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An Adventure in Learning 



A University of Maryland Publication is published twelve times in January; three times 
in February; once in March and April; three times in May; twice in June, August and 
October; once in July and September; three times in November; and once in December. 



VOLUME 12 



NUMBER 1 



AUGUST 22, 1958 




U 

w 

r 

Z 

o 

u 



3 A Message from the President 
5 The University Heritage 
7 You are the Vital Factor 

Admission to the University 
10 Musts — Physical Education Training and Militxry 
Instruction 

How much will it cost? 
13 Where will I live? 

13 Extracurricular, Social and Religious Life 

14 Academic Standards 

14 Special Services 

15 The Program in American Civilization 

The Undergraduate Programs 

16 The College of Agriculture 
The College of Arts and Sciences 

22 The College of Business and Public Administration 

24 The College of Education 

26 The College of Engineering 

IS The College of Home Economics 

3 1 The College of Physical Education. Recreation and 
Health 

33 The School of Nursing 

34 The College of Special and Continuation Studies 



36 Appendix A — Fees and Expenses 
40 Appendix B — Honors, Awards. Scholarships 
Grants-in-Aid 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

and 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Charles P. McCormick 

Chairman 
McCormick and Company, 414 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Edward F. Holter 

Vice-Chairman 
The National Grange, 744 Jackson Place, N.W., Washington 6 

B. Herbert Brown 

Secretary 
The Baltimore Institute, 1 2 West Madison Street, Baltimore 1 

Harry H. Nuttle 

Treasurer 
Denton 

Louis L. Kaplan 

A ssis tant Secre tary 
1201 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 17 

Edmund S. Burke 

Assistant Treasurer 
Kelly-Springfield Tire Company, Cumberland 

Alvin L. Aubinoe 

8000 Overhill Road, Bethesda 

Thomas W. Pangborn 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown 

Enos S. Stockbridge 

10 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Thomas B. Symons 

Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, Takoma Park 

C. EWING TUTTLE 

907 Latrobe Building, Charles and Read Streets, Baltimore 2 




THIS BROCHURE EXPLAINS HOW YOU MAY TAKE ADVANTAGE 

of the opportunity for a quality education at moderate cost 
through the programs and facilities of your State University. 

The key to your future lies in your own hands. The University 
of Maryland exists to help you to develop your particular talents 
and capabilities to the maximum degree. 

At College Park and at Baltimore, the faculties and staff serve 
the citizens of the State through eight undergraduate colleges, a 
graduate school, and five professional schools. 

We welcome your inspection of our program and urge you to 
visit the campus when you have an opportunity. 



V^lt.HL^ 



DR. \MlSON H. F.LKINS 
President oj the University 




The University Heritage 



Few institutions of higher learning in the united states have had 
as rich and proud a history as the University of Maryland. Students admitted 
will find the institution stressing programs of educational excellence, vital re- 
search, and important service to the community. 

Just 31 years after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, there was 
established in Baltimore a College of Medicine, the fifth such medical school in 
the United States. The College began with no visible assets save determination, 
enthusiasm and skill, and the first seven students enrolled received their lectures 
in the homes of their professors. One member of the faculty. Dr. John Shaw. 
died as a result of exposure suffered while working winter nights in a delapidated 
structure that was the college's home in 1808. The other two members of the 
faculty. Dr. John Deal Davidge and Dr. James Cocke, were extremely skillful 
researchers — professionally outstanding in that day and even more so from the 
perspective of today. 

Under an 1812 act of the State Legislature, the College of Medicine of Mary- 
land was authorized to appoint and annex to itself three other colleges and 
faculties: the Faculty of Divinity, the Faculty of Law. and the Faculty of Arts 
and Sciences. These four colleges became known as the University of Mary- 
land. In the ensuing years, the departments of Dentistry and Pharmacy as 
well as the Training School for Nurses were created under the College of 
Medicine. Still, in 1907, on the University's one hundredth birthday, no affili- 
ated College of Arts and Sciences had been established. 

Meanwhile, on the old Ross Borough Estate, south of Baltimore near Wash- 
ington. D. C, another institution, the Mar\land Argicultural College, was 
developing. 



As THE result of INTEREST GENERATED BY A GROUP OF FAR-SIGHTED 

Maryland farmers, "an act to establish and endow an agricultural college" had 
been passed by the State Legislature in 1S56. creating the second such institu- 
tion established in the Western Hemisphere. In 1862 the College became a 



land-grant institution under an act of the United States Congress. In 1920, by 
an act of the State Legislature, the University of Maryland (Baltimore) was 
merged with the Maryland State College of Agriculture (College Park) and the 
combined institutions were given the name University of Maryland. 

This, of course, forms only the briefest outline of the 150-year history of 
the University. 

Although the University is a State institution quite large in physical plant, 
student enrollment, the number of courses and degrees offered, and services 
performed, its objectives remain constant and form a base for all educational 
activity. Simply stated they are: (1) to prepare students in the arts, the human- 
ities, the pure and applied sciences, agriculture, business and public administra- 
tion, home economics, industry, and for the professions; (2) to contribute to 
the civic, ethical, moral, cultural, spiritual, and general welfare; (3) to provide 
general education in its broadest sense, both formal and informal, for all stu- 
dents who enroll; (4) to develop those ideals and finer relationships among 
students which characterize cultured individuals; (5) to conduct systematic 
research and to promote creative scholarship; and (6) to offer special, continu- 
ation, and extension education in communities where it is feasible. 

The government of the University is vested in a Board of Regents, each 
member of which is appointed by the Governor of the State to serve a term 
of nine years. The administration of the University is vested in the President. 
The following is a listing of the major administrative divisions on both 
campuses: 

AT COLLEGE PARK 



College of Agriculture 

College of Arts and Sciences 

College of Business and Public Ad- 
ministration 

College of Education 

College of Engineering, the Glenn 
L. Martin Institute of Technology 

College of Home Economics 

Department of Air Science 

College of Physical Education, Rec- 
reation and Health 



College of Special and Continuation 

Studies 
Graduate School 

Summer School 

Agricultural Experiment Station 
Agricultural and Home Economics 
Extension Service 

Agricultural Services and Controls 



School of Dentistry 
School of Law 
School of Medicine 



AT BALTIMORE 



School of Nursing 
School of Pharmacy 
University Hospital 




You are the Vital Factor 

Where do you fit in? you are the basic, vital factor in the uni- 
versity's educational program. It is with you in mind that the citizens of this 
State (your parents) contribute toward the establishment of a well-equipped 
University. Much has been done to provide the means for you to acquire an 
excellent education. You will have an opportunity to fulfill this obligation by 
diligent application in your studies. 

As a high school student you are trying, certainly, to decide ( 1 ) whether or 
not to spend the next four years of your life at an institution for higher educa- 
tion and (2) which institution and which course of study is the right one for 
you. 

First you should know that the administration and faculty of the University 
of Maryland will make every attempt to help you find the answers to these 
questions. Through personal counseling, letters, and transmittal of college 
catalogs and publications, the University attempts to present to the prospective 
student as complete a picture of its activities as possible. The University is 
willing to go all the way for you, both during your period of decision and (if 
accepted for admission) during your academic tenure. Now, here is what the 
University expects of you. 

The University expects you to be a good student; it expects you to be a 
conscientious student. Even though the University is concerned with a large 
number of students, emphasis remains on the individual. An estimate of the 
value of the individual at the University was given recently by the President of 
the University, Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, in an address entitled "A Quantity of 
Quality." 

During the last few decades we have been witnessing a social 
revolution with the individual as the center, and it is ex- 
tremely important that this revolution have a clear objective. 
Otherwise, it could very easily result in a widespread con- 
viction that every one should share and share alike, the bene- 
fits of a free society regardless of the capacity, effort, initiative, 
and ambition. Among other things this would lead to the 
weakening of higher education by the admission and retention 
of all comers to the campuses of the colleges and universities, 
and the reduction of our program to a low common denomi- 
nator. This would be a disservice to society. We must there- 
fore strive to direct the revolution toward the recognition of 
individual differences while assuring each individual of the 
opportunity to go as far along various courses as his talents 
and energies will permit. 

What Dr. Elkins has said is that there are wide and impressively deep educa- 
tional opportunities offered to each individual at the University of Maryland, 
but it is up to each individual to prove his own worth and to develop his talents 
according to his own special capabilities. The University makes every attempt 
to maintain small, intimate classes and the teaching staff makes every attempt to 
provide individual guidance and instruction for each student. 



When you visit the campus at college park or in Baltimore, you will 
see a number of newly-completed buildings and several under construction. 
Among the major buildings planned or under construction at College Park are 
a new building for the College of Business and Public Administration; Dor- 
chester and Worcester Halls (dormitories for women); also Cecil and Fred- 
erick Halls (dormitories for men). Among the major buildings completed in 
1957 are the new Journalism Building and the new Main Library. The latter 
building provides one of the finest library facilities of its kind on any state 
university campus in the nation. It is located in the geographical center of the 
University, on the Mall, and has become the center of campus intellectual 
activity. Its four floors and seven levels contain these main study centers: 
Fine Arts, Maryland Room and Rare Books, Special Collections, Technology 
and Science, Social Science, Humanities, Browsing Room, General Reference, 
Study Room and Reserve Book Room. Ultimately, the Library will house 
some 1,000,000 volumes. It accommodates 2,000 readers. Other libraries are 
located in the various educational branches. Notable among these are the 
modern libraries located in the College of Engineering and the Department 
of Chemistry at College Park, and in the Psychiatric Institute in Baltimore. 
Professional students will have the advantage of a new modern Medical Sciences 
Library, to be completed in 1958 on the Baltimore campus. 

The University has at its disposal some 2,500 acres of land. The main campus 
at College Park encompasses about 300 acres with 800 additional acres adjacent 
to it available for agricultural research and teaching. At College Park there are 
seventy-five principal buildings all designed in a Georgian colonial style. On the 
Baltimore campus, located in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene Streets, are 
situated a number of buildings including the original School of Medicine build- 
ing constructed in 1812, the Out-Patient Department, the University Hospital, 
the Psychiatric Institute, the Frank C. Bressler Building, the Dental School 
Building, Pharmacy School and Nursing School, the School of Law Building, 
the Gray Laboratory and others. 

New and recent construction in Baltimore includes a building for the School 
of Pharmacy, the School of Nursing, a Union-Dormitory Building, and the 
modernization of existing facilities in the Schools of Dentistry and Medicine. 

In summary, the University offers: 

a large, modern physical plant; 
extensive educational and research facilities; 
accommodations for a large student body; 
a spirit of inquiry and helpfulness which aims 
at the individual rather than at the class; 
and a rich, colorful, and proud heritage. 



Admission to the University 



Now YOU WILL WANT TO ASK THIS QUESTION: WHO MAY BE ADMITTED TO 

the University? 

The University says officially: "Admission from secondary school is based 
upon evidence indicating the applicant's probable success in the program of his 
choice." 

8 



By the word "evidence" the University means that: 

1 ) You must be a graduate of an accredited secondary school; 

2) Your principal or headmaster should recommend you for entrance to 
the University; 

3) Your high school program should have provided you with the subjects 
required for the college and curriculum which you wish to enter. 

Actually, during your high school years, you have been preparing for the 
University. You should have maintained a good scholastic record and planned 
your curriculum so that you will have at graduation the required number of 
units to begin your university program. 

General Requirements 

In general, your subject requirements for entrance total 16 high school units. 
The University requires that 7 of these 16 units be in college preparatory sub- 
jects as follows: English, 4 units; Mathematics (preferably algebra), one unit; 
history or social sciences, one unit; biological or physical sciences, one unit. Of 
course, your remaining nine units should be selected to give you as strong 
preparation as possible for work at the University. You should most certainly 
consult the sections titled, "Recommended Preparation in High School," found 
under each College heading beginning on page 16. 

How about Mathematics? 

Most programs in the University require some college work in mathematics. 
The student who plans to go to college should be sure to take College Prepara- 
tory Mathematics for two, three or four years. Some programs in the Uni- 
versity, for example Engineering, require from three and one-half to four years 
of College Preparatory Mathematics. 

Courses in General Mathematics, Commercial Mathematics, and Shop Math- 
ematics may not be considered as College Preparatory Mathematics. 

A four-year program in College Preparatory Mathematics will include 
Algebra (usually two years). Plane Geometry (usually one year), and Trigo- 
nometry. Analytical Geometry, Solid Geometry, and introduction to the 
Calculus are desirable if available. 



How about English? 

A considerable portion of the work in English during the freshman year at 
the University is devoted to expository writing. The high school student should 
therefore get as much preparation as possible in composition. The student who 
passes the English Classification test in the top fifteen percent of his entering 
class will be excused from part of the freshman English course. 

Where do you apply? 

The Office of Admissions is chiefly responsible for advising prospective 
students prior to application for admission and for processing applications when 



submitted. All inquiries concerning undergraduate work, therefore, should 
be submitted to: 

DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS 
NORTH ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 

In your first letter of inquiry you should state your educational background 
and your expected date of graduation from secondary school, your educational 
objectives, and the date of your expected entrance to the University. You 
should also request only the catalog for the College in which you are interested, 
along with application forms for admission and housing. 

Your completed application form should be returned to the Office of Ad- 
missions as soon as possible after your mid-year grades are available. 

When do you enter? 

New students should plan, if possible, to enter the University at the beginning 
of the fall semester. Application should be filed not later than August 15 for 
the fall semester and January 1 for the spring semester. If a student does not 
apply by these dates it may not be possible to process his application even if 
his records and recommendations are acceptable. 



Musts— Physical Education Training 
and Military Instruction 

The UNIVERSITY IS CONCERNED WITH THE PHYSICAL FITNESS OF EACH 

Student. Therefore, all undergraduate men and women students, classified 
academically as freshmen or sophomores registered for more than six semester 
hours of credit, are required to enroll in and successfully complete four pre- 
scribed courses in Physical Education for a total of four semester hours of 
credit. These courses must be taken by all eligible students during their first 
two years of attendance at the University whether they intend to graduate or 
not. 

The University operates one of the largest Air Force Reserve Officer Training 
Corps units in the United States. Successful completion of the required two- 
year course is prerequisite for graduation. The course must be taken during 
the first two years of attendance. Those students interested in a career in the 
Air Force, and who have not yet reached their 25th birthday at the time of 
initial enrollment in any undergraduate or graduate curriculum, may apply for 
advanced training in the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps upon satis- 
factory completion of the basic requirements. Successful completion of this 
advanced training course, and attainment of a baccalaureate degree leads to a 
commission in the United States Air Force Reserve or a Certificate of Com- 
pletion. 

Basic Exemptions From Military Instruction 

1. Students who have completed the basic course in other approved units 
of the United States Air Force, Army, or Naval R. O. T. C. will receive credit. 

10 



2. Students holding commissions in the Reserve Corps of the Army, Navy, 
Marine Corps, Coast Guard, or Air Force will receive credit. 

3. Students who have served in the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Coast 
Guard, or Air Force for a period of time long enough to be considered equiva- 
lent to the training received in the A. F. R. O. T. C. program will receive 
credit. Short periods of service in any of the branches named above will be 
evaluated and allowed as credit toward completion of the course. 

4. Graduate students will be exempt. 

5. Students classified as "special students" who are registered for less than 
seven semester hours will be exempt. 

6. Students who have passed their thirtieth birthday before starting the 
course will be exempt from any part of the course not already completed. 

7. Students who are not citizens of the United States or one of its terri- 
torial possessions will be exempt. Students having applied for United States 
citizenship will not be exempt. 

How Much Will It Cost? 

Student tuition and laboratory fees and expenses for dormitory 
board and lodging contribute less than half of the actual expense of educating 
a student at the University of Maryland. The deficit is made up from monies 
appropriated by the State Legislature. 



Fees for Undergraduate Students, 
Maryland Residents 


First 
Semester 


Second 
Semester 


Total 


FIXED CHARGES 


$ 92.00 
15.00 
12.00 
30.00 
10.00 
5.00 
5.00 


$ 93.00 


$185 00 


ATHLETIC FEE 


15.00 


STUDENT ACTIVITIES FEE 


12 00 


SPECIAL FEE 

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES FEE .... 
INFIRMARY FEE 


30.00 

10.00 

5.00 


ADVISORY AND TESTING FEE 


5.00 


Total for Residents 


$169.00 


$ 93.00 


$262.00 



Residents of the District of 
Columbia, Other States and 
Countries 



TUITION FEE FOR NON-RESIDENT 

STUDENTS 


$125.00 


$125.00 


$''50 00 






Total for Non-Residents 


$294.00 


$218.00 


$'^1'' 00 






Board and Lodging 



BOARD 

DORMITORY ROOM 

MARYLAND RESIDENTS 

OTHER STATES AND COUNTRIES 



$200.00 $200.00 $400.00 



80-95 
100-120 



80-95 
100-120 



160-190 
200-240 



For complete information concerning fees see Appendix A. 



11 



Can You Work Your Way Through College? 

A number of students are employed on a part-time basis by the University, 
others work in various capacities in shops and stores located in the College 
Park area. If you seek employment while pursuing a regular program of in- 
struction, you should consult the Director of Student Welfare who maintains 
a listing of available jobs within the University and in nearby commercial areas. 

How About Grants and Scholarships? 

For promising young men and women who might not otherwise be able to 
provide themselves an opportunity for higher education, a number of grants 
and scholarships are available. All requests for information concerning these 
awards should be directed to : 

DIRECTOR 

OFFICE OF SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS-IN-AID 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 

In deciding whether you are eligible to receive a grant or a scholarship, the 
Committee considers such qualifications as leadership, character, achievement, 
and participation in student activities, as well as academic ability and financial 
need. 

You should know of the five major groupings of grants and scholarships. 
These are: 

FULL UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS — Covering board, lodging, fixed charges, 
fees and books; 

UNIVERSITY GRANTS — awarded to deserving and qualified secondary school 
graduates covering fixed charges only; 

GENERAL ASSEMBLY GRANTS — for fixed charges only, awarded by members 
of the State Legislature, three for each Senator and one for each member of 
the House of Delegates, only to persons in the county or in the legislative 
district of Baltimore City which the Delegate or Senator represents; 

SPECIAL ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS — awarded to students of exceptional 
academic ability by the Committee on Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid; 

ENDOW^ED SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS — Supported by income from funds 
especially established for this purpose. 

Are Loans Possible? 

Several loans are made available by private organizations to worthy students 
in financial need. 

The American Bankers' Association Loan Fund provides loans of $250 for 
one year only to senior or graduate students who are emphasizing Banking, 
Economics, or related subjects. 

Under the will of Catherine Moore Brinkley, a loan fund is available for 
worthy students who are natives and residents of Maryland, and who are 
studying Mechanical Engineering or Agriculture at the University. 

A loan fund, established by the District of Columbia Home Economics 
Association, is available for students majoring in Home Economics. 

12 



The Henry Strong Educational Foundation Fund makes an annual allotment 
to the University for scholarship loans to young men and women students under 
the age of twenty-five. Only students who through stress of circumstances re- 
quire financial aid and who have demonstrated excellence in educational 
progress are considered in making nominations to the Secretary of this fund. 

Where Will I Live? 

All undergraduate women and all male freshmen, except those who 
live at home or with close relatives, are required to room in University dormi- 
tories. The application for admission is not an application for housins^, however. 
YoK should request housini; application cards on your application for admis- 
sion. The Director of Admissions will inform the Dean of Men or the Dean of 
Women of your request and these offices will forward to you the proper forms. 

If you join a fraternity or sorority, you may move into the chapter house 
after your first year. 

Those of you who live in the dormitories must have your meals at the Uni- 
versity Dining Hall, where meals are served at reasonable cost. Other students 
may make arrangements to board by the semester at the Dining Hall. If you 
live oflf-campus, it is possible for you to get your lunch at the University cafe- 
teria at the Student Union or at any of several eating establishments located 
in College Park. 

The Student Union also serves breakfast and Sunday suppers. 

Extracurricular, Social and Religious Life 

Organized student activities are recognized and encouraged. 
Opportunities are open in student government, fraternities, sororities, clubs, 
civic and service organizations, subject matter organizations, and recreational 
organizations. You may be interested in joining the band or the staff of one of 
the student publications. You may be interested in athletics or perhaps you will 
want to become a member of a club or society which has a primary interest in 
the informal investigation of an academic specialty. 

The Student Government Association represents all students and operates 
under an approved constitution and by-laws. The Associated Women Students, 
in cooperation with the Dean of Women, is concerned with matters pertaining 
to women students. The Men's League, in cooperation with the Dean of 
Men, is concerned with matters pertaining to men students. 

The University Band is under the supervision of the Department of Music 
and is composed of four groups: the Marching Band, the Symphonic Band, the 
Air Force R.O.T.C. Band, and the Pep Band. Membership is open to all reg- 
istered students who meet the requirement of audition. 

Five student publications are published with faculty guidance and the general 
supervision of the Committee on Student Publications and Communications. 
They are: The Diamondhack, the campus newspaper; The Terrapin, the stu- 
dent yearbook; The Old Line, a magazine of humor, literature and art; The 
M Book, the student handbook; and Expression, campus literary magazine. 

Many clubs and societies, with literary, art, cultural, scientific, social, and 
other special objectives function at the University. Some of these are strictly 

13 



student organizations; others are conducted jointly by students and members of 
the faculty. 

To round out your college experience there are many social functions occur- 
ring throughout the year. Formal dances are presented by each of the classes 
and there is the Homecoming Dance each November. In addition, various 
clubs, sororities, and fraternities have smaller parties taking place throughout 
the year. Dormitories sponsor exchange desserts and open houses from time 
to time. For freshmen there is an extensive Orientation Week program which 
includes a number of social events, designed to acquaint new students with 
each other and with the University. 

The All-Faith Memorial Chapel is one of the most beautiful structures of its 
kind in the nation. Within its shelter are housed the offices of chaplains, rep- 
resenting the major denominational bodies, and there are many opportunities for 
you to consult with the minister of your faith. Chances are that you will want 
to join a religious club such as the Canterbury Association (Episcopal), Chan- 
ning Fellowship (Unitarian), Christian Fellowship (non-denominational), 
Christian Science Club, Hillel Foundation (Jewish), Lutheran Students Asso- 
ciation, Newman Club (Roman Catholic), Westminster Foundation (Presby- 
terian), and the Wesley Foundation (Methodist). 

Academic Standards 

The student who maintains at least a "c" average in academic sub- 
jects is proceeding satisfactorily toward graduation. The student who does not 
maintain this average is falling behind. 

The student who fails fifty percent or more of his academic work will 
normally not be permitted to continue. Special provisions, however, are made 
for the student who has difficulty in the first semester of his freshman year. 
The student who fails more than 35% of his academic work or who fails to 
make less than a 1 .5 average for the academic year will be placed on academic 
probation. Each student must earn junior standing within a specified time in 
order to be eligible to continue in the University. 

The regulations governing junior standing, academic probation, and academic 
dismissal are printed in a separate publication. University General and Aca- 
demic Regulations. Every student should familiarize himself with these regu- 
lations. The student who is granted a trial admission will find in this publication 
a staterhent of the special rules applicable to students who have been granted 
this conditional admission. 

Special Services 

Student Health 

The University recognizes its responsibility for safeguarding the health of its 
students. All new undergraduate students are required to undergo a thorough 
physical examination at the time of their entrance. A well-equipped infirmary 
is available for the treatment of sick or injured students, and a nurse is on duty 
at all hours. 

All dormitories, off-campus houses, sorority and fraternity houses are in- 
spected periodically by the Student Health Service to make certain that proper 
sanitary conditions are maintained. 

Group Accident Insurance, issued by a national company, is available to 
students on a voluntary basis. 

14 



Counseling Services 

The services of three offices are available for counseling and guidance: the 
Office of the Dean of Men, the Office of the Dean of Women, and the Uni- 
versity Counseling Center which provides individual assistance concerning 
vocational choice, personal problems and personal educational progress. 

University Post Office 

The University operates an office for the reception, dispatch and delivery of 
the United States Mail, including parcel post items, and for inter-office com- 
munication. The office is not part of the United States Postal System and no 
facilities are available for the receipt or transmission of postal money orders; 
all registered and insured mail must be picked up at the regular United States 
Post Office in the town of College Park. 

At the time of registration, each student is assigned a postal box for which 
a small fee is charged. 

The Student Union 

It is the University policy to assign meeting space in the Student Union 
Building, as far as it is practical to do so, for all student and faculty organiza- 
tions. This building has available a total of 9 meeting rooms varying in capacity 
from 25 to 300. No charge will be made for any student or faculty organiza- 
tion on the College Park campus that wishes to meet in the Student Union. 

Special charges for dances and other extra services may be necessary. Located 
in the building are lounges for relaxation or study, television rooms, music 
lounge with a record library, billiard room, cofTee shop, tobacco shop, student 
supply store and campus post office. 

The Program in American Civilization 

In this modern era of ideological conflict, with the presence of 
totalitarian systems and their cynical philosophies, the University considers it 
important for every student to achieve an appreciative understanding of his 
country, its history and its culture. It has therefore established a compre- 
hensive program in American Civilization to provide the student with a gen- 
eral educational background which is the rightful heritage of every American 
citizen. 

Work in American Civilization is offered at three distinct academic levels. 
The first level is required of all freshmen and sophomores at the University. 
The second level is for undergraduate students wishing to carry a major in 
this area. The third level is for students desiring to do graduate work in this 
area. Majors in American Civilization should request a catalog for the College 
of Arts and Sciences, and graduate students should request a catalog for the 
Graduate School. 

The University of Maryland takes pride in its rich and colorful past, its 
tradition of tolerance, and its constant dedication to the ideals on which the 
American Republic was founded. It attempts, through the American Civiliza- 
tion Program, to pass on this common heritage to each of its students. 

15 




.^1 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Four-year programs leading to the bachelor of science degree 
include courses in the American Civilization Program, in basic biological and 
physical sciences, along with courses in the various phases of agriculture. 

AGRICULTURE-GENERAL. For Students preparing to return to the farm and for 
those preparing to work in any general field of agriculture. 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY. Prepares students for work in food laboratories 
and fertilizer industries and for research in industries related to agriculture. 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND MARKETING. Prepares students for employ- 
ment in agri-business production and marketing of agricultural products. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE. For students preparing to teach 
vocational agriculture, to pursue extension work or rural education services. 

AGRICULTURE-ENGINEERING. A five-year program in Argiculture and Engi- 
neering leading to a B. S. degree in agriculture at the end of the fourth year 
and a B. S. degree in one of the engineering fields at the end of the fifth year. 

AGRONOMY (CROPS AND SOILS) . The basic principles of crop production, soil 
science and soil conservation. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY. Devoted to a broad training in the specialized field of 
animal husbandry. 

BOTANY. The basic plant science work includes plant morphology, taxonomy 
and plant pathology and plant physiology and ecology. A major in Botany is 
also offered in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

DAIRY (dairy husbandry AND DAIRY TECHNOLOGY). Technical and practical 
training in dairy production and dairy processing and distribution. 

ENTOMOLOGY. Basic training in entomology and related fields of insect life 
and control. 

The succeeding pages describe briefly the programs offered by each of the 
colleges. These pages will help the prospective student to get the first informa- 
tion he needs. He should then be ready to consult the catalog of the particular 
college in which he is interested. 



16 



HORTICULTURE (FRUIT AND VEGETABLES, FLORICULTURE AND ORNAMEN- 
TAL FLORICULTURE AND FOOD PROCESSING) . Technical training in fruits, 
vcgctahlcs, nouors. ornamental gardening and processing ot horticultural crops. 

POULTRY. Basic training in poultry production, marketing and processing 
pouItr\ products. 

PRF-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 

PRE-FORESTRY. Basic training for students preparing to study forestry in 
another institution. 

PRE-THEOLOGY. Basic courses in agriculture as a preparation for the rural 
ministry. 

PRE-VETER1N.>\RY. Basic courses for students who wish to prepare for the 
study of Veterinary Medicine. 

LABORATORY 

Up-to-date laborator\ facilities are provided for elTective instruction in plant 
and animal sciences and related fields in agriculture. Research facilities pro- 
vide an additional opportunity for etTective instruction. 

TYPICAL PROGRAM FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 

English English 

Government & Politics Sociology or Philosophy 

R. O. T. C. (men) R.O.T.C. (men) 

Health (women) Health (women) 

Agriculture Zoology 

Botany Agricultural electives 
Agricultural electives 

Physical Activities Physical Activities 

RECOMMENDED PREPARATION IN HIGH SCHOOL 

English 4 units 

Mathematics 2 units 

(Algebra 1 unit and Plane Geometry 1 unit — Agriculture-Engineering 
and Agricultural Chemistry require 2 additional units) 

Biological and Physical Sciences 3 units 

History and Social Sciences 2 units 

Unspecified 5 units 

16 units 

Two units of foreign language are recommended for students in Agriculture- 
Engineering, Agricultural Chemistrv, Botan\ and Entomologv. 



17 




COLLEGE OF ARTS AND 
BACHELOR OF ARTS 



SCIENCES 



The college of arts and sciences offers its students a liberal 
education. It seeks to develop graduates who can deal intelligently with the 
problems which confront them and whose general education will be a con- 
tinuing source not only of material profit, but of genuine personal satisfaction. 
The programs combine liberal education with special concentration in one or 
more of the basic intellectual or artistic disciplines. 

A liberal arts education is the normal preparation for the student who plans 
to go to law school; to a post-graduate or professional school of business ad- 
ministration, library science or social service; or to a theological seminary. 

The student interested in research (business and industry, government, uni- 
versity) and in college teaching will receive the undergraduate preparation 
necessary for the graduate work required in these fields. 

By including the appropriate courses in education, a student in many of 
these areas can qualify for public school teaching. For students interested in 
foreign service, the foreign area programs combine intensive study of a language 
with study of the civilization of the area. Other special fields in business and 
government are open to the student who completes a liberal arts education with 
a suitable concentration in a single field of study. 

Specialized programs are also offered in the fine arts (art, drama, music) and 
in speech therapy. 

18 



FOUR YEAR BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE PROGRAMS 

American Civilizcition 

Art** 

Economics* 

English 

Foreign Area Studies (French, German, Latin American, Russian, Spanish) 

French 

Geography* 

German 

Government and Politics* 

Greek 

History 

Latin 

Music (see also Bachelor of Music degree) 

Philosophy 

Psychology 

Sociology (including also a program in Crime Control) 

Spanish 

Speech (including also programs in Dramatic Art and in Speech Therapy) 

* Programs in these fields are also offered in the College of Business and Public 
Administration. 
**A program in Practical Art is offered in the College of Home Economics. A 
student may also earn a degree in Art Education. 

PRE-LAW. A three year program, followed by three years of Law at the 
University of Maryland Law School, leads to the A. B. and LL. B. degree. 
Pre-law students may also follow any of the four-year programs and earn the 
Bachelor of Arts degree before entering law school. 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC. Four year program leading to the Bachelor of Music 
degree. Professional training in theory-composition, history-literature, and ap- 
plied music (voice or instrument). 

TYPICAL PROGRAM FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR 

Typical program for the freshman year for students following a program 
leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree: 



FIRST SEMESTER 
English 

Science or Mathematics 
Foreign Language 
Sociology or Philosophy 
Public Speaking 
R. O. T. C. (men) 
Health (women) 
Physical Activities 



SECOND SEMESTER 

English 

Science or Mathematics 
Foreign Language 
American Government 
Public Speaking 
R. O. T. C. (men) 
Health (women) 
Physical A ctivities 



19 



RECOMMENDED PREPARATION IN HIGH SCHOOL 

English 4 units 

Mathematics 3 or 4 units of College 

Preparatory Mathematics 

Biological and Physical Sciences 7 or more units 

History and Social Sciences / or more units 

Foreign Languages and Latin 2 or more units 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

The program in each of the science fields combines liberal educa- 
tion with a concentration in one of the basic sciences or in mathematics. The 
graduates of these science programs are prepared for speciaUzed positions in 
industry and government. 

The student in these science programs can also gain the preparation necessary 
for admission to the professional schools of medicine and dentistry or for ad- 
mission to graduate work leading to advanced degrees in Mathematics, Chem- 
istry, Physics, and the Biological Sciences. Research work (industry, 
government, university) and college teaching are among the possibilities open 
to the student who successfully completes an undergraduate and graduate pro- 
gram in mathematics or one of the basic sciences. 

FOUR YEAR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Botany * 

Chemistry 

Mathematics 

Microbiology 

Physics 

Pyschology 

Zoology 

General Biological Sciences 

General Physical Sciences 

* A curriculum in Botany is also offered in the College of Agriculture. 

PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL PROGRAMS. A three-year program meeting 
minimum requirements for medical school or dental school. A four-year pro- 
gram in any of the major fields in the College of Arts and Sciences leading to an 
A. B. or B. S. degree. 

TYPICAL PROGRAM FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 

English English 

Mathematics Mathematics 

Science (one or more of the Science (continued) 

introductory courses) American Government 

Sociology or Philosophy Public Speaking 

R. O. T. C. (men) R. O. T. C. (men) 

Health (women) Health (women) 

Physical Activities Physical Activities 

20 



For the prc-modical and pre-dontal student . . . 

FIRST SF.MISTER SECOND SEMESTER 

Efif^lish English 

Mathematics Mathematics 

Chemistry Chemistry 

Zoology Zoology 

R. O. T. C. (men) R. O. T. C. (men) 

Health (women) Health (women) 

Physical Activities Physical Activities 

RECOMMENDED PREPARATION IN HIGH SCHOOL 

English 4 units 

Mathematics 4 units of College 

Preparatory Mathematics 

Biological and Physical Sciences / or more units, including 

Chemistry and Physics, if 
possible 

History and Social Sciences / or more units 

Foreign Languages and Latin 2 or more units 




21 




COLLEGE OF BUSINESS 
AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Four year programs leading to the bachelor of science degree are 
offered by the College of Business and Public Administration in the following 
fields : 

BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION. The curriculums of the De- 
partment of Business Organization and Administration emphasize the principles 
and problems of the development and the use of policies and organizations, and 
the methods, techniques and procedures of execution — in other words, the es- 
sence of Administration and Management. 

ECONOMICS. The program of studies in the field of Economics is designed to 
meet the needs of students who wish to concentrate either on a major or minor 
scale in this division of the Social Studies. 

FOREIGN SERVICE AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS. If the Student expects tO 
enter the foreign service, he should be well grounded in the language, geog- 
raphy, history, and politics of the region of his anticipated location as well as 
in the general principles and practices of organization and administration. It 
should be recognized that only a limited training can be secured during the 
undergraduate program. 

GEOGRAPHY. This curriculum is designed to aid the student in securing the 
facts concerning the major geographical areas of the world and in studying and 
analyzing the manner in which these facts affect economic, political, and social 
activities. The student interested in international trade, in*;ernational political 
relations, diplomacy, overseas governments, and national aspirations will find the 
courses in this department of great practical value. 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS. The Department of Government and Politics 
offers course work designed to prepare students for government service, politics, 
foreign assignments, and intelligent and purposeful citizenship. If desired, stu- 

22 



dents may specialize in international relations, foreign governments, public 
administration, public law, public policy, political theory, state and local govern- 
ment and administration, or a combination of these fields. 

JOURNALISM AND PUBLIC RELATIONS. The Department offers two profes- 
sional majors: one in editorial journalism, for those who seek beginning news 
jobs upon graduation; the other in public relations, for those who plan to work 
in public relations, in public information, or on company publications. 

OFFICE MANAGEMENT AND TECHNIQUES. The purpose of the curriculums is 
not only to furnish merely technical or vocational training, but also, to aid the 
student in developing his natural aptitudes for secretarial and administrative 
positions. The development of the student's capacity to plan, organize, direct, 
and execute is the guiding principle followed in these curriculums. 

The teaching staff and the curriculums of the College of Business and Public 
Administration have been selected and organized for the purpose of providing 
a type of professional and technical education that will aid the capable and 
ambitious student in developing his potential talents to their full capacity. The 
program of study for any individual student may be so arranged as to meet the 
needs of those preparing for specific lines of work such as accounting, advertis- 
ing, banking, foreign trade, industrial administration, marketing administration, 
personnel administration, office management, real estate practice, insurance, 
journalism, public relations, government employment, office techniques, teach- 
ing and research. 

TYPICAL PROGRAM FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR 



FIRST SEMESTER 

English 
Geography 
Economics 
Organization and 

Control 
Government & Politics 
Speech 

R. O. T. C. (men) 
Health (women) 
Physical Activities 



SECOND SEMESTER 
English 
Geography 
Economics 
Organization and 

Control 
Government & Politics 
Speech 

R.O.T.C. (men) 
Health (women) 
Physical Activities 



RECOMMENDED PREPARATION IN HIGH SCHOOL 

In general, four units of English and one unit each of Social Studies and 
Natural Sciences are required. At least one unit of Algebra is required and one 
unit of Plane Geometry is desirable. While foreign language is desirable for a 
certain programs, no foreign language is required for entrance. Fine Arts. 
Trade and Vocational subjects are acceptable as electives. 



23 




COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

The curriculums in the college of education provide opportunities 
for persons to qualify for certification to teach in the public schools in the 
following subject matter areas and/or grade levels, except in the one instance 
noted which is a program preparing for positions of an educational nature in 
industry. These are four-year programs leading to a Bachelor of Arts or 
Bachelor of Science degree: 

ACADEMIC EDUCATION (SECONDARY SCHOOLS). English, foreign languages, 
mathematics, social sciences, natural sciences, speech (minor only). 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION (SECONDARY SCHOOLS. OFFERED BY THE COL- 
LEGE OF AGRICULTURE) 

ART EDUCATION (SECONDARY SCHOOLS) 

BUSINESS EDUCATION (SECONDARY SCHOOLS) 

CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (NURSERY SCHOOLS AND KINDERGARTENS BOTH 
PUBLIC AND PRIVATE) 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS; GRADES 1-6) 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION (SECONDARY SCHOOLS; VOCATIONAL OR 
GENERAL) 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION (SECONDARY SCHOOLS; INDUSTRIAL ARTS OR VO- 
CATIONAL-INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION) 

EDUCATION FOR INDUSTRY (PREPARES STUDENTS FOR ENTRANCE INTO 
SUPERVISORY OR MANAGEMENT POSITIONS IN INDUSTRY) 

MUSIC EDUCATION (ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS; VOCAL OR 
INSTRUMENTAL) 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH EDUCATION (SECONDARY SCHOOLS; 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION ALSO IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS) 

Majors in English, social sciences, language, and art receive the B.A. degree. 
Majors in mathematics may receive either degree. Majors in all other fields 
receive the B.S. degree. 



SPECIAL FACILIIIES 

The Institute for Child Study conducts child study programs and provides 
for the supervision of undergraduate students in the study of children as a part 
of their program in preparation for teaching. Modern equipped shops and class- 
rooms in a new building house the Industrial Education Department. A nursery- 
kindergarten laboratory school provides for practical experience of students in 
childhood education. Schools in nearby areas offer rich opportunities for ob- 
servation and student teaching. 

24 



I. TYPICAL PROGRAM FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR 

For Students Preparing to Teach in Elementary Schools or 
Nursery Schools and Kindergartens. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Ed. I Freshman Orientation 

Eng. I Composition and American 

Literature 
Soc. J Sociology of A merican Life or 

Phil. 1 Philosophy for Modern 

Man or an Economics Course 
Bot. 1 General Botany 
Art 15 Fundamentals of Art (Elem. 

major) 
A.S. 1 R.O.T.C. (men) 
Health 2 Personal Health (women) 
P.E. Physical Education 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Eng. 2 Composition and American 

Literature 
G.&P. I American Government 
Zool. 1 General Zoology 
Mus. 16 Music Fundamentals for 

the classroom teacher (Elem. 

major) 
A.S. 1 R.O.T.C. (men) 
Health 4 Communhy Health 

(women) 
P.E. Physical Education 
Sp. 3 Fundamentals of General 

American Speech (Childhood 

Education major) 
C.Ed. 2 Introduction to Childhood 

Education (Childhood Education 

major) 



II. TYPICAL PROGRAM FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR 

For Students Majoring in any of the Fields Preparing to Teach 
in Secondary Schools. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Ed. 1 Freshman Orientation 

Eng. 1 Composition and American 
Literature 

Soc. 1 Sociology of A merican Life 
or PhU. 1 Philosophy for Modern 
Man or an Economics course 

Sp. 1 Public Speaking 

A.S. 1 R.O.T.C. (men) 

Health 2 Personal Health (Women) 

P.E. Physical Education 

Science, mathematics, foreign lan- 
guage, or requirements in major 
and minor fields 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Eng. 2 Composition and American 
Literature 

Sp. 2 Public Speaking 

G.&P. 1 American Government 

A.S. 2 R.O.T.C. (men) 

Health 4 Community Health 
(women) 

P.E. Pfiysical Education 

Science, Mathematics, foreign lan- 
guage, or requirements in major 
and minor fields 



RECOMMENDED PREPARATION IN HIGH SCHOOL 

Four units of English and one unit each of social sciences, natural sciences, 
and mathematics are required. For some major fields two units of mathematics 
are required. Additional units in mathematics, natural sciences, social sciences, 
and foreign languages are desirable for a program that permits the greatest 
amount of flexibility in meeting the requirements of various College of Educa- 
tion curricula. Fine arts, trade and vocational subjects are acceptable as 
electives. 



2'> 



C O L L E G E OF ENGINEERING 

Glenn L. Martin Institute of Technology 

Four-year programs lead to the bachelor of science degree in aero- 
nautical, chemical, civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering. Each program 
integrates these elements: (1) basic sciences including mathematics, physics, 
chemistry; (2) engineering sciences including mechanics of solids and fluids, 
engineering materials, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism; (3) 
professional studies in aeronautical, chemical, civil, electrical or mechanical 
engineering; (4) liberal arts and social studies in "The American Civiliza- 
tion Program," and (5) certain other required subjects including military 
science and physical activities. 

Each program lays a broad base for continued learning after college in pro- 
fessional practice, in business or industry, in public service, or in graduate study 
and research. 

The following is representative of work performed by engineering graduates. 

the aeronautical engineer deals with problems related to transporting 
people and things by air and through space. Aerodynamics, thermodynamics, 
and the mechanics of fluids and solids are among his basic sciences. He may 
apply them in some phase of planning or producing airplanes, missiles, or 
rockets, or devising means to sustain and control their flight. 

the chemical engineer applies chemistry to development and economic 
production of industrial chemicals, fuels, modern synthetics and certain alloys. 
He also applies mechanics, thermodynamics, reaction kinetics and aspects of 
nuclear science to unit operations and processes which are fundamental in the 
design and operation of the chemical industries. 

THE civil engineer is primarily a planner, a designer, a builder, and a 
manager of public works and private enterprise. His professional service plays 
a major role in designing, supervising construction, or managing virtually every 
large building, bridge, dam, highway, railway, airport, water supply, waste 
disposal system, city plan, industrial plant, public works project, etc. 

the electrical engineer puts mathematics and the physical sciences to 
practical use in designing systems to generate, transmit, distribute, and use elec- 
trical energy; to transmit and receive "intelligence," as for example by tele- 
phone, radio, radar, television and computers; and to regulate and control 
mechanical and industrial processes by electronics and servomechanisms. 

the MECHANICAL ENGINEER figures ways to transmit power economically by 
heat or by mechanical systems. He applies the mechanics of fluids and solids, 
thermodynamics, and an understanding of the behavior of engineering materials 
under different conditions. As a professional engineer he devises processes for 
industrial production. As an industrial agent he serves as a supervisor, manager, 
or sales representative. 




TYPICAL PROGRAM FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR 

All engineering students enroll in essentially the same subjects during their 
first year in college as follows: 

SEMESTER 

SUBJECTS I 11 

Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Public Speaking — 2 

Elementary Mathematical Analysis 5 5 

General Chemistry 4 4 

Engineering Drawing 2 2 

Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 18 20 

RECOMMENDED PREPARATION IN HIGH SCHOOL 

If you wish to become a professional engineer you should enroll in an 
academic program in high school. Subjects that are recommended and re- 
quired for admission are these: 

SUBJECTS RECOMMENDED REQUIRED 

English 4 units 4 units 

Mathematics (college preparatory) — including 

algebra (2), plane geometry (1), and solid 

geometry, trigonometry, or advanced 

mathematics 3V2 3V2 

History and social sciences 2 1 

Physical sciences 2 1 

Foreign language — German or French 2 

Unspecified academic subjects or suitable 

elect ives 2V2 6V2 

Total 16 16 

The numbers are "semester-credits." A student should plan to devote each 
week, on the average, three hours of effective work for each semester-credit 
on his schedule. 

Each engineering student will select his major-line department — aeronautical, 
chemical, civil, electrical, or mechanical — before he begins his sophomore \ear's 
work. Thereafter he will pursue the approved program of his department which 
leads to the bachelor's degree. 

Advanced engineering students who show promise of creativity and leader- 
ship in engineering, in the engineering sciences, and in teaching and research, 
are encouraged to continue in a program of graduate study leading to master's 
and doctor's degrees. There is an acute shortage of engineers with earned 
doctor's degrees. There are challenging opportunities for able men with such 
top-level preparation. The time to plan and to begin working for these top-level 
opportunities is while \ou are in high school. Your parents and your teachers 
can help provide the opportunity — after that your education is up to you. 
Plan to make the best of it! 



27 




COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

The educational program of the college is planned to help students 
function eflfectively and creatively as individuals, as family members and re- 
sponsible citizens; to interpret the art and science of better home living, and to 
prepare for professions. Certain courses are required for all home economics 
students with additional requirements for the different professions. Among the 
basic requirements for all students in the College are English, economics, psy- 
chology, the physical and/or natural sciences, design, foods, nutrition, textiles, 
equipment, family economics, housing and home management. The four year 
programs leading to the Bachelor of Science degree are: 

GENERAL HOME ECONOMICS. The program is designed to meet the needs of 
students who wish a background in several areas of home economics without 

28 



specialization in any one. Elective courses are chosen within the fields of home 
economics or other subjects to meet individual needs and interests. Graduates 
find positions largely with business firms, working with textiles, clothing or 
equipment in promotion, testing, demonstration, consumer education, writing, 
or a combination of these. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION. This program is designed for students who are 
preparing to teach vocational or general home economics, or to engage in any 
phase of home economics work which requires a knowledge of teaching 
methods. It includes studies of all phases of home economics and the allied 
sciences, with professional training for teaching these subjects. A student 
majoring in this curriculum may also qualify for a science minor. 

HOME ECONOMICS EXTENSION. The program to prepare a student to become 
a home demonstration agent combines the general home economics courses 
with extension methods and home economics education. Courses in speech, 
journalism and rural sociology are essential, and suggested elective subjects in- 
clude literature, philosophy, art, drama and radio. 

FOODS AND NUTRITION. Students learn the scientific principles underlying food 
selection, purchase, preparation and service; nutritional needs of persons of 
different ages and occupations; food processing and marketing, and consump- 
tion practices. They develop some skill in handling foods and some ability to 
manage time, energy and money effectively in supplying food for the family. 
They learn how food affects health and human relations and they acquire the 
ability to improve the nutritional well being of individuals and families. Because 
foods and nutrition are applied sciences, courses in chemistry, physiology, bac- 
teriology, psychology and economics are essential to their understanding. Grad- 
uates find positions in the consumer education departments of food companies 
and their trade associations, magazine and advertising firms, in testing, editorial 
or promotion work, or as nutritionists with industry or in state or community 
programs. 

INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT. The courses in Institution Management empha- 
size food preparation and service in quantity, food science, sanitation, organiza- 
tion and administration procedures, personnel management, human relations, 
teaching methods, nutrition, menu planning, quantity purchasing, cost control, 
physical plant layout, and the selection and care of institution equipment. Work 
experience in an institutional food service is required during the summer be- 
tween the junior and senior year. Graduates have positions dealing with food 
production, supervision, diet therapy, administration or teaching in school lunch 
programs, colleges or commercial food service, government institutions or 
hospitals. 

PRACTICAL art; CRAFTS. This program permits a choice of three majors: art 
in advertising, interior design and costume design. Graduates will have studied 
in the areas of designing, promotion, selling or buying of wearing apparel or 
house furnishings or both. The crafts program permits a choice of two voca- 
tional areas: pre-occupational theraps and teaching. In this program emphasis 
is given to the joy of creation through ceramics, metalry and weaving. 

TEXTILES AND CLOTHING; TEXTILES. The programs are planned for students 
desiring to capitalize on their interest in clothes or home furnishings for per- 

29 



sonal living and future careers through a fuller development of knowledge and 
talents in these fields. Experience gained from courses in textiles, clothing and 
related fields of the social and physical sciences promotes understanding of 
textiles, fashion, clothing design and construction in relation to technological 
and social developments influential in determining consumer and employee 
behavior in the ever-changing textile and clothing market. Graduates have 
positions in homemaking and/or merchandising, designing, fashion promotion, 
textile testing, and in research. 

LABORATORY FACILITIES 

Facilities for studying work simplification and household equipment are 
available in a home management laboratory. A home management house 
serves as a residence-laboratory for senior students to experience managerial 
situations under family living conditions. 

Three foods laboratories are available for teaching the courses in food 
preparation, preservation, economics, and experimental and foreign foods. For 
meal management study a dining room is provided adjacent to the foods lab- 
oratory. 

The nutrition laboratory includes facilities for biochemical analysis of food, 
including vitamin determination, and also facilities for rat feeding experimenta- 
tion. 

Modern, well-equipped studios enable students in practical art to sample 
specialized techniques and media, such as display, photography, air brush, 
silk screen, water color painting, scale drafting, enameling on metal, and clay 
sculpture. 

Textiles and clothing facilities include two well equipped laboratories for 
clothing design and construction, a workroom for use by students and faculty, 
and two textile laboratories with the usual type of equipment used in textile 
analysis and testing. 

TYPICAL PROGRAM FOR FRESHMAN YEAR 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 

English Composition and English Composition and 

Literature Literature 

American Government Sociology of American Life 

Public Speaking Textiles 

Home Economics Orientation Community Health (women) 

Design R.O.T.C. (men) 

Personal Health (women) Physical Activities 

R.O.T.C. (men) General Chemistry, Science or 

Physical Activities Elective 
General Chemistry, Science, or 

Elective 

RECOMMENDED PREPARATION IN HIGH SCHOOL 

English 4 units 

Mathematics 2 units 

History and Social Sciences 1-2 units 

Biological and Physical Sciences 1-2 units 

Foreign Language 2 units 

30 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, 
RECREATION, AND HEALTH 

Four year programs leading to the bachelor of science degree: 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION. The curriculum provides an adequate background in 
general education and scientific areas closely related to this field. Development 
of skills in a wide range of motor activities is emphasized. Many vocational 
opportunities are available in public and private schools, organized camping, 
youth and adult organizations which offer a program of physical activity. 

DANCE. With the increasing recognition of the importance and scope of dance 
in educational programs, the need for teachers adequately trained in dance 
far exceeds the number available. The professional curriculum in dance is 
constructed to meet the steadily rising demand for personnel qualified to teach 
dance in college, secondary, elementary schools, in camps, recreational agencies 
and in preparation for dance therapy. 

RECREATION. Through area courses in sports, speech and drama, music, arts 
and crafts, nature lore, and those courses in the major field itself, program 
planning, organization and administration, leadership techniques, etc. students 
are qualified to accept leadership positions in hospitals, industry, churches, 
public departments, with the armed forces or the many public and private 
agencies. 

HEALTH EDUCATION. A healthy nation is not primarily the responsibility of 
physicians and druggists but of the people themselves. This means that people 
need to know how to live healthfully and to utilize available health facilities 
— that is they all need health education. Persons qualified to teach health are 
needed in schools, colleges, community health agencies and hospitals. Students 
interested in qualifying for supervisory or college-level positions are encouraged 

31 



to plan on doing graduate work either in school health or public health educa- 
tion. 

PHYSICAL THERAPY. Physical therapy is one of the professions which has 
come into prominence as the scope of medical care has expanded. The modern 
concept of the rehabilitation of acute and chronically disabled persons has 
created an increasing demand for physical therapy service. It offers careers 
for both men and women who are interested in becoming members of a 
service which assists the ill and handicapped achieve maximum restoration of 
physical function. 

The University of Maryland offers a course of physical therapy leading to 
the Bachelor of Science degree and to a certificate of proficiency in physical 
therapy. 

RECOMMENDED PREPARATION IN HIGH SCHOOL 

In addition to the four units of English and one unit each of Social and 
Natural Sciences, it is especially desirable for students to have at least one 
unit each in Biological and Physical Science and in Algebra and Plane 
Geometry. Any experience in music, drama, camping, playground and recrea- 
tional activities, and group leadership also will be helpful. In addition, par- 
ticipation in school programs of health and safety education and in physical 
education and athletics are desirable. 

SPECIAL FACILITIES 

The facilities on the campus include five gymnasia, two swimming pools, a 
physical fitness research laboratory, tennis courts, sports fields, golf driving 
range and golf course, dance studio, and an excellent library. The Washington 
YMCA camp. Camp Letts, also is used for certain activities. 

Students also are encouraged to use the excellent facilities of the Library of 
Congress, Army Medical Library and Museum, and the National Institutes 
of Health. 

EXPERIENCES 

In addition to classroom and laboratory work, opportunities for teaching 
on and off campus and participating in field experience are provided. Mem- 
bership in professional groups such as Phi Alpha Epsilon, Aqualiners, Dance 
Club and Gymkana troupe is encouraged as well as participation in other 
campus activities. In each of the fields of specialization in this College unique 
opportunities in dance, sports, recreation, musical and dramatics organiza- 
tions exist in the environs of Washington and Baltimore. 

TYPICAL PROGRAM FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR 

FIRST SEMESTER. English; Government and Politics; Speech; Introduction to 
Physical Education, Recreation and Health; Rhythmic Analysis and Move- 
ment; Sport Skills and Gymnastics; Basic Body Controls (Women); R.O.T.C. 
(Men) 

SECOND SEMESTER. English; Zoology; Sociology, Philosophy or Economics; 
Modern Dance Techniques (Women); Skills in Square and Social Dance; Sport 
Skills and Gymnastics; R.O.T.C. (Men) 

32 




I If 



l^BitTEKDA 



t^ l^'^^^B 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The school of nursing offers both general and fundamental educa- 
tion for students who wish to prepare for professional nursing: (A) A generic 
four year college program planned for students who have no previous experi- 
ence or knowledge in nursing; and (B) A program designed to bring up to full 
collegiate level the basic preparation of graduates of three year hospital di- 
ploma schools. Both programs lead to the degree Bachelor of Science in 
Nursing. 

In association with the Graduate School of the University the School of 
Nursing prepares professional nurses who hold Bachelor of Science degree in 
Nursing with a "B" or better average as instructors, supervisors, and clinical 
specialists in medical and surgical nursing, psychiatric nursing, pediatric nurs- 
ing and obstetrical nursing, the two latter areas being considered as maternal 
and child health. 

Beginning students in nursing spend the first two academic years on the 
College Park campus. Students from other accredited colleges may be ad- 
mitted directly to the Baltimore campus providing they meet admission re- 
quirements. 

Students in the graduate nurse supplementary program may attend classes 
on either campus. Masters students take most of their work on the Professional 
School campus in Baltimore. 

The School of Nursing is accredited by the National League for Nursing in 
all areas including public health nursing. 

33 



SPECIAL FACILITIES 

The facilities for instruction used by the School of Nursing include the 
various colleges and professional schools of the University and the University 
Hospital. Other facilities include the Baltimore City Health Department, Mary- 
land State Health Department, the State Department of Menal Hygiene and 
the Montebello State Hospital. 

TYPICAL PROGRAM FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 

English English 

Sociology Government and Politics 

Zoology Zoology 

Chemistry Chemistry 

Speech Speech 

History of Nursing Nursing 

Physical Activities Physical Activities 

RECOMMENDED PREPARATION IN HIGH SCHOOL 

English 4 years 

Mathematics 2 years 

History and Social Sciences 2 years 

Foreign Language 1 year 

Science 1 year 

(Biology, Chemistry or Physics) 



COLLEGE OF SPECIAL AND 
CONTINUATION STUDIES 

The primary purposes of the college are: (1) to extend the facil- 
ities of the University by offering educational programs at conveniently estab- 
lished off-campus centers located throughout the State of Maryland, the District 
of Columbia and at various overseas military centers; (2) to offer a Bachelor of 
Arts degree in General Studies and a Bachelor of Science degree in Military 
Studies to adult off-campus students. 

High school graduates who are unable to enroll as full-time students at the 
University of Maryland may avail themselves of the educational opportunities 
offered during the late afternoon and evening by this College. Some high 
school graduates may elect to enter the military services upon graduating. The 
University of Maryland is the pioneer in providing educational opportunities 
for service personnel in sixteen countries on four different continents. 

Both of the degrees offered by this College may be completed in their entirety 
off-campus. The Bachelor of Arts degree in General Studies provides oppor- 
tunity for programs in the areas of the social sciences, with concentrations of 
study in such fields as: economics, history, government and politics, sociology, 
geography, psychology, and commerce. 

34 



CURRICULUM FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

IN GENERAL STUDIES: 

Freshman and Sophomore Years 



Eni^'lish I, 2 and 3, 4 or 5, 6 12 semi 

Math, or Science 6 

Foreign Language* 12 

Government and Politics 1 3 

History 5,6 6 

Speech 103, 104 6 

Elect ives 12 



ster hours 



Total 60 
Junior and Senior Years 
Primary Concentration from One 

Department 100 Level Courses 15 
Secondary Concentration from One 
or More Departments — 
100 Level Courses 21 

Other Electives 24 



Total 60 
* Students desiring an area concentration in Commerce may substitute 
Geography 1, 2 or 20, 21 and Economics 31, 32 for the language require- 
ment. 
The Military Studies curriculum is designed for armed services personnel 
desiring to pursue military careers. Only persons who hold or have held a 
commission are eligible to complete this degree. 

In addition, the College of Special and Continuation Studies offers confer- 
ences, institutes and special programs for interested groups. Many high school 
students who obtain employment upon graduation may avail themselves of 
these short term educational opportunities. 

During the 1957-58 school year, programs were offered at the fifty-two 
stateside centers listed below: 



Edgewood Army Chemical 
Center 

Essex 

Fort Detrick 

Fort Holabird 

Fort George G. Meade 

Fort Ritchie 

Frederick 

Ellicott City 

Gaithersburg 

Glen Burnie 

Hagerstown 

Hughesville 

Langley Park 

Metropolitan Police 

Montgomery Blair 

National Bureau of Standards 

Naval Ordnance Laboratory 
Further information may be obtained by writing the Dean of the College of Special and Continua- 
tion Studies. University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland or by calling W'Arfield 7-3800, 
extensions 425, 434, or 541. 



Accokeek 

Andrews 

Annapolis 

Baltimore 

Bel Air 

Bethesda Chevy Chase 

Bladcnsburg 

Boiling Air Force Base 

Bureau of Ships 

Campus 

Cambridge 

Centreville 

Chestertown 

Cumberland 

David Taylor Model Basin 

Denton 

Dundalk 

Easton 



Naval Research 

Laboratory 
Oakland 
Parole 
Paiuxent 
Pentagon 
Reisterstown 
Riverdale 
Rockville 
Rollingwood 
Salisbury 
Silver Spring 
Snow Hill 
Suitland 
Towson 
Viers Mill 
Walter Reed 
\\'estinghouse 
Woodlin 




APPENDIX A 
FEES AND EXPENSES 



GENERAL 



All checks or money orders should be made payable to the University of Maryland for 
the exact amount of the charges. In cases where students have been awarded General Assem- 
bly Grants or University Grants, the amount of such grants will be deducted from the bill. 

All fees are due and payable at the time of registration, and students should come pre- 
pared to pay the full amount of the charges. No student will be admitted to classes until 
such payment has been made. 

The University reserves the right to make such changes in fees and other charges as may 
be found necessary, although every effort will be made to keep the cost to the student as low 
as possible. 

No degree will be conferred, nor any diploma, certificate, or transcript of record issued to 
a student who has not made satisfactory settlement of his account. 



EXPLANATION OF FEES 

The Fixed Charges Fee is not a charge for tuition. It is a charge to help defray the cost 
of operating the University's physical plant, to pay administrative and clerical expenses and 
other costs which ordinarily would not be included as a cost of teaching personnel and teach- 
ing supplies. 

The Athletic Fee is charged for the support of the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics. 
All students are eligible and all students are encouraged to participate in all of the activities 
of this department and to attend all contests in which they do not participate. 

The Special Fee is used to pay interest on and amortize the cost of construction of the 
Student Union Building, the Activities Building, and the Swimming Pool. 

The Student Activities Fee is a mandatory fee included at the request of the Student 
Government Association. It covers subscription to the Diamondback, student newspaper; 
the Old Line, literary magazine; the Terrapin, yearbook; class dues; and includes financial 
support for the musical and dramatic clubs and a cultural entertainment series. 

The Infirmary Fee is charged for the support of the Student Health Service but does not 
include expensive drugs or special diagnostic procedures. Expensive drugs will be charged at 
cost and special diagnostic procedures, such as x-ray, electro-cardiographs, basal metabolic 
rates, etc., will be charged at the lowest cost prevailing in the vicinity. 

Students who register for the second semester but not for the first semester are required 
to pay the following additional fees: Athletic, $7.50; Student Activities, $8.00; Special, 
$15.00; Recreational Facilities Fee, $5.00; Infirmary, $2.50; Advisory and Testing. $5.00. 



DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the time of their 
registration their parents have been domiciled in the State of Maryland for at least one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his first registration 
in the University and may not thereafter be changed by him unless, in the case of a minor, 
his parents move to and become legal residents of Maryland by maintaining such residence 
for at least one full year. However, the right of the minor student to change from a non- 
resident status to resident status must be established by him prior to the registration period 
set for any semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their registration they have 
been domiciled in Maryland for at least one year provided such residence has not been 
acquired while attending any school or college in Maryland or elsewhere. 

The word "domicile" as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent place of abode. 
For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be maintained. 

36 



FEES FOR RESIDENTS AND NON-RESIDENTS 

FEES FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS: 
MARYLAND RESIDENTS 



Fixed Charges 

Athletic Fee 

Student Activities Fee . . . . 

Special Fee 

Recreational Facilities Fee 

Infirmary Fee 

Advisory and Testing Fee 



RESIDENTS OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, 
OTHER STATES AND COUNTRIES 

Tuition Fee for Non-Resident Students 



First 


Second 




Semester 


Semester 


Total 


$ 92.00 


$ 93.00 


$185.00 


15.00 




15.00 


12.00 




12.00 


30.00 




30.00 


10.00 




10.00 


5.00 




5.00 


5.00 




5.00 


$169.00 


$ 93.00 


$262.00 


Semester 


Semester 


Total 


$125.00 


$125.00 


$250.00 



Total for Non-Resident Students 

BOARD AND LODGING 

Board 

Dormitory Room: 

Maryland Residents 

Other States and Countries , 



$294.00 



$200.00 

80-95 
100-120 



$218.00 



$200.00 

80-95 
100-120 



$512.00 



$400.00 

160-190 
200-240 



The above fees do not apply to the temporary Veteran's Housing Units. The rates for 
these family units are as follows: two-room apartment $40 per month; three-room apartment 
$43 per month. 

SPECIAL FEES 

Matriculation Fee for undergraduates, payable at time of first registration in the 

University $ 10.00 

Diploma Fee for Bachelor's degree 10.00 

Engineering College Fee, per semester 4.00 

Home Economics College Fee, per semester 10.00 

Special Fee for students requiring additional preparation in Mathematics, per semester 30.00 
(Required of students whose curriculum calls for Math. 5, 10 or 18 and who fail 
in qualifying examination for these courses.) 
Special Guidance Fee per semester (for students who are required or who wish to take 
advantage of the effective study course, and/or the tutoring service offered by the 

Office of Intermediate Registration 15.00 

R. O. T. C. Uniform Cleaning Fee, per year (Applicable to students registered in 

Basic R. O. T. C. — refundable if uniform is not issued) 2.50 

Room Key Deposit (A room key deposit is payable upon initial entry to the dormi- 
tories. Upon return of the key, a refund will be made whenever the student does 

not plan to re-enter the dormitories the next succeeding semester.) 1.00 

Fees for Auditors are exactly the same as fees charged to students registered 
for credit, with the exception that the non-resident fee will not be charged in the 
case of students not registering for credit in any courses. 



LABORATORY AND OTHER FEES 

LABORATORY FEES PER SEMESTER COURSE: 

Agricultural Engineering $ 3.00 

Microbiology 10.00 and 20.00 

Botany 5.00 and 10.00 

Business Administration 7.50 

Statistics 3.50 

Chemical Engineering 8.00 

Chemistry 10.00 

Education (depending on Labora- 
tory) 1.00, 2.00, 3.00. 5.00 

Practice Teaching 30.00 

Dairy 3.00 

Electrical Engineering 4.00 



Entomology 3.00 

Home Economics — 

(Non-Home Economics .students) 
Practical Art, Crafts, Textiles and 

Clothing 3.00 

Foods and Home Management each 

3.00 and 7.00 

Horticulture 5.00 

Industrial Education 5.00 and 7.50 

Mechanical Engineering 3.00 

Music (Applied Music only) 40.00 



37 



Physical Activities Course 6.00 Psychology 4.00 

Physics Office Techniques and Management . . 7.50 

T ect.ire nemonstration 2 00 Speech (depending on Laboratory) 

Lecture uemonstration z.vu j qq^ 2.oO, 3.00 and 7.50 

Introductory 3.00 Radio and Stage Craft 2.00 



MISCELLANEOUS FEES AND CHARGES 

Fee for part-time student per credit hour 10.00 

(The term "part-time students" is interpreted to mean undergraduate students tak- 
ing 6 semester credit hours or less. Students carrying more than 6 semester 
hours are considered to be full time and must pay the regular full-time fees.) 

Late Registration Fee 5.00 

(All students are expected to complete their registration, including the filing of 
class cards and payment of bills, on the regular registration days. Those who 
do not complete their registration during the prescribed days must pay this fee.) 

Fee for change in registration 3.00 

Fee for failure to report for medical examination appointment 2.00 

Special Examination Fee — to establish college credit — per semester hour 5.00 

Makeup Examination Fee (for students who are absent during any class period when 

tests or examinations are given) 1 .00 

Transcript of Record Fee (one transcript furnished without charge) 1. 00 

Property Damage Charge: Students will be charged for damage to property or 
equipment. Where responsibility for the damage can be fixed, the individual 
student will be billed for it; where responsibility cannot be fixed, the cost of re- 
pairing the damage or replacing equipment will be prorated. 

Library Charges: 

Fine for failure to return book from General Library before expiration of loan 

period per day .05 

Fine for failure to return book from Reserve Shelf before expiration of loan 
period : 

First hour overdue .25 

Each additional hour overdue .05 

In case of loss or mutilation of a book, satisfactory restitution must be made. 
In the event it becomes necessary to transfer uncollected charges to the Cashier's 
office, an additional charge of $1.00 is made. 



TEXTBOOKS AND SUPPLIES 

Textbooks and classroom supplies: These costs vary with the course pursued, but 

will average per semester 35.00 



FEES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Fees for student carrying 10 or more semester credit hours 100.00 

Fee per semester hours for students carrying less than 10 semester credit hours . . . 10.00 

Matriculation Fee, payable only once, at time of first registration 10.00 

Diploma Fee for Master's Degree 10.00 

Graduation Fee for Doctor's Degree 50.00 

Infirmary Fee (voluntary) 5.00 

Foreign Language examination (first examination without charge) 5.00 

Testing Fee (Education Majors) 5.00 

Notes: Fees in the Graduate School are the same for all students, whether or not they are 
residents of the State of Maryland. 
All fees, except Diploma Fee and Graduation Fee, are payable at the time of registra- 
tion for each semester. 
Diploma Fee and Graduation Fee must be paid prior to graduation. 
No provision for housing students is made by the University. 

The Infirmary services normally furnished the undergraduate students are available 
to graduate students who elect to pay the fee of $5.00 for the year (not including 
Summer School), provided that the fee is paid not later than the end of the first 
week of classes in the regular academic session. A graduate student entering in 
February may benefit in the same manner by the payment of $2.50. 

38 



FEES FOR OFF-CAMPUS COURSES 

Matriculation Fee (payable once, at time of first registration by all students — full 
time and part time, candidates for degrees, and non-candidates): 

For Undergraduates 10.00 

For Graduates 10.00 

Fee for all students — limit 6 hours. For exceptional adult students taking ofT- 

campus courses the limit may be increased to 9 hours. Charge per credit hour. . . 10.00 
Laboratory Fees: A laboratory fee, to cover cost of materials used, is charged in 
laboratory courses. Fees vary with the course and can be ascertained in any case 
by inquiry to the Dean of the College of Special and Continuation Studies. 

WITHDRAW.^L AND REFUND OF FEES 

Any student compelled to leave the University at any time during the academic year 
should file an application for withdrawal, bearing the proper signatures, in the Office of the 
Registrar. If this is not done, the student will not be entitled, as a matter of course, to a 
certificate of honorable dismissal, and will forfeit his right to any refund to which he would 
otherwise be entitled. The date used in computing refunds is the date the application for 
withdrawal is filed in the Office of the Registrar. 

In the case of a minor, withdrawal will be permitted only with the written consent of 
the student's parent or guardian. 

Students withdrawing from the University will receive a refund of all charges except 
board, deposits for room reservations, less the Matriculation Fee and any scholarship credit 
in accordance with the following schedule: 

Percentage 
Period from Date Instruction Begins Refundable 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks 

Board is refunded only in the event the student withdraws from the University. Refunds 
of board are made on a pro-rata, weekly basis. Dining Hall cards issued to boarding students 
must be surrendered at the Auditor's Office in the Administration Building on the day of 
withdrawal, before any refund will be processed. 

In computing refunds to students who have received the benefit of scholarships, the 
computation will be made in such a way as to return the maximum amount to the scholarship 
account without loss to the University. 

No refund of the Athletic, Student Activity, Special Recreational Facilities, Infirmary, 
and Advisory and Testing Fees is made to students who withdraw at the close of the first 
semester. 

No refunds of Fixed Charges, Lodging, Tuition, Laboratory Fees, etc., are allowed when 
courses are dropped, unless the student withdraws from the University. 

When regularly enrolled part-time students in off-campus instruction officially drop a 
course or courses and continue with one or more courses, they may receive a refund of 80% 
for the dropped courses if they are officially dropped prior to the third meeting of the class 
or classes. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Students and alumni may secure transcripts of their scholastic records from the Oflice of 
the Registrar. No charge is made for the first copy; for additional copies, there is a charge 
of $1.00 for each transcript, except when more than one copy is requested at the same time. 
In that case, one dollar is charged for the first copy, and fifty cents for each additional copy. 
Checks should be made payable to the University of Maryland. Transcripts of records should 
be requested at least one week in advance of the date when the records are actually needed. 
No transcript of a student's record will be furnished any student or alumnus whose financial 
obligations to the University have not been satisfied. 

39 



APPENDIX B 



HONORS, AWARDS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS-IN-AID 

HONORS, AWARDS 

SCHOLARSHIP HONORS — Final honors for excellence in scholarship are awarded to one 
fifth of the graduating class in each College. First honors are awarded to the upper half of 
this group; second honors to the lower half. To be eligible for honors, a student must com- 
plete at least two years of resident work at the University with an average of B (3.0) or 
higher. 

ALPHA CHI SIGMA AWARD — The Alpha Rho Chapter of the Alpha Chi Sigma Honorary 

Fraternity offers annually a year's membership in the American Chemical Society to the 

senior majoring in Chemistry or Chemical Engineering whose average has been above 3.0 
for three and one half years. 

ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA SENIOR CERTIFICATE AWARD — Senior members of Alpha Lambda 
Delta, honorary scholastic society for women, who have maintained an average of 3.5 receive 
this certificate. 

ALPHA ZETA MEDAL— The Professional Agricultural Fraternity of Alpha Zeta awards 
annually a medal to the agricultural student in the freshman class who attains the highest 
average record in academic work. 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN AWARD — This award is presented to a 
senior woman selected for scholarship and community leadership. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS AWARD — A junior membership in the American 
Society of Civil Engineering is awarded to the senior in the Department of Civil Engineering 
who has the highest scholastic standing. 

APPLEMAN-NORTON AWARD IN BOTANY — The Department of Botany offers an award of 
$100 in honor of Emeritus Professors C. O. Appleman and J. B. S. Norton to a senior major 
in Botany who is considered worthy on the basis of demonstrated ability and excellence in 
scholarship. 

DINAH BERMAN MEMORIAL MEDAL — The Dinah Bermau Memorial Medal is awarded 
annually to the sophomore who has attained the highest scholastic average of his class in the 
College of Engineering. The medal is given by Mr. Benjamin Berman. 

CITIZENSHIP PRIZE FOR MEN — President Emeritus H. C. Byrd, of the Class of 1908, an- 
nually presents this award to the member of the senior class who, during his collegiate career, 
has most nearly typified the model citizen and who has done most for the general advance- 
ment of the interests of the University. 

CITIZENSHIP PRIZE FOR WOMEN — This prize is presented annually as a memorial to Sally 
Sterling Byrd, by her children, to that member of the senior class who best exemplifies the 
enduring qualities of the pioneer woman. These qualities typify self dependence, courtesy, 
aggressiveness, modesty, capacity to achieve objectives, willingness to sacrifice for others, 
strength of character, and those other qualities that enabled the pioneer woman to play such 
a fundamental part in the building of the nation. 

BERNARD L. CROZiER AWARD — The Maryland Association of Engineers awards a cash prize 
of twenty-five dollars annually to the senior in the College of Engineering who, in the 
opinion of the faculty, has made the greatest improvement in scholarship during his stay at 
the University. 

DAVIDSON TRANSFER AND STORAGE COMPANY AWARD — A $500.00 award is made to a high- 
ranking student in the College of Business and Public Administration who is concentrating in 
transportation. This award is made through the College of Business and Public Administra- 
tion. 

DELTA DELTA DELTA MEDAL — This sorority awards a medal annually to the woman who 
attains the highest average in academic work during the sophomore year. 

DELTA GAMMA SCHOLARSHIP AWARD — This award is offered to the woman member of the 
graduating class who has maintained the highest average during three and one-half years at 
the University. 

DELTA SIGMA PI SCHOLARSHIP KEY — This award is offered to a member of the graduating 
class who has maintained the highest scholastic average for the entire four-year course in the 
College of Business and Public Administration. 

40 



GODDARD MEDAL — The Jamcs Douglass Goddard Memorial Medal is awarded annually to 
the resident of Prince Georges County, born therein, who makes the highest average in his 
studies and who at the same time embodies the most manly attributes. The medal is given 
by Mrs. Anne G. Goddard James of Washington, D. C. 

GRANGE AWARD — The Maryland State Grange makes an annual award to the senior who 
has excelled in leadership and scholastic attainment and has contributed meritorious service 
to the College of Agriculture. 

MAHLON N. HAINES AWARD — An award of one hundred dollars is presented each year to 
the students in the Department of Fine Arts for outstanding work in the painting classes. 

CHARLES B. HALE DRAMATIC AWARDS — The University Theatre recognizes annually the 
man and woman members of the senior class who have done most for the advancement of 
dramatics at the University. 

MARYLAND MOTOR TRUCK ASSOCIATION AWARD — A five hundred dollar award is made to a 
student majoring in Transportation with an interest in motor transportation who has shown 
in three years of training an apparent ability to succeed. This award is made through the 
College of Business and Public Administration. 

OMICRON Nu SORORITY MEDAL — This honorary sorority awards a medal annually to the 
freshman woman in the College of Home Economics who attains the highest scholastic 
average during the first semester. 

PHI ALPHA AWARD — Epsilon Chapter of Phi Alpha Fraternity awards annually a plaque 
to the man in the junior class who has attained the highest scholastic average during his first 
two years at the College Park colleges of the University. 

PHI CHI THETA KEY — The Phi Chi Theta Key is awarded to the outstanding graduating 
senior woman in the College of Business and Public Administration on the basis of scholar- 
ship, activities, and leadership. 

PILOT FREIGHT CARRIES, INC., AWARD — A five hundred dollar award is made to a senior 
student in the College of Business and Public Administration who has majored in transporta- 
tion and who has demonstrated competence in this field of study. This award is made through 
the College of Business and Public Administration. 

PI SIGMA ALPHA — FRED HAYS MEMORIAL AWARD — This award. Consisting of the sum of 
thirty dollars, is presented by an alumnus to the senior in Government and Politics having 
the highest average in departmental courses. 

WILLIAM s. ROSENBAUM MEMORIAL FOUNDATION AWARD — This award. Consisting of twenty- 
five dollars, is presented for excellence in Hebrew studies by Barbarossa Lodge 133, Knights 
of Pythias, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

SIGMA ALPHA OMICRON AWARD — This award is presented to a senior student majoring in 
Bacteriology for high scholarship, character and leadership. 

SIGMA CHI CUP — Sigma Chi Fraternity offers annually a cup to the man in the freshman 
class who has made the highest scholastic average during the first semester. 

ALGERNON SYDNEY SULLIVAN AWARD — The Ncw York Southcm Socicty, in memory of its 
first president, awards annually medallions and certificates to one man and one woman of 
the graduating class and one non-student who evince in their daily life a spirit of love for 
and helpfulness to other men and women. 

TAU BETA PI AWARD — The Maryland Beta Chapter of Tau Beta Pi, an honorary fraternity, 
awards annually an engineer's handbook to the junior in the College of Engineering who 
during his sophomore year has made the greatest improvement in scholarship over that of 
his freshman year. 

WASHINGTON PANHELLENic ASSOCIATION .\WARi>— The sum of two hundred dollars is pre- 
sented to a woman student, a member of a National Panhellenic Conference Sorority, who 
has done most to promote social relations among the sororities on the campus. 

DAVID ARTHUR BERMAN MEMORIAL AWARD — This award is offered by the family of David 
Arthur Berman to the highest ranking junior in the Department of Chemical Engineering. 

HAMILTON AWARD — This award is offered by the Hamilton Watch Company to the gradu- 
ating senior in the College of Engineering who has most successfully combined proficiency in 
his major field of study with achievements — either academic, extra-curricular, or both — in 
the social sciences or humanities. 

men's league cup — This award is offered by the Men's League to the graduating male 
senior who has done the most for the male student body. 

41 



PHI BETA KAPPA ASSOCIATION AWARD — This award is presented to the graduating senior 
with the highest cumulative scholastic average whose basic course program has been in the 
liberal studies. 

MILITARY AWARDS 

AIR FORCE ASSOCIATION MEDAL — This silver medal is awarded to the outstanding advanced 
cadet in the A.F.R.O.T.C. course who has demonstrated outstanding ability in scholastic 
grades, both general and military, in individual characteristics, and in performance during 
the period of summer camp. 

ALUMNI CUP — The Alumni Association offers each year a cup to the Leader of the best 
drilled Flight in competitive drill. 

AMERICAN LEGION POST NO. 217 AWARD — This award is presented to the senior advanced 
cadet who displays outstanding leadership. 

AMERICAN LEGION GOLD MEDAL — The gold medal is awarded to the senior advanced cadet 
for academic achievement in leadership. 

ARMED FORCES COMMUNICATIONS MEDAL — This medal is awarded to the senior advanced 
cadet in recognition of outstanding achievement in the field of electronics. 

ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY PLAQUE — This plaquc is awarded to the second year advanced cadet 
who has done the most to advance the A.F.R.O.T.C. interests and activities for the Arnold 
Air Society. 

CONSOLIDATED vuLTEE AIRCRAFT CORPORATION AWARD — This award is presented to the 
sophomore cadet displaying leadership ability and academic excellence. 

DISABLED AMERICAN VETERANS' GOLD CUP — This cup is awarded to the senior advanced 
cadet who has displayed outstanding leadership, scholarship, and citizenship. 

DISTINGUISHED A.F.R.O.T.C. CADET AWARDS — Thcse awards are presented to senior cadets 
who have been outstanding in A.F.R.O.T.C. and who are outstanding in their academic major 
fields. Distinguished A.F.R.O.T.C. cadets are eligible to apply for regular Air Force com- 
mission. 

governor's cup — This cup is oflfered each year by His Excellency, the Governor of 
Maryland, to the best drilled squadron. 

HAMiLL MEMORIAL PLAQUE — This plaquc, offered by the local chapter of Theta Chi 
Fraternity, is presented to the sophomore cadet excelling in leadership and scholarship. 

DISTINGUISHED A.F.R.O.T.C. GRADUATE — Presented to distinguished cadets of the 
A.F.R.O.T.C. who continue to display outstanding academic and leadership qualities. 

A.F.R.O.T.C. ANGEL FLIGHT AWARD — Presented to the most outstanding member of the 
Angel Flight. 

CHARLES H. DICKINSON MEMORIAL PLAQUE — Offered by the Veterans Club, University of 
Maryland, to the Junior cadet who has shown leadership ability, outstanding individual 
characteristics of military bearing. 

VANDENBERG GUARD AWARD — Presented to the member displaying most leadership ability. 

GLENN L. MARTIN AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING AWARD — This award is presented for aca- 
demic excellence in the field of aeronautical engineering to a senior advanced cadet who has 
applied for flight training. 

MARYLAND STATE SOCIETY DAUGHTERS OF FOUNDERS AND PATRIOTS OF AMERICA AWARD 

This award is presented to the freshman cadet attaining the highest over-all academic grades. 

NATIONAL DEFENSE TRANSPORTATION ASSOCIATION AWARD — This Organization offers a cita- 
tion in recognition of leadership qualities, academic standing, aptitude for military service, and 
noteworthy service in furtherance of the aims and objectives of the Association in promoting 
preparedness for the national defense of the United States. 

PERSHING RIFLE REGIMENTAL MEDAL — Presented to the member of Pershing Rifles who 
shows outstanding service to the company. 

PERSHING RIFLE AWARDS — The Pershing Rifle Company presents medals to most out- 
standing basic cadets who are members of the Pershing Rifles. 

PERSHING RIFLE AWARD — Medal presented by Pershing Rifle Company to the best drilled 
cadet of the corps who is not a member of Pershing Rifles. 

42 



PFRSHiNG RIFLE MEDAL — This medal is awarded to the outstanding member of the Persh- 
ing Killes. 

Ri SLRVF. officers' ASSOCIATION MEDALS — Threc mcduls, gold, silver, and bronze, are 
presented by this association to the three senior cadets demonstrating outstanding academic 
achievement in the A.F.R.O.T.C. and in other studies. 

RESERVE officers' ASSOCIATION RIBBONS — The Air Force Reserve Officers Association 
presents ribbons to the 40 outstanding freshman cadets, the 30 outstanding sophomore cadets, 
and to 10 outstanding Juniors. 

SCABBARD AND BLADE COBLENTZ MEMORIAL CUP — This cup awarded to the Commander 
of the winning Squadron in drill competition. 

SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AWARD — This award is presented to the senior Ad- 
vanced Cadet who exhibits in his work a high degree of merit with respect to leadership, 
military bearing, and excellence in his academic course of study. 

SUN NEWSPAPER AWARD — This award is presented to a basic cadet in recognition of 
being the best drilled basic cadet in competitive drill. 

ATHLETIC AWARDS 

TOM BIRMINGHAM MEMORIAL TROPHY — This trophy. awarded by Major Benny Alperstein 
and Major Hotsy Alperstein in memory of the late Tom Birmingham, of the Class of 1937, 
is presented to the outstanding member of the boxing team. 

WILLIAM p. COLE, III, MEMORIAL LACROSSE AWARD — This award, offered by the team- 
mates of William P. Cole, III and the coaches of the 1940 National Champion team, is 
presented to the outstanding midfielder. 

HALBERT K. EVANS MEMORIAL TRACK AWARD — This Eward, givcn in memory of "Hermie" 
Evans, of the Class of 1940, by his friends, is presented to the outstanding graduating senior 
trackman. 

CHARLES LEROY MACKERT TROPHY — This trophy is offered by William E. Krouse to the 
Maryland student who has contributed most to wrestling while at the University. 

MARYLAND RING — The Maryland Ring is offered as a memorial to Charles L. Linhardt, 
of the Class of 1912, to the Maryland man who is adjudged the best athlete of the year. 

ANTHONY c. NARDO MEMORIAL TROPHY — This trophy is awarded to the best football line- 
man of the year. 

EDWIN POWELL TROPHY — This trophy is offered by the Class of 1913 to the player who 
has rendered the greatest service to lacrosse during the year. 

SILVESTER WATCH FOR EXCELLENCE IN ATHLETICS — A gold watch, given in houor of 
former President of the University R. W. Silvester, is offered annually to "the man who 
typifies the best in college athletics." 

TEKE TROPHY — This trophy is offered by the Maryland Chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon 
Fraternity to the student who during his four years at the University has rendered the great- 
est service to football. 

DIXIE WALKER MEMORIAL TROPHY — This tfophy, offered by Theta Chi Fraternity, is 
awarded to the boxer who has shown the most improvement over his performance in preced- 
ing years. 

THE ALViN L. AUBiNOE BASKETBALL TROPHY — This trophy is offered by Alvin L. Aubinoe 
for the senior who has contributed most to the squad. 

THE ALViN L. AUBINOE FOOTBALL TROPHY — This trophy is offered by Alvin L. Aubinoe 
for the unsung hero of the current season. 

THE ALVIN L. AUBINOE TRACK TROPHY — -This trophy is offered by Alvin L. ,'\ubinoe for the 
senior who has contributed most to the squad during the time he was on the squad. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT AWARDS 

Keys are awarded to the members of the Executive Committee of the Student Govern- 
ment Association. Men's League. Association of Women Students, and other organizations 
who faithfully perform their duties throughout the year. 

43 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS-IN-AID 

All requests for information concerning scholarships and grants-in-aid should be addressed 
to the Director of the Office of Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid, University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland. Regulations and procedures for the award of scholarships are 
formulated by this committee. 

The Board of Regents of the University authorizes the award of a limited number of 
scholarships each year to deserving students. All scholarships and grants for the undergradu- 
ate departments of the University at College Park are awarded by a faculty committee. 
Applicants are subject to the approval of the Director of Admissions insofar as qualifications 
for admission to the University are concerned. All recipients are subject to the academic and 
non-academic regulations and requirements of the University. 

Scholarships and grants are awarded to young men and women based upon apparent 
academic ability and financial need. In making awards, consideration is given to character, 
achievement, participation in student activities and to other attributes which may indicate 
success in college. It is the intent of the Committee to make awards to those qualified who 
might not otherwise be able to provide for themselves an opportunity for higher education. 

The recipient of a scholarship or a grant is expected to make at least normal progress 
toward a degree. Normal progress toward a degree is defined by the Academic Probation 
Plan. 

The Committee on Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid reserves the right to review the 
scholarship program annually and to make adjustments in the amounts and recipients of 
awards in accordance with the funds available and scholastic attainment. 

The types of scholarships, grants and loan funds available follow: 

FULL SCHOLARSHIPS 

The University awards fifty-six full scholarships covering board, lodging, fixed charges, 
fees and books. Not more than twenty of these scholarships may be held by out-of-state 
students and at least twelve are reserved for women. Scholastic achievement and participation 
in student activities are given primary consideration in the award of these scholarships. 

UNIVERSITY GRANTS 

The University awards to deserving and qualified secondary school graduates a limited 
number of grants covering fixed charges only. 

GENERAL ASSEMBLY GRANTS 

These grants are for fixed charges and are awarded by members of the Legislature, three 
for each Senator and one for each member of the House of Delegates. They may be awarded 
by a member of the House of Delegates or by a Senator only to persons in the county or in 
the legislative district of Baltimore City which the Delegate or Senator represents. Awards of 
such grants are subject to approval by the Committee on Scholarships and by the Director 
of Admissions as to qualifications for admission. 

SPECIAL ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS 

A limited number of scholarships is awarded each year to students of exceptional aca- 
demic ability out of funds derived from campus enterprises. The amount of these scholar- 
ships varies depending upon the extent of need. These awards are made by the Committee on 
Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid in accordance with the general principles underlying the award 
of all other scholarships. 

ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS 

The University has a number of endowed scholarships and special grants. These are paid 
for by income from funds especially established for this purpose. Brief descriptions of these 
awards follow: 

ALBRIGHT SCHOLARSHIP — The Victor E. Albright Scholarship is open to graduates of 
Garrett County high schools who were born and reared in that county. Application should 
be made to the high school principals. 

ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIPS — The General Alumni Council of the University Alumni Associa- 
tion provides eleven scholarships in the amount of $250 each to be awarded respectively to 
schools or colleges represented on the Alumni Council. The awards are based on scholarship, 
leadership and need and are awarded by the Faculty Committee on Scholarships and Grants- 
in-Aid. 

44 



AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR METALS SCHOLARSHIP IN METALLURGY — A Scholarship of $400 is 

available to a competent student in the field of Metallurgy. The award will be made by the 
faculty in Metallurgy in accordance with the general principles underlying the award of all 
scholarships in the University. 

BALTIMORE PANHELLENic ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIP — A scholarship is awarded annually 
by the Baltimore Panhellenic Association. This scholarship will be awarded to a student 
entering the junior or senior class, who is an active member of a sorority, who is outstanding 
in leadership and scholarship and who needs financial assistance. This award is made by the 
Committee on Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid in cooperation with the Office of the Dean of 
Women. 

BALTIMORE suNPAPERS SCHOLARSHIP IN JOURNALISM — The Board of Trustccs of the A. S. 
Abell Foundation, Inc., has contributed $500 to provide a scholarship in journalism to be 
awarded to a worthy senior in the College of Business and Public Administration who is 
majoring in Editorial Journalism. 

SAMUEL WOLFE BLANKMAN GRANT — The sum of $100 is awarded each year to a foreign 
student on the basis of worth and need to be determined by the Committee on Scholarships. 
The student must be a permanent resident of a country other than the United States, its pos- 
sessions, or Canada. He may be a member of any college or school in the University. 

BORDEN AGRICULTURAL AND HOME ECONOMICS SCHOLARSHIPS — A Borden Agricultural 
Scholarship of $300 is granted to that student in the College of Agriculture who has had two 
or more of the regularly listed courses in dairying and who, upon entering the senior year 
of study, has achieved the highest average grade of all other similarly eligible students in all 
preceding college work. 

A Borden Home Economics Scholarship of $300 is granted to that student in the College 
of Home Economics who has had two or more of the regularly listed courses in foods and 
nutrition and who, upon entering the senior year of study, has achieved the highest average 
grade of all other similarly eligible students in all preceding college work. 

CAPITAL FARM AND GARDEN SCHOLARSHIP — This Scholarship of $400 per year is made 
available by the Capital Division of the Woman's National Farm and Garden Association. 
Inc. to help rural girls and women through scholarships and guidance to the best training in 
agriculture, horticulture, home economics and the related professions. This scholarship is 
awarded by the Committee on Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid in accordance with terms of 
the grant. 

WILLIAM F. CHiLDS, JR., GRANT — The Maryland Highway Contractors Association provides 
a grant of $500 annually to be awarded to a capable and worthy senior in the Department 
of Civil Engineering who plans to enter the field of Highway Engineering upon graduation. 
The award is made by the Committee on Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid in cooperation with 
the College of Engineering. 

DR. ERNEST N. CORY SCHOLARSHIP — This award is made annually to an outstanding junior 
or senior in the College of Agriculture, preferably one majoring in Entomology. The amount 
of the award will vary depending upon the earnings of a trust fund established in honor of 
Dr. Ernest N. Cory upon his retirement. The Committee on Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid 
cooperates with the College of Agriculture in selecting the student for this award. 

THE DANFORTH FOUNDATION AND THE RALSTON PURINA SCHOLARSHIPS The Danfofth 

Foundation and the Ralston Purina Company of St. Louis offer two summer scholarships to 
outstanding men students in the College of Agriculture, one for a student who has successfully 
completed his junior year, the other for a student who has successfully completed his fresh- 
man year. The purpose of these scholarships is to bring together outstanding young men for 
leadership training. 

The Danforth Foundation and the Ralston Purina Company of St. Louis offer two sum- 
mer scholarships to outstanding Home Economics women students, one to a junior and one 
to a freshman. The purpose of these scholarships is to bring together outstanding young 
women for leadership training. 

DAIRY TECHNOLOGY SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS — The Dairy Technology Society of Mary- 
land and the District of Columbia provides a limited number of scholarships and grants-in-aid 
for students majoring in Dairy Products Technology. These awards arc available both to high 
.school graduates entering the University as freshmen and to students who have completed one 
or more years of their University curriculum. The purpose of these awards is to encourage 
and stimulate interest in the field of milk and milk products. The awards arc based on 
scholarship, leadership, personality, need, experience, interest in and willingness to work in 
the field of dairy technology. These awards are made by the Committee on Scholarships and 
Grants-in-Aid in cooperation with the Dairy Technology Society. 

EXEL SCHOLARSHIPS — A Substantial grant for endowed scholarships was made by Deborah 
B. Exel. These awards are made by the Committee on Scholarships to worthy students in 
accordance with the general principles underlying the award of all other scholarships. 

45 



ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY VOLUNTEER FIREMEN'S ASSOCIATION GRANT — This grant is awarded 
to a high school graduate who will enroll in the Fire Protection Curriculum in the College 
of Engineering. The amount of the award is $300 per year and will be available to the recip- 
ient for the normal period of time to complete the program being pursued. This grant is 
awarded by the Committee on Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid in cooperation with the Anne 
Arundel County Volunteer Fireman's Association and the College of Engineering. 

LADIES AUXILIARY TO THE MARYLAND STATE FIREMEN'S ASSOCIATION GRANT This grant is 

awarded to an outstanding high school graduate who will enroll in the Fire Protection Cur- 
riculum in the College of Engineering. The amount of this award is $500 per year and will 
be available to the recipient for the normal period of time to complete the program being 
pursued. This grant is awarded by the Committee on Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid in 
cooperation with the Ladies Auxiliary to the Maryland State Firemen's Association and the 
College of Engineering. 

MARYLAND STATE FIREMEN'S ASSOCIATION GRANT — A $300 Scholarship is awarded an- 
nually to an outstanding high school student who enrolls in the Fire Protection Curriculum of 
the College of Engineering. This scholarship is for four years and is awarded to a student 
of high scholastic ability with a reputation of good character and outstanding fire service in- 
terest. The award is made by the Faculty Committee on Scholarships in cooperation with the 
Maryland State Firemen's Association and the Fire Protection Department of the College of 
Engineering. 

PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY yoLUNTEER FIREMEN'S ASSOCIATION GRANT — An annual Scholar- 
ship of $300 is awarded to an outstanding high school student who enrolls in the Fire Pro- 
tection Curriculum of the College of Engineering. The award is based on high scholastic 
ability, good character and outstanding fire service interest. The Faculty Committee on 
Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid cooperates with the Fire Protection Department of the College 
of Engineering and the Board of Directors of the Prince Georges County Volunteer Firemen's 
Association in selecting the student. 

FOOD FAIR STORES FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS — Each year a number of scholarships is 
made available by the Food Fair Stores Foundation to students from Anne Arundel, Balti- 
more, Frederick, Montgomery, and Talbot counties and Baltimore City. Students receiving 
these scholarships may pursue any of the four-year curriculums of the University. The scholar- 
ships are for $250 for an academic year and are awarded by the Committee on Scholarships 
as in the case of all other scholarships. Under certain conditions they may be granted from 
year to year. 

VICTOR FRENKIL SCHOLARSHIP — A Scholarship of $250 is granted annually by Mr. Victor 
Frenkil of Baltimore to a student from Baltimore City in the freshman class of the University. 
This scholarship is awarded in cooperation with the Committee on Scholarships in accordance 
with the general principles underlying the award of all other scholarships. 

GENERAL MOTORS SCHOLARSHIP — This Scholarship is granted annually to any young man 
or young woman who is an outstanding individual entering the freshman year. The scholar- 
ship is awarded by the Committee on Scholarships. The amount of the stipend depends upon 
the demonstrated need of the individual. The Sponsored Scholarship Service evaluates the 
financial need in each case. 

GODDARD MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS — Four $500 scholarships are available annually under 
the terms of the James and Sarah E. R. Goddard Memorial Fund established through the wills 
of Morgan E. Goddard and Mary Y. Goddard. In granting these awards the Committee on 
Scholarships will consider outstanding scholastic achievement and financial need. Each award 
will be made on a year-to-year basis depending upon the accomplishment of the student. 

WILLIAM RANDOLPH HEARST FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS — Thesc Scholarships are made 
available through a gift of the Baltimore News-Post, one of the Hearst newspapers, in honor 
of William Randolph Hearst. Scholarships up to $500 are awarded annually to undergraduates 
pursuing a program of study in journalism. Scholarships up to $1,000 are awarded annually 
for graduate study in history. These scholarships are awarded by the Committee on Scholar- 
ships and Grants-in-Aid in cooperation with the Department of History and Journalism. 

INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL SCHOLARSHIP — Each year the Interfraternity Council of the Uni- 
versity provides funds for four $200 scholarships. These annual scholarships are awarded at 
the discretion of the Committee on Scholarships to deserving undergraduate male students. 

IOTA LAMBDA SIGMA (nu CHAPTER) SCHOLARSHIP — This Scholarship is awarded annually to 
any outstanding male freshman student who enrolls in the Industrial Education curriculum. 
The student must be a resident of the State of Maryland and signify his intention of teaching 
in Maryland. 



46 



VENIA M. KELLER GRANT — The Maryland State Council of Homemakers' Clubs makes avail- 
able this grant of $100 which is open to a Maryland young man or woman of promise who 
wishes to enroll or is enrolled in the College of Home Economics. It is awarded through the 
College of Home Economics in cooperation with the Committee on Scholarships. 

KiWANis SCHOLARSHIP — A Kiwanis Memorial Scholarship of $200 per year is awarded by 
the Prince Georges County Kiwanis Club to a male resident of Prince Georges County, Mary- 
land, who, in addition to possessing the necessary qualifications for maintaining a satisfactory 
scholarship record, must have a reputation of high character and attainment in general all- 
around citizenship. 

HELEN ALETTA LiNTHicuM SCHOLARSHIPS — These Scholarships, several in number, were 
established through the benefaction of the late Mrs. Helen Aletta Linthicum, widow of the late 
Congressman Charles J. Linthicum, who served in Congress from the Fourth District of Mary- 
land for many years. They are granted to worthy young men and women who are residents 
of the State of Maryland and who have satisfactory high school records, forceful personality, 
a reputation for splendid character and citizenship, and the determination to get ahead. 

THE M CLUB GRANTS — The M Club of the University of Maryland provides each year a 
limited number of awards. They are granted by the Committee on Scholarships to applicants 
who show promise in sports other than football. 

DR. FRANK c. MARINO SCHOLARSHIP — Dr. Frank C. Marino provides a $200 annual scholar- 
ship in Nursing Education. As vacancies in this scholarship occur, it is awarded by the Com- 
mittee on Scholarships to a student who demonstrates special interest and promise in this field. 

MARYLAND EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION GRANTS — The Maryland Educational Foundation pro- 
vides funds each year for the education of several promising young men. These grants are 
awarded by the Committee on Scholarships to applicants who qualify under the provisions of 
the Foundation. 

MARYLAND ASSOCIATION OF CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS SCHOLARSHIP A $200 Scholar- 
ship is awarded to a superior student in the College of Business and Public Administration who 
is concentrating in Accounting. This award is made through the College of Business and Pub- 
lic Administration in cooperation with the Committee on Scholarships. 

EUGENE E. AND AGNES E. MEYER SCHOLARSHIPS — A number of Scholarships is made available 
each year to promising students in meeting the costs of furthering their education, with prefer- 
ential consideration to children of persons employed in public service, including service in the 
armed forces and the judiciary. The awards are made by the Committee on Scholarships in 
accordance with the general principles underlying the award of all other scholarships. 

MILLER CHEMICAL AND FERTILIZER CORPORATION SCHOLARSHIP A $250 scholarship haS 

been made available for a student who needs financial aid, who has a farm background, and 
who has a major in Entomology. Plant Pathology, Agronomy, or Horticulture. The award is 
made by the Committee on Scholarships in accordance with the general principles underlying 
the award of all other scholarships. 

MORTAR BOARD SCHOLARSHIP — The Mortar Board Scholarship is awarded annually to a 
woman student on the basis of scholastic attainment, character, and need. The selection of the 
student for this award is made through the Office of the Dean of Women and a representative 
of Mortar Board in cooperation with the Committee on Scholarships in accordance with the 
general principles underlying the award of all other scholarships. 

PANHELLENic ASSOCIATION OF WASHINGTON, D. c, SCHOLARSHIP — A $200 Scholarship is 
awarded annually by the Panhellenic Association of Washington, D. C. This award is made 
to a member of a national Panhellenic Conference Sorority who in her sophomore or junior 
year has had a 3.0 average or better, who has done the most to promote good social relations 
among the sororities on the campus, and who is an outstanding leader in student affairs spon- 
sored by the University. The award is made by the Committee on Scholarships in terms of 
the provisions of the grant. 

PENINSULA HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY SCHOLARSHIP — The Peninsula Horticultural Society 
provides annually a $200 scholarship to the most deserving junior or senior student, a resident 
of Maryland from the Eastern Shore counties, who is majoring in Horticulture or refated 
subjects, particularly as Lhey apply to the culture of fruits and vegetables. The award is made 
in cooperation with the Committee on Scholarships. 

THE SEARS ROEBUCK FOUNDATION GRANTS — Ten grants of $200 each are provided by the 
Sears Roebuck Foundation to the sons of Maryland farmers who enroll in the freshman class 
of the College of Agriculture. One $250 grant is awarded each year to the sophomore student 
in the College of Agriculture who has proved to be the outstanding student holding a Sears 
Roebuck grant during the previous year. These grants are awarded annually by the Committee 
on Scholarships. 

A limited number of similar grants from the Sears Roebuck Foundation is also available 
for students in the College of Home Economics. 

47 



SOUTHERN STATES COOPERATIVE SCHOLARSHIPS — Two Scholarships are awarded each year 
to sons of Southern States members — one for outstanding work in 4-H Club and the other 
for outstanding work in FFA. The amount of each scholarship is $300 per year and will 
continue for four years. These scholarships are awarded by the Committee on Scholarships 
and Grants-in-Aid in cooperation with the College of Agriculture. 

JANIE G. s. TALIAFERRO SCHOLARSHIP — Under the terms of the will of the late Janie G. S. 
Taliaferro a bequest has been made to the University of Maryland to provide scholarship aid 
to worthy students. The income of the estate amounting to $350 annually is used as a scholar- 
ship to a worthy young man or young woman who qualifies. The award is made by the Com- 
mittee on Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid in accordance with the general principles underlying 
the award of all other scholarships. 

UNION CARBIDE SCHOLARSHIP — A Scholarship covering tuition, fees and books for a four- 
year academic course to a student majoring in Engineering is sponsored by the Union Carbide 
Corporation. One scholarship is awarded to a freshman each year. The award is made by 
the Committee on Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid in cooperation with the College of Engi- 
neering. 

J. MCKENNY WILLIS AND SON GRANT — A grant of $500 is made available annually by 
J. McKenny Willis and Son, Inc., Grain, Feed and Seed Company of Easton, Maryland, to an 
outstanding student in vocational agriculture in Talbot County who will matriculate in the 
College of Agriculture. This grant is assigned by the Committee on Scholarships in accordance 
with the terms of the award. Application blanks for this grant may be procured at the office 
of the County Superintendent of Schools of Talbot County or by writing directly to the Chair- 
man of the Committee on Scholarships. 

vv^ASHiNGTON FLOUR SCHOLARSHIP — This Scholarship, provided by the Wilkins-Rogers Mill- 
ing Company of Washington, D. C, for freshmen in the College of Home Economics, covers 
all fees and books for one year, and is open to any student who is a resident of the District 
of Columbia, Prince Georges or Montgomery Counties in Maryland, and Arlington, Fairfax 
or Loudon Counties, or Alexandria in Virginia. It is awarded annually by the Committee on 
Scholarships in accordance with the general principles underlying the award of all other 
scholarships. 

WASHINGTON STEWARDS' EDUCATIONAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND This fuud provides grants tO 

be awarded to a junior or senior who is preparing for a career as a food manager or dietitian. 
These grants are awarded by the Committee on Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid in cooperation 
with the Department of Foods and Nutrition of the College of Home Economics. 

WESTERN ELECTRIC SCHOLARSHIP — This scholarship is awarded to a student in the College 
of Engineering. The amount of the scholarship covers cost of tuition, books and fees not to 
exceed $800 nor to be less than $400. The award is made by the Committee on Scholarships 
and Grants-in-Aid in cooperation with the College of Engineering. 

WESTINGHOUSE AIR ARM DIVISION SCHOLARSHIP — The Wcstinghousc Electric Corporation 
has established a scholarship to encourage outstanding students of engineering and the physical 
sciences. The scholarship is awarded to a sophomore student and is paid over a period of 
three years in six installments of $250. Students in electrical or mechanical engineering, engi- 
neering physics or applied mathematics are eligible for the award. Selection of the recipient 
is based on achievement as reflected by scholastic standing and general college record. The 
award is made by the Committee on Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid in cooperation with the 
College of Engineering. 

AMERICAN bankers' ASSOCIATION LOAN FUND — This fund providcs loans of $250 for one 
year only to senior or graduate students who are emphasizing Banking, Economics, or related 
subjects. 

CATHERINE MOORE BRiNKLEY LOAN FUND — Under the will of Catherine Moore Brinkley, 
a loan fund is available for worthy students who are natives and residents of Maryland, and 
who are studying Mechanical Engineering or Agriculture at the University. 

HOME ECONOMICS LOAN FUND — A loan fund, established by the District of Columbia 
Home Economics Association, is available for students majoring in Home Economics. 

HENRY STRONG EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION FUND — From this fuud, established under the 
will of General Henry Strong of Chicago, an annual allotment is made to the University of 
Maryland at College Park for scholarship loans to young men and women students under the 
age of twenty-five. Recommendations for these loans are limited, in most part, to students 
in the junior and senior years. Only students who through stress of circumstances require 
financial aid and who have demonstrated excellence in educational progress are considered 
in making nominations to the Secretary of this fund. 

48 



FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

An Adventure in Learning contains basic information for matriculation at 
the University of Maryland. Additional, detailed information is available in 
publications of the University and through written or oral consultation with 
administrative officers. 

PUBLICATIONS 

Normally, course catalogs for the individual colleges are not distributed by 
mail. Information relative to course descriptions and elective subjects is 
available in the office of the college dean supervising the student's major 
field. Students are urged to visit the office of their dean when such information 
is required. 

SPECIAL INFORMATION AND DIRECTION 

Admission, Housing director, office of admissions 

NORTH ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 

Scholarships and Grants-in-aid director, office of scholarships 

AND GRANTS-IN-AID 
SYMONS HALL 

Counseling office of the dean of men 

NORTH administration BUILDING 
OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF WOMEN 
NORTH ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 
UNIVERSITY COUNSELING SERVICE 
BUILDING EE 

Specific Program Information OFFICE OF the dean of the respective 

COLLEGES. 

to COMPLETE THE MAIL ADDRESS FOR 

THESE OFFICES, ADD! 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 









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ifirt*. 



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I^^^^^^^^^^^Ik) 


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UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE COLLEGE OF 

agriculture 

AT COLLEGE PARK 




^ 



The provisions of this 'publication are not to he regarded 
as an irrevocable contract between the student and the 
University of Maryland. The University reserves the 
right to change any provision or requirement at any time 
within the student's term of residence. The University 
further reserves the right at any time, to ask a student 
to withdraw when it considers such action to be in the 
best interests of the University. 



SEE OUTSIDE BACK COVER FOR LIST OF OTHER CATALOGS 



COLLEGE 

of 

AGRICULTURE 



Catalog Series 19584959 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



VOLUME 11 



JANUARY 8, 1958 



INO. 3 



A University of Maryland publication is published twelve times in January; three 
times in February; once in March and April; three times in May; twice in June; once 
in July and August; twice in September and October; three times in November; and 

once in December. 

Re-entered at the Post Office in College Park, Maryland, as second class mail matter 
under the Act of Congress of August 24, 1912. 



CONTENTS 



GENERAL 



Board of Regents 1 

Officers of Administration 2 

Committee Chairman, Faculty 

Senate 5 

Faculty 6 

The College 19 

General Information 19 

Special Advantages 20 

Coordination of Agricultural 

Work 20 

Facilities and Equipment 21 

Costs 21 

Military Instruction 22 

Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid 

For Agricultural Students . . 22 



Student Organizations 22 

Student Judging Teams 23 

Additional Information 23 

Awards 23 

Academic Information 24 

Departments and Curricula ... 24 

Admission 24 

Admission Requirements Table 26 

Junior Standing 27 

Requirements For Graduation . . 27 

Student Advisors 27 

Electives 27 

Farm and Laboratory Practice 27 

Freshman Year 28 



CURRICULA AND REQUIRED COURSES 



Agriculture Curriculum 29 

Agriculture— General 29 

Agricultural Chemistry 30 

Agricultural Economics and 

Marketing 31 

Agricultural Education and 

Rural Life 33 

Agricultural Engineerino 34 



Agronomy 39 

Animal Husbandry 41 

Botany 42 

Dairy 44 

Entomology 47 

Horticulture 48 

Poultry Husbandry 52 

Special Curricula 53 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



Agriculture 55 

Agricultural Economics 56 

Agricultural Education and 

Rural Life 60 

Agricultural Engineering 63 

Agronomy— Crops and Soils 64 



Animal Husbandry 68 

Botany 71 

Dairy 77 

Entomology 80 

Forestry 83 

Poultry Husbandry 87 

Veterinary Service 90 



Agricultural Experiment Station 92 

Agricultural Extension Service 93 

Service and Control Programs 94 



Photographs of several of the College's activities and a map of the campus 
is located in the center of the catalog. Use running headlines located at 
the top of each page as an additional aid in locating subject information. 



CALENDAR 

FALL SEMESTER 1958 
SEPTEMBER 1958 

15-19 Monday to Friday— Fall Semester Registration 

22 Monday— Instruction Begins 
NOVEMBER 

26 Wednesday— Thanksgiving Recess Begins After Last Class 
DECEMBER 

1 Monday— Thanksgiving Recess Ends 8 a.m. 

20 Saturday— Christmas Recess Begins After Last Class 

JANUARY 1959 

5 Monday— Christmas Recess Ends 8 a.m. 

21 Wednesday— Pre-Examination Study Day 

22-28 Thursday to Wednesday— First Semester Examinations 

SPRING SEMESTER 1959 
FEBRUARY 

2-6 Monday to Friday— Spring Semester Registration 

23 Monday— Washington's Birthday Holiday 
MARCH 

25 Wednesday— Maryland Day 

26 Thursday— Easter Recess Begins After Last Class 
31 Tuesday— Easter Recess Ends 8 a.m. 

MAY 

14 Thursday— Mihtary Day 

28 Thursday— Pre-Examination Study Day 

May y-/ Pj-jday to Friday— Second Semester Examinations 
June 53 

JUNE 

6 Saturday— Commencement Examinations 

SUMMER SESSION 1959 
JUNE 1959 

22 Monday— Summer Session Registration 

23 Tuesday— Summer Session Begins 
JULY 

31 Friday— Summer Session Ends 

SHORT COURSES 1959 
JUNE 1959 

15-20 Monday to Saturday— Rural Women's Short Course 
AUGUST 

3-8 Monday to Saturday-4-H Club Week 
SEPTEMBER 

8-11 Tuesday to Friday— Firemen's Short Course 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

and 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Term 
Expires 
Charles P. McCormick 

Chairman 1966 

McCormick and Company, 414 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Edward F. Holter 

V ice-Chairman 1959 

The National Grange, 744 Jackson Place, N.W., Washington 6 

B. Herbert Brown 

Secretary 1960 

The Baltimore Institute, 12 West Madison Street, Baltimore 1 

Harry H. Nuttle 

Treasurer 1966 

Denton 

Louis L. Kaplan 

Assistant Secretary 196 1 

1201 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 17 

Edmund S. Burke 

Assistant Treasurer 1959 

Kelly- Springfield Tire Company, Cumberland 

Thomas W. Pangborn 1965 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., HagerstowTi 

Enos S. Stockbridge 19bO 

10 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Thomas B. Symons 196'-i 

Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, Takoma Park 

C. Ewing Tuttle 1962 

907 Latrobe Building, Charles and Read Streets, Baltimore 2 



Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for terms of nine 
years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer of the 
Board. 

The State law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland 
shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

WILSON H. ELKiNS, President 

B.A., University of Texas, 1932; m.a., 1932; b.litt., Oxford University, 1936; 
D.PHIL., 1936. 

ALBiN o. KUHN, Assistant to the President 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; m.s., 1939; ph.d., 1948. 

ALViN E. CORMENY, Assistant to the President, in Charge of Endowment and 
Development 

B.A., Illinois College, 1933; ll.b., Cornell University, 1936. 

R. LEE HORNBAKE, Dean of the Faculty 

B.S., State Teachers College, California, Pa., 1934; m.a., Ohio State University, 1936; 
PH.D., 1942. 

Emeriti 

harry c. byrd. President Emeritus 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1908; ll.d., Washington College, 1936; ll.d., Dickin- 
son College, 1938; d.sc. Western Maryland College, 1938. 

HAROLD F. cotterman. Dean of the Faculty, Emeritus 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1916; m.a., Columbia University, 1917; ph.d., American 
University, 1930. 

Administrative Officers of the Schools and Colleges 

MYRON s. aisenberg. Dean of the School of Dentistry 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1922. 

VERNON E. ANDERSON, Dean of the College of Education 

E.S., University of Minnesota, 1930; m.a., 1936; ph.d.. University of Colorado, 1942. 

RONALD bamford. Dean of the Graduate School 

B.S., University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S., University of Vermont, 1926; ph.d., 
Columbia University, 1931. 

CLIFFORD G. BLiTCH, Director of the University Hospital 
M.D., Vanderbilt University Medical School, 1928. 

