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Full text of "The Communicator"

M"^ 



riic 



Commiiii ic at o r 



Volume Xlll Issue ^7 



Indiana Universfty-Purdue Unrversity at Ft. Wayne 



Thursday. October 1 . 1 981 



Companies offer jobs 



50 interview 



By CAROL VN ROGERS 



BlairWritcr 

Senion lorAing tor a job after 
gTBduBtlon are getting Mms assistance 
through the recruiting program at 
IPFW 

At the Fall Placement Convocation 
Sept. 13, students who plan to use the 
placement icrvice received Id- 
rormatlon and trochures iltttng the 50 
companlrs participating in the 
program and the positions they ore 
offering. 

Robert S. Barkhaus, director at Ca- 
reer Development and Office 
Placement which planned the con- 
vocation and the recruiting program, 
said program parti dps tion has grown 
from 15 componiea in 1973 to a record 
high of 5!i last year. 

BarUiBus expects that an average of 
one out of every 12 Interviews will 
result In a placement. Many of the 
companies have only one position to 



offer, while others ha 

"Some companies 
many as 300 or MO people for two or 
three accounting positions, and others 
may oat even have as many applicants 
to interview as they have poslUora. For 
examule. Maenavoi mav have 30 to 3^ 
Jobs for E.E.T.s lEleclrlcal 
englnccrijig lochnlcinnsj and will only 
beabieto find 20 applicants," Barktiaus 
Mid. 

"The Companies are here to hire, 
though," Barkhjius said, and he expects 
the SO companies to [dace 45 to 55 soon- 
to-be graduates. 

Engineers are at the top of the 
denjond list lail engineers who applied 
last year were placed), along wilh 
accounting and buslnras graduates. 
Positions in other fields are also 
available. 

Students who qualify and who arc not 
yet reglilcred (or Job placement may 
sign up iKfore Oct. 2 at the Career 
Development and Placement Office In 
Room 113 of Walb Memorial Union. 



Office hours are S a.m. to noon and 1 toS 
p.m., Monday through Friday. Bette 
Knott, placement se<Tetary. said 
seniors can use the placement service if 
they are carrying a minimum of 12 
credit hours ood-or are within one 
nemeslerof grad ua tion . 

In addition to completing the 
necessary forms, seniors must pravide 
25 copies of their resumes along with 
their appilcatiocu. A list of the par' 
tidpaling companies ts posted in tlie 
placement office. 

Students may b^in signing up for 
interviews on Monday. Oct. 12, atB a.m. 
The lnlErviev,-s will t^egin Oct, 19 and 
conUnue through Nov. 20. 

Students can enpect a second in- 
lervlew to follow before Nov. 20. 
N'otification of acceptance usually 
comes In January or February Id the 
case of accounting graduates wliile 
other graduates arc notified In the 
spring. Employment begins in May or 



Senate rejects TV bill 

fly TAMMY RIDINGS Affairs Committee in its dealings with Affaire Committee's project, E 



ilf Wrllo- 

At lu meeting Sept. 23, the Student 
Senate rejected Bill 8182* that would 
have allocated tTBO to purchase a Sony 
television for use in the Learning 
Rcwuree ttailer. 

Senator Suzy Scare, who opposed the 
cipendlture, said, "I think we can 
spend students' money better than for a 
gift." 

did vote to txiy two Dtlier television sets, 
but since the LHC Is on academic 
.department and has Its own budget, ttie 
;>enatG decided to discuss the matter 
further. 

The Senate approved the purctiasc of 
two books, The U.S. Congress Hond- 
booll and ttic Washington InformaUon 
Directory, to assist the Lcgtslativp 



Affairs Committee in its dealings with 
Ihe federal govcmmenl. 

A letter of resignation from the 
chalrpcTEon of the Legislative A/lairs 
Commltlco, Kent Bowman, was read, 
and Ihe Senate approved the 
reslgnahon. Scare and Holden Maecker 
were then appointed as co-chairpersons 
ofthei 



jphon 



Dtlmi 



lothc 



In a 
said he has ' 
Senate Ke said he is taking 12 hour? i 
college courses and also working. "1 
can't devote any time to Ihe Senate I 
don'l feel il Is fair for me to hold up the 
Senale's moving on," he said. Bowman 
also said the Senate "was fun — I en- 
joyed It." 

Senator Ron Diehl proposed a bill to 
appropriate tl52 to fund the Student 



Cold chases hay fever 




By SUZANNE LOOftQS 

Staff Writer 

As the pollen count goes down, so 
does the number of aiiersy related 
cases at the campm health services 
office. In the 3Cwiay period from 
Aug. ia to SepL 18, the oflice had 15 
regular patients visit for allergy 
injections compared to 19 in the 
same period last jtar, 

Nuree Barbara Kidd said the 
recent cold M-eatber contributed to 
the relief of victims with itchy eyes 
and congestion, symptotns of hay 
fever. "It's not usually until the first 
frost that tt-e see decline In alierar- 
rclated cases." Kidd said. 

Ragwwd, which Is the primary 
cause of hay (ei-er, has lb krgest 
eonwntralion in the central part of 
Ole country. aecOM&ng to the Asth- 
mo and Allergy Foimdatlon of 
America. 

For Hoosiers allergic to ragweed, 
this means misery unless they can 
find some relief. Hay fever victims 
do ha-,* other options besides 
praying for the fir^t frosL 

Awarding to Paul Isenberg, an 
Indianapolis allergisi. one option Is 
avoidance, Uenberg suggests 
staling In an air-conditioned en- 
"rtionment or investing In on air 
purifier system. Both dear the air of 
pollen. Also, urtun aress tend to 
have less pollen than rural areas, 
whwe ragweed grows more 
abundantly, Isenberg pointed ouL 

Medications including an- 
tihlstamines, decongestants, or 
those a-hlch combine the two, are 
another optional relief tor tbe 
aymptoms of hay fever. However. 
Iseoberg cauLiooed that over-tte- 



counter remedies should be taken 
according to package directions. He 
stressed an awareness of possible 
side effects such as drou'slness. and 
warned that antihistamines and 
alcohol do not mix well. 

For EuffereiB wilh more severe 
EjTnploms, Isenberg recommended 
an allergist be consulted, Desen- 
sitliation (immunai therapy) may 
tie tbe b^alment suggested for those 
people with allergies to dust and 
other non-seasonal allergens. The 
aliergiat will test to determine what 
substances the person is allergic to 
and prescribe a series of treatments 
for allergy monagemcnL 

Allergy sufferers undergoing 
immunai therapy are injected with 
extracts of the allergen In smaD 
amounts to build up the body's 
natural defenses. Dosage is 
gradually increased until the body 
builds a form of immunity. The 
treatment may take weeks, months 

"While undergoing treatment, 
patients may stiQ take medication to 
relieve their symptoms tem- 
porarily." Isenberg said. "For the 
patlait looking lu- a more per- 
manent method of allergy 
management, immunai therapy ts 
the most satisfactory aitema live, " 

Tbe campus health services may 
give doctor recommended injections 
or refer pa den Is to an allergist 

Tlie health servics office is 
presently located in G-27 ol tbe Walb 
Memorial Union building. It will be 
moved to the new athletic building 
when thai tnildiOig opois In 
November. Tbe services a^ 
available to all IPFW students. 



Affaire Committee's project, a "Swap 
and Shop Want Ad Board." This bill 
was read and returned to the com- 
mlltee for morediscussioh. 

That committee will also continue to 
investigate a petition to designate 
certain areas of Neff and Ketller halls 
as non-smoking areas. A major concern 
of the senators is the problem of en- 
forcing the petition if it is passed. 

In other business: 

— Mark Heller was elected Executive 
Assistantto tbe Senate, 

— Phi Kappa Beta FratEmity was 
recognised as an official campus 
student organization, 

— Tbo IPFW youth chapter of the 
Democratic Sodolistic (Organizing 
Committee was recogziized as an of- 
fidal campus studentorganlzatlon. 



Left-wing group 
forms at IPFW^ 

By GRETCHEN HOLODICK 
SUff Writer 

"People think we're communists, 
but we're bumanitarlaia at heart, 
idealists concerned about our country 
and our world," said Don Banning, co- 
founder of the youth chapter of Ihe 
Democratic Sodalistic Organizing 
Committee at IPFW, 

Banning, a political science and 
history major, said DSOC began 
nationally in 1973. It claims 10,000 
members. Including Congresamao Ron 
Dellums, D-Califorala, and Gloria 
Steinem, 

At [PFW, the organlMllon is much 
newer At Its Sept, 23 meedng, Student 
Senate recognized the youth chapter as 
an ofricial campus organizadon, 

Dave Falkner is the other founder of 
the group which will have its first 
meeting thesecondweekot October. 

Banning realizes "we might have 
trouble recruiting students into tbe 
' t what they must 
:e IS that there arc left-wing 
IS on all the major campuses 
s the nation. 



