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THE 

COMMONER 

oA ^Memorial to 

William Jennings ^ryan 

the Qreat Qommoner 

and a History of the Conception, Birth, 
and Establishment of the William Jen- 
nings 'Bryan University. 



^Published by the 

FIRST STUDENT "BODY 

of the 

William Jennings Bryan 
University 

of 

-VAYTOX. TEXXESSEE 



-t 



COPYRIGHT, 1931 

The Staff 

AMY CARTRIGHT 
Editor 

QUEEN TRENTHAM 
Associate Editor 

GILES RYAN 
Associate Editor 

ROBERT CRAWFORD 
Business Manager 

JAMES CALDWELL 
Assistant Manager 

MRS. BERTHA MORGAN 
Circulation Manager 

ELOISE PURSER 
Photograph Editor 

NORA GIDEON 
Art Editor 

EDWINA WING 
Associate 

R. C. WILBUR 
Associate 




o4 SMountain 'View from 'Bryan Hill 



1 




THE BIRTH 



CHE William Jennings Bryan University opened its doors for freshman students on 
September 18, 1930, approximately five years after the renowned anti-evolution trial 
in Dayton, Tennessee. The inaugural ceremony was held in the courtroom in which 
Mr. Bryan assisted in the prosecution of Mr. John T. Scopes. 

Many thinking men and women feel that this trial and its attendant widespread publicity 
mark the turning point in the effort to check the swelling tide of materialisic and agnostic 
philosophy which had made such marked progress toward engulfing the young students in our 
educational institutions. 

At the conclusion of the trial John T. Scopes, the young teacher charged with violating the 
Tennessee State law against the teaching of evolution, was found guilty. The Supreme Court of 
Tennessee held that the law was constitutional and that Scopes had been guilty of violating it 
as charged in the indictment. 

On the Thursday preceding his death, on Sunday, July 25, 1925, Mr. Bryan suggested the 
establishment of a school for young men upon one of the suburban hills. 

In consequence of his sudden death in Dayton, on the field of the legal battle, his friends fe't 
that the movement inaugurated by him should be amplified and that a great co-educational, 
non-sectarian, but thoroughly Christian institution should be built as a national memorial to his 
life and character. 

Nearly a million dollars has been subscribed for this purpose. A most beautiful site of 
eighty-four acres on a wooded hill overlooking Dayton has been purchased. The Administration 
Building, planned to accommodate 400 students in all departments of college life, is now under 
construction. 

Dr. George E. Guille, of Athens, Tennessee, for fifteen years Extension Bible Teacher for 
the Moody Bible Institute, was selected as the first president of the institution. Mr. Malcolm 
Lockhart, formerly connected in a promotional way with several outstanding Southern colleges, 
was selected as vice-president. All members of the faculty have at least two academic degrees 
or their equivalent, thus insuring the highest educational and scholastic standards. 



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EDI CATION 



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The first student body of the 
William Jennings ^ryan 
University reverently dedi- 
cates this volume to 

rr The Qreat Qommoner" 

in memory of whom Tlryan 

University has been 

founded. 



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Vi>i>s-7->3 




The Qreat Commoner 




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THE COMMONER, 1931 




1 



THE COMMONER, 1931 




F. E. Robinson, Chairman 
Dr. Howard A. Kelly . 
Harry E. Paisley . . . 
T. Edward Ross . . . 
Wallace C. Hagcard . 
Virgil Hollincsworth . 
Grace Bryan Hargreaves 
W. L. Kimball .... 
Dr. A. M. Morgan . . 



F. E. Robinson 
Chairman of the Board 



Board of Trustees 

. . Dayton, Term. Dr. H. A. Ironside Chicago, 111. 

. Baltimore, Md. Hugh R. Monro .... Montclair, N. J. 

Philade'phia, Pa. H. H. Frasa Dayton, Tenn. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Dr. Lewis Sperry Chafer . . Dallas, Texas 

. Dayton, Tenn. Dr. Marion McH. Hull . . . Atlanta, Ga. 