GORDON M. CAIRNS, Dean of Agriculture 

B.S., Cornell University, 1936; m.s., 1938; ph.d., 1940. 

RAY w. ehrensberger, Dean of the College of Special and Continuation Studies 
B.A., Wabash College, 1929; m.a., Butler University, 1930; ph.d., Syracuse Uni- 
versity, 1937. 

NOEL E. Foss, Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

ph.c. South Dakota State College, 1929; b.s., 1929; m.s.. University of Maryland, 
1932; PH.D., 1933. 

LESTER M. FRALEY, Dean of the College of Physical Education, Recreation, and 
Health 

B.A., Randolph-Macon College, 1928; m.a., 1937; ph.d., Peabody College, 1939. 



FLORENCE M. GiPE, Dean of the School of Nursing 

B.S., Catholic University of America, 1937; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1940; 
ED.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

iRViN c. HAUT, Director, Agricultural Experiment Station and Head, Department 
of Horticultiire 

n.s., University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 1930; ph.d.. 

University of Maryland, 1933. 

ROGER HOWELL, Dean of the School of Law 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1914; ph.d., 1917; ll.b.. University of Maryland, 

1917. 

wiLBERT J. HUFF, Director, Engineering Experiment Station and Chairman of 

the Division of Physical Scietices 

B.A., Ohio Northern University, 1911; b.a., Yale College, 1914; ph.d., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1917; D.sc. (hon.), Ohio Northern University, 1927. 

FLORANCE B. KING, Acting Dean of the College of Home Economics 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1914; m.a.. University of California, 1926; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Indiana, 1929. 

FREDERIC T. MAVIS, Dean of the College of Engineering 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1922; M.S., 1926; c.E., 1932; ph.d., 1935. 

PAUL E. NYSTROM, Director, Agricultural Eoctension Service 

B.S., University of California, 1928; m.s., University of Maryland, 1931; m.p.a.. 
Harvard University, 1948; d.p.a., 1951. 

J. freeman pyle. Dean of the College of Business and Public Administration 
PH.D., University of Chicago, 1917; m.a., 1918; ph.d., 1925. 

JAMES REGAN, JR., Acting Dean of the College of Military Science 
Colonel, United States Army, Retired. 

LEON P. SMITH, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

B.A., Emor}' University, 1919; m.a.. University of Chicago, 1928; ph.d., 1930; 
Diploma le I'lnstitut de Touraine, 1932. 

WILLIAM s. STONE, Dean of the School of Medicine and Director of Medical 
Education and Research 

B.S., University of Idaho, 1924; M.S., 1925; m.d.. University of Louis\alle, 1929; 

PH.D., (hon.), University of Louisville, 1946. 

General Administrative Officers 

G. WATSON ALGiRE, Director of Admissions and Registrations 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1930; M.S., 1931. 

NORMA J. AZLEiN, Registrar 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1940. 

HARRY A. BISHOP, Director of the Student Health Service 
M.D., University of Marj'land, 1912. 



DAVID L. BRiGHAM, Alumnt Secretary 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1938. 

c. WILBUR cissEL, Director of Finance and Business 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1932; m.a., 1934; c.p.a., 1939. 

WILLIAM w. COBEY, Director of Athletics 
A.B., University of Maryland, 1930. 

GEARY F. EPPLEY, Director of Student Welfare and Dean of Men 
B.S., Maryland State College, 1920; m.s., University of Maryland, 1926. 

GEORGE w. FOGG, Director of Personnel 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1926; m.a., 1928. 

ROBERT E. KENDiG, Professor of Air Science and Commandant of Cadets, Air 
Force R.O.T.C. 

A.B., William and Mary College, 1939. 

ROBERT J. MCCARTNEY, Director of University Relations 
B.A., University of Massachusetts, 1941. 

GEORGE w. MORRISON, Associate Director and Supervising Engineer Physical 
Plant QBaltimore^ 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1927; E.E., 1931. 

HOWARD ROVELSTAD, Director of Libraries 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1936; m.a., 1937; b.s.l.s., Columbia University, 1940. 

ADELE H. STAMP, Dean of Women 

B.A., Tulane University, 1921; m.a. University of Maryland, 1924. 

GEORGE o. WEBER, Director and Supervising Engineer, Department of Physical 
Plant 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1933. 

Divison Chairmen 

JOHN E. FABER, JR., Chairman of the Division of Biological Sciences 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1926; m.s., 1927; ph.d., 1937. 

HAROLD c. HOFSOMMER, Chairman of the Division of Social Sciences 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1921; m.a., 1923; ph.d., Cornell University, 1929 

wiLBERT J. HUFF, Chairman of the Division of Physical Sciences 

B.A., Ohio Northern University, 1911; b.a., Yale College, 1914; ph.d., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1917; D.sc, (hon.), Ohio Northern University, 1927. 

CHARLES E. WHITE, Chairman of the Lower Division 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1923; M.S., 1924; ph.d., 1926. 

ADOLF E. ZUCKER, Chairman of the Division of Hum.anities 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1912; m.a., 1913; ph.d.. University of Pennsylvania, 1917, 



M 4 



CHAIRMEN, STANDING COMMITTEES, FACULTY SENATE* 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

Prof. Russell B. Allen (Engineering), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS 

Dr. Charles Manning (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

Dr. R. Lee Hornbake (Dean of Faculty), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

Dr. Charles White (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS, CURRICULA AND COURSES 

Dr. Peter Lejins (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS-IN-AID 

Dr. Paul R. PoflFenberger (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RESEARCH 

Dr. John S. Toll (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 

Dr. Leon P. Smith (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARIES 

Dr. Lucius Garvin (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Dr. Charles D. Murphy (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 

Prof. Russell B. Allen (Engineering), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 

Dr. John H. Frederick (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

Prof. Warren L. Strausbaugh (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Dr. Stanley Jackson (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Dr. William E. Bickley (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT EMPLOYMENT AND SELF-HELP 

Dr. John E. Foster (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION 

Dr. IrA'in C. Haut (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, ACADEMIC FREEDOM .\ND TENURE 

Dr. Carroll E. Cox (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS AND SALARIES 

Dr. Monroe H. Martin (Institute of Fluid Dynamics), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 

Prof. Homer Ulrich (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 

Prof. Russell R. Reno (Law), Chairman 
'Effective October 29, 1957. 



FACULTY 

1958-1959 

COLLEGE OF 
AGRICULTURE 



Administrative Officers 

GORDON M. CAIRNS, Dean of Agriculture and Professor of Dairy Husbandry 
B.S., Cornell University, 1936; m.s., 1938; ph.d., 1940. 

PAUL R. POFFENBERGER, Assistant Dean-Instruction, and Professor of Agricultural 
Economics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1935; m.s., 1937; ph.d., American University, 1953. 

IRVIN c. HAUT, Director of Experiment Station and Professor and Head of Horti- 
culture 

B.S., University of Idaho, 1928; m.s., State College of Washington, 1930; ph.d.. 

University of Maryland, 1933. 

PAUL E. NYSTROM, Director of Extension and Professor of Agricultural Economics 
B.S., University of California, 1928; M.S., University of Maryland, 1931; m.p.a., 
1948 and d.p.a., 1951, Harvard University. 

Professors 

ARTHUR M. AHALT, Professor and Head, Agricultural Education 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1931; m.s., Pennsylvania State University, 1937. 

WENDELL s. ARBUCKLE, Profcssor of Dairy Manufacturing 

B.S., Purdue University, 1933; University of Missouri, 1937; ph.d., 1940. 

RONALD BAMFORD, Profcssor and Head of Botany 

B.S., University of Connecticut, 1924; m.s.. University of Vermont, 1926; ph.d., 
Columbia University, 1931. 

GEORGE M. REAL, Profcssor of Agricultural Economics and Marketing 

B.S., Utah State College, 1934; m.s.. University of Wisconsin, 1938; ph.d., 1942. 

WILLIAM E. BiCKLEY, Profcssor and Head of Entomology 

B.S., University of Tennessee, 1934; m.s., 1936; ph.d.. University of Maryland, 
1940. 

ARTHUR L. BRUECKNER, Professor and Head of Veterinary Science 

B.S., University of Kentucky, 1914; v.m.d.. University of Pennsylvania, 1924. 



FRED L. BULL, Extension Professor, Soil Conservation 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1925. 

GEORGE J. BURKHARDT, Profcssor of Agricultural Engineering 
B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1933; b.s.ri.e., 1934; M.S., 1935. 

RAY w. CARPENTER, Professor of Agricultural Engineering 

A.B., University of Nebraska, 1920; ll.b., Georgetov\'n University, 1926. 

GERALD F. COMBS, Professor of Poultry Husbandry 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1940 ph.d., Cornell University, 1948. 

CARROLL E. COX, Profcssor of Plant Pathology 

A.B., University of Delaware, 1938; m.s., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1940; ph.d.. 
University of Maryland, 1943. 

HAROLD M. DEVOLT, Professor of Poultry Pathology 
M.S., Cornell University, 1926; d.v.m., 1923. 

LEWIS p. DiTMAN, Research Professor of Entomology 

B.S., University of Mar)'land, 1926; m.s., 1929; ph.d., 1931. 

DOROTHY EMERSON, Extension Professor, Associate State 4-H Chih Agent 

JOHN E. FOSTER, Profcssor and Head of Animal Husbandry 

B.S., North Carolina State College, 1926; m.s., Kansas State College, 1927; ph.d., 
Cornell University, 1937. 

HUGH G. GAUCH, Profcssor of Plant Physiology 

B.S., Miami University, 1935; M.S., Kansas State College, 1937; ph.d.. University 
of Chicago, 1939. 

wiLLARD w. GREEN, Professor of Animal Husbandry 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1933; M.S., 1934; ph.d., 1939. 

POUL A. HANSEN, Professor of Veterinary Bacteriology 

B. ofpH., Copenhagen University 1922; m.s.. Royal Technical College, Copen- 
hagen, 1926; PH.D., Cornell University, 1931. 

RUSSELL c. HAWES, Profcssor of Marketing 

B.S., Rhode Island State College, 1921; M.S., University of Rhode Island, 1942. 

MARY JUHN, Research Professor, Poultry Physiology 
B.S., Zurich, 1916; ph.d.. University of Zurich, 1923. 

ALBERT V. KREWATCH, Extension Professor and Acting Head Agricultural Engi- 
neering 

B.S., University of Delaware, 1925; M.S., 1929. 

AMiHUD KRAMER, Professor of Horticidture 

B.S., University of Mar)'land, 1938; m.s., 1939; ph.d., 1942. 

ALBiN o. KUHN, Professor of Agronomy and Assistant to the President 
B.S., University of Mar)'land, 1938; M.S., 1939; ph.d., 1948. 



GEORGE s. LANGFORD, ProfcssoT of Entomology and State Entomologist 

B.S., Clemson College, 1921; M.S., University of Maryland 1924; ph.d., Ohio State 
University, 1929. 

copmAD B. LINK, ProfessoT of Floriculture 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1933; m.s., 1934; ph.d., 1940. 

MARGARET T, LOAR, Extension Professor, Assistant Home Demxjnstration Agent 
Leader 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1941. 

JOHN w. MAGRUDER, Extension Professor and County Agent Leader. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1925; m.s., CJomell University, 1941. 

MARGARET OLIVER, Extension Professor and Home Demonstration Agent Leader 
B.S., Huntington College, 1932; m.a., Columbia University, 1954. 

LEO J. POELMA, Profcssor of Animal Pathology 

M.S., University of Maryland, 1928; d.v.m., Kansas City Veterinary College, 1916. 

REGINALD L. REAGAN, Professor of Veterinary Virology 
Major, U. S. Army, Retired. 

RUSSELL G. ROTHGEB, Research Professor in Agronomy 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1924; m.s., Iowa State College, 1925; ph.d.. Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1928. 

EVELYN D. SCOTT, Extension Professor, Assistant Home Demonstration Agent 
Leader 

B.S., South Dakota State, 1932. 

LELAND E. SCOTT, Professor of Horticultural Physiology 

B.S., University of Kentucky, 1927; M.S., Michigan State College, 1929; ph.d.. Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1943. 

CLYNE s. SHAFFNER, ProfcssoT and Head of Poultry Husbandry 

B.S., Michigan State College, 1938; m.s., 1940; ph.d., Purdue Lfniversity, 1947. 

JAMES B. SHANKS, ProfcssoT of Vloriculture 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1939; m.s., 1946; ph.d., 1949. 

JOSEPH c. SHAw^, Professor of Dairy Husbandry 

B.S., Iowa State College, 1930; m.s.. University of Montana, 1932; ph.d.. Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1938. 

MARY s. SHORE, Research Professor, Nutrition 

B.S., College of Idaho, 1928; sc.d., Johns Hopkins University, 1933. 

FRANCIS c. STARK, Professor of Vegetable Crops 

B.S., Oklahoma A. & M., 1940; M.S., University of Maryland, 1941; ph.d., 1948. 

ORMAN E. STREET, Professor of AgTonomy 

B.S., South Dakota State College, 1924; m.s., Michigan State College, 1926; ph.d., 
1933. 



CLIFFORD c. TAYLOR, Visiting ProfessoT of Agrictdtural Economics and Marketing 
B.S., Colorado State College, 1917; M.S., Iowa State College, 1923; m.a.. Harvard 
University, 1926; ph.d., 1930. 

ARTHUR H. THOMPSON, ProfessoT of Pomology 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1941; ph.d.. University of Maryland, 1945. 

ALBERT F. viERHELLER, Extension Professor of Horticulture 

B.S., West Virginia University, 1918; M.S., University of Maryland, 1923. 

ROBERT E. WAGNER, Professor and Head of Agronomy 

B.S., Kansas State College, 1942; m.s., University of Wisconsin, 1943; ph.d., 1950. 

WILLIAM p. WALKER, Profcssor of Agricultural Economics and Marketing 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1921; m.s., 1924. 

KENNETH F. WARNER, ProfessoT of Extension Studies and Training 

B.S., University of Nebraska, 1912; m.s.. University of Minnesota, 1915; d.agr.. 
University of Nebraska, 1954. 

LESLIE o. WEAVER, Extension Professor of Plant Pathology 

B.S.A., Ontario Agricultural College, 1934; ph.d., Cornell University, 1943. 

w. SHERARD WILSON, Extension Professor and State 4-H Cluh Agent 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1932. 



Associate Professors 

JOHN H. AXLEY, Associate Professor of Soils 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1937; ph.d., 1945. 

FRANK L. BENTZ, JR., Associate Professor of Soils 
B.S., University of Marj'land, 1942; ph.d., 1952. 

THEODORE L. BissELL, Extension Associate Professor of Entomology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1920; M.S., Cornell University, 1936. 

GERARD A. BouRBEAu, Associate Professor of Soils 

B.A., St. Francis Xaxier College, 1933; b.s., Laval Quebec University, 1934; m.s.. 
University of Wisconsin, 1946; ph.d., 1948. 

RUSSELL G. BROWN, Associate Professor of Botany 

B.S., West Virginia University, 1929; m.s., 1930; ph.d.. University of Mar)land, 
1934. 

ROBERT J. BYRNE, Associate Professor of Veterinary Science 
D.V.M., Cornell University, 1944. 

CORNELIA M. COTTON, Research Associate, Veterinary Science 

A.B., Cornell University, 1921; M.S., Syracuse University, 1926; ph.d., University 
of Maryland, 1943. 



RICHARD F. DAVIS, Associate Professor and Head of Dairy 

B.S., University of New Hampshire, 1950; M.S., Cornell University, 1952; PH.D., 
1953. 

HARRY w. DENGLER, Extension Associate Professor, Forestry 
B.S., Syracuse University, 1935. 

RAYMOND N. DOETSCH, Associate Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1942; M.S., University of Indiana, 1944; ph.d.. University 
of Maryland, 1948. 

JAMES RILEY FERGUSON, Extension Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry 
B.S., Colorado A. & M., 1941; M.S., Cornell University, 1951 ph.d., 1953. 

GUY w. GiENGER, Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1933; M.S., 1936. 

CASTILLO GRAHAM, Associate Professor of Entomology 

B.S., Mississippi A. & M. College, 1927; m.s.. University of Maryland, 1930; ph.d., 
1932. 

ARTHUR B. HAMILTON, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics and Market- 
ing 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1929; m.s., 1931. 

BASIL c. HATZiOLOS, Associate Professor of Pathology 

D.V.M., Veterinary School of Alfort, France, 1929; Dr. Vet. in An. Hus.— Veterin- 
ary School of Berlin, Germany, 1932. 

ROBERT B. JOHNSON, Associate Professor of Veterinary Physiology 
A.B., University of South Dakota, 1939. 

MARK KEENEY, Associate Professor of Dairy Manufacturing 

B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1942; m.s., Ohio State University, 1948; ph.d., 
Pennsylvania State College, 1950. 

ROBERT w. KRAuss, Associate Professor of Plant Physiology 

A.B., Oberlin College, 1947; m.s.. University of Hawaii, 1949; ph.d., University 
of Maryland, 1951. 

ROBERT c. LEFFEL, Associate Professor of Agronomy 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1948; m.s., Iowa State College, 1950; ph.d., 1952. 

WILLIAM A. MATTHEWS, Associate Professor in Vegetable Crops 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1928; m.s.. University of Maryland, 1930. ' 

JOSEPH F. MATTiCK, Associate Professor of Dairy Manufacturing 
B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1942; ph.d., 1950. 

HAROLD s. MccoNNELL, Research Associate Professor of Entomology 

B.S., Clemson Agricultural College, 1916; m.s.. University of Maryland, 1931. 

VIRGINIA MCLUCKiE, Extension Associate Professor and Hom.e Economist 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1941; M.S., 1953. 



10 



CHARLES P. MERRICK, Extension Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1933. 

AMOS R. MEYER, Extension Associate Professor of Marketing 
B.S., Ohio State University, 1940. 

JEANNE s. MOEHN, (mrs.), Extension Associate Professor and Family Life Spe- 
cialist 

B.S., Iowa State College, 1940. 

DELBERT T. MORGAN, Associate Professor of Botany 

B.S., Kent State University, 1940; m.a., Columbia University, 1942; ph.d., 1948. 

JOHN L. MORRIS, Extension Associate Professor of Dairy Husbandry 
B.S., Iowa State College, 1943. 

RAY A. MURRAY, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics and Marketing 
B.S., University of Nebraska, 1934; m.a., Cornell University, 1938; ph.d., 1949. 

GILBERT J. PLUMER, Associate Professor of Veterinary Science 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1949; d.v.m., New York State Veterinar)' College, 
Cornell University, 1953. 

GEORGE D. QuiGLEY, Associate Profcssor of Poidtry Husbandry 
B.S., Michigan State College, 1925. 

ROBERT D. RAPPLEYE, Associate Professor of Botany 

B.S., University of Marj'land, 1941; m.s., 1947; ph.d., 1949. 

CHARLES w. REYNOLDS, Associate Professor of Vegetable Crops 

B.A., University of Alabama, 1941; b.s., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1947; M.S., 
1949; PH.D., University of Maryland, 1954. 

WADE H. RICE, Extension Associate Professor of Poidtry Husbatidry 
B.S., North Carolina State College, 1921. 

VINCENT SCHULTZ, Associate Professor— Agricidtiiral Biometrician 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1946; m.s., 1948; ph.d., 1949; M.S., Statistics, Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute, 1954. 

MARK M. SHOEMAKER, Associate Professor of Landscape Gardening 
B.A., University of Michigan, 1921; m.l.d., 1922. 

STANLEY c. SKULL, Associate Professor of Agrictdtural Economics and Marketifig 
B.A., Bridgewater College, 1941; m.a.. University of Virginia, 1941; ph.d., Cornell 
University, 1951. 

HAROLD D. SMITH, Associate Professor of Agrictiltural Economics and Marketing 
B.A., Bridgewater College, 1943; m.s.. University of Maryland, 1947; ph.d.. Ameri- 
can University, 1952. 

JAMES R. SPERRY, Associate Professor of Veterinary Science 
D.V.M., Ohio State University, 1915. 

EDWARD STRiCKLiNG, Associate Profcssor of Soils 
B.S., Ohio State University, 1937; ph.d., 1949. 

11 ► 



WILLIAM c. SUPPLEE, Research Associate in Poultry Husbandry 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1926; m.s., 1927; ph.d., 1931. 

M. GIST WELLING, Extension Associate Professor and Assistant County Agent 
Leader 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; m.s., Con>^ll University, 1957. 

DONALD F. wETHERELL, Research Associate in Plant Physiology 

B.A., University of Connecticut, 1951; m.s.. University of Maryland, 1953; ph.d., 
1956. 

BOYD T. WHITTLE, Extension Associate Professor, Animal Husbandry 
B.S., Idaho University, 1947; M.S., Illinois University, 1948. 

Assistant Professors 

GEORGE J. ABRAMS, Assistant Professor of Apiculture 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1927; m.s., 1929. 

DONALD M. BRiTTON, Assistant Professor of Pomology 

B.A., University of Toronto, 1946; ph.d.. University of Virginia, 1950. 

ROBERT L. BRUCE, Extension Assistant Professor and Assistant County Agent 
Leader 

B.S., University of Nebraska, 1949; m.s., Cornell University, 1952. 

JOHN BURic, Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry 

B.S., West Virginia University, 1948; m.s.. University of Maryland, 1952. 

SING c. CHANG, Assistant Professor in Veterinary Virology 

B.S., University of Nanking, China, 1929; ph.d., Rutgers University, 1939. 

JANET L. COBLENTZ, Extension Assistant Professor and Foods and Nutrition 
Specialist 

B.S., Hood College, 1941; m.s.. University of Wisconsin, 1957. 

CHARLOTTE A. CONAWAY, Extension Assistant Professor and Assistant State 4-H 
Cluh Agent 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1947; m.s.. University of Wisconsin, 1957. 

JOHN L. CROTHERS, JR., Extension Assistant Professor, Department of Markets 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1949; m.s., 1954. 

VIVIAN L. CURNUTT, Extension Assistant Professor and Home Furnishings Spe- 
cialist 

B.S., Oklahoma A & M., 1932; m.a., Columbia University, 1933. 

EDGAR A. DAY, Assistant Professor of Dairy Manufacturing 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1953; m.s., Pennsylvania State University, 1955; 
PH.D., 1957. 

A. MORRIS DECKER, JR., Assistant Professor of Crops 

B.S., Colorado A. & M., 1949; m.s., Utah State College, 1950; ph.d.. University 
of Maryland, 1953. 

M 12 



DONALD w. DICKSON, Assistant Professor and Publications Editor 
B.S., Baldwin Wallace College, 1947. 

ANDREW A. DUNCAN, Extension Assistant Professor of Horticidtiire 
B.S., University of Mar>'land, 1950; M.S., 1952; ph.d., 1956. 

CHARLES P. ELLINGTON, Extension Assistant Professor of Agronomy 
B.S., University of Georgia, 1950; M.S., University of Maryland, 1952. 

LEE J. ENRiGHT, Assistant Professor of Ornamental Horticulture 
B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1949; m.f., 1950; ph.d., 1952. 

KENNETH E. FELTON, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; b.s.c.e., 1951. 

FLOYD p. HARRISON, Assistant Professor of Entomology 

B.S., Louisiana State University, 1951; m.s., 1953; ph.d.. University of Maryland, 
1955. 

ELIZABETH E. HAViLAND, Assistant Professor of Entomology 

A.B., Wilmington (Ohio) College, 1923; m.a., Cornell University, 1926; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1936; ph.d., 1945. 

NORMAN V. HELBACKA, Assistant Professor, Poidtr)' Marketing 
B.S., University of Minnesota, 1952; M.S., 1954; ph.d., 1956. 

ROGER w. HEMKEN, Assistant Professor of Dairy Husbandry 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1950; M.S., University of Illinois, 1954; ph.d., Cornell 
University, 1957. 

LAVONiA HiLBERT, Extension Assistant Professor and Clothing Specialist 
B.S., West Virginia University, 1937; m.a., Columbia University, 1946. 

HAROLD H. HOECKER, Extension Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics 
and Marketing 

B.S., Iowa State College, 1941. 

WILLIAM L. HOLLis, Research Assistant Professor in Vegetable Crops 

B.S., University of Delaware, 1952; M.S., 1954; ph.d.. University of Marj'land, 
1957. 

H. PALMER HOPKINS, Assistant Professor of Agricidtiiral Education 
B.S., Oklahoma A. & M., 1936; m.ed.. University of Mar)'land, 1948. 

JOHN H. HOYERT, Extension Assistant Professor of Agronomy 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; m.s., 1949; ph.d., 1951. 

SIDNEY ISHEE, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics and Marketifig 
B.S., Mississippi State College, 1950; m.s., Pennsylvania State University 1952; 
PH.D., 1957. 



13 ► 



WILLIAM R. JENKINS, Assistant Professor in Plant Pathology 

B.S., William and Mary College, 1950; m.s.. University of Virginia, 1952; ph.d.. 
University of Maryland, 1954. 

CARL N. JOHNSON, Extension Assistant Professor in Landscape Gardening 
B.S., Michigan State College, 1947. 

WARREN T. JOHNSON, Assistant Professor of Entomology 

B.S., Morris Harvey College (W. Va.), 1947; m.s., Ohio State University, 1951; 
PH.D., University of Maryland, 1956. 

JAMES G. KANTZES, Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; m.s., 1954; ph.d., 1957. 

EMORY c. LEFFEL, Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; m.s., 1947; ph.d., 1953. 

FLOYD V. MATTHEWS, JR., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1950; m.s., Oklahoma A. & M., 1951. 

OMAR D. MORGAN, JR., Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology 

B.ED., Illinois State Normal University, 1940; ph.d., University of Illinois, 1950. 

JOSEPH L. NEWCOMER, Assistant Professor— Seed Programs 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; m.s., 1955. 

JAMES L. NICHOLSON, Extension Assistant Professor, Poultry Husbandry 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1951. 

JOANNE w. REiTZ, Extension Assistant Professor and Home Management Spe- 
cialist 

B.S., Indiana State Teachers College, 1946; m.s., Pennsylvania State University, 

1952. 

ANNIE N. ROGERS, Extension Assistant Professor, Program Planning Specialist 
B.A., Columbia College, 1938; m.ed.. University of Maryland, 1955. 

BENJAMIN L. ROGERS, Extension Assistant Professor of Pomology 

B.S., Clemson College, 1943; m.s.. University of Minnesota, 1947; ph.d.. University 
of Maryland, 1950. 

WAYNE c. ROHRER, Assistant Professor of Rural Sociology 

B.S., Texas A. & M., 194d; m.s., 1948; ph.d., Michigan State University, 1955. 

PAUL w. SANTELMANN, Assistant Professor in Crops 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; M.S., Michigan State College, 1952; ph.d., 
Ohio State University, 1954. 

JOHN R. SCHABINGER, Extension Assistant Professor of Dairy Husbandry 
B.S., University of Delaware, 1943; m.s., Pennsylvania State College, 1947. 

HUGH D. siSLER, Assistant Professor in Plant Pathology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1949, m.s., 1951, ph.d., 1953. 



-a 14 



noBERT J. SNYDER, Assistaut Professor, Vegetable Crops 

B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1949; m.s., 1951; pii.n., Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity, 1955. 

PAR WIN D. SOLOMON, Extension Assistant Professor in Rural Sociology 

B.S., University of Wyoming, 1943; M.S., Cbmell University, 1951; ph.d., 1957. 

GEORGE A. STEVENS, Extension Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics 

and Marketing 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1941; m.s., 1949; ph.d., University of Mary- 
land, 1957. 

FRANK H. WILCOX, Assistant Professor of Poultry Husbandry 

B.S., University of Connecticut, 1951; m.s., Cornell University, 1953; ph.d., 1955. 

ROBERT c. WILEY, Assistant Professor of Horticidture Processing 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1949; m.s., 1950; ph.d., Oregon State College, 1953. 

JACK B. WILSON, Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology 

B.S., West Virginia University, 1953; m.s., 1954; ph.d., 1957. 

FR.\NCiS c. wiNGERT, Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1947; ph.d.. University of Minnesota, 1955. 

PAUL N. WTNN, Research Assistant Professor of Agricidtiiral Engineering 
B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1947. 

JOHN w. WYSONG, Assistant Professor of Agricidtural Economics and Marketing 
B.S., Cornell University, 1953; m.s.. University of Illinois, 1954; ph.d., Cornell 
University, 1957. 

SANFORD E. YOUNTS, Assistant Professor of Soils 

B.S., North Carolina State College, 1952; m.s., 1954; ph.d., Cornell University, 
1957. 



Instructors 

CLEMENTINE B. ANSLiNGER, Extension Instructor in Marketing 
B.A., College of St. Rose, 1936. 

ROBERT D. APPLEMAN, Extension Instrjictor in Dairy Husbandry 
B.S., Oklahoma A. & M., 1954; m.s., 1955. 

ROBERT J. BEiTER, Instructor in Agricidtural Economics and Marketing 
B.S., University of Man,land, 1952; m.s., 1957. 

MELViN c. BRENNAN, Instructor, VistMl Aids 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1952. 

SANFORD FARWELL, Extension Instructor and Exhibits Specialist 
B.A., Rhode Island School of Design, 1954. 



15 



ANDREW J. FEENEY, Extension Instructor and Information Specialist 
B.S., South Dakota State College, 1950. 

LESTER F. GEORGE, Instructor of Agricultural Engineering 
B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1951. 

WALLACE c. HARDING, JR., Extension Instructor in Entomology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; m.s., 1956. 

GROVER HARRIS, Extension Instructor Poultry Husbandry 
B.S., West Virginia, 1952; m.s., 1956. 

MABEL G. HOWELL, Extension Instructor, Marketing 
B.S., Middle Tennessee State College, 1933. 

DONALD s. HUDSON, Extension Instructor in Agricultural Economics and Market- 
ing 

B.S., Cornell University, 1949. 

WILLIAM G. LANGSTON, Instructor in Agricultural Economics and Marketing 
B.S., V. P. I., 1950; M.S., 1954. 

JOHN A. MEADE, Instructor in Agronomy 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1953; m.s., 1955. 

MARjoRiE A. MOE, Extension Instructor and Information Specialist 
B.S., South Dakota State College, 1953. 

GRAY N. NucKOLS, JR., Instructor in Agricultural Economics and Marketing 
B.S., V. P. I., 1953. 

p.OBERT A. PATERSON, Instructor in Botany 

B.A., University of Nevada, 1949; m.a., Stanford University, 1951; ph.d.. University 
of Michigan, 1957. 

JUDITH A. PHEiL (mrs.), Extension Instructor in Food and Nutrition 
B.S., Hood College, 1931. 

BURNELL K. REBERT, Extension Instructor, Marketing 
B.S., Elizabethtown College, 1947. 

RICHARD G. SAACKE, Instructor in Dairy Husbandry 

B.S., Rutgers University, 1953; m.s., Pennsylvania State University, 1955. 

HERMAN s. TODD, Instru^itor in Horticulture . 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1937. 

BERNARD A. TwiGG, Extension Instructor, Processing 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; m.s., 1955. 

JOSEPH T. WHiTLAw, JR., Instructor in Entomology 

B.S., Clemson College, 1955; m.s.. University of Maryland, 1956. 

M 16 



Research Fellow 

CONSTANTINE A. SOROKIN, Research fellow, Plant Physiology 

Diploma in Agronomy, Donn Agricultural Institute; m.a., Russian Academy of Ag- 
ricultural Science, 1936; ph.d.. University of Texas, 1955. 

Lecturers 

JACK COLVARD JONES, Lecturer in Entomology 

B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1942; ph.d., Iowa State College, 1950. 

REESE I. SAILER, Lcctiircr in Entomology 
A.B., University of Kansas, 1938; ph.d., 1942. 

HAROLD H. SHEPARD, Lcctttrer in Entomology 

B.S., Massachusetts State College, 1924; m.s., University of Maryland, 1927; ph.d., 
Massachusetts State College, 1931. 

Emeriti 

CHARLES o. APPLEMAN, Professor of Plant Physiology, Emeritus 
PH.D., University of Chicago, 1910. 

ERNEST N. CORY, Profcssor of Entomology, Emeritus. 

B.S., Maryland Agricultural College, 1909; M.S., 1913; ph.d., American University, 
1926. 

HAROLD F. coTTERMAN, Professor of Agricultural Education, Emeritus 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1916; m.a., Columbia University, 1917; ph.d., Ameri- 
can University, 1930. 

SAMUEL H. DEVAULT, Professor of Agricultural Economics and Marketing, 
Eyneritus 

A.B., Carson-Nev^Tnan College, 1912; a.m.. University of North Carolina, 1915; 

PH.D., Massachusetts State College, 1931. 

MORLEY A. JULL, Professor of Poultry Husbandry, Emeritus 

B.S.A., University of Toronto, 1908; M.S., McGill University, 1914; ph.d., University 
of Wisconsin, 1921. 

VENLA M. KELLAR, Assistant Director of Extension, Emeritus 
B.S., \\'esleyan University (Nebr.), 1903. 

WILLIAM B. KEMP, Director of Experiment Statioti, Emeritus 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1912; ph.d., American University, 1928. 

JOHN B. s. NORTON, Professor of Botany, Emeritus 

B.S., Kansas State College, 1896; m.s., 1900; sc.d., (hon.). University of .Maryland. 

THOMAS B. symons, Dea7i of Agricidture, Emeritus 

B.S., Maryland Agricultural OiJlcge, 1902; m.s., Man>'Iand State College. 1905; D. 
Agr., University of Mar)land, 1918. 

17 ► 



'^'Su'pervising Teachers in Agriculture 

AHALT, LOUIS F., B.S., 1940, M.S., 1952, University of Maryland 
Middletown High School, Middletown, Maryland. 

BIGGS, w. HARLAN, B.S., 1933, University of Maryland 
South Hagerstown High School, Hagerstown, Maryland. 

CARLTON, JEAN F., B.S., 1948, M.S., 1952, University of Maryland 
Southern High School, Lothian, Maryland. 

LEWIS, GLENN w., B.S., 1938, M.S., 1953, University of Maryland 
Easton High School, Easton, Maryland. 

MCDONALD, LEiB, B.S., 1943, M.ED., 1951, University of Maryland 
Hereford High School, Parkton, Maryland. 

SCOTT, JOSEPH K., B.A., 1935, Bridgewater College; M.S., 1940, Virginia Poly- 
technic Institute 

Williamsport High School, Williamsport, Maryland. 

SMITH, WARREN c, B.S., 1943, M.S., 1952, University of Maryland 
Frederick High School, Frederick, Maryland. 

WATKINS, DONALD E., B.S., 1923, University of Maryland; M.S., 1924, Cornell 
University 

Gaithersburg High School, Gaithersburg, Maryland. 



* Teachers of Vocational Agriculture who supervise student teachers during the prac- 
tice teaching period in cooperation with the Department of Agricultural Education. 

< 18 



THE COLLEGE 

THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE ofFcrs both general and specialized train- 
ing for students who wish to prepare for professional work in agriculture. 
Students receive a basic fundamental and cultural education, correlated with 
technical agricultural courses and the related sciences. The college aims to 
train students in a way that enables them to take responsible positions in 
agricultural and allied industries. Students come from both rural and urban 



HISTORY 

The College of Agriculture is the oldest division of the University of 
Maryland at College Park. The institution was chartered in 1856 under the 
name of the Maryland Agricultural College. For three years the College was 
under private management. When Congress passed the Land Grant Act 
in 1862, the General Assembly of Maryland accepted it for the State and 
named the Maryland Agricultural College as the beneficiary. When the 
institution was merged in 1920 with the University of Maryland in Baltimore, 
the College of Agriculture took its place as one of the major divisions of 
this larger, more comprehensive organization. 

In addition to teaching, the College of Agriculture includes the Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station and the Extension Service. They were estab- 
lished as the result of acts passed by Congress in 1887 and 1914 respectively. 
A more complete description of these two services appears later in this bulletin. 

General Information 

Curricula in the College of Agriculture provide for broad training in 
cultural and scientific courses as well as in courses related to various areas 
of agricultural specialization. Programs are offered for those planning to pursue 
general farming, livestock production, dairying, poultry husbandry, fruit or 
vegetable growing, floriculture or ornamental horticulture, field crop produc- 
tion, or scientific activities related to agriculture, i.e., agricultural education, 
engineering, economics and chemistry. In addition, students are trained in 
the various areas of food processing, for employment in agricultural busmess 
and industry or with a local, state or federal agency. 

Many teachers also conduct research studies in their respective fields. 
Through these studies the frontiers of knowledge are constantly being ex- 
tended. These new findings are incorporated in courses ihcrcb)' making the 
instruction in agriculture dynamic. 

The close relationship of extension specialists, county agents, and home 
demonstration agents with farmers and farm families enables workers in the 
College to evaluate the farm situation. New farm problems are brought to 
the attention of the research worker and new de\clopments are presented to 
farmers and their families through practical demonstrations. 

19 ► 



General Information 

The coordination of teaching, research and extension provides for the 
effective training of students in the College of Agriculture for a career in 
agriculture. Many teachers also contribute to the research and extension pro- 
grams concerned with agriculture and food production, the development of 
new varieties and processing procedures, as well as adjustments in agricultural 
production and marketing. 

Trained workers in the College of Agriculture, through regulatory and 
service activities, are constantly working with actual problems associated with 
the improvement and maintenance of standards for farm products. Regulatory 
and control work extends over a wide range of activities and is concerned 
with reducing losses due to insect pests and diseases; preventing and controlling 
serious outbreaks of diseases and pests of animals and plants; analyzing fertilizer, 
feed and lime for guaranteed quality; and analyzing and testing germination 
quality of seeds to insure better seeds for farm planting. Marketing services 
include federal-state inspection, fresh egg law, dairy inspection, seed inspection, 
weight and measures and market news service. 

SPECIAL ADVANTAGES 

The University of Maryland is within a few miles of the Agricultural 
Research Center of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. This is the largest, 
best manned, and best equipped agriculture research agency in the world. 
Also, the University of Maryland, is within a few miles of the Washington 
D. C, offices of the U. S. Department of Agriculture and other government 
departments, including the Library of Congress. Students can easily visit 
these agencies and become acquainted with their work and the men who 
conduct this work. Such contacts have proved valuable to many University 
of Maryland graduates. 

Also, it is not uncommon for men from these agencies to speak before 
classes at the University and to be guest speakers at student club meetings and 
otherwise take part in student activities. No other college of agriculture in 
the United States is physically located to offer like opportunities to its students. 

COORDINATION OF AGRICULTURAL WORK 

The strength of the College of Agriculture of the University of Maryland 
lies in the close coordination of the instructional, research, extension, and regu- 
latory functions within the individual departments, between the several de- 
partments, and in the institution as a whole. Instructors in the several de- 
partments are closely associated with the research, extension and regulatory 
work being carried on in their respective fields, and in many cases, devote a 
portion of their time to one or more of these types of activities. Close coordin- 
ation of these four types of work enables the University to provide a stronger 
faculty in the College of Agriculture, and affords a higher degree of speciali- 
zation than would otherwise be possible. It insures instructors an opportunity 

^ 20 



General Information 

• 

to keep informed on the latest results of research, and to be constantly in 
touch with current trends and problems which are revealed in extension and 
regulatory activities. Heads of departments hold staff conferences to this end, 
so that the student at all times is as close to the developments in the frontiers 
of the several fields of knowledge as it is possible for an organization to put him. 

In order that the work of the College shall be responsible to agricultural 
interests and shall adequately meet the needs of the several agricultural in- 
dustries in the State, and that the course of instruction shall at all times be 
made most helpful for students who pursue them, Advisory Councils have 
been constituted in the major industries of agriculture. The Councils are 
composed of leaders in the respective lines of agriculture in Maryland, and 
the instructional staff of the College of Agriculture has the benefit of their 
council and advice. By this means the College, the industries, and the students 
are kept abreast of developments. 

FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT 

In addition to buildings, laboratories, libraries, and equipment for effective 
instruction in the related basic sciences and in the cultural subjects, the Uni- 
versity of Maryland is provided with excellent facilities for research and in- 
struction in agriculture. University farms, totaling more than 2,000 acres, 
are operated for instructional and investigational purposes. One of the most 
complete and modern plants for dairy and animal husbandry work in the 
country, together with herds of the principal breeds of dairy and beef cattle, 
and other livestock, provides facilities and materials for instruction and research 
in these industries. Excellent laboratory and field facilities are available in 
the Agronomy Department for breeding and selection in farm crops, and for 
soils research. The Poultry Department has a building for laboratories and 
classrooms, a plant comprising twenty acres, and flocks of the important breeds 
of poultry. A research farm is available for experimental testing under field 
conditions. The Horticulture Department is housed in a separate building, and 
has ample orchards, gardens and greenhouses for its various lines of work. A 
research farm is located near Salisbury where experimental work is carried on 
in the area of intense production. 

COSTS 

Actual annual costs of attending the University include: $185.00 fixed 
charges; $77.00 special fees; $400.00 board; $160.00 to $190.00 lodging for 
Maryland residents, or $200.00 to $240.00 for residents of other States and 
Countries; and laboratory fees which vary with the laboratory courses pursued. 
A matriculation fee of $10.00 is charged all new students. A charge of $250.00 
is assessed to all students who are non-residents of the State of Maryland. 

For a more detailed statement of these costs, write to the Editor of Publi- 
cations for the General Information Catalog. 

21 ► 



General Information 

MILITARY INSTRUCTION 

All male students unless specifically exempted under University rules are 
required to take basic Air Force R. O. T. C. training for a period of two years. 
The successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for graduation, but 
it must be taken by all eligible students during the first two years of attend- 
ance at the University, whether they intend to graduate or not. Transfer 
students who do not have the required two years of military training will be 
required to complete the course or take it until graduation, whichever occurs 
first. 

Selected students who wish to do so may carry advanced Air Force R. O.- 
T. C. courses during their junior and senior years which lead to a regular or 
reserve commission in the United States Air Force. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS-IN-AID FOR 
AGRICULTURAL STUDENTS 

A limited number of scholarships are available for agricultural students. 
These include awards granted by the Sears Roebuck Foundation, the Borden 
Company, Dr. Ernest N. Cory Trust Fund, Appleman-Norton Scholarship, 
the Danforth Foundation, the Ralston Purina Company, Southern States Co- 
operative, Inc., J. McKenny Willis and Sons, Dairy Technology Society of 
Maryland and District of Columbia, Miller Chemical and Fertilizer Corpora- 
tion, and Peninsula Horticultural Society. 

These scholarships and grants-in-aid are awarded by the Faculty Com- 
mittee in accordance with the terms of the respective grants. More detailed 
information about these awards is contained in the General Information 
Catalog. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Students find opportunity for varied expression and growth in the several 
voluntary organizations sponsored by the College of Agriculture. These organi- 
zations are: Agricultural Economics Club, Block and Bridle Club, Collegiate 
4-H Club, Dairy Science Club, Student Institute of Food Technology, Future 
Farmers of America, Plant Industry Club, Riding Club, Poultry Science Club, 
and the Veterinary Science Club. 

Alpha Zeta is a national agricultural honor fraternity. Members are chosen 
from students in the College of Agriculture who have met certain scholastic 
requirements and displayed leadership in agriculture. 

The Agricultural Student Council is made up of representatives from the 
various student organizations in the College of Agriculture. Its purpose is to 
coordinate activities of these organizations and to promote work which is beneficial 
to the College. 

M 22 



Awards 



STUDENT JUDGING TEAMS 



The College of Agriculture sponsors judging teams for dairy cattle, dairy 
products, horticultural products, livestock, meats and poultry. Team members 
are selected from students taking courses designed especially to train them fox 
this purpose. Teams are entered in major contests where the students compete 
with teams from other state universities or agricultural colleges. 

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

For information in reference to the University grounds, buildings, equip- 
ment, library facilities, requirements in American Civilization, definition of 
resident and non-resident, regulation of studies, degrees and certificates, tran- 
scripts of records, student health and welfare, living arrangements in the dormi- 
tories, off-campus housing, meals. University Counseling Service, scholarships 
and student aid, athletics and recreation, student government, honors and 
awards, religious denominational clubs, fraternities, sororities, societies and special 
clubs, the University Band, student publications. University Post Office and 
Supply Store, wiite to the Editor of Publications for the General Information 
Catalog. 

Awards 

GRANGE AWARD 

The Maryland State Grange makes an annual award to the senior who has 
excelled in leadership and scholastic attainment and has contributed meri- 
torious service to the College of Agriculture. 

ALPHA ZETA MEDAL 

The Honorary Agricultural Fraternity of Alpha Zeta awards annually a 
medal to the agricultural student in the freshman class who attains the highest 
average record in academic work. The presentation of the medal does not 
elect the student to the fraternity, but simply indicates recognition of high 
scholarship. 

VIRGINIA DARE AWARD 

The Virginia Dare Extract Company awards annually a plaque and $25.00 
to the outstanding student in ice cream manufacturing with an over-all good 
standing in dairy. 

NATIONAL BLOCK AND BRIDLE AWARD 

The National Block and Bridle awards annually a plaque to the member 
of the Block and Bridle Club who has done the most for the local club during 
the year. 

23 ► 



Awards 

EDGAR P. WALLS AWARD 

Dr. Edgar P. Walls awards annually a gold watch to the senior doing 
outstanding work in Horticultural Processing. 

Academic Information 

DEPARTMENTS AND CURRICULA 

Departments in the College of Agriculture and their curricula are as 
follows: Agricultural Economics and Marketing; Agricultural Education and 
Rural Life; Agriculture-Engineering; Agronomy (including crops and soils); 
Animal Husbandry; Botany (plant morphology and taxonomy, plant path- 
ology, and plant physiology and ecology); Dairy (dairy husbandry and dairy 
technology); Entomology (including bee culture); Horticulture (pomology, 
olericulture, floriculture, ornamental horticulture and commercial processing); 
Poultry Husbandry; Veterinary Science. In addition, there are curricula in 
Agricultural Chemistry and General Agriculture. Courses of study may also 
be arranged for any who desire to return to the farm after one or more years 
of training in practical agricultural subjects. 

ADMISSION 

All students desiring to enroll in the College of Agriculture must apply to 
the Director of Admissions of the University of Maryland at College Park. 

The high school or preparatory school student who intends to apply for 
admission to the University should plan his secondary school program care- 
fully. He should select a program that will prepare him adequately to begin 
college work at the college level. He should allow for the fact that his 
interests may change by selecting a secondary school program that will en- 
able him, when he enters the University, to have a maximum freedom of 
choice among the various curricula offered at the University. 

Every candidate for admission to the University must normally present 
sixteen units of high school subjects. It is required that seven of the minimum 
sixteen units be in college preparatory subjects as follows: 

English 4 units 

Mathematics (preferably Algebra) 1 unit 

History or Social Sciences 1 unit 

Biological or Physical Sciences 1 unit 

The other units should be chosen to give the student as strong a prepara- 
tion as possible for his work at the University. At least twelve of the units 
presented should be in college preparatory courses in academic subjects. 
Although there is no entrance requirement in foreign languages, two or more 



24 



Academic Infornuitum 

units are highly desirable for many programs and are suitable for all pro- 
grams. Likewise it is desirable that each student offer two units in history 
or social sciences, and two units in the biological and physical sciences. It 
is strongly recommended that all students present a unit of plane geometry 
in addition to the one or two units of algebra. 

The following preparatory program has been designed to give the pro- 
spective applicant great freedom of choice among the many curricula at the 
University. The student who successfully completes this program will be able 
to enter any curriculum at the University and to proceed without loss of time. 

English 4 units 

Mathematics ^'A units 

(algebra 2 units; plane geometry 1 unit; trigonometry 
H unit. Prospective engineering students should in- 
clude solid geometry J^ unit) 

History or Social Sciences 2 units 

Biological and Physical Sciences 2 units 

Foreign Language 2 units 

Unspecified 25^ units 

16 units 

Deviation from these recommendations is permitted, but should be under- 
taken only upon competent advice. An unwise selection of preparatory courses 
can effectively prevent the student from pursuing certain curricula at the 
University or materially increase the time necessary to complete a particular 
curriculum. Every prospective applicant should be certain that his prepara- 
tion in mathematics is adequate for any program he might conceivably wish 
to enter. A special fee will be charged for all remedial work in mathematics 
with the exception of the course in solid geometry. 

A well-planned program of college preparatory work contributes much 
to the success of a student in his college work. This fact has an important 
bearing in estimating whether a candidate for admission is likely to be suc- 
cessful in his work at the University. 

The accompanying chart summarizes the specific requirements of the various 
curricula offered in the College of Agriculture. 



25 



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2 fi 

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1 unit required 

2 or more units recom- 
mended 


1 unit required 

2 or more units recom- 
mended 


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2 

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B 

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CJ 

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bt 

B 

0) 

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2 or more units recom- 
mended 

French, Latin, or 
German 


2 or more units recom- 
mended 

French, Latin, or 
German 


B 

V 

B 

.b 
3 
w 

u 
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S fi 

cd U 

"o 
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P9 -B 
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1 unit required 

2 or 3 units recom- 
mended, including 
Chemistry — 1 unit 
Physics — 1 unit 


1 unit required 

2 or 3 units recom- 
mended, including 
Chemistry — 1 unit 
Physics — 1 unit 


1 unit required 

At least 2 units highly 
desirable : Biology, 
Chemistry, Physics. 


s 

■5 


Required : 

College Preparatory 
Mathematics* — 
3 ^ units 

Strongly recommended: 
A total of 4 units 
in College Prepara- 
tory Mathematics* 


Essential : 

Algebra — 1 unit 
Plane Geometry — 
1 unit 

Strongly recommended: 
An additional unit of 
Algebra and % unit 
of Trigonometry 


1 unit required 

Strongly recommended: 
Algebra — 1 or 2 units 
Plane Geometry — 
1 unit 


B 


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■^1 




COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Majors in Agricultural Engi- 
neering. Agricultural Chemistry 


COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
Majors in Botany, Entomology 


COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
Majors in General Agriculture, 
Agricultural Economics and 
Marketing, Agricultural Educa- 
tion, Agronomy, Animal Hus- 
bandry, Dairy, Horticulture, 
Poultry Husbandry ; Pre-veteri- 
nary program 



a s 
2 a 



ia 



Academic Information 



JUNIOR STANDING 



To earn junior standing a student must complete fifty-six (56) semester 
hours of academic credit with an average grade of C (2.0) or better. In 
computing this average, the following provisions apply: all academic courses 
carrying one or more credits which have been taken up to the time of compu- 
tation shall be included; courses carrying "0" credit shall not be included; 
all grades (including F) earned in courses which have been repeated shall be 
included; courses in the basic AFROTC, the Physical Education required of 
all University students, and the Health required of all women students shall 
not be included. 

Detailed regulations pertaining to junior standing are presented in full 
in the publication. University Regulations and General Information. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

Each student must acquire a minimum of 120 semester hour credits in 
academic subjects other than basic mihtary science and physical activities. 
Men must acquire in addition 12 hours in basic military science and 4 hours in 
physical activities. W omen must acquire in addition 4 hours in hygiene, and 
4 hours in physical activities. 

STUDENT ADVISORS 

Each student in the College of Agriculture is assigned to a faculty advisor, 
either departmental or general. Departmental advisors consist of heads of 
departments or persons selected by them to advise students with curricula in 
their respective departments. General advisors are selected for students who 
have no definite choice of curriculum in mind, or who wish to pursue the 
general curriculum in agriculture. 

ELECTIVES 

The electives in the suggested curricula which follow affords opportunity 
for those who so desire to supplement major and minor fields of study or to 
add to their general training. 

With the advice and consent of those in charge of his registration, a 
student may make such modifications in his curriculum as are deemed advisable 
to meet the requirements of his particular need. 

FARM AND LABORATORY PRACTICE 

The head of each department will help to make available opportunities for 
practical or technical experience along his major line of studv for each stu- 
dent whose major is in that department and who is in need of such cx[x;ricnce. 
For inex-pcricnced students in many departments this need may be met by 
one or more summers spent on a farm. 

27 ► 



Academic Information 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



The program of the freshman year in the College of Agriculture is the 
same for all curricula of the College. Its purpose is to afford the student an 
opportunity to lay a broad foundation in subjects basic to agriculture and the 
related sciences, to articulate beginning work in college with that pursued in 
high or preparatory schools, to provide opportunity for wise choice of programs 
in succeeding years, and to make it possible for a student before the end of 
the year to change from one curriculum to another, or from the College of 
Agriculture to a curriculum in some other college of the University with 
little or no loss of credit. 

Students entering the freshman year with a definite choice of curriculum 
in mind are sent to departmental advisors for counsel as to the wisest selec- 
tion of freshman electives from the standpoint of their special interests and 
their probable future programs. Students entering the freshman year with 
no definite curriculum in mind, are assigned to a general advisor, who assists 
with the choice of freshman electives and during the course of the year ac- 
quaints the students with opportunities in the upper curricula in the College of 
Agriculture and in the other divisions of the University. If by the close of the 
freshman year a student makes no definite choice of a specialized curriculum, 
he continues under the guidance of his general advisor in the General Agri- 
culture Curriculum. 



28 



CURRICULA 
AGRICULTURE CURRICULUM 

r—Semester-~', 

Freshnian Year I 11 

*Eng. 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

*G. & P. 1— American Government 3 

*Soc. 1— Sociologv' of American Life . . 3 

A. S. 1, 2-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical ActiWties (Men and \\'omen) 1 1 

Hea. 2— Personal Health 2 

Hea. 4— Community Health . . 2 

Agr. 1 —Introduction to Agriculture 1 

t*Math. 0— Basic Mathematics . . 

**Elect either of the following pairs of courses 

Bot. 1, General Botanv and Zool. 1, General Zoology 4 4 

Chem. 1, 3, General Chemistry 4 4 

Elect one of the following each semester: 

Modem Language 3 3 

tMath. 5, 6 or 10, 11, or 10. 13 3 3 

Physics 1, 2— Elements of Physics 3 3 

A. H. 1— Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry 3 

JAgron. 1— Crop Production . . 3 

***Dairy 1 —Fundamentals of Dairying . . 3 

AGRICULTURE— GENERAL 

This curriculum is designed for persons wishing to return to the farm, 

enter work allied to farming, for those seeking a general rather than a 

specialized knowledge of the field of agriculture and for those preparing to 
work in any general field in agriculture. 

By proper use of the electives allowed in this curriculum, a student may 
choose a field of concentration in agriculture and at the same time elect 
courses that contribute to a liberal education. 



*For classification tests and alternate courses, see Program in American CiWliza- 
tion. General Information Catalog. 

t*An examination in Mathematics ^ill be given during Freshman Orientation week; 
students passing this test will not be required to take Math 0. 

**Both pairs of courses are required for graduation from the College of Agriculture. 
fStudents expecting to pursue the curriculum in either Agricultural Chemistry or 
Agricultural Engineering should, if qualified, take Math. 18 and 19. If not qualified 
they should take Math 1. 

JThe combination of Agronomy 107 and 108 wiU be considered as satisf%-ino the 
requirement of Agronomy 1 for students who desire a more intensive course. 
***Students taking A. H. curriculum should take Dairy 1 the second semester. 

29 ► 



General Agricultural Curriculum 

GENERAL AGRICULTURAL CURRICULUM t 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature; or 

Eng. 5, 6— Composition and English Literature 

"^H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 

Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry 

P. H. 1— Povdtry Production 

Dairy 1— Fundamentals of Dairying 

Sp. 7— Public Speaking 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 

Physical Activities 

Total 

Junior Year 

Zool. 104— Genetics 

Hort. 5— Fruit Production, or Hort. 58— Vegetable Production 
Ent. 1— Introductory Entomology, or Ent. 10— Applied 

Entomology 

Agron. 10— General Soils 

Agr. Engr. 101— Farm Machinery 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics 

Biological or Physical Science Sequence 

**Electives 

Total 

Senior Year 

A. E. 50— Farm Economics 

A. E. 107— Analysis of the Farm Business 

A. E. 108— Farm Management 

Agron. 1 5 1— Cropping Systems 

R. Ed. 1 14— Rural Life and Education 

**Electives 

Total 



-Semester- 
II 



I 



3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 


3 




. . 


3 


2 


, , 


3 


3 


1 


1 


19 


17 


3 




•• 


3 




3 


, , 


4 


3 


, , 


3 


, , 


3 


3 


6 


6 


18 


19 


3 




3 


, , 


. , 


3 


. . 


2 


. . 


3 


11 


7 


17 


15 



AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

This curriculum insures adequate instruction in the fundamentals of both 
the physical and biological sciences. It may be adjusted through the selection 
of electives to fit the student for work in agricultural experiment stations, soil 
bureaus, geological surveys, food laboratories, fertilizer industries and those 
handling food products. 

tif A. H. 1 and Agron. 1 are not elected in the freshman year they must be 
elected in subsequent years. 

*For classification tests and alternate courses, see Program in American Civiliza- 
tion, General Information Catalog. 

** Three-fourths of the electives in the junior and senior years must be 100 level 
of courses. 



30 



Agricultural Economics and Marketing Curriculum 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY CURRICULUM 

f—Semester-~<, 

Sofhomore Year I 11 
Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature; or 

Eng. 5, 6— Composition and English Literature 3 3 

Chem. 15— Qualitative Analysis 4 

Chem. 21— Quantitative Analysis . . 4 

Math. 20, 21-Calculus 4 4 

Bot. 1— General Botany 4 

Zool. 1— General Zoology . . 4 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 19 19 

Junior Year 

Chem. 35, 37— Elementary Organic Lecture 2 2 

Chem. 36, 38— Elementary Organic Laboratory 2 2 

Chem. 123— Quantitative Analysis 4 

Modem Language 3 3 

Geol. 1— Geology . . 2 

Agron. 10— General Soils . . 4 

Sp. 7— Public Speaking 2 

Electives in Biology 3 3 

Total 16 16 

Senior Year 

*H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 3 3 

Modem Language 3 3 

Phys. 20, 21-Gcneral Physics 5 5 

Electives in Agricultural Chemistry 6 or 7 6 or 7 

Total 17or 18 17orl8 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND MARKETING 

The curriculum in agricultural economics and marketing is designed to 
prepare students for the following types of positions: On the farm as fann 
operators and farm managers; with farm organizations, such as the Farm 
Bureau and farmers' cooperatives; with private and corporate business con- 
cerns; and positions with state and federal agencies, such as college teachers, 
agricultural extension workers, and research with federal and state agencies. 

Courses in this department are designed to provide fundamental training 
in the basic economic principles underlying agriculture. The curriculum in- 
cludes courses in farm management, general agricultural economics, marketing, 
finance, prices, taxation, land economics, agricultural policy, and foreign agri- 



*For classiHcation tests and alternate courses see Program in American Civiliza- 
tion, General Information Catalog. 

31 ► 



Agricultural Economics and Marketing Curriculum 

cultural trade to give the student the foundation needed to meet the production 
and distribution problems confronting the individual farmer in a progressive 
rural community. 

Farming is a business, as well as a way of life, and as such demands for 
its successful conduct the use of business methods; the keeping of farm 
business records, analyzing the farm business, and of organizing and operating 
the farm as a business enterprise. It requires knowledge of farm resources 
and taxation, methods of financing agricultural production and marketing, 
including agencies involved, services rendered and the cost of getting products 
from the producer to the consumer through cooperative and private agencies. 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND MARKETING CURRICULUM 



Sophomore Year I 
Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature; or 

Eng. 5, 6— Composition and English Literature 3 

P. H. 1— Poultry production or Dairy 1 Fundamentals of 

Dairying 

Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry 4 

Math. 5— General Mathematics 3 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics 3 

Sp. 7— Public Speaking 2 

A. E. 50— Farm Economics 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 

Physical Activities 1 

C^ Total 19 

Junior Year 

A. E. 101— Marketing of Farm Products 3 

A. E. 103— Cooperation in Agriculture 3 

A. E. 107— Analysis of the Farm Business 3 

A. E. 104— Farm Finance 

**H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 3 

B. A. 130— Elements of Business Statistics; or Agr. 100— Intro- 

ductory Agricultural Biometerics 

Agron. 10— General Soils 

Electives 5 

Total 17 



-Semester- 
II 

3 

3 
4 



3 
3 
1 

17 



3 
3 

3 
4 
5 

18 



*If A. H. 1 and Agron. 1 are not elected in the freshman year, they must be 
elected in subsequent years. 

**For classification tests and alternate courses see American Civilization Program, 
General Information Catalog. 



32 



Agricultural Education and Riiral Life Ciirrictdum 

t^SemesteT—\ 

Senior Year I 11 

A. E. 1 06— Prices of Farm Products . . 3 

Agr. Engr. 101— Fami Machinery 3 

A. E. 108— Farm Management . . 3 

A. H. 1 10— Feeds and Feeding 3 

A. E. 1 1 1— Land Economics 3 

A. E. 110-Seminar 1 1 

Electives 5 8 

Total 15 15 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 

The primary objective of this curriculum is to prepare students for teach- 
ing vocational agriculture. It also prepares them for work as county agents 
and allied lines of the rural educational services. Graduates are in demand 
in rural businesses, particularly of the cooperative ty'pe; a number have 
entered the Federal servdce; others are engaged in teaching and research in 
agricultural colleges; quite a few have returned to the farm as owner-managers. 

Courses in extension methods are included in agricultural education. They 
are especially designed for students who wish to train for extension work, as 
well as others who wish to learn more about how the extension service oper- 
ates. Agricultural education majors, as well as others, are urged to take these 
courses if they can possibly fit them into their curriculum. 

In addition to the regular entrance requirements of the University, in- 
volving graduation from a standard four-year high school, students electing 
the agricultural education curriculum must present evidence of having acquired 
adequate farm ex'perience after reaching the age of fourteen years. 

All students following this curriculum are required to attend meetings 
of the Collegiate Chapter of the Future Farmers of America during their 
junior and senior years in order to gain needed training to serve as advisors 
of high school chapters of FFA upon graduation. Freshman and sophomore 
agricultural education majors are also urged to become members of the FFA 
and to participate in the activities of the organization. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM* 

fSemester—>, 

Sophomore Year 1 U 

Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature; or 

Eng. 5, 6— Composition and English Literature 3 3 

Chcm. 1, 3— General Chemistrj' 4 4 

Sp. 7— Public Speaking 2 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics . . 3 

*If A. H. 1, Agron. 1 and Dairy 1 are not elected in the freshman yor, they 
must be elected in subsequent years. 

33 ► 



Agricultural Engineering Curriculum 



Sophomore Year QContinued^ I 

Bot. 20— Diseases of Plants 3 

P. H. 1— Poultry Production 3 

Hort. 58— Vegetable Production 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 

Physical Activities 1 

Total 19 

Junior Year 

*H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 3 

Ent. 1— Introductory Entomology 3 

Agron. 10— General Soils 

A. H. 1 10— Feeds and Feeding 3 

Agr. Engr. 101— Farm Machinery 3 

R. Ed. 107— Observation and Analysis of Teaching Agriculture 
H. D. Ed. 100, 101— Principles of Human Development 

I and II 3 

Restricted Science Electives 3 

Total 18 

Senior Year 

Agr. Engr. 102— Gas Engines, Tractors and Automobiles 

Pi. Ed. 109— Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture .... 3 

R. Ed. Ill —Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Groups .... 1 

fR. Ed. 103— Practice Teaching 5 

R. Ed. 101— Teaching Farm Practicums and Demonstrations. . 2 

Agr. Engr. 104— Farm Mechanics 2 

A. E. 108— Farm Management 

P».. Ed. 1 1 2— Departmental Management 

R. Ed. 1 14— Rural Life and Education 

Restricted Electives 3 

Total 16 



-Semester- 
II 



3 
3 
1 

17 
3 

4 



3 
3 

16 
3 



3 
1 
3 
5 

15 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

For students of agriculture, the department offers training in those agri- 
cultural subjects which are based upon engineering principles. These subjects 
may be grouped under five heads: farm power and farm machinery, farm 
structures, soil and water practices, such as drainage, erosion control and irri- 
gation, as related to engineering, farm electrification, and mechanics and equip- 
ment for agricultural processing. 



*For classification tests and alternate course offerings see American Civilization 
Program, General Information Catalog. 

fMajors in agricultural education will also be required to take R. Ed. 104, Practice 
Teaching, four credits (or its equivalent), to be arranged in a four-week period prior 
to the opening of the University of Maryland in the fall of their senior year. 



34 



Agricultural Engineering Curriculum 

FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM IN AGRICULTURE — ENGINEERING 

For those students who wish to speciahze in the appHcation of engineering 
principles to the physical and biological problems of agriculture there is offered 
a combined program, extending over a five-year period, arranged jointly by the 
College of Aoriculture and the Colleoe of Engineering, and leading to a degree 
from each of these colleges. 

This program prepares graduates to enter such diversified fields of employ- 
ment as soil and water conservation, management of water resources, and design 
of farm structures; the design and supervision of rural electrification distribu- 
tion systems and applications of electrical equipment; the design, application and 
distribution of farm machinery; or the development of new uses for farm 
products and the profitable utilization of farm wastes and by-products. 

To be properly trained in these fields a student needs a broader knowledge 
of basic and applied engineering principles than could be provided in a four- 
year course in agriculture. He also needs a broader training in the fundamentals 
of agriculture than a standard four-year course in engineering could furnish. 

Upon completion of the normal four-year course of study the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture is granted. For the fifth year the student 
registers in the College of Engineering, and at the end of that year, upon 
satisfactory completion of the required course of study, receives a degree in 
Civil, Electrical, Mechanical or Chemical Engineering. 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURE — ENGINEERING 

r—Setmster—^ 

Freshman Year I 11 

fEng. 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Sp. 7— Public Speaking . . 2 

*Math. 18, 19— Elementary Mathematical Analysis 5 5 

Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry 4 4 

Dr. 1, 2— Engineering Drawing 2 2 

Agr. 1— Introduction to Agriculture 1 

A. S. 1, 2-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 19 20 

For the students whose final objective is a degree in Civil Engineering, the 
balance of the curriculum is: 

Sophomore Year QCh^il Engineering Option^ 

Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature; or 

Eng. 5, 6— Composition and English Literature 3 3 

Math. 20, 21-Calculus 4 4 

*A qualifying test is given during registration to determine whether the student is 
adequately prepared for Math. 18. A student failing this test is required to take 
Math. 1, hitroductory Algebra, without credit. 

fFor classihcation tests and alternate courses, see American Civilization Program, 
General Information Catalog. 

35 ► 



Agricultural Engineering Curriculum 



Sophomore Year QCivil Engineering Option^ 

Phj^s. 20, 21— General Physics 

C. E. 21-Statics 

C. E. 23-Strength of Materials 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) . 
Physical Activities ; . . . . 

Total 

Junior Year QCivil Engineering Option^ 

fG. & P. 1— American Government 

Math. 64— Differential Equations for Engineers . . . 

C. E. 24-Dynamics 

C. E. 30— Materials of Engineering 

Agron. 10— General Soils 

Bot. 1— General Botany 

Zool. 1— General Zoology 

Agr. Engr. 101— Farm Machinery 

Agr. Engr. 107— Farm Drainage and Irrigation . . , 

Agr. Engr. 106— Farm Mechanics; or 

Agr. Engr. 109— Farm Applications of Electricity . 
^Approved Electives 

Total 

Fourth Year QCivil Engineering Option^ 

C. E. 100-Seminar 

C. E. 110, Ill-Surveying 1, II 

C. E. 140-Fluid Mechanics 

C. E. 160— Structural Analysis I 

. C. E. 1 80— Transportation 

E. E. 50— Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering 

Agr. Engr. 102— Farm Engines and Tractors 

Agr. Engr. 105— Farm Buildings 

A. E. 108— Farm Management 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics 

**Aproved Electives 

Total 



-Semester— 
I II 



5 
3 

3 
1 

19 

3 

3 



19 



17 



3 
3 
1 

19 



3 
2 
4 

4 

2 

2 
3 

20 

2 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
17 



* Elect one of the foUovi^ing: 
A. H. 1— Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry (3). 
Dairy 1 —Fundamentals of Dairying (3). 
P. H. 1-Poultry Production (3). 
** Elect one of the following: 
Agron. 1— Crop Production (3). 
Hort. 1— General Horticulture (3). 
Hort. 5— Fruit Production (3). 
Hort. 58— Vegetable Production (3). 
Hort. 59-Small Fruits (3). 
fFor classification tests and alternate courses, see American Ci\dlization Program, 
General Information Catalog. 
^ 36 



Agricultural Engineering Curriculum 

r— Semester—^ 
Fifth Year CCivil Enginecriug Option') 1 H 

*H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 3 3 

C. E. 101— Construction Planning • • 3 

C. E. 1 50-Soil Mechanics 3 

C. E. 161— Structural Analysis II 3 

C. E. 162-Structural Design (Steel) 3 

C. E. 163— Structural Design (Concrete) . . 3 

C. E. 170-VVater Supply 3 

C. E. 171— Sewerage • • 3 

M. E. 105— Principles of Mechanical Engineering . . 3 

** Approved Technical Elective 3 3 

Total 18 18 

For the student whose final objective is a degree in Mechanical Engineering, 
the balance of the curriculum is: 

Sophomore Year ^Mechanical Engineering Option^ 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics . • 3 

*G. & P. 1— American Government 3 

Math. 20, 21-Calculus 4 4 

Phys. 20, 21-General Physics 5 5 

M. E. 20, 21— Manufacturing Tools and Processes 1 1 

M. E. 22, 23-Statics and Mechanics of Materials 3 3 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Actixdties 1 1 

Total 20 20 

Junior Year QMechanical Engineering Option) 

Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature; or 

Eng. 5, 6— Composition and English Literature 3 3 

Math. 64— Differential Equations 3 

M. E. 24— D)Tiamics 3 

Agron. 10— General Soils • • 4 

Bot. 1— General Botany 4 

Zool. 1— General Zoology • • 4 

Agr. Engr. 101— Farm Machinery 3 

Agr. Engr. 107— Farm Drainage and Irrigation . . 2 

Agr. Engr. 106— Farm Mechanics; or 



'^For classification tests and alternative courses, see American Civilization Program, 
General Information Catalog. 

**In order to pro\-ide depth in selected fields, students shall elect, with the advice 
and approval of the Department of Civil Engineering, from such groups of technical 
courses as will be offered in the fields of highway engineering, hydraulic engineering 
and hydrology, sanitary engineering, soils and foundations and structural engineering 
with a senior project in the field selected. 

37 ► 



Agricultural Engineering 

r— Semester- 
Junior Year (^Mechanical Engineering Option^ QContinuecT) I II 

Agr. Engr. 109— Farm Applications of Electricity . . 2 

A. E. 108— Farm Management . . 3 

■^Approved Elective 3 

Total 19 18 

Fourth Year QMechanical Engineering Option^ 

E. E. 51, 52— Principles of Electrical Engineering 4 4 

M. E. 1 00— Thermodynamics 3 

M. E. 101-Heat Transfer 3 

M. E. 102-Fluid Mechanics . . 3 

M. E. 103-Metallography , . 3 

M. E. 104— Kinematics . . 2 

Ch. E. 140— Introduction to Nuclear Technology 2 

Agr. Engr. 102— Farm Engines and Tractors . . 3 

Agr. Engr. 105— Farm Buildings 2 

^Approved Electives 7 



'^'^ , 



Total 18 18 

Fifth Year QMechanical Engineering Option^ 

fH. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 3 3 

M. E. 150, 151-Heat Povi^er, Chemical & Nuclear 4 4 

M. E. 152, 153— Mechanical Engineering Design 4 3 

M. E. 154, 155-Mechanical Laboratory 2 2 

***Technical Electives 6 6 

Total 19 18 



"*Elect one of the following: 
A. H. 1— Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry (3). 
Dairy 1— Fundamentals of Dairying (3). 
P. H. 1 -Poultry Production (3). 
** Elect one of the foUovdng: 
Agron. 1— Crop Production (3). 
Hort. 1— Crop Production (3). 
Hort. 5— Fruit Production (3). 
Hort. 58— Vegetable Production (3). 
Hort. 59-Small Fruits (3). 
***To be selected from the following group: 

M. E. 156— Heating and Air Conditioning. (3) 
M. E. 157-Refrigeration. (3) 
M. E. 158, 159-Applied Elasticity. (3, 3) 
M. E. 160, 161-Advanced Dynamics. (3, 3) 
M. E. 162, 163— Advanced Thermodynamics. (3, 3) 
M. E. 164-Research. (3) 
M. E. 165— Creative Engineering. (3) 
M. E. 166, 167-Advanced Fluid Mechanics. (3, 3) 
For the student whose final objective is a degree in Electrical or Chemical Engi- 
neering, curricula corresponding to the foregoing will be arranged. 

fFor classified tests and alternate courses, see American Civilization Program, 
General Information Catalog. 
^ 38 



Agronomy Ctirriciilum 

AGRONOMY 

The Department of Agronomy offers instruction in crop production, crop 
breeding, soil chemistry, soil physics, soil fertility, soil classification, and soil 
conservation. These courses prepare students to enter various types of private, 
commercial, state, and federal agronomic positions. By careful election of courses 
the student may lay a foundation for either advanced study or employment upon 
graduation with the B.S. degree. Opportunities for advanced students are shown 
in the Graduate School Catalog. Depending on the electives chosen, students 
graduating with the B.S. degree are trained for general farming, farm manage- 
ment, specialized seed production, county agent work, soil conservation, or em- 
ployment with commercial seed companies, fertilizer companies or equipment 
manufacturers. 

CROP PRODUCTION CURRICULUM* 

/^Semester— ^ 

Soj>hoTnore Year I II 

Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature; or 

Eng. 5, 6— Composition and English Literature 3 3 

fH. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 3 3 

Elective Group I 3 

Microb. 1— General Microbiology . . 4 

Ent. 1— Introductory Entomology 3 

Agron. 10— General Soils . . 4 

Sp. 7— Public Speaking 2 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 18 18 

Junior Year 

Agron. 107— Cereal Crop Production 3 

Agron. 108— Forage Crop Production . . 3 

Bot. 1 17— General Plant Genetics . . 2 

Chem. 31— Elements of Organic Chemistry 2 

Chem. 32— Elements of Organic Laboratory 1 

**Advanced Soils . . 3 

Bot. 1 1— Plant Taxonomy . . 3 

Bot. 101-Plant Physiology 4 

Bot. 20— Diseases of Plants 3 

Electives 2 4 

Total 15 15 



*If A. FI. 1 is not elected in the freshman year, it must be elected in subsequent 
years. With permission of the crops advisor additional courses in mathematics, physics, 
chemistry, and botany may be substituted for the courses in this curriculum which are 
required only by the Agronomy Department. 

fFor classification tests and alternate courses, see American Civilization Program, 
General Information Catalog. 
**Any advanced Soils course. 

39 ► 



Agronomy Curriculum 

r— Semester- 
Senior Year I II 

Agron. 103— Crop Breeding 2 

Agron. 151— Cropping Systems . . 2 

Agron. 1 54-Weed Control 3 

A. E. 108— Farm Management . . 3 

Agr. Engr. 101— Farm Machinery 3 

**Advanced Soils . . 3 

A. H. 1 10-Feeds and Feeding 3 

Agron. 101— Senior Seminar . . 1 

Electives . 4 6 

Total 15 15 

CROP BREEDING 

Students specializing in crop breeding will elect Math. 10, or Math. 1£ 

SOILS curriculum'^ 

Sofhomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature; or 

Eng. 5, 6— Composition and English Literature 3 3 

fH. S, 6— Histor)' of American Civilization 3 3 

Sp. 7— Public Speaking . . 2 

Bot. 1— General Botany 4 

Phys. 10, 1 1— Fundamentals of Physics 4 4 

Agron. 10— General Soils . . 4 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 18 20 

Junior Year 

Agron. 107— Cereal Crop Production 3 

Agron. 1 1 2— Commercial Fertilizers . . 3 

Agron. 1 16— Soil Chemistry 3 

Agron. 114— Soil Classification and Geography .. 4 

Bot. 101-Plant Physiology 4 

Chem. 1 5— Qualitative Analysis 4 

Chem. 19 or 21— Quantitative Analysis . . 4 

Chem. 35— Organic Chemistry . . 2 

Chem. 36— Elementary Organic Chemistry Laboratory . . 2 

Electives 1 

Total 15 15 



*If A. H. 1 is not elected in the freshman year, it must be elected in subsequent 
years. With permission of the soils advisor additional courses in mathematics, physics, 
chemistry, and botany may be substituted for the courses in this curriculum which are 
required only by the Agronomy Department. 

fFor classification tests and alternate courses, see American Civilization Program, 
General Information Catalog. 
**Any advanced Soils course. 

-< 40 



Animal Husbandry Curriculum 

/—Semester-^ 

Senior Year 1 U 

Age. Engr. 107— Farm Drainage and Irrigation . . 2 

Agron. 1 19— Soil Mineralogy 4 

Agron. 1 13— Soil Conservation 3 

Agron. 108— Forage Crop Production . . 3 

Agron. 151— Cropping Systems . . 2 

A. E. 108-Farm Management . . 3 

Agron. 1 1 7— Soil Physics 3 

Agron. 1 1 1-Soil Fertility 3 

Electives 2 5 

Total 15 15 

SOIL CONSERVATION 

Students wishing to specialize in soil mapping and farm planning phases of 
soil conservation will follow the soils curriculum except that Physics 10, 11, 
and Chem. 15, 19, 35, 36 will not be required. Agron. 105, A.H. 1, 110, 
Dairy 1, and a course in physics (if the student does not have credit for physics 
in high school) will be required. Suggested electives are P.H. 1, Hort. 5, 58, 
Agr. Engr. 101, Bot. 20, Ent. 1, and Alicrob. 1. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

The curriculum in Animal Husbandry is organized for the purpose of pre- 
paring students for various phases of work in the field of animal industry such 
as: operators and managers of livestock farms, as investigators and research 
workers in Federal, State and private institutions, and as workers in specialized 
fields where a knowledge of the livestock industry is necessary. 

By proper use of electives, the student may equip himself to become a county 
agricultural agent; to meet the requirements of positions with certain types of 
private and cooperative business concerns; or, with more technical and specialized 
training, to become qualified for instructional work in colleges, for investigational 
work in State and Federal experiment stations or in commercial research labora- 
tories. Students who desire to enter the field of teaching or highly specialized 
research should elect the more scientific courses offered by this and by other de- 
partments. 



/^Semester- 
Sophomore Year I II 
Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature; or 

Eng. 5, 6— Composition and English Literature 3 3 

Chem. 31, 33— Elements of Organic Chemistry 2 2 

Chem. 32, 34— Elements of Organic Laboratory 1 1 

Bot. 1— General Botany 4 



* Students planning this curriculum should elect A. H. 1 the first semester and Dairy 
the second semester of the freshman year. 

41 ► 



Botany Curriculum 

r— Semester— ^^ 

Sophomore Year QContinned^ I II 

Zool. 1— General Zoology . . 4 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics 3 

A. H. 30— Types and Breeds of Livestock . . 3 

Sp. 1, 2— Public Speaking 2 2 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 19 19 

Junior Year 

fH. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 3 ■ 3 

V. S. 101— Comparative Anatomy and Physiology 3 

V. S. 102-Animal Hygiene . . 3 

A. H. 1 10— Feeds and Feeding 3 

A. E. 108— Farm Management . . 3 

A. H. 131-Sheep Production 3 

**A. H. 140— Livestock Management . . 3 

Zool. 104— Genetics 3 

Agron. 1— Crop Production . . 3 

Electives 4 

Total 16 18 

Senior Year 

A. H. 1 1 1— Animal Nutrition 3 

A. H. 130-Beef Cattle Production 3 

A. H. 132— Swine Production 

A. H. 1 50— Livestock Markets and Marketing 2 

A. H. 160— Meat and Meat Products 

Agr. Engr. 101— Farm Machinery 3 

A. H. 120— Principles of Breeding 

Microb. 1— General Microbiology 4 

Agron. 10— General Soils . . 4 

A. H. 170, 171-Seminar 1 1 

Electives 2 3 

Total 18 17 

BOTANY 

The department offers three major fields of work; Plant Morphology and 
Taxonomy; Plant Pathology; or Plant Physiology and Ecology. The required 
courses for the freshman and sophomore years are the same for all students. In 
the junior and senior years, the student elects botany courses to suit his particular 
interest. Courses are required in other subjects to contribute toward a broad cul- 
tural education, and to support the courses selected in the chosen field of botany. 

fFor classification tests and alternate courses, see American Civilization Program, 
General Information Catalog. 

** Required for student lacking Farm Experience. 

^ 42 



Botany Curriculum 

Through cooperation with the College of Education, students who wish to 
meet the requirements for the state high school teacher's certificates, may elect the 
necessary work in education. 

The curriculum as outlined, provides a complete survey of the field of botany 
for prospective high school teachers, and lays a good foundation for graduate 
work in botany in preparation for college teaching and for research in state or 
federal experiment stations, or in private research laboratories. 

Students are also afforded an opportunity for training for other vocations in- 
volving various botanical applications, such as extension work, and positions with 
seed companies, canning companies and other commercial concerns. 



BOTANY CURRICULUM 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature; or 

Eng. 5, 6— Composition and English Literature 

Modem Language, preferably German 

Bot. 20— Diseases of Plants 

Bot. 2— General Botany 

Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry 

Sp. 7— Public Speaking 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 

Physical Activities 

Total 

Junior Year 

*H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 

Modem Language 

Phys. 10, 1 1— Fundamentals of Physics 

Bot. 101— Plant Physiology 

Bot. 1 1— Plant Taxonomy 

Bot. 1 10— Plant Microtechnique 

Microb. 1— General Microbiology 

Total 

Senior Year 

Bot. 1 12— Seminar 

Bot. 1 1 1-Plant Anatomy 

Bot. 102-Plant Ecology 

Bot. 115— Stmcture of Economic Plants or Bot. 128— Mycology 

Bot. 1 1 7— General Plant Genetics 

Botany Electives 

Electives 

Total 



I 

3 
3 
3 

4 
2 
3 
1 

19 

3 
3 

4 
4 



-Semester- 
U 



16 



*For classification tests and alternate courses, see American Ci 
General Information Catalog. 



1 


1 


3 






3 




3-4 




2 


2-3 


2-3 


6-8 


5-7 


16 


16 


ition 


Prograi 




43 



Dairy Curriculum 

Students specializing in Plant Morphology or Plant Taxonomy will elect 
Bot. 114 and Bot. 128; those specializing in Plant Pathology will elect Bot. 122, 
Ent. 1, and two of the following: Bot. 123, Bot. 124, Bot. 125, Bot. 126; those 
specializing in Plant Physiology or Plant Pathology will elect Organic Chemistry, 
Chem. 31, 32, 33, 34. 

DAIRY 

The Dairy Department offers instruction in two major lines of work; dairy 
husbandry and dairy technology. In the dairy husbandry curriculum, students 
are given technical and practical training in the breeding, feeding, management, 
and selection of dairy cattle and in milk production. With suitable choice of 
courses, students are qualified as operators of dairy farms, for breed promotion and 
sales work, or employment with private and cooperative business organizations, 
and for county agent work. The dairy technology curriculum is designed to pre- 
pare students for practical and scientific work concerned with the processing and 
distribution of milk, manufacture and handling of butter, cheese, ice cream, and 
other products, in dairy plant operation and management, and in dairy inspection 
and quality control. Students satisfactorily majoring in dairy technology are quali- 
fied for the many technical and applied positions in the various branches of the 
dairy industry. 

By careful election of courses in either curriculum the student may lay a 
foundation for advanced study, for instructional work in colleges, and for re- 
search in experiment stations or commercial laboratories. The suggested curricula 
will be modified to meet the special needs of individual students. 



r'f' 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY CURRICULUM 

/Seniester- 

Sofhomore Year I H 

Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature; or 

Eng. 5, 6— Composition and English Literature 3 3 

Chem. 31, 33— Elements of Organic Chemistry 2 2 

Chem. 32, 34— Elements of Organic Chemistry Laboratory. . . 1 1 

Bot. 1— General Botany 4 

Zool. 1— General Zoology 4 

Microb. 1— General Microbiology . . 4 

Dairy 20— Dairy Breeds and Selection 2 

Dairy 30— Dairy Cattle Judging . . 2 

Agron. 1— Crop Production . . 3 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 20 19 



* Students planning to pursue this curriculum should elect Dairy 1 the second semes- 
ter of the freshman year. If A. H. 1 is not elected in the freshman year it must be 
taken in subsequent years. 

-< 44 



Dairy Curriculum 



Junior Year 

fH. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 

Agron. 10— General Soils 

A. H. 1 10— Feeds and Feeding 

Microb. 133— Dairy Microbiology 

Dairy 103— Physiology of Milk Secretion 

Sp. 7— Public Speaking 

Zool. 104— Genetics 

Electives 

Total 

Senior Year 

Agr. Engr. 101— Farm Machinery 

A. E. 108— Farm Management 

Econ. 77— Fundamentals of Economics 

V. S. 101— Comparative Anatomy and Physiology 

V. S. 102— Animal Hygiene 

A. H. 11 1— Animal Nutrition 

Dairy 101— Dairy Production . . . . 

Dairy 105— Dairy Cattle Breeding 

Dairy 120— Dairy Seminar 

Electives 

Total 



-Semester- 
II 

3 
4 



16 



18 



3 
1 

4 

17 



DAIRY TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM* 

Technical Phase 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature; or 

Eng. 5, 6— Composition and English Literature 3 3 

Chem. 19— Quantitative Analysis . . 4 

fH. 5, 6— Histor)' of American Civilization 3 3 

Microb. 1— General Microbiology 4 

Bot. 1— General Botany 4 

Zool. 1— General Zoology . . 4 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 18 18 



*Students may elect to take either the Technical or the Business Phase. Dairy 1 
should be taken during the freshman year. 

fFor classiBcation tests and alternate courses, see American Civilization Program, 
General Information Catalog. 



45 



Dairy Curriculum 



Junior Year 

Chem. 31, 32— Elements of Organic Chemistry 

Chem. 32, 34— Elements of Organic Chemistry Laboratory. 

Microb. 133— Dairy Microbiology 

Dairy 40— Grading Dairy Products 

Dairy 108— Dairy Technology 

Dairy 110— Concentrated Milk, Cheese and Butter 

Sp. 7— Public Speaking 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics 

Phys. 1— Elements of Physics 

Electives 

Total 

Senior Year 

Dairy 109-Market Milk 

Dairy 1 12— Ice Cream 

Dairy 114— Special Laboratory Methods 

Dairy 1 1 6— Dairy Plant Management 

Dairy 120— Dairy Seminar 

Agr. Engr. Ill —Fundamentals of Food ^^rocessing 

Electives .^ 

Total 

Business Phase 
Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature; or 

Eng. 5, 6— Composition and English Literature 

fH. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 

Bot. 1— General Botany 

Zool. 1— General Zoology 

Microb. 1— General Microbiology 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 

Physical Activities 

Total 

Junior Year 

B. A. 10, 11— Organization and Control , 

B. A. 20, 21— Principles of Accounting , 

Sp. 7— Public Speaking 

Dairy 40— Grading Dairy Products 

Dairy 1 1 0— Concentrated Milk, Cheese and Butter 

A. E. 1 1 5-Marketing Dairy Products 

Microb. 133— Dairy Microbiology 

Electives 

Total 



-Semester- 
II 
2 
1 



19 



10 



17 



3 
1 

18 

2 

4 



4 
2 

3 

4 

18 



4 
4 
3 
1 
3 
6 

18 



3 
3 
1 

17 

2 
4 
2 
2 
4 



19 



fFor classification tests and alternate courses, see American Civilization Program, 
General Information Catalog. 



46 



Entomology CiiTuculum 

^-Scmester—s 

Senior Year 1 U 

Dairy- 108— Dairy Technology 4 

Dairy 109-Market Milk 4 

Dairy 1 12— Ice Cream Making . . 4 

Dairy 1 16— Dairy Plant Management . . 3 

Dairy 121— Dairy Seminar 1 

A. E. 11 1— Fundamentals of Food Processing 3 

Elcctives 9 9 

Total 20 17 



ENTOiMOLOGY 

This curriculum, which trains students for work in various tj-pes of private, 
commercial, State and Federal entomological positions, includes basic courses in 
Entomology and related fields. Most of the first two years is devoted to obtaining 
this essential background. In the junior and senior years the student, besides 
the required courses, will choose 18 credit hours from the following list according 
to his needs: A.H. 1; Agron. 1; Agron. 10; Microb. 131; Bot. 11; Bot. 123; Bot. 
124; Bot. 125; Chem. 31, 33; Chem. 32, 34; Dairy 1; French 1, 2; German 1, 2; 
Hort. 5, 6; Hort. 11; Hort. 58; Hort. 59; iMath. 5, 10, or 11; Physics 1, 2; Zool. 
104. Other electives in Entomology and related subjects are available to broaden 
the scope of the training. 

A student wishing an undergraduate minor in Entomology should take the 
introductory course (Ent. 1) and after consultation wuth the heads of both the 
major and minor departments wall select courses that will contribute most to the 
end he has in view. 



t—Semester^-\ 

Sojihomore Year I II 

Eng. 3, 4, or 5, 6 3 3 

Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry 4 4 

Ent. 2— Insect Morpholog)' 3 

Ent. 3— Insect Taxonomy . . 3 

Bot. 1— General Botany 4 

Alicrob. 1— General Microbiolog\' . . 4 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 18 18 



* Students planning to pursue this curriculum should elect Ent. I the second semes- 
ter of the freshman year. 

47 ► 



Horticulture Curriculum 



Junior Year 

fH. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 

Sp. 1, 2— Public Speaking 

Bot. 20— Diseases of Plants 

Ent. 105— Medical Entomology 

Ent. 101— Economic Entomology 

Courses from suggested list 

Electives 

Total 

Senior Year 

*'^*Ent. 110, Ill-Special Problems 

Ent. 1 12— Seminar 

**Ent. 116— Insect Pests of Ornamentals and Greenhouse Plants 
**Ent. 117— Insect Pests of Field Crops and Stored Products. . . 

**Ent 118— Insect Pests of Fruit and Vegetable Crops 

'^'^Ent. 119— Insect Pests of Domestic Animals 

Courses from suggested list 

Electives 

Total 



—Semester- 
I 11 



3 
2 
3 
3 

5 
3 

19 



3 
5 
6 

19 



1 


1 


1 


1 




3 


2 






3 


2 




4 


4 


6 


4 



16 



16 



HORTICULTURE 

'' ■ The Department of Horticulture offers instruction in pomology (fruits), 
olericulture (vegetables), floriculture (flowers) and ornamental horticulture, and 
processing of horticultural crops. These courses prepare students to enter com- 
mercial production and the horticultural industries such as fruit and vegetable 
processing and seed production. Students are likewise prepared to enter the allied 
industries as horticultural workers with fertilizer companies, equipment manu- 
facturers, and others. Students who wish to enter specialized fields of research 
and teaching may take advanced work in the department. A minimum of 24 
credit hours in horticultural courses is required for graduation. 



. fFor classification tests and alternate courses, see American Civilization Program, 
General Information Catalog. 

*'^'*' Students may satisfy this requirement in one semester, if their schedule permits, 
or expand the work and credits upon departmental approval. 

**Of these four courses each student is required to take only two. 



^ 48 




Students study farm sititiitiuns. 



Students learning to use chemical 
and microscopic methods for the 
ancdyzing of milk and its products. 




UNIVERSITY OF 

College Park Camp 




MARYLAND 
1958- 1959 





III II. DIM, COOK I.FI TEKS FOR (.LASS S(^:HEI)l'LES 

\rt> & Siiciuo— Kranci. Siolt Kcv Hall 

Nuricry School 

.\rmory 

ration 
Chcmiitry 
Coliicum 

Dairy — Turner Laboratory 
.\vialion Pivchologv Laboratory 
Dean ol" Women 

Agronomy — Botany — H. J. I'atterion Mall 
Counfcling Center 
Hortiiullure— Hol/apfcl Hall 
lemporarv Dorm.torv 
Jo„rnali.n; 
Activities Building— Cole Building 

nin — . Margaret Brent Hall 
Agricultural Ungr. — Shrivcr Laboratory 
Kngr. Classroom BIdg. 
Zoolog) — Silvester Hall 
l.ibrarv— Shoemaker Building 
Morrill Hall 
Geography 

.Vgncultuic- Simons Hall 
Industrial Arts St hduiation— J. M. I'alterson BIdg. 

& Public Administration — Taliarcrru Hall 
Building— Woods Hall 
Rngr. Laboratories 
Fducalion- Skinner Building 
Chem. F.ngr. 
Wind Funnel 
I'reinkert Field House 
Judging Pavilion 
Mathematic~s 
Physic. 

Poultry- Jull Hall 
Fngino Research Lab. (Molecular Phj.ics) 

ties Not Shown 
Phi Sigma Sigma 
Alpha C.hi Omega 
Alpha Xi Delia 
nilies Not Sho« n 
Alpha bpsiinn Pi 
Zeta Beta lau 
Phi Kappa Gamma 
Fau Epsilon Phi 



r«it 

IVfrr... • 

I' £ "Ut 



(Rig/if) Students gain first hand knowledge ^^g, 
of grade and quality of Maryland tobacco 
in the crops laboratory course. 




Students (below^ weld a small break in d 
piece of farm machinery as an illustration 
of the vahie of preventative repairs. 




Horticulture Curriculum 

POMOLOGY AND OLERICULTURE CURRICULUM 

r—Semester-^ 

Sophomore Year J U 
Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature; or 

Eng. 5, 6— Composition and English Literature 3 3 

Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry 4 4 

Bot. 20— Diseases of Plants 3 

Hort. 5, 6— Fruit Production 3 2 

Ilort. 58— Vegetable Production . . 3 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics . . 3 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

*Electives 2 

Total 19 19 

Junior Year 

fH. 5, 6— Historj' of American Ci\'ilization 3 3 

Agron. 10— General Soils . . 4 

Bot. 101-Plant Physiolog)' 4 

Bot. 117— General Plant Genetics . . 2 

Ent. 1 —Introduction to Entomology 3 

Hort. 59— Small Fruits '. . . 3 

*Electives 5 4 

Total 15 16 

Senior Year 

Bot. 1 1 l-Plant Anatomy 3 

Bot. 115— Structure of Economic Plants . . 3 

Bot. 125— Diseases of Fruit Crops or 2 

Bot. 126— Diseases of Vegetable Crops . . 2 

Ent. 1 1 8— Insect Pests of Fruit and Vegetable Crops . . 3 

Hort. 101, 102— Technolog}' of Fruits, or 

Hort. 103, 1 04— Technolog)' of Vegetables 2 2 

Hort. 118, 119-Seminar 1 1 

Sp. 7— Public Speaking 2 

*Electives 7-9 4-6 

Total 15-19 13-17 



*Note: 24 hours of Hort. courses required, and electives must include a minimum 
of seven hours from the following: Hort. 11 (3), Hort 22 (2), Hort 62 (3), Hort. 
106 (2), Hort. 107 (3), Hort. 108 (3), Hort. 114 (3), Hort. 116 (3), Hort. 122 

(2-4). 

t For classification tests and alternate courses, see American Civilization Program, 
General Information Catalog. 

49 ► 



Horticulture Curriculum 

FLORICULTURE AND ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURAL CURRICULUM 

r—Semester- 

So'phomore Year 1 II 
Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature; or 

Eng. 5, 6— Composition and English Literature 3 3 

Cliem. 1, 3— General Chemistry 4 4 

Bot. 1 1 —Plant Taxonomy . . 3 

Bot. 20— Diseases of Plants 3 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics 3 

Hort 16— Garden Flowers • • 3 

Hort. 22— Landscape Gardening 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Elective . . 2 

Total 19 19 

Junior Year 

fH. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 3 3 

Agron. 10— General Soils . . 4 

Bot 101— Plant Physiology 4 

Bot. 1 1 1— Plant Anatomy 3 

Bot. 123— Diseases of Ornamental Crops . . 2 

Hort. 1 1— Greenhouse Management . . 3 

Hort. 62— Plant Propagation 3 

Hort. 107, 108-Plant Materials 3 3 

Elective . . 1 

Total 16 16 

Senior Year 

Sp. 7— Pubhc Speaking 2 

Bot. 1 17— General Plant Genetics . . 2 

Hort. 105— Technology of Ornamentals 2 

Hort. 118, 119-Seminar 1 1 

Hort. 150, 151— Commercial Floriculture or 

Hort. 152, 153— Landscape Design 3 3 

Electives 8 9 

Total 16 15 



t For classification tests and alternate courses, see American Civilization Program,. 
Gieneral Information Catalog. 

•< 50 



Horticulture Curriculum 

PROCESSING OF HORTICULTURAL CROPS CURRICULUM 

r-Semesler-^ 
Sophomore Year I U 

Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature; or 

Eng. 5, 6— Composition and English Literature 3 3 

Chem. 31, 33— Elements of Organic Chemistry 2 2 

Chem. 32, 34— Elements of Organic Laboratory 1 1 

Microb. 1— General Microbiology 4 

Hort. 61— Processing Industries . . 1 

Phys. 1, 2— Elements of Physics 3 3 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Electives 2 3 

Total 19 17 

junior Year 

fH. 5, 6— Historjr of American Civilization 3 3 

G. & P. 1— American Government . . 3 

Agron. 10— General Soils . . 4 

Microb. 131— Food and Sanitary Microbiology 4 

Bot. 101-Plant Physiolog)' 4 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics . . 3 

Hort. 58— Vegetable Production . . 3 

Hort. 155, 156— Commercial Processing 3 2 

Zool. 1— General Zoology 4 

Total 18 18 

Senior Year 

Agr. Ehgr. 1 1 1 —Mechanics for Agrictiltural Processing 3 

Agr. Engr. 1 1 2— Machinery and Equipment for Food 

Processing . . 2 

Hort. 103, 1 04— Technology of Vegetables 2 2 

Hort. 118, 119-Seminar 1 1 

Hort. 121-Plant Operations . . 2 

Hort. 123— Grades and Standards for Canned and Frozen 

Products . . 2 

Hort. 124-Quality Control 3 

and one of the following options 

MANAGEMENT OPTION 

B. A. 150-Market Management 3 

B. A. 1 60— Personnel Management . . 3 

Electives 3 1 

TECHNOLOGY OPTION 

Chem. 1 9— Quantitative Analysis 4 

Hort. 1 26— Nutritional Analysis of Processed crops . . 2 

Electives 2 2 

Total 15 13 



t For classification tests and alternate courses, see American Civilization Program, 
General Information Catalog. 

51 ► 



—Sem: 


sster- 


I 


II 


3 


3 


4 


4 




2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


3 




3 


^ 


1 


1 



Poultry Husbandry Curriculum 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

The curriculum in Poultry Husbandry is designed to give the student a 
thorough knowledge of subject matter necessary for poultry raising; the market- 
ing, distribution, and processing of poultry products; poultry improvement work;, 
and as a basis for graduate training of teaching and research in poultry husbandry.. 

The suggested curriculum will be modified to meet the special needs of in- 
dividual students. Superior students, definitely anticipating preparation for a 
professional career in poultry husbandry, will be expected to take a language.. 
However, all students majoring in poultry husbandry will be required to com- 
plete 24 semester hours in Poultry Husbandry. 

POULTRY curriculum'^ 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6 

Ctiem. 1, 3— General Chemistry 

P. H. 2-Poultry Biology 

Sp. 1, 2— Public Speaking 

fH. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 

Math. 5— General Mathematics 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 

Physical Activities 

Total 19 18 

Junior Year 

P. H. 101-Poultry Nutrition 3 

P. H. 102-Physiology of Hatchability 3; 

P. H. 100-Poultry Breeding . . 2. 

''Zool. 20— Vertebrate Embryology . . 4~ 

Microb. 1— General Microbiology 4 

Zool. 104— Genetics 3 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics . . 3 

Agr. 1 00— Introductory Agricultural Biometrics 3 

Eng. 7— Technical Writing . . 2. 

Electives 4 3- 

Total 17 17 



* Students planning to pursue this curriculum should elect P. H. 1, the first semester 
of the freshman year. If Agron. 1 is not elected in the freshman year, it must be 
elected in a subsequent year. 

t For classification tests and alternate courses, see American Civilization Program^ 
General Information Catalog. 

'^* Required of students specializing in poultry genetics, physiology, or nutrition. 

•< 52 



**'" 



Special Curricula 

r-Semester—^ 
Senior Year I U 

P. H. 104— Technology of Market Eggs and Poultry 3 

A. E. 1 17— Economics of Marketing Eggs and Poultry . . 3 

V. S. 108-Avian Anatomy 3 

V. S. 107-Poultry Hygiene . . 3 

P. H. 103— Commercial Poultry Management . . 3 

P. H. 107— Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems 2 

Phys. 1— Elements of Physics 3 

Agr. Engr.— Elective 2-3 

Electives 3-4 10 

Total 13-15 19 

SPECIAL CURRICULA 

PRE-FORESTRY STUDENTS 

The College of Agriculture is glad to cooperate with any student who wishes 
to attend the University to pursue courses which may be transferred to a standard 
forestry curriculum in another institution. The program which a student fol- 
lows depends to some extent upon the forestry college he plans to enter. All pre- 
forestry students in the College of Agriculture are sent to the Department of 
Botany of the University for counsel and advice in these matters. 

PRE-THEOLOGICAL STUDENTS 

The College of Agriculture is glad to cooperate with the officers of any 
theological seminary who desire to urge its prospective students to pursue courses 
in agriculture as a preparation for the rural ministry. Such pre-theological stu- 
dents may enroll for a semester or more or for the usual four year training of 
the College. In either case they should enroll as members of the general curricu- 
lum in the College of Agriculture. 

The electives of this curriculum may be used for such pre-theological require- 
ments as seem desirable. Elections may be made from any of the offerings of 
the University such as history, political science, philosophy, agricultural eco- 
nomics, rural sociology, modem language, English, economics, psychology, sociol- 
ogy, natural science, education and the like. Students desiring to pursue a pre- 
theological program in the College of Agriculture of the University of Maryland, 
should consult with the president or admissions officer of the theological seminary 
which they expect to attend. 

PRE-VETERINARY STUDENTS 

The College of Agriculture is glad to cooperate with any student who wishes 
to attend the Unixersity to pursue preparation for the study of Veterinary Medi- 
cine. The curriculum which a student will follow will depend to some extent 
upon the Veterinary College which he plans to enter. All Pre-Veterinary stu- 

53 ► 



S'pecial Curricula 

dents in the college of Agriculture are sent to the Head of the Department of 
Veterinary Science of the University for counsel and advice in these matters. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS IN AGRICULTURE 

Mature students may, w^ith consent of the Dean, register as special students 
and pursue a program of studies not included in any regular curriculum, but 
arranged to meet the needs of the individual. All university fees for these special 
students are the same as fees for regular students. 

There are many young farmers who desire to take short intensive courses in 
their special lines of vi^ork during slack times on the farm. Arrangements have 
been made to permit such persons to register at the ofl&ce of the Dean of the Col- 
lege of Agriculture and receive cards granting them permission to visit classes 
and work in the laboratories of the different departments. This opportunity is 
created to aid florists, poultrymen and fruit-growers, gardeners, or other especially 
interested persons who are able to get away from their work at some time during 
the year. 

The regular charges are $10.00 for matriculation and $2.00 per credit hour 
per month for the time of attendance. One matriculation is good for any 
amount of regular or intermittent attendance during a period of four years. 



■< 54 



COURSE OFFERINGS 

The University reserves the ri^ht to withdraw or discontinue any course for 
which an insufhcient number of students have registered to warrant giving the 
course. In such an event, no fee will be charged for transfer to another course. 

Courses are designed by numbers as follows: 

1 to 99: courses for underoraduates. 

o 

100 to 199: courses for advanced undergraduates and graduates. (Not all 
courses numbered 100 to 199 may be taken for graduate credit.) 

200 to 299: courses for graduates only. 

A course with a single number extends through one semester. A course with 
a double number extends through two semesters. 

Courses not otherwise designated are lecture courses. The number of credit 
hours is shown by the arabic numeral in parentheses after the title of the course.. 

A separate schedule of courses is issued each semester, giving the hours, places 
of meeting, and other information required by the student in making out his pro- 
gram. Students obtain these schedules when they register. 



AGRICULTURE 

Agr. I. Introduction to Agricidture. (i) 

First semester. Required of all beginning freshmen and sophomores in Agriculture.. 
Other students must get the consent of the instructor. A series of lectures introducing 
the student to the broad field of agriculture. (Poffenberger.) 

Agr. 100. Introductory Agricultural Biometrics. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Introduction-, 
to fundamental concepts underlying the application of biometrical methods to agricul- 
tural problems with emphasis on graphical presentation of data, descriptive statistics, 
chi-square and t-tests, and linear regression and correlation. (Schultz.) 

Agr. 200. Agricultural Biometrics. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, 
Agr. Biom. 100 or equivalent. A continuation of Agr. 100 with emphasis on analysis 
of variance and co-variance, multiple and curvilinear regression, sampHng, experimental 
design and miscellaneous statistical techniques as applied to agricultural problems. 

(Schultz.) 

Agr. 202, 203. Advanced Biological Statistics. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, approval of instructor. An advanced course 
dealing with specialized experimental designs, sampling techniques and elaborations 
of standard statistical procedures as applied to the animal and plant sciences. 

(Schultz.) 

55 ►- 



Agricultural Economics and Marketing 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND MARKETING 

Professors: Poffenherger, Beat, Walker. 
Visiting Professor: Taylor. 
Associate Professors: Hamilton, Shull, Smith. 
Assistant Professor: Ishee, Wysong. 
Instructor: Nuckols. 

A. E. 50. Farm Economics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 37. A general course in agricultural economics, 
with special reference to population trends, the factors in agricultural production, agri- 
cultural wealth, land tenure, farm labor, agricultural credit, the tariff, price movements, 
and marketing. (^Taylor.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

A. E. SlOO A-B S-pecial Prohlems in Farm Economics, (i, J) 
Summer session only. An advanced course dealing extensively with some of the 
economic problems affecting the farmer, such as land values, taxation, credit, prices, 
production adjustments, transportation, marketing and cooperation. Designed primarily 
for teachers of vocational agriculture. (Staff.) 

A. E. 101. Marketing of Farm Products. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite Econ. 31, 32, or Econ. 37. The development of mar- 
keting, its scope, channels, and agencies of distribution, functions, costs, methods used 
and services rendered. (Wysong.) 

A. E. 103. Cooperation in Agriculture. (3) 

First semester. Historical and comparative development of farmers' cooperative organi- 
zations; reasons for failure and essentials to success; commodity developments; operative 
practices; banks for cooperatives; present trends. (Smith.) 

A. E. 104. Farm Finance. (3) 

Second semester. A study of credit principles as applied to private arid cooperative 
farm business and the agencies extending farm credit. The needs for and benefits of 
farm insurance, including fire, crop, livestock, and life insurance. (Ishee.) 

A. E. 106. Prices of Farm Products. C3^ 

Second semester. A general course in prices, price relationships, and price analysis, 

with emphasis on prices of agricultural products. ( ) 

A. E. 107. Analysis of the Farm Business. (3) 

First semester. A concise, practical course in the keeping, summarizing, and an- 
alyzing of farm accounts. (Hamilton.) 

A. E, 108. Farm Management. (3) 

Second semester. A study of the organization and operation of farms from the stand- 
point of efficiency, selection of farms, size of farms, leasing systems, and factors 
affecting profits. Students will make an analysis of the actual farm business and 
practices of different types of farms, and make specific recommendations as to how 
these farms may be organized and operate as successful businesses. (Hamilton.) 

^ 56 



Agricultural Economics and Marketing 

A. E. 109. Research Problems, (i-2) 

First and second semesters. With the permission of the instructor, students will 
work on any research problems in agricultural economics. There will be occasional 
class meetings for the purpose of making reports on progress of work. (Staff.) 

A. E. 110. Seminar. 0,0 

First and second semesters. Students will prepare and present reports on economic 

literature and current agricultural economic problems. (Hamilton.) 

A. E. 111. Land Economics. (3) 

First semester. A study of the principles, problems and policies in the utilization 

of land with special emphasis on agricultural land. (Ishee.) 

A. E. 112. Economic Development of American Agricxdture. (3) 
First semester. This course is designed to acquaint students with major economic 
development in American agriculture. It places particular emphasis upon the economic 
impact of major agricultural movements, such as, colonial agrarianism, the disposition 
of the public domain, farm organizations, recent governmental farm programs and the 
relationship of agriculture to public affairs. (Beal.) 

A. E. 114. Foreign Trade in Farm Prodticts. (3) 

First semester. Economic principles in historical setting, trade barriers, foreign ex- 
change problems, measures to promote trade, past and prospective trends of American 
imports and exports of farm products. CTaylor.) 

A. E. 115. Marketing of Dairy Products. (3) 

First semester. A study of principles and practices in the marketing of milk and 
manufactured dairy products, including the influence of significant geographical and 
institutional relationships on costs and methods of distribution. (Beal.) 

A. E. 116. Marketing of Fruits and Vegetables. (3) 

Second semester. A study of principles and practices in the marketing of fresh and 
processed fruits and vegetables, including the influence of significant geographical and 
institutional relationships on costs and methods of distribution. ( .) 

A. E. 117. Economics of Marketing Eggs and Potdtry. (3) 
Second semester. This course embraces the economic phases of egg and poultr)' 
marketing. Supply and demand factors, including trends, will be discussed along with 
marketing methods, marketing costs and margins, market facilities, transportation, 
government grading, storage and efficiency in marketing. Consumer preference, accept- 
ance and purchases will be related to consumer income, pricing of competitive products, 
and display methods. (Smith.) 

A. E. 118. Foreign Agricidtural Policies. (3) 

First semester. This course deals wdth how the agricultural policies of the United 
States and foreign countries of major agricultural importance are formulated and 
conducted. Specific policies are evaluated. The effect of various incentives and 
barriers to American ex-ports and imports of agricultural products is appraised with 
the assistance of visiting discussion leaders working at the policy level in the United 
States and other major agricultural countries. (Taylor.) 

57 ► 



-Agricultural Economics and Marketing 

A. E. 119. Foreign Agricultural Economics. (3) 

Second semester. This course deals with difiFerences between the agricultural economies 
of several countries and their significance to world-wide production, trade, and con- 
svmiption of the agricultural products of major importance to the United States. 
Special emphasis is given to the roles of institutional and governmental arrangements. 

(Taylor.) 

Technology of Market Eggs and Poultry. 
See Poultry Husbandry, P. H. 104. 

Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems. 
See Poultry Husbandry, P. H. 107. 

Market Milk. 
See Dairy 109. 

Livestock Markets and Marketing. 
See Animal Husbandry, A. H. 150. 

Meat and Meat Products. 

See Animal Husbandry, A. H. 160. 

Advertising. 

See Business Administration, B. A. 151. 

Retail Store Management. 

See Business Administration, B. A. 154. 

For Graduates 

A. E. 200, 201. Special Problems in Farm Economics. (2, 2) 
First and second semesters. An advanced course dealing extensively with some of the 
economic problems affecting the farmer, such as land values, taxation, credit, prices, 
production adjustments, transportation, marketing, and cooperation. (Staff.) 

A. E. 203. Research. 

Credit according to work accomplished. This course will consist of special reports 
by students on current economic subjects, and a discussion and criticism of the same by 
the members of the class and instructional staff". (Staff.) 

A. E. 202. Seminar, (i, 1) 

First and second semesters. Students will be assigned research in agricultural eco- 
nomics under the supervision of the instructor. The work will consist of original 
investigation in problems of agricultural economics. (Staff.) 

A. E. S207. Farm Business Analysis. (I) 

Simimer session only. An advanced course dealing with farm records and accounts. 

Designed especially for teachers of agriculture and county agents. (Hamilton.) 

-^ 58 



Agricultural Economics and Marketing 

A. E. 208. Agricultural Policy. (3) 

Second semester. The evolution of agricultural policy in the United States, em- 
phasizing the origin and de\elopment of governmental programs, and their effects upon 
agricultural production, prices and income. (Beal.) 

A. E. 210. Agriculttiral Taxation. (3) 

First semester. Principles, theory and practical problems of taxation applied to the 
field of agriculture; trends in farm taxes; farm tax burdens; equalizing and reducing 
farm tax burdens; taxation of farm cooperatives; forest lands and interstate agricultural 
commerce; application of income taxes and sales taxes to farmers; taxation of agri- 
culture in foreign countries. C Walker.) 

A. E. 211. Functional Aspects of Farm Taxation. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Taxation policies 
and inter-governmental allocations and grants-in-aid as they affect public services for 
rural people, with special emphasis on public education, public highways, public 
welfare, social security, public debt; and governmental research, extension, and regu- 
latory activities directly concerning agriculture. (Walker.) 

A. E. 214. Advanced Agricultural Marketing. (3) 

Second semester. Advanced study of the complex theoretical, institutional and legal 
factor governing both domestic and foreign agricultural trade, with particular atten- 
tion given to policies and practices affecting cost and price. ( ) 

A. E. 215. Advanced Agricultural Cooperation. (3) 

First semester. An appraisal of agricultural cooperation as a means of impro\ing 
the financial status of farmers. More specifically, the course includes a critical analysis 
and appraisal of specific types and classes of cooperatives. ( ) 

A. E. 216. Advanced Farm Management. (3) 

Second semester. An advanced course in farm orsanization and manaoemcnt which 
applies the economic principles of farm production to the operation of farms of different 
sizes, types, operations, and geographical locations. Consideration is also given to ad- 
justments which have taken place in farming specific areas and probable changes in the 
future. (Ishee.) 

A. E. S216 A-B. Advanced Farm Management, (i, O 

Summer session onlv. An advanced course in farm organization and management, 

especially designed for teachers of vocational agriculture. (Hamilton.) 