"Fort Wayne L 
continued Banning, "isolated from the 
rest of America in cultural and politjcal 
areas. There are doset sodailsts, but 
we have had a hard time recruiting 
them because they fear repercussions 
such as having their names on ttie FBI 
'lilt list.' but tUs just doesn't happen." 

The DSOC chapter at IPF'W will be 
active in the same issues as all other 
DSOC chapters. These Include support 
of the ERA, civil rights, and labor 
unions. "Most importantly, tbe chapter 
will be active in educating and 
organizing its members." Banning 
said. 

"I think this organizatioD is needed 
because of tbe economic realities of 
today and the current government's 
position on social issues, especially 
govcmmenl spending cuts," Banning 
said. 




ill weather comes to the campus, studying become* 
: biteose for sladents who are preparing for Ihe flrel 
Isolleats. <Ph olo by VvoDoe Allen) 



Thousands march in rally 



By WAYNE STEFFEN 



When what t 



naglngE. 



called "the 
rally in American 
history" took place in Washington D.C, 
on Sept. 12. Fort Wayne was 
represented, 

"We went lo protest President 
Reagan's economic policy, speciflcaUy 
cuts In sodal programs and cuts which 
have Instituted high unemployment," 
said Don Banning, a history and 
politicalsdencemajorallPFW, 

Banning was a mong about 500 people 
from local labor, women's groups, and 
the NAACP. who made the bus trip that 
Saturday morning. 

While offidal estimales by the US, 
Park police put the crowd at about 
2EO,0aO, Banning thought there might 
have been more, "I talked lo a D.C, 
policeman who said that the number 
was more like TOO.DOO. He said he had 
been on the force for 20 yeare and this 
was the biggest crowd he had ever 

At the Monument, Banning heard 
such speakers as Lane Kirkland, 
president of the AFL-CIO, Benjamin 
Hooks, National Director of Ihe 
NAACP; Vcnion Jordan, head of the 
National Urban League; and Eleanor 
Smcal. president o[ tbe National 
Organization for Women. 

Banning em^diasized that the point of 
the rally was social, not political. "Ted 
Kennedy was there ol course, and some 
congressmen were milling through the 
crowd, but all ttie politicians who were 
there had to sit in a spedal area and 



"I just don't believe the answer to our 
economic problems Is lying /n n 
drawer In David Stockman's desk." 
Don Banning. IPFW student. 



"This is the first lime in history that 
such a coalition has formed. Labor, 
women, and blacks all gol together to 
protest the way wc feel that both of the 
major political parties have Ignored 
our needs," Banning said. 

Banning hopes that the feelings of 
solidarity engendered by the 
Washington rally will be carried back 
with people and nol left in Washington. 



TOW! 



I Ihls a 






just lis 



tothesp 



'The effect I 
As a history major, i got a real feeling 
of being part of histpry in the making," 
Banning said. 



talking to vario 
groups since his return. 

Banning would like lo form a Fort 
Wayne Qtizens' Coalition. After talking 
to J. B. Pressy IFort Wayne NAACP) 
HJid Margaret Vidals iFort Wayne 
NOW), among others, be feels that 
response so far has been favorable. 

This coalition would, on a local level, 
bring ti^ethcr many of the groups that 
Banning feels have been forgotten by 
both tbe Democratic and Republican 
parties. "Blacks, labor and women 
could sit down and iron out tbeir dlf- 
ferencsa and make their needs known," 
Banning said. 

"In the past, labor has tradltlacally 



supported the Democratic parly. But 
many don't feci that Uie party has lived 
up to labors' support," Banning said. 

One of Uie goals of such a coalition 
would be to johi with similar gmipa 
from other areas to "encourage a 
government policy that will create Jobs 
in tbe Immediate future," 

"TTie leaders of our group aren't 
unaware of economic realities. But 
David Stockman (Preaiitent Reagan'i 
Director of the Budget) says that 
Reagan's programs will take five years 
lo generate Jolia; with the cuts It) 
welfare and unemployment benefits, 
there are many people who won't have 
anything," Banning said, 

"1 just don't trelieve the answer to our 
economic problems is lying In a drawer 
in David Stockman's desk," Banning 
said. 

"Many pet^le came back from 
Washington with tbe feeling thai 
something was wrong with our 
govemmenl and they are coming home 
to tell tbeir friends and ndghhors about 
it."Bannbgsaid. 



Health Service to move soon 



I HOLODICK 
Stiff Writer 

Health services is moving sooo from 
the Walb Memorial Union to tie new 
athletic center, and with tfa^ move will 
come change and "7""°'"^ "The 
em[Jiasls will be on athletic training 
and physical ntness." said Starley 
Pifer, a university nurse. 

In the pest, health services have 
provided students wilh Qnergency first 
aid. health education, counseling, 
position referral and suppcrtivc care 
per family physidan order. 

Now, with the tiaiBfer to tlu new 



building, health services will offer 
prcgrams in areas such as aerobic 
exerdse and diet and weight control in 
addition to past services, Pifer said. 

"Iljere will be a different focus," 
Pifer said, "and this is the concept of 
■wellness.' It is anticipated that 
students, faculty and staff will all take 
advantage of Uie programs and ser- 
vices we will offer," she atkled, 

(^UTTHitly. health sorices is located 
in G27 of tbe Walb Memorial Union until 
the move. Its hours are 8 a.m, to noon 
and 1 to 5 p,m,. Monday through 



EPFW boasts two Sony TVs 



By JIM CHAPMAN 
Sports E^Lor 
Some universities brag atnut 
possessions of vealUi that are en- 
joyed by their sCodents, Some have 
milllon-doiiar sports complexes, 
others have incredible computers, 
and still others have cofriers that, 
like the advertisement, are "really 
made by Xerox." 
IPFW has Sony televisioosetS- 
Tbe first of two tdevlsion sets 
purchased by the Student Senate 
from activity fee funds was 
delivered at tbe Walb Memorial 
Union TV lounge Sept. 2S at 2 p,m. 
The other set will be delivered to the 



Building D TV lounge at a ui^, .»h^ 
Tbe new 11.100 Sony Trinitron 
came complete with remote control 
tuning and a distal dock. It will 
pick up cable as well as the local 
channels, however. Home Box 
Of fice ( HB ) will not be offered. 

The picture on tbe new screen will 
be a little fuzzy until the amplifier 
connecting the roof top antenita 1* 
Installed 
The cable hook-up was iwt to- 
stalled on the day of delivery but 
should be Installed within tbe nett 
month, said Ron Diehl, a student 



PAGE 1 - THE COMMUNICATOR - OCroaEB 1. 081 

Opinion 



Communicator 
gives policies 



"No one reads your paper and ll's no 
wondcTBlnccall you seem to wrilc about 
!■ Ihe Student Senate." one person told 
the editor of The Communicalor last 
week. 

Another pereon said that certainly we 
could find more importsnl things to 
write about than the things they read 
about in our paper 

While we know thai people do read our 
paper — after all. 5.000 copies of it are 
distributed each week and there aren't 
that niany birdcages on campus — our 
readers' comments and eriliclsins are 
welcomed 

The policy of The Communicalor is to 
present to Its readers the news about the 
things that will affect and interest the 
largest number o[ the people we're 
dedicated to serve — Ihe students of 
IPFW 

We abo believe it is important to tell 
readersthlnga they should know, ever if 
sometimes those things are not 
especially interesting to read about. 

This Is why we have articles about 
Student Senate meetings, Faculty 
Sctute meetings, new academic ap- 
pointments, new administrative policies 
and other such "baring" subjects. The 
decisions made by such groups affect 
IPFW students. 

We believe that many people who read 



The Communicator also realiie the 
importance of our stories and editorials-, 
one look at Ihe many letters to the editor 
we have received has convinced us we 
are writing about things that concern 
many people. 

The Communicator also tries to tell 
you in the first few paragraphs of each 
article what is Important about such 
meetings and events, instead of listing 
what happened in the order in which 
they occurred. 

Tills allows even those readers who 
have limited time to read a story to 
know right away the most important 
things that are happening each week. 

Anyone who wants to give an opinion 
about the paper, good or bad, or who 
wants to comment on one of its articles 
can do so in person at The Com- 
municator Office. Suite 215, Walb 
Memorial Union, or send us a letter. 

All letters to the editor should be short 
and to the polnl. Letters longer than 45 
lines. 63 spaces per line, wiU not be 
published. We also reserve the right to 
refuse to print any tetters we believe to 
be libelous or profane. 

Letters to the editor should also be 
typed, double-spaced, and signed. The 
full name, address and phone numlwr of 
the sender should also be on the letter, 
but only the name will be published. 



Senator explains constitution 



ToUiDEdlior, 

BrucG Clurks 
In hla Sept. 17 letter i 
editor item to Imply (hat 
Ken Schcnk Is sami> son of 
powcr-wlelding despot who 
hM an lllegjilmate Senate lo 
hU pocket. I assure you, tliis 
li not IhccoBo. A3 for anrk'a 
alloHadong concerning 
Sc he nk, these ore almosl too 
ridiculous lo deserve 

There ore several reasons 
supporting the Icgillmacy of 
the Sctialc. TJicy arc Ihe 
■pccinc context lo which the 
Dpeclal election rniulrcmcnt 
applies and sittBlenllallon 
from Robert's Rules of 
Order conceminBquoroms. 

