .... 3 

P. E. 190 — Administration and Supervision of Physical Education, 

Recreation and Health .... S 

Ed. 149 — Methods and Practice Teaching .... 9 

Electives .... IB 

Total 15 17 

Minor in Physical Education 

Students registered in the College of Education, with a minor in Physical 
Education, must offer 30 semester hours in this area. For guidance in the 
selection of courses to meet this requirement, see the catalog of the College 
of Physical Education, Health, and Recreation. 



354 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

The University reserves the right to withdraw or discontinue any course 
for which an insufficient number of students has registered to warrant 
giving the course. In such an event, no fee will be charged for transfer to 
another course. 

Courses are designated by numbers as follows: 
1 to 99: courses for undergraduates. 
100 to 199: courses for advanced undergraduates and graduates. (Not 

all courses numbered 100 to 199 may be taken for graduate credit.) 
200 to 299: courses for graduates only. 
A course with a single number extends through one semester. A course 
with a double niimber extends through two semesters. 

Courses not otherwise designated are lecture courses. The number of 
credit hours is shown by the arabic numeral in parentheses after the title 
of the course. 

A separate schedule of courses is issued each semester, giving the hours, 
places of meeting, and other information required by the student in making 
out his program. Students obtain these schedules when they register. 

EDUCATION 
Courses Primarily for Freshmen and Sophomores 

Ed. 2. Introduction to Education (2) — First and second semesters. Re- 
quired of freshmen in Education and recommended for other freshmen who 
are interested in teaching. 

An exploratory or guidance course designed to help students choose 
wisely in their preparation for the teaching profession. Types of positions, 
teacher supply and demand, favorable and unfavorable aspects of teaching, 
and types of personal and professional competence required of teachers are 
among the topics included. The testing and observational program of the 
College of Education is begun in this course. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

(Wiggin.) 

Ed. 6. Observation of Teaching (1). 

Twenty hours of directed observation. Reports, conferences, and 
criticisms. 

Ed. 52. Children's Literature (2) — First and second semesters and sum- 
mer session. Prerequisite, English 1, 2. 

A study of literary values in prose and verse for children. (Bryan.) 

Ed. 90. Development and Learning (3). 

A study of the principles of learning and their application to school 
situations. Designed to meet the usual teacher-certification requirement for 
educational psychology. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 856 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Ed. 100. History of Education I (2) — First semester. 
A study of educational institutions and thought through the ancient, 
mediaeval, and early modem periods. (Wiggin.) 

Ed. 101 History of Edncation II (2) 

Emphasis is placed on the post-Rennaissance periods. (Wiggin.) 

Ed. 102. History of Education in the United States (2) — Second semester. 

A study of the origins and development of the chief features of the 

present system of education in the United States. (Wiggin.) 

Ed. 105. Comparative Education — European (2) 

A study of national systems of education with the primary purpose of 
discovering their characteristic differences and formulating criteria for 
judging their worth. (Stewart.) 

Ed. 106. Comparative Education — Latin American (2) 
This course is a continuation of Ed. 105, with emphasis upon the national 
educational systems of the Western Hemisphere. (Stewart.) 

Ed. 107. Philosophy of Education (2) 

A study of the great educational philosophers and systems of thought 
affecting the development of modern education. 

Ed. 121. The Language Arts in the Elementary School (2) 

This course is concerned with present trends in the teaching of reading, 
spelling, handwriting, written and oral language, and creative expression. 
Special emphasis is given to the use of the skills in meaningful situations 
having real significance to the pupils. 

Ed. 122. The Social Studies in the Elementary School (2) 

The emphasis in this course is on pupil growth through social experi- 
ences. Consideration is given to the utilization of environmental resources, 
curriculum, organization and methods of teaching, and evaluation of newer 
methods and materials in the field. 

Ed. 123. The Child and the Curriculum (2). 

This course will emphasize the relation of the elementary school curricu- 
lum to child growth and development. Recent trends in curriculum organ- 
ization; the eflFect of school environment on learning; readiness to learn; 
and adapting curriculum content and methods to the maturity levels of 
children will be emphasized. 

Ed. 125. Creative Expression in the Elementary School (2) 

This course allows for specialization in selected phases of the creative 
arts. Separate sections will be scheduled in such fields as art, dramatics, 
and music. 



356 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Ed. 126. The Elementary School Curriculum (2) 

A study of important developments in elementary education with par- 
ticular attention to methods and materials which may be used to improve 
the development of pupils in elementary schools. Problems which are 
encountered in day-to-day teaching situations receive much attention. 

Ed. 127. Teaching in Elementary Schools (2-6). 

This course provides a comprehensive view of teaching in elementary 
schools. There is emphasis on planning the sequence of activities during 
the school day, basic teaching strategies, techniques of pupil-teacher 
planning, grouping of pupils, management of routine, cooperation with 
supervisors and administrators, teacher-parent and teacher-pupil relations, 
and analysis of instructional materials. 

*Ed. 130. Theory of the Junior High School (2). 

This course gives a general overview of the junior high school. It includes 
consideration of the purposes, functions, and characteristics of this school 
unit; a study of its population, organization, program of studies, methods, 
staff, and other similar topics, together with their implications for pros- 
pective teachers. For scheduling plan, see Ed. 149. 

*Ed. 131. Theory of the Senior High School (2). 

The secondary school population; the school as an instrument of society; 
relation of the secondary school to other schools; aims of secondary edu- 
cation; curriculum and methods; extra-curricular activities; guidance and 
placement; teacher certification and employment in Maryland and the 
District of Columbia. For scheduling plan, see Ed. 149. 

Ed. 133. Methods of Teaching the Social Studies (2)— Offered in Balti- 
more. 

The course is designed to give practical training in the everyday teaching 
situations. Emphasis is placed on the use of various lesson techniques, 
audio and visual aids, reference materials, and testing programs. Atten- 
tion is given to the adaptation of teaching methods to individual and gfroup 
differences. Consideration is given to present tendencies and aims of in- 
struction in the social studies. 

• Ed. 134. Materials and Procedure for the High School Core Curriculum 
(2). 

This course is designed to bring practical suggestions to teachers who are 
in charge of core classes in junior and senior high schools. Materials and 
teaching procedures for specific units of work are stressed. 

Ed. 137. Science in the Junior High School (2) — Summer school. 

A study of the place, function and content of science in junior high school 
programs. Applications to core curriculum organization. Laboratory fee, 
$2.00. 



•Credit is accepted for Ed. 180 or Ed. 131, but not for both coursee. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 357 

Ed. 140. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation (3) — First and second 
semesters. 

This course is offered in separate sections for the various subject matter 
areas, namely, English, social studies, foreign language, science, mathe- 
matics, art education, business education, industrial education, music edu- 
cation, nursing education, and physical education. Registration cards must 
include the subject-matter area as well as the name and number of the 
course. Graduate credit is allowed only by special arrangement. 

In each section the objectives, selection and organization of subject matter, 
appropriate methods, lesson plans, textbooks, and other instructional mate- 
rials, measurement, and other topics pertinent to the particular subject 
matter area are treated. 

Twenty periods of observation. (Staff.) 

Ed. 141. High School Course of Study-English (2) — First semester. 

This course is concerned with the selection and organization of content 
for English classes in secondary schools. Subject matter is analyzed to 
clarify controversial elements of form, style, and usage. (Bryan.) 

Ed. 142. High School Course of Study-Literature (2). 

Literature adapted to the various grade levels of junior and senior high 
schools is studied. (Bryan.) 

Ed. 145. Principles of High School Teaching (2-3) — First and second 
semesters. 

The class sessions of Ed. 149 but with no student teaching. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 147. Audio-Visual Education (2) — First semester and summer 
session. (Maley.) 

Sensory impressions in their relation to learning; projection apparatus, 
its cost and operation; slides, film-strips, and films; physical principles 
underlying projection; auditory aids to instruction; field trips; pictures, 
models, and graphic materials; integration of sensory aids with organized 
instruction. Recommended for vocational industrial education students. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

Ed. 148. Methods and Practice of Teaching (2-6) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, Ed. 140, grade-point average of 2.275, and ap- 
proval of faculty. Undergraduate credit only. Laboratory fee, $30.00. 

Observation, participation, and teaching in a high school class under 
the direction of the regular teacher and the university adviser. Two hours 
of class sessions weekly, identical with those of Ed. 149, are included. 
Applications must be made as for Ed. 149. 

Students should arrange their university schedules so as to allow ample 
time for the student teaching assignment. 

Open only to experienced teachers and other exceptional students. 

For scheduling plan, see Ed. 149. (Brechbill and Staff.) 



358 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Ed. 149. Methods and Practice of Teaching (9) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, Ed. 140, grade-point average of 2.275, and ap- 
proval of faculty. Undergraduate credit only. Laboratory fee, $30.00. 

Students who register for this course serve as apprentice teachers in the 
schools to which they are assigned. Full time for one-half of one semester 
is devoted to this work. Two hours of weekly class meetings throughout 
the semester are included in which study is made of the principles and 
methods of teaching. One hour of group conferences weekly. 

In the half-semester not devoted to student teaching, certain courses are 
blocked, including the following: Ed. 130, Ed. 131, Ed. 150, Ed. 140, Cr. 198, 
H. E. Ed. 102, H. Mgt. 152, P. E. 140, P. E. 190, P. E. 124. 

Application forms for this course, properly filled in, must be submitted 
to the Director of Student Teaching not less than ninety days before regis- 
tration. (Brechbill and Staff.) 

Ed. 150. Educational Measurement (2) — First and second semesters. 

A study of tests and examinations with emphasis upon their construction 
and use. Types of tests; purposes of testing; elementary statistical con- 
cepts and processes used in summarizing and analyzing test results; school 
marks. For scheduling plan, see Ed. 149. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 151. Remedial Reading Instruction (2) — First semester. 

Causes for reading disabilities; diagnostic techniques; and corrective 
methods are studied. Instructional materials are evaluated. The course is 
designed for both elementary and secondary school teachers. (Schindler.) 

Ed. 152. The Adolescent: Characteristics and Problems (2). 

This course deals with the intellectual, emotional, social, and vocational 
problems which arise in the transitional period between childhood and adult- 
hood, the secondary school period. 

Ed. 153. The Improvement of Reading (2). 

Attention is given to reading readiness, activities for the development 
of interests and language skills, the use of experience stories, procedures 
in using basal readers, the organization of content units to promote de- 
velopment of reading skills, the program in word analysis, selection and use 
of children's literature, and procedures for determining individual needs. 

(Schindler.) 

E3d. 160, Educational Sociology — Introductory (2). 

This course deals with data of the social sciences which are germane to 
the work of teachers. Consideration is given to implications of democratic 
ideologry for educational endeavor, educational tasks imposed by changes 
in population and technological trends, the welfare status of pupils, the 
socio-economic attitudes of individuals who control the schools, and other 
elements of community background which have significance in relation 
to schools. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 359 

Ed. 161. Principles of Guidance (2) — First and second semesters. 

A survey course of guidance principles and techniques, and the admin- 
istration of a program of guidance services. The basic course for counseling 
majors. A course of value for teachers at any level. (Byrne.) 

Ed. 162. Mental Hygiene in the Classroom (2). 

The practical application of the principles of mental hygiene to class- 
room problems. 

Ed. 163, 164 and 165. Community Study Laboratory I, II and III (2, 
2,2). 

This course involves experience from the educational standpoint with 
the agencies, institutions, cultural patterns, living conditions, and social 
processes which play significant roles in shaping the behavior of children 
and adults and which must be understood by individuals working toward 
school and community improvement. Each participant becomes a member 
of a group in a given area of study and concentrates on problems which 
have direct application in his school situation. Readings are integrated 
with techniques of study. (Schindler.) 

Ed. 170. Introduction to Special Education (2) 

This course is designed to give teachers, principals, attendance workers, 
and supervisors an understanding of the needs of all types of exceptional 
children. Preventive and remedial measures are stressed. 

Ed. 171. Education of Retarded and Slow-Learning Children (2) 

A study of retarded and slow-learning children, including discovery, 
analysis of causes, testing techniques, case studies, and remedial educational 
measures. 

Ed. 188. Special Problems in Education (1-3). Prerequisite, consent of 
instructor. Not required. Available to mature students only. 

Individual study of approved problems of special interest to student. 

(Staff.) 

NOTE: Course cards must have the title of the problem and the name 
of the faculty member who has approved it. 

Ed. 191. Principles of Adult Education (2) 

The course includes a study of adult educational agencies, both formal and 
informal, with special reference to the development of adult education in the 
United States, the interests and abilities of adults, and the techniques of 
adult learning. Emphasis is laid on practical aids for teachers of various 
types of adult groups. (Wiggin.) 

For Graduates 

Ed. 202. The Junior College (2). 

The philosophy and development of the junior college in the United States 
with emphasis on curriculum and administrative controls. 



360 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Ed. 203. Problems in Higher Education (2). 

A study of present problems in higher education. 

Ed. 205. Seminar in Comparative Education (2). 

Ed. 207. Seminar in History and Philosophy of Education (2). 

(Wiggin.) 

Ed. 210. The Organization and Administration of Public Education (2) — 

First semester. 

The basic course in school administration. The course deals with the 
organization and administration of school systems — at the local, state, and 
federal levels; and with the administrative relationships involved. (Newell.) 

Ed. 211. The Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Secondary 
Schools (2) — Second semester. 

The work of the secondary school principal. The course includes topics 
such as personnel problems, supervision, school-community relationships, 
student activities, schedule making, and internal financial accounting. 

(Newell.) 

Ed. 212. School Finance and Business Administration (2) 

An introduction to the finance phase of public school administration. The 
«<i'Urse deals with the basic principles of school finance; the implica- 
tions of organization and control; the planning, execution, and appraisal 
of the activities involved in public school finance such as budgeting, taxing, 
purchasing, service of supplies, and accounting. (Van Zwoll.) 

Ed. 214. School Buildings and Equipment (2). 

An orientation course in which school plant and plant planning are 
considered as contributing to instructional programs. This course supplies 
the basis for analyzing existing plant, for determining need for new 
plant, for selecting and developing school building sites, and for planning 
school building. Theory is put into practice in the development of line 
dravnngs for school building design in terms of the instructional program. 
Opportunity is provided to work on specific equipment problems. 

(Van Zwoll.) 

Ed. 215. Public Education in Maryland (2) 

A study of Maryland Public School system with special reference to school 
law. 

Ed. 216. High School Supervision (2). Prerequisite, teaching experience. 

This course deals with recent trends in supervision; the nature and func- 
tion of supervision; planning supervisory programs; evaluation and rating; 
participation of teachers and other groups in policy development; school 
workshops; and other means for the improvement of instruction. Fee, $1.00. 

(Newell.) 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 361 

Ed. 217. Administration and Supervision in Elementary Schools (2). 

A study of the problems connected with organizing and operating elemen- 
tary schools and directing instruction. 

Ed. 218. School Surveys (2-6). 

This course includes study of school surveys with emphasis on problems 
of school organization and administration, finance and school plant planning. 
Field work in school surveys is required in this course. (Newell.) 

EJd. 219. Seminar in School Administration (2). (Van ZwoU.) 

Ed. 220. Pupil Transportation (2) 

This course includes consideration of the organization and administration 
of state, county, and district pupil transportation service with emphasis on 
safety and economy. The planning of bus routes; the selection and training 
of bus drivers, and maintenance mechanics; the specification of school buses; 
and procurement procedures are included in this course. 

Ed. 222. Seminar in Supervision (2) — Prerequisite, Ed. 216. Prerequisite 
may be waived upon approval of the instructor. 

Ed. 223. Practicum in Personnel Relationships (2-6) — Prerequisite, 
Ed. 210. Prerequisite may be waived by consent of instructor. Teaching 
experience required. 

This course is designed to help teachers, school administrators, and 
other school staff members to learn to function more effectively in de- 
veloping educational policy in group situations. 

Each student in the course is required to be working concurrently in 
the field with a group of school staff members or citizens on actual school 
problems. (Newell.) 

Ed. 224. Internship in School Administration (12-16) 

Internships in administration or supervision may be provided for a few 
students who have had teaching experience. The intern will be assigned to 
assist a principal, supervisor, or some other staff member in a school or 
school system. In addition to the experience in the school situation, a pro- 
gram of studies will be planned by the intern, the appropriate member of 
the school staff, and the sponsor from the university. The sponsor will 
maintain a close working relationship with the intern and the other persons 
involved. (Newell.) 

Ed- 225. School Public Relations (2). 

A study of the relationships between the public school as a social insti- 
tution and the community of which it is a part. This course deals with the 
agents who participate in the interpretative process, with propaganda 
and the schools, with parent-teacher associations and other lay advisory 
groups, and with such means of publicity as the newspaper, radio, and 
school publications. (Van ZwoU.) 



362 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Ed. 226. Child Accounting (2). 

An inquiry into the keeping of essential records pertaining to the pre- 
school, school, and post-school life of individuals. This course explores 
the area of child accounting in terms of need, development, and current 
practice in local districts and in the state. Census taking, individual record 
practices, and administrative record procedures are taken into consid- 
eration. (Van Zwoll.) 

Ed. 227. Public School Personnel Administration (2). 

An examination of practices with respect to personnel administration. 
This course serves to aid in the development of principles applying to 
personnel administration. Personnel needs, the means for satisfying per- 
sonnel needs, personnel relationships, tenure, salary schedules, leaves of 
absence, and retirement plans are reviewed. Local and state aspects of 
the personnel problem are identified. (Van Zwoll.) 

Ed. 229. Seminar in Elementary Education. (2). 

Attention will be centered on selected problems in curriculum making, 
teaching, and child development. Members of the class may concentrate 
on seminar papers, prepare materials for their schools, or read extensively 
to discover viewpoints and research data on problems and experimental 
practices. (Schindler.) 

Ed. 230. Elementary School Supervision (2). 

This course is especially concerned with the nature and function of super- 
vision, various techniques and procedures which supervisors may use, 
human factors to be considered in planning supervisory programs, and 
personal qualities essential for effective supervision. The supervisor's role 
in creating conditions which are conducive to superior teaching and learn- 
ing is stressed. 

Ed. 232. Student Activities in the High School (2). 

This course offers a consideration of the problems connected with the 
so-called "extra-curricular" activities of the present-day high school. Spe- 
cial consideration will be given to (1) philosophical bases, (2) aims, (3) 
organization, and (4) supervision of student activities such as student coun- 
cil, school publications, musical organizations, dramatics, assemblies, and 
clubs. Present practices and current trends will be evaluated. 

Ed. 235. Curriculum Development in Elementary Schools (2). 

This course is concerned with problems ordinarily encountered in cur- 
riculum evaluation and revision. Attention is given to sociological and 
philosophical factors which influence the curriculum, principles for the 
selection and organization of content and learning activities, patterns of 
the curriculum organization, construction and use of courses of study, the 
utilization of personnel for curriculum development, and controversial 
curriculum issues. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 363 

Ed. 236. Curriculum Development in the Secondary School (2) 

Curriculum planning; philosophical bases, objectives, learning experi- 
ences, organization of appropriate content, and means of evaluation. 

Ed. 239. Seminar in Secondary Education (2). 

Ed. 242. Coordination in Work-Experience Programs (2). 

This course surveys and evaluates the qualifications and duties of a 
teacher-coordinator in a work-experience program. It deals particularly 
with evolving patterns in city and county schools in Maryland, and is 
designed to help teacher-coordinators, guidance counselors, and others in 
the supervisory and administrative personnel concerned with functioning 
relationships of part-time cooperative education in a comprehensive 
educational program. (Brown.) 

Ed. 243. Application of Theory and Research to Arithmetic in Elemen> 
tary Schools (2). 

Implications of experimental practices, the proposals of eminent writers, 
and the results of research for the teaching of arithmetic in elementary 
schools. (Schindler.) 

Ed. 244. Applications of Theory and Research to the Language Arts in 
Elementary Schools (2). 

Implications of experimental practices, the proposals of eminent writers, 
and the results of research for the language arts in the elementary 
schools. (Schindler.) 

Ed. 245. Applications of Theory and Research to High School Teaching 
(2). 

