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Full text of "Commoner, 1970"

BRYAN COLLEGE LIBRARY 



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NOT TO BE 
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REFERENCE -^„,SROOW 



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li^n I ly 




the Beauty of matuRity 



unfolds slowly across the campus 





A BRAve Beqinninq. pUns fOR ^ colleqe to 
Be Built on ^ rural hilltop. pRAyeR, woRk, 
AnC) pROBlems. ConstAnt BAttles AQAinst 
exhAustion, CiespaiR, AnC) ApAthy. SurvivaI 
fiURinq the 6epRession. new BuilMnqs At 
lASt -the Best of mo^eRn lABORAtoRies, 
clASSROoms, fioRmitORies, apC) Athletic 
fACilities. A pROQRessive cuRRiculum. 
RelevAht sociAl stAnCAR^s. 

BRAve people dARinq foR foRty yeARS to 
help A school come closeR to excellence. 



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quietness stRenqthens individuals 



leARninq to listen, to Be 
RefpesheC) By moments 
Alone, to think ABOUt 
life-occupations, pupposes, 
QOAls. to Reminisce--to 
RcGiscoveR the past, to 
dRCAm-to pUn the futuRe. 

One peRson finding couraqc 
And hope CeveUopinQ within 
himself. 




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discipline BRinqs educAtional success 



leARninq the vAlue of time. wonOeRinq 
If A RequUR daily schedule would 
help. Qettmq tiRed of Beinq con- 
stAntly Behind. tiRed of lASt-mmute 
CRAmmmq. Settinq qoals fOR diffeRent 
classes. Studyinq in the liBRARy 
on SAtuRdays. RcAdinq a Book in ^ 
fRce chapel time. StaRtinq eaRly 
on a tcRm papcR. 

Students Becominq efficient. Students 
leaRnmq how to Become educated. 




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apppeciation 



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Seeing the mountains foR the fiRst time 
fRom A BUS window. AftmiRinq the CROps 
an6 the fARms. wonOeRinq whAt the 
locAl people ARe like, hoping they'Re 
fRiendly. finding a warhi welcome at the 
chuRches' ]oint Reception, making 
fRiends downtown. CheeRing foR Rhea 

high At footBAll games, eating 
home-made shoRtcake and watching 
the StRawBCRRy festival paRade. 

StRangeRS Becoming fellow-citizens. 
StRangcRS Becoming a paRt of 
Rhea County. 




of the community qpows 





people find time to Relax 



exams cominq up. Requiped niqht 
meetings. AnotheR novel to peaO 
foR lit. clASS. letteRS to wRite. 
less anO less sleep. Quick tempeRS-- 
AnC> then ^ BRCAk. A Round of cokes 
And UuQhs in the lionette. A 

tennis match, ai hike up into the 
mountains. A skating paRty in 

Chattanooga. 

people leaRnmg to Relax C)URing 
Busy days, people leaRning to enjoy 
college life. 






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fRienC)ships 

Beqin 

A BRief smile Between 
stRAnqeRS standing in a line. 
A fRiendly nod fRom someone 
on his way to class. A Oate. 
^ walk aROunC> the tRianqle 
BepoRe all-in. Roses foR 
a Banquet. 

two people en]oyinq each 
otheR. two people qettinq to 
know each otheR. 




12 



"7' ^ <i> • 



an6 Always chpist is the example 



tlRe(^ of Being me^iocRe, C)efeAte<^. 
Of hcWinq ChRistunity identified 
with intoLeRAnce and tRAdition. Of 
PRetendinq and of WAtchmQ otheR 
people pRetend. Resolved to lead ^ 
meAninqful life, to Be un^fRAid of 
ch^nqe meRely Because it is new. 
to show qenuine ChRistiAnity in any 
occup^ktion. 

people deteRmined to Be completely 
ChRistian. people deteRmined to 

put ChRISt ABOVe All. 



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16 



Table of Contents 

Academics 18 

Social Life 42 

Athletics 76 

People 94 

Advertisements 130 






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The Commoner 



Bryan College 
Dayton, Tennessee 

'• Vol XXXVI, 1969-70 




Harold Jenkins, Lditor 
Mr*. Louise Bentley, Advisor 



17 



Division of Biblical 
Studies and Philosophy 

The Division of Biblical Studies and Philosophy, a uni- 
que part of a liberal arts college, seeks to help each 
student develop a basic understanding of the Bible. 
Through its survey and analysis courses, the entire Bible 
is studied each year, with special emphases being placed 
on Scriptural relationships to theology and philosophy. 
In recognition of the fact that practical service as well as 
thorough knowledge is essential to the Christian faith, 
this division also offers a major in Christian Education. 




I 



18 





J.r ' flfij'"' 





UPPER MIDDLE: Dr. Jensen shows Charlie 
Gaehring the new seminar assignment. 
UPPER RIGHT: John Main and Bill Robin- 
son cheerfully await the quiz next hour 
LOWER LEFT: New Testament students 
Mary Howard and Jane Scott memorize sur- 
vey charts. LOWER MIDDLE: Mr. Winkler 
directs a class in "The rains came down; the 
floods came up. " LOWER RIGHT: Dr. An- 
derson listens patiently to the fumbling con- 
jugations of a Greek student. 



19 



Division of Literature 
and Modern Languages 

This division attempts to help students gain a knowledge 
of and a respect for the grammar and literature of 
various languages. Courses are designed to stimulate 
critical thought and creative communication. The 
division works to achieve its goals through such varied 
methods as student speeches, class field trips, group 
research projects, and dramatic productions. This year's 
divisional lecturer. Dr. Nelvin Vos, spoke on Biblical and 
modern literary metaphors. 






UPPER LEFT: Ann Fulmer and Jerry 
Wylie wait at the laboratory console con- 
trol for their Spanish assignments. 
UPPER RIGHT: Roger Phillips talks 
with French instructor Miss Lee Taylor 
in the language laboratory. LOWER 
LEFT: As tlie master (Mr. Cornelius), so 
the disciple (Tom Keefer). LOWER 
RIGHT: Miss Gladys Taylor discusses a 
point of grammar with some of her 
Freshmen English students. 




I It 





UPPER LEFT: Professor Ellsworth Snyder. Fine Arts Divisional lecturer, explains 
the musical score of an avant-garde composition. UPPER MIDDLE: Annette 
Winkler participates in one of the frequent musical recitals given by the students 
of applied music. LOWER LEFT: Beckv Mines and Karen Brodsky work dili- 
gently on their art assignments. LOWER MIDDLE: Mrs. Helen Scott, art in- 
structor, prepares a display along with her classroom helper. Miranda Wong. 
LOWER RIGHT: With skillful, careful strokes, John Wylie makes a banner for tht 
accreditation parade. 




22 



"i-'if- 




Division of Fine 
Arts 

This division, in addition to its instruction in 
practical artistic metiiods, strives to fulfill the 
cultural aims of Bryan's educational program. 
With a crowded schedule embracing field trips, 
student recitals, and special programs, the 
division is one of the most vibrant in the 
college. In cooperation with area residents, it 
sponsors the annual Dayton-Bryan Concert 
Series and the spring Fine Arts Festival. Pro- 
fessor Ellsworth Snyder, the divisional lecturer, 
spoke on the theory and mechanics of modern 
music and the philosophy of John Cage. 





23 



Division of Education- 
Psychology 



The Division of Education-Psychology seeks to give ad- 
equate training to students who will be teachers in the 
complex modern school. In its general courses, it aims to 
aid students in self-discovery and in self-adjustment; in 
its physical education courses, it strives to build in- 
dividual and group athletic skills. In addition to a 
semester's experience in the classrooms of local public 
schools, prospective teachers have the opportunity of 
teaching their classmates in simulated-age-group situa- 
tions. The divisional lecturer, Dr. Bealer Smotherman, 
demonstrated the uses of the audio-visuals available to 
contemporary educators. 




24 





UPPER MIDDLE: Randy Bell, a student in the testing and measurements 
class, has a conference with his professor, Mrs. Sheddan. LOWER LEFT: 
Pamela Stroupe and Marsha de Groot study for tests in their education 
courses. LOWER MIDDLE: Dr. Smotherman. divisional lecturer, in- 
troduces his slides on the electronic facilities of Oral Roberts University. 
UPPER RIGHT: Lifting the physical education weights is fitness enthusiast 
Bill McDavid LOWER RIGHT: Marilyn Crandall prepares a day's lessons 
for her elementary class at Sale Creek School. 






Division of Social 
Sciences and History 

This division tries to help students develop a basic understand- 
ing of the historical events and the current situations of our 
world. Close examinations of the past are supplemented by 
critical evaluations of the present. The division's commercial 
courses feature Business Club speakers and field trips. 






h> 



26 




UPPER LEFT: Rod Veon studies for his 
History Seminar quiz. UPPER RIGHT: Be- 
fore class begins. Mr. Bentley takes a last 
fleeting look at the textbook. LOWER 
LEFT: Dr. Rosenberger talks about the 
complexity of modern European history. 
LOWER MIDDLE: Mr. Rose points to one 
of his outlined economics lectures. LOWER 
RIGHT: Bill Chaplin and Phil Jepson find 
something very interesting about a county- 
by-county map of the 1944 election. 






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27 




UPPER LEFT: A dogwood leaf intrigues Leroy Nicholson, a 
botany student. UPPER MIDDLE: Dr. Bauder and Barton Boggs 
work together on laboratory calculations. LOWER LEFT: Laura 
Slattery writes up another experiment report in Physical Chemis- 
try. LOWER MIDDLE: Mr. Matthes is always available to help 
his math students. LOWER RIGHT: Martha Jones works in one 
of the college's new biology laboratories. 





28 




Division of Natural 
Sciences 

The Division of Natural Sciences attempts to provide a 
tiiorougli introduction to the complex fields of biology, 
chemistry, and physics. Independent experiments carried 
out in modern laboratories and numerous field trips to 
the surrounding countryside highlight the various 
courses. The division's guest lecturer, Dr. William J. 
Tinkle, spoke on the relationship of orderly scientific 
laws to the theory of evolution. 




29 



'""r -tt^fei 



Bryan Gains Regional 
Accreditation 



In a climax to years of plans and efforts, the college receives 
regional accreditation by being admitted to the membership of 
the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. This monu- 
mental achievement is the result of much cooperation on the 
part of many people associated directly and indirectly with the 
college. The great improvement of the physical plant, the 
securing of a large number of new doctorates for the faculty, 
and the successful completion of a $300,000 fund-raising drive 
were important factors in this great step forward for the 
college. 










UPPER MlDDLli: lixcitcd stiicloits hurry from classes to 
hear the official announcement of the news, wliich was 
telephoned to the campus from the Southern Association 
meeting in Dallas. LOWER LEET: Dr. Riidd. President 
Emeritus, beams as lie discloses that llryan is i\ow accredited. 
LOWER MIDDLE: The joy of a well-earned accomplishment 
radiates from the faces of Miss Russell, Miss llughey, and 
Miss Lason. UPPER RICIIT: Dr. Mercer and Dr. Scott st^:p 
from the plane to face a cheerini; crowd of over one hundred 
Uryanites welcoming them home from Dallas. LOWER 
RUill'L: Dr. and Mrs. Mercer and Dean Seera talk informally 
after the reception in the President's Home on the evening of 
the accreditation announcement. 



31 




Sk«ta:jKfe,*«**cs3i^ 



In its day-long celebration following the accredita- 
tion announcement, the college looks both to the 
past and to the future. In the morning, an all-college 
parade files past the courthouse, a symbol of the 
school's beginnings. In the afternoon, following 
speeches by Dr. Scott and Dr. Mercer, the student 
small groups propose new institutional projects, some 
of which may be undertaken during the next four 
years. 



UPPER LEFT: With classes called off for the day. faculty 
cars line up to participate in Friday morning's victory parade 
through Dayton. LOWER RIGHT: Dr. Mercer speaks to the 
college community about the privileges and responsibilities 
of the accredited college. FAR RIGHT: This letter officially 
welcomes Bryan into the membership of the Southern 
Association. 



32 





SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 

795 Peachtree Street • Atlanta, Georgia 30308 

Phone 875-8011 Area Code 404 

December 8, 1969 



President Theodore Mercer 
B ryan College 
Dayton, Tennessee 

Dear President Mercer; 

It is a pleasure to welcome your institution into membership in 
the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. You, your 
faculty, and staff may be proud of this accomplishment. It 
is our hope that the benefits and obligations of membership 
may prove stimulating to even greater achievement as you 
participate in the organization. 

You will be expected to complete a full Self-Study for re- 
affirmation of accreditation by the annual meeting in 197 3. 
Before that time a member of the staff will advise you 
concerning the procedures to prepare for this. 

You are requested to submit to the Committee on Admission 
to Membership by September 1, 1970, a full follow-up report on 
all recommendations of the visiting committee with special 
attention and in depth reporting on finances, enrollment, 
faculty salaries and qualifications, and curricula. 



Sincerely yours, 




Gordon W. Sweet 
Executive Secretary 
Commission on Colleges 



GWS:vd 



33 



Gymnasium and President's 
Home New This Year 



Bryan's new one-thousand-seat gymnasium, being used this year for 
the first time, is a most valuable part of the campus. Providing oppor- 
tunities for individual and group recreation, the building was dedicated 
at the beginning of basketball season. Also new is the President's Home, 
which was completed and occupied during the summer. The majority of 
the funds for this building were obtained through the efforts of the 
local citizens on the Bryan Advisory Committee. 





34 





/ --vi>i-» 




FAR LEFT: Coach Dixon speaks to tlie large 
crowd assembled for the dedication of the g\'mna- 
siiim. UPPER MIDDLE: In the first game to be 
played on the new court. Bryan's basketball team 
tramples Atlanta Christian. UPPER RIGHT: The 
President's Home enjovs a picturesque setting on 
the south side of the Hill. LOWER LEFT: Mr. 
Boyd directs Bryan's symphonic band at tlie gym 
dedication ceremony. LOWER RIGHT: Mrs. Glenn 
Woodlee. wife of a past chairman of the Board of 
Trustees, visits in the spacious living room of tlie 
President's Home. 



35 



Who's Who Is School's 
Highest Honor 



Each year the faculty elects from the Senior Class a 
limited number of people whose names are to be 
published in the annual edition of Who's Who in Ameri- 
can Colleges and Universities. The seven individuals 
chosen this year are known for their outstanding contri- 
butions to college life through their individual effort and 
group leadership. In their selections for WHO'S WHO, 
they hold a most distinguished honor. 



UPPER MIDDLE: Jane Ellen Hodges is well known for her 
consistently excellent academic work. UPPER RIGHT: Jerry 
Wylie, an accomplished musician, looks through some new vocal 
arrangements. LOWER LEFT: As elementary education majors, 
Darlene Van Puffelen and Mary Lee Willcox are outstanding 
student teachers. LOWER MIDDLE: Tom Keefer and Harold 
Jenkins arrange the basic elements of a-yearbook page. LOWER 
RIGHT: John Reese, a dedicated president of various organiza- 
tions, studies an FMF Leadership Manual. 







36 





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37 



The Hilltop Comes Aliv 



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The early days of fall have come; students filter in 
from all parts of the country. The campus is alive with 
wandering freshmen and resolute upperclassmen. It is a 
time of meeting new faces, renewing old friendships, 
adjusting to roommates, re-living the summer, and antici- 
pating the new semester. The atmosphere is relaxed, but 
the pace begins to quicken as students experience regis- 
tration. Then the first day of classes arrives, and Bryan is 
off to a new year. 




LOWER LEFT: Bozo Queener entertains Barbara McCanell and 
Gail Hamilton over a Sunday dinner. MIDDLE LEFT: Dr. Mer- 
cer's friendly welcomes are appreciated by all students, but 
especially by the uneasy newcomers. MIDDLE RIGHT: Sarah 
Loftin seems to be rather contented in her "off-campus con- 
vent. " Cedar Hill Dormitory. FAR RIGHT; The preschool days 
include times when an individual is alone. LOWER RIGHT: 
Charlotte Clark. Craig Wilson, and Marcia Griffith relax in the 
informal atmosphere of the Lionette. 




38 






39 





The Nine-Weeks 
Begins 

Freshmen search the halls for the right 
rooms, upperclassmen advertise for used 
books, and the registrar sighs with relief: 
classes have started. Students receive assign- 
ment sheets from professors and encourage- 
ment from Dr. Jensen's helpful chapel mes- 
sages. 



UPPER LEFT: .4s the year begins, students find 
inspiration in the messages of Spiritual Life Em- 
phasis Week. MIDDLE LEFT: Dr. Jensen is a good 
speaker both to hear and to observe. LOWER 
LEFT: Students participate in one of tlie anachro- 
nistic elements of college life. 




40 





And Mid-Semester 
Comes Soon 



Nine weeks can pass quickly— too quick- 
ly. Lights burn late as students make pop- 
corn and cram for exams. After the tests are 
over, the college community enjoys the rest- 
ful quietness of Day of Prayer. One quarter 
of the year is gone. 



UPPER RIGHT: In his afternoon lecture, Mr. Ken- 
neth Adams shows the importance of Christian 
literature to world evangelism. MIDDLE RIGHT: 
Larry Davis and Chuck Russell present one of the 
day's several fine musical numbers. LOWER 
RIGHT: The trauma of their first college exams is 
seen on the faces of these Old Testament students. 





President's Reception 
Welcomes New Students 



The first important social event of the year, tlie President's 
Reception, is in some ways a unique version of freshman 
initiation. Wearing formal clothes and assorted expressions, the 
new students are first greeted by handfuls of rice thrown by a 
howling mob of upperclassmen. The second welcome, only 
slightly more pleasant, comes on the third floor where the 
couples officially meet the administrative officers and the 
faculty members. Refreshments and a musical program con- 
clude the evening, a memorable milestone in the new student's 
stay at Bryan. 



UPPER LEFT: With anxiety and excitement. Sandra Harris. Clarice 
McCarthy, and Jessica Sliaffer await their blind dates. UPPER MID- 
DLE: Chuck Russell and Denise Sasnett smile beneath an avalanche of 
rice. LOWER LEFT: Esther Ruth Hulbert finds no one "hand-ier" than 
P)-esident Mercer himself. LOWER MIDDLE: A handshake may have 
countless meanings. LOWER RIGHT: Charlotte Clark and Paul Morgan 
wait for the program to begin. 






43 



All-School Picnic Is A 
Unique College Function 



The all-school picnic is an example of an educational in- 
stitution, from the President on down, transplanting itself to a 
new location. On this early October Saturday the Hill is 
vacated, and the college community takes to the trails, ball 
fields, and picnic tables of Fall Creek Falls. In the late 
afternoon they filter gradually back to the waiting cam- 
pus — individuals that are more rela.xed and more suntanned, 
and a group that is more unified. 





N 





UPPER MIDDLE: For Linda McKemy and Mark 
Kirby. privacy is hard to find, even at a picnic. 
UPPER RIGHT: For young Mr. Bander, the picnic 
is a good time to be with Pop and David Wolfe. 
LOWER LEFT: Mr. Snyder, alias Wally, fries 
chicken in an appetite-stimulating setting. LOWER 
MIDDLE: Barton Boggs relishes just one more 
piece. LOWER RIGHT: Jeanine Goatley, tlie pride 
of Bryan baseball, prepares to smasli Russ Kar- 
vonen's pitch. 