A. E. 218. Agricultural Economics Research Techniques. (3) 
First semester. A study and an appraisal of agricultural economics research tech- 
niques. Experience is given in outlining and conducting research projects. A critical 
appraisal is made of methods of analysis and the presentation of results. (Beal.) 

A. E. 219. Advanced Land Economics. (3) 

Second semester. A critical analysis of the principles and problems in issuing and 
controlling land resources, including a review of land policies, is given, with special 
consideration being placed on the problems of submarginal lands, range lands, and 

59 ► 



Agricultural Education and Rural Life 

water resources. Conservation o£ various land resources is appraised; problems of 
landed property are presented; and criteria essential to the development of a sound 
Jand policy are studied. ( ) 

A. E. 220. World Agricultural Production. (3) 

First semester. A world-wide appraisal of the economic significance of the growth 
of population, changes in food and fiber requirements, development of land resources, 
development of crop and livestock productivity, substitute or supplementary products 
from factory and sea, the economic imbalance between developed and under-developed 
countries, financial and social limitations, and organized international agricultural 
development activities. (Taylor.) 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 

Professors: Ahalt, Warner. 
Assistant Professor: Hopkins. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

R. Ed. 101. Teaching Farm Fracticuvis and Demonstrations. (2) 
First semester. Two laboratory periods a week. This course is designed to assist 
the student in relating the learning acquired with the problems of doing and demon- 
strating Vv'hich he faces in the field and in the classroom as a teacher of agriculture. 

(Hopkins.) 

J^. Ed. 103. Practice Teaching. (5) 

First semester. Open only to students majoring in Agricultural Education who have 
a satisfactory scholastic average. Five weeks, full time. Under the direction of a 
supervising teacher and the supervision of a teacher-trainer the student is required to 
analyze and prepare special units of subject matter in agriculture, plan and teach 
lessons, supervise farming programs of students and otherv.^ise perform the duties of 
a high school teacher of vocational agriculture. Not less than 125 clock hours, exclu- 
sive of observation, shall be required. (Ahalt.) 

R. Ed. 104. Practice Teaching. C^-4^ 

First and second semesters. Registration concurrent or after R. Ed. 103. One to 
four weeks full time. To provide students an opportunity to gain experience in 
farming program supervision, the opening of school, and in other teaching activities 
not generally a part of R. Ed. 103. (Ahalt.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

R. Ed. 107. Observation and Analysis of Teaching Agricidture. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. This course 

deals with an analysis of pupil learning in class groups. (Ahalt, Hopkins.) 

R. Ed. 109. Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture. (3) 

First semester. A comprehensive course in the work of high school departments of 

vocational agriculture. It emphasizes particularly placement, supervised farming pro- 

-< 60 



Agricultural Education and Rural Life 

grams, the organization ami administration of Future Farmer activities, and objectives 
and methods in all-day instruction. (Ahalt, Hopkins.) 

B. Ed. 111. Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Groups, (i) 
First semester. Characteristics of young and adult farmer instruction in agriculture. 
Determining needs for and organizing a course; selecting materials for instruction; and 
class management. Emphasis is on the conference method of teaching. Cf^opl^ins.) 

E. Ed. 112. Departmental Management, (i) 

Second semester. One laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, R. Ed. 107 and 109, 
or permission of the head of the department. The analysis of administrative programs 
for high school departments of vocational agriculture. Investigations and reports. 

(Ahalt, Hopkins.) 

R. Ed. 114. Rural Life and Education. (3) 

Second semester. An intensive study of the educational agencies at work in rural 
•communities, stressing an analysis of school patronage areas, the possibilities of normal 
life in rural areas, early beginnings in rural education, and the conditioning effects of 
educational offerings. CAhalt.) 

R. Ed. 150. Extension Education. (2) 

Second semester. The Agricultural E.xtension Service as an educational agency. The 
histon', philosophy, objectives, policy, organization, legislation and methods used in ex- 
tension work. CWarner.) 

jR. Ed. 160. Agricidtural Information Methods. (2) 

First semester. General introduction to agricultural public relations programs, in- 
cluding writing for and use of newspapers, magazines, direct mail, radio, and television; 
and protiuctian and use of visual aids such as photographs, slides, exhibits, and posters. 

(Warner.) 



For Graduates 

R. Ed. 201, 202. Rural Life and Education. O, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, R. Ed. 114 or equivalent. A sociological 

approach to rural education as a movement for a good life in rural communities. 

(Ahalt, Flopkins.) 

R. Ed. 207, 208. Problems in Vocational Agrictdture. (2, 2) 
First and second semesters. In this course special emphasis is placed upon the 
current problems facing teachers of vocational agriculture. It is designed especially for 
persons who have had several years of teaching experience in this field. 

(Ahalt, Hopkins.) 

R. Ed. S207 A-B. Problems in Teachitig Vocational Agriculture, (i-i) 
Summer session only. A critical analysis of current problems in the teaching of 
vocational agriculture with special emphasis upon recent developments in all-day 
programs. 

61 ► 



Agricultural Education and Rural Life 

R. Ed. S208 A-B. Problems in Teaching Farm Mechanics. (J-J) 

Siunmer session only. The latest developments in the teaching of Farm Mechanics. 

Various methods in use will be compared and studied under laboratory conditions. 

R. Ed. S209 A-B. Adult Education in Agriculture. (1-i) 

Summer session only. Principles of adult education as applied to rural groups, 
especially young and adult farmers. Organizing classes, planning courses and instruc- 
tional methods are stressed. 

R. Ed. S210 A-B. Land Grant College Education. Ql-O 

Summer session only. Development of Land Grant Colleges and Experiment Sta- 
tions and the role they have played in improving conditions in rural communities. 

R. Ed. S211 A-B. Agricultural Extension Service Education. Cl-O 
Summer session only. Development of the extension service. Types of demonstra- 
tions and instruction used. The role of the County Agricultural and Home Demon- 
stration Agents and 4-H Clubs in the development of rural society. 

R. Ed. S212 A-B. Educational Functions of Rural Institutions. (I-i) 
Summer session only. The part of rural institutions in developing and supporting 
education for rural areas, with special emphasis on the various phases of agricultural 
education. 

R. Ed. S213 A-B. Swpervision and Administration of Vocational Agriculture. 

Summer session only. Administrative and supervisory problems in Vocational Agri- 
culture including scheduling, local administrative programs, supervisor-teacher relation- 
ships and the responsibilities of superintendents and principals in the program. 

R. Ed. 215. Supervision of Student Teaching. (J) 

Arranged. The role of the supervising teacher in checking progress, supervising and 
grading student teachers. Particular emphasis will be given to the region-wide program 
in training teachers of vocational agriculture, including the evaluation of beginning 
teachers. (AhaltO 

R. Ed. 220. Field Problems in Rural Education. (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, six semester hours of graduate study. Prob- 
lems accepted depend upon the character of the work of the student and the facilities 
available for study. Periodic conferences required. Final report must follow accepted 
pattern for field investigations. (Ahalt, Hopkins.) 

R. Ed. 240. Agricultural College Instruction. (J) 

Second semester. Open to graduate students and members of the faculty in the 
College of Agriculture. A seminar type of course consisting of reports, discussions, and 
lectxires dealing vdth the techniques and procedures adapted to teaching agricultural 
subjects at the college level. (Ahalt.) 

R. Ed. 250. Seminar in Rural Education. (1, i) 

First and second semesters. Problems in the organization, administration, and super- 
vision of the several agencies of rural education. Investigations, papers, and reports. 

(Staff.) 

-^ 62 



Agricultural Engineering 

R..Ed. S250 A-B. Seminar in Rural Education, (i-i) 

Summer session only. Current problems of teaching agriculture are analyzed and 

discussed. Students are required to make investigations, prepare papers and make 

reports. 

R. Ed. 215. Research. 

Credit hours according to work done. CStaflF.) 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Professor: Carpenter. 
Associate Professor: Gienger. 
Assistant Professor: Matthews. 
Instructor: George. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Agr. Engr. 101. Farm Machinery. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. This course covers 
the design and construction of modern farm machinery' as applied to selection and 
use. The operation, adjustments, maintenance, and certain economics of owning 
and operating farm machines are included. Laboratory work consists of detailed 
studies of the actual machines, their operation, adjustments, minor repairs and 
cahbration where applicable. (George.) 

Agr. Engr. 102. Farm. Engines and Tractors. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. This course is 
a study of the fundamental principles of construction, operation, and maintenance 
of farm engines and tractors. A detailed study is made of carburetors, generators and 
regulators, ignition systems, transmissions, and differentials. Diesel and L.P. Gas 
systems are also included. (Matthews, Gienger.) 

Agr. Engr. 104. Farm Mechanics. (2) 

First semester. Two laboratory periods a week. Available only to seniors in agri- 
cultural education. This course consists of laboratory exercises in practical farm 
shop and farm equipment maintenance, repair, and construction projects; and a 
study of the principles of shop organization and administration. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

(Gienger.) 

Agr. Engr. 105. Farvi Buildings. (2) 

First semester. A study of all types of farm structures; also of farm heating, water 

supply and sanitation systems. (Matthews.) 

Agr. Engr. 106. Farm Mechanics. (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. A study of tools, 
equipment, and skills needed in a general farm shop for mechanized farming. Practice 
in welding, cold metal and sheet metal work is provided. Also tool fitting, woodwork, 
plumbing, concrete, and blue print reading. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Gienger.) 

63 ► 



Agronomy— Crofs and Soils 

Agr. Engr. 107. Farm Drainage and Irrigation. (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. A study of farm 
drainage systems with emphasis on tile drainage, open ditch drainage, and use of 
engineering instruments. Emphasis will be placed on open ditch drainage laws in 
Maryland. Principles of irrigation will be covered with emphasis on the design and 
operation of the sprinkler system. (Matthews.) 

Agr. Engr. 109. Farm AffUcations of Electricity. (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. This course covers 
the fundamentals of wiring practices, design of farmstead distribution systems, selec- 
tion and use of electrical equipment, and the application of electricity to specific 
jobs such as lighting, heating, cooling, and power applications. (George.) 

Agr. Engr. 111. Mechanics for Agricultural Processing. (3 ) 
First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. A study of the 
fundamentals of physics and mechanics and how they are applied in agriculture. 
Included are the basic laws and applications of mechanics, power transmission, heat 
and heat transfer, fluid flow, refrigeration, instruments, and lighting. Course off^ered 
alternate years. (Not off'ered 1958-59.) (Matthews.) 

Agr. Engr. 112. Machinery and Equifment for Food Processing. (2) 
Second semester. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Agr. 
Engr. 111. A study of the mechanical and engineering operations pertaining to food 
processing plants. Emphasis is placed on machinery and equipment for processing 
methods, plant sanitation, plant maintenance, and materials handling. Plant layout 
and design is also included. (Matthews.) 

Course ofiFered alternate years. (Not offered 1958-59.) 

AGRONOMY— CROPS AND SOILS 

Professors: Wagner, Street. 

Associate Professors: Axley, Bentz, Bourheau, Leffel, Strickling. 
Assistant Professors: Decker, Newcomer, Santelmann, Younts. 
Instructor: Meade. 

A. CROPS 

Agron. 1. Crop Production. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Culture, use,. 

improvement, adaptation, distribution, and history of field crops. (Santelmann.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Agron. 101. Senior Seminar. (I) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Agron. 107, 108. Reports by seniors on currerit 

scientific and practical publications pertaining to crops. (Santelmann.) 

Agron. 153. Selected Crop Studies. (J) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Agron. 107, 108. Advanced individual study of field 

crops of special interest to the student. 

M 64 



Agronomy— Crops and Soils 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Agroti. 103. Crop Breeding. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 117 or Zool. 104. (Not offered in 1959-1960.) The 
principles o£ breeding as applied to field crop plants and methods used in plant im- 
provement. (Leffel.) 

Agron. 104. Tobacco Production. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. A study of the history, 
adaptation, distribution, culture, and improvement of various types of tobacco, with 
special emphasis on problems in Maryland tobacco production. Physical and chemical 
factors associated with yield and quality of tobacco will be stressed. (Street.) 

Agron. 107. Cereal Crop Production. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. 
(Not offered 1959-1960.) Study of the principles and practices of corn, wheat, oats, 
barley, rye, and soybean production. (Santelmann.) 

Agron. 108. Forage Crop Production. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
Bot. 1. Study of the production and management of grasses and legumes for quality 
hay, silage and pasture. (Decker.) 

Agron. 109. Turf Management. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. (Not offered 1958-1959.) A 
study of principles and practices in management of turf for lawns, athletic fields, 
playgrounds, airfields, and highway planting. ( ) 

Agron. 151. Cropping Systems. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 1 or equivalent. The 
coordination of information from various courses in the development of balanced cro- 
ping systems, appropriate to different objectives in various areas of the State and 
Nation. (Wagner.) 

Agron. 152. Seed Production and Distribution. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 1 
or equivalent. (Not offered 1958-1959.) A study of seed production, processing, and 
distribution; Federal and State seed control programs; seed laboratory analyses; release 
of new varieties and maintenance of foundation seed stocks. (Newcomer.) 

Agron. 154. Weed Control. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laborator)' period a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 1 
or equivalent. (Not offered 1958-1959.) A study of the use of cultural practices and 
chemical herbicides in the control of weeds in Held crops and turf. (Santelmann.) 

For Graduates 

Agron. 201. Advanced Crop Breeding. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. (Not offered 1958-1959.) 

Similar to Aaron. 103, but better adapted to graduate students and offering a wider 

range of choice of material to suit special cases. (Leffel.) 

65 ► 



Agronomy— Crops and Soils 

Agron. 203. Cro-p Seminar. (I, I) 

First and second semesters. Presentation of original work or review of literature oik 

agronomic topics. (Street.)^ 

Agron. 204. Technic in Field Crop Research. (2) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1959-1960.) Field plot technic, application of statisti- 
cal analysis to agronomic data, and preparation of the research project. ( ) 

Agron. 205. Biogenesis of Tobacco. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. CNot 
offered 1959-1960.) A study of the structural adaptation of tobacco to environmental 
and experimental variations. (Street. )•- 

Agron. 206, 207. Recent Advances in Crop Production. (2, 2) 
First semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. (Agron. 
206 not offered in 1958-1959.) A study of recent advances in research techniques, 
and findings pertaining to crop production. (Staff.) 

Agron. 208. Research Methods. (2-4) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, permission of staff. Development of research view-^ 
point by detailed study and report on crop research of the Maryland Experiment 
Station or review of literature on specific phases of a problem. (Staff.) 

Agron. 209. Research in Crops. 

First and second semesters. Credit according to work accomplished. With approval 

or suggestion of the Professor in charge of his major work the student will choose his- 

own problem for study. (Staff.); 

Agron. S210. Cropping Systems. (I) 

Smnmer session only. An advanced course primarily designed for teachers of voca- 
tional agriculture and county agents. It deals with outstanding problems and the 
latest developments in the field. (Wagner.)^ 

Agron. 211. Biosynthesis of Tobacco. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. (Not- 
offered 1958-1959.) A study of the composition of tobacco with emphasis on the 
alkaloids and other unique components. (Street.) 



B. SOILS 

Agron. 10. General Soils. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one laboratory period each week. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 1 or permission of instructor. A study of the fundamentals of soils including; 
their origin, development, relation to natural sciences, effect on civilization, physical, 
properties, and chemical properties. (Younts.) 



66 



Agronomy— Crops and Soils 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Agron. Si 10. Soil Management, (i) 

Summer school only. An advanced course primarily designed lur teachers of Voca- 
tional Agriculture and County Agents dealing with factors involved in management of 
soils in general and of Maryland soils in particular. Emphasis is placed on methods of 
maintaining and improving chemical, physical, and biological characteristics of soils. 

(Strickling.) 

Agron. 111. Soil Fertility Principles. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 10. (Not offered in 1959- 
1960.) A study of the chemical, physical, and biological characteristics of soils that 
are important in growing crops. Soil deficiencies of physical, chemical or biological 
nature and their correction by the use of lime, fertilizers, and rotations are discussed 
and illustrated. (Strickling.) 

Agron. 112. Commercial Fertilizers. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 10 or permission of 

instructor. A study of the manufacturing and distribution of commercial fertilizers. 

(AxleyO 

Agron. 113. Soil Conservation. QS') 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 
10 or permission of instructor. (Not offered 1959-1960.) A study of the importance 
and causes of soil erosion, and methods of soil erosion control. Special emphasis is 
placed on farm planning for soil conservation. The laboratory period will be largely 
devoted to field trips. (Bentz.) 

Agron. 114. Soil Classifcation and Geography. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 
10, or permission of instructor. A study of the genesis, morphology, classification and 
geographic distribution of soils. The broad principles governing soil formation are ex- 
plained. Attention is given to the influence of geographic factors on the development 
and use of the soils in the United States and other parts of the world. The laboratory 
periods will be largely devoted to field trips and to a study of soil maps of various 
countries. (Bourbeau.) 

Agron. 116. Soil Chemistry. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 
10. (Not offered 1959-1960.) A study of the chemical composition of soils; cation 
and anion exchange; acid, alkaline and saline soil conditions; and soil fixation of 
plant nutrients. Chemical methods of soil analysis will be studied with emphasis 
on their relation to fertilizer requirements. (Axley.) 

Agron. 117. Soil Physics. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Agron. 
10 and a course in physics, or permission of instructor. (Not offered in 1958-1959.) 
A study of physical properties of soils with special emphasis on relationship to soil pro- 
ductivity. (Strickling.) 

67 ► 



Animal Husbandry 

Agron. 118. Special Problems in Soils. (I) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Agron. 10 and permission of instructor. A detailed 

study, including a written report, of an important soil problem. C Staff.) 

Agron. 119. Soil Mineralogy. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
permission of instructor. (Not offered in 1958-1959.) A study of the fundamental 
laws and forms of crystal symmetry and essentials of crystal structure; structure, occur- 
rence, association and uses of minerals, determination of minerals by means of their 
morphological, chemical and physical properties. Particular attention is given to soil- 
forming minerals. Laboratory periods will be devoted to a systematic study of about 
75 minerals. (Bourbeau.) 

For Graduates 

Agron. 250. Advanced Soil Mineralogy. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 10, Agron. 119 and 
permission of instructor. (Not offered 1959-1960.) A study of the structure, physi- 
cal-chemical characteristics and identification methods of soil minerals, particularly the 
clay minerals, and their relationship to soil and productivity. (Bourbeau.) 

Agron. 251. Advanced Methods of Soil Investigation. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 10 and permission of in- 
structor. (Not offered 1958-1959.) An advanced study of the theory of chemical meth- 
ods of soil investigation vidth emphasis on problems involving application of physical 
chemistry. (Axley.) 

Agron. 252. Advanced Soil Physics. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 
Agron. 10 and permission of instructor. (Not offered 1958-1959.) An advanced study 
of physical properties of soils with special emphasis or relationship to soil productivity. 

(Strickling.) 
Agron. 253 Advanced Soil Chemistry. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, permis- 
sion of instructor. (Not offered 1959-1960.) A continuation of Agron. 116 with em- 
phasis on soil chemistry of minor elements necessary for plant growth. (Axley.) 

Agron. 255. Soil Seminar. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 

(Axley, Bentz.) 
Agron. 256. Soil Research. 
First and second semesters. Credit according to work done. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Professors: Foster, Green. 

Assistant Professors: Buric, Leffel, Wingert. 

A. H. J. Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. A study of the gen- 

< 68 



Animal Husbandry 

cral problems in breeding, feeding, management and marketing of beef cattle, sheep, 
swine and horses. Practice is given in the selection of animals to meet market demands. 
Field trips may be made to near-by farms and packing plants. (Staff.) 

A. H. 30. Types and Breeds of Livestock. C3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, A. H. 
1. A study of the various types and breeds of livestock, their development, characteris- 
tics and adaptability. Practice is given in selection according to standards of excellence. 

CStaff.) 

A. H. 90. Livestock Jtidging. (2) 

Second semester. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, A. H. 30 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Training is given in the judging of beef cattle, sheep, swine and 
horses. Occasional trips are made to farms where outstanding herds and flocks are main- 
tained. (Buric.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

/{. H. 100. A.dvanced Livestock Judging. (2) 

First semester. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, A. H. 90 and permission 
of instructor. An advanced course in the selection and judging of purebred and com- 
mercial meat and work animals. The most adept students enrolled in this course are 
chosen to represent the University of Maryland in intercollegiate livestock judging con- 
tests. (Buric.) 

A. H. 110. Leeds and Feeding. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 
1,3. Elements of nutrition; source, characteristics, and adaptability of the various feeds 
to the several classes of livestock; feeding standards; the calculation and compounding 
of rations. (Leffel.) 

A. H. 130. Beef Cattle Production. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, A. H. 1, 
A. H. 110. Principles and practices underlying the economical production of beef 
cattle, including a study of the breeds and their adaptability; selection, breeding, feed- 
ing, management and marketing of purebred and commercial herds. (Foster.) 

A. H. 131. Sheep Production. O^ 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, A. H. 
1, A. H. 110. Principles and practices underlying the economical production of sheep, 
including a study of the breeds and their adaptability; selection, breeding, feeding, 
management and marketing of purebred and commercial flocks. (Leffel.) 

A. IL 132. Swine Production. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratorj' period a week. Prerequisites, A. H. 
1, A. H. 110. Principles and practices underlying the economical production of swine, 
including a study of the breeds and their adaptability; selection, breeding, feeding, man- 
agement and marketing of purebred and commercial herds. (Wingert.) 



69 



Animal Husbandry 

A. H. 734. Light Horse Production, (i) 

First semester. One lecture a week. Prerequisite, A. H. 1. Study of the light horse 
breeds with emphasis on the types of usefulness of each. A discussion of principles 
of selection and breeding of light horses is included in this course. CLeffel.) 

A. H. 135. Light Horse Production. (I) 

Second semester. One lecture a week. Prerequisite, A. H. 1. Included is a study of 
the organization of the light horse farm, proper methods of feeding and training, control 
of disease, treatment and care of injuries, sale of surplus stock. (Leffel.) 

A. H. 140. Livestock Management. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, A. H. 
110. A course designed to offer practical experience in working with livestock, espe- 
cially to students who lack farm experience. Provides opportunities for students to 
learn practical methods of handling and managing beef cattle, sheep, and swine. 
Practice and training in fitting animals for shows and sales. (Buric.) 

A. H. 160. Meat and Meat Products. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, A. H. 
1. Designed to give information on the processing and handling of the nation's meat 
supply. A study of the physical and structural qualities which effect the value of meat 
and meat products. Trips are made to packing houses and meat distributing centers. 

(Wingert.) 

A. H. 170, 171. Seminar. (J, I) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Advanced under- 
graduates will be required to review literature, present reports and discuss assigned 
topics relating to Animal Husbandry. (Staff) 

A. H. 172, 173. Special Problems in Animal Husbandry. (1-2, 1-2) 
First and second semesters. Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. Pre- 
requisite, approval of staff. A course designed for advanced imdergraduates in which 
specific problems relating to Animal Husbandry will be assigned. (Staff.) 

VoT Advanced Undergraduates and Gradtmtes 

A. H. HI. Animal Nutrition. O^ 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 31, 32, 33, 34; A. H. 110. 
Graduate credit allowed, with permission of instructor. Processes of digestion, absorp- 
tion, and metabolism of nutrients; nutritional balances; nature of nutritional require- 
ments for growth, production and reproduction. (Leffel.) 

A. H. 120. Principles of Breeding. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Zool. 104 and A. H. 130 or A. 
H. 131 or A. H. 132 or Dairy 101. Graduate credit (1-3 hours), allowed with per- 
mission of instructor. The practical aspects of animal breeding, heredity, variation, 
selection, development, systems of breeding, and pedigree study are considered. 

(Green.) 

^ 70 



Botany 

A. H. SI 30. Beef Cattle, (i) 

Summer session only. This course is designed primarily for teachers of Vocational Ag- 
riculture and Extension Service Workers. Principles and practices underlying the eco- 
nomical production of beef cattle, including a study of the breeds and their adapta- 
bility; selection, breeding, feeding, management and marketing of purebred and com- 
mercial herds. (Foster.) 

A. H. 150. Livestock Markets and Marketing. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, A. H. I. Graduate credit allowed, 
with permission of instructor. History and development of livestock markets and sys- 
tems of marketing; trends of livestock marketing; effect of changes in transportation 
and refrigeration facilities; the merchandising of meat products. (Wingert.) 

For Graduates 

A. H. 200, 201. Special Problems in Animal Husbandry. (,1-2, 7-2) 
First and second semesters. Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. Pre- 
requisite, approval of staff. Problems will be assigned which relate specifically to the 
character of work the student is pursuing. (Staff.) 

A. H. 202, 203. Seminar, (i, J) 

First and second semesters. Students are required to prepare papers based upon cur- 
rent scientific publications relating to Animal Husbandry or upon their research work, 
for presentation before and discussion by the class. (Staff.) 

A. H. 204. Research. 0-6^ 

First and second semesters. Credit to be determined by amount and character of work 
done. With the approval of the head of the department, students wall be reqmred to 
pursue original research in some phase of Animal Husbandry, carrying the same to com- 
pletion, and report the results in the form of a thesis. (Staff.) 

A. H. 205. Advanced Breeding. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, A. H. 120 or equivalent and Bio- 
logical Statistics. This course deals with the more technical phases of heredity and 
variation; selection indices; breeding systems; inheritance in farm animals. (Green.) 

A. H. 206. Advanced Livestock Management. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, approval 
of staff. An intensive study of the newer developments in animal breeding, animal 
physiology, animal nutrition, endocrinology, and other closely allied fields as they ap- 
ply to the management and commercial production of livestock. (Staff.) 

BOTANY 

Professors: Bamford, Gauch, Cox, Weaver. 

Associate Professors: Brown, D. T. Morgan, Bafpleye, Krauss. 

Assistant Professors: O. D. Morgan, Sisler, Jenkins, Kantzes, Wilson. 

Instructor: Paterson. 

Lecturer: Wetherell. 

Bot. 1. General Botany. (4) 

First and second semesters. Summer. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. 

General introduction to botany, touching briefly on all phases of the subject. Empha- 

71 ► 



Botany 

sis is on the fundamental biological principles of the higher plants. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. 

Bot. 2. General Botany. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week . Prerequisite, Bot. 
1 or equivalent. A brief evolutionary study of algae, fungi, liverworts, mosses, ferns and 
their relatives, and the seed plants, emphasizing their structure, reproduction, habitats, 
and economic importance. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Bot. 11. Plant Taxonomy. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1, 
or equivalent. A study of the principles of plant classification, based on the collection 
and identification of local plants. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Bot. 20. Diseases of Plants. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1, 
or equivalent. An introductory study of the S)Tnptoms and causal agents of plant dis- 
eases and measures for their control. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 



For Advanced Undergraduates 

Bot. 110. Plant Microtechnique. C3^ 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. L 

Principles and methods involved in the preparation of permanent microscope slides of 

plant materials. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Paterson.) 

Bot. 112. Seminar. (O 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Discussion of special 
topics, current literature, problems and programs in all phases of botany. For seniors 
only, majors and minors in botany or biological science. CBrown.} 



A. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bot. 101. Plant Physiology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 1 
and General Chemistry. A survey of the general physiological activities of plants. Lab- 
oratory fee, $5.00. (Gauch and Krauss.) 

Bot. 102. Plant Ecology. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 1 , 
or equivalent. A study of plants in relation to their environments. Plant successions 
and formations of North America are treated briefly and local examples studied. Lab- 
roatory fee, $5.00. (Brovm.) 



M 72 



Botany 

For Gradtuites 

Bot. 200. Plant Biochemistry. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Bot. 101 and elementary organic chemistry, or equivalent. 
A study of the important substances in the composition of the plant body and the 
chemical changes occurring therein. (Wetherell.) 

Bot. 201. Plant Biochemistry Laboratory. (2) 

First semester. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 200 or concurrent 
registration therein. Application of apparatus and techniques to the study of the chem- 
istry of plant materials. Laboratory fee, $10.00. CWetherell.) 

Bot. 202. Plant Biophysics. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Bot. 101 and introductory physics, or equivalent. (Not 
offered 1958-1959.) An advanced course dealing with the operation of physical phe- 
nomena in plant life processes. CWetherell.) 

Bot. 203. Biophysical Methods (2) 

Second semester. Two laboratory periods a week. (Not offered 1958-1959.) Laboratory 

course to accompany Bot. 202. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Wetherell.) 

Bot. 204. Growth and Development (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, 12 semester hours of plant science. (Not offered 1958- 

1959.) (Krauss.) 

Bot. 205. Mineral Nutrition of Plants. (2) 

Second semester. Reports on current literature are presented and discussed in connec- 
tion with recent advances in the mineral nutrition of plants. (Gauch.) 

Bot. 206. Research in Plant Physiology. 

Credit according to work done. Student must be qualified to pursue with profit the re- 
search to be undertaken. (Gauch, Krauss.) 

Bot. 207. Special Topics in Plant Physiology. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. This course on highly special- 
ized subjects, usually will be presented by a specialist who is a\'ailable at a neighbor- 
ing institution. 

Bot. 208. Seminar in Plant Physiology. (]) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Discussion of special 

topics in plant physiology. (Gauch, Krauss.) 

Bot. 209. Physiology of Algae. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 201, 
the equivalent in allied fields, or permission of the instructor. (Not offered 1958-1959.) 
A study of the physiology and comparative biochemistry of the algae. Laboratory tech- 
niques and recent advances in algal nutrition, photosjTithesis, and growth will be re- 
viewed. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Krauss.) 

73 ► 



Botany 

B. PLANT MORPHOLOGY AND TAXONOMY 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bot. HI. Plant Anatomy. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 110, 
or equivalent. The origin and development of the organs and tissue systems in the 
vascular plants. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Rappleye.) 

Bot. 113. Plant Geografhy. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 1, or equivalent. A study of plant distribution 

throughout the world and the factors generally associated with such distribution. 

(Brown.) 

Bot. 114. Advanced Plant Taxonomy. C3') 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 11, 
or permission of instructor. Principles and criteria of systematic botany. Study of diffi- 
cult plant groups, especially grasses, sedges, legumes and composites with collection and 
identification of native species. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Brown.) 

Bot. 115. Structure of Economic Plants. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 
111. A detailed microscopic study of the anatomy of the chief fruit and vegetable 
crops. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Rappleye.) 

Bot. 116. History and Philosophy of Botany. (J) 

First semester. Prerequisite, 15 semester hours of botany. Discussion of the develop- 
ment of ideas and knowledge about plants, leading to a survey of contemporary work 
in botanical science. (Bamford.) 

Bot. 117. General Plant Genetics. (2') 

The basic principles of plant genetics are presented, the mechanics of transmission of 
the hereditary factors in relation to the life cycle of seed plants, the genetics of 
specialized organs and tissues, spontaneous and induced mutations of basic and eco- 
nomic significance, gene action, genetic maps, the fundamentals of polyploidy, and 
genetics in relation to methods of plant breeding are the topics considered. 

(D. T. Morgan.) 
Bot. 135. Aquatic Plants. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 and 
Bot. 11, or equivalent. (Not offered 1958-1959.) A study of the taxonomy and ecology 
of aquatic plants, especially those of importance in fisheries and wild life management. 
Field trips and collections will be made. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Bot. 136. Plants and Mankind. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 or equivalent. A survey of the plants which are 
utilized by man; the diversity of such utilization, and their historic and economic sig- 
nificance. (Rappleye.) 

Bot. 15 IS. Teaching Methods in Botany. (2) 

Summer. Five two-hour laboratory and demonstration periods per week; 10:00-11:00; 

E-307. Prerequisite, Bot. 1, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00 A study of the bio- 

■^ 74 



Botany 

logical principles of common plants, and demonstrations, projects, and visual aids suit- 
able tor teaching in primary and secondary schools. 

For Graduates 

Bot. 211. Cytology. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Introduc- 
tory Genetics. A detailed study of the chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis, and the re- 
lation of these to current theories of heredity and evolution. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

(Bamford, D. T. Morgan.) 

Bot. 212. Plant Morphology. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 11, 
Bot. Ill, or equivalent. A comparative study of the morphology of the Howering 
plants, with special reference to the phylogeny and development of floral organs. Lab- 
oratory fee, $5.00. (Rappleye.) 

Bot. 213. Seminar in Plant Cytology and Morphology. (2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Discussion of spe- 
cial topics in plant morphology, anatomy, and cytology. (D. T. Morgan, Rappleye.) 

Bot. 214. Research in Plant Cytology and Morphology. 

Credit according to work done. (Bamford, D. T. Morgan, Rappleye.) 

Bot. 215. Plant Cytogenetics. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Introduc- 
tory Genetics. (Not oft'ered 1958-1959.) An advanced study of the current status of 
plant genetics, particularly gene mutations and their relation to chromosome changes in 
corn and other favorable genetic materials. Laboratory fee, $10.00 (D. T. Morgan.) 

Bot. 219. Special Topics in Plant Morphology and Cytology. (2) 
First semester. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. This course treats specialized sub- 
jects very intensively. It will usually be given by a lecturer from a neighboring insti- 
tution. 



C. PLANT PATHOLOGY 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bot. 122. Research Methods in Plant Pathology. (2) 

First or second semester. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or 
equivalent. Advanced training in the basic research techniques and methods of plant 
pathology. Laboratory fee, $5.00 each semester. (Jenkins.) 

Bot. 123. Diseases of Ornamental Plants. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. (Not offered 1958-1959.) Symp- 
toms, control measures, and other pertinent information concerning the diseases which 
affect important ornamental plants grown in the eastern states. (Wilson.) 

75 ► 



Botany 

Bot. 124. Diseases of Tohacco and Agronomic Crofs. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. The symptoms and control of the 

diseases of tobacco, forage crops and cereal grains. CO- D. Morgan.) 

Bot. 125. Diseases of Fruit CrofS. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. (Not offered 1958-1959.) Symp- 
toms and control of the diseases affecting fruit production in the eastern United States, 

C Weaver.) 

Bot. 126. Diseases of Vegetable Crops. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. The recognition and control of 
diseases affecting the production of important vegetable crops groviTi in the eastern 
United States. (Cox.) 

Bot. 128. Mycology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 
2, or equivalent. An introductory study of the morphology, classification, life histories, 
and economics of the fungi. Laboratory fee, $5.00. CWilson.) 

Bot. 141. Nematode Disease of Plants. C2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 20 or permission of instructor. (Not offered 1958- 
1959.) Designed to acquaint students in agricultural sciences with the role of nema- 
todes as plant pathogens; study of representative diseases caused by nematodes; prin- 
ciples and practice of control. (Jenkins.) 

Bot. 152S. Field Plant Pathology. (J) 

Simimer. Daily lectvure first three weeks, 8:00; E-307. Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equiva- 
lent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Not offered 1958.) A course for county agents and 
teachers of vocational agricidture. Discussion and demonstration of the important dis- 
eases in Maryland crops. (Cox and Staff.) 

For Graduates 

Bot. 221. Virus Diseases. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 
20 and Bot. 101. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Consideration of the physical, chemical and 
physiological aspects of plant viruses and plant diseases. (Sisler.) 

Bot. 223. Physiology of Fungi. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Organic Chemistry and Bot. 101 or the equivalent in bac- 
terial or animal physiology. A study of various aspects of fungal metabolism, nutrition, 
biochemical transformations, fungal products, and mechanism of fungicidal action. 

(Sisler.) 

Bot. 224. Physiology of Fungi Laboratory. (I) 

First semester. One laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, Bot. 223 or concurrent 
registration therein. Application of equipment and techniques in the study of fungal 
physiology. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Sisler.) 

Bot. 225. Research in Plant Pathology. 

Credit according to work done. (Staff.) 

■^ 76 



Dairy 

Bot. 226. Plant Disease Control (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. An advanced course dealing with 

the theory and practices of plant disease control. CCox.) 

Bot. 228. Special Topics in Plant Pathology (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. This course on very specialized 
phases of plant pathology will usually be given by a lecturer from a neighboring in- 
stitution. 

Bot. 229. Seyni^iar in Plant Pathology. (I) 

First and second semesters. Discussion on the advanced technical literature of plant 

patholog)'. (Cox.) 

Bot. 241. Plant Nematology. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, permis- 
sion of instructor. (Not offered I958T959.) Detailed study of the nematodes parasitic 
on plants, their general morphology, taxonomy, reproduction, embrj'ology, physiology, 
and ecology. Special emphasis will be given to recent advances in plant nematology. 
Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Jenkins.) 

DAIRY 

Professors: Arhuckle, Shaw. 
Associate Professors: Davis, Keeney, Mattick. 
Assistant Professors: Day, Hemken. 
Instructor: Seely, 

A, DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Dairy I. Fjindamentals of Dairying, (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. This course is 
designed to cover the entire Held of dairying. The content of the course deals with all 
phases of dairy cattle feeding, breeding and management and the manufacturing, pro- 
cessing, distribution and marketing of dairy products. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

(Davis, Mattick.) 

Dairy 10. Dairy Cattle Management, (i) 

First semester. One laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Dair)' 1. A manage- 
ment course designed to familiarize students with the practical handling and manage- 
ment of dairy cattle. Students are given actual practice and training in the Uni- 
versity dairy barns. (Davis.) 

Dairy 20. Dairy Breeds and Selection. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. A detailed study of 
the dairy breeds, factors which have contributed to the success and failure of modem 
breeding establishments and standards of excellence in the selection of breeding cattle. 

(Dans.) 

Dairy 30. Dairy Cattle Judging. (2) 

Second semester. Two laboratory periods a week. This course offers complete in- 

77 ► 



Dairy 

struction in the selection and comparative judging of dairy cattle. Trips to various 
dairy farms for judging practice will be made. CDavis.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Dairy 101. Dairy Production. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Dairy 1, 

A. H. 110. A comprehensive course in dairy cattle nutrition, feeding, and herd 
management. (Hemken.) 

Dairy 103. Physiology of Milk Secretion. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites, 
Zool. 1, Organic Chemistry. (Alternate years, given in 1959-1960.) The anatomy,, 
evolution and metabolism of the mammary gland including hormonal control and 
the biosynthesis of milk constituents. CShaw.) 

Dairy 105. Dairy Cattle Breeding. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 
Dairy 1, Zool. 104. (Alternate years given in 1958-1959.) A specialized course in 
breeding dairy cattle. Emphasis is placed on methods of sire evaluation, system of 
breeding, breeding programs, and artificial breeding techniques. (Davis.) 

Dairy 120. Dairy Seminar, (i) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, students majoring in dairy production. Dairy lOlj 
students majoring in dairy products technology, Dairy 108. Presentation and dis- 
cussion of current Hterature and research work in dairying. (Staff.) 

Dairy 124. Special Problems in Dairying, A (i-4) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Dairy 101. Credit in accordance with the 
amount and character of work done. Special problems will be assigned which relate 
specifically to the work the student is pursuing. (Staff.) 

B. DAIRY TECHNOLOGY 

Dairy 40. Grading Dairy Products. (2) 

Second semester. Two laboratory periods a week. Market grades and the judging 

of mOk, butter, cheese, and ice cream. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Day.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Dairy 108. Dairy Technology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
Dairy 1, Microb. 133, Chem. 1, 3. Composition standards for milk and milk products, 
critical interpretation and application of practical factory methods of analyses for fat 
and solids; quality tests. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Keeney.) 

Dairy 109. Market Milk. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 

Dairy 1, Microb. 133, Chem. 1, 3. Commercial aspects of the market milk industry 

M 78 



Dairy 

relating to transportation, processing, and distribution; operation of a market milk 
plant; quality problems; chocolate milk, buttermilk and cottage cheese. Laboratory 
lee, $3.00. (Day.) 

Dairy 110. Concentrated Milk, Cheese and Butter. (4) 

Fall semester. Two lectures and one live-hour laboratory a week. Prerequisites, 
Dairy 1, Microb. 133 or equivalent; Chcm. 1, 3. Methods of production of butter, 
cheese, condensed and evaporated milk and milk products. Consideration is given to 
the procedures of processing, quality control and the physio-chemical principles in- 
volved. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Mattick.) 

Dairy 112. Ice Cream Making. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Dairy 
108. The ice cream industry; commercial methods of manufacturing ice cream; 
fundamental principles; ingredients; controlling quality. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

(ArbuckJe.) 

Dairy 114. S'pecial Laboratory Methods. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
Dairy 108, Microb. 133, Chem. 19, 31, 32, 33, 34. Application of analytical methods 
to milk, milk products and milk constituents. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Staff.) 

Dairy 116. Dairy Plant Management. (3) 

Second semester. Two lecture periods and one three-hour laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisites, at least three advanced dairy products technology courses. Principles of 
dairy plant management record systems; personnel, plant design and construction; 
dairy machinery and equipment. (Mattick.) 

Dairy 124. S^pecial Prohlems in Dairying. B (2-4) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Dairy 108, 109. Credit in accordance 
with the amount and character of work done. Special problems will be assigned which 
relate specihcally to the work the student is pursuing. (Staff.) 

For Grad2iates in Dairy Hushandry and Dairy Technology 

Dairy 201. Advanced Ruminant Nutrition. (3) 

First semester. Three one-hour lectures per week. Prerequisites, A. H. 110 or Dairy 
101, Organic Chemistry and permission of Department. (Alternate years, given in 
1958-1959.) Biochemical, physiological and bacteriological aspects of the nutrition 
of ruminants and other animals. (Shaw and Davis.) 

Dairy S201. Advanced Dairy Production (i) 

Summer session only. An advanced course primarily designed for teachers of voca- 
tional agriculture and county agents. It includes a study of the newer discoveries in 
dairy cattle nutrition, breeding and management. (Staff.) 

Dairy 202. Advanced Dairy Technology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Dairy 108, 114 or equivalent. Milk and milk products 
from physio-chemical and bio-chemical points of view, with attention directed to hvdro- 
gen ion concentration, electrometric titration, oxidation-reduction, electrometric conduc- 
tivity, buffer system of milk, milk enzymes. (Keeney.) 

79 ► 



Entomology 

Dairy 204. Special Prohlems in Dairying, els') 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, permission " of Professor in charge of work 
Credit in accordance with the amount and character of work done. Methods 6t 
conducting dairy research and the presentation of resuhs are stressed. A research 
problem which relates specifically to the work the student is pursuing will be assigned. 

CStaff.) 

Dairy 205. Seminar. CO 

First semester. Assigned readings in current literature on timely topics; preparation 

and presentation of reports for classroom discussion. - - (^gj^ff^^ 

Dairy 206. Advanced Dairy Research Seminar. (I) 

Second semester. Discussion of fundamental research in Dairy Science. 

Dairy 208. Research. Q -8) 

First and second semesters. Credit to be determined by the amount and quality of 
work done. Original investigation by the student of some subject assigned by the 
Major Professor, the completion of the assignment and the preparation of a thesis in 
accordance with requirements for an advanced degree. (Staff.) 



ENTOMOLOGY 

Professor: Bickley. 

Assistant Professors: Ahrams, Harrison, Haviland, Johnson. 

Lecturers: Jones, Sailer, Shepard. 

Ent. 1. Introductory Entomology. (3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisite, one semester of college Zoology. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The position of 
insects in the animal kingdom, their gross structure, classification into orders and 
principal families and the general economic status of insects. A collection of common 
insects is required. 

Ent. 2. Insect Morphology. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Ent. 

1. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Intensive study of the external structures and less intensive 
study of the internal anatomy of representative insects with special reference to those 
phases needed for work in insect taxonomy and biology. 

Ent. 3. Insect Taxonomy. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Ent. 

2. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Intensive study of the classification of all orders and the 
important families based on individual collections supplemented by typical material 
from the department collection. 

Ent. 4. Beekeeping. (2) 

First semester. A study of the life history, behavior and seasonal activities of the 
honey-bee, its place in pollination of flowers with emphasis on plants of economic 
importance and bee lore in literature. 

-< 80 



Entomology 

Ent. lis. E^Jtotnology for Science Teachers. (3) 

Summer. Two lectures and three two-hour laboratory periods per week. This 
course is designed to help teachers utilize insects in their teaching. The general 
availability of insects makes them especially desirable for use in nature study courses. 
Teachers should be acquainted, therefore, with the simplest and easiest ways to collect, 
rear, preserve, and identify the common insects about which students are constantly 
asking questions. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Ent. 100. Advanced Apiculture. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods. Prerequisite, 
Ent. 4. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Not offered in 1958-1959.) The theory and prac- 
tice of apiary management. Designed for the student who wishes to keep bees or 
requires a practical knowledge of bee management. (Abrams.) 

Ent. 101. Economic Entomology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of the department. (Not offered in 1958- 
1959.) An intensive study of the theory and problems of applied entomology, 
including life historj', ecology, behavior, distribution, parasitism and control. 

Ent. 105. Medical Entomology. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a week Pre- 
requisite, Ent. 1, or consent of the department. Laboratory fee, $3.00. A study of 
insects and related anthropods that affect the health and comfort of man directly and 
as vectors of disease. In discussions of the control of such pests the emphasis will be 
upon community sanitation. (Bickley.) 

Ent. 106. Advanced Insect Taxonomy. (3) 

First semester. Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Ent. 3. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Principles of systematic entomology and intensi\'e study of 
limited groups of insects, including immature forms. (Bickley.) 

Ent. 107. Insecticides (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of the department. The development and 
use of contact and stomach poisons, fumigants and other important chemicals, with 
reference to their chemistry, to.xic action, compatibility, and host injur\'. Recent re- 
search emphasized. (Shepard.) 

Ent. 109. Insect Physiology. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures and occasional demonstrations. Prerequisite, consent 
of the department. The functioning of the insect body with particular reference to 
blood, circulation, digestion, absorption, excretion, respiration, reflex action and the 
nervous system, and metabolism. (Jones.) 

Ent. 110, 111. Special Problems. O, O 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, to be determined by the department. May 
be taken concurrently. An intensive investigation of some entomological problem, 
preferably of the student's choice. Required of majors in entomology. (Staff.) 

81 ► 



Entomology 

Ent. 112. Seminar. (I, J) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, senior standing. Presentation of original 

work, reviews and abstracts of literature. (Staff.) 

Ent. 113. Entomological Literature, (i) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, junior standing. (Not offered in 1958-1959.) A 
study of entomological publications and good scientific writing. Preparation of bibli- 
ographies. (Bickley.) 

Ent. 115. Quarantine Procedures. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of the department. Lectures on the principles 
and procedures involved in preventing the introduction of foreign pests and the limi- 
tation of spread of endemic or introduced pests. (Johnson.) 

Ent. 116. Insect Pests of Ornamentals and Greenhouse Plants. (3) 
Second semester. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisite, Ent. 1 or consent of the department. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The recog- 
nition, biology, and control of insects injurious to plants grown in ornamental plant- 
ings, nurseries, and under glass. (Haviland.) 

Ent. 117. Insect Pests of Vield Crops and Stored Products. (2) 
First semester. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
Ent. 1 or consent of the department. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The recognition, 
biology and control of insects injurious to com, small grains, legumes, cotton, tobacco, 
stored grains, seeds, and cereal products. (Harrison.) 

Ent. 118. Insect Pests of Fruit and Vegetable Crops. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one two hour-laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisite, Ent. 1 or consent of the department. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Not offered 
in 1958-1959.) The recognition, biology and control of insects injurious to important 
fruit and vegetable crops. (Harrison.) 

Ent. 119. Insect Pests of Domestic Animals. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
Ent. 1 or consent of the department. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The recognition, biology, 
and control of insects and related arthropods injurious to horses, cattle, hogs, sheep, 
goats, and poultry. (Haviland.) 

For Graduates 

Ent. 201. Advanced Entomology. 

Credit and prerequisites to be determined by the department. First and second semesters. 
Studies of minor problems in morpholog)^ taxonomy and applied entomology, with 
particular reference to the preparation of the student for individual research. 

(Staff.) 

Ent. 202. Research 

First and second semesters. Required of graduate students majoring in Entomology. 
This course involves research on an approved project. A dissertation suitable for pub- 
lication must be submitted at the conclusion of the studies as a part of the require- 
ments for an advanced degree. (Staff.) 

< 82 



Forestry, Horticulture 

Ent. 203. Advanced Insect Morphology. (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Lab- 
oratory fee, $3.00. Insect structure with special reference to function. Emphasis 
on internal anatomy. Given in preparation tor advanced work in physiology or 

research in morphology. 

Ent. 205. Insect Ecology. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
consent of the department. Laboratory fee, $3.00. A study of fundamental factors 
in\'olved in the relationship of insects to their environment. Emphasis is placed on 
the insect as a dynamic organism adjusted to its surroundings. (Sailer.) 

Ent. 206. Bionomics of Mosquitoes. (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Lab- 
oratory fee, $3.00. (Alternates with Ent. 203; not offered in 1958-1959.) The classi- 
fication, distribution, ecology, biology, and control of mosquitoes. (Bickley.) 

FORESTRY 

Assistant Professor: Enright. 

For. 30. Elements of Forestry. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 1 . A general survey of the field of forestry, including timber values, 
conservation, protection, silviculture, utilization, mensuration, engineering, recreation 
and lumbering. Principles and practices of woodland management. Not opened to 
juniors or seniors. 

HORTICULTURE 

Professors: Hant, Kramer, Link, Scott, Shanks, Stark, Thompson. 
Associate Professors: Reynolds, Shoemaker. 
Assistant Professors: Britton, Enright, Wiley. 
Instructor: Todd. 

Hort. 1. General Horticidture. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. L 
A general basic course planned to give the student a background of methods and 
practices used in production of horticulture crops. 

Hort. 5, 6. Fruit Production. (3, 2) 

First and second semesters. One or two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 
Courses must be taken in sequence. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. A study of commercial varie- 
ties and the harvesting, grading, and storage of fruits. Principles and practices in 
fruit tree production. One field trip required. 

Hort. 11. Greenhouse Management. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 

Bot. 1. A detailed study of greenhouse construction and management. 

83 ► 



Horticulture 

Hort. 16. Garden Flowers. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. 
The various species of annuals, herbaceous perennials, bulbs, bedding plants, and 
roses and their cultural requirements. 

Hort. 22. Landscape Gardening. (2) 

First semester. The theory and general principles of landscape gardening and their 

application to private and public areas. 

Hort. 56. Elements of Landscape Design. (2) 

Second semester. Two laboratory periods per v/eek. A course dealing with basic 
design in the use of trees, shrubs, evergreens, annual and perennial flowering plants on 
home properties. 

Hort. 58. Vegetable Production. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 

Bot. 1. A study of the principles and practices of commercial vegetable production. 

Hort. 59. Small Fruits. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
Bot. 1. A study of the principles and practices involved in the production of small 
fruits including grapes, strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, and cranberries. 

Hort. 61. Processing Industries. (J) 

Second semester. Early history and development of the various types of preserva- 
tion of horticultural crops, such as canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling or brining. 
The relative importance of these methods on state, national and world-vvide bases are 
emphasized. 

Hort. 62. Plant Propagation. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. 

A study of principles and practices of propagation of horticultural plants. 

Hort. 63. Flower Store Management. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 

Hort. 11. Laboratory fee, $5.00. A study of the operation and management of a flower 

store. Laboratory period devoted to principles and practice of floral arrangements and 

decoration. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Hort. 118, 119. Seminar. (I, I) 

First and second semesters. Oral presentation of the results of investigational work 

by reviewing recent scientific literature in the various phases of horticulture. C Start.) 

Hort. 121. Plant Operations. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Agr. 
Engr. Ill, 112, Hort. 155. Course deals with arrangement of machinery and equip 
ment in proper sequence to insure the most economical operation of commercial 
processing plants, providing for continuous flow through the factory. Field trips to 
commercial plants included. (Wiley.) 

-< 84 



Horticulture 

Hort. 152. Landscape Design. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Hort. 
22. Prerequisite or concurrently Hort. 107. A consideration of the principles of land- 
scape design and supplemented by direct application in the drafting room. 

CShoemaker.) 

Hort. 153. Landscape Design. (3) 

Second semester. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Hort. 152. Ad- 

\'anccd lantlscape design. (Shoemaker.) 

Hort. 160. Landscape Maintenance. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites or 
concurrently, Hort. 107, 108. A study of the planting and maintenance of turf, orna- 
mental shrubs and trees. Basic principles of park and estate maintenance included. 

(Enright.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Hort. 101, 102. Technology of Fruits. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Hort. 6, Bot. 101. A critical analysis 
of research work and application of the principles of plant physiology, chemistry, and 
botany to practical problems in commercial production. (Thompson.) 

Hort. 103, 104. Technology of Vegetables. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Hort. 58, Bot. 101. For a description of 

these courses see the general statement under Hort. 101, 102. (Stark.) 

Hort. 105. Technology of Ornamentals. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. A study of the physiological plant processes 
as related to the growth, flowering, and storage of floriculture and ornamental plants. 

(Link.) 

Hort. 106. World Fruits and Nuts. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. A study of the tropical and subtropical 

fruits and nuts of economic importance. (Haut.) 

Hort. 107, 108. Plant Materials. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Bot. 11. A field and laborator\' study of 

trees, shrubs, and vines used in ornamental plantings. (Enright.) 

Hort. 114. Systematic Pomology. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Hort. 
5, 6. A study of the origin, history, taxonomic relationships, and description of fruits. 

(Haut.) 

Hort. SI 15. Truck Crop Management. (^1^ 

Summer session only. Primarily designed for teachers and vocational agriculture 
and extension agents. Special emphasis will be placed upon new and improved methods 
of production of the leading truck crops. Current problems and their solution will 
receive special attention. 

85 ► 



Horticulture 

Hort. 116. Systematic Olericulture. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Hort. 58. 

A study of the classification and nomenclature of vegetable crops. (Reynolds.) 

Hort. 122. Special Prohlems. Q2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Credit arranged according to work done. For major 

students in horticulture or botany. (Staff.} 

Hort. 123. Grades and Standards for Canned and Frozen Products. (2) 
Second semester. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Hort. 124. 
Factors considered in grading. Actual grading of principal products and critical 
appraisal for quality improvement. (Kramer.) 

Hort. 124. Quality Control. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Hort. 
58, 155, 156. This course covers the principles involved in the evaluation of 
factors of quality in processed foods including appearance, kinesthetic flavor and sanita- 
tion factors, and statistical presentation of results. (Kramer.) 

Hort. S124. Tree and Small Fruit Management. (J) 

Summer session only. Primarily designed for vocational agriculture teachers and 
county agents. Special emphasis will be placed upon new improved commercial 
methods of production of the leading tree and small fruit crops. Current problems and 
their solution will receive special attention. 

Hort. S125. Ornamental Horticulture. CO 

Summer session only. A course designed for teachers of agriculture, home demonstra- 
tion agents and county agents. Special emphasis will be given to the development of 
lawns, flowers and shrubbery to beautify homes. 

Hort. 126. Nutritional Analyses of Processed Crops, (2) 

Second semester. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 33, 34, 

Bot. 101, Hort. 123. Laboratory practice in standard methods for determining mineral, 

vitamin, carbohydrate, protein and other food values of various fruit and vegetable 

products. 

Hort. 150, 151. Commercial Floricidture. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisites, Hort. 1 1 . Growing and handling bench crops and potted plants, and the 
marketing of cut flowers. (Link.) 

Hort. 155. Commercial Processing I. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 
Chem. 32, 34, Hort. 61. Laboratory fee, $5.00. The fundamentals of canning, 
freezing, and dehydration of horticultural crops. (Wiley.) 

Hort. 156. Commercial Processing U. (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Hort. 
155. A continuation of Commercial Processing 1. Also includes actual work in 
laboratory of manufacture of jams, jellies, conserves, preserves, marmalades, and juices. 

(Wiley.) 

< 86 



Horticulture 

Hon. 159. Nursery Management. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites or 

concurrently, Hort. 62, 107, 108. A study of all phases of commercial nursery 
management and operations. (Not offered 1958-1959.) CEnright.; 

Tor Graduates 

Hort. 200— Exf erimental Procedures in Plant Sciences. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Organization of research projects 
and presentation of experimental results in the field of biological science. Topics 
included wall be: Sources of research financing, project outline preparation, formal 
progress reports, public and industrial supported research programs, and technical and 
popular presentation of research data. (Haut.) 

Hort. 201, 202. Experimental Pomology. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. A systematic review of scientific 
Lnowledge and practical observations as applied to commercial practices in pomology. 

(Thompson. ) 

Hort. 203, 204. Experimental Olericulture. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. A systematic review of scientific 
knowledge and practical observations as applied to commercial practices in olericulture. 

(Stark.) 

Hort. 205. Experimental Olericulture. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. A systematic review of scientific knowledge 

and practical observations as applied to commercial practices in olericulture. (Stark.) 

Hort. 206. Experimental Floriculture. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. A systematic review of scientific knowledge 

and practical observations as applied to commercial practices in floriculture. (Link.) 

Hort. 207. Methods of Horticultural Research. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and one four-hour laboratory period a week. A critical 

studv of research methods which are or may be used in horticulture. (Scott.) 

Hort. 208. Advanced Horticidtiiral Research. (2-12) 

First and second semesters. Credit granted according to work done. (Staft.) 

Hort. 209. Advanced Seminar. (I, J) 

First and second semesters. Five credit hours for five semesters can be obtained. 
Oral reports with illustrative material are required on special topics or recent research 
publications in horticulture. (Haut and Staff.) 

Hort. 210. Experimental Processing. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, pemiission of instructor. A svstematic review of scientific 
knowledge and practical observations as applied to commercial practices in processing. 

(Kramer.) 

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Poultry Husbandry 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

Professors: Shaffner, Comhs, 
Associate Professor: Quigley. 
Assistant Professors: Helhacka, Wilcox. 

P. H. 1. Poultry Production. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. This is a general 
comprehensive course covering all phases of modern poultry husbandry practices, in- 
cluding breeds, incubation, brooding, housing, feeding, culling, marketing, caponizing, 
and the economics of production and distribution of poultry products. 

P. H. 2. Poultry Biology. (2) 

Second semester. This course is designed to provide basic information as a founda- 
tion for other courses. The zoological classification of and structural differences among 
domestic birds are considered in their relation to food production. 

P. H. 59. Advanced Poultry Judging. (I) 

First semester. Prerequisite, P. H. 1. One lecture or laboratory period per week. 
The theory and practice judging and culling by physical means is emphasized, including 
correlation studies of characteristics associated with productivity. Contestant for re- 
gional collegiate judging competitions vidll be selected from this class. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

P. H. 100. Poultry Breeding. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Not offered in 1958-1959.) Prerequisite, P. H. 1 
or 2 and Zool. 104. One lecture and one laboratory period per week. Inheritance of 
factors related to egg and meat production and quality are stressed. Breeding plans 
are discussed. C Wilcox.) 

P. H. 101. Poultry Nutrition. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Not offered in 1958-1959.) Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Nutritive requirements of poultry and the ingredients 
used to meet these requirements are presented. Studies are made of various nutritional 
diseases commonly encountered under practical conditions. (Combs.) 

P. H. 102. Physiology of Hatchahility. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 
(Not offered in 1959-1960.) The physiology of embryonic development as related to 
principles of hatchahility and problems of incubation encountered in the hatchery in- 
dustry are discussed. Laboratory exercises stressing fundamentals of hatchahility are 
assigned. (Shaffner.) 

P. H. J 03. Commercial Poultry Management. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. Prerequisite, ten hours of poultry husbandry, in- 
cluding P. H. 1. (Not offered in 1958-1959.) A symposium on finance, investment, 
plant layout, specialization, purchase of supplies, and management problems in baby 
chick, egg, broiler, and turkey production; foremanship, advertising, selling, by-products, 
production and financial records. Field trips required. (Quigley.) 

< 88 



Poultry Hushandry 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

P. H. 104. Technology of Market Eggs and Poultry. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Not offered in 1959-1960.) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period per week. A study of the technological factors concerned with the 
processing, storage, and marketing of eggs and poultry, and of the factors affecting their 
quality and grading. (Helbacka.) 

A. E. 117. Economics of Marketing Eggs and Poultry. C^^ 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. (See Agricultural Economics A. E. 117.) 

Poidtry Hygiene, see Veterinary Science, V. S. 107. 

Avian Anatomy, see Veterinary Science, V. S. 108. 

P. H. 107. Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems. (2) 
First semester. (Not offered in 1959-1960.) Relation of poultry to agriculture as a 
whole and its economic importance. Consumer prejudices and preferences, production, 
transportation, storage, and distribution problems are discussed. Trends in the industry, 
surpluses and their utilization, poultry by-products, and disease problems, are presented. 
Federal, State, and private agencies servicing the poultry industry and functions per- 
formed by each agency are discussed. (Staff.) 

P. H. 108. Special Poxdtry Problems, (i-2) 

First and second semesters. For senior poultry students. The student will be assigned 
special problems in the field of poultry for individual study and report. The poultry 
staff should be consulted before any student registers for this course. (Staff.) 

P. H. Sill Poultry Breeding and Feeding, (i) 

Summer session only. This course is designed primarily for teachers of vocational 
agriculture and extension service workers. The first half will be devoted to problems 
concerning breeding and the development of breeding stock. The second half will be 
devoted to nutrition. (Combs, Wilcox.) 

P. H. SI 12. Poultry Products and Marketing, (i) 

Summer session only. This course is designed primarily for teachers of vocational 
agriculture and county agents. It deals with the factors affecting the quality of poultry 
products and with hatchery management problems, egg and poultry grading, pre- 
servation problems and market outlets for Maryland poultr)'. (Helbacka.) 

For Graduates 

P. H. 201 Advanced Poultry Genetics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, P. H. 100 or equivalent. This course ser\'es as a founda- 
tion for research in poultry genetics. Linkage, crossing-over, inheritance of sex, tlie 
expression of genes in development, inheritance of resistance to disease, and the 
influence of the environment on the expression of genetic capacities are considered. 

(Wilcox.) 



89 ► 



Veterinary Science 

P. H. 202. Advanced Poultry Nutrition. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
P. H. 101, Chem. 31, 32, 33 and 34, or equivalent, or permission of instructor. A 
fundamental study of the dietary role of proteins, minerals, vitamins, antibiotics, and 
carbohydrates is given as well as a study of the digestion and metabolism of these 
substances. Deficiency diseases as produced by the use of synthetic diets are con- 
sidered. (Combs.) 

P. H. 203. Physiology of Reproduction of Poultry. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, P. H. 
102 or its equivalent. The role of the endocrines in avian reproduction, is considered. 
Fertility, sexual maturity, broodiness, egg formation, ovulation, and the physiology of 
oviposition are studied. Comparative mammalian functions are discussed. (Shaffner.) 

P. H. 204. Poultry Seminar. (O 

First and second semesters. Oral reports of current researches by staff members, 

graduate students, and guest speakers are presented. (Staff.) 

P. H. 205. Poultry Literature. QA^ 

First and second semesters. Readings on individual topics are assigned. Written re- 
ports required. Methods of analysis and presentation of scientific material are dis- 
cussed. (Staff.) 

P. H. 206. Poultry Research. 0-6^ 

First and second semesters. Credit in accordance vdth work done. Practical and 
fundamental research with poultry may be conducted under the supervision of staff 
members tovv^ard the requirements for the degrees of M.S. and Ph.D. (Staff.) 

P. H. 207. Poultry Nutrition Lahoratory. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. (Not 
offered 1959-1960.) To acquaint graduate students vidth common basic nutrition re- 
search techniques useful in conducting experiments with poultry. Actual feeding trials 
Mrith chicks, as well as bacteriological and chemical assays will be performed. 

(Combs, Romoser.) 



VETERINARY SCIENCE 

Professors: Brueckner, Poelma, DeVolt, Hansen, Reagan. 
Associate Professors: S ferry, Byrne. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

V. S. 101. Comparative Anatomy. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Normal structure of 

the domesticated animals; normal physiological activities; interrelationship of structure 

and function. (Sperry.) 

V. S. 102. Animal Hygiene. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Nature of disease; 

immunity; prevention and control; common diseases of farm animals. (Sperry.) 



•^ 90 



Vetermary Scietice 

V. S. 103. Regional Coni-parative Anatomy. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Structure and function 
ol' the teet of domestic species. Common diseases and abnormalities of the feet; their 
correction and prevention. (Sperry.) 

V. S. 104. Advanced Regional Comparative Anatomy. (2) 
Second semester. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, V. S. 
103. Advanced studies of the anatomy and physiology of the feet of domesticated 
animals. Advanced and detailed studies of abnormalities and diseases of the feet; their 
prevention and correction. 

V. S. 107. Potdtry Hygiene. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Microb. 
I, P. H. 1. Virus, bacterial, and protozoon diseases; parasitic diseases; prevention, con- 
trol, and eradication. (DeVolt.) 

V. S. 108 Avian Anatomy and Physiology. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, Zool. 1. Gross 

and microscopic structure, physiological processes; dissection and demonstration. 

(De Volt.) 

For Graduates 

V. S. 201. Animal Disease Prohlems. (2-6) 

First and second semesters. Credit in accordance wdth work done. Prerequisite, veteri- 
nary degree or consent of staff. Laboratory and field work by assignment. 

(Poelma, DeVolt, Hansen, Byrne, Brueckner.) 

V. S. 202. Animal Disease Research C2-6') 

First and second semesters. Credit in accordance with work done. Prerequisite, 

veterinary degree or consent of staff. Studies of practical disease phases. 

(Poelma, DeVolt, Flansen, Byrne, Brueckner.) 

V. S. 203. Electron Microscopy. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Theor\' of the electron 

microscope, preparation of specimens, manipulations, photography. 

CReagan and Byrne.) 



91 



THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

Irvin C. Haut, Ph.D., Director 

The Agricuhural Expariment Station serves Maryland agricukure in much 
the same manner as research laboratories serve large corporations. Maryland agri- 
culture is made up of over thirty thousand small individual businesses, and there 
is not sufficient capital, or sufficient income so that each one of these can conduct 
research. Yet the problems vi^hich face a biological undertaking such as farming, 
are as numerous and perplexing as the problems of any business. Certainly our 
production of food would be much more costly if it were not for the research 
results that have been obtained by the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

The station is a joint Federal and State undertaking. Passage of the Hatch 
Act in 1887, which made available a grant in aid to each state for the purpose 
of establishing an agricultural experiment station, gave a great impetus to the 
development of research work in agriculture. This work was further encouraged 
by the passage of the Adams Act in 1906, the Pumell Act in 1925, the Bank- 
head-Jones Act in 1935, and the Flannagan-Hope Act of 1946. 

The work of the Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station which is sup- 
ported by these Acts and by State appropriations centers at College Park. On the 
University Campus are to be found laboratories for studying insects and diseases, 
soil fertility problems, botanical problems, and others. This is also the location of 
the livestock and dairy bams with their experimental herds. About eight miles 
from the campus at College Park, near Beltsville, the Plant Research Farm of 
about 500 acres is devoted to work connected with soil fertility, plant breeding 
and general crop production problems. An experimental farm near Upper Marl- 
boro is devoted to the problems of tobacco growing and curing. A farm near Salis- 
bury is devoted to solution of the problems of producers of broilers and of vege- 
table crops in the southern Eastern Shore area. Two experimental farms are 
operated near Ellicott City; one is devoted to livestock problems and the other to 
dairy cattle nutrition and forage research. Also tests of various crop and soil re- 
sponses are distributed throughout the State. These different locations provide 
the opportunity to conduct experiments under conditions existing where the re- 
sults will be put into practice. The solution of many difficult problems in the past 
has given the Station an excellent standing with farmers of the State. 



92 



AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE 

Paul E. Nystrom, Director 

Cooperative Extension work in agriculture and home economics, established 
by State and Federal Laws in 1914, is designed to assist the people of the State 
with their agricultural and homemaking problems. It is conducted under a 
Memorandum of Understanding between the Extension Service of the University 
of Maryland and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. The Extension Service 
becomes the educational arm in the State of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

The work of the Extension Service is cooperatively financed by the Federal, 
State and county governments. In each county there is a County Agricultural 
Agent and I Jome Demonstration Agent and assistants where funds permit and 
the work requires. Backed by a staff of specialists at the University, these Agents 
are in close contact with local people and their problems. 

Practically every phase of agriculture and home life comes within the scope 
of Extension work. The Extension Service teaches largely by demonstrations and 
carries the scientific and economic results of the Experiment Station and U. S. 
Department of Agriculture to rural people in ways that they understand and use. 

In Maryland, the Extension Service works in close association with all rural 
groups and organizations. In addition to work on the farms and in the farm 
homes, the Extension program is aimed at the many rural and even urban people 
who service the agricultural industries of the State including consumers. 

In addition to work with adults, thousands of boys and girls are developed 
as leaders and given practical education in 4-H Clubs. Through their diversified 
activities, the boys and girls are given a valuable type of instruction and training, 
and are afforded an opportunity to develop self-confidence, perseverance and 
citizenship. 

The Extension Service in cooperation with the College of Agriculture and 
the Experiment Station arranges and conducts short courses in various lines, many 
of which are held at the University. Some of these courses have been held regu- 
larly over a period of years and others are added as the need and demand develop. 

CANNERS' SHORT COURSE 

For many years a short course has been held each year to aid canners in keep- 
ing abreast of the latest developments in their industry. It is usually held in 
February. 

RURAL women's SHORT COURSE 

To provide special training for rural women, the Rural Women's Short Course 
has been conducted since 1922. Attendance, extending for one week, has grown 
steadily to more than one thousand women from all counties and includes urban 
women from Baltimore City. 

93 ► 



Service and Control, Dairy Insfection 



OTHER SHORT COURSES 



Courses for nurserymen, florists, poultry flock selection agents, poultr)' prod- 
ucts marketing, beekeepers, greenkeepers, sanitarians, conservation, cow testers, 
and feed manufacturers and distributors are among those held in recent years. 
Announcement of such courses is made to those who may be interested. 

boys' and girls' club week 

Members and leaders of boys' and girls' 4-H Clubs come to the University 
for a week each year, usually in August. Class work and demonstrations are given 
by specialists and a broad program of education, inspiration and recreation is pro- 
vided. 

SERVICE AND CONTROL PROGRAMS 

The State law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of Mary- 
land shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. Numerous serv- 
ices are performed by technically trained personnel which result in the improve- 
ment and maintenance of high standards in the production, processing and dis- 
tribution of farm products. 

In addition the improvement of many control or regulatory activities are au- 
thorized by the State Law and are carried out by the following agencies responsi- 
ble to the State Board of Agriculture. 

DAIRY INSPECTION SERVICE 

The Maryland Dairy Inspection Law became effective June 1, 1935. How- 
ever, the present activities of the Dairy Inspection Service are based on Article 
43 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, Section 542 thru Section 558, of the 
Laws of Maryland, 1951. The Dairy Department is charged with the admin- 
istration of the law. 

The purposes of the Dairy Inspection Law are as follows: (a) To insure pro- 
ducers who sell milk and cream by measure, weight and butterfat test, that sam- 
ples, weights and tests used as the basis of payment for such products are correct; 
(b) To insure dealers who purchase milk and cream that their agents shall cor- 
rectly weigh, sample, and test these products; (c) To insure correctness of tests 
made for official inspections or for public record. To achieve these purposes the 
law requires the licensing of all dealers who purchase milk and cream from pro- 
ducers, whether the purchases are by measure, weight, or test, and the licensing 
of all persons sampling, weighing and testing milk and cream when the results 
of such samples, weights, and tests are to serve as a basis of payment to producers. 

Duties of the Dairy Inspection Service, resulting from, enforcement of the 
Inspection Law, deal with the calibration of that glassware used in testing milk 
and cream and the rejection of inaccurate items; examination of all weighers, 

< 94 



Deparhnent of Markets 

samplers, and testers and the issuance of licenses to those satisfactorily passing 
the examination; and inspection of the pertinent activities of weighers, samplers, 
testers and dairy plants. 

DEPARTMENT OF MARKETS 

All of the activities of the Department of Markets are geared to the impor- 
tance in modern agriculture of the problems of marketing farm products. The 
Department endeavors to serve the every-day needs of the farmer in marketing 
his products and to insure a fair and equitable treatment of the farmer in all deal- 
ings which he may ha\'e concerning the marketing of his products. In the per- 
formance of these responsibilities, the Department carries out programs in ex- 
tension marketing, conducts market surveys, compiles and disseminates marketing 
information and market data, operates a market news service, provides an agri- 
cultural inspection and grading service,, maintains a consumer information serv- 
ice and enforces and interprets the agricultural marketing laws of the State. The 
regulatory aspects of the Department's functions are carried out as the agent of 
the State Board of Agriculture under the authority of various State laws relating 
to the marketing of farm products. A close working relationship is maintained 
with other specialists in the Extension Service, all departments of the Agricul- 
tural Marketing Service, the Maryland Crop Reporting Service, and the Agri- 
cultural Marketing Service of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. The voluntary 
and dynamic cooperation of the personnel in these various activities brings to 
bear on agricultural marketing problems an effective combination of research, 
education, and service. 

The passage of the Federal Agricultural Research and Marketing Act gave 
additional impetus to the study and solution of agriculture's marketing problems. 
The Department of Markets is largely responsible for developing the State pro- 
gram under Title II of this act. 

Information and assistance in all phases of marketing is available to all inter- 
ested persons. When a sufficient number of individuals are interested, marketing 
specialists hold meetings and demonstrations in local communities. Field offices 
are located in Baltimore, Salisbury, Hancock, Hagerstown and Pocomoke. De- 
partment headquarters is at the University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

MARYLAND LIVE STOCK SANITARY SERVICE 

The Live Stock Sanitary Service is organized under the State Board of Agri- 
culture and is charged with the responsibility of preventing the introduction of 
diseases of animals and poultry from outside of the State and wnth control and 
eradication of such diseases within the State. The service is further charged with 
the responsibility of cooperating with the State Department of Health in the sup- 
pression of diseases of animals and poultry which aflfect the public health. 

Control projects in bovine tuberculosis, Johne's disease, and bovine brucellosis 
are conducted in cooperation with the Agricultural Research Service of the United 

95 ► 



Seed Inspection Service 

States Department of Agriculture. TTie field force of State employed veterinarians 
is augmented by a number of Federal veterinarians in the conduct of these control 
programs. The control of swine brucellosis, pullorum disease in poultry, rabies, 
and many other disease conditions is conducted by the State without outside as- 
sistance. 

Facilities for the diagnosis of a vidde variety of diseases are furnished in 
the main laboratory at College Park and in the branch laboratories at Salis- 
bury, Centreville, Bel Air, Frederick, Hagerstown, and Oakland. 

SEED INSPECTION SERVICE 

The Seed Inspection Service administers the State seed law; inspects seeds 
sold throughout the State; collects seed samples for laboratory examination; reports 
the results of the examinations to the parties concerned; publishes summaries of 
these reports which show the relative reliability of the label information sup- 
plied by wholesale seedsmen; cleans and treats tobacco seed intended for planting 
in the State; makes analyses, tests, and examinations of seed samples submitted 
to the Laboratory; and advises seed users regarding the economic and intelligent 
use of seeds. The Service also cooperates with the Agricultural Marketing Serv- 
ice of the United States Department of Agriculture in the enforcement of the 
Federal Seed Act in Maryland. 

The work of the Seed Inspection Service is not restricted to the enforcement 
of the seed law however, for State citizens may submit seed samples to the Lab- 
oratory for analysis, test, or examination. Specific information regarding suit- 
ability for planting purposes of lots of seeds is thus made available to individuals 
without charge. The growth of this service has been steady since the establish- 
ment of the Laboratory in 1912. Most Maryland citizens, city and country, are 
directly interested in seeds for planting in flower-beds, lawns, gardens, or fields. 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF DRAINAGE 

The State Department of Drainage was established in 1937. Its duties are 
to promote and encourage the drainage of agricultural lands in the State, to cor- 
relate the activities of the local drainage organizations in the State and to cooper- 
ate with State and Federal agencies in the interest of a permanent program of 
improved drainage. 

STATE HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

In 1896 the subject of nursery inspection was given consideration under 
Article 48, of the Code of Public General Laws, under the title "Inspection" as 
designated by Chapter 290 of the "Acts of the General Assembly of Maryland 
of 1896." In 1898 certain sections of Article 48 were repealed and reenacted 
with amendments, under a new sub-title, "State Horticultural Department," and 
eight new sections were added thereto. In 1916 the sections were again re-en- 
acted with such changes in the wording as were necessary to bring them into con- 

-< 96 



State htspectioyi and Regulatory Service 

formity with the reorganization of the Maryland State College of Agriculture and 
Experiment Station and its Board of Trustees. Subsequently all regulatory func- 
tions including newly enacted Articles in regard to bee diseases, mosquitoes, and 
aerial spraying, were transferred to the State Board of Agriculture under Chapter 
391 of the "Acts of the Ceneral Assembly." 

Working in this field is designed to control insects and plant diseases and to 
protect the public in the purchase of products of nurserymen and florists. A con- 
siderable part of the time of the staff is occupied by inspection of orchards, crops, 
nurseries, greenhouses, and floral establishments. Cooperation with the Federal 
Government in the inspection and certification of materials that come under quar- 
antine regulations is another major function of the Department. The Department 
enforces the provisions of the Apiary Law, including inspection of apiaries. This 
service includes control and eradication of diseases of strawberries and other small 
fruits, diseases of apples, peaches, etc., inspection and certification of potatoes and 
sweet potatoes for seed, control of white pine blister rust, Dutch elm disease, etc. 

STATE INSPECTION AND REGULATORY SERVICE 

Feeds, Fertilizers, Agricidtiiral Liming Materials, Insecticides and Fimgicides 

The protection of consumers and ethical manufacturers of agricultural prod- 
ucts against fraudulent practices, makes certain specialized statutes necessary. 
These laws are classified as correct labeling acts, and are enforced by the State 
Inspection and Regulatory Service. Included in this legislation are the State 
Feed, Fertilizer, Agricultural Liming Materials, and Pesticide laws. 

Work of enforcing these laws is divided into five distinct phases: First, the 
commodities concerned must be registered under acceptable brand names, and 
with proper labels; second, official samples must be collected by the Department's 
inspectors from all parts of the State; third, chemical and physical examinations 
must be made to establish that professed standards of quality are being met; 
fourth, results must be assembled and published in concise and understandable 
form, with the reports made available to all interested persons; and fifth, the 
prosecution of those responsible for flagrant violations. 

Hundreds of tests also are made annually on feed, fertilizer, and lime sam- 
ples submitted by State purchasers. No charge is made for this ser\'ice. 

Throughout its existence, this Department has cooperated wdth comparable 
Federal agencies in every possible way. In this activity it has attained not only 
State-wide, but also a nationally-recognized reputation for accuracy, timeliness, and 
unbiased fair treatment of the consumer and manufacturer alike. 

The facilities of the Department are at all times available to supply the manu- 
facturer with technical advice and to safeguard him from unfair competition. 

For its entire program of service and protection, the Department relics in large 
measure upon education, from the standpoint of both buyer and seller. However, 
in those rare instances when this policy is unheeded, backing by the courts, both 
Federal and State, can be depended upon for enforcement assistance. 

97 ► 



—The University is the rear guard and the 
advance agent of society. It lives in the 
past, the present and the future. It is the 
storehouse of knowledge; it draws upon 
this depository to throw light upon the 
present; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual horizons and the scientific 
frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
— always toxvard the promise of a 
better tomorrow. 

— From "The State and the University, 
the inaugural address of 
President Wilson H. Elkins, 
January 20, 1955, 
Q)llege Park, Maryland. 



SEPARATE CATALOGS AVAILABLE 



AT COLLEGE PARK 

Individual catalogs of colleges and schools of the University of Mary- 
land at College Park may be obtained by addressing the Ofi&ce of Uni- 
versity Relations, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 

1. General Information 

2. College of Agriculture 

3. College of Arts and Sciences 

4. College of Business and Public Administration 

5. College of Education 

6. College of Engineering 

7. College of Home Economics 

8. College of Military Science 

9. College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

10. College of Special and Continuation Studies 

The catalog of the European Program may be obtained by 
addressing the Dean, College of Special and Continuation 
Studies, College Park, Maryland. 

11. Summer School 

12. Graduate School Announcements 

AT BALTIMORE 

Individual catalogs for the professional schools of the University of 
Maryland may be obtained by addressing the Deans of the respective 
schools at the University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene Streets, 
Baltimore 1, Maryland. 

13. School of Dentistry 

14. School of Law 

15. School of Medicine 

16. School of Pharmacy 

17. School of Nursing 



VOL.11 JANUARY 9, 1958 NO. 4 



1958 
1959 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE COLLEGE OF 

arts and sciences 

AT COLLEGE PARK 



1^ 



The frovisions of this 'puhlication are not to he regarded 
as an irrevocable contract between the student and the 
University of Maryland. The University reserves the 
right to change any provision or requirement at any time 
within the student's term of residence. The University 
further reserves the right at any time, to ask a student 
to withdraw when it considers such action to be in the 
best interests of the University. 



SEE OUTSIDE BACK COVER FOR LIST OF OTHER CATALOGS 



COLLEGE 
of 

ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Catalog Series 19584959 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



VOLUME 11 



JANUARY 9, 1958 



NO. 4 



A University of Maryland publication is published twelve times in January; three 
times in February; once in NIarch and April; three times in May; tuace in June; once 
in July and August; twice in September and October; three times in November; and 

once in December. 

Re-entered at the Post Office in College Park, Maryland, as second class mail matter 
under the Act of Congress of August 24, 1912. 



CONTENTS 



GENERAL 



Board of Regents 1 

Officers of Administration 2 

Chairmen, Faculty Senate 5 

Faculty of the College 6 

General Information 43 

History 43 

Requirements for Admission ... 43 

Costs 44 

Degrees 44 

Residence 44 

Academic Information 45 

General Requirements for 

Degrees 45 

Work in Freshman and 

Sophomore Years 45 



Program in American Civiliza- 
tion 45 

R.O.T.C, Physical Education 

and Health 47 

College Requirements 47 

Junior Requirements 48 

Normal Load 48 

Advisors 49 

Electivcs in Other Colleges 

and Schools 49 

Certification of High School 

Teachers 49 

Special Honors 49 



CURRICULA AND REQUIRED COURSES 



General A.B. Curriculum 50 

I. American Civilization .... 50 

II. The Humanities 51 

Art 51 

Classical Languages and 

Literatures 52 

Comparative Literature ... 52 

English 53 

Foreign Languages and 

Literature 53 

Music 54 

Philosophy 55 

Speech and Dramatic Art. . 56 

III. The Social Sciences 57 

Economics 57 

Geography 57 

Government and Politics . . 58 

History 58 

Psychology 59 

Sociology 60 



General B.S. Curriculum 61 

IV. The Biological Sciences . . 61 
General Biological Sciences 61 

Botany 62 

Microbiology 63 

Psychology 64 

Zoology 65 

V. The Physcial Sciences .... 65 
General Physical Sciences. . 65 

Chemistry 66 

Mathematics 67 

Physics 68 

VI. Pre-Professional 

Curriculums 68 

Combined Program in Arts 

and Sciences and Law . . 68 
Combined Program in Arts 
and Sciences and Dentis- 
try 69 

Combined Program in Arts 
and Sciences and Medi- 
cine 71 



CContintied on next page^ 



CONTENTS 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



American Civilization 74 

Art 74 

Botany 77 

Chemistry 77 

Classical Languages and 

Literatures 83 

Comparative Literature 85 

Economics 87 

English Language and Literature 87 
Foreign Languages and Literatures 91 

Geography 103 

Geology 103 

Government and Politics 104 



History 104 

Library Science Ill 

Mathematics 112 

Astronomy 122 

Microbiology 122 

Music 126 

Applied Music 129 

Philosophy 130 

Physics 133 

Psychology 138 

Sociology 143 

Speech and Dramatic Art 150 

Zoology 157 



Photographs of several College buildings and a map of the campus 
are located in the center of the catalog. Use running headlines located at 
the top of each page as an additional aid in locating subject information. 



CALENDAR 

FALL SEMESTER 1958 
SEPTEMBER 1958 

15-19 Monday to Friday— Fall Semester Registration 

22 Monday— Instruction Begins 

NOVEMBER 

26 Wednesday— Thanksgiving Recess Begins After Last Class 

DECEMBER 

1 Monday— Thanksgiving Recess Ends 8 a.m. 

20 Saturday— Christmas Recess Begins After Last Class 

JANUARY 1959 

5 Monday— Christmas Recess Ends 8 a.m. 

21 Wednesday— Pre-Examination Study Day 

22-28 Thursday to Wednesday— First Semester Examinations 

SPRllSG SEMESTER 1959 
FEBRUARY 

2-6 Monday to Friday— Spring Semester Registration 

23 Monday— Washington's Birthday Holiday 
MARCH 

25 Wednesday— Maryland Day 

26 Thursday— Easter Recess Begins After Last Class 
31 Tuesday— Easter Recess Ends 8 a.m. 

MAY 

14 Thursday— Military Day 

28 Thursday— Pre-Examination Study Day 

, ^y ( Friday to Friday— Second Semester Examinations 
June 5 j 

JUNE 

6 Saturday— Commencement Examinations 

SUMMER SESSION 1959 

JUNE 1959 

22 Monday— Summer Session Registration 

23 Tuesday— Summer Session Begins 
JULY 

31 Friday— Summer Session Ends 

SHORT COURSES 1959 

JUNE 1959 

15-20 Monday to Saturday— Rural Women's Short Course 
AUGUST 

3-8 Monday to Saturday— 4-H Club Week 
SEPTEMBER 

8-1 1 Tuesday to Friday— Firemen's Short Course 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

and 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Term 
Expires 
Charles P. McCormick 

Chnirnian 1966 

McCormick and Company, 414 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Edward F. Holter 

Vice-Chairman 19^9 

The National Grange, 744 Jackson Place, N.W., Washington 6 

B. Herbert Brown 

Secretary 1960 

The Baltimore Institute, 12 West Madison Street, Baltimore 1 

Harry II. Nuttle 

Treasurer 1966 

Denton 

Louis L. Kaplan 

Assistant Secretary 1961 

1201 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 17 

Edmund S. Burke 

Assistant Treasurer 1959 

Kelly-Springfield Tire Company, Cumherland 

Alvin L. Aubinoe 1958 

8000 Overhill Road, Bethesda 

Thomas W. Pangborn 1965 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown 

Ends S. Stockbridge 1960 

10 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Thomas B. Symons 1963 

Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, Takoma Park 

C. EwiNG TuTTLE 1962 

907 Latrobe Building, Charles and Read Streets, Baltimore 2 



Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for terms of nine 
years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer of the 
Board. 

The State law provides that the Board of Regents ot the Universit)' of Maryland 
shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 



DAVID L. BRiGHAM, Alumni Secretary 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1938. 

c. WILBUR cissEL, Director of Finance and Business 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1932; m.a., 1934; c.p.a., 1939. 

WILLIAM w. COBEY, Director of Athletics 
A.B., University of Maryland, 1930. 

GEARY F. EPPLEY, Director of Student Welfare and Dean of Men 
B.S., Maryland State College, 1920; m.s., University of Maryland, 1926. 

GEORGE w. FOGG, Director of Personnel 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1926; m.a., 1928. 

ROBERT E. KENDiG, Professor of Air Science and Head, Defartment of Air Science, 
Colonel, United States Air Force 
A.B., William and Mary College, 1939. 

ROBERT J. MCCARTNEY, Director of University Relations 
B.A., University of Massachusetts, 1941. 

GEORGE w. MORRISON, Associate Director and Supervising Engineer Physical 
Plant QBaltitnore) 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1927; e.e., 1931. 

HOWARD ROVELSTAD, Director of Libraries 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1936; m.a., 1937; b.s.l.s., Columbia University, 1940. 

ADELE H. STAMP, Dean of Women 

B.A., Tulane University, 1921; m.a. University of Maryland, 1924. 

GEORGE o. WEBER, Director and Supervising Engineer, Defartment of Physical 
Plant 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1933. 

Division Chairmen 

JOHN E. FABER, JR., Chairman of the Division of Biological Sciences 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1926; m.s., 1927; ph.d., 1937. 

HAROLD c. HOFSOMMER, Chairman of the Division of Social Sciences 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1921; m.a., 1923; ph.d., Cornell University, 1929 

wiLBERT J. HUFF, Chairman of the Division of Physical Sciences 

B.A., Ohio Northern University, 1911; b.a., Yale College, 1914; ph.d., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1917; D.sc, (hon.), Ohio Northern University, 1927. 

CHARLES E. WHITE, Chairman of the Lower Division 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1923; M.S., 1924; ph.d., 1926. 

ADOLF E. zucKER, Chairman of the Division of Hum.anities 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1912; m.a., 1913; ph.d.. University of Pennsylvania, 1917. 



-< 4 



CHAIRMEN, STANDING COMMITTEES, FACULTY SENATE" 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

Prof. Russell B. Allen (Engineering), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS 

Dr. Charles Manning (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

Dr. R. Lee Hornbake (Dean of Faculty), Chairvtan 

COMMITTEE ON SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

Dr. Charles White (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS, CURRICULA AND COURSES 

Dr. Peter Lejins (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS-IN-AID 

Dr. Paul R. Poffenberger (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RESEARCH 

Dr. John S. Toll (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 

Dr. Leon P. Smith (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARIES 

Dr. Lucius Garvin (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Dr. Charles D. Murphy (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 

Prof. Russell B. Allen (Engineering), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 

Dr. John H. Frederick (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

Prof. Warren L. Strausbaugh (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Dr. Stanley Jackson (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Dr. William E. Bickley (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT EMPLOYMENT AND SELF-HELP 

Dr. John E. Foster (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION 

Dr. Irvin C. Haut (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, ACADEMIC FREEDOM AND TENURE 

Dr. Carroll E. Cox (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS AND SALARIES 

Dr. Monroe H. Martin (Institute of Fluid Dynamics), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 

Prof. Homer Ulrich (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 

Prof. Russell R. Reno (Law), Chairman 



'Effective October 29, 1957. 

5 ► 



FACULTY 
1958-1959 

COLLEGE OF 
ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Administrative Officers 

LEON PERDUE SMITH, Dean of the College and Professor of Romance Languages 
B.A., Emory University, 1919; m.a.. University of Chicago, 1928; PH.D., 1930. 

CHARLES MANNING, Assistant Dean of the College and Associate Professor of 
English 

B.S., Tufts College, 1929; m.a.. Harvard University, 1931; ph.d., University of 

North Carolina, 1950. 

HENRY B. MCDONNELL, M.S., M.D., Dean Eineritus 

Professors 

ALFRED OWEN ALDRiDGE, Profcssor of English 

B.S., Indiana University, 1937; m.a., University of Georgia, 1938; ph.d., Duke 
University, 1942; Docteur de I'Universite de Paris, 1956. 

THOMAS G. ANDREWS, Profcssor and Head of Psychology 

B.A., University of Southern California, 1937; m.a., University of Nebraska, 
1939; PH.D., 1941. 

WILLIAM T. AVERY, Profcssor and Head of Classical Languages and Literatures 
B.A., Western Reserve University, 1934; m.a., 1935; ph.d., 1937; Fellow of the 
American Academy in Rome, 1937-39. 

WILLIAM J. BAILEY, Research Professor of Chemistry 

B. CHEM., University of Minnesota, 1943; ph.d.. University of Illinois, 1946. 

CARL BODE, ProfessoT of English 

ph.b.. University of Chicago, 1933; m.a., Northwestern University, 1938; ph.d., 
1941. 

SUMNER o. BURHOE, Professor Emeritus of Zoology 

B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1925; M.S., Kansas State College, 1926; ph.d.. 
Harvard University, 1937. 

VERNE E. CH ATE LAIN, Profcssor of History 

B.A., Nebraska State Teachers College, 1917; m.a., University of Chicago, 1925; 
PH.D., University of Minnesota, 1943. 



CHARLES N. coFER, Pwfessor of Psychology 

B.A., Southeast Missouri State College, 1936; m.a.. University of Iowa, 1937; 
PH.D., Brown University, 1940. 

JULES DE LAUNAY, ProfcssoT of Physics 

B.A., Oxford University, 1935; m.a., 1938; th.d., Stanford University, 1939. 

CYRIL DOMB, VistUng Professor of Physics 

M.A., Mathematics, Cambridge, England, 1945; ph.d.. Statistical Mechanics, Cam- 
bridge, England, 1945; m.a., O.xford, England, 1951. 

NATHAN L. DRAKE, Pwfessor and Head of Chemistry 
B.A., Harvard University, 1920; m.a., 1921; ph.d., 1922. 

JOHN E. faber, Professor and Head of Microbiology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1926; m.s., 1927; ph.d., 1937. 

WILLIAM F. FALLS, Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of North Carolina, 1922; m.a., Vanderbilt University, 1928; 
PH.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1932. 

LUCIUS GARVIN, Profcssor and Head of Philosophy 

B.A., Brown University, 1928; m.a., 1929; ph.d., 1933. 

WESLEY M. GEWEHR, Professor and Head of History 

PH.B., University of Chicago, 1911; m.a., 1912; ph.d., 1922. 

FRANK GOODWYN, Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Texas College of Arts and Industries, 1939; m.a., 1940; ph.d.. University 
of Texas, 1946. 

ROSE MARIE GRENTZER, ProfeSSOr of Music 

B.A., Mus. Ed., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1935; b.a., Mus., 1936; m.a., 
1939. 

JOHN w. GUSTAD, Professor of Psychology and Director, University Cotinseling 
Center 

B.A., Macalester College, 1943; m.a., University of Minnesota, 1948; ph.d., 1949. 

RAY c. hackman, Profcssor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Nebraska, 1935; m.a., 1936; ph.d.. University of Minnesota, 
1940. 

p. ARNE HANSEN, Professor of Microbiology 

B.PH., University of Copenhagen, 1922; M.S., 1926; ph.d., Cornell University, 
1931. 

SUSAN E. harman, Professor of English 

B.A., University of Nebraska, 1917; m.a., 1918; ph.d.. The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1926. 

CHARLES herzfeld, Professor of Physics 

b.chem.e.. Catholic University, Washington, D.C., 1945; ph.d.. University of 
Chicago, 1951. 

7 ► 



HAROLD c. HOFFSOMMER, ProfessoT and Head of Sociology 

B.A., Northwestern University, 1921; m.a., 1923; ph.d., Cornell University, 1929. 

MAX H. HOUTCHENS, Professor and Case Consultant of Psychology 
B.S., University of Idaho, 1932; m.a., 1935; ph.d., 1937. 

STANLEY B. JACKSON, Professor and Head of Mathematics 

B.A., Bates College, 1933; m.a.. Harvard University, 1934; ph.d., 1937. 

BARL H. KENNARD, Professor of Physics 

B.A., Pomona College, 1907; b.s., Oxford University, 1911; ph.d., Cornell Uni- 
versity, 1913. 

PETER p. LEjiNS, Professor of Sociology 
MAGisTER PHiLosoPHiAE, University of Latvia, 1930; magister juris, 1933; ph.d.. 
University of Chicago, 1938. 

ELLIS R. LiPPiNCOTT, Profcssor of Chemistry 
B.A., Earlham College, 1943; M.S., The Johns Hopkins University, 1944; ph.d., 1947. 

MONROE H. MARTIN, ProfcssoT of Mathematics 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1928; ph.d.. The Johns Hopkins University, 1932. 

JOHN R. MAYOR, ProfcssoT of Mathematics 

B.S., Knox College, 1928; m.a., University of Illinois, 1929; ph.d.. University 
of Wisconsin, 1933. 

JAMES G. MCMANAWAY, PwfessoT of English 

B.A., University of Virginia, 1919; m.a., 1920; ph.d.. The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1931. 

HORACE s. MERRILL, ProfcssoT of History 

B.E., River Falls State College, 1932; ph.m.. University of Wisconsin, 1933; 
PH.D., 1942. 

RAYMOND MORGAN, ProfcSSOT of PhysicS 

B.S., Indiana University, 1916; M.S., 1917; ph.d.. University of Pennsylvania, 
1922. 

CHARLES D. MURPHY, Professor and Acting Head of English 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1929; m.a.. Harvard University, 1930; ph.d., 
Cornell University, 1940. 

RALPH D. MYERS, ProfcssoT of Physics 

B.A., Cornell University, 1934; m.a., 1935; ph.d., 1937. 

MICHAEL J. PELC2AR, JR., ProfessoT of Mictohiohgy 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1936; M.S., 1938; ph.d.. State University of Iowa, 
1941. 

M 8 



A. J. PRAHL, Professor of Foreign Languages and Associate Dean of the Graduate 
School 

M.A., Washington University, 1928; ph.d., The Johns Hopkins University, 1933. 

GORDON w. PRANGE, Professor of History 

B.A., University of Iowa, 1932; m.a., 1934; ph.d., 1937. 

ERNEST F. PRATT, Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., University of Redlands, 1937; m.s., Oregon State College, 1939; ph.d., 
University of Michigan, 1942. 

GiAMPiETRO PUPPi, Visiting Professor of Physics 

DOCTORATE IN PHYSICS at the University of Padua, Italy, 1939; libera docenza. 
University of Padua, Italy, 1948. 

B. HARLAN RANDALL, ProfeSSOT of Music 

B.Mus., Washington College, 1938. 

wiLKiNS REEVE, Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology, 1936; ph.d., University of Wisconsin, 1940. 

CARL L. ROLLiNSON, Profcssor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Michigan, 1933; ph.d.. University of Illinois, 1939. 

SHERMAN ROSS, Professor of Psychology 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1939; m.a., Columbia University, 1941; 
PH.D., 1943. 

HOWARD ROVELSTAD, Director of Libraries and Professor of Library Science 
B.A., University of Illinois, 1936; m.a., 1937; b.s.l.s., Columbia University, 1940. 

HENRY w. SCHOENBORN, Professor of Zoology 

A.B., DePauw University, 1933; ph.d., New York University, 1939. 

ZAKA I. SLAwsKY, Research Professor in Molectdar Physics 

E.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1933; M.S., California Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1935; ph.d.. University of Michigan, 1938. 



LEON P. SMITH, Dean, College of Arts and Sciences, and Professor, Romance 
Languages 

B.A., Emor}' University, 1919; m.a.. University of Chicago, 1928; ph.d., 1930. 



GEORGE A. SNOW, Visiting Professor of Physics 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1945; m.a., Princeton University, 1947; 
PH.D., Princeton University, 1949. 

KARL L. STELLMACHER, Professor of Mathcyuatics 

master's degree. University of Gottingen, 1933; ph.d.. University of Gottingen, 
1936. 

WILLIAM J. sviRBELY, Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1931; m.s., 1932; d.sc, 1935. 



JOHN s. TOLL, Professor and Head of Physics 

B.S., Yale University, 1944; m.a., Princeton University, 1948; ph.d., 1952. 

HOMER ULRICH, Professor and Head of Music 
M.A., University of Chicago, 1939. 

FLETCHER P. VEITCH, ProfcssoT of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1931; M.S., 1933; ph.d., 1935. 

ROBERT s. WALDROP, Profcssor and Case Consultant of Psychology 

B.A., University of Oklahoma, 1934; ph.d., University of Michigan, 1948. 

ROALD K. WANGSNESS, Professor of Physics 

B.A., University of Minnesota, 1944; ph.d., Stanford University, 1950. 

JOEL WARREN, Visiting Professor of Microhiology 

B.A., Yale University, 1936; m.a., Columbia University, 1938; ph.d., 1940. 

FRED w. WELLBORN, Profcssor of History 

B.A., Baker University, 1918; m.a.. University of Kansas, 1923; ph.d.. University 
of Wisconsin, 1926. 

G. w. WHARTON, Profcssor and Head of Zoology 
B.S., Duke University, 1935; ph.d., 1939. 

JAMES P. WHARTON, Professor and Head of Art 

B.A., Wofford College, 1914; b.a., Duke University, 1914; Graduate, Maryland 
Institute of Fine Arts, 1923; m.f.a.. University of Guanajuato, Mexico, 1952. 

CHARLES E. WHITE, Profcssor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1923; m.s., 1924; ph.d., 1926. 

G. FORREST WOODS, Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1934; b.a., 1935; M.S., Harvard University, 1937; 
PH.D., 1940. 

w. GORDON ZEEVELD, Profcssor of English 

B.A., University of Rochester, 1924; m.a., The Johns Hopkins University, 1929; 
PH.D., 1936. 

A. E. zucKER, Professor and Head of Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1912; m.a., 1913; ph.d.. University of Pennsylvania, 

1917. 

Associate Professors 

GEORGE ANASTos, Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Akron, 1942; m.a.. Harvard University, 1947; ph.d., 1949. 

ROY s. ANDERSON, Associate Professor of Physics 

A.B., Clark University, 1943; m.a., Dartmouth College, 1948; ph.d., Duke Uni- 
versity, 1951. 

^ 10 



CECIL R. BALL, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., College of William and Mary, 1923; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1934; 
pir.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1955. 

niCHARD H. BAUER, Associate Professor of History 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1924; m.a., 1928; ph.d., 1935. 

ALFRED J. BINGHAM, Associate Professor of Porei^j^n Languages 
B.A., Yale University, 1933; ph.d., Columbia University, 1939. 

GEORGE M. BROWN, Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Emory University, 1942; M.S., 1943; m.a., Princeton University, 1946; 
PH.D., 1949. 

JOSHUA R. c. BROWN, Associate Professor of Zoology 
B..1,., Duke University, 1948; m.a., 1949; ph.d., 1953. 

FRANKLIN D. cooLEY, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1927; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1933; 
PH.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1940. 

RAYMOND N. DOETscH, Associate Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1942; M.S., Indiana University, 1943; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Mar)'land, 1948. 

RICHARD A. FERRELL, Associate ProfessoT of Physics 

B.S., California Institute of Technolog)% 1948; M.S., 1949; ph.d., Princeton Uni- 
versity, 1952. 

ROBERT E. FULLERTON, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Heidelberg College, 1938; m.s., Syracuse University, 1940; ph.d., Yale 
University, 1945. 

RICHARD A. GOOD, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Ashland College, 1939; m.a.. University of Wisconsin, 1940; ph.d., 1945. 

DONALD c. GORDON, Associatc Professor of History 

B.A., College of William and Mary, 1934; m.a., Columbia Teachers College, 1938; 
iH.D., Columbia University, 1947. 

WILLIAM H. GRAVELY, JR., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., College of William and Mary, 1925; m.a.. University of Virginia, 1934; 
PH.D., 1953. 

RICHARD HENDRICKS, Associate Professor of Speech and Dramatic Arts 

B.A., Franklin College, 1937; m.a., Ohio State University, 1939; ph.d.. Ohio State 
University, 1956. 

WILLIAM F. HORN YAK, Associate Professor of Physics 

B.E.E., C.C.N.Y., 1944; M.S., Cal. Tech., 1949; ph.d., Cal. Tech., 1949. 

RICHARD w. iSKRAUT, Associate Profcssor of Physics 

B.S., City College of New York, 1937; ph.d., Leipzig University, 1941. 

11 ► 



LAURENS JANSEN, Associate Professor in Molecular Physics 

gandidaat's, Utrecht University, 1947; doctoral, 1950; d.sc. University of Leyden, 
1955. 

H. BRYCE JORDAN, Associate Professor of Music 

B.Mus., University of Texas, 1948; m.mus., 1949; ph.d.. University of North 
Carolina, 1956. 

CHARLES F. KRAMER, Associate Profcssor of Foreign Languages 
PH.B., Dickinson College, 1911; m.a., 1912. 

NORMAN c. LAFFER, Associate Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Allegheny College, 1929; M.S., University of Maine, 1932; ph.d.. University 
of Illinois, 1937. 

JOHN LEMBACH, Associote Profcssor of Art 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1934; m.a.. Northwestern University, 1937; ed.d.. 
Teachers College, 1946. 

ROBERT A. LiTTLEFORD, Associate Professor and Seafood Technologist 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1933; m.s., 1934; ph.d., 1938. 

GEOFFREY s. s. LUDFORD, Associate Profcssor of Mathematics 

E.A., Cambridge University, 1948; m.a., 1952; ph.d., 1952. 

THOMAS m. magoon, Associatc Professor of Psychology and Assistant Director of 
University Counseling Center 

B.A., Dartmouth University, 1947; m.a., University of Minnesota, 1951; ph.d., 

1954. 

CHARLES MANNING, Assistant Dean, College of Arts and Sciences, and Associate 
Professor of English 

E.S., Tufts College, 1929; m.a.. Harvard University, 1931; ph.d.. University of 

North Carolina, 1950. 

HERMAN maril, Associatc Professor of Art 

graduate, Maryland Institute of Fine Arts, 1928. 

EDWARD A. MASON, Associutc Profcssor in Molecular Physics 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1947; ph.d., Alassachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1950. 

ELLIOTT M. MCGiNNiES, Associatc Profcssor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Buffalo, 1943; m.a., Brovra University, 1944; m.a.. Harvard 
University, 1946; ph.d., 1948. 

BRUCE L. MELViN, Assoctatc Profcssor of Sociology 

B.s. IN ED., University of Missouri, 1916; m.a., 1917; ph.d., 1921. 

ARTHUR c. PARSONS, Associatc Profcssor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1926; m.a., 1928. 

HUGH B. piCKARD, Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Haverford College, 1933; PH.D., Northwestern University, 1938. 

^ 12 



WILLIAM R. QUYNN, Associatc Pfofcssor of Voreign Languages 

B.A., University oi Virginia, 1922; m.a., 1923; ph.d., The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1934. 

HOMER w. SCHAMP, Associate Professor in Molecular Physics 

A.B., Miami University, 1944; m.s., University of Michigan, 1947; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1952. 

PAUL w. SHANKvvEiLER, Associate Professor of Sociology 

PH.B., Muhlenberg University, 1919; m.a., Columbia University, 1921; ph.d.. 
University of North Carolina, 1934. 

MAURICE R. siEGLER, Associate PfofessoT of Art 

GRADUATE, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, 1921; certificate, Fontainebleau 
School of Fine Arts, 1926; b.s., in architecture, Georgia School of Technology, 
1930; M.F.A., University of Guanajuato, Mexico, 1956. 

S. FRED SINGER, Associate Professor of Physics 

B.E.E., Ohio State University, 1943; m.a., Princeton University, 1944; ph.d., 
1948. 

ALLEN R. SOLEM, Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Minnesota, 1938; m.a., Wayne University, 1948; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1953. 

FACUE K. SPRiNGMANN, Associate Professor of Music 
B.MUS., Westminster Choir College, 1939. 

WARREN L. STRAUSBAUGH, Associatc Professor and Head of S-peech and Dramatic 
Arts 

B.S., Wooster College, 1932; m.a., University of Iowa, 1935. 

CALVIN F. STUNTZ, Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.A., University of Buffalo, 1939; ph.d., 1947. 

KATHRYN M. PAINTER WARD, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., The George Washington University, 1935; m.a., 1936; ph.d., 1947. 

KURT WEBER, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Williams College, 1930; e.a., Oxford University, 1932; m.a., Cokunbia 
University, 1933; ph.d., 1940. 

Assistant Professors 

J. FRANCES ALLEN, Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.S., Radford State Teachers, 1938; m.s.. University of Maryland, 1948; rn D , 
1952. 

FRANK G. ANDERSON, Assistant Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Cornell University, 1941; ph.d., University of New Mexico, 1951. 

MARY L. ANDREWS, Assislaut Profcssor of English 

B.S., New York University, 1929; m.a., 1935; ph.d., 1941. 



JACK c. BARNES, Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Duke University, 1939; m.a., 1947; ph.d.. University of Maryland, 1954. 

GEORGE F. BATKA, Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Arts 
B.A., Wichita University, 1938; m.a.. University of Michigan, 1941. 

OTHO T. BEALL, JR., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Williams College, 1930; m.a.. University of Minnesota, 1933; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1952. 

EARL s. BEARD, Instructor of History 

B.A., Baylor University, 1948; m.a.. State University of Iowa, 1950; ph.d., 1953. 

MELViN A. BERNARDE, Assistant Professor and Seafood Technologist. 

B.S., St. John's University, 1948; M.S., University of Missouri, 1950; ph.d., 
Michigan State College, 1954. 

JOEL H. BERMAN, Assistant Professor of Music 

B.S., Juilliard School of Music, 1951; m.a., Columbia University, 1953. 

ALFRED c. BOYD, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Canisius College, 1951; ph.d., Purdue University, 1957. 

JOHN w. BRACE, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Swarthmore College, 1949; m.a., Cornell University, 1951; ph.d., 1953. 

FURMAN a. bridgers. Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., Duke University, 1925; m.a., University of Chicago, 1928. 

ROBERT F. BRUSH, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Princeton University, 1951; m.a.. Harvard University, 1953; ph.d.. Harvard 
University, 1956. 

ELEANOR w. BULATKiN, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
M.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1950; ph.d., 1952. 

JOHN CARRUTHERS, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

CHARLES H. COAXES, Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.S., West Point, 1924; m.a., Louisiana State University, 1952; ph.d., 1955. 

JOHN L. COULTER, Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., American University, 1934; m.a.. University of North Carolina, 1936. 

HERBERT A. CROSMAN, Assistant Professor of History 
B.A., Harvard University, 1938; m.a., 1944; ph.d., 1947. 

MARGARET T. cussLER, Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., New York State College of Teachers at Albany, 1933; m.a., Radclitfe 
College, 1941; ph.d., 1943. 

CHARLES s. DEWEY, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Pomona College, 1919; m.a., Harvard University, 1920; ph.d., 1924. 

EDWARD DiBELLA, Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.S., Washington University, 1936; m.a., Washington University, 1938. 

-< 14 



EiTEL vv. DOBERT, Assistant Professor of foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Ciencva, 1932; m.a., University of Maryland, 1949; ph.d., 
1954. 

GERTRUDE EHRLiCH, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Georgia State College for Women, 1943; m.a., Uiii\crsity of North Caro- 
lina, 1945; PH.D., University of Tennessee, 1953. 

E. JAMES FERGUSON, Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., University of Washington, 1939; m.a., 1941; ni.D., Uni\ersity of Wisconsin, 
1951. 

SHERMAN K. FITZGERALD, Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Brigham Young University, 1948; m.a., 1949; Cornell University, 1952. 

RUDD FLEMING, Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1930; m.a., Cornell University, 1932; ph.d., 1934. 

WERNER J. FRIES, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
B.S., The Johns Hopkins University, 1948; m.a., 1952; ph.d., 1953. 

MARY K. GERDEMAN, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; m.s., 1956. 

RICHARD c. GONZALEZ, Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

B.A., University of Texas, 1951; m.a., 1952; ph.d.. University of Maryland, 1957. 

HANS GRiEM, Assistant Research Professor of Physics 

ABiTUR, Max-Planck-Schule, Kiel, Germany, 1949; ph.d., Universitat Kiel, Ger- 
many, 1954. 

SIDNEY GROLLMAN, Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1947; M.S., 1949; ph.d., 1952. 

FRANCIS s. GRUBAR, Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A., University of Mar)'land, 1948; m.a., Johns Hopkins University, 1952. 

A. JAMES HALEY, Assistant Professor of Zoology 
B.S., University of New Hampshire, 1949; M.S., 1950; sc.d.. The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1955. 

HUBERT P. HENDERSON, Asststant ProfessoT of Mxisic and Director of University 
Bands 

B.A., University of North Carolina, 1941; m.a., 1950. 

E. BENNETTE HENSON, Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.S., Marshall College, 1949; M.S., University of West Virginia, 1950; ph.d., 
Cornell University, 1954. 

RICHARD T. HiGHTON, Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.A., New York University, 1950; M.S., Uni\ersity of Florida, 1953; ph.d., 1956. 

JOHN HORVATH, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
PH.D., University of Budapest, 1947. 

15 ► 



EOLF o. HUBBE, Assistant Professor of Classical Languages and Literatures 
B.A., Hamilton College, 1947; m.a., Princeton University, 1950; ph.d., 1950. 

JAMES A. HUMMEL, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., California Institute of Technology, 1949; m.a.. Rice Institute, 1953; ph.d., 
1955. 

RICHARD jAQuiTH, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1940; M.S., 1942; ph.d., Michigan State Uni- 
versity, 1955. 

wiLHELMiNA jASHEMSKi, Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., York College, 1931; m.a.. University of Nebraska, 1933; ph.d.. University of 
Chicago, 1942. 

HOWARD J. LASTER, Assistant Professor of Physics 

A.B., Harvard College, 1951; ph.d., Cornell University, 1957. 

THELMA z, LAviNE, Assistant Professor of Philoso'phy 
B.A., Radclilfe College, 1936; m.a., 1937; ph.d., 1939. 

IRVING LiNKOw, Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Arts 
B.A., University of Denver, 1937; m.a., 1938. 

LEONARD I. LUTWACK, Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Wesleyan University, 1939; m.a., 1940; ph.d., Ohio State University, 1950. 

WILLIAM m. macdonald, Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1950; ph.d., Princeton University, 1955. 

WILLIAM G. MAiscH, Assistant Professor of Molecular Physics 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1951; ph.d., Brovvn University, 1956. 

ALEXEi A. MARADUDiN, Assistant Research Professor of Physics 

B.S., Stanford University, 1953; M.S., Stanford University, 1954; ph.d.. Uni- 
versity of Bristol, 1957. 

JERRY MARION, Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., Reed College, Portland, Oregon, 1952; M.S., Rice Institute, 1953; ph.d., 1955. 

ANNIE L. mcelhenie. Assistant Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Franklin College, 1926; b.s., Hillsdale College, 1927; m.a.. University of 
Chicago, 1941; Certificate Third Year, New York School of Social Work, Columbia 
University, 1951. 

CHARLES c. mish. Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1936; m.a., 1946; ph.d., 1951. 

ALBERT D. MOTT, Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., University of Missouri, 1947; m.a., 1949; ph.d.. University of California, 1956. 

graciela p. nemes. Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.S., Trinity College, 1942; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1949; ph.d., 1952. 

-4 16 



GROVER c. NiEMEYER, Assistant Professor of S-peech and Dramatic Arts 

B.S., DePauvv University, 1933; m.a., Northwestern University, 1935; pii.d., Yale 
University, 1942. 

HESTER B. PROVENSEN, Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Arts 
LL.B., George Washington University, 1926; m.a., Emerson College, 1948. 