Implications of experimental practices, the proposals of eminent writers, 
and the results of research for the improvement of teaching on the sec- 
ondary level. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 246. Applications of Theory and Research to the Social Studies in 
Elementary Schools (2). 

The results of research, viewpoints on what the content and organization 
of the social studies program should be, and important curriculum trends 
are analyzed critically for their implications. 

Ed. 247. Seminar in Science Education (2). 

Ed. 248. Seminar in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education (2). 
(See Ind. Ed. 248.) (Browm, Hornbake.) 

Ed. 250. Analysis of the Individual (2) — First semester. 

To provide guidance workers and teachers with proficiencies in identifying 
aptitudes, interests, temperaments, and other essential characteristics of 
each individual through various techniques. Records pertinent to in- 
dividual analysis and their interpretation will be studied. Ed. 161 is 
desirable as a prior course. Required of counseling majors. (Byrne.) 



364 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Ed. 253. Guidance Information (2) — Second semester. 

To provide guidance workers and others interested with proficiencies for 
finding and presenting to pupils information pupils need in making choices, 
plans, and interpretations in major problem areas, such as social, occupa- 
tional, and educational problems. Required of counseling majors. Ed. 161 
is desirable as a prior course. (Byrne.) 

Ed. 260. Principles of School Counseling (2) — First semester. Pre- 
requisites, Ed. 161, Ed. 250, Ed. 253 for majors. Prerequisites may be 
waived by instructor. 

A basic course for counselors in public schools in the theories of counsel- 
ing and study of techniques. Emphasis is on study of techniques used 
with preadolescents and adolescents. (Byrne.) 

Ed. 261. Case Studies in School Counseling (2) — Second semester. 
Prerequisite, Ed. 260. 

To provide elementary proficiencies in counseling in public schools through 
vicarious practice. Discussion of techniques applicable to specific cases. 
These cases will be actual ones reported by counselors in person, in writing, 
and by sound. Problems met by counselors in addition to problems of 
technique will be covered. (Byrne.) 

Ed. 263, 264. Aptitudes and Aptitude Testing (2, 2). (Offered in Balti- 
more.) 

Ed. 267. Curriculum Construction Through Community Analysis (2). 

Prerequisites, Ed. 163, 164, 165. 

Selected research problems in the field of community study with emphasis 
on Baltimore area. (Schindler.) 

Ed. 268. Seminar in Educational Sociology (2). 

Ed. 269. Seminar in Guidance (2) — Second semester. Registration only 
by approval of instructor. 

For majors in guidance who are about to complete certification or degree 
requirements. Reports and discussions on advanced readings and studies 
in the guidance field. (Byrne.) 

Ed. 278. Seminar in Special Education (2). 

Ed. 279. Seminar in Adult Education (2). (Wiggin.) 

Ed. 280. Research Methods and Materials in Education (2). 

A study of research in education, the sources of information and tech- 
niques available, and approved form and style in the preparation of research 
reports and theses. 

Ed. 281. Source Materials in Education (2). 

A course based on the text and work-book by Carter Alexander, "How to 
Locate Educational Information and Data." The work involves attendance 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 365 

at class for one hour with two additional hourse of work in the library. 
Especially valuable for students interested in research. 

Ed. 288. Research Problems in Education (1-6) — First and second semes- 
ters and summer session. 

Master of education or doctoral candidates who desire to pursue special 
research problems under the direction of their advisers may register for 
credit under this number, (Staff.) 

Ed. 289. Research — Thesis (1-6). First and second semesters and sum- 
mer session. 

Students who desire credit for a master's thesis, a doctoral dissertation, 
or a doctoral project should use this number. (Staff.) 

Ed. 291. Administrative Direction of Special Curricular Fields (2). 

A course designed to acquaint school administrators with the adminis- 
trative techniques, opportunities and responsibilities in the modem pro- 
grams of business education, home economics, and industrial arts. It will 
include an over-view of best present practice, recommendations of national 
organizations and agencies, and the development of standards for selec- 
tion of professional personnel, evaluation of programs, development of facili- 
ties, and allocation of budget. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
B. Ed. 100. Techniques of Teaching Office Skills (2)— First semester. 

An examination and evaluation of the aims, methods, and course contents 
of each of the office skill subjects offered in the high school curriculum. 

(Patrick.) 

B. Ed. 101. Methods and Materials in Teaching Office Skills (2). 

Problems in development of occupational competency, achievement tests, 
standards of achievement, instructional materials, transcription, and the 
integration of office skills. (Patrick.) 

B. Ed. 102. Methods and Materials in Teaching Bookkeeping and Related 
Subjects (2) 

Important problems and procedures in the mastery of bookkeeping and 
related office knowledges and skills including a consideration of materials 
and teaching procedures. (Patrick.) 

B. Ed. 103. Basic Business Subjects in the Junior High School (2) 

This course deals with the exploratory aspects of basic business subjects 
and fundamentals of consumer business education, available instructional 
materials, and teaching procedures. 



366 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

B. Ed. 104. Basic Business Education in the Secondary Schools (2). 

Consideration will be given to the vocational and consumer objectives; 
subject matter content; methods of organizing material; types of class- 
room activities; and teaching procedures in basic business subjects in the 
secondary schools. (Patrick.) 

B. Ed. 200. Administration and Supervision of Business Education (2) 

Major emphasis on departmental organization, curriculum, equipment, 
budget making, guidance, placement and follow-up, visual aids, and the in- 
service training of teachers. 

For administrators, supervisors, and teachers of business subjects. 

B. Ed. 255. Principles and Problems of Business Education (2). 

Principles and practices in business education; growth and present status; 
vocational business education; general business education; relation to con- 
sumer education and to education in general. (Patrick.) 

B. Ed. 256. Curriculum Development in Business Education (2-6). 

This course is especially designed for graduate students interested in 
devoting the summer session to a concentrated study of curriculum planning 
in business education. Emphasis will be placed on the philosophy and ob- 
jectives of the business education program, and on curriculum research, and 
organization of appropriate course content. 

Opportunity will be provided through individual and group projects to 
study local school curricular problems. Available to the group will be 
the resources and personnel of the U. S. Office of Education, National Educa- 
tion Association, Maryland school system, and of various business or- 
ganizations. 

A comprehensive report of the individual and group projects will be pre- 
pared at the end of the summer term. Enrollment limited to 25 students. 

CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

C. Ed. 2. Orientation, Observation, and Record Taking (2) — First and 
second semesters. 

Orientation to nursery school and kindergarten; introduction to methods 
of observing and recording behavior of children at different age levels. 

(Glass.) 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

C. Ed. 100. Child Development I — Infancy (3) — First semester. 

Understanding the pattern of growth. Factors influencing the physical, 
mental, and emotional development of the infant; relation of care during 
the first eighteen months to presonality development; study of a child 
fourteen months of age or under. (McNaughton.) 

C. Ed. 101. Child Development II — Early Childhood (3) — Second semes- 
ter. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 367 

A study of the developmental growth of the child from eighteen months 
to five years; characteristics of each age level; experiences which help 
the child in his motor, mental, emotional and social development; obser- 
vation in the nursery school; study of one child. (McNaughton.) 

C. Ed. 102. Child Development III— The Child from Five to Ten (2)— 

First and second semesters. 

Development, characteristics and interests of the middle-age child; 
interpersonal relations as affected by home, school, and community; obser- 
vations in kindergarten, public schools, and community organizations. 

(Stant.) 

C. Ed. 110. Child Development IV (3) — First and second semesters. 

A study of the developmental growth of the child from birth to five 
years; observation in the nursery school. Designed for students in other 
colleges of the University. Laboratory fee, $1.00. (McNaughton.) 

C. Ed. 113. Education of the Young Child I (2). 

A study of the nature and needs of the child from two to six years of 
age, with emphasis upon learning tendencies; the child's relation to the 
materials, experiences, and the people of his world at home and at school. 

(McNaughton.) 

C. Ed. 114. Education of the Young Child II — The Social and Emotional 
Needs of the Young Child (2). 

An attempt to understand what lies beneath outward behavior rather 
than on conformity as such; acceptance of the child's feelings; helping the 
child to live richly and fully on his own level; seeing the child as a whole; 
working with the parents and the home to bring about the most favorable 
adjustment of the child. (Glass.) 

C. Ed. 115. Children's Activities and Activities Materials (3) — First 
and second semesters. Prerequisites, C. Ed. 100, 101, or 110. 

For Nursery School and Kindergarten majors. (Shulman andl Powell.) 

C. Ed. 116, 117. Creative Expression; Art, Music, Dance (2-3, 2-3) — 

First and second semesters. 

Creative experience in the arts on the level of the student; correlation 
of the arts as related to the abilities of the child in terms of his develop- 
ment. (MacCarteney.) 

C. Ed. 119. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Cooperative 
Nursery School (2-3). 

C. Ed. 140. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Nursery School 

(3) — First and second semesters. Prerequisites, C. Ed. 100 and 101, or 
C. Ed. 110. 

Standards and organization of nursery school; study of age levels and 
methods of guidance; selection and use of equipment; observation in 
nursery school. (Powell.) 



368 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

C. Ed. 145. Guidance in Behavior Problems (3) — First ssmester. 
Handling of individual and group problems on the pre-school level; 
gathering of objective data; recording and observation; parent-teacher 

relationship, with special handling of child; guidance resources of com- 
munity. (Powell.) 

C. Ed. 149. Teaching Nursery School (4-8) — First and second semesters. 

Admission to student teaching in Nursery School and Kindergarten de- 
pends upon physical and emotional fitness, and upon approval of the 
teaching staff of the department. An academic average of 2.275 is re- 
quired. It is recommended that each student have some summer experience 
w^ith young children. 

Teaching experience in the University Nursery School and in those of 
nearby communities. Approximately thirty clock-hours of school experience 
are required for each semester-hour of credit. (Shulman.) 

C. Ed. 150. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Kindergarten 
(2-3) — Second semester. 

A study of the interests, needs and activities of children living together 
in the kindergarten; discussion and workshop. (Limburg.) 

C Ed. 159. Teaching Kindergarten (4-8) — First and second semesters. 

Admission to student teaching in Nursery School and Kindergarten de- 
pends upon physical and emotional fitness, and upon approval of the 
teaching staff of the department. An academic average of 2.275 is re- 
quired. It is recommended that each student have some summer experience 
with young children. 

Teaching experience in the University kindergarten and in those of 
nearby communities. Approximately thirty clock-hours of school experience 
are required for each semester-hour of credit. (Shulman.) 

C. Ed. 165. Leadership Training (2). 

Designed for leaders in Parent-Teacher groups and in other organiza- 
tions. Setting up the duties of a leader, participants, obseir^er and 
recorder; developing methods for discussion groups; discussion of special 
problems ot organization. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

H. E. Ed. 102. Problems in Teaching Home Economics (3) — First and 
second semesters. Required of seniors in Home Economics Education. Pre- 
requisite, H. E. Ed. 140, 

A study of the managerial aspects of teaching and administering a home- 
making program; the physical environment, organization, and sequence of 
instructional units, resource materials, evaluation, home projects. 

(Spencer.) 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 369 

H. E. Ed. 120. Evaluation of Home Economics (2). Prerequisite, H. E. 
Ed. 140. 

The meaning and function of evaluation in education; the development 
of a plan for evaluating a homemaking program with emphasis upon types 
of evaluation devices, their construction, and use. (Spencer.) 

H. E. Ed. 140. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation (3) — Second 
semester. Required of juniors in Home Economics Education. 

The place and function of home economics education in the secondary 
school curriculum. Philosophy of education for home and family living; 
characteristics of adolescence, construction of source units, lesson plans, 
and evaluation devices; directed observation in junior and senior high 
school home economics departments. (Spencer.) 

H. E. Ed. 149. Teaching Secondary School Vocational Home Economics 

(9) — First and second semesters. Prerequisite, H. E. Ed. 140 and 102 or 102 
parallel. See Ed. 149. Laboratory fee $30. 

Observation and supervised teaching in approved secondary school home 
economics departments in Maryland and the District of Columbia. 

(Spencer.) 

H. E. Ed. 200. Seminar in Home Economics Education (2) — First semes- 
ter. (Spencer.) 

H. E. Ed. 202. Trends in the Teaching and Supervision of Home Eco- 
nomics (2-4). (Spencer.) 

Study of home economics programs and practices in light of current edu- 
cational trends. Interpretation and analysis of democratic teaching pro- 
cedures, outcomes of instruction, and supervisory practices. 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION 

The staff of the Institute for Child Study offers a series of courses on 
human development and approaches to the direct study of children for mem- 
bers of the educational profession. Certain prerequisites are set up within 
the course sequences, but these prerequisites are modified by the student's 
previous experience in direct study of children; this is done in order to pro- 
vide an interrelated series of experiences leading toward synthesis and the 
ability to apply the principles of human development and behavior. 

Undergraduate courses are designed both for prospective teachers 
(H. D. Ed. 100-101) and in-service teachers (H. D. Ed. 102, 103, 104; H. D. 
Ed. 112-13, 114-15, 116-17). The graduate offering contains two series. 
H. D. Ed. 200, 201, 202, 203 provide a basic core of four seminars for 
students majoring in the field, and also provide electives (beginning with 
H. D. Ed. 200 — Introduction) for any graduate students interested in an 
overview of the field. The other seminars (H. D. Ed. 204 and above) are 
designed for emphasis in depth on the various areas of major processes 
and forces that shape the development and behavior of human beings, and 



370 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

are intended primarily for advanced graduate students. Along with most 
of the graduate seminars, H. D. Ed. 250 provides for concurrent application 
of scientific knowledge to the direct study of children as individuals and in 
groups. 

H. D. Ed. 100, 101. Principles of Human Development I and II (3, 3). 

These courses give a general overview of the scientific principles that 
describe human development and behavior and relate these principles to 
the task of the school. A year-long study of an individual child is an 
integral part of the course and will require one half-day per week for 
observing children in nearby schools. This course is designed to meet the 
usual certification requirements in Educational Psychology. 

H. D. Ed. 102, 103, 104. Child Development Laboratory I, II and III 
(2, 2, 2). 

These courses involve the direct study of children throughout the school 
year. Each participant gathers a wide body of information about an indi- 
vidual, presents the accumulating data from time to time to the study group 
for criticism and group analysis, and writes an interpretation of the 
dynamics underlying the child's learning, behavior and development. This 
course provides opportunity for teachers in-service to earn credit for par- 
ticipation in their own local child study group. 

H. D. Ed. 112, 114, 116. Scientific Concepts in Human Development I, 
II, III (3, 3, 3). 

H. D. Ed. 113, 115, 117. Laboratory in Behavior Analysis I, II, III (3, 3, 3). 

Summer workshop courses for undergraduates providing credit for as 
many as three workshops. In any one summer, concept and laboratory 
courses must be taken concurrently. 

H. D. Ed. 200. Introduction to Human Development and Child Study (3). 

This course offers a general overview of the scientific principles which 
describe human development and behavior and makes use of these prin- 
ciples in the study of individual children. Each student will observe and 
record the behavior of an individual child throughout the semester and 
must have one half-day a week free for this purpose. The course is basic 
to further work in child study and serves as a prerequisite for advanced 
courses where the student has not had field work or at least six weeks 
of workshop experience in child study. When this course is offered during 
the summer it will be H. D. Ed. 200 and intensive laboratory work with case 
records may be substituted for the study of an individual child. 

H. D. Ed. 201. Biological Bases of Behavior (3). 

This course emphasizes that understanding human life, growth and 
behavior depends on understanding the ways in which the body is able to 
capture, control and expend energy. Application throughout is made to 
human body processes and implications for understanding and working with 
people. H. D. Ed. 250 a or b or c must be taken concurrently with this 
course. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 371 

H. D. Ed. 202. Social Bases of Behavior (3). 

This course analyzes the socially inherited and transmitted patterns of 
pressures, expectations and limitations learned by an individual as he grows 
up. These are considered in relation to the patterns of feeling and behaving 
which emerge as the result of growing up in one's social group. H. D. Ed. 
250 a or b or c must be taken concurrently with this course. 

H. D. Ed. 203. Integrative Bases of Behavior (3). 

This course analyzes the organized and integrated patterns of feeling, 
thinking and behaving which emerge from the interaction of basic biological 
drives and potentials with one's unique experience growing up in a social 
group. H. D. Ed. 250 a or b or c must be taken concurrently with this course. 

H. D. Ed. 204, 205. Physical Processes in Human Development (3, 3). 

This course describes in some detail the major organic processes of: 
conception, biological inheritance; differentiation and growth of the body; 
capture, transportation and use of energy; perception of the environment; 
coordination and integration of function; adaptation to unusual demands 
and to frustration; normal individual variation in each of the above processes. 
H. D. Ed. 250 a or b or c must be taken concurrently with this course. 

H. D. Ed. 206, 207. Socialization Processes in Human Development I, 
II (3, 3). 

This course analyzes the processes by which human beings internalize the 
culture of the society in which they live. The major sub-cultures in the 
United States, their training procedures, and their characteristic human 
expressions in folk-knowledge, habits, attitudes, values, life-goals, ahd ad- 
justment patterns are analyzed. Other cultures are examined to highlight 
the American way of life and to reveal its strengths and weaknesses. H. D. 
Ed. 250 a or b or c must be taken concurrently with this course. 

H. D. Ed. 208, 209. Self Processes in Human Development I and II (3, 3). 

This course analyzes the effects of the various physical and growth 
processes, affectional relationships, socialization processes, and peer group 
roles and status on the integration, development, adjustment, and realiza- 
tion of the individual self. This analysis includes consideration of the 
nature of intelligence and of the learning processes; the development of 
skills, concepts, generalizations, symbolizations, reasoning and imag^ination, 
attitudes, values, goals and purposes; and the conditions, relationships and 
experiences that are essential to full human development. The more com- 
mon adjustment problems experienced in our society at various maturity 
levels, and the adjustment mechanisms used to meet them are studied. H. D. 
Ed. 250 a or b or c must be taken concurrently with this course. 

H. D. Ed. 210. Aflfectional Relationships and Processes in Human Develop- 
ment (3). 

This course describes the normal development, expression and influence 
of love in infancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood. It deals with the 



372 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

influence of parent-child relationships involving normal acceptance, neglect, 
rejection, inconsistency, and over-protection upon health, learning, emotional 
behavior and personality adjustment and development. H. D. Ed. 250 
a or b or c must be taken concurrently with this course. 

H. D. Ed. 211. Peer-culture and Group Processes in Human Develop- 
ment (3). 

This course analyzes the processes of group formation, role-taking and 
status-winning. It describes the emergence of the "peer-culture" during 
childhood and the evolution of the child society at different maturity levels 
to adulthood. It analyzes the developmental tasks and adjustment problems 
associated with winning, belonging and playing roles in the peer group. 
H. D. Ed. 250 a or b or c must be taken concurrently with this course. 

H. D. Ed. 212, 214, 216. Advanced Scientific Concepts in Human Develop- 
ment I, II, III (3, 3, 3). 

H. D. Ed. 213, 215, 217. Advanced Laboratory in Behavior Anaylsis I, 
II, II (3, 3, 3). 

Summer workshop courses for graduates providing credit for as many 
as three workshops. In any one summer, concept and laboratory courses 
must be taken concurrently. 

H. D. Ed. 218. Workshop in Human Development (6) — Prerequisites 
H. D. Ed. 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217. 

Summer workshop in human development for graduate students who 
have had three workshops and wish additional workshop experience. This 
course can be taken any number of times, but cannot be used as credit 
toward a degree. 

H. D. Ed. 220. Developmental Tasks (3). 

This course describes the series of developmental tasks faced by chil- 
dren. These tasks, made necessary by the normal processes of growth and 
development, are learnings that the child needs and desires to accomplish 
because of emerging capacities for action and relationship, because of the 
demands and expectancies of his family and of society, and because of the 
progressive clarification and the directive powers of his own interests, 
attitudes, values and aspirations. Emphasis will be placed on the use of 
developmental tasks concepts in educational planning and practice. 