. . Augusta, Ga. Joe F. Benson Dayton, Tenn. 

. Los Angeles, Cal. E. M. Williamson .... Dayton, Tenn. 

. Bradenton, Fla. W. A. Brickey .... Spring City, Tenn. 

. Dayton, Tenn. Euclid Waterhouse . . . Dayton, Tenn. 



THE COMMONER, 1931 




Dr. George E. Guille 

Southwestern University ; D.D., Boh Jones College. 

President of the University, Professor of Bible, and nation- 
ally known Bible Lecturer. For fifteen years connected 
with the Moody Bible Institute of Chicago. Co-founder of 
the Evangelical Theological Seminary, Dallas, Texas. 



J 



THE COMMONER, 1931 




Faculty 



Malcolm M. Lockhart 

A.B., University of Georgia. 

lice-President of the University and Director of the Endowment 

Campaign. 



Frank W. Spindler 

A.B., Hampden-Sydney College; A.M., University of Virginia. 
Dean of the University and Professor of Latin 



THE COMMONER, 1931 





Faculty 



A. P. BjERREGAARD 

B.S., College of City of New York; B.S. and M.S., Agricultural and Mechanical 
College of New Mexico. 

Professor of Chemistry and Bible 



C. A. MONTOYA 

A.B. and M.A., Mercer University. 
Professor of Romance Languages 






THE COMMONER, 1931 



H^HBBn^MHHHMBna 








Faculty 
Dwight W. Ryther, Jr. 

B.S.C. and M.A., University of Georgia. 

Professor of English, History, and Commerce. Coach and Director of 

Student Activities 



Julia Anna Yancey 

B.S., North Carolina College for Women ; Graduate, Student of Peabody Con- 
servatory of Music and of the University of Virginia. 

Instructor in Art and Alusic 



THE COMMONER, 1931 




THE COMMONER, 1931 



ON September iS, 1930, the first class to enter the William Jennings 
Bryan University began its march into the unknown mysteries of col- 
lege work. It was at two o'clock that several hundred people gathered 
at the Rhea County courthouse — a building made famous through the valiant and 
successful efforts of William Jennings Bryan to uphold the truths of the Bible 
against the theory of evolution. "Wisdom, Human and Divine," was the sub- 
ject chosen by Dr. Guille, the president of the University, for his opening address. 

The classes started in the old Rhea Central High School building, and al- 
though the building is not in the best of condition, it has met the needs for the 
first year of work. During the first quarter there were twenty-seven students 
enrolled. At the beginning of the second quarter this number had increased to 
seventy-four. 

The Class of '34 has not had all work and no play. Three plays were given 
by the Dramatic Club with most satisfactory results. A fifteen-piece orchestra 
has been formed under the expert direction of Airs. C. A. Monto}'a and has 
played at many of the University and municipal services. A Halloween car- 
nival was given during the Halloween season, and a good time was enjoyed by 
all who attended. The hall and two rooms of the building were decorated to 
represent a field of shocked corn completely surrounded by a forest in full au- 
tumnal color. 

Basketball teams were formed for both the men and the women, and several 
games were played with — considering the lack of material and facilities — fair 
success. 

Just prior to the closing of the University two picnics were given to the 
graduating classes of the neighboring high schools. It is expected that these 
picnics will become an annual event. 

Perhaps one of the high spots of the class history is to be found in the mar- 
riage of Miss Edwina Wing to Mr. Charles Bailey of Erwin, Tennessee, which 
is also the home of the bride. The marriage, taking place on the tenth of Jan- 
uary, was not announced until the last week of school. 

On June the fourth, after a week of final examinations, the University closed 
a very interesting and most successful year. The students in Bryan's first class 
are now looking forward to their sophomore year, when they will no longer be 
lowly freshmen. 

Amy Cartright. Historian. 