RUDOLPH E. PUGLiESE, Assistant Professor of S-peech and Dramatic Arts 
B.A., Miami University, 1947; m.a.. Catholic University, 1949. 

DONALD K. PUMROY, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Iowa, 1949; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1951; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Washington, 1954. 

GORDON M. RAMM, Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.A., University of Buffalo, 1949; m.a., 1950; ph.d.. New York University, 1954. 

MARGUERITE c. RAND, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Pomona College, 1919; m.a., Stanford University, 1921; ph.d., University of 
Chicago, 1951. 

marjorie richey, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1948; ph.d.. University of Illinois, 1952. 

PATRICK w. RiDDLEBERGER, Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Virginia Military Institute, 1939; m.a.. University of California, 1949; ph.d., 
1952. 

GEORG J. RiEGER, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

DR. RER. NAT., University of Giessen, 1953; habilitation, 1955. 

HELEN A. RivLiN, Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., University of Rochester, 1949; m.a., Radcliffe College, 1950; ph.d., Oxford 
University, 1953. 

JOHN M. ROBINSON, Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Middlebury College, 1945; ph.d., Cornell University, 1949. 

WILLIAM G. ROSEN, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
B.S., University of Illinois, 1943; m.s., 1947; ph.d., 1954. 

LEONORA c. ROSENFiELD, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., Smith College, 1930^ m.a., Columbia University, 1931; ph.d., 1940. 

HERBERT scHAUMANN, Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Westminster College, 1931; ph.d., Cornell University, 1935. 

WALTER E. scHLARETZKi, AssistaM Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1941; m.a.. University of Illinois, 1942; ph.d., Cornell 
University, 1948. 

MARK SCHWEIZER, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
M.A., University of Maryland, 1931; ph.d., 1941. 

17 ► 



WILLIAM M. SMEDLEY, Assistufit ProfessoT of Chemistry 
B.S., Northwestern University, 1938; M.S., 1940. 

DAVID s. SPARKS, Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Grinnell College, 1944; m.a.. University of Chicago, 1945; ph.d., 1951. 

EDWARD A. STERN, Assistant Research Professor of Physics 
B.S., California Institute of Technology, 1951; ph.d., California Institute of Teck- 
nology, 1955. 

ROLAND N. STROMBERG, Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., University of Kansas City, 1939; m.a., American University, 1945; PH.D., 
University of Maryland, 1952. 

JOSEPH sucHER, Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., Brooklyn College, 1952; ph.d., Columbia University, 1957. 

MARTIN J. SWETNICK, Assistant Research Professor of Physics 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1945; M.S., N.Y.U., 1947; ph.d., N.Y.U., 1951. 

H. DAVID TURNER, Assistant Professor of Library Science 

B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1947; b.s.l.s.. Catholic University, 1948; 
M.A., University of Maryland, 1954. 

ANNA MARY URBAN, Assistant Professor of Library Science 

B.A., Cornell University, 1929; a.b.l.s., Emory University, 1938; m.a., Univwsity 
of Maryland, 1951. 

JOSEPH T. VANDERSLICE, Assistant Professor of Molecular Physics 

B.S., Boston College, 1949; ph.d., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1952. 

NORMA WEGNER, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Hunter College, 1944; m.a., Cornell University, 1946; ph.d.. University of 
Connecticut, 1955. 

HOWARD E. WINN, Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.A., Bowdoin College, 1948; M.S., University of Michigan, 1950; ph.d., 1955. 



Research Associates 

mwiN ALTMAN, Research Associate and Junior Instructor of Psychology 
B.A., New York University, 1951; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1954. 

BERNARD G. BERENSON, Counselor— Research Associate of Psychology 
B.A., American University, 1953; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1957. 

THOMAS B. DAY, Research Associate of Physics 

B.S., University of Notre Dame, 1952; ph.d., Cornell University, 1957. 

EiNAR HiNNOV, Research Associate of Physics 

B.A., St. Olaf College, 1952; m.a., Duke University, 1954; ph.d., Duke University, 
1956. 

^ 18 



RBNB LEVESQUE, Research Associate of Physics 

B.S., Sir George Williams College, Montreal, Canada, 1952; PH.D., Northwestern 
University, Illinois, 1957. 

ANGBLO MrNGU2Zi, Research Associate of Physics 

DOCTORATE IN PHYSICS, University of Bologna, Italy, 1952. 

DONALD A. OAKES, Research Associate of Molecular Physics 

TOLANDA PRATT, Research Associate of Chemistry 

B.A., Cornell University, 1938; ph.d., Columbia University, 1942. 

DOMiNiKus RiTZKE, Research Associate of Molecular Physics 
E.E., Engineering School, Zwickau-Saxonia, Germany, 1939. 

SATiSH c. SAXENA, Research Associate of Molecular Physics 
M.sc, Lucknow University, 1953; ph.d., Calcutta University, 1956. 

ARNOLD sEiGEL, Research Associate of Molecular Physics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1944; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1947; d.sc. University of Amsterdam, 1952. 

BERGER M. SHEPARD, Research Associate of Molecular Physics 
B.S., Yale University, 1938. 

JOHN w. TREMBLY, Research Associate of Molecular Physics 

DAVID Y. WONG, Research Associate of Physics 
B.A., Hardin-Simmons University, 1954. 

Instructors 

MALTHON M. ANAPOL, lustructor of Sfeech and Dramatic Arts 
B.S., Rutgers University, 1949; m.a.. Temple University, 1953. 

PHILIP E. ARSENAULT, Instructor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., Clark University, 1936; m.a., Princeton University, 1951. 

THOMAS J. AYLWARD, Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Arts 

B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1947; m.s.. University of Wisconsin, 1949. 

BETTY B. BAEHR, Instriictor of Library Science 

B.A., George Washington University, 1943; b.s.l.s., University of Kentucky, 1947. 

WHITNEY K. BATES, Instructor of History 

B.A., University of Washington, 1941; m.a.. University of Wisconsin, 1948; ph.d., 
1951. 

RICHARD D. BECKMAN, histructor of English 

B.A., Columbia University, 1953; m.a., Rochester University, 1954. 

KATHRYN c. BiERSDORF, Counselor-Instrtictor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Iowa, 1949; M.S., Washington State College, 1952. 

19 ► 



MELViN BERNSTEIN, Instructor of Music 

A.B., Southwestern at Memphis, 1947; b.mus., 1948; m.mus.. University o£ Michi- 
gan, 1949; M.A., University of North Carolina, 1954. 

MARIE BOBORYKiNE, Instructor of Foreign Languages 
M.A., St. Petersburg Archeological Institute, 1914. 

GEORGE p. BREWSTER, Instructor of Mathematics 
B.S., U. S. Naval Academy, 1916, 

MARGARET L. BROWN, Instructor of Mathematics 
B.S., Columbia University, 1943; m.a., 1948. 

SAMUEL E. BROWN, Instructor of English 

B.A., Indiana University, 1934; m.a., Indiana University, 1946; PH.D., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1955. 

RAY B. BROWNE, Instructor of English 

B.A., University of Alabama, 1943; m.a., Columbia University, 1947; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of California, Los Angeles, 1956. 

JOACHIM BRUHN, Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Zurich, 1950; ph.d., Kiel University, 1953. 

JAMES BYRD, Instructor of S-peech and Dramatic Arts 
B.A., University of North Carolina, 1948; m.a., 1949. 

GEORGE H. callcott, Instructor of History 

B.A., University of South Carolina, 1950; m.a., Colimibia University, 1951; ph.d., 
University of North Carolina, 1956. 

ANNA CARPER, Instructor of Library Science 

B.A., Elizabethtown College, 1941; m.s., Columbia University, 1951. 

WILLIAM B. CATTON, lustructor of History 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1951; m.a., 1952. 

IRENE H. CHAYES, Instructor of English 
B.A., New York University, 1939; m.a., 1940. 

CHUNjEN c. CHEN, Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.S., Cornell University, 1919; m.s.. University of Maryland, 1920. 

JOHN c. CLENDENiN, Instructor of English 

B.S., ED., Mansfield State Teachers College, 1935; m.a., Bucknell University, 1941. 

SARA E. coNLON, Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Arts 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1947; m.a., State University of Iowa, 1950. 

SHEROD M. COOPER, JR., Instructor of English 

B.S., Temple University, 1951; m.a.. Temple University, 1953. 

ELLEN CORREL, Instructor of Mathematics 

B.S., Douglas College (Rutgers University), 1951; m.s., Purdue University, 1953; 
PH.D., 1957. 

^ 20 



PHYLLIS w. cowEN, Instructor of English 

B.A., Hunter College, 1947; m.a., University of Syracuse, 1948. 

DOROTHY D. CRAVEN, InstmctoT of Speech and Dramatic Arts 

B.S., Southeast Missouri State Teachers College, 1945; m.a., State University of 
Iowa, 1948. 

LUCILLE D. DAHMS, Instructor of Sociology 

B.S., Oklahoma A. & M. College, 1950; m.s., Oklahoma A. & M. College, 1952. 

CONSTANCE H. DEMAREE, Instructor of English 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1944; m.a., 1945. 

DONALD DEW, Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Arts 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1950; m.a., State University of Iowa, 1956. 

MARGARET M. DONAHUE, Instructor of Library Science 

B.S., Trinity College, 1942; b.s.l.s., Catholic University, 1945. 

THOMAS H. DYER, Instructor of Mathematics 
B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, 1924. 

WILLIAM p. ELLIS, Instructor of Sfeech and Dramatic Arts 

B.S., Towson Teachers College, 1954; m.a.. Northwestern University, 1956. 

GERALD G. EGGERT, histructor of History 

B.A., Western Michigan University, 1949; m.a.. University of Michigan, 1951. 

MARTEsrus M. ESSER, Instructor of Mathematics 
M.S., Northwestern University, 1944; ph.d., 1946. 

EMORY G. EVANS, Instructor of History 

B.A., Randolph-Macon College, 1950; m.a., University of Virginia, 1954; ph.d., 
1956. 

WILLIAM s. FELTON, JR., Instructor of Sociology 

B.A., Marietta College, 1948; m.a.. University of Colorado, 1951; ph.d., 1955. 

JACOB G. FRANZ, Instructor of Sociology 

B.A., Southwestern Oklahoma State Teachers College, 1935; m.a., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1939. 

MELViN J. FRIEDMAN, Instructor of English 

B.A., Bard College, 1949; m.a., Colximbia University, 1952; ph.d., Yale University, 
1954. 

BERNARD FusARO, Instructor of Mathematics 

B.A., Swarthmore College, 1950; m.a., Columbia University, 1954. 

HERBERT R. GiLLis, histructor of S'pccch and Dramatic Arts 
B.A., Kent State University, 1947; m.a., 1949. 

MARY KATHRYN GREEN, InStrUCtOr of Music 

B.M., Eastman School of Music of the University of Rochester, 1952; m.m., 1954. 

21 ► 



MEYER GREENBERG, Instructor of Foreign Languages 

E.A., Yeshiva University, 1934; m.a., Jewish Institute of Religion, 1944; ph.d.. 
University of Maryland, 1956. 

THOMAS w. HALL, Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1938; m.a., Middlebury College, 1950. 

RAYMOND J. HANKS, Instructor of History 
B.A., University of Chicago, 1948; m.a., 1949. 

ISABELLA M. HAYES, Instructor of Library Science 

B.A., Knox College, 1930; b.l.s.. University of Wisconsin, 1931. 

MARIE J. HENAULT, Instructor of English 

B.A., University of Washington, 1945; m.a., University of Washington, 1946; 
PH.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

HAROLD J. HERMAN, Instructor of English 
A.B., University of Maryland, 1952. 

DAVID w. HIRST, Instructor of History 

B.A., University of Connecticut, 1950; m.a.. Northwestern University, 1952. 

ROBERT K. HmzEL, Instructor of Sociology 

B.A., Pennsylvania State College, 1946; m.a., 1950; ph.d., Louisiana State Uni- 
versity, 1954. 

FRANK M. HOADLEY, Instructor of English 

B.A., George Peabody College for Teachers, 1950; m.a., 1951; ph.d.. University 
of Oklahoma, 1955. 

STANLEY M. HOLBERG, Instructor of English 
B.S., University of Buffalo, 1941; m.a., 1951. 

HAi-TsiN HSU, Instructor of Mathematics 

B.E., National Technical College, 1937; m.a.. National Chekiang University, 1945j 
PH.D., Yale University, 1955, 

JOSEPH A. JAMES, Instructor of Foreign Languages 

A.B., Bates College, 1925; m.a.. West Virginia University, 1930. 

RODERICK H. JELLEMA, Instructor of English 

B.A., Calvin College, 1951; post graduate diploma in English studies, Edin- 
burgh University, 1954. 

DORA E. KEARNEY, Instructor of Mathematics 

B.A., University of Minnesota, 1920; m.a.. University of Minnesota, 1924. 

THOMAS c. KEEDY, JR., Instructor of Sociology 

A.B., University of Southern California, 1948; M.S., 1951; m.a., 1955; ph.d., 1956. 

FAYB L. KELLY, Instructor of English 

B.A., University of Florida, 1941; m.a., 1950. 

M 22 



JOSEPH M. KissANE, Instructor of English 

B.A., Duquesne University, 1952; m.a., Columbia University, 1956. 

RUTH MiLLEn KNiEP, Itistructor of English 

A.B., University of Miami, 1948; m.a.. University of South Carolina, 1951; ph.d., 
University of Florida, 1954. 

MELViN D. LANDSBERG, Instructor of English 

B.S.S., City College of New York, 1947; m.a., Columbia University, 1948. 

CHARLES N. LEE, Instritctor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1955. 

LEO R. LEMAiRE, Instructor of Foreign Languages 
ARBiTUR, Frankfurt, 1926. 

iNDA LEPSON, htstrtictor of Mathematics 
B.A., New York University, 1941; m.a., Columbia University, 1945. 

MILLARD G. LES CALLETTE, Instructor of History 

B.A., Western Maryland College, 1952; m.a., Johns Hopkins University, 1954. 

MAREN LOCKWOOD, Instructor of Sociology 

C.S., (honors). University College, London University, 1955; m.a.. University of 
Marj'land, 1957. 

SHUH-YiN Lu MAR, Instructor of Mathematics 

B.A., Ginling College, 1928; M.S., Mount Holyoke, 1932. 

MINERVA L. MARTIN, Instnictor of English 

B.S., University of Alabama, 1931; m.a., Louisiana State University, 1937; ph.d., 
1940. 

JUSTIN G. maccarthy, InstructOT of Mathematics 

B.A., St. John's University, 1936; ph.d.. University of Pittsburgh, 1955. 

JOSEPH R. MARCHES, Instructor of Sociology 

S.A., University of Minnesota, 1952; m.a., University of Marj'land, 1953. 

MARTHA J. MAXWELL, Counsclor-Instructor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1946; m.a., University of Maryland, 1948. 

MARY B. mcclay. Instructor of Mathematics 

B.ED., Eastern Illinois State Teachers College, 1937; m.a.. University of Illinois, 
1941. 

WILLIAM F. MCKBE, Instructor of History 

B.A., College of Wooster, 1952; m.a.. University of Wisconsin, 1954. 

CHARLTON MEYER, InStTtlCtOr of Music 

B.MUS., Curtis Institute, 1952. 

LA VERNE w. MILLER, Instructor of English 

B.A., Milvvaukee-Downer College, 1938; m.a.. University of Chicago, 1943; ph.d., 
Bradley Universitj', 1956. 

23 ► 



ANNABELLE B. MOTZ, Instructor of Sociology 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1941; m.a., University of Chicago, 1943; ph.d., 
1950. 

ANN E. NORTON, Instructor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., Syracuse University, 1945; m.a., 1947. 

ELIZABETH NELSON, Instructor of English 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1944; m.a.. Mills College, 1949; m.a.. University of 
Maryland, 1957. 

KENNETH B. o'brjen. Instructor of History 

B.A., San Jose State College, 1950; m.a., Stanford University, 1951; ph.d., 1956. 

THOMAS A. PALEY, Instructor of Mathematics 

B.S., City College of New^ York, 1950; m.a., Yale University, 1952. 

JESS N. PARMER, Instructor of History 

B.A., Indiana University, 1949; m.a., University of Connecticut, 1951; ph.d., Cor- 
nell University, 1956. 

VIRGINIA PHILLIPS, InstructoT of Library Science 

B.A., Western Maryland College, 1943; b.a.l.s., Emory University, 1946. 

ROBERT M. piERSON, Instructor of Library Science 

B.A., DePauw University, 1946; m.a., Duke University, 1948; ph.d., 1951; m.s.l.s., 
Catholic University, 1955. 

STANLEY s. PLiSKOFF, Instructor of Psychology 

B.A., New York University, 1951; m.a., New York University, 1953; ph.d., 1956. 

JOHN PORTZ, Instructor of English 

B.A., Duke University, 1937; m.a.. Harvard University, 1941. 

JOHN RALEIGH, Instructor of Mathematics 

A.B., Lyceum Licence, 1918; m.a., Columbia University, 1947; ph.d.. University 
of Pennsylvania, 1955. 

OLIVER L. RICE, Instructor of English 

B.MUS., Central College, 1943; m.a., Columbia University, 1949. 

PHILIP ROVNER, Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., The George Washington University, 1948; m.a., 1949. 

FRANK L. RYAN, Instructor of English 

B.A., University of Michigan, 1947; m.a., Boston College, 1948. 

DAVID s. SANDERS, JR., Instructor of English 

B.A., University of California, Los Angeles, 1949; m.a., 1953; ph.d., 1956. 

JOHN F. SCHMIDT, Instructor of Sociology 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1941; m.a., 1946; ph.d., 1950. 

MURIEL c. SEELYE, Instructor of English 

B.A., Bennington College, 1947; m.a.. The George Washington University, 1957. 

M 24 



JULIUS c. SHEPHERD, Instructor of Mathematics 

B.A., East Carolina Teachers' College, 1944; m.a., 1947. 

CAYLE s. SMITH, Ifistructor of English 

B.S., Iowa State College, 1948; m.a., Cornell University, 1951. 

WILLIAM A. SMITH, Instructor of Mathematics 
B.A., Syracuse University, 1941; m.a., 1947. 

THOMAS B. SPRECHER, Counselor-lnstructor of Psychology 

B.A., Dennison University, 1952; m.a., University of Maryland, 1956. 

E. THOMAS STARCHER, InstTuctor of Speech and Dramatic Arts 

B.A., University of Southern California, 1940; m.s.. University of Arkansas, 1948. 

BARBARA H. STEVENSON, Instriictor of English 

B.A., University of California, 1938; m.a.. University of California, 1939. 

M. ELIZABETH STITES, Instructor of Art 
D.ARCH., New York University, 1941. 

MARTHA c. STONE, InstriictoT of English 

B.s. in ED., Southeast Missouri State College, 1927; m.a.. University of Missouri, 
1929. 

PAUL w. SUTTON, JR., Instructor of Philoso'phy 
B.A., University of Cincinnati, 1950; ph.d., The Johns Hopkins University, 1955. 

RAYMOND THORBERG, Instructor of English 

B.A., University of Alaska, 1939; m.a., University of Cliicago, 1946; ph.d., Cornell 
University, 1954. 

JOHN w. TOMLiN, Instriictor of Sociology 
B.A., University of Virginia, 1951; m.a., 1953. 

PAUL TRAVER, InstrtictoT of Music 

B.MUS., Catholic University of America, 1955; m.mus., 1957. 

JAMES A. WALKER, Instructor of English 

B.A., Amherst College, 1939; m.a.. Harvard University, 1941; ph.d., 1948. 

JAMES WALT, histructOT of English 

b.a. University of Minnesota, 1936; m.a.. University of Michigan, 1937; ph.d., 1955. 

CATHERINE M. WEAVER, InStTUCtOT of English 

B.A., University of Michigan, 1918; m.a., Te.xas Christian University, 1929. 

JOSEPHINE A. WEDEMEYER, Instructor of Library Science 

B.A., University of Michigan, 1930; b.s.l.s., University of Denver, 1941; m.educ. 
University of Maryland, 1953. 

J. PATRICK WHITE, Instructor of History 

B.A., University of Michigan, 1949; m.a., 1950; ph.d., 1956. 

PAUL WARREN WHITNEY, InStTUCtOT of English 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1950; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1952. 

25 ► 



DALE E. WOLGAMUTH, Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Arts 

B.A., Western Reserve University, 1954; m.a.. Western Reserve University, 1955. 

JACQUELINE L. ZEMEL, Instructor of Mathematics 

B.S., Queens College, 1949; m.a., Syracuse University, 1951. 

Assistant Instructors 

jAGjiT s. BAKSHi, Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 

Baccalaureate, a.s. College Khanna, 1952; m.a.. Government College Ludhuori, 
1955. 

HAROLD c. BERRY, Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 
B.S., University o£ Maryland, 1955. 

GEORGE R. BLAKELY, Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 
A.B., Georgetown University, 1954. 

RICHARD B. BRIAN, Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 
B.S., Grove City College, 1953. 

ALOIS J. BURDA, JR., Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 
B.S., U. S. Naval Academy, 1940. 

CARLETON M. CLIFFORD, Assistant Instructor of Zoology 
B.A., University of Vermont, 1954. 

MARY F. DEVERMOND, Assistant Instructor of Music 

B.MUS., Howard University, 1942; m.a., Columbia University, 1948. 

DAGMAR R. HENNEY, Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 
B.S., University of Miami, 1954; m.s., 1956. 

JAMES HILL, Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 

B.B.A., University of Miami, 1949; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1955. 

THOMAS w. KiLLOUGH, JR., Assistant Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Arts 
B.A., Henderson College, 1953; m.a.. University of Arkansas, 1957. 

DAVID J. KING, Assistant Instructor of Psychology 

B.A., Boston University, 1951; m.a.. University of Maine, 1952. 

ROBERT c. KLINE, JR., Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 
B.s. Moravian College, 1955. 

BENJAMIN Y. c. Koo, Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 

B.A., Princeton University, 1951; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1954. 

ROBERT E. LANA, Assistant Instructor of Psychology 

B.A., Rutgers University, 1954; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1956. 

RICHARD E. MCGiLL, Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 
B.A., Wooster College, 1954. 

JOHN A. MENDiOLA, Assistant Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Arts 
B.A., Hiram College, 1954; m.a., Ohio State University, 1955. 

< 26 



ALICE L. PEET, Assistant Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Arts 
B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1944; m.a., 1952. 

SCOTT c. sciiURZ, Assistant Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Arts 
B.A., Denison University, 1957. 

JANET G. SMITH, Assistaut Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Arts 
B.S., Akron University, 1952; m.a., State University of I-.wa, 1955. 

TED A. TAYLOR, JR., Assistant Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Arts 
B.L.I., Emerson College, 1954. 

CARL L. TiBERY, Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 
B.S., Bates College, 1949; m..\., Boston University, 1956. 

MARTIN T. TODARO, Assistant Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Arts 
B.A., The University of Texas, 1947; m.a., The University of Texas, 1949. 

ROGER H. TRUMBORE, Assistant Instructor of Zoology 
B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1955. 

NANCY E. TURNER, Assistant Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Arts 
B.A., Denison University, 1957. 

HOWARD WILSON, Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 
B.E.E., George Washington University, 1953. 

JOHN K. WINNER, Assistant Instructor of Mathem^^tics 
B.S., Wilson Teachers College, 1956. 



Lecturers 

HARRISON H. ARNOLD, Lecturer of Foreign Langiiages 

B.A., Haverford College, 1918; m.a.. Harvard University', 1919; ph.d., 1926. 

EDWARD w. BAKER, Lecturer of Zoology 

B.S., University of California, 1936; ph.d., 1938. 

JOSEPH V. BRADY, Lecturer of Psychology 

B.S., Fordham University, 1943; ph.d.. University of Chicago, 1951. 

JOSEPH H. CAMiN, Lecturer of Zoology 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1946; m.s., 1947; ph.d., 1951. 

G. DONALD CAUSEY, Lecturer of Speech and Dramatic Arts 

B.A., University of Marjland, 1950; m.a., 1951; ph.d., Purdue University, 1954. 

R. EDWIN shutts, Lecturer of Speech and Dramatic Arts 

B.A., Indiana State Teachers' College, 1933; m.a.. Northwestern University, 1947; 
PH.D. 1950. 



27 ► 



KUSSELL W. STRANDTMANN, LeCtUrCr of ZoologJ 

B.S., Southwestern Texas Technical College, 1935; m.s., Texas Agricultural and 
Mechanical College, 1937; ph.d., Ohio State University, 1944. 

HAROLD L. WILLIAMS, Lectuver of Sfeech and Dramatic Arts 

A.B., University of Nebraska, 1944; ph.d.. University of Minnesota, 1951. 

Piesearch Assistants 

ALBERT ALTMAN, PhyStCS 

B.S., Brooklyn College, 1954. 

MARINO V. BAUER, PhysicS 

B.S., University of Mexico, 1956. 

EDWARD E. BEASLEY, PhysicS 

B.S., U. S. Naval Academy, 1944. 

ROBERT BENTO, PhysicS 

B.S., Providence College, 1956. 

HANS BERG, PhysicS 

ABiTUK, Gymnasium, Flensburg, Germany, 1951; Staatsexamen, Universitat Kiel, 
Germany, 1957. 

RICHARD T. BETTINGER, PhysicS 

B.S., Syracuse University, 1955. 

PAUL G. CASWELL, Psychology 
B.A., Youngstovni University, 1955. 

KULDiP CHOPRA, Physics 

B.S.C., Delhi University, India; M.S., Delhi University, India. 

LANGDON T. CRANE, PhysicS 

B.A., Amherst University, 1952; m.s., Brovrai University, 1954. 

VITALY DANCZENKO, PhysicS 

B.S., Berea College, 1954. 

JOSEPH F. DARDANO, Psychology 

B.A., Brown University, 1952; m.a., Boston University, 1953. 

JOHN A. DAViES, Physics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1953; m.s., 1954. 

JOHN L. DAVIS, Physics 

B.A., Bowdoin College, 1953. 

ROBERT L. DE ZAFRA, PhysicS 
B.A., Princeton University, 1954. 

PEGGY A. DIXON, PhysicS 

B.A., Western Reserve University, 1950; m.s., University of Maryland, 1954. 

M 28 



DOROTHY DUFFY, Molecuhr Physics 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1951. 

RAYMOND C. ELTON, PliysicS 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1953. 

JAMES s. EVANS, Physics 

B.S., University ot Rochester, 1953. 

STAvnos J. FALLIEROS, Physics 

B.S., The National and Kapodistric University, 1950. 

JOSEPH FINE, Physics 

B.A., Emory University, 1953; m.a., 1955. 

ARNOLD J. CLICK, Physics 
B.A., Brooklyn College, 1955. 

IRVINC I. CLICK, Mathematics 

B.S., The Johns Hopkins University, 1953. 

DAVID T. GOLDMAN, PhysicS 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1952; m.s., Vanderbilt University, 1954. 

WILLIAM HARTE, PhysicS 

B.S., Providence College, 1954; m.a., Dartmouth College, 1956. 

JOHN HENNES, PhysicS 

B.S., University of Washington, 1955; M.S., 1957. 

LOUIS T. HO, Molecular Physics 
B.A., Catholic University, 1953. 

KEN HOTTA, PhysicS 

B.S., Nagoya University, Japan, 1951. 

MORTON KACAN, PhysicS 

B.S., Case Institute of Technology, 1955. 

ROGER P. KOHIN, PhysicS 

B.S., University of Notre Dame, 1953. 

HOWARD KOPP, Molecular Physics 

jURi KORK, Physics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1956. 

JOHN LESSER, JR., Psychology 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1952; M.S., 1953. 

FRANK S. LEVIN, PhysicS 

B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1955. 

CARL A. LUDEMANN, PhysicS 

B.S., Brooklyn College, 1956. 



29 ► 



WILLIAM H. LUPTON, PhyStCS 
B.A., University oi Virginia, 1950. 

MORTON LUTZKY, Phjsics 
B.S., C.C.N.Y., 1951. 

JAGADISHWAR MAHANTY, PhysicS 

B.S., Ravenshavv College, 1949; M.S., Calcutta University, 1951. 

PETER H. MASERiCK, Mathematics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1955; m.a., 1957. 

KENNETH MCCARTHY, Mohcular Pkysics 
B.S., Lehigh University, 1949; M.S., 1951. 

KISHIN MOORJANI, PhyStCS 

B.S., Delhi College, India, 1955; M.S., 1957. 

STAN M. NEUDER, PhysicS 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1955. 

GOETZ OERTEL, PhyStCS 

ABiTUR, Oberschule, Heilbronn, Germany, 1953; vordiplom, University of Kiel, 
Germany, 1956. 

BINYORK OUYANG, PhysicS 

B.S., National Taiwan University, China, 1955. 

jOGESH c. PATi, Physics 

B.S., Ravenshaw College, Cuttack, India, 1955. 

CHARLES P. POOLE, PhysicS 

B.A., Fordham University, 1950; M.S., 1952. 
LOUIS J. POUDRE, Physics 

FRANCISCO PRATS, PhysicS 

Licenciado, University of Madrid, 1946; Ingeniero School of Ind. Engineering, 1953. 

JOHN J. QuiNN, Physics 

B.S., St. John's University, 1954. 

NORMAN M. REED, Molccular Physics 

MARVIN L. ROUSH, PhysicS 

B.S., Ottawa University, Kansas, 1956. 

STEVEN H. SCHOT, Mathematics 

B.A., American University, 1951; M.S., University of Maryland, 1954. 

KWANG Y. SHEN, PhysicS 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1953. 

BETTY SLOAN, PhysicS 

B.A., Birmingham-Southern College, 1944. 

^ 30 



JIN-CHEN su, Physics 

B.S., National Taiwan University, China, 1955. 

JANE R. SWAN, Chemistry 

BETTY R. VANDERSLICB, Mathematics 

B.A., Upsala College, 1945, m.a.. University of Maryland, 1943. 

JOHN L. WARREN, PhysicS 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1955. 

WILLIAM C. WATT, PhysicS 

B.A., University of North Carolina, 1954. 

HAROLD wEiNER, Psychology 

B.B.A., City College of New York, 1953; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1957. 

PHIL WELSH, Psychology 

B.A., Temple University, 1950; m.a., 1951. 

ROBERT C. WENTWORTH, PhysicS 

B.A., Swarthmore College, 1953. 

LOIS A. WILSON, Molecular Physics 

ALFRED c. wu, Physics 

B.S., Wheaton College, 1955. 

JOSEPH ZIMMERMAN, Psychology 

B.S., Brooklyn College, 1953; M.S., Iowa State College, 1956. 

Research Fellows 

JOSEPH M. ANTONUcci, Cheviistry 
B.S., St. John's University, 1953. 

RAYMOND BAYLOUNY, Chemistry 
B.S., Seton Hall, 1954. 

B. PATRICK CALDWELL, Chemistry 
B.S., Rockhurst College, 1955. 

w. G. CARPENTER, Chemistry 

B.S., West Virginia Wesleyan, 1953; M.S., University of Mar}'land, 1956. 

DAVID D. CENTOLA, Chemistry 
B.S., Fordham University, 1949. 

FRANK CESARE, Chemistry 

B.S., Rensselaer Poly. Inst., 1953; m.s., Rochester, 1955. 

EDWARD L. COMPERE, Chemistry 

B.S., Beloit College, 1950; m.s., University of Chicago, 1954. 

WALTER R. DOWDLE, Microhiology 

B.S., University of Alabama, 1955; m.s. 1956. 

31 ► 



WARREN F. HALE, Chemistry 

B.S., Northeastern University, 1952; M.S., Polytechnical Institute of Brooklyn, 1954. 

CHARLES T. HALL, MicroMology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1954. 

JOHN E. KATON, Chemistry 

B.S., Bovv'ling Green University, 1951; M.S., Kansas State, 1955. 

JAMES M. KNIGHT, PkysicS 

B.S., Spring Hill College, 1954. 

CHARLES KNOX, Chemistry 

E.S., Brovm University, 1953; m.a., Columbia University, 1954. 

CHARLOTTE KRAEBEL, Chemistry 
E.S., Western, Oxford, Ohio, 1955. 

DANIEL A. LIMA, Chemistry 

B.S., Bradford Durfee Tech. Inst., 1953. 

RICHARD MAYER, Chemistry 
B.S., St. John's University, 1955. 

JOSEPH A. MEYERS, Chemistry 
B.S., Tulane University, 1953. 

c. DAVID MILLER, Chemistry 
B.A., Columbia College, 1952. 

JOHN c. OPPELT, Chemistry 
B.S., Loyola College, 1953. 

TADASHi, oucHi, Physics 

PH.D., Hiroshima University, 1957. 

DAVID A. POWER, MicroMology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1954. 

SHIRLEY M. READ, Chemistry 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1956. 

FRANK scoTTi, Chemistry 

B.S., City College of New York, 1953. 

JOHN siBiLiA, Chemistry 

B.A., Newark College of Rutgers University, 1953. 

FRANCIS E. WELSH, Chemistry 
B.S., Rockhurst College, 1954. 

c. EVANS WHITE, Chemistry 

B.S., Queens College, 1952; M.S., University of Maryland, 1956. 

E. T. YATES, Chemistry 

B.S., University of Vermont, 1952; m.s., 1954. 

•< 32 



Graduate Assistants 

VALENTiNA ADAMS, Foreign Languages 

B.A., Sarah Lawrence Collcg.;, 1950; Certificate of French Language, Sorbonnc, 
University of Paris, 1954. 

ALFRED W. ALBERTS, Zoology 

B.S., Brooklyn College, 1953. 

R. F. ALLEN, Foreign Languages 
B.A., University of Oklahoma, 1956. 

MARY ANN ALLISON, English 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1957. 

MARTIN ANDERSON, Chemistry 

B.S., George Washington University, 1951; M.S., 1952. 

LOUIS s. ARONICA, Physics 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1955. 

HELEN P. ASTiN, Psychology 

B.A., Adelphia College, 1953; M.S., Ohio University ,1954. 

JOHN BARACH, PhysicS 

B.A., Princeton University, 1957. 

DEREK A. BARNES, PhysicS 

B.A., (Hon.) Christ Church, England, 1956; b.a., (Hon.) Oxford, England, 1957. 

JAMES W. BARNHART, CJlCmistry 

B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1957. 

CORNELIUS W. BARRY, Zoology 

B.S., St. John Fisher College, 1956. 

SANFORD BiENEN, Psychology 
B.A., Queens College, 1957. 

HOWARD A. BLADEN, JR., Microhiology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1956. 

JAY A. BLAUSER, Chemistry 

B.S., Brigham Young University, 1956. 

BRUCE A. BLOOMFiELD, Mathematics 
B.A., University of Oregon, 1957. 

ROBERT L. BOORD, Zoology 

B.A., Washington & Jefferson, 1950. 

G. BROWN BRADLEY, JR., Zoology 

B.S., Furman University, 1957. 

JOHN M. BRIDGES, PhysicS 

B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1957. 

GERALD p. BRiERLEY, Chemistry 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1953. 

33 •• 



HENRY C. BRINTON, PJiysicS 

B.A., University of Delaware, 1957. 

DANIEJL M. BROWN, PhysicS 

B.S., Baylor University, 1956. 

CHARLES J. BURKE, English 
B.S., Loyola CoUege, 1957. 

EDWARD R. BURKE, PhysicS 

B.S., St. Joseph's College, 1957. 

EDDIE CHAN, MicTohiology 
B.A., Texas Western College, 1954; m.a.. University of Texas, 1957. 

FERNANDO U. CHAOS, PhysicS 
B.S., University of Mexico, 1952; B.s., chem.e., 1955. 

YUNG-YI CHEN, PhyStCS 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1955. 

SUE-NING CHU, Zoology 

B.S., Barat College of the Sacred Heart, 1955. 

DONALD R. CLARK, Chemistry 
B.S., Allegheny College, 1957. 

EILEEN J. COHEN, English 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1953. 

EDWARD J. COLEMAN, Zoology 

B.S., St. Peter's College, 1955; m.s.. University of Detroit, 1957. 

RITA s. COOK, Foreign Languages 
Gymnasium Metvira, 1932. 

MAURICE CRASS, Zoology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1956. 

RICHARD DAY, PhysicS 

B.A., Villa Madonna College, 1957. 

ANETTE DEVRiENDT, Foreign Languages 
B.A., Swarthmore College, 1955. 

FRANCOIS DE WAEGH, PhysicS 

Ingenieur Civil Electrician, University of Louvain, Belgium, 1957. 

JOSEPH DiPiETRO, Chemistry 

B.A., La Farina, 1950; b.s., Brooklyn College, 1955. 

HAROLD E. DOORENBOS, Chemistry 

B.S., Central College, Pella, Iowa, 1949; M.S., University of Arkansas, 1956. 

JAMES N. DUNN, Mathematics 
B.S., Canisius College, 1957. 

M 34 



CAROLYN JANE BBLB, S-peech and Dramatic Arts 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1957. 

JOHN R. EDMONDS, JR., Mathematics , 

B.S., George Washington University, 1957. 

ALENA ELBL, Zoology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1954. 

WILLIAM FEAIRHELLER, Chemistty 

a. A., Rutgers University, 1954. 

RONALD w. FELDSTBiN, Chemistry 
B.S., Franklin & Marshall CoUege, 1955. 

EDWARD FETTER, Chemistry 
B.A., LaSalle University, 1955. 

BRADFORD S. FIELD, JR., English 

B.A., Hiram College, 1952; m.a., Kent State University, 1955. 

SHIRLEY FISCHER, PhysicS 

B.S., Brooklyn College, 1957. 

BERT E. FRY, Chemistry 

B.S., University of California, 1954. 

FOREST w. FRYER, Psychology 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1953. 

JAMES GAviGAN, Chemistry 

B.S., University of Scranton, 1955. 

RONALD J. GIBBONS, Microhiology 

B.S., Wagner College, 1954; M.S., University of Maryland, 1956. 

JACK R. GLEASON, PhysicS 

B.A., Bowling Green State University, 1957. 

iSADORE GOLDBERG, Psychology 

B.A., Miami University, 1955; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1957. 

JOSEPH P. GOLDBERG, English 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1952. 

GEORGE G. GONYEA, Psychology 

B.S., Union College 1950; med.. University of Maryland, 1954. 

PHILLIP GRAHAM, Chemistry 

B.S., Washington State University, 1955. 

GRACE-ANN G. GRAY, Zoology 

B.A., University of Delaware, 1952. 

MARGARET A. GRAYSON, Zoology 

B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1948; m.s., 1954. 



35 ► 



NEWTON I. GREENBERG, PhysicS 

B.S., Brooklyn College, 1957. 

CHARLES W. GRIFFIN, m» MicTohiology 

B.S., University o£ Maryland, 1951; m.s., 1953. 

EDWARD F. GROUP, Chemistry 
B.A., Hamilton University, 1957. 

DOUGLAS HALL, Foreign Languages 
B.A., Wake Forest College, 1952. 

ERNEST A. HARRISON, Chemistry 
A.B., Boston University, 1957. 

ROBERT J. HENAULT, History 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1954; m.a., 1956. 

JOHN A. HiLDEBRANT, Mathematics 
B.S., University of Oklahoma, 1957. 

GEORGE L. HINDS, PhysicS 
B.A., Bovi^doin College, 1955. 

JOHN c. HOFFSOMMER, Chemistry 
B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1954. 

JOHN R. HOOTON, Chemistry 

B.S., East Texas State Teachers College, 1951; m.s., A. & M. College of Texas, 
1953. 

IVAN HUBER, Zoology 

B.A., Cornell University, 1954. 

LAWRENCE G. ISAACS, Chemistry 
B.S., College of St. Thomas, 1956. 

ROBERT B. ISAACSON, Chemistry 
B.S., City College of New York, 1956. 

THOMAS E. JENKINS, Zoology 

B.S., Furman University, 1957. 

DONALD E. JOHNSTON, Zoology 

B.S., Wayne University, 1956. 

DONALD G. JONES, Chemistry 

B.S., Washington Missionary College, 1957. 

ESTHER P. joLORAN, Chemistry 

B.S., Silliman University, 1948; M.S., University of Florida, 1953; B. Chem., Univer- 
sity of Florida, 1955. 

JAMES B. JUDD, PhUosofhy 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1956. 

^ 36 



MARION c. KAVEE, Mathematics 
B.A., Hunter College, 1957. 

JOHN R. KEENAN, Chemistry 

B.S., College of St. Thomas, 1957. 

DELYNN M. KEVER, English 
B.A., University of Oklahoma, 1951; m.a., 1957. 

FRED KLEIN, Psychology 

B.B.A., City College of New York, 1956. 

PAUL R. KNAFF, Psychology 

B.A., Champlain College, 1953; m.a., McGill University, 1955. 

SIMON R. KRAFT, Mathematics 

B.A., George Washington University, 1955; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1957. 

CHARLES KRANTZ, Psychology 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1956. 

NOEL KRiEG, MicTohiology 

B.A., University of Connecticut, 1955; m.s., 1957. 

AUGUST D. KUCHTA, Chemistry 
B.S., Pennsylvania State, 1953. 

ALBERT R. LANDGREBE, Chemistry 
B.S., Fordham University, 1957. 

LUCY H. LEE, Zoology 

B.A., St. Mary of the Springs, 1953. 

YUNG-CHANG LEE, PhysicS 

B.S., National Taiwan University, China, 1955. 

ALLEN M. LENCHEK, PhysicS 
B.S., University of Chicago, 1957. 

LUC LEPLAE, Physics 

Licencie de Science Physique, University of Louvain, Belgium, 1955. 

MADONNA LETZRING, English 

B.A., College of St. Scholastica, 1957. 

SUZANNE W. LEVIN, Zoology 
B.S., University of Mar^'land, 1956. 

CLAIRE N. LiESKE, Chemistry 
B.S., University of Idaho, 1954. 

w^ALLACE LUSK, foreign Languages 

B.A., Walla Walla College, 1931; m.a.. University of Southern California, 1934. 

ELLIS G. MACLEOD, Zoology 

B.S., University of Mar)'land, 1955. 

37 



SAROJINI MAHANTY, PhySlCS 

B.S., Delhi University, India, 1949; M.S., 1951. 

RAY A. MALZAHN, Chemistry 

B.A., Gustavus Adolphus, 1951; m.s.. University of North Dakota, 1953. 

EDWARD MARKS, Psychology 
B.A., Temple University, 1957. 

VINCENT C. MCCARTHY, Zoology 

B.A., Toronto University, 1953. 

CHARLES E. MEHLING, Zoology 

B.A., Loyola College, Baltimore, 1954. 

JOHN R. MERKEL, English 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1956. 

STANTON s. MILLER, Chemistry 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1953. 

ERNEST J. MONCADA, English 
B.A., University of Miami, 1952. 

JEROME P. MULLIN, PhysicS 

B.S., Spring Hill College, 1956. 

LEONORA I. MYLES, Mathematics 
B.S., Morgan State College, 1957. 

ARTHUR E. NAETHING, English 

B.A., Trinity University, 1950; m.a., 1952. 

DONALD p. OBERACKER, Zoology 

B.S., Utah State Agrioiltural College, 1956. 

EiLERT A. OFSTEAD, Chemistry 
B.S., St. Thomas College, 1956. 

RICHARD H. PAGE, Psychology 
B.S., Union College, 1955. 

MELVIN D. PALMER, English 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1957. 

JOHN C. PARKER, Zoology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1957. 

EDWARD H. PARKES, Psychology 

B.S., Peimsylvania State University, 1955. 

MARSHALL E. PETERS, Zoology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1954. 



^ 38 



CONSTANTINE c. PETROPOULOS, Chemistry 

U.S., Brown University, 1954; M.S., Florida State University, 1957. 

ANTHONY R. PICCIOLO, Zoology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1955. 

JOE L. POYER, Chemistry 

B.S., University of Oklahoma, 1954. 

PHILLIP PROVOST, Microhiology 

B.A., University of Connecticut, 1957. 

BRONSON L. puRYEAR, Mathematics 
B.S., Davis and Elkins College, 1957. 

CARL A. REBER, PhysicS 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1955. 

JAMES RBiD, Physics 

B.S., Clemson A. and M. College, 1957. 

YOUNG HO RHiE, Mathematics 

B.S., Seoul National University, 1954; m.a., Emory University, 1957. 

AUSTIN I. RHOADS, Zoology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1957. 

PAUL R. RicciuTi, Chemistry 
B.S., College of Holy Cross, 1957. 

JOHN E. RiEDMAiER, Chemistry 
B.S., Carnegie Tech., 1957. 

JOHN R. ROARK, Psychology 

B.A., Lafayette College, 1952; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1957. 

MICHAEL ROCK, Chemistry 
B.A., Yeshiva College, 1952. 

GERALD V. ROLPH, JR., Foreign Langtmges 

B.A., Northwestern University, 1952; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1955. 

ALViN H. ROSEN, Chemistry 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1952. 

EDWARD c. ROSENZWEiG, Microhiology 

B.A., Centre College, 1951; m.s.. University of Maryland, 1956. 

MAY RoswELL, Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Dublin, 1936; Certificate of Teaching, University of Cam- 
bridge, 1937; M.A., University of Maryland, 1957. 

HOWARD E. RUSKiE, Chemistry 
B.S., Fordham University, 1956. 

FRANCIS A. RYDER, PhysicS 

B.S., St. Joseph's College, 1957. 

39 ► 



HARRY A. SCHAFT, PhjsicS 

B.A., The New York University, 1954. 

PETER B. SCHWARTZ 

A.B., Hunter College, 1956; m.a., Emory University, 1957. 

JAMES F. SCULL, Psychology 

B.S., N. C. State, 1953; m.s., N. C. State, 1955. 

ERWiN SEGAL, Psychology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1957. 

CHUN-SHAN SHEN, PhysicS 

B.S., National Taivi^an University, 1957. 

CHiA-HUi SHiH, Physics 

B.S., National Taiwan University, 1957. 

REYNOLD M. SHOHO, Chemistry 
B.S., University of Illinois, 1952; M.S., University of Hawaii, 1957. 

MERLIN w. SHORE, Chemistry 
B.S., American University, 1957. 

DAVID p. SMITH, Chemistry 
B.S., American University, 1956. 

DANIEL E. SONENSHINE, Zoology 

B.S., City College of New York, 1954. 

UN SUN SONG, Sociology 

B.A., Ochanomizu University, Tokyo, 1939; m.a., Kyoiku University, Tokyo, 1942. 

ROSEMAY G. SPiRO, English 

B.A., Pennsylvania College for Women, 1941. 

JOHN F. STOUT, Zoology 

B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1957. 

STUART P. susKiND, Chemistry 
B.S., Duke University, 1957. 

JAMES E. swENARTON, Chemistry 
B.S., University of Virginia, 1953. 

DAVID F. TEMPLETON, JR., Mathematics 
B.A., American University, 1956. 

MELviN c. TEWS, Mathematics 
B.S., Trinity College, 1957. 

GLEN THOMAS, Psychology 

A.B., Stanford University, 1951; m.a., Los Angeles State College, 1956, 

JOHN A. THOMAS, English 

B.A., Brigham Young University, 1952; m.a., Brigham Young University, 1953. 

•< 40 



HAROLD G. THOMPSON, Chemistry 

B.S., Wagner College, 1954; m.s., Syracuse University, 1956. 

LOUIS TRAPASSO, Chemistry 

B.S., City College of New York, 1954. 

GORDON T. TROTTER, Mathematics 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1956. 

BALLARD E. TROY, PhysicS 

B.s. Duke University, 1957. 

JOHN VAN DE CASTLE, Chemistry 
B.S., St. John's, 1955. 

HOWARD T. VOORMAN, Zoology 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1956. 

WILLIAM D. WALLACE, PhysicS 

B.A., Michigan State Normal College, 1955. 

WILBUR H. WANDELL, JR., PhysicS 

B.A., Colorado College, 1956. 

HARRY w. WEBER, Chemistry 

B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1950. 

EDWIN Q. wEiMER, Chemistry 
B.S., Mount Union College, 1952. 

BETTY PERRY WHALEY, English 

B.A., University of North Carolina, 1942. 

RUDOLPH c. WHITE, Chemistry 
B.S., Virginia Militarv Institute, 1951. 

PHLETus p. WILLIAMS, JR., Microhiology 
B.S., Davis and Elkins, 1955. 

JOHN M. WILSON, Sociology 

B.J., University of Missouri, 1954. 

HANS J. WINKLER, Chemistry 

B.S., University of Marj-Iand, 1956. 

ROBERT M. A\TNTER, Chemistry 

B.S., St. Johns University, College, 1954. 

MARTIN F. wiSKOFF, Psychology 
B.A., City College of New York, 1956. 

CONRAD E. YUNKER, Zoology 

B.S., University of Mar)'land, 1952; M.S., 1954. 



41 



Assistants 

GEORGE w. ANDREWS, Chemistry 

GEORGE W. EASTMENT, MicToloiology 
JEANNE FALLIEROS, PhysicS 

RUTH M. FEAiRHELLER, Chemistry 
GiLDANA LIMA, Chemistry 

Baltimore Faculty 

GAYLORD ESTABROOK, Professor of Phystcs 

B.S., Purdue University, 1921; M.S., Ohio State University, 1922; M.S., The Johns 
Hopkins University, 1930; ph.d.. University of Pittsburgh, 1932. 

ALLiE w. RiCHESON, Pvofessor of Mathematics 

B.S., University of Richmond, 1918; m.a.. The Johns Hopkins University, 1925; 
PH.D., 1928. 

FRANCIS M. MILLER, Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Western Kentucky State, 1946; ph.d., Northvi^estem University, 1949. 

ADELE B. BALLMAN, Assistant Professor of English 

B.A,. Goucher College, 1926; ph.d.. The Johns Hopkins University, 1935. 

LESLIE c. cosTELLO, Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1954; ph.d., 1957. 

CLAIRE s. SCHRADIECK, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., Goucher College, 1916; ph.d.. The Johns Hopkins University, 1919. 

MARGARET c. zipp, Instructor of Mathematics 

B.sc, Douglass College (Rutgers), 1939; m.a.. University of Pittsburgh, 1948. 

HOWARD GENDASON, Graduate Assistant in Zoology 
B.S., Western Maryland College, 1957. 



42 



THE COLLEGE 
General Information 

TUB COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES offcrs its Students a liberal education. 
It seeks to develop graduates who can deal intelligently with the prob- 
lems which confront them and whose general education will be a continuing 
source not only of material profit, but of genuine personal satisfaction. It 
also offers each student the opportunity to concentrate in the field of his 
choice; this element of depth serves both as an integral part of his education 
and as a foundation for further professional training or pursuits. 

Students in other colleges of the University are offered training in funda- 
mental courses that serve as a background for their professional education. 

The courses required by the University for the baccalaureate degree in 
any college emphasize the development and nature of American civilization. 
All of these courses except one are given by the College of Arts and Sciences. 

HISTORY 

This college is an outgrowth of the Division of Language and Literature 
and the Division of Applied Science and the later School of Liberal Arts of 
Maryland State College. In 1921 the School of Liberal Arts and the School 
of Chemistry were combined and other physical and biological sciences were 
brought into the newly formed College of Arts and Sciences. In later reorgani- 
zations some departments have been added and some transferred to the admin- 
istrative control of other colleges. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

The requirements for admission to the College of Arts and Sciences are, 
in general, the same as those for admission to the other colleges and schools 
of the University. Application must be made to the Director of Admissions, 
University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

The student who intends to pursue a program of study in the College of 
Arts and Sciences should include the following subjects in his high school 
program: English, 4 units; Algebra, 2 units; Plane Geometry, 1 units; For- 
eign Language, 2 or more units; Biological or Physical Sciences, 1 or more 
units; History and Social Sciences, 1 or more units. 

The student who wishes to major in Chemistr)^ Mathematics, Physics, 
Bacteriology, Botany, Zoology or who wishes to folloAv a pre-medical or pre- 
dental program should include Trigonometry and Solid Geometry, and, if pos- 
sible, Chemistry and Physics in his high school program. 

A complete statement of admission requirements and policies will be found 
in the General Information Catalog. A copy may be obtained by WTiting to 
the Editor of Publications, University of Maryland, College Park, Marvland. 

43 ► 



General Information 

COSTS 

Actual annual costs of attending the University include: $185.00 fixed 
charges; $77.00 special fees; $400.00 board; $160.00 to $190.00 lodging for 
Maryland residents, or $200.00 to $240.00 for residents of other States and 
Countries; and laboratory fees, which vary with the laboratory courses pur- 
sued. A matriculation fee of $10.00 is charged all new registrants. A charge 
of $250.00 is assessed students who are non-residents of the State of Maryland. 

For a more detailed statement of these costs write to the Editor of Pub- 
lications, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, for a copy of the 
General Information Catalog. 

DEGREES 

The degrees conferred on students who have met the requirements pre- 
scribed by the College of Arts and Sciences are Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of 
Science, and Bachelor of Music. 

Students of this College who complete satisfactorily curricula with majors 
in departments of the Humanities or Social Sciences are awarded the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts*. Those who complete satisfactorily curricula with majors in 
departments of Biological or Physical Sciences are awarded the degree of 
Bachelor of Science.f Those who complete satisfactorily a special profession- 
al program in the Department of Music are awarded the degree of Bachelor 
of Music. 

Students who complete satisfactorily the prescribed combined program of 
Arts and Sciences and Medicine, or of Arts and Sciences and Dentistry, will 
be granted the degree of Bachelor of Science. Students who complete satis- 
factorily the prescribed combined program of Arts and Sciences and Law 
will be granted the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

RESIDENCE 

The last thirty semester hours credit of any curriculum leading to a bac- 
calaureate degree in the College of Arts and Sciences must be taken in resi- 
dence in this University. 

*The Departments of Economics, Geography, and Government and Politics, al- 
though administratively in the College of Business and Public Administration, offer 
courses for Arts and Sciences students. Majors may be elected in these departments 
as in those of the other departments of the Division of Social Sciences which are 
administered by the College of Arts and Sciences. 

f The Department of Botany, although administered by the College of Agriculture, 
offers courses for Arts and Sciences students. A major may be elected in this depart- 
ment as in those of the other departments of the Division of Biological Sciences ad- 
ministered by the College of Arts and Sciences. 

-< 44 



Academic Information 

Students working for one of the combined degrees must earn the last 30 
semester hours credit of the arts program in residence in the College of Arts 
and Sciences, College Park. 

The complete statement of this requirement may be found in the University 
publication: University Regtilations and General Information. 



Academic Information 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

The baccalaureate degree from the College of Arts and Sciences may be 
conferred upon a student who has satisfied the following requirements: 

1. University requirements. 

2. College of Arts and Sciences requirements. 

A minimum of 120 semester hours credit in academic subjects other than 
basic military science is required for a bachelor's degree. Men must acquire in 
addition 12 semester hours in military science, and 4 semester hours in physical 
activities. Women must acquire in addition 4 semester hours in hygiene and 
4 semester hours in physical activities. 

WORK IN THE FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS 

The work of the first two j'ears in the College of Arts and Sciences is de- 
signed to give the student a basic general education, and to prepare him 
for concentration in the latter part of his course. 

It is the student's responsibility to develop in these earlier years such 
proficiency in basic subjects as may be necessary for his continuation in the 
field of his special interest. Personal aptitude and a general scholastic ability 
must also be demonstrated, if permission to pursue a major study is to be 
obtained. 

The student should follow the curriculum for which he is belie^•ed to be 
best fitted. It will be noted that a common group of studies is required of all 
students who are candidates for a bachelor's degree. These subjects should 
be taken, if possible, during the freshman and sophomore years. 

THE PROGRAM IN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

The University considers that it is important for every student to achieve 
an appreciative understanding of this country, its history and its culture. It 
has therefore established a comprehensive program in American Civilization. 
This program is also designed to provide the student with a general educa- 
tional background. 

45 ► 



Academic Information 

Work in American civilization is offered at three distinct academic levels. 
The first level is required o£ all freshmen and sophomores at the University 
and is described below. The second level is for undergraduate students wishing 
to carry a major in this field. The third level is for students desiring to do 
graduate work in this field (see catalog for the Graduate School). 

All students receiving a baccalaureate degree from the University of 
Maryland must (except as specific exceptions are noted in printed curricula) 
obtain 24 semester hours of credit in the lower division courses of the Amer- 
ican Civilization Program. Although the courses in the Program are pre- 
scribed generally, some choice is permitted, especially for students who dem- 
onstrate in classification tests good previous preparation in one or more of 
the required subjects. 

The 24 semester hours in American Civilization are as follows: 

1. English (12 hours, Eng. 1, 2 and 3, 4 or 5, 6), American History (6 
hours, H. 5, 6), and American Government (3 hours, G. & P. 1) are required 
subjects^ however, students who qualify in one, two, or all three of these 
areas by means of University administered tests are expected to substitute 
certain elective courses. Through such testing a student may be released from 
3 hours of English (9 hours remaining an absolute requirement), 3 hours 
of American History (3 hours remaining as an absolute requirement), and 3 
hours of American Government. Students released from 3 hours of Enghsh 
wall take Eng. 21 instead of Eng. 1 and 2. Those released from 3 hours in 
History will take H. 56 instead of H. 5 and 6. Students who have been 
exempted from courses in English, American History, or American Government 
may not take such courses for credit. 

S fecial note for foreign students: 

The foreign student is required to take a special classification test in English 
before registering for the required English courses. He may be required to take 
Foreign Language 1 and 2— English for Foreign Students— Ijefore registering 
for English 1. 

The foreign student may meet the foreign language requirement by taking 
additional courses in English as stated below under the Foreign Language require- 
ment. 

2. For the additional hours of the 24 hours required the student elects 
one course from the following group (Elective Group I): 

Economics 37, Fundamentals of Economics (Not open to freshmen; 
students who may wish to take additional courses in Economics should 
substitute Economics 31 for Economics 37). 

Philosophy 1, Philosophy for Modem Man. 

Sociology 1, Sociology of American Life. 

3. Students who, on the basis of tests, have been released from 3, 6 or 9 
hours in otherwise required courses in English, American History, or Amer- 

M 46 



Academic Infornuition 

ican Government (sec 1 above), shall select the replacements f(jr these courses 
from any or all of the following groups: (a) more advanced courses in the 
same department as the required courses in which the student is excused, or 
(b) Elective Group I (see 2 above) provided that the same course may not 
be used as both a Group I and a Group II choice, or (c) Elective Group II. 
Group II consists of the following 3-hour courses: 

H. 2, History of Modem Europe; either H. 51 or 52, The Humanities; 
either Mus. 20, Sur\'ey of Music Literature or Art 22, History of American Art; 
Psych. 1, Introduction to Psychology; and Soc. 5, Anthropology. 

R.O.T.C, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH 

1. Basic Military Science for Men— twelve semester hours. Required 
freshman and sophomore years. 

2. Health for Women— four semester hours. Required freshman year. 

3. Physical Activities for Men and Women— four semester hours. Re- 
quired freshman and sophomore years. 

All male students, unless specifically exempted under University regula- 
tions, are required to take basic Air Force R. O. T. C. training for a period of 
two years. The successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for 
graduation and it must be taken by all eligible students during the first two 
years of attendance at the University, whether they intend to graduate or 
not. Transfer students who have not fulfilled this requirement will complete 
the course or take it until graduation, whichever occurs first. 

Selected students who wash to do so may, with proper approval, carry as 
electivcs during their junior and senior years advanced Air Force R.O.T.C. 
courses which lead to a regular or reserve commission in the United States 
Air Force. 

For further details concerning the requirements in Military instruction 
write to the Editor of Publications, University of Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland, for a copy of the General Information Catalog. 

COLLEGE REQUIREMENTS 

1. Foreign Language— twelve semester hours in one language, unless other- 
wise specified. 

Foreign students may satisfy this requirement by offering twelve hours of 
English in addition to the regular English requirement. The special course in 
English for foreign students (Foreign Language 1, 2) may be included in the 
additional hours of English. This option may not be used by pre-medical students. 

A foreign student may not meet the foreign language requirement by taking 
freshman or sophomore courses in his native language. 

47 ► 



Academic Information 

2. Natural Science and Mathematics— twelve semester hours, unless other- 
wise specified. Candidates for the A.B. or B.S. degree must demonstrate 
eligibility to take Mathematics 10. The science courses elected require the 
approval of the dean; they will usually be from those departments offering majors 
in the College of Arts and Sciences. At least one course must include laboratory 
experience and one course must be elected in each of the divisions of Biological 
and Physical Sciences except in the case of students whose science courses are 
specifically prescribed in their curricula. 

3. Speech— two to four semester hours in accordance with the particu- 
lar curriculum. 

4. Major and Minor Requirements— When a student has completed satis- 
factorily the requirements of the freshman and sophomore years he will select 
a major in one of the departments of an upper division and for graduation 
will complete a departmental major and a minor. The courses constituting the 
major and the minor must conform to the requirements of the department 
in which the major work is done. 

The student must have an average of not less than C in the introductory 
courses in the field in which he intends to major. 

A major shall consist, in addition to the underclass departmental require- 
ments, of 24-40 hours, of which at least twelve must be in courses numbered 
100 or above. 

A minor in programs leading to the A. B. degree, shall consist of a co- 
herent group of courses totalling 18 semester hours in addition to the re- 
quirements listed above. At least six of the 18 hours must be in a single 
department in courses numbered 100 or above. The courses comprising the 
minor must be chosen with the approval of the major department. 

No minor is required in programs leading to the B. S. degree, but the 
student must take such supporting courses in science or other fields as are 
required by his major department. 

The average grade of the work taken in the major field must be at least 
C; some departments will count toward satisfaction of the major requirement 
no course completed with a grade of less than C. The average grade of the 
work taken in the major and minor fields combined must be at least C. A 
general average of C in courses taken at the University of Maryland is required 
for graduation. 

JUNIOR REQUIREMENTS 

A student must acquire a minimum of 56 academic semester hours with 
an average grade of at least C in the freshman and sophomore years before 
he will be permitted to begin advanced work on his major and minor. See Uni- 
versity Regulations and General Information for full statement of this rule. 

NORMAL LOAD 

The normal load for students in this college is 15 semester hours credit per 
< 48 



Academic Information 

semester, exclusive of the required work in physical activities, military science, 
and hygiene. 

A student must have the approval of his advisor and dean to take more than 
the normal program prescribed in his curriculum. 

ADVISORS 

Each freshman and sophomore in this college will be assigned to a faculty 
advisor who will help the student, during his first two years, to select his 
courses and to determine what his field of major concentration should be. 
Juniors in the combined programs will continue in the same system. 

Other juniors and seniors will consider the head of their major department, 
or his designated assistant, their advisor, and should consult him about the 
arrangements of their schedules of courses. 

ELECTIVES IN OTHER COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 

A limited number of courses taken in other colleges and schools of the 
University may be counted for elective or minor credit toward a degree in 
the College of Arts and Sciences. 

The number of credits which may be accepted from the various colleges 
and schools is as follows: College of Education— 24; all other colleges— 20. 
The combined credits from these colleges and schools shall not exceed 20 (or 
24 if courses in Education are included). Schools of Dentistry, Law, and Medi- 
cine—In combined degree programs the first year of professional work must 
be completed. 

CERTIFICATION OF HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS 

If courses are properly chosen in the field of education, a prospective high 
school teacher can prepare for high school positions, with a major and minor 
in one of the departments of this College. A student who wishes to work for a 
teacher's certificate should consult his advisor before the junior year. 

SPECIAL HONORS 

Programs of readings for special honors are open to undergraduates. These 
programs are currently available in Literature, English, French, German, History, 
Mathematics, and Spanish. The program for special honors in literature is 
open to undergraduates in any college of the University who have the approval 
of their dean and of the Head of the Department of English. Candidates are 
examined on an approved list of literary works including translations from 
foreign languages. Application may be made to the Head of the Department of 
English at any time before the beginning of the junior year. The programs for 
special honors in English, French, German, Flistory, Mathematics, and Spanish 
are open to students majoring in the departments concerned. The individual 
programs of readings should be begun early in the student's collegiate career; 
in no case later than the beginning of the senior year. Application should be 
made to the head of the department concerned. 

49 ► 



GENERAL A.B. CURRICULUM 

The following curriculum gives the subjects required of students planning 
to major in one of the departments of the Divisions of Hvunanities or Social 
Studies. Since some departmental majors require prerequisites which should 
be taken during the first two years, individual programs must be prepared in 
consultation with the assigned advisor; the elective hours listed may be used 
for this purpose. Lower division advisors and the heads of the Departments of 
Music and Sociology have available copies of normal curricula for distribution 
to students who wish additional information about majors in Art, Music or 
Sociology. 

r—Semester—^ 

Freshman Year I 11 

*Eng. 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

*G. & P. 1— American Government or Group I elective 3 

*Group I elective or G. & P. 1 . . 3 

**Foreign Language 3 3 

Mathematics or Natural Science 3-4 3-4 

Sp. 1, 2— Public Speaking 2 2 

A. S. 1, 2-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Hea. 2, 4-Health (Women) 2 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 17-19 17-19 

Sophomore Year 

*Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6— Composition and English or World Litera- 
ture 3 3 

*H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 3 3 

Foreign Language (Continued) 3 3 

Natural Science or Mathematics 3-4 3-0 

Elective 3 3-6 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 16-20 16-19 

L AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

The University has a comprehensive program in American studies. It be- 
gins with required courses on the freshman and sophomore level, includes a 
major for juniors and seniors, and also provides for graduate work on the M.A. 
and Ph.D. level. (For information concerning the graduate program, see the 
Graduate School Catalog.) 



*See The Program in American Civilization on pages 45-46. 
**A placement test is given during Registration Week for students wishing to 
pursue a language they have studied in high school. 



< 50 



Art Curriculum 

The student who majors in American Civilization has the advantage of 
being taught by cooperating specialists from various departments. The com- 
mittee in charge of the program represents the Departments of English, His- 
tory, Government and Politics, and Sociology. Members of the committee 
serve as official advisors to students electing to work in the field. 

The program is intended to have generous breadth, but the danger of 
securing breadth without depth is offset by the requirement of an area of 
concentration. Studies in American Civilization are supplemented by studies 
in source cultures and interacting cultures; however, in planning a curriculum, 
students are required to concentrate in one of the four departments primarily 
concerned with the program. The program must include at least 42 semester 
hours of work from the departments participating in the program. These 
credits constitute collectively a major and a minor. At least 20 of these 42 
hours of advanced work must be in 100-level courses. All the advanced work 
should be so distributed that the student will take at least 9 hours in each 
of three out of the four cooperating departments, including, of course, the 
department of his concentration. 

In his senior year, each major student is required to take a conference 
course (American Civilization 137, 138) in which the study of American CiviU- 
zation is brought to a focus. During this course, the student analyzes eight 
or ten important books which reveal fundamental patterns in American life and 
thought and receives incidental training in bibliographical matters, in formu- 
lating problems for special investigation, and in group discussion. 

Freshmen and sophomores who are interested in concentrating in American 
Civilization should consult with their Lower Division Advisor. Upperclassmen 
should consult with the Executive Secretary of the American Civilization cur- 
riculum. Assistant Professor Beall. 

Suggested sample curriculum for American Civilization majors: 

Junior year: H. 52, The Humanities (3); H. 105 and 106, Social & 
Economic History of the United States (3, 3); Eng. 150 and 151, American 
Literature (3, 3); G. & P. 144, American Pohtical Theory (3); Phil. 121, 
American Philosophy (3); Electives (9). 

Senior year: American Civilization 137 and 138, Conference course in 
American Civilization (3, 3); G. & P. 174, PoHtical Parties (3); Phil. 154, 
Political and Social Philosophy (3); Soc. 105, Cultural Anthropology (3); 
Soc. 125, Cultural History of the Negro (3); H. 133 and 134, Histor)' of Ideas 
in America (3, 3); Electives (6). 

IL THE HUMANITIES 
Art 

Two t)^es of majors are offered in art: Art Major A for those who take 
the art curriculum as a cultural subject and as preparation for a career for 

51 ► 



Languages and Literatures, Comparative Literature Curriculums 

which art is a necessary background; Art Major B for those who prepare them- 
selves for creative work on a professional basis. 

In both types the student begins with the basic courses, and moves to more 
advanced study of the theory of design and of the general principles involved 
in visual expression. A large amount of study takes the form of actual prac- 
tice of drawing and painting. The student, in this way, gains a knowledge of 
the vocabulary of drawing and painting, and of the methods and procedures 
underlying good quality of performance. 

Art Major B emphasizes the development of craftsmanship and the crea- 
tive faculty. Art Major A, while including the basic studio courses, necessarily 
places emphasis on general history, composition, and art appreciation, with 
subsequent choices of special art epochs for greater detailed study. 

Art History and Art Appreciation are of special interest to students major- 
ing in English, History, Languages, Philosophy, or Music. It is suggested that 
they schedule Art 9, 10, and 11, Historical Survey of Painting, Sculpture, and 
Architecture, and History of American Art, as excellent supplementary study 
for a fuller understanding of their major. Art 20 is recommended for Eng- 
lish, Languages, Philosophy, Home Economics, and Education majors. Art 
10, History of American Art, is advised for majors in the American Civiliza- 
tion courses. Home Economics and Horticulture majors are encouraged to 
schedule basic art courses as a useful means of training observation and de- 
veloping understanding of, and proficiency in, the visual arts. 

Courses required in all art majors: Art 1— Charcoal Drawing (3); Art 5— 
Basic Design (3); Art 9, 11— Historical Survey of Painting, Sculpture and 
Architecture (3, 3); Art 20— Art Appreciation (2). 

Courses required in Cultural Art major: Art 10— History of American Art 

(O. 

Course Required in Creative Art major: Art 7— Landscape Painting (3). 

Classical Languages and Literatures 

Twelve hours of underclass requirements must be completed before a stu- 
dent may begin work toward a major. These requirements are satisfied by the 
first four courses taken, beginning from the level of initial registration in ac- 
cordance wdth the schedule which precedes the list of course offerings in this 
catalog. No placement tests are given in the Classical Languages. 

The major and minor requirements are those generally in effect in the 
College of Arts and Sciences and stated in the appropriate section above. 

Com'parative Literature 

Comparative Literature courses are offered by the Classics, the English, 
and the Foreign Language Departments. When it is so recommended by the 

M 52 



English, Foreign Languages and Literature Curriculum 

student's advisor comparative literature courses may be counted toward a major 
or minor in English. Requirements for a major in comparative literature include 
a knowledge of one foreign language and the Introductory Survey, Comparative 
Literature 101 and 102. 

English 

Students majoring in English, particularly those who plan to do graduate 
work, are urged to take work in foreign language in addition to that required 
for graduation. In selecting minor or elective subjects, it is recommended that 
students give special consideration to the following: Latin, Greek, French, 
German, philosophy, history, and fine arts. 

Students who major in English must choose 21 hours of the possible 
24-40 hours required of a major from courses in several groups, as follows: 

1. Three hours in language (Eng. 8, 101, 102, 104). 

2. Six hours in major figures (Eng. 104, 112, 115, 116, 121; 155 or 156). 

3. Six hours in survey or type courses (Eng. 110, 111, 112, 113, 120, 122, 
123, 125, 126, 129, 130, 134, 135, 139, 140, 143, 144, 145, 157). 

4. Six hours in American literature (Eng. 148, 150, 151, 155, 156). 

HONORS IN ENGLISH: Seniors whose major in English may become candi- 
dates for honors in English provided that they have an average of at least 
3.0 in all English courses and 3.5 in English courses numbered above 100. 
Candidates must take the Honors Conference Course (Eng. 199); those who 
pass this course with distinction and maintain an average of 3.5 in other Eng- 
lish courses will be certified for graduation with honors in English. 

Foreign Languages and Literature 

The underclass department requirements which must be satisfied before a 
student can begin work toward a major are the courses numbered 1, 2, 4, and 
5 (or 1, 2, 6 and 7, or 1, 2, 4 and 17). 

Two types of majors are offered in French, German, or Spanish; one for 
the general student or the future teacher, and the other for those interested in 
a rounded study of a foreign area for the purpose of understanding another 
nation through its literature, history, sociology, economics, and other aspects. 

LITERATURE AND LANGUAGE MAJOR: Language and literature as such are 
stressed in the first type of major. Specific minimum requirements beyond the 
first two years are a semester each of intermediate and advanced conversation 
(Fr., Ger., or Span. 8 or 9 and 80 or 81), six hours of the introductory survey 
of literature (Fr., Ger., or Span. 75 and 76), one semester of advanced com- 
position (Fr., Ger., or Span. 121), and any twelve hours in literature courses 
numbered 100 or above— a total of 27 semester hours. Beyond this minimum 

53 ► 



Music Curriculum 

further courses in the Department are desirable and as electives work in 
American and in Comparative Literature is strongly recommendedj Compar- 
ative Literature 101 and 102 are required. 

FOREIGN AREA MAJOR: The area study major endeavors to provide the 
student with a knowledge of various aspects of the country whose language 
he is studying. Specific minimum requirements beyond the first two years 
are nine hours of conversation (Fr. Ger., or Span. 8, 9, and 80 or 81), si?^ 
hours of review grammar and composition (Fr., Ger., or Span. 71 and 72), six 
hours in civilization (Fr., Ger., or Span. 161 and 162 or 163 and 164), and six 
additional hours in courses numbered 100 or above— a total of 27 semester 
hours. In addition, Comparative Literature 101 and 102 are required. The 
student takes, as a minor, eighteen hours in geography, history, political science, 
sociology, economics, or other human science courses, distributed through these 
fields in consultation with advisors in the Foreign Language Department. 

SPECIAL honors: The distinction of special honors in French, German, or 
Spanish is awarded to majors who, in addition to fulfilling the above-mentioned 
requirements, have completed certain special readings and passed a compre- 
hensive examination in their field of concentration. The purpose of honors in 
languages is (1) to encourage independent reading and (2) to coordinate 
the knowledge afforded by the various individual courses which constitute the 
major curricula. The work leading to honors is done in conferences between 
students and professors. It should be begun early in the student's collegiate 
career, and in no case may students declare their candidacy for honors later 
than the beginning of their senior year. 

Music 

The functions of the Department are (1) to help the general student 
develop sound critical judgment and discriminating taste in the art of music; 
C2) to provide professional training based on a foundation in the liberal arts; 
(3) to prepare the student for graduate work in the field; (4) to prepare him 
to teach in the public schools. To this end, two degrees are offered: the Bache- 
lor of Music, with a major in theory-composition, history-literature, or applied 
music; and the Bachelor of Arts, with a major in music. The Bachelor of 
Science degree, with a major in music education, is offered in the College of 
Education. 

Courses in music theory, literature, and applied music are open to all 
students who have completed the specified prerequisites or their equivalents. 
The University Orchestra, Band, Chapel Choir, Women's Chorus, and Men's 
Glee Club are likewise open to qualified students. 

THE BACHELOR OF MUSIC DEGREE: The Curriculum leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Music is designed for students who vdsh to prepare for careers as 
performers or private teachers, or to prepare for music teaching on the college 

M 54 



Philosophy Curriculum 

level. The course requirements in the three major areas may be summarized as 
follows. A list of specific courses is available in the departmental office. 



Major in Theory-Composition 


History- 


Literature 


Applied Music 


Academic courses 














specified* 42 


sem. 


hrs. 


42 sem. 


hrs. 


42 sem. hrs. 


unspecified 9 






9 






10 


Theory and Literature 














lower division 27 






23 






23 


upper division 16 






22 






13 


Applied Music 26 






24 






32 



In addition, eight semester hours in ensemble courses; Air Science (men)**. 
Health (women)**, and Physical Activities**. 

THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE: The curriculum leading to the Bachelor 
of Arts degree with a major in music is designed for students whose interests are 
cultural rather than professional. The departmental requirements include sixteen 
semester hours in music theory, eighteen semester hours in music history and lit- 
erature, eight semester hours in applied music, in addition to not more than six 
semester hours in the larger ensembles. A list of specific courses is available 
in the departmental office. 

Philosophy 

The Department's undergraduate courses are designed to help students 
attain philosophical perspective, clear understanding, and sound critical evalua- 
tion concerning the nature of man, his place in the universe, and the significance 
of the principal types of human experiences and activities. 

To those students who wish to explore the field of philosophy, but who 
have not sufficient free electives to take some of the more specialized courses 
offered by the Department, three general courses are available. Phil. 1, Phi- 
losophy for Modem Man, is a Group I elective in the American Civilization 
Program. As such it is directed in part toward examining the philosophical 
basis of American ideas and ideals. But it is concerned also with the general 
educational aspects of the Program and hence deals with the larger philosophi- 
cal questions relating to the nature of man as a thinking, feeling and valuing 
member of human society. 



* University requirement: American Civilization Program, 24 semester hours; Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences requirements: 12 semester hours in foreign languages, and 
6 semester hours in mathematics or science. 

**As required in the general A.B. curriculum. 

55 ► 



Speech and Dramatic Art Curriculum 

In addition to Phil. 1 the Department offers two other courses designed as 
electives for students who wish to acquaint themselves with the ideas of some of 
the great philosophers: Phil. 123, 124, Philosophies Men Live By. 

To students in other fields who wish to explore the philosophy of their 
subjects, the Department offers a choice among a group of specifically related 
courses: 52, Philosophy in Literature; 53, Philosophy of Religion; 135, Philos- 
ophy of Social and Historical Change; 151, Ethics; 153, Philosophy of Art; 
154, Political and Social Philosophy; 155, Logic; 156, Philosophy of Science; 
158, Philosophy of Language. 

To students of literature, history, or the history of ideas, the Department 
offers historical courses in ancient, medieval, modern, recent and contemporary. 
Oriental, and American philosophy. The last course is particularly relevant for 
students of American Civilization. 

The courses in Logic (41 and 155) are recommended in the Arts-Law 
curriculum and the Government and Politics program. 

Minors in Philosophy are especially suitable for students majoring in Eng- 
lish, Literature, the Social Sciences, American Civilization, Psychology, and 
in the pre-Ministry and pre-Law fields. Interested students should consult with 
the Chairman of the Department. 

Freshmen and sophomores planning to major in Philosophy should con- 
sult the Chairman of the Department about preparation for the major. 



S'peech and Dramatic Art 

The courses in this Department have two main functions: (1) to provide 
training in basic oral communication skills to meet the general needs of under- 
graduates of the University; (2) to provide integrated specialized training for 
students who wash to major or minor in Speech. 

A major may be taken in the Speech Department in one of two general 
areas, the speech arts or the speech sciences. The speech arts include theater, 
radio and television, public speaking, and oral interpretation; the speech 
sciences include phonetics, semantics, speech pathology and audiology. The 
undergraduate program provides a level of training that will prepare students 
to enter several professional fields. Specifically, these fields are: (1) teaching 
speech and dramatic art or directing these activities; (2) radio and television; 
C3) speech and hearing therapy. In addition, adequate preparation and training 
for graduate work is provided. 

Minors in Speech are adapted to meet the needs of students majoring in 
English, the Social Sciences, Journalism and Public Relations, Elementary 
Education, Nursery School— Kindergarten Education, pre-Law and pre-Minis- 
try fields. 

■^ 56 



Economics, Geography Ciirriculums 

Prerequisites for all majors in Speech are Speech 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6, and 
Zoology 1. Major requirements: 30 hours of courses in Speech with 15 hours 
of courses numbered 100 and above, in either the speech arts or speech sciences. 
Speech 111, Seminar, is required of all majors in Speech. No grades of D in 
the major field will be counted toward completing the major requirements for 
graduation. 

Specific requirements for professional training in speech and hearing therapy 
include completion of the general requirements for Speech majors with the 
following additions: Zool. 14, 15; Psych. 1, 5, 131; a minimum of 21 hours of 
speech sciences at the 100 level. 

Qualified students, depending upon specialized interests, are invited to par- 
ticipate in the activities of the University Theater, Radio-Television Guild, and 
the Calvert Debate Club. 

III. THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 
Economics 

Students registered in the College of Arts and Sciences may major in 
Economics. During the freshman and sophomore years prospective Economics 
majors should consult with their Lower Division Advisor in Arts and Sciences 
concerning preparation for the major. Normally Economic Developments (2, 
2) is taken during the freshman year and Principles of Economics (3, 3) during 
the sophomore year. 

Juniors and seniors are advised by the faculty of the Department of Eco- 
nomics, which is administered in the College of Business and Public Admin- 
istration. In addition to the ten lower division credits listed above. Economics 
majors must complete a minimum of 26 credits with an average grade of not 
less than C. Advanced Economic Principles (3) and Elements of Statistics (3) 
are required. Other courses to meet the requirements of the major are to be 
selected with the aid of a faculty advisor. Descriptions of courses in Economics 
will be found in the catalog of the College of Business and Public Administra- 
tion. Additional information about the curriculum in Economics may be ob- 
tained at the departmental office. 

Geogra'phy 

Geography is a recognized major field in Arts and Sciences leading to the 
A.B. degree. Arts and Sciences students may register for its courses and 
major in Geography from a liberal arts point of view, although the Department 
is administered by the College of Business and Public Administration. Fresh- 
men and sophomores wishing to major in Geography should consult their Lower 
Division advisors. Additional information about the Geography program may 
be obtained at the departmental office. 

57 ► 



Government and Politics, History Curriculums 

The following courses are required: Geog. 10 and 11 (3, 3); Geog. 30 (3); 
Geog. 35 (3); Geog. 40 and 41 (3, 3); Geog. 170 (3)^ and 18 hours in other 
Geography courses numbered 100 to 199. 

The following science courses are required: Bot. 1 (4); Chem. 1 (4); 
Agron. 114 (4). The following supporting courses are also required: Bot. 
113 (2)^ Econ. 31 and 32 (3, 3); Soc. 105 (3). Certain of these courses are 
applicable to the minor. Please consult Senior Advisor, Department of Geography. 

Government and Politics 

Although this Department is administered by the College of Business and 
Public Administration, Government and Politics is a recognized major field for 
students in the College of Arts and Sciences, leading to the A.B. degree. Fresh- 
men and sophomores wishing to major in Government and Politics should 
consult their Lower Division Advisors about preparation for the major; addi- 
tional information about the Government and Politics program may be obtained 
at the departmental office. Juniors and seniors majoring in Government and 
Politics are advised by the faculty of that Department. 

For further information concerning the courses offered in Government and 
Politics, see the catalog of the College of Business and Public Administration. 
The Government and Politics curriculum described in that catalog does not 
apply to students in the College of Arts and Sciences. Such students must 
complete instead the following requirements: 

1. At least 36 semester hours of Government and Politics. 

2. No course in which the grade is less than C, made after September 
1947, may be counted as part of the major work. 

3. An adequate diversification of study in the various fields of Govern- 
ment and Politics, under the guidance of the faculty of the Depart- 
ment. 

If desired, students may specialize in state and local government, public 
administration, public law, public policy, political theory, comparative govern- 
ment, or international relations. 

History 

The study of history is basic for the cultural background of all fields of 
knowledge. In addition, the Department of History offers a curriculum which 
is designed to assist students who wish to prepare themselves for entering sev- 
eral fields of professional activity. Specifically these fields are (1) teaching 
history and the social sciences at the secondary level; (2) the field of journal- 
ism, which requires a broad historical background; (3) research and archival 
work; (4) the diplomatic service. In addition, the department offers adequate 
preparation and training for those who intend to pursue higher degrees and 
prepare themselves for teaching at the college level. 

^ 58 



History, Psychology CB.A.') Currintlums 

Undergraduate History majors must complete the following departmental 
requirements: 

1. Every major is required to complete a minimum of 24 semester hours in 
advanced courses, with the following exceptions: (a) the total may be 
reduced by 3 credit hours for those students who, in addition to the pre- 
requisites, have taken 6 credits in other courses under the 100 level; 
and (b) the total may be reduced by 6 credit hours for those who, in 
addition to the prerequisites, have completed 12 semester hours in 
courses under the 100 level. 

2. No less than 15 nor more than 18 semester hours in advanced courses 
should be taken in any one field of history, e. g., European, American, 
or Latin American. 

3. Prerequisites for majors in History are H. 5 and 6 (required of all col- 
lege students) and H. 1 and 2. 

4. All majors are required to take the proseminar during their senior year. 

5. No grades of D in the major field will be counted toward completing 
the major requirements for graduation. 

HONORS IN history: A Student whose major is in History and who main- 
tains an approved average in his grades may read for honors in History. A 
candidate for honors is examined upon an approved individual program of 
readings in an area of his special interest. Application may be made to the 
Head of the Department of History between the second semester of the sopho- 
more year and the first semester of the senior year. 

Psychology 

The Department of Psychology is classed in both the Division of Social 
Sciences (for the B.A. degree) and the division of Biological Sciences (for the 
B.S. degree) and offers educational programs related to both of these fields. 
The functions of the undergraduate curriculum in Psychology are to provide an 
organized study of the behavior of man, in terms of the biological conditions 
and social factors which influence such behavior. In addition, the undergradu- 
ate program in Psychology is arranged to provide a level of training that 
will equip the students to enter certain professional pursuits which require a 
background in this field. It is important to note, however, that the under- 
graduate degree in Psychology is not in itself recognized as carrying any pro- 
fessional status. 

Departmental requirements toward the B.A. degree with a major in Psy- 
chology are: Psych. 1, 21, 106, 145, 150; and two from among Psych. 128, 
142, and 148; plus 9 additional hours in Psychology and or other departments 
selected in conference with the student's major advisor. A minor prooram 
is organized to supplement the work in the major, and for the B.A. decree 

59 ► 



Sociology 

this minor program will ordinarily consist of courses in the Social Sciences. 
The departmental requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree are given 
elsewhere in these pages. 

Sociology 

The major in Sociology offers a liberal education and at the same time 
provides a background for those professional fields which focus on an under- 
standing of human relationships. 

Departmental requirements consist of a minimum of 30 semester hours in 
Sociology and for the minor, a coherent group of courses totalling 18 hours. 
Of the latter at least 6 hours must be 100 series courses in a single department. 
Sociology credit with a grade of less than C may not be counted toward the 
major requirement. 

Courses required of all Sociology majors:— Soc. 1, 2, 183, 186, and 196. 

There are several suggested areas of emphasis within the Sociology major, 
some with additional requirements:— (1) General Sociology, (2) Anthropology, 
(3) Community Studies (rural, urban, and suburban groups and their popu- 
lations), (4) Crime Control Curriculum (a four year preprofessional program 
in the field of crime and delinquency and their prevention and control), (5) 
Sociology-Education (fulfills requirements for secondary teaching certification), 

(6) Social Institutions (the structure and functioning of social institutions 
including the family, religion, economic, governmental, and educational), 

(7) Preprofessional Social Work Curriculum (provides preprofessional prepara- 
tion for entering a professional social work school, and qualifications for cer- 
tain social work positions for which post-graduate professional education is not 
required), (8) Social Psychology. A statement of the course requirements and 
>other recommended courses is available in the departmental office. 



■< 60 



GENERAL B.S. CURRICULUM 

The curricula required of students majoring in departments of the Divi- 
sions of Biological Sciences and Physical Sciences vary much in regard to 
the year in which University and College required courses are scheduled in 
order to assure ihe proper sequential and prerequisite arrangement of major 
courses. The following curriculum, which gives the subjects required of stu- 
dents who plan to major in departments of the divisions of Biological or 
Physical Sciences, is, therefore, quite flexible; individual programs must be 
prepared in consultation with the assigned advisor. Lower division advisors 
and department heads have available copies of normal curricula for distribution 
to students who wish additional information about majors in departments of 
these divisions. 

/— Sejwester-^ 
Freshman Year I II 

*Eng. 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

*G. & P. 1— American Government or Group I elective 3 

*Group I elective or G. & P. I . . 3 

Sp. 7— Public Speaking . . 2 

Mathematics - Science 8-9 8-10 

A. S. L 2-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Hea. 2, 4-HeaIth (Women) 2 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 17-19 17-20 

So-phojnore Year , 

*Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6— Composition and English or World 

Literature 3 3 

*H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 3 3 

**Foreign Language 3 3 

Mathematics - Science 9-12 9-12 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 16-20 16-20 

IV. THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

General Biological Sciences 

This program has been prepared for the student who is interested in bi- 
ology but whose interest has not yet centered in any one of the biolocncal 
sciences. This program is also a suitable one for the pre-dental student who 
plans to earn the B.S. degree before entering dental school. This prooram, 

*See The Program in American Civilization on pages 45-46. 
**A placement test is given during Registration Week for students wishing to 
pursue a language they have studied in high school. Some departmental curricula re- 
quire German. Most of the departments prefer or require that the second year be in 
Scientific French or German (Fr. or Ger. 6, 7). 

61 ► 



Botany Curriculum 

however, is not recommended for the pre-medical student. The program in- 
cludes work in Botany, Entomology, Microbiology, and Zoology, and introduces 
the student to the general principles and methods of each of these biological 
sciences. The student may then emphasize any one of these areas in com- 
pleting his program. 

By proper selection of courses during the junior and senior years, a student 
may concentrate his work sufficiently in one area of biology to be able to 
continue in graduate work in that field. However, a student who is definitely 
planning to do graduate work would be well-advised to major in one specific 
field of biology as soon as his interest becomes definite. 

The student following this program must meet the general requirements 
for a degree in the College of Arts and Sciences. He should select French or 
German to meet the foreign language requirement and Speech 7 (or Speech 
1, 2) to fulfill the requirement in Speech. 

Required introductory courses in the Biological Sciences: Microb. 1; Bot. Ij 
Ent. 1; Zool. 1. These courses must be passed with an average grade of at least 
C. The pre-dental student must take Zool. 2 as well. 

Required supporting courses in Mathematics and the Physical Sciences: 
Math. 10, 11; Chem. 1, 3; Phys. 10, 11. The student working in most areas 
of biology v\dll also need a year of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 31, 32, 33, 34 or 
Chem. 35, 36, 37, 38). Additional work in Chemistry may also be required by 
the student's advisor, in accordance with the needs of the student's field of 
emphasis. The pre-dental student must include Chem. 35, 36, 37, 38 in his 
program. 

Advanced courses in the Biological Sciences: The student must complete at 
least 30 semester hours of advanced work selected from the fields of Botany, 
Microbiology, Entomology, and Zoology. Of these credits at least 18 must 
be at the 100 level and taken in at least two of the four departments. The 
following courses in Psychology may be counted as part of the required 30 
semester hours but may not be used to satisfy the requirement of 18 semester 
hours at the 100 level: Psych. 106, 136, 145, 180, 181, 195. 

A junior or senior following this curriculiun will be advised by the depart- 
ment in which he plans to do the most work. 

Botany 

Botany is recognized as either a major or minor field in Arts and Sciences, 
leading to the B.S. degree. The Botany Department is administered by the 
College of Agriculture, but students register for botany courses and major or 
minor in this subject just as if the Department were in the College of Arts 
and Sciences. Course descriptions and further information about the Botany 
Department are given in the catalog for the College of Agriculture. 

-< 62 



Microhiology Curriculum 

Freshmen and sophomores should consuh their lower division advisor 
and also the Botany Department advisor, in planning the major program. The 
four lower division courses, General Botany— Bot. 1 and 2, Diseases of Plants 
— Bot. 20, and Plant Taxonomy— Bot. 11, total 14 credit hours and should be 
taken during the first two years. Sufficient upper division courses to give a 
total of 40 credit hours in Botany must be taken. Included in these will be 
Plant Physiology— Bot. 101, Plant Microtechnique— Bot. 110, Plant Anatomy— 
Bot. Ill, Plant Ecology— Bot. 102, and electives. The botany electives chosen 
depend, in part, on the student's chief interest. 

To support the courses in Botany, major students are required to take 
General Chemistry— Chcm. 1 and 3, Mathematics— Math. 10 and 1 1 as a mini- 
mum. Physics— Phys. 10 and 11, General Zoology— Zool. 1, General Micro- 
biology— Microb. 1, Genetics— Zool. 104, and 12 hours of a modern language, 
preferably German. 

Microbiology 

The Department of Microbiology functions with three purposes in view. 
One of these is to provide fundamental training for those students who 
choose microbiology as a major subject. Two major fields of study are pro- 
vided: (1) applied microbiology, in preparation for such positions as dairy, 
sanitary, or agricultural bacteriologists in federal, state, and commercial labora- 
tories, and (2) medical microbiology, in relation to hospital, public health, 
and clinic laboratories. The second objective of the Department is to provide 
desirable courses for those students who are majoring in closely allied depart- 
ments and desire vital supplementary information. Every efTort has been 
made to plan these courses so that they satisfy the demands of these related 
departments as well as the needs of those students who have chosen micro- 
biology as a major. The third purpose of the Department is to encourage and 
foster original thought in the pursuit of research. 

MICROBIOLOGY CURRICULUM: The field of microbiology is too vast in scope 
to permit specialization in the early stages of undergraduate study. Accord- 
ingly, the applied curriculum outlined below includes the basic courses in 
microbiology and allied fields. 

The course in Advanced General Microbiology (Microb. 5) is required for 
all Microbiology majors, and should follow General Microbiology (Microb. 1). 
Microb. 5 is not required as a prerequisite for upper division courses for majors 
in other departments provided the student has been introduced to certain aspects 
of microbiology or their equivalent, pertinent to their specialty. Microb. 1, how- 
ever, is required. 

A student planning a major in Microbiology should consult his advisor 
during the first year concerning his particular field of study and his choice 
of supporting courses. The supporting courses should be chosen only from 
the biological or physical sciences. The supporting courses in chemistry are 
listed below. 

63 ► 



Psychology QB.S.^, Curriculum 

A grade of D in a course in Microbiology will not be counted toward com- 
pleting the major requirements for graduation. 

Courses required in major and supporting courses:— Microb. 1— General 
Microbiology (4); Microb. 5— Advanced General Microbiology (4); Microb. 
101— Pathogenic Microbiology (4); Microb. 131— Food and Sanitary Microbiology 
(4); Microb. 60, 62— Microbiological Literature (1, 1); Microb. 103— Serology 
(4); Microb. 161— Systematic Microbiology (2); Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry 
(4, 4); Chem. 31, 32, 33, 34— Elements of Organic Chemistry (3, 3); Chem. 
19— Elements of Quantitative Analysis (4); Chem. 161, 163— Biochemistry 
(2, 2); Math. 10. 11— Algebra, Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry (3, 3); 
Phys. 10, 1 1— Fundamentals of Physics (4, 4). 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM: This is a professional program intended 
for those students who wish to prepare for technical work in any type of a 
medical laboratory. Because of its technical nature, it is broader in require- 
ments and allows fewer electives. By proper planning of one's schedule begin- 
ning in the sophomore year, courses in Zoology may be taken in place of 
electives or certain courses in Microbiology. These courses should include 
Zool. 1, General Zoology; Zool. 16, Human Physiology; Zool. 108, Animal 
Histology; Zool. 110, Parasitology; and the following courses in Microbiology: 
Microb. 105, Clinical Methods; and Microb. 108, Epidemiology. 

The student who elects this program should try to obtain summer em- 
ployment in a medical laboratory. This program is so designed that a student, 
with proper planning, can prepare himself for admission to any of the training 
schools for medical technology located in various hospitals. These training 
schools require two, three or four years of collegiate work, and after one 
year of hospital apprenticeship, the student is eligible to take examinations 
for the Registry of Medical Technologists of the American Society of Clinical 
Pathologists (M.T.) if he so desires. 

Psychology 

The Department of Psychology is classed in both the Division of Bio- 
logical Sciences and the Division of Social Sciences, and offers educational 
programs to both these fields. Further details on the undergraduate program 
in Psychology are given elsewhere in these pages. 

Departmental requirements toward the B.S. degree with a major in Psy- 
chology are Psych. 1, 106, 145, 150, and Psych. 136 or 148, and Psych. 
180 or 181, plus 9 additional hours in Psychology and/or other departments 
selected in conference with the student's major advisor. A candidate for the 
B.S. degree with a major in Psychology will offer as supporting courses 30 
hours from among the following groups: Mathematics 10, 11, 18, 19, 20, 
21, 130, 132; Physics 10, 11, 60, 104, 105, 109; Zoology 1, 2, 5, 14, 15, 102, 
104. These 30 hours include the 12 that are required by the College of Arts 
and Sciences. The departmental requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree 
are given elsewhere in these pages. 

< 64 



General Physical Science<i Curricitliim 

Zoology 

Two courses of study have been established as described below. At least 
thirty-two hours of zoology, with an average grade of C, are required for a 
major in the department. Zoology 14, 15, 53, and 55S will not be counted as part 
of the Zoology major requirements. 

zoology: Copies of the suggested curricula for majors in zoology who are 
interested in any phase of animal study, prc-medical training, and prc-dcntal 
training are available from advisors and from the Zoology office. 

Courses required for all majors in Zoology are: Zool. 1, 2— General Zoology 
and the Animal Phyla. (4, 4); Zool. 5— Comparative Vertebrate Morphology 
(4); and Zool. 20— Vertebrate Embryology (4). 

Supporting courses must include the following: Math. 10, 11— Algebra, 
Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry (3, 3) or Math. 18, 19— Elementary 
Mathematical Analysis (5, 5); Phys. 10, 11— Fundamentals of Physics (4, 4); 
Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry (4, 4); Organic Chemistry— Chem. 31, 32, 
33, 34 (6) or Chem. 35, 36, 37, 38 (8); and one of the following courses: 
Bot. 2— Second semester of General Botany (4); Chem. 19— Elements of 
Quantitative Analysis (4); or Math. 20, 21— Calculus (4, 4). 

fisheries: The aquatic resources of Maryland offer an excellent opportunity 
for the study of fisheries and marine zoology. In addition to the courses specified 
for other majors in Zoology, students interested in following the fisheries cur- 
riculum must take: Zool. 118— Invertebrate Zoology (4); Zool. 125— Fisheries 
Biology and Management (3); Zool. 126— Shellfisheries (3); and Zool. 127— 
Ichthyology (4). 

Supporting courses must include, in addition to those specified above, 
the following: Chem. 1 5— Qualitative Analysis (4); Chem. 19— Elements of 
Quantitative Analysis (4); German 1, 2— Elementary German (3, 3); Ger- 
man 6, 7— Intermediate Scientific German (3, 3). 

The student in this curriculum is also required to spend part of his 
summers in practical work in fisheries. 

V. THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

General Physical Sciences 

This program has been prepared for the student who desires an introduc- 
tion to the physical sciences but whose interest has not yet centered in any 
one field of the physical sciences. The program includes some advanced work 
in Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics, and permits the student to emphasize 
one of these fields without having to meet the full requirements for a major 
in one specific field. The program is suitable for the pre-medical or pre-dental 

65 ► 



Chemistry Curriculum 

student who plans to complete the requirements for the B.S. degree before 
entering medical or dental school. This program is also suitable for the woman 
student who is interested in science and wishes to become a technical assistant 
or technical writer in one of these fields, but who does not plan to do graduate 
work. The program is not recommended for students who may later do graduate 
work in mathematics or in one of the physical sciences. 

The student following this program must meet the general requirements 
for a degree in the College of Arts and Sciences. He should select French 
or German to meet the foreign language requirement and Sp. 7 (or Sp. 1, 2) 
to fulfill the requirement in Speech. 

Required introductory courses in Mathematics and the Physical Sciences: 
Math. 18, 19; Chem. 1, 3; Phys. 10, 11 (or 20, 21). These courses must be 
passed with an average grade of at least C for the student to be eligible to 
continue with this program. 

Required supporting courses for pre-medical or pre-dental students: The 
pre-dental student must include Zool. 1, 2 in his program and must include 
Chem. 35, 36, 37, 38 in his advanced work in this program. The pre-medical 
student must include Zool. 1, 2, 5, 20 in his program and must include Chem. 
19, 35, 36, 37, 38 in his advanced work in this program. Students interested 
in technical writing should take Eng. 7, in addition to the courses in English 
required of all students. 

Advanced courses in Mathematics and the Physical Sciences: The student 
must complete at least 36 semester hours of advanced work selected from the 
Departments of Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics. Of these credits at 
least 18 must be at the 100 level and taken in at least two of the three de- 
partments with no less than 3 in the second department. The student should 
normally take Calculus (Math. 20, 21) inasmuch as practically all the advanced 
work in Mathematics and Physics requires Calculus. 

Chemistry 

The science of chemistry is so broad that completion of a well-planned 
course of undergraduate study is necessary before specialization. The cur- 
riculum outlined below describes such a course of study. The sequence of 
courses given should be followed as closely as possible; it is realized, how- 
ever, that some deviation from this sequence may be necessary toward the 
end of the program. All of the courses in Chemistry listed, unless otherwise 
designated, are required of students majoring in chemistry. 

FIRST year: Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry (4, 4); Math. 18, 19— Elemen- 
tary Mathematical Analysis (5, 5); Sp. 7— Public Speaking (2). second 
year: Chem. 15— Qualitative Analysis (4); Chem. 21— Quantitative Analysis 
(4); Chem. 35, 37— Elementary Organic Chemistry (2, 2); Chem. 36, 38— Ele- 
mentary Organic Laboratory (2, 2); Math. 20, 21— Calculus (4, 4); German 

< 66 



Mathematics Curriculum 

1, 2— Elementary German (3, 3). third year: Chem. 123— Quantitative Analy- 
sis (4); Chem. 141, 143-Aclvanced Organic Chemistry (2, 2); Chem. 144— 
Advanced Organic Laboratory (2); Phys. 20, 21— General Physics (5, 5); Ger- 
man 6, 7— Intermediate Scientific German (3, 3); Electives (1-2, 2-3). fourth 
year: Chem. 101— Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (2); Chem. 187, 189— 
Physical Chemistry (3, 3); Chem. 188, 190— Physical Chemistry Laboratory 
(2, 2); Chem. 146— The Identification of Organic Compounds (2); Electives 
(5-8, 5-8); (Eng. 7 is strongly recommended.) 

Mathematics 

This curriculum offers training in the fundamentals of mathematics in 
preparation for teaching, industrial work, or graduate work in Mathematics. 

No grade of D in the major field will be counted toward completion of 
the requirements for graduation in the mathematics curriculum. An average 
grade of C is required in the supporting courses. 

The Mathematics curriculum offers two options depending on the choice of 
electives in the junior and senior years. 

PURE MATHEMATICS OPTION: Elcctivcs in mathematics must include three 
hours in each of the fields of Algebra and Geometry. 

APPLIED MATHEMATICS OPTION: Elcctivcs in Mathematics must include six 
hours in the fields of Algebra and Geometry, and at least six hours in the 
field of applied mathematics. Supporting courses will be selected from the 
Physical Sciences or Engineering in consultation with the Head of the De- 
partment of Mathematics. 

HONORS IN MATHEMATICS : Students majoring in Mathematics who complete 
freshman and sophomore courses in Mathematics with distinction are eligible to 
try for honors in Mathematics. To receive the honors degree in Mathematics, a 
student must ( 1 ) complete the curriculum in Mathematics with an average grade 
of B in all subjects; (2) earn a creditable grade in Math. 190, 191; (3) pass an 
honors examination in Mathematics at the end of the senior year. Students 
who wish to try for honors in Mathematics should apply to the Head of the 
Department, preferably by the conclusion of their sophomore year and cer- 
tainly no later than the beginning of their senior year. 

COURSES REQUIRED IN MAJOR: Math. 18, 19— Elementary Mathematical 
Analysis (5,5); Math. 20, 21-Calculus (4, 4); Math. 110, Ill-Advanced Cal- 
culus (3, 3); Math. 114— Differential Equations (3); and not less than 15 credit 
hours of electives in Mathematics. Supporting courses include Phys. 20, 
21— General Physics (5, 5) and an approved program of at least 12 additional 
hours outside the Department, including at least 6 hours at the 100 level; 
these courses may be in the Physical Sciences or in another area chosen by 

67 ► 



Pre-Professional Curriculums 

the student. The foreign language requirement should be satisfied by either 
German or French. 

Physics 

The Physics curriculum is designed for students who desire training in 
the fundamentals of physics in preparation for graduate work or teaching, 
and for positions in governmental and industrial laboratories. All students 
must take as their introductory Physics course either Phys. 10, 11, Funda- 
mentals of Physics (4, 4), or Phys. 20, 21, General Physics (5, 5). After the 
elementary Physics course, courses specifically required as a part of the 
Physics major are Phys. 50, 51, Intermediate Mechanics (2, 2); Phys. 52, 
Heat (3); Phys. 102, Optics (3); Phys. 104, 105, Electricity and Mag- 
netism (3, 3); Phys. 118, Introduction to Modern Physics (3); Phys. 119, 
Modern Physics (3); and at least four credits of laboratory. Supporting 
courses must include: Math. 18, 19, Elementary Mathematical Analysis (5, 
5), and Math. 20, 21, Calculus (4, 4). Students who wish to be recommended 
for graduate work in Physics must maintain a B average and should also 
include as many as possible of the following courses: Phys. 106, Theoretical 
Mechanics (3); Physics 116, Fundamental Hydrodynamics (3); Physics 120, 
Nuclear Physics (4); Phys. 122, Properties of Matter (4); and Math. 110, 
111, Advanced Calculus (3, 3). Recommended course programs are available 
from the Physics Department. Students may major in Physics only if a grade 
of C is attained in each semester of the elementary Physics courses and in the 
required Mathematics courses. 

VI. PRE-PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUMS 

COMBINED PROGRAM IN ARTS AND SCIENCES AND LAW 

Some law schools will consider only those applicants who have completed 
a four-year college program leading to the A.B. or B.S. degree. Other law 
schools, including the School of Law of the University of Maryland, will ac- 
cept applicants who have successfully completed a three-year program of 
academic work. Law schools do not prescribe the specific courses which the 
student should take in his pre-law work, but do require that the student follow 
one of the standard programs offered by the undergraduate college. 

FOUR-YEAR PROGRAM: The Student who plans to complete the requirements 
for the A.B. or B.S. degree before entering law school should select one 
of the major fields for concentration. Pre-law students most commonly select 
one of the following subjects as their major: American Civilization, Economics, 
English, Government and Politics, History, Philosophy, Psychology, Sociology, 
Speech. During his first two years, the pre-law student will normally follow 
the General A.B. Curriculum described earlier in these pages. During his 
junior and senior year, the pre-law student will complete the major and 
minor requirements for the A.B. degree. The requirements in the various 
major fields are described elsewhere in this catalog. 

-^ 68 



Pre-Professional Curriculunts 

THREE-YEAR PROGRAM: The Student who plans to enter law school at the 
end of his third year should follow the General A.B. Curriculum during his 
first two years. During his junior year he will complete the requirements for 
a minor (18 semester hours) in one of the fields of concentration. lie will also 
be able to take some additional courses as electives. His program for the 
first three years must include all of the basic courses required for a degree 
irom the College of Arts and Sciences and a minor of 18 semester hours as 
approved by his pre-law advisor. He must earn a total of 92 academic semes- 
ter hours, exclusive of the credits in R.O.T.C. (men), Health (women), and 
Physical Education required of all undergraduate students. 

COMBINED DEGREE IN ARTS AND SCIENCES AND LAW: The Student who Suc- 
cessfully completes the three-year program (including the minor) described 
above and who is admitted to the School of Law of the University of Mary- 
land will be eligible for the Bachelor of Arts degree after the successful 
completion of one year of full-time courses in the School of Law in Baltimore 
(or the equivalent in semester hours of work in the Evening Division of the 
School of Law). The completion of a year's work in the Law School consti- 
tutes the student's major. The combined program must include at least 120 
academic semester hours, exclusive of required work in R.O.T.C. (men). Health 
(women), and Physical Activities. The student must earn at least a C aver- 
age in all of his work at College Park, and at least a C average in 28 semes- 
ter hours of work in the School of Law. A student who enters the combined 
program with advanced standing must complete the final 30 academic semester 
hours of pre-law work in residence in the College of Arts and Sciences. Eligible 
candidates are recommended for the degree of Bachelor of Arts by the faculty 
of the College of Arts and Sciences upon the concurrent recommendation of 
the Dean of the School of Law. 

The course of study at the School of Law requires three years of full- 
time work for completion. Students who successfully complete the program 
are awarded the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

COMBINED PROGRAM IN ARTS AND SCIENCES AND DENTISTRY 

Candidates for admission to dental schools should normally plan to take 
at least a three-year undergraduate program. Although the School of Den- 
tistry of the University of Maryland considers some applications from stu- 
dents with only two years of undergraduate preparation, it requires three 
years of the great majority of its candidates and ex-pects these candidates to 
meet the full requirements of the combined degree in Arts and Sciences 
and Dentistry as described below. 

Certain science courses are prescribed for all candidates for dental school: 
Zool. 1, 2; Chem. 1, 3, 35, 36, 37, 38; Math. 10, 11 (or 18, 19); Phys. 10, 
11, or 20, 21). These courses must be included in any pre-dental program. 
The student who wishes to be a candidate at the end of his second year must 
complete all of these courses during the first two years. All requirements must 

69 ► 



Pre-Professional Curriculums 

be completed by June of the year in which the students expects to enter dental 
school. 

Neither successful completion of a pre-dental program nor of degree re- 
quirements guarantees admission to a dental school. All dental schools, includ- 
ing that of the University of Maryland, have their own admission requirements 
and procedures. Dental schools expect candidates to attain an academic average 
substantially higher than the minimum average required for graduation from 
college. Through its pre-dental advisors and its Committee on the Evaluation 
of Pre-Dental Students this College attempts to assist its applicants with their 
problems. 

FOUR-YEAR PROGRAM: The Student electing this program should select one 
of the major fields in which the A.B. or B.S. degree is offered. Pre-dental stu- 
dents following the four-year program most commonly select one of the fol- 
lowing subjects as their major field: Microbiology, General Biological Sciences, 
General Physical Sciences, Psychology, Zoology. These programs are de- 
scribed elsewhere in this catalog. However, a student may meet dental school 
requirements in most of the majors offered in the College of Arts and Sciences, 
provided that he includes in his program the science courses specifically pre- 
scribed by dental schools. The student's pre-dental advisor will assist the 
student in planning a program which will meet both the dental school re- 
quirements and also the requirements for the A.B. or B.S. degree. 

THREE-YEAR PROGRAM: The Student electing to follow this program must 
complete all the courses specially required by the dental school. He must 
earn a total of 90 academic semester hours in addition to the credits in R.O.T.C. 
(men). Health (women), and Physical Activities required of all undergraduate 
students. He must complete a minor (18 semester hours) as approved by his 
pre-dental advisor. He must follow very carefully the program as outlined 
below: 

Freshman year: Eng. 1, 2; Zool. 1, 2; Chem. 1, 3^ Math. 10, 11; R.O.T.C. 
(men); Health 2, 4 (women); Physical Activities. 

Sophomore year: Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6; Group I elective; G. & P. 1; Chem. 35, 
36, 37, 38; H. 5, 6; Foreign Language (French or German or Latin); R.O.T.C. 
(men); Physical Activities. 

Note: Students planning to apply for admission to dental school at the 
end of the second year must take Phys. 10, 11, in place of H. 5, 6. The 
student who takes the two-year program will not be eligible for the Bachelor 
of Science degree. 

Junior year: Phys. 10, 11; Foreign Language (continued); Sp. 7; minor 
courses as approved by a pre-dental advisor; electives. 

Any student who begins the three-year program may change to a four- 
year program by making a choice of a major field and adjusting his program 
accordingly. However, the student is warned that some courses necessary in 

^ 70 



Pre-Professional Curriculums 

certain majors must be taken in the sophomore year in order for the student 
to be eligible for the more advanced courses in that field given in the junior 
and senior year. 

COMBINED DEGREE IN ARTS AND SCIENCES AND DENTISTRY: The Student who 

successfully completes the three-year program (including the minor) described 
above and who is admitted to the School of Dentistry of the University of 
Maryland will be eligible for the Bachelor of Science degree after successful 
completion of the first year in the School of Dentistry. The completion of a 
year's work in the School of Dentistry constitutes the student's major. The 
combined program must include at least 120 academic semester hours, ex- 
clusive of required work in R.O.T.C. (men), Health (women), and Physical 
Activities. The qualitative grade requirements of the College of Arts and 
Sciences and of the University must also be fulfilled. A student who enters 
the combined program with advanced standing must complete the final 30 
semester hours of pre-dental work in residence in the College of Arts and 
Sciences. Eligible candidates are recommended for the degree of Bachelor 
of Science by the faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences upon the con- 
current recommendation of the Dean of the School of Dentistry. 

The course of study at the School of Dentistry requires four years for 
completion. Students who successfully complete the program are awarded 
the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. 

COMBINED PROGRAM IN ARTS AND SCIENCES AND MEDICINE 

The student planning to request admission to a medical school must pur- 
sue a course of study which meets the requirements prescribed by the Council 
of Medical Education of the American Medical Association and those added 
or recommended by the particular medical school of his choice. 

Some medical schools will consider only those applicants who will have 
completed a four-year college program and will have earned the A.B. or B.S. 
degree at the time of entrance into medical school. Other medical schools 
will consider applicants who will have completed three years of college work. 
The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland accepts some candi- 
dates who will have completed only three years of college work but looks 
with more favor upon the four-year program for most students. Both the 
four-year program and the three-year program are described below. In both 
programs all required science courses must be completed by June of the year 
in which the student expects to enter medical school. 

Neither successful completion of a pre-medical program nor of degree 
requirements guarantees admission to any medical school. All medical schools, 
including that of the University of Maryland, have their own admission re- 
quirements and procedures. Medical schools expect candidates to have at- 
tained an academic average substantially higher than the minimum average 
required for graduation from college. Through its Committee on the Evalua- 

71 ► 



Pre-Professional Curriculums 

tion of Pre-medical Students this College attempts to assist its applicants with 
their problems. 

FOUR-YEAR PROGRAM: The Student electing this program should select one 
of the major fields in which the A.B. or B.S. degree is offered. In addition to 
meeting all general degree requirements and the specific requirements of the 
major selected, the pre-medical student must include in his program the fol- 
lowing required pre-medical courses: Zool. 1, 2, 5, 20; Chem. 1, 3, 19, 35, 36, 
37, 38; Math. 10, 11 (or 18, 19); Phys. 10, 11 (or 20, 21). 

