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Full text of "Commoner, 1972"

SEVENTY-TWO 




The Commoner 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/commoner1972brya 




We are individuals coming from every direction. 




Differing in background, nationality, 
and faith, we are: 

Chinese — Vietnamese 

Black— White 
Baptist — Methodist 

Rich — Poor 
Yankee — Southerner 
. . . and many more. 





We have numerous 
reasons for coming to 
Bryan. A desire for 
knowledge, the leading 
of Christ, the personal 
advantages of a small 
Christian college, and 
even the peacefulness 
of a rural setting bring 
many. 



ANALYSIS OF FIRST SEMESTER REGISTRATION 








Bryan College 












Fall Semester 1971 












1967 


1968 


1969 


1970 


1971 


Full-time students 


300 


314 


314 


369 


406 


Part-time students 
Total students 


39 
339 


26 

340 


13 

327 


40 

409 


44 
450 


Full-time students 


300 


314 


314 


369 


406 


Part-time students 












(in terms of equivalent 












full-time students) 


14 


12 


5 


14 


12 


Total students 


314 


326 


319 


383 


418 


CLASSIFICATION BY SEX: 












Male 


156 


160 


157 


188 


209 


Female 


183 


180 


170 


221 


241 


Total 


339 


340 


327 


409 


450 


CLASSIFICATION: 












Seniors 


61 


70 


78 


64 


88 


Juniors 


68 


87 


51 


80 


88 


Sophomores 


83 


53 


86 


97 


85 


Freshmen 


94 


117 


98 


131 


151 


Special 


33 


13 


14 


37 


38 


Total 


339 


340 


327 


409 


450 


RESIDENCE CLASSIFICATION: 










Dorm students 


246 


262 


247 


290 


310 


Day students: 












Rhea County students 


79 


40 


30 


63 


86 


Other day students 


14 


38 


50 


56 


54 


Total 


339 


340 


327 


409 


450 






Compiled by Registrar's 


Dffice 






L. Dona 


Id Hill, Registrar 









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We start a new life where positions 
are varied. Many of us study and 
some teach; others maintain the 
work of the college as administra- 
tors, trustees, and staff. 







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Here we are persons instead of 
computerized numbers. A small 
student-teacher ratio enables us to 
have individualized instruction 
and counsel. The closeness of the 
college community makes us ap- 
preciate a smile, a friendly gesture, 
or assistance from people who 
really care. 









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The personal ambitions that each 
of us has may become reality at 
Bryan. A liberal arts education, 
Christian growth and service, pre- 
paration for a future vocation, 
athletic development and honor, 
and marriage are some of the 
varied goals. 



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HOUSTON I Ljffig 






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As individuals we face the uncer- 
tainty that our goals may be unful- 
filled. We may even lose sight of 
well-planned destinies or discover 
detours that could lead to an en- 
tirely different result. Such devia- 
tions and the consequent confus- 
ion, dissatisfaction, and final re- 
solution mark a growing maturity. 




L 

Student's Name 



J 



Jr_ 

Sr_ 
Sp- 
Pt_ 



and ] 

and 

poinl 

Unit 

hour 
week 
folic 
earni 



Grading period ending 



Catalog 
Number 



Course Title 



Gr. 



Sem. 
Hr.At. 



Sem. 
Hr.Er, 




Gr 

Bi 

En 

Ed 

By 

Hi 



101 
201 
201 
203 
352 
101 



Elementary Classical Greek 
New Testament Survey 
Introduction to Literature 
Safety Education 
Introduction to Micro-Biology 
History of Western Civilization 



3 
3 
2 
2 

3 
3 



B- 

B 

C- 

B 

B 

C 



3 
3 
2 
2 
3 
3 



Prev. Status 


Sem 


Dean's List 


□ 


□ 


Hon. Mention 


□ 


□ 


Honors List 


□ 


□ 


Restriction 


□ 


□ 


Probation 


□ 


□ 



Total Current Record 



16 16 43 2.68b 



Total Previous Record 



Total Cumulative Record 



12 







13 





14 





Behind our individuality is the 
one great Person Jesus Christ. 
As the Holy Spirit indwells us 
we learn to meet problems 
and challenges with increas- 
ing stability — changing pre- 
judice to conviction, opinion 
to fact, and finding the best 
possible answers to our ques- 
tions. Complete and inte- 
grated within ourselves, we 
can become the persons that 
Christ wants us to be. 



15 



This is the year of our changing. 









16 




The 
Commoner 

Bryan College 

Dayton, 

Tennessee 

Vol. 38,1971-72 

I fjwrirrj \ rifts, f ditor 

Mrs. Louisf fientlfy, Advisor 



Campus Life 18 

Athletics 57 

Academics 73 

People 89 

Groups .119 

Advertisements . . . .130 



Opening Weeks 
Are Busy 





Freshmen and transfers arrive at 
Bryan to face a multitude of orien- 
tation tests— emotional and mental. 
Old students return to rehash the 
summer's adventures before facing 
the new semester's classes. Ad- 
justing to the pace and changes of 
college life presents a challenge to 
individual maturity in the midst of 
tiring and time-consuming activi- 
ties. Messages by Reverend Charles 
Stanley during Spiritual Life Week 
help many regain their sense of 
stability. 



18 Campus Life 






REGISTRAT ION 



GRIN 




b : a R it 




Registration means students add books 
and classes and subtract from bank accounts; 
teachers sort class sections and puzzle over 
multiplied loads. When the last line vanishes 
at the day's end, the entire college sighs with 
relief— another registration is over so a new 
semester can begin. 



UPPER LEFT: Sandy Harris begins the awesome 
task of "moving in". UPPER MIDDLE: Dr. Mercer 
opens the first meeting of Spiritual Emphasis 
Week. UPPER RIGHT: Mr. Doddridge assists Betty 
Barrows in arranging her courses. LOWER LEFT: 
Student Senate Members welcome new and return- 
ing students. LOWER RIGHT: A positive attitude 
helps at registration time. 



Campus Life 19 



President's 

Reception 

Is ATest 

For The Stalwart 



The week before the President's 
Reception is filled with anticipation 
and dread for the new students. As 
the traumatic night arrives, each 
one meets his blind date, fears the 
ordeal of running past laughing, 
rice-throwing upperclassmen, and 
faces the long receiving line of smil- 
ing administrators and faculty. Re- 
freshments and a lively musical pro- 
gram help most of the initiated to 
unwind and enjoy a pleasant, un- 
usual evening. 





' 




20 Campus Life 






UPPER LEFT: A long line of friendly smiles 
and firm handshakes awaits each student. UP- 
PER MIDDLE: Dr. and Mrs. Mercer along with 
John Main are the first to greet the students. 
UPPER RIGHT: Cindy Meehan reaches the 
Reading Room where refreshments are served. 
LOWER LEFT: Harrassment by upperclassmen 
is at its zenith during the President's Reception. 
LOWER RIGHT: Even the greatest of times has 
its dull moments for Mr. Don Hill. 



Campus Lifo 21 



Daily Activities 
Become Routine 



Waking for early classes, sitting un- 
comfortably through chapel meetings in 
the gym, and running cross-country or 
practicing other sports sets the pattern 
for many of us. After dinner one may 
return to his room or go to the library to 
cram for tests or keep ahead of long read- 
ing assignments. As if by magic, at 9:30 
p.m. the books close and the studious 
pupils descend to the Lion's Den, the 
T.V., or game rooms. After all-in, dorm 
horseplay and studies continue until tired 
students call it another day. 





22 Campus Life 




UPPER: The Lion's Den is a refreshing place 
after a day of classes. LOWER LEFT: The day 
begins early for those with a first period class. 
LOWER MIDDLE: Because of an increase in 
enrollment, chapel is held in the gym. LOWER 
RIGHT: David Kinsey, Greg Renaud, and Don 
Ford know that practice is necessary for suc- 
cess. 





Compus Lifo 23 



Annual Picnic Offers 
Recreation with Friends 




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24 Campus Life 





Held at Cumberland State Park 
for the second consecutive year, the 
All-School Picnic is well-attended 
and fun. Tennis, boating, im- 
promptu football games, and lei- 
surely walks along the countryside 
all revolve around the PFM meal. 
Generating friendship among the 
new and old members of the Bryan 
family is the happy result of this 
fall outing. 



UPPER LEFT: "Hurry back, Karen!" 
UPPER MIDDLE: Becky Hudson gives a 
good chase. UPPER RIGHT: "Stretch, 
Ben, stretch!" LOWER LEFT: Sitting, 
relaxing, and talking occupy the Boyds' 
time. LOWER RIGHT: P.F.M. has more 
cooks than we realize. 



Coni|)us Lifo 25 



Homecoming 

Provides 

Unusual 

Experiences 



"Friday Fun Night" signals Home- 
coming weekend with basketball games, a 
band concert, and an imaginative pep rally 
featuring Mister Zeke's Big Machine. As 
the rainy Saturday clears, students and 
alumni attend the Alumni Brunch at 
Skyline Bible Conference grounds and the 
afternoon soccer game with King's Col- 
lege. The theme of the evening banquet is 
"Portrait of My Love," highlighted by 
royalty: Miss Martha Jones, queen, and 
her court. Sunday Vespers completes the 
weekend of re-acquaintances, nostalgia, 
and new memories. 








UPPER LEFT: A Friday night intra-squad basket- 
ball game begins the Homecoming activities. UP- 
PER RIGHT: The Class of '73 float takes first 
prize. LOWER RIGHT: The Alumni-Senior Brunch 
attracts many— both students and alumni. LOWER 
MIDDLE: Tim Kimmel maneuvers around a King 
College player in the afternoon soccer game. 
LOWER RIGHT: Dale Wolfe and company bring 
the Bryan lion out of hiding. 



Compus Lifo 27 




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28 Campus Life 






" 



UPPER LEFT: The Queen and her court: Phil 
Loeffler escorting Sophomore Princess Nancy 
Nofsinger; Ed Quigley escorting Senior Queen 
Martha Jones; Steve Johanson escorting Junior 
Princess Barbara VanSice; and Bill Brewer es- 
corting Freshman Princess Debbie Vincent. 
UPPER MIDDLE: Nancy Birch Longnecker is 
one of three former Homecoming Queens at- 
tending the banquet. UPPER RIGHT: A large 
number of the Bryan family members partici- 
pate in the events of the weekend. LOWER 
LEFT: Last year's Queen, Gail Hamilton, 
crowns Martha Jones 1971 Homecoming 
Queen. LOWER RIGHT: An interested group 
of candidates and escorts watch Bryan fight a 
losing battle. 






. 



Campus Lifo 29 



The Campus 

Comes Alive 

With Talent 




■n 




Two big nights of talent shower the campus with variety and 
fun. Freshman Talent Night skits, gymnastics, and serious perfor- 
mances offer many surprises at the abilities of the newcomers. An 
even greater surprise is the wit and versatility of the teachers at 
the Faculty Talent Show. From clever imitations of students to 
skillful expressions of readings and songs and music from har- 
monics to drums, the hilarious evening's entertainment highlights 
the first few weeks of school. 



30 Campus Life 





UPPER LEFT: Sesame's Streets Big Bird pays Bryan a visit. 
UPPER MIDDLE: Coach Matthes and Doctor Cornelius ap- 
pear to be having a rough time of it. UPPER RIGHT: Mr. 
Ashworth takes careful aim on a pool table that few people 
ever use. LOWER LEFT: Sue Hoppe and "Miss Marble Lean" 
(Gwynn Henry) discuss the latest in makeup. LOWER MID- 
DLE: Dan Camp gives the Freshman Talent night a little 
musical entertainment as do LOWER RIGHT: Miss Seguine, 
Miss Sorber, and Miss DeRosset for the Faculty Talent Night. 





Campus Life 31 



Drama Club 
Earns Praise 



The new Drama Club begins its history 
with a great success, The Miracle Worker. 
Directed by Charlie Hunnicutt and Greg 
Norwood, it stars Nancy Myers, Beverly 
Shondelmyer and other talented students. 
The taut, sensitive performances given by 
the actors is proof of long, tiring hours of 
practice. The reception of the play by the 
Bryan community is enthusiastic and en- 
couraging. 





