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Moltare, 



BRYAN COLLEGE COMMONER VOLUME LXIII 1995 



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Student Life 
Academics — 
Organizations 
People -* 
Athletics 
Ads 






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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/commoner1995brya 




BRYANi COLLEGE COMMONER 
70GG BRYAN DRIVE 
D/£*rroM 7 TENNlESSEE 

3 7 J> 2^ \ 

VOLUME SIXTY -TWO 






A 



t the bottom of Fall 
Creek Falls, Dawn 
Brantley and Chris 
Maronge take a breath 
and enjoy the view. 



ean Hill is more comfortable 
with a basketball in his hands. 
But he and other hoopsters 
volunteered as ball boys at 
soccer games and line judges 
at volleyball games this fall. 




Student Life 






nthusiastic small group 
leaders were on hand to 
welcome new students to 
Bryan; S.D.O. staff spent hours 
preparing matriculation pack- 
ets for returning students; 
freshmen endured initiation 
and began learning their way 
around Dayton; some stu- 
dents looked for a Homecom- 



ing date even before they 
were completely moved into 
their dorms; others had bigger 
plans like landing a lead in the 
spring musical or graduating 
this May. But from day one, 
we didn't sit around waiting 
for college life to find us, We 
were geared up and ready, so- 
-Here We Go... 




WeG 





Revenge is sweet. Julie Guest and Heather Arwe 
seem to think so as they cover Rocky Carter's car 
with plastic wrap and toilet paper. 



*au. 



Student Life 



**#, 



'£*£ 



Jj Four Americans in Paris. Chorale 
members Heather Nichols, Brent 
Campbell, Ricky Smith and Julia Fredrick 
enjoy the opportunity to see one of 
France's most recognizable landmarks, 
the Eifel Tower, between concerts. 

J% Sophomore Matt Bostic spent the 
summer getting in shape. His beauty 
regimen involved a Mary Kay facial. 

JCa clean-shaven head must be the 
secret to success. Nine Bryan College 
guys celebrated a summer of toiling for 
tuition as book pedallers by cutting off 
their hair. 





Summer Activities 




THE VIEW FROM 




Frolicking around the glob® 

m pack ip dig & era 



Before we knew what 
lad hit us, we were skipping 
:lass to lounge (not recline!) 
)y the pool, taking adventur- 
ous trips to various water falls, 
ope swings, and cliff jumping 
pots, and spending as much 
Dossible time outdoors as we 
;ould. It could only mean one 
hing. ..Summerwas on the way! 

The summer of 1994 
;ame and went, somewhat nor- 
nally for some and alittle more 
idventurously for others. It 
vas a time for many BC stu- 
lents to return home to famil- 
ar faces and routine summer 
obs, a time to catch up with 
ligh school friends with whom 
hey had fallen out of touch, 
ind to rest, recuperate and re- 



group for the inevitable fol- 
lowing school year. 

But summer was much 
more of an adventure to those 
who stayed in Dayton and had 
the opportunity to actually lie 
down at the pool and wear cut- 
off shorts and T-shirts in the ad 
building all day long. 

For others summer went 
a little bit like this... 

"Lots of beach volley- 
ball," -Tiffany Snyder... 

"I got to work with Scott 
Grisar on grounds, "-Ben 
Simpson.... 

"My dad got to come 
visit,"-Genci Keja... 

"The highlight of my 
summer was asking Pam to 
marry me," — Will Sarrell... 



"I got to see Lenin's 
body in Red Square in Mos- 
cow,"-Trenena Spicer... 

"I spent four days with 
my brother in Nashville watch- 
ing the Prayer Chain record 
their next al- ^^^^^^^___ 
bum, "-Joy 
McCaskey... 

"My 
most memo- 
rable sum- 
mer event 
was travel- 
ing to scenic ~ — 
Knoxville to get a tattoo,"-- 
Matthew "Harley Davidson" 
McClain... 

"Staying here and all my 
friends being here with me, and 
flying to Florida for the Fourth 



My most memorable 
summer event was 
traveling to Knox- 
ville to get a tattoo. 

Matthew McClain, senior 



of July," — Tabitha Rasnake. 
But as the air turned 
colder, the sunsets alittle richer 
and the leaves a lot brighter, 
we all began to face the fact 
that the water at Pocket was 
^^^^_^^^^ turning 
just a bit 
too chilly, 
the pool 
was now 
closed, and 
indoors 
seemed 
much more 
appealing to almost everyone; 
Soon, we realized that we 
would have to bid farewell to 
the idyllic summertime... un- 
til we meet again. 

by Tevon Nelson 




«Sum- 
mer gave 
me a 

chance to 
relax and 
to rely on 
the Lord's 
strength. » 

Joanne 
Huckle 
senior 





X Making Dayton his summer home, senior 
Matthew McClain, worked as part of the confer- 
ence crew on campus. During the month of July, 
he and many others of the Bryan family took part 
in the annual re-enactment of the 1925 Scopes 
Trial. The trial brought national attention to Dayton 
when famous statesman William Jennings Bryan 
joined the prosecuting attorneys to defend the 
Biblical view of creation. 

yC Letting the cool mountain air in Colorado clear 
the academic cobwebs from his brain, senior 
Jason DuRoy, climbed Byers Peak and managed 
to get on the receiving end of the camera this 
summer. 



Summer Activities 




7 




)% A phone may be most students' 
second priority (right behind textbooks of 
course), but what do you do when you 
and your boyfriend want to talk to the 
same person? Try Danny Colpo and 
Heidi Smelser's approach and drag the 
phone outside. 




J% It takes more than college ruled paper, 
a Trapper Keeper and a Bic pen to be 
prepared for college in today's world. To 
make use of the computer lab conve- 
niently located in each dorm the smart- 
student puts high density disks on the top 
of his "must buy" list each semester. 

/(it always happens. You finally go to 
visit a friend in another dorm and they 
aren't home. Message boards, like the 
one Daniel Bushby is writing on while 
Scott Wagner dictates, is one of the most 
reliable means of communication. 




8 




School Start Up 




WE VIEW FROM 



wb m a wrote New look 




If we were to pop a tape 
into a VCR and take a look at 
school supplies when we were 
starting kindergarten, what 
would the nifty little Snoopy 
bookbag contain? 

If my memory serves me 
correctly, mine held those hor- 
rid fat pencils we learned to 
write with, an eight-pack of 
Crayola crayons, Elmer's glue, 
safety scissors (the ones that 
didn't actually cut, they just 
creased), construction paper 
soon to be turned into refrig- 
erator drawings, and a swell 
lunch box with the cartoon of 
choice plastered on it, com- 
plete with matching thermos 
filled with Quik chocolate milk 
( and our mothers wonder where 
we learned to spell). All present 



and accounted for. 

Now, let's hit fast for- 
ward on the ole' VCR of life 
and check out school supplies 
college-style: Mechanical 
pencils with the erasers that 
never seem to actually erase, 
markers of all shapes and sizes 
(magic markers, dry erase 
markers, you name it, we use 
it), super 
glue for 
when your 
sneakers 
start to fall 
apart, sta- 
tionery and 
envelopes 

that rarely 

get used, long distance call- 
ing card (because you never 
use the stationery when you 



I guess when you're 
five years old, col- 
oring inside the 
lines is the biggest 
deal in the world. 



can reach out and touch 
someone), check book to pay 
for the long distance calling 
card, coffeemaker because 
how else do we make it 
through an eight o'clock class, 
White Out for those unavoid- 
able 1:00 A.M. writing mis- 
takes, an answering machine 
good for two purposes; 

1. To 
keep your 
friends 
laughing as 
they listen 
to you 

babble on 
and on 

- — — 2. To 

let your parents know that 
you're at the library studying 
and please send money. 




Also on the necessities 
list: laundry quarters, copy 
machine dimes, and last but 
not least, an entire case of 
Mountain Dew for those in- 
evitable all-nighters that mom 
and dad specifically prohib- 
ited in high school (hey, you 
haven't lived until you've 
pulled an all-nighter). Okay, 
so that about sums it up. The 
objects needed in college are 
obviously more extensive and 
cause more headaches, but try 
telling that to a five-year-old 
who lost her blue crayon, and 
whatever will she do about 
coloring the sky for her Inside 
-the -Lines final? I guess when 
you're five, everything's a big 
deal. Who knew? 

By Elizabeth Clark 



I 



661 

wouldn't 
even think 
of coming 
to college 
without a 
phone. It is 
the door to 
the outside 
world, m 

Brooks Jordan 
freshman 




/{How often do you call someone and he is out? 
Does a hectic schedule cramp your social life? 
Marcus Belamy, smart socialite, relies on his trusty 
answering machine to take calls while he is out. 

/{The yearbook room was in dire need of a good 
cleaning when school began. Melody Sheddan, 
and fearless advisor Karin Carpenter attempt to 
vaccuum out cobwebs and dust. 



School Start Up 





► The upperclassmen show Simon 
Sakatos (The guy who forgot his clothes 
and had to go back home for them) just 
how generous we are here at Bryan 
College by giving him 'The Shirt off our 
Back" 

, Freshmen Julia Bruehl, Alicia 
Mathers, Robin Olive, Lou Velarde, Cindy 
Wright, and Autumn Halsey await their 
initiation at Pocket. Only Julia seems to 
be a morning person. 

, Roommates Tiffany Snyder and 
Becky Summers proudly display the 
results of not wearing their beanies. 
They were only two of the many 
freshmen who got anridlnted with beans, 
ketchup, mustard, and relish. 




Freshman Orientation 




THE VIEW FROM 




&l I A flBflAN M OU! 



Freshman orientation. 
3ur first week here. We were 
)ig college students. We 
ho'ught we were it. Eventu- 
dly the upper-classmen came 
ind put us in our place, but we 
lad our few days of glory. 

How many times did 
we have to respond to: "What's 
/our name? Where are you 
from? How far away is it from 
here? What are you majoring 
? Why? Do you think you 
ill stay with it? What's your 
mother's maiden name? What 
:areer are you going into with 
your major?" On our first day 
we had to answer all of those, 
plus what we wanted to be 
doing in 10 years, in front of 
new acquaintances. It was so 
much fun (whatever). But I 
think we will always remem- 
ber the mother who stood up 



and introduced her son, saying 
that he had to go back home 
because he had forgotten his 
clothes. (We love you, Simon). 
Then we started those 
wonderful small group ses- 
sions, playing interesting 
games so _^^^^_^^^^ 



we 



that 

could "get 
to know 
each other 
better. " 
Maybe I'm 

wrong, but ten his clothes? 

I never got 



Remember the mom 
who stood up to 
introduce her absent 
son who had forgot- 



lege experience. The day 
speaks for itself. Thursday 
dawned very dark and early 
(2:00 A.M. to be exact). We 
poor, helpless creatures were 
awakened by loud voices and 
banging. We were dragged 
_^^^_^^^_ from our 
beds and cor- 
ralled into 
the tennis 
courts. 
Then, treat- 
ing us like 
cattle, they 
(those won- 



to know someone better by play- 
ing some embarressing games. 
And the wonderful leaders. We 
owe all of our freshman suc- 
cesses to these leaders (yeah, 
right). 

Then the hectic day of 
registration. Our first real col- 



derful upperclassmen) herded 
us into cars and drove off into 
the dark night, letting us sit on 
cold, dirty ground. They pro- 
ceeded to do what they call 
"making us feel like a part of 
Bryan." But, I know we all 
had fun! I know I will always 



remember it. What a way to 
start your 18th birthday. 

By the time Saturday 
arrived and the picnic rolled 
around, we were really a part 
of the college. I know I will 
always remember my first 
week here and I think most 
freshmen can say the same 
thing. 

I am sure you have no- 
ticed by now that I forgot to 
say something about the bean- 
ies. This is because it is some- 
thing I would rather not speak 
of. It was such a traumatic 
experience that I have a men- 
tal block toward them. Some- 
day I may commit a horrible 
crime against society, and I 
will have to Bryan College 
beanies to blame. 

By Melody Sheddan 




66 I love 
being at 
Bryan 
College. 
The 
Upper- 
classmen 
have really 
gone out 
ot their 
way to 
make us 
feel at 
home.» 

Julia Bruehl 
freshman 





/f Ah, small group unity. Where would Bryan 
College be without it? Carrie Dantice and Sara 
French haing out with their small group leader, Brian 
Carden, after convocation at the Presidents 
Reception. 

/C Tennyson Martin seems to be having fun her 
first week here at Bryan. Hey, she even has the 
dorm food down to a science. 



Freshman Orientation 




11 




/CAs part of their audition for the circus, 
Justin McBrien and Andy Daniels juggled 
six, yes, ladies and gentlemen, that's six 
pool balls. 

)\ For relieving mid-term stress, there's 
nothing like a game of foosball, Sonya 
Martinez and Scott Hill show great skill 
and determination as they fight to win. 

/( It's never too early to prepare for 
Bryan's annual intramural pool shootout. 
Adam Soukup squares up for a tricky- 
shot in the Lion's Den 




12 



Den Life 




THE VIEW FROM 




it's o jungle in there! 

I ON TH€ WILD « 



Approaching the Lions" 
den, he could hear the low 
inurmurings and growlings. 
Dangerous territory was now 
being encroached upon, for to 
dare to venture into the den 
was a step into fears of all man- 
kind. Caged as these lions were, 
they were safe, but venturing 
in with them, that was totally 
different. Heat radiated from 
the thick glass panes that sepa- 
ated these caged beasts from 
the outer world. 

Suddenly, as he opened 
the door, he was pounced on 
by. . . well, certainly not a lion in 
the zoological sense of the 
word, but a special breed of 
Lion, an underclassman ready 



for a foosball challenge. 

The Lions' Den serves 
as our respite from the activi- 
ties of everyday life. It is the 
only place on campus to let our 
primal competitive instincts 
loose, even if it is only in pool, 
ping-pong, or foosball. In this 
microcosm of Wild Kingdom, 
we also see the hunt for fresh 
meat (or just french fries from 
the snack bar) and the continu- 
ance of the species with certain 
courting rituals. 

The Lion's Den is not the 
perfect place for an intimate 
conversation, but it's a great 
place to spend time together 
with other members of the 
pride. Many guys show up at 



the snack bar counter just to 
torture the poor little girls work- 
ing— yet another tricky social 
behavior of this peculiar breed 
of lions. 

Generally a peaceful 
breed, the ^^^^^^^^^^_ 
only 
bloodshed 
comes 
from who 
gains con- 
trol of the 
big screen 
television, 

where there's always a big 
crowd. The Den serves as the 
perfect watering hole. 

Time to kill after classes 
(or sometimes during classes), 



Caged as these 
lions were, they 
were safe, but ven- 
turing in with them 
is totally different. 



after work, or just to get away, 
the Den provides us the perfect 
habitat in which to spend those 
brief moments with friends that 
are the lasting snapshots of 
college life. 

So as 

time contin- 
ues on, and 
the jungle of 
school and 
life continues 
close around 
us, remember 
the location 
of the watering hole of life, 
where the king of the jungle 
relaxes, and orders a grilled 
chicken sandwich. 

By Chris Fickley 



4T? 



iiThe 
Den's sole 
purpose is 
to provide 
foosball 
entertain- 
ment for 
the student 
body.» 

Alan Smith 
senior 





/C Even though working the grill can be hot, tiring and 
annoying, Amy Floyd still has a smile for her customers 
and the camera. 

/kNgam Ngangmuta takes a break from the Argo 
cafeteria food by placing his order at the grill. Bryan 
College favorites available at this small eatery include 
tater tots, milk shakes (complete with chocolate chip 
cookie doughjand the Bryan Beverage - without 
revealing any trade secrets, we can tell you it has fruit 
punch, a lemon slice and Sprite. 



Den Life 




13 




/f Seniors Merlyn Catron, Glynn 
Stone, Danny Culpo and sophomore 
Ricky Smith kicked off the Homecom- 
ing Soccer game with their harmony- 
filled version of The Star Spangled 
Banner. Later that evening soccer 
players Chris Wood and Claudio and 
Felipe Arias gave a different kind of 
performance as they sang for 
students at the Homecoming 
Banquet. 

JC"The BWA Pie Toss during 
Homecoming Weekend gave Alumna 
Angle Griggs a chance to get 
revenge on Dr. Jack Traylor for all his 
history tests. Other willing victims of 
the event were Mr. Ernie Ricketts and 
Dr. Bill Brown. 

/CNewly-crowned Homecoming 
Queen Brenda Adamson is never to 
busy for a phone call. Here she was 
caught talking to her brother, Jeffery, 
who couldn't make it to the weekend 
festivities, but shared in his sister's 
excitement with thanks to Cellular One. 
Brenda and her fiance, Del, made their 
royal appearance at the banquet later 
that evening. 



14 



YO^ 



Homecoming 




WE VIEW FROM 



W CTOKB ON IHG HILL 



Confused freshmen 
gazed in wonderment as people 
screamed hello's and ran to 
greet each other with open 
arms. The soccer field hill was 
filled with new and old faces 
reminiscing while the Lions 
battled Tennessee Temple be- 
low. Who were all these people, 
the freshmen and transfers 
wondered? They were nothing 
to be feared, only BC alumni. 

What is life like after 
graduation? Where do people 
go? What do they do with all 
their free time when they are 
no longer required to go to 
classes, do homework, clean 
for strict room or be in at 11 
p.m.? 

On graduation day every 
senior is immediately donned 
with the prestigious and highly - 
sought-after title 

of... ALUMNI! But what do 



alumni do exactly? 

BC alumni are spread 
out across the globe doing a 
variety of activities to occupy 
their class-free days. Karyne 
Mathers from the Class of 1 994 
is residing in her hometown of 
Greenville, ^^^^^^^^^— 
South Caro- 
lina. She is 
currently 
waiting 
tables at Red 
Lobster and 
teaching vio- 
lin and piano lessons out of her 
home. Surprisingly though, 
Karyne is not interested in be- 
ing a waitress forever. She 
hopes to be married (hmm...I 
wonder who the lucky 
[Scots]man will be? ) and would 
like to be teaching music les- 
sons full time. "I would like to 
have my own studio to teach 



What do [alumni] do 
with no classes, 
homework, strict 
room or all-in? 



out of right now, but since 
Greenville is such an 'artsy' 
town, I'm lucky to have the 
students I have." 

David Holcomb, 
president of the Class of '94 
stayed in Dayton after gradu- 
^^^^^^^^— ation to 
continue 
working 
at the 
YMCA. 
In Octo- 
ber he left 
for a year- 
long trip to Brazil. 

But not all alumni ac- 
tually leave Bryan Hill. Scott 
Grisar, a graduate of the Class 
of '9 1 , returned to Bryan for 
the 1993-94 school year to 
get his teaching licensure. 
Scott returned to obtain a 
double major in history and 
education to add to the busi- 




ness degree that he already 
has. Scott is looking forward 
to teaching after graduation— 
the second time around. 

Some alumni, have 
moved from the Dayton area, 
but have remained together in 
different areas of the country. 
Mike and Ginger Lehmann 
from the Class of '93, Shan- 
non and Adam Nowlan ("93), 
and Kimberly and Travis 
Dotterer ( '93) all live and work 
in the same town in Georgia. 

Whether still living here 
in Dayton, or in another part 
of the world, alumni are still a 
living,breathing part of this 
place we call Bryan College. 

And they are proof that 
life does go on after gradua- 
tion! 

by Tevon Nelson 




ttThis 
was a 
special 
home- 
coming... 
my last 
year as a 
student 
and my 
first 

glance at 
being an 
alum- 
nus.93 

Glynn Stone 
senior 




J% Jeremy Smith fights off a Temple defender in an 
unsuccessful attempt to put Bryan on the scoreboard. 
Alumni, students, faculty and other Lion fans enjoyed 
the game in spite of the Lion's 2-0 defeat at the hands 
of the Crusaders. 

Jf This year's court arrived at the soccer field in 
convertibles and T-tops. Representives were 
Freshman Joy Woodcock (escort Clark Zoeller), 
Junior Becky Patterson ( escort Joe Graham), Senior 
Tonya Hills (escort Pete Stone). Senior Brenda 
Adamson (escort Del Cothran), Alumna Yvette 
Watson (escort John Spraklin) , Senior Kimberlee 
Hays (escort Kyle DeVaney), Sophomore Johanna 
Zieg ( escort Micah Gelatt), Junior Wendy Taylor 
(escort Mark Davidson), sophomore Mischa Gann 
(escort Dan Boot), and freshman Julia Bruehl (escort 



Homecoming 




15 




Jfwhat a tradition! Burch Walker and 
Bryan Eck always draw a crowd for their 
bi-annual "mock" brawl. Bryan will have 
to find another sparring partner 
following commencement. 

/jMelinda Sneed, Aimee Lee and 
Patricia Keith are among the "top notch" 
or at least top floor residents of Bryan's 
"co-ed" dorm. 

J% Choosing a long distance carrier can 
be an important decision if you have a 
significant other in another state. 
Sophomore Melissa Lubke spent time ' 
and money reaching out to touch Gabe 
Jackson in Illinois. 




Dorm Life 




WE VIEW FROM 



mm 




{ LONG GOGS COG) 




Long Dorm. ..it's notjust 
for men anymore. As llic frcsh- 
men piled onto campus this 
year, a certain observation was 
made "Oh wow, Bryan lias a 
coed dorm." Freshmen arc so 
smart. 

While many of those 
wonderful Long Dorm people 
love to brag about living in the 
coed dorm, the rest of us know 
the truth. Indeed, males and 
females do reside under the 
same roof, but there are no com- 
munal living areas (this is Bryan 
College, after all.) Guys and 
girls have to use separate en- 
trances, and there is and entire 
empty floor separating the 
sexes, and life in the lane is just 
a bit rougher on Long Inhabit- 
ants. Some of the major disad- 



vantages to living there: 

1. No phones in the 
rooms for the first month and 
a half. (As if Freshmen girls 
didn't have enough insecuri- 
ties about their 
social lives on 
the small hill 
in Dayton, 
Tenessce, one 
telephone at 
each end of the 
hall was the 
only link to t 
he outside 
world after all- 

in) This glaring lack may have 
permanently scared both body 
and psyche. Some poor, fresh- 
man co-ed will always remebcr 
being trampled in the stam- 
pede for the one hall phone. 



2. No computer lab. 
This alone may account for a 
lowered GPA among Long 
residents. The stress of im- 
pending nightmares is almost 

unbe a r - 

able. 

W h a t 

about all 

those 

times 

when one 

wakes up 

in the 

middle of 

the night 

with a sudden horror that they 

have a paper due the next 

morning? What then?) 

3. Those lovely little 
codes the doors have. (Keep- 
ing up with room keys is 



Will some poor, little 
girl get trampled by 
the rest in the 
stampede for the 
one hall phone when 
it rings? 



enough responsibility fonnost 

new BC students. What about 
those girls who can't even re- 
member their name, let alone 
a 5 digit number to get into 
their hall?) 

4. Horrible guy/girl 
ratio. So what if it is a coed 
dorm the poor girls are out 
numbered by a whole floor 
and a half. (An advantage to 
the guys but a major disad- 
vantage to the girls.) 

So, lest the rest of us 
feel not quite up to par with 
the coed dormers look at what 
they had to deal with to live 
there. And be thankful for the 
good old halls of Huston, 
Arnold, and Woodlcc-Ewing. 
by Melody 
Sheddan 




$ 



£6 Living 
in a dorm 
with 

dozens of 
other 

people can 
prove to be 
interesting 
at times, 
but it's 
basically 
not that 
bad.» 

Pat Muncey 
sophomore 




J% It's a long way down to reach the dryer when you 
are 6'1 0". Senior Jeff Vandemark plods through one of 
the more mundane aspects of dorm life -- Laundry! 

/ClHigh stakes and big smiles are dealt with after the 
Christmas Banquet during Arnold Women's Open 
Dorm. Living on the wild side are Erin Bryan, Annette 
Sharpe, Lorie Thomas and Haven Strickland. 



Dorm Life 




m 



)% Chava (Tracy Stone) secretly meets 
with Fyedka (Merlyn Catron) to talk and 
exchange books. Fyedka was part of the 
Russian police, so he and Chava were not 
to be talking together. 

/{Bringing new veiws to a traditional 
town, Perchick (Frank Rouse) shocks 
everyone by removing the rope separat- 
ing the men from the women at the 
wedding. 

}C With his hands out streched to the sky, 
Tevye (Bernie Belisle) silently asks God 
how he could allow the Russains to ruin 
the wedding celebration of his daughter, 
Tseitle (Tara Luther), and her new groom, 
Mottel (Chris Wood). 




18 



voj 



t&\ 



v&sfc- 



Fall Play 




THE VIEW FROM 



CTOK BfflrlC FAMILY MALUGS" 




Two theatrical produc- 
>ns could not have been 
ore different: last fall's 
K Little Foxes and this 
aing's,Fiddler on the Roof. 

The Little Foxes, a play 
>out a money-hungry 
mily who evil, materialistic 
ans, was Hilltop Players 
rst presentation. In the 
ad role as the evil Regina. 
irah Beth Nordmoe made 
;r audience come to hate 
;r as she eventually killed 
:r husband Horace (Joel 
oung). Her two brothers, 
en and Oscar, played by 
'alker Haynes and David 
lundy, are equally evil, 
scar beats his wife Birdie, 
Tenena Spicer) who lives 
ostly in a dream world, 
lso mixed up in the mess 



are Oscar and Birdie's son 
Leo (Simon Sakatos), the 
housekeeper, Addie (Brenda 
Adamson) Regina's daughter 
Alexandra (Tara Luther), 
and Regina's husband/vicitim 
Horace. 
In the 
end, all of 
Regina's 
cast of 
accom- 
plices 

rebel 

against 
her. 

Hilltop Players and the 
Chorale combined their 
talents to present the full- 
scale musical production. 
Fiddler on the Roof. The 
head of his poor Jewish 
family, milkman Tevye, 



Marrying for love 
had never been 
done before. It was 
a new concept 
brought by radicals. 



played by Mr. Bemie Belisle, 
struggles with changing 
times and tradition. His 
three oldest daughters (Tara 
Luther, Trish Fen-ell, and 
Tracy Stone) fall in love and 
marry 
without the 
help of the 
matchmaker. 
His first 
daughter 
doesn't 
marry the 
rich butcher 
he had hoped for, but a poor 
tailor. His second daughter 
moves to Kiev to be with her 
husband while he is in 
prison. They are marrying 
for love, something that has 
never been done before in 
Anatevka. Tevye asks his 



wife (Sharon Wood) if she 
loves him. They realize that 
after 25 years of being 
married they never knew for 
sure if they loved each other. 
In one of the saddest 
moments of the play, Tevye 
decides that some traditions 
must not change and disown 
his third daughter, Chava, 
for marrying a gentile. 
Tevye forgives her at he 
end. Filled with haunting 
music and energizing dance 
numbers, the play ends with 
the Jewish people of 
Anatevka being thrown out 
of their town by the Russian 
police. As the people leave 
they are reminded that life is 
just as unsteady as a Fiddler 
on the roof. 

By Elizabeth Clark 





66lt was a 
really 
great 
experi- 
ence 
being in 
"Fiddler". 
I enjoyed 
it a lot.» 

Matt J ones - 
Junior 




/(Tevye asks Golde (Sharon Wood) if she loves 
him. She is confused by his question because love 
was not a part of their tradition. 

/(Addie (Brenda Adamson) questions Regina 
(Sarah Beth Nordmoe) as to how she could be so 
cruel to let her husband die instead of helping him. 



Musical 





/C Jackson Finch ministers to the student 
body, that is , the one's that didn't go to 
the basketball game. 

j% Alana Yederlenic poses on the stairs 
leading to the Homecoming Bnquet. 
Alana was one of the student workers for 
the banquet. 

/f When they were through eating, John 
Crosby, Amy Bafford, and Jeremy Smith 
thought it might be nice to get some 
more light in the dining hall. 



20 



Concerts 



WE VIEW FROM 



M\S BAHQUGT A? ARGO'9 



Banquets. They come 
long three or four times a 
ear. If you're lucky, you'll 
aveadate. If not, you have 
wo other options: Work the 
anquet for cash or go out 
,ith your other dateless 
iends, both of which could 
e fun. Whatever happens, 
ou definitely have to make 
le most of the situation. 

The Homecoming Banquet 
'as sponsered by Student Sen- 
te. The tables were deco- 
ded with the different sea- 
3ns theme (as was the theme 
f the hallway booths). They 

ared nothing with each sea- 
3ii being very obviously in- 

rpreted. Bright candy cov- 
red the "summer" tables. 
astel candies were on the 

pring" tables. Candy com 



wasonthe"fall"tables. Pep- 
permints were on the "winter 
tables". The court was 
seated at a table with globe 
decorations on it. It was 
really a very nice banquet. 