H. D, Ed. 230, 231. Field Program in Child Study I and II (2-6). 

This course offers apprenticeship training preparing properly qualified 
persons to become staff members in human development workshops, con- 
sultants to child study field programs and coordinators of municipal or 
regional child study programs for teachers or parents. Extensive field 
experience is provided. In general this training is open only to persons 
who have passed their preliminary examinations for the doctorate with a 
major in human development or psychology. Prerequisite, consent of 
instructor. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 373 

H. D. Ed. 250a, 250b, 250c. Direct Study of Children (1, 1, 1). 

This course provides the opportunity to observe and record the behavior 
of an individual child in a nearby school. These records will be used in 
conjunction with the advanced courses in Human Development and this 
course will be taken concurrently with such courses. Teachers active in 
their jobs while taking advanced courses in Human Development may use 
records from their own classrooms for this course. May not be taken con- 
currently with H. D. Ed. 102, 103, or 104. 

H. D. Ed. 260. Synthesis of Human Development Concepts (3). 

A seminar wherein advanced students work toward a personal synthesis 
of their own concepts in human growth and development. Emphasis is 
placed on seeing the dynamic interrelations between all processes in the 
behavior and development of an individual. Prerequisites, H. D. Ed. 204, 
206 and 208. 

H. D. Ed. 270. Seminars in Special Topics in Human Development (2-6). 

An opportunity for advanced students to focus in depth on topics of 
special interest growing out of their basic courses in human development. 
Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

For each semester hour of credit for shop and drawing courses two or 
three periods of lecture and practice are scheduled depending upon the 
specific needs of the course. 

Industrial Education 9, 10, and 11 constitute an art crafts sequence 
(Art Crafts I, II, and III). The courses are intended to assist persons who 
are preparing to teach art crafts in the junior high schools of Mary- 
land or for teachers who have already undertaken this type of work in the 
schools. The work is appropriate also for persons who teach art crafts 
at any grade level and for those who teach art crafts in camps, clubs, 
adult evening classes, and the like. 

Ind. Ed. 1 — Mechanical Drawing (2) — First semester. Two laboratory 
periods a week. 

This course constitutes an introduction to orthographic multi-view and 
isometric projection. Emphasis is placed upon the visualization of an object 
when it is represented by a multi-view drawing and upon the making of 
multi-view drawings. 

This course carries through auxiliary views, sectional views, dimension- 
ing, conventional representation and single stroke letters. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 2. Elementary Woodworking (2) — First semester. Two labora- 
tory periods a week. 

This is a woodworking course which involves primarily the use of hand 
tools. The course is developed so that the student uses practically every 
common woodworking hand tool in one or more stituations. There is also 



374 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

included elementary wood finishing, the specifying and storing of lumber, 
and the care and conditioning of tools used. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 9. Art Crafts I (2) — First semester and Summer Session. Two 
laboratory periods a week during the regular term. 

The materials used in Art Crafts I are wood, metals, leathers and plas- 
tics. Each student is provided the opportunity of doing a variety of types 
of work in the four media. Laboratory fee, $5.00 

Ind. Ed. 10. Art Crafts II (2) — Summer session. Two laboratory periods 
a day. 

Art Crafts II offers work experiences in model building, ceramics, graphic 
arts, and paper construction. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 11. Art Crafts III (2) — Summer session. Two laboratory 
periods a day. 

Art Crafts III provides instruction in the principles of design which 
are pertinent to craft work and takes up reed and raffia, threads (weaving, 
hooking, knitting), and seasonal activities. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 12. Shop Calculations (3). 

Shop Calculations is designed to give the student an understanding and 
working knowledge of the mathematical concepts related to the various 
aspects of Industrial Education. The course includes phases of algebra, 
geometry, trigonometry, and general mathematics as applied to shop and 
drawing activities. 

Ind. Ed. 21. Mechanical Drawing (2) — Second semester. Two labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 1. 

A course dealing with working drawings, machine design, pattern lay- 
outs, tracing and reproduction. Detail drawings followed by assemblies 
are presented. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 22. Machine Woodworking I (2) — Second semester. Two labo- 
ratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 2. 

Machine Woodworking I offers initial instruction in the proper operation 
of the jointer, band saw, variety saw, jig saw, mortiser, shaper, and lathe. 
The types of jobs which may be performed on each machine and their safe 
operation are of primary concern. The mediums of instruction are school- 
shop equipment, hobby items, and useful home projects. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 23. Arc and Gas Welding (1) — Second semester. One labora- 
tory period a week. 

A course designed to give the student a functional knowledge of the 
principles and use of electric and acetylene welding. Practical work is 
carried on in the construction of various projects using welded joints. 
Instruction is given in the use and care of equipment, types of welded joints, 
methods of welding, importance of welding processes in industry, safety 
considerations, etc. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 



J 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 375 

Ind. Ed. 24. Sheet Metal Work (2) — First semester. Two laboratory 
periods a week. 

Articles are made from metal in its sheet form and involve the opera- 
tions of cutting, shaping, soldering, riveting, wiring, folding, seaming, 
beading, burring, etc. The student is required to develop his own patterns 
inclusive of parallel line development, radial line development, and tri- 
angulation. Common sheet metal tools and machines are used in this course. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 26. Art Metal Work I (2) — Second semester. Two laboratory 
periods a week. 

An introductory course in designing and constructing art products in 
aluminum, copper and brass. The processes covered include surface deco- 
ration (hammering, piercing, etching, enameling), heat treatment and finish- 
ing. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 28. Electricity I (2) — First semester. Two laboratory periods 
a week. 

An introductory course to electricity in general. It deals with the elec* 
trical circuit, elementary wiring problems, the measurement of electrical 
energy, and a brief treatment of radio such as may be offered at the 
junior high school level. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 31. Mechanical Drawing (2) — First semester. Two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisites, Ind. Ed. 1 and 21. 

A course dealing with the topics enumerated in Ind. Ed. 21 but on a more 
advanced basis. The reading of prints representative of a variety of indus- 
tries is a part of this course. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 41. Architectural Drawing (2) — First semester. Two labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 1, or equivalent. 

Practical experience is provided in the design and planning of houses and 
other buildings. Working drawings, specifications and blue-prints are 
featured. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 42. Machine Woodworking II (2) — First semester. Two labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 22, or equivalent. 

Advanced production methods with emphasis on cabinetmaking and 
design. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 48. Electricity II (2) — Second semester. Two laboratory periods 
a week. 

Principles involved in A-C and D-C electrical equipment, including heat- 
ing measurements, motors and control, electro-chemistry, the electric arc, 
inductance and reactance, condensers, radio, and electronics. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. 



376 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Ind. Ed. 50. Methods of Teaching (2). (Offered in CSCS Centers.) 
For vocational and occupational teachers of shop and related subjects. 

The identification and analysis of factors essential to helping others learn; 

the types of teaching situations and techniques; the use of instruction 

sheets; measuring results and grading student progress in shop and 

related technical usbjects. 

Ind. Ed. 60. Observation and Demonstration Teaching (2). (Offered in 
Baltimore.) Prerequisite, Educational Psychology and/or Methods of 
Teaching Vocational and Occupational Subjects. 

Primarily for vocational and occupational teachers. Sixteen hours of 
directed observation and demonstration teaching. Reports, conferences, 
and criticisms constitute the remainder of scheduled activities in this course. 

Ind. Ed. 66. Art Metal Work (2) — Summer. Two laboratory periods 
a day. Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 26, or equivalent. 

Advanced practicum. It includes methods of bowl raising and bowl orna- 
menting. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 67. Cold Metal Work (2) — Second semester. Two laboratory 
periods a week. 

Metal in the form of bars, rods and tubes are shaped to produce "orna- 
mental iron" and bench metal products. The use of the hacksaw, file, drill 
press, taps and dies, the designing and forming of scrolls and the finishes 
appropriate for cold metal work are representatives of the course content. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 69. Machine Shop Practice I (2) — First semester. Two labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 1, or equivalent. 

Bench work, turning, planing, milling, and drilling. Related technical 
information. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 89. Machine Shop Practice II (2) — Second semester. Two labora- 
tory periods a week Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 69, or equivalent. 

Advanced shop practicum in thread cutting, grinding, boring, reaming, 
and gear cutting. Work-production methods employed. Related technical 
information. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 94. Shop Maintenance (2) — Summer. Prerequisite, 8 semester 
hours of shop credit, or equivalent. 

Skill developing practice in the maintenance of school-shop facilities. 

Ind. Ed. 101. Operational Drawing (2) — Summer. Two laboratory periods 
a day. Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 1, or equivalent. 

A comprehensive course designed to give students practice in the modem 
drafting methods of industry. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 102. Advanced Woodfinishing and Upholstery (2) — Summer. 
Two laboratory periods a day. Prerequisite, Ind, Ed. 22, or equivalent. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 2,11 

This course offers instruction in wood finishing techniques applicable 
to furniture restoration and in the processes of upholstering household fur- 
niture. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 104. Advanced Practices in Sheet Metal Work (2) — Two labora- 
tory periods a day. Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 24, or equivalent. 

Study of the more complicated processes involved in commercial items. 
Calculations and pattern making are emphasized. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 105. General Shop (2). 

Designed to meet needs in organizing and administering a secondary 
school general shop. Students are rotated through skill and knowledge 
developing activities in mechanical drawing, electricity, woodworking, and 
general metal working. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 106. Art Metal Work (2) — Summer. Two laboratory periods 
a day. 

Simple operations in the art of making jewelry including ring making, 
stone setting, etc. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 108. Electricity III (2) — Two laboratory periods a day. Pre- 
requisite, Ind. Ed. 28, or equivalent. 

Experimental development of apparatus and equipment for teaching the 
principles of electricity. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 109. Experimental Electricity and Electronics — A, B, C, D 
(2, 2, 2, 2). (Offered in Baltimore.) 

Ind. Ed. 110. Foundry (1) — First semester. One laboratory period a 
week. 

Bench and floor molding and elementary core making. Theory and 
principles covering foundry materials, tools and appliances. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 124 a, b. Organized and Supervised Work Experience (3 credits 
for each internship period, total: 6 credits). This is a work experience 
sequence planned for students enrolled in the curriculum, "Education for 
Industry." The purpose is to provide the students with opportunities for 
first-hand experiences with business and industry. The student is re- 
sponsible for obtaining his own employment with the coordinator advising 
him as regards the job opportunities which have optimum learning value. 

The nature of the work experience desired is outlined at the outset of 
employment and the evaluations made by the student and the coordinator 
are based upon the planned experiences. 

The time basis for each internship period is 6 forty-hour weeks or 240 
work hours. Any one period of internship must be served through con- 
tinuous employment in a single establishment. Two internship periods 
are required. The two internships may be served with the same business 
or industry. 



378 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The completion for credit of any period of internship requires the em- 
ployer's recommendation in terms of satisfactory work and work attitudes. 

More complete details are found in the handbook prepared for the 
students of this curriculum. 

Ind. Ed, 140 (Ed. 140). Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation (3). 

Major functions and specific contributions of Industrial Arts Education; 
its relation to the general objectives of the junior and senior high schools; 
selection and organization of subject matter in terms of modern practices 
and needs; methods of instruction; expected outcomes; measuring results; 
professional standards. Twenty periods of observation. (Hornbake.) 

Ind. Ed. 141, 142. Industrial Safety Education I (2, 2). 

Ind. Ed. 141 deals with the history and development of effective indus- 
trial safety education programs; Ind. Ed. 142 treats causes, effects, and 
values of safety education in industry. 

Ind. Ed. 143, 144. Industrial Safety Education II (2, 2). Advanced. 

Ind Ed. 143 studies exemplary safety practices, while Ind. Ed. 144, 
through conference discussion, plant visits, and class demonstrations, 
covers actual industrial situations and formulates evaluative criteria in 
safety education. 

Ind. Ed. 145, 146. Industrial Hygiene Education (2, 2). 

Ind. Ed. 145 deals with the theory and Ind. Ed. 146 with the practices 
of the following: Organization of plant medical department; medical ser- 
vices in industry; prevention and control of occupational disease; control 
of air contamination; the venereal disease problem in industry; fatigue; 
nutrition; sanitation; illumination; noise; radiant energy; heating and 
ventilation; maximum use of manpower; absenteeism. 

Ind. Ed. 148. Methods and Practice of Teaching (2-4). 

Forty-five periods of observation, participation, and teaching in a high 
school class under the direction of the regular teacher and the university 
adviser. Two hours of class sessions weekly are included. (See Ed. 148.) 

Laboratory fee, $30. 

Ind, Ed. 149. Methods and Practice of Teaching (9)— First and second 

semesters. See also Ed. 149. Laboratory fee, $30. (Brown.) 

Ind. Ed, 150. Training Aids Development (2) — Second semester. 

Study of the aids in common use as to their source and application. 
Special emphasis is placed on principles to be observed in making aids 
useful to shop teachers. Actual construction and application of such devices 
will be required. (Maley.) 

Ind. Ed. 157. Tests and Measurements (2). Prerequisite, Ed. 150 or 

consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

The construction of objective test for occupational and vocational subjects. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 379 

Ind. Ed. 160. Essentials of Design (2) — Second semester. Two labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisites, Ind. Ed. 1 and basic shop work. 

A study of the basic principles of design and practice in their application 
to the construction of shop projects. It treats the art elements of line, 
mass, color, and design. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 161. Principles of Vocational Guidance (2). 

This course identifies and applies the underlying principles of guidance 
to the problems of educational and vocational adjustment of students. 

(Staff.) 

Ind. EJd. 164. Shop Organization and Management (2) — Second semester. 

This course covers the basic elements of organizing and managing an 
Industrial Education program including the selection of equipment and the 
arrangement of the shop. (Staff.) 

Ind. Ed. 165. Modern Industry (2) — Summer session. 

This course provides an overview of manufacturing industry in the Amer- 
ican social, economic, and culture pattern. Representative basic industries 
are studied from the viewpoints of personnel and management organization, 
industrial relations, production procedures, distribution of products, and the 
like. (Hombake.) 

Ind. Ed. 166. Educational Foundations <at Industrial Arts (2) — First 
semester. 

A study of the factors which definitely place Industrial Arts education in 
any well-rounded program of general education. Lectures, class discussions, 
readings and reports. (Brown and Hornbake.) 

Ind Ed. 167. Problems in Occupational Education (2). 

The purpose of this course is to secure, assemble, organize, and interpret 
data relative to the scope, character and effectiveness of occupational 
education. 

Ind. Ed. 168. Trade or Occupational Analysis (2) — First semester. 

Provides a working knowledge of occupational and job analysis which 
is basic in organizing vocational industrial courses of study. This course 
should precede Ind. Ed. 169. (Brown.) 

Ind. Ed. 169. Course Construction (2). 

Surveys and applies techniques of building and reorganizing courses of 
study for effective use in vocational and occupational schools. (Brown.) 

Ind. Ed. 170. Principles of Vocational Education (2). 
The course develops the Vocational Education movement as an integral 
phase of the American program of public education. (Brown.) 

Ind. Ed. 171. History of Vocational Education (2). 
An overview of the development of Vocational Education from primitive 
times to the present. The evolution of Industrial Arts is also considered. 

(Maley.) 



380 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

For Graduates 

Ind. Ed. 207. Philosophy of Industrial Arts Education (2) — First 
semester. 

This course is intended to assist the student in his development of a 
point of view as regards Industrial Arts and its relationship with the total 
educational program. He should, thereby, have a "yardstick" for apprais- 
ing current procedures and proposals and an articulateness for his own 
professional area. (Hornbake.) 

Ind. Ed. 214. School Shop Planning and Equipment Selection (2) — Second 

semester. 

This course deals with principles involved in planning a school shop and 
provides opportunities for applying these principles. Facilities required in 
the operation of a satisfactory shop program are catalogued and appraised. 

(Hornbake.) 

Ind. Ed. 216. Supervision of Industrial Arts (2) — Second semester. 

(Hornbake.) 

Ind. Ed. 220. Organization, Administration and Supervision of Voca- 
tional Education (2). (Brown.) 

This course surveys objectively the organization, administration, super- 
vision, curricular spread and viewpoint, and the present status of vocational 
Education. 

Ind. Ed. 240. Research in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education (2) — 

First and second semesters. 

This is a course offered by arrangement for persons who are conducting 
research in the areas of Industrial Arts and Vocational Education. (Staff.) 

Ind. Ed. 241. Content and Method of Industrial Arts (2) — Second 
semester. 

Various methods and procedures used in curriculum development are 
examined and those suited to the field of Industrial Arts education are 
applied. Methods of and devices for Industrial Arts instruction are studied 
and practiced. (Hornbake.) 

Ind. Ed. 248. Seminar in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education (2) — 

Second semester. (Brown.) 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

Mus. Ed. 125. Creative Activities in the Elementary School Which Con- 
tribute to Musical Development (2). Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

This course deals with musical experiences in creative listening and 
creative response to rhythm and mood, creative use of percussion and simple 
melody instruments, creative melody writing, creative interpretation of 
music performed. Creative interpretation and creative writing will also be 
studied in connection with its development through correlation with other 
areas and creative programs. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 381 

Mus. Ed. 127. Methods and Materials for Program Productions in the 
Secondary School (2). Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Designed especially for those interested in presenting musical assemblies, 
concerts and programs for all types. Methods of presentation and materials 
suitable for various occasions will be discussed. 

Mus. Ed. 128. Workshop in Music for Elementary Schools (2). Pre- 
requisite, consent of instructor. 

A workshop for the study of group activities and materials through which 
children in the elementary schools experience music. This course has been 
planned as an aid to music teachers and classroom teachers in the elementary 
schools. It presents an outline of objectives, a survey of materials, and 
instructional methods that will develop a more thorough and progressive 
music program in the elementary school. 

Mus. Ed. 132. Workshop in Music for the Junior High School (2). Pre- 
requisite, consent of instructor. 

A workshop designed to make a study of the vocal and instrumental pro- 
gram in the Junior High School Curriculum. Special study will be made 
of a more flexible program that will offer many opportunities for active 
participation in experiencing music to the adolescent with or without special 
music aptitude. The part that Music can play in the integrated program 
will also be studied. 

Mus. Ed. 155. Organization and Technique of Instrumental Class In- 
struction (2). Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

This course deals with practical instruction in methods of tone pro- 
duction, tuning, fingering, and care of the instruments in the hands of the 
students. A survey will be made of the latest methods and materials for 
class instruction. 

Mus. Ed. 170. Methods and Materials for Class Piano Instruction (2). 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

This course deals with the fundamental principles of teaching piano in a 
group of students of various grade levels. It includes the techniques and 
procedures involved in teaching class piano and a survey of materials for 
piano class instruction and recommendation for their use. 

Mus. Ed. 175. Methods and Materials in Vocal Music for the High School 
(2). Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

This course is designed primarily for high school choral directors and 
teachers of voice training classes. Special attention will be given to song 
repertoire, interpretation, diction, tone production, and breath activity. 

Mus. Ed. 180. Instrumental Seminar. (2). Prerequisite, consent of 
instructor. 

A review of beginning methods and materials for wind and percussion 
instruments; materials for bands for all grades; problems of intonation, tone 
quality and interpretation; the percussion section; organization and adjudi- 



382 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

cation of contests and festivals; special maneuvers of the marching band; 
library organization; planning and conducting a concert; organization within 
the band and the orchestra; point systems, and other related topics. 

NURSING EDUCATION 

N. Ed. 2. Introduction to Nursing Education (2) — (Offered in Baltimore.) 
Exploratory and guidance course for nursing education students. Types 
of positions in schools of nursing, teacher supply and demand in such 
schools, and the types of professional and personal competence required 
of teachers in nursing schools are among the topics included. This course 
may be substituted for* Ed. 2. Students who take N. Ed. 2 will not be 
permitted to register for Ed. 2, or vice versa. 

N. Ed. 5, 6. Teaching of Nursing Arts, I and II (3, 3)— (Offered in 
Baltimore.) 

This is the basic course in principles of teaching as applied to the field 
of nursing arts. It is a course which is roughly parallel to the general 
course Ed. 145. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

N. Ed. 112. School of Nursing Finance and Administration (3) — (Offered 
in Baltimore.) 

Sources of financial support for schools of nursing, budgeting, internal 
school accounting, purchase of supplies and equipment, and other selected 
problems of financing and administering schools of nursing. 