UPPER LEFT: Charles Hunnicutt, play director, Marsha 
Shein, and Karen Underwood illustrate the tiresome job of 
producing a play. RIGHT: Nancy Myers gives a stirring per- 
formance of Helen Keller. LOWER LEFT: Beverly Shon- 
delmyer plays the part of Anne Sullivan. LOWER RIGHT: 
Keith Patman and Dale Wolfe help set up props. 



32 Campus Life 




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Cumpus Life 33 




Christmas Is 
Always Special 



The week before Christmas vacation at Bryan is 
hectic but happy. Saturday night is the much- 
prepared-for Christmas Banquet with Bryanites and 
guests in festive attire and enjoying entertainment by 
the popular Madrigals and others. On Sunday after- 
noon the choir and brass ensemble, directed by Dr. 
James Greasby, present Ron Nelson's contemporary 
version of The Christmas Story. The annual Candle- 
light service evokes devotion and worship in its quiet 
reminder of the true purpose and peace of Christmas. 





34 Campus Life 






UPPER LEFT: James H. Patterson from Atlan- 
ta is the Christmas Banquet speaker. UPPER 
MIDDLE: After a delicious meal, friends and 
loved ones relax to an entertaining and inspiring 
program. UPPER RIGHT: Connie Savage and 
Gail Ansel inspect a room in the men's dorm 
during Open House. LOWER LEFT: Paul Peter- 
son is only one of many workers who help 
provide excellent service at the Christmas Ban- 
quet. LOWER RIGHT: The music of The 
Christmas Story is exciting and relevant. 



Campus Lifo 35 




UPPER LEFT: A large group of underprivileged 
children enjoy a Christmas party in the Bryan 
cafeteria. UPPER MIDDLE: Ellen Cox and Janice 
Decker are among members of the choir partici- 
pating in the candlelight service. UPPER RIGHT: 
Shirley Bentley prepares for the annual Dayton 
Bank Christmas Banquet. LOWER LEFT: Tom 
Levengood and Becky Edwards look over some 
unusual decorations on a Christmas tree in the 
men's dorm. LOWER RIGHT: Ardel Caneday 
reads Scripture at the Candlelight Service. 




36 Campus Life 




Cumpus Life 37 



T 1 < ' 'J ■ 
■ ■ ■ 



UPPER LEFT: Receiving grades is al- 
ways an anxious moment. UPPER 
RIGHT: Semester break is a time for 
Stan Roberts to get a haircut. LOWER 
LEFT: Pam Stroupe Judson is a January 
graduate. LOWER MIDDLE: Dann 
Speichinger gets in a few hours of exer- 
cise during the semester break. LOWER 
RIGHT: Some new faces at Bryan for 
the new semester are: Front Row: left to 
right, Scott Bursmith, Barbara Waggoner, 
Kay Blaha, Barbara Sinclair, and Peggy 
Lawson. Second Row: Bob Kerber, 
Reggie Cook, Kathy Reece, Marcia Brun- 
kow, and Andy Hayes. 






38 Campus Life 




New Semester 
Offers Fresh Start 



Change marks the passing of one semester to the 
next, especially this year when the housing situation 
drastically improves. With the new dorm's completion, 
women move from Rader Hall and Cedar Hill, while the 
overflow of men move into Rader. The Christian Life 
Conference sparks the spiritual atmosphere and improves 
attitudes toward the new semester. With uncertainty and 
optimism the transfer students face the adjustments of a 
new school. Classes offer a fresh beginning; many seniors 
start student teaching. As routines settles in once again, 
eyes turn with eager anticipation toward spring break 
and graduation. 



-- ^ 




Ctimpus Lifo 39 




Dr. Warren Webster 




Dr. Don Hillis 





Rev. John Oliver 




40 Campus Life 




Christian Life 
Conference is a 
Learning Experience 



The annual Christian Life Conference, occurring at 
the beginning of second semester, is a time of spiritual 
renewal. In additionl to stirring messages brought by Dr. 
Warren Webster, Dr. Don Hillis, and Rev. John Oliver, 
testimonies and special music highlight each meeting. 
The hard gym seats present a physical problem, but the 
call for rededication of lives to Christ keeps interest 
alive. Many students, faculty, and administrators make a 
public demonstration of faith and dedication in the 
concluding candlelight service. 





UPPER LEFT: Trumpet trio provides special music at one of the 
meetings. UPPER RIGHT: Don Ford examines a missionary display. 
LOWER LEFT: The Best of Love leads in singing camp songs. 
LOWER RIGHT: Peggy Wentworth awaits customers. 



Cumpus Lifu 41 



Sweetheart 
Banquet 

Features "LOVE: 

American Style" 



Couples glow in the romantic setting 
of the Sweetheart Banquet with its theme 
"Love: American Style." Steak, however, 
is the highlight for many hungry diners. 
In amusing, colorful costumes professors 
and administrators serve the students. 
Debbie Vincent and Bill Rosser present 
special music followed by Mr. Dave 
Llewellyn's message on "Love." Open 
house in the New Dorm finishes the 
happy evening. 








42 Campus Life 









UPPER LEFT: Even the Dean of Men dresses for the 
occasion. UPPER RIGHT: Bill Rosser adds a musical 
touch to the banquet. LOWER LEFT: Mr. Llewellyn 
speaks of Love. LOWER MIDDLE: Larry Puckett, 
Dave Geisel and Jane Crosbie inspect the now dorm 
after the banquet. LOWER RIGHT: Mr. and Mrs. 
Schmickl serve at the banquet. 



■MMBOOH 



Campus Life 43 



Student Union 
Comes of Age 

This year the Student Union, led by Steve 
Griffith, shifts into high gear and becomes the 
head of other student organizations. Much 
work is done before classes start with many 
activities for the year planned. Student Union 
and Student Senate members establish and 
decorate offices, buy pool tables and renovate 
the game and television rooms. The Miracle 
Worker, the first play performed by the new 
Drama Club, the Sweetheart Banquet, and the 
All-School Picnic are other projects of the or- 
ganization. The New World Singers, selected 
movies, and other entertainment come to 
campus. Framing a more collegiate atmosphere 
and better student attitudes are results of the 
active Student Union. 






44 Campus Life 




LEFT: Emerson Roth and Connie Cropp help paint the 
Student Union game room. FAR LEFT: Susan Waddell 
works in the TV room. UPPER LEFT: Student Union 
books such groups as the New World Singers. UPPER 
RIGHT: Dow Barton, the current Student Union Presi- 
dent, looks at motion picture magazines. BELOW: The 
Student Union pool table is in almost constant use. 





Cumpus Lifo 45 




MIA Reaches 
the Community 



Missions in Action takes its name seriously this 
year as it becomes the leading Christian organi- 
zation on campus under the capable direction of 
Dave Wolfe, Jim Fitzgerald, and Jim Hughson. The 
newly instituted FISH program involves many 
students— carrying food to shut-ins, helping under- 
privileged children as Big Sisters and Big Brothers, 
mowing lawns for sick people, working at the 
Educably Mentally Retarded School, and other ser- 
vices to the Dayton community. The Summer 
Missions Project supports several students on mis- 
sions in the United States and overseas. Striving 
for more relevant chapel programs second semes- 
ter, M.I. A. organizes focus groups contrasting 
various cultures and religions. The program is de- 
signed to develop the student in active service, 
drawing him closer to the reality of Christ and 
Christian living. 



46 Campus Life 





, ■=■ 





UPPER LEFT: The Summer Missionaries Bryan 
will be sponsoring are left to right: Kim Alt, Sherry 
Porter, Bruce Pauley, Gwynn Henry, Joyce Dres- 
dow, and Ed Quigley. UPPER MIDDLE: Many 
youngsters attend the MIA Christmas party. 
UPPER RIGHT: Dollar Day helps raise support for 
the SMP program. LOWER LEFT: Dave Wolfe is 
president of MIA. LOWER RIGHT: Nancy Nof- 
singer enjoys being with her "little sister." 




niv. 



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Cumpus Lllo 47 




Moving Day 
is Big Event 



Cars loaded with boxes, trucks filled 
with clothes and packages, people 
weighted with luggage in long trips across 
the triangle— all are typical scenes on the 
long-awaited moving day. The new dorm 
is a semester late in completion, but it is 
worth waiting for. Arranged in suites with 
each room divided into study and sleep- 
ing areas, it is fully carpeted and air- 
conditioned. The spacious modern 
kitchen is well-equipped, including a dish- 
washer. For the first time, men may meet 
their dates in the plush lounge. It is a 
welcome addition in the continuing ex- 
pansion of Bryan campus. 




48 Campus Life 




Campus Lifo 49 



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Spring Brings 
New Activities 



Spring is a green campus, flowers, new 
loves, and many events. Fine Arts Week 
features paintings, bands, choruses, crafts, 
singing, and instrumental ensembles pro- 
vided by Dayton and Bryan. Sports 
change from basketball and cross-country 
to baseball and track and field. 

The junior-senior banquet at the V.I. P. 
Dinner Theatre in Chattanooga, with 
after-activities and breakfast at the 
Y.M.C.A., is a well-planned, exciting 
evening. On the senior trip travel Bryan's 
nostalgic graduates to a Georgia national 
park. 

As the term closes the underclassmen 
anticipate finals and seniors delight in 
Baccalaureate exercises, led by Rev. Ian 
M. Hay, a Bryan graduate and Director of 
North America Sudan Interior Mission, 
and proudly participate in Commence- 
ment, addressed by Dr. John G. Barker, 
President of Marshall University. It is the 
conclusion of a year of people changing— 
hopefully learning to live more effectively 
and meaningfully the dynamics of Chris- 
tianity. 



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50 Campus Life 



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UPPER LEFT: Larry Puckett gets a single. UPPER RIGHT: Visitors 
from the community are attracted to the Fine Arts Festival. LOWER 
LEFT: Ray Locy pitches and hits well for the baseball team. LOWER 
MIDDLE: Don Shakespeare and Joe Poole follow the example of the 
track team. LOWER RIGHT: Members of the class of '71 present a very 
entertaining senior chapel to show the '72 class how it's done! 





Campus Lifo 51 



UPPER LEFT: Dr. Mercer opens the 1971 
Baccalaureate Service. UPPER RIGHT: Com- 
mencement in the triangle is traditional. 
LOWER LEFT: Charlie Hunnicutt and Peggy 
Hesterly relax in the spring weather. LOWER 
MIDDLE: Callaway Gardens provides a paradise 
for the class of '72. LOWER RIGHT: Works of 
art are displayed during the Fine Arts Festival. 





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52 Campus Life 





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Cumpus Life 53 






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Marital Dreams 
Become Reality 

The vows are spoken in hushed, ner- 
vous voices; the rice is thrown boister- 
ously with laughter and good wishes, and 
another couple is married. One of the 
atrractive features of Bryan is the many 
couples who meet, date, and marry while 
on campus. The new problems are com- 
mon to all newlyweds: budgets, time to 
study, household duties. But the joy of 
being one with each other in Christ draw 
the two closer in a growing love. 



UPPER LEFT: In December Rick Miller mar- 
ries Kathy Avery, a Bryan graduate. UPPER 
RIGHT: Larry and Bonnie Harper, newlyweds, 
help Bonnie Heath move into the new dorm. 
LOWER LEFT: Pam and Ness Judson still en- 
joy the social functions of the college. LOWER 
RIGHT: Paul and Lynn Peterson conclude their 
careers at Bryan as husband and wife. 




54 Campus Life 




Campus Life 55 



Change Comes in 
Great Variety 

Bryan has a "first" this year in seeing 
three faculty members achieve the doc- 
torate—a worthy personal accomplish- 
ment and increased academic stature for 
the college. Dr. James Greasby (music), 
Dr. Blair Bentley (history), and Dr. 
Richard Cornelius (English) experience 
personal change and promotion of a 
permanent nature. 

Temporary change in behavior or ac- 
tivities is also a necessary part of life; the 
chance to relax and share with others 
helps promote growth personally and 
socially. 