V^ 



46 



Fine Arts Classes Go 
To Nashville 



One of the many field trips made by various classes throughout 
the year is the annual Fine Arts pilgrimage to Nashville to see the 
Parthenon and the Upper Room Chapel and Museum. Transferring 
their sleeping locations from beds to bus seats, students enjoy a 
well-planned itinerary and a picnic lunch. They return in the after- 
noon, having become more acquainted with art and with the ducks 
in the Parthenon pool. 




If^X 





UPPER MIDDLE: In the Parthenon 
basement, Cecilia Richmond pauses a 
moment to enjoy a contemporary paint- 
ing. UPPER RIGHT: Steve Cramer views 
a black marble statuette at the Upper 
Room Museum. LOWER LEFT: 'Wow, 
class, notice tlie octastyle facade, the 
triglvphs, to sav nothing of the me- 
topes " LOWER RIGHT: Bryan 

Shelley receives enjoyment from the 
little things of life — ducks. 




47 



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UPPER LEFT: The candidates and their escorts, from left to right: Senior Vickie Rowsey, 
Tim Margene: Senior Nancy Birch, Byron Ballard: Senior Mary Lee Willco.x, Dudley 
McCready: Junior Phyllis Mitchell. Ben Purser: Junior Gail Hamilton, Bill Irwin: Junior Mae 
Hayes, Mark Kirbvi Sophomore Marilee Poole, La Verne Wicks: Sophomore Linda Weld, 
Kevin Straley: Sophomore Drema Rowsey, Ed Kneisley: Freshman Darlene Cook, Chuck 
Russell: Freshman Vicki Bell, David Kinsey: Freshman Linda McKemy, Everett Kier. 
UPPER RIGHT: The Junior Princess candidates — Gail. Phyllis, and Mae — arrive at the 
soccer field. LOWER LEFT: Anne Crawford. Brent Ferguson, and Janice Decker put the 
final decorative touches on tlie Freshmen candidates' convertible. LOWER MIDDLE: 1968 
Homecoming Queen Kathy Avery and emcee Tom Keefer receive the results of the 
Homecoming court elections from the helmeted courier. Don Pierce. LOWER RIGHT: 
"And the 1969 Homecoming Queen is . . . Miss Nancy Birch. " 



48 





The College Relaxes 
For Homecoming 



Gay, colorful floats frantically assembled on Friday 
nigltt; the presentation of the court at half-time; cheers 
from the cross-country fans; an opportunity for alumni 
to meet the students at the buffet banquet — all these 
help to make the conglomerate weekend of Home- 
coming. Saturday begins with anxious thoughts about 
rain, soggy floats, and withered corsages. It ends with a 
beautifully clear afternoon and with Miss Nancy Birch as 
Homecoming Queen. Seniors appear especially happy; 
their depiction of "Railroad the Eagles" has won them a 
twenty-dollar prize. Even the loss to Tennessee Tech in 
soccer does not seem to blunt the school's enjoyment of 
the day, which concludes with the evening banquet and 
an address by Mr. George Birch. 





49 




50 




\ 






The Happy Winners 



FAR LEFT: Queen Nancy Birch and escort Byron Ballard pose after the evening 
banquet. UPPER MIDDLE: Martha Jones, Ellen Hawkins, and Kathy Avery 
present to Nancy the tiara, robe, and red roses of the Homecoming Queen. UPPER 
RIGHT: A happy group: Junior Princess Gail Hamilton with escort Bill Irwin, 
Sophomore Princess Marilee Poole with escort LaVerne Wicks, and Freshman 
Princess Darlene Cook with escort Chuck Russell. LOWER MIDDLE: Railroads 
make profits, at least for the Senior Class, who built this first-prize float. LOWER 
RIGHT: The Homecoming royalty, still radiant after an enjoyable banquet, are 
Gail Hamilton, Nancy Birch, Marilee Poole, and Darlene Cook. 



51 




Missionaries Speak 
of World Christianity 



The Fall Missionary Conference is planned to 
be a time of discussion and thought regarding the 
individual Christian's obligation to world evange- 
lism and social work. FMF does a most valuable 
service for the college in maintaining this yearly 
event. Due to the small number of missionaries 
present and to the many conflicts between Home- 
coming and Conference activities, FMF is already 
planning various worthwhile changes for future 
conferences. 



UPPER RIGHT: Lyn Warwick looks at one of the dis- 
plays of African art. MIDDLE RIGHT: Bud Fritz gives a 
breakfast devotional at Skyline Bible Camp. LOWER 
RIGHT: Before a morning chapel, students wait to hear a 
report from a missionary alumnus. 



52 





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Few Alumni Attend 
1969 Conference 



An unusually sparse crowd of Alumni re- 
turns to the Hill this year for the annual gradu- 
ates' conference. Their weekend is filled with 
business meetings. Homecoming activities, 
meetings with old friends, and the Senior- 
Alumni breakfast at Skyline Bible Camp. A 
highlight of the year's breakfast is the musical 
presentation by the Senior Class choir. 



UPPER LEFT: Returning alumni buy meal tickets 
and receive information folders in the lobby. LOWER 
LEFT: The Senior Class choir makes its musical debut 
at the Skyline breakfast. 









College Hears 
Vietnam Views 



The Vietnam Discussion Day, lield in 
early December, was designed to be an 
intellectual discussion of a contemporary 
international problem. Representing two 
opposite viewpoints on the war were 
State Senator Lamar Baker and the Uni- 
versity of Tennessee's Professor John 
Reider. It was a time of evaluation, re-ex- 
amination, and deliberation by both stu- 
dents and faculty. Sponsored by the stu- 
dent government, this event was Bryan's 
first college-wide discussion of the Viet- 
nam War. 



UPPER LEFT: Professor Reider offers some 
unique insights into the historical background 
of the war. UPPER MIDDLE: Senator Baker 
pauses during his remarks in defense of the 
Nixon Administration's war policies. LOWER 
MIDDLE: Mr. Bentley directs a question to 
Professor Reider during the afternoon panel 
discussion. 




54 




High School Guests 
Visit Bryan 



\/^ 



& 









Under the CoUege-for-a Day program, more than 
fifty high school guests visit Bryan's campus in an 
attempt to discover what college life is really like. 
They listen to several class lectures, attend the Hallo- 
ween Party, enjoy the hillside bonfire, and finally 
stretch out in sleeping bags to recover from a long 
hard day. During their two days at Bryan, they see 
many aspects of college life-and some return to 
become freshmen in the next academic year. 



UPPER LEFT: A guest from Virginia helps to serve the 
refreshments at the Halloween party. MIDDLE: Their first 
night at college has Just ended-too soon, apparently. LOW- 
ER RIGHT: Larry Jacobsen, alias "The Kid." gives his testi- 
mony to the group assembled for the bonfire. 




55 



Hair Comes Down 
For Halloween 



Exams are finally over; there is a general need for a place 
and time to whoop, stomp, yell, and in general act uninhibited 
without fear of administrative wrath. The Juniors' Halloween 
party is the answer. Costumed students bob for apples, throw 
pies at Byron Ballard, keep time to the music, and wonder if 
some of the faculty present might be human after all. The 
party is a period of relaxation before beginning the work of 
another grading period. 





UPPER MIDDLE: Byron Ballard is the innocent-looking target of his pie- 
throwing friends. UPPER RIGHT; To Jane Long and Bryan Shelley it is much 
more blessed to throw than to receive. LOWER LEFT: Steve Sanford and 
Susan Reynolds play a delightful game. LOWER MIDDLE: Darlene Logsdon 
and Loren Baughman butt heads to get two of those delicious apples. LOWER 
RIGHT: Leroy Nicholson is one of Bryan 's more dignified students. 




57 



Traditional Christmas 
Is Banquet Theme 



Based on the theme of an old-fashioned holiday, the 
Christinas banquet is a prime social event of the year. 
After a delicious meal, a varied musical program, and 
an inspiring message, couples depart to enjoy the 
Christmas decorations in the girls' dormitories. 







/ 






<^l 



WORLD THE 








LEFT: Accompanied by Mrs. Matthes. John 
Main sings a meaningful Christmas solo, O 
HOLY NIGHT. UPPER MIDDLE: The 
dinner is over: everyone begins to think 
uneasily of diets and homework. LOWER 
MIDDLE: Dr. James Fowle delivers a timely 
and interesting address to the students, 
faculty, and college guests. LOWER 
RIGHT: After the banquet, Marcia 
Broughton and Jessica Shaffer display their 
bulletin board, which has won first prize in 
the room decorations contest. UPPER 
RIGHT: Judy Rinck and Randy Miller con- 
clude their evening in her skillfully decora- 
ted room, a part of the dorm 's Open House. 



59 




Musical Productions Highlight Christmas 



UPPER: In Amahl, the shepherds and shep- 
herdesses admire the treasures of the three kings. 
LOWER: Mr. Greasby directs the Choir and the 
Ladies Ensemble in their program of carols. 



In excellent performances, campus and guest musicians 
present the meaning of Christmas in the operetta Amahl and 
the Night Visitors and in the oratorio A Ceremony of Carols. 
Many local citizens join the college community in enjoying the 
harp accompaniment of Miss Judy McDonald and the skillful 
vocal solos of Steve Russell. 





UPPER: On the first morning 
of Bible Conference, students 
walk out onto a snowy campus. 
LOWER LEFT: Professor Tay- 
lor's expression signals the 
approach of more dry wit. 
LOWER RIGHT: The 
Reverend Mr. Stanley illus- 
trates his sermon with per- 
sonal anecdotes. 





Bible Conference Provides 
Meaningful Interlude 



Coming between semesters, Bryan's Bible Conference is a 
time of inspiration and contemplation. Professor Thomas 
Taylor lectures with insight and humor on Old Testament 
problems, while Rev. Charles Stanley delivers helpful addresses 
on victorious Christian living. Discussion periods after the 
evening lectures allow speaker-audience interaction. 



61 



Couples Enjoy Sweetheart 
Banquet 



After the flowers have arrived, the final decorative 
touches have been completed, and the dates have been 
met, everyone relaxes to enjoy the steak dinner. Stu- 
dents especially appreciate the informality of the atmo- 
sphere and the variety of the musical program. It is an 
evening when old friendships grow stronger and some 
new ones begin. 





62 




i 



/' 



- li 



<> 





UPPER LEFT: Roy Harrow and Becky 
Mines think over the things couples are 
interested in. UPPER RIGHT: ■'Butch " 
and "Mother, " one of the college's bet- 
ter-known duos, obviously have captured 
the spirit of the occasion. LOWER 
LEFT: In a skillful performance. Roger 
Phillips plays a medlev of love songs. 
LOWER MIDDLE: Bill Chaplin, banquet 
emcee, prefaces another vocal number. 
LOWER RIGHT: After a delicious meal, 
Bryan students enjoy a program of con- 
temporary music. 




63 




Classroom Discontent 
Troubles The Year 



Bryan, like any other college community, has its 
problems; certain issues are discussed and debated 
throughout each year. This year faculty-student relations 
are unusually frigid with controversy centering around 
what students see as poor classroom instruction, intra- 
coUege communication failures, faculty disregard for 
student opinions, and administrative inaction. It is mark- 
ed by a lack of cooperation and a lack of unity in the 
academic hfe on the Hill. Administrators, faculty, and 
students will need to work diligently and thoughtfully to 
ensure that such problems do not recur in future years. 



UPPER LEFT: Many expressions of dissatisfactions with the 
faculty come from student small group meetings such as this 
one. UPPER RIGHT: Some classes seemed to be unchallenging; 
others were merely boring. LOWER LEFT: Tlie sentiment of 
many a bored scribbler. LOWER MIDDLE: Byron Ballard re- 
turns test papers to his classmates, Chuck Russell, Eva Harris, 
and Linda Bieber. LOWER RIGHT: Steve Gregory, Mark Kirby, 
Lynne Leopold, Paul Peterson, and John Wyllie talk over the 
latest classroom adventures. 




1> 




65 



Student Work Program 
A Way of Life 



A familiar, although not favorite, aspect of Bryan student 
life is the time-clock of the work program. Secretaries, jani- 
tors, waitresses, and leaf-rakers receive their jobs on the basis 
of individual need and skill. The work program provides the 
school with able workers and the students with opportunities 
to help meet their own expenses. 



UPPER LEFT: Gail Hamilton, Student Assistant, grimly adds up the 
morning's dorm points for one Huston room. UPPER MIDDLE; Mrs. 
Ross teaches Dale Gibson how to trisect an angle of apple pie. UPPER 
RIGHT: Ned Berwager is the mind behind Bryan's electricity. LOWER 
LEFT: The enjoyable (?) job of mopping the dining room belongs to 
Ben Turney. LOWER MIDDLE: Mark Longnecker thinks deep thoughts 
over the kitchen suds. LOWER RIGHT: Esther Ruth Hulbert is Bryan's 
version of the outdoors girl. 



I 




I 










67 




UPPER LEFT: Lanny O'Hail, Mark Kirby, and Craig 
Wilson enjoy a talk-in in a typical dorm room. UPPER 
MIDDLE: Ray Locy engages in the weekly ritual of 
offering soap to the washer. LOWER RIGHT: The 
student assistants in Huston Dorm meet with Miss 
deRosset to talk over the week's problems. LOWER 
MIDDLE: What looks like a hen party is actually a 
dorm prayer meeting. RIGHT: Mrs. Dorothy Seera 
talks to the Long Dorm watchdog. Toto. 



68 





Dormitories Offer Unique 
Living Experiences 



Dorm life is a unique blending of elements from life in a 
prison camp, a family environment, and a convention hotel. It 
is full of adaptations, adjustments, and unpredictable events. 
During their stay at Bryan, dorm students find that the dorm 
is what they make of it— cooperative or un-cooperative, consid- 
erate or inconsiderate, interesting or dull, depending largely on 
themselves. Making the adjustment from home life to group 
living is a major accomplishment of those who are becoming 
mature. 





eg 




f^ 



♦• 












^^ii* 




T 




70 



















Off-Campus Students Enjoy 
Home Life 



Bryan Hill is not a twenty-four-hour environment for many of the 
college's students; married students and local students usually commute 
each day from home to school. These people enjoy the freedom of their 
own homes, schedules, and jobs, but often are annoyed by the problem of 
the communication gap between the campus and themselves. Although not 
a fixed part of the campus, they contribute greatly to college life. 



UPPER LEFT: Dave and Martha Haught relax during a walk near their 
apartment. UPPER MIDDLE: Dan and Judy Cvacho squeeze in a little bit 
of married life between classes. LOWER LEFT: Home life entails many 
responsibilities, as Keith and Charlie Kiser are well aware. LOWER 
MIDDLE: Carol Cowden steps from her car into another day of classes on 
the Hill. LOWER RIGHT: John Edwards, alias Papa, finds' that intra-col- 
lege communication is a problem for those who live off campus. 







Different Cultures 
Meet at Bryan 



Foreign students living at Bryan have the unique 
insights, viewpoints, and problems which inevitably re- 
sult when two cultures meet. They read carefully about 
events occurring in their native lands, speak Chinese or 
Arab or Japanese in the lunch line, and worry about visa 
renewals. They compose a small group of individualists 
who have succeeded in creating a distinctive blend of 
American and foreign ways of life. 



UPPER RIGHT: Phil Saade studies some of the letters from his 
home in Lebanon. LOWER MIDDLE: Miranda Wong and Grace 
Wang enjoy eating in the college dining room with Mrs. Lee and 
her daughter, Pauline. 





y 






Faculty Are People, Too 

Faculty members also have lives outside the world of the 
classroom. Their families, churches, clubs, and hobbies occupy 
much of their time. This is good, for they must learii not only 
to be citizens of the campus but also citizens of the county. 



UPPER MIDDLE: Dr. and Mrs. Jensen enjoy records willi their family 
in the evening. LOWER LEl'T: Mr. Greasby raids liis own refrigerator 
after a hard day at the Music Building. LOWl^R RIGHT: Mr. and Mrs. 
Cornelius relax with Craig and Christa. 



73 






74 





ITI 



H iv \ ]m\v I 




Special Events Enrich 
College Life 



Into the routine of weekly classes and studies 
sometimes comes a special cultural, religious, or 
literary event which captures the interest of the 
college community. Such programs— some planned, 
others delightfully unplanned-open new mental vistas 
for college students and help promote a deeper 
appreciation of life outside the campus society. 



UPPER LEFT: Marge Schoh, graduate of Bryan, visits the 
campus before she leaves for missionary work in Ethiopia. 
UPPER MIDDLE: Marion Gray and Steve Griffith contribute 
a guitar duet to Freshman Talent Night. UPPER RIGHT: On 
his visit to the campus, author John Porter autographs for 
Doretha Roach, Diane Mcintosh, and Lanny O'Hail copies of 
his book on Vietnam. LOWER LEFT: The Hilltop Singers' 
program of lively folk music was sponsored by the Student 
Union. LOWER RIGHT: The Chattanooga Symphony Or- 
chestra with Masuko Fushioda, guest violinist, performs in 
the Bryan gymnasium. 



/ 




XS^^MmLa. 



.H^l 






Beating The Blahs 



In between special events are many days when 
students must entertain themselves by their own 
ingenuity. Resting, thinking, talking with 
friends-each eventually develops his own way of 
finding satisfaction during the off-hours. 



UPPER LEFT: In the wasps vs. students chapel contest. 
Bill Robinson holds up the latest victim. UPPER 
MIDDLE: Paul Morgan enjoys the quiet lake scenery of 
Richland Enbayrnent. UPPER RIGHT: Steve Gregory and 
Lyn Warwick muse over the ups and downs of life on the 
Hill. LOWER LEFT: Happiness for Lynne Leopold is 
reacliing out to touch a warm, friendly Black Angus. 
LOWER RIGHT: Kathy McWilliams, Douglas Vaughn. and 
Ben Turney relax after the last class of the day. 




77 



Soccer: A Rough Season 



The 1969 soccer season was two months of hard work, frustra- 
tion, and determination. It was a no-win season; the best quality that 
the team had was their continual willingness to walk away from one 
loss and begin to practice for a better game next time. Their attitude 
was a powerful factor in maintaining the high morale of the school. 
Their poor record is due less to inept playing than it is to the 
unusually high number of injuries, a phenomenom which plagued 
the squad from the very first. Considering their constant psychologi- 
cal and physical obstacles, they were a commendable team. 






78 



f>ti- 




UPPER MIDDLE: Bryan's players head for the far 
end of the field during a hard-fought game. LOW- 
ER LEFT: Dale Gibson, followed by a long-haired 
friend, prepares to kick the ball. LOWER 
MIDDLE: On the road to Temple, they saw a great 
light, etc. LOWER RIGHT: Fan support for the 
team was both consistent and original. 







-^ 




1969 SOCCER SCOREBOARD 


BRYAN 


OPPONENT 


2 


TOCCOA FALLS 


4 


1 


COVENANT 


3 


1 


TENNESSEE TEMPLE 


3 


3 


ST. BERNARD 


8 


2 


TENNESSEE TECH 


3 


2 


COVENANT 


4 


1 


TENNESSEE TEMPLE 


3 





SEWANEE 


3 


2 


BERRY COLLEGE 


6 





PEABODY COLLEGE 


1 



'K 



0^/ 




79 






80 




UPPER LEFT; The soccer team caucuses at 
half-time and hears instructions from Coach 
Bath. UPPER MIDDLE: Craig Wilson. Paul 
Morgan, and Frank Klose are players who fight 
to get the ball. LOWER LEFT: Bill Chaplin. 
Coach Bath, and Paul Stone provide determined 
leadership for the squad. LOWER MIDDLE: 
This was the year of autographed casts. LOW- 
ER RIGHT: With a fierce swing, Dave Hauglit 
kicks the ball far down the field. 



