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Full text of "The Commercial and financial chronicle"

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http://www.archive.org/details/commercialfinanc16newyuoft 



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OL 



T H B 



COMMERCIAL AND FINANCIAL 




HH0Ni€tiif 



AND 



HUNT'§ MERCHANTS' MAGAZINE, 



A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 



Heprestnttug tl)e Jtibustrial anh Commercial aiiteieeta of tl)e tluttb ^StaUs. 



VOLXTME XVI.. 

t A.t( V A. Kir CO J V tf U, ISTS, (*«(.»■■* U. 



/ 



>^tf' 



NRW YORK: 
WILLIAM B. DAMA * COMPANY, 79 * 81 WILLIAM STBltT. 

1873. 



^. 



INDEX 



TO THE 






SIXTEENTH VOLUME, ^^^ 

Embracinor the Numbers from January I to June 30, 1373. 



A. 

not 
lit«m» A Cbaltkooof!* Ratlroiid leu, x'Ji, 319. 

> 8i.), WK 659 

AUbanui D«ht. Ac M, 2»l, 513, 764 

Alakuu Imluniiitj'. Dlstrlbailooof. £cl 144 

AllMiiy FiM-.i H,form»t. Jul. 844 

AllsKtxo}' V« kr R'lilroad ta^ 

Amrnmi LiiaiiB Abroad iu 18TS 78 

Anieriain Railroad BuiidB In Germany. 4U 

Aoieflcau Sccurltlctt at Lt»ndon, Daily Prices of 
(monthly) im Review of ihn Munili, (weekly) 
ttt Monetary and I'unimercial Engliab News. 

ABBaal Financial Tabk'K...' 7-11 

A Hound Bai<la. Ed 6 

Aiflii,...n. •lop<ka * Santa FeKaUroad.,'.'. ... 838 

AliiDtic Hank Dcfalciion. EJ 68* 

Atlantic A (iiiir Railroad 632 

AtiaHlc* Oreiit \Vl^lein Railroad ItO, :91 

Atluitlc * Pacific Railroad 156, S4S, 785 

AiUntic&Si i.Lr.., Railroad Bonda 149 

AU»ntlc8t I' ropTc. A'</. 478. Ed. Hi 

Atlantic, Te: ,:<i Railroad 44.76 

AtUalicTeli.^. -,.... i,.,.isulidai»d 434, 5W 

Atlantic Telcxraiib Cable Brukcu 610 



Balnbridge, Ontlii,ert& Col. Railroad 661 

B illimore ciiv Piuancea 154 

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad 8! 

Banking Sysiem.Chuntes In the National. Hd. 61.i 
Banka, Couniry, and Currency Movcmtnls. Kj 378 

the, and Recent Rise in Gold 710 

Bank Defalcaliuua and the Clearlng-Hoaeo. £d. 678 
•■ Deiwita in, the interior and the Untflow 

of Greenbacks. £U 305 

•• Iranet, the Demand for More. ' i^<;. ". '.. 78S 
" Kudemption as a Preventive of Strin- 
gency. JSa 175 

'• Statements of New York City. Boaton 

andPblladelphln. *« Bankers' Gazette. 

" BtatemenlB and the Gold Movement. E4. SOi 

•' Stocks, Table of and Prices. .185, S17. S90, 

322. 35S, .386, 458, 490, 522, 5;t3, 

066. 658, 69l>. 762^ TVS, 826 

Bank of England and oar Gold Markel. Ba . . 762 

■• Curiency, Belaxailon in. il'd. 814 

" Forgeries 881 

** Ralet*. 5« Monetary and Com- 

mercial English News. 
Bankers' Ganelte (weekly). . . . 15, 45. 77, 105, 160, 
181. 213, 243. 288, :ilS, 319, 382, 411, 454. 4S«, 
M8, 511, 5,W, 1,22, i;51. 1 86, 715, 758, 789, 822, 831 
Banks, Kattuual, Cbun^e^ in Redeeming Agents 
and New Banks Organized 
(weekly). 11,42. 75, 104, 146, 
178, 210, -282, 315. S45, 379, 
408, 451, 483, 515, 641, 6S«, 
618, 649, 681. 712, 754, 785, 

Sl'.l, 848 
■* Lawfal Money Reserves, Dec. 

ST. 1«72 j83 

" " Lawful Money Reserves, Feb. 

28, 18;3 514 

I' " Re.-irves of the. Rd 748 

" Resuurcc^Biifl Liabiliioa June 

10, I8r2, Oct. 3, 1872,and Fob. 

aS.lSiS 644 

Barley. Hn Breadstnfls. 

Bi|;8anrtvl:„;;r,...,l . gg, 

"""• ■ ' rof .«..«....*... II 

IJUH! ! ) . . .. 354 595 

"'"•I ' .*« British Board of 

'I rade Kctui ns. 
Boencl liiiliroad l,iiw In Ohio. Xd 710 

Bs>ndii, (JUy. litt City Bond List 

Prices of (iveitkly). .Ste Bankers' Ga- 
zette. 
■• Ittilroad. Ac. .v« Rallro:id. 
" Suite. .Vec.'^t.Tf; Securi-.les. 

" Siolen. and ihir Ownership. Ht 720 

•' U. S. Oovernmi'nt *'« U. S. Secnritles. 
lie. V. . rnmeni. iind Specie Biporls. Eil.. SiS 
OoFtoi A \"iiny lUi.road w 

1)0:.|0II 11 . ■ *" 



Brurawick ft .MbiTiy Riilroad 161 

BnfTalo. C ui^' R.llrond 61 

Bull's H. i,e Ed 375 

Bullion. I M-tlli.in. 

Hur'i " icjotaRR 12,748 

Ilu. of. Ad 7*1 

liut . , . .»s Current. 



O. 



Hoeton Bank Suto.neni (weekly) Sm Bankers'" 

Gantie. 
Bontun, Concord A Mont-ei;l Railroad 795 

Itnsloii. Clinton A Fitchhuri; Railroad. o2 

Hi'l'in Dividends. .Inn. 2(1. .May 5 .... §6 

li.mlon, Uailford * Erie Railroad. . .21.' 80, 15« 

- , . „ , „ „ ^ 3St, 348, 889. 460, 62;), 7fi5 

Boston A Maine Rallroid fig 

Boston Water Power Co 6>q 

HraailTradc .'.'.'.'.."'.' Jig 

Mrfadstnffs Liverpool Market and "siattsVics 

Mrirkvl (wcDkly). «M Commercial 

Times 
Brttiah Boird of Trade Returns . .178, 830, 615, 682 
Parliament Investigation and the Coal 

Qai-»ll<)n 843 

S.it.guarclH against Panics and Our 

Money Mjirkel, Eii 477 

Brokem* Ala'qii.H 24, 

Brooklyn iwdge ^.i-iziz::::::::..'. m 

Brooklyn rinancr- 60. S,« 



Cable Projocts, Now. . . 

Cairo A Yincennes Railroad 

California. Redemption of State Bonds ^07. 

i^amden ,t .\i Ian tic Railroad 

Canada Paciflc Railway 6.^3, 

(Canada Southern Railway and Chicago & C. 8. 
292. 458, 493, 
Canal Stocks. See Railroad, Canal, Ac. 

Canton Land Co 493,629,766, 

Capital. Foreign, Inllax of. EJ 614, 

Catawibsa Railroad 

Cayuga Lake Railroad 

Cazenovia & Oana^tota Railroad. 

Census ,ind Distribniion of PopBlafiotl. Bd^. 

Central Paciflc Railroad 1 ,. 

Central Railroad of L. i ' i.. 

Central Railroad of New Jersey 220, 292, 

Chainplain Ciinal Scheme 

Charleston, S. C, Banking Capital in 

Chartiers Valley Railroad 

Cheeky TlieCerliilcntion of. Ed 

Chesapeake & Ohio Riilioud 149, 186, 458, 

Chesapeake A Ohio Caual 

Chicago A Alton Rsilroad 8S6, 

Chicago, BnrUm;ton A Quiucy Railroad.... 14, 

Chicago, Danville A Vincenncs 

Chicago A Nor'hwcstern Railroad. .186, 661, T6-">, 

Chicago, Rock Island it Pacific Railroad 180, 

Cincinnati. Hamilton A Dayton Railroad 

Cincinnati A Muskinirum VnlUv Ifailroad 

City Bonds. Prices' of IN. T.. Brook- 
City Railroad Stocks. Prices of f Ivn, Ac. isri, 

217. 290, 323, :i5:), .38>1. 458. 490, 522, 593, 6-2(l. 658. 

U»0, 762. 79.3, 

City Securities Table, (monthly), Il-.i. 2.50, 418, 

564, 7-2, 

Clark County (Mo.) Bond? •. 

Clearing House and Bank Defalcations. Sd 

Clearlng-ironse Settlements. \ New Method. &'/. 

Cleveland Col.. Cinn. A I. RR .325. 49.3, 52;), 

Cleveland, Mt. Vernon & Del. Ralroad 51, 

Cleveland A Pittsburgh Railroad 

Clique" and the Loan Market. Ed 

Clique Spesm RclasLiiig. Ed 

Coal, Monthly .Sail 8. ,S«! Prices Current. 

Coal Resource? of U. S 

Coal Trade in Kugbind 

Coffee .Market (weekly). See Commercial Times. 

Coinage Act, The New 4511, 

Coin and Bullion Product of U. S, in 1672 

" ■' ImportBamt Kxpoitsof (week- 

lyi. S:e Commercial and 
Miscellaneous News. 

'* ■' Prices of. in London (weekly). 

fee Monetary and Commer- 
cial English News. 
Coluuilnie, Chicago A J. 0. U lilroad . * .# - v \ * 
Colmubiis & Hocking Valley Railroaa..'. !. .V. . 

Coninicvcc. A Trihiina; of 

ConnH! rci.1l EiiterprI e in Koston 

Comnitrcial Epitome l(wn«i.l^ .; S«t OtimmCr 

cal Times. 
C.-.innuro;al Failnres in IS73, 1871 and 1870. El. 
Commercial and Mitctil.uieous News iweekh), 

13. 4;i. 76, 101, lid, 180, 2:2. -243 'iSJ. 317 346 

381, 410, 4J;i, 485, .-ilb, 0)B, 688, BiiO. 651, liS3, 713, 

751). 788, 820, 

Commercial Times (weekly), 52. 6\ 8). 124 157 

1S9, SJl. 21)2. 294, .-,56, : .V?, 390, 13), 48 J, 491. 5 6 

5(ili, 697. tiSO ti«J, (■91. 7.i4. 76 ■, 797 830 

Coiisela, Daily Price of in London (weekly). See 

Monetary and Ciimmercial English News- 

(monthly) »«« Review of the Month. 
Consolidation Conl Co. of M.ir\luud 
Coniiecticnt A Pnssiimpsic Railroid 

Connecticut Railro:ids 

co-operation in Orcnt Britain ..... 

Corn. ^eeHrciiiistufrs. 

Cornmeal. * Breadstuffs. 
Cotton Acreage and Crop, June, 1873. 784, 832 
' Bombay Crop ] 

" Ouneomptlou and Stock In Eunlpei 125, 
-' " , 208,2.0,281,312, 

Consumption of American, to Nov. 1, 

IMS 696 

Efllfect of Price on Cunsiimption of Long 

If A.'SSapf,^p':;';*f.::-.::& 

" Enropeaa Movement in 18T2. . . 

Exchange and Vi<-iina Ejhibitlon. 

Future Delivery Contracts 191, 264 

Hanihuig, Movement in li72 

Imports and Exports of Great Britain 
»'!«« market (weekly). 



PA»1 

Cotton Receipts and Prospects 8t 

Takings by Spiunors and llie Overland 

Movement B'S 

Tax. R.fnndine of. Ed.... 280 

Trickery and Fraud 664,833 

" Visible Supply, new table (weekly) ... 768 

Weight of Bales 1B» 

Currency, and the Debt 9 

" How to Reform the. Ed 288 

Inelasticity and Monetary «pagni. .Rf. 609 
' Movement and Country Banks. Ed. 87S 

The Demand for More. Ed 78» 

Custom Honse, Daily Kecelpts at (woeldy). 5« 
Bankers' Gazette. 



1>. 



MS 

75 



810 

6 



292 




in India. 



M 7 ) 

Market and Stntlslics (weekly)." ' Sfi 

Commercial Timerf. 
Planting and the Credit Syttem 464 



Damages for Misrepresentation 

Debt Staleineut, The (.Tune.) Bi 

Debl t-'tatcintnt and rumored l^sue of green- 

tjacks. Ed 

Debt, The and the currency, Ed 

Debt of the United States. See United States. 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co 

I Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad. 295, 

'Delaware A Shore Railroad 817 

Dc8 Moines Vallev Railroad bonds 149, •)93, 765 

Detroit A Milwaukee Railroad 824 

Direct U. 8. Cable Co 408 

Discount rate in London and Continental cillca 

(weekly.) See Monetary and CummeFcial 

iCnglish News. 
Dividimds declared iweekly). Set Bankers' 

Gczelle. 

Dlvidens. taxing 887 

Dry (joods market and Importn (weekly). St* 

Dry Goods Morket. 
Drugs. See Prices Current- ■ 



East Aleb.iua A Cincinnati ilailroad 596 

Eaut Tenu , Vu. A Oa. Railroad 218 

Eastern, Mass., Railroad 83, 7*iB 

Elizabethtown A I'aducah Railroad 44, 7«5 

English correspondence and market reports by 
cable (weekly). i-'ee Monetary and Com- 
mercial English News 

Equitable Trust Co 748 

Erie A Pittsburgh Rai'.rosd 6*4 

Erie Railway 33 149, 'i92, 3S8, 469, (189 

European Steamship Line in Philadelphia 680 

Exchange, foreign. Affected by new coinage law. 487 
" Foreign Daily price of (monthly). 
^ee Review of the Month, 
at London and on London (weekly). 
See Monetary and Commercial Eng- 
lish News. 
Market (weekly). Ste Bankers' Ga- 
xcite. 

" Prices of in 1872 t 

Exports of leading articles from New York 
(weekly). See Commercial Times, 
of merchandise ;ind specie from New 
York. Value of (weekly). See Com- 
mercial and Miscellaneous News. 
F. 

Failures— Mercantile, in 1872, 1871 and 1870 446 

Falling off in our Importations. Ed 846 

Finance Legislation aid its Prospects. Ed 174 

Financial Dangers. Ed 142 

Financial Review of year 18^2. Ed 7 

Financial Policy of the Admlnietratinn. EJ. . . 842 

Financial System, the strength of otir. BJ r,81 

Fiscal Reform at Albany. Ed 349 

Fish. S e Pi ices Current. 

Fiichbnrg Riiilro:d S9 

Florida State Finnnces 187, H87 

Fionr imports ond exuorte of Great Britain, 
(weekly). -Sue Monetary and Commer- 
cial Eniflish News. 
" Market (weekly). 5e« Breadstnfft. 
Foreign Capital, Facilities for Aitracting. Ed. 
" " and our Money Market. Ed.. 

Correspondence (weekly I. 5«« Mono- 
Inry and Commercial English News. 
Excliange. See Exchanee. 
■' Markets (weeklyl. .<r«« Monetary and 
Commercial English News. 
Fort Wayne, Jackson A Saginaw Railroad .... 318 
Fort Wayne, Muncie A Cincinnati Railroad ... (i»7 
Freight Charges and Western Rallroada. Ed.. Htfl 

French Commerce, revival of 610 

Fruit. See Groceries. 



614 
708 



Galveston, Harriebur? A San Antonio R. R. . . . 4«1 

Qirdnerl^toad and Warehouse Bill 648 

Gas BtocltlQ..18S, 217. 290, .S2», 36*, 886. 418, 490. 

.522. 5;l.l. f.3,1, 6S8, ti90. 762. 793, 826 
Georgia Debt and Finances....*!, 187, 218. Sfll, 

323. £87, 748 

Georgia Railroad 887 

German Banking System, Inela-tlcltv of. Ed. 679 
Gi" man Capital and onr Money Market. Ed. . . 87 

Gilbert Elevated Railroad 82S 

Gold, Daily Range In 1872 » 

" Daily Price of (monthly). &M Review of 
tb4> Month. 



January — June, 1673.] 



INDEX 



til 



PAOB 

9oM export nnd Import at New Tnrk (weekly). 
.-«« Couiniurciut aud Mtjfcullttiim>ri!> 
Newe, 
" Mnrkt't (wwkly). Sm Sankcrs' Oazcttc. 

" Miivcniciit tu Qcimiiiv. Arf 371 

" Price «)f aril Kaiik of EDglund ralf. fi^. 783 

" productof Uiilicd Stales 111 18'i» IBl 

" nceiii riri; In nnd Ibr Bnnka. Ed 110 

' ri^oiind ilsCiiunci'. KU 4'IS 

" thall Wf ixijon ii, £" 7M 

" llie Fninruuf and ihi' Money Murkel. AM, 813 
Oovecnmiut 8u< icriiio, dully price of (inouchly) 
/ €f Kcvlcw I f the 
mon'h. 
" •' mark" t for (weekly), 

,'«Bankern' Gazetio. 
" " prices of. at London & 

Frankfort (weekly), 
-S' « Monetary and 
Commercial Rngllah 
News. 
rauKeof pricea In 1878. » 
(able of. SeeV. 8. Debt 
Siaiemeut monlbly. 
Grcln. Stf BreadJtuffe 

Grant. Geiiornl, in New York 444 

Grand Trunk (Cnnada' Railroad 481, 81», 6M 

Great Wettcrn Railway of Canada 411, 694 

Qreenvilli' & Colombia Railroad. Sd sao 

Greceriee. marketfor (weekly). Se* Commer- 
cial Time*. 

Onnriy Cloth, } weel^'y market. *« Cotton Market. 

Gunny baga and cloth, «tocka, Ac (S86 

H. 

Hannibal A St. Joseph Railroad 838, 795 

Harlem Kxunsion Rai'road 83 

Harlem & Portche^tir Railroad 6.'»2 

Holidays, lejffll, in New York 715 

Hoo«ac Tunnel 595 

Honetnn & Great Northern Railroad of Texas. . SSS 

Honlint^don & Broad Top Railroad S58 

I. 

Illinois Cen'rul Railroad 480, 5*5, 59S,,781 

Illinoie Railroads. .. 345 

lIlinolB & St. Louis Bridge ('81, 693 

Imports i.f Icadinp; articles (weekly) See Com- 
mercial Times. 
" of specie and mcrcbtndise at New York 
(weekly). See Commercial and Mis- 
cellaneous News. 

Importations, Falling off In (jur S4ti 

Indianapolis, Bloom. <t West. RR 32!S, eii 

Indianapolis, Cin. & LnfaTuItt RR aso, 796. 828 

ludianapol.s & St. Lonis Railroad 6ft4 

Indianapolis & Vlucennes Railroad SM 

Indiana A Illinois Central Railroad 796 

Indiana State Bonds SO 

Inflation. The Policy of. Kd S8 

Insnrance. Flro, the Hleh latea for. Bd 480 

Insurance Marine and Maritime Disasters 488 

Insurance slocks, table and prices, 185, 217, 490, 
882, im, 38(i, 458, 4W, 532, 59;j, 62B. ti58, 690, 

782. 7I«. 8M 

InternationBl Peace Congress. Ed 846 

International Railroad and Texas Legitlature.. 881 

International Tonnage 681 

Investments, nnd Slate. 'JIty and Corporation 
FinanccB, 19. 49, 81. 104. 154, 18«, 218, 917. 291, 
.323, 154, 387, 415, 459, 491, 5J3, 551, 594. 6i7, 659, 

891, 719. 763, 794, 827, 855 

Investors' Table .377.378 

J. 

Jacksonville, Fcnn. <fe Mobile lailroad 693 

Jeff., MadiEon & Indianapolis Railroad. 493,52} 
Jersey City bonds 794 

K. 

Kansas Pacific Railroad 781 

" " See a'so Paciflc Railroada. 

Kansas Registered Local Bonds J8T 

Kansas state Finances 148 

Khivan Warand it.^ Significance 847 

I.. 

Lake Brio A Louisville Railroad ... 198 

Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad 616 

Lancaster !t K ading Railroad J»S 

Lawrence iia.lroail 6^8 

Lehigh Coal and Navie-atlon 888 

Lehigh Valley Railroad 180 

Lexington & St. Louis Railroad 348 

Little Miami Railroad 524 

Liverpool Market (weekly). Sm .Monetary and 

Coiiiniercial English News. 

Loan Market and the Cliques. BJ 277 

Loans. New, offered in New ) ork V), iM 

Loi al Securities, prices of. in Now York. 185, 217 

290, 322. ,83, 886, 458, 490, 622, 6a3, 626, 6.'i8. 61)0. 

Wi, 7SI3, f28 
Logan»\iort, Crawfordsville & 8. W. Railroad.. 14 
Long Credits nnd Corainenial Failures. Ed... 446 

Lonisiana Sla'e Fiiiauccs 7(j3, 791 

Lumber. S.t Prices Current. 

.If. 
Macon & Augusta Railroad. . 

Maine Cential Railroad 

Maine State Debt 

Marine Ingnr.ince Scrip. .. 



219, 827 

.448, 785 

.. . 8 J 

517 

1 



Market Savings Uark. How to Wind It up. Ed. 31 

Maritime DisHsters and .Marine Insurance 4s3 

Marietta & Cincinnati Railroad 324, 4w2 

Massachufictls Finances SO 

Massacliusclt- Railroads 188 356 

Jemi)liis& Charleston Railroad 11, 219, 595 

Jemplis * Little Rock Railroad 381 

Michigan Central Railroad 187 

Michit;an Lake Shore Railroad 498 

MIdlan,'. liiiilroad ' 50 

MIddlelioro & Taunton Railroiid! 889 

Milwaukee CIry Honds sb 348 

Milwaukee s. St. Paul Railroad.ji, 889, 498.' 853', 691 

Missouri Central Railroad 794 

Missouri County Hond^ '. 20 

Misfouri. KansBsA Texas Railroad '. 878 661 

Misfourl State Finances ' f,4 

Mis-ifsippi Valley & Western Railroad. '.'.'.".'.■. 481 

Moldle FinatLCes ^j ^|^ 

Mobile <t Montgomery Railroad ..'.'."..... ' ti27 

Mobile A Ohio ^1 .J94 

U»Ias«.;»Maik«t<WMklr). Sm GrocerlM. ' 



Monetary and Cnmmerrlal Bugllsh Newafweek- 
ly, 12. 42 7.'., 1*1, 147. 178 ill). 211, 2-<.1 318 
845, 3T9. I1H, |,',|, 181, 515. 544. t^M, IJM. B49 
„ ,. B-ll. ''I*. 7J) '.86. 8:9, 8)8 

Monetary Preasureand Expansion of Credln.Ai/. lUI 

Mouey Market. AW b'j 

and Fntnreof «..ld. EU .. .. 81) 
" '' and the P.i.iisyh,iui» Railroad. BIO 

„ ^ Banks and SyntlUate. lid 141 

In London and Continental 
Cltlea (Meekly). Set Mone- 
tary and Commercial Eugilsli 
News. 

Languor In the. Sd 841 

" our, and British Safejtuards 

against I'aolcs. »i 477 

" onr, nnd Foreign CaplUI. SI. 'i09 

" (weekly). AVs Bnnkera'aaeute. 

Monetary Improvement, the. Ed.. J79 

Monetary Spasm, and iD^laallcliy of lbs Car- 

r.ncy. EU sng 

Monetary Stringency, the caosei thereof. Ed.. 407 

Mouiclair Railway iQ 

Morlga;:e Tax, repc.'il of. Ei '..'.!'.." 148 

Mutual Life Insurance Coiniiany (N. Y.)... '.",.' 180 
N. 

Narrow Uuug'^ Railroad 848 

National Ua ks. S e Banka. 

National Railroad (N. J.) 187 

Naugatnck Railroad 858 

New Bedford A Taunton Rjiilroad 292 

Newcastle A Beaver Valley HK 588 

New Haven, Middlelown A Wlllimantic Rail- 

road 825, 590,698 

New Jersey Ceniral. 5 «Central of New Jersey, 

" AD laware Central Railroad 684 

Free Railroads In. Ed 447 

General Railroad Law 617 

Southern Railroad 896, 061, 686 

New Loans offered in New York 19, 802 

New Orleans, Baton Rouge A Vickstiurg RR.. . 493 
Mobile A Tetae Railroad. ...!48. 

SOB, ii6I. 821 
New York, Boston A Montre)U Railroad 155, 409, 461 
" Central & Hudson River Railroad.. 

83, ill, 354, 858, 881, 461, 493, 629, 

1.61, 789 

CltrFlnanccs 50.151 

A Harlem Railroad IBS, 1K8, 493 

*' Life Insurance Co 213 

" AN England Railroad (B., U. A E.) 596 

WestShoi«AOulcaeoRailroad.52S, 598 
" A Oswego Midland Railroad . 220, 

356, 460, 525, 7liB, 798 
** Providence A Boston Railroad. ... 893 

" State Finances 81.859,189 

State Railroads 588 

North Carolina Finances 21, 323, 822, t27 

" " Railroad 6BJ 

Northern Central Railroad 324, 859, 661, 693 

Paciflc Railroad 343,891,766,796 

O. 

Ohio A Mississippi Railroad 218, 798 

Ohio Railroad Law 698, 698. Ed. 710 

Ohio Railroads 51 

Ohio Town and County Debts BO 

Ottawa, Oswego A Pox River Railroad 698 

P. 

Paciflc Railroads 1S4, 480 

Paciflc Riilroads, Bonds issued to. *« U. 8. 
Debt Statement (monthly^. 

Pacific Mall Steamship Co 328,481,710,763, 788 

Pacific Railroad of Missouri 838 

Palace live stock cars 848 

Panama Railroad 493, 659, 785 

Panics, How to Prevent. Ed 818 

Panics and the Money M arket. Ed 810 

Pai.icB, our .Safeguards against. Ed 640 

Peninsular Railroad 155, 796 

Pennsylvania C.impany 528 

RailroHd. 393, 354, 389, 523, (.93 

State Debt 60,293, 387 

Phelps, Dodge A Co 518 

Philadelphia Bank Statement (weekly). Set . 
Bankers' Gazette. 

A Erie Railroad SSS, 483 

A Reading Ralljioad 14,88,318 

'* Steainehip Lliio to Burope 881 

" ATreiiton Riilroad 343 

" Wilmlugton A Baltimore H.R ... 317 

Piedmont Railroad 595 

Pilotag3 I>aw« 877 

Pittsburgh, Cincinnati A St. Louis R. R 6il 

Pittalinrgh Fort Wayne A Chicago R.R.348, 460, 5« 

Polar Espluratlons 649 

Popnlaiion, Distribution of. El 239 

Population and Wealth, Discrepancy in Growl h. 

fia. 279 

Port Roy.il Railroad 3^8 I 

Por'land AOgilen8>nrgh Ra Iroad 648 

Postal Telegraphy in Congress 177 

Prices Current (weekly) 16), 800, .<i8 1, 896. 48', 
468, BOO, WJ, .')72, 6U3, 838, 8j3, 700, 740. ';72, 

8113, 836, 87« 
Produce, receipts of. at New York (weekly). 
See Commercial Times, 
exports of leading artleloa of (week- 
ly), ^ae Commercial Time*. 
Public Debt. Ste United State" Debt. 
Publicity and the Treasury. EJ 843 



raoi 

■ 40 

. toi 
■ «I 



RalktMdaof Dnti/'dHlatw.prefreMla l»Tt, Ae 
• and through frelgbl eharxaa. K.i.... 

Railway Monitor. 1 be 

Rcnns.eUier A Saratoga RK. 

Review of the Mouth, id. (Moatiil)/.' lisi livL "^ 

419, tSl TS8 
Richardson, Mr, his duly as 8?CfOI»rT. Ed tt* 
Richmond A Dinvll.e Kai road. ' Mg 

Richmond. I'r 1. rli ki.ir . .t i-.-iomae i K M 
Riibmoo'i ■" mMt 

Rockfor.i, , iJR JJi 

Rome, W - _ . U,iL Sm 

HutlsndKB ..... m 

Rye. 9,» Breadstalb. 



a. 



xt. 



Safeguards against Panic*. 

8t. Oroli land grant. gM 

8l Joseph A Denver Clly RaiYroi'd! .'iir.'iKC T« 
St. Louis, Kai)r«.CIIyANnrihernK.B.»«e.4»l, fW 
St. f>ials A Sonibraslern lUII-uad Ita 

Bt. Paul A Pacific Railroad a<ii 

81. Paul A Sluox Clly Railroad...;"."..! S 

Bchenectady A Susquehanna Ballraad. "' «• 

Bc.ma, Rome A Dalton RR in 

Senate Finance Commltise Beporl on OfMa- 

backa. £<( . , m 

Shepang Valley Railroad .'....'.' 7M 

Sherman, Mr., on Specie Reaumptloa. Sd ' 70 
Silver Mining Product of U. a. In 1BI2. . "iM 

SlonxCliy A81. Paul Railroad U8 

South Carolina Railroad. 4M 

Sooth Caro Ina Debt and FInaocM ' IM,tJ8L IM 
Southern Minnesota Railroad 8M 

Kouthorn Railway Security Co. . 7M 

Southern Securities. See Buttun' Otaetti. 

South Side Railroad, L. I. |06 180 

Bpartenburg A Union Railroad.. ' SM 

Specie. Movements of. See Coin and BaiUoii 
Slate Securities, range of in l'>72. ... ( 

StaU Sccnrltiea (monthly) Ubie of, pabliahVd 

on last Saturday of each month IK) 248,418 

•»»• 'SO. M« 
Steam Transportation for Local Merchandise 178 

Stock brokeis' matxins S4I 

Stock of loading articles of merchandise In Now 

York (monthly), fi! « Cumraercla: Time* 
Stock Market (weekly). Bee Bankers' Gssetts. 
Stocks, prices of (monthly). See Beriew of tits 
Month. 

Stocks, railroad, Ac, range of, in 1872 8 11 

Stock and bond tables (munttilyi. puhllshrd oa 
last Saturday in each month, 109, 247, 415, 551, 

719, 88B 
Sub Treasury, dally trtniactioa* at (weakly). 

See Bankers' Gaaette. 
Sugar market (weekly). Fee Oroeeriei, 

Syndicate Banks, and Money Market. Ed 141 

" The, is it a success. Ed SOS 

" and bonds called in tu^ T98 

Syracuse A Chenango Valley Ballroad. tU 

X. 

Tables of stocks and bonds pobllthed on ih» 

last Saturday of each month, a-e Ballroad 

Stocks, Ac, Slate Securities, Ultr SecnriUes. 

Taxes on mortgages repeal of. iial 14a 

Taxation of Railroads and Railroad Bonds, Mr, 

* Ed 611 

Taxation of railroad land craats.... 451 

Tea. 5 e Groceries. 

Telegraph Companies OoneoUdatad 481, 818 

Tennessee Finances 82S, 8i7, <A9, 6*7 

Tennessee State Finaocc* is7 

Texas Finances 1|,V (m 

Texas A Paciflc Railroad «n 

Toledo, Wabash A Western B. B ISS, 851 

Treasury. See United States Treaaary. 

Taming of the Tide. Ed 

V. 
Union Paciflc Railroad.... 164, 230,39), S3f, 481, 

United Companies of New Jersey 187, 

United States Bonds, prices in the year 1372. . . 

" " Bonds called In 818, 

" " Commerce Statistics 819, 

-' Debt Statement (monthly) . 41, 
17;, 816. 4S(l, 688. 754 
" " Greenback issue*— Senate Com- 
mittee's report 71 

" " Loan in London 212 

" OIBclals, increase of Salaries. Al. 310 

" " Rolling Stock Company 291 

" {80 '.OWI.OW Loan, /-d 103.106 

" Tradeof Great Britain with. Set 
Britlbh Board of Trade B*- 
tnms. 
Trea-ury. and the Prospecta of 

Busluess. SI Mi 

" Treasury, weekly transscllnns of, 

in regard to cnrrency. S sCom* 
mereial and Miscol. Niws. 

Usnn Law, Argument AnlnsL Si 

'' " Conn of Appeal* and Legisla- 
ture. El 

" " How its Rep-^al would ala Bor- 
rowers. Et 

" " New Movement*. Ed . . 
" " Senator Wiuslow'a. Si 
Utica, (Tbenango A Soaqaehaana Va ley B. S. . 



813 

(81 
837 
8 
7M 
750 



Stt 



. 479 



3(8 



Vermont Central Railroad. . 



m 



(^uicksllTer Mining Company 293, 768 

H. 
Railroad, canal and mlscctlaneons stock and 
bond lists, published on the last Saturday In 

each month 109, 347, 415, 55., 719, 858 

Railroad stocks. See stocks. 

Bonds, Prices in the year 1873. 10 

" Bonds, Defaults in interest 617 

Construction In the U. 8. in 1873. El. 40 
Earnings. Ed. (Monthly) 73, 210, 

344, 481, 6I«, 785 

" Freights to the West 146 

LawofOhio 598,898,713 

" Loans, new, In New York 19,692 

Railroads, Narrow Oango 348 

of Connecticut 817 

of New York State ... ^8J 

of Massschnsett'* M8, 8 8 



I Vermont A Haasachusetts Rillmad SIS 

Vicksbnrg and Meridian Railroad 793 

Vienna Panic, and lis Effect Here. m.847, TIS 

Virginia Debt and Financ«s ...1S,SI. la I, 391. 

SM, «7. 4», nt 
Virginia Valley Railroad «» 



Waco A Northwestern Railroad (TazM) m 

Ware River Railroad W» 

We-lern IJnIon Telegraph 9Mt 

Whreit Markel(weckly). S » Br««i1sta*j. 

White SUir Line and Ocean Mall SarneB... .711, 718 

Wilmington, Charloi'a A Roih«fi>rd K. B.«2, SM 

Wiliuington A Wcldon Rjllrood SI 

Winona A SI. Peters Railroad SSS 

Wlnslow's I'sury Law. BJ 808 

Wlsco'islo C)unty Bood4 SO 

Wool, iin '0rt4 and exports of arsil Brtiais. 
i««>1tr1iith Soard of 'Trads tUlara* 




xtmm 



HUNT'S MERCHANTS' MAGAZINE, 

REPRESENTING TIIE INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS OF THK TTNITED STATES. 



VOL. ]a 



SATURDAY. JANUARY 4. 1873. 



NO. 393. 



CONTENTS. 



THE CHKONICLB. 



Thf Debt and the Carrency 6 

A 8oacHl Basla 6 

Financial Kevluw of the Year 

18« 7 

GoverntriBnt Secnrliles for tha 

Year 1672 B 

Conrsp of Prices of State fiecnrl- 

tles During the Year 1872 B 

Yewly Table of Gold at New 

York for 1873 9 

Tnhle of Sterling Exchanse for 

Evvry Day in the Year 1872. . . 9 

THE BANKERS' GAZETTE. 
Mjney Market, Railway StockB, I etc 

V. S. Socuritie?. Gold Market, | tJnotatlonB of Stocks and Bonds 

Foreicn Exchange, New York i Investments and Bute, City and 

City P.aiiks.Buston Banks. Phil- | Corporation Finances 

adelphlaBanke.National Banks, | 

THE COMMEKCIAL TniES. 

Commercial Epitome 22 I Groceries 

Cotton SSIDryQoods 

Breaoituffs 251 



Course of Prices of Railroad 
Bonds During the Year 1872. . . 

Course of Prices of Railroad and 
Mit»rellaneou8 Slueks During 
the Year 1872 

Changes In the Redeeming 
Agents of National Banks 

Latest Monetary and Commercial 
Enfjllph News 

Commercial and MlaeellaneoQi 
New* 



10 



The CoMMERCiAi, and KrNANCiAi, Chronicle it issued on Satur- 
day morning, with, the latest news up to midnight of Friday. 



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THU DEBT AND THE CURRENCY. 
The debt statement throws light on a mystery which has 
puzzled Wall street for some time past ; namely, the con- 
tinued sale of gold by the Treasury, notwithstanding that 
bonds could not be bougnt at par to an equivalent amount. 
As the explanation ihat the five-twenties are so ccarce as to 
rule too high for the Treasury limit of price wrs not 
sufficient to satisfy the critics, we have now the further fact 
that the Treasury has really had no surplus during the 
month of December to invest in paying off its bonds. On 
the contrary, the aggregate of the debt has risen from 
12,160,568,036 to $2,1 62,252,333. The increase of $1,684, 
387 is the first interruption we have had of the monthly 
process of debt liquidation, which some persons have 
regarded with so much complacency during the last four or 
five years. Since March 1, 1869, we have paid off363 mil. 
lions of the public obligation*; and during the earlier por- 
tion of that period the liquidation was no doubt of consider- 



able service to the public credit ahrnad. The time haa long 
parsed away when such aid was of any essential use to the 
Government credit at home or in foreign irarkels; and our 
people look with much satisfaction on the approaching oes- 
sation of the heavy monthly decrease In the debt to which 
they have become of late accustomt-d. It is much belter 
that the money should remain to fructify in the pockets of 
the people than that it should be collected bv a wasteful 
oppressive tax system, and boarded in the Treasury or 
spent in redeeming bonds which are not due, and which the 
public creditors do not want paid. 

It is true this paying off of the debt has had the effi-ct of 
lessening the interest payments; but these burden* cad be 
otherwise lightened. Our six per cent bonds are now 
1,342 millions. When we fund these ht 4 per cent, which, 
with good manag-^ment, will in good time be possible, we 
shall annuplly save 126,840,000 in interest. This would be 
better in some points of view than even the payment of 363 
milliors of the principal, for the saving on these liquidated 
funds, if thi-y bore interest at 6 per cent, would amount 
but to 121,780,000 a year, or 5 millions less than the 
amount we should save by funding the sixes at 4 per cent. 
This 4 per cent project was much more talked of a year or 
two ago than now, and one reason whv it failed then was 
that bonds with double dates of m.^turity are unusu^il and 
out of favor in Europe. The Government bonds to which 
investors are accustomed have no such contingencies. The 
consols of England and the rentes of France would sell at 
much lower rates if they were converted into Five-twen- 
ties or Ten-forties. If we want to borrow in the money 
markets of Europe on terms which fairly represent the 
stability of our credit, we must offer bonds without such con. 
tingencies. If wo could borrow at lour per cent we should 
save 26 millions a year on our six per cents alone. But at 
this low rate we shall never borrow on Five-twenties or Ten- 
forties, or any such contingent securities. We must 
prepare to offer long bonds of much greater attractiveness, 
or be content to pay as we hive piid for the last five or six 
years, a vast cum every year for the pleasure of knowing 
that whenever we like we can compel our creditors to 
take back the principal of their bonds, and that we can 
thus prevent these bonds from rising much above par. This 
part of our fiscal policy is attraotiog more attention, and early 
next session a bill will probably be introduced for its reform. 
It costs too much to hold its place much longer. With re- 
gard to the falling off in the revenue receipts of December, 
the explanation is given thtt the interruption of travel by 
the snow has prevented heavy remittances from reaching 
Washington in time to be included in their usual order. 
But the general fact is undoubted that we have reduced our 
taxes to a point which will leave us little if any surplus for 



-^^ 



6 



THE CHRONICLE. 



[Januaiy 4, 1873. 



debt liquidation. If there should be any surplus still re- 
maining a new demand for t«x relief will soon absorb it, 
and for any considerable diminution ot the burden of the 
debt we must for soma time look less to the paying off 
of the principal than to a lowering of the rate of interest 
by lome euch expedient as we have suggested. 

The only remaining topic o( importance suggested by the 
debt statement is the loss of some 24 millions of gold dur. 
ing the year. The coin balance is now 874,359,275^ of 
which ^23,203,000 belong to private depositors, and are re 
presented by coin certificates. Consequently -the govern- 
ment gold balance is only 51 millions against nearly 76 
millions a year ago. The question is where this gold has 
gone. If it is dispersed in this country, and has buried it 
self in the boards of the people or taken its place m the cur. 
rent of business, tLen its loss by the Treasury is not of so 
much account. But if it has gone abroad we are so 
much the poorer in gold, and the stock of the precious met- 
als on which we can rely has been weakened. In this connec- 
tion it is pointed out that our specie exports last year were 72 
millions, while our' whole production is estimated at 
50 millions. If these latter figures be correct we 
have exported 22 millions of specie more than we 
produced during the year, and the German demind fjr 
bullion, for her new coinage has begun already to tell on the 
specie reserves of this country. As to the deductions from 
these facts, they are very conflicting. The best opinion seems 
to De that there is no export demand for gold, either past or 
prospective, which is at all likely to produce much embar- 
rassment in our general finances. 

The currency balance h»s undergone little change. It is 
now $9,876,573, against $10,118,111 a nonth ago. The 
greenbacks have been slightly increased, and are now $358,- 
(542,294, against *358,1.3.'>,043. The fractional currency has 
also increased two millions, and is now $45,722,061 • so 
thit we closed the year with two and a half millions of cur- 
rency, outstanding, in excess of the aggregate of the 
previous month, and about six millions in excess of 
the amount at the close of the previous year. To offset this 
emission, the three per cent, certificates have run down to 
$2,780,000, and over one million were redeemed in Decem- 
ber, while the last lot called yesterday will cease to bear in- 
terest on the 28th of February next. 

These certificates two years ago amounted to $43,550,000 
so that 41 millions have been returned from circulation 
to make way for an equivalent amount of bank notes. The 
certificates redeemed last year were 20 millions. The cur- 
rency balance in the Treasury »hows a notable decrease. 
Two years ago it was $30,284,291, and last year it had fallen 
to $15,861,493. It is now reduced to $9,876,573 ' which 
low average shows with the new currency issued that the 
Treasury has been payingvut more currency that it has re- 
ceived during the last month, contrary to the statements of 
those persons who have reproached the Secretary with lock- 
ing up greenbacks and increasing the trouble in the money 
market. 



ns 



A SOCSD BASIS. 
Instability and over-expansion are the two besetting si... 
of paper-money finance, and the ingenuity of financial 
statespianship is j.ut to a frequent and severe test in 
devising correctives and safeguards against each of these 
two forms of monetary perturbation, Wc hnve received a 
communication from the president of one of our largest 
National Banks relative to some of these safeguards. "lie 
calls our attention to the undoubted fact that the Fall 
pressure in the money market has for several years been 
InorewiDg. It is now harder lo bear, and aa the banks are 



less able than last year to render adequate aid to the 
growing business of the Ofjuntry, he thinks they may per- 
haps fall short next Autumn to a still greater degree. The 
vulgar remedy for this bank restriction is inflation. " Let 
us have more greenbacks," cries one section of the unreflect. 
ing crowd. " Give us more bank currency," clamors 
another. " Release our speculative banks," demands a 
third, "from the obligation to keep ample reserves." To 
listen to these cries would be to pour oil on the flame, and 
convert a future stringency into a general panic. Our 
correspondent very ably shows that such inflition would 
cause more instability than prevails at present. He argues 
that the protracted stringency is due to the general causes 
thus growing year by year. Partlc, however, it is, no doubt, 
caused by the Chicago fire, the effects of which have not 
reached our money market completely until a recent period. 
Fifty millions ot dollars he computes as [the sum of which 
Chicago has depleted the floating supplies of capital by bor 
rowing in our loan market. Then there is the Boston fire, of 
which perhaps the money market will bear the brunt next Fall, 
as it is slightly agitated by it at present. Next come 
the railroads, which in the estimate of our correspondent 
have swallowed up 100 millions of floating capital from the 
loan market, in consequence of their having been unable to 
negotiate abroad for the last six months the bonds on 
which they depended for funds to carry on their work?. 
These works will become productive soon ; but on the 
present supplies of the loan market the drain is exhausting. 
Our railroads absorb up a good deal of capital, and for 
the present wi'.hdraw it from other uses. They are, no 
doubt, worth to the country all that they cost, and many of 
them vastly more ; but they have none the leas depleted 
the money market of funds which would otherwise have 
been available Tor loans to our merchants, manufacturers 
and organizers of industry. 

By what means is this immense drain on the reservoir of 
our money market to be met 1 Obviouslj by refilling it 
with more capital. But how ? What are the sources from 
which the reservoir of loanable capital is fed 1 Are the 
prospects good that we shall be able to meet the exhaust- 
ing drain, and to bear the prodigious movement of our float. 
ing capital into fixed capital without some panic? Obviously 
our hope of exemption from future trouble and financial 
stringency is based in some degree on the immigration of 
foreign capital, for which we can ofler more profit to the 
owners than with equal safety they can find anywhere else 
in the world. Our correspondent seems to have less confi- 
dence than we have expressed in the power of this country 
soon to attract enough for?i;4n capital to make up for 
this absorption of the supplies of our money market. 
But ho has more confidence in the inherent pro iuctive pow- 
ers of our national wealth and industrial life which, if pro- 
perly sustained, will bo adequate to bear any present and 
prospective strain that is threatening to invade them. 

Such are the general views of our correspondent, which 
are well worthy of note, both for their own sake, and espe- 
cially because they coincide in the main with the opinions 
of the most iufluential part of our representative 
financial authorities. We p»ss on, however, to 
the practical measures by which to dtal with 
the dilficulties ol the situation. The first is to give sta- 
bility to our monetary machinery, so far as we can do this 
by legislative interference, or, what is of still more import, 
aiioe, by abstaining from such interference. For the sup- 
port of the banking mechanism and financial confidence of a 
country like ours, it is of the last importance that no violent 
reforms or sudden monetary changes be attempted, by legis- 
lative acts, or executive intermeddling with the currency, or 
with the free movements of business. 



January 4 1873.] 



TriE CHKUNIOLE. 



Stability is of more importance in the monetary organism 
than conformity to any theoretic system, and the practical 
statesman will bring better results out of an imperfect finan- 
cial scheme than can be achieved by more symmetrical 
machinery, if the former have stability, while the latter is 
inconstant, unsettled, and liable to sudden jejiks and unfore 
seen changes. Such fickleness and instability were formerly 
the bane of our monetary policy. They have been partially 
but not wholly got rid of during the last four years. 
In proportion as Mr. Boutwell has firmly resisted 
all temptations to revive them, he has contributed 
to the popularity of his financial policy and to the strength 
and prosperity of the country. Whatever else our financial 
system lacks it should have stability. Any policy leading 
thereto will always be justified by the results. The fall of 
gold, the steady growth of our credit, the progress we 
have made during the last four years in wealth, in popula- 
tion, and in all the elements of industrial strength, are due 
quite as much to this financial stability as to the more con- 
spicuous causes which oftener challenge attention. 

Stability, however, is not that characteristic of a sound 
monetary policy which our correspondent chiefiy discusses. 
His object is to lay special stress on reserves, redemption 
of bank notes, and practical reforms which act directly 
to restrain the overexpansion of credits. On this branch of 
the subject he makes the following remarks, the main pur- 
port of which is that we should get gentle contraction of the 
currency and of credits, if possible, but should resist infla 
ton at all hazards : 



ing must not recede. We must iteer steadily toward It, no 
matter what stormi, or current*, or disasters retard and 
threaten our progress. Among the conditions of such a 
sound policy the most prnniinent are stability in regard to 
the financial administration of the Goverument, and a 
strengthening of the banks by ample reeerveii, metropolitan 
redemption, a watchful restriction of unexpanded credits, 
and a steadfast resistance to every sort of currency 
expansion. 



As to the Back reserves, I have never been able to reconcile 
with sound financial statesmanship the opinion that the framers 
of the Currency Law intemled the required reserve of the banks 
should at all times be kept on hand, thus rendering this large 
sum of money as valueless for business purposes as the brick and 
iron vaults containing it. We should pay too indifferent a com- 
pliment to their intelligence did they not rather intend that the 
reserve should be laid aside to meet any unexpected pressure in 
the money market from movement of crops or other causes, and 
be returned when the storm had passed. Financial writers, mem- 
bers of Congress, and reports of financial officers all have their 
specific for the restoration of our currency to a sound basis, while 
at every move we seem to get farther and farther from so desir- 
able a result. 

Resumption of specie payments can only take place when the 
coin in the country bears a proper proportion to obligations pay- 
able in coin, and when the condition of our foreign trade re- 
quires no shipments of coin to settle balances. Experience has 
also taught us more than once in our history that the amount of 
coin now available in the country will not float one half the 
obligations now existing, payable in coin. Consequently the pres- 
ent is not a favorable time for a radical change in our currency, 
and at the same time we should not lose sight of the fact that 
sooner or later our currency must be based on coin. And all 
legislation should have special reference to placing the country in 
a condition to resume at the earliest period practicable. 

The first step towards resumption of specie payments will be 
to prepare the banks and people by gradual contraction of avail- 
able loanable funds which can be reached as far as now expedient 
by provision, at the expense of Government, for prompt redemp 
t ion of National Bank currency, and its return to the place of 
issue. Such legislation would put an efTectual stop to the con- 
stant desire, for its increase would limit its volume to the exact 
wants of the c luntry, would give that elasticity it does not now 
possess ; would Ihuit the accumulation of money at this point 
and restrict speculation, and provide the necessary means in local 
banks for moving crops without the usual disturbance at money 
centres in the last three or four months of every year. 

The redemption of national currency is too formidable and 
expensive to be attempted by any bank or association of banks, 
and of right should be performed by Government and the ex- 
penses paid out of the taxes collected from the banks now vastly 
in excess of the expenses of the Currency Department. 

Adopt this provision, and we have all the contraction the 
countr.v can bear for a year or two. It will go far to prepare us 
for such farther contraction as may be necessary to reach a sound 
specie basis. 

In these times of .ijjitation, when the whole country is 
sufl'ering from stringency, and Congress is urged to give 
relief by forbidden means, which would leave us a legacy 
of trouble hereafter, it is of irnportance to the whole coun- 
try that the main elements of a sound financial policy and 
of specie payments should be kept before us as the haven 
rom which our financial barque in all its tacking and driftt 



F1SA\CIAL REVIEW OP TUB YEAR 1871— TABLES OF PRICES 
OF GOLD, FORBICS EXCHANGE, l'. 8. GOVERS.MENT 
SECURITIES, STATE BOSDS, RAILROAD B051DS, AND RilL- 
BOAD AND miSCELLANEODS STOCKS. 

[Entered according to Act of Coainren, In tho year 1878. by Wn.UA« B Daxa 
& (Jq., in tlie office of the Librarian of CongrfM, WublDifttia, D.C.] 

lu the tables given on following pages we present a complete 
review of the range of prices In the fiaancial marliets during the 
year 1872. The history of the year is, of course, reflected to a 
great extent in the prices themselves, though there are several 
points which deserve some comment or explanation. 

In regard to the money market, there has probably never beea 
a year of such general stringency in Wall street — excessively 
high rates have rather been the rule than the exception. In the 
first half of the year rates began to harden as early as February ; 
in March and ^Apiil money was excessively stringent, and Iwth 
call loans and those on commercial paper were made at very high. 
rates ; not until the middle of May was money readily obtainable 
at a moderate rate. The summer period of easy money was Bhort> 
and about the middle of September, with the renewal of active 
speculative operations, the spasmodic stringency again set in, and 
from that time until the close of the year there was, with very lit- 
tle intermission, an extraordinarily severe market. 

The Bank Statements at or about the commencement of each 
quarter of the year were as follows, compared with the same pe, 
riods of two previous years : 

Jakuabt 1. 



Dsc 30 1871 

Loans and die $*76,834,000 ' 

Specie a5.(M9,S0O 

Circulation »8.«*.!«? 

Net deposits 900,400.800 

Legal tenders 4O.a»*,8O0 

Afbii. 1. 

March 30, 18TS. 

Loans and dl» $9fW,7«7.40O 

8iH.cie 21,384,700 

Circnlation »8.01».4il0 

Nit deposits SOS.aW.HOO 

Lesaltenders 41,W9,700 

JrLT 1. 

June 29, 1872. 

Loans and dia $289,002,800 

Specie aS.T9S.S00 

Circulation JE-ilS-i!!? 

Netdeposits : 232,887.900 

Lcgalteuders 54,961,400 

October 1. 

Sept. 28, 1872. 

Loans and die $272,293,800 

Specie lt.9(«,5U0 

Circulation 31^'lSSl 

Net deposits W5/«».0S«' 

Legal tenders «,»*»i800 

DacEMBEB 31. 
Dec. 28,1872. 

Loans and dis ♦^'i'J.'^'iS? 

*^nccie ••• 17,241. Jjtu 

clrcalatVon.:: E'*S^ 



Dec. M. 1870. 
$»UI,417,418 
20.828,^16 

1^22a,!l«S 
45,243,358 



April 1, 1871. 

$S91.0e2,927 
17,975, «« 
81,878.789 
222,188,0<« 
83,270, W3 



July 1,1871. 

$294,287,958 
16.»2«.45l 
ao,4»».4.'i7 
248.308.6Wi 
71,348,828 



Sept. 30, 1871. 

$301. .35(1, 100 

13,130,300 

80.25.3,800 

228.138,000 

55,«2,300 



Dec. saiRTl. 
$270,534,tK» 
25.049,600 
28,M2,800 
200.400.800 
40,282,800 



D«e. 31. I8«» 

3l,im.908 
34. 150.867 
17U,129JIM 
45,UU,6aS 



April >, 1870. 

im.T90Mt 

29,900MO 

ss,7aOiOM 

206,400.009 
80,000,000 



July 2, 1870. 

$2711,500,000 

8t.«aa,ooo 

.33,000,000 
219,100,00* 
66,800,000 



Oct. 1, 1870. 



13.J7i.90O 
32,718,100 

l9l,06^Bao 

81,084,000 



Do. 



1)«,B3,<W> 
48,S48,3C6 



Legal tenders. 1 41,119,600 

For the purpose of showing the actual condition of the money 
market throughout the year, we have compiled the following 
table showing the range in call loans for each week ending with 
Friday : 



Week cndine Friday- 
Jan. 5... 7 KTd®3-lBp.d. 

" 12...4p.c(®l-32p.d. 

" 19...4p.«gv7p.c... 

" 26...5p.c@7p.c... 
Fel). 2...5p.c® 7gold. 

" 9...5p.o® 7 gold. 

" ll"....Sp.c@7p.c... 

" 23...5p.c® 7 gold. 
Mar. I...7p.c((i',l-18 pd 

•' R...6p.c<iiv 7 gold. 

" 15...7i>.c(iftl-10 p.d 

•' 22...7p.c@l-lG p.d 

" 29...flp.ca7 gold 
Apl. 5...7p.c@ «p.d. 

" 12...7gld@ ;ip.d. 

" 19...5P.C® 7 gold. 

" S«...6p.c@ 7 gold. 

May ?..,«p.oa Tgold. 



Week ending Friday- 
May 10... Bp.rffi 7goId. 

" 17...8p.c® 7 gold. 

" 24...4p.c® 7p.c.. 

" 81...4p.ciS3> Bp.c. 
June 7...4p.cg> Bp.c.. 

" 14...4p.c@ 6p.c.. 

" 21...Sp.cia 5p.c.. 

'• 28...3p.c@ Sp.c. 
July 5.. .Sp.c® Sp.c. 

" 12.. .Sp.c® Sp.c. 

" 19...3p.c® 4p.c.. 

" 26...2p.c® Sp.c. 
Ang 2...4p.c@ Sp.c. 

" 9.. .Sp.c® 4 p.c.. 

" lB...2pc® 4p.c.. 

" 93...4p.c® 7p.c.. 

•• SO.. Sp.c* Sp.c 
Bept. »...♦?.«••?•«•■ 



Week ending Friday- 
Sep. IS...4p.r® 6 p.c. 

'» S0...7p.r*»l-1« p.d 

" 27...Sp.c«^ 7 gold. 
Oct. 4...8p.c® S' p.d. 

" 11...7p. ~ * 

" 18. ..5p. 

" 25.. .8p.' 
Nov. 1...SP- 

" 8... 4 p. 

" 15... T p. 

'• 22... 6 p. 

•• 29... 6 p. 
Dec. 6...7P. 

" IS... 7 p. 
20...7P 




l-«p.d 
1-S2pd 



»7...7glde «P.d- 



8 



THE CHBONICI.R 



fjanuary 4. 1873. 



United States »ei-uritlea mainUin tlieir price* wiiU finiiueM ar 
a K"""*' f"'". tliougli infla*nced for a time by tliB AUbama 
treaty negotiations, and at other periods by such circumstanceB 
R« bad a bearing npon all the financial markets. Upon the whole, 
United Sutes fecuritles are increasing In favor every yenr, and 
one of the most imporUnt features In regard to them is the re- 
markable fcarcity in the floating supply of bonds which is in- 
quently noticid in our market. The iollowing Interesting table 
shows the highest and lowest points touched during the year and 

the date thereof: 

Lowe»t. 

U. fnnd, 19<'l. eonpoD JOTX Feb. 8 

••, I'*!. roirlKiered 11»X I>M. t 

S^1«I. cospnn iUH-l'"- ,J 

f«K 18M, ronpon 109* Jan. 11 

6-W-, 1-M. coupon . 109XJ"". JJ 

6-»>», 1'6S. cc.oiKjn lliiX-Jan- IS 

6.!»^, I'W. nfw. coupon '"''*„?• 'i 

IH0MS67, conpon ""^I^'''- 5 

6 »n,^8^. coupon ""<F<!b. f 

lO-m*. re^l.tcred 1£J E^""- ,5 

1(M0«. coopon lOTXMar. W 

Ciu-r«i)cr,4* Ill Oct. B 



113J«-Inly 6 
mv Muy 25 
an .Inne 6 
UfiX Aug. h 
nex Aug. 7 
11 « Aug. 1 
mH .Inne 6 
118X June 29 
1175; .hine 8 
lllJi July 30 
113X Aug. 16 
mS May 29 



State Bonds, so far as the Southern list is concerned, are now 
classed rather with the speculative than with investment secuil. 
ties, and have fluctuated widely. 

Railroad Bonds during the early part of the year were In great 
favor, and a large amount of new bonds were placed both In this 
market and abroad ; in the last Jour months of the year the money 
m rktt worked so closely as to interfere seriously with the nego" 
ti ilion of new loans. The great popularity of railroad bonds with 
;.prirate invti tirs has not diminished, however, and notwithetand- 
jLigs^me unfortunate defaults in interest, the best class of these se- 
curities is looked upon with much favor. The highest and lowest 
piints touched during the year by the leading State and Bailroad 
Bonds were as follows : 

Loweet. 
6«Tenne!fee. old 63>^ Jan 



|j« Teunespfc. new GSX Jan 

6s North Carolina, old aO)i June 

6* Norih Carolina, new 16K Jan. 

8« Virginia, old 44Jt Jnly 

S«Vlr;.'inia, consolidated 60 Oct. 

Ita Virginia, deferred 15 Sept 

6a Snnth rarolina. Dew, J. ^ J 28 Dec. 

Cs Missouri 92 Sept 

Central Pacific, let mortgage, gold 99 8upt. 

Union Pacific. l»t 86 Nov. 

Union Padflcl-and Grant 7e Tiji Nov. 

Union I'sciflc Income, 10» 76 Nov. 

Now York C. niral, 68. 1883 89 Nov. 

Krle let mortgage. 7^ 100 May 

New Jirsiy ((jntral let mortgage, 79 lOlJi Oct. 

Fort Wayne iPt mortgage 78 103 Jan. 



Chicago and N W. sf 78 96>i 

Roclt Island l8t mortgage 79 lOOX 



Sept, 
Sept 



Highest. 
f2>fDec. 12 
m Dec 12 
38X Mch. 12 
26 Mch. 12 
J;m. 15 
Dec. 13 
Jan. 10 
Mch. 26 
June 24 
lOSV June 
94>^ Jan. 
86 Mch 
885i Jan. 
97 July 

104 Oct. 
108X Jan, 
107X June 29 

105 Jan. 16 
104>s June 3 



69 
60 
21 
40 
96 



Bailroad and Miscellaneons stocks were, at times, very active 

and speculative transactions were of enormous volume. There is 

ni space here to notice all the salitnt points of the year, and we 

■w.U refer only^tojtho following comments made in our monthly 

t jviews : 

•' Tlie month of March, 1672, will be long remenhercd at the Stock Ex- 
change as the cveutlul period which witne8f.ed the Erie '■ revolution." and 
l,roii^ht again Into prominent notice that old favorite of stock epeculation. 
The ovenhrowofthe old board of directorB and the resignation of Jay Gould 
as President of the company, took place previous lo the middle of the month. 
and the dealings in the stock eubaeqaent to that time were of enormous 
extent." 

Of the month of June we wrote : 

" The sales of Pacific Mall stock in the month were probably several times 
greater '.hj»n the whole amount of the capital. The law passed for reduction 
of the capital from $20,000,000 i o $10,000,000. and the increase by Congries of 
the company'- subsidy to $1,000,000, in consideration of doubling the service 
between China and San Francisco, wore important Influences causing this ac- 
tivity, and al-o the unnnal i lection of the company. In regard to which there 
was some contest, altbough the former directors were elected by a large 
majority." 

Of the month of Siplember; 

"Erie Railway stock had previously (to Sept. 17) been made very scarce, 
and was loHuing at hbh rates from day to da.v, in consequence of tne heavy 
pnrch»*es of a leading speculator, who had thns "cornered" a clique which 
liad i>uUl the stock short lo a very large amount. For the purpose of com- 
pelling the party who was carrying Erie to Sell out. and at the same time to 
barasa the gold party, the (11 ine locked np money and succeeded in making 
tlie high rales of interest above noticed, while borrowers of gold also had lo 
p»T K per cent a day for Hb use, 

' Timt day— the ]7ih of Sopt"raber— when money commanded ^ per cent a 
Jay. gold K per cent a day, and Erie «tock as high as 2)^ per cent, will be re- 
membered in Wall street as the day of the " three corners." 



01 November we wrote : 



"Railroad stocks were comparatively dull until the period of the Boston 
fire, when on Monday the nth, prices declined very sharply, under the fears of 
c depression snch as occurred after the Chicago lire These fiars, however, 
proved to be unfounded, and prices recoveri'd us rapidly as tiiey had declined. 
but)fequent to ihi* there wns no spcciiil movement in the stock ina'kct till the 
CflcVnitcd "lorncr" in Northwcft coninion,\by which that stock advanced to 
Vi on WortnosUay the20ih. tjuched 230 in purchases at the Board on t^aturday 
'hi' 2)d. (fonheacconnt of parties wlio had fulled to deliver on their contracts), 
»aaa;;ain collapsed to 85 bid, on Tuesday." 

In addition '.o the^niafteri above referred to may be mentioned 

t la lestitution in December of about |9,OC0,Ot0 by Jay Gould to 

iho Erie Railway Comoany, in settlement of thtir suits against 

liitn. The highest and loweet points touched during the year I 

Vy leading stocks, and the data thereof, were as follows : ' 



^Lowest — . 

N'W York Central and Hnd»on River 89 Nov. 11 

lem 10Ti<Feb.ia 



F.^h, 
Mch. 



Erie 

<io preferred 

Like ou .le SSVtf Nov, 11 

Waoash »» Nov. 11 

Nor h nest 6'iX Jan, 5 

do preferred 83J<Nov,ll 

Rock Island Id Nov, 11 

St. Paul M Nov, 11 

do i.ref.-rred 72S^ Nov. 11 

Ohio and Misslssip i *0 Nov, 11 

C'nlral of New J.rsev 93 Oct, 4 

Poaoo. Hartford and Erie 3K Jan. S 

D-ilaware. Lackawnna and Western 91 Dec. 1.1 

Uanulhal and St. Joaeuh 28 Nov. 11 

do do prefened 44 Sep, 18 

UnlonPrtClflc 28X.ran, 5 

Colum' us, Chicago and Indiana Central .. .. 193f.Ian. 5 

Pin.ima ''2 Jan. 2 

We-tirn Union Telegraph d'ii Sep. 18 

Quicksilver 25)^ Jan. lH 

do preferred 30 Jan. H 

Pacific Mall MX Jan. 2 

Adams Express >^H Sep. 18 

American Merehants' Union 69 Jan. « 

Unite I States Express 60V Jan. 31 

Wells. Fargo & Co 5fi>f.Tan. 4 

Canton '6 Jan. S 



.^Highest.— ^ 

10)J< Apr. 2 

10 Apr, 25 

7.'>J4 May. 20 

87 Mav 2o 

9 M Mch, 30 

»)« -»pr. 4 

230 Nov, 2.-} 

lui Nov. 25 

lis>i Apr. a 

fi4)i Apr. 1 

P3 Jan. aa 

BIX Apr. 1 

lliX Jan. 15 

11 X Mav 18 

lUX Mch. 18 

«9>f .Ian. 17 

7IH Jan. 19 

48 Apr. 1 

42X May 21 

1485£ Oct, 26 

Six Dec. 23 

49)i Dec. A 

69 Oct. 21 

inP,Ji Oct. 22 

99J< May 20 

80!^ May » 

88X Jnly fi 

95 May 21 

IU7 Oct. 23 



In gold there was no great movement ; the highest point was 
115J on the 8th of August, and the lowest 108^ on the 11th of 
January. Extraordinarily high rates were at times exacted on 
loans. The export of the year was large, tho total from New 
York comparing as follows with previous years : 



1872 $71 ..W'J.Sae 1 1969 $82,108,448 

18T1 63,865,547 1S'« 70341,699 

WIG 58,191,475 I lti67 61,801,918 



1«66 $62,553,-00 

1865 30,003,tiia 



The total values of exports and imports, both of specie and 
merchandise, for tho whole United States, in the two fiscal years 
ending June 80, 1873 and 1871 respectively, were as follows : 

rOBEIOK UtrOBTS— «0I4) VAIUBS. 

. — ' — Merchandise , Gold and Grand 

Tears ending— Free. Dutiable. Total, Silver, Total. 

June 30, :W.. $47,267,018 $579.:«fi.616 $62«.593,654 $1.3.743.88« $640.a')7.540 

June 30, 1871.. 35,957,737 4;3.6ii5,947 6;9,593,634 21,900,024 6i:,493,703 

DOMESTIO IXPORTS— ALL GOLD TALtJIS. 



r Merchandise s 

Atlantic Pacific 

Tears ending— Ports. Ports, 

June 30, 1872,. $416,391,598 $ll,96'(,n83 
June 30, 1871,. 414,82^393 13,712,644 



^-Specie and Bullion-, Grand total 

Atlantic Pacific Merchandise 

Ports. Ports. andSpi'Cie. 

$67,8M.11S $14976,122 J601.153.t-71 

76,187,017 8,818,2i9 613,044,273 



GOVERNMENT SECURITIES FOR THE TEAR 1871. 



B« '81 fund. fls'Sl 68 '81 
coup. reg. coup. 

January — 
Open'g 110 IMK 115 
HIgh'st IIOK ll43i- U5H 
Lowest W<tx UiX 1I4X 
Closing 110 IHJi lloX 

Fehrunrv- 
Onen'g insji ]14« ll.'i)^ 
HIgh'st 108J< 114JJ 115>i 
Lowe-t lfi7!i 114 ll<li( 
Closing 108« 114 llSJi 

March — 
Open'g 108X mn 115V 
High'st no 114Jf 11.5% 
Lowest lUgJi 114K 1153< 
Closing liu 114K 115Ji 

April— * 
Open-g 109% 115 115'* 
High'atll2J( 117 118X 
Lowest 109J4 1I4S( 116X 
Cln-ing llJJi 117 nSH 

Miy— 
Oiiuu g lUi^ 116K 118 
High'st 118 W.ii 119«f 
Lowest llix' 116« 118 
Closing 112% 117X 119Ji 

June — 
Open g 118 114% 150% 

High'st 113% 115 vmy. 
Lowest 112K lux na% 

Closing 112% 114% 120% 

July- 
Opcn'g 113K 116% 117« 
High'st 113X 116 118% 
L-:west 113% 11,5% 117 
Casing 113% 116 118% 

August — 
Open'gll2}f 1!6% 118% 
High'st 112% 116% ll,s% 
lAlwest 112Ji 114 116% 
Closing 112% 114% 118% 

September — 
Open'g 111% 114% 116% 
High'st mx 114% 11614- 
Lowest 109% 113% 114% 
Closing 110% 114% 115% 

Octouer — 
Open'g 111 114% 115% 
High'st 111% 115% 117 
Lowest 111 114% 115',' 
Closing 111% 115 116% 

November — 

Openg 110 n^\( ur,% 
Hicri'st iio.Y ii6;< 117,% 

Lowest 110 114% lI6Ji 
Cln.<mi.' 110% no ll(i% 

December— 
Opun'g 111 112% 117% 
High'st 111% 114% lis 
Lowest 111 112% 117% 
Closing 111% 114% 118 



5-20s 5.208 
1862. 1864. 



5-20S 5-2f)s 6-208 5-208 10-408 10-408 6« 
1865. 1865n. 1867. 1868. reg. coup. cur. 



110% 110% 112% 111% 113 113% 109 110 115% 
110% 110% 112% 111% 113 118% 110% HOK 115% 
109% 109% 110% 109% 111% 111% 109 10<l% 114% 
110% 110% 111% 110% 112% 112% 109% 110% 114% 

110% 110% 111% 110% IIJ 115% 107 110)< 114% 

111% 111% 111% 110% 112 112% 107% 110% 114% 

110% 110 110% 110 111% 111% 10S% 109% ll.W 

111% 111% 111% 110% 111% 112 107 llOX 113% 

111% 111 115% 110% 11)% 112 107% 107% 114 

115% 112% 112% 111% 118 118% 108 108X 115% 

111 111 11S% 110% 111% lis 107% 107% 114 

112 112% 112% 111% 112% 113% 108 103% 115% 



113% 108 10?% 115% 
BX 



115% 112% 118 111% 118 _ ,, 

116% 115% 116% 114% 115% 116 110% 110% 116?; 

112% 112% !12% 111% ]!5% 11.1 108 108% 115% 

115% 115% 116% 114% 116% 116% 110% 110% llOJtf 

112% 112% 112% 114% 115?< 11,5% 110% 110% 118% 

114 113% 115 116% 117% 117% 111% 112% 117% 

1 % 112« 112% 114% 11S% 11,^% 110 110% 116% 

113% 113% 116 116% 117% 117 111% 112 117% 

114% 114 115% 116% 117% 117% 111% 112% 11,5 
lis Ho 116 117% 118*i 117V 111% 112« 115 

}U Ut, U*'^ ™^ ""^ "■"< "">< "'>f i"."< 

114 114% 114% 117% 118% 117'4 111% 112% 114% 

114% 114% 116% 113% 116% 115 111% 112% 114% 
116% 115% 116% 115 116 116 111% mn 115 

} ?,*^ |IJI5 H^^. l^i^ "■'^>^ "^'^ ""■ "''^ "^'^ 

116% 115% 116% 115 116 116 111% 113% 114% 

^??K V^^ "^^^ ""i ""^^ "•'^5f lO'lJ^ "3X IHSf 

Wi^, V^>^ "8'< '^^X »<"'»< "■'55i 109% 113% 114% 
114% 114 -*-" .-«..-.«-. 

114% 111 

114 114% 113<i 113% 114 114 108% 108'i 115% 

114% 114% 114Ji 113% l;4% 114 109 108% 112% 

113 118% 11,8% 112 115% 115% 107% 107% 111% 

114% 114% 114% 113% 113% 113% 108 103 112% 

115% ma 115% 113% 11-!'., 114 lOSJ,' tnSV 111% 

llHli 116 lir.% 115 11.5,H- lis 108% 1l'8»; 114 

115% IMJi 1l5>i 113', llSJi, 111 m'i 107V 111 

115% 116% I16A4 111.'; 114,'ii 111,% 108% 108% m 

112 111% 112% 114 114!< 114% 108 108% 114% 

m 113% iis-^ 11,5% iiH>,- ii.i'^ io«if 10-% ink 

lli% Iil'< 1l2>i 114 I14K 114% 107% 107% 118% 

113 113.% 113% 11.5% 116% 115% 108% 108% 114% 

112;i 113 • niJi 115% 116 11,^% 109% 109% 115% 
113% 113V 113% 116% 117% 116% 110 imri 113% 
112% 112% IIS.V 116 11.5% ll,-« 109% 10n% 112 
112% 113 112% 116% 117% 116% 110 109% 113% 



1U% 113% 113% 113.i< 108% 111% 112% 
114% 113% 113% 113% 108% lli% 112% 



January 4, 1873.1 



THE CimOMCLE. 



COURSE OP PRICES OF STATE SECURITIES DURING TUB YEAR 1871. 

(Compiled from prices bid on each Friday as auated In Tnji Chbobicli.) 



DESCRIPTION. 



Low.Hlgli. 



Alabama 5s 

do 88 

ArkansaBfli, funded. 

do 7« L.U JfcFt.H. 

do TsLKPB&NO 

Califarnia 7b. 

Conaccllcut 6b 

Georgia tis 

do 78. new 

ninoUes, '77, cpn... 

Kcntncky Bs 

liOuliiaua 6a, Levee. . 

do 88 Of '75... 

Maine 6i< 

MassachusettB .ts, gid 
09, K,^76 
Maryland 6s, Defence 
Michigan 69, 1873.... 
Missouri 6b 

di< II. & St. Jo 
New Hampshire (is... 
New York 69, Boun, c 

do 69, Can, '78 

do 59, Can, '74 
North Carolina 68, old 

do 69, Fdg '66 

do 68, new. . . 

do 69, sp. tax 

Ohio 6b, '75 

Pennsylvania 5s, cpn 

do 6«, '67, 5-10. 
Rhode Island 69.., 
South Carolina 68 — 

do J & J 

do A &0 

Tennessee 6s, old . . . 

do 6s, new.. 

Texas 10a of '76 

Vermont 68 

Vlrtjinia 69, old 

do 69, new... 

do 68, consot. 



Jancabt. Fsbrcaut 



Low. High. 



90-90 
50-50 
M - M 
45 - 45 
110 -110 
93 -100 
70 -77 

98"-l66" 
95 - 98 
62«- 63>i 
74 - 74 
10» -101 
98)f- 98X 
1083<-108Ji 
101>i-108 
98-96 
95 - 97>,' 
SI - 94 
99^^-101 
108 -107 
108 -107 

98 - !'8 

•M - 2! 
15 - 16X 

1* - nn 

lOO -101 
95 - 96^ 
i01>s;-10!ri 

99 -100!i 
49 - 60 
85 - 80% 

n - ar 
eay,- ma 

63>i'- 65'.i 

tooii-ioi' 

50-50 
60-50 



March. 



April. 



Low. High. 



Law. High. 



90-90 
57 - 57 
60-60 
49>»-- 4VH 
110 -IIJ 

100 -lOOX 
75 - 7.'> 
85-86 
98-98 
97-98 
62«- 6i}i 
83-8:1 

101 -101 >< 
98>tf- 99;< 

107X-108X 
103 -104 
98-98 
94 - 95 
9i - 92X 
lOOW-101 
106ii-106X 
106 -106>i 
!00 -101 
82 - 34K 
24 - 2* 
16 - 18.Ji 
laX- 18X 

:o; -101 

96-97 
101 -101^ 
100 -100^ 
S3 - 54 
89X- Siii 
S6?i- 31 
i<f>H- 6««i 
6SH- 67 

loiJi-ioiW 

§*:^^ 

55 - 67X 



SS -69 
85-85 
St - 69 



45 - 49 
no -ill 
100 -100« 

si"- 88" 
98 -98 
98,'<- 68X 
64 - 6-i 
78 - 78 

10! -lOlX 
98X- 99 

108 -108 

104 -105 
98 -100 
91 - 95'i 

9ax- «* 

100 -101 
107 -107« 

105 -loo;*' 

101 -101 

35 - ma 

23 - 27 

17','- 23 
13,"^- 18 

101 -101 
97-99 

101 -lOlJi 

I00X-10I*H 
52 - 53 
80»-i- 39 
i>l)i- 34>i 
08-67 
Wii- 67 
88-88 

101 -101 
60-55 
66-58 
Mii- 59 



60-60 
81 - 81 
54 - M 



41-44 

no -no 

lOl.'i-lOl^ 

88"- 88" 
98-99 
97)^- 97X 
67X- 87« 

83«- m\ 

100 -101 

99 - m}i 
107 -107 
103>f-104? 

99-99 
95Ji- KH 
92"^- 94 
99,^-101 
107Ji-10S 
105 -106 

100 -101 

36 - m}i 

25 - 29 

20 - S0!.i 

1«- l-l>4- 

101 -10! 
99 - 99 

102X-105 
101 -101 
40 - 40 
37«- 38)i 
sn - 36 
WH- 70X 

mx- 70 

86 - 86 

100 -100 

55" -'68 
51^- 54i< 



Mat. 



Low. High. 



62«- 62M 
86-88 
54 - so;^ 



Ixnn. 



Low.Higb 



43-48 
no -110 1 
101 -lOlX 
72 - 74 
88-90 

98 - 99 
98-99 
63 - 67 
m)i- 83« 

100 -liOH 

99 - 99X 
105 -105 
104 -10»i 

99-99 
95Ji- 96i,' 
03 - 93Ji 

ios'-im" 

107 -liyiii 

100 -101 
SOJiT- 36 
21 - 24 
SO - 20« 
14 - H}i 

101 -101 
99 - 99 

1(15 -105 
101,V-101X 
50-50 
82X- 86^ 
31)>i- 33 
07,V- 73 
67X- 73 
7.^ - 84 
101 -101 
45,V- 51 
55 - 55 
53?f-86X 



82 - 

t'^H- 

63 - 
44 - 

no - 
ioi«- 

72 - 

88 - 

(•S - 

98 - 
67 - 
79 - 

100 - 

100 - 

loaji- 

99 - 

93Ji- 

108k- 
1113 - 

101 - 

sou- 

25 - 

2o:v- 

14X- 
100 - 

99 - 
lUSJf- 

102 ■ 
62 - 
29 - 
25 - 
72K- 
72^.- 
8l;f. 

liX) - 

44 - 
13 

54 - 



JlTLY. 



Low.HlKh. 



8S 

67« 

S3 

44 
115 
103 

74 

88J< 
100 
100 

67 

79 
■100 
100 

105>i 
100 
97,'< 
■»4X 

•169' 

-ins 
-102 

■ .35 

■ 26 

- 24 

- 15 
-100 
-100 
-lOfiM' 
-102)^ 
-62>i 

- 34>i 

- .3» 

- 7« 
-74)tf 

- 86 
-100 
-48 

- 52 

- 56 



m 

SO 

ss 

lii" 
99 

70 

89 

98 
100 

65 

70 

99 
100 

162k- 
95 - 

91X- 

105'i- 

105 - 

100 - 

.33 - 

S7 . 

21 ■ 

15 - 

98 - 

1110 - 
105 

52 

28>f. 
26 
T3}i 
73 
80 
loo 
42 
48 
50X- 



Aoaun. 



BmrrwMu'n] Ocrosaa. NorxMiiin Dacnus 
Low.HlKh. l^w.Ht(bI 



Low.Hlgh. Low.Rl(b. Low.UI(li. 



- 60 

- 85 

- 64 

- S3 

-lii" 

-99X 
-72 

- 88 

- 98 
-101 

- 60 

- 75 
-100 
-100« 

-164" 

- 97 
94)i 
91 J4 

106X 
105X 
100 
- 31 
■ 27 
23 

• 15 

• 98 
■lOIX 



67-69 
80-84 
"47 - SO 
"60-53 
44 - 44M 
111 -111 
99 -100 
73-73 
87-88 
97-97 
99 -IWS 
96 - W 
70 -70 
100 -100 
100 -lOU 



63 -eni 

47 - 47 

SI - 61 

43 - 44 

109 -111 

100 -101 

70 - 70 
89-88 



100 -100 
99X-99X 



103 
99 

93 - 

90 - 

167"- 

109 - 

100 - 

.33 - 

16 - 

20Ji- 

15 ■ 

93 - 

1(X) 



106 ilOlV 
99xll00X. 



-103« 

- DS 

- 94 
-91 

-losii 

-106 

-100 

-36X 

27 

21 

45 

98 

101« 

102>4 

101 



- 56 


.■iO - 56 1 


- ;9 


25K- 29 


- 26 


23-26 


- 74 1^ 


73X- 74)i 


-74'; 


73K- 74X 


-.86 


86 - 87>i 


-100 


100 -100 


- 44 


44-46 


- 50 


50 -60>,f 


- 54 


50«- 51 



103 - 

99 - 
91 «- 
89 ■ 
96 - 

106X- 
109 . 

100 ■ 
31 . 
31 . 
20 
14 

166" 

101 

101 

40 

23 

33X 

72 

7*>tf 

166 
44 

48 

sov- 



10>\ 

9« 

.« 

81 

96 

lOS 

•10»« 

-100 

-88X 

-36 

-30« 

- IS 

-166' 
-101 
-101 

- BO 
-36 

- 36V 
78?i 

-73J4 

-166" 

- 46 

- 51 

- 60'^ 



80-80 



101 -101 

74 -79 

8S -8« 

»6 -96 

40 '- M 

w)i-io6' 

99-90 



9* - 

80 - 

106 ji- 

104 - 

96 - 

34 - 

10 - 

17 - 

10 - 

160"- 
101 - 
101 - 
45 - 
S8«- 

72X- 
73X- 

166" 
43 
90 
51 



101 

96 
' 9<;i 

91 

lOT 
104 

98 

83« 
' 28 

30 
■ 14 



et -OS 

40-40 



no -no 
101 -101.)< 
70-70 
89 -88 
«8 -IS 
98 -tS 
.50-60 
70-70 

98 - »g 



103 - 
98 . 
9S«- 
91 - 
9TX- 
106 - 
lOS - 
98 - 
33 - 
24 - 
19 - 
14«- 



S» -BS 

HI - U 
42-4* 

in"- ail" 

100 -100 

101 -I03M 
70-70 
18 -88 

2:8^ 



98 -«8 



10»X lOlX 
98 95 

»4«| M)i 

91X| tlH 

■98 iWX 



100 97 

101 )i 101', 



lOlX 
60 

98 
75 
76X 

-166" 

- 44 

- U 

- 53 



ini«- 
so - 

4.-l«. 
36 - 
7SX- 
78 W- 



107 


lOBX- 


lUB 


1113 - 


Uti 


97 - 


88 


S4V- 


nx 


37 K- 


31 


19 • 


•MH 


14?J- 


■ ...-llOO 


-lOlM 97 


WAWIK 


■101 J< 


lOi 



36 
37J4 

751i 
75X 



108« 
100 

H 

98 

-mn 

-106 

-IO»J< 

-100 

-£!'< 

-«« 

-»H 
-14X 
-100 

-101 « 
-103K 
-108 

- 90 

- 34V 
-35« 
-80V 
-BOX 



100 -100 jlOO -100 
44 - 47 ......... 

61V- 54Vl 53-96 
9IV-6»x: 59y-57V 



Day of 

Mouth. January. 

1 (Ilolifiay.) 

3 IttllV-IOOX 

8 IW -109V 

4 109 -109?.' 

9. ... lOOV-lOflJi 

loeji-iooji 

T S. 

8 109J»'-109«i 

9. ... 108'ii-1095S 

10 108^.-109 

11 108X-108»i 

14 ll)8>;-108Ti 

la i08>i-io9>i 

14 8. 

19 108.?i-109}i 

16 lC85i-109 

17 lOSX-lOO^ 

18 10H7i-109 

19 ioe;i-io9ji 

30 109 -109X 

81... . S. 

93 109 -im>i 

33 106Ji-109 

34 103^-109 

25 109 -109V 

*6 109 -lOilV 

27. ... 109V-109Ji 

38 8. 

39 109X-110 

80 109V -lOOi^ 

31 lOHJi-llOV 

Uontb. 108V-110V 



YEARLY TABIE OF GOLD AT NEW YORK FOR 1&72. 



February. 
109V-no 
109V-109J4 
109»i-109;i 
S. 

no -no,vr 
10974-110;,- 

109JJ-110V 

iiov-ncK 

llOii-llOJi 
110V-110;!i 

9. 

iin;i-iio« 
no)i-iioji 

llOJi-llOJ,' 

iiov-noji 
iiov-iio.'i 
iiov-iio>i 

s. 
iio>i-iia( 

110i,'-110V 

lio>.-iiox 

Holiday. 
110«i-lH 
llOV-lll 

3. 

iiov-n6x 
iiov-ne?i 
nu",'-iio,'i 
i09;i-nov 



no 
no 
no 
no 



March . 
110 -110)^ 

iio,','-iio;i 
s. 
-noK 

-1 iKi 

-no!i 
-no>< 
nov-iio,»i 
110 -iiov 

8. 
iiov-nov 

110)i-110V 

no -iiov 
no -iiov 
no -nov 
nov-nov 

8. 

no -nov 
io9K-itov 

10'.l?i-110 

io<j3i-i09;j 

lU9«4-10i);i 
109X-110 

o. 
109?i-109^ 
lOOJi-llt 

no -nov 
iiov-noji 

Holiday. 

110 -nov 

S. 



April. 
110 -UQV 

loojj no 

109'4-llllV 

no -nov 

IIOH-IIOV 
iio.!ii-no>i 

s. 
no,v-nov 
nov-nov 
nov-nov 

110?.'-110>i 
110Ji-110»i 

nov-no>i 

8. 
110fi-110,'.4 

iioji-ni'i 
noK-inv 
iio?i-nij.' 
nui-niii 
inv-ni?i 

s. 
inv-ni'i 
iii,'i-ii:?i 
iiiji-n2'i,' 

112'i-112»i 

ii2?.i-n3v 

11254 113 

8. 
112?4-112;i 

ii2v-n2H 



Mny. 

n2,s;-n2>j 

n2v-113V 

113 -H3V 
s. 

113»i-113,'4 

ii3,v-ii4;,- 
n3v-n4 

111 -114V 

llSTi-lHV 
lUV-IWV 

S. 
n3V-113V 
lliiV-lM 
113?4-114V 

ii3,'i-n4K 
n3,\-ii4v 
n3V;n3V 

n3V-il.3,'-i 

n.3v-ii3v 

113»ii-114 
113;-,-114!,; 

118V-113V 

8. 

n3v-n3v 

113J4-1!4 

n3»4-ii4V 

114 -114V 
114 -114V 



June. 
114 -114V 

S. 
llUi-nt'i 

lUhj-iM?; 
ni,»i-ii4»4 
iuv-in?i 
ii.3»4-n4v 
ii8v-n4v 

:i4v-ii4;i 

113,'4-114V' 
113,'4-114V 
118;4-114V 

naji-iu 

113% 114 

9. 
n3»ii-ii4 
li3;4-ii4V 

113»-;-113V 
ll:l!4-l!3«i 
118?4-niJi 
113.Si-113V 

8. 
113 -1!.3V 

ii3v-n3'-.' 
nsii-iw",' 
nsi-i-nsfi 

118?i-113>4 
113;s-H8V 

s. 



July. 

118>4-114 

n8*4-lia,'4 

li3;i-ll.3V 

Holiday. 

ii3V-n«v 
nsv nsv 

8. 
113«-113V 

ii3V-n.sv 

113,(^-114 
113?, 114 

li3;i niV 

U4 -114 V 

8. 

n4;.--ii4v 

IHV-ll'f,^ 
114).;-1147i 
li4?i-inv 
114V-1H« 
IMV-IHV 
S. 

iHif-ni.'i 
n4.»4-ii4^i, 

114V-114'< 
114»,-114V 

n4v-n4v 

8. 

n4'i-ii4v 
iwv-iis 

115 -115V 



Angnpt. 

nsv-iisv 

113V-n5!f 

n5v-ii3V 

s. 
nsv-iisv 

lloV-llSV 

n5v-n5V 

115V-115V 

]i5v-n5v 
ii5v-n5v 

inv-ii5v 
n4v-ii-''V 
in»;-ii4v 

114V-115',' 

115 -in"j 

115 -115V 

9. 
114)4-115 
113?4-114V 
n3»4-114V 
113'4-114V 
113X-11374 
112>i-113V 

112V-il2V 

n2v-n3 
n2v-ii»W 

n2V-113« 

H2V-112V 

11SV-112»4 



September. 
8. 

lis -nsx 

118 -r.3V 
113 -118V 

113 -n.3v 
n4»4-ii3>4 

112V-113 

8. 
118 -113>,' 

n»v-n3v 

1I2V-113V 

ii2v-n3v 

lI2V-113i2 
113 -113V 

8. 
11.3V-118V 

nsv-in'i 

118V-114>. 

nsv-nsw 

11334-115'; 
113V-114V 

s. 

118!4n4V 

113f4-114 

118V-114 

113^-114 

U3V-114 

113V-n3V 

8. 
IWV-IHV 



October. 
114 n4<4 

inv-n4,»j 
114V -ns.v 
ii4s-:i5 

113Ji-114V 

8. 

112^4-113'.' 

ii2v-:i3v 

n3v-ii3 

n4«-n8v 

114V-1I2V 

8. 
113.V-n2T< 

n9»i-n2v 
ni;;-!^,^ 

112;i-ll3!i 

n2'i-n3^ 

113V-113V 

8. 
113V-118V 
112',4-1I3X 
112'i-n3,'4 

ii2?,"n3*4 
113 -n3>4 

113 -1I3V 

S. 
I1S74-113V 
lUV-113 

ii2v-n2V 
ll2v-liav 



November. 
iii;t :i5ij 
iiiV'n3 
s. 

111V-112V 
Holiday. 
inj.-ili.'4 
II2V 114V 
IIS'MIS 

usv-nax 

8. 
llS.'i lUV 
IISV-113'J 

nsv-nsH 

113 -11.1V 

ii3v-n3»4 

118V-113.'4 

8. 
113V-n3-'4 

ii3V-nasi 

118 -118V 

113 -n3>4 

lis -1J4 
H2>M13V 

s. 
iiJv-nsv 

1I2V-I13 
112S-112,'4 

HolldHy. 
112?, ll-."4 

nsv-iii*. 



Di-ccmber. 

8. 

ii8v-ns 

r '■ 

1 

1. . 



iii'i-nsv 
>*. 

119?i 113V 

lUH-ns 

lli)4-114V 

nsv-nsv 
n2;,-ii*.v 

112', -lUV 

ii3s-ii«v 

iii.v-ntit 

nis-n« 

iiiH-niTi 

nis-iii.v 

mv-nix 

s. 
iiiS-ni^< 
nis-mv 

Hoiidav. 
ln,'4-lU>4 
112 -112?, 
11174-114V 

9 8. 

iiiSi-nsv 
114 -iim 



109V-ia 10'.*V-110>4 109V-113V 112>.'-n4,'4 113 -lUV 113,>4-lloV 112V-11J« 112V-115V 113V- 115V 111K-114V inv-113V 



TABLE OF STERLING EXCHANGE FOR EVERY DAY IN THE YEAR 1872, 



January. 
60 3 
days. days. 
»ij,'ht. 
1.... Holiday. 
».... lOflV-nOV 
3.... ic9v-no 
4.... io9v-no 
S... J09V-109'4 
6.... 109V-109V 
7.... 8. 

8.... 109Vf-U.9V 
9.... inS'i-llO 
10.... 109y-IO9V 
11.... 109V-109V 
IJ.... 10»V-U)9V 
13.... 109V-109V 

is!!!'.- 10914-109'< 
16.... 109 ¥-109 V 
17.... 10SIV-109V 

18 109V-109V 

19 10UV-100T4 

30 109,H-109V 

31... . 8. 

IS 1C9V-109V 

S.... 1II9V-10V, 
.... 109',4-109,V 
35.... 109,'4-109V 
36. .. 109>4-109'4 
37.... 109'4-109V 
28. ...iJ 8. 
39....*'l09V-109V 
8*.... 1O9V-I09V 

n.... 108 -mn 



February. 

60 3 
days. days. 

Sight. 
109 -lOll^i 
10'J)4-109V 
109;i-109V 

8. 
109,'4-1"9V 
10fH4-109?4 
109 "i -109 V 
109?,-109»4 
109X-10»J4 
109V-11O 

io9v-no 
io9v-no 

]09?4-110V 

io,v-n"v 
100,'i-niHi 
io9;.'-no>i; 

8. 
109V-110V 
109V-110V 

I09v-nov 

Holiday. 

1O9J4-110J4 

109fi-110V 

S. 

I09v-nnv 
lOii.v-liov 
loov-nov 

109V-110V 



March. 

60 3 

days. days. 

Sight. 

109J4~110>4 

109J4-110V 

8. 

10934 -nov 
io9;4-no>4 
io9v-nov 
i09v-no'4 

109V-110V 

io9v-^nov 

lOHSi-llO'i 

io9?i-ii(i;,' 

109ii-llll'ii 

loov-noH 
i09v-nov 

loov-iiov 

lO'J.'i-llO',- 
109>4-no>4 
10!IV-1I0'< 
109V-110V 
109,V-110V 
8. 

ioflv-nos< 
loav-no 

109V-110ii 

109V-110V 

Holiday. 

109V-110jSs 

Di 



April. 

60 3 
days, days. 

Sight. 
10n?i-110'4 
10H»4-1inv4 

io9V-nov 
ioy?,-iui!,' 
louv-no 
io9v-no 

109V-^1I0 

losv-no 

i09M-nov 

in9v-no'i 

loov-iiov 

io9v-;iov 

8. 
109?4-110V 

loflv-nov 

10!l?i-110V 

iiri"i-iiov 

1119=4 -llOV 

100?i~110V 

8. 

io9v-nov 

io9v-no,v 

109'i-110V 

109 '4 -no '4 

109,'4-llOii 

8. 
109«4-110?4 

io8v-noh 



May. June. 

60 3 60 3 

days. days. days. days. 

SlKht. Siulit. 

10!l'.;-110>i 109,"i-110«4 

109!<-110?ii 8. 

lUil34-llo;; 109Ti-no?4 

io9j4-no;i looji-iioji 

8. 109!i-110f,' 

109?4-110>i lOini-11044 

I09»i-ii0f4 iO!)j4-no>; 

109';-ilo;4 109v-no« 

KW. -11054 8. 

10i»J4-110»4 109Ji-110K 

109,'4 iioji inov-noji 

8. lOO.'i-no^; 

109«4-110K ins'i-no'i 

10ft'4-nO*i 10!)J4t110V 

lO'i'i-llftV 109,'4-llOJi 



iO'j>,4-iio;; 



8. 



10!l?i-110?, 109T;-110f; 

109V -nov lO'.iJi-iiov 

8. lOP'i-llOV 

109V-110V io9V-nin.' 

io!ij4-no,'i 109^-iiov 

109»< -110*4 109V-110V 

10!iV-110J4 8. 

109>,-nOV 109T4-110V 

109^,-llOV 109'.i-n0'4 

S. HIBV-llOS 

lOB'.-iiov 110 -noi; 

loH^-nosi no -no*, 

lO'jj, iiof, 110 -nov 

lodv-nov "^ s. 

109X-U0K ..... ..... 



July. 

60 3 
day9. days. 

Sight. 
110 -llOK 

no 110,'i 
no nov 

Holiday. 
110 -110*4 

no -nov 

R. 

no -110*4 
no -110*4 
no -110*4 
no -nov 
no -noV 
no -110*4 

8. 

no -nov 
no -iwv 
no -110*4 

ioo'4-no'4 

lii:i',-110»i 

109;, -nov 

8. 

109V-110V 

io9'i-nov 

lO'iv-nov 

lO'.t'i-lKlV 

ioo=.,-nov 

10U>,-110V 

8. 
109V-110'< 
109)4-110'< 
109X-U0« 



August. 

60 3 

days. days. 

Sight. 

109V nov 
lo'iv nov 

109V-110V 

s. 

109V-110V 

io9v-no 

lOJV-110 
109 -109'4 
108'4-lOMV 
108V-10.^V 

s. 

](»'4-!09T4 
lfi8J4-10<.)V 
108'4-in9V 
10S'4-109V 
lOS'i-UOV 
108,',-109V 

S. 
109 -109X 
10y*4-109V 
109V-10»V 
109 -109V 
109 -109V 
109V-109V 

8. 
109V-nO 
109V-109V 
109 -109,'4 
109V-1>»'.' ' 
109 -lO.iV 
109 -109;!^ 



September. 

60 3 

days. days. 

Sight. 

108V "l09V 
lf«V-109V 
108V-109V 
108V-109V 
108V-109V 
108V-109V 
8. 

ioev-109 

106V-109 

108V-I09 

306V-109 

in8ii-109V 

106V-109V 

8. 
108V-109V 
103V-109V 
108 -109 
10eV-109V 

iflev-ioav 

107V-106X 

3. 
107V-109V 
107 V 109^4 
107V-109V 
I07V-109V 
107 V -108 V 
107V-108V 
^ 8. 
197X-108X 



Ociober. 

60 3 
days. days. 

Sight. 
107V I08V 
I07V 108V 
107V-W8V 
107V-108V 
107V-106V 
8. 

108 -109V 
108V-nO 

i(i8','-ioyv 
losv-nov 
io8v-no>,- 

108;4-1IOV 

8. 
108V-H0V 

108V-110V 

109 -nov 
-noif 
-no.v 
-iwv 
s. 

-nov 
-nov 

•nov 

-IIPV 
-110',- 

-iiov 

8. 

-nov 
., - -nov 

IOS.'4-IIOV 

io*;(-iioi( 



109 
109 
109 

109 

109 

108V 

109 

109 

109 

109 
109 



NovcmlHT. 

60 a 
dav9. days. 

SiKht. 

108 V nov 
lOD*, no 

9. 

108V-109T4 

Holiday. 

jo«,s-no 
lon'.-nov 

imv-iiov 
losv'iio.^' 

8. 
10S'4-110V 
lC^'i-llll>i 
IOH'4-IIOV 

los'.-no.v 

108V-"0^ 

i08v-nov 

s. 

K^-' ••" 
I 
i' 

1..^ , •■ . 

108', lUi.-, 

108 '.-UOV 

8. 

1P8V-"0V 
lonv-iiov 

IOH',-MO 

HoliUiy. 
losv-lli) 

loiv-no 



Defemh«r. 

fii 3 
day.'. d.'iyi. 

10<i"4 tlOV 

li 
I 
I - 

10«'. I'.M-, 

10 s -nov 
s 

K'- 

1 

I 

II-.', -11 ■•, 

llliS-llOV 

li'9;4-ll0V 

8. 
lOOV-t'OV 
10»V-I'*.V 



!•- 

I 
1 

1" 

IC' . ' . 

IWV-IIOV 

8. 
109 V -UOV 

mn-MH 



10 



THE CHUONICLE. 



[January 4, IbTS, 



CUURSE Ol' PRICES OP RAILROAD BONDS DURING THE YEAR 187!. 

(Complied from prices bid on each Friday. t9 qgoted In The CgRoyicL^.) 



so^'DS. 



JaNCARY. FCBRCABT MAKCB. 



Low.HIkIi iI-ow.High ILow.High 



Alb. A Siuqacli., l»t. . 101 
do id.. 93« 

do 8d.. 

AltonAT. H., lat ... 
do ltd pref. 

do 9d Inc . 

Am. Dock 4 Imp. Co 
Bdlviile ii So. III... 
B., Hurt. cS Eric, guar 
B.IUrt. &Krie. UiM 
Buff. & Krii*, new... 
Bull, N.Y.i E..l8t.'T 
Bur., C K. & Mlmi.. 
Ci;d. »llti,<tM., UtM 
Cent. PaclHc, cold... 
C, B. & Q., 8*, lei M 

C.,K.l.iPocmc 

CUlc. & Alton, S.F.. 
do l9t .M 

do Income 

Cble. & Mil., 1>I 
ChicAN. W., S. F.. 
flo iuierest. 

do CUIlBOl... 

do l«tM.. 

Clevc. & P., con.. b.F. 

do 3dM 

do 8dM. ... 

do 4tliM.... 
CTtv.,V. & Ash., new. 

do old.. 

Clev. ATol, new. .. 

do S. F 

C. C. A lod., l»t. 

do 2d 

C.CC.ai IftTs.S.F 
Cm., Laf. & Cb., Ist M 
Del.,L. &W., IHM.. 

do ad M. . 

do 78, conv 

D..M.& Toledo 

Del. & Hud. C. 1st M 
1). &SiouxCiiyl8tM 
K. T.,Va.J£ Ga.,l8tM. 

I^rie, Ist M. exien 

do 78, -^d end., '79.. 

do 79, Sd end., '83.. 

do 7e, '4th end., '80. 

do 78, 5tli end., '88. 

Gal. & Chic., cxteu . . 

Ot. West., j8t.M,'8-.. 

do ad II ,'a3. . 

H. &St. Jo., LdGi.. 

do conv.... 

Han. & Naples 

H8n.& Cent. Mo 1st M 

Uarlem, l8tM 

do conv. & S. F. 

flml. R.,7», 2d 1I„S.F. 

do 78. 3d M ... 

HI. Cent., 7s, '75 

Jollet & Cliic, let M. 
LaCr. & Mil..8i,l8t M 
La., Bloom. AMiss.lst 

Lake Snore Div 

Lake Sh., con., coup, 
do do I'eg . . 

Lon):Dock 

Long Inland, l8tM,7s. 

Mar. &L'in., l8tM { uo - 

Mich. Cent., 1st M, 8e 115 • 
Mich. So.. 78,i!IM....! 98 ' 
M.S. &N. L, S. F..7b!!0-2 ■ 
Mil. & a. P., let M., 8s I08X- 



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do conv... 

do constr.. 

do 78 of '71 

Naehv. & Decatur... 

N.J. Cent., ad M 

do new 

N.J. South., ist M... 
K. y. Ceul.,69, '83... 
do 68, '87. 



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do 6s, sub. . . 

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Jdo 7».eon,'76 

do 78, 'W76 

N.y.&N.H. 6a... 

No. Mo.. IstM 

Ohio &, Miss., let M 

do coneol,.! 92 

do 2dM,.. 8-JX 

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Pe'iinbuiur 

P.,I't. W.&C.,l8tM. 
do adM. 

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do 8», eq't 

On. ft Tol., Ist M.,'90 
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do 2dM 

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do 8dM 

do tquip 

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do L. 0. 7s. 

do Inc., lOa. 

West Vn. Tele., Ut M 90 
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108«- 
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96 - 
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97 - 
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95 - 
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Low.High 



97 - 
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96 - 

97 - 
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98 - 
57 - 
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six- 
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113 - 
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97 - 

94 - 
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97 - 

96 - 
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95 - 

99 - 

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83 - 

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100 - 
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101 - 

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AcousT. Septemb'b Octobbb. 



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99 -100 



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87 ■ 

100 • 

108 • 
76 • 
91 ■ 
90 ■ 
87 • 
38 ■ 

100 - 



-83 
-lOlX 

-107' 
-102 
-105 
-100 

- 96 

- 87X 
-97X 
-100 
-100 
-95X 

- 94 

-lie'vs 

- 9;x 
-102 

-107 

-93?i 

■88 

■85 

•96X 

■103X 

■97X 

■ 91 
85 

■98X 
89X 

■100 

103 
75 

■ 92 
91 
87 
88 

lOOX 



lOOX 
93 

93 ■ 

93 ■ 
98 

98 ■ 

83 ■ 

93 ■ 
9BX' 

93 • 

101 ■ 
86 ■ 
73 • 

102 • 



93X- 
99 - 
95 ■ 



103 



-100 
-89X 

• 84 

• 97X 

• 95 

■ 60 
•41X 
■9SX 
-97X 
■9D5i 
-83X 
■loox 

•110 
-lOlX 

-loox 

•lliU 
•94X 

• 92 
•98 
-lOrtX 
-93X 

• 97 

■ 97 

■ 99 

■ 99 
■Six 

• 93 
•96X 

• 95 

■loax 

•87X 
■73X 
■102 



97 

■100 

96 



NOVKMEKn 



Low.IIigh. 



■98X 
■91X 



Deoejibrs 
Low.HIgh. 



100 -100 
88-90 
78 - 82 
97 - 97 



.30 - 

39 - 
93X- 

03 - 

83 - 

81 - 

100 - 

110 - 

lOlX- 

97 - 
103 - 

94 - 
90 - 
93 - 

95X- 

98 ■ 
91X- 
97 • 
96 • 

S8X- 
93 • 

96X- 
93 ■ 
100 ■ 
86 • 
73X- 

99 • 



51 

■ 41 
94 
97X 

■83X 
89 

wy. 

113 
102 

URX 
li8X 

9,'i 

93X 

99 

92X 
■100 

94X 
■9S1X 
■98X 
■85 

■ 9-i 

■ 98 

■ 94 
■102X 
■87X 

78 
100 



90-94 



100 - 
93X- 
69 ■ 
99 - 



94 - 94 
100 -lOOX 

93 - 97 
103 -103 

91-92 



103X 100 -101 

97 - 97X 

94 - 95 
91 - 92X 
93X- 93X 

100 -lOOX 

95 - 96 
SOX- 88 

98 -100 
87 - 89 
85-83 



100 
94X 
■ 90 
■100 
■89X 



101X-102X 



93 - 99X 



95X 

94 - 
87 - 
96 - 

104X- 
99X- 



96 
94 

S7X 
97 

105 
99X 



99 - 

92 - 
94X- 

93 - 

85' - 
87Si- 

94 - 
87 - 
9( - 
86 - 



90 
9.3X 
95 
93 



87X 
94X 
Ss 
94X 



7»X- 



88X 
SOX 
SOX 
97 



106 
102 
101 
100 



92 - 
99 ■ 
99 • 

94 ■ 

95 ■ 

li-i' ■ 
98 ■ 
103 ■ 
!06 - 

93 - 
92 ■ 

87 ■ 
85X- 
96X- 

lO.'i ■ 

96 - 

90 - 

91 - 
98X- 

ioo' - 
101 X- 

76 • 
98 - 

92 - 

88 - 
88X- 

lOOX- 



-106 
-108 
-103 
-101 



• 99 
•99X 

• 94 
•93 



■IISK 
■100 
■103X 
■108 
93 
•9«X 
■87 

■ 81 
■97X 
105X 

■ 97 
92 
91 
98X 

160" 
103 

79 

92X 

93X 

90 

90 
101 



93 - 
93 - 
83X- 
95 - 



95 
93X 

84X 



103 -104 
99 
95 
9S 
93 
fl3X 
94X 
90 
93 



9SX- 99 
94-94 
90 - 90 
100 -100 
88X- 89 
73 - 78 
97 - 97X 
9,5X- 9.JX 
52 - 65X 
41%- 4SX 
94X- 93 
92X- 93X 
86-68 
80X- 82 
101X-102« 
118 -113X 
I0-JX-103X 

97 - 93 
103 -104 

94 - 94 

92 - 93X 
OHX-IOl-l 

93 - 91 
90 - 9t 

98 - 99 

94 - 94 

99 - mx 

97 - 97 
86-87 
93X- 94 

98X-100 
94 - 95 

102X-103X 
87X- Si-H 
TiX- 73 

lOOX-lOOX 



98X- 99X 
97 - 97 
104 -104 
101 -101 

100 -101 

101 -101 



92 - 93X 

100 -1011 

99 - 99X 

95 - 96 

90 - 91X 



11-3X- 
S6X- 
100 - 
106X- 
93 - 
93 - 



95 - 
lOOX- 

96 - 
91 • 
9J - 



115 
97 

inox 
107 

9iX 
89X 

93' 
108 
97 
91 
90 



102X-102X 
72X- 72X 
89 - 91 
88-89 
85 - 86 
88 - Sti 
100 -lOOX 
100 -lOOX 
100 -inox 
95-96 



95 - 

92 - 

83X- 

96 - 
90 - 

108 • 

97 - 

93 - 
97 - 



fcOX- 81 



■H - 



94 - 
85X- 
88 - 
8«X- 
76X- 
78 - 
94 - 



96 
88X 
94 
86 



89 

77X 
Snx 



■ 96 
95 
84X 

■96 
90 
104 

■ 98X 
98 
97 

-69 

•94k 

• 90X 

■ 94 
■88> 

■ 80 



94-94 
96X- 96X 
97-97 

9a' - 91 " 

iiio' -162" 

97 - 97X 
93 - 96X 
92 - 92 
69 - 89X 

102 -102 
96X- 96 
81) - g7X 

100 -102 
89X- 9SX 



99X-100X 

io2' -16.5" 

100 -II 

101 -IflSX 
104 -100 

'87' - 87' " 
93 - 93 
100 -100 
98X-98X 
89 - 93 
90-91 



115 

97X 
10 i 
106X 

«3X 

94 

89X 

84 

38X 
103 Si 

97X 



118 ■ 
95 - 

lOOX- 

106X- 
93 - 
93 - 
89 - 
84 - 
98K- 

103 - 
96X- 



90-90 



100 -100 
102X-103 

91' - 9Jk 
9! - 92 
85X- 83X 
8H - S3X 
lOOK'-liXIX 
100X-10:)X 
lonx-ionx 
95 - 99 



93X- 95X 
94 - 94 
84 - 84X 
97X- «8 
90 - US 
104 -lOIX 
98 - 98X 
93-93 
98-98 



9.5X- 
89 - 
91 !j- 
83 - 
85 - 
66X- 
76X- 
77 - 



96 



93X 
84 
87X 
R8X 
77X 
SIX 
96X1 93 - 95 



94X- 

91X- 



08 
91X 



88 - 


83 


80 - 


80 


M - 


83 


97 - 


99 


wix- 


91 If 


91J<- 


93 


88 - 


83 


89 - 


91 


77X- 


79 


81 - 


KS 


93X- 


96X 



January 4, 1873 J 



THK CHRONICLE. 



if 



rouRss; DP psin^s op r\il;iiiii avd m«(;^i.hnbi)U< srncR^ unm the xu^ \m 



STOCKS. 



Jakcabt. Febbcaiit 



HighLow. High. Low 



U. K. Stocks- 
Alton & Torre Uuuio. 
do do prel. 
Alb'y & Supquehttuim 
Bosl'n.Uurtfd & Brie 
Cbk. &Alton 

do pref . . . 

Cnlc, Burl. & Qulucy 
CUic. & Norlbwest. . . 

do pref.. 

CtaicaKo <jb Ro:k I>. . . 
Cin., Ham. <Ss Dayton. 
Col.,Cliic.& lud. C... 
Clevo. Si Pitt«burE... 
3m. & Ind 



26-28 
57 - 55 

U3 - 'J2 

12;) -liti 
lii -12! 

i4i>f-ia8X 

ma-mH 
aJk- 19« 

li»>.'- SDX 
90X- BiH 



March. 



HIkIi.Low. 



23-22 



lis -115 ii9jf-nT 

5-.X- 55 

-8)j- ri>i 

il3"-92)i 
li6«-125 
II-.! -UU 

75 - 72 
lOO -106 

98X- %« 
94 - 92j)< 
1423i-I40 
13ti -13ti 



47«- 4.3« 
75 - 73 



Cleve.,Col.C 

l)ul>uque & Sioux C 

Del., Lack. &Weet... 106 -103>4 

Erie 38>i- .10 

do preferred 67 -64 

Harlem 118>>-1U 

do pref - .. 

Hannibal & St. Jo... 5W- 47X 
do do pref 71X- 64X 

Hartford & N. Hav -.... 

Joliot & Ciikaco 92X- osx 

lilinoi« Ceotrul 13 : -!30 

Lout; li«lai)d. , 66 

Lake Shore & M. S. . . U6X- S9H 
do do i-crip. 8a>i- 8j>» 

Mac in * Wtiterii... 
Louisv. & Na»Hvlllo. . 
Marietta <& Ciu., let., 
do du 2d.. 

Memphis Jb Cna'ston. 

Michr.;«n Central 

Milwaukee Hi St. P.. 5'.i>f- i!i% 
do pref. 83 - t-iy. 

Mo. Kan. & Texas -.. 

Ittorria & Esaex 93 - 9i 

New Jersey 127 -127 

do Central.. 113X-1U8H 

. do Ld. Imp. Co. 71>i- 7o>j 

do acrip i07 -1U2 

New Jersey S- uthern 
N. Y. C. & H. R. eiock 98«- 94)« 
do fcnp 9i>»- 90ji 

N. T. & New Haven. . l)43x-142 
do scrip 133 -133 

Vorth Missouri . - 

N.Y.,N.H.& Hartford ......... 

Ohio & Missisaippi.. 49^- 41^ 
do pief. 76 - 71 

Piclflc of Missouri - 

Manama 80 - 72 

Pitt*.. F.W. <fc C. guar 9:>f- 93« 
do special . . .- .... 

Beading I16ii-lll,H 

Rome it Watertown. . 93 - 97>» 
Renss. & Saratoga... too -100 
St. L. & Iron Moun. . 64X- 69 
St. L., li. C. « N.pref ......... 

Ijecond Avenac 65 -65 

SixthAvcuuo - 

.Uulon Pacittc 89>i- 28X 

Tol., Wab. & West... 76X- 70J4 
do pr«'. 87X- 86 

Warren 8i) -88 

Tol., Peoria & War -..., 

miscel's ^tock•. 
Consolidated Coal. . . . 42X- 89 
Cumb'ndCoal&lr.,u. 46-46 

American Coal 46 -42 

Maryland Coal 26 -23 

Sprins: Mountain Coal 673i- 62 
K ew Cenfal Coal — 
Pennsylvania Coal... 

Wilkesbarre Coal 

Pacific Mail 

Atlantic Mail 

Canton 

Mariposa 

do pref 3 - lili 

di Trust.lO»,ctfB 
do Laud & M. Co 
do do pref. 

Quicksilver 29K'- 25>i 

do pref 31X- 30 

Western Uni./n Te'.. 74Si- 68X 
N. y.,Newf. &L. Tel ....- ... 

Adams Express 92 Si- 90 

American M. Union.. 613i- B9 

United Stales 66X- 60X 

Wells, Fargo & Co... 63 - 66X 
Del. & Hud. Canal... 124 -U9X 
Brull^wick City Land 6-6 

Manhattan Mas 223 -228 

Bankers' & Bro. Assn 
Boston Water Power 



67-56 
91X- 93 
4%- 3X 
12» -117 
126 -119K 
113 -W< 
na- 73X 

Via- 9u 

iiS«-linx 

US - il2>4 
2.1X- 21 

Via- 90 

88K-8H 
70 - 10 

104 -la-ix 

33>i- 30 
62 - 62 
117 -107X 

IMJi- 37Ji 
67K- 59.x 
166X-166X 

135-130" 

92X- 89>i 
8SJi- 6m 



April. 



Mat. 



High.Low. Hijjh.Low, 



28-95 
60-60 
96 - 96 

9«- ax 

I17K-117 

187' -134" 
84 - 7bX 
96 - U0>« 

inx-inx 

2fi>f- 22« 
92Ji- 90 
90>f- Si 
74 - 74 

mx-iu") 

BIM- 32X 
»3)i- CO 
lis -108 

47"-36Ji 
66K- "S 

g.V- 93" 

133 -132 
74 - 74 
98«- 9IX 

94 - 8»?i 



25 - 9IS ....-., 22 . 2S 

55-66 ....... 48 - 45 

94,'<- 94X 91«- 9d)i «« - 94X 

mx- 8« U%- 1 S}i- 6J< 

liox-in iii7>4-ii6x in -115 

123 -lal 121 -121 



Juki. 



UIgb.Low. 



JCLT. 



HiKhLow. 



AuausT. 

HIsh.Low. 



Simn's. OeroBKB. 



78 - 73 
99X- 9^ 



13« -1S2 
fSJtf- IBX 
»tK- 92>i 

118>i-110>< 

41 K- 2<i;i 

9.iX- 91>4 
91 - S'.>H 
70 70 

I0«X-!'I8 
72 - t\0)i 
84J<- 7!) 

130 -112 

47k- s^ii 

67Ji- 62 



22 
11 



118X-113 
64 - 56!< 
82«- VX 

96' ' - 92k 

126 -nn 
n3x-iu 

75 - 75 
1(18J<-105 
27><- 18 

io<.r,-'M}i 

II.') -89)4 
143 -143 
139,>i-138 



513i- ^»X 

78 - 74 



138 -1.11 
80H- 72 
IIIK- Vi}i 

116X-109Ji 

4S«i- 35 ' ' 
113 - 91 
93 - 91 

inSK-iaV 

75J<- 62K 
87 - 82 
129 -119 

45" - 39k 
64)f-60X 



181 -131 
72 - 72 

94X- 91 



30 . 23 
IIX- UX 
Kb - 31 
117 -ll.'i 
61'<- 59ii 
82X- 79H 



'X-X- 94 95 - 94X 
126;v-128X 126 -12.-X 
lllJi-109X llox-1™* 

76 - 76 I 7H - 75 
10(i>4-lUhX 107 -106X 



1S7 -135 

97h:- 94' 

93X- 91X 
106 -1U6 

80 "- 27 
16 - 14X 

119" lisk 

tilX- 57 

81 -78 



25 - •.•3>< 
li'lJi- 96« 

94J4- 91 

146 -145 

138 -138 

7-7 

51 k- iek 
79 - 77 



32 - 2.) 
99%- 9HX 
U4J(- 91 
14'>i-U.'S 
140 -140 



100-80 
99 - 98),- 



113 
98 



11.5«-112Ji 
lOlX-100 1 99 - 99 
103 -102X 105 -H:3X 



77 - 65K 

85"- so" 

39k- 81 ji 
76X- 75 



214 -212X 
59X- 5S>i 
Sik- 76' 



39«- 35)i 
52 - 62 
45 - 43 
22 - 29 
67 - 65 



92 - 74Ji 



413i- 84X 

80 - 75X 



. 90 
• 95 



95 



100-90 



42 - 37 

80)i- 77 



216 -216 

eoii- 56k 



84H- ■ 

2 - 

3 - 



3BH- 29X 
39X- 323< 
72Ji- 68Ji 

9) "- 96k 



42 -34X 
75 - 65 
42X- 37X 
23>s(- I'X 
62 - 62 



220 -220 



16 - 4« 
WH- (X 03 - (3 

8X- 7)4 , 7J<- «X 
IIM -lia III8 -113 



Norciaiii! Dicnsn 



mgh.Low.HI8h.Low. 



80X-129X 
76X- 70X 
9^X- »0H 
11U-1C8K 

38k- 32k 
fix- 9UJS 
95 - 92X 

l68k-I07' 
66«- 607i 
8lX- ">■% 
1/2 -115X 
135 -135 
41 X- 88 
60-60 



140 -137 

96k- 9.V 
»3X- 'i^X 



28 - 27X 



20 -119K 

fiS - 52 
7!<3i- Tiii 
4lf,- ."" 
96 -92X 

liok-iosii 
76 - 75 

M57J-1M4X 
28)i- 2 
Wi- 96X 
VSa- 94 

147 -147 



50H- ■ISX 
79 - 78 

123>i-l69X 
9SX- 9b>i 



95 - 95 
107 -1U7 
103 -100 

TiK- IIH 



41«- 87>i 

78 - 75 



168 -168 
47Ji- 43« 
75 -74X 

118 "-liik 

9;X- «8 



12'X-'20 
131H181X 
7il«- V.'« 
HI ~ - llOH 
U2X-116X 

37JiI S4X 
92 - Sf'X 
9SX- 91 
6I1X- 60X 

ll5X-101Ji 
59)i- 603i 
»0 - 73 

121 .114X 

4lk- 88X 
61 - 67X 



133 -183 

97k- 92k 
n^- 9.J< 



IIKX '15 
573-4- S3 
79«- 78 
43 - 41X 
s-3 - 9a>4 
I26j;-126>f 
108>i-107 

I05"-10!X 
2.1 - 25 
98X- fix 
9ax- 97X 
43 -144 



164 -164 
46Ji- 45X 
73 -74X 

l23X-li3 
98 - 96X 



<i4 -n 
lis -tro 



2U -lis 115 -llIX 
182K-127X,136 -180 
•■"X- '.2X( ■14K- 70 
9lX- 89)4 "OX- 84 



n»H-l()»X 

8«k- S3k 
93X-90 
91 X- 89 
70 - 70 

I04X-103 
62X- 44X 
MX- 68X 

118 -114X 

8rfk- si' ' 
67X-88 

95' - 93" 
MS -133 

»2k- 88' ' 



100 -S6 

102X-10i" 
77X- 77X 



94 -N 



100 -100 
74 -71X 



13 - 13 

inxliiek 

5««- 53;4 
%0X- 74 
42X- 41 
93 - MIX 
1V6X-12 X 
108 -lOt.X 
77 - 76 
<03X-103 
21 - 24 
99X- 95X 

146' -lie' 



nix-ioex 

87J(- 84X 
«nX- 87X 
90X- 89 

llig' l96k 
64 -47X 
71X- 69 
116 -lOUX 
130 -U) 
3a - 311X 
5tX-«4 



133 -127 
90 "-86k 



80X- SO 
26X-2^J< 



lis -ua 

66 - 53« 
76X- 74 
4;X- 40X 
92 - 91 
127 -12 r 
II16X-IOO 

2i"-18 
lOOX- 92X 



M -M 
«X- 7 
118 -10!) 
115 -114 
188X-183X 
83J,- 66X 
9U - 84X 
1«K-I05>t 

37k-88J| 

Op - "I 

91X-S8 

99k- MX 
&» -47>» 
71X- 701, 
115X-110 



4SX' 42 
76X- 74X 

134 -12i " 
97-96 
9HJ- 94 



95-96 



UH- OOX 
96k- 83X 

IX- a 
4 - X 



45 - 42 

75-75 
21 - 2; 
24X- 22 
60-50 

2i9 "-219" 
47X- 47X 
76X- 6!X 
3;lX- 25X 
96 - 92 
2X- •■% 
*%- 2X 



44X- 8=H- 
64-37 
74 - 89 

99k- 92> 



6!1X- 61X1 74X- 69 
67X- 63 75>i- 66K 
71X- 623i 7834-72 
120X-119 il2<) -119 
6 - " 



210 



-210 

-92 



211 -210 



46X- 41K 
73 - 78 
48 - 47 
2i3<- 21 
55 - 62X 

2i7X-217 

60 - 49X 
87X- 72 
383i- 26 
94 - 91% 
2X- 2X 
3Ji- SX 



44X- 36X 
68 - 4SX 
77 -71X 

99X- 96k 
76X- 72 
79 - 71X 
«.5X- 77 
I20l«-119 
9X- 6X 



40X- 30H 
77 - 75 



46X- 45X 
73 - 70 

2i' -19 " 



215 -215 

■if.k- 67k 

30 - 25 
102 - 93M 

'3 "I '2' 



38X- 87X 
763i- 74X 



41X- i^a 

70 - 70 
42 - 42 



37X- 3.3X 
76X- 73 



Hgh.Low. High. Low. 



93 -94 

8X- s« 
113 -If ST 

13 -lis 
135 -130 



11.2 
IIIX-lOi 



-SIX 
-30 



1.7 -116 
44X- 41X 
75X- '4 

146-126" 
96X- 93 



129 -123 
93k 863, 



81 -M), 
37-26 



117 -116 

58K-533, 
77X- "4 

<3x- <;>. 

9iX- 90 
124 -134 
104 - 9S 

71 - 74 

j;X- 26' 

*iii- 91J, 



144X-142 
48X- 4SX 
75X- 74», 
60 - Jljj 

148X-18''>. 
- .»J)4 



91-94 



-95 
-70 
- 96 
-130 
35X 



74X- 68 



31-24 

43«- 41X 
80-72 

is"- 18' 



78X-73X 

106"- 67" 
1«- IX 
2X- 8 



"SX- 36X 
51X- 39 

7.x- ISX 

69k- 96X 
80>i- 78X 
8.>X- IB 
95 - 85 

VJOX-llflX 
7 - 6X 

211 -210 



42 -StX 
62^- 4.')X 

76X- lax 

P8 - 96k 

vMi- raj4 

h7H- M 
93 - 87V 
121X119K 



43X- 4tX 
53X- MX 



■rex'^k 

MX- 9i' 
2X- S 



48X- ton 
65X-50 



X- 74X1 7.'iX- 6!iX 
82X- 82Xi 83 - 82X 
-~ 97X 97X-96X 



75 -7:iX 
8SX- S3 



- f8 
-117 



74X- 70 

83H- SIX 

88X- ^7 



9S -94 

6ox-es 



113 -110 

113 -113 
13SX-U7 



- nx 9j - 8IX 



26 
?X 



asx 

«. 

91X 
64 - 62 
i»l» - 94 
57X- 48 
74 - 71 
116X-11I 

■iix- 28" 

i2X-48 

92"- 112" 

23 -119 
MX- 83k 



83-60 
2; - »■! 
UX- 14X 

iJX-ii«X 

^7 - h\ 
76 -i- 72X 
4:X- *» 
iiH- WX 

04"- »«k 

93"- 98" 
48 - 25 
9oX- 8'J 



<U -141 
I8K-40 

77X-78 
60-68 
i44 -Ii» 

MX- 93 



!»-'X- 8 X 
116X-K9 

»7K- XiK 
BOX- R^X 
93-90 

9«' - 4i" 
«2X- MX 
79 - 73 
119 -Hi 

«X-»4" 
7I3X- 6IX 



1-.9 -126 
96X-«3k 



79 -79 
SI8X-9T 



in -IHX 
33X- U 
77X- IS 
ISX- 41 - 
9i -891^ 

iu3' -li'li" 
- 70 

ioox-10'V 

27 - 2,'.X' 
lOOX- 93X 



141 -IS-t 
49 - 4631 

74X- 74 
36-65 
l:tf -121 
91X- M 



106 -KM 

90 -90 



42X- 40 
80-80 
43-43 
19 - 15 
60 -60 



Tox-erx 

95"-89X 

■Jx- 2k 



44X- 41 
65X- 61X 
7234- 6,X 

95k- 88X 
71 -6.^X 
82X- 74X 
80X- 79 
120 -118X;110 -11"X 

210 "-210 I2i6"-3i6' 

1 82k- S3kl 49"- 49' 



40X-37X 
74X-68 
90 -88X 

26 "-26" 

46 -41 



23 - 19 
36-66 



103X- 78X 
24X- 16 
107-93 
SX- IX 
4X- 3 
17 -17 



49 - 4SX 

59-64 

8:x- rax 



96 - 91X 

71V- 67 

SIX- 75 

88X- 85 
118 -ll.'i 

5X- 6X, ^ 

310 -205 201 -201 



97 -92 
66-65 



89X- 30X 
73X- M 



80 -30 
49 -43 

mx-m' 

3; -21 
60 -60 
48X-46X 



■t'X 81 

nx- 10 

106X- 99V 

■'H- IX 

4X- » 

iik- ii' 
is "-44' 

67X-62 

81 X- ■»* 



(H - Ul 
71'<- RSJt 
7»X-72 

88 - sn 
mx-iisK 



48 



47X' 55-55 



88X- 8<.;{ 
76 - 69 



48X- 47 
75 - 78 
60 - SS 
22 -Jl 
«.! . 60 
•ISX- 4T 
210 -210 

89k- 71'i 

14X- w t 

107 -llll 

IX- l'< 
8-2^ 

isk- » ' 

31 - 80 
49X-43 

."6X- ■«« 

92X- iJi 

10(1 - 98 
94 -gilf 

83-79 

89 - W|< 
120 -llcS 

JOJX-sw"* 



ZUUU IN TUE RBDEE.VIN6 AUE.NTS UP NlTIU^ilL HANK!!. 

The following are the changes in the Redeeming Agents o| 
National Banks approved since the 19th inst. These 
weekly changes are lurnished by, and pul)li8hed in accordance 
withnn arraDt^ement made with the Comptroller of the Currency : 



LUCATIOH. 

Michigan- 
Battle Creek. . 

Ohio- 
Alliance 

Michisau— 
Buchauan . . . . 

Iowa — 
Boone 

South Carolina- 
Charleston . . 



KsEtacky-r 
LooIbtUI* . 



RSDEBUIMQ AGENT. 



HAMS OV BANS. 

The First NatloualiThe National Park Bank of New York. 
Bank. 1 approved in plnce of ih'; Central 

I National Bank of New York. 

The First National The Third National Bank of New 
Bank. 1 York, approved. 

The First National The Ninth National Bank of New 
Bank. York, approv^'t,. 

The First National' The National Bank of Commerce of 
Bank. \ Chicago, approved. 

TheBai.k of Char- The National Bnnk of the Statoof New 

I Icston Nationil York, New York, approved. 
BanklDK Associa- 
tion. ! 

The German Na- iThe National Park Bank of New York, 

I UoaalBaak. 1 approYed, . .^ 



NAXII or BANS. 



BXDzxioxa Aaxm. 



Sotith Carolina- 
Union 



Mlcbipin— 
Greenville. 

Minnesota— 
Maukato... 



Ohio- 
Medina. 

Iowa — 
Pella .. 

Ohio- 
Malta... 



The Merchants' and The Ninth National Bai.k of H'M 
Planters' Natlou-i York, approved. 
al Bauk. . „ 

The First National The Ninth National B«n^ of N-W 

Baiil£. I York, approved. 

The Citizens' Na- The First National Bank of Chics,':*, 
lioual Bank. I approved as au addlilunat Bedeo y- 

I lion agent. _ ^ 

The First National. The Thiid Na-ional Bank of New York, 
Bank. 1 approved. , . — _ 

The First National The Third National Bank of WcW 
Bank. I York, revoked „ _ . 

The Malta Natlonal.Thc First National Bank of N«» Yortf 
Bauk. I and the Fourth Nalionsl Bjnk ~M 

1 Cincinnati, approved. . , „. j^ 
The National Bank The Second Nailnnsl Bank of Was*- 
ofViritlnia. I Inpon. DC , api roved. , _,,^ 

■The Flr-lNaUonalThe Tli -d N»tl^i al B»..k « «'»; 
I Bank I ''iireh, approved «• an addlt.o.«l 

I Red.mi>t."n irent. 
Illinois— IThe Fint National, The Second Najioral Bank of at. 

CHrilnvllle ■ Bank 1 Lonis. upyiovcd. ,_ , , 

Iowa-- IThe Peila HaUonal The North Western N»Uon»I Etak •» 

pjia I Sunk. 1 CUc»«o, epptoved. 



Virginia— 
Richmond 

Ohio- 
Alliance... 



12 



THE CHUONICLE 



[.January 4, 1873. 



New National BanUs. 



The followlnsr i« a list of National Banks organized daring 
thBTMiBt two weetarrl*. : 

omdkl No. 

lOW-The N«tlon«I Bank of Anderson 8 C, Authorized capital. $50 OOO; 
paid-in caiiital, tW.OOO. JoscpU N. Broivu, President ; J. A. Bfoclt, 
Cisliler Authori/ed to coniineuce luisluejs December SO. WTi. 

«.0T8-The Klrst National Bunk of N.>ctlifleld, Mijin. Authorized capital, 
|;50,(K)0; iwld-in capital, t3T,5O0. Krwleriik GoodscU, President, 
CienrKe M. Phillips, Cashier. Aiilhorizcd to commence business uo- 
ceuiberSO, 187«. ^^^^^^^ 



Coteat fllonctors anir Commercial €ngtigl) Ntroa. 

UA-TES OF BXCHANGB \r LONDON, AND ON I.ONBON 
AT LATEST DATES. 



BXCHANOE AT LONDON— 
DKCEMBEK 1.1. 



Amsterdam... 

Antwerp 

Hamburg 

Parla 

Paris 

ViennA 

Berlin 

Frankfort .... 
8t, Petersburg 

Uadtz 

Lisbon 

Milan 

Genoa. 

Naples. 

New York ... 
Kio de Janeiro 

Bahia 

Valparaiso . . . 
Bueuos Ayres. 
Pernambuco . . 

Singapore 

Uoui; Kong... 

Shanghai 

Ceylon 

Bombay 

Madras 

Calcutu 

Sydney 

Alexandria . . . | 



abort. 
8 months. 



abort. 
3 raontha. 



90 days. 
3 months. 



60 d<iys. 
60 days. 



IS. 1>,-@!S. iH 

30.56 @SO.oO 
2<i.fiO @!U>.70 
S5.96 &i6. 5 
11.80 ail.35 
6.»J(@6.SliK 

31>i®. .. 

38.SiX@a8.81« 

S8.8»>i®a8-b7Jli' 



4s. M. 
4s. 6a. 



U. iOfid. 
U. 1 fid. 
U lOii''. 
1 p. c. (lis. 



KXCHANGK ON LONDON. 



lATBBT 
DATS. 


TIMS. 


Dec. IS. 


short. 


It 


Smog, 
ehort 


Dec- 18. 


8mo8. 


i» 


Bhort 
8moa. 


Dec.' 13. 
Nov. 8. 
Nov. S6. 
Oct IS. 
Nov. 14. 
Nov. 28. 


.... 
60 days. 
90 days. 


Dec. 13. 
Dec. 13. 
Nov. 14. 
Dec. 18. 


6mos. 
6mos. 


Dec. 7. 


6mo8. 


Dec. 11. 


3 mos. 1 



12.10 
85.50 
18. 3 
S5.68 

m'.io 

6.20;i 



45>i 

49-;; 

2i> 

4«. h'iia. 

6s. iHd. 

U. UHd. 

U. 11 7.iad!. 

i». 'n'xd. 
'is';V 



', LFrom our own correspondent. I 

London, Saturday, December 14. 

The leading feature of the week is the reduction in the Bank 
rate of discount to six per cent. The movement ^-as unexpected, 
but the Bank, return which has been published shows that any 
other course was unavoidable. The changes in tlie weekly return 
are of a very satisfactory character, the increase in the reserve of 
notes and coin being £1,400,000; and in the stock of bullion, 
£450,000. The year is likely to close, therefore, with money at a 
reasonable price, and with the trade of the country, in most 
respects, sound. 

Undoubtedly, the bad harvest, and the adverse season for Au- 
tamn sowing have largely diminished the purchasing power of 
the country. The farmers of this country, in spite of free trade, 
are a well-to-do class, and are far from being that poverty .stricken 
section of the community which some would represent them to be. 
I;i average and in abundant seasons they are able to make large 
investments between harvest' and Christmas, but such cannot have 
bpen the ca.se tliis year. A season like the present is just the one in 
which they suffer from the effects of free trade ; but happily such 
seasons are by no means frequent. The prices of sound produce of 
all kinds are indeed high, but to one "run" of good dry English 
#heat offered for sale at market, there are hundreds the intrinsic 
vilue of which is hard to determine. The produce was harvested 
damp, and since harvest the rain has been almost incessant so 
that there has l>een no chance for improvement. Then again, 
With jegard to potatoes. Really sound parcels sell at the high 
price of £10 and £10 10s. per ton, hut the districts which have 
yielded such a quality of produce could with ease be counted, so 
fSW are they in number. It follows, therefore, that while fine 
qualities of produce are very dear, the larger proportion of this 
year's crops can only be disposed of at irregular prices, and at 
prices which are more convenient to the buyer than the seller . 
ilff it must bo borne in mind that there is a good selection of 
foreign produce offering in our markets, the result of which is 
tllat the inferior growths of England are almost altogether dis- 
ced ed. 

I mentioned in my letter last week that many persons were of 
lU'e opinion that the rise in the Bank rate to seven per cent, had 
veiy little to do with the influx of gold from Paris. That opinion 
is still entertR^w^- and in one sense, it appears to be correct. The 

^«o c?°i''.conv| Sx- g^^""" '° "^""^ *° """"K sold from Paris for 
aSlon Pac, i»t M ... 90s- 93 %o compel, owing to the diminished resour- 

do Inc., iOa..i p* -88 rectors to refuse to discount financial paper. 
WlJon^aASt P." i'i'mI ^ l^ ' Buch paper has of late been in circulation 



leading source of trouble is at once apparent. But the question 
may be fairly asked. Why did not the Bank refuse such paper 
at an earlier date, while the rate was at five per cent.? Had 
such a course been adopted there would have been no occasion 
for the advance to seven per cent, with all its attendant excite- 
ment ; and with the facilities which the Bank have in judging for 
themselves the nature of the operations which are in progrees, 
they would have been quite justified in demanding for such paper 
a rate considerably above the existing minimum. To prevent, if 
possible, a repetition of such disturbances daring the period thai 
the Indemnity payments last, some such course should be 
adopted, so as to in the interests of our trade give stability to the 
rates for money. 

There has been a good demand for money daring the Week, 
and that circumstance led few to expect a change in the official 
minimum. The inquiry since Thursday has been active at the 
reduction Annexed are the quotations : 

Per cent, j Per cent. 

Bankrate 5 4 months' bank hills 4^0^*% 

Open-market rates : 6 months' bank bills 4%tS4% 

30 and BO diys' bills 4%@4y, 4 and 6 months' trade bills. 4%®6)i 

8 mouths' bills , . . .4J»@4Ji 

The rates of interest allowed by the joint stock banks and 
discount houses for deposits are subjoined : 



Per cent . 

« 

4 

4H 

4H 

The following are the quotations for money at the leading Conti- 
nental cities : 



Joint stock banks 

Dlscoimt houses at call 

Discount houses with 7 days' notice. 
Discount houses with 14 days' notice 



Bank Open 

rate, market. 
per cent, per cent. 
5 ■■• " 

S 



4M-3 

5 

4 



Lisbon and Oporto 

St. Petersburg 

Brussels 

Turin, Florence and 

Rome 

Antwerp 

Belgium 



Bank Ope« 
rate, market 
per cent, per cent 



7 
8 

5 
4 
» 



1 
8 

6 



Paris 

Amsterdam . . 

Hambur^I . . 

Berlin 5 

Fraukfort 5 

Vienna and Trieste 7 

Madrid, Cadiz and Bar- 
celona 6 

There has been scarcely any demand for gold for export, and a 
moderate supply has been sent into the Bank. The silver market 
has been quiet, but the recent advance in prices has been main, 
tained. The foreign exchanges are rather less favorable to this 
country. The following prices of bullion are from the circulv of 
Messrs, Pixley.Abell, Langley & Blake : 

GOLD. 8. d. B. d. 

BarGold per oz. standard, last price. 77 9 @ 

BarQold,fine per oz standard, do. 77 9 & .... 

Bar Gold, Refinable per oz. standard, do. 77 11 & — 

South American Doubloons per oz. 78 6 ta 73 8 

United (Slates Gold Coin peroz. 7S 8 © 

SILVER. 



s. d. e. 

4 lUi®.. 

5 0®. 
no price 



tto Qerman hands, one, and inde«d the 



Bar silver. Fine per oz. standard, last price 

Bar Silver, containing 5 grs. Gold, .. .per oz. standard, do. 

Fine Cake Silver peroz. 

Mexican Dollars per oz., last price, new, 4 10>j old, BO 

Five Franc Pieces per oz., none here & ... 

Messrs. Clews, Ilabicht & Co. announce that they are authorized 
by the Burlington, Cedar Rapids and Minnesota Railroad Com. 
pany to receive subscriptions to an issue of £440,000 in first mort- 
gage 7 per cent- convertible sterling bonds of £200 each. The 
price of issue will be £166 per bond, and interest will date from 
the 1 St of August last. An accumulative sinking fund of £4,000 
per annum will be applied half yearly from the Ist of February 
1878, for the redemption of the loan. The main line, which ia 
260 miles in length, was opened on the 1st of February lagt, «nd 
the loan now offered for subscription is required to form a con. 
nection with the Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway. Tbe total 
cost of the main line and the extensions will be £2,730,000. 

The suspension of the Banque de I'Union of Brussels and Ant' 
werp (Messrs. Jacob, Freres et Cie.), has created some little sensa- 
tion, more especially on the Continent. The losses which will he 
sustained on this side, if any, will be small. The proprietary is 
rich, and the last accounts say that by calling up £480,000 of 
unpaid capital, each creditor's claim will be satisfied. Two per- 
sons holding important positions at the Bank have been arrested, 
on the charge, I hear, of speculating with the proprietors 
money in oil and other produce. 

As usual towards the close of the year the stock markets have 
been quiet, but cheaper money has given a firm tone to them- 
Many classes of securities are high in price, especially in the 
railway department. The railway traffic receipts continue satis- 
factory, so that though quotations are high, speculators for the 
fall see no present chance of operating. In French scrip there 
has been a marked recovery, owing chiefly to the termination of 
the political crisis. The price is now 3i to 2| premium United 
States Government Securities are very firm: and American rail- 
way shares, excepting Illinois Centra], which are dull, have 
'mproved in value. The following were the closing prieea of con. 
Bols and the principal American aecurities this afternoon ; 



January 4, 1873.] _. 



THE CHEONICLE. 



n 



una 9in 




Consols z 

ITnited Statoi 6 per cent 5-20 bonds, ex 4-6 

do Saserics 

do 18<{5 isdue 

do 1867i8suc ...x 

do 5 per cent 10-40 bonds, ex 4-6 

do B per cent Funded Loan, 1871, ci 4-6 

Atlantic and Cit West., 8 per cent. Debent's. BUchoffshciirv's ctfs.. 
Ditto (;oiisoli(lnted Bonds, 7 per cunt., Blschoffslieiin's ccrtiflcatea. 

Ditto Iwt Mortpugo, 7 per cent bonds 

Ditto 2d Mortgai,'!:, 7 per cent bonds 

Ditto :jd Mortgago 

Erie aiiares, ex 4-»i 

Ditto 6 percent. Oonvcrllblo Bonds 

mifiols Central Sliares, J;100 pd., ex 4-6 ! 

Illinois and St . LouU Bridge, 1ft mort 

Louisiana G percent. Levee Bonds 

Masi^acliusotts 5 percent, sterlinj; bds, 1900 

New Jersey United Canal and Rail bds 

Panama Ocri. Mort. T percent bonds, 1897 

Pennsylvania Oen. Mort 6 per ct bds, 1910. 

Vlreinia 6 per cent bonds, ex 4-6 

The following statement sUowb the position of the Bank 

of England, the Bank rate of discount, the price of Consols 

the average quotation for English Wheat, the price of Middling 

Upland Cotton, of No. 40 Mule Yarn fair second qualitj , 

and the Bankers' Clearing House return compared with the 

four previous years : 

1863. 1869. 1870. 1871. 1872 

Circulation, Including £ £ £ £ £ 

bank post bills ^S.^.^..^! S'i,!)05.4n5 2.1.1170,8.30 24.423,726 24,803,402 

Public deposits 7.146,820 0.773, Wl H,7as,'J.yj 7,837,507 9,303,717 

Other deposits n,9;2i4.W 17.230,507 18,639,717 20,064,692 18,140,754 

Government securities, 14,074,S74 !3.811,yo3 12,925,8S3 15,001,028 13.259,873 

Other securities 17,491,978 16,577,881 15,937,109 15,908,220 18,473,721 

Koserve of notes and 

coin 10,433,640 11.7i;.3.799 15,0.17,18.3 15,619,440 13,8(i3,390 

Coin and bullion 18,158.315 19,167,109 22.892,718 24.655,116 23,24,3,9.50 

Bank rate 8 p. c. 3 p. c. 2>.f p. c. 3 p. c. 6 p. c. 

Consols 92,'<d. 92,'<d. 92;id. 92?,'d. OlJid. 

Price of wheat 493. 8d. 43«. Sd." 62s. Sd. 568. lOd. 57s. 

Mid. Upland cotton .. lO'id. UJid. 8J<d. 9Xd. lOd. 
Ko.40 mule yarn fair 3d 

tiuallty Is. l>.^d. la. S^d. Is- IXd. Is. 3>^d. ls.2Jid. 

Clearing House return. 60,628,000 80,639,000 91,648,000 



Through the Spanish Financial Commission the Spanish Gov. 
ernment have been inviting subscriptions to a loan of .€10,000,000 
of cagh, in a 3 per cent stock, at 28f. Lists were opened on 
Thursday at the principal financial centres of Europe, and it is 
stated that the amount has been more tlian subscribed. Only a 
short time since the Spanish government offered, and the bond- 
holders accepted their interest, as follows: Two-thirds in cash 
and one-third in slock. In addition to this there have been 
republican risings in various parts of Spain, and the news has 
just been received of an insurrection in Madrid, in which about 
twenty persons lost their lives. Spain may, therefore, consider 
korself fortunate in obtaining £10,000,000 of money at no higher 
rate of interest than about 10 percent. The price of the scrip 
has averaged i premium. 

The trade for wheat has been quiet, but there has been a steady 
cftnsumptive demand for good and fine foreign produce, and the 
quotations have ruled firm. There is no improvement in the 
weather, and very slow progress has been made in consequenc e 
with agricultural work. It is quite expected that a large aver- 
age of land which had been intended for wheat will lay fallow 
till the spring, and be sown with barley. 

The following statement shows the imports and exports of 
cereal produ:e into and from the United Kingdom since harvest, 
viz., from September 1 to tlie close of last week, compared with 
the corresponding periods in the three previous years : 



IMP0BT8. 



__ 187S. 

Wheat cwt. 15,739,892 

Barter 4.936,073 



Oats. 

Peas 

Beans 

Indian Corn.... 
Flour 



Wheat cwt. 

Barley 

Oats 

Peas 

Beans 

Indian Com 

Flour .. . 



3,061.878 

433.215 

727.275 

7,716,097 

1,784,611 



1871. 
14,497.612 
3.311.312 
2,8a5,325 
25.1,9:i7 
1,110,335 
6,448,300 
1,049,732 



EXPOUTS. 
100,179 1,425,001 



3,1,S9 
11,806 
2,274 
580 
B.."68 
5,8&1 



6,885 
89,007 
3.117 
1,277 
9,901 
a3.381 



1870. 
9,973,724 
1,818,960 
3,087,807 
282, 30: 
435,906 
6,420,296 
1,378,247 



883 984 
10.800 

243,037 

27,758 

4,2:i2 

26,980 

361.658 



prices keep firmer than they wonid do were the avsrmge quntitr prodnead 
Chemicals In fair demand, and prlcoe remain unchaniied. The •hlpplDu, of 
which at present there is very little in the Tyoe, la mnch tnqalred MUr, kat 
the rates do not Improve. The heavy lours from the Tyne u uld to o«Te 
some cfTect both on freitrhts and on the value of shipping. 

SoiTii Wales— OARDiFr— In the Iron trade thinea remain moch the Mm* 
as for some two or three wn, k" pant, makers not nelag orerhnrdeBed with 
orders, but they continue lo keep their ealAbllahmenU In pretty reenlar 
employ. It is nut unlikely thai many of the less saDiniiun prophets wli: lad 
th It after all the trade Is not destined to sink to so low a stale as some pre- 
dicted. There la. In fact, u revival In the lone of the trade, and Immedlats 
prospects are undoubtedly brighter. Buyers ari alrMdy be^nnlog to better 
themselves, and seem much more dlspoised to place ordera at current rmtee 
than for several weeks past. The tiaplatc work* prcaent a fair dtwree of 
activity, but there la no material chanse to report. The poilUon of the eoel 
trade IS without material alteiatlon. The denuiDd fw steam and boiueeotU 
continues extensive, and good prices are obtained. 



The following relates to the trade of Manchester : 



1869. 
9.088,002 
3,211.3.53 
8,191,373 
•144,001 
1,023,070 
3,090,718 
1,077,456 



122,8:5 

49,882 

21.029 

4,084 

853 

12o 

1,040 



The market Is strong in tone, and producers j^enerally require an advance. 
The reducti<in in the Bank rate has strengthened the position of holders, 
without le.-.rtin;j to any perceptible improvement in the demand. Export 
yarns have been flrmly neld, and spinners decline taking orders at Tucsdav's 
prices. Buyers have been deterred ojienint; to any extent in consequence of 
the advance reciuired. n«rae trade varus have gone off slowly, but there is no 
weakne.-'s in prices. Goods have exhibited a hardening tendency, though the 
demand bus been Inactive. A moderate inquiry has prevailed for shirting 
goods. Miidapollams, mulls and jacconetts have been In quieter request, but 
prices are forward— in some cases qnotably dearer. 

Prom the coal and Iron districts the following reports have been 

received : 

N«wciBTLE-oN-TTHE.— The conl and Iron trades have recovered a little of 
their former tone, although there does not appear to be any definite cause for 
It, beyond the fact that a few contracts have been made for ne\t year at some- 
thing below the current rates. This Is taken as an indication that high 
pri««i will rule next year, but the contracts made -t this time last year aid 
not at all Indicate the extraordinary risa that (ubsequeutly took place. Iron 
la more In demand, although the pro^nctiOQ is lessened, and coDseqnently 



Tnei. 


Wed. 


Thnr. 


Frt. 


91$^ 




?i5J 


Bl» 


Xi" 


& 


»l« 


E^ 


3 


V/^. 




89 


a 


89 


«9 


M« 




89« 


•3 



EuKlliib market Report*— Per Cable. 

Tliedr.ily closingquotationsiathe markets of London and Liver, 
pool for the past week have been reported by submarine telegraph) 
as sliowii in the followiuK summary : 

London, Money and Stock Aftirket. — American ■eenritie* clos* 
at an advance on the prices of a week ago. 

The bullion in the Bank of England has increaacd £347,000 the 
past week. 

Sat. Hon. 

Consols for money Six Ol)^ 

" account 9\% . 91^ 

U. s: 6s (5-20s,)1865,old... 92)i 92^ 

1867 92 »2X 

a.s. 10-408 esu i»H 

New 58 89X 89X 

The daily qootacions for United States Os (1862) at Frank 
fort were ; 

Frankfort 93 J5X 

Liverpool Gotton Markit.—See special report of cotton. 

lAwrpool Breadstu^t Market.— 'i\i.\» market closes firm at 
advanced quotations. 

Bat. 
s. d. 

Flour (Western) ip bbl 30 

Wheat (Red W'n. spr)..*l ctl 11 4 

" (RedWInter) " 11 10 

" (Cal. White club) " 12 10 
Corn (W. m'd) now ^ quarter 29 

Barley (Canadian) fs hush .3 6 

Oat8(Am.&Can.)....f) bush 3 2 
Peas(OanadUn)...¥au»rter 39 

Liverpool Provmon» Market 
tion of lard, have all declined. 
Sat. 
a. d. 
Beef (Pr. raeea) new ff tee.. 98 
Pork (I'r. mess) new ^bb!. 64 
Bacon (Ciuu. cut) new^J cwt 86 
Lard (.Vincrican) — " 37 6 
CheeBe(Amer'nflne) " 64 

Liverpool Produce Market. — Spirits turpentine has declined 

6d., and common rosin 3d., while refined petroleum has advanced 

lid. 

Sat. Mon. Tnee. Wed. 

8. d. ■■ d. a. d. a. d. 

Roeln(eom. N. C.)...|lcwt. 10 10 10 10 

" fine "' 16 16 16 16 

Petroleum (refined)....* gal 1 7X 1 8X 1 9 19 

(spirits) « 14 14 14 14 

Tallow(American)...« cvtrt. 43 43 43 43 

Cloverseed (Am. red) 42 42 42 42 

Spirits turpentine...* cwt. 44 6 44 6 <4 6 44 6 



Hon. 


Tuei. 


Wed. 


Thar. 


Frl. 


8. d. 


8. d. 


8. d. 


8. d. 


S. d. 


30 


80 


80 


30 


80 


11 4 


11 6 


11 6 


11 6 


11 8 


11 10 


12 


12 


12 


13 


12 10 


18 » 


13 2 


18 » 


18 8 


29 


29 


29 


88 « 


88 9 


3 6 


S 6 


3 6 


8 6 


8 8 


S 9 


3 2 


8 2 


8 1 


8 t 


39 


89 


89 


8» 


39 


. — These prices, with the 


excep- 


Hon. 


Toes 


Wed. 


Thnr. 


Frl. 


a. d. 


8. d. 


8. d. 


8. d. 


8. d. 


98 


08 


97 6 


97 « 


97 8 


63 


«« 


62 » 


6} 6 


«« 8 


86 


88 


36 


88 


88 


87 6 


37 6 


37 « 


87 6 


87 6 


64 


88 


68 


68 


68 



Thnr, 
1. d. 
10 
16 

1 9 

1 4 

43 
42 

44 



Frl. 
s. d. 
10 
16 
1 9 
I 4 
48 
41 
44 



London Produce and Oil Market*. — Calcutta linseed has 

declined 3d. since last Friday. 

Sat. Hon. Tues. 

£ s.d. £ s. d. £ 8. d. 

Lln8'dc'ke(obl).*tn 10 10 10 
Un88ed(Calcutta).... 64 64 61 
8ug8r(No.l2D'uh8td) 

on spot, * cwt 88 6 83 6 

gpermoil 8 ton 90 90 

Whale oil " 40 10 40 10 

Linseed oil " 34 84 



88 

90 
40 10 
34 



Wed. 
£ 8. d. 

10 
64 

33 6 

90 00 
40 10 
84 00 



Thnr. Frl. 
£ 8.d. C a.d. 
10 10 • 
64 MO 



33 6 88 

90 90 

40 10 40 10 

84 84 



COMMERCIAL AND MISCELLANEOUS NEWS. 



Imports and Exports fob thb Wkbk.— The imports this 
week show a decrease in both dry goods and areneral mer- 
chandise. The total imports amount to $4,575,759 this week, 
against $6,912,075 last week, and ;f6,935,7U the previous week. 
The exports are $4,107,280 this week, against $4,784,888 last 
week, and $5,702,541 the previous week. The exports of cotton 
the past week were 9,659 bales, against 15.954 bales last week. 
The following are the imports at New York for week ending 
(for dry goods) Dec. 26, and for the week ending (for general 
merchandise') Dec. 27 : 



Dry goods 

Qencral merchandise. 



roanoN imports at miw tork fob thi w»»». 

1870. 11871. 1878. J5?i_ 

$648,938 $»,»»2,068 $1.0T7,V79 •»2'2 

8,098,495 »,9.J».88S 8,814,871 8.8a»,WT 



Total for the week.. 
Previously reported.... 



42.747,4.33 
«6,503,970 



$5,184,398 
*99,8H,8S2 



$4,911,151 
871.601,878 



«4.87»,78» 
4n,890.48a 



SlncoJan. 1 $289,311,403 $.304,488,788 $376,513,7«7 »4«,»86.198 

In our report of the dry goods trade wUl be Jound theimporwof 

dry goods for one week later. , , . , ^ 

The following is a statement of the exports (exclnsive of specie, 

from the port of New York to foreign ports, foi the week ending 

Dec. 31 : 



14 



THE CHTIONICI.E. 



