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Full text of "The Communicator"

Tlic 



Comntuiiicator 



Volume XIII Issue 9 



Indiana University-Purdue University at Ft. Wayne 



Thursday. October 15. 1981 



Station moves, 
needs funding 



First Indians, now this 



y CAROLINA 

nOGERS WII.BBR 

STAFF WRITER 

Local PurdiK and Public Broad- 
coBlIng of Northern Indiana officials 
agreed last week <o allow atallonWIPU 
lo sloy in lis presenl campus localion 
until May I or until 60 days after it 
becomes station PBNl, George Wendt, 
WIPU's sUUon manager, said. 

Wcndl. who will stay on with the 
stotlon after the transfer, also said Ulc 
agree menl has been officially approved 
by the PBNl board and Is now on its 
way lo Purdue's Board of Trusteea for 
formal approval 

According lo terms of iheagrecmcnl, 
PBNE will be allowed lo lease the 
transmitter and related non -academic 
equipment at a cost of one dollar for a 
one-ye^r period afler the station Is 
movcdoff -campus. 

Unless a clear-sight shot between the 
new slatton site and the transmltlcr on 
campus can be found, tho transmitter 
will be HiAcd for B lo ten months lo the 
newlocatioo by a ground line 

PBM President Rocco Navarro 
outlined two fund-raising efforts being 
staged tot>enelll the slation. 

Tlie firs I effort involves ap- 
proximotely t25,MKI lo (27,000 raised 
since Aug. IT through (he station's 
public 



ginning Oct- 16 at ID a.m. the staUon 
will condud a lo-day fund raiseron the 
air Mayor Winfield Moses will read a 
proela motion hve on the air. 

The station is already enlising other 
community leader? to give on-the-alr 
appeate for funds. The goal for the 10- 
day campaign is (50,000. 

Meanwhile, volunteer? will be 
manning station phones during the 
campaign. Marilyn Burnworth. the 
committee co^;hairman of Ihe volun- 
teers, will be assisted by Pauline 
Hunsberger and Rachael Varat, two 
membersofthe Board of Trus lees. 

The second of the fund raising efforts 
will be undertaken by PBM Board 
member? Ihrough the business com- 
munity to establish capital funds. 

In addition, station PBNI plans to 
apply for grant monies to the federal 
government's National Telecommuni- 
cations and Information Ad- 
ministration, which has funds 
available to public broadcast stations. 
This grant is awarded to match any 
grants by private business or industrj' 
to the station, with matching funds 
available up to a maximum of Ihrce 
doliaratoeachonedollar, 

Navarro said they hope to roach their 
overall goal of S100,ooo to support Ihe 
station's budget for one year. 




Falling may seem simple but these 
students will have to land from quite 
a distance before this day is through. 
(Photo by Cheryl Myers) 



Guests canh speak 

ByCIIKHVI.GinsON decided a timellmlt would facilitate the after that is i 



KHVI.GinSON 
Staff n 

Twenty- four guests attended the 
Student Senate meeting Oct. T. It was, 
as one senator described "a more than 
average crowd," but if the crowd came 
lo be heard, it was disappointed. 

Many of the guests came In response 
lo a week-long "come and see for 
yourscir' camfiaign put on by mem- 
bers, as well as opponents of the ScnBtc, 
Nevertheless, Good of the Order, the 
lime for both setia tors and guests lo air 
their \Hews, was slated at Ihe end of the 
agenda and began with only five 
minutes of the regular meeting left. 

The meeting's SO minulc lime limit 
ran out after only Hve of Ihe senators 
had commented: none of the guests had 
been given the opportunity to speak. 

"Plenty of people I know went to that 
mceling lo speak in favor of the Senate. 
It upset me that no one was heard, 
cither pro or ran," said Wendy Welch, 
one of the author? of the petition to 
Impeach student body president Ken 
Sciienk, and a guest at the meeting. 

Up until two meetings prior lo this 
one, Ihcre was no time limit on the 
meetings. But in order lo encourage 
verbose members to 



lethc 

suspend this rule takes a 
tw.-0-thirds majority vote of the Senate; 
although the motion was made twice 
during Ihe meeting 11 was voted down. 
This was Ihe first time a suspension 
was not passed since the lime limit was 
impteed. "It was the lir?l time Ihe 
meeting ended on time." added Suzy 
Scare, a student senator. 

"Ellen (Englemanl made a mislahei 
an agreement was made before ihe 
meeting lin an executive session 
composed of Senate committee 
chairpeopic) that the Good of Ihe Order 
would be after adjournment," said Ken 
Schenk, student body president. 

Engleman. the sludenl body vice 
president and presiding officer of the 
Senate meetings said. "Since Good of 
Ihe Order is on agenda item, I didn't 
Ihlnk that we could have it after the 
meting. I Inter checked this with Jeff 
Sandy (Senate pariimcnlarianl and he 
agreed. This point was brought out in 
theexecutlvesession." 



Dl olUciol and does nt 



:olel 



Engleman bangs her gavel (t 




Engleman added. "I think that it is a 
slinking shame that Ihe students didn't 
gel to speak at the meeting, but I didn't 
slop the meeting — standing rules 
stopped the meeting. 1 cannot extend 
the meeting, and the senators voted two 
limes not to extend the meeUng. 

"I hate to think the meeting was 
ended as some kind of strategy play, in 
order not to hear the students' com- 

"The first time we voted not lo 
suspend Ihe rules it was early in the 
meeting and I didn't feel that we would 
need the time." said Holden Maecker, 
student senator. "The second lime, I 
felt that we had finished business and 
were ready lo close." 

Tom Harris, another senator added. 
"1 was tmaware thai the audience had a 
presentation and there was no con- 
spiracy on the part of the senators." 

"It was unfortunate that Ihe rules 
were not suspended, because the 
senators didn't speak, the students 
didn't speak, and Dean Uhncr didn't 
speak." said Steve Westrick. student 
senator. "Perhaps we were unfair, but 
we had to draw theline somewhere." 
IContlnocdonpagel) 

T.V. news at IPFW 




In Brief,,, 



Clerk job, government §eats open 

Ken Schenk, student body president. Is seeJdog a clerk to the Student Senale 
and has announced two open seats in the Senate andone vacancy inSUBtx;. 

The Scnalc clerk keeps minutes of the group's meetings, maintains Senale 
files and assists in researching proposed Senale bills. The clerk need not be a 
membcrollbe Senale. Schenk said 

Persons interested in the clerk positimi should call Schenk at the Students' 
GovemmentofTLceandleaveaplkine number whereheorshecan be reached. 

Students wanting to be on the Senale or SUBOC are asked lo visit ihe 
Studmts' Government office. Suite 225, Walb Memorial Union for more in- 
firmation 

Music Therapy Club sells marushkas 

Tired of locWng at that blank lirtng room wall? WeD. now is your chance to 
buy a marushkatohangonil. 

The Music Therapy Club is selling marushkas — hand screened prints of 
nature scenes that come in a variety of shapes and siles. CliA President LeAnn 
Krach said the club hopes to raise enough money through its marushka sate for 
funds toallend the national convention formusic therapy Nov. l. 

Anyone intertsled in tuying one of the prints, now on display in the glass case 
ol Neff Hall's main lobb.v. should contact the music department offices in Neff 
130. Depending on pubhc response, Ihe sale wili be continued Inderinitely. 

Homeeoniing dance coming Friday 

SUBOG is sponsonng a "Homecoming Dance" at S p.m. FYiday. Ocl. 16 at 
Goegleins' Dance Hall. All activity card holders admitted free; a (1.50 ad- 
mission charged to all others. No Jeans [dease. 



By WAYNE STEFFEN 
Managing Edilor 

All the momentous events which lake 
place daily at IPFW will soon be sub- 
ject matter of a weekly news program 
produced by Young People in Broad- 
casting. 

The program, "Campus Scene" will 
be entirely wrillen, reported, and 
edited by students and will appear on 
Fort Waj-ne Cablevision Channel 23, a 
channel accessible to all city college 
campuses. 

ScotI Kuhn is the vice president of 
YPBC and its neu,s coordinator. "We 
want lo present campus events in a way 
that is interesting to the community," 
Kuhn said, while talking with TTie 
Communicator in the combination 
office and editing room located in Ihe 
basement of the Heimke Library. 

Forty people currently are Involved 
m yPBC, Kuhn said. "We have a good 
nucleus of interested people that we feel 
«t1! slick around- Of these, I think 20 
arc involved with Ihenews." 



"In this kind of journalism 




hear the news once ond that' 


it. We 


have lo gel peoples attention . 




the (acts clearly and simply 


■ Kuhn 


said. 




There are limits as well. "Television 


is a headline service. Eventually I 


would like lo get into more 




reporting, but that is a very 


liffieult 




■e don't 


have the skill to do that. Bui 




developing, and may be able 




somelhmg like that next sen 


ester." 