The constitution limits the 

all nine who ran for office 
lost spring were elected. But 
there Is a conslitullonol 
requirement Ihat II nine 
vacancies on the Senate nnd 
SUBOG e>l9t simul- 
taneously ipcclol cleclion 
gholl bo conducled. 
However, the oppiicotion of 
this requirement wos 
questionable In light of the 



election 






slate were publicized prior to 
last sorinK'a election. The 
deadline lor potential can- 
didates to submit pcUUaic to 
run wag ol,so extended, yet 

election doy, Whal good 
would it do to conduct 
another "apecial" election to 
more candidates 

tion that couldn't produce 
enough? It doesn't make 
sense As DonGuf/ey pointed 
out, if the special election 
clause was meant to pertain 
to vacancies due to the lack 
of participation In the 
general elecllon, il «xmld 
have oppcared under the 
election code section of the 



Sandy, the porllamenlarlan, 
classified the Senate as 
belonging to the "le^slative 
assembly" category. 
However, Rotxrl stales "...it 
should be noted that certain 
smaller public bodies aiay 
serve a law-making function, 
yet not assume the character 
of a full-scale legislative 
assembly, aad instead rosy 
somewlial resemble a board 
or the assembly of a society. 
Aa example of such a body 
might tie a city-couoctl or a 
\1llBge board which meets 
weekly or monthly and 
ibera continue 




PREGIUAIMT 

Did you know your child's heart 
begifis beating on the eighteenth 
day after conception? Need help? 
Call, 

BIRTHLIIME 
422-1818 



S\ Fort Wayne's (^^ 

^J Newest and Ofily ^54 

l^TAND-UP singles'^ 



:<E) 



Fort Wayne 
Newest and Only 

STAND-UP SINGLES' 
SALOON 

Noon Lunch Specials ^2.95 

11 00 am lo 2 p m. 




'T<M)1)-S1"111ITS (j(M)l>Tl.MfS 

4111 PARWELL AVENUE 
ACROSS FROM THE COLISEUM 

DANCING 

HAPPY HOURS 
y< PRICE NO LIMIT 

Morflay Ihu FriDay 5-7 n m Sal. 2-A p m 
Monday Itirj Tnutsday Midmghl lo 1 a m 
Sanflwlches - Munchies served dally ^-11 p m 

Noon Lunches Mon.-Frl. 11-2 



their 



full-til 



Vacancies o 



mined the special election 
claiEC refers to vacancies 
due to QltrllloD and not lack 
ol partlclpaliDn In the 
Bcneral election The 
c[ucstlon that now arises Is 
■Did the nine elecled 
members ol the Senate 
constitute a quarom, thereby 
tegitimiilng their action?" 

In RotjcTl'G Rules of Order 
there are four types ol 
assembly Jeff 



cupations during their term 
ot service." Robert further 
states "Such an assembly's 
membership is limited lo 
persons who are recorded en 
the rolls of the society as 
voting memiMn' in good 
standing." Those who are 
recorded on Ibe roile of the 
society as voting tnembCTS In 
good steading constitute the 
memtKTship. 

Ttx nine senators elected 
last spring were the voUng 
members In good slaodlng 
and at that time coostitutcd 
the membership. They were 
Ihe representation the 



student body produced and 
elected. The quorom would 
then be Ibe majority of these 
roembet* (five or morel. 

The Senate Interpreted the 
require meol for the special 
election lo the context that it 
occurred I don't think lack 
of participation In the 
general elecUon wos an- 
ticipated by the drafters of 
the constitution. It was a 
apedal circumstance and 
was reckoned with as such. 
The tnterprelalion of the 
special election daise and 
subsequent action by the 
Senate (passing Weslriek's 
resolution not requiring a 
special election) was not 
without reason and sub- 
stantLiUon, The Student 
Senate wll] continue to serve 
Ibe student body as a 
legitimate orgoni cation. 

Don Moore 
Studmt Senator 



Reader demands return of student activity fee 



To the Editor 

I want my WO back. The 
Student Senate refuses lo 
make Itself a legal body by 
conducting Ihe special 
election necessary. 
Therefore, all money 
collecled from students this 
(all for Hie actlilly fee was 
laken Illegally. I, for one. 
demand ^t my money tie 



Also, all the money spent 
by the Student Senate since 
last s(B-ing has t>ecn spent 
lilcgslly since there was no 
legal body to aulhoriie these 
expetidituTcs, Unfcrlunalely 
for Mr, (Ken) Scbenk, this 
means he will hove to return 
the "'necessary" (S.OOO 
I system, pay back the 



spent by the Senate. 

In reference lo Holden 
Moecket's letter of 9-Z4-ai. 
he saya of the Student 
Senate, "...a body ot 
representatives acting In the 
Interests of the students, 
protecting their ri^Is,..." 
Fine. Mr, Maeckcr, put your 
money where your mouth Is, 
Or should I say, put MY 
money where your mouth is. 
From your letter, I'm sure I 
>n your full sup- 
the Immediate 



reimburse m enl f a II s t ud en t 
activity fees. 

11 Is lime for the studenls 
of this campus to take action 
against this gross misuse of 
power. All of us have the 
legal right to have our $^ 
returned immcdjalely, Dchi'I 
wait for tlie other guy to do 
something. The Student 
Senate Lteraily ripped YOU 
off. Let the Student Senate 
know that we won 
and lake this. 

Wendy J Welch 




Due TO TECHttltM. UlFFlCuLTieS 

STu&tm5'6ov'TwitiBERtmmig^»tu-wW£ 



Student takes exception to DiehVs comment 



To the Editor: 

Perhaps 1 am not entitled 
lo reply to remarks made by 
a member of (he Sludent 
Seatle since I have never 
really paid mucbattention lo 
whal they bave said and 
done In the p«H. nor have I 
cared. Bui I feel I must take 
dCcpUon to the ullertv 



"animals'- in KelllerfSll. " "^ ""*" 

I have tieea alleoding 
classes oO and oo al ttdi 
campus since 197B. and all 
tiut one were in Kelller Hall. 
I have spent many boura in 
the louige and have yet lo 
see ooe "anlmaL" I tiave not 
seen one student act oii of 



the rest of the 
Studenls" Govemmenl, then 



— ~is^. Aaynne who can't 
leh the difference between • 
student and an animal 
shouldn't really bold any 
position of responsihilily. 



only hope that Ibe 

boy isn't a pte-vetoTnary 
medidne major. 

By Ibe a-ay, Dol that it Is 
really relevant, but I am 38 
yean old and DO know the 
(Mfereoce bwtweoi animals 
and students, and as I've 
said, I've oo( seen any 
animals in KetUcr Lounge. 
Unii Cloy 




3627 N. Clinton Ft. Wayne 
483-9290 



CiVff)wgyT;ii'SJ 



Don''t trip on the tripods 



Minorilies to get feUowships SurVeyiTlQ ClClSS 



TTw CnnniJlUe co loftitiaioul CoopCTiUoa 
MtdUlihed ■ fellawsHp pn>gr«ni detlsned lo lncreas« tlw 
rq>raa]tBtlon ol meniben of mlnoHly groupi, e^wdally 
IhoH hoUlng doctorates in the uda] (cience*. bumaolUea, 
natural id enccf, mslhematlcsBndeDglncertng. 

The [TDsrim waa rund«] by ^anlj (rtm the Lilly 
Endowmenl. Ihe Andrnv W. Mellon Foundation aadlbc John 
D. and Catherine T MacArthur Foundatian. wltli granla 
from all three (ntsllng more than U million. Tilt program 
will provide 2S fellowships In the social acienca. 10 in the 

matbematlcaand fngineeting for the 1962-83 academic year 
The fellowihlpi provldclull tuition plia a itlpoid of alleasl 

tb.(xa (or four academic yean, provldni that aarma] 

progreulowardBPh.D. limade. 
Any minority student »ho hsa or will rwelve a bachelor's 

degree by August, 1981. la eligible to apply (or the 1982 

com petit I on. 
The fail application deadline i« Jan. IS. 19S2. For more 

detailed Informallon, write to CIC Minorities FeiiowshifS 

Ptogram. Kirkuood Kali 111. Indiana University, 

BloomlngUn, Intt. true. 

Program accepts applicatrons 

Youlhgronl Programs of the National Endowment for the 
Human ilic9 arc currently acc^Ung a[f 1 1 cations to pursue 
non-credit. oul-of-c!asiroom research projects In the 
humanities. Up to T5 grnnls will be awarded, olferlng up 1o 
tl,50a to individuals and 110,000 to groups. 