[Jantia-y 4, 18" 3. 



ixrouTS ruon n«w tork pob th« wekr 
1870. 1871. IR"S. 

rortheweek »»,1.4,8H $4,187,759 $M99,i09 

Pt«v1on»lj reported 



187S. 

M.II7.SW) 

S8fi.087.474 



SlncaJtn. 1 $8,171,516 $4,187,739 $3,199,509 $840,184,754 

The following will show the expof.g of uppclc from the port of 
Sew York for the week endintr Dec. 28. 1872, and since tlie 
be^^in ninir of the year, with a coniparison for the correspondiDg 
date in previous years : 

Silver bars $48,500 

Silver coin 50,001 

American gold coin 400,000 

Dec as— Str, Deutechland, 
Soithampton— 

American gold coin 150,000 

For Bremen— 

Foreign silver coin Ti'.OOO 

Foreign gold coin 1,300 



I)ec23-Str. OnUrio,St. TBo- 
mai — 

Bpantoli donblnona $3,478 

Dec a4— Str. Abyssinia, Liv- 
erpool — 

American gold coin 600 Of'O 

Silvrhars 99,046 

Dec. 28— Sir. City of Parii, 
Llvf'rpno' — 

American gold coin 680,000 

I'uiik* fur me ivuuic 

Prerioasly reported 

ToUlalnce Jan. 1.1878 $71,545,875 

Bam* time In I Same time In 

Hmeumem $tl3.865.M7 ! 1867 t51.P0i.fl48 

1370 58.KP9.17I I 1866 f,S..Wi.700 

1369" ;; 82.1M.448 1865 S0,003,6{i3 

1868 70811,999! 

The Imports of epecie at this port during the past week have 
been as follows: 



....ji.9er,.3S5 

69.6t;4.960 



$300 
600 



Gold 

Dec. 87— Brti; T. Towner, Sa- 
vanilla — 
Unknown 



$9,588 



Dec. 21— Sir. Vicksbnrg, Jer- 
emie— 

Gold , 

Silver 

Oec. 2fi— Sir. Uaenolia, Bar- 

mnda- ( -^-^— 

Total for the week $11,230 

Fl:e\loiiBly reported 6.5S6.n6! 

Total since January 1, 1878 $6,547,311 

Barae tune In I Same time in 

1«1 $8,618,290 ! 1869 $14,518,725 

IflU 11,581.771 I 1868 7.163,071 

Surrender of Bills of Iiadln£. — In The ChuOKICLE of Dec. 
33, on page 858, we referred to the case recently decidtd in Mas- 
Bachusets, upon the subject of the surrender of bills of lading, and 
intended to insert at he same time the following opinion upon 
the subject by eminent counsel in Philadelphia. 

The opinion of counsel above menrioned is as follows: 

" Sir : Th» Massachusetts case of which a report is published 
In this morning's Ledger, is one of great practical im]iortance, 
and it is desirable that our banks and business men should 
not hastily adopt an erroneous practice in such matters. It 
does not appear that the question of law was decided by the 
Court, and the jury may have been allowed to assess the dam- 
ajtes, subJHCt to the opinion of the Court on the point of law re 
served for further consideration. Of course if the surrender was, 
as the report says, contrary to the orders given, the verdict may 
possibly be sustained, but even this is unlikely. The question 
frequently presents itself where no special instructions have lieen 
given, and there it would seem to be plain tliat the bill of ladinjr 
should be surrendered on the acceptance of the draft, thougli 
doulns have been entertained on the suliject. The reas^ons for the 
delivery are found both in a considemtion of the rights of the 
parties to a contract, of sale on credit and of the positinn of the 
acceptor of a draft, or bill of excliange, accepted on the faith of a 
consisrnment of poods. A sale upon credit in inconsistent " ith 
any riuht of lien, and hence it has been held, where goods were 
sold, "tn be paid for by cash, in one month," the vendee was en- 
titled to have the poods delivered immediately, but was not bound 
to pay till the end of the month, and evidence of a contrai-y usage 
was inadmissable — the coiltruct havinp been in writing. As the 
purchaser would, therefore, be able to take the goods by replevin. 
or to bring trover for their conve^^ion, it would seem to be clear 
that he would be entitled to demand the surrender of the bill of 
lading. 

On the other hand, it is equally plain that where a draft is ac- 
cepted against a bill of lading, the acceptor, in the absence of an 
express agreement to the contrary, is entitUd to the possession of 
the goods, in order to obtain the means with which to pay the 
draft at m .turity. Hence it was held, as far back as Lord Mans- 
field's day. that where the drawee accepted, in consideration of a 
future consignment of goods, and tne holder of the bill of ex- 
change, with knowledge of such agreement, received and retained 
the bill of lading, he discharged the acceptor. 

The bank wliicli und- rtakes, therefore, to hold on to the bill of 
lading, without express instruciions to do so. puts itself in a very 
awkward position. If the consignee be a purcha.>;er on credit and 
wishes the goods, he can take 'hem on tendering acceptance, or if i 
he chooses to let them remain in its possession, he can put upon : 
the bank the risk of fluctuations in the market, while the pro- ' 
perty may be changeable or perishable — hoirs on the hoof, bui.er, | 
eggs or peaches ; or, on the other hand, if it be not the interest ' 
Of the drawer to ace pt, a refusal to deliver the bill of lading 
would justify him in refusing acceptance and rescinding his con- 
tract of purcliase. It may he added that, on the Continent, the 
law is Well settled that the bill of lading must always be surren- 
dered on acceptance of a bill exchange payable alter "eight, unless j 
the contrary be expressed on the faci of the bill of exchange;! 
and in England, thoiiirh it is common for the holder of the bill 
to retain control or possession of the goods, a special leiter 
of hypothecation in such cases always accompanies the bills 
of exchange and lading. 

December 10, ;872. I am, sir, &e., S. D." 

At a meeting of the Board of Presidents of the Banks of 
Philadelphia, held December 2, 1872, it was unanimously 

Jicsolved, That the foUowing circular be adopted and for- 



warded to our corresj on icnts as indicative of, and defining the 
custom to be hereafter pursued by the Philadelphia banks iit 
relation to the delivery of bills of lading and shipping receipts 
accompanying time drafts : 

Dfar Sir: lint Arnfs are frequently sent to the banks of this citv for 
acct'piance by the drawcee, accomiianied by shipjiinK receipts or bills of 
lading f-T (r"Ods ahippert to the drawee, without inptruciiouB whether th» 
hills of lading shall be pnrrcndered to the drawee, upon his accepting fhe 
draft or not. We are advised that npon such drafts bcinR accepted ii is th» 
duly of the bank to surrender the bill of lading to the acceptor of the rlraft,. 
in the absence of instructions to the contrary. To prevent any misapprehen- 
sinn arising 'n the course of our business transactions ;n these matters, wo- 
have ihouEht it proper to address this circnlar to our coirespondents. and 
state that we will in nil sneh cases deliver the bills of lading to the drawee, 
npon his acceptance of the draft, unless inslruciert tn th" contrary by otu 
correspondent at the time of sending ns the draft and bill of lading. 

Please note the contents of this circular, and hear In mind that we shall be 
governed by the above stated rule in all cases to which it is applicable. 

L.and Decision by the Attorney-General — WASHINGTON, 
Decemfer 27. — Attorn .'y-lieneral Willinms has given an opinion 
to the effect that the lands in dispute between the Sioux City and 
Saint Paul and McGregor and Missouri River Railroad Comiianiei 
should be patented for the use of the company which shall first; 
construct its road to the point at which it would then entitle them, 
as being ihen within the prescribed limits on each side. 

Neither road is constructed far enough to touch the lands in 
question. 

Mr. Willifcms decides.ns a general principle, that the claim o( 
any railroad company to have patents issued for all lands designa- 
ted to aid in its construction when a part of the road is incom- 
plete, cannot properly be allowed, and that the prioritv of loca. 
tion of the road does not entitle it to patents for land ; also, that it 
cannot obtain patents except where the road is actually coni- 
structed. 

This decision overrules one giren by Secretary Delano, to the> 
effect that the McGregor and Missouri Kiver road was entitled t» 
the lands in controversy. 

Chicago, Bnrllngton & Qnincy, and tlte Bnrllnston dc 
nissonrl Railroads.— Vhe consolidation of these companies wo 
have heretofore Loticed ; the teims as ratified embrace the follow, 
ing points : 

The two companies retain for the present their distinctive titles 
and organizations, and for the purpose of equalizing the value of 
the stocks accoiding to the contract, the Chicago, Burlington and 
Qui' cy Company proposes to issue to stockholders, whose names 
were of record on the 10th inst., bonds to the amount of $1,000 
and $.500, and will bear interest from January 1st. 1873. Any 
person holdinff 40 shares of the stock will be entitled to a $1,000' 
bond and a $500 bond will be issued to the holder of 20 shares. 
Fractional interests may be consolidated, or the bonds will be is- 
sued on the payment of the deficiency at the rate of $25 per share, 
so that the holders ot 39 shares may obtain a $1,000 bond by pay- 
ing $23, or the owner of 15 shares will receive a $500 bond on the 
payment of $125. 

Sale of the liOnloTlIIe, Ne\r Albany and Cblcago Rail* 
road.- Tbe Hon. John D. Howland. Clerk of the United States 
Courts and Snecicl Commissioner for the sale, sold this week the 
Louisville, New Albany and Chicago Railroad. George L. 
Schuyler, Esq., of New York, was the purchaser for himself and 
the hondliolders, at $5,000, the only bid offered. The decree of 
sale was in consequence of suits long pending against the road, 
and but lately and finally decided against it. The amount of 
judgment against the toad is $6129,:ni 12. 

Colnmbus and Hocking: Valley Railroad. — This com 
pany has declared n cai-h dividend of 5 per cent, and a stock 
dividend of 10 per cent, both payable February 1, 1878. An 
increase of capital stock amounting to 10 per cent of the present 
capital is authorized to be subscribed for pro rata by ihe present 
stockholders, to he paid for in two instalments, payable February 
1 and .March 1, 1878. This issue is to piovide new and much 
needed rolling stock. This will increase the capital stock from 
$12,50.000 to? l..')00,f!00. 

Tbe Liosransport, GraivfordsTllle and Sonttaivestern 
Railroad was completed and fully equipped in August. 1872, 
and reported to be doing a large business ; moreover, it has leased 
that portinn of the Evansville & Crawfordsville Road, between 
Rockville and Terre Haute, and runs daily freight and passenger 
trains from Logansport lo Terre Haute, a distance of 115 miles. 

Eastern Railroad of Mas".— Messrs. Henshaw & Brother of- 
fered at auction, recently, in Boston 2.000 shares of Eastern Rail- 
road stock, by order of the corporation. The terms of the sale 
were 25 per cent, cash at sale. 25 per cent. Jan. 1, 25 per cent Jan. 
15, and 25 per cent Feb. 1, no stock to he delivered till Jan. 1. 

Philadelphia and Reading Railroad.— Notice is given that 
the bonds for the new Convertible Loan of the Philadelphia and 
Readinif Railroad Company are ready for delivery on January 2d, 
1878. to Such subscribers as have paid, or will have paid by that 
time, their subscriptions in full. 

Interest upon all installments paid prior to January Ist, 1873, 
will be paid at the office of the company, upon presentation of 
receipts on or after January 2d. 1878. 

— The last rail on Ihe Buffalo, New York and Philadelphia 
Railway was laid Dec. 23, near Emporium, Pa. There was a gene- 
ral excursion over the road on Saturday, the 28th ult. Coal from 
the Cameron mines will be brought over the road at once. 

— The last, rail on the Shore Line, connecting the West Wis- 
consin and Chicago and Northwestern railways, was laid Dae. 23. 
— The Owensboro and Russelville Railroad has been consoli- 
dated with the Cumberland and Ohio roaa. 

— Mr. Francis 0. French, who has had charge of the foreign 
exchange department of the banking-house of Jay Cooke & Co. 
since the establishment of their London house, becomes a mem- 
bsr of the firm Jan. 1. 



January 4, 1373 } 



THE f^TTRONICLE 



15 



BkMm AND FINANCIAL 
bankiWoFficb ofTusiO~hatch, 

New York, Jan. 2, 1873. 

The CHESAPEAKE and OHrO, the CENTRAL and WEST- 
ERN PACIFIC BONDS, all of which have been negotiated by 
us, we believe to be among the best and most desirable Invest 
mcnt Securities in the market, which in time must become very 
scarce ; especially as the Government will probably, during 
this year, pay off in gold another large lot of Fivb-Twentibs, 
and issue in their place Five Per Cent. Bonds. 

The CHESAPEAKE AND OHIO SIX PER CENT. GOLD 
BONDS, the total amount of which is only $15,000,000, are 
secured upon a property worth $35,000,000 to $40,000,000, and 
are fully equal in intrinsic value to the Central Pacific Bonds. 
They are issued in denominations of $100, $500 and $1,000, cou- 
pon or registered, and at their present market price, 86 and ac- 
crued interest, are very desirable. 

The CENTRAL PACIFIC SIX PER CENT. GOLD BONDS 
are too well known to require description or commendation. 
Their total amount is $25,883,000 ; they have for a long time 
ranged in market price near or above par. 

The WESTERN PACIFIC SIX PER CENT. GOLD BONDS 
amount to $3,735,000. This road is now consolidated with the 
Cbntral Pacific, and the payment of its bonds, principal and 
interest, is assumed by the latter. Coupon Bonds, $1,000 each. 
Tlieir market price to-day is 89 to 89^. Ac they have recently 
been introduced on the Stcok Exchange, we expect to see 
them rapidly rise to the price of CENTRAL Pacifics, being 
substantially the same in character and value. 

We buy and sell, as usual. Government Bonds, receive deposits, 
on which we allow interest, make collections, and conduct a gene- 
ral banking busineia in all its branches. 

FISK & HATCH. 



TO INVESTORS. 

To those who wish to REINVEST JANtJARY COUPONS OR 
DIVIDENDS, and those who wish to INCREASE THEIR IN- 
COME from means already,invested in other less profitable securi- 
ties, we recommend the Seven-Thirty Gold Bonds of the Northern 
Pacific Railroad Company as well secured and unusually produc- 
tive. 

The bonds are always convertible at Ten per cent, premium 
(I'lO) into the Company's Lands at Market Prices. The Rate of 
Interest (seven and three-tenths per cent, gold) is equal now to 
about 8i currency — yielding an income more than one third 
greater than U. S. 5-20's. Gold Checks (or the semi-annual inter 
est on the Registered Bonds are mailed to the Post Office address 
of the owner. All marketable stocks and bonds are received in 
exchange for Northern Pacifies ON MOST FAVORABLE TERMS. 
JAY COOKE & CO., 
New York, Philadelphia, and Washington, 

Financial Asienta Northern Pacific Railroad Co. 

A FIRST nORTGAGB SUVEN PER CENT. GOLD BOND 

npon a railroad that is earning a dividend upon stock, besides 
interest upon its bonds, ib seldom offered at so low a price as 
90 and interest. 

THE CHICAGO, DANVILLE AND VINCENNES RAILROAD 
is making such earnings, and we have a small amount of its 
bonds to sell at the above price. 

Maps, statement of earnings, and full particulars furnished 
upon application to 

W. B. SHATTUCK & CO., BAifxERS, 

23 Nassau street. New York, 
General Agents. 



TO Gr ARDIANS AND lEXECVTORS. 

THE EQUITABLE TRUST COMPANY— Capital, $1,000,000— 
•re offering First Mortgage Real Estate Bonds, guaranteed by 
themselves, at par and accrued interest. Every Bond is secured 
by Real Estate of double value, appraised under the most rigid 
rales, and approved by the following Executive Committee: 
Robert Lenox Kenedt. Adrian Ibelin, John D. Maxwell- 
Charles Bctler, Samuel Willets, Eugene Kellt, Peter 
McMartin, Wm. Remsen and Henry P. Haven. 

Jonathan Edwabds, Presideat, No. 76 Cedar Street, N.Y. 



Bankiho House of Henrt Clews & Co ) 
82 Wall street. N. Y. '\ 

Bills of Exchange, Circular Notet, Travelers' and CommercUl 
Credits issued available in all parts of the world. 

Deposits received, subject to check on demand. Interest 
allowed on all Dally Balances, every accommodation sod fad lit j 
afforded usual with City Banks. 



We offer the balance of the First Mortgage (only |16,000 psr 
mile) Eight Per Cent. Gold Quarterly Coupon Bonds of th« 
I-ogansport, Crawfordsville and Southwestern Railway of Indiana. 
This road is finished and equipped, and already does a large 
business in the transportation of block coal. 

JONES & SCHUYLER, 12 Pine street. 



^l)t liSankera' <Ba}Citt, 



DIVIDENDH. 

The followine DiTldendt hav* b«en declared dnrlne the pastwsek : 



COJfPAHT. 



iRallroads. 

Uonsatonlc pref , 

I'orturoouth, Great Falls ^Conway. 

Easrprn (New HHmpshire ' 

Oil Creek <fc Alleghany River 

WIncheeter & Potomac 

Norwich & Worceatcr 

Patereon & Kainapu , 

Paterson & HniUon River 

Michlean Central (stock) 

Fraiikford & Holmeaburg (Pa.) 

East Mahanoy (Pa.) 

Granite 

Metropolitan 

Second Avenue (quarterly) 

Central of New Jersey (qaarterly) 

Central of New Jersey, ioterest on scrip 

stock to Dec. SI at the rate of 

Attloboro Branch 

East Pennsylvania 

Delaware 

Cayuga ifc Susquehanna 

Piits., F.Wayne (fcChtc, spec. guar, (qnar) 
" " '■ guar. (quar.).. 

Ranks. 

Second Nat»oral 

Fifth National (qiiarterlv) 

Firs' National (Jersey City) 

Dry Goods 

Elcvenih Ward 



(SSi. I?2^.. »<»" cu»»- 



1^ 
n 

8 

S 

4 

4 

4 

3 

8 free 

»4 

»« 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan . 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jitn. 
Jan. 
Jan. 



Jan. 10 to Jan. II. 
Dec. 81 to Jan. 18. 
Dec 31 to Jan. is. 



Jan. 

Jan. 
Jan. 



90 
15. 
15. J 

8- 

1. 

laiDecSl toJui.lt. 

8. 

8.' 

27. 'Jan. tto JsD. tr. 



1. 



8. 1 Dec. n to Jan. T. 

10. 1 Dec. 81 to Jan. 10. 

iH I Jan. 2U.' Jan. 4 to Jan. H. 



I 
SO.lJan. 4 to Jan. tl. 
1. 
SI. 

». 
1. 
1. 



Bull's Head (quarterly) 

New York National Exchange.. 

Long Island (Brooklyn) 

Insnranoe. 

Clinton Fire 

Mechanics' Fire (Brooklyn) 

Nassau Fire. . . 

New .Jersey 'Newark) 

Pccple's Fire 

Sun Mutual 

misrellanena. 

Consumers' Ice Company 

Home Petro.eum Company 



7pr. an. 'Jan. 
$8 so; Jan. 
tl SO Jan. 

8 ... , 

5 Jin. 

IV Jan. 

1« ]jan. 

B IJan. t. 

3H Jan. S. 

TV free. 'Jan. S 

SX^free. Jan. 10.'D*C U to Jan. la 

8ii free. Jan. ». 

4 free. iJan. S. 

8 Jan. 6.1 

B Jan. ». 

B tjan. S.I 

S 'Jan. 3.1 

10 Jan. «.| 

10 Jan. S I 

6 free. Jan. S.Dec. 16 to Jan. 1. 

8X .on dem. ' 



10 IJan. 15. 
SOcts. ' on dem.' 



IfRIDAT Etbsiks, J»n. 3. itTtt. 

The IHoBey market. — There had been no important relaxs^ 
tion in the money market previous to this afternoon, when a 
tendency toward easier rates was perceptible, and some loans 
toward the clpse were made at 7 per cent, currency, and 
even lower than that. The ruling rates on call loans have 
previously been 7 per cent, gold per annum, and sometimes 
1-16, i and up to i of one per cent, a day. The disburse, 
ments on account of dividends and interest are progressing 
rapidly, and it is estimated that the payments In this city dur 
ing thirty days from date will not fall much short of $65,000,000' 
while the payments in Boston and Philadelphia would swell the 
amount to about $100,000,000. The effect of these enormous 
sums disbursed by corporations. States and cities, will naturally 
be to increase largely the amount of loanable funds and produce 
an easier money market. If we may judge, however, by previous 
years, a material relaxation can hardly be expected before the 10th 
of January. 

For commercial paper the quotations on prime endorsed are 9(3 
12 per cent., and there is no pressure to sell at these rates. It is 
evident that there is an expectation of coming ease in the money 
market, and that lower rates on paper are expected soon. 

The advices from London are favorable to-day, although there 
were some contradictory reports about the London money market 
on a previous day of this week. The Bank of England gains 
£347,000 in bullion, and the rate remains at 5 per cent. ; the Bank 
ot France gains 500,000 francs. 

In regard to the European money markets, it is stated that on 
January 1st another instalment of £8,000,000 is paid the German 
Government by the French. On February 1, still another instal- 
ment of £3,000,000 is due; also the same amount March l.and 
again April 1. On the other hand, the German Government 
begin January 1 to pay off from £13,000,000 to £15.000,000 of their 



re 



THE CHRONICLK 



[January 4, 1873. 



loan*, contracted during the war with Prance, bo that the effect of 
these large January payments is rather In lavor of ease in the 
Enropean markets. 

The last statement of our New Tork City Banks (Dec. 28) 
showed an increase of $1,173,575 In the oicess of reserves. Tlie 
total liabilities stood at |220,102,60O ; the total reserve at 
1.58,861,400, being f 1,885,750 more than 25 per cent, of the lia 
biliiies. 

The following statement shows the changes from previous week 
and a comparison with 1871 and 1870: 



-isn.- 



Dac. 21. Dec. a. 

Lo«Bl>n4 dll. ... 12^:3:1. IW r^74,3iM"0 

Bpccle rJ.-s.K'j U2ti,!»i 

Clrcnlatlon a;.5£j.T« 27.5:3.000 

NetdepotlU l'Jil.4M.*»l J1I-.3.«I,&M 

L«nUenden... 4I.6>>.70U 41.iIti.»JU 



DUfereDCes. 
Dec. I1J239.000 
lliC. 4,463,700 
Ino . 50.S00 
Dec. • 8114,200 
Dec. S,607,I0O 



1871. 

Dec. s;. 

»27() .834,0 

25.019.500 

as.M.'.eoo 

SW.IOJ.SOO 
40.i5IJ.SW 



ISTO. 
Doc. 31. 

rj(8.-il7,4is 
;0.S2i.M9 
82.153.511 
lSi.223.9!ili 
45,243,338 



United States Bond*.— Qovemment securities were rather dull 
early in the week, and a little weaker on Thursday, in Bympatliy 
with gold, but to-day there was a more active demand, and prices 
were steady. It is to be expected that the market will be pretty 
active during the present month, as there are many individuals 
and corporations who still adhere to governments as their favor- 
ite investments. The offerings to the Treasury on the advertise- 
ment for $1,000,000 of 5-20's for the sinking fuud, on Thursday, 
amountird to only $26G,2!>0, none of which vfcre accepted as below 
par in gold. The Assistant Treasurer has called in another lot of 
the three per cent, certificates, on which interest will cease after 
Feb. 28, 1873. 
Closing prices daily have been as follows, to which we ad(j 

the range daring the year 1872 : 



Dec. Doc. 

2& 30. 

Ill ♦!U 

114K lUX 

117X lis 

112J4 •lliH 

UJH 'IISW 



Sa.rnnd, 1881, op.. 

6a,IS31, rsg 

e>, 1881, coup 

t-30'Him, coup... 
:-20'st<», coap... 

s-s<r«iw5, " ... 'iia*' 

•-'.»■> t6«5,Il" ... M«X 

5-a)'»i8«7. " ... inx 

i-20'8l868, " ... 'Ul 

10-4U'», rcK "109^ 

10-40'9, coapon.... lOOfc 
Currency 6'9 lisjf 



•112X 

117), 
■UiX 
'lO.IJf 



Dec. Jan. 

Si. 1. 

•liiX : 

114« : 

•117« : 

•;i2v : 

•I12X m 

•usS S. 

lisji s 

117H g 

109 V 



Jan. Jan. 

•nix •ui 

•114Sfi VUH 



-1S72.- 



109;< 'KWV 
1I3X 118« 



M4X 

iiajc 
•liaji 

1!3X 

xiiax 

X1I.3K 
I113J« 

110>i 



1I4H 
112 J< 

ICI9« 



103« •;oa;>< 
113 "112H 



.— Loweat.-s . — Highest.-^ 
107X Fob. 8 U3« July 6 
112* Dec. 2 UlM May 25 
114K Jan. 8 1X1% June C 
109X Jan. 11 UOH AUR. S 
109XJan. lllllliX Aug, ■ 



!10:!<Jan. 13 
109J< Jan. 11 
IKXPeb. 8 
lUf^ leb. 9 
107 Kel). 
107XMch.lS 
Ul Oct. 5 



llCx Aue. 1 
inx June 6 
113H June 29 
117V June 3 
:nj< July 3" 
113X Aug. 16 
U7J4 May 29 



■ Thla la tbe price bid. no tale waamade at the Board. 

Closinfr prices of securities in London have been as follows : 



03. S«. 1120s, -65... 
U. S.Sa, 5-208. '67.. 

n.B.5s, 10-408 , 

New 58 



Dec. Dec. 
20. 27. 



92 k 
62 (< 
8SH 
B9X 



92 

33 K 
S3X 



Jan. 
S. 



92V 
92 V 



Year Isit 

Loweat. I Highest. 



WX Nov.ir. 94?i Jan. 2 

91 June 19 ax Dec. 12 

36V Nov. 11 92« Jan. 17 

S^a Feb. 8| 9:h Jan. 8 



.State and Kallroad Bonds. — Southern State bonds have 
been quite inactive, as these bonds can hardly be classed now as 
investment securities, and the speculative demand is held in 
check by the uncertainty as to what action may be taken by the 
respective Legislatures, and also by the unfortunate political dis 
turbances in several ot the States. It has been announced to-dav 
that the Louisiana State interest due January 1 will not be paid 
at present, owing to the non-collection of taxes ; also that default 
is made in interest payment on the Buchanan coauty bonds of 
Missouri, the Lafayette county bonds of Missouri, and the Knob 
Noster school bonds ot Missouri. 

Railroad bonds have been in fa,vor, and we hear (^f numerous 
inquiries from investors, particularly from parties out of town. 
There is a good demand l>oth for old bonds and for the new loans 
now offering in our market. Several of the latter are quite at- 
tractive in their terms, and are apparently sound securities. 

Closing prices daily have been as follows, to which we add the 
range during the year 1872 : 

"~ ■" Jan. Jan. Jan. ^ 1S73.- 



Dec. 
80. 
7»« 
■79 



Dec. 
81. 
80 

si" 

•19 



Dec. 
a. 

(•Tenn., old "TSx 

•aTcnn., new 79 

fiN.Car.. old 

68N.Car.. nev 

»8Vlrg.,oM 

" "^cousolld'd '.54 V 55K 54 
" " deferred.. M5X '15 'isw 
««8.C.,n, J.& J. 22H 22K 22 

•• Mluonrl 66 •93>i 93X 

Cent. Pac. gold.. •102X 1U2 J02W 

On.PaclBf. »>!4 n Wu 

Un. PacL'dOr't 79X 79 TsS 
na. P. Income... !1!< -eiH' WJV 
N.T. Cen, 6s, 1883. •92x w2 '98 

Erleutm.78 lOls MOO 101 

K.J. Con Istm 7s "103 '103 'laSH 
Ft Wayne 1st m 7s •1(;4 MOIV '104 
Chic* NW.sf 78 '100 •100« ... 
Kock Uld Ist IB 78 104 108X MOSK 



Jan. 
2. 
60 

•78 

•.<3iJ 

•19 

•ji" 

'92;< 

I99X 

8iX 

79 

83X 

•92 

•101 

•lOSX" 



Jan. 
3. 

79K 
•79V 

83 ti 
•19 

w'js 

I"! 
»2V 
99' 

e-.' 

■;9K 

83 
•93X 

103)4 



•100>i 'KOH 
'100 lOO.H 



.-Lowest.-, .-Highest. 
63H Jan. 5| S2>j T)ec. 12 
63K Jan. 4I SS Dec. 12 
SOM June 1 38X Mch. 12 
laM Jan. 21 25 Jlch. IJ 
41J« July 22 59 Jan. !5 
50 Oct. 3 60 Dec. 13 
15 Sept.2C| 21 Jan. -.0 
22 Dec. Si 40 Mch. 26 
92 Sept.-.' 9S Juno24 
99 Sept. : JlOSX Juno 6 

88 Nov. Ill 34H Jan. 17 
73XNOV. Ili85 Mch. 19 
76 Nov. 19 88V Jan. 18 

89 Nov. 16 97 July !6 
100 May 4 101 Oct. 28 
101 V Oct. 10 108K Jan. 17 
103 .Jan. 26 107« June29 

96XSept. 4 lOE Jan. 16 
lOJXSept.wllOlX June 3 



• Tnt« U the price bid, no nalt was made at the Board, 

Kallroad and Ml.ceUaneou. Stocks.-stocks have not 
shown extraordinary activity, but prices are generally pretty firm 
The situation of the market is said to be such that the majoritv 
of operators on a moderate scale and holders of stocks and conse- 
quently favorable to a rise in prices ; on the other hand some of 
the heaviest speculators are reported to have been unwillino- to 
buy in at the prices lately current, and are not committed on 
either gide. It does not appear, however, that there is any stronir 
party decidedly on the bear side, and it is therefore concluded 
that higher prices are the most probable. In addition to the in- 
fluonce of an easier money market which is every day expected 
tlie large disbursements at this time stimulate activitv bv fur- 
nishing funds both for investment and speculation. 

... .*"?i"'"^°''.'"'"'*'*^'K^«''*»n«' lowest prices of the active 
MMoi railroad and misoellaneouBstocks on each day of thelastweek • 



N.T.CenAH.tt 

Barlem 

Krie 

do prot 

Lake Siiore.... 

Wabash 

Eforthwest 

do prel. 
Itock Island. .. 

St. Paul 

do pref... 
Ohio A SflsBlp. 
Central of N. J 
Uo«tou.H*E. 
Del., L.& W... 
Bann. ti St Jos 
do pref 
anion PaclOc. 
Col CI1IC.& I.e. 

Panama 

West. Un.Tel. 
Quicksilver ... 

do pref.. 
PaciacMall ... 
Adams £xp-.. 
Aui. Merch. Ex 
United States.. 
Wells, Fargo.. 
Canton 



Satnrdav 
Dec. 28. 

98 V 9»H 
115 1I5S 

6!« O.'Ji 
•76 78 

USX 96 

V^l 

PBii 89 

110X11IJ4 

53V 51H 

r.H 7'X 

48(4 49 

H'2X 102X 
8« 9K 

•92 93 

48 49 

6HK 68K 

3'ii 37W 

86H 67X 

'155 129 • 

80X 81X 

•.... 46i{ 

•50 5G 

73X 75X 

•63 94 

•67X 68 

,7?H 79}< 

lolx 102), 



Monday. 
Dec. 30. 

9SS tS% 
lUM lUV 
61 )i 62X 
n'A 77)4 
9'H 96 
74X 75 
sax e-.H 
tax 89 
IIOV tux 
53X 54 

77 7;« 

13 18V 
1C2V 102V 

8X 9 
•92>i 92V 

r.H 47)4 



Taesday, Wednesd'y 
Dec. 81. Jan. 1. 

»v« loux : 

114K 1I4K : 

o>K 6'H : 

•76)4 78 : 

95»< 96 : 

74X 75X • 

B2X m •■ 

83 H S'<H : 

liiiviux : 

93,S 54 , ■. 

is" 43V : 

102X 102)4 K 

8x 8v a 



MX 
87 



711 
87X 



'92H 83 
•47« 48X 



.36X 36)i 

125 12! 

80 31 

•16 47 

•SIX 55V 

73« 75V 

•esK nn 

C7>4 68 



70 
87V 



79H 

86 

'101 



R6 
105 



;o 

87 

sex S6V 

X125 125 

79X SIX 

iJX 74X 
•92 94 
68 68 
79 79!4 
•t5X t7 
WIS 102X 



ThnrBday 
Jan. 2. 
99J4 100X 

lumux 

6UX 61V 

• . . . 73 
95V 86X 
••i% 75V 
8WX f2X 
88>S 8>X 

111 lllV 
53V 54 
77X 77X 
4f-X 49H 

102 102 X 
8X 8X 

•92V .... 
46X 45V 
7u TO 
37X 88 
S6V S7X 

128 128 
79J« SIX 
46X 46X 



i?x 



79 

•*5X 
•101 



4V 
94 
69 
79 
86', 
U3X 



. Krlday, 
Jan. 3. 
>9X 100 

■!:.. '<^ 

S3 8S 

68)< SfX 

lilVlllX 

S! ii.^ 
77); 77X 

4SX ilH 
1(2 102X 

8X ev 

93X MX 

48k 48X 

70 70 

87X 89 

87 SSX 

•126 ISO 

fO m% 

46X 4«X 

■51V ■« 
7n» 74V 

•98X .... 

6«X 6SX 

79 79 

•35 86 

•100 .... 



• This Is tbe price bid and asked, no sale was made attbe Board. 
The range in these stocks during the year 1872 was 

-1372.- 



NTCen&HB. 

Harlem 

Erie 

do pref 

Lake Shore 

Wabash 

Nurtliwest 

do pref. 

Rocklaland 

St. Paul 

do pref 

Ohio &M1SS,.. 
';:eiitral of N.J. 
Boston. H. &£ 
Del.. L.4 W.. 



-Lowest.-^ .-Higliest.^n ^Lowest.- 

89 Nov. ll.lOlJi Anr. 2liHann.diSt.Jos 28 Nov. 
107X Feb. 12 130 Apr.251 do do pref 14 Sept. 

80 Feb. 61 75:!<.May2o; Union Pacillc. 28X Jan. 

60 Mch. 2 1 87 May 20 Col. Chic.& I.C. 19V Jan. 

83KNov.ll 98XMcn.S0 Panama... 'A Jan. 

... »-__ ..I n„,, ._. ■' West U Teleg'h 67X Sept. 



tl" Kov.Ul «Mi Apr. 
66X Jan. 5 230 N0V.J3 



t3XNov.ll 
10! Nov. 11 
51 Nov. 11 
72XNov.ll 
40 Nov.ll 
93 Oct. 4 
3X Jan. 2 
91 Dec. 18: 



102 Nov.25 

llSXApr. 2 
64X Apr. 1 
83 Jan.20 
51X Apr. 1 

118)4 Jan. 15 
UX May 18 

U2)tMcb.l8 



Quicksilver 25X Jan 

do prei. 30 Jan. 

PacltlcMall.... 63J< Jan. 

Adams Express 8Sv: Sept. 

Am Merch Un. 59 .Tan. 

U.S. Express... 60X Jan. 

Wells, ¥. &. Co. 66X Jan. 

Canton 76 Jan. 



as follows: 

1872. , 

^ ^Highest.-, 
II S9X Jan. 17 
IS 7IX Jau.19 

5 42 Apr. 1 
«VMay21 

118V Oft. 26 
a2X Dec. 23 
49X Dec. 6 
59 Oct. 21 
103X Oct. 22 
,18, 9!)K May 20 

6 SOV May 24 
11 esx July c 

4! 95 May 21 
6i;07 Oct. 23 



Tbe Gold market.— Gold has been free from speculative ex 
citoment, and the price tends downward, closing at 11 If this 
evening. In the absence of any important speculative support 
to the market, the price will now be left to take a natural course 
as regulated by the supply and demand both for mercantile pur- 
poses and for export. Our export during the past year has been 
large, and the relative amount sent abroad during 1873 will 
depend, of course, very largely upon the amount of American 
securities whi( h will be taken in the foreign markets. The bids 
for the Treasury gold on Tharsdav amounted to $3,435,000, tbe 
amount sold being $1,000,000. The lowest bid was 111, and 
the highest 111.09. The rate paid for carrying to-day were 7, 
7 gold, 1-32, 6J, 5, 4, and 6 per cent, and 1-64 for borrowing. 
Customs receipts for the week amount to 1,618,000. 

The following table will show the course of the gold premium 
each day of the past week : 

ijuoiatlons.- 



Open- Low- High- Cios- Total , 

ing. est. est. ing. Clej.rfngs. 

Satnrday,Dec.28 1:2 I'.'.H U-'X 112 J1J.4I7.0D0 

Monday, " SO IIIK 111!* lUX 112 S7.i:,=3.000 

Ttlesday, " 31 112 112 112)J 112X 75,6«0,000 

Wed'day, Jan. 1 Holidav 

Thursday, " S i;2X HIX 112K 1'15< 85,066.000 1,609.952 

Friday, " 3 IIIV i:iX l^V mV 49,925,000 1,149.219 



Balances. — -» 

Gold. Currency. 

H.6;3.5»4 $2,517,419 
1.510.615 1.715.690 
3.3:2,:56 8,804.831 



Currentweek ;:2 lUX 

Previous week IIIX 111)4! 

Kan^e during 1872 109X 108X 



112H 

112« 
USX 



lllV 
112 



217.ni.000 
W5,9I2,(100 



1.419.219 
1,6M,T27 



2,0-0,533 
2^26,781 



2.326.7S! 
1.908,012 



The following are the quotations in gold for fcieign and Ameri 
can coin : 



American gold (old coinage) 

4 p. c. premium. 

Sovereigns fi 87 @tl 92 

Napoleons 3 B3 (» 3 P8 

German X thalers 7 85 la 7 75 

Prns'lan X thalers 8 05 @ 8 15 

G.-rnian Kronen 6 65 ® 6 70 

XgulLlers 3 90 ® 4 00 

Spun sh doubloons 15 60 @ 16 20 

Patriot doubloons 16 50 r<o 15 70 

American Sliver (new).. — 97X'(S — 93)i 



American silver (old coinage) 

„, ^ .. .. ^. 182 p.c. premlnm. 

Dimes and hall dimes.. - 96 @ — 97x 

Five francs - 96 ® — 93 

Fianes -19 ® — !9X 

KngUsh silver 4 30 ® 4 85 

Prussian thalers.. — 70 @ — 72 

Specie thalers 104 ® 106 

Mexican dollars.. I 04 @ 106 

Spanish dollars 101 is 102 

South American dollars par 



Foreign Exchange. — Exchange has been alternately firm and 
weak ; to-day the tendency was toward easier rates, as the demand 
was moderate and prices had already been advanced to tolerably 
high figures. Business was gentrally done at a concession of -J 
from the prices quoted below. A cable transfer of £100,000 was 
sold at 110 7-16 on Thursday. The smaller supply of cotton bills 
during the past few weeks, and the demand to make remittances 
at the first of the year, have recently been favorable to firmness 
in prices. An evening newspaper reports a rumor to-day that 
£700,000 of sixty days' sterling had been loaned on stock collat- 
erals. 

Quotations are as follows : 

60 dayi. 
London prime banKers.. 109X13 



commercial !03)i®10eK 

Paris (bankers) 6.22X85.23V 

Antweip 5.20 <i,5.21X 

Swiss- 5.18V35 SO 

Amsterdam 40X!<i'>0X 

Hamburg 95\'@96 

Frankfort 4Ixa41X 

Bremen 95VS96 

Prussian thalers 72 @7.'X 



3 days. 

noxsfiox 
■ ...®.... 

I!.17X®!.I8V 
5. IS «S.16X 
e.l5 ®5.16X 
40X840V 
96VS97 
41X«41V 
96Va9T 
72X®72V 



The transactions for the week at the Custom House and Sub- 
Treasury have been as follows; 



Saturday, Dec. 28.... 

Monday, " 3') 

Tuesday. " 81.... 

Wednesday ,Jan. 1 

Thursday, '* 2 

Friday, •• 3.... 



Custom 

House 

Receipts. 

ii:80.oo0 
3:0.000 
231,000 



-Sub-Treasnry.- 



-Receipta.- 
Golrt. Currency. 



460,000 
397,000 



■Payment*. , 

_ _ _. ,. Gold. Currency. 
1210.526 03 H 296.932 fo 12,875.606 28 »738.978 :« 
511.332 11 353,659 60 439,193 99 60^.215 90 
670,237 32 1,611,0)0 81 841,317 02 2.117,613 59 

Holiday. 

3,239,863 45 211.310 46 534.S15 31 558.308 81 
833,993 31 489,763 S3 773,8*7 64 628,926 29 



Total 11,618.000 

Balance, Dec. 27 141361.809 62 t30.8S9,996 66 

Balance, Jan. 3 t40,2a9,5«l 68 f40,0ip,629 84 



Jaunary 4, 1873.] 



THE CHRONICLR 



17 



Nbw York Cn-Y Banks.— The foUowlnx Btatement ghows llie 
condition of the Associated Banks of New York City (or the week 
ending »' 'lie commencement of business on Dec. 28, 1872 : 



Bahki. 

How V'orK.. .. 
Manliattaa Co., 
Mcrctitinta* ... 

UiiChanlGB , 

DnlOD 

America.... 



f ■ — — ATlSAea AMOUNT 0» 

Loans and Lentil Net 

Capital ni-jcoiint* BpAcle. TflnderB. Deposits . 
. »i),uo(),oooj;o.;i7juo B,M7,ocie |8t5.(X)u Mjsn.'OO 



'i.0SO.00« 
9,000,000 
3,000,000 
1,500.000 
3,000,000 



Phfflnlr; ,. 1,800,000 

city 1,000,000 

TradesmeQ's l.'WO.OOO 

Falton (00,000 

Chemical 300,000 

Unrchanta RxchaiiRe.... l.'^35,000 

Gallatin, National 1,500,000 

Butchers' cS Urovcra' 800,000 

Mechanloand Tradera', 600,000 

Oreenwloh 200.000 

Leather Mannf..... (00,000 

Beventn Ward, 500,000 

•tfttn 01 New Vorlc a,0JO,noo 

AmertcanRxcbanKe 5,000,000 

Oommerce ' 



s.s^e.aoo 

6.97^,800 
5,5;8,500 

4.60j.saa 

1,709,000 
4,276.700 
4,727,900 
8,121,800 
1,753,500 

e.iffl.noe 

2,«8.1,700 
3,4S2,;00 
2,391,100 
l,9i2 2tKI 
9«).31'0 
2.050.900 
1,133.100 
4.W5.100 
9,910 Oug 



428,100 
1,1T7,900 
490 JOO 
480,600 
8S1,20C 
973,200 
530,800 
2O«,T0O 
110,0IH^ 
3H.2O0 

fti.axi 

312,900 
4<),10C 
12,800 

siiii'sac 

19,40C 
289, W 



10,000,000 21.7«.20C 
1,000,000 8.698.800 



781,000 
889,700 
T05,ll« 
SDO.tOa 
'79,900 
311,100 
219,000 
469,111(1 
Ml ,000 
881,100 
7:0.000 

an.ioo 

816,700 

344,700 

1)3.200 

842,300 

l(i8,10e 

33:1,500 

545,500 I, 003,200 

7;2,40C 2,978,000 

I7S,100 l,7«O,800 



148,81X1 
15.600 
8<9.000 
120,200 
700 
217,500 
193.900 

i:,;vjo 

S36,3i)0 
46,^00 
81 3U0 

105,700 
6l),('00 

179,400 
53.S00 

123,400 
22.400 
5,700 

238.90D 
45.100 



7,-0.1110 
422,70C 
253,600 
514,800 
152,500 
180,000 
232,900 
678.000 
5;.1..«0 
272,900 
230.200 
8W,91iO 
408,100 
598,300 
188,000 
353.1100 
456,600 
191,100 
241,000 
148 J»0 



8,;co.«oo 

4,131,100 
8.817,300 
2,836.000 
4,565,500 
8;08t,80V 
3,071,100 
2.001,800 
!.256,3C0 
3,931,700 
2,29;,500 
1.484.600 
1.5il,5iO 
1,161,900 

754,500 
1,S32.7U0 

■31,000 
!,90«,100 
4.898,600 
8,003.800 
7 781 ,40C 
3,038,50C 
1,862,010 
3,633,600 
2.459,600 
1,229,800 
2,983,400 
1,194,200 
2,0(11 IW 



CIreoU- 

tlon. 

1827,800 

9,100 

*75,3W 

co2eoo 

48CMO 

:,auu 

S06,tU) 

7i>V,.i66 



448.100 
485,41X1 
2I5.5D0 
1»5.7(I0 
2,700 
261,200 
170.715) 
5l5.t«XI 
Ii60.o:ri 
3.115.900 
VOO.IM) 
4 ;7.600 

M-y.-oo 

129,70(1 
5,6U0 

232,i(i6 
li«1.200 



3,413,800-11,173,50(1 
1,23.-|,S00 131.100 
1,7I5..'!00 



3.5-.>,40C 2,217,600 
735,600 3,515,400 
47,800 214,100 



3,700 
14.700 

O.3U0 
30,400 



125.700 
ISS.OOO 
185.500 
269,100 



:,:o),500 4,(181,400 

141,100 2,321,000 

846,308 

285,000 1,367,(100 

868.300 1,031,900 

6;6.ll00 927,500 



IS,20O 

117 400 

3,100 

iss'-oi'io 

8,o00 



250,200 
974,6(10 
242,000 
865,000 
614,000 
292,500 



l,6:0.(X)0 

995.800 

2,189,600 

1.149,000 

1,606,100 

!.iil1.(00 

1.189.300 

1.507 ..500 

575,IK)0 

11,716,100 

17,T.!0.4(lO 

959,:!00 

556.8(0 

932,800 

6a.9O0 

l,3<6,6(IC 

17,197,300 

6.501,(100 

1,081,000 

5,327,000 

4,425.900 

5,0S8,600 

820,900 

2,571,900 

823 aio 

9W,700 

4.307,6(10 

1,801,000 



Broadway.. 

laercantlle 1,000,000 8,sl.i.iH0 

Pacinc 122,700 1,616,0(10 

BepabllC 3,000,000 5,.5,S8.600 

Chatham 4.50,000 2,146,500 

People's 412,500 1.491,000 

North America 1,000,000 8,l7.>i.400 

Hanover 1,000,000 22(>I,700 

irvlnar 500.000 2.093,000 

MotropoUtaa 4,000,000 9,OI2.4'JO 

Citizens 400.000 1.370,100 

Nansao 1.000,000 1,934,600 

Market 1,000,000 2,712,000 

8t. Nicholas 1,000.000 2.518,600 

Shoe »nd Leather 1,000.000 3,326.500 

Corn rfichange 1,000000 i.52l.400 

Continental 2,000.000 3,583.800 

Commonwealth 750.0O0 1.893,2()o 

Oriental 300,000 1.511,200 

Marine 400,000 1.943.600 

At'.aMlc 800.000 817.500 

Importers and Traders'.. 1,500.000 12.71J5.00(J 

Park.. 3,000,000 14,9()I70C 

Mechanics' Banking ASS. 500,000 1.224.100 

G rocers' SCO.OOO 710,700 

North liiver' 400.000 1.112.3U0 

KastUlver 850,000 1,03.'.300 

Manufacturers &Mer.... soo.fioo 1.485.6on 

Foartti National 5,000,000 21,15;.70O 

Oentfal National 8,000,000 10,048,000 

Second K»;i:ual 300.000 l,456.(loo 

Ninth National 1.500,000 5.824,000 

First National 500,000 4.(W,70O 

Third National 1,000.000 5,892,600 

New York N. Bxchanee 500.000 1.23i,!i00 

Tenth Natlon-ii 1,000.000 3.245,900 

Bowery National 250.000 1.211,000 

Now York Connty aijO,000 1.113,900 

German American 2,000.000 5,552,S00 

Dry Goods 1,000,000 2,229.700 

Total... 3M20.200 274,572.400 17,211,800 41,119,600 193,529,600 S7.S73,C0O 

The deviations from the returns ol previous week are as follows : 



oans Dec, Jl,239,00f I Net Deposits Dec. |894,200 

Specie liic, 4,463 700 Circulation .... Inc. 50,t;o 

Legal TeuJers. Deo. 3,307,1001 



39:,S00 
7.37*10 
79(^,9(10 

5,('00 
5«2,.300 
231.0IO 

4,;i 
8(i0.0(,'0 
97.6110 
491,400 
919,5(10 
805.1W 

'..9',0 
10.8.0 
221,500 

2,«37,0WI 
1,460,1(0 
-'55.0(10 
668.0(10 
.115,100 
794.fiO0 
268.400 
8;9,700 
216.0(10 
180,000 



QUOTATIOXS IN BOSTON, PUfLlDELFIII.l, BALTiauBB, &c. 



•wniBiTisa, 



BOSTON. 

Maine 6a 

New Hampshire, 6« 

Vemont M 

Mauacbnsetta <s, Currener,,. 
do <s Gold, int.. . 

do 9t, Gold 

Boston <•, 

do Ss.ifold 

(JhlcaKo BeweraKO 7s 

do Municipal 7s 

Portland 6e, building loan 

Uurllnirton A Mo, L, G.,7 

ClieBtilre,6 

Cln.,aiin.* CleT.,lstM.,7, '»», 
Kastern Masfl..conv..6. 1874... 
Bartiord & Krle, Ist M (new)1, 

do do certificates. 

OgdC4l8hurg & Lake <:h. 8s... 
Old (;ol. » Newport Bds, 6, -». 

do do Bonds, 7, 1877. 

Rutland, new, 7 

Stanstcd & Chambly 7s 

Venn'tCen,, 1st M..cons.,7,*M 

do 2dMort.,7, 18*1, 

Vermont & Can., new. 8 

Vermont ft M ass., 1st M., i, 'SD, 
Boston & Albany stock. . . . 
Boston ft Lowell stock.... 

Boston ft Maine 

Boston ft Providence 

Cheshire pn^ferred 

Chic, Bur. ft Qnlncy 

... „ ^ 'iley.s 



The following are the totals for a series of weeks past : 

Clrcnla. 

Date. Loans. Specie. tlon. Deposits. 

Sept. 28... 372,293.800 1;,<J«3,500 27,7.35,100 195,450.000 41,982.800 

Oft. 3.... 26:i,S10,8UU 9.913,900 27,601,;00 186.1.50,200 41.915,700 

Oct.l!.... 26'(.2 '■',300 U.2i;.8K) 2;,7.37.900 IS9,7a9,.3O0 45,:59,,|00 

Oct. 19.... 270.557,600 lJ.625,.'iO0 27.706.300 201.01,100 52,5f6,400 

Oct. 26.... 2;i,9j5,i«)0 I0,79j,e00 27,686,010 203,22,500 52^312,100 

Nov. 2.... 27i,832,:lOU 11.838.-00 27.591.200 304.405.300 5!,736.,iU0 

Nov. 9.... 377.23l.500 13,121.2'JO 27,5^^,100 2(13.405.600 48,261030 

Nov. 16... 276,933.000 13.590,200 37,599 300 '204.524,600 46,731,600 

Nov. 23.. a76,)61,:!00 12,101, M) 27,5T6,800 199,651,600 45,399,300 

Nov. 30.. 2;6.50J.li01 12,141,200 27,570,91X1 3'JI,9i5,:i00 41,169,500 

nee. 7 ... 2i8.38y,600 13.2119,500 27,569,100 205.019.300 48.401,200 

Dec. 14... 277.620.400 11,719.700 27.513.700 202,911,700 47,217.000 

Dec. 21... 275,811.400 12,773,100 27,522,700 199,42:!,500 44,626.700 

Dec. 23... 274,672,400 17,241,800 27,5;3,0OO 19d,5i9,600 41,119600 



Lec»I, Aggregate 
Tenf1(;rH. CleavlnffR. 
656,8il,4I,s 
777.477,621 
802.221.679 
8t!599.9,;o 
6;9.W.57o 
9U3,910,75i 
6(l,455,C<o 
879,S55.8sT 
T96,902,llJ 
67j.212.01., 
805.55 l,0()y 
TT9.9.i7,29'^ 
807,602,115. 
t608,913,75j 



Bid. 



108 



r,% 



n 

83 



1«J« 



12411 

KB* 



65X 
liiji 



Boston Banks. — Below we g^ive a statetaent of the Boston 
National Banks, as returned to the Clearing' House, on Monday 
Dec. 30, 1873 : 



Banks. Capital 

Atlantic $750,000 

Atlas 1,300,000 

Blackstono 1,500,000 

Boston 1,000.000 

B ovlston ... 600,000 

Broadwav 200,000 

Columbian 1,000,000 



Continental 

JKUot 

Everett 

Kaneull Hall 

Freeman's 

llloho 

Hamilton. 



1,000,0(10 

1,000,000 
200,000 

1,000,000 
800.000 

1,000,000 
730,000 

Howard 1,000,000 

M*rket 800,000 

Massaehnsetts 800.000 

Maverick 40U.000 

Merchants' 8,000,000 

Mount Vernon 200,000 

Now England 1/100,000 

North 1,000,000 

Old Boston 900,000 

Bhawinnt 1,000.000 

Shoe ft Leather 1,000,000 

State 2,000,000 

Suffolk 1,500,000 

traders 600.000 

Tremont 3,000.000 

Washington liO.OOO 

First 1,000,000 

Becond (Granite).,, 1,600000 

Third 300,000 

Bank of Comnicixe 2,000,000 
Bank of N.America l.OOO.iOO 
B'kolRedempHou. 1,000.000 
Bank 01 Ueiiublic... l,5(»i.000 

City l,(««.i.o(io 

Eagle 1,0(X1.01I0 

Kxehange 1,000.000 

Hide ft Leather l,50o,uoo 

Kevere 2,000,000 

Security -200,000 

Union 1,000,000 

Webster 1,500,000 

Commonwealth 500,000 



Loans. 
H.614 30I) 
2.832,400 
8.718.000 
2.2ir!.900 
1.618.200 
320,01)0 
2,t«,000 
l,966.'JO0 
2,337,600 

rie.soo 

3.010.200 
1.51).!.9I0 
2,139.200 
1,522 100 
2,180.300 
1,582,500 
1,895 JOO 
1,049.900 
7,989,400 

592.200 
2.515.600 
3,255.200 
2.014.300 
2.640,500 
2.958,300 
3,718,400 
3.008.800 
1,534,700 
3.26(J.7.10 
l.''41.300 
3,973,200 
5.0Si.4(10 
1.439,51)0 
4,621,.tiiO 
1,913.000 
4.91(i,9(Xl 
2.913,300 
1,J»6.900 
1,879,WI0 
1,365,600 
a,48!l,:oo 
«,827,10(! 

8(19.4(10 
2JM.300 
2,654,000 
2,260,300 



Specie. L.T. Notes. Deposits. Clrcnla. 



»47.70O 
4,100 
91.900 
3..'-00 
17,400 

8,900 

.too 

:l.7O0 

8.610 

130.100 

2.:oa 

6,71)6 
3,600 
23.800 
27,900 
75,000 
131,900 

ii'siii 

21,600 
93,100 
11,500 

27',7()6 
SO.OOO 
36.700 
96,600 
IS.ICO 
37,000 
119.400 
3C.7IIO 
12.400 
4.800 
47,900 

5",™ 
4.700 
12.1,700 
23.300 
4.700 
'2.7110 
8.100 
3.201) 
1,900 



»98,7ll0 
185,300 
390 800 
172,200 
397,300 

61,0'i0 
212,000 

92.100 
208 .(lot 

84.0110 
S(;4,iOO 
100.0 10 
'208.800 
163.900 
174,000 

51.200 
2.'2.700 

S8,900 
976.400 
107.700 
220..300 
237,100 

s-^ioo 

362.300 
247.5C0 
199.100 
257.700 
.53,000 
291,400 
131,800 
4^3.600 
607.900 
128.100 
612.30(J 
280,300 
714,800 
318,100 
115,400 
123,600 
8«l),:oo 

io;,oiio 

4'26.iO(l 
121, K-O 
135,310 
222 900 
318,090 



*445.,500 

836,300 

1.79S.9O0 

1.098.100 

710.100 

258/100 

8:4.000 

595.400 

1,046.200 

490,400 

1,120,900 

556,500 

900,800 

803,400 

719.300 

502,600 

983,700 

527,.300 

4,191.900 

,111.300 

l.OUr.'WO 

1*54,400 

1,166.600 

938,500 

1,316,900 

I, '232,700 

934.300 

770.300 

984,600 

897,91)0 

1 ,247,000 

2,389,600 

1,229.51X1 

1,568,600 

619,200 

1,366,500 

8.', 1,600 

698,400 

693,700 

3.0OI.1OO 

1.127 800 

2,670.400 

630.800 

1.1I7,21W 

1.031,700 

1.878,500 



»4I«.5C0 
J69.700 
7!l7.t'00 
579.200 
441,5(10 
174,000 
793.000 
543,600 
793.S(K) 
117,100 
510,400 
841.M0 
352.100 
242,600 
411.000 
853.4'Xl 
395 600 
241 OUO 
1,577 ODO 
ITS 6 « 
7''3.0Cll 
785,()(XI 
316.1(10 
593,000 
591.100 
975,000 
7S8.9(fl 
174,200 
682.600 
5^7.200 
798.300 
7a5,800 
174.200 
786.9(10 
588.400 
788,100 
795,000 
445,400 
331,7(10 
;95,.500 
775.S00 
750.000 
180,0(10 
582,000 
479,400 
330,(100 



101 
!02k 



119 
UIM 



19 
«H 

89K 

■»■' 

IS 

Mi 

17 

M 



Total t48.390.000 (130.166.500 |I.417,3(iO tll.435.000 151.184.100 $25,597,100 

The total amount "due to other Banks," as per statement of Dec. 80, Is $18,343,300. 



CIn.,S:indnsky ft Clev. stock. 

Concord 

Connecticut River 

Counectlcnt ft Passumpslc, pf. 

Rastern (Mass.1 

Eautern (New Hampshire) 

Fltchhurg 

Manrhester ft Lawrence 

Northern of New Hampshire.. 

Norwich & Worcester 

OKdens. ft L. Champlain 

do do pref.... 

OldCohjny. 

Fort., Saco ft Portsmouth 

Uutland common 

do preferred 

Vermont & Canada 

Vermont A Masf^achnsetta 

PIIIL,ADl!:L,PHIA. 

BTATE A^D CITY BONDS. 

Pennsylvania .58, coup 

(10 6s, '67, 510, 1st.., 

do do 10-15, 2d.,. 

do do 15-35. 3d... 
Philadelphia eg, old 

do 6s, new 

Alleghany rnnnty, Es, coop 

Alleuliany City 68 

Pittsburg 58 

do 68 

do 7« 

New .Jersey State Gs, Exempts 
Doluwaro State Cs 

RAILROAD STOCKS. 

0nltedN. J. Companies 

Camden & Allsntio 

do do prof. 

CatawUsa 

do pref 

Elmlra ft WlUlamsport 

Klmlraft WlllianiMport pref.. 

East ronnsylvanla 

Harrlsb'g. Lancaster* C 

Uuntln.;ton ft Broad Top. .. 
do do pref. 

Lehigh Valley 

Little Schuylkill 

Mlnch'U 

Nt'squehonlug Valley 

Norrlstown 

Nor" hern Central 

No'th I'ennisylvanla 

Oil Creek ft Allegheny River. 

Pennsylvania 

Phlln<lelphla & Frle ....*.... 

Pl.lUdclphla & Reading 

Philadelphia & Trenton 

Phlla., WJmlng.ft Baltiirore 

Tioga 

Westchester , 

do pref 

WestiJersev 

CANAL STOCKS. 

Chcsapcuke ft lifilaware 

Delaware Division 

Lehleh Navigation 

Morris 

do pref 

Schuylkill Navigation 

do pref. ... 
Union pref 

RAILROAD BONDS. 

Alleghany Valley 7 3-lCs, 1896. . 

BelvidereDelaware.lst m,6,'77 

do do 3d M..'35 

do do 3d M.,'37 

Camden ft Amboy, 6s, '75 

do do 6s,'83 

do do ts, '89 

do do mort. «B, '89,.. 

do consol., 6s, '94... 

Cainden ft Atlan. l^t m, 7e, '78. 

do 2d m, 7s, '80.. 

CatawlBsa, 1st M. conv.,'83.... 

do chat. m. do '88.... 

do new 78, iSOO 

Conni'ctlng6s 19(X)-1904 

East Penn. 1st mort. 7s, '88... . 
El. ft W'msport, 1st m, 7s. 'EC.) 9S 

do do 58 .., 

Harrlshurg tst mort. 6s, '83 ... 

H.& B. T. I8tmort.78,*90 IC3 

do 3d mort. 7s, "75.... 
do 3dm. cons. 78. '95. 

Junction 1st mort. 68, '83 

do 2d do 190Q 

Lehigh Valley, 1st M., 6b, IStS. 
do do new 6s, '98... 
do do do rcg... 
do do new 78, reg., Iltio 
Little Schuylkill. 1st M.,7,1(WJ. n\ 
Northern Central 3d m, 68, "SS, 94^ 
do do 2d ID, g. «8, 1100 95 

do do2dm. Ss. 190O... 36.V 

North Penn. 1st m, 6s, '85 

do 2dm. 7s, '96 95 

do lOs. chat.m.,'T7 . 110 

OIlCreek*Al.E..ron.78. '88. 74 

Oil Creek 1st m. 7b. '82 n 

Pem. ft Hlghtstown 7b, '8! 
Penn ft N. Y. Canal 7s, '9«-igM 
Penns¥lTanl»,l8t M.,«.l^, 
do 3d M., 6, ins.. 



«X 



!(BX 



93X 
100 



100.x 
131 H 



19H 






50M 

58X 



taOOIITlM. 



PenSBjl> *., (en. m., COOT, 1910 
_ 'lo do reg..., 

Pcrklonien 1st in.f8,'97 

Phil., ft Krle Isi m. I«, >i 

^ do 2d m. 7», '<»/(,.., 
PlilUdclpbIa ft ltead:nK ••, in 
<!<• do :s. ■9» 

do roBv 7s, *¥ 

do dfb. bones, "ti 

do (. m.7s,e., 1910 

do do reg, , 

6«,g.,l»"o. 
in III. ',».., 



101 H 



IMJi 



"H 



in 



$1 

M9 



48 



13X 



91 



105 



do 
Pblla. 4 Sartinry 

!'hl1.,W1lr,i.* Ili'l 

puts., (In.* St. I,.,iil« 7..!!!! 

SuillMlrv .V J, ;.. !-• 111. 78, "(7. 

f uiilii;i , ■ ri iB 

Warrt , ,^,*l<$ 

WiBl I , ;■, "91 

West Jcrei.'j' '.", .-J., ,,,,..,,, 

do Isim. 6b, 'M 

do do 7», '97 

Weslcrii Penn Cs. '93 

76 do •» 

4S Wllinlng.ftl., ti 

do >;, i'jil 

Reading Coal & irun iit:>, h.. 
oo do mort. b 
1411 „ UA>AL no.iD*. 

... Chesapeake ft Uela. e>,tl..., 

jMX DeUware Division W. ■>< , 

119 Lehigh Navigation 6«, "SI 

'lo Hit. •97, , V» 

do toiv..'7J. 

do conv., g,'9l. 

do Kula. '97 

Morris, lBtM.,«, lire.... ..... 

do 2d M„ fcj 

do boat. '»3 

Pennsylvania rs, 1910 

Sctanyiklll N«v. ist m. 6s. T3.. 

do 2d m., U 

do 6B, '9^ 

do 68, tmp., '^l... 

r'o 68, hoAt, *8B, . 

. do 7B,boat,'M... 

Snsqnebanna 6«, 'n 

do Co»l Co. bonds 

unkm 1st mort.fs, "at 

«est Hrauih Kt m. 6«,'7X.... 
Wyoming Vn ley Ist m. 6«, 18. 

HALTinORK. 
Maryland6s,Jan.. A.. J.ft O.. 

do 6s, Ueience :« 

Baltimore 6s of '75 9«Jf 

do 1884 

do 6s,:90C 

do 11.90 Park 6b 

Baltimore ft Ohio 6s of "TS.. 
do do 68ot'»0., 

do do <sol"<3 

do (N. W.Ta,)2a M.as. K« 
„ do UM.Cb 

Central Ohio. 1st M.,« 

Marletu ft CIn., 1 st M„ 7, 1891 ttk 
do do 2d M.,7, 1»». ft 

Norfolk Water fs 

Northern Cent., Ist M. (gnar) 6 
do do 2dM.. 8. F.,<,'8S. 

do do Sd v., H. F.,6,190( 

do do 3d M. lY. ftC)».>r; 
do do Cons, (gold) 6. i»00 W 
PltU.ftConneIlsT.,lstM.,7,18 M]< 
do do IstSuK. IMS ... 
West Md.lstM., endorsed,*, "90 97 
do IstM., unend.,t,^.. 32 
do 2d M.,endorsea,<,'9l>. 97 

Baltimore ft Ohio stock :54 

Parkersburg Branch., 

Central Ohio 

do preferred.., 

CINCINNATI. 

Cincinnati 58 n ■ 

do 6s 88 91 

do 7J08 irs ,J0« 

Ilam.Co.,Ohlo6p.e. iong>>dK. 90 I 93 
do do 7 p.cltoSyrs. «s "" 
do do Ig h<'». 7 ft 7.3U8 ioo 

Covington ft CIn. lirldge 7" 

Cln, llam.ftD., I8t H.,7, 80... 94 
do do 2d M.,7, "SB... «8 

do do 3dM..S,77... 01 

Cln. ft Indiana, l8t M.. 7 89 

do do 2d M.,7, 1877.. *4 

Colnm., ft Xenla, Ist M.,7, '90. 94 

Dayton ft Mich., 1st v., 7 81.. !S 

do do 2rt M.,7, '»4.. 91 

do do 3d M..7, flil.. S» 

doTo'dodep.hds.7,'8I-'94. 8$ 

Dayton ft West., l>t M.. 7, 1900. 98 

do do 1st M., 6, 1908. 18 

Ind.,Cln.ftLaf.,l8tM.,7 71 

do (I.ftC )!"'M,.T.l'<Sf fS 

lunc, Cln,ft Ir ' ' " - -^J. 80 
Little Miami, 1 8* 

Cln. Ham. * IV, .. 89 

Columbus* X. V .1. I04X 

Dayton ft Mlchli::in 31',(.kexd 41 

do 8 p c. sl'k guai 108)4 
Little Miami stock ex. d IO<)i 

E.oi;iiivii,tiE. 

Louisville 98, la to "37 

do 6B,"»7to'98 

do water 68, '87 to 1)9.-. 
do Water Stork (s, '97. 

do Wharf 68 

do special lax 6e of *». 
Jetr., Mad. ft I.lstM.(IftM)7, '81 

do do 2d M.,7 

do do Ist M.,7, I9nt.... 

LoillST. C. ft Lex., ist M., 7. '97.. 

LwilB.ft Fr'k., I8t M.,e,';o.-7i!.. 

do Loulsv.l.oan.CSl. 

L. * Saab. 1st M. rm.s.) 7. '7;.. 

do Lor. Loan (m.s.>8. '88 '*! 

do (Leh.lir.)«,'86 



M)« 



aev 



«x 



103V 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



IstM. (Mem. Br)7, '7P-'73 

l8tM.(Lcb.hr.ex):. 'SO-'SS 

Lou. L'n(Leb.br.eT)«,'»,^ 

__ Consol.lBt M..7.189S.... 

Icfferson.. Mad.ft Ind 

Loulsv., Cln. ft l.cx.,prof 

do do common. 

lAmlsvllle ft Nashville 

8T. IOC IS. 

i\ LoniB 6s, Long ItondB 

do 68, Sliort do 

io Water 68, gold 

do do do (new) 

do ParktB gold 

io Sewer SpeclalTax 88 

Korth Mlasonrt. latM.T* 

do 3d .M.TB... . 

do Ikl M.79.. 

Ptelllc (of Mj> UlM.iT'-*-" 

Ransas PacIAc >.«,.,. ,. . 

iCaoiuc RR. of Mo. stock .... 



79 

J** 

91 
M 
78 
ST 
« 
87 
M 

« 

\^ 
•1 

MX 
l9l 



lot 

^ 

94 

100 
88 

2S 

H 
9* 

9a 

89 

88 
» 
W 
80 

88 

85 
89 
90 

:os 

43 

m 

1(18 



78k 



11 

rOX 

80 

lit 

99 

79 

83 

39 

8% 

:9 
91 

!4 
94 
99.H 



88 



\« 



18 



THE CHROXICLE. 



[January 4, 1873. 



QUOTATIONS OF STOCKS AND BONDS JN NEW YORK. 
tfotmrnmrn* Bond* and aetiv* Sailroad Stoekt are quoted on a pretioxu page and not repeated here. Prie.ee represent the per 
tent value, whatever the par may be. " N. T. Local Securities " are quoted in a separate list. 




D. S. Bonds. 

(gjoiadpreviuUKlj.) 

State Bond*. 

Tcnneuee «8. old 

do do cev 

Virginia <•, old 

Ao do Dew boniU 

do do ooQsol. boodl 

do do deferred do 

eeorgU t8 

do 7i, new bonds 

do 7i, endorsed 

do Is, Gold 

north CaroUnil 8«, old 

do do 10 S.C. R.B. Co.. 
do do FandlngAct, ISM. 
do do do 18<8. 

do do new bonds 

do do BpecialTiiz — 

Sooth Carolina Ka 

do do Jan. A Juljr 
do do April A Oct 

do do KTindliifr Act, ISW 
do do LaniC,1389, J A J 
do do I».nd C, Itl'iS. A A O 

do do Is oJ 18Si. 

UlS4oariM 

do Han. A St. .lofteph 

do Asylam bonds 

Loaidlanafts 

do do new nonds 

do do new doullng debt. 

do Is, PtfuUerkiiary 

do 6«, levee bonds 

do 88 do 

do ea do Itm. 

do 8s ..of 1310. 

CaltfarnU7s 

do 7b. larfre bonds 

Oounectlcnt fis 

Bhode Islandto 

Alabama 5e 

do 88 

do 8b Mont&Kuf'laR., 
do Sf Mab. * Chat. K. , 

do es oflSM.. 

Arkansaa Ss, funded 

do ->t, L. R. A Ft. 8. Iss. 
do 7«, Memphis & L. R. 
do Is, L. U.,P. B. &.M.O 
do 7«, Miss. O. &K. RlT. 

do 7b Ark. Cent R 

Texas, ICs, of 1876 

Ohkotifl, Itflfi 

do «e,1881 

do««, 188« 

Kentucky 68 

XlUnols canal bonds, 1870 

do 68 coupon, 77 

do do 1879 

do War Loan ,. 

Indiana 5b 

IHollgan 6«,lb73 , 

do 68.1878 

Jo <8,1883 , 

do 7s,1878 , 

Haw York Bounty, reK 

do do cou 

ao 68, Canal, 1873 

■ do 1874 



7»/< 

51 
15 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



68, 

6s, 

<8, 

5s. 
5», 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



1875 

1877 

1878.. .. 

1874 

1875 



Itailroad Slock*. 

(Not previously quoted.) 

Albany At Susqaelianna , 

Atlantic dt i".Hciflc. pref 

Chicago & Alton 

do i, pref 

Chic. Bur & Qnlncy 

CleT., Col.. CIM. 4 (ndlanap ' 
Cleve. & I'lttsbrre. Rua^ 
Central of .New Jersey, scrip 
Ool. Chic, ft ind. Central 

l)-..n-n«*KTO0lCltT , 

Harlem pre! 

Illinois Central "" 

JoUet * Chicago ■■ 

liOnx Island 

Marietta * Cln., let preferred 

w."*? ^ „''° 2dpreC. 

Morris ft Essex....;... . 

Mo.,Eaiisac& T 

New Jersey 

New Jersey Southern ...'. 
J. Y., New Haven * Hartford 
N.T., Prov. A Host (Stoalngt. 
OhloA Mississippi, preferred 
Pitta.. Ft vt. & ChlCKuar.. 
„ ilo do special. 

Ttenatelaer ft Karatoica 
Home, Watertown ft Oicdens! 
St. Louis, Alton ft T. Haute. . . 
« do do pref. 

St. Louis ft Iron Mountain... 
81. L., Kan. I :. 4 Northern prel 
Booth Side, L.I . 
Toledo, foorb* Wa'isaw'"" 

5' <! 1 let pref. 

da do 2l pref 

Toledo. Wab « w .stern, nre; 
macellaneoua Stocka 
American Coal . 
Boston Water lower lili! 
Conaolldated Coal. 
Cumberland Coal and Iron " 

Maryland Coal 

IJ. J. Land Improvement Co! 

Pennsylvania Coal 

SprluK Mountain Coal ....." 
Wllkesbarre Coal.... 

Canton Co 

Delaware ft Hudson <;anaV."" 
Atlantic Mail steamialn 

Mariposa Oold 

do p er. 

do Trustee* Certlt. 

do Land Mining Co .' 
do do nrvf 

Qtilcksllver nreierred... 

New Centrnl Coa' .. .. 

„ i*""*""*'' Bondi'.'"" 

N T. Central i.», 18s3. . 

do 6«,18(n '..'.'" 

« -. !• . ,"». '■i'«l estate... 
K. T. Central ««, subscription 

ci 7«. 1S76 : ■ 

do 7«, conv. 1878."*" 

.^ *° 78, 19«5-76.... 

;Brle ls( MortctKe Kxteoded! ! 



'0 

87 



112 
92H 

lou^ 

S7 



52 H 



100 
.9 

!3H 

jji 

«" 

X) 
MX 



93X 

si" 

ICOs 
lOOJi 
IDOH 



I* 
SKJH 

9J 
lOJX 



94S 






1C3 
106M 



IJlJj 



yi>>* 

91 
98 
95 



Bile 1st Moitsage Endorsed. 

no 78, Hd do 1879 

do 78,Sd do lt>88 

do 78,4th do 1880 

do 78,5th do 1888 

do 78, cons. mort. gold bda.. 

Long Dock tiundfl 

BoaTN. Y.ftK.lstM., 1877.... 

and. B. 7a, 2d M. 8. F. 1885 

do 78,8dMort., I87.'< 

Sarlein, Ist MortgaKe 78 

do Con. M.* s'^kgK'des. 

\lbanyft BuSQh'a, Ist 0.3nd8.. 

do do 3d do .. 

do do Sd do .. 

lUch.Cent., lBtM.8B, 1882 

do Ciinfol. 78. 191)2.... 

Ohlc, Bnr. 4 y. 8 p. c. Ist M.. 

Mich. bo. 7 per ct. 2d Mort 

Mlch.S.&N 1.S.F.7P.C.... 
Cieve. 4 To!, mnking Fund .. 

Cleve. 4 Tol., nt-w bonds 

Cleve., P'vllle ft Ash., oldbds. 

do do new bds. 

Detroit, Monroe ft Tol bonds. 

Buffalo ft Erie, new bonds ... 

Lake 8hore Dlv. bonds 

ftj Lake Shore con. roup bonds. 
90*^ do Con. rekt. bonds... 

' Par.llic R- 7«, guari'd hy Mo... 

Western Pacihc bonds 

Central Pacific gold Bonds 

do State All bds. 

Union Pacific let M'KeBondb. 

do Land Grant, 7s.. 

do Income 10s 

Illinois Central 7 p. ct., 1875. . . 
Jellev'le ft S.Ills. R. 1st M. 8'e. 

AltonftT. H., IstM 

do do 2d M. pref 

do do 2d M. Income. 
Jhlc. 4 N. Western S. Fund.. 
do do Int. BondP 

do do Consol. bde 

do do Kxtn. Bds 

do do Ist Mort.. 

Iowa Midland, iBt mort. , Ss.. 
dan. ft bt. Jo. Land tiranta.. 

do do convertible 

)iil.,LMk. ft Western, let M 

ilo do 2d M. 

do do 78, conv. 

Tol. 4 Wab*h, Ist Mort. ext'd. 

do IstM.StLdlv. 

do 2dMo)t 

do Equip. Bds... 

do Cons. Convert, 

dannjbal ft Naplf^B 1st M 

dreat Western, l«t M., 1«S«... 
do 2d M. 1893..., 

jnlncvft Tol.. iBt M.. 1S90... 

111. A So. Iowa, 1st Mort 

ialena ft Chicago Extended 
do S"! Moit.. 

;hlc. K. Island * Pacific 

Morris A Estex, Ist .Mcrt lis 

„ do do 2d Mort 98 

Sew Jersey Central, 1st M., n. 103>i 
,. do do 2d Mort. 

.;;ew Jersey Southern Ist m "s 
Pitts., n. w.ft onic.istM... 
do do 2d Mort 

do do 3d Mort. 

do i") 8 p. c. en 't bds 

Olcve. 4 Pitts., Consol. B. F'd. 94 

do do 2dMort lU) 

do do ."tdMort " 

•U, do 4th Mort 

Chic, ft Alton Sinking Fund. 

do do Ist Mortgat^e 

do do Income 95 

Ohio 4 M188., let Morteaire.... !;2 
do Consolidated... 

do 2d do .... 8)>, 

Dub. A. Sioux P.. Ist M... 
Penlnaula list Mort.. conv. ... S5 
St. L. 4 Iron Mountain, let M. 96 
Mil. 4 St. Paul, let Mort. Ss. . lOoJi 
do do do 7 3-n 9a>s 
do do 7s gold .A.. ^9 

do do Isi .vlort 

do do lowadiv 

do do 2d M 

Marietta 4 Cm.. 1st Moi t 

Chic. & Milwankee Ist Mort... 
foliet & Chicago, 1st Mor:. . . 
Chic. 4 Gt. Eastern, Ist .Mort., 
Ool.. Chic. 4 Ind. C, l8t .Mort. 37X 

do do 2d Mort 

Tol., Peoria ft Warsaw, E, D. 

do do w. D. 

o do Burl'n Dlv. 

no do 2dM., 

do Consol. 78 

!iew York4 N. Raven 68 

Bodton, H. A Erle.lst mort. 76 41|t 
,. *" _ ..*'' „guaranteei' 5" 
'I-dar Falls A Ml"n. ut M 7 

Bur.. C. ' apldsft Mlnn.7s,gW i',\i 
Rome 4 Watertown let M. 

\.v l>ort.- ,t Jin, Co. 7.NK, 
West. Union Tel.. 1st mort. 78. 96X 
r.on^ IlandRR let .M. 7s.. 
Smlthtown ft Pt. JelT. Ist M. .. 
St. Louis, Jac- . ft Chic. I8t M. 
South Side, L.I. 181 Mort, bos 
do Sinking Fund.. 

Morris A K*eex. convertible.. 
do do construction 

'•■fTerxon RK, l«t Mort. bonds 
Winona ft St. Peters Ist m. 
■. C. C.& Irid'Rlst M, 7s. S. F. 
Cln.&Sp'dlslM.irld.i CC&I 
, do IstM.gld. LSAM b 
La Crosse ft Mil. ^8. IstM.... 
Lafayette, Bl'n A Miss, ist M. 
Pekln. Lincoln A Decatur IstM 
ian. ft Cent. Missouri Ist M. 
Cin., Lafayette ft Chir. Ist m' 
Del. 4 Hudson Canal IstM. 
Atlantic 4 c;re»t West. Ist Ji' 
Morris ft E«8cx 78 of i«7i . . . 
N. ^ „ Newf 1 ft London Tel . 
Galveston. H. ft H ,"8. gold 71 
Pailfic RR. of Mo., stoc- 
Pacific R. of Mo. ]8t fis. gold v^ 
do do 2d 78, cur'y, '91 

nilKcellaneoiiN List. 

ArkHHsas L<-vee b^nds 7s 

Atohisun A P. P<,6s gold'.'.""' 
Atlantic 4 Pacific L.G. 6'8 gld 
Atciiison, Top. A S, Fa 7s Bid 
Atchison ft AebraskaSp. c 
Bur. 4 Mo. lUver, itock...,.;' 1 



\» 

n% 

93n 

91 

BS" 
11 
102H 



85)i 



94 

91 

98 

9VV 

90 

1.9X 

»7X 

i4' 
:0l 

96 
ICO 



;oi 

9")< 



lOO 
ii4V 



Bur. ft Mo. River Land M. 7b. 

•Jo do 2d S., do 78. 

do «o 3d S., doSs. 

do do 4th fi.,do 88. 

do do 5th S.. do88. 

do do 6th S.. doHs. 

do do Creston »*ran-I 

_ do ^ do Charlton Brand 



35 



96)4 

:oiiS 

94 
95 Ji 
92 
87 

be 
95' 



33 
TiX 

96" 
S7» 
31X 

lOJ" 
45 



96 



90 



2d S., do 
no 3d S., doSs.. 
do 4th fi.,do88.. 
do 5th S.. do8».. 
do 6th S..do86.. 
do Creston xran-li 
do Charlton Branch 
Bnrl. ft V, (In Neb.) Isl conv. 
California A Oregon 68, sold. 
Calif omlo Pac. KR. 7'8. Bid. . . 
do 6s. 2d M., gld 

C'nada Southern Ist 78. gold 
Central Par. 78, gold.'onv.. 
Central of Iowa. Ist M, 7'8 gld. 
„ , <io 2dM,T8,gld 

Keokuk A St. Paul. 8s... 1... 
jCarthage* Be:. 8b. ... 

Uixon. Peoria A H«n., 8s. I O't 
0.0. A Fox P.. Valley Ss. |<«S 
QuIneyA Warcaw, 6a ... t« 
11). Grand Tr-.nk.. . ... >=" 

Ohlc. Dub. A Minn., 8s.. (":E 
Peoria * Hnnnlbal R 8'8. I *= S 
Chlrago A Iowa P.. S's.... "" 

Araericiin Central 8s I .... 

Clil. 4 Sontheastern RH. 7'8... 
Col. A Hock. V. 1st 7b, .31 yrs . 
do do Ist 78.10 yrs.. 

„ do do vd 7a, 20 yrs... 

ChlcDanv.A VIncen B7«,ald 
Cleve.. Mt.V. A Del. 76, gold. 
Cnnn.ctlcut Vnllry 7b. ifold... 

Conneetlcut Western 1st 78 

ChesapnaX-p A Ohio 1st 6s, gold 
Chic. A MIclt.Lake Shore 88.. 

De» Moines Valley Isf fs 

_ do do Land Grant 86 

Dan.. Urh., Hi. A P. 1st m 7 eld 
Detroit. Hillsdale 4 In. BR.8'6 

untchess & ColnmWa 7b 

Denver Pfirlfic 78, gold 

Denver A Rto Grande 78, gold 
Detroit. Lonsing A Lake M. 8b 
Kvansville A Crawfordsv. ' 
Erie A Pittsburgh lat 78..., 

do 2rt 7b 

„ do 7s. equip 

EvansvDle. Hen. A Ka6hv.78.. 
Ellzabetliton-n A Padn. 88 eon 
EvanBville. T H A Chic 7s. gld 
European 4 North Am. 6s. gld 
Flint A Pere M. 7b, Land Gr, 
Fort w., Jarkpon A Sac. t^e... 
Graud R. A Ind, 78, gold. guar. 102 

'}" do 78, plain 92 

Grand River Valley 8s... 69 

Indianap., Bl. A W. tst 7s, gld. 

do do 2d 8? 

Indtai ap. A Vin"pn. Ist Ts.giiar 
Towa Falls A Sioux C. Is' 7b 
Indianspolis A St. LouIb 7s. 
J.-icksop. Lansin A Sng. 8b 
EansRs Pac. is. Extension, gld 



97>4 



Ind.ft III. c Ift m gold 7a... 
Ilnd.. B. ft W. Ext , Ist m El 78 
Jack.,N W.AS W. ;6tmgnB 
L. Ont. Shore RR. :st m. gld 78 
Lake Stiore A M. S. Inrrme 78. 
Logins .' raw. AS. W RR.m.g iK) 
1:4 N. Y. AOsweg" Mid. utm.g 10,) 
14 do do i;d conv. e5 
10; North. Pac. Ist m. gold 7 3-10* 
Spring. A 111. S.E. I,R. 1mgl7( 
97M South Carolina RR. 2dm. . 75 
93 SI. I.oulBftS. V. RR con.m. 90 
90 (Pough.A East. RR. UtDi 60 

Sontbern Securities. 



91 
90 

as 

«>« 

88 
104 

lOi' 



do 76, Land Gr., gld. 
do 7b, do new.gld 
do 6s, g d, Juii ADec 
do 68. do Feb A Ang 
do 7b, I87R, Land Gr. 
do 7b, Leaven. Brth. 
do Incomes, No r... 
do do No. 16.. 

do Stotk 

Kalamazoo A .Sonth H. "s. guar 
Kal.. Apeghan. AG R.8s,gu«r 

Kal. A White Pigeon 7s 

Kansas City A Cameron !0b... 
Kan. C, ^t. Jo. A C. B. Sp. c. 
Lake Sup. A Miss. Ist 7'8,g]d. 

do do a<l 76 

Leav.. Atch. A N. W. 7s, guar. 

Leav Law. A Gal., stock 

do do IstM.. 10s.. 

l.oui^lana * Mo. Riv. i.t m. 7s 
Logans.. Craw. A S. W. 88. gld 

Michigan Atr Line, 86 

Mo iiifello AP. Jervi6 7s. gold 

Montclair Isi 76, gold, guar 

do 7s, income 

Mo., K.-n. A Texa- 7b gold...* S3 

Mo. R., Ft., S. A Gulf . stock . .71 

do do l8t. M. 106 

do do 2d M.. Ids 

N. J. Midland Ist7«, gold, guar 

do 2d 78 guar 

A. Y. AOsa-. Mid. :si 7-, gold, 
do do 2a 78, conv 
New York A Boston 7s gold 
N.Havcn.Mlddl-t.A wr76 .. 
Xe'Oiu gbr ch 7b, i>uar. Erie. 
Omnha A Southwestern RR. S's 
Oreg.n A Calllornia 7s, gold 
Oswego A Rome 78, guar 
I'eor a. Pekin A I. ist m, told 

Pitts. Cln. A St. L. 181 7s 

Port Huron A L M.7s, gld. end. 

do do 7s, gold 

Peoria A Rock I. 7*8. gold 
RockfM.T! l.A St. L.l8t7s,gld 

Rome A Watertown s 

Rome, W. A Ogden8borg7B.!' 
Rondout A Oswego 7s. gold 

SiouxCitv A Paclilces 

Souther" Pacifle 6s, gold. . 
Sottth-Slde (L. 1.178! .. . 

SteubenvlUe A Ind>ana6B 

Southern Minn, construe. Ss. 

do do 7b 

St.Jo.AC.Bl. 8tM.,108 

*'o do 8 p. c 

St. Jo. A Den. C.SB,gold,W D 
o ''°.. , ..''° 8s,gold, E, D 
Sandusky. Mans. A Newark 78 
St.Louls, Vand.-illa A T.H. It 
do do 2d 

St. L. A So'eastern Ist 7s. gold 
St. L., A St. Joseph. Ist, 6s, gld 
Southern Central of N.T. 78.. 

Teho A Neo8ho7«, gild 

Union A Loganeiwrt 78...!,*'" 

niah Central 6». gold 

Utiea, Clin. A Bing. 7s, guar" 
Union P»c., so. branch, 6s, gld 
Walkin V»IIev IS' 7s, gild 
West Wiscons'in 7b, gold...!"' 

New l^onnt). 
Arkansaa ^'a'e Bonds, end 7e 
Cln.. Rl. h. A F. W. I6t ragld 78 
Ohlc A Can. Soi.th. ist m gl 7b 
Ch.. D. A v., I. dlv., 1 m gfd 7s »> 

Hou=. A Tex. C. let m.gold78 "" m 
7S Houston 4 Gt.N.Utm.ghl 7a M 

115 j,IniernanER.Tex,l.fmgld7Sl W:} M 



92 

10: 
96M 



107 



81 



97X 

100 



to 



105 
80 
88 
75 
88 
16 

92' 
97H 
110 
85 
95 
65 

is " 

90 
75 
9<> 
80 
100 
85 

75' 

so' 



82« 



90 
70 
S6 
93 

7S' 
74 

•.66' 

92)i 
97H 

:a' 



8;k 



CITIEB. 

Atlanta, Ga.. 7s 12 

do 8« S2 

Augusta, Ga., 78, bonds "1 

Charleston 8toek6e 50 

Charleston. S.C.,7B,r.L.bd8... 68 

Columbia.S. c.,66 58 

ColumbuB, Ga., 78, bonds 70 

Lynchburg 68 70 

\facon 78, bonds 70 

Memphis old bonds, 6b 51 

do new )iotidB,6B .^1 

do end.,M. A C.R.R.... 1*3 

Mobile 5b 60 

oo SB 65 

Montgomery SB 

Nashville 6b, old 

do 68. new 

NewOrleansSs 4' 

oo no consol. 6s *0 

do do bonds, 7b ^ 

do do 108 95 

do do to railroads, 6f 65 

Norfolkfis 65 

PeterBburg 6s 

Ricliniond 6e 79 

Savannati 7b, old 82 

do 78, new EO 

Wilmington, N.C.Jicold. 
do do 8a gold, 

KATLROADS. 

Ala. A Chatt.,iBt.M,88,end... 68 
Ala. A Tenn. K, Ist M.. 7«.... 45 

do 2dM.,78 

Atlantic A Gull consol 70 

do do end Savanl; 75 

do do stock 10 

do do do gnaran. 40 

Central Georgia, Ist M. ,7b 9-5 

do do stock 95 

Charlotte Col. A A.. 1st m. ,7s. 75 

do do stock 30 

Charleston A Savannah 68, end. 60 
Savannah anu Char., 1st m., 78. 00 

Cherawand Da. I'ngton 78 80 

EastTenn. A UecigiaSB (5 

East Tenn. A Vft. 66 end. Tenn 70 
E. Tenn., Va A Ga.. 1st M., 78.. Vi 

do do 8l.>ck 53 

SeorgiaU. R..78 93 

do stock 97 

Greenville A Col. 7b, guar 50 

do do 78, certll. . 45 

Kacon A Brunswick end. 78.., 60 

Macon A Western stock 95 

Macon and Augusta bonds..*. . 82 
no do endorse . ^ 

do do stock.. . 2 

Memphis 4 Charleston, lBt>. 75 
do do 2d 78. . 70 

do do ttiock. 24 

.Memphia-A Ohio, 108 90 

do do 6; 80 

Memphis A Little !1. ^K M 58 

.MlB8l88:ppl Central, Itt m., 7b. 82 

rto 2dm., 88... ^0 

MIsBlsBlppl ATenn.. lBtm.,7s. M 

do do consold., 8*. 

MontgomeryAWestP.l8t.8B.. 90 

no do let end. 90 

do do Income 60 

IMontgom.A Enfanla let Ss.gld 

end by State of Alabama... 70 

Mobile A Mont.. 8s gold, end 80 

Mobile A Ohio sterling S.-) 

do do do ex oifi ^ 

do do 8e, interest.. SS 

do do 2 mtg, 8s 70 

do do Incoihe 70 

do do stock 4^ 

N. Orleans 4 Jacks. 2d M.Ss. SO 

do do cert'B.Ss. 

N. OrlesnB 4 Opelons. Ist M.Sb 
Nashville A Chattanooga, 68,. . 
NorfolkA Petersburg Ist m.,8f 
do do 7e 

, do do 2dmo.,8f 

Northeastern, B.C.. Ist M. 8a. . 

do 2dM.,88 

Orange and Alex., ists, 6s 

do 2d8, 68 

do Sds, 88 

„ ^ do 4thB,88 

Rlchm'd 4 Petcrb'g Ist m., 7s . 
30 do 2d m., 6s. 

™ S°„ . ^ rto Sd m., Ss. 

Rlch.,Fre'kBb'g4 Poto.Ss 

„. ^° J J^° rto conv. 7s. 

Rich, and Danv. let cons'd 68. 

do Piedmont Sa. . 

d'l IsM, 8s 

elraa, Rome 4 1>., Ist M., 78 
South A North Ala. let M., 8b 
Southside, Va., iBtmtg. 8e. 
do 2d m., guart'd 68.. 

do Sd m..68 

do 4thm., Ss 

Southwest. KR., Ga., Ist mtg... 

do stock 

Spartensbur.A nnioa 7s. guar- 
S. Carolina RK. 1 8t M, 78 (new 

do do 68 ' 

do do 78 

do do stock 

Va.A Tenn.lBtB,<a 

do 2ds,6B 

do 3dB Ss 

West Ala,, 8b guar 

Wilmington and Weldon 7s. . . 
do Ch4 Ruth. Ist m. end 
do do l8t M.. 8e... 

PAST DCK COUPONS. 

Tennessee state Cuupous 

Vh-ginla Coupons 

do do deferred,, 
Memphis City Coupons. . . 
Nashville City Conpooi 



90 
90 

85 
92 H 
92S 



iro 

90 



TS 
.12 
43 
74 
78 
15 
45 
I'O 

:on 

80 
40 
70 
70 
90 
f8 
75 
93 
60 
»7 
I'O 
56 

^6" 

ICll 
8S 
91 
25 
85 
»l 
26 



80 
S7 
77 
911 
80 
50 
100 
!S 
81 

97 
92 

a 

SS 
60 
63 
») 
9J 
80 
88 
95 
9S 
43 
45 

TO 
37 



Jfttmarj 4, 18 '3.] 



THE CHRONICLE. 



19 



Snuestmcuts 



AND 
STATE, CITT AIVD OORPOB&TIOIf FIVANOBS. 

tW EXPLANATION OF STOCK AND HOND TAHLES. 

1 . I'ricci" of the mp«t Active SIocUk »nd Bonds are given In the " Bunk- 
ers' Gazette," prcvloimly. Full quotations of all other necurltles will be 
found on preccdinpr pages. 

2. <>i>Teriiinont Secarttl««, with full Information In regard to each 
Issue, the ptTiocIs of interest pftym'^nt. size or denomination of bonds, and 
Bumerous other details, arc given in the U. S. Debt stiitcmcnt published in 
TuE CiiitoNicLE on the first of each month. 

'S. City Koiid*, and Rank, Insurance, City Railroad and 
Can StockH, with qu'>t.ations. will usually he published the first three 
weeks of each month, on the page immediately preceding this. 

4. The Conipln»p Tables of Stntc Securliles, Clly Secnrl- 
tlos, anil Kallroad and .lllKccllaiieous Slocks aiitl Hoiids 
will lie regularly published on the last Saturday in csch month. The publi- 
cation of these tables, occupying fourteen pages, requires the issue of a 
enpnlement. which is neutlj stitched in with the nsaal edition and famished 
to all regular subscribers of Thb CHnoNiCLB. 



INVESTMENTS. 

The attention of all purchasers of b ocks and bonds in directed 
to our extensive tables of prices for the year 1872, as recorded on 
previous pages. An examination of the course of prices for the 
year will prove exceedingly interesting and instructive bo.h to 
speculators and purchasers (or investment. 

As to speculative stoclis and bonds — which are known to be in- 
fluenced to a very great extent by the influt nces bearing immedi- 
ately upon the market, without any regard to their actual 
value — the wide fluctuations show what great uncertainty must 
attend all dealings in such securities. As to investment securities 
the variations in price during the year are in some cases very 
small, hardly amounting to anything beyond the semi-annual in- 
terest accumulation. In other cases the variation in prices of some 
very jrood bonds has been considerable, and suggests to investors 
the possibili'y of sometimes purchasing a good bond so as to 
make legitimate profits by a subsequent rise in price, as well as 
by a good rate of annual interest. It should be the chief object 
of investors, however, to select safe bonds, paying a satisfactory 
rate of annual interest, without much regard to future variations 
in price. 

In the next column will be found a table giving the details of 
every new loan now offering in our market. Many of these bonds 
offer superior inducements in the way of a good rate of annual in. 
terest, and are offered by banking-houses of high standing. As to 
selecting new bonds for purchase, we would make the following 
suggestions : 

That investors should examine as to the several features of such 
bonds and the basis upon which they rest, and in making such 
examination sa;is:y themselves upon the following points: 

1. What proportion of the whole cast of road is raised by bonds, 
and what proportion from actual slock eubscriptious or other cash 
resources? 

2. What amount of bonds is issued per mile of road ; and 
whether this amount is excessive, considering the nature of the 
country traversed, and the probable trafiic of 'he road. 

3. How soon will the road be completed, what amount of gross 
earnings per mile may ba expected when it is completed, and 
alloniuj; 60 to 75 per cent, for operating expenses, will the net 
earnings be sufficient to pay interest on the bonds? 

4. If bonds are based in whole or in part upon a land ijrant, in- 
quiry should be made ai! to the title to such grant and as to the 
character of the lands, and a fair estimate made of the price 
which can probably be realized per acre, and the length of time 
which will be required to sell the lands. 

5. It is also important to consider the character of the officers 
and directors of the company offering bonds; whether they are 
well known financial men, whose names furnish a gu irantee of 
soundness to the enterprise, and who will feel bound to pro- 
tect the i-onds after they are issued. 



Vlrglna Finances.— The Richmond WTiig has the following: 
The partial reassessment of lands reduced the total value seven, 
teen millions seven hundred thonsand dollars. The amount of 
personal prouerty listed for taxaticn is $77,850,540 71 ; real es- 
tate, 1261,411 108 89 ; total, $339,261,649 60. A tax on that sum 
at 50 cents in the hundred wo'ild — if collected — give f 1,693,083 
24. A tax of $1 in the hundred would give just double — that i?, 
if collected. But as the amounts of levy is increased, the num- 
ber of delinquents is increased in a still greater proportion. It 
is probable that a levy of $1 25 on the hundred would not yield 
more than $1 in money. We are not yet advised by any of the 
authorities what sum will be necessary to meet the obligations 
of the State, or how it ia to be raised. Tlie interest at six per 
cent, is $1,810,540 73. During the past year, $584,223 15 have 
been paid, leaving a balance due the 1st of January, 1873, of 
$1,226,218 58— equal to a total on the Ist of January, 1874, of 
$3,036,859 33. It requires about $1,200,000 to support the 
government — and $450,000 for the public schools — a total o i 
$3,686,889 33 to be raised next year — less the cash on hand. We 
have heard no one speak of incTeaaing the present rate of taxa- 
tion. 



NEir LOANS. 

We bring forward again to-day a full list of the new loans at 
present offering, or which have antll very recently been oflering 
in this market. This compilation, by bringiDif together in com- 
pact ehaoe the leading points of every Lew enterprise lovitlnK 
the attention of investors, will be found a valuable Ruide in %ag. 
gesting to them the bontla which are apparently the most satis- 
factory, and which seem to be worthy of their apeclal Investiga. 
tion. 

In regard to prices it should be remembered that tliry are 
always sold with the addition of accrued interest to the Domlaal 
price asked. 



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20 



.THE CHRONICLE. 



[January 4, 1873. 



Oeorsia Stale Fluanees.— The Daily BvMetin liad i> De- 
cember an article upon this subject, containing the following : 
I'he olflcial statement to which we allude (that of Treasurer 
Angler) makes the following exhibit of that portion of the debt 
now ri-cognizt'd as vulid : 

Corroncy Bondi. 

I»»uc(l Dnc. Amoniit. 

IfUa audits ISt3 *i?I-?IS 

1814 and WW 1874 251,600 

1853 1888 100,000 

18S9 18TO SOfl-O"" 

iSS 1880 200,000 

IS? JMl . . 100000 

ISU?: : .. .1881 2fi5.000 

87!i ... im 'ooooo 



Tolal cnrrency bonds *5'??§'?55 

GoldBouds..: 2,598,000 



Total direct indebtedness ■ ..18,286,600 

Contingent indcbtednos by Indorsement $7,033,400 

Lesdby amount repudiated 3,875,000 

Contingent debt regarded valid 3,168,400 



Total dlioct and contingent debt $11,444,900 

ASSETS. 

The State holds tlic following property as assets : 

The Western and Atlantic Railroad, valued at $7,000,000 

10,000 shares of Atlantic and Gulf Kailroad 1,000 000 

186 shares of Georgia Itailroad Company 18,800 



Totol assets '. $8,018,800 

RETENDE RESOURCES. 

Taxable property, exclusive Of railroads, banking, cxpiess and insurance 
companies, $'2-jl,492,48^. 

General taxjs on this amoiint at 4-lOths of one per cent $937,969 

Estimated receipts from taxes on corporations 80,000 

Half rental of \Vestern and Atlantic Itailroad 150,000 

Total tax for ordinary purposes $1,117,909 

Estimated ordinary State expenses for 1878 800,000 

Balance for payment of loans and interest $317,909 

The Common School Fund is independent of the above, and has the follow- 
ing sources of revenue : 

Onc-tenih I'f 1 p. c. on taxable property of State $234,492 

Half rental of Western and Atlantic Railroad , 150,000 

Estimated from special poll tax .'. 130,000 

Estimated from prolossions, liquors, amusements, etc , . . . 30,000 



Total annual school fund $514,492 

Thus it appears that the direct debt, as now acknowledged by 
the State, amounts to only $8,286,500 ; while the liabilities ac- 
cruing on State endorsements, after the repudiation of $3,875,000 
of such indebtedness, stand at $y,158,400 ; making a total for 
which the State now acknowledges its responsibility amounting 
t« $11,444,900. Against these liabilities, it holds over $8,000,000 
of assets, which yield a revenue of |300,000 in the form of rental 
of the Western and Atlantic Railroad. 

Indiana State Bonds —Nearly forty years ago the State of 
Indiana engaged extensively in thi? work of "building canals, issu- 
ing bonds therefor. Ten or fifteen years later, the State having 
in the meantime suspended paying interest, a compromise was ef- 
fected with the creditors, whereby new bonds for one-half the 
original dfibt were issued, and the canal and its revenues wew 
pledged to the creditors to pay the other half. Mr. John W. Gar 
rett, now president of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, is the 
owner of $40,000 of the original bonds, and refused to accept the 
settlement then made. Since then the State lias paid its share of 
the debt represented by the new bonds, but the canal has proved 
to be valueless to th« creditors who had accepted ths mortgage on 
its revenues. Mr. Oarrott has re(;ently obtained judgment against 
the State for the amount of the bonds held by him, and was about 
to sell the canal under execution. To prevent this the Governor 
of Indiana convened the Legislature in order to have the sum 
appropriated to pay him. Had the canal been thus taken away 
from the creditors, the State would again become liable for the 
other half of the debt, which now amounts to about $30,000,000. 
As a further protection, an amendment to the State constitution 
has been submitted to the people, in which any recognition or 
payment of that debt is peremptorily prohibited. 

Counly Bonds In Mlssonrl—A suit has been decided at 
Springfield, Mo., by the District Court. The style of the case 
was the State er. rcl. Attorney-General vs. the County Court of 
Green Connty, and others, and its object the levy of a tax to pay 
the interest on $400,000 of bonds issued by the county for the 
benefit of the Kansas City and Memphis Railroad. The point 
raised was that the bonds had been illegally issued, as the ques 
tion had not been submitted to a vote of the people of the 
county. 

The Court granted the injunction aaked. Defendants took an 
appeal to the Supreme Court. 

Other counties that have issued bonds in the same manner will 
probably follow suit. 

inilwankecBoud«toRallroadii.— No. 50. James et al. vs. 
City of Milwaukee— Error to the Circuit Cqurt for the District of 
Wisconsin. — This was an action to recover on certain bonds issued 
by the city in aid of the Milwaukee and Supeiior Railroad Com- 
pany, and to the Milwaukee and Beloit Railroad Company. The 
gerieral act of the Slate authorizing such aid to railroads by mu- 
nicipal c irporations prohibited siib;criptions in aid of roads not 
duly incorp')rated and organized: and as tlje roads in question 
were not at the date cf the act incorporated and organized, the 
qiieation was whether tlie bonds issued in their aid were vaiid. 
The Court below held that they were not. and the judgment was 
for the city. 'rh.. writ of error maintained that the legislation 
did not mean that aid should be extended only to roads then in- 
corporated and organized, but that aid should not be at any time 



extended to roads which were not incorporated and organized ; 
and the theory was that whenever at any future time a railroad 
sliould be incorporated and orgnnized it was competent for muni- 
cipal corporations to subscribe its aid. The U. S. Superior Court 
of the United States sustains this construction of the legislation, 
and reverses the judgment. Mr. Justice Swayne delivered th» 
opinion. 

CoantytBondH In Wisconsin. — The Chicago Tribune B&yB : 
The counties of Wisconsin which some fifteen years ago voted 
aid bonds to railroads and afterwards were unable to pay them, 
are now experien«ing the severe requirements of the law. The 
authorities of Iowa county, and of several towns in that county, 
were brought before Judge Drummond, of the United States Dis- 
trict Cojirt, in Milwaukee, a few days ago, charged with contempt 
in not having levied the tax for the payment of judgments on the 
bonds, and not having placed the tax-warrant in the hands of the 
tioasurer for collection, as previously ordered by th* Court. The 
officers answered that they had \evit^ the tax. but that the 
treasurer had been unable to give an additional security bond, as 
required by the Court. The officers answered tliat they had levied 
tlie tax, but that the treasurer had bwen unable to give an addi- 
tional security bond, as required by the Court. To this the Court 
ans^verod tjiat the treasurer having failed to give the required 
bond the office should have been declared vacant, and another 
person appointed. If no person could be found to give bond as a 
treasurer, then the tax list should have been given to the sheriff. 
For failure in their duty the Court imposed a fine of $100 on each 
of the officers. Public opinion is against paying the tax, and it 
is doubtful whether any officer can be found who will seek to en- 
force its collection. 

Boston Dividends.— Mr. Joseph G. Martin, Stock Broker, 
No. 10, State street, Boston, furnislies us his usual list of semi- 
annual dividends. He remarks : 

. " Railroad dividends generally run very even. The Michigan 
Central divides four per cent, in stock. The Eastern resumes 
dividends after having passed twice in consequence of the acci- 
dent at Revere, August, 1871. The Eastern in N. H., and the 
Portsmouth, Great Falls and Conway follow as a matter of 
course. The Atttleboro' Branch Railroad pays 3J per cent. Jan- 
uary 1. Hanover Branch $3 January 1. New York, New Haven 
& Haitford 5 per cent. January 2. Philadelphia & Reading 5 per 
cent, on common and preferred January 24, in Philadelphia. 

" The gold payments at the Boston Sub-Treasury will be abcut 
$4,553,624, coupons and registered. The entire issue of 
$64,023,512 currency bonds (to the Pacific Railroads) is registered. 
The total gold interest maturing January 1 oo Government bonds 
will amount to about $26,000,000. The payments will be on 
Coupon 68 of 1881, Five-twenty 68 of 1805-7-8, and old five per 
cent, bonds of 1374. The State of Massachusetts and City of 
Boston pay in coin as usual. The gold payments in Boston 
amount to $5,431,533. 
3 



Name; of Companies. 



Capital, 

January, 

1873. 



^—Dividends—, 
July, Jan., 
187i8. 1873. 



Eailroad Companies. 

Berkshire K. R $600,000 

Boston & Lowell 2,234,000 

Boatou & Low. Scrip, Oct., 1873.. 866,000 

Boston & Lowell (new issue) Int' rest 

Cheshire preferred 2,100,000 

Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska 3,916,200 

Concord & Portsmouth goar'd.... 350,000 

Connecticut River : 1,850,000 

Eastern 4,462,600 

Eastern in N. H 492,500 

Fitchburg 4,000.000 

Granite RaUway 250,000 

Ilousatonic preferred 437,700 

Lateral Roads (Pa.) Dividends 

Metropolitan Horse 1,500,000 

Bichii,'an Central 17,989,400 

Norwich & Worcester 2,864,400 

Og'd * Lake Cham . (com) 3,077.000 

Old Colony* Newport 6,297,900 

Philadelphia, Wil. & Bal 9,472,200 

Pittsflcid & No. Adams 450,000 

Portland, Saco & Portsmouth 1,500.000 

Portsmouth, Gt. Falls & Conway. 770,000 

Providence & Worcester 2,000,000 

South Boston Horse (par 50) 460,000 

Taunton Branch 600,000 

Worcester & Nashua 17,060 slis. 



Uanufactur'mg Compankt. 
1 Androscoggin 1,000,000 



Atlantic. 

1 Bates 

1 Chicopec 

1 Continental Mills 

— Contoocolc 

* Douglas Axe Company . 

DwightMills , 

Franklin Co 

Groat Falls 

Hamilton Woolen 

Hill Mill 

Indian Orchard Mills . . 

Lowell Bleachery 

Massachubetts Mills 



1,.'K)0,000 

1,600,0<X) 

420,000 

900 000 

140 000 

400,000 

1,200,000 

1,000,000 

1,500,000 

600,000 

1,000,000 

6(K),(XI0 

300.000 

1,8(X1,000 

750, (XX) 

1,500 000 

600,000 



Middlesex Mills 
Naumkeag Steam Cotton 

Newmarket (par $500) „„ 

P»,cittc 2,.'K)0,'000 

Salisbury 1,000,000 

Washington Mills 1,650,000 

Waumbeck 100,000 



4 



2 

4 



4 
4 
4 

5 
5 
6 

SH 
3X 
4 
S 
6 

5 

t2« 
4 
$5 



5 
4 
5 

25 
4 
4 
4 
5 
4 
5 

10 
8 
6 

10 
6 
« 
7 
8 

12 
5 
5 
5 



tlJi 
4 
3 

3 

4 

SX 

5 

3 

3 

4 

4 

4 

4 
4 

5 
3 

\^ 

3 

5 

3 

5 

nn 

4 

$3 



5 
4 
4 

25 
4 
+ 
5 
5 
4 
5 

t 
7 
6 

10 
6 
3 
4 
8 

10 


6 



Amount, 
Jan., 
1873. 



$10,.500 
89,360 
10,980 
17,997 
63,000 

186,648 
12,250 
92,500 

133,878 
14.775 

160,000 

10,000 

17,608 

8.080 

60,000 

118,220 
92,310 

220,427 

378,888 
13,500 
75.000 
23,100 

100,000 
11,250 
20.000 
85,250 

$1,980,421 

60,000 
60,000 
60,000 
106,000 
36,000 

2o;666 

60,000 

40.oriO 

76,000 

7o',666 

30,000 
30.000 

108,000 
22,500 
60,000 
48,000 

260,000 



5,000 



* On demand ; t Qaarlerly 



$1,120,500 
J Not declared ; 5 Payable December 31 . 



January 4, 1873.;) 



THE CHRONICLE. ^ 



21 



mOAPITQI.ATIUif. 

Mi»cell«n<!0ii8 |1.2»S1,3!W 

Intvrcst on BoniU 7,'J3'<,3*) 

ManiifttcturiUK DIvldendi 1,130,500 

Ratlruad OlvldemU J,'J80,481 



ToUl— January 1, 1873 $ia.36l.68-» 

July], 1H7S 1!|,7M(»6 

January 1. lS7a 13,874,740 

July 1, 1871 1S,7(«,67« 

January 1, 18T1 13.13«,14() 

North Carolina Bonds. — The committee on securities of the 
Naw York Stock Exchaiigo has iusuod tlie following circular : 

"The United StaUs Circuit Caurt has ordered the dlntribntlon of ISM.SOO 
now tn the haud^of a r«<:oIver, applicable to payment of a |)ortlon of the past 
dne intereHt opon the following; aeacrib«d bond:) uf tUo State of !Nortb Car. 
olina, vi/..: 

No. 1 to 500. datad January ], ISM, due January 1, 1883' 
501 to I.WK), " July 1, law, " July 1, 188.3 

l.noi to L.TX). " January 1,1854, " January 1, 1881 each, for |1,OCO 
1,501 to l.KIO, '• July 1. 18M, " July 1,18*1 

l,(i;)l to 2,0111), " .Tanuary 1,1855, " January 1, 1885J 

Issuc'd under an act ratified January 27, 1819, to aid the North Carolina R*!!- 
road Company. 

Issued under an act ratified February 14, 1855, to aid th« North Carolina 
Railroad Company. 

No. 2 001 10 .I.OOO, dated April 1, 1853, dn« in 1885, each for $1,000. 

The Receiver will pay »t Ualeigb, N. C, 80 percent of the amount of Bucb 
of the seven coupons on siild bonds, maturing m 1S'U1-1870-1871, and Including 
.Tanuary 1872, under ilrst named act, and including April, 1872, luider last 
named act, as have been presented and proved prior to December 2, 1872. 

These Bonds are called at the Ex'chanf;c " North Carolina Old Bonds, to aid 
North Carolina Railroad Company." The coupons from a part of these 
Bonds only (iirobably about oue-hulO have been pre.4ented and provtwi. 

This committee recommend that on and after this date thay be called iepa- 
rately, viz.: those with coupons on, due January 1, 18tiU, and all sub sequent, 
as now — and those with flrst maturing; seven coupons (as -spccitied above) off: 
or, in other words, with coupons on, due July, 1872, or October, 187! l, and all 
•nbse<iuent. 

On the call to be desi^jnated aa 
North Carolina Old Bonds, to aid North CaroUoa B. R., Co.— Coupons on. 
" " "' " Coupons ett." 

Bost«u, Hartford and Brie Railroad. Tbo following 

statement of this company's affairs has been kindly- lumislied 
■US bj the Trustees who are now operating tho road : 

ComnUTcial and Fniaiicial Chronicle. — Gentle men ; The 
Boston, Hartford and Erie Railroad Company is in bank- 
ruptcy, and all its rights and functions are in the Assiisneeg in 
Bankruptcy ; $24,1^3,000 is the amount their books show as 
capital stock issued. The property and franchises of the com- 
pany have passed into the possession of the bondholUera of the 
Bei dell mortgage so called, and by the terms of that mortgage 
the property and franchises vest in the bondliolders in eighteen 
months from the date of the decree. That period expires in 
March, 1873. The Assignees in Bankruptcy are in possession of 
all rights and property of the corporation not mortgaged. The 
floating debt is largely in excess of any amount tho assignees 
can realize from the assets of the corporatioi). So much lor the 
stock. 

The Berdcll bonds date March 19, 180S, duo July 1, 1900, of which 
the Erie RaiUvfiy Company endorsed $5,000,000 $20,000,000 

The Berdell bonds are subject to the mortgage of the Ilartford, 
Providence and FUhkill Railroad Company 2,055.000 

And the Boston, Ilaittord and Erie Firsts of 1884 273.000 

All Berdell bonds, $1,000 each, 7 per cent coupons, payable in 
New York. The line covered by the mortgage extends from Bos- 
ton and from Providence to the Hudson River, with branches 
from Brookline, Mass., to Woonsocket, R. I., from East Thomp- 
son, Ccnn., to Souihbridge, Mass., and from Springvale to Ded- 
bam, Mass., in all 337 miles ; leased road, the Norwich and Wor- 
cester, 66 miles. 

The Trustees report to the State Railroad Commissioners of 
Massachusetts for the year ending September 30, 1873, iurniahes 
the following : 

The cost of the road to the bondholders is represented by tho 

amount of their bonds $!a,000,00a 

And underlying bonds about 2,500,000 



On the property between Bostob and the Uudson Klvor,in all about .$22,500,000 

Miles. 

Length of main line of road from Boston to WilUmantlc, Conn 8"iI5 

Southborough branch, single 17'50 

Woonsocket division, single 33*75 

Dedbam branch, single 8' 00 

Total length of road belonmng to Ttnstees 18900 

Norwich and W'«rc*8ier to AIlyiTs Point, leased 66' 4 

Total miles operated by Trostees JOS' 4 

EOLLtNO STOCK. 

Locomotives, 58 ; passenger cars, 36 ; mail and baggage cars, 15 ; 8-wi^eI 
box freight car*, 114 ; 4-wheel box freight cars, 12; 8-whccl platform cars, liO; 
other cars (coal, gravel, &c.), 125. 

KXPENDITUBE ON OPEBATINO AOCOtTKT FOR TEAR. • 

Maintenance of way and buildings $173,033 

Traffic expenses 411,511 

Miscellaneous 52,909 

RETENCI rOR THE TEAR. 

Receipts from local passcnjcrs $278,678 

Receipts from passengers from and to ether roads 85,211 

Ric!ceipts from frsight 40;3,S39 

Receipts for express 7(i,863 

Receipts for mails ' (i,209 

Receipts as rents 10,587 

Total t8(l,.397 

Total net income above operating expenses 203,931 

Burllmeton, Cedar Rapids and mnnesota Railroad.— 

The London Daily Ne.in, in its financial article, says ; Messrs. 
Clews, Hablcht & Co. will receive subscriptions for £140,000 first 
mortgage seven per cent, coevertible sterling bonds of the Bur- 
lington, Cedar Kapids, and Minnesota Railroad Company, convert- 
ible at the option of the holder at any time i)rior to the Ist Fsb- 
ruary, 1880, into shares of the company at par, and redeemable in 
February, 1902. The price of issue is £83 per cent., or £168 per 
jESOO bond, iacludiag Intereat from the lat o( August lut, 



milivauketi and St. Faul Rallwajr.-TLe followiDg noticM 
have beeu givAn to thu Stock Exchauge : 

MiLWAl'KCE AXI> 8t. PaI'L RAtLWAT CO , I 

New YouK, December 37, 1871. I 
To the Prttldent of Vil If. T. 8'oeh Enhungr: 

8iB— The Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway' - 

new line of railway between Milwaukrr ami ' 
with all the prlr.clpal Ihws of Ihi^ touiilry ; i;. 

are to pay two ntilllon dollars In their common i-t'>.-k Von u IM (Srr<_f>'r« 
please Uke notice that the Ilr>*t said company will itaoe twcnly lliuttaaad 
•bares of thelrrommon siock thirty days from this date. 

I am, yoursreapeitfully, JAMK4 M MrKI.S'l.AV, 

Afsistaut Treasurer and Transfer Agent Milwaukee and SI \'m\ ICjIluajr Co. 
Milwaukee akh St. Paii, Riii.wat ' o.,I 
rtKW VottK. Dceruibcr 1«, l»7* I 
To Oit Prttidtht of Hit N. Y. Slock Kzrhoyg' : 

Sir— Tho scrip preferred stock of Iho Milwaukee and Ht I'anI Railway Com. 
pany will, after thirty days, be lucreasud 2S,00U shares, or t2.50U,i« ■ 
Jiany the like amount of bonds Issued by the company In part pa.v 
new line of railway between Milwaukee and Chli ii:<>. nu'i fur ili, 
depot grounds and depot bulldtntfs In the C'it' ^uj. 

chase of steel rails and equipments for the gtjii' 

1 am, yours, very respecilully, V 

Assistant Secretary and Tram-fur X^tjux ul tuui Cuaii.unjr. 
The Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway C'umiiany do not iaiur 
any new preferred slock. Tlie $2..')OO,60O scrip preferred sttK J 
issued in attached to a like amount of bonds, which will be Ir 'a 
in thirty days to the Conslruciiou Company In part payir ^^1 („ 
th« new road bought from them, whicii connect* C'j'' .^„q ,„j 
Milwaukee. Tho scrip has no valno except as at' ^digd »<, tij« 
bonds, and simply authorizes tho hohlers of the bf ,j^ j^ y„,^ 

.\tlantlc, I?IU»I«iilppl and Ohio Rallr'- j _Tlio Pet'em 
burg Index extracts the following figures Ir- ,^ thL annual tiporl 
of the Atlantic, Mississippi and Olutt.Rajl- ^^^ Company • 

During the past year the (loatina^oV,, „', „,„ various companies 
merged in tho Atlantic, Mississinpi-^mi o),;,, !,„» be. n met and 
extinguished with a portion ot th'.. proceeds of the loaneff.cled 
uj)on the bonds of the company. 




In the transportation department the receipts have been : From 
passenger trains, $.509,042 91 ; from t-mnage trains, $l,3S.'>.27f» S». 
Total, $1,954,278 89. Tho transoonation of passengers has in- 
.creased during tho year $19,41.j, of 4} per cent., while the freight 
trauaportation has increased $48,60^, or 4 per cent., this latter 
derived maiply froi« local business. Tue cost per mile of inn- 
ning tho trains was this year 4877 cents ajfainst 53.01 cents t ha 
year before, a decrease of nearly 17 per cent by which the im- 
proved condition of the road is fuUv sliowo ''l''ie gross revenue 
of the line has been f 1 ,OG9,0.'>3 OC; its current exi,->n»es, ^\;iH4.- 
733 14. Balance, f 734,327 93. An increase ol n, 



over 15 pet cent. 



increase of net .*evenue of 



.^','f'^i"-'"i' ?"* Woldon.-At a special meetioff of tbo 

stockholders of this company, it was resolved that tho franchises 
and property of the company be leased to the Wilmlnifi'-n Col- 
umbia and Augiuta Railroad Company for a term of 99 r.-an. 
upon such terms as will provide for the'payiiiBnt of tho re'irular 
interest on all the bonded debt of that company and the assump- 
tion of all Its assets, including eto-.k and interest in the WilminK- 
ton Railway Bridge Company, and the p.ivmeut of all lis liabili- 
ties other than its funded debt, and the pa"ynient to this company 
of five per cent, on Us capital stock for the current rear and th« 
further payment of six per cent, on its capit 1 slock for the next 
year, and seven per ceut. for each succeeding venr during the 
continuance of the lease ; said payments to bo "f re of United 
States tax. The stockholders ol the Wilmington, Columbia and 
Augusta Railroad (.'ompauy, at a meeting held the same dav also 
ratified tho agreement, and the lease will be executed at once. 
The road thus leased extends from Wilmington, N C north to 
Weldon, 103 miles, with a branch from Rocky Mount to'Tarboro, 
19 miles, making in all 181 miles of railroad. 

The mcinpUU and Cliarlestou Rallroad._In the Nash- 
ville Banner of the 13th December, we find the lollowing: 

" By refeience to an advertisement elsewhere in to-day's i.»Bue. 
it will be seen that the time for the sale of the Winchester ana 
Alabama and McMlnnvile and Manchaster toads has been post- 
poned from December 31. 1872, to February 1, 1873— thirty oce 
days. Tills results from the fact that there was a ' mistake in 
the terms of 8»le.' On the day of purchase, the purchaser will 
have to pay $73,000 in bonds of Ihe State of Tennessee, wi'h 
coupons of and after January 1, 1871, attached, and will have to 
give bond lor a compliance with the terms o< tho original con- 
tract 'to the extent 6f tho purchaser's bid." 

" From a statement published recently by John D. Rather, Esq.. 
President, and 0. P. Beirne, John C. Bradley, and J. J. Donegan, 
Directors of tho Memphis and Charleston road, which com]>an7 
purchased, this year, the Wincljester and Alabama road, we ara 
inclined to think that this comjmny will not be likely to renew 
the purchase. 

" They call on the stockholders for a subscription of 10 per 
cent on the stock of the compauy, which would raise $331,873. 
Whether this call will meet with a favorable response remains to 
be seen, but we rather expect to see the Winchester and Alabama 
road pass into new hands." 

Cairo And VInccnnes. -The Cairo and Vincennes Railroad 
was opened for passage ot through trains on Friday, Dec. IS. 
This road, 157 miles in length, across (in part) the most rngeed 
portion of tiie State of Illinois, has been completed, practiollj. 
since April 1 last. It connecis the city of Cairo, at the junction ot 
two of the three groat rivers of the L'nited States, with all points 
east and northeast, by a direct line, atlords a new outlet to tho 
South, and is destined to be a main channel of commanicatioa 
between the railway system of the Eastern and Central StatW, 
and that rMcUa^ to Texas, Mexico and Uie Pacific Ocean, 



22 



- THE CHHOXICLE. 



[Jahuary 4, 187^. 



^I)c Commercial €;imes. 

FsiDAT NiOHT. Jan. 8, 1873. 

Tbo holiday festivities and the obstructions to transportatioa 
caused by the recent heavy fall ot snow, have greatly diminished 
the volume of biifiinesd in the past week. Stocks of domestic 
produce are (with Indian corn a conspicuous exception) generally 
smaller than last year ; but of loreign gods the quantity in ware- 
house i* said to be larger than last year. What effect these 
facts are to have upon the commerce of the port and of the 
country the next few months will probably demonstrate. 

The following is a statement of tho stocks of leading articles 

of domestic and foreign merchandise, at dates given : 

, 1872. . 1373. 

Jan. 1. Sac. 1. Jan. 1. 

Beef tci.andbbls. 64,980 43,0.M 50 162 

Park ..." l)l)la. 40,'.):2 7,74.i SS.WJ 

Tobacco, foreign.' bales. l!l,7:)l 87,001 . 32,37a 

Tobacco. domMtlo Ixhdt. 12,')55 10,9")ti 9,033 

CoiTbo Kio bagj. 6i,38.S S«,6l« 48,479 

Collee, other bags. I(i,ii73 48,ii!i3 2ii,738 

Cottec. Java. Ac mats. 8.551 i:0,43i 63,3.58 

Surar .. bhds. 27,412 20,074 20 420 

Siutar '. boxes. 8j,124 lt>,i2o 49,8b2 

ba2«r ,.bag»,etc. 22ii,' 21 4:,3B1 110,513 

Meiado hhds. •J..362 1.12? 153 

Molasses hhds. 8.ii33 4.068 2,995 

Molasses bbls. 6,1M 1,416 312 

Hides No. •«5,.300 145,500 86,300 

Cotton bales. 6),4i(i 66.603 62.063 

Kosin bbls. 40,553 62,084 49,270 

Spirits TurponUne bbls. 8,013 6,871 7,040 

Tar ' bbls. 3,914 BJ5 1,240 

Hico,E.I bags. !*,35l «,6«0 14,215 

Rice, Carolina casks. «84 240 360 

Ganny Clotb (Cal) bales. 80,050 25,900 J5.80il 

GuunyBags bales. C.IOI 8,100 7 900 

Unseed 7r. bags. 203,400 13i,20O 94.200 

Saltpetre bags. 7,700 8,000 8,2j0 

Jute and Jute Butts bales. 37,034 12i,000 135,100 

MauilaHemo bales. 2,440 41,004 63,830 

Cotton has been higher, and closes with a decided improve 
ment, at 20Jc. for middling Juplande. Flour has advanced to 
$7(27 iO for shipping extras, and wheat to $1 68@1 65 for No. 2 
spring, but closed dull. Corn without essential change, closing 
at 66ic. for prini'j mixed afloat. Coffee has been very active, and 
other grocert.es in better demand. 

Frfcigh.Xs have been dull and rates weak. Yesterday the Liver- 
pool Bteamers took cotton at {igll-16d., and corn at 8Jd.; and two 
veeeels were chartered to Cork for orders with grain at 7fi. 6d. 
To-day, corn was shipped to Liverpool by steam at 8d., and bacon 
by sail at 35s. 

Tallow has remained nearly nominal at&Jc. for prime. Whiskey 
has declined and closes at 84i(395c., under Iree supplies. Clover- 
seed has advanced to O^gOjc. Naval stores dull ; strained rosin 
$3 70 ; spirits turjientine, 60c. 

Frovlsions have been vaiiable. Pork ha» ruled easier and 
generally only moderately active. New mess has sold in a jobb- 
ing way at $13 50, and in a wholesale way on the 
•pot and for January at |13 ; Western prime mess has 
•old at |14 75, and city at $15 50. Lard has been variable 
but has latterly shown more firmness, with a good demand 
for future; Western has sold at 7io. on the spot and for Janu. 
ary, 7 15-16c. for February, and 8 l-16®8ic. for March, while city 
has latterly brought 7|@7fc. on the spot. Bacon has been in good 
demand for short clear on the spot, and this with a small supply 
caused au aavance, and sales have been made at 8c., but subse- 
quently when December contracts had been filled cut was offered 
at 7ic. for short delivery ; long clear has eold at 6fc. for January. 
Cut Meats have been in good demand, dry salted shoulders have 
•old at 4}c. on the spot, pickled hams at 9g I Oc, short cut dry 
Baited do. at SJc. Beef has been quiet but prices steady, with a 
Block considerably le3.^ than last year. Butter has been very firm 
but quiet as usual during holiday w.-ek. Pork was firmer, 
■with nesv mesa quoted at $13 50@13 75, cash, and $13 25® 
13 50 for lh3 tiUure. Lard was also hiifher at 7|c. for prime West- 
ern steam on tlie spot. Box meats unchanged. Cheese quoted at 
14:314ic. lor prime to choice factories. 

Wool ha-s ruled very dull, except some large sales of Cape at 
about 37cd33c. currency. Petroleum has continued inactive ; buy- 
ers and sellers apart; held at lie. for Crule ia bul ; ; 27ic. for 
refined in bbla, and iOc for ditto in cases. Hops have been dull. 

In Kentucky Leaf, all except the loose lots darnaged by the fire in 
Jersey City have been closed out, mistly at private sale.but includ- 
ing 1«S hhds at auction at g^SlOJc; in round lots the sales have 
been limited to ab,)ut 200 hlidsat full prices; lues, 10(aiOic; com- 
mon to fine leaf, 10i@16c. Seed leaf has been only moderately ac- 
tive, the sales incluJmg lOOcase^, crop 1870, 9@15c ; 200 cases, crop 
1871, Connecticut, 4.i®(53ic; 80 cases, crop 1871, New York, Ojc; 
153 cases, crop 1871, Ohio, private terras ; 83 cases, crop 1871, Wis- 
consin, 9^0. in Hav ina Tobacco, with a large stock, the only tran- 
sactions have been 500 bales at 1@1.07. 

I'l metals, cojjper has b.ien active and higher, but closing 
quiet at 3 Ic. cash for Lake. Tin has sold at 31:., gold, for straits ; 
Knglish scarce, quoted at 81ic., gold. Tin plateslclosed quiet 
aad steady. " 



iixporta of IjeadluK Article* nroiu ^ew York. 

The tollowiug table, compiled Irom Custom House returns, shows 
the exports of leading arttcles from the port ot New York since 
January 1, 1872, to all the principal foreign countiies, and also the 
totals for the last week, and since January 1. The last two lines 
show total values, including the value of all other articles besides 
those mentioned in tho table. 



§a 



• %- — iV^Vf ^ fl.j i, o c- Q o — i-kicor-'^om^aimif. cvr — oi-rccecx-r-«ico* 
t- ^c^iSOOt-ar-^irtTOStjcOr-iiT* C5^~ C to rt .O i- C> GO -^r ql I- ^t (?• «3 l- t^ t'^ 



-r oi t- w « « c^.- ec o c m Ot TT o o - - . 

en (N-rrCiWc*-^ — o& <oc* 'W* ■*T'*r 



a 



— ijiN 



o^^>t•c-o»^T*o>--»o•*-•^•<^»w^ralOl5*^Oloal'JJ^oQOC»^eOlO'No - 
wOifjiOfiMOi— ».'0;0»at-0;Oi- -,;OX)(.-3sO>4.-^e',''— _ ;:^o — c*0 

^■•didSi^cQao^-r cJio'oi— :o — V so -oi-*od trio --^ad*£ 3» •7-''-'^Qtr'- c* o 
en J. o 35 c3 i^ iS to «. 00 w i-" ^ o*~- " — ^ ■- ■ •' 

»- — C^f i3 i* -' T 



Ol Xi ••'^ C? O"- ^ t- . 



-»* ^A^ --■ ».T uy Si J \^^ y^^ ijv -*' w* ,-- '^ t vji^ '^ '-•* ^Z ^ ii 

1-r — QtOi-'wt-oacCJ'vt-t-tRtciO'W'fOi 05 



n 



fas 



s« s-^a 



(d. 



• o>:nor>o-.-'-i ToOi-iw • -^ —• ta -v ^ ta i^ -^ ^a cc in a-, -s • ^<=* 

. to t« ■ J 1-" >« EC ^ .-( — f- TO . w -> t- C3 O t— ira^tO c ^ ■v—- -^ • a^G^ 

o* T-« C4 -^ ' t- o« at CO* 

^ ^ " 55" 






3 (II t" * ■ ^;.so <N ^^ o c 






, -w »i3 L-j 



£ I: 






go— ooo-f^rt* •t-OTOQ? 
CO t- ,"* V CO - a» "t * ^ 
t- of CO cc " "^' i^i o» 



CO ai 93 hi cciMuS c n 



« CO 1^ CT, — 



c* So 



Of-* 



a* <7i 






inM-^n > . .00- 



.0 ff o 



. 0» »n — • <?< ir; O 
- 1- •£: OD -fSfOf^ 



»-i (C cc t- • I 



s ts 



g S ". : : 



•CQ(C 



■ o'-wiTO •■*'» -^ .•ooo-*-^o • ■•-.to .eoo 



• ■^osiojonrt 




icer'fO»***cc'7*T 



• •jvCC-^ -""-QCOSS^^t— ■»?"■- 

• to OC O '-* 00 O iS C* <C r-i 






«ii^ -T^j-i-y uno* •-i^-ci 



' :s3' 






to 99 



8 



is 






!| :SS 



• Cft -v t- lO 

'oci^'ir" 

r1 C* 









ill 



■ ■ ■ s § is 



r- CO ■«•(?* 

CO t*-'W> 

C-Oi 

tdia 






S8 

eo CO 



• CO . 'tDoB • .H5-^ • -cot- 'Wcfo^ ^^ .e?o>rt«o 



S gi 



• 1-1 . • 5 so ^^ ;e3 • jcocoo*?— rtt-^n .i-<_ c«^ *% , 
■— T * ■' v-Too *co * '*c'r- ^of of *^ wQcT oT-v' 



. — . V o> CT c* t" t" 2- o» ■* o »o »* o If? ■V* "^ ■* as '*»"•' th ?r tc ■£ 
• CO i t-M T'^ ;SSBl ^ "^ '^'^■^ ^ 5»obo'=^ "O ^ f-oo05 55 Q 









. -3 • : • a • 

■ 4> ** « a ; o • 

civuuQns CO A 



mm* 



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J' D J3 •• 



• :^ 
■ J 8 






E o 52 
- -5 t<H 



Janaar; 4, 187 3. J 



THE CHBONICLH 



23 



Reoelpt. or Doiae.tto 5>;»d»«« for «Ue Week aud elnc* I there wag decided buoyancy, nnd the highest prices of th-i week 



Were paid. ClosiDf;, however, with a ponioa of the advkocn loiiT 
The prices for futures last reported were (i.uis low middllog) 18 
15 10 lor January, SOic for February, 201c. for March, 21r for 
April, 21Jc. for May, 21lc, for Juue, and 23c. lor July. 
The total sales of this description for the week sre 103. 7i6 

bales, including irroon board. For Immediate deli»er»'tho 

total sales foot up this week ll.l.'ja bales. includioK 6,873 for 
export, 3,215 for consumption, CU8 for speculation, and' 844 in 
transit. Of the above 877 bales were to arrivs. The follow - 
ing are the closing quotations tii^lay : 









Juuuary 1. 










rills 


BiDoe 


Same [ 


This 


Since 


same 




nruek. 
88 


Jan. 1. 
«,7C» 


lime 'it 




weak. 


.lan.l. 


time "71 


A(4iies...pkgs. 


Oll'-ake, pkzi.... 


l.'.ig 


u»,3;o 


75„w.1 


UrcadB-urr* — 






1, OH. lard 




9..1*J 


6.ss: 


i'"louf..bbl8. 


ii.nti s.o;i.iJ4: 3.«i9,w5 


t'eanulN, ba;fa 


1,311 


8lj,44t 


tl.Kii 


Wiies ..b>i<. 


lU0,l')5l'i.«(i.5»l,2r,,-,ls,iUi) 


I'l-oviHlon-i— 








Coru 


0»,(ll!,<0.7ii9 IJl'i? I'fl.lM 


UiUtor, pkgl.... 


10,0S7 


6'0,48? 


7M,473 


OaU 


8;,«1 12,i«« \H li.H'i.ulii) 


Cheese 


4,97a 


l,714,i'l> 


1,4 n,Ka 


Ky« 


3;»1 4^a,i-ii: I.'*i.ii;i 


Culineats 


7.41.1 


831, aii 


103.8.'U 


Biirley. *c.. 


83.i>00 9.IIII.48I; 3.'f6'l,r>.ll 


Runt 


s.ji: 


414 8)" 


4ijjj>e 


tinw* aecii. 


2,»i5 «<,:IS3 


3.V,71.!' 


Pork 


4, 210 


144.*71 


175.«W 


Uciias 


S.ili I.W.W* 


16:.(i37 


Beef, picjn 


i.ti;o 


»s,iin 


IbltOI 


I'eas 


IBii.SH 


1178U 


L*rd, nk({« 

Lard.k'ttfS 


S,u8J 


asi,i;7 


2»f.,52l 


<:. iijQiiMibU 


' I.IUU S0WI6 W\,<5J 




■n.-ii 


«.2ii; 


Cutcou., bales. 


sj,7i» r,a.r,» wi.tv.t ' ii\u«, oKga 


7i; 


13,71.2 


17,511) 


lletup ..bales. 


a] J.WI 30«lSlBrch 


1.8 


SU.MS 


2I:.4M 


HlJe* .Vu. 


3.3'! «38,4;s 4l0.1Ui |S carlne 


*u 


■f>:.i 


19 944 


Hops, .bales. 


3:i'i 2.',3lO .15,0.7 Sugar. hlia8..&o.. 


Si 


8.UII8 


14,127 


LcalUer. Bides 


2S.I4J1 3,';.vj.ilJi S.MUSiS 


Tiillow. pk^B 


7iii 


4.!.«^ 


41 Kt 


M.>laiiii;^.Md8. 


3,1 Ij lifiiS 


62,S'Jj| 


Tohaccu), .ikffs.... 


S.OOl 


S,'8,;86 


2ii,;i.i 


SJavai stores— 






Tobaijco. tihds.... 


82 < 


t:,r,i 


88.1) 3 


Cr.turit bbls 


f.mo 


8.98 -.1 


Whiskey, bbls.... 


I.SIS 


18.!.012 


lliH.ClSI 


BolrlCs turp. 


331 la.iyii 


67,9.!! 


Wool, bales 


l.llil 


77.313 


118.222 


Kosla 


Ui 5<J.0';j 


50J.»'3 


Dressed hogs, No. 


1,3IU 


87.0111 


U7,42U 




IIJ 29,33^ 

i.ur 


19,«TS 
I.IU 










Pltctt 



COTTON 

FuiDAY. P. M., January 3, 1878. 
By special telefframs received to-night from the Southern ,)orts, 
we are inpossessiou of the returns showing the receipts, exports, 
&c., of cotton for the week ending this evening, Jan. 8. It 
appears that the total receipts for the ««von days liave readied 
l()4,70o bales against 103,443 bales last week, Ii5,y57 bales the pre- 
vious week and 125,501 Bates three weeks since, making the total 
receipts since the first of September, 1872, 1,734,210 bales against 
1,480,412 bales for the same period ot 1871-72, showing an in- 
crease since September 1, 1872, of 247,807 bales. The detsils of 
the receipts for this week (as per telegraph) and lor the corres- 
ponding weeks of the five previous years are as follows : 



Ueoolvei this week at— 



Now Orluaus .... 

Mobile 

Cimiiestou 

R:ivaimab 

Te xas 

Teuiifssee. &o... 

"-lorila 

Korih Carol.ua.. 
VirjiuU 



Total this week. . 
TotolnnceSept.l. 



1873. 



24,S35 
17.')2!1 
13.5(8 
a.SJ 
11.594 

»,i;7 

589 
I.fiJl 
8,!l)4 

104.703 

1.731.219 



1873. 



49.2S4 
12.331 

8,3* 
X^5,"9.5 

6.211 

8,3iS 
413 

l.lOli 
11.41; 

ud.8;8 

l,43'i.41i 



45.817 
l.i.8iU 
10.415 
27,|i;9 
11,6 13 
11.017 
411 
S.7S1 
12,S99 

13I.531 

.7o3.0;!6 



4 .632 
14 941 
9.419 
Jl.lOl 
7.S19 
I>,0.i2 
671 
I.SS'i 
8.799 

114,091) 

l,Sl;i,483 



1S«9. 

31.696 
lU.2i'4 
a.Rl; 
2U.461 
3.11:2 
5.101 
421 
1,454 
4,912 

86.906 

1 04I.7SI 



1868. 

"i'2,194 
10.20) 
9,6ii 

Su.iei 

3,012 
9,101 
421 
1,414 
4,912 

";7,;oi 

l.OfiT P49 



The exports tor the week ending this evening reacU a total of 
71,003 bales, of which 54,101 were to Great Britain, 3,351 to 
France, and 13,491 to rest of the Continent, while the stocks as 
made up this evening, are now 434,972 bales. Below are the 
exports and stocks for the week, aud also for the corresponding 
week of last season : 



Orainary . 

UoodDrdlnary 

Slrlct U odO.dloaiT, 

Low Middling 

MIllilllllK..... .. 

Good .MIddllnit. 



..perlb, 

::i 



Uuland aod 
rlorlda. 



KJfi... 

19 «.. 

I*X9 ■ 
low-. 



IS •.... 

184a.... 
'•X«.... 

2t S.... 

»lf«.. 



Urieans. 

I'M*.... 
I«X«.... 

fi52:::: 



I'Hi.. 

fir- 



i'K«.... 

"Sa.... 



Below we give the sales ol spot and transit cotton aud price ot 
Upland) at this market each day of the past week ■ 



Saturday 

.MonflM.v 

rueKdii'y 

WodneS'lay 

Tonrsday 

Friday 



Eip't. 



tss 

2.171 

2>5 

i',2'i 

1.992 



Total ) «,«75 



C" 
sump. 



J(A txs. 

ec 



S70 
BUI 
)C7 



46) 

i.ieu 



8,215 



•'pel 
Ilia* 



ITS 

25 

M 

Kew 

'iv 



Tr»n. 
• P. 



944 

IIV 



Teen 



Total. 

l/jT 

731 
Da>. 

l.C-6 
>.6»J 

ll.lM 



1 ird'ry. 



iiif' 

17« 



Ord'ry. 



!8H 

'ii" 
li 



Midi'r 



l«K 

1»H 

'iiif' 



dlln< 
WW 

W). 
"JBV 

auf 



For forward delivery the sales (including free cm btvrd), 

have reached during the week 102,700 bales (all low middling or on 
the basis of low middling), aud the fjllowing ii a staiemeut of tha 
sales aud prices: 



For Uccember. 

bales. ets. 

100 19 15-3J 

8,300 ma 

400 18916 

I.91I0 .\9H 

2,450 19 11-1 



41*1 

fOO,... 



.19 t-'6 
• 19X 



Kxnorted to— 



Weekendlniji, 
Jan. 3. ' 

KewOrleana.j 

Mobile I 

C.iarl ttoa...| 

Stvaxeuh 

Texas 

iMew York... 
Ottiei ports.. 

Total 

S'oce Uept. 1 



I France I Contln't 



13 SOI 
7.3*1 
2.435 

18.U19 
:.94l 
8.736 
1.143 

,"il,161 
571,239 



3,1St 



8, SSI 
128,9li7 



8,3 JS 



40!) 
9,800 



l906 



13.191 
202,246 



Total this 
weak. 



25.223 
7.3S3 
2,M5 

21,319 
2,911 
8,659 
1,143 



71.003 
9UJ,482 



Same w*k 

1872. 



1873. 



19,475 
8,124 
S.O116 

10,928 
4.26". 

6,9es 

165 



46.922 
7S;.9i2 



159,115 
4'. 000 
29,' 02 
82.757 
69,8t6 
62.312 
40,000 



4^4.972 



187a. 



190.738 
lil.ta 
8.' .8 10 
78.67:. 
43.'.-2; 
li4U!9 
2i.0C0 

iOO.lSO 



From the foregoiuu statement it will be seen 'hat, compared 
with the corresponding week of last season, there is an increase in 
the exports this week ol 30,081 bales, while the stocks to-night are 
15,208 bales leas than they were at this time a year ago. The 
following is our usual table showing the movement of cotton at 
all the porta from Sept. 1 to Dec. 27. the latest mail dates. 



New Orleans 

Mobile 

Cliarlestoa 

Bavaaiiah 

Texas 

New VorK 

Florida 

North Carolina 

Virginia 

Other ports 



Total this year. 
Totil lastya- 



RKOBIPTS 
SINOK 8BPT.1. 



;S72. I 1071. 

4;9,^!88' 407,0)4 
163.819 169,723 
2J2.581; 161,764 
367.973 aS.Ml 
1.>.B.178 105.00: 
86,059! il.6aS 
6, 191 7.126 
80,364' 31,1(16 
145. 
40,355 



CXPOBTBD SINCK SBPT.l TO- 



WS .945 
17,^60 



1629,516 



1375.784 



Great 
BriUln 

156,BC0 
2S.578 
41.657 
64,919 
39.599 

176.539 

'416 

790 

4,800 



617,128 
531.129 



80,773 
1.073 
10,929 
27,215 
3,515 
1,971 



200 



Other 
For'gii 



8S,r62 
2.59 
9,292 

60, ^ 
5,780 

23,227 



188.735 



93,790 



67,151 



Total. 



CnaPt- 
wlse 

Pons. 



8 1.235 
S.',04' 
64.K78: 

l.">2.479 
4^.^91 

201,6: 

■<i6 

790 
9,069 

831,479 



692,370 



75,534 
81,(96 
103.(128 
126,3^6 
4i.5l>- 

6i5i9 
26.321 
171.093 



Stock, 



159,1(3 
37.42! 
28.16i 
87.680 
6 :,572 
64.8,18 

S'.SJi 
!fi,(^9( 
20,000 

481,059 



9,150 total for bee. 
Cor .lanuory 

100 s. n tix 

l.ioo nx 

500 19 17-2 

noo s.n....i9 i>-ie 

«,I10 . 199-16 

£00 s. n !9X 

900 no aot. this 
wce^... 19X 

7.H10 19X 

500 1921-32 

20U no not. 

V.St 19 11-18 

«,7iX) 1911-16 

:iXI «. n 19X 

2U0 MO not. 
Stll 195, 



balM. ct» 

100 no sot. til 

2d I9K 

S,«oo i»v 

iOO no rot. 

SJlh 14:3-1« 

80O 19 13-16 

IOO ►. n 19X 

SOonouot. tiis 

week »% 

l.SV 19K 

100 19 2"- (2 

2,100 191516 

1,900 20 

29.10 totKl .Ian. 
For Febriisry. 
14" t) Hx 

2,40(1 19 1.Vl5 

8,700 JO 

5i .20 1-32 

:,60ll 201-6 

3.>.»<i 20X 

2.100 JO 3-1" 

7.40) *)V 

1,100 20 9-il 

23,600 toul Feb. 



For Mtrdi. 



bales. 
»0 . 

100. . 

2,800.. 

3.40(1.. 

A«.. 

2,150.. 

j.8«.. 

7>l.. 

45J.. 



70X 

Vi-.H 

^H 

!0H 

c07-« 

iO« 

... .209.1- 

-ajx 



14,700 total March. 



For If ay. 

bales. ct, 
iflO n 

MO 21 1-S» 

«» 31 1-IS 

J.IOO ;lx 

4<IU n t-M 

1,!0' Mt 

ire M »-M 

1.00 ilj, 

1,000 X. 7-^ 

»u . ax 

10,200 total Uay. 



For April. 

400 ..»u 

aoo V0 8.16 

1,TO 20K 

500 SO ll-li 

J.7UI JK)* 

30 20; -.« 

1,50(1 Jf U ' 1,7(1 

l,)« 20 1J-IJ 

2,-i90 -11 4,ap3toUI Jane 

2t« 311-1* 

For July. 

10.830 total April. 200 ..1 



For Jane. 

at a u 

100 aiS 

•on ai>, 

40) aijl 

no at II- 1 

i*< 



... ai« 

.2118-1) 



The following exchanges have lieen made during :Ue week : 



The market the past week has developed considerable strength, 
due chiefly to the small receipts at our porta which have forced 
up Liverpool, aud this has reacted upon ourselves. At the 
opening there was considerable buoyancy on account of the small 
arrivals for the previous week, strengthening the views of be- 
lievers in a small crop. Monday the quotations for spots ad- 
vanced ic to 20Jc. for Middling Uplands with a good export 
demand. Tuesday the market was dull; but yesterday (Thurs- 
day) Liverpool having sliown increased aniiuation at beiter 
rates, our quotations were Jc. higher with only a ir.oderate export 
and speculative demand. The almost impassible condition of 
the streets during the whole week checked business. To-day the 
opening was firm but the close was more quiet under the inflence 
of private telegranis that the receipts at New Orleans were likely 
to show an immediate large increase notwithstanding the move 
ment in that direction from Memphis has been stopped by the 
ice. For future delivery tbe market has been quite irregular. 
The lowest prices of the week were made on Thursday morning 
when the opening sales were 19 9-16c. for January to 20jc. for 
April, but there was come recovery towards the close. To-day 



1"0 Doccmbjr for <I0 January, tren. 
SCO • •• 800 •• •• 
7-l'c. p»)'l to exchitn^e IOO .lannHry for 100 February. 
200 Jan: a y s. d. for ^0 Junuar}', rajc>. evan. 
Weather Kepokts bt Telfobapii. — At Mobile it has niinrd 
on two day.s; to-day it is clear and pleasant. It has also laiucd 
two days at Sclma, Montgomery and Charleston, and one day at 
Macon. At Memphis there have been five ruiny days ; our tele- 
gram adds that the bad weather is retarding niarting. It ha.s 
rained more than half the we( k at Xashville. The thermometer 
at Memphis has averaged 88 ; Selma and Savannah 55, Mont- 
gomery 53, Charleston 45, Macon 44. 

India Crop. — Our ifaail dates from India are brought down 
one week later to-night. Messrs. VV. Nicol & Co. write, Novem- 
ber 23, that " crop accounts from all the districts continue very 
favorable. In the Sural district the plants are certainly a li-.ila 
backward, but that ia all that can be said against them. P.ckirg 
is being carried on to a small extent in the Berars and Kbandish, 
but it will be quite a month before the various markets receive 
full supplies. Hingunghaut will, we exp'ct, be coming forward 
freely in about a fortnight or three weeks. Samples received 
from Oomrawultee lately are not so good as the first haurlluls 
forwarded, being very harsh in feel and possessing little staple. 
Khamgnura musters are much better; they are more silky and 
longer in fibre." Messrs. Finlay, Muir & Co., under same date, 
say: "We continue to receive fAvorable reports regarding the 
weather and state of the plants in the interior. The report of 
the Government Inspector iu Khandish give.^ the area under cot- 
ton as 32 per cent larger than last year. The yield per acre is, 
however, estimated to be under an average, but the quality is 
expeced to be very good. Cotton picking is progressing. A few 
BdjuB are being brought into the Hingunghaut market, and Bom- 
bay dealers are paying very extreme prices for them. In iha 
Berars the plants are ripening slowly, and this is in favor of a 
large yield ot fine quality. In Akote a very considerable iocreBM 
over an average yield is looked for. In Ouzerat and Eattywar 
the wo.ither is most favorable, and present appearances ind'icmta 
an early and full crop from those districts. In Dharwar the 
young plants are said to look very healthy aud to gire promise of 
an unusually good cotton crop." 

Visible Supply op America:? Cotton. — .\. correpondeiit 
wishes us to give a detailed btatement of the visible supply of 
American cotton. The figures we receive each we«-k by cable 
do not state separately the American portion of tbe stocks, except 
for Liverpool. This week's mail, however, has brought us the 
statemenis which we published on the 14th ot December. Using 
those returns, as of to-day, and applying them to oar cable 
figures, just received, the following would stow about tbe present 
cottdiUoa oi the Aiueilc«a Dupfly compaxwi with Jan. 0, 1873: 



24 



THE CHRONICLR 



tJanuwy 4, 1873. 



American. 

Stock in Liverpool 03.000 

All other utocks 66,594 

Afloat lor Liverpool 304,000 

Allothorafloat 75.500 

U. Slates out port* 484,973 

U. Sutes inlond towns 91,584 

Expor'd from U.S. this week 71,003 



873 




187S 


ToUI, 


American 


ToUl. 


421,000 


107,000 


669,000 


628,300 


47,200 


457,837 


254,000 


133,000 


858,000 


83,500 


103,071 


1.52,394 


484,973 


500,180 


500,180 


91,584 


92,933 


93.933 


7i,oo;j 


45,573 


45,573 



Total 1,046,053 2,034,259 1,133,558 2,145,906 

Thoao fi<,'uro8 woald indicate a visible supply of American cot- 
ton, 91,903 bales less than at tliis time a year ago. It should be 
remembered also that European spinners Jan. 1872 are supposed 
to have licll more American cotton than they now do. 

New YoiiK Stock, Jan. 1.— We are indebted to Charles A. 
Easton, Chairman of the Committee on Statistics of the Cotton 
Exchange, for the following official count of stock, Jan. 1, declared 
this morninir: In warehouses, 89,443; in Brooklyn, 1,315; on 
wharves, 6,351 ; on shipboard, not cleared, 11,304 ; total, 58,413. 

Bombay Siiipmests. — According to our cable dispatch received 
to-(iay, there have been no shipments from Bombay to Great 
Britain the past week and none to the continent, while the 
receipts at Bombay, durinf; the same time have been 8,000 
bales. The movement since the fir.^t of January is as follows. 
These are the figures of W. Nicol & Co., of Bombay, and are for 
the week ending Thursday, Jan. 3 : 

,-Slilpraeun this week to-. ^Slilpmentselnce Jan. I to^ Week's 
Great Coa- Great Con- Total, receipts. 

Britain, tineut. .Total. Brlluln. tliicnt. 
1873.... none none none 6tj9,000 333.000 917,000 8,000 
aS7l.... 8,000 8,000 11,000 808,000 339.000 1,147,000 25,000 

From the fure^oing it would appear that compared with last 
year there is a decrease this year in the week's shipments to Great 
Britain ol 8,000 bales, and that the total movement since Jan. 1 
now shows a decrease in shipments of 330,000 bales over the 
corr3S'jonding period of 1871. 