A t 

Christ- 
mas Se- 
ll i o r s 
were "in 
charge". 
They 

tried to 

impress 

upon the student body that 
this banquet was going to be 
"Family style". No date 
needed, just go with friends. 
After the banquet, "Santa" 
(Alan Smith) was on hand to 
lend a lap at the Christmas 
Party sponsered by Union. 



The Valentine's banquet 
was for obvious reasons not a 
family style occasion. Put on 
by the Freshmen Class, it was 
complete with two maitre'd, 
and three freshmen girls sang 
"The Rose" 



The Valentines ban- 
quet, for obvious 
reasons, was not a 
family occasion. 



All in all it 
was a very 
romantic 
evening. Af- 
ter the ban- 
quet, there 

was a Fine 

Arts concert 
with members of our Wind 
Ensemble and the Chatta- 
nooga Symphony. 

Besides the Fine Arts con- 
certs, there were concerts of a 
more popular kind. In early 
December, Bryan College had 
Jackson Finch come in. They 



are two guys from Nashville 
who love the Lord and good 
music. Kevin Jackson plays 
the guitar and does back-up 
vocals, while Brian Finch 
plays the piano and does lead 
voclas. Their sound is 
pretty mellow, kind of like 
Out of the Gray, not heavy 
like Audio Adrenaline and 
Newsboys. They really re- 
late to college students since 
they aren't a whole lot older 
than us. They talked a lot, 
and it was all on our level, 
stuff we are really interested 
in. They hope to release 
their second album this sum- 
mer, and I'm sure we will 
hear more abou them in the 
future. 

By Elizabeth Clark 





m 

appreciate 
the tact 
that the 
student 
leaders go 
out of their 
way to 
provide 
good 
con- 
certs.99 

Brian 

Carden, 

Junior 




j% Brad Barrick and Jenesis Robinson enjoy the food 
and fellowship at the Christmas Banquet. 



X Kev in Jackson jams on his guitar during the 
concert that he and his friend and partner, Brian Finch 
put on at the end of Fall semester. Many students 
attended and enjoyed the concert. 



y Qj. 



Banquets ^ He #e. 



21 




JfDavid Wilkinson and Angie Skerjanec 
spend time together fishing at Pocket, a 
quiet and peaceful place to take a break 
and enjoy nature. 



/Cchattanooga is a very popular place 
to go on the weekends (or for a mid-week 
pick-me-up). Carl Diebold, Andrea 
Kemp, Mandy Mayhood, John Crosby, 
Jon Meissner, and Melissa Carson attend 
a non Rated R movie. 

/f Everyone on campusl seems to 
somehow migrate to the walking track at 
the Dayton City Park during the warm 
seasons. Ben Simpson and Whitney 
Deal pause for a water fight. 



22 



■iO> 



A*.t 



VK5&- 



Community Life 




WE VIEW FROM 



WiG Off m COUhTY 



Chicago has Lake Shore 
>ive... the Big Apple's got 
Broadway... Atlanta has the 
Varsity. But what can Day- 
on offer entertainment seek- 
rs? Three of Rhea County's 
)est kept secrets are a must 
or every BC student at least 
)nce before graduation. 

The Dayton Boat 
)ock. This may not sound 
oo elaborate, but its simplic- 
ty is its charm. No predict- 
able trip to the Red Bank 
leater. Rowdy, thrill-seek- 
ng students can spend a fun- 
lied evening trying to sink 
>r overturn the docks, dar- 
ng each other to jump into 
le water in the dead of win- 
er, or seeing how many 



people will actually fit onto 

the dock without anyone 

falling off. For the more 

spiritually-minded, the 

docks are 

perfect for a 

time of praise 

songs or 

prayer. 

Couples (dat- - 

ing or not) will love gazing 

at a full moon or sky full of 

stars while enjoying each 

other's company. 

Ninety-nine cent 
waffle cones from Jiffy — 
one of the best deals ever! 
Two scoops of mouth-wa- 
tering ice cream in any fla- 
vor from rainbow sherbet to 
cherry cheesecake top a co- 



One of the best 
deals: two scoops of 
mouth-watering ice 
cream in any flavor. 



lossal-size waffle cone for 
under a buck (plus tax). Jiffy 
has even been known to run 
summer specials: the same 
delicious 
cone for 
only 
$0.79 (re- 
fer back 
to number 
one: Jiffy cones taste even 
better when eaten at the boat 
docks and the two places are 
strategically located so that 
the ice cream doesn't even 
melt during travel time). 

The Pettite's house - 
this character-filled home 
includes an indoor loft, a 
side deck overlooking the 
pasture, a front porch with 




perfect view of the moun- 
tains and a huge hammock 
that could hold a consider- 
able number of people (plus, 
a room completely deco- 
rated in cheery sunflowers). 
With enough animals to 
compete with Old 
Macdonald's Farm , the 
Pettites also have the un- 
canny knack of making you 
feel at home with kindness, 
hospitality, and some of the 
best apple pie know to man. 
So, let the big cities con- 
tinue to boast of their silly 
plays and greasy restaurants. 
Rhea County has them beat, 
hands down. But let's just 
keep it our little secret. 
by Tevon Nelson 




iiWithout 
a car, it's 
hard to go 
places, 
but there 
are almost 
always 
people 
who will 
take you 
along, m 

Jeff Paulson 
Freshman 




/kJulie Wilson plays a rousing game of Hide-and- 
go-Seek at Northgate Mall. When students didn't 
want to go all the way to Hamilton Place, they 
usually went to Northgate. 

yC FINALLY!! Dayton joins the ranks the ranks of 
other cool town with a Taco Bell. Jeremy Toliver, 
Alan Smith, and Jeremy Colloms find refuge from 
Argo's. 



y OU. 



Community Life 



**#, 



Ss- 23 



\ 




/kAsk any hungry student and t he will 
tel you that Argo's is the most important 
job on campus. Considering that we must 
eat everyday, who cares if the windows 
are clean. Robin Olive demonstrates the 
fine art of meatball making. 

/fOne of the most important missions of 
the grounds crew is to keep Bryan 
students from walking on those pesky 
autumn leaves! The thankless (and. 
endless) job of keeping up with the oak 
trees fell to Charles Hot, Kasey Reid, and 
many others perform for us. 

Une many late hours spent cleaning 
one of the messiest places (the den) seem 
to be taking their toll on Brad Fox. 



24 



yo> 



p& 



VfcVt 



Work 




WE VIEW FROM 



urns work k ra domg 




We see them every day, 
verywhere, busily keeping our 
ilassrooms clean, helping out 
n the library, serving our food, 
vashing our dishes. Who are 
hese paragons of servanthood? 
t's those Work-study guys . 

It's 7:00 P.M. and most of 
is are done with classes for the 
lay. Students are studying in 
he dorms (a place where most 
)f us just sleep, do laundry, 
ind study.) Did you ever stop 
o think about who cleans the 
iorms? Thisjob involves more 
hanjust cruising up and down 
he hall with a vacuum cleaner. 
For those who work in Huston 
}r Long dorms, there are bath- 
'ooms to clean. On most floors 
his means eight toilets, eight 
showers, and eight sinks, as 
tvell as sweeping and mop- 



ping. In all the dorms there 
are laundry rooms must be kept 
clean. The students work long 
and hard to keep our living 
facilities. ..well, liveable. 

Jobs don't stop there. Stu- 
dent work- 



ers also Tne student WO rkers 

work on the 

grounds work long and hard 



to keep the living 
facilities... well, 
liveable. 



where we 
walk, talk 
and study 
every day. 

Grass is 

cut, leaves are raked, and flow- 
ers are planted. The sidewalks 
are swept so that we can enjoy 
a walk around the Triangle or 
down Bryan Hill. These stu- 
dents work long hours, some- 
times in the rain and often in 
the hot sun. 



Working is not all clean- 
ing. A major part of the stu- 
dent workers work in the place 
where we eat. At Argo's, work 
starts early in the morning and 
ends late at night. They serve 
our meals, 
make sure we 
have dishes 
and silver- 
ware, and 
clean up 
when we are 
done. 

Work 

does not stop there. There are 
many other places where one 
can find student workers. They 
work in the library, helping us 
find a book or helping us go 
through the backfiles. They 
work in the bookstore, where 
we drive them crazy at regis- 




tration (how many people can 
you fit in that little bookstore?). 
They work in Rudd cleaning 
the bathrooms or classrooms 
and vacuuming the audito- 
rium. 

Students also work off cam- 
pus. We can see them on our 
weekly trips to Wal-Mart or 
McDonalds. We might find 
them at The newer Bi-Lo and 
Taco Bell. We work for a 
common prize. The money. 
Some of us use it to help pay 
our college bill. Others use it 
for the extra spending cash. 

The next time you see a 
student worker emptying trash 
or raking leaves, remember 
what they do and take a minute 
to stop and thank them. 

ByJoyMotte 



V 



* 



iiWork- 
ing in the 
library has 
helped me 
learn 
many 
valuable 
skills that 
I can use 
later in 
life. 
99 



Jenni Esch 
Freshman 




/ ' ■£?!?' J 



/f If it weren't for Brad Green and his handy dandy 
drill, our desks would fall apart and we would all be 
on the floor. 



)C While grounds workers get to work on their 
tans, Tiffany Snyder was stuck inside fading away, 
washing windows. What a sacrifice to keep Byran 
College looking shiny and clean.. 



Work 



^Sg\, 25 




> A group of more than 15 Bryan 
students, faculty members and their 
families toured London over Chrsitmas 
Break. Touring museums, watching 
plays, seeing the sights and earning 
college credit. Evenings in the hotel 
rooms were spent playing spades. 

> Tim Lien went home for the holidays. . 
all the way to the West Coast. He and his 
six siblings were all together for the first 
time in more than three years. 

► Wedding bells rang for several Bryan 
students over Chrstimas break. On 
December 1 7 Sarah Kiney became the 
bride of Timothy Fary in Spring City, 
Tennessee. Only hours later Brenda 
Adamson became Mrs. Del Cothran in 
Chattanooga. 



26 '^r 



Breaks 




THE VIEW FROM 



sandwiched between the studies 



IYI 




5 tood. m & m 



As the rush of 
nid-term exams comes to 
close, most people look 
orward to relaxing and 
oing home for spring 
reak, but not the Bryan 
College Chorale. Starting 
>n March 3 and ending on 
Aarch 12, the chorale's 
our is a rigorous one. The 
horale usually sings in a 
ifferent church every 
light. This year the tour 
panned from Atlanta and 
iHairsville, Georgia to St. 
'etersburg, Florida. 



With such a large area 
to be covered, long bus rides 
were to be — ^— ^— — 
expected. 
To pass 
the time, 
many 
people en- 
gaged in 

intense 

spades tournaments. Oth- 
ers watched movies on the 
bus' moniter system to help 
pass the time. 

Once we arrived at the 
churches, we were usually 



We watched movies 
or had spades tour- 
naments to pass the 
time on the long bus 
rides. 



> 



fed a meal by the church 
(spaghetti was a popular en- 
tree). Then 
the chorale 
would do a 
concert. 
After- 
wards, it 
was time to 
find out the 




housing arrangements for 
the evening. Many a tale 
was told of the adventures 
that were had at the host's 
home the night before. 



The tour was not all 
work though. While in the 
St. Petersburg area, the 
chorlae went to Busch Gar- 
dens and the beach. 

Even though the tour 
was very entertaining, and 
we all had lot of fun, the 
chorale members still kept 
their focus on what chorale 
tour is really all about: min- 
istering to people for Jesus 
Christ. 

By Deric Whatley 



66 The trip 

was very 
rewarding. 
We learned 
a lot in 
addition to 
having a 
great 
time.ff 

Gayle Couch 
freshman 





/Clslgong Ngangmuta, Tom Cybulski and Ngam 
Ngangmuta Spend their Spring Break camping in 
the woods of Florida 



X One of the most beautiful sights is the ocean at 
sunset. Ngam reflects on the wonder of God's creation 
during and enjoys time away from the books. 



y cu. 



Breaks 



'**«£, 



'*£. 



27 




XBeth Wilson, Matt Gore, Alan Smith 
and Pamela Brown enjoy the elegance 
of the atmosphere and the food at the 
Knoxville Airport Hilton. 

/^Making a fashion statement, juniors 
Tara Luther and Rachel Snyder dress up 
for a night on the big town of Knoxville. 

JjJess Dantice and Randy Gilbert 
discard their formal attire and focus on 
the fun after the meal: concert, laser tag, 
and a variety of other entertainments in 
Gatlinburg. 



28 



vo> 



A*fc 



VRJfc 



Junior/Senior Banquet 




WE VIEW FROM 




"ight lights, "Big City," the 
ft sounds of jazz filtering 
rough the background and 
lally, the thrill of laser tag. 
ie sights and sounds of that 
i forgettable night, April 7, 
>95, more commonly 
lown as the Junior/Senior 
mquet. 

ie evening began with a 
enic drive up 1-75, a drive 
hich brought us to Alcoa, 
>me of Knoxville's local 
rport and the Hilton Hotel. 
ie highlight of the evening 
as not the meal ( no, never 
e meal) but the concert 
:rformed by the Christian 
mtemporary artist, David 
eece. Junior Julie Guest 
:scribed David Meece as 
■meone who is, "very down 



to earth, touching and 
funny." His hilarious jokes, 
soul-stirring music and 
honest, open story of his 
childhood proved to be a 
combination that spoke to the 
hearts and minds of all who 
sat in the ___^^___ 
audito- 
rium of 
the Fine 
Arts 
building 
at the 
College of Maryville. 
Perhaps the best advice given 
to the juniors and seniors 
was given by David Meece, 
"Never hide your feelings 
and tell yourself that time 
heals all wounds. It doesn't. 
Instead, your wounds will 



It was an evening 
that catered to the 
tastes of all who 
were present. 



fester until you feel nothing 
but hate." His testimony 
provided a time of contem- 
plation that added to the 
specialness of the night. 
The next stop on this "road 
trip" was the city of 
_____i^_ Gatlinburg, 
resort 
nestled 



within the 
Smoky 
Mountains, a 
_ proven 
haven for the country star 
elite. It was here that a time 
of frolic and play endured 
and ais Shonda Tompkins 
said, "I had never played 
before and I thought that this 
was a lot of fun. There was a 
varieity of activities and on 



top of all this, the food was 
pretty good." At 2:00 am 
that Saturday morning, it 
was time to once again 
travel back to Maryville and 
watch a collection of slides 
at a local movie theater that 
portrayed the seniors from 
their childhood. For those 
who had spent four years at 
Bryan, it was a reminder 
that this part of their life 
had passed opening up a 
door, whose contents inside 
remain a mystery. Yes, this 
night, April 7, 1995, was an 
evening whose events 
catered to the tastes of all 
who were present, even to 
our most demanding critic, 
our memory. 

By Deric Whatley 



66 Warn- 
ing Jeff 
Vandemark 
recover 
from his 
"near death 
experience" 
on the 
bungee 
trampoline 
was the 
worth the 
price of 
admis- 
sion, m 

Tim Lien 
sophomore 





A THE THREE AMIGOS! Rejecting every beautiful 
girl on the Bryan Campus, Jeff Dearman. John 
Spraklin and Brian Warren chose to spend the 
evening dateless. 

XgiRLS' NIGHT OUT! Julie Shultz, Lori Thomas, 
Jennifer Brasher, Alyson Camp, Tonya Hills, Britt 
Weber, Ruth Shultz, Durinda Compton should have 
gotten together with the Three Amigos! 



y Qj. 



Junior/Senior Banquet 



«*H t 



£/?£. 



29 




> Senior chapel is a special day each 
year for seniors to make fun of Bryan and 
its professors. Jason Martinez, Ted Tucker 
and Stephen Wegner do a number on the 
Science Department. (And the Science 
professors did a number right back, 
raising Olympic-style scores from the 
second row of Rudd Chapel.) 

/kAlyson Camp, Brian Warren and Ruth 
Nangle model proper graduation attire: a 
cap and gown, a well-earned hood, a 
proud expression and a picture-perfect 
smile. 

/CSenior Marcus Bellamy's charge to his 
classmates encouraged them to continu- 
ally look back to the cross, the foundation 
of their faith. 




30 



yoj 



P&c- 



wtvt 



Senior Events 




WE VIEW FROM 



from laughter to tears 

M Of '95 WB fINAL W€Gk 




During their last weeks 
t Bryan College, seniors run 
ie gambit from the ridiculous 
the sublime. Some might 
rgue that the ridiculousness 
egins with seniors being ex- 
mpt from their final exams, 
iut, whether you subscribe to 
lis theory or not. Senior Chapel 
an hour and a half of ridicu- 
aus fun. Seniors from each 
epartment are given the op- 
ortunity to thank, appreciate 
nd generally make fun of the 
acuity and staff. 

Some choose to thank, 
ut most choose to mock their 
leloved faculty and advisors. It 
vill be difficult to forget Ruth 
viaugle's impersonation of Dr. 



Ann Sidebottham. Not only 
did she capture her manner- 
isms and hairdo, but she obvi- 
ously shops at the same store 
(were those twin suits?). Nor 
will we forget Todd De Vaney's 
rendition of Dr. Malcolm Fary 
and his parameters for a good 
paper, bor- 
rowed from 
Winston 
Churchill: 
"Like a 
woman's 

skirt: Long 

enough to cover the subject, 
but short enough to be interest- 
ing." Communication Arts 
majors turned their attention 
from their own professors and 



The Class of 1995 
turned their tassels 
and said their last 
good-byes. 



to other majors with their Top 
1 Reason's to Become a Com- 
munications Major. 

Directly afterchapel, se- 
niors made their get-away to 
Jekyll Island for Senior Trip, 
where they spent the remain- 
der of the week having fun in 
the sun, 
reminisc- 
ing, sleep- 
ing in, talk- 
ing until the 
wee hours, 
and realiz- 
ing that they will never again 
have a practical use for the 
quadratic equation. 

Friday night before 
graduation, they presented 



Vespers (a worship service 
honoring the Lord and their 
parents). Senior John Spraklin 
reminded his classmates that 
God's love has carried them 
through difficult times and 
will continue to do so, using 
his own Bryan experiences as 
examples. Clay Causey both 
led worship and entertained 
at the piano with an original 
composition. 

Saturday morning was 
the culmination of an emo- 
tion-packed week and four 
years of higher education as 
the class of 1995 turned their 
tassels and said their last good- 
byes.. 

by Timothy Fary 



ttSenior 
trip was 
great. After 
four years 
of hard 
work you 
get four 
days of 
play.» 

Kimberlee Hays 
senior 





nn 












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Mb v 3g| 








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N^WWWW^WIW>V^ ' W»*" ' 1 












]C History itself may never change, but there's a lot of 
difference between the professors. At senior chapel, 
history majors explain the differences between Dr. Bill 
Ketchersid and Dr. Jack Traylor (and their effect on a 
student historian's GPA. 

/(communication Arts graduates Betsy Cope, 
Timothy Fary, Tevon Nelson, Deric Whatley, Cherane 
Pack and Lyn Amis gather with Dr. Dann Brown to 
make one last public statement before the future 
draws them apart. 



Graduation 



^fett 



£ *E. 



31 



TUNING IN 
FOR TRAUMA 

ER and Chicago Hope 
Hope for Healthy Ratings 




August of 1994 found television viewers 
ommercials hailing Chicago Hope and 
R as two of the best new shows coming 
o the September line-up. Both hour 
ng dramas were set, coincidentally, in 
owntown Chicago hospitals. NBC and 
7? would prove to be the victors in this 
[rime time showdown, however, pushing 
BS to move its show to a different 
night, where the differences became 
obvious. 

ER focuses its attention on the fast-paced 
lives of emergency room doctors and 
nurses, both professionally and 
personally. The characters on ER are 
portrayed by relatively unknown actors 
and represent a number of various ethnic 
and family backgrounds. The quick pace 
of the emergency room is intense and 
fervent, but. perhaps, the best aspect of 
the show is its continuing, flowing plots 
and storylines. Life is not all scalpels 
and sutures for these people; there are 
real lives to be dealt with outside the 
operating room. 

Chicago Hope, in an effort to distinguish 
itself from the competitor, chose to depict 
the slower, yet equally stressful, lives of a 
predominantly Caucaision cast. The 
show provides an hour of entertainment 
that is similar to General Hospital rather 
than real medical life in a real institution. 

seems to be the weekly drama of 
hoice here at BC, and it's easy to see 

by- 




America watches footbal 
hero face murder trial— Live! 

OJ. Simpson be remembered for Characters from the trial setting have 
the wonderful football career that he had? become household names and have become 
Or the short stint he had on the silver icons of the ludicrous media circus. Names 
screen? Probably not. His football years such as Judge Lance Ito, Kato Kaelin, Rosa 
will be forever shadowed by the murder Lopez, and Faye Resnick have all affected 
trial that seems to never end. the trial- each one with an entire story and 
As we first heard the news that Nicole background. As the trial drags on the jury 
Simpson ahd been murdered, we also pool grows smaller and at the time of this 
heard that OJ was primarily suspected in writing, only two alternates remain. Judge 
the slaying of here and her male friend, Ito has threatened many times to remove 
Ron Goldman. Yet the next news was was reporters and dismiss members of the au- 
even more surprising as we watched OJ dience for small acts as chewing gum and 
and his close friend Al Cowling drive down is riduculed daily by the press. One begins 
the Los Angeles freeway in, the now infa- to wonder what the point is, and how it all 
mous, white Bronco. Yet from the stand- got so far. In today's judicial system there 
off with the police to the bloody glove and is already too many technicalities and ra- 
the DNA evidence, OJ seems apparently cial tensions for there to be a fair trial for 
guilty to the American public. But with Mr. Simpson. The forecast of many trial 
the trial growing more bizarre every day prognosticators is that OJ wil be retried and 
the liklihood of OJ being convicted grows still not be convicted. Won't somebody just 
smaller with every passing day, the prom- please confess? 
ises of a second trial are almost inevitable. 



WHAT'S NEW!? Strange things is what's new. 
Woodstock '94 gave the younger generation 
a chance to capture the spirit of the '60s and 
1 995 gave way to the popularization of being 
"alternative"-- from dress to music. Sprucing 
up your vehicle has always been a hobby, but 
instead of fuzzy dice, or a scent filled Christ- 
mas tree, the aromatic royal crown was seen 
popping up across the nation. Not only must 
your car smell nice, now, it must have neon 
runners that give your car nocturnal pinstripes. 





Enough 5aid 





Mofnasays 

stupid is as 
stupid does. 





from Forrest Gump 
winner Best Picture 
Best Director 
Best Actor 



Forrest Gump 



POETIC LICENSE. Shaking the tranquility 
of the Bryan campus was Randy Gilbert and 
his criminal friends, who violated federal 
and state laws by removing every license 
plate on school premises. Pranks and other 
late night activities kept SDO and the hand- 
ful of RA's on their toes-- Having fun out- 
side of handbook guidelines was a popu- 
lar pastime. 




DAVES WHAT'S IN * WHAT'S NOT* 

Of course we all realize that our grades are important. So are our jobs and our many other responsibilities, 
'but all these things take a backseat to that one constant struggle that we all face every day— trying to keep up 
"■ith the trends. 

I mean hey, you know that the Western Civ final is tomorrow, but what are you going to wear? Is this too 
Eighties? Will people laugh at you? Life is tough- get over it. 



c martens 



hootie, ini kamozi 
torn hanks 
jerry Seinfeld 
friends, ER 
oj Simpson 

>. lion king 



; pegged pants ; 

turtle necks 
cowboy Poots 
suede skirts 
goody's 

>, meatloaf 

joey lawrence 

blossom, 90210 

tonyp hording 

robin hood, angels in the outfield 



live dancing anywhere 



Enough 5a/d \ 33 



eter Pan syndrome? Dr. 
Kurt Wise and Erin Bryant 
show their true colors 
following Bryan's annual 
convocation ceremony. 








Intro to Lit. and World Lit. are 
two of the hardest classes that 
Marcy Treat and Amy Pepple 
are taking this semester. It's 
only the first week, and they 
are already becoming closely 
acquainted to the library and 
its many books. 



34 




Academics 





j 










***! 


<—m 





e play hard; we visit 
with friends for hours on 
end; we make countless trips 
to Chattanooga; we spend 
hours on the phone; we order 
pizza and eatjunk food; we 
shop, go out on dates, watch 
movies, borrow clothes; we 



we go to concerts and no-cut 
chapels; we decorate for open 
dorm. With all this going on, 
it's often easy to forget the 
academic side of life on the 
hill: required courses, majors 
and minors, earning a degree. 
But after all,— We're Here To 



have dorm parties and picnics; Learn. 




To Lear 





"A 



The best of both worlds! Completing those never-ending reading 
assignments while enjoying the last warm days of summer, Sopho- 
mores Beth Wilson, Emily Mayo and Andrea Kemp join generations of 
Bryan students who have struggled to keep their minds on their studies. 



Acad 



emics 




35 




'I? 



EST TIME! 

SACS gives Bryan seal of 
approval for ten more years. 

vJ/nce every decade the Southern Association of 

Colleges and Schools reviews its member institutions by 

sending a committee of educators and administrators 

from other accredited colleges and universities. Bryan 

College, as well as many other prestigious schools of 

higher learning such as Vanderbilt, University of 

Tennessee, Emory, and Florida State, work hard to 

maintain their good standing and accreditation 

with the association. 

In December 1 994, Bryan received word that SACS 

had reaffirmed its accreditation for ten more years, the 

longest possible era. This seal of approval by SACS 

recognizes that Bryan College has met all of the 

association's standards in academic affairs, student 

development, financial planning and policies and 

physical resources. 

This follows nearly four years of self-study by Bryan 

staff, faculty, and students and an intense evaluation by 

the visiting team. The end result is that Bryan will use 

the committee's advice and insights to make the college 

even stronger. Among the things that the college will be 

addressing in the next few years: upgrading of the 

library collection, restructuring of some majors and 

developing a Masterplan for the campus. 




Jnl appily doing the heartless job of buying back fifty dollar books for pennies, 
Diana Kile awaits the next empty-pocketed student. 



36 



yo> 



A*te 



v\fc*fc 



^ Academics 



jjj) oing his Dr. K imitation, Freshman Jamie Cooper risks the chances of having his 
irderline grades take a nosedive. 




\J) pening one of his many fan 
letters, Peter Stone enjoys a minute 
of quiet from the the cameras by the 
mailroom. 




Ninety-five percent of all freshmen eat 
breakfast every day for the first month. 



you. 



Academics ^k D I 




AST FACTS 

InterNET puts resources 
at every student's fingertips 

JTj\3 technology has rapidly progressed, so has 
the value standard of certain things. "Time is Money 
or "Money is Power" slogans have given way to "Infor- 
mation is Power." We even call our phone lines infor- 
mation superhighways. Having access to large amounts 
of data, literally at our fingertips, has given millions of 
businessmen the extra edge and dramatically effected 
home computing. College computing has also changed 

Enter the InterNET. 
Any Bryan student in the computer lab 
(or in his room, if he owns an IBM-compatible com- 
puter) can access almost any other system on the 
InterNET. For example, The Library of Congress has 
a custom computer network which can quickly be 
brought up on our screens via satellite. Rare books and 
papers can be found within seconds. Current news can 
be accessed almost instantaneously. Using a variety of 
"chat" programs, millions of people become available 
as resources. As the number of users has skyrocketed, 
InterNET customer have been able to eliminate long 
distance fees by bringing the entire network into the 

local calling district. 

This is Bryan's first year as a member InterNET. 

Bryan's library system is now available to others, while 

Bryan students (and faculty) gain instant access to the 

almost unlimited information provided by this huge 

network of resources. 
BY TIMOTHY LIEN 




U sing her dorm room as a resource center, Melissa Lubke forgoes the availability 
late per and the library. 



38 



voJ 



A^^L 



Academics 



]| , ooking guilty for some reason. Sophomore Mischa Gann uses the reference 
computer in the library. 




F 



ooling no one, Freshmen 
Rachel Crumpler and Joy 
McCaskey stay up late chatting on 
BryanNET. Late night 
jr«f conversationlists perfected their 
typing and gabbing skills. 





The average bedtime for Bryan College 
students is the early hour of 1:13am. 



you. 



Academics 



**« 



E *£ 



39 




HAT'S LIFE 



*w 



Underclassmen endure 
general education courses 

Varies of despair and gloom could be heard 

throughout the halls. Puzzled looks and mournful 

expressions were seen on the faces of the freshmen as 

they left registration. Their cry was a familiar one to the 

upperclassmen who had once been in their shoes and 

could relate to their bewilderment. "I'm a music major, 

why do I have to take Biology?" "I'm a math major 

what do I have to sit through speech for?" "Fine Arts?! 