The grants are primarily for participants 18 to IS years ol 
ago llie humanlU^ Include such subjects as history, 
comparallve religion, plhnlc studies, folklore, anthropology, 
linguistics, the hlsiorYOt art and philosophy 

All applications must be aubmitled by Nov. IG A copy of 
the guidclinca can be obtained In the placement office or by 
writhig to Voulbgrants Guideline, Mall Stop ia3-C, NaUooal 
Endowment for the Human! tls, Washington. D.C. 20500. 



Military writing competition 

A writing competition, open to anyone with an interest In 
the military history of Indians or the Old Northwest, has 
been announced by Wayne Sanford. chairman of the military 
history section of the Indiana Historical Society. Details may 
be oblnlned by writing lo Sanford at 31S W. Ohio St.. 
Indianapolis, IN U203. 

U.S. in El Salvador topic of talk 

Richard Scobic, executive director of the Unitarian 
Unlversnllsl Service Commlltec, will be the guest speaker 
lor Theatre lor Ideas on Oct. 9, He will speak on the U.S. 
Involvcmenl In El Salvador at 6:30 p m. at the Allen County 
Public Ubrary, and at 8 p.m. at the Unitarian Meeting 

Library sponsors book sale 

The Friends uf the Allen County Public Library will 
sponsor a iced book sale from Oct. 1-3 In the auditorium of 
the llbrory. Sole hours will hcfrom noon toSp.m., Thursday; 
9a.m, loOpm , Friday; and9a m. toSpm on Saturday. 

Nursing exam dates reported 

Challenge and make-up exam dates for the IPFW Nursing 
DepI, have been set (or Oct. 10, Oct. 24, Nov. 14 and Dec. 5. All 
eiBmswlllbeglvimat9a.m.,lnRoamH9,Ner[HBU 



Rubio on £1 Salvador 

The IPFW chapter of Amnesty Inttmatlonol Is sponsoring 
the appearance o( Victor Bubio at 7 p.m. Friday, Ocl 2. In 
room 1« of Kelller Hall. The film "El Salvador: Hevolubon 
or Death" wiilolso be shown. 

YPBC meets noon Mondays 



sets up on campus 



By DIA.V'NE LAKE 
SUHI^'rller 

The people with the tripods 
and the strange- looking 

sidestepped near Ketller 
Hall's parking lots last year 

They were students in the 
Elementary Surveying 
class, and this semester, it's 

working north of the athletic 
building, near the Imnis 
courts. Bruce Franke, class 
Instructor, said the group 
will soon be displaced again 
when work b^ins on the 
proposed soccer field. 
The beginning surveying 






one of the few 
courees offered at IFFW. 
with the exception ol the 
biology Held station, to 
actually do field work and 
Immediately practice what 
students leani in lecture. 
Franke said 

The average student will 
devote six to seven hours a 
week to this class (or which 
they will receive three hours 
of credit. Franke noted This 
extra time is Spent learning 
to use a tape, or chain, a 
transit and a level, he said. 




wUIe a le 
elevations. 

Aa every field strives to 
have Ihe best and rawest 
teclnology available for Its 
students, so also Is each 
department plagued with 
tudget shortages Con- 
struction lechnolc^ Is so 
different, Franke said. Tlie 
surveying class' equipment 
includes one complete, 
Lhrco-plece set ol the newest 
and best equipment 
available, Frank said. 



One would think with such 
geographically widespread 
— '- field, the group i 




OCTQBERI.mi-THECOMML'MCATOR-PA GEJ 

THE FORT 

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Floor of the Walb 

Memorial Union 

Breakfast 7:30-10;30 

Luncti 11:00-1:30 

Grill 1:30-3:30 



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PRESEf^ THIS COUPON AT 
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ir cause, a lew 
safety hazards. No major 
loss of equipment has 
resulted from outside In- 
terference, Frank said. He 
chuckled ^h'hen he said that 
as far as he knew his 
students hadn't caused any 
BUtomDblie accidents in their 
"'line of duly." A number of 
his students have twisted 



ankles 
n then. 



e gopher 



>r the HhDif thing will bl 
le conversation between these (wo 
.iPhoIobyDeanRnsl 



.ork field 
though, Frank sold. 

Government reports are 
continually indicating that 
Ihe housing and construction 
Industry is economically 
down right now But.FYanke 
maintains, it will bounce 
back, and ihe students now 
will then be p-aduales In luie 
for prime jobs. 



ROLLER SKATING 
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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7th 

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Tickets; '2.00 

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calendar 



THURSDAY 1 

Nursing Inforfnation fneeting, Neff, 1 38. 10 a.m. 

Soc/AnEhro Forum. "Vietnam ancJ the Futility of 

War," Walb 114. noon 
Women's volleyball, Anderson at IPFW, 6:30 p.m. 



FRIDAY 2 

PIT, "Whose bfe Is It Anyway?'" 8 p.m. 



SATURDAY 3 

SUBOG mouie, "The Jerk," ballroom, 7 & 10 p,m. 
PIT. "Whose bfe Is It Anyway?" 8 p.m. 
Women's tennis. IPFW at Goshen College, 10 a.m. 
Men's soccer, IPFW at North Park College, 3 p.m. 
Women's volleyball. IPFW at Goshen College. 1 a.m. 
Tae Kwon Do Club meeting. Walb second fjcrar, 
1p.m. 



MONDAY 5 

Women's Studies. "Women's Culture," Walb 294, 

noon 
Young People in Broadcasting meeting. Helmke 835, 

noon 



TUESDAY B 

Coed cfTDSS country, IPFW at Taylor University 

Invitational 4 p.m. 
Men's soccer, IPFW at St. Franas College, 3;30 p.m. 



WEDNESDAY 7 

Inter-varsity ChrSstian Fellowship meeting. Neff 147, 
noon 



THURSDAY B 

Soc/AnthfTD Forum, "The Family Protection Aa." 

Walb 114, noon 
PIT, "Whose Life Is It Anyway?" 8 p.m. 
Women's volteybaU. IPFW at Bethel College, 6 p.m. 



la Untvnllv-Purdua Unhnraicy at Fort WayfM far tha la 
Ol ad unlvaraitv daparananca and ar^aniatlon*. tcvna u ba Induifad tn Campua Calanlar rmiat t 
■ubmlnad cs th* Ofdca of UnlvaralEy Rilatkina and Oavalepniant, Kanler I'll by 9 p.m. on ct 
Thuraday pracading cfaa w» ' ...t..^.. _ 



PAGE* -THE COMMUNrCATOR-OCrOBERl.lsei 



"A BROADWAY I 

OPENS FRIDAY, 0< 



"'Whose Life Is It 
Anyway?' is a 
brilliant play. A 
singular stage 

triumph. A stunning 
performance!" 

Lillian O'Connell, United Press International 



II 



An extraordinary 
evening, as ex- 
hilarating as it is mov- 
ing. You must go." 

William A. Raidy, Newhouse Papers 



"See it! Superb!" 

Joel Siegel, WABC Eyewitness News 



"FUNNY, TOUCHING, C 
MOVING. ABSOLUTLEY 
1979 TONY AWAI 



THE DEPARTMENT OF 

of 
INDIANA UNIVERSITY-PURDUE UNI 

PURDUE-INDIANA THEATRI 

Whose Life Is I 

by Brian C 




OCTOBER 2,3,8,9,10,15,1 



ADMISSION: GENERAL-SS.OO NON-ID STUDENTS i SENK 

FOR TICKETS, RESERVATIONS, AND INI 



"A HIT WHAT A PLAYI...ONE ( 
CAPTIVATING, WARM AND L 



OCTOBER 1 . 13*1 - THE CO MBilUNtCATOR - PAGE S 



BLOCKBUSTER!" 



OCTOBER 2 AT PIT 



G, CAPTIVATING AND 
LEY SUPER. BRAVO?" 

JEFFREY LYONS, W CBS RADIO 

AWARD WINNER 



MENT OF THEATRE 

out UNIVERSITY AT fORT WAYNE 
esflnts a 

HGATRE PRODUCTION OF 

[s It Anyway ? 

rian Clark 




1,15,16,17 at 8:00 p.m. 



[S e. SENIOR CITIZENS-$3.S0 IPFW STUDENT5-$2.00 

IVND INFORMATION CALL 482-5782 



"A performance to be 
remembered for a 
lifetime. Radiant." 

Martin Gofffried, Saturday Review 

'"Whose Life Is It 

Anyway?' is filled 

with the joys of 
living." 

Emory Lewis, The Bergen Record 



"Absolutely brilliant! 
An entertainment 
event of the first 
order! 'Whose Life Is It 
Anyway?' soars in 
triumph. Don't miss 
this play!" 

Max Worthington, New York Herald 



E OF THE MOST MAGNETIC, 
) LOVING I HAVE EVER SEEN" 



Pia Lindstrom, WNBC-TV 



tlie arts 




A s landing-room -only crowd enjoyed a pleasant afternoon at the 
Foclllngcr Theatre last Sunday as Ihe Fori Wayne Philharmonic opened lis 
season wilh o pops concert otmarches, walties and polkas. 