Determination Was Their Best Characteristic 





81 



1969 CROSS COUNTRY SCOREBOARD 


^ BRYAN 




OPPONENT 


P 47 


TENNESSEE TECH 


15 


30 


CARSON-NEWMAN 


25 


24 


COVENANT 


33 


21 


TENNESSEE TEMPLE 


34 


44 


DAVID LIPSCOMB 


17 


19 


SEWANEE 


40 


18 


TENNESSEE TEMPLE 


41 


23 


INVITATIONAL: 






TENNESSEE TEMPLE 


58 




COVENANT 


47 


35 


BERRY 


20 


32 


WEST GEORGIA 


23 


18 


COVENANT 


41 






;; 



82 




.*:;■ 




Another Good Year 
In Cross Country 



In the 1969 Cross-country season, a hardwork- 
ing, team-spirited group of runners provided Bryan 
with several impressive victories. The team took 
first place in this year's college invitational meet 
and third place in the Tennessee State Meet. Al- 
though the entire team displayed continuous skill, 
the most-valuable-player award went to Russ Kar- 
vonen and the most-improved-runner award to 
Johnnie Trivette. Much of the credit for the suc- 
cess of the year must be given to Coach Jake 
Matthes, who has consistently up-graded the qual- 
ity of his squad since its inception three years ago. 




UPPER MIDDLE: Lee Simpson starts his 
two mile warm-up before tlie day 's work- 
out. UPPER RIGHT: David Wolfe runs 
hard across the soggy grass at Mur frees- 
boro. LOWER LEFT: Johnnie Tiivette 
pours on the coal to pass anotlier liard- 
working runner. LOWER MIDDLE: Russ 
Karvonen comes in first at the Bryan Invi- 
tational, setting a new record time for this 
race. 



83 



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4 

^ 



ii^^ 




84 




Bryan Takes Third Place In State Meet 









N 



FAR LEFT: Johnnie Trivette realizes that daily practice 
is the key to continuing success. UPPER MIDDLE: Driz- 
zling rain soaks the runners as they line up at the State 
Cross Country Meet. UPPER RIGHT: Matt Parker rounds 
the flag at the half-way mark during the State Meet. 
LOWER MIDDLE: Lanny O'Hait holds the team's sweats 
as "Little Coach " Matthes looks on. 




/' 



^/ / 



%J^ 



85 



Bryan Enjoys Another 
Winning Season 



In a generally good season of some brilliant wins and 
some disappointing losses, Bryan takes fourth place in 
the Southern Christian Athletic Conference. The team, 
erratically good and bad, does not succeed in retaining 
Bryan's championship title earned in the 1968-1969 
season. Following a slow start, the squad reaches a peak 
of success by sweeping the Tennessee Temple Invitation- 
al games, defeating Calvary, and sparking a six-game 
winning streak. After subsequent ups and downs, the 
team ends the year with the best-played victory of the 
season over Emmanuel College on Bryan's home court. 

By his consistently good performance at the foul line, 
Tim Margene establishes a new career scoring record for 
the college. Steve Roddy and Bozo Queener are the 
other leading scorers for the year. Backed by a good 
bench and supported by enthusiastic fans, the team has 
gained another creditable season for Coach Dixon and 
for Bryan. 








UI'PIiR MIDDLE: Wancii Hill Jrihhlcs around a 
viKitiiiK player. LOWER LEFT: At the final f^amc 
of the year witli Emmanuel, Steve Roddy lilts tlie 
hall to I'hil LoHfi, as I'iiii Marf^ene, Warren Hill, and 
Bozo Queener wateh. UPPER R/ai/'l': EliidiiiK 
Emmanuel's xood defense, Bozo prepares to pass 
the ball to Tim. LOWER MIDDLE: Phil Loim lays 
up two more points for Bryan. LO WER RKHIT: In 
Covenant's xym Bozo shows his rejle.x aetion in 
aihiiilliii)', a lonl. 



87 




Bryan Wins 
Temple Invitational 



LEFT: At the opening jump-ball of the Tennessee 
Temple Invitational. Steve Roddy outreaches his 
opponent. UPPER MIDDLE: Tim Margene, Steve 
Roddy, and Warren Hill pose with the Invitational 
championship trophy. LOWER MIDDLE: Bozo 
Queener holds his trophy, presented to him for 
being the Invitational 's most valuable player. LOW- 
ER RIGHT: On the home court, Tim Margene 
cooly looks for a path around the Maryville block- 
er. 





89 



^^^^^ 1969-70 BASKETBALL SCOREBOARD 


f^ BRYAN 




OPPONENT 


99 


Atlanta Christian 


56 


' 65 


Lincoln Memorial 


72 


70 


Lee 


90 


83 


Grand Rapids 


43 


107 


Johnson Bible 


60 


65 


Hiwassee 


72 


71 


Sewanee 


94 


75 


Covenant 


78 


108 


Calvary 


101 


95 


Tennessee Temple 


72 


81 


Trevecca 


55 


104 


Tennessee Temple 


86 


106 


Lincoln Memorial 


89 


HI 


Toccoa 


77 


75 


Emmanuel 


95 


62 


Hiwassee 


42 


109 


Johnson Bible 


73 


' 84 


Trevecca 


72 


78 


Tennessee Temple 


79 


i 116 


Toccoa 


80 


t 85 


Maryville 


83 


95 


Atlanta Christian 


66 


65 


Lee 


77 


■ 77 


Maryville 


82 


81 


Calvary 


85 


93 


Covenant 


91 


96 


Emmanuel 


90 






90 



r 







Bryan Finishes Fourth in Conference 



1969-70 J.V. BASKETBALL SCOREBOARD 


BRYAN 




OPPONENT 


66 


Lee 


83 


76 


Covenant 


61 


87 


Piedmont Bible 


77 


65 


Tennessee Temple 


75 


66 


Tennessee Temple 


75 


59 


Castle Heights Military Academy 


57 


90 


Tennessee Military Institute 


103 


73 


Lee 


78 


55 


Castle Heights Military Academy 


51 


84 


Covenant 


69 



UPPER MIDDLE: Tim Margene initiates a long shot at 
the basket. LOWER LEFT: At one of the few girls' 
games, Linda Howard tries to take the ball awav from 
two Temple players. LOWER MIDDLE: In Covenant's 
game at Bryan, Steve Roddy has just scored another 
rebound. LOWER RIGHT: Before the Emmanuel game 
the cheerleaders demonstrate a new stance for their 
enthusiastic audience. 




91 



The Board of Trustees 



The Board of Trustees of Bryan College is a group of 
private citizens who are ultimately responsible for establishing 
institutional goals and for ensuring that these goals are imple- 
mented through practical programs. Heavily involved in the 
academic aspects of the college, the Board also maintains a 
keen interest in student affairs through its Trustee-Student 
Coordinating Committee. 



UPPER MIDDLE: By occasional visits to special lectures or banquets, 
trustees see college life as it actually is. LOWER LEFT: Mr. R. L. Bryan 
provides leadership for the college as well as scholarships for various 
students. LOWER MIDDLE: Trustees E. B. Shoff James Barth. Stan 
Brading discuss one of the many topics on the Board meeting's agenda. 





94 







IN MliWORI.AM: f haiij^clloi'^Glejui Wwodlcd, Mr. Charlci.-D.ciUlcV 



'The puUi wf ikejusl-is as ihc sLiiiiing-Li,g|.ti. 
!haUshne'lJai(iioyo and more iiiiio the pcij'ecl 

• ^ •Pru*'j;rbs4:l« 

: '! \" \ 







The President 



Dr. Theodore C. Mercer, President of tiie College, has the 
distinction of being Bryan's official representative. He is the 
institution's chief ambassador to the business world, the re- 
ligious world, and the academic world. Every department in 
the school is either directly or indirectly responsible to him; he 
is responsible to everyone for constantly working to translate 
the college objectives into every-day accomplishments. While 
involved in all of these tasks, however, he always finds time to 
be friendly to both students and visitors. He is an extremely 
capable man doing a highly complicated job well. 

Dr. and Mrs. Mercer in the new official residence 








Dr. Theodore C. Mercer 





Dr. Donald G. Scott 




The Deans 



The varied tasks of Bryan's three deans are associated with 
the academic, social, and psychological aspects of college life. 
Dr. Donald Scott, Dean of the College, is primarily responsible 
for promoting and maintaining the scholastic vitality and ex- 
cellence of the college. He has contributed greatly to the 
formation of the new curriculum as well as to the recruitment 
of higlily qualified faculty members. Mr. Walter Seera, Dean of 
Student Affairs, attempts to coordinate student activities and 
to make Bryan an orderly campus. As Dean of Counseling 
Services, Mrs. Mayme Sheddan serves as a friendly and well- 
qualified adviser to individual students, supervises the college 
testing program, and arranges all student-aid contracts. 





^ ' 



} 



Ml I Walter Secra 



Mrs. Muynic K. Sheddan 



97 




^ V ^ 



t 



Administrative 
Officers 

MR. C.PHILIP DAVIS 

Treasurer 

COL. FRANCIS J. GOATLEY 

Assistant to the President 



MISS LOUISE LASON 

Registrar 
MISS REBECCA PECK 

Executive Alumni Secretary 



DR. JUDSON A. RUDD 

President Emeritus 

MISS ZELPHA RUSSELL 

Director of Admissions 



MR. RUSSELL V. STANSBURY 

Business Manager 

MR. EDWARD STEELE 

Director of Public Relations 

and Development 




98 



Administrative 
Assistants 

MRS. HARRIET ANDERSON 

Assistant Librarian 
MRS. JOSEPHINE BOYD 

Secretary to the Registrar 





a *'>»^ 



MRS. HILDA DAUGHERTY 

Bookkeeper 
MISS WANDA DAVEY 

Clerical Assistant in 
General Services 





1 . .; s &|»l 

43 * i S8 » »^ If 



r^^^^. 





^ 







MISS KARIN deROSSET 

Secretary to the Dean of Students 

MRS. GRACE HIGGINS 

Secretary in General Services 



MRS. JOYCE HOLLIN 

Secretary to the Dean of 

Counseling Services 

MISS MADGE IIUGHEY 

Secretary to the Director of 

Admissions 



99 





Administrative 
Assistants 

MRS. MARY LIEBIG 

Bookstore Manager 

MRS.KATHYMcINTYRE 

Secretary in Public Relations 



/ 




MISS KATHY PAGE 

Receptionist 

MRS. TINA PORTER 

Cashier 



MRS. RUTH ROSE 

Loan Clerk 

MRS. PEGGY ROSENBERGER 

Assistant Librarian 

MR. ROBERT SHEDDAN 

Supervisor of General Services 



MRS. ELEANOR STEELE 

Clerical Assistant in Public Relations 

MRS. HILDA WINKLER 

Clerical Assistant in Public Relations 

MRS. BETTY WYNESEMA 

Secretary to the President 




,^ 



g 




100 



Staff 



MR. BILL BROOKS 

Janitorial Staff 
MISS DOREEN GASSMAN 

School Nurse 



MR. GEORGE R.HALL 

Food Service Manager 

MR. AUSTIN HIGGINS 

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 





MR. JAMES JOHNSON 
Buildings and Grounds Staff 
MR. MELTON PASCHALL 

Janitorial Staff 



MRS. OLA PASCHALL 

Housekeeper 

MRS. MILDRED ROSS 

Cook 



A\ \ 



101 



Division 
Chairmen 



MR. H. BLAIR BENTLEY 

Division of History and 

Social Sciences 

MR. RICHARD CORNELIUS 

Division of Literature and 

Modern Languages 



MR. J. JAMES GREASBY 

Division of Music 

DR. WILLARD L. HENNING 

Division of Natural Science 




^ 

^ 








A 



DR. IRVING L. JENSEN 

Division of Biblical Studies 

and Philosophy 

DR. DANIEL ROSENBERGER 

Division of Education-Psychology 



\ 



c^ss^ 



102 




Faculty 



DR. JOHN C. ANDERSON 

Professor of Ancient Languages 

MR. JAMES BATH 

Instructor in Healtli and Physical 

Education, Assistant Coach 



DR. WALTER J. BAUDER 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

MRS. LOUISE BENTLEY 

Assistant Professor of English 



MR. WILLIAM BOYD 

Assistant Professor of Music 

DR. ELIZABETH CASALE 

Associate Professor of English 



MRS. SHARRY CROOKS 

instructor in Music 

MR. C. PHILIP DAVIS 

Instructor in Accounting 







103 





Faculty 



MR. WAYNE DIXON 

Athletic Director and Instructor 

in Health and Physical Education 

MRS. BETTY GIESEMANN 

Instructor in German 



I 



1 




DR. R. ALLEN KILLEN 

Associate Professor of 

Bible and Philosophy 

MR. GLEN H. LIEBIG 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 

MR. LLOYD J. MATTHES 

Assistant Professor of 

Mathematics 



MR. RUSSELL A. PORCELLA 

Instructor in Biology 

MR. THOMAS G.ROSE 

Instructor in Business 

MISS ZELPHA RUSSELL 

Instructor in Music 



DR. CHARLES G. HAMILTON 

Associate Professor of History 

MR. LEO L. HORTON 

Assistant Professor of Education 




104 



Faculty 



DR. DONALD G. SCOTT 

Instructor in Mathematics and 

Science 

MRS. HELEN SCOTT 

Instructor in Art 



MISS VIRGINIA SEGUINE 

Librarian 

MR. MANNING SEIL 

Assistant Professor in Business 





MRS. MAYME SHEDDAN 

Instructor in Psychology 

MISS GLADYS TAYLOR 

Instructor in English 

MISS LEE TAYLOR 

Instructor in French 



MR. TOM TAYLOR 

Instructor in Accounting 

MR. ALAN WINKLER 

Assistant Prol'cssor of 

Christian Education 

MR. MERVIN L. ZILGLER 

Instructor in Speech and English 



106 




Senior Officers 



The Senior Officers, under President Dave Haught, con- 
tinually work to raise money for their class and to insure that 
the Senior Class's many inherent obligations are fulfilled. They 
provide the nucleus of the force which plans tlie prior-to- 
graduation Senior trip, purchases the Senior gift for the 
school, and organizes the many other Senior activities. 






/ 



11^ 



UPPER LEFT: Keith Kiser, Vice President. UPPER RIGHT: David 
Haught. President. LOWER LEFT: Nancy Birch, Treasurer, and Bonita 
Gunn, Secretary. LOWER RIGHT: Dr. Irving Jensen, Class Sponsor. 



106 



Seniors 

RANDALL BELL: History: Pompano 

Beach, Florida. 

NANCY BIRCH: Elementary Education: 

Dayton, Tennessee. 

JUDY BROUGHTON: Cliri'stian Education: 

Soddy, Tennessee. 



WILLIAM CHAPLIN: History: Denver, Colorado. 

CARVIS CHAPPELL: Chemistry: Cordele, Georgia. 

DANIEL COLLINS: Christian Education: 

Lakeland, Florida. 




^4tfe4ik 




CURTIS COULTER: Elementary Education: 
Sale Creek, Tennessee. 

STEPHEN CRAMER: Greek: Findlay, Ohio. 
MARILYN CRANDALL: Elementary Education: 
Bradenton, Florida. 



WILLIAM CROOKS: History: Baltimore, Maryland. 

JUNE CROSBIE: Music Education: 

Neptune, New Jersey. 

DANIEL CVACHO: Biology: Richmond, Virginia. 



EDWARD DANIELSON: Spanish: San 

Diego, Calilornia. 

PATUUkMAM: Inghsh: Norwood, Ohio. 

ROUI.RT ISTABKOOK: Bible: Muscatine, Iowa. 



10/ 



Seniors 

MARTHA SUE EVERETT; Elementary Education: 

Knoxville, Tennesee. 
MARGARET FERGUSON: Elementary Education: 

Augusta, Montana. 

ROBERT FOLDEN: Christian Education: 

Tacoma, Washington. 



LEROY FRANK: Business Administration: 

Cleveland, Ohio. 

CHARLES GAEHRING: Bible: Medford, New Jersey. 

WYNN ANN GARRETT: Elementary: Miami, Florida. 




^mAik 




DOREEN GASSMAN: Biology: Paris, Ohio. 

KARLGEESEY: Biology: Atlanta, Georgia. 

BONITA GUNN: Elementary Education: 

Wadena, Minnesota. 



KATHLYNN HAMMOND: Elementary Education: 

Streetboro, Ohio. 

EVA HARRIS: English: Dayton, Tennessee. 

ROY HARROW: Mathematics: Dayton, Tennessee. 



STEVE HARTHAN: Greek: Cohasset, Minnesota. 

DAVID HAUGHT: Elementary Education: 

Paris, Illinois. 

CAROLYN HAYES: Christian Education: 

Bradenton, Florida. 



Ai^4ili^ 



108 









Seniors 

ROBERT HEATH: Physical Education: 

Merritt Island, Florida. 

ROBERT HEDLUND: Elementary Education: 

Gates, Oregon. 

STEPHEN HENDERSON: Business Administrat'ion; 

Crossville, Tennessee. 



f:J 



A 




NAOMI HIGGINS: Biology: Dayton, Tennessee. 

WARREN HILL: Physical Education: 

Dayton, Tennessee. 

JANE ELLEN HODGES: Mathematics: 

Dayton, Tennessee. 



HAROLD JENKINS: English: Etlan, Virginia. 

JUDITH JENKINS: Music Education: 

Niota, Tennessee. 

PHILIP JEPSON: History: BeUevue, Washington. 



RUSSELL KARVONEN: Christian Education: 

Suffern, New York. 

THOMAS KLEI ER: English: .Martin, Tennessee. 

KLITH KISER: Greek: Cleveland, Ohio. 



FRANK KLOSE: Business Administration: 

Nassau, New York, 

ROBERT LLEWELLYN: Bible: Sebring, Honda. 

JANL LONG: Elementary Education: 

Johnstown, Ohio. 




109 




Seniors 

JOYCE LUKRIDGE: English: Willow Grove, 

Pennsylvania. 

TIMOTHY MARGENE; History: Ontario, California. 

BEVERLY MASSENGALE: Elementary Education: 

Dayton, Tennessee. 



BEVERLY McCARRELL: Elementary Education: 

Glenview, Illinois. 
CLARICE MCCARTHY: Elementary Education: 

Niles, Michigan. 

CATHERINE McFARLAND: Business Administration: 

Grove City, Pennsylvania. 



ROGER McINTYRE: Bible: Pretoria RepubUc, 

South Africa. 

RANDALL MILLER: History: Waymont, Pennsylvania. 

JACKIE MORRIS: Christian Education: 

Greenville, South Carolina. 



ROGER PHILLIPS: English: Parkersburg, 

West Virginia. 

JOHN REESE: History: Crool^ed Creek, 

Pennsylvania. 

CECELIA RICHMOND: Elementary Education: 

Roanoke, Virginia. 

JUDITH RINCK: Elementary Education: 

Brookfield, Ohio. 



CHARLOTTE ROBINSON: Ctaistian Education: 

Jacksboro, Tennessee. 

MARY ROSS: Elementary Education: 

Dayton, Tennessee. 

JOHN ROUSE: Bible: Campbell. Pennsylvania. 

VICKIE ROWSEY: Englisli: Seminole, I'lorida. 