Pre-medical students, following the four-year program, most commonly 
select one of the following subjects as their major field: Microbiology, Gen- 
eral Physical Sciences, Psychology, Zoology. These programs are described 
elsewhere in this catalog. However, a student may meet medical school re- 
quirements in most of the majors offered in the College of Arts and Sciences, 
provided that he includes in his program the individual courses specifically 
prescribed by medical schools. The student's pre-medical advisor will assist 
the student in planning a program which will meet both the medical school 
requirements and also the requirements for the A.B. or B.S. degree. 

THREE-YEAR PROGRAM: The Student electing to follow this program must 
complete all of the courses specifically required by the medical school. He 
must earn a total of 90 academic semester hours in addition to the credits 
in R.O.T.C. (men). Health (women), and Physical Activities required of all 
undergraduate students. He must follow very carefully the program as out- 
lined in the follovidng paragraphs. 

Freshman year: Eng. 1, 2; G. & P. 1; Group I elective; Math. 10, 11; 
Chem. 1, 3; Zool. 1, 2; R.O.T.C. (men); Health 2, 4 (women); Physical 
Activities. 

Sophomore year: Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6; Chem. 35, 36, 37, 38; Zool. 5, 20; 
Foreign Language (French or German or Latin); R.O.T.C. (men); Physical 
Activities. 

Junior year: H. 5, 6; Foreign Language (continued); Chem. 19; Phys. 10, 
11; Sp. 7; Psych. 1; minor courses as approved by the pre-medical advisor. 

Any student who begins the three-year program may change to the four- 
year program by making a choice of a major field and adjusting his program 
accordingly. However, the student is warned that some courses necessary in 
certain majors must be taken in the sophomore year in order for the student 
to be eligible for the more advanced courses in that field given in the junior 
and senior years. The majority of students would therefore be wise to plan 
a four-year program on entrance and not attempt the highly concentrated three- 
year program. 

COMBINED DEGREE IN ARTS AND SCIENCES AND MEDICINE: The Student who 

successfully completes the three-year program (including the minor) described 
above and who is admitted to the School of Medicine of the University of 

-< 72 



Pre-Professional Curriculutns 

Maryland will be eligible for the Bachelor of Science degree after successful 
completion of the first year in the School of Medicine. The completion of a 
year's work in the School of Medicine constitutes the student's major. The 
combined program must include at least 120 academic semester hours, exclusive 
of the required work in R.O.T.C. (men), Health (women), and Physical Activi- 
ties. The qualitative grade requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences 
and of the University must also be fulfilled. A student who enters the combined 
program with advanced standing must complete the final 30 semester hours of 
pre-medical work in residence in the College of Arts and Sciences. Eligible 
candidates are recommended for the degree of Bachelor of Science by the 
faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences upon the concurrent recommenda- 
tion of the Dean of the School of Medicine. 

The course of study at the School of Medicine requires four years for 
completion. Students who successfully complete the program are awarded the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine. 



73 ► 



COURSE OFFERINGS 
AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

Committee on American Civilization: Assistant Professor Beall, Executive Secre- 
tary. 
Professors: Gewehr, Hoffsommer, Murphy, Plischke. 

Amer. Civ. 1^7, 138. Conference Course in American Civilization. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Four American classics (drawn from fields of the Depart- 
ments of English, Government and Politics, History, and Sociology, which cooperate 
in the program) are studied each semester. Specialists from the appropriate depart- 
ments lecture on these books. For the first semester of this academic year the classics 
are: Franklin's Autohiography, The Life and Writings of Thomas Jefferson, De Tocque- 
ville's Democracy in America, and Schlesinger's The Age of Jackson; for the second 
semester, Thoreau's Walden, Howells' Rise of Silas La-pham, Veblen's Theory of the 
Leisure Class, and Warner's Democracy in Jonesville. Through these books and the 
lectures on them, the student's acquaintance with American culture is brought to a 
focus. 

This course is required for seniors majoring in the American Civilization pro- 
gram. The course also counts as major credit in any of the four cooperating depart- 
ments; a student may take either or both semesters. 

The student majoring in American Civilization can obtain his other courses prin- 
cipally from the offerings of the Departments of English, History, Government and 
Politics, and Sociology. CBode, Beall and cooperating specialists.) 

ART 

Professor and Head: Wharton. 

Associate Professors: Siegler, Lemhach and Maril. 

Instructors: Gruhar and Stites. 

Art 1. Charcoal Drawing QBasic Course^. (3) 

Three two-hour laboratory periods per week. Drawing from casts, preparatory to Hfe 
and portrait drawing and painting. Stress is placed on fundamental principles, such 
as the study of relative proportions, values, and modeling, etc. (Siegler.) 

Art 2. Charcoal Drawing. (3) 

Three two-hour laboratory periods per week. Drawing from model, (head and figure) 

with emphasis on structure and movement. (Siegler.) 

Art 3. Rendering. (2) 

Three two-hour laboratory periods per week. Methods of rendering architectural and 
landscape architectural drawings. Included are: techniques of monotone wash, water 
color, and the use of perspective, shades, and shadows. (Stites.) 

Art 5. Basic Design. (3) 

One lecture hour and five laboratory hours per week. A basic course in design for 
beginners, consisting of the theory and practice of design. Theory of design deals with 
design elements such as line, shape, form, etc., and design principles such as contrast, 

-^ 74 



An 

balance, rhythm, etc. Design practice consists of working with pencil, pen, water color, 
casein, and other painting media in terms ot organization, representation and space. 

(Lembach.) 
An 6. Still Life. (3) 

One lecture hour and five laboratory hours per week. Prerequis'ite, Art 5. A continu- 
ation of Art 5 with emphasis on more advanced still life painting problems with diflFer- 
ent media. (Wharton.) 

Art 7, 8. Landscape Painting. (3, 3) 

Three two-hour laboratory periods per week. Drawing and painting; organization of 

landscape material with emphasis on compositional structure. CMaril.) 

Art 9. Historical Survey of Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture. C3) 

An understanding of the cultures from Prehistoric times to the Renaissance, as expressed 

through painting, sculpture, and architecture. (Grubar and Stites.} 

Art 10. History of American Art. (i) 

A resume of the development of painting, sculpture and architecture in this country. 

(Grubar.) 

Art II. Historical Survey of Painting, Scul-pture, and Architecture. (3) 
Designed to continue the survey begun in Art 9. The course is concerned with the 
development of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Renaissance to the pre- 
sent day. (Grubar and Stites.) 

Art 13, 14. Elementary Sczdpture. (2, 2) 

Two two-hour laboratory periods per week. Study of three-dimensional compositions in 

round and bas-relief. Mediums used: clay, plasteline. (Maril.) 

Art 15. Fundamentals of Art. (3) 

Two three hour laboratory periods per week. This course emphasizes the fundamental 
principles of the creative, visual arts for those wishing to teach. It includes elements 
and principles of design, perspective, and theory of color. Studio practice is given in 
the use and application of different media. (Lembach.) 

Art 20. Art Appreciation. (2) 

An introduction to the technical and aesthetic problems of the artist. The student 
becomes acquainted with the elements that go into a work of the visual arts. He is 
made aware of the underlying structure that results in the "wholeness" of an art work. 
He will see examples (original and reproductions) of masterpieces of art. (Lembach.) 

Art 22. History of American Art. (3) 

This course may be taken by students who qualify to select courses within Elective 
Group II of the American Civilization Program. The development of painting, sculp- 
ture and architecture in America from the Colonial period to the present. 

(Grubar and Stites.) 

Art 100. Art Appreciation. (2) 

This course enables students to get a basis for understanding works of art. It investi- 
gates the forms and backgrounds of painting, sculpture and architecture. 

(Grubar.) 

75 ► 



Art 102, 103. Creative Painting. (3, 3) 

Three two-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Art 1, 5, and 7. Assign- 
ments of pictorial compositions aimed at both mural decoration and easel picture pro- 
blems. The formal values in painting are integrated with the student's own desire 
for personal expression. (Maril.) 

Art 104, 105. Life Class (^Drawing and Painting, Intermediate'). (3, 3) 
Three two-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Art 1 and 5. Careful ob- 
servation and study of the human figure for construction, action, form, and color. 

(Seigler.) 

Art 106, 107. Portrait Class (_Drawing and Paititing). (3, 3) 

One lecture hour and five laboratory hours per vi'eek. Prerequisites, Art 1 and 5. 

Thorough draftmanship and study of characterization and design stressed. (Wharton.) 

Art 108, 109. Modern Art. (2, 2) 

A survey of the developments in various schools of modem art. Works of art analyzed 
according to their intrinsic values and in their historical background. Collections of 
Washington and Baltimore are utilized. (Grubar.) 

Art 113, 114. Illustration. (3, 3) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Art 1, 5, 104. This course 
is designed for the purpose of channeling fine art training into practical fields, thereby 
preparing the student to meet the modern commercial advertising problems. Special 
emphasis vidll be placed upon magazine and book illustrating. (Siegler.) 

Art 115, 116. Still Life Painting ^Advanced'). (3, 3) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Art 6. This course is for 
those who have completed Art 6 and wish to specialize in Still Life Painting, and more 
creative work. (Wharton.) 

Art 154, 155. Life Drawing and Painting (^Advanced). (3, 3) 
Three two-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Art 105. This coiurse is 
for those who have completed Art 105 and wish to develop greater proficiency in the 
use of the figure in creative work. (Siegler.) 

Art 156, 157. Portrait Painting ^Advanced). (3, 3) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Art 106, 107. This course 

is for those who have completed Art 106, 107 and wish to specialize in portraiture. 

(Wharton.) 
Art 185, 186. Renaissance and Baroque Art in Italy. (2, 2) 

Prerequisite, Art 11. The first term is concerned with the emergence and development 
of Renaissance painting, sculpture, and architecture through the first quarter of the 
16th century. In the second term Mannerism and the Baroque phases are discussed. 

(Grubar and Stites.) 

Art J 88, 189. History of 16th and 17th century Painting. (2, 2) 
Prerequisite, Art 11. A study of the development of painting and related arts. 
The first semester study will center on Italian painting in the 16th and 17th century 
and the emergence of Baroque style. During the second semester, the paintings of 
France, Spain, England, and the Low Countries will be considered. (Grubar.) 

^ 76 



Botany, Chemistry 

Art 190, 191. Special Problems in Art. (3, 3) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Permission of Department Head. De- 
signed to offer the advanced art student special instruction in areas not offered regu- 
larly by the Department. (Staff.) 

BOTANY 

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences may select Botany as a major 
field, and may also take courses in this Department for elective credits. For a 
description of courses, see the catalog of the College of Agriculture. 

CHEMISTRY 

Laboratory fees in Chemistry are $10.00 per laboratory course per semester. 

Professor and Head: Drake. 

Professors: Lippincott, Pratt, Reeve, Rollinson, Svirhely, Veitch, White, Woods. 

Research Professor: Bailey. 

Associate Professors: Brown, Pickard, Stuntz. 

Assistant Professors: Boyd, Carruthers, Dewey, Gerdeman, Jaqnith 

A. ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY ! 

Chem. 15. Qtialitative Analysis. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Pre- 
requisite, Chem. 3. (Jaquith.) 

Chem. 19. Elements of Quantitative Analysis. (4) 

First and second semesters. Summer School. Two lectures and two three-hour lab- 
oratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 3. An introduction to the basic theory 
and techniques of volumetric and gravimetric analysis. Primarily for students in engi- 
neering, agriculture, pre-medical, and pre-dental curricula. 

Chem. 21. Quantitative Analysis. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Pre- 
requisite, Chem. 15. An intensive study of the theory and techniques of inoroanic 
quantitative analysis, covering primarily volumetric methods. Required of all students 
majoring in chemistry. (Stuntz.) 

Chem. 123. Quantitative Analysis. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Pre- 
requisite, Chem. 21. A continuation of Chem. 21, including volumetric, gravimetric, 
electromctric, and colorimetric mediods. Required of all students majoring in chem- 
istr)'. (Stuntz.) 

Chem. 166, 167. Food Analysis. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods per 

week. Prerequisites, Chem. 33, 34. 

77 ► 



Chemistry 

Chem. 206, 208. S-pectrogra'phic Analysis. (I, I) 

One three-hour laboratory period per week. Registration limited. Prerequisite, Chem, 

190, and consent of the instructor. (White.) 

Chem. 221, 223. Chemical Microscofy. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and one three-hour laboratory period per 
week. Registration limited. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Chem. 221 is a pre- 
requisite for Chem. 223. A study of the use of the microscope in chemistry. Chem. 
223 is devoted to study of the optical properties of crystals. (Stimtz.) 

Chem. 226, 228. Advanced Quantitative Analysis (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. A study of advanced methods chosen to meet the needs of the 
individual. (Stuntz.) 

Chem. 266. Biological Analysis. (2) 

Second semester. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 

19, 33, 34. A study of analytical methods applied to biological material. 

B. BIOCHEMISTRY 

Chem. 41. Chemistry of Textiles. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 33, 34. A study of the chemistry of the principal textile fibers. 

Chem. 81. General Biochemistry. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 33, 34, or Chem. 37, 38. 
This course is designed primarily for students in home economics. Chem. 82 MUST 
be taken concurrently. CReeve.) 

Chem. 82. General Biochemistry Laboratory. (2) 

First semester. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 34, 

or Chem. 38. A course designed to accompany Chem. 81. (Reeve.) 

Chem. 161, 163. Biochemistry. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 33, or Chem. 
37. This course is designed primarily for students in agriciilture, bacteriology, or chem- 
istry, and for those students in home economics who need a more extensive course in 
biochemistry than Chem. 81, 82. (Woods, Veitch.) 

Chem. 162, 164. Biochemistry Laboratory. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods per M^eek. Prerequisite, 

Chem. 34, or Chem. 38. (Woods, Veitch.) 

Chem. 261, 263. Advanced Biochemistry. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 143, or con- 
sent of instructor. (Veitch.) 

Chem. 262, 264. Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 

consent of instructor. (Veitch.) 

•< 78 




Architect's drmviiig of the new Main Library just completed. 





ilvester Hall, housing the 
^.ollege's Defartnieiit of Zoology. 



The Mathematics Building 



The Physics Bjiildiii' 







UNIVERSITY OF 
College Park Campi 




lARYLAND 
1958- 1959 












BLII.DINC; (;01)F I.FirrHS FOR (LASS SrilElH LES 


A 


An. & Socntc-Kr^niu v.,ir Kc. Hall 




A A 


Nuncry Slhool 




AR 


Armory 




U 


Sluiic 




IB 


Adminii(rition 




C 


Chemiitry 




Col 


toli.cum 




I) 


Dairy — Turner I.aboralorv 




DD 


Aviation Htvchologv l.aboralurv 




DV. 


Dean of Women 




F. 


Agronomy — Bolany — H. J. Haller.on Hall 




F.F 

F 


Coun.cl.ng Center 
HorlKulture— Holzaplel Hall 




FF 


Temporary Dormilorv 




G 


Journaliim 




OG 


Aclivilici Buildmg— Cole Building 




H 
1 

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Home Kconomici — Margaret Brent Hall 
Agricultural Fngr. — Shnver Laboratory 
hngr. Clauroom Bldg. 




K 
1. 


Zoologv— Silveitcr Hall 
Library— Shoemaker Building 




M 


Mornll Hall 




N 


(;eography 




o 


Agriculture— Svmoni Hall 




H 


Induitrial Arl> U Kducalion— J. \\. Patlerjon 


Bldg. 


Q. 


Bunnell «c Public Adminiitration— Talialerro 


Hall 


K 


Cla»iroom Building — Wood. Hall 




S 

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Fngr. Laboratorie. 
Fducalion — Skinner Building 




u 


Chem. Fngr. 
Wind Tunnel 




w 


Hreinkcrl Field Hou.e 




X 


Judging Pavilion 
Mathematici 




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Phviic. 




II 


Poultry— Jull Hall 




JJ 


Fngine. Reiearch Lab. (Molecular Phj.ic.) 




Sof 


)ritie> Not Sho»n 
Phi Sigma Sigma 
Alpha Chi Omega 
Alpha Xi Delta 




Fra 


ernitie. Not Sho»o 
Alpha tpjilon Pi 
Zeta Beta Tau 
Phi Kappa Gamma 
Tau Eptilon Ph, 








Woods Hall, housing the Departments of Sociology and Speech 
and Dramatic Arts. 




Francis Scott Key Hall, administrative headqiiarters 
for the College. 



The Chemistry B^iilding 




Chemistry 

Ghent. 265. Enzymes. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 163. (Veitch.) 

Chem. 268. Special Problems in Biochemistry. (2-4) 

First and second semesters. Two to four three-hour laboratory periods per week. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 161, 162, and consent of instructor. (Veitch.) 

C. INORGANIC AND GENERAL CHEMISTRY 

Chem. I, 3. General Chemistry. (4, 4) 

First and second semesters. Chem. 3, Summer School. Two lectures, one quiz, and 

two t\vo-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 1 year high school algebra or 

equivalent. (Staff.) 

Chem. 11, 13. General Chemistry. (3, 3) 

Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. An abbreviated course in 
general chemistry for students in home economics and pre-nursing. This course is open 
only to students registered in home economics and pre-nursing. (Rollinson.) 

Chem. 101. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 37, 123. 

Chem. 102. Inorganic Preparations. (2) 

Second semester. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 
123. (Jaquith.) 

Chem. 111. Chemical Principles, (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 3, 
or equivalent. Not open to students seeking a major in the physical sciences, since the 
course content is covered elsewhere in their curriculum. A course in the principles 
of chemistry with accompanying laboratory work consisting of simple quantitative ex- 
periments. (Credit applicable only toward degree in College of Education.) (Jaquith.) 

(One or more courses of the group 201-210 will be offered each semester depending on 
demand.) 

Chein. 201, 203. The Chemistry of the Rarer Elements. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures per week. (White.) 

Chem. 202, 204. Advanced Inorganic Laboratory. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Chem. 205. Radiochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Rollinson.) 

Chem. 207. Chemistry of Coordination Compounds. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Rollinson.) 

Chem. 209. ISJon-Aqueous Inorganic Solve7its. (2) 

First or second semester. Two lectures per week. (Jaquith.) 

79 ► 



Chemistry 

Chem. 210. Radiochemistry Laboratory. (1-2) 

One or two four-hour laboratory periods per week. Registration limited. Prerequisites, 

Chem. 205 (or concurrent registration therein), and consent of instructor. CRoUinson.) 

D. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

Chem. 31, 33. Elements of Organic Chemistry. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 3. Organic 

chemistry for students in agriculture, bacteriology, and home economics. (Woods.) 

Chem. 32, 34. Elements of Organic Laboratory. (], I) 

First and second semesters. One three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites, 

Chem. 31, 33, or concurrent registration therein. (Woods and Staff.) 

Chem.. 35, 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Chem. 37, Summer School. Two lectures per week. Pre- 
requisite, Chem. 3. A course for chemists, chemical engineers, premedical students, 
and predental students. (Drake.) 

Chem. 36, 38. Elementary Organic Laboratory. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Chem. 38, Summer School. Two three-hour laboratory 

periods per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 35, 37, or concurrent registration therein. 

(Drake and Staff) 
Chem. 141, 143. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 37, 38. An 
advanced study of the compounds of carbon. (Reeve.) 

Chem. 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory. (2-4) 

First and second semesters. Stmimer School. Two or four three-hour laboratory periods 

per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 37, 38. (Pratt.) 

Chem. 146, 148. The Identification of Organic Compounds. (2, 2) 
First and second semesters. Summer School. Two three-hour laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisites, Chem. 141, 143, or concurrent registration therein. The sys- 
tematic identification of organic compounds. (Pratt.) 

Chem. 150. Organic Quantitative Analysis. (2) 

First and second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
consent of the instructor. The semi-micro determination of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, 
halogen and certain functional groups. (Gerdeman.) 

(One or more courses from the following group, 240-253, will customarily be offered 
each semester.) 

Chem. 240. Organic Chemistry of High Polymers. (2) 

An advanced course covering the synthesis of monomers, mechanisms of polymeriza- 
tion, and the correlation between structure and properties in high poljTuers. Prerequi- 
site, Chem. 143. (Bailey.) 

Chem. 241. Stereochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Woods.) 

< 80 



Chemistry 

Chem. 245. The Chemistry of the Steroids. (2) 

7vvo lectures per week. (Pratt.) 

Cheni. 249. Physical As'pects of Organic Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Woods.) 

Chem. 251. The Heterocylics. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Pratt.) 

Chem. 253. Organic Sulfur Compounds. (2) • 

Two lectures per week. (Dewey.) 

Chem. 254. Advanced Organic Preparation. (2-4) 

First and second semesters. Summer School. Two to four three-hour laboratory periods 

per week. (Pratt.) 

Chem. 258. The Identification of Organic Compounds, an Advanced Course 

(2-4) 
First and second semesters. Summer School. Two to four three-hour laboratory periods 
per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 141, 143 or concurrent registration therein. (Pratt.) 

E. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

Chem. 181, 183. Elements of Physical Chemistry. (2, 2) 
First and second semesters. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 1, 3; Phys. 
10, 11; Math. 10, 11; Chem. 19. A course intended primarily for premedical students 
and students in the biological sciences. This course must be accompanied by Chem. 
182, 184. (Brown.) 

Chem. 182, 184. Elements of Physical Chemistry Lahoratory. (i, J) 
First and second semesters. One three-hour laboratory period per week. May be taken 
ONLY when accompanied by Chem. 181, 183. The course includes quantitative ex- 
periments illustrating the principles studied in Chem. 181, 183. (Brown.) 

Chevi. 187, 189. Physical Chemistry. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 19 or 21; 
Phys. 20, 21; Math. 20, 21; or consent of instructor. A course primarily for chemists 
and chemical engineers. This course must be accompanied by Chem. 188, 190. 

(Svirbely.) 
Chem. 188, 190. Physical Chemistry Lahoratory. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. A laboratory 
course for students taking Chem. 187, 189. (Pickard.) 

Chem. 192, 194. Glasshlowing Lahoratory. (J, i) 

First and second semesters. Summer School. One three-hour laboratory' period per 
week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Carruthers.) 

(The common prerequisites for the following courses are Chem. 187 and 189, or their 
equivalent. One or more courses of the group, 281 through 323, will be offered each 
semester depending on demand.) 

Cheyn. 281. Theory of Solutions. (2) 

First or second semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 307, or equiva- 
lent. (Svirbely.) 

81 ► 



Chemistry 

Chem. 285. Colloid Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures per week. CPickard.) 

Chem. 287. Infra-red and Raman Spectroscopy. (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Lippincott.) 

Chem. 289. Selected Topics in Advanced Colloid Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectiues per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 285. (Pickard.) 

Chem. 295. Heterogenous Equilibria. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Pickard.) 

Chem. 299. Reaction Kinetics. (3) 

Three lectures per week. CSvirbely.) 

Chem. 303. Electrochemistry. (3) 

Three lectures per week. (Pickard.) 

Chem. 304. Electrochemistry Laboratory. (2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

(Svirbely.) 
Chem. 307. Chemical Thermodynamics. (3) 
Three lectures per week. (Pickard.) 

Chem. 311. Physicochemical Calculations. (2) 

Offered in summer session only. (Pickard.) 

Chem. 313. Molecular Structure. (3) 

Three lectures per week. (Brown.) 

Chem. 317. Chemical Crystallography. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A detailed treatment of 
single crystal X-ray methods. (Brown.) 

Chem. 319, 321. Quantum, Chemistry. (3, 2) 

Three lectures a week first semester. Two lectures a week second semester. 

(Lippincott, Mason.) 
Chem.. 323. Statistical Mechanics and Chemistry. (3) 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 307, or equivalent. (Brown.) 

F. SEMINAR AND RESEARCH 

Chem. 35 1. Seminar. (I) 

First and second semesters. (StafiF.) 

Chem. 360. Research. 

First and second semesters, summer session. (Staff.) 



M 82 



Classical Languages and Literatures 

CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

Professor and Head: Avery. 
Assistant Professor: Huhhe. 

No placement tests are given in the Classical Languages. The following 
schedule will apply in general in determining the course level at which students 
will register for Latin and Greek. All students whose stage of achievement 
is not represented below are urgently invited to confer with the Head of 
the Department. 

Students offering or 1 unit of Latin will register for course 1 . 

Students offering 2 units of Latin will register for course 3. 

Students offering 3 units of Latin will register for course 4. 

Students offering 4 units of Latin will register for course 5. 

No credit will be given for less than two semesters of Elementary Latin or 
Greek except as provided below in the course description of Latin 1 , 2. 

LATIN 

Latin 1,2. Elementary Latin. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. The essentials of Latin grammar, exercises in translation, 
composition, and connected reading. A student who has had two units of Latin in 
high school may register for Latin 1 for purposes of review, but not for credit; how- 
ever, he may, under certain conditions, register for Latin 2 for credit with depart- 
mental permission. (Avery.) 

Latin 3. Intermediate Latin. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Latin 1 and 2 or equivalent. Grammar 
review, Latin readings, and exercises in composition, followed by the reading of 
selections from Caesar's Commentaries on the Gallic War. (Hubbe.) 

Latin 4. Intermediate Latin. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Latin 3 or equivalent. Selected orations of 

Cicero. (Aver}'.) 

Latin 5. Vergil's Aeneid. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Latin 4 or equivalent. Selections from 

Vergil's Aeneid. (Hubbe.) 

Latin 5L Horace. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Latin 5 or equivalent. Selected Odes and Epodcs of 

Horace. (Aver)'.) 

Latin 52. Livy. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Latin 51 or equivalent. Selections from Livy's histor)'. 

(Avery.) 

83 ► 



Classical Languages and Literature 

Latin 61. Pliny's Letters. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Latin 52 or equivalent. Selected letters of Pliny the 

Younger. C Avery.) 

Latin 70. Greek and. Roman Mythology. (3) 

Second semester. Taught in English, no prerequisite. A systematic study of the 

divinities of ancient Greece and Rome and the classical myths concerning them. 

C Avery.) 
Note: This course is particularly recommended for students planning to major in 
Foreign Languages, English, History, the Fine Arts, and Journalism. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Prerequisite for 100 level courses, Latin 61. 

Latin lOL Catullus and the Roman Elegiac Poets. (3) 

Lectures and readings on Catullus as a writer of lyric, an imitator of the Alexandrians, 
and as a writer of elegy, and on TibuUus, Propertius, and Ovid as elegists. The read- 
ing of selected poems of the four authors. Reports. CHubbe.) 

Latin 102. Tacitus. (3) 

Lectures and readings on Greek and Pioman historiography before Tacitus and on the 
author as a writer of history. The reading of selections from the Annals and His- 
tories. Reports. (Avery.) 

Latin 103. Roman Satire. (3) 

Lectures and readings on the origins and development of Roman satire. The read- 
ing of selections from the satires of Horace, Petronius' Cena Trimalchionis, and the 
satires of Juvenal. Reports. CAvery.) 

Latin 104. Roman Comedy. (3) 

Lectures and readings on the origins and development of Roman comedy. The read- 
ing of selected plays of Plautus and Terence. Reports. (Hubbe.) 

Latin 105. Lucretius. (3) 

Lectures and readings on Greek and Roman Epicureanism. The reading of selections 

from the De renun natura. Reports. (Hubbe.) 

Latin 111. Advanced Latin Grammar. (3) 

Summer Session only. Prerequisite, three years of college Latin or equivalent. An in- 
tensive study of the morphology and syntax of the Latin language supplemented by 
rapid reading. (Avery.) 

For Graduates 

Latin 210. Vulgar Latin Readings. (3) 

First and second semesters. Summer School. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An 
intensive review of the phonology, morphology, and s)aitax of Classical Latin, fol- 
lowed by the study of the deviations of Vulgar Latin from the classical norms, 
with the reading of illustrative texts. The reading of selections from the Peregrinatio ad 
loca sancta and the study of divergences from classical usage therein, with special 
emphasis on those which anticipate subsequent developments in the Romance Lan- 
guages. Reports. (Avery.) 

-< 84 



Cumparative Literature 



GREEK 



Greek 1,2. Elementary Greek. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. The essentials of Greek grammar, exercises in translation, 

composition and connected reading. (Hubbe.) 

Greek 3. Intermediate Greek. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Greek 1 and 2 or equivalent. Grammar review, Greek 
readings, and e.xcrcises in composition, followed by the reading of selections from the 
Anabasis of Xenophon. (Hubbe.) 

Greek 4. Intermediate Greek. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Greek 3 or equivalent. Selections from the Homeric 

epics. See Greek 6. (Hubbe.) 

Greek 5. Herodotus. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Greek 4 or equivalent. Selections from Herodotus' history 

of the Persian Wars. (Hubbe.) 

Greek 6. The New Testament. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Greek 3 or equivalent. Greek 6 will be substituted 
for Greek 4 upon demand of a sufiBcient number of students. The study of New 
Testament Greek and its deviations from Classical Greek. The reading of selections 
from the four Gospels. (Hubbe.) 

Greek 51. Euripides. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Greek 5 or equivalent. Selected plays of Euripides. 

(Hubbe.) 
Greek 52. Plato. (3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, Greek 51 or equivalent. Selected dialogues of Plato. 

(Avery.) 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

Professors: Aldridge, Falls, Goodwyn, Harmon, McManaway (P.T.), Murphy, 
Pralil, Zeeveld, Ziicker. 

Associate Professors: Cooley, Gravely, Manning, Parsons, Weher. 

Assistant Professor: Andrews. 

Requirements for major include Comparative Literature 101, 102. Com- 
parative Literature courses may be counted toward a major or minor in Eng- 
lish when recommended by the student's major advisor. 

Comp. Lit. 1. Greek Poetry. (2) 

First semester. Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, with special emphasis on the literar)' 

form and the historical and mythological background. 

Comp. Lit. 2. Later European Epic Poetry. (2) 

Second semester. Virgil's Aeneid, Dante's Divine Comedy, Nihehmgenlied and other 

85 ► 



Comparative Literature 

European epics, with special emphasis on their relationship to and comparison with 
the Greek epic. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Comp. Lit. 101, 102. Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature. Q3, 3) 
First semester: Survey of the background of European literature through study of 
Greek and Latin literature in English translations, discussing the debt of modem 
literature to the ancients. Second semester: Study of medieval and modem Conti- 
nental literature. (Zucker) 

Comp. Lit. 103. The Old Testament as Literature. (3) 

Second semester. A study of the sources, development and literary types. (Zucker.) 

Comp. Lit. 105. Rom^anticism in France. (3) 

First semester. Lectures and readings in the French romantic writers from Rousseau 

to Baudelaire. Texts are read in English translations. (Parsons.) 

Comp. Lit. 106. Romanticism, in Germany. (3) 

Second semester. Continuation of Comp. Lit. 105. German Hterature from Buerger 

to Heine in English translations. CPrahl.) 

Comp. Lit. 107. The Faust Legend in English and German Literature. C3) 
First semester. A study of the Faust legend of the Middle Ages and its later treat- 
ment by Marlowe in Dr. Faustus and by Goethe in Faust. (Prahl.) 

Comp. Lit. 112. Ibsen. (3) 

First semester. A study of the life and chief work of Henrik Ibsen with special 

emphasis on his influence on the modern drama. CZucker.) 

Comp. Lit. 114. The Greek Drama. (3) 

First semester. The chief works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes 
in English translations. Emphasis on the historic background, on dramatic structure, 
and on the effect of the Attic drama upon the mind of the civilized world. (Prahl.) 

Comp. Lit. 125. Literature of the Middle Ages. (3) 

Narrative, dramatic, and lyric literature of the Middle Ages studied in translation. 

CCooley.) 
In addition, the foUovdng courses will count as credit in Comparative Literature. 

English Language and Literature 

Eng. 104; Eng. 113; Eng. 121; Eng. 129, 130; Eng. 144; Eng. 145; Eng. 155, 156; 

Eng. 157. 

Foreign Language and Literatures 
Span. 109. 

Speech and Dramatic Art. 
Speech 131, 132. 

^ 86 



Economics, English Language and Literature 

For Graduates 

Camp. Lit. 258. Folklore in Literature. (3) 

A study of folk heroes, motifs, and ideas as they appear in the world's masterpieces. 

(Goodwyn.) 

The following courses will count as credit in Comparative Literature: 

English Language and Literature 

Eng. 201; Eng. 204; Eng. 206, 207; Eng. 216, 217; Eng. 227, 228. 

Foreig7i Languages and Literatures 
Ger. 204; Ger. 208. 

ECONOMICS 

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences may select Economics as a 
major field, and may also take courses in this department for elective credit. 
For a description of courses, see the catalog of the College of Business and 
Public Administration. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professor and Acting Head: Murfhy. 

Professors: Aldridge, Bode* Harman, McManaway (P.T.), Zeeveld. 

Associate Professors: Ball, Cooley, Gravely, Manning, Ward, Weber. 

Assistant Professors: Andrews, Barnes, Beall, Coulter, Fleming QP.T.^, Liitwack, 
Mish, Schaumann. 

Instructors: Beckman, Brown, Browne, Chayes QP.T.^, Clendeuin, Cooper, 
Cowen CP-F.^, Demaree, Friedman, Henault, Herman, Hoadley, Holherg, 
Jellema, Kelly, Kissane, Knief, Landsherg, Martin, F. Miller (_P.T.^, L. 
Miller, Nelson CP-F.'), Portz, Rice, Ryan CP.T.^, Sanders, Seelye CP.F.X 
Smith, Stevenson, Stone, Fhorherg, Walker, Walt, Weaver, Whitney. 

Graduate Assistants: Allison, Burke, Cohen, Field, Goldberg, Kever, Letzring, 
Merkel, Moncada, Naething, Palmer, S-piro, Thomas, Whaley. 

Eng. 1, 2. Composition and American Literature. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Summer School. Required of freshmen. Eng. 1 is the 
prerequisite of Eng. 2. See Eng. 21. Grammar, rhetoric, and the mechanics of writ- 
ing; frequent themes. Readings are in American literature. (Barnes and StafiF.) 

Eng. 3, 4. Composition and World Literature. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Summer School. Prerequisite, Eng. 2 or 21. Eng. 3, 4, 
or Eng. 5, 6, or an acceptable combination of the two, are required of sophomores. 
Credit will not be given for more than six hours of work in 3, 4 and 5, 6. Practice 
in composition. An introduction to world literature, foreign classics being read in 
translation. (Cooley and Staff.) 

*On leave first semester 1958-59. 



English. Language and Literature 

Eng. 5, 6. Composition and English Literature. (_S, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Eng. 2 or 21. Eng. 3, 4, or Eng. 5, 6, or an 
acceptable combination of the two, are required of sophomores. Credit will not be 
given for more than six hours of work in 3, 4 and 5, 6. Practice in composition. An 
introduction to major English writers. CCooley and Staff.) 

Eng. 7. Technical Writing. (2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Eng. 2 or 21. For students desiring practice 

in writing reports, technical essays, or popular essays on technical subjects. 

(Coulter, Walt.) 
Eng. 8. College Grammar. (3) 

First and second semesters. Summer School (2). Prerequisite, Eng. 2 or 21. An 
analytical study of Modern English grammar. (Harman.) 

E,ng. 9. Introduction to Narrative Literature. C-3) 

Second semester. Simimer School (2). Prerequisite, Eng. 2 or 21. An intensive study 
of representative stories, vvdth lectures on the history and technique of the short story 
and other narrative forms. (Harman.) 

Eng. 12. Introduction to Creative Writing. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Eng. 2 or 21. (Friedman.) 

Eng. 14. Expository Writing. (3) 

Not offered on College Park campus. Prerequisite, Eng. 2 or 21. Credit will not be 
given for Eng. 7 in addition to Eng. 14. Methods and problems of exposition; prac- 
tice in several kinds of informative writing including the preparation of technical 
papers and reports. 

Eng. 15. Readings in Biography. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). Prerequisite, Eng. 2 or 21. An analytical study 

in the form and technique of biographical writing in Europe and America. (Ward.) 

Eng. 21. Advanced Freshman Composition and Literature. (3) 

First and second semesters. Replaces the Eng. 1 and 2 requirement for students ex- 
empt from Eng. 1. Includes a survey of fundamentals covered in Eng. 1 in addition 
to material comparable to that of Eng. 2. (Thorberg and Staff.) 

Vor Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Eng. 4 to 6 and jimior standing are prerequisite to courses numbered 101 to 199. 
to 199. 

E,ng. 101. History of the English Language. (3) 

Second semester. Smnmer School (2). (Harman.) 

Eng. 102. Old English. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). (Ball.) 

Eng. 103. Beowulf. (3) 

Second semester. (Balh) 



English Langtiage and Literature 

Eng. 104. Chaucer. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). A literary and language study of the Canterbury 

Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and the principal minor poems. (Harman.) 

Eng. 110, HI. Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. The most important dramatists of the time, other than 

Shakespeare. (Zeeveld, Mish.) 

Eng. 112. Poetry of the Renaissance. (3) 

Not offered in 1958-59. ' (Zeeveld.) 

Eng. 113. Prose of the Renaissance. (3) 

Not offered in 1958-59. (Zeeveld, Mish.) 

Et7g. 115, 116. Shakespeare. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Summier School (2, 2). Twenty-one important plays. 

(Zeeveld.) 

Eng. 120. English Drama from 1660 to 1800. (3) 

Second semester. The important dramatists from Wycherley to Sheridan, with em- 
phasis upon the comedy of manners. (Ward.) 

Eng. 121. Milton. (3) 

Second semester. Summer School (2). (Murphy.) 

Eng. 122. Literature of the Seventeenth Century, 1600-1660. (3) 

First semester. The major non-dramatic writers (exclusive of Milton). (Murphy.) 

Eng. 123. Literature of the Seventeenth Century, 1660-1700. (3) 
Not offered in 1958-59. The Age of Dryden, with the exception of the drama. 

(Aldridge.) 

Eng. 125, 126. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (3, 3) 

Eng. 125, Summer School (2). First and second semesters. (Aldridge.) 

Eng. 129, 130. Literature of the Romantic Period. (3, 3) 

Summer School (2, 2). First and second semesters. (Weber.) 

Eng. 134, 135. Literature of the Victorian Period. (3, 3) 

Summer School (2, 2). First and second semesters. (Cooley.) 

Eng. 139, 140. The English Novel. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Eng. 140, Summer School (2). (Ward, Mish.) 

Eng. 143. Modern Poetry. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). The chief British and American poets of the 

twentieth century. (Fleming.) 

Eng. 144. Modern Drama. (3) 

First semester. The drama from Ibsen to the present. (\\'eber.) 

89 ► 



English Language and Literature 

Eng. 145. The Modern Novel (3) 

Second semester. Summer School (2). Major English and American novehsts o£ 

the twentieth century. (Andrews.) 

Eng. 148. The Literature of American Democracy. C^) 

Not offered in 1 9 5 8-5 9. (Bode.) 

Eng. 150, 151. American Literature. O, Sj 

First and second semesters. Summer School (2, 2). Representative American poetry 
and prose from colonial times to the present with special emphasis on the literature 
o£ the nineteenth century. (Manning, Gravely, Lutwack.) 

Eng. 155, 156. Major American Writers. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Simimer School (2, 2). Two writers studied intensively 

each semester. (Gravely, Manning.) 

Eng. 157. Introduction to Folklore. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). Historical background of folklore studies; types 

of folklore with particular emphasis on folktales and folksongs, and on American 

folklore. (Cooley.) 

Eng. 170. Creative Writing. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. (Fleming.) 

Eng. 171. Advanced Creative Writing. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. (Fleming.) 

Eng. 172. Playwriting. (2) 

Not offered in 1958-59. (Fleming.) 

Eng. 199. Honors Conference Course. (3) 

Second semester. Open only to seniors. Prerequisite, candidacy for honors in English. 
A topic will be studied in selected literary works of various periods and types. Read- 
ings; discussions; conferences; preparation of a term paper. (Cooley.) 

For Graduates 

Eng. 200. Research. (J -6) 

Arranged. Credit in proportion to work done and results accomplished. (Staff.) 

Eng. 201. Bihliografhy and Methods. (3) 

First semester. An introduction to the principles and methods of research. (Mish.) 

Eng. 202. Middle English. (3) 

First semester. (Harman.) 

Eng. 203. Gothic. (3) 

Second semester. (Harman.) 

Eng. 204. Seminar in Medieval Literature. (3) 

Second semester. (Cooley.) 



90 



Foreign Languages and Literature 

Eng. 206, 207. Seminar in Renaissance Literature. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Eng. 206, Summer School (2J. 

(McManaway, Zeeveld.) 

Eng. 210. Seminar in Seventeenth-Century Literature. (3) 

Summer School (2). Second semester. (Murphy, Mish.) 

Eng. 212, 213. Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Literature. C3, 3) 

First and second semesters. (Aldridge.) 

Eng. 214, 215. Seyninar in Nineteenth-Century Literatttre. (3) 

First and second semesters. Eng. 214, Summer School (2). (Cooley, Weber.) 

Eng. 216, 217. Literary Criticisin. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. (Murphy.) 

Eng. 225, 226. Seminar in American Literature. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Summer School (2, 2). (Bode, Lutwack.) 

Eng. 227, 228. Problems in American Literature. (3, 3) 

Eng. 227, Summer School (2). Not offered in 1958-59. (Aldridge.) 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

Professor and Head: Zucker. 

Professors: Falls, Goodwyn, Prahl, Smith. 

Lecturer: Arnold. 

Associate Professors: Bingham, Kram.er, Parsons, Quynn. 

Assistant Professors: Bridgers, Bidatkin, Dohert, Fries, N ernes, Rand, Rosen- 
field, Schweizer. 

Instructors: Arsenatdt, Bohorj'kine, Chen CP-T.^, Greenherg QP.T.^, Hall, James, 
Lee, Lemaire, Norton, Rovner. 

At the beginning of each semester a placement examination is given for all 
students who have had some foreign language in high school and wish to do 
further work in that language. By this means the Department assigns each 
student to the suitable level of instruction. Any student who fails to qualify 
for the second semester of his language will be required to register for the 
first without credit or register for a different language. (Students who wish to 
continue Latin should consult the section on Classical Languages elsewhere 
in these pages). 

No credit will be gi^en for the elementary first semester (1) alone unless 
followed by further study. 

Language conversation courses, 3, 8, or 9, are not to be taken to meet the 
college requirement of 12 hours of language unless the student has finished, 
the second semester of second year French, German, Spanish, etc. (5, 7, or 17). 

91 ► 



FoTtdgn Languages and Literature 

Taking conversation courses to meet the college requirement is permitted in 
the case of students who enter language courses with Advanced Standing. 

A student whose native language is taught at the University may not meet 
the language requirement by taking freshman or sophomore courses in his 
language. 

HONORS IN FRENCH, GERMAN OR SPANISH: A Student whose major is in 
French, German or Spanish and who maintains an approved average in his 
grades may read for honors in French, German or Spanish. A candidate for 
honors is examined upon an approved individual program of readings in an 
area of his special interest. Application may be made to the Head of the 
Department of Foreign Languages between the second semester of the sopho- 
more year and the first semester of the senior year. 

Attention is called to the courses in Comparative Literature elsewhere in 
these pages. 

Foreign Language 1,2. English for Foreign Students. C^, 3^ 
First and second semesters. An introduction to English usage, adapted to the needs 
of the non-English-speaking student. Pronunciation, spelling, syntax; the differences 
between English and various other languages are stressed. (Bridgers.) 

FRENCH 

French 0. Intensive Elementary French. CO) 

Summer School only. Intensive elementary course in the French language designed 

particularly for graduate students who wish to acquire a reading knowledge. 

(Kramer.) 
French 1, 2. Elementary French. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. French 2, Summer School. Three recitations and one 
laboratory period per week. Elements of grammar and exercises in translation. One 
hour drill in pronunciation and conversation. A student who has had two units of 
French in high school may take French 1 for purposes of review, but not for credit. 

(Falls and Staff.) 

French 3. Elementary Conversation. (I) 

First and second semesters. Open to all students who have completed their first year 

French or French 1 with the grade A or B. (Arsenault.) 

French 4, 5. Intermediate Literary French. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Siunmer School. Prerequisite, French 1 and 2 or equiva- 
lent. Students who have taken French 6 and 7 cannot receive credit for French 4 
and 5. Reading of texts designed to give some knowledge of French life, thought and 
culture. (Falls and Staff.) 

French 6, 7. Intermediate Scientific French. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, French 1 and 2 or equivalent. Students 

who have taken French 4 and 5 cannot receive credit for French 6 and 7. Reading of 

technical and scientific prose, with some grammar review. (Kramer and Staff.) 

-^ 92 



Foreign Languages arid Literature 

Vretich 8, 9. Intermediate Conversation. (3, 3) 

First antl second semesters. Prerequisite: for French 8, French 3 or consent of in- 
structor; for French 9, French 8 or consent of instructor. CArsenault.) 

French 17. Grammar Review. (3) 

First and second semesters. May be taken after completion of French 4 or 5. Recom- 
mended for students who expect to major or minor in French. CHall.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

FrcticJi 51, 52. The Development of the French Novel. Q3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Introductory study of the history and growth of the 
novel in French literature. French 51 covers the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, 
French 52 the nineteenth. (Kramer.) 

French 53, 54. The Development of the French Drama. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Introductory study of the French drama. French 53 

covers the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, French 54 the nineteenth. 

(Kramer.) 

French 55, 56. The Development of the Short Story in French. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. A study of the short story in French Hterature. French 
55 covers examples up to the nineteenth century, French 56 the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries. (Kramer.) 

French 61, 62. French Phonetics. (_1, J) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite French 1, 2, or equivalent. Elements of 

French phonetics, diction and intonation. (Hall.) 

French 71, 72. Review Grammar and Composition. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, French 17 or equivalent. For students who, 
having a good knowledge of French, wish to become more proficient in the wTitten 
and spoken language. (Quynn and Bingham.) 

French 75, 76. Introduction to French Literature. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, second year French or equivalent. An ele- 
mentary survey of the chief authors and movements in French literature. (Falls.) 

French 80, 81. Advanced Conversation. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. For students who wish to develop fluency and confidence in 

speaking the language. (Arsenault.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

French 100. French Literature of the Sixteenth Century. (3) 

First semester. The Renaissance in France; humanism; Rabelais and Calvin; the Pleiade; 

Montaigne. (Falls.) 

French 101, 102. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. First semester: Descartes, Pascal, Comeille, Racine. Second 
semester: the remaining great classical vxtiters, with special attention to Moliere. 

(Quynn, Rosenfield.) 

93 ► 



Foreign Languages and Literature 

French 103, 104. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. First semester: development of the philosophical and 

scientific movement; Montesquieu. Second semester: Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau. 

(Falls, Bingham.) 

French 105, 106. French Literature of the Nineteenth Century. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. First semester: drama and poetry from Romanticism 

to Symbolism. Second semester: the major prose writers of the same period. 

(Bingham, Quynn.) 

French 107, 108. French Literature of the Twentieth Century. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. First semester: drama and poetry from Symbolism to the 

present time. Second semester: the contemporary novel. (Falls.) 

French 121, 122. Advanced Com-position. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Translation from English into French, free composition, 

letter vwiting. (Falls.) 

French 161, 162. French Civilization. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. French life, customs, culture, traditions. First semester: 

the historical development. Second semester: present-day France. 

(Rosenfield, Bingham.) 

French 171. Practical French Phonetics. (3) 

First semester. Pronunciation of modem French. The sounds and their production, 

the stress group, intonation. (Smith.) 

French 199. Rapid Review of the History of French Literature. (I) 

Second semester. Especially designed for French majors. Weekly lectures stressing 

the high points in the history of French literature. (Falls.) 

For Graduates 

The requirements of students will determine which courses will be offered. 

French 201. Research. 

Credits determined by work accomplished. Guidance in the preparation of master's 

and doctoral theses. Conferences. (Staff.) 

French 207, 208. The French Novel in the First Half of the Nineteenth 

Century. (2, 2) 
First and second semesters. (Falls.) 

French 209, 210. The French Novel in the Second Half of the Nineteenth 

Century. (2, 2) 
First and second semesters. (Falls.) 

French 211. Introduction to Old French. (3) 

(Smith, Bulatkin.) 

-< 94 



Foreign Languages and Literahire 

French 215,216. Moliere. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. (Quynn.) 

French 221, 222. Reading Course. ^Arranged') 

Designed to give the graduate student a background of a survey of French hteratiue. 

Extensive outside readings, with reports and periodic conferences. (Staff.) 

French 230. Introditction to European Linguistics. (3) 

(Smith, Bulatkin.) 
French 251, 252. Seminar. (3, 3) 
Required of all graduate majors in French. (Staff.) 

GERMAN 

German 0. Intensive Elementary German. (0) 

Summer School only. Intensive elementary course in the German language designed 

particularly for graduate students who wish to acquire a reading knowledge. (Kramer.) 

German 1, 2. Elementary German. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. German 2, Summer School. Three recitations and one 
laboratory period per week. Elements of grammar and exercises in translation. One 
hour drill in pronunciation and conversation. A student who has had two units of 
German in high school may take German 1 for purposes of review, but not for credit. 

(Dobert and Staff.) 
German 3. Elementary Conversation. (J) 

First and second semesters. Open to all students who have completed their first year 
German or German 1 wdth the grade A or B. (Lemaire.) 

German 4, 5. Intermediate Literary German. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Summer School. Prerequisite, German 1, 2, or equivalent. 
Students who have taken German 6 and 7 cannot receive credit for German 4 and 5. 
Reading of narrative prose designed to give some knowledge of German life, thought 
and culture. (Dobert and Staff.) 

German 6, 7. Intermediate Scientific German. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, German 1, 2, or equivalent. Students who 
have taken German 4 and 5 cannot receive credit for German 6 and 7. Reading of 
technical and scientific prose, with some grammar review. (Kramer and Staff.) 

German 8, 9. Intermediate Conversation. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite: for German 8, German 3 or consent of 

instructor; for German 9, German 8 or consent of instructor. (Lemaire.) 

German 17. Grammar Review. (3) 

First and second semesters. May be taken after completion of German 4 or 5. Recom- 
mended for students who wish to major or minor in German. (Kramer.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

German 61, 62. German Phonetics, (i, i) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, German I, 2, or equivalent. Pronunciation 

of German, study of phonetics, oral exercises and ear training. (Schweizer.) 

95 ► 



Foreign Languages and Literature 

German 71, 72. Review Grammar and Composition. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, German 4, 5, or equivalent. This course is 
required of students preparing to teach German. A thorough study of the more de- 
tailed points of German graimnar with ample practice in composition work. 

CKramer.) 

German 75, 76. Introduction to German Literature. C3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, German 4, 5, or equivalent. An elementary 

survey of the chief authors and movements in German literature. (Schweizer.) 

German 80, 82. Advanced Conversation. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, German 8, 9 or consent of instructor. For 
students who wish to develop fluency and confidence in speaking the language. Read- 
ing of German newspapers. CDobert.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

German 101, 102. German Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. The main works of Klopstock, Wieland, Lessing, Herder, 
Goethe, Schiller. (Prahl, Schweizer.) 

German 103, 104. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Outstanding works of Kleist, Grillparzer, Grabbe, Hebbel, 

Ludwig, Stifter, Keller, Anzengruber. (Prahl, Schweizer.) 

German 105, 106. Modern German Literature. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prose and dramatic writings from Gerhart Hauptmann to 

the present time (1890-1950.) (Prahl, Dobert.) 

German 107, 108. Goethe's Faust. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. First and second parts of the drama. CZucket.) 

German 121, 122. Advanced Cam-position. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Translations from English into German, free composition, 

letter writing. (Kramer.) 

German 161, 162. German Civilization. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. A survey of two thousand years of German history, out- 
lining the cultural heritage of the German people, their great men, tradition, customs, 
art and literature, with special emphasis on the interrelationship of social and literary 
history. (Prahl.) 

German 199. Rapid Review of the History of German Literature. (I) 
Second semester. Especially designed for German majors. Weekly lectures stressing 
the leading concepts in the history of German literature. (Schweizezr.) 

Attention is called to Comparative Literature 106, Romanticism in Germany, and 
Comparative Literature 107, The Faust Legend in English and German Literature. 

< 96 



Foreign Languages and. Literature 

For Graduates 

The requirements of students will determine which courses will be offered. 

German 201. Research. 

Credits determined by work accomplished. Guidance in the preparation of master's 

and doctoral theses. Conferences. (Staff.) 

German 202, 203. The Modern German Drama. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. (Zucker.) 



German 204. Schiller. (3) 

German 205. Goethe's Works Outside of Faust. (2) 

German 206. The Romantic Movement. (3) 

German 208. The Philosophy of Goethe's Faust. (3) 



(Prahl.) 
(Zucker.) 

(Prahl.) 
(Zucker.) 



German 221, 222. Reading Course. (^Arranged^ 

Designed to give the graduate student a background of a survey of German htera- 

ture. Extensive outside readings, with reports and periodic conferences. (Staff.) 

German 230. Introductio7t to European Lingtustics. (3) 

(Smith, Bulatkin.) 
German 23 L Middle High German. (3) 

(Schweizer.) 
German 251, 252. Seminar. (3, 3) 
Required of all graduate majors in German. (StaflF.) 

SPANISH 

Spanish 1,2. Elementary Spanish. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Spanish 2, Summer School. Three recitations and one 
laboratory period per week. Elements of grammar and exercises in translation. One 
hour drill in pronunciation and conversation. A student who has had two units of 
Spanish in high school may take Spanish 1 for purposes of review, but not for credit. 

(Parsons and Staff.) 

Spanish 3. Elementary Conversation. (I) 

First and second semesters. Open to all students who have completed their first year 

Spanish or Spanish 1 with the grade A or B. (Nemes.) 

Spanish 4, 5. Intermediate Spanish. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Summer School. Prerequisite, Spanish 1, 2, or equivalent. 
Reading of texts designed to give some knowledge of Spanish and Latin-American 
Ufe, thought and culture. (Parsons and Staff.) 

Spanish 8, 9. Intermediate Conversation. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite: for Spanish 8, Spanish 3 or consent of 

instructor; for Spanish 9, Spanish 8 or consent of instructor. (Nemes.) 

97 ► 



Foreign Languages and Literature 

Spanish 17. Grammar Review. (3) 

First and second semesters. May be taken after completion of Spanish 4 or 5. 

Recommended for students who expect to major or minor in Spanish. 

(Rovner, Norton.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Spanish 51, 52. Business Spanish. Q3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, second year Spanish or equivalent. Designed 
to give a knowledge of correct Spanish usage; commercial letters. (Bingham. ) 

Spanish 61, 62. Spanish Phonetics. Ql, I) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Spanish 1, 2, or equivalent. The pronuncia- 
tion of Spanish, study of phonetics, oral exercises, and ear training. (Goodwyn.} 

Spanish 71, 72. Review Grammar and Composition. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Spanish 4, 5 or equivalent. Intended to 

give an intensive and practical drill in Spanish composition. (Parsons, Rand.) 

Spanish 75, 76. Introduction to Spanish Literature. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Spanish 4, 5, or equivalent. An elementary 

survey of the history of Spanish literature. (Parsons, Rand.) 

Spanish 80, 81. Advanced Conversation. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Spanish 8, 9, or consent of instructor. For 

students who wish to develop fluency and confidence in speaking the language. 

(Nemes.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Spanish 101. Epic and Ballad. (3) 

First semester. The legendary and heroic matter of Spain. Readings of the Poema del 

Cid and of ballads of various cycles. (Parsons.) 

Spanish 102. The Spanish Popular Ballad. (3) 

Second semester. Typical ballads composed and developed in the Spanish-speaking 
world during and since the Golden Age, with stress on the folkloristic point of view. 

(Goodwyn.) 

Spanish 104. The Drama of the Golden Age. (3) 

First semester. Selected plays of Lope de Vega, Calderon de la Barca, Tirso de 

Molina and others. (Parsons.) 

Spanish 108. Lope de Vega. (3) 

First semester. Selected plays of Lope de Vega, Calderon de la Barca, Tirso de Molina 

and others. (Parsons.) 

Spanish 109. Cervantes. (3) 

Second semester. Selected works of Cervantes; plays, exemplary novels, and Don 

Quixote. (Goodwyn.) 

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Foreign Languages and Literature 

S'panish 110. Modern Spanish Poetry. (3) 

First semester. Significant poems of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. (Rand.) 

Spanish 111. The Spanish Novel of the Nineteenth Century. (3) 

First semester. Readings of some of the significant novels of the nineteenth century. 

(Parsons.) 
Spanish 112. Modern Spanish Drama. (3) 
Second semester. Significant plays of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

(Nemes.) 
Spanish 113. The Spanish Novel of the Twentieth Century. (3) 
Second semester. Significant novels of the twentieth century. (Rand.) 

Spanish 115. Modern Spanish Thought. (3) 

First semester. The generation of 1898 and other significant and interpretative writ- 
ings of the twentieth century. (Rand.) 

Spanish 121, 122. Advanced Composition. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Training in self-expression in Spanish, free composition, 
letter writing. (Goodwyn.) 

Spanish 151. Spanish-American Fiction. (3) 

First semester. The novel and short story from the Wars of Independence to the 

present and their reflection of society in the republics of the Western Hemisphere. 

(Nemes.) 
Spanish 152. Spanish-American Poetry. (3) 

Second semester. Representative poetry after 1800 and its relation to European trends 
and writers. (Nemes.) 

Spanish 153. Spanish-American Essay. (3) 

First and second semesters. Social and political thought from Bolivar to Vasconcelos 

and its relationship to social and political conditions in Spanish America. (Nemes.) 

Spanish 161, 162. Spanish Civilization. (^3, 3^ 

First and second semesters. Introductory study of the literary, educational, artistic 

traditions; great men, customs, and general culture. (Rand.) 

Spanish 163, 164. Latin-American Civilization. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Introductory study of the cultures of Latin America; the 
historical-political background and the dominating concepts in the lives of the people. 

(Gooduyn.) 

Spanish 199. Rapid Review of the History of Spanish Literature. (2) 

Second semester. Especially designed for Spanish majors. Weekly lectures stressing 

the leading concepts in the history of Spanish literature. (Parsons.) 

For Graduates 

The requirements of students will determine which courses will be offered. 

Spanish 201. Research. 

Credits determined by work accomplished. Guidance in the preparation of master's 

and doctoral theses. Conferences. (Staff.) 

99 ► 



Foreign Languages and Literature 

Spanish 202. The Golden Age in Spanish Literature. (3) 

(Goodwyn.) 
Spanish 203, 204. Spanish Poetry. (3, 3) 

(Goodwyn.) 
Spanish 205, 206. Spanish Literature of the Twentieth Century. (3, 3) 

(Rand.) 
Spanish 21 L Introduction to Old Spanish. (3) 

(Parsons, Bulatkin.) 

Spanish 221, 222. Reading Course. (^Arranged') 

Designed to give the graduate student a background of a survey of Spanish literature. 

Extensive outside readings, with reports and periodic conferences. (Staff.) 

Spanish 230. Introduction to European Linguistics. (3) 

(Smith, Bulatkin.) 

Spanish 251, 252. Seminar. C3, 3^ 

Required of all graduate majors in Spanish. (Staff.) 

RUSSIAN 

Russian 1, 2. Elementary Russian. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Elements of grammar; pronunciation and conversation; 

exercises in translation. One laboratory period per week. (Boborykine.) 

Russian 3. Elementary Conversation. (I) 

First and second semesters. Open to all students who have completed their first year 
Russian or Russian 1 wdth the grade A or B. (Boborykine.) 

Russian 4, 5. Intermediate Russian. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Russian 1 and 2, or equivalent. Reading of 

texts designed to give some knowledge of Russian life, thought and culture. 

(Boborykine.) 

Russian 8, 9. Intermediate Conversation. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite: for Russian 8, Russian 3 or consent of 

instructor; for Russian 9, Russian 8 or consent of instructor. (Boborykine.) 

Russian 10, 11. Scientific Russian. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, Russian 4 and 5 or equivalent. (Boborykine.) 

Russian 71, 72. Review Grammar and Composition. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, first and second year Russian. Designed to 
give a thorough training in the structure of the language; drill in Russian composition. 

(Boborykine.) 

Russian 75, 76. Introduction to Russian Literature. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, second-year Russian or equivalent. An ele- 
mentary survey of Russian literature. (Boborykine.) 

< 100 



Foreign Languages and Literature 

Russian 80, 8L Advanced Conversation. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequiste, Russian 8, 9, or consent of instructor. For 

students who wish to develop fluency and confidence in speaking the language. 

(lioborykine.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Russian 101, 102. Modern Russian Literature. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Works of Maxim Gorky, Alexei Tolstoy, P. Romanov, M. 

Zoshchcnko, M. Sholokhov. (Boborykine.) 

Russian 103, 104. Russian Literature of the Nineteenth Century. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Selected vnritings of Pushkin, Gogol, Lermantov, Tur- 
genev, Dostoevsky, Leo Tolstoy, Chekhov. (Boborykine.) 



HEBREW 

Hebrew 1, 2. Elementary Hebrew. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Elements of grammar; pronunciation and conversation; 

exercises in translation. (Greenberg.) 

Hebrew 3. Elementary Conversation, (i) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Hebrew 1 and consent of instructor. (Greenberg.) 

Hebrew 4, 5. Intermediate Hebrew. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Hebrew 1 and 2 or equivalent. Texts de- 
signed to give some knowledge of Hebrew life, thought, and culture. (Greenberg.) 

Hebrew 8, 9. Intermediate Conversation. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite: for Hebrew 8, Hebrew 3 or consent of in- 
structor; for Hebrew 9, Hebrew 8 or consent of instructor. An intermediate practice 
course in spoken Hebrew. (Greenberg.) 

Hebrew 75, 76. Introduction to Hebrew Literature. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, second year Hebrew or equivalent. 

(Greenberg.) 

Hebrew 101. The Hebrew Bible. (3) 

Reading of selected portions of the Pentateuch. (Greenberg.) 

Hebrew 102. The Hebrew Bible. (3) 

Reading of selected portions of the Prophets. (Greenberg.) 

Hebrew 103. Modern Hebrew Literature. (3) 

The period of the Haskalah (Enlightenment). (Greenberg.) 

Hebrew 104. Modern Hebrew Literature. (3) 

The period of the Tehiah (Modern Revival). (Greenberg.) 

101 ► 



Foreign Languages and Literature 

CHINESE 

Chinese 1, 2. Elementary Chinese. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three recitations and one laboratory period per week. 

Elements of pronunciation, simple ideograms, colloquial conversation, translation. 

(Chen.) 
Chinese 4, 5. Intermediate Chinese. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Chinese 1 and 2 or equivalent. Reading of 
texts designed to give some know^ledge of Chinese life, thought, and culture. (Chen.) 

Chinese 101, 102. Readings from Chinese History. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Chinese 5 or equivalent. Based on an 

anthology of historians from the Chou to the Ching dynasties. (Chen.) 

Chinese 161, 162. Chinese Civilization. (,3, 3') 

First and second semesters. This course supplements Geography 134 and 135, Cultural 
Geography of East Asia. It deals vidth Chinese literature, art, folklore, history, govern- 
ment, and great men. Second semester: Developments in China since 1911. The 
course is given in English translation. (Given every other year, rotating with Geog- 
raphy 134 and 135.) 

Chinese 161 and 162 may be counted as history credits in meeting major and minor 
requirements, and, along vidth Chinese 1 and 2, as meeting the 12-hour language re- 
quirement. (Chen.) 

JAPANESE 

Japanese 1, 2. Elementary Ja'panese. (3, 3) 

Not offered on the College Park campus. Elements of grammar; pronunciation and 

conversation; exercises in composition and translation. 

Japanese 4, 5. Intermediate Japanese. (3, 3) 

Not offered on the College Park campus. Reading of narrative prose designed to give 

some knowledge of Japanese life, thought and culture. 

Japanese 161, 162. Japanese Civilization. (3, 3) 

Not offered on the College Park campus. Japanese life, customs, culture, traditions. 

ITALIAN 

Italian 1,2. Elementary Italian. (3, 3) 

Not offered on the College Park campus. Elements of grammar; pronunciation; exer- 
cises in translation. 

Italian 3. Elementary Conversation. (J) 
Not offered on the College Park campus. 

Italian 161, 162. Italian Life and Customs. (3, 3) 

Not offered on the College Park campus. An introductory study of the Italian people 
against a background of political and social history. A survey of Italian literary and 
cultural traditions. 

^ 102 



Geogra'phy, Geology 

ARABIC 

Arabic 1,2. Modern Arabic. (3, 3) 

To be offered in the European Program only; for American personnel stationed in 

Saudi Arabia and other Near East posts. 

MODERN GREEK 

Mod. Greek 1,2. S-poken Modern Greek. (3, 3) 

Not offered on the College Park campus. An intensive course in the colloquial style 
ot Athens with emphasis on the vocabulary of everyday situations and including an 
introduction to Greek wTiting. 

Mod. Greek 3. Elementary Conversation, (i) 
Not offered on the College Park campus. 

Mod. Greek 4, 5. Intermediate Greek. (3, 3) 

Not offered on the College Park campus. Literary texts and newspapers in Modem 

Greek. 

KOREAN 

Korean 1,2. Elementary Korean. (3, 3) 

Not offered on the College Park campus. Elements of grammar; pronunciation and 

conversation; exercises in composition and translation. 

Korean 3. Elementary Conversation. (!) 

Not offered on the College Park campus. Open to all students who have completed 
their first year Korean or Korean 1 with a grade of A or B. 

Korean 4, 5. Intermediate Korean. (3, 3) 

Not offered on the College Park campus. Reading of narrative prose designed to give 
some knowledge of Korean life, thought and culture. 

Korean 161, 162. Korean Civilization. (3, 3) 

Not offered on the College Park campus. Korean life, customs, culture, traditions. 

GEOGRAPHY 

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences may select Geography as a 
major field, and may also take courses in this department for elective credit. 
For a description of courses, see the catalog of the College of Business and 
Public Administration. 

GEOLOGY 

Lecturer: Brown. 

Geol. 1. Geology. (3) 

Prerequisite, Chem. 3. A study dealing primarily with the principles of dynamical 

and structural geology. Designed to give a general survey of the rocks and minerals 

10? ► 



Government and Politics, History 

composing the earth; the movement within it; and its surface features and the agents 
that form them. 

Geol. 2. Engineering Geology. (X) 

The fundamentals of geology with engineering applications. 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences may select Government and 
Politics as a major field, and may also take courses in this Department for 
elective credit. For a description of courses, see the catalog of the College of 
Business and Public Administration. 

HISTORY 

Professor and Head: Gewehr. 

Professors: Chatelain, Merrill, Prange, Wellborn. 

Associate Professors: Bauer, Gordon. 

Assistant Professors: Beard, Ferguson, ]ashemski, Mott, Riddleherger, Rivlin, 

Sparks, Stromherg. 
Instructors: Bates, Catton, Eggert, Evans, Hanks, Hirst, Les Callette, McKee, 

O'Brien, Parmer. 

H. 1, 2. History of Modern Euro'pe. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. The basic course, prerequisite for all advanced courses 
in European History. H. 2 may be taken by students who qualify to select courses 
within Elective Group II of the American Civilization Program. A study of European 
History from the Renaissance to the present day. First semester to 1815. Second 
semester since 1815. CP^rmer and Staff.) 

H. 5, 6. History of American Civilization, (3, 3) 

Piequired of all students who entered the University after 1944-45. Normally to be 
taken in the sophomore year. An historical survey of the main forces in American 
life with emphasis upon the development of our democratic heritage. First semester 
from the colonial period through the Civil War. Second semester, since the Civil War. 

CRiddleberger and Staff.) 
H. 51, 52. The Humanities. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Either of these courses may be taken by students who 
qualify to select courses within Elective Group II of the iWerican Civilization Program. 
In surveying history from prehistoric times to the present, man's cultural development 
is emphasized. The course is a study of the achievements of the various civilizations 
which have contributed to the common cultural heritage of western civilization. It is 
designed as an introductory course in history which will make a more direct contribu- 
tion to the other liberal art fields. First semester to the Renaissance. Second semes- 
ter since the Renaissance. CJashemski.) 

H. 52, 54. History of England and Great Britain. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. A history of the development of British life and institutions. 
Open to all classes. Especially recommended for English majors and minors. First 
semester to 1485. Second semester, since 1485. (Gordon.) 

-«a 104 



History 

H. 56. American Life and Thought. (3) 

First and second semesters. Required of all students who qualify by examination for 
exemption from H. 5, 6. Normally to be taken in sophomore year. A survey of 
significant historical trends and selected problems in the development of Am'.Tican 
Civilization from the colonial era to recent times. (Beard and StafiF.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

A. AMERICAN HISTORY 

H. 101. American Colojiial History. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. The 
settlement and development of colonial America to the middle of the eighteenth 
centur}'. (Ferguson.) 

H. 102. The American Revohuion. (3) 

Second semester. Summer School (2). Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. The 
background and course of the American Revolution through the formation of the 
Constitution. (Ferguson.) 

H. 105. Social and Economic History of the United States to 1865. (3) 
First semester. Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. A synthesis of American life 
from independence through the Civil War. (Chatelain.) 

H. 106. Social and Economic History of the United States since the Civil 

War. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. The development of Ameri- 
can life and institutions, with emphasis upon the period since 1876. (Chatelain.) 

H. 114. The Middle Period of American History 1800-1860. (3) 
First semester. Summer School (2). Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. An ex- 
amination of the political history of the U. S. from Jefferson to Lincoln with particular 
emphasis on the factors producing Jacksonian democracy. Manifest Destiny, the Whig 
Party, the anti-slaver)' movement, the Republican Party, and secession. (Sparks.) 

H. 115. The Old South. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. A study 
of the institutional and cultural life of the ante-bellum South with particular reference 
to the background of the Civil War. (Riddleberger.) 

H. 116. The Civil War. (3) 

Second semester. Summer School (2). Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. Mili- 
tary aspects; problems of the Confederacy; political, social, and economic effects of the 
war upon American society. A tour of one selected battlefield is a required part of 
the course. (Sparks.) 

H. 117. The New South. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). Prerequisites H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. The 
South's place in the Nation from Appomattox to the present with special reference 
to regional problems and aspirations. (Riddleberger.) 

105 ► 



History 

H. 118, 119. Recent American History. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Summer School (2, 2). Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the 
equivalent. Party politics, domestic issues, foreign relations of the United States since 
1890. First semester, through World War I. Second semester, since World War I. 

(Merrill.) 

H. 121. History of the American Frontier. (3) 

First semester, Summer School (2). Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. The 

Trans-Allegheny West. The westward movement into the Mississippi Valley. 

CGewehr.) 

H. 122. History of the American Frontier. (3) 

Second semester, Summer School (2). Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. The 
Trans-Mississippi West. Forces and factors in the settlement and development of the 
Trans-Mississippi West to about 1900. (Gewehr.) 

H. 123. The New West. (3) 

Second semester. Simimer School (2). Prerequisites H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. 
Regional peculiarities and national significance of the Plains and Pacific Coast areas from 
1890 to the present. (Bates.) 

H. 124. Reconstruction and the New Nation 1865-1896. (3) 
Second semester. Sxmimer School (2). Prerequisites H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. Prob- 
lems of reconstruction in both South and North. Emergence of Big Business and in- 
dustrial combinations. Problems of the farmer and laborer. (Merrill.) 

H. 127, 128. Diplomatic History of the United States. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. An historical 
study of the diplomatic negotiations and foreign relations of the United States. First 
semester, from the Revolution to the Civil War; second semester, from the Civil War 
to the present. (Wellborn.) 

H. 129. The United States and World Affairs. (3) 

Summer School (2). Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. A consideration of the 
changed position of the United States vvdth reference to the rest of the world since 
1917. (Wellborn.) 

H. 133, 134. The History of Ideas in America. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Simimer School (2, 2). Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the 
equivalent. An intellectual history of the American people, embracing such topics as 
liberty, democracy, and social ideas. (Beard.) 

H. 135, 136. Constitutional History of the United States. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. A study of the 
historical forces resulting in the formation of the Constitution, and the development of 
American constitutionalism in theory and practice thereafter. (Gewehr.) 

Am.er. Civ. 137, 138. Conference Course in American Civilization. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. The student's acquaintance with American Civilization is 
brought to a focus through the analjrtical study of eight to ten important books, such as 

^ 106 



History 

De Tocqueville, Democracy in America, Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter, Veblen, The 
Theory of the Leisure Class, and Myrdal, An American Dilemma. Specialists from 
related departments participate in the conduct of the course. (Bode.) 

H. 145, 146. Latin American History. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, II. 5, 6, or the equivalent. First semester, 
a survey of the political, social and economic history of colonial Maryland. Second 
semester, Maryland's historical development and role as a state in the American Union. 

(Chatelain.) 

H. 145, 146. Latin American History. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. H. 146, Summer School (2). Prerequisites, 6 hours of 
fundamental courses. A survey of the history of Latin America from colonial origins 
to the present, covering political, cultural economic, and social development, with 
special emphasis upon relations with the United States. First semester, the Colonial 
Period. Second semester, The Republics. (Crosman.) 

H. 147. History of Mexico. (3) 

First semester. The history of Mexico wth special emphasis upon the independence 
period and upon relations between ourselves and the nearest of our Latin American 
neighbors. (Crosman.) 

B. EUROPEAN HISTORY 

H. 151. History of the Ancient Orient and Greece. (3) 

First semester. A survey of the ancient empires of Egypt, the Near East, and Greece, 

with particular attention to their institutions, life, and culture. (Jashemski.) 

H. 153. History of Rome. (3) 

Second semester. A study of Roman civilization from the earliest beginnings through 

the Republic and down to the last centuries of the Empire. (Jashemski.) 

H. 155. Medieval Civilization. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, or H. 53, 54, or the 
permission of the instructor. A survey of Medieval life, culture, and institutions from 
the fall of the Roman Empire to the thirteenth century. (Bauer.) 

H. 161. The Renaissance and Reformation. (3) 

Second semester. Summer School (2). Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, or 53, or the permission 
of the instructor. The culture of the Renaissance, the Protestant revolt and Catholic 
reaction through the Thirty Years War. (Bauer.) 

H. 163, 164. The Middle East. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, six hours from the following groups of 
courses: H. 1, 2; H. 51, 52; or H. 53, 54. A survey of the historical and institutional 
developments of the nations of this vital area. The Islamic Empires and their cultures; 
impact of the west; breakup of the Ottoman Empire and rise of nationalism; present day 
problems. (Rivlin.) 

H. 165. Topics from Middle Eastern History in the Nineteenth and Twen- 
tieth Centiiries. (3) 

107 ► 



History 

First semester. Prerequisites, H. 163, 164 or the equivalent or permission of the in- 
structor. Conference Gjurse for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Lec- 
tures and special assignments, dealing with Middle Eastern institutions in the nine- 
teenth and twentieth centuries. (Rivlin.) 

H. 166. The French Revolution. (2) 

First semester. The Enlightenment and the Old Regime in France; the revolutionary 

uprisings from 1789 to 1799. (Gordon.) 

H. 167. Nafoleonic Europe. (2) 

Second semester. European Developments from the rise of Napoleon to the Congress 

of Vienna. (Gordon.) 

H. 171, 172. Europe in the Nineteenth Century, 1815-1919. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, or H. 53, 54. A study of the 
political, economic, social, and cultural development of Europe from the Congress of 
Vienna to the First World War. (Bauer.) 

H. 175, 176. Eurofe in the World. Setting of the Twentieth Century. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Summer School (2). Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, or H. 53, 54. 
A study of political, economic, and cultural developments in twentieth century Europe 
with special emphasis on the factors involved in the two World Wars and their 
global impacts and significance. (Prange.) 

H. J 85, 186. History of the British Empire. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. H. 186, Summer School (2). Prerequisite, H. I, 2, or 
H. 53, 54. First semester, the development of England's Mercantilist Empire and its 
fall in the war for American Independence (1783); second semester, the rise of the 
Second British Empire and the solution of the problem of responsible self-government 
(1783-1867), the evolution of the British Empire into a Commonwealth of Nations, 
and the development and problems of the dependent Empire. (Gordon.) 

H. J 87. History of Canada. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, or H. 53, 54. A history 
of Canada, with special emphasis on the nineteenth century and upon Canadian rela- 
tions with Great Britain and the United States. (Gordon.) 

H. 189. Constitutional History of Great Britian. (3) 

Second semester. A survey of constitutional development in England with emphasis 
on the real property aspects of feudalism, the growth of the common law, the develop- 
ment of Parliament, and the expansion of liberties of the individual. (Gordon.) 

H. 191. History of Russia. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, H. 1, 2, or the equivalent. A history of Russia from the 

earliest times to the present day. (Bauer.) 

H. 192. Foreign Policy of the USSR. (3) 

Second semester. Summer School (2). Prerequisite, H. 191. A survey of Russian 
foreign policy in the historical perspective, with special emphasis on the period of the 
USSR. Russian aims, expansion, and conflicts with the western powers of Europe, 
the Near and Middle East, and the Far East will be studied. (Bauer.) 

< 108 



History 

H. 193, 194. History of Euro-pean Ideas in Modern Times. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, or U. 53, 54 or equivalent. Begin- 
ning with a review of the basic Western intellectual traditions as a heritage from the 
Ancient World, the course will present selected important currents of thought from the 
scientific revolution of the si.xteenth and seventeenth century down to the twentieth 
century. First semester through the eighteenth century. Second semester, nineteenth 
and twentieth centuries. (Stromberg.) 

H. 195. The Far East. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). A survey "of institutional, cultural and political 
aspects of the history of China and Japan and a consideration of present-day problems 
of the Pacilic area. (Parnier.) 

H. 196. Southeast Asia. (3) 

Second semester. Summer School (2). Prerequisites H. 1, 2 or M. 5, 6. The 
political, economic and cultural history of the new nations of Southeast Asia with 
emphasis on the colonial period and a view to understanding contemporary develop- 
ments. (Parmer.) 

H. 199. Proseniinar in Historical Writing. (3) 

First and second semesters. Discussions and term papers designed to acquaint the 
student with the methods and problems of research and presentation. The students 
will be encouraged to examine those phases of history in which they are most interested. 
Required of historj' majors in junior or senior year. (Bauer, Stromberg, Riddleberger.) 

For Graduates 

H. 200. Research. 0-6') 

Credit proportioned to amount of work. Arranged. Required of all candidates for 

degrees. (Staff.) 

H. 201. Seminar in American History. (3) 

First and second semester. Stammer School (2). (Staff.) 

H. 202. Historical Literature. (3) 

First and second semesters. Summer School (2). Assignments in various selected fields 
of historical literature and bibliography to meet the requirements of qualified graduate 
students who need more intensive concentration. (Staff.) 

H. 205, 206. Topics in American Economic and Social History. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Readings and conferences on the critical and source ma- 
terials explaining our social and economic evolution. (Chatelain.) 

H. 208. Topics in Recent American History. (3) 

First and second semesters. Selected readings, research, and conferences on important 

topics in United States history from 1900 to the present. (Merrill.) 

H. 211. The Colonial Period in American History. (3) 

First semester. Readings and conferences designed to familiarize the student with some 

of the sources and the classical literature of American colonial history. (Ferguson.) 

109 ► 



History 

H. 212. Period of the American Revolution. (3) 

Second semester. Readings and conferences designed to familiarize the student with 
some of the critical literature and soxirces of the period of the American Revolution. 

(Ferguson.) 
H.215. The Old South. (3) 

Readings and conferences designed to familiarize the student with some of the standard 
sources and the classical literature of the ante-bellum South. (Riddleberger.) 

H. 216. The American Civil War. (3) 

A seminar in the sources and problems of the history of the American Civil War. 
Military and political problems are emphasized. (Sparks.) 

H. 217. Reconstruction and Its Aftermath. (3) 

A seminar on problems resulting from the Civil War. Political, social and economic 
reconstruction in South and North; projection of certain post-war attitudes and problems 
into the present. (Merrill.) 

H. 221, 222. History of the West. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Summer School (2, 2). Readings and conferences designed 
to give the student an acquaintance with some of the more important sources and some 
of the most significant literature of the advancing American frontier. (Gewehr.) 

H. 233, 234. Topics in American Intellectual History. (3, 3) 
Readings and conferences on selected phases of American thought, vidth emphasis on 
religious traditions, social and political theory, and development of American ideas. 

(Beard.) 

H. 245. Topics in Latin American History. (3) 

Selected readings, research, and conferences on important topics in Latin American 

history. (Crosman.) 

H. 250. Seminar in European History. (3) 

First and second semesters. Summer School (2). (Bauer.) 

H. 251. Topics in Greek Civilization. (3) 

Readings and conferences designed to acquaint the students with selected topics and 

sources in Greek and Hellenistic history. (Jashemski.) 

H. 253. Topics in Roman History. (3) 

Readings and conferences designed to acquaint the student with selected topics and 

sources in Roman history. (Jashemski.) 

H. 255. Medieval Culture and Society. (3) 

Readings and conferences designed to acquaint the student with the important litera- 
ture and interpretations on such topics as feudalism, the medieval Church, schools and 
universities, Latin and vernacular literature, art and architecture (Jashemski.) 

H. 265. Prohlems in Diplomatic History of the Middle East. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisites, H. 163, 164 or H. 165 or the equivalent. Studies 
involving the international relations of the Middle East. A knowledge of French and/or 
another foreign language is required or permission of the instructor. (Rivlin.) 

•^ 110 



Lihrary Science 

H. 282. Prohlenis in the History of World War II. (3) 

Investigation of various aspects of the Second World War, including military opera- 
tions, diplomatic phases, and political and economic problems of the war and its 
aftermath. (Prange.) 

H. 285, 286. Topics in the History of Modern England and Great 

Britain. (3, 3) 
Readings and conferences on the documentary and literary materials dealing with the 
transformation of England and the growth and evolution of the British Empire since 
1763. (Gordon.) 

H. 287. Historiography. (3) 

First and second semesters. Readings and occasional lectiues on the historical writing, 
the evolution of critical standards, the rise of auxiliary sciences, and the works of 
selected masters. The work of the course includes field trips to the Library of Con- 
gress and the National Archives. Required of all candidates for advanced degrees. 

C Sparks.) 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Professor and Head: Rovelstad. 

Assistant Professors: Turner, Urban. 

Instructors: Baehr, Carper, Donahue, Hayes, Phillips, Pierson, Wedemeyer. 

L. S. 1,2. Library Methods. 0,1^ 
First and second semesters. 

These introductory courses are intended to help students to use hbraries with greater 
facility and effectiveness. Instruction, given in the form of lectures and practical work, 
is designed to interpret the library and its resoiorces to the students. The courses con- 
sider the classification of books in libraries, the card catalog, periodical literatvu:e and 
indexes, and certain essential reference books which will be found helpful throughout 
the college course and in later years. (Staff.) 

L. S. lOlS. School Library Administration. (3) 

No prerequisite. The organization and maintenance of effective library ser\'ice in the 

modem school. Planning and equipping library quarters, purpose of the library in the 

school, standards, instruction in the use of books and libraries, training student assistants, 

acquisition of materials, repair of books, publicity, exhibits, and other practical 

problems. 

L. S. 102S. Cataloging and Classification. (3) 

No prerequisite. Study and practice in classifying books and making dictionary catalog 
for school Hbraries. Study of simplified forms as used in the Children's Catalog, Stand- 
ard Catalog for High School Libraries, and Wilson printed cards. 

L. S. 103S. Book Selection for School Libraries. (3) 

No prerequisite. Principles of book selection as applied to school hbraries. Practice 
in the effective use of book selection aids in the preparation of book Usts. Evaluating 
of publishers, editions, translations, format, etc. 

Ill ► 



Mathematics 

L. S. 104S. Reference and Bihliography for School Libraries. (4) 
No prerequisite. Evaluation, selection, and use of standard tools, such as encyclopedias, 
dictionaries, periodical indexes, atlases, and yearbooks for school libraries. Study of 
bibliographical procedures and forms. 

L. S. 111. Introduction to Fundamentals of Special Library Service. (3) 
No prerequisite. An introductory course of library methods as applied to an organiza- 
tion in which the primary function of the library is bibliographic control of material 
pertinent to the specialized field of the organization. A course planned to train in gen- 
eral library methods a person who already is a specialist in some particular phase of 
library service. 

MATHEMATICS 

Professor and Acting Head: Jackson. 

Professors: Mayor CP-T.^, Martin, Stellmacher. 

Research Professors: Diaz* Montroll* Weinstein.* 

Associate Professors: Fullerton, Good, Ludford. 

Associate Research Professors: Douglis,* Payne.* 

Assistant Professors: Brace, Ehrlich, Horvath, Hummel, Rosen. 

Assistant Research Professor: Pucci.* 

Instructors: Brewster, Dyer, Esser, Pusaro, Hsu, Kearney, Lefson (P.T.'), Lu Mar, 

MacCarthy, McClay, Paley, Raleigh, Shepherd, Smith, Zemel. 
Assistant Instructors: Bakshi QP.T.^, Berry QP.T.^, Bldkley (P.T.'), Burda, Hen- 

ney (P.T.'), Hill (P.T.'), Kline (P'.T.'), Koo (P.T.'), Tihery (.P.T.:), 

Wahba CP.T.'), Wilson (,P-T.:i. 

The Mathematics Department Colloquium meets frequently throughout 
the academic year for reports on current research by the resident staff, visit- 
ing lecturers, and graduate students. In addition the Institute for Fluid Dy- 
namics and Applied Mathematics Colloquium meets at frequent intervals for 
reports on research in those fields. All colloquium meetings are open to the 
public. 

The local chapter of Pi Mu Epsilon, national honorary mathematics fra- 
ternity, under the guidance of the faculty advisor, Dr. MacCarthy, meets 
regularly for the discussion of mathematical topics of interest to the under- 
graduate. The programs are open to the public. 

The following courses are open to students who offer at least one unit of 
algebra for entrance: Math. 1, 5, or 10. 

The foUowang course is open to students who offer two or more units of 
algebra for entrance: Math. 18. 



* Member of the Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics. 

-< 112 



Mathematics 

Students are enrolled in Math. 5, 10, or 18 provided they pass the Mathe- 
matics section of the general classification test given to incoming students 
during registration. Students who fail this test should enroll in Math. if 
their curriculum calls for Math. 5 or 10, and in Math. 1 if their curriculum calls 
for Math. 18. 

In general students should enroll in only one of the course sequences. 
Math. 5, 10-11, 18-19. In case this rule is not followed, proper assignment of 
credit will be made upon application to the Department of Mathematics. The 
following are listed as typical situations: 

Math. 5, 10, 18. Credit in only one course: the one enrolled in latest. 
Math. 11, 18. Math. 11-2 credits; Math. 18-5 credits. 

Math. 0. Basic Mathematics. (0) 

First and second semesters. Recommended for students whose curriculum calls for 
Math. 5 or 10 and who fail the qualifying examination for these courses. The funda- 
mental principles of algebra. Special fee $30. (Smith and Staff.) 

Math. 1. Introdtictor)' Algebra. (0) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, one unit of algebra. Recommended for stu- 
dents whose curriculum calls for Math. 18 and who fail the qualifying examination 
for this course. A review of the topics covered in a second course in algebra. Special 
fee $30. (Smith and Staff.) 

Math. 2. Solid Geometry. (0) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, one unit each of algebra and plane geometr)'. 
Open to students who enter deficient in solid geometry. Students in the College of 
Education may be granted two credits for Math. 2. Lines, planes, cylinders, cones, the 
sphere and polyhedra, primary emphasis on mensuration. Intended for engineers and 
science students. (Brewster and Staff.) 

Math. 3. Fundamentals of Mathematics. (4) 

First and second semesters. This course is open to all students and is designed to give 
an introduction to mathematical thinking. Content: logical structure for several ele- 
mentary' mathematical systems, historical advances in typical phases of mathematics and 
their role in world development, famous unsolvable problems, currently unsolved prob- 
lems, applications of mathematics to other fields of learning. (Ehrlich and Staff.) 

Math. 5. Business Algebra. (3) 

First and second semesters. Summer School. Prerequisite, one vmit of algebra. Open 
only to students in the College of Business and Public Administration, the College of 
Agriculture, the College of Military Science, and the Department of Industrial Edu- 
cation. Note regulation above in case student enrolls in more than one of the courses. 
Math. 5, 10, 18. Fundamental operations, fractions, ratio and proportion, linear 
equations, exponents, logarithms, percentage, trade discount, simple interest, bank dis- 
count, true discount, and promissory notes. (Shepherd and Staff'.) 

Math. 6. Mathematics of Finance. (3) 

First and second semesters. Summer School. Prerequisite, Math 5 or equivalent. Re- 
quired of students in the College of Business and Public Administration, and open 

113 ► 



Mathematics 

to students in the College of Arts and Sciences only for elective credit. Line diagrams, 
compound interest, simple interest, ordinarj' annuities, general annuities, deferred 
annuities, annuities due, perpetuities, evaluation of bonds, amortization, and sinking 
fvmds. (Shepherd and Staff.) 

Math. 10. Algehra. (3) 

First and second semesters. Summer School. Prerequisite, one unit each of algebra 
and plane geometry. Open to biological, pre-medical, pre-dental, and general Arts and 
Sciences students. Note regulation above, in case student enrolls in more than one of 
the courses, Math. 5, 10, 18. Fundamental operations, factoring, fractions, linear equa- 
tions, exponents and radicals, quadratic equations, progressions, logarithms, permuta- 
tions and combinations, probability, mathematics of investment. 

(MacCarthy and Staff.) 

Math. 11. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry. (3) 

First and second semesters. Svmimer School. Prerequisite, Math. 10 or equivalent. 
Open to biological, pre-medical, pre-dental, and general Arts and Sciences students. This 
course is not recommended for students planning to enroll in Math. 20. Note regu- 
lation above, in case student enrolls in more than one sequence, Math. 10-11, 18-19. 
Trigonometric functions, identities, addition formulas, solution of triangles, coordinates, 
locus problems, the straight line and circle, conic sections, graphs. 

(MacCarthy and Staff.) 

Math. 13. Elements of Mathematical Statistics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 10 or equivalent. Frequency distributions, aver- 
ages, moments, measures of dispersion, the normal curve, curve fitting, regression and 
correlation. (Hsu.) 

Math. 18, 19. Elementary Mathematical Analysis, (5, 5) 

First and second semesters. Stunmer School. Prerequisites, high school algebra com- 
pleted and plane geometry. Open to students in the physical sciences, engineering, 
and education. Note regulation above, in case student enrolls in more than one of the 
course sequences, Math. 5, 10-11, 18-19. The elementary mathematical functions, 
composed of algebraic, exponential, trigonometric types and their inverses, are studied 
by means of their properties, their graphical representations, the identities intercon- 
necting them, the solution of equations involving them. The beginning techniques 
of calculus are included. Other material may be selected from such topics as permu- 
tations, combinations, probability, statistics, determinants, vectors, matrices, and solid 
analytic geometry. (Ehrlich and Staff.) 

Math. 20, 21. Calculus. (4, 4) 

Three lectures and two one-hour drill periods a vi^eek, first and second semesters. Siun- 
mer School. Prerequisite, Math. 19 or equivalent. Open to students in engineering, 
education, and the physical sciences. Limits, derivatives, differentials, maxima and 
minima, curve sketching, rates, curvature, kinematics, integration vdth geometric and 
physical applications, partial derivatives, space geometry, multiple integrals, infinite 
series. (Rosen and Staff.) 

Math. 64. Differential Equations for Engineers. (3) 

First and second semesters. Simimer School. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. 
Required of students in mechanical and electrical engineering. Differential equations 
of the first and second order with emphasis on their engineering applications. 

(Ludford and Staff.) 

M 114 



Mathematics 
A. ALGEBRA 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 100. Higher Algebra. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Math 21 or equivalent. The algebra of vector spaces 
and matrices, with emphasis upon those aspects of interest to students in applied 
mathematics. Cl^afcighj 

Math. 103, 104. Introduction to Modern Algebra. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. For Math. 104, the usual prerequisite of Math. 
103 may be w^aived upon consent of instructor. In Math. 103 are studied the basic 
concepts of abstract algebra: integral domains, divisibility, congruences; fields, ordered 
fields; the fields of rational numbers, of real numbers, of complex numbers; polynomial 
domains over a field, including classical results on the theory of polynomial equations 
with rational, real, or complex coefficients; unique factorization domains, irreducibility 
criteria; rings. In Math. 104 are studied groups, vector spaces, linear transformations, 
matrices. (MacCarthy.) 

Math. 106. Introduction to the Theory of Numbers. (3) 

Summer School (2). Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Integers, divisibility, 
Euclid's algorithm, Diophantine equations, prime numbers, Moebius function, congru- 
ences, residues. (Good.) 

For Graduates 

Math. 200, 201. Modern Algebra. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 103 or consent of instructor. Groups, rings, fields, algebraic num- 
bers, Galois theory. (Ehrlich.) 

Math. 202. Matrix Theory. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 103 or consent of instructor. The theory of 

vectors and matrices with applications. (Ehrlich.) 

Math. 204, 205. To'pological Growps. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An introductory course in abstract groups, topologi- 
cal spaces, and the study of collections of elements enjoying both these properties. The 
concept of a uniform space will be introduced and studied. The representation problem 
will be considered together with the subject of Lie groups. (Good.) 

Math. 271. Selected Topics in Algebra. (3) 
(Arranged.) 

B. ANALYSIS 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Math. 110, HI. Advanced Calcidus. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Limits and continuity of real and complex func- 
tions, Riemann integration, partial differentiation, line and surface integrals, infinite 

115 ► 



Mathematics 

series, elements of vector analysis, elements of complex variable theory. Emphasis on 
problems and techniques. CHummel.) 

Math. 114. Differential Equations. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 110 or equivalent. Ordinary differential equa- 
tions, symbolic methods, successive approximations, solutions in series, orthogonal func- 
tions, Bessel functions, Sturmian theory. CMartin.^ 

Math. 115. Partial Differential Equations. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 114. Partial differential equations of first and second order, char- 
acteristics, boundary value problems, systems of equations, applications. (Martin.) 

Math. 116. Introduction to Complex Variable Theory. (3) 
Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Open to students in engineering and the physical 
sciences. Graduate students in mathematics should enroll in Math. 286. Fundamental 
operations in complex numbers, differentiation and integration, sequences and series, 
power series, analytic functions, conformal mapping, residue theory, special functions. 

(Ludford.) 

Math. 117. Fourier Series. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 114 or equivalent. Representation of functions by series of ortho- 
gonal functions. Applications to the solution of boundary value problems of some 
partial differential equations of physics and engineering. (Ludford.) 



For Graduates 

Math. 212. Special Functions. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 287 or consent of instructor. Gamma function; 
second order differential equations in the complex domain, regular and irregular singu- 
larities; h3rpergeometric functions, Riemann's P- functions, Legendre functions, con- 
fluent hypergeometric functions, Whittaker functions, Bessel functions. (Diaz.) 

Math. 215, 216. Advanced Differential Equations. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 100 and 111 and 114, or consent of instructor. Existence and uni- 
queness theorems for systems of ordinary differential equations and for partial differ- 
ential equations, characteristic theory, reduction to normal forms, the methods of 
finite differences. (Horvath.) 

Math. 217. Existence Theorems in Differential Equations. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 114. Recent results on the existence of solutions 

of quasi-linear systems of partial differential equations. (Horvath.) 

Math. 218. Integral Equations. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Math. 100 and 287, or consent of instructor. Integral 
equations of the first and second kind, Volterra's equation, Abel's equation and frac- 
tional differentiation; the Fredholm theory, the Hilbert-Schmidt theory, Mercer's 
theorem, expansion in orthonormal series; existence theorems of potential theory and 
other applications. (Douglis.) 

■< 116 



Mathematics 

Math. 272. Selected Topics in Analysis. (3) 
(Arranged). 

Math. 280, 281. Linear Spaces. O, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 287 or equivalent. Linear vector spaces and their topologies, linear 

operations and transformations and their inverses, Banach and Hilbert spaces. (Brace.) 

Math. 286, 287. Theory of Functions. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 1 1 1 or equivalent. Basic topics in real and complex variable theory, 
real and complex number systems, point sets on the line and in space, continuity, 
Riemann and Stieltjes integrals, Cauchy integral theorem, residues, power series, 
analytic functions, introduction to Lebesgue measure and integration. (Rosen.) 

Math. 288. Theory of Analytic Functions. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 287 or a course in complex variables. Advanced 
topics in complex function theory, properties of power series, entire functions, con- 
formal mapping, classification of singularities, harmonic functions. (Stellmacher.) 

Math. 289. Measure of Integration. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 287 or a course in real variables. Set functions, 
abstract theory of measure, differentiability properties and absolute continuity of set 
functions, measurable functions, abstract integration theory, introduction to linear 
spaces. (Brace.) 

C. GEOMETRY AND TOPOLOGY 

Vor Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Math. 122, 123. Elementary Topology. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Open and closed sets, elementary topolog)' of the 
straight line and the Euclidean plane, the Jordan Curve Theorem and its applications, 
simple connectivity. (Rosen.) 

Math. 124, 125. Introduction to Projective Geometry. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Elemental)' projective geometry largely from the 
analytic approach, projective transformations, cross ratio, harmonic division, projective 
coordinates, projective theory of conies, Laguerre's definition of angle. (Jackson.) 

Math. 126, 127. Introduction to Differential Geometry and Tensor Analy- 
sis. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. The differential geometry of curves and surfaces 
with the use of vector and tensor methods, curvature and torsion, moving frames, 
curvilinear coordinates, the fundamental differential forms, covariant derivatives, in- 
trinsic geometry, curves on a surface, applications to problems in dynamics, mechanics, 
electricity, and relati\'ity. (Jackson.) 

Math. 128, 129. Higher Geometry. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or consent of instructor. Math. 128 is not a prerequisite for 
Math. 129. Open to students in the College of Education. This course is designed for 
students preparing to teach geometry in high school. The first semester is devoted to 

117 ► 



Mathematics 

the modem geometry of the triangle, circle and sphere. In the second semester em- 
phasis is placed on the axiomatic development of Euclidean and non-Euchdean 
geometry. (MayorO 

For Graduates 

Math. 220, 221. Differential Geometry. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. Ill and 152, or consent of instructor. Curves and surfaces, geom- 
etry in the large, the Gauss-Bonnet formula, surfaces of constant curvature. (Jackson.) 

Math. 223, 224. Algebraic Topology. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 103 and 123, or consent of instructor. Homology, cohomology, 

and homotopy theory of complexes and spaces. (Fullerton.) 

Math. 225, 226. Set-theoretic Topology. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 123 or consent of instructor. Foundations of mathematics based on 
a set of axioms, metric spaces, convergence and connectivity properties of point sets, 
continua and continuous curves, the topology of the plane. (FuUerton.) 

Math. 273. Selected Topics in Geometry and Topology. (3) 
(Arranged). 

D. PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Math. 130. Prohahility. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Combinatory analysis, total, com- 
pound, and inverse probability, continuous distributions, theorems of Bemoidli and 
Laplace, theory of errors. (Hsu.) 

Math. 132. Mathematical Statistics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Frequency distributions and 
their parameters, multivariate analysis and correlation, theory of sampling, analysis of 
variance, statistical inference. (Hsu.) 

Math. 133. Advanced Statistical Analysis. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite Math. 132 or equivalent. Advanced methods in corre- 
lation analysis, regression analysis, analysis of variance, and sequential analysis, curve 
fitting, testing of hypotheses, non-parametric testing, machine tabulation in statistics. 

(Hsu.) 

E. HISTORY 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Math. 140. History of Mathematics. (3) 

Summer School (2). Prerequisite, Math. 21 or consent of instructor. A survey of the 
historical development of mathematics and of the mathematicians who have contributed 
to that development. (Jackson.) 

M 118 



Mathematics 
F. MATHEMATICAL METHODS 

T^OT Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Math. 150, 151. Advanced Mathematics for Engineers and Physicists. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. An introduction to advanced mathematical 
methods and their application to the technical problems of physics and engineering. 
Topics include Fourier series, matrices, ordinary and partial differential equations of 
applied mathematics, numerical methods, Bessel functions, complex variables, opera- 
tional calculus. (Esser.) 

Math. 152. Vector Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Algebra and calculus of vectors and apphca- 

tions. (Esser.) 

Math. 153. Operational Calcidiis. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Operational solutions of ordi- 
nary and partial differential equations, Fourier and Laplace transforms. (Esser.) 

Math. 155. Numerical Analysis. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 110 and 114, or consent of instructor. A brief 
sur\'ey of computing machines, study of errors involved in numerical computations, 
the use of desk machines and tables, nimierical solution of polynomial and trans- 
cendental equations, interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, ordinary 
diflFerential equations, systems of linear equations. (Good.) 

Math. 156. Programming for High Speed Computers. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. General characteristics of 
high-speed automatic computers; logic of programming, preparation of flow charts, pre- 
liminary and final coding; scaling, use of floating point routines; construction and 
use of subroutines; use of machine for mathematical operations and for automatic 
coding. Each student will prepare and, if possible, run a problem on a high speed 
computer. (Davis.) 

For Graduates 

Math. 250. Tensor Analysis. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Math. 100 and 152, or consent of instructor. Algebra 
and calculus of tensors, Riemannian geometry and its extensions, differential in- 
variants; apphcations to physics and engineering, and in particular the theory of 
relativity. (Stellmacher.) 

Math. 251. Hilhert Space. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Math. 100 and 287, or consent of instructor. The orig- 
inal and general Hilbert space, scalar product, metric, strong and weak convergence, 
linear functionals, symmetric operators, complete continuit)', eigenvalues, orthonormal 
systems, Schwartz-Bessel inequality and Parseval identity, eigenvalues in sub-spaces, 
spectral theorem. (\\'einstein.) 

119 ► 



Mathematics 

Math. 252. Variational Methods. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 260 or consent o£ instructor. The Euler- 
Lagrange equation, minimal principles in mathematical physics, estimation of capacity, 
torsional rigidity and other physical quantities; s3Tnmetrisation, isoperimetric in- 
equalities, estimation of eigenvalues; the minimax principle. CP^yne.) 

Math. 255, 256. Advanced Numerical Analysis. QS, 3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 100 and 155, or consent of instructor. Review of numerical 
differentiation and integration, solution of ordinary differential equations, stability, 
accuracy, use of high-speed digital machines, properties of elliptic, hyperbolic and 
parabolic partial differential equations, conversion of partial differential equations to 
partial difference equations, stability and convergence of methods for solving partial 
difference equations, rates of convergence of relaxation methods, gradient methods, 
iterative methods, the method of characteristics. General methods of solving problems, 
existence and uniqueness theorems for difference equations associate with partial 
differential equations, stability of solutions, perturbation, iterative procedures, steepest 
descent, eigenvalue problems. (Davis.) 

G. MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Math. 160, 161. Analytic Mechanics. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Statics, kinematics, dynamics of a particle, 
elementary celestial mechanics, Lagrangian equations for dynamical systems of one, 
two, and three degrees of freedom, Hamilton's principle, the Hamilton-Jacobi partial 
differential equation. CMartin.) 

For Graduates 

Math. 260. Foundations of Mathematical Physics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. General survey of mathematical 
methods and results employed in various branches of mathematical physics. The fol- 
lowing are among the general topics to be discussed: vector analysis and integral 
identities (Green-Gauss, Stokes, etc.), ordinary and partial differential and difference 
equations, integral equations, formulation of typical boundary and initial value prob- 
lems and indication of the main methods of solution. (Diaz.) 

Math. 261, 262. Fluid Dynamics. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 260 or consent of instructor. Basic kinematic and dynamic con- 
cepts, equation of continuity, velocity, potential and stream function, vorticity, Ber- 
noulli's equation; perfect incompressible fluids, Helmholtz' vorticity theorems, plane 
hydrodynamics, Kutta-Joukowski theory of Uft, conformal mapping, vortices and 
vortex streets, Prandtl-Munk theory of finite wdngs; viscous fluids, Navier-Stokes equa- 
tions, boundary layer theory; perfect gases, method of characteristics, subsonic, tran- 
sonic, and supersonic flows, hydrograph method, theory of shock waves. (Ludford.) 

Math. 263, 264. Elasticity. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 100 and 260, or consent of instructor. Stress and strain, nuclei 

of strain, compatibility equations, Saint-Venant principle, bending, torsion and flexure 

-< 120 



Mathetnatics 

of beams, complex variable methods, Airy's stress function, axial symmetry, strain 
energy and potential energ)', buckling, bending, and vibration of plates and shells. 

(Payne.) 

Math. 265. Hyperbolic Differential Equations. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 260 or consent of instructor. Two variables, 
Cauchy's problem, characteristics, Riemann's method, properties of the Riemann 
function, quasi-linear equations and canonical hyperbolic systems, wave equation in 
n-dimensions, methods of Hadamard and Ricsz, Euler-Poisson equation and the singular 
problems, Huygcns' principle. CStellmacher.) 

Math. 266. Elliptic Differential Equations. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 260 or consent of instructor. The equations of 
Laplace and Poisson, flux, the theorems of Gauss and Green, potentials of volume 
and surface distributions, harmonic functions. Green's function and the problems of 
Dirichlet and Neumann; linear elliptic equations with variable coefficients, in par- 
ticular the equations of Stokes and Beltrami; fundamental solutions, the principle of 
the maximum, and boundary value problems; introduction to the theory of non- 
linear equations. (Pucci.) 

Math. 274. Selected Topics in Applied Mathematics. (3) 
(Arranged.) 

H. FOR TEACHERS OF MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Math. 181. Foundations of Number Theory. (3) 

Summer school. Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instruc- 
tor. Designed primarily for those enrolled in programs with emphasis in the teaching 
of mathematics and science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in the 
physical sciences, since the course content is usually covered elsewhere in their 
curriculum. Axiomatic development of the real nimibers. Elementary number theory. 

(Jackson.) 

Math. 182. Foundations of Algebra. (3) 

Summer school. Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instruc- 
tor. Designed primarily for those enrolled in programs with emphasis in the teaching 
of mathematics and of science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in the 
physical sciences, since the course content is usually covered elsewhere in their 
curriculum. Modem ideas in algebra and topics in the theory of equations. 

(Ehrlich.) 

Math. 183. Foundations of Geometry. (3) 

Summer School. Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instruc- 
tor. Designed primarily for those enrolled in programs with emphasis in the teaching 
of mathematics and science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in the 
physical sciences, since the course content is usually coA'ered elsewhere in their 
curriculum. A study of the axioms for Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometrj'. 

(Jackson.) 

121 ► 



Astronomy, Microhiology 

Math. 184. Foundations of Analysis. (3) 

Summer school. Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instruc- 
tor. Designed primarily for those enrolled in programs with emphasis in the teaching 
of mathematics and science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in the 
physical sciences, since the course content is usually covered elsewhere in their 
curriculum. A study of the limit concept and the calculus. (Previous knowledge of 
calculus is not required.) CGood.) 

I. RESEARCH 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Math. 190, 191. Honors Reading Course. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, permission by the Department to work for honors. Selected reading 
on topics in mathematics of special interest to the student imder the guidance of a 
staff member. CStaff.) 

For Graduates 

Math. 298. Proseminar in Research. (J) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, one semester of graduate work in mathematics. A 
seminar devoted to the foundations of mathematics, including mathematical logic, 
axiom systems, and set theory. CFullerton.) 

Math. 300. Research. 
CArranged.) 

ASTRONOMY 

Astr. 1,2. Astronomy. (3, 3) 

An elementary course in descriptive astronomy. 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Professor and Head: Faber. 
Professors: Hansen, Pelczar. 
Visiting Professor: Warren. 
Associate Professors: Laffer, Doetsch. 

Microh. 1 . General Microhiology. (4') 

First and second semesters. Summer School. Two lecture and two two-hour labora- 
tory periods a week. The physiology, culture and diflEerentiation of microorganisms. 
Fundamental principles of microbiology in relation to man and his environment. 
Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Pelczar.) 

Microh. 5. Advanced General Microhiology. (4) 

Second semester. Summer school. Two lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisites, Microh. 1 and Chem. 3. Emphasis wdll be given to the funda- 
mental procedvires and techniques used in the field of microbiology. Lectures will 
consist of the explanation of various procedures. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Laffer.) 

-< 122 



Microbiology 

Microb. 51. Household Microbiology. (3) 

Second semester. Two lecture and one two-hour laboratory periods a week. For home 
economics students only. Morphology and physiology of the bacteria, yeasts, and molds. 
Application of the effect of chemical and physical agents in the control of microbial 
growth. Relationship of microbiology to home sanitation, food preservation and manu- 
facture; personal and community hygiene. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Doetsch.) 

Microb. 55. Sanitary Bacteriology for Engineers. C2) 

First semester. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week. For junior and 
senior students in engineering only. Discussion of the fundamental principles of 
bacteriology and their relationship to water supply, sewage disposal, and other sanitary 
problems. Demonstration of these principles in the laboratory. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

(Laffer.) 
Microb. 60, 62. Microbiological Literature. Ch O 

First and second semesters. One lecture period a week. Prerequisite, a major in micro- 
biology with junior standing. Introduction to periodical literature, methods, inter- 
pretation and presentation of reports. (Doetsch.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Microb. 101. Pathogenic Microbiology. (4) 

First semester. Two lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
Microb. 5. The role of microorganisms in the diseases of man and animals with em- 
phasis upon the differentiation and culture of bacterial species, types of disease, modes 
of disease transmission; prophylactic, therapeutic and epidemiological aspects. Laboratory 
fee, $10.00. (Faber.) 

Microb. 103. Serology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
Microb. 101. Infection and resistance; principles and types of immunity; hypersensitive- 
ness. Fundamental techniques of major diagnostic immunological reactions and their 
application. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Faber.) 

Microb. 104. History of Microbiology. (I) 

First semester. One lecture period a week. Prerequisite, a major or minor in micro- 
biology. History and integration of the fundamental discoveries of the science. The 
modem aspects of cytology, taxonomy, fermentation, and immunity in relation to early 
theories. (Doetsch.) 

Microb. 105. Clinical Methods. (4) 

First semester. Two lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. A practical course designed to integrate clinical laboratory pro- 
cedures in terms of hospital and public health demands. Examination of sputxmi, feces, 
blood, spinal fluids, urine, etc. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Faber.) 

Microb. 108. E-pideniiology and Ptiblic Health. (2) 

Second semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, Microb. 1. History, character- 
istic features, and epidemiology of the important communicable diseases; public health 
aspects of man's struggle for existence; public health administration and responsibilities; 
vital statistics. (Faber.) 

123 ► 



Microhiology 

Microh. 12 L Advanced Methods. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, consent of instructor. The application of specialized equipment and techniques 
for analysis of bacteriological problems. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

(Hansen and Pelczar.) 

Microh. 131. Food and Sanitary Microhiology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
Microb. 1. The relationship of microorganisms to fresh and preserved food and methods 
of control. Bacteriological and public health aspects of water supplies and sewage dis- 
posal, restaurant and plant sanitation, insect and rodent control. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

(LafiFer.) 
Microh. 122. Dairy Microhiology. (4) 

First semester. Two lecture and two two-hovir laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
Microb. 1. Relation of bacteria, yeasts, and molds to milk, cream, butter, ice cream, 
cheese, and other dairy products. Standard methods of examination, public health re- 
quirements, plant sanitation. Occasional inspection trips. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

(Doetsch.) 

Microh. 135. Soil Microhiology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequi- 
site, Microb. 1. The role played by microorganisms in the soil; nitrification, denitrifica- 
tion, nitrogen-fixation, and decomposition processes; cycles of elements; relationships of 
microorganisms to soil fertility. Laboratory fee, $10.00. CHansen.) 

Microh. 150. Microhial Physiology. (2) 

Second semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, eight credits in Micro- 
biology. Aspects of the growth, death, and energy transactions of microorganisms are 
considered, as well as the effects of the physical and chemical environment thereon. 

(Doetsch.) 

Microh. 161. Systematic Bacteriology. (2) 

First semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, 8 credits in microbiology. 
History of bacterial classification; genetic relationships; international codes of nomen- 
clature; bacterial variation as it affects classification. CHansen.) 

Microh. 181. Microhiological Prohlems. (3) 

First and second semesters. Simimer School. Prerequisites, 16 credits in microbiology. 
Registration only upon the consent of the instructor. This course is arranged to pro- 
vide qualified majors in microbiology and majors in allied fields an opportunity 
to pursue specific microbiological problems under the supervision of a member of the 
Department. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Faber.) 

For Graduates 

Microh. 201. Medical Mycology. (4) 

First semester. Two lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
30 credits in microbiology and allied fields. Primarily a study of the fungi associated 
with disease and practice in the methods of isolation and identification. Laboratory 
fee, $10.00. (Laffer.) 

< 124 



Microbiology 

Microh. 202. Genetics of Microorganisms. (2) 

Second semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An 
introduction to genetic principles and methodology applicable to microorganisms. 

(Hansen.) 

Microb. 204. Bacterial Metabolism. (2) 

First semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, 30 credits in microbiology 
and allied fields, including Chem. 161 and 162. Bacterial enzymes nutrition of auto- 
trophic and heterotrophic bacteria, bacterial growth factors, dissimilation of carbohy- 
drate and nitrogenous substrates. 

Microb. 206, 208. S'pecinl Topes, (i, i) 

First and second semesters. One lecture period a week. Prerequisite, 20 credits in 
microbiology. Presentation and discussion of fundamental problems and special sub- 
jects in the field of bacteriology. (Staff.) 

Microb. 210. Virology and Tissue Culture. (2) 

Second semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, Microb. 101 or equivalent. 
Characteristics and general properties of viruses and rickettsiae. Principles of tissue 
culture. (Warren.) 

Microb. 211. Virology and Tissue Culture Laboratory. (2) 

Second semester. Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Microb. 101 
or equivalent. Registration only upon consent of instructor. Laboratory methods in 
virology and tissue culture. Laboratory fee, $20.00. (Hilleman.) 

Microb. 214. Advanced Bacterial Metabolism. (I) 

Second semester. One lecture period a week. Prerequisite, Microb. 204 and consent 
of instructor. A discussion of recent advances in the field of bacterial metabolism with 
emphasis on metabolic pathways of microorganisms. (Pelczar.) 