What in the world is that?" 
The reality of General Ed. hit many freshmen like a 
brick and served as a stumbling block to classes that 
really did seem to relate to their career goals and pro- 
posed major. Class like Concepts of RE., Freshman 
English, Intro to Lit and Intro to Communications are 
all classes that every BC students must survive (and by 
survive, we mean pass!) in order to move to the more 

"Career-oriented" classes. 

Some foolish seniors, however, managed to put a few of 

these classes off until the last possible semester. They 

were unhappily dissecting pigs or writing fine arts 

critiques during their final spring on Bryan Hill. 

General Ed., it's a rite of passage. It's not the most 

entertaining part of life on the Hill, but a necessary 

part. So, chin up, freshman: you practiced your 

speeches, wrote your term papers and now you can 

watch from the lofty plain of experience while next 

year's freshmen do the same. 
BY' TEVON NELSON 




(^ learly a posed picture, the photographer would lead us to believe that this 
freshman is actually doing homework. 



40 



i<» 



*■&■ 



wtvfc- 



Acad 



emics 



1 1 aving a good time with Bo "ny" Skeleton, freshmen Marty Whisman and Jeff 
ulson kill another class period. 






M- 



* 





VVaveless (and chickless) 
Senior Randy Gilbert still keeps his 
California smile by hangin' loose 
with Bible professor Dr. Fouts. 




A shocking 37% of students interviewed 
view Dayton as the Las Vegas of Tennessee 



y-cu. 



Academics 



'«**, 



£ *E 



41 





AT'S OFF 



Professors offer counsel 
and friendship to students. 

JL he family atmosphere, the beautiful, moun- 
tain -filled scenery, the fact that the president of the 
school knows you by name. These are all valid answers 
to the question, "What makes Bryan College different 
from other institutions?" But what about the people 
who help you adjust to college life beginning you very 
first week on campus? What about that person who 
pulls strings to sneak yOu into that one class you're 
required to have, even though it's supposed to be 
closed? What about that one special person who warns 
you to wait and take Western Civ. when you can have 
Dr. Traylor instead of Dr. Ketchersid? What about that 
proud mentor who will talk boastfully about all your 
successes after you graduate to underclassmen who are 
just starting out. That's right, I'm talking about your 
advisor, that one persistent professor who sicks with you 
through four, five, six (Maybe, even seven) years of 
school, always reassuring you of your ability to graduate 
- eventually. Advisor/advisee relationships are defi- 
nitely one special aspect of Bryan that not every school 
can offer. So, for all those long hours of counseling and 
rearranging our schedules, for get-togethers out of class, 
for your prayers and encouragement and for helping us 
to push toward graduation, our hats are off to our 

wonderful advisors! 

BY THVON NELSON 




eing cheerful while studying is the trademark of the Bryan student as Freshmar 
Jenny Nave shows. 



42 



-fOJ 



p$£ 



VfcVfc 



Academics 



(jl iving the studious look, Junior Stuart Sloan blots out the rest of the world for a 
ew seconds... and trips over a backpack. 




iyj[_ aking the grade, Sopho- 
mores Mandy Mayhood and Marcy 
Treat frantically study eighteen 
chapters for an 8:00am class. 




The majority of underclassmen believe 
the Grassy Bowl grows in circular spiral. 



y Qj. 



Academics 



'«&/,£ 



*£. 



43 



->. 



mm 




N THEORY 

f Big Bang can cause big 
brain strain in Origins class 



I, 



n Bio 3 1 4, commonly referred to as Origins 
class, students are exposed to current theories of the 
origins of the universe. For many students any science 
course is a traumatic experience: dissecting pigs, learn- 
ing complicated chemical formulas, identifying indig- 
enous Tennessee foliage. But Origins has a trauma all 
its own: exposure to the brilliant mind of Harvard 

scientist, Dr. Kurt Wise. 
For instance, Dr. Wise explained that Einstein pre- 
dicted that clocks would run at different speeds at 
different altitudes due to a gravitational well. Einstein's 
theory was validated when nuclear clocks placed at 
1 ,000 feet above sea level and those at sea level ran at a 
difference of five microseconds over the course of a year. 
Assuming the universe is bounded and that the earth is 
at the center of the universe, while one second elapsed 
on earth, millions of years could elapse at the edge of 
the universe. This would allow light to travel from the 
edge of the universe to the earth within the amount of 
time prescribed by the young earth model. 
Straining their brains to try to consider the scientific 
and perhaps theological ramifications of such a theory, 
many Origins scholars took frantic notes, attempting to 
document Dr. Wise's every word for future recall. 
However after finishing his explanation, Dr. Wise told 
the class that he felt this theory offered more problems 
than solutions. The trauma of sitting under a brilliant 

professor. 

BY' TIMOTHY' FA RY 




ing able to talk openly with faculty and alumni alike is a unique characteristic 
about Bryan as student Jamie Reed finds out. 



44 



io> 



n& 



\&&- 



Academics 



(j etting the scoop from Julie Schultz is Sophomore Joy Motte. 






I 



t wouldn't take a math major to 
count Senior Tevon Nelson's teeth 
in her usual friendly, scholarly 
smile. 




I * 




The average full-time load of a typical 
Bryan student is fifteen hours. 



you. 



Academics 



^bh Ei 



'*£. 



45 




N THE TEAM 

New VP sees role as 
encourager and supporter 

X^fter 2 1 years as Associate Professor of Higher 
Education at the University of Alabama, Dr. David 
Masoner is drinking in the fresh spirit of Bryan Col- 
lege. "People are excited about the Lord here," he 
said. "It's so wonderful to be able to openly begin a 

meeting with prayer.' 
Masoner, who served as Academic Dean and Director 
of the Institute of Higher Education at UA, joins 
Bryan as Vice President of Academic Affairs, replac- 
ing Dr. Herb Sierk. The new VP feels that God has 
been preparing him to make this move to Christian 
Education for nearly 1 5 years. "I have just become 
more and more convinced that the best place that I 
could contribute was in the Christian environment," he 
said. Masoner, his wife, Barbara and his daughter 
Nancy, who moved to Dayton in May, already feel at 
home here. "Were I to have designed a professional 
setting, this is exactly what I would have made," he 
said. Masoner admits he's already enjoying Bryan's 
size. "Without all the red tape, we can really get things 

done." 

This newcomer on campus already thinks like one of 

the team. "Bryan College is strong in the area of 

teaching students to think 'Christianly,'" he noted. 

There's a strong commitment among the faculty here. I 

want to encourage and support them. We're doing 

things well here, and I want to help a fine faculty do 

them even better." 




*V 





^\hh, the sunset, ahh the mountains, awwww, Western Civ— three freshmen con 
each other equally in the well manicured Grassy Bowl. 



46 



io) 



A*t 



VfcVfc- 



Acad 



emics 



|\Jo problem, mon! Good humor and good teaching are synonymous when Bryan 
ofessors arc involved as Dr. Fouts gives a Jamaica smile. 




E 



ating is a must, if Sophomore 
Kelly Moore is going to get through 
her weekly all-nighter. Health food 
is not allowed in the dorms past 
11pm. 





I 



Selling back your books brings back an 
average lucrative return of $3.42. 



y cu. 



<oe? 



Academics 



^ 47 




<T 



UT THERE! 

Students can experience 
hand's-on education 

iL^ab sciences were perhaps Bryan's pioneers in 

the field of hand's-on education, sometimes more hands 

on than any of us wanted. Education majors began 

their trips to the "real world" of bulliten boards and 

behavior problems by as early as their sophomore years, 

when required practicums placed them in classrooms 

throughout the county. 
And more and more students are learning the nitty 
gritty lessons of the work-a-day world and gaining a 
refreshing new perspective on their own education. 
Communication Arts majors have worked (hard and 
with no financial reward) at the local radio station, the 
newspaper, doing public relations work at Rhea Medi- 
cal Center and the Dayton Chamber of Commerce. 
Psychology majors have experienced the joys of 
communting, while traveling to work and learn in 

Chattanooga hospitals. 
The education major has even brought the "real world" 
right on campus by developing and staffing an after- 
school enrichment program for Rhea County school 

kids called "Kids College." 
History majors may chose to spend a whole semester in 
Washington, D.C. earning credit and seeing our gov- 
ernment at work. 
Yes, learning does go on up in those third floor class- 
rooms in the adminstration building, but for many of us 
we have had to venture beyond the hill to complete our 

educational experience. 




Award-winning Christian Education major Clay Causey finishes a 
life as President Brown shakes his hand. 



huge chapter of 



48 



io> 



AV&V^. 



Academics 



Unfortunately, smiles and beauty can't be graded or handed in as homework. 




Kin 

A he only easy way out of Fine 
Arts requirements was a difficult 
tour of London during Christmas 
Break. Looking American and only 
slightly touristic was this years 
group of cultured students. 




History of Western Civilization is the course 
that must be repeated the most often. 



y cu. 



Academics 



«te 



*SJ^ 49 




UPERIOR! 

More than seventy 
students receive recognition 

JL t's scriptural: Giving honor to whom honor is due. 

r 

And Honors Day is designed for just that purpose. 
Space will not permit a comprehensive list of awards, 
but we can include some of the highlights. 
Perhaps the most prestigious award, Bryan's RA. Boyd 
Award, is awarded to five students of outstanding char- 
acter and principles who have devoted themselves to best 
interest of student life at the college. This year's recipi- 
ents were seniors Marcus Belamy and Amy Murphree, 
junior Tonya Hills, Sophomore Jeanna Broome and 

Freshman Julia Bruehl. 
Several awards carried scholarships with them including: 
the Robert D. Marston Scholarship (William Sarrell), 
Mary McDonald Groves Music Scholarship (Andrew 
Heathershaw, Jennifer Esch, Beth Freeman), Brynoff 
Scholarship (Jeanna Broome), Theodore C. Mercer 
Scholarship (Tracy Stone), Catherine McDonald Com- 
munications Scholarship (B. Walker Haynes), Nannie 
K. McDonald Education Scholarship (Christina 
Kroeker), Lawrence E. and Lillian C. Payne Scholar- 
ship [Bible] (Mark Davidson, Ricky Smith), Al Page 
Memorial Scholarship [Business] (Jeff DeArman), 
Frank J. Schmickl Scholarship [Mathematics] (Alana 
Yederhnic), John Graves LeDu Scholarship (Amanda 
Smith, Elizabeth Green), Doris Morgan Scholarship 
(Jennifer Fine), Mercer and Bernyce Clementson Schol- 
arship [Business Administration] (Adam Soukup), 
M.A. Cooley Memorial Music Scholarship (Merlyn 
Catron, Sarah Beth Nordmoe) and the Paul McCarthy 
Scholarship [Computer Science] (Michele Huneycutt). 




Jj) r. Wilhoit displays the correct resting technique for trumpet to Freshman Matthew 
Hargraves and Senior Deric Whatley. 



50 



io>t 






Academics 



§ canning the heavens above Dayton, Senior Marcus Bellamy, fufills his science lab 
requirement for Dr. Barnett. 




L. 



rooking good at the wee hours of 
the morning comes naturally for 
Freshman Jennifer Esch, who 
catches a nap before her 8:00 am 
class. 



S 



sX' 









» r 





■ 



Psychology professor Dr. Steve Bradshaw 
received the honor of Teacher of the Year. 



you. 



Acad 



emics 



:•***, 



^ 51 



Commercially speaking, 

q> 'Best 

ancKfce W/3R5T 



Tiie 23est 

Tlie J3uc/u;riser frogs - 'wise" . . . hud' . . ,' ex . 
Stupid as it sounds the frogs were an audience 
favorite. 

Any local 'Dayton commercial for it's laughter 
value 

CiSlPVl advertisements for hockey night. 

The 'Doritos ©flips habies singing a tune. 

Little Beasars' IPizza ads provide a quick 
laugh and stupidity for the whole family to enjoy. 

Promotions [or the Kicki Lake Show 
The Worst 

* Any Shaquille o'neal Commercial 

* Any Local Dayton commercial for 
it's natural screen talent 

* The Ford Ranger ad with the 
purple pick-up truck and the 
pseudo-country music 

* the frightening comeback of the 
doublemint twins. 

* Dj Simpson Highlights on any 
channel or on any show. 

* the zddo flushes ad with the 
lady we don't recognize 

Promotions for the Ricki Lake 
jhow 




♦ 



menca Go® On-line 



SUBSCRIBERS TO COMPUTER NETWORKS 
AND SERVICES EXPLODE IN 1994-95 



America has gone Online. Millions of 
Americans spend hours a day chatting, surf- 
ing the Internet or just finding and exchange 
information on the bulletin boards. 

By the latest count there are 50,000 of 
them in the US alone. No one knows for sure 
how many people are hooked up to them. 

The biggest attention, as well as customer 
getters have been online services like America 
Online, CompuServe, Genie, Prodigy and oth- 
ers like them. They offer users all the same 
features: private chat, instant update on sport, 
weather, business and news, access to many 
online references like magazines, books and 
even interactive encyclopedias. Of course they 
let their members surf the "net" too. All these 
are the reasons why it is so easy to use: easy 
to use, friendly format, no previous knowledge 
of computers required. You can even reserve 
your airline tickets, a rental car and hotel room, 
as well as a shopping guide to any major US 
city online. There seem to be no limits to what 
can be done. 



The computer users liked these ideas 
so much that in the last year the top five online 
services increased their membership by 400 
percent. The records on growth have been set 
by America Online. In August 1993 the com- 
pany started an by November they had less than 
500,000 members. Before the beginning of 
March 1995 2.5 million users have been con- 
nected to AOL Steve Case, the director of AOL 
contributes this speed of growth to many fac- 
tors: good tech staff, user friendly Windows 
based software, and especially aflat rate. "Many 
users have been confused with other services, 
how much time they .were allowed in what sec- 
tion of the system. Here in AOL it is simple. 
You get 5 hours a month to go anywhere and 
do anything, if you decide to do more it will 
only cost you $3.50 an hour." 

So more and more people learn how to 
use their phone lines without picking up thei 
phone. You never know, maybe the man sit- 
ting behind you is"Wired." 



POLITICALLY SPEAKING: Stephen G. Breyer 
was sworn in as Supreme Court Judge in Au- 
gust following an easy confirmation by the 
Senate. When the Surgeon General, Joyceln 
Elders, stepped down, it wasn't easy. Both lib- 
erals and conservatives had problems with 
nominee Henry Foster. White House policy 
was very grey on Cuban refugees. In an at- 
tempt to control the influx of boat people, the 
U.S. Coast Guard shipped everyone back to 
Guantanamo, then Clinton reversed his policy 
and allowed all non-criminal Cubans to enter 
the country. 






Enough 5aid 




from Forrest Gump 
winner Best Picture 
Best Director 
Best Actor 



CRASH LANDING: Frank Corder ended 
his life in the wreckage of a small plane on 
the White House lawn. With a history of 
depression and drug abuse, Corder was the 
first of several people to breach security at 
the president's home. Following a shoot- 
ing incident, Pennsylvania Avenue was 
closed to traffic in front of the White House. 



Dayton makes the big time... 

KRYSTAI* taco SILL &M® 
WItSPTS ©©mu T© t®wh 



"So, where do you want to eat?" 
"Well, let's see, there's Hardees and Long 
John Silvers." 
"And Pizza Hut... " 

"Right. Ummm.... Did I mention Hardees?" 
Okay, so we know why Bryan College 
doesn't put "endless possibilities for fine din- 
ing" on their PR brochures. But consider the 
above scenario from a few years a go and 
maybe you will see Dayton in a tastier light. 
"Back in my day there was no McDonalds 
in Dayton." This may sound like a phrase right 
out of your grandfather's mouth, but actually 
any graduate in'the early eighties would have 
remembered Dayton as one of the last remain- 



ing towns that still lacked the mark of civiliza- 
tion: "The Golden Arches." 

But, once McyD's moved in, it was just one 
right after the other. Okay, maybe it wasn't 
quite like that, but the choices did become 
more numerous. 

This year's graduating class can remember 
the introduction of Bubba's, Ayala's, Western 
Sizzlin'. 

And even the Class of 98 remembers Day- 
ton in the pre-Krystal, pre-Taco Bell era. And 
by the time you read this article you can even 
find a square hamburger at Wendy's. Rumor 
has it that Arby's isn't far behind. Dayton will 
never be the same again. 




Enough 5 aid 




m 



urder Mysteries on Cam- 
pus, a Student Union 
Sponsored activity, was 
a "noteworthy" evening 
of entertainment. 




| chubert's Mass inG, performed 
by the Bryan College Chorale, 
featured soloists Paula 
Abernathy, voice teacher; Mark 
Tilley, guest baritone and se- 
nior Danny Colpo. The Mass 
was one of the college's re- 
quired Fine Arts Events. 



54 




Organizations 









hat is it that defines a typical 
Bryan student? For an over- 
whelming number of us it's not 
our major, our GPA or our class 
rank. Instead, we define our- 
selves by (and devote our hours 
to) a host of groups whose 
combined effort impact the 
campus, the county and the 
world. We teach BEM on Thurs- 



days, perform Latin melodies for 
fine arts concerts, put on musi- 
cals, take missions trips around 
the world, plan white water 
rafting trips, make student 
handbook revisions, take musi- 
cal tours during breaks, write 
stories for the paper, and pro- 
duce radio segments— it's just 
ail part of what we do here. . . 



What We D 




avid Mundy (Oscar) and Simon Sakatos (Leo) accost Sarah Beth 
Nordmoe (Regina) in a futile attempt to get their money back, while 
Walker Haynes (Ben) waits for a more opportune moment to voice his 
opinion in the Hilltop Players' fall production of the melodrama, The 
Little Foxes. 



Organizations 




55 



—Evidently Jeff and Jennifer Baker's BEM kids 
learned much more than Bible stories. Jeff was 
a part of the Lion basketball team and also led a 
youth group in Evansville. 



-* Hands shoot up with curious questions as 
Tara Luther and Pamela Brown deliver another 
■^creative lesson. Being consistently creative can 
be challenging for busy students. 




5a HK II J? Kit LI Mm. Na Qo Pp Qq Rr Ss T 




** %% ^ 



& 



^ Ams & Iksftasss ^ @fflQg% ss>mmBSSS>§) 



56 



YO> 



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VfcVfc- 



BEM 



—Preparing for a creative BEM lesson takes time 
as Brent Campbell finds out. 





y 



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. 




wi 



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Bible Class I O 



BEM allows a rare ministry into the 
public schools of Rhea County 



While Rhea County might be a small 
countr)' county with not much to it, Bryan 
College has a special ministry opportunity 
we couldn't have anywhere else. We can 
go into the elementary schools and teach 
the kids about God. B.E.M., Bible Educa- 
tion Ministries, is a rare ministry opportunity 
to have in today's society where things like 
this are against the law in many places. 

Sometimes we B.E.M. teachers wonder 
if the time commitment is worth it and if we 
really have that much of an impact on the 
kids, but we really make more of an impact 
than we may ever know. I grew up in Rhea 
County and I had B.E.M. teachers through- 
out my elementary' school career. I can still 
remember the anticipation our class would 
feel as we awaited for the half hour each 
Thursday that we could escape real class 
and enjoy a break. But that wasn't all that it 
meant. I know that sometimes I feel like 
the kids think I must be the biggest idiot, 
but they really don't. We used to look at 
our Bible teachers like they were the best 
things on this earth. We thought they knew 
evetything and we loved them. Sometimes 
when I'm discouraged about teaching I just 
remember what it was like to sit in class as 
a student and that really encourages me. 



—►Quieting this noisy group of eager BEM 
students, Gimper's very own Carter Rocky 
caused many students to participate in God's 
word with many smiles and loud voices. 



Being a Bible teacher is not an easy 
thing to do. It takes a lot of time, love, and 
creativity! While some stories are easy to 
visualize and to make exciting, others take 
a lot of thinking and craziness to make 
interesting. Dressing up like a Bible 
character is always a fun one. But it's hard 
to stop the laughter when you're a girl and 
you're trying to be Moses. Then there are 
always the wonderful flannelgraphs that 
are so confusing that they are a last resort 
Worksheets, filmstrips, games, and songs 
are just some of the interesting things we 
B.E.M. teachers do to get the kids to learn a 
stor)/. Not all things go like you want them 
to. Like when turning the jar of water to 
blood I managed to dye the table and my 
hands bright red. Or when my partner, 
Melinda Snead, tried to use a straw as a 
snake. We got laughed out of the room. 
The following week one of the girls 
brought us a book on snakes to show us 
what one looks like. 

Though it might take a little bit of our 
time that we don't really have, being a 
Bible teacher is a very important and huge 
ministr)'. No one can quite realize the 
impact or the effect it has on many 
children that desire direction and the love 
of Cod's word. It's something even>'one 
needs to take part in at least once. 



,BY MELODY SHEPDAN 



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-»BIBLE EDUCATION MINISTRY: One of the amazing aspects of BEM is the amount of students that 
get involved. Many upperclassmen have been doing BEM ever since they arrived at Bryan, and there 
are many freshmen who sign up, despite adjusting to the busy college schedule. 



THAT'S 
WHAT 
WE DO 
HERE! 



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57 



—One of the all-time favorites. The antics of this 
Lion have entertained (and painlessly instructed) 
hundreds of children and adults. 



-*A moving experience: Cimper operators 
spend a lot of time assembling and breaking 
vdown their stage. Ruth Shult and Haven 
Srickland have become old pros at the drill. 




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-•Freshman Jennifer Patrick helps take down the 
stage and load it on the van . 





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Behind the Curtain 

Gospel Gimpers put in many hours so 
their puppets can present the gospel 



Every Thursday morning groups 
of about six students packed up 
their puppets and piled into vans. 
These students have become 
experts and lip synching with their 
hands. They have also learned to 
pack up and haul trunks of pup- 
pets, tapes, sound equipment, 
curtains and PVC pipe and reas- 
semble their traveling show in a 
manner of minutes. 

These groups of dedicated 
puppeteers are called Gimpers. 
This division of Practical Christian 
Involvement (PCI) presents the 
gospel through puppets to a differ- 
ent BEM class every week. School- 
aged kids andBEM teachers alike 
eagerly look formward to having 
the colorful group of puppets (and 
the unseen engineers behind the 
blue curtain) entertain them while 
they talk and sing about Jesus. 

To make these presentations a 
success, these groups get together 



about once a week and practice 
making the mouths and bodies of 
their little felt covered friends look 
as real as possible. They use pre- 
recorded tapes and practice in 
front of a long horizontal mirror on 
the wall in the PCI hallway (You've 
always wondered why that mirror 
was there, haven't you?). They also 
discuss how they can better get 
the children involved. 

On Thursday mornings the 
teams head out, perform and pack 
up in about 30 minutes. After 
hours of work perfecting a new skit 
or song, it is over in just a moment 
or two. However, the group does 
get to compete once a year at a 
puppet contest. And our Bryan 
College Gimpers always give a 
good showing, bringing home 
awards and high schores for their 
diligence and commitment. 

-BY MELINDA SNEAD 




-»GIMPER PUPPETEERS: (front, from left) Brenda 
Nollmeyer, Carter Rocky, Cara Helping, Diana 
Whorley, Andy Graham, (back) Brian Eastling, Jeff 
Schumacher, Ruth Schult, Haven Strickland, John 
Butler, Kasey Reid, Jeremy Toliver, Jennifer Patrick. 



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59 



-♦Pumpkin carving has become an annual tra- 
dition. For the past several years Bryan students, 
-A time to relax and have fun. Both the kids jjke Marcy Treat, have helped their PALS put 
and their older Bryan PALS enjoy the fellowship. faces on their pumpkins 



g 







60 



-•Movie night in the Lions Den provided a fun 
and inexpensive outing for the PALS. 





Meeting New Friends 

Ministering to Senior Adults brings 
rewards to both young and old 



Some things about PCI ministries 
are constant: the faces change, the 
seasons change, but this remains the 
same: the rewards outweigh any of our 
human efforts. 

As usual, working the Senior Adult 
Ministry was a rewarding experience. 
Every week we zoomed off to the 
nursing homes and senior center 
hoping to minister to the senior citizens 
we were visiting. And, I think, that goal 
was accomplished. We went to share 
the love of Christ and to offer a little 
change of pace for those seniors who 
welcome a change in their daily 
routines. 

But nearly every week, it was the 
college-aged crowd that came back 
refreshed from spending time with our 



—►Developing his listening skills. Terry Bafford 
spends most of his weekly visit to the Pinnacle 
Retirement Home listening. 



post-sixty-five friends. It was always fun 
to watch the residents get involved in 
the activities. (Singing and story-telling 
were always a big hit.) Most of the 
folks that we visited were not shy in 
telling us how much they enjoyed our 
visits, and how we were always able to 
brighten up their weeks. 

But that wasn't all they shared. 
After several weeks of sharing and 
visiting, we soon became the recipients 
of decades of wisdom, passed on 
sometimes by direct advice, but more 
often by telling us stories of lessons 
they had learned while they were 
grrowing up. 

All in all, the Senior Adult Ministry 
(SAM) experience is a unique and 
rewarding one. I would encourage 
anyone to get involved. You'll be glad 
you did. 

^BY GAYLE COUCH 




-» PALS (young & old): Marcy Treat, Jennifer R. 
WOoten, Almee Lee, Eric Walker, Jonathon 
Compton, Will Sarrell, John Richardson. 



-» SENIOR ADULT MINISTRY: (front, from left) 
Melody Owens, Bekhy Batchelder, Johanna Zieg, 
Jennifer Wilson, Joy Motte, (back)Terry Bafford, 
Dimitri Bogachev, Matt Vanderwall, Andrew 
Heathershaw, Rebecca Miller, Patrick Muncey. 



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61 



-►Sarah Johnson and Heather Brasher enjoy a -.Spring Break in Jamaica sounds glamorous and 

good meal in Chicago. These two girls, along leisurely, but for the members of the Break For 

with the rest of their team, spent their Spring ^ Change Jamaica Team, it was mostly hard physi- 

Break serving others in the inner city. cal labor in the hot tropical sun. 





-Break for Change 



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Break for Change 



-.Nate Bauman, like his Jamaican Teammates, 
came back on campus sporting braids. 








Making a break for it 

Bryan College students visit Jamaica, 
Chicago, and New York over break 



Spring Break 1995! Sunshine, sand, 
sleep! Right?! For a small group of Br)>an 
students the cold and windy city of 
Chicago or the lushly foliaged hills of 
Jamaica became their destination for the 
week of Spring Break. 

The Chicago team piled into two vans 
and were forced to get to know one 
another faster than they expected. All 
week the group ministered to a low 
income section of Chicago. Painting, 
teaching, and spending time with children 
was a large part of the week. Exploring 
foreign opportunities and being able to 
serve caused many on the Chicago trip to 
be encouraged spiritually and to see things 
from a different perspective. Scott Hill and 
Amy Murphree headed the team with 
organizing many things and providing the 
spiritual direction on the trip. Melody 
Klingbeil was their adviser who added 
tremendously to the success of the trip. 

As the Chicago team was entering 
freezing temperatures, the Jamaica team 
was steppimg off an airplane into a breez)>, 
tropical paradise. The purpose of the trip 
was to accomplish as much construction as 
they could for a future village of Jamaica's 
deaf. The team was able to mix and pour 
concrete for a ceiling to a large cistern, pur 
electrical wiring in a house and erect 
foundation walls for an apartment complex. 
The highlight of the trip was when the team 



visited an existing deaf school nearby. 
Seeing the children being cared for by 
people who love God instensly was a very 
moving experience. Without the presence 
of the Carribean Christian Center's for the 
Deaf most of these children would be 
ignored and forgotten in a country- strug- 
gling to survive. Many on the Jamaica trip 
were overcome by the immensity of Cod's 
plan for his church and his incredible 
goodness and provision. They were also 
encouraged by the enthusiasm and 
sincerity of the Jamaican Christians. 
Everything that has been accomplished 
already for the deaf in the brothers and 
sisters in Christ is an amazing testimony to 
God's faighfulness. Randy Gilbert and 
Kimberlee Hayes were the team's student 
leaders and Dr. Dave Fouts lightened the 
whole experience with his spiritual wisdom 
and his awful puns. 