UPPER RIGHT: Bryan's newest doctors. Dr. 
Greasby, Dr. Bentley, and Dr. Cornelius, ex- 
amine their research materials. LOWER 
RIGHT: Mrs. Andrews puts the finishing 
touches on her snowman. LOWER LEFT: Meal- 
time is a time to "relax". 




56 Campus Life 




Athletics 




Alhlollcs 67 




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Soccer: 

A Year 

of Building 



Soccer is a relatively new sport in America, little 
known and practiced in the lifetime of most college 
athletes. According to Coach Jim Bath, this fact ac- 
counts for the inexperience of many new Bryan play- 
ers. In spite of this, diligence and perseverance yield 
two wins for the season. Encouraging the team with 
enthusiastic support by the Bryan students and cheer- 
leaders becomes a special help during soccer months. 



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UPPER LEFT: Warm-ups are part of every 
game. UPPER RIGHT: Determination as ex- 
pressed by Steve Kocher is one of the soccer 
team's best attributes. LOWER LEFT: Steve 
Goehring and Paul Peterson are two offensive 
players with drive. LOWER RIGHT: A surprise 
party given the soccer team by the cheerleaders 
encourages the team. 



Allih.'tics 59 



. 



- 



UPPER: An opposing team's goalie makes a 
good stop. LOWER LEFT: Halftime is a time 
to rest, regroup, and plan. LOWER MIDDLE: A 
soccer game gives the students a sense of unity 
or belonging. LOWER RIGHT: The 1971 Bryan 
soccer team: Left to Right: FRONT ROW: Jeff 
Tubbs, Ron Goehring, Mark Shaver, Steve Par- 
cell, Steve Kocher, Larry Jacobsen, Paul Peter- 
son, Doug Mains, and Dave Kinsey. BACK 
ROW: Paul Bishop, Dan Camp, Fred Clark, Tim 
Kimmel, Everett Kier, Steve Goehring, David 
Ice. Dale Henry, Steve McCollam, Ray Locy, 
and Coach James Bath. 







**» 




J 









■•*■ ' • V? . 

*■ - .*.■*>' 










60 Athletics 



. - 



■ ■ 




,. *%:•„ 



• 

• 


■ 

- ■■ • 


- 


- 

• > - 


■ 


■■ 


• 







1971 Soccer Scoreboard 




Bryan 


Opponent 


1 


Tocca Falls 


2 


1 


U. of Ala. Huntsville 


5 





University of the South 


1 


3 


Tennessee Tech 


8 


1 


Covenant 


10 


3 


Tennessee 


5 





Tennessee Temple 


11 


1 


King College 


3 


6 


Athens College 


1 


2 


St. Bernard 


11 


6 


Tusculum 


5 







fc&£ 







Athlotics 61 




I 









1971 Crosscountry Scores 


Bryan 




Opponent 


38 


Covenant 


22 


35 


Milligan 


24 


59 


Milligan 


41 


59 


Carson-Newman 


34 


41 


Fisk 


19 


34 


Berry 


24 


32 


Covenant 


26 


34 


Covenant 


23 


43 


Middle Tenn. 


19 


17 


Lee 


44 


43 


Lipscomb 


18 




62 Athletics 




Cross Country: 

A Year 

of Learning 



To prepare for the new cross country season Coach Jake 
Matthes encourages his runners to attempt 500-1000 miles' 
practice during summer vacation. But with only 3 returnees 
and 7 starters, the team begins with a built-in handicap. The 
season, however, is a good one in spite of 10 losses and 1 
win. Record-breaking Dave Wolfe adds interest to the 
50-day-long season. He places first in 8 dual meets and 2 
invitationals and comes in 110th in the NAIA Crosscoun- 
try Championship in Liberty, Missouri. 



UPPER LEFT: The Cross Country team: left to right: Coach Lloyd 
Matthes, David Wolfe, Mark Thoreson, Jim Thornton, Roger Coul- 
ter, Bart Boggs, Keith Davis, and Jim Steele. LOWER LEFT: 
Built-up tensions are released at the beginning of the race. MIDDLE: 
The meet goes on despite harsh weather. LOWER RIGHT: Dave 
Wolfe sets a new school record as he wins the invitational. 




J 



T 



4 



Alhlili. •. (,.! 



UPPER LEFT: Strategy is planned in the team 
huddle. UPPER RIGHT: Crowd support is un- 
usually good. LOWER LEFT: Paul Bishop 
knows what responsibility means. LOWER 
MIDDLE: One of the Lions' biggest handicaps 
is height. LOWER RIGHT: The cheerleaders 
"give it all they've got." 






64 Athletics 




Basketbal 
Outlook is 
Encouraging 

The 1971-72 basketball season, ac- 
cording to Coach Wayne Dixon, is a year 
of rebuilding for the Lions. Five returning 
lettermen spur the players to win several 
games out of a variety of tough teams like 
Union University in Jackson, several 
VSAC schools, and the usual SCAC 
teams. Freshmen and transfers offer good 
reinforcements to complete the Lions' 
team. In spite of the handicaps, it is an 
encouraging year of hard work and even 
some victories. 




Athlotics 65 




66 Athletics 



_— 







BASKETBALL 1971-72 




Bryan 




Opponent 


73 


Trevecca 


91 


84 


L.M.U. 


102 


71 


Lee 


82 


76 


Baptist Christian 


69 


70 


Temple 


73 


64 


Montevallo 


89 


83 


Union 


101 


85 


Maryjville 


86 


75 


Milligan 


88 


90 


Milligan 


115 


87 


Temple 


72 


89 
104 


L.M.U. 


86 


Spring Arbor 


112 


81 


Sewanee 


96 


90 


Maryville 


98 


75 


Trevecca 


85 


98 


Covenant 


91 


87 


Lee 


79 


85 


Covenant 


95 


92 


Augusta 


114 


63 


Armstrong 


104 


97 


Steed 


85 


75 


Temple 


85 


108 


Johnson Bible 


80 



UPPER LEFT: The 1971-72 Bryan Lions, left to 
right, kneeling: Milo Smith, Dave Eldridge, Woody 
Duncan, Steve Johnson, Wayne McPherson, and 
Bill Brewer. Standing: Larry Eastman, Rick Efird, 
Gary Freels, Ray Locy, Mike Scott, Phil Long, and 
R. T. Barker. UPPER RIGHT: The Bryan Cheer- 
leaders left to right, below: Patty Baker, Ann 
Fulmer, Martha Jones, Barb McCarrell, and Jackie 
Bright. Above: Debbie Surbaugh, Nancy Bugg, and 
Bertha Combs. LOWER LEFT: Dave Eldridge is a 
good defensive player, too. LOWER RIGHT: For 
some fans the ball game has special meaning. 



Athletics 67 





UPPER LEFT: The cheerleaders encourage the team. 
UPPER RIGHT: Girls' basketball games begin with 
warmup, too. LOWER LEFT: Woody Duncan is one 
of Bryan's leading scorers. LOWER MIDDLE: Bryan 
sometimes has foul trouble. LOWER RIGHT: The 
Bryan Girls' Basketball team, left to right, kneeling: 
Ginger Bell, Naomi McCarrell, Kaye Williamson, Paula 
Sims, Trudi Hitchens, Kay Newhouse, Anne Bryant, 
Crystal Ammerman. Standing: Coach Paul Bishop, 
Cathy Lynn, Carris Barker, Judy Steele, Mary Pierce, 
Vickie Pyfrom, Bonita Spenser, and Joy Steele. 




68 Athletics 



J 







GIRLS BASKETBALL 




Bryan 




Opponent 


41 


Hiawasee 


62 


51 


Temple 


40 


21 


Hiawasee 


50 


28 


St. Mary's 


40 


37 


Ft. Sanders 


38 


57 


Erlanger 


36 


42 


Temple 


58 





Athlotics 69 






Recreational 

Sports Enliven 

Campus 



RIGHT: The Bryan Junior Class football team 
completes an undefeated season with a victory 
over the Tennessee Temple team. BELOW: 
Even girls participate in contact sports. BELOW 
RIGHT: Mr. Llewellyn enjoys the challenge of 
a good game of pool. 















8 


p 


W 


It 



70 Athletics 




Academics 71 



Division Of 

Biblical Studies 

And Philosophy 



Preparing students for seminary, mis- 
sions, Christian work, or professional 
fields is the main thrust of the Division of 
Biblical Studies and Philosophy, chaired 
by Dr. John Anderson. This ever- 
expanding division strives to make Bryan 
College known for its Biblical Studies in 
the context of the school's purpose— "To 
train young people under auspices dis- 
tinctly Christian and spiritual." Depart- 
ments and chairmen under this division 
are Bible, Dr. Irving Jensen; Christian Ed- 
ucation, Mr. Alan Winkler; Ancient Lan- 
guages, Dr. John Anderson; and Philoso- 
phy, Dr. Robert Mounts. Dr. Kenneth O. 
Gangel, Trinity Seminary, is this year's 
speaker for the Distinguished Christian 
Scholar Lecture Series. 





72 Academics 






UPPER LEFT: Dr. Jensen, Dr. Anderson, and Mr. Winkler are professors in 
the division. MIDDLE: Dr. Kenneth Gangel is the Divisional Lecturer. 
UPPER RIGHT: Bible majors and guests attend a banquet in honr of Dr. 
Gangel. LOWER LEFT: Kevin Straley looks for materials for a Bible 
Seminar paper. LOWER RIGHT: Dr. Anderson patiently listens to a 
freshman's Greok translation. 



Academics 73 



Division Of 

Education And 

Psychology 



Helping students develop a philosophy 
of education and preparing them for 
teaching careers with emphasis on the 
Christian perspective in human behavior 
and growth are the main purposes of the 
Division of Education and Psychology, 
chaired by Dr. Dale Carter. Along with 
classroom instruction and techniques, 
competitive sports activities and student 
teaching, the section also serves as an 
information center for approximately 
two hundred prospective employers. In- 
cluded in the division are the Depart- 
ments of Education and Psychology, led 
by Dr. Carter; and Physical Education, 
headed by Coach Wayne Dixon. 






74 Academics 






UPPER LEFT: Mr. Boyd, Psychology instructor, reviews a 
paper with Cindy Meehan. UPPER RIGHT: At the student- 
teacher dinner student teachers get to know their critic 
teachers. LOWER LEFT: Mr. Hill talks with Mike Corbin 
concerning an assignment. LOWER MIDDLE: Dr. Carter, 
head of the Education Department, is teaching his first year 
at Bryan. LOWER RIGHT: Lois Auringer finds that student 
teaching demands much of her time. 



A. iiili'imi '. /', 



Division Of 
Fine Arts 



The Division of Fine Arts provides opportunities 
for artistic development both in the classroom and 
co-curricular activities. According to Dr. James Greas- 
by, chairman of the division, each discipline seeks to 
increase the student's sensitivity, understanding, and 
appreciation. The very active Music Department, 
headed by Dr. Greasby, oversees the spring Choir 
Tour to Dallas and New Orleans. Buying new choir 
robes means many money-raising activities, including 
a Talent Show in February. Other departments are 
Art and Fine Arts in which students may not only 
learn about the arts but also participate in the crea- 
tion of painting, sculpting, and ceramics. Events for 
the entire division include traveling art shows, the 
Rhea County Concert Series, and the county-wide 
Fine Arts Festival in April. 




ABOVE: Dr. Greasby and Charlie Hunnicutt relax in the 
Lion's Dean. RIGHT: Annette Winkler devotes much of her 
time to practice. UPPER RIGHT: In ceramics class Ellen 
Hawkins learns to work with clay. FAR RIGHT: Dennis 
Bollien, a music major, listens attentively to the music of a 
chapel program. LOWER RIGHT: As Mary Pierce plays, Mrs. 
Holt listens and instructs. 




76 Academics 






PL . 