The orehcslra was In fine form os il breezed Ihruugh such selections as 
"The Blue Danube," 'Thunder and Ughlning," "King Cotton" and "The 
Slnrs and SIripcs Forever." The lilting music, directed by Ronald Ondrejka, 
provided a perfect complimeni lo Ihe balmy day as people sal around the 
grandstand wllh picnic lunches and blankets, obviously enjoying Ihem- 
Eelvcs. (Pholo by Dean ftoss.l 



Sophisticated comedy- 
returns in new film 



spnce. there wai 


a cooiplainl 






sophlstlcBlcd, 


romaolic 


comedy Ul cum 


It filma. Al 


the end or thai article, some 


encouraging s 


gns that 


sophiitlcalfd c 




clinging to life 




Honed. AiBther film proving 


liii3 Fact opened 


siwtek- 




lack fmcsje in a 


few placa 



and may ool ha^-e a con- 

9lep In the nghl dlreclim In 
evoking memories of (hose 
screwball comedies and the 
wonderful Tracy- He [*um 

Like those films. "Divide" 
revolves around a seemingly 
mismatched couple whose 
sparring and fighting lead to 
Of course, there's no 






III the 01 



il Ihcy meel 



Balin reworks 
familiar sound 

•f a. 



from the m 
each other. 

■'Continental Divide's" 
director. Michael Apted. and 
writer, Lawrence Kasdan, 
show a fondness for Ihoseold 
rdms, and have fun wilh (he 
conventions of those films. 



along with adding some nice 
touches of their own. 

First and raremosi. Apted 
and Kasdan develop the 
romance leisurely, giving 
Ihe character? and audleoce 
time lo respond to their 
growing afforlloa Even 
though you know bow the 
film's going lo end, II hap- 
pens believably, and the 
filmmakers don't rush It 

Kasdan's witty script 
helps to tring the romance 
off and provides the actors 
wlh good, naturalistic hnea 
lo bounce off each other The 
dialogue never comes off as 
fm'ced OT stagey, and Is a 
good showcase tor the ac- 

More than in any other 
kind d film, acting is ira- 

comedy because the 
chemistry t)etween the lead 
actors makes or breaks the 
film. In "Conlinenlal 
Diiide." the teamlngol John 
Beli&hi and Slair Brown 
works and saves the fihn 



a hard-boiled Chicago Sun- 
Tunes columnist, shows a 
flair for romanUc comedy, 
and pnnrs thai he can be 
FiuDiy wilboul resorting lo 
burping or bashing beer cans 
against his he«d. Fa 
BeliBhl. this is ohnosl a 
dmniaUc role, and be 
acquits blmsctl well. 
Hopefully, he will gel more 
rotes like this so he can 
expand his range. 

Blair Brown, as NeU 
Porter, an omilhologisl, and 
Souchak's balUing partner, 
is wonderful. L^sl seen In 
"Altered Slates" where she 
gave a powerful per- 
formance, ihe also proves lo 
tie a fine comedienne. 

She manages lo exude 



Ding vulgar 



Us 



Belushi, o 



ileSouchak, 



wonder Ihal Souchak falls in 

Together, Belushi and 
Brown create Ihe kind of 
chemisU^ thai hasn't been 
seen on screen In a long 
lime; il is obvious Uiat they 
enjoyed king with each 
other. They make "Con- 
tinental Divide" fun. 



JACKGKAMLING 
Still tVrller 

Filleen years ago, a San 
FYoncisco six'plece bond 
released its first nlbum on 
nCA. Known as the Jef- 
lerson Airplane, the band 
featured a male and a 
rcmalc lead vocallsl, both ol 
whom took turns singing 
material wriltcn by Ihemale 
lead vocalist. 

That vocalist. Marly 
Balln, went on to produce 
some or die most strikingly 
original rock 'n' roll down 
tho ycnrs wllh the Airplane, 
and its riplnorr group ol 
Starshlp His most Inmous 
compoaitlon Is the 1975 
ballad "Mtriicles," on which 
ho shared vocal work wilh 
Grace Slick and Paul 
Kantner. 

' Now II 1b 1D8I Balln, sans 
Slick. Kontncr and Ihe rest of 
Uio Airplanc-Stamhlp axis 
lor Ihrco years now, released 
his lirsl solo album Ihls 
lummcr, "Balln," Icoturing 
tho hll single "Hearts." As 
on "Miracles" ond prcriouj 
other Jelrcrson Slot^hlp 
singles, Ihe song Ipalurcs Uie 
singer's clear, roller-coaster 
lenor dominating a lush, 
electric-p la no-heavy back- 
groiEid. 

For many reviewers, this 
Is the only good part or what 
is otherwise a very disap- 
palming outing Rolling 
Stone all but suggested 
banging Bahnby his thumbs, 
Cumniiinifutor 
wuniN wriiprs 

Tho Communicolor is 
looking lor people who 
always wanted lo be urltcrs 
bul never felt they had the 



the Wulb Memi 
Suite 21B, and 
'c friendly. 






Stereo Review likewise 
lambasted the album in its 
most recent Issue, calling 11 a 



Sad to say. the reviens 
have a point in same cases. 
Usten to Balin strain his 
larynx on the hard-rocking 

of wNch he con be blamed 
lor composing, ' 
can't all [ 
bellows on "Spotlight,' 
hell, we might as well try." 
Try asho might, he sllU can't 
overcome playing Cu[dd to 
dead malinee idols on "Elvis 
and Morilyn." Dreck like 
Ihls makes the l^ationol 
Enquirer read like Atlantic 
Monthly. 

Bulnot all of the criticism 
is Justified, Al least Balin did 
save his voice for baUad- 
orienled malerial on side 
one, which is not so heavy- 
handed as Slcrfo Review- 
would have you Ihink. He 

"Lydia," which, for Balin, is 
somclMng, considering he ts 
nol a prolific songwriter and 

being one since his days with 

And that's probably what 
the reviewers were ex- 
pecting—a return lo Balin's 
salad days when he per- 
formed such daiiilng 
numbers as "ll'sNoSec ret," 
"Three-rifths ol a Mile In 10 
Seconds" and "Volunteers." 
\Vhal they got, though, is an 
orlist who's done litUe more 
Ihan rehash his best stuff 
with Ihe Slarship, and 




Bloom presents facts, 
history of toy soldiers 



^<^^ 



Is It Anywi 
lesyolPuril 



1 and Deborah Wilson (Dr. Scoll) 
m Ihe PlTproducUon of "Whose Life 
h opens this weekend. (Photo cour- 



arts 
at a 
^ ^ glance 



On the Sliver screen 

The SUBOG film this week will be "The Jerk," shown al 
ind 10 p.m., Soturday, in the Walb Memorial Unii 
Ballroom 

The Cinema Center will be showing "Captain Blood." 

i pirate story starring Errol Flynn and Olivia < 

Hovilland, at 7 and 9 p.m.. Saturday, in the Fort Wayi 

Public Ubrary. ' 

Ginsberg to speak here 

Allen Ginsberg will read and discuss his poetry at S p.r 
Friday, Ocl. 2, Ui Nell 101 . Admission is S4, 13 lor university 
students, and t3 for senior citizens and children. 



Treading the boards 



Center. 

.The Nell Simon musical "They're Playing Our Song" wi 
inEtagoallheEmt>as3yThealreotBp.m.,Ocl.7and8. 
The Embassy Theatre will present "Ballet Folkloric 

MeJiicor>o"ata p.m., Sunday. Ocl, 4. 



By JOHN HLIBERTZ 

Staff tVrller 
Lined up in orderly rows, 
tiny men In uniform face off 
across Ihe field Of conflict. 
Motionless, as il frozen in 
eternal readiness, soldiers or 
every country and era 

This is the fantasy norld of 
Judge Louis Bloom and 
thousands of other collectors 
of historical mllllary 

What? Bloom, respected 
community leader that he is, 
plays with toy soldiers? 
iflslorlcally. leaders and 
military men throughout the 
ages have been fascinated 
wllh model soldiers and 
games of conflict. Bloom 
said. 






lodel a 



on record have been found in 
the tombs of Egyptian and 
Chinese rulers. Assigned lo 



protect the ruler in die af- 
terlife, some ancient leaders 
were buried with IhoiEands 
of Hies lie clay models. 
Bloom said. 

In more primitive times, 
records Indicate some kings 
were txiried with live 
soldiers and household 
servants. Perhaps l>ccausc 
tills was such a waste of 
valuable manpower, Ihe 
practice ol burying models 
was substi luted for the 
burial of real soldiers. 

During his presentation ol 
the facts and history of toy 
soldiering, at the Fort 
Wayne Hlsiorlcal Museum, 
Bloom noted that because of 

hobby, model prices have 
skyrocketed. A set of the 
most common model British 
soldiers will command a 
hefty $70 to 1150. 



"Enter the _ 
Dragon" H- 



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CONTINENTAL DIVIDE. 