Many people would think that giving 
up a spring break is a huge sacrifice and 
would view it as something thatwould not 
be fun. Getting to know fellow students 
and taking part in many crazy activities 
made the week a vacation of a different 
kind. Unquestionably, all who spent spring 
break on a short term missions trip were 
refreshed, pleased , and grateful to God for 
the experience that brought many different 
people together in a fun and loving spirit 

-BY TIMOTHY LIEN 



-. Helping the administration fill the time slot from 
10 a.m. to 10:40 a.m. each day (Except Thurs- 
days) was a challenging, time consuming job. The 
Chapel Planning Committee (CPC) led prayer and 
praise times. Chris Wood and Brian Ward lead 
their small group Bible Study in a time of praise 
and singing to the Lord. 






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Break for Change 



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63 



-.Brad Barrick and Stephen Ward look at their -.One of Marcus Bellamy's endeavors, besides 

new yearbooks with RAs Marcus Bellamy and his work as a resident assisant, is his involvelment 

John Fortner. with music. 




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-♦Junior Julie Schultz relaxes in a tree in front of 
Arnold Dorm. 

















ELEPHANT BY THE TAIL 

Life as an RA means less sleep, tough 
tasks, hard lessons and Gods love 



Remember the story about the blind 
people who were asked to touch different 
parts of an elephant and describe what 
they thought it looked like? One person 
described an elephant as something long 
and skinny; another as big and flat. They all 
had different perspectives, but only when 
you put them together: the trunk, the body, 
etc., can you really know what an elelphant 
looks like. 

It seems to me that Bryan is the same 
way. As a student, you see the classrooms, 
meet professors and find out what dorm 
life is all about. The janatorial department 
sees all the dirt and grime that needs to be 
cleaned and grounds crew gets a good 
look at the lawns, the flowerbeds, and so 
on. 

RAs get to see eveiyday work of 
counseling and disciplining, lust like all the 
other departments, this one can be hard 
work, dirfy, grimy and exasperating. But it is 
also a very rewarding perspective. You find 
that people you thought would never like 
you, actually want to talk to you and be 
your friend. You see that there is more pain 
going on in people's lives than you had 
ever imagined. Most of all, you see Cod's 
work in ways you never dreamed of. 



—•Matthew McClain and Tevon Nelson get a 
view from their own unique perspective: the 
rooftop of the Ad Building. 



-► Resident Assistants: (front, from left) Becky 
Patterson, Matthew McClain, Cristy Kroeker, 
Bethany Phinney, Sara Cunningham, Wendy Tay- 
lor, Lori Thomas, Jennifer Brasher, Christy Ross, 
Marcus Bellamy (back) John Fortner, Matt Jones, 
Jeff DeArman, Julie Schultz, Tonya Hills. 



/ have glimpsed both students and 
SDO from a very new perspective. But 
more importantly, I saw God, myself and 
my relationship to Him from a different 
perspective as well. I have learned that I 
can live through second All-Ins at 2:00 a.m. 
I can get up the nerve (eventually) to 
confront the same person for the fifth time. 
I learned to live a productive life on ven,' 
little sleep. I also learned to live with the 
fact that some people don't like me 
because of my title and because of the 
things I have to do and that there is 
nothing I can do to change their opinion- 
that's still a little hard to chew on. 

Through this time God has been (and 
still is) teaching me that He never promised 
me universal popularity or an easy life with 
at least eight hours of sleep. He didn't even 
promise me total success (Believe me, I 
have failed many times as an RA) But He 
did promise that he would love me, and 
he does. 

If being an RA only meant late nights, 
difficult confrontations and minimumal 
rewards, I think it would still be worth the 
spiritual lessons God has been able to 
teach me: I am His child! No failures, no 
bad days can separate me from His love. 

I like that perspective! 

-BY JENNIFER BRASHER 



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•Senate had more to do than just plan a ban- 
quet. They also organized this pie toss, where 
Dr. Bill Brown, president, and Jeff Bruehl, busi- 
ness prof, got their "Just Desserts." 



-•Senate members Karent Trammel and Kyle 
DeVaney recruited other folks with hot air, like 
Dawn Banker to help inflate the hundreds of 
balloons that decorated the cafeteria. 




/ 

t 



Senate 



•Charles Flot and Tevon Nelson pull for the se- 
niors at the Tug-o-war at the All-College Picnic. 



r 



. Re Mark'- >»e 



IViJTH 






A VOTE FOR CHANGE 

Senate ends its final year of service and 
gives way to a revitalized government 



The 1 994-95 school year will be 
marked as a year of great change 
for Senate. Traditionally, Senate 
and Student Union shared roles in 
student activities, policy making, 
and student related function. 
Working together, it was possible 
to accomplish everything and make 
decisions, but as a seperate entites, 
there was confusion, inefficiency, 
and frustration. To eliminate these 
trouble spots, several students 
worked to streamline the system to 
imporve the student body voice 
and the quality of things that Union 
and Senate produce. 

As student leader Brian Warren 
and Dr. Peter Held sat down to 
make needed revisions, Brian was 
amazed at how hard it would be to 
make the present system better. 
He wondered if it would just be 
better to start from nothing and 
create a Studen Government 



—Senior Brad Green shows his athletic 
prowess at the Senate sponsored All-College 
picnic. 



custom fit to Bryan's needs then to 
include the existing duties of 
Student Union and Senate. After 
many hours of research and talking 
to other schools, Brian Warren and 
Willie Soffield came up with a 
proposal that would completely 
revolutionize Bryan Government: 
The Student Government Associa- 
tion or SGA. 

The beneficial trademarks of 
SGA are many. Instead of having 
many responsibilities, an elected 
official can concentrate on fulfilling 
one purpose or just a few. With 
special job titles and an evident 
chain of command, SGA should 
improve all aspects of student life. 
Graduating senior Brain Warren 
has passed the leadership baton to 
Willie Sofield for SGA's inaugural 
year. Response to SGA was 
greeted with positive feeling and 
enthusiasm, from both faculty and 
the student body. 

-BY TIMOTHY LIEN 



- STUDENT SENATE: (from left) Kathyrn Spicer, 
Jeff Schumaker, Sherry Hill, Karen Trammell, Kyle 
DeVaney, Rebecca Archibald, John Montgomery, 
Brian Warren, Dave Warren, Matt Marcus, Willie 
Sofield, Robert Lay and John Butler. 



THAT'S 
WHAT 
WE DO 
HERE! 



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Senate 



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•Student Union brought Mysteries on Campus 
to Bryan one Saturday night. Students surround 
one of the mystery characters to gather clues. 



• Student Union's trip to Six Flags was a little 
wet this year. Melody Sheddan and Melinda 
Snead have sunny smiles in spite of the rain. 




£5 -Union 



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•One big Slip-n-Slide! Students get cooled off 
while having a fast ride down the soccer field. 






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A Union Everyone Likes 

Student Union works hard to bring 
some excitement to the Bryan campus. 



Acfim.J\dventJure-.Entertainn lentJhese 
are just a few of the thrills that 
Studen Union provided for the 
studen body this year. Executive 
officers Daniel Johnson, Becky 
Patterson and Willy Sofield worked 
hard to provide old time favorite 
activities as well as new and excit- 
ing events. They started the year 
off by welcoming back familiar 
faces and getting to know the new 
ones with a pool party and super 
slide. After the treacherous trips 
down the soapy slide set up near 
the soccer field, students played 
water games and relaxed by the 
pool, whil getting reacquainted 
and enjoying watermelon. 

White Water rafting and Alpine 
Slide returned to Union's event 
calendar as long-running favorites 
of the student body and "Mysteries 
on Campus" brought a touch of 
variety to the year. "Mysteries" 
consisited of a 3 person acting 



—Although the Alpine Slide could result in 
bruises and scrapes. Many students stille 
enjoyed the thrill of it. Senior Mike Terrell 
laughed in the face of danger and flew down 
the track. 



team that staged a murder mystery 
for the audience to solve. Senior 
Matthew McClain and junior Tracy 
Sone had the chance to put their 
acting skills to use and get involved 
in the performance as they tried to 
keep the audience from solving the 
crime. Christmas time brought a 
post-banquet party where Santa 
Claus was the featured guest and 
banquet attenders could pose 
with jolly Old St. Nick for pictures. 
"The Grinch Stole Christmas" and 
"It's A Wonderful Life' were also on 
the evening's agenda. The highlight 
of the year, though, came in mid- 
Tebreuary when the musical talents 
bfthe popular bands Audio 
Adrenaline and The Newsboys lit 
up the stage of Rudd Auditorium. 
Thanks to the persistent and hard 
working Vice president of concerts, 
Willy Sofield the biggest concert 
ever scheduled at Bryan College 
was a complete success and stu- 
dents continued to "Shine" for 
weeks afterward. 

-BYTEVON NELSON 




— STUDENT UNION: (from left) Jeremy Cheon, 
Cinny McKinney, Tevon Nelson, Daniel Johnson, 
Trisha Balko, Becky Patterson, Brent Campbell, 
Staci Price, Marcy Treat, Julia Bruehl, Willie 
Sofield. 






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Union 




69 






—Tara Luther and Chris Wood lent their musi- 
cal and theatrical talents to Fiddler on the Roof. 
The musical was required of Chorale members. 



—(Members fo the bass and tenor section of the 
Chorale sing in one of their many performances. 




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Chorale 



-w'Twas the season, the Chorale presented the 
Christmas Fine Arts Concert again this year. 






Many Mobile Musicians 

Chorale members sacrifice spring break 
to represent Bryan College on the road 



As the rush of mid-term exams 
comes to a close, most people look 
forward to relaxing and going 
home for spring break, but not the 
Bryan College Chorale. For more 
than a week (March 3 to March 
1 2), the traveling singers live out of 
suitcases and sleep in a different 
bed every night. The chorale's tour 
is a rigorous one singing in nearly a 
dozen churches from Atlanta and 
Blairsville, Georgia to St. Peters- 
burg, Florida. 

With such a large area to be 
covered, long bus rides were to be 
expected. To pass the time, many 
people engaged in intense spades 
tournaments. Others watched 
movies on the bus' moniter system 
to help pass the time. 

Once we arrived at the 



churches, we were usually fed a 
meal by the church (spaghetti was 
a popular entree). Then the cho- 
rale would do a concert. After- 
wards, it was time to find out the 
housing arrangements for the 
evening. Many a tale was told of 
the adventures that were had at 
the host's home the night before. 

The tour was not all work 
though. While in the St. Peters- 
burg area, the chorale went to 
Busch Gardens and the beach. 

Even though the tour was very 
entertaining, and we all had lot of 
fun, the chorale members still kept 
their focus on what chorale tour is 
really all about: ministering to 
people for Jesus Christ. 

^BY DERIC WHATLEY 




-» CHAMBER SINGERS: (front, from left) 
D. Holder, H. Nichols, D. Colpo, H. Davis, 
(middle) Dr. D. Luther, M. Catron, C Bausch, 
S. Ward, T. Luther, F. Rouse, (back) J. Butler, 
C Ashworth, B. Campbell, K. Smeltzer, R. Smith, 
i S. Nordmoe, |. DuRoy 



— CHORALE: (front, from left) T. Terrell, A. Sharpe, J. Esch, G. Broome, C Arias, F. Arias, M. McClain, 
J. Colloms, C Dale, S. Sakatos, G. Stone, T. Luther, H. Davis, J. Wilson, (middle) Dr. D. Luther, 
W. Deal, D. Brantley, C Asworth, M. Catron, C Wood, S. Ward, A. Heathershaw, D. Holder, 
F. Rouse, T. Tucker, W. Austin, R. Snyder, B. Shepherd, C. Bausch, L. Amis, H. Smeltzer, S. Nordmoe, 
J. Reed, M. Jones, B. Campbell, R. Smith, N. Daniels, C. Flckley, J. DuRoy, D. Whatley, J.Butler, 
K. Smeltzer, T. Rasnake, T. Nelson 



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—•During his stint as student conductor, Jeremy 
Colloms had to accompany the group on piano . 



Wind Ensemble 





Making a Joyful Noise 

Both vocalists and instrumentalists give 
generously of their time and talents 



In an effort to spread the Word 
of God though the ministry of 
music, Bryan College has several 
music groups which represent the 
college in churches throughout the 
United States. 

The Symphonic Wind En- 
semble, a small ensemble made up 
of people who play the trumpet, 
french horn, the tuba, baritone, 
flute, clarinet, and saxophone, 
often share their musical gifts at 
college concerts, chapel and other 
special events. 

VISION, a six-member vocal 
group, includes a quartet of voices, 
a pianist and a sound engineer. 
With the dubious distinctions of 
being the smallest organized vocal 
group at Bryan College, VISION 
also requires the most time and 
energy. The group is constantly on 
the move. Traveling to dozens of 
churches throughout the United 
States each semester, these tal- 



— >Sarah Beth Nordmoe looks down at her 
music and wiats for the director to cue th 
piccolo. 



ented singers spend many week- 
ends on the road presenting their 
message in music and answering 
questions about Bryan College. 

Senior Tabitha Rasnake is a 
began her stint as a VISION vocal- 
ist as a freshman. She is the 
group's soprano. A newer face 
and voice is Junior Rachel Snyder, 
alto. Dean of Men Chris Watkins 
sings tenor and has been the 
sponsor of VISION for several 
years. The rookie vocalist is fresh- 
man John Bailey, bass. Supporting 
the mixed quartet are Tena 
DeVaney, pianist, and Todd 
DeVaney, sound engineer. 

Rachel Snyder especially enjoys 
meeting new people. "Vision is a 
really neat opportunity to minister 
to many people who we probably 
never would have met otherwise," 
she said. "I have really enjoyed 
doing the concerts and I feel like 
God is really working through us." 

-BY ELIZABETH CLARK 




—VISION: (from left)Tena Devaney, Mr. Chris 
Watkins, Rachel Snyder, John Bailey, Tabatha 
Rasnake, Todd Devaney. 






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Vision 



■****,» 



73 



—>After the Honors Day ceremony Dr. Kantzer —(Although working on the yearbook extended 

and Jeanne Broome stop to talk about the Arts well into the summer dedicated students like 

and Letters program. * Melinda Snead stayed to help. 




Triangle/Commoner 





Writing out the storm 

Commoner and Triangle work to pro- 
duce two large student publications 



Deadlines, late nights, work 
sessions, equipment failure, early 
mornings, misplaced articles, lost 
photographs: its all a normal part 
of any student's life who is in- 
volved in a student publication. 
The Commoner staff spends count- 
less hours in weekly meetings 
gathering ideas for pages, delegat- 
ing assignments, taking pictures, 
meeting deadlines, proofing copy, 
laying out pages and producing a 
memory-filled book to give each 
student a tool in which to remem- 
ber their college days. The Triangle 
staff also spends hours upon hours 
every other Tuesday night working 
to get out the bi-weekly publication 
of campus happenings. Tuesday 
night work sessions often begin 
after eleven at night and drag on 
into the early morning hours. But it 
doesn't all add up to hours of hard 
work alone. Jiffy dogs, mounds of 



■•1 :00 a.m. and Tim Lien is sitting dedicatedly 
behind the computer diligently working to 
complete the yearbook. 



junk food, late-night stories and 
laughs are all part of the good 
times. 

Some yearbook staff members 
were required to go way above 
their call of duty. When June 7 
rolled around the book was still 
incomplete. Yet Tim Lien, Melody 
Sheddan, and Bobby Lay contin- 
ued to put in 8 hour days to get it 
done. Melinda Snead even came 
back from the city of Atlanta to 
help get it done. Trying to find 
pictures that were never taken is 
not an easy task: Neither is writ- 
ing 10 articles a night, millions of 
captions, or titles and still be 
creative. Tim and Melody working 
together and actually getting along 
is another impossibility. These 
were just some of the many blocks 
that we had to overcome to bring 
this book to you. We hope you 
appreciate it. 



-BY TEVON NELSON 




-» TRIANGLE STAFF: (left to right) Tom Davis, 
lererfiy Toliver, Mark Wagner, Marty Manor, Alan 
Slaten, Jennifer Wilson, Brian Ward, Joy Motte, 
and Tracey Stone. 



-COMMONER STAFF: (front from left) Melinda 
Snead, Melody Sheddan, Sandy Britt, Joy Motte, 
Elizabeth Clarke, Tim Lien, Chris Fickley, Jeremy 
Toliver. 



THAT'S 
WHAT 
WE DO 
HERE! 



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Arts &- Letters 



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75 



-.Pam Davis' family gears up for the Walk For -» Busily spreading the bad news about Bill 
Life with Timothy Fary and his wife Sarah. The and Hillary Clinton, Timothy Fary and Julie Scott 
walk drew many locals as well as Bryan students, "convince Becky Patterson to be more politi- 
cally active 




H3l?(mi& to? ©Qqsioqsp 



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Students for Life 



• ~ In tip-top shape, expert marathon walkers,' 
Derek Bollinger and Phil Zoeller lead the pack at 
the Dayton walking track during the Walk for Life. 






Making Life A Choice 

Students for Life work hard to give lo- 
cal girls love, life, support, and love 



Fighting the battle for defensless 
unborn lives on the Bryan College campus 
was the Students for Life organization . 
Ver)> often the issue of abortion is highly 
emotional and sometimes harsh voices are 
louder than actual love towards those 
affected by it. President of Students for 
Life, Julie Scott, has worked tremendously 
hard to inform Bryan Students of the 
immensity of the problem and the large 
amount of need. Working along side of 
Kathy Woods of the Dayton's Women's 
Care Center, Julie organized student 
involvment, activities, and headed fund 
raising and the annual Walk For Life. 

The purpose of the Women 's Care 
Center is to provide counseling for those 
who are currently pregnant and those who 
have chosen abortion. Free pregnancy 
tests are given as well as baby supplies and 
maternity clothes. Btyan students are 
involed by helping with counseling and by 
donating their time to help around the 
center and the events. The funding for 
these services comes from private dona- 
tions and large fundraisers like the Walk for 
Life. This last year Walk for Life raised over 
10,000 dollars, almost doubling last year's 
contributions. The advantage of having a 
publicized fund-raiser is that it naturally 
raises more money, but more importantly it 
lifts the awareness of the fight on abortion 



throughout the Dayton and Rhea County 
community. It also gives students and the 
local church to advocate a pro-life stance 
without being violent or appearing hateful. 

Bryan students were also given an 
opportunity to place baby supplies in an 
empty crib that was placed in the Lion's 
Den for collection to be distributed at the 
center. Julie Scott and Kathy Woods also 
held a touching and beautiful candlelight 
service that honored the deaths of so many 
innocent unborn children. Events and 
services similar to these achieved their 
purpose to inform and educate those who 
havn't been close to the abortion issue. 

One other special event was a special 
speaker who was a former abortionist and 
had owned several abortion clinics. Now, 
a Christian, she described many feelings 
that accompany and surround the intimate 
ideas of abortion. 

One of the amazing aspects of 
Students for Life and the care center is that 
all work is on a volunteer basis. Students 
that were involved in SFL give a time and 
emotional committment to many lives of 
women that absorb the love and care that 
the women 's center provides. Bry'an 
College is privleged to be an active part in 
the community, and especially, contribut- 
ing hope and help to many valuable lives. 

-BY TIMOTHY LIEN 



THAT'S 
WHAT 
WE DO 
HERE! 



y cu. 



Students for Life 



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H£/? £ 



77 



r 




eading the way [or the women s 
fifl i club soccer team is Nicole Pruitt, 



The men s club soccer team was played 
indoors in Chattanooga, 




f i 



7 eeling the heat, Junior Brad 
1 Jfrli Bar rich, prepares a tasty coohoui 
for the Woodfee-Ewing dorm, Brad 
also sewed as PCI president, 









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78 



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Candids 



\ 



\ 




« 



/ lashing her contagious 
smile, Sophomore 



Christina Day. brightens the 
Bryan campus. 




isplaying the emotion it 
takes to be Chaplain 
Junior Brian Ward also shared 
some of his musical talents. 




Candids 



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**, 



^ 70 



When you least expect it! 









^FJHEA MEDICAL 1 


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MAs one enters the city of Dayton, they can 
hardly miss the "Welcome to Dayton" sign. The 
sign is one of the many welcoming features Dayton 
has to offer. 



"i* Although having to leave good friends behind 
at the end of the school year is sad, most students 
are happy that they get to go home and that finals 
are (almost) over. Frank Rouse helps Nancy 
Winstead carry boxes. 



"iTJiulia Frederick and 
Julie Schultz are glad to 
be seniors because it 
means no more student 
teaching. 



T^Tim Shetter and 
Joel Gonce play their 
instruments during 
Wind Ensemble 
rehearsal. 





"iTSuch a lovely face. 
Memmo Espana gives 
his opinion of those little 
stickers all over the 
mailboxes (swift): 



iXShauna Murrey finds 
an empty computer in 
the coputer lab. How 
many times can you find 
an empty computer 
during finals week? 





iTThe floating hamburger spatula serves Cory 
Lawrence at the Woodlee-Ewing (men only) picnic. 
John Maggard watches all this is wonderment. 




iTThe Bryan College Super Soaker Patrol 
(aka Chris Olson and Brian Eastling) prepare 
to initiate freshmen. Ain't it great to be a 
senior? 



80 



^o) 



t#z- 



*v& 



Candids 



« IT 






i^Jason DuRoy poses 
in the season's latest 
Jr./Sr. wear. Seriously, 
Jason supports his 
class on clash day from 
head to toe. 



^Apparently Merlyn 
Catron didn't want 
anyone to know his 
plans to rob a bank, 
Steve Ward found it 
amusing though 



l^Joy McCaskey 
cleans her room at the 
end of finals week. What 
else is there to say? 



"iYwhat a shock! Alan Smith and Jeremy Dollar 
are acting silly for the camera. Riding the ten 
minute lift to the top of the Alpine Slide brought 
forth some great conversations. 

"VlStudents flee the confinement of chapel as 
they rush toward the reassuring sights, smells 
and sounds of Argo's cafeteria (home, sweet 
home). Whatever. 



i^Bethany Burch models the Homecoming decorations on 
the bottom of her feet. Makes you wonder what else they did 
to the Homecoming paraphernalia. 






l^TJust like the mailman, Tracy Stone, Charles 
Flot and Bryan Wells would trek through snow, 
rain, sleet, drought, Fall Creek Falls, and other 
natural occurences to partake of Kentucky Fried 
Chicken. 



you. 



Candids 



'^**ftte 



81 



TERRORISM STRIKES THE HEARTLAND 



Nation Shocked As Bomb 
Destroys Federal Building And 
ClaimsThe Lives of Innocent Americans 





rant r@«®«^®r 



feet & I emm Just 



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Iiumm f teat tan 

— * Sag 



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mlelng a® dlsqf m B 

--Guillermo Pneto Espaha 
on hearing the news 
of the explosion 



The initial reports on CNN 
gave us no real facts. But 
then what the reporters 
were saying was not impor- 
tant. The images were. An 

entire building crippled by an incredible ex- 
plosive force, lay in rubble as screaming people 
tended to wounds or helped others from the 
wreckage. A man bleeding with cuts up and 
down his arm, still searching for other less 
fortunate still left inside. Little children and 
infants caught in the ugly crossfire of a twisted 
adult world. These were the things we saw 
and we didn't need to know the specifics. We 
saw pain and tragedy. "What foreign element 
could have done this," we wondered. Only to 
find that this was a domestic problem. Some- 
thing that arose within our own borders. Why? 
How? Another fear crept into the American 
mind- if it could happen in Oklahoma, what's 
stopping it from hitting where I live? Is hu- 
man life becoming a political statement at the 
price of death? As crowds gathered to watch 
the demolishing of the remains of the remains 



of the the federal building in Oklahoma City, 
more tears were openly shed. It brought back 
the memories of an earlier explosion which 
destroyed so many lives and affected every 
American's mind. It made us wonder how safe 
America really is and how heartless some 
people are. How could someone blow up a 
building that had a daycare on the scond floor 
? As the FBI arrested Timothy Mcveigh and 
searched for more arrests, the issue of gov- 
ernmental hatred and political unrest became 
important. Yet even through this tragedy, poli- 
tics was brought in. Each party blames each 
other. How the government could already start 
blaming each other is shameful. What hap- 
pened was the result of a very demented per- 
son. Not the results of a Rush Simbaugh fan 
or a fanatical right-wingist. Every person hurt 
for the families of the dead, especially the 
lost innocence in the children's death. The 
rescuers will forever be scarred by the images 
of the bodies found. It will be a long time be- 
fore people heal from the wound that blasted 
open in Oklahoma City. 



PAIN IS NEVER FOREIGN. Haiti was em- 
broiled in severe political problems of their 
own. Shortages of fuel, food, and water left^g 
the small country in a sea of confusion. Shar- 
ing part of their distress was Japan whose is- 
land suffered a devastating earthquake, that 
leveled seemingly indestructible structures. The 
year also brought fear to the Japanese people 
who also dealt with terrorists that exposed poi- 
sonous gases in public places. 




V53/ 1 Enough 5 aid 





you never 
know what 

your'e going 
to get. 





rom Forrest Gump 
inner Best Picture 
Best Director 
Best Actor 



Forrest Gump 



CONTRACT WITH AMERICA. Taking 
control of house and leading the Republi- 
can takeover of Congress, new house 
leader, Newt Gingrich, had to quiet more 
than reporters, when his mother involved 
herself with Connie Chung and the messy 
world of media, politics, and dirty words. 
Surviving all of these attacks, Gingrich looks 
to lead a very strong Republican majority 
to handicap the Clinton administration. 




Enough 5a»d \83 










84 



People 



1 1 



& t 









*~» 



^^W s summei drags on, the 


boxes start sputtering up the 


^ I halls of the Ad building 


hill, the campus begins to 


remain lifeless and silence rings 


come alive with a new hope 


through the classrooms. Staff 


and rejuvenation. The almost 


and faculty members roam 


zombie-like professors begin 


aimlessly across the campus, 


to rejoice as students begin 


with no direction or purpose 


once again to arrive on cam- 


to their travel. But during the 


pus. Shouts can be heard 


middle of August when cars 


resounding through the halls, 


packed with luggage and 


"They're Here..." 



■They're 




I occer games can be hazardous. Unsuspecting sports enthusiasts can 
leave Bryan's hillside "bleachers" grass- stained beyond repair. But for 
the early bird there is a solution: Carl Diebold, Tracey Stone. Amy Belk, 
Becky Patterson, Joe Graham, and Daniel Johnson join informed fans 
on the roof of the dugout. 



People 




85 




♦Merlyn Catron sweetly helps Chara 
Ashworth fasten her necklace. 



DAVID ALBAN, Mathematics 

EVELYN AMIS, Communication Arts 

CHARA ASHWORTH, Liberal Arts 

WENDY AUSTIN, Church Music 

TERRY BAFFORD, History 

DAWN BANKER, Liberal Arts 



CARMA JO BAUSCH, Liberal Arts 

MARCUS BELLAMY, Christian Education 

TONI BOGER, Secondary English 

DEREK BOLLINGER, Business Administration 

ANGELA BOWERS, Business Administration 

KATHY BROWN, Elementary Education 



BETHANY BURCH, Communication Arts 

JOHN BUTLER, Bible 

ALYSON CAMP, Liberal Arts 

MERLYN CATRON, Church Music 

CLAY CAUSEY, Bible 

JAMIE CHANCE, Bible 



86 



-fO> 



K& 



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Seniors 



Without a doubt 

SENIOR CREDITS CLASSMATES WITH 
OUTSTANDING TEAMWORK 



Ui 

b 

CO 



Forever friendships. Exciting 
knowledge. Faith through tragedy. 
Loving professors. Christ Above All. 
These are a few of the many things 
that have left a lasting impact on the 
Class of 1995. We came together in 
August of 1991 as a very diverse group 
of people. We came from different 
backgrounds, different countries, for 

different reasons. 

However, we did have one 

thing in common-a love for God 

and a desire to grow in faith and 

truth. Somehow we all knew that 

Bryan College was the place for 

us--a place where we could love 

and grow more than we could 

ever imagine. 

Our years between beanies 

and caps and gowns are packed 

with memories. As I think over 

the things that have happened, I 

realize a distinctive of our class- 

-teamwork. No matter what hap- 




pened, we were going to experience it together. 
From agonizing over Freshman term papers, to 
supporting our athletes, to organizing our chap- 
els, we worked as a team. 

When tragedy struck and we nearly lost one 
of our friends, Tina Leap, to a nearly fatal car 
wreck during our sophomore year, we just 
pulled together and prayed.. .as a team. 

And when it was time to just hang out and 
have fun, nobody could think up 
more crazy stuff than the Class 
of 1995 (I've even forgiven who- 
ever covered my maroon 
Beamer with Clinton propaganda 
and put it in the lobby of Rudd 
following the election.) 