Kuhn 


".ill need Ihem 


too because of 


the varied skills needed 




compar- 


I i rely simple n 


e«-scasl. "Our 




three camera 


people. 


ine floor manager, probably 












echnician and 




person. Of co 






3Ur staff doub 




Kuhnsa 


d 




The equipment used 




pressiv-e 


YPBC has IWB Sony 



a portable lifting and 
sound system that can be operated 
either by battery or through a regular 
electrical outlet. "We try to ke«p tlie 
equipment out a lot, lo build up our 
prcsmcconcampiE." Kuhn said 

The mobile equipment is valued at 
about 16,000. -The equipment we hare 

have It because it is perfect to train our 
people. The latest equipment would 
cost usaboul (15-120,000" Kuhn said. 

The training aspect of the news 
program is very important. ' 'We want 



Kuhn: 

Once the news is brought in by the 
mobile crews, it goes down the hall 
from the editing room lo the television 
studio — two rooms that look like Darth 
Vadcr?' gameroom. 

Kuhn was unsure of the price tag to 
tie attached to the sludio equipment, 
but thought it might be as high as 
(200,000. Six television cameras, a 
sound and light board, and several 
monitor? were packed into the sound- 
proofed rooms. 

As we sat in the control room, Kidm 
agreed with this slightly wi(te-eyed 
reporter that the power imphed in all 
this gadgelry was quite seductlre. "We 
can go IbetheUlC (Learning Resource 
Center) and run a tape through any 

television. Our cable access reaJIy has 
been a blessing, "Kuhn said. 

YTBC would like U) expand its 
coverage to all colleges in Fort Wayne, 
"We don't really know what the other 
campuses have. St. Francis has some 
equipment, biA we're going lo have lo 
send out feelers lo the others and 
perhaps hare live reports coming In 
during our newscasts," he continued. 
( Continued on page 51 



Frat jumps 



By CHERYL MYERS 
Staff Writer 

In September, faced with the problem 
of what to do for nn encore following 
their convincing portrayal of Indians at 
an Old Fori skirmish in July, John 
Hoham and Don Gutfey convinced the 
other members of Sigma Phi Epsilon 
that an appropriate follow-up would be 
to jump out of an airplane. TTiemselv^s 
e:q«rienced jumpera, they were soon 
signing up members for Ihe four-hour 
parachute-jumping cour?e offered at 
Para Sport, in Tocsm, Indiana. 

Para Spori specialises in Ihe 
recreational aspects of skydiving. A 
small organization consisting of tv.v 
single-engine planes, as many pilots, 
and Tive or six instructors and jump 
masters, this group nex'crthelcsa is sn 
accredited jump school. Para Sport 
takes great pains lo insure the safety of 
its students, requiring aspiring jum- 
pers to attend a lengthy lecture, work in 
a paracjiute hamess-slmulalor, and 
practice PLF's (parachute landing 
falls) sweral lima before actually 
going up. 

Tie firsl jump land Ihe next five or 
ten. depending on the student's 
progress) la a static-line jump. In which 
Ihe chute Is opened automatically about 
six seconds after leaving the plane. The 
student Is in the air between three and 
five minutes before landing and is in 
contact, via a chest radio, with the 
ground crewdurlng Ihe en tire fall. 

An employe* of Para Sport, Jennie 
Bonbrake, said the worst Injuries 
usually seen are twisted or sprained 
ankles from failure to land pixipcrly. In 
her opinion, skydiving is no more 
dangerous than snow or water skiing. 
As for parachute malfunctions, Jump 
master Lance Anderson pointed out 
there Is a reserve chute m every pack 
which is seldom needed. 

"But when they are needed," added 
instructor Fred Schlmmel, "you'll 
think it's the most beautiful chute 
you've ever seen In your life." He went 
on lo say he's only used Ihe reserve 

On Ihe Saturday morning of the 
Sigma Phi Epsilon jump, three active 
members, two pledges, and two friends 
arrived at Para Sport to begin their 
Irainhig. Of Ihe seven, only pledge 
Charlie-Heili had any previous jumping 
experience and that was from his Army 
days. TTie other six — Steve Souers, 
Samlh Abouhalkah, Brent Adams, Joe 



Mothcrun^lt. \'ema Arnold and Stacey 
Sipcs — hadnever jumped before. 

Nevertheless. all successfully 
cumplcted their training before gelling 
out 11 tied In jumpsuits, helmets, 
goggles, chutes, and chest radios. 

Then line action Ijcgan. The pdot, 
Paul Ojchran. sal them three at a time 
on the floor of a compartmeDl about the 
site of the interior of an economy car. 
The jump master then ins true ted the 
first sludenl lo sit next to the hatch as 
he hooked up the line that triggered the 

Next, the pilot cut the engine and 
started to glide TTic hatch was opened 
tor the jumper to crawl out onto a bar 
beneath the wing, amid 60-mlIe-an-hour 
winds. At the jump master's signal, the 
student was to let go and begin his six- 
second free-fall, making sure to keep 
his back arched to avirid tumbling head 
over heels. 

All the participants jumped suc- 
ccs.sfully, and though admitting some 
nervoiBness before Ihe flight, all spolic 
well of the experience, 

"I like It," said Abouhalkah, "but the 
challenge Isklndoforer Tlie first jump 
is whether or not you can make your^f 
do it. From now on, it will be gaining 
skill to become better." 

Stacey SI pes was surprised by Ihe 
forceof the nind "\Vhen I got out there, 
it just dragged me away," he said. "I 
didn'l have time lo arch my back, so I 
had trouble getting balanced until the 
parachuteopened." 

"And you just have to w-onder, 'Is it 
going to open?', no matter how safe 
you're convinced jumping Is," added 
Joe Motherwell. 

Many member? stayed around for a 
second jump, despite Ihe cold, dreary 
weather. 

The owners of Para Sport encourage 
any and all lo come out and give 
skydiving a Iry. stressing that it is not 
as forbidding and difficult as it may 
seem. And the cost, after completing 
the training program, ' 



might b 



and is 



probably more cidtlng. 

As for the members or Sigma Phi 
Epsllon, they're on to other projects. 
They are already planning another 



sounds a bit lame after jumping out of 
airplanes, oneshoiddprobably consider 
'Of Ihe fraternity members 



Campus 'Scene' here 



provide experience to help our people 
in Ihe media job market," Kuhn said. 

"People have to learn to write news 
in a professional manner," he said, 
"Most of ow viewers probably aren't 
directly involved with the university, so 
our reporters have got lo make things 




arly asmuch fun cleaning up as Ills jumping, 
oj neipirom hli friend, (Photoby Cheryl Myers i 

SUBOG activities 



By JODIE Z 

Staff Wrller 

The Student Union Board of 
Governors (SUBOGi, the social and 
cultural arm of Students' Government 
currently has two of its H seats vacant. 
Ken Schenk, student body president, 
announced last week. 

SUBOG. one ol two branches of IP- 
FW' s Students' Government, has thus 
far sponsored an Hawaiian luau. an 

"Fame." "The Jerk" and "Shampoo" 
this semester. Further planned fall 
aclMlirs include hayrides, the annual 
Halloween costume dance, skntmg 
parlies and lectures by Paula Nelson 
and Tlie Great fCreskin, 

In Ihe spring, the group will host 
Harbor Arbor Days, a week-long 
festival with various activities. 

Many SUBOG activities are bee lo 
actiilty card holders lACH), while 
others are discounted sufcstanlially to 
those wi th a clivi ty cards . 

"Most students don't know that their 
l.D. card is Iheir activity card," said 
Corina Pena, SUBOG member. The 
activity-I.D. cards are iSstribuled the 
first few weeks of each semester and 
show the photograph of the holder. 

All students enrolled In nine or more 
credit hours are assessed a (20 acli vity- 
alhlelic fee. Proof of payment of the fee 
entitles students to Ihe activily card. 

U a studcat has no activity card but 
has paid the fee, tie or she may presail 
the pink fee receipt at a SUBOG ac- 
tivity and receive the same discount or 
those with activity 



Of the (20 assessed fee, 13,S5 goes lo 
SUBOC, The rest of the fee Is 
distributed among other campus 
organizations, including the athletic 
department (19) Purdue- Indiana 
Theatre ISI. HI and Ihe IPFW day care 
center HI. 181. 

"We Iry It 



bee admission 



plan activities for all age 
Terry Schuster, one of 
Ihe group's co-chairpersons. The other 
chairperson, Craig Baumgartner, said 
activities are chosen on the basis of 
sludenl input to SUBOG members. 

Although SUBOC traditionally 
chooses its members during the spring 
Students' Ckivemment election, the 
groiq) uses a method known a) 
petiUoning to Tdl empty SUBOC scats. 
That is. a student musi present a 
petition signed by 30 stixlcnls who ap- 
prove his or her becoming a new 
member. 

Alter the petition Is presented, 
current SUBOG members check the 
petitioner's G.P.A. If it exceeds the 
rei^ired mimmum. Ihe seated mem- 
bers vote on the acceptaitce of lie 
petitioner as a member. 

Students wishing to serve on SUBOG 
can get petitions and other needed 
information about how to apply at the 
Students' Government office. Suite !as, 
Walb Ntemorial Union. 

Suggestions, questions or comments 
about SUBOG and its activities can be 
made there as well. The Com- 
municator, campus posters and 
pamphlets handed out by group 
members adrertise SUBOG events. 