Microb. 280. Seminar-Research Methods. (I) 

First semester. Discussions and reports prepared by majors in bacteriology engaged 
in current research; presentations of selected subjects dealing wdth recent advances in 
microbiology. (Staff.) 

Microb. 282. Seminar-Microbiological Literature. (I) 

Second semester. Presentation and discussion of current literature in microbiology. 

(Staff".) 
Microb. 291. Research. 

First and second semesters. Summer School. Credits according to work done. The in- 
vestigation is outlined in consultation with and pursued under the supervision of a 
senior staff member of the Department. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Staff.) 



125 



Music 

MUSIC 

Professor and Head: Ulrich. 

Professors: Grentzer, Randall. 

Associate Professors: Jordan, S-pringmann. 

Assistant Professors: Berman, Hayes, Henderson. 

Instructors: Bernstein, Green, Meyer, Traver. 

Assistant Instructor: deVermond. 

Music 1. Introduction to Music. C3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Required of all Music and Music Education 
majors in the first semester of the freshman year. Music 1 and Music 20 may not 
both be counted for credit. A study of the forms and styles of music, leading to an 
intelligent appreciation of the art and providing a foundation for more advanced 
courses in the Department of Music. (Jordan.) 

Music 4. Men's Glee Cluh. (I) 

First and second semesters. Open to any student who can qualify. May be taken 
until a total of six semester hoturs of credit has been earned; the music studied will 
cover a cycle of about six semesters. (Traver.) 

Music 5. Women's Chorus. (J) 

First and second semesters. Open to any student who can qualify. May be taken until 
a total of six semester hours of credit has been earned; the music studied will cover 
a cycle of about six semesters. (Hayes.) 

Music 6. Orchestra. (I) 

First and second semesters. Open to any student who can qualify. May be taken 
until a total of six semester hoius of credit has been earned; the music studied wiU 
cover a cycle of about six semesters. (Berman.) 

Music 7, 8. Theory of Music. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and three laboratory hours per week. A 
fundamental course in the elements of music. Study of rhythms, scales, chord 
structures, and tonalties through ear training, sight singing, and keyboard drill. The 
student must achieve a grade of B in Music 8 in order to register for Music 17 and 70. 

(Green.) 

Music 10. Band. (J) 

First and second semesters. Open to any student who can qualify. May be taken un- 
til a total of six semester hours of credit has been earned; the music studied will 
cover a cycle of about six semesters. (Henderson.) 

Music 15. Chafel Choir. (I) 

First and second semesters. Summer School. Open to all students in the University, 
subject to the Director's approval. The Choir wiU appear at services held in the 
Memorial Chapel. May be taken until a total of six semester hours of credit has been 
earned. (Springmann.) 

Music 16. Music Fundamentals for the Classroom Teacher. (3) 

First and second semesters. Open to students majoring in Elementary Education 

or Childhood Education; other students take Music 7. Music 7 and 16 may not both 

^ 126 



Music 

fee counted for credit. The fundamentals of music theory and practice, related to 
the needs of the classroom and kindergarten teacher, and organized in accord with 
the six-area concept of musical learning. (Travel.) 

Music 17, 18. Dictation and Sight Singing. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, completion of Music 8 with a grade of at 
least C. Students whose curriculum calls for Music 17 and 18 must take these courses 
concurrently with Music 70 and 71, respectively. Four laboratory hours per week. 
Harmonic, melodic, rhythmic, and contrapuntal dictation. Sight singing of two-, 
three-, and four-part music, and an introduction to clef reading. 

(Bernstein and Staff.) 

Music 20. Survey of Music Literature. (3) 

First and second semesters. This course may be taken by students who qualify to 
select courses within Elective Group II of the American Civilization Program. A 
study of the principles upon which music is based, and an introduction to the musical 
repertoires in America today. (Ulrich and Staff.) 

Music 21, 22. Class Voice. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Beginning course. T\vo two-hour laborator)' periods per 
week. Fundamentals of tone production and diction, and correct breathing as applied 
to singing. (Randall.) 

Music 23, 24. Class Piano. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Beginning course. Two two-hour laboratory' periods per 
week. Fundamentals of hand position, and technical problems related to acquiring 
facility at the piano. (Traver.) 

Music 70, 71. Harmony. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, completion of Music 8 with a grade of at 
least C. Students whose curriculum calls for Music 17 and 18 must take Music 17 
concurrently with Music 70, and Music 18 VAath Music 71. Three lectures and one 
laboratory hour per week. A review of music theory and a study of harmonic pro- 
gressions, triads, dominant sevenths and ninths in root positions and inversions. 
Altered and mixed chords, modulation, enharmonic intervals. Simple harmonizations 
and original composition. (Bernstein and Staff.) 

Music 80, 81. Class Study of Instruments. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Four laboratory hours per week. A study of the tech- 
niques of orchestral and band instruments. Practical experience on the instruments 
in class ensembles. Music 80, strings; Music 81, winds and percussion. 

(Berman, Henderson.) 
Music 120, 121. History of Music. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Music 1 or 20 and junior standing. A 
study of musical styles from their origins in western Europe to their present-dav 
manifestations. The interaction of music and other cultural activities. Music 120, the 
Greek period to Bach; Music 121, Bach to the present. (Jordan.) 

Music 141, 142. Musical Fonn. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Music 70 and 71. A study of the organiz- 
ing principles of musical composition, their interaction in musical forms, and their 

127 ► 



Music 

functions in different styles. Music 141, the phrase to the rondo; Music 142, the 
larger forms. (Jordan.) 

Music 143, 144. Comfosition. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Music 70 and 71. The principles of 
musical composition, and their application to the smaller forms. Original writing in 
nineteenth- and twentieth-century musical idioms for various media. 

Music 145, 146. Counterfoint. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Music 70 and 71. A course in eighteenth- 
century contrapuntal techniques. Study of devices of imitation in the invention 
and the choral prelude. Original woiiting in the smaller contrapuntal forms. 

CBemstein.) 

Music 147, 148. Orchestration. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Music 70 and 71. A study of the ranges, 
musical functions, and technical characteristics of the instruments, and their color 
possibilities in various combinations. Practical experience in orchestrating for small 
and large ensembles. (Jordan.) 

Music 150. Keyboard Harmony. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Music 70 and 71. One lecture and two laboratory 
hours per week. The application to the piano keyboard of the harmonic principles 
acquired in Music 70 and 71. Harmonization of melodies, improvisation and ac- 
companying, playing from dictation, and transposition. (Meyer.) 

Music 160, 161. Conducting. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Music 160 or the equivalent is prerequisite to Music 161. 
A laboratory course in conducting vocal and instrumental groups. Baton technique, 
score reading, rehearsal techniques, tone production, style, and interpretation. Music 
of all periods will be introduced. (Grentzer, Henderson.) 

Music 166. Survey of the Of era. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Music 120 and 121 or the equivalent. A study of the 

music, librettos, and composers of the standard operas. (Randall.) 

Music 167. Symphonic Music. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). Prerequisites, Music 120 and 121 or the 
equivalent. The study of orchestral music from the Baroque period to the present. 
The concerto, symphony, overture, and other forms are examined. (Jordan.) 

Music 168. Chamher Music. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Music 120 and 121 or the equivalent. The history 
and literature of chamber music from the early Baroque period to the present. Music 
for trio sonata, string quartet and quintet, and combinations of piano and string 
instruments is studied. (Ulrich.) 

Music 169. Choral Music. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Music 120 and 121 or the equivalent. The history and 
literature of choral music from the Renaissance to the present, with discussion of 
related topics such as Gregorian chant, vocal chamber music, etc. (Jordan.) 

M 128 



Applied Music 

APPLIED MUSIC 

A new student or one taking Applied Music for the first time at this 
University should register for Music X (Piano) or Music X (Violin), etc. 
He will receive the proper classification at the end of his first semester in 
the Department. Special fee of $40.00 per semester on basic music courses. 

Music 12, 13. Applied Music. (2-4 hours each course') 

First and second semesters. Freshman course. Two half-hour lessons and si.x prac- 
tice hours per week if taken for two hours credit; or one hour lesson and fifteen 
practice hours per week if taken for four hours credit. The four-hour course is for 
piano majors in the B. Music curriculum only. The student will register for Music 12 
(Piano) or Music 12 (Violin), etc., if taken for two hours credit; and Music 12D 
(Piano) if taken for four hours credit. The same principle applies to Music 13 
and Music 13D. Special fee of $40.00 per semester. (Staff.) 

Mmsic 52, 53. Applied Music. (2-4 hours each course) 

First and second semesters. Sophomore course. Two half-hour lessons and six nrac- 
tice hours per week if taken for two hours credit; or one hour lesson and fifteen 
practice hours per week if taken for four hours credit. The four-hour course is for 
instrumental majors in the B. Music curriculum only. Prerequisite, Music 13 (or 13D) 
on the same instrument. The student will register for Music 52 (Piano) or Music 52 
(Viohn), etc., if taken for two hours credit; and Music 52D (Piano) or Music 52D 
(Violin), etc., if taken for four hours credit. The same principle applies to Music 
53 and Music 5 3D. Special fee of $40.00 per semester. (Staff.) 

Music 112, 113. Applied Music. (2-4 hours each course) 

First and second semesters. Junior course. Two half-hour lessons and sLx practice 
hours per week if taken for two hours credit; or one hour lesson and fifteen practice 
hours per week if taken for four hours credit. The four-hour course is for instru- 
mental or vocal majors in the B. Music curriculum only. Prerequisite, Music 53 (or 
5 3D) on the same instrument. The student uall register for Music 112 (Piano) or 
Music 112 (Violin), etc., if taken for two hours credit; and Music 112D (Piano) or 
Music 11 2D (Violin), etc., if taken for four hours credit. The same principle applies to 
Music 113 and Music 113D. Special fee of $40.00 per semester. (Suff.) 

Mxisic 152, 153. Applied Music. (2-4 hours each course) 

First and second semesters. Senior course. Two half-hour lessons and six practice 
hours per week if taken for two hours credit; or one hour lesson and fifteen practice 
hours per week if taken for four hours credit. The four-hour course is for instru- 
mental or vocal majors in the B. Mus. curriculum only. Prerequisite, Music 113 (or 
11 3D) on the same instrument. The student will register for Alusic 152 (Piano) or 
Music 152 (Violin), etc., if taken for two hours crecht; and Music 152D (Piano) or 
Music 152D (Violin), etc., if taken for four hours credit. The same principle applies 
to Music 153 and Music 15 3D. Special fee of $40.00 per semester. (Staff.) 



129 



Fhilosofhy i 

PHILOSOPHY 

Professor and Head: Garvin. 

Assistant Professors: Lavine, Robinson, Schlaretzki. 

Phil. 1. Philoso'phy for Modern Man. (3) 

Each semester. Modern man's quest for understanding of himself and his world, 
with particular reference to American ideas and ideals. 

This course is one of a group of three courses within Elective Group I of the American 
Civilization Program. It may also be taken by students who qualify by tests to 
select substitute courses in the Program (provided the student has not taken the 
course as his Group I elective). (Garvin and Staff.) 

Phil. 41. Elementary Logic and Semantics. (3) 

First semester. An introductory study of logic and language, intended to help the 
student increase his ability to employ language with understanding and to reason 
correctly. Topics treated include: the uses and abuses of language, techniques for 
making sound inferences, and the logic of science. (Schlaretzki.) 

Phil. 52. Philosophy in Literature. (3) 

Second semester. Reading and philosophical criticism of novels and dramas contain- 
ing ideas significant for ethics, social policy, and religion. (Lavine, Schlaretzki.) 

Phil. 53. Philosofliy of Religion. (3) 

Second semester. This course seeks to provide the student with the means by which 
he may approach intelligently the main problems of religious thought: the nature 
of religious experience, the forms of religious expression, the conflicting claims of 
religion and science, and the place of religion in the community and in the hfe of 
the individual. (Robinson.) 

Vor Advanced. Undergraduates and Graduates 
Phil. 101. Ancient Philosophy. (3) 

First semester. A history of Greek thought from its beginnings to the time of Justin-- 
ian. The chief figures discussed: the Presocratic philosophers, Socrates, Plato, Aris- 
totle, Epicurus, the Stoic philosophers and Plotinus. (Robinson.) 

Phil. 102. Modern Philosophy. (3) 

Second semester. A history of philosophical thought in the West during the 16th, 
17th, and 18th Centuries. The chief figures discussed: Bacon, Galileo, Descartes,, 
Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, flume and Kant. (Garvin, Schlaretzki.) 

Phil. HI. Medieval Philosophy. (3) 

First semester. A history of philosophical thought in the West from the close of the- 
Classical period to the Renaissance. Based upon readings in the Stoics, early Christian 
writers, Neoplatonists, later Christian writers and Schoolmen. (Robinson.) 

Phil. 114. Contemporary Movements in Philosophy. (3) 

First semester. A survey of recent and present developments in philosophy. Atten- 
tion will be given to such thinkers as James, Bergson, Russell, Dewey, and White- 
head and to such movements as Pragmatism, Idealism, Naturalism, Positivism, and 
Existentialism. Particular consideration will be paid to the bearing of these develop- 
ments on contemporary problems of science, religion and society. (Garvin.) 

M 130 



Philosophy 

Phil. 120. Oriental Philosophy. (3) 

Second semester. A brief survey of Indian and Chinese philtjsophy. Discussion of 
Indian thought will center about the Rig- Veda, the Upanishads, the Buddhist philos- 
ophers, and the chief Hindu systems. Discussion of Chinese thought will center 
about Confucius, Lao-tse and their disciples, particular attention being given to the 
development of democratic ideals from Mencius to Sun Yat-sen. (Robinson.) 

Phil. 121. American Philosophy. (3) 

Second semester. A survey of American philosophical thought from the 18th Cen- 
tury to the present. Special attention is given to Edwards, Jefferson, Emerson, Royce, 
Peirce, James, Dewey and Santayana. (Schlaretzki.) 

Phil 123, 124. Philosophies Men Live By. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Phil. 123, extension (3). Designed as electives for stu- 
dents who wish to acquaint themselves with the held of philosophy. Phil. 123 not 
necessarily a prerequisite for Phil. 124. An exploration of the fundamental beliefs 
which determine what men make of their lives and of the world they live in. Each 
semester classic statements of these beliefs by great philosophers will be chosen for 
class discussion on the basis of their significance for the problems confronting mod- 
em man. (Staff.) 

Phil. 125. The Great Philosophers. (3) 

Offered in Baltimore only. A discussion of the ideas of the great Western philosoph- 
ers, based on readings in their works. (Staff.) 

Phil. 130. The Conflict of Ideals in Western Civilization. (3) 
First semester. A critical and constructive philosophical examination of the assump- 
tions, goals, and methods of contemporary democracy, fascism, socialism, and com- 
munism, with special attention to the ideological conflict between the U. S. and 
Russia. (Lavine, Schlaretzki.) 

Phil. 135. Philosophy of Social and Historical Change. (3) 

Second semester. A survey and an assessment of the religious, the philosophic, and 
the scientific approaches to socio-historic change, including the theories of linear 
progress, evolutionary progress, cyclical repetition, Hegelian-Mar.xian dialectic, Web- 
erian secularization and bureaucratization. (La\-ine.) 

Phil. 140. Philosophical Bases of Educational Theories. (3) 

Second semester. A critical study of the foundations of major views regarding the 

proper ends of education and the implications of these views for educational practice. 

(Robinson.) 
Phil. 151. Ethics. (3) 

Second semester. A critical study of the problems and theories of human conduct, 
aimed at developing such principles of ethical criticism as may be applied to con- 
temporar)' personal and social problems and to the formulation of an ethical philoso- 
phy of life. (Garvin, Schlaretzki.) 

Phil. 153. Philosophy of Art. (3) 

Second semester. An inquiry into the nature and functions of art. The course will 
begin with an examination of the relations between art and imitation, art and craft, 
art and beauty, art and pleasure, art and form, art and expression, art and not-art, 

131 ► 



Philosophy 

and good, bad, and great art, and conclude with a consideration of the uses of art, 
propagandistic, rehgious, escapist, and therapeutic. (Robinson.) 

Phil. 154. Political and Social Philosophy. (3) 

Second semester. An inquiry into the nature and functions of society and of the state. 
Attention is given to the major classical and contemporary theories, but the course is 
not primarily historical. The central problems: determination of the grounds of political 
obligation; reconciliation of the claims of personal freedom and social welfare. 

(Lavine, Schlaretzki.) 
Phil 155. Logic. (3) 

Second semester. A critical exposition of deductive logic. The course includes an 
examination and appraisal of Aristotelian logic and a systematic presentation of the 
foimdations of modern symbolic logic. Consideration is given to the application of the 
techniques of logic in the organization of knowledge and in scientific method. This 
course does not presuppose Phil. 41, but forms a natural sequel to it. (Garvin.) 

Phil. 156. Philosophy of Science. (3) 

First semester. An inquiry into the relations of the sciences, the nature of observa- 
tion, hypotheses, verification, experiment, measurement, scientific laws and theories, 
the basic concepts and presuppositions of science, and the relations of science to 
society. (Lavine, Robinson.) 

Phil. 158. Philosophy of Language. (3) 

Second semester. An inquiry into the nature and function of language and other 

forms of symbolism. (Schlaretzki.) 

Phil. 191, 192, 193, 194. Topical Investigations. (]-3) 

Each semester. Tutorial course. Independent study under individual guidance. Topics 
selected by students in conference with the Department Chairman. Restricted to ad- 
vanced students with credit for at least 12 units of philosophy. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

Graduate instruction in the Department of Philosophy is carried on main- 
ly by independent investigation of special topics under individual supervision. 
Any of the courses listed below may be elected more than once. Course selec- 
tions require the approval of the Department Chairman. 

Phil. 201. Research in Philosophy. (1-3) 

Each semester. Selected projects in historical research under individual guidance. 

(StaflF.) 
Phil. 203. Selected Problems in Philosophy. Q-^^ 

Each semester. Intensive study of selected topics in systematic philosophy under in- 
dividual supervision. (StaflF.) 

Phil. 205. Seminar in the History of Philosophy. 0-3^ 

First semester. A special topic will be selected for each year, e.g., Plato, Aristotle, 

Kant, British Empiricists, Russell. (Staff.) 

Phil. 206. Seminar in Problems of Philosophy. (1-3) 

Second semester. A special topic will be selected each year, e.g., Symbolic Logic, Philo- 
sophical Analysis, Perceptual Knowledge. (Staff.) 

M 132 



Physics 

PHYSICS 

Professor and Head: Toll. 

Professors: de Launay (^P.T.^, Herzfeld CP-T-X Kennard CP-T^O? Morgan, Myers, 

Wangsness QP.T.^. 
Visiting Professors: Dovih, Puppi. 

Associate Professors: Anderson, Ferrell, Horny ak, Iskrant, Singer. 
Assistant Professors: Laster, MacDonald, Marion. 
Assistant Research Professors: Maradudin, Stern, Swetnick. 
Research Associates: Day, Griem, Hinnov, Kasner, Levesque, Sticher. 

Phys. 1. Elements of Physics: Mechanics, Heat, and Sound. (3) 
First semester. Three lectures a week. The first half of a survey course in general 
physics. This course is for the general sHident and does not satisfy the requirements 
of the professional schools. Prerequisite, successful passing of the qualifying examina- 
tion in elementary mathematics. Lecture demonstration fee, $3.00. (Morgan.) 

Phys. 2. Elements of Physics: Magnetism, Electricity, and Optics. (3) 
Second semester. Three lectures a week. The second half of a survey course in general 
physics. This course is for the general student and does not satisfy the requirements of 
the professional schools. Prerequisite, Phys. 1. Lecture demonstration fee, $3.00. 

(Morgan.) 
Phys. 10, 11. Fundamentals of Physics. (4, 4) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures, one recitation, and one two-hour labora- 
tory period a week. A course in general physics treating the fields of mechanics, heat, 
sound, electricity, magnetism, optics, and modem physics. This course satisfies the 
minim.um requirements of medical and dental schools. Prerequisite, entrance credit 
in trigonometry or Math. 11 or concurrent enrollment in Math. 18. Lecture demon- 
stration and laboratory fee, $10.00 per semester. (Laster and Staff.) 

Phys. 20. General Physics: Mechanics, Heat and Sound. (5) 
First and second semesters. Three lectures, two recitations and one two-hour labora- 
tory period a week. The first half of a course in general physics. Required of all 
students in the engineering currictda. Math. 20 is to be taken concurrently. Lecture 
demonstration and laboratory fee, $10.00. (Anderson, Iskraut, and Staff.) 

Phys. 21. General Physics: Electricity, Magnetism and Optics. (5) 
First and second semesters. The lectures, two recitations and one two-hour laboratory 
period a week. The second half of a course in general physics. Required of all stu- 
dents in the engineering curricida. Prerequisite, Phys. 20, Math. 21 is to be taken 
concurrently. Lecture demonstration and laboratory fee, $10.00 

(Anderson, Iskraut, and Staff.) 
Phys. 50, 51. Intermediate Mechanics. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 11 or 21. 

(Morgan.) 
Phys. 52. Heat. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 11 or 21. Math. 20 is to 
be taken concurrently. (Iskraut.) 

Phys. 53. Nuclear Physics and Radioactivity. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. II or 21. (Ferrell.) 

133 ► 



Physics 

Phys. 54. Sound. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 11 or 21. Math. 21 is 

to be taken concurrently. CAnderson.) 

Phys. 60. Intermediate Physics Experiments. 

Three hours laboratory work for each credit hour. One or more credits may be taken 
concurrently. Prerequisites, Phys. 11 or 21. Laboratory fee, SI 0.00 per credit hour. 

(Marion.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Phys. 100. Advanced Experiments. 

Three hours laboratory work for each credit hour, each semester. One or more credits 
may be taken concurrently. Prerequisite, Phys. 52 or 54. Laboratory fee, $10.00 per 
credit hour. (Marion.) 

Phys. 101. Laboratory Arts. 

Three hours laboratory a week for each credit hour. One or more credits may be 

taken concurrently. Prerequisite, Phys. 100 or consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, 
$10.00 per credit hour. (Homyak.) 

Phys. 102. Optics. (3) 

Three lectures a week, second semester. Prerequisites, Phys. 11 or 21 and Math. 21. 

(Morgan.) 

Phys. 103. Applied Optics. (3) 

Three lectures a week, first semester. Prerequisite, Phys. 102. (Morgan.) 

Phys. 104, 105. Electricity and Magnetism. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Phys. 11 or 21; Math. 

21. (Daen.) 

Phys. 106, 107. Theoretical Mechanics. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Phys. 51 or consent 

of instructor. (Martin.) 

Phys. 108. Physics of Electron Tubes. (3) 

Three lectures a week, first semester. Prerequisite, Phys. 104 must be taken previously 

or concurrently. (Homyak.) 

Phys. 109. Electronic Circuits. (4) 

Four lectures a week, second semester. Prerequisite, Phys. 105 must be taken previ- 
ously or concurrently. (Homyak.) 

Phys. 110. Applied Physics Laboratory. (I, 2, or 3) 

Three hours laboratory work for each credit hour. One to three credits may be taken 
concurrently, each semester. Prerequisite, Phys. 52 or 54, and one credit in Phys. 100. 
Laboratory fee, $10.00 per credit hour. (Marion.) 

Phys. 111. Physics Shop Techniques. (J) 

One 3 hour laboratory per week, first semester. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Horn.) 

M 134 



Physics 

Phys. 114, 115. Introduction to Biophysics. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, intermediate physics 

and Calculus. 

Ph)S. 116, 117. Vxmdamental Hydrodynamics. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 107 and Math. 21. (Hama.) 

Phys. 118. Introduction to Modern Physics. (3) 

Three lectures a week, first semester. Prerequisites, Math. 21 and Phys. 11 or 21. 

(Hornyak.j 

Ph)s. 119. Modern Physics. (3) 

Three lectures a week, second semester. Prerequisite, Phys. 118. (Maradudin.) 

Phys. 120. Nuclear Physics. (4) 

Four lectures a week, second semester. Prerequisite, Phys. 118 or equivalent. 

(Homyak.) 

Phys. 121. Neutron Physics and Fission Reactors. (4) 

Four lectures a week, second semester. Prerequisite, Phys. 120. (Shapiro.) 

Phys. 122. Properties of Matter. (4) 

Four lectures per week, first semester. Prerequisite, Phys. 118 or equivalent. 

(Maradudin.} 

Phys. 124. Introduction to Astrophysics and Geophysics. (3) 
Three lectures a week, first semester. Prerequisites, Phys. 1 1 8 or the consent o£ in- 
structor. (Singer.) 

Phys. 126. Kinetic Theory of Gases. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 107 and Math. 21, or equivalent. 

(Kennard.) 

Phys. 130, 131. Basic Concepts of Physics. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. First and second semesters. Prerequisite, junior standing. Lec- 
ture demonstration fee, $2.00 per semester. A primarily descriptive course intended 
mainly for those students in the liberal arts who have not had any other course in 
physics. This course does not satisfy the requirements of professional schools nor ser\'e 
as a prerequisite or substitute for other physics courses. The main emphasis in the 
course will be on the concepts of physics, their evolution and their relation to other 
branches of human endeavor. (Laster.) 

Phys. 150. Special Problems in Physics. 

Research or special study. Credit according to work done. First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, major in physics and consent of instructor. Lab. fee, $10.00 per credit 
hour when appropriate. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

Of the courses which follow, 200, 201, 212 and 213 are given every year; 
all others will be given according to demand. 

o o 

135 ► 



Physics 

Phys. 200, 201. Introduction to Theoretical Physics. (5, 5) 

Five lectures a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, Phys. 106 or consent 

of instructor. CMyers.) 

Phys. 202, 203. Advanced Dynamics. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, Phys. 200. (Myers.) 

Phys. 204. Electrodynamics. (4) 

Four lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. (Iskraut.) 

Phys. 206. Physical Optics. (3) 

Prerequisite, Phys. 201. (Myers.) 

Phys. 208. Thermodynamics. (3) 

Three lectures per week, first semester. Prerequisite, Phys. 201 or equivalent. 

CSchamp.) 
Phys. 210. Statistical Mechanics. (3) 

Three lectures a week, second semester. Prerequisites, Phys. 119 and 201. 

CSchamp.) 
Phys. 212, 213. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. (^4, 4) 
Four lectures a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. (Ferrell.) 

Phys. 214. Theory of Atomic Spectra. (3) 

Three lectures a week, first semester. Prerequisite, Phys. 212, or consent of instructor. 

(Anderson.) 

Phys. 215. Theory of Molecular S-pectra. (3) 

Three lectures a week, second semester. Prerequisite, Phys. 214, (Anderson.) 

Phys. 216, 217. Molecular Physics. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 213. (Jansen.) 

Phys. 218, 219. X-Rays and Crystal Structure. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, Phys. 201 or consent 

of instructor (Morgan.) 

Phys. 220. Application of X-Ray and Electron Diffraction Methods. (2) 
Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, concurrent enrollment in Phys. 218. 

(Morgan.) 

Phys. 221. Upper Atmosphere and Cosmic Ray Physics. (2) 
Two lectures a week, second semester. Prerequisite, Phys. 200 or consent of in- 
structor. (Singer.) 

Phys. 222, 223. Boundary-Value Prohlems of Theoretical Physics. (2, 2) 
Prerequisite, Phys. 201. (de Launay.) 

Phys. 224, 225. Supersonic Aerodynamics and Compressible Flow. (2, 2) 
Prerequisite, Phys. 201. (Pai.) 



136 



Physics 



Phys. 226, 227. Theoretical Hydrodynamics. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. (Burgers.) 

Phys. 230. Seminar. 

Seminars on various topics in advanced physics are held each semester, with the con- 
tents varied each year. One semester credit for each seminar each semester. (Faculty.) 

Phys. 231. Applied Physics Seminar. 

(One semester credit for each seminar each semester.) 

Phys. 232, 233. Hydromechanics Seminar. (/, i) 



Phys. 234, 235. Theoretical Nuclear Physics. (3, 3) 
Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 213. 

Phys. 236. Theory of Relativity. (3) 
Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 200. 

Phys. 237. Relativistic Quantum Mechanics. (3) 

Three lectures per week, first semester. Prerequisite, Phys. 213. 

Phys. 238. Quantum Theory— Selected Topics. (3) 
Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 236 and 212. 

Phys. 239. Elementary Particles. (3) 

Three lectures a week, second semester. Prerequisite, Phvs. 237. 

Phys. 240, 241. Theory of Sound and Vibrations. (3, 3) 
Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. 

Phys. 242, 243. Theory of Solids. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, Phys. 213 

Phys. 245. Special Topics in Applied Physics. 
(2 credits each semester.) Two lectures a week. 

Phys. 246, 247. Special Topics in Fluid Dynamics. (2, 2) 
Prerequisite, advanced graduate standing and consent of instructor. 



(Burgers.) 
(Kennard.) 
(MacDonald.) 
(Iskraut.) 
(Toll, Ferrell.) 
(Staff.) 
(ToU.) 
(Snavely.) 
(Montroll.) 
(Staff.) 
(Burgers.) 
(Staff.) 



Phys. 248, 249. Special Topics in Modern Physics. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Calculus and consent of instructor. 

Phys. 250. Research. 

Credit according to work done, each semester. Laboratory fee, $10.00 per credit hour. 
Prerequisite, an approved application for admission to candidacy or special permission 
of the Physics Department. (Staff.) 

Phys. 262, 263. Aerophysics. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Three lectures a week. (Pai.) 



137 



Psychology 

S fecial Physics Courses for High School Science Teachers 

The courses in this section were especially designed for high school teachers 
and are not applicable to B.S., M.S., or Ph.D. degrees in physics without special 
permission of the Physics Department. However, these courses can be included 
as part of a physics minor or as electives. No prerequisites. 

Phys. 118 A. Atoms, Nuclei, and Stars. (3) 

Three lectures per week. CHerzfeld.) 

Phys. 122 A. Profcrties of Materials. (3) 

Three lectures per week. (Myers.) 

Phys. 160 A. Physics ProUems. (I, 2, 3) 

Lectures and discussion sessions arranged. CGoodwin.) 

Phys. 170 A. Affiled Physics. (3) 

Three lectures per week. (MontroII.) 

Phys. 199. National Science Foundation Summer Institute for Teachers of 

Science and Mathematics. (2) 
Five two-hour seminars each week in the last two weeks of Summer School. Enroll- 
ment limited to participants in the N.S.F. Summer Institute. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

CLaster and Staff.) 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor and Head: Andrews. 

Professors: Cofer, Gustad, Ross. 

Associate Professors: McGinnies, Magoon, Solem. 

Assistant Professors: Brush, Gonzalez, Pumroy, Wegner. 

Instructors: Berenson, Biersdorf, Maxwell, Pliskoff. 

Lecturer: Brady. 

Psych. 1. Introduction to Psychology. (3) 

First and second semesters. This course may be taken by students who qualify to 
select courses with Elective Group II of the American Civilization Program. A basic 
introductory course, intended to bring the student into contact with the major prob- 
lems confronting psychology and the more important attempts at their solution. 

(McGinnies and Staff.) 

Psych. 2. Afflied Psychology. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 1. Application of research methods 
to basic hvmian problems in business and industry in the professions, and in other 
practical concerns of everyday life. (Solem, Gonzalez.) 

Psych. 4. Prohlems in Modern Psychology. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 1. Primarily for students in the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences who major or minor in psychology. A systematic survey of 

-^ 138 



Psychology 

the field of psychology with particular emphasis on methodology. Consideration of in- 
dividual dillerences, motivation, sensory and motor processes, learning, emotional be- 
havior and personality. (Staff.) 

Psych. 5. Me7ital Hygietie. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 1. Introduction to the psychology of 
human personality and adjustment with a view toward increasing self-understanding 
and developing an appreciation of the mental health movement and each individual's 
stake in it. (Magoon.) 

Psych. 21. Social Psychology. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 1. Personality and behavior as in- 
fluenced by culture and interpersonal relations. Social influences on motivation, learn- 
ing, memory, and perception. Attitudes, public opinion, propaganda, language and 
communication, leadership, ethnic differences, and group processes. 

(McGinnies, Wegner.) 

Psych. 25. Child Psychology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 1. Beha\aoral analysis of normal development and 
normal socialization of the growing child. Leading theories of child nature and care, 
and their implications. (Wegner.) 

Psych. 26. Development Psychology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 1. Genetic approach to human motivation and ac- 
complishment. Research on simpler animal forms, the child, the adolescent and the 
adult in terms of the development of normal adult behavior. (Staff.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Graduate credits will be assigned only for students certified by the Depart- 
ment of Psychology as qualified for graduate standing. 

Psych. 106. Statistical Methods in Psychology. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Psych. 1 and Math. 1, 5, or 10 or equiva- 
lent. A basic introduction to quantitative methods used in psychological research; 
measures of central tendency, of spread, and of correlation. Majors in psychology 
should take this course in the junior year. (Brush, Pliskoff.) 

Psych. 110. Educational Psychology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 1 or equivalent. Researches on fundamental 
psychological problems encountered in education. Measurement and significance of 
individual differences; learning, motivation, transfer of training, and the educational 
implications of theories of intelligence. (StaflF.) 

Psych. 122. Advanced Social Psychology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 21 and consent of instructor. A systematic re- 
view of researches and points of view in regard to major problems in the field of social 
psychology. (McGinnies, Wegner.) 

Psych. 123. Language and Social ContniJinication. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 21. The nature and significance of verkil and 

139 ► 



Psychology 

non-verbal communicati'on in social psychological processes, including examination of 
relevant theoretical approaches to symbolic behavior. (Wegner.) 

Psych. 128. Human Motivation. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 21. Review of research literature deal- 
ing with determinants of human performance, together with consideration of the major 
theoretical contributions in this area. (Cofer.) 

Psych. 131. Abnormal Psychology. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, three courses in Psychology. The nature, 

diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of mental disorders. (Magoon, Pumroy.) 

Psych. 136. Applied Experimental Psychology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 1 or consent of instructor. A study of basic 
human factors involved in the design and operation of machinery and equipment. Or- 
ganized for students in engineering, industrial psychology, and the biological sciences. 

(Ross.) 

Psych. 140. Psychological Prohlems in Advertising. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 1. Psychological problems that arise in connec- 
tion with the production and testing of advertising; techniques employed in attacking 
these problems through research. (Gonzalez.) 

Psych. 142. Techniques of Interrogation. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 21. The interview, the questionnaire, 
and other methods of obtaining evidence on htunan attitudes and reactions, as viewed 
in the light of modern research evidence. (Gonzalez.) 

Psych. 145. Introduction to Experimental Psychology. (4) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisite, Psych. 106. Laboratory fee per semester, $4.00. Primarily for 
students who major or minor in psychology. A systematic survey of the laboratory 
methods and techniques as applied to human behavior. Emphasis is placed on in- 
dividual and group participation in experiments, use of data, and preparation of re- 
ports. (Ross, Brush.) 

Psych. 148. Psychology of Learning. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 145. Review and analysis of the major phenomena 
and theories of human and animal learning, including an introduction to the fields of 
problem solving, thinking and reasoning behavior. (Cofer, Brush.) 

Psych. 150. Tests and Measurements. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 106. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Critical survey of 
measuring devices used in counseling, educational and industrial practice with an 
emphasis on the theory, development and standardization. Laboratory practice in the 
administration and interpretation of a variety of commonly used tests is provided. 

(Gustad, Magoon.) 
Psych. 161. Industrial Psychology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, 6 hours in psychology. A survey course, intended for 
those who plan to enter some phase of personnel work, but who do not plan to under- 
take graduate study. (Solem.) 

-^ 140 



Psychology 

Psych. ISO. Physiological Psychology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 145. An introduction to research on the physiologi- 
cal basis of human behavior, including considerations of sensory phenomena, motor 
coordination, emotion, drives, and the neurological basis of learning. (Ross, Brady.) 

Psych. 181. Animal Behavior. (3) 

(Same as Zool. 181). Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A study 
of animal behavior, including considerations of social interactions, learning, sensory 
processes, motivation, and experimental methods, with a major emphasis on mam- 
mals. (Ross.) 

Psych. 191, 192. Advanced General Psychology. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, 15 hours of psychology including Psych. 145 
and consent of instructor. A systematic review of the more fundamental investiga- 
tions upon which modern psychology is based. Intended primarily for exceptional 
senior majors and for graduate students. (Ross, Gofer and Brush.) 

Psych. 194. Indefendent Study in Psychology. (1-3) - 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, senior standing and written consent of in- 
dindual faculty super\'isor. Integrated reading under direction, leading to the prepa- 
ration of an adequately documented report on a special topic. (Staff.) 

Psych. 195. Minor Prohlems in Psychology. (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, written consent of individual faculty super- 
\asor. An indi\'idualized course designed to allow the student to pursue a specialized 
topic or research project under supervision; also designed to allow groups of students 
to work under supendsion in a topical area not included in the courses offered at the 
graduate level. (Staff.) 

Psych. 198. Proseminar: Professional Aspects of Psychological Science. (2) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of faculty advisor. Survey of professional prob- 
lems in psychology, including considerations of contemporary developments, profes- 
sional ethics, literature resources, formulation of critical research problems, and dis- 
cussion of the major institutions requiring psj'chological services. (Staff.) 

For Graduate Shidents 

(All the following courses require consent of the instructor.) 

Psych. 201. Sensory Processes. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 180 and 191. (Ross.) 

Psych. 202. Perception. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 191. (Andrews.) 

Psych. 203, 204. Graduate Seminar. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. (Staff.) 

Psych. 205, 206. Historical Viewpoints and Current Theories in Psychology. 

(3,3) 
First and second semesters. (Hackman, Gofer.) 

141 ► 



CBrush, Gonzalez.) 

(Cofer.) 
(Gustad, Magoon.) 
(Gustad, Magoon.) 



Psychology 

Psych. 207. Learning Theory. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 192. 

Psych. 208. Language and Thought. (3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 192. 

Psych. 220. Psychological Concepts in Mental Health. (2) 
Second semester. 

Psych, 221. Seminar in Counseling Psychology. (2) 

Psych. 222, Seminar in Clinical Psychology. (2) 
Prerequisites, Psych. 150, 220. 

Psych. 223. Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Difficulties. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Psych. 150, 220. (Magoon.) 

Psych. 224. Advanced Procedures in Clinical and Counseling Psychology. (2) 

(Staff.) 

Psych. 225. Practicum in Counseling and Clinical Procedures, (i-3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 220. (Gustad, Staff.) 

Psych. 228. (_Same as Ed. 228). Seminar in Student Personnel. (2) 
First semester. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 

Psych. 229. Advanced Industrial Psychology. (3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 161 or equivalent. 

Psych. 230. Determinants of Human Efficiency. (3) 
Second semester. 



(Byrne, Gustad.) 

(Solem, Gonzalez.) 

(Ross.) 



Psych. 23 L Training Procedures in Industry. (3) 

Second semester. (Solem.) 

Psych. 232. Personnel Selection and Joh Analysis. (3) 

First semester. (Solem.) 

Psych. 233. Social Organization in Industry. (3) 

First semester. (Solem.) 

Psych. 240. Interview and Questionnaire Techniques. (3) 
Second semester. 

Psych. 24 L Mass Communication and Persuasion. (3) 

Second semester. (McGinnies.) 

Psych. 242. Seminar in Social Psychology. (3) 

Second semester. (McGinnies.) 

Psych. 250. Mental Test Theory. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 253. (Gustad.) 



-« 142 



Psych. 251. Development of Predictors. (3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 253. 

Psych. 252, 253. Advanced Statistics. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 106. 

Psych. 255. Seminar in Psychometric Theory. (2) 
Prerequisite, Psych. 253. 

Psych. 260. ludividjial Tests. (3) 
Laboratory fee, $4.00. Prerequisite, Psych. 150. 

Psych. 262. Appraisal of Personality. (3) 
Prerequisite, Psych. 150. 

Psych. 264. Projective Tests. (3) 

Second semester. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Prerequisite, Psych. 260 

Psych. 265. Advanced Developmental Psychology. (2) 



Sociology 

(Andrews.) 

(Andrews, Brush.) 

(Andrews.) 

(Magoon, Pumroy.) 

(Cofer.) 

(Cofer.) 



Psych. 266, 267. Theories of Personality and Motivation. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. 

Psych. 270. Advanced Ahnormal Psychology. (3) 
Prerequisite, Psych. 131 

Psych. 271. Special Testing of Disabilities. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 260. 

Psych. 272, 273. Individual Clinical Diagnosis. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, Psych. 260. 

Psych. 280. Advanced Psychophysiology. (2) 
First semester. 



(Staff.) 
(Cofer.) 



Psych. 288, 289. Special Research Problems. QTS} 
First and second semesters. 

Psych. 290, 291. Research for Thesis. ^Credit arranged^ 
First and second semesters. 

SOCIOLOGY 



(Cofer, Gustad.) 
(Magoon.) 
(Gustad.) 
(Brady, Ross.) 
(Staff.) 
(Staff.) 



Professor and Head: Hoffsommer. 

Professor: Lejins. 

Associate Professors: Melvin, Shankweiler. 

Assistant Professors: Anderson, Coates, Cussler, DiBella, Fitzgerald, Rohrer, 

McElhenie. 
Instructors: Dahms QP.T.^, Pelton, Fratiz, Hirzel, Keedy, Motz, Schmidt. 
Assistant Instructor: Lockwood CP.T.^. 



143 



Sociology 

Sociology 1 or its equivalent is prerequisite to all other courses in sociology excepting 
Soc. 5. 

Sociology 1, 2, 183, 186 and 196 or their equivalents are required for an undergradu-, 
ate major in sociology. 

Soc. 1. Sociology of American Life, (3) 

First and second semesters. Siunmer School. This course is one of a group of four 
coiurses within Elective Group I of the American Civilization Program. It may also 
be taken by students who qualify by tests to select substitute courses in the Program 
(provided the student has not taken the course as his Group I elective). Sociological 
analysis of the American social structure; metropolitan, small town, and rural com- 
munities; population distribution, composition and change; social organization. 

CHoffsommer and Staff.) 

Soc. 2. Principles of Sociology. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Soc. 1 and sophomore standing. The basic 
forms of human association and interaction; social processes; institutions; culture; hu- 
man nature and personality. (Cussler, Felton.) 

Soc. 5. Anthrofology. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). This course may be taken by students who 
qualify to select courses within Elective Group II of the American Civilization Pro- 
gram. Introduction to anthropology; origins of man; development and transmission of 
culture; backgrounds of himian institutions. (Anderson.) 

Soc. 13. Rural Sociology. (3) 

First semester. Rural life in America; its people, social organization, culture patterns, 

and problems. (Fitzgerald.) 

Soc. 14. Urban Sociology. (3) 

Second semester. Summer School (2). Urban growth and expansion; characteristics 
of city populations; urban institutional and personality patterns; relations of city and 
country. (Schmidt.) 

Soc. 51. Social Pathology. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). Prerequisite, sophomore standing. Personal-social 
disorganization and maladjustment; physical and mental handicaps; economic inade- 
quacies; programs of treatment and control. (Shankweiler, Franz, Keedy.) 

Soc. 52. Criminology. (3) 

Seceond semester. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. Criminal behavior and the 
methods of its study; causation; typologies of criminal acts and offenders; punishment, 
correction, and incapacitation; prevention of crime. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 62. Social Institutions. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. Nature and function of social 
institutions; the perpetuation of behavior through customs and social norms; typical 
contemporary American institutions. (Melvin.) 



144 



Sociology 

Sac. 64. Courtship and Marriage. (3) 

First and second semesters. Summer School (2). Prerequisite, Soc. 1 and sopho- 
more standing. A sociological study of courtship and marriage including considera- 
tion of physiological and psychological factors. Inter-cultural comparisons and practical 
considerations. Designed primarily for students in the lower division. 

(Shankvveiler, Fitzgerald, Motz, Dahms.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Sociology 1 or its equivalent and junior standing are prerequisite to 
courses numbered 100 to 199. 

Soc. 102. Interculttiral Sociology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 2. On the basis of a comparative study of customs, 
individual and group behavior patterns and institutions, this course studies the 
ideologies of America and other modern societies. The analysis focuses on the 
nature of the social processes and group behavior of various peoples having or 
not having a written language. CMelvin.) 

Soc. 105. Cultural Anthrofology. (3) 

Second semester. Simimer School (2). A survey of the simpler cultures of the 

world, with attention to historical processes and the application of anthropological 

theorj' to the modern situation. (Anderson.) 

Soc. 106. Archeology. (3) 

Second semester. A survey of human cultural developments as revealed by archeo- 
logical methods, with materials to be drawn from selected areas of both Old and 
New Worlds. (Anderson.) 

Soc. 112. Rural-Urhan Relations. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). The ecology of population and the forces 
making for change in rural and urban life; migration, decentraHzation and regionalism 
as methods of studying indixddual and national issues. AppHed field problems. 

(Cussler.) 

Soc. 113. The Rtiral Community. (3) 

Second semester. A detailed study of rural life with emphasis on levels of living, 
the family, school, and church and organizational activities in the fields of health, 
recreation, welfare, and planning. (Fitzoerald.) 

Soc. 114. The City. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). The rise of urban civilization and metropolitan 
regions; ecological process and structure; the city as a center of dominance; social 
problems, control and planning. (Schmidt.) 

Soc. 115. Industrial Sociology. (3) 

First and second semesters. Summer School (2). Prerequisite, Soc. 2. The sociolooy 
of human relations in American industry and business. Complex industrial and 
business organizations as social systems. Social relationships within and between 
industry, business, commimity, and society. (Coates.) 

145 ► 



Sociology 

Soc. 116. Military Sociology. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Soc. 2. The sociology o£ military life. Social 
change and the growth of military institutions. Complex formal military organizations. 
Military organizations as social systems. Military service as an occupation or profes- 
sion. Career patterns, problems and satisfactions. Relations between military institu- 
tions, civilian communities and society. (Coates.) 

Soc. 118. Community Organization. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). Community organization and its relation to 
social welfare; analysis of community needs and resources; health, housing, recreation; 
community centers; neighborhood projects. (DiBella, McElhenie.) 

Soc. 121. Population. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). Population distribution and growth in the 

United States and the world; population problems and policies. (Hirzel.) 

Soc. 122. Population. (3) 

Second semester. Trends in fertility and mortality, migrations, population estimates 

and the resulting problems and policies. (Hirzel.) 

Soc. 123. Ethnic Minorities. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). Basic social processes in the relations of ethnic 
groups within the State; immigration groups and the Negro in the United States; 
ethnic minorities in Europe. (Lejins, Felton.) 

Soc. 124. The Culture of the American Indian. (3) 

Second semester. A study of type cultures; cultural processes; and the eflFects of 

acculturation on selected tribes of Indians in the Americas. (Anderson.} 

Soc. 125. Cultural History of the Negro. (3) 

First semester. The cultures of Africa south of the Sahara and the cultural adjust- 
ments of the Negro in North and South America. (Anderson.) 

Soc. 131. Introduction to Social Service. (3) 

First and second semesters. General survey of the field of social-welfare activities; 
historical development; growth, functions, and specialization of agencies and services, 
private and public. (DiBella.) 

Soc. 136. Sociology of Religion. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). Varieties and sources of religious experience. 

Pieligious institutions and the role of religion in social life. (Anderson.) 

Soc. 141. Sociology of Personality. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). Development of human nature and personality in 
contemporary social life; processes of socialization; attitudes, individual differences, and 
social behavior. (Motz, Cussler, Schmidt.) 

Soc. 144. Collective Behavior. (3) 

Second semester. Social interaction in mass behavior; communication processes; struc- 
ture and functioning of crowds, strikes, audiences, mass movements, and the public. 

(Cussler.) 

^ 146 



Sociology 

Sac. 145. Social Control. (3) 

First semester. Forms, mechanisms, and techniques of group influence on human be- 
havior; problems of social control in contemporary society. (.Motz.J 

Soc. 147. Sociology of Law. (3) 

First semester. Law as a form of social control; interrelation between legal and other 
conduct nonns as to their content, sanctions, and methods of securing conformity; 
law as an integral part of the culture of the group; factors and processes operative 
in the f irmation of legal norms as determinants of human behavior. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 153. Juvenile Delinquency. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). Juvenile deliquency in relation to the general 
problem of crime; analysis of factors underlying juvenile delinquency; treatment and 
prevention. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 154. Crime and Delinquency Prevention. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 52 or Soc. 153 or consent of instructor. (Offered 
in alternate years with Soc. 156.) Mobilization of community resources for the 
prevention of crime and delinquency; area programs and projects. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 156. Institutional Treatment of Criminals and Delinquents. (3) 
Second semester. Summer School (2). Prerequisite, Soc. 52 or Soc. 153 or consent 
of instructor. (Offered in alternate years with Soc. 154.) Organization and functions 
of penal and correctional institutions for adults and juveniles. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 160. Interviewing in Social Work. (13^) 

Summer School only. (DiBella.) 

Soc. 161. The Sociology of War. (3) 

First semester. Simimer School (2). The origin and development of armed forces 
as institutions; the social causes, operations and results of war as social conflict; the 
relations of peace and war and revolution in contemporary civilization. (Coates.) 

Soc. 162. Basic Principles and Current Practice in Public Welfare. (3) 
Summer School only. (DiBella.) 

Soc. 163. Attitude and Behavior Problems in Public School Work. (15^) 
Summer School only. (DiBella.) 

Soc. 164. The Family and Society. (3) 

Second semester. Summer School (2). Prerequisite, Soc. 1 and Soc. 64 or equivalent. 
Study of the family as a social institution; its biological and cultural foundations, 
historic development, changing structure and function; the interactions of marriage 
and parenthood, disorganizing and reorganizing factors in present day trends. 

(Shankweiler.) 
Soc. 171. Family and Child Welfare. (3) 

First semester. Summer School (2). Programs of family and child welfare agencies; 
social services to families and children; child placement; foster families. (Diiielia.) 



147 



Sociology 

Soc. 173. Social Security. (3) 

First semester. The social security program in the United States; pubHc assistance; 

social insurance. CDiBella.) 

Soc. 174. Public Welfare. (3) 

Second semester. Development and organization of the public welfare movement in 
the United States, social legislation interrelations of Federal, State, and local agencies 
and institutions. (DiBella.) 

Soc. 180. Small Group Analysis. (3) 

Analaysis of small group structure and dynamics. Review of research on small groups 
in factories, military service, schools and communities. Presentation of techniques 
used in the study of small groups. (Franz.) 

Soc. 183. Social Statistics. (3) 

First and second semesters. Measures of central tendency and dispersion, use of 
statistical inference in simple testing of null hypotheses, chi square, and labor saving 
computational devices for correlation. (Schmidt.) 

Soc. 185. Advanced Social Statistics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 183, or equivalent. Provides refined statistical 
research methods for advanced students in the social sciences. Sampling theory, 
specialized correlation technique, advanced tests of significance, and other procedures. 

(Schmidt.) 

Soc. 186. Sociological Theory. (3) 

First and second semesters. Development of the science of sociology; historical back- 
grounds; recent theories of society. (Melvin.) 

Soc. 191. Social Field Training. (,1-^^ 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, for social work field training, Soc. 131; 
for crime control field training, Soc. 52 and 153. Enrollment restricted to available 
placements. Supervised field training in public and private social agencies. The student 
will select his particular area of interest and be responsible to an agency for a 
definite program of in-service training. Group meetings, individual conferences, and 
written program reports will be a required part of the course. (DiBella.) 

Soc. 196. Senior Seminar. (3) 

Second semester. Required of and open only to senior majors in sociology. Scope, 
fields, and research methods of sociology; practical applications of sociological knowl- 
edge. Individual study and reports. (Hoffsommer.) 

For Graduates 

Prerequisites for entrance upon graduate study leading to an advanced 
degree with a major in sociology: either (1) an undergraduate major (totaling 
at least 24 semester hours) in sociology or (2) 12 semester hours of sociology 
(including 6 semester hours of advanced courses) and 12 additional hours o£ 
comparable work in economics, political science, or psychology. Reasonable 
substitutes for these prerequisites may be accepted in the case of students 

< 148 



Sociology 

majoring in other departments who desire a graduate minor or several courses 
in sociology. 

With the ex'ception of Soc. 201, 285, 290, and 291, individual courses 
numbered 200 to 299 will ordinarily be offered in alternate years. 

Soc. 201. Methods of Social Research. (3) 

First semester. Selection and formulation of research projects; methods and techniques 

of sociological investigation and analysis. Required of graduate majors in sociolog)'. 

(HofFsommer.) 
Soc. 215. Comimmity Studies. (3) 

First semester. Intensive study of the factors affecting community development and 
growth, social structure, social stratification, social mobility and social institutions; 
analysis of particular communities. (Coates.) 

Soc. 216. Sociology of Occupations and Professions. (3) 

First semester. An analysis of the occupational and professional structure of American 
society, with special emphasis on changing roles, functions, ideologies and community- 
relationships. (Coates.) 

Soc. 221. Pofuhtion and Society. (3) 

Second semester. Selected problems in the field of population; quantitative and qualita- 
tive aspects; American and world problems. (Hirzel.) 

Soc. 224. Race and Culture. C3) 

Second semester. Race and culture in contemporary society; mobility and the social 

effects of race and culture contacts and intermixture. (Anderson.) 

Soc. 230. Comparative Sociology. (3) 

Second semester. Comparison of the social institutions, organizations, patterns of 

collective behavior, and art manifestations of societal values of various countries. 

(Melvin.) 
Soc. 241. Personality and Social Structure. (3) 

Second semester. Comparative analysis of the development of human nature, per- 
sonality, and social traits in select social structures. (Cussler.) 

Soc. 246. Piihlic Opinion and Propaganda. (3) 

Second semester. Processes involved in the formation of mass attitudes; agencies and 

techniques of communication; quantitative measurement of public opinion. (Motz.) 

Soc. 253. Advanced Criminology. (3) 

First semester. Survey of the principal issues in contemporarj' criminological theory 

and research. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 254. Seminar: Criminology. (3) 

Second semester. Selected problems in criminology. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 255. Seminar: Juvenile Delinquency. (3) 

First semester. Selected problems in the field of juvenile delinquency. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 256. Crime and Delinquency as a Community Problem. (3) 

Second semester. An intensive study of selected problems in adult crime and ju\enile 

delinquency in Maryland. (Lejins.) 

149 ► 



Speech and Dramatic Art 

Soc. 257. Social Change and Social Policy. (3) 

First semester. Emergence and development of social policy as related to social change; 

policy-making factors in social welfare and social legislation. (Melvin.) 

Soc. 262. Family Studies. (3) 

Second semester. Case studies of family situations; statistical studies of family trends, 

methods of investigation and analysis. (Shankweiler.) 

Soc. 263. Marriage and Family Counseling. C^) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Soc. 64 or Soc. 164 or consent of instructor. A 
sociological analysis of an emerging, family-centered profession: its interdisciplinary 
development and professional organization: its basic methods of coordinating art 
and science in solving family problems. Designed for advanced sociology majors or 
allied fields for use in vocations such as teaching, medicine, the ministry and others 
embodying the role of guidance. (Shankweiler.) 

Soc. 264. The Sociology of Mental Health. (3) 

First semester. A study of the sociological factors that condition mental health to- 
gether with an appraisal of the group dynamics of its preservation. (Melvin.) 

Soc. 282. Sociological Methodology. (3) 

Second semester. Logic and method of sociology in relation to the general theory 

of scientific method; principal issues and points of view. (Staff.) 

Soc. 285. Seminar: Sociological Theory. (3) 

First semester. Critical and comparative study of contemporary European and American 

theories of society. (Melvin.) 

Soc. 290. Research in Sociology. (.Credit to he determined^ 

First and second semesters. (Thesis Advisor.) 

Soc. 291. S'pecial Social Prohlems. (Credit to he determined^ 

First and second semesters. Individual research on selected problems. (Staff.) 

SPEECH AND DRAMATIC ART 

Associate Professor and Head: Straushaugh. 

Associate Professor: Hendricks. 

Assistant Professors: Batka, Linkow, Niem^eyer, Provensen, Pugliese. 

Instructors: Anapol, Aylward, Byrd, Conlon, Craven, Dew, Ellis, Gillis, Starcher, 

Wolgamuth. 
Assistant Instructors: Killough, Mendiola, Peet, Schurz, Smith, Taylor, Todaro, 

Turner. 
Lecturers: Causey, Shutts, Williams. 
Graduate Assistant: Ehle. 

Speech 1, 2. Ptiblic Speaking. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites for advanced speech courses. Speech 1 

prerequisite for Speech 2. The preparation and delivery of short original speeches; 

< 150 



SfeecJi and Dramatic Art 

outside readings; reports, etc. It is recommended that this course be taken during the 
ircshmL'.n 3'ear. Laboratory foe $1.00 each semester. (Linkow and Staff.) 

Speech Clinic. No credit. 

Kcmcilial work in minor speech defects. The work of the cHnic is conducted in 
inilividual conferences and in small group meetings. Hours arranged by consultation 
with the respective speech instructor. (Conlon and Staff.) 

Speech 3. Fundamentals of General American Speech. (3) 
Each semester. Training in auditory discrimination of speech sounds, rhythms and 
inflections of general American speech. Analysis of the physiological bases of speech 
production and the phonetic elements of speech reception. This course is required 
of speech majors, and recommended for foreign students. (Hendricks and Staff) 

Speech 4. Voice and Diction. (3) 

First and second semesters. Emphasis upon the improvement of voice, articulation, 
and phonation. May be taken concurrently with Speech I, 2. 

(Starchcr and Staff.) 
Speech 5, 6. Advanced Public Speaking. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Speech 1 and 2, or 7, or 18 and 19. Ad- 
vanced work on basis of Speech I, 2. Special emphasis is placed upon speaking 
situations the students will face in their respective vocations. (Starcher and Staff.) 

Speech 7. Public Speaking. (2) 

Each semester. The preparation and delivery of speeches on technical and general 

subjects. Laboratory fee, $1.00. (Linkow and Staff.) 

Speech S, 9. Acting. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Basic principles of 

histrionic practice. (Niemeyer, Pugliese.) 

Speech 10. Group Discussion. (2) 

First and second semesters. A study of the principles, methods, and types of discus- 
sion, and their application in the discussion of contemporary problems. 

(Linkow and Staff.) 
Speech 11, 12. Debate. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Pre-law students may take Speech 11, 12, instead oP 
Speech 1 and 2. A study of the principles of argument, analysis, e\idence, reasoning, 
fallacies, briefing, and delivery, together with their application in public speaking. 

(Anapol.) 

Speech 13. Oral Interpretation. (3) 

First semester. The oral interpretation of literature and the practical training of 

students in the art of reading. (Provensen.) 

Speech 14. Stagecraft. (3) 

First semester. Fundamentals of technical production. Emphasis on construction of 
scenery. Laboratory fee, $2.00. (Bvrd.) 

151 ► 



Speech and Dramatic Art 

Speech 15. Stagecraft. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 14. Technical production. Emphasis on stage 
lighting Laboratory fee, $2.00. (Byrd.) 

Speech 16. Introduction to the Theatre. (3) 

First and second semesters. A general survey of the fields of the theatre. 

(Pugliese.) 

Speech 17. Make-up. (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. A lecture-laboratory 
course in the theory and practice of stage make-up, covering basic requirements as 
to age, type, character, race, and period. Laboratory fee, $2.00. CByrd.) 

Speech 18, 19. Introductory Speech. Ql, 1^ 

First and second semesters. Speech 18 prerequisite for Speech 19. This course is 
designed to give those students practice in public speaking who cannot schedule 
Speech 1, 2. (Provensen and Staff.) 

Speech 22. Introduction to Radio and Television. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite for all courses in radio. The development, 
scope, and influence of American broadcasting and telecasting, including visits to 
local radio and television stations, with guest lectiuers from Radio Station WTOP 
and Television Station WTOP-TV. (Batka.) 

Speech 23. Parliamentary Law. CO 

First and second semesters. A study of the principles and application of parliamentary 
law as applied to all types of meetings. Thorough training in the use of Robert's 
Rules of Order. (Strausbaugh.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Speech 102. Radio Production. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Speech 22 and consent of instructor. A study of the 
multiple problems facing the producer. Special emphasis is given to acoustic setup, 
casting, "miking," timing, cutting and the coordination of personnel factors involved 
in the production of radio programs. Laboratory fee, $2.00. (Batka.) 

Speech 105. Speech-Handicapped School Children. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Speech 3 or consent of instructor. The 

occurrence, identification and treatment of speech handicaps in the classroom. An 

introduction to speech pathology. (Craven.) 

Speech 106. Clinical Practice. Ql to 5 credits, up to 9) 

Each semester and simimer. Prerequisite, Speech 105. Clinical practice in various 
methods of corrective procedures with various types of speech cases in the University 
clinic, veterans hospitals, and the public schools. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours 
per semester. May be repeated for a total of 9 semester hours credit. Laboratory fee, 
$1.00 per hour. (Conlon.) 

<^ 152 



Sfeech and Dramatic Art 

Speech 107. Advanced Oral Interpretation. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 13. Emphasis upon the longer reading. Pro- 
gram planning. (Provensen.) 

Speech 108. Pnhlic Speaking. (2) 

Second semester. Limited to junior engineers. Prerequisite, Speech 7. Continuation 

of Speech 7 with emphasis upon engineering projects that fall within student's own 

experience. (Linkow.) 

Speech 109. Speech and Language Development of Children. (3) 

Second semester. Admission by consent of instructor. An analysis of normal and 

abnormal processes of speech and language development in children. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 111. Seminar. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, senior standing and consent of instructor. 
Required of speech majors. Present-day speech research. (Strausbaugh.) 

Speech 112. Phonetics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 3 or consent of instructor. Training in the 

recognition and production of the sounds of spoken English, with an analysis of 

their formation. Practice in transcription. Mastery of the international phonetic 

alphabet. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Conlon.) 

Speech 113. Play Production. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 16 or consent of instructor. Development of 

procedure followed by the director in preparing plays for public performance. 

(Pugliese.) 
Speech 114. The Film as an Art Form. (3) 

A study of the motion picture as a developing form of entertainment, communica- 
tion, and artistic expression. A series of significant American and foreign films are 
viewed to illustrate the artistic, historical and sociological trends of the twentieth 
centu^)^ Laboratory fee, $7.50. (Niemeyer.) 

Speech 115. Radio in Retailing. (3) 

First semester. Limited to students in the College of Home Economics. Prerequisites, 
Speech 1 and 2 or 7. Laboratory fee $2.00. \Vriting and production of promotional 
programs for the merchandising of wearing apparel and housefurnishings. Collabora- 
tion with Washington and Baltimore radio stations and retail stores. (Batka.) 

Speech 116. Radio Announcing. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Speech 4 and 22 or consent of instructor. The theory 

and application of all types of announcing. Laboratorj' fee, $2.00. (Batka.) 

Speech 117. Radio and Television Continuity Writing. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 22 or consent of instructor. A study of the prin- 
ciples, methods and limitations of writing for radio and tele\'ision. Application will 
be made in the waiting of general types of continuities and commercials. (Avlward.) 

Speech 118. Adi'anced Radio and Television Writing. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 117. Advanced work with emphasis on the 
dramatic form. Extensive outside readings on dramatic theor)', plays and criticism. 
Application will be made in the writing of an original hour-long play for radio or 
television. (Aylward.) 

153 ► 



S'peech and Dramatic Art 

S'peech 119. Radio Acting. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 22. A workshop course designed to give the 

student practice in radio acting. (PugHese.) 

S'peech 120. Speech Pathology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Speech 105. A continuation of Speech 105, wdth empha- 
sis on the causes and treatment of organic speech disorders. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

(Hendricks.) 

Speech 122, 123. Radio Workshop. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Speech 102 or 116. A laboratory course 
dealing with all phases of producing a radio program. Laboratory fee $2.00 each 
semester. (Batka.) 

Speech 124, 125. American Public Address. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Speech 1 and 2 or 7. The first semester covers 
the period from Colonial times to the Civil War period. The second semester covers 
from the Civil War period through the contemporary period. (Strausbaugh and Staff.) 

Speech 126. Semantic Aspects of Speech in Human Relations. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, one course in Public Speaking. An analysis of speech 

and language habits from the standpoint of general semantics. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 127, 128. Military Speech and Commands. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Speech 1 and 2 or 7. Limited to students in 
the College of Military Science and Tactics. The preparation and delivery of lectures 
dealing with military subjects. EflFective execution of field orders, commands, etc. 
Extensive use of voice recordings. (Pugliese.) 

Speech 129, 130. Play Directing. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 8 or consent of instructor. A lecture-laboratory course dealing with 
the fundamentals of script cutting, pacing, movement, blocking, and rehearsal routine 
as applied to the directing of plays. (Niemeyer.) 

Speech 131. History of the Theatre. (3) 

First semester. A survey of dramatic production from early origins to 1800. 

(Niemeyer.) 
Speech 132. History of the Theatre. (3) 
Second semester. A survey of dramatic production from 1800 to the present. 

(Niemeyer.) 

Speech 133. Staff Reports, Briefings, and Visual Aids. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 6 or 104. Limited to the students in the College 
of Military Science. Lecture and laboratory course dealing with the techniques used 
in military briefings, staflF reports and the use of visual aids. (Linkow.) 

Speech 135. Instrumentation in Speech and Hearing Science. (2) 
First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 3. The use of electronic equipment in the measure- 
ment of speech and hearing. Laboratory fee, $2.00. (Linkow.) 



-< 154 



Sfeech and Dramatic Art 

S^feech 136. Princifles of Speech Thera-py. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 120. Differential diagnosis of speech and language handicaps 
and the application of psychological principles of learning, motivation and adjust- 
ment in the treatment of speech disorders. Laboratory fee, $3.00 (Hendricks.) 

Speech 137. Experimental Phonetics. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 112. The application of experimental methods in the quantitative 

analysis of the phonetic elements of speech. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 138. Methods and Materials in Speech Correction. (3) 
Prerequisite, Speech 120 or the equivalent. The design and use of methods and 
materials for diagnosis, measurement, and retraining of the speech -handicapped. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Craven.) 

Speech 139. Theatre Workshop. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 8 or 14. Given each semester. A laboratory course designed to 

provide the student with practical experience in all phases of theatre production. 

(Strausbaugh.) 

Speech 140. Principles of Television Production. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 22. A study of the theory, methods, techniques 
and problems of television production and direction. Units of study covering television 
cameras and lenses, lighting theory and practices, scenery and properties, costumes 
and makeup, graphic arts and special effects are included. Observation of production 
procedures at nearby television stations. Application will be made through cre^"- 
assignments for University-produced television programs. (Batka.) 

Speech 141. Introduction to Audiometry. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 3. Analysis of various methods and procedures 
in evaluating hearing losses. Required for students whose concentration is in speech 
and hearing therapy. Laboratory fee, $2.00. (Craven.) 

Speech 142. Speech Reading and Auditory Training. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 3. Methods of training individuals with hearing 
loss to recognize, interpret, and understand spoken language. Required for students 
whose concentration is in speech and hearing therapy. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

(Conlon.) 

For Graduates 

The Department maintains a reciprocal agreement with Walter Reed Gen- 
eral Hospital whereby clinical practice may be obtained at the Army Audi- 
ology and Speech Correction Center, Forest Glen, Mar)'land, under the direc- 
tion of James P. Albrite, M.D., Director. 

Prerequisite for all courses, consent of instructor. 

Speech 200. Thesis. (3, 6) 

Credit in proportion to work done and results accomplished. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 201. Special Problems Seminar. (A Throiigh K). (2, 3) 

(6 hrs. applicable toward M.A. degree.) A. Stuttering; B. Cleft Palate; C. Delayed 

155 ► 



Sfeech and Draviatic Art 

Speech; D. Articulation; E. Cerebral Palsy; F. Voice; G. Special Problems of the 
Deaf; H. Foreign Dialect; I. Speech Intelligibility; J. Neurophysiology of Hearing; 
K. Minor Research Problems. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 202. Techniques of Research in Speech and Hearing. (3) 
First semester. Analysis of research methodology including experimental techniques, 
statistical analysis and preparation of reports for scientific investigations in speech and 
hearing science. Required of candidates for Master's degree in speech and hearing 
therapy. (Williams.) 

Speech 210. Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing. (3) 

A study of the anatomy and physiology of the auditory and speech mechanisms. 

Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Speech 211. A, B, C, D. Advanced Clinical Practice. (J, 3 up to 12) 
(6 hrs. applicable toward M.A. degree.) Supervised training in the application of 
clinical methods in the diagnosis and treatment of speech and hearing disorders. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00 per hour. (Craven.) 

Speech 212. Advanced Speech Pathology. (3) 

Etiology and therapy for organic and functional speech disorders. Laboratory fee, 

$3.00. (Lore.) 

Speech 214. Clinical Audiometry. (3) 

Testing of auditory acuity with pure tones and speech. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

(Shutts.) 

Speech 216. Communication Skills for the Hard-of -Hearing. (3) 

First semester. Speech reading, auditory training, and speech conservation problems 

in the rehabilitation of the hard-of-hearing. (Causey.) 

Speech 217. Selection of Prosthetic Appliances for the Acoustically Handi- 
capped. (3) 
A laboratory course in modern methods of utilizing electronic hearing aids. Labora- 
tory fee, $3.00. (Shutts.) 

Speech 218. Speech and Hearing in Medical Rehahilitation and Special Edu- 
cation Programs. (3) 
Second semester. Administrative problems involved in the organization and operation 
of speech and hearing therapy under different types of programs. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 219. Speech Disorders of the Brain-Injured. (3) 

Methods of evaluation and treatment of children and adults who have suffered injury 
to brain tissue, with subsequent damage to speech and language processes. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 221. Communication Theory and Speech and Hearing Problems. (3) 
Second semester. Analysis of current theories of communication as they apply to 
research and therapy in speech and hearing. (Hendricks.) 



-< 156 



Zoology 

ZOOLOGY 

Professor and Head: Wharton. 

Professor: Schoenhorn. 

Professor Emeritus: Bnrhoe. 

Associate Professors: Anastos, Brown, Littleford. 

Assistant Professors: Allen, Benarde, Costello, Grollman, Haley, Henson, High- 

ton, Ramni, Winn. 
Lecturers: Baker, Camin, and Stradtvtann. 

All zoology courses \viih laboratory have a laboratory fee of $8.00 per course 
per semester. 

Zool. 1. General Zoology. (4) 

First and second semesters. Summer School and Pharmacy. Two lectures and two 
two-hour laboratory periods a week. Zool. 1 and Zool. 2 satisfy the freshman pre- 
medical requirement in general biology. This course, which is cultural and practical 
in its aim, deals with the basic principles of animal life. (Wharton.) 

Zool. 2. The Animal Phyla. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, Zool. 1, 16 or Bot. 1. A study of the anatomy, classification, and life histories 
of representative animals, invertebrates and vertebrates. (Anastos.) 

Zool. 4. The Animal Kingdom. (3) 

Second semester. Pharmacy only. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period 
a week. A survey of the animal kingdom with special emphasis on parasites, insects 
and other forms that have special economic interrelationships with man. (Costello.) 

Zool. 5. Comfarative Vertebrate Morphology . (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisites, Zool. 1 and 2 or equivalent. A comparative study of selected organ systems 
in certain vertebrate groups. (Ramm.) 

Zool. 14. Human Anatomy and Physiology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
Zool. 1 or 16. For students who desire a general knowledge of human anatomy 
and physiology. (Grollman.) 

Zool. 15. Human Anatomy and Physiology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, Zool. 14. A continuation of Zool. 14. (Schoenbom.) 

Zool. 16. H^iman Physiology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Open 
only to those students of the College of Home Economics for whom this is a required 
course. An elementary course in physiology. (Wharton.) 

157 ► 



Zoology 

Zool. 20. Vertebrate Embryology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and tvv^o three-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisites, Zool. 1 and 2 or equivalent. Basic principles of early development from 
the ovum to the establishment of the organ systems. (Ramm.) 

Zool. 53. Physiology of Exercise. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Zool. 15. A detailed consideration of the mechanism 
of muscular contraction; the metabolic, circulatory, and the respiratory responses in 
exercise; and the integration by means of the nervous system. Open only to students 
for whom this is a required course. 

Zool. 55S. Develo'pment of the Human Body. (2) 

Summer School. Five lectures a week. A study of the main factors affecting the 
growth and development of the child vidth special emphasis on normal development. 

Zool. 75, 76. Joxirnal Club. Ch O 

First and second semesters. One lecture a week. Prerequisites, permission of the 
Department and a major in zoology. Reviews, reports and discussions of current 
literature. . (Staff.) 



For Graduates and Advanced Under graduates 

Zool. 102. General Animal Physiology. (4) 

Second semester. Occasional Summer School. Two lectures and two three-hour 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, one year of zoology and one year of chemistry. 
The general principles of physiological functions as shown in mammals and lower 
animals. (Grollman.) 

Zool. 104. Genetics. (3) 

First semester. Summer School. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, one course 

in zoology or botany. A consideration of the basic principles of heredity. (Highton.) 

Zool. 108. Animal Histology. (4) 

Second semester. Occasional Summer School. Two lectures and two three-hour 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, one year of zoology. A microscopic study of 
tissues and organs of vertebrates with special emphasis on ,the mammal. Practice in 
elementary histo-technique will be included. (Brown.) 

Zool. 110. Parasitology. (4) 

First semester. Occasional Summer School. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, one year of zoology. A study of the taxonomy, morph- 
ology, physiology, and life cycles of animal parasites. (Haley.) 

Zool. 111. Veterinary Parasitology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, one year of zoology or permission of instructor. Alternate years. Not offered 
in 1958-59. Classification, epidemiology, and control of economically important parasites 
of domestic animals. (Anastos.) 

<i 158 



Zoology 

Zool. 112. Wildlife Parasitology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, one year of zoology or permission of instructor. Alternate years. Not 
oftered in 1958-59. Classification, epidemiology and control of economically important 
parasites of game animals, fur bearers and commercial and game fishes. (Anastos.) 

Zool. 118. Invertebrate Zoology. (4) 

First semester. Occasional Summer School. Two lectures and two three-hour lab- 
oratory periods a week. Prerequisite, one year of zoology. An advanced course dealing 
with the ta.xonomy, morphology, and embryology of the invertebrates, exclusive of 
insects. (Allen.) 

Zool. 121. Principles of Animal Ecology. (3) 

Second semester. Occasional Summer School. (4) Two lectures and one three-hour lab- 
oratory period a week. Prerequisite, one year of zoology and one year of chemistry. 
Animals are studied in relation to their natural surroundings. Biological, physical and 
chemical factors of the environment which affect the growth, behavior, habits, and 
distribution of animals are stressed. CHenson.) 

Zool. 125. Fisheries Biology and Management. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequi- 
site, Zool. 1 and 2 or equivalent. A study of the biology and management of fresh 
and salt water fin fishes. Particular attention is given to practical applications in fish- 
eries work. (Allen.) 

Zool. 126. Shellfisheries. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisite, Zool. 2 or equivalent. A study of the biology of shellfish and other inverte- 
brates of economic importance. Particular attention is given to problems of manage- 
ment and conservation of these forms. (Allen.) 

Zool. 127. Ichthyology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one two-hour and one three-hour laboratory periods 
a week. Prerequisites, Zool. 5 and 20. Alternate years. To be offered 1958-59. 
A course in anatomy, embryolog)', distribution, habits and taxonomy of marine and 
fresh water fish. (Winn.) 

Zool. 128. Zoogeography. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
one year of zoology, botany, or geology. Alternate years. To be offered 1958-59. 
Principles governing the geographical distribution of living things, with particular 
reference to ecological changes during geologic time. (Henson.) 

Zool. 181. Animal Behavior. (3) (_Same as Psych. 181') 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. 
Alternate years. Not offered 1958-59. A study of animal behavior, including consid- 
erations of social interactions, learning sensory processes, motivation, and experimental 
methods, with a major emphasis on mammals. (Ross.) 

Zool. 199S. National Science Foundation Summer Institute for Teachers of 
Science and Mathematics. Seminar. (I) 

159 ► 



Zoology 

Summer School. Seminar fee, $5.00. An integrated discussion of recent advances and 
basic principles of biology. The program will include lectures by recognized authorities 
in various fields of biology, laboratory demonstrations, and organized discussion groups. 
Student participation will be encouraged. (Brown and Staff.) 

For Graduates 

Zool. 200. Marine Zoology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Al- 
ternate years. Not offered 1958-59. A course in the environmental characteristics of 
salt water. Particular attention is given to brackish water environments such as the 
Chesapeake Bay. (Allen.) 

Zool. 202. Animal Cytology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequi- 
site, Zool. 108. Alternate years. To be offered 1958-59. A study of cellular structure 
with particular reference to the morphology arid physiology of cell organoids and 
inclusions. (Brown.) 

Zool. 203. Advanced Emhryology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, Zool. 20. Alternate years. Not offered 1958-59. Mechanics of fertilization 
and growth. A review of the important contributions in the field of experimental 
enabryology. (Ramm.) 

Zool. 204. Advanced Physiology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequi- 
sites, Zool. 102, and one year of organic chemistry. The principles of general and cellu- 
lar physiology as found in animal life. (Schoenborn.) 

Zool. 205. Limnology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Alternate 
years. Not offered 1958-59. Application of the methods and principles of ecology to 
the intensive study of fresh water ecosystems, with particular emphasis on the physics, 
chemistry and production biology of standing waters. (Henson.) 

Zool. 206. Research. (Credit to he arranged') 

First and second semesters. Summer School. Work on thesis project only. A. Cytol- 
ogy; B. Embryology; C. Fisheries; E. Parasitology; F. Physiology; G. Systematics; H. 
Ecology; and I. Behavior. (Staff.) 

Zool. 207. Zoology Seminar. (Credit to he arranged) 

First and second semesters. Summer School. One lecture a week for each credit hour. 
A. Cytology; B. Embryology; C. Fisheries; D. Genetics; E. Parasitology; F. Physiol- 
ogy; G. Systematics; H. Ecology; I. Behavior; and S. Recent Advances. (Staff.) 

Zool. 208. Special Prohlems in Zoology. (Credit to he arranged) 
First and second semesters. Summer School. A. Cytology; B. Embryology; C. Fish- 
eries; E. Parasitology; F. Physiology; G. Systematics; H. Ecology; and I. Behavior. 

(Staff.) 

^ 160 



Zoology 

Zool. 209. Advanced Parasitology. (,4^ 

First semester. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequi- 
site, Zool. 110 or permission of the instructor. Alternate years. To be offered 1958-59. 
i he nature, origin and interrelations ^)i parasitism with emphasis upon life histories. 

(Anastos.) 

Zool. 210. Systetnatic Zoology. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Alter- 
nate years. To be offered 1958-59. The principles and practices involved in the 
collection, preservation and classification of animals. (Highton.) 

Zool. 211, 212. Lectures in Zoology. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Advanced lectures by outstanding 
authorities in their p.irticular field of zoolog)'. As the subject matter is continually 
changing, a student may register several times, receiving credit for several semesters. 

(Visiting Lecturers.) 
Zool. 21 5S. fisheries Technology. (4) 

To be offered as needed during the Summer School at the Sea Food Processing Lab- 
oratory, Crisfield, Maryland. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a 
week. The technological aspects of netting and collection of fish and other fishery re- 
sources, methods of handling the catch, marketing of fishery products, and recent ad- 
vances in the utilization of fishery products. (Littleford.) 

Zool. 216. Physiological Cytology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequi- 
sites, Chem. 161, 162, Phys. 11, Zool. 102, or permission of the instructor. Alternate 
years. Not offered 1958-59. A study of the structure and function of cells by chemical, 
physical and microscopic methods. (Brown.) 

Zool. 220. Advanced Genetics. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, Zool. 104. Alternate years. Not offered 1958-59. A consideration of recent 
developments in genetics with emphasis on population genetics and evolution. Breeding 
experiments with Drosophila will be conducted. (Highton.) 

Zool. 223. Analysis of Animal Structure. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Alternate 
years. To be offered 1958-59. The integration of morphological sj'stems and appli- 
cation of physical laws to animal structures. (Ramm.) 

Zool. 23 IS. Acarology. (3) 

Summer School only. Leaure and laborator\'. An introductory study of the Acarina 
or mites and ticks v\ith special emphasis on classification and biology'. (Camin.) 

Zool. 232S. Medical and Veterinary Acarology. (3) 

Summer School only. Lecture and laboratorv'. The recognition, collection, culture, and 
control of Acarina important to public health and animal husbandry with special em- 
phasis on the transmission of diseases. (Stradtmann.) 

Zool. 233S. Agricxdtural Acarology. (3) 

Summer School only. Lecture and laboratory. The recognition, collection, culture and 
control of Acarine pests of crops and ornamentals, (Baker.) 

161 ► 



Zoology 

Zool. 234. Experimental Mammalian Physiology. (4) 

First semester. Two four-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Zool. 102 and 
one year o£ chemistry above general chemistry. Alternate years. Not offered 1958-59. 
The theory, use, and application to research of instrumentation normally found in the 
physiology laboratory with an introduction to surgical techniques on both large and 
small animals. CGroUman.) 

Zool. 235. Comparative Behavior. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisites, Zool. 121 and 181, or permission of instructor. Alternate years. Not 
offered 1958-59. An advanced course that deals vidth comparative whole animal re- 
actions to the inanimate and animate environment. Particular emphasis is placed on 
the correlation of field and laboratory studies. (Winn.) 



162 



—The University is the rear guard and the 
advance agent of society. It lives in the 
past, the present and the future. It is the 
storehouse of knowledge; it draws upon 
this depository to throw light upon the 
present; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual horizons and the scientific 
frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
— always toward the promise of a 
better tomorrow. 

— From "The State and the University," 
the inaugural address of 
President Wilson H. Elkins, 
January 20, 1955, 
College Park, Maryland. 



SEPARATE CATALOGS AVAILABLE 



AT COLLEGE PARK 

Individual catalogs of colleges and schools of the University of Mary- 
land at College Park may be obtained by addressing the Office of Uni- 
versity Relations, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 

1. General Information 

2. College of Agriculture 

3. College of Arts and Sciences 

4. College of Business and Public Administration 

5. College of Education 

6. College of Engineering 

7. College of Home Economics 

8. Department of Air Science 

9. College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

10. College of Special and Continuation Studies 

The catalog of the European Program may be obtained by 
addressing the Dean, College of Special and Continuation 
Studies, College Park, Maryland. 

11. Stmimer School 

12. Graduate School Announcements 

AT BALTIMORE 

Individual catalogs for the professional schools of the University of 
Maryland may be obtained by addressing the Deans of the respective 
schools at the University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene Streets, 
Baltimore 1, Maryland. 

13. School of Dentistry 

14. School of Law 

15. School of Medicine 

16. School of Pharmacy 

17. School of Nursing 



VOL.11 JANUARY 10, 1958 NO. 5 



1958 
1959 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE COLLEGE OF 

business and public administration 

AT COLLEGE PARK 





M-JLh^^ 




B a 5 



The fvovisions of this -puhlication are not to he regarded 
as an irrevocable contract hetween the student and the 
University of Maryland. The University reserves the 
right to change any provision or requirement at any time 
within the student's term- of residence. The University 
further reserves the right at any time, to ask a student 
to withdraw when it considers such action to he in the 
hest interests of the University. 



SEE OUTSIDE BACK COVER FOR LIST OF OTHER CATALOGS 



COLLEGE 
of 

BUSINESS AND PUBLIC 
ADMINISTRATION 

Catalog Series 19584959 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



VOLUME 11 JANUARY 10, 1958 NO. 5 



A University ot Maryland publication is published twelve times in January; three 
times in February; once in March and April; three times in May; twice in June; once 
in July and August; tvdce in September and October; three times in November; and 

once in December. 

Re-entered at the Post Office in College Park, Maryland, as second class mail matter 
under the Act of Congress of August 24, 1912. 



CONTENTS 



GENERAL 



Board of Regents 1 

Officers of Administration 2 

Faculty of the College 6 

Organization 13 

Objectives 14 

American Civilization Program . . 15 

Academic Information 16 

Degrees 16 

Graduation Requirement .... 16 

Junior Standing 17 



Academic Information (continued) 

Senior Residence Requirement 17 

Programs of Study 17 

Professional Objectives 17 

Facilities Furnished 18 

Military Instruction 18 

Costs 19 

Admission 19 

Honors and Awards 19 



CURRICULA AND REQUIRED COURSES 



Business Organization and 

Administration 22 

Accounting and Statistical 

Control 26 

Financial Administration .... 28 

Industrial Administration .... 29 

Insurance and Real Estate . . 30 

Marketing Administration .... 31 
Personnel Administration and 

Labor Economics 32 

Transportation Administration 33 

Public Administration 34 

Economics 34 



Foreign Service and International 

Relations 36 

Geography 38 

Government and Politics 40 

Journalism and Public Relations 42 
Office Techniques and 

Management 45 

Bureau of Business and Economic 

Research 48 

Bureau of Governmental 

Research 49 

Maryland Municipal League ... 49 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



Business Organization and 

Administration 50 

Economics 59 

Geography 62 



Government and Politics 68 

Journalism and Public Relations 73 
Office Techniques and 

Management 75 



A map of the campus is located in the center of the 
catalog. Use running headlines located at the top of each 
page as an additional aid in locating subject information. 



CALENDAR 

FALL SEMESTER 1958 

SEPTEMBER 1958 

15-19 Monday to Friday— Fall Semester Registration 

22 Monday— Instruction Begins 

NOVEMBER 

26 Wednesday— Thanksgiving Recess Begins After Last Class 

DECEMBER 

1 Monday— Thanksgiving Recess Ends 8 a.m. 

20 Saturday— Christmas Recess Begins After Last Class 

JANUARY 1959 

5 Monday— Christmas Recess Ends 8 a. m. 

21 Wednesday— Pre-Examination Study Day 

22-28 Thursday to Wednesday— First Semester Examinations 

SPRING SEMESTER 1959 
FEBRUARY 

2-6 Monday to Friday— Spring Semester Registration 
9 Monday— Instruction Begins 

23 Monday— Washington's Birthday Holiday 

MARCH 

25 Wednesday— Maryland Day 

26 Thursday— Easter Recess Begins After Last Class 
31 Tuesday— Easter Recess Ends 8 a.m. 

MAY 

14 Thursday— Military Day 

28 Thursday— Pre-Examination Study Day 

May zy-/ Priday to Friday— Second Semester Examinations 
June 53 

JUNE 

6 Saturday— Commencement Examinations 

SUMMER SESSION 1959 
JUNE 1959 

22 Monday— Summer Session Registration 
23— Tuesday— Summer Session Begins 

JULY 

31 Friday— Summer Session Ends 

SHORT COURSES 1959 

JUNE 1959 

15-20 Monday to Saturday— Rural Women's Short Course 

AUGUST 

3-8 Monday to Saturday-4-H Club Week 

SEPTEMBER 

8-11 Tuesday to Friday— Firemen's Short Course 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

and 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Term 
Expires 

Charles P. McCormick 

Chairman 1966 

McCormick and Company, 414 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Edward F. Holter 

Vice-Chairman 1959 

The National Grange, 744 Jackson Place, N.W., Washington 6 

B. Herbert Brown 

Secretary I960 

The Baltimore Institute, 12 West Madison Street, Baltimore 1 

Harry H. Nuttle 

Treasurer 1966 

Denton 

Louis L. Kaplan 

Assistant Secretary 1961 

1201 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 17 

Edmund S. Burke 

Assistant Treasurer 1959 

Kelly- Springfield Tire Company, Cumberland 

Thomas W. Pangborn 1965 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown 

Enos S. Stockbridge 1960 

10 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Thomas B. Symons 1963 

Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, Takoma Park 

C. EwiNG Tuttle 1962 

907 Latrobe Building, Charles and Read Streets, Baltimore 2 



Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for terms of nine 
years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer of the 
Board. 

The State law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland 
shall constitute the Maryland State Board of AgriciJture. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Princi'pal Administrative Officers 

WILSON H. ELKiNS, President 

B.A., University of Texas, 1932; m.a., 1932; b.litt., Oxford University, 1936; 
D.PHIL., 1936. 

ALBiN o. KUHN, Assistant to the President 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; ph.d., 1948. 

ALViN E. CORMENY, Assistant to the President, in Charge of "Endowment and 
Development 

B.A., Illinois College, 1933; ll.b., Cornell University, 1936. 

R. LEE HORNBAKE, Dean of the Faculty 

B.S., State Teachers College, California, Pa., 1934; m.a., Ohio State University, 1936; 
PH.D., 1942. 

Emeriti 

HARRY c. BYRD, President Emeritus 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1908; ll.d., Washington College, 1936; ll.d., Dickin- 
son CoUege, 1938; d.sc. Western Maryland College, 1938. 

HAROLD F. coTTERMAN, Dean of the Faculty, Emeritus 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1916; m.a., Columbia University, 1917; ph.d., American 
University, 1930. 

Administrative Officers of the Schools and Colleges 

MYRON s. AiSENBERG, Dean of the School of Dentistry 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1922. 

VERNON E. ANDERSON, Dean of the College of Education 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1930; m.a., 1936; ph.d.. University of Colorado, 1942. 

BONALD BAMFORD, Dean of the Graduate School 

B.S., University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S., University of Vermont, 1926; ph.d., 
Columbia University, 1931. 

CLIFFORD G. BLiTCH, Director of the University Hospital 
M.D., Vanderbilt University Medical School, 1928. 

CORDON M. CAIRNS, Dean of Agriculture 

B.S., Cornell University, 1936; M.S., 1938; ph.d., 1940. 

RAY w. ehrensberger, Dean of the College of Special and Continuation Studies 
E.A., Wabash College, 1929; m.a., Butler University, 1930; ph.d., Syracuse Uni- 
versity, 1937. 

NOEL E. Foss, Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

PH.c, South Dakota State College, 1929; b.s., 1929; m.s.. University of Maryland, 
1932; PH.D., 1933. 

M 2 



LESTER M. FRALEY, Dean of the College of Physical Ediication, Recreation, and 
Health 

B.A., Randolph-Macon College, 1928; m.a., 1937; ph.d., Pcabody College, 1939. 

FLORENCE M. GiPE, Dcau of the School of NuTsing 

B.S., Catholic University ot America, 1937; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1940; 
ED.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

IRVIN c. HAUT, Director, Agricultural Experiment Station and Head, Defartment 
of Horticulture 

B.S., University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 1930; PH.D., 

University of Maryland, 1933. 

ROGER HOWELL, Dean of the School of Law 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1914; ph.d., 1917; ll.b., University of Maryland, 
1917. 

wiLBBRT J. HUFF, Director, Engineering Experiment Station and Chairman of 

the Division of Physical Sciences 

B.A., Ohio Northern University, 1911; b.a., Yale College, 1914; ph.d., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1917; D.sc. (hon.), Ohio Northern University, 1927. 

FLORANCE B. KING, Acting Dean of the College of Home Economics 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1914; m.a.. University of California, 1926; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Indiana, 1929. 

FREDERIC T. MAVIS, Deati of the College of Engineeritig 
B.S., University of Illinois, 1922; m.s., 1926; ph.d., 1935. 

PAUL E. nystrom. Director, Agriciiltiiral Extension Service 

B.S., University of California, 1928; m.s.. University of Maryland, 1931; m.p.a.. 
Harvard University, 1948; d.p.a., 1951. 

J. freeman pyle, Dean of the College of Business and Puhlic Administration 
PH.B., University of Chicago, 1917; m.a., 1918; ph.d., 1925. 

JAMES REGAN, JR., Acting Dean of the College of Military Science 
Colonel, United States Army, Retired. 

LEON P. SMITH, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

B.A., Emory University, 1919; m.a.. University of Chicago, 1928; ph.d., 1930; 
Diplome le I'lnstitut de Touraine, 1932. 

WILLIAM s. STONE, Dean of the School of Medicine and Director of Medical 
Education and Research 

B.S., University of Idaho, 1924; m.s., 1925; m.d.. University of Louisville, 1929; 

PH.D., (hon.). University of Louisville, 1946. 

General Administrative Officers 

G. WATSON ALGiRE, Director of Admissions and Registrations 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1930; m.s., 1931. 

NORMA J. AZLEiN, Registrar 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1940. 



HARRY A. BISHOP, Director of the Student Health Service 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1912. j.-- 

DAVID L. BRiGHAM, Alumfii Secretary 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1938. 

c. WILBUR cissEL, Director of Finance and Business 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1932; m.a., 1934; c.p.a., 1939. 

WILLIAM w. COBEY, Director of Athletics 
A.B., University of Maryland, 1930. 

GEARY F. EPPLEY, Director of Student Welfare and Dean of Men 
B.S., Maryland State College, 1920; M.S., University of Maryland, 1926. 

GEORGE w. FOGG, Director of Personnel 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1926; m.a., 1928. 

ROBERT E. KENDiG, Profcssor of Air Science and Commandant of Cadets, Air 
Force R.O.T.C. 

A.B., William and Mary College, 1939. 

ROBERT J. MCCARTNEY, Director of University Relations 
B.A., University of Massachusetts, 1941. 

GEORGE w. MORRISON, Associate Director and Supervising Engineer Physical 
Plant ^Baltimore') 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1927; e.e., 1931. 

HOWARD ROVELSTAD, Director of Libraries 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1936; m.a., 1937; b.s.l.s., Columbia University, 1940. 

ADELE H. STAMP, Dean of Women 

B.A., Tulane University, 1921; m.a., University of Maryland, 1924. 

GEORGE o. WEBER, Director and Supervising Engineer, Department of Physical 
Plant 

B.S., University of Marj'land, 1933. 

Division Chairmen 

JOHN E. FABER, JR., Chairman of the Division of Biological Sciences 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1926; m.s., 1927; ph.d., 1937. 

HAROLD c. HOFSOMMER, Chairman of the Division of Social Sciences 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1921; m.a., 1923; ph.d., Cornell University, 1929. 

wiLBERT J. HUFF, Chairman of the Division of Physical Sciences 

B.A., Ohio Northern University, 1911; b.a., Yale College, 1914; ph.d., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1917; D.sc, (hon.), Ohio Northern University, 1927. 

CHARLES E. WHITE, Chairman of the Lower Division 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1926; m.s., 1927; ph.d., 1937. 

ADOLF E. zucKER, Chairman of the Division of Humanities 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1912; m.a., 1913; ph.d.. University of Pennsylvania, 
1917. 



CHAIRMEN, STANDING COMMITTEES, FACULIT SENATE* 

GENEHAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

Prof. Russell B. Allen (Engineering), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS 

Dr. Charles Manning (Arts and Sciences), Cliairuinn 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

Dr. R. Lee Hornbakc (Dean of Faculty), CJinirvuvi 

COMMITTEE ON SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

Dr. Charles White (Arts and Sciences), Chainuau 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS, CURRICULA AND COURSES 

Dr. Peter Lejins (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS-IN-AID 

Dr. Paul R. Poffcnberger (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RESEARCH 

Dr. John S. Toll (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 

Dr. Leon P. Smith (Arts and Sciences), Chair-man 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARIES 

Dr. Lucius Garvin (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Dr. Charles D. Murphy (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 

Prof. Russell B. Allen (Engineering), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 

Dr. John H. Frederick (Business and Public Administrarion), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

Prof. Warren L. Strausbaugh (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Dr. Stanley Jackson (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Dr. William E. Bickley (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT EMPLOYMENT AND SELF-HELP 

Dr. John E. Foster (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION 

Dr. IrA'in C. Haut (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, ACADEMIC FREEDOM AND TENURE 

Dr. Carroll E. Cox (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS AND SALARIES 

Dr. Monroe H. Martin (Institute of Fluid Dynamics), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 

Prof. Homer Lllrich (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 

Prof. Russell R. Reno (Law), Chairman 
*Effective October 29, 1957. 



FACULTY 
1958-1959 

COLLEGE OF 
BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 



Administrative Officers 

J. FREEMAN PYLE, Pwfessor of Marketing and Economics and Dean of the 
College of Business and Public Administration 
PH.B., University of Chicago, 1917; m.a., 1918; PH.D., 1925. 

JAMES H. REiD, Professor of Marketing and Assistant Dean of the College of 
Business and Public Administration 
B.S., University of Iowa, 1923; m.a., University of Nebraska, 1933. 

Professors 

FRANKLIN L. BUR0ETTE, Profcssor of Government and Politics, and Director of 
the Bureau of Governmental Research 

A.B., Marshall CoEege, 1934; m.a.. University of Nebraska, 1935; m.a., Princeton, 

1937; PH.D., 1938. 

CHARLES E. CALHOUN, Professor of Finance 

A.B., University of Washington, 1925; m.b.a., 1930. 

ELI w. CLEMENS, Professor of Business Administration 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1930; m.s.. University of Illinois, 1934; PH.D., 
University of Wisconsin, 1940. 

J. ALLAN COOK, Professor of Marketing 

B.A., William and Mary, 1928; m.b.a.. Harvard, 1936; ph.d., Columbia, 1947. 

JOHN H. COVER, Profcssor and Director of the Bureau of Business and Economic 
Research 

B.S., Columbia, 1915; a.m., 1919; ph.d., 1927. 

ALFRED A. CROWELL, Profcssor and Head of the Defartment of Journalism and 
Public Relations 

A.B., University of Oklahoma, 1929; m.a., 1934; m.s.j.. Northwestern, 1940. 

DUDLEY DiLLARD, Professor and Head of the Department of Economics 
B.S., University of California, 1935; ph.d., 1940. 

^6 



ALLAN J. FISHER, Pwfessor of Acconnthig mid finance 

B.S., Wharton School of Finance and Commerce, 1928; litt.m., University of Pitts- 
burgh, 1936; PH.D., 1937. 

JOHN H. FREDERICK, Professor and Head of the Department of Business Oragani- 

zation 

B.S., Wharton School of Finance and Commerce, 1918; m.a., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1925; PH.D., 1927. 

ALLAN o. GRUCHY, ProfessoT of Economtcs 

B.A., University of British Columbia, 1926; m.a., McGill 1928; ph.d., University 
of Virginia, 1931. 

CHARLES Y. Hu, Pwfessor of Geography 

B.S., University of Nanking, China, 1930; m.a., University of California, 1936; ph.d.. 
University of Chicago, 1941. 

EARL w. MOUNCE, Professor of Law and Labor 

B.S., University of Missouri, 1921; m.a., 1922; a.b., 1927; ll.b., 1929; ll.m.. Uni- 
versity of Southern California, 1945. 

ARTHUR s. PATRICK, Professor of Office Management and Business Education 
B.S., Wisconsin State College, 1931; m.a.. University of Iowa, 1940; ph.d., Ameri- 
can University, 1956. 

ELMER PLISCHKE, ProfessoT and Head of the Department of Government and 
Politics 

PH.B., Marquette, 1937; m.a., American University, 1938; ph.d., Qark University, 

1943. 

REUBEN G. sTEiNMEYER, Ptofcssor of Government and Politics 
A.B., American University, 1929; ph.d., 1935. 

CHARLES T. SWEENEY, ProfcssoT of Accounting 

B.S., Cornell, 1921; m.b.a.. University of Michigan, 1928; c.p.a., Iowa, 1934; Ohio, 
1936. 

HAROLD F. SYLVESTER, ProfessoT of Personnel Administration 
PH.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1938. 

CHARLES A. TAFF, ProfessoT of Transportation 

B.S., University of Iowa, 1937; m.a., 1941; ph.d.. University of Maryland, 1952. 

WILLIAM VAN ROYER, Profcssor and Head of the Department of Geography 
M.A., Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht, 1925; ph.d., Clark University, 1928. 

srvERT M. WEDEBERG, Professor of Accounting 

B.B.A., University of Washington, 1925; c.p.a., Marj'land, 1934; a.m., Yale, 1935. 

NORMAN WENGERT, Ptofcssor of Government and Politics 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1938; m.a., Fletcher School, 1939; ll.b.. University 
of Wisconsin, 1942; ph.d., 1947. 

HOWARD w. WRIGHT, Professor of Accounting 

B.S., Temple, 1937; m.a.. University of Iowa, 1940; c.p.a., Te.xas, 1940; ph.d., 
University of Iowa, 1947. 

7 ► 



Consulting Professor 

VICTOR ROTERus, Consulting Professor of Geography 
PH.B., University of Chicago, 1930; M.S., 1931. 

Associate Professors 

THORNTON H. ANDERSON, Associate Professor of Government and Politics 

A.B., University of Kentucky, 1937; m.a., 1938; ph.d.. University of Wisconsin, 
1948. 

JOHN P. AUGELLi, Associate Professor of Geography 

B.A., Clark University, 1943; m.a.. Harvard, 1949; ph.d., 1951. 

JOHN H. CUMBERLAND, Associate Professor and Assistant Director of the Bureau of 
Business and Economic Research 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1947; m.a.. Harvard, 1949; ph.d., 1951. 

TOWNES L. DAWSON, Associate Professor of Business Law 

B.B.A., University of Texas, 1943; b.s., U. S. Merchant Marine Academy, 1946; 
M.B.A., University of Texas, 1947; ph.d., 1950; ll.b., 1954. 

DWiGHT L. GENTRY, Associate Professor of Marketing 

, A.B., Elon College, 1941; m.b.a., Northwestern, 1947; ph.d.. University of Illinois, 
1952. 

HENRY w. GRAYSON, Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., University of Saskatchewan, 1937; m.a., University of Toronto, 1947; ph.d., 
1950. 

JOHN G. GURLEY, Associate Professor of Economics 
B.A., Stanford, 1942; ph.d., 1951. 

DANIEL hamberg, Associatc Professor of Economics 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1945; m.a., 1947; ph.d., 1952. 

DONALD w. KRiMEL, Associate Professor of Public Relations 

B.ED., Illinois State Teachers, 1941; ph.m.. University of Wisconsin, 1946; ph.d., 
1955. 

STEPHEN J. MUELLER, Associate Professor of Industrial Management 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1939; m.b.a.. Northwestern University, 1943; j.D., 
DePaul University, 1947. 

Assistant Professors 

FRANK o. ahnert. Assistant Professor of Geography 
DR. PHIL., Heidelberg University, 1953. 

ALBERT L. ALFORD, Assistant Professor of Government and Politics 
A.B., University of Akron, 1948; a.m., Princeton, 1951; ph.d., 1953. 

=^ 8 



ROBERT G. CAREY, Assistant Professor of Jotirnalisvi 

A.B., Westminster, 1950; a.m , University of Pittsburgh, 1954. 

jC'HN A. DAiKER, Assistant Professor of Accounting 

C.P.A., District of Columbia, 1949; b.s., University of Maryland, 1941; m.b.a., 1951. 

JOHN H. DALTON, Assistant Professor of Economics 
A.B., University of California, 1943; pii.d., 1955. 

ALFRED DANEGGER, Assistant Professor of Press Photography, University 
Photographer 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1950. 

WALTER w. DESHLER, Assistant Professor of Geography 

B.S., Lafayette College, 1943; m.a., University of Maryland, 1952; ph.d., 1957. 

HORACE V. HARRISON, Assistant Professor of Government and Politics 
B.A., Trinity, Texas, 1932; m.a.. University of Te.xas, 1941; ph.d., 1951. 

GUY B. HATHORN, Assista7it Profcssor of Government and Politics 
B.A., University of Mississippi, 1940; m.a., 1942; ph.d., Duke, 1950. 

DAVID J. M. HOOSON, Assistant Professor of Geography 
B.A., Oxford University, England, 1948; m.a., Oxford University, England, 1950; 
B.sc, (Econ.), London University, England, 1951; ph.d., London University, Eng- 
land, 1955. 

LEROY L. LEE, Assistant Professor of Accounting 

A.B., George Washington University, 1948; c.p.a., Maryland, 1949; a.m., George 
Washington, 1952. 

NEIL M. MCARTHUR, Assistant Professor of Geography 

B.A., U. of Western Ontario, 1948; m.a., 1950; ph.d., U. of Michigan, 1955. 

WALTER s. MEASDAY, Assistant Professor of Economics 

A.B., William and Mar)', 1945; ph.d., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1955. 

BOYD L. NELSON, Assistant Professor of Business Administration 
B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1947; m.a., 1948; ph.d., 1952. 

DURWARD E. NEwsoM, Assistant Professor of Journalism 

B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1948; m.s.j.. Northwestern University, 1949; ed.d., 
Oklahoma State University, 1957. 

MAURICE E. o'donnell, Research Associate and Assistant Professor, Bureau of 

Governmental Research 

B.S., Eastern Illinois State, 1948; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1951; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1954. 

ANTHONY SAS, Assistant Professor of Geography 

B.A., University of Amsterdam, 1947; m.a.. University of Washington, 1951; ph.d., 
Qark University, 1957. 

G. DONALD SHELBY, Assistant Professor iyi Economics 

B.A., University of Cincinnati, 1947; ph.d.. University of California, 1955. 

9 ► 



SPENCER M. SMITH, Assistant Professor of Economics i 

B.A., University o£ Iowa, 1941; m.a., 1942; ph.d., 1948. 

Instructors 

CHARLES E. BARRETT, Instructor in Economics 

A.B., Loyola College, 1942; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1950. 

CARTER R. BRYAN, Instructor in Journalism 

B.A., University of California, 1937; ph.b.. University of Vienna, Austria, 1940. 

ELBERT M. BYRD, Instructor in Government and Politics 
B.S., American University, 1953; m.a., 1954. 

ROBERT R. CLUSE, Instructor in Statistics 
B.B.A., 1951; M.A., University of Miami, 1952. 

ERNEST H. DAY, Instructor in Economics 

A.B., Oberlin College; ll.b., George Washington, 1950; M.A., 1955. 

NORTON T. DODGE, Instructor in Economics 
A.B., Cornell, 1948; m.a.. Harvard, 1951. 

CHARLES B. EDELSON, Instructor in Accounting 

B.B.A., University of New Mexico, 1949; m.b.a., Indiana University, 1950; G.P.A., 
Maryland, 1951. ^ 

WILLIAM P. GLADE, JR., Instructor in Economics 

B.B.A., University of Texas, 1950; m.a., 1951; ph.d., 1955. 

JOHN J. HEBAL, Instructor in Government and Politics 
PH.B., University of Wisconsin, 1947; m.a.. University of Alabama, 1948. 

DONALD c. HESTER, Instructor in Government and Politics 
B.A., Blufton College, 1943; m.a., Ohio State University, 1944. 

CHARLES F. HE YE, InstTuxitor in Business Organization 

B.B.A., University of Texas, 1943; m.b.a.. University of Maryland, 1947. 

ROBERT s. HiMES, Instructor in Accounting 

B.C.S., Benjamin Franklin University, 1939: m.c.s., 1940; b.s., American University, 
1951; m.b.a., 1955. 

WALTER V. HOHENSTEiN, Instvtictor in Government and Politics 
B.A., Winona State Teachers College, 1950; m.a.. University of Minnesota, 1951; 
PH.D., 1956. 

ARTHUR E. KARiNEN, Instructor in Geografhy 
B.A., University of California, 1944; m.a., 1948. 

JANE H. o'neill. Instructor in Office Techniques 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1932. 

MARK A. PLivELic, Instructor in Accounting 

B.S., Duquesne, 1951; m.litt., University of Pittsburgh, 1956. 

•< 10 



WERNER J. SEVERIN, InstTuctOT in Press Photography 
B.A., University of Missouri 1956. 

wiLMER A. WATROUS, Instructor of Industrial Management 

B.S., University of California, 1940; m.a., University of California, 1946. 

JAMES G. BROWN, Instructor of Office Techniques and Management 
B.A., George Washington University, 1948; m.a., 1949. 

Junior Instructors 

CHARLES R. ANDERSON, Junior Instructor in Office Techniques and Management 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1957. 

WILLIAM R. HAMILTON, JR., Junior htstructor in Government and Politics 
B.A., University of Oklahoma, 1954; m.a.. University of Marj'Iand, 1956. 

DAWN F. SHIELDS, Junior Instructor in Office Techniques and Management 
B.S., Ohio State University, 1951. 

Lecturers 

WILLIAM A. DYMSZA, Lecturer in Economics 

A.B., Pennsylvania State College, 1943; m.b.a., Wharton School of Finance and 
Commerce, 1948; ph.d., University of Pennsylvania, 1951. 

LYNN R. EDMiNSTER, Lecturer in Economics 

A.B., Harvard, 1916; ph.d., Brookings Institution, 1930. 

CARL P. N. JENSEN, Lccturer in Economics 

B.S., University of California, 1934; m.a., Columbia University, 1946. 

HOYT LEMONS, Lccturer in Geography 

B.ED., Southern Illinois University, 1936; m.a., . University of Nebraska, 1938; 
PH.D., 1941. 

F WEBSTER MCBRYDE, Lecturer in Geografhy 

B.A., Tulane, 1930; ph.d.. University of California, 1940. 

EDMUND c. MESTER, Lecturer in the Department of Government and Politics 
and Executive Secretary of the Maryland Municipal League 
A.B., University of Mar)']and, 1948; m.a., 1949. 

JOHN L. TiERNEY, Lccttircr in Industrial Management and Personnel 

A.B., University of Minnesota, 1929; ll.b.. University of Wisconsin, 1938; ll.m., 
George Washington, 1956. 



11 



Research Associate 

BRUCE w. MACY, Research Associate, Bureau of Business and Economic Research 
B.S., Iowa State College, 1952; M.S., 1954. 

Faculty Members Teaching Abroad 

EOSCOE BAKER, PH.D Lccturcr in Government and Politics 

JAMES D. BLiCK, PH.D Assistant Professor of Geography 

JOHN A. BOTTOMLEY, M.A Instructor in Economics 

LESLIE R. BUNDGAARD, PH.D Lccturcr in Government and Politics 

ROBERT Y. DURAND, M.B.A Instructor in Business Administration 

DAVID M. EARL, PH.D Lccturcr in Government and Politics 

KURT GLASER, PH.D Lecturer in Government and Politics 

WAYNE w. HEisER, M.A Instructor in Geografhy 

CHARLES p. KRETZSCHMAR, M.A Instructor in Economics 

THOMAS J. LEARY, PH.D Lecturer in Economics 

ARTHUR A. MANDEL, PH.D Lccturcr in Economics 

THEODORE MCNELLY, PH.D Lecturer in Government and Politics 

EDWARD R. PADGETT, PH.D Lecturer in Government and Politics 

JOHN M. STREET, B.A Instructor in Geografhy 

DONALD E. TOTTEN, M.s Instructor in Geography and Assistant to Director 

JOHN H. WARKENTiN, M.A Instructor in Geography 

LARMAN c. WILSON, M.A Lecturet in Government and Politics 



12 



THE COLLEGE 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND is in an unusually favorable location for 
students of Business, Government and Politics, Economics, Public Admin- 
istration, Geography, Journalism and Public Relations, Foreign Service and 
International Relations. Downtown Washington is only twenty-five minutes 
away in one direction, while the Baltimore business district is less than an hour 
in the other. There is frequent transportation service from College Park to each 
city. Special arrangements are made to study commercial, manufacturing, export- 
ing, and importing agencies and methods in Baltimore. Assistance is given 
qualified students who wish to obtain a first-hand glimpse of the farflung 
economic activities of the national government or to utilize the libraries, govern- 
ment departments, and other facilities available in Washington. 

Organization 

The College comprises seven departments and two bureaus of research. 

I. Department of Business Organization and Administration 

1. Accounting and Statistics 

2. Financial Administration 

3. Industrial Administration 

4. Insurance and Real Estate 

5. Marketing Administration 

(a) Advertising 

(b) Foreign Trade 

(c) Retail Store Management 

(d) Sales Management 

6. Personnel Administration 

7. Transportation Administration 

(a) Airline and Airport Management 

(b) Traffic Management 

8. Public Administration 

II. Department of Economics 

III. Department of Foreign Service and International Relations 

IV. Department of Geography 

V. Department of Government and Politics 
VI. Department of Journalism and Public Relations 

VII. Department of Office Techniques and Management 

1. Office Management 

2. Office Techniques 

13 ► 



Objectives of the College 

VIII. Bureau of Business and Economic Research 
IX. Bureau of Governmental Research 
X. Maryland Municipal League (Affiliated) 

Objectives 

The College of Business and Public Administration offers courses designed 
to prepare young men and women for service in business firms, governmental 
agencies, cooperative enterprises, labor unions, publishing firms, small business 
units, and other organizations requiring effective training in administrative skills 
and techniques, and for the teaching of business subjects, economics, geography, 
government and politics, and journalism and public relations in high schools 
and colleges. It supplies scientific training in administration to students and 
prospective executives on a professional basis comparable to university training 
in the other professional fields. Administration is regarded as a profession. The 
College of Business and Public Administration offers its students courses of in- 
struction which present general principles and techniques of management and 
administration and brings together in systematic form the experiences and 
practices of business firms and governmental units. This plan of education does 
not displace practical experience, but supplements and strengthens it by short- 
ening the period of apprenticeship otherwise necessary, and by giving a broad 
and practical knowledge of the major principles, policies, and methods of ad- 
ministration. 

During the first half of the college study program the student secures a 
broad foundation upon which to base the professional and the more technical 
courses offered in the last half of the curriculum. The managerial and operat- 
ing points of views are stressed in the advanced courses in production, marketing, 
labor, finance, real estate, insurance, accounting, office management and public 
administration. The purpose of the work offered is to aid the student as a pro- 
spective executive in developing his ability to identify and to solve administrative 
and managerial problems; and to adjust himself and his organization, policies 
and practices to changing social, political and economic situations. 

The aim of the college is to present and illustrate such sound principles 
of management as are applicable to both big business and small business. Large- 
scale business, because of its possible economies, will be expanded in some in- 
dustries under certain well-known conditions. There are, on the other hand, 
industries and many situations which still call for the small business. If these 
small-scale businesses are to be operated with profit to the owners and with 
satisfactory and economical service to the public, it is imperative that authentic 
principles of administration be applied to them. Sound principles of ethical con- 
duct are emphasized at all times throughout the various courses. 