110 



Seniors 

LEE SIMPSON: Biology: Wellborn, Florida. 

LESLIE SIMS: Greek: Denbigh, Virginia. 

DI.ANE SMITH: Elementary'Educa"tion: 

Hendersonville, North Carolina. 



LYNNE STEVENS: Music Education: 

Memphis, Tennessee. 

PAUL STONE: Elementary Education: 

Antioch, Tennessee. 

ROSEMARY STONE: English: 

Saint Albans, West Virginia. 



REIKO SUZUKI: History: Shizuoka Ken, Japan. 
JOHN TRIVETTE: Mathematics: Johnson City, 

Tennessee. 
DARLENE VAN PUFFELEN: Elementary Education: 

Bradley, West Virginia. 





RODERICK VEON: History: Darlington, 

Pennsylvania. 

MARILYN WELTON: Elementary Education: 

Mercer, Pennsylvania. 

LaVERNE WICKS: Business Administration: 

Fort Myers, Florida. 

MARY LEE WILLCOX: Elementary Education: 

Miami, Florida. 



BILL WILSON: Chemistry: Bradcnton, Florida. 

KATHY \VIPI'LlNGi:i<: Music Education: 

Jamison, IVniisylvaiiia. 

GERALD WYLIE: Bible: Traverse City, Michigan. 

JOHN YOUNG: Bible: Alquippa, Pennsylvania. 



in 



!• 



Underclassmen 
Officers 



As underclassmen leaders, each group 
of class officers works throughout the 
year on major projects as well as routine 
jobs. Soon after their arrival the Fresh- 
men demonstrate creativity and 
versatility in their Talent Program. After 
a year of money-making drives, the Soph- 
omores enjoy a day-long spring picnic in 
one of the state parks. To the Junior 
Class goes the most glamorous and costly 
jobs— the planning and carrying out of the 
Junior-Senior Banquet. Each of the un- 
derclassman presidents also represents his 
class in the Student Senate. 





UPPER RIGHT: Freshmen: Mr. Russ Porcella. 
sponsor: Marion Gray, vice-president: Gail Cook, 
secretary-treasurer: Paul Morgan, president. LEFT: 
Sophomores: Joe Poole, treasurer: Steve Sanford, 
vice-president: Ed Fritts, president: Ruth Mc- 
Kinney. secretary: Mr. Tom Rose, sponsor. 
MIDDLE RIGHT: Juniors: Mr Richard Cornelius, 
sponsor: Maye Hayes, treasurer: John Fortune, 
vice-president: Chris Page, secretary: Joel Pearman. 
president. 




112 




UNDERCLASSMEN 



MELODY ADAMS; Freshman: Sale Creek, 

Tennessee. 
SHIRLEY ALVIS: Sophomore: Jacksonville, 

Florida. 
ANITA ANDERSON: Sophomore: Dayton, 

Tennessee. 
JEANETTE ARMENTROU:T Sophomore: Front Royal, 

Virginia. 

ANITA BACON: Freshman: Kno.wille, 

Tennessee. 

BYRON BALLARD: Junior: Trenton, 

Georgia. 

CHARLES BANE: Junior: Rockwood, 

Tennessee. 

PAUL BANFIELD: Freshman: Chesterland, 

Ohio. 

RALPH BARKER: Junior: Wyanet, 

Illinois. 

ALAN BAUGHMAN: Sophomore: Wa.xhaw, 

North Carolina. 

LOREN BAUGHMAN: Freshman: Waxhaw, 

North Carolina. 
DARLENE BECKWITH: Sophomore: Emmalena, 

Kentucky. 



VICKI BELL: Freshman: Memphis, 

Tennessee. 

NED BERWAGER; Sophomore: Hanover, 

Pennsylvania. 

LINDA BIEBER: Junior: Muscatine, 

Iowa. 
PAUL BISHOP: Sophomore: Chattanooga, 

Tennessee. 
CONNIE BLAKE: Junior: Strawberry Plams. 

Tennessee. 

DENNIS BODLIEN: Freshman: Ellicott City, 

Maryland. 
ELIZABETH BOEDDEKER: Sophomore: St. Louis, 

Missouri. 
TIM BOEDDEKER: Sophomore: St. Louis, 

Missouri. 

BARTON BOGGS: Sophomore: Butler, 

Pennsylvania. 

DAVID BOUCHARD: Sophomore: Fort Fairfield, 

Maine. 

RICHARD BRADSHAW: Sophomore: Avella, 

Pennsylvania. 
BOB BRICKELL: Freshman: Chattanooga, 

Tennessee. 
KAREN BRODSKY: Freshman: Fincastic, 

Virginia. 
BETHANY BROUGHTON: Sophomore: Soddy, 

Tennessee. 
MARCIA BROUGHTON: Freshman: Irving, 

Texas. 

KEN BUCKLES: Sophomore: Griffin, 

Georgia. 

CMARLOTTI CLARK: Ircshman: Peoria, 

Illinois. 
ELIZABtTH CLARK: Sophomore: Erwin, 

Tennessee. 
MARTIN COLLINS; Sophomore: Dayton, 

Tennessee. 
Bl RTHA CO.MBS: Ffc»hman: West Alexandria, 

Ohio, 







ftC L 




AmJk 





Underclassmen 

BECKIE CONRAD: Sophomore: Landour, 

Mussoorie, U.P., India. 

DARLENECOOK: Freshman: Latrobe, Pennsylvania. 

GAIL COOK: Freshman: Jenison, Michigan. 
JOHN COOK: Junior: St. Petersburg, Florida. 



GARY COTTON: Freshman: Brush Prairie, 

Washington. 

CAROL COWDEN: Freshman: Dayton, Tennessee. 

ANNE CRAWFORD: Freshman: Wa.\haw, 

North Carolina. 

JUDY CVACHO; Sophomore: Dayton, Tennessee. 



LUCIEN DAIGNEAULT: Junior: Dayton, Tennessee. 

VIOLET DAIGNEAULT: Junior: Dayton, Tennessee. 

MARGARET DAVIES: Freshman: Miami, Florida. 

LARRY DAVIS: Freshman: Detroit, Michigan. 



JANICE DECKER: Freshman: 

Murfreesboro, Tennessee. 

MARSHA De GROOT: Sophomore: Warner Robbins, 

Georgia. 

PAOLA Di PRIMA: Freshman: Montreal, 

Quebec, Canada. 

JOHN EDWARDS: Sophomore: Ironton, Ohio. 



REBECCA EDWARDS: Freshman: Bradenton, Florida. 

STEVEN EISENHOWER: Freshman: 

Trevortown, Pennsylvania. 

CHERYL ESTABROOK: Sophomore: Muscatine, Iowa. 

BRENT FERGUSON: Freshman: Trenton, Georgia. 



JOHN FORTUNE: Junior: Balboa, Canal Zone. 

EDWARD FRITTS: Sophomore: Harriman, Tennes.see. 

ANN FULMER: Sophomore: Springfield, Virginia. 

SUZANNGEORGIANNl: Freshman: Miami, Florida. 



DALE GIBSON: Junior: Cloverdale, Virginia. 

SANDY GIBSON: Freshman: Erlanger, Kentucky. 

DAVID GIESEL: Freshman: Orlando, Florida. 

JEANINE GOATLEY: Sophomore: Dayton, Tennessee. 




d il^t^ 




114 




Underclassmen 

MARION GRAY: Freshman: Forest Park, Georgia. 

STEVE GREGORY: Freshman: Ypsilanti, Michigan. 

MARCIA GRIFFITH: Freshman: Fort Riley, Kansas. 

STEVE GRIFFITH: Freshman: TuUahoma, 

Tennessee. 



GILDA GRISWOLD: Fresliman: Miami, Florida. 

MARY LOU GUY: Freshman: Pearland, Te.\as. 

MARY HELEN HAKES: Junior: Pikeville, Kentucky. 

GAIL HAMILTON: Junior: Greenhurst, New York. 



4fi^^ 



TERRY HARBIN: Sophomore: East Point, Georgia. 

HAROLD HARRIS: Sophomore: Waynesville, 

North Carolina. 

SANDRA HARRIS: Freshman: Bloomfield. Indiana. 

ELLEN HAWKINS: Sophomore: New Orleans, 

Louisiana. 



MAE HAYES: Junior: Central, South Carolina. 

"AUL HAYWARD: Sophomore: Swaziland, 

South Africa. 

ANNETTE HENDERSON: Freshman: Crossville, 

Tennessee. 
DALE HENRY: Freshman; Akron, Ohio. 



JANET HERLONG: Freshman: Hialeah, Florida. 
PEGGY HESTERLEY: Freshman: HendersonviUe, 

North Carolina. 

PATRICIA HILL: Freshman: Kno.wille, Tennessee. 

TERRY HILL: Sophomore: Dayton, Tennessee. 



REBECCA MINES; Ireshman; Chattanooga, Tennessee. 

GEORGE HIPPLE; Junior; Honcsdalc, Pennsylvania. 

.MIRANDA IIOANG: Junior: Cholon. Vietnam. 

DANIEL IIOUBS: Ireshman; Carney's Point, 

New Jersey. 



RI HI rCA IIOGAN: Junior; Ucrryville, Virginia. 

HI riY IKJII.I.MAN: Junior: llamplon, Virginia. 

SIANLty HOPKINS: Ireshman: Greenville, 

South Carijjina. 

LINDA IIOWAKD; Ercjliman; Lc-illc. Michigan. 






d^'^ ^Ak^th 







1 



r 




115 




A.l^ .^ifi^ 



Underclassmen 

MARY HOWARD: Sophomore: Sale Creek, 

Tennessee. 
ESTHER HULBERT: Freshman; Minneapolis, 

Minnesota. 
LAWRENCE JACOBSEN: Sophomore: Chicago, 

Illinois. 
STEPHEN JOHANSEN: Freshman: Richmond, Virginia. 



PATRICIA JOHNSON: Junior: Miami, Florida. 

MARTHA JONES: Sophomore: Abbeville, 

South Carolina. 

NESS JUDSON: Sophomore: Linden, New Jersey. 

TWYLA JUDY: Junior: Witter, Arkansas. 



DIANE KARR: Sophomore: Clarkston, Georgia. 
THOMAS KEEPING: Junior: Rancho Cordova, 

California. 

EVERETT KIER: Freshman: Lexington, Virginia. 

TIMOTHY KIMMEL: Sophomore: Mayo, Maryland. 



DAVID KINSEY: Freshman: Memphis, Tennessee. 

MARK KIRBY: Sophomore: Lakeland, Florida. 

CHARLENE KISER: Junior: Cleveland, Ohio. 

SONIA KNAPP: Freshman: Roanoke, Virginia. 



EDWARD KNEISLEY: Sophomore: Johnstown, Ohio. 

JOEL KNOUSE: Junior: Alto Pass, Illinois. 

LYNNE LEOPOLD: Sophomore: Milford, Ohio. 

JOHN LILLEY: Junior: University City, Missouri. 



JAMES LINDH: Junior: Graysville, Illinois. 
REBECCA LOCKE: Freshman: Dayton, Tennessee. 
RAYMOND LOCY: Freshman: Takoma Park, Maryland. 
SARAH LOFTIN: Freshman: Ma.xton, North Carolina. 



DARLENE LOGSDON: Freshman: Jacksonville, 

Florida. 

MARION LOMAS: Freshman: Orlando, Florida. 

PHILIP LONG: Sophomore: Johnstown, Ohio. 

MARK LONGNECKER: Sophomore: Orangeville, 

Pennsylvania. 




i. iJ 



116 



Underclassmen 

DIANE LOOMIS: Sophomore: Sweetwater, 

Tennessee, 

KEITH M.ACE: Junior: New Middletown, Ohio. 

JOHN MAIN: Sophomore: Northville, Michigan. 

JOAN MASON: Freshman: Chepachet, Rhode Island. 



BARBARA McCARRELL: Freshman: Glenview, 

Ilhnois. 
NAOMI McCARRELL: Freshman: Cleveland, 

Tennessee. 
STEVE McCOLLAM: Freshman: Wellsville, Ohio. 
DUDLEY McCREADY: Junior: Lusby, Maryland. 



BILL McDAVID: Sophomore: Harriman, Tennessee. 

DIANE .MclNTOSH: Freshman: Oak Lawn, Illinois. 

BONNIE McKEE: Freshman: Curwensville, 

Pennsylvania. 

LINDA McKENY: Freshman: Lexington, Virginia. 









b^AA^ 




RUTH McKINNEY: Sophomore: Ocean Springs, 

Mississippi. 

WAYNE McLEOD: Freshman: Newark, Delaware. 

KATHERINEMcWILLIAMS: Sophomore: Decatur, 

Illinois. 
HAROLD MEBERG: Sophomore: Orlando, Florida. 



TED MEBERG: Junior: Orlando, Florida. 

RATHI MENSCH: I'reshman: Leavenworth, Kansas. 

GURNEY MILLER: Junior: Columbia, 

South Carolina. 

TIMOTHY MILLER: I'reshman: Athens, Alabama. 



LINDA MINTI'.R: Sophomore: Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 

DANIEL MirCllFLL: Sophomore: Mentor, Ohio. 

PHYLLIS MITCHELL: Junior: Knowille, 

Tennessee. 
KATIIY MOLLl'TTF: Freshman: Red Jacket, 

West Virginia. 



PAUL MORc;AN: Ireshman: Norfolk, Virginia. 
TWILLA MULLINS: Sophomore: Oxon Hill, 

Maryland. 
KAIIII II N MUKI'lll Y: Junior: Michigan Cily, 

Indiana. 
TIMOTHY MURPIHT; Ireshnian: Michigan Cily, 

Indiana. 



11/ 



Underclassmen 

ROBERT MURRAY: Freshman: Sayville, New York. 

CAROLYN NEWKIRK: Junior: Smithport, 

Pennsylvania. 

RICHARD NEWKIRK: Junior: Beaver Dam, New York. 

LEROY NICHOLSON; Sophomore: Latrobe, 

Pennsylvania. 



LANNY O'HAIL: Sophomore: Mansfield, Ohio. 

DAVID OTTO: Freshman: Glen Burnie, Maryland. 

ROBERTA PACKARD: Freshman: Flagstaff, 

Arizona. 
CHRISTINE PAGE: Junior: HuntsviUe, Alabama. 



MATTHEW PARKER: Junior: Detroit, Michigan. 
PATRICIA PATTERSON: Junior: Grove City, 

Pennsylvania. 

JOEL PEARMAN: Junior: Harriman, Tennessee. 

ALLEN PENTON: Freshman: Paramus, New Jersey. 



MYSY PENTON: Freshman: Paramus, New Jersey. 

PAUL PETERSON: Sophomore: Fort Myers, Florida. 

DEBORAH PICKETT: Sophomore: Sale Creek, 

Tennessee. 
MARTHA PICKETT: Freshman: Sale Creek, 

Tennessee. 









^Aihl^ 





AmAM 




DON PIERCE: Sophomore: Emmalena, Kentucky. 

JOE POOLE: Sophomore: Opa Locka, Florida. 

MARILEE POOLE: Sophomore: Opa Locka, Florida. 

JOAN POPE: Special: Ooltewah, Tennessee. 

LARRY PUCKETT: Freshman: Bristol, Tennessee. 



LYNN PUFFER: Freshman: Miami, Florida. 
CHARLES QUEENER: Junior: Cleveland, Tennessee. 
ELEANOR QUIGLEY: Sophomore: Claymont, Delaware 

JAMES REEVES: Junior: Atlanta, Georgia. 
ROY REMINGTON: Freshman: Jamestown, New York. 



SANDRA REVIS: Sophomore: Dayton, Tennessee 
SUSAN REYNOLDS: Sophomore: Little Rock 

Arkansas 

DORETHA ROACH: Freshman: Hayesville 

North Carolina 

DAWN ROBERTS: Junior: Harriman, Tennessee 

WILLIAM ROBINSON: Sophomore: Jacksboro 

Tennessee 



118 




Underclassmen 

STEVE RODDY: Sophomore: Dayton, Tennessee. 

DREMA ROWSEY: Sophomore: Seminole, Florida. 

CHARLES RUSSELL: Sophomore: Fairfield, Ohio. 

PHILIP SAADE: Freshman: Beirut, Lebanon. 



MIRIAM SAILERS: Junior: East Point, Georgia. 

STEVE SANFORD: Sophomore: Quito, Ecuador. 

DENISE SASNETT: Freshman: Waxhaw, North 

Carolina. 
CHARLENE SAYLOR: Freshman: Miami Springs, 

Florida. 



JENNESS SCHROEDER: Sophomore: Marysville, 

Michigan. 
HELEN SCHUESSLER: Junior: East Rutherford, 

New Jersey. 

JANE SCOTT: Sophomore: Graysville, Tennessee. 

BETSY SENTER: Freshman: Greenville, South 

Carolina. 



JESSICA SHAFFER: Freshman: Clearwater, Florida. 
DONALD SHAKESPEARE: Sophomore: Lansdale, 

Pennsylvania. 

GARY SHAMEL: Freshman: Flint, Michigan. 

THOMAS SHAVER: Freshman: Dayton, Tennessee. 



FRANK SHEDDAN: Sophomore: Dayton, Tennessee. 
BRYAN SHELLEY: Junior: AshevUle, North 

Carolina. 
BONITA SHU.MAKER: Sophomore: Northumberland, 

Pennsylvania. 
DAVID SMITH: Freshman: Hackettstown, 

New Jersey. 
DOUGLAS SMITH: Freshman: Chicago, Illinois. 



MARY ANN SNYDER: Junior: Akron. Ohio. 

LILY STEWARD: Sophomore: Mussooric, 

U. P., India. 

MARCY STEWART: Sophomore: Lake Alfred, 

Florida. 
ALEXIA STINNETT; Freshman: Dayton, 

Tennessee. 
KEVIN STRALEY: Sophomore: Lansing, Michigan. 



PAMELA STROUPE: Freshman: Killarncy, 

Manitoba, Canada. 

CHARLES SUMMERS: Junior: lluntinglon. 

West Virginia. 

BOBBIE JEAN TALLENT: Irc^hman: Dayton, 

Tennessee. 

BOBBY TALLI NT: Ircshman: Dayton. Tennessee. 

CAROL M-RWILLIGER: Junior: Angelica. 

New York. 










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\i . \ 



119 



Underclassmen 



RONNIE THOMPSON: Freshman: Rockwood, Tennessee. 

JUDY TRIPLETT: Junior: St. Petersburg, Florida. 

JOYCE TURNER: Sophomore: Wheaton, Maryland. 

BEN TURNEY: Freshman: North Charleroi, Pennsylvania. 



DENNIS UNDERWOOD: Freshman: Harriman, Tennessee. 

BARBARA VAN SICE: Freshman: Elkton, Maryland. 

RICHARD VAN SOEST: Freshman: Gilbert, Minnesota. 

GEORGIA VARGA: Junior: Sully, Iowa. 



DOUGLAS VAUGHN: Freshman: Curwensville, Pennsylvania. 

KENNETH VIELDHOUSE: Freshman: Pottstown, Pennsylvania. 

JIM VINCENT: Junior: Rockwood, Tennessee. 

CAROL WALTERS: Freshman: Annapolis, Maryland. 



GRACE WANG: Sophomore: Cholon, South Viet Nam. 

MARILYN WARWICK: Freshman: Fort Lauderdale, Florida. 

LINDA WELD: Sophomore: Lansing, Michigan. 

PEGGY WENTWORTH: Freshman: New London, Wisconsin. 





