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Full text of "Communist activities in the Philadelphia area. Hearings"

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Given By 

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COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

HEARINGS 

BEFORE THE 

COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

EIGHTY-SECOND CONGRESS 

SECOND SESSION 



OCTOBER 13, 14, 15, AND 16, 1952 



Printed for the use of the Committee on Un-American Activities 





UNITED STATES 
GOVERXMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
25241 , WASHINGTON : 1952 



^ 



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COMMITTEE ON UN-AMEKICAN ACTIVITIES 
United States House of Representatives 

JOHN S. WOOD, Georgia, Chairman 
FRANCIS E. WALTER, Pennsylvania HAROLD H. VELDB. Illinois 

MORGAN M. MOULDER, Missouri BERNARD W. KEARNEY, New York 

CLYDE DOYLE, California DONALD L. JACKSON, California 

JAMES B. FRAZIER, JE., Tennessee CHARLES E. POTTER, Michigan 

FRANK S. Tavenner, Jr., Counsel 
LOUIS J. Russell, Senior Investigator 
JOHN W. Carrington, Clerk of Committee 
Raphael I. NixON, Director of Research 

n 



CONTENTS 



October 13, 1952: 

Testimony of — ^'^"'^ 

Thomas F. Delaney 4301 

David Davis . 4329 

Max Helfand 4341 

October 14, 1952: 
Testimonv of — - 

Max "Helfand (resumed) 4346 

John Joseph Ellis 4351 

John Tisa 4358. 

Jacks. Zucker 4364 

Jules Abercauph 4373: 

October 15, 1952: 
Testimony of — 

Samuel J. DiMaria 4381 

Abe Sokolov 4419 

October 16, 1952: 
Testimony of — 

Michael Fersick 4430 

Sterling Rochester 4434 

Charles William MacBride 4442 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

Davis Exhibit No. 2 — Daily Worker, May 24, 1938, page 5, article headed, 
"State Parleys Plan for Nat'l C. P. Convention Opening Thursday" 

Facing 4470 
Davis Exhibit No. 4 — Booklet entitled, "Lenin Memorial, 1939 Yearbook,' 
dated January 20, 1939, at time of a Lenin Memorial Meeting, held by 
the Communist Partv, at Convention Hall, Philadelphia, Pa., Frida}", 

January 20, 1939_.__" 4444-4468 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 (same as Davis Exhibit No. 4) 4444-4468 

Helfand Exhibit No. 6 (same as Davis Exhibit No 2) Facing 4470 

Ellis Exhibit No. 2 (same as Davis Exhibit No. 4) 4444-4468 

Ellis Exhibit No. 4 — Advertisement issued by the Communist Party of the 
United States, headed, "Vote for the Following Communist Candidates," 
listing candidates on the Communist ticket for the 1938 elections in 

Philadelphia (unnumbered pages, this vol.) '. At end 

Philadelphia Exhibit No. 3 (introduced during testimony of Samuel 
DiMaria) — June Literature Bulletin, issued by the Literature-Education 
Commission, Eastern Pennsylvania, Communist Political Association, 
listing clubs in that section of the Communist Political Association and 
the quantities of types of literature sold to them and at what cost- 4453 and 4454 
Sokolov Exhibit No. 2 (same as Davis Exhibit No. 2) Facing 4470 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 



MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1952 

United States House or Representatives, 

Subcommittee of the Committee 

ON Un-American Activities, 

Philadelphia^ Pa. 

public hearing 

The subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities met, 
pursuant to notice, at 10 a. m., in Federal Court, room No, 1, Federal 
Building, Philadelphia, Pa., Hon. John S. Wood (chairman) pre- 
siding. 

Committee members present : Representatives John S. Wood (chair- 
man), Francis E. Walter, Clyde Doyle, and Harold H. Velde. 

Staff members present: Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., counsel; Thomas 
W. Beale, Sr., assistant counsel ; William Jackson Jones, Alvin Stokes, 
Earl L. Fuoss, and Frank Bonora, investigators; Raphael I. Nixon, 
director of research ; John W. Carrington, clerk ; and Thelma Scearce, 
staff member. 

Mr. Wood. The hearing will be in order. 

Mr. Reporter, let the record show that, acting under the authority 
of the resolution establishing the House Committee on Un-American 
Activities, I have set up a subcommittee composed of Representatives 
Francis Yj. Walter, Clyde Doyle, Harold H. Velde, and myself, John 
S. Wood, as chairman, all of whom are present, and for the purpose 
of conducting hearings, beginning today, relating to the extent, char- 
acter, and objectives of alleged Communist Party activities in this 
vital defense area. 

Many forms of the Communist conspiracy, including that of espio- 
nage, by foreign agents have been brought to light by this committee. 
In its efforts to carry out the duties imposed upon it by the Congress, 
tliis comuiittee has investigated and exposed Communist infiltration 
in entertainment, education, and Government, and other fields of 
industry. 

Wlien fascism presented a clear and present danger to the security 
of the United States, the committee was one of the first to make exten- 
sive investigations into the extent and character of the development 
of that totalitarian doctrine. 

Investigations conducted by the committee in Baltimore, Md., State 
of Massachusetts, State of Michigan, Chicago, 111., and other loca- 
tions throughout the United States during the Eighty-second Con- 
gress have disclosed a pattern : 

(1) Communist concentration in major defense areas of this coun- 
try; and 

4299 



4300 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IX THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

(2) Communist Party activities in obtaining and relayin<>: to tlieir 
international organization vital data relating to industrial potentiali- 
ties; and 

(-■>) Commujiist Party efforts to colonize the defense industry. 

During these investigations the committee has at no time interested 
itself in internal disputes within labor unions or in disputes between 
management and labor, but it has concentrated its efforts upon ascer- 
taining the character and extent of the Communist Party activities 
of those who attempted to cloak themselves Avith respectability of 
imionism. 

An examination of the decisions of the Comintern and Central Com- 
mittee of the Communist Party of the United States show that the 
most important task, and I quot" fron) the Comnnniist official organ 
of the Connnunist Party of the United States is : 

To shift the center of gravity of the daily activities of our party, unions, anrl 
opjiosition fjroups to the shops and factories to make the factories, the mines 
and mills and the ships our fortress. 

The Communist Party has attempted to persuade the rank and 
file tliat this committee is conducting these hearings for the purpose 
of harassing unions and creating racial issues. This typical propa- 
ganda effort on the part of the Connnunist Party has been worn 
threadbare. The connnittee abhors the exploitatioii of any group 
and has always believed in and attempted to uphold the basic in- 
tegrity, character, and loyalty of Americans, regardless of race, color, 
or creed. 

I would like at this time, before beginning the liearings, to make 
this announcement to the public generally. 

We are here at the direction of the Congress trying to discharge a 
duty and an obligation that has been placed upon us by the Congress. 
No one who is present or who will be present in this room during 
these hearings except the witnesses who are under subpena is required 
to be here. You are here by the permission of the committee and not 
by the compulsion of the committee. 

This committee will not countenance any attempt to make any 
demonstration either favorable or unfavorable toward the commit- 
tee's undertaking or toward any person called as a witness. 

May I say that I do not mean this in any spirit of threat, but such 
conduct if it should occur, I should promptly ask the United States 
marshal to eject those who start or participate in any demonstration 
in this hearing room and if necessary to clear the entire room. 

(At this point, the subcommittee heai'd the testimony of Gen. 
Walter Bedell Smitli before going on with the inquiry into Com- 
munist activities in the Philadelphia area. Testimony on the Phila- 
delphia question follows: ) 

The committee will be in order, please. 

Mr. Counsel, are you ready now to proceed with the hearing in- 
volving this area? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes, sir, I would like to call Mr. Tliomas F. 
Delaney. 

Mr. Woon. Would you raise your right hand and be sworn, please? 
Do you solemnly swear the evidence you shall give this subcommittee 
shall be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help 
you God ? 

Mr. Delaney. I do. 



COMPvrUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4301 

Mr. WcoD. Will you have a seat iiere and are you represented by 
counsel ? 

Mr. Delaxey. I am, sir. 

TESTIMONY OF THOMAS F. DELANEY, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, BERNARD L. BARKAN 

Mr. "Wood. Will counsel please identify himself for the record ? 

]Mr. B.ARKAx. Bernard L. Barkan. appearino- for M. H. Goldstein, 
1411 Walnut Street. 

Mr. Wood. Mv. Barkan, at any time durino- the prooress of the in- 
terrogation of the witness, you are at liberty to confer with him as you 
deem ])roper. 

Mr. Barkax. I should like for the record to show that we are coun- 
sel for the International Union of Electric, Radio, and Machine 
Workers. CIO, by whom Mr. Delaney is presently employed. 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Delaney, you are at liberty at any time you desire to 
confer v.ith Your counsel and seek such advice and counsel as you 
think yourself in need of. 

Mr. Delax^ey. Thank you, sir. 

Mr. Velde. I would like to <j;et clear on the statement of for whom 
he is appearing. 

Mr. Barkax. We rei)resent his present employers, the International 
Association of Electrical Workers, CIO. 

Mr. Wood. At this moment you represent Mr. Delaney ? 

Mr. Barkax. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Wood. Very well. 

Mr. Tavexxer. What is your name, please ? 

]\Ir. Delaxey. Thomas F. Delaney. 

Mr. Tavex'x^er. When and where were your born, Mr. Delaney? 

Mr. Delaxey. I was born in Philadelphia, on February 8, 1912. 

Mr. Tavexxer. How are you presently employed? 

Mr. Delaxey. As an organizer for the International Electrical 
and Radio and Machine Workers, CIO. 

Mr. Tavex^xer. How long have you been an organizer for the lUE ? 

]Mr. Delaxey. Since June of this year. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Prior to that time, how were you employed? 

Mr. Delax'^ey. I was employed as an organizer for local 155, UE. 

Mr. Tavexx^er. And how long had you been employed as an organ- 
izer for local 155 of the UE ? 

Mr. Delaxey. I first became employed in 1913 as an organizer, and 
continued to 1952 with the exception of a short period of 1913 and 
1944 when I was in the merchant marine. 

]Mr. Tavexxer. Prior to 1943 had you been active in labor matters? 

Mr. Delaxey. Yes. 

Mr. Tavexxer. What was the nature of your employment back, 
say. to a few years ]:>rior to 1943 ? 

Mr. Delaxey. Well, prior to that, immediately prior to that, to 
my election as an officer or rather as an organizer in local 155, I was 
employed by the Fox Products Co., as a production worker. 

Mr. Tavexxer. How long Avere you employed by Fox Products ? 

Mr. Delaxey, Just under 2 years. 

Mr. Ta\t:xxer. What is the nature of their business ? 



4302 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Delanet. They were engaged in war work during the war, 
mainly small parts for the radio industry. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was your educational training? 

Mr. Delaney. I completed the elementary school and had a course 
of 2 years in commercial business. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Delaney, in the course of your activity with 
various labor unions, and you have had considerable activity with 
labor unions, were you ever solicited to become a member of the Com- 
munist Party ? 

Mr. Delaney. I was. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you become a member ? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir ; I did become a member. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell the committee in your own words just 
how you became a member and the circumstances under which you 
became a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Delaney. I first began to read the literature of the Communist 
Party in 1936. It seemed to me that at the time they were interested 
in fighting for the rights of the under dog, and in 1938 I took a civil- 
service examination and became employed by the Department of Pub- 
lic Assistance of Pennsylvania as a relief visitor. While working in 
that capacity I had occasion to visit hundreds of homes in which I 
saw able-bodied people who were unable to find employment, and at 
the same time I had been invited to attend some of the rallies of the 
Communist Party. After further reading their literature, it seemed 
to me that they had a program which would help to build a better 
society, that capitalism had failed to solve the major problems of our 
times, which was full employment. The program of the Commu- 
nist Party as I understood it was to build a society that would solve 
the problem of full employment, that would avoid periodic crises and 
avoid all wars. It seemed to me a very attractive program at the 
time and I felt it was a privilege to join an organization that was 
fighting for such objectives. So in 1939 I joined the Communist 
Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did a time come when the attractiveness that 
you have mentioned of the Communist Party which led you into it 
ceased to exist ? 

JNIr. Delaney. Yes, sir ; it did. 

Mr. Tavenner. What did you do ? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, I left the Communist Party for the same rea- 
sons that I joined it. I had felt that they were working for the work- 
ing people and the interests of tlie working people, and I later found 
that they had only contempt for working people, and that they were 
interested mainly in gaining power for the sake of power. That is 
why I left the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did you leave the Communist Party ? 

Mv. Delaney. Well, I had broken with them sometime ago, but I 
did not began to actively fight against the Communist Party until 
IVIay of this year. 

Mr. TA^T.NNER. May of 1952? 

Mr. Delaney. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, I would like to go back to the beginning of 
your Communist Party membership and ask you various questions 
regarding your own participation in the activities of the party and 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4303 

I will ask YOU to tell the coinniittee all you kuow about its activities 
if you are williiio- to do it. 

Mr. Delanky. Yes, sir. 

^Ir. Tavenner. Who recruited you into the Conununist Party ? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, the person that recruited me is deceased. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, I will not ask you to mention the name of a 
deceased person. What branch, or to what branch of the Conununist 
Party were you assioned when you became a member in 1939^ 

Mr. Delaney. To the branch known as the professional branch at- 
tached to the employees of the department of public assistance. 

Mr. TAVENNf:R. You spoke of it as a professional branch. Will you 
describe that further? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, since the members were social workers and they 
considered their work as a profession, that is the reason it was given 
that name. 

Mr. Tavenner. We have just come back from hearings in California 
where it was demonstrated by the testimony that the Communist 
Party organized cells or branches of the Communist Party in the 
various professions, such as law, medicine, and Government employees, 
and that is as far as the testimony has gone thus far. It was also in 
the Newsjmper Guild. In each instance the membership in these 
various cells was limited to the particular profession. Was that true 
in the case of the professional cell that you become a member of? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes ; that was true. 

Mr. Tavenner. And they were social workers? 

Mr. Delaney. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Approximately how many persons were members 
of this professional cell in 1939? 

Mr. Delaney. About 15. 

Mr. Ta\-enner. Did it increase substantially in size at any time? 

Mr. Delaney. No ; I think rather the opposite ; it decreased in size 
from that time on. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the reason for that, do you know? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, when our country entered the war there was 
a very fast switch on the part of the Communist Party that most 
people couldn't understand, and still don't understand to this day, 
except that it was apparent from 1939, when I was associated with 
them, until 1941 they claimed to be for peace, but innnediately when 
the Soviet Union was attacked, instead of the "Yanks are not com- 
ing," the Yanks couldn't get there fast enough to suit them. So a 
number of people left the party at that time. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. In other words, some people couldn't take the switch 
in the Communist Party line as quickly as it was made? 

Mr. Delaney. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. D0YI.E. Was that in 1941 ; did I hear correctly? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you recall the names of any of the officers of 
that professional branch of the Conununist Party? 

]Mr. Delaney. There was Max Helfand ancf Sam Kaplan. 

Mr. TA^'ENNER. Will you spell Helfand? 

Mr. Delaney. H-e-1-f-a-n-d. 

Mr. Tavenner. And Kaplan ? 

Mr. Delaney. K-a-p-1-a-n. 



4304 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether Max Helfand used any other 
name? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes ; he was known as Mac Harris at one time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was he known by that name solely in the party — 
the Communist Party — or was he known by that name also outside of 
the party? 

Mr. Delaney. That I don't know; I know that he was known by 
that name in the party. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was his occupation at that time? 

yh\ Delaney. When I first met him he was, I believe, the trade- 
union secretary for the eastern Pennsylvania Communist district. 

Mr. Tavenner. Trade-union secretary — what area would that 
include? 

Mr. Delaney. Eastern Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall what position in the party if any Sam 
Kaplan held at that time ? 

Mr. Delaney. No ; I do not recall. 

Mr. Tavenner. What offices in the branch did they hold? 

Mr. Delaney. I believe Kaplan w^as educational director in the 
branch. 

Mr. Tavenner. What did the educational director do in your branch 
of the party ? 

]\Ir. Delaney. Well, they w^ere responsible for securing: and distrib- 
uting; the current literature that was supposed to be given to all or 
sold to all Communists, and also in lots for them to distribute and 
sell elsewhere. They w^ere responsible for the sale of the Daily Worker 
and the Sunday Worker. They were responsible to see that each group 
held discussions on basic theory of Marxist doctrine. 

Mr. Tavenner. That indicates that you had a reg;ular course of 
study, prescribed study, while a member of the Communist Party ( 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you recall any of the books or pamphlets which 
wei'e given to you to study ? 

Mr. Del.\ney. Yes, sir; of the books that were known as the basic 
tenets of the Communist Party, there was the History of the Com- 
munist Partv in the Soviet Union, the Foundations of Leninism. Das 
Kapital by Marx, Political Economy by Leontiev, and there were a 
vast number of them. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall State and Revolution, by Lenin? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, I do. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall Left- Wing Communism, by Lenin ? 

Mr. Delaney. I do ; yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Fred- 
eiick Engels? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. TavT'^nner. Handbook of Marxism ; do you recall that? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. And Problems of Leninism, by Joseph Stalin ? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall that? 

Mr. Delaney. Foundations of Leninism, I believe it is. 

Mr. Tavenner. I believe there w^ere two of those books by Stalin. 

Mr. Delaney. Pardon me a second, please. 

(Whereupon the witness conferred wnth his counsel.) 



COMMUNIST ACTIVI'J'IES IN THP: PHILADELPHIA AREA 4305 

]\rr. Tavkxxkk. 1 believe tliei'e were two books by Stalin, one en- 
titled Problems of lieninism, and the other is Foundations of Leninism, 

Mr. Dki^4Ney. I don't recall the distinction, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do yon recall Invving studied Connnnnist Strategy 
and Tactics, by List on M. Oaks '( 

Mr. Delaney. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you have lecturei's who came to your meetings 
an.d helped in the instruction of the classes as far as yon can recall^ 

jNlr. Delaney. Well, occasionally there would be an official from 
the district who would attend the branch meeting, in order to check 
up that such studies were being made, but generally it was an assign- 
ment that would be given at the previous meeting to one of the persons 
to carry on at the following meeting. 

^Slr. Tavenner. Do you remembei- the names of any of those persons 
who came from the district organization ? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, there were a large number of the district 
organizei'S who came from time to time. There was Sam Darcy, Phillip 
Frankfeld, Dave Davis, Max Helfand, Frank C'estare, Sam Donchin, 
and Ed Strong. 

Mr. Tavenner. How do you spell it^ 

Mr. Delaney. S-t-r-o-n-g. 

Mr. Tavenner. At the time you became a member of this group or 
cell of the Connnnnist Party, were you a member of any labor union? 

]\{r. Dei^vney. Yes, sir. I was a member of local 4(5 of the State, 
County and Municipal Workers of America, CIO. 

Mr. Tavenner. That was Abe Flaxer's organization? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes ; I believe he was the international president. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, as you observed it, what was the principal 
function of the Communist Party at that time in organizing this 
branch of the Connnnnist Party that you were a member of? 

Mr. Delaney. You mean the function of the branch itself ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. Delaney. Well, in addition to being active in the union their 
job was, as we noticed, a study of Marxist doctrines, raising funds 
for party causes, increasing the sale of the Daily Worker and the 
Sunday Worker by door-to-door assignments, and recruiting of new 
members. 

Mr. Tavenner. About how many members of your local union of 
the State, County and Municipal Workers were members of the Com- 
munist Party to j^our knowledge? 

]Mr. Delaney. Well, I understand there were about 75. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many members were there of that local union ? 
I am not talking about Communist members, but how many members 
of the local were there? 

Mr. Delaney. A maximum, I would say, of 1,200. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were these Communist Party members divided up 
into local groups or cells or branches of the party ? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did you remain in the first cell, the Com- 
munist Partv cell which was known as the cell of professional workers? 

Mr. Delaney. Until the end of 1941. 

Mr. Tavenner. And how were you employed at that time ? 

Mr. Delaney. Asa visitor for tlie department of miblic assistance. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, what was your next employment ? 



4306 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Delaney. I secured work in the Fox Products Co. 

Mr, Tavenner. A^Hiien you secured work in the Fox Products did 
3^ou remain in the same professional cell or were you ti'ansferred '. 

Mr. Delaney. I was transferred to the metal-trades section. 

Mr. Tavenner. To the metal-trades section of the Communist 
Party ? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Taa-enner. Now, will you tell us about that group, please? Tell 
us first who were members of that group with you, if you can recall. 

Mr. Delaney. Well, the organizer of that group was Philip Saba. 

Mr. Tamcnner. Will you spell the last name, please? 

Mr. Delaney. S-a-b-a. The other members of the group were David 
Davis, Max Helfand, Mike Fersick 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you s})ell the name, please? 

Mr. Delaney. F-e-r-s-i-c-k, Sam DiMaria. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you spell that, please ? 

Mr. Delaney. D-i-M-a-r-ia, who I would like to add has joined 
me in this present fight against the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes; and I think that I should suggest to you now, 
that if any of these persons whose names you are now giving or have 
given have left the Communist Party, to your definite knowledge, you 
should say so. 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. TA^"ENNER. Have any of them up to this point left the Commu- 
nist Party to your knowledge? 

Mr. Delaney. Not to my knowledge, with the exception of Sam Di- 
Maria ; I don't know about the others. There was Mary and Bob Mor- 
rell, Ethel Spiller, Helen DeMarco, and Don Ferguson. 

I understand. Mi'. Chairman, that Don Ferguson is no longer and 
liasn't been for many years a member of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, you stated that Mr. Sam DiMaria had joined 
you in a fight against the Communists. Have you cooperated with 
other Government agencies in making known to them important mat- 
ters relating to the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. I believe you told us the name of the organizer of 
the Communist Party at the time you were transferred to the metals 
section ? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. TA^^<:NNER. Who was that? 

Mr. Delaney. Philip Saba, 

Mr. Tavenner. How many were members of that group of the Com- 
muiiist Party ? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, there are a maximum of 30, I would say. 

Mr. Tavenner. And what trades did they represent, if any? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, they were either trade-union officials or workers 
in the shops, in metalworking trades. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did you remain a member of that group? 

INIr. Delaney. Until I got out of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Your next employment, I believe, was with Local 
155, UE? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the nature of your employment with that 
oreanization ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4307 

Mr. Delaney. I was elected as a local organizer. 

Mr. TA^^:NNER. And you were a member of the Communist Party 
when you were so elected'^ 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. TAy-ENNER. Do you know^ whether the fact that you were a 
member of the Communist Party had any bearing upon your election 
to that position as organizer '? 

Mr. Del.\ney. It w^ould not have been possible to be elected as an 
organizer unless I had been a member of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Walter. Then do 1 understand you to mean that all organizers 
are members of the Communist Party 'i 

Mr. Delaney. In that particular local ; yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you elaborate on that, and tell us in what way 
the Communist Party controlled the election of organizers of the Local 
155. UE? 

Mr. Delaney. "VYell, as the local grew from 1,900 members to 
approximtely 7,000 

Mr. Tavenner. There you are speaking of Local 155, UE? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. There was need for more organizers and 
prior to the time of the election of an organizer, the matter would 
be discussed in a Communist branch and an individual would be 
decided upon. Thereupon the members of that branch would secure 
pledges from people in various shops that they would support and 
bring others out to support the candidacy of that individual. 

So, that at the time of the election, there would be a solid block 
to whom the individual may not necessarily be known, but that were 
pledged to vote for theuL In that wa}^ anyone who was not so endorsed 
could not possibly win. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, who made up that block? Were non-Commu- 
nists members of that block as well as Communists ? 

Mr. Delaney. No, sir; they were all Comnumists who made the 
original decision as to who would run for office. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, in your case, you were a member of the Com- 
munist Party, and I assume from what you have stated that the Com- 
munist Party members met, and it was agreed that you would become 
a candidate for that position, the position of organizer of the local? 

Mr. DeLu\ney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you recall what argument was used, if any, as 
to the support of you for that position ? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, prior to my election in that position, I had 
been elected to the executive board of the local, and it was between 
elections, that is between regular elections of the local that the decision 
was made that another organizer had to be added to the statf. It was 
then proposed to the executive board that I would be a logical candi- 
date. I was then appointed by the executive board subject to the 
ap):>roval of the membership at the following meeting and the approval 
w^as secured. 

Mr. Tavenner. But that entire arrangement was set up by the 
Communist Party ? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, some one must have taken the leadership in 
arranging for the control of the elections in the local, so as to see that 
Conununist Party members became the organizers. 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 



4308 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavenxer. Who took that leadership ? 

Mr. Delaney. David Davis. 

Mr. Tavenner. David Davis ? 

Mr. Delaney. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. What position did lie hold in the local union, if any? 

Mr. Delaney. He was business representative of the local union. 

Mr. Tavenner. How is he now employed ? 

Mr. Delaney. He is employed by the local union as an organizer, 
I believe. 

Mr. Tavenner. What local ? 

Mr. Delaney. 155, UE. 

Mr. Tavenner. Has he remained connected with that local since 
the time that you have testified about? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many organizers were there in your union? 

Mr. Delaney. Four. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were any of them members of the Communist 
Party in addition to yourself? 

Mr. Delaney. All were. 

Mr. Tavenner. What were their names ? 

Mr. Delaney. David Davis, Max Helfand, Sara DilSIaria, and 
myself. 

Mr. Tavenner. I understand that in May you withdrew from the 
Communist Party, or at least you began fighting the Conununist 
Party in May? 

Mr. Delaney. I had withdrawn l)efore then. 

Mr. Tavenner. You had withdrawn before? 

Mr. Delaney. 1 began to fight them in May. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you still an official in local 155, UE ? 

Mr. Delaney. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who took your place ? 

Mr. Delaney. I understand my place was taken by a Wilford 
Shervington. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is he known to you to be a member of the Com- 
munist Party ? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. On what do you base your knowledge ? 

Mr. Delaney. I met with him as a member of the Conununist 
Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did Mr. Sam DiMaria also Avithdraw ;is an or- 
ganizer of the UE, 155 ? 

Mr. Delaney. We were suspended, sir. He had witlidrawn and 
began to fight against the Communist Party, and we were suspended 
from our positions. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who replaced him? 

Mr. Delaney. I don't know, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. While you were a member of the Communist Party 
and were also organizer for local 155, UE, did you have occasion 
to meet in the city of Philadelphia with a city committee of the Com- 
munist Party on any occasions? 

]\Ir. Delaney. 1 have met with them occasionally ; yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the occasion for your meeting with them ? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, as a member of the trade-union commission. I 
would occasionally find mj^self in the company of the city conunittee. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4309 

Mr. Tavexxer. Now, you stated you were a member of a trade-union 
commission. Do vou mean trade-union commission of the Communist 
Party ? 

Mr. Delaxey. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Weli, tell us the reasons for the appointment of such 
a connnittee and Avhat its functions were. 

]Mr. Delaxey. Well, it was an arm of the Communist Party different 
from the branches, and its function was to keep an active check on the 
affairs of the local or locals where the party had some strength and to 
plan tlie strategy and tactics to be used from time to time. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Well, who made up the trade-union commission? 
Were there representatives of different groups of the Communist 
Party ( 

Mr. Delax'^ey. Yes, sir; and different shops. 

Mr. Tavexx^er. Well, will you describe that set-up a little more fully, 
what shops, and what Communist Party cells? 

Mr. Delaxey. Well, there were representatives from local 155. 

Mv. Tavex'X'er. And you were that representative? 

Mr. Delaxey. Yes, sir ; I was one of them. 

Mr. Tavex^xer. Were there others from your local ? 

Mr. Delax^ey. Yes, sir. 

]\Ir. Tavexx'er. Who were they ? 

Mr. Delaxey. David Davis and Lauren Taylor. 

Mr. Ta"\-ex'xer. Will you spell the first name? 

Mr. Delaxey. L-a-u-r-e-n Taylor. 

]SIr. Tavex'x^er. Were there any others from local 155 ? 

Mr. Delax'^ey. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavex'X'er. Now, what other cells of the Communist Party were 
rei)resented on that trade-union commission of the Communist Party? 

]Mr. Delax'ey. There were representatives from the local 107, 
Westinghouse. 

Mr. Ta\-exxer. That is local 107 of the UE? 

Mr. Delaxey, Yes, sir. 

^Ir. Tavexxer. Who were the representatives ; do you recall ? 

Mr. Delax'ey. Matt Snyder. 

Mr. Tavexx^er. How do you spell that? 

Mr. Delaxey. S-n-y-d-e-r, and Norman Smith. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Can you identify those persons a little more defi- 
nitely as to what their occupation was at that time ? 

]Mr. Delaxey. They were employed in the Westinghouse plant ; that 
is all I know. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Do you know where they are employed now? 

Mr. Delax-^ey. No, sir ; I do not. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Now, that is local 107. Were any other locals of 
the Communist Party members from locals of the UE on this trade- 
union commission with you? 

Mr. Delaxey. No ; the others were functionaries of the Communist 
Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. On what level ? 

Mr. Delaxey. On the district level, that is the eastern Pennsylvania 
district. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Who Avere they ? 

Mr. Delaxey. There was Bob Klonsky. 



4310 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavenner. How do you spell the last name ? 

Mr, Delaney. K-1-o-n-s-k-y. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will yon identify him a little more fully? 

Mr. Delaney. He was a paid functionary of the Communist Party, 
and Joseph Kuzma. That is K-u-z-m-a. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was he also a paid functionary of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr, Tav^enner. What positions did each of these men hold in the 
Communist Party ? 

Mr. Delaney. I believe Klonsky was educational director, and 
Kuzma was trade-union secretary, 

Mr. TA^^NNER, Were there any persons on that trade-union com- 
mission who were not members of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Delaney. No, sir, 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know the names of any other persons who 
were members of that commission ? 

Mr. Delaney, No, sir, 

Mr, Ta\t.nner, Now, we were speaking of your meeting occasionally 
with members of the city committee of the Communist Party. Were 
those persons different in name fi'om tliose who were members of the 
trade-union commission of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, they w^ould be different functionaries; that is 
all. 

Mr. Tamsnner. What were their names ? 

Mr. Delaney. Ed Strong, Tom Nabried 

]\[r. Tavenner. Let me interrupt you there. Will you describe them 
a little more fully, and do you know what they did ? Were they paid 
functionaries of the Comuiunist Party or were they employed else- 
where ? 

Mr. Delaney. Strong was the district organizer of the Communist 
Party, and Nabried was a functionary, and I don't know what his 
task was, 

Mr. Tavenner. All right ; who else ? 

Mr. Delaney. That is all that I recall there. Over the years, as 
Strong replaced others, there would be other district organizers who 
would be present at such gatherings. 

Mr, Tavenner. Well, now, if you can recall the names of other 
persons who later on attended these city conunittee meetings of the 
Communist Party, we would like to have them. 

^ Mr. Delaney. Wei], I had mentioned that Philip Frankfeld and 
Sam Donchin and Frank Cestare and Philip Bart 

Mr, Tavenner, He became editor of the Daily Worker at a later 
date ; did he not ? 

Mr, Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did Steve Nelson ever attend any of the meetings 
that you attended? 

Mr. Delaney. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you hold any position with UP]; that is, with 
your local? Let us take first youi- local 155 of the UE, in addition 
to the position as organizer. 

Mr. Delaney. Well, I was a member of the executive board as a 
sergeant-at-arms from 1942 until I was elected as an organizer. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4311 

Mr. Ta^tenner. Well, let nie ask you a little about the fuuction of 
the executive board. AVhat was the functiou of the executive board 
of your local union as distinguished from the functions of the or- 
ganizers ? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, the members of the executive board were all 
employed in the various shops, and the board consisted of 15 of these 
persons who were elected to office, and they would meet weekly and 
handle the affairs of the union. The paid organizers would meet 
Avitli them and would have a voice on each motion but no vote. 

Mr. Tavenxek. In other words, the organizers were the function- 
ing staff of the organization? 

Mr. Delaney. That is right, sir. 

Mr. TA\Ti;N]srER. Relatively speaking, which of the two groups took 
the most active control and direction of the affairs of the local union? 

Mr. Delaney. The staff, sir, in that the agenda would be made up 
by the staff and the meml>ers of the board would usually defer to the 
opinions of the staff in that they were busy working in shops all day, 
and the staff was supposedly aware of what was going on, so that the 
staff influenced in a great measure the decisions made by the board. 

Mr. Taat.nner. Therefore, if the Communist Party controlled the 
organizers which constituted the staff, they could in turn direct and 
control the acti\aties of the local ? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. And I believe you told us that all of the organizers 
were members of the Connnunist Party ? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Xow, have you held any positions in the national 
organization of the UE? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Taat5Nner. What position ? 

Mr. Delaney. I was a member of the general executive board of 
the international union. 

Mr. Tamdnner. Then you became a national officer of the I^E? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, no, sir; there are three national officers as 
such, and my title was member of the board. 

Mr. Ta^^nner. To what extent did the Connnunist Party in- 
fkience your election to that board? 

Mr. Delaney. In the same manner as it influenced my election as 
an organizer. I could not have been elected had I not been a mem- 
ber of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Ta\tsnner. Will you identify, please, those persons wdio were 
members of the executive board, the national executive board of the 
UE, who were known to you to be members of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Delaney. I never met with any of the members of the national 
executive board as a Communist. I was told by Davis that there were 
a number of them who were considered reliable; and, therefore, I 
assume they were Connnunists. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall tlie number? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, about half a dozen, or thereabouts. 

Mr. Tavenner. Out of a total membership of what? 

Mr. Del^vney. Twenty-three. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall any occurrence that might be the basis 
of knowledge on your part that any particular members of this execu- 
tive board were members of the Communist Party ? 

25241 — 52 2 



4312 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Delaney. Only insofar as the Communist Party line or objec- 
tives as they would be explained to me prior to the meetings of the 
general executive board would be supported by these other people on 
the executive board. 

Mr. Tavenner. When you were on this board, was it a district board 
or was it the national board? 

Mr. Delaney, The national board. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, between your local and the national board, 
was there still another board? 

Mr. Delaney. There was a district board. 

Mr. Tavenner. The district board ? 

Mr. Delaney, Yes, sir, 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you serve on the district board ? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes; I served as secretary of the district, and in that 
way I automatically became a member of the general executive board 
as a result of my election to the district. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, did you have knowledge that other persons on 
the district board were members of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Delaney. None other than Davis and myself to my knowledge. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. How many were members of the district board of 
theUE? 

Mr. Delaney. About 15, 1 would say. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the number of the district ? 

Mr. Delaney. District No. 1 — the number of members you mean ? 

Mr. Tavenner, No ; I meant what was the title of this district, and 
did the districts go by numbers? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes; this was district council No, 1 of the UE. 

Mr. Tavenner, Wliat area did district No, 1 include? 

Mr. Delaney, Eastern Pennsylvania, south New Jersey, Delaware, 
Maryland, and part of Virginia. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you have occasion to meet members of the execu- 
tive committee of other districts of the UE ? 

Mr. Delaney. As a member of the national board, I did; yes, sir, 

Mr. Tavenner, And do you recall who represented, or the names 
of any of those who were members of district 11? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir; there was Ernest DeMaio, and Grant 
Oakes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Both of them were from Chicago; were they not? 