PAGE 2 - THE COMMUNICATOR - OCTOBER 15. 1381 



Students talking; 
anyone listening? 



"The Scnale dug lis own grave by not 
Iblenrng lo the (iludenls. All or the 
posiljvc work Ihal we have done ia going 
lo be forgotlen now by Ihosc people thai 
did nol speak." said Ellen Engleman, 
student body vice-president, after lasi 
week's Senate meeting at which more 
than two dozen guests were denied 
speaking privileges when the Senate 
adjourned. 

The Communicalor couldn't agree 

For (he past few weeks, each time Ken 
Schenk and other members of iPFW's 
Students' Government were ashed why 
certain decisions had been made- 
Including the question of Ihc special 
dec lion decision— the main response 
has been thai no students had expressed 
themselves to members of that body in 
opposition to any of its decisions. 

As recently as last Tuesday. Schenk. 
student body president, was quoted as 
saying students should attend meetings 
of Ihe Senate and SUBOG and speak out 
on the Issues that concern them. 

Other Senate members, as well, have 
expressed the desire lo hear Ihe opinions 
of students and have urged allendnnce 
at Sonalc meetings. 

SUUOG members provided guests 
ample time to speak al their meeting 
Oct. 7. but. why. we ask, did the mem- 
bers of the Senate veto the motion made 
losuspcnd theSO-mlnute Senate meeting 
lime llmil? 

Do the senators believe that by 
keeping students' commenls out of of- 
Ficlal Senate minutes they can conlinue 
lo use the excuse that only a "couple of 
people" want the special election? 

Can Schenk still claim to be "willing lo 



hear both sides of the issue"? 

During the past week. Schenk has told 
The Communicator of plans lo create 
better communications with IPFW 
students. The plans include Students' 
Gnvernment informational forums, at 
which time the members o( that body 
will announce its plans and decisions, a 
Students' Government booth in Kelder 
Kali, to which students can go to give 
opinions, complaints and ideas; and a 
plan by which all students who want lo 
work on Senate matters can become 
executive assistants to Ihe group, with 
all senatorial rights exccpl Ihc rights to 
vole or Inlliate legislation. 

The Communicator Ihinks these plans 
are good ones and would, indeed, create 
bolter understanding between Students' 
Government members and Ihe students 
they represent. 

But, if last week's Senate meeting is 
an example of that body's desire lo 
communicate wilh students, we'll be 
surprised il new lines of communication 
are any more successful than the old. 

It's lime for Students' Government to 
reassess its priorities, especially if 
ending a Senate meeting on lime is more 
important than hearing what INVITED 
guests have come lo meetings to say 

It's not too late for the Senate to nil in 
its "grave" and get on a sound footing 
with Ihe students it represents. 

The Senate can do this by granting 
ALL who wish tospeak the lime in which 
to be heard— even if it means staying at 
a meeting longer than planned, or 
perhaps planning a longer meeting. 

Students want lo be heard, and we 
urge the Senate to listen 




ii^^m^ 



Tough row lo hoe 



Garden not impressive 



grocery bills, my husband 
and I attempted lo grow a 
garden thisyear. 
And like many others who 



byd 



anled 



grow il all 

iturally. too. No herbicides 
or pesticides for us. 

No folks, we were going lo 
live in harmony with nalure. 

Nalure. boivever, didn't 
cooperate. 

II must have rained every 
weekend in May — never- 
theless. It uas a happy day 
when we planted our very 
rirsl garden in late June 



day. We sa 
cdeh 



erroHs 



Kidd, Souder head alumni 



ByGRETCIIEMIOLODICK 

SlflirWrller 

Mark E, Souder and 
Barbara J. Kidd, prcsidenls 
of, rcspccltvcly, I U.'s and 
Purdue's local alumni 
assoclallons arc sU'lvtng toi 
provide ncUvilics for olumni ' 
andstudcnls this year. 

The IPFW Alumni 
Associallon lIPFWAAl 
holds board meetings 
regularly to spoi^sor such 
Frograms tor thealumniosB 
yearly bus trip lo an lU 
taolbull game al 

Bloominglon, Ihe annual 
Dickens Dinner, as ucll us 
the student leaders rcccp- 

pockcl calendar distributed 
lo lacully and students Is 
also glv^n rourlesy o( the 

gradualed from IPFW can 
belong lo Uie IPFW Alumni 
AssoclaLon. The lirsl year Is 
free and nller that the an- 
nual dues are S16 lor Indiana 
and 11(1 (or Purdue 
graduates 

The two alumni groups 
work Jointly on alumni ac- 

d programs. 
70 percent of the nearly 
n.OOH alumni reside In the 
greater Fori Wayne area. 

Souder, who holds IPFW 
business degree, is president 




DARBARAJ.KIDD 



ol Souder 's Furniture in 

of the Fort WajTie Rotary 
Club, Grabill and Greater 
Fori Wayne Chambers of 

L'ruises of Fort Wayne, 
Christians [or Polilicol 
AllcrnalivES, and the Mid- 
west Home Furnishings 
ilssociation, Souder recently 
toaulhored the book, 
"Country' Folks: The History 
of the Grabill-Lco-Cedarvillc 
Area," and completed a 
maslers degree at the 
University of Notre Dame. 

Kidd, a nursing graduate, 
is employed by C.J. 
McEachem, M.D,, and Is a 
member of Uic IPFW Health 
She has lieen 
acuve wilh Iho Indiana Stale 
Nurses' Association, Fort 
Wayne Ballet Angels, the 
Nebraska Immunization 
Clinic, and Ihe Norlhwood 
and NorUicresI PTA. She is 
also a graduate student of 
Ihe Indiana University 
School of Nursing. 

I U E other local officers 
include Joseph L. Wiey, vice 
president and Janet I den, 
secrelary-lreasurer, Pur- 
due's ofTicers arc Donna F. 
Andrews vice president; 
R Wray, secretary; 
and Robert D. Lake, 
Ireasurer, 



beer, cheese 

"Gosh, we've planted loo 
much," 1 Isked tsked as we 
proudly beamed over our 
nice, ncally planted rows of 
vegetation. Just then an 

mosquiloes chased us Inside. 

Thai was only the first 

mosquilo aiiack of many to 

Because of the mosquitoes, 
weeding Ihe garden liecame 
on exercise in Icelh- 
gnashing. Ii became unsafe 
lo weed wilhoul a plasma 
unit nearby. 

By mid-July, as we hud- 
dled safe from musquiloes 
inside our home, we found 
growing weeds lo be a much 
simpler task than growing 
our vegetables. 



Further iroubles included 
a mole, who introduced us lo 
his version of plowing — 
sU-alghl through the sweet 
peas. When we asked a 
garden shop manager how lo 
convince Ihe mole lo leave, 
he suggested we use 
poisonnl bail. 

Naturally, we cnnged al 
such an unnatural remedy. 

A helpful neighbor then 
offered her homegrown 
remedy for moles, insisting 
all die while that she HATED 
la kill "one of God's tilde 
crea lures." 

"But." she went on lossy, 
much lo our chagrin. "I 
finally got rid of him " She 
had just planted new grass 
seedloeoveraliarespoland 
the new grass was just 
coming up. Wouldn't you 
know, Ihe dang mole tun- 
neled ri^l undemeathil. 

"So I took a pilch fork and 
slabt)cd the ground a couple 
of times until he didn't move 
anymore." 

We, however. used 
morally superior, nalurally 
organic methods lo finally 
rid ourselves of our mole. 
Because wa didn'l dare fight 
the mosquiloes to go outside 
and weed, break up the soil 
or even water our garden, 
the SOU iKcame granite-like 
wiUiin a month. The male, 
finding our garden much too 
hard andunprorilable, left 

The fmal assault on our 
garden came in August. 

"August is Ihe monUi for 
white flies" trumpeted a 
newspaper article, as It 
lisled appropriate. If un- 
natural, 5[H-3ys for gar- 



Because, irt A FWEDOK 

ri&tt'TER;mTSWHY!.' 




While 



I'd 



heard of Ibem, even during 
my insccl-collecling daj-s. 
when I asked my garden- 
planting dassmales aboul 
Uiem, tbey said they had 
neverheardof them, either 

Sure enough, when I 
looked, we had while Dies In 
our garden. They, of course, 
devoured much of what was 
left 

Now It's October, and the 
garden Is ffnally winding 
itself down. Needless lo say, 
our money-saving harvest 



ail, <, 



e harvested a 



bages (everybotly — slugs, 
bugs, and rabbits ~ picked 
on Ihemi, three peppers, 
seven squash, five pump- 
kins, one carrot and a 
walermelan the size of a 
senhall. 

We are not. however, 
deterred from organic 
farming. In fact, we're 
already making plans for 
next year's garden. 

Let's see now — marigolds 
lo repel insects so we can 
water Ibe garden in realitive 
peace. Strips of plastic 
sheeting between the rows to 
negate the need to weed . And 

only planting tomatoes. .. 