Our dispatch also states that the injury to the crop from the 
storm reported three weeks since has been greatly exa;jgeratod. 

GuSNY Bags, Bagging, &c. — Bagging has ruled quiet and steady 
the past week. But little, if anything, has been done during the 
holidays. The only sales that have transpired are 150 rolls Bos- 
ton at 12ic cash, immediate delivery ; 100 rolls New York at 13}@ 
13c cash, immediate delivery. Future deliveries can still be 
bought for March, April and Sliiy at 13i@14c, c. o. d. from second 
hands. India balfs dull and neglected. Borneo also dull and 
nominal. We hoar of a sale of 135 bales bags on privAte terms, 
thought to be in vicinity of l-t|c. There is some little inquiry, 
and quite a brisk trade might result if holders would concede a 
little iu price; but stocks are small, 5,200 bales in New York, 
2,000 bales in Boston, making a total of about 7,300 bales, so that 
holders are not disiioscd to yield. We quote price at close 14|c, 
with fijm feeling on the part of holders. 'I he [market for butts 
has rule t quiet and steady throughout the past week or ten days. 
Free arrivals have caused a slight relaxation in price, and sales 
have been made from ship at 2 1-I6(a3ic cash. We hear of sales 
of 500 bales at former price ex. Pi-arl of India, and 500 bales at 
latter price ex. Charlotte White. We quote prices at the close at 
2Jc cash from ship, and 2 3-16@2ic cash and time from store. 
Contracts for future delivery we quote at 2Jc gold, and 3f@3ic 
currency. 

Visible Supply or Cotton Made op by Cable and Tele- 
8RAPII. — By cable we have to-night the stocks at the different 
European ports, the India cotton afloat for all of Europe, and the 
American afloat for each port as given below. Frotr figures thus 
received, we have prepared the following tal)le, allowing the 
quantity ol cotton in sight^'at this date (Jan. 8) of each of the 
two past seasons : ' 

1873. 

Stock in Liverpool bales. 421,000 

Stock in London 226,000 

Stock in Havre 237,000 

Stock in Marseilles 13,000 

Stock in Bremen 36,000 

Stock in Amsterdam. 66,000 

Stock at Antwerp 32.000 

Stock at Barcelona 28,000 

Stock at Trieste 1.200 

Afloat for Great Britain (American) 304,000 

Afloat for Havre (American and Brazil).. . 88,090 

Afloat for Bremen (American) 85,000 

^X float for Amsterdam (American) 2,.500 

""otal Indian cotton afloat for Europe 58,000 

"i '- in United States ports 484,973 

Btoc^ 'nland towns 91,584 

Stock in . , United States this week . . . 71,003 
Exports frotu ____;___ 



1872. 

509,000 

167,809 

160,000 

16,000 

12,505 

27,300 

12.343 

55,000 

6,870 

183,000 

83,000 

14,071 

6,000 

194,733 

500,180 

93,933 

45,573 



Total 



, 2,034,259 



2,145,906 



Thesefigures indicate a >TeMr."Z jlllf * *°-°'^'^' 



of 111,647 bales compared with 



movements ok CoI'TON at the i.rTBKIOR POIlTS.-B.loW We 

give the movements of cotton at the inte^'or poits-receipts and 
Bliipraon<8 for the week, and stock to-night and for the correspond- 
ing week ol 1871^;^^^ ^^^_ ^^^ ^^^^^ flTeek endln.? .Ta,,. 5 ;78-> 
Receipts. Shipments. Stock. Bee*lpts, fahipnienlB. Stock. 

Augusta* 7533 6,539 13,503 3,941 S^oJ 19,091 

Columbus a.S95 2,713 12.176 1,105 TTl 10.428 

Macon 1,946 1,065 18,307 1.394 1,045 14,72o 

Montgomery... 1,410 1,641 11,706 1,378 1,093 ll,3ol 

»Thi9 Is tlic stock at AnguBta by actual count. The Incraage over the 
running count is not givuii In our telogrum, bat If »bOVe 8blpment» are COr- 
ract tU^ incrcMe mant be i,iSi balet. 



Selma.... 1.117 1,861 4,533 1,593 2,579 7,393 

Memphis 8.836 14,430 30,934 10,307 11,472 24,954 

Nashville 1,603 1,091 5,436 1,578 2,574 4,491 

35,039 80,533 91,584 21,056 23.690 93,933 
The above totals show that the interior stocks have increased dur- 
ing the week 3,955 bales, and are to-night 1,349 bales less than 
at the same period last yoa.r. The receipts have been 3,983 bales 
more than the same week last year. 

The exports ot cotton this week from New York show a de- 
crease since last week, the total reaching 9,6.39 bales, against 
15 954 bales last week. Below we give our table showing the 
exports of cotton from New York, and their direction for each of 
the last four weeks ; also the total exports and direction since 
September 1, 1873 ; and in the last column the total for the same 
period of the previous year : 

Exports of Cotton Cbales) n-om New ITork since Sept.lt 18T3 





■WKIK BNDIN8 


Total 

to 
date. 


Sama 




Dec. 

11. 


Dec. 

18. 


Dec. 
25. 


Jan. 
1. 


prev. 
year. 


Liverpool 

Other British Ports 


7,598 


15,804 


15,254 


8,7)6 


185,141 

134 


170,781 
949 


Total to Gt. Britain 

Havre 


7,598 


15,804 
63 


15,25« 


8,736 
17 


185,275 
1,928 


171,731 
213 


Other French ports 






2,330 


63 
798 


600 
100 


17 
906 


1,928 

17,028 
4,498 


213 


Bremen and Hanover 


4,097 


Otlier ports 


1,133 




Total to N. Europe. 

Spain,Oporto& Oibraltar&c 
All others 


2,330 


793 


700 


906 


21,536 
2'^7 


6,M9 


Total Spain, &c 


.... 








2,607 





Grand Total 


: 9,9S8 


16,665 


15,954 1 9,659 


2U.;i36 


177.473 



The following are the receipts of cotton at New York, Boston 
Philadelphia and Baltimore for the last week, and since Sept.1,1872 '. 



BBOS'TB 7B0K- 



BALTIUOBX.' 



New Orleans.. 

Texas 

Savannah 

Mobile 

Florida 

S'th Carolina.. 
N'th Carolina.! 

Virginia 

Nsrth'rn Ports 
Tennessee, &c| 
Foreign 

Total this year! 

Total laflt year. 




2,4791 41,980 

Shipping News.— The exports of cotton from the United States 
the past week, as per latest mail returns, have reached 77,437 
bales. So far aa the Southern ports are concerned, these are the 
same exnorts reported by telegraph, and published in TheChtion- 
icle last Friday, except Galveston, and the figures for that port 
are the exports for two weeks back. With regard to New York, 
we include the manifests of all vessels cleared up to Wednesday 
night of his week : 

„ .„ „ ,. , Total bales. 

New TonK— To Liverpoel, per steamers City of Limerick. 1,733. . . .City 
of Paris, 1,070. .. .Adriatic, 2,029... Wisconsin, 3,264.... pet ship 

Cordillera, (MO ,,,. 8,738 

To Havre, per steamer St. Laurent, 17 10 

To Bremen, per steamer Dentschland, 906 906 

Niw Orleans— To Liverpool, per steamers Gracia, 2,691 . . . Louisiana, 
3,518, . . .per ships Whampoa, 3,659 and 18 bags seed cotton. . .Vic- 
toria, 2,473 .... Advance, 4,632 ... per bark Kalos, 2.774 19,803 

To Bremen, per steamers Cordeva, 2,924.... Franklnrt, 2,722.... per 

ships Coiistantia, 3,152.,., Scotia, 1,962 10,780 

To Antwerp, per ship Mary Durkee. 2,516 2,516 

To Barcelona, per bark Joven Emilia, 600 600 

To San Sebastian, per bark Maria Teresa, 800.... 800 

To Santandcr, per bark Luz. 800 ' ,,[ goo 

MoBiLK— To Cork, &c., per ship West Derby, 2,270 per bark jotin E. 

C'liase, 2.010 4 jgo 

CnABi.EsTON— To Liverpool, per ships Ida Lilly, 1,003 Upland . . . Richard ' 

III, 3,231 Upland and 6S6 Sea Island per bark Nimroud, 2,933 

Up'aud 7 75,^ 

To Havre, per ship Uncle Joe, 2.520 Upland aiid 187 .Sea Islaiid.. 2*707 

Savannah— To Livfrpool, per ship John Mann, .3.504 Upland, .per barks 

Angeles, 1,065 Upland Alice Cooper, 2,65.3 Upland 7,222 

To Havre, per ship Wild Hunter, 2,770 Upland and 54 Sea Island 2,844 

Texas— To Liverpool, per ship Waterloo, 3,314 and 22 Sea Island per 

barks Texas, 1,715. . . Carl Von Dobeclin, 1,252 6 288 

To Antwerp, per bark T. U.Armstrong, 1,425 '" l',4as 



Total... 

The particulars of these 8hii;ments, arranged in out usual 
are as ioUows: 

Liver- Brc- 

pool. Cork. Havre, men. 

NewYork 18,736 .... 17 906 

NewOrleans 19,803 10,766 

Mobile 4,280 

Charleston 7,753 2,707 

Savannah 7,822 .... 2,824 

Texas .6,288 



Ant- Barce- San8»- San- 
werj). lona. bst'u. t'nder. 

2,516 'm "m "m 



1,455 



77,437 

(orm 



Total. 

9,659 
35,2^9 

4,280 
10,460 
10,046 

7,713 



Total 49.802 4,280 6,548 11,666 3,941 603 800 800 77,437 

Below we give all news, received during the week, of disasters 
to reBSfils oacrjriQg cotton Uoa\ mj port oi the Uaited States ; 



January VISTS.] 



THE CHRONICLE. 



26 



Eight hala- or '•onon, Bopnose 1 to he pnrt of the c»r(fo of the utesmer St. Lonlt 
from New Orl.anB for New York, wore picked up Dec . lu, botwvea ibo 
Southwest Pai*8 and Tonu^aH. 

Leone iFr.j from Ni w Orleunn for Hnvre, before reported atrnrk on Tonne* 
«co rM'f. iieir Indian Key. Dec. 1\ was llshfcued of l.WiD li U-r of cot- 
ton, when Rho flohted and waa taken into Key West on the 18lh. The 
1,000 liulc-K would 1)1! frclKhted to Key Went 

J. B. ncrrus (Br). KH'am, at ChnrlcBtnn. 80, with S,S40 balea cotton, (at la«t 
acconntB) on board for Bremen, took fire in tlio cotton forward nlRlit of 
Dec 88. Shewoa filled with wit"rand I'unk alongBidu the wharf. CarKO 
Insured ; 11 l» all damaged by salt water. The vui^tcl was being pumped 
out on the S9th. 

BXArroRD. Curry, from New York, before reported drove from her anrhors at 
Sa'erno during' a sale Dec. 4, and drifi'-d on Ilie rock^, ^maahini; her port 
eldo and bottom ; of the carao, con»isiln,< of 8+1 bales of cotton, COS had 
been landed previous lo Ihe capualt\'; Sllbaloi* have alnce been taken 
from the vessel, and it was sn.^posed. Dec. 7th, that 18 more could be 
•aved ; Ihe rigging and a great part of the ship's apparel have been 
saved, and her cooper sheathing wa- being stripped. 

London. January 2.— The log of the eteam*'hip MinncBota, which arrived at 
l^iverpool on TueHduv last from New York, shows that the cargo o' 
cotton was on flro when the vnssel was llvu days out from the latter 
port. One hundred and fifty hales were destroyed. 

(iotjD, E.'Ccii\NOK AMi> b'asionTS. — liold lias fluctuated the 
past week botvyeen lllj^ and 1!2J, and the close was lllj. 
Foreign Exchanjre market is steady. Tlie foUowlnsr were 
the last quotations : London bankers', lonjj, 109i@109|; short, 
110|(ailOi, and Commercial. lOSjaiOO. Freights closed at 
*3i9-lfid. by steam and 5 16(a9d. bysail to Liverpool, li@lic. gold 
by steam and Ic. comp. by sail to Uavre, and Jd. comp. by steam 
to Hamburp. 

By Tklkouaph from iiivEnpooij. — 

LtVERPooi., January 3—5 P.M - The market opened Arm and closed active and 
flrmcr lo-day. with sales footln' np 18.000 bales, including 4.000 bales for ex- 
port and Boccniation. Of the Biles to-day 8,000 bales were American. The 
sales of Ihe week have been 76,000 bales, of which 5,000 bales wi're taken 
for expori and r.OOO bales on Bpecnlation. The stock in port Is 4^1,000 hales, 
of which f)8.000 hales are American. The stock of cotton at sea, bound to this 
port Is 231,000 bales of which 201,000 bales are American. 

Dec. 6. Dhc. 1.3. Dec. 20 Dec !8 

Total sales 86,000 81,000 i::i,000 70,0OU 

Sales for export 5.000 8,000 fl.OOO 5,000 

Bales on sniiculation 9.000 8,000 31.000 7,000 

Totalstock 3SS.000 3ti5 000 33H,000 421,00(1 

Stock of American 48,000 61,000 4»),000 63.000 

Totalafloat 825,000 S1S,000 224.0(;o SSt.iioo 

A.-ncrican aftoat :il.OO0 12;i.000 141.000 201.000 

The following table will show the dally closing prices of cotton for the weea: 
Sat. Won TucB. W»rt. Tbnrs. Fri. 

Price Mld.Uprd9.10VS....10X(3»lOJ<10iraiOK Holiday. Holiday. lO.H®.... 
" Orleans. :OJiaiO>flOX@... lOX® a ®....10X®.... 

Trade Report.— The market for yarns and fabrics at Manchester 18 firm,, 
with an npward tendency. 



BRE ADSTUFFS 

Friday P. M., Jan. 3. 1873. 
The markets have been moderately active, and prices have 
shown some improvement during the past week, closing, how- 
ever, comparatively quiet, and the advance barely supported. 
The following is a comparative statement of stocks on hand, 
January 1 ; 

1ST8. 

Flonr, bhls ;i42,' IT 

Wheat, bush 1,(I7(>,'J56 

Corn, bush 6.(158,074 

Oats, bush 1,5^4,S«3 

Rye, bush B:},0B1 

Barley, bnsh 1,204,743 

PeoR, hush 6,'i!)! 

Malt, bush 27ti,0t'4 



1871. 

48,'<,.'W4 

4,150,675 

1,171,121 

«,028,702 

550,720 

617,H78 

9,528 

2ri6,4j2 



"TIhm 



ToUl grain, bush 10,698,935 ■"^,H55,163 

Reeeipta o( flour have been interrupted by the recent heavy 
fa'.l of snow, and the same influence has greatly reduced the 
home demand ; but shippers have been able to operate more 
freely, and in grades under |8 there hai been an advance of 10@ 
25c. per bbl. Very few good shipping extras have been obtained 
under $7 25. West India brands have brought $7 50@$8 pretiy 
freely, and superfine for the Provinces, $6@$6 25. The better 
grades have been dull, with occasional concessions to effect sales. 
Today the streets were in a worse condition than ever, and busi- 
ness almost at a stand still ; nevertheless prices were very firm. 

The wheat market has been more active, and In spring growths 
there has been a further advance In prices. The demand has 
been mainly for export, favored by higher foreign accounts ; but 
there has been a fair business to local millers. Winter wheats 
on the contrary, have been more freely offered, with moderate 
sales at Inside prices; In fact, late nominal quotations have not 
been fully supported. Late transactions embraced amber Michi- 
gan, tl 90 ; red winter, $1 75 ; No. 1 spring, $1 70 ; No. 2 Mll- 
waukoe, $1 6.5(31 66, afloat ; No. 2 Chicago, |1 58@1 60, and No. 8 
"pring, f 1 48@1 53. Today, there was a disposition to demand 
some further advance and prices were Irregular, with little doing. 

Corn has been variable. Yesterday there was a revival of de- 
mand for export at 64(a66ic. for prime old mixed in store and 
afloat. Receipts at the West continue to show a marked falling 
off as compared with lasi year, and the stocks in store are under- 
going a rapid depletion. To-day the market was quiet and un- 
changed. 

Rye has remained quiet and nominal. In barley there has been 
a movement aggregating a quarter million bushels, including 
Canada West, $1 12(31 17 ; No. 2 Western, $1 05 ; and No. 8 do- 
92(a9oc, which prices show a considerable advance over late quo- 
tations, especially for Western. 



Oats have been dull and nnteitlrd. 
The following are closing quotations : 

- ^ „ F'lX)tTB. I OUAIII. 

BaperflneStateaud West- Wheat-No.tsuring.busb.tl f, 

„<""■■ -. » bbl. |Ji Mia « » I No. IsprlnffT...:.... .. J 7 

Bxtra Slate, 4c 7 104 7 40! Med Western lU 

Western Spring Wheat ( Amber du 1 

extras 7 00^7 25 1 White J 

do double extras 7 '5® 9 00, Corn-Westtrn mixed W 

do winter wheat extras 

and double extras 7 31^11 73 

City shipping extras. .. 
City trade and family 

brand 




Southern bakers' and fa 

mlly brands 

Southern shipp'geztru,. 

Ilye flour 

Corn meal— Western, Jc. 
Corn mcal—Br'wlne. Ac. 



7 Cft^ 800 
8C0O11 00 




\VhlioW.stcm..'. .;.■.'. WA S 

Yellow Western l*( 

Soul hern, white 

Rye— Statu and Canada. .. 

Western 

Oals— N.-W Black 4ft 

Chicago mixed 

White Ohio and 8ut«... 
Barley~W» stem 

Canada West I It.., 

Peas— Canada I ISJt 1 40 




The movement in breadstuffs at this market haa been at follow* : 



, RECEIPTS AT KIW TOnK.— 

. 1872. . Sam* . 1»72. 

For the Since time Jan. For the Since 

week. Jan. I. I. !«71. week. Jan. I. 

Clonr, bhit. si.72t 5.021.724 8,«49.('45 " 

C. meal, " . I.IOO 202,31(1 I85.».'>» 

Wheat.bns. 100,488 !B,22«.r)91 2(l.ni8.:i«l 

Corn, '• . m.im 10 769.791 27.106,1.% 

Rye, " . S7.-) 488.088 1 aw 621 

Bsrlcy,*f.. .'B.'OO .5.I0:|.»S4 8,H(.8.I2:i 

OalB 87,534 12,486.193 12,516.%0 



xxroBTs ntoa new rnaK.— -> 

. 1871 , 

Forth* Sine* 
week. Jan. 1 
29 472 l.lSl.OfO 50,748 »"'.74a 

1.8117 iim.sm nam tn-.? 
12;|,V.I5 1.1 -.w ■■' ■'• -'■■ ■• ' '. 
ISl.SW 23.1.'. 

li" 



3i.iti 



irti 



bit 



The following tables, prepared for The CiinoNlfS.K by Mr. K. 
H. Walker, of the New York Produce Exchange, show the Orain 
in sight and the movemunt of BrcadHtuUa to the latest uiuil 
dates : 

aKCEIPTS AT I>AKR AND RIVER PORTS FOR THE WBKX EMDISO 
DEC. 28. AND FROM ALO. 1 TO DEC. 28 



Chicago .J 

Hliwaukee 9,219 

Toledo 2..V.2 

Detroit 8.307 

Olevelnnd •32'.0 

3t. Louia .. 6,ilA 

Oulath 

Total 59,404 



Flonr. Wheat 
bbls. hnrb, 
(lOHlhs.l (80 lbs ) 
29,402 169,580 



Corn. Oats. Uirlc; . 
bnsh. bnsb. bnih. 
fsaihs.)f^lb..>(4l>'h» 



Previous week. 
Oorresp'ng week,'71. 

'70. 

69. 

'68. 

'67. 



U7.(>t7 

53,180 

1:14.402 

27>,521 

250.1.13 

62.360 



15".8l)S 

35.614 

24,911 

8,750 

83,332 



431.013 
695.880 
249,410 
a38.130 
«21.r25 
5t6,922 
180.154 



260.5 
11.40(> 

107.770 

21.r,.')9 

7.050 

31,(iOO 



145 160 

11. .VW 

2.MIO0 

6.957 

9.150 

23.492 



82.290 
16.>0I 
4 3<« 
3.UI8 
(.4(10 
6.1IA 



Ryr, 

Host. 
(Mf'.l 

8.sm 

390 



439.869 
678,457 
1.041.119 
648,431 
29S.401 
S»i9.704 
359..322 



222,1:9 
414.6'<5 

«n,si4 

119.178 
177.241 
200.162 
(;«.419 



Total Ang. 1 to date.. 2,445.207 S0.146..556 28.081.855 11,7:0.293 6, 

Same time 1871 2.618 483 2iMii!l,9;2 a4.6.«4,8«6 l.5,2'.io..^r i 

Same time 1870 2.981.751 ;8.B46 285 1!,71 1.581 II i; • 

Same time 1869 8,061,134 30,682,921 14,438,347 9,0> - 

• Estimated. 



11 6. 4(7 

140.161 

72,:«8 
24.716 
28.018 
80,210 

5U..547 
246.1183 1 

TT.-.-.'fO 1 
■I 
■' 1, 



i.ots 



2*.4« 

36..' 7 J 
Ifi.ic* 
20.158 
»'.6t2 
34.! »l 

10. na 

.037.984 
,020,372 



Shipments of Flour aad Qratu from 
Toledo, Detroit, St. Louis. Cleveland and 
cndii'B Dec. 28, and from Jan. 1 to Dec. 28 

Flonr, Wheat, Corn, 
bbis, bnsb, bnsh. 

67.809 91.892 124.083 

114,191 2;n.3.S8 242.043 

67.010 26.S9T 2"15.7:il 

8.5.866 18.830 1.S9.7H5 

47,921 S.5.%5 81.0-6 



Chicago, Milwaukee, 
UUluth tor the wenk 



Weekending — 

Dec. 23. 1872 

Dec. 21. 1872 

Corresp'ng week 1871 
Correso'e week 1S70. 
Correep'K week 18H9 



Oats, 

biM**. 
1S1.810 
252,316 
tM.604 
34.928 
16.261 
9.052,398 
6 8J0.306 
1.99i.ia3 
9,932.502 



Barl*)-, 

bnsh. 
43.«5a 

3.3.03; 
15.1^75 
7.676 
5.805.673 
3.397.872 
3.027. !i7 
412,107 



onf>l • 

3.7,-.» 

in.rao 

».7l't 
1.83* 
2.870 
1.<M.4I« 
1.8il(.9S4 
l.r*l.2*7 
ii67,«5< 



T tal Jan. 1 to date. 4,716.011 30.865 9.')4 '•.6.71.'i.93 

Same time 1871 4,.518,430 3.5.982,979 19.912,978 1 

Same time 1K70» ....4,225,467 37,71;, 197 i2,187.r>31 1 
Same lime 1869* 4,572,407 34,277,957 23,697,154 

* St. Lonlt not included'. 

BECBIFTB OF FLOIJB AND ORAIN AT SEABOARD PORTS FOR THR 
WEEK ENDING DEC. 28, AND FROM JAN. 1 TO DEC. 28. 

Flour, Wheat, Corn, Data, Barley. Rye. 
bush. bush. bush. bush. bash. 
129.980 65.n.''0 92.875 22.900 

920 58,000 21,798 21.614 MX 



At bhls 

Keir York 87.''i*7 

Boston JJ,488 

Portland 

Montreal 4,400 

Philadelphia 15.641 

Baltimore 12,7.W 

New Orleans 12,445 



4.200 
65.(100 
11,300 



71.100 

96,li00 

74,158 



85,800 
13.234 



2.000 
42,000 



1,200 
BOO 



Total 108.511 211,400 365.456 19.3,705 88.514 2 Ma 

Week ending Dec. 21. 163,879 474 443 44^.8'tt 289.497 12r>,:6r 2,178 

C^or. week 1871 lll..'i.53 108.197 5,401.124 285.103 1I9.SJ9 SOO 

Total Jan. 1 to date.. . 7.744.6.1:1 2.'j.064.8H0 72,iai.231 22.01.5,484.5,416.784 MW.dSS 
Do. same time 1871.. 9,239.19142,057.537 44.035.7I321.760,3624,1(.8.22« 1,881,43* 

The Visible Scpply of Grain, including stocks in store at 
the principal points of accumulation at lake and seaboard porta, 
in transit by rail, and frozen in New York^canals, Dec 33, 1872 : 

Wheat, 

hash. 

In store at New York and afloat 1,976.956 

In store at Albany 4,000 

Insioro atBulTalo 421,773 

(n store at Chicago 1.019,5.58 

In sloreatMilwankeo 669.000 

In storeatDuhiih 70000 

In store at Toledo 232,6*3 

Instoreat Detroit 96.601 

In store at Oswego 6.39,773 

InstoreatSt. Lonis 61.«.231 

In store at Boston IH.O-M 

In store at Toronto 5.3.2.33 

In store at Montreal 223.8 

Instoreat PhlladelphU.. I10.I.V) 

In store at Baltimore 150,OX) 

Rail shipments for week 91.892 

Amount on Ne>7 York canals. 52,120 



Com, 


Oats, 


Barley, 


bnsb. 


bnsh. 


bnsh. 


6.658.074 


1,581.803 


1,204,743 


41.000 


8«.«10 


3)!9.(tM 


291,700 


92,877 


313.380 


1,410,110 


f(V4.0-.-2 


190.127 


89,000 


150,000 


7^000 


330.4.52 


1S6.799 


11.8St 


66.772 


89.290 


40.518 


SOS 062 


2,078 


IST.TOt 


15.3.114 


137.6X1 


ISl.tM) 


iot.re« 


W1.78S 


«lk74t 


2.735 


4.091 


69.801 


.888.246 


».:48 


ll.flOt 


s.nooo 


135,000 


W.OBO 


233.507 


65.000 




121.083 


is;.S40 


43 tM 


161.457 


85,200 


7S.138 



Total 8248.673 9.5'«.S»8 8.414.084 2.W&WJ 

rotalinstorcandlntran6ltDcc.21.'72 6,699.213 9.M7.8J7 8,570.7® |.M8.759 

" •• Dec 14 '72 6.081.153 9.5S3.444 3.888.914 3.IIS.4S1 

" •• Deci 29, '71 10,801,088 7,«i;,461 6,»17,*« t,4M,8M 



26 



THE CHRONICLE. 



[January 4, 1878, 



Green. 


Japan. 


Tota. 


19.1».S99 


s.ni.iR) 


K.rri.iW 


i,6«,8j6 


lo.oia.iji 


42.663,8U6 



GROCERIES. 

Friday Etbmihs, Jan. 3. 181.3. 

There lia'i been a fair busintes in most lines, notwithstanding 
all that has occurred to retard trade. The close of the year, 
af.ide from tlie fact of its being closely associated with holidays, 
is always given up to the closing of accounts, and there is very 
little business done, as the rule, for at least a week or ten days 
following the opening of a new year. There has been a good 
deal of activity in cofiees during the past week, with an especially 
animated demand for the Uio grades. Sugars have sold a little 
more freely at a shade better prices. Other goods are without 
important change. 

TBA. 

Holders of teas have shown very little disposition to press Bales dnring the 
week, though there has l.cen some inquiry, and a slight concession would 
probably have the cITcct of moving considerable amounts. After the year has 
fairly opened, however, a much better demand is looked for, and it is in an. 
tieipation of this that importers ore now holding back their stocks. There is 
scarcely a probability of prices going any lower nnder any circumstances, 
whlleif the supplies in the interior be as light as is generally supposed, the 
.oneumptlve requirements of the trade arc likely to be sufficiently heavy to 
result iu better rates. The offerings are solely at full rates, and the market 
while dull exhibits iv very strong tone. The sales are 3,900 half chests Greens, 
],(XX) do. Souchong, and 8,000 do. Oolong. 

There have been no Imports at New York the past week. 
The following taole shows the Imports of Tea into the United State* 
I^om January 1 to date, in 1872 and 1«T1 : 

Black. 
Atlantic ports, 1873.. .lbs. 18,SM.8(>I 
Atlantic ports, 1871 IS.UOI.'jSS 

The Indirect receipts at Xew York, principally overland receipts from San 
Francisco, have been 213.183 pkgs. aluce Januaryl. against 18fi,567 last year. 

Imports at San Francisco from Jan. 1 to Dec. 16 were 1,273,209 lbs. of Cliiua 
and 2,218,128 lbs. of Japan tea. 

COFFEB. 

This has b een a broken week in all of the markets, and the nenal holiday 
dniness has prevailed. There has been an active call for coffee, however' 
dnring tho few days upon which there was really any business done. The 
Brazil descriptions, of course, came in for the bulk of the trade, and the move" 
ment In these grades shiws more activity than could reasonably have been 
.ooked for this week. Cargoes are taken up as fast as they arrive, and many 
transactions are effccicd previous to arrival, where the vessels are soon due. 
Considerable Santos has been sold here and at the outports during the week, 
in vessels at liand and to arrive, the receipts of this grade being more liberal 
lUst now than for some time previous. The business of 1873 showed a smaller 
increase in the sales of Kio and .Santos over those of 1871 than was anticipated. 
The cheapening of the other grades of coffee increased their sale and reduced 
the demand for Brazilw somewhat, though* the transactions at New York aggre- 
gated .568,211 bags. The receijits for the jiast year were 5M,3:i7 bags. The 
trade iu West ludia grades since our last report baa been light, owing to 
the restrictions placed upon the jobtjing business by the severe storm and the 
holidays. East Indies are quiet, but the market Is sti'ong on all descriptions, 
and we repeat former quotations. The sales here are 4,700 bags Eio, ex 
"Endymiou;" 3,000 do., e.x "Paramount,'' to go to New Orleans; 1,800 
do., ex "Maggie V. Ilugg ;'' 1,000 do., the balance ex "Contest;" 
2,000 do. ex " -icrrimack' ' ; 3,160 do. Santos, ex "England's Rose" ; 891 per 
"Antilope," to arrive; 3,200 Kio, per " Linns" ; 4,857, per "Lord Baltimore"; 
4,078 Santos, per"Giiilia" ; 4-3,602 Rio, per "Edcna" ; 1,.500 do., per "Brazil," 
to come here from the Roads ; 5,S00 per " Lubra," at Baltimore, and 3,501 per 
"J. Boyd," also at Baltimore. 

Imports at this port the past week have included 6,782 bags Eio, per " Lord 
Baltimore," .3,200 do. do., per "Linus," 2,172 do. do., per "Antilope ;" 803 
mats Singapore, per *' Ariadne ;" 1,820 bags Ceylon, per " Southern Belle ;" 
1,284 do. St. Domingo, per " Wej'bosset," and 49 do. sundries. 

The stock of Rio Dec 26, and the Imports since Jan. 1,1872, are as fallows: 



changed since our last report, but are fairly steady at the close, with rather 
more Inquiry reported. Sales have been made of 264 hhds. CubaatOKc, 
2,500 hhds. Cuba molasses to good reffning at 7>.'@9?»'c., 179 do. Centrifugal 
at «?ic., 230 do. I'orto Rico at 9?i,®9Jic., 2,500 boxes Havana at 8®9Xc., and 
4,100 bags Peruambucoat 9Xc. 
Imports at New York, aud stock in flrst hands, Dec. 26. were as follows : 



Cuba. 

bxs. 

Imports this week . . !'41 

" since Jan. 1. 432,851 

" sametline, '71 33I,B5J 



Cuba. P. Rico. 

*hlirl8. •bhds. 

581 34 

SK.SIl 81 .8M 

205.454 S3,5U 



Other. Brazll.Manlla,*c.Melado 
•hhds bags. tbags. hhds. 



49,040 
7i.83; 



l.S2,6i9 
61.416 



78<,0-3 
792,491 



Stock In first hands. 

Same lime 1871 

•• 1870 



B2.263 
35 715 



22.719 
27.418 
2i,5Sl 



111.310 
V25,390 
307,832 



48 
29,81)4 
43,M4 

2.'W.1 
74] 



inOliASSES. 

There is as yet very little doing in foreign grades of molasses. Refiners 
have been looking about for a day or so, but have not operated as yet to an 
considerable extent. Their wants are not pressing, and they naturally show 
an indisposition to purchase much stock beyond what they actually require 
until after the year Is fairly opened. The stock of boiling molasses has In 
creased but little, and is not excessive, though, with the market ruling as dul' 
as It has for some weeks past, prices have naturally yielded a trifle; and while 
the quotable range is not materially changed, lots for boiling purposes could 
be picked up at rather easier figures. There has been a good call for grocery 
qualities in lots for the trade, but the transactions have not extended much 
beyond domestic parcels. The sales of New Orleani have been fair, and very 
full prices have been realized. Sales at auction brought 68XC, and the higli 
cost of these goods is having a tendency to increase the sale of syrups, which 
can be bought much lower. The sales foot up about 1,000 bbis at 67®70c. 

The receipts at New York, and stock in ftrst hands, Dec. 26, were as roUowt! 



Cuba, 


P. Rico, 


Demerara 




Other 


>.o. 


•hhds. 


•hhds. 


•hhds. 




•hhds 


bbls. 


in 


.339 






.32 


3.«8? 


'S.i.iS 


2.i,S87 


8.528 




14,761 


43.!>89 


77,619 


87,236 
2,412 


3,582 




27,175 


61,339 


i.nsi 




6"! 




800 


1,355 


6,001 




.486 




itta 


6,544 


231 


1 


,726 




500 



Imports thlBweek 

" sinceJan.l 

" 8ametlmel871 

Stock In flrst bands l.nSl 

" " same time '71 ' "*" 

" " same time "' 

Imports ot SuKar & molasaes at leading; ports alnce Jan. I * 

Thelmports of sugar (including Melado). and of Molasses at the leading pons 
from January 1, 1872, to date, have been as follows : 



1872. 
New York .... 4o2,»l 

Boston 28.592 

Philadelphia... t31, 485 

Baltimore 77 477 

New Orleans... 66,501 



1871. 1872. 

381.S.59 il.i,-in 

41.2S8 71.055 

32,413 ^52.432 

48,571 106,373 

41,523 6.370 



Sugar. 

, "HEds. , . B 



-Bags , 

1S71. tl872. 1871. 

339.437 916.712 874.007 

8'..(iOS 1,008 098 713,18S 

66 629 12.3.873 90,383 

Il7,6i6 33,060 3J,5n0 

9,760 



,— Moiaases. — 


, *HhdB.— . 


1872. 


1871. 


118,909 


143.8 3 


51,226 


41,9m 


}in,679 
21,570 




6,244 


526 



Total 637,216 5i3,654 612,il6 633,310 I,9;9.7*3 1,713.078 315,6:8 304,5G3 

■ tncliifllnKtiP.rcos and barrels redaooct to hhds 

t Tnclndea jaskets. &c.. reduced. 

J Corrected from Craig .t Stotosbury'B annual circular. 

WHOLESAIiE PRICES CURRKNT. 



Uyflon, Common to fair Sn ® 45 

do Superior to fine.... EO @ 65 

do ?:x.flne:to finest.... 70 ® 80 

TouoK Hyson, Com. to fair. 35 @ 43 

do Super, to floe. 53 ® 75 

do Ex. fine to finest 80 ®l 05 

3unpowderCom tofalr... 43 @ 69 

do Sup. to fine,. 63 @ SO 

do Ex.flne to finest. I'D @l 15 

tmperial, Com tofMr.... 37 ® 50 

do Suo.tofine 57 ^ .0 

do Extra fine to finest 75 @ 92 



31 


® 25 


27 


a 81 






35 


@ 49 


6(1 


@ 65 


70 


@1 05 


,T2 


® :-8 


41 


(» ^2 


71' 


®1 05 


■>i 


m 3-, 



New 
In Bags. \oik. 

Stock 61.77! 

«»medatol871 5.1.919 

Iiiports 56l.i56 

" In ISil 653,622 



Phlla- Baltl- New Mobile, Gal- 

delphla. more. Orleans. &c. veBt'^n. Total. 

. .. 9.401 S,3i4 6,5!fl 2,HI) 73,498 

18,310 13.01! UK) SjOO 92,101 

4 012 Slt5.-,6i 149 692 71,175 IS,' 15 :,1';3,146 

14.805 543,181 205,197 74,411 22,2^) 1.518,936 



Ofothersortathe Stock at New York. Dec. 26, and the imports at thescveial 
porta since January 1 , 1872, were ai follows ; 



.-New York-, Boston. Phlladel. Bait. N. Orle's. 



stock. Import. Import, import, import, import. 

*A «'s *ii'u atia .Qfl'Tfi? 



In bags. , 

Java and Singapore t5.575 'I'iS.'ifa *S0,757 

Oylon 15,8:5 2.1.846 

Mariicalbo 5,6.59 169.R16 

Latranyra ',53 SO.T.O .... 36,690 

B1. Domingo 59,275 4.S67 

other 2,160 S'9,961 9,667 394 

ToUl 29.962 6n,i86 44,891 37.034 

Same time, 1871 17.510 45M4^ 61,250 21,532 



4,539 



4.539 

8,7;o 



2,54 

t Also, 61,399 mats. 



709.988 
552.48S 



Tea. 

Hyson Sk. & Tw. C. to fair. 

do do Sup. to fine. 

do do fcx.i.tofln'st 

Uncol. Japan, Com. to tair.. 

do Sup'r to fine... 

do Ex. f. to finest. 

Oolong, Common to lair 

do Superior to fine.... 
do K.X line to finest — 
Souc. & Cong., Cora, to fair. _ 

do Sup'r to fine. 40 @ 55 

do Ex.f.tofinest. 63 @1 (5 
Cefree. 

Rio Prime gold. 18S^@19 i Native Ceylon gold. 16 S18 

do good gold. 18 @I8'4 ! Maracalbo gold. 16 ®17X 

do fair gold. 17 @!7V4 I Laguayra goid. 16 fS18 

do ordinary gold. 16 iai6)^ 81 Domingo gold. I3X*)3X 

Java, rants nod bags gold. IS^'^^O I -lam-'Ica gold. 15>^(f?17 

Java mats, brown gold. 20 @23 IMocha.... .gold. 22 @23 

Saaar, 

Caba, Inf.tocom. refining.... 8J<® S% I ILivana, Box, white 11S^®!2^ 

do fair to good refining »Kft sx Porto Rico, reflnlnggrades... SH9 9H 

do prima. ® 9^ do grocery grades.... Sji^l'.'K 

do fair to good grocery.... 9^'8 9^ Brazil, bags SX® 9X 

do pr. t6 choice grocery... Bj^aiO Manila, bags S%& Vi 

do oentrllugal, hhds. & bxs. 9KIB1CX ! White Sugars, A. lixa.... 

Jo Mclado ^}i@r,%\ do do B lixa.... 

lo moiasses 7X@ 9S< do do extra C II ®11X 

aav'a,Box,D. S.No8.7to9... 6?«a 9>( Yellow sugars m&W% 

do do do 10tol2.. 9Ji,® 9J(( Crushed «12!< 

do do do 13 to 15.. 10X®l(i5< Powdered aim 

do do do 16 to 18.. 10:!<®11?< Granulated ®I2X 

do do do 1910 20.. 11)«S11X I 

inolasanti. 

New Orleans new V gall. 60 S7I ICubaClayed SO ®2? 

."orto Rlno 28 ®.55 Cuba centrifugal 17 ®H 

Cuba Uuscovado ^2 @S'J I Eugllsh Islands 00 @38 

Rice. 

Kangoon dressed, gold In tond 3)£® 3;< I Carolina 7v® e'4 



gold 9 lb. 
do 



" Includes mats, Ac reduced to I>se<i. 

STJOAR. 

Refiners have been looking around more during the past week,'altbough the 
demand for their goods has not increased materially, and there is nothing in 
the position of the market to cncourag3 very much activity on their part. The 
outlook is said lo he favorable, it is true, and a strong feeling is manifested 
by refiners generally, but in the face of the current extreme dulness it is with 
Vhc ntmist dilllcnlly that rates are fully maintained. The market for raws is 
nut very buoyant at the moment, owing to the absence of an active business, 
but there i-i a pretly strong undertone, and with a general demand from re- 
finers .•n;aln, the nuirkct would advaucc materially. The mere prosijcct of 
increased activity during Iho current week has had the cft'ect of stift'ening 
r »*;s a fraction, and we quote the market fairly steady at the close of a bosis 
or i,c. Improvement, or say 9','®9,;,c. for fair to good refining. The sales of 
r-flnlng (luolltles during the week have been light, but there has been rathrr 
were doing In good-ilzed lots, 8 a arent that the principal refiners arc 

corop»r«tlv«ly biire Mrs are a shade easier, if at all 



Cassia, In cases 
Cassja. in mats — 
Ginger, Kace and Af (gold) 

Mace do 

Vutmegs, casks 



•lo cases Penang 94 



® 23S 
....® 23 
10K(* ll« 
1 2'l ®1 25 
-" - 94 



Spices. 

Pepper, in bond (gold) 

do Snraa ra & Singapore 
Pimento, Jamaica. .. (gold) 



12 ® 13 

n (» a) 

....® ;2x 

22 ^ w 

15 @ 17 



do In bond do 

Cloves - do 

do In bond,... do 
I Clove stems do 

Fruits and Nnts. 

Ral81n8,8eeaies8, nw V rrall.4 5(1 ® [ African Peanuts ® 

do Layer, :S72, » box.2 00 ®2 ('5 ■ Filberts, Sicily 12}<® 

do Snftana,* lb nuot ISK do Barcelona IIM® 

jb Valencia, «i R) 9>^® 9^ Walnuts' Bordeaux 9J<® 

do Loose Muscatels 2 6' '«'i *'* "' " '" "" ~ 



_ 5 

CarrAnt9,ncw ^ Vi. 6^® .... 

Citron, Letrhorn (new) 40 ^ 42 

J?rune8, .French 12>*J® 13 

Prunes, Turkish, old ® 

do new 7K® 1^ 

Dates 6);® r,'^ 

»les,"S'nvrna * B. 9 (i 14 

Canton (linger. CHSC 8 W (fc8 60 

Almonds, Languedoc 20 ® ... 

do Tarragona lS5(a 10 

do Ivlca IBX® 19 

do Sicily, soft shell ® 

do Shelled, Sicily... 30 ® 8! 

■io paper shell & 

Sardines ..*h(.box. SO ® 82 

tardinss 4' ar.boz. 2Ut^a '21 

Uraitl (I'jls new w a .,., 



8 ® 8)f 



Macaroni, Italian 1I>,@ 

I DOMHSTIO DRIED FRUITS. 

Apples, State * B . 6^® 

I do sliced 

I 00 Western ® 

! do Southern, good..,. 5 ® 

1 do prime 8 

I do sliced, new 9 ® 

1 Peaches, pared 14 ® 

1 do unpared.qrs&hlve 4xa 

I Blackberries a>,® 

I Cherries pitted 22 @ 

I Pecan Nuts * B , 9 @ 

I Hickory Nuts (Jbusb. ... 

ICheetaute do 
Peamit«,Vu,g'dtoiucy ol ) 
d.-i <!0new 1 30 
do Wll.it'dtobeitd*. 1 tS 



12« 
11^ 
lOX 



w .... 

|iS5- 



J 



anaary 4, 1878.1 



THE CHRONICLE. 



27 



THE DRY GOODS TRADE. 

FniDAT, p. M.. Jan. 3. 1873. 
The dry goods market as well as most other branches of trad* 
has felt the effects of the holiday season during tho past week, 
and trade in all classes of goods has been extremely dull. Re- 
tailers found no trade beyond what they were able to supply Irom 
their stocks. Jobbers, therefore, had little to do, and their time 
has been given up to the annual accounting of stocks. The 
closing of 1873 was generally satisfactory to merchants, as 
regards tho showing of their trade, but the year was not one of 
fully average profits. Tlie Presidential campaign, and the series 
of disasters to the mercantile community in different parts of the 
country that occurred during the year, naturally had a bad effect 
upon trade, and to effect the distribution of goods it has been 
necessary to make concessions in prices. Domestic manufacturers 
of goods did not suffer to any serious extent, excepting tliose 
confining themselves to woolens. The cotton business was fairly 
profitable, although goods were relatively low during portions of 
the year as compared with the cost of the staple. Siill manufac- 
turers were able to obtain fair prices during the greater part of 
the year, and came out at the end with not a bad showing. 
Woolen manufacturers Buffered during the entire year. The 
year opened unfavorably for them, and as wool took a downward 
turn during the early summer months, goods instead of paying 
a slight profit, as they might have done had prices bean main- 
tained, were reduced a point, and remained stagnant oven at the 
reduction. It was not until after tho opening of the fall season 
that woolens began to show more strength, and indeed the mar- 
ket improved but slightly until after the Boston fire. That dis- 
aster, by relieving the market of large accumulations of goods 
at a time when the raw material had a strong upward tendency, 
stimulated trade, and resulted in a greatly increased demand 
which has enabled holders to maintain rather better rates since. 

The changes in business firms on the 1st Inst, were few, and 
the new year opens with the trade in a very good condition, and 
prices favorable for holders of goods. 

Domestic Cottox Goods. — The week has been extremely 
quiet, and there are few new features to record in connection with 
any branch of trade. Large package buyers have been operating 
to a limited extent in anticipation of future wants, but small pur. 
chasers are not doing anything as yet. Prints have been very 
dull, and only small selections of the choicest effects have been 
made. Prices are without important alteration, and are fully 
maintained. 

Domestic Woolen Goods. — Tho demand for flannels is about 
over, and tho month opens with the usual absence of trade. 
Spring woolens are inquired for in a small way at the close of the 
week, and there is a prospect of a more liberal distribution early 
in the month. It is yet early to speak of the lighter descriptions 
of spring fabrics, but these will all be noted in our columns as 
the season advances. 

FoBEiGN Goods. — A very small trade has been done during 
the past week, either with importers or jobbers. Even the holi- 
day branches became quiet in consequence of the dullness ruling 
in the retail trade owing to the almost impassible condition of the 
streets. The markets for all staple fabrics abroad are remarkably 
firm, and in some instances prices havelbeen materially advanced 
more particularly on worsted textiles of British manufacture, 
Buch as alpacas, mohair lustres, and Orleans cloths. The regular 
dry goods auctioneers held no sales during the week, but some of 
the cash houses disposed of numerous lots of sundries at very 
low prices. Jobbers' stocks are pretty well depleted of desirable 
dress fabrics, and none of them have as yet brought forward spring 
styles. Chene effects of worsted and cotton mixture are likely to 
be in vogue next season, and in low-priced British goods Japan- 
ese stripe will again become candidates for popular favor. A 
large demand is expected to continue for fine black mohair lustres, 
which are in great request. 

We annex a few particulars of leading articles of domestic 
manufacture, our prices quoted being those of leading Jobbers : 



Brown Drflla. 

Width. Price. 

Amoakcax 15 

Augusta. 

Laconia 15^ 

LangleyB.... 14 15 

Pepporcll l"iw 

Stark A 15 

BPchcd Sheeting* 
and ShlrtluKii 



AmoHkeuK. 46 
do 43 

do A. 86 

Androscog- 
einl. 86 

Arkwr!'tWT8« 



17X 
16i< 



15)r 
17 

Auburn 86 16K-1S 

Albion . ..4-4 11 

Bartletta... 86 WH 

do .... 33 18^ 

do .... 31 U 

Bates 45 IS 

do XX.. 46 18 

do BE... .36 itii 

do B.... 83 14 

Blackstouo 

AA 36 U)i 

Boott B.... 86 14>4 

do C... 88 13« 

do 0.... 30 U<4 

Bl!ertonW84-4 13«-14 

Frnit of the 

Loom 86 16K 

ar't Palls Q 86 Ib^ 

do 8 31 Vi 

do A 32 i3)i 

do H 83 13 

Lonsdale... 86 !6 

do Cambric 86 Hii 

N. Y. Mills 36 19-20 
Pepperell.. 8-4 87>f 
do .... 7-4 30 
do .... 8-4 8SX 
do .... 9-4 37J< 
<lo 10-4 42X 
di/ ....11-4 V^ 
Poccasset P 33 lOX 

Utica 5-4 • %•> 

do Nonp 4-4 18 

do 9-4 50 

do 10-4 55 

do .... 4-4 17X 

do heavy 86 17X 

do XX 10-4 55 

Wamsutta.. 45 2« 

do .... 40X 22 

do nn as isv 

do XX .36 18X 
Canton Flannelx. 

BROWN. 

Amoskeag -\ in . .23 20 

do B 29 19 

do H 28 17 

Ellcrton N 23 

do 20 

do P 18 

do S 16 

do H 26 

Everett T 13 

do X 14X 

do XX .... 18 

do XPX 22 

Tremont n 12K-I3 

do A 16X-17 

do X 20 

do XXX.... 25 

Hamilton Stout... 17 

do XX 20 

NashuaXX 22>i 

do A 16 

Pemberton D 15 

BLEACHED. 

Amoskeag BB...29 26 

do A. ...29 21K 

do AA. ... 27 

do EX plush 27 17« 

Ellerton WN 28 

do N 25 ■ 

do P 20 

TremoutT 16 



Price. 

TremontY 19V 

do XX 24 

namiltonXP. 16 

do BX :» 

do XX U 

NaahnaXX S3>f 

Nanrokrag A A.... M 
Whlttcnton AA... IT 

Everett X UU 

do A 21 

do B 19 

Laconia 17 

Prints. 

American US 

Amoskeag 10 

Bedford 8)( 

Cochoco IS 

Qamcr A Co.... 11-llX 

Oloaccator 11^ 

do moomlng ll,v 

Ilamilton. 11>^ 

Lodl lOX 

Manchester ll)i 

Merrlmac D dk. . .. llx 
do W pk and par. 18 

do Hhlrting UH 

Pacittc 11J< 

. Richmond's 11J< 

: Simpson 2d Monrn. l\)i 
I do black & white, lix 

' Sprague's fan ]l>i 

I Cllazed Cambrics. 

I Amoskoa.' 8>f 

I Garner a>i 

I Harrnrny 6-«H 

I Manvllle 8)5 

' Pwinot 8X-9 

I Red Crojs 8V 

I Vlctoryll 8« 

I TIckinK*. 

I Amosk'g ACA. 

I do A.. 

I do B.. 

do C. 

do D.. 

Cordis AAA.. 

do No. 2. 

No. 3. 

No. 4. 

No. 5. 

No. 6. 

No. 7. 

A. ... 



Everett 

Haymaker Bro 

L<.'wl>u>n 

Manchester ., . 
Oils AXA 

do BB....... 

do CO 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
Esvton 



13 



80 
34 
21 
19 
17 
23 
2t 
21 
19 
17 
15 
14 
"« 

19 
29 
21 



Pnee 
35 

li« 

30 
33 

30 
IT 



Corset Jeans. 



t, 3210.— 

ck— 



IS 
IS 

13M 
ll¥ 

13« 

10 



80-8)1 
40-40 

2^ 

34 
M 



do B 

Hamilton 

Lewiaton A . . . 86 

do B... 30 

Stripes. 

Albany 1)4 

Algodoa ]2>f 

American 13-14 

Amoskeag. 18-19 



Arkwrlght . 

Easton 

Hamilton 

Jewett City.. 

Whittenton A. 

do BB.. 

do C. 

Checks. 

Caledonia, 8.. 

do 9.. 

do 12.. 

do IS.. 

do 70.. 

do 8(1.. 

Park, No. 60.. 

do 70.. 

do 80.. 

do 90.. 

do 100.. 

Denims. 

Albany 

Amoskeag 

Algodon 

Bedford 

Boston 

Beaver Cr. AA 
Chester D'k B 



19 
14 

18 

12«-13X 
IT 
14 
13 



16 
18 
K)i 
27V 

fi^ 

25 

17 

19 

21 

23X 

25 

13 

95 

13 

UH 

ViX 

21 

13.J*i 



Amoakeag. 
Androacog'n sat 
Berkley.*... 
Canoe River.. 
Hallowpll Imp 
Ind.Orch.Imp 

Laconia 

NanmkaagMit. 

Pe'iuot UJ(-lb 

Cotton Dock. 
Sail dnck, S21n.— 
Wdb'ry, 
Fl'lwlng 
Dmld 
Light due 
Bear duck (8 OS.) 
do heavy (Ooz.). 
Mont.Ravens29ln 
do 40iu. 
Bacs. 

American 83 00 

Amoskeag 33 00 

Great Kails A. 84 00 
Ludlow AA.... 84 00 

Lewlston 84 00 

Ontario A 8T BO 

PowhattaoA.. 85 00 
do B.. 43 50 

Stark A 37 50 

do C 3 bnsh 86 00 

Domeetic GIuk* 

hams. 

Amoskeag u 

Bales u 

Caledonia 13V 

ChlcopcB... 13V 

Glasgow 18 

Gloucester 13K 

Hartford nj( 

Lancaster 14 

Manchester IS 

Namaske 14 

Park Milli 14 

Peabody 13 

Quaker City 13V 

Renfrew 15 

Union 13V 

Spool Cotton. 

Brooks, per dojs. 
200 Tds. ... 

J. A P. Coat's 

Clark, John, Jr. 
& Co 

Clark's. Geo. A. 

Willimantic, 8 

cord 

do 6 cord. 

Samosset. 

Green is Dan- 
iels 

Hadlcy.. aS-STV 

Hol.voke 85 

Sterling 70 

Carpets. 

Velvet, J. C'roee- 
ley & Son's 

best 3 66 

do do A No 1.. 3 55 

Tap Brussels. 

Crnsslev* Son's.. 141 

Eng. Brussels. 3 30-3 80 

Hartford Carpet Co : 

Extras ply 1 e7V 

Imncrlal3-ply.. 1 60 

Superfluc 1 .35 

Med. super 1 30 

Body BrU8 5fra. 3 10 
do 4 do 2 00 
do 3 do 1 90 

Hemp, plain, 36 in 32V 

do ex plain, 36 In 88 



70 
70 

TO 
TO 

47V 

70 

4»V 

«V 



inCPORTAXIONS OF DRV GOODS AT TBE POUT OF 
NEtr YORK. 

The importations of dry goods at this port for the week ending 
January 3, 1873, and the corresponding weeks of 18"2 and 1871 
have been as follows : 



Brown Sheetings 
and Shlrtlnss. 

Width. Price. 



Agawam P... 36 

AlbionA 36 

Arctic B. ... .36 

AtUntlc A... 37 

do D.... .37 

do H... 37 

Appleton A.. 36 

do N.. 30 

Angi'eta. .3!i 

Bedford R. .. 30 

Boott 31 

do S 40 

do W 48 

ConettogoD. 38 



11 
10>i 

14 

13 I 



32 



Cabot A 

D wight X... 
do Y... 

do W 36 

Indian Head.7-8 
do ..48 
Ind'n Orchard 

A .38 

do C. 30 
do BB. .33 
do W. 80 

Laconia O 39 

do B... 37 
io B.... 36 
Lawrence A . . 36 
do D.. 36 
do XX 36 



36 13 

87 n-iiv 



12 
12X 
12 
20 

14X 

13 

12 

11 

MX 

13« 

12X 

14 I 
15 



Lawrence LL. 36 
no J.. 40 
do Y.. 86 

Nashua One O .38 
do It.... 36 
do E.... 40 
do W.. 48 

Pepperell 7-4 

do .... 8-4 
do ... 9-4 
do ....10-4 
do 
do 

ui!ca na 

do 48 

do B8 

do Ann Mod 40V 



..11-4 
..12-1 



12 

15V 

12V 

13 

14V 

16 

19 

27V 

30 

32V 

37V 

liX 

45 

1«V 

25 



BNTEBED FOB OONSDMPTIOK FOR THB WBBK SHDIKO JAKUABT 2, 1875. 

. 1878 . 

Pkgs Valne. 

354 tieOiM) 

1G0,!«: 

3n.«i« 

i<aw3 

36,366 



Mannf actures of wool 254 

do cotton.. 1,1 !5 

do Bilk 2S4 

do nax K» 

Miscellaneous dry goods. 914 



. 1871 , 

Pkirs. Value. 
|:U7.851 

2;9.S31 
98.723 
106.074 



Pkgs, 
•1 10 
7011 
211 
4.3 i 
607 



-1872 . 

Value. 
$1M.08I 

no .-.OS 

VitMl 
97„17S 
186.903 



.596 

281 

1,'69 

SM 



Total 3.105 $S61,0-28 2.3S5 tW.XSIl 8,009 $7110.414 

WITHSBAWN FBOX WABEBOOSE AMD TUBOWN niy) TUB XAKKBT OITI1IH0 TBS 
SAME rKBIOD. 



alanuf actures of wool 142 

do cotton.. 108 

do silk 37 

do flax 295 

Miscellaneous dry goods. 23 



(56.413 
31,(W0 
41.261 
4S,7P3 
19,044 

$197,051 
861,028 



Total 010 

Add ent'd forcon8ampt'n.3,105 

Total thrown upon m'rk'l 3.715 tl,058,0S2 2,973 $1,030,077 3,162 $871,481 



154 
55 
26 
221 
129 

588 
2,385 



$61,557 
21,089 
81,263 
B4.m 
13,222 

$I84.-:R3 
815,814 



151 

m 
II 

102 
115 



$73 87<» 
12.r,7I 
6,150 



EKTEBED TOR WARIBOUS tNO DITRINO SAME PERIOD. 



Manufactures Of wool 418 

do cotton.. 477 

do silk 210 

do flax 2')8 

Ml^cellaneons dry goods. 2,365 

TotAl .3.768 

Add ent'd for consnrapt'n.|3 105 



$151,661 
123.365 

20.3.036 
fi6,!!75 
.38,012 


5.19 
4.33 
12ti 
.393 
854 


$!'»«. 5« 
t!:,9lti 
131,907 
91.987 
54,435 


$5S2.»79 
861,088 


1.743 
2,385 


».586.S09 
845,811 



MO 
741 
IVi 
403 



3.533 

8,009 



$380,135 
240008 
127.8:4 
9&.6SS 

730,414 



Total entered st the port. 6,873 $1,446,507 4,138 $1,413,633 5,541 tl,49«,e4« 



2S 



THE CHRONICLE. 



[January 4, 1873. 



Financial. 



AUe. J. BSOWX. 



WAJLBTOX B. BR(»WXI. 



Augustus J. Brown & Son 

BANKEBS 

50 Liberty Street, New Vork. 

BPECIAL AJTESTION GIVEN TO THE NEOOTli- 
TIOS OK 

RAILROAD SKCirRITIEN. 

H 0. BjLKHCT. O. H. HiTMOXD. «. D. rO»T«K 

Barney, Raymond & Co. , 

BANKEKS ASD BROKERS 
£ WALL STREET. 

6T0CK3, GOLD. BONDS AND ALL OTHER 

SKcrniTlEi 

Bougbt and Sold on Commission. 

lutereit paid oa Deptoiu •nbji-ct to nheclc. 

11. N. nA'iNEY, U„..., 
A. H. UAHNliY. »*•■"""■ 



Marq 



uand, Hill & Co., 

ILL ST., NEW YORK 

New Vork Stock Exchange, 
ad Gold bobjshtand sold ou coi 

uand & Hill, 



No. 37 WALL ST., NEW YORK. 

Members New Vork Stock Exchange. 
Stocks, Bonds and Gold bobjshtand sold ou commls- 

flOD. 



Financial. 



Marq 



BANKERS AND BROKERS, 

No. 18 DevonsUIre St., Boston. 

Stocks, Bonds and Gold boneht and sold on coramls- 
eloi ; Collections made ; Business Paper Negotiated. 

Knoblauch 

& Lichtenstein, 

BANKERS, 

3T Broad Street, Netr York. 



SAFE 



INVESTMENT 

FOB 



Eastern Capital. 

MONET LOANED FOR EASTERN PARTIES OX 

iniPROVED FARms. 

Ten per cent Interest (clear from all expenses) pai^ 
wherever desired. 



Gibson, Casanova & Co., 

BANKERS, 

No. SO EXCHANGE ..UlCE. 

STOCKS BONDS, GOVERNMr.NT SECURITIES, 
F01;K10N EXCHANliE and OOlU bought and sold 
on the uii>8t (ai-onibli: terms. 

INTEREST allowed oil deposits either In Currency 
or Gold, sablect to check at sight, the same a» with 

ADVANCES made on all marketable secnrltles. 
CEKTIFIC.Vl'ES oJ Deposit issued bearing Interest. 
COLLECTIONS made at all points of the UNION 
nd mtlTlSH FROVINCliS. 

SOUTTER & Co., 

BANKERS, 

Ko. 53 WILLIAM STREET, NEW TORK. 

Dealers in Bills of Exchange. GoTernments, Bondr, 
Stocks, Gold, Commercial Paper and all Nogotiauiti 

Interest'allowed on Deposits subject to Sight Dratt 
or Check. 
Adf'aiices made on approved securities. 
Special facilities for negotlatlr,- '■•immerclnl Paper, 
(^olleotlons both Inland and foreij,.. promptly uiadc. 
Foreign and Domestic Loans Negotla-cd 

VERMILYE & CO., 

BANKERS, 

IC aud 18 Nassau Street, New York. 



DEALERS TS ALL ISSUES OF GOVERNMENT 
SECURITIES. 

BUY AND BELL ON COMMISSION 

RAILWAY STOCKS, BONDS AND 
GOLD, 

MAKING LIBERAL ADVANCES. 
Tuterest on Dnposlta. 



Bailroads. 



Heyerdalil, Schonlerg L Co., 

31 PINE STREET, NEW^ YORK. 

10 Comhlll, E. C, London. 

Steel and Iron Rails. 

Sole Agentt in the United, Stattt for 

Samuel Fox Sc Co.'s 

BESSEIVER STEEL RAILS. 

R AILRO AD SECURITIES NEGOTIATED. 
CRUCIBLE STEEL WORKS. 

William Butcher & Co., 

Lcivistoivn, Pa., 

Manufacturers of 

CRrCIBLE STEEL TYRES, 

Axles, Forglngs, A:c., &.C. 

OFFICES : 

NEW YORK : BOSTON : 

No. 59 JOHX Street. Kg. 125 FEDEniiSntEET. 

PHILADELPHIA; CHICAGO: 

218 SocTH FouBTU St. 36 SotJTH Canal Street. 

Wrin. TOOTUE, eeneral Asent, 
59 John Street, N. Y. 

George A. Boynton, 

BROKER IN IRON, 

70 WALL STREET. NEW YORK. 



EDWARD P. BIOELOW. 



JAUES JOHNSTON 



MORHIB, 

Illinois, 



E. SANFORD, 

Attorney and fiolicitor. 



References eiven to prominent persons In any largt 
city In the Unlou. 



M. K. Jesup & Company, 

BANKER»i AND inEKCHANTS, 

M LIBERTY STREET. 

NftKOtlate 

Kouda and Loans for Railroad Cos. 
i oi^vract lor 

iron or Steel Rails, Locoin«tlref , 
rnra. He. 
and undertake 
all ba>lne««conn«cted <vlth Rallnraj • 

Winslow, Lanier & Co., 

BANKERS, 

87 PINE STREET, NEW YORK. 
Receive the accounts of Interior bank^ bankers, 
eorporatloDS and Merchants. 

Agents for the sale of City, County and Railroad 
Bonds, Issue Letters of Credit for foreign travel. 
LONDON CORRESPONDENTS, 
CITY BANK, Threaduecdic Street. 



TBE 

German American Bank, 

Cor. Broadway and Cedar St., 
CAPITAL, ....-- $3,000,000 

DRAWS BILLS OF EXCHANGE and Issues ' LET- 
TERS or CREDIT available at all principal places 
abroad. 

Accounts of Merchants. Bankers, *c. solicited. 

O. H. SOHBEINER, Cashier. E.UIL SAUEK, Pres. 



Commercial Cards. 

Smith, Baker & Co., 

conmissioN merchants, 

Yokobama and Hioso, Japan. 

KEPRKSENTED BY 

E. "W. CORLIES, 

66X Pine Street, New York. 

Olyphant & Co., 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

HOBK Konz, Staan^Iial, Foocliow & 

Canton, China. 

Represented bt 

OLY-PHANT & CO., of China, 

104 W^all St., New York. 

Everett & Co., 

66 State Street, Boston* 

AGENTS FOR 
ACGIISTINE HEARD A. CO., 

OT CHINA AND JAPAN. 

fl (trances tnaae on conRirTiments ot approved mer- 
chandize. 

Stephen Higginson, 

No. 87 BEAVER STREET, 

P. O. Box No. 4660. NEW YORK. 

REPRESENTING 

Messrs. DUMMLER & CO., Batavia and Pfldang. 
CHAS. THOUEl, & CO., Yokohama. 
" CLARK, SPENCE & CO.. Gallc and Colombo. 
" GILFILLAN, WOOD & CO.. SlnRapore. 
" SANDILANDS, BUTTERY & CO., Penang. 

Coffee Orders Received for Rio de Janeiro. 



Bigelow & Johnston, 

48 Pine Street, New York. 

Iron and Steel Rails 

OF APPROVED FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

MANUFACTURE. 

HAVE FOR SALE 

SOO Tons 66 lb. " Aberdare" Fish 
Bar Ralls, in store at New York. 

2,000 Tons 56 lb. "Stockton" extra 
do. do., to arrive at New York. 



r. H. WILSON, EDWARD F. WINSLOW. 

Late Bt. Maj. Gen.,U.S.A. Pics. St.L.& S.E.R"w»y 

Winslow & Wilson, 



COB. FOURTH & WALNUT 6TS., ST. LOUIS, MO 
Report upon. Build, Manage and Equip 

RAILWAYS. 

Negotiate Loans and sell Sccurllies of all kinds. 



7. UUWAUD SilTCtlUtrL, 

Philadelphia, 
14 North 5th Street. 



PHILIP B. JCSTICK, 

New York, 
42 Cliff Street. 



Charles Otis, 

No. 9 New Street and 74 Broadway. 
CITY RAILROAD, OAS *c 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES. 

Bee qnotatlona f Local Stcurltles " In this paper. 



John Dwight & Co., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 
SALERATVS, 

SUPER CARB. SODA, &c. 

No. 1 1 Old Slip, New York. 

The Jobbing Trade ONLY Supplied. 



Philip S. Justice, 

LONDON, 

n SOUTHAMPTON BUILDINGS. 



Steel and Iron Ralls, 

C. S. Tyres and Axles, 

Steel and Iron Wire, 

mining Ropes, Cables, dec, 
GalT'd Iron Wire, Ship's Rlgglns, 
Galv'd Corrugated Sheet Iron, 
W^rouKht Iron Screw Plies, 

Ship's Forgings, &e. 

Edward W. Serrell, 

CIVIL ENGINEER, 

78 Broadvray, Neir Y'ork. 



William Wall's Sons, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Cordage, 

ELEPHANT BAGGING, and Dealers 
In HEMP, 

GANGS OF RIGGING MADE TO ORDER. 

Office, 113 Wall St., N. Y. 



RAILROADS, BRIDGES AND EXPLORATIONS. 

"BEPRELL'S PATENT WROUGHT 

IRON VIADUCTS." 



1^* Particular attent, jn given to the examination 
of Pnbllc Works for capitalists seeking Investments. 

Thos. J. Pope & Bro., 

aoa Pearl Street, New York. 

Pig Iron, 

RAILS, COPPER, ,„._ 

SPELTER, TIN, LEAD, 

NICKEL, BlS.trrTH, 




xmtk 



HUNT'S MERCHANTS' MAGAZINE, 

REPRESENTING THE INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS OF THE nNITED STATES, 



VOL. ]a 



SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 1873. 



NO. 394. 



CONTFfJTS. 



THB CHRONICLE. 

The "Railway Monitor" 87 

Germun Capital and Oar Monov 

Marki't , 87 

The Policy of Inflation S8 

Tho Court of Appeals, the Usury 

Law. and tho Legislature 39 

Railroad Extension in 187i 40 



Debt Statement for January, 1873 
Changes In the Redeeming 

Agents of National Banks 

Latest Monetary and Commercial 

EugUsh News 

Commercial and Miscellaneous 

News 



Money Market, Railway Stocks, 
U. b. Secnritiee, Gold Market, 
Foreign Exchange, New York 
City Banks, Boston Banks, 
Philadelphia Banks, National 



THE BANKERS' GAZETTE. 



Banks, etc 

(Quotations of Stocks and Bonds 
Investments and State, City and 

Corporation Finances 



THE COMMERCIAL TIMES. 

Commercial Epitome 52 I Groceries .... 

Cotton.. MIDryGoodB 

Broaasiufls B5 j 



48 



49 



Stije €!)ronitU. 

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day morning, with the latest news up to midnight oj Friday/. 

TSBK8 OF SUBSCKIPHOir-PATABLB IN ADTANCB. 

The Oommkbcial and Financial CoRomchZ, delivered by carrier 
to city subscribers, and mailed to all others (exclusive of nostaec) 

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The Cbeoniolk will be sent to subsoribers until ordered discontinued by tetter 
Postage is -M cents per year, nniiisj) dd bv the subscriber at Ms mv ■■ vost-offlce 
WILLIAM B. DANA, I WILLIAM B. DANA & CO., Publishers 

JOHN o. TLOTD, JB. j 79 and 81 WiUiam Street NE'.V YORK. 

Post OFricE Box 4,594. 
Subscriptions and Advertisements will be taken in London at the office of 
the CiinoNicLE, No. 5 Austin FruTf. Old Broad street, at the following rates : 

Annual Subscription (including postage to Great Britain) £S 3s 

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Drafts or Post-Offlce Money Orders. 

13S^ A neat file for holding current numbers of the Chronicle is sold at the 
office for 50 cents. Volumes bound for subscribers at tl 85. The first and 
second volumes of the Chboniclb are wanted by the publishers. 



"THE RAILWAY MONITOR." 
We have long felt the want of additional space for devel- 
oping the Railroad Department of our paper. With each 
succeeding year this great inte-est is becoming raore and more 
important, not alone in its relations to commerce but also as 
an element affecting all monetary movements. Hence we 
have from year to year devoted to this subject increased space, 
and finally, in October, 1871, began the monthly issue of a 
supplement, so as to present a statement as nearly perfect as 
possible of all the bonds and stocks of every road which 
forms a part o( the complex system of the country. These 
tables, however, show more clearly the necessity for further 
information on the same subjects. To make them complete 
one needs comparative detailed statements of the reports of 
the roads, with all the current news and changes in any 
way afTectiiig the bonds, stocks, roadway or management of 
the companies. This has in part been attempted heretofore 
by yearly volumes. We all see. however, the comparative 
uselessness of information coming at such infrequent 
periods ; before it reaches the reader his interest in it has 
been supplantefj by later news. 



Seeing the existence of this want, and the impossibility 
of full/ satisfying it within the pagea of Th« Crroniclx, 
we have determined to begin next week the issue of a new 
paper, to be continued on tho fifteenth o* each succeeding 
month, called " The Railway Monitor," which, with the 
weekly railroad department and bond and stock lists of 
The ChroViclk, will, we think, supply all necessary facts. 
We propose that " The Monitor " shall contain a yearly his- 
tory of every railroad in the United States, so arranged, 
classified and indexed that one may readily turn to each 
Railway report, contract, law or decision, or any news 
item as to construction, operation and progress of roads, as 
well as meetings and|eiections, djc, about which one may 
desire information. That this paper may obtain a wide cir- 
culation we issue it to subscribers of The Chroniclk at 
three dollars a year, and to all others at four dollars — these 
prices include a convenient file-ooTer for holding current 
numbers, which will be given the first year to every sub- 
scriber. Tne first number will be ready for delivery on 
Wedue'dsy of next week. 



GEBIHAN CAPITAL AND Ol'B HONET MARKBT. 

The reduction in the rate of the Bank of England to 4J 
per cent has produced very little impression here, except as 
suggesting some prospect that with the return of easy 
money the foreign demand may revive for our railroad se- 
curities. This, however, is a result which will probably be 
deferred while so much uncertainty hangs over the London 
loan market about the payment of the German indemnity, and 
the effect it may have on the foreign exchanges. The recent 
stringency of money in London has very naturally pro- 
duced a number of heavy failures, which must have spread 
much impoverishment and distress. As the stringency was 
wholly due to the failure of the Bank of England to provide 
beforehand the ample reserve of gold which was needful for 
its functions and stability, it is gralif;^ing to find that the 
bullion reserve is increasing, and has reached 24 millions 
sterling. So fur as our money market is concerned, there 
is little prospect that any trouble from that source will 
threaten us at an early day. Tne only event of this sort 
that is likely is a demand for c;oId for shipment. Aud this 
we shall be able to meet to a moderate extent without my 
serious inconvenience to the general mercantile interests of 
the country. 

It is repotted that the German government, after a lull 
in the coinage operations, is beginning to buy gold again for 
that purpose. The growing easj of money in London in 
face of this news is asoribad to the belief th*t some under- 
standing has been arrived at which will prevent the bullion 
in the Bank of England from being seriously depleted from 
this cause. Another ipetjjod of protecting iu bullion i« 



-39 



THE CHRONICLE. 



[January 11, 1878. 



mentioned by our London correspondent in the letter we 
published last week. lis intimates that the rise in the 
rate of discount to 7 per cent was not supposed to be the 
only or the chief force which compelled the recent flow of 
gold from Paris to London; but the real causa of this active 
movement was that the bank authorities refused to discount 
financi! paper. This fact, which is the common talk in Lon- 
don, confirms our suggestion, and very nearly carries out the 
plan that we recommended, six or eight months ago as a 
preventive against the monetary trouble which, as appeared 
to us, the indemnity payments must inevitiibly bring on the 
European money markets. Our recommendation was that 
the Bark of England, instead of waiting to check a drain of 
gold by raising its rate, should anticipate that drain, and 
should either refuse to add.iinaicing obligations to its oilier 
liabilities, or should get a supply of gold by special purchase 
or otherwise, so that, by preparation beforehand, the Eng- 
lish money markets might be kept free of disturbance from 
foreign flnancial operations and international payments of 
great magnitude, which properly had nothing whatever to 
do wiih the interior trade of Great Britain. Had this hint 
been taken, and this obvious policy beeu adopted by the 
Bankla.'it summer, the late disastroun stringency there would 
probably have been averted altogether, and multitudes of 
reputable English families, whose ruin or impoverishment 
has thus been precipitated through no fault of theirs, m'ght 
still have been in comfort and prosperity. 

If the gold which Germany wants for its coinage opera- 
tions cannot be got from England, it is supposed that the 
intention is next to try this market. How much of truth 
there may be in the conjecture, we do not affirm. What 
seems to bo certain is that we have a large ainjunt of capi- 
tal from Germany lending in Wall street on call. Hence if 
Ihey wish to buy up a little of our gold, they have abund..nt 
means here for that purpos?. It is this German capital thus 
lending here that has in a considerable degree helped to 
8U;.ply our money market during the stringency of the past 
four months. 

This monetary tightness here has not yet passed off 
though it is slowly weakening its hold, as is shown by the 
improvement of mercantile credits. It is worthy of note, 
that the stringency which was partly brought on b) the 
refusal of Germany to buy our securities was p.irtly relaxed 
and alleviated by supplies of German capital emigrating 
liiiher and investing itself , at high rates in loans on call. 
How far it may tend to our interest, and to the quiet of our 
money market for such foreign capital thus to be absorbed 
here in call loans instead of in more permanent forms of 
investment, is a quf stion which claims more consideration 
thin it lias heretofore had from our financial observers. It 
adds another illustration of the important connections 
between the finances of Germany and of this country, which 
are now so rapidly multiplying. This close sympathy of 
mutual good offices began to command grateful recognition 
early in the history of our war-loans, and is destined, with- 
out doubt, to play an important part in the future industrial 
growth and financial progress of the two nations. 



. THE POLICY OF INFLATION. 

Never since the close of the war have the inflationists 
made such vehement efforts as at present to give us a ruin 
ous issue of more currency. Their efforts are directed with 
the moat impartial indifference towards both the greenback 
currency ard the National b,nk circulation. As to the 
greenbacks the sum in circulation reached its highest point 
.n August 18tt5 when it was H33,160,569. At that time 
the greenbacks were allowed to fluctuate Within certain 



limits at the discretion of the Secretary of the Treasury, 
who, in obedience to tha popular excitement against inflation, 
reduced the aggregate to $422,749,253 when the act of April 
12, 1860 was passed ordering a monthly reduction of not 
more than ten millions in six months, and a fjrther reduc- 
tion of not more than four millions a month after that time. 
The discretion placed in the hands of the Secretary was 
oppced, and on the 4th February, 18GS, the further contrac- 
tion of the currency was suspended and has never a^ain 
been resumed. The greenb.icks outstanJing at th;it date 
were 356 millions of dollars which is the legil aggregate at 
present, and has been so regarded without question for the 
last five years. Quite lately, however, and for the first time 
since the administration ot' tha present government, the right 
has boen claimed for the issue of 44 millions of new green- 
backs, chiefly on the ground that it was po.ssible to revive 
the war powers of currency-issua conferred by the laws of 
1862 and 1863 which fixed the aggregate of the curr. ney 
at 450 millions, but contemplated according to Chief Jus- 
tice Chase " a permanent circu'ation of 400 millions until 
resumption of piyment in coin." As the eontraclion laws 
of 1866 and 1863 recognise no such large aggregate of 
greenbacks, and as no officer of the government is au- 
thorized to miike any new issues, or to emit a single dollar 
of new greenbacks except in exchange for mutilated notes, 
this dictum of the Chief Justice on a point not before the 
the Court or within its jurisdiction dots not seem to help, 
the inflationists much. 

Without giving up wholl} their task of getting inflation of 
the currency through greenback issues if possible, they next 
betook themselves to the work of National bank expansion. 
Here their task was, if possible, more difficult still. There 
is a large party opposed to the national banks, and anxious 
to rob them of the large profits of issuing notes. We have 
often defended the banks against such attacks which are 
renewed every year, and have once or twice seemed very 
likely to be passed by Congress. If any attempt be made 
to enlarge the issues of bank notes, this party will be sure 
to take the alarm, a public excitement could scarcely fail of 
being stirred up, and the project would be defeated by the 
combined efforts of the fiiends of the banks and the advo- 
cates of a sound currency. 

In this contingency what was to be done? The expan- 
sionists could not hope to have the bank note aggregate 
increased from 354 millions to 375 or 400 million?. A 
project to do this is before Congress, and was received in 
such a significant wjvy that it can scarcely find resusci- 
tation during the present Congress. A more plausible 
plan was adopted. T ey got up a scheme for what 
they called "free banking." These ingenious and busy 
gentlemen, many of whom arc equally enthusiastic and dis- 
interested, profess much anxiety that Congress should relieve 
banking from the restrictions which surround it. But they 
forget that in this country banking is more free than almost 
anywhere else in the world. If they want to open a banking 
house, and have money to lend, they are perfectly free to do 
it. If they can gain the public confidence, and any one will 
trust them with deposits, they are free to receive this 
money and to lend it in addition to their own. And this 
is free banking. For everybody knows that banking 
proper consists essentially of these two things, receiving 
deposits and lending out the money to those who'^i.-h to 
borrow. 

But this sort of free banking dor-s n ■)' suit our 
reformers, although it is the only free bankinij worthy 
of the name. Their proposition is to have (he 
Treasury issue to them bank notes on deposit of five or six 
per cent bonds. Thus, if they buy ^100,000 of govern 
tnept securities they wish that $90,000 of notes should be 



January 11, 1378 ] 



THE CHRONICLE 



39 



fffi'ii Bulk V» tlwrn "Ky-the goi'ernment on condition that 

they deposit the bonds in the Treasury. This is what they 
call " f.ee banking." Every individual, firm, or corporation 
that can Ret $100,000 op any other sum iu bonds is 
to have permission to avail himself of this privilege, and on 
application to the Treasury may get 90 per cent of notes in 
exchange lor his bonds, without any restraint or condition 
except that he is to promise to redeem his notes on demand- 
l?ut this hopeful scheme is not yet complete. An Assorting 
Houio is to be established to enforce redemption. Now in 
regard to oar National bank notes we know how im- 
possible it has been to get any such machinery for re 
demption into working order, though efforts for that pur- 
pose have been making for eight or nine years past. For 
the most part the National bank notes never go home for 
redemption, and if they do ihey are eusily put out again, 
and they can ba kept afloat without difficulty, because they 
are a legal tender for certain purposes, and thus enjoy a 
forced circuhtiou. 
» There are some other features of this scheme, which 
we will omit for the present. Meanwhile we cannot con- 
gratulate the expansionists on the accuracy of the name 
which they have ndopted for their newest scheme of cur. 
rency inflaiion. They call it free banking. They mean 
raally a new i-ssus of legal-tender bank notes. It is the old 
cry for niore paper-money, more inflitionof prions, more 
premium 'on gold, more disturbance of general values. 
Congress for soire years has earnestly spurned every such 
plan tor plunging the nation into an abyss of bankruptcy. 
We believe they will save the country from the over- 
whelming disasters which would attend a revival of the 
defunct policy of inflation. 



THE COURT OF 



APPEALS. THE USURY LAW, AND THK 
LEGISLATURE. 

The Legislature at Albany has lost no time in responding 
to the general demand for a repeal of the usury laws, and 
the ) ills introduced for that purpose should be carefully 
watched. The agitation of the public mind must not be 
allowed to cool xmtil success is complete The 
Chamber of Commerce, the Union League Club, and the 
Law Reform Association, may all render valuable help. A 
new impulse ha« just been given to the public mind against 
the usury laws by ih« late decision of the Court of Appeals. 
For years it has been held that the National Banks ure not 
subject to the State laws against usury ; but to the pre. 
visions of the national currency law, which are much less 
stringent. Under the Slate law, usury voids the contract, 
forfeits bo'h principal and interest, and subjecU the party to 
six months' imprisorment and to one thousand dollars fine. 
The penalty of the national currency law being much 
lighter, forfeiting otly the interest, it has been a sort of 
protection to the national banks to be thus shielded. The 
courts have always ruled that the State laws against usury 
do not apply to (he national banks, and the decisions till 
now have been all one way. 

This uniform course of things has, however, been dis. 
turbed. The First National Bank of Whitehall sued the 
maker and endorser of a protested note. The defence set 
up was usury in corruptly taking mora than seven per cent 
g per annum for the loan of the money for which the note was 
given. The decision was in favor of the bank, and was 
appealed to the General Term where it was affirmed. It 
was then carried up to the Court of Appeals, by whom the 
judgment has just beec reversed, and a new trial ordered, 
six of the seven judges concurring. This decision has 
again unsettled the law, and pending the appeal whicli 
>l is said will be taken to the Supreme Court of the United 



States, nobody knows for certain what the penally may 
really be in this State for taking usury. This uncerUinty 
glvos point to the other arguments for the immediate aboli- 
tion, in this great metropolitan State, of the antiquated 
barbarous laws which are of no imaginable use except to 
oppress borrowers, to drive capital away when it is moat 
wanted, and to give violence to the spaiims of the money 
market in seasons of stringency. As there are many similar 
cases pending it may be well to examine the chief points in 
the decision which was pronounced by Judge Rapallo. 

One of the fundamental principles on which the Court relied 
was that the National banks are fubject to the Federal law 
in respect only to their relations with the National Treasury 
as depositories, fiscal agents, and privileged functionaries, 
and not for their private dealings with third parties. In 
these the banks are held to be on the saiie fooling with 
n;\tural persons, and are subject to the laws of the States in 
which (hey carry on their business. The bank act does not 
pkce these corporations on any different footing from natu- 
ral persons chosen by the government, authorize:l to perform 
some special public function, and periuilted at the same time 
to carry on a private business on their own account. In 
support of this view the decisions of the Supreme Court of 
the United States is cited in the case of the National Bank 
vs. Commonwealth, 9 Wall. 302, where it is said of Na- 
tional banks, "They are subject to the laws of the States, 
and are governed in their daily course of business far more 
by the laws of the State than of the Union. All their eon- 
tracts are governed and construed by State lawj. Their 
acquisition and transfer of property, their right to collect 
their debts, and their liability t^ be sued for debt are all 
governed by State laws. It is only when a State law inca- 
pacitates them from discharging their duties to the govern- 
ment that it becomes unconstitutional." 

The effect of this is to divide the functions of the Na- 
tional Banks into two distinct parts (I) that concerned with 
tlie business of the Treasury as fiscal agenU or otherwise, 
and ("-i) that pertaining to their contracts with the public as 
banks of deposit and discount. lo the former the acts of 
Congress override all other statuses ; in the latter those acts 
do not apply, but the b:inks are subject to the jurisdiction 
uf the Slates. In conformity with this view Judge Ripallo 
cites the VHrioui sections of the National Currency law 
which make the capital stock and real estate of the national 
banks liable to Stkte taxation, and subject the corporations 
themselves to the jurisdiction of the State courts, and even 
to the visitorial powers of the Courts of Chancery. From 
this fundamental principle,which underlies the whole banking 
law, and makes tho banks liable lo State jurisdiction when- 
ever their business with the Treasury does not absolutely 
demand exemption from such jurisdiction, the inference is 
drawn that "none of the suboidinate provisions of ihe net 
should be so construed as to exempt contracts made by 
these corporations from the operation of a particular State 
law. unless the intention to do so is so clearly apparent as 
to leave no room for doubt. If, by any reasonable construc- 
tion, the provision now in question can be harmonized with 
the laws of the State, that construction should be adopted." 
Applying this principle to the interpretation of the usury 
section of tlie National bank law, Judge Rapallo gives it * 
totally differfut meaning from that usually ascribed to it. 
The section is in these words: 

Section 30. And be it further enacted, that every awwdatlbn 
may take, receive, reserve, and charjre on anr loan or di»co«nt 
made, or upon any note, bill of exchange, or otber evidence of 
debt, interest at the rate allowed by the l.wa of the St*te or ter- 
ritory where the back is located, aad no more, except that where 
by the laws of any State a different rate i. limited [«" l*"^' »» 
issue, organized under Sute laws, .the rate so limited shall be 



40 



"^^ THE CHRONICLE 



[January 11, ISTS 



allowed for associations organized in any such State under this 
act. And wben no rate is fixed by tlie laws of the State or terrij 
tory, the bank may take, receive, reserve, or charge a rate not 
exceeding euven per centum, and such interest may be taken in 
mdvance, reckoning the days for which tlie note, bill, or other 
evidence of debt has to run. And the knowingly taking, receiv- 
ing, reserving, or charging a rate of interest greater than afore- 
said shall bs held and adjudged a forfeiture of the entire interest 
which the note, bill, or other evidence of debt carries with it, or 
which has been agreed to be paid thereon, and in case a greater rate 
of interest has been paid, the person or persons paying the same, or 
their legal representatives, may recover back, in any action of 
debt, twice the amount of tlie interest thus paid from the associa- 
tion taking or receiving the same, provided that such action is 
commenced within two years from the time the usurious tran- 
saction occurred. But the purchase, discount, or sale at not more 
than the current rate of exchange for sight drafts, in addition to 
the interest, shall not be considered as taking or receiving a 
greater rate of interest. 

This section consists of (our provisions, which have 
always been construed together. Judge Rapallo proposes 
to separate them. In the first, certain national banks, he 
argues, are put nader state regulations relative to the rale 
of interest, and ire separated from other banks ■which are 
in stales having no such regulations fixing the rate of in- 
terest. These banks are provided for by the second and 
third provisions, which pre quite distinct from the first, and 
are not to be c;nstrued with it at all. On this theory the 
thud or penal provision has no application to any banks in 
states having usury laws, and the penalty is not attempted 
to be prescribed iu this section except for banks in such 
stites as have no usury laws and no fixed rate cf interest. 
Th'.s new interpretation the court defends by the argument 
that to construe the national currency law "as undertaking 
to remodel the usury laws of the states would, besides other 
grave objections, be inconsistent with the manifest purpos* 
of the act to subject the banks to the local policy, on the 
subject of the interest of money, of these states where the 
interest was regulated by law." 

As under this construction Congress has not attempted 
lo override the state laws agiiinst usury, the conclusion was 
inevitable that the defense of usury was av.iilable, and the 
usury laws were declared applicable to national banks as to 
all other corporations and individuals. Here, as we have 
said, the uniform decisions of the courts of this state for 
years past are overruled. 

"We have no space to discuss this decision further, and 
cite it chieCy as new evidence of that disgraceful a.id tor- 
menting uncertainty of the law to which we have often re- 
ferred as aggravating the other mischiefs of onr penal 
statutes against usury. 

The inference practical men educe from the subject is to 
use their whole power to get these laws repealed. Governor 
Dix, in his message, recommends their repeal. Intelligent 
borrowers all over the country are anxious to get rid of 
them. Strange to say, the farmers, who are among the chief 
sufferers from the law, are its chief friends. But for ihein 
it would have perished before now. From the country 
membetc at Albany the opposition to usury reform is now 
^s always, the hardest to overcome. These men are consci 
entious, and wish to do tlieir whole duty to the people and 
to their constituents. They argue that if Wall street 
charges \ per cent a day for money in spite of repressive 
laws, the rates will run higher still if these laws be taken 
«way. Now, nothing is more certain than that here, as in 
other States, the repeal of the usury laws would make 
money accessible to men who cannot now get it at any 
price, and would benefit the farmers as much as any class 
of borrowers by putting down and keeping steady the rate^ 
of interest. Meanwhile these usury laws are driving away 
large misses of loanable funds from this centre into the 
Western Stales, where there are no usury laws to fetter 
capital or endanger its free use at its market value. 



RAILROAD EXTENSIO.N IN 1872. 

There is some disappointment with the work of railroad 
extension lor the past year. We have done less than was 
expected. We have built fewer new roads than in either of 
the two foregoing years. We can show an increase of but 
6,511 miles, against 7,9GI miles of new roads in 1871 ; 7,433 
in 1870. The whole length of railroad is now 69,158 miles ; 
while 44,000 miles more are in various stages of incipiency, 
and will make our net work of railroads, when finished, 
113,000 miles. 

The growth of the network of iron roads in this country 
was very backward till the gold discoveries of 1848. At the 
close of that year we had less than 6,000 miles of railroad, of 
which 1,276 were in New England. 4,000 miles in the 
Middle and Southern States, and less than 700 miles in the 
Great West. When the troubles of 1860 began the net 
work of railways had increased five-fold. The Western 
States had 11^000 miles, the Southern States over 9,000, 
the Middle States nearly 7,000, and New England 3,600. 
These 30,000 miles had cost us 1,070 millions of dollars, 
more than one-tenth of which, perhaps, was f( reign capital. 
The war did not stop our railroad building as was 
feared. The work was only checked. In the second year 
of the war we had added nearly 2,000 miles to our railroad 
network, and had laid out 100 millions of dollars upon it, 
besides the vast cost of the war itself. At the close of 1865> 
the year of peace, onr railroads had 35,000 miles, and now 
they have a length of nearly twice as much, or 69,158 miles 
Since the war, then, we have built new railroads of 34,000 
miles long. This is more than has been built in the whole 
of Europe in the same time. Had we no more than theso 
34,000 miles that have thus been made since the war, we 
should have a larger mileage of railroad than Germany, 
Austria, France and Russia, with iheir 175 millions of 
people. This will be seen from the following tables show- 
ing the railroad developments of these and other countries 
of Europe compared with that of the United States : 

BAILROADS or PNITED STATES AND OF CERTAIN OOUNTMBS VS ECROPE. 

Inhabl- Sq. m. KR. 
Area t'nta per to Rli. cost 
eq. milea. eq. m. mile. perm. 



Railroad, 
miles. Population. 

United States 69,158 38,555,983 2,995,879 14 43 t49.59» 

Germany 12,207 40,111,265 212,091 189 17 109,n5J 

AustrU 6.865 35,M8,692 227,234 168 40 73,915 

France 10,333 36,469 875 201,900 151 19 168.714 

Russia in Europe 7,044 71,207,794 1,992,674 86 284 166 477 

Great Britain 15,537 31,817,108 120,769 265 8 176,««» 

Belgium l,30t 4,839.094 11,412 430 9 106,987 

Netherlands 836 8.858.06S 13,464 236 13 97,202 

Switzerland 820 2.6(i9.095 15,233 175 13 87,134 

Italy 3,667 26,273,776 107,961 226 29 83,n2 

Denmark 4J0 1,784,741 14.553 111 84 57,11* 

Spain 3,401 18.30i,850 182,758 90 64 107,156 

Portugal 453 3.987.667 36,610 99 81 101.311 

bwcden and Norway... 1,04'J 6,660,122 188,771 19 180 62,438 

Greece 100 1,332,508 19,941 71 199 60,000 

These figures are very suggestive. They not only illus 
trate what we have snid as to the railroad network of this 
country and its great breadth as compared with those of the 
chief commercial nations of Europe, but they are u.^eful in 
many other respects. We return to the railroad growth 
of the past year and to the lessons it offers us. The first of 
these is as to the stringency of the money market, which 
for several months has been unusually severe. To this 
cause and to the disturbance since July of the foreign de- 
mand for our securities is largely due the check which has 
been given our railroad construction, which, but for such hi' S 
drances would no doubt have reached 9,000 miles during the 
year, and perhaps more. It has been doubted by conserva- 
tive men whether our railroad progress has not been too 
rapid since the war. In England a similar active conver- 
sion of floating into fixed capital produced the railroad 
panic of 1847. Our financial system is not sufliciently 
elastic, these persons tell us, to bear the exhausting drain o 



January 11, 1873.J 



ft! 



TfiE CHRONICLE. 



41 



1836.. 
1838.. 
1837.. 
1838. 
18*19. 
184C., 
1841. 
184 J. 
18 13. 
l^M. 
1845. 
1846. 
1847. 
1648 



1,098 
1.273 
1,507 
1,913 
2,308 
2.818 
3,B35 
4,026 
4.185 
4,877 
4.633 
•"4,930 
6,698 
8,996 



over 400 millions of capital which has been annually ab- 
sorbed by railroad inve.stmeuts. Hence in this temporary 

retarding cf our railroad progres.s thej see a wholesome 

change which may avert future trouble. 

There is no doubt some truth jin these reasonings. But 

it must not be forgotten that every well-built railroad if 

suitably located becomes a productive machine which adds 

to the wealth of the whole country, and especially of the 

region it traverses. Our new railroads incrcHso the value 

ol farms and open new markets for their products. They 

lessen the time and cost of travel. They give a value 

to commodities otherwise almost worthless. They concen- 
trate population, stimulate production and raise wages by 

making Libor more e(B(.ient. Our existing railroads are from the subjoined table. 

computed to create more wealth every year than is absorbed 

for the construction of new railroads. Still it is possible 

that we have been absorbing in these great works more of 

our floating capital than can be spared without injury to 

other enterprises which depend on the limited supply of 

the loan miirket. la that case the evil will soon euro 

itself, and a premature check is it much more wholesome 
means of recuperation than a violent revulsion two or three 

years hence when the mischief has grown worse and is less 
susceptible of gentle remedies. 

Secondly, we notice the small cost of our railroads, com- 
pared with those of other countries. This is abundantly 
seen in the foregoing table of the cost of foreign railways, 
The whole cost ot our 69,000 miles of road is about 
$3,436,638,749, which is a sum not very much greater 
than England has spent on her 16,000 miles of railroad. 
Still the relative cost of our railroads is increasing every 
year. Steel rails are taking the place of iron, light rails are 
taken up and heavier rails laid down. Belter bridges, 
double tracks, solid earthworks, stone ballast, and other im- 
provements add both to the cost and durability of the works. 
as well as to their economy. There have also .sprung up a 
number of abuses and peculation:* which clamor to be ex- 
posed and put down. In 1867 the average cost of our rail- 
road? was H2,770 per mile; in 1809 it had risen to $44,255, 
and last year to $49,592, showing a steady rise in the money 
value of railroads and of their equipment. This subject is 
discussed by our contemporary, the Railroad Journal, with 
its usual sagacity and sound judgment, as follows : 

Peculation and knavery liave incessantly levied heavy booty on 
capital used in construction in its transit from a tloatin); to a per- 
manent condition, and that this roguery has contributed largely 
to swell the cost there can be no po.ssible doubt. Bat still the main 
conclusion must be that the character of construction and of 
locomotive and carrying machinery has been essentially changed 
and improved at a large moeily of the enhanced cost. 

Taking the Boston and Albany Railroad as an instance of in- 
creased cost, we find that while at the close of 1867 this was 
only $17,693,361, it had risen by the close of 1873 to $34,301,751, 
an increase of $6,609,390, or 85 per cent, no additional length of 
road having in the meanwhile been made. An explanation of the 
change exhibited is found by reference to the reports of the com- 
pany lor the years named, which show that in the interim there 
have been added to the second track and sidings about 70 miles ; 
that a large amount of rail has been changed from iron to steel ; 
that nearly all the bridges have been rebuilt with stone and iron ; 
that scarcely an old structure remains, and that the equipment 
has been enlarged by the addition of about 60 locomotives and 
3,000 cars. In fact an almost new road has been built and equipped 
at the cost represented by the increased amount. 

There are, however, many instances in which the increased cost 
is chiefly nominal, and the result of financial manipulation. The 
more prominent of the concerns thus indicated are of too no- 
torious a character to need spe cial notice. 

Again we observe the healthy distribution of the increase 
over all parts of the Union, tha great valley ofj the Missis- 
sippi having the chief share. Thus, while the New England 
States, whose railroad network is almost complete, has but 
162 miles of new road, the Middle States have an increase 
of 1^0 miles, and the Southern States 1,273 mile». This 
leaves 3,3C0 miles for the Western States, and 549 miles 
for the Pacific slope. To illustiate still further the diatri- 



buiion of the railroads in the various sections of the coun'ry 
we give a summary of the mileage (1) in the New England 
Slaleii : Maine, New IIampshir», Vermont, Massachusetts 
Rhode Island and Connecticu'.; (2) in the Middl<i States : Neir 
York,New Jersey,Penn8y Ivan's.Delaware, Maryland, District 
of Columbia, and West Virginia ; (3) in the Western State* : 
Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, 
lows, Nebro-ska, the Territories, Kansas, Miesoari ; (4) in 
the Southern States : Virginia, North Caiolina, South Caro- 
lina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiaoa, 
Te.vas, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas and Colorado; and 
(5) in the Pacific States : California, Nevada and Oregon. 
The progress in each of these groups of Stales will be seen 



MUCH In Milealu Mllca In Miles In Mlleiln MtlMln 
U. States. N.E.Statof. M. SUtoa. W. SUUl. S. SUtea. F.SUtea. 



1819 7,265 

1880 9,081 

1851 10,983 

1852 12,9ij8 

1853 15 340 

1854 16,720 

1855 18,314 

1856 22,016 

1857 21,503 

1858 26,963 

185J 98.789 

1800 30,686 

1861 31.256 

1862 32,120 

1863 33,170 

1864 83,908 

1865 85,085 

1866 36,827 

1867 39,276 

1868 42,255 

1869 47,253 

1870 54,686 

1871 62,647 

187« 69,158 



113 
139 

aoo 

2M 

322 
527 
689 
811 
865 
865 
073 
1.032 
1,225 
1,276 
2,073 
2,608 
2.80] 
8,973 
3,153 
8.250 
3,469 
3.577 
3,59!» 
S,616 
3,652 
3.860 
3.697 
3,751 
8,793 
3,793 
3,834 
3,868 
3,938 
4,019 
4,300 
4,516 
4,9&l 
5,147 



654 
796 
980 
1,232 
1,463 
1.666 
1,837 
2.006 
2,018 
2.094 
2,100 
2.148 
2.350 
2.518 
2,901 
8,202 
8,7»5 
4,3« 
4,745 
6,068 
6.473 
^«86 
6,068 
6,348 
6,413 
6,706 
6,963 
7,263 
7,613 
7,941 
8.539 
9,144 
9,555 
9,765 
10,752 
11.3J3 
12,323 
13,542 



44 

88 

igs 

144 

sso 

312 

S74 

419 

606 

679 

■IK 

1.276 

1346 

2.426 

3,706 

4,001 

4,667 

7,024 

8,186 

•,49S 

10,427 

11.0S4 

ll.SSO 

11,657 

12,221 

12,497 

12,847 

is,en 

15.226 
16,889 
19,766 
24,5a> 
29,602 
32,707 



831 
838 

•IT 

4ST 
473 
6M 

(13 

968 
l.OJJ 
1,106 
1,188 
1,831 
1,415 
1,623 
1.664 
1,035 

a, 641 

8.181 
3.764 
4,411 
4,857 
8.707 
6,817 
7.888 
8,274 
9.181 
9.188 
8.412 
9,468 
9,611 
9.631 
^867 
10,128 
10,683 
11,277 
12,505 
13,589 
14,874 



8 

:8 

13 
28 
13 

S3 

n 

n 

73 
188 
»3 

817 
431 
883 
1,164 
1,749 
3,239 
1,788 



Soon after the gold discoverips, the growth of oui rail. 
road system became less irregular and partial than before. 
The above table illustrates the wonderful stimulus which was 
then imparted by the increase in our circulating medium, 
and shows how swiftly the advancing wave of railroad 
extension struck the most prominent sections of the conn- 
try. The Atlantic States were the most rapid in their 
material growth, and they received the earliest impulse. 
After 1849, in New England, the railroad mileage doubled 
in twenty years ; in the Middle States it doubled in eight 
years ; in the Western States the mileage increased ten-fold 
in nine years, and twenty-fold in twenty years ; in the 
Southern States the mileage quadrupled in eight years, and 
it is now eight times as much as in 1849. In the gold-pro- 
ducing States themselves the railroad system was slow to 
start its development. Till 1855 there were no railroads 
in the Pacific States. During eight years more bnt thirty 
miles were built, and the cost of transportation was enormous. 
With 1863 a new impulse began, and tha railroad mileage 
doubled every two years except those which have just 
closed. 



TUE DEBT statement: POR JASUARY. 187J. 
The following is the official statement of the public debt , 
as appears from the books and Treasurer's returns at the close 
»f business ou the last day of December, 1872 : 



42 



THE CHEONICLE. 



[January 11, 1873. 



Debt bearing lutereat in Coln.l 



Autuorlz- 



Interest Acrtn'i 



Cbar&cterof iMue. InK^'C. i'ay'ble Reffl<-ter"(l coupon. 
*''"-- ...Juirel4.'5'<....lS;4 ( .»f,0l5.(XXl IIS.^.IWO 



Whon 
r«yoie Regl'ter-il Coupon. Overdu ■. i;'}"''*'. 



Mof 1858 

taoflSSl Feb. 8.'61....1S«(, 

•i. OreRonWar M»r 3, ■ill....l8»il 

Mof lasi, July :7 and AUK. 9. 'M ...18SI 

)». i-iOV. ul lS«i Fob. 2.'., 'Si. . ..«■>« 

(a Of 1881 M«r. S, '«3 ...ISbl 

M, -.iMOa M»r. 8, 6( ...l»Jl 

Sis-aS'oriSW Jaiie30/81....18<JA< 33.0U.:50 3i.960.5fl 

«!.&^aS.18«.~ Mar. 3. '65. . . . 1835 . 8«.Si7.liOO 119.«58,Ma 

Csau*. i86-\ now. ...Mar. S, •«)... .'.SSS 

•a, S-»ia, 18(7 Mar. 8. 'St.. ..1837 

e., V*«. 18SS Mar. 3. •65....18J8 

Si. Funded Loan, 1831.J uly 14, "TO. . . . 1881 



lS,74a,0OU t,67.),000 

(B)iM3,000 

ril1,4M.(150 6 868, TOO 

1 3i,06U,l(Xl Sffi,w2!l,200 

5S,l>il,HM 2l.Wt,6aO 

;39,ti7K.'j^0 M.891,ueU 

■J,i»3,000 



SS.l.Vi.SlU 150.6-13.70J 

90.471,"0O 2i5.10MiO 

IS.SJi.SOO 24,799.S<y 

1273J1830 72,118,150 



16.2"i4 (a)5;^2,l'>0 

2 955 (aia^SoO 

16«,12»fal5,«;9,l>40 

9sr..B5i (Wa.eresN 

59,931 (a)2.25y.«)0 
S31, 80 (C)3.2I2,758 
895 (ft)-S,9«) 
233,80J (6J689.7J6 
47^,616 lin.561.S6> 
60<.,iOi(a)6.27l,i66 
9Jl,9i5(o 9.476,-.' ."0 
ia,S20(a)l,159,153 

874.6971djl,C6«,6«6 



AgfCTisAte of debtbearinK Intnr't In coin, 
(a) lutereBt p*yabli\ Jan. & _,Jn y. (I» 



coupons ».iO & jslU) paid «'.nUHlly In ^ arc-li. (''I feb.. May, ""f,- * ^ o^; , 
$3,1*); coupon »1.(KK. (/) m-K. 1,000, »S.ilOO, »:0.00J; coup "i tl,0O0. (0) 
iiSo. (*; W. »M, »1WI. »300? »1,WJ,»3.«X) &. »10,000; coupons, JSO, |lC 



72 926 850 1,023,7-24,600 4,-.'63.277l 85,777,015 

%!av & Nov. (c) Mirch & .->ept., except 

(rfl Feb., May, rtUK. & .>.ov. («) Iteif. 

• - "^ -g) »■■(!, $100 

flOU, $3j0 & 

Debt Bearlns Interest In I.awfal Money. 

> p«r cent Certirs. . . .Acts M»rch 2, 67 anil J nl 25. '68. .Paya- Prlucipal. 
blcon demand, wltn interest (Isiiued in S5,0it) & $10.000) — J2,;,8J,Oiiq 
S't.NavvDonsion.. >ct iuly2J,'l)8 .Int.onlyar 
««,Certll'« of Indebtedness.. Act July 8, "70 



I'll to peus'ns. 
One in 1875 



14,000,000 
3,000 



Interest. 

»45,n2 

210.1*10 

9.010 



Asirrceate of debt hearlntr Interest In lawlul money »n,45S.n00 «. 61,212 

Debt on IVhlcJb luteretit Has Ceased Since Maturity. 

ITlnclpal. Interest 

4 to 68, Bonds Matur'u at varl's dutes prior to Jan. 1, "37. 

9« Mex Indem Mnfurcd at various dales iu '51 and *52... 

•'s, Bonds Mature'l Dec. 31, 1S67 

It, Bounty L Sep.... Matured July 1,1849 

6*8, Texas indem.. ..Matured I>ec.31, 1864 

5s, Bonds Matured Jaa. 1,1871 

S»,5-a0s, (called). ...Matured Dec. 1. '71. and Mch.7 4b20, "72.. 

l-l0@6sTr. notes Matured, at various dates from '33-*44 

;-10a69Tr. notes Matured at various dates in *17 and '43... 

6e. 'fr'y notes Matured at various dates In '48 aud'49. .. 

3^6'B, tr'y n's Matured at various dates in '58 and '59. . . 

8's, Tr'y notes Matured .March 1, 1863 

7 8-10's. 3 years Matured Auk. 19 and Oct. 1, 1864 

6«, one year Matured at various dates In 1865 

6'8, 2 years Matured at various dates in 1866 

»'8, Com. int. n's. . . . Matured J une 10, '67, and May 15, '68 

7 3-10*8, 3 years Matured Ann. 15, 1667. and June 15 and 

July 15, 1868 

5'8, Certif. of Ind.... Matured at various dates in 1866 

«,S4 6's,Tem. 1 Matured Oct. 15, 1866 

S>, Certlls. (called). Matnre.d monthly Ironi Dec. 31, 1870, to 

Aprill, 1872 l,3(a,000 



157,665 

1,104 

I.IBO 

3.9iiO 

174.000 

10,000 

1,280,^50 

82,575 

6,000 

950 

2,000 

8.IS0 

19,450 

93,795 

62,850 

532,920 

803.900 

5,000 

73.560 



{61,174 

S.l 

172 

23-1 

11,.'W0 

6.'5 

103.218 

2,670 

206 

57 

106 

878 

1.481 

4.701 

4.474 

105,922 

27.338 

813 

7,313 



6,150 



Agg. of debt on which int. haa ceased since mat'y $1,084,220 $315,990 

Debt Bearing no Interest. 

Authorizing acts. Character of issue. Arat. outstand. 

Jnlyn, 1861, and Feb. 12, 186i Demand notes $81,387 

Feb. 25 and July 11. '62. and March 3. '63. .r. S. legal-tender notes 358^57,907 

Jnn; 8. 18:2 Certificates of deposit 25,370.(00 



43,7-82,061 
23,'a63,000 



July 17, 186; > ractional Currency. 

March 3, 1663. and June 30, 1864 Fractional currency 

March S, 1863(tu $20, JO.IOU, 500, 1,0005,000) .Certils. for gold deposited... 

Aggregate ot debt bearing no Interest $152,897,356 

Kecapltulatiou. 

Amount T..*—.... 
Outstanding. Inte«"- 

SSBTBX^BtKQ IiTrxBKST IS CoiiT— Bonds at 6 p. cent $l;i42.0:4.I5U 

Bonds at 5 p. cent 414,567,300 

Total debt bearing Interest in coin $1,756,651,45) $40,040,293 

V}BB-r BBARINO INTKBEST IN LAWFUL MONKY— 

Certificates at 4 perce'it $(i73,000 

Navy pension fund, at 8 per cent 14.000,000 

Certificates at 3 per cent 2,78J,000 



Total debt bearing interest In lawful money $17,458,000 

DEBTON WHIOU Int. HA8CKX9BD SINOB MaTUBITT 4,0^,320 

DmBT BKVKINO no iNTKRKH-l — 

OeoK-lnd and legal tender notes $359,642,'29 1 

Certificates of deposit 2.'i,370.0'iO 

Jraclional currency 4'>,r22,061 

Certificates of gold deposite 1 23.2S3.0X) 

Total debt bearing no Interest $41^997,356 

Unclftlmod P. R. Interest 



SM.272 
315.990 



ie,6M 



Total $2,231. 19!,Oi6 $40,657,161 

Total debt, principal and interest, to date. Including interest due not 
preaented for payment $2,271,858 i^j 

AXOmfT IX THX TBBASnBT— 

Coin.. $-4.!Bi3.275 

cjurrencT...« 9,876 373 

Special dennsit held for redemption of certlflcates of deposit ai ' 

provided by law j 25,370,000 

Toul 

Debt, less amount In the Treasury, Jan. 1,1873 

Debt, less amount in the Treasury, Dec. 1, 1872 



*1II9.60S.8I9 

2.162.'M2,S?8 

2,160,568.030 



Increase of debt (Interest account) during the past month $1 681 3(y7 

Decrease of debt since March 1. :87-; . $63'56l'i59 

Decrease of dGi>t Rlnci^ Marr-h 1. 18t;9. to March 1. 13:3 "... .'/.'", $2'9'6l»'7B2 
Bonds Issued to the PacIHc Railroad Companies, Interest 
Payable lu Lan'lul money. 

Interest Interest Interest Balance of 

Amount accrued ... ■ - - 

outstanding, and not 

yel paid. 

$776,553 

6,3OS,0lX) 1S'>,090 

27,23'i.512 817,093 

1,600,000 48,000 

I,970,'6O 69,116 

1,S'23,3» 4J,M9 



Character ol Issue. 

Central Pacific $ 15,3.'«.120 

Kan. Pac, late U.P.E.D. 

[inlon Pacific Co 

Con. Br'h Un. Pacific. 

Western Pacific 

Bioiix City and Pacific-, 



paid by 

United 

States. 

$6.36-^,376 

1,969 J53 

6,931,752 

493,803 

867,679 

889,606 



repaid by Int. paid 
transp'tion by United 
of malls, 4c. States. 



$614/57 

1,067,179 

3,296.875 

17,714 

9,3,'» 

82S 



$5,754,319 

902.174 

4.034,876 

476,093 

888,780 



Total lyued. ........ $64,623,512 $1,938,705 $16,570,573 $4,006,002 $12,564,573 

The Pacific Ball oa-l binds are all Issued unclcr the aets ol July 1 186'' and Julv 
2, 1861: they are reglster.d bonds, in denouilnationa of $l,l«),$5,0iiO &$inoo«- 
bear sir oer c nt l-i-en^st In currency, payable January 1 and July 1, and matuie 
$9 years from their dat ■■ 

CHANGES IM THB EiJIUEfilHING AGEi^TS UP NATIONIL USU. 

The following are the changes in the Redeeming AgPntB of 
National Banks approved sinco the 2d inst. These 
weekly changes are lurnished by, and published in accordance 
withan arrantreraent made with the Comptroller of the Currency ■ 



Ohio— 

Urbana . . . 
New York- 

Poudam. 



WlKonain— 
Esa Claire. 



HAVB or BAHK. 

The Third National 

Bank 

The National Bank. 



The First National 
Bank 



Hlehlnn- 
Big%ipidf . . 

Alabama— 
B.irpli.gham. 



The Northern Na- 
tional Bank 

The National Bank. 



BBDXB1IIH8 ASBNT. 

The Itnporters' and Traders' National 

Bank of New York, approved . 
The Importers' and Traders' National 
. ^.'J"'?"""'''"''^' spproved in place 

of The National Bank of North Am- 

ericA, New York. 
The Central National Bank of New 

York an 1 The Second National Bank 

of Chicago, approved. 
The Third NaUonal Bank of Chicazo 

approved. ' 

The Second National Bank of Louis- 

vllle. approved. 



Cateat JlTonetarB ani> Commercial (Englial) Netua. 



RAXKS OF EXCHANGB AT LONDON, AND ON LONDON 
AT LATEST DATBS. 



KXCHANQK AT LONDON- 
DECEMBER 20. 



AmBterdam , 

Antwerp 

Hamburg 

Paris 

Paris 

Vienna 

Berlin 

Frankfort .. 
St. Peteraborg 

Odiz 

Lisbon. ... 

Milan 

Qenoa 

Naples 

New York . 
Kio de Janeiro 

Bahia 

Valparaii'o ... 
Peruarabuco . . 

Singapore 

Hong Kong... 

Shanghai 

Ceylon 

Bombay 

Madras 

Calcutta 

Sydney 



short. 
3 months, 



short. 
3 mouths. 



90 days. 
3 months. 



60 days. 
60 days. 



12. 1 
24.76 



IS. » 

_S5.80 

30.50 @30.54 

2:,M ia25.62X 

25 90 .®26. 

11.3«>i@'1..37>< 

6.25 (at6.i&}i 

1I9X®:I!IJ< 

31>i@. .. 

52>i(a52S' 
28.70 ©2,1.75 
28.70 ©28.75 
28.70 ©28-75 



4« 
4s. 



U. WKd- 
U. 1 %<i. 

i« loy.d. 

1 p. c. dis. 



KXCHANQK ON LONDO^I. 



LATEST 
OATS. 



Dec- 80. 



Dec. 20. 



Dec. 20. 
Nov. 58 
Nov. 2G. 
Oct. 13. 
Nov. 28. 

De<!l'i9. 
Dec. 19. 

Dec.' 18. 

Dec "iB. 



short. 



3 mos. 
short. 



3 mos. 
short 



60 da vs. 
90 days. 



6 mos. 

6 mos. 
6 mos. 



12.05 
25.40 
13. 3 
25.56 

109.76 

IIBH 



109X 
25>4'it26 
2JX6aii 
45X 
26X 



4«. r,iid. 
6<. Did. 

1». nV-l6<J. 

1 llXai 11 T-16 



IFrom our own correspondent. | 

London, Saturday, December 21. 

The closing weeks of the year are usually remarkable for the 
scanty supply of news. Whether it be in monetary or commer 
cial circles, there is no disposition to embark largely in fresh 
transactions ; but, on the contrary, a desire is evinced to close as 
far as practicable the engagements of the year. Hence businoss 
on the Stock Exchange, this week, has been of an exceedingly 
moderate character, and has been only augmented by the fact that 
in consequence of the diminifhed facilities accorded to speculators 
by the German and Ai<8trian banks, the prices of foreign stocks in 
Germany have rapidly declined, the result of which has been that 
an absorption here ha» been in active progress. Money being rather 
abundant in this market, many firms have taken advantage of the 
depression existing in Germany, and have effected what appear to 
be very favorable investments in foreign stocks and in Lombardo 
Venetian shares. It is well known that there has been in Ger- 
many this' year a wild speculation, and that the operators on 
the German and Austrian Bourses have had considerable 
influence upon the money markets. The introduction of new 
companies has been rapid ; numerous Investments have been 
made, and the banks have been freely resorted to to borrow upon 
•lock, with a view to operate on an extensive a scale as pos 
sible. There has, as a matter of course, been an abundance ot 
accommodation paper which has, as usual, been a prominent 
source of trouble. Latterly, however, the banks have deter- 
mined to check the current, and have demanded much higher 
rates for advances upon stock, and also, one would presume, for 
" finance " bills. The effect is immediate — unhealthy speculation 
is ended, and those who have traded beyond their means are com' 
polled to realize a part of their capital, or what is more prob- 
able, are forced to sell their pawned stock, and trade within their 
means. The German banks have only done what the Bank of 
England did when the rate was advanced to seven per cent> 
viz: to refuse to negotiate finance bills. Such a course is, pet. 
haps, not always desirable ; but that it is necessary when the 
resources of the bank are at a low ebb is unquestionable. The 
" clean out " in Germany will be productive of good, for although 
many weak firuis will no doubt break down, a healthier state of 
things will exist. 

Sound as the commercial position of the country appears to have 
been, the year is closing with numerous failures^ chiefly in Man- 
chester. The suspensions have been latterly very numerous, and 
for considerable amounts, and there are, as usual, grave fears 
that others must follow. 

There has been a steady demand for money during the week, 
and the rates of discount have ruled firm. To a considerable 
extent the inquiry has been incidental to the close of the year, 
but easier quotations are anticipated as soon as the year is fairly 
passed. The Bank return indicates this for the proportion of 
reserve to liabili iea is now as much as 53 per cent. It is prob- 
able, therefore, that the rate of discount may be reduced to 4 per 
cent., a point which would no doubt give birth to a large amount 
of finance paper in connection with the Frencn loan and Indem- 
nity payments, and lead once more to a commotion iA the money 



January 11, 13T8.J 



THE CHRONlCUi 



43 



market. There Is do doubt that we shall be liable to those dis' 

turbances as long as France is so largely indebted to Qerman;' 

and influential firms here are assisting in the operation. The 

quotations for monej are as follows : 

Per cent. Percent. 

6 4 months' bank bills *K&^H 

6 months' bank bills *HQA% 

■*K&- ■ ■ * uQd mouths' trade bills. 4^(^X 



Bank rate 

Open-market rates : 

80 and 60 cUys' bills. 

8 mouths' bills i>i'^A 

The rates of interest allowed by the joint stock banks and 

discount houses for deposits are subjoined : 

Per cent . 

Joint stock banks 4 

Discount houses at call 4 

Discount huuecs with 7 days' notice 4)^ 

Discount bouses with 14 days' notice. . . *ii 

The following are the quotations for money at the leading Conti- 
nental cities : 



Bank Open 
rate, market 
per cent, per cent 

Lisbon snd Oporto 7 7 

St. Petersburg B 8 

Brussels 5 6 

Turlu, Florence and 

Rome 5 B 

Antwerp 

Belgium 



Bank Open 
rate, market. 
per cent, per cent. 

Paria 5 4Ji-5 

Amsterdam S B 

Hamburg 4>|' 

Berlin B B 

Frankfort B S 

VIennaand Trieste.... 1H 7>f 
Madrid, Cadiz and Bar- 
celona 6 6 

There has been a strong demand for foreign bills of exchange 

and the rates are lower. The large purchases of foreign stocks 

In Germany naturally create a demand for remittance. Gold is 

not wanted for export ; but silver is rather dearer. The Jollow- 

iog prices of bullion are from the circular of Messrs, Pixley 

Abell, Langley & Blake : 

GOLD. 

BarQold per oz. standard, last price. 

Bar Gold, fine per oz standard, do. 

Bar Gold, KeSnable per oz. standard, do. 

bouth American Doubloona per oz. 

United Sutes Gold Coin peroz. 

aiLTIR. 

Bar Silver, Fine per ox. standard , last price. 

Bar Silver, containing 5 grs. Gold, ...peroz. standard, do. 

Fine Cake Silver per oz. 

llezlcan Dollars per oz., last price, new, 4 lOH' old, BU 

Five Franc Pieces per oz ., none he-re <^ ... 

The following statement shows the present position of the Bank 

of England, the Bank rate of discount, the price of Consols, 

the average quotation for English Wheat, the price of Middling 

Upland Cotton, of No. 40 Mule Yarn fair second qualitj , 

and the Bankers' Clearing House return compared with the 

four previous years : 

1809. 1870. 1871. 

£ £ £ 

aj,155.076 S.1,75r),7.?J 24.601,044 

8,013,647 7,419,921 e,49a,g57 

17.S'.»,112 17,8:5,283 20,526,251 

13,811,953 12 925,S53 15,001,028 

18,088,159 15,876,568 16,233,590 



The wtather, not only here, but on th« continent alao, hM b«en 
wetter than ever. The rainfall haa been unusaally leTere, and 
many parts of the country are flooded. The quantity of land 
under winter wheat cultivation is much below the average, a fact 
of serious importance should the spring be backward and un- 
propitious. The wheat trade, however, haa been wanting in 
animation as usual at this period of the year, but good and fine 
qualities of produce command full rates. The condition of the 
English supplies is still very unsatiofactory. 

The following figures show the imports and export* of 
grain, &c., into and from the United Kingdom since harvest, viz., 
from September 1 to the close of last week, compared with the 
corresponding periods in the three previous years : 

IMPORTS. 

1971. 18TI. 1870. 1WS. 

Wheat cwt. ie.7ao.8?7 IB.SK.Wi t,S7».;M a.oeM,OM 

Barley B,tW,»t S,Blii,M7 1,8I8,M60 8.ttl.8«S 

Outs 8.274.873 1,0«(,1IT 1,087.807 t,1»l.r3 

Peas 498.618 IW,184 181.30: 444.eiil 

Beans 788,8:4 1,1CS,748 48.\M» 1.018.076 

IndianCom 8,080,443 6,810,010 t,4M,tM S,n«0,7IS 

Flour 1,951,443 1,167,148 1.878,147 1,077,4:< 

KXP0KT8. 



s. d. s. d. 

77 9 © .... 

77 9 © .... 

77 11 © .... 

73 6 © 78 8 

76 8 © .... 

>. d. s. d. 

. 4 11H®4 llJi 

B @B UX 

no price 



1863. 
Circulation, including £ 

bank post bills !3,374,.372 

Public deposits 6,89'.). 705 

Other deposits n,8."0,7Ha 

Government securities. 14,121,874 

Other securities 18,339,395 

Reserve of notes and 

coin 10,351,438 

Coin and bullion 13,291,621 

Bank rate 6 p, c. 

Consols .. MXd. 

Price of wheat 49s. 5d. 

Mid. Upland cotton .. 10)id. 
lio.40 mule yam fair id 

quality l9. IXd. 

Clearing House return. 



11.578 677 
19,2.13,611 

"fed" 
43s, lOd. 
UXd. 

IJ. 8Xd. Is. l),'d. Is. axd. 



14.867,902 


15,864.648 


22.8a4,4';7 


24.933,288 


2X p. c. 


3 p. c. 


91Xd. 


92«d. 


B2s. 5d. 


B63. 5d. 


8Xd. 


JO 5-16d. 



1878 

£ 
24.660,225 

10,242,82S 
n,442,Wl 
13,275,2,19 
17,961,439 

14,576,767 
23,844,492 

6 p, c. 

9IJid, 
568. 6d, 

10)4 d. 

Is, 3d. 



Wheat cwt. 

Barley 

Oats 

Peas 

Beans ...•. 

Indian Com 

Flour 



101.442 1,4&4,1U 1.088.833 196.148 

8,529 8,110 11.954 BO.MT 

12,044 Hl.om S^\.*ii 80.1M 

1.421 3.S04 M.sa0 4,48S 

632 1,1107 4.2.11 831 

B.7IS 10.:'2» 17,945 178 

6,617 13,996 874.401 14.»M 



EuKllata market Keporta— Per Cable. 

Thednily closing quotations in the markets of London and T,iver. 
pool for the past week have been reported by submarine telegraph 
as shown in the following summarv : 

London Money and Stock Market. — American seearities close 
at an advance on the prices of a week ago. 

The bullion in the Bank of England has Increased £37,000 the 
past week. The rate of discount haa been reduced \, and is now 
4i per cent. 

Bat Men. Toes. Wed. Thnr. FrI. 
Oonsols for money il% »1^ SI 9SK 'Xtii HK 



account yiK 92X Kii 

U. S. 6s(5-208,)1865,old... 92^ 91^ A3X 

1867 92K OS WH 

U.S.10-40S 89 89K 89X 

New 88 90 WX »"« 



MX vtH Wi 

SSM NX M/? 

MV MW MX 

BNJK mn m^ 

«ox KH nH 



The daily quotations (or United States Os (1863) at Frank 
fort were : 



Frankfort. 



96X 



96H 96X <6H 



83,335.000 120,802,000 128,625,000 



The astounding news that Jay Gould has offered to refund to 
the Erie Railway the whole of the amount claimed by the drec- 
tors has naturally caused great excitement in the market for 
Erie railway shares. On Friday, dealing in them was very 
active, and the quotation, which was 48 on Thursday night, was 
as high ag 5!}. The closing price last night was 49 to 49i, and 
to-day the market has been quiet, the highest quotation having 
been 50}. 

Other departments of the Stock Exchange have been quiet, 
but owing to the tendency to easier money, a firm tone is appar- 
ent. Next week will be a holiday week, and in the following 
week there will be an account to adjust, as well as a holiday on 
New Year's Day, so that very little fresh business is expected thig 
year. The new year, however, is likely to open with consider- 
able buoyancy. The following were the closing prices of con- 
sols and the principal American securities this afternoon : 

Consols X 91J4@ 92 

United states 6 per cent B-SO bonds, ex 4-6 , .... 90K© 91K 

do Sdseries 91X© 91Ji 

do 1865i8sue ....91 © ta"t' 

do 1867 Issue ...X 91Ji@ 92>i 

do B per cent. 10-40 bonds, ex 4-6 8iiX© 88X 

do B per cent Funded Loan, 1871,^cx 4-6 89)4® 89J{ 

Atlantic and Ot West., 8 per cent. Debent's. Blschoffsheltri's ctfe.. 48 ® BO 
DittoConmlldatedBuuds, 7 per cent.,BischoS'sheim'scertiflr3tes, S3 © 36 

Ditto IdtMortpage, 7 percent bonds 77 © 78 

Ditto 2d Mi)rt(;ai,'e, 7 per cent bonds 63 ©64 

Ditto 3d Mortgage... 285<© 29>tf 

Erie Shares, ex A WJ^a 5' 

Ditto 8 per cent. Convertible Bonds SIX© 92X 

Illinois Central Shares. $100 pd., ex 4-6 9»xaiO()X 

Illinois and St. Louis Bridge, li-t mort 97 

Louisiana per cent. Levee Bonds BO 

Maasachusetts 5 per cent, sterling bds, 1900 94 

N«w Jersey United Canal and Rail bds 99 

Panama Gen. Mort, 7 per cent, bonds, 1897 01 

Pennsylvania Gen. Mort, 6 per ct, bds, 1910 96 

Vlrglniu 6 per cent, bgnds, ex 44 46 



Liverpool Cotton Markit. — See special report of cotton. 
Liverpool Breadstugs Market. — This market cIom* dall a 

a decline in quotations. 

Sat. Mon. Tues. Wed. Thnr. Fri. 

B. d. s. d. 8. d. *. d. ■. d. ■. d. 

Plonr (Western) « bbl 30 800 800 800 800 196 

Wtieat(l<ed W'n. spr)..ttctl 11 6 II 6 11 6 11 6 11 8 11 < 

" ated Winter) " II 12 18 11 11 11 

" (Cal. White club) " 13 3 13 3 13 1 18 1 18 1 18 

Corn (W.m'dl now » quarter 28 9 889 188 MS 186 M3 

Barley fCanadlan)....* bush 36 3 6 36 36 86 31 

Oats(Am. &Can.)....ipbn»h 3 2 32 31 31 31 SI 

Peas (Canadian)... V Quarter 39 39 39 39 89 88 6 

Liverpool Provinoni Market. — Lard and cbee^e havj ad. 
vanced ; other prices exhibit a decline. 

Sat. Mon. Toes' Wed. Tbur. FrI. 

t. d. t. d. a. d. 8, d, s. d, s. d. 

Beef(Pr. mess) new* tee.. MO 980 960 980 986 966 

Pork (Pr. mess) new »bb'. 630 680 630 630 630 81 6 

Bacon (Cum. cut) news cwt 360 88 6 366 86 6 360 U 9 

Lard (Amiriean) ..." 3? 37 37 37 3 87 6 87 6 

ChccsefAmer'nane) " B30 680 630 630 640 650 

Liwrpool Produce Market. — Common rosin and tallow hava 
advanced, while spirits petroleum has declined. 

Sat. Mon. Tues. Wed. Thnr. FrI. 

8. d. 8. d. 8. d. 8. d. 8. d. 8. d. 

Ro8ln(com. N. C.)...»cwt. 9 9 10 10 6 18 6 10 6 10 » 

" flue ■• 16 16 16 16 16 16 

Petroleum(reflned)....»gal 1 9J< 1 9X 1 «« ' »X | W } J 

(spirits) « 14 14 14 14 14 11 

TalIow(Amcrican)...» cwt 43 43 U 43 43 4.1 44 6 

CloverseedCAm.red) 42 42 42 42 8 « 41 

Spirits turpentine...* cwt. 44 44 44 44 44 44 

London Produce and Oil Jfarfcif*.— Calcutta linseed has 

advanced 3d. and linseed oil has declined 53. since last Friday. 

Bat. Mon. Tues. Wed. -ThBr. Fri. 

£ s. d. £ s. d. £ 8. d. £ s. d. £ ». d. « 8. d. 

UnB'dc'ke(obl).»tnlO 10 10 10 10 « >« » J 

Uu86ed(Calcutta):... 640 640 640 640 648 643 

8ugar(No.l2D'ohstd) „, „ 

nn «nnt SB rwt 336 836 33 6 33 • "*•_.«• 

Sn^rA% «itou9a 09100M009100 WOOWOo 

^hl^o •"40 10 « 10 40 10 40 10 10 10 40 10 9 

Unseed oil.'.'.'.. " 34 83 15 33 15 83 15 83 IB 81 IS , 



COMMERCIAL AND MISCELLANEOUS NEWS. 

Imports and Exports for the Wbbk.— The Import* this 
week show a decrease in both dry 8<x^!- *";J ^°«'*' '°"- 
chandise. The total imports amount to $6,286,904 this week, 
against 14,575,759 last week, and ^6,912,075 '»" PJ^^.^I^T^.^- 
The exports are $3,513,908 this week, against $4,107,880 lait 



-44 



TfiE CHRONiCLR 



[January ll, lbT3. 



week, and f!4,784,886 the previous week. The exports of cotton 
the past week wore 18,205 bales, against 0,659 bales last week. 
The following are the imports at New York for week ending 
(for dry aoods) Jan. 3, and for the week ending (for general 
merchandise') Jan. 3 : 

roaKiaN ixpobts at Haw tobk roB th» itkek. 



1870. 

11,897,855 

8,2S5,M0 



1871. 

11,44:).50T 
2,483,747 



137*. 

$1,4.«,C23 
6,06<,984 



1873. 

$1,499,643 

4,787,561 



54.654,895 t3,927,i54 $7,495,607 $6,586,904 



Orj (foods 

General merchandise... 

» ■ Total for tic week. . 

Prevloualy reported 

Since Jan. 1 $4,552,895 $3,927,254 $7,495,607 $6,286,904 

In our report of the dry goods trade will be found theimponsof 

dry goods for one week later. , . . 

The following is a statement of the exports (exclusive of specie, 

from the port of New York to foreign ports, for the week ending 

Jan. 7 : 

EXPORTS FROM NTBW YORK TOR THB WEEK 

1870. 1871. 1872. 1878. 

Tor the week $3,518,756 $4,774,187 $2,209,95', $3,513,006 

PreriouBly reported 2,174,516 4,187,739 3,199,iC9 

Since Jan. 1 $6,693,878 $8,961,926 $5,409,162 $3,513,900 

The following will show the exports of specie from the port of 
New Yf'k for the week ending Jan. 4, 1873, and since the 
beginning of the year, with a comparison for the corresponding 
date in previous years : 

Jan. 1— Str. Ocean Qaeen, 
Gnayaqull - 

American gold coin $15,010 

American si K-er coin 101, 102 

Jan. 3 - Str. Thurjngia, Ply- 
mouth — 

Silver hars 184,179 

Jan. 4— Sir. Cnba, Liverpool- 
Silver liars 304,884 



Jan. 4— Str. Bremen, South- 
ampton — 

Mexican silver coin $7,000 

Mexican silver bullion.... 3J,S31 
Jan. 4— Str. City of New York, 
Liverpool— 

Silverbara 179,448 

Gold bars 1.975 



Totw for the weett $831,919 

Previously reported 



Total since Jan. 1, 1873 

Same time in 

1878 $3,414 

1371 481,997 

1870 4-2.h70 

1869 745.628 

The imports ot specie at this 
been as follows: 
Dec 27— Brig T. Towner, Sav- 
anilift— 

Unknown $862 

Deo. 30— Str. Ocean Queen, 
Asaiuwall — 
Gold 528 

Total for the week $27,160 

Previously reported 5,547.31 ! 



$831,919 

Same time In 

1868 $5,537,394 

1867 1.695,310 

1866 1,192,630 

port during the past week have 

Unknown 676 

Silver 2,'.00 

Dec. 30— Str. City of Havana, 
Havana — 

American silver 2,927 

Unknown 20,0ii7 



Total since January 1, 1878 $6,574,471 

Same tune In I Same time in 

1871 $8,618,290 ! 1869 $14,918,725 

1870 11,581,77111868 7,163,071 

— The citizens of Louisville, Ky.. have voted in favor of loan 
ingcity bonds to the amount of $1,000,000 to the Elizabethtownand 
Paducah Railroad Company, to enable the company to build an 
independent line into the city. The road now ends at Elizabeth- 
town, a point on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, forty-five 
miles from the city. 

Atlantic, Tennessee and Oblo Railroad.— The following 
letter explains itself : 

CnAHLOTTE, X. C, Deo. 27, 1873. 
Itesara. W. B^ P.irA & Co., Publishers. 

jPentlb:.»:e.n — I have been shown an article in your issue of 
NJv-. jOtb, under the title of "An Explanation Wanted." The 
^iter says the designation of tha "first mortgap:e bonds of the 
Atlantic, Tennessee and Ohio Railroad Company's bsaring 8 per 
cent, interest," in an advertisement in the Charlotte Observer is a 
misnomer as to the bonds; it there is no fraudulent purpose in 
making ouch an advertisement. 

He then states that the company executed a mortgage and 
issued bonds, and that a large number of such bonds are still 
outstanding, &c. This is true in part. In 1863 the company did 
execute a mortgage and issue bonds, but of this confederate issue 
all have been redeemed except about $85,000 bonds and coupons. 
These bonds having been issued during the late war and sold 
for confederate currency have been decided by the Supreme Court 
of the State of North Carolina to be subject to the confederate 
scale in the case of S. B. Alexander vs. the Atlantic, Tennessee 
and Ohio Railroad Company at its last June term. The scale 
would reduce the value of the $85,000 outstanding to about 
$53,000 in greenbacks. As by an act of Congress the United 
States Courts conform their decisions as far as practicable to 
those of the State Courts but little doubt can be entertained of 
the result in the case pending. Had the holders of these bonds 
agreed to accept payment according to this decision of the Su- 
preme Court the company would have paid the last one of them 
as they are now ready to do ; although some of the bonds are not 
yet due. 

Besides, before offering to sell one of their mortgage gold bonds 
the company caused to be placed in the hands of R, A. Lancaster 
(Trustee in the mortgage), of the House of Lancaster, Brown 
& Co., New York, $90,000 of its 8 per cent, gold bonds as a secu- 
rity for the redetuption ot the 6 per cent confederate bonds and 
coupons of the nominal or par value of $85,000. * * * * 

William Johnston, President 

Barnum's Last Fire.— Tb tfie Editor Commekcial and Fi- 

NANCI.\L CiinONlCLE — SiR : As everybody knows Barnum, the 

following characteristic letter will interest the public. — Her- 

BIHGS & Fakkel. New Yobk, Jan. 2, 1873.— Jtfe««r«, Herrings 



<6 Farrel, No. 251 Broadway, JVew Fcr^— Gentlemen : Your 
safes, at the burning of my museums in 1865 and 18(58, preserved 
my books and papers intact, and 1 am now glad to say tliat the 
safe just dug from our ruins, when opened, gave me a like satis- 
factory result. Not a figure is defaced on my books or papers, 
and the bank notes and all other property contained therein are 
as fresh as when placed there. Tiuly yours, — P. T Barnum. 

The .x:tna Fire Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 
— A full meeting of the stockholders of this comiiany was held 
at the office of the company on December 30, to con- 
sider the financial condition of the company with a vie w to supply 
any deficiency which should appear in its capital. It was voted 
to reduce the capital of the company from $3,000,000 to $3,000,000. 
It was then voted to increase the stock to $3,000,000 by the issue 
of new stock, which is first to be offered pro rata to tie present 
stockholders. The meeting was unanimous in this action. 

— The United States Life Inanrance Company presents its an- 
nual statement in this number of The Chronicle, and we invite 
the attention of our readers to its exhibit. The business of the 
year just closed shows a very large percentage of increase over 
that of tha previous year — in number of policies issued 08 )ier 
cent, and in amount of insurance 77 per cent — while its loans on 
policies have decreased 43 per cent. The investments of the com- 
pany are such that its entire assets are available, and in an 
emergency could be used without delay or loss. Those who are 
familiar with the science of Life Insurance, however, will under- 
stand that the tables of mortality are regular and exact, and the 
business is not liable to such disasters as have frequently of late 
befallen the business of Fire Insurance. 

The statement shows careful r-anagement on the part of tha 
officers of the company, and its surplus of $991,,558 93, or more 
than 33 per cent of its liabilities, speaks well for their sagacity. 
In studying this report our readers will bear in mind that it is 
not a " made up " statement, but is taken, as our bank statements 
are, " from the books of the company at the close of business," on 
the 31st of December, and was given to the public on the 4th of 
January. 

— In another part of this paper will be found the card of Messrs. 
Jacob R. Shipherd & Co., Bankers, offering for sale the first mort- 
gage extension bonds of the South Side Railroad of Long Island. 
These bonds bear seven per cent interest, payable March and 
September, and are issued for the purpose of extending the road 
from Patchogue to a junction with the Sag Harbor branch of the 
Long Island Railroad, and for extending the double track of the 
line. 

— The interest due the first Monday in January on the bonds of 
the State of Alabama are payable on presentation of the coupons at 
the banking-house of Henry Clews & Co., who have recently been 
appointed financial agents of the State of Alabama. Messrs. Clews 
& Co. entertain very hopeful views of the financial prospects of 
the State. 

— Mr. Charles W. Hassler, well known as a prominent broker 
in miscellaneous railroad bonds, has admitted ns a partner in his 
business Mr. G. A. Robertson, late with McKim Brothers & Co. 
Having made railroad bonds a special study, Mr. Hassler has be- 
come an authority in matters pertaining thereto, particularly as 
to that numerous class of bonds not sold at the Exchange. 



BANKING AND FINANCIAL. 

BANKlNG^Fi\[C^E"oi^S]KTHATCH, 

New York, Jan. 10, 1873. 

The CHESAPEAKE and OHIO, the CENTRAL and WEST- 
ERN PACIFIC BONDS, all of which have been negotiated by 
us, we believe to be among the best and most desirable Invest 
ment Securities in the market, which in time must become very 
scarce ; especially as the Government will probably, during 
this year, pay off in gold another large lot of Fivk-Twenties, 
and issue in their place Five Per Cent. Bonds. 

The CHESAPEAKE AND OHIO SIX PER CENT. GOLD 
BONDS, the total amount of which is only $15,000,000, are 
secured upon a property worth $35,000,000 to $40,000,000, and 
are fully equal in intrinsic value to the Central Pacific Bonds. 
They are issued in denominations of $100, $500 and $1,000, cou- 
pon or registered, and at their present market price, 86 and ac- 
crued interest, are very desirable. 

The CENTRAL PACIFIC SIX PER CENT. GOLD BONDS 
are too well known to require description or commendation 
Their total amount is $25,885,000 ; they have for a long time 
ranged in market price near or above par. 

The WESTERN PACIFIC SIX PER CENT. GOLD BONDS 
amount to $2,735,000. This road is now consolidated with the 
Ckntral Pacific, and the payment of its bonds, principal and 
interest, is assumed by the latter. Coupon Bonds, $1,000 each. 
Their market price to-day is 89J to 89}. Aa they have recently 
been introduced on the Stock Exchange, we expect to see 
them rapidly rise to the price of Central Pacifios, being 
substantially the same in character and value. 

We buy and sell, as usual. Government Bonds, receive deposits, 
on which we allow interest, make collections, and conduct a gene- 
ral banking busine is in all its branches. 

FISK & HATCH, 



January 11, 1«78.] 



THE CHRONICLE. 



45 



TO INVESTORS. 

To those who wish to REINVEST JANUAKY COUPONS OR 
DIVIDENDS, and those who wish to INCKEASE THEIR IN- 
COME from means alreddy|invested in other less proBtalile securi- 
ties, we recommend the Seven-Thirty Gold Bonds of the Northern 
Pacific Railroad Company as well secured and unusually produc- 
tive. 

The bonds are always convertible at Ten per cent, premium 
(1*10) into the Company's Lands at Market Prices. The Rate of 
Interest (seven and three-tenths per cent, gold) is equal now to 
about 8J currency — yielding an income more tlian one third 
greater than U. S. 5-20's. Gold Cliecks for the semi-annual inter- 
est on the Registered Bonds are mailed to the Post Office address 
of the owner. All marketable stocks and bonds are received in 
exchange for Northern Pacifies ON MOST FAVORABLE TERMS. 
JAY COOKE & CO., 
New York, Philadelphia, and W^ashington, 

Financial Agents Northern Pacific Railroad Co. 

TO GUARDIANS AND lEXECUTORS. 

THE EQUITABLE TRUST COMPANY— Capital, $1,000,000— 
are offering First Mortgage Real Estate Bonds, guaranteed by 
themselves, at par and accrued interest. Every Bond is secured 
by Real Estate of double value, appraised under the most rigid 
rules, and approved by the following Executive Committeu: 
Robert Leno.^ Kenedy, Adri.^n Iselin, John D. Maxwkix, 
Ch.\rles Butler, Samuel Willets, Eugene Kell\, Peter 
McMartin, W^m. Remsen and Henry P. Haven. 

JoN.^THAN Edwards, President, No. 78 Cedar Street, N.Y. 

Banking Hodsb op Henry Clews & Co., > 
33 Wall street, N. Y. f 

Bills of Exchange, Circular Notes, Travelers' and Commercial 
Credits issued available la all parts of the world. 

Deposits received, subject to check on demand. Interest 
allowed on all Daily B dances, every accommodation and facility 
afforded usual with City Banks. 



mONEIT TO LOAN ON COTTON IN STORE. 

R. M. V\rATERS & CO,, 
56 Broad street. 

^I)e bankers' <©a?ette. 



DIVIDENDS. 

The tollowlnff DlviJenda have been declared darlne the past week ; 



Company. 



Railroads. 

Lake Shore & Michigan Southern. 
Cheshire prcf. 



Ogdcnsburj^ & Lake Champlaln 

Julnois Ceutr.il 

Louisvill.) & NaaUvillc 

Liitle Schuylkill Nav., BR. Sn Coal Co .. 

Cleve., Col., Cin. & lud , 

MInehill & Schuylkill Haven 

Southern Koilway Securily 

ilanlis. 

Brooklyn 

New "i ork Gold Exchanfje 

First National (Yonkers.N, Y.) 

Insurance. 

Park Fire 

Empire City Fire 

Knickerbocker Fire 

" " extra 

New York Equitable 

Tradesmen's Fire • 

Mechanics' & Tiwlers' Fire 

Globe Fire 

Germanift Fire 

TJnltert States Fire 

Long Island 

Manufacturers' & Builders' Fire ', 

Stuyvesant Fire 

inisceUaneus. 

United States Express (quarterly) 

Manhattan Telegraph Co. . . 

Saginaw Valley Land. Salt & Mineral Co! 



Feb 

Cent. 



4 
$3 
3 
6 
3 
8X 

4 free. 

8X 

5 free. 
3 free. 
5 free. 

8 
5 



When 
P'ablk. 



BooKj Closed. 



Jan. 10 to Feb. 4. 



Feb. 1. 

Jau. 15. 

Jan. IS. 

Ful). 1. Jan. 16 toF.-b. 5. 

Feb. l.'Jan. 10 to Feb. 1 

on dem.l 

Feb. 3. 'Jan. 10 to Fob. 4 
Jan. 16. 
Jan. SO. 

ondem. 
Jan. 15. 
Jau. 10. 



Dec. 23 to Jan. 31. 



Jan. 13 to Jan. 16. 



ondem, 

on dem 

.^free. iJan. 15. 



6 free. 
10 

S 
10 

6 

S 

7 

7 

5 



6 
30cts. 



Jau. 6 to Jau. 1.5. 
Jan. 6 to Jan. IS. 



Jan. 15. 
Jan. 13. 
on dem 
ondem. 
on dem, 
on dem. 
on dem. 
on dem. 
Jan. 10. 
on dem. 



Feb. I.Jan. 20 to Feb. 3. 

on dem. 

Jan. n.l 



Fkidat Bvenins, Jan. 10, 18:3. 
The money Warket.-The opinion which we ventured to give 
in our last report that there would not be a material relaxation in 
the money market before the 10th of the month, has proved to be 
tolerably correct. There was a temporary decline to eaaier lates 
on Saturday afternoon, the 4th instant, which continued to some 
extent on Monday, but the market soon hardened again, and rates 
have since ranged from 7 per cent gold to a commission of 1-64, 
1-32, and in some cases to 1-16 per day. This afternoon there 
waa a material break in the high rates, and after three o'clock loane 



■were made at 5'®? per cent per annum. These lower rate* mar 
not be permanent, though the f.oa haa certainly arrired when 
our money market sliould have • more abundant supply of loan- 
able funds, and call loans be obuinable at 6(^7 p<>r cent. It has 
been suspected by some, tliat parties intereatod to keop up rat«« 
liave endeavored to make monny app<>ar acarca in order to get 
daily commissions for a tittle while longer, but ii is evident that U 
such has been their action this week, it cannot be kept up long 
when money becomes really abundant. One of the featunaof tUa 
market has been the appearance again of an excaaalve supply of 
National bank notes, which have been loaned for a time, within 
certain limitations, free of interest, provided the loww wtre re> 
turned in legal tenders. 

The lust instalment of the Government money put into the 
New York city banks to give relief to the money market early in 
October was withdrawn January 4. The total amount sodtpo- 
Bit*-d with the banks October 7 and 10 was |6,023,:i87 SO. and 
it has been withdrawn as stated below. The amount of currency 
paid out on bond purchases and the amount taken into the Trea- 
sury on soles of gold are also shown below aa condensed from a 
statement in tlie Eoeninij Pvd : 

BoiTD rracBAtn. 

Amt of 



^DEPOSITS VITHDRAWK. | 


Date. 


Amount. 


November 1... 


. »«0.00i 


15. . 


. aoo.uoo 


21.. 


. 595,S«8 


21.. 


. B2'.8S! 


87.. 


602,33)1 


December 4.. 


. i.aM,r.7; 


17.. 


. IMUMt 


January 4. . 


. I,3l9,8l« 


Total 


. vfia^ 



Date. 
November •.. 

IS.. 

SO.. 

96 . 
December 4.. 

».. 
January 8. 



Cur'ncy 
p'dou'. 
ins.tO! 
1,19(A» 
IXS, <t 

6 ijtn 

4M.S:8 
33,297 



OOLO (ALU. 

Amt. of 

Car'ncj 

Date. tak'D to. 

norci.ber 7.... tl,l»,WI 

14.... I,ISI.»H 

21.... iism 
«... i.m.sM 

December 5.... l,lM.OTt 



Jmxarj 




Total IS.5J9.512 Total t1UI2,4St 

It will thus be seen that the Treasury has taken since Novem- 
ber 1 $0,023,387. placed with the banks in October, and $11542,- 
480 for gold sold ; making a total of $17,38!),873 nearly all in 
letal tender notes. Against this the Treasury has paid out for 
5-208 purchased $-5,529,212, muking a net low to the banks of $11,- 
730,611, and as this was chiefly in legal tenders, the loss to the 
market was very much greater. 

There is quite an active business in commercial paper at 0(S13 
per cent as the quotable range for prime names, while a tendency 
towards lower rates is decidedly noticeable, and some very choice 
4 months paper has been sold at 8 per cent. 

From London the advices are favorable; the bank rate has been 
reduced to 4A per cent from 5, the previous figure, and money in 
the open market is reported 1@3 per cent lower than the Bank 
minimum. The Bank of France loses 1,333,000 francs In specie 
this week. 

The last statement of our New York City Banks (Jan. 4) showed 
an increase of $9o3,27.5 in the excess o! reserves. The total 
liabilitie? stood at $331,421,900 ; the t'ltal rPservc al 60,0-13,500, 
being $2,788,02.5 more than 25 per cent of the liabilities. 

The following statement shows the changes from previona week 
and a comparison with 1872 and 1871: 



Loans and dls. 

Bpecic 

Circulation . . . 



Dec. 23. 

. r-!"J.57!.4IO 
. 17 2I1.;'0j 
. 27.."3.(XX) 
. 19'.5i9.6(IO 



-1S73.- 



Netdepohlts., 

Lcuil tcniicrB ... Jl.iW.KiO 41.lt5.40O 



.Ian. 4. 

|2-.7.Ii'.-.»J0 

I9,4';».rj'j 

«,B1S.»10 
2 .1,8(18.100 



Differences. 
Inc.. |3.na.5(0 

Inc.. i.Jse^JO 

Inc . 40 SCO 
Inc.. 5,2185(10 
luc. 43.800 



1872. tSTl. 

Jan. 6 Jan. 7. 

»2T2.:00.4 i2«.1.'7S.(27 

28 8-.11.C00 ■.■C..-«i.l»I 

28.492.«ll) WlU.llS 

»S.8i8J0U XriJiii^Ui 

40.038,2(0 <!l,a3I,4l0 

securities have lieen 



I'nitcd States Bonda. — Government 
iitrong and active durmg all the week until to-day, when there 
was a slight check to the upward movement in prices, and some- 
what less business done. The advance tLis week up to last 
night was about IJ to 3 per cent on the popular ipsu'-s of five- 
twenties, but the reaction to-day carried prices back aiwut |@i 
per cent. As usual in every time of pharp demand for govern- 
ments in this market, a great scarcity^f bonds has been de- 
veloped, and parties having orders to put^^^^oond lots could 
only fill them by picking up pmall amount^tfVljnM^be ob- 
tained. The present demand has come both from ■^«eand 
foreign buyers, and in the case of a single banking house w«mPW 
heard of the shipment of $350,000, with the statement that tlMf 
might have sent out several millions had the bonds been obtain- 
able at satisfai tory prices. The present upward turn in Govern- 
ments, and the universal and increasing lavor with which they 
are regarded, has an important bearing upon the subject of the 
negotiation of the new 5 and 44 per cint bonds, and suggests very 
forcibly the inquiry, whether, under good management, it would 
be necessary for our Government to pay high commissions en the 
negotiation. 

On the Treasury advertisement for the purchass of |!,000,000 
five-twenties on Wednesday, only $71,500 were offered, and only 
$20,850 were accepted. 

Closing prices daily, and the range since Jan. 1, hiive been : 



Jan. Jau. Jan, 

4. 8. 7. 

Ss.fond, 1881,cp..*IlI«'!HX ... 

I«,1881, reg 114X !151« I15H 

»»!liw coup lli;< ll.'i), 'liSH 

j-ao'osea, coup... 'iiss "iian 

S.30*»H<i4, coup... IlSii USX 

5-aO'aH65, " ... 1131( n4X 

S.30'8l8fo,n" ... ll^V in 

5-20'8l8«7. •• .. USX 113H 

5-20'Bl968. " ... ".''H 111 

10-40'8. rcK 'lO^Jt '110 

lii-4a'B, coupon.... MUI linx 



•iwx 

I13H 
114)4 

114H 

ink 
i;oS 

UOM 

•;i2X 



Jan. Jan. 



•:iiK 

115S 
1I«K 
IIS« 
•USH 
114\ 
11S>< 
lUX 
119 
I!0V 
llOX 
113 



Jao 
10. 
112 M2S 
115X '.ISx 
116 Ml*), 
\U% • 13S 
114 "114 
U5H ""5K 
114 113% 
115X ■ 



115« 
111 
111 
113 



CurreocySNi 'IHX inS 

' This Is the price bid. no tali was made at the BoariL 
Closing prices of securities in LoiSdoB-k»Te 



.— Lowest. -N 

luH Jan. 

'.Uh Jan. 

li/K Jan. 

I13>( Jan. 

•fS Jan. 

112* .;an. 
•.!4!i: l:!H " 

'115 I 

•l|n|fl 
':10» 
112X 



\'f\ Ian 
II*?, ,I»n. 
DISK Jan. 
112X Jan. 




U.B.$>.5-20s,'65... 
IT. S.6s,5-3IIS. '67., 

U. 8.5s.l0-40a 

New 58 




Dec. 
27. 