BRENDA WIKOFF: Junior: Cincinnati, Ohio. 

BETH WILLIS: Freshman: Nashville, Tennessee 

CRAIG WILSON: Sophomore: BrecksvUle, Ohio. 

ANNETTE WINKLER: Sophomore: Dayton, Tennessee. 



DAVID WOLFE: Freshman: Wheaton, Illinois. 

DANIEL WRIGHT: Freshman: Pennsboro, West Virginia. 

JOHN WYLLIE: Sophomore: New Orleans, Louisiana. 

MARK WYMAN: Junior: Bradenton, Florida. 



TERRY YODER; Sophomore: West Liberty, Ohio. 
PATRICIA YOUNG: Sophomore: Plymouth, Indiana. 
MARSHA ZICKEFOOSE: Sophomore: Warren, Ohio. 



120 




Academic Council 

The chairmen of the six academic divisions of the 
college under the chairmanship of Dr. Scott compose the 
Academic Council. This group makes decisions regarding 
individual requests for course requirement waivers and 
presents recommendations to the Teacliing Faculty. 



STANDING; Dr. Donald Scott; Dr. Witlard Henning: Dr. Daniel 
Rosenberger. Mr. Blair Bentley: Mr. Richard Cornelius: Mr. Ja- 
mes Creasby: Dr. John Anderson. 



Teaching Faculty 

The organization of Bryan's professors provides a 
forum for the discussion of important academic topics. 

FRONT ROW: Mrs. Louise Bentley; Mrs. Mayne Sheddan; Miss 
Virginia Seguine: Miss Gladys Taylor; Miss Zelpha Russell; Mrs. 
Helen Scott. SECOND ROW: /V//-. Alan Winkler; Mr. Richard 
Cornelius; Dr. Daniel Rosenberger; Mr Russell Porcella; Dr. John 
Anderson. THIRD ROW: Mr Leo Norton; Mr Glenn Liebig; Mr. 
Manning Sell; Dr. Charles Hamilton; Mr. James Bath; Dr. Walter 
Bauder FOURTH ROW: Dr. Willard Henning; Mr. Lloyd 
Matthes; Mr. Blair Bentley; Mr. Wayne Dixon; Mr. Philip Davis; 
Dr. Irving Jensen. FIFTH ROW: Mr. Mervin Zieeler 




121 




Student Senate 

The bicameral form of student government initiated at 
Bryan this year has as its upper house the Senate, composed of 
three officers and thirteen members. The Senate reviews the 
suggestions of the student discussion groups and officially 
represents the students in meetings with the college adminis- 
tration. In addition to its routine jobs of assisting with such 
events as Homecoming, Student orientation, and the Presi- 
dent's Reception, the Senate strives to create and maintain 
campus unity and to improve college-community relations. 

r'RONT ROW: Jane Ellen Hodges: Miriam Sailers, secretary-treasurer: 
Betsy Senter: Connie Blake: Marilee Poole: Mary Howard. SECOND 
ROW: Harold Jenkins, president: David Haught: Everett Kier: Byron 
Ballard: Joel Pearnian: Mark Longnecker: Ed Fritts. 



Small Group Chairmen 



Thirteen small groups of twenty students each form the 
lower house of the bicameral student government. The leaders 
of these groups compile a summary of the monthly student 
discussions, and this in turn is presented to the Student Senate 
by the Small Group Chairman. 



STANDING: Bill Chaplin: Randy Bell: Phil Jepson, chairman: Gurney 
Miller: Lyn Warwick: Ben Turney: Tim Murphey: Paul Bishop: Tom 
Keefer: Tim Kimmel. 



I 



122 




Student Union 



After last year's problem-filled beginning, 
the Student Union has become both effi- 
cient and effective in its provision of week- 
end recreation, entertainment, and excur- 
sions for Bryan students. The creative vari- 
ety of its programs, which range from skat- 
ing parties to spelunking, has stimulated a 
membership increase, and the newly -com- 
pleted charter has given the organization per- 
manence and stability. With repeated suc- 
cess, it brings to the campus the vital ingre- 
dient of relaxation. 



FRONT ROW: Sarah Loftiii: Margaret Ferguson: 
Patricia Patterson; Maye Hayes, secretary-treasurer: 
Larry Jacobsen. SECOND ROW: Roy Harrow, 
president: Bryan Shelley: Gurney Miller, vice-presi- 
dent; Lanny O'Hail. 





Intramural Council 



Ten elected student representatives, two 
from each of the upper classes and four from 
the Freshman class, constitute the Intra- 
mural Council, which is headed by Johnnie 
Trivette. This year the council has supervised 
class competition in football, volleyball, bas- 
ketball, and Softball, as well as organized 
tournaments in the latter two sports. 



FRONT ROW: Wini Garrett: Bertha Combs: Beckv 
Hogan: Lyn Warwick; Hazel Kan: SECOND ROW: 
John Trivette. chairman; Larry Davis: Don Pierce: 
Larry Jacobsen: La Verne Wicks. 




Business Club 

The Business Club, now completing its 
second year, provides interested sludeuts 
with a study of the free-trade philosophy 
and with a source of new information and 
ideas. A program cominillec is responsible 
for scheduling discussions, films, and field 
trips to local business enterprises. 

SI ANDINti: Mr. 'I'oin Hose, sponsor; David Olio; 
Chris /'age; Mark Longncvkcr, program chainiiuii: 
Cathy Mci'arhiiul: Sifvc llrihtcrson. prcsiilciil: l.c- 
roy h'rank. 



123 




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Cheerleaders 



Generating and maintaining en- 
thusiasm for the various athletic 
teams is the time-consuming task of 
the cheerleaders. They must pro- 
vide constant moral support for 
Bryan teams playing on other cam- 
puses and be good representatives 
of the college at all athletic func- 
tions. 



STANDING: Martha Jones: Dreina Row- 
sey: Denise Sasnett; Gail Hamilton, co- 
captain; Vicki Rowsey, co-captain; Ann 
Fulmer. 



Christian Service 
Association 



The CSA works each spring with Campus 
Crusade for Christ by sponsoring evangeliza- 
tion projects among the college students 
vacationing at Ft. Lauderdale Beach. In addi- 
tion, this organization provides Bryan stu- 
dents with opportunities for teaching Bible 
in the Rhea County Public School System. 



FRONT ROW: Tim Kimmel. president; Mr Alan 
Winkler, sponsor; John Fortune, coordinator; 
Nancy Birch, secretary-treasurer. SECOND ROW: 
Don Shakespeare, vice-president; Steve Sanford, 
vice-president. 





Foreign Missions 
Fellowship 



The Bryan F.M.F. Chapter is affiliated with the national 
organization, an arm of Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship. 
F.M.F. promotes weekly prayer groups, periodic chapel ser- 
vices, the annual college missionary conference, and the bi- 
annual southeastern regional conference in Toccoa, Georgia. 



STANDING: Leroy Nicholson, vice-president; Beckie Conrad, secre- 
tary; John Reese, president; Darlene Beckwith, treasurer; Mr. Tom 
Rose, sponsor. 



124 




Fellowship of Christian 
Athletes 

The Bryan FeUowship of Christian Athletes attempts to 
stimulate the spiritual growth of campus sportsmen througli 
prayer breakfasts and special meetings. 

[■RONT ROW: Barlon Boggs: Russ Kanoneii. vice-president: Bill Chap- 
lin: Lanny O'Hail: Larry Jacobsen: Bill Robinson. SECOND ROW: Paul 
Bishop, president: Paul Morgan: Tim Murphey: Steve Roddy: Warren 
Hill: Dale Gibson. 



Lettermen's Club 



The Lettermen's Club was organized in November of this 
school year as a union of the most outstanding campus ath- 
letes. 



[■RONT ROW: Gail Hamilton: Vicki Rowsey. secretary-treasurer. SE- 
COND ROW: Bill Chaplin, vice-president: Craig Wilson: Paul Peterson: 
Tim Kimmel: Charles Gaehring: Larry Jacobsen. THIRD ROW: Barton 
Boggs: Paul Morgan: Don Pierce: Roy Harrow: Steve Roddy: Warren 
Hill: Date Gibson: Paul Bishop. NOT SHOWN: Tim Margene, president. 



125 





Touring Choir 

The Touring Choir, formerly chosen later in the year, was 
selected this year at the fall and began practice immediately 
for its ten-day spring tour. Special Christmas performances this 
year included the opera "Amahl and the Night Visitors," as 
well as the oratorio "Ceremony of the Carols." 

FRONT ROW: Beth Willis; Steve Henderson; Becky Hogan; Charles 
Russell; Lynne Stevens; Gurney Miller; June Crosbie, secretary; Dudley 
McCready; Gail Hamilton; Mr. James Creasby. director. SECOND 
ROW: Dennis Bodlien; Marcy Stewart; Dawn Roberts; Larry Davis; 
Marilee Poole; Linda Minter, librarian; Ben Turney; Jessica Shaffer; 
John Main; Pain Stroupe; Clarice McCarthy. THIRD ROW: Darlene 
Beckwith; Steve Gregory; Jeanine Goatley; Jim Lindh; Phyllis Mitchell; 
Ann Fulmer; Ned Berwager; Darlene Cook; Lal'erne Wicks; Roger 
Phillips; Dale Henry. FOURTH ROW: Jerry Wylie. vice-president; Lan- 
ny O'Hail; Rick Van Soest; Loren Baughman; Paul Stone, president; 
Ray Locy; Terry HiU; Roy Harrow; Paul Hayward; Matthew Parker; 
Brent Ferguson. 



Symphonic Band 



Bryan's symphonic band, now in its second year, is the 
school's most important instrumental group. Starting with a 
very small number of players, Mr. Boyd has built up a respect- 
able musical organization, which performs creditably at school 
and area functions. 



FRONT ROW: Clarice McCarthy; Margaret Ferguson; Carol Cowden; 
Janice Becker; Marilyn Crandall. treasurer; Beckie Conrad, secretary. 
SECOND ROW: George Hippie; Linda Minter, secretary; Dennis Bod- 
lien; Tim Kimmel; Dale Henry; Mark Wyman; Paul Bishop; Kathy 
Wipplinger; Richard Bradshaw; Steve Griffith; Jim Lindh. president; Joe 
Poole; Frank Sheddan; Martin Collins; Bonnie Sliumaker; Ray Locy; 
Paul Peterson; Mr. William Boyd, director. 




Ladies' Ensemble 



The Ladies" Ensemble, a completely new 
musical group at Bryan, is composed of nine- 
teen vocalists and has as its leader and chief 
promoter Miss Virginia Seguine. Presenting 
its weD-balanced program of comic songs, 
classical numbers, and hymns, the ensemble 
performs with distinction at local churches 
and at colleae conferences and concerts. 



FRONT ROW: Paola di Prima: Vicki Bell: Sandra 
Harris: Peggy Davies: Annette Winkler: Marion Lo- 
mas. SECOND ROW: Miss Karin de Rosser, pianist: 
Mary Helen Hakes: Anita Anderson: Sandra Mat- 
thes: Anita Bacon: Denise Sasnett: Marsha De 
Croat. THIRD ROW: Pat Durham: Gail Cook: Jane 
Long:' Judy Tripiett: Marcia Broughton: Kathy 
McWilliams: Barbara McCarrell. 





Madrigals 



The sixteen madrigal singers enjoy singing 
for themselves as well as for area liigh school 
and civic groups. Their repetoire ranges from 
English, French, and Italian songs of the fif- 
teenth and sixteenth centuries to serious and 
humorous contemporary numbers. As official 
musical representatives of the college, they are 
a continually enjoyable part of the public 
relations program. 



SEATED: Linda Minter: Darlene Cook: Brenda Wik- 
off: Ann Fulmer: Phyllis Mitchell: Dawn Roberts. 
STANDING: Charles Russell: Jerry Wy he: Paul Stone; 
Roger Phillips: Matthew Parker: Mr. James Greasby, 
director: Terrv Hill: Bill Wilson: Larrv Davis. 



The Hilltopper 



The Hilltopper. Bryan's student newspaper, 
is a voice for student opinion and an outlet for 
student creativity. As a member of the Inter- 
national Press Service, the paper is able to fea- 
ture articles of interest to all college students. 
In addition to preparing the monthly edition, 
the industrious staff carries on a news exchange 
program with fifteen other colleges. 



STANDING: Byron Ballard, managing and sports edit- 
or. Hazel Karr. aniuont editor: Marilyn Crandall, 
editor 



1?7 




■*'>■ 










;^r 









^^ . 







5, 



\ 



-^. -^ -i-ji*^ 



/' 



*\i-=>^'' 






F'RONT ROW: Paul Peterson; Ness Judson: Larry Jacobsen: Bill Chap- 
lin, co-captain: Steve Sanford: John Wyllie: Steve Griffith, manager. 
SECOND ROW: Mr. Jim Bath, coach: David Naught: Jerry Wylie; 
Stanley Hopkins: Tim Kimmel: Paul Stone, co-captain: Craig Wilson: 
Phil Jepson: Steve McCollam: Paul Morgan: Dale Gibson: Paul Hayward: 
Ray Locy. NOT SHOWN: Everett Kier: Steve Johansen. 



Soccer Team 



Cross-Country Team 



FRONT ROW: Joe Poole: John Trivette: Lee Simpson: Jack Lilley: 
Lanny O'Hail. SECOND ROW: Mr. Lloyd Matthes. coach: Dave Wolfe: 
Tim Murphey: Matthew Parker: Russ Karvonen. 




128 




STANDING: Mr. James Bath, coach: Tim Miller: Wayne Mcl.eod: Larry 
Puckett: Paul Morgan: Tim Murphey: Ray Lacy: Ron Thompson: Bart 
Boggs. Dan Hobbs: Ben Turney. 



Varsity Basketball 



J.V. Basketball Team 



FRONT ROW: Tim Miller: Warren Hill, co-captain: Ron Thompson: 
Dale Gibson: Tim Margene. captain. SF.COND ROW: Terry Hill: Phil 
Long: Steve Roddy, co-captain: Jim I'incent: Bozo Queener. 




This autograph page compliments 

of 

Class of 1970 




130 




This autograph page comphnients 

of 

Class of 1971 



131 



This autograph page compliments 

of 

Class of 1972 





This autograph page compliments 

of 

Class of 1973 



MODERN WAY CLEANERS 



%^li^ 




Dayton's Oldest and Most Reliable 
"Your Personal Appearance is your Greatest Asset.' 



North Market 



Dayton, Tennessee 



Phone 775-9951 



134 



ROGERS' 




PHARMACY 




Richard L. Rogers 



Corner Main and Market 



Day (on, Tennessee 



136 





Compliments 


^c%'s mm^i 


of 


HIGHWAY 27 SOUTH 




DAYTON. TENNESSEE 37321 


ZENITH HOSIERY 




MILL 


Phone 775-1181 






Dayton 




Tennessee 



BROWN CHEVROLET CO. 




Phone 775-2921 



136 Market St. 



136 



Dayton, Tennessee 



TALLENTS 
PRESCRIPTION STORE 

Dayton, Tennessee 
Day: 775-2362 Night: 775-0276 


TONY'S DRIVE-IN 
RESTAURANT 

A Friendly Place To Eat 
Dayton, Tennessee 


THE THRIFT STORE 

> 

Dayton's Most Modern and 

Complete Department Store 

Phone 775-9414 Dayton 


FAMILY SHOE CENTER 

Shoes for the Entire Family 

Market Street 
775-2937 Dayton 


JOHNSON HARDWARE COMPANY 

Dayton, Tennessee 


CONNER'S SUPERMARKET 
Dayton, Tennessee 


MORGAN FURNITURE COMPANY 

RJiea County's Largest Display of 

Home Fumisnings 

EstabUsned 1909 

Phone 775-0313 Dayton, Tenn. 


DAYTONA CAFETERIA 

122 East 2nd Avenue 
Home of Southern Fried Chicken 

Purser and Fine Dayton 


ALLEN PHILLIPS' JEWELRY 

Expert Watcii Repair 
Diamonds - Watches 

Dayton and Spring City 


SUNSHINE CENTER 

Coin-Operated Laundry & Dry Cleaners 

W. 1st Ave. 775-9973 

Hugh and Nina Wright Dayton 


Compliments of 
DELUXE CLEANERS 

Dayton Tennessee 

137 


SUBURBAN MANUFACTURING 
COMPANY 

Manufacturers of Gas Furnaces 

P.O. Box .^99 l)ayl()n,Tcnn. 37321 
Area Code 6 1 5 Telepiione 775-2 1 3 1 



L & M JEWEL BOX 

Gifts Diamonds Watcnes 
Watch Repair & Engraving 

Phone 775-2013 



Buick - Opel - Oldsniobile 
BORDER MOTOR COMPANY 

Highway 27 South 

Dayton, Tennessee 

Phone 775-2260 



MANSFIELD'S COFFEE SHOP 

"We Are Proud To Be a Neighbor of 

Bryan College" 

Polly, Butch, Peggy, Bernie 

Downtown Dayton 



CARY & WEST CO. 

Firestone Dealer 

Phone 775-1545 Dayton, Tenn. 



Compliments of 
KAYSER ROTH HOSIERY CO. 

Dayton, Tennessee 



H. J. Shelton Phone: 775-2414 

Compliments of 

SHELTONS' 

LETTER SHOP 

Engraving • Commercial Printing 

128 E. Second Ave. Dayton, Tennessee 



ROBINETTE MOTEL 

Wall-To-Wall Carpet - Free Television 
Air Conditioned - Phones in Rooms 

77 5-97 1 7 Highway 27 South 

Dayton, Tennessee 



EDD MORGAN AGENCY 

Insurance & Real Estate 

Box 190, Dayton, Tennessee 
775-9311 



THE COTTON SHOP 

Complete Line for the College Gal 

Phone 775-191 1 Dayton, Tenn. 



Comphments of 
DAYTON MEN'S SHOP 

Ray Cooley 

775-1233 



PURSER CLOTHING STORE 

Shoes and Apparel 
for the Entire Family 



775-9757 



Market Street 



FAMILY SHOE CENTER 

Shoes for the Entire Family 

Market Street 



775-2937 



Dayton 



Compliments of 

PRUETT'S FOOD TOWN 

Dayton (No. 4) and Daisy (No. 3) 




FORD 



BEARD-WALTERS FORD 



Hwy 27 South 
Phone 775-1811 



Dayton 
Tennessee 



138 



Compliments of 
EAST-TENN. AMERICAN, INC. 

Dayton, Tennessee 



Reward 

For Attempts To Make Bryan 
A Great Mental Institution 




Upper East Tennessee Chapter 
Bryan College Alumni Association 

( 1 ) By monthly meetings (even though half the gang has to drive 

over 160 miles). 

(2) By disregarding ROBERT'S RULES OF ORDER in favor of 

railroading tactics. 

(3) By giving regularly each month. 