N. Ed. 115, 116. Ward Management and Clinical Teaching (2, 2)— 

(Offered in Baltimore.) 

This course covers the administrative phase of a hospital unit or ward, 
especially the assigning of duties according to the level of ability of the 
worker. Emphasis is placed upon hospital economics and the budgeting 
of supplies. A program for clinical bedside teaching is stressed through 
the entire course. 

N. Ed. 117. Newer Trends in Nursing Service (2). (Offered in Baltimore.) 

N. Ed. 118. Industrial Nursing (2) (Offered in Baltimore.) 
This course involves an analysis of the role of the graduate nurse in 
industry and an analysis of specific problem areas in industrial nursing. 

N. Ed. 190. Principles of Pediatric Nursing (3) — (Offered in Baltimore.) 

Principles of nursing children with emphasis upon the direction of growth 

and development of children under conditions where nursing care is required. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH EDUCATION 
A. Physical Education 
P. E. 30. Introduction to Physical Education, Health and Recreation 

(3) — First and second semesters. 
Orientation course in the professional fields. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 383 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Courses starred (*) may be taken for graduate credit 

P. E. 113, 115. Methods and Materials for Secondary Schools I (3, 3)— 

Two lectures and two laboratories a week. 

Theory and practice; class organization, analysis, and teaching tech- 
niques of sports, gymnastics, self-testing activities, and rhythms for Junior 
and Senior High School programs. 

P. E. 114, 116. Methods and Materials for Secondary Schools II (3, 3)— 

Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week. 

Theory and practice; class organization, analysis, and teaching techniques 
of sports, gymnastics, self-testing activities, and rhythms for Junior and 
Senior High School Programs. 

P. E. 120. Physical Education for the Elementary School (2)— First 

and second semesters and summer. 

Designed to aid educators in the development of elementary school chil- 
dren through the use of school rhythmic activities and games. Some 
demonstration and practice with children will be included. 

P. E. 123, 125. Coaching Athletics (3, 3)— Two lecture and two labora- 
tory hours a week. 

Methods of coaching the various competitive sports commonly found 
in high school and college programs. 

P. E. 124, 126. Methods and Materials in Team Sports (2, 2)— Four 

laboratory hours a week. Prerequisites, P. E, 62, 64, 66, 68. 

Theory in coaching and officiating sports for women. Opportunity for 
National Officials' Ratings. 

P. E. 140. Curriculum, Instruction and Observation (3) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisites, MEN— P. E. 113, 115; WOMEN— P. E. 114, 116; 
124, 126. (See Ed. 140.) 

*P. E. 180. Measurement in Physical Education and Health (3) — First and 
and second semesters. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week. The 
application of measurement to physical and health education. 

*P. E. 190. Administration and Supervision of Physical Education, Health, 
and Recreation (3) — First and second semesters. 

The application of the principles of administration and supervision to 
physical education, health, and recreation. 

For Graduates 

P. E. 200. Seminar in Physical Education, Recreation and Health (1) — 

First and second semesters and summer. 



384 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

P. E. 201. Foundations in Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

(3) — First and second semesters and summer. 

An overall view of the total fields with their inter-relations and places 
in education. 

P. E. 203. Supervisory Techniques in Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health (3) — First and second semesters and summer. (Course may be 
offered in Baltimore.) 

Principles and practice of supervision applied to the special fields indi- 
cated. Includes evaluation of facilities, program, personnel, and processes, 
using either survey or guidance techniques. 

P. E. 205. Administration of Athletics (3) — First and second semesters 
and summer. 

Problems and procedures in the administration of school and college ath- 
letic competition, the installation and maintenance of indoor and outdoor 
athletic equipment, special problems of surveys, legislation, property acqui- 
sition, finances, inventories, and the selection of personnel. 

P. E. 210. Methods and Techniques of Research (3) — First and second 
semesters and summer. 

A study of methods and techniques of research used in physical educa- 
tion, recreation, and health education; an analysis of examples of their 
use; and practice in their application to problems of interest to the student. 

P. E. 220. Quantitative Methods (3) — First and second semesters and 
summer. 

A course covering the statistical techniques most frequently used in 
research pertaining to physical education, recreation, and health education. 
An effort will be made to provide the student with the necessary skills, 
and to acquaint him with the interpretations and practical applications of 
these techniques. 

P. E. 230. Source Material Survey (3) — First and second semesters and 
summer. 

A library survey course, covering the total areas of physical education, 
recreation, and health, plus research in one specific limited problem of which 
a digest, including a bibliography, is to be submitted. 

P. E. 250. Mental and Emotional Aspects of Physical Education Activi- 
ties (3) — First and second semesters and summer. 

This course involves exploring certain psychological phenomena of recog- 
nized importance to physical education teachers and coaches. Taken into 
consideration are such factors as aesthetic appreciations of the dance and 
sports activities; psychological readiness for competition, problems of stale- 
ness, emotional upset in relation to diet and instruction, the effect of anxiety 
upon bodily functions, and the measurement of emotional disturbance. 

P. E. 280. Scientific Bases on Physical Fitness (3) — First and second 
semesters and summer. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 385 

A course designed to meet the needs of persons interested in the solution 
of problems related to the kinesiological and physical fitness aspects of 
sports. Problems pertaining to the performance of sport skills, the physical 
conditioning of participants, and the over-all effects of exercise are studied; 
in addition, the techniques employed in the solution of such problems are 
reviewed. 

P. E. 288. Research (1-6) — First and second semesters and summer. 

Master of Education or Doctoral candidates who desire to pursue special 
research problems under the direction of their advisers may register for 
1-6 hours of credit under this number. A Master of Education candidate 
may register for two or more credits under this number, and write one of 
his seminar papers. 

P. E. 289. Thesis (1-6) — First and second semesters and summer. 
Students who desire credit for a Master's thesis or a Doctoral project 
should use this number. 

P. E. 290. Administrative Direction of Physical Education, Recreation 
and Health (3) — First and second semesters and summer. 

A course to acquaint school administrators with the administrative tech- 
niques, and opportunities and responsibilities in the modern programs of 
physical education, recreation, and health education on a coordinated school- 
home-community basis. It will include an over-view of the best present 
practices, recommendations of national bodies and the development of 
standards for selection of professional personnel, evaluation of programs, 
development of facilities and allocation of budgets. 

P. E. 291. Curriculum Construction in Physical Education and Health 

(3) — First and second semesters and summer. 

A study of the principles underlying curriculum construction in physical 
education and health education and the practical application of those prin- 
ciples to the construction of a curriculum for a specific situation. 

B. Health Education 

Hea. 114. Health Education for Elementary Schools (2) — First and 
second semesters and summer. 

Materials and methods in health education for the classroom teacher. 

Hea. 120. Teaching Health (3) — First and second semesters. Prerequi- 
site, Hea. 40, or equivalent. (May be offered in Baltimore.) 

A study of materials and methods in health education. Planning the 
health education curriculum. 

Hea. 160. Problems in School Health Education (2-6). 

Two workshops each, of three weeks duration and granting 3 semester 
Hours ci'edit, will be given. The first workshop will be planned primarily 
for elementary school personnel; the second will be planned for secondary 



386 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

school personnel. The workshop will deal with health services, healthful 
environment, and health instruction with emphasis in the latter. 

*Hea. 190. Organization and Administration of Health Education (3) — 

First and second semesters. 

The planning of school curricula and the presentation of courses of study 
in hygiene to the classroom teacher. 

For Graduates 

Hea. 220. Principles and Practice of Health Education (3) — First and 

second semesters and alternate summers. 

Health education and health in public schools and colleges as supported 
by endowed funds or by public taxation. 

Hea. 230. Public Health Education (3) — First and second semesters and 
summer. 

A survey course designed to acquaint the student with the current major 
problems in public health and to enable him to recognize and understand the 
relationships and relative importance of these problems. 

Hea. 240. Advancements in Modern Health (3) — First and second semes- 
ters and summer. 

Latest knowledge of the fundamental principles involved in personal, 
community, state and national health; functions and relationships of the 
various health agencies cooperating with the educational faculties and their 
contributions to health; present status of preventive medicine and sanitation. 

SaENCE EDUCATION 

*Sci. Ed. 1. Science for the Primary Grades (2) — Summer. Laboratory 
fee, $1.00. 

This course considers the characteristics of elementary school children 
in grades one through three. Selecting, organizing, and presenting science 
materials appropriate to this level is done in relation to these characteristics. 

*Sci. Ed. 2. Science for the Primary Grades (2) — Summer. Laboratory 
fee, $1.00. 

This is a continuation of the previous course using different subject 
matter areas to provide a wider range of experiences. 

*Sci. Ed. 3. Science for the Upper Elementary Grades (2) — Summer. 

This course is designed to meet the needs of ♦^^eachers of grades four, five, 
and six by providing background material from selected phases of science 
which can contribute to these levels. Special attention will be given to 
materials of the local environment. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 



* students may receive credit for both Sci. Ed. 1 and Sci. Ed. 2 or Sci. Ed. S and 
Sci. Ed. 4, but no other combination of these courses is accepted. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 387 

*Sci. Ed. 4. Science for the Upper Elementary Grades (2) — Summer. 

This is a continuation of the previous course using different subject 
matter materials to provide a wider background of experiences. Labora- 
tory fee, $1.00. 

Sci. Ed. 105. Workshop in Science for Elementary Schools (2). 

This course gives teachers an opportunity to acquire science understand- 
ings and to develop materials which are of practical value. The emphasis 
is on content closely related to science units developed in elementary 
schools. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 



* students may receive credit for both Sci. Ed. 1 and Sci. Ed. 2 or Sci. Ed. 3 and 
Sci. Ed. 4, but no other combination of these courses is accepted. 



GLENN L MARTIN 
College of 

ENGINEERING AND 
AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 



STAFF 
-, Director of Engineering Education and Research. 



S. Sidney Steinberg, B.E., C.E., 
Dean in Charge of Undergraduate Students 



William R. Ahrendt, M.S., Lecturer on Automatic Regulation. 

Redfield W. Allen, M.S., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Russell B. Allen, B.S., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

David W. Baker, M.S., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

Edward S. Barber, B.S., C.E., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Walter R. Beam, B.S., Instructor in Electrical Engineering. 

William D. Becker, M.S., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Joseph H. Bilbrey, Jr., B.S., Instructor in Chemical Engineering. 

Donald T. Bonney, Ph.D., Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

George F. Corcoran, M.S., Professor of Electrical Engineering and Chair- 
man of the Department. 

Gerald Corning, B.S., Associate Professor of Aeronautical Engineering. 

John B. Cournyn, M.S.E., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

L. DiLLWYN Eckard, Jr., B.S., Instructor in Aeronautical Engineering. 

Benjamin S. Elliott, Research Associate in Civil Engineering. 

A. Bernard Eyler, B.S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Jacob J. Freeman, Ph.D., Lecturer on Signal Analysis and Noise. 

Carl W. Gohr, B.S., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Victor G. Gottschalk, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Joseph A. Guard, M.S., Assistant Professor of Merchanical Engineering, 

Arthur L. Guess, M.S., Assistant Professor of Aeronautical Engineering. 

Charles R. Hayleck, Jr., M.S., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

60NALD C. Hennick, B.S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Lawrence J. Hodgins, B.S., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Harry B. Hoshall, B.S., M.E., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

WiLBERT J. Huff, Ph.D., D.Sc, Professor of Chemical Engineering and 
Chairman of the Department; Director of the Engineering Experiment 
Station; Chairman, Division of Physical Sciences. 

389 



390 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Louis C. Hutson, Instructor in Mining Extension. 

Junius 0. Hutton, M.S., Instructor in Aeronautical Engineering. 

John W. Jackson, M.S., M.E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

DUANE R. Keller, M.S.E., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

George R. Kennedy, B.S., Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

Eugene P. Klier, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering and 
Metallurgy. 

Ralph H. Long, Jr., M.S., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Robert F. Luce, B.S., Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

Morris S. Ojalvo, M.S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Louis E. Otts, Jr., M.S., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Harry W. Piper, B.Arch.E., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Henry W. Price, M.S., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Walton R. Read, M.S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Henry R. Reed, Ph.D., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Irving H. Shames, M.S., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

Shan-Fu Shen, Sc.D., Assistant Professor of Aeronautical Engineering. 

A. Wiley Sherwood, M.S., Research Professor of Aerodynamics; Manager 
of Wind Tunnel; Acting Chairman of Aeronautical Engineering De- 
partment. 

Charles A. Shreeve, Jr., M.S., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

David E. Simons, M.S., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Eric H. Small, M.E.E., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Joseph S. Smatko, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

S. Sidnney Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering and 
Chairman of the Department; Dean in Charge of Undergraduate 
Students. 

John W. Stuntz, M.S., Lecturer on Applied Science. 

William W. Thomas, B.S., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

T. C. Gordon Wagner, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Stanton Walker, B.S., Lecturer on Engineering Materials. 

Robert K. Warner, M.S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Joseph Weber, Ph.D., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Presley A. Wedding, B.S., Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

John E. Younger, Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Chair- 
man of the Department. 

Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 

Raymond J. Seeger, Ph.D., Acting Director, Institute for Fluid Dynamics 

and Applied Mathematics. 
Daniel Bershader, Ph.D., Associate Professor Fluid Dynamics. 
Joaquin B. Diaz, Ph.D., Associate Research Professor Applied Mathematics. 
Elliott W. Montroll, Ph.D., Research Professor Statistical Physics. 
Alexander Weinstein, Ph.D., Research Professor Applied Mathematics. 



ENGINEERING AND AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 



391 



GLENN L. MARTIN 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

AND AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 

, Director of Engineering Education and Research. 



S. Sidney Steinberg, B.E., C.E., 
Dean in Charge of Undergraduate Students 




THE primary purpose of the College of Engineering is to 
train young men to practice the profession of Engineer- 
It endeavors at the same time to equip them for their 
duties as citizens and for careers in public serv- 
ice and in industry. 

In training professional engineers it is neces- 
sary that great emphasis be placed on the funda- 
mentals of mathematics, science and engineering 
so as to establish a broad professional base. 
Experience has also shown the value of a co- 
ordinated group of humanistic-social studies for 
engineering students since their later professional 
activities are so closely identified with the public. 
It is well recognized that an engineering training affords an efficient prepa- 
ration for many callings in public and private life outside the engineering 
profession. 

The new buildings recently completed for the College of Engineering were 
made possible through the interest of Mr. Glenn L. Martin, of the 
Glenn L. Martin Company of Baltimore, which resulted in two large gifts 
from the Company to the University, to which have been added funds 
made available by the Legislature of Maryland. The new units consist 
of four structures, namely, the General Engineering building, an Engineer- 
ing Laboratories Building, a Chemical Engineering building, and a Wind 
Tunnel building. 

This increase in facilities has made possible an expansion of the work 
in each department and the establishment in the College of Engineering 
of an Institute for Advanced Technological Research. This Institute will 
carry on full-time research in connection with an organization known as 
the State Institute for Industrial Research, authorized by the Maryland 
Legislature to be under the direction of the Board of Regents of the Uni- 
versity, and also to carry on studies in the various departments leading 
to graduate degrees. 

The length of the normal curriculum in the College of Engineering is 
four years and leads to the bachelor's degree. In the case of most students 
these four years give the engineering graduate the basic and fundamental 
knowledge necessary to enter upon the practice of the profession. Engi- 



392 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

neering students with superior scholastic records are advised to supplement 
their undergraduate programs by at least one year of graduate study lead- 
ing to the master's degree. All the engineering departments encourage 
graduate work leading to the doctor's degree, and the Department of 
Chemical Engineering has already awarded Ph.D. degrees to a number 
of candidates. Graduate engineers desiring to enter research and de- 
velopment work should endeavor to qualify for the doctorate. Graduate 
programs will be arranged upon application to the chairman of the engi- 
neering department concerned. 

In order to give the new student time to choose the branch of engineering 
for which he is best adapted, the freshman year of the several curriculums 
is the same. Lectures and conferences are used to guide the student in 
making a proper choice. The courses diifer only slightly in the sophomore 
year, but in the junior and senior years the students are directed definitely 
along professional lines. 

Admission Requirements 

In selecting students for admission to the University more emphasis 
will be placed upon good marks and other indications of probable success 
in college rather than upon a fixed pattern of subject matter. In general, 
4 units of English, 3^^ units of Mathematics including Solid Geometry, and 
1 unit each of Social and Natural Sciences are required. Fine Arts, Trade 
and Vocational subjects are acceptable as electives. 

It is possible, however, for high school graduates having the requisite 
number of entrance units to enter the College of Engineering lacking one 
unit of Advanced Algebra and one-half unit of Solid Geometry. The pro- 
gram for such students would be as follows: during the first semester, five 
hours a week would be devoted to making up algebra and solid geometry; 
in the second semester, mathematics of the first semester would be scheduled; 
and the second semester mathematics would be taken in the Summer School. 

All students desiring to enroll in the College of Engineering must apply 
to the Director of Admissions of the University of Maryland at College 
Park. 

For a more detailed statement of admissions, write the Director of Publi- 
cations for a copy of the "General Information Issue" of the Catalog. 

Bachelor Degrees in the College of Engineering 

Courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science are offered in the 
Departments of Aeronautical, Chemical, Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical 
engineering, and in Metallurgy. 

Costs 

Actual annual costs of attending the University include: $165.00 fixed 
charges; $61.00 for special fees; $340.00 board; $120.00 to $140.00 room; 
and laboratory fees which vary with the laboratory courses pursued. A 
matriculation fee of $10.00 is charged all new students, and a College fee 



ENGINEERING AND AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 393 

of $3.00 per semester is charged to all students registered in the College 
of Engineering. An additional charge of $150.00 is assessed students not 
residents of the State of Maryland. 

Military Instruction 

All male students unless specifically exempted under University rules 
are required to take basic air force R. 0. T. C. training for a period of two 
years. The successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for gradu- 
ation but it must be taken by all eligible students during the first two 
years of attendance at the University, whether they intend to graduate or 
not. Transfer students who do not have the required two years of military 
training will be required to complete the course or take it until graduation, 
whichever occurs first. 

Selected students who wish to do so may carry Advanced Air Force 
R. O. T. C. courses during their Junior and Senior years which lead to a 
regular or reserve commission in the United States Air Force. 

General Information 

For information with reference to the University grounds, buildings, 
equipment, library facilities, requirements in American Civilization, defi- 
nition of resident and non-resident, regulation of studies, degrees and cer- 
tificates, transcripts of records, student health and welfare, living arrange- 
ments in the dormitories, oif-campus housing, meals, University Counseling 
Service, scholarships and student aid, athletics and recreation, student 
government, honors and awards, religious denominational clubs, fraterni- 
ties, sororities, societies and special clubs, the University Band, student 
publications. University Post Office and Supply Store, write to the Director 
of Publications for the General Information Issue of the Catalog. 

Master of Science in Engineering 

Candidates for the degree of Master in Science in Engineering and in 
Metallurgy are accepted in accordance with the procedure and requirements 
of the Graduate School. See Graduate School Catalog. 

Professional Degrees in Engineering 

The degrees of Aeronautical Engineer, Chemical Engineer, Civil Engineer, 
Electrical Engineer, and Mechanical Engineer will be granted only to 
graduates of the University who have obtained a bachelor's degree in 
engineering. The applicant must satisfy the following conditions: 

1. He shall have engaged successfully in acceptable engineering work 
for not less than five years after graduation. 

2. He must be considered eligible by a committee composed of the Dean 
of the College of Engineering and the heads of the Departments of Aero- 
nautical, Chemical, Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering. 

3. His registration for a degree must be approved at least twelve months 
prior to the date on which the degree is to be conferred. He shall present 



394 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

with his application a complete report of his engineering experience and 
an outline of his proposed thesis. 

4. He shall present a satisfactory thesis in duplicate on an approved 
subject. 

Equipment 

The Engineering buildings are provided with lecture-rooms, recitation- 
rooms, drafting-rooms, laboratories, and shops for various phases of 
engineering work. 