46 



THE CHRONICLE. 



t January 11, 1873. 



state and Railroad Bond*. — There has not be^n much »c- 
tlvitv ill Southern State bonds, a limited number of transactions 
in Virginias and Tennessees, and a few sales of North and South 
Carolinas, having been the principal busioess. Missouri 63 have 
Bold at 921(303, and at tlese rates are apparently a cUeap State 
bond. The New York State Canal loan gold 6s of 1887 have 
been placed on call at the Stock Exchange. The interest payable 
January 1 on Virplnia bonds having been suspended by law, a 
committee of the State Senate is to confer with the representa- 
tives of the bondholders on February 3 proximo, and try to ar- 
range some terms of seUlement. Coupons of the Consols are 
quoted at 81, though thoy are not yet received in payment of 
taxes. 

Railroad bonds are in active request for the investment of 
January interest and dividends, and tlie transactions both iu old 
and new bonds have been of considerable amounts. Union Pa- 
cific bonds are depressed to-day by the Credit Mobilier investiga- 
tion, though it is difficult to see how the bona fide holders of these 
lionds at the present time will be at all injured by the investiga- 
tion. 

Closing prices daily, and the range since Jan. 1, have been : 



-Since Jan.l 



-Since Jan, i.— 



Jan. 



66T6nQ., old 81) 

BsTeun., nfw.... *;9V 
6«M.Car., old.... '33 
(■18 X. Car., new... 19 

6s Vlrft.,olil 

•* *' coiisolld'd — 

" " delerrca.. 'ISX 

6b3. C, n, J.4 J. ai)i 

«f> Missouri C3 

Cent.Pac. KOld.. 9'<S< 

Un.Pac.,191. i1% 

Uii. Pac.L'dOr't 'i^% 
Un. P. Income... «>j 
N.V. Cen,6B, 1883. '93 

KrlelBtm.78 

N.J. Cen Istm 7» lu.'s 
Ft Wayne Ut m i« "II'OS 
Chic* NW.sf 78 "lOOi 
Bock Isld 1st IP 7a lOUX 



Jan. 
6. 

eo 

ail 
•33 s 

•18 

51" 

•15X 
21)4 
93 

•MK 
S7X 

•aji 

83* 
•91 
101 
•lotX 

ma 

■101 

100 



Jan. 

7. 
•60H 

•811 
•38>S 



69 
M5X 

21 K 

98 
.99 

S7X 

79H 

a 

•34 
'lOlK 

lOiX ■ 
•1(13 
•101 ■ 



BOX 



■i\% 

99 Ji 
87 

7»X 
82 X 

lOlX 
'105 



Jan. 
9. 
81 

•8UK 
•3314 
•18 
••15 
•51 
•15 
ii 

9»H 
66X 
73X 

•:9 

92 

lOlX 
IIMM 



Jan 

10. 
30X 
•80K 
H 



103^ 'lOSJi 

100 

100 lOOM 



1.^ 
•22 
•92V 

M9-I, 

85 

77 

76 

93 

101)4 

-ifo" 

•loux 



-Since Jan.l 
^Lowest, ^ ^Highest 
',9% Jan. 3 "■ 



80 Jan. 
33H Jan. S 
19 Jan. 4 



54 Jan. 6 
15 Jan. 10 
21X Jan. 4 
92y Jan. 8 
99 Jan. 2 
85 Jan. 10 
77 Jan. 10 
76 Jan. 10 
92 Jan. 8 

101 Jan. 

iOS Jan. 

102M Jan. 



Jan. 
fOU Jan. 8 
31 Jan. 10 
19 Jan. 4 



55X Jan. 
15H Jan. 
22 Jxn. 
93 Jan. 

99M Jan. 

87X Jan. 

80 Jan. 
Oi 83V Jan. 
8| 93 Jan. 
6 lOlX Jan. 
4 103K Jan. 
6 1031-, Jan. 



Wi Jan. 6 HOOK Jan. 9 



* This IR the price bid. no »ale w as made at the Board. 

Railroad and Miscellaneous StocUs.— The stock market has 
not yet shown extraordinary activity since the commencement of 
the year, nor have there been very important fluctuations in 
prices this week, if we except the decline in Pacific Mail to 70 on 
Thursday, Union Pacific to 35i to-day, and the sharp rise in New 
York Central and Hudson to 104 this afternoon. The general 
position of the market does not appear to have changed materially 
since our last report, and it is said that the active support of 
lea'lin<r speculators is wanting to give the usual impetus to a 
reguUr bull cimpaiyn. The money market, however, has thus 
far been so stringent as to afford little inducement for outside 
parties to come in as purchasers, and with a material relaxation 
in money, it ia quite possible that stocks may advance. The 
special cause for an upward turn in Central to-day was found in 
the rumor of another stock dividend. 

llailroad earnings for the month ot December, so far as yet re- 
ported, were as follows : 



Krc™*HR. 99}< Jan. 8 KM Jaa.:0 Hann.ft8t.Jo8 t'KJan.lC 

Harlem 114>4 Jan. 6 115)4 Jai, 8 do do prel •;0 Jan. 2 

Krle ftJk'.'an.lu 64 Jan. 6 iPnlon Paciilc. R-'^X ■'»"• U' 

do pref 77X Jan. 6 80 . an. 10 Col. (■lilc.& I.C. S7 Jan. S 

LakeShsre »5V Jan. lOi 97 Jan. 6 Panama 128 Jan. V 

Wabash 7ax Jan. ui 75V Jan. 2 iWi-st [1 Teleg'h HX Jan. 

Norlhweat 80^4 Jan. 10 83X Jan. 4 jQuu-kBllver 16 Jan. 8 

do pref. Kt\*, -'an. s H''S Jan. 2 I do prel. — Jan. 
Rock Island.... 109X -Ian. 7 UIV Jaw. 2 iPaclllc Mall... 70 Jan. 

St. Paul 5:1)? Jan. 9 54)j Jan. 3 Adams Express 94V Jan. 7 

do pref 77 Jan. 10 77X -Ian. 8 Am Merch Un. 68)4 Jan. 8 

OhioftMiss... 1";(; Jan. 9| i'MZin. 2 |IT. R. ExpreBS... 79 Jan. 2 



Lowes .-s — Highest...^ 



ie.tralof N.J. 99)4 Jan. 
B )Bton, H. & £ 6)4 Jan. 
Del.. L. * W.. as Jan. 



^xpr . 
«:io;s -Ian. 2 IWellB. F.* Co. 

61 9)4 Jai. 8 iCanton 

71 94)4 Jan. M 



50M Jan. < 
71)4 Jan. e 
V>^ Jan. 4 
39X Jan. 9 
1.''0 Jan. a 
82X J'n. 9 
4«X Jan. 2 
— Jan. — 
71V Jan. il 
95 Jan. 7 
70X Jan. 8 
82 Jan. C 



102 



Jan.— — Jan. — 
Jan. i:103H Jan. « 



Lapsley & Bazley, Brokers, 47 Exchange place, quote stock 
privileges (.signed by responsible parties), 1 per cent premium 30 
days, and 1^@2 per cent tJO days, at prices varying from the mar- 
ket as follows : 



Pot«. Calls. 

Below. Above. 

Central ft Hndson.. >4al IV^'^X 

Lake Shore J4@l IX"2 

Rock Island i osll^ 2.,®3X 

Erie 3)4e3V 3X"<X 

PaclBc Mall 4 -6 6 ®8 

Noitliwestern 1 ftl)4 ...@... 



Pun. 

Below. 
West. rnionTel.... IX-.IX 
OhloA MIsbicElppl. VAl 

Union Pacific IJi'-lX 

Wabash 1 »V4 

C. U. & I. C 1 I'OX 

Gold X for 80 days.. V91 



Calls. 
Above. 
SX®3X 

2 d2)< 

3 (USX 

i 32X 



BJLII.BOAD XAnKINGB IN DECEHBER. 

1872. 



Atlantic &;Great Western 1404,1100 

Central Paciiic 1,007,1'..5 

Clilcago & .\ltoD 301,173 

Cleve., Col., Cin. & lud 3.37,404 

E;ie l,39i,61') 

llliuois Central 640.18.3 

Kansas Pacific »249,141 

Lake Shore cfc Mich. Southern... 1,4-'!.3.931 

Marietta* Cincinnati S04,19fi 

Michisan Central *557 .". w 

Milwaukee & St . Paul Ma,797 

Missouri, Kansas & Texas •225,901 

St. Louis and Iron Mountain ♦225.970 

St. Loiiio, Alton .fr T. K 'loS.aTS 

T'llodo. Pef>.l» & Warsaw 00.858 

Tol., Wa'4«sh & Western 492,--35 

'Jniori. IJaclflc +644,346 



1871. 


Increase. 


$3.57,108 


t47,797 


672,358 


a34,767 


377,687 




329.9S6 


7,478 


1,416.217 




688.131 




S1U,197 


^::3.944 


1 2'^-ani 


las, 6 18 


169,820 


34,.376 


507,050 


50.5a3 


473,295 


40.492 


105 244 


120,6fi0 


IH9.605 


56, %5 


102.995 


62,383 


99.804 




516,931 




469.393 


174,954 



Decrease 
$ 



16,512 

83,662 

4.7.048 



IXaiX 

The Gold Market.— Gold was quiet and without any special 
movement of importance in the early part of the week, but has 
since been stronger on the renewal of an export demand. Ship- 
ments have already been made this week ot about $1,000,000 in 
specie, and it was estimated to-day that another $1,000,000 might 
be shipped to-morrow ; ihe amount, however, is uncertain. Loans 
have been reasonably easy, and to-day the rates paid for carrying 
were 6, 7, 6^. 7, gold, and 5 per cent. Time loans in gold are 
quoted at J to | per cent, for carrying for 80 days, j per cent, for 
60 days, i to | for 90 days, and -J per cent, for four to six months. 
For the use of gold for all the year one per cent, is paid. At the 
Treasury sale of $1,000,000 on Thursday bids amounted to $4 - 
443,000, the highest bid was 113.30, and the lowest 111.51. Cus- 
toms receipts tor the week amount to $2,601,000. 

The following table will show the course of the gold premium 
each day of the past week : 

, 1 

Open- 1 
log. 

Saturday, Jan. 4 ::lx 

Monday, •' 6 IIIX 

Tuesday, " 7 111)4 

Wed'day, " 8 11. V 

Thursday, •' 9 :'.2)4 

Friday, " 10 ::2% 

Current week I'.lx 

Previous week 112 

Jan. 1, 1S73, to date 112X 

Foreign Excliani-'e. — The Ex:liange market has been strong 
during most of the week, and rates have been sufliiciently high to 
admit of renewed specie Bhipments, ruling to-day at 109i@109| for 
60 days and 110^ for short sight bills. The movement of prices 
appears to have been the natural result of an ordinary demand, 
with a relatively small supply of bills to meet it, except that 
some slight weakness was occasioned by the sale of £100,000 of 
60 days' borrowed bills on Thursday. It is anticipated that the 
easy money market in London will facilitate the negotiation of 
American railroad loans, and that some considerable amounts of 
exchange may bo produced in that way as the year goes on. 

The transactions tor the week at the Custom House and Bab- 
Treasurv have been as foUowa; 

Sub-Treasury.- 



ow- Hleh- 


Clos- 


Total 




est. 


est. 


ing. 


Clei. rings. 


Gold. 


Jnrrency. 


U154 


!!1)4 


lilV 


11S.4-.0.0(I0 


|2.-i7 1.216 


»3,S23.189 


ii;;i 


tllX 


IllV 


31.32f.000 


1,9('7.!1S5 


2,t43.ftn 


i:is 


111)4 


mx 


29,591,000 


;,5.'!7.8l5 


1.954,1)78 


lllV 


i:2x 


U2X 


30.732,100 


1,7SO,:00 


2,719 817 


112X 


112X 


1121,- 


S8,6«8.000 


1,679.736 


:,9S7,413 


112)4 


Ii;)4 


tl2X 


47,322,IW) 


1.7:5,707 


1,931 ,509 


UK 


112X 


m% 


526.109.000 


1.715,707 


1.931.509 


'.V.% 


112,H 


lliV 


217,771,000 


1,419.219 


2.326.-S1 


iii« 


U2X 


112)4 









8,948 
24.699 



Total 8,936,699 7,901,043 1,157,3(15 

Net Increase 1,036,656 



121,709 



•Fourth week estimated. 
+ ApprDximate by telegraph. 

The following were the highest and lowest priced of the active 
listol railroad and miscellaneousstocks on each day of the last week 



custom 

House 

Receipts. 

(301.0110 
513,000 
670,000 
3ei,0.'0 
42J,000 
855,000 



-Recelpts.- 



Gold. 

J2, 134,610 79 

5.52 083 76 

61S,7~3 52 

1.601.9H 68 

769,959 S6 

2,459,»8 77 



-Payments. — — , 



CnrrencT. 

(861,633 72 
72:.116 28 
707,400 76 
654.025 03 
742.203 31 
<0:,e80 07 



Gold. Currency. 

Saturday. Jan. 4.... JSOr.OIIO «n2,'7j 63 tl,601,205 54 

Monday, ■• 6.... 513,000 l.ses.re) Ort 7^2.100 87 

Tuesday, " 7.... 670,000 1.1<6,623 72 1,649,03! 03 

Wednesday," 8.... 3ei,0.'0 53S.«S6 93 51O,SI0 27 

Thursday, " 9... 42J,000 1!W,W: H6 1H.261 61 

Friday, " 10.... 85.5,000 112,68190 1,337,60180 

Total »2,601,000 

Balance, Jan. 3 t40,2e3,5n 68 (20,010,629 S4 

Balance, Jan, 10 |37,16;,013 89 122,566,394 25 

New Yokk City Banks. — The following statement shows the 
condition of the Associated Banks oi New York City tor the week 
ending at the commencement of business on Jan. 4. 1872 : 



N.T.Cen&H. K 

Barlem 

Erie 

do prel 

Lake Snore.... 

Wabash 

Northwest 

do pref 
Rock IslaQd. .. 

6t. Paul 

do pref... 
Ohio « MlBslp. 
Centralol N. J 
Boston. H ft E. 
Del., L. ft W... 
Hann. ft St Jos 
do pref 
Onion Paclttc. 
Col Chlc.ft I.e. 

Panama 

West. Un.Tel. 
Quicksilver ... 
do pref.. 
Pacific Mall ... 
Adaiiii Exp .. 
Am. MorcU.Ex 
United States.. 
Wells, Fargo.. 
Canton 



Saturday 
Jan. 4. 
II9X I'fl 

•111 115X 
62X 68X 

•7S 78 
9654 96)4 
71X 75 X 
S3 33)4 
f8X 6HX 

111 111)4 
51 51X 
7.x 77)4 
IBX I9X 

102 X 102X 
7X 8V 
94X WX 
ti% 48X 
70 70 
38)4 39 X 

37 X 38 V 

128 128X 

79)4 81X 

4CX 16X 

•52X .... 

73)4 74)4 

•93)4 91 X 

•68V .... 

79V 79V 

•8iX 85 

102 lOiS 



Monday, 
.>an. 6. 
99H \M% 

UIX lllX 
62X 64 

"77 7-X 
96X 97 
74 X 75X 
82V 83X 
87 X M 

103V '.11 
53X MX 
77)4 77S 
lex 18 X 

XSOX >9x 
6X 7X 
93V 94 
48X 50X 
71 71X 
fSH 89 X 
37X -HX 

130 130 
79X 3')4 
16W 46X 

'..r. 56 
72X 

•91 

•68)4 
Si'X -- 

•35V '^ 

102 102H 



73X 

95 

70 



Tuesday. 

Jan. 7. 
100 X lldX 

mx mx 

.?? 63)4 

96)4 9fiH 
73)4 74V 
SIX 83X 
87V 87V 
1U9X' liOfi 
53V .'.4 
77X 77X 
17!S im 

lOl'X lOOX 
7X 8X 
93 9IX 
•49X 60 
70X 70V 
38 SiV 
37X 3<X 

128 128 
7-IX 80 
16X (6X 

'.... 5(i 
71 X 72.x 
91V va 

"69 
8'JV SOV 

• (-'fl 

•iOl 103 



WedneBd'y 

Jan. 8. 

ii'ix io;x 

115 115X 
62)4 62X 

".... 78X 
96)4 96)4 
74 71)4 

^81)4 82 

109V lioii 

5814 54 

r.H 77X 

17X 18)4 

lOOX lOOX 

PX 9)4 

•94X 91X 

48X 48X 

7IPX 70 X 

37 V 38 X 

*X 3SH 

nu ■ 



7»X 
16 



70X 



S"X 
46 
5« 
72X 
ai 1>5 
70X 70X 
'Si'H SIX 
•... MX 
".... 102S 



Thursday 


Jai 


.9 


101 X lO.'X 


11514 1I5X 


61X 


62 V 


•'..'.X 


7S 


96)4 


96V 


73X 


71 X 


81 


81V 


88 


RK 


109V 110)4 


53 X 


51 


77 X 


;.x 


46X 


17X 


lOOX lODX 


sx 


9 


91V 


9IK 


48 X 


49 
7.1 


37X 


38X 


88). 


39X 


128 


29 


SOX 


S2X 


46 


46 



70 

95 

63i 

79V 
".-5 
101 



56 

95 

70 
SOX 
83 V 

usx 



Vrlday, 


Jai 


. 10 


101 X 101 


l:5X U5X 


60X 


61V 




80 


95 V 


96 X 


72X 


73 X 


SOX 


«!X 


*>'•% 


H7X 


10))4]09>4 


5.3', 


iSX 


77 


77 


11. X 


17 


lOil 


.00 X 


'•!4 


<i% 


94 V 


n\ 


«X 


47X 


85 X 


!t7X 


38X 


ssx 




I'.M 


81X 


82 


•15 




* 


56 


70)4 72 


•95 X 




■69V 


70 


19V 


80X 




S5 


101 


102X 



' * This Is the price bid and asked, no «a7e was made at the Board. 
The range in these stocHs since Jan. 1 has Ueen |tt follows ; 



Banks. 

New Fork 

Manhattan Co 

Merchants'... 

MechanlCB 

Union 

America .. 

Phcenlx: 

City 

Tradesmen's 

F'llton 

■Chemical 

Merchants KxchaUKe... 

Qallatin, National 

Butchers' ft Drovers'... 
Mechanics and Traders' 

Greenwich 

Leather Manut 

Seventn Ward, 

S5ateot New York 

American Bxchanffo 

t;ommerce 

Broadway 

Mercantile 

PacISc 

Republic 

Chatham 

People's 

ITorth America 

Hanover 

irvin.e 

Metropolitan 

Citizens 

Nassau..... 

Market 

St. Nicholas 

Shoe and Leather 

Corn Exchange 

Coatlnental 

Commonwealth...,.,.... 
Oriental ,.. 



Canltal 

. t3.0O0,0O() 

. 2,050,000 

, 3,000,000 

. 2,000,000 

, 1,500.000 

3,000,000 

, 1,800.000 

, 1,000,000 

1,'100,000 

600,000 

300,000 

. I,2a5,000 

. 1.500,000 

800,000 

600,000 

800.000 

600,000 

500,000 

2,0J(),000 

5,000,000 

10,000,000 

1,000,000 

1,000,000 

422,700 

2,000,000 

450,000 

412,500 

1,000,000 

1,000,000 

500,000 

4,000,000 

400,000 

1,000.000 

1,000.000 
1,000.000 
1,090.000 
1,000 000 
2,000.000 
7511.000 
SOO.QOO 



AVSBAeX AMOTTNTOV 

Loans and Lej;al Net 
DUconnts Specie. Tend tie. Deposits. 

t'.0.8l8.l«0 ll.775,90t »597,5«l 19,085.000 

6,713,400 1,053,700 8i;.2!'0 5,398,81)0 

1,262.400 6G6.70C 

410,900 55^!,6O0 

510,1100 431,400 

1.09.-.aoc i,:63.ooo 

439,«10 2U4.200 

792,100 

213,000 

151,61 il) 

311,20) 

58,800 
291,100 

54 00C 

23,100 



7.lt.2,100 
5,515,200 
4.690.400 
7,94^,200 
4,2.5.600 
6,062,100 
3 3W.300 
1,734.300 
6 132.90C 
8,142,900 
3,112.500 
2.256.000 
l.ml.lOO 
959 SCO 
2,5:8,900 
1 ,121.100 
1,648.800 
)0,066,3iJO 
22,350.400 
6.998,400 
,J,818 3lO 
1,« 10,900 
6.5ii6,700 
2,238,900 
1.417.600 
3.176 OOO 
2,1.')6.700 
2.15.',IX)0 
9.5T7,6')0 
1.323,300 
1.95i,400 
2.7118,000 
2.^32.300 
8,417,000 
2.615,400 
3,120,500 
1,«6,I00 

i52s,eog 



244 .5X 
4I.90C 
419,700 



406,000 
570,700 
257,000 
881,100 
785,30(1 
283,700 
S7\0(10 
259,000 
133,600 
S6S.900 
179,300 
311,S00 



518,2i«' 1,203 800 

710,7lX. 2.91-2,600 

150,900 2,120,700 

ir2,6'J0 SI I. Olio 



.100 

641.700 

129.700 

1.900 

22i.t.;o 

121,000 
19.»'J0 

S93,8i« 
15,000 

sssoo 

91,900 

3«,900 
212.700 

74.500 
116.600 

i:,2O0 
6,000 



425,900 
581,100 
640.600 
1 10.300 
215,000 
280,300 
51l.0i« 
405.900 
3UI.0O0 
2S7.10O 
450,a« 
470.CO0 
461,100 
110,000 
866,iva 
477,900 
131,000 



763.500 
8.56.',700 
3.053,600 
5,S23,3«) 
2,57'J,000 
8,111.300 
8.013.100 

i.ns.nfl 

3.931,700 
2,501,400 
1,423,000 
l,158,ao 
1,269,600 

817,100 
1.7-9,300 

10),600 
2,f66,100 
5,216,500 
8,6.;S,300 
7 9.'8,0OC 
3.159,W 
1, .389,1(0 
3.709,600 
2,607.100 
1J36..'HX' 
8.016,7110 
1,121.600 
I 961.01 
3.906.800 
1,233.300 
1,960,800 
1,63.1,100 
1.132,500 
2.-2«!,000 
1,173,000 
l,t5.1,SllO 
1.57S.60C 
1,1U,300 



CIrcnIa. 

tlon. 

1831 .400 

9,700 

872.800 

500 200 

485,510 

1,300 

S06,7tO 

■63,506 



418.000 
491,900 
215.aiO 
195.700 
2.700 
263,7ixj 

514,800 

1I6O.OO0 

S.U6J00 

iCO.lOO 

4.7.500 

Bsb'.MO 
129,40(1 

2y9'JH« 

lo9,20a 

1,171,8C<> 

130.900 

stw'.wii 

739.100 
789.510 

S.HIO 
584,900 
230.7(0 

4,100 



January 11, 1873.] 



THE CHRONICLE. 



4T 



Marine 

itHaitic 

tmporteri and TraderC. . 

Pirk 

Macbanlca' Banking Aai . 

Orrtcora' 

North Bl»«r 

haat River 

Mannfactnrara * Mar.... 

Fonrtu National 

Cantzat National 

Second Kat<:tttl 

Ninth National 

First National 

Third National 

New York N. KxehanKa 

Tenth Nation: II 

Bo»ery National 

NowTork County 

Oerman American 

Dry uoodi,.,. 



400.000 
DOU.OOO 
l,«)O.0OO 
3,000.900 
MO.OOO 
800.000 
400.000 

aso,oo« 

500.000 
S.000.000 
8,000,000 

800.000 
1.500.000 

BOO.OOO 
1,000.000 

500.000 
1,000.000 

'^50.000 

3110,000 
3.000.000 
1,000.000 



1.964,700 

88«.700 

13 557.800 

16 S:5»,7nC 

l.l^a.4<lO 

7«.WW 

1.1-8,100 

1.061.100 

1.S81.81V1 

31 SiiOOO 

10.138,100 

1,J11.20U 

6.IOU,UIO 

4.347.9(1(1 

t,856.WX) 

1,218,0110 

2.JI»,«00 

1.33%n(IO 

l.lia.700 

5,105,000 

3,348,300 



843.700 

7U.300 

897.900 

1,«3I.9U0 

47.600 

4.3U0 

I6.BU0 

S JOO 

80,600 

;,6''4,lO0 

137,000 

we'.ooo 

5S3.100 
847,:00 

189 400 
4.100 

K9.6(<0 
17,3U) 



27S,IX)0 

13-1.100 

3,28 l.3U(l 

{.MiH.lOC 

179.900 

I'O.OOO 

167. iOO 

372.900 

2I8.WJ 

8,669, IIKI 

3.282,'.0U 

84S,UU0 

1,4(3.000 

690.9V0 

|i»;,5()0 

313,200 

531.000 

3IS.II00 

&S6.20U 

897,500 

301,600 



1.50;.2flO 

5;^ .300 

11,5:».«)0 

ll,lU'l.70i) 

8'.8,r«0 

619.21 

S99,i«x) 

7;.6.*I0 

1 3!ll,Hllj 

17.628,100 

8.MI,U)0 

l,l'itil,300 

5.'.T2,11U0 

4,S"'T.30l) 

5,5(iO.WO 

6;w.2i'0 

1.419.HI0 

h56 0i0 

9511.300 

S.973.4«l 

l,8;i7.3U0 



SKI.W 

4i»3on 

8OT.800 

:.9 n 

10.80 
334,500 

S,9'tii'.<c<l 
1,455,8 
%d,0ll0 
f6>.0(0 
«15,«(iO 
la3,0l» 
2fi9.200 
878,100 

180,0U0 



,.^1^, _ JUSO.SOO iT7,72o',8«0 19,47i,l0O 41,165,400 303.308,100 37.618.800 

""• Notrpcalyed— iamo aa la^t week. 
The deviations trom the returns ol previous week are as IoIIowb : 



(JLHTATIOXS IN BIISTUN. PHILADELPHIA. BUTHIIItE. Lt. 



I'oant.. 

Specie 

LeKal Tendera. 



. ... Ine. •8,148.500 I Net Depoalta. 

..Inc. J.iSrt.Si" I Circulation .. 

!.'.!. ...Inc. 45,8001 



, Inc. »5,3';R,vo 

,...Iiic. 40,S00 



The following are the totals for a series of weeks past 



Data. 

Oft. 5.... 
Oct I!.... 
Ort. 19... 
Dot. 36.... 
Nov. 2.... 
Nov. 9... 
Nov. 16.. 
Nov. 23 .. 
Nov. 30.. 

Pec. 7 .. 

Dec. II.. 

Dec. 21.., 

Dec. 38.. 

jan. 4. . 



Loani. 

36i.810.3O0 
26-<,a id.SOO 
270.557.600 
271,925.000 
377,832.300 
377.281.500 
276.93o.000 
276,161,300 
3;6,n6;l.l«) 
37li.3S?,600 
377.620.400 
37.5.811.400 
374,572>t)0 
277,730,900 



Specie. 

9,913,900 
12,317,800 
13.635,500 
10,79-),SOO 
11.883.'-110 
13.121.200 
13.590,300 
13,101,200 
I2.'M7,20O 
1S.2(».500 
11.719.700 
12,7-3,100 
17,241,800 
19,178,100 



L,ecal 
TenrlerB. 
41.915.-00 
45,759.100 
63.5S6.40O 
53.343.100 
61,736 ,.500 
48,361 000 
46,731,600 
45,8<'9.300 
47,169.500 
46.401,300 
47.317.ieO 
44,6^6,700 
41,1 19,800 
41,165,100 



DenORlta. 

186.150,500 
189,709.300 
201.0 1.100 
203.21 3.500 
304.405.300 
2(13.405.600 
204.524.600 
ltti>,631,600 
2'J1,9'.5,S00 
205.0;9 SOO 
2(fi.91 1.700 
199,42 *.'00 
19-1,5:9,600 
303,80J,100 



Olrcnla- AgKreitate 



jili 



tlOll. 

27,6l'4,'.'00 
37,7:17.900 
27.706 ,800 
27.68S,0.K) 
3 7, 591. -200 
37.5-1-1.100 
37.599 300 
27.5;il.800 
27.570.'«lO 
27.5(19.100 
27,r.w.700 
37,5-23.700 
27.5 3,'JOO 
37,613,800 



Clpu-.l 

777.477.62 1 
802.J3l.6-9 
818.599.9::0 
879,»()6.570 
»ii8,9;0,753 
611,455,6-8 
S79,-<55 831 
798.;«2,i:2 
873,212.01.; 
8li">.'i51,088 
779.9-7.29:1 
W7,602,656 
60S.3l',754 
64i,834,8i: 



Boston Banks.— Below we give a stateraent of the Boston 
National Banks, as returned to the Clearing House, on Monday, 

an. e, 1873 : 

Banka. Capital 

Atlantic »WM« 



ilk 



L.T.Notea. Deposits. Clrcnfa. 



1,500,000 
1,500,000 
1,000.000 
600.000 
300.000 
1,000.000 
1.000.000 
1,000,000 
300.000 
1,000,000 
300.000 
1,000,000 
750,000 
1,000,000 
800,000 
800.000 
400.000 
8,000,000 
200,000 
1,000,000 
1,000.000 
900,000 
1,000.000 
1,000.000 
3,000,000 
1,500,000 
600.000 
3,1100.000 
750.000 
1,000 000 
1,600 000 
300.000 
2,000.000 
1.0' 10,000 
1,000,000 
1,500,000 
1,000,000 
1,000,000 
1,000.000 




Atlas 

BlackBtonc 

Boston 

Bjylston ... 

"Broadway.... 

Colnmblan 

Continental 

KUot 

Everett 

Kanc-nll Hall 

Freeman's 

lllohe 

Hamilton 

Howard 

M-trket 

Massachnseits 

Maverick 

Merf.hanls* 

Monnt Vernon 

New {England 

North 

OM Boston 

BUawmut 

Bhoeft Leal her 

State 

Biffolk 

Traders 

Tremont 

Washington 

First 

Second (Granite)... 

Third 

Bank of Commerce 

Bank of N. America 

B*k of Redemption. 

Bank of KepuDllc... 

City 

Eagle 

Exchange ,,.^™.«v« 

Hlde&Leather 1,500,000 

Revere 3,000.000 

Security 300,()00 

Union.. 1.0*.«5 

WebHter 1.500.000 

Commonwealth 500.000 

Total »48.350.000 »132.S73"So «2.";5.4lfl «ll.r23.W 153.040.K10 t25.614.-100 

The total amount "due to other Banks," aa per statement of Jan. 6, la $1»,0.2, ^00. 

" Not received— same as last week. 

The deviations from last week's returns are as follows : 

l,oans Iucrca8e.t3.686.200 1 Deponits Increase.|3,55«.7i'0 

Bi??cie ............Increase 658,3.10 Circulation lucrease. 16,900 

LeicalTenders Decrease. 832J00 I 

PHILADELPHIA BANKS.— The following IS the average condition 
of th« Philadelphia National Banks for the week preceding Mon 

day, Jan. 0, 1873 : ■^'"*' ""' 

Banks. Capital. 

Philadelphia »l,5ixi,000 

North America 1,000,000 

Farmers and Mech. 3,000,000 
r. .I..1 ainnim 



Commercial 810,000 

Mechanics" 800,000 

Bank N. Liberties. 600,000 

Bonthwark 350,000 

Kensington 350,000 

Venn 500,000 

Westerr. 400.000 

Mannlactnrers'.... 1,000.000 
Bank ol Commerce 260,000 

Olrard 1,000,000 

Tradesmen's 200,000 

Consolidation 800,000 

City 400,000 

Commonwealth.... 800.0(X) 
Corn Kxcbangc.... 500,000 

Union 

First 

Third 

Sixth 

Seventh 

BUhth 

Central 

Bank of KepnhUc. 
Security 



800,000 
1,000,000 
800,000 
150,000 
3.50,(00 
275,000 
750,000 
1,000,000 
350,000 



Specie. 

160,000 
5,627 
61.700 
19.000 
37,9.15 

7,366 

7'.666 
S.61J 

19',636 

19,000 

11.613 

I 10.500 

; 2-28 

i 10,000 
I 51. 00 
) 15.1HK1 
) 45,000 



41.00 



Total net 
L Tender. Ueposlts.Clrculat'n. 

1925.0(10 |3,914.0(1(, 11.000.000 

696 547 2.625,530 7:^4 000 

1 100000 4.819.000 1.000.0(« 

632000 1.64t.<00 116,1100 

301,000 1.0-28,000 467,950 

216(100 1,853,000 «50.(W 

83;SO0 1,127.20-,1 311,990 

347J00 711.491 2^5 420 

14,59-25 959.540 173,(143 

335 176 1,436.705 I74.73S 

316100 l,185.4o: 544.i74 

iwo56 723.000 Wj.82J 

668.0(10 2.778,000 53l,00C 

866.919 1.033,311 173.811 

3-28.;t(13 766,357 270,O(< 

835.400 933..578 S59.6-! 

8:1872 4. '2.82:; 3'8.78( 

425 0(10 1,931,000 45O.O0( 

290,1X10 lIsiS.OOO 269.01K 

917,000 8.371,000 796.00( 

liieX? 1,011,™ 360.9'! 

ittOOO 461.000 133.00 

61.000 690.000 819,0W 

141,000 751,000 240,60 

447,(100 1.97iOOO 57^0(l 

343 000 1,0.9,000 800(10 

nelooo 423,000 I80,oo 



XoUI 116 J3S.000 f:55 870.011 1421.453 »10,576,155 110.861.114 111.891.57, 

The deviations from the returns of prevlotis week are as follows ; 

T,o»n. Inc. 775 370 I Deposits Inc.|l,57C.115 

i"JS« .......Inc. 114.944 Circulation P»c., '.ajW 

liV^u fender Note* loc '" "'■' 



BOSTON. 

Maine la 

New UampBhlre.ea 

Ver^ioDt aa. 

Maasachnsetta es. Currency... 
do t* Gold, 191«... 

do St, Gold 

Boston M, 

do Ss.KOld 

Chicago Bewerasa It 

do Municipal 7a 

Portland to, building loan 

llurlluKton * Mo. L. U.,1 

Cheahlr«,6 ;-.-■•.••.-_ 

Cln., San. 4k CleT.,lstM., 1, ••7 

Kaatern Matt., conv.. «. 1874. .. 

Hartford *F.rle,ltt M (new>7. 

do do ccrtlflcate*. . 

OkdecsbnrfE ft Lake < h. 8t 

Old Col. A Newport Bdt.t, '7«. 
do do Bonds, 7, 187)., 

RntlRn(l,ne«r,7 

Stansted & Chambly 7s ... . 

Verm't Cen., Ist M ., cons., 7, 
do ^d Mort.,7,18»l.... 

Vermont & Can., new, 8. . . .^. . 

Vermont * Mass., 1st M.,<,'8a. 

Boston A Albany Block 

Boston A Lowell stock 

Boston A Maine 

Boston ft Providence 

Chpdhlrp preferred 

Chic, Bur. ft Quiicy... ....... 

Cir... Snndusky * Clev. stock. 

Concord 

Connectlcnt River .• 

Connecticut ft Paatumptic, pf. 

Kastern (Maas.l 

Kantern (New Harapahire) — 

Fit,<-,libnru 

Manchester ft Lawrence 

Northern of New Hampahlre.. 

Norwich ft Worcester 

OKdens. ft L. Champlaln ....... 

"'■ do do pref.... 

Old Colony 

Port.,Sai-o ft Portamonth 

Rutland common 

do pieferred 

Vermont ft Canada 

■Vermont ft Massachnsetta 

PHILADELPHIA. 

8TATK AND CITY BONDS. 

PcnnsvlvaniaSB. coup. ........ 

do 68. '67,5-10, Ist... 

do do 10-15, 3d... 

do do 15-35. 8d... 
Philadelphia 6s, old 

do 6s, new 

AiicB-hany rnnnty,6s, coop... 

Allci-hany City 68 

Pittsburg 5s 

do 6s 

do 7b ■■ •- 

New .lerscy Slate «b, Eiemptt 
Delaware State «s 

BAIl.HOAD STOCKS. 

UnltPd N. .1. roinnanles 

Camden ft Atlantic... 

do do pref. 

Catawlssa 

do pref 

F.lmira ft WilUamsport 

Klmlra ft wllllRm«port pref. 

Kast PennsTlvnnla..... 

Harrlsb'K. Lancastpr * C 

Huniln„-ion ft Broad Top. .. 
do do pref. 

Leblith Valley.. 

Little Schuylkill 

Minphlll ■■•,-. 

Nestinchonlng Valley 

NorriBtown 

Norhern Central 

No. th Pennsylvania. .. 

Oil Creek ft Allegheny River. 

Pennsylvania 

PhllBdClpnla A T'rle 

Phiiartelpbla ft Reading 

Philadelpbla ft Trenton 

Phila., WUmlng. ft Balturow. 

Tioga 

West Chester 

do pref — ^ 

WestJersev 

CANAL 8TOCKB. 

Chesapeake ft i ' elawaro 

Delaware Division 

l.ehiRh Navigation 

Morris 

do pref 

Schuyltui Navigation 

do pref. ... 
Union pref 

KAILROAn BONDS. 

Alleghany Valley 7 3-l('s. 1896 

BelvideroDeiaware,lBtni,6. .. 

do do 3d M., 115 

do do 3d M..'87 

Camden ft Amboy, Is, "75 

do do 6b,'8S 

do do «8. '89 

do domort. 68, "89... 

do consol.. 6b. *94... 

Camden ft AUan. I't m,.7s. TS. 

do 3dm,7s. "ao.. 

Catawlssa. 1st M. conv. ,«.... 

do chat. m. do "88 . 

do new 7s, iWX) 

Conm-ctlngCB 1900-19114........ 

F.nstPenn. :st roori.7B, •M..^. . 

El. ft W'msport, i8t m, 78. •80. 

do do St.... 

Ha-Tlsbu-g 'St mort. 6sJ8S — 
H.ft B. T. iBtmori. ■b,'90..... 

do 2d mort. .s, nS — 1 

do 8d m . cons. 7B, '95. 1 

Junction Ist mort. 68, '5S. ...1 

do 2d do 190C 

Lehigh Valley, Ist M., 6s, 1878. 

do do new 6s, 1*8 

do do do reg.._^ 
do do new .s. reg., ino 
Little SchnylklUl.tM..^.1^i. 
Northern Central 2d m.to.'Ki 
do do 2d m. g. 6e, 1900 

do do 2d m. 6s. 1*jO. 

North Penn. Ist m, Sa, ■85.... 
do 2dm. 78, '96...^ 

do 105 chat. m.,*n 

on Creek* Al. R., eon. 7a, '88. 
Oil Creek iBtm. 7«. "82 



Pcnnsyba.,gcn. m.,coDV, II'U) 
It (In do rag.... 

I'rrklomCB ist in. 'a. "97 

Phlla. ft Krle iat m.«a, jil 

do 3d m. 7b, 'W...., 
PtatladrlpbU 4 ReadlDC to, ■M 
-•'- do 78, "W 

rn«T. 78, *V* 
drb. bondt, ts 
(.01.78, cltlO 
do rw. . . 

«..ir.o.. 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



w 

31" 



lO'H 



IBX 



MX :wn 

... 1C5,»V 
I0« 107 

95k 
lOOX lOO)* 

'>1H 



9»k 



»K 



W 

l»V 



tM 
*t 

w 

»IH 

M 

'& 
K 

n 

7»)< 
Tl" 

•5" 



QO St, R.,1*,V. . 

Ptalla. ft Banbury ism. 'it,... 

Phll..wnm.* Bal.,M,'«4 

Pttt8.,Clo.*8t. Lonla7t 

Sunbury ft Erie Ist m 78, M.. 

Uunbury ft Lewtst- D 78 

Warren ft F. let m. •;'')* 

West Cheater cons. ;t, tl 

Wett Jeney to. '84 

do lttm.to,'M 

do do 7f , '#7 

Wettern Penn to, 'M 

do do to. p. b., "f 

Wllmlng. ft Kcad..ltt M .,7, 1«<1 

do do Id Mort im 

Reading Coal ft IroB deb. b. . 

do do mort. b 

CAHAl. BOffD*. 

Chetapeake « Dala. to, t!... 

Delaware Dmalon to, f 

Lahigh Navigation to, II 

do BR. ■»:.... 

do coov.,*n. 

do couv., g,'M. 

do gold, tr 

Morris, 1st M., 6, im 

do 3dM., ina 

do boat. '85 

PenntTlvaola to, 1*10 

Schuylkill Nav. lat m. to. "73. . 

do 3d m.,'83 

do to, '95 

do to. Imp., '^... 
(•o to, boat. "88. . 
do 78, boat, '68, . . 

Snaqnetaanna to. '»4 

do Cosl Co. bondt 

Union Ist mort. to, '8.1 

«ett Bran, h It tm. to, '78 

Wyomintf Va ley 1st 01. to, T9. 

HALTimuKK. 
Maryiand68,.Jan., A.. J.ftO.. . 

do to, Delenca '.'I 

Baltimore to of IS 97 

do 1884 -•■ 

do to,:90e MVI 

do 1!W Park to 

Baltimore ft Ohio to of "TO 

do do tool'H) 

do do to ol '8S 

do (N.W.Va.) 2all.tr- .... 
do 8d M. to .. . 

Central Ohio, ist M..6....^.M* 
Marietta ft Cln., 1st M.,7, IWl 10 * I 
do 'lo 3d M..7, 18M. 

Norfolk Water Ps 

S orthern Cent., Ist M - (guar) • 

do do 3dM., S. FT,*,'*. 

do do 8dM.i8. F.,«,I«« 

do do 3d M. iT. ft C) *.'r 

do do Cons, (gold) «, IW 

Pitta, ft Connell8T., 1st M.,7, '•8 

I do do IstM, «. 1^ 

WeatMd,letM.,endorted,6/30 

do let M.,onend., «,"».. 

do 2d M..endor«ea,i,'*). 

Baltimore ft Ohio stock 

Parkerabnrg Branch 

Central Ohio 

do preferred 

CINCINNATI. 

Cincinnati 58 

do to 

do 7-808 ...-• 

Ham. Co., Ohio 6 p. c. ong bds 



Mi 



Wc' 



S'H 



MX 



lUii 

VIM 



MM 



IM 



91 93X 



87V 



ICJJi 



«S9',»5S I 



\jn v,rcciv IP- i". .-. •^•- ,.„•• 

;?:s;jS!rcr^7:;itiic. 

>P.nn.j.vanla,l.tM.,M^g)... 



do do 7p.c.,lto5jrr». 

do do Ig bds, 7*7^08 

Covliigton ft Cln. Bridge..^.. 

cm., Ham. ft D.. iBt M -. ■!.»••• 

do do 3d.M.,7,«... 

do do 3dM.,8,T7... 

Cln. 4 Indiana, Ist M.,7..^^.. 

do do 2d M.,7, 1877.. 

Colum., ft Xcnia. 1st M..7, '90. 
Dayton ft Mich., 1st M..^ 8^.. 

do do 2c M.,7, 04.. 

do do 8d Mm"*, "88.. 

do To'do dep. bds. t -SI-^SJ 
Dayton ft West.. 1st M.. .. IMS. 

do do IstM., «, 1906. 

Ind., Cm.ft I.af;. 1st »U7....j^ 

do (L*C)lstM 7 IW 

innc, Cln. 4 Iniiii,!'' *'iil'^*-| j: 
Little Mlaml,l8tM.,«,18W.... |< 

Cln. Pam. ft Dayton stock.... I » 

(■ >lnmbus ft Xenia stork ex d. 

Dayton ft Michigan stock ex d 

do 8p c.sfkgnar 

Little Miami atock. ... . . .ex. d. 

LOUISVILLE. 
LonlsvUlato.fato;^ 

do w'aterto,'87to'»;.. 
do Water Stock to, t?. 
do Wharf to......... ^■ 

do special tax to of ■». 

Jeff, Mad. iLlBtM-Q***)!.-" 

do do 2dM., I,...;...... 

do do I8t M.,7,l«06i;.. 
I llaT.C.4LeI.,I8tM./J.2J.• 
L'.v:l«.4 Fr'k., Itt M.,«,*I<V'78., 
do Lonltv,Loan,«/8I- 
I,. * K«ah. Ist M. (m.s.) ./77„ 
do 1«T . Lost, (m V*\ . .if 
do do lLeh.llr.)6,« 

do UtM.tMem Br)7 -J^TS. 
do WtM.(Leb.br.ex)7.'8p-W 
do Lou.L'n(LeB.br.ex)«,'» 
do Couaol. Itt M..7,18«e... 
.Jefferson.. Mad. ft Ind... .... 

ISsi lx)ul»v.,Cln.ft Lex.,prer..... 

«o>,| """i,^ do common 

1 oolBVllle ft Nat*";?'"' 

ST. LOUIS. 

>', Loola to. Long nondt 

do to.s::ort do 

io water to. gold....;.. 

do do do (new) 

do Park to gold ... ... 

do Sewer SpeclalTai* 
74KiNvrtbMlt.ourLI«M.7.... - 

,ii; II.' M. 7« 

laclflctofM..) ItlM. gld.. . 
r^ - BB of Mo. ttecle . 



11 

IMS 

«l 

7» 

SI 

M 
78 
il 
J7 
g: 

8i 

n 

M 

nx 

91 

»K 
<«1 

•t' 

9 



•I 
I'-M 
P* 

•7 

Tun 

% 

°4 
100 
M 

m 
« 

M 

n 
a* 

81 

80 
9* 

BS 

n 

90 
OS 
43 

:11 

•a 



M 
84 

eoK 

to 

N 
N 

7« 
St 

M 

as 
<i 

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81 

RM 

ft 

»i 

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91 
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II 

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87 — 

I II :3 



^e 



THE CHRONICLE 



[January 11, 1873. 



QUOTATIONS OF STOCKS AND BONDS IN NEW YORK. 



ItoKmment Bonds and active Railroad Stocks are quoted on a previous page and not repeated here. Prices represent the p»r 
cent vaiue. vhateter the par may be. " N. T. Local Securities are quoted ta a separate list. 



■X0UBIT1K3. 



Bid. A*k 



IT. S. Bonds. 

(Quoted pre viQUnly.) 

State Bonds. 

Tennessee ts. old .. 

do do new 

VtrKlalaSs, Ola 

*do do new bonds 

do do consol. bonds.... 

do do deferred do 

Georgia 6s 

do 7s, new bonds 

do 7a, endorsed 

do "s.Onld 

North Carolina 66,^ old 

do do to N.C. n.R. Co. 
do do yundlng Act, 1866. 
do do do 1863, 

do do new bonds 

do do SpecialTax 

Bonth Carolina lis ..-,* — 

do do .Taa.& July... 

do do April & Oct... 
ao do Fnudliif? Act. 1366 
do do LanaC,1889, J & J 
do do I.»naC,18J9,A&0 

do do 78 of 18?8. 

UlMonrl 6s 

do Han. A Pt. .loseph. 

do Asylum bonds 

Louisiana 6s 

do do new oonds 

do do new floating debt. 

do Is, I'enltentlary 

do Gs, levee bonds 

do Ss do 

do 88 do 1S?5.. 

do 8s of 1910. 

California 7s 

do 7s. large bonds 

Connecticut 6s 

Rhode Island 68 - 

Alabama 58 

do 8b 

do 38 Mont & Euf'laR.. 
do 8r Mab. &. Chat. K. . 

do Es of 1S92.. 

Arkansas 6s, funded 

do 7s,L. li. & Ft. S.188. 
do 78, MemplilB & L. R.. 
do 7s, L. I!.,P. B. &N.0. 
do 7s, MIS8.0.& R.Riv. 

do 79 Ark. Cent U 

Texas, ISs, of X876 

Ohio 6», 1875 

do 68,1881 

do 6s, 1836 

Kentucky 68 

Illinois canal bonds, 1870 

do 6s coupon, 77 

do do 1879... 

do War Loan 

Indiana Ss..; 

HIelilgan 68,1873 

do 68,1878 

do 68,1883 

do 78,1878 

Hew York Bounty, rog. . . 

do do cou 

ao 68, Canal, ls'3 
do -- "- •-■ 



do 
do 
do 
Ao 

do 



«s, 

«s, 

68, 
<S, 

58. 

Ss, 



do ' 1874. 
do 1875. 
do 1877.... 
do 1878.. . 
dogldl887.... 
do 



liullroad Stocks 

(Not previously quo! 
Albany & Sasquehanna. 



(Not previously quoted.) 

Ibany & Susquehanna 

Atlan tic & Fjicific, pref 



Chicajo & Alton 

do di) pret" 

Chic Bnr &Qalncy 

Clev., CoL.Cln. * Inrtlanap . 

Clevc. & Fittsb'irff. gnat- 

Central of New .Jersey, scrip. 
Col. Chic. & Ind. Central.... 

!>.,,, n^inp Kr. >sioux City 

Harlem pref 

1111 nols Can tral 

JoIIet»& Chicago 

l»onK Island 

Mariettas Cin., Ist preferred 

., do do 2d pref. 

Morrl«& Essejt 

Mo., Kansas & T 

New Jersey 

Kew -Jersey Southern 
N. ir.. New Haven & Hartford 
N.V., Prov. « Bost (Sioningt.) 
Ohio A Mississippi, preferred. 
Pltte., Ft W. * Chic., guar.. 
„ do do special. 

^oBselaer & Saratoga 

Rome, Watertown& Ogdens.. 
at. Loula, Alton 4 T. Haute. . . 

do do pref 

St. Louis & Iron Mountain.... 
St. L., lian. i\Ss NorthernpreX 

South Side, L.I 

Toledo, rcorinft Waisaw!!!" 
■)» d 5 l8t pref. 

™"','' , „ , do 81 pref.. 
Toledo. tVab & W-isteni. pref. 
miacellnneona Stocks 

American Coal 

Boston Water I'ower 
Consolidated Coal.. 
Cumberland Coalandlron '"' 

Maryland Coal ./ 

N, J. Land Improvement Co!! 

Penn8ylvan La Coal 

Sprl.irf Mountain Coal' 

wilkcabarre Coal 

CaiUon Co 

Delaware A Hudson CiinaV.*" 
Atlantic Mail Steammlp 
Mariposa Gold ;. 

do p er. 

do Trustee^* Certif. 

do ■ Land Mining Co!!! 

do do pref 

Oulclcsllver preferred.... ' 
^ow Centr.al Cnal ... 



« '.'RXroad Bonds." 

N 1 . Central Cs, I8SS 



do 68; 1387!!!! 

«• T- v.* . , fc.reFi! estate... 

ft. 1. Central 6s, sahscrlptlon 

do 78.1876....... 

40 5«, conv. 1876.... 

_,, ,''?„ - *,188S-76 

Brie 1st Mortgage Extended 



95 
95 

ma 

108 Ji 
107 
.06 
106M 

ma 

1I4 
103 



nx 



112 



UOH 



lo: 



15 
IS 
39 

ii'H 

MX 

87' 
37 

now 

IWK 
1»H 
lOlX 



S4X 



IM 
105M 



127 
2J' 

96x 

26 H 

li05i 



102)4 



SSOUBITlXa. 



Bid. ABk 



Bile let Moitjage Endorsed. 

do 7b, 2d do 1879 

do 7s,ad do 1883 

do 7s, 4th do 1880 

do 78,5th do 1888 ■•••••■• 

do 7b, cons. mort. gold baa.. 
Long Dock UouUa... ....^.... 

BullTN. Y.& E.18tM.,18T;.... 

Qud. R.7B,adM.S.F.I885 

do 7», 8d Mort., 187n 

Harlein, IBtMortKagc 78. ..... 

do Con.M.&s'kgF'dSs. 

ilbany de Susqh'a, Ist ponds. . 

do do 2d do .. 

do do 3d do .. 

Slich.Cent.,lstM. 88, 1883 

do Consol. is, 1902.... 

Chic, Bur. & Q. 8 p. c. Ist M.. 

Mich. So. 7 per ct. 2d Mort 

Mich. 8. AN 1.S.F.7 p.c... 
Cleve. & Tol. Sinking Fund . . 

Cleve. & Tol.,n*'W bonds 

Cleve., P'vllle & Aah., oldbds 

do do new bds. 

Detroit, Monroe & Tol bonds. 

Buffalo & Erie, new bonds ... 

Lake Shore Div. bonds 

Lake Shore con. roup bonds. 

do Con. reg. bonds... 

Paciflc R- 7s, Kuart'd by Mo... 

Western Pacific bonds 

Central Pacific gold Bonds 

do State Aid bds. 

Dnlon Pacific Ist M'geBonds. 
do Land Orant, 7s 

do Income IOb 

Illinois Central 7 p. ct., 1815. . . 
Bellev'le & S.IllB. «. UtM. 8'8. 
Alton 4 T. H., 1st M 

do do 2d M. pref 

do do 2d M. income. 

Ghlc.&N. Western S. Fund.. 
do do Int. Bonds 

do do Consol. bds 

do do Kxtn. Bds 

do do Ist Mort 

Iowa Midland, l8t mort., 8s... 
dan. 4 tit. Jo. Land Grants... 

do do convertible 

(Iiil., LiCk. & Western, Ist M. 

do do 2dM.. 

do do 7s, conv. 

rol.il Wab'h,lBtMori. ext'd. 

do iBt.M. StLdlv. 

do 2d.Moit 

do Equip. Bds 

do Cons. Convert. 

dannibal 4 Naples 1st M 

Qreat We8tern,l«t M..lKail.... 

do 2dM. 18S3.... 

OulncT* Tol., UtM.. 1890.... 

111. & So. Iowa, Ist Mort 

Galena & Chicago Extended . 
do 2d Molt... 

ijhlc. H. Island & Paciflc 

Morris 4 Essex, Ist Mcrt 

do do 2d Mort 

New Jersey Central, 1st M., n 
„ do do 2d Mort. 

New Jersey Southern 1st m 76 
Pitts., Ft. Vf.& Chic, Ist M.... 
do do 2d Mort. 

do do 3d Mort. 

do ^) 8 p. c. eq't bdt 

Olove. 4 nttB., Consol, S. F'd. 

do do 2d Mort 

do do .'id Mort 

do do 4th Mort 

Chic. 4 Alton Sinking Fund. 
do do ist .Mortgage. . 

do do Income 

Ohio 4 Miss., Ist Mortgage... 
do Consolidated... 

do 2d do 

Dub. & Sioux C.lat M 

Peninsula 1st Mort., conT- .. 

St. L. 4 Iron Mountain. 1st M 

Mil. 4 St. Paul. iBt Mort. 88.. 

do do do 7 3-11 

do do 78 gold 



lOO 



99 

iiy. 

61 

6SH 

94 

96,H 

91 



do do let Mort.. 

do do Iowa dlv 

do do 2dM 

Marietta 4 Cin., let Mort 

Chic. & Milwaukee l8t Mort.. 
.toilet & Chicago, 1st Mort... 
Chic. 4 Gt. Eastern, 1st Mort. 
Coll, Chic. & Ind. C IM Mort. 

do do SdMort.... 
Tol., Peoria 4 Warsaw, E, D. 

do do W. D. 

o do Burl'n Dlv 

no do 2dM.. 

do Consol. 78 

New York 4 N. Haven 68 

Boston, H. 4 Erie. Ist mort. 7b 

do do guaranteed 

Cedar Falls A Mi"n. ist M.... 
Bur., C. I apids 4 Minn.7B,Eld 
Home & WatCrtown ist M.... 

Ijl l>nck41m.Co.7."S6 

West. Union Tel., Ist mort. 7fi 

I.onif I-land RK let M. 7s 

Smithtown & Pt. Jeff. IstM... 
St. Louis, Jack. & Chlc. Ist M. 
South Side, L.I. IBt Mort. bds 
do Sinking Fund.. 

Morris 4 Essex, convertible... 

do do conBtructlon 

Jefferson RK, 1st Mort. bonds 
Winona 4 St. Peters 1st m.. . . 
i:. C. C. 4 Ind'a 1st M, 78, S. F. 
Cln. 4 Sp'd Ist M, eld. i; C C 4 I 

do iBtM. gld. L84MS 

La Crosse 4 M 11. SB, 1st JI 

Lnfayette. Bltn* Miss. iBt M. 
Pekln, Lincoln 4 Dccatnr IstM 
Man. & Cent. Missouri IstM.. 
Un., Lafayette 4 Chic. IstM. 
Del. & Hudson Canal Ist M. 
Atlantic 4 Grc:it West. 1st. M 
Morris & E-sex 7s of 1871. 
N. y.. Newr.l & London Tel. 
GBlveston, H. 4 H ,78, cold,71 
Pa llic Hi:, of Mo.. sticK-. .. 
PaclflcK.of Mo. Ist lis. gold 'SS 

do do 2d 7b, cur'y, '91 
iniscelIaneou« List. 
Arkansas Levee b^nds 7s 
Alchi8nn4P. Pj.Bsgold . 
Atlantic 4 Paciflc L.G. 6'8 gld 
AtoliHon, Top. 4 8. Fe 78 Kid. 
Atchison 4 Nebraska 8 p. c... 
Bar. 4 Wo. Blver, Btoci lU 



.00 
lOOH 

90 

9j 

94 

91 
U4 

:U7X 

»;;* 

101 X 
s6 
91 
il7 
1-5 

r,. 

95 
93 



89X 
99H 

Ul'K 
85 Jt 
7.x 
76« 

102V 



lOO 

91 S 
SIX 

tax 

lOil' 

99' 
96 
97M 
\j9 

98 
li3 



96 

■ma 

!U4 
93 
lOiX 



95 

MJt 
94 
100 
97S 

tan 
1.66' 

95 
t2 

91 jr 

8l>, 
90 
■)S 
98 
107 



110 
98V. 



:oox 



99)< 



'.7X 

96 
9!-.>i 
89>s 
81 

97" 
92 

101 

9:k 



s'W 



103 



BSOUBlTlKt . 



:o2 



VI 
35 



ir.8 

SBk 
74 

91 
91 
87 



78 
US 



1 sc 



Oii 



Bur. 4 Mo. River Land M. 7».. 

do do 2d S., do 76.. 

do do 3d &., do 8s.. 

do do 4th S.,do 8s.. 

do do 5th 8.. do 88.. 

do do 6th S.,do88.. 

do do Creston wran'l 

do do Chariton Branch 
Burl. 4 M. an Neb.) ist conv.. 
California 4 Oregon 6e, void,. 
California P»c. KH.7'8, Bid... 
do 68, 2d M., gld 

Csnada Southern Ist 78, gold.. 

Central Pac. 7b, goUl.conv 

Central of Iowa. Ist M,7'b gld. 
do 2dM,7'8,gld 

Keokuk 4 Sl.Paul, 88.... 1 ... 
Carthage 4 Bur. 8s. .. ■ • 
Ulion, Peoria* Unn., 88. lot 
0.0.4F0X K.Valley 88. « = 
Qnlncy4 Warsaw, 8b ... 

III. Grand Tr'ink 

Chic, Dub. 4Minn.,Bs.. 
Peoria* Hannibal R 8'8. 
Chicago 4 Iowa R. 8'b.... 

American Central 8b I — 

Chi. 4 Southeastern Rli. 7'8.. . 
Col. 4 Hdck. V. 1st 7b, 3.1 yrs . 

do do Ist 78. 10 vr8.. 

do do ?d 7s,20yi'8... 

Chic, Danv. & Vlncen s 7B.(;ld 
Cleve.. Mt.V. & Del. 7s, gold. 
Counecticut Valley 7b, fold... 

Connecticut Western 1st Is 

Chesapeake & Ohio 1st 6s,pold 
Chic. 4 Mich. Lake Shore £b.. 

Des Moines Valley IS' fs 

do do Land Grant Ps 

Dan., ITrb., B1.4P. Istm 7 eld 
Detroit, nillBdale4 III. RR.S'B 

Dutchess & Columbia Ts 

Denver Pacific's, gold 

Denver 4 Rio Grande 7s. gold 
Detroil. Limsing & Lake M. Ss 
Evansville 4 Crawfnrdsv. "s.. 

Erie 4 Pittsburgh Ist '8 

do 2.1 Ts 

do "s. equip — 

Evansville, Hen. & Nnsiiv. 78. . 
Klizabethtown 4 Padn. 8s con 
Evansville, T H 4 Clilc 7s. gld 
Knr pean 4 North Ani.68.gld 
Flint & Pere M. Ts, Land Gr.. 
Fort w., .lackson 4 Sac. Ifs... 
Grand R. & Ind. 7b, gold. guar. 

d" do 7s. plain 

Grand River Valley Bs 

Indlanap., Bl. 4 W . t st 78, gld. 

do do 2rt 8< 

Indlanap. 4 Vln^-en. Ist 7B.guar 
Iowa Falls 4 Sioux C. Ist 7b... 

Indianapolis 4 St. Louis 7s 

Jackson. Lansin 4 Sag. 8s... 
Kansas Pac. ',8, Extension, gld 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



7b, Land Gr., gld 
do new. gld 



68. 



g'd,jjun_4pec 



99H 
99H 



Feb 4 Aug 

IB, 1876, Land Gr 

7s, Leaven. Brch 

Incomes, No. 11. 

do Ko. 16. 

Stotk 

Kalamazoo 4 South IT. 88. guar 
Kal., Alieghan.4G R.S8,guar 

Kal.& White Pigeon 7s 

Kansas City 4 Caineron lOs... 
Kan. C..!-t. Jo. & C. B.Sp. c. 
Lake Sup. 4 Miss. l!?t 7'8, gld. 

do do 2d "8 

Leav.. Atch. 4 N. W. 78, guar. 
Leav Law. 4 Gal., stock 

do do IstM., 10s.. 

Lonlslana * Mo. Ri^-. l=t m. 7* 
Logans.. Craw. 4 S. ^V. 88, gld. 

Michigan Air Line, 88 

Mo ilieello 4 P. Jervi878,gold 
Montclalr 1st 7s. gold, guar 

do 78, income 

Mo.,Kan. 4 Texa.* *8 gold 

Mo. R., Ft., 8. 4 Gulf, stock. . . 

do do IBt. M. IDs 

do do 2d M.. Ills 

N.J.Midland Ist 7b, gold, guar 

do 2d 7s guar 

N. Y. 4 Osw. Mid. IBt It, gold. 

do do 2d 7s, conv. 

New York it Boston 7s gold.. 
N. Haven. Mkltllpt. 4 W. 7s ... 
Newbu'gbr'ch 78, euar. P^rie. 
Omaha 48onthwostern RR.S's 
Oregon & Calilornia 7b. gold.. 

Oswego 4 Rome 7b, guar 

Peoria. Pekln 4 T. Ist m, jzold 

Pitts. Cin. &St.L.lBt7s 

Port Huron 41. M.Ts.gId, end. 

do do 7b, gold 

Peoria 4 Rock I. Ts. gold 

Rockf'd.R 1.4 St. L.lBt78,gld 

Rome & Watertown 's 

Rome, W. 4 OKdensburg7s... 
Rondout A Oswego 78. gold... 

Sioux City 4 Pacific 6s 

Southern Paciflc 6's, gold 

South Side (L. l.>7s 

Steubenville 4 Indianaes 

2a 78 
Southern Minn, construe. Ss. 

do do 78 

St.Jo.4C.Bl. 6tM.,10e 

do 8 p. c.. 

St. Jo. 4 Den. C.Bs.gold.W. D 
do do 8s,Kold,E. D 

SaT.dnsky.Mnn8. & Newa'k 7b 
St.Louls, Vandalia4 T.H.lt 
do do 2d 

St. L. 4 So'eastern 1st 7b. gold 
St. L.. & St. Joseph. lBt,6s, gld 
Southern Central of N. Y. 78. . 

'Tebo 4 ls'eo8ho78,gold 

Union & Logansport78 

Utah Cemral 6b. gold 

Utlca, Clin. 4 Bing. 7p, guar.. 
Union Pac, i-o. branch. 6b, gld 
Walkill Valley Ist 7s, gold .... 

West Wisconsin 78, gold 

Mew Loans. 
Arkansas Sta'e Bonds, end. 76 
Cin.. l!l.-h. 4 F.W. Ist m gld 7« 
Chlc. & Can. South. Ist m Kl 78 
Ch., D. 4 v., I. dlv., 1 m grd 78 
Hou". 4 Tex. C. Ist ra. gold 7s 
Houston 4 Gt. N. iBt m. glil 7i 
Internat'l BR.Tez, Ittm gIdTg 



99 
94 
85 

7SX 

81K 

9ii 

79 

38 

24 

IIX 

3-M 

91 

81 



S3 

81 
6-. 
9tX 



9;>« 

lOU 



AbI 



97)4 



r.4 

:i4 

10-J 

97 k 

93 

90 

9l" 

F4 

98 

98 

94 

98 



91 

90 
86 

88 
101 

loi" 



n 

101 

£6M 



97X 

no 

85 
95 
65 

i2' 
86 
75 

83' 
lOO 
85 

75' 

80' 





97 It 




-.00 


Rfi 


.... 


06 




Si 


87 


fil 


8i!< 


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■u 


86 


.... 


B8 




911 






74 


92 


97 




92K 




90 




75 




90 






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du 



BBOITBITIXS. 



BM 



rnrt. &11I. C 1ft m pold 78... 
Ind.. B. & W. Ext , Ist in prl '.t 
.Jack.,>! W.&s \V. iBtinElls 
L. Ont. Shore KR. \^X ni.Rld *;* 
L»ke Slior** & M. S.lnr-'nieTs. 
Lop^'BP .' raw.&S.W.RR.'m.f^ 
N. Y. & Obwce" Mid. it-t m.g 
do do lid conv. 

Vorth.Par. ist m.gold 7a-iOa 
SprJnK. & lil. S.K- liil* lmgl'6 
South Carolina HK. ^'dni.. . 
St. Louis & S, E. RU. cou.m. 

Pough.& Enwt.T!!!. Mm 

South bide of L. 1. let m. ex.. 

Sontbern Securities, 

CITIES. 

Atlanta, Ga., 79 

do 88 

AngUBtfl , Ga., 7b, bonds 

Charleston stock 6b 

ChBiieslon.S.C.Ta.F.L.bds... 

Colunihia.S. C.Cb 

Coliimbi;8, Ga., 7a, bonds 



LynchbuiR 6s.._ 

Maron Ts. bonds 

Memphis old bonds, Cs 

do new iioiids.Bs 

do end.,M.& C.K.R... 
Mobile 5s. 



CIO Ss , 

Montgomery 8b 

NashTille 6b, old 

do Gb, new 

N'ew Orleans 58 

ao ao con8olB6p, 

do do bonds, 7». 

do do 108 

do do to rflilroadB,6j 

Norfolk 68 

Petersburg 66 

Richmond 6b 

SavJinnal) 7e,old 

do 7s. new 

Wilmington, N.C, «• cold 

do do S8 gold„.. 

EAILKOADS. 

Ala. A Chatt..iBt,M,6B,end... 
Ala. ft Tenn.B.lBt M..7B.... 

do 2dM.,78 

Atlantic & Gall consol 

I do do end Savun't 

I do do stock. 

! do do do gnaran. 

iCentral Georgia. IstM., 7a 

i dp do stock 

iCharfotU- Col. & A.,l8tm.,76. 

do do stock 

Charleston & SaTannah fis.end. 
jSavannah iinuCbar., Ist m.,78. 
|Cherawand Oarl'ngtnli 71.... 

East Tenn. & GevitjlaKs 

lKaBtTenn..t, Vft.6b end.Teun 
E.Tenn., Vn& Ga., Ut M.,78.. 

do do st.^ck 

■Georgia R. R..7b 

do stock 

Greonvllle & Col. 78, guar 

do do 7s, ct-rtil., 

\facon & Rranswlck end. 7s.., 

Macon & Western stock , 

Macon and Augusta bonds... , 

do do endorse 

do do stock.. .. 

MemphlB & Charleston, Ist '«).. 

do do Slid 78.. 

do do utock. 

Memphis & OIilo. lOs 

do do 6s 

Memphis & Little 1^. !c;M... 

MlsBlBBlppl Central, l^t m., 7s. 

do 2dm.,Ss... 

Mississippi &Tenn., l5tm.,78 . 

do do consold., 88. 

Montgomery & West P.. Ist. 88., 

GO do let end. 

do do Income 

Montgom.A Eufaula Ist 8s, gld 

end. by State of Alabama... 

Mobile & Mont., gs gold, end . . 

Mobile & Ohio sterling 

do do do excifs. 

do do 88, interest.... 



do 
do 

do 



do 
do 
do 



2 nitg, 8e. 

Income 

stock.... 



N. Orleans & .lack8. <d M. Ks. 

do do cert's, 8s. 

N.OrleflnsA Opplous. l8tM.8& 

Nashville & f hattiinooga, 68.. . 

Norfolk*; Petersburg let ni-.S? 

do do 7(? 

do do 2dmo., 8t 

Northeastern, B.C., lei M.Bb. ... 

do 2d M. ,8s 

Orange and Alex., lets, 6b - 

do 2ds, 6s 

do 3dB, 88 

do 4ths,88 

Rlchm'd & Peterb'g ut m., 78 . 

do do 2d m., 6s. 

do do Sd m., Ss. 

Rlch.,rre'ksb'g& Poto.es.... 

do do do conv. 7b. 

Rich, and Dauv. Ist cona'd 6s. 

do Piedmont Bs. .. 

d ' lst8, 8p 

VJelma, Rome& J).,l^t Jf..7B.. 
South & North Ala, 1st M., 8s. 

Southslde, Va., Istmtg. Sa 

do 2dm.,guartM 6s... 

do 3d m..6s 

do 4ttim.,86 

SottthweBt. RR., Ga., Ist mtg... 

do stock 

Spartensbur.* TJniori 7a, guar- 
S. Carolina RR. !fit M,7S (new; 

do do 68 

do do 7b 

do do Btock 

Va.& Tenn.l8ts,6e 

do 2dB.68 

do 3d8 88 

West Ala.. 88 guar 

Wilmington and Welrion 7b. . . . 
do Ch& Kuth. 1st m. end 
do do let M.. 8S.... 

PAST DTTK COrPOSB. 

TennesBee State coupons 

Vt>.'lnla Coupons. . . . . .... 

do do deferred... 

Memphis oty Coupons 

:?aBhvUie City Coupons 



January 11, 1873. 



THE CHRONICLE 



49 



iutieatments 



STATE, CITY AND CORPORATION^ riNANOE!). 

a^ EXPLANATION OK STOCK AND BOND TARLE3. 

!• Price* of ttip mp«t Active Stockd and Bonds are given In the "Bank- 
ers' Gazette," previously. Full quotations of all other becuritles will be 
found on precefliiiff pagce. 

2. Uoveriinient Secnrltien, with full infoi-matlon In rep^ard to each 
issue, the periodH of interest payment, size or denomination of bonds, and 
numerous otiier details, are given in the U. S. Debt atuteuient published in 
Tbe C11HO111CI.IC on the first of each month. 

3. City Rondu, and Rank, Tnanranoe, City Railroad and 
Gas 8tockN, witii quotation.'*, will uhuuIIv be puiiiishcd the first three 
weeks of eacti month, on the pa;;c immediately precedin;; tills. 

4. The Coniplelc Tablcn of State Mceiirilie)i, Clly Seriirl- 
ties, and Railroad and iTllKCcllanrous Stot-ka and ICoiidN 
will be re<;ul:u-ly jmlilished on the last Sjttiirday in e'K-li nionlli. The pultli- 
cation of these tables, occupying fourteen pages, requires the issue of a 
supplement, .vhich is neatly stitched In with the usual edition and furnished 
to all ret'ular euliserihers of TuE Ciironici.b. 



INVESTMEIVTS. 

The demand for Government securitiea has been active thia 
week from those purchasers who wish to hold bonds that are 
always marketable with ease, and which are moit cc- 
ceptablo 'as collateral security for loatis, whenever the owners 
may wish to borrow money. There is more and more evidence 
each year of a general confidence in U. S. bonds, which will 
probably cause their prices to gradually advance. 

Railroad stocks arc comparatively high in mo-st cases, and do 
not at present offer as much inducement to purchasers for invest- 
ment as they have done in the past. 

Railroad bonds continue to be the favorite Securities with 
private investors, who simply purchase with a view of obtaining 
safe bonds which pay an annual rate of interest from 7 to y per 
cent. We noticed last week all the new loans offered in our 
market, with the principal details of each, (the price of Logans- 
port, Crawfordsville & Southwestern 1st Mortgage Gold 7s should 
have been stated at! 97i instead of 90,) and wo will now refer 
briefly to some of the more prominent old bonds. The Central 
Pacific Ist Mortgage Gold 6s, which are so favorably known 
among large purchasers both in this market and in Europe, are 
selling at 99 J ex interest. We shall probably be able to give, next 
week, an interesting exhibit of the financial condition and pros- 
pects of the company, from a pamphlet of Messrs. Fisk & Hatch, 
just published for distribution to their customers. The Western 
Pacific first mortgage gold 6's, are quoted at 89J bid, and as they 
have a security hilly equal to the Centrals, must be considered rela- 
tively cheap. The Union Pacific railroad bonds have been popular 
for some time past on account of their low prices. The Credit Mo. 
bilier investigation now progressing, as to the original issue of 
some of these securities can hardly affect present bona fide hold- 
ers, and if it should result in securing the restitution of any 
funds to the company (after the manner of the Jay Gould suits 
in Erie), the effect would be favorable. The present value of 
Union Pacific bonds would seem to depend chiefly on the conv 
pany's net earnings, and these for eleven months ending Nov. 30, 
1872, amounted to $3,080,004, while gross earnings were $8,134,- 
754, and operating expenses, including large outlays to provide 
agaiuGt snow blockades, were $4,44S,7.50 ; the company's annual 
interest liabilities are now about 1^3,200,000, so that if the net- 
earnings for December are added there would be a considerable 
excess in the net-earnings of the year uver the interest liability. 

The Governing Committee of the Stock Exchange have decided 
in the case of the forged coupons of the Union Pacific Income 
Bonds, that hereafter when bonds are ordered back, coupons must 
follow the same course, on satisfactory proof of their having 
been cut from and belonging to the bonds. Union Pacific first 
mortgage gold G's are quoted at 87, Land Grant 7'b at 78}, In- 
come lO's at 79|. 

It is not necessary for us to give the prices of any considerable 
list of the biibstantial bondn on the Stock Exchange, as all 
these prices are quoted on a previous page, we may mention 
a few, however, which appear to be selling atreasonable 
rates — as the Fort Wayne 2d mortgage at 94|, 3d mortgage 
at 94i ; some of the smaller issues on sections of the Lake 
Shore and Michigan Southern road at 94 to 96 ; Albany 
and Susquehanna 8d mortgage, 91 to 95 ; Toledo, Wabash and 
Western St. Louis Division bonds, 93|; Chesapeake and Ohio 
Ist mortgage gol4 O's are selling by the financial agents 
at 80 and inteiest. We might enumerate many other 
bonds, including some that are seldem or never sold at 
the Exchange, but it is unnecessary to do so, as readers of the 
Cnnosici.E will generally form an opinion as to the different 
bonds, by examining the statements in regard to the respective 
companies which are published from time to time in our columns 



Purchasers should keep one fact in viair, nameljr, that s good 7 
per cent mortgage bond, on an old and paying road, cannot ottra 
be purchased below 00 In this market. There are undoubtedly 
some exceptions to thia rule, and it should he noderttood alio 
that it does not apply, at all, to new loana 

There has been some discuMion lafelr In regard to a decision 
in the suit of Adams Express Co. against MiMn. Vermllye & Co. 
Bankers, concerning the lethal ownership of certain 7-30 note* 
stolon from the Expreva Co. and paid for by them, and afterward* 
bought by Messrs. Vermilye li Co. in the regular course of baii- 
ness. Wo learn from counsel in the case that the decision did 
not turn chiefly on a question of fact in regard to notice bad bjr 
Vermilye & Co., but that the Conrt held that tbeae notes (U. 8. 
7 3-108) being past due at the time of purcLase by Vermilye It 
Co., and not bearing interest, were not to be considered as nego- 
tiable in the usual sense of that term, but only negotiable for 
purposes of redemption — that the point taken by defendant'* 
counsel that the notes were a part of the currency of the country 
was without force, and that purchasing them, as V. & Co. did 
after maturity, they acquired only the title of the vendor, which 
was the title of a thief. Also Adams Express Co., having paid 
immediately upon proof of loss the claimants of tlie bond*, stood 
properly in the place of owners. The fact of notice havinff b«en 
given of the loss was only incidentally mentioned by the Court. 



Debt and Finances of tbe State or Alabama.— The fol- 
lowing are the chief points of the State Auditor's Report lor tbe 

year ending Sept. 30, 1872: 

On the Both of September, 1871, there was a balance of ontstand- 

iiig warrants against the treasury amounting to $317,031 M 

Tlie disbursements during the year have been l.lT^.uai U 

Making a total of Ill..;»^5.-H 4t 

The receipts into the tresanry darins the year lure been 1.:%.U4A 65 

Leaving a balance against the treasury In outstanding warrants to 

amount of tl>7>U'< 81 

To this amount add State certificates outstanding SM.SOO 00 

And it will be seen that we have the fall sum of f MM.lffT 8t 

that mnst be secured fur the use of tbe State to pay sfT all h«r ubii|;ittioDS 
already presented and audited for payment. 

The claims pressing upon the State for liquidation so soon as 
funds can be secured for that purpose, which are not enumerated 
above, are as follows : 

Ralancc due school fund , $317 5*3 SS 

Salaries due State officers. Judges, Chancellora, *c I8,WI0 CO 

Balance due University on account of Interest lt.000 00 

$M«,i:5 S5 

m, 107 81 



Making a total of 

To which add Items heretofore enumerated . 



And we have a total of 

which ought to be provided for at the earliest poaslhle day. 
The actual receipts from State taxes during the year have been 



$9t0,58S 1< 

$7«7.i«3 m 

The Comptroller estimates the total receipts into the treasury 
for the next vear ending Sept. 30, 1873, at |1,250,000, and dis- 
bursements at $1,189,066. 

Candor cnmpels me to say that railroad endorsement by the 
State was not the chief agency in causing the decline of the 
State's credit. 

An ndeqtiate levy of taxes, and the prompt adjustment as pro- 
vided by statute pf all State obligations in the matter cf endorse- 
ment when defanlt was made, would have secured the entire 
confidence of financiers, and enabhd the corporations, whose 
success depended jpon the soundness of the State credit, to com- 
plete their projected lines, thereby faving tl.e people from loss 
and credit of the State from embarrassment. 

It will be observed that the direct indebtedness has been in- 
creased during thi- year in the sum of $301,474 28, and the con- 
tingent debt has been increased by railroad endors.ment to 
amount of $1,090,000. making a total increase, direct and con 
tingent, of 11,991,474 28. No inforiuution is on file in tliis office 
.showing how much, if any, of the contingent oMiRation of the 
State has became a direct or assumed indebtedness, but, in my 
opinion, great misapprehension prevails in the minds of the 
people upon this su'oject, 

The State has one mile of railroad comjdeted and equipped for 
every sixteen thousand dollars of recognizid endorsement (except 
endorsement of South and North road, which is ^2,000 per mile), 
and it will be seen at once that if the Slate will promptly dis- 
pose of each road when default is made in pnymenl of interest, 
the only loss that can accrue to the State will be the difference 
between sixteen thousand dollars per mile and the amount for 
which the road is sold at auction. 

To estimate tlie loss of the State at f2,0O0 per mile will be 
deemed ample, and this amount upon all roads which may pos- 
sibly make default will not exceed f l,o£0.000 upon all endorse- 
ments made to date. 

Add to this the siraight bonds issued by the Slate for railroad 
purposes (plac ing a low estimate upon the v.ilue of lands and 
other securities within the control of the State upon default), and 
we have an ultimate direct Indebtedness, arising from aid granted 
to said roads, of an amount not exceeding $3,000,000. Should 
this entire amount become a burden upon the pc-ople. the public 
debt inav be so adjusted that it can ultimately be p.ii I off without 
great hardship. The amount of interest on {'.\e total indebted- 
ness of the SUte would not in such contingency excee 1 $H(sJ,788, 
which could be discharged bf s tex lory of 4-10 of one per cent 



50 



THE CHRONICLE 



[Janu*ry 11, 1878. 



Add to this 4-10 of one per cent for State expenses and Bcbools, 
and one half mill tax for sinking fund, and we will have annual 
tax of 8} mills. TUis would be a per capita tax of %\ 85,_aDd 
allowing an equal amount for county purposes, it wouM be f 3 70 
per capita, a sum much less than the taxes now paid by New 
York, Pennsylvania, Ohio. Massachusetts or Vermont. 

The Auditor is unofficially advised of the eale of $218,000 in 
Alabama bonds of tlie last |1,000,000 loan, the proceeds of which 
have not been certified into the treasury, nor accounts for same 
presented for payment at this office ; making the total amount of 
Alabama bonds sold by financial agents, and unaccounted for at 
this date, |3sa.9()0. 

The amount of tax per capita for State and county purposes in 
Alabama is less tlian one-third of that of Vermont, one fourth of 
that of Ohio, one fifth of ihat of New York, and one-seventh of 
that of Massachusetts, all of which is fully shown by the public 
records of the country. 
Total bonded debt $5,661,800 00 

IDUOATIOHAIi FUND INDBBTEDKESS . 

UnWersity Fnnd ,*2K2 2S 

Sixteenth Section Fund ''^iS'™;? f? 

Valueless Sixteentti Section Fund 97,091 21 

Surplus Revenue Fund 6':9.086 86 

Total Educational Fund indebtedness 2,801,533 84 

OntsUindinR State Certificates per Treasurer's Eeport .3%,fii'0 00 

OutstandiiiK Auditor's Warrants 197.607 81 

Temporary loan from Lehman, Durr & Co 6,000 CO 



Agregate direct indebtedness $9,063,441 65 

Annual interest on trust funds $224,122 71 

ENDORSEMENT OF RAILROAD BONDS, &C., TO SEPT. 30, 1872. 

Nam", Of Road. Miles. Amount. 

Alabama ,jb Chatianooga 295 $4,7M,i 00 

'• '• reported excess issued 680,010 

East Alabama & Cincinnati 25 400,000 

Mobile & Alabama Grand Trunk 60 800.000 

Mobile & Montgomery 2,600,000 

Moatiomeiy & Eufaula 80 1,280,000 

Selma & Gulf 40 610,000 

Selma, Marion & Memphis 45 720,000 

Smith and North 115 2,5*1,000 

Savannah & Memphis 40 640,000 

690 $11,810,000 

STATE BONDS TOR RAILROAD PURPOSES. 

Alabama & Chattanooga $2,000,000 

Montgomery & Eufaula 300,000— $2,300,000 



Total Contingent Liabilities $17,110,000 

Mem.— State liouds (issue 1872) reported unsold, in hands of 

Financial Agents $782,000 

State Bonds (issue 1866) reported unsold, in hands of Financial 

Agents 1,600 

TAXABLE PROPERTr. 

Ti'tal value lands $';6,7S7,2!)9 80 

Total town property 36 733,482 22 

Total personal property 30,648,189 39 

Salaries, commissions, dividends, receipts, &c 2,979,082 29 

Premiums paid Insurance Companies 963,887 30 

Poll taxes 14 1 ,845 00 



Total value taxable property $147,224,925 50 

The average annual taxation of real and personal property is, 
therefore, about 6i mills on the dollar for the use of the State. 

raassacbnaottsi Finances. — Governor Washburn's message 
makes a very favorable exhibit of the financial condition of his 
State. More than ihree millions of the public debt have been 
extinguished during 1872, or, with the addition of a two million 
dollar loan to the Troy dnd Greenfield Railroad and Hoosac Tun- 
nel, a net reduction of about $3,000,000 has been accomplished. 
The existing funded debt is now $37,692,704. In Massachusetts 
no debt has been contracted of late years witliout the formation 
of a sinking fund to extinguish it, and, as a consequence, a large 
portion of the War Fund Loan, not absolutely maturing until 
1886, was paid ofT last year. 

Pennsylvania Finances. — Governor Geary's message was 
Biibaiitted to the Legislature Jan. 8. He saya the State debt has 
been reduced during the year nearly two and a half million dol- 
lars, leaving it, less assets on band, $16,531,039. He recommends 
a repeal of the enrollment tax on private ads chartering indus- 
trial institutions, and all taxes on capital stock, earnings and divi- 
dends of such companies. 

ITIalne Finances.— The financial statement is cheering. The 
deposits and the savings institutions have increased nearly $3,000,- 
000 during the past year. The finances of the State itself are also 
in excellent condition. The receipts last year were $1,335,000, 
and the debt was reduced over $50,000, and will be reduced the 
coming year more than three times that amount, while the State 
tax will not exceed five mills. The debt to-day is a little over 
$7,009,000, which the accumulating sinking funds will promptly 
pay. The financial prospects of the State were never so bright as 
now, for our products are undoubtedly growing in variety and 
amount. 

Debts or To-nrns, Counties, Etc., of Oblo. — In the message 
of Governor Noyes, of Ohio, the local indebtedness of the State on 
the Ist of September last ie stated as follows : 

Debt of counties, $3,756,000 ; debt of townships and Board of 
Education, $447,238 ; debt of cities of the firjt and second class, 
$11,495,591 ; debt of incorporated villages, $616,559 ; debt of school 
districts (special), $1,590,547, making a total of over seventeen 
millions and a half. Governor Noyes says the evil continues and 
grows upon tie people, and it is not likely to be diminished until 
a remedy shall be found in positive prohibitory legal enactments 
or in constitutional provisions absolutely forbidding local public 
debts. 

New York City Finances—The message of Mayor Have 
meyer states that the actual disbursements in 1873 as compared 
yrith the expenses aitd liabilities of the preceding year show a 



saving of $6,037,789, or of $8,733,866 allowing for the excess of 
State taxes, interest, and the amount paid or liable to be paid on 
account of Fourth Avenue improvements. The expenditures of 
the year 1873 are less than 1.81 per cent of the same valuation of 
1871, being $30,234,799 64. The city and county debt now 
amounts to a total of $118,855,329, an increase in six years of 
$45,187,770; and the annual taxation during that period has in- 
creased from $16,950,767 to $3'3,036,290. The taxation of 1873 h as 
been fixed at 3.23 per cent on the valuation of 1872. The in- 
creased rate is required to meet the excess of the quota of the 
State tax for 1873 over 1873, amounting to $4,016,703 49. Of this 
amount, $3,044 387 72 is required to be contributed by this 
county to meet a deficiency in certain sinking funds of the State. 
The inequalities of State and city taxation impose on the city of 
New York a large por'.ion of the expenses which should properly 
fall on other portions of the Stite. Mayor Havemeyer shows 
that this city will pay this year $3,108,700 out of its local taxa- 
tion for the support of local schools, and a further sum of $761,- 
553 for the support of schools in other parts of the State. 

Brooltlyn Finances.- The Mayor's Message accounts for the 
increase of taxation in Brooklyn by the addition of several large 
debts which the city incurred last year, one ot which, $147,000, 
should have been included in the taxes of last .year. The Chi- 
cago relief fund, amounting to $100,000, the deficiency of 1871- 
'72, $100,000, and $1 10,000 for repairing certain streets also helped 
to swell the amount 

The total funded debt of Kintrs County is $3,437,000 00 

Total certificates of indebtedness issued 217,712 00 

Total $3,654,712 OO 

City debt $23,006,000 00 

Less amount on hand, sinking fund , 2,745,070 92 

Total $20,200,929 08 

The bonds issued for local improvement, and now outstanding, 
amount to $9,458,055 10; certificates outstanding,'$2,293,900 50. 
The indebtedness under the heading of certificates outstanding 
is $766,350 iu excess of last year. 

County Bonds, Judgment against a Repudiating County. 

— No. 24 — Lynde vs. County of Winnebago — Error to Circuit 
Court for Iowa — This was. an action on county bonds, and the 
judgment was for the county, on the ground tliat the bonds were 
issued without a vote of the people, aa required by law. That 
judgment is here reversed, in accordance with a long line of de- 
cisions on the same point in similar cases, to the effect that where 
such bonds are issued reciting on their face that they are issued 
in pursuance of a vote of the people, and they fall into the hands 
of innocent parties without knowledge that the recital is false, 
the county issuing them is estopped to deny the fact. 
Mr. Justice Swayne delivered the opinion. 

Boston, Hartford and Erie Railroad. — It appears that a 
report of this company published in TuE Chronicle of Jan. 4, 
on page 21, has misled some partii s as to the earnings, expenses, 
and net income of the road. It should be distincLly understood 
that the statements there given referred to the portion of ,the 
road in Massachusetts, and not to the whole line including the 
Hartford, Providence, and Fishkill road. The gross receipts on 
the whole property are reported to be somewhere near $3,000,000. 
Boston and Lonrell and Fttcbbiirg Railroads Consoli- 
dated.— Our special correspondent writes from Boston : 

"The most important movement bere at present is the consoli- 
dation of the Boston and Lowell and Fitchburg roads, with the 
ulterior purpose of consolidating with them the Vermont and 
Massachusetts and the whole Hoosac Tunnel line to Troy. The 
consolidation of the B. and L. and the F. is favored by the mana 
gers of both roads, but the proposition has not yet been laid 
betore the stockholders. It may meet with opposition in the 
Legislature, as there is a strong inclination in some quarters to 
have the State take this line." 

Boston and Itlaine Railroad Seven Per Cent I.oan.— 
The proposals for |5u0,000 of the above loan were opened this 
week. Bids were received for over $1,600,000. The accepted 
bids averaged 4f per cent premium. 

midland Railroad and I>ela\rare and Hudson Cai>al 
Company. — The VXiv.& Observer says: The leases of the Utica 
and Clinton and Bingham ton. and the Rome and Ciinton Rail- 
roads to the New York and Oswego Midland Railroad and the 
Delaware and Hudson Canal Company, completed recently at New 
York, and signed by the Presidents of the different companies, 
and these important measures so long iu progress have been con- 
summated iu a manner quite satislaetory to all the interested 
parties. 

For nearly a year past these two roads have been operated by 
the Midland under preliminary agreement, and now they have 
passed permanently into the hands and under the control of the 
lessees, the Midland operating the roads, and the Delaware and 
Hudson Canal Company furnishing a vast amount of coal for 
transportation and guaranteeing the payment of the annual 
rentals. 

inontclair Railwray. — The completion of the Montclair 
branch of the New York and Oswego Railway is regarded very 
justly in New Jersey as an event of no small importance to that 
State. The road is about forty miles long, commencing at Jersey 
City, passing through Kearney, North Newark, Bloomfield, 
Montclair, Little Falls and Pompton to Greenwood Lake, where it 
is to connect with the short line of the New York and Oswego 
Midland Railroad. The Montc',air Railway has two branches now 
building, one leading tot Orange and the other to Morristown. 

— E. R. Mitchell, acting financial agent of the State of Alabama, 
left a few days ago to negotiate bonds issued by one of the Legis- 
latures. It is thought that he may not stop at New York, but go 
to Europe. 



January 11, 1873.] 



THE CHRONICLE. 



61 



The BaflTalo, Corry & PIttHbarKh Railroad has been Hold 
to Co). Phillips, of Pittsburgh, President of ihe Alleghany Val- 
ley and th« Oil Creek and Allepliany Kiver Railroads. Tlie road 
-will be laid with new iron, and be made first class in all its 
appointments. Through coaches will be run Irom Pittsburgh 
direct to Buffalo. 

This road was sold on the 7th of December to the trustees of 
the fi rst-mortgape bonds for $000,000. The road is 43 miles long, 
extending from Brocton, N. Y. (on tho Lake Shore road, 10 miles 
west of Dunkirk) southward to Corry, Pa. For tlie Inst year 
reported (ending Sept. 30, 1871) its earnings were about $250,000, 
and its expenses $195,0U0. Its bonded debt was $700,000, but it 
had a flouting debt of nearly half a million. 

The Cairo and Fulton Railroad.— The last rail on the north- 
em division of the Cairo and Fulton Railroad, connecting Little 
Rock, Ark., with St. Lonis, was laid Jan. 2. The southern dlvi- 
sion of this road extends from Little Rock to Northern Texas, 
where connection will be made with the International Railway, 
wliich in turn connects at Hearne, Texas, with a system of roads 
extendinsr to the Gulf of Mexico. This division will be com- 
pleted within the pr. sent year. 

Cleveland, Monnt Vornon dc Dcla'ivare.— The necessary 
papers have been filed with the Secretary of Stale of Ohio, to 
enable the company to construct a branch from near Oxford, in 
Holmes county, south through Coshocton and Muskingum counties 
to Dresden on the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati & St. Louis load, a dis- 
tance of about 40 miles. The capital stock is to be increased 
$1,000,000, making it $3,000,000. 



—The first train on the Missouri. EaoMS and Trias Bdlroad 
arrived at Deniaon, Texas, Wndneaday night, amid general re- 
joicing ot the people of Northeru Ttxas. 



RAILROADS OP OHIO. 

We have obtained Irom official sources a labulaKMl slatf m'-nt 
of all the railroads of the Slate of Ohio for the year ending June 
30, 1872. Although this is pablished at a comparatively lale 
period, it has not yet been given to the pablic, and will not be 
published in the State report for some time to come. The total 
figures for the entire lines of all railroads, including the mileage 
without the Stale as well as in it, are aa follows : 

Capital stock paid in, $219,101,127 ; funded debt, $217,171,753 ; 
floating debt, $10,738,180 ; total debt, $327,90U,03.'; ; length of 
road and branches, laid with rail, 0,500 miles ; cost of read and 
equipment, $338,1 13,404 ; gross earnings, $65,603,078 ; operating ex- 
penses, $45,034,708 ; net earnings, $20,568,370; passengers C4rrle<l, 
13,008,832 ; freight carried, 20,083,008 tons ; interest paid on bondi, 
$0,726,359 ; dividends paid, $7,554,032; persons killed, 192 ; per- 
sons injured, 358 ; animals killed, 1 ,020 ; amount paid for same, 
$45,573 ; employes, 23,893 ; per cent increase gross earnings for 
year, 12.74 ; average cost (per cent) of operating, 08.32 ; per 
cent increase of net earnings, 11.03; increase of rail laid, in- 
cluding sidings, &c., 375 miles. 



COMPANY. 



s-sS 



8.6 
667 

'is 

1-37 
6 

60 

20.5 
148.5 

42 
815.5 

48.5 
391 
(•) 
«<114.S 
22.-). S 
(i) 

69 
(*) 
(') 
140.7 

.HI. 8 
(i) 

7 

9J.4 
37 
1,073.8 
37 
8 

276.8 
102 

W 
44.9 
35.3 
393 
11 
978 5 
503.3 
5.5 
116.2 
602 8 



Cost of 

road and 

equipment. 



0059,723,841 



(» 110.461 

5.S00.000 

1.102,953 

6,326.116 

2,032,209 

6..'i00.3«7 

1.011.085 

7,982,9.3.'i 

8,1.00,000 

14.413.282 

3 1 17,914 

2,5-i5.12o 

11.804.024 

86.919,2S« 

3.3io,813 

(*) 

1 49:), 146 

6,72:;,K81 

Iil2.015 

860,000 

200,000 

322.668 

4,696,374 

1.487,312 

57,086,;49 

2.8.38,252 

('Id) 

4,657,617 

21.79'-).488l 

l,6.')0.000i 

31.1.729 

1.728.000 

1,1.55.651 

34,410.752 

2.55.997 

18.432.871 

26,288.122' 

124,]>i9 

.3,2I9.465[ 

8:!,700,a00 



Amount oflAmount of 
capital funded and 



-EamloKS.. 



stock paid 
up 



floating 
debt. 



t234,.380 

24,000,000 

875,.566 

14. ICO 

2,84.5,.W) 

«70,600 

8,600.000 

600.000 

8,996,610 

:i82,600 

4,729,a3 

1.100.000 

IS.S-M.SS-l 

a. 059,200 

1.200.000 

11,220,160 

13.328,r)69 

1,113,110 

(*) 

1,7S6,500 

8,400.69! 

86,000 

200.000 

129,5.'i0 

3,055.000 

974.000 

85000,000 

741.938 

200,000 

4,108,250 

845.660 

13,993.952 

i.-.o.ooo 

191.7. 5 
848,000 
5011.0001 

24,0.30.000 

255.997 

5.4.l:j,.W0 

21,614.286 
75.863 
9.30,623 

16,000.000 



$100,000 

60,375,.52rt 

69,578 

2,6ob'.o66 

432.4.Vi 

2.032.000 

(/)i.oro.ooo 

L.'iOO.OOO 

711,199 

.3,274 4.'!H 

2..5OO,00O 

3.000.000 

1,164.000 

2.300.000 

3.842.600 

24.3.52.348 

2,0li0,l37 

(h 

802,000 

8,600,721 

627.445 

674,000 



Passen- 
gers. 



77.3,240 



271,590 



417.011 
72,.3:)t) 

126,725 
77,265 

264,431 



15.449 

8,038.000 

612,342 

28,914,424 

2,076,160 



1,680.000 

6,000 

11.195,614 

1,500.000 

102,219 

- 8^0.000 

559,684 

10.440,76J 



13,996.243 
13,640.830 
37.600 
2,307,843 
17,700,000 



803,057 

(0 

77,160 
602,874 
(it 
11.3,020 
(*) 
(I) 
807.006 

48,306 

(i) 

(»') 

9.443 
125,291 

28..573 
8,975,157 



Freight. 



3,028,076 



8.1.31 
636,870 



693.344 
114,185 
289,73- 
132,879 
607,648 



(1) 
4&il51 



89.132 
1,021,902 



(02,699,567 

2.505.696 

15,091 

166.1,55 

1,202,990 



3,876,806 

«) 

209.898 i 
8,690,898 

(i) 
653,789 
(*l 

») 
781.010 

78,365 

(i> 
(m) 

81.971 
155,577 

4t863 
11,502,363 



(A) Total. 



* 

3,921,601 



6 829 
966,316 



1,369^784 



147,600 
2,164,499 



(06.641,927 
6,441,704 

tn) 

383,764 
4 304,493 



1..300,.3.34 
196.249 
458.572 
218741 
850.765 

4,3i53,896 
lil 
800.347 
8,898.846 
(*) 

68 J, 195 
(») 
It) 
1,082,922 
134,118 
(I) 
("■) 

9.5.8.82 

295,959 

71.052 

16,210,585 

(«)18.188 



Operating 
cxpeuiies. 



» 

!,916,348 



3.906 
850,339 



il 

. o 
■ •% 

ii 



Net earo- 
Ings. 



767.969 6905 
l:«,877l «8.SS 



3a •.858 
169.209 
625.611 



(i) 



1.860.717 

{r)60,792 

(0 



(0 



1,916,C43 
(0 



67.88 
48 



45.SS 



60.18 
«1,10 



Afhtabuin, Tonng, & Pitte, (a) 
Atlantic & Great Western ;4). 

Atlantic & Lake Eric (a) 

Carrollton & Oneida 

Central Ohio (c) 

Cincinnati & Baltimore (d),.. 
Cincinnati, Ham. & Dayton. . . 

Cincinnati & Iiidiaiia 

Cincinnati & Muekingura Val. 
Cin., Richmond * Chicago («). 
Cin.. Sandusky & ClevelHnd(!?) 
Cliicinnntl * Springfield (a)., 

CleVL-., Col.. Clii. & Ind 

Cleveland & Mahonlnj; (A) 

Cleve., Mt. Vmjon & Bel. (o) 
Cleveland & PitlBburg (.if) .. 
Colnmbus. Chic. & Iiid V.(j) 
Columbus & Hocking Valley. 
Columbue, Spring. & Cin, (A) 

Columbus & Xenia (j) 

Dayton * Michigan («; 

Dayton & Union 

Daytcm & Western (J)... 

Harrison Branch (m) 

Iron 

Junction (Cin. & Indianapolis) 
Lake Erie & Louisville i+)(a). 
Lake hhore& Mich. South.... 
Lake Shore & Tuscarawas V(aJ 

Libertv & Vienna (U) 

Little Sliami ij) 

Mansfleld.Coldwiiter & L.M.(o) 

Marietta & Cincinnati 

Marietta & Pittsburgh (a) 

Massillon & Cleveland («) 

Newark. Som. & Straitsv. (d). 

Nlles & New Lisbon 

Ohio & Mississippi 

Painesville & Youngstown (<7) 
PitMburgb, Clu. & St. Lottis(0 
Pittsburgh. F. W. & Chic, (f) 

Eocky River 

Sand., Mans. & Newark (!), c). 
Toledo, Wabash & Western . . , 

Total miles laid with rail, .. I6.598«lt388,113,494i$219,161, 127 $227,909,9.36 tl6,108,462l$46,889,178 $66,603,078 »15.0 '4,708. 
Length to be when completed 7,408>i Lest dcflcits (n) (p). 

Length laid with rail in Ohio. '3,787 



74.S4 



«t.80 



70.40 
77.88 
61 77 



t 

i,oo6,afls 
i.sis 

115.977 



iDterett 

Said on 
iinded 
debt. 



8,170,307; 

«l I 

173.619, 
1,&S1,*;9 

«) 
?0',662 
(*) 

(') 
716.731 

81,9:J9 

(1) 
(">) 

68,403 
341,4 

43.158 
11,376 682 



78.80 



71. 34 
109.67 
67 
TO 



688 866 
68.378 

136.716 
49. &4 

tSS.*44 



1,183,889 
<i) 

186.718 
1,717,6« 
(t) 

878,633 
(*) 
"•) 

866,191 
n,809 
O) 
(m) 
87,479 
(") 
87.8M 
4,833.90.1 
(0)18,188 



Uivldenrti. 

Rate per 

oeoi. 



(»ituo.ooa 

67,906 
MS 080 
80.8110 

te.ios 

4S.7i!0 
164,8401 
140.0W 
810. 

86 

181. 

*.1,675 

1,2W.*74 

144.468 

(f. ! 

81.7831 

859.475 

10,800 

W,7W 



108.60 



179 553 i 
3,343,846 



94,178 IB.80 
8,359,Si8l TO.K 



(« 



(P) 
(i) 



8S.S7S 
864.006 



(09.802,8161(07.701.508 18.80 (0«.101.S18 
9,312,318; 4,889.214 60 80: 4,4«,1M: 



t.4fi0 

l,Mi;WT 



101,M9 



T.96« 
•6.17« 
S5.108 

eie,»d 



15.091 

574.951 

6,000,384 



n,5;i2 76.60 8.669 

637,149 9342 87,808 

8,991.0791 66.90 8,009,306 



884. 188 

»M,57S 

li!49 

168,500 

1.8i«7,»a0 



tS0,6e8.81»lt»,1i«,8» 

, , , n,8«« 



(«)• 



Length double track in Ohio. 
Length sidings, &c, in Ohio.. | 



208 

682— making 4,677 miles of track in Ohio laid with rails. 



$20,668,870 



U 



(ee) 

(a) 



{«) 



T 

T 

7a)6 
(wi 

(M» 



(«) lOK 



(«)T 

'■■» 



(o) Roads In process of constmctlon. 

(6) For 10 months only. Includes Cleve, A Mahoning in length and operations. 

(c) Leased— operated by B, & O. RR. Co. 

(d) Just completed. 

(e) Operated in conjnnction with C, H, & D, RR. underlease, 

(O Two millions of this, a joint mortgage of this Co, (80Xm.) and the Ind., 
Cin, & Laf . RR, Co. (158xm.) properly apportioned; total debt i» $2,269,060, 

(a) IncludesCol., Sp, <fc Cin RR, 

(h) Leased— operated by A. & G. W, RR, Co, 

(il Included in report of lessee. 

(J) Leased— operated by P. C. & St, L, Ey. Co. 

(«) Stock exchanged for that of Cin., San. & Cleve RR. Co ; payment of 
bonds and interest assumed by latter, and road and operations iuclndcd in ita 
report . 

(0 Stock sank. 

(m) Leased— operated by White Water Valley RR, Co. ; no report. 

(n) Deflcit$28,6-i3. 

(0) Earnings of mixed train run In connection with construction train, five 
montiis— Jan. 31 to June 30. 

(p) Deficit, $65,326, (Of this, $24,990 Is excess of expense of telegraph line 
over receipts from same source.) 

(g) From Oct., '71, to June ;iO, '72, Marietta to Caldwell, 35 miles. 

(r) Included with construction. 

(») Leased— operated by C, Mt. V. & D. RR. Co. 

(0 Includes leased lines. In addition to length given, this Co. owni jointly 
and Dies la common with C. O. Kii. Co., S3 mllei between Newark and 
Colojnbui. 



(«> Carry passengers only. 

(V) "Lake Erie iHv, B. & O. RR." 

(aa) From former reports . 

(6ft) $101,000 "original cofit" balance expended past year. 

(cc) Paid from rental . 

(dot) Not reported. 

(ee) Includes length and operations of Mast. A Clere. SB. 

(ff) Leased — operated by Penn. Co. 

(f/g) Made a stock dividend of 20 p«r cent. 

(hn) Made also a frsctionai extra dividend. 

• Per annum part of year. 

(A) Includes $.3,610, t3.S from mail, express, 4e. 

tThe Lake Eric & Lonisvillo lUl.road was sold at Judicial sale Jnly 87, 1871 : 
sale confirmed October 18, 1811 . It was pnrchasi-d by irostees for benefit of ill 
tho bondholders. That portion locateciln Ohio, extending (Vom Fremoollo 
Union City, reorganized und»r name of Fremont, Lima * Union Railway Co^ 
in November, 1871, and the property waa deeded to them by trustee Decembar 
8tf,1871. , 

Tbat part in Indiana reorganized Not. 10, 1871, and the two companle* con- 
solidated April 12, 1S12. ^^ . -.. , . 

That part of the L. E. * L. RR. lying lonih of Cambridge City. Ind., wae 
not sold under the decree of foreclosure, and thia company have izleaded 
their line from Fremont to Sandosky, under act of April 87, 1878, cerUflcale 
filed May 17, 1872. ... „™,,~ v . 

Since the reorganization a first mortgage was eiecntedfor $Wi80,00n, bat no 
bonds were isened ander it at date of report (Jane 80, Vtttt. A eecond mort- 
gage was also iesued for $1,000,000, of which $600,000 were Bagottatad. 



52 



.THE CHRONICLE. 



[January 11, 1878. 



®l)2 Commercial ^imes. 

COMMERCIAL EPITOME. 



Fbidat Nioht, Jan. 10, 1873. 
Trade opens the new year with many favorable aspects. In 
imported goods the improvement being especially marked, busi- 
ness having been so dull the past two months that the wants of 
the country now begin to be felt, stocks in the hands of dealers 
having been much reduced. Still, the condition of our streets is 
a serious drawback, causing delays, and increasing the cost of 
doliving mercbandiae. Withjan improvement in this respect, and 
milder weather throughout the Northern and Western States, a 
further increase in the volume of business will undoubtedly take 

place. 

Cotton has been variable ; an advance of Jc. early in the week 
has since been partly lost, middling uplands closing at SOic Flour 
has become dull, phipping extras closing at $7@7 40; wheat has 
also become dull and depressed. No. 2 spring closing at $1 56@ 
$1 85. Corn closed quiet at 64@G6J^e. for prime mixed in store 
and afloat. Groceries have been in fair demand, but coffees have 
shown less buoyancy, while sugars have been scarce. 

Freights have been more active, the result mainly, however, 
of some decline in rates. Nearly half a million bushels grain 
have been shipped to Liverpool at 7@7id. by sail, and 7i(i5!8d. 
for wheat; with cotton 5-lG@fd. by sail, and 7-lC@Jd. by 
Bteam; also by steam, cheese 60s. and bacon .55s. Grain to 
Cork, for orders, 7s. 6J., and petroleum 73., with a few charters, 
to-day there was a firmer feeling ; grain to Liverpool at 7i@7fd. 
by sail, and 7i@8d. by steam ; and to London by sail, wheat 9d. 
and flour Ss. 3d. 

Tallow has advanced to 8ic. for prime, with more activity. 
Whiskey declined to 92ic., but has recovered to 90c. Alcohol 
has sold for export at 47c. in bond. Strained rosin has been more 
active at !j3 70 for export, closing with an advance to |3 80. 
Spirits turpentine was easier, with free sales at 59@59ic., but 
closing at (ilc. Tar has declined to $3 35. Crude petroleum has 
decline,! to lOJo. on the spot and lOJc. for next month. Refined 
petroleum is stili nominal at 25@37^c. in bbls., but rather more 
demand. Naphtha has declined to 15J@lCc. in bbls. Wool con- 
tinues to rule dull. The stocks, except of domestic fleece, are 
about 130 jier cent, in exce.'S of last year. Clover seed has been 
quite active at 9i@9ic. Hops have ruled dull. East India goods 
quiet, exci'pt some sales ot Calcutta lineed at $3 50. gold. 

Provisions have shown some advance in prices during the past 
week. Park has been moderately active and prices have ad- 
vanced ; now mess has sold ut $13 75@I4 in a jobbing way on the 
spot, and in wholesale lots for future delivery at $13 75@13 80 ; 
Western prime mess in wood bound packages has sold at ^14. 
Lard has advanced and has been very active for future delivery, 
the sales in one day lor March amounting to over 5,000 tierces, 
and a good bv -nesshas also been done for Feb. and April ; prime 
Western has e<'lJ at 8@3ic, on the spot and for January, 8 3-16 
@8ic. for February, 8i@8Sc. for March, and 84^e. for April, closing 
at outside figures. Bacon has after some reaction that took place 
since the breaking of the "corner'' become firmer, and there has 
been a good business done ; long clear has sold at 6|@7c. on the 
Bpot, fife, for Janunry. and 7c. for February ; short clear closed at 
7J@7fc. on spoi, and has brought 7fc. for January and March de- 
liveries, and Ions and short clear together have sold for February 
and March at 7(ci!7ic.. Cut Meats have been in good demand and 
business been done at 5@5 l-16c. for dry salted shoulders, closing 
• with 5ic. asked. The market for hog products closed with some 
speculative buoyancy in lard and box meats. Beef has been 
quiet »nd rather easier. Butter has been very firm especially for 
fine grades. Cheese has been in more demand and higher, with 
sales ot choice factories at 15@t5ic. 

Tobacco has been rather quiet during the past week. Stocks 
are light and assortments poor ; besides, it has been so difficult 
and expensive to transport merchandize for delivery or ship- 
ment that some orders have been held back. The sales of Ken- 
tucky have been only about 200 hhds., nearly all for expert, 
including some new crop at 8i@10ic. for lugs and low leaf ; 
quotations must, for the time being, be omitted. Seed leaf 
tobacco has also had a rather slow sale. We notice the follow- 
ing : Crop of 1871— 200 cases Connecticut, 45@55c.; 21)0 do. Ohio, 
lOJ^llic.; 300 do. Wisconsin, OfSlOc; crop of 1870—200 cases 
sundries at 10i@13c. Spanish Tobacco remains dull : sales 30O 
bales Havana, $1@1 07 ; 50 bales Yara, on private terms. 

Dried fruits have been doing better for botli foreign and do- 
mestic, sales including layer rai.sins, $3'; loose Muscatel do., 
$2 50; Zante currants, 6ic. ; Turkish prunes, 7ic., and citron, 38c. 
Fish was active, with sales of No. 1 Halifax mackerel at 116 50@ 
$18, ex ship, and cod at $5 63i<a$a 50 for Bank. In fish oils 
there has been some improvement. 

Of metals, we notice a largo movement in ingot copper at 34i@ 
35ic. tor Lake, spot and forward delivery, and 30i(a)31ic. for 
English. Block tin quiet, but in plates the sales have been lib- 
eral, including charcoal tin at $10 75@$11, gold. Pig iron has 
declined to $41®$ 15 for No. 1 American, with 20,000 tons Grey 
Forge, sold a' .$40, and 1,800 tons Eng'ish scrap at $50, which ia 
a material decline. 



lixporta or LeadliiK Article* trota !Vew Tfork. 

The loUowingtable.compiledlromCuBtomHouse rolurnB, shows 
the exports of leading articles from the port of New York since 
January 1, 1873, to all the principal foreign countiies, and also the 
totals for the last week, and since January 1. The last two lines 
show total mluea, including the value of all other articles besides 
those mentioned in the table. 

w tx so e- « to - • »• 

'if cr. t-_ci5ofiR ; • — 



eas; 



m St" in - 



32 K ' 



• -N M -*■ O ' O " "■ '"" 

■305*3-00 — 



C2 T-i oc tO o g ij 



i« m— I 



-s 



CO O o: c? "If to 9 



SWIM r- 



H irt C» O -O Ci 
C* :0" — -W 

*a' "WE 



Sr-« to 17* O W O 



Scn-^ o o 3s 



fa- 












•def 









■S.sK'^ : : 


i;i; 


«« . . - . 


• : : • 


S 




o 


: .-SS 



•■8 



■ -* * t- 
■!0 — ■«• 






:§ :i ■■ 



.eo ■ '^ 



•■% 



Us 



^ a 

09 9« 

a a, 



ss 



• o ■ 
•of ■ 



OE4 






0) OS 






•■ :28 



: IS 



•S« -wet 



; tnot 



C40 



Jf 



= ■ E'S 






:S : :S 









.•» . .f • • -o 

• n • •to ' • '& 



Wirt 



IKS 









:s 



:3 = 



•m • aot- 

th t- QD 









. a . ■ 

:£< : : 



a 



llli'tllllifes 

■ w '^ o ; *D « 
:^ .2 , » <" 



■••e. 



:P< 









;«>iB ■■$ ':cil 



u»(aH;i; ' co 



A 



«t<(< 



January 11, 1873.] 



THE CHKuNIOLE. 



68 



Import* ol'IiOadlnK Artlclea. I 

Til* following table, compiled from Cualom Home return* 
Bliowa the foreign imports of leading articles at this port ginc» 
Jan. 1, 1873, and for the same period of 1873 and 1871: 

[The quantity la given In paclatKea whon not otlierwlno Bpeclfled.] 



Ublna, <}lass anU 
EartUeuwaro— 

China 

KartUenware — 

Ulaas 

Glassware 

Olasfl plate 

Buttons 

Coal, tuns 

Cucoa. bags 

Cotl'ce. btiKs — ... 

Cotton, bales 

Prugs, &c.— 

Bark, I'eruvlan, 

Blea powders. .. 

ilrlnistone, tons 

Coclilnual 

Cream Tartar.. 

Gambler 

Gam, Arabia 

IndlKO 

UadUer 

O.ls, essential.. 

Oli.OUve 

opium 

^oda. bl-carb... 

Soda sal 

Soda,a£!i 

jflax 

Furs 

Gunny cloth.. ., 

Hair 

Hemp, bales 

Hides, &c.— 

Bristles 

Hides, diesBcd. 

Cndla rubber 

iTory 

Jewelry. &c.— 

Jewelry 

Watches 

Linseed 

Molasses 



Same 
time 
lliU, 



18,575 



167 



Same 
lime 
IKl. 



499 
1,761 
S.SKi: 

Bll 

liii 

s;l 

1,191 



Metals, dsc— 

t;utlery 

Hardware 

Iron, Uli bars.. 

Lead, pigs 

r,li)» 



Since 

Jan. 1, 

1873. 



Spelter 

bteel 

Tin. boxes 

Tin sUbs, Ibi., 

20I!nK« 

1,3U buisar. hhds., tC0. 

...1 itbbls 

jSugar, boxes A 

1,607) bags 

riSTea 

ITobttcco 

137Waijte 

85,Wlnes, &.r..— 

Champag'e.bks. 

bii) Wines 

163, Wool, bales 

.... Artl les reported 
llj by value— 

SiK'Clifars 

1^, Corks . 

Fancy goods 

....IFIsh 

!i2«iFruit8, &c.— 

931 Lemons 

is\ Oranges 

....) Nuts 

Ill Kaislnt 

1,793 Hides undressed 
Klce 

24 Spices, &c.— 

^,694 Cassia 

1,176 Ginger 

1 Pepper 

Saltpetre 

341 Woods— 

6i Cork 

600 Fustic 

25 Logwood 

1 Mahogany 



Same 
time 
1872. 



91 

S3 

9,\»i 

8,723 

8.077 
U,<,S 

l!',i78 

!,M0 

12,293 
l,4<« 

3,186 
2 

7.31' 

i.aso 

2.68^ 



l.OU 
633 

: 1.960 
8,017 

2.il<)9 
21,101 
26,211 
66,4(6 
335,7. « 
24,613 

1 

3,709 
ti 



2.ii(y) 

17,468 
4»6 



51 

55 

23,125 

4,142 

llle,8<* 

1,7;: 

4,53! 

731,766 

8,e(:6 

8,880 

53.623 

bfia 



6,847 
986 



£6,686 

n,v~ 

IU,5JU 

i4.5in 

46,188 

iri.;s5 

\6i.UU 

320,1 6!i 

1,672 

21,872 



1,7S0 
•.,321 
I9,2a» 
6,W6 



Receipts of Domestic 

The receipts 



Produce for tUe Week aud 
January I. 

of domestic produce have been as follows : 



Bun* 
time 
1871, 



83 

47 

6.951 

8.571 

r.i'io 

6,315 

6>.75J 

1,439 

SM 

1,873 

3,0M 

469 

19 

7.148 

5,8S2 

491 



1,884 
12.433 



9.804 

24.US5 

HO 

283.541 



9 ;07 
1,159 



>,99e 
t 
since 



From the foredolnp statemrtt It will b«ie. '" • < ompirM 
with the correspond injT w^ek of last season, tli' reatt ii 

the exports this week of 23,90S bales, while the f. i.n{ht ar 

1.9,)7 bales U»> than they wr-re at this time a year ago. Thi 
following is our nsual table showlnjc the movemeDt ol cotton a 
all the ports from Sept. 1 to Jan. 3. the latest iiiall dates. 



PORTS. 



mSOKll-Tli 

•noa Ml 



NswOrleana .... 

Mobile 

Cnarlestou 

Savannah 

Texas 

Hew York 

Florida 

North Carolina. . 

Vlreinla 

Other ports 



Total this year 

Total laatyar ■... 



iHXfOSTV!. .1 .<f.|t kf-T 



4H ; ■ 






sMiiv 


81,417 


;?• ijiiJ a.s» , 


2;i., . li,,ir» 


tS'/i 


t>l.vr, Jl>".;27 M.tSli 27,215 


63.44 


1'>0«29 l:i.<<EI 


42,a7a, 3,5.) 


W' 


8S,«I ».(rM 


1BS.2;3 ijna 


i*J 


•,jan itm 




••.. 




11,985, 82,512 


41C 


.... 


... 


1M.K9 417,143 


T90 






1<I,IS1 48,292 


tJM 


Ha 


4/iei 


1735«l 




»75,79« 


m.w.\ m.:< 


....|14>IJM 


Mo,gao ttfti^ si/ik, 



84S.4]!' njm 
»».41l; »7,r" 

17.1 ri lu.l 



• • I 7/... 
41* r.*N 

10.111- 



suck 



Ashes... pkgs 
Breadavuffa— 

Flour. .bbls. 

Wiiea'...bu« 

Corn 

Oats 

Bye 

Barley, *c. 

Qraas seed. 

Beans 

Peas 

C. meal. bbls 
Cotton. .baleS- 
Hemp.. bales. 

Hides No 

Hops. ..bales. 
Leather. sides 
Molasses, hds. 
Do., bbls 
Naval Stores- 

Cr.turp bbls 

Bolrlts turp 

Roaln 

Tar 



This 


Since 


week. 


Jan. 1. 


36 


36 


30.163 


30.162 


169,645 


189.645 


!0i,7i«) 


102,700 


212,301 


212,301 


12i 


li5 


53.«0 


53.930 


2,403 


2,403 


1,231 


1,231 


495 


493 


1.993 


1.999 


18,181 


18,1S1 


66 


66 


11,793 


11,795 


520 


520 


43,515 


43,515 


5',662 


5,002 


311 


341 


),2.;S 


1,2IM 


7,935 


7,935 


1,159 


1.159 



Same 

time 'la, 

180^ 

46,G0S 
29,610 
270.410 ' 
112.292; 

60".MMj 

28.171! 
6,153, 
9.020 
2.111; 

IS.Dtll 

73 

9,003 

46 -i, 

6S.20J 

3i88J 

4! 

l,772l 

ll,H« 

738 



This 
week. 



Pitch 


90 


Oil .ake, pkgs.... 


1,961 


on, lard 




Peanuts. ba.;s 


STS 


Provisions- 




Butter, pkgs.... 


18,351 




4.794 


Cutmeata 


10.822 


Kgirs 


2.035 


prirk 


6.120 


Beef, pkgs 


1.490 


Lard, pkgs 

Lard, kiga 


7,114 
210 


rilee, pkgs 


214 




S.I25 


3 earine 


5^6 


Sugar.bbls 




Sutfar. blida 

Tallow, pkira 




619 


Tobacco, ,ikgB.... 


1,S21> 


Tobacco, bhds — 


321 


Whiakcy.bbla.... 


2,430 


Wool, bales 


1.01! 


Dressed lioffs. No. 


6,557 



Since 
Jan. 1. 



Same 
time '72 



50 
1,961 



I3,33i; 

4.7111 

10.82.'! 

2.1133 

6 '2.' 

1 '0 

1.' ' 

27l 

214 

S.125 

525 



1,526 

327 

2,430 

1,017 
6.567 



1,769 

2,467 

12,023 

: 5,098 

.1,054 

4,319 

7Sa 

18,011 

53 

191 

8,368 

603 

'243 

6.10 
1,293 

144 
4,8S2 

55j 
8,62 



COTTON. 

Friday, P. M., January 10, 1878. 
By special telegrams received to-night from the Southern ports, 
we are in possession of the returns showing the receipts, exports, 
&c., of cotton for the week ending this evening, Jan. 10. It 
appears that the total receipts for the seven days have reached 
133,235 balesagainst 104,703 baleslast week, 103,443 bales the pre- 
vious week and 125,357 bales three weeks sincn, making the total 
receipts since the first of September, 1872, 1,868,380 ba'.es against 
1,571,498 bales for the same period of 1871-73, showing an in- 
crease since September 1, 1872, of 290,788 bales. The details of 
the receipts for this week (as per telegraph) and for the corres- 
pond! ng weeks of the five previous years are as follows : 



Received this week at- 



Uew Orleans bales . 

Mobile 

Charleston 

Savannah 

Texas 

Tennessee, &c 

•florlda 

North Carolina 

Vlrgmla 



Total this week. . 



49.199 
15.765 
13.716 

12.579 

3.SJ 1 

4*) 

1,169 

14,107 

133.23= 



1871. 



41.593 
13.546 

9.530 
27,737 

9,384 

11,249 

39; 

1.631 

11,8:9 



40.roo 

13 3.13 
6,7!6 

15,1136 
8,(100 
8,146 
171 
2,466 
5.S97 

9^,737 



26,S8S 

10.666 

5.818 

11,360 

3,11.9 

7,108 

792 

1,163 

4,876 



74.450 1 100,0!S 



Total aince Sept. 1 1.853.;86 1,371.496 1,9110.532 1.413.225 1119.201! 947.09 ; 

The exports for the week ending this evening reach a total of 
106,033 bales, of which 70,183 were to Great Britain, 3,743 to 
France, and 33,106 to rest of the Continent, while the stocks as 
made up this evening, are now 497,835 bales. Below are the 
exports and stocks for the week, and also for the corresponding 
week of last season : 



Exported to- 



''•^l*"!!)'.'' JQ-B''"- I France I Contln't 



Total this 
week. 



N«wOrl«an«. 

Mobile 

Charl iton... 

Savainab 

Texaa 



Npw ifcrk.. 
porta. 



New : 
tithei 



Total 

since Sent. 1 



31.322 
6,0*) 
2,811 

12.2S4 
559 

16.081 
1.106 

70!l83 
616.9:9 



3,745 
132,710 



13.573 

363 

5,501 

12,533 

"124 



32,106 
329,6(2 



Bamew'k 

1872. 



4'.«10 
6,388 
8,312 

21.S22 
5.39 

15,205 
1,106 



106.0S2 
1,003,351 



8-2,131 
821,189 



1873. 



30,913 


161.M3 


8.«li 


41 :iii 


4.0.-.8 


3«,40! 


21.646 


78.875 


6.y3 


8)1,228 


8,!II0 


69.375 


2,130 


40,000 




The tendency of the market tbe p**t week baa b«en dowi 
wards. This is duo almost entirely to the Increased receipts. W 
have frequently pointed out the causes which have been operatioi 
since the early part of November to check the free moTtment o 
cotton. Liverpool has not accepted these explaoatiriiis, but ba 
interpreted the decreased weekly arrivals as indicating a rnal 
crop ; the activity and advance there has reacted npon ourmarkei 
and the result has bern a considerable rise in our quotationi 
Now these conditions appear to be reversing themselves, and coc 
sequently with larger receipts larger crop estimates are madt 
and lower prices rule. Still the downward movemfnt bas b«e; 
slow, spot quotations being reduced only -Jc. during the week. T< 
day the transactions wore moderate, and tbe tone of tbe nurkc 
dull ; torae support to prices bas been imparted by tbe decide 
improvement in the money market at London. For future dr 
livery there was a steady decline till Wednesday mornine, wl 
the lowest figures of the week were made, the market b<- 
especially depressed for the later months, sales beinjf made a 
19ic. for January, 19 9-lCc. for February, 19 13-16c. for Marob, an 
20ic. for April, a decline of l-16@ic. from the prices of tbe pr« 
vious day. From thcHe prices there was some improvemen 
during that day, especially for the early months, while oi 
Thursday there was a further advance of 4@!!-16c., but with 
reduction in the volume of business. To-Jay there 3vaB some fui 
thir improvement, but a limited business except for March.'' 
sales for that month aggregating 4, COO bales, v 
2,400 bales at one price for February. The pi 
for futures last reported were (I,a»l8 low mlddl.i ., 
19|c. for January, 19|c. for February, 20ic. for March, 2091C<-. ■ 
April, 2015-1 6c. for May, 21 |c, for June, and 21»c. for J 
The total sales of this description for the week are 9'.1 

bales. Including tree on hoard. For immediate delivery im 

total sales foot up this week 10,803 bales, including 0,21il fo: 
export, 3,123 for consumction, 1 263 for speculation, and 200 i 
transit. Of the above 1,^34 bales were to arrive. Tbe foUon 
ing are the closing quotations to-day : 





Upland and 
Florida. 


Mobile. 


Kew 
Orleans. 


Texas 


Ordinary per lb. 


17X4.... 
18X».... 


17K«.... 
19K{».... 
19H9.... 

pS:::: 


19k*.... 
isx-*.... 
UK«.... 

A:::: 

22X«.... 


!;5jt:: 




3U ».. 


Low Middling 


lOK*.. 




3I>4».. 


GoodMlddllng 


UH*.. 



Below we give the sales of spot and transit cotton and price o 
Uplands at this market each day of the past week : 





eAUit. 1 


rtpyfn. 




Expt. 


Con- 
anmp. 


Spec- 
ula'n 


Tran- 
.11. 


Tola,. 


Op<l'ry.|or<l'ry. 


M'.?.-g. 


dllo 


Saturday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 


f02 

1J64 

1,0 iJ. 

1,252 

977 

732 


493 
•S5 

3S2 

ta 

(71 
4«T 

3,;3J 


34 

1,051 

44 

tl 

■ji 


'iw 
'ioo 


831 ; 

8,650 
l.<«8 
!.!« 
l.CM 
1,3»U 


;7H 


19 

l>X 
I8X 


19V 


20 

1 


Total 


(.219 


1.262 


200 


ICJCS 




.... 


■■■■ 


... 



For forward delivery the sales (including free on board 

have reached during the week 99,900 bales (all low middling or o 
the basis of low middling), and the following is a statement of tb 
sales and prices : 



497,' 25 495,868 



for January 
balca. els. 

70O 19X 

2.:00 J9 91S 

luoinat 19K 

2,000 19X 

i.ao 19 11-n 

2,000 19'k: 

1,6011 19 lS-'6 

100s. n 19J< 

200 no not. be- 
fore 131h...l9X 

4,00l> 19K 

100 19 15-16 

14 JX) total Jan. 

For Fcbrnsry. 

600 19 9-16 

4.fOO I9S 

800 19 21-32 

2,400 19 1116 

500 half brokpd 
by buyer.. .19X 

100 flat 19V 

S«0 19? 

9ai '.913-16 

S,«IU. 

100. 



■i929-S 



bales. CIS. 

600 19 15-16 

im 19 31-12 

IJSU' 20 

1,;W 2Ul-'6 

8.600 2C« 

21,800 total Feb. 

For March. 

4011 1918-16 

e.lPO 19K 

s,4ai ..l9l^i( 

\,'V0 JO 

1,300 ilS in 

lOli JOS-16 

3,780 VH 

1,600 S0 8-16 

;,950 xu 

2,«00 20 M6 

i,:(iO If* 

2iO 207-10 

100 2016-32 

JOO 20S, 

24,500 total Mart b. 

For April. 
1,300 30X 



balea. 

2,100 

lAP 

2,400... 
2.4(0... 



CIS. 
20 5-16 

.a)7-?« 

XH 

...20 I7-M 



i.aro !0»-'6 

£01 J0« 

IICO 20 II.16 

too JO* 

10 20I8-1S 

3C0 20K 

SCO 50;H6 

13.100 tOUl April. 



For Ma; 



'ay.. 

..JOIM 



TOO 

4.7rO *« 

IOC 20 2M2 

2S0O i-OIS-l" 

,,S5;:::::;.a.i?S 

1,000 tl 

200. 211-I8 

40O 21 "< 

IOO a »-i* 



balee. 
1,10' 

tec 2; 

18,300 tola' May. 
For June. 

Ijro 21 1-1 

4.100 " 

i.tw a: 

jro.. 

310 21 : 

l,«' „4 

800 Jii 

IOO til, 

• « Jll 

tm.. 

ar.. 

ll,4KII<'1al Job*. 
Tor July. 
100 21-1 



21 :■; 

I 



». 



I J") 

' 21) 

1 21 15-1 



IJMtoial Jaly, 

c«k 



Tbe following exchanges have been made dnnng tb.- « 
,-l.c. paid to exchange '■J.J ^Xa'Sv '"r-jKlS."^' 



1)4C. 



100 Februarv '^- ;_ „ - 
5(.0.rebni«ry fOrSOOMay, 



54 



THE CHRONICLE. 



[Jahuary 11, 187 g 



Weather Reports bt Telegraph. — There is very little of 
importauce to notice in our weather telegrams to-nisfht. Just at 
present llie pl-nlers are befjinning to ma le their preparations 
ior the next crop. No indication can as yet, of course, be ob- 
tained or given as to the extent of the preparations. The nat- 
ural iofHrence is that with present prices the cultivation will be 
well kept UD. Tlie weather during the week has generally been 
cold and dry. At New Orleans they have bad one heavy rain, 
but the rest of the week has been pleasant. There has been no 
rain at Selma, Montgomery. Savannah, and Augusta, but the 
weather has been cold. At Mobile it has rained on one day, with 
the rest of the week cold and pleasant. It has also rained on one 
day at Columbus, Macon, and Memphis, and in the early part of 
the week at Charleston. At Memphis the balance of the week 
has been alternately clear and cloudy. The thermometer at Mem- 
phis has averaged 3.5; Se'.ma, 45; Montgomery, 50; Macon, 49 ; 
Columbus, 46 ; Charleston, 51, and Savannah 45. 

Bombay Ship-MENTS. — According to our cable dispatch received 
to-(iay, there have been 6,000 bales shipped from Bombay to Great 
Britain the past week and 2,000 to the continent, while the 
feeeipts at Bombay, during the same time have been 20,000 
bales. The movement since the first of January is as follows. 
These are the figures of W. Nicol & Co., of Bombay, and are 
l>rought down to TImrsday, Jan. 9 : 

,-ShlpmeutB this week to-, .— Shipments since Jan. I to^ Week's 
Great Con- Great Con- Total, receipts. 

Britain, tlnent. Total. Britain. tiuent. 

1878.... 6,000 2,000 8.000 6,000 3,000 8.000 30,000 
J37a.... 23,000 4,000 27,000 34000 7,000 41,000 30,000 

From the foregoing it would appear that compared with last 
year there is a decrease this year in the week's shipments to Great 
Britain of 17,000 bales, and that the total movement since Jan. 1 
shows a decrease in shipments of 33,000 bales over the cor- 
Tssoonding period of 1872. 

Our cable dispatch to night states that crop reports are very 
favorable. 

Gunny, Bags, Bagging, &c. — The market for bagging has 
been quiet and steady the past week. Some orders from the 
South come in daily, which dealers are filling at 13@13}c. Sales 
of 300 rolls in Boston at 12 Jc. cash, and possibly 500 rolls more 
might be had at same price. Futures from second hands for 
March and April delivery we quote at 13f(3)14c. It is reported 
that some 3,000 rolls were sold quite recently to a eoathern buyer 
at 14c. for future delivery. Bags are quiet and steady at 14f@14|<;. 
asked. We hear of no sales the past week, and holders seem 
unwilling to yield in price. Butts have ruled quiet and steady, 
liecent heavy arrivals have relaxed the price from ship a little, 
and the price has fallen off from 2^5*2 l-16e. cash and time. 
We do not note any marked change in the price of Butts 
from store, which wo still quote at 2 3-16@3Jc. cash and time. 
Sales since our last icsue have been 380 bales Boston, at 2Jc., 30 
days ; 300 bales Boston at 2ic., 30 days ; 1,000 bales New York at 
2ic. There are buyers at 2c. cash, but no sellers under 2]l-16c. at 
the moment. 

Visible Scpplt of Cotton Made op by Cable and Tele- 
graph. — By cable we have to night the stocks at the dilTerent 
European ports, the India cotton afloat for all of Europe, and the 
American adoat for eacli port as given below. Frotc figures thus 
received, we have prepared the following table, showing the 
quantity of cotton in sightj'at this date (Jan. 10) of each of the 
two past seasons : 

1873. 

Stock in Liverpool bales. 446.000 

Stock in London 220,000 

Stock in Havre 220,000 

Stock in Marseilles 13^250 

Stock in Bremen 34.000 

Stock in Amsterdam 72,000 

Stock at Antwerp ^^ 80.000 

Stock at Biioelona ; 2S,G0o 

Stock at Trieste 1.200 

Afloat for Great Britain (American) 198,t)00 

Afloat for Havre (American and Brazil).. . 33,000 

Afloat for Bremen (American) 40,000 

Afloat for Amsterdam (American) 4,000 

Total Indian cotton afloat for Europe 60,000 

Stock in United States ports 497,825 

Stock in inland towns 83,116 

Exports from United States this week. . . 106,033 



1872. 

552.01)0 

166,670 

161,000 

16,000 

12,505 

27,800 

12.343 

55,000 

5,820 

138.000 

83,000 

14,071 

11,600 

196,000 

495,868 

93,944 

83,124 



Total 3,093,423 



2,123,745 
These figures indicate a decrease in cotton in sight to-night 

of 31,323 bales compared with the same date of 1873. 
Move.viknts ov Cotton at the Interior Ports. — B^low we 

give the movements of cotton at the interior ports — receipts and 

Bhipraen's for the ireek, and stock to-night and for the correspond- 
ing week of 1872 : 

,- Week endlni; Jan. 10, 1878 -> —Week ending Jan. 15, '72 ^ 
Receipts, bbipmcnts. Htock. Receipts. Shipments. Stock 

Augusta 4.534 - -<■- • ■--- 

Columbus * 2.048 

Macon 1,835 

Montgomery ... 1 ,345 

Selmaf ],.'-.08 

Memphis 11,798 

KashvilleJ 1.539 



5,833 


12.303 


4,036 


5,006 


18.721 


3,363 


10.153 


1.474 


J, .596 


10.306 


1,491 


13,651 


1,570 


2,304 


13,991 


1,345 


10,949 


1,377 


1,898 


10,630 


2..593 


4.454 


1,543 


2,334 


6.712 


14.408 


28,324 


16,530 


12,051 


28.433 


2,093 


3,382 


1,120 


460 


5,151 



24,663 30.025 83.116 27,550 25,539 93,944 
• There v!m an error in our fl^nres for Colambns last week, our rc'Ular tclenram 

having tald o reach us nntll Saturday morning. The stock a:iould have Deen 

given at 10,»((9«ud ih» receipts 1,216. 
t Stock at Selma by actual count was found to be as above, being an Increase ol 

M? bales over the ruuulng count. ' ""•■'^-•= "' 

Jstock »t r^MUrtlU was ««ttnted t«-day and fotma to be 1,509 lot tijan tli« run- 



The above totals show that the interior stocks have decreased dur 
ing the week 8,408 bales, and are to-night 10,828 bales less than 
at the same period last year. The receipts have been 2,887 bales 
more than the same week last year. 

The exports of cotton this week from New York show an in- 
crease since last week, the total reaching 16 205 bales, against 
9,659 bales last week. Below we give our table showing the 
exports of cotton from New York, and their direction for each of 
the last four weeks ; also the total exports and direction since 
September 1, 1872 ; and in the last column the total for the same 
period of the previous year : 

Exports otCottoa(ba.le«) from New ITork since Sept.l, 18T3 



■ XPORTKB TO 



Liverpool 

Other British Ports. 



Total to Gt. Britain 

Havre 

Other French ports 



lotal French.... 

Bremen and Hanover. 

Hamburg 

Other porta 



Total to N. Europe. 

Spain,Oporto& Oibraltar&c 



All others 

Total Spain, tec. 

Orand Total... 



WXEK SHDIMe 



Dec. 

18. 



15,804 



19,804 
63 



68 
798 



798 



Dec. 
25. 



15,254 



15,254 



600 
100 



Jan. 
1. 



8,7.J6 



8,736 
17 



17 
908 



906 



18,665 15.954 I 9.659 16.2C5 



Jan. 
8. 



16,081 



16,081 



124 



124 



Total 

to 
date. 



aoi.aas 

1S4 



201,356 
1,928 



1,9-28 



17,152 
4,493 



S1,6S0 



2,607 



227.541 



Same 
lime 
prev. 
year. 



175,476 
949 

176,425 

SH 

48 



261 

4,122 

299 

1,183 



6,5S4 



1,19« 



1,196 



183.4.36 



The following are the receipts of cotton at New York, Boston, 
Philadelphia and Baltimore for the last week, and since Sept.1,1872: 



asox'TB moH- 



New Orleans.. 

Texas 

Savannah 

Mobile 

Florida 

S'th Carolina. 
N'tb Carolina. 

Virginia 

North'rn Ports 
Tennessee, &c 
Foreign 



NBW TOBK. 



This I Since 
week. /Sept. 1. 



48,958 
20.251 
94,2'J6 



911 

7.361 

6,1951 

-71 
3,960 1 
1,317' 
8,0OS| 

2;i«fil 

341 



PBn,ADELP'U 



Total this year! 
Total lastyearj 



18,654; 427, 



88 711 
1.^298!l 
109,049 1 1 
4.9421 
37,8801 
l,.35o|) 



1,454 



2.695' 
l,-.;50! 



2,082' 

8.0781 

956' 



293 

8341 
,270 
,992 

,803 
161 

,703 
,0.57) 
,956! 



12,415 124,972! 
20.084' 372,893'! '1.271112, 



■:ll 



"",568 



This I Since 
week. , Sept 1. 



684 
l"i74 



2,083 

70 

9,212 



6,418 



6,837: 
lOSl 



2,450; 23,725! 



BALTIICORX. 



This 
week. 



.... 
113 



Sine* 
Septl. 

702 

4,514 



188 6.:40 
1,317 10,770 
744 22.778 
... I 1,097 
....I 4,708 
■-I ■•■■ 
2,862| 50.704 



1,893 27.85911 3,6401 45,620 



Shipping News. — The exports of cotton from the United States 
the past week, as per latest mail returns, have reached 81,303 
bales. So far as the Southern ports are concerned, these are the 
sameexnorts reported by telegraph, and published in TheChdon- 
ICLK last Friday, except Galveston, and the figures for that port 
are the exports for two weeks back. With regard to New York 
we includs the manifests of all vessels cleared up to Wednesday 
night of his week : 

Total 

New York— To Liverpool, per steamers Greece, S.801 . . Oceanic 1 993 

....City of New York, 1,333.... Cuba, 5.3l. ...Panhia, 1,231.... Ke- 

••:;■'■•, ",'"2....Glamoriran, 893. . ..Egypt, 1,870. ...Wm. Cory, 2,654 

. . ..per ship Lord of the Isle^, 53 

To Bremen, per steamer Bremen, l-i4 ".'.'.'.".*..'.". 

New ORLEAS9— To Liverpool, per steamers Fatchoy. 2 ^0 .. Bei^ian' 
3,370. ...per «hip8 Sea King. 2,850.... Ocean Pearl, S,l83..?.per 

barks 3'ores de Mayo. 511 Belgium, 1,600 

To Cork, per ship C. B. Hazeliiie, 2.60u .... 

To Havre, per ship John O. Baker. 3.334 W 

To Amsterdam, per brig R. B. Gove, 1 ,.M6 

To Ma aga p-r bark Revna de 1 -sCielos, 1.446 ... 

To Genoa, per barks Bridgeport, 1,591 M.irsala, 1,202 

Mobile— To Liverpool, per ships Tonawanda, 4,016 British Oiieen, 

3,367 ._,, 

Chaeleston— To Liverpool, per ship Island Home, 2,244 Upland, 191 

Sea Island, and 37 bags seed co'tou 

ToBarcelO''-a. per brig San Antonio. 4()0 Upland '....'.'.'..'.'.'.'. 

Savannah- To Liverpool, per ships Western Kmnire, 4,490 Upland 

Cyii"sure, 4,362 Upland.. . .Alfred, 3.917 Upland. . ..Lennle, 3, 125 

Upland per bark O^wingo. 2,135 Upland 

To Cork, per bark Edmund. 1,570 i pland 

To Bremen, per bark Yarmouth, 2,130 Upland 

Texas- To Liverpool, per steamer Australian, 4,549 and 67 bags Sea 

Island per bark Geo. Booth, 862 

To Bremen, per brig Prn.sperite. 700 !!!!!!.'." 

ToIIaml»urg, per brig Ettmeralda, 6*^0 *.!]'.*.!!** 

Baltimore— To Liverpool, per steamer Hibernian, 891 and 156 bigV. . 



balsa. 



16,081 
124 



13.504 
2,600 
8,334 
1,540 
1.446 
8,793 

7,384 

2,447 
400 



Total.. 



The particulars of these shl];:iiieuts, arranged in our usual 
are as follows: 

Liver- Bre- Ham- Amstr- Ma- 

pool. Cork. Havre, men. burg. dam. laga, Genoa. 

■ 184 .... .... . ... 

2,600.8,334 .... 



18,019 
1,670 
2,130 

6,478 
700 
600 

1,047 

81.308 
form 



1,546 1,446 8,793 



New York 16.081 

New Orleans 13.50» 

Mobile 7,3'B 

Charleston 8,417 

Savannah 18.019 1,670 .... 2,130 

Texas 5,478 700 

Baltimore 1,047 

Total 68,9S9 4,270 8,334 8,954 600 1,648 1,44« 8,793 81,30J 

lucladed in tbt «Vot« totalt «ra, from CbarlMtoo, 400 balei to Bm««1ob». 



600 



Total. 

16.203 

2.5,223 
7,383 
2,M7 

81,819 
6,778 
1,047 



January 11, 1873.] 



THE CHRONICLE. 



55 



Below we give all news, received during the week, of disasters 

to vessels carrying cotton from any port ol the United States : 

T. D. CoL««AN, tiink at Hamilton. N. C, has bocn pnmped out and towed to 
Norfolk Jan. 3d. with a IrtfK" hole in her port bilge. She had on board 
37 bales cotton badly damaged. The principal part of her cuTgu had 
been landed in li;>hterH. 

W«T Dbiibv (8-21 tonx, of LirorpooP, Uran, from Mobile Dec. 84, with 2,310 
buleu of cotton fur Cork, fur orders, waa wrecked on the TortUKaa prior 
10 Jan. 7. Assistance waa dii^uatched to hi^ irom Key West. 

liABKLLA IIarjjktt (Br, 3>7 tons), WllUanis, New Orleiins Nov. 8, with 1,101 
bales of corton, lor (Jhent, wne abandoned at sea Ucc. 28. Crew saYcd, 

J. B. Vvrrva (Br.), lor Bremen, which caught Are at (Jliarleslon, Dec. 2C, had 
on board ttbont a,-Jlil bales Upland cotton, worth nearly $200,000. This la 
supposed to be fully covered by Insurance In Northern and foreign 
olBces, with a ri8» at Charleston of $20,000 gold In the Orient Inaurancu 
Company. The orlu-ln of the Are i« unknown, as the part of the vessel 
In which It originated wus completed in stowage about ten days, and had 
not subsequently been woiked on. 

OtniN or Till South, Corson, loading at Galveston for New York, with cot- 
ton, beef and hides, was struck by lightning morning of Jan. 4. The 
cotton took Are, and at uoon same day the vessel was being Hooded to 
put out the Are. 

fltmiiT South, from Wilmineton. N. C, with cotton and naval stares for New 
York, struck a wreck or bar off the Cavern Houses, Jersey coast pounded 
over, sprunji; a leak, and was towed on to the Ji-rsey Flats, New York 
harbor, where she now lies with a good deal of water in her. 

(iOLD, Excn-VNOE AND b'RKiouTS. — (iold has Uuctuated the 
past week between 1!1| and 112^, and the close was 112|. 
Foreign Exclianjie market is strong. The following were 
the last quotations : London bankers', long, 109|@100i ; short, 
llOicailOi, and Commercial, 108}@109J. Freights closed at 
7-l(i@}d. by steam and 5 lOd. bv sail to Liverpool, H@Hc. gold 
by steam and Ic. by sail to Havre, and |d. by steam to Ham- 
burg. 

Bv TELKORAPH from LiIVERPOOL.— 

LivBKpooL, January 10 — 1 P. M.-The market has ruled quiet and steady 
to-day, with sales estimated at 10,000 bales. Including 2,000 bales for ex- 
port and speculation. The sales of the week have been 100,000 bales, of 
which 3,000 bales were taken for export and 9.000 bales on speculation. The 
stock in port Is 446.1)00 bales, of which 91.000 bales arc American. The stock 
of cotton at sea, bound to this port is 21r,000 bales of which 193,000 bales are 
American. 

[Dec. 13. 
81,000 
3,000 
8,000 
365 000 
64,000 
218,000 
129,000 

The following table will show the daily closing prices of cotton for the week: 

Sat. Mon. Tues. Wed. Thnrs. Fri. 

Price Mld.Upl'do.WJS... .10%®, ...lOxaiOJi 10!^@ ... WH&WH I0X@10X 

Orleans. 10^® ...10J4®... 10X@10>i 10>iiaiO« lOKSlOX 10,'i@IOX 

Trade Report. "TUe market for yarns and fabrics at Manchester is quiet 

but firm. 

iioiit)PE.4.N Cotton Markets. — In reference to these markets 
our correspondent in Londou, writing under the date of Dec. 31, 
•tales : 

Liverpool, Dec. 31, — The following are the prices of middling 
qualities of cotton, compared with those of last year: 

,-Piilr * r-Oood & ^Same date 1871- 
^Ord.& Mld^ g'd fair^ Kine.-^ Mid. Pair. Good. 

Beslelaud 20 21 23 85 44 2t 30 

Florida 19 22 2t 27 32 21 26 

Ord. G.Ord, L.MId. Mid. G.Mld. Mid. F. Mid. Q.Mid. 
Upland... 9!i iji 10 1-16 10 8-16 10)i lOJf 9 15-16 lOK 
Mobile.... 9!i 97i lOs; lO.ii 10?.^ W^ 10 
N.0&Tex9)i 10 lOJi 107-16 lOK 11 10J< 

The following are the prices of middling qualities of cotton at 
this date and at the corresponding periods in the three previous 
years 



Total sales 

Sales for export 

Sales on specalation . 

Toul stoclc 

Stock of American. . . 

Total afloat 

American afloat 



Dec. SO . 


Jan. 1. 


Jan. 10. 


113,000 


76,000 


100,000 


9,000 


5,000 


3.000 


81,000 


7,000 


9,000 


336,000 


421,000 


446,000 


46,000 


63.000 


91,000 


224,000 


251,000 


217,000 


141.000 


201,000 


198,000 



10 ;l-16 
10 7-16 



44 

82 

M.F. 

10?.' 

io« 

lOJi 



1869. 1870. 1871. 1872. 
Midland d. d. d. d. 
Sea Island 21 15 24 20 

Upland. ...IIV S'i 915-16 103-16 
Mobile...ll 9-16 8 7-16 10 lOK 
Orleau8....11'i 3>i lOJf IC 7-16 



Midland 
Pernambuco, 

Eiryptlau 

Broach 

Dhollerah.... 



1869. 1870. 1871. 
d. d. d. 

n}i S}4 .... 
io;i( HH SH 

8 5 DJi 

8 5>i BX 



1872. 
d. 

5X 



Since the commencement of the year the transactions on specula 
tion and for export have been : 



r-Taken on spec, to this data—, 



1872, 
bales. 
217.280 
97.870 
4,410 
8,200 
325,540 



1871, 

bales. 

895.330 

122.840 

32,810 

11,670 
201,190 



1870, 

bales. 

16.5,920 

17.310 

7 310 

2,740 

145,300 



r-Actnal eip. from 
Liv., Hull & other 
outports to date—, 



1872, 
bales. 

129,949 
42,279 
10.S85 
14.938 

280.240 



1871, 

bales. 

298.^11 

65,993 

12,315 

8,854 

322,295 



Actual 

exp'tfrom 

U.K. in 

1871. 

bales. 

802,180 

60, .WO 

12,620 

15.710 

519,490 



American... 

Brazilian... 
Egyptian. . 
W. Indian.. 
B. Indian.. 

Total. ... 612.900 761,470 338,610 478,291 698.388 9!0,.38O 

The following statement shows the sales and imports of cottot 
for the week and year, and also the stocks ou hand on Thursday 
•vening last : 

BALES, BTO., OF ALI. DB80RIPTION8. 

, Sales this week , Total Same Average 

Ex- Specula- this period weekly sales 

Trade, port tion. Total. year. 1871. 1872. 1871. 

American.. bales. 26.920 1,280 1,760 29,960 1,715,2.50 8,434.540 26,3:M 37.910 

Brazilian 10,040 IfiO 890 10,590 848.700 618,350 i:j,900 8.420 

Egyptian 9,880 160 2,260 11310 138 220 279,420 5,750 5,010 

BmyrnaAQreekl . .,-n „,„ a Ami '^^ 21,750 9, .500 1 , A^n o oan 

West Indian, &c r-'^" * 'I 8.«70 151,6r)0 141.810 f ^•*™ •*'■"" 

Ba«t lu.Uan 20.400 6,960 21,170 51,830 1,277,980 1,046,460 12,130 9,560 

Total 71,500 9,170 31.280 112,950 4,353,550 4,5-29,580 60,5S0 63.i!0 



-Importa.- 



American... 

;Srazillan 10, 

Egyptian 11,295 

Smyrna ifcGr'k 

W.Indian.... 2,875 
Kast Indian... 1,703 



To this To this 
This date data 
week. 1872. 1871. 
19.711 1,344,:W5 2,177,246 



695,1573 
268,749 
16,163 
136,J54 
832,351 



486,8t<4 
252,360 
5,i55 
111.183 
883,514 



ToUl. 

1871. 
2,233,984 
6IW,466 
861,880 
6,4!)8 
113,640 
695,368 



This 
day. 

45,690 

13.180 

89.820 

3.810 

9,890 

233,790 



-Stocks. 

Same 

date 

1871. 

77,190 

38,340 

2«,O50 

1,610 I 

11,640! 

281,110 



Dec. 31, 

1871. 
168,BO0 
64,0.30 
49,760 

i:,S50 

272,770 



Total 46,3713,294,025 3,921,442 4,014,786 335,680 437,990 666,900 

Of the present stock of cotton in Liverpool 13.75 per cent is 
American, against 17.60 per cent, last year. Of Indian cotton tli« 
proportion Ir nearly 70 per cent, against 64 per cent, 



BRE ADSTUPPB 

FaiDAT p. U.. Ju. 10. ISM. 

The market has been generally irregular durlD^ tlie past weA, 
and closes somewhat unsettled in tone, with prices for the mat 
part nominal. 

Flour hss come forward more freely by rail ; with dull ae- 
counts from Liverpool and London the shipping demand fell off, 
and the local trade came forward for supplies, and mada preti/ 
free purchases, notwithstanding the ditUculiy of moving heavy 
goods. The result of these circumstances has been, that low 
grades have become dull and weak, while grade* at $8 and ap- 
ward have had a full »ale, and in some cases have brought more 
money ; but this demand liaviuf; been met In its Immediate needs, 
the whole market closed yesterday dull and heavy. To.4Uy 
holders were firm, but the demand waa quite limited. 

Wheat opened the week with considerable buoyancy, especially 
for spring growths. There was a good export demand, favored 
by a sliglit decline in ocean freights. There waa also aome speca- 
lation. No. 3 spring Chicago and Milwaukee sold quite freely at 
$1 G0@1 67. But latterly foreign accounts have been dull, limita 
of orders have been reduced, and private advices state that the 
English trade is disconcerted by large receipts and the fact that 
the surplus of the world is moving toward their markets at 
relatively high prices; while the confidence of our holders waa 
impaired by the continued excess of receipts over la>t year at tb« 
Western markets, and some weakness was caused by the pres. 
sure to sell the low grades of spring received by rail. Yesterday 
trade came almost to a stand still. To day, there was very little 
done, and prices quite unsettled ; No. 3 Milwaukee offered at 
$1 G5 afloat, with car loads of rejected spring quoted as low aa 
|1 40. 

ludian corn has been selling more freely for export, and on 
Tuesday prime old mixed Western advanced to Ol^c in store and 
67c afloat. But the market showed no strength. There is a fair 
amount of new corn arriving, and the condition and quality being 
good, it is preferred by the local trade. The close yesterday waa 
^c under the above figures The receipte at the West are consid- 
erably increased, but are still smaller than last year. A severe 
snow storm at the West this week, threatens to check supplies 
for a few dnys, but may afterwards increase them by providing 
good sleighing. To-day there were buyers of prime old mixed at 
Glc in store and 66c afloat, but these prices not readily accepted ■ 
choice new mixed in car loads brought 67c. 