Mr. Delaney, Yes, sir, 

Mr, Tavenner, How well were you acquainted with Grant Oakes? 

Mr, Delaney, Well, I had met with him as a board member and 
occasionally had a drink with liim. And other than that I wasn't too 
well acquainted with him, 

Mr. Tavenner, What were the circiunstances under which you met 
Grant Oakes ? 

Mr, Delaney. He was elected to the board, I believe in 1948 or 1949 
and when the board convened I met with him then in New York City. 

Mr. Tavenner, Were you ever sent to Grant Oakes with any matter ? 

Mr, Delaney, No, sir, 

Mr. Tavenner. What were the circumstances under which you be- 
came acquainted with Ernest DeMaio? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, in the same manner that when I was elected to 
the board, he was also a member of the board. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4313 

Mr. Tavennek. How well did you know him? 

JMr, Delaney. Not too well. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you ever sit in a Connnunist Party meeting 
with either of them ? 

Mr. Delaney. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavennek. Did you ever have a conversation with either of 
them regarding the Communist Party or its objectives? 

Mr. Delaney. Not as Connnunists. I had conversations with them 
about the policy of the UE which was at times the same policy as the 
Communist Party, so that it was difficult to differentiate the policies. 

Mr. Tavennek. Did you discover during your activity as a member 
of the national executive committee that the Communist Party line 
was being fostered upon the board? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir ; I did. 

Mr. Tavennek. Well, how did you come to a realization that that 
was true and what were the circumstances? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, just prior to a meeting which usually was 
called quarterly in New York City, I would be contacted by a member 
of the Communist Party and told that certain things the Communist 
Party hoped to attain and have passed by the general executive board, 
so that these policies were then introduced at the board meeting and 
very often were passed. 

Mr. Tavennek. Who gave you that information ? Who passed the 
Communist Party line down to you ? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, sometimes it would be Joe Kuzma who was 
trade-union secretary of the eastern Pennsylvania district here before 
I left for New York, and other times it was Walter Barry, who was an 
international representative of the UE. 

Mr. Tavennek. Will you spell that ? 

Mr. Delaney. B-a-r-r-y. 

Mr. Tavennek. Was Walter Barry known to you to be a member 
of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavennek. Did he hold any position in the Communist Party 
at any time ? 

Mr. Delaney. Not that I know of. 

Mr. Tavennek. Do you know what the occupation of Barry was 
at any time ? 

Mr. Delaney, He was the international representative of the UE. 

Mr. Tavennek. Yes, in addition to his being an international rep- 
resentative, do you know, is he still or does he still hold that position, 
that is what I mean to ask. 

Mr. Delaney. I believe he is now working for the March of Labor, 
a magazine. 

Mr. Tavennek. Do you know by whom the IMarch of Labor is spon- 
sored ? 

Mr. Delaney. No, sir; I don't know who it is sponsored by directly. 

Mr. Tavennek. Who is the editor ? 

Mr. Delaney. I think a person named John Steuben. 

]Mr. Tavennek. Do you know how to spell that ? 

Mr. Delaney. S-t-e'-u-b-e-n, I believe. 

]Mr. Wood. I guess we had better suspend here, counsel, and the 
committee will stand in recess until 2 o'clock. 

(Whereupon at 12:30 p. m., a recess was taken until 2 p. m., the 
same day.) 



4314 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

AFTER RECESS 

( The hearing was resumed at 2 p. m. ) 

Mr. Wood. Let us have order, jilease. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Dehmey, at the time we recessed this morning, 
I was asking you about Mr. John Steuben, editor of the March of 
Labor. Are you personally acquainted with him ? 

Mr. Delaney. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know where March of Labor is published? 

Mr. Delaney. No. sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are acquainted with the provisions of the Taft- 
Hartley Act which relate to certain officials of labor unions, are you 
not ? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know what the ]Dolicy of the Communist 
Party was with regarcl to its members who occupied those positions 
in labor which were required to sign a non-Communist affidavit under 
that act? 

Mr. Delaney. The policy as ex])laiiied to me was that — — 

Mr. D0YI.E. May I ask the witness to speak just a little louder, 
please. 

Mr. Delaney. The policy as I understood it was that those persons 
who had to sign the non-Communist affidavit were to be considered 
as no longer Communists. In other words, they had resigned from 
the Communist Party, if they had been members. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did they take part in Communist Party meetings 
after that time, that is, any of those that you knew to have been mem- 
bers of the party and who signed the affidavit? 

Mr. Delaney. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Was any device used to keep such persons, that is, 
those who had formerly resigned from the party and signed the af- 
fidavit, informed as to the Communist Party line and its activities ? 

Mr. Delaney. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know of instances where persons still re- 
maining in the Communist Party advised those who had formerly 
been members of the business of the party ? 

Mr. Delaney. I don't know definitely, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. During the time that you were a member of the 
national executive board of the UE, did you have occasion to come in 
contact with other members of the Communist Party whose names 
have not been presented here up to this point ? 

Mr. Delaney. With the exce])tion of Walter Barry — he was the 
only other person I believe that I liad contact with at tliat time. 

Mr. Tavenner. You have testified as to those who were members of 
the staff of the UE when you were an organizer, that is, when four of 
you occupied that position. Were there other persons who occupied 
the position of members of the staff or organizers whose names you 
have not given us? 

Mr. Delaney. You mean organizers? 

Mr. Tai'enner. AVho were members of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Delaney. Well, there were organizers who are presently servic- 
ing the shops in local 155. Are those the persons you mean ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes; that Avould include those if you know of any. 

Mr. Dei^ney. Yes. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4315 

Mr. Tavenner. That is, if you kno^Y them to be members of the 
Commmiist Party. 

Mr. Delaney. Yes ; there is Joseph McCann. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Will yoii spell his last name, please. 

Mr. Delaxey. M-c-C-a-n-n. Then there is Louis Kaplan 

Mr. Tavexxer. How do you spell Louis ? 

Mr. Delaxey. L-o-u-i-s,"^! think — and Philip Saba, S-a-b-a. 

yiv. Tavexxer. How many members were there in local 155, UE, at 
the time you left that organization ? 

Mi: Delaxey. 4,000, approximately. 

Mr. Tavexxer. What had been its greatest number while you had 
been connected with it? 

Mr. Delaxey. Approximately 7,000. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Will you state, if you have any basis for it, how 
man}' members of the Communist Party there were within local 155, 
UE, about the time that you broke off from that organization? 

Mr. Delaxey. Well, there weren't very many, possibly half a 
dozen in addition to the organizers. 

Mr. Tavexxer. What is tlie most in number that you think the Com- 
munist Party readied within local 155, UE, while you were a member ^ 

^Ir. Delaxey. I would say about 30 at the maximum. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Will you tell the committee just what influence the 
small group of half a dozen besides the organizers who were members 
of the Connnunist Partv could wield in an organization as large as 
4,000 ? 

Mr. Delaxey. Well, it is a relatively simple matter for an organ- 
ized group to control a union meeting. Union meetings may have 
from 100 to 200 people present and if there are half a dozen members 
of tlie Communist Party who have met beforehand and laid out a 
])rogram, tliey make the motions and they speak on the motions. 
They are well informed, so it is quite logical that their motions and 
resolutions are passed by that body. That is about it. 

Mr. Tavexxer., In what way would the Communist Party go about 
organizing the presentation of matters before the union? 

Mr. Delaxey. Well, at the branch meetings they would discuss 
what action they wished the union to take and then they would assign 
the persons who would make the motion and do the seconding and 
speak, if necessary, on the motion. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Now, prior to the time that you broke with the 
Communist Party, did you receive any instructions as to the con- 
centration of Communist members in any particular industry? 

]\Ir. Delaxey. Well, the concentration was to be in heavy or basic 
industry. I was told that that is where the Communists should seek 
employment rather than the light industr}^ 

Mr. Tavexxer. Were you given any reason why that should be 
done ? 

Mr. Delaxey. Well, just that the basic industries were the back- 
bone of industry as such and there were larger masses of people 
working in those industries to be influenced. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Was there any concerted effort to put any particular 
individuals in light industry, and if so, why? 

Mr. Delaxey. Well, there were persons who had not previously 
worked in industry, people from professional groups, we will say, who 



4316 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

would be placed in light industry in the beginning so that they would 
learn how to act as working people. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are speaking of Communists now, are you not ? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then does that mean tliat persons unacquainted 
with labor problems were put in light industry first as a part of a 
plan of training? 

Mr. Delaney. That has been my experience ; yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. And was that in preparation for their transfer at 
some later time to lieavy industry? 

Mr. Delaney. In some instances it was, yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, are you acquainted with any persons 
who were directed to be transferred either from a wdiite collar job to 
light industry or from liglit industry to heavy industry in line with 
the policy which you have mentioned? That is, persons who were 
members of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Delaney. There were two persons who were transferred, to my 
knowledge, from light industry to heavy industry. One was Lauren 
Taylor and the other was Harold Allen. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where were they transferred to? 

Mr. Delaney. I understand Taylor was transferred to Baldwin 
Locomotive and Allen to Bethlehem Steel. 

Mr. Tavenner, And where were they transferred from? 

Mr. Delaney. Taylor worked in Hugh H. Eby and Allen worked 
in the Taylor Lock Co. 

Mr. Tavenner. Had they been members of local 155? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you tell us how the transfer was effected? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, such things would usually, I assume, be given 
them at their branch meetings as instructions. 

Mr. Tavenner. At branch meetings of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you ])lay any ])art at any time in this coloniza- 
tion work, that is, transferring Communist Party members from one 
field to another in order to carry out Comnumist Party purposes and 
objectives? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, I would assign or send peo]:)le to shops that 
were under contract with local 155 when I knew that they had no 
previous experience in that particular field. They were referred to 
me as Communists. They may l)e })rofessional people, but the purpose 
was that they would get to work in a shop and learn how to be working 
people. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who insti'ucted you to carry out that program of 
colonization ? 

Mr. Delaney. Ed Strong, the district organizer of the Communist 
Party, and Dave Davis. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many peo]ile do you think were so assigned 
under your supervision or with your assistance? 

Mr. Delaney. I recall only two at the ])resent time. 

Mr. Tavenner. While you were a member of the Connnunist Party, 
did you attend any Communist Partv school which had been organized 
for the instruction of Communist Party members? 

IVTr. Delaney. Yes : I did. 

Mr. Tave/nner. Will you tell the committee about that, please? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4317 

Mr. Dklaney. I attended tlie workers* school in Philadelphia in the 
early forties and stndied ])arlianientary procedure antl public 
s]>eakin^. 

]\Ir, Tavexner. How lono- were you in attendance at that school? 

]\rr. Delaney, I imagine about 3 or 4 months. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Where was that school located and what was its 
name ? 

Mr. Delaxey. The Workers' School on Walnut Street in Pliila- 
delphia. 

Mr. Taa-exxer. Who were the instructors, if you recall ? 

Mr. Delaxey. Norris Wood and Ealph Glick. 

Mr. Tavenxer. Will you spell the last names ? 

Mr. Delaxey. W-o-o-d and G-1-i-c-k. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Now^ I am informed that there is a Norris Wood, 
Jr., and a Norris Wood, Sr. 

Mr. Delaxey. This is Norris Wood, Jr. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Do you recall any other persons who took part in 
giving instruction at the Workers' School ? 

Mr. Delax^ey. No; I can't recall them. 

Mr. Tavex^x'er. Can you give us the names of any of those who at- 
tended classes with you ? 

Mr. Delaxey. Sam DiMaria is the only other one that I recall . 

]Mr. Tavex'^xer. Did you at any time attend a Communist Party 
school on a higher level, on a national level? 

Mr. Delaxey. Yes, sir; I did. 

Mr. Tavexxer. What was the nature of that school ? 

Mr. Delaxey. That was a national school for a selected group from 
throughout the country. It was a 6 weeks' course for the purpose of 
higher training in the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavex^x^er. What was the name of the school and where was 
it located? 

Mr. Delaxey, It was called the National School of the Comnnmist 
Party, located at Camp Beacon, N. Y. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Will you tell the committee when you attended that 
school and how you were chosen and all of the circumstances about 
your attendance at that school ? 

Mr. Delaxey. Well, it was in December of 1946. I attended school 
for only a very short period and I did not complete the course. I 
was informed that I had been selected along with one other person 
from this geographical area. 

]Mr. Tavex-^xer. Who was the other per;?on? 

Mr. Delaxey. Joseph Kuzma. 

Mr. Tavexner. And who informed you of that fact? 

Mr. Delaxey. Davis, David Davis. We w^ere not told where it 
was. We were just told to go to the New York headquarters of the 
Communist Part}^ and we would receive instructions there. 

Mr. Tavenxer. The headquarters in Philadelphia? 

Mr. Delaxey. No ; in New York City. 

Mr. Tavenner. In New York City? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes. From there a group of us were taken by auto- 
mobile to a place that we later found to be Camp Beacon. 

Mr. Tavenx^er. Were vou advised in advance where this cam]) or 
this scliool was to be held? 



4318 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Delaney. No, sir; we were not. We were told to prepare to 
be out of town for a period of at least 6 weeks. 

Mr. Tavexner. "\Vas the location of this school kept a matter of 
secret ? 

Mr. Delaney. Highly secret. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, what was the nature of the training that you 
received there? 

Mr. Delaney. "We received training in the basic Marxist books, 
discussed the situation in the Communist Party in other countries 
where we received intensive training on how to concentrate and how 
to study. That is about it. For as much of the time I was there those 
were the subjects that were covered. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long were you there? 

Mr. Delaney. Just a little more than 1 week. 

Mr. Tavenner. Why did you leave before the course was termi- 
nated ? 

Mr. Delaney. I received a notice that there was a faction developed 
in local 155 that threatened to eliminate the Communist leadership 
and that I was needed back in Philadelphia. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who notified you of that? 

Mr. Delaney. David Davis notified me by telephone. 

Mr. Ta^-enner. How was it that Dave Davis knew where you were 
located if the location of this camp was kept secret? 

^Ir. Delaney. Well, he was a member of the national committee 
of the Communist Party and as such he probably would be in on it. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, before I ask you about what occurred after 
3^ou returned, let me ask you who were the instructors at this school. 

Mr. Delaney. Jack Stachel, George Siskin, and Joseph Eeams. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you spell the last name, please? 

Mr. Delaney. R-e-a-m-s, I believe. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether that is the same George 
Siskin who is now facing deportation proceedings? 

Mr. Delaney. I believe it is. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you recall any other teachers at that school? 

Mr. Delaney. No, sir; I can't. There was an Indian teacher there, 
but I don't know what his name was, from India. . 

]\Ir. Tavenner. From India? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, what was the subject that he was teach- 
ing? 

]Mr. Dei,anea'. He taught about the underground activities of the 
party in India, the security measures that had been taken to reduce 
the contacts between party members to groups of three and indicated 
the possibility that that may become necessary in this country. 

Mr. Tavenner. When was that? When was that subject taught by 
the Indian? 

Mr. Delaney. In 1946. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you learned since that time that that is exactly 
the procedure that the Communist Party has adopted in this country? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir ; it is. 

Mr. Tavenner. AYliat were the other subjects taught by the par- 
ticular instructors that you mentioned, if you can recall? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, there was political economy based on Veon- 
tief 's book : Das Kapital by Marx ; Value, Price and Profit and Wage, 
Labor and Capital. Those were essentially the texts. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4319 

Mr, TA^•ENNER. You stated there were representatives from all over 
the country attending this school? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you mean representatives from all of the dis- 
tricts of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, I don't know that every district was repre- 
sented, but there were about 25 people in the school. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you give us the names of any of those who 
attended ? 

Mr. Delaney. There are two that I do recall. One is Irving Goff, 
G-o-f-f , and the other is Howard Fast, F-a-s-t. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is Howard Fast, the writer? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. From New York City, I believe ? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Can you tell us anything more about Irving Goff? 

Mr. Delaney. Only that I understand he was a former officer in 
the Abraham Lincoln Brigade in Spain. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you recall more in detail about the teachings 
of the Indian instructor on the subject of the underground activities? 
You stated that they would meet in groups of three in India. Will 
you explain what he said in addition to that as to how that group of 
three would function? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, how it w^ould function is that of the three 
persons in the lowest grouping, or branch, one person would be known 
to two others from similar branches, and they in turn would select 
one of their number to be in contact with the next higher group so 
that no one individual knew more than two others, and so on up the 
line to the top governing body of the party. It was a pyramiding plan 
in that way. 

Mr. Tavenner. You stated that during the course of your attend- 
ance at this school you were called back by Mr. David Davis 

Mr. Delaney. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Because of a factional difficulty or dispute which 
was arising in your own local 155 ? 

Mr. Delaney. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, did that factional dispute relate to a bona 
fide problem of the union, of your local, or was it a Communist Party 
difficulty which had arisen? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, it was that several of the officers of the execu- 
tive board had entered an anti-Communist slate in the elections to be 
held in the month of December. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. In other words, this was an instance where the 
organizers had not been able to control the executive board ? 

Mr. Delaney. That is true. 

Mr. Tavenner. Fully? 

Mr. Delaney. That is right. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. And several members of the executive board had 
an anti-Communist slate? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. Now, what was the purpose iu calling 
you home about that? 

Mr. Delaney. In order that I might work for the defeat of that 
anti-Connnunist slate and assure the continuance of tlie party control 
of the local. 



4320 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the result ? 

Mr. Delaney. Some 3,800 people voted and the incumbents, that 
is, the slate endorsed by the Comnumist Party, won by, I think, 2,200 
votes out of the 3,300, or somethino- like that. 

Mr. Tavexxek What was the total membership of the local union 
at that time^ 

Mr. Delaney. Close to 7,000. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, then 2,200 Connnunists controlled the election 
out of 7,000? 

Mr, Delaney. There certainly weren't 2,200 Connnunists. 

Mr. Tavenner. Or rather 2,200 people Vn-Iio were sup})ortin<T; the 
Communist slate ? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, that was rather a larae vote, generally, in any 
election. That percentao;e was hich, but of it approximately 45 per- 
cent, rouf^hly, of the entire membership did cast their vote at that 
time. The majority of those casting their votes supported the leader- 
ship of the staff and the slate that they entered into the contest. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then apparently the Communist Party thought it 
was of greater value to it for you to miss this special course in training 
in order to come back to help put over this Communist plan in 
locall55? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Or the Communist slate ? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the average turn-out for voting in local 
155? You said this total vote of 3,300 was 45 percent. What was 
the normal percent, do you think ? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, much lower because of the fact there were 
rarely contests. If there was no contest and no issue of anticom- 
munism versus communism, far fewer would cast their vote. It was 
necessary to journey, from outlying sections of the city in some 
instances in order to cast their vote. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Delaney. Counsel points up something that I think I over- 
looked. I want the record to show that the 2,200 people who voted 
in support of the recommendations of the staff certainly were not 
aware that they were supporting the Communist Party dictates. 

Mr. Tavenner. How did you manage to deceive them about 
that point ? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, as the leader we said that we felt this slate 
was the best, it delivered in the past, that the persons who had broken 
with the leadership of Davis and had entered the anti-Connnunist 
slate were self-seekers looking for jobs for themselves, or something 
of that nature, and that they were out to destrov and disrupt the union. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, would the rank and file members, in your 
judgment, have supported the Communist Party ticket or slate if 
they had known that it constituted the backbone of the Communist 
Party within that union? 

Mr. Delaney. They certainly would not have. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then is this not a fair nnd ]:)roper observation to 
make: That if the rank-and-file membership of any union can be 
informed as to the true character of the leadership which is asserting 
itself and then come out and vote that that would be the end of 
Communist control within a union, wouldn't it? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4321 

Mr. Delaxey. I believe it certainly would. 

( The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Tavexner. Now, goin^ back a moment to the school that yon 
attended for 1 week, do you recall having met a person there by the 
name of John Kelly Ellis i 

Mr. Delaney. Not in that national school. 

Mr. Tavenxer. Well, did yon meet such a person in the workers' 
school that you attended i 

Mr. Delaxey. Yes; I did. 

Mr. Tavexx'^er. Was he known to you to be a member of the C<jmmu- 
nist Party ? 

Mr. Delaxey. Yes; he was. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Can you identify him further as to his occupation? 

Mr. Delaxey. I believe he is a carpenter, but I am not sure. 

Mr. Tavexxer. How long had you known him ? 

]Mr. Delaxey. Well, I don't know him very well, but I have known 
him, I suppose, about 10 years. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Do you know whether or not Mr. Ellis at any time 
held any oflicial position in either the Communist Party or the Com- 
munist Political Association? 

Mr. Delax^ey. I don't definitely know that he did. 

"Sir. Tavexxer. What do you base your statement on that he was a 
member of the Communist Party to your knowledge? 

Ml'. Delaxey. I met him at meetings. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Were those meetings thrown open to the public gen- 
erally or were they closed Communist Party meetings? 

]Mr. Delaxey. These would be closed Communist Party meetings. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Now I am not certain whether you have made it 
plain or not as to just how party instructions, that is. Communist 
Party instructions, are received by an individual siich as yourself or 
any other district organizer of the party from higher echelons in the 
Communist Party. How do Communist Party directives get down 
to persons who occupy the position you did? 

Mr. Delaxey. Well, first, I was not a district organizer of the 
Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavexxer. No ; you were of the UE ? 

Mr. Delaxey. That is right. The instructions would come down 
through the pyramiding in the same way as I explained it before. 
There would be one person in each group who would receive the 
instructions from someone in a higher group. 

Mr. Tavex'Xer. You spoke of the course that was conducted by the 
Indian at the school in which he described how the underground 
worked or was organized in India and that he stated in all probability 
you would have to come to that in this country. Was any reason 
ass^igned as to why the Communist Party might resort to the same 
procedure in this country ? 

Mr. Delaxey. Well, there was no real forecast of it, but it was a 
tried and true method of maintaining the highest degree of security 
under situations where the party would be illegal. 

^Ir. Tavexxer. Well, did a time come when the same underground 
policy was put into effect and the same type of organization per- 
fected in this country ? 

Mr. Delaxey. Yes. In 1949 the party structure was changed into 
those groups of three. 



4322 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, tell the committee how you became aware that 
that was the policy and how you found out about it. 

Mr. Delaney. Well. Davis had informed me that that was the 
agreed upon policy and that hereafter he would meet only in groups 
of three and that whether or not we knew of other people who were 
members of the party, we were not to discuss with them or to recog- 
nize them as party members other than the people wdth whom we 
regularly met. 

Mr. Tavenner. You then became one of a group of three yourself ? 

Mr. Delaney. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who were the other two ? 

Mr. Delaney. Wilfred Shervington and Louise Koczyalka or 
Koszalka. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Spell that name, please. 

Mr. Delaney. I think it is K-o-c-z-y-a-l-k-a, or K-o-s-z-a-l-k-a. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you identify her further, if you can, as to 
what her occupation was if she had one. 

Mr. Delaney. She was employed in Eby's. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliat was the reason given b}^ Davis or any other 
person in the Communist Party on a higher level for resorting to such 
organizational work as that ? 

Mr. Delaney. I think this was an outgrowth of the trial of the 
Communist Party leaders in New York ; it followed about that time. 
They felt the party was becoming quasi-legal and that these security 
measures should be taken. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now this group of three of which you were a mem- 
ber, was that a group within Eby or was it made up of representatives 
of different companies? 

Mr. Delaney. No, the other group 

Mr. TA^^<:NNER. Working for different companies, I should amend 
that. 

Mr. Delaney. I was the organizer assigned to Eby's so that it was 
set up on that basis. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, were there other groups at Ebj^'s in addition 
to your group of three ? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, there was one other. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you name that group or those who constituted 
that group ? 

Mr. Delaney. There was Nina Parris, Ernest Scott, Eleanor Price, 
and Arthur Storey. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you further identify those persons ? 

INIr. Delaney. They are all either employed at Eby's or have lefc 
there. That is the only identification I know of them. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, do you know of the formation of similar 
groups in other industries? 

Mr. Delaney. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. What kind of industry was the Eby Co. ? 

Mr. Delaney. Light industry. It is television and radio ]^arts. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, when it becomes necessary for the Communist 
Party to break up its larger meetings and larger organizations into 
groups of three, and two of the three are not permitted to know the 
names of any other members of the Communist Party, isn't the Com- 
munist Party tremendously handicapped in carrying out its objec- 
tives and in recruiting new members? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4323 

Mr. Delaney. I would say it is; yes. 

INIr. Tavennp:r. Would you say that that type of orgauization is 
virtually a last resort for security purposes by the party when it has 
to operate on that basis ? 

]\Ir. Delaney. I suppose so ; yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. In your judgment is the Communist Party handi- 
capped in attempting to foster its control upon legitimate labor unions 
when it has to operate on that basis ? 

Mr. Delaney. In my opinion it is ; yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you identify, please, the members of the party 
known to you who were either working in or operating through local 
155 at the time you broke with the party ? 

Mr. Delaney. In addition to those that I have named, there is Sid 
Levy and Ben Thomas. Those are about all I recall in addition to 
those I have mentioned. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know a person by the name of Tom De 
Fazio? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes; I do. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was he a member ? 

Mr. Delaney. Member of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you spell the last name, please. 

Mr. Delaney. D-e F-a-z-i-o. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, Mr. Delaney, the investigations conducted b}- 
this committee since August of 1949 have disclosed many organ- 
izers of the UE to have been members of the Communist Party. We 
have had testimony to that eifect in Michigan, in Illinois, in Ohio, 
and we are now getting it here in Philadelphia and we have had it 
at other places. I might add we have had the same testimony at 
Baltimore and we have had it in Massachusetts and other places in 
Pennsylvania and in New York State. 

Now, why is it that the Communist Party, if you know, has been 
so determined to take over or at least to endeavor to control the UE ? 

Mr. Delaney. I would say it is the last union of any size where 
the party exercises any real control. It also represents people in the 
basic and mass industries and as such the party finds it necessary 
through all of its teachings to infiltrate and control, if possible, the 
unions in the mass industries. 

Mr. Tavenner. From your long experience in the Communist 
Party did you recognize that the Communist Party of the United 
States owed an allegiance to any foreign power ? 

Mr. Delaney. I believe the allegiance is to world communism as 
directed from the Soviet Union. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you give the committee a fair estimate of the 
strength, of the present strength — or I should say the strength of the 
Communist Party at the time you withdrew from it 2 years ago in the 
city of Philadelphia — as compared with other cities of comparable size 
in the country, if you know? 

Mr. Delaney. It would be only an estimate. I assume it is on 
a par with the other large cities, with the exception of New York. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Now, you have told us in the early part of your 
testimony of the break that you made from the Communist Party. 
Are there any additional reasons that you would like to give the com- 
mittee as to why you got out of the Communist Party ? 



4324 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Delaney. Well, as I said before, I got out for tlie same reasons 
I got in. I found that their professed aims in which I was interested 
were far different tlian their actual goals. 

They say they believe in fighting against anti-Semitism and yet I 
know of one instance where a person was denied the right to be elected 
as an organizer purely because he was Jewish. They say they believe 
in fighting racial prejudice and religious bigotry, and I have seen no 
instance that that is truly what they are fighting against. I have 
seen other instances to show that they have nothing but contempt for 
working people. 

They talk about democracy and in their own organization there 
is no democracy. People are expelled without a reason and without 
a hearing and then people are told a lot of character assassination 
and vilification about those expelled for the purposes of justifying the 
expulsion. 

They talk about free speech and yet I have seen several instances 
where people who dared to exercise free speech in local 155 were driven 
out of the union. 

There is no better indication than since this fight started in May 
where the people were driven out of the union. There were all kinds 
of slander and lies. The big-lie technique is being used every day. 
They will stoop to anything of any unprincipled nature in order to 
gain their ends. 

I think that anybody who comes to those conclusions after having 
been in the Communist Party as long as I have will feel that there is 
no possibility of fighting for the decent things in life and still go on 
being a Communist. They subvert and thwart the aims of decent 
people. 

I think the fight for the building of trade-unions can go on — to fight 
for fair employment practices and things of that nature — but I think 
that the presence of the Communist Party, supposedly in there fight- 
ing, is only a detriment to the achievement of those aims. 

That is about it. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Walter, do you have any questions? 

Mr. Walter. I have no questions, but I do want to congratulate 
the witness on his courage in coming here and cooperating with this 
committee in the manner in which he has. It wasn't easy, I know, and 
the people of this entire community are indebted to him for a contri- 
bution which can't be measured. 

I trust that his attitude here will serve to point the way to other 
people who have been interested, as many of us have been, in provid- 
ing better things for the masses of people so that they won't be deceived 
and that they will recognize communism for what it really is. 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Doyle. 

Mr. Doyle. I wish, also, to express an appreciation to the witness 
for his forthright statement and cooperation. Also, I do want to ask 
several questions. 

You just said that there is no possibility of fighting for decent things 
within the Communist Party. Is there any possibility of a member of 
the Communist Party being loyal to the objectives of the Communist 
Party of the United States and also being devoted to forthright patri- 
otism to the United States ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4325 

Mr. Delaney. I feel that there are many members of the Conimu- 
nist Party who are not fully aware of the real aims of the party itself. 
It is only after many years of association do they become aware that 
the allegiance of the Connnunist Party is not to the United States or 
is not to the best interests of the people of the United States. So con- 
ceivably, here may be some people who are not aware of those things 
who are still fighting for the decent things and are also patriots. 

Mr. Doyle. Well, then, if I could rephrase your answer, would it 
be that those members of the Communist Party in the United States 
who are aware of the objectives and aims of the Communist Party in 
the United States cannot be loyal to that party and also be loyal to the 
United States ? 

Mr. Delaney. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Doyle. Did I understand you to say that they have nothing but 
contempt for working people ? 

Mr. Delaney. I believe that the Communist Party itself has noth- 
ing but contempt for working people. 

Mr. Doyle. Well, it is built around the working people, isn't it ? 

Mr. Delaney. They put out a program designed to indicate that 
they fight for the interests of the working people, but by their use of 
that program the ends to which they intend to carry them and to the 
degree that they consider the people pawns in this game, they have 
nothing but contempt for them. That is what I mean. 

Mr. Doyle. You stated, "I found their actual aims were different 
than their professed aims.'' I don't know as I caught the significance 
of .that statement by you. To what did you refer ^ 

Mr. Delaney. Well, as I said, they profess to be for the good things 
for the working people. Their actual aims do not take into considera- 
tion the true interests of the working people, but rather their aim is 
to gain power for themselves. 

Mr, Doyle. When our distinguished counsel asked you something 
about the relationship of the Communist Party in America to a foreign 
power with reference to allegiance, I understood you to say, "I believe 
their allegiance is to world communism." 

Mr. Delaney. That is right. 

Mr. Doyle. Didn't you so state ? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Doyle. What connection, if any, has the Communist Party in 
the United States to world connuunism ? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, in the time that I was associated with them, I 
saw the line of the Communist Party in the United States switch to 
accommodate itself to the line of world communism in each instance. 

Mr, Doyle. Emanating from where ? From any other country than 
our own ? 

Mr. Delaney. From the Soviet Union. 

Mr. Doyle. From the Soviet Union ? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes. 

Mr. Doyle. I wish to interpolate here, Mr. Chairman, that I just 
leturned a couple of weeks ago from Korea, Japan, Okinawa, and 
other places over in the Far East, and all of the intelligent people tell 
me the same thing, that the Communist Party in America is dominated 
and controlled absolutely by Soviet Russia and that it is a world 
conspiracy. 



4326 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

I was interested in your statement that the UE represents people 
in the basic industries. Why would the Communist Party want to 
control basic industry in the United States ? 

Mr. Delaney. That is where the masses of people are emi^loyed. 
The largest masses would be in the basic industries. 

Mr. DoTLiE. Well, isn't that inconsistent with your statement when 
3'ou said that they were not interested in the working people? 

Mr. Delaney. They are interested in controlling the working people. 
I said they are not interested in the true welfare of the working people. 

Mr. Doyle. Why would they be interested in controlling the work- 
ing people in America ? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, their only hope to rise to power is to control 
the interests of the working people. 

Mr. Doyle. I was interested in your relating about that election. 
You stated that when there was no issue such as communism versus 
anticommunism, or some contest, the vote, the percentage of the vote, 
was nnich smaller. Do I understand that this particular election 
where 3,300 members voted out of 7,000 and the vote was 2,200 to 1,100 
to put those that you claim were Communists back in office, that the 
members didn't know tliat the issue was a clear-cut one of communism 
versus anticommunism ? Or was it a clear-cut issue ? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, those with the anti-Communist slate attempted 
to make it a clear-cut issue, but they were not successful and the people 
didn't understand it. 

Mr. Doyle. Wliy couldn't you make it a clear-cut issue? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, the favorite device of the Communist Party 
is tliat anytime anyone embarks upon an anti-Communist position 
they consider that Red-baiting and say that Red-baiting injures unions 
and helps bosses only, so that they can get off the issue of whether or 
not it is a matter of communism versus anticommunism. 

Mr. Doyle. I remember you said that there was a teacher from India 
in this school which you attended for a week, the national school. Do 
you now recall any representative of any other foreign country at that 
school who was teaching? 

Mr. Delaney. No, sir; I do not. 

Mr. Doyle. You haven't mentioned anything about any progi'am 
for the Communist Party in America as relates to children or young 
people. Are you aware of any program in that field ? 

Mr. Delaney. I am not aware of it. 

Mr. Doyle. Did I understand you to say that there was only a maxi- 
mum of 30 outright Communists in the total membership of 7,000? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

]Mr. Doyle. And yet 30 active Communists control the election of 
the board and the policies of that great union ? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr, Doyle. You liave twice said that "I found them interested in 
power for power's sake," What power is that? What power were 
they after ? What power is the Communist Party in this country seek- 
ing to get by methods some of which you have related '( What is their 
objective in our country ? 

Mr. Dp:laney. Their stated objective is that they want to build a 
socialized society in the United States if they can get sufficient people 
interested in it. Th;\t is their program. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4327 

Mr. Doyle. Do th.\v cite any ])reseiit condition in any other country 
as the condition after which they want to pattern the same in this 
country? 

Mr. 'Delanf.y. I don't helieve they state it as such, but it is assumed 
that it wouhl be patterned after the set-uj) in the Soviet Union. 

Mr. Doyle. I noticed yon rehited to our distinouished counsel that 
you had read a certain list of books. As I recall them, all of the books 
you named were books about Soviet communism or Leninism. Didn't 
yon folks ever study anything' about the history of America and the 
Constitution of the United States or the Declaration of Independence? 
Didn't 3'ou ever read any books about the history of our own country 
at these Connnunist meetings? 

]Mr. Delaxey. No ; not at the Connnunist meetings, but it was neces- 
sary that Communists have a pretty fair knowledge of the history of 
our country and things of that nature. 

JMr. Doyle. You stated that one of the purposes of this class you 
attended was parliamentary procedure. I think you said that class 
was in Philadelphia. 
Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Doyle. Why in the world would they want you to put in 3 
months studying parliamentary procedure? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, the classes would extend maybe one or two 
nights a week, and the purpose was to train people who were Commu- 
nists in order to take over leadership of the organizations that they 
happened to be a part of. 