14 






THE COMMONER, 1931 



Class of '34 



Hazel Allen 



DAYTON", TENN". 



Elmira Arnold 

DAYTON", TEN"N". 



Reba Arnold 

"Bea" 

DAYTON", TENN". 

Class Treasurer; Basketball; Bryan Play- 
ers; Tennis. 



Edwina Wing Bailey 

"Eddie" 

ERWIN, TENN. 

Class Secretary; Bryan Players; Social 
Editor. 



Catherine Beard 

"Catrinka" 
SPRING CITY", TENN. 

Basketball. 




»5 



THE COMMONER, 1931 




'34 



Nina Billingsley 

"Lindy" 
DAYTON, TENN. 

Basketball, Captain; Bryan Players; Ten- 
nis. 



Elizabeth Byron 

"Curly" 
DAYTON, TENN. 

Bryan Players; Tennis. 



Amy Cartright 

"Feesh" 

DAYTON, TENN. 

Class Historian; "Commoner" Editor; 
Bryan Players. 



Dorothy Caudle 

"Dodo" 

DAYTON, TENN. 

Bryan Players; Basketball. 



Dora Clarke 

"Dodo" 
DAYTON, TENN. 



16 






THE COMMONER, 1931 



Class of "34 



Montie Cochran 

DAYTON, TENN. 

Bryan Players. 



Mildred Cooley 

"Mil" 

WASHINGTON, TENN. 



Robert Crawford 

"Dooley" 

DAYTON, TENN. 

Class President; Bryan Players; Basket- 
ball; "Commoner" Business Manager; 
Tennis ; Orchestra. 



Marion Denton 

"Tag" 
EVENSVILLE, TENN. 

Basketball ; Bryan Players. 



Audrey Duggar 

"Hen" 
DAYTON, TENN. 




17 



THE COMMONER, 1931 







;\ 



Class of "34 



La Fleda Duggar 

"Pete" 

DAYTON, TENN. 



Harriett Dunlap 

"Tillie" 

DAYTON, TENN. 

Bryan Players; Basketball; Tennis. 



Rose Fisher 

DAYTON, TENN. 

Basketball. 



Mona Flerl 

BAKEWELL, TENN. 

Tennis. 



Beulah Swafford Gentry 



DAYTON, TENN. 



IS 



THE COMMONER, 1931 



Class of '34 



Nora Gideon 

WASHINGTON", TENN". 

'Commoner" Art Editor. 



J. M. Hughes 



DAYTON", TEN'S". 



Pauline Kidd 



DAYTON, TEN-NT. 



Ruth Lacewell 

"Lacy 

CHATTANOOGA, TEN'N\ 

Basketball, Alternate Captain; Bryan 
Players ; Tennis. 



Norman Locke 

-Babe" 
DAYTON, TENN. 

Tennis. 




19 



THE COMMONER, 1931 










Class ©f '34 



Sybil Lusk 

"Syb" 

HARLAN, KY. 

Bryan Players; Bryan Quartette. 



Betty Matthews 

"Bet" 

DAYTON, TENN. 

Basketball. 



Bertha Ansley Morgan 

"Lady Morgan" 
DAYTON, TENN. 

Bryan Players; "Commoner" Circulation 
Manager. 



Howard Morgan 

"Scrappy" 
DAYTON, TENN. 

Basketball, Captain; Bryan Players; Ten- 
nis. 



Amanda Pugh 

"Blondie" 
GRANDVIEW, TENN. 

Tennis. 



THE COMMONER, 1931 



Class of "34 



Viola Pugh 

"Vi" 

GRANDVIEW, TENN. 

Bryan Players. 



B. S. Purser 



"Ben" 

DAYTON, TENN. 

Basketball; Tennis; B.yan Players. 



Eloise Purser 

"JVeezie" 
DAYTON, TENN. 

Basketball ; "Commoner" Photo Editor. 



Logan Rector 

"Reck" 

EVENSVILLE, TENN. 