Head-hunting astounds senator 



To the editor 

Despite my 19 years ex- 
perience with the workings 
dI the human mind, 1 am 
occasionally still astounded 




lolt, such lota] 
such Ill-founded 
>g within a 



present barrage of letlcrs 
regarding an alleged 
"proposed activity tec in- 

companying mDvempnl lo 
"impeach Ken Schenk." 

"Why arc they promoting 
a mandatory activity fee for 
part-lime students? " asks 
Thomas McLaughlin. My 
queslion: "Who is promoting 
a mandator!' fee for part- 
Surely not Ihe prfseni 
Student Senate, which has 

even debated the Idea. 
Perhapslhenebulous"lhey" 
really means Ken Schenk; 
but president Schenii 
vehemently opposed the full, 
lime raise from JI5 last 
spring. 



s the ■■ 



eclcd 



body" wilh whom Ihe 
proles tors are "lired of 
having an activity lee raised 
by?" If one must look for a 
scapegoat, the only groups to 
fit Ihal bill are Ihe Indiana 
and Purdue Boards ol 
Trustees, the "un elected 
bodies" who have final say 
on mailers such as activity 

Another irony surrounding 
Ibe activity fee is the nodon 
that Students' Government 
is gelling all or mo«l of II la 
spend as they see fit Ion 
dances, concerts, movies 
and the like). Aclually. a per 
capita breakdown shows that 
nine of the $20 goes lo die 
athletic department, while 
only $3.B6 goes to the Student 
Government account (and 
11.33 of this is for The 
Communicator) The lee 
raise from ttS to %7a last 
sphi\% was of litUe benefit la 
Students' Government, as il 
was largely intended la go to 
the aUilelie deparlmcnl to 
make pcesible lis expansion 
inlo the new facibly ithey 
gat an SO percent budget 

Government got a 10 percent 
hike)... 
Finally, let me address die 



recent complaints regarding 
acLvilies Uiat SUBOG 
promotes. I feel that il is 
time for someone lo stand up 
for the desires of full-lime, 
"traditional" students who 
do have a social life and do 
live for Uiings other than 

I often hear it quoted thai 
die average student here is 
27 years old, hut this is like 
saying that the average 
person has one breast and 
one leslide; it jusi doesn't 
represent ibe true picture 
Obviously, there are older 
students here ( many of 
whom are part-time and do 
nol pay an actlvily fee), but 

penence than simply Ihe 

One of the problems of a 
commuter campus is trying 
lo gel students Involved in 
die subsidiary aspects ol 
college life. WhUe some 
students may choose to 
ignore these offerings, and 
probably for their own good 
reasons, il certainly does not 
mean that ihcy should tie 
atwlishEd or ignored. 

Hold en Maccker 
Student Sena lor 



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BV JLUA SHAFFER 
STAFF WTllTEB 

IPFW students and faculty 
I membere were among the 
many area colJege 
reproojla lives who par- 
ticipated in Higher 
Education Weekend Oct 9, 
10 and 11 at G1ent)roo]i 

TTie group pcriormcd six 

US during the 

tliree-day event and spon- 




IPFW on display 



OCTOBER li 1W1-THEC0M.MI:N!CAT0R-PAGE) 



fflseiBsed dental care tor 
children on Fnday as its 
performance. Later the 
same mghl. Taculty mem- 
hers from (he department of 
nufsmR presenlnJ a talk on 
concept of 

On Saturday, members of 
IPFWs opera uorkshop, 



Later on Saturday, the 

department of cheinlslry 
presented a cliemistr>- 
magic sho^u•, «ilh Allan 
Longro}' as the magicun 

Tony AiSessa and Mas<:on 
Robertson, from the Divuion 
of WiBic, performed a 
classical reotal oT violin and 
piano music on Sunday. 

The recital was followed 
by a repeat perforroancc of 
Longftiy'smagic show- 
In addition to the six 
shows, displays about Tibet, 
physics and eleclrical 
engineering represented 
IPFW 

The IPFW booths and 
disploj^ were coordinated 
by Amy McVay. of 
University Relations. In 
conjunclion with Ihe 
department of admissions. 

Other local colleges and 
universities represented at 
Glcnbrook uKluded Fort 
Wayne Bible College. Ivy 
Tech, St. Francis College 
and Tri -Sla te UnlvcrsI ty 



The Communicator 

needs writers and 

photographers who 

want to learn journalism. 

Experience not necessary. 

Apply in Suite 215, 

Walb Memorial Union. 



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calendar 



THURSDAY 1 5 

Soc/Anttio Forum, "Do Male Nurses Do it Better?" 

Walb 114, noon 
PIT "Whose Life Is iC Anyway?" B p.m. 
Women's vollevball. Goshen College at IPFW. 6:30 

p.m. 
Men's soccer, Bethel College at IPFW, 4 p.m. 



FRIDAY 16 

PIT "Whose Life Is IC Anyway?'" B p.m. 
Coed cross country, iPFW at UtCle State at Purdue, 
TBA 



SATURDAY 1 7 

SUBOG movie, "Altered States," ballroom. 7 & 10 

p.m. 
PIT "Whose Ufe Is It Anyway?" 8 p.m. 
Men's soccer. Marion Colfege at IPFW, noon 
Women's volleyball. IPFW at Purdue-Calumet, 11 

a.m. 
Tae Kwon Do Club, Walb second ffoor, 1 p.m. 

SUNDAY 18 

University Winij Ensemble, Neff 101 . B p.m. 



MONDAY 1 g 

Women's Studies. "Mottiers and Daughters." Walb 

224, noon 
Young People in Broadcasting, Helmke 835. noon 
Panel discussion, "An Administrative Prospective of 

Pnamotion and Tenure at IPFW," K1 1 7. noon 
Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Greater Ft. Wayne 

organizattonal meeting, Distinguistied Alumni Room. 

K101, noon. All interested persons are invited to 

attend - 

TUESDAY 20 

Women's Studies, "Mothers and Sons." Walb 924, 

7:30 p.m. 
Women's volleyball, Marion College at IPFW. 6:30 

p.m. 

WEDNESDAY 21 

Men's soccer, IPFW at Huntington College, 3:30 

p.m. 
Percussion Ensemble. Neff 1 01 , 8 p.m. 
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship. Neff 147, noon 

THURSDAY 22 

Soc/AnCbro Forum. "IPFW: The University's Role tn 

Fort Wayne's Economic Recovery," Walb 114, 

noon 
Women's volleyball. IPFW at Earlham Cdlege. B p.m. 



Campui Calandar Im mponurad 
al all unnnntty atpanwsrru ii 
■ubmnEKl u tha Oftfa ar Unh 
Thunday pracsding tha wsok d 



liana Univaraity-Purdua Unhn 



PACE4-THEC0MMUNICAT0K- OCTOBER IS. 1981 

tkc arts 




Simon strikes out on the screen 



Imagination stranded in film 



MIKEtiKfH 
\RTS HHITER 

Lnlike his play, 'They're 
l3>ing Our Song," N«l 
mon'i lalesi rilm, "Only 
hen I Laugh,' tai no 
n.-df^mtng quail lies. ir 
'^ng ' uas his oasis, [hen 
'I^Ljgh" ^crws (hat he is 
ilrancJed on Ihe dull 
beachhead at his 
imagination. 

Lack of Imagination is Ihe 
main probiem of "Laugh." 
Like "Song," th»re l! a T.V. 
menlallly to it. only there is 
no Mit Involved, Simon liikis 

il prediclably. In fact, he 



ipera plots and stuck some 
ilthcuorsloneslagelher. 
Condlser: Georgia Hincs 
Marsha Mason) is a 



ivered alcoholic 
got out of a hallway house 
On the day she gets out. her 
dau^Ier Polly iKrisly 
McNlcholi, who is living 
wilh Georgia's exhusband. 

iDavid Dukeal. a 

p!ayv.Tighl. calls and wants 
her to star in a play he's 
written about their 
relalionship 

Mind you, all this happ>?ns 
In one day. During the rest of 
the nim, Georgia goes back 
on the booie and gets beaten 
up, and her daughler runs 
away and gets drunk. 

Simon's ioipl stranfb 
good performers «ho try but 
can't rise above Ihc film's 
emotionally bankrupt Lone 
Mor^a Mason can be a fine 
actress but, unfortunalely, 
appears most of Ihc lime in 
her husband's films. AU the 
force of her character comes 
oul of her, not out of the 
character. En fad. Georgia Is 



full of 

pity, and is nt cardboard, it 
is 3 wonder a talented ac- 
tress like Mason accepted 
the rule in the fir^l place 

Krisly McNichol is another 
lalcnted performer who gets 
bogged dou-n in (his slop. Stic 
puts real fire into her 
diaracter. but like Mason, it 
all i:amesfrom her. 