^Ir. Doyle. In other words, they recognized that, by you and other 
members of the Communist Party in these local unions being expert 
parliamentarians, thereby you could help largely in taking over the 

control of thousands of men and women 

Mr. Delaney. That is correct. 

Mr. Doyle (continuing) . In union meetings. Was that the pur]:)ose 
of it? 

Mr. Delaney. Insofar as I was concerned, yes; that was the 
l)urpose. 

Mv. Doyle. I will ask you just one or two more questions that I 
made notes of. 

You made reference to the fact that some members left the party in 
1941. In connection with that statement you said that they had 
claimed to be for peace. Do you remember that? I think I have it 
correctly. Then you didn't give any more testimony along that line. 
What did you discover, if anything, about their not being for world 
|)eace ? 

Mr. Delaney. I think that I mentioned in my testimony that prior 
to the Soviet Union becoming involved in World W^ar II they had 
used every effort to prevent this country from becoming involved in 
it and they had the slogan "The Yanks Are Not Coming," and yet 
as soon as the Soviet Union was involved, in June of 1941, which was 
6 months before our country was attacked, the whole apparatus of 
the Communist Party was turned around so that we couldn't get in 
the war fast enough to suit them. That would indicate that they are 
not for peace as such. 

Mr. DoYijs. I noticed, particularly toward the last of your very 
valuable testimony, you made the statement "There is no possibility 

25241 — 52 3 



4328 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

for fightiiifj for decent things in the Communist Party in America." 
Why isn't there? 

Mr. Delaney. Well, it is necessary as long as you are a member of 
the Communist Party to accept the discipline of the party itself. 
They will make a decision which you are required to carry out which 
may not be or certainly is not to the interest of the decent things. I 
think I have giyen illustrations of that in my testimony. 

Mr. Doyle. How many years were you active in the Communist 
Party in and around Philadelphia? 

Mr. Delaney. About 12 years. ' 

Mr. Doyle. About 12 years ? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes. 

Mr. Doyle. And you obtained a point in leadership up to and in- 
cluding being selected as one of about 25 men from all over the United 
States to attend the national Communist school someplace in New 
York? 

Mr. Delaney. Yes, sir. I may correct an impression there. I was 
selected to attend a particular training school of 25, but that doesn't 
necessarily mean that I was among a group of 25 who were leaders 
of the party in this country. 

Mr. Doyle. I think that I am asking you perhaps a question that 
our counsel didn't ask. When you say that there is no possibility of 
fighting for decent things in the Connnunist Party in America, if that 
is true, then being a member of the Communist Party in America must 
eliminate the possibility of living for decent things as an individual. 
Ai!i I wrong in my assumption? What effect does it have on an indi- 
vidual if he wants to be a freedom-loving American, if it has any 
effect on the iiidividual members ? 

Mr. Delaney. I think it is not possible for him to fully understand 
tiie role of tlie Communist Party and remain decent, if he remains in 
it. I think there are many decent people that are attracted to it and 
may work with it for a long time until they find out how they twist 
the decent principles, and then certainl}^ if he doesn't get out he can't 
maintain his decency for very long. 

Mr. Doyle. In other words — and this is my last question, Mr. Chair- 
man — from your testimony, then, I would conclude that if a person 
arrives at that point where he or she discovers that the practices of 
the Comnnmist Party in America do stifle and choke and depress in- 
dividual initiative, and then the person stays in the party activities 
after that point, it is a definite limitation on freedom of speech and 
freedom of thinking and tends to definitely imprison and destroy the 
iiidividuality of a person. Is that a fair assumption ? 

Mr. Delaney. I would think it would be; yes, sir. 

Mr. Doyle. Thank you very much. 

Mr. Wood. I also add my voice to that of my colleagues in express- 
ing our sincere appreciation for your coming here and for the con- 
tribution you have made to the work that we are seeking to do. All 
patriotic American citizens should applaud. 

Is there any further question by counsel ? 

Mr. Tavenner. No, sir. 

Mr. Wood. Is there any reason why the witness shouldn't be ex- 
cused from further attendance on the committee? 

Mr. Tavenner. No, sir. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THK PHILADELPHIA AREA 4329 

Mr. Wood. Well, it is so ordered and the committee will stand in 
recess for 15 minutes. 

(A 15-minLite recess was taken.) 

Mv. Wood. Let us have order, please. 

Counsel, are you ready to proceed? 

Mv. Tavenner. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Wood. Whom do you call? 

Mr. Tavenner. I will call Mr. David Davis. 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Davis, will you raise your right hand and be sworn, 
please ? 

Mr. Davis, do 3'Ou solemnly swear the evidence you give this com- 
mittee shall be the truth, the wdiole truth, and nothing but the truth, 
so hel]) you God? 

Mr. Davis. I do. 

Mr. Wood. Have a seat, please, sir. 

TESTIMONY OF DAVID DAVIS, ACCOMPANIED BY HIC COUNSEL, 

DAVID COHEN 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your name, please, sir? 

Mr. Davis. David Davis. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr. Davis. I am. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel please identify himself for the record ? 

Mr. Cohen. David Cohen, 612 Market Street, National Bank 
Building [Philadelphia, Pa.]. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born, Mr. Davis? 

Mr. Davis. I was born on January 7, 1907, in Poland. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did you come to the United States? 

Mr. Davis. I believe it was in the year 1920. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you a naturalized American citizen? 

Mr. Davis. I have derivative citizenship from my father. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where was he naturalized ? 

Mr. Davis. In the year 1926, in New York. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you outline briefly for the committee what 
your educational background has been ? 

Mr. Davis. I graduated from the public schools and graduated from 
high school and attended one term in Cooper Union College in New 
York and some night sessions in City College. 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you now employed? 

Mr. Davis. I am an organizer of local 155, UE. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you been an organizer of local 155 ? 

Mr. Davis. I would like to consult my counsel. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, the witness has answered that he is 
an organizer of local 155 

Mr. Wood. I don't think that such a question comes within the pur- 
view of the fifth amendment, and I can see no possible incrimination 
in connection with it. I direct the witness to answer the question. 

Mr. Davis. I would like to consult my attorney. 

Mr. Wood. You have that privilege at any time. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 



4330 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Davis. May I have counsel please repeat the question? 
Mr. Wood. Read the question. 

(Whereupon the pending question was read by the reporter as fol- 
lows: ''How long have you been an organizer of local 155?") 
Mr. Davis. I have been an organizer of local 155, UE, since May 

21 or 22 of this year, around that time. It may be June; I am not 
exactly sure of the exact time, but around that time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state to the committee, please, what your 
record of employment lias been, say, since 1035 ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you tell us briefly 

Mr. Davis. I was the business rejn-esentative of local 155, UE. 

Mr. Tavenner. When were you made business representative of 
155? 

Mr. Davis. I believe I was elected in 1935 or 1934. I don't rcall the 
exact time. 

Mr. Tavenner. And you held that position continuouslv until May 

22 of this year? 

Mr. Davis. I was elected yearly in a secret-ballot election. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where did you reside while you held that posi- 
tion ? Have you lived at the same place all of the time ? 

Ml". Davis. No. I moved around but all the time in Philadelphia. 

Mr. Tavenner. You liave been a resident of Philadelphia? 

Mr. Davis. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where have you resided in Philadelphia? 

Mr. Davis. Well, at present I live at 1725 North Creighton Street. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you lived there? 

Mr. Davis. I think since about October 1950, approximately. 

Mr. Tavenner. Prior to that where did you live? 

Mr. Davis. I believe it was 4935 North Smedley Street. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. And when did you first move to North Smedley 
Street? 

Mr. Davis. I believe we moved in the year 19-11: when I was waiting to 
be inducted into the Army. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you serve in the Army ? 

I\Ir. Davis. No ; I was waiting to be inducted and then the ruling was 
made I was too old, and they just didn't take me. I passed my physical 
and was waifing around to be inducted. 

Mr. Tavenner. Prior to 1941: where did you live? 

Mr. Davis. I lived, I believe, on North Marvine Street. I think 
it was 5130, but I am not sure of the exact address. 

Mr. Tavenner. And how long did you live there? 

Mr. Davis. A few years; I don't remember it exactly. 

Mr. Tavenner. At 5130, that was? 

Mr. Davis. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Davis, I hand you a copy of the Daily Worker of 
May 4, 1936, and I will ask you to examine this document and see 
whether or not the name of Dave Davis of the International Asso- 
ciation of Machinists was reported as chairman of the May Day 
rally in 1936. 

Mr. Davis. I see on this paper the words "Dave Davis." 

Mr. Tavenner. Does that article refer to you as the chairman of 
the May Day rally ? 



COMMUNIST ACTI^'ITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4331 

Mr. Davis. I assert my rights, my constitutional privilege of the 
fifth amendment, and refuse to answer. 

INIr. Tavexner. You refuse to answer? 

Mr. Davis. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavexner. I desire to ofl'er the issue of the Daily Worker of 
May 4. lOoG. in evidence and ask it be marked "Davis Exhibit No. 1." 

Mr. Wood. It will be received. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Davis Exhibit No. 1," 
is tiled herewith.) 

Mr. TAMix^x^ER. Mr. Davis, were you a delegate to the national con- 
vention of the Communist Party held at Madison Square Garden in 
New York in May of 1938? / 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment of the 
Constitution and refuse to answer. 

jNIr. Tavex'^xer. I hand you a copy of the Daily Worker of May 24, 
1938, and I Avill ask 3'ou to examine it and state whether or not your 
name appears in an article on that page, on page 5, showing that you 
were a delegate to that convention. 

Mr. Davis. On the photostat that you gave me appears "Dave 
Davis.'' 

]\Ir. Tavexx^er. In connection with the list of delegates to the Com- 
munist Party convention at Madison Square Garden in May of 1938? 

iSIr. Davis. I assert my privilege of the fifth amendment of the 
Constitution and refuse to answer. 

Mr. Taa-exx-^er. I am asking you if it shows the name "Dave Davis." 

Mr. DA^^s. I read the name Davis and it says here "Dave Davis," 
and I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment of the Constitu- 
tion and refuse to answer. 

Mr. Ta^-ex^xer. I ask that the issue of the Daily Worker of May 
24, 1038, be introduced in evidence and marked "Davis Exhibit No. 2." 

Mr. Wood. It will be received. 

( The document above referred to, marked "Davis Exhibit No. 2," is 
filed herewith.) ^ 

i\[r. Tavex^xer. I hand you a copy of the Daily Worker of March 
22, 1038, and ask you to examine it. 

(Document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Tavex^xer. Do vou see there a call for the May Day conference 
to be held on IMay 3,' 1038, at the Broadwood Hotel, Philadelphia, 
signed by David Davis? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

]\Ir. Davis. I see just a photostat and I see the name "Dave Davis." 

Mr. Tavex-^x'er. Does the name "David Davis" appear there in con- 
nection with a call for the May Day conference of April 3, 1938, at 
the Broadwood Hotel ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Tavenx'er. I am just asking you what the paper shows. 

Mr. Davis. I want to read it and see what it is. 

Mr. Tavenx^er. All right. 

Mr. Davis. I see a photostatic copy which reads "United May 1 
Call Issued in Philadelphia," and in the body of that article I see 
"Dave Davis." 

Mr. Tavexx-^er. Does that refer to vou ? 



^ See illustration opposite p. 4470. 



4332 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privileoe under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to ansv/er. 

Mr. Tavenner. I ask that the March 22, 1938, issue of the Daily 
Worker be offered in evidence and marked "Davis Exhibit No. 3.'' 

Mr. Wood. It will be received. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Davis Exhibit No. 3," 
is filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you acquainted with a person bv the name of 
Mac Harris ? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend the Communist Party national con- 
vention held in Chicago on September 1, 1939? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer, the same as before. 

Mr. Tavenner. In 1939 were you a member of the district bureau 
of the Communist Party of eastern Pennsylvania? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Davis, the committee has in its possession an 
article entitled "The Land of Peace and Socialism,"' which appeared 
on page 14 of the Lenin Memorial 1939 Yearbook issued January 20, 
1939. The following is quoted from that article : 

In the present world situation tlie Soviet Union stands out as a beacon of 
light and inspiration to all of the people of the world who aspire to prosperity 
and peace. 

Will you examine the article, please ? 

(Document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you write that article ? 

Mr. Davis. I see an article entitled "The Land of Peace and Social- 
ism," and I assert my right under the fifth amendment of the Con- 
stitution and refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer in evidence the Lenin Memorial, 
1939, the Yearbook, and ask it be marked as "Davis Exhibit No. 4." 

Mr. AVooD. Let it be received. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Davis Exhibit No. 4," 
is filed herewith.)^ 

Mr. Tamsnner. I should limit that exhibit to page 14 of that docu- 
ment. 

Mr. Wood. It will be so limited. 

Mr. Tavenner. I will ask you to look at Davis exhibit No. 4 again, 
at page 3. Do you see there photographs of individuals, certain 
individuals? 

Mr. Davis. I see what looks like the simile of certain individuals. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are they persons known to you ? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you examine the photographs appearing on 
page 3 and state whether one of them is the photograph of Thomas 
Nabried ? ^ 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 



1 See pp. 4444-4468. 

2 See p. 4448. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4333 

Mr. Tavenner. Was Thomas Nabried a member of the district 
bureau of the Communist Party of eastern Pennsylvania ? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you acquainted with Thomas Nabried? 

jNIr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you examine the jihotograph again and state 
wliether or not the photograph appears there of a person by the name 
of Ed Solway? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment of the 
Constitution and refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Ed Solway by any other name ? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you ac(|[uainted with Abe Sokolov? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Walter. What is this privilege that you are asserting? 

Mr. Davis. The privilege that is asserted, the fifth amendment gives 
me the right not to testify against myself. 

Mr. Walter. In any criminal matter, and this isn't a criminal mat- 
ter. You might be interested in knowing that under the law testi- 
mony given before this committee can't be used against a person 
giving it. 

Mr. Davis. Congressman, I am glad you raised this question be- 
cause I think the present atmosphere that your committee has created 
today in the witch hunts and intimidation is such that no person can 
know when he is going to be incriminated if he answers your question. 

Mr. Walter. That has a familiar sound. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Davis, I ask you to look at a copy of the Daily 
Worker, a photostatic copy of it, dated December 19, 1940, and state 
whether you see on that photostatic copy a signed statement urging 
the immediate dismissal of charges against Sam Darcy, Communist 
leader in Philadelphia. Do you see such a signed statement ? 

Mr. Davis. I see a photostatic copy of a statement that reads "Free 
Sam Darcy." 

Mr. Tavenner. Whose name is signed to that statement ? 

Mr. Davis. There is a list of names signed to that statement. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you see among the names the name of Dave or 
David Davis? 

Mr. Davis. I see on this photostatic copy the name "Mr. David 
Davis." 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did you sign that statement ? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. I ask that the photostatic copy of the Daily Worker 
of December 19, 1940, be admitted in evidence as "Davis Exhibit 
No. 5." 

Mr. Wood. You mean that page of it that has been identified? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Wood. It may be admitted. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Davis Exhibit No. 5," 
is filed herewith.) 



4334 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you a pamphlet of the Philadelphia Work- 
ers' School showing the spring term 1940 curriculum on page 8 and 
ask you if you see the name "David Davis" as an instructor at that 
school. 

Mr. Davis. What instructor of what? There are a lot ot names 

here ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, under the title of "Instructor" do you see 
the name "David Davis" ? 

Mr. Davis. There is no list of instructors that I can see. 

Mr. Tavenner. On page 8. 

Mr. Davis. It is just the words "Dave Davis." Under "Trade 
Unionism Day" I see the words "Dave Davis." 

Mr. Tavenner. Does that indicate that a person by the name of 
Dave Davis was an instructor at the Philadelphia Workers' School? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my constitutional right under the fifth amend- 
men and refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you at any time an instructor in the Phila- 
delphia Workers' School ? 

]\Ir. DA\^s. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the Philadelphia Workers' School? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. I ask that the pamphlet, page 8 of the pamphlet 
be introduced in evidence and marked "Davis Exhibit No. 6." 

Mr. Wood, Let it be received. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Davis Exhibit No. 6," is 
filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you a letterhead of an organization known 
as the National Federation for Constitutional Liberties which is dated 
November 6, 1940. On the back of this letterhead appear the names 
of certain sponsors of that organization. Will you examine it and 
state whether or not your name appears there as a sponsor. That is, 
the name of David Davis. 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Does the name David Davis appear as a sponsor 
on that letterhead ? 

Mr. Davis. I see on this letterhead "Dave Davis." 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, were you a sponsor of the National Federa- 
tion for Constitutional Liberties during the year 1940 ? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

My. Tavenner. I offer in evidence the letterhead and ask that it 
be marked "Davis Exhibit No. 7." 

Mr. Wood. Let it be received. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Davis Exhibit No. 7," 
is filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavenner. On August 16, 1938, Walter S. Steele testified before 
this committee ■ 

Mr. Dwis. May I have the name again, please? 

Mr. Tavenner.' Walter S. Steele testified before the Special Com- 
mittee on Un-American Activities which was the predecessor of this 
committee that one Dave Davis was a member of the Pennsylvania 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4335 

State committee of tlie Communist Party. Was that statement made 
by Mr. Steele true or false ? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
I'efuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavexxek. "Were you a member of the Pennsylvania State 
committee of the Comnnniist Party at any time^ 

IMr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Taat:xnek. I show you a photostatic copy of a Call to Con- 
ference on Constitutional Liberties in America to be held in Wash- 
ington. D. C, on June 7, 1940. There appears on the back thereof 
;i list of sponsors included in which is the name David Davis. Will 
you examine it, please, and state whether the name David Davis does 
api^ear as a sponsor of that organization? 
(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 
(The document was shown to the witness.) 

Mr. Davis. I see a piece of paper which has the name David Davis 
on it. 

^Ir. Tavenner. Were you a sponsor of the Conference on Con- 
stitutional Liberties? 

Mr. Davis. I assert m}' privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

]\Ir. Tavenner. I ask that the document be entered in evidence and 
marked "Davis Exhibit No. 8." 
Mr. Wood. It is admitted. 

Has that organization been listed or cited by the Attorney General ? 
Mr. Taa^nner. Mr. Chairman, that conference was the founding 
conference for the National Federation for Constitutional Liberties 
which has been cited as subversive and Communist by Attorney Gen- 
eral Tom Clark on December 4, 1947. 

Mr. Wood. Let the document be received. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Davis Exhibit No. 8," 
is filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavenner. And again by Attorney General Francis Biddle on 
September 24, 1942, under the citation given by Mr. Biddle this is 
said: "Part of what Lenin called the solar system of organizations 
ostensibly having no connection with the Communist Party by which 
Communists attempt to create sympathizers and supporters of their 
program. It was established as a result of a Conference on Constitu- 
tional Liberties held in Washington, D. C, June 7 and 9, 1940." 
That is the document that I have presented. 

I now hand you a throw-away sheet advertising a meeting at which 
there were speakers commemorating Lenin. Do you see your name 
appearing there, or the name Dave Davis appearing there? 

Mr. Davis. I see a piece of paper with the name "David Davis." 
Mr. Ta^^nner. The heading on this paper is "Lenin Memorial 
Meeting, twentieth anniversary of the Daily Worker" and the speak- 
ers William Foster and others, among which is the name David Davis. 
Did you speak on that occasion ? 

]\Ir. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment of the 
Constitution and refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the leaflet in evidence and ask that 
it be marked as "Davis Exhibit No. 9." 
Mr. Wood. Let it be received. 



4336 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

(The document above referred to, marked "Davis Exhibit No. 9," is 
filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you a speaker at the Lenin memorial meet- 
ing of the Communist Party held at Broad and Poplar Streets, Phila- 
delphia, on February 26, 1946 ? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did any of the following persons speak on that 
occasion : Philip Bart, John Devine, and William Foster ? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Davis, on April 25, 1947, or shortly prior 
thereto, there was a resolution adopted by the CIO, Pennsylvania In- 
dustrial Union Council, banning Communists as officers of the coun- 
cil. I show you a photostatic copy of an article appearing in the 
April 25, 1947, issue of the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin regarding 
this resohition. The article reads in part as follows : 

David Davis, business agent of local 155, of the UERMW of Philadelphia, 
vigorously opposed the resolution, telling the delegates, "I am a Conununist 
and I vpant to talk to you about communism. Everyone who says he is an 
anti-Conununist claims to be an expert on communism, but I think that I could 
tell you something about it." 

Were you correctly quoted? 

Mr. Davis. I see a photostatic copy of a newspaper article and I 
assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and refuse to answer. 

Mr, Tavenner. Were you correctly quoted in stating that you were 
a Communist and you wanted to talk to the delegates about com- 
munism ? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you business agent of local 155 on April 25^ 
1947? y ^ i ^ 

Mr. Davis. I would like to 

Mr. Wood. I believe the witness has already answered that, 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes, sir, I will withdraw the question. 

Mr. Davis. I think I answered it. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the article in evidence and ask that 
it be marked as "Davis Exhibit No. 10." 

Mr. Wood. It will be admitted. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Davis Exhibit No. 10," 
is filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavenner. On July 21, 1947, Mr. Walter S. Steele submitted 
to the Committee on Un-American Activities a breakdown of the Com- 
munist Party of Pennsylvania. In this breakdown he listed one Dave 
Davis as a member of the labor committee of the Communist Party. 
Was he correct in this listing of you ? 

Mr. Davis. Is that the question ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend the anniversary dinner given at 
the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel on June 20, 1947, in honor of Mother 
Bloor's eighty -fifth birthday? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4337 

Mr. Davis. I assert m}^ privile,ge under the fiftli amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you a sponsor of the fourth anniversary din- 
ner of the American Youth for Democracy held at the Benjamin 
Franklin Hotel, Philadelphia, Pa., on November 18, 1947^ 

Mr. Davis. Am I supposed to answer these things on the basis of 



memorv 



JNIr. Tavenner. Well, do you recall having attended such a dinner, 
and if you do not 

Mr. Davis. I refuse to answer on the basis of my privilege under the 
hfth amendment of the Constitution. 

Mr. Taatdnner. Do you recall the occasion when William Z. Foster 
was the principal speaker at a Lenin Memorial meeting held at the 
Metropolitan Opera House on February 27, 1948? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my j^rivilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you present at that meeting? 

Mr. Davis, I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you one of the principal speakers at the May 
Day rally of the Communist Party held at Kayburn Plaza, Philadel- 
phia, on May 1, 1948? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend the annual convention of the Com- 
munist Party, district 3, held at the Chris J. Perry Elks Hall on July 
16, 17, and 18, 1948? 

Mr. Davis, I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer, 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether the Civil Rights Congress 
sponsored the picketing of the United States courthouse at Ninth and 
IMarket Streets — that is this courthouse — protesting the indictment of 
the 12 Communist leaders in New York, on October 17, 1948? 

JNIr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you participate in the demonstration? 

Mr. Davis. I assert the same privilege and for the same reason, 

Mr. Tan^nner. Are you a member of the Civil Rights Congress? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall a n.ieeting which was designated "A 
Rally for Peace and Democratic Rights" sponsored by the Communist 
Party, district 3, held at the Stephen Girard on April 8, 1949, at which 
Gus Hall was the principal speaker? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend that rally? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege for the same reason and the same 
answer. 

Mr. Tavenner, Were 3^011 acquainted with Gus Hall ? 

Mr. Davis. I assert itiy privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you one of the principal speakers at the 1949 
Ma}' Day ralh' held at Thirty-first and Diamond Streets, 
Philadelphia ? 



4338 COM-MUXIST ACTIVITIES IX THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

]Mr. DA^^s. I assert inv privileoe under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Ta^-exxer. Did you attend a United Peace lially hekl at the 
arena, Forty-tifth and 'Market Streets. Phihidelphia. and sponsored 
1)V the Progressive Party of Pennsylvania on May o. 194^ ? 

" Mr. DA^•IS. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Ta%'exxer. I hand you a letterhead of the National Xon-Parti- 
san Committee to Defend the Rights of the Twelve Commtinist Lead- 
ers dated September 9, 1949. "Will you examine it. please, and state 
whether or not the name of Dave Davis appears as a sponsor. 

]Mr. DA^^s. I see on this piece of paper the name ""David Davis." 

Mr. Taa-exxer. Did you permit your name to be used as a sponsor 
of that organization ? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to ansAver. 

INIr. Tavexxer. I desire to offer tlie document in evidence and ask 
that it be marked as "'Davis Exhibit Xo. 11." 

Mr. WcoD. AVhat is the organization ? 

Mr. Tavexxer. It is the National Xon-Partisan Committee to De- 
fend the Rights of the Twelve Communist Leaders. 

Mr. Wood. It will be received. 

(The document above referred to. marked "Davis exhibit Xo. 11." 
is filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavexxer. "Were you chairman of the Thirtieth Anniversary 
Rally of the Communist Party held in Reynold's Hall in Philadel- 
phia on September 29. 1949 ? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

]VIr. Tavexxer. At that meeting did you introduce Irving ""Chick" 
Katz — that is apparently a nickname — and refer to him as a literature 
director of the Communist Party, district 3 ? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Ta-\"exxer. Are you acquainted with Irving or "Chick" Katz ? 

Mr. DA^^s. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

^Ir. Taa-exxer. Did you introduce at that meeting Philip Bart and 
refer to him as the chairman of the Communist Party of eastern 
Pennsylvania and Delaware recently assigned to the national head- 
quarters ? 

^Ir. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and re- 
fuse to answer. 

]Mr. Ta^-exxer. Are you acquainted with Philip Bart ? 

]Mr. Davis. I refuse to answer for the same reason. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Did you not also introduce Ed Strong and refer to 
him as the chairman of the Communist Party of eastern Pennsylvania 
and Delaware? 

Mr. Davis. I assert the privilege of the fifth amendment and refuse 
to answer. 

Mr. Ta'st.xxer. Are you acquainted with Ed Strong? 

Mr. Davis. I refuse to answer for the same reason. 

]Mr. Taat.xxer. Did you introduce Bill Crawford and refer to liim 
as the party organizer in Delaware County? 



COiM-MUXIST ACTIVITIES IX THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4339 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privileoe niuler the fifth aineiuhueiit and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavkxxek. Are you acquainted with Bill Crawford? 

Mr. Davis. 1 refuse to answer for the same reason. 

"Sir. Tavexxer. Did vou attend a peace rally held at ReynoldV Hall, 
Philadeiphia. on March 9, 1952 

]Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege ■ 

]\Ir. Tavexxer. "Wait a minute — honorinir William Z. Foster on his 
seventieth hirthday at which Elizaheth Gnrley Flynn and Steve Nelson 
were the principal speakers ( 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to ansAver, 

Mr. Taatexxer. I may have mispronounced the name, it is F-1-y-n-n. 

Were you the principal speaker at a meeting held in Paramount 
Hall in Philadelphia on October 9, 1952, sponsored by the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Do you know whether John T. Bernard, a former 
Member of Congress from Illinois and a recent witness before the com- 
mittee on I'n-American Activities in Chicago, attended that meeting 
on October 9. 1952, and in addressing it advised those present not 
to answer any of the committee's questions because the committee 
couldn't put them in jail? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Tavex'X'er. Are vou ac(piainted with former Congressman John 
T. Bernard ? 

(The w^itness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Davis. I assert the privilege of the fifth amendment and refuse 
to answer. 

Mr. Tavexx'er. Have you seen Mr. John T. Bernard since Thursday 
of last week ? 

Mr. Davis. Since Thursdav. did vou say? 

Mr. Tavexxer. The 9th of October. 

ISIr. Davis. I still assert the privilege of the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Taa-ex'xer. A witness by the name of Mr. Thomas F. Delaney 
testified just before you. Were you present in the courtroom during 
his testimony? 

Ml". Davis. I was. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Did you hear his testimony? Let me put it this 
way 

Air. Davis. If I may 

Mr. TA^'EN^^ER. Let me change the question. Did you hear him 
testify that you were a member of the Communist Party and his rela- 
tionship with you while he was a member of the Communist Party? 

;Mr. Davis. The lowest kind of animal in the labor movement is a 
rat and stool pigeon. 

Mr. Tavex^x-^er. Answer the question, 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavex'X'er. Are vou now a member of the Communist Party ? 



4340 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Davis. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Walter. 

Mr. Walter. I have no questions. 

Mr. Doyle. Mr. Davis, did I understand that you heard all of Mr. 
Delaney's testimony this morning? Were you here? 

Mr. Davis. I didn't answer that. 

Mr. Doyle. Well, were you here and did you hear all of his testi- 
mony this morning? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Davis. I wasn't here all of the time and I didn't hear all of it. 
I was feeling pretty badly and I didn't hear part of it. 

Mr. Doyle. Were you here this afternoon and did you hear his 
testimony ? 

Mr. Davis. I heard some of his testimony. 

Mr, Doyle. You were right in the front row. I thinlv I saw you all 
this afternoon. 

Mr. Davis. I heard some of the testimony. 

Mv. Doyle, You were right in the front row all of the afternoon 
since the committee reconvened, weren't you ? 

Mr. Davis. Yes; but I haven't paid all of the attention for the 
reason that I have indicated to the counsel and you wouldn't let me 
finish. 

Mr. Doyle. Now, you heard his testimony. Is there any part of 
his testimony that you wish to deny 

Mr. Davis, I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr, Doyle, Where he named you ? 

Mr, Davis, I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. If Mr, Congressman is interested in knowing my 
credo, I can tell it to you. 

Mr. Wood. The committee isn't concerned about your opinion of the 
witness ; the committee is concerned about youi- i-eaction to the truthful- 
ness or veracity of the witness if you have anything to say about that. 
That is, insofar as it relates to the testimony he gave concerning you, 

Mr, Davis, I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. I said, JSIr. Chairman, if you want my opinion on 
certain things as far as trade unions are concerned, I will be glad 
to give it. 

Mr. Doyle. The reason I asked the witness this question, I saw him 
in the courtroom all this afternoon right in the front row with his 
counsel within a few feet of the witness, and I figured that if there was 
any part of Thomas F. Delaney's testimony that was untrue where he 
named this witness, that this would be a good chance for this witness 
to deny it. 

Mr. Wood. Are there any further questions ? 

Mr. Doyle. I have no other questions. 

Mr. Wood. Any further questions, Mr. Counsel ? 

Mr. Tavenner. No, sir. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4341 

Mr. Wt)OD. Is there any reason why the witness shouldn't be excused 
from further attendance on the committee? 

Mr. Tavenner. No, sir. 

Mr. Wood. It is so ordered. 

(The witness was excused.) 

Mr. Tavenner. I will call ;Mr. Max Helfand. 

Mr. Wood. Will 3^ou raise your ri<2:ht hand and be sworn? 

Do you solemnly swear that the evidence you shall gjive this subcom- 
mittee will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so 
help you God ? 

Mr. Helfand. I do. 

Mr. Wood. The same counsel is representing the witness. 

TESTIMONY OF MAX HELFAND, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

DAVID COHEN 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your name? 

Mr. Helfand. Max Helfand. 

Mr. TxWENNER. Are you known by any other name ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Helfand. I assert my rights under the fifth amendment and I 
refuse to answer tluit question. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born, Mr. Helfand? 

Mr. Helfand. I was born in Poland, May 26, 1902. 

Mr. Ta\enner. When did you come to the United States? 

Mr. Helfand. I came here approximately in June of 1906, 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you a naturalized American citizen? 

Mr, Helfand. I am a naturalized American citizen, and I have 
derivative citizenship through the naturalization of my father. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where was your father naturalized? 

Mr. Helfand. I believe he was naturalized in the Supreme Court in 
NeAv York, approximately in 1912. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you please give the committee a brief resume 
of your educational background? 

Mr. Helfand. I am a graduate of grammar school and I have at- 
tended a session of evening high school and some trade schools. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your trade, profession, or occupation? 

IMr. Helfand. At the present time ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

^Ir. Helfand. I am a union organizer. 

Mr. Tavenner. For what union ? 

Mr. Helfand. Local 155, United Electrical, Radio and Machine 
Workers of America. 

Mr, Tavenner, How long have you been an organizer? 

Mr, Cohen, May I ask the picture- taking be held up ? 

Mr. Wood. If the witness objects to having his picture taken, of 
course the committee would respect his wishes. Sometimes it is a little 
disturbing to the witnesses to be photographed during the progress of 
their testimony, and w^e have to respect their wishes about it. So if he 
objects to it, I will ask the photogi-aphers not to take pictures. 

Mr. Helfand, Will you please rephrase that question, I didn't get 
it. I am sorry. 

Mr. Tavenner. Read the question. 



4342 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IX THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

(Whereupon tlie pending' question was tlien read by the reporter, as 
above recorded.) 

Mr. Helfaxd. Approximately 10 years. 

Mr. Tavenxek. Prior to that time, how were you employed? 

Mr. Helfaxd. I assert my rights under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Tavex^ner. Over how long a period of time do you assert your 
privilege against answering the question? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Helfax'd. Pardon me. I am trying to get clarification. 

Mr. Tavexxek. You stated that prior to 10 years ago you would not 
testify as to your employment, asserting the right to refuse under the 
immunity gi-anted under the fifth amendment, and now over how 
long a period of time prior to 10 years ago was it that you were em- 
ployed in a manner on which you refuse to testify ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

]\[r. Helfax^d. From the period of 11*29 to 1043. In other words I 
am willing to discuss, as much of it as my memory permits, my em- 
ployment prior to 1929. 

Mr. Tavexxer. And what did you state was the date of your birth? 

Mr. Helfaxd. May 26, 1902. 

Mr. Tavexx^er. Where have you resided since you have been an 
organizer for local 155 ? 

All". Helfax^d. You mean at the ])resent time ? 

j\Ir. Tavexx^er. Well, fi'om the present time to on back until the 
time you were first em})loyed as an organizer. 

Mr. Helfaxd. 1 am presently residing at 703 West Wyoming 
Avenue. 

Mr. Ta\'exxer. How long have you resided there ? 

Mr. Helfax^d. Approximately 21^ years. 

Mr. Tavex^x'er. Prior to that time where did you reside? 

jMr. Helfaxd. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment of 
the Ignited States Constitution and respectfully refuse to answer that 
f[uestian. 

Mr. Ta\^exx^er. Well, I think that I will have to test in some manner 
your reason for that. You may have a reason but I think that you have 
U) give the committee 

Mr. Helfax d. Are you asking for my reason ? 

Mr. Ta\^xxer. Just wait a minute. 

Mr. Helfax^d. Pardon me. 

Mr. Ta\'exx"er. I think that you will have to give the committee 
some basis by which it can determine that you are entitled to assert 
your privilege as to a question of that kind, because it certainly is not 
obvious from the question and your answer that it would tend to in- 
criminate you if you answered it truthfully. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Helfaxd. I have been informed by counsel that I am not obli- 
gated to state the reason why I plead my privilege under the fifth 
amendment, and therefore I refuse to answer your question under the 
fifth amendment, under the privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr, Tavexxer. Did you reside within the United States ? 

Mr. Helfaxd. I did. 

Mr. Ta\^nxer. Did you reside at 1114 Pine Street, Philadelphia? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4343 

Mv. Helfanu. I assert my privileoe under the fifth amendment, and 
refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Tavenxer. Did you reside at any time at 3222 Susquehanna 
Avenue, Phihidelphia, Pa.? 