(4) By originating worthwhile projects: 

Audio-Visual Aids: projectors, screens, records, filmstrips $1000 

Science Equipment: balances, lenses, autoclave 1223 

Library books, periodicals, bookcases 1729 

Gifts forTlic King 359 

Commoner advertisements 120 

Alumni graduate study loan program 400 

Stock for endowment fund 1000 

Newspaper subscrijjtions for dorms 44 

Bani|iRls honoring Bryan personnel 587 

Stii(k-nt loa.i fund 100 

Alinnni field representative support 1300 

f'oreign Missions Icllowsliip luiid 50 

Volleyh.ill •.liiiHJ.uds 150 

( lia|)el livinii hook racks 100 

Bryan pl:ii (iii.iis 413 

Misrcll.iiicoils 496 

iiiirU-eii-year(,r;nMl I .,t;il $9,071 




DAYTON BANK AND 
TRUST COMPANY 



A Full Service Bank 



Member of Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 



Two Offices to Serve You 



140 



First United Methodist Church 




"The Church That Cares" 
Soutli Market Street, Dayton 



Rev. Mitchell O. Pettus, Pastor 
Mr. William Boyd, Music Director 



Dr. S. E. Nichols, Adm. Bd. Chmn. 
Mrs. James A. Henry, Secretary 



^^Me, a Byran grad, 

a foreign missionary 
in the U.S.A.?" 



For information regarding 
staff positions, contact: 



YES. You can join hands with those who already 
are proclaiming the gospel message among the 
200,000 foreign students in America. In addition, 
businessmen, tourists, diplomatic personnel, and 
military trainees swell this unique mission field to 
more than five million internationals who are in 
the U.S.A. each year. 

* These foreign visitors come from more 
than 170 nations. 

* They speak English. 

* They are eager to make friends, for they 
want to learn all they can about Americans, 
including their spiritual values. 



International 

2109 E StrMt, N.W. 



Students, Inc. 

Washington, D.C. 20037 



SALE CREEK, 

PRESBYTERIAN 

CHURCH 



Wants to Say "Thank You" to All 
tlie Bryanites Who Have Supported 

tiie Services This Past Year. 
Your Fellowship Has Been Heart- 
Warming 

Charles Westgate, Pastor 
Tom Ashworth, Ministor of Music 

Sunday School - 9:45 A.M. 
Morning Worship - 1 1 :00 A.M. 
Youth Fellowship - 6:30 P.M. 
Evening Worship - 7:30 P.M. 

We Invite You to Worship witJi Us. 




FIRST NATIONAL COUNTY BANK 

From a Five-Year-Old to a Forty-Year-Old — Congratulations 




105 W. Rhea Ave. - SPRING CITY, TENN. 






99 W. Main St. - DAYTON, TENN. 




Rhea County's Only National Bank 



142 




Mrs. Mildred Sharon 




Mrs. Almeda Slaten 




Mrs. Anna Mae Byerley 



Professional Food - 
Service Management 



Mr. George R. Hall 
Manager 




ic'''^^'^-"s^>'- 




Cumberland 
Presbyterian Church 



R. Allan Killen, Pastor 
Dayton, Tennessee 



143 



First Baptist Church 

Dayton, Tennessee 

Hay den D. Center, Pastor 

L. Donald Hill, Minister of Music 

Order of Services 



Sunday School 
Morning Worship 
Training Union 
Evening Worship 
Prayer Meetings 
Wednesdays 



9:45 A.M. 

11:00 A.M. 

6:30 P.M. 

7:30 P.M. 

7:30 P.M. 



For the Local News Read 

THE DAYTON HERALD 

Read All the News of Rhea County 

Phone 775-1313 



CompUments of 



Sequatchie Coca-Cola 
Bottling Company, Inc. 



P.O. Box 335 
Dunlap, Tenn. 37327 



FARMERS' CO-OP 

Seed Feed Fertilizer Tires 
233 S. Market St. 775-2484 



RHEA EQUIPMENT CO. 

West 3rd Avenue 775-9646 

Dayton, Tennessee 37321 

Farmall Equipment, International Trucks 

Pontiac Sales and Service 



BISHOP & PURSER FEED CO. 

Fertilizers, Feeds, Groceries, and Meats 

775-1171 Railroad St. 



SUPERIOR SUPPLY COMPANY 

All Types of Building Materials 
775-2054 N. Railroad St. 



McPHEETERS INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 

"Your Partner in Security" 

120 W. 3rd Ave., Dayton, Tenn. 
Phone 775-2722 



SHIRLEY'S 5<^ TO S5.00 STORE 

Fabric and Rug Center 

Phone 775-1464 Phone 775-0455 

Dayton, Tennessee 



LOOKOUT SPORTING GOODS 

Specialist in Sports 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 

719 Cherry Street 

265-3464 



HY-WAY GARDENS 
Flowers and Gifts 



Hotel Aqua Building 
West Mam Street 



Phone 775-0626 
Dayton, Tenn. 




'Robinson's is YOUR kind oi place!" 



"^s^ 



I'll. Hit- 775-1611 



Dayton, Tennessee 



lis 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



Adams, Melody 

Route 1 

Sale Creek, Tennessee 37373 

Adams, Sharon (Mrs.) 

, 1255 Duane Road 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 37405 

Alvis, Shirley 

9260 Old Plank Road 
Jacksonville, Florida 32220 

Armentrout, Jeanette 

419 Kerfoot Avenue 

Front Royal, Virginia 22630 

Bacon, Anita 

Rt. 18 MeadowTun Lane 
Knoxville, Tennessee 37914 

Ballard, Byron 

Route 2 

Trenton, Georgia 30752 

Bane, Charles 

121 North Ridge 
Rockwood, Tennessee 37854 

Banfieid, Paul 

12670 Buckeye Drive 

Chesterland, Ohio 44026 

Barker, Ralph 

310 West Main Street 

Wyanet, Illinois 61379 

Baughman, Alan 

JAARS, Box 248 

Waxhaw. North Carolina 28173 

Baughman, Loren 
JAARS, Box 248 
Waxhaw, North Carohna 28173 

Beckwith, Darlene 
Emmalena, Kentucky 41740 

Bell, Vicki 

1842 Dorrie Lane 
Memphis, Tennessee 38117 

Bell, Randall 

3204 N.E. 8 Ct. No. 4 
Pompano Beach, Florida 3 3062 

Bellamy, Cheri 

p. O. Box 473 
Dahlonega, Georgia 30533 

Berwager, Ned 

Route I 

Hanover, Pennsylvania 17331 

Bieber, Linda 

403 East Fifth Street 
Muscatine, Iowa 52761 

Birch, Nancy 
610 South Market 
Dayton, Tennessee 37321 

Bishop, Paul 

315 Gillespie Road 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 37411 

Blake, Connie 

Route 2 

Strawberry Plains. Tennessee 37871 

Bodlien, Dennis 

81 17 Woodview Road 
Ellicott City, Maryland 2 1043 

Boeddeker, Elizabeth 
8427 Midland Boulevard 
St. Louis, Missouri 63121 

Boeddeker, Tim 

8427 Midland Boulevard 
St. Louis, Missouri 63121 

Boggs, Barton 

R. D. 4 

Butler, Pennsylvania 16001 

Bouchard, David 

8 Milk Street 

Fort Fairfield, Maine D4742 

Bradshaw, Richard 

Route i 

Avella, Pennsylvania 15312 

Brickell, Robert 

6502 Shallowford Road, Rt 7 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 37421 

Brodsky, Karen 

Box 1 I 

Fincastle, Virginia 24090 

Broughton, Bethany 

Route 1 

Soddy. Tennessee 37379 



Broughton, Judy 

Route 1 

Soddy. Tennessee 37379 

Broughton, Marcia 
1115 Lucille Street 
Irving, Texas 75060 

Brown, Margaret 

Box 598 

Kisumu, Kenya, Africa 

Buckles, Ken 

P. Q. Box 586 
Griffin, Georgia 30223 

Byerley, David 

Route 1 

Dayton, Tennessee 37321 

Chaplin, William 

6130 W. 40th, Apt. 12 
Denver, Colorado 80033 

Chappell, Carvis 

405 18 Avenue East 
Cordele, Georgia 31015 

Dark, Charlotte 

912 North Rebecca Place 

Peoria, Illinois 61606 

Qark, Elizabeth 

629 Jersey Street 
Erwin, Tennessee 37650 

Cochran, Delano 

South Market Street 
Dayton, Tennessee 37321 

Collins, Dan 

Route 8, Box 240 
Lakeland, Florida 33803 

Collins, Martin 

Route 1 

Dayton, Tennessee 37321 

Combs, Bertha 

RR. 3, Box 368 

West Alexandria, Ohio 45381 

Conrad, Beckie 

Mount Hermon, Landour 

Mussoorie, U. P., India 

Cook, Darlene 

19 Avenue East 

Latrobe, Pennsylvania 15650 

Cook, Gail 

7984 Ronson Avenue 
Jenison, Michigan 49428 

Cook, John 

4723 - 24th Avenue South 
St. Petersburg, Florida 337 1 1 

Coulter, Curtis 

Leggett Road 

Sale Creek, Tennessee 37373 

Cowden, Carol 

804 North Market Street 
Dayton, Tennessee 37321 

Cramer, Stephen 

]03Woodley Avenue 
Findlay.Ohio 45840 

Crandall, Marilyn 

2725 1 1th Avenue West 
Bradenton, Florida 33505 

Crawford, Anne 

Box 248. JAARS 

Waxhaw, North Carolina 28173 

Crooks, William 

1080 Montgomery Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21227 

Crosbie, Jane 

1608 Doris Street 
Neptune, New Jersey 07753 

Crosbie, June 

1608 Doris Street 
Neptune, New Jersey 07753 

Cvacho, Daniel 

3427 Cooper Road 
Richmond, Virginia 23225 

Cvacho, Judy (Mrs.) 

3427 Cooper Road 
Richmond, Virginia 23225 

Daigneault, Lucien 
Route I. Box 116 
Meadow Bridge, West Virginia 25976 



Daigneault, Violet (Mrs.) 

Route 1, Box 1 16 

Meadow Bridge, West Virginia 25976 

Danielson, Edward 

451 1 Larch Street 

San Diego. California 92105 

Davies, Margaret 

1241 NE 129th Street 
Miami, Florida 33161 

Davis, Larry 

2334 Stair 

Detroit, Michigan 48209 

Decker, Janice 

205 North Baird Lane 
Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37 1 30 

De Groot, Marsha 

615 Briarcliff Road 

Warner Robins. Georgia 31093 

Di Prima, Paola 

4528 St. Urbain Street 
Montreal, Quebec, Canada 

Duong, Van Thanh 
86 Irieu Quang Phuc 
Saigon, Vietnam 

Durham, Patricia 
381 1 Regent Avenue 
Norwood, Ohio 45212 

Edwards, John 

720 Washington Street 

Ironton, Ohio 45638 

Edwards, Rebecca 

101 1 - 37th Street West 
Bradenton, Florida 33505 

Eisenhower, Steven 
60S Shamokin Street 
Trevorton, Pennsylvania 17881 

Estabrook, Cheryl (Mrs) 

630 Jackson 
Muscatine, Iowa 52761 

Estabrook, Robert 

630 Jackson 
Muscatine, Iowa 52761 

Everett, Sue 

1305 Virginia Avenue 

Knoxville, Tennessee 37921 

Fellman, Barbara 

71 1 Shaw Avenue 

Lansdale, Pennsylvania 19446 

Ferguson, Brent 

Route 2 

Trenton, Georgia 30752 

Ferguson, Margaret 

P. O. Box 268 

Augusta, Montana 59410 

Fisher, Charlotte (Mrs.) 

110 East Florida Avenue 
Dayton, Tennessee 37321 

Folden, Robert 

171 1 South 102nd Street 
Tacoma, Washington 98444 

Fortune, John 

1402 Thomas Avenue 
Charlotte, North Carolina 28205 

Frank LeRoy 

1922 Broadview Court 
Cleveland, Ohio 44109 

Fritts, Edward 

Route 3, Box 194 
Harriman, Tennessee 37748 

Fulmer, Ann 

5904 Kingsford Road, Apt. E 
Springfield, Virginia 22152 

Gaehring, Charles 

Taunton Road 

Medford, New Jersey 08069 

Garrett. Wynn Ann 

180 NW 1 1 1 Street 
Miami, Florida 33168 

Gassman, Doreen 
22 1 1 Paris Avenue 
Paris, Ohio 44669 

Georgianni, Suzann (Mrs.) 

65 5 6 SW 2 3 Street 
Miami, Florida 33155 

Geesey, Karl 

6J Maddox Drive NE 

Atlanta, Georgia 30309 



146 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



Gibson, Dale 

Maple Street 

Cloverdale. Virginia 24077 

Gibson, Sandy 
6:0 Willow Street 
Ejlanger, Kentucky 41018 

Giesel, Dave 

6203 Brookgreen Road 

Orlando. Florida 32S09 

Goatley, Jeanine 

Bryan College 

Dayton. Tennessee 37321 

Gray, Marion 

6126 Biscayne Drive 
Forest Park. Georgia 30050 

Gregory, Steve 

4841 Grandview Drive 
Ypsilanti. Michigan 48207 

Griffith, Mai(;ia 

302-2 Mosby Place 
Fort Riley. Kansas 66442 

Griffith, Steve 
1301 Bel-.\ire Drive 
Tullahoma, Tennessee 37388 

Griswold. Gilda 
6300 Coral Way 
Miami. Florida 331SS 

Gunn, Bonita 

R. R. 3 

Wadena, Minnesota 56482 

Guy, Maiy Lou 

Route I. Box I 12 
Pearland. Texas 77581 

Hakes, Mary Helen 

Southland Bible Institute 
Pikeville. Kentucky 41501 

Hamilton, Gail 

Box 18, Pearl Street 
Greenhurst. New York 14742 

Hammond, Kathlynn 
9869 Sunny Lane 
Streetsboro, Ohio 44240 

Harbin, Terry 

2883 Arrowood Drive 
East Point. Georgia 30344 

Harris, Eva 
Route 1. Box 366 
Dayton, Tennessee 3732 1 

Harris, Harold 

Route I 

Evensville. Tennessee 37332 

Harris, Sandra 

331 South Lewis Street 

Bloomfield. Indiana 47424 

Harrow, Roy 

69 McDaniel Drive, Kent Acres 

Dover. Delaware 19901 

Harthan, Stephen 

Route 1 

Cohasset. Minnesota SS721 

Haught, David 
91 3 South Main 
Parit. Illinou 61944 

Hawkins, EUen 

133 Magnolia Boulevard 

New Orleans, Louisiana 70123 

Hayes, .Mae 

P.O. Box 212 

Central. South Carolina 29630 

Hays, Carolyn (Mrs.) 

2725 l-.lcvcnlh Avenue We»l 
Hridenlon. Plorida 33505 

Hayward, Paul 

140 JanKt Street 

Fcedint HllU. Mauachusells 01030 

Healh, Frank 

»I2 7lh Street 

Merrill ItUnd. I-I'irida 32952 

Hedlund. Kuberl 
Oalci 
0>c(on 97)46 

Henderion, Annette 
I 107 N'rtlh Miin Sl>««l 
CroMvdle. tcnncttce J8555 

Mendervm, Stephen 
1307 N<»lh Main SIml 
Crm«vlll«. Tenn<%«*f 30S5S 



Henry, Dale 

2743 Bender Avenue 
Akron, Ohio 44319 

Henry, Liz (Mrs.) 

no Bruce Street 
Sevierville. Tennessee 37862 

Herlong, Janet 

6890 Winged Foot Drive 
Hialeah. Florida 33014 

Hesterly, Peggy 

412 North Whitted Street 
Hendersonville. North Carolina 28739 

Higgins, Naomi 

122 West 7th Street 
Dayton. Tennessee 37321 

Hill, Patricia 

Rt. 18. Oak Ridge Hwy. 

Knoxville, Tennessee 37921 

HiU, Terry 

ON301 Winfield Road 

Winfield, Illinois 60190 

HiU, Warren 

Route 2 

Dayton, Tennessee 37 321 

Hines, Rebecca 

Route 4. Shingle Road 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 37409 

Hippie, George 

250 Irving Street 

Honesdale, Pennsylvania 18431 

Hoang, Miranda 

248 F/Nhan-Vi Street 
Choion, Vietnam 

Hobbs, Daniel 

31 1 Green Avenue 

Carney's Point. New Jersey 08069 

Hodges, Jane Ellen 

610 South Market Street 
Dayton. Tennessee 37321 

Hogan, Rebecca 

1 1 1 Academy Street 

Berryhill. Virginia 2261 1 

HoUeman, Betty 

121 Chichester Avenue 
Hampton, Virginia 23369 

Hopkins, Stanley 

43 Pine Ridge Drive 

Greenville. South Carolina 29605 

Howard, Linda 

314 South Main Street 
Leslie. Michigan 49251 

Howard, Mary 

Route I, Aslinger Road 

Sale Creek. Tennessee 37373 

Hulbert, Esther Ruth 

492 5 Ossco Road 
Minneapolis. Minnesota SS429 

Hutsell, Jack 

Star Route 

Spring City, Tennessee 37381 

Jacobscn, Larry 

3938 West 104th Place 
Chicago. Illinois 60655 

Jenkins, Harold 

Filan 

Virginia 22719 

Jenkins, Judy 

l-arrcll Streel 

Niola. Tennessee 37826 

Jensen, Dennis 
Cooperiiluwn 
North Dakota 58425 

Jcpson, Philip 
3202 I65lh S 1;. 
Ucllcvue. WashlUKlun 98004 

Johanscn, Steve 
H9S7 Kualk Kond 
Richmond, Virginia 23235 

Johnson, Patricia 
5910 S. W, 13 Tcrroce 
Miami. I liirlda 33144 

Jordan, (Jpal 

Tnyliir llllln. Box 512 

Daylon, TonnosMc 37321 



Jones, Martha 

Box 207. Route 3 

Abbeville. South Carolina 29620 

Judson, Ness 

744 Lindegar Street 

Linden, New Jersey 07036 

Judy, Twyla 

Star Route 

Witter, Arkansas 72776 

Karr, Diane 

1020 Casa Drive 
Clarkston, Georgia 30021 

Karvonen, Russell 

67 Viola Road 

Suffern, New York 10901 

Keefer, Thomas 

Route 4 

Martin. Tennessee 38237 

Keeping, Thomas 

10543 Dolecetto Drive 

Rancho Cordova, California 95670 

Kier, Everett 

902 Raeford Avenue 

Lexington. North Carolina 27292 

Kimmel, Timothy 

104 Lakeview Avenue 
Mayo. Maryland 2 1 106 

Kinsey, David 

3222 North Maynoka Circle 
Memphis. Tennessee 38 1 1 1 

Kirby, Mark 

Route 2, Box 800 
Lakeland, Florida 33801 

Riser, C^arlene (Mrs.) 

3249 East 57 
Cleveland, Ohio 44127 

Riser, Reith 

3249 East 57 
Cleveland. Ohio 44127 

Klose, Frank 

R. D. 2 

Nassau. New York 1212 3 

Knapp, Sonia 

33S5 Melody Avenue SW 
Roanoke, Virginia 24018 

Kneisley, Everett 

218 Sunset Drive South 
Johnstown, Ohio 43031 

Rnouse, Joel 

Alto Pass 
Illinois 62905 

Lee, Kim Chi (Mrs.) 