Neither 5hc nol her mother 



throughout the filn 
characlers come 
totally plastic We 



"Only When I Laugh" is a 
dismal piece of rilmmaking 
that is typical of Ihe T.V. 
syndrome currently 
prevalent in Hollywood. It Is 
made by people who think 
■ - no lasle - 



The film also show 
Neil Simon is loo prolific (or 
lus own good. His last ibd 
films, "Chapter Two" and 
"Seems Like Old Times," 
i£dn*i do sell at the box 
office. Ttiis should (eil him to 
slow down. He can be 3 good 
writer, as "(Goodbye Girl," 
"Odd Couple" and "Barefoot 
In The Pork" allesl, but his 
latest films have been 
examples ol Simon's menial 
masturbation 

"Only When I Laugh" bills 
the ^tTiter's name above (he 
title. This seems like a trivial 
otiservatlon. but. as with a 
Few other films al similar 
quality that also had the 



titles. 






[f the writer's name appears 
above the (iUe, It will be a 
bad film. "Only When I 
Laugh" is simply a current 



Simon succeeds on stage 



Embassy crowd loves play 



8r MIKE CiEFFEN 

An en)oysblc production o( 
Nell Simon's lalcel Broad- 
way hit "They're Playing 
Our Song" waa offered at (be 
Embassy Theafe Oc( 7, and 
the enthuslnnllc crovtd who 
nUed Ihc theatre obviously 
loved it. 

The play proved that Neil 
Simon hasn't lost his touch 
for writing snappy one 
liners. Although most of his 
rcccnl plays and films, lack 
character development, 
"Song," had enough omus- 
ing mqmenis lo make 11 
guccced as an entertaining, 
llghlvi'clght piece of fiuK. 

The plot Is basically a 
' ' — boy songwrltc" 



back together. Simon never 
gets past the sUcom level of 
this plot but mokes up (or it 
becaific his lines have a 
certain amount of charm. 

The music adds to the 
charm ol the play, and 
smoolhs over the spots 
where the triteness of 
Simon's script is apparent. 
The score, by Marvin 
Hamllsch and Carole Bayer 
Sager. is pleasant and 
contains some of (heir best 
worklodole, 



"Fill in the Words." 

The cast made the most of 
these numbers and had fun 
with the willy lines of ihe 
script. June Gable, as Sonla 
Wabk, clearly had the 
stronger role, and she had 
the most (un with her port. 

Though her timing seemed 
slightly off, probably due to 
rushed direction, she had a 
good voice and great natural 
charm Sheseemcd" ''" 



liming than she was and did 
his numbers well, warming 
up to his part during the 

All in all, this louring 
company production of 
"They're Ploying Our Song" 
was enjoyable and en- 
tertaining and made for a 
r theatre "' " 



at a 
^ ^ glance 



On the silver screen 

TheSUBOG film (or Ihlswtek will be "Altered Slatea.' 
which will be ihoviTi al ; and 10 p m.. SilunJay, in the 
Walb Memorial Union Ballroom. 

. - The Cinema Center nill tie showing ' 'The Chant of 
Jimmie Blacksmith" at 7 and 9 p.m., Saturday, at Ibe 
Fori WajTie Public Litcarj' 

Treading the boards 

ThcPITproduclionof "Whose Life Is It Anyway'?" will 
closewith this Saturday's performance. 

. "ae Loves Me" «iUopcn this weekendot the Arena 
DinnerTheaire. 

. . . Fort Wayne Civic Theatre's Stage II u'lll present 
"Don Juan in Hell" on m-o weekends, beginning this 

Concerts of note 

by James Alor, associate profeuor of 
premiere ot 8 p.m., Sunday, at (he IPFW Wind 
concert in Nel( 101. 
The Letlcrmcn will appear In concert at (he 
Embassy Theatre at B p.m., this Saturday. 



Oettel exhibit opens 



An e^lblllon ol woodculs, serigraphs. and etchings by 
DeltyC Oettel v^nllbeon display Oct IGthroughNov.eat 
Ihe IPFW Deparlmenl of Fine Arts A reception will opei 
the exhibit at7pm., Oct. 16, 



1 still k 
ilaywrtghl. 



legids. 



the 






The 



flngb. 









■; they 



fall In love, break up and eel 



nythlng 
(un of the play. Most of the 
tunes are upbeat, standout 
numbers (hat show off the 
talent of the cast as well of 
the composers. Among the 
highlights were the lltle 
lunc, "Workin' II Out." and 



charaeler. a 
most of them. 

Richard Ryder, as Vernon 
Ccrsch, didn't fare as well. 
He was stiff, and brought no 
life lo his character, 
nllhough he had a good 
voice, he lacked the 
chcmistr>' Gable had. Still he 



wcakntssBS. U's nice to sec 
him have a hit after such a 
long dry spell. 

'■Ilicy're Playing Our 
Song" is an amusing play 
thot entertained the large 
crowd at Ihe Embassy It 
showed the Embassy is 
balling a Ihoitsand with its 




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Women 
Children 
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You dashed to 
class and forgot 
your cash? 

Don't worry. 
There's a new 
OWL Machine on campus. 




Fort Wayne National Bank's OWL Machine is 
open on the lower level of the Union Building. 

Here's good news. Now you can take care of your banking 
needs right on campus. You can take care ot thiem even 
when the banks are closed, too. Because the new 
automatic teller OWL Machine is yours to use whenever 
the Union Building's open. 

Now when you need to make a quick withdrawal, make a 
deposit or transfer funds from one account to another, 
don't worry. You can do it all at the new OWL Machine- 
on campus. 

Last chance. 
Demonstrations end 
October 19. 



All tt takes is an OWL Card. 

If you're a customer of Indiana, Peoples or Fort Wayne 
National Bank, you can use the OWL Machine. All it lakes 
is an OWL Card. You can get your free OWL Card from 
any one ol these three banks. 

Well teach. You might win $$. 

Personnel from Fort Wayne National Bank will be demon- 
strating the OWL Machine October 12th thru October 1 9th. 
This is your chance to see how easy the OWL operates 
and to win some goodies, too. Stop by and register for a 
drawing for one SI 00 and two S50 savings bonds. 




FORT WAYNE 
NATtONAL 

that's my BANK 

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CCTH8ER IJ. 19B1 - THECOStMVNlt ATOR — PAGEi 



x¥EKSlOJL1?S YPBC 



Students* Government forum 

A public F'omm on Sludoil's Government wiH be 
■ponvired by Ro-Publlca si noon Monday, Oct 19, roam 
14S KeltJer 

IPFW §ociali§t8 to organize 

The Democratic Soclalia rjrganiirag Commillee 
iDS0C)willmee(a(n>aiWednHd3y:0cl Jl.lnroomlio 
of Die Wfllb Memorial Union. IPFW facuHy rnemher^ 
Gary Bliimcn»hlne and Jerry Houseman will sptak on (he 
bencriix of social democracy 

Chancellor Giusti to speak 

The IPFW Soc-Anthro Fonim will preseni "The 
Unlvemlly's Hole In Fort Wayne's Economic necovcry," 
given by Chancellor Joseph Giusli. The Forum will be 
held 01 noon Thursday, Oct. W in room H of Ihe Walb 

Psychologists have seminar 

'Dio DeparUncnl of PaychologlcalSclencet will preMM 
a tcmlnor on Gradunle School In PBychology and related 
neldson Monday, Oct. is, from l2-l:15p.m.inKettIerl46. 

Broadcasting Club to meet 

The Young People in Broadc.i.'iting Club will meet b1 



[iDcdlroaipaicel> 

n gMling \TBC 
in general and (he nem show 
in plrli cilia r oil the ground 
arc Dwighl Fish, production 
manager of VPBC. and Tun 
Snglelon, a member of the 
communieallon dcparlmeni 
family and faculty advisor 
for YPBC 

"I just tell Dwighl whal I 
need and he tells people 
ukhere Id stand," Kuhn said. 
HFIsh can presently be seen 
00 reruns of IrTBC's -Tele- 
oslons" project, where he 
shows s truly unusual 
singtng style in some of the 
•egmenlS' "and Tim is a 
very wise man who taught us 
everything we know about 
media." 

Other notables come In to 
give YPBC newshounds 
some help as well. "We've 
had Mike Barnard (evening 
news anchor on WANE-TV) 

helping us and we hope lo 

have him bach " Kuhn ssid- 

Kuhn looks lo expand the 



news coTo^ge and ova- 
come some of the imroedjate 
proMems, "Our tmi cast 
■nil probably have a lot of 
copy on professors and 

Bloomuigion. but »e hope to 
begin sports coverage and 
have specialty reporta* in 
such fields as government 
1 WBC is already preparing 
to broadcast IPFW Student 
Senate meetinfSl If the 
reporters have beats, Ihen 
Ihey will get to know the 
people thai they cover," 



Kuhn 9 
"Also. < 



r ne*-s lag <i 



n the e 



o the 



timeitgelson Ihea 
about a weck-and-n-halC to 
stmt, bul hopefully as we 
gain experience, it wUJ get 
shorter," Kuhn said 

He stresses Ihsl the studio 
is open to all inicrcsled 
students, not just Radio-TV- 
Film majors. And nil stu- 



h\TBC 



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ETERNAL LIFE 

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Last Three Performances 

October 15, 16 & 17 



"FUNNY, TOUCHING, CAPTIVATING AND 
MOVING. ABSOLUTLEY SUPER. BRAVO!" 