Mv. Helfaxd. I assert my privilege under the fiftli amendment and 
refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Doyle. Mr. Chairman, I started to ask a question, whether or 
]'ot the residence of this man has been held as subversive as a place of 
some kind by anvone. I didn't know that where a man resided was 
grounds for a refusal to answer under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Wt)OD. The chairman cannot knoAv either. The witness is under 
oath and it either does tend to incriminate him or the evidence is false, 
I don't know Avhich, but I know of nothing I can do about it. I have 
r^ever known before that it was incriminating for a man to live in 
Philadelpliia, particularly on either of the streets that have been named 
here, but the witness is testifying under oath. 

Mr. TA^^]s^NER. Mr. Helfand, I hand you a photostatic copy of a 
signature or a voter's pei'manent registration affidavit over the sig- 
nature of Max Helfand, bearing date of August 30, 1948, and I w^ould 
like for you to examine it and state whether it is a copy of your reg- 
istration affidavit. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

(The document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Helfand. Counsel, are you asking me whether this is my regis- 
tration ? 

Mr. Taa'enner. Whether this is a copy of your affidavit. 

Mr. Helfand. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment 
'and refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Tavenner. Does your signature appear on that document ? 

Mr. Helfand. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment 
and refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. TA^'ENNER. I hand you a second photostatic copy of a regis- 
tration affidavit under date of August 9, 1950, and ask you to examine 
it and state whether or not you i-ecognize it as a copy of your regis- 
tration in the city of Philadelphia. 

(The witness conferred witli his counsel.) 

(A document Avas shown to the witness.) 

Mr. Helfand. I as-sert my privilege under the fifth amendment 
and decline to answer that question. 

Mr. Tavenner. May I have it a moment ? 

(The document was handed to counsel.) 

Mr. Tavenner. What was your father's name when he was natural- 
ized? 

Mr. Helfand. I beg your pardon, I didn't hear the question. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was your father's name Avhen he was natural- 
ized ? 

Mr. Helfand. Aaron Helfand. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you examine this document and see whether 
or not you see the name of your father as being Aaron Helfand. 

(The document was handed to the witness.) 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr, Helfand. I see here the name of Aaron Helfand. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is the name of your father, 

25241 — 52 4 



4344 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Prior to 1929 what was your occupation ? 

Mr, Helfand. Well, I worked in various occupations. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you teach at any time ? 

Mr. Helfand. Prior to 1929 ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 
(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Helfand. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment 
and refuse to answer that question as to my teaching. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you a third photostatic copy of a perma- 
nent registration of voters. This one is signed "Mac Harris" and it 
shows the place of birth as in New York City. I want to ask you if 
you used the name Mac Harris in connection with that registration and 
whether or not you stated that you were born in New York City. 

Mr. Helfand, I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment 
and decline to answer that question. 

Mr. Tavenner. In registering to vote did you ever represent that 
you were born in New York City instead of in Poland ? 

Mr. Helfand. I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment 
and refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Ta\ienner. I desire to offer the three photostatic copies in evi- 
dence and ask that they be marked as "Helfand Exhibits Nos. 1, 2, 
and 3," 

Mr, Wood. Let them be received. 

(The documents above referred to, marked "Helfand Exhibits Nos. 
1, 2, and 3," are filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you the January 13, 1936, issue of the Daily 
Worker. That is a photostatic copy of it listing Mac, M-a-c, Harris 
as section organizer for the Communist Party of eastern Pennsyl- 
vania. Will you please examine the document and state whether or 
not the Mac Harris referred to there is you ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Helfand. I see a piece of paper with the name Mac Harris 
on it. 

Mr. Tavenner, Do you also see that Mac Harris is reported there 
to be the section organizer for the Communist Party of eastern Penn- 
sylvania for that year, which is 1936 ? 

Mr. Helfand. I will have to take time to read this whole thing in 
order to ascertain that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Possibly we can help you by pointing it out. 

Mr. Fuoss. I believe that was on another date, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Tavenner. I will withdraw the question for the present. 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Counsel, it is approaching 5 o'clock and I think that 
we might as well take a recess until 10 o'clock in the morning. 

The committee stands in recess until tomorrow morning. 

(Whereupon, at 4:45 p. m., a recess was taken until Tuesday, 
October 14, 1952, at 10 a, m.) 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AEEA 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1953 

United States House of Representatives, 

Subcommittee of the Committee on 

Un-American Activities, 

Philadelphia^ Pa. 

The subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities 
met at 10 a. m., pursuant to recess, in Federal courtroom No. 1, Federal 
Building, Philadelphia, Pa., Hon. John S. Wood (chairman) pre- 
siding. 

Committee members present : Representatives John S. Wood (chair- 
man), Francis E. Walter, and Clyde Doyle. 

Staff members present: Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., counsel; Thomas 
W. Beale, Sr., assistant counsel; John W. Carrington, clerk; Raphael 
I. Nixon, research director; W. Jackson Jones, Earl L. Fuoss, and 
Frank Bonora, investigators; and Thelma Scearce, staff member. 

Mr. Wood, Let the record show that for purposes of the continua- 
tion of the hearings in Philadelphia, and acting under the authority 
of the resolution creating this committee, I have set up a subcommittee 
composed of Messrs. Walter, Doyle, and Wood, who are all present. 

Are you ready to proceed, Mr. Counsel ? 

Mr. Cohen. Mr. Chairman, I would like to move for a postpone- 
ment of the effective date of a subpena involving Mr. Louis Kaplan, 
and he was subpenaed for yesterday, and he is involved in negotia- 
tions in a plant in Philadelphia which has a strike vote on tomorrow. 
I wonder if the effective date on that could be postponed to whatever 
date could be possible. He was subpenaed for yesterday. 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Counsel, I feel that under the circumstances a little 
more time should be given. Would the 17th of November in Wash- 
ington, D. C., be satisfactory? 

Mr. Tavenner. I suggest the 18th. 

Mr. Wood. Very well, until November 18 in the committee hearing 
rooms in Washington, in the Old House Office Building. 

Mr. Cohen. That is November 18. That is fine. 

Mr. Wood. It has been our policy at all times to cooperate in matters 
of this sort, particularly where there are controversies in matters 
of the character you mentioned, and 1 day's time in the service of a 
subpena is a little quick and we will be glad to accommodate you until 
that time. 

Mr. Cohen. Very good, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Helfand. 



4345 



4346 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

TESTIMONY OF MAX HELFAND, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL 
DAVID COHEN— Eesumed 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you present yesterday, Mr. Helfand, during*^ 
the testimony of Mr. Thomas Delaney ? 

Mr. Helfand. I was. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you hear that part of his testimony in Avhicb 
he stated that you Vvere known by the name of Mae Harris, as well 
as by the name of Max Helfand ? 

Mr. Helfand. I lieard him say something to that effect. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was it true? I mean by that, were 3'ou known by 
that name, that is, the name of Mac Harris ? 

Mr. Helfand. I refuse to answer that question, and I assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Let me refer you again to the photostatic coj^ies of 
the registration forms which were presented to you yesterday. I refer 
first to the one signed "Mac Harris" of October 3, 1986. This shows 
a new address of Mac Harris as being 3'222 Susquehanna Avenue, and 
will you look at that? 

( Document was handed to the witness. ) 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you see that? 

Mr. Helfand. I note on this document that it is 3222 Susquehanna 
Avenue. 

Mr. Tavenner. And you notice the signature of Mac Harris? 

Mr. Helfand. I see a signature of Mac Harris on it. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, will you examine the second, bearing the 30th 
day of August for the year 1940, which shows the address from which 
the registrant moved as being 3222 Susquehanna Avenue. 

(Document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Helfand. I note on this document 3222 Susquehanna Avenue.. 

Mr. Tavenner. You also notice the signature of Max Helfand I 

Mr. Helfand. I so notice. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is it your signature ? 

Mr. Helfand. I refuse to answer that question, and I assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you reside at 3222 Susquehanna Avenue '. 

Mr. Helfand. I respectfully decline to answer that question, and 
I assert my privilege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you a photostatic copy of an article appear- 
ing in the Daily Woi'ker of January 25, 1936, entitled, "The Task of 
Eecruiting That Faces All Communist Party Members," and allegedly- 
written by Mac Harris, section organizer, South Philadelphia. 

(Document was handed to the witness.) 

(The witness consulted with his counsel.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you observe that article ? 

Mr. Helfand. I see on this document an article bv IVlac Harris. 

Mr. Tavennp:r. What is the title of it? 

Mr. Helfand. "The Task of Recruiting That Faces k\\ Connnunist 
Party Members." 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you observe in the second column of that article- 
a statement that approximately 300 party members are organized at 
])resent in 5 street units, 3 industrial units, and 8 shop units ? 

(The witness consulted with his counsel.) 

Mr. Helfand. I see such words there. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4347 

]\Ir. Tavenner. Did 3'ovi make that statement in the press or for the 
])i'ess, or in that articled 

Mr. PIelfaxd. 1 respectfully refuse to answer that question assert- 
iuo- mv privilege under the tifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did 3'ou write the article? 

Mr. Helfand. 1 refuse to answer that question and assert my priv- 
ilege under the fifth amenchnent. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was that an accurate statement of the party's 
sti'eugth at that time? 

Mr. Helfand. I refuse to answer that question for the same reasons. 

]Mr. TA^'ENNER. Were you the section organizer of the Communist 
Party for South Philadelphia in 1936? 

Mr. Helfand. I decline to answer that question and I assert my 
pi'ivilege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you a member of the district committee of 
the Communist Party in 1936 ? 

Mr. Helfand. I refuse to answer that question and assert my priv- 
ilege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you the May Day festival program for 
April 30, 1936, and ask you if you do not see on it the name of Mac 
Harris as participating in the program activities as a member of the 
district committee of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Helfand. I see on this document the name of Mac Harris, as 
you stated. 

Mv. Tavenner. What is the description that follows the name ? 

Mr. Helfand. "District Committee of the Communist Party." 

Mr. Ta%'enner. Was that you ? 

Mr. Helfand. 1 refuse to answer that question and assert my priv- 
ilege under the fifth amendment. 

]Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer in evidence at this time the Jan- 
uary 1936 issue of the Daily Worker, January 25, and ask that it be 
marked ''Helfand Exhibit 4," and I desire to also introduce in evi- 
dence the Mav Day festival program for April 30, 1936, and request 
that it be marked "Helfand Exhibit No. 5." 

^Mr. Wood. They will be received. 

(The documents referred to, marked "Helfand Exhibits 4 and 5," 
are filed herewith.) 

Mv. Walter. Where did you live in January of 1936, Mr. Helfand? 

Mr. Helfand. I beg your pardon ? 

Mr. Walter. Where did you live in January of 1936? 

Mr. Helfand. I refuse to answer that question and assert my privi- 
lege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Walter. What criminal prosecution do you think might ensue 
if you answered that question ? 

Mr. Helfand. I don't think. Congressman Walter, that I am 
obligated to explain why I assert my privilege, and I again assert 
my privilege under the fifth amendment and refuse to answer your 
question. 
. Mr. Walter. What was your occupation in January of 1936? 

Mr. Helfand. I refuse to answer that question and assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment, 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you a delegate to the national convention 
of the Communist Party which was held in May of 1938 in Madison 
Square Garden in New York City ? 



4348 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Helfand. I respectfully decline to answer that question and 
assert my privilege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you a photostatic copy of the Daily Worker 
of May 24, 1938, and ask you to examine it. Do you see there the 
name of either Max Helfand or Mac Harris as a delegate to that 
convention ? 

Mr. Helfand. On this document handed to me I see the name of 
Mac Harris. 

Mr. Tavenner. In connection with what? 

Mr. Helfand. I will have to look at it further, if you don't mind. 

Mr. Tavenner. I think if you look at the preceding paragraph^ 
you will see the answer to that. 

Mr. Helfand. I believe it states as a delegate to a convention. 

Mr. Tavenner. What convention ? 

Mr. Helfand. It seems to be a Philadelphia convention. 

Mr. Tavenner. Of what ? 

Mr. Helfand. Of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend that convention ? 

Mr. Heli'^and. I refuse to answer that question and assert my privi- 
lege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to introduce the document in evidence and 
ask that it be marked "Helfand Exhibit No. 6." 

Mr. Wood. Let it be admitted. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Helfand Exhibit No. 
6," is filed herewith.) ^ 

Mr. Tavenner. On August 15, 1938, Mr. Walter Steele testified 
before the predecessor of this committee, and it was known as the 
Special Committee on Un-American Activities, that certain indi- 
viduals were members of the Pennsylvania State Committee of the 
Communist Party. In that listing of individuals he mentioned along 
with Dave Davis, the name of Mac Harris. Were you the Mac Harris 
referred to in that testimony ? 

Mr. Helfand. I respectfully decline to answer that question and 
assert my privilege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, were you on the Pennsylvania State Com- 
mittee of the Communist Party at any time ? 

Mr. Helfand. I refuse to answer that question for the same reason. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have here an article, entitled, "Help Democratic 
Spain,'' which appeared in the Lenin Memorial Yearbook for 1939. 
Will you examine it? 

(Document was handed to the witness.) 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you the Mac Harris listed as the author of this. 
article ? 

Mr. Helfand. I refuse to answer that question and assert my privi- 
lege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you see the name of Mac Harris listed as the 
author of that article ? 

Mr. Helfand. I so note it. 

Mr. Tavenner. What title or descriptive matter appears after the 
name "Mac Harris"? 

Mr. Helfand. I note on this document, "Member of the district 
committee." 



1 See illustration opposite p. 4470. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES TN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4349 

Mr. Tavexner. Were you a member of the district bureau of the 
Eastern Pennsylvania Conununist Party at that time? 

Mr. Helfand. I refuse to answer that question and assert my privi- 
lege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavexner. I desire to introduce the document in evidence and 
ask that it be marked "Helfand Exhibit No. 7." 

Mr. Wood. Let it be admitted. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Helfand Exhibit No. 7,'- 
is filed herewith.) ^ 

Mr. Tavexxer. Did you at any time teach a course in the principles 
of scientific socialism and elementary study at the Tom Paine School 
of Social Science, located at 810 Locust Street, Philadelphia, during 
the year 1942? 

Mr. Helfaxd. I refuse to answer that question and assert my privi- 
lege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavex^x^er. Were you connected in any way with the Tom 
Paine School of Social Science? 

Mr. Helfaxd. I refuse to answer that question for the same reason. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend the 1943 convention of the Com- 
munist Party held in Pliiladelphia? 

Mr. Helfaxd. I respectfully decline to answer that question and 
assert my privilege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavexner, Did you attend a Communist Party meeting held 
at Town Hall, Philadelphia, on January 21, 1944, honoring V. I. 
Lenin, and celebrating the twentieth aninversary of the Daily Worker ? 

Mr. Helfaxd. I refuse to answer that question for tlie same reason. 

Mr. Tavex'xer. The committee has information that there was a 
picketing of the United States Immigration and Naturalization Serv- 
ice located at 1506 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, on January 29, 
1948, protesting the deportation proceedings against Doyle, Bittel- 
man, IMartinez, Obermeier, Jones, and Santos. Was this demonstra- 
tion organized and sponsored jointly by the Communist Party and 
the Civil Rights Congress to your knowledge ? 

Mr. Helfand. I respectfully decline to answer that question and 
assert my privilege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you take part in the picketing? 

]\Ir. Helfand. I refuse to answer that question for the same reason. 

Mr. Walter. When was that, Mr. Tavenner? 

Mr. Tavenner. January 29, 1948. 

Did you attend a May Day rally of the Communist Party held at 
Rayburn Plaza, Philadelphia, on May 1, 1948, at which Philip Bart, 
Jules Abercauph, Sterling Rochester, and Lauren Taylor spoke? 

Mr. Helfand. I refuse to answer that question and I assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you acquainted with Jules Abercauph? 

Mr. Helfand. I refuse to answer that question for the same reasons. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you participate in the picketing of the Federal 
Building located at Ninth and Market Streets, Philadelphia, on Oc- 
tober 16, 1948, protesting the Federal indictment of the 12 Com- 
munist leaders? 

Mr. Helfand. I refuse to answer that question and assert my priv- 
ilege under the fifth amendment. 



^ See pp. 4444-4468. 



4350 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mv. Tavexner. Did you attend a Rally for Peace and Democratic 
Rights sponsored by district 3 "of the Communist Party held in the 
Stephen Girard, Philadelphia, on April 8, 1949, at which Gus Hall 
and others spoke? 

]Vlr. Helfand. I refuse to answer that question for the same reasons. 

Mr. Tavenxer. Do you know Gus Hall ? 

]Mr. Helfaxd. I refiise to answer that question and assert my priv- 
ilege under the fifth amendment. 

]\Ir. Tavexxer. Did you attend a meeting of the Trade Union Com- 
mittee To Defend Labor's Rights held on December 7, 1951 ? 

Mv. Helfaxd. I refuse to answer that question and assert my priv- 
ilege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavexxer. During the course of the testimony of Mr. Thomas 
F. Delaney, frequent reference was made to your participation in 
Communist Party activities and that you were a member of the group 
of the Connnunist Party of which he was a member. Did you hear 
that testimony ? 

Mr. Helfaxd. I so heard the testimony. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Was it true ? 

Mr. Helfaxd. I refuse to answer that question and assert my privi- 
lege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Are you now a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Helfaxd. I refuse to answer that question for the same reason. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Ml'. Helfaxd. I refuse to answer that question and assert my privi- 
lege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavexxer. I have no further questions. Mr. Chairman. 

]\Ir. Wood. Mr. Walter, do you haye any questions? 

Mr. Walter. To Avhat extent did you participate in the organized 
attempt that was made during the last session of the Congress to 
prevent the enactment of the new Immigration and Naturalization 
Code? 

Mr. Helfaxd. I refuse to answer that question and assert my privi- 
lege under the fifth amendment. 
'Mr. Walter. That is all. 

IVIr. Wood. Mr. Doyle. 

Mr. Doyle. Have you visited any foreign country since you obtamet^i 
your derivative citizenship, as I understood it yesterday from your 
father's coming to this country from Poland ? 

Mr. Helfaxd. Pardon me. I want to consult my counsel. (The 
witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Helfaxd. I refuse to answer that question and assert my privi- 
lege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Doyle. How long since you visited the Soviet Union? 

]\Ir. Helfaxd. I refuse to answer that question and assert my privi- 
lege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. DoTLE. Did you make an application under the name of Mac 
Harris, or under some other name, when you applied for a passport, 
if you applied for a passport? 

Mr. Helfaxd. I refuse to answer that question and assert my privi- 
lege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Wood. Any further questions, Mr. Counsel ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4351 

Mr. Tavenner. I think I mioht state that from our investigation 
the information obtained from the State Department is that no appli- 
cation was filed under either name, so if an application were filed, it 
must have been under some other name that we do not know of at the 
present time. 

Mr. Doyle. I was not assuming, or I would not assume that the man 
was participating in subversive activities merely because he visited 
some other country. 

Mr. AVooD. Any" further questions, Mr. Counsel? 

]\Ir. TA^^ENNER. No, sir. 

Mr. Wood. Any further reason why the witness should not be ex- 
cused from further attendance on the committee^ 

Mr. Tavexner. No, sir. 

Mr. Wood. It is so ordered. 

(The witness was excused.) 

Mr. Wood. Whom do you call now ? 

Mr. Tavexner. I would like to call Mv. John Kelly Ellis. 

Mr. Cohex. Mr. Chairman, I would like to move that a subpena 
commanding Philip Saba to appear before this committee today be 
])ostponed until a later date. The subpena was served on him yester- 
day, and he is tied up in some very important negotiations in the city. 

Mr. Wood. Negotiations between labor and management? 

Mr. CoHEX. That is right. 

Mr. Wood. Here in the area ? 

Mr. Cohex. Yes, that are pending now and have been, and that was 
not served until yesterday, commanding him to appear today. 

Mr. Wood. Vvell, Mr. Counsel, I feel impelled to recognize the valid- 
ity of the showing, and shall we say that we will postpone his appear- 
ance until the 18th of November, also? 

Mr. Tavexxer. Yes, sir. 

INIr. Wood. Iji tlic committee hearing room in the Old Hou.se Office 
Building in Washingion, on the 18th of November 1952 at 10 o'clock. 

Mr. CoHEX. Very good. 

Mr. Wood. What is the witness' name who has been called? 

Mr. Tavexxer. John Kelly Ellis. 

Mr. Wood. INIr. Ellis, will you stand and be SAvorn, please. Do you 
solemnly swear the evidence you shall give this subcommittee shall be 
tiie truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Ellis. I do. 

Mr. Wood. Have a seat, sir. Are you represented by counsel? 

Mr. Ellis. Yes, sir. 

j\Ir. Wood. Yv'ill counsel identify himself for the record, the name 
and address? 

Mr. Kaplax. Jerome Kaplan, 1100 Lewis Tower, Philadelphia. 

TESTIMONY OF JOHN JOSEPH ELLIS, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, JEROME KAPLAN 

Mr. Tavexxer. What is your name, please, sir? 

Mr. Ellis. John Joseph Ellis. 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Elli.s, in order that we may be permitted to hear, 
would you mind elevating your voice slightly so that we all will 
hear you ? 

Mr. Ellis. iVll right, sir. 



4352 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavenner. I referred to you, I believe, as John Kelly Ellis. 
Have you used the name '"Kelly" in addition to the name "Joseph"? 

Mr. Ellis. I refuse to answer that, under the privilege of the fifth 
amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born? 

Mr. Ellis. Philadelphia, November 30, 1910. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you give the committee, please, a brief state- 
ment of your educational training ? 

Mr. Ellis. I have had 8 years of grammar-school training. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you currently employed? 

Mr. Ellis. I am employed at the present time. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is the nature of your employment? 

Mr. Ellis. I am a carpenter. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state to the committee briefly what your 
record of employment has been since 1935 ? 

Mr. Ellis. My record of employment since 1935 was about 14 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. In what line of work ? 

Mr. Ellis. In the building line. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, were you self-employed or were you employed 
by any construction company during that period or tell us more about 
the nature of your employment. 

Mr. Ellis. I w^as employed by a number of contractors. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you used an}^ name other than the name of 
John Joseph Ellis in procuring employment, or in any other manner? 

Mr. Ellis. I refuse to answer that under the privilege of the fifth 
amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever used the name "John Kelly" ? 

Mr. Ellis. I refuse to answer that under the privilege of the fifth 
amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever used the name of "John J. Kelly" ? 

Mr. Eli>is. I refuse to answer that under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you participate in the May Day concert and 
celebration held April 30, 1930 ? In order to refresh your recollection, 
I will hand you the program for that concert. 

(Document was handed to the witness.) 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Ellis. I see a program advertising a concert for May 1. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did you participate in it in any way? 

Mr. Ellis. I exercise my constitutional rights under the fifth 
amendment, and I refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you see the name "John Kelly" appearing on 
the program ? 

Mr. Ellis. I see the name "John Kelly" appearing on the program. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is the description which appears following 
the name ? 

Mr. Ellis. The description is "The Young Communist League." 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you the John Kelly referred to ? 

Mr. Ellis. I refuse to answer that under the fifth amendment of the 
Constitution. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you ever a member of the Young Communist 
League ? 

Mr. Ellis. I refuse lo answer that statement on the privilege of the 
fifth amendment. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN TPIE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4353 

]\Ir. Tavenxer. I desire to offer the document in evidence and ask 
It be marked '^Ellis Exliibit No. 1." 

Mr. Wt)OD. It will be admitted. 

(The document above referred to. marked "Ellis Exhibit No. 1," is 
filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavexxek. In the Lenin Memorial Yearbook of 19-JV) there ap- 
pears a photograph of an individual listed as John Kelly. Will you 
look at that photograph and state whether or not it is your photo- 
graph? 

(Document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Tavexxer. Can you state whether or not it is a photograph 
of you? 

Mv. Ellis. I see a photogra])h of a picture by the name of John 
Kelly. 

Mv. TA^'EXXER. Well, is that a photograph of you? 

Mr. Ellis. I refuse to answer that under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Does it look like you ? 

]Mr. Ellis. I refuse to answer that under the basis of the fifth 
amendment. 

]\Ir. Tavexxer. Will you hand the document to the committee, 
please ? 

(Document was handed to members of the committee.) 

Mr. Tavex^xer. I desire to introduce it in evidence and ask it to be 
marked as "Ellis Exhibit No. 2." 

INIr. Wood. Let it be admitted. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Ellis Exhibit No. 2," is 
filed herewith.) ^ 

]Mr. Tavexxer. I would like for you to examine exhibit No. 2 again 
and state wdiether or not the photofi,raph of John Kelly is listed as a 
member of the district bureau, Communist Party, eastern Penn- 
sylvania. 

(Document handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Ellis. I see a picture of John Kelly, which states in a program, 
"Member of the district committee." ^ 

Mr. Tavexxer. District committee of what? 

Mr. Ellis. District committee of the Communist Party, eastern 
Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Well, were you a member of the district committee 
of the Communist Party of eastern Pennsylvania ? 

Mr. Ellis. I exercise my rights under the fifth amendment, and I 
refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Walter. Was that picture published without your permission? 

]\Ir. Ellis. I refuse to answer that question under the fifth amend- 
ment of the Constitution. 

Mr. Walter. You never protested anywdiere because your picture 
was published in that booklet, whatever it is, did you ? 

Mr. Ellis. Do you want me to answer that ? 

Mr. Walter. Well, say something. 

Mr. Ellis. I refuse to answer. 

Mr. Walter. That is what I expected. 

Mr. Ellis. That is right. 



^ See pp. 4444-4468. 
* See p. 4448. 



4354 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavenner. There are also listed as members of the district 
bureau of the Communist Party and the photographs of the indi- 
viduals appear in that same article, or in that same booklet, "Sterling 
Eochester, and Ed Sohvay." Were these individuals also members 
of the district bureau of the Communist Party of eastern Pennsyl- 
vania at that time, to your knowledge ? 

Mr. Ellis. I exercise my constitutional rights under the fifth amend- 
inent and T refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you acquainted with Sterling Rochester and 
EdSolway? 

Mr. Ellis. I refuse to answer that question under the fifth amend- 
ment of the Constitution. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was Ed Solway also known by the name of Abe 
Sokolov ? 

Mr. Ellis. I exercise my constitutional rights under the fifth amend- 
ment, and I refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Tavenner. In the American Free Press of May 1, 1940, page 2, 
there appears an advertisement of an antiwar rally of the Young^ 
Communist League, to be held at 1605 Katherine Street, Philadelphia, 
on May 10 of that year, 1940. The speakers are listed as Sam Adams 
Darcy, State secretary of the Communist Party of eastern Pennsyl- 
vania; Max West, national committee. Young Community [sic] 
League ; and John Kelly Ellis, executive secretary. Young Communist 
League, eastern Pennsylvania. Will you examine the document and 
state whether or not you are the John Kelly Ellis referred to in this 
article or advertisement? 

Mr. Ellis. I see an article here, and advertising an antiwar rally^ 
YCL, Friday evening May 10, 8 p. m. I see an advertisement of John 
Kelly Ellis, executive secretary. Young Communist League. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is that you? 

Mr. Ellis. I refuse to answer that question under the fifth amend- 
ment of the Constitution. 

Mr. Tay'enner. I desire to offer the document in evidence and ask 
it be marked "Ellis Exhibit No. 3." 

Mr. Wood. Let it be admitted. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Ellis Exhibit No. 3," is 
filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you chairman of a meeting of the TAventy- 
fourth Ward of the Communist Partv of Eastern Pennsylvania held 
on September 25, 1940, at Postal Hall, Philadelphia, at which Ella 
Reeve Bloor and Ben Careathers were the principal speakers? 

Mr. Ellis. I exercise my constitutional rights under the fifth amend- 
ment and refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you a speaker at the annual convention of the 
Young Communist League of Eastern Pennsylvania held on May 10 
and 12, 1940 ? 

Mr. Ellis. I exercise my constitutional rights under the fifth amend- 
ment and refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever been a candidate for office on the 
Comnnuiist Party ticket? 

Mr. Ellis. I refuse to answer that question on the basis of the fifth 
amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you campaign for the office of city magistrate^ 
on the Communist Party ticket in the city of Philadelphia in 1937 ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4355 

Mr. Ellis. I exercise my rights under the fifth amendment of the 
Constitution and I refuse to answer that question, 

Mr. AValter. Do you take the position that you have taken with 
respect to answering- these questions because you have learned that you 
liave been a part of a conspiracy to overthrow the Government which 
has provided the Constitution behind which you are now hiding? 

Mr. Ellis. I refuse to answer that question on the basis of the fifth 
amendment which gives me that right to give that answer. 

Mr. Taa'enner. Will you please examine an advertisement issued by 
the Communist Party of the United States in which it lists as a can- 
didate for councilman in 1938 election in Philadelphia one John J. 
Ellis? 

(Document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Tavexner. Do you see the name "John J. Ellis" as a candidate 
for councilman ? 

Ml'. Ellis. I see the photostatic copy here, advertising the follow- 
ing candidates, and I see the name John J. Ellis. 

Mr. Tavenner. What office does it show John J. Ellis to have been 
a candidate for ? 

Mr. Ellis. Fourth councilmanic district. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you the John J. Ellis referred to? 

Mr. Ellis. I refuse to answer that question and exercise my rights 
Tinder the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you also campaign or did you campaign for 
a seat on the City Council of the City of Philadelphia in 1939 as a 
I'epresentative of the Communist Party ? 

]Mr. Ellis. I exercise my rights under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer that question, 

IMr. TA\TEX]srER, I desire to offer in evidence the Communist Party 
advertisement last referred to, and I ask it be marked "Ellis Exhibit 
Xo. 4." 

Mr. Wood. Let it be admitted. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Ellis Exhibit No. 4," is 
filed herewith.) ^ 

Mr. Tavenner. Appearing in the same advertisement is the name 
of Sterling Rochester, candidate for magistrate on the Communist 
Party ticket, and also the name of Walter Lowenfels, as a candidate 
for constable on the Communist Party ticket. Do you know either 
of tliese individuals? 

Mr, Ellis. I exercise my rights under the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer that question. 

oVIi". Tavenner. Did you campaign for the position of general assem- 
blvman of the State of Pennsylvania on the Communist Party ticket 
in 1940? 

jNIr. Ellis. I refuse to answer that question under the fifth amend- 
ment, 

Mr. Tavenner, You stated that you had been employed by various 
contractors. Were you employed by the Chester Shipbuilding & Dry- 
dock Co., of Chester, Pa., in 1943 ? 

Mr. Ellis. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did you first become employed by the Chester 
Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., of Chester? 



^ See last illustration in this publication on unnumbered page. 



4356 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Ellis. I don't exactly know the date. I think it was in 1941. 

Mr. Tavenner. And how long were you employed by that company ? 

Mr. Ellis. I was employed, I think, around 6 or 7 months. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you employed there as late as 1943? 

Mr. Ellis. It might have been because I don't know ; it was during 
the war when I was employed there, when they were hiring. 

Mr, Tavenner. Well, during your service with the Chester Ship- 
building & Dry dock Co., did you also serve as chairman of the control 
conmiission of the Communist Party, district 3, and as head of the 
Communist Party unit in the Sun Shipbuilding Yards at Chester ? 

Mr. Ellis. I refuse to answer that question under the fifth amend- 
ment of the Constitution. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend a May Day rally held by the Com- 
munist Party in Rayburn Plaza, Philadelphia, on May 1, 1948 ? 

Mr. Ellis. Do 3^011 want me to answer ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. Ellis. I refuse to answer that question under the fifth amend- 
ment, 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, during the period that you were employed 
at the Chester Shipbuilding & Drydock Co. of Chester, and during 
the period of your other employment in your trade as carpenter, were 
you a member of a union ? 

Mr. Ellis. I was a member of a union ; yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. What union ? 

Mr. Ellis. I v/as a member of the Sun Ship Union, CIO. 

Mr. Tavenner. I am sorry. I did not hear you. 

Mr. Ellis. The union, it was the CIO shipbuilders' union, I think, 
it was. 

Mr. Ta\t2nner. What was the name of it ? 

Mr. Ellis. The only way I knew it, it was a union of ship workers.. 
CIO, and they were asking for members to join the union, and I 
joined the union. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you at any time been a member of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners, American Federation of 
Labor ? 

Mr. Ellis. I refuse to answer that question under the fifth amend- 
ment. 

Mr. Walter. That is no Communist organization, is it? 

Mr. Ellis. It is not. It is far from a Communist organization. 

Mr. Walter. I should think you would be very proud of your mem- 
bership in it. 

Mr. Eli^is. I am proud of it, but circumstances which are taking- 
place today with such investigations frighten to death the people and" 
the hysteria forces a witness to give an answer like that. 

Mr. Wood. I know of no hysteria or any claim of hysteria concern- 
ing this branch of the American Federation of Labor, this particular- 
organization, and I fail to see how an admission of membership in 
that organization could in any way tend to incriminate you. I direct 
that you answer the question. 

Mr. Ellis. What did you say? 

Mr, Wood. I direct that you answer the question, 

Mr. Ellis. I answered it my way. 

Mr. Wood. You declined to answer for reasons which you stated. 
The chairman holds, though, those are not valid reasons, and you are: 
directed to answer the question. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4357 

Mr. Ellis. I am a member of the Brotherliood of Carpenters ; yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did you become a member? 

Mr. Ellis. In 1940. 

Mr. Tavenner. How lon<; did you remain a member? 

Mr. Ellis. I am still a member. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you been a member since 1940 ? 

Mr. Ellis. You mean since 1940; yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Continuously? 

JSIr. Ellis. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, during your membership in this union were 
vou organizer for the building trades section of the Communist Party, 
district 3 ? 

Mr. Ellis. I refuse to answer that question under the fifth amend- 
ment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did vou attend the annual convention of the Com- 
munist Party, district 3, held at the Chris J. Perry Elks Hall in Phil- 
adelphia on July 16, 1948? 

Mr. Ellis. I exercise my constitutional rights under the fifth amend- 
ment and refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you serve as 1 of 10 individuals to coordinate 
the activities between the district and section levels of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Ellis. I exercise my constitutional rights under the fifth amend- 
ment, and I refuse to answer that question. 

Mr, Tavenner. Did you attend a Rally for Peace and Democratic 
Rights sponsored by the Communist Party and held at the Stephen 
Girard Hotel, Philadelphia, on April 8, 1949, at which Gus Hall Avas 
one of the speakers ? 

Mr. Ellis. I refuse to answer that under the fifth amendment of the 
Constitution. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you take part in a meeting or banquet held at 
the Stephen Girard in Philadelphia on June 10, 1949, the purpose 
of which was to raise funds for the defense of the 11 Communist 
Party leaders on trial in Federal court in New York City? 

Mr. Ellis. I exercise my constitutional rights on the fifth amend- 
ment and refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are j-ou now^ a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Ellis. I refuse to answer that question under the fifth amend- 
ment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you not elected to the district committee of 
the Communist Party at a meeting on December 10, 1950? 