The primary aim of collegiate education for government and business ser- 
vices is to prepare for effective management. The College of Business and Public 
Administration, University of Maryland, was established to supply effective ed- 

-< 14 



American Civilization 

ucation in administration to the young men and women whose task will be the 
guiding of the more complex business enterprises and governmental units result- 
ing from industrial, social and political development and expansion. 

The Program in American Civilization 

The University considers that it is important for every student to achieve 
an appreciative understanding of this country, its history and its culture. It has 
therefore established a comprehensive program in American Civilization. This 
program is also designed to provide the student with a general educational back- 
ground. 

Work in American Civilization is offered at three distinct academic levels. 
The first level is required of all freshmen and sophomores at the University 
and is described below. The second level is for undergraduate students wishing 
to carry a major in this field (see catalog for the College of Arts and Sciences). 
The third level is for students desiring to do graduate work in this field Csee 
catalog for the Graduate School). 

All students receiving a baccalaureate degree from the University of Mary- 
land must (except as specific exceptions are noted in printed curricula) obtain 
24 semester hours of credit in the lower division courses of the American Civiliza- 
tion Program. Although the courses in the Program are prescribed generally, 
some choice is permitted, especially for students who demonstrate in classification 
tests good previous preparation in one or more of the required subjects. 

The 24 semester hours in American Civilization are as follows: 

1. English (12 hours, Eng. 1, 2 and 3, 4 or 5, 6), American History (6 
hours, Hist. 5, 6), and American Government (3 hours, G. & P. 1) are required 
subjects; however, students who qualify in one, two or all three of these areas 
by means of University administered tests are expected to substitute certain 
elective courses. Through such testing a student may be released from 3 hours 
of English (9 hours would remain an absolute requirement), 3 hours of Amer- 
ican History (3 hours remaining as an absolute requirement), and 3 hours of 
American Government. Students released from 3 hours of English will take 
Eng. 21 instead of Eng. 1 and 2. Those released from 3 hours in History will 
take Hist. 56 instead of Hist. 5 and 6. Students who have been exempted from 
courses in English, History or American Government may not take such courses 
for credit. 

2. For the 3 additional hours of the 24 hours required, students elect one 
course from the following group (Elective Group I): 

Economics 37, Fundamentals of Economics. (Not open to Fresh- 
men. Students who may wish to take additional 
courses in economics should substitute Economics 
31 for Economics 37.) 

Philosophy 1, Philosophy of Modern Man 

Sociology 1, Sociology of American Life 

15 ► 



Academic Information 

(Students enrolled in the College of Business and Public Administration will 
normally meet this requirement by taking Economics 31 in the Sophomore year.) 

3. Students who, on the basis of tests, have been released from 3, 6 or 9 
hours in otherwise required courses in English, American History or American 
Government (see 1 above), shall select the replacements for these courses from 
any or all of the following groups: (a) more advanced courses in the same 
department as the required courses in which the student is excused, or (b) 
elective Group I (see 2 above), provided that the same course may not be used 
as both a Group I and a Group II choice, or (c) Elective Group II. Group II 
consists of the following 3 -hour courses: 

History 2, History of Modern Europe; either History 51 or 52, The Hu- 
manities; either Music 20, Survey of Music Literature or Art 22, History of 
American Art; Psychology 1, Introduction to Psychology; and Sociology 5, 
Anthropology. 

Academic Information 

DEGREES 

The University confers the following degrees on students of Business and 
Public Administration: Bachelor of Science, Master of Business Administration, 
Master of Arts, and Doctor of Philosophy. The College has a number of grad- 
uate assistantships in Business Administration, Economics, Geography, Journalism 
and Public Relations, Government and Politics, the Bureau of Governmental 
Research and the Bureau of Business and Economic Research available for 
qualified graduate students. Applications for these assistantships should be made 
directly to the Dean of the College of Business and Public Administration. (See 
bulletin of Graduate School for graduate rules and regulations.) 

Each candidate for a degree must file in the office of the Registrar on a date 
announced for each semester a formal application for a degree. Candidates for 
degrees must attend a convocation at which degrees are conferred and diplomas 
are awarded. Degrees are conferred in absentia only in exceptional cases. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENT 

A minimum of 120 semester hours of credit with an average of "C" in 
courses suggested by the College in addition to the specified courses in military 
science, physical activities and hygiene are required for graduation. A minimum 
of 57 semester hours of the required 120 hours must be in upper division courses. 
The student is required to have an average of "C" for courses used in meeting 
the quantitative graduation requirements. The time required to complete the 
requirements for the bachelor's degree for the average student is eight semesters. 
A superior student, by carrying more than the average load, can complete the 
work in a shorter period of time. 

•< 16 



Academic hiformation 



JUNIOR STANDING 



To earn junior standing a student must complete fifty-six (56) semester 
hours of academic credit with an a\eragc grade of C (2.0) or better. In com- 
puting this average, the following pro\isions apply: all academic courses carry- 
ing one or more credits which have been taken up to the time of computation 
shall be included; courses carrying "O" credit shall not be included; all grades 
(including F) earned in courses which have been repeated shall be included; 
courses with grade F shall be included; courses in the basic AFROTC, the 
Physical Education required of all University students, and the Health required 
of all women students shall not be included. 

Detailed regulations pertaining to junior standing are presented in full in 
the publication, University Regulations and General Information. 



SENIOR RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT 

After a student has earned acceptable credit to the extent of 90 semester 
hours exclusive of the required work in military science, physical activities, and 
hygiene, either at the University of Maryland or elsewhere, he must earn a 
subsequent total of at least 30 semester hours with an average grade of "C" or 
better at the University of Maryland. No part of these credits may be trans- 
ferred from another institution. Specific requirements for graduation in the 
selected curriculum must be met. 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

The College offers programs of study in economics, business administration, 
office techniques, office management, public administration, government and 
politics, geography, journalism and public relations, and some combination cur- 
riculums, e.g., business administration and law, commercial teaching and in- 
dustrial education. Research is emphasized throughout the various programs. 



PROFESSIONAL OBJECTIVES 

1 he c.\ccuti\c manager or administrator in modern business enterprises and 
governmental units and agencies should have a clear understanding of: 

(a) the business organizations and institutions which comprise the modern 
business world; 

(b) the political, social, and economic forces which tend to limit or to 
promote the free exercise of his activities; and 

(c) the basic principles which underlie the efficient organization and ad- 
ministration of a business or governmental enterprise. 

17 ► 



Academic Information 

In addition, the executive or the prospective executive should: 

(a) be able to express his thoughts and ideas in correct and concise English; 

(b) have some useful knowledge of the physical u^orld in which he 
operates. 

(c) have a knowledge of the development of modem civilization through 
a study of history, government, economics, and other social studies; 

Cd) have a sympathetic understanding of people gained through a study 
of sociology, geography, politics, labor relations, marketing, and other subjects. 

If the executive is to be successful in solving current and future busi- 
ness and governmental problems, he should be skilled in the scientific method 
of collecting, analyzing, and classifying pertinent facts in the most significant 
manner, and then, on the basis of these facts, be able to draw sound conclusions 
and to formulate general principles which may be used to guide his present and 
future professional or vocational conduct. In other words, probably the most im- 
portant qualities in a successful executive are: 

(a) the ability to arrive at sound judgments; 

(b) the capacity to formulate effective plans and policies, and the imagina- 
tion and ability to devise organizations, methods, and procedures for executing 
them. 

FACILITIES FURNISHED 

The teaching staff and the curriculums of the College of Business and Pub- 
lic Administration have been selected and organized for the purpose of providing 
a type of professional and technical education that will aid the capable and am- 
bitious student in developing his potential talents to their full capacity. 

The college study programs on both the undergraduate and graduate levels 
presuppose effective training in English, history, government, science, and mathe- 
matics.* The program of study for any individual student may be so arranged 
as to meet the needs of those preparing for specific lines of work, such as account- 
ing, advertising, banking, foreign trade, industrial administration, marketing ad- 
ministration, personnel administration, ofi&ce management, real estate practice, 
insurance, journalism, public relations, government employment, office tech- 
niques, teaching, and research. 

MILITARY INSTRUCTION 

All male students unless specifically exempted under University rules are 
required to take basic air force ROTC training for a period of two years. The 



*The major portion of this training is usually secured in the four years of high 
school and the first two years of college. 

-^ 18 



Honors and Awards 

successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for graduation but it must 
he taken by all eligible students during the first two years of attendance at the 
University, whether they intend to graduate or not. Transfer students who do 
not have the required two years of military training will be required to complete 
the course or take it until graduation whichever occurs first. 

Selected students who meet the requirements of the Military Department 
may carry advanced Air Force ROTC courses during their Junior and Senior 
years and may receive, under conditions determined by the Military, a regular 
or reserve commission in the United States Air Force. 

COSTS 

Actual annual costs of attending the University include $185.00 fixed 
charges; $77.00 special fees; $400.00 board; $160 to $190 lodging for iMaryland 
residents, or $200 to $240 for residents of other States and Countries; and lab- 
oratory fees which vary with the laboratory course pursued. A matriculation fee 
of $10.00 is charged all new students. A charge of $250.00 is assessed to all stu- 
dents who are non-residents of the State of Maryland. 

For a more detailed statement of costs, write to the Director of Publications 
for a copy of the General Information Catalog. 

ADMISSIONS 

All students desiring to enroll in the College of Business and Public Ad- 
ministration must apply to the Director of Admissions of the University of 
Maryland at College Park. 

In selecting students more emphasis will be placed upon good marks and 
other indications of probable success in college than upon a fixed pattern of 
subject matter. In general, four units of English and one unit each of Social 
Studies and Natural Sciences are required. One unit each of Algebra and Plane 
Geometry is desirable. While Foreign Language is desirable for certain programs 
no Foreign Language is required for entrance. Fine Arts, Trade and Vocational 
subjects are acceptable as electives. 

For a more detailed statement of admissions, write to the Director of 
Publications for a copy of the General Information Catalog. 



Honors and Awards 

The Dean's list of Distinguished Students. Any student who has passed at 
least 14 hours of work in the preceding semester, without failure of any course, 
and with an average grade on all courses of at least 3.5, will be placed on the 
Dean's List of Distinguished Students. This list is posted in the ofi&ce of the 
Dean of the College. 

19 ► 



Honors and Awards 

Beta Gamma Sigma. The Alpha of Maryland Chapter of Beta Gamma 
Sigma was chartered in 1940. The purpose of this honorary society is to en- 
courage and reward scholarship and accomplishment among students of com- 
merce and business administration; to promote the advancement of education in 
the art and science of business; and to foster integrity in the conduct of busi- 
ness operations. Chapters of Beta Gamma Sigma are chartered only in schools 
holding membership in the American Association of Collegiate Schools of Busi- 
ness. Third and fourth year students in business administration are eligible; if 
in his third year, a student must rank in the highest four per cent of his class, 
and if in his fourth year, he must rank in the highest ten per cent in order to 
be considered for selection. 

. The Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key is awarded annually to the student 
who has maintained the highest scholastic standing during the entire course of 
study in business administration or economics. 

Delta Sigma Pi was founded at New York University on November 7, 1907. 
The " Gamma Sigma of Maryland chapter was chartered at the University of 
Maryland in 1950. Delta Sigma Pi is a professional fraternity organized to 
foster the study of business in universities; to encourage scholarship, social 
activit)', and the association of students for their mutual advancement by re- 
search and practice; to promote closer affiliation between the commercial world 
and students of commerce; and to further a high standard of commercial ethics 
and culture, as well as the civic and commercial welfare of the community. 
Members are selected from the College of Business and Public Administration 
on the basis of leadership, scholastic standing, and promise of future business 
success. 

The Pi Sigma Alpha Fred Hays Memorial Award in Government and 
Politics is awarded annually by the Department of Government and Politics to 
the graduating senior who earns the highest grades among the majors in Gov- 
ernment and Politics of the graduating class. The award is a cash award, not 
less than $25.00, provided by an anonymous alumnus. This award is named 
in memory of Fred Hays, an honor graduate and former student president of 
Pi Sigma Alpha, the honorary Political Science fraternity. Fred Hays was 
killed in action in Korea. 

The Alumni Association of the University provides a scholarship of $250. 

Baltimore Sunpapers Scholarship in Journalism. The Board of Trustees 
of the A. S. Abell Foundation, Inc. has contributed $500 to provide a scholar- 
ship in journalism to be awarded to a worthy senior in the College of Business 
and Public Administration who is majoring in editorial journalism. 

• The Baltimore News-Post finances two $500 annual journalism scholarships. 

The Montgomery County Press Association's $200 annual journalism scholar- 
ship is awarded to a resident of that county. 

-4- 20 



Honors and Awards 

The Maryland Motor Truck Association, Inc., provides an award of $500 
annually to a student concentrating in transportation who is registered in the 
College of Business and Public Administration. 

The Davidson Transfer and Storage Co. gives an award of $500 to a 
capable student in the College who is concentrating in transportation. 

Pilot Freight Carriers, Inc. provides a $500 award to a senior in the Col- 
lege of Business and Public Administration who is concentrating in trans- 
portation with a major interest in motor transportation. 

The Maryland Association of Certified Public Accountants makes avail- 
able a scholarship of $200 for an outstanding student in accounting who is 
registered in the College. 



21 



CURRICULA AND REQUIRED COURSES 

A student in the College can so arrange his grouping and sequence of 
courses as to form a fair degree of concentration in one of the Departments. 
When, however, he wishes to become a specialist in any one of the depart- 
ments, he should plan to continue his subjects on to the graduate level, work- 
ing toward either the Master or the Doctor of Philosophy degree. 



I. BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

Business organizations are set up primarily for the purpose of ■producing 
and distributing goods and services. Modern business administration requires 
a knowledge of and skill in the use of effective tools for the control of organi- 
zations, institutions, and operations. The curriculums of the Department of 
Business Organization and Administration emphasize the principles and prob- 
lems of the development and the use of policies and organizations, and the 
methods, techniques and procedures of execution, in other words, the essence 
of Administration and Management. 

STUDY PROGRAMS IN THE DEPARTMENT 

The programs of study in the Department of Business Organization and 
Administration are so arranged as to facilitate concentrations according to the 
major functions of business organization. This plan is not, however, based 
on the assumption that these major divisions are independent units, but rather 
that each is closely related and dependent on the others. Every student in Busi- 
ness Administration, therefore, is required to complete satisfactorily a mini- 
mum number of required basic subjects in economics and in each of the major 
functional fields. Each graduate upon completion of the requirements for the 
bachelor's degree finds himself well grounded in the theory and practice of 
administration. There are five commonly recognized major business functions, 
viz: production, marketing, finance, labor relations, and control. 

The function of control may be thought of as comprising two sectors, viz. 
internal and external. Internal control has to do with men, materials, and 
operations. External control is secured through the force of laws, and court, 
board and commission decisions, also through the influence of custom and 
public opinion. Management endeavors to make adequate adjustments to these 
forces. Courses in law and public administration, for example, aid in giving 
the students an understanding of the problems, devices, and methods of ex- 
ternal or "social" control. 



< 22 



Business Organization and Administration Curriculum 

FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE REQUIREMENTS 

During the first half of the program of study each student in the Depart- 
ment of Business Organization and Administration is expected to complete 
the following basic subjects, except as indicated in a particular curriculum: 
Required Courses : Semester Hours 

Eng. 1 , 2— Composition and Readings in American Literature '. . . 6 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6— Composition and World or English Literature 6 

Math. 5, 6— Mathematics 6 

Geog. 1, 2— Economic Resources 4 

Econ. 4, 5— Economic Developments 4 

B.A. 10, 11— Organization and Control 4 

G. & P. 1— American Government' 3 

Elective Group I 3 

Hist. 5, 6— Histor)' of American Civilization ' 6 

B.A. 20, 21— Principles of Accoimting 8 

Speech 18, 1 9— Introductory Speech 2 

Econ. 31, 32— Principles of Economics 6 

Military Training and Physical Activities for Men 16 

Health and Physical Activities for Women 8 

Total speciiied requirements 66 or 74 

A minimum of forty per cent of the total number of credits required fox 
graduation must be in subjects with designations other than Business Adminis- 
tration; forty per cent of the required 120 semester hours of academic work 
must be in Business Administration subjects, the other twenty per cent may 
be in either group or comprise a combination of the two groups of subjects. An 
average of "C" in Business Administration courses is required for graduation. 

Freshmen who expect to make a concentration in foreign trade, or who 
plan to enter public ser\dce abroad, should elect an appropriate foreign lan- 
guage. If a foreign language is elected, 12 semester hours or the equivalent 
must be completed with an acceptable grade. 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR REQUIREMENTS 

During the junior and senior years each student in the department is 
required to complete in a satisfactory manner the following specified courses 
unless the particular curriculum being followed provides otherwise: 

Econ. 140— Money and Banking 3 

B. A. 140— Financial Management 3 

B. A. 150a— Marketing Principles and Organization 3 

B. A. 150— Marketing Management 3 

Econ. 160— Labor Economics 3 

B. A. 130— Elements of Statistics 3 

B. A. 1 60— Personnel Management 3 

B. A. 1 69— Industrial Management 3 

B. A. 180, 181-Business Law I, II 8 

Total 32 

'See American Civilization Program, page 15. 

23 ► 



Business Organization and Administration Curriculum 

The remaining credits for juniors and seniors may be used to meet the 
requirements for one of the special concentration programs, for example, in 
Public Administration, Foreign Service, Commercial Teaching, and in the 
fields of Business Administration, such as: Accounting and Statistics, Produc- 
tion Administration, Marketing, Advertising, Retailing, Purchasing, Foreign 
Trade, Transportation, Labor Relations, Real Estate, Insurance, Investment and 
General Finance. Juniors and seniors may elect appropriate Secretarial Training 
courses. 

COMBINED ADMINISTRATION AND LAW PROGRAM 

When a student elects the combination Administration-Law curriculum, 
he must complete in a satisfactory manner the specific requirements listed for 
the first three years of the general curriculum in administration plus enough 
electives to equal a minimum of 92 credits exclusive of military science, physical 
activities and hygiene, with an average grade of at least "C." The last year 
of college work before entering the Law School of the University of Maryland 
must be done in residence at College Park. The Bachelor of Science degree 
from the College of Business and Public Administration is conferred upon the 
completion of the first year in the Law School with an average grade of "C" 
or better. Eligible candidates are recommended for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science by the College of Business and Public Administration upon the concurrent 
recommendation of the School of Law, University of Maryland. Business Law 
cannot be used as credit in this combined curriculum. 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Business Administration are ac- 
cepted in accordance with the procedures and requirements for the Graduate 
School. See Graduate School Catalog, Section II. 

THE GENERAL CURRICULUM IN ADMINISTRATION 

This curriculum is set up on an eight semester basis which corresponds 
to the traditional four-year course that leads to a bachelor's degree. A student 
may complete the full course in a shorter period of time by attending summer 
sessions. A superior student may, however, complete the course in a shorter 
period of time by carrying a heavier load each semester. 

r-Semester—^ 
Freshman Year I 11 

Geog. 1, 2— Economic Resources 2 2 

Econ. 4, 5— Economic Delevopments 2 2 

Eng. 1, 2— Composition and Readings in American Literature^ 3 3 

B. A. 10, 1 1 —Organization and Control 2 2 

Mathematics 5 and 6 3 3 

G. & P. 1 —American Government ^ 3 

A. S. 1, 2-Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) 3 3 

Hea. 2— Personal Health (Women) 2 

Hea. 4— Community Health (Women) . . 2 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Elective . . 3 

Total 18-19 18-19 

^ See American Civilization Program, page 15. 
^ 24 



Business Organization and Administration Curriculum 

r-Setnester-~^ 

Sophomore Year I U 

Eng. 3, 4, or 5, 6— Comp. and World or English Literature 3 3 

Econ. 31, 32— Principles of Economics 3 3 

B. A. 20, 21— Principles of Accounting 4 4 

Speech 18, 19— Introductory Speech 1 1 

H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization ' 3 3 

Electives CWomen) 3 3 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Total 17-18 17-18 

junior Year 

Econ. 140— Money and Banking 3 

B. A. 140— Financial Management . . 3 

B. A. 130— Elements of Business Statistics 3 

B. A. 150a— Marketing Principles and Organization 3 

B. A. 1 50— Marketing Management . . 3 

Econ. 160— Labor Economics 3 

B. A. 160— Personnel Management . . 3 

Electives in Bus. & Pub. Adm. Economics, or other approved 

subjects 3 6 

Total 15 15 

Senior Year 

B. A. 180, 181-Busmess Law, I, II 4 4 

Econ. 131— Comparative Economic Systems 3 

Econ. 171— Economics of American Industries or 

B. A. 184-Public Utilities 3 

Econ. 142— Public Finance and Taxation 3 

B. A. 1 69— Industrial Management 3 

B. A. 1 89— Government and Business . . 3 

Electives in Bus. & Pub. Adm. Economics or other approved 

subjects 3 6 

Total 16 16 

Electives may be chosen under the direction of a facuky advisor from 
courses in Accounting, Statistics, Geography, Public LItilities and Public Ad- 
ministration, Secretarial Training, or other courses that will aid the student 
in preparing for his major objective. The electives indicated in the General 
Course are provided so that students can arrange their schedules, under the 



'See American Civilization Program, page 15. 

25 



Accounting and Statistical Control Program 

guidance of a faculty advisor, in such a way as to secure a concentration or 
major when desired in: 

1. Accounting and Statistics 5. Marketing Administration 

2. Financial Administration 6. Personnel Administration 

3. Industrial Administration 7. Transportation Administration 

4. Insurance and Real Estate 8. Public Administration 



1. ACCOUNTING AND STATISTICAL CONTROL 

Internal control in modem business and governmental organizations is a 
major over-all administrative function. The rapid growth in size and com- 
plexity of current governmental units and business enterprises has emphasized 
the importance of the problems of control in management. In order to control 
intelligently and effectively the manifold activities of these units, it is neces- 
sary to establish an organization, formulate policies, and develop methods of 
procedures. In order to perform satisfactorily these managerial activities, it 
is necessary to have pertinent facts concerning the operations of the various 
units, divisions, and departments. It is the function of the accounting and 
statistical departments to secure, analyze, classify, and interpret these facts. 

This study program is designed to give the student a broad training in 
administrative control supplemented by specific technical training in the prob- 
lems, procedures, methods and techniques of accounting and statistics. If the 
program is followed diligently, the student may prepare himself for a career 
as a public accountant, tax specialist, cost accountant, auditor, budget officer, 
comptroller, credit manager, or treasurer. 

In order to provide for practical experience arrangements have been made 
with firms of certified public accountants in Baltimore, New York and the Dis- 
trict of Columbia for apprenticeship training in the field of public accounting. 
This training is provided between semesters of the senior year (approximately 
January 15 to February 15), and for the semester immediately following 
graduation. A student may also elect to take one semester of apprenticeship 
training before graduation. 

The following study program provides courses for those wishing to con- 
centrate in this important field: 

Students who select a concentration in accounting and statistics follow 
the general study program in the freshman and sophomore years. 

M 26 



Accounting and Statistical Control Program 

/^Semester— ^ 
Junior Year I U 

B. A. 110, 11 1— Intermediate Accounting 3 3 

B. A. 121-Cost Accounting . . 4 

B. A. 123— Income Tax Accounting 4 

B. A. 130— Elements of Business Statistics . . 3 

Econ. 140— Money and Banking 3 

B. A. 140— Financial Management . . 3 

B. A. 150a— Marketing Principles and Organization 3 

B. A. 1 50— Marketing Management . . 3 

Elective 3 

Total 16 16 

Senior Year 

Econ. 160— Labor Economics 3 

B. A. 1 60— Personnel Management . . 3 

B. A. 124— Advanced Accounting Theory and Practice 

or B. A. 11 8— Governmental Accounting 3 

B. A. 126— Advanced Accounting Theory and Practice.... .. 3 

B. A. 122— Auditing Theory and Practice 3 

B. A. 127— Advanced Auditing Theory and Practice . . 3 

B. A. 1 69— Industrial Management 3 

B. A. 180, 181-Business Law 4 4 

Electives . . 3 

Total 16 16 

The student interested in the field may select such electives, with the aid 

of his advisor, from the following list of subjects, such courses as will best meet 
his needs: 

B.A. 116-Public Budgeting (3) B. A. 220-Managerial Accounting (3) 

B. A. 118— Governmental Accounting (3) B. A. 221, 222— Seminar in Accounting 
B.A. 125-C.P.A. Problems (3)* (arranged) (3) 

B.A. 129— Apprenticeship in Account- B. A. 226— Accounting Systems (3) 

ing (0) B. A. 228— Research in Accounting 
B.A. 132, 133— Advanced Business Statis- (arranged) (3) 

tics (3, 3) B. A. 229— Studies of special problems in 
B. A. 141— Investment Management (3) the fields of Control and Organization 

B. A. 143-Credit Management (3) (arranged) (3) 

B. A. 148— Advanced Financial Manage- Econ. 131— Comparative Economic Sys- 

ment (3) tems (3) 

B. A. 149— Analysis of Financial State- Econ. 132— Advanced Economic Principles 

ments (3) (3) 

B.A. 165— Office Management (3) Econ. 1 34— Contemporary Economic 
B. A. 166— Business Communications (3) Thought (3) 

B. A. 184— Public Utilities (3) Econ. 142— Public Finance and Taxation 
B. A. 210— Advanced Accounting Theory (3) 

(2-3) 

*C.P.A. Problems is recommended for students who plan to go into public account- 
ing. Such students should plan their study program so as to meet the professional 
examination requirements of the State in which they expect to take the examination or 
to practice. 

27 ► 



Pinancial Administration Curriculum 
2. FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION 

A nation with a highly developed industrial system requires an eflFective 
financial organization. Production and marketing activities of business enter- 
prises must be financed; a large volume of consumer purchases depend on 
credit, and the activities of local, state, and federal government depend, in 
large part, on taxation and borrowing. To meet these needs a complicated 
structure of financial institutions, both private and public, has evolved together 
with a wide variety of financial instruments. The methods used are equally 
varied and complicated. Since the financing service is so pervasive throughout 
our economic life and because it is an expense which must be borne by the 
ultimate purchaser, the management of the finance function is endowed vdth 
a high degree of public interest. 

This study program is designed to give the student fundamental informa- 
tion concerning financing methods, institutions, and instruments; and to aid him 
in developing his ability to secure and evaluate pertinent facts, and to form 
sound judgments with reference to financial matters. Through a wise selection 
of subjects the student who selects this curriculum may prepare himself for 
positions in the commercial, savings, and investment banking fields, invest- 
ment management; corporate financial management; real estate financing; and 
insurance. A student may qualify him.self to enter government service, e. g., in 
departments regulating banking operations, international finance, the issuance 
and sales of securities, and a number of financial corporations owned and 
operated or controlled by the government. 

Students wishing to form a concentration in Financial Administration 
should follow the general study program for the freshman and sophomore 
years, the program for the junior and senior years is outlined as follows: 

, — Semester-^ 

Junior Year I II 

Econ. 140— Money and Banking 3 . . 

B. A. 140— Financial Management . . 3 

B. A. 130— Elements of Business Statistics . . 3 

B. A. 110-111— Intermediate Accounting 3 3 

B. A. 166— Business Communications 3 

B. A. 150a— Marketing Principles and Organization 3 

B. A. 1 50— Marketing Management . . 3 

Electives in Economics, Government and Politics, and Busi- 
ness and Public Administration 3 4 

Total 15 16 

^28 



Industrial Administration Curricidum 
/—Seme^:<:r^ 
Senior Year I 11 

B. A. 180, 181-Business Law 4 4 

B. A. 169— Industrial Management . . 3 

B. A. 141— Investment Management 3 

B. A. 143— Credit Management 3 

B. A. 160— Personnel Management . . 3 

Econ. 160— Labor Economics 3 

B. A. 148— Advanced Financial Management 3 

Electives 3 3 

Total 16 16 

Selection of electives may be made with the aid of the advisor from the 
following list of subjects: 

B. A. ]23~Income Tax Accounting (4) B. A. 249-Studies of Special Problems in 

Econ. 147— Business Cycles (3) the Field of Financial Administration 

B. A. 149— Analysis of Financial State- (arranged) 

ments (3) Econ. 141— Theory of Money, Credit and 

B. A. 165— Office Management (3) Prices (3) 

B. A. 184-Public Utilities (3) Econ. 142-Public Finance and Taxation 

B. A. 190-Life Insurance (3) (3) 

B. A. 191— Property Insurance (3) Econ. 149— International Finance and Ex- 

B. A. 196— Real Estate Finance(3) change (3) 

B. A. 240— Seminar in Financial Manage- Econ. 241— Seminar in Money, Credit and 

ment (3) Prices (arranged) 

3. INDUSTRIAL ADMINISTRATION 

This curriculum is designed to acquaint the student with, the problems of 
organization and control in the field of industrial management. Theory and 
practice with reference to organization, policies, methods, processes, and tech- 
niques are surveyed, analyzed, and criticized. The student becomes familiar 
with the factors that determine plant location and layout, types of buildings, 
and the major kinds of machines and processes utilized, as well as eflFective 
methods and devices for the selection and utilization of men, materials and 
machines. 

The courses, in addition to those required of all students in the college, 
which will aid the undergraduate student in preparing himself for a useful 
place in this field of effort are: 
*B. A. 121— Cost Accounting (4) B. A. 170— Transportation Services and 

B.A. 122, 127-Auditing (3, 3) Regulation (3) 

B. A. 132, 133— Advanced Business Sta- B. A. 171— Industrial and Commercial 
tistics (3, 3) Traffic Management (3) 

B. A. 153— Purchasing Management (3) B. A. 172— Motor Transportation (3) 

■'B. A. 163— Industrial Relations (3) *B. A. 177— Motion Economy and Time 

B.A. 165-Office Management (3) Study (3) 

B.A. 166— Business Communications (3) 'B.A. 178— Production Planning and 
■"B. A. 167-Job Evaluation and Merit Control (2) 

Rating (2) B. A. 265— Development and Trends in 

*B. A. 169— Industrial Management (3) Industrial Management (3) 

*These courses are specific requirements for students concentrating in Industrial 
Administration. 

29 ► 



Insurance and Real Estate Curriculum 

4. INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE 

Today both insurance and real estate are fields which prefer university 
trained persons. In insurance, opportunities are available in the home oflBces 
and in the field to persons vv^ho will ultimately specialize in life, property, or 
casualty insurance. In real estate, a group of specialists— real estate brokers, 
appraisers, property managers, and persons handling the financing of real 
estate— are now recognized. A proper arrangement of courses by a student 
will provide academic preparation toward the examinations for Chartered Life 
Underwriter (C.L.U.), Chartered Property Casualty Underwriter (C.P.C.U.), 
and new professional requirements in real estate. Also, from a purely personal 
or family viewpoint these courses can be of immense value. 

Students who select a concentration in insurance and real estate should 
follow the general study program for the freshman and sophomore years. The 
program for the junior and seniors years is outlined below. 

f — Semester— y, 
Junior Year I II 

Econ. 140— Money and Banking 3 

B. A. 140— Financial Management . . 3 

B. A. 130— Elements of Business Statistics 3 

B. A. 150a— Marketing Principles and Organization 3 

B. A. 1 50— Marketing Management . . 3 

B. A. 190— Life Insurance 3 

B. A. 191— Property Insurance . . 3 

B. A. 195-Real Estate Principles 3 

B. A. 196— Real Estate Finance . . 3 

Elective . . 3 

Total 15 15 

Senior Year 

B. A. 180, 181-Business Law 4 4 

B. A. 169— Industrial Management . . 3 

Econ. 160— Labor Economics 3 

B. A. 1 60— Personnel Management . . 3 

B. A. 141— Investment Management 3 

B. A. 194— Insurance Agency Management 3 

B. A. 197— Real Estate Management . . 3 

Electives 3 3 

Total 16 16 

Selection of electives may be made with the aid of the advisor from the 
following and other subjects: 

Soc. 114-The City (3) B. A. 148-Advanced Financial Manage- 

Soc. 173-Social Security (3) ment (3) 

Econ. 141-Theory of Money, Credit and B. A. 151-Advertising(3) 

Prices C3) B.A. 165-Office Management (3) 

Econ. 142— Public Finance and Taxation B. A. 166— Business Commimications (3) 

(3) B. A. 189— Business and Government (3) 

B. A. 123-Income Tax Accounting (4) B. A. 290-Seminar in Insurance C3) 

Econ. 147-Business Cycles (3) B. A. 295-Seminar in Real Estate (3) 

^ 30 



Marketing Administration Curriculum 

5. MARKETING ADMINISTRATION 

Modem business administration is concerned largely with marketing ac- 
tivities. Buying and selling of products and services comprise the major por- 
tion of the time and energies of a large group of our population. The ideals 
of our system of private property, individual initiative and free enterprise 
are closely related to present-day marketing organization and practice. Effec- 
tive solutions of the problems of marketing are necessary to the success of 
the individual business enterprise and for the welfare of the consumer. If 
the costs of distribution are to be reduced or kept from rising unduly, it is 
necessary that careful study be made of the organization, policies, methods, 
and practices of advertising, selling, purchasing, merchandising, transporta- 
tion, financing, storing, and other related marketing activities, and appropriate 
action taken by qualified technicians and executives. 

The purpose of the marketing administration program is to give the stu- 
dent an opportunity to analyze, evaluate and otherwise study the problems 
connected with marketing institutions, organizations, policies, methods, and 
practices. The student who elects this field of concentration may develop his 
aptitudes, on the technical level, for research, selling, buying, and preparing 
advertising copy, and on the administrative level develop his abilities for organ- 
izing, planning, and directing the various activities in the field of marketing. 

Thoughtful selection of courses from the following lists, in addition to 
those required of all students in business administration, will aid the student 
in preparing himself for an effective position in the field of marketing. He 
may form a concentration in: 

a. General Marketing d. Retail Store Management 

b. Advertising e. Sales Management 

c. Foreign Trade 

B. A. 132, 133— Advanced Business B. A. 170— Transportation Services and 
Statistics (3, 3) Regulation (3) 

*B. A. 143-Credit Management (3) B. A. 171-Industrial and Commercial 

Econ. 147— Business Cycles (3) Traffic Management (3) 

*B.A. 151-Advertising (3) B. A. 172-iMotor Transportation (3) 

B. A. 152-Advertising Copy and Lay- B. A. 190-Life Insurance (3) 

out (3) B. A. 191— Property Insurance (3) 

*B. A. 153-Purchasing Management (3) B.A. 195-Real Estate Principles (3) 

*B.A. 154-Retail Store Management (3) B.A. 150-Problems in Sales Manage- 
B. A. 155— Problems in Retail Merchan- ment (3) 

dising (3) B. A. 251— Problems in Advertising (3) 

B.A. 156-Marketing Research Methods B. A. 252-Problems in Retail Store 

(3) Management (3) 

B. A. 158-Advertising Problems (3) B. A. 257-Seminar in Marketing Man- 
B. A. 159— Newspaper Advertising (3) agement (arranged) (3) 

B.A. 165— Office Management (3) B. A. 258— Research Problems in Mar- 
B. A. 166— Business Communications (3) keting (arranged) (3) 

*B. A. 169-Industrial Management (3) 



*These courses are specific requirements for students taking a concentration in Mar- 
keting Management. 

31 ► 



Personnel Administration and Labor Economics Curriculum 



For those especially interested in foreign trade, selections may be made 
jFrom the following courses: 

Geog. 102— The Geography of Manufac- 
turing in the United States and Can- 
ada (3) 

Geog. 110, Ill-Latin America (3, 3) 

Geog. 1 1 5— Peoples of Latin America (2) 

Geog. 120— Economic Geography of 
Europe (3) 

Geog. 122— Economic Resources and De- 
velopment of Africa (3) 

Geog. 130-131— Economic and Political 
Geog. of Southern and Eastern Asia 
(3, 3) 

Geog. 180, 181— Principles of Geograpliy 
^ (3, 3) 

Geog. 260-26 1 —Problems in the Geog. 
of Europe and Africa (3, 3) 



fEcon. 136— International Economic 
Policies and Relations (3) 
Econ. 137— Economics of National 

Planning (3) 
fEcon. 149— International Finance and 
Exchange (3) 
B. A. 151— Advertising Programs and 
Campaigns (3) 
fB. A. 157— Foreign Trade Procedure C3) 
fB. A. 170— Transportation Services and 

Regulation (3) 
fB. A. 173-Water Transportation (3) 
B. A. 19— Government and Business (3) 
Ec. Geog. 4— Regional Geography of the 

Continents (3) 
Geog. 100, 101— Regional Geography of 
the United States and Canada (3, 3) 



6. PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION AND LABOR ECONOMICS 

Recent development of large scale operation on the part of both private 
enterprise and government has emphasized the growdng importance of personnel 
relationships. Successful operation depends on harmonious cooperation betw^een 
employer and employee. The interests of the public, the owners, and the 
management, as well as those of the employees, may be greatly affected by 
the solutions evolved in any given case of personnel relationship. The growth 
of large-scale, centrally controlled labor organizations and the increased par- 
ticipation of governmental agencies in labor disputes have created problems 
for which business management, union officials, and government representa- 
tives have been, on the whole, ill-prepared to solve satisfactorily. The govern- 
ment, the unions, and business need men and women qualified to deal effectively 
with these problems. They should have broad training and technical informa- 
tion in the fields of business and public administration, economics, and psychol- 
ogy, together with suitable personalities. They must be able to approach these 
problems with an open mind, unbiased by personal and class prejudices. 

Personnel administration which has to do with the direction of human 
effort, is concerned with securing, maintaining, and utilizing, an effective work- 
ing force. People adequately trained in personnel administration find employ- 
ment in business enterprises, governmental departments, governmental corpora- 
tions, educational institutions and charitable organizations. 



fThese courses are specific requirements for students taking a concentration in 
Foreign Trade. 



M 32 



Transportation Administration Curriculum 



A student may select from the following courses those which will, in 
addition to those required of all students in business administration, best 
prepare him for the kind of personnel work he wishes to enter. 

*B.A. 163-Inclustrial Relations (3) 
*B. A. 164— Recent Labor Legislation and 
Court Decisions (3) 



*B. A. 167-Job Evaluation and Merit 

Rating (2) 
*^B. A. 169-Industrial Management (3) 
G. & P. Ill-Public Personnel Admin- 
istration (3) 
Psych. 2— Applied Psychology (3) 
Psych. 21— Social Psychology (3) 
Psych. 161— Industrial Psychology (3) 
G. & P. 214-Problems in Public Person- 
nel Administration (arranged) (3) 



B. A. 262— Seminar in Contemporary 
Trends in Labor Relations (3) 

B. A. 265— Development and Trends in 
Industrial Management (3) 

B. A. 266— Research in Personnel Man- 
agement (arranged) (3) 

B. A. 267— Research in Industrial Rela- 
tions (arranged) (3) 

B. A. 269— Studies of Special Problems 
in Employer-Employee Relationships 
(arranged) (3) 

B. A. 271— Theory of Organization (3) 



7. TRANSPORTATION ADMINISTRATION 

The problems of transportation administration are complex and far reach- 
ing. The student preparing for this type of work should be well grounded in 
economics, government, and business administration, as well as being pro- 
ficient in the use of the technical tools of the profession. Rail, highway, 
water, and air transportation are basic to our economic life, in fact, to our 
very existence. This curriculum gives considerable emphasis to air trans- 
portation. 

The following courses, in addition to those required of all students in the 
college will aid the student in preparing himself for a useful place in the fields 
of air, water, highway, and railway transportation. This curricidum besides 
preparing for positions with carriers also fits the student for industrial traffic 
management, trade association and government work in transportation. (To 
major in Transportation Administration the student must complete 15 hours of 
the courses listed below including B.A. 171): 

B. A. 157— Foreign Trade Procedure (3) 
B. A. 170— Transportation Services and 

Regulation (3) 
B. A. 171— Industrial and Commercial 

Traffic Management (3) 
B.A. 172— Motor Transportation (3) 
B. A. 172a— Motor Carrier Administration 

(3) 
B.A. 173-Water Transportation (3) 
B.A. 1 74— Commercial Air Transportation 



B. A. 175— Airline Administration (3) 
B. A. 176— Problems in Airport Manage- 
ment (3) 
B.A. 184-Public Utilities (3) 
B. A. 270— Seminar in Air Transportation 

(3) 
B. A. 275— Seminar in Motor Transporta- 
tion (3) 
B. A. 277— Seminar in Transportation (3) 
B. A. 284-Seminar in Public Utilities (3) 
(3) 

Other courses may be selected with the approval of the advisor for the 
curriculum. 



*These courses are specific requirements for those students taking a concentration 
in Personnel Administration and Labor Economics. 

33 ► 



Economics Curriculum 

8. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

The trend toward increased governmental participation in the fields of our 
economic, political and social life has been developing for a number of years so 
that now the government is the largest business enterprise in the country. In 
addition to the Federal Government, State and Local Government agencies have 
called upon the universities to aid in training young men or women for effective 
public service. Students desiring a specialized training in the broad field of 
government service should take the regularly established curriculum in Govern- 
ment and Politics appearing in pages 40-42 of this Catalog and select electives 
from the following: 

G. &. P. Ill— Public Personnel Administration (3) 

G. & P. 112— Public Financial Administration (3) 

G. & P. 181— Administrative Law (3) 

B. A. 10, 11— Organization and Control (2, 2) 

B. A. 20, 21— Principles of Accounting (4, 4) 

B. A. 130— Elements of Business Statistics (3) 

B. A. 189— Business and Government (3) 

Econ. 140— Money and Banking (3) 

B. A. 150a— Marketing Principles and Organization (3) 

Other courses may be selected with the approval of the advisor for the pro- 
gram. Students pursuing this curriculum should arrange their programs under 
the supervision of the Department of Government and Politics. 

n. ECONOMICS 

The program of studies in the field of Economics is designed to meet the 
needs of students who wish to concentrate either on a major or minor scale in 
this division of the Social Sciences. Students who expect to enroll in the 
professional schools and those who are planning to enter the fields of Business 
or Public Administration, or Foreign Service, or Social Service Administration, 
will find courses in economics of considerable value to them in their later work. 
A student of economics should choose his courses to meet the requirements 
for his major objective, or the Master of Arts, or a Doctor of Philosophy 
degree. (He should consult the bulletin of the Graduate School for the general 
requirements for the advanced degrees.) 

REQUIREMENTS FOR AN ECONOMICS MAJOR 

In addition to the University requirements in Social Studies, English, Mili- 
tary Science, Hygiene, and Physical Activities, the student majoring in Eco- 
nomics is required to complete a minimum of 36 semester hours in Eco- 
nomics v\dth an average grade of not less than "C". Required courses are 
Econ. 4, 5, 31, 32 and 132. B.A. 130 (Statistics) is also required, and B.A. 20 
and 21 (Accounting) are recommended. Other courses in Economics to meet 

■< 34 



Economics Curriculum 

the requirements of the major are to be selected with the aid of a facuhy 
advisor. Business Administration courses which may count as Economics credit 
are B.A. 130, 132, 133, 164, 184, 189. 

Economics majors enrolled in the College of Arts and Sciences must, of 
course, fulfill all the specific requirements of that college, including 12 semester 
hours of Foreign Language and 12 semester hours of Natural Science and 
Mathematics. 

Economics majors enrolled in the College of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration may elect to take a foreign language or, in lieu of Foreign Language, 
may take B.A. 10 and 11 and Geog. 1 and 2. All B.P.A. students must take 6 
semester hours of Mathematics, but may substitute B.A. 20 and 21 for Natural 
Science. 

A student who elects Economics as a major will normally have earned 10 
semester hours credit in the lower division courses in Economics prior to begin- 
ning the advanced work of the junior year. These lower division courses must be 
completed with an average grade of not less than "C". 

The specific courses comprising the student's program of study should be 
selected with the aid of a faculty advisor in terms of the student's objectives 
and major interest. Attention is directed to requirements under the American 
Civilization Program, p. 15. 



STUDY PROGRAM FOR ECONOMICS MAJORS 

/—Semester-^ 

Freshman Year I U 

Speech 18, 19— Introductory Speech 1 1 

Econ. 4, 5— Economic Developments 2 2 

Eng. 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

JVIathematics 5, 6 or 10, 1 1 or 18, 19 3 3 

G. & P. 1— American Government ' 3 

Foreign Language or B. A. 10, 11 3-2 3-2 

A. S. 1, 2-Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) 3 3 

Hea. 2— Personal Health (Women) 2 

Hea. 4— Community Health (Women) . . 2 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 I 

Elective . . 3 

Total 17-19 17-19 



' See American Civilization Program, page 1 5. 

35 ► 



foreign Service and International Relations Curriculum 

r—Semester- 

Sofhomore Year I II 

Eng. 3, 4, or 5, 6— Comp. and World or English Literature 3 3 

Econ. 31, 32— Principles of Economics 3 3 

Foreign Language or Geog. 1,2 3-2 3-2 

Natural Science or B. A. 20, 21 3 3 

H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 3 3 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Total 15-19 15-19 

Junior Year 

Econ. 140— Money and Banking 3 

B. A. 1 50a— Marketing Principles and Organization 3 

B. A. 1 30— Elements of Business Statistics . . 3 

Econ. 160— Labor Economics 3 

Econ. 131 —Comparative Economic Systems . . 3 

Electives in Economics, Government and Politics, and Busi 

ness Administration* 6 9 

Total 15 15 

Senior Year 

Econ. 132— Advanced Economic Principles 3 

Econ. 1 34— Contemporary Economic Thought 3 

Econ. 171— Economics of American Industries or 

B. A. 184-Public Utilities 3 

Econ. 142— Public Finance and Taxation . . 3 

Electives in Economics, Government and Politics and Busi- 
ness Administration* 6 12 

Total 15 15 



III. FOREIGN SERVICE AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

If the student expects to enter the foreign service, he should be well 
grounded in the language, geography, history, and politics of the region of his 
anticipated location as vi^ell as in the general principles and practices of organi- 
zation and administration. It should be recognized that only a limited training 
can be secured during the undergraduate period. When more specialized 
or more extensive preparation is required, graduate work should be planned. 
The individual program in either instance, however, should be worked out 
under the guidance of a faculty advisor. The following study program is 
offered as a guide in the selection of subjects. Attention is directed to require- 
ments under the American Civilization Program, p. 15. 



* Other electives may be selected with the approval of the Head of the Department 
of Economics. Normally these electives must be on the Junior and Senior level. 
^ See American Civilization Program, page 15. 



-* 36 



UNIVERSITY OF 

College Park Camp 




/lARYLAND 

1958- 1959 



SirpJui Propfrty 
(Si.ir Ajtfncy) 








m II, DING (;<)l)r I.F. ITERS FOR (LASS SMIF.IJf LES 


\ 


Am & Sucnco-rfaniii St.ill Key Itill 


\\ 


Nuncry School 


\R 


Armory 


II 


Muiic 


III 


Adminiilralion 


i: 


(^hcmiilry 


( nl 


Cohtcum 


1) 


Dairy — Turner i,abtirjtory 


1)1) 


Aviation Pivchologv Laboratory 


inv 


Dean o( Women 


1: 


Agronomy— Botany — H. J. Patlcrwin Mall 


FF, 


Coumcling Center 


1' 


Hortiiiillore-Hol/apl'el Hall 


ri- 


Temporarv Dormitory 


!■ 


Journahim 


<-<; 


Activities Building — Cole Building 


II 


Home Kconomici — Margaret Brent Hall 


1 


Agricultural Fngr. — Shriver Laboratory 


1 


Kngr. Clauroom Bldg. 


K 


Zoologv— Silvoter Hall 


I. 


Library- Shoemaker Building 


\l 


Morrill Hall 


s 


Geography 


1) 


Agnculture— Svmoni Hall 


!■ 


Industrial Arts & liducalmn-J. M. I'attcrvjn Bldg. 


(1 


Business & I'ublic Administration- Taliaferro Hall 


R 


Classroom Building- Woods Hall 


s 


Fngr. Laboratories 


1 


F.ducation— Skinner Building 


(' 


Chem. Fngr. 


\' 


Wind Funnel 


W 


I'rcinkcrt Field House 


X 


Judging I'avilion 


"l 


.Mathematics 


z 


I'hysics 


11 


Poultry— Jull Hall 


.1.1 


Engines Research Lab. (Molecular Physic.) 


s.. 


oritics Not Shown 




Phi Sigma Sigma 




.■\lpha Chi Omega 




Alpha .\i Delta 


I'ta 


tcrnitics Not Sho« n 




Alpha Kpsilon Pi 




Zcta Beta Tau 




Phi Kappa Gamma 




Tau Fpsilon Phi 





ri,n., a 



Foreign Service and Iniernational Relations Curriculum 

/Semester— ~, 

Freshman Year J // 

Eng. 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

G. & P. 1 —American Government ' 3 

Foreign Language (Selection) 3 3 

Geog. 1, 2— Economic Resources 2 2 

Econ. 4, 5— Economic Developments 2 2 

Mathematics 5, 6 or 10, 1 1 3 3 

A. S. I, 2-Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) 3 3 

Hea. 4— Community Health (Women) . . 2 

Hea. 2— Personal Health (Women) 2 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Elective . . 3 

Total 19-20 19-20 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4, or 5, 6— Comp. and World or English Literature 3 3 

Foreign Language (Continuation of Freshman year selection) 3 3 

Econ. 31, 32— Principles of Economics 3 3 

H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization " 3 3 

G. & P.— Comparative Government, selection in accordance 

with the student's need 2 2 

Sp. 18, 19— Introductory Speech 1 1 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Total 16-19 16-19 

Junior Year 

B. A. 150a— Marketing Principles and Organization 3 

Econ. 140— Money and Banking 3 

Econ. 160— Labor Economics . . 3 

G. & P. 101— International Political Relations . . 3 

B. A. 130— Elements of Business Statistics 3 

Econ. 131— Comparative Economic Systems . . 3 

Ec. Geog.— Selection of Regional division to fit student's needs 3 3 

Electives to meet student's major interest 3 3 

Total 15 15 

Senior Year 

G. & P. 102— International Law . . 3 

G. & P. 106— American Foreign Relations 3 

G. & P. 131, 132— Constitutional Law 3 3 

B. A. 189— Government and Business 3 

Econ. 132— Advanced Economic Prin., or Econ. 134, Con- 
temporary Thought 3 

G. & P. 181— Administrative Law . . 3 

Econ. 136— International Economic Policies and Relations .... 3 

Econ. 149— International Finance and E.xchange . . 3 

Electives to meet student's major interest . . 3 

Total 15 15 

'Those exempted by University examination shall select a substitute course as indi- 
cated on page 16, paragraph 3, or in Government and Politics. 

'See American Civilization Program, page 15. 37 ► 



Geography Curriculum 

American History 127, 129, 133, 135, 145, and 146. 

European History 175, 176, 185, 186, and History 191-History of Russia; His- 
tory 195— The Far East. 
Government and Politics 7, 8, 9, 10, 105, 108, 154, and 197. 

IV. GEOGRAPHY 

This curriculum is designed to aid the student in securing the facts con- 
cerning the major geographical areas of the world and in studying and 
analyzing the manner in which these facts affect economic, political, and 
social activities. The student interested in international trade, international 
political relations, diplomacy, overseas governments, and national aspirations 
will find the courses in this department of great practical value. Work is 
offered on both the undergraduate and the graduate levels. 

Students who expect to enroll in the engineering and professional schools 
and those who are planning to enter the fields of Business and Public Ad- 
ministration, or Foreign Service, will find courses in geography of material 
value to them in their later work. Openings exist for well-trained geographers 
in government service, in universities, colleges, and high schools, as well as 
in private business. A student of geography should choose his courses to 
meet the requirements for his major objective, be it undergraduate major or 
minor, or a Master of Arts, or a Doctor of Philosophy degree. He should consult 
the bulletin of the Graduate School for the general requirements for the advanced 
degrees. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR AN UNDERGRADUATE MAJOR IN GEOGRAPHY 

A student majoring in geography is required to complete satisfactorily 
120 semester hours of work in addition to the required work in military science, 
hygiene, and physical activities. A general average of at least "C" is re- 
quired for graduation. Only courses in which the student receives a grade 
of "C" or above will be counted toward the major. 

The specific requirements for the geography major are: 

I. Geog. 10 and 11 (3,3), or equivalent; Geog. 30 (3); Geog. 35 (3); 
Geog. 40 and 41 (3,3); Geog. 170 (3) and 18 hours in other Geography courses 
numbered 100 to 199, of which 6 hours must be in non-regional courses; a 
total of 39 hours in Geography. 

II. Social Sciences-G. & P. 1 (3); Econ. 31 and 32 (3, 3); History 5 
and 6 (3, 3); Soc. 105 (3); a total of 18 semester hours.^ 

III. Natural Sciences-Botany 1 and 113 or 102 (4, 2 or 3); Agron. 114 
or equivalent (4); Chem. 1 (4). Total of 13 (14) semester hours. 



*See American Civilization Program, page 15. 
38 



Geography Curricuhim 

IV. English-Eng. 1 and 2 (3, 3) and 3, 4, or 5, 6 (3, 3); Speech 18, 19 
(1, 1); a total of 14 semester hours. ^ 

V. Foreign Language and Literature— 12 semester hours in one Ian 
guage, unless an advanced course is taken. 

VL Military Science, Hygiene, and Physical Activities. The present 
University requirement is 16 semester hours in Military Science and Physical 
Activities for able-bodied male students. Women students are required to take 
8 semester hours credit in hygiene and physical activities. 

A student who elects geography as a major must have earned eighteen 
semester hours credit in the prerequisite courses in geography prior to be- 
ginning the advanced work of the junior year. These are normally taken dur- 
ing the freshman and sophomore years. Only courses in which the student 
receives a grade of "C" or above will be counted toward the major. 

A minor in geography should consist of Geog. 10 and 11 (3, 3), Geog. 30 
(3) and such other courses as the major advisor deems suitable. 

For the guidance of those who expect to do graduate work in geography, 
it should be emphasized that the Department of Geography is particularly 
interested in the appraisal of natural resources in relation to economic, social 
and political developments; it aims to encourage study of the natural resource 
base of the culture of an area. This necessitates, on the one hand, an ele- 
mentary knowledge of certain of the physical sciences as a basis for the 
physical aspects of geographic study and resource analysis. On the other 
hand, a certain amount of knowledge of economics, of sociology and of political 
organization is necessary in order to understand stages of resource utilization 
and the social consequences. 

The specific courses comprising the student's program of studies should 
be selected with the aid of a faculty advisor from the Department of Geography 
in terms of the student's objective and major interests. Attention is directed 
to requirements under the American Civilization Program, page 15. 

Special study programs are available for those who wish to concentrate 
in cartography, and for those who wish to prepare for geographic work in 
planning agencies. 

STUDY PROGRAM FOR GEOGRAPHY MAJORS 

,— Semester- ^ 

Freshman Year I Jl 

Geog. 10, 11— General Geography 3 3 

Chem. 1 —Introductory Chemistry 4 

Bot. 1— General Botany . . 4 

Speech 18, 1 9— Introductor}' Speech 1 1 

G. & P. 1 —American Government ^ 3 

Eng. 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

A. S. 1, 2-Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) 3 3 

Hea. 2— Personal Health (Women) 2 

Hea. 4— Community Health (Women) . . 2 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Total 20-21 17-18 

'See American Civilization Program, page 15. 

39 ► 



Government and Politics Curriculum 

r-Semester- 

Sofhcmore Year I H 

Geog. 30— Principles of Morphology 3 

Geog. 35— Map Reading and Interpretation . . 3 

Geog. 40— Principles of Meteorology 3 

Geog. 41— Introductory Climatology . . 3 

H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 3 3 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6— Composition and Fieadings in Literature. ... 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

A. S. 3, 4~Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Total 16-19 16-19 

Junior Year 

Dot. 113— Plant Geography 2 

Agron. 1 14— Soil Geography . . 4 

Soc. 105— Cultural Anthropology . . 3 

Econ. 31, 32— Principles of Economics 3 3 

Geog.— Selection to fit student's needs 6 3 

Electives, with advisor's consent 6 3 

Total 17 16 

Senior Year 

Geog. 170— Local Field Course 3 

Geog.— Selection to fit student's needs 6 6 

Electives, with advisor's consent 6 6 

Total 15 12 



V. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS MAJOR AND MINOR REQUIREMENTS 

In this course of study, the following conditions are to be observed: (1) 
G. & P. 1, American Government, or its equivalent, is prerequisite to all other 
courses offered by the Department. Exemption from G. & P. 1 by University 
examination is equivalent to this prerequisite, and students exempted may not 
take G. & P. 1 for credit. Students taking this course of study, who are not 
so exempted, must complete G. & P. I with a grade of "C" or better. (2) In 
this curriculum, at least 33 hours of Government and Politics, in addition 
to G. & P. 1, or its equivalent, must be completed with a grade of "C" or 
better. (3) The electives of the junior and senior years are to be chosen 
from the list suggested below, unless consent to take other courses is obtained 
from the Head of the Department. Electives in Government and Politics 
and in related fields are to be chosen to make an integrated course of study. 
Attention is directed to requirements under the American Civilization Program, 
page 15. 



< 40 



Government and Politics Cvrricithivi 

/^Semester -^ 

Freshmcni Year I U 

G. & P. 1— American Government ' 3 

Eng. ] , 2— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Math. 5, 6 or 10, 1 1 3 3 

Econ. 4, 5— Economics Development 2 2 

Speech 18, 19— Introductory Speech 1 1 

Foreign Language 3 3 

A. S. 1, 2-Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) 3 3 

Pica. 2— Personal Health (Women) 2 

Flea. 4— Community Health (Women) . . 2 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 I 

Elective . . 3 

Total 18-19 18-19 

Sophomore Year 

G. & P. 4— State Government and Administration 3 

G. & P. 5— Local Government and Administration or Psychology 

1 (Introduction to Psychology) or Soc. 52 (Criminology) . . 3 

Eng. 3, 4, or 5, 6— Comp. and World or English Literature 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Econ. 31, 32— Principles of Economics 3 3 

H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization ^ 3 3 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Total 16-19 16-19 

Junior Year 

G. & P. 7 or 9, 8 or 10— Comparative Go^'ernment 2 2 

G. & P. 1 10-Public Administration 3 

G. & P. 141-History of Political Theorv 3 

G. & P. 174-Political Parties '. 3 

G. & P. 1 24— Legislatures and Legislation . . 3 

G. & P.-(Elective) 3 

Electives 6 9 

Total 17 17 

Senior Year 

G. & P. 101— International Political Relations 3 

G. & P. 131-132— Constitutional Law 3 3 

One full year of advanced Economics or b.a. courses 3 3 

Electives 6 9 

Total 15 15 

Suggested electives: Any G. & P. courses not required above; any history 
courses related to the student's integrated course of study. 



' Those exempted by Uni\ersitv examination shall select a substitute course as in- 
dicated on page 16, paragraph 3, or in Government and Politics. 
"See American Civilization Program, page 15. 



41 ► 



Journalism and Public Relations Curriculum 

Econ. 131— Comparative Economic Sys- B. A. 164— Labor Legislation and Court 

terns Decisions 

Econ. 132— Advanced Economic Principles B. A. 180, 181— Business Law 

Econ. 1 34— Contemporary Economic B. A. 189— Business and Government 

Thought Philosophy 155— Logic 

Econ. 140— Money and Banking Psych. 21— Social Psychology 

Econ. 142— Public Finance and Taxation Psych. 122— Advanced Social Psychology 

Econ. 160— Labor Economics Sociology 52— Criminology 

B. A. 130— Elements of Business Sociology 1 47— Sociology of Law 

Statistics Sociology 1 86— Sociological Theory 

VI. JOURNALISM AND PUBLIC RELATIONS 

The department offers tvi^o professional majors: one in editorial journalism, 
for those w^ho seek beginning news jobs upon graduation; the other in public 
relations, for those who plan to work in public relations, in public information, 
or on company publications. 

Although a minor is not permitted in this college, a student may take as 
many as 12 semester hours in a subject other than his major in addition to 
requirements. Specialized jobs are most attractive financially. Journalism majors 
ordinarily elect secondary concentrations in such fields as agriculture, home 
economics, business administration, advertising, foreign language, science, social 
and political sciences, psychology, philosophy. Public relations majors choose 
theirs from business administration, advertising, political and social sciences, 
psychology, foreign language. Other electives may be approved by the advisor 
in this department. 

Office Techniques may be taken for lower-division elective credit (courses 
numbered below 100). Since all work in the technical courses of the Depart- 
ment of Journalism and Public Relations is typewritten, those who cannot 
type at least 35 words per minute should enroll in O. T. 1 before taking 
Journalism 10. Women planning to seek combination journalism-secretarial 
or public relations-secretarial jobs upon graduation may take typing and short- 
hand for lower-division elective credit. 

Since 57 hours of upper-division work (courses numbered 100 or more) 
are required for graduation in this department, the student should use his 
electives and required courses the first two years to work off all prerequisites 
for his upper-division studies. No lower-division course can substitute for an 
upper-division elective. 

To enroll in an upper-division course, the student must have accumulated 
at least 56 hours of academic work (exclusive of R.O.T.C. and Physical Ac- 
tivities), with an over-all grade average of at least 2. (C). 

To enroll as an upper-division major in this department, a student must 
have earned at least B in Journalism 10 or 11. A major who makes less than 

-^ 42 



Joumalistn and Public Relations Ciirriculum 

a C in an upper-division required course is asked to repeat the course and/or 
change his major. 

A student may declare his major in this department when he enrolls in it 
at the beginning of any semester, and ordinarily he will be advised from that 
time until graduation by the same advisor in the department. In no case, how- 
ever, can one be graduated with a major in this department without having 
spent at least four semesters as a major in one of its curricula. 

Majors arc urged to work on a student publication throughout their col- 
lege residence, and to obtain professional experience in the summers. 

The department maintains close working relations with professionals and 
their organizations in this area. One of the purposes is to provide speakers, 
trips, laboratories, and other types of training for students enrolled in the 
department's technical courses. The student is notified in advance of each 
event, and his participation is required unless it happens to conflict with one 
of his scheduled classes. 

A required part of the journalism major's education consists of training 
on the Baltimore Sunpapers or Baltimore News-Post and on nearby weeklies. 

Advanced reporting students spend one afternoon a week with Sun or 
News-Post reporters on police and city hall beats; advanced editing students 
spend one afternoon a week at the central copy desk or at the rewrite desk. 

Some journalism majors serve as "stringers" in the special coverage of 
the campus maintained by the Sunpapers and the News-Post. 

Outside work necessitates enrollment in less than a normal program of 
study, and in no case should the student attempt to work full time and take 
more than a course or two. 

Listed below are the required curricula in journalism and in public rela- 
tions. Each curriculum requires a minimum of 28 hours in the department, and 
not more than 40 hours in the department is permitted. 

LOWER-DIVISION CURRICULA (JOURNALISM, PUBLIC RELATIONS) 

JOURNALISM STUDY PROGRAM 

/~-Semester-^ 

Freshman Year I U 

Eng. 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Elective Group P 3 

G. & P. 1— American Government ^ . . 3 

Geog. I, 2— Economic Resources and Econ. 4, 5— Economic 

Developments or Foreign Language 4-3 4-3 

Math. 5, 6— General Mathematics and Mathematics of Finance 

(or natural science) 3-4 3-4 

Speech 18, 1 9— Introductory Speech (or Speech 1,2) 1-2 1-2 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Hea. 2— Personal Health (Women) 2 

Hea. 4— Community Health (Women) . . 2 

Air Science 1, 2-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Total IS 18 

'See American Civilization Program, page 15. 

43 ► 



Journalism and Public Relations Curriculum 



So'phomore Year I 

Joum. 10— Introduction to Journalism 3 

Eng. 3, 4, or 5, 6— Comp. and World or English Literature 3 

H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 3 

Econ. 31, 32— Principles of Economics 3 

B. A. 10, 11— Organization and Control (or Foreign Language) 2-3 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 

Air Science 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 

Elective 

Total 

Junior Year 

Journ. 160— News Editing I 

Joum. 163— Newspaper Typography 

Journ. 176— Newsroom Problems 

Joum. 181— Press Photography 

G. & P. 178-Public Opinion 

Electives 

Total 

Senior Year. 

Joum. 161— News Editing II . 

Joum. 165— Feature Writing 

Joum. 175— Reporting of Public Affairs 3 

Joum. 191— Law of the Press 

Journ. 192— History of American Journalism 3 

B. A. 189— Business and Government (either semester) .... 3 

Electives 7 

Total 16 



Semester- 
11 

3 
3 

3 
2-3 
1 
3 
3 



18 



3 
3 

7 

16 



1( 



10 
16 



7 
16 



PUBLIC RELATIONS STUDY PROGRAM 

Requirements for the first two years of the public relations curriculum are 
the same as those in the journalism program (see above). 

The folloM^ing curriculum is taken in the junior and senior years by the 
public relations student who plans to work for a public relations firm or in 
a public relations department. 

For electives preparatory to public relations work in business, the student 
should look to at least the following fields: business administration, advertis- 
ing, economics, business statistics, personnel management, and marketing. For 
government public relations work: public administration, American history, in- 
ternational relations, political parties, etc. Good elective courses for any public 
relations major may be found in psychology, sociology, speech, Englisla, radio, 
and education. 



-< 44 



Office Techniqties and Management Curriculum 

/—Semester—^, 

Junior Year 1 U 

Joum. 160— News Editing I 3 

Joum. 165— Feature Writing 3 

P. R. 166-Public Relations 3 

Joum. 181— Press Photography 3 

P. R. 194-PubIic Relations Cases . . 2 

Electives 7 11 

Total 16 16 

Senior Year 

P. R. 170-Publicity Techniques 3 

P. R. 171— Industrial Journalism 2 

P. R. 186— Public Relations of Government . . 3 

Joum. 191— Law of the Press . . 3 

P. R. 195-Seminar in Public Relations . . 2 

G. & P. 177-Public Opinion 3 

Electives 8 8 

Total 16 16 



VII. OFFICE TECHNIQUES AND MANAGEMENT 

I. OFFICE MANAGEMENT 

With the rapidly mounting volume of office work now being done, and the 
rapid increase in the number of office workers required to do it, effective office 
management and supervision is needed. Despite the current popular opinion 
that the oflGce manager needs to know only a number of systems and machines, 
there is an ever-growing group of executives who believe that the management 
and supervision of an office is quite as important a job as the management 
of a factory or any other industrial enterprise. 

Any young man or woman entering business need have no hesitancy in 
preparing himself for the position of office manager, for that position has 
proved a stepping stone to positions of great responsibility for many of our 
present executives. 

1 he student interested in this field will find the following required courses 
with the suggested electives under the guidance of the advisor, a valuable aid 
in preparing for positions in this field. Attention is directed to requirements 
under the American Civilization Program on page 15. 

45 ► 



Office Techniques and Management Curriculum 
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION STUDY PROGRAM 
Freshman Year 

CJeog. 1, 2— Economic Resources 

Eng. 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 

B. A. 10, 11— Organization and Control 

Math. 5— General Mathematics 

Math. 6— Mathematics o£ Finance 

G. & P. 1— American Government^ 

O. T. 1— Principles of T)rpewriting 

O. T. 2— Intermediate Typewriting 

A. S. 1, 2-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 

Hea. 2— Personal Health (Women) 

Hea. 4— Community Health (Women) 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 

Elective 



-Semester- 



Total 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature 

Econ. 31, 32— Principles of Economics 

B. A. 20, 21— Principles of Accounting 

Speech 18, 19— Introductory Speech 

H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization ^ . . . , 

Elective 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 
Physical Activities (Men and Women) 



Total 

Junior Year 

Econ. 140— Money and Banking 

Psych. 1— Introduction to Psychology 

B. A. 1 50a— Marketing Principles and Organization 

Econ. 160— Labor Economics 

B. A. 1 12— Records Management 

B. A. 121-Cost Accounting 

B. A. 130— Elements of Business Statistics 

B. A. 150— Marketing Management 

B. A. 160— Personnel Management 

B. A. 1 14— Machines Management 

Electives 



I 


II 


2 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


3 


^ , 


, . 


3 


3 


, , 


2 


. , 


, , 


2 


3 


3 


2 


. . 


, , 


2 


1 


1 




3 


18-19 


18-19 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 


1 


1 


3 


3 


2 


, . 


3 


3 


1 


1 


17-20 


15-18 


3 




3 




3 




3 




2 






4 




3 




3 




3 




3 



Total 

Senior Year 

B. A. 165-Office Management 

B. A. 166— Business Communications 

B. A. 169— Industrial Management 

B. A. 180, 181-Business Law 

B. A. 168— Advanced OflBce Management 

Electives in Accounting, Marketing, Real Estate, Insurance, 
Finance, and Transportation 



Total 



^See American Civilization Program, page 15. 
46 



16 

3 
3 
3 

4 



3 
16 



16 



15 



Office Techniques and Management Curriculuvi 

2. OFFICE TECHNIQUES 

The purpose of this curriculum is not only to furnish merely technical or 
vocational training, but also, to aid the student in developing his natural apti- 
tudes for secretarial and administrative positions. The development of the 
student's capacity to plan, organize, direct, and execute is the guiding princi- 
ple followed in this curriculum. This program of study will appeal to the 
young man or woman who is ambitious, naturally capable, and willing to 
work. It will also appeal to those who realize that positions in secretarial 
service require much more than merely skill in typewriting and stenography. 
These are essential tools, but knowledge and skill in other subjects are as 
important for the more responsible positions. 

PLACEMENT EXAMINATION 

Students vidth one or more years of college, high school, or equivalent train- 
ing in shorthand and/or typevnriting are required to take a placement examina- 
tion in those subjects at the time of their first registration in a shorthand or 
typewriting course at the University. 

Credit will be given only for the work done in residence. 

RECORD OF COMPETENCY 

Students must make a grade of "C" in each course in the OfBce Techniques 
sequence before they may progress to the next advanced course. A major earn- 
ing less than a C grade in an advanced course is asked to repeat the course. 

The followdng program of study is designed to give the capable student an 
opportunity to develop his potential aptitudes to an effective end. Attention is 
directed to requirements under the American Civilization Program on page 15. 

i-— Semester— ^ 

Freshman Year I II 

Eng. 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

G. &. P. 1— American Government^ 3 

B. A. 10, 1 1— Organization and Control 2 2 

Speech 18, 1 9— Introductory Speech 1 1 

Math. 5, 6— General Mathematics and Mathematics of Finance 3 3 

O. T. 1— Principles of Type^vriting* 2 

O. T. 2— Intermediate Typevrating . . 2 

A. S. 1, 2-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Hea. 2— Personal Health (Women) 2 

Hea. 4— Community Health (Women) . . 2 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Elective 3 

Total 17-18 17-18 



* O. T. 1 should be completed prior to enrollment in Principles of Shorthand 1 
(O. T. 12). 

'See American Civilization Program, page 15. 

47 ► 



Bureaus 

I — Setwester— \ 

So'phomore Year 1 11 

Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature 3 3 

H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 3 3 

Econ. 31, 32— Principles of Economics 3 3 

O. T. 12, 13-Principles of Shorthand I, II 4 4 

O. T. 10— Office Typewriting Problems 2 

Econ. 4, 5— Economic Developments 2 2 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Physical Activities (Men and Women) 1 1 

Total 18-21 16-19 

Junior Year 

B. A. 20, 21— Principles of Accounting 4 4 

to. T. 1 16-Advanced Shorthand 3 

fO. T. 1 1 7— Gregg Transcription 2 

O. T. 1 1 8— Gregg Shorthand Dictation . . 3 

B. A. 166— Business Communications . . 3 

B. A. 1 14-Machines Management 3 

B. A. 1 12-Records Management 2 

Econ. 140— Money and Banking . . 3 

Econ. 160— Labor Economics 3 

B. A. 160 Personnel Management . . 3 

Total 17 16 

Senior Year 

O. T. 110-Secretarial Work 3 

O. T. 1 14— Secretarial Office Practice . . 3 

B. A. 165-Office Management 3 

B. A. 168— Advanced Office Management . . 3 

B. A. 180, 181-Business Law 4 4 

Electives 3 6 

B. A. 150a— Marketing Principles and Operation 3 

Total 16 16 

COMBINED SECRETARIAL TRAINING AND BUSINESS 
TEACHING CURRICULUM 

Capable students may elect courses offered by the College of Education in 

such a manner as to qualify themselves for commercial teaching in high schools. 

\ III. BUREAU OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC RESEARCH 

The Bureau of Business and Economic Research is recognized as the labora- 
tory for the practical study of business and economic problems. As such, it has 
three principal functions: first, to train students in the field of business and eco- 

t O. T. 116, Advanced Shorthand, and O. T. 117, Gregg Transcription must be 
taken concurrently. O. T. 10 should be completed prior to O. T. 116, Advanced Short- 
hand. 



48 



Bureaus 

nomic research; second, to disseminate information concerning business and 
economic conditions in Maryland, or which affect Maryland interests, and third, 
to give active research assistance to interested Imsiness firms, governmental units, 
and citizen groups. 

Through the facilities of the Bureau qualified interested students can obtain 
practical experience in research work. This involves the application of techniques 
and principles studied in the class room to actual business and governmental 
problems. 

The Bureau— through its direct contact with business, government, labor and 
the professions and in its research into problems in these fields— serves as an 
important source of information relative to business and economic conditions and 
developments in this region. This information is made available, in part, by 
means of Bureau publications and, in part, by direct inquiry to the Bureau. This 
service is supplemented by active cooperation with individual business firms and 
citizen organizations within the state who request assistance in the study of 
specific problems which arc recognized as having an important bearing upon com- 
munity welfare. The Bureau welcomes the opportunity to be of real service to 
such organizations. 

IX. BUREAU OF GOVERNMENTAL RESEARCH 

The Bureau of Governmental Research was organized in 1947, then called 
the Bureau of Public Administration. It is closely allied, both in function and 
personnel, with the Department of Government and Politics. The Department 
of Government and Politics is the teaching agency; the Bureau of Govern- 
mental Research is the research agency. The Bureau's activities relate primarily 
to the problems of state and local government in Maryland. The Bureau en- 
gages in research and publishes findings with reference to local, state and national 
government. It undertakes surveys and offers its assistance and ser\'ice to units 
of government in Maryland. Finally, it serves as a clearing house of information 
for the benefit of Maryland state and local government. The Bureau furnishes 
an opportunity for qualified interested students to secure practical experience in 
research in government problems. 

X. MARYLAND MUNICIPAL LEAGUE 

The office of the Maryland Municipal League, an organization of Maryland 
cities, is located in the College of Business and Public Administration. The 
League provides opportunities for association to municipal officials, offers services 
to city governments and organizes legislative programs affecting municipal affairs. 
It publishes monthly the Maryland Municipal News. The League's mailing 
addess is Maryland Alunicipal League, Box 276, College Park, Maryland, 



49 



COURSE OFFERINGS 

The University reserves the right to withdraw or discontinue any course for 
which an insufficient number of students have registered to warrant giving the 
course. In such an event, no fee will he charged for transfer to another course. 

Courses are designated by numbers as follows: 
1 to 99: courses for undergraduates. 

100 to 199: coxirses for advanced undergraduates and graduates. Not all courses num- 
bered 100 to 199 may be taken for graduate credit. 
200 to 299: courses for graduates only. 

A coiurse with a single number extends through one semester. A course with a double 
number extends through two semesters. Courses not otherwise designated are lecture 
courses. The number of credit hours is shown by the arabic numeral in parentheses 
after the title of the course. A separate schedule of coiuses is issued each semester, 
giving th homis, places of meeting, and other information reqmred by the student in 
making out his program. Students obtain these schedules when they register. 

BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

Professors: Frederick, Calhoun, Clemens, Cook, Cover, Fisher, Mounce, Pyle, 

Reid, Sylvester, Sweeney, Taff, Wedeherg, Wright. 
Associate Professors: Gentry, Dawson, Mueller. 
Assistant Professors: Darker, Lee, Nelson. 
Instructors: Cluse, Edelson, Heye, Himes, Plivelic, Watrous. 
Lecturers: Tierney. 

B.A. 10, 11. Organization and Control. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Required in all Bus. Adm. curriculums. A survey comse 
treating the internal and functional organization of a business enterprise. B.A. 11 
includes industrial management, organization and control. 

B.A. 20, 21. Principles of Accounting. (4, 4) 

First and second semesters. Required in all Business Organization curriculums. Pre- 
requisite, sophomore standing. The fundamental principles and problems invoh'ed in 
accounting for proprietorships, corporations and partnerships. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

B.A. 110, 111. Intermediate Accounting. (,3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, a grade of B or better in B.A. 21 for majors 
in accounting or consent of instructor. A comprehensive study of the theory and prob- 
lems of valuation of assets, application of fimds, corporation accounts and statements, 
and the interpretation of accotmting statements. 

B.A. 112. Records Management. (2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, junior standing. Laboratory fee, $7.50. Spe- 
cific management methods and techniques that have proved valuable in the creation, 
use, maintenance, protection and disposition of records are studied. 

^ 50 



Business Organization and Administration 

B.A. 114. Machines Management. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, junior standing. Laboratory fee, ?7.50. 
Mechanization has complicated the problem of managing office activities. This course 
is devoted to the study of the management and utilization of modern office machines. 

B.A. 116. Puhlic Budgeting. (3) 

Prerequisites, B.A. 21 and Econ. 32. A study of budgetary administration in the United 
States, including systems of financial control and accountability, the settlement of 
claims, centralized purchasing and the reporting of financial operations. 

B.A. 118. Governmental Accounting. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. Ill, or consent of instructor. The content of this course covers the 
scope and functions of governmental accounting. It considers the principles generally 
applicable to all forms and types of governmental bodies and a basic procedure adapt- 
able to all governments. 

B.A. 121. Cost Accounting. (4) 

Prerequisite, a grade of B or better in B.A, 21 for majors in accounting or consent of 
instructor. A study of the fundamental procedures of cost accounting, including those 
for job order, process and standard cost accounting systems. 

B.A. 122. Auditing Theory and Practice. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 111. A study of the principles and problems of 
auditing and application of accounting principles to the preparation of audit working 
papers and reports. 

B.A. 123. Income Tax Accounting. C^) 

Prerequisite, a grade of B or better in B.A. 21 for majors in accounting, or consent 
of instructor. A study of the important provisions of the Federal Tax Law, using illus- 
trative examples, selected questions and problems, and the preparation of retxims. 

B.A. 124, 126. Advanced Accounting. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, B.A. 111. Advanced accounting theory ap 
plied to specialized problems in partnerships, estates and trusts, banks, mergers and 
consolidations, recei\'erships and liquidations; also budgeting and controllership. 

B.A. 125. C.P.A. Prohleyns. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 124, or consent of instructor. A study of the nat- 
ure, form and content of C.P.A. examinations by means of the preparation of solutions 
to, and an analysis of, a large sample of C.P.A. problems covering the various account- 
ing fields. 

B.A. 127. Advanced Auditing Theory and Practice. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 122. Advanced auditing theory, practice and re- 
port WTriting. 

B.A. 128. Advanced Cost Accounting. (2) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 121. A continuation of basic cost accoimting with special emphasis 

on process costs, standard costs, joint costs and by-product costs. 

51 ► 



Business Organization and Administration 

B.A. 129. A'pprenticeshi'p in Accounting. (0) 

Prerequisites, minimum of 20 semester hours in accounting and the consent of the 
accounting staff. A period of apprenticeship is provided with nationally known firms 
of certified public accountants from about January 15 to February 15, and for a 
semester after graduation. 

B.A. 130. Elements of Business Statistics. (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing. Required for graduation. Laboratory fee, $3.50. This 
course is devoted to a study of the fundamentals of statistics. Emphasis is placed upon 
the collection of data; hand and machine tabulation; graphic charting; statistical dis- 
tribution; averages; index numbers; sampling; elementary tests of reliability and simple 
correlations. 

B.A. 132, 133. Advanced Business Statistics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, B.A. 130. Laboratory fee, $3.50 for each 
course. The use of statistical methods and techniques in economic studies and in the 
fields of business and public administration. Advanced methods of correlation and 
other selected techniques are applied to statistical analyses of economic fluctuations, 
price changes, cost analysis, and market demand indexes and functions. 

B.A. 140. Financial Management. (3) 

Prerequisites, B.A. 21 and Econ. 140. This course deals wdth principles and practices 
involved in the organization, financing, and rehabilitation of business enterprises; the 
various types of securities and their use in raising funds, apportioning income, risk, 
and control; intercorporate relations; and new developments. Emphasis on solution of 
problems of financial policy faced by management. 

B.A. 141. Investment Management. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 140. A study of the principles and methods used 
in the analysis, selection, and management of investments; investment programs, 
sources of investment information, security price movements, government, real estate, 
public utility, railroad, and industrial securities. 

B.A. 142. Banking Policies and Practices. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 140. A study of the organization and manage- 
ment of the Commercial Bank, the operation of its departments, and the methods used 
in the extension of commercial credit. 

B.A. 143. Credit Management. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, B.A. 140. A study of the nature of credit 
and the principles applicable to its extension and redemption for mercantile and con- 
sumer purposes; sources of credit information and analysis of credit reports; the or- 
ganization and management of a credit department for eflFective control. Recent de- 
velopments and effective legal remedies available. 

B.A. 148. Advanced Financial Management. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 140. Advanced course designed for students spe- 
cializing in finance. Emphasis is placed upon the techniques employed by executives 
in their application of financial management practice to selected problems and cases. 
Critical classroom analysis is brought to bear upon actual methods and techniques used 
by business enterprises. 

^ 52 



Business Organization and Administration 

B.A. 149. Analysis of Financial Statements. (3) 

Prerequisites, B.A. 21, B.A. 140. Analysis of financial statements for the guidance 
of executives, directors, stockholders, and creditors, valuation of balance sheet items; 
determination and interpretation of ratios. 

B.A. 150a. Marketing Principles and Organization. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. This is an introductory course in the field of marketing. 
Its purpose is to give a general understanding and appreciation of the forces operating, 
institutions employed, and methods followed in marketing agricultural products, natural 
products, services, and manufactured goods. 

B.A. 150. Marketing Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 150a. A study of the work of the marketing division in a going 
organization. The work of developing organizations and procedures for the control of 
marketing activities are surveyed. The emphasis throughout the course is placed on the 
determination of policies, methods, and practices for the effective marketing of various 
fonns of manufactured products. 

B.A. 151. Advertising. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 150. A study of the role of advertising in the 
American economy; the impact of advertising on our economic and social life, the 
methods and techniques currently applied by advertising practitioners, the role of the 
newspaper, magazine, and other media in the development of an advertising campaign, 
modern research methods to improve the effectiveness of advertising, and the organi- 
zation of the advertising business. 

B.A. 152. Advertisirjg Co'py and Layout. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, B.A. 151, and senior standing. A study of the prac- 
tices and techniques of copy writing and layout. The student will participate in ex- 
ercises designed to teach him the essential principles of writing copy for various media 
and presenting ideas in visual form. The course deals with the development of ideas 
rather than art forms. 

B.A. 153. Purchasing Management. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, B.A. 150 and senior standing. Retail store organization, 
determining the proper sources, quality and quantity of supplies, and methods of 
testing quality; price policies, price forecasting, forward buying, bidding and negotia- 
tion; budgets and standards of achievement. Particular attention is given to govern- 
ment purchasing and methods and procedures used in their procurement. 

B.A. 154. Retail Store Management. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, B.A, 150 and senior standing. Retail store organization, 
location, layout and store policy; pricing policies, price Hnes, brands, credit policies, 
records as a guide to buying; purchasing methods; supervision of selling; training and 
supervision of retail sales force; and administrative problems. 

B.A. 155. Problems in Retail Merchandising. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 154. Designed to develop skill in the planning 
and control of merchandise stocks. Deals with bupng policies, pricing, dollar and unit 
control procedures, mark-up and mark-down policies, merchandise budgeting, and the 
gross margin-expense-net earnings relationships. 

53 ► 



Business Organization and Administration 

B.A. 156. Marketing Research Methods. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, B.A. 130 and B.A. 150. This course is intended to 
develop skill in the use of scientific methods in the acquisition, analysis and interpre- 
tation of marketing data. It covers the specialized fields of marketing research, the 
planning of survey projects, sample design, tabulation procedure and report prepa- 
ration. 

B.A. 157. Foreign Trade Procedure. (3) 

Prerequisites, B.A. 150 and senior standing. Functions of various exporting agencies; 
documents and procedures used in exporting and importing transactions. Methods of 
procuring goods in foreign countries; financing of import shipments; clearing through 
the customs districts; and distribution of goods in the United States. 

B.A. 158. Advertising Problems. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 151. This course is devoted to the application 
of advertising skills for the purpose of conducting advertising campaigns scaled to 
specific marketing needs and financial resources. It combines sound principles with 
laboratory techniques; familiarizes the student with the price structure, technical needs, 
and problems of effective presentation for newspapers, magazines, radio, television, 
and other media. 

B.A. 159. Newspaper Advertising. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 151. A study of the problems of newspaper ad- 
vertising with special attention to the needs of retail business. The course covers lay- 
out, production methods, sales techniques, and classified advertising. Students are en- 
couraged to work in the advertising departments of campus and nearby publications 
for actual experience. 

B.A. 160. Personnel Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 160. This course deals vidth the problems of directing and super- 
vising emplovees under modem industrial conditions. Two phases of personnel ad- 
ministration are stressed, the application of scientific management and the importance 
of human relations in this field. 

B.A. 163. Industrial Relations. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, B.A. 160 and senior standing. A study of the develop 
ment and methods of organized groups in industry with reference to the settlement of 
labor disputes. An economic and legal analysis of labor union and employer associa- 
tion activities, arbitration, mediation, and conciliation; collective bargaining, trade agree- 
m.ents, strikes, boycotts, lockouts, company unions, employee representation, and in- 
junctions. 

B.A. 164. Recent Labor Legislation and Court Decisions. (3) 
First semester. Prerequisites, B.A. 160 and senior standing. Case method analysis of 
the modem law of industrial relations. Cases include the decisions of administrative 
agencies, courts and arbitration tribunals. 

B.A. 165. Office Management. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, junior standing. Considers the application of 

the principles of scientific management in their application to office work. 

•< 54 



Business Organization and Administration 

B.A. 166. Business Communications. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, junior standing. A systematic study of the 
principles of eflcctivc written communications in business. The fundamental aim is 
to develop the ability to write clear, correct, concise, and persuasive business letters 
and reports. 

B.A. 167. Job Evaluation and Merit Rating. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisites, B.A. 160, B.A. 169 and senior standing. The investiga- 
tion of the leading job evaluation plans used in industry, study of the development and 
administrative procedures, analyzing jobs and writing job descriptions, setting up a 
job evaluation plan, and relating job evaluation to pay scales. Study of various em- 
ployee merit rating programs, the methods of merit rating, and the uses of merit rating. 

B.A. 16S. Advanced Office Management. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, B.A. 165 and junior standing. A study of the policies, 
systems, practices used to promote the effective utilization of the office functions. Among 
the subjects studied will be organization, standards determination, procedures, schedul- 
ing, layout, and process charting. The above techniques will be used in analyzing, 
evaluating, and improving the office methods found in several actual business cases. 

B.A. 169. Industrial Management. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Econ. 160 and B.A. 11. Studies the opera- 
tion of a manufacturing enterprise. Among the topics covered are product develop- 
ment, plant location, plant layout, production planning and control, methods analysis, 
time study, job analysis, budgetary control, standard costs, and problems of supervision. 

B.A. 170. Transportation Services and Regulation. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A general course covering the five fields of transportation, 
their development, service and regulation. (This course is a prerequisite for all other 
transportation courses.) 

B.A. 171. Industrial and Commercial Traffic Management. (3) 
Prerequisite, B.A. 170. Covers the details of classification and rate construction for 
ground and air transportation. Actual experiences in handling tariffs and classifications 
is provided. It is designed for students interested in the practical aspects of shipping 
and receiving and is required for all majors in Transportation Administration. 

B.A. 172. Motor Trayts'portation. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 170. The development and scope of the motor 
carrier industry, different types of carriers, economics of motor transportation, services 
available, federal regulation, highway financing, allocation of cost to highway users, 
highway barriers. 

B.A. 172a. Motor Carrier Administration. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, B.A. 170 and 172. Over the road and terminal opera- 
tions and management, the use of management controls, management organization, 
Interstate Commerce Commission policy as affecting management decisions. 

B.A. 173. Water Trans'portation. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 170. Water carriers of all types, development and t\-pes of services, 
trade routes, inland waterways, company organization, the American ^lerchant Marine 
as a factor in national activity. 

55 ► 



Business Organization and Administration 

B.A. 174. Commercial Air Transportation. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 170. The air transportation system of the United States; airways, 
airports, airHnes. Federal regulation of air transportation. Problems and services of 
commercial air transportation; economics, equipment, operations, financing, selling of 
passenger and cargo services. Air mail development and services. 

B.A. 175. Airline Administration. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 174. Practices, systems and methods of airline management; actual 
work in handling details and forms required in planning and directing maintenance, 
operations, accounting and traffic transactions, study of airline operations and other 
manuals of various companies. 

B.A. 176. Problems in Airport Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 174. Airports classified, aviation interests and community needs, 
airport planning, construction, building problems. Airports and the courts. Manage- 
ment, financing, operations, revenue sources. 

B.A. 177. Motion Economy and Time Stiidy. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, B.A. 169 and senior standing. A study of the prin- 
ciples of motion economy, simo charts, micromotion study, the fundamentals of time 
study, job evaluation, observations, standard times, allowances, formula construction and 
wage payment plans. 

B.A. 178. Production Planning and Coittrol. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisites, B.A. 169 and senior standing. An analysis of the 
man-, material-, and machine requirements for production according to the several types 
of manufacture. The development and application of inventory records, load charts, 
production orders, schedules, production reports, progress reports and control reports. 
One lecture period and one laboratory period each week. 

B.A. 179. Problems in Supervision. (3) 

Prerequisites, B.A. 160, B.A. 169 and senior standing. A case study course in prob- 
lems of management and administration with emphasis upon analysis and reasoning 
applied toward a solution. 

B.A. 180, 181. Business Law. (4, 4) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, senior standing. Required in all Bus. 
Org. curriculums. Legal aspects of business relationships, contracts, negotiable instru- 
ments, agency, partnerships, corporations, real and personal property, and sales. 

B.A. 184. Public Utilities. (3) 

Prerequisites Econ. 32 or 37 and senior standing. Using the regulated industries as 
specific examples attention is focused on broad and general problems in such diverse 
fields as constitutional law, administrative law, public administration, government control 
ol business, advanced economic theory, accounting, valuation and depreciation, taxation, 
finance, engineering and management. 

E.A. 189. Busi^iess and Government. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Econ. 32 or 37 and senior standing. A study of the 
role of government in modern economic life. Social control of business as a remedy for 
the abuses of business enterprise arising from the decline of competition. Criteria of 
and limitations on government regulation of private enterprise. 

-< 56 



Business Organization and Administration 

B.A. 190. Life Insurance. (3} 

First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A general survey of liic insurance: 
Its institutional development, selection of risks, mathematical calculations, contract pro- 
visions, kinds of policies, their functional uses, industrial and group contracts and 
government supervision. 

B.A. 191. Property Insurance. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A study of the insurance coverages 
wTitten to protect individuals and businesses; fire, extended coverage, business interrup- 
tion, automobile, liability, fidelity, surety, inland marine and ocean marine. Hazards, 
rate-making, legal principles, standard forms and business practices are discussed. 

B.A. 194. Insurance Agency Management. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 190 or 191. This course deals with the more 
practical problems and policies of the insurance agent, manager, or broker; the manage- 
ment of his own organization and its relations with the public and home offices. Ad- 
vanced topics in life insurance and additional coverages in property insurance are con- 
sidered also. 

B.A. 195. Real Estate Principles. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. This course covers the nature and 
uses of real real estate, real estate as a business, basic legal principles, construction prob- 
lems and home ownership, city planning, and public control and ownership of real 
estate. 

B.A. 196. Real Estate Finance. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. This course includes consideration 
of the factors influencing real estate values, methods and techniques in the general 
appraisal of real estate by brokers and professional appraisers, and general problems in 
real estate financing. 

B.A. 197. Real Estate Management. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 195 or 196. A study of mortgage banking in 
its relation to real estate operations, various financial institutions, and the oeneral 
economy; and a study of real property management with its responsibilities to owners, 
tenants, employees, and the public. 

For Graduates 

(Graduate standing and consent of instructor required.) 

B.A. 210. Advaf7ced Accoiinting Theory. (2-3) 
Prerequisites, B.A. 1 1 1 and graduate standing. 

B.A. 220. Managerial Accounting. (3) 

E.A. 221, 222. Seminar in AccoiDiting. 
(Arranged.) 

B.A. 226. Accounting Systems. (3) 

B.A. 228. Research in Accounting. 
(Arranged.) 

57 ► 



Business Organization and Administration 

B.A. 229. Studies of S'pecial Prohlems in the Fields of Control and Organiza- 
tion. 
CArranged.) 

B.A. 240. Seminar in Financial Management. (^-3) 
Prerequisites, Econ. 140, B.A. 21, B.A. 140. 

B.A. 249. Studies of S'pecial Prohlems in the Field of Financial Administration, 
(Arranged.) 

B.A. 250. Prohlems in Sales Management. (3) 

B.A. 251. Prohlems in Advertising. (3) 

B.A. 252. Prohlems in Retail Store Management. (3) 

B.A. 257. Seminar in Marketing Management. 
(Arranged.) 

B.A. 258. Research Prohlems in Marketing. 
(Arranged.) 

B.A. 262. Seminar in Contemporary Trends in Lahor Relations. 
(Arranged.) 

B.A. 265. Development and Trends in Industrial Management. (3) 

B.A. 266. Research in Personnel Management. 
(Arranged.) 

B.A. 267. Research in Industrial Relations. 
(Arranged.) 

B.A. 269. Studies in Special Prohlems in Employer-Employee Relationships. 
(Arranged.) 

B.A. 270. Seminar in Air Transportation. (3) 

B.A. 271. Theory of Organization. (3) 

B.A. 275. Seminar in Motor Transportation. (3) 

B.A. 277. Seminar in Transportation. (3) 

B.A. 280. Seminar in Business and Government Relations. 

(Arranged.) 

B.A. 284. Seminar in Puhlic Utilities. (3) 

B.A. 290. Seminar in Insurance. (3) 

B.A. 295. Seminar in Real Estate. (3) 

B.A. 299. Thesis. 
(Arranged.) 

^ 58 



Economics 

ECONOMICS 

Professors: Dillard, Gruchy. 

Associate Professors: Grayson, Giirley, Hamherg. 

Assistant Professors: Dalton, Measday, Shelby, Smith. 

Instructors: Barrett, Day, Dodge, Glade. 

Lecturer: Edminster. 

Econ. 4, 5. Economic Developments. (2, 2) 

first and second semesters. Freshman requirements in Business Administration 
Curriculums. An introduction to modem economic institutions— their origins, develop 
mcnt, and present status. Commercial revolution, industrial revolution, and age of mass 
production. Emphasis on developments in England, Western Europe and the United 
States. (Dillard and Staff.) 

Econ. 31, 32. PHncifles of Economics. QS, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. Required in the 
Business Administration Curriculums. A general analysis of the functioning of the 
economic system. A considerable portion of the course is devoted to a study of basic 
concepts and explanatory principles. The remainder deals wath the major problems of 
the economic system. (Grayson and Staff.) 

Econ. 37. Fundamentals of Econom,ics. (3) 

First and second semesters. Not open to students who have credit in Econ. 31 
and 32. Not open to freshmen or to B. P. A. students. A survey of the general prin- 
ciples underlying economic acti\aty. This is the basic course in Economics for the 
American Civilization program for students who are luiable to take the more complete 
course provided in Economics 31 and 32. (Smith and Staff.) 

VoT Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Econ. 102. National Income Analysis. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32. An analysis of national income 

accounts and the level of national income and employment. 

Econ. 131. Comparative Economic Systems. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. An investigation of the 
theor}' and practice of various types of economic systems. The course begins with an 
examination and evaluation of the capitalistic system and is followed by an analysis of 
alternative t^'pes of economic systems such as fascism, socialism, and communism. 

(Gruchy.) 

Econ. 132. Advanced Economic Principles. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32. Required for Economics majors. 
This course is an analysis of price and distribution theor)' with special attention to 
recent developments in the theory of imperfect competition. (Grayson.) 



59 



Economics ' 

Econ. 134. Contem'porary Economic Thought. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Econ. 32 and senior standing. A sxorvey of recent 
trends in American, English, and Continental Economic thought with special attention 
to the work of such economists as W. C. Mitchell, J. R. Conmaons, T. Veblen, W. 
Sombart, J. A. Hobson and other contributors to the development of economic thought 
since 1900. (Gruchy.) 

Econ. 136. International Economic Policies and Relations. C3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A descriptive and theoretical analysis 
of international trade. Full consideration is given to contemporary problems facing 
international trade and to the impact of governmental policy upon international com- 
mercial relations. 

Econ. 137. The Economics of National Planning. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. An analysis of the principles and 
practice of economic planning with special reference to the planning problems of Great 
Britain, Russia, and the United States. CGruchy.) 

Econ. 138. Economics of the Soviet Union. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. An analysis of the organization, 
operating principles and performance of the Soviet economy with attention to the 
historical and ideological background, planning, resources, industry, agriculture, domestic 
and foreign trade, finance, labor, and the structure and growth of national income. 

(Dodge.) 

Econ. 140. Money and Banking. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prereqviisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A study of the ograniza- 
tion, functions, and operation of our monetary, credit, and banking system; the relation 
of commercial banking to the Federal Reserve System; the relation of money and credit 
to prices; domestic and foreign exchange and the impact of public policy upon banking 
and credit. 

Econ. 141. Theory of Money, Credit, and Prices. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Econ. 32 and 140. A study of recent domestic and 

international monetary policies, their objectives and theoretical foundations. CGurley.) 

Econ. 142. Public Finance and Taxation. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A study of government 
fiscal policy with special emphasis upon sources of public revenue, the tax system, gov- 
ernment budgets, and the public debt. , (Grayson.) 

Econ. 147. Business Cycles. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 140. A study of the causes of depressions and 

unemployment, cyclical and secular instability, theories of business cycles, and the 

problem of controlling economic instability. (Hamberg.) 

Econ. 149. International Finance and Exchange. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 140; Econ. 136 and 141 recommended. This 
course considers the theory and practice of international finance and exchange. The 
increased importance of public authority in foreign trade, international policies, and 
finance is given due emphasis. 

< 60 



Economics 

Econ. 160. Labor Economics. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. The historical development 
and chief characteristics of the American labor movement are first surveyed. Present- 
day problems are then examined in detail: wage theories, unemployment, social securitVf 
labor organization, and collective bargaining. (Dalton, Measday, Smith.) 

Econ. 170. Monopoly and Competition. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. Changing structure of the American 
economy; price policies in difierent industrial classifications of monopoly and competi- 
tion in relation to problems of public policy. (Smith.) 

Econ. 171. Econoviics of American Industries. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A study of the technology, economics 

and geography of twenty representative American industries. (Qemens.) 

For Graduates 

Econ. 200. Micro-Economic Analysis. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 132. Price, output, and distribution analysis 
as developed by Chamberlin, Triffin, Hicks and others; econometric methods including 
Leontief input-output techniques of inter-industr)' analysis. Considerable attention is 
given to contributions in periodicals. (Grayson.) 

Econ. 202. Macro-Economic Analysis. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 132. National income accounting: determination 
of national income and emplojonent especially as related to the modem theorj' of effec- 
tive demand; consumption function; multiplier and acceleration principles; the role of 
money as it affects output and employment as a whole; cyclical fluctuations. (Dillard.) 

Econ. 204, 205. Seminar in Economic Development. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Historical and theoretical analysis of the major factors 
which influence economic development; comparisons between more developed and less 
developed areas; policies and techniques which hasten economic development. 

Econ. 230. History of Economic Thoiight. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 132 or consent of instructor. A study of the 
development of economic thought and theories including the Greeks, Romans, canonists, 
mercantilists, physiocrats, Adam Smith, Malthus, Ricardo. Relation of ideas to economic 
policy. (Dillard.) 

Econ. 231. Economic Theory in the Nineteenth Centnr)'. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 230 or consent of the instructor. A studv of 
various nineteenth and twentieth century schools of economic thought, particularly the 
classicists, neo-classicists, Austrians, German historical school, American economic 
thought and the socialists. (Dillard.) 

Econ. 232, 233. Seminar in Institutional Economic Theor)'. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. A study of recent developments in the field of institu- 
tional economic theory in the United States and abroad. (Gruchy.) 

61 ► 



Geography 

Econ. 236. Seminar in International Economic Relations. (3) 

C Arranged.) A study of selected problems in International Economic Relations. 

Econ. 237. Seminar in Economic Investigation. (3) 

Econ. 240. Seminar in Monetary Theory and Policy. (3) 

Theories of money, prices, and national income with emphasis on recent develop- 
ments. Monetary theories of income fluctuations. Domestic and international monetary 
policies. (Gurley.) 

Econ. 247. Economic Growth and Instability. (3) 

Second semester. An analytical study of long-term economic growth in relation to 
short-term cyclical instability. Attention is concentrated on the connection between 
accumulation of capital and the capital requirements of secular growth and business 
cycles. Earlier writings as well as recent growth models are considered. (Hamberg.) 

Econ. 270. Seminar in Economics and Geography of American Industries. C3) 
(Arranged.) CClemens.) 

Econ. 299. Thesis. 
(Arranged.) 

GEOGRAPHY 

Professors: Van Roy en, Hu. 

Consulting Professor: Roterus. 

Lecturers with rank of Professor: Lemons, McBryde. 

Associate Professor: Augelli. 

Assistant Professors: Ahnert, Deshler, Hooson, Mc Arthur. 

Instructors: Karinen, Sas. 

Research Associate: Batter shy. 

Research Assistants: Langen, Salome and Taylor. 

Geog. 1,2. Economic Resources. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week 
for Geog. 1; two lectvire periods for Geog. 2. Freshman requirements in the Business 
Administration Curriculimis. General comparative study of the geographic factors under- 
lying production economics. Emphasis upon climate, soils, land forms, agricultural 
products, power resources, and major minerals, concluding with brief survey of geog- 
raphy of commerce and manufacturing. (Deshler and Staft.) 

Geog. 10, 11. General Geography. (,3, 3") 

First and second semesters. Required of all majors in geography; recommended for 
all minors; Geog. 10 is suggested for students of Arts and Sciences, Education and 
others who may desire a background in geography and its application to problems of 
their respective fields. Introduction to geography as a field of study. A survey of the 
content, philosophy, techniques, and application of geography and its significance for 
the understanding of world problems. (Augelli.) 



Geog. 20, 21. Economic Geography. (3, 3) 
(Not offered on College Park campus.) 



62 



Geogra'phy 

Geog. 30. Principles of Morphology. (3) 

First semester. A study of the physical features of the earth's surface and their 
geographic distribution, including subordinate land forms. Major morphological pro- 
cesses, the development of land forms, and the relationships between various types of 
land forms and land use problems. (Ahnert.) 

Geog. 35. Map Interpretation and Map Problems. (3) 

First and second semesters. Interpretation of landforms and man-made features on 
American and foreign maps. Functions, use, and limitations of various types of maps, 
with emphasis upon topographic maps. Problems of use and interpretation. (Ahnert.) 

Geog. 40. Principles of Meteorology. (3) 

First and second semesters. An introductory study of the weather. Properties and 
conditions of the atmosphere, and methods of measurement. The atmospheric circu- 
lation and conditions responsible for various types of weather and their geographic 
distribution patterns. Practical applications. (Ahnert, Sas.) 

Geog. 41. Introductory Climatology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Geog. 40, or permission of the instructor. Climatic 
elements and their controls, the classification and distribution of world climates and 
relevance of climatic differences to human activities. (Sas.) 

Geog. 42S. Weather and Climate. (2) 

Summer only. An introduction to the principal causes of the weather and the major 

types of climate, with special emphasis upon North America. 

Geog. 100. Regional Geography of Eastern Anglo- America. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, Geog. 1, 2 or Geog. 10, or permission of the instructor. 
A study of the cultural and economic geography and the geographic regions of £astem 
United States and Canada, including an analysis of the significance of the physical 
basis for present-day diversification of development, and the historical geographic 
background. (McArthur.) 

Geog. 101. Regional Geography of Western Anglo-America. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, Geog. 1, 2 or Geog. 10, or permission of the instructor. 
A study of Western United States, Western Canada and Alaska along the lines 
mentioned under Geog. 100. (McArthur.) 

Geog. 102S. Geography of the United States. (2) 

Summer only. Permission of instructor. A general study of the regions and resources 
of the United States in relation to agricultural and industrial development and to 
present-day national problems. 

Geog. 103. Geographic Concepts and Source Materials. (2) 

First semester. A comprehensive and systematic survey of geographic concepts de- 
signed exclusively for teachers. Stress will be placed upon the philosophy of geography 
in relation to the social and physical sciences, the use of the primary tools of geog- 
raphy, source materials, and the problems of presenting geographic principles. 

63 ► 



Geography 

Geog. 104. Geografhy of Major World Regions. (2) 

Second semester. A geographic analysis of the patterns, problems, and prospects 
of the world's principal hvmian-geographic regions, including Europe, Anglo-America, 
the Soviet Union, the Far East, and Latin America. Emphasis upon the causal factors 
oi differentiation and the role geographic differences play in the interpretation of the 
current world scene. This course is designed especially for teachers. 

Geog. 105. Geography of Maryland and adjacent areas. (3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. An analysis 
of the physical environment, natural resoiurces, and population in relation to agri- 
culture, industry, transport, and trade in the state of Maryland and adjacent areas. 

Geog. 106S. Geography of Maryland. (2) 

Summer only. Permission of instructor. The geographic regions of Maryland and 
their principal characteristics, especially in relation to the development of home studies 
and other projects. 

Geog. 110. Economic and Cultural Geography of Carihhean America. (3) 
First semester. An analysis of the physical framework, broad economic and his- 
torical trends, cultural patterns, and regional diversification of Mexico, Central America, 
the West Indies, and parts of Columbia and Venezuela. (Augelli.) 

Geog. 111. Economic and Cultural Geography of South America. (3) 
First semester. A survey of natural environment and resources, economic develop- 
ment and cultural diversity of the South American republics, with emphasis upon 
problems and prospects of the countries. CAugelli.^ 

Geog. 120. Economic Geography of Europe. (3} 

First semester. The natural resources of Europe in relation to agricultural and 

industrial development and to present-day economic and national problems. 

(Hooson, Van Royen.) 

Geog. 122. Economic Resoiirces and Development of Africa. (3) 
Second semester. The natural resources of Africa in relation to agricultural and 
mineral production; the various stages of economic development and the potentialities 
of the future. (Van Royen.) 

Geog. 123. Problems of Colonial Geography. (3) 

First and second semesters. Problems of development of colonial areas, with special 
emphasis upon the development of tropical regions and the possibilities of white settle- 
ment in the tropics. 

Geog. 130, 131. Economic and Political Geography of Southern and Eastern 
Asia. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. A study of China, Japan, India, Burma, Indo-China, 
and the East Indies; natural resources, population, and economic activities. Com- 
parisons of physical and himian potentialities of major regions and of their economic, 
social and political development. CHu.) 

Geog. 134, 135. Cultural Geography of East Asia. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. A comprehensive and systematic survey of the geo- 
graphical distribution and interpretation of the major racial groups and cxiltural 

^64 



Geogra'phy 

patterns of China, Japan, and Korea. Special emphasis will be placed on the unique 
characteristics of the peoples of these areas, their basic cultural institutions, outlooks 
on life, contemporary problems, and trends of cultural change. Designed especially 
for students of the social sciences, and those preparing for careers in foreign ser\'ice, 
foreign trade, education, and international relations. (Hu.) 

Geog. 140. Soviet Lands. (3) 

First and second semesters. The natural environment and its regional diversity. Geo- 
graphic factors in the expansion of the Russian State. The geography of agricultural 
and industrial production, in relation to available resources, transportation problems, 
and diversity of population. CHooson.) 

Geog. 146. The Near East. (3) 

First semester or second semester. The physical, economic, political, and strategic 

geography of the lands between the Mediterranean and India. 

Geog. 150. History and Theory of Cartography. (3) 

First semester. The development of maps throughout history. Geographical orien- 
tation, coordinates, and map scales. Map projections, their nature, use and limitations. 
Principles of representation of features on physical and cultural maps. Modem uses 
of maps and relationships between characteristics of maps and use types. (McBryde.) 

Geog. 151, 152. Cartography and Graphics Practicwn. (3, 3) 
First and. second semesters. One hour lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods 
a week. Techniques and problems of compilation, design, and construction of various 
types of maps and graphs. Relationships between map making and modem methods of 
production and reproduction. Trips to representative plants. Laboratory work directed 
toward cartogi'aphic problems encountered in the making of non-topographic maps. 

(Karinen.) 

Geog. 153. Problems of Cartographic Representation and Procedure. (3) 
First and second semesters. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory a week. 
Study of cartographic compilation methods. Principles and problems of s)Tnbolization, 
classification, and representation of map data. Problems of representation of features 
at different scales and for different purposes. Place-name selection and lettering; stick- 
up and map composition. (Karinen.) 

Geog. 154. Problems of Map Evaluation. (3) 

First or second semester. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory a week. 
Schools of topographic concepts and practices. Theoretical and practical means of 
determining map reliability, map utility, and source materials. Nature, status, and 
problems of topographic mapping in different parts of the world. Non-topographic 
special use maps. Criteria of usefulness for purposes concerned and of reliability. 

(Karinen.) 

Geog. 155. Problems and Practices of Photo Interpretation. (3) 
First and second semesters. Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per 
week. Interpretation of aerial photographs with emphasis on the recognition of land- 
forms of different types and man-made features. Study of vegetation, soil, and other 
data that may be derived from aerial photographs. Tvpes of aerial photographs and 
limitations of photo interpretation. (Ahnert.) 

65 ► 



Geography 

Geog. 160. Advanced Economic Geography I. Agricultural Resources. (3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, Geog. 1 and 2 or Geog. 10. The natxire of agricultural 
resources, the major types of agricultural exploitation in the world, and the geographic 
distribution of certain major crops and animals in relation to the physical environment 
and economic geographic conditions. Main problems of conservation. (Van Royen.) 

Geog. 161. Advanced Economic Geography II. Mineral Resources. C3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, Geog. 1 and 2, or Geog. 10. The nature and geo- 
graphic distribution of the principal power, metallic and other minerals. Economic 
geographic aspects of modes of exploitation. Consequences of geographic distribution 
and problems of conservation. CVan Royen.) 

Geog. 170. Local Field Course. (3) 

First semester. Training in geographic field methods and techniques. Field observa- 
tion of land use in selected rural and urban areas in eastern Maryland. One lecture 
per week with Saturday and occasional weekend field trips. Primarily for under- 
graduates. (Ahnert.) 

Geog. 180. History, Nature and Methodology of Geography. (3) 
First semester. A comprehensive and systematic study of the history, nature, and 
basic principles of geography, with special reference to the major schools of geographic 
thought; a critical evaluation of some of the important geographical works and methods 
of geographic research. CHu.) 

Geog. 190. Political Geography. (3) 

Second semester. Geographical factors in national power and international relations; 
an analysis of the role of "Geopolitics" and "Geostrategy," with special reference to 
the current world scene. CAugelli.) 

Geog. 195. Geography of Transportation. (3) 

Second semester. The distribution of transport routes on the earth's surface; patterns 
of transport routes; the adjustment of transport routes and media to conditions of the 
natural environment centers and their distribution. CMcArthur.) 

Geog. 197. Urban Geography. (3) 

First semester. Origins of cities, followed by a study of elements of site and location 
vdth reference to cities. The patterns and functions of some major world cities will be 
analyzed. Theories of land use difterentiation within cities will be appraised. 

CMcArthur.) 
Geog. 199. Topical Investigations. (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Independent study under individual guidance. Choice 
of subject matter requires joint approval of advisor and Head of the Department of 
Geography. Restricted to advanced undergraduate students with credit for at least 24 
hours of geography. (Staff.) 

Geog. 200. Field Course. (3) 

Field work in September, conferences and reports during first semester> Practical 
experience in conducting geographic field studies. Intensive training in field methods 
and techniques and in the preparation of reports. For graduate students in geography. 
Open to other students by special permission of the Head of the Department of 
Geography. (Staff.) 

M 66 



Geografhy 

For Graduates 

Geog. 210, 221. Seminar in the Geogra'phy of Latin America. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Geog. 110, 111 or consent of instructor. 
An analysis of recent changes and trends in industrial development, exploitation of 
mineral resources, and land utilization. (McBryde.) 

Geog. 220, 221. Seminar in the Geography of Europe and Africa. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Geog. 120 or 122, or consent of instructor. 
Analysis of special problems concerning the resources and development of Europe 
and Africa. (Van Royen.) 

Geog. 230, 231. Seminar in the Geography of East Asia. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Analysis of problems concerning the geography of East 
Asia with emphasis on special research methods and techniques applicable to the prob- 
lems of this area. CHu.) 

Geog. 240, 241. Seminar in the Geography of the U.S.S.R. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Investigation of special aspects of Soviet geography. 

Emphasis on the use of Soviet materials. Prerequisite, reading knowledge of Prussian 

and Geog. 140, or consent of instructor. (Hooson.) 

Geog. 246. Seminar in the Geography of the Near East. (3) 
First and second semesters. 

Geog. 250. Seminar in Cartography. Qcredit arranged^ 

First and second semesters. The historical and mathematical background of carto- 
graphic concepts, practices, and problems, and the various philosophical and practical 
approaches to cartography. Discussions will be supplemented by the presentation of 
specific cartographic problems investigated by the students. (McBryde and Karinen.) 