Bryan College 

Dayton. Tennessee 37321 

Leopold, Lynne 

35 Sherwood Drive 
Milford,Ohio 45 150 

Lilley, John 

8325%tanford 

University City, Missouri 63132 

Lindli, James 

208 Harding Street 
Grayslake, Illinois 60030 

Llewellyn, Bob 

Box 100 

Sebring, Florida 33870 

Locke, Rebecca 

916 South Market 
Dayton, Tennessee 37321 

Locy, Raymond 

7306 16th Avenue 

Tiikoma Park. Maryland 20012 

Loftin, Sarah 

Route I 

Maxlon. Ni>rlh Carolina 28.164 

Log.sdon, Darlene 

5677 Haywood Terrace 
Jacksonville. Florida 3221 I 

Lomas, Marion 
2809 Forsyth Road 
Orlando, Florida 32807 

Long, Jane 

175 I.akevlew Drive 

Johnstown. Ohio 43031 

Long, Philip 

175 Lakeview Drive 

Johnstown, Ohio 430.11 



1-17 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



Longnecker, Mark 

R. D. 2 

Orangeville, Pennsylvania 17859 

Loomis, Diane 

South Lee Highway 
Sweetwater, Tennessee 37874 

Lukridge, Joyce 

422 Madison Avenue 

Willow Grove, Pennsylvania 19090 

Mace, Keith 

Box 220 

New Middletown, Ohio 44442 

Main, John 

23939 Forest Park Drive 
Northville, Michigan 48167 

Margene, Tim 

1 323 Vesta Avenue 
Ontario. California 91762 

Mason, Joan 

Chestnut Hill Road 
Chepachet. Rhode Island 02814 

Massengale, Beverly 

Route 1, Box 137 
Dayton, Tennessee 3732 1 

Matthes, Sandra (Mrs.) 

Bryan College, Box 375 
Dayton, Tennessee 3732 1 

McCarrell. Barbara 

28 1 1 Virginia Lane 
Glenview. Illinois 60025 

McCarrell, Beverly 
281 1 Virginia Lane 
Glenview, Illinois 60025 

McCanell. Naomi 

915 Fairmont Avenue 
Cleveland, Tennessee 3731 1 

McCarthy, Clarice 

2221 South 13th Street 
Niles, Michigan 49120 

McCollam, Stephen 

R, D, 1. Box 353 
Wellsville, Ohio 43968 

McCready, Dudley 
Lusby 
Maryland 206S7 

McDavid, Bill 

Box 318 

Harriman, Tennessee 37748 

McDonald, Marsha 

806 Walnut Street 

Monongahela, Pennsylvania 15063 

McFarland, Cathy 

Route 1, Box 136 

Grove City, Pennsylvania 16127 

Mcintosh, Diane 

6421 West 85th Place 
Oak Lawn. Illinois 604S9 

Mclntyre. Roger 

133 Dormie Avenue 

Pretoria, Republic South Africa 

McKee, Bonnie 

R. D. I 

Curwensville, Pennsylvania 16833 

McKemy, Linda 

Route 4 

Lexington, Virginia 24450 

McKinney, Ruth 

Fast Beach, Route 3 

Ocean Springs, Mississippi 39564 

McLeod, Wayne 

2 1 5 Brennen Drive 
Neward. Delaware 19711 

McMillan, Anita (Mrs.) 

Bryan College 

Dayton, Tennessee 37321 

McWilliams, Kathy 
345 Oak Lane 
Decatur, Illinois 62526 

Meberg. Harold 

818 Keniiworth Terrace 
Orlando. Florida 32803 

Meberg, Ted 

818 Keniiworth Terrace 
Orlando, Florida 32803 

Mensch,Kathi 

1204 Spruce Street 
Leavenworth, Kansas 66048 



Mercer, Sheila 

While Horse Road 
Kirkwood, New Jersey 08043 

Miller, Gurney 

1424 Denny Road 

Columbia, South Carolina 29203 

Miller, Randall 
R. D. 2 

Waymont, Pennsylvania 18472 

Miller, Timothy 

74 Ingleside Drive 
Athens, Alabama 3561 1 

Minter, Linda 

302 East Farragut Road 
Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 

Mitchell, Danny 

Lt. 42 Wintergreen Lane 
Mentor. Ohio 44060 

Mitchell, PhylUs 

Route 4, Hammer Road 
Knoxville. Tennessee 37914 

Mollette, Kathy 

P, O. Box 85 

Red Jacket, West Virginia 25692 

Morgan, Paul 

6435 Cabot Avenue 

Norfolk, Virginia 23502 

Morris, Jackie 

11 Parkhurst Avenue 

Greenville, South Carolina 29609 

Mullins, Twilla 

3488 Brinkley Road SE 
Oxon Hill, Maryland, 20031 

Murphey, Kathleen 

151 N. Mozart 
Palatine. Illinois 60067 

Murphey, Timothy 
151 N. Mozart 
Palatine, Illinois 60067 

Murray, Robert 

Foster Avenue 

Sayville, New York 1 1782 

Myers, Connie 

1828 - 1 1th Avenue South 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55404 

Newkirk, Carolyn (Mrs.) 

Route 1 

Beaver Dams. New York 14812 

Newkirk, Richard 

Route 1 

Beaver Dams. New York 14812 

Nicholson, LeRoy 
859 Josephine Avenue 
Latrobe, Pennsylvania 15650 

O'Hail, Lanny 

547 Glendale Boulevard 
Mansfield. Ohio 44907 

Otto, David 

206 Norman Avenue 

Glen Burnie, Maryland 2 1043 

Packard, Roberta 

Route 2, Box 310 
Flagstaff, Arizona 86001 

Page, Christine 

5702 Criner Avenue SE 

Huntsvilie, Alabama 35802 

Parker, Matthew 

265 1 Superior 

Detroit. Michigan 48207 

Patterson, Patricia 

R. D. 2, Box 142 

Grove City, Pennsylvania 16127 

Pearman, Joel 

P. O. Box 346 

Harriman, Tennessee 37748 

Penton, Allen 

140 Grain Road 

Paramus, New Jersey 07652 

Penton, Mysy 

140 Grain Road 

Paramus, New Jersey 07652 

Peterson, Paul 

2324 Woodland Boulevard 
Ft. Myers, Florida 33901 

Pickett, Deborah 

Route 1 

Sale Creek. Tennessee 37373 



Pickett, Martha 

Route 1 

Sale Creek, Tennessee 37373 

Pierce, Donald 

Box 2 3 

Emmalena, Kentucky 41740 

Phillips, Roger 

Route 4 

Parkersburg, West Virginia 26101 

Poole, Joe 

18555 NW 38th Avenue 
Opa Locka, Florida 33059 

Poole, Marilee 

18555 NW 38th Avenue 
Opa Locka, Florida 33059 

Pope, Joan (Mrs.) 

Route 1, Box 210 
Pikeville, Tennessee 37367 

Puckett, Larry 

1 125 Shelby Street 
Bristol, Tennessee 37620 

Puffer, Lynn 

1050 NW 146 Street 
Miami. Florida 33168 

Queener, Charles 

1273 Carolina 

Cleveland, Tennessee 3731 1 

Quigley, Eleanor 

21 Osage Road 

Claymount, Delaware 19703 

Reese, John 
P. O. Box 67 
Crooked Creek, Pennsylvania 16919 

Reeves, Jim 

4151 North Statford 
Atlanta, Georgia 30305 

Remington, Roy 

143 Chautauqua Avenue 
Jamestown, New York 14701 

Revis, Sandra 

Route 3 

Dayton, Tennessee 37321 

Reynolds, Susan 

2805 West 6th 

Little Rock, Arkansas 72205 

Richmond, Cecilia 

4122 Belle Meade Drive 
Roanoke. Virginia 24018 

Rinck, Judy 

R, D. 1. Box 76 
Brookfield.Ohio 44403 

Roach, Doretha 
Route 4. P. O. Box 144 
Hayesville, North Carolina 28904 

Roberts, Dawn 

Route 4. Box 346 
Harriman. Tennessee 37748 

Robinson, Charlotte 
Box 35 

Jacksboro, Tennessee 37757 

Robinson, Bill 

Box 35 

Jacksboro, Tennessee 37757 

Roddy, Steve 

Oak Avenue 
Wyoming. Ohio 45421 

Ross, Mary 

803 Oak Street 

Dayton, Tennessee 3732 1 

Rouse, John 

R. F. D. 1 

Campbell. New York 1482 1 

Rowsey, Drema 

8620 Flame Vine Avenue 
Seminole, Florida 33540 

Rowsey, Vickie 

8620 Flame Vine Avenue 
Seminole, Florida 33540 

Russell, Charles 

5 30 Vinnedge Court 
Fairfield, Ohio 45014 

Saade, Philip 

29 Justinian 
Beirut, Lebanon 

Sailers, Miriam 

2194 Newnan Street 
East Point, Georgia 30344 



148 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



Sanford, Stephen 

Casilla 2361 
Quito. Ecuador 

Sasnett, Denise 

Box 284 

Waxhaw, Norlh Carolina 28173 

Saylor. Charlene 

351 Hunting Lodge Drive 

Miami Springs, Florida 33166 

Schroeder, Jenness 
45! Sixth Street 
Marysville. Michigan 4S040 

Schuessler, Helen 
60 Lincoln Place 
East Rutherford. New Jersey 07073 

Scott, Jane 

Box 105 

Gra\sville, Tennessee 37338 

Sells, George 

Route i 

Soddy, Tennessee 37379 

Senter. Betsy 

9 East Circle Avenue 

Greenville. South Carolina 29607 

Shaffer. Jessica 
1442 Bugle Lane 
Clean-vater. Florida 335 16 

Shakespeare. Donald 

Box 538. Rt. 2. Merror Road 

Lansdale. Pennsylvania 19445 

Shamel, Gary 

1425 West Bristol Road 
Flint. Michigan 48507 

Shaver, Thomas 

Route 1 

Dayton, Tennessee 37321 

Sheddan, Frank 

Bryan College 

Dayton. Tennessee 3732 1 

Shelley, Bryan 

67 Rash Road 

Asheville. North Carolina 28806 

Shumaker. Bonnie 

Box 129 

Northumberland, Pennsylvania 17857 

Silva, Daniel 

P. O. Box 173 

Soddy. Tennessee 37379 

Simpson, Lee 

Route I . Box 100 
Wellborn, Florida 32094 

Sims, Leslie 

52 Denbigh Boulevard 
Denbigh, Virginia 23602 

Slallery. Laura (Mrs.) 

Dayton 

Tennessee 3732 1 

Smith, Betty 

123 South Montreal 

Dalla*. Texas 75208 

Smith. David 

5 3 F.ast Avenue 

Hackcttsiown. New Jersey 07840 

Smith, Diane (Mrs.) 

53 F-as! Avenue 
Hackeltttown. New Jersey 07840 

Smith, Douglas 

37 15 Norlh Ncwtaslle 
Chn.afif>. Illinois 60634 

Snyder. Mary Ann (Mrs.) 
120& Gram Sirecl 
Akron, Oh»o 

Steveni. Lynne 

260J fJnir>n Avenue 
Memphu. Tenncitcc 38 I I 2 

Strward. UJy 

f'ljremonl. Liindour 
Mu%VHjfic, V. P., India 

Slrw9rt, Mafcy 

30) h4%l Or«n(r Street 

Lake Alfred. tUttid* 33ft50 

SlinncK, Alexia 
M'.ulr J. Hot 2 15 
h*rtitn. TcnnctMc J732 I 

Sl/mc, Paul 

to Tuwulum Rotid 

AnKoch. Tennru«e .170(3 



Stone, Rosemary 

P. O. Box 107 

St. Albans. West Virginia 25177 

Straley, Kevin 
1829 South Rundle 
Lansing, Michigan 489 10 

Stroupe, Pamela 

Box US 

Killarney. Manitoba, Canada 

Summers. Eugene 
1014 West 12th Street 
Huntington. West Virginia 25704 

Summers, Laurel (Mrs.) 
1014 West 12th Street 
Huntington. West Virginia 25704 

Suzuki, Reiko 

I 16 Ta Kabayaski Cho, Hamatsu 

Shizuoka Ken. Japan 

Tallent, Bobbie Jean (Mrs.) 

206 East Main Street 
Dayton, Tennessee 37321 

Tallent, Bobby 

206 East Main Street 

Dayton, Tennessee 37321 

Terwilliger, Carol 

Fairground Road 
Angelica. New York 14709 

Thompson, Ronnie 
537 Greenwood Drive 
Rockwood. Tennessee 37854 

Trinh, Peter (Bich Due) 
P. O. Box 939 
Saigon, Vietnam 

Triplett, Judy 

4735 - 4th Avenue North 
St. Petersburg, Florida 33713 

Trivette, Johnnie 

2700 North Roan Street 
Johnson City, Tennessee 37601 

Turner, Joyce 
11706 Leona Street 
Wheaton, Maryland 20902 

Tumey, Ben 

601 Conrad Avenue 

North Charleroi. Pennsylvania 15022 

Underwood, Dennis 

P. O, Box 696 

Harriman. Tennessee 37748 

Van Puffelen, Darlene 
Appalachian Bible Institute 
Bradley, West Virginia 25818 

Van Sice, Barbara 
158 West Main Street 
Elklon, Maryland 21921 

Van Soest, Rick 

Route 1. Box I lOV 
Gilbert, Minnesota S5741 

Varga, Georgia (Mrs.) 

Box 34 

Sully. Iowa 5025 1 

Vaugtm, Douglas 

Susqueh.inna Avenue 
Curwensville. Pennsylvania 16833 

Veon, Roderick 

Route 2 

Darlington, Pennsylvania 1 6 I I S 

Vieldhou.sc, Kenneth 

i', O, Box 317 

I'ollslown. Pennsylvania 19464 

Vincent, Jim 

I 1 ^ Tnnjly 

Utitkwood. Tennessee 37854 

Wallers. Carol 

4 lorbes SlfCL't 

Annapolis, Maryl.ind 2I4U1 

Wallon, Juanita 
Kouic 2, l((fx I IH D 
Powhalun, Virttinia 2 313*' 

Wang, Grace 

55 Montt BiiiiK SirccI 

Choloii (Silicon), Snulti Viclii.ini 

Warwick, Marilyn 

3460 N I , 17lh Tcrriiif 

II. Ijiudcrfhtlc, I ImiiiLi .1 I.iok 

Weld. Linda 

1114 I'lLrvc Koiul 
LnrulMK. MkhlKiiM 4891 



Welton, Marilyn 

R. D- 6 

Mercer. Pennsylvania 16137 

Wentworth, Peggy 

R. R. 3. Box 104 

New London. Wisconsin 54961 

Wicks, La Verne 
2055 Maraville Circle 
Ft. Myers. Florida 33901 

Wikoff, Brenda 
8684 Antrim Court 
Cincinnati. Ohio 45236 

Willcox, Mary Lee 
129th NW97th Street 
Miami, Florida 33150 

Willis, Beth 

1200 Davidson Road 
Nashville, Tennessee 37205 

Wilson, Bill 

9421 - 17th Avenue NW 

Bradenton. Florida 33505 

Wilson, Craig 

7965 Lonnvicw 
Brecksville, Ohio 44141 

Winkler, Annette 

Bryan College 

Dayton, Tennessee 37321 

Wipplinger, Kathy 
33 (Tlearview Drive 
Jamison, Pennsylvania 18920 

Wolfe, David 

1 1 17 Lexington Street 

Wheaton, Illinois 60187 

Wolfe. Mitch 
1916 Kirkland 
Waycross. Georgia 31501 

Wright, Daniel 

110 East Wells 

Pennsboro. West Virginia 26415 

Wylie, Gerald 

824 Shady Lane 

Traverse Cily. Michigan 49428 

Wyllie. John 

8131 Panola Street 

New Orleans, Louisiana 701 18 

Wyman, Mark 

702 - 29th Street West 

Bradenton. Florida 33505 

Yates, Alice 

4509 East Shaffer Road, Rl. I 

Midland. Michigan 48640 

Yoder, Terry 

R R 1 

West Liberty. Ohio 43357 

Young, John 

4616 Brodhcad Rojd 

Aliquippj, Pennsylvania 15001 

Young, Patricia 
710 West Garro 
Plymouth, Indiana 46563 

Zickcfoosc, Marsha 
2159 l-'.wall Avenue 
Warren, Ohio 44483 

Zollinger, Robert 
Laurelbrook School 
Dayton, Tennessee 37321 



149 



Events Index 



ACCREDITATION 30-33 
ALL-SCHOOL PICNIC 44,45 
ALUMNI CONFERENCE 53 
AMAHL PRESENTATION 60 
BASKETBALL 86-91 
BIBLE CONFERENCE 61 
CEREMONY OF THE CAROLS 60 
CHRISTMAS BANQUET 58,59 
COLLEGE-FOR-A-DAY 55 
CROSS COUNTRY 82-85 



FALL DAY OF PRAYER 41 
FINE ARTS TRIP 46.47 
HALLOWEEN PARTY 56,57 
HILLTOP SINGERS CONCERT 74 
HOMECOMING 48-51 
MISSIONARY CONFERENCE 52 
PRESIDENT'S RECEPTION 42,43 
SOCCER 78-81 

SWEETHEART BANQUET 62,63 
VIETNAM DISCUSSION DAY 54 



Student Index 



Adams, Melody 113 

Alvis, Shirley 25,113 

Armentrout, Jeanette 30,113 

Bacon, Anita 60,113,127 

Ballard, Byron 40,48,49,50,51,56,64, 

113,122,127 
Bane, Charles 113 
Banfield, Paul 113 
Barker, Ralph 40,113 
Baughman, Alan 61,113 
Baughman, Loren 12,22,34,41,58,60,113, 

126,133 
Beckwith, Darlene 30,60,113,124,126 
Bell, Randall 24,53,107,122 
Bell, Vicki 48,1 13,1 27,133 
Berwager, Ned 3,58,60,67,113,126 
Bieber, Linda 12,40,64,69,113 
Birch, Nancy 48,49,50,51,106,107,124 
Bishop, Paul 34,113,122,125,126,160 
Blake, Connie 68,113,122 
Bodlien, Dennis 34,60,113,126 
Boeddeker, Elizabeth 113 
Boeddeker, Tim 113 
Hoggs, Barton 28,30,44,1 1 3,1 25,1 29 
Bouchard, David 11,113 
Bradshaw, Richard 9,34,113,126,137 
Brickell, Robert 113 
Brodsky, Karen 22,113 
Broughton, Beth 40,113 
Broughton, Judy 40,107 
Broughton, Marcia 59,60,113,127 
Buckles, Ken 113 
Chaplin, William 27,62,80,93,107,122, 

125,128 
Chappell, Carvis 107,160 
Clark, Charlotte 39,43,113 
Clark, Elizabeth 1 1 3 
Collins, Danny 107 
CoUins, Marty 113,126 
Combs, Bertha 60,1 13,1 23 
Conrad, Beckie 18,34,114,124,126,154,160 
Cook, Darlene 11,48,49,51,60,112,114, 

126,127,133 
Cook, Gail 60,114,127,154 
Cook, John 114 



Cotton, Gary 114 

Coulter, Curtis 107 

Cowden, Carol 89,114,126 

Cramer, Stephen 47,107 

Crandall, Marilyn 25,34,107,126,127,156 

Crawford, Anne 48,1 14 

Crooks, William 107 

Crosbie, June 53,60,107,126 

Cavcho, Dan 89,107 

Cvacho,Judy 89,114 

Daigneault, Lucien 114 

Daigneault, Violet 114 

Danielson, Edward 107 

Davies, Margaret 40,60,114,127,133 

Davis, Larry 41,60,114,123,126,127,130 

Decker, Janice 34,39,48,114,126 

DeGroot, Marsha 24,60,114,127 

DiPrima, Paola 30,60,114,127,133 

Durham, Pat 64,69,107,127 

Edwards, John 89,114 

Edwards, Rebecca 114,133 

Eisenhower, Steven 114,133 

Estabrook, Cheryl 114 

Estabrook, Robert 107 

Everett, Sue 53,69,108 

Ferguson, Brent 48,60,92,114,126,133 

Ferguson, Margaret 53,108,123,126 

Folden, Robert 108 

Fortune, John 112,114,124,156 

Frank, Leroy 64,108,123 

Fritts, Edward 112,114,122 

Fulmer, Ann 20,60,114,124,126,127 

Gaehring, Charles 18,108,125 

Garrett, Wynn Ann 68,108,123 

Gassman, Doreen 14,101,108 

Geesey, Karl 108 

Georgianni, Suzann 1 14 

Gibson, Dale 34,67,78,79,80,93,114, 

125,128,129 
Gibson, Sandra 10,92,114 
Giesel, David 114 
Goatley, Jeanine 45,60,114,126 
Gray, Marion 15,74,112,115,133 
Gregory, Steve 30,58,60,65,77,115,126 
Griffith, Marcia 115 