Academics 77 



Division Of 

Literature And 

Modern Languages 



The Division of Literature and Modern Languages, 
chaired by Dr. Richard Cornelius, strives to teach 
students to become aware of interrelationships of 
language, literature, and life through the processes of 
critical reading and thinking, effective writing and 
speaking, and to refine their Christian philosophy of 
life. The English department offers the major in the 
division; other areas include Speech, French, Spanish, 
and German. Activities include field trips, creating 
ads for Bryan in national magazines, and annual stu- 
dent writing contests. Special features this year are 
Dr. Ernest Lee, lecturing in April on "Linguistics and 
the Layman," and non-credit Russian classes, offered 
by Mr. Joseph Overholt. 






78 Academics 




UPPER LEFT: Mr. Overholt's French class listens and 
watches very closely. UPPER RIGHT: Finding the correct 
English course can be confusing. LOWER LEFT: Annette 
Henderson finds the card catalogue one of her best friends as 
she goes on an English seminar "Treasure Hunt." LOWER 
MIDDLE: Dr. Cornelius has various ways to emphasize his 
point. LOWER RIGHT: Ardel Caneday adds the final touch- 
es to his lit paper. 





1 



1 



Academics 79 



Division Of 
Natural Sciences 



The Division of Natural Sciences 
strives to maintain a relevant, academic 
section. Learning and relating science to 
society is the main goal. The woodland 
setting of the college adds special oppor- 
tunity for the study of specimens from 
rocks, trees, and streams. The Depart- 
ment of Biology, chaired by Dr. Willard 
Henning, is notable this year for its new 
undergraduate research projects concern- 
ing the effect of alcohol, hormones, and 
stimulants on living animals. Mr. Jake 
Matthes, chairman of the Mathematics 
Department, works on plans for studies in 
applied mathematics, complex variables, 
and computer training to be added to the 
curriculum. 





UPPER LEFT: Dr. Barnhart and Mr. Matthes head the Math 
Department. LOWER LEFT: Rick Efird and Dave Eldridge 
finish their chemistry assignments. LOWER MIDDLE: Much 
of the plant world on Bryan campus is examined by botany 
students. RIGHT: Dave Smith checks the mice involved in 
the organic chemistry tests. 




80 Academics 






Academics 81 



Division Of 
History, 

Business, And 

Social Sciences 



The Division of History, Business, and 
Social Sciences strives to increase aware- 
ness and develop Christian values and 
integrity. In the light of man's experi- 
ences in the past, the division, chaired by 
Dr. Blair Bentley, seeks to illuminate 
truths about man that will help the stu- 
dent to a new social consciousness and to 
accept his Christian responsibility in the 
contemporary world. The Departments in 
the section are History and Social Sci- 
ences, led by Dr. Bentley, and Business, 
headed by Mr. Ben Doddridge, with ma- 
jors in both Business Administration and 
Business Education. 






UPPER LEFT: David Kypriandes asks Everett Kier about the 
Ancient History assignment. UPPER RIGHT: While Professor 
Bentley completes his doctoral dissertation, LOWER RIGHT: 
Miss Sorber teaches in his place. LOWER LEFT: The new 
calculating machine helps Marty Collins in his business 
courses. LOWER MIDDLE: Wayne McLeod searches for in- 
formation for his Government survey paper. 



Academics 83 



! 




^wm* 






UPPER LEFT: Small group meetings often discuss 
ways to improve and evaluate the college. UPPER 
RIGHT: Richard Daugherty assists Mr. Liebig in 
typing questionnaires and committee reports. 
LOWER LEFT: Don Shakespeare compiles the re- 
sults of one of the many questionnaires. LOWER 
RIGHT: Mr. Coverdale discusses his committee's 
report with Mr. Liebig. 




84 Academics 



*£?rv -v^r^5 




Self Study 
Forces Evaluation 



The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools states 
its purpose to "help institutions reassess their objectives, 
measure success in attaining objectives, explore ways and 
means by which educational efficiency may be improved, 
and prepare for the ever- increasing demands by society." 
Mr. Glen Liebig directs the time-consuming committee re- 
search, reports, and evaluations that include all faculty, 
administrators, and a select group of students. 



Academics 85 



Who's Who Is Peak 
Senior Recognition 



Who's Who Among Students in American Univer- 
sities and Colleges is one of the highest honors given 
to students for outstanding service, industriousness, 
and achievement. Chosen yearly by the faculty and 
judged on the basis of leadership, scholarship, and 
future potential are seven senior men and women. 
Included in the award is notice in the national publi- 
cation and a lifetime reference service. 






86 Academics 






UPPER LEFT: Martha Jones, among her many and varied activ- 
ities, is cheerleader captain. UPPER RIGHT: Besides being Stu- 
dent Assistant, Kevin Straley, left, is a member of the Student 
Senate. John Main, right, is Student Senate President. LOWER 
LEFT: Beckie Conrad, who is active in Missions in Action, also 
works in the Records Office. LOWER MIDDLE: A former Co- 
Editor of the yearbook, Marcy Stewart offers suggestions to 
current Editor, Ed Fritts. LOWER RIGHT: Lynda Paulson is a 

• lllM.-rflll '.iM.lrnl /■ -.1,1.11,1 



Academics 87 




The European Study Tour and night 
classes are popular additions to this year's 
curriculum. Residents of the Dayton 
community as well as Bryan students take 
advantage of these opportunities for 
learning. 



ABOVE: Bryan's first summer European Study 
Tour is conducted by Dr. John Bartlett. 
RIGHT: For some students, the library be- 
comes a familiar place. BELOW: Because of the 
enrollment increase, night classes become neces- 
sary. 





88 Academics 




People 89 




Trustees Confirm 
New Chapel 



The Bryan Board of Trustees aids the school in 
many ways: overseeing campus developments, helping 
secure and acquire money necessary for the continua- 
tion of the school, and regulating school policy and 
standards. Composed of businessmen and private citi- 
zens, the Trustees are a necessary and essential part of 
the college. 



UPPER: The Board meets with the administration twice a 
year for the purposes of discussing and establishing goals for 
the school. LOWER: Dr. J. Wesley McKinney is the present 
Chairman of the Board. 




90 Trustees 



The Board Of Trustees 



Mr. James R. Barth 
3265 E. Western Reserve 
Poland, Ohio 44514 



Mr. D. Lewis Llewellyn 

Box 100 

Sebring, Florida 33870 



TRUSTEE EMERITI 

Mr. Roy Adams 

Sale Creek, Tennessee 37373 



Dr. C. Markham Berry 
4665 Mystic Drive 
Atlanta, Georgia 30305 



Dr. J. Wesley McKinney 
921 Exchange Building 
Memphis, Tennessee 38103 



Mrs. E. B. Arnold 

123 West Second Avenue 

Dayton, Tennessee 37321 



Mr. Stanley Brading 

30 East Liberty 

Sumter, South Carolina 29151 



Mr. Robert B. Norris 

P.O. Box 329 

Dayton, Tennessee 37321 



Mrs. J. S. Frazier 
N. Market Street 
Dayton, Tennessee 37321 



Mr. M. V. Brodsky 

Box 11 

Fincastle, Virginia 24090 



Mr. Widney Brown 

P.O. Box 313 

Dayton, Tennessee 37321 



Mr. R. L. Bryan 
P.O.Box 154 
Bartow, Florida 33830 



Mr. R. Don Efrid 

407 Iris Avenue 

Kannapolis, North Carolina 28081 



Mr. Bryan Elder 

P.O. Box 168 

Dayton, Tennessee 37321 



Mr. Albert J. Page 
5702 Criner Road 
Huntsville, Alabama 35802 



Mr. E. J. Robeson 

119 York Street 

Chester, South Carolina 29706 



Mr. Jack Robinson 

P.O. Box 25 

Dayton, Tennessee 37321 



Dr. J. J. Rodgers 
N. Market Street 
Dayton, Tennessee 37321 



Rev. Mark Senter 

9 E. Circle Avenue 

Greenville, South Carolina 29607 



Mrs. Harris Gregg 
1 10 East & West Road 
Lookout Mountain, 
Tennessee 37350 



Mr. Harry C. Johnson 
223 Jackson Street, S.E. 
Athens, Tennessee 37303 



Mr. Clarence E. Mason, Sr. 
Georgia Villa Rest Home 
Douglasville, Georgia 30134 



Dr. Herman Hoyt 

Box 135 

Winona Lake, Indiana 46590 



Rev. Ian M. Hay 
228 Forest Road 
Fanwood, New Jersey 07023 



Mr. Edward B. Shoff 

P.O. Box 2868 

Asheville, North Carolina 28802 



Mr. John D. Hood 
P.O. Box 916 
Toccoa, Georgia 30577 



Rev. W. Earle Stevens 
1 145 Audubon Drive 
Memphis, Tennessee 38117 



Miss Ruth Huston 

P.O. Box 18 

Emmalena, Kentucky 41740 



Mr. C. P. Swafford 

P.O. Box 293 

Dayton, Tennessee 37321 



Dr. Karl E. Keefer 
R.F.D. 4 Cherry Drive 
Martin, Tennessee 38237 



Mr. C. Barry Whitney 
20 Eighth Street 
Augusta, Georgia 30902 



Trustoes 91 



The President 



Dr. Theodore C. Mercer, President of the 
College, is an exceptionally dynamic leader as 
he serves for his fifteenth year at Bryan. As 
executive officer of the Board of Trustees, he is 
responsible for the financial welfare of the 
school. In all phases of the college's functions 
he is the mediator. With his friendly personal- 
ity. Dr. Mercer stimulates public relations; he 
speaks in churches, in civic clubs, and in alumni 
groups. The President faces many innovations 
for the present and near future— the new dorm, 
the Self-Study project, and the drive for the 
new chapel-fine arts building. With his many 
qualifications, Dr. Mercer proves to be a suc- 
cessful, effective president who shows a per- 
sonal interest in everyone. 




Dr. Theodore C. Mercer 




92 Administration 





Dr. John B. Bartlett 



Dr. Robert L. Mounts 



The Deans 





Mr. Robert D. Andrews 



Miss Karen deRosset 




An involved and aware dean. Dr. John 
B. Bartlett demonstrates much personal 
interest in Bryan as well as fulfilling his 
regular duties as Academic Dean. Chairing 
the academic council, counseling students 
with academic problems, and teaching 
nearly a full load are just a few of his 
activities. He secures faculty members 
and serves as administrative representative 
to the Trustees' Academic Committee. To 
be a fair administrator to the faculty and 
a just and wise liason between teachers 
and students is the aim of this versatile 
and capable man. 

The goal is consistency as Dr. Robert 
L. Mounts fulfills his office of adminis- 
trator for the total personnel program. 
With the help of an efficient staff he 
works toward a clear, honest interpreta- 
tion of handbook rules and for better 
communication with students. According- 
ly, his responsibilities include personal 
counseling and occasional disciplinary ac- 
tion. 

As assistants to Dr. Mounts, Karin 
deRosset, Dean of Women, and Robert 
Andrews, Dean of Men, find a challenging 
but time-consuming job. Discipline, coun- 
seling, housing, and permission are in the 
area of their work; in addition, they 
supervise student assistants, help solve 
inter-dormitory problems, and recom- 
mend policy changes. Carrying out their 
many duties in the face of obstacles is a 
tribute to the stability and industrious- 
ness of both deans. 