Mr. Ellis. I exercise my rights 

Mr. Tavenner. Wait a moment. Just a moment. That is at April 
Farms, route 2, Coopersburg, Pa. 

Mr. Ellis. I exercise my constitutional rights under the fifth amend- 
ment and refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Tavenner. What official positions have you held in the union 
when you say you have been a meuiber since 1940, that is, the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners, AFL? 

Mr. Ellis. It was only 1 year I held a position as alternate delegate, 
to district council. 

Mr. Tavenner. What year was that? 

Mr. Ellis. It was last year. 



4358 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you hold any official position there now ? 

Mr. Ellis. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party? . 

Mr. Ellis. I refuse to answer that question under the Constitution, 
the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions. 

Mr. Wood. Any questions, Mr. Walter ? 

Mr. Walter. I have no questions. 

Mr. Doyle. Under what name are you a member of the AFL union ? 

Mr. Ellis. John J. Ellis. 

Mr. Doyle. I have no other questions. 

Mr. Wood. Any reason why the witness should not be excused from 
further attendance on the committee ? 

Mr. Tavenner. No, sir. 

Mr. Wood. It is so ordered. 

(The witness was excused.) 

Mr. Wood. The committee will stand in recess for 15 minutes. 

( A short recess was taken. ) 

Mr. Wood. Are you ready to proceed ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. Mr. John Tisa. 

Mr. Wood. Will you raise your right hand. You solemnly swear 
the evidence you shall give this subcommittee shall be the truth, the 
whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. TisA. I do. 

Mr. Wood. Have a chair, please. 

TESTIMONY OF JOHN TISA, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 
JEROME KAPLAN 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliat is your name, please, sir ? 

Mr. Tisa. John Tisa. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are represented by counsel ? 

Mr. Tisa. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel please identiy himself for the record ? 

Mr. Kaplan. Jerome Kaplan. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you reside ? 

Mr. Tisa. 3171 Highland Avenue, Camden, N. J. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born ? 

Mr. Tisa. April 6, 1914, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mr. Tavenner. Would you give the committee a brief statement of 
your educational training ? 

Mr. Tisa. Graduated from high school, a few^ months of college in 
south Jersey ; that is all. 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you now employed ? 

Mr. Tisa. I am employed as an organizer. Distributive, Processing, 
and Oflice Workers of America. 

Mr. Tavenner. What local? 

Mr. Tisa. I am working out of the national union, and I work 
here in Pliiladelphia. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you occupied that position? 

Mr. Tisa. Distributive, Processing, and OlHce Workers of America, 
I believe it is around October 1950. 



COMMUNIST ACTRITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4359 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, will you state what your former employment 
was, that is, your employment prior to that time ? 

Mr. TiSA.'l was Avith the Food and Tobacco Workers' Union from 
the fall of 1939 to 1950, I believe, at one time known as the United 
Cannery and Aoricultural and Packiniihouse Workers, and then it 
became the Food and Tobacco Workers Union. 

Mr. Tavexxer. What olHcial position did you hold in that union? 

Mr. TiSA. Incidentally, there was a period in 1942 to 1945 I was 
in the Army, and I don't want to mislead the committee here, but 
the position as organizer, it was in the fall of 1939, 1940, 1941, and 
1942, until I went into the Army, I was business agent of the local 
in Camden, N. J., United Cannery, Agricultural and Packinghouse 
Workers of America. 

Mr. Tavexxer. What was the number of the local ^ 

Mr. TisA. Local 80. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Who was the president of that local? Who was 
the president of the union ? 

j\ir. TisA. At that time there were several presidents, and I don't 
remember. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Did you state all of the positions that you held 
in the union between 1939 and 1950? 

Mr. TiSA. No. Wlien I came back from the Army in 1945, the 
latter part of 1945 and 1940, I think, I was appointed director of 
organization for the Food and Tobacco Workers Union, and later, 
I believe it was in 1949, I became a temporary president of the Food 
and Tobacco Workers Union, until October of 1950, I believe. 

Mr. Tavenx^er. AVhat position do you hold in your union now? 

Mr. TiSA. Now I am organizer liere in the city of Philadelphia, 
but I do have a title of vice president of this DPOWA. 

Mr. Tavexxer. The DPOWA stands for what ? 

Mr. TiSA. Distributive, Processing, and Office Workers of America. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Prior to 1939, how were you employed ^ 

Mr. TisA. From 1932, 1 believe, to the end of 193G, I was employed 
in a number of occupations, among which was barbering, WPA proj- 
ects, Campbell Soup Co. Those are some that I can remember. 

^fr. Tavexxer. Hoav were you employed between 193() and 1939? 

Mr. TiSA. Sir, the dates of the end of 1936 to the middle of 1939, 
I would invoke my pi-ivilege under the fifth amendment and refuse to 
answer. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Did you at any time travel outside of the United 
States except during the period when j^ou were a member of the 
Armed Forces? 

Mr. TisA. I refuse, sir, under the same ground, the fifth amendment 
of the Constitution. 

]Mr. Tavex'xer. Have you been known or have you used the name of 
John Tisso, T-i-s-s-o, at any time ? 

Mr. TiSA. I refuse, sir, to answer that question on the same grounds. 
May I consult with counsel a miiuite? 

Mr. Tavexxer. Yes. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. TiSA. Now I am ready. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Have you ever made an application for a passport 
to travel in a foreign country ? 

25241—52 5 



4360 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. TiSA. To that question, sir, I must also refuse to answer on the 
basis of the fifth amendment, the section which deals with self- 
incrimination. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you a member of the Abraham Lincoln 
Brigade ? 

Mr. TisA. To that question, likewise, I refuse to answer on the same 
ryfisis sir 

Mr. Tavenner. The Daily Worker of February 28, 1941, lists one 
John Tisa, former Campbell Soup worker, Abraham Lincoln Brigade 
fighter, an organizer of the union, United Cannery, Agricultural, 
Packing and Allied Workers of America, CIO. I hand you a photo- 
static copy of the issue of February 28, and ask you to examine it and 
state whether or not you are the John Tisa referred to in that article. 

(Document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Tisa. I refuse to answer that question, sir, on the fifth amend- 
ment. 

Mr. Tavenner. AVell, do you see the name John Tisa listed? 

Mr. Tisa. I see a name here, sir, that says John Tisa. 

Mr. Ta-s^nner. And does it say "Former Campbell Soup worker, 
Abraham Lincoln Brigade fighter, and organizer of the union"? 

Mr. Tisa. That is what tliis says. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the document in evidence and ask 
that it be marked "Tisa Exhibit No. 1." 

Mr. Wood. Let it be admitted. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Tisa Exhibit No. 1," is 
filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavenner. In the introduction of the January 27, 1949, issue 
of Volunteer for Liberty, which was the official organ of the English- 
speaking battalions of the International Brigade who fought for the 
Eepublic of Spain during 1936 to 1939, one John Tisa, an American 
worker, is listed as the last editor of this publication, and as having 
been a front-line fighter with the brigade in Spain. Will you examine 
the bound volume of Volunteer for Liberty, which is being handed 
you, and state whether or not the name of John Tisa is so listed ? 

Mr. Tisa. The name of John Tisa I see here as listed. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you read the paragraph in which the name is 
listed? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Tisa (reading) : 

Ralph Bates, the British novelist, was its first editor. Edwin Rolf, the 
American poet, was its second. John Tisa, an American worker, was its last. 
All three had front-line experience with the brigade, in addition to the literary 
and journalistic background. Having been close to the men in the ranks, they 
knew what tliese men wanted in newspapers. Being close to the Spanish people 
in the rear their editorial talents were enriched by contact with the people their 
comrades had come to defend. 

Mr. Ta"\^nner. Are you the John Tisa listed in there ? 

Mr. TiSA. I refuse, sir, to answer that question on the grounds of 
the fifth amendment under the Constitution. 

Mr. Tavenner. The Daily Worker of March 22, 1942, lists one 
John Tisa as being one of the principal speakers at a Philadelphia 
mass meeting held at Town Hall, Philadelphia, for the freedom of 
Earl Browder. Will you examine the issue of March 22, 1942, of the 
Daily Worker, and state whether the name John Tisa is so listed ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4361 

Mr. TisA. I see here a photostat with a name, "John Tisa,"' on it. 
Mr. Tavenxer. Well, is the name "John Tisa" listed there as one 
of the princii)al speakers at the mass meeting? 
■Sir. TisA. It says here (reading) : 

Philadelphia mass ineetins. memory of Tom Mooney. symbol of civil liberties 
for the freedom of Earl Browder, Town Hall. Wednesday, March 25, 8 p. m., 
Warren K. Billings. William Browder, Harold Kotzer, Arthur Fancett, John 
Tisa, and Francis Fisher Kane. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were yon the John Tisa referred to in that article? 

Mr. Tisa. I refuse to answer that, sir, on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. I offer the document in evidence and ask it be 
marked "Tisa Exhibit No. 2.'' 

Mr. Wood. Let it be admitted. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Tisa Exhibit No. 2," is 
filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you not attend that meeting and introduce at 
the meeting a number of the speakers, including Jules Abercauph? 

Mr. Tisa. Is that a question ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. Tisa. I refuse, sir, on the same grounds to answer that question, 
and I might add, sir, any questions that have to do with communism 
directly, indirectly, or remotely or otherwise, I intend to refuse and 
do not intend to be a stool pigeon for this committee. 

Mr. Beale. Just answer the questions as they are asked you. 

Ml'. 'i'lSA. I am indicating to the counsel 

Mr. AVooD. We ^^ ill get along better if you wait until the question 
is asked. 

Mr. Tisa. I don't mean to be disrespectful, you understand. 

Mr. Wood. Well, we will get along a lot better if you will wait your 
answ^ers until you are asked the question, and then answer them or not 
as you see fit. 

Mr. Tavenner. You refuse to answer that question ? 

Mr. Tisa. Yes, sir, the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. The September 6, 1942, issue of the Worker carries 
a greeting to this publication from the United Cannery, Agricultural, 
Packing and Allied Workers of America, local 80, in which John Tisa 
is listed as business agent. You have already testified that you were 
business agent of local 80. 

Mr. Tisa. Yes, sir, 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did you as business agent authorize the plac- 
ing of this ad, this advertisement in the Worker of September 6, 1942, 
and I hand you a photostatic copy of the issue to refresh your recol- 
lection. 

(Document was handed to the witness.) 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Tisa. I refuse to answer that question, sir, on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the document in evidence and ask 
that it be marked "Exhibit No. 3." 

Mr. Wood, Let it be admitted. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Tisa Exhibit No. 3," is 
filed here Vv'ith.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you a member of the Committee for Peaceful 
Alternatives of the Atlantic Pact, which issued on December 14, 1949, 



4362 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

a statement to President Truman urging an agreement whereby the 
atomic bomb should not be used as an instrument of international 
warfare ? 

Mr. TiSA. Is that the end of the question, sir ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. TiSA. I refuse to answer, also, on the constitutional fifth amend- 
ment grounds, self-incrimination. 

Mr. Tavenner. During tlie testimony of Matthew Cvetic before the 
Committee on Un-American Activities on March 24 and 25, 1950, Mr. 
Cvetic introduced as Cvetic exhibit 31 an article entitled "Eleven 
Hundred Labor Leaders Blast Indictment of 12 Communists," in 
which appears the name of John Tisa, division of organizing, FTA. 
I hand you Cvetic exhibit No. 31, and ask you if you are the John 
Tisa mentioned in that exhibit. 

(Document handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Tisa. To that question, sir, I refuse to answer on the same 
grounds, unless you want me to repeat each time, sir, about the fifth 
amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. If you state on the same grounds, we will certainly 
understand what you mean. 

Mr. Tisa. All right. Thank yon. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Tisa, are you now a member of the Communist 
Party ? 

Mr. Tisa. I refuse to answer that, sir, on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Tisa. I likewise refuse to answer that also on the same grounds. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Walter, do you have any questions ? 

Mr. Walter. What type of work do you do, Mr. Tisa ? 

Mr. Tisa. I am organizer here in the city of Philadelphia at the 
present time, union organizer. 

Mr. Walter. Have you any trade or occupation ? 

Mr. Tisa. You mean what am I organizing? 

Mr. Walter. Oh, no. Have you any trade ? 

Mr. Tisa. Trade? No particular trade at the present time. 

Mr. Walter. Have you ever worked outside of organizing? 

Mr. Tisa. Yes, sir; I have; I indicated earlier in my testimony 
to that effect, sir. 

Mr. Walter. How long have you been an organizer? 

Mr. Tisa. An organizer since the latter part of 1939, 1 believe. 

Mr. Walter. That is all. 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Doyle ? 

Mr. Doyle. Under what name were you working at Campbell Soup ? 

Mr. Tisa. I don't remember, sir. 

Mr. Doyle. What is your name ? 

Mr. Tisa. My name is John Tisa. 

Mr. Doyle. Do you not remember whether or not you worked 
under that name ? 

Mr. Tisa. I believe I did. It may have been a misspelling of the 
name. 

Mr. Doyle. How would you have spelled it if 3'ou misspelled it 
when you worked in Campbell Soup ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4363 

Mr. TisA. I Avould have— I don't understand your question. Would 
you mind repeating; it? 

]Mr. Doyle. You stated you miglit have misspelled it. How do you 
misspell it if you did when you worked for Campbell Soup ? 

Mr. TisA. I don't know, sir, and I don't remember that far back. 

Mr. Doyle. When was that? 

Mr. TisA. That was 1932 or 1933 and 1934, during those years at 
various times. 

INIr. Doyle. How have you found yourself misspelling your name, 
if you ever did, unintentionally ? 

Mr. TisA. I refuse to answer that, sir ; the same grounds. 

]\[r. Doyle. When were you discharged from the Army ? 

Mr. TisA. I believe it was in the latter part of 1945. 

Mr. Doyle. What rank ? 

Mr. TisA. Staff sergeant. 

Mr. Doyle. And under what name did you go into the Army ? 

:Mr. TiSA. John Tisa, T-i-s-a. 

Mr. Doyle. Under what name are you working as business agent 
for the union ? 

Mr. Tisa. I believe the name is John Tisa, T-i-s-a. 

Mr. Doyle. Under what name were you working for the Food and 
Tobacco Workers Union ? 

]\Ir. Tisa. The same name. 

Mr. Doyle. Did you ever travel abroad in any other country ? 

Mr. Tisa. I have already answered that question, sir. I refuse 
to answer on the basis of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Doyle. I mean other than with the United States Army. 

Mr. Tisa. Again I refuse to answer on the same grounds. 

Mr. Doyle. I think that is all, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Wood. Any further questions, Mr. Counsel ? 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions. 

]\fr. Wood. Any reason why the witness should not be excused from 
further attendance on the committee ? 

Mr. Taat.xner. No, sir. 

Mr. Wood. It is so ordered. 

(The witness was excused.) 

Mr. Tavenner. I will call Jack S. Zucker. 

Mr. Wood. Will you please hold up your right hand. You sol- 
emnly swear the evidence you shall give this subcommittee shall be 
the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. ZrcKER. I do. 

Mr. Wood. Have a seat, please. 

Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr. Zucker. I am. 

Mr. Wood. Will counsel please identify himself for the record, 
including the address? 

Mr. Levitan. My name is A. Harry Levitan, 1412 Fox Building, 
Philadelphia. 

Mr. Wood. Have a seat, please. 



4364 COMMUXIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

TESTIMONY OF JACK S. ZUCKEE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

A. HAHEY LEVITAN 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your name, please, sir ? 

Mr. ZucKER. My name is Ziicker, Z-u-c-k-e-r, Jack; S. is the middle 
initial. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your present phace of residence? 

Mr. Zucker. 2518 North Corlies Street. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you })orn ? 

Mr. Zucker. It is either Poland or Russia now. I was born on 
April 22, 1910. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did you come to this country ? 

Mr. Zut'ivER. I don't have the exact date, but it is, rou^hlv, around 
1922. 

Mr. Ta"\t^.nner. Are you a naturalized Amei'ican citizen? 

Mr. Zucker. I have citizenship, derivative, as a result of papers 
taken out by my mother. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where was your mother naturalized? 

yiv. Zucker. I will give you this information in just one moment. 
Certificate No. 318849, petition No. 11451, made out to Bertha Zucker 
Marlaman, 1000 East Baltimore Street, December 16, 1929, and the 
Baltimore, Md., indicates all of the information you desire. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did you reside in Baltimore? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Zucker. I invoke the privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Wood. Just a moment. I know of no circumstances conceivable 
where an admission or denial of residence in the city of Baltimore 
could possibly result in any prosecution for crime or remotely incrimi- 
nate a man. The question was, "How long did you live in Baltimore, 
Md. ?'' and an answer to that question is ]iot such an answer as wonld 
jeopardize a man in a criminal prosecution, and you are directed to 
answer the question. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Zucker, Just about a year. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you mean just about a year after you arrived 
in the United States? 

Mr. Zucker. No ; I do not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, where did 3'ou first take up vour residence 
in the United States? 

Mr. Zucker. Springfield, Mass. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long, and you arrived there in 1922? 

]Mr. Zucker. Approximately around that time. 

Mr. Tavenner. How lone: did you live in Springfield. Mass.? 

Mr. Zucker. Well. I don't exactly remember, but it nnist be roughly 
about 2 years. 

Mr. TAVENNf:R. Tluit would bring you up to 1924. 

Mr. Zucker. Roughly around that time. 

Mv. Tavenner. Where did you reside after 1924, or rather after 
leaving Springfield? 

Mv. Zucker. In Washington. D. C. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did you live in Washington? 

Mr. Zucker. I would say better than 15 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Does that mean then that you lived there until 1939 ? 

Mr. Zucker. That is correct. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4365 

Mr. Tavenxei:. AVhere did yon live after leaving Washington ? 

Mr. ZrcKVM. In various cities in ni)-State New York. 

Mr. Tavennek. What cities? 

Mr. ZrcKER. Binohamton, Rochester, Corning. 

Mr. Tavenner. ilow lon<y vrere yon at each of those phices? 

( The witness conferred with his connseh) 

]Mr. ZucKER. I don't exactly remember, bnt I shonld imagine the 
total amonnt of time spent in np-State New York amounts to roughly 
abont o years, 3 to 4 years, or sometliing like that. 

yiv. Taaenner. Then after leaving np-State New York, where did 



von so 



^Ir. ZucKEK. My family stayed in Washington for a while, while I 
was working in North CaroUna. 

jMr. Tavenner. How long did von work in North Carolina? 

Mr. Zucker. Well, 6 or 7 months, I guess; maybe longer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where in North Carolina? 

Mr. Zucker. The Winston Salem-Burlington area. 

]Mr. Tavenner. After performance of that work in North Carolina, 
where did you reside ? 

Mr. Zucker. Baltimore. 

Mr. Tavenner. So that would mean that some time in 1942 or 
194;5 

Mr. Zucker. No, it would run nuich later. It would run after 1945 
jind 1946 or 1947, or something like that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, if you left Washington in 1939, and you spent 
3 years in up-State New York, that would be 1942. 

]\Ir. Zucker. I did not say; I did not say I left Washington in 1939, 
no. I did not. I left Washington around 1943 or 1944. That would 
t>e a more exact date. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right, then. Then if you were in up-State New 
York for 3 years, that would bring you up to about 1946, when you 
went to North Carolina. 

Mr. Zucker. Roughly around that time, I would say, yes ; roughly 
ground that time. 

Mr. Tavenner. So that in 1946 or 1947 you returned to Baltimore. 

yir. Zucker. First to Washington and then to Baltimore, roughly 
ground that time; yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. How lonsf did you remain in Washington when you 
returned from North Carolina ? 

]\Ir. Zucker. Well, my family was in Washington during the whole 
period I was in North Carolina, and I stayed in Washington, I would 
say. I must have lived in Washington roughly around a year then, 
A^ hile I was working in Baltimore. 

Mr. Tavenner. And from there while you were working in 
l^altimore? 

Mr. Zucker. For a short period. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did you move your family to Baltimore ? 

Mr. Zucker. I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did you work and how long did you 
remain in Baltimore? 

Mr. Zucker. The period I said before, roughly about a A'^ear or a 
year and a half. 

Mr. Tavenner. And you would place that now at what time ? 



4366 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. ZucKEE. To the best of my recollection it would run the latter 
part of 1947 through early 1049, that is as best I can recollect. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliere did you reside after leaving Baltimore ? 

Mr. ZucKER. I moved my family to Philadelphia. 

Mr. Tavenxer. Have you lived in Philadelphia continuously since 
that time ? 

Mr. ZucKER. Outside of trips for work, but my family was in Phila- 
delphia. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was your emi^loyment in Baltimore before 
coming to Philadelphia ? 

Mr. Zucker. This question I invoke the privilege of the fifth amend- 
ment. 

Mr. Wood. For that reason you refuse to answer ? 

Mr. Zucker. And for that reason I refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliy did you come to Philadelphia to reside ? 

Mr. Zucker. I invoke the privilege of the fifth amendment, and I 
refuse to answer for that reason. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was your employment in Philadelphia of the same 
general character as that in Baltimore ? 

Mr. Zucker. The same answer and the same reason. 

Mr. Tavenner. What has been your employment in Philadelphia, 
since your arrival here in 1949 or 1950 ? 

Mr. Zucker. The same answer and the same reason. 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you now employed ? 

Mr. Zucker. The privilege of the fifth amendment, I refuse to 
answer. 

Mr. Ta\-enner. When you came to Washington in 1942, and re- 
mained there until approximately 1943, how were you employed ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Zucker. I invoke the privilege of the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the nature of your employment in up- 
State New York, in Binghamton and Corning, and the other places 
you mentioned ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Tavenner. I believe that you mentioned Rochester. 
(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Zucker. Mv work in up-State New York was in the interest of 
thousands of workers but since tliis question is placed for the purpose 
of entrapping me, I am invoking the fifth amendment. I might add 
that my work was public and publicly known. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, it is quite apparent that the witness 
has some other reason than a legal reason under the fifth amendment 
for his refusal to answer. 

Mr. Wood. The witness says his work was pubbc and publicly 
known, and it becomes very obvious that it could not possibly incrimi- 
nate him or it already would have done so, and so I direct he answer 
the question. 

(The witness conferred with liis counsel.) 

Mr. Zucker. Mr. Chairman, the privilege of the fifth amendment 

was passed 

Mr. Wood. I did not want any argument. 

Mr. Zucker. T am not arguing. I am answering your question. 

Mr. Wood. I direct that you answer the question. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4367 

Mr. ZiTCKEK. T am invoking the privilege, Mr. Chuirinan. 

Mr. Wood. And you refuse to answer? 

Mr. ZvcKER. I refuse to answer. 

Mr. Wood. Let the record show tliat the subconnnittee is all pivsent. 
J^roceed. 

Ml-. Ta\enx7R. Were you an organizei- for the VK in the city of 
iJaltiniore? 

Mr. ZucKER. The same answer and the same reason, invoking the 
])rivilege. 

Mv. Wood. Tlie UE. That is an abbreviation for United Electrical, 
Radio and Machine Workers of America. Hasn't that organization 
been expelled from the CIO for (^ommunist domination? 

Mr. Tavenxer. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Wood. I believe the witness is within his rights. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you an organizer for the UE in up-State 
NeAv York? 

Mr. ZucKER. The same answer. 

Ml". Tavenxer. During the period that you sa}' you worked in Bing- 
hamton, Rochester, and Corning? 

Mr. ZucKER. The same answer and the same reasons. 

Mr. Tavexner. ]Mrs. Mary Stalcup Markward testified before the 
Committee on Un-American Activities that she had entered the Com- 
numist Party in the city of Washington and remained a member for 
7 or 9 years, and I do not recall which, and rose to the position of 
secretary of the Communist Party for the city of Washington. Dur- 
ing the course of her testimony she identified Jack Zucker as a member 
of the trade-union commission of the Comnuniist Party. Her testi- 
mony was as follows on that subject. 

This question was asked her : 

Can yoii sivf' lis the names of the members: of the trade-union commission who 
Mere l<nown to you to he members of the Communist Party V 

Mrs. Markward. I can't S'o into any i;reat detail on that. It is my impression 
that .Taclv Zuclver was a member of tliat eonunission during the time he was in 
Baltimore. 

Question : Was he an organizer of tlie UE? 

Mrs. Markward. Yes. 

Question: Was he known to you to be a niemlier of the ConuuTuiist Party? 

Mrs. Markward. He Mas. 

Was Mrs. Markward testifying truthfully or falsely? 

Mr. Zucker. I invoke the jirivilege of the fifth amendment and I 
refuse to answer under that privilege. 

I might add I would be willing to talk about my activities, that 
have always been public, right outside of this hall at any radio 
station or any television set, but the ])urpose of this hearing is for 
the ])urpose of incriminating me, and that is the reason I will not 
answer these questions. 

Mr. Tavexxer. In other words, you will not answer them intder 
oath before this committee. 

Mr. Zucker. It depends upon the question. The questions are asked 
for the purpose of incriminating an innocent man, and I will use the 
fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Were you a member of the Conmumist Party at 
any time ? 

Mr. Zucker. I invoke the privilege of the fifth amendment. 



4368 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THF PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Walter. Would you answer that question outside of this room 
over the radio ? 

Mr. ZucKER. I shall discuss my political life with anybody but 
you, Mr. Congressman, any time, and I will discuss my public record 
in the las.t 20 years with yours, at any time, television, radio, or any 
place. My record is a record for the people. 

Mr. Wood. Just a moment, please. I am not going to permit the 
statement that you have just made to go unchallenged, when you say 
tliat this coirunittee is seeking to convict an innocent man, and 
3'ou refuse to answ^er the questions upon the grounds that to do so 
would incriminate you under the provisions of the fifth amendment. 
Your answers are under oath, and unless to answer the question truth- 
fully would incriminate you or tend to incriminate you, then your 
answers are not truthful. I am not going to permit aiiy witness to 
leave a record here that he is willing to swear under oath tluxt the 
answer to a question would incriminate him, and yet it w^ould not 
incriminate him, because it either does incriminate you or your testi- 
mony is false. It is one or the other. 

Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Tavenner. On May 21, 1941, a person by the name of Mary 
Spargo testified before the Special Connnittee on Un-American Activ- 
ities, and identified one Jack Zucker as a member of the executive 
committee of the Washington Peace Mobilization. Are you the indi- 
vidual so identified by her ? 

Mr. Zucker. I invoke the privilege of the fifth amendment, and I 
refuse to answer under those grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. Appearing on a letterhead of the Washington Peace 
Mobilization, dated February 18, 1941, there appears the name of 
Jack Zucker, as one of the vice presidents of this organization. Will 
you examine it, please? 

(Document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Tavexner. Will you state whether or not you see the name Jack 
Zucker listed as a vice president of the Washington Peace Mobiliza- 
tion ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Zucker, Under the list of vice presidents, the last name I see 
is Jack Zucker. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you used the name Jack Zucker ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Zucker. The question is, do I use the name "Jack Zucker" ? I 
do. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you the Jack Zucker referred to as the vice 
president of the Washington Peace Mobilization? 

Mr. Zucker. I invoke the privilege of the fifth amendment and I 
lefuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to introduce the document in evidence and 
ask that it be marked as "Zucker Exhibit No. 1." 

Mr. Wood. Has the Washington Peace Mobilization been an organi- 
zation cited by the Attorney General? 

Mr. Beale. It is a branch of the American Peace Mobilization, sir. 

Mr. Wood. Let it be admitted. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Zucker Exhibit No. 1,"^ 
is filed herewith.) 



COMMUNlSr ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4369 

Mr. Tavenner. In the Daily Worker of May 2, 1941, there is a list 
of 688 persons who sig-ned a petition deniandino; the freedom of Earl 
Browder, which list was prepared from those attending an American 
Peace Mobilization meeting of April G, 1941, in New York City. Your 
name appears on that list. Will you examine the list, please, and state 
if you tind the name "Jack Zucker" ? 

(Document was handed to the witness.) 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. ZucKER. I see an article with a headline "Signers of a petition 
to free Browder," photostatic copy of the Daily Worker, New York, 
Friday, May 2, 1941. Among a series of names listed, I see the name 
"Jack Zucker." 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you a signer? 

Mr. Zucker. What was the question again ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you one of the signers of that list ? 

Mr. Zucker. The same answer and the same privilege. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to introduce the document in evidence and 
ask it be marked "Zucker Exhibit No. 2." 

Mr. Wood. Let it be admitted. 

( The document above i-eferred to, marked "Zucker Exhibit No. 2," is 
filed herewith.) 

Mr. Wood. The connnittee will stand in recess at this point until 2 
o'clock. 

(Thereu])on at 12 : 15 p. m., a recess was taken until 2 p. m., the same 
day.) 

afternoon session 

(The subcommittee reconvened at 2 p. m., pursuant to recess, Rep- 
resentatives John S. Wood (chairman), Francis E. Walter, and Clyde 
Doyle being present.) 

Mr. Wood. Are you ready to proceed, Mr. Tavenner ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes, sir. Mr. Zucker. Is Mr. Zucker present ? Will 
you call for him in the hallway, please. 

TESTIMONY OF JACK S. ZUCKEE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 
A. HAREY LEVITAN— Resumed 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, Mr. Zucker, while you lived in Washing-ton, 
D. C, were you a member of the Washington Bookshop? 

Mr. Zucker. I invoke the privilege of the fifth amendment, and I 
refuse to answer on that basis. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did 3^ou in February of 1949 transfer from district 
4 of the Communist Party of Baltimore, Md., to the Fourth Congres- 
sional District of district 3 of the Communist Party, Philadelphia? 

Mr. Zucker. The same answer and the same privilege. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you participate in a call to the "Pennsylvania 
Conference to Defend the Bill of Rights, the Constitution, Your Own 
Civil Liberties"? 

Mr. Zucker. The same answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Held at the xVdelphi Hotel, Philadelphia, on No- 
vember 18, 1950? 

Mr. Le\'itan. Could w^e see that, please ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Would you hand the circular to the witness? And 
I will ask him to see if he finds there the name of J. S. Zucker? 



4370 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

(The document was handed to the witness.) 
Mr. Tavenxek. As participating in tlie call for that conference. 
Mr. ZucKER. I claim the privilege. 

Mr. Tavexner. Well, do you see the name J. S. Zucker as a partici- 
pant in the call? 

Mr. Zucker. I see a name listed, "J. S. Zucker" ; yes. 
Mr. Tavexner. What is the title or reference to the individual, 
appearing after the name ? 

Sir. Zucker. The paper reads as follows : "J. S. Zucker, executive 
secretary, Philadelphia chapter.'' 

Mr. Tavexxer. I^hiladelphia chapter of what ? 

Mr. Zucker. On top. I see something reading which says, '"Civil 
Rights Congress,*' and underneath it says "'Officers." 

Sir. Tavexxer. Well, were you the executive secretary of the Phila- 
delphia chapter of the Civil Rights Congress at that time ? 

]Mr. Zucker. I invoke the same privilege, and give the same answer. 
Mr. Tavexxer. Did you participate in the call that was indicated 
by that document ? 

Mr. Zucker. The same privilege and the same answer. 
Mr. Tavexxer. I desire to otl'er the document in evidence and ask 
it be marked "Zucker Exhibit 3." 
Sir. Wood. Let it be admitted. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Zucker Exhibit No. 3," 
is filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavexxer. The Daily Worker of June G, 1049, on page 2, lists 
one Jack Zucker, field representative of UE, as having sent wires of 
protest to Judge ^Medina, pertaining to the handling of the trial of the 
11 Communists in Xew York. Will you examine a photostatic copy 
of that issue, and state whether or not you see listed there the name of 
Jack Zucker, field repi-esentative of TIE ? 
(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Zucker. I see on the bottom facing the right-hand corner a 
story marked "Philadelphia," and underneath I see something like 
this. It says "Initial telegrams were sent by Jack Zucker, field rep- 
resentative of UE." 

Mr. Tavexxer Will you tell the committee who approached you and 
the circumstances under which you were approached, if you were, to 
send a telegram to Judge Sledina ? 

Mr. Zucker. The same privilege and the same answer. 
Sir. Tavexxer. Did you send a telegram to Judge Sledina ? 
Sir. Zucker. The same privilege and the same answer. 
Sir. Tavexx^er. I desire to offer the document in evidence and ask 
it be marked "Zucker exhibit No. 4." 
Mr. Wood. Let it be admitted. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Zucker exhibit No. 4," 
is filed herewith.) 

Mr. TA^^Exx^ER. Did you participate in a delegation from the city 
of Philadelphia sponsored by the Civil Rights Congress and the Coni- 
nnmist Party whose primary function was to travel to New York and 
join other delegations in the picketing of the Federal courthouse in 
protest of the trial of the 11 Communist leaders? 

Mr. Zucker. Do you mind repeating the question? I did not quite 
£:et it. 



COMAIUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4371 

Mv. TAVEX^'E'R. Will you read the question^ 
(Question was read bv the reporter.) 

Mv. ZucKER. I invoke the ])rivileoe of the fifth amendment and re- 
fuse to ansAver. . .1 t? i i 
^fr. Tavenxer. Did you join m any way ni picketing the l^ederal 

courthouse? 

Mv. Zuoker. The same answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. In protest of the trial of the 11 Communists? 

]\Ir. Zucker. The same answer and the same privilege. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend the Thirtieth Anniversary Rally of 
the Communist Party held at Kevnolds Halls, Philadelphia, on Sep- 
tember 29, 1949 ? ' 

Mv. Zucker. The same answer and the same privilege. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you actively participate in a crusade to Wash- 
ing-ton by members of the Communist Party of Philadelphia, to pro- 
test the denial of bail to the 11 Communist leaders in New York? 

Mr. Zucker. The same answer and the same privilege. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did rou ])articipate in the organization of the Com- 
mittee Against the Mundt-Ferguson Bill? 

Mr. Zucker. I invoke the privilege of the fifth amendment and re- 
fuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you receive a copy of William Z. Foster's book 
Outline of the Political History of America, as a reward or as a 
recognition for your outstanding work in the Communist fund drive 
in 1951? 

Ml-. Zucker. The same answer and the same privilege. 

Mr. Taa-enner. Did you take ])art in any way in the rental of 
Reynolds Hall, 1416 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, for a meeting 
to be held on August 16, 1951, sponsored by the Committee to Defend 
the Victims of th.e Pennsylvania Sedition Law? 

Mr. Zucker. I invoke the fifth amendment and refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you speak at a meeting held at Reynolds Hall, 
Philadelphia, on October 3, 1952, which was sponsored by the Civil 
Rights Congress? 

I\Ir. Zucker. The same privilege and the same answer. 

Mv. Ta^^enner. Are you now a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Zucker. I invoke the fifth amendment and refuse to answer. 

Mv. Tavt2nner. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party ? 

Mr. Zucker. The same answer and the same reason. 

jNIr. Tavenner. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mv. Walter. I have no questions. 

Mv. Doyle. I have no questions. 

Mr. Wood. Is there any reason why the witness should not be ex- 
cused from further attendance ? 

Mr. Tavenner. No, sir. 

Mr. Wood. It is so ordered. 

Mr. Zucker. Am I released from this committee, Mr. Chairman? 
I request a copy of the hearings, and I also want to fill out the form 
for the expenses for the day. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tliat is the duty of the clerk, who is here for that 
j)urp()se. 