Together, we have laughed, 
cried, prayed, and loved. . . and 
Bryan College is a place that we 
will never forget. 



'•♦•Julie Scott, one of two com- 
mencement speakers, joined 
Marcus Bellamy in addressing 
their peers. 



Julie Scott spent a semester other 
Junior year in Washington D.C. She 
was also president of Students for 
Life. 




here do 

we 20 



from 

HERE? 



il'm going to UTC for a 
Masters in music. .or I 
might go to Law school. 
Actually I just want to 
rock and roll. 9 

Deric Whatley 

61 plan to figure out 
what I want to do with 
the rest of my life. 9 

Maria Smith 

■ -1 

61 'II be getting married 
to Brock and then mov- 
ing to California to work 
with a Junior High youth 
Group. 9 

Kelsey Hartzell 

DIANNE COCHRAN, Liberal Arts 
DURINDA COMPTON, Liberal Arts 
ELIZABETH COPE, History 
BRENDA COTHRAN, Psychology 
NATALIE CRAWSHAW, Individualized Coal 
SARA CUNNINGHAM, Accounting 



PAULINE DAVEY, English 
CHRISTINA DEVANEY, Liberal Arts 
TODD DEVANEY, Mathematics 
TRACI DOTTERER, Liberal Arts 
JASON DUROY, Music 
BRIAN EASTLING, Christian Education 



TIMOTHY FARY, Communication Arts 
CHARLES FLOT, Individualized Coal 
JOHN FORTNER, Bible 
HEIDI FOULK (BOOT), Psychology 
JULIA FREDERICK, Liberal Arts 
BRADLEY GREEN, Bible 



y-cv. 



Seniors 



***, 



***. 



87 




■♦•Mark Boot cuts loose in the hallway of 
Woodlee-Ewing Dorm 




♦A bit overdressed for work detail, 
Sherry Hill puts the finishing touches on 
the Homecoming decorations minutes 
before the students descend on the caf- 
eteria. 




MM 






■♦■Enjoying the last of his bachelorhood, 
Mark Pack takes aa study break in front of 
the tube. 

RACHEL HARKINS, Psychology 

KELSEY HARTZELL, Natural Science 

KIMBERLEE HAYS, Mathematics 

SHAWN HILL, Liberal Arts 

SHERRY HILL, History 

TONYA HILLS, Liberal Arts 



SARAH JOHNSON, Psychology 

DAVID JOHNSTON, Histor) 

KELLEY JONES, Individualized Goa 

DIANA KILE, Liberal Art 

TIMOTHY KNAPP, Business Administratior 

CORY LAWRENCE, Histor) 



STACEY LANNING, English 

MICHELLE LEAVITT,/./bera/Arts 

MATT MARCUS, Mathematics 

JASON MARTINEZ, Natural Science 

MATTHEW MCCLAIN, Psychology 

MIMI MCDONALD, Psycholog)' 


















88 



YO> 



p&**L 



>eniors 



r~ 



Without a doubt 

COLLEGE 15 DIEEEREMT 
AETERYOU5AY"! DO!" 



u 
u 

CO 



Sometimes the greatest blessings in 
life don't jump out and grab you. I re- 
member the first time 1 came to Bryan 
College. It was in the middle of the Sum- 
mer and absolutely no one was on cam- 
pus. It looked like a ghost town and like 
all the ghost were on vacation. I remem- 
ber thinking to myself, "There's no way 
I'm coming to this little country town in 
the middle of nowhere. I wanted to go 
to a "BIG" university. After all, the big- 
ger the better right? God eventually 
changed my mind and blessed me 
beyond my wildest dreams by allow- 
ing me to attend Bryan College. 

I remember talking to a cheer- 
leader one day in the library. She 
was beautiful, but didn't make the 
greatest first impresssion. (Not that 
she was trying to.) I thought to my- 
self, "There is no way I could ever 
date this chick!" Boy, did God open 
my eyes. Two years later I married 
her and Portia has become my clos- 
est earthly friend. She challenges me 
to live a life worthy of the title 
"Christian." 

Life sure does change after you 
say "I do." There are positives and 




negatives. You have to pay the "bills." There is no 
"all-in!" You get to know a person better than you 
have ever known anyone before. You come home 
to the person you love. I do miss dorm life and 
hanging out with the guys, but I'd never go back 
because I'm right where I belong. 

I used to think to myself, "There is no way I 
want to have children early in my marriage." God 
again changed my mind. Look for "Causey Produc- 
tions," to make their first product in early October. 
And, truthfully, I can't wait until that precious little 
baby gets here. I'm gonna love it 
'til I can't love it anymore. 

Sometimes the greatest bless- 
ings in life don't jump out and grab 
you. Often times life's greatest 
blessings aren't even what we want. 
But God knows what's best for us 
and what will bring Him the great- 
est glory. I'm grateful that He is in 
control and not me. I'm thankful 
that He has been the same faithful 
God both before and after I said, "I 
Do!" 



-♦•Clay Causey and Portia Stone 
Causey began a new chapter of 
their lives last summer, between 
Clay's junior and senior years. 



Clay Causey play for four years for 
the Lions basketball team, majored in 
Bible and plans to attend Dallas 
Theological Seminary in the fall 




here do 

we go 
from 

HERE? 



61'm going to Disney 
World!! Seriously, I'm 
going to seminary in 
Orlando. 9 

Tim Fary 

6l'm coming back here 
to get my teacher's 
licensure, then, I'll work 
somewhere. 9 

Julie Scott 

iAfter I finish 
minimester, I guess I'll 
have to find a job. 9 

Sarah Johnson 

GINNY MCKINNEY, Liberal Arts 

AMY MURPHREE, Psychology' 

RUTH NAUGLE, Liberal Arts 

TEVON NELSON, Communication Arts 

CHRIS OLSON,H/sto/y 

CHERANE PACK, Communication Arts 



MARK PACK, Business Administration 
BETHANY PHINNEY, Psychology' 
JACLYNETTE PORTERFIELD, Liberal Arts 
AMY PRICE, Liberal Arts 
NICOLE PRUITT, Psychology' 
TABITHA RASNAKE, Music 



AMY REED, Psychology 
CHRISTY ROSS, Psychology 
RUTH SCHULT, Accounting 
JULIE SCHULTZ, Liberal Arts 
JULIE SCOTT, History 
TYLER SHANNON, Bible 



y ou. 



^ 



Seniors 



*£*E 



89 




+At graduation* 1 seniors were given the 
opportunity to speak to the audience. Ja- 
son DuRoy thanked his family for their love 
and support and he gave thanks to God. 



♦A group of senior girls enjoy their last 
visit to Fall Creek Falls and a Bryan Col- 
lege tradition, the All-College Picnic. 





♦Senior events were usually well attended, including the senior camp out. Amy 
Murphree sets out pizza and other food to help the seniors keep up their strength. 

ANGELA SKERJANEC, Psychology 
KRISTEN SMELSER, Music 

MARIA SMITH, Natural Science 

JOHN SPEARS, Liberal Arts 

KATHRYN SPICER, Christian Education 



TRENENA SPICER, Psychology 

JOHN SPRACKLIN, Bible 

GLYNN STONE, Bible 

CHRISTIAN SUMMERS, Business Admin. 

ALLISON TAYLOR, Christian Education 



BRYAN TAYLOR, Business Administration 

NOAH TEAL, Psychology 

LORI THOMAS, Liberal Arts 

THEODORE TUCKER, Natural Science 

PAUL UQUHART, Individualized Coal 





90 



~<oj 



#&■ 



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Seni 



ors 



Without a doubt 

5TUDEhT5 AhTICIPATE THE 
UNEXPECTED AT BRYAN 






z: 



>- 

i— 
O 



CO 



Graduating Seniors probably 
would describe their college experi- 
ence as anything BUT routine and 
predictable. Pledged bachelors found 
themselves wearing a ring, while 
young women who thought good 
men lived in storybooks, joined their 
own story with another. Buisness 
majors decided to enter seminary, 
and some who had promised 
that May 1995 would mark the 
end of their educational endeav- 
ors decided that a few more years 
of school to get their Masters or 
Doctorate degree would not be so 
bad after all. Expecting the un- 
expected- it goes beyond the 
cliche here at Bryan College. 
Nothing is normal, nothing is 
routine. 

Many departing seniors re- 
alized that a life wholly commit- 
ted to Christ is the benchmark 




-♦■Unexpectedly, Tevon Nelson 
will be using her communica- 
tions degree as a full time DJ at 
Dayton's very own WAY-FM. 



of the adventurous and the unpredictable. The 
unexpected nearly became routine on Bryan 
Hill this year, from the felonious prank of steal- 
ing license plates, to near-death accidents and 
an emotional goodbye to a longtime friend and 
mother- Joanie Bostic. Matt Gore's caving ac- 
cident was shock to everyone, but many prayers 
were answered as he made an incredible re- 
covery that encouraged everyone around him. 
Undisputedly, most seniors 
agreed that they could not have 
imagined the changes and events 
that happened over four years of 
college. For many, it gives a 
sense of excitement and antici- 
pation for what careers, families, 
and God's plan holds for the fu- 
ture. 

Once again, Bryan College 
graduates a class of students that 
enjoys the unexpected, de- 
mands the uncommon, and rev- 
els in the new and the exciting. 



here do 
we go 
from 

HERE? 



61 hope to get a job 
counseling children at 
Vanderbilt University 
Hospital. 9 

Kelly Wetmore 

zzzzzzzzzzz 
%\'\\ be back here next 
year for another round 
at Bryan College. 9 

Paul Uquhart 



vzzzzzzzm 

6l'm hoping that one of 
my many interviews 
leads to a real job. 9 

Burchon Walker 




BURCHON WALKER III, Psychology 
STEPHEN WARD, Christian Education 
BRIAN WARREN, Business 
BRITT WEBER, Liberal Arts 
STEPHEN WEGNER, Natural Science 



BRYAN WELLS, Business 

KELLY WETMORE, Psychology 

DERIC WHATLEY, Music Communications 

BONNIE WHITE, Christian Education 

PHILLIP ZOELLER, Business Admin. 



NOT PICTURED: 

Scott Arnold 
Mandie Brown 
Noel Christy 
Danny Colpo 



Andy Daniels 
Jason DuRoy 
Jon Dyer 
Todd Jackson 
Kirk Lewis 



Laura McLane 
Chuck Merop 
Sara Merop 
Troy Orndoff 
Daniel Pfeifer 



Willie Sofield 
Abby Taylor 
Michael Terrell 
Jeff Vandemark 
Russell Williams 



Seniors 



^Ate 



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91 



Class of 1996 




92 



voj 



A*fc 



VK5&- 



REBECCA ARCHIBALD 
CLAUDIO ARIAS 
FELIPE ARIAS 
MICHAEL ARNOLD 



JEFF BAKER 
SAM BARNARD 
BRUCE BARNETT 
BRAD BARRICK 



PAUL BARTH 
BRYAN BECK 
DANIEL BOOT 
JENNIFER BRASHER 



SANDY BRITT 
ERIN BRYANT 
BRENT CAMPBELL 
BRIAN CARDEN 



BEN COULTER 
JULIA CRAWSHAW 
JOHN CROSBY 
CRAIG DALE 



JESS DANTICE 
MARK DAVIDSON 
MATT DAVIES 
HILARY DAVIS 



JEFF DEARMAN 
CARL DIEBOLD 
KYLE DEVANEY 
JEREMY DOLLAR 



MICHELLE DOWNEY 
MELODY DURHAM 
BRYAN ECK 
JULIA EDDLETON 



►Adam Soukup 
wasn't quite 
prepared for our 
camerman. Can 
you tell? 



►Someone (the 
roving mystery 
hand) almost 
forgot that Bryan ' 
Eck isn't a fresh- 
man anymore. 
Too bad. I'll bet he 
looks good in 
ketchup. 





N 



Juniors 




E\GjRIENCING SENIORITY: 

Juniors reap the benefits of years of collegiate struggle: 
Top eleven reasons to push past that sophomore slump 



Last week I was taking a walk around campus and I realized that my feet hurt. 
I was just walking, taking in beauty and wonder of Bryan College. It occurred 
to me that while being a junior is hard and exasperating at times (the first 
month and half of my status as a junior has been overbearingly stressful.), it is 
refreshing to be able to see the light at the end of the proverbial tunnel. I 
have compiled a list of the top eleven fun facts about becoming a junior 
(other than the fact that you have to in order to eventually become a senior). 
Fact number 11: They get better chapel seats. Fact number 10: It's a shorter 
word than "sophomore" and it takes less time to spell. Fact number 9: You 
don't have to wait as long for early registration. Fact number 8: The class 
size begins to diminish. Fact number 7: It's from the Latin root word "juvenis" 
meaning, well lots of different things. Fact number 6: It's also (typically) a 
boys' name. Fact number 5: They have more privileges than the sophomores, 
but not as many responsibilities as the seniors. Fact number 4: By the time 
you're a junior, you know the best ways to sneak out. Fact number 3: They 
know the best places to graze (okay, so this is if you're a sheep, but you catch 
the metaphor). Fact number 2: You don't have to go to Siberia to be a junior. 
Fact number 1: They are the epitome of cool. By Chris Fickley 





►When juniors get frustrated, its time to suv out their u.,v. Mi|»- Ao<i 
Matt Jones and Stacy Price are great at non-verba! communication; but 
Tara Luther expresses smiling perfection. 




► Cristy Kroeker isn't 
quite sure what angle 
to take in her revenge 
against Dr. Traylor. 
The pie toss was a 
wonderful tension 
release for many 
students and staff 
members. 




y cu. 



1*4 



Juniors 



'**£. 



93 



Class of 1996 




KARL EMMONS 
GUILLERMO ESPANA 
JENNY FINE 
AMY FLOYD 



TYLER FORD 
MICAH GELATT 
MICHAEL GILMAN 
JOE GRAHAM 



JENNIFER GRUENKE 
JULIE GUEST 
JODI HADLOCK 
JASON HAMRICK 



WALKER HAYNES 
KEITH HEISHMAN 
GRANT HENDRIX 
DEREK HERMEL 



KERRY HICKMAN 
JOANNE HUCKLE 
ANDY HUDSON, JR. 
MATT JONES 



BILL KETCHERSID 
QUINTON KOCHER 
RUTH KRUEGER 
CRISTY KROEKER 



JOHN LEA 

BRANDON LORENZEN 
TARA LUTHER 
APRIL MARGENE 



ALAN MCMANUS 
JON MEISSNER 
CRYSTAL MILLER 
KATHRYN MORROW 




►Micah Gelatt and 
Matt Jones gave a 
humorous skit 
during the Upper- 
classmen talent 
show. Then, de ja' 
vu struck at Skit 
Night. Hmm. 




94 




Juniors 



ENCODING UPPEROASSflEN 

The love bug of engagement and marraige is back, he's 
preying on younger victims, and the juniors aren't thrilled. 




By the time one gets to be a junior, he or she has become too mature to 
resort to torturing underclassmen. Those juvenile practices were left behind 
long ago (actually last year, but that's beside the point). However, there are 
some things that irk juniors so much that they succumb to temptation and 
begin the process of sophomoric (sorry, it's in the dictionary) pranks, 
gossip,and other such degrading practices. This year, the junior class (at the 
least the female half) has something legitimate to gripe about. We, the 
Junior class, want to know what's up with all these freshmen and sopho- 
mores getting engaged (or "promised")? I've heard of going to college for 
your MRS degree, but the usual consensus is to wait until the junior or 
senior year. All right, so we're a teeny bit jealous, and we're ready to yell the 
old stand-by that got us later bed times in grade school and later curfews in 
high school, "It's not fair! We're OLDER!!" Okay, so maybe that tactic 
doesn't work anymore. What it all boils down to, and you current sopho- 
mores and freshmen may see this point when you're in our shoes watching 
your younger peers get married, is that we feel like old maids at 20, 21, and 
22. Stop making us feel so old. It's depressing. 

By Sandy Britt 




►Just when you thought they were gone, they came back, and thi 
they're juniors. Yikes. Kyle DeVaney, Shonda Tompkins, B. Waike 
Haynes, and Quinton Kocher get caught in the act on film. 





►Chris Wood and 
Felipe and Claudio 
Arias entertained 
during the Homecom- 
ing Banquet. How 
come they look like 
they're in pain 
though? 

►Jamie Reed, once 
again, tries to talk 
during a photo. 
How many times 
have we said it...? 



95 




Juniors 



Class of J 996 




SARAH BETH NORDMOE 
CHRISTIANA OLOWOLA 
PAMALA OLSON 
TROY ORNDOFF 



BECKY PATTERSON 
DANIEL PFEIFER 
PHIL PREWETTE 
STACY PRICE 



JAMIE REED, JR 
JENESIS ROBINSON 
CARTER ROCKEY 
ANNETTE SHARPE 



KACEY SLATEN 
STUART SLOAN 
ALAN SMITH 
RACHEL SNYDER 



WILLY SOFIELD 
ADAM SOUKUP 
DEANNA STEPHENS 
PETER STONE 



TRACY STONE 
DAWN SULLIVAN 
WENDY TAYLOR 
HANNAH THOMASTON 



SHONDA TOMPKINS 
SUZI TOW 
BRIAN WARD 
JULIE WILSON 



CHRISTIN WINKLER 
ERIC WALKER 
FAITH WRENN 
CHRIS WOOD 



►Alan Smith 
bravely trusts his 
coiff to the steady 
hands of Kelsey 
Hartzell. 



■ffrl 

r 



\ 




mK, 



96 



•yo> 



**fc 



V&Vk 



Juniors 




^ 



NSIVE SEARCH: 



The search for an exciting place to celebrate one's 21st 
birthday is slightly less than hopeful in Rhea county. 




One's 21st birthday comes only once in a lifetime. It's a spectacular moment 
when you are officially considered an adult in all capacities, can drive rental cars 
in most states, and obtain the privelege to buy you-know-what legally. Yes, 
one's 21st birthday should be a special time, an unforgattable day, but in Day- 
ton, TN an unforgettable moment is unacheivable if looking for entertainment 
in town. The local Generation X-ers visit Wal-Mart parking lot religiously every 
Friday and Saturday nights. This could be done to celebrate such an important 
time as a birthday, but most cars these days just don't have gas mileage neces- 
sary to have such an adventurous outing. Bubba's is a good place to eat, but it's 
a scary thought to see the same people you just saw 5 minutes ago on campus 
joining you unofficially for the big celebration. Darn. Of course there is Chatta- 
nooga. A nice eventful drive down 27 to. ..what? Hamilton Place food court? 
The aquarium? The college favorite (especially during Forrest Gump), The 
Redbank Dollar Theater? All lovely suggestions for just any night on the town, 
but your 21st birthday? Next suggestion. Atlanta would be a GREAT idea, but 
only if you know someone who lives there. It's impossible to get per for any 
hotel visit in the United States. So what else is there to do for the big 21 ? Sit in 
the lounge, watch Urkle, and wish you'd picked a college nearer the big city 

where option exist. By Sandy Britt 





► Erin Bryant water slides down the soccer field hill, Mark Davidson and 
Dan Boot escort their homecoming nominee girlfriends, and Jeremy 
Dollar breathes in the barbeque smoke at the Men's resident picnic. 




►Jeff DeArman 
kicks a soccer ball 
so fast, we didn't 
even see it! 

► Becky Patterson and 
Joe Graham share a 
joke during their 
meal. Little do they 
know that the camera 
is on them. 




Juniors 




97 



Class of 1997 




JENNIFER BAKER 
BEKHY BATCHELDER 
DAN BEERY 
AMY BELK 



RYAN BLACK 
MATTHEW BOSTIC 
DAWN BRANTLEY 
HEATHER BRASHER 



JEANNA BROOME 
PAMELA BROWN 
ED CAMPBELL 
MELISSA CARSON 



ELIZABETH CLARK 
JEREMY COLLOMS 
KRISTY COPENHAVER 
ANNA CUNNINGHAM 



98 



lO> 



p?&- 



YS5&- 



Sophomores 



TOM CYBULSKI 
NICK DANIELS 
CHRISTINA DAY 
CHRIS DEWALD 



KRISTY DILLER 
CHRIS FICKLEY 
JOSH FLEMING 
MISCHAGANN 



MATT GORE 
ANDY GRAHAM 
PATRICIA GREEN 
DANIELLE HALL 



CHRISTA HANSON 
CYNDEE HAYS 
CARA HELPLING 
KATHLEEN HICKS 



►John Maggard 
and Heather 
Nichols fight for 
the sophomores in 
the Tug of War. 



► Dawn Brantley 
and Chris Maronge 
spend time 
together at the 
waterfall at Fall 
Creek Falls during 
the All College 
picnic. 



■ 







Hq 



E\taPTIOIWL RECOVERY: 



Sophomore Matt Gore miraculously survives a near-fatal 
accident and surpasses all odds of recovery. 




A caving adventure turned into 24 hours of pure horror for Matt Gore on 
February 3, 1995. Matt, Nathan Lorenzen, and Jake Minton were planning to 
spend the night in the Grassy Cove cave outside of Grandview. While they 
were climbing down fallen rock, Matt pulled some loose and fell a total of 30 
feet to a pit at the bottom of a waterfall in the cave. Matt fell at approximately 
8:00 P.M. Jake went for help at about 5:00 A.M. The rescue workers began to 
come at 9:00 A.M. He was removed from the cave at 8:05 on Saturday 
evening. Transported to Erlanger Hospital of Chattanooga via Life Force heli- 
copter, he was diagnosed with a broken left hand, possible kidney damage, a 
bazil fracture to the skull, blood on the right side of his brain, and multiple 
breaks to the face. In time his hand turned out to be dislocated, no kidney 
damage was confirmed, no spine or neck injuries occurred, the blood clot on 
the brain never changed size, and no infection occured on the brain due to the 
skull fracture. On February 9, Matt underwent six-and-a-half hours of facial 
reconstruction. Metal plates were implanted in his face and his jaw was wired 
shut due to the multiple breaks. The following Monday, the wire for his jaw was 
partially cut and some stitches were removed. On February 15, 1995, Matt 
returned home to Birmingham to recover. (As of March 3, Matt was planning to 
return to classes after Spring Break!!) By Jennifer Wilson 





►While Jeff Schumacher grins cheerily at the Homecoming backdrop, 
Heidi Smelser shows us her peariy whites, the "unidentified" sophomore 
sings from his heart, and Ed Campbell dares us to take the picture. 




► Jennifer Wilson 
visits with Matt Gore 
in his room during an 
open dorm last fall. 



rcu. 



Sophomores 



'**», 



•e*t 



99 




SCOTT HILL 
STACY HIXSON 
GENCI KEJA 
SUMMER KENT 



BETH KETCHERSID 
KRISTEN KOCHER 
CORY KRUEGER 
AIMEE LEE 



TIM LIEN 
JOHN MAGGARD 
CHRIS MARONGE 
MANDY MAYHOOD 



EMILY MAYO 
TAMI JO MEDLIN 
JAKE MINTON 
JOY MONROE 



100 



YCO 



Pifr**i 



Soph 



JOHN MONTGOMERY 
KELLY MOORE 
APRIL MOSELY 
JOY MOTTE 



PATRICK MUNCEY 
NGAM NGANGMUTA 
AMY PEPPLE 
KERI POLSON 



CHAD REED 
FRANK ROUSE, 
DAVID SAITTA 
WILL SARRELL 



JEFF SCHUMACHER 
BROOKE SHEPHERD 
ALAN SLATEN 
HEIDI SMELSER 



►Cara Helping and 
Joy Monroe get 
ready to kiss 
summer good-bye. 




►The sophomore 
members of the 
Homecoming 
court; Johanna 
Zieg and Micha 
Garni ride down to 
the soccer field in 
style. 



> 




omores 




tf&ax 










Ye 



ERTS IN EVERYTHING 



The sophomore class shows their expertise as they reach 
the top of the proverbial hill and start the downhill trek. 



I can remember when I was a little girl and thought that college was for, like, 
old people. College people were ADULTS! I don't think I ever imagined 
that one day I, too would be that old. Now that we as sophomores are 
almost halfway through college (yikes!), I can't believe I ever thought college 
aged people were old. It kind of makes me wonder what five-year-olds think 
when I tell them I'm in college. I'm sure many of you sophomores can 
relate. Does it ever seem to you that life is going to fast, and you wish there 
were an optional slow motion life so that you had more time to enjoy it? 
Okay, so maybe it's just me. Whatever. Seriously though, look at what we 
as the sophomore class have (hopefully) accomplished this year. We have 
been accepted into our major of choice. We have passed the halfway mark 
in our college trek. We have undertaken many positions of leadership other 
than just in our class. We have been able to say to the freshmen, "Oh, I 
remember that from last year." and sound like experts on the subject. We 
have successfully shown through chapels our desire to serve the Lord , 
Bryan College, and our fellow students. On the whole, the class of 1997 is 
having a great time, learning a lot (or so our parents hope), and growing 
closer to each other and the Lord day by day. I am proud to be a part of 
this class, and I hope the rest can say the same. By Elizabeth Clark 




►Whether talking on the phone like Melissa Carson, Sunbathing 
(burning) like Marcy Treat, Mudsliding like Beth Wilson, or simply posin 
like Beth Ketchersid, Bryan College sophomore girls really get around. 




► Here we go a- 
Gapping! Christy 
Tilly, Kristy Diller, and 
Cyndee Hays try on 
hats. 



Sophomores 






I0l 



Class 




_ 



NOT PICTURED 

Amy Bafford 
Kelly Bridenstine 
Jeremy Smith 
Mark Wegner 







RICKY SMITH 
RENAE SPEICHINGER 
JOHN STONESTREET 
HAVEN STRICKLAND 



KAREN TRAMMEL 
MARCY TREAT 
CHRISTINE TILLY 
HOLLY VANDERPOOL 



MATT VANDERWALL 
RICKY VELARDE 
MARK WAGES 
SCOTT WAGNER 



YURI WAKABAYASHI 
BRENT WALKER 
DANIEL WALTERS 
JODY WATTS 



LORI WEBER 
MICHELLE WILEY 
BETH WILSON 
JENNIFER WILSON 



JENNIFER A. WOOTEN 
STEVEN YOUNG 
JOHANNA ZIEG 
CLARK ZOELLER 



►Jenn Spencer and 
Elizabeth Clark go 
shopping behind 
Long Dorm. 



► Michelle Wiley 
and Johanna Zieg 
enjoy a floor 
activity on 
Michelle's boat. 




►Renae 
Speichinger 
recieves a sisterly 
kiss from fellow 
volleyball player, 
Jennifer White. 





102 



^ 



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VS5&-' 



Sophomores 



f 




YlR4 CURRICULA 



Sarah Sophomore leaves Freshman worries behind as she 
moves on to discover what college life is really about. 



Dear Mom and Dad, 

I am amazed at how much I enjoy college now that I know how to do it right. 
I haven't eaten a meal in the cafeteria in weeks (by the way, they let me return my 
Music Theory book since I've decided to be a Biology teacher. You'd be amazed at 
how many tacos you can buy with $24.95.) I've learned a lot this year (Isn't that why 
you sent me to a liberal arts college?) The walking track is a whole lot less crowded if 
you go during chapel, and they don't campus you until you have nine chapel cuts (I 
won't be missing anymore this semester). I am no longer intimidated by the computer 
labs. I am an expert at Pegasus Mail and computer calling since Jimmy and I always 
"talk" after all-in. My profs have been fabulous this semester. Of course, it helps that I 
don't have to take as many dumb Gen-Eds. I found the best place to lay out which is 
good because now when I go to the Bahamas (hint) to visit this really cool exchange 
student, I won't get a major burn. It's a real relief to no longer be a Scholarship 
student. It certainly has taken the pressure off of me, and I no longer feel compelled 
to spend so much time studying. I even have my weekends free, and I have high 
hopes of soon making my computer relationship into a real life relationship. I think 
you'd really like this guy. It's his fifth year here, and he may graduate next year. He's 
been a real help to me as I have chosen a major and what professors to take. Gotta 
go now, we're going to McDonald's for coke and apple pie. Oh yeah, please send 
money Love, Sarah By Elizabeth Clark 





►So many sophomores, so many personalities.. .Nick Daniels shows us 
his pensive face. Mandy Mayhood gives the peace sign. Emily Mayo 
and Amy Bafford get silly. Beth Ketchersid just smiles. 



►These four sopho- 
mores (and Ngong) 
are trying hard not cc 
laugh, while 
mainaining a "cool" 
face. Alan Slaten, 
Tom Cybulski, Pat 
Muncey, Ngam 
Nganmuta, and 
Ngong Nganmuta 
mug for the camera. 