Rye and barley have been firm but quiet. 

Oats have latterly met a brisk demand from the local trade, and 
yesterday prime new Western advanced to 49@S0c lor mixed, and 
53@53c for white. To-day the market was quiet. 

The following are closing quotations : 

Floub. I Uraih. 

Superfine State and West- ] Wheat— No.Ssprlng.buth.tl 

em ^? bbl. f 6 00® « 40 I No. 1 spring .. 1' 

Extra State, Ac '.... 7 10® 7 40 I Ked Western 1' 

Western Spring Wheat j Amber do II 

extras 7 00® 7 28 I White H 

dodouble extras 7 ^5(it 9 00 ; Corn-Western mixed. 

do winter wheat extras 1 White Western 

and double extras 7 2S®11 76 I Yellow Western , 

City shipping extras. .. 7 60® 8 00 | Southern, white 

City trade and family I Kve — State and Canada... 
"I Wc 



brands. 



6 60^11 00 I 



Vcstern... 



Sonlhern bakers' and fa I Oats— New Black 

mlly brands 9 Xtait 00 | Cbicagomlxcd 

Southern shlpp'g extras.. 7 75® 8 .'-0 1 White Ohio and SUU. 

Rye flour E 79® 6 SO 

Corn meal— Western, Jkc. 8 30(a 3 6S 

Corn meal— Br'wine, Ac. 8 86®!* 00 



Barley— Western. 

Canada West 1 It 

Peas — Canada 1 



1 6B 

1 n 

I 110 
•T 
W 

« 

75 
M 
86 
« 
M 
U 

il« 
I IT 

• 1*9 



The movement in breadstuffs at this market haa been aa follows : 



, RBCBIPra AT NEW YORK. 

, 1878. . Same 

For the Since time Jan. 

week. Jan. 1. 1, ■S7S. 

Plonr, bbls. 30.162 80,168 46,603 

D. meal, " . 1,999 !,9-9 8,1 !9 

Wheat.bus. 169,645 169,615 »9,.6lO 

Corn, " . 102,700 102 700 270,430 

Hye, " . 125 125 

Bariey.&c. 53.950 63,950 60.550 

...„„. siisoi lii,2il8 



,. XXPOBTS raOH ICaW TORX.~^ 

. I87S. , . 187*. , 

For the Since For tb* Since 

week. Jan. 1. week. 

15 568 15.568 11.518 

1,718 1,718 I.8>0 

811,703 811708 88,708 

190,875 180,875 tU,»M 



Oats, 312,301 



4.000 



4,000 



Jan. I. 

88.M0 
4,4n 

98, «N 
6«l.8a» 

IT.MO 



Sit 

The following tables, prepared for The ChrosiCLK bT Mr. E. 
H. Walker, of the New York Produce Exchange, show the Grain 
in sight and the movement of BreadstuS's to the latest mail 
dates : 

asCKIPTa AT lake AND RITER PORTS FOR THE WEKX EXDIXa 
JAN. 4, AND FROM AUG. 1 TO JAN. 4. 

Corn. Oats. Barlay. Byr. 
bush. bash. bnab. httb- 
(B«lhs.)fMlb«.M«Ibs.) naibvj 
187.574 600.5!5 80S 9M W.nS S0.8W 
191,629 38.800 «9.<00 tl.IOO 

68 121 818.500 68.130 6,S»» 

41 855 60.090 14.118 4,881 

3i'i30 19,950 14.450 ^eoo 
19,880 «8,4i» «,m 4,ei» 



Chicago - 

Milwaukee lO.Oui 

Toledo 4.500 

Detroit 6.125 

Caoveland 8.200 

St. Louis S,8»8 

Ouluth 



rionr. Wheat 

bbls. bnsb. 

(lt'6lbii.) (80 lbs ) 

. 34.711 



U.M» 
3M 



7M 



ToUl 8S,«» "»•>" •'0^ »«•"» ""•*■'' *^^ 



66 



THE CHRONICLE. 



[Janudfy 11, 1878. 



Previoas week 

Oorresp'ng week, '73. 
" '71. 

•70. 



59,4M 


431,011 


489.869 


833,159 


116,407 


78.149 


949. 6.« 


1.210,159 


8IS,I1<) 


99,551 


SO.liM 


511,5,763 


594, .144 


135,437 


46.S39 


loi.aot 


617,817 


2«0,:i6H 


260,409 


83,088 


1M.9«I 


570,514 


'I8VB37 


195,B3> 





33,443 

31,038 
23.818 
16.030 
37,217 



ToUl Anc. 1 todate..3,488.8.« 30,213,277 28,1»6.83J 11,907.711 6,3:»,b96 .0«,254 

8»me ?mc 1871 2.69(i.»33 29..'.19,605 ^5,691,725 15,53),4I10 4.S35.-84 .J'3.f|^ 

IJSe time 1870 . .1011.315 29.212.018 12,305,828 M26,243 4,4«.2!W l,01b,U25 
B^O {lSel869:.;..;.8.182;335 31.300,733 14,6'.;8,715 9,389.304 2,547,833 l,03b,402 
SniP.'UKNTS of Flour and Uraiu from Chicago, Milwaukee, 
Toledo, Detroit, St. Louis, Cleveland and Uuluth for tlio week 
)^ndii<8 Jan. 4, and from Aug. 1 to Jan. 4 : 
Flonr, Wheat, Corn, 

bash. 

66.723 

91.892 

29,438 

26,111 

9li,l>8l 

67,722 

29,438 

2>i,441 

96,'i81 



Week epdlng— 

Jan. 4, 1873 

Dec. 38. 1872 

Curreap'nj; week 1872 
CorresD'K week 1871 . 
Corresp't; week 1870. 
ToUl Aug. 1 to (late. 
Same time 1871-72... 
Same time 1S70-71 .. 
Same time 1889-70. . . 



bblB. 
43.020 
67.809 
61,030 
5».3i0 
5.'>,3:i2 
43.626 
61,03« 
59,3(0 
55,392 



bnsb. 
101,977 
134,033 
339,669 
188,107 
129.330 
101.977 
339,569 
188,101 
130,330 



Oate, 

bnsh. 

137,418 

131,840 
90.053 
85.132 
30,616 

131,418 
90.053 
33,112 
3i),B16 



Barlej-, 
bneh. 
93.813 
48,959 
62,859 
34.408 
0.697 
93.313 
62,859 
94,408 
6,697 



Rye. 
bueh. 

5,800 
3.7S3 
9.169 
5,535 
3.831 
5.300 
9,167 
5,533 
3,631 



BBCKIPT8 OF FLOOTl AND OBAIN AT SEABOARD PORTS FOR TUK 
ENDING JAN. 4. AND FROM DEC. 28 TO JAN. 4. 



WBEK 

Floor, 

At bblB. 

Neir York 3S,8S1 

Boston 11,134 

Portland 160 

Montreal 4,200 

Philadelphia 12,99J 

Baltimore 9,350 

New Orleans 4,425 

Total 75,149 

Week ending Dec. 28. 108.511 

Cor. week 1871 98,878 

Total Dec. 28 to date.. 75,119 

Do. same time 1872.. 98.8T8 



Wheat, 


Corn, 


Oats, 


Barley, 


bush. 


bnsh. 


bush. 


bush. 


140,905 


90,150 


175,320 


51.500 




24,000 


85,730 


18,413 




1,000 






5,330 






1,200 


44,200 


37.200 


63,800 


29,600 


5,600 


35,800 


12.100 




.... 


16,226 


9,833 


.... 


195 955 


204,376 


276,778 


100,713 


211,400 


363,456 


193,705 


88.514 


96.300 


749,232 


172,092 


82,618 


195.955 


201,376 


276,718 


100,713 


96,300 


749,732 


173,092 


82,618 



Rye, 
bush 
3-5 
4C0 



800 
200 



1,175 
2.562 
2,720 
1,775 
2,720 

The Visi ble Supply op Grain, including stocks in store at 
tho principal points of accumulation at lake and seaboard ports, 
in transit by rail, and ^frozen in New York canals, Jan. 4, 1873 : 

Wheat, 
bush. 

In store at New York and afloat 1,269.695 

In store at Albany 4,500 

In si&re at Buffalo 409,646 

In store at Chicago 1,165,650 

In store at Milwaukee 850,000 

In storeatDuhith 70.000 

In store at Toledo 365,968 

Inetoreat Detroit 153,0.39 

In store at Oswego 439,173 

Instoreat St. Louis 473,466 

In store at Boston 16,305 

In store at Toronto 6.3,2:13 

In store at Montreal 142,130 

In storeat Piiiladelphia 100,000 

In store at Biiltimore 125,000 

RailBhipiuents for week 67.722 

4.mount on New York canals 53,120 



Total 5658,267 

Total in store and In transit Dec.88,72 6.248.373 

Dec. 21. '72 5,699,213 

" " Dec. 14.'12 6,051.153 

>• " Jan. 6, '72 10,841,473 



Corn, 


Oats, 


Barley. 


bush. 


bush. 


bush. 


5,110,500 


1,393,862 


599,166 


27,000 


19,000 


325,100 


256,063 


89,515 


250,6'.9 


1,868,25:1 


904,299 


337,19J 


53,000 


170,000 


86,000 


369,367 


177,759 


11,882 


66,001 


48,933 


31,9I« 


265.000 


2,078 


197,900 


145,776 


129,274 


113,760 


73,310 


48,073 


105,406 


2,735 


4,094 


69,801 


355,206 


66,214 


9,677 


215.000 


125,000 




223.814 


60,000 




104 977 


131,4;8 


s,8i;i 


164,457 


85,200 


7e,i:w 


9,:}»4,519 


8,554,719 


2,21'>,562 


9,595,398 


3.414,084 


2,868.863 


9,267,367 


3,575,768 


2,535,759 


9,533,444 


3,835,914 


3.113,430 


8,330,027 


6,469,217 


2,054,334 



The Indirect receipts at New York, principally overland receipts from San 
Francisco, have beet: 1.498 pkgs. since .lanuaryl. against 3.659 la^t year. 

Imports at San Friaci..<co from Jan. 1 to Dec. 16, 1872, were 1,273,209 lbs. of 
China and 8,313,128 lbs. of Japan tea. 

COFPEE. 

We have had another active week is coffee, and the market shows additional 
strength in all grades. A good jobbing movement has been In progress during 
the entire week, and liberal amounts of the Brazil and India grades have been 
distributed. West India descriptions arc now well sold out of first hands, and 
the remaining stock is very firmly held, prices, where quotable, showing an 
improvement on our last figures. The market for Ceylon and Java has also 
been very strong, with liberal sales of the latter into consumption, and both 
grades are held at improved rates. There is a continued active inquiry for 
the Brazil giadcs, with sales from first hands about as fast as anything is 
offered. Uio has moved very freely here and at the outports, and the gales 
have been almost entirely into second bands, Bnt little coffee has been bought 
up by 8i)eculator8 during the season of activity, which has lasted for some 
weeks, and the present firmness is based on strong grounds. The Rio t«le- 
grams are very strong, and in addition to reporting a rise, they indicate pros- 
pects of a short crop. The prices ruling there at present arc above our market 
and the outlook is favorable for still higher rates here, though we repeat our 
last quotations. Sales include 3,002 bags Rio ex "Merrimack," here, 5,410 
do., ex "Jennings," 914 ex "Lord Baltimore," 1,514 do. to arrive, ex "A Pen- 
dergast," 930 do. ex "Erie" 853 ex "Caroline." At the out ports we notice 
2,170 bags to arrive at Mobile per "Hannibal," 7,461 per "Juno," ;?,000 residue 
per "Paramount," and 2,193 per "Amalia," all at New Orleans ; and at Balti- 
more 1,150 per "Maggie V. Hugg," and 3,50J per Clyde," both before arrival ; 
5,030 ex -'Taipean," and 2,600 ex "Amazon." 

Imports at this port the past week have included 5,410 bags Rio, per " F. H- 
Jennings," 5,fci0 do. do. per " Brazil," 4,511 do. do. per " Hessel," 6,031 do. do; 
per "C^irolina," 4,060 do. do. per " Anguste," 4,000 do. do. per " Bmpereza,' 
3,160 do. Santos per "England's Rose;'* 3,631 do. MiracaiOo per "Nicola 
Maria," 2,0.3:1 do. do. per '" Allemannia;" 1,451 do. St. Domingo per " Race 
Horse," 800 do. do. per " Henry Middleton," 400 do. do. per " Oliver Cutts," 
and 212 do sundries. 

The stock of Rio Dec 26, and the imports since Jan. 1, 1873, are as follows; 

New 
In Bags. York. 

Stock 61,71! 

Sjmertatel871 55,9« 

Iliports 21,17'^ 

" in 1912 11,391 

Ofother sorts the stock at New York, Dec. 26, and the imports at the seveial 
ports since January 1 , 1873, were ai follows ; 

Boston. Phlladel. Bait. N. Orle's. SS 
Import. Import. Import, import. 



Phila- Baltl- New 


Motille, 


(i»l- 




delpbta. moie. Orleans. 


&c. 


vestnn. 


Total. 


9.401 3.3i4 


6,500 


2,60) 


78,498 


.... 18,310 13,0!i 


:uu 


3,500 


93,101 


;... 6,W>J 


S.VM 




S»,2al 




3,300 


2,6U0 


17,491 



..-New York^ 
stock. Import. 



In bags. 

lava and Singapore t5.3',5 

Ceylon 15,8:5 

Maracaibo 5.659 3,651 

Liiiguayrs 153 — 

tit. Domingo 2.65! 

Other 2.160 212 

Total 29.962 6.314 

Same time, 1871 11,510 2,333 



1,S50 



t Also, Bl,33< mats. 



GROCERIES. 

FniDAT ETiNiHa, Jan. 10, 1878. 

The grocery market, in a general way, lias shown signs of return- 
ing animation, and in most branches the business of the week 
has been more active than that reported in our last issue. The 
consumptive trade at this season is fairly active, and the distri- 
bution from second hands continues lively. Coffee is selling with 
especial freedom at the full rates quoted in our last, with better 
prices on some grades. Sugars are rather dull, and barely steady. 
Tea has shown a little more animation, but still rules quiet. 
Fruits are jobbing fairly and are fairly steady in all descriptions. 
Molasses is very strong and sells fairly at full former rates. 

TEA. 

The market is gradually becoming more active as the stock of new crop teas 
is increased, and buyers find more desirable selections and at the same time be- 
come convinced that prices are now as low as they can expect them to go. 
For some time past there has been a stand off on prices between buyers and 
tellers, bnt tho former have refused to make any concession and buyers are 
beginning to come to terms under the pressure of their current requirements. 
There has been a moderate businci?s during the week with a greatly increased 
demand for invoices toward the close, and several transactions are said to bs 
pending. Tho sales closed have been mostly for small invoices, but the aggre- 
gate is fair. Oolongs show more strength and are moving moderately from 
recently arrived cargoes. Japans are strong with a limited inquiry, and 
Greens are selling well at full rates. Large offerings have been made at auc- 
tion during the week but the amounts moved were not heavy, though what 
sales wore effected realized satisfactory prices. From Wednesday's sale we 
quote Oolongs, 41@80c.; Souchongs, 41®80c. ; Jap&ns, 52X®T0c. ; do. Oolongs, 
26V ®.30c. ; Hyson, 81®70.!<c. ; Young Hyson, 35@85c. ; Gunpowder, 33)<®tl 
16; Imperial, 38®75Xc. ; Twankys, 89V@34c. Sales have been effected in a 
regular way include 4,300 half chests Greens, 6,100 do Japans, 9,100 do Oolongs. 

Imports at New York the past week have included 630,613 lbs. Japan, per 
"Etta Lorin;^." from Yokohama ; 167,762 do. do., per " Leander," from same 
port ; 13,100 lbs. black and 8,500 do. green, per " Beemah," from Hong Kong ; 
1,300 lbs. black and 6:1,40} do. green, per "Si. Paul," from do., and 551,065 lbs. 
black, per " Benefactor," from Foo Chow. The receipts indirectly have been 
100 pkgs. by steamer and 1,398 by rail overland. 

The following table shows the Imports of Tea into the United States 
from January 1 to date, in lH13aud 1812: 

Atlantic ports, 1813... lbs. 
Atlantic ports, 181i 



♦ Includes mats, 4c.. reduced to bags. 

SUGAR. 

There has been a limited call for raw sugars during the week, but tho dnli 
condition of the market for refined grades prevents refiners trom operating on 
a very liberal scale. There is a large portion of the refining machinery still 
Idle, and the stock of sugar is well reduced, but the absence of a demand pre- 
vents the market from becoming buoyant, and prices are heavy, granulated 
being shaded a trifle from our quotations of last week. Softs are dull, but 
remain fairly steady at old rates. The few sales of raw sugars for refining 
purposes have been at about previously quoted rates, and the market mani- 
fests a moderate degree of steadiness, the range of quotations remaining on a 
basis of 9@9Xc. for fair to good. Holders are steady at these rates, with the 
stock not heavy and well controlled, but it is difficult to effect sales, and 
prices cannot be regarded as stable until the inquiry becomes more active. 
Sales siace our last foot up 1.900 hhds. Cuba, a'i grudes, 45 do. Demcrara at 
10Ji®lIc.; 700 boxes Havana, 9>i@93ic.; 12,000 bags Pernambuco, 9c. 

Imports at New York this week, and stock in first hands Dec. 26, were: 

Other. Brazil.Manlla.&c.Melado 
•hhds bags. t^ags. hhds. 
1.S97 81,120 33,ll» 
1,S97 31,120 33,105 
:,212 3.000 



Imports this week . . 

since Jan. 1. 

" same time, '12 



Cuba, 
bis. 
2,114 
2,111 
4,810 



Cuba. P. Klco. 

"hhds. 'hhOs. 

7i1 B3S 

717 633 



562 
562 



Stock In first bands. 52.263 

Same time 1811 35.1:5 

•• laiO 6W11 



22.119 

27.113 



111.310 
223,390 
801,832 



118 
■M 



Black. 
J62»,465 



Green. 

107,908 



Japan. 
1,893,375 



Tots'. 

2,131,746 

837,564 



niOLASSES. 

The market for foreign grades of molasses has been neglected during the 
past week, and very few sales have been effected either of grocery or boiling 
qualities. There has been a moderate inquiry from the trade for the latter, 
and the sales of good qualities of foreign stock are assisted by the extrem© 
high rates which the market for domestic has reached. The demand for New 
Orleans stock continues unabated, and some choice goods have been placed 
during the week at 73@74c. The ruling range on prime new molasses, how- 
ever, Is about 68@72c., anything selling above the latter figures having to bo 
very choice. These high rates have increased the demand for syrups, and the 
supply is well run down. There is no molasses syrup iu the market, and the 
production of sugar stock is barely sufllcient to keep pace with the liberal de. 
mand.from the trade. Prices are very strong on all grades, and rather favor 
sellers, except on foreign stock. The latter is firm in grocery grades, but re- 
fining qualities are slow of sale, and are somewhat nominal. We note sales of 
50 hhds. Porto Kico. 1,500 bbis. new domestic at quotations. 

The receipts at New York this week, and stock in first hands Dec. 36, were : 

Cuba, 
•UbdB. 

Imports this week 531 

" since Jan. 1 682 

" sametlmelS7^ 

Stock in first hands 1,0^1 

•' " same time -71 1,355 

" " same time '10 6.544 

Imports ot Snsar dc molaasea at leadlns ports since Jan. 1 ■ 

The imports oi sugar (includin? Melado). and of Molasses at the leading poru 
from January 1, 1873, to date, have been as follows ; 



P. Rico. 


Demerara, 


Other 


H.O. 


•Uhds. 


•hbds. 


•hhds 


bbls. 




177 


16 


4,593 




17! 


16 


4,.i93 






173 


5,148 


2,412 


604 




800 


S.001 


2,468 




4IJ0 


251 


l,1i;6 




500 



Januar 11, 18787 



THE CHRONICLE. 



67 



N«wTor1c .... 

BoHton 

ClilUiIelphla... 

Oaltlniore 

NevrUrlesns... 



Tot»l 3,TU 



■ — Roxea. . 

I«73. I8-.J. 
2,71t LSM 



18'.9. 

i.rii 

39< 



115 



1.2il 
«31 



. Bagt. > 

tirs. ir.i. 

r.. 8,131 



^MOWMW. - 

•Hhd».— . 

ler.i, 
ns 



U7i 

15 



I.MS HfilS 



5,131 



» TnolnrtlnatlornnBand haprela reduced to hllds 
t iDcludcB jafkoifl. Ac. reduced. 

WHOLESAIiE PRIOBS OUnUENT. 

Conee, 

iev019 I Native Ceylon KOld. )« 



Klo Prime gold 

do Kood , (EOld, 

do fair gold. 17 

do ordluary gold. 16 

Java, mats nv^ *^-><Ti «ola. 19 

Java matt. Ill ovo. gold. iJ 



_, . - . ., .- ai8 

amu I Maracatbo gold. I6)igl8 

anj» ; Lagnayra goid. 16*4 .i!8H 

s:<>i St Domingo gold. 14 r.^.... 

« 1 I lamiloa BoM. It »nx 

@'!S I Mocha .gold •,,.. 

Mnicar. 

9 8<k I Havana, nox, white UidtUH 

" " Porto UICO,relln|]iK grades... 8K3 SH 
do grocery grades.... iS'^V^H 

Brazil, bags BKA tH 

Manila, bags 8K9 •>< 

White Sugars.A 111(9.... 

do do B HH9--- 

do do extra C 11 ailX 

Yellow sugars 9)iei(i!( 

Crushed &iV4 

Powdered ai2i< 

Uranulated KKSliX 



Cuba, ln(. to com. refining.... 8 

do fair to good reflnlng 9 [^ &% 

do prime ® ftJi 

do lair to good grocery.... 9S($ 9>i 

do pr. to cliolce ^rrocery... i\^ 9}i 

do ccntrllUKal,hhds. &bxs. 9v<i»IO 

Jo Mclado 4Va 7 

lo moiasses 1H& 8^ 

Oav'a,Box,D. B. NoB.7to9... 8x» SK 

do do do lOtoll!.. 9Ka 9H 

do do do 18 to 19.. iH9^Vs 

do Ho do lOtolS.. l(iH®nX i 

do do do IDtoSU., IIXK'1% I 

molaimnii. 

VewOrleanf aew 11 gall. 60 371 | Cuba Clayed 50 ®M 

Porto Kino '^8 ®S5 Cuba centrllugal 17 ®U 

Cuba Muacovado U eSO I Bugllsh Islauds 30 ®38 

Rice. 
Kangoon dressed, gold I> bond SHO 3^ I Carolina 7Ha (X 



interest. The year bas not adrineed far enough *■ yet to ea«u« 
any Important demand for these goodg, excepting (or the mott 
staple varieties wliicU are sold to a fair extent for shipment to 
the interior, and have been taken up in some case* by local 
dealers in anticipation of lutare wan's, Price* abroad are 
stiHening daily, and a stronger tone is noticeable here on worsted 
and Bilk fabrics, which manufactarers hare adrised their agenla 
liere to bold at an advance. 

We annex a few particulars of Icadinj; articlra of domastte 
manufacture, our prices quoted being those of leading Jobber* : 

Brown Sbectlnica 
and ShIrllUK*. 

Width. Price. 



THE DRY aOODS TRADE. 

Fbidat, p.m.. Jan. 10. 1878. 
Now that tlie yearly Bettlement of accounts has progressed far 
towards completion, there are some indications of an improvement 
'n the demnnd for goods, buyers from the more remote sections 
having already begun their purchases of staples for the spring 
trade. The trade is confined to package transactions, and has not 
as yet extended much beyond some of the leading qualities of 
e'tton fabrics. California buyers purchase their heavy stocks as 
Sir y as possible, in order to make shipments by the water routes 
»i low rates of freight, and these, with buyers from other remote 
localities in the West and Southwest.are the only purchasers who are 
in t lie market at present. Local buyers have taken up a few goods 
and have placed contracts in somo instances for goods to be deliv- 
ered later in the year, but their operations are restricted to the 
leading qualities of staple cottons, which are held in small sup 
ply by the agents. The general market is steady and as active 
as could be reasonably hoped for at this period of the year. If 
the predictions of the weatherwiite regarding the probabilities of 
an early spring be fulfilled, we may look for an early opening of 
trade, though it is thought by many that the scarcity of money in 
the interior will restrict the retail trade of the winter, and leave 
dealers with such full stocks at the opening of the spring season 
as will make them very cautious purchasers until the consump 
tive demand sets in with considerable activity. 

Domestic Cotton Goods. — There has been a fairly active 
trade in most of the leading styles of cotton fabrics toward the 
close of the week, including liberal sales of some of the more 
popular brands of both brown and bleached sheetings and shirt, 
jngs in original packages. The stock of these goods is very 
much smaller than is usually held at this period of the year, and 
many makes of the finer descriptions of brown cottons are 
largely contracted for to arrive. Prices have not varied much on 
brown goods, but bleached fabrics have taken an upward turn 
and nearly all brands of the grade of Lonsdales are ^c. higher 
in first hands, and the advance is fully maintained. The demand 
for colored cottons has been light. Some sales are made for ship- 
ment to the West, but the general trade lacks animation. There 
has been a moderate call from the same source for medium or 
light effects in prints, but the offerings are small and poorly 
assorted as yet, and the aggregate business is unimportant. 

Domestic Woolen Goods. — The week opened with very little 
inquiry for any grade of woolens, but toward the close there 
have been more buyers in the market, and with clothiers making 
fairly liberal selections the trade has assumed appearances of more 
animation. The movement has not become very general as yet 
owing to the fact that agents are holding back their choice sampjes 
until jobbers begin to make their selections. The reductions of 
stocks of winter weights was so far effected as to leave the 
market well cleared of old stock, and in a good position for the 
opening of the spring trade. Prices are not much above those of 
last year, on sales that have been effected thus far, but holders 
Consider the position of the market favorable, and are looking 
forward to an advance upon the better grades. 

Foreign Goods. — The movement in imported fabrics has 
teen very light, and the market has been without feature of 



Agawam F... 8« 

Albion A 86 

Arctic B. ... 86 

Atlantic A... 87 

do D.... 87 

do H... 87 

Appleton A.. 36 

do N.. 80 

AngiTta 86 

Bedford R... 80 

Boolt 84 

do S 40 

do W 4<| 

'InncBtngo J). S8 

C'Bhot A . . . . S« 

UwlghtX, 

do Y.... 8! 

do W... 86 

Indian Head. 7-8 

do .48 

Ind'n Orcliard 



11 
lOX 

ii" 

14 

11« 
12 

9X 
13 
13 

It 
I-S 
37 11-llX 

la 

U 
SO 



36 
38 
88 
80 
39 
87 
36 
H6 
36 



A. 

do C. 

do BB. 

do W. 

LacoriiaO. 

do B.... 

-0 

Lawrence A . . 

do I).. 

do XX SB 
Lawrence LL. 36 

■'• J.. 40 

do Y,. 86 

Nashaafine O 88 

do U... 36 

do E.... 40 

do W.. 48 
Pepperell 7-4 

do .... 8-4 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Utiua.. 
do .. 



. 9-4 
.10-4 
.11-4 
.18-t 
. . S« 
. 48 



14X 

13 

1? 

11 

13X 

18X 

Via 

12>; 

14 

IS 

12 

15X 

14.x 

13 

14X 

Hi 

13 

.80 

3S,<4 

87X 

t'iii 

45 

25 
8J.J4 



UH 
»M 

1»« 

lf'« 
13 
J8« 
18 

19-n 
na 

80 

87X 

v> 

18 

M 

M 

17X 

17Ji 

66 

M 

M 

18X 

18X 



do rs 

An flii.- ■^^nTl 40 
Broivn Drills 

AmoHkeag 15 

Augusta 

Laconta 15)^ 

Langley B 14 15 

Pepperell MX 

Stark A 15 

Bl'chod SheettnKS 

aad Slilrtliies. 
Amoiikcag. 46 17X 
do 4« 16X-17 
do A. 36 :6 
Androscog- 
gin L 86 15X-16 

Arkwri'tWT38 17 

Auburn 88 16X-IS 



Albion . . . 4-4 

Uartletts... 86 

do .... 83 

do .... 31 

Bates 4S 

do XX.. 46 
do BB... 36 
do B.... 38 



11 

12 

■19 

18 

16X 

14 



Width. Prlc« 
Blackatone 

AA 36 

Boott B.... 80 

do C... 88 

do O.... 80 

BllurtonW84-4 

Proitof the 

Loom 86 

dr't Falls q 8« 

do 8 81 

do A 8S 

do M 81 

Loordale... 8( 

do Cambric 36 

N.Y. Mills 8« 

PeDperclt .. 6'4 

do .... 7-4 

do .... 8-4 

d" .... 9-4 

do 111-4 

di, ....11-4 

Poccasset F 88 

Utlca »-4 

do Nonp 4-4 

do »-« 

do 10-» 

do .... 4-4 

do heavy 86 

do XX 10-4 

Wamsutta.. 45 

do .... 4nw 

do nn 36 

do XX 3« 

Priut*. 

Price. 

American I IX 

Amoskeag 10 

Bedford 8K 

Cocheco 13 

Gamer A Co.... 11-llX 

Gloucester IIX 

do raoumlog 11,^ 

Hamilton 11X 

LodI lOX 

Manchester UX 

MerrhnacDdk. .. !1X 
do W pk and par. 18 

do Shirting. IIX 

Pacific UH 

' Richmond's IIX 

I Simpson 3d Mourn. 11X 
do black & white. 11J< 

' Sprugue's fan IIX 

I Ulazed Cambrics. 

I AmoDkoae 8X 

I Gamer 8X 

I Mar n<ny 8-8M 

Manvllle 8X 

Piqnot 8X-9 

I Red Cross RX 

I VlctoryTI 8X 

I Tleklnga. 

I Amosk'g ACA. SO 

i do A.. 34 

do B.. 31 

I do C. 19 

I do D.. 17 

>' Cordis AAA.. 33 

do No. 3. 3t 

do No. 8. 31 

do No. 4. 19 

do No. S. 17 

do No. 8. 15 

do No. 7. 14 



1 width. Pnca 


1 baton A. ... 


I'M 


do B 


11 -»S 


Hamilton 


1» 


LewlstoD A... 


M n 


do B. . 


M 81 


Denims. 


Albanr 

Amoskeag 


18 


>S 


Algodon 

Bedford 


18 


Boston 


»H 


Beaver Cr. AA 


11 


Chester U'k B 


n« 


Everett 


«3 


Hiyniaker Bro 


UH 


Lewtston 




Mancbetier ... 


M 


OtiaAZA 


11 


do BB 


M 


doCC 


IT 


Corset Jeans. 


Amoskeag 


IS 


AndroM-og'n hi 


18 


Ciinoc River.. 


lOX-11 


Hallowfll Imp 


13X 


Ind. Orch. Imp 


I3X 


Laconta 


UH 


NaumkeagMt. 


1» 


Pequot 

Snffclk 


14X--15 
ItM 


Cotton Dnek. 


Sail duck, 331n.- 




mv'i7g 9to6J 80-88 


Light due [ — 




Bear dock («o». 


' s« 


do hravy(9or.' 


MoDt.RaveDs99in 14 


do 401 n 


M 


Bass. 




American 


33 00 


Amoskeag. 

Great FaUa A. 


83 00 


84 OO 


Ludlow AA.... 


84 00 


Lewlston 


84 00 


Ontario A 


87 BO 


PoHbattanA.. 


ssto 


do B.. 


43 DO 


Stark A 


87 SO 


do C 8 hnsh 


8S00 


Domestic Gln&- 


hams. 




Amoskeag 


... 16 


Bates 


.. 14 


Caledonia 


... »K 


Chicopee 


.. UH 


Glasgow 


... n 


Gloucester 


■ ■■ IIH 


Hartford 


... UH 


Lancaster 


... U 


Manchester 


... 11 




...14 


Park Mills 


... 14 


Peabody 


... 13 


Quaker City.... 
Renfrew 


... UH 


... 14 


Union 


... UH 


Spool Cotton. 


Brooks, per dor. 




SCO yds. ... 


W 


J. A P. Coat'a 


70 


Clark, John, Jr. 




b^t Co 


TO 



PORT OP 



iraPORTATIONS OP DRY GOODS AT THE 
NEnr YORK. 

The importations of dry goods at this port for the wepk ending 
January 9, 1873, and the corresponding weeks of 18*2 and 1871 
have been as follows : 

ENTERED FOB COMSCMPTtON FOB THS WEEK ENOtKe JAKCABT 9, 1873. 



, 1871 . 

Pkgs. Value. 

Manufactures Of wool i!46 128.3.415 

do cotton.. 1,6 !9 461 W9 

do silk 381 383.5S3 

do flax 1,117 *14,176 

Mlscellaneons dry goods. 343 1,16.89.) 



. 1873 , 

Pkea. Value. 

53) t36S.8&l 
1.264 815 620 

2'il 1111.847 

881 143.848 
4,454 134,078 



. 1878 < 

Pkct Value. 

896 f179.70t 

1,186 SSS.eST 

»« Vn.S4t 

K« i76.«r« 

609 JiU.4&8 



Total 4.033 $1,(06,593 7,815 $1,041,337 8,314 tl.04?.«i4 

wiTHoaAWN raojt wabsuouse and thbowm into tbe UAtaaei ddrino tux 

SAME PKIUOD. 



iilanufactures of wool 243 

do cotton . . 332 

do silk 73 

do flax 3*0 

Miscellaneons dry goods. 83 



#fl8,9SS 
60.835 
93.W4 
66.T78 
8.690 

t319.IV5 
l,kl6,598 



806 
120 
437 
I8t 

1.719 
7,315 



Total -m 

Add ent'd for consimipt'n. 4,035 

rotalthrown upon m'rk't 4.815 $1,725,598 9.031 $1,73:,901 4,»t6 t],S«,'>(S 



$368,106 

134.943 

168.618 

10«.»71 

35 3:iO 

$6S6..V!« 
1,041,487 



408 
466 
83 
4<S 

111 

1.683 
8814 



$301894 

I48,Mt 

38.67S 

71,018 

8.984 

•SSt.lll 
10M.a54 



ENTERED FOR WAREHOUSINO DUBINO SAME PERIOD. 



Mnnnfactores of wool 

do cotton.. 

do silk 

do flax 

MiKellaneoDS dry goods. 



315 
4i3 

.^4 

471 
23 



Totnl .. 1385 

Addent'dforconsnmpt'n. 4 035 



$106,896 
130. iro 
65.507 
97.016 
I^33^ 

$ •04.719 
1,406,598 



806 


$I5'),R.38 


768 


3!:,5« 


113 


111,308 


818 


6«.04S 


1,363 


36.343 


3,8e6 


$67«,7» 


7,315 


1,041.187 



883 
484 

76 

418 

1.065 

3.845 
8,3141 



14&1M 

Gt.03> 

lor.ois 

17,601 

itram 
1,01mm 



lotal sntered at the port. 6,306 $1,811,843 10,181 $1,617,996 5,659 $),S«a,47$ 



68 



THE CHRONICLE. 



f January 11, 1878. 



Industrial Exhibition. 



The Estimated Income 

OF THE 

Indnstrial Eihibiiion Comp'y is $2,615,400, 

READ THE REPORT BELOW, 

ASB TOU WILI, BE BATISriKD THAT AH INVE8TMBNT 
UADE I!4 THE STOCK OP THE 

Industrial Exhibition 

C O M P A N T! 

19 SAFE. 

The first $2,000,000 of the stock Is otTcrBd at 80 ; 

after Feb. 1 uo «tock will bo sold at less 

than par. 

NOTB— Any bank in New York will receive snb- 

■crlption. 

As the cost of each lot Is abont $4,700, an invest- 
ment of that nmonnt in this stock will entitle the 
holder to o "Lot" value in the property. 

We, the nnderslgned, members of a special com- 
mittee appointed at a public meeting, presided 
over by John A. Dix, at the St. James Hotel, on 
Friday, December 13, 1873, were instrncted to 
examine and report as to the desirability and 
praclicnbility o? securing for New York a pfrm.i- 
nent Indnstrial E.thibition .Building, Art Gallery, 
Public Library, and G.irden of Plants, and more 
especially as to the value and fitness of the land 
contracted for, have the honor to report: 

First— Thnt the Industrial Exhibition Company 
1« a properly organized corporation, under a special 
Act of the Legislature of the State of New York. 
with full power to purchase land, erect buildings^ 
and to do all other things necessary for the com- 
pletion of the objects above enumerated. Tlie 
property of the Indnstrial Exhibition Company is 
exempted from taxes and assessments for five 
years, and its stockholders are free from personal 
liability, and generally all powers are granted to it 
that will facilitate its objects. 

jS'scona'— That the Industrial Exhibition Company 
of 1870 contracted for the land between Ninety- 
eighth and One-Hundred-and-Second streets and 
Third and Fourth avenues, comprising in all eight 
blocks of ground, besides the unopened streets and 
avenner-. The price agreed npon was $1,700,000, of 
which $200,000 have been paid ; that there remains 
due $1,300,000, which must bo paid on or before 
Feb. 1,1873, or the contract for the land will ex- 
pire and all moneys paid bo forfeited. 

The deed of this land has been executed to the 
Indnstrial Exhibirion Company, and is hold in 
escrow by the Union Trust Company, to be deliver- 
ed whenever $1,500,000 shall be paid. Your Com- 
mittee have consulted with 'eminent real estate 
men as to the value of the land, and the lowest 
estimate placed on it after deducting all the streets 
(which arc as valuable for the purposes of this 
Company as any other portion), is $1,820,000 (and 
the streets being valued, at $2,438,000). As we 
understand, this is the only piece of land in one 
location, owned or controlled by incjividuals, large 
enough for a World's Fair, lying south of 110th st., 
and its central location is proved by the fact that 
all the steam railroads running into New York 
have a side track on this ground. As an engineer- 
ing necessity, any rapid transit railroad that may 
in future be built must go within four hundred feet 
of this 'property, if not directly upon it. The 
property Is solid rock, and at Ninety-eighth street. 
Third avenue, and Oue-Hnndred-and-Second street 
there is an abrupt slope. It is estimated that this 
peculiar formation will save at least $1,000,000 in 
the preparation of this ground for such a building 
and building foundations as are proposed. The 
Indnstrial Exhibition Company contracted for this 
land in 1S70. It was regarded as a good purchase 
then, and has increased in value since, and will 
continue to increase. 

7Atr(<— The estimated cost of a suitable building 
Is abont $7,000,000, and in such an edifice all New 
Yorkers will feel a just pride. 

Fourth— K proposition has been made by an 
eminent New England firm to construct a dome 
over the court, which dome shall be the largest and 
most magnificent iu the World. All this firm ask 
iB that they be grai'ted a perpetual lease of the 
dome, above the spring of the nrch, subject to 
reasonable conditions. The estimated cost of this 
dome Is $3,000,000. Sufliclent bonds will be given 
for the performance of their contracts. 

jFi/.A— Your committee 1» of the opinion that, if 
a snmcicnt amount of the stock of this Company is 
soil] to acquire a free and unincumbered title to the 
land, t'lere will be no difllculty in raising all the 
money requisite to erect a buildin<r. 

Sixth— U this land Is pnrthiisedand work com- 
menced at once on the buildiu', we hope the Con- 
gress of the t'nited States will so fiivor the enter- 
prise that a World's Pair can be opened here in 
1878, nnder the auspices of the United States 
Gov^'rnment, which would be commemorative of 
the One-Hundredth Birthday of this our great 



Republic. This need not Interfere with the proposed 
"centennial" celebration in Philadelphia, but as 
wo New Yorkers cnnnot but feel tb.it \v e may cele- 
brate in our own way and iu onr own city so irapo.- 
tant an occasion, and we also feel that if the 
world Is to be brought together in a gronl 
competitive exhibition In that year, that New 
York being the commercial metropolis of the 
whole country, such world's fair should be held 
here At no other place could the millions of 
v.sitors ho accommodated. Financially, we believe 
that the land Is worth more than is to be paid for 
it ■ and If the enterprise is carried out as proposed 
we do not see any possible chance of loss. Iu view 
of these facts— 

1. We recommend, first, that a series of meetings 
be held for the purpose of awakening the people 
to the importance of this enterprise. 

a. That a committee be appelnted who shall, 
without delay, prepare a suitalile memorial and 
present the same to Congress, and that such Com- 
mittee have power to ask Congress to give fuch 
indorsement as may in their opinion be thought 
advislble. 

3. Also, a committee who shall confer with the 
Mayor and Aldermen, as well as the Department of 
Public Parks, with a view of obtaining snch prlvi 
leges as municipalities have ordlnuiily given to 
such enterprises . 

4. Also, t, committee to confer with the Governor 
of the State and the Li-gisliture, with a view of 
obtaining such endorsement as will add to the 
dignity of the enterprise. 

5. Also, a committee to prepare a.i address to the 
people of New York, the country, ■■ d the world. 

6. Also, committees selected froi the different 
branches of Industries, to obtaii; subscriptions to 
the stock of the Company from their respective 
associates. 

We further recommend that here and now sub- 
scription papers be circulated. Your Committee 
believe that this enterprise is sound fin nclally, and 
if it is carried out tha^ it will benefit every person 
in New York and prove of great advantage to the 
whole country, and they do earnestly recommeud 
it to the serious consideration of all the people. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 
A. S.DI'VEN, 
SAM. SLOAN, 
RICHARD SCHELL, 
ERA8TUS BROOKS, 
H. B. CROSBY, 
JAS. L. .TACXSON, 
EDWARD ROBERTS, 
PAUL N. SPOFFORD. 



AVM. M. VERMILYE, 
RICHARD SCHELL. 
LP. MORTON. 
CHAS. L. TIFFANY. 
ANSON P. STOKES. 
FRKD. DE PEY8TER 
SAMUBL SLOAN. 
PAUL N. SPOFFORD 
ALFREDS. DARLING 



A. V. STOUT, 
WM. H. WEBB. 
HENRY CLEWS. 
HIRAM B CROSBT. 
EilASTUS BROOKS. 
RICHARD KELLY. 
C.TANGIER SMITH. 
JOUNF. HENRY. 
SAMUEL HAWK. 



COMMITTEES APPOINTED. 

The above report was unanimously adopted, and 
subscriptiim papers were distributed among those 
present. 

Action was then takeu in reference to the appoint- 
ment of commiltces, and the following gentlemen 
were unanimou^lv appointed : 

Genebai. Committee— a. S. Dlven. S. Slo.in, 
Richard Schell, H. B. Crosby, J. L. Jackson, Edw. 
Roberts and Paul N. Spofford. 

Committee to Me.moriauze Congress — C. K. 
Gnrrison, K. S. Diven, H. B. Claflm, Gouveineur 
Morris, W. H. Appleton, W. II. Webb, J. J . Astor, 
W. B. Ogden and E. D. Morgan. 

Committee on New Yokk— George Opdyke, 
Jonathan Sturges, Ausou Phelps Stokes, Paul N. 
Spofford, Ambrose C. Kingsland, Ch. H. Russell, 
John U. Sherwood, Geo. Biiss, H. M. Taber, and 
Robert McCafl'erty . 

Committee to Puepaee an Adokess— Elliot C. 
Cowdln, William Cullen Bryant, George Wm. Cur- 
tis, J. M Bnndy, Fletcher Harper, William M. 
Evarts. William Barnes, S. B. Chittenden, W. W. 
Phelps and Oswald Oltendorfer. 

Committee to Confer with Governor and 
Legislature— Richard Schell, James M. Brown. 
Eiastus Brooks, Robert H. Pruyn, Francis Sklddy, 
Russell Sago, J. E. Williams and R. M. Ballchford. 
Committee on Mechanics and Industries — 
Salem H. Wales, John Roach. Dema? Barnes, Geo. 
Quintard, Willis Blackstone, J. P. Wlnslow, Albert 
Steinway, D. D. Badger and Ch. L. Tififiiny. 

The following subscriptions have been made : 

JOHN A. DIX $25,00O 

A. S. DIVEN and others ,50,000 

PAUL N. SPOFFORD 20.000 

EDWARD ROBERTS 25,000 

RICHARD SCHELL, WM. II. WEBB, 
SAM. SLOAN. H. B. CROSBY, WM. 
F GARY. JOHN F. HENRY, W. H. 
RAYNOR, JAMES R. JESSUP, 
RICHARD KELLY. J. MATTHEWS, 
andothcrs 396,000 



Total $516,000 

After Feb . 1 no stock will be ofl'ercd at less than 
par. 

INDVSXKIAI. EXHIBITOIV COITI. 
PANY OF NEW, VORK. 

Gov. JOHN A. DIX, President. 
ALEX. S. DIVEN, Vice-Presideut. 
D. D. T. MOORE, Vice-President. 
directors . 

JOHN A. DIX. 3W. 21st St., Gov. of New York. 

WM. B. OGDEN. Clilcago, 111. and High Bridge, 
New York. 

A. S. Dr\''EN, Vice-President. Erie Railroad. 

D. D. T. MOORE, Publisher Moore's Rural New 
Yorker. 

J. D. BAGLKY, Wall street. New York. 

H. H. DURKEE, Pearl street, New York. 

L. G. BARTLETT, 43 W. 31st street. 

R. J. TODD, 77 Cedar street. 

JEWETT M. RICHMOND, Bufl'alo, New York, 

PA. ALBERGER, Bufl'alo. New York. 

Whenever $2,000,000 of stock shall have been 
subscribed for. and paid in, a Shareholders' Meet- 
ing will be called to elect the Directors. The fol- 
lowing named gentlemen have consented to serve 
as additional Directors, if elected: 
WM. F. HAVEMEYER. ADRIAN ISELIN, 
I. H. FROTHINGHAM. 6. B. C'HITiENDEN. 



ELIAS HOTCHKISS. 

WE, 
ALEX. S. DIVEN, RICHARD SCHELL, 

SAMUEL SLOAN, ERASTUS BROOKS. 

U B CROSBY, .TAMES L. JACKSON, 

PAUL N. SPOFFORD. EDWARD ROBERTS 
being a special Committee for the purpose of ap- 
pointing committees from each braiich of business, 
and fcr localities dir ctly interested in seeing the 
completion of the project which has been inaugu- 
rated by the Industrial Exhibition Comjiany, viz., 
the establishing In New York of a crystal palace 
to be used as a perpetual world's fair, have the 
iionor to announce the following appointments. 
Owing to circumstances beyond onr control we 
have been unable to see each of the gentlemen 
below named, but we fee) confident that none of 
those whura wo have selected will refuse to spend 
a small portion of his time between now and the 
first day of February next, for the purpose of 
making. In this, the commercial metropolis of the 
Western Hemisphere, an Institution which will 
tend to elevate all of the people. 

We have mode the committees to represent each 
trade and commercial pursuit. 

If we have overlooked any branch of bnsinese we 
shall regard it as a special favor to be communicat- 
ed with and a suitable committee recommended, 
which will be at once appoi.. ted. 

Each committee named below is requested to 
meet, elect from among its number a chairman, 
and organize for active work. 
Each committee may add members. 
A full report of the work done should be for- 
warded to the special committee on Jan. 29, 1873, 
and we request that the original subscriptions be 
forwarded to the Union Trust Company, 73 Broad- 
way, each day. , 

A full explanation has been sent each member or 
the committee. 

BANKS ABOVE CANAL ST. 

Richard Kelly President Fifth National Bank 

Addison Smith President Harlem Bank 

C. Schwarwzaelder President Germanla Bank 

Edward Schell.. President Manhattan Savings Bank 
Richard Williamson . . . President Bull's Head Bank 

BANKS LOCATED EAST OF BRO.^DWAY AND 
BELOW CANAL STREET. 

T. J. S. Flint President Continental Bank 

Thomas A Vyse Ninth National Ikink 

N Hayden Chatham Bank 

Robert Lennox Kennedy Bank of Commerce 

BiNKS LOCATED WEST OP BROADWAY AND 
BELOW CANAL STREET. 

S R Comstock President Citizens' Bank 

S B. White President Grocers' Bank 

A. V. Stout Shoe and Leather Bank 

IRON MANUFACTURERS. 

J. B. Cornell 1-39 Centre st 

Architectural Iron Works, El 14th at and Avenue C. 

Abram 8. Hewitt 81 John st 

James L. Jackson 315 E. Twenty-eighth st 

TRUST COMPANIES. 

I. H. Frothlngham 73 Broadway 

J. A. Stewart." 49 Wall ft 

STEAM R.\ILROADS. 

Ssm Sloan 26 Exchange Place 

Wm D. Bishop N. H. R. R 

P H Watson Er.e R. R. Ofiice 

Sidnov Dillon 52 Wall st 

Wm. H. Vanderbilt 459 Fifth ave 

HORSE RAILROADS. 

Thurlow Weed Broadway and Second ave 

Wm. Remsen Madison ave 

Robert Squires Belt Railroad 

Henry Hart 

STAGE LINES. 
Madison ave Fifth ave. 

INSURANCK AGENTS. 

AUigor Bros 10 Pine st 

James A . Rhodes 157 Broadway 

C. L. North IGO Fulton st 

GENERAL BUSINESS. 
Drexel, Morgan &, Co. 

James Haid 119 Wall st 

Dun. Barlow &> Co 335 Broad vvay 

J. M. Bradstreet & Co 279 Broadway 

L. A. Deshons 108 Fulton st 

S. M. Pettcnglll & Co 37 Park row 

O. H. P. Archer. 

J. Gerson 360 Broadway 

Albert Welles 67 Universitv place 

Cyrus Cleveland 39 Wall st 

Hugh Allen Pier 7, North River 

Mnnn & Co 37 Park Row 

H. C. Dexter 40 Broad st 

J. J. Sproule 9 Aslor House 

Jay Cooke <Ss Co 20 Wall st 

Union Adams &Co 637 Broadway 

Chas Zinn & Co 406 Broadway 

E. B. Pond. 

Cortlaiidt Palmer, Jr 346 Broadway 

Wm. Bliike. 

NOTE BROKERS. 

Blake Bros. &Co 59 Wall st 

E. C. Bogart ,& Co 47 William st 

John B. Sommcrfeld & Co 66 Wall st 

Badgley & Mead 72 Wall st 



STOCK BROKERS. 

Frank Work 36 Broad st 

Joiin L. Rogars 18 New st 

Robert L. Cutting, Jr., & Co 19 William st 

L. T. Iloyt 46 Exchange Place 

J. A. Jameson 14 Broad st. Banker 

BANKERS. 
W. W.tSherman. 
Mr. Liiltev, of A. Belmont & Co. 
Chas. D. Dickey, of Brown Brother* Si Co. 



Jauoary 11, 1873.] 



THE CHRONICLE. 



59 



: Flak # Hatch... .^,...vi^.j...i NMnaii *t 

ITonry Clews & Co 82 Wall «t 

O. D. Athli'y &Oo S7 Now at 

Wm. Selignittn &Co.... 21 Broad at 

GOLD BROKERS. 

Trevor, ColRnte & Co 47 Wall st 

PRINT WORKS. 

Garner & Co 61 Worth at 

Wm. H. Locke 216 Wont TUIrty-»lxlh st 

W. W. Freeninn & Co North Adauit*. Mass 

Harvey Arnold &, Co Nonh Adams, Mass 

Hamilton .M'f'gCo LowWl, Maoa 

American Print Worka Pall Rtvcr, Mobs 

Hon. C. .\dnm>< Cohoes, N. Y. 

A. <fcW. Sprague Providence, R. I. 

COLORS AND DYE STUFFS. 

Riimpir A Lutz 43 Beaver at 

Plckbard t & Kuttroff 88 Cedar at 

Beach & Co Hartford, Conn 

J. C. Bloomlield * Co 11 Doy st 

PIANOS AND OBGANS. 

Maaon & Hamlin 696 Broadway 

Albert Weber 108 Fifth ave 

Decker Broa HH Union squnre 

Geo. Steck & Co 25 East Fourteenth »t 

Chlckering & Sona 11 East Fourteenth at 

BAGS AND BAGGING. 

W. B. Aftcn & Co 25 Pearl at 

Cottrell Bioe 6 Broadway 

Wll:iara80n & Goodhue 9 Water at 

BILLI.\RD TABLES. 

Kavanajh A Dijckor 154 Centre st 

H. W. Collender .«. 738 Broadway 

Geo. E . Phelan 7 Barclay st 

CCMMITTEBiFOH HARLEM. 

Addison Smith 2,279 Third nve 

B. F. Kayiior 61 West 124tb at 

Wm. B Asteu. BO East I'i'th st 

E. H. Brown 211 W. st 12,Mh st 

Jordan L. Mott 90 Beeiiuian at 

COM.MITTEE FOR YORKVILLE. 
Edward Roberts. Chas. ( rary. 

Hedden. A. C. Quackenbueh. 

Thomas Rutter. 

COMMiriEE FOR WE.'^TCHESTER COUNTY 

AND ADJOINING LANDS. 

Wm. B. O-den 52 Wallet. 

Gouverneiir Morria. 
Wm. C. Rhinelander. 
Wm. Browning. 

Royall Houghton 343 Lexington ave 

PAPER. 

Vernon Broa. & Co 65 Duane st 

Hall & Bryan 76 Duane st 

Liebcnroth A Von Auw 5J and 52 Pranklin st 

Jespup <fc Moore 128 William at 

Campbell, Uall & Co 114 Nassau st 

GROCERS. 

Park & Tilford 920 Broadway 

Acker, Merrall & dmdit Broadway and 42d st 

Compb'Il & Galwoy 1,203 Broadway 

HaghB. Jackson 182 Fifth ave 

W. S. Corwiu & Co 1,138 Brotdway 

Dow S. Kittle 716 Third ave 

TEA IMPORTERS. 

Cary & Co 90 Pine st 

Olyphant, Son & Co 140 Pearl st 

Carter, Hawlcy & Co 140 Pearl st 

John O'Donohue'8 Sons 83 Front at 

FUIJNITURE AND UPHOLSTERY. 
Pettier & Stymu8MTgCo.,cor. 42d8t. & Lesing- 
ton avenue. 

Hcrter Bros 877 Broadway 

L. Murcott &Co S9 East Seventeenth st 

Bruner & Moore 75 King st 

C. Schwarzwaeldcr & Bros 9 East Broadway 

Rous & Co 827 Broadway 

Degraff & Taylor 8'J Bowery 

B. L. Solomon & Sons 657 Broadway 

GAS FIXTURES. 

Mitche'l, Vance &Co 597 Broadway 

Archer Pancoast M'f'g Co 70 Wooster st 

Covell, Gray &, Co r54 Broadway 

Geo. H. Kitchen & Co 591 Broadway 

Fellows, Hoffman ct Co 631 Broadway 

CARPETS. 

W. & J. Sloane 665 Broadway 

Haddon & Co 33 Chambers st 

Bigelow Carpet Co 1C2 Worth at 

CAKRIAGE GOODS. 

8. A. Martine&Co 11 Warren at 

Lnnt & Lee 99 Chambera st 

EXPRESS COMPANIES. 

W. B. Dinsmore 55 Broadway 

L. W. Wincheater 63 Broadway 

Geo. Stoker m Broadway 

John Uoey 59 Kroadway 

W. G. Fargo 113 Broadway 

A. H. Barney 291 Broadway 

Alex. Holland 65 Broadway 



Do.. 

11 

li,.. 

Weed. 



aker. 



M Ckubera at 
nT7ltRftl~«quare 

29IBowiry 

. . ,87t Broadway 
tIS Broadway 



ART DEALERS. 

Knoedler & Co cor. Fifth ave. and 22d st 

Wm. Schaus 749 Broadway 

John Sncdecor 768 Broadway 

S . P. Avery 82 Fifth ave 

REAL ESTATE. 
V. K. Stevenson 11 Pine st 

E. n. Ludlow & Co 8 Pino st 

Homer Morgan & Co 2 Pine at 

A. J . Blcoeker & Co 77 Cedar st 

John Lloyd & Sona 7 Warron at 

Wm. H, Raynor &Co 5J^ Finest 

Chao. McCrae 70 Cedar si 

Robert McCafferty 654 Fifth ave 

SLGAR REFINERS. 
Havcmeyer & Co 98 Wall at 

F. O. Matthiessen & Wiechera IPB Wall st 

'.Vm. Mollcr & Sons 99 Wall st 

Ockershausen Bros 81 Wall st 

R. L. &A. Stuart 189 Chambers st 

STRAW GJODS. 

Vyse & Co 5.S7 Broadway 

Oliver Carpenter & Co 637 Broadway 

SEWING MACHINES. 
WtMelcr A WUaon 625 Broadway 



Secor «97 Broadway 

CIGARS, niPORTBRS. 

G. W. Pah.r 86 Beaver at 

Michaclla & Levin 808 Broadway 

D» Barry & Kling 3t Broad at 

„ . TOBACCO, IMPORTERS. 

P. Lorlllard & Co. 

William Agnow's Soni S84 Fro»t at 

M. &K. Saloman 8B Maiden Une 

Martin H. Levin 182 Pearl at 

Connelly & Gardner Front at 

J. P. Korncchan. 

UMBRELLAS. 

Wm. A. Drown* Co 493 Broadway 

John J. Smith 88J Broadway 

Isaac Smith'H Sona & Co 405 Broadway 

M. L. Rau & Co Sflo Broadway 

IVIP0RTEB3 OF GLASS. 

A. V. Downing,!!; Co 57 Bcekmnn at 

DM. Schank A Sons STChumhcrs st 

Simon Bache A Co m Dunne st 

Flei.Hchmauii A Co ;w Warreu st 

Julius Palme A Co fi College place 

Ko(i«..vel t A Son M Maiden lane 

Noel, Sanrel & Antolnc 22-25 Howard at 

E. A. Boyd 79 Murray at 

METALS. 

Phelpo, DotlgoA Co 11 Cllft'at 

Naylor &Cr> <i<| J„hn at 

IKuilricks liros. A Co 49 Cilffat 

Bussing, Crocker A Co 82 Cliff ►t 

Lucius Hurt A Co 10 Burling Blip 

T. B. Coddington 27 Cliff at 

Bruce A Cook 190 Water st 

John S. DIckerson A Co 29 Cliff at 

DRY GOODS JOBBERS. 

Eldrldge, Dunham A Co 340 Broadway 

S. B. Chiitenden A Co 828 Broadway 

E S. JallrayACo 850 Broadway 

Cochran, JIcLcan A Co 464 Broadway 

Arnold, Constable A Co 881 Itroadway 

Lord A Taylor 895 Broadway 

Peake, Opdyke A Co 427 Broadway 

FANCY GOODS AND NOTIONS. 

I. A A. Blumeuthal Xn Broadway 

Hecht Bros 48} Uroadway 

Howard, Sanger A Co 105 Chambers at 

Ve J. Magnih, Gnedin A Co 6.52 Broadway 

Roscnfeld Bros. A Co 357 Broadway 

Schuyler, Hartley A Graham 20 and 22 John st 

StrasKburger, Pfciffer A Co 394 Broadway 

Althof, Bergraauu A Co., cor. Park place and 
Church St. 

IMPORTERS OF DRY GOODS. 

Benkhard A Hutton 144 Duane st 

Escher ACo 73 Broome st 

Kuiter, Luckemeyer A Co 61 Worth st 

A . Rush A Co cor. Grand and Greene sts 

Passavant A Co 222 Church st 

PatuuACo 341 Broadway 

E. Oelbermana ACo 64 Worth st 

Hardt ACo 60 Worth st 

Banendahl A Co 86 Worth st 

C. A. Auffmordt A Co 10 Greene st 

Richard Iseltn ACo 3.39 Canal st 

F. Buttertield, Jacobus A Co 189 Dnane at 

DRY GOODS COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Almy A Co 65 Leonard at 

Anthony A Hall 68 Leonard at 

Denny, Poor ACo 7i Worth st 

Frothingham A Co 110 Worth st 

8 . S. Fischer 74 Worth at 

Iloyt Spragues A Co 107 Franklin st 

Jas. L. Little A Co 59 Leonard st 

Lord, Debost A Co 47 Walker at 

.lohn Sladc A Co 68 Worth st 

Spaulding, Hunt A Co 80 Worth at 

Whittcmorc, Peet, Poat A Co 346 Broadway 

PURS. 

C. G. Gunther'a Sona 602 Broadwpy 

.Martin Bates A Co Mercer st 

J. RusE'ts 457 Broadway 

Wm. Moser 481 Broome st 

Nichols, Burtnett A Co 477 IJroadway 

LirMBER. 
Wm. G. Grant A Son. . . Foot of Thirtieth at, E. R 
Watrous, Wilson A Co. 
J . H . Havens Fifty-sixth st and Eleventh ave 

D. C. Newell A Sons.. Foot of Weat Nineteenth et 

J. W. Stivens A Bro Fifty-seventh st 

A. W. Budlong corner Illh ave and22d(t 

STONE. 

H. B. Caswell Bigelow Blue Stone Co 

Walter R. Wood A Co 283 Front st 

Babcock, Brainerd A Co. . Foot of E. Forty-eighth at 
RUBBER GOODS. 

Col. Greeley, of Tillotson A Co 8Dey et 

A. S. Gatchel 3". Corllandt st 

H. G. Norton corner Bare ay and Church sts 

R. G. Allerton A Co Broadway, near Fulton at 

HARNESS, SADDLERY, Ac. 

Hoover, Calhoun A Co 862 Broadway 

Harmer. Hays A Co 72 Beekman st 

Henry A Seaman A Bro Chambers st 

CM. Moseman A Bro 114 Chambers st 

W. Gibson 793 Broadway, near Eleventh st 

G. H. Norton A Co 57 Murray at 

IRON MERCHANTS. 

Marshall Lefferts, Jr 94 Beekman at 

Abeel Bros 365 Water it 

Ciia-' Congrove A Son 104 John st 

Egglestou Broa. A Co 166 Sontb at 

BUILDERS. 

Elisha Sniffcn 183 Eldridge st 

G<o. W. Young. 

Jercmia'i T. Smith 218 West Fiftieth it 

Thos. McClellau Seve.ity-founh at 

Geo. J. Gregory 143 Eaat Forty-ninth at 

•Ichn Giiffln. 
John McCool. 

JEWELRY. 

Tiffanv A Co Union emiara 

Ball, Black A Cu Broadway 



. .flVIVMMv at 
SM Broadway 



Wm t; ■ ■ J 

Ran.' 

C A 

Thou nirK|)«iriri( (bVBrtadway 

Stephen RIchardaon in BivMVay 

WATCOn. 

■loaeph Bmnner , « Maldaa Un* 

J E llyde'iSoM •• IllUldan Ian* 

Win. F. Ladd 10 Wall at 

Chas. Rubena A Co tSIIaldan Ititr 

Paul A. Brez tS John at 

Julea U Uugaenln-Vllamia *t Nuaan at 

UeuryGlnnuT at Maiden Ua« 

PRECIOUS BTONKS. 

Philip Blaslnger 12 John at 

David Bmhl 6 Maiden laa* 

Henla Broa 1( Maiden Una 

PBOTOGBAFHS. 

Wm. Kurt* 87t Broadway 

Nap. Saronr tm Broadway 

J. Garner itSon UM rinh ave 

M. B. Brady 185 Broadway 

Hogardaa A Bcndauo Broi l.tSS Broadway 

Cbaa. D. Fredcrlcka A Co Ml Broadway 

8TATIONEB8. 

Browcr Broa ns Broadway 

Geo F. Nosl.lltACo IM Peart at 

Ebcrhard Paber Ul WUIIan at 

Willy WalUch ; 41 John at 

PRINTERS. 

Kennard A Hay » Liberty at 

Pool A McLaughlin IDS Eaat 12Ih at 

Ilallett A Bniii 60 and 60 Futoa at 

J. O. Ilallenlieck |I3 Faltoa at 

John C . O'Brleu 58 WUIiam at 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 

Howe*. Hyatt A Co Cor Grand and Oraama at 

B.'uedict, Hall A Co tSlOraodal 

Duhola McOovem A Co 848 Broadway 

.lamea Wlggina A Co ...SSCbanibera at 

Melvln. Trask A Ripley 29 lark Placa 

HIDE AND LE.<THER DEALERS. 
Lorlnp, Andrews A Son (II ClilT at 

C. B. Foadick ASon MBpnicaat 

Frascr, Major A Co •« Cliff st 

Hovt Bros Tl Gold at 

Matthisons A McCoy 9B Cliff st 

Schnltz, Sonihwlck ACo » Cliff st 

Thomas L. Smull 46 Frankfort at 

Fred. M. Maas 174 William at 

Jonathan Thorne 524 Fifth ave 

COAL DEALERS. 

R. Hecksher, Jr Ill Broadway 

Wcyland A Lawton. ' tl 

David Duncan Ill Broadway 

TELEGRAPH SUPPLIES. 
L. J. Tillotson A Co 8 Dey it 

E. Holmes 7 Mnmy st 

Chaa. T. Chester 104 Centre st 

BOOK PUBLISHERS. 
Harper A Bros 331 Pearl it 

D. Appleton A Co 6.'j9 Broadway 

Scrlbuer, Armstrong A Co 6.54 Broadway 

Ivlson, Blakeman A Taylor 18 Grand st 

Sheldon A Co «T7 Brosdway 

Geo. W. Carlton A Co Fifth Av-one Hotel 

F. W. Chrlstprn Tl Univeraity place 

Hard A Houghton 13 Asior place 

A. D. F. Randolph A Co 770 Broadway 

L. W. Schmidt 24 Barclay st 

Ernest St eiger M Frankfort it 

B. Wcstcrmann A Co 624 Broadway 

Chaa. S. Francis 17 Aator place 

STEAMSHIP UNES 

W. H. Webb .. M Exchange Place 

Wm. R. Garrison 5 Bowling Green 

Chas G. Francklyn 4 Bowling Green 

George Mackenzie 56 Broadway 

Murray Pcrria A Co 62 South at 

Williams A Gnion 63 Wail at 

J. H. Sparks 19 Broadway 

,Oe!richs A Co Bowling Oreen 

Knnhardt A Co 61 Bioad at 

C. B. Richards A Boas Bmdway 

F. Alexandre A Sena 83 Broadway 

Henderson Broa 7 Bowling Green 

J. G. Dale 31 Broadway 

Howland A Aaplnwall 54 South st 

F. W. J. Hurat 69 Broadway 

E. E. Morgan's ?ons TOBoatbat 

A. W. DImock } Bowling Green 

Pim, Forwood ACo 88 Wall at 

LIVERY STABLES. 

Briggs A Co ttd st bet . 6ta and 7th avennea 

Win. Ebbitt »u« Seventh avenue 

S. H. Mason ACo U East Slat at 

Jas. Mlllward 521 Fifth avenue 

A. G. Armour W Uotreraity Place 

HOTELS. 
Fifth Avenue. (irand Central. 

Hoffman House. Earle'a 

St. Jamea. French's. 

St. Nicholae. Metropolitan. 

Delmonico'a. Gllaey. 

Grand. St. Clond. 

WOO',. 

Telkampf A Hitching 65 Broadway 

.foseoh Ripley A Sou 68 Pine at 

Banendahl A Co BS Worth st 

SHIPPING MERCHANTS. 

Spofford, Bros. A Co 29 Broadway 

(ha-. 11 Marshall A Co 8S Bnrllns; Slip 

(iriuncll, Miulurn A Co 7.1 South ft 

Funch, Edye A Co 28 Bonlh William st 

N. L. McCreadyACo 187 Greenwich »t 

W. W. DeForest A Co 8« Sooth at 

COTTON. 

H. M. Taber 141 Pearl st 

Cornwall A Zerega. _^., . 

R. R. Graves A Co « Wall at 

PRODUCE. 

Isaac n. Reed :^*i"»',?** 

David Dows A Co lOSonthat 

Jesse Hovt ACo IfSonthat 

J. M. Fiske ACo 18 Sooth st 

EAST nroiA OOOD9. 
A. A. Low A 00 M Burling iUp 



60 



THE CHRONICLE. 



[January 11, 1873. '< 



Financial. 



ACS. J. BSOWN. 



WAXSTON n. BBOWM. 



Augustus J. Brown & Son 

nANKER!«, 

.69 Liberty Street, New York. 

BPXCIAI. ATTENTION GIVEN TO THE NEGOTIA- 
TION OF 

RAILROAD SKCIJKITIES. 

K O. BABNXT. O. H. RAYMOJTD. K. D. FOSTBH 

Barney, Raymond & Co., 

BANKERS AND BROKERS 
5 U'AIili STREET. 

BT0CK8, GOLD, BON D8 AND ALL OTHEK 

SECURITIES 

Bonsrht and Sold on Oommiiifiloii. 

Interest paid on Deposits subject to check. 

J>. N. BARNEY, ) c„„.., 



Marquand, Hill & Co., 

No. 37 IVALL ST., yMW TORK. 
Members New York Stock Exchange. 
Stocks, BouUs and Gold bought and sold on commls- 
Bion. — 

Marquand & Hill, 

BANKERS AND BROKERS, 

No. 18 Devonsbire St., Boston. 

Stocks, Bonds and Gold bought and gold on comrals- 
Bion ; Collections made ; Business Paper Negotiated. 

Knoblauch 

& Lichtenstein, 



BANKER 



37 Broad Street, Neir York. 
SAFE INVESTMENT 

FOB 

Eastern Capital. 

MON£T LOANED FOR EASTERN PARTIES OH 

imPROVED FARmS. 

Ten per cent interest (clear from all expenses) pai< 
wherever desired. 



MOBRIS, > 

Illinois, J 



E. SANFORD, 

Attorney and Solicitor. 



References given to prominent persons in any largf 
city in the Union. 



M. K. Jesup & Company, 

BANKERS AND nERCIIANTS, 

69 LIBERTY STREET. 
Neitotfate 
Hondm and Loan* for Railroad Go*. 

i ou'.Tactlor 

iron or Steel Rail*, IjOconi«tlTe§, 
<!?ar8, etc. ' 

and undertake 
■11 buBlneaa connected witb Raflwaj ■ 

LocKwooD & Co., 

BANKKR8, 
04 BROADVirAY. 
Tranaact a General Banking busi- 
ness, Including tbe purcbase and sale 
of OoTernment and State Bondr, Rail- 
road Stocks and Bonds, and other 
■•enrltlOM, on commission, 

TBE 

German American Bank, 

Cor. Broadway and Cedar St., 

CAPITAL, $2,000,000 

DRAWS BILLS OF EXCHANGE and Issues LFT 
Jbrofd" '=1'^"" available at all principal places 
Accounts of Merchants, Bankers, &c. solicited. 
O. H. ScaKKINBB, Caehlei'. E.\IIL SAUEH, Pres. 

Charles Otis, 

No. g New Street and 74 Broadway. 
CITY RAILROAD, GAS & 

INVESTMENT SEOt7RITIES. 

9e«fnoUUoiu "Loc»lS«cwltlet" in this paper. 



Financial. 



Gibson, Casanova & Co., 

BANKERS, 

No. 50 EXCHANGE I'i^CE. 

STOCKS, BONDS, GOVERNMilNT SECURITIES, 
FOKKIGN EXCHANGE and GOLD bought and sold 
on the most favorable terms. 

INTEREST allowed on deposits either In Currency 
or Gold, subject to checii at sight, the same as with 
the City Hanks. 

ADV.\NCES made on all marketable securities. 

CERTIFICATES of Deposit issued bearing interest. 

COljLECTIONS made at all points of the UNION 
ind BKITISU PROVINCES. 



SOUTTER & Co., 

BANKERS, 

No. 53 WILLIAM STREET, NEW YORK. 

Dealers in Bills of Exchange. Governments. BonUir, 
Stocks, Gold, Commercial Paper and all NcgotlmUie 
Securities. 

Interest allowed on Deposits subject to Sight Drati 
or Check. 

Advances made on approved securities. 

Special facilities for negotiatir.r Commercial Paper. 

Collections both inland and forei^j promptly made. 

Foreign and Domestic Loans Ne^otla.ed- 



VERMILYE & CO., 

BANKERS, 

16 And 18 Nassau Street, Neiir York, 



DEALERS IN ALL ISSUES OF GOVERNMENT 
SECUKITIES. 

BUY AND SELL ON COMMISSION 

RAIIin'AY STOCKS, BONDS AND 
GOLD, 

MAKING LIBERAL ADVANCES. 



futercst on D<«po8lta. 



Smith & Hannaman, 

BROKERS 

AND INVESTING AGENTS 

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA. 
Choice Ten Per Cent investmests at and below par 
Financial Laws and Forms of INDIANA sent free. 

;l. T. National ExcHAras Bank. Corresnondent. 



A 9 Per Cent Investment 

I am selling NORFOLK CITY, VA., EIGHT PER 
CENT WATER BONDS, at SVA and aoJrucd interest 
Coupons payable at National Park Bank, New York. 
At present price they pay 9 1-7 per cent interest 
secured by a Water Tax and First Mortgage on the 
Water Works. For further information, apply to 
FRANCIS B. LONEY, 

Baltimore, Md. 

SPECIALTY.— COMMBROIAL PaPBE NB90TIATBD. 



Wood & Davis, 

BANKERS 

AND 
DEALERS IN RAILROAD BONDS. 

Keep on hand a variety of choice bonds to supply In 
Testers, furnish bonds advertised on the market at 
subscription prices, execute orders for Government 
securities, gold and railroad stocks, and do a 

GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS, 

No. 31 Pine Street. 

D WOOD, 
Formerly of Vermllve A Co'. 



SAMUEL D. DAVIS. 



William T. Meredith & Co., 

No. 54 EXCHANGE PLACE, NEW YORK. 
Dealers in 

RAILROAD Si MUNICIPAL BONDS. 

Stocks and Securities Bought and Sold 
at the New York Stock Exchange. 

LOANS AND PAPER NEGOTIATED-INTEREST 
ALLOWED ON DEPOSITS. 

Robins, Povv^ell & Co., 

BANKERS, 

NO. 10 WALL STREET, NEW TORK. 
Government Securities, Gold, Stocks and Bonds 
bought and sold on Commission, 
' DeposKe recelTed and Interest alloired, 



Financial- 



Investment Securities. 

MORRIS AND ESSEX KR. 1st Mortgage 7». 
ELIZABETH CITY 7s. 
ST. JOSEPH CITY (Mo.) BRIDGE lOs. 
MOBILE AND OHIO RR. Ist Mortgage 8s. 
NEW YORK AND OSWEGO 1st Mort. Gold 7s. 
MONTCLAIR RR. 1st Mortgage Gold 7s. 
DAN., URBANA & BLOO.M'GTON 1st. Mort. Gol 
NEW YORK AND OSWEGO Convertible 7s. 
NEW JERSEY MIDLAND Ist Mort. Gold 7§. 
BROOKLYN CITY Cs and 7s. 

Foe Sale By 
UTLEY & BOAVEN, 

4 Wall Street, 



The City Bank, 

LONDON, ENGLAND. 

INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER, A.D. 1835 



HEAD OFFICE 

BRANCH 

OFFICES, 



((Corner of Finch Lane), Thread- 
\ needle Street. 
;No. 31 Old Bond Street, 
N06.159& 160 Tottenham CoortBoad, 
fNo.25Ludgate Hill. 



Subscribed Capital ' 

(50,000 Shares of iao each). 
Paid-up Capital - 
Reserved Fund - ' 



«1, 000,000 

600,000 
120,000 



IDIRECTORS:! 

John Jones, Esq., Chairman. 
Henry Vigura East, Esq., l Joaquin De Manchft, Esq. 



John Hackblock, Esq., 
Andrew Lawrle, Esq., 
Robert Lloyd, Esq., 
Wm.McArthur, Esq.,M.P., 
Wm. McNaughtau, Esq., 



William Simpson, Esq., 
Jonathan Thorp, Esq., 
James F. Vanner, Esq., 
George Young, Esq. 



MANAGER— Alfred George Kennedy. 

SECRETAET— C. J. Worth. 



Accounts opened with approved American and other 
Foreign Firms or liaiiks, at such moderate rates of 
Commission as shall be considered consistent with 
sound mutual advantage. The Interest upon such 
accounts is calculated at current rates on daily bal. 
ances, and is made up on the 30th June and Slst Decern 
bcr in each year. 

Demand Cheques and Exchange honored against 
approved previous or simultaneous Keinittances. 
Credits opened against First-class Securities negotiable 
in London. Mercantile and Marginal Credits are 
issued, as also Letters of Credit upon any leading 
Commercial City. 

Travelers' Credits 

encashed when issued by Clients, and every description 
of general Banking Business transacted. The Officers 
and Clerks of the Bank are pledged not to disclose the 
transactions of any of its customers. 

CuAB. Geeen, President, MiLO Hatch, VicePres 
Edmund Ketcuum Cashier 



Miscellaneous. 



Jos. Bachman & Sons, 




GorhamMf'g Company's 
Sterling Silver Ware. 

No. 8 niAIDEN LANE, NEW^ YORK. 

Rosendale Cement Co. 

OEmENT OF THE BEST OUALITY. 

No. 102 Wall Street, 

Wew York. 

. W. BBNEDICT Stcretary. 




tonirk 



HUNT'S MERCHANTS' MAGAZINE, 

REPRESENTING THE INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS OF THE UNITED STATES. 



VOL. la 



SATURDAY. JANUARY 18, 1873. 



NO. 395. 



CONTe UTS. 



THK CHRONICLE. 



Why is Money Katiiorf 69 

Mr. Shermanon Specie Sesamp- 

tlon 70 

The Report of the Senate Fi- 

iinnce Committee on Green- 

baclc Issues 71 

Railroad Earning8 for December I 

and for ttie Years 1872 and 1871 72 



The India Cotton Crop — 

Clianges in tlie Redeeming 

Agents of National Banlcs.... 
Latest Monetary and Commercial 

Eilgiisti News 

Commercial and Miscellaneoas 

News 



THE BANKERS' GAZETTE. 



Money Marliet. Railway Stocks, 
U. S. Securities. Gold Marlcet, 
Foreign Kxchan;;:c, New York 
City Banks, Boston Banks, 
Philadelphia Banks, National 

THE COMMEKCLAi TIMES, 

S.*! I Groceries , 

86 I Dry Goods.... 



Banks, etc .' 

Quotations of .Stocks and Bonds 
Investments and State, City and 

Corporation Finances 



Commercial Epitome.. 

Cotton. 



BreaastuHs. 



il 



^l)e €l)ioni£U. 

The CoMMEKciAL AND FINANCIAL CHRONICLE t» xssued On Satur- 
day morning, with the latest news up to midnight oj Friday. 

TSBUS OF StTBBCBIFTION-FATABLE IN ADTANCJt. 

TuE Commercial and Financial Chronicle, delivered by carrier 
to city subscribers, and mailed to all others (exclnsive of postage). 

For One Year $10 00 

ForSixMonths 6 00 

jTAs Chronicle wiU be sent to subscribers until ordered discontimitd by letter. 
Fostaqe is 20 certis per year^ n.n.d is p nil b>t the fnbscrJbev at his o?/'i vost-office. 
WILLIAM B. DANA, 1 WILLIAM B. DANA & CO., Publishers, 

JOHN o. PLOTD, JR. f 79 and 81 William Street, NEW YORK. 

Post Ofpioe Box 4,592. 
Subscriptions and Advertisements will be talien in London at the office of 
the Chronicle, No. 5 Austin Friars. Old Broad street, at the following rates : 

Annual Subscription (including postage to Great Britain) £2 2s. 

Half-Yeariy " " " " IBs. 

Advertisements, 9d. per line each insertion ; if ordered for five or more 
1 Dsertinns, a liitft-al discount is allowed. 

the; RAII, way monitor— a Journal of general Railroad Intel- 
ligence, intended to supplement the brief railroad news contained in Tiis 
' HF.ONicLE. is published monthly on the fifteenth of each month. 

Subscription price per year (including a Hie cover the first year) $4 50 

" " " to subscribers of the Chronicle 3 00 



t3f The Publishers cannot he responsible for Remittances unless made by 
Drafts or Post-Ofllce Money Orders. 

tW A neat file for holding current numbers of the Chronicle is sold st the 
olhcc for 50 cents; postage on the same is 20 cents. Volumes bound for sub- 
scribers at Jl 50. The first and second volumes of the Chronicle are wanted 
by the publishers. 



THE BAIL.l«rAY mONITOR. 

The first number of the Railway Monitor (monthly) was published 
January 15, 1873. 

The characteristic feature of the Monitok consists in its furnishing the 
most complete reports and freshest intelligence concerning every railroad 
in the country, so classified and indexed that each item of information can 
always be referred to with the utmost convenience. 

A Handsome File Cover or Binder for cnrrent nnmbers, is 
famished gratis to every new subscriber for one year. 

A Standing Index is continued from number to number, so that all 
railroad matters published within the year can be referred to by the last 
number issued. 

The monitor is In no respects intended to take the place of the 
Railroad Department of the Clironicle, hut is expressly inlended to 
snpply a want long felt by the readers of that department, in giving 
numerous reports and details of railroad information, which could never 
be given In the limited space allowed in the columns of the latter. 

TerniB of Subscription— (Payable in Advance.) 

The Railway Monitor for one year, (including File Cover with first sub- 
scription) $4 00 

The Railway Monitor, to subscribers of the Commercial and Financial 
Chronicle 8 00 

The Commercial and Financial Chronicle alone (with File Coyer first 
year) 10 00 

WILLIAM B. DANA & CO., Pitblishibs, 

79 & 81 William Street, New York. 



VHT IS MONEY EASIER? 
Two points of monetHry importance which are closely 
connected together are the further relaxation ot the rale of 
interest to 6 per cent, in transactions where no risk is in- 
volved ; and secondly, the return of National bank not"» 
from ihe country. Soma of our city banks have been sell- 
ing Naiional.bank notes for greenbacks, to the brokers, at J 
per cent, discount ; and these brokers sell them again at ^ 
per cent, to supply country bunks. This dissount pays the 
express charges, which are $1 per 11,000 to Chicigo, or 
about one-tenth per cent.; while to the chief points in Ohio 
the expressaga is about 75 cents a thousand, or one-thirteenth 
percent. The sudden accumulation of bank notes, and the 
resulting ease to the money market is not a novel uiovement. 
It was first noticed about four or five years ago, and it has 
gone on increasing till last year, when it reached its maxi 
mum. This year the plethora has been less noteworthy as 
yet. Its causes are partly the general settlement of accounts 
all over the country at the end of the year. With a view 
to these payments, currency has been accumulating in the 
pockets and hoards of the country people for many previous 
months. As tbese hoards are depleted and paid out, the 
currency finds its way very 8:>on into the banks, and like 
the tributary streams of some vast river, when ones in molior, 
the mass in a short time begins to pour itself visibly this way. 
Another cause is the payment of the local taxes in 
Ohio, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and New York. These 
taxes, to the ' amount of 90 millions of dollars, are 
paid, for the most part, about the 1st January to the County 
Treasurers, who have, many of them, borrowed beforebaad 
on the security of these maturing fiscal dues. The local 
banks, who are the official depositories, receive the currency 
thus coming in, and the total flow to this city thus acquires 
from all parts of the country a considorable volume. To 
wards the clase of the month the incoming movement ot 
currency is arrested, and does not begin asjain till summer; 
when, from the cessation of business in the country, leas cur- 
renoy is wanted; and in obedience to well-known forces, it flows 
hither to swell the over-expanded resources of our summer 
monny market. 

There are thus two great tidal accumulations of 
bank-notes in this city — the greater one in July, when 
greenbacks accumulate here as well as bank-notes; and 
the lesser one in January, which is occurring now, and chiefly 
brings in National Bank currency without more than jwr- 
haps five to fifteen per cent of greenbacks. But why, it W 
asked, do the bank-notes thus predominate. Th« reason is 
well known. The banks all over the country pay out bank- 
notes in preference to greenbacks. The people do the same. 
Thus the greenbacks are hoarded by the banks and by the 
public, and such greenbacks as get into the country banks at 



j6 



THE CHRONICLE 



(January 18, 18TS 



this season are not sent here unless in exceptional cases and 
to as limited an extent as possible. Should any adequate 
system of bank-note redemption be devised which could be 
efficiently woriied, it would correct these spasmodic accumu 
latioDs of currency at the financial centres, especially that c( 
the summer, which is the most troublesome of all. The win- 
ter plethora, as we have said, is this year abating of itself; 
partly, perhaps, for the reason that the local taxes and otlier 
settlements are being paid by the people a little less 
promptly than in fcmer years of greater prosperity. Money 



Treasury is authorized and required to pay on demand, at the 
office of the Assistant Treaenror in the city of New York, to any 
holder of United States notes to the amount of $1,000, or any 
multiple thereof, in exchange for such notes, an equal amount of 
the gold coin of the United States ; or in lieu of coin, he may, at 
his option, issue in eichange for said notes an equal amcnnt of 
coupon or registered bonds of the United States in such form as 
he may prescribe, and of denominations of $50, or some multiple 
of that gum, redeemable in coin of the present standard value, 
at the pleasure of the United States, after ten years from the date 
of their issue, and bearing interest payable quarterly in such coin 
at the rate of five per centum per annum ; and the Secretary of 
the Treasury may reissue the United States notes so received, or 
if tljey are cancelled may issue United States- notes to the same 



taxes or duties of the United States, as well as from taxation in 
any form by or under State, municipal or local authority ; and the 
said bonds shall have set forth and expressed upon their face the 
above specified conditions, and shall, with their coupons, be made 
payable at the Treasury of the United States. 



, , . , ,, . i_ . 1 amount, either to purchase or redeem the public debt or meet the 

has been so tight all over the country thit our people are current payments for the public services ; and the said bonds and 

indulging in more delay in their payments than usual. *'^* interest thereon shall be exempt from the payment of all 

We Lave thus in full activity one of the great conditions 
of an easy money-market, namely, an abnndance ^C cur 
rency. Another condition, the abundance of floating cap 

ital seeking to invest itself on call, is not quite so active. 

And this for several reasons. We h'lve had very heavy 

drafts on our loan market during the past year. Our rail- 
road building, for example, has absorbed 423 millions of 

dollars, while other permanent investments have swallowed 

up perhaps two or three times that sum besides. Now it 

has been believed that a less portion of this mo"ey than 

formerly has been borrowed abroad. This opinion receives 

confirmation from the report of last year's foreign loans 

negotiated in the London money market. An elaborate 

statement, occupying three columns of thp. London Times, 

has been compiled by Messrs. Spackman & Sons, which 

shows that various municipal and other loans tor this 

country had absorbed nineteen millions sterling, or 

95 millions of dollars during the year. This 

sum does not include our shipments of U. S. 

bonds, railroad shares, and miscellaneous securities. 

What amount of these have been exported to Germany and 

England is doubtful. The demsind fell ofl' about July, but 

was active up to that time, so that we may perhaps set down 

the total at one-third as much more, making the aggregate 

of European capital lent here 125 millions of dollars. This 

sum, largo as it seems, represents less than one-tenth of the 

capital we have in various ways invested during the year. 

Still it is a great relief of our burden that we have had so 

copious a stream of foreign money flowing this way and 

helping to protect our loan market from the well-known and 

dreaded resulis of too severe and too sudden a depletion. 
But how, it is demanded, do these streams of foreign capital 
reach us ? The inquirer should look over the statistics of 
our foreign commerce. They show that we imported goods 
last year to the value of 428 millions, while we could not 
export more than 276 millions, specie included. For the 
balance, 152 million?, we partly exported securities, and we 
partly owe it still, on current accounts or otherwise. If the 
securities we have exported amount, as estimated, to 125 
millions, we have 27 millions of foreign debt to begin the 
new year with, in addition to that running a twelvemonth 
ago. These facts disclose some of the causes why our money 
market shows signs of being depleted of floating capi. 
tal, and they suggest reasons for believing that no serious 
trouble will come of it. 



MR. SHERMAN ON SPECIB RESUMPTION. 
The title to Mr. Sherman's bill is a misnomer. He should 
rather have called it an act to prevent resumpi ion than to help 
it. As presented on Thursday, the bill contains six sections. 
The first orders the Secretary of the Treasury to sell his gold 
at par for greenbacks ; but at his option he mny refuse to 
sell gold to any applicant, and may compel that person to 
take 5 per cent bonds in exchange for his greenbacks. Tijis 
section we give below as a curious waif of proposed legis- 
lation : 
That on the Ist day of Januai-y, 1874, the Secretary of the 



If any such provision should ever get itself enacted, it is 
easy to see how wide a door would be opened to j ibbery 
and corruption. Any man to whom the Secretary chose to 
(lell gold could get it at par. No other man could get it at 
all. It is also easy to see how soon the Treasury would be 
dnined, and how its gold would pass as by magic into the 
hands of those whom the " option " preferred. The Secre- 
tary is bound to sell gold at par or not at all ; for it would 
be insufferable that he should sell at par to some persons 
and at a premium to others. How long he could keep his 
gold balance on these conditions is a curious problem in 
financial dynamics. Several enthusiasts have at various 
times been extremely anxious to disperse the gold reserves 
of the Treasury. Tbey would succeed by this law to their 
hearts' content. 

Leaving the Treasury, this cormorant bill swoops down 
on the National Banks. Its second section aims at thnt young 
and not very vigorous system a fatal blow. After July 1, 
there is to be no limit imposed by law on the note issues. 
The banks may emit as many notes as they please on depos- 
iting bonds issued under the section given above, or under 
the last loan bill of July 14, 1870. How much per cent of 
currency may be issued on these bonds is a delicate question 
on which the bill is mule. But the work of despatching the 
National banks is not yet finished. 

The next blow is against another vital part. It destroys 
the reserves. The third section of the bill declares that all 
banking associations which, after July 1, 1874, redeem their 
notes, shall be exempt from the obligation to hold reserves. 
An insignificant and unnessarj excep'.ion is made in regard 
to gold banks. The gold reserves of the Treasury and the 
lawful reserves of the banks being thus dispersed and dissi- 
pated, the bill very significantly provides ngaiiist the time 
when conservative bankers will be afraid to issue notes, and 
enacts that National banks may be organized without circii 
lation on depositing at Washington 110,000 or upwards of 
United States bonds. 

Such is the newest product of financial reform at Wash- 
ington. In view of such crude and reckless schemes gravely 
proposed in the Senate of the United States is there any 
wonder that the credit of our Government bonds is so very 
low in Europe? Is it strange that all hough we have paid 
300 or 400 millions of our public debt, a fiscal achievement 
greater than has ever been done by any other nation o 
ancient and modern times, still our bonds rule fo low and 
take their place in the stock lists of Europe among 
very poor company? Here is a bill proposed 
by the Chairman of the Einanro Committee of 
what foreigners would call our Upper House. And what 
this bill proposes to do is to sell off at ten or twelve per 
cent, below its present market value all the av.-iilable gold 
in the vaults of the Treasury. But th's is not pII. Under 
the law of 8d March, 186.3, the Treasurv may issue $120 of 



Jannarj 18, 1878.J 



THE CHRONICLE 



11 



coin certificates (or every 1100 of actual coin. These phan- 
tom gold notes would no doubt soon be issued in payment 
of interest, and they would eventually be presented for pay- 
ment at an empty Treasury uoder tho pressure of some of 
those panics which seem as normal in this zone of tlie con. 
tinent as earthquaites and tornados are in others — panics 
which, for half a century or more, have periodically desolated 
t ur country, and which can never be safely left unprovided 
for in any financial system which aims to be of use among us. 
Against the overwhelming force of such panics we have 
three safeguards. First, tho gold in the Treasury, which 
gives stability to the government credit, ensures the prompt 
payment of the interest on the public debt, underlies the 
United States bonds which are the basis of our financial 
organism, and gives the whole fabric a solidity unsur- 
passed by any monetary system ever set up in this country. 
Secondly, we have impassable bounds fixed against an 
increase of bank notes. Hence that currency is an instrument 
of commerce as stable in its value as it can be while it is a 
legal tender and is so imperfectly redeemed. Every country 
in Europe, except England and Germany, his now an irre- 
deemable currency like ours. At present ours is the best of 
them all. Notwithstanding its defects it is a more effi 
cient instrument than the paper money nf Austria, Italy, 
Eussia or France. Mr, Sherman would fasten on his coun- 
try the blighting curse of sure, rapid depreciation. He 
would remove thj breakwater which shuts out an inunda- 
tion of legal tender paper-money, the course and end of 
which baffles the wisdom of man to foresee. 

The third of our safeguards against panic is the reserves 
of the banks. These give to our commercial credits the 
same stability which the Treasury gold gives to the govern- 
ment credit, and which a limitation of the bank-notes attempts 
for the stability and standard value of that delicate instru- 
meat, the currency. Having dispersed the government 
reserves, the reserves of the banks next vanish at the bid- 
ding of this financial measure, and if oar national credit 
and the stability of our government bonds do not suffer at 
home and abroad by this attack upon them, that result will 
be arrested only by the assurance that Congress legslates 
on finance much better that it talks. Moreover, the preseii' 
session is so short that no financial measures whatever can 
easily get themselves enacted into laws; so that thi^ lope- 
ful prodigy which we have been looking at will be 
strangled as surely as others of the same pestiferous brood 
have perished so often before. 



THE REPORT OF THE SENATH FINAHiCE COMMITTEE ON GREEN- 
BACK ISSUES. 
The majority of the Senate Finance Cjmaiittee have just 
reported that there is no law for the five million overissue 
of greenbacks in October. This report is thoroughly ap- 
proved by public opinion, and stamps the seal of illegality 
on any inflating of the legal tender currency. For two 
reasons there is no positive blame charged upon the Sec- 
retary or his Assistant for the recent issue. Mr. Uoutwell 
himself was absent at the time it was done, and his duties 
temporarily devolved on Mr. Richardson, who advisel the 
overissue ; backed, it is said, by the Cabinet, and approved 
by Secretary Boutwell on his return to his duties at Wash- 
ington. But this emission, though unlawful, was urged by 
80 many prominent persons who claimed to have given in- 
valuable political aid to the government, and the con- 
sequences of refi'sing were depicted in such daik colors that 
a sort of semi-panic seems to have been stirred up at the 
Treasury. An examination of the laws suggested a superficial 
argument to favor its legality, and without due consideration 
tho law was broken and the issue made. Exactly where 
the blame should be placed, and how it should be dis- 



tributed, does not seem very easy to discover. And enough, 
perhaps, has been done, both in and out of Congiens, to 
prevent such a semi-panic in Washington from repeating the 
same mischief again. 

But, secondly, the Committee were not required to ap- 
portion the blame of the wrong doing. All that they had 
to do under the resolution of the 6th inst. was to *' inquire 
whether the Secretary of the Treasury has power, under ex- 
isting law, to issue greenbacks in lieu of the 4-1 millions re- 
tired and cancelled under the act of April 12, 1866." With 
this " inquiry " their duties were at an end. The CommittM 
voted 5 to 2 oi; (he adoption of the report. 

It is now proposed that Congress shall pass a new law 
prohibiting the future issue of greenback currency. But 
why, it may be asked, should the Secretary be prohibited 
from doing this anv more than any other unlawful act? If 
there is no man, and no body of men in this country who 
possess the power in time of peace to issue greenbacks, why 
make any penal law to prohibit it? The Supreme Court 
of the United States has virtually settled this question. 
The whole country accepts the doctrine almost without hesi- 
tation that the right to issue greenbacks can only stand on 
one ground, namely, that the power to issue was used by 
Congress a^s an incident to the war-power and to the ancil- 
lary powers of " borrowing money, coining money, and pro- 
viding for the natur.il defence and general weKare." If we 
had not been at war not a dollar of leg il tender paper money 
could have been issued in 1802, or in any Ister year. From 
this doctrine it follows that since the establishment of peace 
in 18(55 the power to issue greenbacks has lapsed, that no 
vestige of such power remained even in Congress, nnd that 
this poralyzed and abolished power could be quickened and 
mide alive by nothing short of a new wiir. Even this 
authority lias be^n disputed. Many persons of eminence 
have doubted whether Congress, even in time of w«r, and 
as an incident of the war-power, could, under the Constitu- 
tion of the United States, issue legal tender paper money. 
Under the various decisions of the Supreme Court which we 
have heretofore reviewed in the Chrosiclb, the true doc- 
trine may be held to be established as we have limited it, 
and while Congress is the sole depository of suoh powers 
to issue paper money as may be compatible with the Con. 
stilution, even Congress itself is debarred such powers and 
forbidden such issues of l°gal teuder paper except under ti.e 
pres ing necessity of war. 

But why, it has been asked, if this be so, did not the 
greenbacks disappear with the war? For answer we will 
refer to the report before us, which ihows how the power to 
issue legal tender money has been ex< rcised and used by 

Congress. 

It was first asserted and exercised by Congress Feb. 85, 1862, 
wlientocoin tbe public credit into money seemed tho only ex- 
pedient left to maintain the authority of the Govemraent durinjj 
a pressing war. This authority was again exercised July H. 
1862, and Marcli 3, 1863. These several acts declared the Lnited 
States notes to be lawful money and a legal tender in payment of 
all debts, public or private, within the United States, except for 
duties on imports and intereet on the public debt, and were to be 



issued only if required by the exigency of the public service, for 
the payment of the army and navy and other creditors of the 
Government. The amount of each issue was carefully limited. 
The aggregate could not exceed $-150,000,000, and in fact never 
exceeded $433,160,569. The power thus exercised was felt to be 
a dangerous one, liable to abuse, and was carefully limited and 
cuarded. Though the war continued two years and more after 
the passage of the act of March 3, 1863, and immense sums were 
i«.rr.,w«.a iinon various forma of security, the limit of Lnited 

By the proviso in section 3 of 



States notes was not enlarged. _ . 

the act of June 30, 18(i4, under which the national debt was 
largely increased, it was |)rovided among other limiUtio»* >or 
shall the total amount of United Slates notes issued or to be 
issued, ever exceed $400,000,000, and such additional sum not 
exceeding $.50,000,000, as may je temporarily reqvJr^ for tbe 
redemption of temporary loans." It is apparent that this pro- 
vision in a loan act was not only a limiUtion upon prert -. -■ • 
authoritting United States notes, but was a declaretion . 
policy and a pledge of the publlo faith to the nstU-nal 



72 



THE CHRONICLE. 



[January 18, 1878. 



tbat their securities should not ever thereafter he impaired hy 
any increise in legal-tender notes. The United States notes were 
regarded as a necessary medium or means to borrow money dur- 
ing war, and with full knowledge that in due timo they were to 
be redeemed in coin, and that any increase would impair their 
value and affect the value of all public securities. 

Here we have the data for answering tho inquiry why 
the greenbacks did not vanish from circulation when the 
war was over. The reason was that the greenbacks were 
depreciated. They were payable in coin on demand, but 
the Government was unable to pay them in coin. This 
inability was due to two causes ; first, that the Treasury 
had not gold enough to redeem these greenbacks from the 
channels of the circulation, and to supply their place with 
coin. Secondly, a more important reason still was that our 
paper monej was depreciated. The greenback dollar was 
of less value than the specie dollar. This depreciation was 
due to over-issues and could only be properly corrected by 
contracting the issues, by retiring and cancelling the excess- 
sive volume of greenbacks. These, then, are the reasons why 
the war-paper money did not die with the war. It was a 
legacy which lived after the conflict and lives and troubles 
us still. But this depreciation lives only till it can be 
shaken off by contraction of the volume of currency within 
its proper bounds and channels. The process of contraction 
began about the close of the war and till now no act has been 
done by the Trei^sury hostile to it. These points are well 
illustrated by the committee in the following paragraphs: 

The close of the war was followed with measures, by both the 
executive and legislative branches of the Government, to still fur- 
ther limit and reduce the volume of legal tender notes. All forms 
of temporary loan, including the legal-tender interest-bearing 
Treasury notes, were funded into bonds. For this purpose a por- 
tion of the $50,000,000 of reserved United States notes, under the 
act of June 30, 1864, was used for the redemption of temporary 
loans, but these notes were soon redeemed and cancelled, and 
with the usual policy of contracting the currency. The act of 
April 13, 186G, referred to in the resolution of the Senate, was 
passed in approval of, and in accordance with, the avowed policy 
of Mr. McCulIoch, then Secretary of the Treasury, to retire all 
short-time liabilities by funding them into bonds and to reduce 
the volume of United States notes so that those remaining out- 
standing should be, from their scarcity, at par with gold. The 
only limitation made to this power of contraction was by the fol- 
lowing proviso ; 

Provided, That of United States notes not more than $10,000,000 
may be retired and canceled within six months from the passage 
of this act, and thereafter not more than $4,000,000 in any one 



general an increase in comparison with 1871 as several pre 
vious months have shown, It is to be remembered, how- 
ever, in noticing the amount of increase or decrease, that 
December earnings are usually smaller in the gross amount 
than those of the preceding autumn months, and consequent- 
ly the increase in the traffic on particular roads appears 
smaller in amount, although it may be quite as large a per- 
centage connpared with the corresponding qponth of last year. 
The Central Pacific, Union Pacific, and Lake Shore roads 
are most cou.ipicuous for a large increase in earnings, and 
the Illinois Central is stil! noticeable for a decrease. A 
greater interest centres, at the present moment, in the 
earnings for the whole year 1872, which we notice at some 
length below. 

Railroad earnings for the month of December were as 
follows : 

BAnJU>.U> KAKNINeB IK DECEHBEB. 

1872. 

Atlantic & Great Western $401,900 

Burlingtou, Cedar Rapids * Minn 84,628 

CwnlralPacilic 1,007,125 

Ctiicago & Alton 361,175 

Chicago, Daaville & Vincennes.. 49,440 

Clcve., Col., Gin. & Ind . 337,404 

Erie 1,.39!,6H 

Illinois Central 640.183 

Indiannpolis, Bloomington & W. 126,124 

Kansas Pacific 22:1241 

Lake Shore* Mich. Soathern... 1,4.3.3,9.31 

Marietta & Cincinnati 204,196 

Michigan Central 676 7(-'3 

Milwaukee & St. Paul 5:3.787 

Mi830iiri, Kansas & Texas 200.228 

OK'io & Mippissippi 2!t4,I.'i0 

Pacific of Missouri *275,.30a 

St. Louis and Iron Mountain *225.!I70 

St. Loui", Alton & T. H •1.55.378 

T'llndo. Peoria <fc Warsaw 90.856 

Tol., Wabash & Western 492,i35 

Union Pacific t644,346 



Total (except roads not report- 
ing in 1871) 9,583,851 



mouth. 

Why this policy of contraction, so needful for resumption 
of specie payments, was suspended we explained not 
long ago. On this subject our views are substantially the 
same as those of this report. It is important to notice that 
Congress has never attempted since the war to arrogate to 
itself the right to issue greenbacks. Still less has Congress 
attempted to confer that power by direct legislation on the 
Secretary of the Treasury or any other officer of the govern 
ment. The Committee, in closing their report, sum up the 
whole question as follows : 

Such a power, if given, would be by clear and unambiguous 
language, and should not be inferred by subtle reasoning or 
depend upon the pressure of interested parties or changing views 
of public policy. In all questions of construction as to the extent 
of powers conferred by law, in matters which affect the public 
credit or public securitiiis, a reasonable doubt as to a grant of 
power should be held to exclude it. 

After a careful review of the subject, your Committee are cf the 
opinion that the Secretary of the Treasury has not the power to 
issue United States notes in excess of $356,000,000 outstanding 
when the act of Feb. 4, 1868, took effect, but he may replace, with 
new notes, all mutilated or defaced notes, and within the limit of 
$356,000,000 may exchange or replace new notes for old ones and 
your Committee report the following resolution : ' 

Resolved, That in the opinion of the Senate the Secretary of 
the Treasury ha.s not the power, under existing law to issue 
United States notes for any portion of the $44,000,000 of United 
States notes retiied and canceled under the act approved April 
12, 1866. 



1871. 


Increase. 


Decrease 


$357,103 


$47,797 


$ 


62,6.')0 


21,972 




672.358 


834,767 




377,687 




16,618 


329.926 


7,478 




l,4lfi.Jn 




23.602 


688,131 




47,948 


92,151 


38,973 




8111,197 


13,044 




1,235,285 


198,648 




169,820 


84..376 




507.050 


69,7.33 




473.296 


40,492 




105 244 


94,984 




26ti,751 


27,399 




899,052 




24,830 


169.605 


56,365 




102.995 


52,383 




99.804 




8,948 


S1K.934 




24.699 


469.392 


174,954 




8,628,147 


1.809,363 
1,063,404 


145,959 



* Fourth ueoK ostimalod. 
1 Approximate uy telegraph. 



BAENISeS FKOM JANnAEV 1 TO nXCEMBEB 

1872. 

Atlantic & Great Western $5,131,918 

Burl . , Cedar Rapids & Minn . . . 995,865 

Central Pacific 12,900.126 

Chicago & Alton .5,164,897 

Cleve., Col., Cin. &Ind 4 438,070 

Erie 18,390,605 

Illinois Central 7,922.644 

Kansas Pacific .... 3,641,182 

Lake Shore and Mich. South... 17,537,734 

Marietta & Cincinnati 2,029,927 

Michigan Central 6,994,124 

Milwaukee & St. Paul 6,957,771 

Missouri. Kansas & Texas 1,887,468 

Pacific of Missouri *3,577,768 

St. Louis &Iron Mountain *2,a71,658 

St. Louis. Alton & Terre Haute.. *1,921,726 

Toledo, Peoria & Warsaw 1,270,216 

Toledo. Wabash & Western . . . 6,968,317 
Union Pacific t8,779,099 



) DICEMBEB 31, 1878. 




1871. 


Increase. 


Decrease 


$4,47.1,788 


$656,123 


$ 


9,467,072 


3,4.33,054 




5.278.910 




114,013 


.3.81.6,076 


571,994 




17,397,3.34 


993,271 




8,401,143 




478,49a 


3,306,826 


337,356 




14,979,975 


2,557,759 




1,690,714 


339,213 




5,984 907 


1,009,317 




6.690.6% 


867,075 




997.293 


890 169 




3,568,472 


9,296 




1,645, •:61 


62.5,797 




1,820,796 


100,930 




1,072,948 


197,268 




5,7.36,662 


231,655 




7,521,138 


1.257,961 





$592.61» 



Total (excepts., C.E.&M.).$n6,788,138 $108,908,512 $13,478,188 
Netlncrease 12,885.626 

♦ Fourth week of December estimated, 
t Approximate by telegraph. 

The whole year 1872, being now completed, it is possi- 
ble to make a comparison with tlie previous year; in re- 
gard to some roads, also, the expenses have been reported, 
enabling us to see what the net earnings have been. The 
Central Pacific reports $12,900,120 gross earnings in 1872 
— $5,375,000 operating expenses (November and December 
approximate) and 17,525,126 net earnings, against S5,171,. 
192 net earnings in 1871. The Union Pacific has now its 
complete reports to the end of November, and shows for 
the eleven months $3,686,004 net earnings, against $3,768,- 
597 for the same time in 1871, but the gross earnings show 
a large excess, and part of Iha heavy operating expenses are 
due to large expenditures recently made to provide against 
snow blockades hereafter. The gross receipts of the 

umm EA.«„«s F« .™..E« m m m um ZS'ao.ls^r^Z.ttS-Jt'.l'r?;! 

im &^U 1871. $945,444 less than last year. 

Kailroad earnings for the month of December, 1872, so I The annual report of Cleveland & Pittsburg sUtes the 
far as they have yet been reported, do not show quite as ' receipts for renUl, interest and sinking fund at $1,030,121 



January 18 U78.] 



THE CHRONICLE 



73 



and disbursements at $1,028,152, leaving $1,708 balance un- 
expended. 

The most important falling off in earnings is shox"!! by 
the Illinois Central Railroad, nraounting to the gross sum 
of $478,499. This is, undoubtedly, owing to the circum- 
stances set (orth in the President's report last year ; namely, 
the rip'd incrense in the coni^tructiou of new lines, wliich 
drain the country formerly monopolized by the Central. 
This mov. mpnt results in taking a greatquantitj of produce 
direct to the East from the interior of Illinois, which for- 
merly went to Chicago btfore transportation to the East 
could be obtained. 

The following is an estimate of the receipts, expenses, and 



net earnings of th.i Central Railroad Company of New 
Jersey for the year 1872, cjmpared with the vear 1871 : 



18T». 



OrOBS rraelpt« tT.tlS.lM t3 

Expenscn . «,084.»1 «8 

Netcarnlnca 8,128,818 68 



isn. 

t>.8«l,*79 M 
8,7011,144 48 
>,US,a4 11 

The receipts and exiienses for December are estimated, 
Hnd the result v^ilI prol>ably be b<tter ihan shown. 

A number of prominent roads have m^iterially increued 
their mil age. Among these are the Central Pacific, Chicago 
& Northwestern, Milwaukee it St. Paul, and othen; either 
by new construction or by leasing branch roads. We shall 
give hereafter a statement of the number of miles operated 
at the beginning of the year, upon which their earningi, 
as reported, were based. 



THE INDIA COTTON CROP. 



There appears to be a wide diversity of opinion here as to the extent of the present cotton crop of India and 
the time of its being marketed this year. We have from month to month set out in our cotton report the suooessive 
steps in its favorable progress towards maturity, an.l have also given our reasons for believing that the shipments after 
the press't date and before the monsoon will be larger than is ge.ierally anticipated. To-day as a further tjuide to *n 
lntelli;^eiit opinion upon the subject we have prepared ^he two following statements. The first is a compilation of semi 
monthly extracts from Bombay circulars respecting the weat'ier and progress of the crop the past two year», beginning 
wiih the monsnon. The more thorough acquaintance we have with Iha sur'-oundings of the India plant from the first 
preparation of the grond to its maturity, the more correct will lie our judgement as to results : these extracts will help us 
o gain such information as to the present and previous cjop. We begin with the monsoon, knowing ihal the extent of 
the monsoon is usually a pretty correct measurement of the extent of the crop : 

ISTS. 

1872— Jane SOth— The soutliwest monsoon burst on the 11th Instant, but 
there was no heavy fall of rain till the night of the 18th. The balk of the re- 
ceipts has come by railway, It being no longer safe for native craft to venture 



to sea. Holders have been able to store their cotton this year comparatively 
firee from rain damage. The estimate of the quantity put in Godown is 116,000 
bales, about 30,000 more than the estimate last year. No estimates from the 
districts as to the probable stoclcs held there at the commeucement of the 
monsoon, but it is thought there is much less than last year. Rain has been 
general throaghout the country and a beginnin£^ has been already made in 
some parts to prepare the ground for crops . The high prices that hav(? been 
ruling throaghout the past season will probably induce culUvators to devote 
as much land as possible to cotton. 

July •Sth— The rainfall so far has been very satisfactory, upwards of thirty 
inches having been guaged to date. From all the districts we hear the rain 
fall has been very satisfactory, and preparations for sowing are being rapidly 
pushed forward. It seems beyond a donbt that the stock of cotton still to 
come forward from the interior is very much less than last year, and much 
tinder the average quantity for some years back. In the port of Dhollera 
1,600 hales against 15,000, and stocks in other parts of Kattywar are in about 
the same proportion . In Guzerat stocks are exhausted, and in the Berars 
there are 2,000 to 3,000 bales ; in the Dharwar districts and ports the estimate 
of stock is 5.9,000 to 65,000. 

July 18th— The weather has been more moderate, but rain has fallen daily. 
Our advices from the districts report a continuance of favorable weather in all 
parts, and that the cotton plants in the earlier districts have come up, looking 
stronij and ht althy ; should the rest of the season be as favorable as the com" 
mencement a large and fine crop may be expected. 

August 1st— Receipts expected to be trifling till the monsoon is over and 
coast traffic can be resumed . Even after the monsoon it Is generally con- 
•idered that the figures will fall short of those of last year, as the stock in the 
Interior is very small. The rain fall has been heavy both here and in the dis- 
tricts, and it is reported from some quarters that it has been excessive, and lias 
washed away the young plants. There is, however, plenty of time for resow- 
ing. From the Oomrawutty districts we are advised that a break in the 
weather was much wanted to enable the cultivators to weed the cotton fields 
in some of which the young plants were being choked. 

August 15th— The weather reports from all quarters continue to be very 
satisfactory. Oomrawutty and Hingunghaut districts the weather has been 
fine enonah to permit of weeding, which hao been actively carried on. In 
•ome parts of Guzerat, particularly about Veerumgaum, some replanting will 
be necessary to replace damage done by excessive rains, which have, however, 
now cleared up. We aie advised that, notwithstanding the decline in pricesi 
the ryots are not taking advantage of having to resow to put down other crops 
than cotton. 

August 29th— The stock of cotton in Bombay is estimated at about 50,000 
bales, of which the greater part is of very poor quality and badly mixed with 
dirt, seed, etc. Accounts of the Hingunghaut and Oomra« utty crops are very 
favorable, and the weather so far has been all that could be desired. Weeding 
has been pretty generally completed and the plants look very flourishing. In 
Guzerat the plants were looking a little unhealthy on account of too much 
moisture, but of late have been steadily improving. In Kattywar cotton and 
all crops are said to be looking exceedingly well, and a correspondent advises 
ns that, phouldthere te no unseasonable rain or bligiit from cold tliis year the 
cotton crop will i>e a very fine one. and that, judging from the fields in the dis- 
trictn he passed through, it should be a month earlier than last one. 

September 12— The coasting trade has not yet reopened. The appearances of 
the weather indicate an early termination of the monsoon, but the reports 
from the interior are to the i-ffect that the plants are so strong that they can 
do quite well wlthont further rain. The plants are beginniii"; to flower in 
early districts. Heavy rain fell in Broach at the beginning of the month, and 
It was feared some damage might have resulted, but telegrams from Broach 
and Sural received yesterday advise " c itton crops healthy." The picking 
season is expected Ut be late. From Kattywar the news continues to be satis- 
factory. In Scinde cotton picspects are reported " fair." Locusts have done 



1871. 

1871— June SO— The monsoon set In quickly on tho evening of ths 6tb lost, 
and daring the interval but litUe rain has fallen, only about eight InchM 
having been registered to date. It Is impossible to estimate with accuracy 
the quantity of last crop left in tho country. The natives generally SMin to 
calcul ■ te that not more than 85,000 bales have been pat into Oodowa hers, 
and that about 220,000 to 2-25.000 remain In the districts. 

July 4— The weather during the fortnight has been comparatively fine and 
open, and our rainfall up to date only amounts to about 14 inches, agalast U 
to same time last year. Arrivals by sea are now enUrely stopped. The (Sti. 
Kate of stock given in our last is now generally accepted. Above Ghant ths 
rainfall has been more satisfactory tlian in the ConcaD, and planting appears 
to be going on freely. By latest accounts from the OhoUers districts, how- 
ever, the weather still continues fine. 

July 18— During the early part of the fortnight the weather contlnned open, 
but latterly we have had heavy rains and strong winds. Tho fall to dale is SO 
inches, against 40 last year. In the Dhollera and Kattywar distrlcu the fall 
has been quite trifling, and It is likely that much land which was sown in 
anticipation of the first rains will have to be replanted. In the Broach quar- 
ters the yield will depend entirely on the second planting, the Srst havinf 
failed, In the Berars Khandeish, and above Ghant generally (except in 
Dhollera, where, owing to tho destruction of the grain crops, an Increitsca arc* 
of land will be available for cotton), the early rains were insufficient to save 
tho first sowings, but the later fall has been more favorable. Wo hare 'no 
reliable information as to tho acreage planted as compared with last year, bnt 
present appearances do not favor tuo expectation of any Increase in the total 
outtnm of the crop. 

August 1 —The weather report of the Cotton Commissioner for the ceotral 
provinces and the Berars was published on 25th nit., and reported 



unfavorably of the condition of the crops in the early part of the season than 
the public expected, but later advices contain news ofa more satisfactory fkU 
of rain, and the prospects of the yield are more favorable : no important varia- 
tions expected in acreage in these districts, and a slight Increase In Ilingung- 
hant. In the Khandeish districts and in Sholapore the rainfall has been 
exceedingly abort, and unless tho weather henceforward Is excepllonally 
favorable it Is most likel)r the crops there will tarnlout very badly. No com- 
plaints from Broach. Rainfall unusually light Ip Kattywar, but the appear- 
ance of plant on the whole promising. Steady rain set in In Dharwar on list. 
Fall in Bombay 21@28 inches, against 50 to same time last year. 

Aug. 15— The accounts from the up country on the whole have been 
more favorable. On the 12tb instant the Cotton Cnmmlssloner for ths 
Berars and central provinces advised that in the Wnrdah Valley and 
East Beiar the prospects were favorable and the weather very seasonable. 
The area of land sown there Is snpposed to bo about the same as last year. 
In West Berar the rainfall has been liglit, and though the plants srs 
sufiiciently healthy, they are backward, and the yield will be nnasually 
dependent on the later inousoon. In Khandeish the weather still keeps 
flue, and it seems probable that under any circumstances the crop tbers 
will be a poor one. Throughout ICattywnr and Gnzerat there have been 
very heavy rains, and lar^'e tracts of country arc jeporied as flooded. 
It is to be hoped that the water may shortly subside, as otherwise conelderabl* 
damage to tne latei sowin'_')> must result. In Sholapore and the adjacent 
country there has still been little rain. At Dharwar there has been a fair fall, 
and it is expected that planting will now be |)ushrd forward with vigor. 

August 20— In the central provinces tho weather has been very favorable, 
and in the Berars, except In the southwest district, where the rainfall has 
been scanty, the prospects are satisfactory. In Khandeish rain is much 
wanted, and nnless It comes soon the plants are likely to he permanently and 
seriously injured. In and around Sholapore the country is quite bamt np, 
audit is thought the crops both of cotton and grain are Irretrievably mine 



In the Broach districts the plants are healthy and very promising, and In ths 
more northern portions or (Guzerat, and throughimt Kattywar the yield is 
likely to be satisfactory. 



In the Dharwar districts there has been a sufficient fall of rain. The ulti- 
mate outturn of the crop is slill very largely a question of weather. The are* 
of laud planted is not expected to show any material increase except in ths 
Dharwar districts. According to the best of our infnmiation. no exce» ovar 
last year's crop can be looked for, and unless the weather improves thers 
seems room for a considerable deficiency. The season generally is a late one, 

Sept. 12— At the close of last month the weather on this tide of India 
change 1, and daring the Interval there nas been a more general and season- 
able, though not a very heavy fall of rain. This has caused a very material 
improvement in the prosjiects of all the growing crops. From the Berara 
aiiJ Central Provinces the accounts are favorable. It is thought that ths 
dama-c which was at one time looked for in ths southwest Berar will be re- 
covered, and that the outturn from these districts will be up to an average. 

In Khandeish the crops have been much beneStted by the rain, hot they srs 



aome damage to the young plants, but less to iudiganoua than exotic varieties [ still behindhand, and some lands have been left unsown. The rain which s«v 



H 



THE CHUONICLR 



LJanuary 18, ISTS.r- 



is-ya. 



In the Southern Mflratha country Bowing has been uearly completed. A very 
Tlolent Btonn passed over Bombay, ftHd a heavy fall or rain took place. 

ScDlember 28th— One boat has come in from Vingorla and two from 
Bhownueger, but the weaUier is not yet settled . The severe storm to whicft we 
alluded m our last caused serious loes of life and property in Bombay, 
Gnzerat and Khandeiah. Several bridges and a considerable portion or the 
railway to Ahmedabad were carried away and communication has not yet ueen 
restored. We are glad that cotton lias not bicn eo seriously damaged as was 
feared, as the plants were juf^t In the conrlilion when they were best able to 
Btand against such storms. The most injury has been done in the lirocu ais- 
tricta, where late-sown llelds have been washed away. In the Oomrawutty and 
Hlnghunghaut districts the plants are in full flower and look very we I. Itic 
Mason is, however, a late one and Bupplies are not looked for until well on in 
December, and only very little Oomrawuttv till January. The Broch crop will 
also be late ; some of our friends say at least a month later than last year. In 
Kaltvwar and Scinde locut^ls are doing damage to the cereal crops, but cotton 
has riot been touched. In Dhirwar cotton sowing is said to be nearly ftnished, 

October 12— The monsoon appears to be over. No cotton has yet been ex- 
posed ou the green, but dealers will probably begin to put out their stocks 
after the present native holidays are over. A few boats of Bhownugger have 
come in. The past monsoon has bt-en very favorable on this aide of India, and 
a full and fine harvest of all descriptions of produce is confidently expected. 
We hear that native reports from Bhownugger state that grain will be fifty per 
cent and cotton twenty-five per cent, in excess of last year, which was, how- 
ever, under an average. From Hingunghaut, Oomramutty and Kbandeish dis- 
tricts satisfactory advices of the appearance of the plants are received, and all 
fields are in full blossom. In Guzerat and Kattywar the cotton crop is said to 
look very healthy. In the Bharwar districts sowing is completed. It is 
thought that the area put under cotton is about the same as last year, and that 
the crop will be a good deal later in coming to market. 

Oct. 26— Reports from the cotton inspectors in Guzerat, Khandeish, Dbarwar 
and Sciude have been received. In Guzerat the weather is said to be such as is 
considered most essential for.the plants in their present stage and the season 
is somewhat early. In Khandeish the crop is progressing most favorably, and 
picking will be pretty general by the middle of November. In Dharwar the 
young plants have made fair progress, and although the crop was late in being 
sown, it promises at this date to be fair. Picking has commenced in Upper 
Scinde and the ouiturn is expected to be short, but in Centi'al and Lower 
Scinde the crop looks well. From the Central Provinces and the Berars the ac- 
counts continue satisfactory, and unless some unforeeen accident happens or 
unseasonable rains fall, there is every prospect of the crop being exceptionally 
fine and large. Cotton is beginning to appear in the fields, but very little 
Oomrawutty is expected to reach us before the end of the year. 

November 9th — Receipts for the fortnight only about one-sixth of the 
quantity received during the corresponding period of last year. The market 
has seldom been so bare of stock, the total being estimated at 30,000 bales. 
Advices from the districts continue favorable. In Hingunghaut the outturn 
may not be so large as was anticipated, but in the Berars a larrt:e increase over 
last year's crop may be looked for. Further information confirms the opinion 
that we shall have but little new cotton in our market before the end of the 
year. At present the grain crops are being reaped, and until that is finished 
cotton picking will not commence. The telegraphic reports from all districts 
received this week advise " cotton crops healthy." 

November asd— We continue to receive favorable reports regarding the 
weather and state of the plants in the interior. The report of the Government 
Inspector in Khandeish gives the area under cotton as 33 per cent larger 
than last year. The yield per acre is, however, estimated to be under an aver- 
ago, but the quality is expected to be very good. Cotton picking is progress- 
ing. In the Berars the plants are ripening slowly, and this is in favor of a 
large yield of fine quality. In Akote a very considerable increase over an 
average yield is looked for. In Guzerat and Kattywar the weather is most 
favorable and present appearances indicate an early and full crop from these 
districts. In Bhurwar the young plants are said to look very healthy and to 
give promise of an unusually good cotton crop. 

December 7— Last Saturday night rain fell in Deccan generally, and next 
night it extended further northward, and was prelty general in Kandeish and 
and West Berar. About Khamgaum the fall was heaviest, nearly two inches 
having been registered between the 1st and 5ih inst. This rain will affect the 
quality of thr cotton that was ready for gathering, but the Oomrawutty crop 
generally is late, and it is believed that the damage done has been inconsider- 
able. The telegram from the Government Inspector In Khandeish merely 
says, "cotton injured," and no further advices have come to hand. In 
Oomrawutty and Akote no damage has been done. In Broach a heavy shower 
fell, which would do the plant more good than harm. The weather generally 
has cleared up, and there are no signs of further rain. In Dhollera the weather 
has continued favorable, and the prospects for the coming season are said to 
be very cheerful. 

T/ie storm referred to above is the one spoken of in our Bombay cable dispatch^ 
tokick we published tn The Chronicle o/i)««m&«r 7. the same day these cir- 
culars were issued. On the 2l8t of Dec, our dispatch stated that the damage 
had been greatly overestimated, and as the reports sent us by cable since liave 
all been favorable, we may conclude that up to the present time the crop 
promises well. 



1871. 

in in the Sholapore districts at the end of last month has not been so heavy 
as was hoped for. A portion of the crops of cotton and grain will probably 
be saved, but we fear that the general yield will be vei7 unsatisfactory. From 
Broach the reports are sufliciently encouraging, and throughout Guzerat and 
Kattywar the crops promise fairly. In Dharwar sowing has commenced under 
favorable circuinstances, and with seasonable weather henceforward a large 
yield is looked for from that quarter. 

The rainfall in Bombay so far is only 40 inches, and in the districts there Is 
every probability that the ripening of the growing crops will be late. 

Sept. 30— In Bombay the weather has become very hot ; the rainfall to date 
is about 10 inches less than in any monsoon since the vei7 short one of 1855. 
In the Berars and central provinces the crops are in a good state, and we think 
that, except in some of the western districts, the yield will be a good one. 
In KhandeiBh the increase in acreage is roughly estimated at over 30 per cent, 
and the plants arc undoubtedly backward. From Sholapore, yesterday's ad- 
vices are more favorable, but the planting was small and late. In the Broach 
districts, and throughout Guzerat, Kattywar and Cutch generally, the crops 
look well at present, but there has not been enough rain to provide for tho 
fnture nourishment of tho plants, and unless a further fall takes place, the 
ultimate yield may be much less than present appeal ances promise, The next 
few weeks is therefore a very critical period, and rain after that would seri- 
ously damage the ripening cotton. In Dharwar the weather is still threaten- 
ing, and we think, on the whole, the prospects there are pretty good. During 
the past two days there have been some heavy rains on the coast, which we 
hope may come up and help to increase our supply. 

October 14— All appearances of the monsoon have now passed away, and 

the weather over the country has been dry and forcing. The crops are reported 

on as for the most part in a satisfactory state, but the ultimate outturn is still 

} uncertain. Natives estimate roughly that the yield will be about % of a full 

1 crop, and our advices seem to favor this guess, though in Dharwar there will 

probably be a considerable increase. 

October 28— The weather generally throughout the country, so far as wa 
have advices, has been very hot, and the monsoon appears to be quite over. 
Picking has begun in the Hingunghaut districts, but only in very small lots. 
The crops in those districts where the rains were so short (except Khandeish) 

1 appear to have stood the late scorching weather better than was at one time 
expected, and at the moment appearances are more favorable to an average 
outturn than earlier in the month. 

November 11— From the growing districts the advices do not present any 
novel feature. The weather in Bombay has become threatening during the 
past few days, and fears are entertained of unseasonable rains. In the Hing- 
unghaut districts picking continues on a small scale. In the Berars the crops 
are reported on favorably and up to an average, except in the southwestern 
portion, where a deficiency, variously estimated at 10 to 15 per ceil., is prob- 
able. Throughout Khandeish we fear the crops both of cotton and grain will 
turn out very badly. In Broach and Guzerat generally the plants have been 
k€pt in good order by heavy dews, and in Kattywar and Cutch the pros- 
pects are on the whole satisfactory. From the Dharwar coUectorates the ac- 
counts are encouraging. 

November 25— On the I2th and 13th instant we had a strong gale of wind, 
accompanied by heavy rain, but the stock exposed ©n the green did not suffer 
any material damage. The rain appears to have been pretty general in the 
Mofuseil, and in some districts occasional showers have since fallen. From 
Hingunghaut the accounts slightly difter, but as about half the crop was still 
unpicked, some slight damage by stain and black leaf has no doubt taken 
place. In tiie Berars the growing plants have l/cen strengthened by the rain, 
and the pods are not sufficiently developed to suffer from damp. Khandeish 
has been singularly free from rain, and the crops are in a most nneatisfacloi-y 
condition. In Guzerat and Kattywar the crops have been greatly benefitted, 
and although some of the early plants have suffered a little damage by poda 
being knocked oil, the ultimate yield will be increased. From Dharwar the 
accounts continue very favorable. 

December 9— The prospects of the crops in the growing districts are satis- 
factory. The earlier statements as to the damaging effect of the rain last 
month in Hmgunghaut. turn out to have been slightly exaggerated, and the 
later reports from all quarters except Khandeish speak of the plants as in a 
thriving and promising condition. With a continuance of favorable weather, 
we expect the deficiency in the yield, as compared with last year's outturn, 
will be but small, and if the weather is very favorable there may be no d«- 
ficiency at all. 

December 23— The report of the Cotton Commissioner for the Central Pro- 
vinces and the Berars was received in Bombay on the 15th. The statistics of 
acreage under cotton cultivation show a decrease of about 70,000 acres in the 
Central Provinces, and about 100,000 acres In the West Berar, and an increase 
of 30,000 acres in East Berar as compared with last year. The conclusions ar- 
rived ai with respect to the crop now being gathered are that the yield in the 
Central Provincet will be up to the average, whilst a deficiency of 20 to 25 per 
cent is to be looked for in the outturn of tne Berars. The accounts from tho 
other large growing districts (always excepting Khandeish) continue satisfac- 
tory. Some damnge appears to have been done by rain in a portion of Dhollera 
districts, but the area affected is not extensive. A smart shower fell here last 
night, and we just leain that some rain has fallen near Broach, where picking 
Is about to commence. 



The foregoing statements show — First, ttat the crop of 1871 was shortened by several circumstances: 1. In many districts the 
Commissioners reported a decrease in acreage — for instance, 250,000 acres less are reported for three districts alone. 2. The low 
ange of prices ruling at the end of May, 1.871, had a tendency to curtail the planting. 3. An abundance of rain during the 
monsoon is of vital importance for cotton in India, and the season of 1871 was very unfavorable in this respect. On the Ist of 
August, 1871, only 28 inches were guaged against 50 inches in 1870, and on the 30th of September it was remarked that the 
rain fall had been less than in any monsoon since the very short one of 1855. Replanting was necessary in some districts, and nearly 
all sections suffered from want of sufficient moisture. 4. After the monsoon, the accepted estimate of the last crop was about 
aeven-eighths of an average, and less old cotton was reported in the country than in 1870. Second — As to the present crop, the 
following favorable circumstancss appear : 1. The monsoon was satisfactory and abundant. 3. There was an increased acreage 
put under cotton this year. In this connection It is interesting to remember that the average prices in 1872 were fully 25 per 
cent higher in Bombay than in 1871. 3. The season since the monsoon has been highly satisfactory. 

If then it is admitted, as at present the advices evidently indicate, that the crop now being picked is to be considerably larger 
than last year's crop, the only remaining question is, when will it be marketed ? As throwing light upon this point we give the 
following table showing the monthly shipments from Bombay for seven years from 1866 to 1873, both inclusive. It will be noticed 
that for the five years, 1867 to 1871 inclusive, there is but a slight difference, comparing one year with another. 

MONTHLY SHIPMENTS FROM BOMBAY FOR EUROPE FOR THE PAST SEVEN YEARS. 

, 1866. . , 1867. . , 1868. . . 1869. . , 1870. . . 1871. , . 1872 . 

G.Brit, Con't. G. Brit. Con't. G. Brit. Con't G. Brit. Con't G. Brit. ConH. G. Brit Con't. G. Brit. Con't. 

Jaunary 165,703 3,818 74,104 1.849 65,476 4,736 42,454 13,807 35,610 8.153 58,294 11,177 102.330 19 016 

February 127,870 8,229 97,799 5,072 63,863 5 218 83,358 17,611 82,315 18.091 40,319 18.365 75 754 47^857 

March 126,145 1,080 151.458 8.409 134,462 12.169 134.151 36.709 56.774 33,188 51,610 36,768 94!591 69 706 

April 146,834 10.070 155,049 14.169 159,067 14,201 178,2?.9 40,918 113,7.33 41,196 108,700 78.031 110 601 41 991 

May..' ^H'3'5 ^-^^^ 211,573 19,331 183.887 56,436 213,551 41,534 226,196 29,296 141,469 55.622 92,002 40,646 

Jane 98,103 850 132,013 15,599 231,111 36,146 113,888 12.275 176,857 6.048 154,270 70,405 86,467 14 105 

July 1«,106 940 75.174 7,190 60,055 7,116 63,504 8,199 72,704 8,566 69,941 31,213 25,432 8,352 

August 12,260 806 65.379 630 16,533 350 38.869 1,177 61,504 1,664 51,211 8,667 32.629 5 267 

September 11,9S7 .... 20,864 2,430 29,660 .... 37,773 302 15,661 613 1.3!o92 3,857 15,506 1 355 

October 18,471 2,920 25,572 100 17,783 .... 17.619 1,729 22.866 4.339 38,978 41669 10.756 2,-393 

NOTember 27,045 .... 18,826 .... 19.922 1,814 13.896 564 18,363 4,705 28,158 6,406 7,000 7,000 

December 45,444 6,357 34,435 1,371 49,496 4,138 80,429 3,981 32,811 9,309 42,471 14,831 17,000 10,000 

Total 918,587 39,162 1,062,246 76,150 1,0S6.3!5 142.324 967,706 178,806 864,394 165,168 798,518 340,011 670,168 260,693 

Grand total 952,74 1,138,896 1,178,689 1,146,512 1.029,562 1,138,524 930,861 



January 18, 1873.] 



THE CHRONICLE. 



76 



CDANGES IN THB RBDEEMINQ AGENTS OP NATIONAL KANK!'. 
The following are the changes in the Redeeming Agents ol 
National Banks approved since the 0th Inst. These 
weekly changes are furnished by, and published in accordance 
with an arrangement made with the Comptroller of the Currency : 



LOOATIOK. 



Illinois— 
Joliot.. 



Riiode Island— 
Providence , . 

PennBylvania— 
Plttsborsh.... 



Colorado — 
General City. 



KAMI OF BAMS. 



Will CountT 
tional Bank. 



Na- 



The Globe National 
Dank 



The Union National 
Bank 



The Kocky Moun- 
tain Nat'nol Bank 



BBDaiMIHa ASBRT. 



The Flrat National Bank of Chicago, 
approved in place of the CookCoun* 
ty National Bank of Chicago. 

The National Ezchaoge Bank o( Bos- 
ton, approved as an additional Ra- 
deinptlou Agent. 

The Importer? and Traders' National 
Bank of New York, approved in 
olaco of The Ninth Natteual Bank of 
New York. 

The Fourth National Bank of New 
York, approved In place of The Mer- 
cantile National Bank of New York. 



Neiv National Bank*. 

The following is the only National Bank organized daring the 
past week, viz. : 

OfBclul No. 

S,074— The Citizens' National Bank of the City of Yonkers, N. Y. Anthoriied 
capital, $100,000 ; paid in capital, $50,000. Chas. H. Hamilton, Preoi- 
deut ; Jonathan vail, Cashier. Authorized to commence business 
January 15, 1873. 



.Catcflt illoiictarg anb (Eommtrcial ®nglifll) Nema. 

RATKS OF EX0BA.N6K AT I.ONOON, AND ON LONDON 
AT IiATEST DATBS. 



EXCHANGE AT LONDON- 
DECEMBER 87. 


BXCHANGK ON LONDON. 


•H— 


Tin. 


BATB. 


I.ATB8T 
DATB. 


TIMB. 


BATB. 


Amsterdam... 


short. 


12. 1 ais- » 


Dec. 27. 


short. 


12. 


Antwerp 


3 months. 


85.70 ©85.80 


*' 




85.85 


Hamburg 




20.48 ©20.52 


*' 


8 mos. 


13. 7X 


Paris 


short. 


2o.47>iia25.57>i 
25,85 ®35.95 




short. 


85 50 


Paris 


3 months. 








Vienna 




n.32>tfa!1.373i 
119>i@n9Ji 


Dec 87. 


3 mos. 


109.70 


Berlin. . .. 








8.20X 
118 


Frankfort 




" 


short. 


St. Petersbmg 




3IX@31 9-16 


" 


3 mos. 




Cadiz 


90 days. 


<3 a48« 

5ax(a52« 




.... 




Lisbon 




Milan 


3 months. 


28.72X(a28.77« 








Genoa. 


.... 


28.72Jf@28.77X 








Naples 




28.72xa28.77)f 








NewYerk.... 






Dec. 26. 


60 days. 


tosx 


Rio de Janeiro 






Nov. 28. 


90 days. 


85^386 


Bahla 






Nov. 26. 




Valparaiso . . . 






Nov. 14. 




4534 


Pernambuco .. 






Nov. 28. 




86)i 


Singapore 


60 days. 


is. ad. 


Doc. 19. 


6 mos. 


is. iMd. 


Hong Kong... 


'* 


4a. M. 


Dec. 19. 


" 


6». IXd. 


Shanghai 












Ceylon 






Nov. 28. 


6 mos. 


li.n%d. 


Bombay 


60 days. 


U. iO%d. 


Dec. 18. 


** 


U. 11 7.16(1. 


Madras 


'* 


Is. 11 J^cf. 








Calcutta 


•* 


1». lOKd. 
1 p. c. dis. 


Dec. 18. 


6 mos. 


1 11H®1 n 7-16 


Sydney 


** 


Nov. a. 


60 days. 


a di8.®>f prem. 


Alexandria.... 


" 




Dec. 85. 


8 mos. 


96;4 



LFrom our own correspondent. | 

London, Saturday, December 28. 

The holidays have engaged so much of the public attention 
this week that [there is very little that is fresh to report. As re- 
gards American affairs the week is almost without a feature ; but 
in spite of the restricted character of the business in progress, a 
firm tone prevails. The rapid advance in Erie Railway shares 
has led to some difficulties in that market and one failure is re- 
ported, while another dealer is said to have to pay on Monday as 
large a sum as £24,000 in " differences" in connection with that 
stock alone. There have been additional failures, chiefly in the 
Manchester trade; but those recorded up to the present time,though 
naturally causing anxiety, can scarcely be considered as evidence 
of the un.soundness of our position. Indeed, taking into consider, 
ation the unprecedented bounds of our commerce, the high prices 
which were attained during the summer months for many com- 
modities, and the recent considerable fall, the few suspensions 
which have been recorded justify the assertion that trade and 
speculation have not been conducted recklessly. There is no 
doubt that the commercial body believe in the sound and healthy 
condition of our trade, and hence they are anticipating a good 
and remunerative business iu 1873. 

The money market has again become easy. There is just now a 
large demand in consequence ot the approaching close of the year 
and the usual desire which is shown to possess large balances at 
the banks on December 31. The fact, however, in no way affects 
the general condition of the money market. The supply of money 
has become more than ample for our requirements, and Jthere is 
an impression that the rate will decline to 4 per cent. Gold con- 
tinues to accumulate in this market, and the, supply held by the 
bank is large, so that, in many respects, the commencement of the 
New Year will be satisfactory. For a few days, however, the 
rates in the open market are certain to be equal to the bank mini. 



mum, after which period the qneation of • redaction would ap 
pear to be s simple labject for diBcaaaion. The folio wing ar« the 
qaotations (or money : 

Fm mm 

4 months' bank bllli 4M ' 

t months' bank bUli "-'' 



Bank rate 

Open-market rates : 
Wandaodays'billl 



Per cent. 
6 



4 and 6 monlha' trade blUi. 



1^. 



8 months' bills 4%i 

The rat«s of interest allowed by the Joint itock banka and 
difcount houBea for deposits are sabjolned : 

Par cent. 

Joint stock bank* 4 

Discount hoases at call 4 

Discount houses with 7 days' notice 4j^ 

Discount hoases with 14 days' notice... ^ 4)t 

The following are the quotations for money at the leadiag Conti- 
nental cities : 

Bank Open Bank Opco 

rate, market. rate, market 

per cent, per cent. per cent, per cent 

"' ' Lisbon and Oporto.... 7 T 

St. Petenborg 8 8 

BnuieU t 8 

Tnrln, Florence and 

Rome 5 8 

Antwerp 

Belgium 



B 

8 

'5 
5 



6 
S 




Paris 

Amsterdam 

Hamburg 

Berlin 

Frankfort 

Vienna and "rriette .... 
Madrid, Cadiz and Bar- 
celona 

On 'Change this week very little basinesa has been done. The 

quotations, however, are rather less favorable to this country. In 

the bullion market there is no important feature. The follow 

ing prices of bullion are from the circular of Messrs, Plzley 

Abell, Langley & Blake : 

oou>. 

Bar Gold per oz. standard, last price. 

Bar Gold, fine per oz standard, do. 

Bar Gold, Kofinable per oz. standard, do. 

South American Doubloons per oz. 

United States Gold Coin per oz. 

S11.TIB. 

Bar Silver, Fine per oz. standard, last price. 

Bar Silver, CbntalnlngS grs.Gold, .. .per oz. standard, do. 

Fine Cake Sliver per oz. 

Mexican Dollars per oz., last price, new, 4 10 5-lb 0ld,6 

Five Franc Pieces , per oz., none here O ••■ 

The following statement shows the present position of the Bank 

of England, the Bank rate of discount, the price of Consols, 

the average quotation for English Wheat, the price of Middling 

Upland Cotton, of No. 40 Mule Yarn fair second qualit] , 

and the Bankers' Clearing House return compared with the 

four previous years : 

1868. I8«9. 1870. ISTl. 187<. 

Circulation, including £ £ £ £ £ 

bank post bills 23.916,770 23,341.440 83.611, 14» 15.008,088 18,388,114 

Public deposits 7,301.894 8,685.115 8.101,171 (,088,113 10,453,541 

Other deposits 19,488,961 18,804,607 13,845,465 81,110,177 17,088,811 

Government secnrlties. 14.181.874 13.811,953 11.925,853 15,001,018 13.875,131 

Other securities 80,780,849 19,781,988 l'i,168,411 17.180488 18,818,130 

Reserve of notes and 

coin.. 9,931,888 11,897.672 14,653,191 IS,«T,8B8 18.8M.7Tr 

Coin and buUion 18,445,858 19,194,623 82.703,536 H.914,81t tt,g«8.881 

Bank rate 8p. c. 3 p. c. 8X P- c. 3 p. c. 8 p. c 

Consols MXd. M^d. MKd. MJid. 9l%i. 

PriceofwUeat 50b. 7d. 43a. 5d. Ms. 7d. 55». 8d. 668.3d. 

Mid. Upland cotton .. lOXd. ll^d. 8Xd. 9 6-18d. lOMOd. 
Na.40 mule yarn fair id 

quality Is. IJ^d. iJ. 3d. Is. IXd. It. l«d. li. Sd. 

Clearing House return. 58,135,000 63,451,000 81,517,000 

In the stock aind share markets a firm tone has been apparent ; 
but in consequence of the holidays and the settlement of 
the final account of the year, business has been restricted. 
British railway shares are decidedly better, the Christmas 
traffic being, it is thought, of an unusually extensive charac- 
ter, the weather having been mild and bright. Erie shares havs 
fairly supported the recent improvement in their value. The fol- 
lowing were the closing prices of consols and the principal 
American securities this afternoon : 

Consols *^J'>^SJg 

United States 6 per cent 5-SC bonds, ex 4-6 1»«< > «X 

do Idsorles S*" 2S 

do 1865issne S*** ' 2% 

I do 1867i8sne X « ( > MX 

do 5 per cent. 10-40 bonds, ex 4-6 88Jt( t 88 

do 5 per cent Funded Loan, 1871,tex 4-6 8eX( 1 ttK 

Atlantic and Gt West., 8 percent Debent•^BiechoflWhalc^'• ctfs.. 80 ( t M 
DlttoConsolidatedBonds, 7percent.,BlscholBbelm'ecertiac»t«». 88 ( »« 

Ditto l8t Mortgage, 7 percent bonds nx( i ToM 

Ditto 2d Mortgage, 7 per cent bonds « I 1 88 

Ditto 3d Mortgage ••• W,' * JJ 

Erie Shares, ex 4-6 W*' ' S!,^ 

Ditto 6 per cent. Converiible Bonds, w^i > »» 

Illinois Central Shares, $100 pd., ex 4-8 100 i HOI 

Illinois and St. Louis Bridge, 1st mort S * - 

Louisiana 6 per cent. Levee Bonds ,•....• 80 

Massachusetts 5 per cent, sterling bde, 1900 J* 

New Jersey United Canal and Kail bd« J" 

Panama Gen. Mort 7 per cent, bonds, 1897 .• g 

Pennsylvania Gen. Mort. 6 per ct. bde, 1910 3 

Virginia 6 per cent, bonds, ex 4-8 *• 

In the corn market there has been extreme qnletneaa, and 
scarcely any change in prices. For prood and fine dry whaata the 
market is firm in tone, the scarcity of that quality of English 
produce being very groat. The weather is still mild and open, 
and the heavy land farmers continue to suffer from the excessiTe 
moisture, but on light and chalky soils, the young wheat plant 
looks promising. 

The following return shows the Imports and eiporta of 
grain, &c., Into and from the United Kingdom since harraat, rim. 



76 



THE CHRONICLR 



[Januaiy 18, 1873. 



from September 1 to the close of last week, compared with the 
corresponding periods in the three previous years : 

IMPORTS. 

1872. 1871. 1870. 1889. 

WTieat «wt. 17.735,556 16,191,9.33 Il.«74,li^ SSISJ 

ifJir^l Kn«B.>l .H7n7fUn 2,190,852 3,60.3,808 



BarleT 6,0.58.821 8,707,840 

oZt^ ... 3,662.712 3,228,481 

prn 638,335 .381,055 

B«»na ■..'. 850,010 1,273,706 

IndUnCom 8,580,531 7,214,946 

FlOM .... ...... 2,124,817 1,202,633 

EXPORTS, 



3;498,781 2,415,868 

a38,3:8 651,623 

495,929 1,111,873 

6,815,482 4,087,687 

1,615,302 1,224,201 



108,068 1,523,438 

3,901 8.251 

12,472 •38.982 

2,715 3.849 

632 1,457 

6,S5S 10,.'29 

7,073 24.693 



1,096,006 

13.385 
333,770 

28,366 
4,378 

30,048 
381,389 



98,017 

4,706 
19.942 
5,333 
7&J 
3,2:ra 
5,802 



Wheat cwt. 

Barley 

Oats 

Peaa 

Beans 

Indian Com 

Flour 

In the cotton market very little has been done thia week 
owing to the intervention of the holidays. The following relates 
to the trade of Manchester : 

Coneidcrinc thnt this market has been inflaenced during the past fortnight 
by a euccessicin of heavy failures, which havealwaye a more or less depressing 
effect, prices have remained very steady, and there has been an absence of 
that panic-stricken appearance which has usually been the case under similar 
circumstances on previous occasions. This, doubtless, is owing to the large 
orders which producers have on hand, and the absence of large stocks of 
eltner yarns or cloth. Fortunately, also, the tension on the money market 
has been relaxed before these. failures occurred. Moreover, most of these 
failures have been of a sectional nature so far, many of the Arms which have 
succumbed having been dependent upon each other. The discovery that 
there was so much bad accommodation paper afloat has undoubtedly jjiven a 
shock to credit; but, fortunately, this mischievous system of trading, or 
rather of reckless gambling, has not extended into the general trade of the 
district. That merchants trading upon their means have suffered heavy and 
successive losses is, we fear, too true; but, fortunately, they had a good deal 
of capital to fall back upon, and the best proof of the stability of many large 
and important firms is that they have been able to curtail their business for 
some time back. 

This market has been quiet to-day, but prices remain quite firm. Little 
business is now looked for during the few remaining days of the year. Owing 
to Ihe holidays, this has been quite a broken week, and for the same reason, 
probably, the receipts of cotton at the American ports may have fallen off 
considerably. However, the imports into Liverpool have begun to increase 
materially, and spinners will have a better choice ere long. They have bought 
rather freely of late, and are not without stocks of cotton. 

Export yarns have been little inquired for, both water twist and mule sarns 
are well engaged, some favorite spinnings being heavily so. Quotations of 18'8 
to 24's water and 40's inul'! are UEchanged since Tuesday. If spinners were 
particnlarlyanxions to sell, perhaps they might find it less easy to do so than 
a week since, but they appear to be indifferent about taking further orders for 
the present. 

Ill home-trade yarns there has also been a very limited business done dur- 
ing the week. In 32'8 cop twist there is no change in price since Tuesday. 
Fine cop twist from 60's to SO's and corresponding numbers of weft yarns are 
still scarce, and cominmd high prices. 

The cloth market has been inanimate duiing the week; 401n., 451n. and 
501n. shirtings are all tolerably well sold, and remain steady. Printing cloth also 
keeps steady, but some makes are dilflcnlt to sell, and occasional stocks are 
to be met with. Coarse and heavy descriptions of cloth remain rather flat, 
and bad to sell at full prices. 

Eusllsh market Reports— Per Cable. 

Tlie dr.ily closing quotations in the markets of London and Liver- 
pool for the past week have been reported by submarine telegraphy 
as siiowii in the followins: summary: 

London Money and Stock Market. — American securities close 
at an advance of i on 10-40s and a decline of ^ on 67s. 

The bullion in the Bank of England has increased £214,000 the 
past week. 

Sat. Mon. Tues. Wed. Thur. Frl, 

Consols for money 92K 92}< 98)i 92 32 92X 

" account 92X 92}^'' 92>i 92>i 12)^ 9ajf 

U. S.68(5-208,)1865,old... 93)i 93)i 93>i 93% 93.Ji 93% 

" 1867 9-3X 93% 93X 9.3% 93% flSJf 

U.S. 10-408 SMJi 89% 89X 90 90 90 

New 58 90X OOX 90)^ 90%. x89K 89% 

The daily quotations tor United States 6s (1862) at Frank 
fort were : 
Frankfort 



9B>i 96>» 



96% 



London Produce and Oil Markets. — Linseed oil has declined 5s. 



since last Friday. 

Sat. 

e s.d. 

Lins'dc'ke(obl).Vtn 10 

Linseed (Calcutta).... 64 3 
8ugar(No.l2D'ohstd) 

on spot, ^ cwt 83 6 

Sperraoil B ton 92 

Whale oil " 40 10 

■jinaecdoil " 33 15 



Mon. 
£ 8. d 
10 
64 



92 
40 10 
33 15 



Tues. 
£ s. d. 
10 
64 3 



92 
40 10 
33 15 



Wed. 

£ s. d. 

10 

64 3 

33 6 
92 
40 10 
33 16 



Thur. 
£ s.d. 
10 10 
64 3 



Frl. 
£ s.d. 




33 6 
92 
40 10 
33 10 



92 
40 10 
33 10 



COMMERCIAL AND MISCRLLANEOUS NEWS. 



Imports and Exports fob the Webk. — The imports this 
week show an increase in dry goods and a decrease in ceueral mer- 
chandise. The total imports amount to f 5,348,106 tiiis week, 
against f6,286,904 last week, and |,4,575,759 the previous week. 
The exports are ,$4,454,423 this week, against $3,513,906 last 
week, and S4,107,280 the previous week. Tlie exports of cotton 
the past week were 10,835 bales, against 16,205 bales last week. 
The following are the imports at New York for week ending 
(for dry goods) Jan. 9, and for the week ending (for general 
merchandise) Jan. 10: 



rOBBION IMPORTS AT NBW lORK FOR THB WBBK. 

1870. 1871. 1872. 

Dry goods $1,571,194 $1,811,342 $1,617,996 

General merchandise... 2,786,324 3,829,450 4,631,205 



1878. 

$1,562,478 
3,785,628 

$5,348,106 
6.286,904 



Total for the week.. $4,357,518 $5,640,792 $6,249,201 
Previously reported.... 4,562,895 3,927,254 7,495,ii07 

Since Jan. 1 $8,910,413 $9,568,046 $13,741,808 $11,635,010 

In our report of the dry goods trade will be found the imports of 

dry goods for one week later. 
The following is a statement of the exports (exclusive of specie, 

from the port of New York to foreign ports, foi the week ending 

Jan. 14: 

BXPOBTS FROM NEW YORK POR THB WBEK 

1870. 1871. 1872. 1873. 

For the week $2,462,778 $4,607,757 $4,006,015 $4,454,428 

Previously reported,. .. 6,693,272 8,961,926 5,409,162 8,513,906 

Since Jan. 1 $8,156,060 $13,569,683 $9,416,177 $7,968,329 

The following will show the exports of specie from the port of 
New York for the week ending Jan. 11, 1873, and since the 
beginning of the year, with a comparison for the corresponding 
date in previous years : 



Liverpool Cotton Market.— See special report of cotton. 

Liverpool Breadstuja Market. — This market closes firm, 

price.i, excepting Winter wheat, exhibiting a downward tendency. 

Hat. Mon. Tues. Wed. Thur. Frl. 

8. d. s. d. 8. d. 8. d. 8. d. B. d. 

Flour (WeBtem) ^ bbl 29 6 29 6 29 6 29 6 29 5 29 6 

Wheat (Red W'n. spr)..fctl 11 6 11 6 11 4 11 4 11 4 11 6 

•' (Red Winter) " 12 12 12 12 12 13 2 

" (Cal. White club) " 1.2 13 12 9 12 9 12 9 12 10 

Corn(W.m"(linew^ quarter 28 3 28 3 28 3 28 3 28 3 28 

BarleyfCanadian)....#bush 36 3 6 36 36 36 36 

Oats (Am. & Can.).... f bush 32 32 3 2 32 32 32 

Peas(Canadian)...'Panarter 33 6 38 6 33 38 38 38 

Liverpool Provisions Market. — Lard and cheese have ad- 
vanced ; other prices exhibit a decline. 

Sat. Mon. Tues Wed. Thur. Frl- 

8. d. 8. d. s. d. 8. d. 8. d. 8. d. 

Beef (Pr. mess) new tp tee.. 96 6 96 95 95 95 95 

Pork (Pr. mess) new ^bb!. 63 63 63 0' 03 63 62 6 

Bacon (Cum. cut) new^ cwt 31 6 34 31 84 34 34 

Lard (American) ..." 38 38 38 38 38 38 

Chee8e(Amer'nflne) " 66 66 66 66 66 67 

Liverpool Produce Market. — Refined petroleum and spirits 
turpentine have each advanced. 