Administration 93 



Administrative 
Officers 



Mr. Vern Archer 
Treasurer 

Mr. L. Donald Hill 
Registrar 

Mr. Marvin Keener 
Director of Development 



Miss Rebecca Peck 
Executive Alumni Secretary 

Miss Zelpha Russell 
Director of Admissions 

Mr. E. Walter Seera 
Admissions Counselor 



Mrs. Mayme Sheddan 

Dean of Counseling Services, Director of 

Testing, Student Aid Officer 



Mr. Robert Sheddan 

Director of Administrative Services 

1917-1972 



Mr. Russell Stansbury 
Business Manager 




Staff 



Mrs. Harriet Anderson 
Library Assistant 

Mrs. Betty Arnold 
Secretary to Dean of Counseling Services 

Mrs. Mildred Arnold 
Cashier 



Mrs. Josephine Boyd 
Secretary to Registrar 

Mr. Bill Brooks 
Janitorial Staff 

Mr. Ernest Buff 
Food-Service Manager 




94 Administration/Staff 




Staff 









■ - • " - ° 





* ■.,' 



WyVVVW 



■ "•' 


«v M 


^ -■' 










Miss Peggy Cooper 
School Nurse 

Mrs. Hilda Daugherty 
Bookkeeper 

Miss Wanda Davey 

Clerical Assistant in Administrative Services 

Mrs. Barbara Davidson 
Secretary in Public Relations 



Mrs. Carolyn Hays 

Clerical Assistant in Administrative Services 

Mr. Austin Higgins 

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

Mrs. Grace Higgins 

Secretary in Administrative Services 

Mrs. Joyce Hollin 
Student Work Coordinator 



Mrs. Mary Hook 
Cashier 

Miss Madge Hughey 

Secretary to Director of Admissions 

Mrs. Mary Liebig 
Bookstore Manager 

Mrs. Ann Morgan 
Secretary to Academic Dean 



Miss Kathy Murphey 
Secretary in Personnel 

Mrs. Mildred Ross 
Cook 

Miss Virginia Schmickl 
Receptionist 

Mrs. Eleanor Steele 

Clerical Assistant in Administrative Services 



v:\ 



vxX> .v.vmv Wli 




Mrs. Rebecca Van Meeveren 
Assistant Librarian 

Mrs. Hilda Winkler 

Clerical Assistant in Administrative Services 

Mrs. Betty Wynsema 
Secretary to President 



M.ill !)!, 



Faculty 



Dr. John C. Anderson 
Professor of Ancient Languages 






Mr. Phil Ashworth 
Assistant Professor of Biology 



Dr. Richard Bamhart 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 



Dr. John B. Bartlett 
Professor of Speech 




96 Faculty 




Dr. H. Blair Bentley 
Professor of History 



Faculty 97 



Mrs. Louise Bentley 

Assistant Professor of English 



Dr. Dale E. Carter 

Associate Professor of Education 
and Psychology 







Dr. Stephen G. Cobb 
Associate Professor of History 



Mr. William Boyd 

Assistant Professor of Music 



98 Faculty 




Dr. Richard Cornelius 

Professor of English 




Mr. J. Scott Coverdale 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 





Mr. Wayne Dixon 

Athlutic Director and 
Assistant Professor of 
Health and Physical 
Education 



Mr. Ben F. Doddridge 
Instructor in Business 



Faculty 99 



Mrs. Betty Giesemann 
Instructor in Chemistry 





Dr. J. James Greasby 

Professor of Music 




Dr. Willard Henning 

Professor of Zoology 




Mr. L. Donald Hill 

Associate Professor of Education 



100 Faculty 




Mrs. Mary N. Holt 
Instructor in Music 



Mr. Wayne Hook 

Instructor in Art 






Mr. Leo L. Horton 

Av.i-.t.ml I'rrjfi'V.ni "I 
Education and Ptycholoyy 



Dr. Irving Jensen 

Prolussor of Biblii 



Faculty 101 



Mr. Glen Liebig 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 



Mr. David Llewellyn 

Assistant Professor of English 





Dr. Robert Mounts 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 
and Psychology 



Mr. Joseph Overholt 

Assistant Professor in Modern Languages 



102 Faculty 





Mr. Lloyd Matthes 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 





Mr. Ray Parker 

Instructor in Christian Education 



Miss Kay Sorber 

Instructor in History 









Mrs. Rebecca Van Meeveren 
Assistant Librarian 



Miss Virginia Seguine 
Librarian 



Mr. Alan Winkler 
Assistant Professor 
of Christian Education 



Faculty 103 



Seniors 



ALVIS, SHIRLEY: Elementary Education 
Jacksonville, Florida 

ARNDT, EDSEL: History 
Beckley, West Virginia 

ARNOLD, GEORGE: Business Administration 
Dayton, Tennessee 



AURINGER, LOIS: Elementary Education 
Friendship, Ohio 

BARKER, ROY: Biology 
Hazard, Kentucky 

BECKWITH, DARLENE: French 
Ipswich, Massachusetts 



BELLAMY, CHER I: Elementary Education 
Dahlonega, Georgia 

BERWAGER, NED: Biology 
Hanover, Pennsylvania 

BISHOP, PAUL: Greek 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 



BOEDDEKER, ELIZABETH: Mathematics 
St. Louis, Missouri 

BOGGS, BARTOM: Mathematics 
Butler, Pennsylvania 

BOUCHARD, DAVID: Psychology 
Fort Fairfield, Maine 



BRADSHAW, RICHARD: Mathematics 
Avella, Pennsylvania 

BYERLEY, DAVID: Business Education 
Spring City, Tennessee 

CANEDAY, ARDEL: History 
Taylor Falls, Minnesota 




104 Seniors/Alv-Can 




CLARK, ELIZABETH: Elementary Education 
Erwin, Tennessee 

COMBS, BERTHA: Elementary Education 
West Alexandria, Ohio 

CONRAD, BECKIE: Elementary Education 
Dayton, Tennessee 



CORDER, MARY JEAN: Elementary Education 
Hammond, Indiana 

DILLON, DONALD: History 
Kermit, West Virginia 

DRIVER, MARGARET: Elementary Education 
Chatham, Illinois 



FORD, DONALD: History 
Four States, West Virginia 

FOUTS, GERALD: Bible 
Hammond, Indiana 

FRITTS, EDWARD: English 
Harriman, Tennessee 



FULMER, ANN: Bible 
Springfield, Virginia 

GRAHAM, JANE: Business Education 
Graysville, Tennessee 

GREGORY, STEVE: English 
Muskegon, Michigan 



GRIDLEY, JOHN: Christian Education 
St. Joseph, Michigan 

HARBIN, TERRY: English 
East Point, Georgia 

HARPER, LARRY: Greek 

Hnul it. I >'.,!•, 



Seniors/Clo-Har 105 



HARRIS, HAROLD: Christian Education 
Evensville, Tennessee 

HAUGHT, MARTHA: Elementary Education 
Dayton, Tennessee 

HAWKINS, ELLEN: English 
New Orleans, Louisiana 



HOLDER, PATRICK: Bible 
LaFargeville, New York 

HOWARD, MARY: Music Education 
Sale Creek, Tennessee 

IRWIN, BILL: Business Administration 
Richmond, Virginia 



JACOBSEN, LAWRENCE: Elementary Education 

Chicago, Illinois 

JACOBSEN, LINDA: Elementary Education 
Chicago, Illinois 

JENKINS, JAMIE: History 
Mobile, Alabama 



JENKINS, YVONNE: Elementary Education 
Beaver, West Virginia 

JONES, MARTHA: English 
Abbeville, South Carolina 

JUDSON, NESS: Business Administration 
Linden, New Jersey 



KARR, DIANE: English 
Clarkston, Georgia 

KEEPING, THOMAS: Christian Education 
Decaturville, Tennessee 

KIMMEL, TIMOTHY: Greek 
Ashland, Ohio 




106 Seniors/Har-Kim 





«Yfct* 








V ' 



KYPRIANDES, DAVID: History 
Newport News, Virginia 

LEAF, GARY: Christian Education 
Stanchfield, Minnesota 

LOEFFLER, PHILLIP: Mathematics 
Royal Oak, Michigan 



LONG, PHILLIP: Biology 
Johnstown, Ohio 

LONGNECKER, MARK: Business Administration 
Orangeville, Pennsylvania 

MAIN, JOHN: Greek 
Northville, Michigan 




MATHISEN, GERALD: Bible 
Wausau, Wisconsin 

MATTHES, SANDRA: Music Theory 
Dayton, Tennessee 

McCARRELL, BARBARA: Elementary Education 
Glenview, Illinois 




MEBERG, HAROLD: Bible 
Orlando, Florida 

MERCER, SHEILA: Elementary Education 
Kirkwood, New Jersey 

MILLER, RICK: Biology 
Miami, Florida 



MINTER, LINDA: Music Education 
Oak Ridge, Tennessee 

MITCHELL, DANNY: Christian Education 
Mentor, Ohio 

NEAL, LOIS: Elementary Education 
Granite Falls, Minnesota 



Seniors/Kyp-Nea 107 



OTTO, DAVID: Business Administration 
Glen Burnie, Maryland 

PAULSON, LYNDA: Elementary Education 
Hopkins, Minnesota 

PETERSON, LYNNE: English 
Milford, Ohio 



PETERSON, PAUL: Biology 
Fort Myers, Florida 

POOLE, JOSEPH: Elementary Education 
Miramar, Florida 

POOLE, MARILEE: Elementary Education 
Miramar, Florida 



QUIGLEY, ELEANOR: English 
Claymont, Delaware 

RUSSELL, CHARLES: Christian Education 
Fairfield, Ohio 

RYDER, PAUL: Business Administration 
Cortland, New York 



SAVAGE, CONNIE: Biology 
Lake Worth, Florida 

SHAKESPEARE, DONALD: Psychology 
King of Prussia, Pennsylvania 

SHAVER, HOUSTON: Business Administration 
Dayton, Tennessee 



SHEDDAN, FRANK: Music Education 
Dayton, Tennessee 

SHUMAKER, BONITA: Music Education 
Northumberland, Pennsylvania 

SMART, LAURA: Elementary Education 
Dayton, Tennessee 




108 Seniors/Ott-Sma 




SMITH, DAVID: Biology 
Hackettstown, New Jersey 

STEWART, MARCIA: Music Education 
Lake Alfred, Florida 

STRALEY, KEVIN: Bible 
Lansing, Michigan 



STRICKLAND, KENNETH: Bible 
Pompton Plains, New Jersey 

STROUPE, PAMELA: Elementary Education 
Killarney, Manitoba, Canada 

SUMMERS, GENE: Biology 
Huntington, West Virginia 



TALLENT, BOBBIE: Elementary Education 
Dayton, Tennessee 

TURNER, JOYCE: Elementary Education 
Wheaton, Maryland 

VAN PROOYEN, NANCY: Elementary Education 
Wausau, Wisconsin 



WELD, LINDA: Biology 
Lansing, Michigan 

WELKER, DONALD: History 
Elkhart, Indiana 

WELLS, PATRICIA: Elementary Education 
Huntington, West Virginia 



WETHERBEE, TIM: Music Education 
Newfield, New York 

WHISMAN, JAMES: Elementary Education 
Louisville, Tennessee 

WILSON, CAROL: Elementary Education 
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 



Soniors/Smi-Wil 109 



life- 



WILSON, LARRY: English 
Bradenton, Florida 

WINKLER, ANNETTE: Music Theory 
Dayton, Tennessee 



WYLLIE, JOHN: English 
Williamston, South Carolina 

YODER, TERRY: History 
West Liberty, Ohio 




Senior Class Officers 








«&*! 




Joe Poole, Treasurer 



Marcy Stewart, Secretary 





Ardel Caneday, Vice President 



Kevin Straley, President 





Underclassmen 



ADAMS, MELODY, So. 
ALLISON, KENNETH, Jr. 
ALT, KIM, So. 

AMMERMAN, CRYSTAL, Fr. 
ANDERSON, JAMES, Fr. 



ANSEL, GAIL, Fr. 
ASHBY, DIANNA, Fr. 
AUSTIN, CAROL, So. 
AUSTIN, ROBERT, So. 
BABICH, DANIEL, Fr. 



BAER, BETTY, Fr. 
BAKER, DEBORAH, So. 
BAKER, PATTY, Fr. 
BALLARD, KATHY, So. 
BALMAN, DANIEL, Jr. 



BARKER, CARRIS, Fr. 
BARKER, TOMMY, Fr. 
BARROWS, BETTY, So. 
BARTON, DOW, So. 
BAUDER, ANDREW, So. 



BEARD, MARY, So. 
BELL, GINGER, Fr. 
BENTLEY, SHIRLEY, Fr. 
BIRKETT, ERICK.So. 
BODLIEN, DENNIS, Jr. 