Mv. Jules Abercauph. 



4372 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Wood. Hold up your right hand and be sworn. You swear the 
evidence you shall <Tive this subcommittee shall be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Abercatjph. I do. 

Mr. Wood. Be seated. 

Mr. Levitan. Will the chairman of the board please excuse me for 
a moment while 1 confer with Mr. Abercauph for just 2 minutes? 

Mr. Wood. Privately, you mean? 

Mr. Levitan. Yes, sir. 

(The witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Levitan. May it please the chairman of this connnittee, Mr. 
Abercauph advises me that he has counsel, and that his counsel unfor- 
tunately is engaged in other matters, and cannot possibly be here until 
3 o'clock. LTnder those circumstances, may we please request the indul- 
gence of this committee as far as calling Mr. Abercauph is concerned 
until his counsel reaches here? 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, the witness conferred with me the 
first thing this morning and asked when he would be called, and I told 
him that w^e would put it over until 2 o'clock and I would like to 
inquire whether he notified his counsel about that. 

Mr. Abercauph. Yes. sir; I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. You were told earlier this morning that you would 
be called at 2 o'clock. 

Mr. Abercauph. I conferred with him, and he told me it would be 
impossible for him to be here before o o'clock, and there was nothing 
that I could do but appear here. 

Mr. Levitan. I thinlv, if the chairman please, Mr. Abercauph should 
be afforded the privilege of having counsel of his own choosing. 

Mr. Wood. There is not any question about that, sir; but this com- 
mittee has no power of punishing attorneys for refusing to show up 
to represent their clients. 

Mr. Levitan. I am sure the committee would not want to; but, in 
view of the fact he could not possibly get here, if thei-e are other wit- 
nesses who might appear before this committee pending his ar- 
rival 

Mr. Wood. That is just the trouble. I understand that perhaps 
this is the last witness for the day. 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. Having excused two other witnesses who were 
scheduled for appearance today, this would be the last witness. 

Mr. Wood. It puts us in a rather inconvenient position, and 1 want 
to indulge the witness, but it does not appear why his attorney cannot 
be here. 

Mr. Abercauph. The reason is that I got my subpena Friday after- 
noon, and it was practically impossible for me to get an attorney until 
the last moment. I only made the arrangements for my attorney 
yesterday at about 4 o'clock. . 

]VIr. Wood. Well, it is an extraordinary request. 

Mr. Levitan. I think in view of the fact that Mr. Abercauph has 
presented signed statements to the effect that he is quite seriously 
ill, as the chairman of the board very well knows, to have him undergo 
this proceeding in the absence of counsel 

Mr. Wood. I was going to remark that while it is an extraordinary 
procedure, and there is no reason having been assigned why the coun- 
sel is not here, but in the light of the fact that the committee has 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4373 

received information as to the physical condition of Mr. Abercauph, 
I certainly do not want to impose any undue hardship on him, and 
we will take a recess until 8 o'clock. I hope that counsel will be avail- 
able at that time. 

(Thereupon, at 2: 15 p. m., a recess was taken imtil 3 p. m. the 
same day.) 

(The subcommittee reconvened at 3 p. m., members of the sub- 
committee being present: Representatives Francis E. Walter and 
Clyde Doyle.) 

iVIr. Walteu. Are you ready to proceed ? 

]Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Abercauph, will you raise your right hand, please, 
and be sw^orn ? 

Do you solemnly swear the evidence you will give this subcommittee 
shall be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so 
help you God ? 

^Ir. Abercauph. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF JULES ABERCAUPH, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, HOWARD RICHARD 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your name, please? 

Mr. Aberc-vUph. Jules Abercauph. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr. Abercauph. I am, sir. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Will counsel please identify himself for the record ? 

Mr. Abercauph. Howard Richard, 635 Commercial Trust Building, 
Philadelphia. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you spell your last name ? 

Mr. Abercauph. A-b-e-r-c-a-u-p-h. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you reside? 

Mr. Abercauph. 739 Spruce Street. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born ? 

Mr. Abercauph. I was born in Philadelphia, in 1903, April 7. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was your name at birth ? 

Mr. Abercauph. My name at birth as far as I can understand was 
Rosenfield. I went through grammar school under the name of Ros- 
enfield. When I was about 14 or 15 years old my mother told me that 
my father's name was not Rosenfield but it was Abercauph and during 
my w hole adult life I have lived as Abercauph. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you used any other name than Abercauph, 
or Rosenfield ? 

Mr. Abercauph. I have not. 

Mr. Tavenner. When you were first called before the committee, 
a suggestion w^as made that you had not been in good health, and 
you presented a letter from a doctor to that effect. Is that correct? 

Mr. Abercauph. Yes, sir. I suffered a very severe heart attack in 
December of 1948, and I was hospitalized for over 2 months in a 
graduate hospital, and I have been working on restricted activity ever 
since. 

Mr. Tavenner. But that activity has not been so restricted as to 
])revent you from being in attendance here at these hearings since they 
began ; has it ? 



4374 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Abercaupii. I tliink that I will invoke the privilege for that, 
although I have not attended these meetings until I came here this 
morning, I came this morning, the first time, and presented the letter. 

1 had not been here prior to that. 

Mr. Tavenner. AVell, did you take part in the picket demonstra- 
tion that occurred here yesterday ? ■ 

Mr. Abercaupii. I did not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you in the picket line at any time yesterday ? 

Mr. Abercauph. I was not even around the neighborhood. 

Mr. Tavenner. You were not in the neighborhood ? 

Mr. Abercauph. Except at my place of work. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where is your place of work ? 

Mr. Abercauph. 726 Sansom Street, I am a jeweler. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you in and about the Federal Building here ? 

Mr. Abercauph. IS^o. 

Mr. Tavenner. Let me ])resent to you this photogra])h of the picket 
line and I will have pointed out to you there an individual and I will 
ask you to state whether or not it is a ])icture of you. 

(A document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Abercauph. This is not me, although I was surprised myself. 

Mr. Tavenner. It resembles you very much, but you state it is not 
you. 

Mr. Abercauph. It is not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, w^ill you give the conunittee, please, a brief 
outline of your educational training? 

Mr. Abercauph. I graduated from grannnar school. I Avent about 

2 months to public school and then I left to go to work. I have had 
no other education than that. 

Mr. Tavenner. What has been your employment record since 19;>5 ? 

Mr. Abercauph. Well, I am a little hesitant, but in the main I was 
in the jewelery business. I am a jeweler and I work at the trade. I 
would say I worked for someone else until about 1941 or 1942, and 
then I went into business for myself. 

Mr. Tavenner. During the period of time that you have been in 
the jewelery business, either as self-employed or as an employee, have 
you been a member of any union ? 

Mr. Arercauph. Yes, sir. I was a member of the International 
Jewelry Workers' Union, Local 5. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you hold any official position? 

Mr. Abercauph. I was the business agent and at one time I was 
the president. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did 3'ou take ])art in the organization of that union ? 

Mr. Abercai'ph. Xo; the union was a bona fide organized union 
when I joined it . 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you take any part in the organization of your 
local, local No. ;i? 

Mr. Ap.ercaui'H. I took part in adding additional shops to the local, 
l)ut not in organizing the local. The local was organized; and all I 
(lid, in my ca})acity as business agent, I helped to organize unorganized 
shops. 

Mr. Tavenner. Over what period of time were you business agent 
of that union '. 

Mr. Abercauph. 1 was business agent of the union, I would say, for 
a period of (> years. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4375 

Mr. Tavenner. Bec^iniiiiio- when ? 

Mv. Abercauph. Well, roughly from 1935 to about 1941 or 1942. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you at one time secretary of the Tenauts' 
League '( 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. AnEKCAUPH. I invoke the privilege of the fifth amendmeut. 
The question may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Walter. Is that an organization that has been cited ? 

Mr. Tavenner. No, sir. 

Mr. Walter. Then I will have to instruct you to answer the ques- 
tioiL 

Mr. Apercauph. I was never secretary of the Tenants' League, 
I was secretary of a branch of the Tenants' League. 

Mr. Tavenner. What branch was it 'i 

Mr. Abercauph. It was the South Philadelphia branch. 

Mr. Tavenner. During what years Avere vou secretary of the South 
Branch ^ 

(The witness conferred with counsel.) 

ilr. Ap,ercauph. It would be in the neighborhood of the early 
1930"s, and I really don't remember the dates. 

]Mr. Tavenxer. Over how long a period were you secretary? 

]\Ir, Abercauph. For about a year and a half. 

Mr. Tavenner. What did you give as your present address ? 

Mr. Abercauph. 739 Spruce Street. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you lived there ? 

Mr. Abercauph. Approximately 4 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Prior to that, where did 3'ou live ? 

Mr, Abercauph. 5945 W^harton Street. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did you live at that address ? 

Mr. Abercauph. Two years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Prior to that '? 

Mr. Abercauph. 2830 South Fairhill Street. 

Mr. Tavenner. Over what period of years did vou live there ? 

Mr. Abercauph. I lived at 2830 and 2828 Fairhill Street— I do 
not recall exactly — about 4 or 5 years. You can see we lived first in 
one house and then in another. We moved next door. 

Mr. Tavenner. You stated that you lived at 2830. 

Could you be mistaken in that, and could you have lived at 2832 ? 

Mr. Abercauph. Yes, sir; it could have been 2832. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you live there in 1940 ? 

Mr. Abercauph. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. While living at 2832 South Fairhill Street, did you 
sign a Communist Party nominating petition in the city of Phila- 
delphia ? 

(AYitness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Abercauph. I invoke the privilege 

Mr. Tavenner. The privilege of the fifth amendment? 

Mr. Abercauph (continuing) . The privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. And do you refuse to ansAver? 

Mr. Abercauph. I refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Let me present to you the 1940 listing of the Com- 
munist Party nominating petition for the Connnonwealth of Penn- 
sylvania, and I will ask you to look at the alphabetical place in the list 

25241—52^ G 



4376 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

where your name would appear and state whether or not you see it. 

Mr. Abercauph. I see the name ; yes, "Abercauph, Jules, 2832 South 
Fairhill Street." 

Mr. Tavenner. Was that you? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Abercauph. I invoke the privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, appearing in the Daily Worker of January 9, 
1944, is an advertisement announcing the Twentieth Anniversary 
Worker Grand Jubilee Celebration, to be held at the Town Hall in 
Philadelphia on January 21, 1944. The name of Jules C. Abercauph, 
business agent, Jewelry Workers Union (AFL), is listed along with 
that of William Z. Foster, national chairman of the Communist Party, 
U. S. A., and Dave Davis, business agent, local 155. U. E., as the prin- 
cipal speakers ; that is, along with other persons. 

Will you examine the document and state whether or not the name 
of Jules C. Abercauph appears ? 

Mr. Abercauph. Jules C. Abercauph appears. 

Mr .Ta\t:nner. Did you participate in that meeting? 

Mr. Abercauph. I invoke the privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to introduce the document in evidence and 
ask it be marked "Abercauph Exhibit No. 1." 

Mr. Walter. It will be received. 

(The document referred to, marked "Abercauph Exhibit No. 1," is 
filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Abercauph, were you at any time a candidate 
for mayor of the city of Philadelphia ? 

Mr. Abercauph. I was. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Wlien was that ? 

Mr. Abercauph. In 1943. 

Mr. Tavenner. On what ticket did you run ? 

Mr. Abercauph. Independent Voters' League. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell the committee what you know about 
the formation of the Independent Voters' League in Philadelphia. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Abercauph. I feel that this question would tend to incriminate 
me, and I wish to invoke the privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Walter. Do I understand you to mean that you refuse to an- 
swer the question ? 

Mr. Abercauph. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. How were you chosen as the candidate for the posi- 
tion of mayor on the Independent Voters' ticket ? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Abercauph. I refuse to answer the question, and I invoke the 
privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Walter. Has that organization been cited by the Attorney 
General or by this committee ? 

Mr. Tavenner. No ; it has not. 

May I ask you this question: did the Communist Party initiate 
the formation of the Independent Voters' League, to your knowledge ? 

Mr. Abercauph. I refuse to answer the question because it may 
tend to incriminate me and I invoke the privilege of the fifth 
amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you campaign actively for the position of 
mayor ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4377 

Mr. Abercauph. Yes ; I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did Earl Browder, Communist Party leader in the 
United States, work actively in your behalf, in your candidacy for 
mayor ? 

Mr. Abercauph. I refuse to answer the question ; it would tend to 
incriminate me. I invoke the privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Walter. The Independent Voters' League was just a name 
adopted by a lot of Communists for the purpose of advancing the 
candidacy of a man for mayor, is that not a fact ? 

Mr. Abercauph. I refuse to answer that question, because it would 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did Philip Saba, or Saber, I think that there are 
two spellings of the name, S-a-b-a, and S-a-b-e-r, work actively in 
your campaign for election as mayor of the city of Philadelphia ? 

Mr. Abercauph. I refuse to answer for the same reason. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you preside at the Communist Political Asso- 
ciation meeting held at the Broadway Hotel in Philadelphia, on April 
26, 1949, at which Sam Donchin was the main speaker? 

Mr. Abercauph. I refuse to answer and I invoke the privilege of 
the fifth amendment. 

]Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever identified yourself publicly as a 
member of the Communist Party of the United States? 

Mr. Abercaui'h. I refuse to answer, and I invoke the privilege of 
the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you chairman of the May Day rally held at 
the Metropolitan Opera House in Philadelphia on May 2, 1947? 

Mr. Abercauph. I refuse to answer for the same reason. I invoke 
the privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you sponsor a meeting held by the American 
Youth for Democracy on the fourth anniversary of its founding at 
a meeting held in the Benjamin Franklin Hotel in Philadelphia on 
November 18, 1947? 

Mr. Abercauph. I refuse to answer for the same reason, and I in- 
voke the privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. I show you the fourth anniversary booklet of the 
American Youth for Democracy, and I ask you to examine the booklet 
and see whether or not your name appears or whether the name of 
Jules Abercauph appears as a sponsor? 

Mr. Abercauph. I see the name of Jules Abercauph. 

Mr. TAMiNNER. Do you see it listed as a sponsor of the meeting? 

Mr. Abercauph. Yes, I do. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you act as sponsor ? 

Mr. Abercauph. I refuse to answer for the same reason. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to introduce the document in evidence and 
ask that it be marked as "Abercauph Exhibit No. 2." 

Mr. Walter. It will be so marked. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Abercauph Exhibit 
No. 2," is filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend a Lenin Memonal meeting spon- 
sored by district No. 3 of the Communist Party held at the Metropoli- 
tan Opera House in Philadelphia, on February 27, 1948 ? 

Mr. Abercauph. I refuse to answer this question as it may tend to 
incriminate me, and I invoke the privilege of the fifth amendment. 



4378 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavenner. In March of 1948, were you a sponsor of the Civil 
Eights Congress of Philadelphia ? 

Mr. Abercauph. I refuse to answer the question for the same 
reason. 

Mr. Tavennj:r. Do you hold or have you ever held any position of 
responsibility in the Civil Eights Congress ? 

Mr. Akercauph. I refuse to answer for the same reason. 

Mr. Ta\'exner. Did you preside at a May Day rally hehl at Rayburn 
Plaza, in Philadelphia, on May 1, 1948, at which the principal speakers 
w^ere Sterling Rochester, Dave Davis, and Philip Bart '^ 

Mr. Abercauph. I refuse to answer this question as it may tend to 
inci-iminate me, and I invoke the privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. I show you the May 3, 1948, issue of the Daily 
Worker, and ask you to look at page 4 where there is a listing of the 
name of Jules Abercauph, business agent, local 5, Jewelery Workers 
Union, AFL, as chairman of the May Day rally held at Rayburn 
Plaza, Philadelphia. 

I withdraw that question for the present. 

Did you speak at a Connnunist Party meeting held at Sixtieth and 
Walnut Streets, Philadelphia, on May 22, 1948? 

Mr. Abercauph. I invoke the privilege of the fifth amendment and 
I refuse to answer the question. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend the annual convention of district ?> 
of the Communist Party held in Philadelphia, on July 16, 17, and 18, 
1948? 

Mr. Abercauph. I refuse to answer the question, and I invoke the 
privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you participate in a picket of the United States 
Courthouse, Philadelphia, on September 25, 1948, sponsored jointly 
by the Civil Rights Congress and the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Abercauph. I refuse to answer this question and I invoke the 
privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you speak at a Communist street meeting held 
at Preston and Market Streets, in Philadelphia, on October 23, 1948 ? 

Mr. Abercauph. I refuse to answer for the same reason. 

Mr. Tavenner. A call to the (^ongress on American Soviet Rela- 
tions, held at the Manhattan Labor Center, New York City, December 
3, 4, and 5, 1949, and sponsored by the National Council of American 
Soviet Friendship lists Jules C. Abercauph, Philadelphia, as one of 
the endorsers. Were you an endorser of that congress ? 

(Witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Abercauph. I invoke the privilege of the fifth amendment and 
I refuse to answer the question. 

Mr. Tavenner. Returning now to the question that I asked you and 
withdrew for the moment, I would like to ask the reporter to read 
the question and in the meantime I would like to present the document 
to the witness for his examination. 

(The document was handed to tlie witness.) 

Mr. Abercauph. I see the name of Jules Abercauph listed in the 
paper. 

Air. Tavenner. Were you chairman of the rally? 

Mr. Abercauph. I refuse to answer for the same reason. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now a member of the Communist Party ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IX THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4379 

]Mr. AiiERCAUi'H. I refuse to answer this question as it may tend to 
incriminate me, and I invoke the privilege of tlie fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tam5Nner. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party ^ 

Mr. ABEKCArrii. I refuse to answer for the same reason. 

Mr. Tavexxek. 1 have no fuitlier questitms, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Doyle. Mr. Abercau[)h, liave you ever read Public Law 601 as 
enacted by the United States Congress in the Seventy-ninth session 
of the Congress. 

Mv. Abercauph. Xo; I have not, sir. 

Mr. Doyle. You are not familiar with it at all ^ 

Ml'. ARERCAUPir. Xo. 

Mr. Doyle. I just want to read then one paragraph to you, reading 
from the law : 

The Committee on Un-American Activities as a whole or by subcommittee is 
authorized to make from time to time investigations to tlie extent, character, and 
objectives of un-American propaganda activities in tlie Ignited States, the dif- 
fusion within the United States of subversive and un-American propaganda that 
is insti.aated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin wliich attaclis the 
principle of the form of government guaranteed by our Constitution, and all 
other questions in i-elation thereto that would aid Congress in any necessary 
remedial legislaticai. For the purpose of any sucli investigation tlie Committee 
on Un-American Activities or any si;bcommittee tliereof is authorized to sit and 
act at such times and places witliin tlie United States whether or not the House 
is sitting, has recessed, or has adjourned. To hold such hearings and to require 
the attendance of such witnesses and tlie production of such books, papers, and 
documents and to take such testimony as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be 
issued under the signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommit- 
tee, or by any member designated by any such chairman and may be served by 
4iny person designated by any such chairman or member. 

Have you traveled out of the continental United States in the last 
1(» years? 

Mr. Abercaupif. I have not. 

Mr. Doyle. That is all. 

Mr. Walter. Is there any reason why the witness should not be 
excused '( 

Mr. Tavexner. There is one other question I would like to ask the 
witness. The witness, Thomas F. Delaney, testified here yesterday, 
and in his testimony he identified you as a member of the Communist 
l*arty. Is there any e.\])lanation you would like to make of his identi- 
fication of you ? 

Mr. Abercauph. I read a very, I would think, appropriate descrip- 
tion of ]\Ir. Delaney that he was the lowest form of animal life in the 
lahor movement and he was a rat and a stool pigeon. 

Mr. Tavexxer. In other words, he told the truth about you? 

Mr. Abercauph. He told nothing about me; I read this in Phila- 
delphia papers. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Was it the truth? 

Mr. Abercauph. I don't understand 

^Ir. Tavexxer. Was there anything that he said that was not true? 

Mr. Abercauph. I invoke the privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavexxer. I have no further questions. 

^h: Walter. Mr. Abercauph, every question asked you today was 
predicated on a very careful and thorough investigation made by a 
very competent staff of investigators. I am sure those questions rang 
a bell with you. We didn't ask these questions just for the fun of 



4380 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHJTADELPHIA AREA 

asking them, but we hud an idea tliat perhaps in you and in anyone 
who recognizes the vahie of the lifth amendment of the Constitution 
there would be an appreciation of wliat that great document means and 
a desire to make a contribution toward strengthening it and pre- 
serving it. 

We believe that you could give us a lot of very valuable information, 
as a matter of fact, we know you could. 

Wouldn't you like to cooperate with this connnittee, and wouldn't 
you like to answer some of these questions so that we may in our deliber- 
ations decide on w^hether or not different types of legislation are 
necessary, and whether there should be amendments to existing laws? 

Why don't you make a contribution to the strengthening of this 
great Republic of ours? 

(Witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Jklr. Abercaupii. Mr. Chairman, I only wish to answer in the manner 
in which I have answeied, and I don't want to make a statement. 

Mr. Walter. Well, there was a day when you made no attempt to 
cover up your affiliations with all of these organizations, and with their 
movements, and I had an idea that since Korea, at least, you would be 
convinced that affiliation with that sort of thing was not for the best 
of America. 

Is there anything further? 

Mr. Tavenner. No, sir. 

Mr. Walter. The witness is excused from further attendance under 
the subpena. Are there any other witnesses? 

(The witness was excused.) 

Mr. Tavenner. No, sir. There Avere two others who were postponed 
to another day, and that leaves us without any other witnesses today. 

Mr. Walter. The committer will stand in recess until 10 o'clock 
tomorrow morning. 

(Whereupon, at 3 : 40 p. m., a recess was taken until 10 a. m. Wednes- 
day, October 15, 1952.) 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1952 

UxiTED States House of Representatives, 

Subcommittee of the Committee 

ON Un-American Activities. 

Philadelphku Pa. 

The subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities 
met, pursuant to adjournment, at 10 : 20 a. m., in Federal Court Room 
Xo. 1, Federal Building, Philadelphia, Pa., Hon. Francis E. Walter, 
presiding. 

Committee members present : Representatives Francis E. Walter 
(presiding) and Clyde Doyle. 

Staff members present: Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., counsel; Thomas 
W. Beale, Sr., assistant counsel; John W. Carrington, clerk; Raphael 
I. Nixon, research director; W. Jackson Jones, Earl L. Fuoss, and 
Frank Bonora, investigators; and Thelma Scearce, staff member. 

Mr. Walter. The subcommittee will come to order. 

Mr. Tavenner, who is j'our first witness? 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Samuel J. DiMaria. Will you come forward, 
please, sir. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand. 

Do you solemnly swear the testimony you are about to give will be 
the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. DiMaria. I do, sir. 

Mr. Walter. Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Walter. Will counsel please identify himself for the record? 

Mr. Barkan. Bernard L, Barkan, appearing for M. H. Goldstein, 
1411 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, and we are attorneys for District 
No. 1, International Union of Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers, 
CIO, Mr. DiMaria's present employer, and are appearing for Mr. 
DiMaria. 

Mr. Walter. All right. 

TESTIMONY OF SAMUEL J. DIMARIA, ACCOMPAmED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, BERNARD L. BARKAN 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your name? 
Mr. DiMaria. Samuel J.' DiMaria. 
Mr. Tavenner. When and wliere were you born ? 
Mr. DiMaria. I was born in Philadelphia, Pa., August 27. 1915. 
Mr. Ta\^nner. What has been your educational training, Mr. 
DiMaria ? 

Mr. DiMaria. I completed the third year of high school, sir. 

4381 



4382 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you now employed ? 

Mr. DiMaria. I am presently employed as a temporary union or- 
ganizer for Local 128 of the Intei-national Union of Electrical, Radio 
and Machine Workers, CIO. 

]\Ir. Tavenner. Mr. DiMaria, are you now a member of the Com- 
munist Party? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir; I am not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever been a member? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes, sir ; I have. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did vou become a member of the Couimu- 
nist Party ^ 

Mr. DiMaria. I joined the Connnunist Party in the late fall of 
1939. 

Mr. Tavenner. Hoav long did you remain a member of the party ? 

Mr. DiIMaria. I remained a member, sir, of the Connnunist Party 
until the spring of 1951. 

Ml-. Tavenner. I am going to ask you to tell the connnittee what 
you learned of the activities of the Conninmist Party through your 
own experiences in the party, that is the chief purpose for interrogat- 
ing you. And before the testimony is completed, I will ask you the 
circumstances under Avhich you terminated your relationship with the 
Communist Party. I think probably the best thing to do is to begin 
right with your first connection with the Communist Party and ask 
you to tell us, step by step, what your experience has been. 

Before doing so, I would like to ask you whether or not you have 
coo])erated before this with other govermnental agencies? 

Mr. DiMaria. I have. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you remember the name of the person who re- 
cruited you into the Communist Party? 

]Mr. DiMaria. No, sir ; I do not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell us the circumstances under which 
you were recruited into the party? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, sir, in the late period of 1939 I had been at- 
tending several meetings of the Comnuniist Party. 

I had been given some of the literature of the Connnunist Party and 
I had become interested in the program and the policies of the Com- 
nnmist Party. At a meeting, I believe a mass meeting of the Commu- 
nist Party, 1 signed an application card for membership into the Com- 
munist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. How were you employed at that time? 

Mr. DiMaria. In the late period of 1939, sir, I was emploved on 
WPA. 

Mr. Tavenner. So it was while you w^ere employed on WPA that 
you actually became a member of the party ? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct. 

Mr. Taa-enner. I think it may be well, right at this point, to find 
out what your record of employment has been. 

Ml'. DiMaria. Sir, I wonder if I may clarify the last answer to 
the last question? 

Mr. Tavenner. Certainly. 

Mr. DiMARTA. It is true that I joined the Communist Party while 
I was employed on WPA. However, I was not recruited into the 
Communist Party through the WPA. I was recruited into the Com- 
munist Party while attending a mass meeting which certainly had 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4383 

]io connection uitli tlie WPA. I mifrht add at this time that the 
WPA to nie was a very important project becanse it did provide me 
with work in a period when certainly work was very scarce to be had 
for many individnals in the United States. 

Mr. Tavexner. Were any persons who were responsible for your 
recruitment into the party active in WPA projects at that time to 
your knowledge ? 

]\Ir. DiMARiA. There were other members of the Communist Party 
who were employed on WPA, sir. As I subsequently came to know, 
that is. ' 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, will you state at this time what your record 
of employment has been since 1939 ^ 

Mr. Dimaria. I was employed as a local union organizer for Local 
155 of the United Electrical Radio and Machine Workers of America, 
Indej)endent. I was employed 

Mr. Tavenner. Beginning about what time? 

Mr. Dimaria. About 1943. I was employed prior to that as the 
executive secretary of the New Castle County Industrial Council, 
Wilmington, Del. Prior to that I worked at the E. G. Budd Manu- 
facturing Co., the Ocean City Manufacturing Co., the New York 
Shi]\yard. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now after 1943, did j^ou continue in your em- 
])loyment with Local 155, UE ? 

Mr. Dimaria. I was employed as a local union organizer for Ix)cal 
155, UE, from 1943 until 1952. 

Mr. Ta\t.nner. What month in 1952? 

Mr. Dimaria. May 1952. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was there a period between 1939 and 1952 when 
you were in the Armed Forces of the United States ? 

Mr. Dimaria. Yes, sir; there was. 

Mr. Tavenner. What years? 

Mr. Dimaria. 1945 and 1946. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, let us go back to the time when you were 
recruited into the Communist Party in 1939. 

Were you assigned to a branch or unit of the party at that time? 

Mr. Dimaria. I was, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did it have a name? 

Mr. Dimaria. Yes; it did. It was named the Olney Branch of the 
Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. 0-1-n-e-y? 

Mr. Dimaria. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where was that branch located? 

Mr. Dimaria. In the northeastern section of Philadelphia. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you tell us how the membership was made up 
of that branch of the party? 

Mr. DiMaria. That particular branch of the Communist Party was 
made up mostly of professionals and intellectuals. I believe, sir, I 
was the only person who was a member of that branch who engaged 
in working in the shop. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who were the officers of that branch ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Cea Geiselman and Paul Geiselman. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you spell the names, please? 

Mr. DiMaria. G-e-i-s-e-1-m-a-n, C-e-a, and P-a-u-1. 

Mr. Tavenner. What were their offices? 



4384 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. DiMaria. I believe that Paul Geiselmaii v/as branch chairman 
and Cea Geiselman was memborship director. 

Mr. Tavenxer. Xow, you spoke of having attended meetings or 
lectures prior to becoming a member of the Communist Party. How 
were those meetings organized and arranged for? 

Mr. DiMaria. Prior to my becoming a member of the Conununist 
Party, sir, I did not kiiow. I was informed, by persons I knew, that 
a meeting was to be held at an auditorium where a leader of the Com- 
munist Party would speak on a subject concerning current events, a 
subject concerning world history or whatever the case may be. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, did you state you received literature of one 
kind or another? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes, sir; I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is prior to your joining the party ? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. How did you receive this literature? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, I was given a copy of the Daily Worker, or the 
Sunday Worker, or I was given copies of current pamphlets at the 
time, which dealt with many aspects of world problems that all citi- 
zens were facing at that time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Your recruitment into the party, then, was a grad- 
ual affair? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. And it was the result of organized effort over a 
period, some little period of time? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. After joining the Communist Party, were you re- 
quired to pay dues ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes, sir; I was. 

Mr. Tavenner. What were your dues? 

Mr. DiMaria. I believe my dues at that time, sir, were 25 cents per 
month. 

Mr. Tavenner. To whom did you pay the dues? 

Mr. DiMaria. To the membership director of the branch. 

Mr. Tavenner, Who was that? 

Mr. DiMaria. Cea Geiselman. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many belonged to this cell, the Olney, to which 
you were first assigned ? 

Mr. DiMaria. I believe, sir, approximately 20 or 25. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did you remain a member of the Olney 
Branch ? 

Mr. DiMaria. I remained a member of the Olney Branch until I 
was transferred to the Wilmington Branch of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, during the period of time that you were a 
member of the Olney Branch, did you come to a conclusion as to what 
the main functions of that branch of the Communist Party were? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes, sir; I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. What were they ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, at that time, sir, the major functions of the 
Communist Party, of this particular branch, were two-fold. 

First, it was to sell the literature of the Communist Party, the 
Daily Worker and the Sunday Worker, its pamphlets and its other 
materials of a printed nature, and secondly to collect dues from the 
Communist Party members associated with that branch, and thirdly. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVrriES IN THK PHILADELPHIA AREA 4385 

to further the education of the individual Communist Party members 
Avho were within that branch. I might also state, sir, that the world 
of 1940 was a great different than 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you s]x^ak a little louder, please? 

Mr. DiMaria. I say, "sir, that the world of 1940 was in many re- 
spects a great deal different than tlie situation that we face today. At 
that time there were many major questions facing the Ameivican 
peo]de, full employment certainly had not been achieved and the Com- 
nuniist Party was developing the theme of how it could provide a 
way that unemployment would cease, and there would be no need for 
further unemployed members of our society. Further, the world was 
fast approaching a world war, and the Communist Party had a pro- 
gram, a plan, a method to attempt to avert such a world war. These 
were some of the statements, some of the lectures, and some of the dis- 
cussions that concerned the Communist Party in this particular branch. 
I might add, also, that a typical Olney Branch meeting would consist 
of possibly a 2-hour session, the first hour would be devoted to a dis- 
cussion on current events or a discussion on certain phases of Marxian 
theory or would concern itself with the economic problems of the 
day, and the second hour of the meeting would concern itself with the 
sale of the literature of the Comnnuiist Party, the collection of dues 
and a report by individual Communist members on persons they were 
attempting to interest in joining the Connnunist Party. Plans would 
be laid for the furtherance of that particular type of work for the 
next period of time prior to the next Communist Party meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. You spoke of the education of the members as being 
one of the functions of tliis branch cell. By "education," did you 
mean their education along Comnuuiist Party lines or the theory of 
communism ? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What material was furnished as an aid in the 
education of the members in Connnunist Party matters? 

Mr. I^iMakia. W^ell, sir, there was a Workers School on Walnut 
Street, in Philadelphia, to which in.dividual members of the Com- 
munist Party were sent to be further educated in the principles of 
the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. How often did your branch meetings occur? 

Mr. DiMaria. Every 2 weeks, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where were the meetings held? 

Mr. DiMaria. Usually at the home of Cea Geiselman. 

Mr. Tavenner. When was it that you v/ere transferred from the 
Olnev Branch to Wilmington, Del. ? 

Mr. DiMaria. In 1942. 

Mr. Tavenner. W^hat was the reason for the transfer? 

Mr. DiMaria. I was approaclied by a section organizer of the 
Communist Party by tlie name of Charles Spencer, who informed me 
that a position with the New Castle County Industrial Union Council 
was open, and he suggested that I make apj^lication for that job. I 
did so, and I was hired for the job in the post of executive secretary 
of the New Castle County Industrial Council. 

Mr. Walter. Who suggested that you apply for that job? 

Mr. DiMaria. Charles Spencer, a section organizer of the Com- 
munist Party in Philadelphia. 



4386 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADEI PHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavenner. At the time he suggested that you apply for the 
position did he indicate to you that he had arranged for you to get it? 
Mr. DiMaria. No, sir ; he did not, but I do not doubt that such 
arrangements had been made. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the organization ? 
Mr. DiMaria. The New Castle Industrial Union Council, sir. 
Mr. Tavenner. What did it consist of? 

Mr. DiMaria. It consisted of an organization of all of the labor 
unions in the Wilmington area who were affiliated with the New Castle 
County Industrial Union Council. 

Mr. Tavenner. Why did this man appear to have the power to 
appoint you, this Communist, to that position? 
Mr. DiMaria. Well, sir, I don't know. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did he not indicate to you an}' reason why he felt 
that you could be appointed to that position? 
Mr. DiMaria. No, sir; he did not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Or he could be a spokesman for all of the labor 
unions in the Wilmington area? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, sir, the particular job that I had there con- 
sisted of secretary to the council, of taking the minutes and assisting 
in organizing. 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. DiMaria. But he did not discuss with me the arrangements that 
had been made for my obtaining that job, although I certainly do not 
doubt that that had been done. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, may we have a short recess? 
Mr. Walter. All right. The committee will stand in recess for 5 
minutes. 

(A short recess was taken.) 
Mr. AValter. We will proceed, Mr. Tavenner. 

Mr. Tavenner. You stated that the Communist Tarty organizer 
who suggested tlie vacancy to you, and that you apply for it, was 
Charles Spencer ? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Had you known Charles Spencer prior to that time 
that he made this suggestion to you ? 
Mr. DiMaria. Yes, sir ; I had". 

Mr. Tavenner. Under what circumstances had you known him? 

Mr. DiMaria. He was generally the person who would meet with 

the branch and advise the branch as to the topics of discussion or the 

concentratioii area of wliere the Daily Worker or Sunday Worker 

should be sold. 