Sat. Mon. Tues. Wed. Thur. Frl 

s. d. B. d. 8. d. 8. d. 8. d. B. d. 

BoBlnfcom. N. C.)...^cwt. 10 6 10 6 10 6 10 6 10 6 10 6 

" fine " 16 16 16 16 16 16 

Petroleum (refined)....^ gal 19 19 19 19 19 19« 

(spirits) " 12 12 12 12 12 IS 

Tallow(Amertcan). . $ cwt 43 43 43 43 43 43 

Cloverseed (Am. red) 42 42 42 42 42 42 

Spirits turpentine... {) cwt. 45 45 45 6 46 6 46 6 45 6 



Jan. 4— Str. Oceanic, Liver- 
pool — 

Gold bars $72,000 

Silver bars 6,300 

Jan. 8— Str Vicksburg, Port 
an Prince — 

American Sliver coin 91,542 

American gold coin 32,126 

Jan- 8— Str. Parthia, Liverp'l— 

Silver bars 219,001 

Gold birs 68,344 

Jan. 9— Str. Hammonia, Lon- 
don — 
American gold coin 850,000 



For Hamburg — 

Silver bullion $19,000 

Jan. 11— Str. Henry Chauncey, 
Guayaquil — 

American silver coin 17,960 

Jan. 11— Barkllva, Maracalbo — 

American gold coin 135,810 

German thiilers 9,720 

Jan. 11— Str. Baltic, Liverpool- 
American gold coin 500,000 

Jan. Il-Str. City of Brooklyn, 
Liverpool — 

Silver liars 192.427 

American gold coin 500.000 



Total for the week $2,695,233 

Previously reported 83 1,919 

Total since Jan. 1, 1873 $3,527,1.52 

Same time in 

1872 $572,827 

1871 97;,no 

1870 716.593 

1869 745.623 

The imports of specie at this port during the past week 
been as follows : 



Same time In 

1368 

1867.. 

1866. 

1865. 



537.400 
.6B2,3J0 
,192.6.34 
,640,602 
have 



Jan. 6— Str. Morro^Caatle, Ha- 
vana- 
Silver $12,967 

Gold 1.600 

Jan. 7— Brig Kate, Carthagena— 

Total for the week 

Previously reported 



Gold dust 

Jan. 8— Str. Henry Chauncey, 
Aspinwall — 
Gold 



$260 

763 
$15,590 



Totaleince January 1, 1873 $15,690 

Same time In I Same time In 

1872 $45,702 i 1870 $26.3,782 

1871 79,945! 1869 68,9-;0 

Atlantic, Tennessee & Oblo Railroad. — In regard to the 
letter of the president of this road, published on page 44 of the 
Chronicle of Jan. 11, a gentleman who is a member of a firm of 
stock brokers in this city writes, us as follows : 

" This explanation may pos.sibly be satisfactory to the holders 
of the $85,000 of bonds. Granting that it is so, that they accept 
the compromise offered by the company and surrender their 
mortgage, there will, nevertheless, still remain uncancelled yet 
another mortgage on all the property of the Atlantic, Tennessee 
& Ohio Railroad Company of prior date to that execute! in favor 
of the holders of the company's 8 per cent, gold bonds. This 
mortgage— for $2,000,000— was executed in the spring of 1869, to 
the State of North Carolina, to secure the State against loss on 
her own 6 per cent, bonds for the same amount issued to the 
Atlantic, Tennessee & Ohio Railroad Company. About $150,000 
of these State bonds are outstanding, and the holders are en- 
deavoring to have the State's lien transferred to them. The 
matter is now before the courts at Raleigh." 

" A Holder of North Carolina State Bonds Issued to 
the Atlantic, Tennessee & Ohio Railroad Company.' 

— The Chicago Railway Review issued a double number includ- 
ing the weeks December 28, 1872, and January 4, 1873, in which 
they gave a statement in much detail showing the progress of 
railroad building in this country in the year 1872. The Review 
is now the principal railroad newspaper published at tlm West 
and has shown much enterprise in business since the losses by 
Cliicago fire, so that its annual statement will be received with 
much consideration by all who are interested in rallroadg. 



January 18, liiS.J 



THE CHRONlCLli 



77 



— The Railroad Gazette publishes this week an extended review 
of railmadB ron atructed in the United States during the year 
1873. The editors state that this record is not a mixture of 
guesses and ascertained facts, like most of the kind, but is made 
up from reports made to tliem by railroa<l otflcers, compared witli 
the information received weekly throughout the year; has boen 
compiled with th« utmost care and enormous labor, and is very 
nearly correct. This record makes the mileage completed in 1873, 
7,364. The most careful record for 1871 gave 7,303 miles as tliu 
aggregate thai year. We have always regarded the Oazelte as 
one ot tile very best of our railroad exchanges, and wo have much 
confidoucii in the statements of its editors. 

— As will be seen by a notice in our advertising columns, the 
Phenix Insurance Compauy of Brooklyn — office 173 Broadway, 
N. Y. — will pay its usual semi-annual dividend of 5 per cent on 
the 20th inst. The Phenix in passing through the fiery ordeals 
of Chicago and Boston does not seem to have lost any of Us 
energy. 

BANKING ANU FINANCIAL. 

BANKIN^'^oii'ICE' oinFliK ¥'hATCH^""""~" "" 
New YoTiK, Jan. 17, 1873. 

The CHESAPEAKE and OHIO, the CENTRAL and WEST- 
ERN PACIFIC BONDS, all of which have been negotiated by 
us, we believe to be among the best and most desirable Invest 
ment Securities in the market, which in time must become very 
scarce; especially as the Government will probably, during 
this year, pay off in gold another large lot of Five-Twenties, 
and issue in their place Five Per Cent. Bonds. 

The CHESAPEAKE AND OHIO SIX PER CENT. GOLD 
BONDS, the total amount of which is only $15,000,000, are 
secured upon a property worth $35,000,000 to $40,000,000, and 
are fully equal in intrinsic value to the Centbal Pacific Bonds 
They are issued in denominations of $100, $500 and $1,000, cou- 
pon or registered, and at their present market price, 86 and ac- 
crued interest, are very desirable. 

The CENTRAL PACIFIC SIX PER CENT. GOLD BONDS 
are too well known to require description or commendation. 
Their total uicount is $35,885,000 ; they have for a long time 
ranged in market price near or above par. 

The WESTERN PACIFIC SIX PER CENT. GOLD BONDS 
amount to $3,735,000. Tliis road is now consolidated with the 
Cbntual Pacific, and the payment of its bonds, principal and 
interest, is assumed by the latter. Coupon Bonds, $1,000 each. 
Their market price to-day is 90 to 90^. A« they have recently 
been introduced on the Stock Exchange, we expect to see 
them rapidly rise to the price of Centual Pacifics, being 
substantially the same in character and value. 

We buy and sell, as usual, Qovernmeut Bonds, receive deposits, 
on which we allow interest, make collections, and conduct a gene- 
ral banking busine;s in all its branches. 

FISK & HATCH. 



TO INVESTORS. 

To those who wish to REINVEST JANUARY COUPONS OR 
DIVIDENDS, and those who wish to INCREASE THEIR IN- 
COME from means already [invested in other less profitable securi- 
ties, we recommend the Seven-Thirty Gold Bonds of the Northern 
Pacific Railroad Company as well secured and unusually produc- 
tive. 

The bonds are always convertible at Ten per cent, premium 
(I'lO) into the Company's Lands at Market Prices. The Rate of 
Interest (seven and three-tenths per cent, gold) is equal now to 
about 8i currency — yielding an income more than one third 
greater than U. S. 5-20's. Gold Checks for the semi-annual inter- 
est on the Registered Bonds are mailed to the Post Office address 
of the owner. All marketable stocks and bonds are received in 
exchange for Northern Pacifics ON MOST FAVORABLE TERMS. 
JAY COOKE & CO., 
New York, Philadelphia, and Washington, 
Financial Agents Northern Pacific Railroad Co. 



Banking House of Henkt Clews & Co.,) 
32 Wall street. N. Y. f 

Bills of Exchange, Circular Notes, Travelers' and Commercial 
Credits issued available in all parts of the world. 

Deposits received, subject to check on demand. Interest 
allowed on all Daily Balances, every accommodation and facility 
afforded usual with City Banks. 



TO GDARDIAlfS AlfD BXBCVTOaS. 

THE EQUITABLE TRUST COMPANY-Caplul, $1,000,000- 
are ofTering First Mortgage Ileal Estate Bonda, guaranteed bj 
themselves, at par and accrued interest. Every Bond la aocored 
by Ileal Estate of double value, appraised under th« moat rigid 
rules, and approved by the following Executive Committea: 
Robert Lenox Kenedy, Adrian Ibrmn, John D. Mazweix, 
Charles Butler, Samuel Willets, Euoenb Kellt, Peter 
McMartin, Wm. Kehsen and IIenrt P. Hatbm. 

Jonathan Edwards, President, No. 78 Cedar Street, N.T. 



MONEY TO LOAN ON COTTON IN STORE. 

R. M. WATERS & CO,, 
56 Broad street. 



^\]t ©ankers 


' (Sfa}tnt. 


DIVIDBIfDN. 

The (oUowlnic Dividends have been declared durlnc the paat weak ; 


COHPAXT. 


Obht. 


pfMi BoouOi-aas. 


Rallroada. 


s 

5 
10 


Feb. IS, J*n M tA p«h 11 




ondem. 
on dem. 
on dem. 
Jan. IS. 


' ' ~ 


Insurance. 

wmiamfiburgh City Fire (Brooklyn) 




PaclflcFlrc 

Firemen's Trust (Brooklyn) 




American Fire 




American Exchange Fire 






ondem. 
Jan. 20. 
on dem. 
Jan -0. 




Niagara Fire 




Lenox Fire 




Phenix (Brooklyn) 




Atlantic (Br(JokIyn) 


on dem. 
on dem. 
Jan. 14. 
Fab 1 




Citizens' 

Kings County Fire (Brooklyn) 

Wee tchester Fire (New Rochelle) 










in 'Jan. Ifl. 




Manhattan Fire 




on dam. 





Fbtdat ETEiine, Jan. IT, IKt. 

The nioner Market. —The decided tendency towards easier 
rates, both on call loans and commercial paper, which we noticed 
in our last report, has since been further developed, and (or the 
first time in many weeks we are able to report the New York 
money market tolerably easy. The ruling rates on call since 
Tuesday have been from 6 to 7 per cent., according to the 
collateral furnished. It is hoped, of course, now that we shall 
have a more healthy tone in monetary afTdirs for some time to 
come. Last year, however, rates began to harden a^ain as early 
as February, and the relaxation which followed the Janaary dis- 
bursements was of short duration. 

Just at the present moment one of the nnfavorable feature* of 
our market is the plethora of national bank notes and scarcity of 
greenbacks, and this condition of affairs suggests, as usual, the 
necessity of a practical law providing for the redemption of these 
notes. 

Commercial paper is more active and sells at lower rates ; the 
standard quotation is 8(310 per cent, though some transactions 
have been made down to 7J for very choice paper, and the tend- 
ency is evidently towards better prices for sellers. It is notice- 
able that long paper sells quite as well as 60 days' paper. 

Advices from London report a continuance of ease in money, 
the bank rate remaining at 4^, and the gain in bullion this week 
amounting to JfSU.OOO. 

The labt statement or our New York city banks (January 11) 
showed an increase ot $1,903,000 in the excess of reserves. The 
total liabilities stood at $334,903,000 ; the total reserve at $63,418,- 
800, being $4,690,035 more than 25 per cent of the liabilities. 

The following statement shows the changes from previous week 
and a comparison with 1872 and 1871: 



-1S73.- 



Loansand dis.. 

Specie 

Clrcnlation... . 
Net deposits — 
Leiral tenders . 



Jan. 1. Jan. 11. Dlfferencea. 

. tr.t.n'isfn |27s.«S!.«« Dec. I2.ie.in) 

19,478.1I» 32 93«J0) Inc.. S,(K1.0I« 

. J7.«lS,8nO 27.«l.600 Deo. 152 JOO 

. 3l>.1,!>ll8.1(in •tTi.i'Xjmtt Inc.. 3.6$3.«I0 

11.165.400 iO.^lS.W Dec. 2»8.t00 



■am. 


mi. 


Jan. It 


Jan. u. 


Wixaxt 


tmswmi 


riMi m 


Tfjm^j^ 


tS.4S.3n) 


SIPM.OI 


3i4.a'4(iaa 


»lt.4ltTit 


tsjM.oat 


tOiXbtll 



ITnlted States Bonds.— The principal feature of the market 
for Government Securities has been the prevalence of a good de- 
mand from both foreign and home purchasers, and a scarcity of 
bonds, which is very perceptible whenever attempts are ma<ie to 
purchase round lots. Without some material advance in the bids 
made for Governments, it seems hardly probable that foreign 
buyers will be able to obtain any very considerable amounts from 
our market. A material advance in prices would, of course, draw 
out bonds from the hands of present holders. At the Treasury 
purchase on Wednesday $318,600 were offered, and $197,600 were 
taken as below par in gold, and paid for entirely with National 
Bank notes. 

Closing prices daily, and the range since Jan. 1 . bst* been : 



Sa.fanil, 1881, ep 

ts.lMl, refc 

«8. 1881, coup 'IIRS 

5-W)'»19«a, conp... 'IISH 
5!"'al!lfrl, coop... IISS 
!Wsl8«8, ■• ... MUX 
J-2 'ilS'Vi.n" ... IISX 
S-Wii 18K7. " ... 1I4« 
5 20'sl368. " ... I15X 

lO-m'B, reif 

lij-4J>'s, coupon.... Il<<:( 
CnrrencytH •IWS 



Jan. Jan. Jan. 
U. IS. 14. 
lIJH'ir.H'lUK 
nsvi ".IS 'lis 

ill '.15J« 
'IIS 'in 
'IISK 'lis 

114V 114 

IHU 

lt4V 
'MIX 
'I10« 

ll"* 
118X 



\u\ 

IIIH 

iin« 

llOK 
lUX 




^oaJaa. I 

^LawMt.~ — Hisbaat.- 

- 1I7K Jan. II 

ili>« Jan. • 

IKU Jan. t 

ll4)i Jaa. It 

:i4 Jaa. • 

M.^K Jib. • 

\UH Jaa. ID 

: IPM ;aB. li 

3 wm Jan. % 

S 'II Jaa. • 

% IIIK Jan. n 

ttll4S Jan. 14 



• This la the price bid, no tal» was made at the Board. 

Closing prices of securities in London have been as follow* : 



76 



THE CHKONICLR 



[January 18, 1878 



U^. 61. 5-306, '«S 

U. 8.IH.5-S08, ■«1... 

X;. 8.!K,10-M> 

NewSs 



Jan. 



MX 



Jan, 

10. 



93H 



Jan. 



«3K 

90 
S9X 



-Since Jan. I.- 



Loweat. 



KS Jan. 
ns Jan. 
89 Jan. 
69X Jan. 



Blglieat. 



tSH Jan. IG 
93X Jan. 10 
90 Jan. 15 
tOH Jan. 8 



State and Railroad Bonds. — There have been very few 
transactions in Southern State bonds, and the dealings in these 
securitieB must necessarily be attended with considerable uncer- 
tainty as long as the several Legislatures are in session and liable 
at any time to pass laws which might be prejudicial to the inter- 
ests of bondholders. Louisiana and Arkansas are still in default 
on their January interest, though it has been rumored that the 
Louisiana interest would be paid soon. In Virginia the auditor, 
pursuant to a decision of the courts, will now direct the receivers 
of taxes that coupons must be taken in payment when offered. 
Coupons have sold here up to 83, but were not better than 80 bid 
this afternoon. 

Railroad bonds have been in good demand, and a well- 
distribnied business has been done throughout the list. The 
New York Central & Hudson will issue $10,000,000, or £2,000,000, 
of thier $40,000,000 loan in sterling- bonds. The Erie Railway 
directors have authorized $10,000,000 new bonds, provided they 
can be sold at par, the bonds to be convertible into stock at par. 

Closing prices daily, and the range since Jan. 1, have been : 



cipal support to the market is apparently found in the fact that 
exports have recently been resumed, and exchange is ruling high 
enough to warrant further shipments. There are some parties 
also who believe very confidently that gold will go higher, in con- 
sequence of the large shipments during 1873 ; the trade balance 
against this country in merchandize ; and the prospect, as they 
think, that American securities will not continue to be sent abroad 
in as larffe amounts as they have previously been. 

The rates on gold loans to-day were 4, 4i, 5, 3, and 1 per cent, 
for carrying, and flat for borrowing. On Thursday the bids 
at the Treasury sale amoanted to $4,91.5,500, and the entire 
amount, $1,000,000, was sold to one party at 113..52}^. Customs 
receipts for the week amount to $3,727,000. 

The following table will show the course of the gold premium 
each day of the past week : 

■ ^notations. . 

Open- Low- High- dps- 





Jan. 


Jan. 


Jan. 


Jan. 


Jan. 


Jan. 


. Since Jan. 1. 


— , 




i:. 


13. 


14. 


15. 


16. 


17. 


^Lowest 


.-, ^Highest. 


»«Tenn., old 


80>i 


80H 


•SO 


T9V 


♦79 


"7i 


T9V Jan. 


3 


SI Jan. 


9 


6«Tenn., new.... 


m 


an5 




Ml 


•79 


•M 


80 Jan. 


6 


80X Jan. 


8 


«bN. Car., old.... 


•.tin 


'\a\i 


.... 


•38 S' 


•33 K 


•S3 


33H Jan. 


8 


34 Jan. 


10 




•1»H 


•19 


•18 




•15 


■15 


19 Jan. 


4 


19 Jan. 


4 


6BVirg.,o'ld 




•45 


■45 


•45 




•45 










" " consoUd'd 


•55 


55i< 


•55 K 


•55 X 


56 


•55'4 


54 .ian. 


6 


56 Jan. 


16 


" " deferred.. 


•15 


•15 


•15K 


■15 


•15 


■15 


15 Jan. 


lU 


15M Jan. 


2 


fiss. C.,n, J.* J. 


WW 


2i 


•22 


22 


22 


22 S 


21 K Jan. 


4 


22H Jan. 


11 


fis .Mlsfloart 


'nv 


93 


93 


93 


93 


93 


92X Jan. 


3 


93 Jan. 


4 


Cent.Pac. gold.. 
Un.Pac.lst. 


99X 


*»9« 


99« 


99 W 


99K 


«»<« 


99 Jan. 


2 


99X Jan. 


« 


R.5V 


H5K 


1)5 


86 « 


M\ 


86V 


85 Jan. 


10 


87X Jan. 


4 


Un.PacL'dGr't 


1«H 


74 


m^ 


ri% 


■,T^ 


-MV. 


74 Jan. 


13 


80 Jan. 


« 


Un. P. Income... 
N.Y. Oen, 6b. 1883. 
Erie 1st m. la 


7JX 


7S 


•92 


77 
•92 


78 
93 


9214 


73 Jan. 
92 Jan. 


13 
8 


83V Jan. 
93 Jan. 


6 


•92 S 




10 


•101 


101 K 


•lUlX 


101 K 


101 V 


•101^ 


101 Jan. 


6 


lOlV Jan. 


16 


N.J. CenUtm 78 


'104X 


•104V 


•105 


105 


105H 


•104V 


105 Jan. 


4 


105S Jan. 


16 


Ft Wayne 1st m 78 




•KKH 


•m^i 


•103W 


•103K 


■104 


102JS Jan. 


6 


10341 Jan. 


8 


Chic & NW. 8 f 7b 


•lOlX 'lOl^ 
lOOii lOOX 


•ma 
ma 


•lOlH 
lOOV 


■102 
101 


•102 
102 










Rook l8ld I8t m 7b 


lOll Jan. 


6 


102 Jan. 


17 



• This Is the price bid, no «a?« was made at the Board. 

Railroad and iniscellaneous Stocks. — The stock market 
has not yet shown a decided movement, and continues com- 
paratively steady Ttithin a moderate range of fluctuations. There 
has been no sharp upward turn as yet, and we have frequently 
referred to the fact, that the leading speculators are not yet 
committed in favor of higher prices. It has been evident that 
prices were extremely well supported during the latter part of 
last year, considering the extraordinary severity of the money 
pressure, lasting for many weeks, and no basis for a strong up- 
ward movement in stocks has been furnished at this time by the 
existence of previous low prices. 

The market appears to be in a reasonably healthy condition , 
and a steady movement at or about the prices now ruling, may be 
preferable for the generality of dealers, to an unsettled market 
and violent fluctuations. 

The following were the highest and lowest prices of the active 
listof railroad andmiscellaneousstocks on each day of the lastweek: 

Monda' 



Ing. 

Saturday, Jan. 11 :!2K 

Monday, ■• 13 nsx; 

Taesday, " 14 112)< 

Wed'day, " 15 112 

Thursday, " 16 'Ai% 

Friday, " IT il2M 




Balances. , 

Gold. Currency, 
I1.M4.310 $2.565,«1 

1.505.715 

2,065.249 
3155,446 
2,287,826 
2,134,793 

8.131.792 
1,931,509 



Saturday 
Jan. 11. 
N.T.Cen&H. K 102>j 104K 

Harlem 115!4 115)4 

Erie 69H 61 

do pret 

Lake Shore.... nx t2V 

Wabash 72V 73H 

Northweat SIX .^IX 

do pref. 87S 87 s 
Rock Island.:. 109^109;^ 

St. Paul SIX 58X 

do pref... 76H 76>4 
Ohlo& MlSBlp. tSH 46V 
Centralof N. J'lCOX 
Boston, H & E. S>^ 
Del,,L.4 W... 95X 
Hann. * St Joa 47 

do pref • 

Union Pacific.. 35« 36X 
Col.Chlc.*I.C. KU S8];< 

Panama '.... 128 

West. Un. Tel. SIX 84>i 
QolcksllTer.... •ll 47 

do pref.. •... 
PaclfloMall... 70 
Adams Exp... "95 
Am. Mercb.Ez 69V 69v 
United States. . 80 SOU 
Wells, Fargo.. '.... 85 
Canton '....103 



iday, Taesday. Wednesd'y Thursday , Krlday, 
n. 13. Jan, 14. Jan. 15. Jan. 16. Jan. 17. 



8X 
95 V 
48 
71 



55 



101% 102V 
115 115X 

'75 76X 
ViU. 93 
WX 73>j 

•80 

87K 97X 

109V lllX 
51 S 52 
77 77 

46 47 
101 10: 

8X 8M 

94X 94X 

47 47 
■.... 71 

84 S6X 
38X 39X 
•.... 130 
83 84X 
•13 45Mi 
•.... 55K 
70H 71V 
•94 96 
69V 69« 
79X 79X 
•.... 15 
'101 102V 



102X 103X 
116 H6H 
58X 61V 
*.... 76 
92V 9JX 
73X 73X 
Bl 81 
87X 83 
llOK lllX 
51k 51V 
76J« TTJi 
46V 17 
lOOX lOOV 
8X »% 
9)X 91V 
46 46S 

S4?i 35V 
38X HH 

».... 130 
83,H 84X 
«5X 45V 

•50 54 
71X 72 
95M 95X 

•eiM 69V 
79X 79V 

•.... UH 

102 102 



ICIX Wi% 
IISH 115>« 

60X 62X 
*.... 80 

92X 93 

7SX ;sv 

•80 
8S 88 

IIOVUIH 
52 5>X 
77X 77X 
46X 47X 

lOOX lOOX 
SH 6V 

:94M 91X 
47 48 

•... 70 
35% 86X 
38 3SV 

•.... 130 < 
82X S4X 
45 45 



71 
■95 
•69X 
.79X 

lOi' 



71 X 

•id" 

79V 
81 
VllH 



101 V 102% 
115V 116 
MH 61 
•.... 77X 
92X 92V 
73 13% 



UOX 111 

77)? 77X 

46X 46X 

101 101 X 

8« 8V 

95 95 

•46 X 48 

•68 X 70X 

S5V 37 

88X 38X 

'123 127 

82X S3V 

•I4X 45« 

'50 .... 

69K 71X 

•95X 96 

69X 69X 

79X 79X 

•§3 85 



102X I02X 

115X 117 
60X 61X 

*.... 77 
32X 92X 
72X 73 
BOV 81 
88 8S 

llOX lUX 
62 52X 
T7X 77X 
«X 46X 

102 103V 
SV 9 
96 98 
46 46 

36' S6V 

•''^iH^ 

83X 83V 
,44X 44X 

69X 70 X 
•95X 96J, 
•69X 69X 

79 79X 
■82X 65 



• This 18 the pries bid and asked, no sale was made at the Board . 
The range in these stocks since Jan. 1 has been at follows 

-Since Jan. !.- 



__ ,-Lowest.^ ^Hlghest.^ 

HTCenftHR. 99x Jan. 6,104X Jan. Ill 

Harlem 114X Jan. 6'H7 Jan. 171 

Erie 5?XJan.l3 61 Jan 



do pref 77XJan. 16 

Lake Shore 91 x Jan. 

Wabash 72X Jan. n 

Northwest 80V Jan. 17 

do pref. 67X Jan. 8 
Bocklsland. ... 109X Jan. 7 
8t. Paul 51X Jan. 11 

do pref 76X Jan. 11 

Ohlo£MlB8... 45H Jan. 11 
Central of N«). 99X Jan. 6 
Boston, H.&£ «x Jan. 6 
Del.. L. i W., 98 Jan. 7 



80 Jan. 10 

97 Jan. 6 
75V Jan. 2 
83X Jan. 4 
83X Jan. 2I 

lUVJan. 21 
54XJan. 3: 
77X Jan. 3 
49X Jan. 21 

103V Jan. 171 
9X Jan, 8 

98 Jan. 17- 



, ^-SUice Jan, 1. , 

,-Lowest.^ ,-Hlghest.-, 



Hann. & St. Jos 46 Jan. 14 

do do pref 70 Jan. 2 

tJnlonPaclilc.. 34 Jan. IS 

Col, Chlc.& I.e. 37 Jan. 3 

Panama 128 Jan. 2 



West U Tcleg'h 7SX Jan. 7 



SOX Jan. 6 
71XJau. « 
S9X Jan. 4 
89X Jan. IS 
1.30 Jan. 3 
„ .. 84X Jan. 13 

Quicksilver.... 44X Jan. 17 46XJan. 2 
do pref. — Jan.— — Jan. — 
PaclfloMall,... 69KJan.l7 74V Jan. 2 
Adams Express 94V Jan, 7 95X Jan. 14 
Am Merch Un. 6SX Jan, 3 70X Jan. 8 
U.S. Express... 79 Jan. 2:82 Jan. 
Wells, F.& Co. — Jan.— — Jan. — 
Canton 101 Jan. IE lOSX Jan. 4 



Lapsley & Bailey, Brokers, 47 Exchange place, quote stock privileges (signed by 
responsible parties), 1 per cent premium 3J days, and lx®2 per cent todays, at 



prices varylc.gfrom the market as fullows : 



Puts 

„ Below. 

Central A Hudson.. V^IW 

Lake Shore X@l 

Rock Island 1 ait^ 

Erie 2 ^S 

Paclflc Mall 3 Zi 

Northwestern i ^i^ 

The Gold market. 



Calls. 
Above. 

lX®2!i 
1 <»2 
2X®3H 
3 ®1 
8®10 



Puti. Calls. 

Below. Above. 

West. Union Tel.... IX a2 2X93X 

Ohio & Mississippi. V®1 1X®2)4 

Union PaclSc Mi&'^X 2 <82x 

Wabash 1 «1X Ive2s< 

Gold X for 30 days.. V®1 lX<aiX 



Current week 112X 

Previous week Ill ji 

Jan. 1, 1873, to date llvx 

Foreign Excbange. — The exchange market continues strong 
to-day, though early in the week some leading bankers were 
drawing quite freely at 109i@109i for 60 days' bills, probably 
against cotton exchange purchased South, Cotton has recently 
been coming in more freely, and as bills are purchased at the 
South by agents ef our bankers, the efiect upon this market 
always follows very closely the purchase of these bills. The 
general aspect of the market is strong, and unless checked by a 
higher range of gold or other unforeseen events the prospect 
seems good for continued firmness. 

In regard to the negotiation of American securities abroad the 
London Times has published an interesting table showing 
the amount of various loans placed in that market in 1872, upon 
which the Post comments to-day as follows : " The amount paid 
on An erican State and city loans aggregated £4,936,445, while 
the amount actually put into American securities, being new 
issues of existing companies, which amount includes the railroad 
loans placed in London, was £12,876,71.3. The total of all th«se 
in dollars amounts to about $95,000,000. This total does not 
include shipments of unknown amounts of miscellaneous 
stocks (like Erie) and Vends already current in this 
and the foreign markets, nor does it include the United 
States bonds sent abroad — a comparatively small amount. It is 
estimated that the total cash value of our securities sold in 
London last year amounted to at least $110,000,000. And it 'is a 
fair estimate that the German markets took $15,000,000 to $30,- 
000,000 more. The whole amount paid up at London on loans and 
stocks marketed thereduring 1872 is £133,000,000 or $660,000,000, 
of which only $15,000,000 was for home (or English) enterprises, 
with the remainder distributed between the United States and 
other foreign countries. It is proper to say that the greater of 
the American securities taken in London and Germany were mar- 
keted during the early part of the year, the European demand for 
our securities for the past six months having been small, although 
there are indications that it is now reviving. The figures given 
above throw some light on the question of how our excessive im 
portations of foreign merchandise have been paid for, or, in other 
words, how our balance of trade has been settled." 
The following are the quotations ; 

60 days. 3 days, 

London prime bankers 109X® 110X8. 

" commercial ... !03x®109X ®. .. 

Paris (bankers) 6.22XiS5.23V 5.17X(&5.18X 

Antwerp 5.21X®5.22X 5. lex's 5. 17 14 

Swiss S.lSVeS 20 5.13V85.15 

Amsterdam 40Xi5'i0V 41 ®41X 

Hamburg 96 ®96X 97 ®97X 

Frankfort 41X®41»« 41X«41V 

Bremen 96 ®96X 97 <a97X 

Prussian tbalers . 72 a72X 72XS72V 

The transactions for the week at the Custom House and Sub 
Treasury have been as follows: 

Sub-Treasury .- 



Saturday, Ji 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, ' 

Thursday, 

Friday, 



. 11.... 
13.... 
14.... 
15.... 
16.... 
17.... 



Custom 

House 

Receipts. 

1318,000 
434,000 
470.000 
456,000 
524,000 
525,000 



Gold. 

»e92,s91 73 
501,677 49 
591.317 76 
489.730 86 
884,128 35 
720,544 99 



-Recelpts,- 



Currency, 
(421,234 50 
631,-37 93 
366,960 56 
175,331 73 
206,312 .'iO 
1,561,220 71 



Gold. 

»4 13,725 10 
487,332 56 

1,396,821 69 
856,769 00 
315,487 93 

1,365,291 »i 



Payments. . 



Currency, 
»361.0S8 22 
2.604,620 75 
469,373 92 
847,:b7 85 
463.043 97 
424,9:S SS 



Total., $2,727,000 

Balance, Jan. 10, 137,167,043 89 {22.566,394 25 

BaUnOe.Jan.17 »S6.182,804 57 »20,779,010 26 

New York City Bakks. — The following statement shows the 
condition of the Associated Banks of New York City for the week 
ending at the commencement of business on Jan. 11. 1873 : 



There have been more speculative pur- 
chases of gold this week, and the price has advanced. The prln- 



Bakkb. 


Capital 


new YotK 


, t3,000,OOC 


Manhattan Co 


, 2,050,000 


Merchants' 


. 3,000,000 


Mechanics 


. 2,000,000 


Onion 


. 1.500,000 


America 


. 3,000,000 


Phfflnii; 


. 1,800,000 


City 


. 1,000,000 


Tradesmen's 


1,000,000 


Fulton 


600,000 






Merchants Exchange.. 


, 1.235,000 


Gallatin, National 


, 1.500,000 


Butchers' & Drovers',.. 


800,000 


Mechanics and Traders' 


. 600,000 




200.000 


Leather Manuf 


600,000 


Seventn Ward, 


500,000 


State ol New Tork 


2,000,000 


American Ezotaange 


5,000,000 


commerce 


10,000,000 


Broadway 


1,OOO.OCO 



ATSBAOB AMOUNT OF 

Loans and Lecral Net 
Discounts Specie. Tendeie. Deposits. 
"" ■ "■ im.500 111.052,500 



6.381.300 
7.263.200 
5,543,900 
5,045,400 
7,813,100 
4,248,700 
5,218,800 
3.477,000 
1,TJ2,400 
6.251,800 
S,2!I5,40C 
3,512,200 
2,314,700 
1,929,400 
967.100 
2,670,600 
1,132.800 
4.691,600 
10.027,41)0 
21.079.iiOC 
9,067,400 



803,300 

1,176,300 

341,300 

699,400 

1.267,900 

434,800 

1,067,800 

262.000 

169,20l' 



896,600 
462,400 
846,900 
373,900 
912.400 
506,700 
305,000 
518,800 
410,700 



361,200 1,523,200 



95,400 
471,100 
51.500 
24,600 

347,60C 
52.90C 
S9:.900 



74,400 
281,700 
339,900 
375,300 
IS^.400 
523,400 
17S,500 
5?0,100 
64^000 l.o;0 300 
724,700 2 23 ,500 
160,000 2,121,600 



4,072.100 
4,6(3.000 
8.966,900 
3,336,600 
5,239,60) 
2,'J0O,OOO 
8,453,200 
2,207 100 
!,3J3,-('0 
4,419.-'-00 
2,H4,;0C 
1,7111,000 
1,511,0(10 
1,293,100 
8E9,.i00 
2 llil-.O 

i:«,8iJ0 
2,907,700 
6,02T,0C0 
7,.5;;?,000 
8 431, IOC 



Circula- 
tion. 
(826,600 
9,700 
871,100 
498 600 
483,5(0 
1,300 
363,900 

7'6l',466 



41S.600 
491,800 
2II,90U 
195,700 
2.700 
263,100 
170,200 
514,300 
860,0011 
3,143.900 
894,00 



January 3 8, 1878.] 



THB, CHRONICLE. 



7^ 



WarcaPille 1,000,OCO J.POSll'O 

Paciac «a,70ti 1,-2*.8W) 

Bapubic a.OOO.OOli 5,Vi8,«O0 

Ctaallam 450,00(1 2.133,8UU 

PoovlB"* irj.SOO 1.J06.700 

NO'thAlnerlM 1,000,000 J.180JW0 

U«nover 1,000,000 ^,10t,eiiO 

irvlilK SllO.OflO ^.188,000 

Untropolltan <,000.000 i.!fi\.l')0 

Ulllzoat 400.000 l.!!59,-uo 

Nmiau 1,000.000 1.953,voo 

MiirKot 1,000.000 2,NVA(!00 

St.NloUolol 1,000.000 2,t'iO,aoo 

stioe »nil Lastliar 1,000.000 S,'llO,aoo 

Corn rfiohiiuge 1,000.000 ,'.Ki4.4oo 

CintliiBntal 2,000.000 3.3».(i()o 

Ommonwuttltll . 750.OO0 I.^'AOuo 

Oriental 300.000 1.4™.*0 

Marine 400.000 1.»M.Am 

It'.aallc „ 80O.0O0 8W..'0O 

Importer* and Tradera'.. 1,500.000 KMiAK 

e*rlc j.ooo.ooo is'SS-soc 

Mechanlo'liaDklnKAas. 500.000 LIH-'OO 

O.-nnifrs' " 300.000 73J,I»00 

North Hlvcr 400,000 l.l'S-liW 

KaatUlvcr 850.000 l.OftS.Juo 

Manufacturers* Mer.... 500.000 l.lg.4K) 

fourtilNatlonol 5,000/)00 JO.i'^Ooo 

Cjntfal National 3,000,000 Q.nlS.CoO 

■.SoconiNatCnal sno.OOC i.5ll.a«i 

math National 1..WO.OO0 fi.3J,'.l»X) 

rirst National 500,000 4,'*7,l00 

Third National 1,000,000 5.828.900 

NnwYork N. KxchanRe 500.000 l.^??.?'"' 

TeilthNatlon-ll..... 1,000.000 a.05I,qiO 

Bowury National 250.000 1,21^000 

Now York County SuO.OOO l.ir-i,7(» 

Barman American 2,000.000 5,105,300 

Dry Uoods 1,000.000 2,190,500 

ToUl 51.4365oO iT5,552,80O 32,539,100 40,S76.'00 207,411,500 27.461,600 

■ Not recalved— same as last weelc. 

The doTiations from the retaruB of previong week are as follows ; 

Loans. Dec. }2,168,10<' | Nei Deposits Inc. (3,b8.1.1iio 

Specie inc. SMl.mo I Circulation Dec. 152,200 

Lenal Tenders. Dec. 233,7001 

BOSTON Banks. — Below we give a stateraent of the Boston 
National Banks, as returned to the Clearing House, on Monday, 
Jan. 13, 1873 : 



2MJ00 


72J.800 


8.4J5,SM 
l.4U4,400 


«:«.8ao 


23,800 


»»»K 




1,084,300 


181.700 


8JS50,«flO 


Ml,466 


129.700 


701.700 


2,7t4Ma 


IM,ll)0 


5.500 


173.000 


UiM.MK 


9,(X 


2n2.l(» 


WiS/M) 


8,098,100 




105.000 


871,000 


1.168.200 


290.41« 


is.a'jo 


sn.ooo 


1,9«»,IH0 


l<i8.400 


wi,«oa 


S85.P00 


8.870,100 


l,n8.8IW 


25,600 


i72.000 


1.318.800 


130 900 


57.400 


217.200 


1335,900 


8,900 


"•es9 


TDO.SCO 


2,120,800 


819,0011 


89,700 


417,800 


1.163,800 


74 MOO 


224,600 


562.500 


2,5M,10O 


787.5:<i 


51.100 


129,000 


1.193,900 


5.1(10 


131.400 


440.000 


1.568,'(00 


686.300 


IS.UOO 


477,000 


1.686.700 


230.9U1 


lt.500 


199,100 


1.160,200 


4.1(10 


227.903 


311,600 


1.(17,1100 


800.000 


72.700 


155.000 


6U5.;00 


97,'«X1 


497.500 2.51S.40O 


12,l.'«,f«) 


497,300 


1,162 8410 6,490,200 


18.6M,70C 


»OS,30I) 


50,<'«) 


315.900 


1,011,800 


8O5,l')0 


4.300 


189 JW 


6M,7tO 


1.9 


IC.SdO 


167.100 


899,600 


10,BL« 


6 Slid 


34S.\)i)fl 


867.100 


224,500 


43,.'iOO 


.'3.i,fflO 


1.S00.80C 




;,7;7,CO0 


8.512,100 


16,966,100 


J.» 18,500 


131,100 2.(r20,',XXJ 


7.707,(100 


1. 450.800 




843.U0* 


i.iijs.aoo 


251.000 


517.000 


1,2-6.000 


6,968,ao<.l 


S6S.t»0 


601.300 


612.9110 


4,574J!00 


811,900 


W3,500 


601,500 


5,302WI 


792,200 


59,300 


207,400 


849,700 


368.100 


144.500 


260,000 


649.300 


876,100 


4.200 


26),00O 


867 Ol* 


216,000 




3S6.200 


956..K10 


180,000 


459.700 


613,900 


4.310.4Lyj 




19.000 


389,100 


1.814.500 





Banks. 


Capital 


Loans. 


Specie. L 


T. Notes 


Deposits. 


Clr(^nl«. 




1750,000 
1,500,000 


H,596 ■•» 
1.S'.I3,900 


tso.soo 
lo.soo 


»77,III0 
191.400 


H45.500 
955.600 


m6..3C0 
777.000 


Atlas 


Blackstonc 


l,500,l»X) 


8.7C7.200 


56.000 


826.300 


1.7C6.300 


793,600 


Boston 


1,000.000 


2.211,400 


12.200 


; 81,500 


1.017.100 


571,100 


Boylston 


600.000 


1,670,100 


32,400 


804.900 


S03.:00 


441,500 


Broadway 


200.000 


520,100 




4S,0',10 


264.200 


174.600 


Columbian 


1,000,000 


2,.578.000 


24.000 


305.000 


1 143.000 


793,000 


Continental 


1,000,000 


1,977,000 


200 


117.000 


67J.300 


560,600 


KUot 


1,000.000 


2.376,900 


35.000 


117.71X) 


927.700 


788,500 


Everett 


■200.000 


".53.20U 


2.S!X) 


57.700 


543.100 


116,700 


KancntlHall 


l/JOO.OOO 


S.IB.OOO 


114,900 


323,000 


1,306.700 


.5(19.80 


Freeman's 


300.000 


1.60J.01X1 


2,; 00 


6;.0(X) 


SSO.xOO 


342,^00 


Illohe 


1,000.000 


2,191.800 




283.000 


936.000 


319.200 


Hamilton 


750.000 


1,619.100 


64,100 


80.100 


972.800 


210.600 


Howard 


1,000,000 


2,^16.100 


40,300 


141.700 


6;6.1KI0 


lll.OiX) 


Market 


800,000 


1.519,700 


21,200 


55 ..500 


492.700 


852.0'X) 


Massachusetts 


800,000 


1.946.900 


84,900 


112.700 


975.700 


395 300 


Maverick 


400.000 


l.O5i.700 


7.500 


09,500 


594,400 


212 OiiO 


Merchants* 


3,000,000 


8.222,300 


273,600 


836,700 


4,4|-..100 


l,50t.6X) 


Mount Vornon 


200,000 


Sa'i.OJC 




95,900 


467,200 


i;5.!XXI 


New Kupland 


1,000,000 


2.571,600 


96,600 


131«X) 


1,081,300 


7;9.7(X) 


North 


1,000.000 


.1.3,'S7.4.10 


261,700 


79,600 


1.841,300 


789.800 


Old Boston 


900,000 


1.988.9(10 


151.900 


306,200 


1.165.9(X1 


356.300 


Shawiuut 


1,000.000 


2.^.1.600 


9,900 


186.700 


1.222.100 


591. (XXI 


Shoe & Leather 


1.000.000 


2.953,100 




803.300 


l,3.il.4(» 


598.200 


State 


2,000,000 


3.695.100 


40,000 


198,600 


1,122,709 


974,6(X) 


Siffolk 


1,500,000 


3.''5I.400 


83,000 


251,900 


1,086,100 


710.2(X) 


Traders 


600,000 


1.561.400 


34,100 


65,500 


969 8(X) 


17.5 800 




ajKM.OOO 


3.533.4'I0 


8(1300 


3\4,S00 


l,o9ii,800 


679,800 




750.000 


2,105.200 


10,300 


22(1,500 


1, 119,9 '0 


555,400 


First 


1,000.000 


4.182;lOO 


165,400 


237,500 


1 ,464.100 


;97.i;o 


Second (Granite)... 


1,600 000 


5.0,'1,900 


147 200 


712.600 


2.378.100 


781,000 


Third 


300,000 
2,000,000 


1,498,000 
t,690,0iia 


68.000 
3.500 


9S.60C 
«»».30<J 


I.ISS.IXW 
1.749,200 


173 (XXI 


Bank of Commerce 


757.1110 


Bank of N. America 


1,000,000 


2,010,91X1 


15,300 


299,700 


589,900 


590.:(X; 


B*k of RedemplloD. 
Bank of UepUDll(\. 


1,000,000 


4.98!,700 


169.700 


728,300 


1,460,800 


785,0(X1 


1,500,000 


8.034,300 


50303 


167,800 


796,500 


794.600 


City 


1,000,000 


1 .ii't.am 


2,700 


211,200 


1,151,400 


150.700 


Eagle 


1,000,000 


1,919,100 


4,400 


152.500 


787,900 


!37,910 


Exchange 


1,000,000 


l,731.ai0 


191,400 


399,200 


2.551.200 


797.70(1 


Hide & Leather.... 


1,. ^00,000 


3.4.'i3.900 


37.400 


804,400 


1.385 200 


788.S(XJ 




2,000,000 
200,000 


(.89i.;oij 

SIS.SIX) 


6,800 
2,S'J0 


375 100 
58,610 


2.S6>.200 
6:2.000 


71." .00; 




180.(1(10 




I.ITO.OOO 

L.'iOO.UOO 

500.000 


2.61C.9(X; 
2,636.800 
2.332.500 


77.300 

3,S0J 

150,000 


115.100 
226 5;o 
Ui.SlX) 


1.2X1,61X1 
1.177.100 
1,9«3,3C10 


5.^i.3lX 




17 7. .500 


Commonwealth 


2.W.IW 



duoTiTioNs IN »mm. PHILAOELPHU, BUTIIOIE. &t. 



•BODIITIK*. 



Bid, 



Total »4S.350.000 tm.SS 1.700 12,738,7110 110,880,800 155,771.500 I25.590.30O 

Tile total amount "due to other Banks," as per statement of Jan. 13, la $19,791,400. 

The deviations from last week's returns are as follows : 

liOans Increase. $656.0001 Deposits Increase. (i30,7('0 

specie Increase. eo.l.SiX) ClrcnlatloD Decrease. 21,100 

evalTenders Decrease. 241,iOO 1 

Philadelphia Banks. — The following is the average condition 
of th« Philadelphia National Banks for the week preceding Mon- 
Jan. 13, 1873 : 
Banks, Capital. 



day, 



I'hlladajphla »1,5(X1,000 

North America 1,000,000 

Farmers and Mech. 2,0OO,(XX) 

Commeralal 810,000 

.Mechanics' 800,000 

Bank N . Liberties. 600,000 

Bouthwark 250,000 

Kensington 250,000 

fenn 500,000 

Western 400.000 

Manufacturers*.... 1,0(X).000 

Bank of Oomiuerce 250.000 

Glraid 1,000,000 

Tradesmen's 200,000 

Consolidation 300,000 

City 400,000 

Commonwealth.... 800,000 

Corn K.YChange.... 500,000 

Union 300,000 

First 1,0«0,000 

Third 800,000 



Sixth 

I eventn 

: lehth 

1 entral 

\ ankof Republic. 



150,000 
2.10,000 
275,000 
750,000 
1,000,000 



Security 250,000 



Total net 

Loans. Specie. L. Tender. Deposlts.Clrculat'n 

15,530,000 »5S,000 11,066,000 $4,003,000 »1,000.(XX1 

3.988.835 5.6SS 716,160 2,8o7,lM 7?6.600 

5,458,1100 66,400 1,219,100 1,074,300 1,01X1,000 

2,3!!6,000 19.000 566,000 1,702,200 611,500 

2.177.000 6,940 275,000 1.142,000 467,950 

2,270.01X1 .... 194,000 1,797,000 450,000 

;.327.500 7,700 301,100 1,100.200 211,500 

1.091,996 .... 232,000 787,889 225.415 

1,331,430 7,000 188,928 1.016,210 1~2,.S.'5 

1,601,584 3,917 233,924 1,5.37„515 174.715 

2.112.100 .... 235,500 1,173.682 538.610 

807.590 26,725 276.181 765,115 207,830 

3,668,000 27,000 917,000 8,855,IXXI 590,000 

1,513.533 15.058 365,019 1,155,823 177,821 

1,129311 10.500 210,717 790.508 300,000 

1,461,'252 766 356.516 979.777 859,9i7 

710,701 10,000 108358 481,598 3(8,760 

3,2'!B,00O 63.000 371 OOO 1,855,000 450,000 

1318,000 57.000 397.000 1,174.000 209,000 

3,805,000 26,000 714,000 3.090,000 795.500 

1320,673 .... 864,241 1,02(1,241 260,.'-.52 

.573,000 .... 155,000 459,000 185,000 

321,000 46.0X1 86.000 664.000 219,850 

1,032,000 .... 173,000 811,300 240,700 

2.371.000 .... 890.000 1.930 000 576.000 

2.091,IX«) .... 29.5.000 1,131,000 StXI.OOO 

624,000 .... nO.OOO 414,000 180,000 



BOSTON. 

Maine «• , 

New Hampshire, 6s 

Vermont <• 

Maaiacboaetta As. Currency, 
do «• Oold, ine. 

do 9t, Oold 

Boston e«, 

do ss.Kold 

Chicago SeweraKe 7s , 

do Municipal 7a , 

Portland (i, building loan 

Burlington * Mo. L.U.,1... 

Cbeahlre,8 

Cln., Bas. * Clev., 1st M., 7, '<7. 
Kaatero Mass.. conT., 6, 1874... 
Hartford * Erie, 1st M (new)7, 

do do certificates... 

Ogdenabarg A I,ake ( h. Ss.. . 
Old Col. 4k Newport Bda, 6, "M, 

do do Bonds, 7, isn. 

Rutland, new, 7 

Staustcd A Chainbly 7b 

Verni't Cen., Ist M ., cons., 7, '84 

do 2d Mort.,7,18»l.... 

Vermont ft Can., new, 8 

Vermont & Mass., Ist M.,6, 

Boston & Albanv stock 

Boston & Lowell stock 

Boston & Maine 

Boston ft Providence , 

Cheshire preferred 

Chic, Bur. & QalRCy 

Cln., Sandusky ft Cler.Btook. 

Concord 

Connectlcnt River 

Connecticut ft Passompalc, pf. 

Eastern fMass.) 

Kastorn (New Hampshire) .... 

Kltcbbnrir. 

Manchester ft Lawrence 

Northern of New Hampshire.. 

Norwich* Worcester 

OKdens. ft L. ChamplalD 

do do pref.... 

Old Colony. 

I'ort., baco ft Portsmouth 

Rutland common 

do preferred 

Vermont & Canada 

Vermont & Masaachnsetts 

PHII.ADELPHIA. 

8TATK AND CITY BONDS. 

Pennaylvanla .58, coup 

(10 6s, '67, 510, Ist... 

do do 10-15, '2d... 

do do 15-25. 3d... 
Philadelphia 6s, old 

do 6e, new 

Allcjrhany County, Ss, coop... 

Alleiihany City 6b 

Pittsburg 5s 

do 68 

do 78 

New Jersey State «s. Exempts 
Delaware State Cs 

BAILBOAD STOCKS. 

United N. J. Coiiinanles 

Cauidcn ft Atlantic 

do do pref. 

Catawlesa 

do pref 

Klmlraft wllllamspon 

Klmlra ft Wllllamsport pref.. 

F.ast rennsvlvflnia 

llarrlsb'K. Lancaster* C 

Uuntln,;ton ft Broad Top. .. 
do do pref. 

Lehigh Valley 

Little Schuylkill 

MlnehlU 

Nesquelioning Valley 

Norrlatown 

Norllicrn Central 

North I'cnnRylvanla. 

Oil Creek & Allegheny Klver 

Pen nsylvania 

I'hilancipiila ft Frlc 

PMludclphla ft Reading 

Philadelphia ft Trenton . 

Phlla., wllmlng. ft Baltimore. 

Tioga 

Westchester , 

do pref .... 

WcstJcrsey 

CASAI. STOCKS. 

Chesapeake* I'claware 

Delaware Dirtslon 

Lehigh Navigation 

.Morris 

do pref 

Schuylkill Navigation 

do pref. .. 
Union pref 

RAlLIiOAP BONDS. 

Alleghany Vallej- 7 S-lOs. IBM 
Belvldere Dclaware.lst ni.6,'' 
do do 2d M.,'8S 

do do 3d M.,'S7 

Camden ft Amboy, 68, •75 

do do 6s,'88 

do do 6s, '89 

do do mort. 68, '89... 

do consol., 68. '91... 

Camden ft Atlan. l^t ra, 7s, 13. 

do 2dm,7s. *|I0.. 

Catawlssa, 1st M. conv.,'83.... 

do chat. m. do *83. ... 

do new 7s, 1900 

Connecting 6s 191XH904 

East Penn. ist mort. 78, '^8... . 

El. ft Wmsport, 1st m, 78, "EC. 

do do 58. 



nu 



«« 



flH 



101 

n 
■an 

31 X 

10 

81 

•M\ 

181 
120 
I9U 



18K 
SO 
1^ 



130X 



100 
12X 



100 

oox 
104 
106« 

96 
100« 

78X 



MH 



147 
182 



iMk 



MS 



•aouuTna. 



BM. 



Pnuurlva.,(eB.m,,eaa«',l8!9 M 

_ do do r«f....l .... 

PtTklomea lit m.ei.tl .... 

Pblla. ft Krle lat in.<>. kl W 

_ do -Id 11 »l>i 

miadslphUftlt' 98 

do :U4 

do niHT. ,.. 'r' ... 

do deb. bonds, in: 78 

do (. m. IB, c, »: 

do do reif,. 

do ••,(.,1*10. 

PblU. ft ganburr itt m. 7s.. 

Phll.,Wlln.ft Hal.,<«.'M.... 

Pitta., Cln. ft St. LonUlB...... 

Snnbnry ft Erie Isi m.7s. %T.. 

itunbnry ft Lewl>t,.n Is 

Wamnft F. Istm. is,*** 

WfBi Cheatercons. Ts, tl 

Weat Jener <«, "84 

do latm.ta.'N 

• - tl 



do do 7b, 

Weatern Pens, la, "M 
do do 68. 

Wllmlng.* Read..tn 



■flH 



■M 

W 



'»f^1.ii8 

do do 3d Mort. IMt 



180« 

liJVi 

12S 
65 
101 
118 

ii' 
<i 
bi 
a 



1C4X 

isSg 



72,S 



122X 



lOX 

I5X 

5«)i 

IS 

SIH 

ss 

» 

57 

•2TX 

MX 

SSH 



48 

88K 
SO 

124H 
S 
14 



Total ... $16,235,000 $.55,214,833 $4!6,6U $10,628,334 $41,0M,;« $11,412,18$ 

The deviations from the returns of previous week are as follows : 



oans 

Specie, 

Lbkbi Tender Notes,. 



Dec. 155.128 I DepoBlts 

Inc. 82,136 lOirsulatlon 

Inc, 6i,17»l 



..Inc. $193,628 
...Inc. :o#)« 



91X 



83 
97 
93 



loox 



m 



83 



$0 



■av 



MX 

MIX 
18 
81 X 

n 

>i')4 

>I!4 



ttn 



88X 



87H 
M 



Harrlabnrg 1st mort. 6s, '88.... « 

H.ft B. T. 18tmort.7s,*90 1« 

do 2d mort. 7s, IS..., 
do 3dm. cons. 7s, '$5. 

Junction 1st raort. 6e, 'S> 

do 2d do ;9C0 

Lehigh Valley, 1st M., fn.lSTS. 
da do uew66, '96.»... 

do do do reg 

do do newls, reg., 1910 

Little Schuylklll.lstM.,*,!"". 

Northern Central 3d m, 6a, '85 

do do 2d m, g, «a, IDW 

do do 2d ra. ta. 1»J0,. 

North Penn. I8tm,8»,'85 

do 2dm.7a,^ 

do 103. chat, m., 71 

on Creek ft Al. R.. eon. 78, "8$ 

on Creek 1st m.7». '82 

Pern, ft lllghtftown 7». "St 

Penn ft N. Y. Canal 78, 'Bft-lSOO 
Pennsylvania, Ist M..6,l«»... 
do 2d M..6,li'75.. 



«» 



104 
88 
93 
>IK 
SIS 

»X 

to 

I 



»5K 



Beading Coal ft Irondeb.b... 
do do mort. b 

OAKAI, BOKO*. 

Cbeaapeake ft Dala. •«,'>!.... >7X 

Delaware DIrlaloD «, "II 

Utaigh Navlgauon ts, "^l Wk 

do KR, •»;.... ... 

do ronv.."??. 11 

do couv., g.'»4. «!S 

do gold, 11 .,.. 

Morris, iBtM., 8, 181$ *IK 

do 2dM, fee , — 

do boat, '88 

Pennsylvania ea, 1910 

Sctanylklll NaT. Ist m.6a.*R. 
do 3d in.,'U.... 

do Ss.irs 

do 68, Imp., '81... 
do 6a, boat. *88. . 
do 7b, boat, '80... 

Snsiinehwiiia 6b, 'fl .. 

do Coal Co. bonda. 

Union 1st mort. 08, *88 

West Branch iFt m. 6b, *78 

Wyoming Va ley Ist ni, 6«, T9. 

JBALTimuRIi. 
Maryland 68, Jan,. A.. J. ft U.. 

do 6a, Delence 

Baltimore $8 of *7S 

do 1884 

do $8,1100 

do 18»0, Park$8^ 

Baltimore ft Ohio (b of '7S 

do do 6BOf*S0 

do do $801*85... 

do CN. W.Va.)34M «i. 
do 8dM.$i 

Central Ohio, 1st M..$ 

Marietta ft Cln., Ist M., 7, 18fl 
do do '2d M.,7, 189$ 

Norfolk Water f« 

Northern Cent., ibi M.(giiar)$ 

do do 3d M., 8. F., «,*$■. 

do do 8d M., 6. F.. «, 1$» 

do do$d M. (Y. *C)$,17 

do do Cons, (gold) ijm 

Pitta, ft ConnellBV., 1st M.,7, *$$ 

do do IstM., $, 18$$ 

West Md, latM., endorsed. VW 

do 1st M., nnend.. $.10 

do SdM^endorsed $.'90. — 

Baltimore ft Ohio stock ISIV 

Parkersburg Branch 

Central Oblo 

do preferred 

CINCINNAri. 

Cincinnati 5e 83 

do 6» 88 

do 7-J08 lis 

Ram.Co.,Oblolp.c. nngbdi-. 90 
do do 7p.c.,lto5yr». 
do do Ig hds, 7 ft 7.30s 

Covington ft Cln. Brldr« 

Cln., Ham. ft D., 1st M.,7, SO... 
do do 3d M.,7. SS... 
do do 3dM.,S,77... 

Cln. ft Indiana, let M.,7 

do do 2d M.,7, 1877. 

Colnra., ft Senia, Ist M.,7, 10. 

Dayton ft Mich., ist M.,7 81.. 

do do 2rtM.,7, "gl.. 

do do 3dM^7, '88. . 

do To'do dep. bds, ■,, •Sl-'W 

Dayton* West., Ist M..7, 1905. 

do do I«1M.,$,H$6. 

Ind., Cln. ft Laf., 1st M..7 

do (1.4 C list M.. 7,18»' 

Jonc, Cln. ft Ind., 1st M J,*S$. 
Little Miami, 1st M., $, 1888 
Cln, Ham. ft Dayton stock, . 
Columbus ft Xenia stock ex d. 
Dayton ft Michigan stock ex d 
do 8 p. c. sl'k guar 

Little Miami stock ex.d 

I.OCriSVILI.B. 

Loolsvllle 68, *S3 to '87 

do ee.'Ktom 

do w'ater6e,*87to'»S.. 
do Water Stock $e, ti. 

do Wharf68 

do special lax 6a of •». 
Jeff., Mad.ik I,lBtM.(IftM)7, "81 

do do 2d M.,7,. « 

do do I8t H.,f,l<a$^. 

I,0.il8T.C.ft Lel.,l8tM.,7,'fJ. 
Lwila. ft Fr-k., Ist M.,$, *»■•». 
do LonlST.Loan,$.*n. 
L. ft Nash. 1st M.(m.s.) lij':. 
do Lor. Loan (in. 8.16. ^*.'«7 
do do (Leb.Br.)$,'»$ 
do l8tM.(Mem.nr)7,*HV*7S. 
do lslM.(Leb.br.ex)7.'S0-W 
do Lou.L'n(Leb.br.ei)«,1f 
do Consol. 1st M.,7,189S... 
Jefferson., Mad. ft Ind... .... 

Lonlsv., CIn.ft Lex., pref..... 

do do common 

LooUvllle ft Naahvllle 

ST. LOITIS. 

SI LoalB •», Long Bonds 

do •s.Siort do 

Jo Water 68, gold 

do do do (new) 

do P»rk$agold ... ... 

do Sewer SpeelalTax ft 
North MU«,url.UtM.7.. 

.10 8,1 M. 7s »K 

Pa«l&ciu(M.<MslM. gld.. . $3 . 

I f. ■■ KB of Mo. stock . 8$M' '$ 



10$M 



lOlK 



«x 

»1X 



UBJi 



$$ 
$1 

M 

iS 

8$ 

m 



73 
71 
FS 
90 

n 

m 

83 
W 
•i 

m 
It 

$7 
8$ 
97 



81X «! 



» i 
tl ' 

91 K 
I9I 

««■ 

9 



89 

S» 
lu 
HI 
80 

•$ 

B 
«t 
10 

:as 
II 

ita 

$$ 
$t 

$4 
M 
«l 
fit 
9$ 
$■ 
$1 
id 
8R 
<3 
81 
84 

rtX 



■H 



SO' 



THE CHRONICLE. 



[January 18, IHIB. 



I QUOTATIONS OF STOCKS AND BONDS IN NEW YORK. 

BovernTnent Bonds and active Railroad Stocks are quoted on a previous page and not repeated here. Prices represent the per 
cent value, whatever the par may be. " N. T. Local Securities " are quoted in a separate list. 



sBOUBiTtaa. 



IT. S. Bonds. 

(Quoted preTlously.) 



State Ronds. 

TooneBsee 6s, old 

do do cew 

VlrKlnla Ss, old 

do do new bonds 

do do coneol, bonds,. 

do do deterred do ... 
Bjoriflaes 

do 78, new bonds 

do 7s, endorsed 

do lB,Qold 

t^orlh Carolina 6s, old. 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do to N.C. R.R. Co.. 
do Funding Act, 1866. 
do do 1868. 

do new bonds 

do Special Tax 

South Carolina 68 

do do Jan. & July... 

do April* Oct... 

do Kandlnir Act, 166« 
do Lanac,i889, J& J 
do L.ndC,18M,A&0 

do 7s of 18^8. 

Missouri 63 

do Han. & 8t. .loseph. 

do Asylum bonds 

(jonlBlanaes 

do do new Donds 

do new floating debt. 

78, Penitentiary 

6s, levee bonds 

8s do 

8s do 1875.. 

88 Of 1910. 

California 78 

do 78. large bonds 

Connecticut 6s 

Rhode Island 68 

Alabama 5s 

do 8s 

do 88 Mont & Enf 'la R. . 
do 8r Mab. iChat. K.. 

do 88 ori59a.. 

A rfcansae 6b, funded 

do 7s, L. U. & Ft. S. 188. 
78, Memphis & L. R.. 
7b, L.R.,P. B. &N.0. 
7b, MlBB. 0.& K. Rlv. 

7s Arlc.Cent R 

Texas, I'Js, of 1876 

Ohio 6s, 1875 

do 68,1881 

do 6s, 1886 

Kentucky 6s 

Uinols canal bonds. 1870 

do 6s coupon, 77 

do do 1879 

do War Loan 

Indiana 38 

tflchlKan 6s,1873 

do 68,1878 

do 68,1883 

do 78,1873 

New Vork Bounty, reg 



!09X 



do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
fio 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do con . 
68, Canal, 1873... 
6s, do 1874.. 
6s, do 1873.. 
68, do 1877. . 
68. do 1878. . 

dogiai887.. 

do 187; 



5s. 

58, 



lOO 
96>j 
96 



108 

106X 

MH 

106H 

106 >j 

IK 

103 



Ilallroad Stocks. 

t>Jot previously quoted.) 

Albany & Susquehanna... 

Atlantic* Pacific, pref 

Chicago & Alton 

do do pref 

Chic. Bur AQulncy 

Clev., Col.. Cin. & Indianap . . 

Cleve. & Pittsburg, guar 

Central of New Jersey, scrip. . 

Col. Chic. & Ind. Central 

Dno'i'-ne A Sionx City 

Harlem prel 

Illinois Central 

Jollet ft Chicago 

Long Island 

Marietta & Cin., Ist preferred 

do do 2d pref..... 

Morris & KBsex 

Mo. , Kansas* T . 

New Jersey 

New Jersey Southern 

N. Y., New Haven & Hartford 
N.Y., Prov. & Bost (Stoningt.) 
Ohlo& Mississippi, preierred. 
PlttB.. Ft W. & Chic, guar... 
do do special.. 

KeuBselaer & Saratoga 

Rome, Watertown & 0«dens. , 
St. Louis, Alton 4 T. Hiute... 

do do pref. 

St. Louis ft Iron Mountain 

St. L., Kan. C.& Northern pref 

Bonth Side, L.I 

Toledo, Pcori.i & Wa'saw 

do do Ist pref.. 

do do 21 pref... 

Toledo. WabftWiStern. pref 

ITIIscellaneouB stocks 

AmericanCoal 

Boston Water t'ower 

Consolidated Coal 

Cumberland ^;oal and Iron ... 

Maryland Coal 

N.J. Land Improvement Co.. 

Pennsylvania Coal 

Spring Mountain Coal 

Wilkesbarre Coal 

Canton Co 

Delaware ft Hudson Canal 

Atlantic Mail Steamioip 

Mariposa Gold ..... 

do P ef. 

do Xrastee!* Certii 

do Land Mining Co... 

do do pref. 

OuickBllver preferred 

New Centra! Coal,., 

Railroad Bonds. 

N T. Central 6s, 1S83 

do 68,1887 

do 6s, real estate... 

N. T. Central 6s, subscription. 

do 78.1876 

do 7s, conv. 1876 

do 78,1865-76 

Brie Ist Mortgage Extended.. 



91X 

■Mii 
117 
113H 
89 X 

ma 



!2i4 

15' 
at 
S) 



9: 

89 

87 

WH 
lOOX 

iiex 

lOlM 



83X 



105>i 

111 

111 



114M 
107 



114 
90 

90X 

63' 
122k 



101 X 



Erie 1st Moi tgage Endorsed. 

do 7s,2d do 1879 

do 78,3d do 1888 

do 'iS, 4th do 1880 

do 7s, 5th do 1888 

do 7s, cons, mort, gold bds. 

Long Dock Bonds 

Bufl. N. Y.&E. 1st M., 1877... 

and. R. 78, 2d M. S. F. 1885 

do 78, 8d Mort., 1875 

aarlem, Ist Mortgage 7s 

do Con. M.& S^kgF'd6s 
llbany ft Susqh'a, 1st bondB. . 
do do 2d do . 

do do 3d do . 

illch. Cent., 1st M. 8s, 1882.... 
do Consol. (8, 1902... 

Chic, Bur. ft Q. 8 p. c let M.. 
Mich. So. 7 perct. 2d Mort — 
MIch.S.&N 1.S.F.7P.C... 
Cieve. ft Tol. Sinking Fund . 

Cleve. ft Tol., new bonds 

Cleve.,P'vllle& Ash., oldbds. 
do do new bds 

Detroit, Monroe & Tol bonds. 
Buffalo ft Erie, new bonds .. 

Lake Shore Div. bonds 

Lake Shore con. coup, bonds 
do Con. reg. bonds.. 
Pacific R. 7s, gnart'd by Mo.. 
Western Pacinc bonds 



sxcnjBiTiKa. 



Central Pacific gold Bonds 

do State AH bds. 

Onion Pacific 1st MVeBonds. 
do Land Grant, 78.. 

do Income IDs 

Illinois Central 7 p. ct., 1875. . . 
Bellev'le ft S.Ills. R. IstM. 8's. 

4.1ton ft T. H., Ist M 

do do 2d M. pref 

do do 2d M. income.. 

hie ft N. Western S. Fund.. . 

do do Int. Bonds 

do do Consol. bds 

do do Extn. Bds 

do do Ist Mort.. 

Iowa Midland, iBt mort., 8s... 

dau. ft St. Jo. Land Grants... 

do do convertible 

'):d., Lu!k. ft Western. 1st M. 

(lo do 2dM.. 

do do 7s, conv. 

Tol. ft Wab'h, 1st Mort. oxt'd, 

do IstM.StLdlv. 

do 2dMoit 

do Kqniji.Bds 

do tons. Convert, 

dannibal ft Naplr's IstM...... 

Great Western, Ist M.. IflSH 

do 2d M. 1898.... 

JJuincvft Tol., 1st M.. 1890.... 

ill. ft 80. Iowa, Ist Mort 

Galena & Chicago Extended . 
do 2rt Molt... 

Chic K. Island ft Pacific 

Morris ft Essex, 1st Mcrt 

Uo do 2d Mort 

Sew Jersey Central, Ist M., n. 
do do 2d Mort. 

New Jersey Southern Ist m 7s 
Pitts., Kt. W. ft Chic, 1st M... 
do do 2d Mort, 

do do 3d Mort. 

do (* J 8 p. c. eq't bds 

Clove, ft Pitts., Consol. S. F'd. 

do do 2d Mort 

do do 3d Mort 

.Kj do 4th Mort 

Chic, ft Alton Sinking Fund. . 
do do 1st Mortgage... 

do do Income 

Ohio ft Miss., 1st Mortgage.... 
do Consolidated.... 

do 2d do 

Dub. & Sioux c. 1st M 

Peninsula Ist Mort., conv. ... 
St. L. ft Iron Mountain, 1st M. 
Mil. ft St. Paul, Ist Mort. 88.. 
do do do 7 3-10 

do do 7s gold 

do do l8t Mort, 



do 
do 



do 
do 



Iowa div.. 
2d M . . 



Marietta ft Cin., Ist Mort 

Chic ft Milwaukee Ist Mort.. . 

Joliet ft Cliicago, Ist Mort 

Chic ft Gt. Eastern, iBt Mort.. 
Col., Chic, ft Ind. C. Ist Mort. 

do do 2d Mort 

Tol., Peoria ft Warsaw. E,D.. 

do do W. D.. 

o do Burl'n Dly. 

GO do 2dM.. 

do Consol. 7s.. 

New York ft IJ. Haven 6s 

Boston, H. <fe Krle.lst mort. 7s 

do do guaranteed 

(In.dar Falls ft Mi"n. lat M.... 
Bur.. C. ' apids ft Minn.78,gld 

Rome & Watertown let M 

A-11 Dock .t Im.Co. T.'86. ... 
West. Union Tel., 1st mort. 78 

IjOUif Jj-laud RR 1st M. 78 

Smithtown ft Pt. Jeff. 1st M. .. 
St. Louis, Jack-. & Chic. Ist M. 
South Side, L.I, 1st Mort. bds 
do Sinking Fund.. 

Morris &■ Essex, convertible... 

do do construction 

Jefferson RR, 1st Mort. bonds 

Winona ft St. Peters Ist m 

C. C. C. & Ind's Ist M, Ts. S. F. 
Cin. ft Sp'd Ist M, eld, 1 C C ft I 

do IstM, gld. LS&MS 

LaCi-osseft Mil. Ss, IstM 

Liifayette, Bl'D ft Miss. 1st M. 
Pekin . Lincoln ft Decatur IstM 
Han. & Cent. Missouri IstM.. 
Cln.,Lafnyette & Chic IstM. 
Del. ft Hudson Canal IstM.... 
Atlantic ft Grciit West. 1st .M. 

Morris &E-sex7sofl87l 

N.Y.,Newr'i ftLondonTel.. 
Gulveston, H. ft H ,7s. gold, '71 

Paiillc RK. of Mo., stoc!; 

PacificR.of Mo. 1st 6s. gold '«8 

do do 2d 78, cur'y, *91 

miscellaneous List. 

Arkiinsas L«'vee b'>nda 7s 

Atchison ft P. P<, 6s gold 



Atlantic & Pacific L.G. 6's gld 
Atchison, Top. ft S. Fe 7s aid. 
Atchison ft N ebraeka 8 p. c... . 
Bur. ft Mo. River, stock 



Bid. Ask. 



99 

98 

9<X 

93 

94 

92 

93 
102 
IOC 
lOOSt 

90 

;oo 

94 X 
90 
U4X 

IS^^ 

lOOX 

97 

85 

91 

96 

93X 

96>S 

9; 

ma 

90 
,99« 



S6S; 


mx 


','.'♦ 


7S1, 


i9 
103 


79K 




iikV 


8K 




80 


SI 


U'i 




91 




91 


IS 


91 K 




99 






101 


li"" 


92 j< 


.... 


!>7 




!I9 


99 


99):; 


^i 


98 W 


92 


q( 


B3K 




tss 


90 




90 


*X 


97 



100 
.ilik 



104 
95>ii 



99>i 

97 

83H 

lOi" 
95 
92 
92 
85 
90 



IO8 
94 

91 '■ 
86!k 

84 



S9* 
76 
90« 
90 



lOO 
40X 



79 5^ 
39 



S9X 



102 



101 



93X 



:oi)4 
loi' 

95 

i;5 



99)^ 



8SODBITIXS. 



Bur. ft Mo. River Land M. 78. 

do do 2d S., do 78. 

do do 3d £.. doSs. 

do do 4th S.,do88. 

do do 5th s.. do8s.. 

do do 6th S.,do88. 

do do Creston Mraneh 

do do Charlton Branch 
Burl, ft M. (In Neb.) Ist conv.. 
California & Oregon 69, sold.. 
California Pac. RK. 7's, gld. . . . 
do 6s. 2d M., gld 

Ciinada Southern Ist 7s, gold.. 

Central Pac. 78, gold, ronv 

Central of Iowa. :st M, Ts gld. 
do 2d M, 7'8, gld 

Keokuk ft St. Paul, 88 



Carthage ft Bur. 88 
Dixon. Peoria ft Ilnn., 88. 
0.0. ft Fox K.Valley Ss. 



Qnlncy ft Warsaw, 

ni.G — ■ 



1. » y 
R, 8's. I S 2 



93 

ids" 

98 

165' 
1'5J< 

105' 

95 " 

1U1>J 

9; 

102 >i 



102X1 
97 
93 



Grand Tr'ink., 
Chic, Dub. ft Minn 
Peoria ft Hannibal .. . 
Chicago ft Iowa R.8'8.. 

American Central 8b I ... 

Chi. ft Southeastern Kit. 7's.. 
Col. ft Hock. V. 1st 7s, sn yrs 
do flo 1st 78,10 yrs. 

do do ?d T*, '20 vrB.. 

Chic, Danv.ft Vincens is, uW 

, It.V. ft Dcl.7s, gnl 
ConiHcticut Valley 7s, gold 
Connectirut Western Ist Is. 
CheBiip''ake & Ohio let 66, gold 
Chic, ft Mich. Lake Shore 6s 
De.^ Moines Valley Isr, Fs 

do do Land Gi-ant I 
Dan., Uriiy BI. ft P. 1st m 7 =ld 
Detroit. HIllBdaleft III. RR.8'8 
Dutchess & Columbia Ts. 
Denver Pacific 78, gold.. 
Denver & Rio Grande 7s, gold 
Detroit. L-mslng ft Lake M. 8 
il'^vansviUe & Ci-awfordsv. 7s. 
Erie & Pittsbnrcrh 1st 78 

do ad 7s 

do 78. equip... 

Evansville, Hen-ft Nosnv. 7b. 
Elizabetlitown ft Padn, 8s con 
Evansville, T H ft Chic 7s, gld 
Eurnpean ft North Am. 6s. gld 
Flint ft Pere M. Ts. Land Gr.. 
Fort \\'.. Jaekson ft Sasx. Ss... 
Grand R. & Ind. 78, gold, guar, 

d'l do 78, plain 

Grand River Valley Ss 

Indianap., BJ. ft W. Ist 7b, gld 

do do 2d Si 

indianap. & Vincen. Ist 7s,Buar 
lo'.va Falls & Sioux C. let ' 
Indianapolis & St. Louis ' 
.Jackson. Lanein ■ & Sag. __ .. 
Kansas Pac. '.a. Extension, gld 



8a 



ioi>t 



do 7b, Laud Gr.. gld, 
do 78, do new, gld 
do 68,g'd, Juu&Dec 
do 6e, do Feb & Aug 
do 78, 1876, Land Gr. 
do Ts, Leaven. Brch, 
do Incomes, No. 11. , 
do do No. 16. 

do Stoi:k 

Kalamazoo & South H.Ss.gaar 
Kal.. AHeghan.&G R.B8,guflr 

Kal.& Wlilte Pigeon 78 

Kansas Citv & Cameron lOs... 
Kan.C, St. Jo.& C. B. Sp. c. 
Lake Sup. &■ MIfb. Ist 7'8, gld, 

do do 2d 78 

Leav.. Atch. & N. "W. 78, guar. 

Leav Law. & Gal., stock 

do do lBtM.,108.. 

Louisiana *, Mo. Riv. is^t m. 78 
Logans,. Craw. & S. "W. 88, gld. 

Michigan Air Line, 88 

Mo iiieello & P. Jervis78,gold 
Montclair 1st 78, gold, guar,, 

do 78, Income , 

Mo., Km, & Texa- ~B gold., 
Mo. P.. Ft.. S.& Gulf, stock, 
do do let. M, 10s 

do do 2d M.. 10b 

N. J. Midland l^tTs, gold, guar 

do 2d 78 guar 

N. Y. & Osw. Mid. let 7s ROld. 
do do 2d 7s, conv. 

New York & Boston 7s. gold.. 
N.Haven,Middl^t.& W. 78 ... 
Newbuig br'ch 7s, auar. Erie. 
Omaha & South western RR.8'8 
Oregon & California 78, gold.. 

Oswego & Rome 7s, guar 

Peoria, Pekin & I. Ist m, gold 

Pitts.. Cin. & St. L. 1st 7s 

Port Huron & L M.Ts, gld. end. 
do do 78, gold.... 

Peoria & Rock I. 7'8, gold 

Rockf'd.R I.& St. L.l8t78,gld 

Rome & Watertown "s 

Rome, W. & Ogden8burg7B.,. 
Rondout & Oswego 7b, gold... 

Sioux Citv & Pacrac 6s 

Southern Pacific 6*8, gold 

South Side (L. I.) 78 

SteubenvlUe & Indiana 6b 

2a 78 
Southern Minn, construe. Ss. 

do do 7s 

St.Jo.&C.Bl. etM.,108 

do do 8 p. c. 

St. Jo. A Den. C. Ss.gold/W^. D 
do do 88,gold, E.D 

Sandusky. Mans. & Newark 7b 
St.LoulB, Vandalla & T H. If^t 
do do 2d 

St.L. & So'eastern Ist 78, gold 
St. L.. & St. Joseph. Ist, 68, gld 
Southern Central of N. Y. 7s. , 

Teho & Neosho 78, gild 

Union & Logansport78 

ntah Oeniral Pp. gold 

Utica, Clin. & Bmg. 7s, guar.. 
Union Pnc. i-o. branch, 6e, gld 
Walkill Valley iBtTs.goId .... 

West Wisconsin 79, gold 

New^ Loans, 
Artaneaa S'a'e Bonds, end. 78 
Cin.. Rich. & F.W. Ist m gld 78 
Chic. & Can. Somh. let m k1 7b 
Ch., D. & v., 1. div., 1 m grd 78 
Houp. &Tex. cut m. gold 78 
Houston & Gt. N. 1st m. ghl 7b 
.ImeruaVl lUi.Xex, mmgldTB 



99H 
99M 



81 
9U 
79 
88 

■u 

IIM 

94 
81 



9<M 
lOU 



»7M 



91 
90 
85 
^'iH 

m 

1(M 

lOi" 
9^K 

90 

92*' 

101 
95 



16 
80 
92 

110 
85 
95 
65 

i'i 
86 
75 

100 
85 

100 
85 



8'iH 



8? 

8iH 

70 



BXOTTBITlBfl. 



Ind. &ni. C let m. gold 7b... 
Ind.. B. & W. Ext , fst m gl 7b 
Jack.,N W.&S W. IstmglTs 
L. Onr. Shore RR. 1st m. gld 78 
Lake Shore & M, S. income 7s. 
LogiinB.,Craw.&S.W.BR.!m,g 
Milwaukee & North, ist m- Ss. 
N. Y. & Oawego Mid. 1st m. g 
do do 2d conv. 

North. Pac. Ist m.gold 78-103 
Spring. & in. S.E. HR. imglls 
South Carolina RR. 2d m.. . 
St. Louis & S. K, RR. con. m 

Pough.& East. RR. istm , 

South Side of L. 1. Ist m. ex. , 

Southern Securities. 

CITIES. 

Atlanta, Ga., 7s 

do 88 

Augusta, Ga., 78, bonds , 

Charleston stock fis 

Charle8ton,S.C.,78,F.L.bdB... 

Columbia, S. c, 68 

Columbus, Ga., 78, bonds... .. 

Lynchburg 6s 

^lacon 78, bonds 

Memphis old bonds, fis. 

do new bonds. 68.. , 

do end.,M.&C.R.K..., 

MobileSp 

ao 8e.,.. . 

Montgomery Ss 

Nashville 6a, old 

do 6s, new 

New Orleans 58 

ao ao consol. 68.... 

do do bonds, 78,... 

do do IDs 

do do to railroads, Si 

Norfolk 6s 

Petersburg 68 

Richmond 6s 

Savannah 7s, old 

do 76, new 

Wilmington , N. C, «b e old 

do do 88 gold.... 

EATLEOADfi. 

Ala. & Chatt.,l8t,M,8fi,ei:d... 
Ala. &Tenn.R,lBt M., 78. .. 

do 2dM.,7B 

Atlantic &GuIt consol 

do do end. Savi'U'h 

do do stoct 

do do do guaran. 

Central Georgia, Ist M.,7s 

do do stock 

Charlottf Col. & A..l8t ir:.,78. 

do do stock 

Charleston &. Savannaluis.end. 
Savannah and Char., Ist m., 78. 

Cheraw and Darlington 78 

East Tenn. & Geo!gla6s 

EastTenn.A Va.6h end. Tenn 
E.Tenn.,Va^k Ga., If^t M., 76.. 

do do 61 ck 

Georgia li. R..7b 

do stock 

Greenville & Col. 7b, guar 

do do 7s, certit. . 

Macon & Brunswick end.Ts... 
Macon & Western stock....... 

Macon and AuguBtabondB... . 

do do endorse- . 

do do stock.. .. 

Memphis & Charleston, ist 7^.. 
do do 2d 7s. . 

do do tuock. 

Memphis & Ohio, lOs, 

do do 6s 

Memphis & Little R. !s:tM.... 

MlBSlaslppi Central, Ut m., 7b. 

do 2dm., 8b... 

Mississippi &TenD., l8tm.,78 . 

do do consold.. 8b. 

Montgomery & West P.. i Bt, 8b.. 

fiO do 1st end. 

do do Income 

Montgom.& Eufaula let Ss.gid 

end. by State of Alabama... 

Mobile & Mont.. Ss gold, end . . 

Mobile & Ohio sterling 

do do do ex ctfs. 

do do 88, Interest 

do do 2 mtg,Ss 

do do income I 

do do stock .1 

N. Orleans & Jacks, :;d M. Rs. 

do do cert'B.SB. 

N. Orleans & Opelous, Ist M. 88 

Nashville & Chattanooga, 6b.. . 

Norfolk* PeterBburg let m.,86 

do do 78 

do do 2dmo.,8E 

Northeastern, S.C., Ist M. Ss. 

do 2dM., 88 

Orange and Alex., Iste, 68. . . . 
do 2d8, 6a... 

do Sds, 8s 

do 4thB,8s 

Richm'd & Peterb'g Ist m., 7b . 

do do 2d m., 66. 

do do Sd m., 88. 

Rlch.,Fre'k6b'g& Poto.68.... 

do do do conv. 78. 

Rich. and Danv.lBt cons'd 68. 

do Piedmont 8s. ., 

do iBtS, 88 

Selma, Rome& D.,l8t M..78.. 
South & North Ala, Ist M., Ss. 

Southslde, Va., Ist mtg. 8s 

do 2dm.,guart'd6fi.., 

do 3d m..68 

do 4th m.,88 

Southwest. RR., Ga., Ist mtg... 

do stock 

Sparten8bur.& Union 7b, guar- 
S. Carolina RR. !stM,78(new> 

do do 6b 

do do 78 

do do stock 

Va. & Tenn.lstB.68 

do 2dB,68 

do 3d8 8b 

West Ala., SB guar 

Wilmington and Weldon Ts 

do Ch& Ruth. 1st m, end 
do do 1st M., Ss 

PAST DTTE COUPONS. 

Tennessee State Coupons 

Vli-glnia Coupons 

do do deferred.. . 

Memphis City Coupons 

^asUvUIe City Coupons J 



January 18, 1873.] 



THE CHRONICLE. 



81 



lnr)t stmt wis 



STATE, CITT AND CORPORATION FINANCES. 

tap- KXPLANATIO^J OF STOCK AND BOND TAOLES. 

1 . Price* of the moit Active Stocks and Bonds are given In the " Bank- 
ers' Gazette," prevlonsly. Full quotations of all other becurltles will be 
found on preceding pages. 

2. GoTernmeiit Securities, with full Information in regard to each 
issue, the piriod« nf interest payment, size or denomination of bonds, and 
nnmi!rou» other delnila, are given in the U. S. Debt statement published In 
Thk Chronicle on llie first of each month 

3. City ItondK, and Bank, Insnrance, CItjr Railroad and 

GasStockK, with quotntlonB, will usually be published the first tlirce 
weeks of each month, on tlie page immediately preceding this. 

4. The <ioniplcte Tablesi of State Securllleii, City Securl- 
llea, and Railroad and moccllaneoud Stock* and Bonds 

will be regularly published on the last Saturday in onch month. The publi- 
cation of those" tables, occupying fourteen pages, re<iuire« the issue of a 
supnioment, which is neatly stitched in with the usual edition and furniehed 
to all regular subscribers of The Chronicle. 

Debt and Finances of New York State, — The following 
contains the principal points of State Comptroller Hopkins' 
report for the liscal year ending September 30, 1872 : 

The followinijr statements show the amount of the funded debt 
of the State and the balances in the several sinking funds : 

DEBT. 

On the 30th of September, 1871 and 1872, the total funded debt waa as follows : 

1871. 1873. 

General fnnd t4,CMO,02fi $3,98H,5i6 

Contingent 68,000 68,0(10 

Canal . r. 11 ,966,Ii80 1 1 ,390, 680 

Bounty S«,047,000 21,121,000 

Total $38,121,606 $36,574,206 

Actual reduction of the State debt during the fiscal yea rending 
September 30, 1872, by cancellation of matured stocks and those 
purchased on accouit of bounty debt sinking fund, $1,547,400. 

The following statement shows the amount of the State debt 
on the 30th of September, 1872, after deducting the unapplied 
balances of the sinking funds at that date : 



Debt on the 

30th Sept., 

1872. 

General Fund $3,988,.'JJ6 

Cimtingent 68,000 

Canal 11,300,680 

Bounty 21,121,000 



Balances of Sink- 
ing Funds on 
30th Sept., 1872. 
* $2,787,567 
1!1,7I0 
1,449,978 
+6.930,224 



Bal. of Debt 

after applying 

Sink'g Funds. 

$1,200,968 

48.480 

9,946,701 

14,190,775 



Total $.36,574,206 $11,187,480 $25,386,725 

* Includes $1,202,571 received since the close of the fiscal year. 

+ Deducting interest accrued to October 1, 1872, payable January 1, 1873. 

The State debt on the SOth September, 1871, after deducting the 
unapplied balances of the sinking funds, amounted to $30,482,702 

On the SOth September, 1872, to 26,386.725 



Showing a reduction of $4,095,976 

, REVENUES. 

The statement of expenditures for the last fiscal year shows an 
apparent deficiency of $9,148,836 92. The account may be 
stated as follows: 

Deficiency as above $9,148,836 92 

Comptroller's bonds for temporary loans to the Treasury 8,225,000 00 

Accrued interest on same 35,000 00 



$11,408,&36 92 
The following sums are applicable to the reduction of this 

amount : 

Balance due from county treasurers $S,131,047 82 

Amount advanced on account of canal deflcienci«'8 

included in lax levy of 1872 913,866 65 

Amonnt advanced on account of new Capitol in 
ant'cipation of tax of 18:2 255,000 00 

New York city bonds hold in trust for general fnnd 800,000 00 

$6,699,913 97 



Actual deficiency Sept. .30, 1872 $4,808,922 95 

This is $757,763 86 in excess of the estimates in the annual 
report of my predecessor, transmitted to the Legislature at its 
last session. Tliis excess is due to a diminution in the receipts 
and the payment in jiart of large appropriations authorized by 
the Legislature of 1872, properly chargeable to the tax levy for 
the current year. 

TAXATION. 

There is no public question in which the people have so direct 
an interest as that of taxation. 

It is respectfully submitted that the legislature has seemed 
sometimes to have lost sight of the legitimate object of taxation. 
It lias been the practice of the legislature to appropriate large 
sums of money for purposes of a strictly private character. A 
striking example of this is the appropriations which have been 
made to charitable institutions under the control and direction of 
private corporations or individuals. 

The increase in taxation has been so great, that widespread ap 
prehension and solicitude has been created in the public mind. 
The rate has increaseci in the last ten years from five mills to nine 
and three-eighths mills on a dollar. The vicious practice 
h .s prevailed of pas.sing bills making large appropriations at the 
close of the legislative tessiou, evidently without having received 
the examination and consideration which ought to have been 
given to them, and without, it is feared, the members of the 
legislature or many of them, knowing their purpose or extent. 
When the Comptroller entered upon his official duties, he found 
a deficiency in the treosury amounting to some $'5,500,000, which 
deficiency was produced, as above stated, by the excess of appro- 
priations over revenues from all sources, including taxation. 



TAZXI. 

Inl8«Sthe «UteUxwa« |«,aS«,1M T7 

In 18T> the atatn tax was itJUOJM SO 

In ISSa the tax for all purpotea known to tbli office WM IMSM8S 40 

Id 187) the tax for all purpoara known to this office wa* n^lliHS n 

The Rrota valuation of taxable property In 18<3 wu tli^^U^^ 00 

The grosa valuation of 1872 waa 1,088,017,4 



Increase In ton yean . 



17,445 Oa 

Increase of valuation of 1872 over 1871, $36,080,547. 

The state tax for the current fiscal year Is Of niills, for the fol- 
lowing purposes : 

For schools IK mlDa. 

For general purpoaea lli " 

For bounty debt al " 

For new capltol H " 

For canal floating debt, onder chapter 171, Laws of 1880 1-80 " 

For new work on canals and extra repairs 7-10 " 

For academies and union schools 1 10 ** 

For canal and General Fund deficiencies SH " 

Toua «K " 

The above tax of Of mills on the present valuation will yield 
$19,580,882 30. 

It will be noted that the largest amount ever paid and received 
to meet the requirements of the government is the amount now 
in process of collection for the current year, and that the rate per 
dollar upon the valuation of the property of the state is con- 
siderably larger than any rate ever before Imposed. 

Exclusive of extraordinary work on the canals and work on 
the new capitol the following rate will be necessary for the en- 
suing fiscal year : 

For general fund 1 nllls. 

For schools Hi " 

For bounty loan ' 1 " 

For floating canal debt, chap. 171, laws of 18S9 H " 

Total .^ : 6K " 

The above estimate is based on the assumption that the legis- 
lature will not sanction extraordinary appropriations tor any new 
enterprise, however deserving, unless a corresponding tax is laid. 
The following statement shows the tolls received on each canal 
and the total expenditures for ordinary and extraordinary repairs 
and new work during the fiscal year ending 'Sept. 30, 1872: 



Canals. Income- 
Erie Canal $2,760,147 ro 

■ - ■ 180,614 28 

90.796 87 

17,882 88 

4,12081 

6,«!l0 67 

10,888 86 

18,828 36 



Champlain Canal . 

Oswego Canal 

Cayuga and Seneca Canal . . 

Chemung Canal 

Chenango Canal 

Black River Canal 

Genesee Valley Canal 

Oneida Lake Canal 

Baldwinsviile Canal 

Oneida River improvement. 
Seneca River towing-path. . 

Cayuga Inlet 

Crooked Lake canal 



680 00 
IM 86 
304 86 
270 24 



Diflbnreements- 
$1,GH7,021 11 

488.083 08 
813.468 78 

»4,88S» 

118.084 DO 
383.747 60 
119.479 38 
«i«,61S 30 

8,710 00 
180 fa 



162 33 

13,708 1ft 



$.3,060,328 89 
) of all income. 



$3,374,701 90 

Total dtsbursementa on all canals in excess of all income 314.873 00 

Total income in excess of disbureementa for ordinary repairs. . 1,070,613 70 

The following statement exhibits the receipts at lake ports as 
compared with the receipts at New York and at tide water by the 
Erie and Champlain canals. The receipts at each point include 
flour, reckoning each barreliof flour as equal to five bushels of 
wheat : 

Tide-water by 
New York. N.Y. can's. 
70,068.428 81 416,300 

64,447,421 40.628.240 

68,395.682 38.116,600 

88,712,788 88.283.100 

88,622,941 83,701.100 



Receipts at Years Lake Porte . 

1868 . bUsheU. 115,297.465 

1869 184,814.979 

1870 136,996.800 

1871 166,014,088 

1872 to Dec. 7 148, 170,470 



110.182,340 



Total for 8 years 697,803,801 880,747,108 

Virginia Finances.— A special message to the Senate from 
Gov. Walker, .Ian. 13, recoinmends the reduction of the principal 
of the debt by the sale and application of the proceeds of the 
assets of the railroad, bonds and stock and non-productive pro- 
perly of the State, by which the proportion of the debt assumed 
by Virginia will be reduced to $26,000,000 ; the annual interest on 
which will be $1,560,000. It recommends certain changes and 
reforms in the State government, thereby reducing its annual 
expenses to $600,000. It recommends the equalization and cor- 
rection of assessments and the more thorough assessment of per- 
sonal property, by which the total assessed valuation of real and 
personal property will reach four hundred millions of dollars, the 
annual tax upon which will be two millions. The tax from other 
sources is estimated at $800,000, making the total revenue of 
$2 800 000, of which $400,000 is to be appropriated to schools, 
leaving a balance of $2,400,000 available to pay the interest on 
thij public debt and the current expenses of the State government. 

The Governor says the interest upon the bonds funded under 
the act of March 30, 1871, that is, the Funding act, must be paid, 
and no mode of avoiding it can be devised, even if we desired it. 
He shows that the interest due and unpaid on these bonds on the' 
first of January, 1873, and that which will fall due by the first of 
Januarv, 1874, will amount to nearly $3,600,000. which amount, 
added to the other indebtedness falling due during the current 
year, makes a total of over $4,260,000 to be provided for by the 
first of January. 1874. 

—The resolution of the House of Delegates inviting the holders 
of Virginia bonds to a conference with a special committee of th« 
General Assembly on the 3d of February has been amended M 
that if the resolution is approved by the Governor, or allowed to 
go into eflect, the conference will be held in Richmond on tie 
15th of February. 



82 



TH|: 



CHRONICLE. 



[January 18, 1878, 



Balllmore & Ohio Railroad— Ulaln Stem and Branobo*. 

—Me^urtis for the Fiscal year Miiding September 30, 1873 

Cn.lRACTEniSTICS OF ROAD. 

Jfoin 5fa»l— Baltimore, Md., to Wheclioe, W. Va. (doublu) 379.6 miles. 

Winchester & Potomac Eailroad— Harper's Ferry to 

Winchester 32.0 " 

Ltated Winchester & Strasburg Railroad— Winchester to 

Branelieh <, Strasburg 19 " 

Washington County Railroad— Weverton to Hagers- 
town 24.0 " 

Total length of railroad operated 454.6 " 

The other leSBcd lines, constituting portions of the B. &, O. H. R. system, 
and opertted under the same auspices, but reporting their operations sepa- 
rately, are as follows : 

Washington Branch lUilroart— Relay House to Washington 30.0 miles. 

ParkerBl)urg Brancli Railroad— Grafton to Parlver^burg 103.5 " 

Central Ohio Railroad— Bel-Air to Columbus 137.0 " 

Sanduslty, MnnsHcld & Nownrlc R. R.-Sandusliy to Nswark 116.3 " 

Wheeling, Pittsburg & Baltimore R. R.— Wnccling to WaBliington. 32.0 " 
Newarlt, Somerset & StraitsviUe R. R.— Newark to Shawnee Valley 44.0 " 

The earnings, working exi)Pnses and net results of the main 
Btem, and the otlicr roads and branches, owned, leased and con- 
trolled by the Compauy, are shown aggregately in the following 
table, viz.: 

Miles Gross Working Net 
ofR.R. Earnings. Expenses. Earnings. 

Main stem and branches 4.'>4.6 $10,(J.M,472 $6,122,400 $4,632,072 

Washington Branch ,30.0 

Parkersburg Branch 103.5 

Central Ohio division 137.0 

Lake Erie division 11B.3 

Wheeling. Pbg. & Bait. R. R. . .' .32.0 

Newark, Somerset & 8traits\'Ule R.R. . . 44.0 

Total 917.4 $1.3,626,677 $8,367,475 $.5,259,202 

The working expenses upon the whole system of roads in oper- 
ation amounted to 61 '4 per cent of the gross earnings. 

rOMPARATIVE .^iTATEMENTS FOU FIVE TEARS. 
Soad and Equipment. 



422,711 
16,163,410 


.3(6,452 

13,3i«,312 


486,444 
18.562,370 


620,7M 
30,769,207 


$1,871,339 

1,381.399 

489,M9 

479,471 

10,478 


$1,563,658 

1,052,108 

514,5.50 

2:19,602 

274,948 


$1,994,689 

1,420,572 

574,117 

395,609 

198,508 


$2,046,142 

1,542,026 

604,116 

500,000 

4,116 


on at Close of each FUcal Year. 




$4,471,274 

217,437 

1,000,420 


$4,471,274 

460,000 

1,002,979 


$4,921,274 

190.000 

1,01S!,570 


$6,816,808 

787,509 

1,016,686 


$5,686,131 
5,096.014 


$.5,934,2.53 
5,171,995 


$6,193,944 
6,<)33,164 


$8,621,003 
7,873,910 



• Returns for the Fiscal Tear end- 



480,645 


144,910 


335,735 


826,803 


712,262 


114,,541 


989,327 


818,605 


170,721 


600,888 


,503,7.30 


96,658 


48,164 


47.684 


480 


26,878 


17,8*3 


8,995 





1867-68. 


1S68-69. 


1869-70. 


1870-71. 


1871-72. 


Miles operated 


411.6 


435.6 


464.6 


454.6 


4f>4.6 


Passenger engines ... 


60 


56 


62 


.55 


72 


Freight engines 


231 


260 


262 


280 


311 


Passenger train cars. . 


144 


151 


199 


208 


2.33 


Freight train cars. . . . 


4,5li8 


6,012 


5,438 


6,272 


8,012 




Ojiemtiom and Fiscal Results. 






Train, mileage 


5,.589..394 


6,640,721 


5,749,834 


7,851,264 


9,172,997 


Through m'd'se, tons.. 


308,690 


199,873 


28B,&35 


435,207 


557,609 


Flour to Baltim'e, bbis 


752.799 


630,049 


910,390 


1,077,649 


757,842 


Live stock to Balt.,t'n, 


5.3,693 


51,702 


54,604 


63,201 


72,631 


Lumber, tons 


36,007 


32,002 


30,258 


41.383 


55,839 


Coal to Bait., &c., tons 


766,611 


1,357,990 


1,219,638 


1,591,602 


1,661,259 


Gross earnings 


$7,558,li44 


$8,794,915 


$8,427,728 


$9,913,:390 $10,654,472 


Working expenses 


6,0.54,448 


5.756,106 


5,453.480 


5.906,887 


6,122,400 


Nett earnings 


2,604,196 


2,!t68,809 


2,974,268 


4,006,503 


4,632.072 


Div. W. B. R.R. stock 


101,980 


102,340 


102,630 


102,780 


102,780 


Inc. sinking funds... 


71,7:19 


61,7:34 


75,940 


76,938 


95,236 


Honse-rents. 


14,109 


16,061 


14,531 


15,7.39 


15,322 



Freight (tons) carr. . ,389,778 

Freight mileage 15,066,188 

Gross earnings $1,643,073 

Operating expenses. 1,172,164 

Net earnings 470,909 

Dividends 456,294 

Bal. to reserve acc't. 14,615 

Mnanolal Condition 

Capital stock $4,471,274 

Floating debt 210,000 

Surplus earnings 989,942 

Total $5,671,216 

Constmct'n & equip. 4,936,611 

Eastern Ballroad (inass). 

iiig September 30, 1872. 

CHARACTERISTICS OF RO.^D. 

Total length of main and branch lines owned 113.10 miles. 

Total length of lines o^yncd and leased 264.65 " 

The Eastern (N. H.) Eailroad ia used as a part of the main line 
between Boston and Portsmouth, making the total length .57.94 
miles. The New Hampshire iKirtion receives the same dividends 
as the Massachusetts portion of the road. The lease is for 99 
years, from August 1, 1841. 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS FOR FIVE TEAR!?. 
Operations and Fiscal He-mlts. 

Train, mileage 900,280 

Passengers earned. .... 3,10<),787 

Passenger, mileage 44.047,644 

Freight (tons) carried. . 281.809 

Freight, mileage 7,947,902 

Gross earnings $1,427,442 

Operating expenses 868,503 

Nett earnings 5.58,939 

Interest 1:3.3,609 

Dividends 368,458 

Surplns 66,872 

Financial Conditior 

Capital stock $3.8a3,300 

Funded debt 2,192,400 

Unfunded debt 856,200 

Total $6,931,900 

Construction $5,365,640 

Equipment 7:39,.593 

Property and assets — 826,667 

Total $6,931,900 $6,618,964 $7,855,742 $8,561,193 $9,848,348 

FItcbbarg Ballroad. — (Returns for the Fiscal Tear Ended 
Sept. 30, 1873.) 

COMPARATIVE ST.VTEMENTS FOR FIVE TEARS 
Road and Erjuiptnent. 

1867-68. 1868-69. 1869-70. 1870-71 1871-72. 



Total means ... $2,692,024 $3,147,944 
Prom which " total means' 

DiTldends, 8 p. c $1,060,943 

Interest and taxes 67.3,375 



Ground rents. 
Rcnt-W. & P. R.R.... 

" Wash. Co. R.R. 

" Win. &BfgRR. 
Central Ohio Division. 

Lake Erie Division 

Wh ,P'b'g& Bait. R.R. 
Losses on steamthips. 



$3,167,369 $4,201,960 $4,746,410 
the following payments were made : 
$1,051,:338 $1,051,440 $1,051,448 
699,229 753,2.58 432.447 



2.% 108 
21.600 



24,472 

27,000 
91,993* 



$1,051,440 

753.2.58 

26,231 

27,000 

63,981 



410,129 202,813 



286,529 
10,583 



26,6:33 
27,000 
58,%1 
6,229 

136,584 
76.493 
16..583 

603,000 



$1,182,879 
283,1.33 
29,437 
27,000 
58,961 
5,229 
175,643 
77,691 



959,318 


8.50.699 


1,1.52,426 


1,403,17» 


2,849,247 


3.l)45,&19 


4,610,277 


5,000,.399 


57.357,609 


51,220,764 


59,9:39,325 


66,496,488 


:321,:326 


284,693 


:365,!I65 


424,320 


8,896,106 


7,810,627 


10.304,890 


12,a32,483 


$1,675,2.39 


$1,462,770 


$1.871,6.37 


$1.97.3,623 


944,370 


819,197 


1,2.36.328 


1,361,422 


7.30,869 


M3,573 


6.35,.309 


622,201 


172,827 


173,746 


2.36..353 


300,050 


:371.867 


:383,li24 


.364,408 


none. 


186,385 


86,;303 


34,548 


322,151 


at End of each Fiscal Tear. 




$4,037,800 


$4,062,600 


$4,262,000 


$4,262,600 


2,900,400 


3,037.400 


2,987,400 


5,149,400 


450,200 


575,200 


1,139,:32« 


347,635 


$7,388,400 


$7,675,200 


$8,389,326 


$9,759,635 


$5 7:J4,862 


$5,789,.375 


$5,6.55,8.30 


$6,649,095 


847,314 


993,887 


1,4!I0.69>.I 


2,0a3,978 


1,036,788 


1,072,480 


1,415,854 


1,115,275 



MUes operated......^ ,.... 93.32 9.3.32 

Milesof track 170.50 173.6:3 

Locomotive engines 31 .32 

Passenger train (8-wb. cars) 47 51 

Freight train C8-wh. cars) 507 520>f 

Other (coal, gravel, &c.) cars. ... 36 36 



(10 mos.) 
93.:32 
175.13 
.35 
53 
664>^ 
36 



93..32 

178.83 

36 

64 

614>i 

110 



Operations and Fiscal Results. 



666,0.57 

1,753,222 

22,705,0.34 

no record 

no record 



Total payments. $2,181,160 
Profit and loss. . $610,864 



$2,096,930 $2,164,000 $2,330,278 $1,839,873 
$1,051,014 tl,013,.369 $1,871,688 $2,905,637 



• Rent for IS months. 

Mnandal Condition at Close of Each Tear. 
Capita] stock $13,1.51,962 $13,161,962 $13,151,962 $13,151,962 $13.1.51,982 



PrefeiTert stock 

Punded debt 

Unclaimed dues 

Washington Branch 
Accounts (balance). 
Profit and loss 



3,089,800 

8,769,1.30 

48,130 

355,733 



19,310,662 



3,11.5,900 

8,751,750 

50,611 

377.660 

:306,984 

20,381,676 



3,3!I8,400 
11,346,293 

51,595 
375,984 

.%,.301 
21,375,051 



3,529,800 
11,186,185 
56,3.35 
472,700 . 



3,553,800 

12,456 6:36 

58,513 

642,300 



2.3,246,732 26,152,269 



Total $44,725,417 $48,115,543 $49,735,654 $51,64.3,715 $56,014,-1 



Permanent 

Stocks and bonds. .'. . . .■l2,'49i),'043 

Sinking funds I,»40,a97 

Uncollected Revenue... 478,.544 

Material and fuel .527,644 

Accounts & loans (bal). . 322.389 

Treasurer 105,294 



$29,551,906 $30,340,183 $.32 243 405 $.35,131,615 $39,168,607 

12,910.910 16,028,640 14,:390,848 l:3,42;3,a32 

1,.302,630 101,192 " - 

675,566 399,835 
822,128 690,407 



Miles run by trains .556,594 614.525 5:38,088 

Passengers carried 1.623,166 1,767.249 1,8:30,975 

Passenger mileage 20,619,491 22,1:34,414 20,328,234 

Freight (tons) carried). 559,868 870,439 .528.846 

FreiSlit mUeage 1.5,669,871 1(),941,140 1.3,.56.3,5.59 

Grob*s earnings $1,5.55,259 $1,290,,594 $1,085,9:37 

Onerating expenses.... 810,959 48,714 8:3:3,452 

Nett earnings 344,300 341,880 2.52,285 

Dividends 298,105 298,105 298,105 

Surplus 46,195 43.775 (Deficit) 

Financial Condition at Close oj Each Tear. 

$3,540,000 $3,540,000 $3,640,()q() $4,000.(X« 



93.32 

178.00 
38 
68 

659« 
85 

716.246 

1,869,427 

24,.341,I23 

740,123 
19,618,511 



$1,327.:341 $l,:3o0,289 
1,010,603 1,026,354 



316.7:38 

303.054 

13,661 



Capital stock... 
Surplns income. 



.556,476 



Total $4,096,476 

Construction 3,189,851 

Equipment 350,149 



547,050 

$4,087,030 

3,189,8.51 

:350,149 



601,2:30 

$4,141,2.30 

3,289,861 

:360,149 



613,438 

$4,513,438 

.3,440.000 

560,000 



64.138 872,279 



loi.iie 

864,412 

673,163 

62.3,372 

59,.323 



101,192 

687,!>42 

809.687 

1.792.015 

34.106 



Total $44,725,417 $48,116,543 $49,736,664 $51,643,715 $66,014,480 

', Boston and naine Ballroad. — (Returns for th^ Fiscal Tear 
ended Sept. 30, 1872.) 

On February 17, 1871, an act authorizing the extension of the 
B. & M. B. It. to Portland was approved by the Governor of 
Maine, and on March IG, 1871, accepted by the stockholders. Tlie 
work was completed in December, 1872, and trains are now run- 
ning on the Company's line from Boston to Portland. The orig- 
nal estimate for construction was about $8,000,000; but the actual 
cost will be nearly $3,000,000. 



:323.935 

331,960 

1,975 

$4,000,000 
511,.300 

$4,,511,300 

3,50.3,372 

560,000 

Total $3,540,000 $:3,.540.000 $3 840,000 $4,000,000 $4,06.3,372 

Boston, Clinton and Fltchburg Kallroad — (Returns for 
Fiscal Tear Ended Sept. 30, 1872.) 

The Boston, Clinton and Fitchburg (formerly Agricultural 
Branch) Railroad, 28.97 miles, and the Fitchburg and Worcester 
Railroad, 13.90 miles, were con.solidated July 1, 1869, under the 
then legal title of the first named railroad. More recently the 
consolidated company leased and now operate the MansPeld and 
Framingham Railroad, 21.25 miles, and the Framingham and 
Lowell Railroad, 26.12 miles. Including these leases the company 
now operate 90.24 miles of railroad. 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT FOB FIVE YEARS. 
Operations and Fiscal Results. 



Miles operated 

Locomotives 

Pass, train, cars 

Freight train, cars. . 

Train mileage 

Passenger..? carried . 
FMMngcr mileage.. 



CO.MPARATIVE STATE.MENT FOR FIVE YEARS. 
Operations and Fiscal Results. 

1867-68. 1888-69. 1869-70. 1870-71. 

(10 mos.) 

147-50 147-50 14750 14750 

43 45 46 49 

M^ 94 98 1(M 112 

910 1,016 1,021 1,055 

92,5,241 992,609 849,692 1.093,1.38 

3,254.782 3,.5ft3,337 3.127,328 3,873,587 

44,899,(^48 01,248,678 44,(Vt»,919 55,65.5,967 



1871-72. 

154-00 

61 

130 

1,132 

1,216,996 

4,135,489 

57,«4T,475 

1 ■< lu . ■ 



1867-68. 1868-69. 

Gross earnings $288,82:3 $271,738 

Operating expenses.... 196,409 22:3,805 

Net earnings 73,413 48,932 

Coupons and interest... 27,2-23 30,663 

Leaserents 

DividendsP. &W. RR. 14,868 14,877 

Div. on guar, stock 3 600 3,800 

Surplus 26,722 deficit. 



1869-70. 

(10 mos.) 

$i86,-2S0 

2-29,864 

56,416 

58,6-24 



1870-71 . 1871-7; 



$447,802 

340,051 

107,751 

64,696 

27,299 



$576,413 

3a3,619 

192,795 

75,789 

S9,S6* 



3,800 
deficit. 



3,600 
12,155 



3,600 
84,161 

$872,600 
1,260,000 



38,780 



Mnancial Condition at Close of Each Fiscal Tear. 

Capital stock $872,600 $872,600 $872,600 $872,600 

Funded debt 400,000 648,000 800,500 916,000 

Unfunded debt 101,252 104,954 188,651 139,464 

Surplus income 30,567 31,650 30,843 43,049 

Totalmeans $1,404,419 $1,657,204 $1,892,694 $1,1(71,113 

Construction 1,146,196 1,173,621 1,805,983 1,2-31,520 

Equipment 225,732 274, (i36 395,0:35 548,676 

Property. &c 33,490 208,945 291,575 200,916 

ToUldl»bnr6ed.. $1,404,419 $1,667,204 $1,898,594 $1,971,1)8 $2,161,880 




Jauuarjr 18, 1878.] 



THE CHitONICLR, 



68 



Rlctamond, FredorlckiibnrK, and Potomac Railroad.— 

(Return) for Fitcal Year Ended 8ej)t. !!0, 1872. ) 

The Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac Ruilroad forms an 
important linli in the coast line of railroads south of tlic Potomac, 
river. On the 18th day of July,, under arrangements with the | standing only the following 



DiirinR the year 50,190 sharesof stock, rcpresenlinp a per value 
of |2/>09,500, were created and issued in exchange for a similar 
amount of convertible bonds of the company. 

Of all former issues of convertible \i(mA» there are.yet out 



Alexandria & Fredericksburg and the Baltimore and Potomac Rail 
road Companies, thc! night lines in both directions between Rich- 
mond and Washington were opened, and since then through 
cars have been rtm regularly between Weldon and Baltimore. 



COMPAKATIVE STATEMENTS FOU FIVE YBAB8. 

Ojieratioru and Fiecal Bemlu. 



186T-«e. 
75.80 
13 



Miles of K.R 

Locomotives & englnee. 

Traill mileage ]81,IS5S 

Car mileage 

Gross earnings t296,TS6 

Operating expenses 193,984 

Net earnings 10a,744 

Interest on bonds, Ac.. 39,895 

Div. on guar, stock .... 20,089 

Bal. to profit and loss . 42,776 



1H68-89. 
78.50 
12 
181,552 



1869-70. 
75.80 
12 
173,001 



1332,026 
199,,\33 
132,491 
41,0R1 
21. 9.32 
69,477 



$.328,128 
259,883 
68,244 
37,533 
26,926 
3,784 



1870-71. 

75.50 

12 

181,709 

1,212,214 

$,326,180 
202.960 
123,220 
.39,0W 
31,6<» 
52,479 



1871-72- 

86.91 

12 

199,825 

1,337,260 

$351,919 
20.5,999 
145,919 
.52,488 
;i3.245 
60,186 



Financial Condition at Close of each Fiscal Tear. 



C.ipital stock ; .$1,320,575 

Funded debt 580,776 

Floating debt 38,034 

Profit and loss 490,409 



$1,414,1.36 

482,677 

2.5.186 

559,886 



$1,464,128 $1,509,828 $1,509,828 

466,604 ■ 735,.554 889,899 

34,949 114.074 4.3,417 

557,817 504,778 559,804 



Total $2,429,795 $2,481,886 $2,523,589 $2,864,2.36 $3,002,749 



Construcfn & eqnipm't$2,297,931 $2,298,349 

Investments 49,026 40,818 

Floating debt 77,209 83.197 

Cash at close of year. . . 5,628 .59,521 



$2,.3m,423 $2,.548,flR9 $2,922,927 

97,618 95,700 n6,&39 

115,267 20<).860 218,691 

7,280 12,685 44,.59I 



Total $2,429,795 $2,481 ,886 $2,523,689 $2,864,236 $3,002,749 

Philadelphia and Reading Railroad. — The annual meet 
Ing of stockholders was held at Philadelphia, January 13. 
The report for fiscal year ending Nov. 30, 1873, shows the follow- 
ing comparative result of the year's business : 



1871. 



1872. 



Travel through pass . 719,845 

Merchandize tons. 2 305,234 

Coal tons. 4,584,460 

Mail 

HiscellaneonB 



$1,641,395 

2,306,643 

8,287,293 

.36,678 

290,834 



791,478 
2,891,.399 
4,866,520 



Gross receipts $12,562,848 

Gross expenses 7,655,903 



Net profits. 



$5,006,940 



Travel, increase $145,667 

Merihandizc. Increase 381,.387 

Coal, decrease 774,178 

Mail, i ncrease 3,285 

Miscellaneous, decrease 193,816 



Gross receipts, decrease $437,805 

Gross expenses, increase 507,6)19 



$1,786,962 

2,688,0.30 

7,613,115 

39,913 

97,018 

$12,125,038 
8,0*3,542 



$4,061,496 
Per Ct. 

8 9-10 
16 6-10 

9 3-10 
8 8-10 

66 6-10 

3 5-10 
6 7-10 



Net profits, decrease $945,444 18 9-10 

Gross expenses, including renewal fund, rents of lateral roads, 
taxes, etc., in the year 1871 were 60 1-10 per cent of gross receipts. 
For the year 1873 they were 60 5-10 per cent of the gross receipts. 

The result of the year'a business, as condensed from transporta- 
tion and income account, may be stated thus : 

Receipts over cost of working the road $4,061,496 43 

Add balance of Interest account, including Interest and dividends 
on stocks and bonds held by thc Company, receipts from the 
Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company, profit on 
steam colliers, etc, first deducting drawbacks on trafSc ef 1871, 
and loss upon the business of the Schuylkill and Snsquehanna 
Canals for 1872 ■ 846,478 47 



Total $4,907,974 90 

Amount to credit reserved fnnd. 1871 $789,555 90 

Amount of United States tax on divi- 
dend, Jan., 1872, deducted from income 

in last report, but not paid 67,592 73 

847,148 63 



From which deduct interest on bonded 

debt $1,694,488 00 

Taxes on interest on bonded debt 82,858 44_ 

Interest on bonds and mortga 
Dfbit balance of renewal fund 
Sinking fund, loans 1874-77. . . 



$5,756,133 53 



-$I,777,.3?16 44 

es 103,613 44 

90,167 79 

25,00000 



Om of which has been'paid, in July, 1872, five percent 

dividend on $34,209,375 28 $1,710,468 

Statetaxondo 88,523 44 



2,001,127 67 
$3,753,996 86 



-$1,795,992 20 



There has been declared a dividend. ]>!,yabl* in cash 
on the 24th of January, 1873, of five per cent, on 
the priferri'd and common stock, $34,23t),175 28. $1,711,808 76 

State tax on do 85,590 41 



$1,958,003 66 



-$1,WT,S99 17 



Balance of reserve fund $160, 604 49 

Although the amount of traffic in tons and number of passen- 
gers carried during the past year is greater than that of any 
previous year, yet the gross receipts derived therefrom are less 
than those realized from the smaller business of the preceding 
year, and the receipts per ton for coal transported in 1872 are less 
than those of any year since 1863. Had the company been able 
to maintain the same rates for tolls and transportation of coal as 

were either in force daring 1871, or realized as the average. — ., ^, . - •. n. ■« o -i 

charges of the past ten years, the profits for the year just closed consolidation of this company with the Texas & Panfir Railwmr 
would have been tar in excess of those of any previous year. ' Company. 



6 par cent mortgage loan of 188S $WI(!00 

7 per cent debcutitre loan of 1890 M,'oOO 

Total ITMiwO 

The 7 per cent sterling loan of <872. amounlinir an per laiit re- 
port to $110,400, was retired durlof; the year, and in its place 
$110,000 of the consolidated mortgage bonds of l!>lt ispued. 

The Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company has con- 
tinued to increase its ownership of lands, and now controls ovrr 
80,000 acres of anthracite coal lands, upon which there are 98 col- 
lieries. Most of these collieries are worki'd by IcFsees, but 27 of 
the largest of them are now owned and will be worked by the 
company. 

The tonnage of those lands last year was 3.030.880 8-20 tone, 
and the rents derived from this tonnage amounted to $940,774 60. 

Almost the entire issue of $19,000,000 of the consolidated 
mortgage loan Wiis applied to the purchase and development of 
the lands, in addition to which the bonds of the Coal and Iron 
Company, guaranteed by the Philadelphia and Heading Railroad 
Company, to the extent of $11,131,000 have been issncU lor the 
same purpose. 

The Coal and Iron Company will mine next year between two 
millions and two and a half millions of tons from its own landu, 
and including this product it Is believed that the entire production 
of coal upon its estates will amount to at least four milliou one 
hundred thousand tons during the year 1873. 

For the purpose of aiding In the development of these lands, 
building additional steam collieries, extending some of the branch 
railroads, constructing additional rolling stock, etc., etc., the man- 
agers have issued a prospectus for a new debenture loan of 
$10,,')00,000 of 7,per cent coupon bonds, payable In 1893, and con- 
veitible into the stock of the company at par at any time after 
the first day of July, 1876, and before the first day of January, 
1892, giving to each stockholder the right to subscrilje at par, not 
only for his proportion of the entire loan, but (or his proportion 
of such of the surplus as would not be taken by otker stock- 
holders. 

The following statement shows the amount of subscriptions re- 
ceived : 
Whole amount of loan $10,900,000 

Pro rata subscriptions $8,5)8,000 

Sarplus subscriptions 4,8I«,400 

Total subscriptions tHWt^tM 

The whole loan was thus taken at par witliout llic payment of 
any commissions by the Company. Of the entire subscription, 
$3,305,030 had been paid in cash np to the end of the year. 

Erie Railway— New Bonds.— On Tuesday, Jan. 14, tin Erie 
Board of directors met at the Erie offices, an I iifter di.spoiiing of 
the usual routine business the directors went immediately Into 
the discussion of the new loan. After some talk on the subji'Ct a 
resolution was proposed and carried which authorized the com- 
pany to issue 7 per cent, convertible bonds for $10,000,000, pro- 
vided the same bonds can be negotiated at par, the proceeds to bo 
used for the purpose of laying a third rail and a double track 
along the line of road. Part of the proceeds ol the sale of the 
bonds will also probably be used in laying steel rails over the 
line. It is the intention of the directors to offer these bonds on 
the English market, where they anticipate a ready sale, .is Eng- 
lish speculators appear to have recovered confidence in Erie f ince 
the change of management. The resolution defines very plainly 
that the bonds are not to be sold lower than par, and also slates 
that the interest on such bonds will be payable in both I>oiidon 
and New York. On motion, the reslgi ation of Mr. J. B. Ilodg- 
skin, the treasurer of the road, was accepte<l, and Mr. William 
Pitt Sherman was unf.nimously elected In his place. No otUtr 
business of importance was transacted. 

N. Y. Central & HndRon.— The directors mot on Sntuiday. 
Jan. 11, and authorized a change in the form of the $40,(HK».(K)0 
bonds for the issue of wliich authority wiis given some time ago. 
It was originally intended to make the entin- issue in dollar bonds, 
bearing 7 per cent currency. -Authority was given at this meeting 
to Issue Instead .£2,000,000' sterling iKnids, bearing 6 \>vr cent u'old 
interest, equivalent to $10,000,000 dollar bonds— and $30,00t>.<H)0 
dollar bonds bearing 7 per cent currency. Tliis action of the 
directors, together with semi-official statements to that ••(Tect, 
show that there is no intention of raising the money necessary to 
lay two new tracks to Buffalo by making a scrip divulend and 
calling up a certain percentage of It in cash, as had lioen rutuored 
of late by the speculators for a rise in the stock. 

Harlem Exienelon.— This road is to be sold at Benning- 
ton, Vt., Jan. 20, by order of the Court of Chancery of Vermont, in 
a foreclosure suit, the Union Trust Company of New "iork being 
plaintiffs In the suit. The amount claime<l is $l.(i."iT.(KHl and 
costs. The company which was formed by the consoliilntion of 
the Lebanon Springs, the Bennington & Ruflan<l. and the Ver- 
mont & New York companies has a road from Chatham. N. \.. to 
Bennington, Vt., 116 miles. For the year ending S<-ptenilN r 30. 
1871, the last for which we have reports, the o|M>ratiiig cxikiws 
of the road (including payments for car service) ex-c<HHled i!.-< re- 
ceipts by $9,88.5. The total mortgage debt is $4.0tH).0<W. 

Southern Trans-Contlnental Rallwajr Company. - A 
meeting of the stockholders of this company is to l)e held on 
the 32d day of January, 1873, for the puriwse .>f ratifying the 



84 



THE CHRONICLR 



[January 18, 1873. 





Earnings 


Gross Earnings. 
$5,71(i,n5 54 


per Mile. 


$9,511 


7,9;i5,116 18 


9,S43 


9,467,072 15 


9,1.'>5 


*ia,793,001 91 


10,896 



Central Paclflc Railroad.— Messrs. Fisk & Hatch, the bankers 
of this company, have issued their usual annual siatement of the 
biisiaeas of the company, showing that the gross earnings for the 
rear exhibit an increase of over 33 1-3 per cent. ; and the pet earn- 
ings over operating expenses have increased over 40 per cent, as 
compared with 1871. 

The following comparison shows the per centage of operating 
expenses to gro.<<s earnings for the years 1871 and 1872 : 

Gross Operating Net Ratio of Exp. 

Barnhigs. Expenses, Earnings. to Earnings. 

1871 t»,4«7,072 t4,i!93.879 $5,171,192 45 31-100 p. c. 

187S »li,793,001 6,327,376 7,465,625 4165 100 " 

The following table, exhibiting the earnings per mile of road 
operated for the past few years, sliows that tlie increase in tra'^'c 
and earnings for tlie year 1873 is largely in excess of the increased 
mileage : 

Averagi! No. of Miles 
Operated. 

1869 liOl 

1870 863 

1871 1*34 

187* 1175 

♦The actual earnings for 1872, publislied subsequent to^tlie date of the 
report, were over $100,000 greater, being $12,900,126, 

The b mded debt outstandiiiff is given with every detail in the 
tables of the Ciiuoniclb published each month. 

With the completion of the California & Oregon Branch the 
entire system of lines .composing the Central Pacific Bailroad 
and branches will bo finislied, and the comnrehensive plans of 
the company will be consummated. Upon this branch, as the 
■work progresses, the company will liave the right to issue $7,200,- 
000 additional first mortgage bonds, of which $2,080,000 are now 
authorized by the terms of the mortgage upon the amount of 
work already done, and $759,000 have been sold during the year. 

The entire first mortgage debt of the company, with its main 
line and branches completed, and the authorized amount of first 
mortgage bonds all i83ued,aQd the annual interest thereon, will 
be as follows: 

.\mount Int. 
Am't Bonds. in Gold. 
Central Pacific Main Line, from Ogden to Sacramento. $35,88.3,000 $1,552,980 
Western Pacific Main Line, from Sacramento to San 

Jose and Oakland, is.'iued prior to consolidation, and 

now assumed bj- Central Pacific 2,733,000 

California and Oregon, issued prior to consolidation, 

now assumed bj' 'Central Pacific 6,000,000 

Central Pacific on California andOrftgou Branch *7, 200,000 

Central Pacific on San .Joaquin Valley Branch 6,080,000 

San Francisco, Oakland and Alameda, issued prior to 
,,. .. . .. „ . jj,. 



164,100 

360,000 
432,000 
364,800 



consolidation, and now assumed by Central Pacific. tl,.'iOO,000 

Total first mortgage debt authorized, and annual 
interest $49,898,000 



120,000 



$2,993,880 



• Of which only $750,000 have been sold. 
+ Of which only $500,000 have been issued. 

Miscellaneous bonded debt outstanding and interest thereon : 

Central Pacific 7 per cent, bonds of 1883 $1,483,000 $103,610 

'• State Aid Bonds 1,500,000 * 

" Land grant bonds 9,153,000 549,183 



Total bonded debt $61.534,000 

Total annual interest (in gold) $3,646,870 



• Interest paid by State of California. 
Add premium, at average rate, at which the earnings in 
gold for 1872 were reduced to a currency value 



460,417 



Net earnings for 1872 
Sarplus 



4,107,287 
7,465,625 



by these extensions, giving the company a total of 2,000 miles of 
track. The first train from Milwaukee over the new steel-rail 
line of the Milwaukee and St, Paul Company has reached Chicago, 
but regular trains do not begin running until some tjme in Janu- 
ary. The 6th day of January, Chicago and St. Paul were put in 
direct communication with each other. 

Rockford, Rock Islaud.A St. I^ouls.— A supplement to the 
agreement between the company and its bondholders has 
been agreed upon, to the effect that no pledge of the 
road may be made, or second mortgage issued, without the 
consent of a majority of the preferred stockholders (who are the 
bondholders). The chief points of the agreement are: 

1. The bonded debt of $9,000,000 to be reduced by one-half, 
and preferred stock of the same par value to be accepted by the 
bondholders for the oth(!r half. Gold interest at the rate of 7 per 
cent, to be paid on the reduced bonded debt, beginning with the 
half-yearly coupon due February 1, 1873. The preference shares 
are to receive 7 per cent, dividends before anything is paid on 
common stock. 

2. For the three coupons, Nos. 6, 7 and 8, now past due, 
amounting to $945,000, debt certificates bearing 4 per cent, in- 
terest are to be given, the interest to be first paid August 1, 1873. 

3. The branch line from Sagetown to Keithsburg, 18 miles, 
which has no connection with the rest of the road, and hitherto 
could not be rented, to be sold or pledged, and the receipts there- 
for to be expended in fencing the line and increasing the rolling 
stock. 

In case the agreement should be accepted, and any part of the 
bondholders should determine to undertake legal proceedings, 
then all those bondholders who have accepted the agreement are 
to enter fully upon their original rights, and the bonds and 
coupons are to be good for their face, as at first. — Railroad Oazette. 

St. Joseph Ac Denver City — -The Sheriff denies the truth 
of a report to the effect that an attachment has been placed in his 
hands to seize the effects of the St. Joseph and Denver City Rail- 
road Company in this city to await the issue of a suit said to have 
been brought against the company by Jay Cooke & Co. to recover 
$100,000 loaned the railroad company. 

St. Paul & Pacific.— There have been recently some inquiries 
in Germany concerning the financial condition of this company, 
and investigations have been made which are reported to have 
established the following facts: 

While the main line from St. Paul westward to Breckenridge, 
317 miles, and the branch from a point 10 miles from St. Paul 
northwestward 66 miles to Sauk Rapids were constructed by the 
same company, they are now under separate organizations, the 
stockholders, however, being the same, and for the most part 
also controlling stockholders of the Northern Pacific. During 
1871 the receipts of the Breckenridge line were $383,973 35 (or 
$1,770 per mile), its expenses $254,873 91, and its net earnings 
thus $129,099 44, or nearly $600 per mile. The receipts of 
the Sauk Rapids line were $265,896 68 ($4,029 per mile), the ex- 
penses $138,111 75, and the net earnings $137,784 93, or $3,688 
per mile. The Sauk Rapids line received $235,274 33 for sales 
of its land, and the Breckenridge line $609,175 58. The former's 
mortgage debt is $2,753,500; the latter's, $13,453,000. The Sauk 
Rapids line ^the company owning it is called, we believe, the St. 
Paul & Pacific Railroad Company, First Division) is constructing 
two extensions — one from the terminus at Sauk Rapids up the 
Mississippi about 55 miles to a junction with the Northern 
Pacific at Brainerd, which will give the Northern Pacific, be- 
tween the Mississippi and the Red River, a direct communication 
with St. Paul and the routes to Milwaukee, Chicago, St. Louis, 
and the rest of the country; the other from St. Cloud (two miles 
below Sauk Rapids) west by north, nearly parallel with the 
Breckenridge line, to the Northern Pacific at Glyndon, Minn. , (10 



From the foregoing it will be seen that in 1873 the net earnings 
were sufficient to pay the annual interest on the entire bonded 

debt ot the company outstanding, and on the remaining amount „i^v,«v-....^.ftv, , -„ ^..,.v .„*..„...„ ... v., -., ,v 

of bonds authorized to be issued upon the California and Oregon I miles (east of the Red River) and thence nearly due north, not 
branch when completed, and the unissued bonds of the San Fran- 1 more than 10 or 12 miles from that river, to the borders of British 
Cisco, Oakland and Alameda, and leave a surplus of over $3,300,- Columbia at St. Vincent, a distance of about 300 miles. For the 



000, sufficient to pay a dividend of six per cent, on the issued 
cipital stock of the company. 

The capital stock account of the company remains as stated in 
our last report, viz. : 

Authorized capital stock $100,000,00n 

Amount of capital stock subscribed .59,(i4.1,00x 

Amount of capital stock paid in 54,28.3,191 

No dividends have as yet iieen paid upon the capital stock, the 
surplus earnings, after paying interest and providing for the 
sinking funds in accordance with the terms of the mortgages, 
having been applied to the extension of the branch lines, increased 
equipment, improvement of water fronts, buildings, &c., thus 
adding largely to the value of the c:)mpany's property, without 
a corresponding increase in the funded debt. 

S.\N Francisco, January 14.— The Board of Supervisors of 
this city, last night, unanimously adopted a resolution ex- 

fressing the willingness of the city to grant to the Central 
acific Railroad Company such facilities on Mission Bay as may 
be necessary to bring railroad cars and ships together ; provided 
the company will withdraw the Goat Island bill from Congress, 
and make Mission Bay their permanent terminus. 

Chicago Sc Northwestern Railroad. — The Chicago & 
Northwestern Railway Company has completed its extension 
to the Lake Superior region, which is now closely connected with 
Chicago and the world at large. The same company has also 
completed two more of its extensions, that running from Geneva 
to Batavia, in Illinois, and that running from Stanwood, on its 
Iowa Division, to Tipton, Iowa. The Madison extension, in Wis 
consin, is also substantially completed, supplying the only missing 
link for a through connection from Chicago to St. Paul. Four 
hundred miles of track are added to the Northwestern railway 



construction of these two branches $15,000,000 in bonds were 
issued in London and Amsterdam last year. As the country on 
the new lines is very thinly peopled (though for the most part 
very fertile, it is. said), it is not expected that the earnings will 
for some time be sufficient for the payment of coupons. But 
something is expected from sales of land, and the company 
reports that money for the interest for three years from the time 
of issue, intended to cover the period of construction, has been 
set aside, invested in United States bonds, and held by European 
houses which negotiated the bonds. The company received from 
the -State 63 J miles of old road-bed, considered worth $2,500 a 
mile, and from the United States land grants amounting to 
1,830,000 acres. 

During the past season a good deal of grading was done from 
Sauk Rapids towards Brainerd, and some from St. Cloud west 
ward; while about 65 miles of track was laid on the St. Vincent 
extension from Glyndon northward to Crookston. — iJ. R. Gazette. 

Railroad Aid Bonds Declared Void. — OM-iiHA, Jan. 15. — 
The Supreme Court of this State to-day decided that the issue of 
bonds by counties and precincts in aid of railroads was void. The 
decision aflFects a large number of cases in various counties 
throuahout the State. 

— The Pittsburgh, Cincinnati & St. Louis Railroad Company 
leased the Jefferson ville, Indianapolis & Madison Railroad a year 
ago, with tlie privilege of cancelling the lease at the end of the 
year. The lease has been cancelled, and. the stockholders have 
voted to lease the road to the Pennsylvania Central Company for 
ninety-nine years. 

—Notice is given that $80,000 of the Moultrie Co. Illinois 
bonds, dated December, 1873, issued to Mattoon, Sullivan & De- 
catur Railroad, are to be contested. 



January 18, 1878.] 



THE CHRONICLK 



85 



<j:i)c Olommcrcial ^imes. 

COMMERClAirEpTrOME. 

Friday Nianx, Jan. 17, 1878. 

Mercantile affairs, while presenting many favorable features, are 
still suffering from the accumulation of snow in our streets, which 
renders many of the streets almost impassable to loaded vehicles . 
in consequence of which all purchases in a jobbing way are, if 
possible, postponed in the hope that the difficulty and additional 
expense of making deliveries will soon be removed. It is the 
general opinion that country dealers have very small stocks both 
of domestic productions and of foreign goods, and it is believed 
that with the restoration of the usual facilities for transportation, 
a revival of trade will take place. 

Cotton has declined under free receipts at the ports and dull 
accounts from abroad, middling Uplands closing at 30ic. Flour 
has been irregular, low grades being in demand for export and 
higher, at $7 20@7 60 for shipping extras, but family grades 
close weak. Wheat has also advanced for the Spring growths, 
with a moderate business for export at $1 60@1 08 for No. 3 
Spring, but Winter wheats have remained dull. Corn has been 
dull and lower at C3@«6c for Western mixed in store and 
afloat. Coffee has been active and higher, and the grocery trade 
generally has been better. 

Freights have been dull and rates have shown a downward 
tendency for general business, but there has been a marked in- 
crease in petroleum charters. To Liverpool by sail late engage- 
ments have been at 7@7id. for grain, i@9-33d. for cotton, and 25s 
@278. Cd. for provisions ; and by steam, cotton |;<i)7-10d., grain 
7i@7Jd., bacon SOs., and cheese 553. To London by sail an ex- 
ceptionally large business has been done at 38. 6d. per bbl. for 
flour and 24s. per ton for oil cake, and wheat at 8d., all 
at call of ship and delivered alongside. The charters embrace 
naphtha to Cork for orders at 8s.@83. 3d., and grain at 7s(a!7s. 6d., 
and petroleum from Philadelphia to the Continent at Gs. To-day 
there was a fair business ; grain to Liverpool by steam 7i@7id.; 
corn to Loudon by sail, 8d. 

Tallow has ruled firmer at 8S<a8|c. for prime. Whiskey has 
declined to 93c, with free sales. Strained rosin has further ad- 
vanced, but closes quiet at $3 80@3 85. Spirits turpentine has 
been in demand, and advanced to 64i@85c.. Tar has been more 
salable at $3 25@3 50. Wool continues dull, and since the pub- 
lication of the statement of stocks, prices have shown a downward 
tendency. Hops have remained quiet. 

The combination in petroleum seer".s to have been wholly 
broken up, attended by a marked decline in prices, whicll has led 
to a very large business. Refined in bbls. has declined to 31i@ 
22c. Naphtha in shipping order is down to 14J^@15i;. and crude 
petroleum has been sold freely at 8l@9c in bulk. The transac- 
tions in petroleum and its product during the past few days have 
been fully 100,000 bjls. 

Provisions have been a little irregular during the past week. 
Pork has remained dull. For beef the demand has been more ac- 
tive, the sales including extra India mess at |30 per tierce. But 
the chief feature of the trade has been the activity and buoyancy 
in lard, in which the transactions for immediate and early delivery 
have averaged about 5,000 tierces per day, and prices at the close 
show a recovery of fully ^c. per lb from the lowest figures of the 
season. The closing prices yesterday, for prime Western steam, 
were 8ic. for January and February, 8Jc. for March, and 8Jc. for 
April. Box meats have also been active, especially long clear 
bacon at GJc @ 7c. spot and February, and 7ic. for March, and dry 
salted shoulders at 5@54c. spot and future. Meats for home 
consumption have been dull. Butter has shown an upward ten- 
dency, especially extremes of qualities. Cheese is also higher on 
the favorable foreign advices. To-day pork was more active, in- 
cluding new mess, at $13 75 on the spot, and $13 80 (3 $14 for 
March and April, and old mess on the spot $13 25. Lard was not 
salable at over 8ic. for prime steam on the spot, but brought 
8 5-16c. for February, 8ic. lor March, and 8f c. for April, with a 
good business. Bacon was firm, with buyers at 7ic. for long and 
short clear for February; long clear sold on the spot at 6|c and 
short clear 7fc. on spot and 7 7-1 6c. for February. Dry salted 
shoulders sold at Sjc. for January. Cheese quoted at 15@16c. 
for good to choice factory. 

Kentucky tobacco has been more active, and the sales for the 
week aggregate about 1,000 hhds. common to good leaf at 10J@ 
14c. At the close, stocks of the old crop are much reduced, being 
smaller than tor several years past, little being left on hand suita- 
ble for shipping orders. Seed leaf has been in but moderate 
demand, ^ajea have been, crop of 1871, 300 cases Connecticut, 
at 45@00i'.; 400 cases New York, partly at 9c.; 100 cases Pennsyl- 
vania, at 20c.; 200 cases Wisconsin, at 9@10o.; also, 300 cases, crop 
of 1870, sundry lots, at 9@I5c. Spanish tobacco doing better, 
with sales of 700 bales Havana at 98@$1 10. 

Calcutta linseed has advanced to $3 57i@3 60, gold, on the spot, 
and has sold at $3 67i, gold to arrive. The transactions thus far, 
this month, aggregate about 100,000 bag.^. Other East India 
goods dull. 

Hides are firmer at 37i@28c., gold, for dry Buenos Ayrns. Lin- 
seed oil has advanced to 93c., but fish oils have been a little weak, 
and crude sperm sold early in the week at $1 52i. Cloverseed 
has had a free sale for export at 9^9fc. Fish in good demand, 
but fruits quift. 

Metals have been less active. Some business is reported in 
ingot copper at 34i@35c. for American, and 30i<a31c. for Englisli. 
Straits tin quoted nominally at Sl^c., gold; charcoal tin plates 
$11@11 25, gold. Pig iron quiet. 



Bzport* or LeadluK ArUelea t*om Naw T*rk. 

The following table, compiled from Custom Hooaeretnrni.ihowt 
the exports of leading articlfs from the port of New York liace 
January 1, 1873, to all the principal foreign countiiei.and aliotb* 
totals for the last week, and since January 1. The last two Uott 
show total valuei, including the value of all other utJclei beiidei 
those mentioned in the table. 






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86 



tSe chronicle. 



[January 18, ld73. 



Imports of LeadlnK Article*. 

Tbe following table, compiled from Custom Hoaie returns 
■nowa the foroign imports of leading articles at this port since 
Jan. 1, 1873, and for the same period of 1872 and 1871: 

[Theqqautity la given \a packatfea wlien not otherwieo Bpeclfied.l 





Since 
Jan. 1 
1873. 


Same 
time 
1672, 


Same 
time 
1871. 




Since 

Jan.], 

1873. 


Same 
time 
1872. 


Same 
time 
1871. 


UUna, Glass and 


582 

2,62s 

21,752 

2,423 

499 

17S 

li023 

45,563 
49 

1,316 

"65 
; 23 

2,192 
IH 
3 S 
25 
46 
222 
12 

1;!?; 

sa 

'iii 
7,n 

Si 

3il 

1,959 

1 

113 

53 

19,251 

1.623 


1,005 
2,88: 
33,073 
4,155 

509 

156 
8,8^9 

600 
, 100,847 

317 

3.154 

i.aw 

■m 

39 

9,'SO 

401 

50S 

81 

23 

473 

31 

9,555 

S,302 

1.814 

6i9 

175 

S50 

20! 

17,815 

43 

346 

3,011 

28 

146 

.5!) 
42,521 
2,39! 


559 

S.451 

18Ji!2 

1,248 

45) 

120 

3.435 

859 

12,367 

41 


Metals,&c.- 


245 

186 

17,3m 

14,732 

823,890 

7,580 

23,383 

187,129 

5,298 

4,225 

46 862 

10,333 

5,470 

119 

12.065 
2.367 
3,685 

91.726 
1,909 
84,922 
11,468 

6,330 
52,095 
84,872 
104,813 
476.923 
48,633 

1,781 

5,390 

62 

13,735 

1.180 

3,805 

25,311 

4W 


169 

133 

34,10! 

U,4S3 

530,851 

5.692 

18,557 

',011,130 

9,285 

4,399 

95,6(;9 

47,099 

3,688 

168 

5,918 
11.621 
8.433 

56,199 
5,118 
42,476 
34,978 

15.151 
97,028 
51,440 
l6i.66S 
555.053 
13,171 

35,303 

:04',i29 

29,043 
1,999 

20,417 
6,006 


834 


Chlaa 


Uardware 

Iron, Kli bars.. 

Lead, pigs 

Spelter, lbs 

Steel 

Tin, boxes 

Tin slabs, lbs.. 

Bags 

Sugar, hlids., tea. 

Sbbls 


97 


Earthen ware.... 

Olau 

eUwaware 

Olaas plate 

Buttons 

Coal, tons 

Cocoa. bags 

Coffee, bass 


18.371 

13.221 

107.438 

4A''7 

17,651 
151.786 

4.509 

4,695 

19.401 
13.108 


Bark, Peruvian. 
Blea powders... 
Brimstone, tons 
Cocblneal..; — 
Cream Tartar... 
Qambler 


1,820 

1,157 

510 

25a 

55 
299 


Sugar, boxes & 

bags 

Tea 


Tobacco 


=^} 


Wines, *c.- 
<^bamnaff*R.hki). 


~H 


Onm, Arabic 


122) Wines'.. r. 

2l6|Wool, bales 

75 Artli-les renorted 


2,836 
5S5 


Madder 




Oils, essential... 
OH.OUve 


965 

52 

7,050 

4,428 

1,136 

990 

168 

'529 
2,190 

50 
3,310 


by value- 


62,037 
9,633 


Opium 

5oda. bl-carb 


Corks 

Fancy goods 

Fish:.? 


8oda,aBh 

fHx 


Fruits, Ac- 
Lemons 

Oranges 

Nuts 


1,419 


For! 


27,696 
18.791 


Hair 






Hemp, bales 

aides, &c.- 


Hides undressed. 
Klce 


639,084 


Brlstles 


Spices, &c.— 
Cassia 






9 107 




2,^9 

209 

93 

13,931 

207 




1,159 








Jewelry. Ac— 


Saltpetre 

Woods- 
Cork 


«,4C5 






Llhseed 




1,760 
'.2,298 
9,435 




Logwood 

Mahogany 





Receipts of Domestic Produce for tbe Week and since 
Jannarr 1. 

The receipts of domestic produce have been as follows : 





This 


Since 


Same 




This 


Since 


Same 




week. 


Jan. 1. 


time '72. 




week. 


Jan.l. 


time '72 


Aahes...pkgs. 


126 


163 


283 


Pitch 


43 


93 




Br«ad8iuffs-' 








Oil cake, pkgs 


713 


2,734 


3,329 


Flour.. bbls. 


47.707 


77,869 


89,966 


Oil, lard.. .. 






160 


'W(iea'...bus. 


163,020 


334.665 


50,631 


Peanuts, bass 


1,331 


2,';oi 


4,166 


Corn 


!54,?UO 


236,900 


555,750 


Provisions- 








Oats 


19I,0U{: 


40J,311 


225,102 


Butter, pkgs.... 


12,092 


25,4(3 


20,942 


Rye 


373 
40,823 


500 
94.775 


123.931), 




7,J15 

17,483 


12,009 
28,305 


13,585 
S2,3t;9 


Barley, &c.. 


Cutmeats 


Qrass sd,b;;s 


5.013 
1.021 
2,255 


7,453 
2,755 
2.7.30 


18,680 

34.! 

13,220 


Eges 


1,898 
9,851 
1,514 


3,933 
15,472 
3,1)04 


5,817 


Pork 


7,589 


Pea8,bU3h.. 


Beef, pkgs 


3,661 


C.meal.bblB 


3,503 


5,503 


4,137 


Lard, pkgs 

Lard, k3gs 


13,717 


20,831 


82,603 


Cotton. .bales. 


25,261 


43,445 


41,iJ5! 


54 


3'J4 


419 


Hemp.. bales. 


22! 


293 


153 


Rlee, pkgs 


145 


839 


416 


Hides No. 


9,134 

431 

65*73 


21,229 

958 

108.590 


14,196 

631 

157,i;29 


Starch. 


2.415 
465 


5.540 
991 


11,096 


Hops.. .bales. 


Stearlne 


978 


Leather. sides 


Sugar, bbls 




Molasses, hds. 








Sugar, hhds 

Tallow, pkKB 


79 


79 


662 


Do., bbls 


2,585 


7,537 


8,515 


i,;.<l7 


1,806 


1,120 


JJaval Stores- 








Tobacco,i)kgs.... 
Tobacco.hhds.... 


3,419 


4,945 


2,900 


Cr.turp bbls 


803 


643 


245 


491 


818 


4d0 


Solrlts turp. 


2,131 


,'•21? 


4,220 


Whiskey, bbls.... 


3,53! 


5,967 


8.857 


Kosln 


Ufim 


24.6'23 


33,218 


Wool, bales 


1,151 


2,571 


1.062 


Tar 


1,572 


2,!31 


■ 1.013 


Dressed hogs. No. 


5,976 


12,543 


13.410 



COTTON. 

Fbiday, p. M., January 17, 1873. 
By special telegrams received to-night from the Southern ports, 
we are in possession of the returns showing the receipts, exports, 
&c., of cotton for the week ending this evening, Jan. 17. It 
appears that the total receipts for the seven days have reached 
136,325 bales against 133,235 bales last week, 104,703 bales the pre- 
vious week and 103,443 bales three weeks since, making the total 
receipts since the first of September, 1872, 2,003,525 bales against 
1,703,000 bales for the same period of 1871-73, showing an in- 
crease since September 1, 1872, of 300,525 bales. The details of 
the receipts for this week (as per telegraph) and for the oorres- 
ponding weeks of the five previous years are as follows : 



Received this week at- 



New Orleans bales. 

Mobile 

Charleston 

Savannah 

Texas 

Tennessee, &c 

Florida 

North Csrolma 

Virginia 



TotalthlBwcek 

Total since Sept. 1.. 



1873. 



43,694 
12.358 
13,032 
21,270 
13.145 

8,838 
451 

1,219 
16,663 

136 .22? 

2,003,525 



1872. 



14,124 
16,346 
10,3: 1 
19,335 
10,339 
7.139 
616 
992 
9,135 

118V8S7 



50,359 
15.425 
10,116 
i8,I53 
10,737 
16,073 
482 
2.683 
12,509 

116,837 



i,043,024 1,532,219 



1870. 



83,715 
11.34! 
5,290 
15,057 
7,000 
8,398 
598 
803 
6,103 

88,311 



26.258 
8,417 
7,233 

12,307 
6,055 
7,774 
673 
1,437 
6,873 

76,957 



1.025,937 



The exports for the week ending this evening reach a total of 
87,854 bales, of which 63,461 were to Great Britain, 523 to 
France, and 23,870 to rest of the Continent, while the stocks as 
made up this evening, are now 503,918 bales. Below are the 
exports and stocks for the week, and also for the corresponding 
week of last season : 



Exported to— 



Weekending' _ .. , 
Jaa. 17. O.Brit. | 



NewOrlean*. 

Mobile 

Ctiarl .-ston... 

Swannah 

Texas 

New Vork... 
Othul porta.. 

.Tut.tl 

S'nce Sent. 1 



France 



26,866 I 

5',756 
6.9S4 
12,.133 
10,7.15 
773 

63.461 
717,211 



Contln't 



Total thla 
week. 



523 
133,233 



10.686 
1,2.30 
3,U80 
2,875 
5,187 
100 
712 



23,810 

248,348 



Same w'k 

1872. 



88,035 
1,;50 
8,830 
9.829 
17.570 
10,835 
1,185 



87,851 
1,098,792 



52,013 

6,243 

993 

11,563 
5,286 
5,900 



82,415 
909,497 



Stock. 



1873. 



167.704 
4S,2S9 
30,892 
77.2;i 
72,471 
67.288 
40,000 



1872. 



133,639 
M,5^6 
37.234 
79,335 
45.994 
71,133 
29,000 



503,918 



511,226 



From the foregoing; statement it will be seen that, compared 
with the corresponding week of last season, there is an increase in 
the exports this week of 5,439 bales, while the stocks to-night ara 
7,308 bales less than they were at this time a year ago. The 
following is our usual table showing the movement of cotton at 
all the ports from Sept. 1 to Jan. 10, the latest mail dates. 





BKOKIPTB 
S1N0> 8KFT.1. 


aXPOBTKD BINOB BllPT. 1 TO- 


Coast- 
wise 




PORTS. 


Great 
Britain 


France 


Other 
For'gn 




Stock. 




:s72, , 1671. 


Total. ^0"^ 




New Orleans 


.'i33,9!3 48;,89J| 211 5M 


87,830 
1,073 
10,9-29 
27,215 
3,515 
1,923 


2.75S 
15,29.1 
74,933 

7,464 
24,257 

4",069 


SS5,09S 87.U74 
45,812 110,093 
76,124 113,134 
199,120 140.584 
53,945 46,109 
2J7,541 

.... 7,571 
416 80.828 
790 195.369 
12,092 


161,015 
41 701 


Mobile 


196,63»; 192,"90 
280,635 177,762 
418,327 3U8,.373 
182.605 118,871 

40,369 48,597 
7,'.71 9^44 

33,154 33,191 
208,216 165,826 

20,611 46,eii 


41,931 
49,902 
96,922 
42,9<o 
201,356 

'416 

790 

7,823 


Charleston 


86,401 


Savannah 

Texas 

New York 

Florida 


72.375 
80,228 
58.605 


North Carolina 


2.6S3 

14,935 




22,000 






Total this year 


1367,800 .... 


653,750 


132,710 


2M,4-8 


1010,938 


725.762 


190,463 


Total last year 


.... 1584.113 


623,114 


98411' 100,6C«i 821.831 


537,432 


495,781 



The market the past week has ruled dull, and the tendency of 
prices has been downwards. This ig due principally to the very 
liberal receipts at the ports, which early took the lead of the 
large week's totals of a year ago, with which the comparison must 
be made. At the same time foreign accounts have been dull, 
and the demand, whether for export and home consumption, has 
been limited. Tuesday, quotations were reduced ^c. without 
stimulating the demand, and last evening the close was again in 
buyers' favor. To-day there was a revision of quotations, though 
i.he general features of the market remained unchanged, good or- 
dinary being reduced ^c., strict good ordinary reduced l-16c., ordi- 
nary and low middling unchanged, and middling and good mid- 
dling advanced ^c, with more business reported for both export 
and home consumption. For futures there has been considerable 
Irregularity. Early in the week there was a uniform decline in 
the later months, and the closing prices of Tuesday showed Jo. 
decline from the previous Saturday on the early months, and 5- 
16@ic. for the later months. The reduction, however, did not 
increase the demand, but owing mainly to the limited ofieringj 
there was a recovery for April and May of ^c. and for June of 
Jc. in face of a decline in Liverpool and liberal receipts at the 
ports. To-day, however, the market was dull and drooping, and 
the closing prices were among the lowest of the week. The prices 
for futures last reported were (basis low middling) 
19^. for January, 19|c. for February, 19|c. for March, 20ic. for 
April, 30Jc. for May, 21c, for June, and 21 7-16c. for July. 
The total sales of this description for the week are 67,600 

bales, including tree on board. For immediate delivery the 

total sales foot up this week 10,255 bales, including 6,383 for 
export, 3,343 for consumption, 430 for speculation, and 100 in 
transit. Of the above 2,026 bales were to arrive. The follow- 
ing are the closing quotations to-day : 



Ordinary per lb. 

Good Ordinary 

Strict Good O.diiiary 

Low Middling ; 

Middling...... 

GoodMIddllng 



Upland and 
Florida. 



17X6.... 
I85«».... 
19 1-16® .. 

isHia.... 

20^19 ... 



Mobile. 



17V®.... 
KHd.... 
19 5-16®.. . 
19 V®.... 
20K®.... 

aaxfe.... 



New 
Orleans. 



18 Cv.... 
I9j<a.... 
19 9-16®... 

20 a.... 

21X®.... 
22«®.... 



Texas 



18X«.... 

19JS«.... 

19 18-16 

203««.... 

2I»®.... 

23X*.... 