Geog. 260. Advanced General Climatology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Geog. 41, or consent of instructor. Advanced studv of 
elements and controls of the earth's climates. Principles of climatic classification. 
Special analysis of certain climatic t}'pes. (Lemons.) 

Geog. 261. Applied Climatology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Geog. 41, or consent of instructor. Study of prin- 
ciples, techniques, and data of micro-climatology, physical and regional climatology 
relating to such problems and fields as transportation, agriculture, industry, urban 
planning, human comfort, and regional geographic analysis. (Lemons.) 

Geog. 262, 263. Seminar in Meteorology and Climatology. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Selected topics in 
meteorology and climatology chosen to fit the individual needs of advanced students. 

(Lemons.) 

Geog. 280. Geomorphology. (3) 

Second semester. An advanced comparative study of selected geomorphic processes 

and land forms; theories of land forms evolution and geomorphological problems. 

(Van Royen.) 

67 ► 



Government and Politics 

Geog. 290, 291. Selected Topics in Geography. Ci-3) 

First and second semesters. Readings and discussion on selected topics in the field 

of geography. To be taken only with joint consent of advisor and Head of the 

Department of Geography. (Staff.) 

Geog. 292, 293. Dissertation Research. (Credit to he arranged^ 

First and second semesters and summer. CStaff.) 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

Professors: Plischke, Burdette, Steinmeyer, and Wengert. 
Associate Professor: Anderson. 

Assistant Professors: Alford, Harrison, and Hathorn. 
Instructors: Byrd, Hamilton, Hehal, Hester, and Hohenstein. 

G. and P. 1. American Government. (3) 

Each semester. This course is designed as the basic course in government for the 
American Civilization program, and it or its equivalent is a prerequisite to all other 
courses in the Department. It is a comprehensive study of governments in the United 
States— national, state, and local. 

G. and P. 4. State Government and Administration. C3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the organization and functions 
of state government in the United States, viath special emphasis upon the government 
oi Maryland. 

G. and P. 5. Local Government and Administration. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the organization and functions 
of local government in the United States, with special emphasis upon the government 
oi Maryland cities and counties. 

G. and P. 7. The Government of the British Commonwealth. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the governments of the United 

Kingdom and the British Dominions. 

G. and P. 8. The Governments of Continental Europe. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A comparative study of the governments 

of France, Svidtzerland, Italy, Germany, and the Scandinavian countries. 

G. and P. 9. The Governments of Latin America. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A comparative study of Latin American 

governments, with special emphasis on Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico. 

G. and P. 10. The Governments of the Far East. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, G. &. P. 1. A study of the governments of China and 

Japan. 

G. and P. 11. The Government and Administration of the Soviet Union. (3) 
Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the adoption of the Commimist philosophy by 
the Soviet Union, of its governmental structure, and of the administration of govern- 
ment policy in the Soviet Union. 

M 68 



Government and Politics 

G. and P. 97. Major Foreign Governments. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. and P. 1. An examination of characteristic governmental institutions 
and political processes in selected major powers, such as Britain, Russia, France, 
Germany, Italy, Japan, and China. Students may not receive credit in this course 
and also obtain credit in G. & P. 7, 8, or 10. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

G. and P. 101. International Political Relations. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the major factors underlying 
international relations, the influence of geography, climate, nationalism, and imperialism, 
and the development of foreign policies of the major powers. 

G. and P. 102. International Law. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. Fundamental principles governing the 

relation of states, including matters of jurisdiction over landed territory', water, airspace, 

and persons; treatment of aliens; treaty-making; diplomacy; and the laws of war and 

neutrality. 

G. and P. 104. biter- American Relations. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. An analytical and historical study of the Latin-American 
policies of the United States and of problems in our relations with indi\'idual countries, 
with emphasis on recent developments. 

G. and P. 105. Pxecent Far Eastern Politics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. The background and interpretation of recent 

political events in the Far East and their influence on world politics. 

G. and P. 106. American Foreign Relations. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. The principles and machinery' of the con- 
duct of American foreign relations, with emphasis on the Department of State and the 
Foreign Ser\-ice, and an analysis of the major foreign policies of the United States. 

G. and P. lOS. International Organization. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the objectives, structure, 

functions, and procedures of international organizations, including the United Nations 

as well as functional and regional organizations as the Organization of American 

States. 

G. and P. 110. Principles of Public Administration. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of public administration in the 
United States, giving special attention to the principles of organization and management 
and to fiscal, personnel, planning, and public relations practices. 

G. and P. 111. Ptihlic Personnel Administration. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 110 or B.A. 160. A sur%'ey of public personnel 
administration, including the development of merit ci\'il ser\'ice, the personnel agency, 
classification, recruitment, examination techniques, promotion, service ratings, training, 
discipline, employee relations, and retirement. 

69 ► 



Government and Politics 

G. and P. 112. Puhlic Financial Administration. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 110 or Econ. 142. A survey of governmental 
financial procedures, including processes of current and capital budgeting, the admin- 
istration of public borrowing, the techniques of public purchasing, and the machinery 
of control through pre-audit and post-audit. 

G. and P. 124. Legislatures and Legislation. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A comprehensive study of legislative organi- 
zation, procedure, and problems. The course includes opportunities for student con- 
tact vidth Congress and vwth the Legislature of Maryland. 

G. and P. 131, 132. Constitutional Law. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A systematic inquiry into the 
general principles of the American constitutional system, with special reference to the 
role of the judiciary in the interpretation and enforcement of the federal constitution; 
the position of the states in the federal system; state and federal powers over commerce; 
due process of law and other civil rights. 

G. and P. 133. Administration of Justice. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. An examination of civil and criminal court 
structure and procedures in the United States at all levels of government, with special 
emphasis upon the federal judiciary. 

G. and P. 141. History of Political Theory. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A survey of the principal political theories set 

forth in the works of writers from Plato to Bentham. 

G. and P. 142. Recent Political Theory. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of 19th and 20th century political 

thought, vidth special emphasis on recent theories of socialism, communism, and fascism. 

G. and P. 144. American Political Theory. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the development and growth of 
American political concepts from the colonial period to the present. 

G. and P. 154. Prohlems of World Politics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of governmental problems of inter- 
national scope, such as causes of war, problems of neutrality, and propaganda. Students 
are required to report on readings from current literature. 

G. and P. 174. Political Parties. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A descriptive and analytical examination of 
American political parties, nominations, elections, and political leadership. 

G. and P. 178. Puhlic Ofinion. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. An examination of public opinion and its effect 
on political action, with emphasis on opinion formation and measurement, propaganda^ 
and pressure groups. 

^ 70 



Government and Politics 

G. and P. 181. Administrative Law. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the discretion exercised by ad- 
ministrative agencies, including analysis of their functions, their powers over persons 
and property, their procedures, and judicial sanctions and controls. 

G. and P. 197. Comparative Governmental Institutions. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of major political institutions, such 
as legislatures, executives, courts, administrative systems, and political parties, in selected 
foreign governments. 

For Graduates 

G. and P. 201. Seminar in International Political Organization. (3) 
A study of the forms and functions of various international organizations. 

G. and P. 202. Seminar in International Law. (3) 

Reports on selected topics assigned for individual study and reading in substantive and 

procedural international law. 

G. and P. 205. Seminar in American Political Institutions. (3) 
Reports on topics assigned for indi\ddual study and reading in the background and de- 
velopment of American government. 

G. and P. 206. Seminar in American Foreign Relations. (3) 

Reports on selected topics assigned for individual study and reading in American foreign 

policy and the conduct of American foreign relations. 

G. and P. 207. Seminar in Comparative Governmental Institutions. (3) 
Reports on selected topics assigned for individual study and reading in govemmenta] 
and political institutions in governments throughout the world. 

G. and P. 211. Seminar in Federal-State Relations. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the field of recent fed- 
eral-state relations. 

G. and P. 213. Problems of Public Administration. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the field of public ad- 
ministration. 

G. and P. 214. Problems of Public Personnel Administration. (3) 
Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the field of public per- 
sonnel administration. 

G. and P. 215. Problems of State and Local Government in Maryland. (3) 
Reports on topics assigned for individual study in the field of Mar)'land state and local 
government. 

G. and P. 216. Government Administrative Planning and Management. (3) 
Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in administrative planning 
and management in government. 

71 ► 



Government and Politics 

G. and P. 217. Government Corforations and S fecial Purpose Authorities. (3) 
Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the use of the corporate 
form for governmental administration. The topics for study will relate to the use of 
the corporate form as an administrative technique, as in the cases of the Tennessee 
Valley Authority, the Port of New York Authority, and local housing authorities. 

G. and P. 221. Seminar in Public Opinion. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the field of public 

opinion. 

G. and P. 223. Seminar in Legislatures and Legislation. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading about the composition and 

organization of legislatures and about the legislative process. 

G. and P. 224. Seminar in Political Parties and Politics. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the fields of political 

organization and action. 

G. and P. 225. Alan and the State. (3) 

Individual reading and reports on such recurring concepts in political theory as liberty, 
equality, justice, natural law and natural rights, private property, sovereignty, national- 
ism, and the organic state. 

G. and P. 231. Seminar in Public Law. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the fields of constitu- 
tional and administrative law. 

G. and P. 251. Bibliografhy of Government and Politics. (3) 

Survey of the literature of the various fields of government and politics and instruction 

in the use of government doctmients. 

G. and P. 252. Problems of Democracy: National 1. (3) 
Summer session only. 

G. and P. 253. Problems of Democracy: International I. (3) 
Summer session only. 

G. and P. 254. Problems of Democracy: National 11. (3) 
Simimer session only. 

G. and P. 255. Problems of Democracy: International II. (3) 
Summer session only. 

G. and P. 261. Problems of Government and Politics. (3) 
Credit according to work accomplished. 

G. and P. 281. Departmental Seminar. (No credit^ 

Topics as selected by the graduate staff of the department. Registration for two semes- 
ters required of all doctoral candidates. Conducted by the entire departmental staff in 
full meeting. 

-^72 



]ournalistn and Public Relations 



G. and P. 299. Thesis Course. 
(.Arranged). 



JOURNALISM AND PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Professor: Crowcll. 

Associate Professor: Krimel. 

Assistant Professors: Carey, Danegger, Newsom. 

Instructors: Bryan, Severin. 

JOURNALISM COURSES 

Journ. W. Introduction to Journalism. (3) 

Two lectures, two laboratory periods each week. Prerequisites, at least average grade 
of "C" in Eng. 1 and 2. Survey of journalism. Laboratory time spent in writing news- 
story exercises assigned by instructor. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

]onrn. 11. News Pieporting. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures, two laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite, Joum. 

10. More specialized types of news stories. Laborator)' fee, $3.00. 

Joum. 101. Radio-Television News Reporting. (2) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and two laboratory periods each week. Theory 

and practice in radio-television news reporting. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Joum. 160. News Editing I. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures, two hours of laboratory each week. Prerequisite, grade 
of at least "B" in Journ. 10 or Journ. 11. Copy editing, proofreading, headline writing. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Jotirn. 161. News Editing II. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures, three hours of laboratory work on Baltimore Sun or 

Baltimore News-Post desk each week, arranged. Headwriting, makeup, rewriting, copy 

editing. 

Journ. 162. Community Journalism. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures, three hours of laboratory work on a weekly newspaper 

each week, arranged. Introduction to community and weekly newspaper. 

Journ. 163. News-paper Typography. (3) 

Each semester. One lecture, four hours of laboratory each week. Introduction to news- 
paper typography, practice in laying out and making up advertisements and newspaper 
pages. 

Journ. 165. Eeature Writing. (3) 

Each semester. Writing and selling of newspaper and magazine articles. 

Journ. 173. Scholastic Journalism. (2) 

Introduction to theory and practice in production of high school and junior high pub- 
lications. 

73 ► 



Journalism and Public Relations 

Journ. 174. Editorial Writing, (2) 

First semester. Theory and practice in editorial writing. 

Journ. 175. Reporting of Public Affairs. (3) 

First semester. One lecture, three hours of laboratory time spent each week on regular 
beat for Baltimore Sun or Baltimore News-Post, by arrangement. Advanced reporting; 
city, county, federal beats. 

Jorirn. 176. Newsroom Problems. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Ethics, newsroom problems and policies, free- 
dom and responsibilities of the press. 

Journ. 181. Press Photo grafhy. (3) 

First and second semesters. One lecture, four hours of laboratory each week. Prerequi- 
site, junior major standing in the department. Shooting, developing, printing of news 
and feature pictures. Equipment provided by university. Student furnishes own 
supplies needed in course. Laboratory fee, $6.00, provides demonstration supplies, 
maintenance of cameras. 

Journ. 182. Advanced Press Photography. (2) 

First and second semesters. One lecture, two hours of laboratory per week. Pre- 
requisite, Journ. 181 or equivalent. Advanced shooting, developing, printing of news 
and feature pictures. Equipment provided by university. Student furnishes own 
supplies needed in course. 

Journ. 184. Picture Editing. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Journ. 181. Theories and exercises in handling pictures 

for the press. 

Journ. 191. Law of the Press. (3) 

Second semester. Non-legal introduction to libel, right of privacy, fair comment and 

criticism, privilege, contempt by publication, Maryland press statutes. 

Journ. 192. History of American journalism. (3) 

First semester. Historical background of American journalism. 

Journ. 196. Problems in Journalism. (2) 

First and second semesters. Group and individual projects in problems of journalism. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS COURSES 

P. R. 166. Public Relatiorts. (3) 

First semester. Survey of public relations; general orientation, principles, techniques. 

P. R. 170. Publicity Techniques. (3) 

First semester. Strategy and techniques of publicity operations. Orientation, practice 

in use of major media of public communications. 

P. R. 171. Industrial Journalism. (2) 

First semester. Introduction to industrial communications, management and produc- 
tion of company publications; public relations aspects of industrial journalism. 

^ 74 



Office Techniques and Management 

P. R. 186. Public Relations of Government. (3) 

Second semester. Study of public relatitms, publicity, propaganda, information ser\'ice8 

in public administration. 

P. R. 194. Public Relations Cases. (2) 

Second semester. Study of cases in public relations, with particular attention to policy 

formulation, strategy, ethical factors. 

P. R. 195. Seminar in Public Relations. (2) 

Second semester. Group and individual research in public relations. 

OFFICE TECHNIQUES AND MANAGEMENT 

Professor: Patrick. 

Instructors: Brown and O'Neill. 

Junior Instructor: Anderson 

O. T. 1. Principles of Typewriting. (2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Five periods per week. 
Laboratory fee, $7.50. The goal of this course is the attainment of the ability to oper- 
ate the typewriter continuously with reasonable speed and accuracy by the use of the 
"touch" system. This course should be completed prior to enrollment in O. T. 12, 
Principles of Shorthand. 

O. T. 2. Intermediate Typewriting. (2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, minimum grade of "C" in O. T. 1 or con- 
sent of instructor. Five periods per week. Laboratory fee, $7.50. Drills for improving 
speed and accuracy and an introduction to office production typewriting. 

O. T. 10. Office Typewriting Problems. (2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, minimum grade of "C" in O. T. 2 or consent 
of instructor. Five periods per week. Laboratory fee, $7.50. A course to develop the 
highest degree of accuracy and speed possible and to teach the advanced techniques of 
typewriting with special emphasis on production. 

O. T. 12, 13. Principles of Shorthand. (4, 4) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, O. T. 1 and consent of instructor. Five periods 
per week. This course aims to develop the mastery of the principles of Gregg Short- 
hand. In O. T. 13 special emphasis is placed on developing dictation speed. 

O. T. 110. Secretarial Work. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, O. T. 116, and O. T. 117 or consent of instructor. 
Five periods per week. A comprehensive study of the procedures and information essen- 
tial for the handling of the duties and responsibilities of an administrative assistant. 

O. T. 114. Secretarial Office Practice. (3) 

First and second semesters. Si.x times per week. Prerequisite, senior standing and com- 
pletion of O. T. 110. The purpose of this course is to give laboratory and office experi- 
ence to senior students. A minimum of 90 hours of office experience under superWsion 
is required. In addition, each student will prepare a WTitten report on an original prob- 
lem previously appro\'ed. 

75^ 



Office Techniques and Management 

*0. T. 116. Advanced Shorthand. (3) 

First semester. Five periods per week. Prerequisite, minimum grade of "C" in O. T.^ 
13 and O. T. 2 or consent of instructor. A course in shorthand speed building; de- 
velopment of dictation skill to the maximum for each individual. 

O. T. 117. Gregg Transcription. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, minimum grade of "C" in O. T. 13 and O. T. 10 or con- 
sent of instructor. Four periods per week. Laboratory fee, $7.50. This course is to be 
taken concurrently with O. T. 116. A course in intensive transcriptional speed build- 
ing, and in the related skills and knowledges. 

O. T. 118. Gregg Shorthand Dictation. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, minimum grade of "C" in O. T. 116 and O. T. 117, 
or consent of instructor. Five periods per week. Advanced principles and phases of 
shorthand; dictation covering vocabularies of representative businesses. 



*0. T. 10 should be completed prior to Advanced Shorthand (O. T. 116); O. T. 
116, Advanced Shorthand, and O. T. 117, Gregg Transcription, must be taken con- 
currently. 



-^ 76 



—The University is the rear guard and the 
advance agent of society. It lives in the 
'past, the present and the future. It is the 
storehouse of knowledge; it draws upon 
this depository to throw light upon the 
present; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual horizons and the scientific 
frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
— always toward the promise of a 
better tomorrow. 

— From "The State and the University, 
the inaugural address of 
President Wilson H. Elkins, 
January 20, 1955, 
G)llege Park, Maryland. 



SEPARATE CATALOGS AVAILABLE 



AT COLLEGE PARK 

Individual catalogs of colleges and schools of the University of Mary- 
land at College Park may be obtained by addressing the Office of Uni- 
versity Relations, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 

1. General Information 

2. College of AgrioUture 

3. College of Arts and Sciences 

4. College of Business and Public Administration 

5. College of Education 

6. College of Engineering 

7. College of Home Economics 

8. College of Military Science 

9. College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

10. College of Special and Continuation Studies 

The catalog of the European Program may be obtained by 
addressing the Dean, CoUege of Special and Continuation 
Studies, College Park, Maryland. 

11. Summer School 

12. Graduate School Announcements 

AT BALTIMORE 

Individual catalogs for the professional schools of the University of 
Maryland may be obtained by addressing the Deans of the respective 
schools at the University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene Streets, 
Baltimore 1, Maryland. 

13. School of Dentistry 

14. School of Law 

15. School of Medicine 

16. School of Pharmacy 

17. School of Nursing 



VOL.11 JANUARY 13, 1958 NO. 6 



195S 
1959 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE COLLEGE OF 

education 

AT COLLEGE PARK 




The provisions of this puhlication are not to he regarded 
as an irrevocahle contract hetween the student and the 
University of Maryland. The University reserves the 
right to change any provision or requirement at any time 
within the student's term of residence. The University 
further reserves the right at any time, to ask a student 
to withdraw when it considers such action to he in the 
hest interests of the University. 



SEE OUTSIDE BACK COVER FOR LIST OF OTHER CATALOGS 



COLLEGE 

of 

EDUCATION 



Catalog Series 19584959 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



VOLUME 11 



JANUARY 13, 1958 



NO. 6 



A University of Maryland publication is published twelve times in January; three 
times in Februarj'; once in March and April; three times in May; twice in June; once 
in July and August; twice in September and October; three times in November; and 

once in December. 

Re-entered at the Post Office in College Park, Maryland, as second class mail matter 
under the Act of Congress of August 24, 1912. 



CONTENTS 



GENERAL 



Board of Regents 1 

Officers of Administration 2 

Chairmen, Faculty Senate 5 

Faculty of the College 6 

Special Facilities and Activities ... 15 

Undergraduate Programs 16 

Admission 16 

General Information 17 

Military Instruction 17 

Physical Education and Health 18 



Guidance in Registration 18 

Junior Standing 18 

Certification of Teachers 19 

Degrees 19 

Costs 19 

Graduate Studies 19 

Status 19 

Registration 20 

Master's Degrees 20 

Doctor's Deorees 20 



CURRICULA AND REQUIRED COURSES 



Agricultural Education 26 

Art Education 26 

Business Education 28 

Childhood Education 30 

Elementary Education 31 

Home Economics Education .... 35 

Industrial Education 36 



Vocational-Industrial Certification. 38 

Education for Industry 39 

Music Education 41 

Physical Education and 

Health Education 43 

Health Education 46 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



Education 50 

Business Education 59 

Childhood Education 60 

Home Economics Education .... 61 



Human Development Education . . 62 

Industrial Education 66 

Music Education 72 

Science Education 74 



Photographs of several of the College's activities and a map of the campus 
is located in the center of the catalog. Use running headlines located at 
the top of each page as an additional aid in locating subject information. 



CALENDAR 

FALL SEMESTER 1958 
SEPTEMBER 1958 

15-19 Monday to Friday— Fall Semester Registration 

22 Monday— Instruction Begins 
NOVEMBER 

26 Wednesday— Thanksgiving Recess Begins After Last Class 
DECEMBER 

1 Monday— Thanksgiving Recess Ends 8 a.m. 

20 Saturday— Christmas Recess Begins After Last Class 

JANUARY 1959 

5 Monday— Christmas Recess Ends 8 a.m. 

21 Wednesday— Pre-Examination Study Day 

22-28 Thursday to Wednesday— First Semester Examinations 

SPRING SEMESTER 1959 
FEBRUARY 

2-6 Monday to Friday— Spring Semester Registration 
9 Monday— Instruction Begins 

23 Monday— Washington's Birthday Holiday 
MARCH 

25 Wednesday— Maryland Day 

26 Thursday— Easter Recess Begins After Last Class 
31 Tuesday— Easter Recess Ends 8 a.m. 

MAY 

14 Thursday— Military Day 

28 Thursday— Pre-Examination Study Day 

May 2,y-l Friday to Friday— Second Semester Examinations 
June 5 3 

JUNE 

6 Saturday— Commencement Examinations 

SUMMER SESSION 1959 
JUNE 1959 

22 Monday— Summer Session Registration 
23— Tuesday— Summer Session Begins 

JULY 

31 Friday— Summer Session Ends 

SHORT COURSES 1959 
JUNE 1959 

15-20 Monday to Saturday— Rural Women's Short Course 
AUGUST 

3-8 Monday to Saturday— 4-H Club Week 
SEPTEMBER 

8-11 Tuesday to Friday— Firemen's Short Course 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

and 
MARYLAND STATU BOARD OI AGRICUITIIRE 

Term 
Expires 
Charles P. McCohmick 

Oialrman 1966 

McCormick and Company, 414 Li(;ht Street, Baltimore 2 

FmvARD F. HOLTBR 

Vice-chairman 19S9 

The National Grange, 744 Jackson Place, NAV., Washington 6 

n. IlEnnEHT Brown 

Secretary 19£,0 

The Baltimore Institute, 12 West Madison Street, Baltimore 1 

I \.\W\\\' II. NlITTLE 

Treasurer 1966 

Denton 

Loins L. Kaplan 

Assistant Secretary 1961 

1201 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 17 

Edmund S. Burkb 

Assistant Treasurer 1959 

Kelly-Springfield Tire Company, Cumberland 

Thomas W. Pangborn 1965 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown 

Enos S. Stockbridge 1960 

10 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Thomas B. Symons 1963 

Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, Takoma Park 

C. EwiNG TuTTLE 1962 

907 Latrobe Building, Charles and Read Streets, Baltimore 2 



Memt>ers of tlie Board are appointed by the Go\ernor of the State for tcmis of nine 
years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, E.\ecuti\e Officer of the 
Board. 

The State law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland 
shall constitute the Mar^-land State Board of Agriculture. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

WILSON H. ELKiNS, President 

B.A., University of Texas, 1932; m.a., 1932; b.litt., Oxford University, 1936; 
D.PHIL., 1936. 

ALBiN o. KUHN, Assistant to the President 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; ph.d., 1948. 

ALViN E. coRME^fY, Assistant to the President, in Charge of Endowment and 
Development 

B.A., Illinois College, 1933; ll.b., Cornell University, 1936. 

R. LEE HORNBAKE, Dean of the Faculty 

B.S., State Teachers College, California, Pa., 1934; m.a., Ohio State University, 1936; 
PH.D., 1942. 

Emeriti 

HARRY c. BYRD, President Emeritus 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1908; ll.d., Washington College, 1936; ll.d., Dicldn- 

HAROLD F. coTTERMAN, Dean of the Faculty, Emeritus 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1916; m.a., Columbia University, 1917; ph.d., American 
University, 1930. 

Administrative Officers of the Schools and Colleges 

MYRON s. AiSENBERG, Dean of the School of Dentistry 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1922. 

VERNON E. ANDERSON, Dean of the College of Education 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1930; m.a., 1936; ph.d.. University of Colorado, 1942. 

RONALD BAMFORD, Dean of the Graduate School 

B.S., University of Connecticut, 1924; m.s.. University of Vermont, 1926; ph.d., 
Colimibia University, 1931. 

CLIFFORD G. BLiTCH, Director of the University Hospital 
M.D., Vanderbilt University Medical School, 1928. 

GORDON M. CAIRNS, Dean of Agriculture 

B.S., Cornell University, 1936; m.s., 1938; ph.d., 1940. 

RAY w. EHRENSBERGER, Dean of the College of Special and Continuation Studies 
B.A., Wabash College, 1929; m.a., Butler University, 1930; ph.d., Syracuse Uni- 
versity, 1937. 

NOEL E. Foss, Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

PH.c, South Dakota State College, 1929; b.s., 1929; m.s.. University of Maryland, 
1932; PH.D., 1933. 

LESTER M. FRALEY, Dean of the College of Physical Education, Recreation, and 
Health 

B.A., Randolph-Macon College, 1928; m.a., 1937; ph.d., Peabody College, 1939. 

M 2 



rLORENCB M. ciPE, Dcan of the School of Nursing 

B.S., Catholic University i)f America, 1937; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1940; 
i-D.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

IRVIN c. HAUT, Director, Agricultural Experiment Station and Head, Department 
of Horticulture 

B.S., University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State Gjllegc of Washington, 1930; ph.d., 

University of Maryland, 1933. 

ROGER HOWHLL, Dcan of the School of Imw 

n.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1914; ph.d., 1917; 1.1..1)., University of Maryland, 
1917. 

wiLBERT J. iiiiFP, Director, Engineering Experiment Station and Chairman of 

the Dix'isioti of PJiysical Sciences 

B.A., Ohio Northern University, 1911; b.a., Yale Cx)!Icge, 1914; ph.d., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1917; D.sc. C"oN.), (Jhio Northern University, 1927. 

FLORANCH B. KING, Acting Dean of the College of Home Economics 

B.S.. University of Illinois, 1914; m.a., University of California, 1926; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Indiana, 1929. 

TREDERic T. MAVIS, Dean of the College of Engineering 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1922; m.s., 1926; c.E., 1932; ph.d., 1935. 

PAUL B. NYSTROM, Director, Agrictdtural Extension Service 

B.S., University of California, 1928; M.S., University of Maryland, 1931; m.p.a., 
Harvard University, 1948; d.p.a., 1951. 

J. FREEMAN PYLE, Dean of the College of Business and Public Admiriistration 
PH.B., University of Chicago, 1917; m.a., 1918; ph.d., 1925. 

JAMES REGAN, JR., Acting Dean of the College of Military Science 
Colonel, United States Army, Retired. 

LEON p. SMITH, Deayi of the College of Arts and Sciences 

B.A., Emory University, 1919; m.a., University of Chicago, 1928; ph.d., 1930; 
Diploma le I'lnstitut de Touraine, 1932. 

WILLIAM s. STONE, Dean of the School of Medicine and Director of Medical 
Education and Research 

B.S., University of Idaho, 1924; m.s., 1925; m.d.. University of Louisville, 1929; 

PH.D., (hon.), University of Louisville, 1946. 

General Administrative Officers 

c. WATSON ALGiRE, Director of Admissions and Registrations 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1930; m.s., 1931. 

NORMA J. AZLEiN, Registrar 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1940. 

HARRY A. BISHOP, Dtrcctor of thc Student HcaltJi Service 
M.D., Uni\ersity of Maryland, 1912. 



DAVID L. BRiGHAM, Alutnni Secretary 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1938. 

c. WILBUR cissEL, Director of Finance and Business 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1932; m.a., 1934; c.p.a., 1939. 

WILLIAM w. COBEY, Director of Athletics 
A.B., University of Maryland, 1930. 

GEARY F. EPPLEY, Director of Student Welfare and Dean of Men 
B.S., Maryland State College, 1920; m.s.. University of Maryland, 1926. 

GEORGE w. FOGG, Director of Personnel 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1926; m.a., 1928. 

ROBERT E. KENDiG, Professor of Air Science and Commandant of Cadets, Air 
Force R.O.T.C. 

A.B., William and Mary College, 1939. 

KOBERT J. MCCARTNEY, Director of University Relations 
B.A., University of Massachusetts, 1941. 

GEORGE w. MORRISON, Associate Director and Supervising Engineer Physical 
Plant QBaltimore^ 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1927; e.e., 1931. 

HOWARD ROVELSTAD, Director of Libraries 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1936; m.a., 1937; b.s.l.s., Columbia University, 1940. 

ADELE H. STAMP, Dean of Women 

B.A., Tulane University, 1921; m.a. University of Maryland, 1924. 

GEORGE o. WEBER, Director and Supervising Engineer, Department of Physical 

Plant 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1933. 

Divison Chairmen 

JOHN E. FABER, JR., Chairman of the Division of Biological Sciences 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1926; m.s., 1927; ph.d., 1937. 

HAROLD c. HOFSOMMER, Chairman of the Division of Social Sciences 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1921; m.a., 1923; ph.d., Cornell University, 1929. 

wiLBERT J. HUFF, Chairman of the Division of Physical Sciences 

B.A., Ohio Northern University, 1911; b.a., Yale College, 1914; ph.d., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1917; D.sc, (hon.), Ohio Northern University, 1927. 

<;harles e. white. Chairman of the Lower Division 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1923; M.S., 1924; ph.d., 1926. 

ADOLF E. 2UCKER, Chairman of the Division of Humanities 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1912; m.a., 1913; ph.d.. University of Pennsylvania, 1917. 



M 4 



CHAIRMEN, STANDING COMiMITTEES, FACULTY SENATE* 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

Prof. Russell B. Allen (Engineering), Chairnuin 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS 

Dr. Charles Manning (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

Dr. R. Lee Hombake (Dean of Faculty), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

Dr. Charles White (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS, CURRICULA AND COURSES 

Dr. Peter Lejins (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS-IN-AID 

Dr. Paul R. Poffenberger (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RESEARCH 

Dr. John S. Toll (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 

Dr. Leon P. Smith (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARIES 

Dr. Lucius Garvin (Arts and Sciences), Chairnuin 

COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Dr. Charles D. Murphy (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 

Prof. Russell B. Allen (Engineering), Chairnuin 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 

Dr. John H. Frederick (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT DISCIPLINB 

Prof. Warren L. Strausbaugh (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Dr. Stanley Jackson (Arts and Sciences), Chairnuin 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Dr. William E. Bickley (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT EMPLOYMENT AND SELF-HELP 

Dr. John E. Foster (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION 

Dr. Irvin C. Haut (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, ACADEMIC FREEDOM AND TENURE 

Dr. Carroll E. Cox (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS AND SALARIES 

Dr. Monroe H. Martin (Institute of Fluid Dynamics), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 

Prof. Homer Ulrich (Arts and Sciences), Chairnuin 

COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 

Prof. Russell R. Reno (Law), Chairman 

"EfTective October 29, 1957. 

5 ► 



FACULTY 
1958-1959 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

GRACE L. ADAMS, Assistant Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study. 
B.S., University of Southern California, 1940; M.S., University of Southern Cali- 
fornia, 1956. 

VERNON E. ANDERSON, Professor of Education and Dean of the College of Edu- 
cation. 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1930; m.a.. University of Minnesota, 1936; ph.d.. 

University of Colorado, 1942. 

JAMES E. BBASLEY, Grant Foundation Fellow, Institute for Child Study. 
B.S., Georgia Teachers College, 1939; m.ed., Duke University, 1951. 

ANNE E. BEAUMONT, Fellow, Institute for Child Study. 

B.A., University of Georgia, 1944; m.a., University of Georgia, 1945. 

ROBERT K. BiNG, Graduate Assistant, Institute for Child Study. 
B.S., University of Illinois, 1952; m.a., University of Maryland, 1954. 

GLENN o. BLOUGH, Associate Professor of Education. 

B.A., University of Michigan, 1929; m.a., 1932; ll.d.. Central Michigan College 
of Education, 1950. 

LUCILLE BOWIE, Assistant Professor of Education., Institute for Child Study. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; m.a., Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1946; ED.D., University of Maryland, 1957. 

RICHARD M. BRANDT, Associate Professor of Education, Institute for Child Stu3.y. 
B.M.E., University of Virginia, 1943; m.a.. University of Michigan, 1949; ed.d.. 
University of Maryland, 1954. 

ELEANOR A. BROOME, Instructor in Childhood Education. 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1943; m.ed., 1957. 

LILLIAN w. BROWN, Instructor in Childhood Education. 
B.A., Lake Erie College, 1930. 

MARIE D. BRYAN, Associate Profcssor of Education. 

B.A., Goucher College, 1923; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1945. 

RICHARD H. BYRNE, Professor of Education. 

B.A., Franklin and Marshall College, 1938; m.a., Columbia University, 1947; ed.d., 
1952. 



-^ 6 



FRANCES H. DAYWALT, Gratit rowtclat'ton Fellow, histittitc for Child Study. 
B.F.D., University of California, 1939; m.a., 1955. 

MARIE DENECKE, Instructor in Education. 

B.A., Columbia University, 1938; m.a., University of M.iryland, 1942. 

GEORGE \v. DENEMARK, Ptofessor of Education and Assistant Dean of the College 
of Education. 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1943; m.a., 1948; ed.m., 1950, ud.d., 1956, University 

of Illinois. 

7 AHA II. ELiAS, Ecllow, Collcfi^e of Education. 

B.A., Higher Teachers College, Baghdad, Iraq, 1946; m.a.. Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1954. 

HARRY w. FOSKEY, Graduate Assistant, College of Education. 

B.S., Salisbury State Teachers College, 1951; m.a., George Washington University, 
1955. 

CHRISTINE GLASS, Itistructor in ChildJwod Education. 
B.S., Columbia University, 1917; m.a., 1927. 

JACOB D. GOERiNG, Instructor in Education, Institute for Child Study. 
B.A., Bethel College, 1941; b.d., Bethany Seminary, 1949. 

TEAN D. GRAMBS, hccturer in Education. 

B.A., Reed College, 1940; m.a., Stanford University, 1941; ed.d., 1948. 

NORRis G. HARiNG, Lecturer mtd Coordinator of Special Ediwation Programs. 
B.A., Nebraska State Teachers College, 1948; m.a.. University of Nebraska, 1950; 
ED.D., Syracuse University, 1956. 

I'AUL E. HARRISON, JR., Associate Professor of Indtistrial Education. 

B.ED., Northern Illinois State College, 1942; m.a., Colorado State College, 1947; 
PH.D., University of Maryland, 1955. 

B. LEE HORNBAKE, Profcssor of Industrial Education and Dean of the Vacuity. 
B.S., State Teachers College, California, Pennsylvania, 1934; m.a., Ohio State Uni- 
versity, 1936; PH.D., 1942. 

KENNETH o. HOVET, Professor of Education. 

B.A., St. Olaf College, 1926; ph.d., University of Minnesota, 1950. 

JAMES L. HYMES, Professor of Education. 

B.A., Harvard College, 1934; m.a., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936; 
ED.D., 1947. 

ECKHART A. JACOBSEN, Associate ProfessoT of Industrial Education. 

Oswego State Teachers College, New York, 1937; m.s., Cornell University, 
1946; PH.D., University of Connecticut, 1957. 

BRUCE E. JOHNSON, Grant Foundation Fellow, Institute for Child Study. 

B.A., University of Southern California, 1953; m.ed.. University of Maryland, 1956. 

7 ► 



MERViN L. KEEDY, Associate Director of the Junior High School Mathematics 
Research Study. 

B.S., University of Chicago, 1946; m.a.. University of Nebraska, 1950, ph.d., 1957. 

L. DAVID KORB, Lccturcr in Industrial Education. 

B.A., Brovra University, 1939; m.a., Boston University, 1952. 

JOHN J. KURTZ, Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study. 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1935; m.a.. Northwestern University, 1940; ph.d.. 
University of Chicago, 1947. 

DOROTHEA E. LAADT, Instructor in Childhood Education. 
B.E., National College of Education, Evanston, Illinois, 1956. 

DONALD MALEY, Profcssor and Head, Industrial Education. 

B.S., State Teachers College, California, Pennsylvania, 1943; m.a.. University of 
of Maryland, 1947; ph.d., 1950. 

WESLEY J. MATSON, Assistant Professor of Education. 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1948; m.a.. University of California, 1954. 

RICHARD L. MATTESON, Instructor in Education, Institute for Child Study. 

B.A., Knox College, Galesburg, Illinois, 1952; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1955. 

JOHN R. MAYOR, Part-time Professor of Education and Mathematics. 

B.S., Knox College, Galesburg, Illinois, 1928; m.a.. University of Illinois, 1929; 
PH.D., University of Wisconsin, 1933. 

GEORGE R. MERRILL, Instructor in Industrial Education. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1954; m.ed., 1955. 

MADELAiNE J. MERSHON, Profcssor of Education, Institute for Child Study. 

B.S., Drake University, 1940; m.a.. University of Chicago, 1943; ph.d.. Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1950. 

DOROTHY R. MOHR, Profcssor of Physical Education. 

B.S., University of Chicago, 1932; m.a., 1933; ph.d., University of Iowa, 1944. 

H. GERTHON MORGAN, Profcssor of Education, Institute for Child Study. 

B.A., Furman University, 1940; m.a.. University of Chicago, 1943; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1946. 

CLARENCE A. NEWELL, Professor of Educational Administration. 

B.A., Hastuigs College, Nebraska, 1935; m.a., Columbia University, 1939; ph.d., 
1943. 

LEO w. o'neill. Associate Professor of Education. 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1938; m.a.. University of Kansas City, 1953; ed.d.. 
University of Colorado, 1955. 

REGINALD c. OREM, JR., Graduate Assistant, College of Education. 
B. A., University of Maryland, 1953. 



ROBERT D. OVERLY, Graduate Assistant, Industrial Education. 
B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1953. 

LAKE c. OXFORD, Grant Foundation Fellow, Institute for Child Study. 

B.S., Louisiana Polytechnic Institute, 1949; m.ed., Southern Methodist University, 
1952. 

ARTHUR s. PATRICK, Professor of Business Education. 

B.B., State Teachers College, Whitewater, Wisconsin, 1931; m.a.. University of 
Iowa, 1940; ph.d., American University, 1956. 

BERNARD PECK, Assistant Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study. 

B.A., Indiana University, 1939; m.a., Columbia University, 1941; ed.d.. University 
of Maryland, 1957. 

HUGH V. PERKINS, Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study. 

B.A., Oberlin College, 1941; m.a., University of Chicago, 1946; ph.d.. University 
of Chicago, 1949; ed.d.. New York University, 1956. 

DANIEL A. PRESCOTT, Profcssor of Education and Director, Institute for Child 

Study. 

B.S., Tufts College, 1920; m.ed.. Harvard University, 1922; ed.d.. Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1923. 

ROBERT G. RisiNGER, Assoctate Professor of Education. 

B.S., Ball State Teachers College, 1940; m.a.. University of Chicago, 1947; ed.d.. 
University of Colorado, 1955. 

ALViN w. scHiNDLER, Professor of Education. 

B.A., Iowa State College, 1927; m.a.. University of Iowa, 1929; ph.d., 1934. 

FERN D. SCHNEIDER, Associate Professor of Education. 

B.S., Nebraska Wesleyan University, 1932; m.a., George Washington University, 
1934; ed.d., Colxmibia University, 1940. 

MABEL s. SPENCER, Assistant Professor of Home Economics Education. 
B.S., West Virginia University, 1925; M.S., 1946. 

MARGARET A. STANT, Assistant Professor of Childhood Education. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; m.ed., 1955. 

JOANNE w. TAYLOR, Instrtictor in Childhood Education. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1954. 

FRED R. THOMPSON, Associatc Profcssor of Education, Institute for Child Study. 
B.A., University of Texas, 1929; m.a., 1939; ed.d.. University of Maryland, 1952. 

WILLIAM F. TiERNEY, Associate Profcssor of Industrial Education. 

B.S., Teachers College of Connecticut, 1941; m.a., Ohio State University, 1949; 
ED.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

ORVAL L. ULRY, Associate Professor of Education and Assistant Director of the 
Summer Session. 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1938; m.a., 1944; ph.d., 1953. 



JAMES A. VAN zwoLL, t'rofessof of School Administration. 

B.A., Calvin CoUege, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1933; m.a.. University of Michigan, 
1937; PH.D., 1942. 

WALTER B. WAETjEN, ProfessoT of Education, Institute for Child Study. 

B.S., State Teachers College, Millersville, Pennsylvania, 1942; M.S., University of 
of Pennsylvania, 1947; ed.d.. University of Maryland, 1951. 

GLADYS A. wiGGiN, Profcssor of Education. 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1929; m.a., 1939; ph.d.. University of Maryland, 
1947. 

ALBERT w. WOODS, Associate Professor of Physical Education. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1933; m.ed., 1949. 

ROSE zwiCKL, Fellow, Institute for Child Study. 

B.S., Seton Hall University, 1952; m.s.. University of Maryland, 1956. 

SUPERVISING TEACHERS 1956-57 

CHARLOTTE M. ADAMS, AnnafoUs Junior High School, Anne Arundel County 

MARGARET A. ADAMS, Glen Bumie Junior High School, Anne Arundel County 

MAE ALDER, Lewisdole Elementary School, Prince George's County. 

HELEN p. ANDERSON, Bladcnshurg Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

DOROTHY ANDREWS, Laytonsville Elementary School, Montgomery County. 

EDNA ARNN, Suitland Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

WILLIAM G. BAGNALL, Montgomery Blair Senior High School, Montgomery County. 

CECiLE J. BARNES, College Park Elementary School, Prince George's County. 

THOMAS BATsoN, Blodenshurg Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

RUTH H. BAUER, Northwestcm Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

ESSIE c. BECK, Montgomery Hills Junior High School, Montgomery County. 

RENA BECKER, Montgomery County Jewish Community School, Montgomery County. 

ALICE BEHLMER, Towson Senior High School, Baltimore County. 

FRANCES L. BELL, HyattsvUle Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

FRANCES R. BELL, Mtlford Mill Senior-Juntor High School, Baltimore County. 

ALBERT BENDER, Bethesda-Chevy Chase Senior High School, Montgomery County. 

SUZANNE BENNETT, Thomas Stonc Elementary School, Prince George's County. 

MARIE BiEGUN, William. Paca Elementary School, Baltimore City. 

HELEN BIGGS, High Point Senior-Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

GILBERT BLUMBERG, Forest Park High School, Baltimore City. 

SAMUEL M. BOHINCE, Takoma Park Junior High School, Montgomery County. 

EDYTHE BOLTON, University Park Elementary School, Prince George's County. 

WILLIAM BOND, High Point Senior-Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

WALTER BOROWETZ, Greenhclt Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

IRIS M. BosLEY, Montgomery Hills Junior High School, Montgomery County. 

HELMA BOWERS, Frederick Senior High School, Frederick County. 

CLARA BRicKER, Northwestcm Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

MARGARET BRODNAx, Montebello Elementary School, Baltimore City. 

SARAH V. BROWN, Lcland Junior High School, Montgomery County. 

BETTY BRUNSTEiN, N orthwestcm Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

JOSEPH D. BRYAN, High Point Senior-Junior High School, Prince George's County 

MARY BURGESS, Frederick Sasscer Senior-Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

GILBERT CARRiLLO, Frederick Sasscer Senior-Junior High School, Prince George's 

County. 

ANNA CELLA, Falstaff Road School, Baltimore City. 

LOUIS CHACos, Wheaton Senior-Junior High School, Montgomery County. 

RUTH CHANEY, Beltsville Elementary School, Prince George's County. 

■< 10 



JOHANNA CODA, Bladcnshtag Primary School, Prince George's County. 

LUCILLE COGCIANO, North Point jutiior tligh School, Baltimore City. 

DORIS N. coMBY, SiirrattsvUlc Senior-junior High School, Prince George's County. 

CATHERINE coNAFAY, Wakefield High School, Arlington County, Virginia. 

GILBERT CONN, Calvin CooUdge Senior High School, Washington, D. C. 

HELEN COOK, Montgomery Blair Senior High School, Montgomery County. 

HARRY E. coRNPROPST, Frederick Seyiior High School, Frederick County. 

MARY COUNCELL, Washington and Lee High School, Arlington County, Virginia. 

JEWELL, M. CREiGHTON, Woodside Elementary School, Montgomery County. 

BEATRICE CROCKER, KcusingtOH Junior High School, Montgomery County. 

JENNIE LEE CROSS, University Park Elementary School, Prince George's County. 

ADELAIDE M. CROWDER, Bladcnshurg Junior High School, Prince George's Cotmty. 

NANCY CUBBAGE, Northwcstcm Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

MARY E. DAVENPORT, Bladcnsburg Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

FRANCES E. DAVIDSON, CatonsviUe Senior High School, Baltimore County. 

MARY DELANEY, Margaret Brent School, Baltimore City. 

GLENORE H. DETvvEiLER, Montgomery Blair Senior High School, Montgomery County. 

LENORE DiCKMAN, Louisa M. Alcott School, Baltimore City. 

BETTY DOWNING, College Park Elementary School, Prince George's County. 

MEARLE D. DUVALL, Bladeushurg Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

HOPE w. EAGLE, Silver Spring Nursery School, Inc., Montgomery County. 

LUCY EASTHAM, Paul Junior High School, Washington, D. C. 

DOROTHY R. EHLERS, Bladenshurg Senior-Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

CORNELIUS J. FLAESCH, SxirrattsvUle High School, Prince George's County. 

ANN A. FLORENCE, Whittter Elementary School, Washiyigton, D. C. 

ELIZABETH D. FORTiN, Western Junior High School, Washington, D.C. 

ESTELLE FRY, Calvert Homes School, Prince George's County. 

PHYLiss K. FRYE, Carole Highlands Elementary School, Montgomery County. 

GAIL FURNAS, Tokoma Park Nursery School, Mo7ttgomery Couyity. 

SALLY B. GEOGHEGAN, High Poiut ScntOT High School, Prince George's County. 

GEORGE p. GEORGE, Bhdenshjirg Senior-Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

DALE E. GERSTER, Bladenshurg Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

SARAH GLASS, Thomas Jefferson Elementary School, Baltimore City. 

HERBERT H. GORiN, WhcatoH High School, Montgomery Coutity. 

ELE.\NOR H. BOSSETT, Stajiton Elementary School, Washington, D.C. 

LELLA A. GRAEFF, Ager Road Elementary School, Prince George's County. 

HELEN M. GRAHAM, Community Ntirsery School, Montgomery County. 

RACHEL E. GREEN, Francis Scott Key Junior High School, Baltimore City. 

s.'URA GREEN, East Silver Spring Elementary School, Moyttgomery County. 

ELWYNNE M. GRIFFITH, Suitland Scmor-J unior High School, Prince George's County. 

KATHERiNE GRIMES, Bladenshurg Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

JOHN G. GRUBER, Sxiitland Senior-Junior High School, Priyice George's County. 

MARjoRiE HACKETT, HyattsvUlc Jttnior High School, Prince George's County. 

HELENA J. HAINES, Northwestcm Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

MILDRED H;\NEY, Keuwood Juntor High School, Baltimore County. 

LOIS HARDING, N orthwe Sterol Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

CAROLINE HARDY, N orthwestem Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

SUELLA HARRINGTON, Roland Park Jutiior High School, Baltimore City. 

RICHARD HART, Baltimore City College, Baltimore City. 

JOHN E. HAWKiNSON, Bladcnsh^irg Jxtnior High School, Prince George's County. 

EDWARD A. HEBDA, Takoma Park Junior High School, Montgomery County. 

11 ► 



EELEEN HENZE, Pimlico Junior High School, Baltimore City. 

MARY JANET HiHN, William Paca Elem.entary School, Baltimore City. 

PAULINE HOLCOMB, Wheaton Senior-Junior High School, Montgomery County. 

RUTH HOLSTEiN, Garden Nursery School, Inc., Montgomery County. 

BELVA H. HOPKINS, High Point Senior-Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

BEATRICE HOPPER, Liberty Elementary School, Baltimore City. 

HELEN A. HORNER, Westminster High School, Carroll County. 

ANDREW HUGAR, PoolesvUle Senior-Junior High School, Montgomery County. 

CLARA LEE HYATT, Bethesda-Chevy Chase Senior High School, Montgomery County. 

LUCILLE A. IRWIN, Glenside Cooperative Kindergarten, Montgom.ery County. 

EVELYN josEPHSON, Arlington Elementary School, Baltimore City. 

EDWARD c. JUSTICE, Northwestern Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

DONALD E. KADY, Bladenshurg Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

JACK KALBAUGH, High Point Senior-Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

MARiANNA KEENE, HyattsvUle Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

DEVONA KEiTHLEY, Northwestern Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

GEORGE Ann' kemerer, HyattsvUle Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

MAUREEN KEMPFER, Glenhrook Nurscry School, Inc., Montgom.ery County. 

DORA KENNEDY, College Park Elementary School, Prince George's County. 

ERIKA KEssEL, University Park Elementary School, Prince George's County. 

ELNORA L. KiDD, Stanton Elem.entary School, Washington, D.C. 

CHARLES R. KiLBouRNE, Suitland Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

ELAYNE KLUGMAN, Arlington Elementary School, Baltimore City. 

KATHERiNE s. KRiEMELMEYER, Takoma Park Nursery School, Montgomery County. 

GLADYS KUBSKi, Liberty Elementary School, Baltim^ore City. 

SARAH R. LACY, Northwestem Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

VALTA c. LAWLER, HyattsvUle Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

HILDA LAYDEN, Landovcr Hills Elementary School, Prince George's County. 

ADALYN LE HARDY, Parksidc Elementary School, Montgomery County. 

DOROTHY R. LEUBA, Franklin D. Roosevelt School, Baltimore City. 

ALFRED w. LITTLE, HyattsvUlc Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

FRANK T. LUPASCHUNSKI, Howard County Senior High School, Howard County. 

MATTIE V. LYNCH, Laurel Senior-Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

MARY LYNN, Mt. Ranicr Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

BABETTE G. MAC PHERSON, Rolling TeTToce Elementary School, Montgomery County. 

JOHN E. MARLEY, Richard Montgomery High School, Montgom.ery County. 

WILLIAM MC DONALD, Bladcnsburg Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

JOSEPH J. MC FADDEN, Blodcnsburg Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

FRANKEE Y. MC MiLLEN, High Point SenioT-Junior High School, Prince George's 

County. 

MARY MC NEIL, Garden Nursery School, Inc., Montgomery County. 

INEZ MEHRENS, Parkside Elementary School, Montgomery County. 

GEORGE G. MEssiCK, Bethesda-Chevy Chase Senior High School, Montgomery County. 

ANTHONY R. MILLER, Hyattsvillc Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

BERNiCE MOELLER, Chevy Chase Elementary School, Montgomery County. 

HELEN c. MONiCK, Northwcstem Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

ROSALIE L. MOODY, CUfton Park Junior High School, Baltimore City. 

FRANKLIN F. MOON, Bladcnsburg Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

LILLIAN G. MOORE, Bethesda-Chevy Chase Senior High School, Montgomery County. 

MARIAN J. MOORE, Parkside Elementary School, Montgomery County. 

ELMER G. MUTH, Wheaton Senior High School, Montgomery County. 

^12 



ANNE H. NOWLAND, Northwestern Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

MARY PFEiL, Thomos Jeffcrson Elementary School, Baltimore City. 

EDWARD PHILLIPS, Northwcstem Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

LOUISE M. POOLE, Rolling Terrace Elementary School, Montgomery County, 

ALINE PORTER, College Park Elementary School, Prince George's County. 

EDMUND G. PSALTis, HyattsvUle junior High School, Prince George's County. 

JENNIE PURDY, Chcvcrly Elementary School, Prince George's County. 

ANNE PUTNAM, Norihwesicm Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

DONALD H. REDDicK, Norlhwood Senior J unior High School, Montgomery County. 

DONALD R. REDMiLEs, Glcnriilge Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

RONALD R. REEDER, Suitlancl Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

KATHLEEN REHANEK, Northwestem Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

RICHARD REiNHARDT, PiniUco Jiinior High School, Baltimore City. 

GERALD G. REYMORE, Shenvood Senior-junior High School, Montgomery County. 

GiRARD I. REYNOLDS, Kensington Junior High School, Montgomery County. 

ERNEST V. RHODES, Montgomery Blair Senior High School, Montgomery County. 

JANET RICHARDS, Glcfimont Elementary School, Montgomery County. 

EDWARD p. REiDER, Montgomery Blair Senior High School, Montgomery Cmmty. 

MARY ROGERS, Bcnvy Elementary School, Prince George's County. 

MICHAEL R. RONCA, Northwestern Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

JOSEPH A. ROSTowsKi, Brooklyn Junior-Senior High School, Anne Arttndel County. 

ANN ROUNDTREE, Fallstaff Road Elementary School, Baltimore City. 

ETHEL R. ROWALT, Bethesda-Chevy Chase Senior High School, Montgomery County. 

SARAH ROUSE, Paid Junior High School, Washington, D.C. 

JAMES RUCKERT, University Park Elementary School, Prince George's County. 

ROGENE RUSSELL, Lewisdale Elementary School, Prince George's County. 

ALFRED A. SADUSKY, Bcthesda-Chevy Chase Senior High School, Montgomery County. 

ELIZABETH SAUNDERS, District Heights Elementary School, Washington, D.C. 

MILDRED scHOCH, Bradley Elementary School, Montgomery County. 

EVELYN scHOENHAAR, Wavcrly Elementary School, Baltimore City. 

JOHN R. SCOTT, High Point Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

ROBERT SENEY, Gwyttns Folls Jiinior High School, Baltimore City. 

SARA M. SHEGOGUE, Bladcnshurg Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

INA w. SHIELDS, Lewisdale Elementary School, Prince George's County. 

IRENE siLVERSTEiN, Mt. Rairticr Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

FLORENCE siMONDS, Parkway Elementary School, Prince George's County. 

HOWARD J. SKiDMORE, HughesvUle Junior High School, Charles County. 

YVONNE SLOCOMBE, Bladcnshurg Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

KENNETH H. SMITH, CatonsvUle Senior High School, Baltimore Cotmty. 

ELIZABETH B. SMiTHER, Montgomery Hills Jttnior High School, Montgomery County, 

CLIFTON STREAT, Sudhrook Junior High School, Baltimore County. 

HELEN L. STRiEBY, Franklin Senior-Junior High School, Baltimore County. 

LOIS TEETER, Tliomas Stone School, Prince George's County. 

JOAN c. THIELEMANN, Catonsville Junior High School, Baltimore County. 

MARY TONER, Wcsthrook Elementary School, Washington, D. C. 

FRANCIS TRACY, Glenridgc Junior High School, Priytce George's County. 

FRANK TURK, Gallaudet College, Washington, D. C. 

FLORENCE VAN METER, Whitmore Nursery School and Kindergarten, Baltimore City. 

LOIS VARS, High Point Senior-Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

JANICE viEAU, High Point Senior-Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

ESTHER H. voGEL, Suitland Senior High School, Prince George's County. 

13 ► 



FRANCIS D. WAGNER, Maryland Park Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

MARY WALDROP, Community Coo'perative Nursery School, Montgomery County. 

HENRIETTA RAY H. WALKER, Oxon Hill Scnior-Junior High School, Prince George's 

County. 

SARAH H. WATSON, Mt. Ranier Elementary School, Prince George's County. 

MILDRED A. WHITESIDE, Westminster High School, Carroll County. 

FERN WILL, Richard Montgomery Senior-Junior High School, Montgomery County. 

ANN M. wiLLiARD, Montgomery Hills Junior High School, Montgomery County. 

MARY F. WILLIAMS, Ook Vicw Elementary School, Montgomery County. 

HUGH R. WOOD, JR., Mt. Rainier Junior High School, Prince George's County. 

GERTRUDE c. woRSLEY, Tokoma Park Junior High School, Montgomery County. 

HARRY 2EMEL, Liberty Elementary School, Baltimore City. 

JOHN M. ziNN, High Point Senior High School, Prince George's County. 



< 14 



THE COLLEGE 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION mccts the nccds of the following classes of stu- 
dents: (1) persons preparing to teach in secondary schools, elementary 
schools, kindergartens, and nursery schools; (2) present or prospective elemen- 
tary teachers who wish to supplement their preparation; (3) students preparing 
for educational work in the trades and industries; (4) graduate students prepar- 
ing for teaching, supervisory, or administrative positions; (5) students whose 
major interests are in other fields, but who desire courses in education. 

Special Facilities and Activities 

RESEACH AND TEACHING FACILITIES 

Because of the location of the University in the suburbs of the nation's capi- 
tal, unusual facilities for the study of education are available to its students and 
faculty. The Library of Congress, the library of the U. S. Office of Education, 
and special libraries of other government agencies are accessible, as well as the 
information services of the National Education Association, American Council 
on Education, U. S. Office of Education, and other institutions, public and priv- 
ate. The school systems of the District of Columbia, Baltimore, and the counties 
of Maryland offer generous cooperation. 



THE INSTITUTE FOR CHILD STUDY 

The Institute for Child Study carries on the following activities: (1) it under- 
takes basic research in human development; (2) it digests and synthesizes research 
findings from the many sciences that study human beings; (3) it plans, organizes, 
and provides consultant service programs of direct child study by in-service teach- 
ers in individual schools or in municipal, county or state systems: (4) it ofiFers 
field training to a limited number of properly qualified doctoral students, prepar- 
ing them to render expert consultant service to schools and for college teacliing of 
human development. Inquiries should be addressed to Director, Institute for 
Child Study. 



THE WORKSHOP ON CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND EDUCATION 

The College of Education operates a Workshop on Child Development and 
Education for six weeks each summer. Requiring full-time work of all partici- 
pants it provides opportunities for (1) study and synthesis of scientific knowledge 
about children and youth; (2) training in the analysis of case records; (3) train- 
ing for study-group leaders for in-service child study programs; (4) planning in- 
service programs of child study for teachers and pre-service courses and labora- 
tory experiences for prospective teachers; (5) analysis of the curricular, guidance, 

15 ► 



Undergraduate Programs 

and school organization implications of scientific knowledge about human de- 
velopment and behavior. Special announcements of the workshop are available 
about March 15 of each year and advanced registration is required because the 
nimiber of participants must be limited. Inquiries should be addressed to the 
Director, Workshop on Child Development and Education. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

The Industrial Education Department is housed in a new building known 
as the J. Milton Patterson Building. The facilities of this building are devoted 
exclusively to the work of the Department. There are ten shops, a drafting room, 
library, conference room and two classrooms. All of the shops are adequately 
equipped with modem tools and machines. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND NURSERY-KINDERGARTEN SCHOOL 

The University of Maryland operates a nursery-kindergarten school on the 
campus in which students majoring in childhood education receive training and 
practical experience. 

PROFESSIONAL AND PRE-PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 

The College of Education sponsors two professional organizations: Phi Delta 
Kappa, the national professional fraternity for men in Education, and Iota 
Lambda Sigma, the national honorary fraternity in Industrial Education. Both 
fraternities have large and active chapters and are providing outstanding profes- 
sional leadership in their fields of service. 

The College of Education also sponsors a Chapter of the Student National 
Education Association. This chapter is open to undergraduate students on the 
College Park campus. 

COURSES OUTSIDE OF COLLEGE PARK 

Through the College of Special and Continuation Studies, a number of 
courses in education are offered in Baltimore and elsewhere. These courses are 
chosen to meet the needs of groups of students in various centers. In these centers, 
on a part-time basis, a student may complete a part of the work required for an 
undergraduate or graduate degree. 

Announcements of such courses may be obtained by addressing requests to 
the Dean, College of Special and Continuation Studies, College Park, Md. 

Undergraduate Programs 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

All students desiring to enroll in the College of Education must apply to the 
Director of Admissions of the University of Maryland at College Park. 

M 16 



Undergraduate Programs 

In selecting students more emphasis will be placed upon good marks and 
other indications of probable success in college rather than upon a Gxed pattern 
c.f subject matter. Of the sixteen required units, four (4) units of English and 
1 unit each of social sciences, natural sciences, and mathematics are required. 
Additional units in mathematics, natural sciences, and social sciences arc desir- 
able for a program that permits the greatest amount of flexibility in meeting the 
requirements of \'arious College of Education curricula. While Foreign Langu- 
age is desirable for certain programs, no Foreign Language is required for en- 
trance. Fine Arts, Trade and Vocational subjects are acceptable as electives. Every 
prospective applicant should be certain that his preparation in mathematics is ade- 
quate for any program that he might wish to enter. A special fee is charged for 
all remedial work in mathematics with the exception of the course in solid ge- 
ometry. 

Students are referred to the General Information Catalog for a complete 
statement of requirements for admission to the different curricula in the College 
of Education. 

Candidates for admission whose high school or college records are consistent- 
ly low are strongly advised not to seek admission to the College of Education. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

For information in reference to the University grounds, buildings, equipment, 
library facilities, requirements in American Civilization, definition of resident 
and non-resident, regulation of studies, degrees and certificates, transcripts of 
records, student health and welfare, living arrangements in the dormitories, oflF- 
campus housing, meals, University Counseling Service, scholarships and student 
aid, athletics and recreation, student government, honors and awards, religious 
denominational clubs, fraternities, societies and special clubs, the University 
Band, student publications. University Post Office and Student Supply Store, 
write to the Editor of Publications for the General Information Catalog. 

MILITARY INSTRUCTION 

All male students, unless specifically exempted under University rules, are 
required to take basic Air Force R.O.T.C. training for a period of two years. 
The successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for graduation but it 
must be taken by all eligible students during the first two years of attendance at 
the University, whether they intend to graduate or not. Transfer students who 
do not have the required two years of military training will be required to com- 
plete the course or take it until graduation, whichever occurs first. 

Selected students who wish to do so may carry advanced Air Force R.O.T.C. 
courses during their junior and senior years which lead to a regular or reserve 
commission in the United States Air Force. 

For further details concerning the requirements in Military Instruction, write 
the Editor of Publications for the General Information Catalog. 

17 ► 



Undergraduate Programs 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH 

All undergraduate students classified academically as freshmen and sopho- 
mores, irrespective of their physical condition, who are registered for more than 
six semester hours, are required to complete four prescribed courses in physical 
education. These courses must be taken by all eligible students during the first 
two years of attendance at the University, whether they intend to graduate or 
not. Transfer students who do not have credit in these courses or their equivalent, 
must complete them or take them until graduation, whichever occurs first. Stu- 
dents with military service may receive credit for these required courses by apply- 
ing to the Department of Air Science. 



GUIDANCE IN REGISTRATION 

At the time of matriculation each student is tentatively assigned to a member 
of the faculty who acts as the student's personal advisor. The choice of subject 
areas within which the student will prepare to teach will be made under faculty 
guidance during the first year in the Orientation to Education course required 
of all freshmen. Thereafter, the student will advise regularly with the faculty 
member in the College of Education responsible for his teaching major. While 
it may be possible to make satisfactory adjustments as late as the junior year for 
students from other colleges who have not already entered upon the sequence of 
professional courses, it is highly desirable that the student begin his professional 
work in the freshman year. Students who intend to teach (except Vocational 
Agriculture) should register in the College of Education, in order that they may 
have the continuous counsel and guidance of the faculty directly responsible for 
their professional preparation. 

JUNIOR STANDING 

To earn junior standing a student must complete fifty-six (56) semester hours 
of academic credit with an average grade of C (2.0) or better. In computing this 
average, the following provisions apply: all academic courses carrying one or more 
credits which have been taken up to the time of computation shall be included; 
courses carrying "0" credit shall not be included; all grades (including F) earned 
in courses which have been repeated shall be included; courses with grade of F 
shall be included; courses in basic AFR.OTC, the Physical Education required of 
all University students, and the Health required of all women students shall not 
be included. 

Detailed regulations pertaining to junior standing are presented in full in the 
publication. University Regrdations and General Information. 

The first two years of college work are preparatory to the professional work 
of the junior and senior years. To be eligible to enter the junior year professional 
covttses, a student must have attained junior status. 

< 18 



Graduate Studies 



CERTIFICATION OF lEACIIERS 



The State Department of Education certifies to teach in the approved high 
schools of the State only graduates of approved colleges who have satisfactonly 
fulfilled subject-matter and professional requirements. The several curricula of 
the College of Education fulfill State Department requirements for certification. 

Students intending to qualify as teachers in Baltimore, Washington, or any 
other city or state should, in their junior year, obtain a statement of certification 
requirements from these areas and be guided thereby in the selection of courses. 
Advisors will assist in obtaining and utilizing such information. 



DEGREES 

Tlie degrees conferred upon students who have met the conditions prescribed 
for a decree in the College of Education are Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of 
Science. Majors in English, social sciences, language, and art receive the B.A. 
degree. Mathematics majors may receive either degree. All others receive tke 
B.S. deoree. 



COSTS 

Actual annual costs of attending the University include: $185.00 fixed 
charges; $77.00 special fees; $400.00 board; $160.00 to $190.00 lodging for 
Maryland residents, or $200.00 to $240.00 for residents of other states and coun- 
tries; and laboratory fees, which vary with the laboratory courses pursued. A 
matriculation fee of $10.00 is charged all new students. A charge of $250.00 is 
assessed to all students who are non-residents of the State of Maryland. 

For a more detailed statement of these costs, write to the Editor of Publica- 
tions for the Catalog of General Information. 

Graduate Studies 

GRADUATE STATUS 

For graduate study in education a student must have earned at least 16 se- 
mester credits in education at the undergraduate level, and hold a bachelor's or 
master's degree from a college or university of recognized standing. This require- 
ment may be interpreted so that foundation work in fields other than education 
may be accepted in cases of graduate students not preparing for school work. The 
student must also satisfy the Graduate School as to his ability to do graduate 
work. 

All new graduate students in education are required, during the first semester 
of graduate work, to take a test battery. A testing fee of $5.00 will be charged 
on first registration. 

19 ► 



Graduate Studies 



REGISTRATION 



A graduate student in education must matriculate in the Graduate School. 
Application for admission to the Graduate School should be made prior to dates 
of registration on blanks obtained from the office of the Dean of the Graduate 
School. For further instructions a student should consult the Graduate School 
Catalog. 



MASTERS DEGREES 

A graduate student in education may matriculate for a Master of Education 
or a Master of Arts degree. For requirements of these degrees, the student should 
consult both the Graduate School Catalog and the duplicated material issued by 
the College of Education. On matriculation, the student should select a faculty 
advisor. 

doctors' degrees 

Programs leading to a Doctor of Philosophy or a Doctor of Education degree 
in Education are administered for the Graduate School by the Department of 
Education. For requirements of these degrees, the student should consult both 
the Graduate School Catalog and the statement of policy relative to doctoral pro- 
grams in education. If the student has not already made arrangements with a 
member of the faculty to advise him, he should consult with the chairman of 
the Education Committee on Doctoral Programs regarding a proper advisor. 



20 



CURRICULA AND REQUIRED COURSES 

The undergraduate curricula in the College of Education with advisors for 
each curriculum are as follows: 

Academic Education 

English— Marie D. Bryan 
Foreign Languages— Fern D. Schneider 
Mathematics— John R. Mayor 
Natural Sciences— Or\'al L. Ulry 
Social Studies— Robert G. Risinger 
Speech— Warren Strausbaugh 

Agricultural Education (under the College of Agriculture) 
Arthur M. Ahalt 

Art Education 
Vienna Curtiss 

Business Education 
Arthur S. Patrick 

Elementary Education 
Alvin W. Schindler 
Marie Denecke 
Glenn O. Blough 
Leo W. O'Neill 
Wesley J. Matson 

Home Economics Education 
Mabel Spencer 

Industrial Education 
Donald Maley 
Paul E. Harrison 
Eckhard Jacobsen 
George R. Merrill 
William F. Tierney 

Music Education 
Jane S. Hayes 

Nursery School-Kindergarten Education 
James L. Hymes, Jr. 
Margaret A. Stant 

Physical Education (Men) 
Albert W. \\^oods 

Physical Education (Women) 
Dorothy R. Mohr 

21 ► 



Gefieral Requirements 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS OF THE COLLEGE 

A total of 120 semester hours in addition to the University requirement in 
military science and physical education is required for graduation in the College 
of Education. In no case shall the total number of semester hours required for 
graduation be less than 128. 

The following are minimum requirements for graduation: English— 12 
semester hours; social studies— 12 semester hours as follows: G. & P. 1— Amer- 
ican Government; H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization; and one of the fol- 
lowing courses: Soc. 1— Sociology of American Life, Phil. 1— Philosophy for Mod- 
ern Man, Econ. 31— Principles of Economics, or Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Eco- 
nomics; science or mathematics— 6 semester hours; education— 20 semester hoursj 
speech— 3 semester hours; physical education and military science as required by 
the University. (Students who qualify in classification tests in English, American 
History, or American Government will be exempted from a three-hour require- 
ment in the area concerned and will select a replacement from a set of courses 
designated. See General Information Catalog.) 

Marks in all required upper division courses in education and in subjects in 
major and minor fields must be C or higher. A general average of C or higher 
must be maintained. In order to be admitted to a course in student teaching 
a student must have a grade point average of 2.30 and the consent of the in- 
structor in the appropriate area. 

Exceptions to curricular requirements and rules of the College of Education 
must be recommended by the student's advisor and approved by the Dean. 

Students who are not enrolled in the College of Education but who are pre- 
paring to teach must meet all curricular and scholastic requirements of the College 
of Education. 



MAJORS AND MINORS 

Students select a teaching major: for example, social science, art, music, 
physical education. Those electing the academic curriculum will ordinarily se- 
lect both a teaching major and a teaching minor, and students in other curricula 
may select minors if they so desire. Advisors may waive the requirement for a 
minor when necessary to permit the development of an approved area such as 
psychology, human development, or sociology. 

Students selecting an academic major and an academic minor, or those se- 
lecting one special teaching field such as industrial education need to take only 
one methods course: for example, Ed. 140 or Ind. Ed. 140. Students who select 
an academic major and a special fields minor, or vice versa, must take methods 
courses in both the major and minor fields, and should divide their student teach- 
ing between the two fields. 

M 22 



Academic Education 



ACADEMIC EDUCATION 



Students enrolled in this cuiriculuni will meet the above minimum require- 
ments in English and social science, plus the following: 

(1) Foreign language for candidates for the bachelor of arts degree: 12 
semester hours provided the student enters with less than three years of 
foreign language credits; 6 semester hours, if he enters with three years 
of such credits. No foreign language is required of any student who 
enters wnth four years of language credits nor of candidates for the 
bachelor of science degree unless specified in the curriculum. 

(2) Science or mathematics, 12 semester hours. 

(3) Education, 22-25 semester hours. 

(4) Speech, 4 semester hours. 

All students who elect the academic education curriculum will fulfill the pre- 
ceding general requirements and also prepare to teach one or more school subjects 
which will involve meeting specific requirements in particithr subject matter 
fields. 

The specific requirements by subject fields are as follows: 

English. A major in English requires 36 semester hours as follows: 

Composition and Literature 12 semester hours 

American Literature, xAdvanced 3 semester hours 

Electives 21 semester hours 

A minor in English requires 26 semester hours. It includes the 15 semester 
hours prescribed for the major and 1 1 hours of electives. 

Electives must be chosen wath the approval of the advisor who will guide the 
student in terms of College of Education records and recommendations of the 
English Department. 

Social Sciences. For a major in this group 36 semester hours are required, 
of which at least 18 hours must be in history, including 6 hours in American 
history and 6 hours in European history. Six of the 18 hours must be in ad- 
vanced courses. For a minor in the group, 24 hours are required, as specified 
below, less the electives. 

History (including one year each of American and European 

History) 18 semester hours 

Economics, sociology, government, consumer education, or 

geography 6 semester hours 

Electives in social sciences 12 semester hours 

Electives should be chosen so that of the 18 hours of electives there will be 
a total of at least 3 in Economics, 3 in Geography, 3 in Government and Politics, 
and 3 in Sociology. 



Academic Education 

Foreign Languages. All students preparing to teach French, German, or 
Spanish are required to take Comparative Literature 101 and 102 and are strongly 
advised to take the review course for majors. Further courses in comparative lit- 
erature along with work in European or Latin American history are also recom- 
mended. 

Specific minimum requirements in the three languages are a semester each 
of intermediate and advanced conversation (Fr., Ger., or Sp. 8 and 80), a semes- 
ter of grammar review, six hours of introductory survey of the literature (Fr., 
Ger., Sp. 75 and 76), one semester of a Life and Culture Course (Fr., Ger., Sp. 
161 or 162) and six hours in literature courses numbered 100 or above. If a for- 
eign language is offered as a second field, all major requirements must be met. 

Classical Language— Latin. A minor for teaching Latin requires 24 pre- 
scribed semester hours of Latin based upon two years of high school Latin or 
18 prescribed semester hours of Latin plus 6 elective hours based upon four 
years of high school Latin. Those students with two years of high school Latin 
should take Latin 3, 4, 5, 51, 52, 61, 101, and 102. Those with four years of 
high school Latin begin with Latin 5; otherwise, the same as above with 6 hours 
selected from Latin 103, 104, or 105. 

It is recommended that electives also be taken from Latin 70, History 153, 
Comparative Literature 101, English 101, and Art 9. 

Mathematics. A major in mathematics requires 30 semester hours and a 
minor, 20 semester hours. The following courses must be included in both major 
and minor: Math. 2— Solid Geometry (2), Math. 18, 19— Elementary Mathe- 
matical Analysis (5, 5), and Math. 20, 21-Calculus (4, 4). 

Students who have had solid geometry in high school or who pass satisfactorily 
an examination in this subject need not take Math. 2. Electives in mathematics 
are selected with the advice of the advisor. 

Science. In general science a major of 40 semester hours and a minor of 30 
semester hours are offered, each including the following courses: Chem. 1, 3— 
General Chemistry (4, 4), Zool. 1— General Zoology (4), Bot. 1— General Botany 
(4), Phys. 10, 11— Fundamentals of Physics (4, 4) or Phys. 1, 2— Elements of 
Physics (3, 3). 

Other courses will be chosen subject to the approval of the student's major 
advisor and of the science department in which his interest lies. 

Minors of 20 semester hours are offered in chemistry, in physics, and in bio- 
logical sciences. A minor in biology must be supported by a one-year course in 
chemistry. A minor in physics must be supported by a one-year course in chem- 
istry. A minor in chemistry must be supported by a one-year course in physics. 

The requirements for major and minor are met if 52 semester hours in nat- 
ural science, including the above listed courses, are offered. 

< 24 



Academic Education Ciirrictdiim 

Speech. A minor of 22 semester hours is offered in Speech. The minimum 
requirements for this minor arc 12 semester hours in addition to the 10 semester 
hours of departmental requirements in Speech 1, 2, 3, and 4. The 12 semester 
hours above the departmental requirement must include 6 hours of courses num- 
bered 100 or higher. It is the policy of the department to build a program of 
study in anticipation of the needs of prospective teachers, supervisors, correction- 
ists, dramatic coaches, and other specialists in the general field of speech. All 
programs for the minor must be approved by the departmental advisor. 



ACADEMIC EDUCATION CURRK:ULUM 

/^Semester— >, 

Freshman Year I 11 

*Ed. 1— Freshman Orientatiun 

Eng. 1 , 2— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

**Soc. 1— Sociology of American Life or Phil. 1— Philosophy 

for Modern Man 3 

Sp. 1, 2,— Public Speaking 2 2 

*G & P. 1— American Government . . 3 

A. S. 1, 2-Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) 3 3 

P. E. 1, 3 (Men); P. E. 2, 4 (Women) 1 1 

Hea. 2-Personal Health (Women) 2 

Hea. 4— Community Health (Women) . . 2 

Science, Mathematics, Foreign Language or major and minor 

requirements 3-6 3-6 

Total 17-20 17-20 

Sophomore Year 

*Ed. 2— Introduction to Education 2 

Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature, or 3 3 

Eng. 5, 6— Composition and English Literature 

H. 5, 6— Histor)' of American Civilization 3 3 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) 3 3 

P. E. 5, 7 (Men); P. E. 6, 8 (Women) I 1 

Science, Mathematics, Foreign Language or major and minor 

requirements 6 6 

Total 18 16 

Junior Year 

H. D. Ed. 100, 101— Principles of Human Development .... 3 3 

Major and Minor Requirements, Electives 13 13 

Total 16 16 

*May be taken either semester. 

**Or Econ. 31— Principles of Economics (3) or Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Eco- 
nomics (3) in the sopohomore year. 



25 ► 



Agricultural Education, Art Education Curriculum 

r-Semester—^ 
Senior Year 1 II 

*Ed. 140— Curriculum, Instruction and Observation 3 

*Ed. 145— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education ... 3 

*Ed. 148— Student Teaching in Secondary Schools 8 

**Electives 2-3 

* Major and Minor Requirements, Electives . . 16 

Total 16-17 16 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

This curriculum is designed to prepare students for teaching vocational agri- 
culture in high schools. To obtain full particulars on course requirements, the 
student should consult the catalog of the College of Agriculture. 

ART EDUCATION 

This curriculum is planned to meet the growing demand for teachers and 
supervisors of art activity. Emphasis is placed upon ways to draw out and de- 
velop the creative inclinations of beginners; to integrate art and other areas of 
study; to utilize art in solving social problems. 

ART EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

/^Semester-^ 

Freshman Year 1 II 

*Ed. 1— Freshman Orientation 

Eng. 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

fSoc. 1— Sociology of American Life or Phil. 1, Philosophy for 

Modem Man . . 3 

G. & P. 1— American Government 3 

Sp. 1, 2— Public Speaking 2 2 

Pr. Art 1-Design . . 3 

Pr. Art 2-Survey of Art History 2 

Hea. 2-Personal Health (Women) 2 

Hea. 4— Community Health (Women) . . 2 

A. S. 1, 2-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

P. E. 1, 3 (Men); P. E. 2, 4 (Women) 1 1 

JLanguage or electives 3-4 2-4 

Total 19-20 19-21 



*May be taken either semester, except in the Foreign Languages area where course 
is only offered in the Fall semester. 

**English and Social Studies majors must elect Ed. 134. 

fOr Econ. 31, Principles of Economics (3 credits) or Econ. 37, Fundamentals of 
Economics (3 credits) in the sophomore year. 

{Required foreign language: 12 semester hours provided the student enters with 
less than three years of foreign language credit; 6 semester hours, if he enters with three 
years of such credit. No foreign language is required of any student who enters with 
four years of language credit. 

< 26 



Art Education Curriculum 

/—Semester^ 

Scyphontore Year I 11 

Ed. 2— Introduction to Education 2 

Eng. 3, 4— Gjmposition and World Literature 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

Pr. Art 3— Silk Screen Printing 2 

Pr. Art 4— Three-dimensional Design . . 2 

Pr. Art 20— Costume Design 3 

Pr. Art 30— Typography and Lettering . . 3 

Pr. Art 40, 41— Interior Design 1 3 

Cr. 2— Simple Crafts . . 2 

Art 1 3— Elementary Sculpture or Cr. 20. Ceramics 2 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

P. E. 5, 7 (Men); P. E. 6, 8 (Women) 1 1 

Totals: Women 17 17 

Men 20 20 

Junior Year 

H. D. Ed. 100, 101— Principles of Human Development 3 3 

H. 5, 6— American History 3 3 

Pr. Art 0— Professional Lectures . . 

Pr. Art 21 -Action Drawing of Art 104. Life Class . . 2-3 

Cr. 5— Puppetry . . 3 

Art 6-Still Life 3 

Art 9, 11— Historical Survey of Painting, Sculpture, Archi- 
tecture 3 3 

**Language or electives 4-6 2-4 

Total 16-18 16-19 

Senior Year 

Ed. 140— Curriculum, Instruction and Observation in Art .... 3 

Pr. Art 1 32— Advertising Layout 2 

Art 7— Landscape Painting 3 

Ed. 134— Materials and Procedures for the Secondary Core 

Curriculum . . 3 

Ed. 145— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education .... . . 3 

***Ed. 148— Student Teaching in the Secondary Schools . . 8 

Pr. Art lOO-Mural Design 2 

**Language or electives 6-8 

Total 16-18 14 

A minimum of 24 semester hours constitutes a minor in art education. Re- 
quired: Pr. Art 1, Pr. Art 2, Cr. 2, Art 7, Ed. 140. Electives are to be chosen 
from courses which carry the symbols Pr. Art, Cr., Art. Electives should be selected 
in consultation wath the advisor to Art Education students. Scheduling of labora- 
tory courses necessitates an early start on an art program. The art minor does not 
qualify students for Ed. 148, Student Teaching in the Secondary Schools. 

** Required foreign language: 12 semester hours proxided the student enters with 

less than three years of foreign language credit; 6 semester hours, if he enters with three 

years of such credit. No foreign language is required of anv student who enters with 

four years of language credit. 

*** Available only during 8 weeks of the spring semester. 27 ► 



Business Education Curriculum 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Two curricula are offered for the preparation of teachers of business subjects. 
The General Business Education Curriculum qualifies for teaching all business 
subjects except shorthand. Providing thorough training in general business, in- 
cluding economics, this curriculum leads to teaching positions on both junior and 
senior high school levels. By the proper selection of electives, persons following 
this curriculum may also qualify as teachers of social studies. 

The Secretarial Education Curriculum is adapted to the needs of those who 
wish to become teachers of shorthand as well as other business subjects. 



GENERAL BUSINESS EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

Freshman Year 

*Ed. 1— Freshman Orientation 

Eng. 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 

*G. & P. 1— American Government 

**Soc. 1— Sociology o£ American Life or Phil. 1— Philosophy for 

Modern Man 

O. T. 1— Principles of Typewriting 

Sp. 1, 2,— Public Speaking 

A. S. 1, 2-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 

Hea. 2— Personal Health (Women) 

Hea. 4— Community Health (Women) 

P. E. 1, 3 (Men); P. E. 2, 4 (Women) 

Elect Math. 5, 6; H. 1, 2; or Science 

fEIectives 

Totals: Women 

Men 

Sophomore Year 

*Ed. 2— Introducticn to Education 

Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature 

H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 

Econ. 31, 32— Principles of Economics 

B. A. 20, 2 1 —Principles of Accounting 

O. T. 2— Intermediate Tj'pewriting 

O. T. 10— Office Typewriting Problems 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 

P. E. 5, 7 (Men); P. E. 6, 8 (Women) 

Totals: Women 

Men 



, — Semester- 
I 11 



3 3 

3 



2 

2 
3 

2 

1 

3 
2 

18 
19 



18 
21 



18 
19 



3 
3 
3 

4 

2 
3 
1 

16 
19 



*May be taken either semester. 
**Or Econ. 31— Principles of Economics (3) or Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Eco- 
nomics (3) in the sophomore year. 

fA minimimi of 55 semester hours of courses in Economics, Business Administra- 
tion, and Office Techniques are required. 



28 



Biisiness Education Curriculum 



-Semester- 



Junior Yeiir 

B. A. 180, 181-Business Law 

B. A. 166— Business Communications 

II. D. EtI. 100, 101-Principles of Human Development . 

B. A. 1 12-Uccords Management 

B. A. 1 14— Machines Management 

Econ. HO-Moncy and Banking 

*Electivcs 

Total 

Senior Year 

Ed. 145-Principles and Methods of Secondary Education 

E^l_ 140-CurricuIum, Instruction and Observation 

pj_ 148-Student Teaching in Secondary Schools 

B. A. 165-OIHce Management 

B. Ed. 100-Techniques of Teaching Office Skills 

*EIectives and Requirements 

Total 

SECRETARIAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

Freshman Year 

Same as General Business Curriculum 
Sophomore Year 

*Ed. 2— Introduction to Education 

Eno. 3, 4-Composition and World Literature 

H.°5, 6— History of American Civilization 

O. T. 12, 1 3-Principles of Shorthand I, II 

O. T. 2— Intermediate Typewriting 

O. T. 10-Office T}^ev\T:iting Problems 

Eccn. 37-FundamentaIs of Economics 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 

P. E. 5, 7 (Men); P. E. 6, 8 (Women) 

**Electives 

Totals : Women 

Men 

Junior Year 

H. D. Ed. 100, 101 -Principles of Human Development 

O. T. 1 10-Secretarial Work 

O. T. 11 8-Gregg Shorthand Dictation 

O. T. 1 16-Advanced Shorthand 

O. T. 1 17-Transcription 

B. A. 20, 21 -Principles of Accounting 

B. A. 1 12-Records Management 

*Electives 

Total 



I 


II 


4 


4 




3 


3 


3 


2 




3 






3 


3 


3 


15 


16 




3 


3 






8 


3 


. , 




3 


10 




16 


14 



18 
21 



3 

2 
4 
2 
2 

16 



II 

3 
3 

4 



3 
1 
3 

16 
19 

3 
3 
3 



4 

3 

16 



*Mav be taken either semester. . . 

**A minimum of 55 semester hours of courses in Economics, Business Administra- 
tion and Office Techniques are required. 



Childhood Education Curriculum 

r-Semester—^ 
Senior Year 1 U 

B. A. 1 14— Machines Management 3 

B. A. 165-Office Management 3 

B. A. 166— Business Communications 3 

Ed. 145— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education ... . . 3 

Ed. 140— Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation— Business 

Subjects 3 

Ed. 148— Student Teaching in Secondary Schools . . 8 

B. A. 180-Business Law 4 

B. Ed. 1 00— Techniques of Teaching Ofl&ce Skills . . 3 

Total 16 14 

CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

The childhood education curriculum has as its primary goal the preparation 
of nursery school and kindergarten teachers. It is also planned to further the 
personal development of the student and to provide general education in one facet 
of homemaking. 

Observation and student teaching are done in the University Nursery School 
and Kindergarten on the campus and in approved schools in nearby communities. 
Each student is encouraged to select a minor in an allied field. 

Graduates receive a B.S. degree and meet the requirements for certification 
for teaching kindergarten and nursery school in Maryland. Each student should 
have one summer of experience in working with children. 

CHILDHOOD EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

f—Semester—^ 
Vreshman Year I 11 

*C. Ed. 2— Orientation, Observation, and Record taking 2 

Eng. 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

**Soc. 1— Sociology of American Life or Phil. 1— Philosophy for 

Modem Man 3 

*G. & P. 1— American Government 

Sp. 3— Fundamentals of General American Speech 

Bot. 1— General Botany 

Zool. 1— General Zoology 

Hea. 2— Personal Health (Women) 

Hea. 4— Community Health (Women) 

P. E. 2, 4 

*Ed. 1— Freshman Orientation 

Total 15 16 

*May be taken either semester. 
**Or Econ. 31— Principles of Economics (3) or Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Eco- 
nomics (3) in the sophomore year. 

^ 30 





3 




3 


4 






4 


2 






2 


1 


1 









Elementary Education Curriculum 



Sofhomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature or 

Eng. 5, 6— Composition and English Literature 

H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 

Music 16— Music Fundamentals for the Classroom Teacher . . 

Ed. 52— Children's Literature 

Foods 1— Introductory Foods 

Nut. 10— Elements of Nutrition 

P. E. 6, 8 

Electives 

Total 

Junior Year 

C. Ed. lOO-Child Development I 

C. Ed. 101-ChiId Development II 

C. Ed. 1 15— Children's Activities and Activities Materials . . . . 

C. Ed. 1 16— Creative Music for Young Children 

C. Ed. 140— Curriculum, Instruction, Observation— Early Child- 
hood Education 

Nurs. 9-Nursing and Child Health 

Electives 

Total 

Senior Year 

C. Ed. 149— Teaching Nursery School 

C. Ed. 159— Teaching Kindergarten 

H. D. Ed. 100, 101— Principles of Human Development .... 

C. Ed. 145— Guidance in Behavior Problems 

Ed. 1 47— Audio- Visual Education 

Ed. 1 07— Philosophy of Education 

Electives 



-Sentesier- 



Total 



I 


11 


3 


3 


3 


3 




3 


2 




3 






3 


1 


1 


5 


3 


17 


16 


3 






3 




3 


3 






3 




2 


10 


5 


16 


16 


4-8 






4-8 


3 


3 


3 


. . 


, , 


3 


3 




0-4 


3-7 


17 


17 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATIOiN 

There are two undergraduate curriculums in elementary education. The first 
one is for regular undergraduate students who desire to earn the Bachelor of Sci- 
ence degree and to qualify for an elementary school teaching certificate. The 
second curriculum is for teachers in service. 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM 
FOR REGULAR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

This curriculum is designed for regular undergraduate students who wish to 
qualify for teaching positions in elementary schools. Students who complete the 
curriculum will receive the Bachelor of Science degree, and they will meet the 
Maryland State Department of Education requirements for the Bachelor of Sci- 



31 ► 



Elementary Education Curriculum 



ence Certificate in Elementary Education. The curriculum also meets certifica- 
tion requirements in many other states, Baltimore, and District of Columbia. 

Some of the academic courses need not be taken in the indicated sequence. 
For example, Botany 1 may be taken during the second semester of the freshman 
year instead of the first semester, or it may be taken during the sophomore or 
junior year. However, the courses in Human Development Education and cer- 
tain other Education courses must be taken during the junior year, and Ed. 149 
—Student Teaching in Elementary Schools should be taken during the first semes- 
ter of the senior year. 

,. — Semester— \ 
Freshman Year I II 

Eng. 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

**Soc. 1— Sociology of American Life or Phil. 1, Philosophy for 

Modem Man' 3 

*G. & P. 1— American Government . . 3 

Bot. 1— General Botany 4 

Zool. 1— General Zoology . . 4 

Art 1 5— Fundamentals of Art 3 

Mus. 16— Music Fundamentals for the Classroom Teacher .... . . . . 3 

*Ed. 1— Freshman Orientation 

P. E. 1, 3 (Men); P. E. 2, 4 (Women) 1 1 

Hea. 2— Personal Health (Women) 2 

Hea. 4— Community Health (Women) . . 2 

A. S. 1, 2-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Approved Electives (Optional) 

Totals; Women 16 16 

Men 17 17 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature or Eng. 5, 6— 

Composition and English Literature 3 3 

H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 3 3 

Sp. 4— Voice and Diction 3 

*Ed. 2— Introduction to Education 2 

Chem. 1— General Chemistry 4 

or Geog. 30— Principles of Morphology (3) 

or Geog. 40— Principles of Morphology (3) 

or Phys. 1— Elements of Physics (3) 
Chem. 3— General Chemistry . . 4 

or Foods 1 —Introductory Foods (3) 

or Nut. 10— Elements of Nutrition (3) 

or one of the other physical science courses listed above. 



"^May be taken either semester. 
*'^Or Econ. 31— Principles of Economics (3) or Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Eco 
nomics (3) in the sophomore year. 



32 



Areas of Specialization 



So-phomore Year CContinuetO 

Note: Only one Geography and only one Foods course may 
be taken. 

Math. 0— Basic Mathematics (If required) 

Math. 10-AIycbra or Math. 5-Gcncral Mathematics 

P. E. 5, 7 (Men); P. E. 6, 8 (Women) 

Hea. 40— Personal and Community Health (Men) 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) 

fApproved Electi\es (Women) 

Tulids: Women 

Men 

Junior Year 

H. D. Ed. 100, 101— Principles of Human Development .... 

H. 1, 2— History of Modern Europe 

Geog. 10— General Geography 

Ed. 52— Children's Literature 

**Ed. 1 53— Teaching of Reading 

**Ed. 121— The Language Arts in the Elementary School 

**Ed. 122— Social Studies in the Elementary School 

**Ed. 124— Arithmetic in the Elementary School 

**Sci. Ed. 105— Workshop in Science lor Elementary Schools . . 
fApproved Electi\'es 

Total 

Senior Year 

Ed. 149— Student Teaching in Elementary Schools 

Geog. lOO— Regional Geography of Eastern Anglo- America . . 
or Geog. 101— Regional Geog. of Western Anglo- America 

or Geog. 120— Economic Geography of Europe 

Two of the following courses: 

P. E. 1 20— Physical Education in the Elementary School . . . . "i 

Mus. Ed. 1 28— Music tor the Elementary Classroom Teacher . . I 

Ed. 125— Art in Elementary Schools J 

fApproved Electi\es 

Total 



—Semester- 
l II 





1 

3 
2 

17 
18 

3 
3 

3 

2 



6 
17 

16 



3 
1 
3 
3 

4 

20 
19 

3 
3 
3 

2 
2 
2 

2 
2 



16 



4-5 

10 

16 21-23 



AREA OF SPECIALIZATION IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH EDUCATION 

Students enrolled in the College of Education and majoring in elementary 
education may pursue an area of specialization in elementary school physical edu- 
cation and health education. Students interested in this area should consult with 
the Dean of the College of Physical Education, Health, and Recreation. 



**Open only to students in elementary curriculum. Students who register for one 
double starred course must register for all five courses. 

fNumber of elective hours and choice of courses must be approved by advisor. Sev- 
eral electives must be taken at the 100 level during junior and senior years. 

33 ► 



Areas of Specialization 

AREA OF SPECIALIZATION IN ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL MUSIC EDUCATION 

Students enrolled in the College of Education and majoring in elementary 
education may pursue an area of specialization in elementary school music edu- 
cation, and thereby qualify for the Bachelor of Science Certificate in Special 
Subjects. In order to fulfill requirements in this area, the following courses 
should be taken in addition to those required in the Elementary School Curricu- 
lum: 

Mus. 1 (3); Mus. 8 (3); Mus. 160 or 161 (2); Mus. 70, 71 (3, 3); Mus. 
80, 81 (2, 2); Applied Music: Piano (8), Voice (4); P. E. 50 (1); and Mus. 
Ed. 139 (3) in place of Mus. Ed. 128 (2) in the senior year. 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM FOR 
UNDERGRADUATE TEACHERS 

This curriculum is for teachers who have completed a two-or three-year cur- 
riculum in a teachers college. It is also for teachers who have two or more years 
of successful teaching experience which can be used in lieu of student teaching 
to meet certification requirements. 

This curriculum, leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in elementary edu- 
cation, requires a total of 128 semester credits. The last 30 credits earned before 
the conferring of the degree must be taken with the University of Maryland. 

State Department of Education requirements provide that a teacher in serv- 
ice may not earn more than six credits for certification purposes during a school 
year. The College of Education assumes no responsibility in this connection, but 
candidates are advised to observe the regulation. 

Specific requirements for the degree are as follows: (In meeting requirements, 
particular attention must be given to the footnotes.) 

Requirements for individuals vidth approximately 64 transfer credits: 

Education 4 

* English (not including freshman and sophomore English) 10 

** Natural Science (chemistry, physics, botany, zoology, bacteriology, ento- 
mology, general science, meteorology) 10 

*** Social Science (history, government, sociology, economics, geography) 12 
Electives (As many as needed to give a total of at least 128 credits) 



*If less than 12 credits were earned in English during the first two years of college, 
the deficiency must be made up in addition to the credits specified above. 

**No more than four semester hours of Science Education and other approved sub- 
stitutions for regular science courses will be counted toward the natural science require- 
ments. 

***If the transfer credits did not include at least 3 credits in American Government, 
3 credits in Sociology, Philosophy, or Economics, and 6 credits in American History, 
those deficiencies must be made up in addition to the 12 social credits specified above. 



34 



Home Economics Education Curriculunt 

Requirements for individuals with approximately 96 transfer credits: 

Education 2 

*English (not including freshman and sophomore English) 6 

**Natural Science (as above) 6 

***Social Science (as above) 12 

Electives (As many as needed to give a total of at least 128 credits) 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

The Home Economics Education curriculum is designed for students who are 
preparing to teach vocational or general home economics or to engage in any 
phase of home economics work which requires a kn<nvlcdgc of teaching methods. 
It includes studies of all phases of home economics and the allied sciences, with 
professional training for teaching these subjects. A student majoring in this 
curriculum may also qualify for a science minor. 

The offering includes both undergraduate and graduate programs leading to 
the degrees of Bachelor of Science, Master of Education, and Master of Science. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION CURIUCULUM 

, — Suinester—^ 

FTeshman Year I H 

fEd. 1— Freshman Orientation 

Eng. 1 , 2— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Soc. 1— Sociology of American Life or Phil. 1— Philosophy for 

Modem Man 3 

G. & P. 1— American Government . . 3 

Sp. 1, 2— Public Speaking 2 2 

H. E. 1— Home Economics Lectures 

Pr. Art 1— Design 3 

Hea. 2— Personal Health (Women) 2 

Hea. 4— Community Health (Women) . . 2 

P. E. 2, 4 1 1 

Tex. 1— Textiles 3 

Elective . . 6 

Total 17 17 

Sophomore Year 

fEd. 2— Introduction to Education 2 

Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature, or 3 3 

Eng. 5, 6— Composition and English Literature 3 3 

H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 

Chem. 1 1, 13— General Chemistry 3 3 

Pr. Art 20— Costume Design 3 

Clo. 20A-CIothing . . 3 

Foods 2, 3— Foods 3 3 

P. E. 6, 8 1 1 

Total 18 16 



* ** *** Refer to footnotes on page 34. 
fMay be taken either semester. 

35 ► 



Industrial Education Curriculum 



Junior Year 

H. E. Ed. 140— Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation . . . 
H. D. Ed. 100, 101— Principles of Human Development .... 

H. Mgt. 150, 151-Home Management 

Foods 101— Meal Service 

Clo. 22— Clothing Construction 

Nut. 1 10— Elements of Nutrition 

Pr. Art 2— Survey of Art History 

Pr. Art 40— Interior Design 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics 

Zool. 16— Human Physiology 

Bact. 51— Household Bacteriology 

Total 

Senior Year*^ 

H. E. Ed. 102— Problems in Teaching Home Economics . . . . 
H. E. Ed. 148— Teaching Secondary Vocational Home Eco- 
nomics 

Ed. 145— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education . . . 

H. Mgt. 152— Practice in Management of the Home 

Bot. 1— General Botany 

Electives 

Total 



3 
1 

4 

17 



-Semester- 
II 



4 
12 

16 



17 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Three curriculums are administered by the Industrial Education Department: 
(1) Industrial Arts Education, (2) Vocational-Industrial Education, and (3) 
Education for Industry. The overall oflFering includes both undergraduate and 
graduate programs leading to the degrees of: Bachelor of Science, Master of Ed- 
ucation, Master of Arts, Doctor of Education, and Doctor of Philosophy. 

The Industrial Arts Education curriculum prepares persons to teach indus- 
trial arts at the secondary school level. It is a four-year program leading to a 
Bachelor of Science degree. While trade or industrial experience contributes sig- 
nificantly to the background of the industrial arts teacher, previous work experi- 
ence is not a condition of entrance into this curriculum. Students who are en- 
rolled in the curriculum are encouraged to obtain work in industry during the 
summer months. Industrial arts as a secondary school subject area is a part of 
the general education program characterized by extensive shopwork and labora- 
tory experiences. 

The Vocational-Industrial Curriculum may lead either to certification as a 
vocational-industrial teacher with no degree involved or to a Bachelor of Science 

** Subjects in the senior year will be so arranged that the two semesters may be 
interchanged. 



-< 36 



Science Cil Ileal ion jm I he e\e- 
iiientciry school teneher in iiii 
iiiiportdiil course oj sliuly 
ojjereJ hy the ( OUe'^e. 








/\ youii;^ leiicher-l(j-hc lenrns 
tlie url of iiislnictiiig prc- 
school children. 




leiieher I'vei'iirnlion fnr special 
cihiciitiDii cliisscs. 



(' 



UNIVERSITY OF 

College Park Camp 




z^^ll 



MARYLAND 

1958- 1959 



Nuricry School 





UV l.rrTERS FOR CLASS SCHEDILES 



I Scott Kcv Mill 



Dairy— Turner Laboratory 

Aviation Pivchologv Laboratory 

Dean of Women 

Agronomy — Botany— H. J. i'altcrton Half 

Counseling Center 

Horticulture— Hol/.apfel Hall 

Dormitory 
Journalism 
Activities Building- Cole Building 

lies — Margaret Brent Hall 
Agricultural Fngr. — Shriver Laboratory 
lingr. Classroom BIdg. 
Zoology— Silvester Hall 
Library — Shoemaker Building 
Morrill Hall 
Geographv 

Agncultuie— Symons Hall 

Industrial Arts 5c Hducation — J. M. Patterson I 
Busini-ss Sc Public Administration — Taliaferro \ 

Building— Woods Hall 
F.ngr. Laboratories 
Education — Skinner Building 
Chem. F.ngr. 
Wind funnel 
Prcinkert Field House 
Judging Pavilion 



Poultrv— Jull Hall 

Engino Research Lab. (Molecular Physics) 

ties Not Shown 
Phi Sigma Sigma 
Alpha Chi Omega 
Alpha Xi Delta 
nities .S-ot Shown 
Alpha Fpsilon Pi 
/eta Beta Ian 
Phi Kappa Gamma 
Tau Epsilon Phi 



Young men learn the tech- 
niques of the Industrial Echi- 
cation Department. 




Elementary and secondary 

school teachers learn art 

crafts in the Art Education 
Department. 



Setting a "stick of type is part of 
teacher education in the Industrial 
Arts Department. 




Industrial Edtication Currictthim 

degree, including certification. The University of Maryland is designated as the 
institution which shall ofFer the "Trade and Industrial" certification courses and 
hence the courses which are offered are those required for certification in Mary- 
land. The Vocational-Industrial Curriculum requires trade competence as speci- 
fied by the Maryland State Plan for Vocational Education. A person who aspires 
to take the certification courses should review the State plan and may well contact 
Maryland State Department of Education officials. If the person has in mind 
teaching in a designated city or county he may discuss his plans with the voca- 
tional-industrial official of that city or county inasmuch as there are variations in 
employment and training procedures. 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION CURRICULUM 



^May be taken either semester. 



-Semester- 



I 


11 








3 


3 


2 


2 



Freshman Year 

*Ed. 1— Freshman Orientation 

Eng. 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 

Sp. 1, 2— Public Speaking 

Soc. 1— Sociology ot American Life or Phil. 1— Philosophy for 

Modern Man 3 

*G. & P. 1— American Government . . 3 

Ind. Ed. 1— Mechanical Drawing 2 

Ind. Ed. 34-Graphic Arts I 3 

Ind. Ed. 2— Elementary Woodworking 2 

Ind. Ed. 22— Machine Woodworking I . . 2 

*Ind. Ed. 12— Shop Calculations 3 

A. S. 1, 2-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

P. E. I, 3-Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 19 17 

So]}hoTnure Year 

*Ed. 2— Introduction to Education 2 

Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature, or 3 3 

Eng. 5, 6— Composition and English Literature 

H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 3 3 

Ind. Ed. 21— Mechanical Drawing 2 

Ind. Ed. 28-Electricity I . . 2 

Ind. Ed. 26-General Metal Work 3 

Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry 4 4 

Math. 10-Algebra ' .. 3 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

P. E. 5, 7-Physical Acti\'ities 1 1 

Total 21 19 



37 ► 



Vocational-Industrial Certification Curriculum 

Junior Year I 

H. D. Ed. 100, 101— Principles of Human Development .... 3 

Phys. 1, 2— Elements of Physics 3 

Ind. Ed. 41— Architectural Drawing 2 

Ind. Ed. 48— Electricity II 

Ind. Ed. 33— Automotives I 3 

Ind. Ed. 1 60— Essentials of Design 

Ind. Ed. 164— Shop Organization and Management 

Ind. Ed. 166— Educational Foundations of Industrial Arts .... 2 

Ed. 161— Principles of Guidance 

*Electives— (Shop and/or drafting) 

Electives— (unspecified) 

Total 

Senior Year 

Ind. Ed. 140— Curriculum, Instruction and Observation, Iu(.!us- 

trial Education 

Ind. Ed. 148— Student Teaching in Secondary Schools 

Ed. 145— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education .... 

Ind. Ed. 23— Arc and Gas Welding 

Ind. Ed. 69— Machine Shop Practice I 

Ind. Ed. 105— General Shop 

Ind. 1 10— Foundry 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics 

*EIectives— (shopvvork and/or drafting) 

Electives— (professional courses) 

Total 14 



2 
2 

17 



-Semester— >^ 
II 
3 
3 



2 
2 

3 
2 
2 

19 



1 
3 
2 
1 
3 
4 
5 

19 



VOCATIONAL-INDUSTRIAL CERTIFICATION 

A total of 240 clock hours of instruction is required for vocational-industrial 
teacher certification. The courses listed belov,' are currently required: 
Ind. Ed. 50— Methods of Teaching 
Ind. Ed. 60— Observation and Demonstration Teaching 
Ind. Ed. 164— Shop Organization and Management 
Ind. Ed. 168— Trade or Occupational Analysis 
Ind. Ed. 169— Course Construction 

Ind. Ed. 1 70— Principles of Vocational Education, and/ or 
Ind. Ed. 171— History of Vocational Education 

"The remainder of the 240 clock hours are to be met through elective indus- 
trial education courses offered by the University of Maryland and approved by the 
State Supervisor of industrial education." ** The courses from which electives may 

*After the student has completed the basic courses in drafting, woodworking, metal- 
working, graphic arts and automotives he is to select advanced courses in one or more 
of these areas as advised. 

**Maryland (State Department of Education). The Maryland State Plan for Voca- 
tional Education 1947-1952, p. 108. 



^ 38 



Edtication For Industry Curriculum 

be chosen are: 

Ind. Ed. 150— Training Aids Dc\clopnient 

Ind. Ed. 157— Tests and Measurements 

Ind. Ed. 161— Principles of Vocational Guidance 

Ind. Ed. 165— Modern Industry 

Ind. Ed. 167— Problems in Occupational Education 
**Ind. Ed. 220— Organization, Administration and Supervision of Voca- 
tional Education 

Ind. Ed. 240— Research in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education 

Ind. Ed. 248— Seminar in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education 

Ed. 150— Educational Measurement 

Ed. 160— Educational Sociology 

Ed. 161— Principles of Guidance 

Ed. 253— Guidance Information 

Ed. 261— Practicum in School Counseling 

Ed. 269— Seminar in Guidance 
A person in vocational-industrial education may use his certification courses 
toward a Bachelor of Science degree. In doing so the general requirements of 
the University and College of Education must be met. A maximum of twenty 
semester hours of credit may be earned through examination in the trade in which 
the student has competence. Prior to taking the examination, the student shall 
provide documentary evidence of his apprenticeship or learning period and 
journcyrnan ex-perience. For further information about credit by examination 
refer to the Academic Regulations of the University of Maryland. 

EDUCATION FOR INDUSTRY 

The Education for Industry curriculum is a four-year program leading to a 
Bachelor of Science degree. The purpose of the program is to prepare persons 
for jobs within industr)' and, as such it embraces four major areas of competence, 
(a) technical competence, (b) human relations and leadership competence, (c) 
communications competence, and (d) social and civic competence. The student 
who is enrolled in this curriculum is required to obtain work in industry in ac- 
cordance with the plan described in the course, Industrial Education 124 a, b. 

r-Semester—^^ 
Freshnuin Year I U 

Eng. 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

*Soc. I— Sociology of American Life 3 

*G. & P. 1— American Government . . 3 

Ind. Ed. 1— Mechanical Drawang 2 

Ind. Ed. 12— Shop Calculations 3 

Ind. Ed. 21— Mechanical Drawing . . 2 

Ind. Ed. 22— Machine \^'^oodu'nrkinf7 I 2 

Ind. Ed. 23-Arc and Gis W'elding' . . 1 

Ind. Ed. 69— Machine Shop Practice I . . 3 

Ind. Ed. 1 lO-Foundry 1 

Sp. 7— Puhlic Speaking 2 

*May be taken either semester. 
**A course bearing a "200" number is open onlv to graduate students. 

39 ► 



Education For Industry Curriculum 

r-Semester- 

Freshman Year ^Continued') I II 

A. S. 1, 2-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

P. E. 1, 3-Physical Activities 1 1 

Math. 10-Algebra . . 3 

Total 19 20 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4— Composition and World Literature or 3 3 

Eng. 5, 6— Composition and English Literature 

Ind. Ed. 24-Sheet Metal Work 2 

B. A. 10, 1 1 —Organization and Control 2 2 

Phys. 1, 2— Elements of Physics or 

Phys. 10, 1 1— Fundamentals of Physics 3 or 4 3 or 4 

Math. 11— Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry 2 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

P. E. 5, 7-Physical Activities 1 1 

H. 5— History of American Civilization . . S 

Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Economics . . 3 

Total 16 or 17 18 or 19 

Jtifiior Year 

H. 6— History of American Civilization 3 

Psych. 1— Introduction to Psychology 3 

Psych. 2— Applied Psychology . . 3 

Chem. 1, 3-General Chemistry 4 4 

Econ. 160— Labor Economics 3 

find. Ed. 124a— Organized and Supervised Work Experience . . 3 

Ind. Ed. 143, 144-Industrial Safety Education 2 2 

B. A. 160— Personnel Management . . 3 

Soc. 1 1 5— Industrial Sociology . . 3 

Electives 3 3 

Total 21 18 

Senior Year 

B. A. 1 63— Industrial Relations 3 

B. A. 167— Job Evaluation and Merit Rating 2 

find. Ed. 1 24b— Organized and Supervised Work Experience.. 3 

Ind. Ed. 164— Shop Organization and Management . . 2 

Ind. Ed. 165-Modern Industry . . 2 

Ind. Ed. 168— Trade or Occupational Analysis 2 

Psych. 21— Social Psychology . . 3 

Electives 5 8 

Total 15 15 



fMust be pursued concurrently wdth the regular Summer Sessions between the 
sophomore and junior and the junior and senior years respectively. 

-^ 40 



Music Education Curriculum 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

The Music Education curriculum adords prc-scrvicc preparation in the spe- 
cialized field of music education and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Education with a major in public school music. The curriculum provides train- 
ing in both the choral and instrumental fields of music and is planned to meet 
the growing demand for special teachers and supervisors in those areas. In the 
senior year the student may concentrate in either elementary-school or secondary- 
school requirements. 

The major in music education must include 20 semester hours in applied 
music with at least Music 53 on a principal instrument and four to six semester 
hours in ensemble (orchestra, chorus, etc.). 

A minor in the field may be received with 24 semester hours in music edu- 
cation, theory, and history; 8 semester hours in applied music; two semester hours 
in ensemble; Ed. 140 in music; and student teaching divided between the stu- 
dent's major and minor fields. The 24 specified hours must include Music 1, 
7, 8, 17, 18, 70, 80 or 81, 121, and 160 or 161. 

MUSIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

r-Semester—^ 

Freshnicn Year I U 

Ed. 1— Freshman Orientation 

Eng. 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

*tSoc. 1— Sociology of American Life or Phil. 1— Philosophy for 

Modem Man 3 

*G. & P. 1— American Government . . 3 

Mus. 1 —Introduction to Music . . 3 

Mus. 7, 8-Theory of Music 3 3 

Mus. 21 or 23— Class Voice or Class Piano . . 2 

Applied Music 2 2 

P. E. 50— Rhythmic Analysis and Mo\ement 1 

A. S. 1, 2-Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Ensemble-Music 4, 5, 6, 10 or 1 5 1 1 

Hea. 2— Personal Health (Women) 2 

Hea. 4— Community Health (Women) . . 2 

P. E. 1, 3-(Men); P. E. 2, 4-(Women) 1 1 

Totals : Women 16 20 

Men 17 21 



*May be taken either semester. 

fOr Econ. 31— Principles of Economics (3) or Econ. 37— Fundamentals of Eco- 
nomics (3) in the sophomore year. 

41 ► 



Music Education Curriculum 



r-Semester- 

Sophomore Year I II 

*Ed. 2— Introduction to Education 2 

Eng. 3, 4, or 5, 6— Comp. and World or English Literature 3 3 

Mathematics or Natural Science 3 3 

Mus. 17, 18-Dictation and Sight-Singing 2 2 

Mus. 70, 71-Hannony 3 3 

Mus. 21 or 23— Class Voice or Class Piano . . 2 

Applied Music 2 2 

Ensemble Mus. 4, 5, 6, 10, or 15 1 1 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force R.O.T.C. (Men) 3 3 

P. E. 5, 7-CMen); P. E. 6, 8-CWomen) 1 I 

Total 17-20 17-20 

Junior Year 

H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 3 3 

H. D. Ed. 100, 101— Principles of Human Development .... 3 3 

Sp. 4— Voice and Diction 3 

Mus. 80, 81-Class Study of Instruments 2 2 

Mus. 120, 121-History of Music 3 3 

Mus. 1 50— Keyboard Harmony . . 2 

Mus. 160, 161— Advanced Conducting Methods 2 2 

Applied Music 2 2 

Ensemble Mus. 4, 5, 6, 10, or 15 1 1 

Total 19 18 

Senior Year QSecondary school concentration^. 

Ed. 140— Curriculimi, Instruction and Observation 3 

Ed. 145— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education .... 3 

*Ed. 148— Student Teaching in the Secondary Schools . . 8 

Mus. Ed. 1 32— Music in the Secondary School . . 2 

Applied Music 2 2 

Electives 6 3 

Ensemble-Mus. 4, 5, 6, 10, or 15 1 

Total 15 15 

Senior Year (Elementary school concentration^. 

Ed. 52— Children's Literature 2 

*Ed. 149— Student Teaching in the Elementary School . . 8 

Mus. Ed. 128— Music for the Elementary Classroom Teacher. . . . 2 
Mus. Ed. 139— Music for the Elementary School Specialist., 3 
Mus. Ed. 1 70— Materials and Methods for Class Piano Instruc- 
tion 2 

Applied Music 2 2