**/, 



Sophomores 



*H£# e 



103 




104 



■i<» 



(*&■ 



VSeS*- 



Freshmen 



HEATHER ARWE 
TRISH AUSTIN 
JOHN BAILEY 
TRISHA BALKO 
CHRISTY BAUKEMA 



NATE BAUMAN 
DIMITRI BOGACHEV 
CHRISTINA BROOME 
JULIA BRUEHL 
RACHEL BRUNNER 



JENNIFER BURCHFIELD 
ADAM BUSHBY 
DANIEL BUSHBY 
STAC Y CARTER 
JEREMY CHEON 



JONATHON COMPTON 
KEN CONRAD 
JAMIE COOPER, II 
GAYLE COUCH 
RACHEL CRUMPLER 



JENNIFER CURTIS 
CARRIE DANTICE 
JEREMY DAVIDSON 
HEIDI DAVIS 
CAROLINE DAY 



MARK DEVANEY 
KEVIN EDMONDSON 
JONATHAN EDWARDS 
JENNI ESCH 
DEREK FERNANDES 



BRAD FOX 
CHARLES FOX 
BETH FREEMAN 
SARA FRENCH 
TINA GODSMARK 



JOELGONCE 
BETH GREEN 
AUTUMN HALSEY 
SACHEEN HARDING 
MATTHEW HARGRAVES 



JASON HARRISON 
ANDREW HEATHERSHAW 
AMANDA HICKS 
ADAM HILL 
AIMEEHILL 

► Ben Simpson 
demonstrates how 
to get ready for 
classes at the 
Talent Show. 



►A very typical 
look for Jeremy 
Toliver (a.k.a. the 
class flirt till Robby 
Campbell came 
along). 'Nuff said. 





e\C^SPERATING SIBLINGS: 

Brothers and Sisters share Bryan College. Yes, it is pos- 
sible to attend the same college and stay sane! 




i 







It's hard to erase the genes that our parents have passed on to us, espe- 
cially when an older brother or sister is involved. Many upperclassmen 
have had their space invaded by their freshman brother or sister this year. 
And as if sharing a campus with a younger sibling wasn't bad enough, 
three older brothers ended up sharing their activities with that sibling. 
These three brother/sister teams are Chris and Sharon Wood, Ngam and 
Ngong Ngangmuta, and Brian and Dave Warren. Chris and Sharon both 
share a talent of vocal performance. Many times, alone, together, or with 
other people, they have sung at chapels, banquets, and other special 
events. They both participate in the Chorale, and they went on tour to 
Florida last March. Ngam and Ngong both played on the Bryan College 
soccer team last fall, and they both plan to play again next year as well. 
Brian and Dave Warren were intricately involved in Student Senate last 
year. They both helped plan and form the new Student Government 
Association. It can probably be difficult to have a brother or sister with 
you at the same college no matter if you are the older one or the younger 
one, but I am sure it can be fun at times too. It's like a little piece of home 
brought with you to college. I'm sure we will see many more sibling pairs 
in future years. By Sandy Britt 




►The four typical phases of a freshmen: Dazed and confused (Vickie 
Neidiehl huge smile hanniness Mulia Bruehl). homesickness (Robert 



Lay), and poutiness (Heather Ingersol. 








► Hanging out at 






home (well, 
someone's home), 
Melody Sheddan, 
Amy Bafford, and 






Melinda Snead relax 






away from Bryan 


1 


-.-_-'-- 


College. 



y cu. 



■Vfe 



Freshmen 



**t 105 




DAVE HILTGEN 
MICHELE HONEYCUTT 
ANDREW HURLEY 
HEATHER INGERSOLL 
CHRISTOPHER JENESS 



BRAD JOHNSON 
HEATHER JOLLEY 
PATRICIA KEITH 
LAURA KELLER 
ANDREA KEMP 



CYNTHIA KITTLE 
MELANIE LANGSTON 
ROBERT LAY 
JONATHAN LEVENGER 
MELISSA LUBKE 



MARTY MANOR 
TENNYSON MARTIN 
SONYA MARTINEZ 
ALICIA MATHERS 
KRISTIE MATTSON 



JUSTIN MCBRIEN 
JOY MCCASKEY 
HEATH MCCLURE 
LAURA MCDANIEL 
MARYMCKINNON 



REBECCA MILLER 
ANDREA MOORE 
DAVE MUNDY 
SHAUNA MURREY 
JENNY NAVE 



NGONG NGANGMUTA 
VICKIE NEIDIGH 
BRENDA NOLLMEYER 
ROBIN OLIVE 
ELIZABETH OLSEN 



KORIE OTTO 
MELODY OWENS 
JENNIFER PATRICK 
JEFF PAULSON 
NATE PETERSBURG 



JENNY QUYE 

KASEY REID 

JOHN RICHARDSON 

JESSICA RITTERBUSH 

ELISARUIZ 



►With a big smile 
full of spirit, Nancy 
Winstead repre- 
: sents her class 'as a 
cheerleader. 



,, 



4 



L 



\ 










Y& 



WING OUR HORIZONS: 



College rookies face challenges and changes, determined 
to reach the next rung on the educational ladder 

FRESHMAN. Eight letters that together spell a whole new world. From the secure 
world of our homes and high school to dorm life and a new level of academic 
achievement. Gone are the days when teachers would give you the answers to the 
next day's test during your review. Now, instead we struggle to figure out what 
each professor wants. Socially, it's also a whole new world. We've met lots of new, 
good looking guys (or girls) to date. Okay, so maybe the part about dating isn't 
true, but bear with us. Freshmen headed up Bryan Hill expecting change, but 
STRESS is also part of the package. Classes are are our main stressor, especially for 
the unlucky, ignorant freshmen who had no upperclassman warning to avoid 
Ketchersid's Western Civ class. Freshmen who came to college with academic 
scholarships have added a new level of urgency to their prayer life - praying that 
they can maintain the GPA to keep the scholarship. The infamous freshman term 
paper that causes many students to pull their first all-nighter (or to pull out most of 
their hair during a late-night session at the computer). For some of us computers 
are one of the biggest stressors ever. Then there's always the transition from 
mom's good ole' home cooking to Argo's cafeteria. Freshmen must learn to be 
quick on their feet, too. Jumping out of the shower every time someone flushes the 
toilet lest you be scalded is an art form, perfected by mid-November. About 40 
lucky freshmen even got to live in Long dorm with bats, paper-thin mattresses, and 
no-sink counters, but, hey, at least there's a great view of Woodlee-Ewing. But the 
most memorable experience of college is the first lucky college date, at least that's 
what we've been told. Take a hint guys! By Melinda Snead 





►Don't our freshmen have big beautiful smiles? Allison Womble, Kristie 
Mattsson, Chris Triolo, and Akhari Sakaguchi show us how happy they 
are to be Bryan College freshmen. 



► Marcy Whisman 
makes her way 
through the Ad 
building, but 
pauses for a photo. 

► Simon Sakatos 
prepares to play his 
guitar for the fresh- 
man talent show. 



Freshmen 





Whitney Deal 
Brooks Jordan 
Joanna Knorr 
Nathan Lorenzen 
Kim Scott 
Ben Simpson 
Tiffany B. Snyder 
Heather Wheeler 
Jen White 
Christy winans 
Erica Wood 
Joel Young 



AKARI SAKAGUCHI 
SIMON SAKATOS 
STEPHANIE SANDS 
JASON SCHULTZ 
MARK SCHUMACHER 



MELODY SHEDDAN 
TIM SHETTER 
ANDREA SIMMONS 
CRISTIE SIMPSON 
AMANDA SMITH 



TRAVIS SMITH 
MELINDASNEAD 
TIFFANY R. SNYDER 
JOSHUA SOFIELD 
REBECCA SUMMERS 



SAM TEASLEY 
MELISSA TODD 
JEREMY TOLIVER 
CHRIS TRIOLO 
ADAM VARNER 



LOURDES VELARDE 
ERIC WARD 
DAVE WARREN 
MARCYWHISMAN 
DIANA WHORLEY 



MANDY WILLS 
NANCY WINSTEAD 
ALLISON WOMBLE 
BYRON WOOD 
SHARON WOOD 



JOY WOODCOCK 
JENNY R. WOOTEN 
CINDY WRIGHT 
ALANAYEDERLINIC 
SERGE YUROVSKY 



►Justin McBrien 
cruises down the 
fiberglass track at 
Alpine Slide. 

► Ben Simpson and 
Melinda Snead 
enjoy a football 
game at UTK. Co 
Vols!! 



►Gee, guess which 
ones are freshmen. 
Oh, those beloved 
beanies! Don't 
you wish you could 
wear them forever? 



V 




108 



yo> 



*■<&■ 



\&& 



Freshmen 




EXASPERATING SIBLINGS 

Brothers and sisters share their collegiate experience. 
Yes, this campus is big enough for all of them! 



Many upperclassmen have had their space invaded by their freshman 
brother or sister this year. And, as if sharing a campus with a younger sibling 
wasn't bad enough, three older brothers watched their siblings follow in their 
footsteps. Chris and Sharon Wood, Ngam and Ngong Ngangmuta, and 
Brian and Dave Warren shared meals, professors, and common interests. 
Chris and Sharon both share a talent of vocal performance. Bryan students 
have enjoyed hearing their voices (together, with others and solo) at chap- 
els, banquets, and other special events. They both sing in the Chorale, 
toured Florida during break with the group, and landed leads in last spring's 
production Fiddler on the Roof. Ngam and Ngong both played on the Bryan 
College soccer team last fall, and they both plan to play again next year as 
well. Brian and Dave Warren were intricately involved in Student Senate last 
year. They both helped plan and form the new Student Government Asso- 
ciation. It can probably be difficult to have a brother or sister with you at 
the same college no matter if you are the older one or the younger one but 
I am sure it can be fun at times, too. It's like a little piece of home brought 
with you to college.. By Sandy Britt 




►The finalists for the Freshman of the year contest are: Dave Warren 
speaker extorclinaire; Matthew Hargraves, academic genius; Jamie 
Cooper, fashion king; and Sharon Wood...what else, singing. 



■BH^^^H 






m^m^^^h 



aammmmamwmimwmi«»emMei 




► The freshmen "get" 
Brian Warren after 
the talent show for 
failure to wear his 
beanie during Fresh- 
man orientation. 



y cu. 



Freshmen 



**ȣ, 



*£. 



109 




MR. PAUL ARDELEAN 

Director of Alumni 

MR. DOYLE ARGO 

Manager Argo's Food Service 

MRS. MILDRED ARNOLD 

Admissions Office Manager 

DR. STEPHEN BARNETT 

Asst. Professor of Physical Science 

MR. BERNARD BELISLE 

Asst. Professor of Communication Arts 

DR. STEVE BRADSHAW 

Asst. Professor of Psychology 

DR. DANN BROWN 

Associate Professor of Communication Arts 

DR. WILLIAM BROWN 

President 

MR. JEFF BRUEHL 

Asst. Professor of Business 
MRS. VALERIE CASTLEN 
Mail Clerk/Clerical Assistant 
MR. JIMCOFFIELD 
Adjunct Professor of Psychology 
DR. RICHARD CORNELIUS 
Professor of English 

MRS. JANET CRUVER 

Assistant to the Registrar 

MISS WANDA DAVEY 

Director of Mail Room 

MRS. PAM DAVIS 

Administrative Assistant to the Chancellor 

MR. TIM DAVIS 

Director of Counseling Services " 

MR. TOM DAVIS 

Director of Public Information 

DR. KEN FROEMKE 

Dean of Institutional Effect & Planning 

MRS. MARCY FROEMKE 

Insturctor of Music 

MRS. KEM HARRIS 

Housekeeping Supervisor 

DR. MALCOLM FARY 

Professor of Education 

MRS. TRISH FERRELL 

Advancement Assistant 

MISS DIANA FORBES 

Library Technical Assistant 

DR. DAVID FOUTS 

Asst. Professor of Biblical Studies 




_ 










DR. MARTIN HARTZELL Professsor of Biology 
MRS. JENNIFER HATTLEY Sec, Exec. Offices 
DR. PETER HELD Vice-President for Student Life 
MR. BRIAN HILL Asst. Professor of Chemistry 
MRS. GALE HOOD Admissions Secretary 
MR. TIM HOSTETTLER Operations Manager 
MR. DENNIS INGOLFSLAND Dir. LibraryService 

MRS SHEILA INGOLFSLAND Bookstore Manage 
MR. WALTER JAHNCKE Asst. Prof. Accounting 
MRS. VONNIE JOHNSON Public Serv. Librarian 
MR. WHIT JONES, Asst.. Professor of English 
DR. RUTH KANTZER Professor of English 
MR. TOM KEMNER Director of ASPIRE 
DR. WILLIAM KETCHERSID Professor of History 



110 



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Faculty and Staff 






V 










J 






V 




Ye 



E\l™ SCHOOLVOk: 



Faculty continually pressing toward higher education. 
"Never stop learning" the motto at Bryan College. 



If you were to ask many of the Bryan College faculty what their next aca- 
demic goal was, they would most likely tell you they were working toward 
obtaining a higher degree of education. A high percentage of high schools 
and colleges are requiring their faculty to constantly be learning and increas- 
ing their knowledge in their field of expertise. Bryan College is no exception, 
but rather a good example. Of the 40 professors here at Bryan College, 
half have their doctorates in the area that they teach. At least half the 
faculty of each academic department have their doctorates. Still others are 
close to finishing or in the process of their finishing doctorate studies. Last 
fall Jeff Breuhl presented his dissertation for his doctorate in Business. This 
spring Stephen Barnettsuccessfully defended his dissertation and now has a 
PhD in Natural Science. Ernie Ricketts will be leaving us for' the next two 
years to work on his doctorate in Greek. Whit Jones will soon be finishing 
his disertation for his doctorate in English. Jim Coffield is about through with 
his doctorate studies in Psychology. Academics are important to Bryan 
College not just for students but by the faculty as well. All this studying is a 
great csae of studying by example. By Karis E. Clark 




►Melody Klingbei! always manages a quick smile. Mr. Jones carries his 
son Will on his shoulders. Always a big smile from Chuck Reed. Still 
smiling after being "creamed" by pies. You're a good sport Mr. Ricketts 




►Mrs. Arnold is 
ready for the 
caravaners to take 
over Bryan 
College. ..as long as 
they register first. 

► How did Dr. 
Brown get that 
shaving cream to do 
those neat little 
lines across his 
head? 



you. 



Faculty and Staff 



***** 



111 





MRS. PAT KINNEY 

Accts. Payable/ Payroll 
MISS MELODY KLINGBEIL 
Dean of Women 
MISSINGRIDKREIN 
Admissions Counselor 
DR. WILLIAM LAY 
Asst. Professor of Business 

MRS. MARGIE LEGG 

Admin. Assistant to President 
DR. PHILLESTMANN 
Professor of Mathematics 
DR. DAVID LUTHER 
Associate Professor of Music 
DR. SIGRID LUTHER 
Associate Professor of Music 

MISS AMBER MARKS 

RD of Arnold, Operations Secretary 

MR. STUART MEISSNER 

Vice President for Advancement 

MRS. VELMA MEISSNER 

Mailroom and Printing Services Asst. 

MR. MORRIS MICHALSKI 

Asst. Prof, of Educ./Men's B'ball Coach 

MRS. DEE MOONEY 

Controller 

MR. MARC NEDDO 

Admissions Counselor 

MRS. LADONNA OLSON 

Instructor of English 

MRS. SHARRON PADGETT 

Secretary, SDO 

MISS MARY ANNE PARROTT 

Cashier 

MR. RON PETITTE 

Registrar 

MRS. DEBRA PHILLIPS 

Asst. Professor of Modern Languages 
DR. GARY PHILLIPS 

Professor of Bible and Philosophy 

DR. BRIAN RICHARDSON 

Professor of Christian Education 

MRS. SHARON RICHARDSON 

Director of PCI 

MR. ERNIE RICKETTS 

Asst. Professor of Ancient Languages 

MR. RICHARD REIDER 

Vice President for Business 




►Mr. Jim Coffield 
comforts Dr. Marty 
Hartzell who really 
got it from Maria 
Smith and the 
other Sciece 
seniors at senior 
chapel. 





MRS. JUDY SHETTER Admin. Asst. to Financial t 
DR. ANN SIDEBOTHHOM AssocProf of Educati 
DR. HERBERT SIERK Vice President of Academ 
DR. ROBERT SIMPSON Professor of Mathemati 
MR. FRED TRAN Lan System Engineer 
MR. PETER TRAVERSA Director of Financial Ai 
DR. JACK TRAYLOR Professor of History 

MRS. KARIN TRAYLOR Admin. Asst. Academi 

MR. MARK WEST Ground Maintenance Sup. 

Mr. CHRIS WATKINS Dean of Men 

DR. MEL WILHOIT Professor of Music 

DR. KU RT Wl SE Asst. Prof Science/Origins Resear 

MRS. BRENDAWOOTEN Ad. Asst. Advanceme 

DR. SANFORDZENSEN Athletic Dir./SoccerCoa 



112 



-fO> 



A**- 



V&5&- 



Faculty and Staff 



■ 



Ye 



eNltra school wdrk 




Faculty continually pressing toward higher education. 
"Never stop learning" the motto at Bryan College. 



Bryan College is almost like a family, especially if it IS your family. Many of 
our faculty members are husband and wife. The Dr.s David and Sigrid 
Luther are co-partners in the music department. They practically adopt the 
members of the chorale and the chamber singers. They almost always have 
time to talk if you need advice. Dr.Jack Traylor, one of the History Profes- 
sors, and his wife Karin, who works in the Vice President's office, though 
friendly to everyone, have a special place in their hearts for the girls' basket- 
ball team. The Froemkes are another husband/ wife duo. Ken is the dean 
of institutional effect and planning, and his wife Marcy is a music instructor 
for piano and organ. Dennis Ingolfsland is the director of the Library. He's 
always there to answer questions or help a student find materials for a 
project. Sheila is the Bookstore Manager. They were my floor parents this 
past year, and I can tell you, they tried their best to show us a good time 
whatever we were doing. Chris and Nita Watkins (though Nita isn't really 
part of the staff) are the RDs for Woodlee-Ewing as well as Chris being the 
Dean of Men and the director of VISION. They treat the VISION members 
and all the guys in Woodlee-Ewing as their own children. The entire of the 
staff at Bryan loves their students, but it's nice to have surrogate parents! 

By Karis E. Clark 







M ■( ■ 99 


: 




►Dr. Sandy Zensen gets ready for his class. Stu Meissner can hardly 
wait to try that punch. Dr. Jack Traylor bravely awaits the pie that is to 
cream his face, while Mr. Jeff Bruehl scoffs at his pie-bearing attacker. 




►Mr. Ron Pettite 
hold his youngest 
daughter Stephany 
at the bottom of 
Fall Creek Falls. 

► A long-awaited 
completion, Mrs. 
LaDonna Olson 
autographs one of 
the first copies of 
the college history 
book, Legacy of 
Faith. 




y CU. 



Faculty and Staff 



'**«£, 



*£. 



113 




IT'S ONLY SKIN DEEP. But the 

winner of this year's Miss America 
Pageant displayed much more 
than her externals as she became 
the first woman to win the crown 
that had a disability. Heather 
Whitestone is deaf. Her talents 
included dancing, where she per- 
formed a three minute routine to 
music by memorizing the beats in 
her head. 




leading Mother To Prison Inmate j 

Smith Disgusts the 



ion And Admits To Drowning Her Sons 



The reason: her boyfriend 
did not want her if she had 
children. Her solution: lock 
them in a car and push it 

intO a river. Susan Smith is one mother 
who should have never been one. When 
America first heard reports of an unfortunate 
"kidnapping", the nation surrounded her with 
sympathy towards a poor mother who had 
been, supposedly, accosted by a black man 
carrying a gun. But the public's sympathy 
and sadness turned to horror and anger as 
she slowly admitted to driving her car into the 
water with her trusting, helpless two little boys. 
How could a mother kill her own two sons for 
a man who required their absence for a pos- 
sible relationship? 

As she awaits trial the debate rages on 
wether or not this cold woman deserves the 
death penalty. This comes at a time when 
many are re-evaluating the death penalty and 
looking to it as a possible solution to a infla- 
tionary crime rate. It does not go to the core 
of the causes, but there must be consequences 



and there must be accountability. Those chil- 
dren were not pets, nor were they unwanted 
trash that could be disposed of when they were 
a hassle or uneeded. The uproar of the Ameri- 
can public was a much needed wake-up call 
to a society that has begun to take the value of 
human life casually. Will the defense take the 
angle of temporary insanity? Will they be le- 
nient because she is a female? Does she de 
serve to live when she can dispose of defensless 
lives at her will? Must the state apply its pwer 
as she abused her power? The trial will defi 
nitely become a media frenzy, as the issue of 
the death penalty will play a large part. Man^ 
view this crime as particularly cold and use-Ik 
less murder with no real reason or rationale. 
A mother. Not a convicted criminal 
Someone like we know. A mother. AmeriCc 
will watch this trial closely, because its result; 
will affect us all very closely. Can life be takei 
so easily with reprocussion? Hopefully, thi 
trial and the results will fare better than the 
Simpson fiasco. 



FIGHTING THE HATE. The US once again 
entered another country to extend its policies. 
Bosnia proved to be a dangerous place for 
American soldiers. One downed pilot was nar- 
rowly rescued. Rwanda became a concentra- 
tion of humans living in poor conditions from 
ethnic cleansing that was similar to the con- 
flict in Bosnia. Hundreds of lives were lost as 
the brutal massacres forced thousands to flee 
the country. 



JlUi Enough 5 aid 






like it 

uuhh-lot. 




Forrest Gump 




rom Forrest Gump 
winner Best Picture 
Best Director 
Best Actor 



IT'S A THRILLER. Michael Jackson has 
never been one to stay out of the news. 
Recovering from blasts that he molested 
children, Jackson made an effort to save 
his face by marrying Lisa-Marie Presley. An 
exclusive interview is planned to be aired 
in the summer of '95 and a new unreleased 
album has already debuted on the Billboard 
charts at number four. Without hearing a 
note the public has made Jackson a larger 
rock icon than the Beatles. 




^eari of 5? jQion 

Joan Bostic Demonstrated Faith, Courage, Love 

Who was Joanie Bostic? lo some Bryan students, she was an incredible encouragement. She always smiled, always had a kind 
word, and she was always the last one to let you go when she hugged you. lo other Bryan students, she was the epitome or 
courage and strength. As she battled leukimia she always spoke or her wonderful Lord Jesus Christ and how wonderful and 
powerful He was. To others she seemed to he the embodiment of faith. She faced each day that the Lord gave her with hope for 
tomorrow and talk of her next Bryan basketball game. If you asked her how she was doing, she almost invariably answered that 
she knew she was getting stronger. Who was Joanie Bostic? No matter what way she may have ministered in your life, I'm sure 
you will agree. Joine Bostic was our friend, and we will miss her. 



Enough 5a/d i 115 




owering in against tough 
Covenant defenders, senior 
Jason Martinez comes through 
again. He and six other seniors 
helped lead their teammates to 
several at-the-buzzer victories. 




116 



HOi 



P&c- 



VSS&- 



Sports 








very sport needs a strategy, 
a certain plan that if properly 
executed, will result in a well- 
fought victory At Bryan even 
the sport novice joins the cheer- 
ing masses. Soccer thrills us 
with double overtime ties and 
amazing keeper saves. Volley- 
ball gives us powerful spikes 



and commanding kills. Fans 
love to hoop it up in Summers 
Gymnasium as "our Bryan Lions" 
defend a lead, come from be- 
hind or have a 3-pomt shoot- 
fest . Whatever the season, the 
team leaves us wanting more. 
How do they do it? -- Here's 
the Game Plan... 




ame 





T 



HANKS FOR THE MEMORIES, GUYS! Ecstatic Bryan Fans rush the 
field to congratulate the 1994 District Soccer Champions. After waiting 
for their first score against rival Tennessee Temple, the Bryan offense 
got the job done with two scores in the final three minutes of the game. 



you. 



Sports 



^Efi E 



*£. 



117 



BC 


01 


MM 


If] 

m 


0) 


MM 


0) 


A 


THLETIC 


^s 




1 I 

>- Stretching himself out in more 
ways than one, Ngam Ngamuta's 
exciting play kept Bryan crowds vocal 
and satisfied. 




TO PLAYOFFS 

Lions earn ticket to national tournament, 
lose tough double overtime shootout 



In 1992 the men's soccer 
program finished with 4- 1 1 
record, fans hoped that 1 993 
might produce better results. 

1993 brought a 12-5 record 
and season ending defeat to 
Temple in the district final. 

1 994 proved to be the year of 
destiny. The Lion's were able 
to defeat the defending 
district champions and home 
a district championship 
banner. Bryan defeated 
Temple and got the monkey 
off their back. Coach Sandy 
Zensen told the Triangle "that 
we will be up for this year's 
game (against Temple). Last 
year's final really sticks in my 
craw." Dr. Zensen demon- 
strated that he was serious by 
scheduling Tennessee Temple 
as Bryan's Homecoming 
opponent. 1 994 was not 
without disappointment for 
the championship bound 
Lions. There was some 




>^ Sharing goal keeping 
responsibilities with Bryan Eck, 
Sophomore John Maggard 
keeps the net empty. John was 
the Sophomore class president. 

speculation that the 4-0 start 
was just a flash in the pan. 
By early October the Lions 
had fallen to an unimpressive 
5-4. A three-game winning 
streak gave hope, but the 
Lion's then fell to Tennessee 
Temple at Homecoming, 2-0. 
The bad news got worse when 
the Lion's lost to King in the 



first round of the N.A.I. A. 
playoffs. Some wondered if 
Zensen would take the team to 
the N.C.C.A. playoffs even if 
they did qualify. The Lions 
performed well in the district 
final. They avenged their 
homecoming defeat with a 2-0 
shutout over the defending 
champs. This secured the 
Lions the right to go to the 
national tournament. The 
momentum carried the Lions 
to a tie in the first round of the 
National tourney After two 
overtime periods the game 
went to penalty kicks. Receiv- 
ing honors for the Lions in 
1994 were Felipe ARias, 
Mattie Davies, Jeremy 
Davidson, and Jeremy Smith 
were named to the All-District 
team. Felipe Arias was namec 
an Ail-American, and Jermey 
Davidson was named All- 
Conference. 

by Timothy Far; 



>- From left to right- Back row: Brandon 
. Lorenzen, Ngam Ngamuta, Bryan Eck, 
Ngong Ngamuta, Guillermo Prieto Espana, 
John Maggard, Charles Fox, Genci Keja, 
Jason Schultz, John Spracklin, Tom 
Cybulski, Quinton Kocher, Mark Neddo, 
Jeremy Davidson, Coach Sandy Zensen, 
Scott Grisar. Front row: Chris Wood, 
-Jeremy Smith, Jeff DeArman, Claudio Arias, 
Felipe Arias, Matt Davies 




118 



vo> 



ptfr 



V&5&- 



Soccer 



^,:^t^\^fCh 



>~ Three's definitely a crowd with Matty Davies, Ngam 
Ngamuta, and Jeremy Davidson fighting for the ball. 



All-TV AC Conference Selection Jeremy Davidson 
offers an exhausted Jeff DeArman a hand 




>- Fans began to expect 
this familiar sight from 
Bryan Hill. Off-season 
sweat was traded for the 
adrenaline and laughter as 
goals often hit the net. 



BRYAN OPPONENTS 






IKSu IrnlB 1 il 1 H 
BE^flLJkZZJB 

id^hjI mm 1 1 DB 


(A 
03 
P 

OJ 


| wins losses 




1 asbury college* 





6 brescia college * 


i 


2 Cumberland university 





1 houghton college 


5 


4 bartlesville wesleyan 


1 


8 milligan college 


2 


covenant college 


2 ! 


2 tusculum college 


3 


u. ofalabama-huntsville 1 


6 montreat-anderson * 


1 


1 king college 





4 david lipscomb * 





tennessee temple * 


2 


4 tennessee wesleyan * 


2 1 


2 tocoa falls * 


3ot 


lee college 


4 


1 blue-field college 


It 


2 sue bennett * 


3 


belmont * 


Ocanc 


1 king college 


3 


2 tennesse temple 





2 geneva college 


2t 


7 asbury college 


1 


1 judson college 


3 


* home games 






Soccer 






TTING THE PACE 

A Young Bryan College Volleyball Team 
Makes Good Showing with Inexperience 



c 



>■ Looking for the emminent sideout, 
talented freshman Marty Manor was a 
valuable addition to Bryan athletics. 