Below we give the sales of spot and transit cotton and price of 
Uplands e.t this market each day of the past week : 



■atarday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday. 
Thursday... 
Friday 



<:8 

425 
243 
884 
612 
671 



Total 6,332 3..34S 



Exp't. 



6 
574 

2,240 
873 
672 

2.015 



Con- Spec- Tran- 
sump, nla'n kit. Totai. 



227 
3 

174 
5 
21 



434 

1,326 
2,486 
1,933 
1,319 

2,707 



10,255 



Go^Kl Low MM- 
Ord'ry. Ord'ry. Mldl'g. dling 



^RICBB. 



;7x 



:8« 
i«X 

18V 
18V 
18V 



19X 
19X 
1?S 
19X 
19 K 
19X 



20X 

20X 
20H 
20X 
20<( 



For forward delivery the sales (including free on board), 

have reached during the week 67,600 bales (all low middling or on 
the basis of low middling), and the following is a statement of the 
sales and prices : 



For January, 
kales. eta. 

200 s. n 19H 

200 19V 

200 1917-32 

3,000 19 9.16 

50a. 1919-32 

ICO no not. be- 
fore 21st... 19X 

5,400 19K 

300 '.9 21-32 

1,000 19 11-16 

eOOs.n 19V 

80O 19V 

1,600 19.13-16 

13^ total Jan. 
For February. 

200 19 9-16 

S.900 n% 




9,800 total Feb. 
For March. 

8,200 19« 

3,000 1916-16 

6,300 20 

2,000 20 1-16 

1,100 20W 

100 20 5-32 

1,900 20 8-16 

500 JWX 

18,600 total March. 
For April. 
500 r.JM 8-16 



bales. eta. 

1.600 20W 

300 20 9-S 

3,150 20 5-16 

1,900 20H 

100 20 13-32 

1,000 20 7-16 

500... 20X 

t50 20 9-16 

1,500 20X 

11,400 total April. 
For May . 

1,200 ao« 

200 20 21-S 

1,000 JO 11-16 

2,200 20V 

400 JO 13-16 

SCO 20« 

1,600 20 15-16 



bales. 

1,300.. 



ct«. 
..21 



8,200 total May. 
For June. 

2,300 21 

300 21X 

700 21 S--! 

1,500 21X 

400 -21 jj 

300 2n-r« 

100. 21H 

5,600 total June, 
f or July, 

100 JllH 

200 2: 7-li 

100 21X 

400 total July. 



The following exchanges have been made during the week : 
l-ljc. paid to exchange 400 January for 40O February. 
5-lM- " 200 Januaiv for 200 March. 

10- 2,ftX» February lor 2,000 May. 

Weather Reports by Telegraph.— There has been rain on 
one day the past week at New Orleans— a heavy thunderstorm. 
At Mobile there has also been one rainy day : our correspondent 
states that plowing has now commenced for the next crop. It 
has rained on three days at Selma and two days at Montgomery. 
At Macon and also at Columbus there has been rain on one day • 
our correspondent at Macon adds that over three-fourths of the 
crop in that vicinity has been marketed. At Savannah it has 
been warm, sultry and wet. It was clear and pleasant the early 



January 13, 1873.] 



ite (Miiui^fctE. 



87 



part of the week at Charleston, but the latter part was rainy' 
They have had rain on three days at Memphis ; the crop is being 
Bent to market freely ; much competition is demoralizing the 
labor, and wajres are goinp up. The thermometer at Memphis 
has averaged 47, at C'harlebton 00, Columbus and Macon 4U, 
:}iont^omery 51 and Selma 54. 

Receipts and PaosrECTS op the Crop.— There seems to bo 
no little surpriso expressed by many that cotton is coming in 
so freely. We have so often and decidedly given our opinion 
with regard to the matter, that it is not neceswiry to repeat it ; 
and yet wo must admit tliat it is satisfactory to see It beinj; con- 
firmed so fully, now that some of the dilliculties in the way of 
the free movement of the crop have been removed. Wo have 
never for a moment seen any reason lor changing the opinion we 
originally expressed, that llie year's total cannot be less than tlxe 
minimum we gave in our estimate, Our advices to-night are that 
the receipts for nest week will continue to be liberal, and tliat 
New Orleans will show a larger total than for tho past week. 

India Chop. — On an editorial page we give some interesting 
compilations with regard to India cotton. The advices by mail 
from Bombay this week are to Deo. 7, and they contain an ac- 
count of the storm which was cabled to the Chbonicle and 
published in our issue of tho same day, Dec. 7. It seems that 
this rain extended from the 1st to the 5th of December, and was 
heaviest about Kbamgauiii, where nearly two inches were regis- 
tered. Our dispatch stated that considerable damage was feared, 
and we see by the mail reports received this week that such was 
the prevailing opinion at the time at Bombay ; but our later 
cable reports atato that tho damage was much overestimated, 
and that tho crop is now progressing very favorably. 

Bombay Shipments. — According to our cable dispatch received 
to-day, there have been 11,000 bales shipped from Bombay to Great 
Britain the past week and 15,000 to the continent, while the 
receipts at Bombay, during the same time have been 19,000 
bales. The movement since the first of lanuary is as follows. 
These are the figures of W. Nicol & Co., of Bombay, and are 
brought down to Thursday, Jan. 16 : 

,-SlilpmeiitB tills week to-, .— Shipments since Jan. 1 to-. Week's 
Great Con- Great Con- Total, receipts. 

Britain, tlaent. Total. Britain. tincnt. 

1873.... 11,000 15,000 26.000 17,000 17,000 34,000 19,000 
1872.... 15,000 2,000 17,000 49,000 9,000 58,000 47,000 

From the foregoing it would appear that compared with last 
year there is a decrease this year in the week's shipments to Great 
Britain of 4,000 bales, and that the total movement since Jan. 1 
shows a decrease in shipments of 24,000 bales over the cor- 
rsaoouding period of 1872. 

GuNNv Bags, Bagging &c. — Bagging has ruled quiet during 
the past week. We hear of sales of 600 rolls Boston at 12Jc. cash, 
and more can be had at same price, both in Boston and New 
York. Contracts (second hand), April and May delivery, can be 
bought at 13}(al4c. c.o.d. At the close we note some anxiety to 
sell OH holders' part. The market for bags is also quiet and with- 
out animation. There are several inquiries in the market, but we 
do not hear of any transactions having occurred. We quote 14J 
@14|c. as price asked. Butts. — Arrivals have further affected the 
market, and we note a sa!e of 2,500 bales ex ship at 2c. cash, 500 
bales in store at same price, 500 bales more at 2c. cash, 1,600 bales 
at 2^0. on time. The price now asked is 2 l-16@2c. cash, and an offer 
of 2 1-16 would buy one or two parcels. Contracts are dull and 
neglected ; can buy April and October delivery at 2 1-16(32 l-8c. 
gold, or equivalent in currency. 

Visible Supply of Cotton Made up by Cable and Telk- 
VRAPii. — By cable we have to-night the stocks at the different 
European ports, the India cotton afloat for all of Europe, and the 
American afloat for each port as given below. Froir figures thus 
received, we have prepared the following table, showing the 
quantity of cotton in sight at this date (Jan. 17) of each of the 
two past seasons : 

1873. 1873. 

Stock in Liverpool bales. 455,008 519,000 

Stock in London 216,000 179,000 

Stock in Havre 223,000 160,000 

Stock in Marseilles 13,500 16,000 

Stock in Bremen 36,000 12,.505 

Stock in Amsterdam 70,000 24,808 

Stock at Antwerp 36.000 13,343 

Stock at Barcelona 28,000 55,000 

Stock at Trieste 1,200 5,830 

Afloat for Great Britain (American) 231,000 169,800 

Afloat for Havre (American and Brazil)... 29,000 56,000 

Afloat for Bremen (American) 39,000 13,974 

Afloat for Amsterdam (American) 7.500 16,000 

Totallndian cotton afloat for Europe 81,000 204,000 

Stock in United States ports 503,91 8 51 1 ,226 

Stock in inland towns 87,530 96,706 

Exports from United States this week. . . 87,854 87,666 



Total 2,144,493 2,139,040 

These figures indicate an inereme In cotton in sight to-nigh ' 
of 5,452 bales compared witli the same date of 1872. 

Movements of Cotton at the Interior Ports. — Below we 
give tho movements of cotton at the interior ports — receipts and 
•hipments for the week, and stock to-night and for the correspond- 
ing week of 1873 ; 

,-Wcek ending Jan. 17, ISIS-v 
Receipts. Sbipiccnts. Btodc 



Augusta 6,403 5,195 13,410 

Columbus 2,028 1,264 10,917 

Macon 2,493 1,698 14,451 

Montgomery ».. 1,684 3,194 10,488 



—Week ending Jan. 19. '72 ^ 
Receipts, glilpments. Stock 
5,523 4,986 19,'358 
1,561 1,295 10,573 
2,139 2,301 13,829 
1,454 1,790 10,294 



Selma 1306 1,820 4,938 2,121 3,608 tXVi 

Mompkis 18,504 14,600 29,228 16,747 144>2a 80JIM 

Nashville 2,376 1,609 4,089 8J8a2 2,718 «;g70 

82,202 27,935 87,530 33,377 S«,ei5 M,70« 

* This U the stock at MoDtgonierjr to-niglit, lijr actual coaiil, belnc unir 11 kala • 
more than the rnnuinR count. ^ ' ■ "•' ■ 

The above total a show that the Interior stocks have iiureaud dor - 
Ing the week 4,404 bales, and are to-night 0,180 bales leu '^'"t 
at the same period last ye^r. The receipts have been IflSS b*}M 
leiu than the same weeli last year. 

The exports ot cotton this week from New Tork show a de- 
crease since last week, the total reaching 10335 bales, a^mlast 
16,305 bales last wei^k. Below we] give our table showing tb« 
exports of cotton from New lork, and their direction for each of 
the last four weeks ; also the total exports and directloa sioM 
September 1, 1872 ; and In the last column the total for the same 
period of the previous year : 



Exports ot Cotton (bales) flrom New Tork elaee 


S«»t.l 


1 18TS 


BXPOBTBD TO 


w»K siiDna 


Tetal 

la 
data. 


Bam* 
ilais 


Dec 
85. 

16,251 


Jan. 
1. 


Jan. 
8. 

16,081 


Jao. 
13. 


pr«T. 
r»ar. 




8,7M 


10,735 


«i:,9e7 

1S« 


MMn 
MB 


Otlicr British Peru 


Total to Gt. Brttalo 

Havre 


15,854 


8,7«« 

n 


16,061 


10,785 


SU,Otl 
1,U6 


18(,6M 
«T4 


Otlicr French ports 


lotal French 

Bremen and Hanover 


600 

too 


IT 
908 


m 


ioo 


i,n8 
n,tg« 

4,599 


an 


Other ports 


1,188 




Total to N. Europe, 

Bpain,Oporto& Gibraltar&c 
Ail others 


700 


900 


114 


100 


21,760 


6,CSB 
lilM 


Total Spain, &c 






*'*' 


__ 


2,607 


1,198 


Crand Total 


16.954 1 9,859 


16,206 1 10.88* 


1238.876 1 1M.118 



The following are tlio receipts of cotton at New Tork, Boston 
Philadelphia and Baltimore for the last week.and since Sept.1,1873 



BBOa'TB ntOH- 



New Orleans.. 

Texas 

Savannah 

Mobile 

Florida 

S'th Carolina. 
N'th Carolina. 

Virginia 

North' rn Porta 
Tennessee, &c 
Foreign 



Total this year 
Total last year. 



BIW TOBK. 



This Since 
week. Sept 1. 



l.fi.'iS 
1,625 
6,008 



60,6!6, 
88,07Gi 
99,2841 



This i Since 
week. Sept-l. 



2.555 
1,024 



14 

4,432 9.3 14.31 

'.fi~i', lB.970ii 

6,05S| 114,107, 

.... * 4 942 

.... 1,855: 



6b9 



85,1831 452..'.82; 



_30,1S1' 892.430 



7,5S8 
4,319 
24,294 1 

1,992 



',4921 

....[ 16; 

3,820 41,52.3; 

4.173 4i),830; 

8«3i 10,8 is: 

....,_ 58, 



16,418 141,390] 



7.1331119,701! 



rHiuDXLr u 



This I Since 
week.;8ept.l. 



887 



1,063 

70 

8,212 



8,418 



6,724 
106 



8871 24,612 



l,6S2l 28,676 



This Slice 
week. Sepi.1. 



701 
tfiU 




S,!:ao 64,034 



3.0961 48.719 



SHiPPma News. — The exports of cotton from the United Statea 
the past week, as per latest mail returns, have reached 104,709 
bales. So far as the Southern ports are concerned, these are the 
same exports reported by telegraph, and published in The ChbOH- 
ICLB last Friday, except (Jalveston, and the figures for that port 
are the exports for two weeks back. With regard to New York 
we include the manifests of all vessels cleared up to Wednesday 
night of his week : Total bale*. 

New York— T» Liverpool, per steainers City of Brookljo, 500 . . .llnitic, 
1,884.... Wyomltig, 2.255... Java, 683.. Niger. 2,197. .. .per fhlps 
Lake Superior, 318. .Don Quiiolo, 1,025. ., .City of London, 779 

....Royal Saion, 1,094 10,786 

To namlmrg, per Bteanier llanimonia, 100 100 

Naw Orlkans— To Liverpool, per steamers Corinthian. 2,060... Min- 
nesota. 2,930... per sliips Marlborough, 4.596... ZIml, 2,!.26 

Iharlcs Davenport, 3,459 Rowanlrce, 2,774 J. A. Thomson, 

3,899... North Star, 4,188.... per barks Uuke of Cornwall, 1,781 

....Guinevere, 2,739 81,811 

To Cork, per ships Riverside, 3,930.... Livingstone, 8,800.... per 

barkEmbla, 1.1;« 7,888 

To Havre, per ship Forest Eagle, 3,743 8,748 

To Barcelona, per barks India, 2.000. ...Virgin de Us Niavea, 878 

... per brigs Antonio, 448... Maria Isabel 190. ...Cells, 906 8,51 

To Malaga, pur bark Virgin de las Nieves, 600 80 

To Genoa, per hark Rome. 2,190 1,1(0 

Mobile— To Liverpool, per (hip Allsa. 4,040 4,010 

To Queenstown (for orders), per ship Svca, 1.990 1,180 

To Barcelona, per brig Glorias deMasnon, 868 888 

CH^nLBSTON— To Liverpool, per bark Investigator, 2,078 Upland and 81 

Sea Island per brig Santona, 700 Upland 1,810 

To Amsterdam, per barks Wentworth, 2,307 Upland Jrroina 

Jones, 2,194 Upland 4,601 

To Barcelona, j)er haik Clscar, 600 Upland per brigs Segundo 

Romano, 500 Upland 1,100 

Savannah— To Liverpool, per ships Cefcrina, 2,702 Upland Abble 

Ryerson, 3,573 Upland per barks Douglass Castle, 2,058 Upland 

....Esmeralda, 748 Upland.... Seraino, 1,654 Uphuid....Neder- 

land, 1,651 Upland 11,184 

To Bremen, per ships La Glolrc, 3,1559 Upland.... Roslgnol, 4,498 

Upland 8*098 

To .\m8terdaBi, per bark Susan M. Dndman, 2,245 Upland V^ 

To Malaga, per bark Dona Flora de Ponih„, 1,670 Upland I,f]0 

To San Sebastian, per bark Maria, 5S8 Upland 8M 

Texas— To Liverpool, per bark Bremen, S.OIH and 3 bags Ssca Island.. . 1,181 

To Queenstown, per bark Sea Gem, 1.555 1,665 

Baltijjobe- To Liverpool, per steamer Austrian, 700 780 

Boston— To Liverpool, per eteamers Siberia, IOO — Malta, 403 808 

PaiLADELPmA— To Liverpool, per steamer Potomac, 773 T78 



ToUk, 



iM,7«R 



88 



THE CHRONICLE 



[January i8, 1&73. 



The particulars of these shiiMaents, arraogfed in oar 
ue as follows: 

Liver- Qqccub- Bre- Amstr- Bar- 

pool, town. Cork. Harre. men. dam. celona. 

NewTork 10,735 

New Orleans 81,8« ... 7,368 »,748 8,517 

Mobile 4,040 1,980 868 

Charleston 2,810 4.601 1,100 

Savannah 18,284 8,055 2,225 

Texas 2,082 1,655 

Baltimote 700 

Boston 508 

Philadel^hU 7(8 



nsaal form 



Ma- 
laga. 


Total. 




10,8:35 


50(1 


48,640 




6,388 




8,411 


1,670 


24,822 




3,637 


, 


700 




503 




773 



Total 65,849 3,635 7,888 3,743 8,055 6,786 4,985 8,170 104,709 

Included In the above totals are, from New Tork, 100 bales to Hamburg; from 

New Orleans, 2,190 bales to Genoa, and from Savannah, 588 bales to San Sebas- 

tlao. 
Below we give all news, received during the week, of disasters 

to vessels carrying cotton from any port of the United States : 

The British ship Mont Eagle, Captain Scott, from New Orleans, Jannary 4, 
for Bremen, with a carco of cotton, was wrecked on Great Andrews, 
one of the Bahama Banks. Her mate and four sailors arrived bere in a 
boat yesterday, and report that the captain and the rest of the crew were 
in another boat, and are probably saved. 

Ship British Fbg, iron, 1,265 tons, Capt. Symes, sailed from New Tork Not. 
8, of and for Liverpool, with 69,281 bushels com, 41 pkgs. and 15 hhds. 
tobacco, 200 bales cotton, 22 bales leather chips and 1,800 staves, and has 
not since been heard of. 

The steimer Cherokee, from Pine Blufl' for New Orleans, with 380 bales of 
cotton, saved from the wreck of the steamer Little Rock, sank in Silver 
Lake, last Wednesday, and will prove a total loss. The boat was valued 
at $16,000, and was insured for $8,000 in Cincinnati and Louisville com- 
panics. 

TtuCARonA, 1,449 tons, of Philadelphia, Dunlevy, from Mobile, Nov. 18, with 
3,653 bales of cotton for Liverpool, sunk or foundered at sea near Cadiz 
prior to Jan. 14. 

LlOKE (Fr.), Lemercler, from New Orleans for Havre, was at the wharf at Key 
Wt'St Jan 7, reloading the cotton which was taken out of her while ashore 
on Tennessee Reef. 

Znn (Br.), Hatfield, which cleared at New Orleans Jan 7, with 2,926 bales of 
cotton for Liverpool, is reported by telegraph to be on fire below New 
Orleans on the 14th. 

QuZEN OF THE SouTD. at Galveston for New York, before reported, was struck 
by lightning near the head of the mizzenmast, and proceeding down- 
ward, it entered the hold of the vessel through the coping around the 
mast, and fired the cargo. The lower hold was tilled with barrels of mess 
beef, while the upper hold contained ninety bales of cotton. The hold 
of the vessel was filled with water. The llames were subdued sufficiently 
to enable the cotton to be taken out and landed on the whaif. The loss 
will not amount to more than $2,500, as the vessel was damaged but 
slightly. 

ExTLT. from Roanoke River, with a full cargo of cotton, was cut through by 
the ice at Norfolk, and sunk in ten feet of water. About 60 bales were in 
the hold, -Jan. s. badly damaged by water and mud. 

West Derbt (Br.). L'lan, from Mobile for Cork, before reported ashore on the 
Tortugas, and subsequently gotafioat, went on night of Jan. 4, near East 
Key. Capt. Uran arrived at Key West morning of 7th, in schr. In Time, 
which brought 50 bales of cotton from the vessel. 

(ioi.u, JQxc'iivN'jr; a.n'> if'ii^i.'sii rs.^Uold has fluctuated the 
past week between 1!1| and 113*. and the close was 112f. 
Foreign ExcliaD^e market Is steady. The following were 
the last quotationH : London bankers', long, 109|@109i ; short, 
110i@110|, and Commercial, 108i@109i. Freights closed at 
5-l()@|d. by stL-am iinu id. by sail ti) Liverpool, lj@l^c. gold 
by steam and Ic. by sail to Havre, and f d. by steam to Ham- 
burg. 

Br Telegraph from LiIverpool. — 

LrvERPOOL, January 17— 5 P. M. -The marketopened dull and closed heavy 
to-day, with sales footing up 8,000 bales, including 1,000 bales for ex- 
port and speculation. The sales of the week have Deen 49,000 bales, of 
which 2,000 bales were taken for export and 3,000 bales on speculation. The 
■toek in port is 455,000 bales, of which 98,000 bales are -American. The stock 
of cotton at sea, bound to this port is 285,000 bales of which 231,000 bales are 
American, 

Dec. 20. 

Total sales 113,000 

Sales for export 9,000 

Sales on speculation , 31,000 

Total stock 336,000 

Stock of American 46,000 

Total afloat 234,000 

'American afloat 141.000 

The following table will show the daily closing prices of cotton for the week: 
Sat. MIon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Pri. 

Price Mid.Uprd8.10>i©....10>i@ ...10 @10>i 10 ©.... 9%®W 9%®.... 
" Orlean8.10>i(a....lOJi@... 10K®10?< 10!i@ .. lOX®-'-.. 10>i@I0« 

Trade Report.— The market for yams and fabrics at Manchester is heavy 
and depressed. 

BRE ADSTUPFS. 

Fbidat P, M.. Jan. 17. 1873. 
'The markets for flour and grain have been somewhat irregular 
tliepast week, and close with an unsettled feeling. 

Receipts of flour have been quite moderate. The demand early 
in the week was small. Shicpers held off', and the local trade 
did not give any steadiness to the demand. Still, with the limit, 
ed offerings, there has been some hardening of prices, it being 
known that stocks are undergoing a steady reduction. Yester- 
day, however, developed some irregularity. Shippers took 5@ 
6,009 bbls., mainly at $5 for good No. 2, $6 50 for prime superfine, 
and $7.'40 for good extra Western, and these grades were 10@15c 
higher, bat in tlie better grades, especially family flours, there 
was some preB lire to Fell, vitli an occasional concession of 25c. 
per bbl., a line of choice Oregon flniii- being sold at $10. To-day 
the demand was moderate, and the only transaction of moment 
was 1,000 Ijbls. round Loop VVi .stern extra, at $750, delivered 
from store. 

Tho wheat luarliet Am raled dull and heavy until Wednesday, 

when there was some business at $1 61 for No. 2 Chicago, $1 65 

for di). NoTthwest, ■i;id SI 'If !nr dn Mil waukee, all afloat, and yes- 

.terday there was more activity, embracing No. 3 Spring, in boat- 



Jan. 1. 


Jan. 10. 


Jan. 17. 


76,000 


100,000 


49,000 


6,000 


3,000 


2,000 


7,000 


9,000 


3,000 


421,0(10 


446,000 


455.000 


63.000 


91,000 


98,000 


254,000 


247,000 


285,000 


204,000 


198,000 


231.000 



loads, afloat, at $1 54 @ $1 54^, and No. 2 Milwaukee in store at 
$1 65 @$1 66. Winter wheats have ruled dull. Receipts of wheat 
at the Western markets have been moderate, and the quantity 
reaching this market by rail is much below our wants. To-day 
there was a falling off in the demand, and holders contributed to 
a quiet market by asking advanced prices. No. 2 Northwest sold 
at $1 65 afloat, and No. 2 Milwaukee at $1 66 in store. 

Indian corn has ruled dull, and prices show a slight decline. 
The export demand has been fair, but the home trade have bought 
sparingly, finding their wants mostly supplied by the new corn 
received by rail. To-day, there was a limited business in prime 
mixed at 65JS66c for both old and new afloat. 

Rye has been dull and drooping. In barley there has been a 
large movement, mainly at $1 16@1 17 for Canada West, the 
market ruling very firm. Oats have been in better supply, and 
for two or three days past prices have been drooping, closing to, 
day quiet. 

The following are]closing quotations : 



Saperflne State and West- | 

em... ¥ bbl. {6 15® 6 60 I 

Extra State, Ac 7;30® 7 60 ! 

Western Spring Wheat i 

extras 7 85® 7 50 | 

do double extras 8 00® 9 00 I 

do winter wheat extras | 

and double extras 7 60®18 00 I 

City shipping extras. .. 7 75® 8 25 | 

City trade and family I 

brands 9 00®11 50 | 

Southern bakers' and fa 

mlly brands 9 50®ia 00 | 

Southern shipp'g extras.. 8 CO® 8 75 I 

Rye flour 5 75® 6 60 1 

Cornmeal— Western, Ac. 3 30® 8 65 I 

Corn meal— Br'wine, &c. 8 85® 4 00 | 



ORAnj. 

Wheat— No.2spring,bu6h.$l 60® 1 68 

No. 1 spring .. 1 78® 1 7S 

Red Western 1 75® 1 80 

Amber do .. 1 86® 1 98 

White 1 85® 2 10 

Corn-Western mixed 63® 6« 

White Western 67® 70 

Yellow Western 6"@ 68 

Southern, white 72® 75 

Rye— State and Canada. . . 92® .... 
Western 90® 

Oats— New Black 46® 

Chicago mixed 49® 

White Ohio and State... 61® 



49 
51 
64 

Barley— Western 90® 1 10 

Canada West 1 14® 1 18 

Peas— Canada 1 12® 1 40 



The movement in breadstuffs at this market has been as follows 



-BBCEIFTS AT NEW TORK.- 



-1873.- 



Same 



-EXPORTS FROII NEW YORK. , 



For the Since time Jan. 



Plotu-, bbls. 
0. meal, " . 
Wheat, bus. 
Com, *' . 
Kye, 
Barley,&c 



week. 

47,707 
3,509 
163,020 
154,200 
375 
40.825 



Oats 197,000 



Jan. 1. 

77,869 

5,50S 

332,665 

a56,<)00 

600 

91,775 

409,391 



1, ;S72. 

89,966 
4,187 

50,631 
655,750 

123,93b 
225,102 



•1873. 
For the Since 



-1872. 
For the Since 



week. 

26.997 

2,991 

159,814 

230,699 



Jan. 1 

42,665 

4,703 

371 517 

421,074 

4Vobb 

675 



week. 

18,889 

2,744 

157,573 

835,669 

9,893 

SOO 



Jan. 1. 

51,099 

7,171 

255.9H7 

799,898 

27,883 

1422 



The following tables, prepared for The Chronicle by Mr. E. 
H. Walker, of the New York Produce Exchange, show the Grain 
in sight and the movement of Breadstuffs to the latest mail 
dates : 

aSCEIPTS AT LAKE AND RIVER PORTS FOR THE WEEK ENDIUa 
JAN. 11, AND FROM AUG. 1 TO JAN. 11, 

Kye- 

bo»h» 

(Dli lbs.) 

18,893 

10,290 



Chicago... 

Milwaukee 10,301 

Toledo 4.99S 

Detroit 8,06J 

Cleveland *3.500 

St.LouiB .. 14,279 

Doiuth 

Total 96,914 



Flour. Wheat 

bbls. ))neh. 

(1961hF.> (601bs.) 

24,274 195,700 



Corn. Oats. Barley 
Iinsh. bueh. bush. 
(561bB.)(321bs.)(481bs, 



107,075 

105. .S05 

47,312 

38,259 

25,148 



398.690 
10,000 

206,400 
46,635 
25,550 
41,070 



161.173 
12,660 
5.3,387 
25,032 
11,660 
25,671 



69,0.35 
13,802 
2,600 
5,133 
4,400 
5,280 



3,357 



Previous week 
Oorresp'ng week,'72 

" '71 

'70 

" '69 

" '68 

Total Aug. 1 to date. 

Same time 1871-72, 

Same time 1870-71. 



65,303 
, 83,716 

79,769 
, 84,688 
, 145,927 

55,217 
.2,585.747 
,2.780,348 
.3,121,114 



Same time 1869-70. .. .3,266,963 



618,799 

643.161 

401,856 

538,948 

35:1,444 

555,139 

186,460 

30,7:K,076 

29,921,461 

28,750 996 

31,654,188 



788.245 

850,287 

1,438.328 

606,383 

185,914 

445,701 

648 601 

28,915.077 

27,.333,053 

18,912,211 

14,794,629 



289,573 

343.328 

349,600 

1.54,836 

165,688 

198,589 

178,852 

12. 197,284 

I.5,fi83,060 

11,416,479 

9,494,992 



100,250 

110,477 

100,255 

29,227 

30,854 

24,230 

40,809 

6,439,946 

4,9:!5,5:39 

4,468,185 

8,578,677 



82,540 

45,it69 

42,705 

19,694 

13,111 

39,308 

17,217 

1.075,794 

2,016.);40 

1,036.619 

1,049,513 



* Estimated. 

Shipments of Flour and Grain from 
Toledo, Detroit, St. Louis, Cleveland and 
ending Jan. 11, and from Dec. 29 to Jan. 11 
Flour, Wheat, Corn 

bbls. " " 
83,789 
43,626 
67,417 
60,314 
57,272 
127,415 



Chicago, Milwaukee, 
Duluth for the week 



Weekending — 

Jan. 11, 1873 

Jan. 4, 1873 

Corresp'ng week 1872 
Corresp'g week 1871. 
Cotrresn'g week 1870. 
Total Dec. 29 to date. 

Same time 1872 128,458 

Same time 1871 119,654 

Same time 1870 112,664 



bush. 

120.005 
66,722 
33,644 
38,930 
92,392 

186,727 
63,088 
65,371 

189,073 



bush. 

270,683 
104,977 
371,948 
213,358 
38,563 
375,660 
711,517 
401,450 
808,893 



Oats, 
bush. 
141,959 
187,418 
180.581 
64,170 
34,646 
279,377 
210.574 
89,312 
65,262 



Barley, 
bnsb. 
54,397 
93,313 
88,888 
16,819 
4,875 

147,710 
91,147 
51.227 
11,572 



Rye- 

bnsb. 
6.130 
5,300 

14,498 
1,387 
4,740 

11,4.30 

23,667 
6,922 
8,571 



receipts OF FLOUR AND ORAIN AT SEABOARD PORTS FOR THE 
WEEK ENDING JAN. 11, AND FROM DEC. 29 TO JAN. 11. 



Flonr, 

At bbls. 

NeiF York 45,636 

Boston 20,238 

Portland 2,500 

Montreal 6,300 

Philadelphia 13,160 

Baltimore 12,427 

New Orleans 10,127 



Wheat, 
bush. 
184,420 



3,500 
48,400 
10,628 



Corn, 
bush. 
148,800 
40,674 
6,500 

60,'466 
32,400 
87,845 



Oats, 

bush. 

205,650 

45,658 

1,80« 

49,500 
10.600 
18,558 



Barley, 
bush. 
22,000 
40,014 

2.iob 

17,000 



Rye, 

bush. 

125 

1,150 



246,918 360,019 38.\666 101,114 1,775 

195,955 204,376 276,778 100,713 1.775 

99.879 753,640 194,952 89.845 S,662 

442,903 664,395 602,444 201,827 3,550 

196,179 1,508,878 367,044 178,463 6,882 

The Visi ble Supply of Grain, including stocks in store at 
tho principal points of accumulation at lake and seaboard ports, 
in transit by rail, and frozen in New York canals, Jan. 11, 18V3 : 



Total 110,388 

Week ending Jan. 4... 75,149 

Cor. week 1872 143,414 

Total Dec. 29 to date.. 185,537 
Do. same time 1878.. 242,898 



January 18, lh78.) 



THE CHRONICLE. 



89 



Wheat, 
hn«h. 

In store at New York and afloat l.ni.aSQ 

In store at Albany 5,(i00 

In store at BnlTalo 30,')J5J 

In store at Chicago* 1,324",I13 

In store at Mi Iwaukce 888,0<)0 

In store at Diilnth 77.000 

In store at Toledo 268,968 

In store at Detroit 176.161 

In store at Oswego* SBO.OOO 

In store atSt. Louis 626,7M 

In store at Boston 16, JS6 

In store at Toronto 63.333 

In store at Montreal 1«,130 

In store at Philadelphia* 90.000 

In store at Baltimore* ISO.OOO 

Rail shipments for week imOOS 

Amount on Now York canals 54,120 



Total 6,687.850 

Total in store and in transit Jan. 4. 73 5 658.867 

" " Dec. 28. '72 8,248.973 

Dec 81,'7a 5.699,213 

" " Jan. 13,'72 10,555,405 

• Estimated. 



Corn, 
bush. 

4,74^.961 

23.000 

246.786 

2,25.\6I0 

36,000 



87,5.37 

228.000 

137,582 

47,.394 

2.735 

355,206 

265.000 

50.00) 

270.681) 

184,457 

9,.352,3I8 
9.394.619 
9,595.398 
9.a67..367 
8,939,589 



Oata, 

bnsh. 
1,367,081 
Si.MK) 
87,437 
990,190 
192,000 

177,759 

47,702 

2,078 

138,8.35 

44,364 
4,094 

66,214 
120,000 

50,000 
14I,9.19 
85,200 

3,686,8;9 
3,604,719 
3.414,08) 
8,.^70,76S 
6,066,702 



B«rl«7, 
bush. 

671.051 
806,000 

83o,a»i 

358,230 
88,000 

ll!882 

88,267 
170,000 

82,187 
101.963 

69.801 
9,677 

10,000 

54 ,.397 
78,138 



2,2.65.035 
2. 416.563 
2,8fi8.865 
2,5;i5,739 
2,036,737 



GROCERIES. 

Friday Evknino, Jan. 17, 1873. 
There hag been an improved demand for raw sugar during the 
past week, and with a continued fair activity in tea and molasses, 
and a very excited dentand for coffee, the general market for gro 
ceries has shown a fair degree of animation. The distriliutive 
outlet for all goods remains fairly active, and second hands are 
purchasing to a fair extent The tea trade is not very active as 
yet, but the supplies in the country are very light, and there is 
likely to be a more liberal movement as soon as the spring trade 
fairly sets in, which will not be until money becomes somewhat 
easier. 

TEA. 

The strength manifested by holders, and their Indisposition to sell except 
at full rates, have made buyers rather more ready to operate, especially as 
their wants have biicome somewhat pressing. The result has been an increased 
business during the cnrrent week, and a good inquiry continues up to the 
close. The latest news from the Cliinese markets report settlements for the 
United States light and the market somewhat depressed in consequence of the 
nuravonble advices from this country. Some settlements had been efl'ected 
at a shade easier rates, and there seems to be a slight probability now that we 
will be able to land some teas here upon which importers can at least realize 
cost. The country is undoubtedly pretty bare of stock, and a steady demand 
for lines is looked for. The demand for invoices is Increased both on account 
of immediate necessities and to supply future wants. Oolongs show a marked 
Improvement in the demand, and are also stronger, though still moving at 
about last figures. Greens liave sold freely, and are held at full rates. Japans 
rule steady, and have sold fairly since our last. Included in the transactions 
made public are I0,i45 half chests Oolongs, 5,100 do. Greens, 4,256 do. Japans ■ 
and at anction 800 half chests Oolongs and Japans at 25@67c. 

Imports at New York the past week have included 843,162 lbs. green and 
18,S87 lbs. Japan, per "Cashmere," from Shanghai; !i9,231 lbs. black and 707.- 
381 lbs. green, per " Conqnuror," from Shanghai ; 44,800 lbs. black, and .34,300 
lbs. green per " Archos,'' from Whampoa. At Boston, 174,979 Ibs.black, per 
"Kin Lin,'' from Amoy. The receipts indirectly have been 250 pkgs. by 
steamer and 8,761 by rail overland. 

The following table shows the imports of Tea Into the United States 
from January 1 to date, in 1873 and 1^7^: 

itlaek. Green. Japan. Tota . 

Atlantic ports, IBIS... lbs. MS.eiS 1,622,380 1,417.^62 3,R69,317 

Atlantic ports. ISTi 593.260 341,896 12,2S0 953.436 

The indirect receipts at New York, principally overland receipts from San 
Francisco, have beer; 4.499 pkgs. since Januaryl. against 3.932 last year. 

Imports at San Fninci.-co from Jan. 1 to Jan. 11. 1872, were 1,873,809 lbs. of 
China and 2,212,128 lbs. of Japan tea. 

CUFFBE. 

Continued activity in the Jobbing and invoice demand, with further advices 
of a favorable character from Rio have been very beneficial to our market for 
Brazil coffees during the past week, and the firm tone noted in our last report 
is still apparent, with prices fully IXc higher on all grades, the advance 
occurring chiefly during the closing days. The transactions have been liberal 
both here and at the outports, and the supply is not large. The bulk of the 
sales have been on consumptive account, only one cargo, so far as reported' 
having been taken upon speculation. The " Asteria " brought 4,200 bags of 
Rio, and this was taken np by a speculator at 17KC., gold. This cargo is 
retained in our figures of stock. The burning of the "Erie" ofl' Pernambuco 
with 28.000. bags of Rio on board, helped to cause the advance in our market, 
and with the strong speculative feeling that now exists It will not be surpris. 
ing if prices go higher. The India grades had sold freely since our last in a 
jobbing way, but sales from first hands have been restricted by the illiberal 
ofi'eringB. Java's have sold to a fair extent in a jobbing way, and close very 
firm with rumors of some buriness from first hands, but no particulars obtain- 
able as yet. A cargo of Singapore is said to have been sold in Boston, but we 
are without the details. The sales were 1.033 bags Rio ex " Adelaide Pender- 
gast;" 2,000 ex " Merrimack," 4,000 ex "Favorite," 4,511 ex " Bessel," 4,200 
81 " Asteria," at njic on speculation. 1,281 Santos ex "Antelope," 4,060 
bags Rio ex " Augaste," 5,178 ex " Caroline," and 800 ex " Spain," all here. 
At the outports, 3,200 Rio ex " Asta," 3,600 do. ex " Sjogasten," at Hampton 
Roads. 1,500 do to arrive at Mobile per '-Hannibal," 300 per " Tre Sostre," 
and 4,300 per " Haufa." at New Orleans. l.OOOper "Amazon," and 2,000 per 
" Lapw,ng," both at Baltimore. 

Imports at New York the past week have included 4,092 bags Rio, per " Ade- 
laide Pendergast," 4,200 do. do., per " Asteria." 4,000 do. do., per •' Favorite," 
25,157 mats Java, per "Competitor:" 5.241 bags Maracaibo. per "W. A. Heney," 
1.811 do. do., per "LonisaD., "6,750 do. St. Domingo, per "Oliver," 686do.d,o.. 
per "C. F. Mayo," and 1 654 do. sundries. 

The stock of Rio Jan. 11, and the imports since Jan . 1, 1873, are as follows : 



in Bags. 

Stock 

Sume date 1872.. 

I31 porta 

" In 1872., 



New Plilla- Baltl- New Mobile, Gal- 
York. delpUla. more. Orleans. &c. veston. Tota). 
47.788 .. 11.39J 8,684 6.o09 .... lixm 
83,774 .... 29,182 13,(100 10.9UU 5,'4U 115,818 
i4.6<i .... 23,808 128,868 8,109 .... 108,417 
11,391 279 17,682 .... 8,0(10 %Hi tiflU 



Of Other sorta the stock at New York. Jan. 11, ud the imporu at ±e Mraal 
pons since January 1 , 1878, were ai followe : •"»■• 

,„h.„. -NewTork^ Boston, rblladel. Ball. K. Orle'a. fia 

in Dans stock. Import. Import. Import. Import. Unport. ti 

Java and Singapore f2,»25 'fi.ets 'lI.Ta f""- ""i~"- imrmt. gj 

f'fivUin 1A afi« ' '111 •••• ••*• B^ 

h 



tnyi"" ; Ujtu 

Maraealbo 4,|2S 

Uljuayra M7 

St. Domingo 

Other i,ik 



ToUl 

Same time, iro.. 



IU,7U 

loJm 

I.3M 



I3JJS 

1x0 



i.ii* 



■ Inclndea mau. *e.. 





:::: 


n 


"m 


m6 


w 


tAlM, 


t7,«l uiau. 



reduced to bags. 

HCGAH. 

At the opening of the week and for > few dayi following the demand for 
raw sugars was extremely light, the lame iDdlepoeltion to operate being ap- 
parent on the part of refiners In the absence of pressing BCCMsltice on their 
part. Holders did not press sales to the extent of offering conceesloos, Iml 
the market was far from being strong, and the basis of SQSXc- 'or 'air to 
good refining Cuba was chiefly nominal. For the part two days there has been 
a little more Inquiry from refiners, whose wanU have become somewhat mor 
pressing by the reduction of their stocks and a slight Improvement In tlie 
trade in refined sugars. The Increased sales have steadied tbe market, and 
holders show more firmness at the dose. For refined sugsr the oatlet Is 11m. 
ited. bnt hards have become somewhat stronger, and are qnoted at fall pre- 
vious rates. Softs continue steady, and are selMng In a limited way. The 
transactions in raws since our last report Include : IM hhds. molasses sugar at 
8Xc.; 800 Porto Rico, 8X®9Xc.; 8,841 bxs. Dcrosne at 10Q,10)<c.; 80 bhds. 
clariflcd St. Jago, »}ic.; 1,133 hhds., 1 tea., and 85 bbls. MarUnlqae at SKc; 
10 hhds. Dcmerara at 9)ic.; 5,500 bags, brown Pernambaco, B^e.; 250 bhds. 
new crop MnBcovado,9;ic.; 8,163 bxs. Havana, 8M®9c.; 4,840 bag* Paralirba 
atSVOSHc. 

Imports atNew York and stock In first hands Jan. 11, were a* follows : 



Imports this week . . 
" since Jan. 1. 
" same time, -72 


Cubs, 
bxs. 
8.548 
8.257 
12.«69 

5.1.737 
23.6W 
W.797 


Cuba. 

<bhds. 

441 

3J6 


P. KICO. 
•hhds. 
495 
l,0li0 


Other. 

•bhds 

601 

2,MS 

ua 


Brssll.Manlls.*c 

113.101 
2SS,-.72 

man 


Jtelado 
khde. 


Stock In first hands. 

Same time 1872 

■• 1371 ... 




22.212 
25.911 
21.762 




741 



mOLASSBH. 

The principal feature of the market has been the demand for domestic 
qualities which continues active, and is about all the trade there Is to report 
Refiners are in the market and would be moderate buyers If the ofl'crlngs of 
stock included anything suitable for their uses. As It Is there is nothing offer. 
ing except the low grades, which are too poor for refining purpose'. The call 
for foreign grocery qualities is extremely limited, the demand for this grade 
being supplied mainly ft'ou domestic stockt. There hsvo been s few small 
lots of English Islands grocery sold at full prices, but the call for most forclgr 
descriptions Is barely sufficient to establish rates. There has been a libera' 
movement In New Orleans molasses, both from auction and In a regular waj. 
The extreme high rates of last week have not been reported this week, and 
the sales are pilncipally within a range of 68c. ® 72c. Syrups remain Terj 
strong, with very little molasses stock and the production of sugar symps 
barely sufHcient to meet the current trade requirements. The high price Of 
domestic molasses is Increasing the demand for symps and supplies are kept 
well reduced. We note sales to the extent of 70 hhds. Porto Rico at SS^SOc, 
in lots, and 1,500 bbls. New Orleans at 64®72c. 

The receipts at New York, and stock In first hands Jan. 11, were as follows : 



Cuba, 

•bhds. 

I'nports thlsweek 


P. BIco, 
•hhds. 

27 
27 

■iSSi 
2.439 

131 


Demerara, Other 

•bhds. 'bbds 

73 169 

too IM 

103 173 


k.O. 
bbls 

2,539 
7.181 


" sametimel872 


<^ 




548 

2,091 

581 


ijm 


" same time -73 1,252 
" " same time '71 5.768 


6,aa) 

3JX0 



Imports ot 8nKar ^k nolaaaea at leaillnx porta alnce Jan. 1 

The Imports ot sugar (includi np Molado), and of Molasses at the leading pons 
from January 1, 1873, to date, have been as follows : 

<— Moiessss. — 



1873. 
New York .... 3,257 

Boston 

Philadelphia 

Ilaltlmore 4,22<i 

Kew Orleans... 25 



. Sugar.- 

, — Boxes.- . . — 'Hbde.- 



1,772 
1,2110 
2,448 



1873. 

5,317 
531 
SI'S 

1.423 
Hi 



1872. 

2,713 
398 
404 

2,169 



, Bags. . 

t1873. 1872. 
88.13S 12JU0 
42 921 2,134 



1873, 
1,014 



Total 12,508 17,837 8,C49 5,717 159J)62 1i,8$4 '..H 

■ tneludlnirttarcos and barrels reduced to bbdS 
t Inclndes jaskets, &c., reduced. 

WHOIiESALB PRICES CURRENT. 

ColTee. 

Rio Prime gold. 30 a2UX 1 Native Ceylon Kold 

do good gold. 19X919)4 j Maracalbo 

do fair gold. I8Viiai3H ' 



»S 

18 
»JS 
404 5«t 

S< .... 



do ordinary. 
Java, mats and bags. 



.gold. n!,9!7S; 
gold. 19 a^l 



Java mats, browc gold. 20 



IS all 

- gold. l8K31t 

Lagnayra goid. IS^'IsK 

8t Domingo gold. 14 •'.... 

umsica low. 18 mrnt 



...•9K 
9149 9X 
S«9 9X 

9«(cin 



Brazil, bags 

Manila, bags. . . . 

White Sugars, A 

do do B 



do 



Cuba, ml. to com. reining — 

do fair to good refining.... 

do prime 

do fair to good grocery — 

do pr. to choice grocery.., 

do centrllngal, hhds. & bxs. .. 

lo Melado 4V9 7 1 

10 molasses !><•!* 

aaT'a,Box,D. S.Nos.7to9... 81<9 6K 1 

do do do 10 to 12.. 9H9 9H 

do do do lSto15.. •K9IOi> ,' 

do do do 16to18.. I0H9I1X I 

do do do 19to2l).. UM«i>k I 

Rice. 
Hangoon dressed, gold In bond 3X9 3X I Carolina.... 
Spice*. 



923 I Mocha 4Iold. 

Saear. 

Sk I Havana, Box, white ll)<9!i; 

' ' Porto Rlco.reflnlnggrades... Wjr " 
do grocery grades. . , 




IIX9-, 



Yellow sngsrs.. 
Cmshed 



do eitrac! », fJlK 



lltWIVK 
«I8K 



i^msoea • Si5i3 

Powdered ."iwiSS 



Granulated . 



»K91*K 



i 9* 



Cassia, In cases... gold V lb. 27 9 2'H 
Cassia. In mats — do — 9 21 
OInger.Race and Af (gold) 10X9 11J< 

Mace do 1 17 91 g 

Vatmegs, casks 9S 9 M 

•<q cases Penang it 9 .■• 



Pepper, In bond (gold) 

do Soma ra 4fc Singapore 
Pimento, Jamaica... (gold; 

do In bond do 

Cloves do 

do In bond.... do 
IClorestems do 



«S18 



7Xfl 
U 9t — 

U • IT 



80 



THE CHRONICLE. 



fJanuarjr 18, 1878. 



Pralta and Niitn. 



Rsuuu.ueeaicsn, nw 9 rrall.4 si)%9 .... 
do Layer, :s:a. » boi.a 00 a .... 

do tiultanii.V D ima !3H 

JO Valencia,* » fjf® PH 

do Loose Mu8cale]8,...2 4C &'i St) 

Currants, iifw t* it. 113^9 .... 

Citron, I^nhori) (now) SI 4 40 

PrunSB.jFrench liH» 13 

Prunes, Turkish, old <a .... 

do new 8 & 

iJate« «J,'(a 6X 

Flics. S'nvrtta lift. 9 (id 14 

Canton Olngcr.r.»se... 8 0" &9 50 

Almonds, Lan»,'ucdoc 'iO & 

do TarrftKona ISV® 

do Ivlr.a 18>4@ 

do Sicily, son sholl <• 

do Shellod. Sicily... SJ « 

■lo paper sliell & 

8«rdln«a K hi. box. 90 (^ 

■ardlnnii 41 or, box. £iJ>ia 

VrazllKils new 11 «• 



19 
19 



31 



nx ' 



I Airican Peanut* A 

Kllbcrls, Sicily 12«® 

' do Barcelona .. 11X« 

1 Walnuts' Bordeaux 9H® 

Macaroni, Italian llh® 

1 DOUXSTIC DBIED TBTJITS. 

Apples, SUte *tt. ex* 

Ao sliced SX® 

' 00 Western * 

f do Southern, good.... 5 » 

I do prime " ® 

I do sliced, new 9 (9 

I Peaches, pared 14 fl 

I do unpared,qr8&hlve 4%a 

I Blackberries ''»® 

I Cherries, pitted W S 

Pecan Nuts I* lb. i (ft 

Hickory Nuts Vbusli. ...® 

Clicstouti do ... e 

I Peanuts, Vn.u'd to tncy ol 1 

1 do CO new 1 ^ 

do 'iTlI.,i;'dtobcBl<l9. 1 tO 



Brown Staeetlngs 
and i<iliirttne:ii. 

Width. Price. 



S ■■ . 

»l 80 
• 1 



Agawam F. . 
AlbionA.... 
Arctic B. .. 
Atlantic A. 

do D.. 

do H. 
Appleton A 

do N 

AngrrtR 36 

Bedford R... 80 

Boott 34 

do S 40 

do W.... 4R 
roncBtogo D. 28 
Cabot A. ... as 



33 



THE DRY GOODS TRADE. 

Fbidat, P.M.. Jan. n. IStS 
There liaa beon a very slight improvement in the demand for 
unbroken packages during tlie current week, and the volume of 
trade is wholly devoid of any semhlance of speculation. Agents 
are firm holders of nearly all descriptions of goods, both cotton 
and woolen, and the present range of values ofTers but little 
margin for speculative purchases. This has the natural conse. 
quence of restricting jobber's purchases to about actual require, 
ments, and few are purchasing with any degree of freedom ex- 
cepting those from remote cities. The Texas and California 
trade are buying moderately, through their representatives here, 
of staple goods that they can ship by slow and cheap lou'es, and 
there is some disposition shown by some of the larger houses 
here and in other near-by cities to lay in supplies of the leading 
makes of cotton goods, which are in very small supply for this 
period of the year, and are not likely to be offered in very liberal 
amounts. There is a goo3 degree of firmness in the market for 
all descriptions of goods, with prices somewhat higher on leading 
makes of bleached fabrics. The recent failures abroad, coupled 
with some small failures here, have created an uneasy feeling in 
the trade, though more confidence is felt now, and there is no 
apparent probability of further troubles. 

Domestic Cotton Goods. — There has been a limited call for 
brown sheetings and shirtings, the demand coming mainly from 
the jobbin;; trade of the more distant cities. Local buyers have 
not shown much disposition to purchase, although they are pick- 
ing up a few goods, principally of the leading makes, which are 
in short supply, and consequently likely to advance. The market 
is already stronger on many of the fine grades, and agents are 
asking a slight advance, but for the most part quotations are not 
changed. Bleached sheetings and shirtings are very strong, and 
gome of the finer grades of light weights are held at an advance 
of ^c. per yard. The supply of bleached goods has seldom been 
80 light as it is at the moment, and the strong tone is fully justi 
fied. Cotton drills are not inquired for to any extent for the ex- 
port trade, and the market is only moderately active on home ac- 
count. Canton flannels remain dull. Colored cottons are selling 
in a limited way, and bring very full prices. There has not 
been much activity in the demand for prints, and the only sales 
effected are of a few choice dark effects tor current distribution, 
and of medium colorings for the interior, to make up spring 
stocks. All goods are firmly held at full quoted rates. , 

Domestic Woolen Good.s.— There has been more inquiry 
from the clothing trade for goods for the manufacture of their 
spring stocks, but excepting this very little demand is reported. 
Agents are showing their samples of spring goods more freely, 
and a few sales of choice goods have been made to jobbers. Cas- 
simeres are held very firmly, and the current prices will be 
fairly remunerative if maintained. Cloths and doeskins are not 
selling very freely as yet, but what sales are making realiae full 
prices. It is too early for any very liberal offerings of fancy 
Bpring woolens, and the market is, therefore, without important 
feature of interest. 

FoREuiN Goods.— The inactivity which has marked the trade 
In foreign goods throughout the portion of the year which has 
expired continues, and no improvement was observed in any 
department. Some of the importers are withdrawing their spring 
importations from bond, but evince no disposition to to offer them 
for sale during the present dull spell, and none of the jobbers 
show any movement as yet. Staple silks and worsted fabrics are 
held firmly in price, but are quiet and in light request. Thus 
far our imports have not been so heavy as they were last year, 
and it is thought that the amount will be somewhat restricted 
during the entire year. 

Vt'i- annex few particulars of leading articles of domettic 
uaaufacture.i i prices quoted being those of leading Jobbers : 



Dwight X 

do Y 

do W.... 38 
Indian Head. 7-8 
do ..48 
Ind'n Orchard 



11 
lOX 

u" 

ISX 
13>i 
14 

12 

m 

13 

13 

IBX 

11 

13 



.37 11-1 IX 



A 

do C. 
do BB. 
do W. 

Laconia O 

do B... 

Lawrence A., 
do D.. 36 
do XX .1« 
<lo LL. 36 
do J.. 40 
do Y.. 36 

Nashua fine O 33 

do 11.... 36 

do E.... 40 

do W.. 48 

Pepperoll — 7-4 



Jo 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Ul!ca . 

do . 

do , 

dn flii.i Noil 4(l)i 



8-4 

9-4 

...10-4 

...11-4 

...12-4 

«6" 

... 48 



Broivn Drills. 



12 

12 
20 

U)4 

13 

12 

11 

13X 

lax 

12>i 

PW 

14 

1.1 

12 

15M 

12>^ 

13 

14>i 

II) 

19 

in^ 

30 
32>i 

37i,f 

42X1 

49 

16X 

25 I 

Six 

I'W 



Width. Price. 
Pepperell . . 6-4 27X 
do .... 7-1 30 
do .... 8-4 82X 
do .... 9-4 87X 
do 10^ 42X 

do ....11-4 47X 
PoccasBet F 83 W)i 

Ctica 6-4 2.5 

do Nonp 4-4 18 

do 9-4 60 

do 10-4 55 

do .... 4-4 11H 

do heavy 36 17>i 

do XX 10-4 65 

Wameutta.. 45 26 

do .... 40X 22 
do HH 36 19 

do XX 36 19 

Print*. 

Price. 

American llji 

AmoBkcag 10 

Bedford 8>i 

Cocheco 12 

Garner & Co.... ll-llX 

Gloucester IIX 

do mourning UM 

Hamilton IIX 

Lodi lOX 

Manchester 11>4 

MerrimacDdk. .. ll>i 
do W pk and pur. 13 

do Shirting. 11)4 

Pacific IIX 

Richmond's 12 

Simpson 2d Mourn. IIX 
do black* white. IIX 

Spragnu'sfan IIX 

Glazed Cambrics. 

Amoskoair SX 

Garner 8X 

Harmcny 8-8X 

Ittanville »yi 

Pi-quot 8X-fl 

Red Cross 8X 

VictoryH 8X 

Tickings. 
Amosk'g ACA. 



Canton Flannels. 

BROWN. 

Amoskeag A in . .23 20 

do B... .29 12 

do H 28 17 

Ellerton N ... 23 

do 20 

do P 18 

do 8 18 

do H 2« 

Everett T 13 

do X 14X 

do XX .... 18 

do XPX 22 

Tremont H 12X-13 

do A !6>i-17 

do X 20 

do XXX.... 25 

Hamilton Stout... 17 

do XX 80 

NasiiuaXX ii)i 

do A 16 

Pembcrton D 15 

BLKACBSD. 

Amoskeag BB...29 26 

do A.... 29 21X 

do AA. ... 27 

do EX plueh 27 17X 

Ellerton WN 28 

do N 25 

do P 20 

Tremont T 16 

Stripes 



15 



15X 
15 

MX 
15 



Amoskeag, 

Augusta 

Laconia 

Langley B.. .. 14 

Pepperell 

Stark A 

BPclicd isiiectlngs 
and Shirtings. 

Amoskeag. 40 19 

do 42 16X-17 

do A. 36 !6 -16X 

Androscog- 
gin L 36 16X-16 

ArkwriHWT3(i 17 

Aubnrn 36 15X-16 



Albany 

Algodoa 

American 

Amoskeag — 

Arlnvright 

Easton 

Hamilton 

Jewett City.. . 
Whittenton A. 

do BB.. 

do C. 



7K 
12X 

1.9-14 

18-19 
19 
14 

16-17 
12X-13>tf 
17 

14-16 
13 



Albion . . . 4-4 

Bartletts... 36 

do .... 33 

do .... 31 

Bates 45 

do XX.. 46 

do BB... 

do B.... 
Blacks tone 

AA 

Boott B... 

do C... 

do 0.... 
E:iertonWS4-4 
Fruit of the 

Loom .... 36 16X-n 



36 
33 



36 

36 



30 



11 

16X 

13X 

12 

19 

18 

16X 

14 

15 , 
14X 
13X 
12X 
13X-14 



ar't Falls Q 36 

do 8 31 

do A 32 

do M 32 

Lonsdale... 36 

do Cambric 36 

N. Y, Mills 36 



15X 
12 
13X 
13 

;6x 

22>tf 
20 



30 

do " A.. 24 

do B.. 21 

do C. 10 

do D.. n 

Cordis AAA.. 23 

do No. 2. 21 

do No. 8. 21 

do No. 4. 19 

do No. 5. 17 

do No. 6. 15 S 

do No. 7. 14 

Easton A. .. . 12>i 

do B 12 -12X 

Hamilton 19 

Lewiston A... 36 30 

do B... 30 21 
Denims. 

Albany 13 

Amoskeag. 25 

Algodon 13 

Bedford 14X 

Boston 12X 

Beaver Cr, AA 21 

Chester D'k B 13X 

Everett 25 

Haymaker Bro 13X 

Lewiston 

Manchester... 20 

OtisAXA 22 

do BB 2C 

doCC 17 

Corset Jeans. 

Amoskeag 13 

Androscog'n sal 15 
Canoe River.. lOX-H 



'I 9to6J 



30-38 
40-46 

26 
24 
34 



Cotton Dock, 

Sail (luck, 22in.- 
W'db'ry, 
Fl'tv/ing 
Druid 

Light ducii— 

Bear dnck (8oz.) 

do heavy (9 oz.). 

Mont.Raven829in 

do 40in. 

Bags. 

American 32 00 

Amoskeag 32 00 

Great Falls A. 34 00 
Ludlow AA.... 34 00 

Lewiston 34 00 

Ontario A 37 60 

PowhattanA.. 35 00 
do B.. 42 50 

StarkA 37 50 

do C3bti8h 36 00 



Hallowell Imp 
Ind. Orch. Imp 

Laconia 

Nauinkeagsat. 

Pequot 

Suffolk 



13X 
12X 
13X 
1616 
14X- 



Domestic GiUK* 
liams. 

Amoskeag 15 

Bates 14 

I Caledonia 125tf 

Chicopce 12)i 

Glasgow 13 

Gloucester 11)4 

Hartford 12Jf 

Lancaster 14 

Manchester 12 

Namaske 14 

Park Mills 14 

Peabody 12 

Quaker City 12X 

Renfrew 14 

Union 12>< 

Spool Cotton. 
Brooks, perdoz. 

200 vds .... 
J. &P. Coat's 
Clark, John, Jr. 

& Co 



70 
70 



70 



IinPOBTAXIONS OF DRV GOODS AT TUB PORT OF 
NEAV YORK. 

The importations of dry goods at this port for the week ending 
January 16, 1873, and the corresponding weeks of 1873 and 1871 
have been as follows : 

ENTERED FOR CONSCMPTION FOR THE WEEK ENniNQ .TANUART 16, 1873, 



Manufactures of wool. . 
do cotton . . 

do silk 

do flax 

Mlscc11aneou8 dry goods 



. 1871 

Pkgs. Value 




. 1873 , 

Pkss Value. 
926 $551,548 
463,591 
482,144 
192.825 
191,697 



1,349 

665 

964 

4,128 



Total 3,567 $1,316,129 3,723 $l,a57,56T 7,932 $1,881,306 

WITHDRAWN PROM WAREHOtTSE AND THROWN INTO THE MARKET DURING THB 
SAME PERIOD. 



olannfactures of wool 554 $229,168 

do cotton.. 578 147,387 

do silk 175 2:J3.717 

do flax 1,035 190,310 

Miscellaneons dry goods. 389 24,435 

Total 2.731 $824,907 

Add cnt'd for consnmpt'n. 3,567 1,316,129 



Total thrown upon m'rk't 6,298 f2.141,03« 7,570 $2,290,766 19,871 $2,849,443 




$.358,104 
262,650 
134,457 
179,294 
.33,633 



ENTERED FOR WAREHOUSING DURING SAME PERIOD. 



Manufactures of wool 

do cotton . . 

do silk 

do flax 

HIsccllaneone dry goods. 



629 
931 
120 
6.52 

80 



Total 2,4181 

Add cnt'dfor consumpfn, 3,567 



$223,646 
256.443 
93.7.36 
120,178 
29,816 

$729,819 
1,816,129 



4M 

a'io 

257 
503 

693 

2,661 
8,723 



$211,532 
2.50,942 
246,383 
) 49,40! 
45,8.32 

$904,155 
1,357.667 



828 

1,441 

423 

669 

B.906 



$a'i9,669 
653, '.72 
407,885 
170.677 

e3,:oi 



13,206 $1,554,394 
7,983 1,881,805 



•I entered at tbc port. 5,085 1(1,045 948 6,384 {<,26l,7<2 «I.198 $S,48S.6W 



Jauaary 18, 1873.] 



THE OHRONICIJE. 



91 



Industrial Exhibition. 



The Estimated Income 

or THE 

Indastrial Exhibition Comp'y ii $2,643,400. 

READ THE REPORT BELOW, 

AND TOU WILL BE SATISPIED THAT AN INrSaTMEKT 
MADE IN THE BTOCK OP TUB 

Industrial Exhibition 

C O m P A KT » 

IS SAFE. 

The first »2,000,000 of the stock Is offered at 80 ; 

after Feb. 1 no stock will bo sold at lesa 

tbaa par. 

NoTB— Any bank In New York will receivo »nb- 

ecriptlon. 

Ab the cost of each lot la abont $4,700, an Invest- 
ment of that amount in this stock will entitle the 
holder to a "Lot" value in the property. 

We, the undersigned, members of a special com- 
mittee appointed at a piiblic meeting, presided 
over by John A. DIx, at the St. James Hotel, on 
Friday, December 13, 1872, were Instructed to 
examine and report as to the desirability and 
practicability of securing for New York a perma- 
nent Industrial Exhibition Building, Art Gallery 
Public Library, and Garden of Plants, and more 
eapeclally as to the value and fitness of tba land 
contracted for, have the honor to report : 

.Kr»(— That the Induslrial Exhibition Company 
is a properly organized corporation, under a special 
Act of the Legislature of the State of Now York, 
with full power to purchase land, erect buildings 
and to do all other things necessary for the com- 
pletion of the objects above enumerated. The 
property of the Indnstrial Exhibition Company Is 
exempted from taxes and assessments for five 
years, and its stockholders are free from personal 
liability, and generally all powers are granted to It 
that will facilitate its objects. 

5«;<mi— That the Industrial Exhibition Company 
of 1870 contracted for the land between Ninety- 
eighth and Onc-IIundred-aud-Second streets and 
Third and Fourth avenues, comprising in all eight 
blocks of ground, besides the unopened streets and 
avenues. The price agreed upon was $1,700,000, of 
which $800,000 have been paid ; that there remains 
due $1,500,000, which must be paid on or before 
Feb. 1, 1873, or the contract for the land will ex- 
pire and all moneys paid be forfeited. 

The deed of this land has been executed to the 
Industrial Exhibition Company, and is held in 
escrow by the Union Trnst Company, to be deliver- 
ed whenever $1,600,000 shall be paid. Your Com- 
mittee have consulted with eminent real estate 
men as to the value of the land, and the lowest 
estimate placed on It after deducting all the streets 
(which are as valuable for the purposes of this 
Company as any other portion), is $1,820,000 (and 
the streets being valued, at $2,4i8,(K)0) . As we 
understand, this is the only piece of land in one 
location, owned or controlled by individuals, large 
enough for a World's Fair, lying south of 110th St., 
and Its central location is proved by the fact that 
all the steam railroads running Into New York 
have a side track on this ground. As an engineer- 
ing necessity, any rapid transit railroad that may 
In future be built must go within four hundred fect 
of this property, if not directly uyon It. The 
property is solid rock, and at Ninety-eighth street. 
Third avenne, and One-Hundred-and-Second street 
there is an abrupt elope. It is estimated that this 
peculiar formation will save at least $1,000,000 in 
the preparation of this ground for such a building 
and building foundations as are proposed. The 
Industrial Exhibition Company contracted for this 
land in 1870. It was regarded as a good purchase 
then, and has increased in value eince, and will 
continue to increase. 

7AtT<<— The citimated cost of a snitable building 
is about $7,00n,(XX), and in snch an edifice all New 
Yorkers will feel a just pride. 

Fmtrth—K proposition has been made by an 
emlTient New England firm to conxlrnct a dome 
over the court, which dome shall be i ho largest and 
most magiiiftccut in the World. All this firm ask 
is that they be granted a pirpctual lease of the 
dome, above the spring of thci arch, subject to 
reason.ihle conditions. The estimated cost of this 
dome is $a,(XX),(XX). Sufficient bonds will be given 
for the performance of their contracts. 

Ftfih. — Your committee is of the opinion that, if 
a sufficient amonnt of the stock of this Company is 
sold to acquire a free and unincumbered title to the 
land, there will be no difiiculty in raising all the 
money requisite to erect a building. 

Sixth—It this laad Is purchased and work com- 
mcnced at onceon the buildinir, we hope the Con- 
gress of the United Stales will so favor the enter 



Republic. Tills need not interfere with the proposed 
centennial" celebration In Philadelphia, but ai 
wo Now Yorkers I'annot but feel that « o may cele- 
brate In our own way and In onr own city so Impor- 
tant an occasion, and we also feel that if the 
world Is to be brought together In a granil 
competitive exhibition in that year, that New 
York, being the commercial mctnpolis of the 
whole country, such worWa fair should be held 
hero At no other place could the millions of 
v.sitors be accommodated. Financially, we bi-lleve 
that the land la worth more than la to be paid for 
It ; and If the enterprise is carried out as proposed 
we do not see any possible chance of leas. In view 
of these facts— 

K 'l ^'« "commend, first, that a aerlea of moetlnga 
pe held for the purpose of awakening the peoiile 
to the imporlancc of this enterprlie 

2. That a committee be appointed who shall, 
without delay, prepare a suftablo memorial and 
present the same to Congrcaa, and that aach Com- 
mittee hav.o power to ask Congreaa to aire auch 

d • Tn"""" "' ""''' '" ""*'' "P'"'"" •>• thought 

3. Also, a committee who shall confer with the 
Mayor and Aldermen, as well as the Department of 
Public Parks, with a vle>v of obtaining anch privl 
leges as municipalities have ordinarily given to 
snch enterprises. 

4. Also, a committee to confer with the Governor 
of the State and the Legislature, with a view of 
obtaining such endorsement aa will add to the 
dignity of the enterprise. 

.5. Also, a committee to prepare an address to the 
people of New York, the country, and the world 

6. Also, committees selected from the difl'erent 
branches of industries, to obtain subscriptions to 
the stock of the Company from their respective 
associates , 

We furiher recommend that here and now sub- 
scription papers be circulated. Your Committee 
believe that this cnter|)ri»e Is sound financially, and 
if it is carried out thai it will benefit every person 
in New York and prove of great advantage to the 
whole country, and they de earnestly recommend 
It to the serious conaidcratlon of all the people 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 
A. S. DIVEN, 
SAM SLOAN, 
RK'IIARD SCHELL, 
KRASTUS BROOKS. 
11. B.CROSBY, 
JAS. L. JACKSON, 
EDWARD ROBERTS, 
PAUL N. 8P0FF0RD. 



WM. M VKK.MII.YE, 
RICIURI) sell ELL 
LP MORTON 
C1IA8 L. TIKPANT 
ANSON P HTOKKH 
FRED DE PEYHIKH 
HA.MUKL SLOAN 
PAl'L N SPOFFOIIO 
ALFRED B DARLI.-^i 



A. V. STOUT, 
WM n WKBB 

ir* 



V. 



H.\,Mi t.i. MA^^ ^ 



COMMITTEES APPOINTED. 

The above report was unanimously adopted, and 
subscription papers were distributed among those- 
present. 

Action was then taken in reference to the appoint- 
ment of committees, and the following gentlemen 
were unanimously appointed; 

Oenehal C0M.MITTEB— a. S. Diveu. S. Sloau, 
Richard Schcll, H. B. Crosby, J. L. Jackson, Edw 
Roberts and Paul N. Spofford. 

COMMITTKE TO MEMORIALIZE CONORBBS— C. K 

Garrison, A . 8. Divcn, H. B. Claflin, Oouvemenr 
Morris, W. H. Appleton, W. H. Webb, J. J. Aator 
W. B. Ogden and E. D. Morgan. 

Committee on New York— George Opdyke, 
Jonathan Rturges, Auson Phelps Stokea, Paul N 
Spoft'ord, .\rabro3e C . Kingsland, Ch . H . Rnssell 
John H. Sherwood, Geo. Bliss, H. M. Taber, and 
Robert MoCafl'erty. 

CO-MMITTBE TO PREPARB AN ADDRESS— Elliot C 

Cowdin. William Cullen Bryant, George Wm. Cur- 
tis, J. M Bundy, Fletcher Ilarper, William M 
Evarts, William Barnes, S. B. Chittenden, W. W. 
Phelps and Oswald Ottendorfer. 

Committee to Confer with GovERNea and 
Legislatitre — Richard Schell, James M. Brown. 
Erastus Brooks, Robert H . Pruyn, Francis Skiddy,' 
Russell Sage. J. E. Williams and B. M. Baltchford! 

Committee on Mechanics and Industries— 
Salem H. Wales, John Roach. Deinas Barnes, Geo 
Quintard, Willis Blackstone, J. F. Winslow, AlbcK 
Steinway, D. D. Badger and Ch. L. Tiffany. 

The following snbacriptlona bare been made : 

JOHN A. Dix $2.;,ooa 

A. S DIVEN and others 50,000 

PAUL N. SPOFFORD 20,000 

EDWARD ROBERTS 35.000 

RICHARD SCHELL, WM. H. WEBB, ' 

SAM SLOAN. H. B. CROSBY, wrf. 

F. CARY, JOHN F. HENRY. W. H. 

RAYNOR. JAMES R. JESSUP, 

RICHARD KELLY, J. MATTHEWS, 

and others 396,000 



Total $516,000 

After Feb. 1 no etoclc wIU be offered at less than 
par. 

INDI7STRIAL EXHIBITON COm. 
PANT OF NEIV VORK. 

Gov. JOHN A. DIX, President. 
ALEX. 8. DIVEN, Vice-President. 
D. D. T. MOORE, VIcePreeldent. 

DIRECTORS. 

JOHN A. DIX. 3 W. 2l8t at.. Gov. of New York 

WM B. OGDEN. Chicago, 111. and High Bridge, 
New York. 

AS. DIVEN, Vice-President. Erie Railroad. 

D. D. T. MOORE, Publisher Moore'a Rural New 
Yorker. 

J D, BAGLKY, Wall street. New York. 

H. H DURKEE, Pearl street. New York. 

L. G. BAHTLETT, 40 %V. 31st street. 

R. J. TODD, ','! Cedar street. 

JEWETT M. RICHMOND, Buffalo, New York. 

F A. ALHERGE11, liufTalo, New York. 

Whenever $2.0OO,(XK) of stock shall have been 
subscribed for. and paid in, a Shareholders' Meet- 
ing will be csUcd to elect the Directors. 



_ „ The fol- 
lowing named gentlemen have consented to serve 
as additional Directors. If elected : 
WM. F. HAVEMEYER ADRIAN ISEUN, 

me uae-tinnareatn Birthday of this our freeit I. H. rROTHINGHAM. 8. B. CHITlKNSJBN. 



ELIAH HOTCHKIBH 

ALEX H DIVEN, I'lK IIAHI) schkLU 

SAMUEL SLOAN, KIt.\xTLS BK jr/KS 

H. B CROSBY, JAMKS L JArKSOJf 

PAUL N. SPOFFORD. EDWARDItoMKKTS' 

being a apeclal Commllleo for (h.- pur „f «„. 

pointing committee, from ench lir 
and fcr localities dir tlly liiier' - 
completion of the project whMi !, 
rated by the Indurlrljil E»liil)lil<m (.cuiijjaiiy, \li , 
the eatabllahlngln New York of a cryiul pahira 
to bo naed aa a perpetual »i>rld'a fair, have the 
honor to announce the follnwliig appolntnirnla. 
Owing to clrcamslano'S bivond our control «6 
have been unable to «eo cich of the gontlemea 
below named, but we feel ronlldint that none of 
those whom we have •elected will refni-e lu spend 
a small portion of his time bi'lween now and the 
first day of February next, for the pur|io»e of 
making. In this, the commercial metropoll" of the 
Western Hemisphere, an inaiitudon which will 
tend to elevate all of the jMHiple. 

We have made the committees to repreaeot each 
trade and commercial pursuit. 

If we have overlooked any brnnch of bnslneaa wt 
shall regard It «a a special favor to be comnmnlcat- 
ed with and a suitable coinmittcn recommended, 
which will be at once appointed. 

t^ach committee named below I,* re<|ueiited to 
meet, elect from amon^' Its nnmber a chalmutn, 
and organize for active work. 
Each committee may add members . 
A full reiiort of the work done shonld be for- 
ward<>d to the special committee on Jan. 29, 187$, 
and we request that the ori(;lna! «nbscrip!iona be 
fonvardod to the fnion Trnst Company, 7.3 Broad- 
way, each day. 

A full expUinatloD haa been sent each member of 
the committee. 

BANKS ABOVE CANAL ST 

Richard Kelly President K flh National EUak 

Addison Smith i'risideul Harh m Bank 

C. Schwarwzaelder Pn nident Gennania Bank 

Edward Schcll. President Manhitiaii SaNin;;ii Bank 
Richard Williamson. . . President Bull's Head Bank 

BANKS LOCATED EAST OF BROADWAY AND 

BELOW CANAL STKI'RT 

T.J. 8. Flint President (•••^ "»ank 

ThomasA. Vyso Nlu; ink 

N. Hayden ink 

Robert Lennox Kennedy B«..~ .., . ..niurrre 

BANKS LOCATED WEST OK BROADWAY AND 

BELOW CAN.VL STREET. 

S. R. Comatock President Cillzins' Bank 

S. B. White Prcfldeut (;ronr.' Bank 

A. V. Sloo* Shoe and Leather Bank 

IRON MANUFACTURERS 

J. B. Cornell 13V Centre at 

Architectural Iron Workc, E: Utb at and Avenne V . 

Abram S. Hewitt 8t Joho at 

James L. Jackson. . ...'... .315 R. Twenty-eighth a i 

TRUST COMPANIES. 

I. H. Frothlngham TSBrnadwar 

J. A. Stewart 49 Wall at 

STEAM RAILROADS. 

Sam Sloan •» Exchange Place 

Wm. D. Bishop N. 11. R. R 

P. H. Watson Kr.e R. R. Office 

Sidney Dillon ^s Wall >t 

Wm. H . Vanderbtit 469 Fifth avc 

HORSE RAILROADS. 

Thnrlow Weed Broadway and Second are 

Wm. Remsen Madiron avo 

Robert Sqalrea Belt Railroad 

Henry Hart 

STAGE LINES. 
Madison are Fifth avc. 

INSURANCE AfiENTS 

AlligerBroe 10 Pine at 

James A. Rhodes 187 Brcadwajr 

C, L. North IGO Fulton at 

GE.\ERAL BUSINESS. 
Drexel, Morgan A Co. 

James Ha id 1 in Wnll at 

Dn", Barlow & Co I my 

J. M. Bradstreet & Co .ly 

L. A. DeshoDS ,i .t 

S. M. Pettengill A Co .iTrmk row 

OH. P. Anier. 

J. Gerson .IfiO Brindwa; 

Albert Wellea 07 Unlver^lty place 

C^TUS Cleveland 39 Wall at 

Hugh Allen Pier T, North Illver 

Munn <& Co -;r,,]kl?ow 

H. C. Dexter i 1 ,1 st 

J. J. Spronle • \ ^ , il-'iise 

Jay Cooke* Co .ti Wall st 

Union Adams &Co w. ,,.... 637 Bn-adway 

ChasZinn ,fc Co 4m BniadiCay 

E. B. Pond. 

Cortlandt Palmer, Jr 346 Broadmy 

Wm. Blake. 

NOTE BROKERS 

Blake Bros. £Co 52 Wall at 

E. C. Bogart * Co 47 WIMam at 

JohnB. Summerfeld & Co «H Wallet 

Badgley &Mead 72 Wall at 



STOCK BROKERS. 

Frank Work M Broad at 

John L. Rogers 18 New M 

Robert L. Catting, Jr., A Co 19 WillUm at 

L. T. Hoyt 46 Exchange Ptoeo 

J. A. Jameson M Broad st. Banker 

BANKERS. 
W. W Sherman 
i Mr. Lukey, of A. Belmont A Co. 
Chu. 0. Diokey, of Brown Bnithen Jk Co 



92 



THE CHRONICLE. 



[January 18, 1873. 



FislsA Hatch 5 Nassau st 

Henry Clews & Co 33 Wallet 

O. D. Ashley A Co 37 New 8t 

Wm. Seligman & Co aiBrondst 

GOLD BROKERS. 
Trevor, ColRatc & Co 47 Wall »t 

PRINT WORKS. 

Garner & Co 61 Worth st 

Wm. H. Locke 815 West Thi: y-sixth et 

W. W. Freeman & Co North Adains, Mass 

Harvey Arnold & Co North Adams, Mass 

Hamilton M'f'gCo Lowell, Mass 

American Print Works FaM Hlver, Mass 

Hon. C. Adams Cohoes, N. Y. 

A. & W. Sprague Providence, R. I. 

COLORS AND DYE STUFFS. 

Rnmpff & Liitz 42 Beaver st 

Plckhardt & Kuttroff 2:) Cedar st 

Beach & Co Hartford, Conn 

J. C. BloomHeldA Co 11 Dey st 

PIANOS AND ORGANS. 

Mason & Uamllu 696 Broadway 

Albert Weber 108 Fifth ave 

Docker Bros 83 Union square 

Geo. Steck & Co 25 East Fourteenth st 

Chickering & Sons 11 East Fourteenth st 

BAGS AND BAGGING. 

W. B. Asteu & Co 25 Pearl st 

Cottrell Bros 6 Broadway 

Williamson & Goodhue 9 Water st 

BILLIARD TABLES. 

Kavana^h & Decker 154 Centre st 

H. W. Collender 738 Broadway 

Geo. E. Phchai 7 Barclay st 

CCMMITTEE.FOR HARLEM. 
Addison Smith : 2,979 Third ave 

B. P. Raynor 61 West 124th st 

Wm. B Asten 50 East 123th st. 

E. H. Brown 211 West 125th st 

Jordan L. Mott 90 Beeknian st 

COMMITTEE FOR YORKVILLE. 
Edward Roberts. Chas. <rary. 

Hedden. A. C. Quackeubush. 

Thomas Rntter. 

COMMITIEE FOR WESTCHESTER COUNTY 

AND .\DJOINING LANDS. 

Wm. B. Ogdnn 62 Wall st. 

Gouverneur Morris. 
Wm. C. Rhinelander. 
Wm. Browning. 

Hoyall Houghton 243 Lexington ave 

PAPER. 

Vernon Bros. & Co 65 Duane st 

Hall & Bryan 76 Duane st 

Liebenroth cSb Von Auw 50 and 52 Franklin st 

Jespup & Moore 123 William st 

Campbell, Hall & Co 114 Nassau st 

GROCERS. 

Park & Tiltord 920 Broadway 

Acker, Merrall & Condit Broadway and 42d st 

Campbill ifc Galway I,2a3 Broadway 

HughB. Jackson 182 Fifth ave 

W. S. Corwin & Co 1,1.38 Broadway 

Dow S. Kittle 716 Third ave 

TEA IMPORTERS. 

Cary & Co 90 Pine st 

Olyphant, Son & Co 140 Pearl st 

Carter, Hawley & Co 140 Pearl st 

John O'Donohue's Sous * 88 Front st 

FURNITURE AND UPHOLSTERY. 
Pettier & StymusM'f'g Co.,cor. 42det. & Lexing- 
ton avenue. 

Herter Bros 877 Broadway 

L. Marcott & Co 29 East Seventeenth st 

Bruuer & Moore 75 King st 

C. Schwarzwaelder & Bros 9 East Broadway 

Roux & Co 827 Broadway 

Degrafl' & Taylor 89 Bowery 

B. L. Solomon & Sons 667 Broadway 

GAS FIXTURES. 

Mitche'I, Vance <feCo 597 Broadway 

Archer Paneoast M'f'g Co ^.70 Wooster st 

Covell. Gray & Co ."154 Broadway 

Geo. II . Kitchen & Co .591 Broadway 

Fellows, Hoffman & Co 631 Broadway 

CARPETS. 

W. & J. Sloane 665 Broadway 

Hadden & Co 83 Chambers st 

Bigelow Carpet Co 1G2 Worth st 

CARRIAGE GOODS. 

8. A. Martine & Co II Warren st 

Lnnt &Lee 99 Chambers st 

EXPRESS COMPANIES. 

W. B. Dinsmore "..55 Broadway 

L. W. Winchester 63 Broadway 

Geo. Stoker (i3 Broadway 

John Hoey 59 Broadway 

W. G. Fargo 113 Broadway 

A. H. Barney 291 Broadway 

Alex. Holland 85 Broadway 

ART DEALERS. 

Knoedler & Co cor. Fifth ave. and 22d st 

Wm. Schaus 749 Broadway 

John Snedecor 768 Broadway 

8. P. Avery 82 Fifth ave 

REAL ESTATE. 
V. K. Stevenson 11 Pine st 

E. H. Ludlow &Co 3 Pine st 

Homer Morgan & Co 9 pme st 

A. J . Bleocker & Co 77 Cedar st 

John Lloyd & Sons 7 Warren st 

Wm. H. Raynor & Co 5J^ Finest 

Chju. McCrae 70 Cedar st 

Robert McCafferty 654 Fifth ave 

SUGAR REFINERS. 
Havemeyer&Co 98 Wall st 

F. O. Matthiessen & Wlechers. irfi Wall st 

Wm. Moller & Sons 99 Wall st 

Ockershausen Bros 81 Wall at 

E. L. (fc A. Stuart 169 ChambersK 

STRAW GOODS. 

Vvse & Co 637 Broadway 

Oliver Carpenter & Co 637 Broadway 

^ SEWING MACHINES, 

Wbeeler & Wilson 625 Broadway 



Domestic 96 Chambers st 

Florence 29 Union square 

Remington 29 1 Bowery 

Grovcr & Baker 876 Broadway 

Weed 61.1 Brojidwjiy 

Sccor H97 Broadway 

CIGARS, IMPORTERS. 

0. W. Paber 36 Beaver st 

Mlchaelis & Levin 393 Broadway 

De Barry & Kllng 52 Broad st 

TOBACCO, IMPORTERS. 
P. Lorillard & Co. 

William Agnow's Sons 284 Front st 

M. & E. Saioman 86 Maiden lane 

Martin H. Levin 162 Pearl st 

Connelly & Gardner Fr»nt st 

J. P. Koruechan. 

UMBRELLAS. 

Wm. A. Drown & Co 493 Broadway 

.lohn J. Smith ; 285 Broadway 

Isaac Smith's Sons & Co 405 Broadway 

ML. Rau & Co 360 Broadway 

IMPORTERS OF GLASS. 
A. C. Downing & Co 67 Beekman st 

D. 8. Schank & Sons 27 Chambers st 

Simon Bache & Co 134 Duane st 

Flelschmann <fc Co 38 Warren st 

Julius Palme & Co 6 College place 

Hoos'jvelt & Son 94 Maiden lane 

Noel, Saurel & Antoine 22-25 Howard st 

E. .\. Hoyd 79 Murray st 

METALS. 

Phelps, Dodge & Co 11 Cliff st 

Naylor & Co 99 John st 

Hendricks Bros. & Co 49 Cliff st 

Bussing, Crocker & Co .32 Cliff ft 

Lucius Hart & Co 10 Burling slip 

T. B. Coddington 27 Cliff st 

Bruce & Cook 190 Water st 

John S. Dickerson & Co 29 Cliff st 

DRY GOODS JOBBERS. 

Eldridge, Dunham & Co 340 Broadway 

S. B. Chittenden & Co .328 Broadway 

E . S . Jaffray <fc Co 350 Broadway 

Cochran, Mcljeau & Co 4R4 Broadway 

Arnold. Constable & Co 881 Broadway 

Lord & Taylor 895 Broadway 

Peake, Opdj'kc & Co 427 Broadway 

FANCY GOODS AND NOTIONS. 

1. tt A. Uluinenthal ,377 Broadway 

Ilecht Bros , 483 Broadway 

Howard, Sanger & Co 105 Chambers st 

Ve J . Magnin, Guedin & Co 652 Broadway 

Rosenfeid Bros. & Co 357 Broadway 

Schuyler, Hartley & Graham 20 and 22 John st 

Strassburger, Ffeiffer & Co 394 Broadway 

Althof, Bergmanu & Co., cor. Park place and 

Church St. 

IMPORTERS OF DRY GOODS. 

Benkhard & Ilutton 144 Duane st 

Escher & Co 73 Broome st 

Kutter, Luckemeyer & Co 61 Worth st 

A. Rush & Co cor. Grand and Greene sts 

Passavant & Co 222 Church st 

Paton & Co 341 Broadway 

E . Oelbermann & Co 64 Worth st 

Hardt &Co 60 Worth st 

Baucndalil & Co 86 Worth st 

C. A. Auti'mordt <fc Co 10 Greene st 

Richard Isclin & Co 839 Canal st 

F. Butterfleld, Jacobus & Co 189 Duane st 

DRY GOODS COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Almy & Co 65 Leonard st 

Anthony & Halt 66 Leonard st 

Denny, Poor & Co 72 Worth st 

Frothingham & Co 110 Worth st 

S. S. Fischer 74 Worth st 

Hoyt Spragucs ifc Co 107 Franklin st 

Jas". L. Little & Co 69 Leonard st 

Lord, Debost & Co 47 Walker st 

John Slade & Co 66 Worth st 

Snauldlng, Hunt * Co 80 Worth st 

\V hltteinore, Peet, Post & Co 346 Broadway 

FURS. 

CO. ti anther's Sons 602 Broadway 

Martin Bates & Co Mercer st 

J. Kusz'ts 457 Broadway 

Wm. Moser 481 Broome st 

Nichols, Burtnett & Co 477 Broadway 

LUMBER. 
Wm . G . Gra ut & Son . . . . Foot of Thirtieth st, E . R 
Watrous, Wilsou &. Co. 
J. H. Havens Fifty-sixth st and Eleventh ave 

D. C. Newcll& Sous. .Pool of West Nineteenth st 

J. W. Stevens & Bro Fifty-seventh st 

A. W. Budlong corner 11th ave and 22d st 

STONE. 

H. B. Caswell Bigelow Blue Stone Co 

Walter R. Wood & Co 283 Front st 

Babcock, Bralnerd & Co. .Foot of E. Forty-eighth st 
RUBBER GOODS. 

Col. Greeley, of Tillotson & Co 8Dey st 

A. S. Gatcbel 31 Cortiandt st 

H. G. Norton corner Barc'ay and Church sts 

R . G . Allertou & Co Broadway, near Fulton st 

HARNESS, SADDLERY, &c. 

Hoover, Calhoun & Co 362 Broadway 

Harmer. Hays & Co 72 Beekman st 

Henry A Seaman & Bro Chambers st 

C. M. Moseman & Bro 114 Chambers st 

W. Gibson 793 Broadway, near Eleventh st 

G. H. Norton & Co 57 Murray st 

IRON MERCHANTS. 

Marshall Lefferts, Jr 94 Beekman st 

Abeel Bros 365 Water st 

Cha« Congrove & Son 104 John st 

Eggleston Bros. & Co 166 South st 

BUILDERS. 

Elisha Sniffeu 183 Eldridge st 

G(0. W. Y'oung. 

Jeremia'i T. Smith 213 West Fiftieth st 

Thos. McClellan Seveuty-fourih st 

Geo . J . Gregory 143 East Forty-ninth st 

JohnGiifflu. 
John McCool . 

JEWELRY. 

Titlaiiy & Co Union square 

Ball, Black & Co Broaclway 



Wm. Ruhl 2 Uaiden lane 

Randel, Baremore & Co 58 Nassau st 

C. A. Stevens 869 Broadway 

Thos. Kirkpatrick 8^9 Broadway 

Stephen Ricliardson 177 Broadway 

WATCHES. 

Joseph Brunner 28 Maiden lane 

J. E. Hyde's Sons 22 Maiden lane 

Wm. F. Ladd 19 Wall st 

Ciias. Rubens & Co 25 Maiden Ian" 

Paul A. Brez 23 John st 

Jules D Huguenin-Vilemin 44 Nassau st 

HenryGiunel 31 Maiden lane 

PRECIOUS STONES. 

Philip Bissiuger 12 John st 

David Bruhl 5 Maiden lane 

Henle Bros 16 Maiden lane 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 

Wm. Kurtz 872 Broadway 

Nap. Sarony tJ8C Broadway 

J. Gurney & Son 108 Fifth ave 

M. B. Brady 785 Broadway 

Bogardus & Bendann Bros 1,163 Broadway 

Chaa. D. Fredericks & Co 587 Broadway 

STATIONERS. 

Brower Bros ... 293 Broadway 

Geo. F. Neshitt &Co 16-> Pearl st 

Eberhard Faber 132 William st 

Willy Wallach 41 John st 

PRINTERS. 

Kennard & Hay 89 Liberty st 

Pool & McLaughlin 205 East 12th st 

Hallett & Brun 58 and 6fl Futon st 

J. 6. Ilallenbeck 113 Fulton st 

John C. O'Brien 26 William st 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 

Howes, Hyatt & Co Cor Grand and Greene st 

Benedict, Hall & Co 131 Grand st 

Dubois, McGovern «fc Co 343 Broadway 

James Wiggins & Co 85 Chambers st 

Melvln, Ti-ask & Ripley 29 I'ark Place 

HIDE ANT) LEATHER DEALERS. 
Loring, Andrews & Son 61 Cliff st 

C. B. Fosdlck &Son 26 Spruce st 

Fraser, Major & Co 9i Cliff et 

Hoyt Bros 72 Gold st 

Matthisons & McCoy 98 Cliff st 

Schultz, Sonthwlck & Co 65 Cliff st 

Thomas L. Smull 46 Frankfort st 

Fred. M. Maas 174 William st 

Jonathan Thome 624 Fifth avo 

COAL DEALERS. 

R. Hecksher, Jr Ill Broadway 

Weyland & Lawton. 

David Duncan Ill Broadway 

TELEGRAPH SUPPLIES. 
L. J. Tillotson & Co 8 Dey st 

E. Holmes 7 Murray st 

Chas. T. Chester 104 Centre st 

BOOK PUBLISHERS. 
Harper & Bros 331 Pearl st 

D. Appleton & Co 569 Broadway 

Scribner, Armstrong & Co 654 Broadway 

Ivison, Blakeman & Taylor 1;8 Grand at 

Sheldon & Co 677 Broadway 

Geo. W. Carlton & Co Fifth Avenue Hotel 

F. W. Christern 77 University place 

Hord & Houghton 13 Astor place 

A. D. r. Randolph & Co 770 Broadway 

L. W. Schmidt 24 Barclny st 

Ernest Steiger 24 Frankfort st 

B. Westermann & Co 524 Broadway 

Chas. S. Francis 17 Astor place 

STEAMSHIP LINES. 

W. H. Webb 54 Exchange Place 

Wm. R. Garrison 5 Bowling Green 

Chas G . Francltlyn 4 Bowling Green 

George Mackenzie 58 liroadway 

Murray Ferris & Co 62 South st 

Williams & Gaion 63 Wall st 

J.H. Sparks 19 Broadway 

Oelrichs & Co Bowling Green 

Kunhardt & Co 61 Broad st 

C. B. Richards & Boas Broadway 

P. Alexandre & Sons 33 Broadway 

Henderson Bros 7 Bowling Green 

J. G. Dale 31 Broadway 

Ilowland & Aspinwall : 54 South st 

F. W. J. Hurst 69 Broadway 

E. E. Morgan's Sons 70 South st 

AW. Dimoek 5 Bowling Green 

Pirn, Forwood & Co 88 Wall st 

LIVERY STABLES. 

Briggs & Co 23d st bet . 6th and 7th avenues 

Wm . Ebbltt 206 Seventh avenue 

S. H. Mason & Co ]2East Slstst 

Jas. Mlllward 521 Fifth avenue 

A. G. Armour 54 University Place 

HOTELS. 
Fifth Avenue. Grand Central. 

Hoffman House. Earle's 

St. James. French's. 

St. Nicholas. Metropolitan. 

Delmonico's. Gilsey. 

Grand. St. Cloud. 

WOOL. 

Telkampf & Kitching 65 Broadway 

Joseph Ripley & Son 68 Pine st 

Bauendahl & Co 86 Worth st 

SHIPPING MERCHANTS. 

Spofford, Bros. & Co 29 Broadway 

Chas. H. Marshall & Co 33 Burling Slip 

Grinnell, Mlntarn & Co 73 South st 

Punch, Edye & Co 28 South William st 

N. L. McCready & Co 187 Greenwich st 

W. W. DeForest & Co 82 South st 

COTTON. 

H. M. Taber 141 Pearl st 

Cornwall & Zerega. 

R. R. Graves & Co 63 Wall st 

PRODUCE. 

Isaac H. Reed 5 Stalest 

David Dows & Co 90 South st 

Jesse Hoyt & Co 19 So-.ith st 

J. M. Flske & Co 18 So ath st 

EAST INDIA GOODS. 
A. A. Low & Co 81 Burling slip 




turn 



HUNT'S MERCHANTS' MA.GAZINB, 

REPRESENTING THE INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS OF THE nNTTED STATES. 



VOL 16. 



SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 1873. 



NO. 39B. 



C O N T E M r 8 . 



THE CHRONICLE. 



Monetary PreJsnro and the Ex- 
pansion of Credits 

The Tlireo Hundred Million 
Loan 

Latest Monetary and Commercial 



108 



Eni;ll9h News 

Chan<^6s in the Redeeming 

Agents of National Banks 

Commercial and Miscellaucons 

News 104 



104 



Money Market, Railway Stocks, 
0. i3. Securities, Oold Market, 
Foreign Exchange, New York 
City Banks, Boston Banks, 
Philadelphia Banks, National 
Banks, etc 105 

Quotations of Stocks and Bonds 108 



THE BANKERS' GAZETTE. 



Investments and State, City and 

Corporation Finances — 109 

Canal and Miscellaneous Stock 

and Bond List 109 

State Securities 110 

City Securities 112 

RaUroad Stock and Bond List . . US 



THE COMMERCIAL TIMES. 

Commercial Epitome 124 I Groceries 

Catton laslDryGoods 

Breaostufla 187 j 



12B 
139 



®hf €\)xonxtit 

The Commercial and Financial Chboniclk is Utued on Satur- 
day morning, with the latest news up to midnight of Friday. 

TBBHS OF SDBSCSIPTION-FATABLE IH ADTANCZ. 

Tbx Commkhoial akd FiSTANctAL CiinoNtOLE, delivered by carrier 
to city subscribers, and mailed to all others (exclusive of postage). 

For One Year $10 00 

For Six Months 6 00 

7%« CuuoNicLE wUl be sent to subscribers until ordered discontinued by letter. 
Postage is 20 cents per year, find /s p tid bij the .^ubicriber at his nw post-office, 
WILLIAM B. DAHA, I WILLIAM B. DANA & CO., Publishers, 

JOIIS 8. FLOTD, JR. ) 79 and 81 William Street, NEW YORK. 

Post Oryioi Box 4,592. 
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the Chronicle, No. 5 Austin Friars. Old Broad street, at the following rates : 

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Half-Yearly " " " " 15s. 

Advertisements. 9d. per line each insertion; if ordered for five or more 
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THE RAIL, -WAY MONITOR— A Journal of general Railroad Intel- 
ligence, intended to supplement the brief railroad news contained in TuE 
Chronicle, is published monthly on the fifteenth of each month. 

Subscription price per year {including a file cover the first year) $4 60 

'• " " to subscribers of the Chronicle 3 00 



^r~ The Publishers cannot be responsible for Remittances unless made by 
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scribers at (1 50. The first and second volumes of the Chronicle are wanted 
by the publishers. 



THE RAIL^ITAT inONITOR. 

The first number of the Railwat Monitor (inontUy) was published 
January 15, 1873. 

The characteristic feature of the Monitor consists in its furnishing the 
most complete reports and freshest intelligence concerning every railroad 
in the country, so classified and indexed that eacli item of information can 
always be referred to with the utmost convenience. 

A Handsome File Cover or Binder for current numbers, is 
furnished gratis to every new subscriber for one year. 

A Standing Index is continued from number to number, so that all 
railroad matters publlahed within the year can be referred to by the last 
number issued. 

Tlie Monitor is in no respects Intended to take the place of the 
Railroad Department of the Cbronlcle, but ia expressly inlendod to 
supply a want long felt by the readers of that department, in giving 
numerous reports and details of railroad information, which could never 
be given in the limited space allowed in the columns of the latter. 

Terms of Snbscrlptlon— (Payable in Advance.) 

The Railway Monitor for one year, (including File (Jover with first 6ub- 
scrintlon) $4 00 

The Railway Monitor, to subscribers of the Commercial and Financial 
Chronicle 3 00 

The <'ommercial and Financial Chronicle alone (with Pile Cover first 
year) 10 00 

WILLIAM B. DANA & CO., Pdblishers, 

79 * 81 William Street, Hew York. 
Specimen Copies S«nt on Appllcatloo, 



MONETARY PRESSURE AND THE EXPANSION OP CREDITS. 

Two financial movements are just now httracting notice. 
The first is the ebsii^g up of the money market, which is 
making itself more visible in regard to mercantile paper. 
Capital continues to accumulate here, as the bank statemeot 
to-day will probably show. Last week the rise was five 
millions in deposits, and the tide is still flowing in. This 
concentration of money in New York is checked in some 
degree by the stringency in the money markets of the inte- 
rior, which is already causing an outward flow of currency 
from this city. 

This pressure on the monetary movements all over the 
country is ascribed by some persons, on insufficient grounds, 
to the obligation of the banks to hold 25 per cent of rwerve. 
The banks, if they were not compelled by law to keep idle 
so large a mass of greenbacks, could lend this money, wo 
are told, and could thus relieve commerce and trade, which 
have been sorely distressed for the past three or four months} 

As relief from other sources cannot be had, why, it if 
asked, cannot this method be tried of letting loose the 
greenback reserve 1 Why cannot the banks be left to their 
own judgment to bold less or more of reserve just as they 
please 1 The persons who thus argue forget the lessons of 
e.xperience which we have so dearly bought in this country. 
Experience does not show that the b.inks can safely be left 
free of restriction in this matter, or that the reserves of the 
banks are a source of weakness, or that the power of those 
inslitations to give atisistance to commerce and industry is 
capable of enhancement in the way proposed. Since 1857 
our banks have been more free from panics than ever before, 
and their freedom has been due chiefly to their ample 
reserves. To weaken the reserves of a bank is to place 
that bank in danger, and to do this to our banks generally 
is to undermine the foundations of the whole financial 
machinery of the country. 

The true sources of the general stringency which ha« per- 
vaded the financial movements of the past year are not to 
be sought in the excessive reserves of the banks, but in the 
over-expansiou of our credit system. The banks have held 
less reserve during the last year than ever before in the 
course of our banking history under the National Currency 
law. If the reserves are justly chargeable with being the 
cause of the stiingency, the latter should have decreased t* 
the former fell. But the stringency has done just the con- 
trary. With obstinate tenacity, it has been much more 
severe since the reserves were defective than in former 
years, when ample reserves were held. It is well known 
that the chief cause of our banking stringency is over, 
expansion ; and this being so, the weakening of the reserves 
of the banks could give only a temporary ^ase. It would 
mock us with a destructive and disappointing relief. StiJJ 



102 



THE CHRONICLE. 



[January 25, 1873. 



although these facts are generally acknowledged, «uch is the 
monetary pressu'e which obtains throughout the country 
that a considerable number of persons ar« tempted to grasp 
at any «xpedient which promises miiigation. With the 
growing ease of money they will not be so liablo to be thus 
led astray ; and, as has heretofore happened, the popular 
feeling on the subject will suSside. 

A second point is the rise in gold and governments yes 
terday. The advance in the Ten-forlies is doubtless duo to 
the announcement of the Syndicate operations, which are 
discussed elsewhere. But the rise in gold has been pro- 
duced by a large complexity of causes. Prominent among 
these is the agitation for enlarged issues of cuarency. If 
the inflationists can only succeed in this scheme, the price of 
gold must inevitably go up. In regard to new issues of 
greenbacks, Congress does not seem so pliable as was ex- 
pected. The chief hopes of the inflationists i est in the in- 
crease of national bank notes. This expansion they hope 
to obtain ; and the prospect, however doubtful, has exerteJ, 
with other forces, a noteworthy influence on the gold market 
for some days past. 

There are a'so indications of .in accumulation of bank 
notes, which are selling at a discount, but the influx is not 
so great as earlier in the month. The eccumuiation of hank 
notos at this centre gives us a foretaste of the effect of the 
free banking scheme. This project proposes to flood the 
country with bank notes, and to remove the present limit 
to their issues. At present 354 millions is the highest ag- 
gregate of notes allowed in this country. Till 1870, the 
limit was 300 millions, and since the increase to 354 mil 
HoLF, and the agitation for further expansion, gold has gone 
up from 109 to 114. 

On the methods for contracting the National Bank circula- 
tion we have often written, and discussion of this matter 
will become more important every year. Some pertl 
nent suggestions are made in the following letter from an 
esteemed correspondent in Boston : 

Much has been said about making our National Currency more 
elastic. Would it not be well to have the law give some ad- 
vantage to those banks which will contract their issues in the 
dull eeason ? Thus the law might compel eacli national bank to 
pay taxes of two per cent a year, but only on the average amount 
kept out by itself. Or the Government might charge at the rate 
of two per cent, a year to each bank on the amount actually in 
circulation, and nothing to each bank on the amount of its 
authorized circulation kept in its vaults. This last plan would 
require a reorganization of the banks, I think, so for as to have 
frequent and perhaps weekly reports, and also that the country 
banks should become branches ot large banks in the redemption 
citits. The head banks only might be required to make t'>e 
weekly reports as in Scotland, where each head bank has forty or 
fifty branches. 



THE THREE HUNDRED MILLION LOAN. 

A final agreement was made on Thursday at Washington, 



here ; and that the foreign part of the negotiatior. will not 
comprise more than two-thirds or three-fourths of the whole. 
In this anticipation a largu number of applications have 
been already made by bankers in various parts of the 
coKntiy to be allowed to take a share. The presei't 
arrangement is, however, to confine the business to the 
same central a£;encie8 by wl;ich it was managed before. 
The chief of these were, if we mistake not, Messrs. Fisk & 
Hatch, Henry Clews, the Fourth National Bank, aiid the 
First National Bank. What compensation these agents 
are to be allowed by the Syndicate has not trans- 
pired, but we believe that on the last ocdsiun they gained 
about \^ per cent; though their profits depended, in 
part, on their adroitness in taking advantage of the 
movements of the markel. The present Syndicate is the 
result of the union of two separate parties, that of Marton 
Bliss & Co. and that of Jay Cooka & Co., each of whom 
had been making proposals to the Secretary. If there is to 
be any Euch operation, the people are well satisfied that Mr. 
Jay Cooke should be prominent in it, for two reasons. 
First, he hss had more experience than any other individual 
in negotiating the loans of the United States from the first 
five-twenties of 18G2 to the present time. Among the ser- 
vices which in some of the war loans he conspicuously ren- 
dered to the country, it is not the least, that the Treasury 
was, at a critical period of the war, almost wholly depend- 
ant on its receipts from Mr. Cooke's extensive agencies, for 
the funds needful for the carrying ot the struggle to a sue 
cessful close, when other means for raising these funds had 
disappointed expectation. It is also remembered that by 
the one thousand millions of bonds or more which Jay 
Cooke has at various times negotiated, the Treacuiy has 
never lost a dollar ; but the payments to the government 
have always been made promptly according to his contract. 
Such being the public view of the case, it is gratifying to 
find that if there is to be a Syndicate Messrs, Jay Cjoke & 
Co. are to be in it, and that they are backed by such pow- 
erful associates. 

As to the 4^ per cents, the expectation is that they will 
be taken up next by the Syndicate, and that the four per 
p«nts will follow, a few months interval being allowed 
between each loan. The present loan, as we have said, is 
for three hundred millions, which exhausts all the fives 
authorized by the law of July 14, 1870, as amended Jan. 
20,1871. These laws authorize 300 millions of 4:^ per 
cents and 700 millions of 4 per cents, of wh-ch ihe former, 
it is supposed, can be negotiated during the year 1874, if 
the present loan is satisfactorily carried thl'oiigh. 

These are the main facts we have been able to ascertain 
as to the new Syndicate. There are, however, a number of 
points on which information is wanted. The first, has re- 



by which Mr. Boutwell sold 300 millions of new fives to a | gard to the rate of commission which Mr. Boutwell has 
Syndicate of bankers. The purchasers are Jay Cooke & agreed to pay. The law specially limits the appropriation 



Co., and Morton, Bliss & Co. The former firm are asso- 
ciated with the Rothschilds and others, and the latter firm 
with the Barings and others. There is thus a broader combi 
nation than that of August, 1871, which was under t'le sole 
control of Jay Cooke & Co. How long a term the new 
Syndicate arh allowed in which to pay for these 300 mil 
lions is not announced. But the report is that they expect 
to complete the whoh negotiation in a year, and perhaps 
before. With this view it is said the legal 90 days' notice 
will be given by Mr. Boutwell, to expire in May, for pay- 
ing oflT the first 100 millions of Five-Twenties; while a 
second lot of 100 millions are proposed to be called in for 
1st June, and a third lot for the 1st July. Of these 300 
millions of outstanding Five-Twenties, about 100 millions 
are believed to be held in this country. This fact seems to 



to ^ per cent, which includes " the expense of preparing, 
issuing, advertising and disposing" of the bonds. If the 
Secretary of the Treasury has agreed to pay more than this 
I per cent. Congress may refuse to make the appropriation 
or to allow the disbursement. There are conflicting opinions 
as to what Congress is likely to do in the matter. The 
recent report of the Committee of Wa>'s and Means leaves 
the question in some doubt. What is certain is, that the 
committee could not agree to affirm either the lawfulness of 
the Syndicate arrangement or the contrary. A non-com- 
mittal resolution was, therefore, the '-nly alternative. 
Whether Congress will be equally divided in sentiment, 
and what shape the matter will assume whn it comes up, 
as it inevit ibly must, admits of great uncertainty. A large 
number of members of the House .vill, no duubt, agree with 



suggest thata part of the loan will have to be negotiated I tho YJew held by Tbb Chrokiclk, that the law;a8 it at present 



January 25, 1873. 



THE CHRQNlCLEi 



103 



stands does not allow Mr. Boutwell to pay more than ^ per 
cent for the expenses of this negotiiitios. Congress has 
hitherto refused to enlarge this coininission. The Com- 
mittee of Ways and Means have refused to report in favor 
of any such incre:^se. In view ot these facts, the question 
is whether Mr. Boutwell has really agreed, as reported, to 
givo. besides the ^ per cent three months' interest as a 
bonus to the Syndicate, equal to 1^ per cent. If he has so 
agresil, and th • agreement is ultra vires, what is to be done 
about it 1 

Ann' hjr question if, whether if ihesa difficulties can be 
remedierl, the present time is a favorable one for the rie- 
gotiution. It has been argued that the recent stringency in 
the European money markets is unfavorable to such an 
operation, anl that the French indemnity paymer.ts this year 
will increase the trouble. The Syndicate on the contrary 
argue that the present time is nn unusually good one. They 
point to tho fact that the monetary stringency in P^igland 
and G.-rmany is over. The bullion in the Bank of England 
is above 24 millions sterling. Letters from London capital- 
ists declare thit so favorable a time has not for years been 
observed in Englaid fcr marketin>; American securities. 
As to Germany, the Syndicite declare that the situation has 
wholly changed. France now agrees to make larger pay. 
ments than were expected during the first five months of 
this year. In order to emancipate her territory from German 
occupation Frsnce is to pay $40,000,000 a month from now 
till Msy next. This will complete the second milliard 
almost a year in advance of the stipulated time of payment, 
and will release the whole of France except tho fortress o( 
Belfort. With regard to these prodigious payments the 
Syndica'.e argue that they vfill to enlarge the mass of capital 
seeking investment iis to offer us an opportunity for pi cing 
our new bonds, which we ought not to lose. 



Cateat lllonetarn anii Commercial (£119 


iai) Neroa. 


a.\TE8 OV BXCH.«.I<r«B AT LOHTDON, AND 


ON LONDOA 


AT LATEST DATES. 




EXCHANGE AT LONDON- 
JANUARY 3. 


EXCHANGK ON LONDON. 








XATEST 






OK— 


TUB. 


BATB. 


DATK. 




RATI. 


Amsterdam . . . 


short. 


12. a!3- 1 


Jan. 3. 


short. 


12. 


Autwcrp 


3 months. 


J5 65 ©25.70 


*' 


" 


25. 35 


Hamburg 




20.43 ©20.47 


'* 


8 mos. 


13. 7\' 


Paris 


short. 


J;.47>i@26.57X 


** 


short. 


25.50 


Paris 


3 months. 


2S.82>4.a25.87K' 








Vienna 




11.17X@;i.«SX 


" 


3 mos. 


109.70 


Berlin 




f,.ny,m-^H 1 


'* 


" 


6.S0V 


Frankfort 




ii9)t@.nHx 


'* 


short. 


inx 


St. Petersburg 


.... 


31X@31« 








Cadiz 




42^S48>tf 




.... 




Lisbon 


90 days. 


52>«<a5s>,' 


• • •• 




• ■ .. 


Milan 1 












Genoa > 


:) months. 


J!8.C2>i@88.67X 






• • •• 


Leghorn ( 












New y«rk 


.... 




Jan . 3. 


60 days. 


109'i 


Rio de Janeiro 






Dec 7. 


90 day«. 


85X 


Bahia 






Dec. 8. 




25><©S« 


Vatparaiao . . . 


.... 




Nov. 14. 




85M 


Pcrnambnco . . 






Dec. 11. 




25f.'®26X 


Kingapore 


80 days. 


4». 5rf, 








Hong Kong... 


** 


il. M. 


Dec. 27. 


6mo». 


6«. »X(i. 


Shanghai 


.... 




Doc. S8. 




6s. l)id. 


Ceylon 












Bombay 


60 days. 


U. 10>i-ll-16<i. 


Jan. 2. 


6 mos. 


ii.Und. 


Madras 


" 


U. 1( Ji-ll-lM. 








Calcntta 


** 


i» w%-n-\fid. 


Jan. i. 


6 mos. 


U. Ufid. 


Sydney 




Ip. c. dis. 


.... 







IFrom our own correspondent. | 

London, Saturday, January 4, 1873. 
This has been somewhat of a broken week, and business can be 
scarcely said to have been fully reBumed ; but although transac- 
tions are small, a firm tone prevails in most departments of trade. 
In Manchester a certain degree of anxiety exists, owing chiefly to 
the diverse estimates of the American cotton crop, while the re- 
cent failures are an additional cause of uneasines.s. It is hoped 
however, that there will be no further suspensions of importance. 
The opening stock market of the year was characterised by a 
feature for which but few persons were prepared. The market 
for British railway shares was considerably depressed, nearly all 
the leading stocks having declined in value 1 to li per cent. It is 
well known that the value of Eog'Iisb railway shares has 



materially improved daring the last few yean, and it wm ganw- 
ally believed that the shares of the diridend-parlnn eompanlea 
were, in nearly all cases, at their legltlnut* ralna, that is to mj 
that the price had been forced np to a point which would redoea 
the dividend to 4^ or 5 per cent. But latterly, coal and irou have 
become much dearer, and the rate of wages has been advaneed ; 
and it is expected that as these additional charges will form a pro- 
minent feature in the half year's accoants, the divldrndi wbleb 
which will soon be declared will, In some caaea, be disappointing 
This week, nearly all accounts which ware open for the riaa 
appear to have been closed, and rather an extensira "bear" accoant 
has supplied their place. 

The closing Stock Exchange settlament for 1872 witneasad 
some fai'ures in the Erie market. The unexpected announcement 
of Jay Gould's restoration of so large an amount of property to 
the company embarrassed, as a matter of course, the "bears," of 
whom there appeared to be many ; but It is aatlsiactory to notice 
that the suspensions were only three, of whom only one waa of 
importance. The letters delivered this week contain the dewila 
of the movement, and as there appears to be every indication that 
the present directors will employ every effort to make the line a 
success, there is now as much confidence in the fntore of tha 
undertaking as there was distrust in it before. 

It would be a good thing for American finance, as far as the 
raising of niouriy in Europe is concerned, if similar measures 
could be adopted in regard to certain other enterprises. The 
revelations which are now and then made naturally make In- 
vestors cautious of American railroad bonds, and militate against 
their succcs.^. A lo.in appeared some months back for the Ala- 
bama & Chattanooga Railroad Company. To the bondholders 
the investment has been a great loss, and the following, which 
has been communicated by the Conncil of Foreign Bondholders, 
gives them but little hope of a satisfactory management of their 
interests : 

The following is an extract from a letter of Mr. F. de Neufolllc, of New 
York, to Dr. I.cvita, agent of the Council of Fiirclgn Bondholders at Frank- 
fort, in relation to the Alabama and Chattanooj,'a Railway ; " Tho prcMOt 
atjtie of tho company is the following: The first puichaxcr of the railway 
under the decree of the Bankrnplcy tN>urt was the Sthl« «>f Alahsra* ttwelf. and 

It hils to pay about $.313,000; of this, however. It o: ' ' ? ■" ' ""' •^l.tte, 

on its i)art, sold the railway to St«nton and collo i a llh 

which amount Alabama intended to cover the $li ..'lich 

it still had to p«y. Slanton has. as yet, only paiil iii'Hut ^i".<"r i. miu it -;» very 
questionable whither he can or will pay the remainder of the purchase money. 
Meanwhile the railway is, as at the commenccmerif. still in bankruptcy, and 
in the hands of Judge Bustead, of the United States District C <nrt in Ala- 
bama, and he can at any moment, if he wishes, sell it at any price, and to any 
one, in order to cover the judgment costs. It la even po'.sll>le that in the case 
of anolher sale be will disregard the bondholder* if tncy are not represented 
here. I beg you, therefore, as soon as possible, to fonn a committee and to 
nominate some one l^re as your representative." 

There has been a good demand for money during the week, bnt 
it has been chiefly of a temporary and provisional character. The 
increase in "other securities" at the Bank of England is £5,280,- 
000, and in " other deposits," £4,445,020, It is evident, therefore, 
that tne desire to possess large bankers' balances on the 31st of 
December has still to be fulfilled; but as the accommodation U 
only temporary the bank account is likely to be soon reduced to 
its normal state. There is at present no demand for gold for 
export, and as the Australian mail steamer has arrived with 
£494,000, rather a considerable supply has been sent into the 
bank. Hence tho stock of bullion shows an increase of £347,441 
compared with that given in the preceding return. Next week 
the dividends on the public funds will be distributed, and it is 
anticipated that the next bank account will afford grounds for 
believing in an early reduction in the bank rate. There are eome_ 
indeed, who believe in a revival of the German demand for gold 
though there are at present no signs of it. Tho French indemnity 
operations will undoubtedly render the course of the money 
market uncertain, and numerous changes in the official minimum 
are therefore anticipated during the year. The tendency jnst 
now is clearly towards ease, but the vast operations of Oermany , 
if England should be the medium through which they are con- 
ducted, would quickly check the downward movement and pro- 
duce considerable firmness. The quotations for money are now 

as follows : 

Per cent. I Tercem. 

g 4 months' bank bills <Xe4K 

« months' bank bills ...... iM9*X 



Bank increase 

Open-nmrkct rates : 
30 and 60 d.tys' bills 
3 months' bills 



■.m 



4X 



4 and < montlia' trad« bill*. *)i9^)i 



The rates of interest allowed by the joint stock banks and 
discount houses for deposits are subjoined : ^^ ^^^ 

Joint stock banks J 

Discount houses at call • .,. 

Discount houses with 7 days' notice T» 

Discount house* with 14 day*' notice.- ''s 

The following are tha quoUtions for money at the leading Ooatl- 

nental cities ; 



104 



THE CHRONICLE. 



[January 25. l»78. 



Bank Open 

rate, market, 
per cent, per cent. 

Pari* S i)i-S 

Amsterdam 5 5 

Hambar^ 5 

Berlin S 6 

Frankfort B S 

Vienna and Trieste.,., t}4 1i( 
Uadrld, Cadiz and Bar- 
celona 6 6 



Lisbon and Oporto. 

St. Petersburg 

Brnssels 

Turin, Florence and 

Rome 

Antwerp 

Belgium 



Bank Open 

rate, marke 

per cent, per cent 

7 7 

8 8 
5 6 



Excepting British railway shares, the stock market hag been 
firm, and the quotations have had an upward tendency. The 
Talae of foreign stocks has improved, and American descriptions 
have been inactive request at an advance, Erie shares have 
been in demand, and the quotations are firmer; and there has 
also been a better demand for Illinois Central. In the consol 
market there has been no important movement. 

Tbere has been an active demand for foreign bills of exchange, 
and the rates are less favorable to this country. Gold continues 
to accumulate in this market, but silver and dollars are rather 
firmer, the supply on offer being very limited. 

The following statement shows the present position of the Bank 
of England, the Bank rate of discount, the price of Consols, 
the average quotation for English Wheat, the price of Middling 
Upland Cotton, of No. 40 Mule Yarn fair second qualiij, 
and the Baokers' Clearing House return compared with the 
four previous years : 

1870. 1871. 1872. 187.3. 

£ £ £ £ 

24,34. 577 24.942,S63 S6.10l.8n9 85.907.884 
1II.-J4I7H2 fi.2Sfi,109 7.3f>7.001 11,035,6J9 
18.287,743 2r>,2-s.?,2S3 25.024,5K8 21,481.8.12 
!6,,311,399 12 925,669 14.H%,440 13.270,3« 
20,2,53,219 18,902,267 80,05'J,2tt8 23,972,130 



1869. 
Circalatlon, Including £ 

bank post bills 84,417,433 

Public deposits 6,4Bri 495 

Other deposits 19,49,5.^05 

Government securities. l.'I.9S4.710 

Other securities 20,646,496 

Reserve of notes and 

coin 9,4>J,8fi6 

Coin and huUlon' 18,519,861 

Bank rate 3 p, c. 

Consols 92Jid, 

Priceof wheat BOs. lid. 

Mid. Upland cotton ., lid 

1^0.40 mule yarn fair Sd 

quality l9, 2Vd. 

Clearing House return 



10.S5S46I) 
19.095.721 
8 p. c. 
92>ixd. 
43s. 8d. 
ll>fd. 



13.234,919 

22..382,931 

2K p. c, 

52s. 3d, 
7 15-16d, 



14,646,351 
25.291,761 
3 p. c. 
925id, 
65s, 4d. 
S lS-16d. 



U. 3d. Is. IXd. Is. iii&. 



13 45.3.093 
24,014.298 

fi p. c. 

BlJid. 
669. 4d. 

lOKd, 

Is. 3i. 



93,041,000 U0,906,000:i30.057.000 



* In both departments. 

The opening corn markets of the year have shown Indications 
of considerablft firmness, especially for good wheat. The tend- 
ency of prices has been decidedly upward, and the stocks on hand 
are only moderate. In France wheat continues to be sparingly 
offered, and the trade is firm, with an upward movement in the 
quotations. The weather continues very wet and unsettled, bu* 
on light soils the wheat plant looks well, though perhaps it is 
too forward for the time of year. 

The following is a return of the stocks of grain, etc., in the 

port of Liverpool : 

Dec. 31, 
1871. 

Wheat Quarters. 513,481 

Barley " '"" 



Sept. 1, 
1872. 

191.793 
2,000 
1,261 



6,453 

Malt'. 1,345 

GaU 15,315 

Beans 53,101 33,443 

Peas §,438 13,177 

Indian Corn 152,191 231,474 

Oatmeal Loads. 12,012 ,3,0;5 

Plonr Sacks, 41,i54 26,695 

Flour Barrels. 82,949 24.849 



Dec, 31, 

1872. 

381,370 

6.889 

1,337 

8,654 

«2,.364 

18,166 

832,775 

6,157 

23,206 

86,144 



Since I completed the above letter an important failure has 
been announced, viz., that of Messrs, J, F, Pawson & Co,, Ware, 
housemen, of St, Paul's Church Yard, The firm have conducted 
a large business for more than half a century, and the liabilities 
are estimated at from £600,000 to £700,000. It is believed, how. 
ever, that on the realization of the assets there will be a surplus 
remaining. 



EusUah market Reports— Per Cable. 

The df jly closing quotations in the markets of London and Li ver- 
poolforthe past week have been reported by submarine telegraph, 
as shown in the following; summarv: 

London Money and Stock Market. — American securities excited 
at the close, with a large business doing, and wide fluctuations. 
It is reported on the Stock Exchange that prices have been 
foroed to float tlie new loan. 

The bullion in the Bank of England has Increased £433,000 the 
past week. 
The Bank rate has been reduced \, and is now 4 per cent. 

Tbnr. 



Bat. 

Consols for money 92 If 

*' account 925i 

U. S. 6b (5-20?,)1865,old... 93X 

1867 9.3Ji 

D.8, 10-408 90 

Hew 5s 89X 

The daily quotations 
fort were : 
Frankfort . ., 



Mon, 
92 
92« 
93X 
98« 



Tues. 
92X 
92X 

nn 

92% 
90X 
89>i; 



Wed, 
92X 
92X 
93X 
92Ji 
91 
89X 



32X 
92i< 
93;!i 

90X 
89X 



for United Btatea 6a (1862) at 



98X 



Frl. 

92X 

92V 

92X 

93 

92 

90K 

Frank 



Liverpool Ootton Marh)t,—BM special report of cotton. 



Liverpool Breadstu^s Market. — With the exception of a 
cline of 3d. in corn, these prices remain unchanged. 

Hat. 
_, "■ d. 

Flour (Western) ^ bbl 29 6 

Wheat (Red W'n. spr)..^? ctl 11 6 

" (Red Winter) " 12 2 

" (Gal. White club) •' 12 10 
Corn(W.m'd)new^quarter 28 

Barley ^Canadian) ^ bush 3 6 

Oats(Am. ACan,) " " • - - 



de- 



Peas ^Canadian), 



$ bush 3 2 
¥ ouarter 33 



Mon, 
B, d. 
89 6 

11 6 

12 8 
12 10 
28 

8 6 

8 2 

88 



Tues. 
B. d. 
8!) 6 

11 6 
18 8 

12 10 
88 

3 6 

3 2 

38 



Wed. 

B, d. 
89 6 
11 6 
IS 2 
U 10 
28 
3 6 
3 8 
38 



Thnr. 
s. d, 
29 6 

11 6 

12 8 
12 10 
28 

3 6 
3 8 
38 



Frl. 

e. d. 

89 6 

11 6 

13 a 

18 10 

87 9 

3 S 

3 3 

8 

ad- 



Liverpool Provisioni Market. — Lard and cheese have 
vanced ; other prices exhibit a decline. 

Sat. Mon. Tues Wed. Thnr. Frl- 

8. d. B. d. B, d. B. d. B. d. 8. d. 

BBef(Pr. mesBjnew^ tee.. 95 95 9.1 9' 6 93 6 90 

Pork (Pr. mess) new ^bb!. 63 63 6:3 C3 63 62 

Bacon (Cum. cut) new^cwt 31 34 3t 34 34 84 

Lard (American) ..." 38 38 38 3 38 3 88 6 88 9 

Cheese(Amer'nflne) " 680 680 63 680 680 830 

Liverpool Produce Market. — Common rosin and spirits petro- 
leum have each declined, and spirits turpentine has advanced. 



Sat. 



d. 

Ro8ln(com. N. C.)...<?cwt. 10 6 
" fine " 16 



Mon. 
8. d. 



10 « 



Tues. 
B. d. 
10 6 
__ 16 16 

Petroleum (refined) ^gal 1 9>f 1 9X 1 8X 

" (spirits) " 12 12 12 

Tallowf American)... S cwt. 43 43 

Cloverseed (Am. red) 42 42 

pirits turpentine. ..¥ cwt. 45 6 48 



43 
42 U 
46 



Wed. 

B. d. 

10 6 

16 

1 9 

1 
43 



1 


42 
46 



Thnr. 

8. d. 

10 3 

16 

1 9 

1 1 

43 

42 

48 



Frl. 
8. d. 
10 3 
16 

1 9)< 

43 
42 
48 



London Produce and Oil Markets. — Sugar has advanced 6d. 
since last Friday, and linseed oil has declined 10s. 



Sat. Mon. Tues. 

£ 8. d. £ p. d. £ s. d. 

Llns'dc'ke(obl).^tn 10 10 10 

LlnBend(Calcutta).... 64 6 64 6 64 6 
Sugar ;No.l2D'ohstd) 

onspot.^cwi 33 6 83 6 

Spermoil 8 ton 94 91 

Whale oil " 40 10 41) 10 

Linseed oil.. .. " 33 10 33 5 



33 
94 
40 10 
S3 



Wed. 

£ s. d. 

10 

&4 6 

33 6 
91 
40 10 
33 



Thnr. 
£ B.d. 
10 
64 6 

33 6 
94 
40 10 
33 



Frl. 
£ B.d. 
10 
64 6 



84 
94 
40 10 
33 



CIIANUmS li\ THE KBUtliiMINti A(iE.\n (IK KATIUi\itl "AU^ 
The following are the changes in the Redeeming Agents of 
National Banks approved since the 16th inst. These 
weekly changes are furnished by, and published in accordance 
with an arrangement made with the Comptroller of the Currency : 



LOCATION. 



Iowa- 
Charles City.. 

Minnesota— 
Northfleld. .. 

Indiana — 
Go!*hen 

Pennsylvania — 
Glen Rock 



Michigan- 
Marshall. 



Michigan — 

Grand Haven.. 
DacotaU Terrl'y- 

Yankton 



HAMS or BANK. 



BSDBBHINO A6SNT. 



First National Bank First National Bank, New York City, 

I approved SB ar additional Redeem- 

1 ing Agent. 
FlrBt National Bank Ninth National Bank. New York City, 

I approved. 
City National Bank. Third National Bf.nk, New York City, 

I approved. 
First National Bank First National Bank, New York City, 

i and Niitlonal Exchange Bank, Baltl- 

I more, approved In place of Union 

I National Bunk. Philadelphia. 
City National Bank, Fourth National Bank, Chicago, ap- 

I proved as an additional Redeeming 

t Agent, 
First National Bank Approval o( Commercial Bank of Chic- 

I ago flp Redeeming AL'ent revoked. 
First National Bank Ninth Niiional Bank, New York City, 
I approved. 



Nenr National Hauhii. 

The following is the only National Bank organized daring the 
past week, viz. : 

Offloliil No. 

2,075— The City National Bank of Griffln, Ga. Anthcrlzed capital, fSO.OOO ; 

paid in capital. $30,000. Gi'man J. Drake, Prefidert; J, G, Rhea. 

Cashier. Authorized to commence bnstness Jan. 20. 1873, 

COMVIERCIAL AND MlSCliLL.VNEaUS NEWS. 



Imports and Exports for the Week. — The imports this 
week show an increase in both dry goods and treneral mer- 
chandise. The total imports amount to |;ll,282,162 this week, 
against f 5,348,106 :ast week, and |6,286,904 the pruvious week. 
The exports are $4,586,333 ihis week, against $4,454,423 last 
week, and S3,513,906 tl\e previous week. The exports of cotton 
the past week were 12,163 bales, against 10,835 bales last week. 
The following are the imports at New York for week ending 
(for dry goods) Jan. 16, and for the week ending (for general 
merchandisel Jan. 17: 



rOBEiaS IMPORTS AT NKW TORK FOR TBS WRKK. 

1870. 1871. 1872. 

Dry goods 11,571,194 J2,045,948 t2,2«l,75S 

General mercliandlse... 8,788,324 8,544,?'83 8,873,016 

Total for the week. . J4,,357,5I8 
PreviouBly reported 4,552,895 



16,590 S34 
6,641.792 



$6,734,788 
13,741,8('8 



1873. 

$3,435,699 

7,84<).4t;8 

$11,282,1151 
11,636,010 



Since Jan. 1 $8,910,413 $11,231,326 $18,879,644 $»,gn.m 

In our report of the dry goods trade wUl be found the imports of 

dry goods for one week later. 
The following is a statement of the exports (exclusive of specie, 

from the port of New York to foreign ports, foi the week ending 

Jan. 21 : 

KXPORTB FROM NIW TORK FOR THB WIKK 

1870. 1871. 1872. 

For the week $2,696,806 $5,131,499 $5,160,172 

PreviouBly reported., .. 8,156,030 13,f69,683 9,41.%I77 



1878. 

$4,586,333 

7,968,329 



Since Jan, 1 $10,862,856 $18,704,188 $14,575,319 $12,554,663 

The following will show the exports of specie from the port of 
New York for the week ending Jan. 18, 1873, and since the 



Januan 25, 1873.? 



THE CHRONICLE 



105 



beffinning of the year, with a compariaon for the correspondiog 

date in previous years ; 

Jiiu. 13— Schr. ChSB. Tliomp- | Jan. 18— Str. Main, Bremen— 

•on. Jacmel— | American gold coin tlS.OOO 

American gold coin $S,000 I Jan. 18— Str. City of Merlda, 

American silvor coin 1.1,000 | Progreaao— 

■Ian. 13~Str.. Java, Liverpool— I Mexican doubloons .1.9JS 

Sliver barn 494,830 | ^ 

Total for the weeic f32B 155 

Previously reported 8,517! 153 

Total since Jan. 1,1873 |:i,88^308 



Hame time In 

1874 $94.5,892 

1871 l,784.7;i:i 

1870 l,:ac.t;81 

18«9 l,101,3i» 



Same time In 

18<18 J6,910,93t 

1867 I,8«9,0l8 

18«« 1,878,444 

180.5 1,970.437 

The imports of specie at this port during the past week have 
been as follows : 



Jan. 13— Str. Columbia, Ua- 
vana— 

Sliver $4,n:.8 

Oold 500 

Jan. 13— Str. City of Mexico, 
Vera Cruz- 
Total for the week .' $38,019 



Silver $S0,700 

Jan. 17— Str. Tybee, Porto 
I'lata- 

SUv-sr 7,754 

Gold 5,009 



Previously reported 15,590 

Total since January 1, 1873 $53,(109 

Same time In Same time In 

1874 161.640 I 18(19 $169,906 

1871 1159,416 18«i8 95,049 

1870 470,37711867 143,388 

— In regard to the recent sale of stock of the South Side (L. 
I.) Railroad, the Secretary of the Company states, in a circular, 
that " the purchasers are anonymous clients of the Banking House 
of Jacob K. SLipherd & Co., 24 Pine street, and include capitalists 
in New York and Boston, who believe the stock cheap at the price 
paid, and were offered, as it is reported, $200,000 bonus for their 
stock within twenty-four hours after its transfer. The negotia- 
tions were only consummated by an agreement between ths princi- 
pal shareholders to sell each a bare majority of his interest and 
retain the rest. Not a single individual was ' bought out,' and the 
corixjration retains as large shareholders every capitalist hereto- 
fore connected with it. » * « The rumor that Oliver 
Charlick was at the bottom of the transaction is entirely without 
foundation. The effect of the transaction upon the Company's 
new loan now on the market, has been to give a great impetus to 
sales." 

— The Canada Southern Railroad is now finished, and it is 
expected will bo in operation at an early day. The Chicago and 
Canada Southern is being pushed as rapidly as possible, with a 
view to finishing it during 1873. Messrs. Leonard, Sheldon & 
Fo.iter, 10 Wall street, are offering the 7 per cent, gold bonds of 
the latter company at 90 and accrued interest. 

— Messrs. Jay Cooke & Co., financial agents of the Northern 
Pacific Railroad Company, report that there is a good investment 
demand for the First Mortgage T 30 gold bonds of the road, and 
that the sales since the first of January amount to nearly 
fl,000„000. 

— The annual statement of The New York Mutual Insurance 
Company will be found in this numi)pr of The Chronicle, 
showing assets amounting to $794,337 40. The Trustees have 
directed the payment of six per cent interest on all outstanding 
scrip on and after Feb. 11th, and have al.so declared a scrip divi- 
dend of 40 per cent on the net earned premiums for the year, cer- 
tificates for which will be ready for delivery Marcli 1. 

— The Pacific Mutual Insurance Company. — By the annual state- 
ment of this company, which appears in «.nother part of this paper. 
It will he observed that during the year just closed its receipts for 
premiums on Marine risks were $673,30.') 08, and on January 1 its 
total assets were $1,021,091 59. Interest on the outstanding cer. 
tificates of profits, at the rate of 6 per cent, will be paid on and 
after Feb. 4. 

— The thirty-ninth semi-annual statement of the Home Insur- 
ance Co., which is given in our advertising columns, shows the 
assets of the company on the 1st of January to be $4,446,858 78, 
while the liabilities (consisting of claims foi losses and dividends 
unpaid) are only $,590,914 19. Such a showing, after the expe- 
rience of the last fifteen months, reflects great credit on the 
officers of the company, and is proof of the strong confidence 
which the public has in this staunch old institution. 

— The coupons of the First Mortgage 8 per cent gold bonds of 
the Logansport, Crawfordsville, and Southwestern Railway Com- 
pany, due February 1, 1873, will be paid on and after that day at 
the office of Messrs. Jones & Schuyler, Financial Agents, 12 Pine 

street, N. Y. 



BANKING AND FINANCIAL. 



Bankiko House ok Henky Clkws Si Co.,) 
32 Wall street. N. Y. f 

Bills of Exchange, Circular Notes, Travelers' and Commercial 
Credits issued available In all parts of the world. 

Deposits received, subject to check on demand. Interest 
allowed on all Daily Balances, every accommodation and facility 
afforded usual with City Banks. 



RAII.ROAD BONDS— Whether you wish to BUY or SELL 
write to 

HASSLER & CO.. 
No, 7 WsU street, New York. 



BANKING OFFICE OB" F18K & HATCH, 

Nbw York, Jan. 24, 1873. 

The CHESAPEAKE and OHIO, the CENTRAL and WE8T 
ERN PACIFIC BONDS, all of which have been negotiated by 
us, we believe to be among the bent and mo«t desirable lovast 
ment Securities in the market, which in time must beoome very 
scarce ; especially as the Qoverument will probably, daring 
this year, pay off In gold another large lot of FivkTwemtiiu, 
and issue in their place Five Per Cent. Bonds. 

The CHESAPEAKE AND OHIO SIX PER CENT. OOLD 
BONDS, the total amount of which is only $15,000,000, ar« 
secured upon a property worth |3.'5,O00.OOO to $40,000,000, and 
are fully eijual in intrinsic value to the Ckntbal PACiric Bonm, 
They are issued in denominationa of $100, $600 and $1,000, cou- 
pon or registered, and at their present market price, 86 and ac- 
crued interest, are very desirable. 

The CENTRAL PACIFIC SIX PER CENT. GOLD BONDS 
are too well known to reqnirn description or commendation. 
Their total amount is $25,88.5.000 ; they have for a long tlma 
ranged in market price near or alwve par. 

The WESTERN PACIFIC SIX PER CENT. OOLD BONDS 
amount to $2,735,000. This road is now consolidated with the 
Central Pacific, and the payment of its bonds, principal and 
interest, is assumed by the latter. Coupon Bonds, $1,000 eaeb. 
Their market price to-day is 90i to 90f As they have reoentl/ 
been introduced on the Stock Exchange, we expect to M* 
them rapidly rise to the price of Central PACirics, being 
substantially the same in character and value. 

We buy and soil, as usual, Qovernment Bonds. receive deposits 
on which we allow interest, make collections, and conduct a gene- 
ral banking businejs in all its branches. 

FISK & HATCH. 



TO INVESTORS. 

To those who wish to REINVEST JANUARY COUPONS OR 
DIVIDENDS, and those who wish to INCREASE THEIR IN- 
COME from means alreaJy'invested in other less profitable securi- 
ties, we recommend the Seven-Thirty Oold Bondii of the Northern 
Pacific Railroad Company as well secured and unusually produc- 
tive. 

The bonds are always convertible at Ten per cent, pretciam 
(I'lO) into the Company's Lands at Market Prices. The Rate of 
Interest (seven and three-tenths per cent, gold) is eqaal now to 
about SJ- currency — yielding an income more than onethird 
greater than U. S. 5-20's. (jtold Checks lor the semi-annual inter- 
est on the Registered Bonds are mailed to the Post Office addroea 
of the owner. All marketable stocks and bonds are received in 
exchange for Northern Pacifies ON MO.ST F.WORABLE TERMS. 
' JAY COOKE & CO., 
Ne-vy York, Philadelphia, and Wsshington, 

Financial Agents Northern Pacific Railroad Co. 



®l)c ©ankera' (Ba}titt. 

» I VI D E N D N . 

The (ollowlns Dividends have been declared dortnc the past 



COMrANT. 



PiB 

CasT. 



Railroads. 

Terre Haute ife Indianapolis 

Conn. & PastJUmpsIc River pref 

Dry Dock, E»»t Broadway & Battery 

Baaka. 

Oerman American 

Loaners' 

Insurance. 

Rutsfcrs Fire 

Rutgers Fire, extra 

Peter Cooper Fire 

msrellniieoiia. 

Delswore &, Hudson Canal 

F»fm*n' Loan & Trust Co 

Kimb'« Coal A Iron 

CeuLrrt, Xew .Jersey I.an(l Improvement Co. 
Amerl'can Coal Co.' of AUeghaay Co., Hi.. 

Oulncy Xflnlng 

Berdan Fire Arms Mauuf. Co 



« 

.1 



Whkm 
Faslb. 



Jan. ao. 
Feb. 1. 
Feb. 1. 



4 free. Feb. 1. 
3X fiee. Jan. SO. 



8 
3 
10 

6 
3 
5 

SMS. 
88. 

s& 

1 



Feb. 1 
Feb. 1. 
Feb. 1 



Books Obsao. 



Jan. tS to Fab. S. 
Jta. n toF«b. *. 



Feb. 1. Jan. 18 to Feb. S. 

Feb. 1.1 

Jan. S2.'jan. Uto Feb. 1 
Feb. S.'Jan. «l to Feb. 5 
M«h. lO.IPeb. » to Mcb. 11 
Fab. »•. Feb. 13 to Feb. *4 
Feb. 1. '.Tan. as to Feb. 1 



FaiDAT ETBHiNa, Jan- M, IWS. 
The Money market. — The money market has been slightly 
irregular at times during the week, and closed this evening quite 
active at the highest point made, namely, 1-32 per day. in addition 
to 7 per cent, interest. This rate, however, is quite exceptional, 
and only took place on a sharp tum late in the afternoon, when 
no apparent cause for it was developed. Regular rates for money 
have l>een 6@7 per cent., with exceptions as high as 7 gold, and 
down to 4 and 5 per cent, on several days In the alternoon, when 
brokers' accounts had generally been made up. 

The experience of former years has encouraged an eipecUUon 



106 



fM CHRONICLE 



[January 25, 1873 Q 



that money will continue easy for several months after the first 
of the year, and the sharp advance in call loans thiB evening 
is not considered as having any special significance. 

For prime commercial paper the demand continues good at 8@ 
10 per cent., while some very choice paper has been sold as low 
as 7 per cent. 

Reports from the London market are quite favorable, bullion 
in the Bank of England showing a further incre&se this week of 
£432,000, and the discount rate having been reduced to 4 per cent, 
from ii. 

The Bank of France shows a decrease in specie this week of 
500,000 francs. 

The last statement of our New York city banks (January 18) 
showed an increase of $809,075 in the excess of reserves. The 
total liabilities stood at |240,130,400; the total reserve at $65,531, 
700, being $5,499,100 more than 25 per cent, of the liabilities. 

The following statement shows the changes from previous week 
and a comparison with 1872 and 1871: 

-1S73. 



Jan. 11. .Jan. 18. DUferences. 

Loans and dla. ... f2;5.55!.SflO 1278.209.61)0 Inc.. »2.656,80O 

Specie aSiW.lOJ 2l,ll'.',8a) Dec. 1,428,910 

Circulation 27,461.600 27,5.I2.200 Inc.. 80.600 

NetdeposIM 207,441,500 212,558.200 lie. 5,116,;0O 

Leeal tenders ... 40.876.700 44.420.900 Inc. 3,5(4,200 



1872. 
Jan, 20. 
1279,032,900 
27,693,800 
28.371,200 
220,361JiO« 
45,419,500 



tSTl. 
Jan. 21. 

|270,S.t3,7»'. 

28,520,495 

S1.9S8.274 

211,690,030 

49,774,557 



United States Bond*.— The market for governments has been 
quite active and buoyant. The higher range of gold and the 
more definite information in regard to the syndicate operations 
have been favorable to higher prices. A Washington despatch 
to the Herald gives the following in regard to the agreement 
made with the two syndicates : 

** The parties to the two proposals which have been pending before the Sec 
retary of the I'reasury having united, the Secretary has completed a cuntract 
for the negotiation of the remaining $300,000,000 five per cents funded loan, 
with Messrs. Jay Cooke & Co., representing N. M. Rotlischlld & Sons, Jay 
Cooke McCulloch & Co. and themselves ; and with Messrs. Morton. Bliss & 
Co., Drexel. Morgan & Co., representing Messrs. Baring Brothers & Co., J. S. 
Morgan & Co., Alorton, Rose <fc Co. and themselves. 

'* The terms are substantially the same as the iirst contract, the Secretary 
reserving the right to determine when he will place the bonds and what 
amount shall be placed." 

The immediate result of this agreement has been to advance 
the 5 per cent bonds, and both 10-40s and the funded 5s are ma- 
terially higher than last week, 10-40s having been quoted to day 
at 114| against 111^ last Friday, and funded 5s at 114i@115 
against 111^ last week. This is a remarkable advance for gov- 
ernment bonds, and has ftrengthened the whole market. Trans- 
actions have been large, and the amount of sales yesterday and 
to-day at the stock exchange were the largest recorded for some 
time past. 

At the Treasury purchase of 5-208 on Wednesday the ofTerings 
amounted to $666,400, and the bonds accepted to $.546,400. 

Closing prices daily, and the range since Jan. 1. bnvBjbeen: 

since Jan. 1. \ 

-Lowest.-^ . — Highest.^ 



Jan, Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan 

U. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 

58. fund, 1881, cp.. in<4 UiK'llSit 113M ilia ''.ilji 

68,1881, reg 115^ "IISX "IIS^' 116 115X '.16X 

6a, 1881, coup HEX I17V} inji m% inx iisx 

5-20'8 1962, coup... '114 114« '1145i 'lUX IH^ !HJ< 

S.2'rs 1864, coup... 'lUK'lMX lUfi'lUH 115 115X 

6-20'»1865, " ... I15X •115X 116>i 115« i;6X U6X 

5-2l'8l8M,n" ... Ul'< 114K 114K 114S, 114H H5X 

B-20'B 1967. " ... 115H 115N 115H 115M 1165i l!5)i 

5-20'8lS68, " ... 1I5X USX U5X 115X 1155< »116 

10-40's, reg 'lux mix •ii2;i ni2H ;i2*' 'iisx 

ia-40'B, coupon. ... •UIX 112 USX USX 113>i 111« 
•iliJi 114 'IISX '114 IU% 



ia-40'B,conpon.... •Ul)( 
Currency 6*8 *114 



112 Jau. 11 

114XJan. 4 

\\ii4 Jan. S 

Wffi Jan. S 

113X Jan. 6 

U3>i Jan. 2 

112SCJan. 4 

US^i^Jan. 2 

USJfJan. 2 

109>i Jan. S 

109J« Jau. 2 

112>i Jan. 6 



113X Jan. 23 
1161i Jan. 24 
118)4 Jan. 24 
114K Jan. 24 
115K Jan. 24 
116H J: n. 24 
115H Jan. 24 
lie Jan. 24 
115H Jan. 22 
::S)i Jan. 23 
114?^ Jau. 24 
n4>i Jan, 24 



* This 18 the price bid, no nale was made at the Board. 
Closing prices of securities in London have been as follows : 





Jan. 

10. 


Jan. 
17. 


Jan. 
24. 






Lowest. 1 Highest. 




MX 
9SX 
89 X 
90K 


93K 

89H 


92 X 
93 
92 
90K 


91'^ Jan. 2 93« Jan. 10 
92^ Jan. 2 93H Jen. 10 
39 Jan. 2 92 Jan 24 


U. 8.68,5-208, '61 

V S 58,l0-40s 


New 58 


B914 Jan. 1« iO% Jan. 24 



state and Kallroad Bond*.— Southern State Bonds have been 
more active than last week, and some considerable transactions 
have taken place in Tennessees, North Carolinas, Virginias, Mis- 
souris, and to-day several sales of Alabama 8s were recorded at 
83 to 84. There is no further intelligence from the Southern 
Capitals beyond that which we have previously given in regard 
to the various messages and financial reports. 

Railroad bonds have been quite active both for the old bonds 
and the new issues. Sales at the stock exchang;e show a large 
business in the bonds of Central and Union Pacific, in conse- 
quence of proposed legislation in Congress, and as to the latter, 
the excitement attending the Credit Mobilier investigation. The 
income bonds of the Union Pacific, depending lor their value 
upon the current earnings of the road, have been particularly 
sensitive and fluctuated considerably. There has been a well 
distributed business at the Board for the railroad bonds sold 
there, and the miscellaneous list, embracing a large number of 
bonds sold only by brokers, has received much attention. In regard 
to this latter class of bonds, the best information as to prices, &c., 
can be obtained by addressing reliable brokers and dealers in 
stocks and bonds. 

Closing prices daily, and the range since Jan. 1, have been : 



Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. 
18. 20. 21. 

e«Tenn.,oia nsx •78« 79X 

68Tenn.,new 

««N. Car., old.... '33 .... 'Six 
6b N. Car., new... '16 "IT "17 

«BVlrg.,old "45 .... -45 

" " consolld'd 'ibii "SSH 55X 

" " deferred.. 15 15 'UX 

ess. C.,n, J.* J. "22 22X 22K 

•a Missouri 92X 92g 93 

Cent. Pac. gold.. "Sax 99 X •99X 

Un.Paclsf. 86X eeii 87 

Un. PacL'dBr't 7SK '78 7SX 
Un. P. Income... 78^ 79 78M 
N.T. Cen,68, 1888. •92K "92 •92X 

Brlelstm. 78 'loi^ "lOlx 'iniK ' 

N.J. CcnlBtmlB 105;^ -105 •ia>X 
Ft Wayne iBtm 7b "105 '104 105 
Ohio & NW. 8 f 7b '102 "irau •102k ' 
Bocls iBid l8t n> 7a 102 'lOlH 102 



22. 

80 
"33 
•17 
•45 

55 J< 
•14W 

22X 

93 

MX 

87 

r,x 

•B2H 

loix 

106)i 

m" 

101 X 



Jan. 


Jan. 


23. 


24. 


80 


80K 


80 


80V 




.■UK 


•17 


17H 


•45 


•45 


•55V 


"55 9i; 


•i4V 


•UK 


•22 


•22 


93 


93 


1(10 


99 K 


hB 


85 


77 S 


17 


•16 H 


75 


93 


•92 H 


10(1 


•101 


106 


105H 


!(ffi 


•105 


I02i< 


•ics 


lOlX 


102 



• Tnu U the prlct bid, so ««(< wM lB«d« *t the Bo»ra, 



. since Jan. i. 


.._ 


^Lowesl 


.-> .-HieheBt. 


79« Jan. 


21 


s: Jan. 


9 


79^ Jau. 


22 


80V Jan. 


24 


33>pi Jan. 


S 


34 Jan. 


10 


U% Jan. 


24 


19 Jau. 


4 


64 Jan. 


6 


66 Jan. 


16 


IS Jan. 


10 


15)4 Jan. 


2 


21X Jan. 


4 


23 Jan. 


20 


92XJan. 


8 


93 Jan. 


4 


99 Jan. 


2 


100 Jan. 


23 


85 Jan. 


U) 


i1% Jan. 


4 


74 Jan. 


IS 


80 Jan. 


6 


73 Jan. 


13 


83y Jan. 


6 


92 Jan. 


n 


93 Jan. 


10 


101 Jan. 


6 


lOlX Jan. 


16 


106 Jan. 


4 


!06X Jan. 


22 


102X Jan. 


6 


105 Jan. 


21 


liKJ Jan. 


e 


m jau 


17 



Kallroad and Mlacellaneons Stock*. The general market 

has moved with more buoyancy, particularly on Wednesday and 
Thursday, prices on the latter day having made quite a sharp 
advance, with large transactions in Ohios, Lake Shore, 
Kock Island, New York Central, and Pacific Mail. 
The highest point of most stocks was touched on 
Thursday afternoon and this morning, but subsequently there 
was some reaction, and prices close this evening lower than yes- 
terday in consequence of some considerable sales made to realize 
the advance. The movement here noticed in the market is said 
to be without the assistance of the leading stock speculators, and 
the support of outside purchasers is considered an important ele- 
ment. No new developments have transpired affecting the value 
of particular stocks ; the Toledo and Wabash Company have 
authorized $5,000,000 of new bonds for the purpose of laying 
steel rails ; reports have been current that the Erie Company 
may be successful in placing their new bonds in London at par ; 
Union Pacific is unfavorably influenced by the Congressional 
investigation and the possibility of adverse legislation ; Pacific 
Mail has been strong, notwithstanding the telegram that the 
steamer Alaska was four days overdue at Hong Kong. 

The following were the highest and lowest prices of the active 

list of railroad andmiscellaneoasstocks on each day of the last week: 

Saturday Monday, Tuesday. Wednesd'y Thursday, Friday, 

Jan. 18. .Jan. jO. Jan. 21. Jan. 22. Jan. 23. Jan. 21. 

K.T.CeniH.K :02X I'SK WHiWHi 103X 104S< lC4>i lli5X 105M I06X 105k 10« 

Harlem 117 122X 119^122 122 122H ISO I21H 120 121 r.9M120i< 

Erie 603< 81X 61 eiH 61X 63X iiH 68)i 63 64« 61;^ 65H 

do pret •73X 77X *.... 78 77 77 '.... 78 17 78>J 

Lake Shore.... 92X 92K 92H 92V 92K S^V 93X 91 94 95 « 35 93V 

Wabaah 71X 72H 72 73>4 11% '.SH 'JaX 73 ;SM T3V ISV 74H 

Northwest 8Q>i 30>i 81 81 81 81 81 81 SIX 8SH 83 84 

do pref. 88 SS sea iS'A aa% SSH 88K SS% 89 SOK 90 91K 
Bock Island.. . IIOX UlJi HI HIV 111)» 112 112 llSJi U2« 114H IlSJtf 114V 
St. raul 52 !2 52 S2K 52V S3X 5SH 53V M}i 33V 53« SSX 

do pref... T7X 77>i 77X 7TX "X 77H n% 77v 7-M T»V WV 79H 
Ohio&MlBSlp. 46J4 46K i6% 46V W'.'i )6« 46J< 4;« 47X 49X 48J< 4'.IX 
Centralof N. J 1(2 104X I03K lOSX 102V 103 103 103 103 103 103 103H 
Bostou.H&B. 8 HH SW SH 8K 8V 8J| 9 9 »ii 85< 9 

DeL.L.A W... 97V 98 •.... 9TV 97)i 97H "97 97K 97J< 9:x '97 P7K 
Hann.AStJoB 4iK 47H 47« 48 "46)4 47V *46:S 47« 47 49M iSH i'iii 

do pref'.... 70 •68X 70X "68 70k '68 71M 71 71 

Union Paolflc. 36 36J< 86X te)i S6X 36V 36M 36K 35V S6% 35X 36X 
Col.Chlc.& I.e. 88 S8H SSii 38X 38X 3SH iHii 39 38V 39X 38>^ SSii 

Panama 125 125 •125 139 •.... 127« ♦125H 128 •1S7X 130 128K 128H 

West. Un. Tel. 82!^ 83j4 82« 84X ia% 84k 8.3X S4X 84k S5 B35i 84J4 
Quicksilver... 43M 44X *I3V .... "43X UH 43H 43V 43H 43V 43X 43X 

do pref.. 63 53 '.... 5t •.... 54 ".... 64 

PaolfloMall, ... 69H 70J< 70M n% 70V 71X Ilk ''3% 73 WX '2X MV 

Adams Exp 96 96 •95X .... •96V ■•■• '^VA .... "98 

Am. Merch.Ex •69k «9k '69 69X •.... 69k '69 e9k 69>i 69k 69k mn 
United States.. 79 79^ X76V 16» 76 76 73k T6 76X 7Ik 77^ 73k 
WollB, Fargo.. "63 85 •S3>i 85 85 86 "84k S5k "fS 84 •83 85 
Canton 101 101 100« lOlM lOOX lOUk lOUk 100>< 100>i lOOX 

* This iB the price bid and asked, no sale was made at the Board . 