BOEDDEKER, ANDREW, Fr. 
BOGGS.BRENDA, Fr. 
BOYD, BONNIE, So. 
BRADSHAW, STEPHEN, Fr. 
BREWER, BILL, Fr. 



BRIGHT, JACKIE, So. 
BRODSKY, KAREN, Jr. 
8ROST, DARLENE, Jr. 
BROWN, JOYCE, Fr. 
BROWN, RONDALL, Fr. 



Undorclassmon/Ado-Bro 1 1 1 



BRYANT, ANNE, Fr. 

BUCHSBAUM, WAYNE, Fr. 

BUCKHANNON, JANET, Fr. 

BUGG, NANCY, So. 

BURROWS, SHIRLEY, Jr. 



CAMP, DANNY, Fr. 

CANTWELL, DONALD, Fr. 

CAPPS, RICK, Fr. 

CARTER, PHILIP, Fr. 

CATHER, JENNY, So. 



CHATMAN, VIRGINIA, Jr. 

CILIBERTO, LOUISE, Fr. 

CLARK, BRUCE, So. 

CLARK, CHARLOTTE, Jr. 

CLARK, FRED, Fr. 



COLLINS, MARTIN, Jr. 

CONRAD, BOB, Fr. 

COOPER, PEGGY, Sp. 

CORBIN, DEANNA, Jr. 

CORBIN,MIKE,So. 



CORNTASSEL, KENNETH, Jr. 

COULTER, ANNETTE, Jr. 

COULTER, JEANETTE, Jr. 

COULTER, ROGER, Fr. 

COX, ELLEN, So. 



CRAWFORD, ANNE, Jr. 

CRAWLEY, PHYLLIS, Fr. 

CROPP, CONNIE, Fr. 

CROSBIE, JANE, Jr. 

CROSTHWAIT, DELANA, So. 



CURTIS, ANGELA, Fr. 

DANNER, SUSAN, Fr. 

DAUGHERTY, RICHARD, So. 

DAVANT, BILL, Fr. 

DAVEY, MARTHA, Fr. 




112 Underclassmen/Bry-Dav 




DAVIDSON, RON, Jr. 
DAVIES, ELAINE, Fr. 
DAVIES, PEGGY, Jr. 
DAVIS, ALICE, So. 
DAVIS, CHUCK, Fr. 



DAVIS, KEITH, Fr. 
DAVIS, SCOTT, Fr. 
DECKER, JANICE, Jr. 
DEWITT, KATHY.Fr. 
DIPRIMA, PAOLA, So. 



DIRKS, DARCY.So. 
DRESDOW, JOYCE, Fr. 
DUNCAN, WOODY, So. 
EASTMAN, LARRY, Jr. 
ECKLES, CATHY, Fr. 



EDWARDS, BECKY, Jr. 
EFIRD, RICK, So. 
EISENBACK, JON, So. 
ELDRIDGE, DAVID, So. 
ELLISON, SHIRLEY, Jr. 



ELY, FRED, So. 
FARNEY, RICK, Fr. 
FERGUSON, BRENT, Jr. 
FITCH, PAUL, Jr. 
FITZENREIDER, ROZLIND,Jr. 



FITZGERALD, JAMES, So. 
FLORENCE, PHYLLIS, Fr. 
FOLEY, SANDY, Fr. 
FREDERICK, RONALD, Fr. 
FREELS.GARY, Fr. 



FRENS, LAUREL, Fr. 
FUGATE.CORA ANN, Jr. 
GAGE, GLENN, Jr. 
GARRIS, PAM, Fr. 
GAUSE, REBEKAH.So. 



Undorclassmon/Dav-Gau 113 



GEORGIANNI.SUZANN, Jr. 

GIBSON, SANDY, Jr. 

GIESEL, DAVE, Jr. 

GILMER, MIKE, Fr. 

GODFREY, JIM, Fr. 



GOEHRING, RON, So. 

GOEHRING, STEVE, So. 

GRAHAM, BILLY, Jr. 

GRAHAM, JANETT, Fr. 

GRAY, MARION, Jr. 



GRIFFITH, STEVE, Jr. 

HARRIS, SANDY, Jr. 

HARTSHORN, SHARON, So. 

HAWKINS, MARILYN, Fr. 

HAZLETT, WILMA, Sp. 



HEATH, BONNIE, So. 

HENDERSON, ANNETTE, Jr. 

HENRY, DALE, Jr. 

HENRY, GWYNN, Fr. 

HESTERLY, PEGGY, Jr. 



HICKMAN, RANDY, Fr. 

HIGDON.TOM, Fr. 

HILL, SHERRY, So. 

HITCHENS.TRUDI.So. 

HOBBS, DAN, Jr. 



HODGES, BETTY, So. 
HOPPE,SUE,Fr. 

HORTON, LINDA, So. 
HOWARD, BARBARA, Jr. 
HOWARD, DEBORAH, Fr. 



HOWARD, LINDA, Jr. 

HUDSON, REBECCA, Fr. 

HUGHSON, JIM, Jr. 

HULSEY, HAROLD, Fr. 

HUNNICUTT, CHARLES, So. 




114 Underclassmen/Geo-Hun 




ICE, DAVID, Fr. 
INGLE, SYDNEY, Fr. 
JACOBSEN, JOYCE, So. 
JEWETT, CAROLYN, So. 
JILES, MARTHA, Fr. 



JOHANSEN, STEVE, Jr. 
JOHNSON, LYNN, Fr. 
JOHNSON, STEVE, Fr. 
JORDAN, GLENDELL, Fr. 
KIER, EVERETT, Jr. 



KINCER, JUDY, Fr. 
KINSEY, DAVID, So. 
KIRKPATRICK, CRAIG, So. 
KLINGBERG, SUSAN, Fr. 
KNUTSON, RON, Jr. 



KOCHER, JOEL, Fr. 
KOCHER, MARK, Fr. 
KOCHER, STEVE, Fr. 
KORVER, GAY, Fr. 
KRUEGER, DEBBIE, Fr. 



LAMB, JIM, So. 
LE, HUU, Sp. 
LEININGER, JAN, Fr. 
LEININGER, JUDY, Fr. 
LESTER, ROBERT, Fr. 



LEVENGOOD, JERRY, Fr. 
LEVENGOOD, THOMAS, So. 
LOCY, RAY, Jr. 
LOOSE, LIZABETH, Jr. 
LOVEGREN, TERRY, So. 



LYNN, CAROL, So. 
LYNN, CATHY, Fr. 
MAINS, DOUG, So. 
MAHLOW, BOB, So. 
MARSHALL, JOHN, So. 



linden l.r.'.cneri/lc .<• M.ii 1 1!i 



MARSHALL, MURIEL, So. 

MASON, JOAN, Jr. 

MCCARRELL, NAOMI, Jr. 

MCCOLLAM, STEVE, Jr. 

MCCUNE, SCOTT, Fr. 



MCGUIRE, ELAINE, Fr. 

MCKEE, BONNIE, Jr. 

MCKEMY, CAROL, Fr. 

MCLEOD, WAYNE, Jr. 

MCMANUS, THOMAS, Jr. 



MCMILLAN, ANITA, Jr. 

MCPHERSON, WAYNE, So. 

MEEHAN, CINDY, Fr. 

MERCER, JOHN, So. 

MEZNAR, JILL, Fr. 



MILLARD, PAT, Jr. 

MILLER, BEVERLY, Jr. 

MOORE, RICHARD, Jr. 

MORRIS, DEBBYE, Fr. 

MORRISON, PATRICIA, Fr. 



MYERS, NANCY, Jr. 

NAGY, DENNIS, So. 

NAPIER, REBECCA, So. 

NEDDO, JONATHAN, Fr. 

NEUMANN, SANDY, Fr. 



NEWELL, JANET, Fr. 
NEWELL, STEVE, Fr. 
NEWHOUSE, KAY, Jr. 
NGUY, TIMOTHY, Fr. 
NOFSINGER, NANCY, So. 



NOLAN, SUSAN, So. 

NORWOOD, GREG, Fr. 

O'CONNELL, BEVERLY, So. 

PARCELL, STEVE, Fr. 

PARKER, VALERY, Fr. 




116 Underclassmen/Mar-Par 




PARROTT, KAREN, So. 
PATMAN, KEITH, Fr. 
PAULEY, BRUCE, Jr. 
PECK, BARBARA, Jr. 
PENCE, ANICE, So. 



PETERSON, JOHN, Jr. 
PIERCE, MARY, So. 
POINSETT, RONALD, Fr. 
PORTER, SHERRY, So. 
PRECHTER, MIKE, Fr. 



PRICE, MARIE, So. 
PUCKETT, LARRY, Jr. 
PUFFER, LYNN, Jr. 
PYFROM, VICKIE, Fr. 
QUIGLEY.ED, Fr. 



RAMSEY, REBECCA, So. 
READER, ALANNA, Jr. 
REED, CHUCK, Jr. 
REMINGTON, ROY, Jr. 
RENAUD, GREG, Jr. 



RICH.TERRI, Fr. 
ROACH, DORETHA, Jr. 
ROBERTS, STAN, Fr. 
ROBINSON, DAVID, Fr. 
ROCKHOLT, SANDY, Fr. 



RODDY, DEBBIE, So. 
RODDY, JACK, Fr. 
ROTH, EMERSON, Fr. 
ROTHENBACH, CAROLEE, Fr. 
RUSSELL, TOM, Fr. 



ST. GEORGE, NANCY, Jr. 
SANTSCHI, GARY, Fr. 
SAWTELL, LESLIE, Fr. 
SCOTT, MIKE, Fr. 
SEERA, DAVID, So. 



Undorclassmon/Par-Seo 117 



SHARPE, CARMEN, Fr. 

SHAVER, MARK, So. 

SHAVER, TOM, Jr. 

SHEIN, MARCIA.So. 

SHOFF, CURTIS, Fr. 



Ii 



SHONDELMYER, BEVERLY, Fr. 

SIMS, PAULA, Fr. 

SMITH, DAVID D., Fr. 

SMITH, DAVID G., Fr. 

SMITH, DOUG, Jr. 



SMITH, ELLEN, Fr. 

SMITH, MILO, So. 

SMITH, STEVE, Fr. 

SMITH, TOM, Fr. 

SMOOT, DEBBIE, Fr. 



SPEECE, RICK, Jr. 

SPEICHINGER, DANN, Jr. 

SPENCER, BONITA.So. 

STAYTON, DENNIS, Fr. 

STEELE, JIM, So. 



STEELE, JOY, Fr. 

STEELE, JUDY, Fr. 

STOCKSTILL, JENNIFER, So. 

SURBAUGH, DEBBY, Fr. 

SWAFFORD, BARB, So. 



TALLENT, GLEN, So. 

TANKERSLEY, LESTER, Fr. 

TAYLOR, DALE, So. 

THOMPSON, ELAINE, Fr. 

THOMPSON, LINDA, So. 



THORESON, MARK. Fr. 

THORNTON, JIM, Jr. 

TODD, MIKE, Fr. 

TOLIVER, JOHN, Fr. 

TRAIL, KATY, Fr. 




118 Underclassmen/Sha-Tra 




WRIGHT, DAVE, So. 
WRIGHT, VICKI.So. 
YODER, LILY, Jr. 



TRAIL, TIM, Fr. 
TRINH, PETER, So. 
TUBBS, JEFF.Fr. 
TURNEY, BEN, Jr. 
UNDERWOOD, KAREN, Jr. 



VANHUISEN, MIKE, Jr. 
VANPUFFELEN, DAVID, Jr. 
VANSICE, BARBARA, So. 
VEJR, DAN, Fr. 
VINCENT, DEBBIE, Fr . 



VOSS, PAT, So. 
WADDELL, SUSAN, So. 
WAITE, BARBARA, Fr. 
WALFORD, JUNE, Jr. 
WALKER, MARTHA, Fr. 



WALKER, SCOTT, Jr. 
WARSTLER, CHRIS, Fr. 
WATERS, EVELYN, Jr. 
WEBBER, JANE, Fr. 
WELTON, ALLEN, Fr. 