Volleyball Camp 1994- A 
handful of returning players, not 
sure what to expect, a bunch of 
scared-to-death freshmen, and a 
new coach. What kind of season 
ws this going to be? I'm sure 
that's what we were all wonder- 
ing the night we met each other 
for the first time. That same 
night Coach Beck talked to us 
about what she wanted for the 
season, and what she expected 
from us. She told us to be able 
to have pride; pride in our team, 
pride in our accomplishments, 
and pride in the work we were 
going to put in. Pride through 
hard work was a theme carried 
out throughout the entire season, 
but it was made very obvious to 
us the first week. 

Three miles in HOW 
many minutes?! Most of us 
were not used to the kind of 
conditioning that we went 
through that week, and many of 
us felt sure we wouldn't make it, 
but by supporting each other and 
giving 100%, we did, and it 
brought us closer together. 

The first week set the tone 




J^- Providing much needed 
leadership for the youthful 
team, Senior Kimberlee Hayes 
shows her glamorous side as a 
Homecoming Representative. 

for the upcoming season, and we 
went into it ready to face the 
competition. With very few 
returning players, several 
newcomers stepped into the 
starting positions at the begin- 
ning of the season. Even though 
they were not used to playing 
with each other, the starters were 
filling their demanding roles and 
were soon working well together 
and winning matches. 



As the season progressed, 
injuries became an increasing 
problem and the team had to lea 
to play together no matter who 
was on the court. Many of the 
bench players had to step in on 
short notice and fill in for the 
depleted roster. In every situa- 
tion, the players managed to pul 
together and play like a team. V 
ended the season with a record 
that was improved over Covena 
College and a first place finish i 
a mid-season tournament. 

Despite discouraging 
setbacks of inexperience, injurie 
and demanding workouts, the 
team grew out of its youthful 
label and began to shape itself 
into a mature team with poise ai 
charisma. The year could have 
easily seemed like a failure, but 
the promising outlook for the 
future kept hopes and spirits hi£ 
Under the skillful guidance of 
Coach Jeri Beck, the team 
progressed immensly and looks 
forward to next year with antici 
pation. 

by Gayle Couch 



>■ From left to right- Back row: 
Assistant Jack Traylor, Head Coach Jeri 
Beck, Christin Winkler, Andy Daniels. 
Middle row: Mandy Brown, Heidi Davis, 
Renae Speichinger, Jen White, Mart Manor 
Front row: Joy McCaskey, Tiffany Snyder, 
Kimberlee Hayes, Melody Owens, Gayle 
i Couch. 



120 



«fOJ 



A*fc 



vssfc 



Volleyball 





>- A rare ball manages to 
sneak by the indomitable 
front middle-blocker posi- 
tions held by frosh Marty 
Manor and Junior Christin 
Winkler 



S> Confounding players opposite the net, Renae 
Speichinger lands from a high jump 



>■ Senior Bethany Phinney and Freshman Joy 
McCaskey get the team ready for serious play 



OPPONE^ 



1 


: :: : :: l«J : : 


11 


' i 



losses 



a 


lincoln memorial 


0-3 


a 


tocoa falls 


3-0 


a 


covenant college 


0-3 


fa 


monlreat anderson 


3-1 


h 


lusculum college 


0-3 


h 


milligan college 


0-3 


a 


lee college 


0-3 


a 


Cumberland college 


3-1 


a 


lagrange 


3-2 


a 


covenant college 


3-0 


h 


tennessee temple 


3-2 


h 


Cumberland college 


0-3 


h 


bluefield college 


3-2 


h 


king college 


0-3 


a 


montreat anderson 


3-0 


a 


tusculum college 


0-3 


a 


milligan college 


0-3 


a 


allanta christian 


2-0 


a 


tennessee temple 


2-0 


h 


lincoln memorial 


1-3 


h 


crown college 


3-1 


h 


lee college 


0-3 


a 


clinch valley 


3-2 


a 


bluefield college 


2-3 


a 


king college 


0-3 


h 


covenant college 


0-3 


a 


king college 


0-2 


a 


bluefield college 


1-2 




Volleyball 



^^c 



121 



1 L 



BC 


111 

0) 
0) 


m 13 

m 

ATHLI 


H 

ETIC 







TO GET THERE 



A Tough Season Helps Bryan Tennis To Look 
Ahead With Excitement And Encouragement 




>- Newcomer to the Bryan 
campus, Freshman Mandy Wills 
maintains her composure through- 
out a tough match 



Although the combined 
record for the Varsity men's 
and women's tennis teams 
was 2-18, with the womwn 
earning both wins, they both 
had stronger seasons than the 
record showed. This is only 
the second year Bryan Col- 
lege has had a tennis team. 

Much of the team was 
young and most decided to 
play for Bryan at the last 
minute. The team's dedica- 
tion was shown by working 
around the schedule of Coach 
Bill Rush and even by having 
to get up at 6:00 a.m. one 
Saturday for an away match. 
But, of course, there were 
some bonuses and perks to 
playing tennis: many classes 
were missed for matches, tans 
could be worked on while not 
playing, and the all-in curfew 
was not in effect if practice 
went late. 

Since Bill Rush coached 
both tennis teams, most of 




>^ Hoping that running a 
mile was not a requirement for 
tennis, John Lea, was one of the 
many that joined the tennis 
team at the last second. 



the matches were played 
together. This involved much 
travelling on VERY crowded 
vans and very long hours of 
watching others play. One 
Saturday, two matches were 
played back to back, starting 
at 9 a.m. and ending at 9 
p.m.. 

The members of the 



women's tennis team Seniors 
Christy Ross and Mandie Cory 
Krueger and Alan Slaten, and 
Freshmen Nate Baughman and 
Charles Fox. The Most 
Improved Award was given to 
Christy Ross and Alan Slaten, 
and the Most Valuable Player 
was awarded to Melinda 
Snead and Daniel Johnson. 
With a little more time 
and practice, hopefully the 
tennis program at Bryan will 
continue to expand and to 
improve. Althought the record 
does not indicate a wonderful 
season, it was encouraging to 
see the wealth of potential 
talent in a strong class of 
freshmen female lions. More 
importantly, however, the 
team had a great attitude and a 
willingness to try their best in 
all circumstances. If nothing 
else, they had alot of fun and a 
lot of laughs. 

by Melinda Snead 



^ MVP tennis player and ping- 
pong terror, Freshman Melinda 
Snead retrieves a scared 
opponent's long shot. Melinda 
enjoyed embarrassing many male 
adversaries who tried to overcome 
her overpowering serve. 




122 



yoj 



tx&- 



VfcVfc- 



Tenn 



is 



IlillllJ 



Mil JIKIt 1 




^- Team comedians off 

the court, Juniors Bryan Eck 
and Daniel Johnson give 
their "Agassi" pose. Daniel 
was named male MVP and 
Eck is still arguing about it. 



>- From left to right: Daniel Johnson, 
Charles Fox, Cory Krueger, John Lea, Bryan 
Eck, Nate Bauman, Alan Slaten 



>> Melody Sheddan, Christy Ross, Mandie 
Brown, Mandy Wills, Melinda Snead, Tami 
Jo Medlin, Stacy Price, and Erica Wood. 



J* 

j 




lee college(m)* 
tusculum college(m&w) 
university of the south(m) 
tennessee wesleyan(w)* 
miliigan collegefm&w) 
young harris(m&w) 
tennessee weslyan(w) 
miliigan college(m&w)* 
young harris(m&w)* 
tusculum college(w)* 
olgethorpe university(m) 
lee college(m&w) 
tusculum college(m)* 
lee college(w)* 



* home matches 





lit* /-- -^ -, 




z 
u 

I 

a 

2 




Tennis 





Slamming down two points, Senior 



Paul Urqhart, fires up the crowd with 
some Scottish style basketball. 




THERE TO HERE 

Lion Cagers Post Impressive Turnaround 
Season With A Wealth Of Talent and Seniors 



If you were to look at the 
Bryan basketball season of 
last year(5-27), the prospects 
for winning even half the 
scheduled games in 1995 
were very bleak. This year, 
however, turned out to be a 
very exciting year in the 
history of Lion hoops. 

Coach Morris Michalski 
was understandably very 
excited to get the season 
under way. Last summer he 
was able to sign 6' 10" Senior 
Jeff Vandemark— a transfer 
from Division I school, 
Western Carolina. Teamed 
with the "tower" in the 
middle was phenom returner 
Mark Pack. Healthy and 
prepared to achieve Ail- 
American status again, Mark 
was at the top of of his game 
entering the season. The 
supporting cast to this won- 
der-duo was as equally gifted 
and athletic. Seniors Paul 
Uquhart, Jason Martinez, 
Clay Causey, John Spears, 




^- Showing the face of a 
Bryan Lion, Senior John Spears 
looks to make another amazing 
play- John was considered a 
leader by all his teammates 

and Shawn Hill were top 
performers to watch through- 
out the entire season. 

Backed by Assistant 
Student Coach John 
Stonestreet, Michalski started 
the high octane offense by 
releasing the Lions to run and 
shoot at will. The team ran 
into a few speed bumps when 
they relaxed on defense or 
stood by to watch the Pack 



show. The regular season 
appeared to be the time when 
the team would finally gel 
heading into the playoffs. 
The Lions were honored to be 
invited to both the NAIA 
qualifiers and the NCCAA 
National Tournament; how- 
ever, Bryan was only able to 
achieve a dissapointing 
postseason record of 2-4. 
Overall, they recorded 2 1 
wins and 1 7 losses. 

Highlights of the season 
were Mark Pack's record- 
breaking 22 1 three-point 
baskets, and his individual 
stellar game of 13 treys. 
Vandemark and Pack both 
look to play at the next level 
this coming year. 

Some would feel that the 
1995 Lions underachieved, but 
this team marked Michalski 's 
first team that he could claim 
as completely his own. This 
season was the start of some- 
thing great. 

by Timothy Lien 



>■ From left to right- Back row: Derek 
1 Fernandez, Jason Martinez, Jess Dantice, "* 
Mark Pack, Daniel Beery, Jeff Vandemark, 
Jeff Baker, Paul Urqhart, Josh Fleming, 
Peter Stone, Coach Morris Michalski. Front 
row: Chris Summers, Assistant Coach John 
Stonestreet, Shawn Hill, Matt Bostic, John 
_Spears, Clay Causey, Burch Walker, Brooks 
Jordan, Dawn Banker. 




124 



io> 



p& 



V&5&- 



Men's Basketball 




>*-- Known to Bryan faith 
ful as the "BIG DOG", 
Senior Jeff Vandemark 
shone as the league's 
premier inside player. 





BRYAN OPPONENT 






| 


TpiB BlM I H 1 1 
LLUZJ 1 TO 1 blULJ 1 
JuUXJH UXJUZj] 




wins losses 






109 


freed-hardeman university 


[03 






89 


cmmanuel college 


99 






79 


tennesscc temple university 


80 






88 


alice Lloyd college 


86 






96 


covenant college 


80 






78 


lenncssce state university 


102 






9.1 


stillman college 


86 






98 


alice lloyd college 


103 




tea 
g. 


124 


NuCield college 


111 




if 


71 


milligan college 


90 




c 


112 


monlreat-anderson college 


78 




.2 


100 


birmingham southern college 


107 




I 


80 


florida a&m university 


S3 






103 


tusculum college 


113 






94 


bluefield college 


77 






71 


clinch valley college 


65 






115 


emmanuel college 


76 




1 

E 


109 


tennesseo wcsleyan college 


90 




102 


Jacksonville state university 


129 




J 


112 


Virginia intermont college 


101 




■a 


102 


king college 


73 




« 


69 


king college 


68 




1 


85 


covenant college 


93 




a 


105 


Virginia intermont college 


89 




+ 


101 


lee college 


109 






92 


milligan college 


124 






99 


tusculum college 


97ot 




« 


111 


raontreat-anderson college 


97 




1 


103 


Leruiessee wcsleyan college 


89 




1 


108 


lee college 


129 




90 


clinch valley college 


77 






95 


tennessec temple university 


90 






101 


bluefield collcge- 


89 






90 


aliee lloyd college- 


105 






116 


emmanuel college* 


89 






94 


lee college* 


lOlot 






74 


western baptist college+ 


95 






89 


cornerstone college+ 


99 






>- Not much got by Senior Clay Causey on defense, and he 
controlled much of the floor for the Lions playing point-guard. 



All-American and long-range specialist, Mark Pack 
shows he can score anywhere on the court. 



y cu, 



Men's Basketball 



4fc 



«g£s 125 



J 



B 








HH 
MM 


If] 

0) 
0) 


A 


THLETIC 


:s 




I I 

>- Breaking the way for the Lady 
Lions, local Rhea County Senior, Maria 
Smith provided leadership for the team 




UILDING BLOCKS 

Determined lady lions fight through season 
with endurance, character, and bryan pride 



If you were to look at the 
Bryan women's basketball 
season of this year(6-21), you 
would probably think that it 
was a misprint or the men's 
record from last year. But 
beyond the numbers and all 
the statistics, this years' team 
showed incredible talent 
behind the losses. The Lady 
Lions' distinctives this year 
were youth and endurance. 

Coached by Camille 
Ratledge and Assistant Jeri 
Beck, the team was largely 
made up of underclassmen. 
Inspiration and direction was 
for the younger players was 
found in Seniors Maria Smith 
and Traci Dotterer. Traci's 
never-say-die attitude under 
the basket along with Maria's 
unrelenting defensive pres- 
sure and enthusiastic hustle 
helped build the character and 
trademark of the 1995 Lady 
Lions. 

The team's determina- 
tion and heart was evident 




>*■"-* Leading the team for the 
second year in a row, Junior 
Emily Mayo controlled the floor 
with ease and athleticism at the 
point-guard position. 

when the Lions were able to 
beat two of the NAIA's best 
women's basketball teams. 
The Lions upset Milligan 
College and perrenial favorite 
King College— teams thought 
to be out of their reach, 
according to the statistics. 
These kind of results have left 
expectant fans anticipating 
what next season will hold. If 
the men's turnaround season 



is any indication of what the 
women will do next year than 
the women's basketball pro- 
gram is in for a treat. 

Talent is definitely not in 
short demand. With expert 
ball-handler, Junior Emily 
Mayo returning with two 
seasons of point guard experi 
ence, the Lions will most 
likely excel. The entire team 
will be more mature and will 
have gained the leadership 
qualities necessary for a 
TVAC Championship. Fresh- 
men Marty Manor and Andre; 
Simmons were also bright 
recruiting spots for Coach 
Ratledge. 

Despite the evidence 
showing a discouraging and 
disapointing season, the 
valuable lessons learned in 
1995 will be applied towards 
the 1 996 season. Look for the 
Lady Lions to be on top of the 
league standings next year. 

by La Donna Olson 



>■ From left to right: Andrea Simmons, 
Heidi Davis, Manager Britt Weber, Mary 
McKinnon, Sonya Martinez, Tiffany Snyder, 
Coach Camille Ratledge, Michelle Downey, 
Jodi Hadlock, Traci Dotterer, Shauna 
Murray, Assistant Coach Jeri Beck, Maria 
.Smith, Andrea Moore, Ursela Bell, and 
Emily Mayo. 




126 



iOi 



P!& 



VSS&- 



Women's Basketball 




>»- Opponents hoping for a 
rebound or two points, first 
had to first go through 
Junior Michelle Downey or 
Senior Maria Smith. 



s> Scrambling for the middle of the pile, Freshman Shauna 
Murrey, exhibits the tenacity that was on this years' team. 



> Concluding her career at Bryan, Senior Traci 
Dotterer led the Lions inside the paint. 





BRYAN OPPONENTS 






Mi n ■ rnB BLLI HT1B 
BUI 1 if lBmlf f 1 IB IB 






wins losses 




42 


emmanucl college 


110 


75 


tennessee temple university* 


50 


48 


alicc lloyd college 


73 


61 


covenant college* 


74 


82 


stillman* 


46 


65 


bluefield college* 


66 


52 


milligan college 


74 


66 


montrcat andcrson college* 


76 


64 


alice lloyd college* 


80 


j 55 


tusculum college 


102 


76 


blufield college 


83 


62 


clinch valley college 


87 


53 


emmanuel college* 


87 


i 43 


tennessee wcsleyan college* 


60 


1 78 


tennessee temple university 


62 


73 


Virginia internum: college 


76 


57 


king college* 


59 


69 


king college . 


66 


64 


covenant college 


66 


53 


Ice college* 


79 


79 


Virginia intermont college* 


66 


62 


milligan college* 


59 


68 


tusculum college* 


82 


65 


montrcat andcrson college 


67 


48 


tennessee wesleyan college 


63 


60 


lec college 


79 


52 


clinch valley college* 
* home games 


56 




y cu. 



Women's Basketball 



«**, 



'£/?£. 



127 




ATHLETICS 




>- It's all fun and games for 
Sophomore Kristin Kocher as she 
yells for the Lion soccer team 




AUSING AN UPROAR 

Bryan Cheerleaders Commit Themselves To 
Spurring Another Successful Season 



"It's great-to-be-a Bryan 
Lion!!" This was one of the 
many ways the Bryan cheerlead- 
ers got the crowd enthusiastic at 
sports events. The cheerleaders 
were dedicated in being at every 
home soccer and basketball 
game and even attending some 
away games. When the crowd 
was quiet, their job was to get 
them on their feet and into the 
game. 

Although they many 
times do not get much recogni- 
tion, the cheerleaders put in 
many long hours working on 
cheers and routines. They 
performed several halftime 
shows for the crowd which took 
a lot of time and effort. 

This group of spirit leaders 
faced many challenges including 
yelling and cheering when the 
score looked fairly hopeless, 
remaining enthusiastic when the 
crowd was dwindling, and 
dodging mud puddles and mud 
balls on the soccer field! But 
the cheerleaders toughed it out 
and had a successful season. 




^ Lifting the crowd to their 
feet, Ed Campbell caused 
excitement at numerous 
occassions and athletic events 
with his own enthusiasm. 

Despite some opinions 
that cheerleaders don't do 
much, they do a lot of things 
that go unnoticed by everyone 
except the teams. The cheer- 
leaders sent encouraging notes 
and little gifts to the players on 
game days just to encourage the 
them. 

A special surprise for all 
Bryan fans came in the middle 
of the basketball season when 



Ed "just call me Ed" Campbell 
made a unexpected cameo 
appearance for several games. 
Undaunted by the large basket 
ball crowds Ed fearlessly exhil 
ited Bryan Spirit at its peak. 
Loyal Bryan fans were disap- 
pointed when Ed no longer 
graced the sidelines of Summe 
Gymnasium. Ed joined Brad 
Johnson as the only two male 
cheerleaders on a squad that w 
packed with talent 

At the Athletic Banquet 
their sponsor, Lisa Davis, 
awarded Captain Tracy Stone 1 
Most Valuable Cheerleader. 
Tracy was also involved in 
Drama Production and Triangl 
which added to her already bu; 
athletic schedule. Many of the 
cheerleaders also carried other 
responsibilities and were heavi 
involved in Bryan life besides 
fulfilling their role as Lion 
cheerleaders. Their smiles and 
cheers made everyone want to 
shout, "It's great-to-be-a Bryar 

Lion." 

by Jolynne John* 



>- From left to right- Back row: Carrie 
Dantice, Christina Day, Nancy Winstead, 
Kristy Mattson. Front row: Jennifer Wilson, 
Kristin Kocher, Brooke Shepherd, Tracy 
Stone, and Sponsor Lisa Davis. 




128 



-fO> 



$&. 



VS5& 



Cheerleading 



^- Always flying in forma- 
tion, the Bryan cheerleading 
squad provided much 
needed support and fun 
throughout all sports. 




>- Showing the perfect form, including her never-ceasing 
smile, Kristy Mattson yells for the winning Lions 



All mixed up, Brad Johnson and Paul Urqhart attempt 
to follow the complex cheers of Tracy Stone 



y-cu, 



Cheerleading ^ 



'«E. 



H £f?E. 



129 





B 






sr 


P^Sl^l 


in 


Q) 


L^Ugs^l 


0) 


0) 


MM 


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THLETIC 


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>- No one could catch Sophomore 
sprinter Jason Hamrick who ran most of 
his touchdowns in against the seniors 




CLASS ACT 

Intramural athletes releive stress and 
compete for the pride of their class 



When Bryan College 
Intramurals started in the fall, 
class relations became some- 
what strained. Worn-out 
cleats, old football jerseys, 
and tough looking faces were 
put on by anyone who partici- 
pated in flag football. During 
the winter athletes put on 
their sneakers and hit the 
hardwood at Summers' 
Gymnasium for bragging 
rights to the basketball crown. 
And as leaves started turning 
green, racket strings were 
tightened, and the tennis 
courts were filled to capacity. 
While there was a lull in the 
action outside, the billiards 
title was fought on the felt 
and ping pong players 
paddled furiously in the 
Lion's Den. 

Predictably, the 
Seniors' talk was much 
louder than anything they 
could actually accomplish. 
They managed to show some 
dominance in football, but 
they faltered near the end of 
the intramural season on the 
gridiron. 

Apparently, their lack 
of team unity carried over 
into the basketball season 




>^ Assuming Intramural 
duties as well as coaching the 
women's volleyball team, Coach 
Jeri Beck looks on as the 
Sophomores win again. 

where the Sophomores 
displayed an amazing aerial 
show of dazzling dunks and 
flurry of three-point baskets 
that destroyed every class 
team. Standouts for the 
Sophomore basketball team 
were John "The General" 
Stonestreet, Jess "Get These" 
Dantice, and Tim "Dunkin' 
Fool" Lien. 

Tennis was another 
matter, however. Troy 
"Agassi" Orndoff seemed to 
be on track to win the indi- 



vidual tennis title when Felipe 
"Loco" Arias, came strong am 
derailed him. Orndoff re- 
deemed himself with Stacy 
Lanning as they tornadoed 
through the mixed doubles 
tournament. Orndoff was 
overheard saying that the 
tournament was like "a walk 
in the park". In women's 
tennis, Tracy Stone wrapped 
up the women's tennis title 
quite handily. 

Billiards was won with 
authority by Mark "The 
Shark" Wages. Unfortunately 
for Mark, there was no money 
riding on it— only class pride. 

Coach Jeri Beck 
headed up the organization of 
all the teams and refereeing. 
She promoted the general 
attitude of intramurals by 
having a word of prayer 
before every event. 

All in all, intramurals 
allowed every class member tc 
show some spirit in a little 
different way. The spirit of 
intramurals was really quite 
fun when everyone decided 
not to take themselves or the 
activities too seriously. 

by Timothy Lier 
sophomore 



^ Junior Eric Walker tries to 
muscle in on Sophomore front-line 
sensation Chad Reed. The Intramu- 
ral Football Championship was 
barely won by the Seniors. 




130 



-fO^ 



A*t 



V&5&- 



Intramurals 




^- Leaving fallen pursu- 
ers, Sophomore John 
"Freight Train" Maggard 
breaks free for the inevi- 
table seven points. 






Intramural 

Championship 

Results 


# 


Class 


Points 


1 


Seniors 


11,627 


2 


Sophomores 


11,626 


3 


Juniors 


4,000 


4 


Freshmen 


845 




Ping Pong master, Junior Tyler Ford, takes on all 
eager challengers in the Lion's Den. 



Where's the ball? Sophomore Ngam Ngamuta runs another 
trick play that amazes the Juniors as well as his teammates 



Intramurals 



you. 



«t 



«£*£ 



131 



THE THRILL OF VICTORY: 

Bryan's soccer team beat Tennes- 
see Tempie and earned a trip to 
the national tournament this year. 
One season later the basketball 
team was also play-off bound. 
Both teams failed to advance past 
the first round of the national com- 
petition. Andre Agassi entered the 
U.S. Open unseeded and walked 
away with top honors. The Canon 
(Image is everything) EOS Rebel 
spokesman cropped his long locks 
almost immediately after the win, 
to please actress/girlfriend Brooke 
Sheilds. 












Enough 5aid 




RDOKIE||j|"HEYEAR 

More to cheer about: Pro Football 
and Basketball each add two teams 



The NFL has hit the big 30 (No, not in 
years, in size). Starting in August of 1 995, 
there will be five teams in every one of the 
three conferences in both NFC and AFC. 

The decision for two expansion fran- 
chises was made by the board of direc- 
tors. Two more feline mascots and logos 
will enter the NFL market. Jacksonville Jag- 
uars will join the AFC Central. They will 
play in the newly remodelled "Swamp" sta- 
dium that has hosted many of the Univer- 
sity of Florida games in years past. 

The Carolina Panthers will get a 
tougher schedule in the NFC West. One of- 
the teams that they will have to face twice 
next season will be defending Super Bowl 
champions, the San Francisco 49ers. The 
Panthers will spend their rookie year on 
the Turf at Clemson, the third largest sta- 
dium in the nation (Yes, Vols fans, it is 
smaller than Neiland Stadium). Eventually, 
the team will move to their permanent 
home in Charlotte, where a new stadium, 
which will seat over 70,000 people, is cur- 
rently under construction. 

As more teams are added, and a cleci- 



HEADLINE MAKERS: San Francisco 
shocked the San Diego Chargers 49-26 in 
Super Bowl XXIX. The 49ers Steve Young, 
MVP, broke Joe Montana's record for most 
Super Bowl touchdowns with 6. And Michael 
Jordan, after a 1 -year stint in minor league 
baseball, hung up his cleats and re-donned 
his Chicago basketball shoes. 




sion is made as to which division each wi 
play in, the old geographic names see( 
more and more far-fetched. Atlanta, Can 
lina and New Orleans are all in the NF 
West. Even with third grade map-readin 
skills this makes no sense. But traditio 
seems to win out over logic. There doe 
not seem to be any move afoot to chang 
either the teams or the names. 

Pro basketball is also having growin 
pains in a more northerly and decided 
Un-American direction. The Toronto Ra| 
tors and the Vancouver Grizzlies will joi 
the NBA next season. Both Canadian tearr 
will play their first games next year. Wii 
good spots in the draft (6 and 7) and 
chance to pick up non-protected vetera 
players over the summer, who knows, i 
just few years they may duplicate the fei 
of the three-year-old Orlando Magic ari 
make it to the championship game: 
Former Detroit Piston Isiah Thomas hope 
he can help his team, the Raptors, wil 
good draft picks and careful trades. Th> 
mas has a piece of the action in Toron 
as part-owner, 





and that's all 

i have to say 

about that. 

ll 



Forrest Gump 




rom Forrest Gump 
winner Best Picture 
Best Director 
Best Actor 



STRIKE! Major league baseball players 
walked out of the 1994 season: no play- 
offs, No World Series (for the first time since 
1 904) and almost no spring training. Play- 
ers and owners reached an agreement 
about salary caps after nearly 10 months 
of negoitiations. Disrguntled fans threat- 
ened to strike and attendence was low for 
the beginning of the 1995 season. 



orig Oner Pack Shootf tor The NBA* 



For most college players, the end of their senior 
season marks the end of the their basketball 
careers. The smaller the school, the smaller a 
player's chances beco me to continue playing on 

Astounding crowds and 
ation, Bryan's very 
seemingly impossible 



and letters from agents, foreign teams, pro-camps, 
and even an invitation to the new NBA expansion 






the 




^m 



t he__ae xt level 
orJobkrrs from aroifri 
pwmvlark Pack lool 

dream. Appropriately, wearing number three, 
Pack has poured in a record number of treys, and 
delighted fans with quick and amazing moves. 
Apparently, more than just the fans were watching 
Pack, as the end of the season brought phone calls 




team— the Toronto Velociraptors. Pack signed with ) 
an agent in late May of '95, and will atjend a canip 
^ui Chicago during the week^lTcTo June 10th. Flying|| 
t to Toronto June 28th tr> try on : with the Raptors, 
ack will talk with GM Isa^suVThb 
hopefully put on a vintage Mark 
Pack is not the only one to enjoy post-college 
attention from professional teams. Division one 
transfer, Jeff Vandemark is also considering playing 
overseas, and weighing his options this summer. 



mas, and 

'ack perioftnande. 




Enough 5a/d ( 133 




134 



YCO 



*& 



\&&- 



Closing 





escending the heights of 

Bryan Hill, we leave with 
a new perspective that enables us 
to live a life with Christ Above All. 



Our excitement lies not in ridding 
ourselves of Bryan, but being ready 
to experience everything God has 
to offer us in his specific plan for 
our lives. 

Many of us came as children, 
just out of high school, and just as 
immature, discovering parts of 
ouselves, who God really is, and 
learning to live peaceably with oth- 
ers. Here at Bryan we began to 
grow- really grow, and we began 
to see a different world. 