Drafting-Rooms. The drafting-rooms are fully equipped for practical 
work. The engineering student must provide himself with an approved 
drawing outfit, supplies, and books. 

LABORATORIES 

Chemical Engineering Laboratories 

Instruction and research in Chemical Engineering is housed in a new 
building designed for this purpose. It contains lecture rooms, library, 
laboratories, shops, storerooms, dark rooms and offices, equipped for the 
full range of chemical engineering studies, from the elementary chemical 
and physical reactions underlying process development to the construc- 
tion and operation of pilot plants and the design of full scale equipment, 
with provisions for specialized work in options such as electrochemical 
engineering, fuel engineering and metallurgy. Laboratories are main- 
tained for (1) General Testing and Control; (2) Unit Operations; (3) Unit 
Processes; (4) Electrochemical Engineering; (5) Metallurgy; (6) Gas and 
Fuel Analysis; (7) Cooperative Research; (8) Graduate Research, Shops 
include a complete machine shop, a wood shop and a student shop. 

General Testing and Control Laboratory. In this laboratory there is 
available complete equipment for the chemical and physical testing of water, 
gases, coal, petroleum, and related chemicals, and for general industrial 
chemicals, both inorganic and organic. 

Unit Operations Laboratory. This laboratory contains equipment for 
the study of fluid flow, heat flow, drying, filtration, distillation, evaporation, 
crystallization, crushing, grinding, combustion, gas absorption, extraction, 
and centrifuging. For the study of fluid flow a permanent hydraulic as- 
sembly is available, and this includes flow meters of most types. A 
Chemical Control Laboratory is maintained in conjunction with the Unit 
Operations Laboratory. 

In the laboratory there is a large column still with a kettle capacity 
of 100 gallons, equipped for the measurement of temperature and pressure, 
sampling devices, condensers, and vacuum receivers. This still is so de- 
signed that it can be used either as a batch type unit, continuous feed 
type, direct pot still, steam still, or as a vacuum still. Studies in evapora- 
tion can be made on a double effect evaporator, one unit of which is 



ENGINEERING AND AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 395 

equipped with a horizontal tube bundle and the other with a vertical tube 
bundle. Dryers include cabinet, tray and vacuum types. Gas absorption 
equipment includes a blower and a stoneware column packed with different 
types of packings in respective sections so that comparative studies may 
be made. Filtration equipment includes plate and frame, Sweetland and 
Sparkler types. Combustion equipment available consists of an industrial 
carburetor, pot furnace, premix gas-fired furnace and the usual gas analysis 
equipment. For grinding there is a comminuting machine, jaw crusher, 
a disc crusher and ball mills. Mechanical shakers, standard sieve, and sub- 
sieve separator are available for particle size separation. Centrifugation 
studies may be made on a continuous super centrifuge, Tolhurst basket 
type or centrifugal dryer. Concentrating equipment includes a flotation 
cell and Wilfley table. Student shop facilities include a milling machine, 
lathes, drill presses, grinder, welding equipment, and other tools necessary 
for unit operation studies. 

Unit Processes Laboratory. The Unit Processes Laboratory is designed 
to permit the preparation of chemicals on a semi-industrial scale from 
1 pound to 100 pounds. Both organic and inorganic compounds can be 
made. An advantageous feature is the integration of this laboratory with 
the unit operations laboratory, thereby allowing a broad range of typical 
chemical engineering activities. Equipment includes apparatus for auto- 
claving, nitration, sulfonation, reduction, oxidation, esterification and neu- 
tralization, halogenation, amination, diazotization and the like. Substances 
such as dyes, plastics, wetting agents, organic insecticides, e. g., D.D.T., 
analine, nitrobenzene, phenol, paradichlorbenzene, ethyl acetate, cellulose 
acetate, benzaldehyde, B-naphthyl methyl ether and many others can be 
synthesized. 

Electrochemical Engineering Laboratory. This laboratory contains 
apparatus simulating industrial electrochemical engineering equipment, 
as well as small laboratory size units to illustrate principles of operation. 
Studies include electric furnace operations, metal winning and refining, 
electroplating, corrosion, electrochemical preparations, chlorine and caustic 
soda manufacture, instrumentation, and related operations and processes. 

The laboratory contains small dry rectifiers, one 500-ampere 6-12 V 
motor generator set, several 300-ampere motor generator sets, 75 KVA 
variable D.C. supply for furnace operations, and numerous storage batteries 
as power sources. The equipment includes a small (25KVA) silicon carbide 
furnace, aluminum electrolytic cell, small arc furnace for making ferro- 
silicon, ferro-chromium, aluminum bronze and other alloys, numerous 
electrolytic cells for electroplating, copper, lead, nickel, chromium, zinc, 
cadmium, brass, silver, gold, rhodium, and other metals. Flexible arrange- 
ments are maintained for the production electrolytically of materials such 
as iodoform, white lead, cuprous oxide, azobenzene, dyes, nitrites, hydroxyla- 
mine, chlorine, caustic soda and other chemicals. Corrosion testing equip- 
ment is also on hand. Arrangements are flexible enough so that most in- 
dustrial electrochemical operations can be reproduced on a moderate scale. 



396 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Metallurgical Laboratories. These laboratories contain equipment for 
heat treating, testing, and metallographic work. The furnaces available 
include a 16 KW Hoskins muffle furnace, an 18 KW Hevi-Duty salt pot 
furnace, an 8 KW Leeds and Northrup Vapocarb unit, an American Gas 
Furnace Company salt pot furnace, and a General Electric electronic 
heater. The testing equipment consists of one Baldwin 60,000 lb. Southwark- 
Tate-Emery testing machine, one 5,000 lb. Dillon Universal Tester, one 
Riehle impact testing machine, and a Chapman high temperature tensile 
testing machine. Brinell and Rockwell hardness testers are available. The 
metallographic equipment consists of one Vickers projection microscope 
with full range of accessories, a number of smaller metallurgical micro- 
scopes, and all additional equipment necessary for mounting and preparing 
specimens, such as mounting presses, sanders, polishers, etc. The metal- 
lurgical laboratories are also equipped with a North American Phillips 
60KV-50MA X-ray diffraction apparatus. 

Electrical Engineering Laboratories 

Electrical Machinery Laboratory. This laboratory, with a floor space of 
5,760 square feet, is divided into four working areas, each area being 
serviced by a modern distribution switchboard and auxiliary panels. The 
distribution switchboard also provides inter-connection between each work- 
ing area as well as to the various other laboratories situated throughout 
the electrical engineering department. Each working area is provided 
with an educational DC-AC motor generator and a variety of modern 
motors, generators, transformers, and other electrical devices of such size and 
design as to give typical performance characteristics. An overhead crane 
is available to facilitate the moving and rearrangement of the various 
machines. 

Electric power is supplied to the laboratory by a three-unit motor- 
generator set consisting of a 150-HP synchronous motor driving a 
50-KW, 125/250 volt direct current generator, and a 62.5-KVA, 80 per 
cent power factor, 3-phase, 60-cycle generator. This latter machine is so 
connected as to supply both 120 volts and 240 volts simultaneously. Modern 
switchgear provides well regulated voltage from each generator. 

Adjoining the laboratory is an instrument and small-equipment room 
provided with a large assortment of measuring instruments essential 
to practical electrical testing, namely, ammeters, voltmeters, wattmeters, 
watt-hour meters, frequency meters, strobotacs, tachometers, wheatstone 
bridges, double bridges, impedance bridges, oscillographs, and special 
rheostats. 

A well appointed shop is available with modern metal and wood turning 
tools for the repair of equipment, the building of experimental devices, 
and the general repair of all laboratory facilities. Another adjoining 
room provides lecture room facilities, computation tables and reference 
material. 



ENGINEERING AND AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 397 

Industrial Electronics Laboratory. A floor area of 1,900 square feet 
adjacent to the machinery laboratory and connected with it by way of a 
two-ton monorail crane is called the Industrial Electronics Laboratory. 

This laboratory is equipped with apparatus and controls similar to those 
used in industry in obtaining better products in greater quantities, by 
means of electronic devices. 

The experimental apparatus consists of several amplidynes, an elec- 
tronic welder, a high frequency heating unit, several types of electronic motor 
controllers, voltage regulators, photo-electric counters, thyratron recti- 
fiers, servo-control systems, and an X-ray installation. 

The laboratory is energized from a distribution center similar to the 
system used in the adjacent machinery laboratory and in addition, three- 
phase ignitron rectifiers and high voltage power supplies are provided. 

The instrument room and shop which serve the machinery laboratory 
also serve the Industrial Electronics Laboratory. 

Sophomore Laboratory. A balcony ovei'looking the machinery labora- 
tory is equipped with seven work stations at which basic electrical engi- 
neering experiments are performed. 

Equipment is provided for fundamental measurements of current, voltage, 
power, resistance, and transmission losses. Basic non-linear circuit con- 
cepts are also studied experimentally in this laboratory. 

Electrical Measurements Laboratory. Fifteen basic measurements ex- 
periments which constitute the laboratory portion of the "Electrical 
Measurements" course are housed in this laboratory. 

Ballistic galvanometers, long solenoids, flux meters, potentiometers, 
a-c bridges, oscillographs, rotating standards, and impedance-measuring 
circuits are employed in measuring electric and magnetic quantities and 
in calibrating electrical instruments. 

Photometry and Oscillographic Laboratory. A laboratory, provided with 
a dark room, is available for photometric and oscillographic measurements. 
The photometry apparatus consists of a bar photometer and four types of 
portable photometers and light meters. Typical lighting installations are 
available for experimental study. 

Electromagnetic oscillographs are available for studying transient and 
steady-state time variations of electric currents and voltages. The dark 
room facilities permit on-the-spot development of the photographic film. 

Electronics and Radio Engineering Laboratories. A room 25 feet in 
width by 60 feet in length is equipped with eight work stations, four of 
which are specifically outfitted for basic electronics experiments and four 
specifically for radio engineering experiments. 

The electronics equipment consists of various bread-board layouts, signal 
generators, cathode-ray oscilloscopes, vacuum tube voltmeters, frequency 
meters, and a wide range of indicating instruments. With this appa- 
ratus, pentode and thyratron characteristics are studied experimentally 



398 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

and basic electronic measurements are performed. The performance charac- 
teristics of amplifiers, oscillators, and regulated power supplies are also 
investigated in this section of the laboratory. 

The radio equipment consists of various bread-board layouts, including 
mixers, discriminators, oscillators, IF stages, inverters, class C amplifiers, 
and push-pull audio stages. Complete radio receivers and transmitters are 
available both in commercial form and in demonstration panel form for 
experimental study. 

Adjacent to this laboratory is a combined instrument room and radio 
repair shop. 

Ultra High Frequency Laboratory. Experimentation and measurements 
in the frequency spectrum ranging from 200 to 10,000 megacycles per 
second are performed in this laboratory. 

Signal generators covering this frequency range as well as a wide variety 
of magnetron, klystron, and light-house tube oscillators are available. 

In the lower frequency ranges, parallel-wire transmission lines are em- 
ployed to illustrate single and double stubbing theory. The transmission 
line is also used as an impedance measuring device. 

In the higher frequency ranges, wave guides, slotted sections, sectoral 
horns, and parabolic antennas are employed to demonstrate microwave 
techniques. Crystal detectors and bolometers are provided for signal de- 
tection and power measurements respectively. Apparatus for making 
special tubes is provided. 

FM and Television Laboratory. Space is provided on the upper floor 
of the main engineering building for experimental study of frequency- 
modulated and television signals. Receiving and transmitting apparatus 
are available for this purpose. Owing to the location of the laboratory, 
antennas may be installed readily and connected from the transmitter to 
the roof of the building, where a 50-by-500-foot unobstructed area may be 
used for antenna pattern measurements. 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratories 

Applied Mechanics Laboratory. This laboratory is equipped for the study 
of Dynamics and Stress Analysis. Experiments and research can be 
carried out in the fields of: vibration, steady and transients, photo- 
elasticity, and related subjects. 

The equipment includes A.C. and D.C. strain gauge amplifiers, transient 
recorder and printers, vibrographs, 15G vibrating table, vibration pick-ups 
of various types and a photoelasticity bench for the study of two dimen- 
sional stress problems. 

Engine Laboratory. This laboratory is for instruction in all phases of 
Internal Combustion Engine work. 

Experiments and research can be carried out in the fields of: ignition, 
injection, combustion and detonation, and engine performance. 



ENGINEERING AND AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 399 

Included in this laboratory are: variable compression ratio test engines 
for octane determination, diesel operation and general ignition work; 
multicylinder gasoline engines; eddy current, electric, and water dyna- 
mometers; and three jet engines. In addition there are indicators of 
various kinds including Piezo-electric and Cox intermittent as well as a 
number of different exhaust gas analyzers and temperature measuring 
devices. 

Heating, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Laboratory. Equipment 
is available in these laboratories for the study of heating and cooling 
units plus air flow, dehumidification and humidification systems. Heating 
tests can be made on the performance of coal and oil burning units and 
hot water or warm air space heaters. In the study of refrigeration, freon 
and ammonia vapor compression units and absorption units are arranged 
for visual demonstration and equipped for performance tests. 

In most cases, laboratory units are fitted with both hand and commercial 
automatic controls. Instruments that are used include mechanical and 
hot wire anemometers, pitot tubes, gas analyzers, orifice plates, inclined 
and vertical manometers, thermocouples, potentiometers, resistance ther- 
mometers and sling psychrometers. 

Metallography Laboratory. This laboratory is equipped for the physical 
study of metals. Research and practice can be carried out in this labora- 
tory in the following fields: crystallography and alloy systems, heat treat- 
ment and strength of materials, and macro and micro examination of 
metals. Included also are controlled heat treating and melting furnaces, 
bakelite mold press, polishing wheels, etching equipment, microscopes, 
photographic equipment. Universal testing machine, fatigue testing ma- 
chine, hardness tester, Jominy end quench testing equipment, creep test- 
ing machine, cutting off wheels, thermocouples and pyrometers, and other 
special instruments. 

The laboratory has a Bausch and Lomb I L S metalloscope for producing 
photomicrographs up to 2,000 magnifications. 

Steam Power Laboratory. This laboratory is equipped for the study 
of steam power. Experiments and research can be carried out in this 
laboratory in the following fields: turbines, compressors, parallel opera- 
tion of A.C. turbogenerators, series and parallel operation of turbines, 
condenser characteristics, etc. 

Included in this laboratory are steam turbines, compressors, engines, 
indicators, condensers, injectors, and various special equipment and instru- 
ments. There is also a complete Educational Power Plant consisting of 
two 20KW A.C. turbogenerators, condenser, synchronous motor and gauge 
board. 

Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer Laboratory. This laboratory is 
equipped for study and research in Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer. 

Experiments can be performed in the determination of viscosity, heat- 
ing value, conductivity, calibration of gauges, etc. 



400 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Equipment includes: bomb calorimeters, Junkers calorimeters, viscosi- 
meters, distillation apparatus, conductivity box. Brown temperature (six 
channel) recorder, potentiometers, galvanometers, and related equipment. 

Machine Shop. The machine shop is equipped with various types of 
lathes, planers, milling machines, drill presses, shaper, midget mill, and 
precision boring head. Equipment is available for gas and electric arc 
welding. 

The shop equipment not only furnishes practice, drill, and instruction 
for students, but makes possible the complete production of special appa- 
ratus for conducting experimental and research work in engineering. 

AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING 

Aerodynamics Laboratory. The Aerodynamics Laboratory is equipped 
for study in several phases of aerodynamic problems. Research can be 
carried out in the the following fields: Optical evaluation and pressure 
measurements in supersonic flows; total drag measurements on projectile- 
type bodies and spheres; analogue solutions of potential flow problems in 
both incompressible and compressible flows. Equipment available includes: 
one-foot supersonic wind tunnel with interchangeable sections for both axi- 
symmetric and two-dimensional flows at Mach numbers varying from 1.1 
to 3; two-foot circular low speed wind tunnel; ballistic range; water table 
for hydraulic analogy; large electrolytic tank for electric analogy; Schlieren 
optical system; high speed flash photographic unit; strain-gage type pres- 
sure pick-ups; manometer board; other accessories shared with the struc- 
tures laboratory. 

Wind Tunnel Laboratory. The University of Maryland Wind Tunnel has a 
test section measuring 7.75 feet by 11 feet with air velocities up to 280 miles 
per hour. The six component balance system prints and simultaneously 
punches data into International Business Machine cards. This permits the re- 
duction of data automatically through use of standard punched card ma- 
chines. A variable frequency power source with precision metering makes 
possible the operation of electric motors in airplane models to simulate pro- 
peller effects. Steady pressures are indicated on a 100-tube manometer 
board and unsteady pressures are recorded on a standard oscillograph with 
s pecial el ectrical instruments. 

The laboratory is currently engaged in a year-round program of military 
tests for aircraft companies and the military services. Provision is made 
for active participation of senior students in one test during the year in 
connection with Aeronautical Laboratory. Facilities are also available to 
graduate students working on special subsonic problems. 

Structures Laboratory. The laboratory is designed to extend and com- 
plement theoretical solutions to practical design problems and to provide 
facilities for proof tests of built-up structural units under both static and 
dynamic loads. 



ENGINEERING AND AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 401 

The equipment consists of a 400,000 pound capacity Universal testing 
machine, a 24,000 pound Universal test machine complete with stress-strain 
recorder, a 500 ton hydi-aulic compression jack, hydraulic tension-compres- 
sion jacks and pumps, and lead shot bags for applying structural loading. 
A rigid test rig is a permanent fixture in the laboratory. For measuring 
loads there are available traction dynamometers and SR-4 tension-com- 
pression load cells. The laboratory also has SR-4 strain indicating equip- 
ment with switching and balancing units, extensometers, compressometers, 
Huggenberger tensometers, and an oscillograph for measuring strain. 

Aeronautical Shop. The shop includes complete facilities for the work- 
ing of metal, sheet metal, and wood with particular emphasis on the tools 
used in aircraft construction. 

The sheet metal shop includes squaring shears, bending brake, nibbler, 
bending rolls, aircraft sheet metal router, rivet squeezers, and an electric 
furnace with automatic control for heat treating rivets. 

The machine shop includes a quick-change lathe, universal milling 
machine with vertical mill attachment, shaper, drill press, electric welder, 
acetylene welding and cutting outfit, metal cutting handsaw, power hack- 
saw, tool grinders, arbor press, table saw, belt sander, and two-ton hydraulic 
floor hoist. 

Civil Engineering Laboratories 

Hydraulics Laboratory. The equipment consists of four electrically 
driven pumps together capable of circulating a maximum of 4,000 gallons 
of water per minute, a standpipe 5 feet in diameter and 60 feet high which 
can be used as a constant level tank at three different heads; 150 foot head 
tank, 300 foot head tank, 3 foot by 4 foot by 15 foot metal weir tank, 3 foot 
by 4 foot by 25 foot glass sided flume for weir and model experiments, 
Pelton water wheel with glass sides for direct observation, Rodney-Hunt 
reaction turbine, measuring tanks, weirs, nozzles, venturi meters, other 
meters, gauges, and other small apparatus necessary for the study of the 
flow characteristics of water. 

Materials Testing Laboratory. Apparatus and equipment are provided 
for making standard tests on various construction materials, such as sand, 
gravel, stone, steel, concrete, lumber, brick, bituminous materials and road 
mixes. 

Equipment includes a 400,000-pound universal hydraulic testing machine, 
a 60,000-pound universal hydraulic testing machine, three 100,000-pound 
screw power universal testing machines, torsion testing machine, impact 
testing machine, fatigue testing machine, weather-o-meter, Rockwell, 
Brinell and Shore hardness testers, abrasion testing machine, rattler, con- 
stant temperature chamber, moist room and other facilities for mixing, 
curing and testing concretes and mortars, as well as extensometer and 
micrometer gauges, electrical strain gauges and other special devices for 
ascertaining the elastic properties of various materials. 



402 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Sanitary Laboratory. The laboratory is designed to provide facilities for 
instruction and research in water and sewage problems. 