WENTWORTH, PEGGY, So. 
WHEELER, LYNN, Fr. 
WHITAKER, PAT, Fr. 
WILKIE, JOHN, Fr. 
WILLIAMSON, KAYE, Fr. 



WILLIS, BETH, Jr. 
WILSON, WANDA, Fr. 
WOLFE, DALE, Fr. 
WOLFE, DAVE, Jr. 
WOLLEN, ROBERT, Fr. 



Underclawmon/Tra-Yod 1 19 



Underclassmen 
Officers 



Junior Class: Planning money-making 
projects— working many hours organizing 
and sponsoring the Junior-Senior Ban- 
quet—thinking ahead for the purchase of 
the Senior gift— finishing the year with a 
sense of accomplishment. 

Sophomore Class: Sponsoring the 
Thanksgiving Banquet— planning class 
events— budgeting money for coming re- 
sponsibilities. 

Freshman Class: Organizing a new 
class— starting funds for future needs- 
choosing activities. 





UPPER RIGHT: Junior Officers, left to right: Larry Puckett, 
President; Janice Decker, Secretary-Treasurer; John Peterson, 
Vice-President. ABOVE: Sophomore Officers, left to right: 
Rick Efird, President; Nancy Nofsinger, Secretary-Treasurer; 
Bob Marlow, Vice-President. LOWER RIGHT: Freshman 
Officers, left to right: Dan Camp, President; Carris Barker, Sec- 
retary-Treasurer; Jeff Tubbs, Vice-President. 




120 Underclassmen 



, 




Groups 121 




Student Senate 



Mediating between students and 
administration— seeking more privileges 
for students— changing the slacks' rule to 
allow girls' pantsuits in classes— striving to 
improve relationships all-around at Bryan. 



Student Senate Members, Left to Right; SEAT- 
ED; Janett Graham; Rozlind Fitzenreider; 
Karen Brodsky; Eleanor Quigley, Secretary; 
Hazel Karr; and Darcy Dirks. STANDING: Lar- 
ry Harper; Chuck Davis; Larry Puckett; Kevin 
Straley; John Main, President; Dave Wolfe; 
Marion Gray, Vice-President; Rick Efird; John 
Mercer; and Dan Camp. 



Small Group 
Leaders 




NiH 



The middle-men between students and 
the Student Senate— providing all stu- 
dents with a voice in campus affairs- 
submitting desired changes through 
proper channels for action. 



Small Group Leaders, Left to Right: Jim Lamb; 
Erick Birkett; Mike Gilmer; Lynn Wheeler; 
Roger Coulter; David Kypriandes, Chairman; 
and Mark Kocher. 



122 Groups 




Business Club 



Monthly dinner meetings— guest speak- 
ers relating the practical realms of the 
business world— field trips to local busi- 
ness firms. 



Business Club Officers: Left to Right: Anne 
Crawford, Secretary-Treasurer; David Otto, 
President; Peggy Davies, Vice-President. 



Student Union 



Re-organized this year— directs campus 
organizations— provides entertainment 
with guest singers, movies, parties- 
establishes and decorates offices for the 
Student Union. 




Left to Right: FRONT ROW: Dow Barton, Vice-President; Paul Bishop; Steve Griff ith, 
Pretident; SECOND ROW: John Wyllie, Publicity Chairman; Kay Williamson; Rebecca 
Ramiey; Steve Goehring; BACK ROW: Jon Eisenback; Ann Fulmer; Rick Farney; 
Charles Hunnicutt; Nancy Bugg, Secrotary; Ben Turney; Larry Wilson; Peggy Wentworth, 
Treasurer; Bev Millor. 



Groups 123 




Missions In 
Action 



Programs involving concerned students in active 
missions— FISH, volunteering services to the Day- 
ton community— supporting students in foreign 
countries in the Summer Missions Project- 
sponsoring joint chapels. Focuses, and the Chris- 
tian Life Conference— planning special programs 
like Dollar Day, Intercristo, and March for Mis- 
sions. 



M.I.A.: LEFT ROW, front to rear: Jim Fitzgerald, Vice- 
President; Jim Hughson, Treasurer; Glen Leibig, Sponsor; 
David Wolfe, President. RIGHT ROW, front to rear: 
Yvonne Jenkins, Secretary; Nancy Van Prooyen, Publicity 
Chairman; Earl Conrad, Missionary-in-residence. C.S.A.: 
LEFT TO RIGHT: Larry Harper, President; Ardel Cane 
day, Vice-President provide C.S.A. leadership. 




Christian Service Association 



Activities involving students in local out-reach 
programs— child evangelism— visitation in convalescent 
homes and jails— beach evangelism— school ministry- 
radio programs. 



124 Groups 




Fellowship Of 
Christian Athletes 



Binding athletes with a community of strength- 
exhibiting Christ in word and deed; Bible study, 
assemblies in high schools, prayer meetings. 



Left to Right: FRONT ROW: Mark Shaver, Steve Kocher, 
SECOND ROW: Jeff Tubbs, Phil Loeffler, THIRD ROW: 
Wayne McLeod, Ed Quigley, FOURTH ROW: Dan Hobbs, 
Steve McCollam, FIFTH ROW: Tom Russell, Larry Puck- 
ett, LAST ROW: Paul Bishop, President, Ned Berwager. 




Intramural 
Council 



Football, volleyball, basketball, 
softball— games for everyone to 
enjoy— inter-class and inter-col- 
legiate competition— trophies to 
honor the most athletic classes. 



Left to Right: Wayne McLeod, Mary 
Pierce, Phil Loeffler, Ellen Smith, Paul 
Bishop, Kay Newhouse, Jeff Tubbs, 
Bertha Combs, Mark Shaver. 



Groups 125 







Dorm Councils 



Elected leaders from each floor in 
mens' and womens' dorms— regulating 
kitchen, lounge, and television— making 
prospective students comfortable— acting 
as go-between for deans and students. 



WOMEN'S COUNCIL: left to right, KNEEL- 
ING: Janice Decker, Crystal Ammerman, Sue 
Nolan, Yvonne Jenkins, Bonnie McKee, Jane 
Crosbie, and Susan Klingberg. STANDING: 
Karen DeRosset and Kathy Murphey, Head 
Residents, Nancy Van Prooyen, Linda Jacob- 
sen, Susan Waddell, Mary Howard, and Carolee 
Rothenbach. 




MEN'S COUNCIL: left to right, STANDING: 
Dan Camp, Bruce Pauley, and Paul Bishop. 
SITTING: Bob Andrews, Head Resident, Lynn 
Wheeler, Joel Kocher, and Phil Loeffler. 



126 Groups 



Commoner Staff 



Left to right: David Byerley, Business Manager; 
Marcy Stewart, Copy Editor; Ed Fritts, Editor; 
Karen Brodsky, Layout Editor; Muriel Marshall, 
Typist; Mrs. Louise Bentley, Adviser; Harold 
Meberg, Photographer; Kim Alt, Typist; and 
Dave Wright, Assistant Photographer. 




Madrigals 



One of the busiest student groups— 
sixteen top singers— directed by Dr. James 
Greasby— represents the college in many 
cities— presents campus concert to pay for 
striking new outfits— goes on tour with 
choir at spring break. 



Madrigals, Left to Right: Debbie Vincent, Rick 
Efird, Dennis Bodlien, Peggy Hesterly, Sherri 
Hill, Sue Nolan, Larry Wilson, Emerson Roth, 
Greg Norwood, Chuck Davis, Carol Austin, 
Barb Peck, Brent Ferguson, Cindy Meehan, Dan 
Camp, and Pat Voss. 




Groups 127 




Band 



Directed by Mr. William Boyd- 
adding new instruments— carpeting 
and re-arranging the bandroom— 
improving intonation and sound- 
presenting many concerts for Bryan 
and Dayton. 

Band, left to right, STANDING: Mr. 
William Boyd, director, Mike Todd, 
Frank Sheddan, Bonnie Harper, Pat 
Whitaker, and Kathy DeWitt. Back Row, 
left to right: Carolyn Jewett, Paul 
Bishop, Carris Barker, Sandy Neumann, 
Bob Wollen, Drew Bauder, Becky 
Napier, Wayne Buchsbaum, Marcia Brun- 
kow, Marty Collins, Erick Birkett, and 
Ray Locy. Front Row: Bonnie Heath, 
Joyce Brown, Dennis Bodlien, Cherri 
Bellamy, Pat Morrison, Bob Conrad, 
Cindy Meehan, Dianna Ashby, Pam Gar- 
ris, Janice Decker, and Becky Conrad. 




Choralaires 



Under new direction by Mrs. Ruth Bart- 
lett— singing group composed of women 
students— performing at college functions 
and outside engagements. 



Left to right: FRONT ROW: Barb McCarrell, Sue 
Hoppe, Bev Shondelmyer, Terri Rich, Joyce 
Brown, Phyllis Florence, and Mrs. Ruth Bartlett, 
Director. SECOND ROW: Beckie Hudson, Joy 
Steele, Vickie Pyfrom, Valery Parker, Nancy 
Myers, Peggie Davies, and Carris Barker. BACK 
ROW: Judy Steele, Mary Pierce, Jackie Bright, 
Brenda Boggs, Crystal Ammerman, Sandra Neu- 
mann, and Carolee Rothenbach. 



128 Groups 




Music Educators' 
National Conference 



Picnics— bringing special speakers to 

campus— lectures on electronic music and 

the Orf teaching methods— attending the 
national convention in Atlanta. 



MENC Officers: STANDING, left to right: Ray 
Locy, President and Erick Birkett, Vice-President. 
SITTING, left to right: Annette Winkler, Secretary 
and Mary Howard, Treasurer. 



Choir 



Blending voices in melodious harmony- 
raising money for choir robes and tour- 
selling eggs, slaves, and presenting variety 
shows— representing Christ and Bryan 
through several states like Texas and 
Louisiana. 



* 


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Left to right: FIRST ROW: Shern Hill, Peggy Hesterly, Nancy Nofsinger, Chuck Davis, Carol McKemy, Sue 
Nolan, Jenny Cather, John Main, Betty Barrows, and Carolyn Jewett. SECOND ROW: Kathy Reece, Ellen Cox, 
Denmt Bodlien, Phyllis Lawrence, Lynn Puffer, Paula Sims, Beverly O'Connell, Beverly Shondelmyer, Linda 
Mmter. Liz Loose, Susan Waddel, Barb Peck, Carol Austin, and Dr. James Greasby, director. THIRD ROW: 
Betty Baer, Beckie Napier, Emerson Roth, Bill Rosser, John Marshall, Mike Van Huisen, Greg Norwood, Pat 
Whitaker, Charlie Hunnicutt, John Peterson, Larry Puckett, Dale Henry, Bonnie Boyd, and Janice Decker. 
FOURTH ROW: Debbie Vincent, Dale Taylor, Tim Woatherbeo, Erick Birkett, Larry Wilson, Mike Corbin, Brent 
Ferguson, Dave Wright, Mike Gilmer, Dow Barton, Dan Camp, Mary Howard, Pat Voss, and Cindy Meehan. 



Groups 129 



KELLY'S MOTEL 



Highway 27 South 

Dayton, Tennessee 37321 

Phone 775-1181 




MANUFACTURERS OF 

NOTARY 
SEALS 

CORPORATE 
SEALS 



PHONE 266-1314 



P. O. BOX 429 



CHATTANOOGA 

RUBBER STAMP & 

STENCIL WORKS 



John L. McNair, President 
23 Patten Parkway 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 



TRADE 
CHECKS 



POLICE BADGES 



BRASS NAME PLATES 



TOOL CHECKS, KEY TAGS 



BRASS 
STENCILS 



14-speed 

Dual-Range 

Cyclomatic" 

Qsterizer 



AUTOMATIC 



controlled 

cycle 

blending! 




Compliments of 



Dr. and Mrs. 
Karl E. Keefer 



Select from any of 7 Lo range speeds, or 7 Hi range 
speeds. Exclusive Cyclomatic control 
automatically cycles "on" and "off" for perfectly 
chopped pieces of food. 14 continuous speeds 
can be used separately for smoothly blended foods. 
5-cup glass container opens at both ends 
for easy emptying and cleaning. 2-oz. measuring 
cap; cord storage compartment; 84-pg. 
cookbook. Two-tone styling in Antique White, 
Harvest Gold, or Avocado. Solid state. 
Powerful 1200 watt motor. 