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OCTOBER!. IWl — THE CO MMLINICATOR — PAGET 




McDonald named coordinator 



Athletics fills post 



Bj JIM CHAPMAN' 

SporUEAilir 

Bart McDonald baa taken 

a new tull-tlme poaitton 

orrered by the athletic 

mlnUtratlan coordnator. 
Dave Skellon. athlcUc 
<firectoraai± 

McDooald li a new-coiner 
to Fort Wayn*, as well as to 
IPFW. She Is from Ml^ml, 
Florida, where she taught, 
coached girls volleyball, 
basketball and ton ball and 
counseled lor a high school. 

McDonald's duties a-ill 
Include making sure all 
athletes are eligible For tbeii 
respective sports, planning 
schedules for IPFW teams, 
making sure there are 
enough officials at every 
contest, ordering athletic 
equipment and supplies and 



ng concessions during 
certain home games. 

McIXoald Slid die took 
the )ob beca use she had been 
m alhleCics all her life, and 
she vanted to do more tar 
sports, especiaDy at (he 
college level. 

"I want to develop a highly 
respected athletic program 
here. I want us to be the 
brat." McDonald said. 

As administration coor- 
dinatcr, McDonald said, she 
uould like to expand the 
athletic program by adding 
more sports. She said that 
she Kould like to start a 
women's Softball team at 
IPFW. 



-Iw 



10 give 



rathleli 



athletic pragran from 
NCAA DivisioD m to 
Division n and she v'ould 
like to accomplisb thai leaL 

ministration coordlnatar. 
McDonald Is also the new 
women's basketball cooch. 

"1 am verj- eiciled about 
coaching a girls ha^kettial] 

that will be a credit to IP- 
FW," McI>oaald said. 

McDonald said that she 
vtould like all interested girls 
trying out for baskelttall to 
make an appointment to see 
her and get lo know her 
McDonald's ofFice ts located 
in the athlellc ofrice. Room 
210 Of the Walb Memorial 



Weekend Bhowcases Fort Wayne Daisies 



TTie Brsl pracllce 
women's basketball 
dllionlngstartsOct. 15. 



'Run, Jane, Run" spectacular event 



ByRUSS 
ZOLUNGER 
flUirWrlUr 

"Run, Jane. Hun," a 
women-ln-sporta weekend at 
Tab Cum Wah Recreation 
Center last weekend, lumcd 
outtotieagpectacularevenl. 

Included among the ac< 
Uvllles were a 22-team. four- 
dlvlslon, Mflball tour- 
oamenl, a flve-Mlomcter 
nm, a volleyball tour- 
nament, and Ihc reunion of 
the Fort Wayne Daisies 
profeaslonal balcboU team, 
ZTyeanafter III demise. 

The purpose of the event, 
co^ponsofid by the Fort 
Wayno Women's Bureau and 
WMEE radio, was lo 
showcase women's a parts In 
Fort Wayne, while raising 
funda (or the bureau. 

The Ove-kllomelcT run on 
Simday morning had a total 
of n participonls, with 
priiea awarded to the lop 
three flnlshcra In Dve 
categories. A alight mix-up 



on the route, when the police 
car escorting Uie runners 
missed the loop at Taylor 
Street and Portage 
Boulevard, cut IJie distance 
by about one-fourth Dl a 
mile. The lead runner? failed 
lo rtcognlxe the mistake, 
and everyone else followed 

Kathy Kujawskj of South 
Bend was the first acmsathe 
Tinlsh line, with a time of 
IB:Z7:Z Alma 0)eda,Bgel2, 
came in second, only seven 
seconds behind Kujawski, 
even Ihough she had made a 
wrong turn near the finish 
Uml added loher distance. 

OJcda won the 19 ond 
under division, followed by 
Tracy Schaski, 13, ond 
Cassandra Shlrmcyer, IS, 

Kujawski was followed In 
the 20-^ divisim by Janet 
Young, 23, and MadeUnc 
Gulman,27. 

Bobbi Widmenn, 39, won 
the 30-39 division with a time 
of 19:40i6. wilh Ann 
Jamison, 37, taking second 



and Marsha Schmidt, 35, 
third 

Dede Benschneider. 41, 
look lop bomrs In the 4<M9 
group, finishing In 31:SZ:e. 
She was followed by Carolyn 
Horn, 41, and Julia WUson, 

Jean Longsworlh captured 
the SO and over division 
with her time of Z4:56 9 
Phyllis Grieger, M. and 
Jeonnine DlFilippo, 52, look 
second and Ihird places 
reapectii-ely. Evelyn Shaw, 
t5, won the award for being 
the oldest runner. 

The volleyball touroamenl 
was won by Belter Sellers, 
10-15, 15-12, 15-9; and 15-11, 

15*, over A i I in thedouhle- 
elimiaotlon finals. The 
Better Scttera were upset by 
a group of media per- 
sonalilles, B-15, 15-7, lS-9 
Playing for the media team 
were Lit Berry. Barb Watch- 
man, Elizabeth Kay, Julio 
Lockhan. Marty Wright, 
Sylvia Smilh, Corrlne 



Maur 

Shaughoessy, Elizabeth 
Nolan. Kim Curtis and 
Siaron Gator. 

Division A of the double- 
elimination Softball lour- 
namcnt was won by A * I, S- 
4, over Giovanni's, after 
Giovanni's had beaten A& 1. 
7-fl,forAJtrsnrsllcs3. 

Division was captured by 
Denver Merchants with a S'l 
victory over Imperial 
Trophies in the final. 
" Division C found The 
Vanneltes coming from the 
losers' bracket (o defeat 
Colonial Pizui twice, 12-1 
and9-2. 

Divtsion D honors went lo 
Denny's VIP, as they came 
from the losers' bracket to 
upset Pizza Hut, 13-12, in 
eighl Innings, and 13-5 in the 
lens I on -pa eked finals , 

Then came the highlight of 
the festivities, as 15 former 
members of Ihe Fort Waj-ne 
Daisies squared off against 
the Daisies Juniors The 



three-Inning game turned 
out to be a comedy oferrors, 
OS each sldehad iisproblcms 
getting into the swing of 
Uilngs. At one point. Jeanne 
Grclssinger Harding of Ihe 
Daisies hit a clean triple Into 
the gap. When she arrived at 
third base, she found her 
coach had brought out a huge 
bolUe of "whiskey" lo revive 

There was no doubt that 
the Daisies would win the 
game, as the scorekceper 
chalked up three runs for 
each time Ihe Daisies 
scored. The large crowd on 
hand didn't seem lo mind, 
though at one point, il looked 
like the Daisies might win 
lance. Tlie 






IS 21-8. 



*kend lunied out lo 
be quite successful, as 
piellminary figures show 
the Fort Wayne Women's 
Bureau raising over t7,DD0, 
wilh more due in from 
pledges from the run. 



Sociology Department offers internship program 



The aoclology departmBit 
Bl IPFW offers students a 
chance lo broaden Uielr 
understanding of sociology 
through partldpalion in the 
behavioral science In- 
lemshlp program nnd Is 
designed lo give students a 
working knowledge of 
classroom theories, said 
Fane Hein, Inlcm coor- 
dinator. 

Kein explained thai 
Bludenli Involved In Ihe 
program w-ork at a social 
work agency (or ap- 
proximBlcly Qve lo six houra 
a week, under the direction 
of a professional eupcrvisor. 
The Mental Health Center, 
Ibe Fort Wayne State 



Hospital, Catholic Charities, 
end Ihe Fort Woyno Ckim- 
munlty Schools are ]uat 
some of the participating 

Heln explained that 
students may work In an 
administrative capadly or 
directly wilh clients. For 
instance, an intern working 
at Ihe welfare department 
may be Involved in research 
and needs assessment, while 
another Intern may work 
with a group of handicapped 
children, helping them lo 
Improve their self-concept. 

"Tlie Internship pn^am 
was tieRun 10 years ago In 
response lo s growing 
demand (or communlly 
involvement among IPFW 
students, Hein said. Today 



the pn^am Is sllll 
cemed with community 
outreach. One of the goals of 
the internship program is to 
establish a posilivE working 
relalionship between the 
university and the com- 
munity. Hein said 
"Univcraltiea used to be 
remote from the com- 
munity," she said. "We 
wanted to change Ihat." 

Moat of the students 
participating in the In- 
ternship program are 
Eodolo^ majors, said Hein, 
but special education, 

psychology and political 
science sludenls have also 
participated. 

One of the benefits of the 
Internship program, Hein 



work 



when they graduate. Alison 
Crosby, a sociology major 
participating in the 
program, agrees "I've 

where I could use my ma)or 
before." Crosby said. '"Hie 
expcnence has given me all 



Heln also added thai the 
program gives participants 
practical experience that 
may later help Ihem gel a 
job. "90 percent of tte inlem 
students who don't go on to 
graduate school get o job 
directly or indirectly 
ishlp 






>ugh 



."Heinsa 



Arvoida Sell, an inlem c 
the NorOi West 

Bloomingdalc Neighbors 
Serv'ice, echoed Heln's 

liclpattng in the internship 
program because I'd like as 
many referrals as possible 
when I graduate." Sell said. 