Pearl Reed 

"Shorty" 
DAY-TON, TENN. 





31 



THE COMMONER, 1931 




Class of '34 



Vesta Robinson 

DAYTON", TENN". 

Orchestra. 



Hazel Roddy 



DAYTON, TENN". 



Madge Shaver 



DAYTON, TENN. 



Magnolia Shaver 

"Mag" 

DAYTON", TENN". 



Margie Smith 

"Smhty" 

EVENSVILLE, TENN. 

Basketball; Tennis. 



THE COMMONER, 1931 



Class of '34 



Katherine Taylor 

P1KEVILLE, TENN. 

Basketball. 



Viola Thurman 

"Vi" 

WASHINGTON, TENN. 



T 



ennis. 



Queen Trentham 

"Madam Queen" 
CARP, TENN. 

'Commoner" Associate Editor; Basketball. 



George Trout 

"Fish" 

HA.RRIMAN, TENN. 



Nola Watson 

SPRING CITY, TENN. 

Basketball; "Commoner" Sport Editor. 



23 




THE COMMONER, 1931 




Class of '34 



R. C. Wilbur 

"Blovy" 
DAYTOK, TENN. 

Bryan Players; Basketball, Alternate Cap- 
tain; "Commoner'' Associate. 



Virgil Wilkey 

"Rosco" 

DAYTON, TENN. 




24 



THE COMMONER, 1931 



Class of '34 

Students whose indiridiial pictures are not in "The Qommoner 



Dorothy Blackburn" . . . Dayton, Tenn. 

Marie Bowmax Dayton, Tenn. 

Mrs. Jack Browx .... Dayton, Tenn. 
James Caldwell . . . Spring City, Tenn. 
Basketball; Bryan Players; Assistant Business 

Manager "The Commoner". 
Mrs. Pansy T. Collixs . Evensville, Tenn. 

Gladys Fixe Dayton, Tenn. 

Helex Fugate . . . Rhea Springs, Tenn. 
R. L. Gentry Dayton, Tenn. 



Mrs. T. C. Kxight .... Dayton, Tenn. 

T. C. Kxight Dayton, Tenn. 

Muriel Kxight Dayton, Tenn. 

James Locke Dayton, Tenn. 

Basketball; Bryan Players. 

Cecil McCaee Dayton, Tenn. 

Leta Miller .... Rhea Springs, Tenn. 

Cecil Monday Roddy, Tenn. 

Mrs. A. M. Morgax . . . Dayton, Tenn. 
Mrs. \V. C. Haggard . . . Davton, Tenn. 



Irene Moyers ("Rene"), Spring City, 

Una Ray EYensville, 

Wayne Smith Roddy, 

Thelma Vaughn Dayton, 

Eloise Wilkey ("El") . . Evensville, 

Bryan Players; Tennis. 
Mrs. \V. E. Morgan .... Dayton, 

Irene Odom Spring City, 

Giles Ryax Dayton, 

Ralph Tallent Dayton, 

Eloise Walker .... Graysville. 



Tenn. 
Tenn. 
Tenn. 
Tenn. 
Tenn. 

Tenn. 
Tenn. 
Tenn. 
Tenn. 
Tenn. 



25 



THE COMMONER, 1931 




Campus Scenes 
26 



THE COMMONER, 1931 




"HOME TIES" 

Other Plays: "The Steppinc Mother", "His Majesty the Queen" 

The Bryan Players 

Reea Arnold, Nina Billingsi.ev, Robert Crawford, James Caldwell, Amy Cartright, Montie 
Cochran, Harriett Dunlap, Ruth Lacewell, James Locke, Sybil Lusk, Mrs. Bertha Morgan, 
Howard Morgan, Viola Pugh, Ben Purser, R. C. Wilbur, Eloise Wilkey, Edwina Wing; 
Properly Managers: Elizabeth Byron, Dorothy Caudle, Marion Denton; Prof. Ryther, 

Director. 