JEFFREY LYONS. WCBS RADIO 

1979 TONY AWARD WINNER 



THE DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE 

INDIANA UNIVERSny. PURDUE UNIVERSITY AT FORT WAYNE 

PyROyE'lNDIANA THEATRE PRODUCTION OF 

Whose Life Is It Anyway ? 



by Brion Clork 




OCTOBER 2,3,8,9,10,15,16,17 at 8:00 p.m. 



FOR TICKETS. RESERVATIONS, AND INFORMATION CALL 462-5782 



Performances Thursday, Friday and Saturday 



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PAGE S - THE COMMUNICATOR - OCTClBEB IS. 1«1 



WHAT COULD 

THE ARMY 

POSSIBLY OFFER 

A BRIGHT PERSON 



Drop your guard for a 
minute. Even though you're 
in college right now, there 
are many aspects of the Army 
that you might find very 
attractive. 

Maybe even irresistible. 
See for yourself, 

MEDSCHOOUONUS 

You read it right 

The Army's Health Professions Scholarship 
Program provides necessary tuition, books, lab 
fees, even microscope rental during medical 
school. 

Plus a monthly stipend that works out to 
about $6,000 a year 

After you're accepted into medical 
school, you can be accepted into our program. 
Then you're commissioned and you go 
through school as a Second Lieutenant in the 
Army Reserve. 

The hitch? Very simple. After you graduate. 
you give the Army a year as a doctor for every 
year the Army gave you as a med student, with 
a minimum obligation of three years* service. 

IKIHIMSHIRRESIDEMCY 
& CASH BONUSES 

Besides scholarships to medical school, the 
Army also offers AMA-approved first-year 
post-graduate and residency training programs. 

Such training adds no further obligation to 
the scholarship participant But any Civilian 
Graduate Medical Education sponsored by the 
Army gives you a one-year obligation for 
every year of sponsorship, with a minimum 
obligation of two years' service 

But you get a $9,000 annual bonus every 
year you're paying back medical school or post- 
graduate rrainmg. 

So you not only get your medical education 
paid for, you get extra pay while you're paying 
it back. Not a bad deal 

A GREAT PLACE TO BE A NURSE 

The rich tradition of Army Nursing is one 
of excellence, dedication, even heroism. And 
it's a challenge to live up to. 

Today, an Army Nurse is the epitome of 
professionalism, regarded as a critical member 
of the Army Medical Team 

A BSN degree is required. And the clinical 
spectrum is almost impossible to match in 
civilian practice. 

And, since you'll be an Army Officer, you'll 
enjoy more respect and authonty than most of 
your civilian counterparts. You'll also enjoy 
travel opportunities, officer's pay and officer's 
privileges. 

Army Nursing offers educational oppor- 
tunities that are second to none As an Army 
Nurse, you could be selected for graduate degree 
programs at civilian universities. 



UKEYOU? 



ADVANCED NURSING COURSE, 
TUmON-FREE 

You get tuition, pay and li\'ing allowances. 
You can also take Nurse Practitioner courses 
and courses in many clinical specialities. All on 
the Army- 
While these programs do not cost you any 
money, most of them do incur an additional 
service obligation. 

A CHANCE TO PRACTICE LAW 

If you re about to get your law degree and 
be admitted to the bar, you should consider a 
commission in the Judge Advocate General 
Corps. Because in the Army you get to practice 
law right from the start 

While your classmates are still doing other 
lau'yers' research and other la\\7ers' briefs, you 
could have your own cases, your own clients, 
in effect, your own practice. 

Plus you'll have the pay, prestige and privi- 
leges of being an Officer in the United States 
Army. With a chance to travel and make the 
most of what you've worked so hard to 
become A real, practicing Iau7er Be an Army 
Lauder 

ROTC SCHOLARSHIPS 

Though you re too late for a 4-year 
scholarship, there are 3-, 2-, and even l-year 
scholarships available. 

They include tuition, books, and lab fees. 
Plus S 100 a month living allowance. Naturally 
they're very competiti\'e. Because 
besides helping you towards your 
degree, an ROTC scholarship helps 
you towards the gold bars of an 
Army Officer 

Stop by the ROTC office on 
campus and ask about details. 



UPTOS170AM0NTH 

You can combine 5er\-ice in the 
Army Reser\'e or National Guard 
with Army ROTC and get between 
S7,000 and $14,000 while you're 
still in school 

It's called the Simultaneous 
Membership Program. You get $100 
a month as an Advanced Army ROTC 
Cadet and an additional S70 a month 
(sergeant's pay ) as an Army Reservist, 

When you graduate, you'll be 
commissioned as a Second Lieutenant. 



but not necessarily 
assigned to active duty Find 
out about it 

A BONUS FOR 
PART-TIME WORK 

You can get a $1,500 
bonus just for enlisting in some Army Reserve 
units. Or up to $4,000 in educational benefits. 
You also get paid for your Reserve duty It 
comes out to about $1,100 a year for one weekend 
a month and two weeks annual training 

And now we have a special program to help 
you fit the Army Reserve around your school 
schedule- 
It's worth a look- 

A SECOND CHANCE AT COLLEGE 

Some may find college to be the right place 
at the wrong time for a variety of reasons. The 
Army can help them, too, 

A few years in the Army can help them get 
money for tuition and the maturity to use it 
wisely. 

The Army has a program in which money 
saved for college is matched two-for-one by the 
government- Then, if one qualifies, a generous 
bonus is added to that. 

So 2 years of service can get you up to 
$15,200 for college. 3 and 4 years up to $20,100. 
In addition, bonuses up to $5,000 are available 
for 4-year enlistments in selected skills. 

Add in the experience and maturity gained. 
and the Army can send an individual back to 
college a richer person in more ways than one. 

We hope these Army opportunities have 
intrigued you as well as surprised you. Because 
there is indeed a lot the Army can offer a bright 
person like you- 

For more information, send the coupon- 



Please IL-II me m.ire about Dl AM)Medical School ,ind Army Mtdicm 

DiANlrhc Army Nurse Corps, a (ALl Army Law, 

D iFRl ROTC Scholarships, D (SSl Army Rescr\'e Bonuses, 

D iPCl Army Educaiion Benefiis 



Sendio ARMY OPPORTUNITIES, PO BOX }<S> 
NORTH HOLLYWOOD. CALIF 01605 

BEALLYOUCANBE. 
ARMY. 



OCTOBER 15, 1981 - THE CaMMl'MCATOR - PAGE 7 



Komets begin 30th season 



wholsalr 



BYMIKEFRA.VKB 

TTi* Fort Wayne KomeU 
have b«|[m tbeir Xlh leason 
In Ihe IntCTiuUonal Hockey 
l.eagiw amlEJst a coaching 
change and a 
Chan geoF player 

Gone Is Coach MooEeLallo 
who will ipcnd the leason 
coaching in Ballimote alter 
three yean behind ihe 
Komel bench. Stepping in is 
Ron UJlym, son of Uam 



ovma Km Ullj 




(even yean wil 


Ihf Komeli 


httore hoginnir 


: a cnaching 


career wilh P 


1 Huron of 


Ihcl.H.I-.andr 




Port Worih of 


the Central 


Hoclicy [.cogue 




AIM gone 




goalicndcr Hobble Irons who 


ipenl Lwclve yi 


ir^ manning 


the ncui [or a 


K'5 before 


deciding 10 reb 


c and take a 


local pom lion 


wlLh Pepal. 



Trying In fill Irons' ska la 
'j,-ill be S-year-old Jim Park. 
v.ho most rtccnlly loded for 
Indianapolis of (he Cenlral 
Hockey League Park played 
In the I H L during [he 1?74 
iKnian mlh the E>a Moines 
Oak Leafs and was a 
tearnmale of Komel Cen- 
lerman Terry McI>ougall for 
that season's Turner Cup 
CTiampions. 

Coach tJllyol Is hopeful 
thai either Barl Hunter or 
Ed Ijylon will provide 
adequate backup tervice for 
the veteran Park. Hunter 
comes to Fort Wayne from 
the Washington Capitol 
organ nation, and Layton 
played college hockey last 



! will be 50rely 



Senate 



ackup goalie 



'Contlngcdlrom pagelJ 

"The Bcnnte dUK its own 

jjrave by not IIMoilnglo the 

itudcnts," <uiii[ Englcman. 

we have done i£ going to be 
forgotten now by Uiose 
people that didnot speak." 

"The (k«id of Order is 
really a courtesy to guests^ it 
was pos.slble for Ihem to be 
added to Ihe agenda as an 

"Ned week we have been 
assured that we wilt be an 
agendo Hem under new 
busincs.i and will get a 
chance lo speak up," said 
Welch. 

SUBOG and the Senate will 
scl up a table In Kcltter Hall 
for Infnrmallon and 
suggcstlDn.1. The table vAH 
be set up on Thursday and 
Frldayri 

— Plans nre being made 
(or weekly public hearings in 
PIT between Ihe Students 



nenl and IPFW 
students and faculty. 

- Student Affoira Com- 
mittee announced Ihe fly 
problem will be solved by 
weekly spraying of Kettler 
Hall. 