The sociology internship 
program services about lO 
students a semester, Heln 
said. The inlemshlp can be 
taken a lotal of three times. 
Heln estimaled that over the 
10 year period of Ihe 
program's existence nearly 
1,000 sludenls have par- 
ticipated. 



Letter to editor asks "Why?' 



m 



To the editor: 

(Concerning the editorial) 
In The Communicator, Sept. 
24, Opinion "Where is it?". If 
this article is taken on face 
value and the Senate is not 
legally elected, then one may 
be Inclined lo think that the 
activity funds that were 
collected are nol also Illegal. 
If this la true, why was I and 
Uie rest of the student body 
forced to pay Ibem' 



rights?) 

questions. 

Why I 

money b 



This U 



is tobi 



criminal matter that should 
be Investigated by the 
campus as well as the Police 
Department of Fort Wayne. 
(Where is 



I have my 
k with "interest" 
. be compensated 
tor my money by some 
student activities' This does 
not mean Insulting my In- 
telligence with clDwie 
walking around the school or 
120 u-orth of looking at the 
Har^'est Queen. 

SI ephenA. Strauss 111 
P S. I am not knowledgeable 
in why newspaper exists, 
always believed that 



they li 



bligatioo 



? Where 






COMMUNICATOR 
CLASSIREDS 

50^ 



Police provide protection, services 



By BECKV DORRILL 

Start Writer 

The major function of 
the IPFW University 
Police and Safety 
department is campus 
protection, said Maurice 
Shady, chief of the 
campus police, but it 
offers many other ser- 
vices to the school also 

The department helps 
during emergencies, 
proi'ldes escort services, 
unlocks cars for those 
who have left keys In 
them, enforces parking 
regulations and runs a 
tost-and-f ound s e rvi ce 

The Univenily Police 
and Safely department 
consists of six foUce 
officers, two student 
patrol officers, a 



secretary, a clerk and 
three student workera 
that manage the officeon 
weekends. 

Shady said Ihe moat 
important thing for the 
university community lo 
know is Ihat Ihe 
university police officers 

graduates of the Indiana 
Law Enfarcemenl 
Academy. 

They aren't merely 
security officers, such as 
a shopping mall might 
employ. Shady said. They 

enlorcemenl equal lo 
those of any state, county 
orclty officers. 
Shady said, however. 



becaise the campus 
police ore unauthorized (o 
moke arrests. 



"1 



that 



students know this about 
tE, they feel much more 
secure,"Shadysaid. 

The campus police are 
very suict about en- 
forcing parking 
regulations, he said, 
because "the students 
may not know 11, but we 
enforce parking rules as a 
protection tothesludcnts. 
If everyone parked where 
he or she wanted, by the 
day's end the students 
that had parked legally 
would be pinned in." 



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PACE 8 - THE COMMUNICATOR - OCTOBER 1. 1381 

v%tport» 




Record falls to 4-3 



Tuskers lose twice 



By MIKE B 

A dejfcled Ed 

Stelankiewici kntli on cue 
knee otl to tlie side of Uie 
IPFW soccer field, wod- 
denngoul loud whal had jmt 
happened to his team, snd 
wh}- ihey had jusl losl Ibeir 
ihird straight game. Ihi5 
arm to Grand HapiA 
Baptist. 2-1. Sept. X The 
Tuskers also lost to Ghlo 
Northern, 2-0. on SepL 21 

Aller starting the season 
Hith [our uins in a nrw by 
scores of 6-0, Ml. 10-1 aod 6-1. 
the Tuskers have found 11 
dJincult to riDd the net In 
Ihdr last three gamia, they 
■"" " only managed to pul 



ie shot in 



legoal. 



rC Bri»k> loiet hli footing >i he attempti to heal bis Grand 
' li wai paiied by one or Brook's teamtnales. Grand Rapids 



■I don^l 
I've tried everything," the 
coach said. "Before, our 
passing *as there. Sure ue 
played rotten learns, but I 
thought it u'ould continue 
when we started playing 



Saturday when they hosted 
Grand Rapds, tnit nather 
vm tlie brtaka. Gr«nd 
Rapids opened the scoring 
early in the game when the 
ball, deep in TUsker 
lerrilory. deflected off the 
foot of a TXisker fullback and 
onto the fool ol Grand 
Rapids' Greg Schenk 
Tusker goalie Mark Blessing 
<fdn'( bave a p^>'er as 
Scbeok bil it higti mio the 
upper comer of the net at the 

The first half conunued 
with both teams finding the 
going tough on Ihc hard. dr>' 
Field. "There was no mid- 
field play," Ihe coach said 
"II was aD transition." Tlie 



The second half went much 
ihc same as the fir^t. wllh 
neither team nble to mount 



TTic passing w 



t Ibere changed late 



wtieD Grand Rapids u-u 
awarded a penalty shot 
becaise of a TUsker vlcdation 
liDlde the penalty aros. 

The sbol. token from II 
meters out. Is ntmost atwi)'« 
a sure goal, as the shooter 
only has to shool by Ihe 
goalie There U no defense to 
worry about, and Ihe shooter 
has only to hope the goalie 
will guess wroi^. T^e goalie 
IS not allowed lo move until 
the ball is shot, and he has to 
guess cm-ectly 

On Ihls occasion, Blessing 
guessed right, as he dove to 
b:s left side and knocked Ihe 
ball to Ihe side A goal mouth 
siramble followed, and 
Blessing was able to control 
the ball. He punted II high 
into Ihe wind The wad- 
assisted kick landed oo Ihe 
foot of Tusker striker 
Mladen Kral], KralJ carried 
the ball In. pul a dcko on a 
Grand Rapids defender, and 
scored his eighth goal of Ibe 
season, tying Ihe game at 
one. with seven minutes lefl 



tnlbe match. 

Ttie tie didn't Usi hng. 
hoa-ever, as on Grand 
Rapids* oeii trip down Held. 
a Tusker player was knocked 
lo the ground, and 1PF\V was 
called for pushing. This gave 
Grand Rapids ■ direct free 

Grand Rapidi dliki't wtsto 
Ihe golden opportunity, ai 
Ihe Tusker faithfuls looked 
on in disbelief Dan Sootn 
lifted Ihc ball over a wtU of 
Tusker defenders and by 
Blessing to give Grand 
Rapids its margin of victory 

left in Ihc coolest 

Tuskers traveled to Ohio 
Norlhcm where Ihe home 
team shut-out Ihe TUsken. 3- 

Tho Tuskers are currenlly 
involved In a four game road 
trip. They travel lo North 
Park College on Soturdoy on 
Ocl. 3. and then piny croas- 
10U11 rival St. Francis. 
IMcsday.Od.e. 



Spikers win^ place 5th in contest 



ByMIKEFTtANKE 
The IPFW women's 
volleyball leam completed n 
busy weed ol competition as 
Ihcy ilefcalcd Huntington 
College in a home match on 
Sept. 22 and Ucd for nflh 
place in Uic Sainl Mary's 
Invltallunal Tournament In 
South Bend Sept. 25. 

On Sepl £1 against Hunt- 
inglon College, Ihe IPFW 
women wurc vlclorlnus in a 
four gome match, lS-10, IS- 
IS, 15-S, 1^6. The second 
game hod IPFW ahead is-a, 
at one point, but the iquad 
faltered and went on to lose. 
Game three had Coach 



busting 
out lo a 10-3 lead. Ihcn 
coasting to the IS-S winning 
advantage. The finale was 
similar ns IPFW coasted loa 
victory In Ihe match. 

Senior Kim Heknonn led 
Ihclcam In ser^'ing aces with 
six. Sophomores Jo EUen 
Witte and Amy Brunow had 
IT kills between them. 

Coach Amle Ball saw 

coming from the evening's 
activities. Ball said, "These 
kids are beginning lo believe 
they can do what they want. 
Medioaily had been evident 
for a while, now they are 



Coach Ball continues to be 
happy with the team's 
overall effort, and not Just 
because his squad won. He 
said, ' 



still in- 



becaiae we're not giving ell 
of ourselves during Ihe 

Tlie team then loaded up 
school vehicles early 
Saturday morning, Sepl. 2S 
and drove lo South Bend for 
the Saint Mary's 

[nvltatlonal. Sbt teams 
participated In the tour- 
nament. Those schools were : 



Sainl Mary's. Hillsdale 
College, Lake Michigan 
College, Notre Dame, 
Southeastern Michigan and 
IPFW 

tPFW didn't fair as well OS 
Coach Ball had hoped, as his 
leam rmishedin a lie for fiflh 
in the overall standings. 
Saint Mary's took Iwo games 
from IPFW 15-5, IW. 

The spikers splil with Lake 
Michigan College, 15-13, 2-15 
Hillsdale College swept two 
games from IPFW. i5-3, i5-3. 
Coach Ball described 
Saturday's action ss "very 
disappointing." 

TWO injuries occurred on 



Uie road trip toSainl Mary's 
Janet Braun suffered a badly 
sprained ankle, and Lorl 
Gray came back to Fori 
Wayne with a broken nose, 
complimenis of a collision 
with a teammate. 