THE ORCHESTRA 

Mrs. C A. Montoya, Violin, Director 

Piano: Mrs. F. E. Robinson; Violins: Sara Ewing, C. A. Montoya, Vesta Robinson, Mrs. P. C 
Tallent; Cornels: Robert Crawford, A. M. Morcan, B. S. Purser; Bass: Joe Gallagher: 
Trombone: Delmar Greene; Clarinet: Harold Stout; Banjo: John Arrowwood; Drums: Will 

Manis. 

27 



THE COMMONER, 1931 




Coach Ryther, Caldwell., Denton, Locke 
Purser, Capt. Morgan, Crawford, Wilbur 



Boys" Basketball Team 

It was not the intention of the University authorities that Bryan University should 
take part in intercollegiate athletics until somewhat better prepared to do so. The 
students, however, were of a different mind and requested time after time that they 
be allowed to have a basketball team — a request which was granted. 

With great hopes, but with little expectancy — little could be expected from a 
seven-man basketball squad, only two of whom had participated in high school athletics 
— for a successful season, basketball was begun. Dressed in Cardinal and New Gold, 
the beys prepared to meet what might come. And come it did. 

From the standpoint of scores, the season was one of little success ; from the stand- 
point of learning to "play the game," the results were most satisfactory. At least the 
ball was started and will continue to roll, gathering more and more momentum, down 
through the years to come. 

Schedule 

Bryan 6; Rhea High 32 

Bryan 9; Dayton "Y" 41 

Bryan 16; Hiwassee College 50 

Bryan 24; Modern Woodmen 23 

Bryan 29; Hiwassee College 71 

Bryan 25 ; Burritt College 28 

Bryan 29; Rhea High 25 

Bryan 36; Burritt College 28 



Bryan 



203 ; Opponents 
28 



323 



THE COMMONER, 1931 




Coach Ryther, Trentham, Watson, Dunlap, Ray, Fisher 
Purser, Lacewell, Capt. Billingsley, Smith, Beard 



Girls' Basketball Teain 

"What is sauce for the gander, is sauce for the goose" ; so it was not long before 
it was definitely understood that Bryan would put two basketball teams onto the court 
instead of one. The girls, three of whom had played basketball to some extent in 
high school, began to organize for war. Recruits were enlisted, and practice began 
with ten prospective players on deck. 

The number of applicants for berths on the team had soon dwindled to some seven 
or eight, and it was not until the influx of students for the second quarter that much 
could be accomplished in the way of practice. 

As was the result of the boys' work, perhaps the greatest benefit gained from the 
season lies in the fact that the game has been introduced and that the preliminary 
organization will at least be less difficult next year. 



Schedule 

. 6 ; Rhea High 34 

.13; Hiwassee College 29 

. 16; Hiwassee College ' . 17 

.14; Rhea High 26 

.15; Decatur Independents 37 



Bryan 

Bryan 

Bryan 

Bryan 

Bryan 

Bryan 20; Decatur Independents 13 



Bryan 84 ; Opponents 



156 



29 



THE COMMONER, 1931 



1 




'Among Those Present" 
30 



THE COMMONER, 1931 




A Little Bit of Everything 



THE COMMONER, 1931 











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J 



THE COMMONER, 1931 











We Congratulate the 






Faculty or the Bryan University 






On the First Years Work of This 
Splendid Institution 






rlay It Be the Foundation of One of the 
South s Finest Schools 






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DAYTCN, TENN. 






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THE COMMONER, 1931 




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THE COMMONER, 1931 





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Dayton, Tenn. 






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F. E. ROBINSON COMPANY 






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Dayton Veneer and 
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THE COMMONER, 1931 















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THE COMMONER, 1931 



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ATTEND 

Bryan University 

An institution which educates spirit- 
ually, mentally, and physically. 

Catalogue on Request 



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THE COMMONER, 1931 



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