The apparatus and equipment required to make the standard chemical 
and bacteriological analyses of water and sewage are available. 

Ample space and equipment for model work are provided in this labora- 
tory and since it is adjacent to the hydraulics laboratory, access to its 
facilities for additional studies is available. 

Soils Mechanics Laboratory. The laboratory is designed for instruction 
and research into the properties of soil and their structural applications. The 
laboratory is equipped for the performance of all the usual soil tests, sieve 
and hydrometer analysis, Atterberg limits, compaction, permeability, capil- 
larity, consolidation and strength. 

The strength testing equipment includes direct shear and triaxial devices 
to be loaded statically or by variable speed motors and a universal testing 
machine with a 240-pound low range and automatic recorder. A repetitive 
loading device is available to simulate fatigue or compaction from traffic 
loads. Compaction equipment includes an automatic tamper and a variable 
frequency vibration table. 

Also available are field sampling and resistivity exploration equipment, 
California bearing ratio apparatus for field and laboratory, apparatus for 
chemical and microscopic studies and motorized pulverization and mixing 
equipment. 

Structural Models Analysis Laboratory, This laboratory is equipped for 
the mechanical solution of indeterminate structures by use of scaled models. 
The equipment available for this analysis includes the Beggs Deformeter, 
the Eney Deformeter and the tools necessary for plastic model construc- 
tion. Equipment for making brass spring equivalents of trussed frame- 
works is available, as are machines for photoelastic studies and membrane 
analogy (torsion) studies. 

Research Foundation. The National Sand and Gravel Association and 
the National Ready Mixed Concrete Association have, by arrangement with 
the College of Engineering, established their joint testing and research 
laboratory at the University. The purpose of the Research Foundation 
thus organized is to make available to the Association additional facilities 
for its investigational work, and to provide for the College of Engineering 
additional facilities and opportunities for increasing the scope of its 
engineering research. 

Surveying Equipment. Surveying equipment for plane, topographic, and 
geodetic surveying is provided properly to equip several field parties. A 
wide variety of surveying instruments is provided, including domestic as 
well as foreign makes, and stereoscopic instruments are available for the 
interpretation and use of aerial photographs. 

Special Models and Specimens. A number of models illustrating various 
types of highway construction and highway bridges are available. 



ENGINEERING AND AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 403 

A wide variety of specimens of the more common minerals and rocks 
has been collected from various sections of the country, particularly from 
Maryland. 

Engineering Library 

In addition to the general University Library an Engineering Reading 
Room in the Engineering Building receives the standard engineering maga- 
zines and technical journals and maintains a reference library of the standard 
engineering works and current technical literature. Also special reference 
books and catalogs for design courses are provided in the design rooms 
of the various departments. The Departments of Chemical Engineering 
and Chemistry maintain independent, readily available working libraries, 
also. 

The Davis Library of Highway Engineering and Transport, founded by 
Dr. Charles H. Davis, President of the National Highways Association, 
is part of the Library of the College of Engineering. This library covers 
all phases of highway engineering, highway transportation, and highway 
traffic control. 

There has also been donated to the College of Engineering the trans- 
portation library of the late J. Rowland Bibbins of Washington, D. C. The 
books and reports in this library deal with urban transportation problems, 
including railroads, street cars, subways, busses, and city planning. 

Curricula 

The normal curriculum of each department is outlined on the following 
pages. Students are expected to attend and take part in the meetings of 
the student chapters of the technical engineering societies. 

Freshman engineering students are given a special course of lectures 
by faculty members and practicing engineers covering the work of the 
several engineering professional fields. The purpose of this course is to 
assist the freshman in selecting the particular field of engineering for 
which he is best adapted. The student is required to submit a brief written 
repoi't of each lecture. A series of engineering lectures for upper class- 
men is also provided. These are given by prominent practicing engineers in 
the various branches of the profession. 

Student branches of the following national technical societies are estab- 
lished in the College of Engineering: American Institute of Chemical Engi- 
neers, American Society of Civil Engineers, American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Institute of Aero- 
nautical Sciences, and Institute of Radio Engineers. The student branches 
meet regularly for the discussion of topics dealing with the various fields 
of engineering. 

A student in the College of Engineering will be certified as a junior 
when he shall have passed all the basic technical courses of the Freshman 
and Sophomore years with an average grade of C or higher. 



404 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The proximity of the University to Baltimore and Washington, and to 
other places where there are large industrial enterprises, offers an excellent 
opportunity for the engineering student to observe what is being done in 
his chosen field. An instructor accompanies students on all inspection trips, 
and students are required to submit a written report of each trip. 

The courses listed in the curricula to follow will be found described in 
detail on the succeeding pages. 

BASIC CURRICULUM FOR ALL FRESHMAN STUDENTS 

All freshman students are required to take the following curriculum 
during their first year: 

/ — Semester — n 
Freshman Year I II 

TSng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 8 8 

Speech 7 — Public Speaking .... t 

*Math. 14 — Plane Trigonometry 2 .... 

•Math. 15 — College Algebra 8 .... 

Math. 17 — Analytic Geometry .... A 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 4 4 

Dr. 1, 2 — Engineering Drawing 2 2 

Engr. 1 — Introduction to Engineering 1 .... 

A. S. 1, 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 19 1» 

AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING 

Aeronautical Engineering deals with the design, construction, and mainte- 
nance of aircraft and aircraft power plants; aerodynamics and performance 
of aircraft; structural design and mechanical equipment; and the organiza- 
tion and operation of industrial aircraft plants. 

Aeronautical Engineering Curriculum ^ Semester > 

Sophomore Year I II 

G. & p. 1 — American Government 8 .... 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life .... 8 

Math. 20, 21— Calculus 4 4 

Phys. 20, 21 — General Physics 6 S 

Surv. 1 — Plane Surveying .... 2 

Dr. 8 — Advanced Engineering Drawing 2 .... 

Shop 1 — Machine Shop Practice 2 .... 

Shop 2 — Machine Shop Practice .... 1 

Shop 3 — Manufacturing Processes 1 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 20 20 



• A qualifying test is given during registration to determine whether the student is 
adequately prepared for Math. 14 and 16. A student failing this test is required to take 
Math. 1, Introductory Algebra, without credit and is not eligible to take Math. 14 concurrently. 



J 



ENGINEERING AND AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 405 

/ — Semester — \ 
Junior Year I II 

*Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature; or 3 3 

*Eng. 5, 6 — Composition and English Literature 3 3 

Math. 64 — Diflferential Equations for Engineers 3 .... 

Mech. 2 — Statics and Dynamics 5 

Mech. 52 — Strength of Materials .... 6 

M. E. 53— Metallography 3 

M. E. 100 — Thermodynamics 3 .... 

Aero. E. 101 — Aerodynamics I .... 3 

Aero. E. 103 — Airplane Detail Drafting 1 .... 

Aero. E. 105 — Airplane Fabrication Shop .... 1 

E. E. 51, 52 — Principles of Electrical Engineering 4 4 

Total 19 19 

Senior Year 

*H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

Aero. E. 102 — Aerodynamics II 2 .... 

Aero. E. 106 — Airplane Fabrication Shop 1 .... 

Aero. E. 107, 108— Airplane Design 4 4 

Aero. E. 109, 110— Aircraft Power Plants 3 3 

Aero. E. Ill, 112 — Aeronautical Laboratory 2 2 

Aero. E. 113,114 — Mechanics of Aircraft Structures 3 4 

Aero. E. 115 — Aerodynamics III .... 3 

Total 18 19 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Chemical Engineering deals primarily with the industrial and economic 
transformation of matter. It seeks to assemble and develop information on 
chemical operations and processes of importance in modern life and to 
apply this under executive direction, according to engineering methods, for 
the attainment of economic objectives. Modern chemical research has con- 
tributed so much to industrial and social welfare that the field of the 
chemical engineer may now be said to cover practically every operation in 
which any industrial material undergoes a change in its chemical identity. 

When the Department of Chemical Engineering was founded in 1937, the 
Board of Regents transferred all the work in Industrial Chemistry, including 
the staff and equipment, to the Department of Chemical Engineering. 

Beginning in 1948-49, the Department of Chemical Engineering expanded 
its offerings to include an option in Metallurgy. Students who elect this 
option, which is outlined below, will receive their bachelor's degree in 
preparation for work in Metallurgy. 



• A. S. 101, 102 and A. S. 103. 104 — Advanced Air Force R. O. T. C. — 3 credits per semester 
may be substituted. 



406 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Chemical Engineering Curriculum , — Semester — \ 

Sophomore Year ^ ^^ 

Math. 20, 21 — Calculus * * 

Phys. 20, 21 — General Physics 6 B 

Chem. 35, 37 — Elementary Organic Chemistry Lectures 2 2 

Chem. 36, 38 — Elementary Organic Laboratory 2 2 

Chem. 19 — Quantitative Chemical Analysis 4 .... 

Ch. E. 11 — Chemical Engineering Control 2 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 ^ 



Total 



21 19 



Junior Year 

Econ. 31, 32 — Principles of Economics 3 3 

**Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature; or 3 3 

**Eng. B, 6 — Composition and English Literature 3 3 

Ch. E. 103, f, s — Elements of Chemical Engineering 3 3 

Chem. 187, 189 — Elements of Physical Chemistry Lectures 3 3 

Chem. 188, 190— Physical Chemistry Laboratory 2 2 

Mech. 1 — Statics and Dynamics 3 .... 

Mech. 51 — Strength of Materials • • • • 3 

Ch. E. 110 — Advanced Chemical Engineering Calculations 3 .... 

G. & P. 1 — American Government 3 

Total 20 20 

Senior Year 

t*H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization ; or 3 3 

tCh. E. 114 — Application of Electrochemistry 4 .... 

Ch. E. 105, f , s — Advanced Unit Operations 5 6 

Ch. E. 109, f , s — Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 3 3 

Ch. E. 108, f, s — Industrial Chemical Technology 2 2 

E. E. 51, 52 — Principles of Electrical Engineering 4 4 

tCh. E. 104 — Seminar 1 1 

Ch. E. 123, 124— Elements of Plant Design 3 3 

Total 21 or 22 21 

Seniors desiring to do so may audit Mech. 53 in preparation of licensing examinations. 



** A. S. 101, 102, Advanced Air Force R. O. T. C, 3 credits per semester, may be 
substituted. 

* Students who are to become candidates for graduate degrees requiring foreign language 
may elect instead a foreign language and secure the American History credit in their graduate 
program. Students who wish to do graduate work in Electrochemical Engineering may 
elect Ch. E. 114, "Applications of Electrochemistry," and secure the American History 
credit in their graduate program. 

t A. S. 103, 104, Advanced Air Force R. O. T. C, 3 credits per semester, may be 
substituted. 

t Students prepare reports on current problems in Chemical Engineering and partici- 
pate under supervision of staff member. The content of this course is constantly changing 
so a student may receive a number of credits by re-registration. 



ENGINEERING AND AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 



407 



// 

4 
6 

2 
4 
3 
1 

19 



Metallurgical Option , — Semester — \ 

Sophomore Year 

G. & P. 1 — American Government 

Math. 20. 21— Calculus 

Phys. 20, 21 — General Physics 

Chem. 19 — Quantitative Chemical Analysis 

Ch. E. 11 — Chemical Engineering Control .... 

Ch. E. 23 — Non-ferrous and Ferrous Metallurgy ... 

A. S. 3, 4 — Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 

Physical Activities 1 

Total 20 

Junior Year 

tfEngr. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature 

or 3 

tfEng. 5, 6 — Composition and English Literature 

Chem. 187, 189— Elements of Physical Chemistry 3 

Chem. 188, 190 — Physical Chemistry Laboratory 2 

Ch. E. 64, 66— Physical Metallurgy 5 

Econ. 31, 32 — Principles of Economics 3 

Mech. 1 — Statics and Dynamics 3 

Mech. 51 — Strength of Materials .... 

Total 19 

Senior Year 

Ch. E. 182, 183— Optical and X-ray Metallography 4 

Ch. E. 164, 166 — Thermodynamics of Metallurgical Processes 3 

Ch. E. 110 — Advanced Chemical Engineering Calculations 3 

tCh. E. 104 — Seminar, Metallurgical Section 1 

Ch. E. 168, 170 — Metallurgical Investigations 2 

Ch. E. 103, f,s — Elements of Chemical Engineering 3 

*tH. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 

Totel 19 



4 
3 

1 
4 
3 
3 

18 



* Students who are to become candidates for graduate degrees requiring foreign language 
may elect instead a foreign language and secure the American History credit in their 
graduate program. Students who wish to do graduate work in Electrochemical Engineer- 
ing may elect Ch. E. 114, "Applications of Electrochemistry," and secure the American 
History credit in their graduate program. 

tt A. S. 101, 102 — Advanced Air Force R. O. T. C. — 3 credits per semester may be 
substituted. 
tA. S 



O. T. C. — 3 credits per semester may be 



103, 104 — Advanced Air Force R. 
substituted. 

t Students prepare reports on current problems in Metallurgy and participate under 
supervision of staff member. The content of this course is constantly changing so a student 
may receive a number of credits by re-registration. 



408 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Civil Engineering deals with the design, construction, and maintenance 
of highways, railroads, waterways, bridges, buildings, water supply and 
sewerage systems, harbor improvements, dams, and surveying and mapping. 

Civil Engineering Curriculum , — Semester — > 

Sophomore Year ^ ^^ 

G. & P. 1 — American Government 8 .... 

Soc. 1 — Socioloify of American Life .... 8 

Math. 20, 21— Calculus 4 4 

Phys. 20, 21 — General Physics 6 6 

Mech. 1 — Statics and Dynamics .... 8 

Surv. 2 — Plane Surveying 3 .... 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 19 19 

Junior Year 

*Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature ; or 3 8 

*Eng. 5, 6 — Composition and English Literature 3 8 

Dr. 3 — Advanced Engineering Drawing 2 .... 

Geol. 2 — Engineering Geology .... 2 

Speech 108 — Public Speaking 2 

E. E. 50 — Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering 3 .... 

M. E. 50 — Principles of Mechanical Engineering .... 3 

Mech. 50 — Strength of Materials 4 .... 

Mech. 53 — Materials of Engineering .... 2 

C. E. 50 — Fluid Mechanics 3 

C. E. 100 — Theory of Structures 4 

Stirv. 100 — Advanced Surveying 4 .... 

Surv. 101 — Curves and Earthwork 3 

Total 19 19 

Senior Year 

*H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 8 

Eng. 7 — ^Technical Writing .... 2 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics 3 .... 

Bact. 65 — Lectures in Sanitary Bacteriology 2 

Engr. 100 — Engineering Contracts and Specifications .... 2 

C. E. 101— Soil Mechanics 8 

C. E. 102 — Structural Design 6 .... 

C. E. 108 — Concrete Design .... • 

C. B. 104 — Water Supply 8 .... 

G. E. 106 — Sewerase .... > 

C. E. 106 — Elements of Highways .... 8 

TbUl 20 19 



• A. S. 101, 102 and 103, 104 — Advanced Air Force R. O. T. C. — 3 credits per semester 
may be substituted. 



ENGINEERING AND AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 409 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Electrical Engineering deals with the generation, transmission, distribu- 
tion, and utilization of electrical energy; and with the transmission and 

reception of intelligence as, for example, telephone, radio, radar, and tele- 
vision systems. 

Electrical Engineering Curriculum , — Semester — . 

Sophomore Year I II 

G. & p. 1 — American Government 3 .... 

S'oc. 1 — Sociology of American Life 3 .... 

Math. 20, 21— Calculus 4 4 

Phys. 20, 21 — General Physics 6 6 

Mech. 1 — Statics and Dynamics .... S 

E, E. 1 — Basic Electrical ETngineer ine .... 4 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 19 20 

Junior Year 

*Eng. 3,4 — Composition and World Literature; or 3 3 

*Eng. 5, 6 — Composition and English Literature 3 3 

Mech. 51 — Strength of Materials 3 .... 

C. E. 50— Fluid Mechanics 3 

Math. 64 — Differential Equations 3 .... 

E. E. 60 — Electricity and Magnetism 3 .... 

E. E. 62, 63 — Electrical Measurements 2 2 

E E. 65 — Direct Current Machinery 3 

E. B. 100 — Alternating Current Circuits 4 

E. E. 101 — Engineering Electronics .... 4 

E. E. 104 — Communication Circuits .... 3 

Total 18 18 

Senior Year — Electronics Option 

*H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

M. E. 51 — Thermodynamics 4 .... 

M. E. 52 — Power Plants 4 

E. E. 102 — Alternating Current Machinery 4 .... 

E. E. 103L — Alternating Current Machinery Laboratory .... 1 

E. E. 105-106 — Radio Engineering 4 4 

E. E. 114— Applied Electronics 3 

E. E. 109 — Pulse Techniques 3 

E. E. 108— Electric Transients 3 

ToUl 18 18 

* A. S. 101, 102 and 10.3, 104 — Advanced R. O. T. C— 3 credits per semester may be 
substituted. 



410 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

( — Semester — s 

Senior Year — Power Option I II 

*H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

M. E. 51 — Thermodynamics 4 .... 

M. E. 52— Power Plants 4 

E. E. 102-103 — Alternating Current Machinery 4 4 

E. E. 105 — Radio Engineering 4 .... 

E. E. 106L — Radio Engineering Laboratory .... 1 

E. E. 117 — Power Transmission and Distribution 3 .... 

E. E. 116 — Alternating Current Machinery Design .... 3 

E. E. 108— Electric Transients 3 

Total 18 18 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Mechanical Engineering deals with the design, construction, and main- 
tenance of machinery and power plants; heating, ventilation, and refrigera- 
tion; and the organization and operation of industrial plants. 

Mechanical Engineering Curriculum , — Semester — \ 

Sophomore Year I II 

G. & P. 1 — American Government 3 .... 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life .... 8 

Math. 20, 21— Calculus 4 4 

Phys. 20, 21 — General Physics B i 

Surv. 1 — Plane Surveying 2 

Dr. 3 — Advanced Engineering Drawing 2 .... 

Shop 1 — Machine Shop Practice 2 .... 

Shop 2 — Machine Shop Practice .... 1 

Shop 3 — Manufacturing Processes 1 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 20 20 

Junior Year — General Option 

•Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature ; or 3 8 

*Eng. 5, 6 — Composition and English Literature 3 8 

Math. 64 — Differential Equations for Engineers 8 .... 

Mech. 2 — Statics and Dynamics 6 .... 

Mech. 62 — Strength of Materials .... 6 

E. E. 51, 52 — Principles of Electrical Engineering 4 4 

M. E. 53 — Metallography 8 

M. E. 54 — Fluid Mechanics 8 

M. E. 100 — Thermodynamics 8 .... 

Total 18 18 



♦ A. S. 101, 102 — Advanced Air Force R. O. T. C. — 3 credits per semester may b« 
substituted. 



ENGINEERING AND AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 411 

r — Semester — \ 

Junior Year — Aeronautical Option I II 

•Eng. 8, 4 — Composition and World Literature ; or 3 3 

•Engr. E, 6 — Composition and English Literature 3 3 

Math. 64 — Differential Equations for Engineers 3 .... 

Mech. 2 — Statics and Dynamics 6 

Mech. 62 — Strength of Materials 6 

E. E. 61, 52 — Principles of Electrical Engineering 4 4 

M. E. 68 — Metallography 8 

M. E. 56 — Fluid Mechanics and Aerodynamics .... 8 

M. E. 100 — Thermodynamics 3 

Total 18 18 

Senior Year — General Option 

Engr. 100 — Engineering Contracts and Specifications .... 2 

*H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

M. E. 101— Heat Transfer 2 

M. E. 102 — Heating and Air Conditioning 3 .... 

M. E. 103— Refrigeration 3 

M. E. 104, 105— Prime Movers 4 4 

M. E. 106, 107- — Mechanical Engineering Design 4 4 

M. E. 108, 109 — Mechanical Laboratory 2 2 



Total 18 18 

Senior Year — Aeronautical Option 

Engr. 100 — Engineering Contracts and Specifications .... 2 

*H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

Aero. E. 113, 114 — Mechanics of Aircraft Structures 3 3 

M. E. 101— Heat Transfer 2 

M. E. 104, 105— Prime Movers 4 4 

M. E. 106, 107 — Mechanical Engineering Design 4 4 

M. E. 108, 109 — Mechanical Laboratory 2 2 

Total 18 18 



• A. S. 103, 104 — Advanced Air Force R. O. T. C. — 3 credits per semester may be 
substituted. 