Mr. Tavenner. AVlien you speak of "the branch," you mean the 
branch of the Communist Party? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct, sir, the Olney branch. 
Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether he, at that time, was a func- 
tionary of tlie Communist Party on a higher level tlian merely of the 
Olney branch? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes, sir. He was a paid functionary of the Com- 
miniist Party, and he was the section organizer of tlie Communist 
Party. 

Mr. TA^T.NNER. When you obtained this position in Wilmington, 
were you assigned to a branch of the Communist Party there? 
j\Ir. DiMaria. Yes, sir ; I was. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4387 

Mr, Tavenner. Did it have a name?' 

Mr. DiMaria. Wilmington Branch of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, can you identify members of the Ohiey branch 
other than the officers \yhose names you have already given ^ 

Mr. DixMakia. No, sir; I cannot. That was many years ago, but 
I remember distinctly who were the officers of that branch. 

Mr. Tavexner. How long did you remain a member of the Wil- 
mington i>roup or branch of the Communist Party? 

.Air. DiMaria. Until February of 1943. 

Mr. Wali-er. How far is Wilmington from Olney ? 

Mr. DiMaria. I conmiuted daily, sir, and it took me approximately 
1 hour to go from Philadelphia to Wilmington, Del. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is there any connection in any possible way between 
Olney and Wilmington ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, yes, sir ; there is, in a sense, that the Communist 
Party is organized in districts and the Communist Part^^ of eastern 
Pennsylvania comprises as part of its territory Wilmington, Del. The 
district organizer of the Communist Party of this particular area also 
serves in tlie capacity of district organizer for Wilmington, Del. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you become acquainted with the members of 
the branch in Wilmington ? 

Mr. DiMaria. There were very few members in the Wilmington 
branch, sir, and I do not recall specifically at this time how many there 
were. I remember who the chairman of that particular branch was. 
He was a person by the name of Dan Slinger, who was the chairman 
of the Wilmington branch of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you spell the last name ? 

Mr. DiMaria. S-1-i-n-g-e-r. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Can you give us further identification of him ? Do 
you know^ how he was employed at that time ? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir ; I do not. I believe that Dan Slinger was a 
prominent figure in the labor movement in that area. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was your occasion for knowing him ? 

Mr. DiMaria. I was introclucecl to Dan Slinger by Charles Spencer 
as the chairman of the branch to which I would be assigned in Wil- 
mington, Del. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you meet with him on any occasions ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes, sir ; I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. How frequently do you think ? 

Mr. DiMaria. The branch in Wilmington did not meet with the 
regularity that the Olney branch did. My meetings with Mr. Slinger 
usually were for lunch, at which time he would discuss with me cer- 
tain aspects of Communist Party policy. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, you stated that your employment there lasted 
until February of 1943, 1 believe . 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner, Then what was your employment after that time ? 

Mr. DiMaria. I was assigned to the International Union of the 
Electrical, Radio, and Machine Workers of America, the UE. Ex- 
cuse me, sir, the correct name is the United Electrical, Radio, and 
Machine Workers of America, which at that time was affiliated with 
the CIO. I was employed by them in the capacity of international 
field organizer. 



4388 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavenner. What were the cdrciimstances under which your em- 
ployment was changed from Wihnington, Del., to the position with 
the'UE? 

Mr. DiMaria. Sir, if I may, I would like to, clarify the fact that the 
United Electrical, Radio, and Machine Workers Union was expelled 
from the CIO in 1949 because of Communist activities. However, in 
the year 1943 the UE was still a part of CIO. 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. DiMaria. In answer to your last question, I knew Tom Delaney. 
Tom Delaney and I had been friends for many years, and he was 
employed in a shop at that time which was under contract with Local 
155 of the UE. I understood at that time that he had been advised 
by David Davis that there was a possibility of his being placed on 
the staff of Local 155 of UE and Tom suggested, or rather in dis- 
cussions between Mr. Delaney any myself he suggested, that he would 
talk to Davis about my possible employment by the international union 
of the UE as a field organizer. He did talk to Mr. David Davis, and 
I was employed by the UE in February of 1943, 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Tom Delaney is the same person who testified 
Monday before this committee ? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. And David Davis is the witness who appeared on the 
same day as a witness ? 

Mr. DiMaria. I read in the newspapers, sir, that he did appear here 
as a witness. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know what David Davis' present employ- 
ment is ? 

Mr. DiMaria, I believe, sir, that he is employed in the capacity of 
local union organizer for Local 155 of the UE. 

Mr. Ta\t<:nner. Now, at the time that you received that appointment 
or just immediately prior thereto, you were employed in Wilmington? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, in order to be appointed as a member or as an 
organizer with the UE, weren't you required to be an employee in some 
plant in which the UE had a union or with which it had a contract? 

Mr. DiMaria. I had been employed, sir, in the electrical industry, 
and I had worked at the Ocean City Manufacturing Co. prior to my 
employment in Wilmington, Del. I might also add that the Ocean 
City Manufacturing Co. was also under contract to local 155 with re- 
spect to collective-bargaining rights. 

Mr. Tavenner. At the time that Mr. Delaney suggested that you 
make this application for employment by the UE, did you know Mr. 
Delaney to be a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. DiMaria. I did, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. At that time did you know David Davis to be a 
member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. DiMaria. I knew David Davis to be a member of the Communist 
Party. 

INIr. Tavenner. What position in the Commuist Party did David 
Davis hold at that time, if you know ? 

Mr. DiMaria. David Davis was a member of the district board of 
the Communist Party of eastern Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Tavenner. You stated earlier in your testimony today that 
there was a Workers' School where members of the Communist Party 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4389 

were sent for further education in Communist Party principles. 
Wlien did you attend, or did you attend such a school ? 

Mr. DiMaria. I did, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did vou attend it? 

Mr. DiMaria. In 1940. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then, that was prior to your employment with 
theUE? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. TA^T.NNER. Where was that school held? 

Mr. DiMaria. I believe tliat school was located on Walnut Street. 

Mr. Tavenner. In Philadelphia? 

Mr. DiMaria, Yes, in Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did the school have a name? 

Mr. DiMaria. I believe the name of the school was "Workers' 
School." 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether it is now in existence or 
whether it was terminated ? 

Mr. DiMaria. It is not now in existence. It was discontinued in 
1940. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know the reason why it was discontinued ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, I know the reasons, sir, from what I read in 
the newspapers. At that time, I believe, the police department fomid 
a bomb in the Workers' School, and that case Avent to court. I do not 
remember wliether the indictment was dismissed or what happened 
exactly, but I do know that, as a result of the alleged bomb being found 
in tlie Workers' Scliool, the school was discontinued. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, was it alleged in substance that the bomb 
was used for instruction purposes ? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is what was alleged, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, during the period you were an attendant at 
the school, did you see any such thing occur as the use of a bomb 
in instructions ? 

Mr. DiMaria, Absolutely not, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What were the courses that you studied and what 
was the general character of the instruction that was given ? 

Mr. DiMaria. There were many courses taught. 

The history of the United States, the history of the Communist 
Party, trade-union parliamentary procedure, public speaking, the 
fundamental works of Marx and Lenin — Das Kapital by Karl Marx ; 
Foundations of Leninism, and so on — were taught. There were 
courses in most of the basic works of Marxian ideology. 

Mr. Tavenner. I would like for you to give us the names of all of 
the texts and pamphlets that were used that you can recall involving 
Leninism, and Stalinism or Marxism, in other words, the Communist 
teachings. 

Mr. DiMaria. Das Kapital was used as a book for an outline of 
study by Karl Marx, Foundations of Leninism, by Joseph Stalin, was 
used as a basis for study. Several texts concerning the history of the 
United States were used as a basis for discussion and study. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall whether the History of the Commu- 
nist Party in the Soviet LTnion was one of the books? 

Mr. DiMaria. The History of the Communist Party in the Soviet 
Union, Bolshevik, was taught, sir. 



4390 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavenner. State and Revolution by Lenin 

Mr. Di]Maria. Yes; that was another course tliat was taught. 

Mr. Tavenner. Left "Wing Comnumism by Lenin ; do you recall 
that? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes; that was taught. 

Mr. Tavenner. The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and 
Frieclrich Engels ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Handbook of Marxism, do you recall that ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, The Plandbook of Marxism embraces within it 
many of the aspects of Marxian philosophy, and many of the books 
that you have already mentioned are to be found within the text of 
The Handbook of Marxism. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, Communist Strategy and Tactics, bv Linton 
M. Oaks? 

Mr. DiMaria. That, sir, I am not acquainted with. 

]Mr. Tavenner. I hand you a book entitled ''On Organization,'' by 
J. Stalin, and did you turn that over to the committee ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes, sir ; I did. 

Mr. Tavenner, This pamphlet, Mr. Chairman, On Organization, 
by Joseph Stalin is a compilation of excerpts from speeches made by 
Stalin over a period of years and it deals witli the experiences of the 
Connnunist Party, of the Soviet I'nion on matters of organization and 
it is distributed by the Communist Party of America as a guide on how 
to deal with certain matters relating to organizational problems. 

I would like to have it marked as an exhibit. 

Mr. Walter. It will be marked as ''Philadelphia Exhibit Xo. 1." 

(The document above referred to, nuxrked ''Pliiladelphia Exhibit 
No. 1," is filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you An Outline foi- the Study of the Eco- 
nomic System, Political Structure and Foreign Policy of the Soviet 
Union, and American-Soviet Collaboration, iDy J. Mindel. Did you 
turn that over to the committee at its request? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes. Would you please repeat your question. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you turn that document over to the committee 
at the committee's request? 

Mr. DiMaria. I did, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. This pamphlet, Mr. Chairman, is An Outline for the 
Study of the Economic System, Political Structure and Foreign Policy 
of the Soviet Union, and American-Soviet Friendship, by J. Mindel. 
It was published and circulated by the education department of the 
Communist Party of the U. S. A. It is a short history of the Com- 
munist Party of the Soviet Union from the October 1917 revolution, 
to 1944. It apparently is a substitute for the short course of the 
history of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union and it is intended 
to acquaint the American Communists with the origin and founda- 
tion of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, 

I would like to offer it in evidence and ask it to be marked as 
"Philadelphia Exhibit No. 2." 

Mr. Walter. It will be marked "Philadelphia Exhibit No. 2." 

(The document above referred to, marked "Philadelphia Exhibit 
No. 2," is filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, from the investigations that the committee 
has made from time to time, there was an important occurrence in 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4391 

1944, markin<j somewhat of a change in policy of the Communist 
Party. Can you tell the committee what occuri'ecl of unusual impor- 
tance in 1944? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, sir, my own personal knowledge of the change 
which occurred in the program of the Communist Party in 1944 oc- 
curred as a result, actually of Earl Browder's book, Teheran, which 
indicated that American capitalism and Soviet socialism could peace- 
fully exist side by side for many generations to come, and there need 
no longer be any fear of American capitalism and world socialism en- 
gaging in hostilities. This also brought about many changes in the 
Conmuuiist Party work, and organization. I might point out- that 
when this program was advanced by the national leadership of the 
Communist Party of the United States, the Communist Political As- 
sociation was formed. The basic aims of the Communist Political 
Association differed greatly from those of the Communist Party in 
this sense : The Communist Political Association dealt with the lierit-i 
age of American history and American freedom. It dealt with a basib 
program to acquaint the American people in a greater sense of the 
heritage of struggle the American people went through in order tb 
achieve the fruits of American democracy, and further the work of the 
Communist Political Association dealt w^ith the work in the neighbor- 
hoods, to sell the Communist Political Association literature in the 
neigliborhoods instead of the places where individual Communists may 
have been employed, such as in a trade-union, such as in a fraternal 
organization, and so on. 

Mr. Tavenxer. Then that re])resented a departure from the former 
policy of the Communist Party? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct, sir. 

]Mr. Tavenner. Did you learn at the time, or at any subsequent time 
that that was merely a device of the Communist Party to promote its 
ultimate objectives and was not in any sense a surrender of the views 
of the Communist Party as to world domination and particularly to 
domination in this country? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, here again, sir, I may only answer from my 
particular experiences within the Communist Party. Wlieii 1 i-e- 
turned from the service the basic change from the Communist Political 
Association back to the Communist Party as originally had been 
organized had already taken place. I was not active in the Com- 
munist Party during that particular change. However, I do recall 
the letter that the French Communist leadei', Duclos, wrote, which 
appeared in the Sunday Worker and the Daily Worker, criticizing 
the program that had been adopted by the American Communist 
Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. And as a result of that criticism, Browder was 
ousted and the party was returned to its former position ? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Walter. Would that have happened if the Communist Party, 
U. S. A., w^as not a part of the world-wide consi)iracy to overthrow 
this form of government? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, sir, I would be unable to answer that question 
from my own particular experiences within the Communist Party. 
At that time I certainly would not have been able to answer it. 

25241—52 7 



4392 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavp:nner. All right. The committee's staff has obtained a 
photostatic copy of the June 1944 literature bulletin of the Communist 
Political Association of Eastern Pennsylvania, issued by the Litera- 
ture Educational Commission. 

This bulletin lists various sections of the Communist Political Asso- 
ciation on page 2 of the document. I will ask you to examine it and 
state whether or not you can point out the section of which you were 
a member. 

(Document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Let me ask the question this way. Can you, by 
an examination of that chart, identify the group or section of the 
Communist Political Association of which you were a member ? 

Mr. DiMaeia. Yes, sir ; I can. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is the name of it, and how is it described ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, at the top there is a heading "Club," and then 
there is a listing of clubs, and in that listing appears Olney, and of 
that club I was a member. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, will you read into the record the names of 
the clubs, as designated on that chart? 

Mr. Barkan. If it is your intention to admit or to ask that the 
connnittee admit in evidence this literature bulletin, may I respectfully 
suggest, sir, that the document will speak for itself, and I don't know 
what purpose will be served by reading into the record the numbers 
of the clubs. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to introduce the document in evidence and 
ask it be marked "Philadelphia Exhibit No. 3." 

Mr. Walter. It will be received. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Philadelphia Exhibit 
No. 3" is filed herewith.) ^ 

Mr. Tavenner. I notice the first club designated is Victory. There 
is a column appearing after the club with the initial "C" above it. 
Do you know whether or not that designates or describes the number 
of Communist literature books that were sold in that club ? 

Mr. DiMaria. That would designate, sir, the number of magazines 
entitled "The Communist," that were sold in that club. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then the next column is marked, "Concentration" 
and do you know what that means, or what that refers to ? 

Mr. DiMaria. That would probably refer to the inunber of indi- 
vidual pamphlets which were considered by the Communist Party 
to be concentration ]:)amphlets for a particular period of time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then the next column has at the heading, "Mass," 
and do you know what that signifies ? 

Mr. DiINIaria. The Communist Party issued or had printed a num- 
ber of magazines, and a number of clip sheets for mass distribution, 
for distribution to homes or distribution at affairs. That probably 
dealt with that particular group. 

Mr, Tavenner. And the next column was marked "Marxist". 

Mr. DiMaria. That would probably deal with works of Karl Marx 
or Joseph Stalin or Lenin. 

Mr, Tavenner. And then the next is marked "Miscellaneous" and 
under it appears certain figures in dollars and cents. 



1 See pp. 4469 and 4470. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4393 

Mr. DiMahia. That would probably represent the total cost of the 
uiairazines or other literature bono;ht by the individual clubs. 

Mr, Ta\'enxer. Jn other words, this^ sheet shows the transactions 
in literature for a designated month of the various clubs of the (3oni- 
luunist Political Association within this area? 

Mr. DiMarla., That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Tavexner. I desire, Mr. Chairman, to read into evidence the 
names of the clubs, the Victory Club I have already read. 

Do you know anything about the Sam Le€ Club, and wdiere it is 
located ? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir, I do not. 

Mr. Tavexner. Do you know anything about the location of the 
Fred Douglas Club '^ 

Mr. DiINIaria. No, sir, I do not. 

Mr. DiMaria. "24-W," do you know what that designates? 

Mr. DiMaria. That would probably designate the twenty-fourth 
ward. 

Mr. Tavexner. "WC"? 

Mr. DiMaria. I would not know what that referred to. 

Mr Tavexner. ''46-W"? 

Mr. DiMaria. That would probably refer to the forty-sixth ward. 

Mr. Tavexner. The "52-W"? 

Mr. DiMaria. That also would probably refer to the fifty-second 
ward. 

Mr. Tavexner. ";5-C1)*'? 

Mr. DiMaria. That probably referred to the Third Congressional 
District. 

Mr. Tavenner. "28-38" ? 

Mr. DiMaria. That I would not know, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Our investigation, Mr. Chairman, reflects that that 
has reference to the twenty-eighth and thirty-eighth wards. "8!2-47" ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, from your previous statement, sir, I would 
gather then that that would designate the wards. 

Mr. Tavenner. "5-CD," does that mean Fifth Congressional Dis- 
trict ? 

Mr. DiMaria. I would say so; yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. "22-W"? 

Mr. DiMaria. That would probably refer to the twenty-second 
ward. 

Mr. Tavenner. Olney, of which you were a member, and which 
you have already described. 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. "Upper Darby" ? 

Mr. DiMaria. That would probably refer to the branch located in 
Upper Darby. 

Mr. Tavenner. "City"? 

Mr. DiMaria. That probably referred to the branch in central 
Philadelphia. 

Mr. Ta^^nner. Our investigation, Mr. Chairman, indicates that this 
city club consisted of a very limited number of members restricted 
to important people within the party. 

"N-1, 2, 3"? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know what those are ? 



4394 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. DiMaria. I would not recognize that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then there follows a listing of seven clubs, each 
of which is prefixed by the figure "8" and reads as follows : "8-MO," 
"8-TN," "8-TF," "8-TW," "8-TG," and "8-MX," and "8-TO." 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know the significance of the number "8"? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir. I do not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, our investigation reflects that the 
figure "8" refers to the eighth section of the Communist Political 
Association, and described professional clubs. 

Anthracite ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Anthracite would probably refer to the branch of 
the Communist Party organized in the anthracite region. 

Mr. Tavenner. "SE"? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir ; I do not recognize that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Lehigh-Bucks? 

Mr. DiMaria. That probably referred to the organization of the 
Communist Party existing in the Lehigh-Bucks County area. 

Mr. TA^^ENNER. You mean of the Communist Political Association? 

Mv. DiMaria. The Communist Political Association. 

Mr. Tavenner. Chester? 

Mr. DiMaria. Probably referred to the Chester organization of the 
Communist Political Association. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wilmington? 

Mr. DiMaria. That referred to the Wilmington section of the Com- 
munist Political Association. 

Mr. Tavenner. I failed to ask you how long you attended the 
Workers' School. 

Mr. DiMaria. I attended the Workers' School for approximately 7 
months. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was the school continuously in session, or did it have 
regular periods ? 

Mr. Di]SL4RiA. I attended classes at the school during the evening, 
classes usually were lield from 7 until 11, and the majority of the classes 
were taught during the evening. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who was the director of the school while you were in 
attendance ? 

Mr. DiMaria. A person by the name of Otty Heller. 

Mr. TxWENNER. Can you give us the names of any of the faculty 
members, and when you give the names state what subjects they 
specialized in if you recall. 

Mr, DiMaria. Ralph Glick, I believe he specialized in teaching the 
history of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. Norris Wood, 
Sr,. I believe he taught certain aspects of American history. Joe 
Dougher taught trade-union parliamentary procedure, and the history 
of the trade-union movement in the United States. JNIike Gates, an- 
other instructor at the school, I do not specifically recall, sir, the 
particular classes that he taught. 

Mr. Tavenner. After taking the courses of instruction at the 
Workers' School, did you engage in instruction of any character for 
the Communist Party ? 

Mr. DiMaria. During my association with the Olney Branch, I 
served as the educational director for a brief period of time of the 
Olney Branch, and from time to time the educational commission of 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4395 

the Comnuinist Party would issue to all of the branch educational 
directors outlines for discussion, outlines for o-eneral discussions in the 
branch, and in that sense I did lead many discussions concerning many 
of the topics that I was given by the educational commission of the 
Comnnmist Party. 

Mr. Tantenner. Did members of the Comnuinist Party on a higher 
level, that is functionaries of the party, attend your meetings and 
lecture to the membership on occasions? 

Mv. DiMaria. Yes, sir, 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you give us the names of any high functionaries 
who appeared before your groups ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Sam Donchin who was the district organizer of the 
Connnunist Party in this area. 

Mr. Tavenner. Spell the name, please. 

Mr. DiMaria. D-o-n-c-h-i-n. Frank Cestare, who attended some 
of the meetings of the Communist Political Association, of the 
branches, and also led discussions on certain topics; they are about 
the only ones that I recall at this time, sir. 

Mr. Tavenxer. Earlier in yom- testimony you referred to two per- 
sons by the name of Geiselman, a man and a woman. Were they hus- 
band and wife? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir; they were brother and sister. 

Mr. Tavenner. I understand there are two persons by the name of 
Geiselman, junior and senior. 

Wliich of the two did you refer to ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Junior. 

Mr. Tavenner. The committee has heard testimony from numerous 
witnesses in which they referred to fraction meetings of the Commu- 
nist Party. What do you understand by a fraction meeting? 

Mr. DiMaria. The term "fraction" was used by the Communist 
Party to describe a unit of the Communist Party within a trade-union. 
That term was discontinued. Actually it was used approximately in 
1940 or 1941, but in the sense that it was used, it was to describe a 
Communist Party organization within a trade-union. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did that mean that the members of that group 
would be representatives from different cells or branches of the Com- 
munist Party ? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir. That meant that the members who belonged 
to that particular fraction of the Communist Party all worked in the 
same establishment, like a local union may have collective bargaining 
rights with a particular company, and therefore that fraction was 
made up of those individual Communists who worked in that 
particular company. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were they necessarily members of the same group 
or cell of the party ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes. 

Mr. Taat.nner. Well, what was the main function of a Comnuinist 
fraction within a union ? 

Mr. DiMaria. The main function of a Connnunist organization 
within a union 

Mr. Tavenner. As distinguished from an ordinary branch of the 
Communist Party 

Mr. DiMaria. Would be to specifically concentrate Communist ac- 
tivities within a particular union, whereas a branch of the Communist 



4396 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Party would concentrate in a particular area of the city. There would 
be literature to be sold, members to be recruited, funds to be raised — 
that would all be done in that particular union. Further, the Com- 
munist organization would endeavor to direct the political policies of 
that particular union. 

Mr. TxWENNER. That is through tlie Communist fraction? 

Mr. DiMarta. Tliat is correct, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you elected to any j)osition or office in the 
Communist Political Association? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes, sir; I was. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the nature of the office? 

Mr. DiMaria. I was elected to the district committee of tlie Com- 
munist Political Association. 

Mr. Tavenner. What were the duties of that coinmittoe? 

Mr. DiMaria. Usually that committee met approximately every 3 
months, and it would receive a report from the district organizer of 
the Comnmnist Political Association to the general program of work 
for the next o- or i-month period. There would be discussion and 
debate over the program and then the progiam would finally be 
arrived at and turned over to the various sections and the various 
branches for the carrying out of the practical work raised by the 
program that liad been discussed by the district committee. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who served on the district connnittee with you? 

Mr, DiMaria. There were a number of persons on the dist i-ict com- 
mittee. There was Sam Donchin, Ella Reeve Bloor, Red Eddy. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you spell the name? 

Ml-. DiMaria. E-d-d-y. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you give some further descriptive information 
I'egarding that person ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, I never knew that persoji too well, but I under- 
stood that that person was active in the Communist Political Associa- 
tion, in the anthracite region, I believe. 1 may be incorrect, but I 
knovv^ that he was active in Communist circles outside of the city of 
Philadelphia. 

Dan Slinger, who represented the Wilmington group of the Com- 
munist Party 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, just a moment, do you know wliere Dan 
Slinger is now or what he is doing? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir ; I do not. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. 

Mr. DiMaria. Frank Cestaro, Dave Davis, Jack Devine, Tom 
Nabried, Dan Df^lano, Bob and Mary Morrell, Jules Abercanph, Wal- 
ter Lowenfels, Sterling Rochester, and Jessie Schneiderman. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether the Jules Abercauph is the 
same person who ran for mayor of the city of Philadelphia in 1943? 

Mr. DiMaria. I believe he is the same person; yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you give us further descriptive information 
of Walter Lowenfels? 

Mr. DiMaria. Walter Lowenfels is a writer and served for a time, 
I believe, for the Philadelphia edition of tlie Sunday Worker. 

Mr. Tavenner, Do you know what position he has now with any 
organ of the Communist Party? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir: I do not. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4397 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you acquainted with a person commonly called 
Red Eddy, or I believe his initials are J. G. Eddy ^ 

Mr. DiMaria. That is the person that, sir, about whom I answered 
your previous question, who I understood to be active in Communist 
Political Association work at that time outside of the city of Phila- 
del])hia, in the suburban areas. 

Mr. Tavexxer. That is the same person? 

y\v. Di]Maria. That is the same person ; yes. 

Mr. Tavexner. I am not certain whether you named David Davis 
as havinfr been a member of that ^roup. 

Mr. DiMaria. He was a member. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Do you know vrhether Sam Donchin used any other 
name or was known by any other name? 

Mr, DiMaria. Yes, Sam Donchin was also known as Sam Don. 

Mr. Tavexxer. D-o-n ? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct, sir. 

]\rr. Tavexxer. Now, did you serve on any commission of the Com- 
munist Political Association, and I want to keep separate the com- 
missions of which you may have been a member in the Communist 
Political Association, and in the Communist Party. 

Mr. DiMaria. I served on two commissions of the Communist Po- 
litical Association, the educational commission and the trade-union 
connnission. 

Mr. Tam^xx'^er. Tell about the functions of the trade-union com- 
mission. 

Mr. DiMaria. The trade-union commission of the Communist Po- 
litical Association was or2:anizo,d to receive reports on the work of 
individual Communist Party members within particular unions, with 
respect to sale of literature, recruiting new members, with respect to 
the collection of dues, with respect to raising of funds, with respect 
to tlie general work of a Communist within the trade-union movement. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Who served on the trade-union commission with 
you ? 

]\Ir. DiMaria. Dave Davis, Bob Morrell. 

Mr. Ta^texxer. Will you give us further identification of Bob 
Morrell? How do you spell the name? 

Mr. DiMaria. M-o-r-r-e-1-1. Bob Morrell, I believe, was em- 
ployed, I am not certain, I do not recall where he was em- 
ployed at that time. And the district organizer of the Communist 
Party who at that time, I believe was Jack Devine on that commission, 
and myself. 

Mr. Tavexxer. How many composed the membership of the edu- 
cational commission of the Communist Political Association? 

Mr. Di^Maria. W^ell, there were several members of the commission. 
May I have the question again, sir? 

Mr. Tavexxer. I asked you how many persons served with you on 
llie educational commission of the Communist Political Association? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, the educational commission of the Communist 
Political Association was made up of a number of people. Usually 
a commission was drawn up on as wide a representation as possibly 
could be given to it. 

I don't know specifically how many persons were on it. 

!Mr. Tavexxer. Can you give us the names of any persons who 
served on that commission with you? 



4398 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. DiMaria. Dan Delano served on that commission. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you spell the name, please ? 

Mr. DiMaria. D-e-1-a-n-o, Sam Donchin, Dave Davis, Mary Mor- 
rell, and they are the only persons I recall at this time. 

Mr. Tavenner. What relationship was there between Mary Morrell 
and Bob Morrell, if any? 

Mr. DiMaria. They were husband and wife, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. In carryino- out the work of that commission, were 
high functionaries of the Communist Party brought in here to con- 
duct special classes at any time? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes ; they were. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Did William Z. Foster come in as a part of the 
program ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes ; he did. 

Mr. Tavenner. Of the program of education ? 

Mr. DiMarl\.. Of the program of education, yes, sir; that is 
correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did he conduct classes? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes, sir ; he did. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you name any other persons or any other high 
functionary who came in and performed that function ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Gilbert Green, John Williamson, Betty Gannett. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, you have spoken of this work in the Com- 
munist Political Association and you told us at a little earlier point 
in your testimony that the Communist Political Association was aban- 
doned and again reconstituted. I believe you said that you were in 
the Armed Forces during that period of transition. 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then what was the situation that you found when 
you came back from the service, with regard to the Communist 
Party ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, I returned from tlie service, sir, and I was in- 
vited to a meeting of the Communist Party. It was a meeting of 
section organizers, and members of the district committee. 

Mr. Tavenner. When you say section organizers, do you mean of 
the Communist Party ? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct, sir. And the topic of discussion was 
that during the period of time of the existence of the Communist 
Political Association the Communist Party clubs in the trade-union 
movement or trade-union locals had been dissolved and the mem- 
bership of those clubs had been reassigned to the street branches. 
Therefore, the Communist Party found it very desirous to again 
reorganize the Communist Party clubs within the trade-union move- 
ment. There was a great deal of discussion at the meeting that I 
attended about what could be done to again reorganize those clubs. 
Accordingly, a commission was established to reconsolidate those par- 
ticular clubs of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, did that commission have any special name, 
that is the commission to which you referred as being organized? 

Mr. DiMaria. The name of the commission, I believe, was the com- 
mission to consolidate and reorganize Communist Party branches in 
the trade-union movement. That is about as close as I can recall. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you become a member of that connnission? 

Mr. DiMaria. I was elected to that connnission ; yes, sir. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4399 

Mr. Tavrxner. Tell die connnittee now just what was done by that 
commission, of which yon were a member. 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, it was the purpose of that connnission to re- 
oi'jiiini/e the Connnimist I*arty clnbs that had been dissolved during 
the days of the Connnnnist Political Association in local 155, UE. in 
General Electric and Westinohonse, and in RCA. 

Ml'. Tavenxer. And by RCA you mean Radio Corp. of America? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct. 

Ml". Tavexxer. Now, will you give us the names of those fields in 
which a special effort Avas made to reorganize the Conununist Party 
cells. You said 155, 1 believe, local 155. 

Mr. DiMaria. Local 155, FE, as a miscellaneous local made up of, 
or that was comprised of some 56 shops. The Radio Corporation 
of America 

Mr. Tavex^ner. Now, just a moment, do you know the general type 
of business being conducted by the 56 shops in which local 155, UE, 
was organized ? 

Mr. DiMaria. There were a number of different businesses that 
the emidoyers with whom we had collective bargaining rights were 
engaged in. However, a great majority of them, or not a majority 
but a great number of them, were engaged in the manufacturing of 
tools a]id dies. 

IVIr. Tavex^ner. Tools and dies are considered very essential defense 
materials, are they not 'i 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, I would believe so. 

Mr. Tavex-^xer. Do you know whether there were defense contracts 
with a number of the 56 shops in which local 155 w^as organized? 

Mr. DiMaria. Some had defense coiitracts, yes, sir, and some were 
engaged in the manufacturing of toys and it was a miscellaneous 
assortment of businesses, actually, with the exception of one group 
which was the basic group which produced nothing else but tools and 
dies. 

]\Ir. Tavexxer. How many of those shops do you think were en- 
gaged exchisively in the manufacture of tools and dies ? 

Mr. DiMaria. A])proximately 20, sir. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Now, proceed to the next, please. 

Did you say Radio Corp. of America was one? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavexx^er. In what type of business was that organization 
engaged to your knowledge? 

]\[r. DiMaria. It was engaged in the manufacturing of electrical 
equipment, 

Mr, Tavenx^er. Do you yourself know of anything of defense con- 
tracts with that organization ? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir, I do not know })ersonally of anything, out- 
side of what general information was obtained through the news- 
papers. 

Mr. Tavexx^er. And now name the others. I believe you said West- 
inghouse was one? 

Mr. DiMaria. Westinghouse Corp. M'as one. 

]\Ir. Tavex^xer. And in general what was the type of work in which 
the Westinghouse was engaged? 

Mr. DiMaria, The same thing, electrical manufacturing. 



4400 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA ARF^ 

Mr. Tavenner. And then you named a fourth, and what was it^ 

Mr. DiMaria. General Electric. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, just what did you do in order to get tlie 
Communist Party cells reorganized in those industries? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, I worked very closely with Joseph Kuzma, who 
was the trade-union secretary for the Communist Party in this area. 
We attempted to arrange to reconstitute meetings of a regular nature 
of the Communist Party groups in those particular plants. I might 
say, sir, that with the exception of local 155 our efforts were ]iot too 
successful. The members of the Communist Party who had formerly 
worked at General Electric, and Westinghouse, and ECA in the main 
had left those places at the conclusion of World War II when there 
were serious cut-backs in production and as a result there w^ere lay-offs. 

We attempted to have meetings of persons in RCA but the only suc- 
cessful organization or reorganization of the Communist Party group 
was within local 155. 

Mr. Walter. I think that this is a good place to recess. The com- 
mittee will stand in recess until 2 o'clock. 

(Whereupon, at 12 : 20 p. m., a recess was taken until 2 p. m. of the 
same day.) 

after recess 

(The hearing reconvened at 2 : 10 p. m,, Representatives Francis E. 
Walter and Clyde Doyle being present.) 

Mr. Walter. We will proceed. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. DiMaria, at the close of the morning session 
you were describing to us how you became a member of a commission 
which had to do with the reorganization of Communist Party cells 
within industry, and you told us something of tlie purposes of and the 
work of that commission. According to my recollection you testified 
that on your return from the service you met with a group of Com- 
munist Party members and that you were selected by that group to be 
a member of this commission of the Communist Party. Were the 
members of that group w^iich selected you just rank and file members 
of the Communist Party or did they constitute some official body of 
the Communist Party ? 

Mr. DiMaria. They constituted an official body of the Communist 
Party in the sense that many of the members at that meeting were 
members of the district committee of tlie Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall how many persons comprised the 
conmiission to which you were appointed ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes ; I believe there were three other members other 
tlian myself. 

Mr. Ta\t5nner. Who were they ? 

Mr. DiMaria. The commission to which I was elected consisted of 
Philip Bart, district organizer of the Communist Party 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you speak a little louder ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Philip Bart, district organizer of the Communist 
Pai'ty ; Joseph Kuzma, trade-union secretary of the Communist Party ; 
Dave Davis, a member of the district board of the Communist Party,, 
and myself. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall the occasion of the first meeting of 
that commission, which vou attended? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes, I do. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4401 

]Mr. Tavennek. Where was that nieetiMg held? 

Mr. DiMaria. That nieetinc: was held at the home of Phili}) Bart, 
district organizer of the Conimiinist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you tell us a])i)roxiinate]y tlie time that that 
meetiug was held ? 

Mr. DiMaria. I believe that that meeting Avas held, it was during- 
the year 1947, probably in the veiy early summer or late spring. 

Mr. Tavenner. What of importance occurred at that particulai- 
meeting ? 

Mr. DiMaria, I had been advised by Dave Davis and Philip Bart 
to prepare a report on the actual work of that commission, its failures, 
its successes and its prospects for future work, to be given to the per- 
son who was in charge of that work on a national basis, within the UE. 
I did so, and I prepared such a report. 

Mr. Ta\unner. Well, was that report presented at some future 
meeting ? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, that report was presented at that meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. At that meeting? 

]\Ir. DiMaria, That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. At that meeting; in other words, prior to that meet- 
ing you had been directed to prepare this report ? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, will you be a little more specific as to what 
this report was to cover ? 