— SUBOG onnounced Ibcy 
will be buying more albums 
lor the stereo 5>'Slem. Also, o 
possible Christnins formal 
and a pool tournament are in 
them 



Steve Janazak seems b 
landed a spot in the Centra 
League as he makes a bid for 

the National Hockey League. 

On defense this season, the 
K's will have all new faces. 
Gene are veterans Mike 
Penasse. Tim Dunlop, Peter 
Crawford and Hory Cava^ In 
theu* places will be Tom 
Madson, Mike Meadows and 
Matthieu CloiJier. 

^tadson and Meadows 
played college hockey lasi 
season in Ktinnesola, while 
the M-y ear-old Cloutier 
comes from Montreal. 

Komet forward Gary 
DeLong will be roaming the 
bluelinc this year for the 
team If Ullyot isn't able to 
find some more defensive 
help, DeLong was a 20 goal 
scorer Inst year. 

Even though the team 
went win less dunng Ihe 



mlitees Nancy Floyd. 
Sandra Wiley, and Julia 
Shaffer to the Chancellor's 
Advisory Board and Mark 
Helter to Campus Appeals. 

— Resolution 1 was passed 
to "encourage Ihe ad- 
ministralion to take im- 
mediate action to Increase 
parking availability " 

— Resolution J' 



sason. Coach 
UUyol wasa'i too atrried 
about his dub's offense. 
Back Ihis season are 
v-elcrans Terry McDougjU. 
Barrj- Scully. Gcvge Ko<- 
sopolous and Dale Baldwm. 
Scully led the league in goals 
lasI year aith GS. and is 
gunrung for the all-time 
league record of 72 sel by 
former Komel great Jlerv 
Dubcheck. 

Of the newcomers. Coach 
UllyDi will be looking lo the 
likes of Brent Paschal, Dave 
Hilt. Darren Galley, Marc 
LeClair and Tom Scanlon for 
the needed firepower 
LeClair played Junior 
Hockey last season for the 
Saskatoon Blades, picking 
up 42 goals in S6 games. 

The Komets were looking 
to have more veterans in 



It locks as K the Komew mil 

door" of personnel rillenng 
through Ibe Coliseum then 
National Hockey League 
teams Iriin ihar tielere m 
the not few weeks. 

Last seaKin the Komets 
acquired four qual)<> 
players four veeks into the 
season, and it's hoped Ihjl 
this season will bnng ab"u\ 
the same silualion. Unlil 
then. Coach Ulljol mil do ha 



veterans, including John 
Flesch and Michel Bergeron 
The Komels will play nl 
Milwaukc* ne,\l \Vcdnisd.i> 



exactly worked out that way 

Athletic announcements 

PFW Athletic ,_,„-,, 



Department 
offering competition in 
women's soflball and track 
Ibis spring. An 

organ izalional meeting will 
be held Oct. 20 at 3 p.m. in 
the Walb Memorial Union, 



The department 
announced that the 
tramural c(n;d volley 
deadline will tie (3ct ii 
capains meeting ssUI be 
21 m the athletic office 



McGuire can't talk 



Internal Affairs Com- 
mittee staled left -hand desks 
have been installed In 
Kettler and Building D 

— Bi1lai-B2-11 passed into 
committee. The amendment 
may change the constitution 

general elections 

— "Hie senale is allocating 
money to run an od in Ihe 
Communicator to survey 
students on non -smoking 






fntltlini 



Director David 
Skelton announced that Al 
McGuIre will not be able to 
moke a presentation on Nov 
It OS earlier planned. 



department is trying 
schedule the lormi 
Marquette basketball coac 
turned-sport sca.ster a I 



The 



bill 



presented by Julia Shaffer. 

— Schcnk announced the 
fol lowing people to 



itllf^■rtll^^orkiEimts mti 



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PAGES- THECOMMUNICATOR- OCTOBER IS. U81 

Inconsistency reigns 



Spikers win one, lose another 



ByMIKEFBANKE 
IPFW's Women's 

Volleyball Conch Aroie Ball 
li wdnB the "elevator ef- 
fccl" imer again «nlh his 
■quad U teems as Uicwgh 
Ihc tram Ie cauftht in a 
dllcnima o( bring up one 
match and down Ihe next 

Boll-B forces went to 
Bethel Collt-ge Oct. 8 and it 
woii an upbeat evening. 
IPF^ defeated Manchester 
Collpge. 15-11. 10-15, IM. 

In Ihrir second match ol 
Ihc niRht the spacer* 



dispoied ot Bethel College. 
lS-2. 7-15, 15-7 The victory 
solidified the team'selaim lo 
the honorable mcnllon list of 
the latest N.C.AA. Div. Ill 
Volleytull ratings That 
fact could be helpful in the 
squad's chances of making 
post-season eompetitioi 

On Oct. 10. Ihc learn 
traveled east to the Ohio 
Northern Invitational. The 
result w a pair of loues 
tt;at tdt Coach Ball uiihappy. 

IPFW lost the first malch 
lo Ohio Northern In two 



games. 15-B, 15-11. In the 
second match, the Tickers 
fell to Taylor in three games. 
H-16.li9.e-lS 

Rio Community College 
defeated IPFW in a very 
strange three-game match 
flio won the first game 15-7. 
but Ihe Fort Wayne club 

opposition in game tv,'D. 15.7, 
lUo ttwn came luck 10 uin 
the finale, 1^9. 

Ball was upset with the 
effort put forth on Saturday. 
"Their hen* were screwed 



play." 

After the first game in the 
Taylor malch. Ball Ufled his 
llarters and utilized his 
bench in the starting roles. 
Lc»kicg for a lift In en- 
thusiasm, he got it: "Those 
girb came in and pbyed 
their hearts out," he eo- 
Ihused- 

The up-aod-dowTi attitude 
" " -in trail 



I olf-ai 



"lack of codcsitTaCion" 
could be the cause of Ihe 
[apses, be said, but he's 
really not sure. 

"1 can't explain it, il I 
could this wouldn't be a 
problem." 

Tonlght IPFW boats 
Goshen College at 6:30 In the 
friendly confines of the 
Conconia Seminary Gym. 
Saturday the squad travels 
lo Purije^^umet. then 
home lor an Oct. 33 malch 
with Marion Co liege. 



Runners face strong foes 



BVJI.MCIIAP.HAN 
M-nRTSEniTOil 

After running Ihe two best 
races of its beginning season 

Invilallonal and against Si. 
Francis, Ihc IPFW cross 
country team did not fare as 
well ogslnsl what Coach 
John Endsley called 
'tougher competition." 
Endslcy'B running Tuskers 
finished fifth In a field of 

Invitational and lost in the 
Tr I -Stole Invilallonal. 

In Iho Taylor InvilallDnal, 
wnn by the host school, 
IPFW found Its fiflh place 
Tinlsh hard to come by as it 



fought a hilly course "The 
course was so steep and 
slippery that you had lo be 
dam near a goat to run 11.'" 
said Brad Stevens, who was 
again the leading Tisker. 
fintshinB 13th with a time of 
28. IB 

Other Tusker finishers 
included Steve Horstman, 
who finished 19ih wllh a lime 
of 28:«; Steve Leffere,2Slh, 
29:10; Mark Hemdon. ath, 
29:32; Ron Brlnker, J7lh. 
30:02; Kirk Klein. 41th. 
31:12; David Puff, nth. 



Brinker, who finished fiflh 
for IPFW and 371h In the 
race, said the team is Michigat 
missing a good fifth man in The vt 



all its races. "The lop (our 

our depth could be better." 
he said. "TTiere's a gap 
hetneen the fourth and fifth 
man I want to be Ihal fifth 
man anda good fiflh man." 

Spring Arbor's Tniby 
Dennis had the winning time 
of 26:30 as Taylor rinUhcd 
with 22 points; Spring Arbor, 
60; Marion, 100; Taylor's 
reserve leam, 106; IPFW, 
123; Manchester, 126; and 
Findlay, 142. 

ITic Tickers finished last 
in the Tri-State Invitational 
which featured teams from 



India 



Ohio 



Baldwin-Wallace CoUegc 

Hope College finished 
second u-ilh 76; Ollerbein 
College, 101; Calvin College, 
143; AlbiorCollF^e, 146; Ohio 
Wesleyan, 152; Rose 
Hulman, 156; Manchester, 
171; Spring Arbor, 240; Tri- 
Stale. 249; Ohio Northerm 
260; IPFW, 338. 

For the first lime this 
season, Mark Hemdon was 
the top Tusker as he finished 
52nd with a time of 27-35. The 
other two top Tusker 
finishers included Brad 
Stevens (62nd, 27:«) and 
Steve Horstman lB7th, 
2S.43I. 



Absenteeism plagues tennis team 



The IPFW women's tennis 
team finished lis season Oct. 
II with n fl-3 loss to Hunt- 
ington Cnlloge. 

Singles winners for the 
Tuskers included Lois Sch- 
midt and Deb Turner. 