AGRICULTURE — ENGINEERING 

A five-year combined program in Agriculture and Engineering, arranged 
jointly by the College of Agriculture and the College of Engineering, per- 
mits students to become candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in the College of Agriculture at the end of four years and for the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in the Departments of Civil, Electrical, Mechanical, 
or Chemical Engineering at the end of the fifth year. 

Details of this program will be found listed in the catalog of College 
of Agriculture. 



412 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

FELLOWSHIPS OF THE NATIONAL SAND AND GRAVEL ASSOCIA- 
TION RESEARCH FOUNDATION AND THE NATIONAL READY 
MIXED CONCRETE ASSOCIATION RESEARCH LABORATORY 

The University of Maryland, in cooperation with the National Sand and 
Gravel Association and the National Ready Mixed Concrete Association, 
offers Fellowships for research on appropriate problems related to the 
sand and gravel and the the ready mixed concrete industries. That offered 
by the National Sand and Gravel Association is known as the Stanton 
Walker Fellowship. Two are offered by the National Ready Mixed Con- 
crete Association, known as the Stephan Stepanian and the C. Dolly Gray 
Fellowships. Fellows enter upon their duties on August 1 and continue for 
11 months. Payments under the Fellowships are made at the end of each 
month and amount to $1500 for the year, in addition to tuition fees and 
costs of books. 

Fellows register as students in the Graduate School of the University of 
Maryland. Class work is directed by the heads of the departments of 
instruction, but about half of the time will be spent in research work. The 
faculty supervisor is the Dean of the College of Engineering of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

These fellowships are open to graduates in Engineering from an accredited 
college or university, who are qualified to undertake graduate study and 
research work leading to a Master's degree. Applications should be accom- 
panied by a certified copy of college record, applicant's recent photograph, 
statement of technical and practical experience (if any), and letters from 
three persons, such as instructors or employers, covering specifically the 
applicant's character, ability, education, and experience. 

The applications should be addressed: Dean S. S. Steinberg, College of 
Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

INSTITUTE FOR FLUID DYNAMICS AND APPLIED MATHEMATICS 

The Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics has been 
established by the University to prosecute fundamental research in applied 
mathematics and in theoretical and experimental fluid dynamics. Its pro- 
gram encompasses the important problems of high-speed and high-altitude 
flight. Research currently under way at the Institute includes coordinated 
theoretical and experimental investigations of physical phenomena in gas 
jets including shock waves and turbulence, and theoretical investigations of 
non-linear phenomena, particularly those occurring in gas dynamics and in 
elasticity, and of solid-state phenomena, especially those amenable to the 
methods of statistical physics. The former program is partially supported 
by the Office of Air Research, the latter by the Office of Naval Research. 
The Institute is particularly cognizant of the government research being 
done in the neighborhood of the University and offers its facilities for 
achievement of common objectives. 



ENGINEERING AND AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 413 

The Institute is comprised of Research Professors who are in charge of 
the above programs. Each year a scholar of international renown, usually 
from abroad, is invited as a Visiting Research Professor. The Senior staff 
are assisted by Research Associates, University Fellows (post-doctoral), 
and University Assistants (doctoral candidates). In addition, faculty mem- 
bers from several of the University Departments participate in the activi- 
ties of the Institute. 

The Institute sponsors weekly Seminars dealing with its own research 
fields. In addition, it holds monthly colloquia on I'esearch problems in 
applied mathematics and applied mechanics. The University also sponsors 
occasional lectures by distinguished scientists. 

Additional information may be obtained from Dr. R. J. Seeger, Acting 
Director of the Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

ENGINEERING SHORT COURSES 

Through short courses, the College of Engineering carries the benefits 
of engineering teaching to persons and industries in various parts of the 
State. These courses offer, in addition to regular instruction, an oppor- 
tunity for the discussion of problems of interest to those engaged in public 
works, in public health, and in public safety. 

Volunteer Firemen's Short Course. In cooperation with the Maryland 
State Firemen's Association a short course is held annually at College 
Park for volunteer firemen throughout the State. This four-day course 
is designed to bring to firemen the newest developments in fire prevention, 
control and extinguishment, as well as information on inspection, arson 
investigation and equipment maintenance. 

Information regarding fire service extension courses may be found under 
"Fire Service Extension Department." 

Mining Extension Classes. In cooperation with the Maryland Bureau of 
Mines and the State Departments of Education of Allegany and Garrett 
Counties, night mining classes are conducted throughout the year in several 
training centers in the western part of the State. The subjects studied are 
coal mine gases, coal mine ventilation, map readings, and mine safety. 

Motor Fleet Supervisors Training Course. This course is offered annually 
in cooperation with many national and state organizations interested in 
conservation and safety. It is open to fleet owners and operators, safety 
and personnel directors, fleet supervisors, and safety engineers. 

Additional information regarding engineering short coui'ses may be 
obtained from Dean S. S. Steinberg, College of Engineering, University of 
Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

FIRE SERVICE EXTENSION DEPARTMENT 

The Fire Service Extension Department is organized under the College 
of Engineering in cooperation with the State Department of Vocational 



414 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Education, and operates with both Federal and State funds. The Depart- 
ment provides in-service training for firemen with classes conducted through- 
out the State by about 100 local instructors, with two full-time Senior 
Instructors. Basic training of 60 clock hours is given in the fundamentals 
of firemanship, as well as an advanced course of 69 clock hours, covering 
the technical field fire prevention, control and extinguishment and a third 
section of 57 clock hours in related technical information. A training course 
of 45 clock hours for industrial plant fire brigades is also available. A four- 
day short course is held annually the first week in September at the Uni- 
versity at the new Fire Service Building. Specialized courses are scheduled 
to meet growing demand for more comprehensive technical knowledge. 
Included are Instructor Training, Conferences for Fire Company Presi- 
dents, Conferences for Fire Chiefs and Schools for Fire Officers. Firemen 
who have completed the prescribed training courses have been given pref- 
erential rating in positions in the military and naval fire fighting forces. 

The Department also serves in an advisory capacity to the State Fire 
Marshal and municipal authorities in matters of fire prevention, fire pro- 
tection engineering, and fire safety regulations. The Director serves as 
Technical Adviser to the Maryland State Firemen's Association, and on 
various National Committees of the National Fire Protection Association. 

Additional information may be obtained from Chief Robert C. Byrus, 
Director, Fire Service Extension Department, Fire Service Building, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION 

WiLBERT J. Huff, Director. 

The Engineering Experiment Station carries on cooperative Investiga- 
tions with industries of Maryland and Departments of the State and Fed- 
eral Governments. A diversity of engineering training, experience, and 
equipment represented by the faculty and laboratories of the College of 
Engineering is thus made available for the problems under inquiry. 

The staif of the College of Engineering available for research studies 
will be glad to discuss proposed problems of importance to industry and of 
public interest where means can be found for the cooperative researches; 
such studies may be undertaken with the approval of the administration of 
the University. 



ENGINEERING AND AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 415 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

The University reserves the right to withdraw or discontinue any course 
for which an insufficient number of students have registered to warrant 
giving the course. In such an event, no fee will be charged for transfer to 
another course. 

Courses are designated by numbers as follows: 
1 to 99: courses for undergraduates. 
100 to 199: courses for advanced undergraduates and graduates. (Not 

all courses numbered 100 to 199 may be taken for graduate credit.) 
200 to 299: courses for graduates only. 
A course with a single number extends through one semester. A course 
with a double number extends through two semesters. 

Courses not otherwise designated are lecture courses. The number of 
credit hours is shown by the arable numeral in parentheses after the title 
of the course. 

A separate schedule of courses is issued each semester, giving the hours, 
places of meeting, and other information required by the student in making 
out his program. Students obtain these schedules when they register. 

AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Sherwood; Associate Professor Corning; Assistant 
Professors Guess, Shen; Instructors Eckard, Hutton. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Aero. E. 101. Aerodynamics I (3) — Second semester. Three lectures a 
week. Prerequisites, Phys. 21 and Math. 21. 

Basic fluid mechanics and aerodynamic theory. (Sherwood.) 

Aero. E. 102. Aerodynamics II (2) — First Semester. Two lectures a 
week. Prerequisite, Aero. E. 101. 

Elements of hydrodynamics and application to engineering problems. 

(Sherwood.) 

Aero. E. 103. Airplane Detail Drafting (1) — First semester. One 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Dr. 3. 

Standards of airplane drafting. (Corning.) 

Aero. E. 104. Airplane Layout Drafting (1) — Second semester. One 
laboratory period a week. Lofting. Prerequisite, Aero. E. 103. 

Layout of component parts of airplanes, wings, fuselage, etc. (Coming.) 

Aero. E. 105. Airplane Fabrication Shop (1) — Second semester. One 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, junior standing in Aero. E. 

Aero. E. 106. Airplane Fabrication Shop (1) — First semester. One 
lecture period a week. Prerequisite, senior standing in Aero. E. 



416 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Both Aero. E. 105 and Aero. E. 106 include airci-aft sheet metal forming 
and fabrication. Airframe materials, sheet metal fabrication, machining, 
fasteners, welding, casting, foz'ging, and costs. (Eckard, Hutton.) 

Aero. E. 107, 108. Airplane Design (4, 4) — First and second semesters. 
Two lectures and two supervised calculation periods per week. Prerequi- 
sites, Aero. E. 101, Aero. E. 104, and Mech. 52. Aero. E. 102 and Aero. E. 
113 to be taken concurrently. 

Theory and method of airplane design, airplane stability and control, and 
structural design. Each student designs a jet transport based upon assigned 
specifications. Charts and formulas used in industry are derived and used 
as basis of design. Optimum airplane is obtained by variation of fundamen- 
tal parameters. (Corning.) 

Aero. E. 109, 110. Aircraft Power Plants (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Three lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Mech. 
52, M. E. 100. 

Thermodynamics and dynamics of aircraft power plant design. Gas tur- 
bines and jet propulsion. Study and tests of engines in laboratory. 

Aero. E. Ill, 112. Aernonautical Laboratory (2, 2) — First and second 
semesters. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
Aero. E. 101. To be taken concurrently with Aero E. 102 and Aero. E. 113. 

Wind tunnel tests. Structure tests. Ballistics tests. Fluid flow analogies. 

(Staff.) 

Aero. E. 113, 114. Mechanics of Aircraft Structures (3, 4) — First and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, Mech, 52. and Math. 64. 

Principles and problems of airplane stress analysis and design. 

(Guess.) 

Aero. E. 115. Aerodynamics III (3) — Second semester. Elementary 
theory of the flow of a compressible gas at subsonic and supei-sonic speeds. 
Prerequisite, Aero. E. 102. (Sherwood.) 

For Graduates 

Aero. E. 200, 201. Advanced Aerodynamics (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 
Aero. E. 101, 102, Math. 64. 

Special problems in performance and stability of aircraft. Design of 
aircraft for speeds approaching the velocity of sound. Wind tunnel research. 

Aero. E. 202, 203. Advanced Aircraft Structures (3, 3)— First and 
second semesters. Prerequisites, Aero. E. 113, 114. 

Advanced theory and problems of aircraft structural analysis. 

Aero. E. 204. Aircraft Dynamics (3) — First semester. Prerequisites, 

Math. 64 and Aero. E. 114. 



ENGINEERING AND AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 417 

Dynamic loads on a rigid airplane. Dynamics of elastically connected 
masses. Influence coefficients. Mode shapes and principal oscillations. 
Generalized coordinates and Lagrange's equations. Transient stresses in an 
elastic structure. (Shen.) 

Aero. E. 205. Aircraft Dynamics (3) — Second semester. Prerequisites, 
Math. 64 and Aero. E. 101. 

Wing divergence and aileron reversal. Theory of two dimensional oscil- 
lating airfoil. Flutter problems. Corrections for finite span. Compressi- 
bility effects. (Shen.) 

Aero. E. 206, 207. Advanced Aircraft Power Plants (3,3) — First and 
second semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisites, M. E. 100; Aero. E. 109, 110. 

Special problems of thermodynamics and dynamics of aircraft power 
plants; jet and rocket engines. Research in power plant laboratory. 

Aero. E. 208, 209. Advanced Aircraft Design and Construction (3, 3) — 

First and second semesters. One lecture and two laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisites, Aero. E. 107, 108; Math. 64. 

A course in project engineering. The student studies methods involved 
in the design, production, and flight testing of aircraft. Problems in design 
production, management, testing, etc. 

Aero. E. 210. Aerodynamic Theory (3) — First semester. Prerequisites, 
Aero. E. 101, Math. 64. 

Fundamental equations in fluid mechanics. Irrotational motion. Circu- 
lation theory of lift. Thin airfoil theory. Lifting line theory. Wind tunnel 
corrections. Propellor theories. Linearized equations in compressible flow. 
Special topics. (Shen.) 

Aero. E. 211. — The Design and Use of Wind Tunnels (Supersonic) (3) — 

First and second semesters. 

The design and use of wind tunnels (supersonic). Review of basic aero- 
dynamics and thermodynamics. Problems in supersonic tunnel design such 
as pumping, power supply, condensation and driers. Equipment for measur- 
ing results, including balances, manometer, optical instruments, such as 
schlieren, spark illumination and Xray equipment. 

Investigations in supersonic wind tunnels are described with special refer- 
ence to similitude required for conversion to full scale. 

Aero. E. 212, 213. Bodies at Supersonic Speeds (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. Prerequisites, degree in Aero. E. or M. E. or equivalent, and 
consent of instructor. 

Brief review of gasdynamics, drag, lift, stability, and damping on a body 
in a supersonic stream. Special aerodynamic problems in the design of 
supersonic missiles. Methods for obtaining accurate test data on the aero- 
dynamic characteristics of supersonic missiles. 



418 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Aero. E. 214. Seminar — (Credit in accordance with work outlined by 
Aero. Engr. staff.) First and second semesters. Prerequisite, graduate 
standing. 

Aero. E. 215. Research — (Credit in accordance with work outlined by 
Aero. Engr. staff.) First and second semesters. Prerequisite, graduate 
standing. 

Aero. E. 216. Selected Aeroballistics Problems (3) — First semester. 
Physical processes and aerothermodynamic laws connected with the flow 
around supersonic missiles. Boundary layer problems and the transfer of 
heat and mass. Prerequisite, degree in Aero. E. or M. E. or equivalent 
and consent of instructor. (Kurzweg.) 

Aero. E. 217. Aerodynamics of Viscous Fluids (3) — Second semester. 
Fundamental concepts. Navier-Stokes' equations. Simple exact solutions. 
Laminar boundary layer theory. Pohlhausen method. Turbulent boundary 
layer; mixing length and similarity theories. Boundary layer in com- 
pressible flow. Prerequisite, Aero. E. 101, Math. 64. (Shen.) 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Professors Huff, Bonney; Associate Professors Klier, Smatko; Assistant 
Professor Gottschalk; Instructor Bilbrey. 

Ch. E. 11. Chemical Engineering Control (2) — Second semester. Six 
laboratory hours a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 19. 

Introductory laboratory studies of widely used materials, methods and 
computations encountered in the examination and interpretation of chemical 
engineering operations. Laboratory fee $8.00 per semester. 

(Bonney and Staff.) 

Ch. E. 23. Nonferrous and Ferrous Metallurgy (4) — Second semester 
Four lectures and demonstrations a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 3. 

The methods of extraction of the important metals and their fabrication. 

(Klier and Bilbrey.) 

Ch. E. 64, 66. Physical Metallurgy (5, 5) — First and second semesters. 
Three lectures, two laboratories a week. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 23; Math. 20, 
21; Physics 20, 21. 

Principles of Crystallography as applied to metals; X-ray diffraction; 
physical metallurgy of appropriate systems, including optical and X-ray 
metallography; constitution and properties of alloy systems; phase trans- 
formations and diffusion theory. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

(Klier and Bilbrey.) 

Ch. E. 68, 70. Mechanical Properties of Metals (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisites, same 
as for Ch. E. 64, 66. 



ENGINEERING AND AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 419 

Introduction to metal forming operations, ingot casting, forging, rolling; 
powder metallurgy; metal tests, tensile, impact, creep, fatigue, hardness. 
Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Klier.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Ch. E. 103, f, s. Elements of Chemical Engineering (3, 3) — First and 
second semesters. Three hours a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 3; Phys. 21. 

Theoretical discussion of underlying philosophy and methods in chemical 
engineering and elementary treatment of important operations involving 
fluid flow, heat flow, evaporation, humidity and air conditioning, distillation, 
and absorption. Illustrated by problems and consideration of typical 
processes. (Huff, Smatko.) 

Ch. E. 104. Chemical Engineering Seminar (1, 1) — One hour a week. 

Students prepare reports on current problems in chemical engineering 
and participate in the discussion of such reports. 

The content of this course is constantly changing so a student may receive 
a number of credits by re-registration. (Bilbrey.) 

Ch. E. 105, f, 8. Advanced Unit Operations (5, 5) — Two lectures and 
one all-day laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 103; Chem. 
189, 190. 

Advanced theoretical treatment of basic chemical engineering operations. 
Study and laboratory operation of small scale semi-commercial type equip- 
ment. A comprehensive problem involving theory and laboratory operations 
is included to illustrate the development of a plant design requiring the 
utilization of a number of fundamental topics. Laboratory fee $8.00 per 
semester. (Bonney and Staff.) 

Ch. E. 106, f, s. Minor Problems (6, 6). Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semes- 
ter. Not offered in 1952-1953. 

Ch. E. 107. Fuels and Their Utilization (3) — Second semester. Three 
hours a week. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 103, or permission of Department of 
Chemical Engineering. 

A study of the sources of solid, liquid, and gaseous fuels, their economic 
conversion, distribution, and utilization. Problems. (Huff.) 

Ch. E. 108, f. s. Industrial Chemical Technology (2, 2)— Two hours a 
week. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 103, or simultaneous registration therein, or 
permission of the Department of Chemical Engineering. 

A study of the principal chemical industries. Plai.t inspections, trips, 
reports, and problems. (Smatko.) 

Ch. E. 109, f, 8. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (3, 3) — Three 
hours a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 187, 189; Ch. E. 103, or permission 
of instructor. 



420 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

A study of the application of the principles of engineering and chemical 
thermodsmamics to some industrial problems encountered in the practice 
of chemical engineering. (Bonney.) 

Ch. E. 110. Advanced Chemical Engineering Calculations (3) — First 
semester. Three hours a week. Prerequisites, Math. 21; Ch. E. 103. 

A study of methods for analysis and solution of chemical engineering 
problems by use of differential equations. Graphical methods and approxi- 
mations by use of infinite series are covered. Also given at Army Chemical 
Center. (Bilbrey.) 

Ch. E. 114. Applications of Electrochemistry (4) — First semester. Three 
lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite, consent 
of instructor. 

Topics: Corrosion, batteries, electroplating, electro-oxidations and reduc- 
tions, metal winning and refining, electrolytic products, passivation, cathodic 
protection, electric furnaces, refractories and abrasives and others. Labora- 
tory fee, $8.00. (Smatko.) 

Ch. E. 119. Empirical Equations and Nomography (3) — Second semes- 
ter. Three hours a week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Formulation of empirical equations to represent laboratory data. Con- 
struction of various types of nomographs. Also given at Army Chemical 
center. (Bilbrey.) 

Ch. E. 123, 124— Elements of Plant Design (3, 3)— First and second 
semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 
Ch. E. 103, f, s; Ch. E. 110; Chem. 189. 

The solution of typical problems encountered in the design of chemical 
engineering plants. (Huff.) 

Ch. E. 164, 166. Thermodynamics of Metallurgical Processes (3, 3) — 

First and second semesters, three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 
187, 189; Chem. 188, 190. 