So now we relish all the experi- 
ences we have had, and we begin 
to see how much fun God's plan 
really is, even those long nights 
seem far away, and the tears shed 



over relationships and failures don't 
even seem so bad. The challenge, 
now, is not to always look back, but 
continue forward, occasionally 
glancing back to see the progress 
and the planning, and the purpose. 
How can we know, now, what 
our four years here has really 
meant? More schooling, lifemates, 
careers, and families-- everyone 
going their seperate ways. Which- 
ever path the Lord brings you on, 
just remember- at one time... 



YOU 





Continuing to walk with Christ Above All when leaving Bryan 
Hill is a challenge for all students (left)- in relationships, our 
Christian worldvievv, and our ongoing enjoyment of God"s 
plan and the victory in our lives (above). 



Closing 




S5M35 



EVERYONE GOES HERE. 




NO ONE GOES ANYWHERE ELSE. 



„_•*■ how 
■ -,- area 1 - v 

Isn JrU capl ? 
say ^ a %* in need 

^;S off-; -2d 

bui 1d , n Tine +° 
wa^ in 



WAL-MART STORES, INC 
Highway 27 S 
Dayton, TN 37321 
(615) 775-4448 



d^y s 

d t0 *"e Xvo 9 r ? S do ^ 

for a J; b "ys 1t 
PriC --' *A? at 7 °* 

th Can 9e t a U n S ^^n yone 
th er e anything 



136 



-«» 



t<& 



\#&- 



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saLe cReek inDepenDent 

"Ckrist-centered Bible Teaching" 
Dr. Brian Richardson, Pastor 



5 tan s 'Pdarmacij 



P.O. Box 309 

7787 Rhea County Hwy 

Dayton, TN 37321 




Stan Gravett, D.Ph. 




BAR-BE-QUE & 

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200 Abel Drive 

Wal-Mart Shopping Plaza 

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you may find that you're able to negotiate a better price on your purchase and a better interest rate on 
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4589 Rhea County Highway 
Dayton, Tennessee 37321 
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^5^ 137 



A 




Rhea County 
National Bank 



Ask about our free RCNB 
student checking accounts. 

Member of CIRRUS and MOST 
24-hour teller networks. 

"Committed to Rhea County and to you." 

1525 MARKET STREET/ DAYTON, TENNESSEE/ (615)775-2381 



FDIC 
INSURED 



EQUAL HOUSING 

LENDER 



Congratulations Bryan College 

Graduates of 1^5 from: 

A Special Place Child Care 

8763 Rhea County Highway 

(615) 775-1928 



We Applaud You, 
The Class of 1995!! 

May the Lord be with each and 
every one of you and bless you. 

Ephesians 6:10-20!! 

Your B.C. Yearbook Staff. 



SMITH'S CHEVRON Chevron 

Dayton, TN 37321 
(615) 775-0582 



J 



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pnir 1 525 Market Street 
rlfl ^ Dayton, TN 37321 
INSURED (615) 775-1522 


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Congratulations 
Graduates! 

May God richly bless you as 
you pursue His leading in your 
lives. 

We invite you to worship with 
us any time you are in Dayton. 



Grace Bible Church 

2809 Old Washington Highway 

Dayton, TN 37321 

615-775-5460 




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RDGERS PHARMACY 

YOUR (j ^XAti^ ) STORE 
MAIN & MARKET PHDNE: 775- 1 1 4 1 




FARMERS INSURANCE GROUP OF COMPANIES 

MARK J. OLSON 

Agent 

OLSON INSURANCE AGENCY 

For Your Insurance Needs 

4121 Rhea County Hwy., Dayton, TN 37321 
Business: (615) 775-5006 • Fax: (615) 775-9692 



COUNTRY 

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775-5379 

3771 RHEA COUNTY HWY 
DAYTON, TN 





Head to Crystal 

Congratulations to 

Bryan Graduates 

Heading Out Into the 

Great Unknown!!! 



1995 



|4jy 



Crystal 



WILLIAM F. CASTEEL, O.D. 
DOCTOR OF OPTOMETRY 

OFFICE HOURS: 8:00am - 5:00pm 

monday - friday. 
270 3rd Ave. 
Dayton, TN 37321 
(615) 775-0922 

"Clear vision begins with healthy eyes" 




CHARLIE ROGERS FORD INC. 

P.O. Box 467, Hwy. 27S. 
DAYTON. TENN. 37321 



Ford • Mercury • Ford Trucks 

Bus. Phone 775-1811 



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Phone: 1615) 775-0331 
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Greg Long, Owner 
(615)775-1233 (615)775-3237 



Congratulation 
Seniors! 



From 
Dayton Paint and Glass 



PITTSBURGH PAINTS - PLATE GLASS ~ CAR GLASS 
TABLE TOPS ~ MIRRORS 



116 East Main Avenue, Dayton, Tennessee 37321 



(615) 775-0404 
(615) 775-1909 



First 
Baptist 
Church 

J. Milton Knox, 
Pastor 



Rick Markum, 
Minister of Music/Youth 

SUNDAY 

Sunday School Morning Worship Evening Worship 
9:45 a.m. 8:30 a.m. 7:00 p.m. 

11:00 a.m. 
Discipleship Training 

3rd and Cedar 775-0255 




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i^ROWIN 

BUICK- PONTI AC- OLDS- GMC 
DAYTON, TN. 



PHONE: 775-2260 
"WHERE CUSTOMERS SEND THEIR FRIENDS" 



m 



pffim 



MODERN WAY CLEANERS 



MONDAY - FRIDAY 7:00 - 6:00 P.M. 
CLOSED SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS. 



Volunteer Carpet Outlet 

Carpet ■ Vinyl ■ Ceramic ■ Wood Floors 
Wallpaper • Gray Seal Paints 



Dora Harrison 



Ph: 615-775-6276 
Ph: 615-775-4015 
Res. 6 1 5-775-3421 



1 1 88 Market St. 
Dayton, TN 3732 1 



See Any Signs of Success 
in Your Future? 



At Best Realty Better Homes and Gardens® we do. 

Our goal is to help you successfully buy or sell your home. 
We have the exclusive systems to insure your success. 
Just look for our signs popping up in yards all over 
Rhea County. We sell our community one yard at a time. 



We make it happen for you!" 



Best 

RE A LTY 

#* Better 
PWiHomes, 



775-1920 



t=r 



I — I =ach firm -virsendenily owned and operated 
;*."£.". ;: " Copy s" 1 Mereoilh Corporation 1 993 All nghis rese^ed 



Congratulations Class of 1995! 




SUBURBAN 

Suburban Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 

Quality Recreational Vehicle, 

Water, Residential Heating and 

Air Conditioning Equipment. 



142 



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Ontu% 



21 t=i \m 

AhE £ ilVJi'i'uVi'i! I — 



[aula 

Pug Martin Realty 

3981 Rhea County Highway 
Dayton, Tennessee 37321 
Residence (615) 775-2237 
Fax (615) 775-4374 
Business (615) 775-6121 

Lynn & Suzanne Travis 

Owners 



Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated 



MLS 




RHEA FLORAL & GIFT SHOPPE 





mmottst 



249 Main Street 

Dayton, TN 37321 

(615) 775-3551 




CONGRATULATIONS 
CLASS OF 1995!!! 



rsMKayser-Roth 
^^Corporation 



Total Quality.. .Being the Best 



220 Broadway Street 
Dayton. TN 37321 
615 775-1551 Ext. 237 
Fax 615 775-3106 




BJ's Tire & Service 
Center 

Brakes ~ Alignment ~ Rotation ~ Oil/Filter/Lube 

775-TIRE 

ALLEN COMPUTER TEST CENTER 



136 LOCUST STREET 
DAYTON, TN 3732 1 



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< 




Congratulations 
Class of 1995 !!! 




775-6513 

"LENNOX 




RHEACO9 

^5 V ^ * \x S 




• Wfiilfe*: 



RHEACO SERVICE, IHTC. 



174 Cemetary Road 

Dayton, TT¥. 37321 

(615) 775-6513 



144 



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CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC 




TIMOTHY. J. HENRY, D.C. 







& 



INSURANCE CLAIMS WELCOMED 

HOURS: MON - THURS 9 AM - 12 NOON - 2 PM - 6 PM 
FRI 9 AM -12 NOON 



775-01 92 



7274 RHEA COUNTY HWY 
ACROSS FROM RICHLAND PARK SHOPPING CENTER 



THIS BOO! 

WOULDN'T BE HERE" 

IF YOU H/On BEEN THERE! 

Tbe Commoner Staff 

recognizes the folks who went above 

and beyond the call of duty this summer. 

Tim Lien 

Melody Sheddan 

Tim Fary 

Deric Whatley 

Gayle Couch 

Melinda Sneed 

Bobby Lay 

Tevon Nelson 

Julie Scott 




I vhcre he'll climb hiv firsi obslaclc, 

Experiment with his firsl Slinl 

\iul learn to lake life one step at a til 

Your home is more than just wood and shin- haven A placi 

to raise your famil) Shape their values. \ place i" return to. 



■v In we pm 'py° u 

find the right haven And alv, ■ > special place lo 

ore than jusl a sale. It's a wa\ ol life, 

7108 Rhea County Highway, Dayton, TN 57321 

775-1920 
We make it happen for you! 



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WITH 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



ROBINSON MANUFACTURING COMPANY INC. 



FINE APPAREL SINCE 1927 

Robinson Manufacturing Company Inc. 



798 MARKET STREET, P O. BOX 338, DAYTON, TN 37321, (615) 775-2212 



146 



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(Left to right) Jas^n J-larriscn. CTyndee J-lays {seated), Adam JJiLL. JuLia B>ruehl, 
Joel Young, klen Conrad. Nick Paniels (squatting). J<?y Woodcock, and klim i)c:^tt 

J-lere's the picture! (yep, the <?ne right before the train camel) I L?Ve it! Ltape 
y^u all dtf ttftf. because it c^uld never have been without each one of you\ 
Thank y<?u aLL for such an avJesome night! - It Was the best I had all year! Y<?u 
all are the greatest! JjtfW b<?ut next year We get a picture in fr^nt tff the 
train? Anyway, may the L^rd bless every ^ne of you and give y^u strength 
and guidance far this next school year! 

F/tfreVer and always abounding. 

Y^ur friend and brother in Christ. 




E>tfbby Lay 



Lphesians 6:10-20 
Philipians 3:20-4:1 



o 



P.t>. I'LL miss you three - Ail. J.Y. and kl.6.! Please c<?me back sometime! 




I W INJ O 



A Big Thank You: 

To all my friends and supporters, through all my silliness (Mr. Rogers, 
Cookie Monster, etc.) Thanks for all of the jokes about my "pretend" Russian 
wife, Julia. 

From the guy who tried to make you roll in the aisles, 

Jeff Schumacher. 



Oil 



Dearest vicki. 

Wly Lord has given me an excellent wife. Your worth is far above jewels. I trust in you. It 
open your mouth in wisdom. Wlany women have done nobly, but you exceed them all. rlou 
beautiful you are my darling, how beautiful you are. You are altogether beautiful. 

Your loving husband, 

(David 



Messages 









David filban 

David - You have excelled in your life and your goals/ 
We thank god for giving you to us. May you continue to 
be sensitive to His perfect will. Vsalm ^8: 1*4 
Love. 

•Dad, llloui. 'Debbie. 'Von Jr.. and 'Dan. 



'Derek IBollinger 

6mile and the world. . .'Derek, you will always be in a smiling world 
because you hare never stopped smiling. 1 on have worked hard, but 
always smiled. We are so very proud of you. 
Worn and 'Dad. 



flmamda TRoberts [Brown 

andie - Words cannot express the pride and admiration we feel as you 
reach a new goal. 'With god's guidance may you always follow your dreams ! 
Cove always. 
\lfiom and 'Dad. 



Todd William TleVaney 

Todd, you have finished the race set before you. May god richly bless 
you and Tena as you move on to the next step in hfis plan for your lives 
We love you! 

(Dad. Worn, Kyle, and Mark. 



'Timothy fary 

Jeremiah 2Q: I I "for I know the plans I have for you declares the Lord. . ." 
We -are not privy to these plans, but we are thrilled He is your planmaker. Our 
hearts are with you in Orlando. Keep looking to Him. 

'Dad & Wlom 



Kimberlee Hays 

lo you, Kimberlee. a time, a season of life at IBryan where you have learned 
much of god s word, mind and love, resulting in a sewants heart . a woman 
of god. 

Your family. 



Qory Lawrence 

We know that "He which hath begun a good work m you will perform it until 
the day of Jesus Christ." Philippians 1:0. 
We love you son! 



MiuumL 



ail 111 areas 



Watt, your enthusiastic lone for "Christ Above fill" family, kids, and 
Bryan College will always challenge those who follow in your steps! 
We are I'ery proud of you! 
Love. 

T)ad. Wlom. Kristin, and Stet'e. 



Bethany Phmney 

Here's to you lady! fliay the love and grace of god shine upon you and keep 
you ! 



Tabitha TRasnake 

god spoke "Tobitha's" plan into my lieart long before she was conceived. 
Little did I know that she would be my rock in the storms. / loue you lab! 
Love, 

Wlom. 









Dedications 








Julie /fun Schultz 

Julie - Stay on track, and §od will continue to lead you. and bless your life. 
We are very proud of you. and love you i>erj/ miich.' 
<Dad. Mom. mi. Tracy, and Kutli. 



Trenenn Spicer 

Trenenn • £od gave us a wonderful blessing when lie gave us you. We 
have always known that you are special. May your life be filled with hfis 
best! Cove. 

<Dad and Wlom. 



Bryan 'Taylor 

TBryan - f am most proud of the way you have lived your life to this exciting 

ilestone. TRemember who you belong to! Wlatthew 6:33- 
Love. 

'Dad. 



Teodore Tucker 

Congratulations, Theodore on a job well done! 

With Love. 

(Dad and Wlom. Tim and Anita Joy, Fred and Juanita Kay, Becca 
and Katie. Alvin. 'Winnie, Sharon, 'Daniel. Elizabeth, and Sarah 

"Yet those who wait for the Lord will gam new strength, They will 

mount up with wings like eagles. They will run and not get tired. 

Theu will walk and not become weary. " Isaiah UP: 3 > ■ 



Stephen Ward 

Congratulations/ We are so proud of you! 

endeavor to serve Him. 

Love. 

(Dad and Wlom. 



■lay 



§od bless you as 



you 



[Brian Warren 

'Dear Brian, we salute you! Spring [Break together was awesome, and the best 
is yet to come.' The £ord Himself is truly the best! Wlay your soul find 
complete satisfaction in rfim. Jeremiah /7 ; 7-8. 
£oue. 

Wlom. 'Dad. ^Dave. (Don. and Sabnna. 



Kelly Wetmore 

Thank you for letting us see §od's love m you. You are always thoughtfid 
and considerate of us and others, fill the joys and laughter we shared! You 
make us proud knowing tliat you draw your strength from §od. He has blessed 
you. Always. 

I'lUther and 'Daddy. 



'i^eric Whatley 

<D)ear ©eric, you have always been our pride and )oy. We thank the Lord 

for Messing us with you as our son. Prouerbs 3: I 10. 

Love! 

Wlom and 'Dad. 



Vhillip Zoeller 

Congratulations. Vhillip! 

We love you and are very proud of you! 

Mother. (Dad. Wlimi. Larsen £. Whipsnade. 

and Guthbert J. Twillie. 








Dedications 




149 




-A- 

Adamson (Cothran), Brenda 14, 

15,86 
Alban, David 86 
Amis, Lyn 86 
.Archibald, Beckie 92 
Arias, Claudio 14, 92 
Arias, Felipe 14, 92 
Arkhipova, Oksana 86 
Arnold, Michael 
Arnold, Scott 
Arwe, Heather 104 
Ashworth, Chara 86 
Austin, Trish 104 
Austin, Wendy 86 

-B-C- 

Bafford, Amy 20, 98, 103 
Bafford, Terry 86 
Baker, Jeff 92 
Baker, Jennifer 98 
Bailey, John 104 
Balko, Trish 104 
Barbt, Bruce 104 
Banker, Dawn 86 
Barrick, Brad 20, 86, 92 
Barth, Paul 
Batchelder, Bekhy 98 
Baukema, Christy 104 
Bauman, Nate 104 
Bausch, Carma Jo 86 
Beck, Bryan 
Beery, Dan 98 
Belk, Amy 85, 98 
Bell. Ursula 92 
Bellamy, Marcus 9, 86 
Black, Ryan 98 
Bogechev, Dimitri 104 
Boger, Toni 86 
Boot, Daniel 15 
Boot, Mark 92 
Bostic, Matt 6, 98 
Bowers, Angela 86 
Boyer, Cheryl 
Brantley, Dawn 98 
Brasher, Heather 98 
Brasher, Jennifer 92 
Bridenstine, Kelly 98 
Britt, Sandy 84, 92 
Broome, Christina 104 
Broome, Jeanna 9 



Brown, Mandie 123 
Brown, Kathy 86 
Brown, Pamela 92 
Bruehl, Julia 10, 11, 15, 104 
Brunner, Rachel 104 
Bryant, Erin 17, 30, 92, 96 
Burch, Bethany 80, 86 
Burchfield, Jennifer 104 
Bushby, Adam 104 
Bushby, Daniel 8, 104 
Butler, John 86 
Camp, Alyson 86 
Campbell, Brent 6, 92 
Campbell, Ed 98 
Campbell, Robby 
Carden, Brian 11 
Carson, Melissa 
Carter, Stacy 
Catron, Merlyn 14, 86 
Causey, Clay 86, 87 
Chance, Jamie 86 
Cheon, Jeremy 
Christy, Noel 

Clark, Elizabeth 3, 98, 102 
Cochran Dianne 87 
Colpo, Danny 8, 14, 54 
Colloms, Jeremy 98 
Compton, Durinda 86 
Compton, Jonathon 
Conrad, Ken 

Cooper, II, Jamie 104, 109 
Cope, Betsey 
Copenhaver, Kristy 
Couch, Gayle 
Coulter, Ben 
Crawshaw, Julia 
Crawshaw, Natalie 
Crosby, John 
Grumpier, Rachel 
Cruver, Natalie 
Cunningham, Anna 
Cunningham, Sara 
Curtis, Jennifer 
Cybulski, Tom 98, 103 

-D- 

Dale, Craig 
Damshcroder, Matt 
Daniels, Andy 12 
Daniels, Nick 98, 103 
Dantice, Carrie 11, 104 
Dantice, Jess 



Davey, Pauline 
Davidson, Jeremy 
Davidson, Mark 15 
Davies, Matt 
Davis, Heidi 
Davis, Hilary 
Day, Caroline 
Day, Christy 
Deal, Whitney 
DeArman, Jeff 
DeVaney, Kyle 15 
DeVaney, Mark 
DeVany, Tena 
DeVaney, Todd 
DeWald, Chris 
Diebold, Carl 85 
Diller, Kristy 100, 101 
Dollar, Jeremy 80, 94 
Dotterer, Traci 
Downey, Michelle 
Durham, Melody 
DuRoy, Jason 80, 87 
Dyer, Jon 

-E-F- 

Eastling, Brian 80, 87 
Eck, Brian 16, 94, 123 
Eddleton, Julia 
Edmondson, Kevin 
Edwards, Jonathan 
Emmons, Karl 
Esch, Jenni 

Espana, Guillermo Prieto 
Fary, Tim 
Fernandes, Derek 
Fickley, Chris 
Fine, Jenny 
Fleming, Josh 
Flot, Charles 80, 87 
Floyd, Amy 13 
Ford, Tyler 
Fortner, John 86, 87 
Foulk (Boot), Heidi 
Fox, Brad 
Fox, Charles 
Freeman, Beth 
Frederick, Julia 6 
French, Sara 1 1 

-G- 

Gann, Mischa 15 
Gelatt, Micah 15, 84 



Gilbert, Randy 
Gilman, Michael 
Godsmark, Tina 
Gonce, Joel 
Gore, Matt 
Graham, Andy 
Graham, Joe 15, 85 
Green, Beth 
Green, Brad 
Green, Patricia 
Gruenke, Jennifer . 
Guest, Julia 
Guilfoyle, Dawn Marie 

-H- 

Hadlock, Jodi 

Hall, Danielle 

Halsey, Autumn 10 

Hambrick, Jason 

Hanson, Christa 

Harding, Sacheen 

Hargraves, Matthew 

Harkins, Rachel 

Harrison, Jason 

Hartzell, Kelsey 

Haynes, Walker 55 

Hays, Cyndee 

Hays, Kimberlee 15, 88, 121 

Heathershaw, Andrew 

Heishman, Keith 

Helping, Cara 

Hendrix, Grant 

Hernial, Derek 

Hickman, Kerry 

Hicks, Amanda 

Hicks, Kathleen 

Hill, Adam 

Hill, Aimee 

Hill, Scott 12 

Hill, Shawn 

Hill, Sherry 

Hills, Tonya 15 

Hiltgen, David 

Hixon, Stacie 

Hobson, Allison 

Holbrook, Roxaline 

Huckle, Joanne 7, 

Hudson Jr., Andy 

Huneycutt, Michele 

Hurley, Andrew 




Index 



-I-J- 

Ingersoll, Headier 
Jackson, Todd 
Jenncss, Chris 
Johnson, Brad 
Johnson, Daniel 85 
Johnson, Sarah 
Johnston, Davis 
Jolley, Heather 
Jones, Kelley 
Jones, Matt 
Jordan, Brooks 9 



-K- 

Keidi, Patricia 16, 
Keja, Genci 
Keller, Laura 
Kemp, Andrea 31 
Kent, Summer 
Ketchersid, Beth 
Ketchersid Jr., Bill 
Kile, Diana 
Kittle, Cynthia 
Knapp, Tim 
Knorr, Joanna 
Kocher, Kristen 
Kocher, Quinton 
Kroeger, Ruth 
Kroeker, Cristy 
Krueger, Cory 

-L- 

Langston, Melanie 
Lanning, Stacey 
Lauriault, Susan 
Lawrence, Cory 
Lay, Robert B. 
Lea, John 
Leavitt, Michelle 
Lee, Aimee 16, 
Levenger, Jonathan 
Lewis, Kirk 
Lien, Tim 
Lorenzen, Brandon 
Lorenzen, Nathan 
Lubke, Melissa 16, 106 
Luther, Tara 26, 104 

-M- 

Maggard, John 80, 100 
Manor, Marty 
Marcus, Matt 
Margene, April 
Maronge, Chris 
Martin, Tennyson 1 1 
Martinez, Jason 112 
Martinez, Sonya 12 
Mathers, Alicia 10 
Mattsson, Kristie 



Mayhood, Mandy 
Mayo, Emily 31 
McBrien, Justin 12 
McCaskey, Joy 81, 106 
McClain, Matdiew 
McClure, Heath 
McDaniel, Laura 
McDonald, Mimi 
McKinnon, Mary 
McKinny, Ginny 
McLane, Laura 
McMannus, Alan 
Medlin, Tami Jo 
Meissner, Jon 
Merop, Chuck 
Merop, Sara 
Miller, Crystal 
Miller, Rebecca 
Minton, Jake 
Monroe, Joy 
Montgomery, John 
Moore, Andrea 
Moore, Kelly 
Morrow, Kathryn 
Moseley, April 
Motte, Joy 100 
Muncey, Pat 100, 103 
Mundy, Dave 55 
Murphree, Amy 
Murrey, Shauna 80, 106 

-N- 

Naugle, Ruth 

Nave, Jenny 

Neidigh, Vickie 

Nelson, Tevon 

Ngamuta, Ngam 13, 100, 103 

Ngamuta, Ngong 103, 106 

Nichols, Heather 6, 98, 100 

Nollmeyer, Brenda 

Nordmoe, Sarah Beth 85 

-o- 

Olive, Robin 10 
Olowola, Christiana 
Olsen, Elizabeth 
Olson, Chris 
Olson, Pamala 
Ordoff, Troy 
Osborne, Brian 
Otto, Korie 
Owens, Melody 



-P-Q- 



Pack, Cherane 

Pack, Mark 

Patrick, Jen 

Patterson, Becky 15, 85 
Paulson, Jeff 24, 108 
Pepple, Amy 30, 102 
Petersburg, Nate 



Pfeiffer, Daniel 
Phiriney, Bethany 
Pokhlebkin, Vadim 
Poison, Keri 
Porterfield, Jaclynette 
Prewett, Phil 
Price, Amy 
Price, Stacy 
Pruitt, Nicole 
Quye, Jenny 

-R- 

Raev, George 
Rasnake, Tabitha 
Reed, Amy 
Reed, Chad 
Reed Jr., Jamie 96 
Reid, Kasey 
Richardson, John 
Ritterbush, Jessica 
Robinson, Jenesis 
Rockey, Carter 
Ross, Christy 
Rouse III, Frank 80, 102 
Ruiz, Elisa 

-s- 

Saitta, David 

Sakaguchi, Akari 

Sakatos, Simon 10, 55, 108 

Sands, Stephanie 

Sarrell, Will 

Schult, Ruth 

Schultz, Jason 

Schultz, Julie 

Schumacher, Jeff 99, 103 

Schumacher, Mark 

Scott, Julie 

Scott, Kim 

Shannon, Tyler 

Sharpe, Annette 17 

Sheddan, Melody 9, 108 

Shepherd, Brooke 

Shetter, Tim 

Simmons, Andrea 

Simpson, Ben 

Simpson, Cristie 

Skerjanec, Angie 

Slaten, Alan 

Slaten, Kacey 

Sloane, Stuart 

Smelser, Heidi 8, 84 

Smelser, Kristen 

Smith, Alan 13, 80 

Smith, Amanda 

Smith, Jeremy 15 

Smidi, Maria 

Smith, Ricky 6, 14 

Smith, Travis 

Snead, Melinda 16, 

Snyder, Rachel 

Snyder, Tiffany B. 10 



Snyder, Tiffany R. 
Sofield, Josh 

Sofield, Willy 

Soukup, Adam 12, 92, 96 

Spears, John 

Speichinger, Renae 102, 103 

Spencer, Jenn 102 

Spicer, Kathryn 

Spicer, Trenena 

Spracklin, John 15, 

Strappenbeck, Randy 

Stephens, Deanna 

Stone Jr., Glynn 14, 15 

Stone, Pete 15, 

Stone, Tracy 85 

Stonestreet, John 

Strickland, Haven 17 

Sullivan, Dawn 

Summers, Chris 

Summers, Rebecca 10 

-T- 

Taylor, Abby 
Taylor, Allison 
Taylor, Bryan 
Taylor, Wendy 15 
Teal, Noah 
Teasley, Sam 
Terrell, Michael 
Thomas, Lorie 17 
Thomaston, Hannah 
Tilley, Christy 
Tompkins, Shonda 
Todd, Melissa 
Toliver, Jeremy 
Tow, Suzy 
Trammell, Karen 
Treat, Marcy 30 
Triolo, Chris 
Tucker, Ted 
Turner, Kelly 

-u-v- 

Urquhart, Paul 
VanBrocklin, Heidi 
VanDerMark, Jeff 17 
VanDerPool, Holly 
Varner, Adam 
Velarde, Lou 10 
Velarde, Ricky 

-w- 

Wages, Mark 
Wagner, Scott 8 
Wakabayashi, Yuri 
Walker, Brent 
Walker III, Burch 16, 
Walker, Eric 
Walters, Daniel 
Ward, Brian 
Ward, Eric 81. 108 



Index 




Ward, Stephen 81, 86, 91 
Warren, Brian 
Warren, Dave 
Watts, Jodi 
Webber, Lori 
Weber, Britt 
Wegner, mark 
Wegner, Stephen 
Wells, Bryan 81 
Wheeler, Heather 
Wetmore, Kelly 
Whatley, Deric 
Whisman, Marcy 108 
White, Bonnie 
White, Jen 112 
Whorley, Diana 
Wiley, Michelle 84, 102, 103 
Wilkinson, David 
Williams. Russell 
Wills, Mandy 
Wilson, Beth 31, 
Wilson, Jen 
Wilson, Julie 
Winans, Christy 
Winkler, Christen 
Winstead, Nancy 
Womble, Allison 
Wood, Byron 
Wood, Chris 14, 
Wood, Erica 
Wood, Sharon 108, 109 
Woodcock, Joy 15 
Wooten, Jennifer A. 
Wooten, Jennifer R. 
Wrenn, Faith 
Wright, Cindy 10 

X-Y-Z 

Yederlenic, Alana 18, 108 

Young, Joel 

Young, Steve 

\urovsky, Serge 

Zieg, Johanna 15, 84, 99, 104 

Zoeller, Clark 15 

Zoeller, Phil 



152 



* S * I A 

r Index 



4