Natalie Ellis andSch 
Theteam,aalthas 
year long, was I 
players who could nt 
Ihe malch because ol 



on Didi Rippeloe and Norma 
Knoop, who unable to show 
up, lost their respective 
matches. 



i Tliese senleelsm. 



had to play lo avoid a forfeit. 
She was defeated by Hunt- 
ington's Comlle Klein 6-3, S- 
0. 

Coach Ben Becker, 
disappointed with the lack of 
involvement by this year's 
individual squad members, 



Endsley said that the TH- 
Slate Inntational, although 
discouraging, was just what 
(he team needed. "It was a 
difficult courw and the 
competition w^s Ihe best in 
the region," he said "This is 
the kind of competition thai a 
first year program needs lo 
beinTOlved with to see where 
they are and lo see where 
they can go wllh (eamwork 
and dedication." 

The running Tuskers will 
close out their season when 
(hey compete at Tri-Slale 
(omorrow and (Joshen Oct, 
H. Stevens said (he team is 
looking forward lo doing its 
best for these last meets. 



commented. "I wish the 
women would have shown up 
for practices all Ihe time. 1 
would just love lo have about 
13 peoirie on the squad next 
year so we will have a full 



Snagging, popular and controversial 



"Good night, you've got a 
big one. Now stay calm, pull 
up.Bndcnsldown." 

Such are Ihc words oI 

fishermen. Cohoandchlnook 
salmon slugging is a popular 
and controversial sport (his 
limeol year m Michigan. 

According to Gene Wing, 
manager of the Ludington 
St 010 Part in fjidinglon 
Michigan, salmon snagging 
is allowed in three Michigan 
localiaiu: onthcbanksofthe 
Pere Marquette River at 
Ludington Slate Park and 
Scollville; and the Manisle« 
FliveralTippyDam. 

Ludington, otxiut 60 miles 
north of Muskegon on Lake 
Michigan, Is about 260 mites 
from Fori Wayne and is 
perhaps the most popular 
among Ealmon llshermiui In 
this area. 

Allhough popular wllh 
many fishermen, salmon 
snagging Is ycl so unpopular 
with some, according 10 
Wing, It mighlnol be allowed 






in that sr 



» closed ts unclear, but 
indications from other of- 
ficials arc telling us that 
snagging will not be allowed 
next j-par," he said. "But we 



One 



■ Ihe r 






individuals directly 
directly connected witn the 
Michigan United Con- 
servation Club T>iese in- 
dividuals think snagging is 
an unsportsman-like way 
fish ■ .... 



11 



directly catching 
without the lurcof bait. 

Tlie MUCC also disagrees 
with the selling of eggs, since 
females are usually caught 
just before Ihey spawn ilay 
their eggs), Wing s.aid. A 
fisherman con have his 
catch cleaned at a fish 
cleaning station and receive 
paymcni for a female's ege, 
or he con sell the eggs lo 
other dealers ss long as he 
proi'ldes proof of the Visit 
that carried the eggs. 

The MUCC argues further 
thai the selling of Ihe eg^ 
goes against a stale bwlhat 
prohibits the sale of any 
game fish or any port ofoce. 
Hip MUCC considers the 
eg^ pijrt of the Gsh, Wing 

Snagging a fish is easy. 



even for a beginner, liecause 
some streams ore loaded 
wllh salmon. State hat- 
cheries have been stocking 

provide game fish for 
fishermen and to cut down an 
the populalion of alewives, 
fish whose life span are so 
short, Ihcy pollute the shores 
of Lake Michigan with their 
decomposed dead carcasses. 
Wing said 

The Michigon Department 
of Natural Resources plants 
salmon in some streams 
where conditions are not 
favorable for salmon 
reproduction, A river must 
have a gravel bed like Pere 
Marquette's in order for 
eg^ lo hatch, because 
salmon cannot hatch in a 
river with a sand bed. Wing 

Salmon, whether bom 
naturally or planted in 
slreams, will head out Into 
L^ke Michigan and return to 
Ihalsame.slrcam within two 
10 three years, he said. In 
streams where salmon can 
reproduce naturally, a male 
will look for female whose 
cg^ he can fertilise, and the 
two will head upstream. 

The female will thenspola 
place 10 spawn If she is not 
caught. The male, done 
fertilizing her eggs, will join 
her to die and decompose 
afterwards. Wing said. 

In streams where salmon 
cannot reproduce naturally, 
hatcheries are located where 
mate and female salmon 
swim into holding ponds. 
Workers then strip Ihe eggs 
from the female and the 
male's sperm for fer- 

Alter a significant penod 
of lime, they fertilized eggs 
hatch. The young salmon, 
when they are tliree to four 
inches long, arc planted in 
i-arious streams m the 
spring to start the salmon 
cycle all over agam. Wing 

Wutg listed I wo halchenes 
in Michigan (hat he knew of 
— Ihe one on the Piatt River 
and the other on the Saublc 
River. He said Uiere are 
others, however. 

At Ludington. park of- 
ficials try to give evtryaae a 

every odd numbered 
calendar day or caieh five 
fish, whichever comes firrL 
The paiii officials hold four 
twivhour sessions for salmon 
snagging 00 these days. 
Wing said. 

In order to fisb during one 
of Ihe sessions, a person 



representing (he time 
session during which he 
desires lofish. Every session 
draws 125 names and half of 
that number fish every odd 
numbered day. Wingsaid. 

A day of salmon snagging 
begins bright and early with 
park officials drawing 

5e\en a.m. In order to get a 
good place in line, one must 
be at the park lodge al six 



Roebuck in Fort Woync, 
says that one should use a 30 
lb. line for snagging and a 
number two size hook with a 
hardness of tour. The type of 
pole to be used should be a 
good stiff one about &G<: feel 






said. 



If r: 



L, sleet, s 



id 30 



winds decide lo 
converge on your day lofish, 
don't get discouraged — not 
all October days in Michigan 
fit this description Jus( 

After all the names are 
drawn, finding a spot to fish 
isn't hard. Since park of- 
ficials allow only 125 to fish 
within (he park, (he Pere 
Marque tic has plenty of 



:ianed. no bait is 
neHled for snagging — Just 
three or four good jerks on 
the pole. Thai's (he easy 
part. I( is smart. Milter said, 
to have two people reel in the 
monster, especially if it's a 
30 lb. Chinook. 

Eren so, (he experience of 
pulling in a fish is . . . well . . . 
aUhough one may have 

shark, he just might think h 



had 



1 his li 



reeling in a Chinook C!oho 
are a little easier to bring in 
since (hey weigh between 
eight and 12 pounds. 

Wbea one snags a Chinook 
□r a Cobo at Ludington. he 
>-ells, "Fish on!" so others 
around him will know and 
getoulofhisway. 



It is e 



tell a 






pericnccd person I els the fish 
take his line 50 yards up- 
stream while the veteran 

pulling up on his pole and 
then casting his reel ulienhe 
brings his pole down. "Pull 
up, cast down." (hey say. 

' 'About 35,000 salmon were 
caught al Ludmgton last 
year, which was a big year. 
Only about 20,000 will be 
caught (his year. On the 
average, aliout IS or 17,000 
are caught every year," 
Wingsaid. 



vacation if one only wants to 
avoid fishmg and ai)oy 
scenic beauty. To get into the 
park. Wing said, one musl 
pay (wo dollars for Ihe whole 
day and six to spoid the 



One must. howevCT. pay 
(wo dollois for each hour he 
wishes lo fish. A salmon 
fishing license Is also 
required, Wingsaid. 



Communicator 

Classifieds 

50* 



Tnskers defeat St. Francis, tie Grace 

B> >I1KE ROEGER 
Sun Wrt(t» 

MladniKralj'sgoal with (ho muiulcsranaining in overtime lifted (he IPnV»occer team 

lo a 4-3 come-from-bdund win a\t! cress-town rivil St. FTancis TtJisday aflemoon. 

Saturday'smatcb with Grace, on the other hand, aided in a t-l deadlock 

Kralja. a freshman sinker led the Tuskers by scoring all lour goal* ngainsl St Francis 

The Tinkers fell behind 3-0 at the halHime intEimission. as Ihe Cougars' Brian Barker 

scored all of the goals. TTie TUskers, however, came roaring back at (he beginning of the 

" " ingoal.includingKralj'sfirsttwogDals.beforeSI.Frnnclsgoton 






second half with 
a shot of 

KralJ got the tymg goat with eight minules 
from Art Slefoskiandsent the ball into Ihe goal 

Tlie Ttiskers weren't able to match their overtime heroic* al Grace, tiowcrer This gome 
found Ihe TUskers almost giving the game (0 (he host school, as'1^Isker fullback Davr Husar 
misplayedlhe ball, and sent it into UicTisker goal, gi\ing Grace a 1-0 lead. 

Jim Sharpe, how-evcr, made up for Husar's mistake, as he scored a tjing goal mid-way 
through the second half, sending the game inlook'cmme Neither team was able lo score in 
(lie extra period. 

With Saturday's lie, (he T\iskers completed a foir game road trip, that saw them win 
iwlce.loseorce.andbeonce Thcirseasonrecordlsnow'£-4-i 

Tonight the T\isker^ return home to entertain Bethel at 4 p m fk:t 17 (he Tuskers host 





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