The application of the principles of thermodynamics to metallurgical 
systems with emphasis on steel making; laws of chemical reactions; mate- 
rials and reactions in steel making processes; applications of theory to 
steel making; applications of theory to selected non-ferrous systems. 

Ch. E. 168, 170. Metallurgical Investigations (2, 4) — First semester, two 
three-hour laboratory periods a week; second semester, three lectures and 
one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 182, 183, 

A study of the basic metals industry in which typical metallurgical 
processes in plant installations are considered in some detail. Class and 
individual assignments involving laboratory work and literature reviews. 

Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. (Klier.) 

Ch. E. 182, 183. Optical and X-Ray Metallography (4, 4)— First and 

second semesters. Three lectures and one laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisites, Ch. E. 64, 66; Ch. E. 68, 70; or permission of instructor. 



ENGINEERING AND AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 421 

The application at an advanced level of the principles of metallography, 
with emphasis on the correlation of associated test procedures; constitution 
of metal systems and phase transformations; alloy steels; hardenability and 
tempering of quenched steels. 

Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. (Klier.) 

Ch. E. 188, 189. Alloy Steels I, II (2, 2)— First and second semesters. 
Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, graduate or undergraduate standing. 
(Ch. E. 188 is not prerequisite to Ch. E. 189.) 

Recent advances in the physical metallurgy of steel; ferrite, cementite, 
and austenite; the isothermal transformation of austenite; variables affect- 
ing the isothermal transformation of austenite; decomposition of austenite 
by continuous cooling; the effects of various metallurgical treatments on the 
mechanical properties of steels. 

The properties of quenched and tempered steels; importance of harden- 
ability in engineering applications; calculation of hardenability; variables 
affecting hardenability; intensifiers; effects of alloying elements on the 
mechanical properties of steels; efficient use of alloying elements in steel. 

(Note: To be offered at off-campus naval installations as determined by 
departmental and registration requirements.) 

For Graduates 

Ch. E. 201. Graduate Unit Operations (5) — First semester. One-hour 
conference, three or more laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, per- 
mission of the Department of Chemical Engineering. 

Advanced theoretical treatment of typical unit operations in chemical 
engineering. Problems. Laboratory operation of small scale semi-commer- 
cial units with supplemental reading, conferences and reports. 

Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Bonney.) 

Ch. E. 202. Gas Analysis (3) — One lecture and two laboratory periods 
a week. One semester. Prerequisite, permission of Department of Chemical 
Engineering. 

Quantitative determination of common gases, fuel gases, gaseous vapors, 
and important gaseous impurities. Problems. 

Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Bonney.) 

Ch. E. 203. Graduate Seminar (1) — One hour a week. Required of 
all graduate students in Chemical Engineering. 

The content of this course is constantly changing so a student may 
receive a number of credits by re-registration. 

Students prepare reports on current problems in chemical engineering 
and participate in the discussion of such reports. Also given at Army 
Chemical Center. (Staff.) 

Ch. E. 205. Research in Chemical Engineering and in Metallurgy — 
Credit hours to be arranged. 



422 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The investigation of special problems and the preparation of a thesis in 
partial fulfillment of the requirements of an advanced degree. 

Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. (Huff, Bonney, Smatko, Klier.) 

Ch. E. 207, f, s. Plant Design Studies (3, 3) — Three conference hours 
a week. Prerequisite, permission of Department of Chemical Engineering. 
Also given at Army Chemical Center. (Huff.) 

Ch. E. 209, f, 8. Plant Design Studies Laboratory (3, 3)— Three labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisite, permission of Department of Chemical 
Engineering. 

Laboratory fee $8.00 per semester. (Bonney.) 

Ch. E. 210, f, 8. Gaseous Fuels (2, 2) — Two hours a week. Prerequi- 
site, permission of Department of Chemical Engineering. 

An advanced treatment of some of the underlying scientific principles 
involved in the production, transmission and utilization of gaseous fuels. 
Problems in design and selection of equipment. (Huff.) 

Ch. E. 214. Corrosion and Metal Protection (4) — Second semester. Four 
lecture hours a week. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 114 or Chem. 189 or Chem. 190 
or consent of the instructor. 

The subjects to be covered include: Theories of corrosion of ferrous and 
non-ferrous metals, passive films, corrosion inhibitors, metal cleaning, stress 
corrosion, corrosive chemicals, electrolytic protection, restoration of ancient 
bronzes, organic coatings, metal coloring, parkerizing, hot dip coatings, 
plated coatings, and selection of engineering materials. Class demonstra- 
tions will illustrate the subject matter. Due to the diversity of subjects 
and scattered sources, considerable outside reading will be necessary. 
Also given at Army Chemical Center. (Smatko.) 

Ch. E. 216. Unit Processes of Organic Technology (3) — Second semes- 
ter. Three lectures a week. Required of graduate students in Chemical 
Engineering. Prerequisite, permission of the Department. 

This course coordinates the study of fundamental principles of organic 
synthesis with the requirements of the industrial plant. (Smatko.) 

Ch. E. 217. Unit Processes of Organic Technology Laboratory (2) — 

Second semester. Two or more laboratory periods a week. Required of 
graduate students in Chemical Engineering. Prerequisite, permission of 
the Department. 

Pilot plant operation of processes such as halogenation, hydration, nitra- 
tion, oxidation, reduction and sulfonation. 

Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. (Bonney, Smatko.) 

Ch. E. 220, 221. Solid Phase Reactions (3, 3)— First and second semes- 
ters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 187, 189; Chem. 188, 190; 
Ch. E. 182, 183; or permission of the instructor. 



ENGINEERING AND AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 423 

The application of thermodynamics to the study of phase equilibria and 
transformations in metals; mechanism and rate determining factors in solid 
phase reactions in metals; order-disorder phenomena, diffusion processes, 
nucleation theory, precipitation from solid solution, eutectoid decomposi- 
tion. (Klie'^-) 

Ch. E. 224, 225. Advanced X-Ray Metallography (3, 3)— First and 
second semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisites, Math. 114, 115; Ch. E. 182, 183. 

Analysis of crystallography or martensite reactions, and transformations 
in general; analysis of complex diffracting systems. 

Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. (Klier.) 

Ch. E. 228. Seminar in Metallurgy (1)— First and second semesters. One 
meeting a week. Required of graduate students in metallurgical curriculum. 

Survey of the Metals literature, and oral presentation of prepared reports. 

The content of this course is constantly changing, so a student may re- 
ceive a number of credits by re-registration. (Klier.) 

Ch. E. 229. Gases in Metals (2) — Second semester. Two lectures per 
week. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 182, 183, or permission of the instructor. 

A consideration of the behavior of gases in metals with emphasis on the 
action of hydrogen in solid metals. (Klier.) 

Ch. E. 230, 231. Mechanical Metallurgy (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, Math. 114, 115; Ch. E. 182, 183. 

Theory of plastic flow and rupture of polycrystalline metals; the influence 
of combined stresses, rate of deformation and temperature variation on the 
flow and rupture of metals. 

Flow and fracture in single crystals; theoretical crystal plasticity, theory 
of failure, recovery, recrystallization, and texture formation. (Klier.) 

Ch. E. 232, 233. Advanced Physical Metallurgy (3, 3)— First and second 
semesters. Three lectures a week. Required of graduate students in metal- 
lurgical curriculum. 

The principles of X-ray metallography; the atomic theory of metals; 
magnetic materials; phase equilibria; review of important binary and 
ternary systems; diffusion and transformations in the solid state. (Offered 
at the Navy Department.) 

Ch. E. 240, 241. Advanced Heat Transmission (2, 2) — First and second 
semesters. Elective of graduate students in Chemical Engineering and 
others. Prerequisite, permission of the Department. (Offered at the Army 
Chemical Center only.) 

The technical and scientific elements of the mathematical theory of heat 
conduction. (V. H. Gottschalk.) 

Ch. E. 250. Chemical Engineering Practice (6) — Four hours conference 
and forty hours per week of work in laboratory and plant for eight weeks. 



424 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Prerequisite, permission of the Department. (Offered at the Army Chemi- 
cal Center only.) 

The advanced application of chemical engineering principles to real prob- 
lems encountered in a large technical organization. These problems are 
solved by planning and conducting experiments in the laboratory and plant, 
with the aid of supplemental reading and conferences. Emphasis is placed 
on the solution of problems under plant conditions and on the presentation 
of results orally and in written reports. 

Ch. E. 270. Plastics Technology (3) — First semester. Two lectures and 
one laboratory a week. Required of students in Chemical Engineering. 
Prerequisite, permission of the Department. 

A study of chemistry of the synthesis of resinous substances and high 
polymers. The processes of manufacture of both raw and finished products. 
The properties in relation to constitution and application. 

Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. (Smatko.) 

Ch. E. 280. Graduate Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (3) — 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 109, f,s; Ch. E. 110; or permission 
of instructor. 

Advanced studies of the applications of the principles of engineering 
and chemical thermodynamics to some industrial problems encountered in 
the practice of chemical engineering. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Professors Steinberg, Allen, Otts; Lecturer Walker; Associate Professors 

Barber, Cournyn, Gohr, Keller; Assistant Professors Piper, Wedding; 

Instructors Kennedy, Luce. 

C. E. 50. Fluid Mechanics (3) — First or second semesters. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Mech. 1. Required of 
juniors in civil and electrical engineering. 

A rational and experimental study of fluids at rest and in motion with 
special emphasis on water and oils. Principles of viscous and turbufent 
flow through pipes, orifices, nozzles and metering devices; impulse and 
momentum concepts. Flow through closed conduits and open channels; 
divided flow, pumps, turbines, dimensional analysis; laws of similarity. 

(Cournyn.) 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

C. E. 100. Theory of Structures (4) — Second semester. Three lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Mech. 50. 

Analytic and graphical determination of dead and live load stresses in 
beams and framed structures; influence lines; lateral bracing and portals; 
elements of slope and deflection. (Allen, Piper.) 

C. E. 101. Soil Mechanics (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Mech. 50 and 53. 



ENGINEERING AND AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 425 

An introductory study of the properties and behavior of soils as engi- 
neering materials. Soil physics, soil mechanics, and applications to engi- 
neering. (Barber.) 

C. E. 102. Structural Design (6) — First semester. Five lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, C. E. 100. 

Design and detailing of wood and metal structural members and their 
connections; wind stresses in building frames; structural framework. 

(Allen.) 

C. E. 103. Concrete Design (6) — Second semester. Five lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, C. E. 100. 

Design and detailing of plain and reinforced concrete structures, appli- 
cations of slope-deflection and moment distribution theories; rigid frames. 

(Allen.) 

C. E. 104. Water Supply (3) — First semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, C. E. 50 and senior standing. 

Requirements of a municipal water supply — design, operation, mainte- 
nance, and administration. (Otts.) 

C. E. 105. Sewerage (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week. Prerequisite, C. E. 50 and senior standing. 

The collection, treatment and disposal of sewage. (Otts.) 

C. E. 106. Elements of Highways (3) — First semester. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, C. E. 101. 

Location, design, construction, and maintenance of roads and pavements. 
Laboratory problems and field inspection trips. (Barber, Gohr.) 

C. E. 107. Statically Indeterminate Structures (3) — First or second 
semesters. Prerequisite, C. E. 100, or equivalent. 

Deflections in beams, trusses and similar structures, both statically de- 
terminate and indeterminate. Real and virtual work, Castigliano's Theorem, 
area moments, the Williott-Mohr diagram. Classical methods of analysis 
of indeterminate structures; theorem of three moments, method of least 
work, slope deflection method. Modern methods of analysis of indeterminate 
structures; moment distribution, general method of successive corrections. 
Applications to particular structures; arches, closed rings, built-in beams 
and beams over multiple supports. (Allen, Keller.) 

C. E. 108. Photogrammetry (3) — Second semester. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Surv. 100. 

The fundamental principles of terrestrial and aerial photographic sur- 
veying and then application to principles of map making. Laboratory exer- 
cises in the use of the stereoscope, stereocomparagraph, contour finder, 
interpretometer, and the vertical sketchmaster. Study of the use of photo- 
graphs in accident investigations and tax maps. (Gohr.) 



426 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

C. E. 109. Hydrology (3) — First semester. Two lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week. Prerequisite, C. E. 50. 

A study of the factors governing the supply of ground water and the 
flow of streams and their relation to water power, water supply, drainage 
and sanitary engineering. (Cournyn.) 

For Graduates 

C. E. 200. Advanced Properties of Materials (3) — First or second semes- 
ter. Prerequisite, Mech. 53 or equivalent. 

A critical study of elastic and plastic properties, flow of materials, resist- 
ance to failure by fracture, impact, and corrosion, the theories of failure. 
Assigned reading from current literature. (Wedding.) 

C. E. 201. Advanced Strength of Materials (3) — First or second semes- 
ter. Prerequisite, Mech. 50, 51, or equivalent. 

Special problems in engineering stress analysis. Limitations of flexure 
and torsion formulas, unsymmetrical bending, curved beams, combined 

stresses, thin tubes, thick-walled cylinders and flat plates. (Keller.) 

C. E. 202. Experimental Stress Analysis (3) — First or second semester. 
Prerequisite, Mech. 50, or equivalent. 

An introduction to the theory of elasticity. Applications of this theory 
to experimental methods of stress analysis with particular reference to the 
electric strain gauge, strain rosettes, photoelastic methods, brittle lacquer 
technique and various analogy methods. (Keller.) 

C. E. 203. Soil Mechanics (3) — First and second semester. Prerequi- 
site, C. E. 101, or equivalent. 

A detailed study of the properties of engineering soils. Assigned reading 
from current literature. (Barber.) 

C. E. 204. Advanced Foundations (3) — First or second semester. Pre- 
requisites, C. E. 101, 102 and 103, or equivalent. 

A detailed study of types of foundations. Design and construction to meet 
varying soil conditions. (Barber.) 

C. E. 205. Highway Engineering (3) — First or second semester. Pre- 
requisite, C. E. 106, or equivalent. 
An intensive course in the location, design, and construction of highways. 

(Barber, Gohr.) 

C. E. 206. Theory of Concrete Mixtures (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, Mech. 53, or equivalent. 

A thorough review of the methods for the design of concrete mixtures, 
followed by a study of factors affecting the properties of the resulting con- 
crete. This course is intended as a background for work in the field of 
concrete, concrete aggregates, or reinforced concrete. The second semester 
of this course is open only to students who are majoring in concrete. 

(Walker.) 



ENGINEERING AND AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 427 

C. E. 207. Advanced Structural Analysis (3) — First semester. Pre- 
requisites, C. E. 102, 103, or equivalent. 

Maxwell's Law of Reciprocal Displacements, Castigliano's Theorem, gen- 
eral work and energy methods for displacements and for solution of inde- 
terminates, slope-deflection methods. Hardy Cross method of moment dis- 
tribution and column analogy methods. Solution of indeterminates by 
actual deformations of scaled models, with particular reference to the 
Beggs and the Eney deformeters. (Keller.) 

C. E. 208. Advanced Sanitation (3) — First or second semester. Prerequi- 
site, graduate standing in civil engineering. 

A detailed study of environment and its relation to disease, covering 
malaria and its control; rodent control; food sanitation; collection and dis- 
posal of municipal refuse; housing sanitation, including plumbing, rat- 
proofing, etc.; rural water supply and excreta disposal; sanitary inspection 
procedure. (Otts.) 

C. E. 209. Advanced Water Supply (3) — First or second semester. Pre- 
requisite, C. E. 104 or equivalent. 

A detailed study of the problems of water supply including recent develop- 
ments in the treatment of water. (Otts.) 

C. E. 210. Advanced Sewerage (3) — First or second semester. Prerequi- 
site, C. E. 105 or equivalent. 

A detailed study of the problems of sewerage, including recent develop- 
ments in the treatment of sewage. (Otts.) 

C. E. 211. Sanitary Engineering Design (3) — First or second semester. 
Prerequisite, C. E. 104, 105 or equivalent. 

Practical problems in the design of sewer systems and appurtenances; 
sewage treatment plants; water collection and distribution systems; water 
purification plants. (Otts.) 

C. E. 212. Research — Credit in accordance with work done. First and 
second semesters. (Staff.) 

C. E. 213. Seminar — First or second semester. Credit in accordance with 
work outlined by the civil engineering staff. Prerequisite, graduate standing 
in civil engineering. (Staff.) 

C. E. 214. Sanitary Engineering Laboratory (3) — First or second semes- 
ter, Prerequisites, C. E. 104 and C. E. 105, or equivalent. 

Lectures, conferences, assigned readings, and laboratory exercises in the 
technique and principles involved in the physical, bacteriological and chem- 
ical tests used in water analysis. (Otts.) 

C. E. 215. Sanitary Engineering Laboratory (3) — First or second semes- 
ter. Prerequisites, C. E. 104 and C. E. 105, or equivalent. 



428 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Lectures, conferences, assigned readings, and laboratory exercises in the 
technique and principles involved in the physical, bacteriological and chem- 
ical tests used in sewage and industrial waste analysis. (Otts.) 

C. E. 216. Hydraulic Engineering (3) — First or second semester. Pre- 
requisite, C. E. 50, or equivalent. 

Water power and flood control. Analysis of the principal features of a 
water power project with special reference to reservoir, waterway, dam, 
plant accessories, and power house equipment. Complete report on a water 
power project required, including costs and power valuation. (Coumyn.) 

C. E. 217. Hydraulic Machinery (3) — First or second semester. Pre- 
requisite, C. E. 50, or equivalent. 

Principles of design, selection and operation of hydraulic pumps, turbines 
and other hydraulic machinery. (Coumyn.) 

C. E. 218. Advanced Structural Design (3) — Second semester. Pre- 
requisites, C. E. 102, 103 or equivalent. 

Design problems encountered in rigid frames under vertical load. Design 
problems encountered in frames under horizontal load, with particular 
reference to wind loads. Design of radio towers and of industrial buildings. 

(Allen.) 

C. E. 219. Sanitary Engineering Design (3) — First or second semester. 
Prerequisite, C. E. 104, 105 or equivalent. 

Selected problems in the design of structures related to the operation of 
water supply and sewerage systems and industrial waste treatment 
plants. (Otts.) 

C. E. 220. Soil Mechanics Laboratory (3) — First or second semester. 
Prerequsite, C. E. 101 or equivalent. 

Detailed study and practice of standard and special laboratory test 
methods. Construction and operation of models. Application of tests to 
design and construction projects and research problems. (Barber.) 

DRAWING 

Dr. 1, 2. Engineering Drawing (2, 2) — First and second semesters. Two 
laboratories a week. Required of engineering freshmen. 

Lettering, use of instruments, orthographic projection, auxiliary views, 
revolution, sections, pictorial representation, dimensioning, fasteners, tech- 
nical sketching, and working drawings. 

Dr. 3. Advanced Engineering Drawing (2) — First semester. Two labora- 
tories a week. Required of juniors in Civil Engineering, and sophomores in 
Aeronautical and Mechanical Engineering. Prerequisites, Dr. 1 and Dr. 2. 

Descriptive Geometry with applications to drafting room problema. De- 
velopments, intersections, transition pieces and perspective. 



ENGINEERING AND AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 429 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Professors Corcoran, Reed, and Weber; Associate Professors Hodgins, 

Wagner, and Small; Assistant Professors Price, Simons, and Becker; 

Lecturers Ahrendt, Freeman, and Stuntz; Instructor Beam. 

E. E. 1. Basic Electrical Engineering (4) — Second semester. Three lec- 
tures and one laboratory period a week. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Prerequi- 
sites, concurrent registration in Math. 21 and Phys. 21. Required of sopho- 
mores in electrical engineering. 

Basic concepts of electric potential, current, power, and energy; d-c cir- 
cuit analysis by the mesh-current and nodal methods; network theorems; 
electric and magnetic field concepts. (Corcoran, Becker.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

E. E. 50. Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering (3) — First semester. 
Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Laboratory fee, $4.00. 
Prerequisites, Math. 21 and Phys. 21. Required of juniors in civil engi- 
neering. 

Principles of direct and alternating currents; power circuits and distri- 
bution systems; direct and alternating current machines and applications; 
operating characteristics of electrical machines and transformers. (Beam.) 

E. E. 51, 52. Princi