Oster Corporation 
Dayton, Tennessee 




TALLENT'S PRESCRIPTION STORE 



West Main Street 
Dayton 

Day: 775-2362 Night: 775-0276 



Compliments of the 
BRYAN ELDER FAMILY 



Buick - Opel - Oldsmobile - Pontiac 

BORDERS MOTOR COMPANY 

Highway 27 South Dayton, Tennessee 

775-2260 



Compliments of 
JOHNSON FURNITURE 

Athens, Tennessee 



Compliments of 



MR. AND MRS. CLYDE RODDY 



Don't be left out of The Picture 




Come and join the ranks of one of America's fastest growing Seminaries. Write today: Director of Admissions, Grace Seminary, Winona Lake, 
Indiana. 



Advertisements 131 



SELF PORTRAIT: G.deo* 




"But how can I ' trajj y know? 
You calf Ms qui dance ?" 



IF YOU WAMT 
KELP i rJ 
READIU6V0UR 
RJEBtt, 6ET 
IKJ XOUCM UTTtt 

Sl/PAN 

INTERIOR 
MISSION] 

CANDIDATE SEC 
1017 E JEFFERSOM 
WHEATON, ILL- 

60187 



&SA4/\mj- 



- 




Compliments of 

DAYTON'S MEN'S SHOP 

Ray Cooley 
775-1233 



SUNSHINE CENTER 

Coin-Operated Laundry & Dry Cleaners 
W. 1st Ave. 775-9973 

Hugh and Nina Wright Dayton 



H. J. SHELTON 



PHONE: 775-2414 



s 



he/tons' a 

I/ETTER WHOP 



ENGRAVING * COMMERCIAL PRINTING 
128 E. SECOND AVE. DAYTON, TENNESSEE 



ROBINETTE MOTEL 

Wall-To-Wall Carpet — Free Television 
Air Conditioned — Phones in Rooms 

775-9717 Highway 27 South 

Dayton, Tennessee 



Compliments of 

THE COTTON SHOP 

Market Street Dayton 
775-1911 



DAYTONA CAFETERIA 

122 East Second Avenue 

Home of Southern Fried Chicken 

Purser and Fine 775-9958 Dayton 



L & M JEWEL BOX 

Gifts Diamonds Watches 
Watch Repair & Engraving 

Phone 775-2013 



For the Local News Read 

THE DAYTON HERALD 

Read All the News of Rhea County 

Phone 775-1313 



MORGAN FURNITURE COMPANY 

Rhea County's Largest Display of 

Home Furnisliings 

Establislied 1909 

Phone 775-03 1 3 Dayton, Tenn. 




ROGERS' REXALL 



A Friend to Bryan Students 

and 
Dayton Citizens 



Corner of Main and Market 775-1141 Dayton 



Advortisoments 133 




GARY & WEST COMPANY 



Dayton, Tennessee 37321 
775-1545 



Compliments of 
REDFORD'S 5 & 10 STORE 

Two locations to serve you better 
Market Street 775-1866 Dayton 



TONY'S DRIVE-IN 
RESTAURANT 



A Friendly Place To Eat 

Dayton, Tennessee 
775-9992 



ALLEN PHILLIPS JEWELERS 

Expert Watch Repair 

Diamonds — Watches 

Hand and Machine Engraving 

Stone Setting 



FAMILY SHOE CENTER 

Shoes for the Entire Family 
Market Street 



775-2937 



Dayton 




Dr. C. Markham Berry 



Atlanta, Georgia 



-*KQ 



BROWN CHEVROLET 
COMPANY 



175-3038 

HOURS 

0'-5-00»«- 
AYS A WEEK 
E NOON ON WED. 



136 Market Street 



Phone 775-2921 



Dayton 



THE THRIFT STORE 



DAYTON FLOWER SHOP 

"For the finest flowers in town" 
West Main Street 775-3038 Dayton 



Dayton's Most Modern and 
Complete Department Store 



Market Street 775-2937 Dayton 



DAYTON BANK AND TRUST 

COMPANY 
Friendly, Courteous Service 




A Better Service Bank 
Member of FDIC 



Arlvurtisumonts 135 



II 

I' ' 



" 'i 

.1,1 



W*V CLEANERS 




Modern Way 
Cleaners 



North Market Street 

Dayton, Tennessee 

'Dayton's Oldest and Most Reliable" 

Phone 775-9952 

We are behind Bryan 100% 




136 Advertisements 



Hi-Way Gardens 



Flowers and Gifts 



Hotel Aqua Building 
West Main Street 



Phone 775-0626 
Dayton, Tennessee 



Compliments of 

DAYTON DEPARTMENT STORE 

"for the finest shoes" 

Market Street 775-1661 Dayton 



Compliments of 

MRS. E.B.ARNOLD 

'for anything a lady could want — except shoes" 

West Second Avenue 775-2641 Dayton 



Compliments of 



MARKH. SENTER 



Compliments of 
DR. J. J. RODGERS 

Dayton, Tennessee 



Compliments of 
KAYSER-ROTH HOSIERY CO. 

Dayton, Tennessee 



FIRST NATIONAL 
COUNTY BANK 

Rhea County's Only 
National Bank 






105 West Rhea Ave. Spring City 



Member Federal Reserve System 



99 West Main Street - Dayton 



Advertisements 137 



ybuTi^RN Tilk Mills 

FINE TRICOT WARP KNIT FABR.IG/' 

Ovettt- 

LINGERIE 

We Want to Help Make Tennessee A Better and 
More Prosperous Place in Which to Live 




^UTHM^I^MILU; 




ASTROLOFT 7~ U4 X« \J STRETCHON 

Bulk Yarn / Spniy. Gify %£uu*u*+ Stretch Yarn 



138 Advertisemetns 



Compliments of 
BRADY'S DEPARTMENT STORE 

Dayton's Newest Department Store 
West Second Avenue Dayton 


MORGAN INSURANCE AGENCY 

Insurance & Real Estate 

Box 190, Dayton, Tennessee 

775-9311 


Compliments of 

MERLE NORMAN COSMETICS 

West Main Street Dayton 


Compliments of 
SEQUATCHIE COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO. 

"Things go better with Coke" 
Dunlap, Tennessee 


BEARD-WALTERS FORD 

Highway 27, South 
Dayton, Tennessee 


Compliments of 
BISHOP AND PURSER 

Groceries and Feed 
Railroad Street 775-1171 Dayton 


PRUETT'S FOODTOWN 

Dayton, Tennessee 
775-9181 


Compliments of 

ABEL HARDWARE 

Market Street 775-2772 Dayton 




STAN'S PHARMACY 



775-3030 



138 East First Avenue 



Advertisements 139 




255 SMOKY PARK HIGHWAY 
ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 

OLDSMOBILE * MERCEDES-BENZ * JEEP * MAZDA 



THE DEALERSHIP THAT'S DIFFERENT! 



"J 



This Is More Than A Catchy Phrase. Skyland Emphasises The Things That Are 
Really Important To You. We Are Different In Ways That You Can Measure For Yourself. 

1 . Different In The Interest We Take In The People Who Are Our Customers. 

2. Different In The Quality Of Our Service Department - A Reputation For Service Unequalled In The Asheville Area. 

3. Different In The Professional Quality Of The People Who Are Our Employees. 

4. Different In The Design Of Our New Facilities - Designed Specifically For Convenience and Service. 

5. Different In The Quality And Variety Of Cars We Sell Offering Only The Very Finest In Each Price Class. 

6. Different In The Manner In Which We Back Up What We Sell. 

7. Different In Our Desire And Effort To Maintain A Record Of Integrity Of Business Dealings. 

8. Different Because We Care About You! 




140 Advertisements 




Class of 75 




An Angel paused in his downward flight 
With a seed of truth and love and light; 
And he said, "Where must this seed be sown 
To bring most fruit when it is grown?" 
The Master heard as He said and smiled, 
"Go, plant it for Me in the heart of a child." 



Class of 74 



Congratulations to the Senior Class, 
from the Senior Class 



se 



verity - 



three 




It's been fun. 

But we've got to run. 



Advertisements 141 



Try it, you'll like it. 




The Service at Robinson's is Right On 
Robinson's Drug Store 



Dayton, Tennessee 
Phone -775-1611 



142 Advertisements 



Index 



People 



Administration 

Faculty (may be found listed alphabetically) 

Seniors (may be found listed alphabetically) 

Trustees 

Underclassmen (may be found listed alphabetically) 



92-93 

96-103 

105-110 

90-91 
111-119 



Events 



All-College Picnic 

Baseball 

Basketball 

Christian Life Conference 

Christmas Banquet 

Cross Country 

New Dorm 

Drama Club 

Homecoming 

MIA 

President's Reception 

Registration 

Soccer 

Student Union 

Sweetheart Banquet 

Talent Nights 



24-25 
50 
64-69 
40-41 
34-35 
6263 
48-49 
3233 
26-28 
46-47 
20-21 
19 
58-61 
44-45 
42-43 
30-31 



Groups 



Band 

Business Club 

Choir 

Choralaires 

COMMONER Staff 

CSA 

Dorm Councils 

FCA 

Intramural Committee 

Madrigals 

MENC 

MIA 

Small Group Leaders 

Student Senate 

Student Union 



128 
123 
129 
126 
127 
124 
126 
125 
125 
129 
129 
124 
122 
122 
123 



Inclox 143 




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Bryan Marks 

Year of 

Growth 



Bryan experiences many changes 
this year. Innovations indicate the 
overall growth of the school: the 
new dorm, tennis courts, a choir 
room, and a new road. These phy- 
sical changes are apparent to every- 
one. For progress and expansion of 
any college, buildings emerge and 
modernization occurs to ac- 
commodate the increasing student 
population. These surface altera- 
tions are important, but they are 
not the real changes. 

Policies of the college undergo 
revisions this year. Televisions are 
permitted in dorm rooms, girls wear 
pantsuits to class, all-in is extended 
for women, and trustees and ad- 
ministration make all-out efforts to 
understand the students. Significant 
as they are, these accomplishments 
are not the most meaningful. 





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146 Conclusion 






"I think that I am more mature, more 
open minded, and more able to adjust to 
unexpected changes. I think that Bryan 
is starting to see that students are able to 
make more of their own decisions." 
Doretha Roach. 



"The biggest change in me is that I have learned 
more how the Lord Jesus blesses those who 
sincerley want what He wants and are willing to 
simply trust Him." Danny Camp. 




It is the difference that occurs within the 
individual that determines the success of a year 
at Bryan. How he is affected by Bryan's teach- 
ings—not necessarily the views he hears in class 
or chapel, but even those of his peers— aids in 
his personal development. Such areas as his 
philosophy of life, his ideas about Christianity, 
and his educational thoughts cannot escape 
being influenced for good or bad, slightly or 
drastically. We become part of all the influences 
here, but we retain our own unique qualities 
making us individuals. 



UPPER LEFT: In the new choir room two Bryan 
coeds wear fashionable pantsuits. UPPER RIGHT: 
Arnold Hall is the official name of the new dorm. 
LOWER LEFT: The new tennis courts offer the latest 
in playing surfaces. 



"I have e/pononr.ed a hreaking away from The 
mold that wa» formed by parents and homo, 
not radically, but to form my individual per 
tonality." Janice Docker. 



"Being at Bryan has changed my attitude 
toward Christianity. Tho ingredients for 
growth and servico are here, but it is up 
to each individual to use his talents for 
Christ," Susan Wadded 



Conclusion 147 




FIT * V 




When students move to different attitudes, 
concepts, and outlooks, especially at a Christian 
college, there must be something or Someone 
behind the move. We find this Person to be 
Jesus Christ; He is the manifestation and the 
hope in the year of our changing. 




148 Conclusion 



- 1 -■-.,, L 

BRYAN 






1