The range in th«se stocks since Jan. 1 has been at follows : 

. Slnc« Jan. 1. , 

-Lowest.-, ^Highest.—. 



-Since Jan. 1. 
^Lowest.-^ ^Highest.-. 
NTCenJkHK. 99H Jan. 6106?4Jan.2S 

Harlem H4X Jan. 6 122k Jan. 18 

Erie 63kJan.l3 65« Jan. 24 

do pref 77 Jan. 22 73k Jan. 24 

Lakeshere 91% Jan. li 97 Jan. 6 

Wabash 71k Jan. 18 75V Jan. 2 

Northwest 80k Jan. 18 84 Jan. 24' 

do pref. 673^ Jan. 10 9;kJan.24 
Rock Island. .. . 109k Jan. 7ill4V Jan.24 
St. Paul 51k Jan. Ill 54k Jan ~ 



do pref 76X Jan. 11 

Ohio & Miss... 45k Jan. 11 

Central of N.J. 99M Jan. 6 

Boston, H.&E 6K Jan. 6 

Del.. L. 4 W. . 33 _Jan. 7 



79.k Jan. 21 
49X Jan. 24 
104k .Ian. 18 
9k Jan. 23 
"" Jan. 17 



Honn. ASt.Jos 46 Jan. 14 

do do pref 70 Jan. 2 

Union Pacific. 34 Jan. IS 

Col, Chlc.& I.e. 36V Jan. 2 

Panama 125 Jan. 18 

West U Teleg'h SK Jan. 7 
Quicksilver.... 4Sk Jan. IS 
do prel. 53 Jan. 18 
Pacific Mail,... 69k Jan. 17 
Adams Express 94 V Jan. 7 
Am Merch Un. 68k Jan. 8 
U.S. Express... 75k Jan. 2i 
Wells, r. & Co. 85 Jan. 21 



SOk Jan. 
■H}i Jau. o 
39k Jan. 4 
39>i Jan. 23 
1.30 Jan, 6 
85 Jan. 23 
46k Jan. 2 
E3 Jan. 18 
75k Jan. 28 
96 Jan. 20 
70k Jan. 8 
8i Jan. 6 
Jan. 21 



Lapsley & Bazley. Brokers, 47 Exchange place, quote stock "privHeges'" (sie 
responsible parties), 1 per cent premium for 30 days, and lk(S2 per cent lor 6 



at prices varylug from the market as follows 



Canton 100>^ Jan. 22 :02k Jan. 4 

led by 
I days. 



Puts. CallB. 

Below. Above. 

Central* Hudson.. V«l Miml 

Lake Shore >,91 lk®2 

Bocklsland lk(»' 2k®3 

Erie 2kffl! 3 @4 

Pacific Mall 4 @5 7 ®9 

NorthweBtern X@l 



Puts. Calls. 

Below. Above. 

Ohlo& Mlsslselppl. X®1 lk@2M 

Union Pacific 1 ®1>4 2 ®2k 

Wabash v»l lk«2k 

eol., Chic. & I.e.... I ®lk ' ®2H 

Gold k P c for 30 ds V®1 lH®lk 



— Balances. , 

Gold. Currency. 
»2.24;.790 t3.0.'!6,246 



The Gold market. — Gold was pretty strong early in the 
week, but was checked for a time in its advance by the Syndi 
cate reports from Washington and the prospect of a further nego- 
tiation of 5 per cent, bonds. The check was temporary, however, and 
to-day the price was again buoyant, touching at 1141 and closing at 
1 14. In addition to the influence of speculative purchases the mar- 
ket received support from the large amount put up for ship- 
ment to-morrow, which footed up $2,000,000 ; though, exchange 
being weaker, it is possible that some of it may be withdrawn. 
On loans the rates paid for carrying to-day were 3, 4, 1, 2^, 4i and 5 
per cent. At the Treasury sale of $1,000,000 on Thursday the 
bids amounted to $3,963,000, at prices from 112.51 to 113.63i. 
Customs receipts for the week amount to $2,632,000. 

The following table will show the course of the gold premium 
each day of the past week: 

. (Quotations. . 

Open- Low- High- Clos- 
ing, est. est. Ing. 

Saturday, Jan. 18 ;'.2X I12X !!3k 118k 

Monday, " 30 U3 112X USX IISK 

Tuesday, •' 21 1I3X i;3k 113« 11S« 

Wed'day, " 22 V.SH 113H IISV llSH 

Thursday, •' 23 IIIH 113k I13» USv 

Erlday. " 24 llSV 113H tl4k 114 

Currentweek IU% 112X l!4k 114 311,880.000 

Prevlonsweek ::2X lUk 112V 1!2X 212,630,000 

Jan. 1, 1S73, to date 112k lUK I14K 114 

Foreign Excbange. — The exchange market has been pretty 
active, particularly on Thursday, when prices were quoted up to 
109J for 60 days' sterling, and llOi for short sight. The high 
prices made and the prospect of specie shipments, as noticed 
above, checked activity, and today the market was more quiet, 
though rates were nominally maintained by the leading bankers. 

There have been some borrowed bills on the market, but there 
has also been a demand for short sight to pay back 60 day bills 
previously borrowed, and the latter transactions are now prob- 
ably quite equal to the former, as there is little inducement to 
borrow sterling when money is easy. 

The transactions for the week «t the Custom House and Sub- 
TreaBuiy have been as follows; 



Total , 
Clef.rlngB. 
147,352,000 
57.213,000 
65,201,000 
107.992,«)0 
62,945,000 
51,177,000 




1,<!22,;76 2.078.4S7 
1,862,4 JI 2,;si,792 



January 25, 1873.] 



Tffi CtitKuNICLli 



107 



Baturday, Jan. 13. 
Monday. "" 

TiieBdiiy, 
Wc'inesday, 
ThursUay, 
Friday, 



a).. 

21.. 



28.... 
■U.... 



Total 

Balanoe, Jan. 17.. 
Balance, Jan. U,. 



caatom 

House 

Receipt*. 

•5<I4.0U0 
631,000 
487.000 
833,»J0 

3S5,onu 

KlfiOO 

....t«,e$i.ooo 



Oold 
W)II.8W 88 
6911,506 81 
iV.ini M 
9*7,850 •! 
S89.iVI 70 

63u,ui a; 



Recelyti.' 



-Bnb-Trflaaory.- 



Currenny. 

tMI.883 n 
5.^,637 89 
183,39 < «3 

1,3K,V11 97 
6w5.4il 7) 

1,3W,(I«8 63 



Oold. 

ni9,7l7 01 
8M,IJ<S 33 
8M.489 J7 
7HU.1W 00 
m.'l'K! Ul 

1,370,03) 91 



Paymenta 



Currency. 

43i,ioH ua 
jjt.ce 19 
su.-fi oo 

744.975 01 
3M,474 M 



tB<,:83,804 57 f3O,779,01O 36 
I36,6:«,3I4 41 132,716.357 96 

New York City Banks. — The following statement showi the 
condition of tlie Associated Banks of New York City tor the week 
ending at the commencement of business on Jan. 18, 1873 : 



Ba.i(Ka. 

Wow rork 

Ilanhactan Co 3,050,009 

llarohanta'... 3,000,000 

ICecliaDlcs 2,000,000 

Dnion 1,500,000 

America ... 8,000,000 

PSoBnli; 1,800,000 

Ity , 1.000,000 

T radeaman'a l.TOO.OOO 

Pulton 600.000 

Ohemloal 800,000 

Merctianta KzcbanKe.... 1.335.OO0 

Qallatln, (Tatlonai 1.600.000 

Butcliera'A Drovers .... 800.000 
Ifectiaalcs and Traders'. 600.000 

Greenwich ■ 300.000 

Leather Mannl tOO.OOO 

SeveDtn Ward. 500.000 

SUteol New Srort 3.00C.OOO 

American BxchauKe 5.000.000 

Oommcrce lO.OOO.OOO 

Broadway l.OOO.OCO 

Mercantile , 1.000.0CO 

PaclSo ; 423.700 

Bepubllc 3,000.000 

Otaatham 450.000 

People's 412.500 



— ^TEBAea AMOFKTOF 

Loans and Le^al Net 

Capital DUnoiints Hpecle. Tender!. Depoatta . 

. t3.0U0.00C I'. 1,71)1. WU t2,664,e0C MOi.OOO 110.714.300 



North America 1.000.000 

ttanover 1.000.000 

irvlnR 500.000 

tletropoUtas 4,000.000 

Citizens 400.000 

Nassau 1.000.000 

MarKet l.OOO.OOO 

St. Nicholas 1.000.000 

Shoe and Leather 1.000.000 

Corn rfichange 1.000000 

Continental 2.000.000 

Oommonwealtli 750.0UO 

Oriental 300,000 

Marine 400.000 

Atlantic 800.000 

Importers and Traders'. . 1 ,500.000 

Park 3.000.300 

Mechanics' BankInK Ass. 500.000 

Oroc.ors' 800.000 

North River 400.000 

KastUlvcr 850,000 

Manufacturers * Mer 500.000 . 

PourtH National 5.000,000 3J.45i 500 

Oant.-al National 3.000.000 9.251,000 

Second Nattsaal 800,000 I,51».800 

Ninth National 1.500,000 6,37B,U00 

Klrst National 500.000 4.'31,AIO 

Third National 1,000.000 S.7M.000 

New York N. Bxchanite 500.000 l.^K'^W 

Tenth Natloail 1,000.000 ^■2?''i'S 

Bowery National 250,000 1.3US,00g 

New rork County 200,000 1.0;6.»» 

German American 2.000.000 5JS18.900 

Dry lioods 1,000.000 2,3j3,200 



«.3».900 

7.ua.(X)0 

5,8I4..MXI 
6.257..'W 
7.59i,300 
4,22:.9O0 
5,913.100 
8.822.200 
1,780,000 
6.30tl.lOO 
8,3M.;00 
3,482,400 
2,317,300 
1,913 100 

964 sra 

2,931,100 
MIVOOO 
4.654.10O 
9,»03,7'lfl 
20,005.700 
9.094,000 
4 021 910 
1,438,800 
5.162 200 
2,237.100 
1.4i;,!«0 
8,451.100 
2,175.200 
2,140.000 
e,657,0'J0 
1,446.800 
1.968.300 
2,952,600 
2.553.000 
3,807.300 
2.657.600 
3.527.600 
1,965,100 
1.556,800 
1.991,900 
801.300 
12.5)5.306 
15 146.2UC 
1,267,800 
765,000 
1.067,900 
1.124.400 
1.327.900 



638.200 522.310 
1,102.800 494.0UC 

408.900 946,500 

630.700 283,300 
1,218,200 l,109.(KiO 

4 10.500 390.400 



8t!8,900 
56,100 

15S,»H.! 

422,40J 
73,200 

3;i.;uo 

49 00C 
26,000 

34i)',o5c 
62.80C 
480,600 



404,000 
677,71)0 
506,700 
891,800 
6:46,300 
225,400 
497,700 
3M,900 
14>,100 
419.700 
218.31)0 
461.400 
461.200 I.OSI.SOO 
663,800 2.21)8,900 
1S9J00 3,287,300 
1 19.9J0 896.3(<0 



16.100 
1.257.600 

131.000 
5.600 

201.900 

112.900 
22.6'JO 

791,600 
24,100 
81.200 
76,300 
62,100 

193,300 
59.700 

128 JOO 
32,800 
5,600 

2!8,30a 
38,600 



ST7,.10C 
297,000 
720,400 
308,900 
310,000 
846,200 

4>2.omi 

693,000 
316,300 
296.600 
742.1W 
427.500 
515,000 
139,000 
S8C,(nO 
45IJ00 

2S7,500 
I59,«)0 



476,500 2,922,800 

999.500 4,9.!I,-0C 

75.900 353.7110 

4,400 13f.900 

18,700 221.800 

5400 3SI.3:H) 

89.800 2i(l,')00 

2,266,000 3,303,700 

99.100 2.f.89,lX)0 

371,008 

567,000 1,376.000 

598.100 731,500 



662.400 

26,500 

147.500 

4.200 

4'6b'.36o 
14,»<0 



807,500 
292,600 
254,900 
277,000 
400.000 
625,500 
315,000 



4,0)7300 
4.240.100 
4J»6,80a 
3,331.Uia 
5J36,000 
2,'.I31.200 
3,8115.700 
2.089,200 
!,4'i.1."(IO 
4.191.200 
3,6O3,I0U 
1,426,300 
1,043,5(10 
1,271,300 

955,400 
3.323.300 

)80,400 
3,822,600 
4,671,600 
6,71'',90C 
8 621.300 
3.721.70(i 

1 ,6;;o,5jo 

3.87S,31iO 
2,957.600 
1, ■270,600 
3,139,200 
1,229*10 
1,962,(H0 
4.1.53.100 
1,42.1.600 
3,045,1U) 
2,137,900 
1,147.900 

2.3;e,;oo 

<,194,300 

1,854,000 

1.602.300 

1.250.S00 

1.621.400 

540.200 

12,519,600 

19.80S.90C 

1,182.700 

616,0110 

361,700 

90:1.700 

1.180.910 

15,356,900 

8.106,000 

1.206,600 

6,1J5,00') 

4,698.700 

5,176,500 

g49,9(« 

«:o,500 

190 000 

1,019,400 

4,693,4110 

1,961,900 



Circula- 
tion. 
1825.600 
9,7(1) 
869,000 
505.400 
486,01 U 
1.200 
4*7.800 

-63.3il6 



448.100 

490.800 
341.600 
195.700 
2,700 
262.100 
160.600 
514,300 
993,900 
8.145.90l< 
888.CU1 
4,5.900 

esi'.coo 

128,500 
5,600 

29V.2tlO 

la7.50O 

l,179,30lf 

130.100 

8,900 
3=6..5»1 
74ii.7i» 
783,51)0 

5.(00 
581,100 
330.2U0 

4,100 
880.000 
96.4110 
496 500 
97S.3I«I 
801.6)0 

:.9 

I0,8.« 
334,500 



llDOTATIO^rs IN BOmn. PHIIIDELPHU, BUTUIIB. kt. 



•KIIIBTnU. 



BOSTON 

Maine 6s 

New Hampshire. 0s., 

Veroionl M 

Maasachnaettsts, Carraney... 
do (• Oold, irfe, 

do 6a, Oold 

Boston ts. 

do fia.tfold 

Chicago Beweraxe 7s 

do Municipal 78 

Portland as, balldlngloaii 

HurllnKton*Mo.L.«i.,7 

('heshlre, 6 - 

Oln., Han. « Cler., IstM., 7. t1. 
Kaatern Maaa.. conr., 6, 1874. .. 
Hartford * Krle, 1st M (new)7. 

do do certlfleataa... 

OgdensburgA Lake ' h.Sa 

Old Col. « Newport Bds,*, It. 

do do Bonds, 7, 1877 

Rutland, new. 7 

Btansted ft Chambly 7a 

Verm'tCen.. lslM.,cona..7,t)« 

do 2dMort..7,1891..., 
Vermont * Can., new. 8. . . , 
Vermont & Mass., 1st M.. 6. 

Boston ft Albany Block 

Boston ft Lowell stock 

Boston ft Maine 

Boston ft Providence 

Cheshire preferred 



WH 



3.949.100 
l,44l,5('0 

Ki5,000 
579.000 
813,600 
789. !00 
367,800 
871,600 
216.090 
180,000 



TOUl ai.42OJ00 378.309,600 31,;iO,80O 41,420,900 212.588,200 57.5I2.2C0 

The deviations from the returns of previous week are as follows 

;3,«5«,80(' I Net Deposits Inc. 15,148,700 



Loans Inc. 

Specie Deo. 

LeKal Tenders Inc. 



.Inc. 



80,600 



1 428,3' Circulation 
3,544,200 I 

Boston Banks. — Below we give a statement of the Boston 
National Banks, as returned to the Clearing House, on Monday, 
Jan. 20, 1873 : 



Banks. 

Atlantic 

Atlas 

Blackstonc 

Boston 

Boylston 

Broadway 

Columbian 

Continental 

Eliot 

Everett 

VaneuUHall... 

Freeman's 

(llohe 

BamlltoQ.. 



Capital 

$750,000 

1,500,000 

1,500,000 

1.000.000 

600,000 

200.000 

l.OOO.OOO 

1,000.000 

1,000,000 

200.000 

1,000,000 

soo.ooo 

1,000.000 
750.000 



Howard 1,000,000 

Market 800,000 

Massachusetts 800.000 

Maverick 400,000 

Merdhante' 3,000,000 

Mount Vernon 200,000 

New Kngland 1,000,000 

North 1,030,000 

Old Boston 900,000 

Bhawmut 1,000.000 

Shoe ft Leather 1,000.000 

State 3,000,000 

Suffolk 1,500,000 

Traders 600,000 

Tramont 3,000.000 

~ ■ ■ 7SO.00O 

1,000.000 
1,600 000 
300,000 
2,000,000 
1.01)0,000 
1,000,000 
1,500,000 
1,000,000 
1,000,000 
1,000.000 
1,. 500,000 
2,000.000 
200,000 
1,000,000 
1,500.000 
500.000 



Washington... 

First 

Second (Qranlte) . . . 

Third 

Bank of Commerce 
Bank of N. America 
B'k of Redemption. 
Bank of RepuDltc... 

City 

Kngle 

Exchange 

Hide ft Leather 

Revere 

Socnrlty 

Union 

Webster 

OommoQwealth 



Loans. 

11,538 800 
2,903,01X1 
9,72 •..9C0 
3,215.400 
1.661,600 
535,300 
2,986.000 
1,9)8,700 
8.010,300 
779.300 
3,129.200 
1.619.10J 
2,177.900 
1,69)300 
2,294.500 
1,512,900 
1,838.400 
1.071.600 
8,-286.600 
599,100 
2.593.1)00 
3,316.300 
1.949.9il0 
2.;i2.6O0 
3.045,200 
3.726,400 
3.:i29.4llO 
1,5X1.500 
3.532,700 
2,167,700 
4,258,200 
4.9.32.200 
1.513.700 
l,76l,70J 
2,019,400 
6.!61,30J 
3.010,500 
1,9S5,'200 
1,9 12,300 
4.7(13.100 
3.503,500 
4.3i2,UO 
321,600 
3.613,300 
2,656,000 
2,402,600 



Specie. L.T. Notes. 



$47,100 
18,200 
52.800 
10.700 
33,400 

36.400 

100 

62.000 

1.500 

143.200 

2.;oo 
7i'.i65 

6U.500 
3.5.600 
96,100 
7,500 
338,200 

10l',9i)6 

220,200 

150,100 

8,800 

Ki'.OOO 

90.000 

82,900 

103,600 

3.200 

130,5(10 

152.900 

68,200 

1,000 

5.700 

153.300 

50.000 

3,700 

4,500 

131,200 

8.100 

9.400 

3,000 

75.200 

60J 

190,000 



188.300 
135,300 
261.500 
198,700 
391.2(0 
53,01.10 
283,000 
215,200 
119.300 
82,100 
304.000 
l;6.0)0 
199.000 
82,200 
141,100 
73.800 
96.500 
88,600 
774,700 
95,800 
177,100 
102,(100 
379.400 
219.310 
312.400 
207.900 
323.200 
27,700 
391.800 
188.700 
3111.500 
6.12.0(10 
83J0C 
627.31)0 
295,400 
591,900 
H3,-200 
349,8(0 
110.41 
572,900 
3->2.30O 
435 6i0 
50.6110 
117.900 
837 200 
152.800 



Deposits, Clrcnia. 

Mdo.SOO I445.JCO 



936.300 
l,73:),6Cfl 
1.005.600 
816.700 
2i>8,500 
1.072.000 
796.700 
: ,086.200 
645,0(0 
1,853.700 
623,000 
"50..500 
1,008,700 
746.900 
909,000 
905.700 
537.200 
4.295.2110 
471,600 
1,021,000 
1.643,100 
1.022.OC0 
1.128.800 
1,509,300 
1,192,610 
1,143.400 
1,187 900 
1,365.900 
I,-.:95.7;» 
1,891,7(0 
2.421.100 
1.431.700 
1.691.400 
5;r7.2O0 
1.451.200 
77*.S0O 
1,J31,0(I0 
7in.S00 
3.451,200 
1,423 900 
2,541.100 
599,600 
l,241,-.00 
1 107.600 
1.937,300 



777.0(10 
739.800 
571^01 
442.000 

ns.-.oo 

791,610 

968.50.1 

783,000 

116.700 

509.600 

S4!.;i00 

349.700 

240 800 

446.500 

352.800 

393 8)0 

•242 100 

1,560,500 

176.000 

7;9.8(iO 

785,30) 

857,100 

596.200 

696.000 

977.210 

746.800 

17.1600 

676.700 

533.000 

790.100 

781,000 

172,70(1 

752,400 

591JC0 

783,400 

794.501 

419.700 

SST.7:lO 

796.900 

78S.:cO 

7 If. .000 

177.000 

583.100 

486,(100 

35U.000 



Chic, Bur. ft Qnlr.cy. 

cm., Sundoaky ft CleT.ttock. 

Concord 

Connecticut Klver 

Connecticut ft Passumpsic, pf. 

F.astern (M a88.5 

Eastern CNew UampBhIre) .... 

FItchburoi 

Manchester ft Lawrence 

Northern of New Hampshire. 

Norwichft Worcester 

OBdens; ft L. Champlain 

do do pref.... 

Old Colony, 

Port.,Bacoft Portsmouth.. 

Rutland common 

do preferred 

Vermont ft Canada 

Vermont ft Maasaohnsetta.. 
PHILADEEiPHIA 

BT\TK A.VI) CITT BOKP9. 

PennBvWanla 5s. coup 

(Jo ts, '«7, 5-10, Ist 

do do 10-15, 2d... 

do do 15-25. 3d. 
Philadelphia 6s, old 

do 8e, new 

Alleghany County, 5a, coop 

Alleirhany City 6a 

Pittsburg 5s 

do 9s 

do 7s 

New Jersey State 68, Exempts 
Delaware iitatc 68 

RAILROAD STOCKS. 

0nlted N. J. Companlee 

Camden ft Atlantic 

do do pref.... . 
Catawlfisa 

do pref 

Klmlra ft wuilamsport 

Klmlra ft WllUamsport pref. 

East Pennsylvania 

Harrlsb'g. Lancaster ft C 

Uuntln^-tonft Broad Top. .. 
do do pref. 

Lehigh Valley 

Little Schuylkill 

Mlnehlll 

Nesquehonlng Valley 

Norristown 

Nor'hcrn Central 

North Pennsylvania., 

on Creek ft Allegheny Blver 

Pennsylvania 

Philadelphia ft Trie 

Philadelphia ft Reading 

Philadelphia ft Trenton 

Phlla., Wllm'lng. ft Baltimore 

rioga ..•• 

Westchester 

-do pref 

WestJorsev 

CANAL STOCKS. 

Chcsapeakeft I'elaware 

Delaware Division 

Lehigh Navigation 

Morris 

do pref 

Schuylkill Navigation 

do pref. .. 
Union pref 

RAILROAD BONDS. 

Alleghany Valley 7 8-lCa, lf»6^ 



lOlM 
67 



41 H 
ID 



133 
124 
148 
Tl 
119 
18 
90 



•UK 



PeDasrl<a.,g«B.iD.,eaav.MU> n 

<i'i do reg. ... »4 



105V. 

m" 
lao 

112H 
12SK 
64 

too 

1I2X 
136 



lOOX 



96 

lOOH 
77 

T2)4 

lO'H 
'.02 



13DV 

S6X 
30S 
44 
27 



41K 



14IX 



18X 



108X 

:u3 

12»X 

113" 
126 
6S 
lUl 
lt2M 



101 

li'4>» 

107 

i66j< 



UH 



131 

:7X 
21 X 
45 



39X 40 



lox 

15 

9H( 
16 
93K 



Belvldere Delaware,lst m,«, 

3a M., so 
Sd M.,'87 



Total $48,890,000 $131,115300 13,798,9110 $11,051,500 $55,781,900 $25,568,400 

The total amount "due to other Banks," as per statement of Jan. 20, Is $19,660,100. 

The deviations from last week's returns are as follows : 

JLoans Increase. $887,1001 Deposits Increase. $10,300 

specie Increase. 60,200 Circulation Deoreaae. 21,900 

LagalTenders Increase. 173,1001 



do do 

do do 

Camden * Amboy, 68, ■75 

do do 68,'88 

do do 6s, '89 

do domort. 68, '89... 

do consol., 68, '94... 

Camden ft Allan. I»t m, 7s, ■78. 

do 2d m, 78. '80.. 

Catawlsaa, 1st M. conT. , '83 — 

do chat. m. do '83.... 

do new7s, 190O 

Connecting 6« 190O-I9W... 

Kaat Penn. ist mori. 78, ^.;^. 
El. ft W'mBport. Ist m. 78. '80, 
do do 5a..., 

Harrlsburg '.8t mort.6«^_;8S... 
H. ft B. T. Ist mon. 78, '90. . . . 
do 3d mort. 78, "TS... 
do 3d m. cons. 7a, 'W, 
Junction Ist mort. 6b. 'S3. . . . 
do 2d do '.900.... 
Lehigh Valley, let M.. 6b. 1878. 
do do new 68, '93... 
do do do reg... 
do do new 7s. reg.. 1910 
Little Schnylklll.lst M..7. 1"". 
Northern Central 2d m, 6s, 'SB. 
do do 2d m. K. 6a, 1900 

do do2dm. Is. 1*XI... 

North Penn. Ist m, 6s^ 

do 2dm.7B,T6...„.. 

do 10s. chat, m., "17 

Oil Creek A Al. R., con. 7s, "U 
Oil Creek ist m. 7b, '82.. ^.... 
Pern, ft HIghtstown .«, W..^ 
Penn ft N.V. Canal 78 ■9W906 
Pennsylvania, Ist M., 6, li«i. 
I io 2d M.. 6. 1879.. 



H« 
83 

97 

93K 

is" 

98' 
90 
18 

n% 

.01 



novamak 



Pcrklonca Isl m. <•. t) 
Phlla. ft Krie Isim.la, 'tl 

do Id n. 7., •«•...., 
PblladelphU * Baadlug «•, W 
do do 78. *W 

do COBT.78, "' 

do dab. bond*. —I 

do g. m. 7s,c.. 1910 

do do rttt... 

do ■■,(.,17.0.. 

PbBa. A Banbury lat m. Ta... 
?hlI..WIIin.* «-i •- •" ... 
»ltU..Clli.» ^ 

Sanbory A K;. ,7 

Minbary A I.-- 

Warren A F. Ist 111 ,■. '* 

Wrst Chester con*. Ta, *91...,. 

Weat Jetwy M, "U 

do latm. ••,■«*.... 

do do 7b, t7 

WeateriiPeno.ta, 1$ 

do do •■. p. b- PI- 

Winning. A B«ad.,lal M ..7.1«n 

do do 3d Mart ItOi 

Baadlng Coal A Iron deb. b. . 

do do mort. b, 

OAJiAL aoKDa. 

Cbeaapeake A Dala. 6«,1I.,.. 

Delaware DItIsIos as, '74 

Lahlgh NarlgaUon ••, "^l 

do KR. t;... 

do eonT..*n 

do COOT., f,'94. 

do gold« 17 

MorTlt,l8tM., 6,187$ 

do 3d M., 1871 

do boat, 'Its •.. 

Pennaylvanla 6a, 1910 

Bchoylklll Kav. lat ni.l«,*n. 
do 3d m.. •«.... 

do 6a.t3 

do 6a. Inip., *8t.., 
()o 6a. host. *8B. . 
do 7s. boat. If... 

Snuiaetaauna 6a, '*4 

do Coal Co. bond*. 

Union 1st mon. 68, Tli 

West Rranih lit m. 6<,'7<< 

Wyoming Va ley Ift in. 6a, T$. 

HALTIiflOKIt. 
Maryland 6a, Jan., A., J. A U.. 

do $a, Dfltence 

Baltimore 6a of *7S 

do 1884 

do (s-.toe 

do 1890 Park 6a 

Baltlmora A Ohio <a of *n 

do do 6a 01 f* .... 

do do $8 ot ' 85,,,. 

do (N.W.Va.)2oM 61. 
do 8dM.(4 

Central Ohio, lat M..S 

Marletu A cm., lat M.,7. lan 
do do 3dM.,7,18M. 

Norfolk Water rs , 

Northern Cent., Ist M. (gnar) • 

I do do 2dM., 8. Kr,<,'85. 

do do SdM..8. F.,6,H(» 

do do 8d M. cT. A C) *.T 

I do do Cons, (gold) 6, 19U 

Pitta. A Connellsv., Ist M.j7, "ft 

do do IstM., I, l8f» 

WeatMd,lstM..endoraed,(iia 

do 1st M., nnend.. •• 10_ 

do 3d M.,endoraed 6,'90, 

Baltimore A Ohio aiocK. 



*'k 



•: 

n 
vtih 






r.H 



«H 



uk 



s** 



.01 



vc 



7»H »2 

.... M 
NttlMX 



7« 
81 
7SK 

77' 
79 
St 



Ok 



7»M 



"^ 



'87)i 



99S 
*IH 

loi' 

98 
93 
91*- 
37 

95J< 

is' 

99 

98 



91S' 



95), 



•9V 



Parkeraburg Branch. 

Central Ohio 

do preferred 

CINOINNA-ri. 

Cincinnati 9a 

do 6a 

do 7-908 

Bam. Co., Ohio 6 p. c. ong bds. 
do do 7p.c., lto5yrs, 
do do Ig bds, 7 A i.90a 

Covington ft Cln. Brldg* 

CIn., Ham. ft D.. 1st M., 7, 80... 
io do 3d M.,7, KS... 

do do 3d M., 8,77... 

Cln. A Indiana, 1st M.,7 

do do 3d M.,7, 1877.. 

Colum..ft Xenla.lsl M.,7._'90. 
Dayton A Mich., lat M.. 7 81.. 
do do JdM..7,'84.. 
do do SdMM7,'88.. 

do To'do dep. hds, i, ■91-'»4. 
Dayton A West., Ist M.,7, 1908, 
"do do IstM., •,1905, 

Ind., Cln.A Laf., Ist M.,7.... ;;_^ 

d<; a.AC)IatM'.,7,lW' 

JnncCIn. ft Ind..Ist MmI.-JB. 
Little Miami, 1st M., «, I8W ... . 

Cln. Ham. A Dayton stock. . . . 

Colnmbos ft Xrnia stock ex d 

Dayton A Michigan stock ei d 

do 8 p c. st'k guar 

Little Miami stock. ......ex. d. 

K.OOISVILLK. 

LoolaTUle6a,'Wto;m 

do «a,'»7to'98 .„. 

do wattrfc.'gJto'W.. 
do Watar Stock la, 't7 

do Wbarfta 

do Bpeclal tax 6a of ■89. 
Jeff., Mad. * I,lBtM.(I*M)7. V 
do do 2d M.,7,....;..... 

do do Ut M., 7,1906... 

liOillaT. C . ft Lex., I8t M .. 7, •«. 
lSS. ft Fr'k.. l»t M .. 6. ho-r^ 
^^ do LonlBv.Loan,«. m 
L. * Saab. Isi M. (ra. s.) ., ^^ 
do Lor. Loan ( n •.)«. 'i-'~^- 
do do (Leb.lir.)6.'9« 

do IstM. (Mem. Rr)7,'7i^'T5 
do latM.(Leb.hr"x)7.1«>-2 
do Lon.L'nd.eb.br.ex)*,* 
do Conaol.lstM..7,18«.... 

Ieffar8on.,Mad. ft Ind^. 

LonlsT., Cln. ft Lex., pref. .. . 
^ Jo do common. 

Loalavllle A Nashville 

ST. toiTm. 

31 LooU 68. Long Bondt 

do 68,8^03 do 

io Waur«B,gold 

do do do (new) 

do Parkta gold 

Io BewerSpeclalTaxle 

North MliBonrl, lat M. 7s. . .. 

do MM. 78.... 

,|o iki M.Ta.. . 

PaclBc (of M> 5 181 M. gld.. 

Kansas Pactflr stock 

p. r RR. of Mo. Stock 



INK 



i$" 

10* 

a* 



n 
«1K 



U7K 



a 

as 

1(8 

90 

9S 
100 

7' 

94 

•8 

98 

85 

>4 

M 

!S 

•1 

U 

M 

88 

73 

■» 

»$ 

« 

84 

9t 
lj.,4 

iniH 
104)4 

81 
CO 
.<$ 
7»H 

so 

81 

9* 
7» 
b7 
:• 
87 
81 
!7 
» 
i-lM 

96 

91 

«x 

x*l 

7714 

:3 
7S 



4 

too 

H 

» 
IS 
M 
« 
H 
8* 
W 
M 
80 
M 
89 
«t 
90 

:09 

41 

It 
!.» 

8i 

n 

H 

n 

M 
M 

•» 
M 
St 

as 

«T 

I* 
84 

fJH 
96 



na 



71 



91 



Hi 

•0 ; i: 



108 



THE CHRONICLE. 



[ January 26, 1878. 



QUOTATIONS OF STOCKS AND BONDS IN NEW YORK. 

Oovernment Bonds and actiw Railroad Stocks are quoted on a previous page anu, Mt repeated here. Prices represent the per 
cent value, whatever the par may be. " N. T. Local Securities " are quoted in a separate list. 



ftaouBrriiB. 



V, S. Bonda. 

(Quoted prevlooBly.) 

State Bonda. 

Tennessee 6b, old 

do do new 

VlrKinlatii, old t 

io do new bonds 

do do consol. bonds 

do do deferred do 

Georgia 6s 

do "B, new bonds 

do 7b, endorsed 

do iB.Gold 

Worth Oarnllna 68. old 

do do to N.C. B.B. Co., 
do do Fundlngr Act, 1866. 
do do do 1868. 

do do nevboDds 

do do Special Tax 

Sotttb CarolinaKs 

do do ,Ian. & July... 
do do April A Oct... 

do do Knndliift Act, 1S66 
do do LantlClSSO, J & J 
do do L.udC,18S9,A&U 

do do 78 of 18?8. 

HlBBOnrl 63 

do Han. * St. .roneph. 

do Asylum bonds 

LonlBlana6s 

do do new oonda 

do do now floating debt. 

do 7b, Peuitentlafy 

do 68, levee bonds 

do 8s do 

do 8s do 1873.. 

do 88 of 1910. 

California 7s 

do 7b, large bonds.... 

Oonnecttcnt 6b ..,. 

Rhode Island 68 

Alabama Ss 

do 8s 

do 88 Mont & Enf 'la B. . 
do Bf Mab. &Chat. E. 

do Es of 1592. 

ArkansaB 6s, funded 

do 7b, I.. R. & Ft. S. Iss 
do 78, Memphis & L. R.. 
do 7b, L. R.,T. B. & N.O. 
do 7b, Ml8S. O. & B. BIT. 

do IsArk.CeDtR 

Texas. ICs, of 1876 

Onio6B,l»75 

do «B,1881 

do 68, 1886 

Kentnc!<y 68 

Iltnois canal bonds, 1870 

do 6b coupon, 77 

do do 1879 

do WarLoan 

Indiana 5b 

Michigan 6b, 1873 

do 6b, 1878 

Jo 6s,188S 

do 7b,1878 

New York Bounty, reg 



do 
ao 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do cou 

68, Canal, 1813 

6b, do 1874 

do 1875 

do 1877 

do 1878.. .. 

dogldl887 

do 18T4, 



68, 



5s, 
58, 



9U 



S3X 



1U8H 
Si 

97' 
97 



Stallroad Stocks. 

fNot previously Quoted.) 
tjany s Susquehanna , 

Atlantic & Pacldc, pref 

Chicago & Alton 

do d'j pref 

Chic. Bur AQuincy 

Olev., Col., Cln. & Indianap.. 

Cleve. * PlttBbtir?. guar 

Central of New Jersey, scrip. 
Col. Chic. & Ind. Central.... 

Dninnnp*. SIOUX Cltv 

Harlem pret 

Illinois Central 

JoUetft Chicago 

Long Island 

Marietta & Cln., iBt preferred 
do do 2d pref... 

Morris 4 Essex 

Mo.,Kau8a«ft T 

Kew Jersey 

Wew Jersey Southern 

N. T., New Haven * Hartford 
K.r., Prov. & Bost (Sioaingt.) 
Ohio* Mississippi, preferred. 
Pitts., Ft W. & Chicenar... 

do do special.. 

Rensselaer 4: Saratoga 

ttome, Watertown & Oedens.. 

Bt. Louis, Alton & T. Haute. . . 

do do pref. 

8t. Louis A Iron Mountain 

St. L., Kan. < ;. & Northern pref 

BDUth Side, L.I 

Toledo, Poori". & Wa-saw 

d*^ di Ist pref.. 

do do 21 pref... 

Toledo. Wab A W-iStern. pret. 

Iniscellaneons Stocbs 

Americati Coal 

Boston Water i'ower 

Consolidated Coal 

Cumberland Coal and Iron 

Maryland Coal _._ 

K. J. Land Improvement Co.. 

Pennsylvania Coal 

Spring Mountain Coal... 

Wllitesbarre Coal 

Canton Co 

Delaware^ Hudson Canal 

Atlantic Mall Steamtaip 

Mariposa 6-old .. 

do pief. 

do Trui*toe8 Oertit 

do Land Mining Co... 
do do pref. 

Quicksilver preterred 

kew Central Coal 

Railroad Bonds. 
S T. Central 6s, 1883 

do 6s,18S7 

do 6b, real estate... 

K. T. Central 6b, subscription. 

do 78.1876 

do 78, conv. 1878.... 

do. 7b,1865-T» 

Brl* lit Mortgage Kxteuded, . 



104H 

IDj 

iOS 

;o(,x 

106H 

iOi>s 
ids' 



■.Via 

!16 
115X 

80 Ji 



»0K 



141X 



93X 



SBOtTBlTIBS. 



105X 



122y 
26 



«)4 



22H 
6i 



91 

87 
37 
102 



101 



Bid. Aak. 



Erie 1st Moitsage Endorsed.. 

do 7s,2d do 1879 

do 7s,8d do 1883 

do 7s,4th do 1880 

do 7B,5th do 1888 

do 78, cons. mort. gold bds.. 

Long Dock Bonds 

Bufl. N. Y. & K. 1st M., 1877 

and. R. 7s, 2d M. 8. F. 1885. 

do ls,8d Mort.,1875... 

aarlem, let Mortgage 78. 

do Con. M. & S'kg F'd 68. 

ilbany & Susqh'a, let bonds . 

do do 2d do .. 

do do 3d d*" .. 

ijlch. Cent., 1st M. 8s, 18S'.c 

do Consol. J8. 1902,... 

Ohlc, Bur. & Q. 8 p. c. Ist M,. 

Mich. So. 7 per ct. 2d Mort 

Mich.S.&N l.S. F. ?jp. c... 
Cieve. & Tol. Sinking Fund . . 

Cleve. Ss Tol., new bonds 

Cleve., P'vlUe* Ash., old bds. 

do do new bds. 

Detroit, Monroe & Tol bonds. 

Buffalo & Kile, new bon(H ... 

Lake Shore Dlv. bonds 

Lak« Shore con. t-oup bonds. 

do Con. reg. bonds... 

Pacitlc B. "s, guartM by Mo... 

Western Pacinc bot ds 

Centra! Pacillc gold Bonds. . . . 

do State Al I bds. 

Qnlon Pacific 1st M'ge Bonus. 

do Land tyrant, 7s.. 

do Income lOs 

Illinois Central 7 p. ct., 1875. . . 
BelleT'lc & S.Ille. R. Ist M. 8's. 

llton & T. H., l8t M 

do do 2(1 M pref 

do do 2d M. income.. 

Chic. * N. Western S. Fund.. . 

do do Int. Bonds 

do do Consol. bds 

do do Extn. Bds 

do do Ist Mort.. 

Iowa Midland, 1st mort,,8B... 

dan. A St. Jo. Land Grants... 

do do convertible 

'»ol., Lack. Ss Western, 1st M. 

ilo do 2dM.. 

do do 7s, conv. 

Tol. * WabTi, l8t Mori. eifd. 

do IstM.StLdiv. 

do 2d Molt 

do Equip. Bds 

do Cons.Convert. 

dannibal ft Napif^a ist M 

areat Western, 1«( M..1SRH 

do 2dM. 1893.... 

iJolncT & Tol.. iBt M., 1890.. . . 

111. & So. Iowa, Ist Mort 

tialena & Chicago Extended . 
do 2<l Molt... 

ilhic. K. Island & Pacific 

viorrle & Esuex, let Mcrt 

do do 2d Mort 

new Jersey Central, 1st M,, n. 

do do 2d Mort. 

New Jersey Southern let m 7s 

Pitts., 1. 1. W. 4 Chic, let M... . 

do do 2d Mort. 

do do 3d Mort. 

do (♦ J 8 p. c. en't bd8 

Olove. 4 Pitts., Consol. S. F'd. 

do do 2d Mort 

do do SdMort 

do do 4th Mort 

Chic. 4 Alt on Sinking Fund. . 
do do 1st Mortgage... 

do do Income 

Ohio Sc Miss., Ist Mortt^aee.,.. 
do Consolidated,... 

do 2d do 

Dob. * Sioux C, Ist M 

Pealnsula Ist Mort., conv ... 
St. L. * Iron Mountain. Ist M. 
Mil. & St. Paul, let Mort. 8s. . 
do do do 7S-10 

do do 7s gold 

do do Ist Mort, 



99X 

97 

97 

96 

98H 

an 

92 
93 

US 

lOCH 
1M\ 

:oi 

S6X 
92 
1U» 

liok 
lis ' 

102 
91 
97 
66 
98 
MX 
93X 

§i^ 

97 

90X 

lOw 

linX 
Six 
7.x 
laJi 

Mi>t 

99" 

89X 
BOX 
lC2 

92' 
91 
lUO 

lol' 

95' 
98 
98 

92 



do do 

do do 

Marietta & Cln. 



Iowa dlv 

2dM 

1st Mort 



Chic. & Milwaukee Ist Mort, 

,Ioliet A Chicago, 1st Mort 

Chic. & 6t, Eastern, let Mort.. 
Col,, Chic. & Ind. C. 1st Mort, 

do do 2d Mort 

Tol., Peoria * Warsaw, E, D . . 

do do W.D., 

o do Burl'n Dlv. 

00 do 2dM.. 

do Consol. 7b 

New York& N. Haven 6s 

Boston, H. & Erie .1st mort. 78 

do do guaranteed 

Cndar Falls A Mfn. let M.... 
Bur., C. I apids & Minn.78,gld 

Rome A Watertown let M 

iji Dork* lin.Co. T.'Hii 

West. Union Tel., let mort. 7b, 

Loniil-landRRlBt M. 7b 

Smlthtown A Pt. Jeff. Ist M. .. 
St. Louis, Jack'. A Chic. Ist M, 
South Side, L.I. Ist Mort. bds 
do Sinking Fund.. 

Morris A Essex, convertible... 

do do construction, 

Jefferson RB, 1st Mort. bonds, 

Winona A St. Peters Ist m 

C. C. C. A Ind's 1st M, Ts, S. F. 
Cin. A Sp'd l8t M, Eld, (' C C A I 

do IstM, gld. LS&M S 

LaCrosae A Mli.Ss. IstM 

Lufayette, Bl'n A Miss, ist M. 
Pekln. Lincoln A Decatur IstM 
Han. A Cent. Ml'souri let M.. 
Cin., Laf iiyette A Chic. Ist M 
Del. A Hudson Canal IstM... 
Atlantic A Grei.t West. Ist M 

Morris A E-sex 7s of 1871 

S. Y.,Newr'l A London Tel.. 
GHlveston, H. A H ,"8, gold."?! 

Pacific BB. of Mo., stock 

PaciflcB.of Mo. IstSB. goldMj 

do do 2d "8, ciir'y, '91 

iniscellaneons List 

Arkansas L.-vee b^nds 78 

AtchlS'inA P. P^-, 68 gold... 
Atlantic A Paclflc L.tj. 6'8 gld 
Atciilson, Top. A S. Fe 7b gld 
Atchison A Nebraska 8 p, c... 
Bar. A M«. BlT«r, ttock , 



97 
87 K 

101 " 

97 

.ai* 

lOoX 



105 
96K 



101 

97 

83 H 

93 
102 

9a 

92 y 

91 X 

K5iK 

90 

95 

iiH 
107>, 

95X 

h\ 

8bX 
84 



102 



93X 

loiji 



103 

9;k 



99X 
102 
103 
HO 
lueji 

15" 
106 

97 

95 
1112 

97 



102X 
9! 
925^ 
93ii 



91X, 



lOO 
40« 

bi 

31 
91)4 

95' 
97 

89' 
91 



10I« 

95 

113X 

F,6' 
90 
79 



BKOUBtTIKF. 



US 






110 

89Ji 



S5 
lOSH 



55 
92 >f 



Bur. A Mo. Elver Land M. 78.. 

do do 2d S., do 78.. 

do 00 3d S.. do 86.. 

do do 4th S.,do8<.. 

do do 6th 8.. do 88.. 

do do 6th S., doSs.. 

do do Creston wran'-h 

do do Chariton Branch 
Burl. & M. rln Neb.l ist conv.. 
Cnllfornia A Oregon 6ft, told.. 
California Pac. RK. Ts, gld. . . . 
do 6b, 2d M., gld 

Cinada Southern Ist 78. gold.. 

Central Pac. 7s, gold, conv 

Central of Iowa, Ist M, 7's gld. 
do 2dM,TB,gld 

Keokuk A St. Paul, 8a... . 
Carthage A Bu:. 8s. 
Dixon, Peoria A Hnn., 88. 
0.0. A Fox R.Valley 88. 
QuIncyA Warsaw, 88 ... 

111. Grand Trmk 

Chlc.Dub. AM)nn.,8e.. 
I'eoria ,«■ Hnnnibal E 8'b. I S E 
Chicago A Iowa P.. S's... .i"" 

AmerlCHU Central 88 J 

Chi. A 8outhi'»sternKK.7'8... 
Col. A Hock.V. Itt7s, 3,1 yrs . 

do do lBt78.10 yrs.. 

do do id 7.-, 20 yrs... 

Chic, Danv. A Vlnccn 8 fs.iild 
Cleve.. Mr.V. A Del. Is, gold 
Ci>nn' ctlcut Valley 7s, gold.. 
Connectirut Wef.tern ist 's...- 
Chesap. ake & Ohio tst fis, gold 
Chic. A Mich. Lake Shore 88 

De» Moines Valley Isi 1-8 

do do Land Grant 8s 

Dan.. Urb., Bl. A P. Ist m 7 Eld 
Detroit, nillsdaleft In. BR. 8's 
Dutchess & Cniuinbia Is 
Denver Paclflc 78, gold. 
Denver A Rio Grande 78, gold 
Detroit. Liinsing & Lake M. 88 
Evansvtlle A Crawfordsv. 78.. 

Eric A Pittsburgh 1st 7s 

do 2(1 7» 

do 78. equip — 

EvansvlUe, Hen. A Nasnv. 7b. . 
Elizabethtown A Padn. 8b con 
EvansvlUe, T H A Clilc 7s. gld 
Fur pean A Morth Am.6s.gld 
Flint A Perc M. 7s. Land Gr. . 
Fort w.. Jackson A Sa». 6s... 
Grand E. A Ind. 78, gold, guar, 

dr. do 7s. plain 

Grand River Valley 8b 

Indianap., Bl. A W. tst 7s. gld, 

do do 2d 88 

Indianap. A Vincen. ist 78.guar 
Iowa Falls A Sioux C. Ist .8 
Indianapolis & St. Louis 7s. 
Jackson. Lsnsln A S«g. 8s 
Kansas Pacts, Extension, gld 
do 78, Land Gr., gld. 
do 78, do new, gld 
do 6b, gM, Jiin A Dec 
do 68, do Feb A Aug 
do 78, 1876, Land Gr. 
do 7s, Leaven. Brch. 
do Incomes, No 11.. 
do do Ko. 16. . 

do Sto.-k 

Kalamazoo A South H. Ss. guar 
Kal.. Alleghan. AG B.e8,gaar 

Kal. A White Pigeon 78 

Kansas City A Canieron !0s. . . 
Kan. C, i-t. Jo. A C. B. S p. c. . 
Lake Sup. A Miss, ist 7'8,gld 

do do 2d 78 

Leav., Atch. A N. W. 78, guar. 
Lear Law. A Gal., stock 

do do IstM., 10s.. 

Louisiana A Mo. Riv. l«t m. 7s 
Logans.. Craw. A S. W. 8s, gld 

Michigan Air Line. 8s 

Mo.itlcello A P. Jervi87s.gold 
Montclair Ist 78, gold, guar.. . 

do 78, Income 

Mo., K:in. A Texa- 76 gold. . . 
Mo. B., Ft., S. A Gulf, stock. . 

do do l8t. M, 10s 

do do 2d M..I08 

N.J.Midland Iftt 7a, gold, guar 

do 2d 78 guar 

N. T. A Osw. Mid. :8t 7s, gold, 

do do 2d 7b, conv. 

New York A Boston 7b gold. . 
N.Haven.Mlddlpt. A W. 7s... 
Newbuigbr'ch 7s, auar. Erie 
Omaha A Southwestern RK.8'8 
Oregon A Calirornia7s. gold. 

Oswego A Rome 7b, guar 

Peoria. Pekin A I. ist m, gold 

Pitts .Cln. A St.L. I8t7« 

Port Huron A L M.Ts, gld.cnd 

do do 78, gold... 

Peoria A Rock I. 7'8, gold 

Rockf'd.R I. A St. L.l8t7s,gld 

Rome A Watertown 's 

Rome, W. A Ogdensburg's 
Rondout A Oswego 7b, gold 

SlonxClty A Pacillc6s 

Southern Pacific 6"s, gold... 

South Side (L. 1.1 78 

Steubenville A Indiana 68.. 
20 78 
Southern Minn, construe. Ss. 

do do 78 

St.Jo. AC.BI. St M., ins 

do do 8 p. c.. 

St. Jo. A Den. C.Ss.goldlW. D 
do do 8s, gold.E.D 

SanduBky. Manp. A Newark 78 
St. Louis, Vandnlia & T. H. I't 
do do 2d 

St. L. A So'eastcrn 1st 7s. gold 
St. L.. A St. Joseph, Ist,68, gld 
Southern Central of N.T. 7s.. 

Tetto A Neosho7B, gold 

Union & Logan8port78 

Utah Central 68, gold 

Utlca, Clin. A Blng. 78, guar. . 
Union Pac, so. branch, 68, gld 
Walkill Vallev Is' 78, gold ... 

West Wisconsin 7s, gold 

Newr lioans. 
Arkansas S'ate Bonds, end. 7l 
Cln., Rich. A F.W. Ist m gld 78 
Chic. A Can. Soutli. Ist m gl 78 
Ch., D. A v., I. dlv., 1 m grd 7s 
Hou". A Tex. Cist m. gold 78 
Houston A Ot. N. 1st m. gld 7b 
anternst'l BB, T«x, Ut m gld 7i 



77 


79 


;iii 




KH 




80 






86 


HO 




RS 


91 




90H 




85 


96 


9!W 


8(1 


S5 


1112 


103 


m 


93 


99 


102 




92 H 




Bil., 




90 




m 




92 


IIK* 


Ull 


93 


95 



70 

71 

83 

CO 

90 

90 

80X 

65 

75 



97X 
100 



92 
88X 



AbI 



105 
80 

SIX 

88 
15 
80 
92 
97M 
HO 
65 
95 



bxohbitixb. 



82X 



74 
97 

92k 
99 

75 

92X 

HO 

90 

90 

SO 

W 



Ind. A UI.C Ut m. gold 7a, 
Ind., B. A W. Ext, Ist in gl 
Jack.,N W.AS-W. letm Kl78 
L. Ont. Shore RR. Ist m. girt 78 
Lake Shore A M. S. Income 7b. 
Logans., Craw. A S.W.RR.tm.g 
Milwaukee A North. 1st m" F' 
N. Y. A Oswego Mid. Ift m.g 
do do 2d conv. 

North. Pac. 1st m. gold 7 8-108 
Spring. A 111. S.E. 1:K. ImgHs 
South Carnllna BR. 2dm.. . 
St. Louis A S. F. RB con.m. 

Pouch. A hast. BR. l.tm 

South Side of L. List m.ex.. 

Sontbern Securities. 

CIT1K8. 

Atlanta, 68., 78 

do 8s 

Augusta, 6a., 78, bonds 

Charleston atock 68 

Charleston.S. C.,7s,F.L.bds. . . 

Columbia, S. C, 6s 

Columbus. Ga., 7b, bonds 

I .ynchbnrg 68 

^Iacon 7s, bonds 

Memphis old bonds, 6s 

do new'bond8,6s 

do end.,M.A C.B.R.... 

MoblleSB 

00 8b , 

Montgomery 8b 

Nashville 68, old 

do 6s, new 

>f ew Orleans 5s 

00 00 consol. 68 

do do bonds, 7b 

do do lOs 

do do to railroads, 6« 

Norfolk68 

Petersburg 6s 

(Richmond 6s 

Savansaii 7s, old 

do 7s. new 

Wilmington, N.C.,6Beold,.. 
do do 8s gold... 

BATLKOADS. 

Ala. A Chati.jlst.M, 8s, end. 
Ala. ATenn.E,l8t M., 7b.., 

do 2dM.,78 

Atlantic A 6nll consol 

do do end. Savan'h 

do do stock 

do do do guaran 
Central Georgia, 1st M., 78.. . . 

do do stock 

Charlotte Col. A A., 1st m., 7s. 

do do Block 

Charleston A Havanualifis.end. 
Savannah anu Char., Ist m., 7s. 
Clieraw and Darlington 7s — 

East Tenn. A Geoi gla 68 

EastTenn.A Va. 6j. end. Tenr 
E.Tenn.,VaA GB.,lst M.,7s.. 

do do stock 

Georgia R. E., 7s 

do stock 

Greenville A Col. 7s, guar 

do do (8, certif. . 

Macon A Brunswick end. 7s.,. 

Macon A Western stock 

Macon and Augusta bonds. . . . 

do do endorso'i . 

do do stock.. .. 

Memphis A Charleston, 1st Ts.. 

do do 2d 78.. 

do do bbOck. 

Mempliis A Ohio, lOs, 

do do 6s 

Memphis A Little R. !:tM.... 

MlBSisslppi Central, Ut m.,7s. 

do 2dm., 8s... 

MlBBlsslppl A Tenn., I8tm.,7s . 

do do consold., 8s. 

Montgomery A West P. .Ist, 88.. 

GO do let end. 

do do Income 

iMontgom.A Euf aula Ist 8s, gld 

end, by State of Alabama... 

Mobile A Mont.. 88 gold, end . . 

Mobile A Ohio sterling 

do ' do do ex ctfs. 
do do 88, interest 



do 
do 
do 



do 
do 
do 



2 mtg, 88 
Income . . 
stock 



N. Orleans A JackB. 2d M. 88. 

do do cert'8,88. 

N. Orleans A 0pel0U8.lstM.8s 

Nashville A Chattanooga, 6s.. . 

NorfoIkA Petersburg 1st m.,8B 

do do 7b 

do do 2d mo., 8s 

Northcastom, S.C.lst M. 8s. ... 

do 2dM.,86 

Orange and Alex., Ists, 68 

do 2d8, 68 

do Sds, 8b 

do 4ths,88 

Elchm'd A Petorb'g Ist m., 78 . 

do do 2d m., 6s. 

do do 3d m., Ss. 

Rich., Fre'ksb'gA Poto.68.... 

do do do conv, 7s. 

Rich, and Danv. 1st cons'd 6b. 

do Piedmont 8b. . 

do IstB, 88 

Selma, Rome A I)., 1st M.,7a.. 
South A North Ala, Ist M., 8 
Southside. Va., 1st mtg. 8b. . . 
do 2d m., guart'd 6b 

do 8dm. ,6s 

do 4th m., 88 

Southwest. RE., Ga., 1st mtg... 

do stock 

Spartensbur. A Union 7b, guar* 
S. Carolina RR. I st M, 7B (new; 

do do 68 

do do 7s 

do do stock 

Va. A Tenn. lets, 6s 

do 2d8,6B 

do dds 88 

West Ala., Ss guar 

Wilmington and Weldon 7s — 
do Ch* Ruth. 1st m. end 
ao do 1st M.. Ss.. 

PAST DtJB COrPOKB. 

Tennessee State Coupons 

Vlrtrlnia Coupons. , 

do do deferred., 

Memphis City Coupons 

KashTlIle City CoupoBB 



January 25, 1873.] 



THE CHRONICLE. 



109 



Suoestmcuta 



AND 
STATE, CITY AND OOBPOBATION FINANCES. 

■TATB SBCrRITIES, CITT SBrrRITIKK, RAILROAD 

STOCK AND BOND MST, CAN A I. ANU ITIISCUI.- 

LANEOVS HTOCK AND BOND LiIST. 

[Entered according to A«t of ConitreM, In the yesr IStS, by William n. Vuia. * 
Cj., In the ofiQce of tue Llbrftnan of Consreu* WMhlugton, D.C. 1 

The Chronicle monthly tables of stocks and bonds will be 
found to-day on tliis and following pages. 

In tlie present and several ansuing months, the tables have 
more than the usual interest, on account of the numerous addi- 
tions and corrections which are made to them after the closo ol 
the year, when a great number of states, cities and railroad com- 
paoles issue their annual financial reports. The most essential 
figures from these reports will be found in the "remarks" oppo- 
site to the statement of bonds in the tables, and the volume and 
page of CaaONClLK where more detailed information has been 
published, is also indexed in the same place. 

Since the first of January, 1873, the publishers of The Com- 



mercial A!TD FiifASiciAL Chromcle have iMued theflrit num. 
ber of " The Bailwa* Monitor," % monthly journal d«vol*d 
to railroad intelligence There baa been soma miaapprebaniloB 
aa to the character of The Monitor and the ground which it U 
intended to cover, and the publishers desiro that it should b« 
very clearly understood that the Itallroad Department ot Tbb 
Chronicle will not be superseded nor changed in any reapeet 
except that It may be enlarged and improved. No subKriber o 
the Chronicle will obtain lest railroad news than heretotor*, 
but in addition to the financial news and the neceiaarlly brief 
reports published in these columns, he can obtain for a modermt* 
price, in The Railway Monitor, the most complete detaiU of 
information about each railroad in the country, thoroughly cIbmI- 
fied and indexed for ready reference. The Chronicle table* of 
stocks, bonrls, prices, &c., will not be pabliahed In TbB 
Monitok. The subscription price of The Railway Mokitob 
is |4 per year, and to subscribers of THE Chboricls $8 ; ibaeo 
prices includiag a neat file furnished to every new sabeerlbor. 
A sample copy of The Monitor will be sent free of eharfo on 
application by letter. 



CANAL AND MISCELLANEOUS STOCK AND BOND LIST. 

[Entered according to act of Congreas, In the year :872. by Wk. B. Daxa & Co.. In the offlce of the Librarian of Congreaa, WuUlnrlon, D. C] 



DESCRIPTION'. 



Miles 

of 

Tor explanation of all r.-ferenrea aee C'nal 
foot notC'^ on lac page of RK. Tablpa. 



1ANAI,«. 

Chesapeake <* Delaiearv — stock 

Ist morlKage (originally $2,8110.0(10) 

Chenapeake tc 0/l(o— etocK 

Maryland Loan, sinking fund 

Guaranteed Sterling Loan 

Honda having next preference 

Delii icare i)(yw(oft— stock 

Ist mortgage 

J)elaware A Iliulfoii — stock 

KeglHtered Bonds 

Registered Bonds 

Reglste^-ed Bonds 

De i>eii tures. Bterllng 

Dela. tt Jiarttan—stocK 

Lehigh Coal db yavigatlon~itoc)t 

Loan, convertible, coupon, gold 

Ist raortga','e reglsterefl — 

1st mort. registered, KR 

Mort. loan, on equipments &c.. gold... 

Loan covertible Into ntoclc till Dec, 12... 
Monongahela JVao. Co.— stock 

Iftt mortgage 

Jforrrt— Stock, consolidated 

Pre^erre'l^tock 

I8t mortga'JO 

2(1 mortgage 

Boat loan 

Prelerred stock scrip dividend 

Pennsulvania — Stock 

nt if., guar, by Penn. BR., s.f. »5.000,0OO. 

West Br. & S^squ.. Ist and 2d mort 

SchnnlkiU ;v'ap.— stock, common 

Preferred stock 

1st mortgage (duei88j, ext. to 1897) 

2d mortgage 

Common bonds 

Improvem nt bonds 

Boat and car loan 

Boat and car loan 

Sufijuehanna & Tide TTarer— Stock 

Maryland loan. :^d mortgage 

SBsqh.t'a^al. common bouda, 3d mort... 

do pref. end T. SV. priority bds. 

rmon— stock 

lat mortgage 



103 
108 
103 
103 
1U3 

875 
123 
108 



-^f 









1856 
18f0 
1869 
1869 

isio 



Amount 

Ont- 
Btmndlnff. 



1864 



50 

var. 

23 



50 
1,000 

lOO 
I,0(«) 
1.000 

"ioo 

90 
I.IXHI 
l,ftO 
1.001 
1.000 
1,000 

50 
1,010 

:nii 

IOO 
l.(X10 
'.,000 
var. 
var. 
50 
1,000 

■■'60 
90 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,00 
I, Olio 
1,000 
50 



INTEREST OR DIVIDENDS. 



Bate 






1,880,800 

l.Wl,>ra 

8.229.594 

2.000,000 

4,875,000 

l.e»l),500 

1633,350 

800,000 

15.000,000 

1.900,000 

3,500,000 

:i,500,«00 

3,'*iO.OOO 

4,999.400 

8,272,800 

922,000 

9J186,27! 

2.000,000 

5,000.000 

1,196.^79 

1,008,800 

108.000 

1.045,000 

1,175.010 

610.000 

285,000 

236.963 

lO.f.Wt 

4,457.150 

2,805 000 

7«,0OO 

1.645.04 ■< 

2,8116.977 

1,7M.213 

4,016.670 

171.854 

805.900 

800.000 

e38,:'50 

2.002.746 

1,000.000 

1311,000 

325.316 

2,907,850 

8,000,000 



6 
5 
6 
4 

6 

5 

7f. 

7f. 

7 

eg. 

« 

5 
« 
2 
9 
6 
6 
1 
7 

"it. 

6 
25c. 
25C. 

6 



When 1 



Where Payable and. 
* by Whom. 



Bonitt.i 
Principal, 
when Due. 

laatDlTl'd. 



Philadelphia, ofllce. 
do do 



Balto.,A. Brown li Bona. 

London. 

BaIto..A. Krownft Sons. 

Philadelphia, offlce 

do do 

N. T.;olBce, 71 Bway. 

N. y., Bk or Commerce. 

do do 

do do 

London. 

N.T., Oince NJ.Cen.RB 



Dec. n.T! 
July, 1B3« 

iSTO 
1890 



RBMABXB. 



Del. Cltx to Cheaap. gtr, Md. Ifetetra 

Inn from opTatlona, ISTl, fW,(«9. 
Annual report In (bko- icl». t. I'.p. •** 
ahowB t et recfipu In l*<:i. 92i3,S4t; net 
receliiU In (inaner ending Anc. SI, ini, 

tU'3.t»i. 

Aug., 1»72 Lf a« d lo Uhliih Coal * Kar. Co., at Int. 
Julyl.lSTSi on bonds and 8 p. e. a yr on itocli. 
Feb. 1, ISTSiXet receipts In \fn. »2.il»a 4. Ca-h dlT.l; 
1877 ( yra, lit D. <-t. i.eaaea A b. * SUQ. •&< 

Rrna. * S. Railr'ada. Annual i (port la 

CBBOSI0I.C. T. It, p. 793. 



J.* J. 

J.'* .1. 
.1. & J. 
F.& A. 
K.&A. 
M.&S. 
J.& J. 
J. & J. 
M.& N. 
JI.ftN. 
M.AN. 

J. *'j. 
S.ScJ. 
3.Sii. 



oWce. 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Philadelphia, 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Pltt«b'irg, ofDce. 

N. Y., S. B'K of Com'ce. 

Leh. Val. liR. Co. Jhlla 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 



1884 
1991 

.July, irs 

Oct. 10, "73 
May, 1867 

18114 

I8SI 

1897 

lan 

1877 



July, 1872 Grosa 
July 1, 1887 
Aug, 1872 



Philadelphia office. 



Philadelphia, offlce 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Phlla. ftBaltimoie. 
do do 

da do 

Phlladeipbia,' offlce . 



S'e Cam. * Amboy BR. <t. 14. p. % M.) 
Oioaa re'elpit laat year, I1.9M1W) ex- 

f'i.'nie<. In te real aodtaxea, f l,3M,ei< ;D«t 
ncoma. t272.8U. Be* annnai report ta 
CnBONiou. T. M, p. «». Cent. BR 
ofN..!. 
01 W^T 



V 



Aug, 1872 
Aprn, 187« 
April, l« 6 
Oct., 1899 
Feb., 18b7 

July ■'1910 



di.i 

Leaacii. 

for 9;''J yrs. 



l3l(UXn ot told loan 

'Vi; expenaaa 
'.ii 71.9 per ct . 
...h Valley RB. 
livt es aaaumirg bda 



& scrip 4k paying iO p. c , per annum en 
pref stork, au(r4 on conaol. stock, (v. 
11. p. 714.) 

Wvoming * WIconlaco m'read iB'o. and 
West Branch * 8uaQ. owned by P., C.C. 

.Inly, 187J Leaaed from June 1. 1870, to PI tl. * Bead- 
Ju y. 18721 for 999 yeae at annual rent of WSi OOO 



Mann 18721 
Jan., 1882 
Jan., 1876 
May, 1870 
May, 1868 
May, 188S 



.Ian., 18-8 
J n. 1, ^878 
Jan., 1891 



tnclodlng certain r'^al and 
p rty conreyed to P. * 



Leased to P.* Rea' 



U. (T.l<,p. 



Injt BR. for latereat 
on bond» and half ofnete mlnca; id 
1370-71 defl< U after ezpenacs ai^U lat- 
rreat irae »8,',657. (14. p. 77.) 
,Oroaarro Ipta. 1870.188,90; operjMM ax- 
May 1, 188S pcuaca, aame. Komiaal coai,t3,MnjM. 



JI1ISCEI.I.ANKOVS. 



DESCRIPTION. 



Date 

of 

for explanation of all references, see Bonds, 
foot'notes on Ist page of RB Tables. 



Aiama Bxpreat Co.— stock 

Amer. Merchants^ Union Ex. — stock, 

American coal (Md.)— stock 

American Dock <t Improvement Co. . 

Atchteon Bridge, It mort.. guar 

Atlantic Matt Steamship Co— stock... 

So9ton Water Power 

Canton Improvetnent Co., Bait 

Union R.K. hou'ls guaran'eed 

Cary Improvement Co.— stock 

Ventral of If . J. Land Co 

CO'ieolidation Goal '/ 3fd. — stock.... 

Istmort. (convertible) 

Ist M., consol.. conv. (tor $l,i.iO,000) 

Cumberland Copland I.— 1st mort.. 
do do 2d mortgage 

Cumberland Coal & Iron Co— Stock 
DunletthdkDubuque Bridge—hii s.f.. . 

Ilia. t£ St. Louis £rtdfirc— bonds 

Louisville .Brfdcrfi— bonds 

Mariposa Landtk Mining C^.— stock. 

Preierre i stock 

Vargla nd t oai— stock 

Kew Central Coal f ■ d) 

Paciyu^ Mail Steamship Co.— stock. .. 
Pennt'jlvania Codi— stock 

lat mortgage bonds 

Pennsi/tvantu Company—Cora, stock 

Prelerred S'ock (o » ed by Pa.K.B.) 
Quicksilver Mining Co.— Com. stock. 

prpf,.rred ator.lr 

Ist mor g:)ge, gold 

jd mortgage,? old . . 

Spring Mountain Coa7.— stock 

Mpriice Hill Coal. — stock 

United States Express— tttod 

Wells, Fargo A Co. Express— ttocti... 
Western Onion Telegraph— etock 

l«t morteage 

Real estate bonds, gold ,,. 

Tfl'JMtarrt Cool , 



size or 
par 

valuet 



ia«4 

i«r2 

1 852 
1869 



Amount 

Ont. 
st'ndlog. 



100 110.000,000 
100 18,000.000 
29 1,900,000 



1,500.000 

4,(XX).000 

4,00l>.000 

731.250 

71)3.0CX) 

SS.OOOshs. 



isa 



100 
100 
16X 



IOO 
1.000 
1,000 

i',66o 

100 
1,000 



IOO 
100 

100 

IOO 
100 

so 

■'fO 
BO 
100 
100 



90 
10 
100 
100 
lOU 

i,66o 

100 



INTEREST. 



Bate 
pert 
Cent 



When II 
Payable. 



10,290.000 
513,000 

SOT.boO 
49j,U00 
500,000 
480,000 



10,000,000 

5,''a.,Ofio 

4,100,000 
5.000,000 
20.000.000 
4.000,000 
5l.','0!) 
4.00O.OOO 

3,oap,a)fi 

5,700, W 
4,30 ,000 
500,000 
1.1100,1110 
1.250.000 
1000.000 
6 900.000 
9,000.000 
59/100.000 
4.000.000 
IJOO.OOO 
1,400,000 



lOa. 



7g. 

■R. 
9 

■j' 

I" 

7 

r 



7. & J. 

M.&S. 
M.&N. 



r. & A. 
J.&.I. 
J.& J. 

J.& J. 
r.* A. 

A.&O. 
M.*N. 
A.*0. 
J.&D. 



Q-r. 



J. ft J, 



J.&D. 
l.*.l. 
J. ft J. 

J. ft J. 
M.&N. 
M.ftN. 
U.*N. 



Wbere Payable and 
by Whom. 



Bonds. { 

Principal, 

Wh-n Due, 

Stocks, 
Laat Dlvi'd. 



N. T.. Bank of N. T. 

do do 

New Tork. office. 

N. T.. Cent.BB. ofN.J. 



Sept. 2, 1872 
Jan. J. 1S78 
Mar. 10, 18781 



Dec. 18*7 , 
Nov. 12, 18!2| 



Boston, office. 

N. y.Co.'s Offlce. 

N.Y. Co's offlce, 71 B'y. 

do do 

do do 

New Tork. 

do 

do 

N. T. by III. Cent. B.B. 

N. Y.. "k of Commerce. 

T., Gllman, Sou ft Co 



DeclSTO 

Sept!,"iS69 
Aug.. 1872 
Aug. 1, 1681 



Plttsbnrgn Co.'a offlce. ; Jan., 1873 



N. T., Ill Broadway, 
do do 



REMARKS. 



.Tan. 9,18159 
Feb. 9. 1373. 
Jan. 20.18.3 
.Tan., 1881 
Jan. 1. 1SJ7 

18i9 
Feb., 1879 
Ool. i, 1872 
^0T., 18M 



jGuar. by Ch.* 8.; If., H. ft 61. Jo., ft C«B.Br. U. P. 

Cmojaoti. Tol. 14, p. 716. Aaaaal r«p«r« In 

Chkosicli, t. 19, p. 19. 

A sufficient portion of newconaol. incr»«»»a la 
l.ei<l to retlr* old bonda. Sea Caaoncu. t. It. 
p.<«. 



Cbsosiclx.t. 15, p. a66:T. U.p. iM. 
Bee Caao2nci.«, t. U, p. 3M. 

Propertv, r JOOXICO: debt. trti-Ofl. C l", ». »:•■) 
See CBSOKIOL'.T. I4. p 730; T. IJ, p. Wl.., 
Dividends la 1871. 20 per cent. (r. 14. p. «M.) 

This 'con^pany ooerstea many of the Pwa. B.B. 
leaeed Unea. (t. 14, p. 2711. 765. 



N.T., E. Kelly ft Co. 
do 



New Yorit offlce. 
New Tori" .office- 
New York, offlce. 
N. Y..Baokof S.r. 
N. y. union Trust Co. 
FMladalpUa. 



Jan i>, Itm 

Feb!'i,l»78 

Jan. >, 1S73 ^^ ^ ^ 

Jan.. 1870 AniinalriportlnCB«)in«i.».T. IS.p. 4«J. H« 
1875 I celpta, »2,740,2n. (v. 19, p. 73, 155, S^S, tl2.) 

May, 19^2 
Not., WW I 



110 



THE CHRONICLE. 



[January 25, 1878. 



STATE SECUEITIES. 

[Entered according to »ct of Congreu, In the year 1873, by Wm. B. Dana & Co.. In the office of the Librarian of Congresi, Washington, D. C] 
Sabscrlbera will conftr a great favor by givlns ua Immediate notice of any error dlacovered In our Table*. 



DESCRIPTION. 



For explanations see foot-notes. 



J yr. 



Alabama : 
State bond!, due in ISTJ ft extended 

do extended 

do do 

Eterlliig bonds of ISSO, extended 

bterllcg bonds, extended 

do do 

do do 

New bonds 

do 

Hew loan of inn (for »l,000,UOO).... 

■Pdu-^Hilonal Kund Debt 

]U " Iroad bond Indorsements 

i>o n to Mont. & Ktifala RK 

Loan to Ala. & Chattauooga RR^^.. 
Temporary Floating Debt Sept., li. 
Arkansas ; 

Funding bonds of 1369 

Levee bonds (or warrants) 

Ol i unfunded debt 

Ten year bonds for deflclencies — 

Floatin;; debt 

To Memphis* Little Rocic RK 

To Little Rock & Fort Smith RR... 
To L. R., rine Bluff & N.O. RK.... 
To MlsB,, Ouachita* Red River BR 

To Arkansas Central RR 

CaUtomia : 
ClTll bonds, sinking fund, gold. 

do 

Soldiers' relief bonds 

do bounty bonds 

State capUol bjnds 

Connecticrtt : 

War bunds, 10-20 year "l g^ 

do aoyear.. 

do 20 year. . 

do 10-30 vear.. 
do non-taxable 
JHorma : 

Old bonds held by tJ. 8. GOTt 

Due Scliool and Internal imp fund 

Conventiou bonds 

State bonds (sold or hypothecated. 

do 

Loau to Jackson, F. * Mob. RK — 
(ttnrgia : 

Western & Atlantic BR. bonds 

do do do 

Atlantic & Gulf RB. bonds 

Bonds, act of Ma ch 12, 1860 

Bonds, aet Sept.. '70, gold 

Bonds, »ct Oct., '70, gold 

Bonds of 1872 

Railroad endorsements 

Brunswick & Albany BR 

Illinois : 

Interest bonds, inscribed stock 

Refunded stock bonds 

N mini University bonds 

Thornton loan bonds 

"War bonds 

R-ixenue deficit bonds (to Chicago). 
JTuwiaH ; 

Bonds, 1361 to 1869. funding. &c 

Bonds for various State purposes.. 

Military loan 

Kenluckif : 

Bonds to contractors, &c 

do John Tllford, act 1313 

do Military purposes 

do held by Board of Ed 

LoHtfHana : 

Cha itv Hospital bonds 

Bonds for relief of State Treas 

Bonds In aid of various railroads... 

Levee b^nds 

do 

do ; 

Bonds funding coupons 

BondsVor redemptiijn certlfs, *c.. 
Bonds to Boeuf<fe Crocodile Nav.Cs 
do for rellL-f of P. .1. Kennedy.. 
Issued to St ite P nit -ntlary, 
to fund floating debt of State 
toMlss.* Mex. O'lf Canal.... 
Iss.t > N. La. & Texas Kit. Co 
FChool held by Stat ; Treas 
to N. O., Mob. & Gnat. RR. 
to N. O., Mob. & Texas RR 



Data 

of , . 
BondB. Value' 



1866 
1870 



18(6 
18C7 



'70-71 
1870 
1870 



do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Maine . 
Civ I loan bonds. 

W^r do ,-,- 

Bounty do f S i 

do oo =J t4 

Munlctp »I, War Debt ussnmed j S t 
Maruland : 

Bait.* (.hloRR., sterling 

Chesaneake \' Ohio Canal, st'g 

Rallroa s nnd canals 

Eastei-n Shore RR 



Baltimore ^^i Susq, RR 

Chesapeake & Ohio canal 

Bait. & Susquehanna UR 

Annapolis & F.lkridge RR 

Defen-e Bounty Loan 

Southern Relief bonds 

Deaf and ' uinb AsyluTi Loau... 

Md. Ho pltal loan, 10-15 years 

Maryland State Loan ', 

J^(Msoc/i«»eHs— State Almshouse L'n 

do do 

State House Enlargement Loati 

Lunatic Hospital, &c.. Loan 

Lnnatlc Hosnltal (West. Mass)..,!" 

Back HayLandsLoan 

Union Fund Loan " 

do do ' 

Coast Defense Loan \ 

Bounty Fund Loan \ 

Bounty Fund Loan 

do do sterling '. 

War Loan, sterling 

Trov * Grecnf . RR, Loau, sterling. 

do do home . . , 

do do sterling. 

do do sterling 

Southern Vermont RR, Loan 

Norwich & Worcester RR. Loan... 
Boston, Hartr. k Erie Rli., sterling 

Harbor Laud linproveiritnit 

sterling loan (for illj.KX)) 

Mtchioan ' 

Kcnewal Loan Ponds 

Two Million Loan 

War Bounty Bonds 

Ste Mario Canal Bonds 



187a 

1869 
1870 
1870 
1870 
1870 

1857 
1860 



1870 

1861 
1863 
1364 
1864 
1865 

1857 

1868 
1868-69 
1871 
1870 

1818 
Var's. 

do 

1866 

1870 

1870 

1872 
1870-71 

1870 

iai7 



'61-'69 
'61-'69 
1864-69 

'41* '42 
1843 
1864 



1832 
1853 

isei 

1''67 
1870 
1866 
1866 
1870 
1870 
1869 
1870 
1869 
1869 
1857 
1870 
1871 

'51-'61 
1863 
1863 
1*64 
1868 



1838 
varl'u* 



1837 



1867 
1871 
1872 

1852 
1855*51 
1853*54 
1854 
1857 
'61-'62 
'61-'62 
'61.'62 
'63-'64 
1863 
1861 
1861 
1«69 
'S8-'61 
'61-'63 
13« 
'69-'7l 
I860 
1857 
•68- '69 
1870 
1812 



186.1 
186S 
1S59 



Size or 
par 



Amount 

Out- 
Bt'nding. 



INTEREST. 



Rati 



■,00*c 

UIU&C 
lU0*c 



lOOAC 
I'.'O&C 
1,0110 



1,000 
IWtc 



1,000 

1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

10O*c 
500&C 
500&C 
500* c 



lOO&c 
l,noo 
1,0 
1,000 
100*c 

1,000 

\fii> 

1,000 

I'ooo 

1,000 
250&C 
500 
500*c 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1(X)&C 



100*c 
100*c 



1,000 
600 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
500 
lOO&c 
1,000 
1,000 
1.000 
1,000 
1.000 

i.otxi 

1,000 
1000 
1.000 
1,000 

500*c 
5C0&C 
1.000 
500&C 
100 *c 



100 &c. 

I'.OOO 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
500 
.•ifO&c 
50O*c 
1,000 
1.000 
50ii&e 

JElOO&c, 
£.'011 

i2U0*c, 
50il*c 

ilOO&c 

fioo*c, 

5,(J0O 
1.000 
£2 
1.000 
£500 

1.000 
1.000 
1,000 
1.000 



(168,000 

1,941,000 
473.800 
683.000 
64,800 
82,'iOO 
648,000 
877,200 
5 0.000 
215.000 

2.801,588 

:4,810.000 

300,000 

2,0(10,000 
600,107 

2.8.'i0.000 
2.185,000 
1,67(',000 

SOO.nUO 

200.000 
1,200,000 

900,OOJ 
UOO.OOO 

600,0 
1,050,000 

1,983,000 
125,000 
3)9,500 
605,000 
250,000 

706,700 
•12.000 

1,474,000 
935 500 

1,741,100 

2iO,0OO 
262,0 
30,000 
194,000 
210,000 
4,000,0v,0 

176,500 

388.0(0 

600.000 

3.900,000 

2,700.000 

l,880,0n0 

700,000 

7.645,900 

1,500,000 

971,834 
348,000 
45,000 
102,000 
416,800 
260,000 

101,;75 
889,000 
346,000 

593,000 

66,000 

281,000 

1,652,316 

80,000 

750.000 

1,830.000 

1,000,000 

8,960,000 

2,»60.000 

965.300 

2 0,0011 

80,000 

1*1,000 

500,000 

2.9S0,000 

480,000 

546,000 

665,000 

750,000 

2,500.t00 

296,000 

525,000 

473.000 

2.832.500 

3,084,400 

2,273,533 

2.9>8.111 

1,237,051 

81 .06'! 

269,000 

'.28,172 

308,026 

65,207 

3,6.T7,745 

100.000 

75.000 

SSU.OOO 

i(id.boo 

IIO.OOO 
165.000 
94.000 
50.000 
220.000 

2,4:V),000 
WXI.OOO 
888 001 
200,000 

4,379,50(1 

4.000,744 
999,944 
6.'.4 180 
966.500 

2.952.40O 

3 152.37-i 
200,000 
■lai.COO 

S,.5«9.0'.'4 
230.001" 

2,150.000 

150.000 

1,465,000 

463,000 

81,000 



: 

5 

5 

6g 

5g. 

6g. 

Sg. 

8 

8 



7 
7 
7 
7 
7 

7g. 
7g. 

?f: 

7g. 



7 
g.f. 



5*6 
6 
6 
6 
6 

5g. 

f 

6 

3 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

"Sg. 
5g. 
5g. 
6g. 

l^- 
5g. 

6g. 

5g. 

5g. 

5g. 

5g. 

5g. 

5g. 

6g. 

r«. 

5g. 
5K 

=8- 
6g. 
5g. 
5g. 
5g. 

6 
6 
7 
6 



When 
Payablet 



M. * N 

do 

do 
Junel, 
J.* J. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 



J. *J. 
J.& J. 



A. * O 
do 
do 
do 
do 

J. * J. 
do 
do 
do 
do 

J. &J. 

do 

do 

A. * O, 

do 



Various. 

J.'&J. 

M. & N. 
Various. 

F. * A. 

J. A. I. 
Q-J. 

A. &0. 

J. &"d. 

J.* J. 

do 

do 
M. *S. 

J. & J. 

M.&N. 

.July 

J. * J. 

do 

Various. 
M. & 8. 
Various. 



M. *S. 

J. * J. 
Various. 

do 
M. * N, 

M. AS. 

J. A J. 

M.AS. 

J.& J. 
do 

M. *S. 
M. * N, 

M. &S. 

A. &0. 
Various. 

J.& J. 

A.&O. 

Various. 
M. AS. 

F. & A. 

J. *D. 

A. AO. 

J. A J. 

do 
Quarter. 
A.AO. 
(Du^rter. 
J. & J. 
Quarter. 
A.AO. 
J.& J. 
do 
ao 
J. A J. 

m.'a'n. 

A. A O. 

do 
J.&.T. 
.I.*D. 
M.AN. 
J. A J. 

do 

do 

do 
M.AN. 

do 
.1. * J. 
A. A O. 

do 

do 
.1* J. 
A.&O. 
J. A J. 

do 

do 

do 

J. A J. 

do 
M.AN. 
.1, A J. 



Where Payable abd 
by Whom. 



N. 7., H. Clews* Co. 
do do do 

do do do 

London. Union Bk. 

do 

do 

do 

N.T.,H.Clewa A Co. 

do do do 

do do do 



N.T..H. Clews* Co. 
do do 



N. Y., Un. Trust Co. 
do do do 



ST. T., 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Union Trust Co. 
do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 



Principal, 
when due. 



Sacramento, Treasury, 
do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

Hartford, Treasury. 
Oo do 

do;; do 

do do 

do do 



New York. 
N.Y., Duncan, 8. A Co. 

N. Y„4th Nat'l Bank 
do do do 

do do do 

do do do 

N. y., Loud. 01 Frank. 



N. Y., 4th Nat'l Bank. 

N. Y., Am. Ex. Bank, 
do do do 

do do do 

do do do 

do do do 

do do do 

N. Y., Qllman.SonA Co 
do do do 

do do do 

N. Y., B'k of America. 

do do do 

Frankfort, Ky. 

do do 

N.O., Cltiz'ns' Bk. of La 

do do do 

do do do 

do do do 

N.Y.. B'k of America, 
do do do 

N. O., Citiz'n Bk. of La. 
do do do 

do do do 

do do do 

N. Y., B'k of America, 
do do do 

N.O., Cltiz'ns' Bk ol La. 

N.Y., Bank o( America. 

N.O-, Cltiz'ns' Bk of La. 

N.y.jBank of America, 



Augusta and Boston. 

Boston, Snlfolk Bank, 
do do do 
do do do 

Augusta and Boston. 

London, Baring Bros. 

do do 

Baltimore, State Agent, 
do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do. 



Boston, Treasury, 



London, Baring Bros. 

London, Baring Bros. 

do do 

Boston. Treasury. 

London, Baring Bros. 

do do 

Bo,=ton, Treasury. 

do do 

London, Baring Bros. 

Boston. Treasury, 
London. iBarlng Bros. 

N. Y., Mercantile N.Bk 
do do do 

do do do 

do do do 



May, 1892 
May,1^86 
May, 1886 
June, 1890 

1886 

1886 

1886 



Jan. 1, 1892 



1882 

1399 
1900 
1900 

April, 1900 

1877 
1880 
1883 
1834 
188S 

July, 1881 
Jan., 1888 
Jan.. 1884 
Oct., 1894 
Oct., 1885 



1898-99 



May. 1874 
'73 A '74 
'79-'SO-'l-'6 
Jnly, 1886 
Oct., 1890 



Dec, 1890 

Jan., 1878 
Various 
Jan.,I»80 
Jan.,lS80 
Jan., 1880 
alter 18S1 

188.7-'84 
1876- '99 
1884-'99 

isn 

Sept., 1873 
1895 



March 20. '72 
July. 1893 
'72 to 1906 

1886 

May 1, 1907 

March 1,1875 

1886 * '88 

Sept., 1906 

Jan. 1,1890 

Jan.1, 1890 

March 1,1909 

May. 1910 

1899 

1909 

Jnly 1,1910 
April, 1911 

187J-78 
Var., 188S 
Aug., 1880 
June, 1889 
Oct., 1898 

18«0 

1890 
1880 * 1830 

1890 

1890 

18-5 

1890 

1890 
1875 * 1893 

1873 

!885 
April,18ffi-S7 

Nov.; 1872 
Oct,,'73-'74 
Oct,, '73- '74 
Inly, 1874 
une,1877 
' y, 1880 
, '73-'76 
,■, '77-'78 
iy, 1883 
'r, 1894 
'. 1M4 
1891 
,1«8!1 
'88- '90 
'91-'93 
188.' 
'8 -91 
1890 



B£MABKg4 



July,: 
June. 
May. 
July. '■ 
Jnly, 
Jnly, 
July, 
May. 
May. 

Oct, ' 
April. 
April, 
Julv 



April 



July 



J.& . 
Jan. 
July 



y, 1877 
J.. -.900 



..1875 
■, 1891 



Jnly, 1878 

187S,'78* '83 

May, 1890 

July, 1879 



An abstract of Auditor's report for year ending 
Sept. 30. 187^. was publislird in Chkonioi.k. v. 16, 
p. 49. Total as-i'.ssed value of laims. $76,757,259. 
of town lots, $^5,733,482; of personal property, 
»:')0.64».189, The Alan.* Chat. RR., was loiigbt by 
the State. April. I6T;. and resold In Scfpt : the 
State's guaranteed interest on the Companv'a 
bonds is Ir d>f«ult. A new loan of »2.0O0.0O()la 
reported authorized, the valillty of which is 
contested. Sea Chbokiclx, v. 16, p. 802. 860; t. 
16, p. 49. 



Under a law of 1869 bonds are issued to railroad* 
at f 10,000 per mile to land grant ro.ids and I15.0OO 
per mile to others, but limited to 850 miles in all. 
AsseR«ed valuation of all taxable property about 
tl20.000,000 ; rate of taxation, 5K mills. Unfunded 
debt is mof tlv lieM bv U. S. The "Levee" bonds 
and funded bonds are in default for interest. 
(CuRosroLB, vol. 16, p. 50, 181, 187.) 



The debt is being rapidly reduced by a sinking 
Innd. See notice of redemption of bonds in 
Chronicle, v. 15, p 99. 



Debt has been reduced since 1866 from »IO,000,000 
to prePent ncnres. by sinking fund purchases. 
The 1861 bonds are navable at pleasure since Julv, 
1871. and those of 1C64 after Oct.. l'<74. A'sessed 
value of real and personal properly, $339,782,738 ; 
rate of taxation. 2 mills. 

Total direct debt Jan.. 1 J72, (tated at $1,500,000. Old 
Territorial bonds arc not recognized. Real and 

Personal property assessed In 1871 at $.3.1.673.753. 
oanto J..P. A M. R.R.. is secured by mort- 
gage on road. Other loans to raHroadshave been 
authorized to amount of $7,148,000 but not Issued 

Assessed value of property in 1872. $234,492,468 
Kafe of tax. 4 niilla Legislaiure declared void 
the scmi-annuaU old bonds of 1R70, and $120,000 
of the quarterly bondp held by H. Clew* & Co.; 
the B. & A. bonds. $1,500.(00; and the lollcwing 
RR. c :idorsements. viz : Brun'm Ick A Alb.. $3,800, 
000. Bainbr.. C. & C. $600,001. Cherokee Val., 
$800,100. rartersvillc A V., $276,000. (v. IS, p. 155 
187. 218, 25C; v. 16, p. 20.) 

The debt has been rapidly reduced. Valuation of 
personal property In 1871, $113,915,561 ; railroads. 
$25 516,042; real "State. $259,289,895. or abonv 
one fifth of the actual value. The 111. Cent. RB. 
tax amounts to about $500,000. The bonds ol 1871 
were issued for relief of (Jhicago. (v. 13, p, 559.) 

The valuation of real and personal property In 1872 
Is $120.000,OW. Bonds of counties, towns, ant 
cities are registered, and interest collected by 
the State, (v. 14. p. 457.) 

The nominal debt of Kcntneky is $.:.W0.7'0. Re- 
sources of sinking fund. $2,420 .393. Totcl valua- 
tion of properly in 1871, $126,322,707. Tax rate, 
45 cents on $10(). 

A constitutional amendment limits the total debt 
to $25,000,000. Direct d. bt. Jan. 1, 1872. was 
$20,188.s00; contingent debt. $6,579,683; temporary 
$3,476,268; total outstanding, $.'J0.244.751 . It was 
decided, however, that bonds anthnrizrd 
previous to the amendment miglit be isFued, 
which Includes $120.f00 to Miss, A Mex. Gulf 
Canal ; $594,000 to X, La, * Texas RB,; $2,075,000 
bonds guar, for N.O.. Mob. A Texas RR.; $2,2.50.000 
bonds to be issued to same company ; $l.ir25.000 
(or more) to N. O.. B.iton R. & Vlcksbnrg RR.; 
$100.000 to Shrnveport Hospital; $1WI.000 subs, to 
'Miss. Val. Nav. Co. Total real and personnl pro- 
perty in 1871 a'sessed at $2-0.59i,4!7. Kate of 
State taxation, in 1871. 14H mills; Default was 
made in payment of interest Jan. 1, 1873. 



The war debt sinking fund Jan., 1872. was $611,266, 
the municipal debt sink'gfund was $197,030; $810.- 
000 of debt matured in 1871. After ibe U.S. Su- 
preme Court decision, intercsi was piid in gold 
tin the decision wjts reversed. Valnatlon in 
1872, $224,609,951. tax rate. 55i mills, (v. 16. p, EO) 

The a'sessed valuanon of property in 1871 was 
$116,716,283, on which the rate of taxation wasl9« 
cents per $100; Income from dividends on rail- 
road, canal and other stocks owned by the State 
was $354,123, The State has largely assisted 
canalBandrailroads, and holds $4 ,694,51.^ of stocks 
and bonds of solvent companies, besides $1,868.- 
797 in the sinking fund, leaving only $5,883,467 of 
debt, without any offset; the State also holds 
$20,557,166 in unproductive securities. 



By a law of 1862 all Interest on the debt ot 
Massachusetts is paid in coin, excepting on the 
temporary loans. During 1872 debt was d"creased 
about $2,000,000. The finking lunds In Jan.. 1872. 
were 16. and the securities held cost $13,628,864. 
their market value at close of last fiscal 
vear being more ihan the original cost. The 
loan to Boston. Hartford & Erie R.R. is Fecured 
bv deposit of $4,oai.000 "Berdell" mort. bonds. 
The as.sessor's aegregate of real and personal 
property In the State is $I.5!(l,9»8,0CO. the actual 
value oeing $2,307,004.4 7. Taxation in 1871 -"aB 
$21. 892,943. of which $6,634,000 wa* tor Slate pur- 
poses, and $14,789,715 lor municipal. Revenue 
Is also derived Irom a tax on pavings bank 
deposits, on corporations, on national bank 
stocks, and from several o'her sources, 'Tbc 
credit of Massachusetll m llic London market 
Is deservedly very binh. War loan, registered, 
currency6'8, were paid after J uly 1ST2. (T.16,p.60.) 

The debt has been largely diminished In 4 last 
years. Assessed valnatlon of real and persenal 
propc-ty, 18:i-2. $630,000,000, nn.l rate of taxation 
2X mills. Surplus revenue Is applied to purchase 
ot bonds asf s»' as It accnmnlates. 



• S^e.orpat- na(»e.— This column shows thn several sixes or denominations In which each Issue of nonai is maoe. «. , .. .^ 

1 WIU!tPw<">lt—J- *.i "lanaifor.Tan. A Jnly; F. * A., Fan. A Aug.; M. « 8.. Maicii A Sent. ; A. * 0., April * Dot.; M. *N.,Mar A Nor.; J.« D.iJlM »D«c. 
Q.-J., qnartarly from Jan.-, «J.—F., quarterly Irom February Q.-Jt,, quarterly from March. 
W»mark4.-rigmt In braoktii at tka and s{ raaarju, la ta; oua, raUr le tb» Tslaaa and paga of COMatOfA, oontkiainil <BU«r tsloranllok 



January 25, 16'< 8.] 



THE CHRONICLE 



111 



STATE SECURITIES. 

Sabucrlbera wrill confer a grot ffcvor by giving n« Immediate notice of anr error dIecOTered la oar Table*. 



DESCBIPTION. 



For f xpUnatlon of all rcrnrcncea see 
ooc not-JH on preceding page. 



Data 

ol 
Bonda. 



BU, or 

pal 
Value' 



iitnne/ioUi : 

State UulldlDg Loan 

do do 

do do 

Slnnx War Loan _. 

Kallroad i5oiidB(uot recognized) .... 
Mimouri: 

btate bonds 

CuiiHolldated boudH 

IJrilvtTsily Ai Lunatic Asyliun bds. . 

lluluia ti> N'urtli .Mo. illt 

llonds to l.airo & Kulton lilt 

ItondH to Platte County KK 

Bonds to Iron .Mountain UK 

Paclllc Kit 

8. W. ur. Pacinc Rli 

H. VV. I'r. I'aclllc UU. (guar.) 

liannlbal & St. JouepU UU 

yeriitlu: 

Htato bonds 

do to fund floatlog debt. .. . 
iV. Bammhire: 

War loan coupon bonds 

do do 

do do 

Munlclp.al war loan 

New Jermi/: 

War oau bonds, tax free 

do do do 

o do taxable 

New York: 

llounty loan bonds, coupon 

do do ret^lstcredstocK, 

General fund debt— Antor t-tock 

do do deilciency loan, 
do do do 

do do do 

f Under Art., 7, Sec. f 
1, Ol Con-»tttutlon I 
\ Art. 7, Sec. 3, and 
I Alt 7, Boc. n. 
do gold loan cp. or reg..'! 

Peflclcnoy loan of IHVi 

Coniiirroll'-r's bdM (by Kev. Stats). 
Nortf) VaroHiui: 
UK. and improvement bouds, old. 
do do do do 

do do new (not special tax) 

do do do do 

Funding bonds, since war 

do do do 

liegist'd ccniilcates of literary fund 
Penltcnilary bonds, act Aug. 2l, '68. 

Special tax bonds 

Ohio: 

itegistered loan, payable after 1S70. 

do do do do IS;5 

do do do June.HSl. 

do do do do 188(1. 

Orsffou— Relief bonds 

Bounty bonds 

Willamctic Canal and Lock 

PetW'tijlvania: 

Inclined plane!lo.in, April 10 

Coupon loan, Aiiril 'i (f24,0U0rog.).. 

ilo do 

do May 4 

Reglster'd do do 

Coupon loan of April ls>(»»l,()00reg) 
MlUtiiry loan of Mav 15 (cp. & reg.) 
Stock loan of Feb. 3 (rcKlsteied). 
do do do 
do do (cp. &. reg.)... 
do do (reglstore >)■ 
do do (cp. & reg.) 
do do (registered).. 
Chanib''rsbll-gctfs, May 21, (veg.). 
SlMde Island: 
War bonds 



Canal Debt, 



•«8-« 
18<8 
18J2 
•51-8 
'57-9 
'59-80 
'54-9 
'53-9 
•57-6« 
•5«-91 
•53-7 

18<7 
1871 

61-3 
18«4 
186« 
1872 

isei 

18l» 
18M 



I.OIXI 
1 ,1100 
l.OX) 
I.IXX) 
1,OUO 

l.OOO 
I.UW 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

i.uoo 

1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



noo&c 

1,000 
500*c 
lOO&c 

lOO&c 
lOO&c 
I'JO&C 



INTEnEST. 



"W? When Where Payable and 
c'int P»y»-'«- brWhom. 



1850 
liM) 
18«0 
1856 



18;0 

1819 

18.53 
1.S53 
l&i3 
1853 
1853 
1861 
1867 
1867 
1867 
1867 
1867 
186; 
1871 



439,000 

3,737.000 



SOO&c 
SOO&c 

1.000 
i.aio 
laa&a 

100*c 



South Carolina: 

State stock - 

titate House stock, 1st '.ssue 
do do 2d do 

do do 3d do 
do do 4th do 

de do 5tii do 

Funding bonds 

Bine Kidge Kit bonds 

New State House bonds 

do do 

Funding bill* recelva'jle... 

Piiynieutof Inter.st 

Funding bank bills 

Conversion bonds 

Landcomiti sslon bonds 

Fire loan bon-ls, (Sterling... 
do do dome.^tic.. 

Railroad endorsements 

lefinennee: 
suae dttht proper — ' 

Turnpiki; road stocks 

Bank T nn. stock 

Railroad stocks....; 

HcrniitaKc purchase bils 

State <-apltol stock , 

3dR to fund lot. on above to Jan, 
Hfiilrond debt — 
Bonils end'rscd for railroads 
Bonds loaned to KR.'s, old. . 
Bds issued to KR.'s since '<)6— 

Green Issue, no letter 

Now scrlc', letter B 

do not b'ttored 

flrf'en i^sue, no letter ^ 

Bds to lundint. onaboie to .Jan., , 
Int. dueonailbd^ estim'd to.Jan. '7J 
l/totilinrf (tebt—lik ol Tenn. notes. 

Treasury warrant 

WLoan account 1 n New York 

I'ota! Jebt ol all kinds to Jan., 1872 

1 «j;n.i— Scliool fund bonds 

Penit-ntiary debt 

Frontier protection, gold, SO-'lOyr!. 
Deflclcncy bds. under act May, 18T1 

Claims on State before 1866 

fermont:^\Var loan bonds, coupon. . 
" " registered 

n*'firf/il(i— Old bonds, coupon 

" registered. 



"o«*^«K 



(- = 



500,000 
160,000 

60O,(Wl 

600,00(1 

495,000 

2,205,000 

1,199,900 

1,003,900 

593,400 

1,373,000 

20,675,000 

5tll,V« 

900,000 

800,000 

1,137,887 

1,106,420 

5.150,'«0 

2,099,000 

47;t,0O0 

880,000 

847,000 

1,05. '.900 

66,473 

4,7.18,800 
3,639,400 
2,616,000 
1,739,000 
2.417.400 
1,731.100 
;)83(V45 
100.000 
11,407,000 

875,393 

1.600,000 

4,1195.309 

2,4(10,000 

44.500 

46,037 

200,000 

400.000 
S96,(XI0 
1V3,000 

2.94.1,000 
3:15,300 
29(1.000 

1.507.160 

3,778,550 
93,860 

7,890 ,.150 
90,400 

9,271.880 
733.9.'il) 
2J7,3;6 



38.887 

189.691 

127,441 

301 ..370 

215.476 

130,315 

1,131,701 

970,000 

250,(100 

11,6I» 

500,000 

1,100,000 

1,358,550 

1,265.800 

700,000 

484,445 

300.439 

6,713,606 



Bt. Faol, Treuarf. 

do do 

do do 

do do 

K. Tk MetropolIUn Bk. 

K. T.,Kat. DkofCom. 
do do do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Funding bonds 



sterling coupon 



registered 

•' " coupons 

" " i-ficisterej 

" sterling ■* 

'.pterest fundable to .Jan. 67 

dno to Jaly 1,1371 

Contol, boadt.coupon A rag...... 

«niT«d criiila (or H ofola <t«st. . 



1886-67 
'67-'8-'9 
186W9 



I«JO 
1871 

ism 

1:63 
var. 



1867 
1887 
1867 



1,000 
1,000 



var 

var \ 4,063,991 



31,177,837 



01*0 
V200 



, most 
J.&J.. 

! some 
A&O 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
do 
do 
do 

do 
do 
do 
do 



do Unucan, S. ft Co 

State Treasury, 
do 

Concord or Boston, 
do do 

do do 

do do 

Trenton A J. City, 
do do do 
do do do 



Prloelpal, 
When Du 



1«TJ 
1S7S 
1«7» 

i>;9 
Dec , im 

IBM 

law 
Jo'T. leia 

lnl-188S 

imi-ms} 

imt-lrK) 

i(n«-ifut 

iro-itn 

mi 

1871 

tn*-i887 

.March, tin 
March, lasi 

Jolr, 'TIM 

gept.. '84-9 

Oct., 11M 

Jan., '(31908 

Jan., '73-84 
Jan., '88-96 
.Ian., •97-031 



N T. 


Manhattan Bank 


do 


do do 




Albany, 
Manhattan Bank 


N. Y. 


do 


do do 




Albany. 


(J. V. 


Manhattan Bank 


do 


do do 


do 


do do 


do 


do do 


do 


do do 


do 


do do 


do 


do do 




Albany.' 




New Tork. 




do 




do 




do 




do 




do 


Raleigh, Treaanry. 




New York. 




do 



RSMAB&B.t 



All tli<M boDdi ara held bTihap'nni 

fnnd. fhe ■• MInneaou Stale R*llr<Md" bead*, 
wbteh are npadlatwi. wrra Uauad In IMS to U* 
amount of |3J7a,aa;; ihrlr te<'c/g>uloB la dla- 
cuMcdln the_8tat«. Toul properly valjaUoa, 
I»!». *m;mf». uiatloa >m milli. 

The raluatlon of r. al mate I . Itn waa f4tTJMJM 
andof peraosal, |'.<04na«!<. Total. M.i.i'.J.i"]. 
upon which the lax la 3 mllla. Th. * 

Bt. Joarph Kit. provides the Intern' 
bonda dne Jan.. ivn. wrrr T>Mtd \n k 

that litre 'ncurrencv • « ro^uiuiiun 

01 the LrginiNture. ^ra tliaa far 

■uiialned the law. 'I • ravaaMiga. aa 

to Bnancoa, waa pnti. luhic-ls t. U. 

p. KM. 



N. T.,Ainer. Ex. Bank, 

do do do 

do do do 

do do do 

State Treasury. 

do 



April, 1877 
April, imi 
At will 
July, 1875 
July, 1878 
At will. 
Jan.. 1874 
Vir., vm 
Oct., 1874 
Oct., 1875 
Dec. 1877 

Jan. 1,1881; 
July, I8s7 

On demand. 

'68- -g* 

do 

do 

do 
Jan., 1900 
Oct., 1898 
tndellnlte. 
Oct., 1868 
'9».'W 

Jan., 1871 
Jan.. 1876 
JnIy,l88I 
Jan.. I&i7 
1R35 

ins 



ToUl -ntloatlon of real eatal* 1170, 111 JBO.IIS . par- 

Booal, t8,in,M8 i tax (tl UK P«r liai) ajuoustcd 

to $231408. 
The Municipal loan of >m waa laiuad to clllea 

and tovna, the proceeds to be used In redaclna 

their iaveral war debla. 

Of (he flrst two claaaes of bonda Um prtiwlpal Is pay- 
able. |lO0/no per vear. Valnallon of rral and 
prmonal proper'.y In ItTI waa ttl»jmA*l : la Un. 
«S8l.«ni.ft48. euielai.Sn.lllir^ 

There la alao M8,00(> i outlorriil debt lo L. I. BR.,* 
PtJUl per annuin for Indian anoolllra. Pea 
financial report In CnaomcLK. T. 16, p. ri. TIM 
total debt, lew alnt Ing funds. Bept. IP. 1*71, «a« 
t2>.3!8,735, against t29,4<t},7iu In lir7l. Asaraaed 



Phlla.,Fann.&M.B'k. 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Harrlsburg Trcasnry. 

Prov.,R.I.H.*T.Co. 
do do 

do do 

do do 

Colnmbia, St. Treaa. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Columbia * N. T. 

Columbia. Treasrfry. 

do 

do 

Columbia & N. V. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

London. 

Columbia. 



M.A S. 



No Interest now paid 



April, Iff79 
July.l8S3 

do 
Aug., 1877 

do 
Aug.. 1878 
Aug., ini 
Feb , l»I2 
Feb., 1873 
Feb., l«n 
Feb.lSTJ 
Feb., 1882 
Feb., 1882 
Juno, 1878 

March, 1882 
April, 1893 
Jaly. 1893 

Angnst, 1894 

At pleanre. 
Jan. 1, 18TI 
Jan. l.lSSt 
July 1, •»t-8- 
July 1, VJ-Xi 
Jul. 1. '82-86 
July 1, '^7-»7 
July 1. '75-79 
July 1, 1S81 
Jan.l, I88S 
July 1.1388 
July 1.1888 
Joly 1, 1889 
July 1. 183 

Jn1y'l,18»3 
Joly 1, 1888 



1988-93 

ISW 
IKO-TS 

1893 

:w»-«3 



valuation of real propeny In 1-72 l> tl,M>xny> 
410: of persona'. |44;,/48.081 : total . »3 0«)R74<*. 
Tax rate In 1872 a aa 9K mllla, the ulshcst ever 
known In the Htat<-. InUrett on all debt esceni 
bonnty loan la voluntarily paid In gold. Bo. da 
matured Jnly, 1873. wera alao paid u lold. (T. 
15, p 698 < V. 18. p. 81.) 



The groae amount of the aeveral Isaues of debt ara 
here given, but the value of bond* i«*". .i .mr*, 
1880 varies much on the particular \ i\ 

plans have been proposed for sc.'. • 

debt, but no dellnitc action has vi" 
Int. Is paid on bonda Issued ioS'.( . lunros'i of 
thf decUii u of Dee., lii72. O'ber Inlereet l-i de- 
fault for sume years, (vol. IS, p. 891, 771, 609, 880; 
V. 18, p. 21.) 

The total valnallon of real and ehalte; property la 
isn was tl,KB.129,»<1, on which the 2.09 mills Btata 
tax produced U^un'M, and other local taira. 
which are very heavy In Ohio, ralsad |U,«tM,i<0. 
(V. 13, p. 840 ) 

The •'ebt Is ptorlded for by sinking (tend*, which 
will par It at or before maturity. 

Revenue Is raised from num^roni soTtrr^s. princi- 
pal v from rorroratlona. Taxes .r ■ ---^ rn 
pi-rsonal property, which waa aasr- 71 

at 1:171,666. 91M. and the Ux was I >I 

rrvni'i.- In :^;l.»: l^'t.'H'. Kumlr :i- 



In K'li'l till Sii iriaii" prim • 

bonds may be changed to registered 



..d 
The bonda 



New Tork. 



Bost., N. B. Mut. Rcd'n. 
Montpeller, Treasury 



1992 
IMM 
1900 
1900 



due In 1872 are parable at any lime till lb7. . 
those of 19n 11,1 1882; hoae of IH] till 1U3- (v- 
15, p. 218, 9K., 



Debt waa all created for war purposes and Is being 
steadily diminished. The valnallon of real and 
personal property for the fiscal v< ar endinx Apr. 
1870. $1S<,189.4S9. and lax o 2J cihti on |100. Total 
nvenno in 1871-73. $841,305. 

The Comptroller's rfport, Nov., 1872, reports Iha 
bonded debt at »!".8M..rT. exclu»lve of f4.797.S08 
rontlngrnt rallioad debt, and |4,0(0xa> Blu« 
Ridge RR. bonds. The asi-cts are staled st MM,- 
700, but chiefly valueless. The esllmalr for8ts*« 
ex,iensesand Interesl lu N"uv.,l"7t. In f7.05l.S47. 
and fo^ previous deflclencv $: Z.'.*.! ne 

Ridge UR. serin, anthiirlied ;k7^. i- « 

unconstitutional. Taxation for '. ia 

"mills : conntv. 8 mills. Asaesseil . ...... ..: , ..-p- 

e'ty,tlSS,913,S!7. Tne Slate defsullrd on lulrrrat 
Jan.,ir,J. (V.l4,p.J68 ;«3;V. 15,p.-i«.2»,3:C,<»I.) 



The Governor, Jan„ 1818, recommenda funding all 
debt In a 40 year 6 per cent bond ; Interest lo be 
resumed by July, 1^74. lie e»llmstcs total 
taxable properly al foo.wniim Th* total 
debt here given Is, acri' ' • ■ ' ' " ■"• "la- 
mental report of the Co- '■', 
af'cr ilc(lurtlngbon''snald ' ^ 
this total debt of l3l,990/»:' •• 
ducts— debt of solvent ra : :e 
from railroads then aolt. ■'! 
bonds that will pav in'err^ ^■ 
est.»lS0,3a': Int. I'Pn ■ • ■ 
590; eslttnaled balm 
II.20D.0OO; making f 



189»-1910 
March 1,1878 

I8;V-T8 
1974-110 
1986-1900 
1986-1900 
1886-1900 
1888-1900 
lg78-l'>8 
1878-1886 
1877-18(17 
1877-1887 
1885-1901 



tt atltuai't irtOi W.Vi, 



im 



and leaviiij; iIh- 
Total > 
other , 
0». N 
two.|Iii[^ 



1. .»7J, 

.aW.475. 

JSIJ90. 

Iota and 



iinil". »J':. •'». - . 

:4,V4S; total taxable. $»!.•«.- 
An be crialed, except by a 

.„„- e people. The rale of laxa- 

lion Is 4U CIS on the (lOO, but a tax la laid nn rall- 
roatl receifiis, and on some other sonrcea of 
revenue, (v. 13, p. aiM.sMO . , ^ 

The State owns about 83viai.00O arrea of land, aad 
alao claims, on different accounts agmlnat the U. 
B. t4SI,000, whlchwonld he to thai extent an o»et 
to the debt. Valn-lan of propeny. IKJ, 
t29»,464,.1l7. (V. I4,P.6S7. 7'.« I 

Th-- debt Is being rapidly rrii '*• 

tered bds tiSS.SDO are held f . '*• 

Special snessage on finances li; .';• 

IcLl, V. 18. p. SI. Th.- fUn 1. 

allowing coupons to be p»: ""n 

held valid by the court"; in • :o" 

consolldaiedbondsJan.l.ii?;?. Ol »^^M^J«lco■. 
sots., about »:i>.000.0(» are In f onpjjtjiMte Aa- 
sesaed value of property In im,$mjaM*:t»l 
raie.S mills. Cb»oxicl« v. li,p. 88, HI ■»; v. 
18, p. 19,81. 



112 



THE CHRONICLE. 



{January 25, 18T3. 



CITY SEC DEITIES. 

Entered according to act of Congrees, In the year 1S73, by Wm. B.Dana & Co., in tbo office of the Librarian of CongrosB, "Washington, D. CI 
Siibscrlbers will confer a great flavor by clTlnKus Immediate notice ofanr error diacovered In our Tables. 



DKSCKIPTION. 



For explanation, ftee foot-notes. 



Date 

of 

Boudi. 



Albanu, y. i'.-Ba»for ninniclp'l pnr's 

do ilo 

flo do 

do do 

do di> 

do do 

do do 

do do 
"Water stock 



Bonds loaned to Alb. &Bnsq. U.R. 
Bonds lor various purposes 



SatUmore : 
City st'kdne at pleasure after 1890. 

Jail stocli 

Water loan 

Consolidated bounty loan 

Kxeinpt do 

Pabllc Parks (Drnlrt Hill) 

Park improvement loan 

Loan to Bait. * Ohio UR 

One million loan, Pllta & C. BR... 
New City Uall 



do 



do 



Consolidated loan 

Court Honeeloan 

Funding loan ^ . . 

Loan to Va. Valley R.P. 

To West. Mil. R.R. (f or »1, 000.000) . , 
Endorsements for N, W. Va. RR.... 

do do York* Cam. RR. 

do do Wesl. M(i. RH .. 

do lo Union RR 

tnngor, Jf <. : 

City debt proper... 

Penobscot A Kennebec RK. loan... 

European & X. American RR 

Bangor &, Piscataquis KR 



Soxton : 

Varlona Irast Fnnds 

Kenewal City Debt 

For various city parposes 

do do 

War debt, recruiting, bounties, &c, 
do for bounties 



Roxbnry deot assumed 

Dorchester debt ass uned 

Consolidated St. Imp. loan, st'rllng 

Renewal of water bonds ot '48 

Water loan, sterling 

."^Ity notes (new mam) .\ct 1853 

Water loan (Chesnut Hill Reso.).., 
do (water Into Dorchester). 

Jioston Ilighhiiids 

Dorchester water loan 



Brooklyn : 

City Hall loan 

"Waterloan 

Debtof WlUIamsburgh loan 

do do local improvem t 

Isrookiyn local improvement loan., 

Mt Pro-*pect Square loan, 

fcoldlers aid fund loan 

Nat'l G'd & Vol. Firemen's loan 

National Guard loan, 

Atlantic ave. Improv. loan, local ... 

Third street do do ... 

do do do ... 

OowanuB Canal impr. loan, do 



Bnshwick av. 
Bonth Seventh 
ITnion street 
Fourth ave. 

do 
Wallabout Bay 
Bedford ave 
Kent ave. basin 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do .. 

do . 

do .. 

do .. 

do .. 



local. 



. . T. Bridse loan, reg& coupon 

Prospect Park loan, do 

Water loan , .. 

<io 

pRwerage bonds, continuous, local. 
Ass. fund bonds, co'it.nuous do 

Central ave. sewer bonds 

So. Brooklyn do 

Temporary debt, tax certificates.... 

Charleston, S. C; 

City stock 

do bonds (coupon) 

Fire loan bonds 



Cf7iicaffo : 

Water loan 

do 

Sewerage bonds 

do 

River improvement bonds 

Municipal and School bonds 

do do 

S. Park loan (not a bond of Ch'go) 
Cook County debt 

Cincinnatt : 

Bounties to Volunteers P 

Bonnties to Volunteers 'f 

To build Kggleston Ave. sewer. .B- 

Loan oCln, & Hills. RR F 

do to Little Miami RR A 

do Baton & Ham. RU G 

do Covington* Le.v.RR n 

do Ohio £ .Mississippi BB 1 

_uo Marietta* Cin. RI5 M 

Common School purposes, reg. . . . A 

Bonds to fund floating debt 

Bda to O & .M UR to pnf . whf prop.N 
do for Common School purposes. . 
do to pur real estate for Workh'seY 

do to build Workhous-; Y< 

do pur. Orph. Asvl. gds for park.O 
do forerectlon of a Workhouse... 

do for waterworks C*.J 

do for waterworks (j.-, 

do for Coiimion school purposesP.' 
do for Common School purposes. P 
do toO& MRRtopur. whf prop.N 
do pur Epis.Bury'gOds for park.O 
do lorexten.&lmp. waterworks.* 
do do do D 

do do do E 



Bi7.e or 

par " 

Value. 



Amount 

Out- 
st'udiug. 



1(150 

1864 
IsM 
18 
1870 

:8:i 
la-i 

1851,t52 
IS65 



Var. 



Var. 

m« 

1851 
18<i.3 
1S65 
ISfiO 
18»i3 
1853 
18.53 
13M 
18TO 
1BI!4 

isio 

18-1 
tSTi 



1853'66 
ISM 

1S6!> 



l&'i'.i.'eS 

1853 
1853- '« 
1883- "» 
1861-63 

18»1 



1870 
1870 

18t«&4S 
1861 
1865 

1870-71 
186S 
1870 



18)9.'50 

1833 

1855 
1859- '6! 

1361 

1857 

1865 

18?4 

l-ies 

1862 

1867 

1866 

1365 

1866 

1867 

18«2 

1367 

1867 

1867 

1869 

1870 
1860■•T^ 
18-.7-'T< 

1872 



1870 
187J 
1S71-J2 



1853 '54 
1866 



1863-K 



186'.i 

i968 
18.5U 
1844 
18.50 
1851 

m2-'51 
H51 
1815 
1S35 
1S55 
1834 
1866 
1866 
18.53 
1*8 
1863 
1%S 
1»6S 

1860- '61 
1855 
1560 
1347 
1619 
1860 



1,000 
1,1*10 
1,0 
1,000 
1,000 
1.000 
1,0.10 
1 ,00'J 
1,000 
l,tO0 



!90&c 



lOO&c 
1004c 

m&- 

lOO&C 
llXl&c 
it«l4c 
lOO&c 
lOO&c 
lOO&c 
lliO&c 
lOO&c 
100*c 
ICO&c 
1004c 
ilXIVc 
lOO&c 



ICOic 

1,000 
1.000 
1,000 



1,000 

£ID0&c 
1 000 



1,000 
1,000 
1.000 

1.000 
i,aw 

1,0110 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,0|10 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,1)00 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 
1.000 

nmu 

1,(X)0 
1,000 
500&C 
500&C 

sm'c 



1000 
1,0110 
1.01 10 
1,(K1J 

i,ono 

1,009 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

i,two 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 
1,01») 
1.000 
1,0 X) 
1,0IX) 

\,m) 

l.OiX) 
l.OIK) 
l.OCX) 
500SC 
500&C 
500 Jtc 



^ When + 



INTEREST. 



59,000 
300,1 «X1 
100,000 
19(1,0011 
350,000 

50.000 
400X100 
10 1,000 
500,000 
1,000.000 



7,'i07,632 

t8,913 

5,000.0110 

2,-Jll,06S 

410,353 

555..566 

185,733 

5,0(K).OO0 

l.OIX),^* 

l,aX),(IOO 

614,700 

891,646 

137,414 

773,900 

1 ,000,000 

1,000.000 

656,500 

504000 

1,375;000 

117 000 



274,700 

560,000 

1,000,000 

60.1,100 



3:7,759 
583,205 

3,04i,295 
11,198,675 

1,794 500 
i2O,0OO 
634,700 
183,500 

4,000.0W) 
688,000 

1,»49,711 
394,000 

2,376,000 
6 5,000 
700,000 
375,000 



55,000 
65,000 
150 000 
13^,000 
213.000 
90,000 
652,000 
27,000 
32,000 
2.'i,000 
167,000 
135,000 
S,i2,000 
299,000 
29,l,0a) 
826,000 
'230,000 
309.000 
734,0 
278,000 
315,000 
2,100,000 
8.938,000 
9,416.000 
50,100 
1.960,000 
4,811,5'I5 
400,01X) 
75.0;X) 
1,850,000 



6,142.000 
61,500 
90,000 



1,030,000 
3,790,00 ' 
87,000 
2.593.nf0 
J,896,000 
282 090 
3.425 000 
2,000,000 
3,800,000 



31,000 
25,000 
150,000 
91,000 
96,0tlO 
131.000 
91.ftT0 
551.0.00 
llO.lXIO 
25.000 
66,000 
210.000 
4O.n00 
1>,000 
11,01X1 
31.000 
230,000 
ISft.i'O) 
l.SO.OiW 
100,000 
99,1100 
199.000 
17,000 
199,501 
96,000 
100,000 



6 

« 
5 

6 

5-6 

5 to 7 

6g. 

5g 

4Kg. 

5g 



6 

6 

7S-;o 

6 
6 
6 
6 



7 3-10 
73-'0 
7 3-10 
73-10 

6 

6 

6 



,1. & D. 
M.&N. 
J.&D. 
K.& A. 
M.&S. 
M.&N. 
M.&S. 
M.&.V. 
K.& A. 
M.&N. 



Var. 
A.&O. 
J. & J. 
A. & O. 



Var 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
d. 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
eo 



J.* J. 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



V 



J> & J. 



J.& J. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
A. & O 

Var. 



& .7. 

& ,) 

&D. 

& A. 

& D. 

& J. 

& J. 

& .1. 

& D. 

&N. 
. &N. 
. &N. 

&N. 
. &S. 

&i>. 

&S. 

& n. 

& A. 
& D. 
&,I. 

&,r. 

& N. 
.&N. 
.*(). 

&0. 

&0. 



Where Payable and by 
Whom. 



N. T., Duncan, S. & Co. 

do do 

do do 

Boat.. Merch'nts' Bank. 

N. Y., Duncan, S. & Co. 
do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 



Bait., 
Bait., 



Bait., 
Ball., 
Halt., 
Bait,, 



Bat. 
Bait. 



Bait., 
Bait. 



Bait. 



Augusta. 



Farm.* Plan.Bk 
Register's office, 
lialumore. 

do 

do 

do 
N. MecliaulcB'Bk. 
Farm.* Plan.Bk, 
N. Mechanics' Bk, 
Farm.* Plan- Bk. 

do 

do 
N. Mechanics' Bk, 
Farm. * Plan. Bk, 
Baltimore. 
N. Mechanics' Bk, 
, Resister'8 office. 
Baltimore 
N. Mechanics' Bk 
Baltimore. 



Bangor* Boston, 
do 

Bost., Mereh. Nat. Bank 
Boston, 2d Nat. Bank. 



Boston. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
London. 
Bostou. 
London. 
Boston. 

do 

do 

do 

do 



Brooklyn, 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do • 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Charleston 
do 
do 



(f. T., Duncan, S. * Co. 

do do 

N.Y., Am.EiCh.N.Bk. 

do do 

do do 

>7. Y., Duncan, s. * Co. 

do do 

N. v.. Am. Exch.N.Bk. 
N.Y., Metropolitan Bk 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



N. T., Ainer. Ex. Bank 
do do do 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
Philadelphia, Bank N. A. 
N. y., Amer. Ex. Bank 
do do do 

do do do 

CiBCinnali, 
Ilo 
do 
N. Y., Amer. Ex. Bank, 
do do do 
do do do 

do do do 

do do do 

do do do 

Cincinnati. 
N. Y., Amer. Ex. Bank 
do do do 

do do do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Principal 
when duo. 



June, 1S72-74 

May, 1379 
June, 1880-81 
Feb., 1835-!H 
Mch 1393.1900 

Nov., 1910 
Mch. 1674-91 

May, 1911 
Feb., 1876-8: 

Nov., 1695 



1872-'89 



July, 1890 

1973 
May 1, 1875 
Sept. 1,1893 
Sept. 1, 1693 
Sept. 1, 1890 
Jan.1, 1^95 
Jan. 1,1390 
Jan. 1,1886 
JulyLlsil 
Apr. 15, 1900 

1885 
July 1. 1890. 

1900 

iwj 

July, 1900 

IMS '85 

1886 

1890 



1872- '85 
1874 
1891 
1899 



On demand 

1878-'79 
1873- '81 
1874- '92 
1871-'86 
18T4-'.5 
167J-'85 
lBr.'.'8! 
1899-1900 
1900-1901 
18r2-'7S 
I877-'79 
1875-1901 

1900-ina: 

'79-'8U&'98-'93 
1900-1901 



18T!-'T6 

1873 

1875 
1879- '81 

1891 

18.7 
1835-'»4 
1880.'81 

1875 
186l-'73 

1881 

1881 
1867- '90 
18Ti.'»0 
1872- '90 
1877 '86 
1866-'95 
1868- '95 
1868- '90 

1877 

1879 
1901'11 
i 1915-'24 
1881-1902 

Syrsfr d'te 

do 
I 1880 
I 1873-74-75 
t .... 



Sinking fund for municipal bonds, $16,000 per an . 
num. Amoi.nt now 'U sinking lund. r3a0,61«. 
Sinking lund lor water stock. $5.00*1 per annual. 
Loan to Albany & SusquehHiina is secured by lat 
mortgage on road from Albany to bingbamton. 



1S6J '98 

188,3- '84 

1890 



lR-4-'82 
1882- '95 

ISSO 
1830.'95 
1890-'95 
1873-'76 
1874- '99 
18r2-'79 
187J-89 



J-.lly, 1872 
July, 1876 
Dec, 1S80 
Aug., 187* 
Dec, 1880 
Jan.. 1881 

do 
JaK..lS82 
June, 1884 
Nov.. 1885 

do 

do 

do 
March, 1886 

Oct.. 1836 
March, 1888 
June, 1883 
Aug., 1888 
June, 1889 
July, 1^88 
Jan.. 1890 
Nov.. 1890 

do 
April, 1895 

do 

do 



REMAnK84 



City receipts, 1871, ^15,689 1 lot. account, 176,862. 



The city credit has been loaned extensively to rail- 
roads, in e (Change lor their securities, which it 
holds to the amount 01 $U,015,968. The tlnklDg 
fund lor ". 4 0. RR. $5,000.0(10 loan was f!,ii79,682, 
Dec. 81, 1871 ; West. Md. RR. sinking lund. »'!n,32!> 
and the total of the several other sinklug funds 
$1,469,132. TOO amount of <'e.)t on which cltv 
pavs interest Is $13,023,066, oe h. & O. EB. pays oh 
$5,000,000 loan ; Water loan is ra'd hy income of 
waterworks, and Public Perk t.v City Passenger 
Kallway, and interest on $1,4^7, '(n; by other com- 
paiiles. The $;. 1 00,000 lo-xn 01 1S72 lor West. Md. 
K.R. is to be in placeof $5^5,0CU bonds previously 
endorsed. The assessed vaj'ie 01 propertyln t8'.0, 
$202,756,140. Population In IS'Owss 267,354, ngunsl 
212,418 in 1860. Loans iirc issued In registered 
stock and are generally due at pleasure after the 
dates of maturity uauicil. The fiscal year now 
closes uct.31. 



Valuation of real and peiDonal property $9,378,955. 
Itate of taxation, 2>i' per ct. The loans to Europe 
A N. Am. KR., and to Bangor & Piscataqu s RK . 
are secured by first mortgages on those roads. 



The population of Boston in 1870 was 2.'>0..526. against 
177,840 in 1860. Valuation of real estate In 1871 was 

t 393.2:4,9.50 ; personal propertv, $217,448,600; total. 
612,66*,5.''i0, upon which the rate 01 taxation w as 
$1 57per $1,000 for State and $11 53 for CItyand 
County '1 he net increase of debt in lb71-72 was 
$745,8'.l9.- The total debt. April 30, 1872, Mas 
$28,628,535, and the sinking fund then held, 
$11,6S4,337. Sinking fund provisions are sutficient 
to meet, the debt as it matures. Mr. Thomas 
Hills Chaiiinan of Board of Assessors, estimates 
the value of buildings destroyed in the great ftre 
of 1872 at $14,000,00(), and personal nropcrly at 
$;0,Ot:.',t'00. 



The average rale of taxation on the assessed valua- 
tion of real and personal properry i« about 
$'d 50 per $KW, being an increase of 75 vents 8 mills 
over 1871. The Mavor. in his Message, Jan- 
uary, 1S73. stated the debt at $23,0( 6 lioo for pub- 
lic improvements, less $2,745,070 In sinking fund , 
$9,4:,8,055 lor local improvements (as marked local 
in this tablp) which are a Hen on the prop- 
erty benefitted and must be paid by its 
floating obligations, and ti.'in.Mf of celt fl- 
cates. Population in 1870. 396.200 against 266.661 
in 1860. Valuation of property in Kings County 
in 1^72, by the State Board of Equalization. 
$175,411,591) for real estate and $l»,7i6,7.il for 
personal. The Board of Supei visors valued ths 
total taxable pro| erty of Brooklyn at $207,766,. 
452. and ot all KInss County at $219,214,513. 
Chkomole, V 16, p. 50. 



Bonds are mostly held within the Slate o( South 
Carolina, and interest is paid in Charleston. 



Total funded debt, April 1, 1872, $14,103,000. Float- 
ing debt, $824,649. Assessed value of real proper- 
ty. Sept., 1^71, was $236.89S,«.'iO ; lersonnl. $52,847. 
820. (;< of actual value.) Total loss hi- fire 
calculated at $196 tXX),(XX). Tax rale for 1872. 10 
mills; rebate of taxes tor loss by (ire, $K0<),000. 
Population in 1870 298,983, against 109,2<i'> in 1.-60. 
Cook County detitls all 7 percent, except $150,000 
due in 18T3.and interest is all payable lu J. & J., 
or In M. & N. (V. 15, p. 82, 803.) 



Population by census of 1870. 218.900, againrt 161.044 
In 1860. Ta\- rale for 1S7I. $22 20per$1.0(«l The 
following table Iroui the books 01 the Auditor of 
Hamilton County. Ohio, exhibits the assessed 
valuation of the City ot Cincinnati for ten years 





Eeal 


Personal 


Total 


Ra'e tax 


\'ear. 


estate. 


e.-tatc. 


valuation. 


pertl.OCO 
$17^5 


iS60.. 


$61,620,904 


T31.4I1,S12 


$93,032,716 


I«,il 


6 ',657,365 


SO, 18,111 


92,970,776 


19 20 


|X62.. 


63,503,296 


29,707,361 


9:i,211,15l 


17 66 


:863.. 


61.441,53! 


35,932,1V1 


100,S74,0:.8 


18 20 


IH6I.. 


65,585,774 


47.809,574 


113,395,848 


20 20 


:k65.. 


67,610,611 


6t,ia5,,3«2 


130,745,993 


2J 9') 


1866.. 


66,451,662 


67 -18,101 


133.672,768 


21 6J 


1H67,. 


68,51)9,040 


68,41; -H^ 


136,931,325 


27 40 


186-i.. 


69.799.601 


6-.,?33,()a5 


131,383,529 


28 on 


1S69 , 


T; 'i<3.s44 


•"1.-7 r, 666 


130.715,510 


31 90 


|K7(I.. 


736 4«1 


57,310.751 


1 6,lff7,'2!16 


31 60 


1371.. 


1.3,427 ,a3ii 


56,931,014 


180,361.9«J 


22 20 



Total debt ot Cincinnati Is about $5,006,000. Int 
account about $3.'')0,000 peranni.;m. 



w St'""' >""■?'""<;— This column shows the sizes or denominations in whl3h each issue of bonds is made. „ . 

t ir»«'i»opW<'.-,T.*,r.»tandafor.Ian. & Julv; K. & A.. K«h. * Aur.; .M. Ss S., March a Sept.; A.*C-., April A Oct.; M, * N., May * Nov. J.a P, Isine&Dee.; Q-J. 

Quarterly fro n Jan.; g -F.. quarterly Irora t'cb.; Q.-.M., qnarterly from March. ~ 
1 JW.n3rt9.-i1 Igurcs la hracicta at the cuJ 01" remaris, In ioy case, refer to the voluraa and pa^e of Cn»o»ioi,« eoataiaing fuller Intoimatiun 



] January 25, ibii 



THE CHRONIOLR 



113 



CITY SECURITIES. 



Siibaerlbfirii ivlll confer ■ grtimt fkvor ky Kivlng n« Immediate notlee of anjr error 4lee«Tere4 In enr Taklea. 

BktT' 



DESCRIPTION. 



For explanation of all refereiires, 8ce 
loot nutt'8 on preceding paKO. 



C/Mi>rnnMU— (Continued > 

(io for f undtnK lloatlni^ deht,...A2 
do loaned to Whitewater Canal. .A 

do fur nt-w hoHplt tl S 

do t't/r new ti<;rt|tlial ..Sli 

do loriniulliiff CuKtliiK debt L 

do l'orexten.£liup. wuterworlcs.K 
do do do F 

Bd9 pur. Orph Asyl. Q'da for Parlc.O 

do tor Workhiuso V3 

00 t'ol seweriiife... It 

do for ttnprovtnx tUlbcrt ave — V 
do to ladM Ki(;£U!itton ave aewerB.S 

do liiiproveuiciit bonds W 

do water woik purposeB ('4 

U.-nerul linprovein.;ut W'i 

tvbitnbld, .S. C: 

Iloud-« for varlonR purpo8e« 

Kuiullnff and ttubstilute tmnds, &c. 
city Hail,&c 



Vohtmhu-^, fja. : 
Subieriptloud to various RK. atocks 
do do do 

Oas Co. ato -k 

l-'undlnt^ bonds, coupon 

Bonds tor various purposes 



letrnit, Mich. : 

Bonds for various City purposes 

do Water W'k Co, Kuar. bv city, 
Pub. nulld. stock (Jlty llalU bonds 

Jtrxeij, City : 

WnlMi- loan bonds., coupon 

do do do 

Iniproveinent bonds 

Keconstructlon bonds 

Inl iroveiuout bou.ls 

Alortra I street dock 

Cltv bonds, coupon 

do 

Funded debt bouda 

H idsonCity bon<ts 

Berjfeu sciiool !< an boudB ,. 

do S'werage bonds 

do Improvement bonds 

ilo bounty ioau 



Date 

ol 

Bouds. 



Size or 



Ainoont 

Out- 
st'udiug 



oiilsnlle, Ky.: 

For JetlVrsonvlUe RR stock . 

School Uouso.4 



Subscrlp. to stock, L. & N. R. R. . 
strider 3, wharf 



Water worka . 

Bounty lund 

For iiuprovement of acreeta,, 

I'uoltc schools 

Water stock , 

Sewer bonds 

do 



Rowan's, >i city whaf. . 
Klizabeth andP. RR.. 



Wha f property, 

.1 all bouda 

For old liabilities 

School bonds 

For old liabilities 

St Lolls Air Line RR 

Ne* City Hall 

HR bonus, endorsed by Louisville. 

tynchburff, Va.: 

ifohda various purposes 

B juds, 8 percent 



M •ir.f'htH, Te»)i.: 

Bunds for vurluns purposes 

Post bonds 

Fuudinx loan, (if old; 

Fudorseuieut M. & L. lik. B.R.. 



Mihpaukte : 

, R'vadj <i8i nient bonds 

General City bouMB 

Water bjs.(ls>ue f l,(Ml.(Mti) coupon 
do iisi It t IM.liM) registered 

Jlobile: 
City debt ABC (pay. an'ly till •91). 
do do UKF (pay. an'ly till '86). 
Bonds to Mob. & Ot. North RR. . 
l^onds to Qrand Truuk Railroad. . . 

Wharf bonds 

City fdnded d(iht 

To Mobile St Northwestern RK.... 



IW7-'48 
i»47-'4« 

lUff! 

IWI 

lies 

1893 
1853 

1894 
IHOli 
1869 
ISCU 
1869 
1J71 
1871 
1871 



18M-f8 

18W-71 

liVi 



ISSS-'il 

1871 

ia'i3 

1866 
136;-'69 



185S-59 
IS66.'71 



18Sa-«7 
186»-71 

18 lU 

187) 

1811 

i8;u 
Var. 
Var. 
\S» 
Var. 
1888-69 
18l!9 
1868-69 
Varl. 



IS.'K 
1853-Sl 

1814 

IS.'Vt 
18.i7-59 

1863 
1866-17 
1.8.>1.'70 

1867 

1868 

1871 

1888 

1863 

18.8 

1868 
ISfV 
I869-';U 

1870 

1871 

1371 



Var. 

isru 

1897 



Montgomfiru, Ala.: 
Bonds of 1868, N . lii S. Ala. 



RR.. 



IMt 
1871 
1872 

18J2 



1868 
1366 
185'" 

ir.o 

1870 
1871 
ll^i 



SOOAC 

l,UUO 
I,UU) 
\JMU 

i,uio 

1,000 
l.UUO 
1,000 
1,000 

i,mu 

1,000 

1,000 

1,00(1 

i.uoo 

1,000 



1,000 
1.000 
1,000 
lOO&c 
500.SCC 



1,003 
1.000 
1,0I.<0 
l,0(tl 

irtlo 

1,000 
1,0UI 
Var. 

I.IUJ 

Var. 

I,l4l0cltc 
1,0 O&c 
l.WK&C 
Varl 



1000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

1,000 

1,IU1 
lAio 
1,000 
1,000 

1,000 
1,000 
l.OOO 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1.000 
1,000 

1,0110 
i.oiu 

1,000 
1,000 



l.OOO 
90O.isc 
l.ltlO 

1,000 

500&C 
1,'U> 
1.000 

lO.OiO 

100* c 
1004 c 

1.000 

1.000 
1,000 
500* e 



INTERK8T. 



cffi. »^>'»'>'« 



yew York: 

Water stock 

do 

Croton water stock 

New C oton Aqueduct stock 

Addt-.'nal new Crotou Aqueduct... 

Crorou water main stuck 

CtOton Reservoir bonds 

do Aqueduct bonds 

C^'Oton water pipe bonds 

Central Pa. It lund stock 

no ao do ao 

do do do do 

Cen. Park at'idltlonal fund stock 

do do do 

Central Park Imp. fund stock 

du do do do do 

do do do do do . 

Buildinffloan stock, No 4 

Real estate bonds 

Public education stock 

Uociis and slips stock ....• 

Dock Bonds 

FloatlniiT debt lund stock 

Market stock „ .... 

do do 

do do 

City Cemetery stock 

C!ty impr«v. n.ent stock 

do do 

Luuitic Asylum stock 

do do 

Fire department stock , 

Fire telegraph bonds 

fax relief bonds 

(■o do coupon 

New York Brldife bonds 

A.0cumular.ed debt bonds 

c'treet bnprovemeat bonds 

gj'eet op«alQ«aali mprove bonds 



1841-83 

1870 
ItlS-^O 
1863 

is:o-'i 

1S71-3 

136M0 

1869 
18.">:i-7 
18M-7 

ia.iT 

1359 

1957-9 

I860 

1865 

1S53 
1860-3 

1853 

1852 

1870 

1860 

18KI 



1869 



lata 

197U 



100«c 
lOO&c 
lOO&c 
lOOAc 

100&C 
lOO&o 
lOOic 
lOO&c 
100*c 

looi •. 
loo&c 
1004c 
lOOftc 
lOOftc 
10D(S!C 
:ooftc 
lOOic 
100 tn 
lOO&c 

loo.tc 

lOO&e 
lllOSc 
1004c 
lOOAc 
lOO&C 
lOOic 
lOO&C 
lOO.tc 
I0O*c 
100£c 
HKMW 
lOOAe 
ICOdkn 
tai£c 

50a*c 
iin.fec 

100&C 

lowkc 

lOCMtc 



« 

6 
73-0 
73-10 

8 

8 

6 

6 

t 
73-10 
73-10 
73-10 
; 3-10 

7 

1 



9 A 8 

7 
7 



148,0(10 

»7,«10 
500,000 
1190,000 

60,000 

75.000 
100,000 
100,000 

70,UH) 
150,000 
150 000 
100,000 
136,00 
(50,000 
300,000 



1S3.400 
161,4.'>0 
'490,000 



118,000 
147,000 

10,000 
n.i.HOO 

:f7,500 



221,000 

l'50,000 
800,000 



1,314.000 
475,0 

1,0(X),0(X): 
510,000 

'2,68<J.(IOO 
U'),00O 
933,000 
73,(C3j 
500,1100 
•i8l,395 
150,000 
400,000 
•*0,000 
1^,000 



17,000 
72,000 
449.000 
159,000 
91<1,000 
38.000 
870,.'VXl 
191,000 
500,000 
154,000 
425.001 
136,000 

1,000,000 
166,000 
WO.OUl 
2T-'.»iO 
135.000 
2'5,000 
5(10,000 
■J-'iO.OOO 

1,558,000 



8a9.69'2 
111,117 



25,000 

S.5 15,(100 
•-■37 ,((00 
800,OUI 



45^009 
130.0 
•.'•H,(«) 
lOO,0((O 



55'.,a)0 
•234,20 1 
Si5,«K 
500.000 
360.000 
23O.II00 
300,0i(0 



4.596,995 

500.000 

2,900.000 

250.000 

3.131.00' 

1,500,000 

9i4,nO0 

490,0(0 

4.''iO,000 

3,066.071 

399.3O0 

•275.000 

990.000 

10 000 

2,500.000 

2.081.200 

1,766,600 

115,000 

1,133.43; 

151.000 

200,1(00 

2,V10.(I00 

2,148,001) 

75,000 

40,000 

181.0)0 

75,000 

491.200 

3,340,000 

300.000 

400.000 

531953 

400.000 

2.767,000 

8.000,000 

811,000 

6,500.000 

6,ao;,9S9 
1,000.000 



When 



1 

7 

7 
7 
* 7 



5*6 

8 
5 & 6 

6 

6 
64 7 



6 
9 
6 
6 
9 
8 
6 
8 
9 
6 
5 
9 
;46k 



M.4N. 
M.4N. 

J. 4 U. 
M.4N. 
.1 . 4 ,1 . 
.J. 4 I). 
A. 4 0. 
M. 4 8. 
A. 40. 
M.tS. 
M.4 S. 

A.4;o. 

M.4.S. 
F,& A. 
J.:4D. 



J. ft .1. 
J. 4 J. 



.1. 4 J. 

Var 
J. 4 J. 
A. 40. 
J. 4 J. 



Varl. 

J. 4 J. 

Van . 



J. 4 J. 

J . 4 .1 . 

J. A J. 

M 4N. 

J. 4. 1. 

J. 4 J. 
Vadous, 
V (rioua. 

M.4N. 
Various. 

J. 4 J. 

J. 4 J. 

■1.4 J. 

J. 4 J. 



A. 40. 

J. 4 J. 
A itO. 
M. 4 S. 
M.SN. 

Varl. 

Varl. 

Varl. 
J, 4.). 
J. 4 J. 
J.4D. 
M.4N. 
A.40. 

Vn I. 
A.40. 

Varl. 

Varl. 
F. 4 A. 
.M.4S. 
A.4 0. 

Varl. 



J. 4.1. 
J . 4 .) . 



J. 4.). 
.1 . 4 .1 . 
M.4 N. 
J. 4 J. 



J. 4 D. 
J..«.l 
■1.4.1. 
J 4 J. 



Wbcrc Payable ud 
by Wliuin. 



i 



.T. & J. 
J. 4 I. 
.1 . 4 J . 
J. 4 J. 
M.4N. 
■I. 4.1. 
.) . 4 J . 



J. 4.1. 



«.-F. 



B. 



Plillidelphii, Bank N. A. 
du do do 

N. V.,Amer. Ki. N. B. 
do do do 

do do do 
do do do 
do do du 
Cincinnati 

N. Y., Ainer. Kx N 
do du do 
do do du 

N. Y.,Ainer. K«. N 
do du du 

do do do 

do do do 



Columbia, 
do 



'fnclnal. 
When Uiic. 



Savannah.C.R. H. Bk. 

New Y..rk. 

Col. C(ty T easnrr. 

New York 4 Culunious, 

Culunibus. 



.N. Y.,Cent. Nat. Bank. 

du 

du 



.I'raer C.Hud.ConntyBk 



do 
do 

("O 

do 
dj 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
di 
do 



. Bk, 



S. v.. Mercantile N 

do do 

do do 

do do 

N. Y., Bank of Ainertca. 

Louisville. 

du 

do 

N. Y.,Bkof America. 

do do 

do do 

Louisville. 

Y. Bkof America. 

Louisville. 

do 

do 

do 

Y. Bk of America. 

do do 

du do 

du do 



I.ynchbnrg. 
do 



Memphis. 

N.y..P. M. Myers 4 Co 

do do 

Charleston, S. C. 



N. 



N. 



March, tan 

do 
■lane, IM 

Nav.,iar: 

Jul., IWO 
Jane, two 

Oct., iwn 

Uareh, KM 
Oct., 1881 
Sept., 1M< 

do 

Oct., 18M 

March 1,1888 

Auk. 15. 1-8C 

Dec. 1, 19»l 



llt7'-8! 
intn 
18in 



1872. •ei 
1891. '«2 

1878 
1873- '83 
1887. 'M 



UW-''«1 



.)an , 18T7-*I> 

July. '9l>.|«lil 

1376 

1891 

1901 

1 90 

Varl.'as. 

Va loua, 

1891 

Vartoof. 

Ian.. 'leigOL 

July, 18S9 

lKi4-7» 

Varioua. 



April, 1882 

l'-83-84 
April. 18BI 

1881 

May. 1887-89 

■79 4 85 

1898-97 

1BI2-'W 

July. 1897 

July. 1898 

June, lam 

May. l«se 

Oct., 1816 

■731018 

1899 

1889-1901 

•r2-'8» 

■754 '80 

Sept., 1391 

Alirll, 1891 

teto'93 



MII.4N.y., 
do 
do 
du 



A.Goettel 
do 
do 
do 



Mobile, Hk of Mobile. 

do do 

<lo du 

N. V...MMeh. N. Bank 

.Mobile City Tro<sory. 

do do 

N. y., MercU. N. Bank, 



N.Y., Howes 4M. 



Popnlallon. :b;o ».■». •rala'il.i'nJIn 180) t«WJtO 
inarkrt Ituuda Here laauwd lu MVt tSV.'. 



Bonds are alt coupon, and were laaofd lu ^aiall 
aM(Ouutj> an wauled. ( Ity holda su . « alurkt aad 
ulb'T pro|>rrl>. ValuaUuo ol pru|M-tly la;i 
»3.,'«6.0.0. f I" I 



Population In 1870, 79J01 ; V .. --. ,|(, 

tl,221,7U. acalnat a debt u 

city taxes uu rval aod P4t ,2, 

lil^.DOg: Iul8;i,(*l8iin^ l(. ; 

A report made by citizens, Dec., 1871, tUlM Ik* 
total debt of the cl'y at ti.tfjtx, an InctesMi at 
^I679,((00 over the (tmount nominally held aitaloat 
the ctty at the time uf tic- c.'iisoll.lat(ou, two 

{ears and a half aK». lit the l[)r(ri.»e, huwever 
2,16.^,000. aruse under rout set- adopleu befuie 
the act uf consolldat on. and |U4(00U lia- b«*«a 
made by the iundiuK of Ihe f'trnier ftoallnn d«bl. 
The e with die cash now in the tteaaury reduce 
the actual amuuut of Increase uodet Uc preaeitt 
city government to (1,I.4,UUI. 



18 5-'a« 

187J-19KI 
Nov.,1900 
July.isn 



June 1, 1891 
.ran. 4.1901 
Jan. I, 1908 
Jan. 1.1902 



1891 

188* 

1889 

Julv.lS99 

N.>v.. 1896 

till 1901 












KEMARKH. 



' cl'v dpb!. orfr irJ •l»ore 
-tn. wu t'.' tOh^Slj". Tbr • uu- 
ikins fuutl reportcdJitfiaarir. 



to Janti^'^" '" 
Mlnkiii. 

mtSSI" .,ii.iu||iuuu rvifwr^oj .#■»■■■■ f I 

1872. t(' ' ((ra wereadeijuate to meet all 

the city debt as It niatnrea (except the ll.u«jOuv 
to the E 4 P. I R.^ The total dert Jaaasry. 
1872. was 86.193 OOO. elcluslvr uf Ihe railroad debt. 
for which the ruada are liai )e. aaiuumluc to 
ilA'>8.000. PopuUtiou lu im was 100,7:0 ecalivt 
88.083 in 1860. 



1888 



Interest on tWO.OOO of Ihe alxes Is paid In Bain, 
more. City bolda nominal asset 1 of |>3t.843. 



1 lie floatloi; debt Sept. 1. 18n. was •^3S..•n. Valua- 
llou of real properly In :s.2 f c -w. ino- riei<M»nal, 
M.690.00U; tax rate, *ts P' <>(e 

currency debt was in d, .u- 

poiis unpaid amount 10 0.1 . -'t^m 

in 1870, 40.2W. 

The City cannot Issue debt beyond 5 per rent of Its 
aesessedvalue, which in '.^721s abont f ■•'.itv.'fsi' 
Sinking funds are provided for all the ho((d- . lihl 
city bonds issued to raliruada receatJy keld raUd 
(v. 16. p. ai.) 

Valuation of property. IfC* •■>■"'-.-■■■' — n^ 

per Ceu(. l(tere are al- - IB 

baudsof trustesfor II 1 -.^r 

Mobile 4. S' W.R.R. .\lo( ,9 
per cent bunds outsiaudln^. 



Bonds are en Joteed by N. 4k 8. Ala. RR. 



lSW-75-7»« 
N..T. 1,1902 

133S-90 
1884 

AUK. i,i<ini 

Nov. 1. 1900 
I907-I'ill 
1907-141 

1880 

ISS7 

1898 

I8j« 

1874 

1874 

1878 

1887 

189» 

im 

187* 
187S 

is;3-i87« 
Nov. i.i«ai.2 

1878 
ISM 

lan 
i8n 

1888 
1888 
1888 
188U 
1889 
1889 
18M 
1879 
189U 
Nov. 1. 1908 
1884-1888 
1888 
1 1 m9-188l 



The city and county, though Identical aa to hoooda- 
rle.x. have separate oncaaizatlona and dlkUaat 
debts. The followluftstate 1 ent shows iheauiuual 
of funded and temporary debt, and the amonnl Us 
the sinking fund at the dales named. 

Jan. 1. Jan. I. Jan. I, 

Pes rlpllonof Debt. ISTl. 18n. in>. 

FuniM city debl «(I8.01<.79( |S7.I«MW P*.7r«jaS 

Funded county debt . 20.1(81,390 t^m jm ».»: «0l 

Total funded debt, .t88.998.148 t87.3a8.*ai •H.m m» 
sinking fund 18,119j)M ao.lg|J»l MUUK* 

ToUl. less s'k^g rd.»50.88}JS» H^fiMOtl »;o.i40.3'« 
Temporary city debt. 10.SB.1W l«.*44jm I8,«:, 71 
Clly revenue boads.. SjIBftlM) MKIM Ml*.4*1 

i;ouuiy rev.k'da,*c. Ajmxa twjem I.M7.7W 



-he population t - . . 

against 809.898 in 1860. The f ollovlac taki* ilwwa 
the progrea* la tea yean ot propeiv ^XS^ 



1888 1 

I 1^9-1881 I 



aad taxatioa. 
Real 

Tear, eaula. 

188*. . |a«tJ13WI* 
«a8.9«B.8<6 
889.988.401 
403.187 JS2 
410T>4,48S 
427,aiD,884 
478.9 4.934 

8^,286^986 
884.188 918 
7«!.10d;O75 



ruxprgno*-. 



1881.. 

isa.. 

l-lSS.. 
1881.. 
1869.. 
1868.. 
1967.. 
1988.. 
1889.. 
1870.. 
18n.. 
187*.. 



;i7,l«8.889 



Penonal 




City a 




state. 


Coaaty. 
14 (• 


tl78.<<*7M! 


H Is 


174.884 JW 


at* 


18 « 


172.418.031 


197 


IS 49 


191J(7.IS1 


427 


MM 


22-.920JW 


4 31 


17 M 


lSi:«.4Tl 


4 98 


14*4 


J57JM.974 


1 98 


1*0» 


ntx».*n 


4t: 


31 «■ 


!a6.iN,i;2 


1 ■* 
It* 


»«T 


Ml .14 MM 


19 f) 


ai9.*6JM 


>7a 


\*m 


3(^S:i? 


*«» 


17 R 



114 



THE CHUONICLE. 



[January 25, 1878. 



CITY SECUKITIES. 

Sabucrlbers will confer a sroat <Uvor by givtne n» Immediate notice of any error dUeovered In our Tables. 



DKSCBIPTIOS. 



For explanation of all references, see 
foot notes on '.id j)age ;)revlou9. 



Xew rort-(Contlniied) 
Vol. Soldiers Kam. Aid flind bonds. 

do do do do 

.Ninth district Court Hou-e bond*., 

Consolidated stock, coupon 

Dept far^s Improv. bonds 

Central Park commission bonds... 

Assess Dent boikds 

City Parks imnrovoni'tfund stock. 

Kormal school fund stock 

Public scliOol bulldlnf; Itind btock.. 

Ad iltional Croton water stocK 

bewer ~epalr stock 

Imprc vement bonds. 

Consolidated stock of 1 J9i 

y. r. Countv: 
County Court House stock 

do do No. 8... 

do do No. 4... 

do do No. 5.., 

Sol. subs. Hod. bounty bonds 

8ol. bounty fund bonds... .. . . . . 

Bol. subs, and Belief Kcd. bonds..., 
Kol. bounty fund bonds, No.S...... 

Bol. bounty fimd lied, bonds, No. i. 

Riot dauiavCB Bed. bonds. 

do do indem. bonds 

Assessment fund stock 

Repairs to buildings, ttock. 

Consolidated stock, coupon 

Accummulated debt bonds ». 

N. y. & Westchester Co. Imp. bds 

Sew Orleans : , ^ 

CoQsolldateddobt) »S3O,0O0arpllcd 

do do > yearly to fnl'st 

do do ) and principal. 

Railroad debt 

do do 

do do 

do do « 

Old corporations 

Pnnch^rtrai