The women play a home 
match tonight against 
Anderson Colli^ge at the 
Concordia Seminary gym, 
starting at 6:30. Weekend 
action has the team out of 
town both Oct. 2 and Oct. 3. 
tliday's opponent Is Saint 
Mary's again, and Saturday 
the leam travels east (or the 
Ohio Northern tnvilallonal. 



Workman to manage new gym 



By JIM niAPMAN 
Sports Ed liar 
Many IPFWstudcnis know 
Ken Workman as Ihe men's 
baskelboll coach, bul Ihls 
year, he will also be the 
facility manager of the new 
Alhlelic Ceeler. according to 
David Skelton, alhlcUc 

Workmon's duties will 
includedirccling the Athletic 
Center's funellons of 
scheduling atKl ulllizatlon, 
providing sccurily and 
control of Uic building, 
selling up equipment, and 
supervising Ihe personnel 
related lo Hie issuing of 



Ft. Woyno Blood 
Plasnia Donor Center 

HOUIS 



$CASH PAIDS 

f 91 Blood Fiumi 

Donitions 



The Athletic Center, when 
rijially completed, will seat 
l;p to 2,500 people. It will 
contain basketball and 
volleyball courts, a nine-lap 
track, fire racquetball and 
handball courts, loose weight 
equipment, weight machines 
and areas (or dancing 
exercises and gymnastics. 
The building will also have 
on ortUiciill floor covering 
that con be used as a lennls 
court. Workman said, 

"The biggest challenge of 
my job will be to make sure 
thai everything is puperly 

cverybo^'s needs," Work- 
As facltily manager. 
Workman has many goals in 
mind. Among them Is the 
goal of "bcller serving the 
students and staff (or 
alhlelic related activities," 
he said 

Workman's biggest hurdle 
as Ihe Athletic Cmter 
manager Is plain, bul not so 
5imple - to gel Ihe building 
open for use. At Ihls lime, he 
is hoping lo have the building 
open by Ihe end of Oclober. 

The firsl public event 
planned lor Die Athletic 
Center is a basketball game 
belweon Ihe IPFW" men's 
basketball leam and a team 
of louring English nationals. 
The game is scheduled for 
Nov 17 

According to Workman, 
the crew installing the 
bleachers in Ihe building has 
promised only half the full 
number of bleachers lo be 



. IT. Because of 
this reason, a maximum of 
1,2S0 people wUI be able lo 
see Ihe game. 

If more than 1,250 tickets 
are sold. Workman said, the 
game will have to be moved 
to another place— either Ihc 
Concordia Seminary gym. 
where Uie Tuskers used lo 
play, or the coliseum. 

"I am crossing my fingers 
that we will have the place 
opened In lime lor the game. 
We would hope that iheylthe 
bleacher crew) could find 
some addldonal help to 
improve that situation." 
Workman said. 

Despite the possltJe delay 
of the opening ol Uie Athletic 
Center, Workman is nol 
"We have 
_ hutitwillslill 
be worth the wait and the 
delay ol events to gel 
everything right. 

Workman said he has an 
a d eijuat e num ber of ja ni tors , 
supervisors and work-study 
students lo help nui the 
building when it opois, bul 
be also said more part-bme 
openings for this type of 
work will probably become 
available as the j-ear goes 
by. Workman said he needed 
more time lo decide on the 
type of Jobs thai will take 
care of Ihe builtiing's par- 
ticular needs. 

When the building is 
completed, all IPFW iridoa- 
sporting aclivillcs. Including 
the Indoor sports events of 
the Intramural program, will 
take place there. Workman 
said 
Workman also mentioned 



the possibility o( an indoor 
lennls clinic lo be held 
sometime during the year 
and the possibility of a fit- 
ness center "We have 

developing an adult fitness 
center where people can 
select acUvitios that will fii 
their fitness siluation." 
Workman said. 

He added that the fitniss 
center and the indoor tennis 
dlnlc ideas were only 
discussed, nol planned. 

Workman said the use of 



the Athletic Center for other 
university related evenla 
would be discussed if other 
groups and organisations 
inquired about scheduling 
use of Ihe building. 

The day will come when 
Uie Athletic Center will open, 
but Workman and the 
alhlelic department can 
hardly wail till it docs. 'This 
building will make us (IP- 



Women's tennis team loses, 
men's team wins 1, loses 1 

By MIKE FRANKE 
Staff Wrtler 

IPFWs women's and men's tennis teams had matches kst week, as Ihclr seasota 
drawtoBclose. Tiewomenlost lo Manchester on Sept. 14, 4-1. Tlic men's team split two 
matches with SI. Francis on Sept. Z5and 26. 

Tlie women nellers lost all four singles matches, bul managed to salvage the two 
doubles matches. 

Manchester's Babbe Spider beat Roxanne Wearly, 6-2, fr3. Tlie second match saw 
Manchester's Ann Wiley defeat Deb T\micr ol IPFW, a-3, 7-5. The TXiskcr's Natalie Ellis 
losl to Cellna Crump, 7-6,6-3 The singles Tinale saw IPnv'sLolsSchmldlgoitown to aS- 
0, 6-1. defeat to Manchester's Ericka Colburn, 

In doubles action. Roxanne Wearly and Deb TUmerblanked Manchester's Tracy Pric* 
and Wendy Hlllcgoss, (Hi, The second doubles malch saw Natalie Ellis and Lois Schmidt 
topple Tonya Blakely and Christine Rhodes of Manchester, B-J. 

The women havelwo matches left, Ihe neil will be on Saturday atGoshcn College. 

The men's team finished Iheir fall schedule tasi weekend wilha home and away malch 
against Saint Francis St Francis defeated IPFW Sepl. 2S.S-I, at St. Francis. The tablet 
tumedSepl.26as IPFW defeated SI, Frands.S-l. 

The opening singles malch on Saturday saw the Tusker's Joe Scloll defeat Mark 
Gennano, 6-2. 6-1. IPFW's Holden Maecker, lost lo Ted Omass, 6-2, B-1. Tusker oeller 
John Megland beal Scoll Grlllllh6-3, 7-5. 

In the fourth singles malch, IPF'W's Joe Altmeyer beat Jim Zem, 4-e. 7-6, 0-3. Paul 
Grider of the Tuskers toppled Andy McDonough, 6-1,6-1 In the lost singles match, Bnico 
Ojedn of IPFW defeated flay Fruils of St. Fronds, 6-t, M, 

Scloli onii Maecker of IPFW brccied pasl Ormano and Omasa of Saint Francis, 6-3, 0' 
In doubles competition Theolher twodoublcs matches were lost to the rain, 



Runners finish 11th out of 12 



FWl 



sotUe 



vehicle as an institution. We 
e able to do so much 
" Workman concluded 




By JIM CHAPMAN 

The IPFW cross counlry 
leam rinlshcd lltb out of 12 
teams at the Marlon 
lnvllalional.Sept.2S. 

Taylor University won Ihe 
event with 53 points; Man- 
chester had 69; Anderson 
College, 89; Bellermine 
College ol Kentucky, 98; 
Wabash College. 106; ^ring 
Arbor College of Micl^gan, 
IBS, Goshen, 190; Hanover 
College, 241; Marion College, 
287, Cedarville College ol 
Ohio, 287; IPFW, 306; Grace, 

The best individual lime ol 

McGuire 



i tOlh V 
lime of 27;07. Sieve Hont- 
man finished wllh a time of 
27:31; Mark Hemdon, 27:J7; 
Steve Leffer^, 28:32; Ron 
Brinker, 28:49; David Puff, 
30:14; Kirk Klein, 31:16 and 
Gary Beam, 32:14 Jeanne 
Myers finished Il2th out of 
approximately 124 runners. 

IPFW coach John Endsley 
said be knows that his team 
Is trying, bul Ihdr Inex- 
perience as a new cress 
country team Is hurting 
Ihem. "We could have been 
in it if we had a Utile better 



pcrfonnance from our 
runners. They know they CAn 
do better. They're learning, 
bul each lime they team a 
lillle late," Endsley sold. 

Endsley pointed out thai 
the evidence thai proves his 
team la trying lies In Uielr 
logelherness. "They're 
really tight. They work 
together really well even 
though they've known each 
other (or a very short period 
of time. They're a good 
bunch of kliU," Endsley 
said. 

The running T\iskcn will 
hosi St. Fronds al Shoaf 
Park 012:30 p.m. on Ocl-1. 



Speak 



Alhlelic director David 
Skdion has announced that 
NBC college basketball 
commenlalor At McGuIre 
will make a presenLalim al 
[PFWonNov. 17 






ri Uie 



Ken Workman, who li known to many ii IPFW's men's 
basketball coach, wtli become the manager ol ihe new 
Athletic CenlerupoDCompIellon of the building. (Pfaoloby 
OeanRosi) 



IPFW campus where 
McGuire will speak and Ihe 
exact time of his presen- 
tation have not been 
detcrlned yet, Skelton said. 




WORLD FAMOUS 



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