Griffith, Steve 22,74,1 15,1 26,1 28,1 33 

Griswold, Gilda 4,34,58,115 

Gunn, Bonita 106,108 

Guy, Mary Lou 61,1 15,156 

Hakes, Mary Helen 115,127 

Hamilton, GaU 15,38,48,49,51,60.66,68, 

91,115,124,125,126 
Hammond, Kathlyn 69,107 
Harbin, Terry 25,115 
Harris, Eva 64,108 
Harris, Harold 115 
Harris, Sandra 42,60,115,127 
Harrow, Roy 53,60,62,108,123,125,126 
Harthan, Stephen 108 
Haught, David 53,81,88,106,108,122,128 
Hawkins, EUen 48,49,51,91,115 
Hayes, Maye 48,49,51,58,1 12,115,123 
Hays, Carolyn 64,108 
Hayward, Paul 16,60,115,126,128 
Heath, Frank 109 
Hedlund, Robert 109 
Henderson, Annette 115,133 
Henderson, Steve 10,109,123,126 
Henry, Dale 21,60,115,126 
Herlong, Janet 115 
Hester ley, Peggy 65,115 
Higgins, Naomi 109 
HiU, Patricia 58,115,133 
Hill, Terry 60,93,115,126,127,129 
Hill, Warren 86,89,93,109.125,129 
Hines, Rebecca 22,41,62,115 
Hippie, George 9,34,1 15,1 26 
Hobbs, Daniel 115,129,133 
Hodges, Jane Ellen 36,109,122 
Hogan, Rebecca 10,60,115,123,126 
HoUeman. Betty 115 
Hopkins, Stanley 115,128 
Howard, Linda 90,115 
Howard, Mary 18,116,122,158 
Hulbert, Esther 42,67,1 16 
Jacobsen, Lawrence 55,78,81,116,123, 

125,128,156 
Jenkins, Harold 37,109,122,160 
Jenkins, Judy 60,109 
Jepson, Philip 27,58,109,128 



150 



Johansen. Stephen 63.92.1 16.1 28 

Johnson. Patricia 116 

Jones, Manha 25.29.48.51.91.116.124 

Judson. Ness 80.116.128 

Judy.Twyla 116.160 

Karr, Diane 116.123.127,156 

Kaivonen. RusseU 45.64.83.84.109,125,128 

Keefer, Thomas 20.37,48.49,109,122 

Keeping, Thomas 30,116,155 

Kier. Everett 15.39,48,92,116,122,128 

Kimmel, Timothy 34,80,116,122,124,125, 

126,128 
Kinsey, David 48,1 16 
Kirby, Mark 44,48.65,68,1 16,156 
Kjser, Charlene 88,116 
Kiser. Keith 88.106.109 
Klose. Frank 10.53.68.81.109 
Knapp, Sonia 22.116 
Kneisley. Eddie 16.48,116 
Knouse. Joel 116 
Lee, Kim Chi 72 
Leopold. Lynne 22,65,76,116 
Lilley, John 16,116,128 
Lin dh, James 34,60,69,116,126 
LleweUyn, Robert 109 
Locke, Rebecca 116 
Locy, Raymond 34.60,69,116.126,128, 

129.133 
Loftin. Sarah 39,116,123,133,135 
Logsdon. Darlene 20,58,116,133 
Lomas. Marion 1 16.1 27 
Long, Jane 53.57,60,64,109,127 
Long, PhU 10,86,87,90.116,129 
Longnecker, Mark 25,66,116,122,154 
Loomis, Diane 25,53,69,117 
Lukridge, Joyce 110 
.Mace, Keith 93,1 17 
Main, John 19,58,60,117.126 
.Margene, Tim 48,63,86,87,88,89,90,1 10, 

125,129 
.Mason, Joan 30,93,117,133 
.Masscngalc, Beverly 1 10 
Matthes. Sandra 34,58,127 
McCarrell, Barbara 38,11 7,1 27 
.McCarrell, Beverly 110 
McCanell, Naomi 1 1 7 
McCarthy. Clarice 34,42,60.110,126 
McCoUam, Stephen 1 1 7,1 28,1 33 
McCrcady, Dudley 48,49,60,1 1 7,1 26 
McDavid. Bill 25,117 
Mcfarland, Catherine 53,69,1 10,1 23 
Mcintosh, Diane 48,91, 11 7, 1 33 
Mclnlyrc. Roger 110 
McKce, Bonnie 1 I 7 
McKcmy, Linda 44.48,1 17,1 33,135 
McKlnncy.Ruth 112,117 
McUod. Wayne 117,129 
McMillan, Anila 60,113,127 
.McWilliamv Kathcrine 60.77.1 17,1 27 
Mcbcrg, Ha/old 92,1 17 
Mcbcrg. Tcd6,ll7 
Mcntch. Kalhi 117 
Miller, fiurncy 117.122.123,126 
Miller, Randall 12,59,110 
Miller. Tim 117.129,133 
Minlcf. Linda 34.40,60.1 1 7.1 26,1 27 
Mitchell. Danny 117 



MitcheU, Phyllis 30.38.48.49.60.93 

117,126,127 
Mollette, Kathy 117 
Morgan, Paul 43,76.78,80,92,1 1 2,1 1 7, 

125,128,129,133 
Morris, Jackie 1 10 
Mullins, TwUla 117 
Murphey, Kathleen 117 

Murphey, Timothy 117,122,125,128,129,133 
Murray, Robert 21,118 
Newkirk, Carolyn 118 
Newkirk, Richard 1 1 8 
Nicholson, Leroy 25,28,57,118,124 
O'Hail, Lanny 60,68,75,76.84,118.123, 

125,126,128 
Otto, David 118,123,133 
Packard, Roberta 118 
Page, Christine 30,112,118,123 
Parker, Matthew 60,85,118,126,127,128 
Patterson, Patricia 93,118,123 
Pearman, Joel 112,118,122 
Penton, AUen 41,118 
Penton, Mysy 118 

Peterson, Paul 34,65,80,1 1 8,1 25,1 26,1 28 
PhiUips, Roger 21,60,62,110,126,127 
Pickett. Deborah 118 
Pickett. Martha 118 
Pierce, Donald 48,1 1 8,1 23,1 25 
Poole, Joe 30,34,93,1 1 2,1 1 8,1 26,1 28 
Poole, Marilee 48,49,51 ,1 1 8,1 22,1 26 
Pope, Joan 118 
Puckett, Larry 118,129,133 
Puffer, Lynn 58,61,93,118,133 
Queener, Charles 38,86,87,88,118,129 
Quigley , Eleanor 1 1 8 
Reese, John 37,53,60,64,110,124,155 
Reeves, James 118 
Remington, Roy 118 
Revis, Sandra 118 
Reynolds, Susan 7,56,118 
Richmond, Cecelia 46,53,1 10 
Rinck. Judith 12,59,110 
Roach, Doretha 75,118.133 
Roberts, Dawn 14,60,118,126,127 
Robinson, Chariotte 10.53.92,110 
Robinson, William 19,76,118,125 
Roddy, Steve 86,88,89,90,93,119,125,129 
Ross, Mary 110 
Rouse, John 1 10 

Rowsey, Drema 48,60,91,1 19,1 24 
Rowscy, Vickie 48,63,9 1,1 10, 1 24, 125 
Russell, Charles 41,43,48,49,51,60,64. 

119.126,127 
Saadc, Philip 14,72,119 
Sailers. Miriam 1 19,122 
Sanford, Stephen 56,80,1 1 2,1 19,1 24,1 28 
Sa.sncll,Denise 43,48,60,91,1 19,1 24, 

127,133 
Saylor, Charlcne 21,119 
Schrocdcr, Jenness 1 19 
Schuessler, Helen 119 
Scott, Jane 18,119 
Scnter, Betsy 30,119,122,133 
Shaffer, Jessica 4 1 ,4 2,59,60,6 1 ,75,1 1 9, 

126,133 
^Shakespeare, Donald \i'J.i 24 
'shamcl.Gary 119 



Shaver, Roy 119 

Sheddan, Frank 34,1 19,126 

Shelley, Bryan 47,57,1 19,1 23 

Shumaker, Bonita 34,1.19,126 

Simpson, Lee 82,111,128,160 

Sims, Leslie 1 11,156 

Slattery, Laura 28 

Smith, David 13,61,119 

Smith, Diane 13,53.111 

Smith, Doug 119 

Snyder, Mary Ann 1 1 9 

Stevens, Lynne 40,53,60,64,1 1 1,1 26 

Steward, Lily 15,119 

Stewart, Marcia 4,40,119,126 

Stinnett, Alexia 119 

Stone, Paul 60,80,1 1 1 ,1 26,1 27,1 28 

Stone, Rosemary 1 1 1 

Straley, Kevin 48,63,119 

Stroupe, Pamela 16,24,60,119,126 

Summers, Eugene 119 

Suzuki, Reiko 16,1 1 1 

Tallent, Bobby 119 

Tallent, Bobbie Jean 119,133 

Terwilliger. Carol 1 19 

Thompson, Ronnie 90,120,129 

Triplet!, Judy 60,120,127 

Trivette, Johnnie 82,84,85,92,111,123,128 

Turner, Joyce 1 20 

Turney, Ben 34,60,64,77,1 20,1 22,1 26, 

129,133 
Underwood, Dennis 1 20 
Van Puffelen, Darlene 36,53,68,1 1 1 
Van Sice, Barbara 63,120,133 
VanSoest, Rick 60,1 20,126 
Varga, Georgia 1 20 
Vaughn, Douglas 77,120 
Veon, Roderick 26,111 
Vieldhouse, Kenneth 120,133 
Vincent, Jim 120,129 
Walters, Carol 11,120 
Wang, Grace 7,72,120 
Warwick, Marilyn 30,52,77,1 20,1 22, 

123,133 
Weld, Linda 48,1 20 
Welton, Marilyn HI 
Wentworth, Peggy 120 
Wicks, La Verne 48,49,5 1 ,1 1 1 ,1 23,1 26 
Wikoff, Brenda 60,1 20,1 27 
Willcox, Mary Lee 36,48,49,51,69,111,160 
Willis, Beth 58,120,126 
Wilson, Bill 14,111,127 
Wilson, Craig 39,68,8 1 ,1 20,1 25,1 28 
Winkler, Annette 23,60,11 1,126 
Wipplingcr, Kalhy 34,60,1 1 1,126 
Wolfe, David 30,45,61,63,83,84,120, 

128,133 
Wong, Miranda 22,72,1 15 
Wright, Daniel 41,120 
Wylie, Gerald 20,37,60,1 1 1,1 26,1 27,128 
Wyllie, John 7,23,65,120,128,157 
Wyman,Mark 34,57,120,126 
Yoder, Terry 1 20 
Young, John 30,64,111 
Young, Patricia 1 20 
Zickcfoosc, Marsha I 20 



151 



The Reason For 
Bryan College 



An Editorial 

Forty years ago, dedicated men and women of deep 
foresight planned and began what is today Bryan Col- 
lege. They planned it to be a distinctive educational 
institution — a Christian college of arts and sciences. 
They saw it as a place where students would learn 
academic subjects while profiting from their relation- 
ships with Christian professors. This concept of a Chris- 
tianity-centered, academically sound education is an 
ideal toward which the college continues to work. In its 
forward progress, Bryan must never lose sight of the 
proper function of a Christian college. 





■-¥i'"^r'^"' '-Si*" 









UPPER MIDDLE: A view 
soutliward across the campus 
to the lake. UPPER RIGHT: 
The Administration Building, 
symbol of Brvaii College. 
LOWER LEFT: The main 
entrance to tlie college. 
LOWER RIGHT: The Triangle 
ill winter. 



153 




^. 



One of the academic principles which must be sturdily upheld in any college 
community is the liberating, enlightening function of an education. College 
courses, perhaps with rare, specialized exceptions, should not be taught to prove 
Christianity; they should be taught objectively in the belief that Christianity is 
essentially independent of all academic props and can be embraced best by an 
open-minded student. Too often at Bryan, course material has been warped in 
attempts to substantiate the veracity of the Bible; this is unfortunate. While the 
motivation behind such actions, or even the need for them, may be justifiable, 
the practical effects are not — the integrity of academic subject matter must be 
preserved. Proving the validity of Christianity is not the paramount function of a 
Christian college. Bryan, primarily, must present, fairly and honestly, man's 
thought in all subject areas and believe that a student will find Christ as a part of 
his personal search for truth. 




154 





UPPER RIGHT: Mark Longnecker 
has fust inspected the microfilm 
machine given to the Bryan library 
by the American Lava Company. 
UPPER MIDDLE: Beckie Conrad 
puts in her daily practice time on the 
flute. UPPER LEFT: As John Reese 
realizes, regular Bible study is the key 
to inward spiritual growth. LOWER 
MIDDLE: A college is a place wliere 
students such as Gail Cook learn of 
the great ideas and achievements of 
human history. LOWER RIGHT: By 
reading tlie newspaper, Tom Keeping 
becomes educated to the contempo- 
rary world. 





155 



UPPER MIDDLE: Mark Kirby 
and Larry Jacobsen show off their 
topless haircuts. UPPER RIGHT: 
John Wyltie looks at one of his 
favorite rock records. LOWER 
LEFT: Students enjoy the free- 
dom of an autumn afternoon to 
relax in their own unique ways. 
LOWER MIDDLE: Dick Brad- 
shaw demonstrates the latest in 
modern grooming. 





\m. 



15b 



1 






A college campus must be in the vanguard of new ideas; it must be the 
residence of a community living in the present and preparing bravely for 
the future. A Christian college such as Bryan cannot be a sanctuary for the 
ideas of customs of outdated eras. It cannot be a haven for every 
closed-minded social, political, economic, or religious idea; rather, it must 
be a forum for many viewpoints, a place where the merits of many ideas 
are debated and discussed. Bryan must not fear to train its students with 
twentieth-century methods and to welcome to the campus the contempo- 
rary ideas of various thinkers. It must examine the new and not be afraid 
to go against the wishes of alumni or financial supporters in ensuring that 
the liberalizing tradition of the liberal arts college is maintained. To be a 
college, Bryan cannot be a monastic island of isolationism which does not 
come in contact with the changing ideas of the current academic world. 
Rather, it must work to become a respected part of that world. Bryan 
must be up-to-date. 



157 



A Christian college is not distinctive because of its excellent plant, its modern 
methods, its objective search for truth, or its cooperation with other colleges. Any 
college can have these characteristics. Bryan, as a college, must be distinguished by the 
vibrant lives and workable philosophies of its administrators and professors. These 
people must not merely sign a statement of faith, although this is important. Primarily 
they must live their faith, so that students benefit by their associations with them. 
They must demonstrate their religious convictions to students in their intellectual 
honesty, in their tolerance of varying ideas, and in their standards of academic 
excellence. They must be unified in their goals and in their methods and must never 
consciously work at cross-purposes with each other. They must seek to live lives in 
which Christ is indeed above all. They must try to change students neither by lengthy 
exhortations nor by overly meticulous presentations of the relationships of Christiani- 
ty to literature or to science, but, instead, by providing them with examples of what 
the victorious Christian pilgrimage is all about. 

A Christian college does not exist to change the nature of course subject matter in 
order to force it into an artificially close relationsliip to Christianity; it does not exist 
to preserve conservative social or cultural customs; it does not exist to preach at its 
students or to recruit missionaries. The function of a Christian college must be to 
enlighten its students by the presentation of academic truth, and, if possible, to relate 
this integral subject matter to a Christian frame of reference; to introduce them to the 
world of today in all of its facets; and to provide them with opportunities for contact 
with outstandingly successful Christian teachers and administrators. To realize these 
goals will be a continuing task for Bryan College. 



*^'1P- 



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i i-f f-t ^t 









t/PPfi? MIDDLE: Mr. Cornelius is 
dedicated to thoroughness, tiiought- 
fulness. and practical Christian living. 
UPPER RIGHT: Mrs. Sheddan is a 
readily available counselor to all of 
those who need friendly, knowledge- 
able advice. LOWER LEFT: Presi- 
dent Mercer is always willing to talk 
with and help any individual in the 
college community. LOWER 
MIDDLE: Mr. Boyd's enthusiasm for 
his subject matter is contagious, a 
fact appreciated by all of his stu- 
dents, including Man' Howard. 
LOWER RIGHT: Through her con- 
stant cheerfulness and hard work. 
Miss Seguine has become a good 
friend of many students. 





159 




The COMMONER Staff 

SEATED: Beckie Conrad: Mrs. Louise Bentley, sponsor: Vickie Rowsey. STANDING: Carvis Chappell: Harold Jenkins, editor: Brenda Wikoff: Paul 
Bishop: Lee Simpson: Twyla Judy: Mary Lee Willcox. NOT PICTURED: Don Shakespeare. 



The 1970 COMMONER was lithographed by 
the Delmar Printing Company of Charlotte, 
North Carolina, under the direction of its Knox- 
ville, Tennessee, office. The custom-embossed 
cover is Unen grey Roxite C-57598 with the 
title stamped in silver. The first sixteen pages 
are printed in Warren's Saxony paper, with the 
remainder of the book printed on Warren's 
eighty pound enamel paper. The endsheets are 
HammermOl Cover sixty-five pound paper. Sky 
Blue. Special type in the opening is Libra. Head- 
line type is Times Roman, 24 Point upper and 
lower case. Body type is 10 point Press Roman; 
identifications and captions are 8 point Press 
Roman. Class portraits are by Olan Mills Studios 
of Chattanooga, Tennessee. 



160 



In Conclusion . . . 

... 1 hope that each of you enjoys reading and re-reading 
your 1970 COMMONER. 1 also hope that you appreciate the 
technical innovations presented in the current book, as well as 
the staff editorial on the preceding pages. 

This year our staff has tried to produce for Bryan a realistic 
picture of campus Hfe — a story of both the happy and the 
unhappy events which have occurred. Consequently, we have 
not attempted to gloss over unfortunate occurrences or to give 
a one-sided, public-relations-oriented view of Bryan College. 
We feel that an honest picture is essential if the COMMONER 
is to be truly collegiate. This main volume is to be followed by 
a spring supplement, which will be available in September. 

Our staff wishes to acknowledge the outstanding contribu- 
tions made to the 1970 COMMONER by Mrs. Louise Bentley, 
faculty adviser, and by Mr. Ron Wempe, Delmar Printing 
Company adviser. We also wish to thank all of you in tlie col- 
lege community who have helped us in many ways. 

Sincerely, 

Harold Jenkins 
Editor 



DATE DUE 



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378.19805 34715 

B84c 

Bryan College Commoner 1970 



378.19805 
B84c 

Bryan College Commoner 1970 



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