Mr. DiMaria. This report covered the activities of this conmiission, 
of the Connnunist Party, with respect to its successes and failures in 
reactivating the Connnunist Party branches within local 155, RCA, 
General Electric and Westinghouse. 

Mr, Ta^-enner. Now, you say that report was to be made to someone 
from a higher level ? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you told at that time to whom the report was 
to be made ? 

Mr. DiMaria. I was. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who was that person? 

Mr. DiMaria. Russ Nixon, legislative director of the UE. 

Mr, Tavenner. Do you loiow whether Russ Nixon is the same per- 
son as Russell Nixon ? 

Mr. DiMaria, I believe it is, 

Mr. Tavenner. Was Russell Nixon present at the time you were 
given the instructions to prepare the report? 

Mr. DiMaria. No he was not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was he present at the time the report was made and 
delivered ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes, sir; he was. 

Mr. Tavenner, Was any other person present? 

Mr. Di]\Iarta. Philip Bart, district organizer of the Communist 
Party, 

Mr. Tavenner. Did vou make the report? 

Mr. DiMaria. I did.' 

Mr, Tavenner. Was that report made to both Phil Bart and Russ 
Nixon at the same time? 

Mr. DiMaria. It was. 



4402 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr, Tavenner. At a meeting of tlie three of you ? 

Mr. DiMarta. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where was that meeting held? 

Mr. DiMaria. At the home of Pliilip Bart, district organizer of 
the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you tell us more definitely when that meeting 
was held ? I think you have already stated it, but I wanted to know 
whether 3'^on could be more definite as to the time. 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir; I cannot. Mj best recollection is that it 
was in the late spring of 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. When you were directed to prepare this report, who 
gave you those directions ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Philip Bart, district organizer of the Communist 
Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. What did he advise you about the making of the 
report, that is to whom it was to be made and the circumstances under 
wdiich it was to be made? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, as I have already answered, sir, he advised 
me to make as detailed a report as possible to be given to the person 
who was in charge of the same type of work that I was functioning 
on in this commission, only on a national basis. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is a person who was operating on a higher 
level in the Communist Party; is that what you mean? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is what I mean ; yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did he tell you at the time that Russ Nixon was 
the person to whom the report was to be made? 

Mr. DiMaria. He did. 

Mr. Tavenner. And then at the time that you were to make the 
report, I understand Euss Nixon appeared and Mr. Philip Bart was 
also there ? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, tell us what occurred when that report 
was made, and tell us the substance of the report and everything that 
occurred that you can recall. 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, I gave the report and from the facts of the re- 
port itself, the report did not speak of any great success in reactivating 
the Communist Party branches at RCA, General Electric, or Westing- 
house. The only place where the Communist Party branch had again 
been reorganized successfully was within local 155. 

Mr. Tavenner. And, of course, in that testimony, you are confining 
it to the Philadelphia area? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. And your observations from this area ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, they are the only areas, or this is the only area 
that I have any ex])erience with. 

Mr. Tavenner. I wanted to make certain that you were speaking 
only of the Philadelphia area. 

Mr. DiMaria. That is right; and when I concluded the report, it 
was discussed in detail and it was pointed out that the main weakness 
of the report dealt with the fact that local 155 was the least important 
to the Communist Party reorganization when compared with the great 
number of people who worked at General Electric, Westinghouse, or 
RCA. and therefore that more emphasis should be given to rebuilding 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4403 

the Comniiinist Party branches in tliose i)articnlar places other than 
local 155. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who pointed that out to yon ? 

Mv. DiMaria. Both Philip Bart and Rnss Nixon. 

Mr. Tavenner. What connnent, or what was the language, if you 
can recall, of Rnss Nixon in pointing- out that weakness which your 
report disclosed ? 

ISIr. DiMaria. Well, I remember specifically Rnss Nixon stating" 
that "I don't give a chamn about 155, 1 am more interested in the buikl- 
ing of the Communist ]^arty organizations in General Electric, Wes- 
tinghouse, and RCA. Unless the Communist Party is going to be 
rebuilt on a solid foundation within those three plants, then the TTE 
certaiidy Mill not be able to carry on its program and its policies in 
a correct manner and fashion within those plants." 

]\Ir. Tavenner. Is it not true that the number of persons emplo3^ed 
in those three plants you mentioned, RCA and General Electric and 
Westinghouse, numbered in the thousands? 

JNIr. DiMaria. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. That they constituted the mass organizations • 

Mr. DiMaria. Just a moment. 

(Whereupon the witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. DiMaria. Would yon repeat the question ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes; would you read it? 

(Whereupon the pending question was then read by the reporter as 
f olloAvs : "Is it not true that the nmnber of persons employed in those 
three plants you mentioned, RCA and Cjeneral Electric and Westing- 
house, numbered in the thousands?") 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is mass organizations on a large sca-le? 

]\Ir. DiMaria. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wasn't the objective of the Communist Party at 
that time, and at all times, to perfect its organization and to strengthen 
it and to colonize it in those industries where large mass organizations 
or large masses of the ])eople worked? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes, that has always been the objective of the Com- 
nninist Party. 

Mr. D0T1.E. May I have that answer of the witness where he men- 
tioned what Russ Nixoii read because I didn't catch quite the end 
of it.^ 

Mr. Tavenner. Will the reporter read it? 

(Whereupon the reporter read the applicable answer of the wit- 
ness as above recorded.) 

Mr. DiMaria. I would like to, if I may, sir, add that the purposes 
of the Communist Party being so interested in rebuilding the organi- 
zations in GE, AVestinghouse, and RCA, where great numbers of 
workers were employed, was because it gave easier access to dissemi- 
nating the propaganda of the Communist Party, and it gave easier 
access to the possibility of recruiting into the Communist Party and to 
carrying on that particular type of"activity of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Taat.nner. How long "had you known Russ Nixon? 

Mr. DiMaria. I had known of Russ Nixon ever since my association 
with the UE. However, that was the first time that I ever met with 
Russ Nixon as a member of the Communist Party. 



4404 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

jNIr. Tavenner. Was any comment made by Russ Nixon regarding; 
tlie possible effect upon the Communist organization in local 155 if 
Ihere was a failure to properly organize the Communist Party in RCA, 
Westinghouse, and General Electric? 

Mr. 1)iMaria. No, sir; I cannot specifically recall any direct com- 
ment with respect to local 155 other than that which 1 have already 
given. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the result of the making of this report? 

Mr. DiMaria. The result of the making of this re])0]'t was the re- 
organization of the connnission, and the committee was reorganized 
with different personnel. 

Mr. Tavnner. Who took pait in the decision to cause that com- 
mission to be reorganized ? 

Mr. DiMaria. That I do not know, sir. I was not party to the 
discussion which led to the reorganization of that connnission. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was that discussed by Russ Nixon and Philip Bart 
at the time that you made the report ? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, no, sir ; no ; it was not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Proceed, I interrupted you. 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, the only thing that occurred at that meeting 
is that the report was given, the weaknesses and the strength of the 
report were accepted, there was criticism of the work of the commis- 
sion up until that particular point in not having moved ahead at a 
much faster tempo; and following that discussion the meeting was 
adjourned officially and purely an informal discussion took place. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, tell us about this informal discussion. 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, I recall particularly at that meeting that Phil 
Bart began to discuss the general situation of the Communist Party 
in the United States and began to discuss the growing criticism and 
the sharp and increasing attacks upon the Communist Party in the 
United States due to its line within the United States itself. He 
pointed out the possibility that the Communist Party feared that it 
may find itself declared unconstitutional, and as a result of that fear 
it began to consider ways and means of preventing such a legislating 
out of existence of the Communist Party as such. 

(At this point Representative Francis E. Walter returned to the 
hearing room.) 

Mr. DiMaria. I gathered from the discussion that was led by Phi] 
Bart that the party was thinking in terms of organizing more tightly 
knit, more secretly, or even perhaps another organization that would 
be in a position to combat the declaring of the Conuniuiist Party as 
an unconstitutional party. It was to at least endeavor to prevent such 
laws being enacted or if such laws were enacted to endeavor for their 
repeal. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who were present during that informal conver- 
sation ? 

]VIr. DiMaria. To my best recollection, sir, Phil Bart, Russ Nixon, 
and myself. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where did that conversation take places' Was it 
at the same place of the meeting that had been held at the home of 
Phil Bart, or was it at another place ? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, it was at thai same meeting, hoAvever it was an 
informal discussion which took place after the business matter of the 
meetino; itself had been concluded. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4405 

Mr, Tavenner, Did Russ Nixon take part ill the conversation ? 

Mr. DiMaria, To the same degree that I did, and we listened and 
we made comments and questioned, but the discussion was led by Phil 
Bart and he w^as speaking mostly, I presume, from his own ideas. 

Mr. Tavenner. Prior to that time, had you received any informa- 
tion from any source that the Communist Party was planning to, or 
anything that would indicate that they were planning to, form an 
underground apparatus in this area? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir; I had not. That was the first time, to my 
knowledge, that I had heard of the Communist Party even thinking 
along such lines. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, what transpired afterward, to show that it 
was a definite plan of the Communist Party to establish an under- 
ground apparatus in this area? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, in the latter part of 1947, or the early part of 
1948, 1 do not recall specifically, there spread a rumor throughout the 
Communist Party that the functionaries of the Communist Party were 
to be apprehended and, in fact, I might add that David Davis left the 
city of Philadelphia as a result of that rumor. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know where he went ? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir ; I do not. However, the rumor proved to be 
foundless. Nonetheless, I was called to a meeting by Philip Bart and 
Josepli Kuzma, who pointed out to me that notwithstanding the fact 
that the runur pro\ ed to be baseless, the possibility that such an occur- 
rence or such an event would occur was not to be discounted. 

Therefore, he said the Communist Party was thinking in terms of 
establishing an apparatus which would have within it members of the 
Communist Party who were not too well known, with the possibility 
that those members might be able to endeavor to fight to prevent the 
illegalization of the Communist Party. 

I was advised by both Philip Bart and Joseph Kuzma to drop out 
of activities of the Communist Party, all public activity of the Com- 
munist Party, and I did so. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was that to be done immediately or was it to be 
done gradually ? 

Mr. DiMaria. It was to be done over a period of time. I was to 
stop attending Communist branch meetings and I was to cease going 
to the mass rallies of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. But were you to drop out of those meetings instan- 
taneously or gradually ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Gradually, sir, which I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. And the purpose of that was to deceive the mem- 
bers, the rank and file members of the Communist Party, do you think ? 

Mr. DiMaria. 1 would say that the purpose of that was to indicate 
that there were certain individuals who could not be identified with 
the Communist Party. At least that would be my understanding of 
why that decision was reached. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right ; if you will continue in your description of 
what occurred. 

Mr. DiMaria. For a period of time after I had dropped out of all 
activity of the Communist Party nothing happened. I didn't attend 
meetings and I wasn't approached by anyone. I didn't have any tasks 
to perform. I simply performed my duties as a local union organizer 
for the union. 



4406 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

However, during the latter part of 19J:8 I was called by Joseph 
Kiizma and he asked me to meet him in a restaurant which I did. He 
advised me that another individual had been assigned to the same type 
of activity as I had been and that the name of that person was Mike 
Fersick and that I was to begin meeting with him and discuss with him 
the work that this group could possibly perform. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you spell the last name of Mike Fersick? 

Mr. DiMaria. I don't believe I know, sir. I think it is spelled 
F-e-r-s-i-c-k. I may be wrong; I don't know, I honestly don't know. 

I want to make clear here that the purpose of this group or the rea- 
son for the organization of this group as was told to me was the fear 
by the Communist Party that it would be declared to be an unconstitu- 
tional party, and therefore it wanted to organize a group that would 
have the possibility of endeavoring to regain constitutionality for the 
Communist Party. That was the purpose of this particular grou]). 

I discussed this matter with Mike Fersick and that is all that was 
done. We had discussions concerning the possibility if that should 
occur of what we should do. 

Sometime later I was advised by Joe Kuzma, once again, that an- 
other person had been selected by the Comnnmist Party to be engaged 
in this particular group. The person's name was Jack Mondress. It 
w^as suggested to me by the Conmiunist Party that Mike Fersick meet 
with Jack Mondress and have a series of discussions with him con- 
cerning this matter and sliould Jack Mondress be willing to join this 
group that a meeting should be arranged with Jack Mondress and 
myself. That was done. 

After several meetings of Mr. Fersick with Mr. IMondress, I met 
with Jack Mondress in Hunting Park the early part of 1949 on a 
Sunday morning where we discussed the group and its possible 
activities. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you let me interrupt you there a moment. Can 
you tell me any of the particular elements that entered into your con- 
sideration of Jack Mondress as being a person suitable particularly for 
the work you anticipated doing in this secret apparatus^ 

Mr. DiMaria. I was advised by Joe Kuzma that Jack Mondress had 
been chosen for this work. What reasons went into the thinking of 
the persons with whom Joe Kuzma discussed this matter I d() not 
know, other tlian this one fact that Jack Mondress had been relatively 
inactive in the Communist Party for a ])eriod of time and it was there- 
fore felt that persons who had been inactive in the Communist Party 
would be of value in this particular group. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know^ what his occupation was at that time ? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir ; I do not know. I believe that he drove a 
laundry truck, but I may be wrong; I understood that that was his 
occupation. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether or not, or have you at any 
time since his selection heard, that his occupation of driving a laundry 
truck fit in particularly well with the plans of your apparatus in the 
event of difficulty ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes; I was informed to that effect by Joe Kuzma 
that that was important to this group to have someone with mobility 
who would be able to get around to the various parts of the city and, 
if need be, by using a laundry truck or whatever means of transporta- 
tion 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IX THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4407 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you give iis finy further ideutificution of Jack 
Mondress? By the way, I don't believe his name has been spelled into 
tlie record. Will you spell it. 

Mr. DiMaria. I believe it is M-o-n-d-r-e-s-s. 

No, sir; there isn't any other further identification I could give of 
Mr, INIondress other than I believe at one time he Avas active in the 
Teamsters' Union and led a fight in the Teamsters' Union against the 
introduction into the constitution of a clause stating that Communists 
could not hold office in the Teamsters' Union. I understand that he 
led quite a struggle against that clause being introduced into the 
constitution. Other than that, I did not know of Mr. Mondress' 
activity. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was he successful in that fight ; do you know ? 

Mr, DiMaria. I do not believe so. 

Mr. Tavenner. During the period that you were a member of this 
secret apparatus of the party here in Philadelphia, did you have 
occasion to handle any funds of the Connnunist Party ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes, sir ; I did, 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Will you tell us about that, please. 

Mr. DiMaria. I was advised by Joe Kuzma that it would be neces- 
sary for me to house funds for the Communist Party. He advised 
me to obtain a safety-deposit box where such moneys would properly 
be stored. From time to time he gave me various sums of money to 
be placed within the safety-deposit box. 

Mr. Ta\-enner, IVliat was the source of those funds ? 

Mr. DiMaria, Communist Partj^ funds. 

Mr. Tavenner, Wliat was the most that you had at any one time ? 

Mr, DiMaria, $3,800. 

Mr. Walter. Where did the funds come from ? 

Mr. DiMarla. I was given the funds by Joseph Kuzma. 

Mr. Walter. Was it dues, money from the sale of periodicals, or 
how was the money raised ? 

Mr. DiMaria. That I do not know, sir. I would assume that it was 
raised within the Communist Party. 

Mr. Walter. In this area ? 

Mr. DiMaria, I would assume from this area. 

Mr. Walter. Did you ever have any reason to believe that any of 
the money had been transferred here from New York ? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir ; I did not. I was not advised so. 

Mr, Walter. All right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were any of these funds used by you or any other 
members of this group personally ? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was this safety-deposit box used at any time as a 
})ersonal box by you, or, in other words, were personal effects or money 
of your own placed in the box ? 

Mr, DiMaria, No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. It was used solely 

]\Ir. DiMaria. Just a moment. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

]\Ir. Tavenner. I don't know if you understood the last question. 

Mr. DiIMaria. No, sir; I did not. 

25241—52 8 



4408 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you use this particular safety-deposit box for 
any funds of your own or of any other individual as distinguished 
from the Communist Party? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir; 1 did not. It was strictly the money that 
was given to me by the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. In what denominations was this money turned over 
to you and how frequently ? 

Mr. DiMarl^. Well, I was given money by Joe Kuzma from time 
to time, usually in the amounts of $200, $250, or $500. Many times 
the amounts of money varied, and the times that he would give me 
such money varied. 

Mr. Tavenner. Our investigation in California disclosed that the 
Communist Party secured tremendous sums from Communist Party 
members connected in one way or another with the moving-picture 
industry — that is, screen writers and others — and, in fact, that they 
paid as much as 4 percent of the tremendous salaries they received 
into the coffers of the Communist Party, and that that money was 
sent to New York. 

Did you ever receive information that any of the funds could have 
originated in California which were turned over to you ? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir ; I did not. I was never advised as to where 
the funds were derived from. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. What disposition was made of the funds? 

Mr. DiMaria. I was informed by Joe Kuzma to place the fu.nds in 
the safety-deposit box. However, some time later I was advised by Joe 
Kuzma that another person also was going to be involved in this group. 
That person was Abe Sokolov. I was told by Joe Kuzma that that 
mone}^ should either be turned over to Abe Sokolov or remain in the 
safety-deposit box. I received money from both Mr. Sokolov and Mr. 
Kuzma. I was instructed whether or not to place that money in 
the box or to give it to either one of those two persons, which I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, when you gave it to either of those two per- 
sons, do you know for what purpose it was used ? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir ; I do not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you given any receipt or record of any kind 
to show that you had given it ? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir ; I was not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you give any receipt or make any record of the 
amount of money you received and from whom ? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir; I did not. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the number of the safety-deposit box 
which you used? 

Mr. DiMaria. I believe it was 1-444. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you a batch of photostatic copies of en- 
trance lickets bearing the signature or purported signature of Samuel 
DiMaria, beginning with June 23, 1949, and ending with May 14, 
1951, numbering 20 in all. Will you examine them and state whether 
or not those entrance tickets were signed by you and that you did 
enter the box on the occasions mentioned on those tickets? 

Mr. DiMaria. These are my signatures on the entrance slips to the 
safety-deposit box. 

Mr. Tavenner. That indicates that you had access to the box on 
the dates indicated ? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4409 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer tliem in evidence as a batxh and 
mark them "Philadelphia Exhibit No. 3." 

Mr. Walter. It will be marked and received. 

(The documents above referred to, marked "Philadelphia Exhibit 
Xo. 3," are filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavenner. You spoke of a person by the name of Abe Sokolov 
as bein<»; one of those who paid money to you and to whom you paid 
money out of this box. Do you know if Abe Sokolov was known by 
another name ? 

Mr. DiMaria. I believe he was also known as Ed Sol way. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was your first contact with Abe Sokolov? 

Mr. DlMaria. I was informed by Joe Kuzma that Mr. Sokolov had 
been designated to be in charge of this particular group in the Phila- 
delphia area. I was further informed by Mr. Kuzma that I would 
receive a call from Mr. Sokolov, which I did. Mr. Sokolov asked me 
to meet him again at a restaurant where we had a discussion concern- 
ing the purposes of this group. At that time Mr. Sokolov arranged 
with me the possibility of future meetings, and we designated a 
restaurant for our future meetings where questions concerning our 
activities in this group would be discussed. 

Mr. Tavenner. How did you first become acquainted with Joe 
Kuzma ? 

Mr. DiMaria, I knew Joe Kuzma as the trade-union secretary of 
the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where did he reside ? 

Mr. DiMaria. In Philadelphia. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether or not he lived at Easton, 
Pa., at any time? 

Mr. DiMaria. I do not know. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know where he is now ? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir; I don't. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, a subpena has been issued for Mr. 
Kuzma, but he has not been found. 

Wlien was the last time that you saw Joe Kuzma ? 

Mr. DiMaria. The latter part of 1950. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, let me at this time ask you to proceed with 
your description of the activities of this underground apparatus of 
which you, Joe Kuzma, Ed Sol way or Abe Sokolov, and Jack Mondress 
were members. 

Mr. DiMaria. There isn't much else to report, sir, other than the 
fact that we would have meetings and discuss various questions con- 
cerning the purposes to which we understood that this particular group 
had been organized. 

It was my understanding that this particular group was organized 
for the purposes of fighting to maintain the constitutionality of the 
Communist Party, and, further, should the Communist Party be de- 
clared unconstitutional, that this group was to be in a position to issue 
leaflets or agitate within mass organizations for the repeal of what- 
ever legislation led to the illegalization of the Communist Party as 
such. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you ever given any equipment of anv char- 
acter? 

Mr. DiMaria. I was given a mimeograph machine by Joe Kuzma 
to be turned over to Mike Fersick. 



4410 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavenner. How was tliat mimeograph machine to be used 
and under what circumstances? 

Mr. DiMaria. That mimeograph machine was to be used in the 
event the Communist Party was declared unconstitutional. 

Mr. Tavexner. Did you deliver it to Mike Fersick ? 

Mr. DiMaeia. I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. AVhen ? 

Mr. DiMaria. In the spring of 1949. 

Mr. Tavexner. Do you know to Avhat group of the Communist Party 
Mike Fersick belonged ? 

Mr. DiMaria. I believe at that time that Mike Fersick belonged 
to the gi-oup of the Communist Party in northeast Philadelphia. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know what official position he had within 
the Communist Party ? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir ; I do not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was he a member of the underground apparatus 
to your knowledge ? 

Mr. DiMaria. No. I had been advised by Joe Kuzma that Mike 
Fersick was to be used or was to be involved in this work for the 
specific purpose of transmitting messages from one person to another. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, he was to be a courier ? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did he make any recommendations regarding other 
persons who should be brought into the underground movement ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Mike Fersick, you mean ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. DiMaria. We discussed certain people whom Mike Fersick 
kneAV, and those names were rejected by Joe Kuzma and Mr. Sokolov 
as not to be engaged in this activity. 

Mr. Tavenner. What final disposition was made of the safety- 
dejDOsit box which you handled ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, sir, if I may, I would like to take the oppor- 
tunity at this time to point out that wlien I was involved in this work 
I did not discuss it with anyone with the exception of Thomas 
Delaney. 

At that time both Mr. Delaney and myself were discussing ways 
and means of dropping out of the Communist Party. To me, at 
least, this particular work that I was involved in afforded me an 
opi)ortunity not to be active whatever in Communist Party work, 
and therefore I stayed in it. 

However, in the spring of 1951, at a meeting which I had with Mr. 
Sokolov, I was advised by Mr. Sokolov of the possibility that this 
particular group may be called upon or might be called upon to en- 
gage in a different type of activity. 

1 was informed by Mr. Sokolov that there had been consideration 
of this group's activity in the event of hostilities between the United 
States and the Soviet Union. I was informed that in that event 
leaflets should be distributed advising the American people that such 
a war was opposed to the best national interests of the American 
people. 

I was informed, further, that the Comnninist Party believed that 
should such a war come to be — which I certainly hope does not and I 
believe that everybody in this room certainly hopes does not — the 
authorities would apprehend all known Communists; and, therefore, 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4411 

those Commimists who were not apprehended were to be organized 
in a group for the carrying out of such opposition to the general 
warfare. 

In addition, it was pointed out to me that this group might be called 
upon to hinder the war effort of the United States, especially in the 
trade-union movement, by slowdowns, strikes, or whatever may be. 

AVhen Mr. Sokolov informed me of these possibilities for which this 
group was organized, I informed Mr. Sokok)v that I certainly did 
not want any part of such activities. Tlie first time this matter was 
brought to my attention, that 1 as a member of the Connnunist Party 
miglit be called upon to engage in activities which were detrimental 
to your country and mine in the event of war between the Soviet 
Union and the United States, I informed Mr. Sokolov at that specific 
moment that I was resigning from that group and I was resigning 
from the Communist Party as such. 

After my statement Mr. S()k()h)V advised me that the funds which 
were still in my ])ossession nuist be turned over to him forthwith. The 
following morning I did obtain tliose funds from the safety-deposit 
box, and I turned those funds over to ]Mr. Sokolov. Tliat was the last 
time that I met Mr. Sokolov, and that was the last time that I ever met 
with Mr. Mondress, Mr. Fersick, or Mr. Kumza. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, when you found that the plan of 
the underground apparatus was to hinder any war effort that might 
be to tlie interests of this country in this very important defense area, 
you severed your connection with tlie Communist Party ? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Tavenxer. Did you ascertain from your experience in the Coni- 
numist Party that there were other groups of a similar nature which 
would sabotage the defense effort of this country and important in- 
dustries here in Pliihidelpliia? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, sir, again I can answer only from my experi- 
fTices in the Communist Party. I had been advised, however, that 
such organizations of which I had been a part were in the process of 
organization in other sections of the city of Philadelphia. 

Mr. Tavexner. Did you at any time ascertain any information re- 
lating to similar activities of the Communist Party in other defense 
areas of the count ry ? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir; I did not. I was one member of this par- 
ticular group, and my information dealt specifically with this par- 
ticular grou}). 

Mr. Tavex'^xer. This would be a convenient place for a break if it 
is satisfactory with the committee. 

^Ir. Walter. The connnittee will stand in recess for 10 minutes. 

(A 10-minute recess was taken.) 

]\fr. Walter. We will proceed. 

Mr. Tavex^x'er. Mr. DiMaria, was there any occasion when you gave 
any part of the funds from the safety-deposit box to Jack IVIondress 
that you recall? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir ; there was not. 

Mr. Ta\tnxer. Did you ever give Jack Mondress any sum of money ? 

Mr. DiMaria. I was advised by Joe Kuzma to give to Jack Mon- 
dress $500 for him to keep and to be turned over only to me. 

Mr. Tavenxer. Did you give it to him ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes ; I did. 



4412 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IX THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavenner. Was that money from tliis safety-deposit box? 

Mr. DiMaria. No, sir; it was money which was given to me for the 
specific purpose of giving to Jack Mondress. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know what disposition Jack Mondress made 
of the $500? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes, sir; he returned that money to me which I 
returned to Mr. Sokolov. 

Mr. Taa'enner. Now, did the Communist Party interest itself in 
the activities of the Communist Party in Greece in any way ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes, sir, it did ; to the extent tliat I was given a type- 
vrritten document consisting of two or three pages of material which 
dealt with the work of the Communist Party in Greece. I was ad- 
vised by Mr. Sokolov to discuss the contents of this document with 
Mr. Mondress and then to return it to him, which I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the purpose in giving that statement to 
you ; do you know ? 

Mr. DiMaria. To acquaint the members of this group with the 
security needed to be exercised by the members of the Communist 
Party when the possibility of the Communist Party being unconsti- 
tutional or an illegal organization presented itself. 

Mr. Tavenner. I do not know whether I have given you an oppor- 
tunity to tell the committee just how the Communist Party functioned 
in connection with your local 155, UE. To what extent did the Com- 
munist Party exert an influence or control over the conduct of the 
business of local 155 or the election of its officers ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Prior to the membership meetings and executive 
board meetings of local 155, there would be a meeting of the Com- 
munist branch within local 156 where the political questions to be 
raised on the floor of the local were discussed. Further, speakers 
were appointed on certain particular subjects and persons were desig- 
nated to make a motion on a particular subject or second a motion on a 
particular subject. 

Prior to elections in the local, or rather prior to the nominations in 
the local which took place under the constitution and bylaws of the 
local during the month of November, a meeting of the Communist 
branch would be held where discussions would take place concerning 
possible candidates and their being placed in nomination. 

Mr. TA^^CNNER. Well, did that plan result in an effective control of 
the I^E v.hile 5^ou were a member; that is, of local 155? 

Mr. Dii\lARiA. Yes, it did, with respect to the political questions 
which came up on the floor of the mesting, with respect to the passage 
of resolutions which came up on tlie floor of the meeting and with 
respect to officers who Vv ere elected by the local. It did exercise consid- 
erable control over the processes of the local. 

Mr. Tavenner. Nou', did local 155 take action on matters of foreign 
relations between tlie United States and other countries while you 
were a member ? 

Mr. DijyiARiA. Yes, it did. 

Mr. Tavenner. What iiiter^st did tlie organization of the union — 
that is, local 155 — have in foreign relations ? Possibly I haven't stated 
the question clearly. Wliat interest did local 155— that is, the rank 
and file members of the union — have in the promotion of various prin- 
ciples affecting the foreign relations of this country other than those 
which came down to it from the Communist Party,' if any? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4413 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, I would answer that this way, sir: That the 
control of the Connnnnist Party in local 155 invariably assisted the 
membership in takin^^ action against its own natiojial interests in this 
sense — that local 155 passed a resolution condemning the Marshall 
plan, local 155 passed many resolutions condemning the Atlantic Pact, 
and local 155 passed other resolutions of a similar nature. These 
resolutions were certainly not detrimental to tlie policies and to the 
program of the Communist l*arty. 

Mr. Walter. As a matter of fact, the oflicial position of the union 
was taken because of the dictation it received from the Communist 
Party ? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did the rank and file membership understand that 
its policy and its resolutions were being initiated and dictated by the 
Communist Party '( 

Mr. DiMaria. I believe it did, sir. That is why certain events took 
place in local 155, UE, in jMay of 195'2. I certainly believe that it was 
the resentment of the membership against the continuing policy of the 
Communist Party within that orgaiiization to continually condemn 
legislation adopted on behalf of and in the interests of the United 
States while not criticizing any actions taken by the Communist Party 
of any other land. 

Mr. Doyle. May I ask this : Approximately when did the memlier- 
ship in local 155 to which you refer as coming to realize that the 
Communist line was controlling their union, about when did that 
happen ? Do you understand my question ? In other words, approxi- 
mately when did the membership in local 155 become aware of the 
fact that the Communist line was controlling their resolutions? In 
other words, about wdiat year, if I may make my question clear? 

Mr. DiMaria. I would say, sir, that in 1946 there was a concerted 
effort to break the hold of the Connnnnist Party on local 155. How- 
ever, the efforts of those forces were defeated by the Communist Party 
which was able to mobilize the membership to support the present 
leadership. 

The same sort of a struggle occurred again in 1947, but again the 
forces which opposed the leadership of local 155 who were members 
of the Communist Party were defeated. 

In 1949 when the UE was expelled from the CIO because of Com- 
mmiist domination, again there was a concerted effort by a group of 
members within the local to break the hold of the Communist Party. 
That proved unsuccessful, and as a result many of the shops which 
previously were in local 155 left the I^E and ioined again with the 
CIO. J - 

Again in 1952 there was a concerted effort to break the hold of the 
Communist Party in local 155. Here again the Communist Party 
was successful in preventing their elimination from leadership com- 
pletely, and as a result of the events of 1952 a substantial group of 
the membership of local 155 left the UE and went back into the CIO. 

Mr. Doyle. Thank you. 

Mr. Taa^nner. Do you consider that the Communist Party has 
made very strenuous efforts to control UE through the course of the 
years ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, sir, I might state this: My experiences in UE 
were primarily with local 155. I had very little experience with the 



4414 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IX THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

UE nationally. I did not serve in any capacity other than local 
nnion organizer of local 155. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, why was it, if you know, that the Comnmnist 
Party did make such a consistent fight to control local 155 of the UE 
of which you were a member ? 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, I might state, sir, that the reason the Com- 
munist Party made such a concerted effort to control the policies of 
local 155 was to present a picture within the trade-union movement 
to the American people that the membership of the trade-union move- 
ment opposed much of the legislation which w^as being ])assed in Wash- 
ington and much of the legislation which dealt witli a foreign-policy 
nature. 

Also, I would say that the same direction was in UE, because I did 
attend a convention of the UE where certain resolutions were placed 
on the floor and passed by the UE. 

I would state further that certainly there is always a concerted effort 
by the Communist Party to direct the policies of a union because when 
it does it finds easy access to disseminate its propaganda and to sell its 
literature. Also, it finds access to the ])ossible recruiting of additional 
members to the Comnmnist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliat is the importance to the Communist Party to 
recruit members, say in areas or in grou]is, such as the community 
groups or the street groups of the Communist Party? 

Mr. DiMaria. To direct the activities of community groups or 
neiahborhood groups. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do those groups also form the nucleus of a training 
area for the Communist Partv? 

Mr. DiMaria. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Could the Communist Party function in the United 
States in an efficient manner in the underground apparatus which you 
have described if it were not supported morally, financially, and in 
other ways by the rank and file members of the Communist Party 
cells? ^ 

Mr, DiMaria. No, sir; I do not believe it could function without the 
assistance, financially and organizationally, of the individual members 
of the Communist Party. 

However, I do believe that the security measures which the Com- 
munist Party has taken have lessened its efficienc}^ and have lessened 
the opportunities for it, the Communist Party, to present its views 
either by voice or by printed materials. I believe the security measures 
taken have lessened its opportunity to recruit new members. I also 
believe they have lessened the opportunity for the Communist Party 
to raise funds necessary for its organizational work. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, you have told us of the statement made to you 
by Joe Kuzma of using the underground apparatus in the event of a 
conflict between this country and some other country 

Mr. DiMaria. I was advised, sir, bv Mr. Sokolov. 

Mr. Tavenner. By Mr. Sokolov? 

Mr. DiMaria. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, during your experience in the Communist 
Party, did you learn of any special allegiance that the Communist 
Party owed to any country, that is, the Communist Party of the United 
States owed to any organization or any countrv outside of the United 
States? 



COIMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4415 

Mr. DiMaiua My iiiidei'staii(rni<2: of the Coninuiiiist Paitv was (hat 
the alle*»:iaiice of a Communist in America was to America. However, 
I further understood that communism is a w^orld-wide movement and 
therefore, necessarily. Communists in America or m China or in South 
America should aline themselves with each other; but my understand- 
ing, sir, of the Communist Party was that the allegiance of a Com- 
munist was to America, and certainly their allegiance was to the Soviet 
Union as well. 

]Mr. Tavexner. Well, in the event of a conflict between the United 
States and the Soviet Union, where would one owe his allegiance if 
he were a true member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. DiMaria, Well, sir, I would state that each member of the 
Connnunist Party would have to answer that question for himself. 
That question was asked of me and I answered it in my fashion accord- 
ing to my experiences and beliefs, but I don't believe that I could 
answer for all of the members of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavexner. Well, in w-hat w^ay was that question put to you? 

Mr. DiMaria. The question that w^as put to me was that there might 
be a possibility that the group which I was associated with might be 
called upon to carry out certain activities which, in my opinion, were 
absolutely detrimental to the American people and to the American 
workingman. In all of my experiences in the trade-union movement 
I have w^orked very hard to endeavor to raise the standard of living 
of the American worker. I believe very deeply in the free, democratic 
trade-union movement. 

As long as I found it possible to carry out those objectives and re- 
main a member of the Communist Party I did, in my opinion — and I 
think that my record as an organizer, sir, will speak for itself — but 
when it was presented to me that I might have to engage in certain 
activities which would be detrimental to those interests of the member- 
ship which I had represented for certain years, I refused to be a 
party to them. That is why I broke my connections with the Com- 
munist Party. 

Now. individual Communists will have to make that decision for 
themselves. 

Mr. Walter. Do I gather from wdiat you say that anybody who at 
this moment has not broken with the Communist Party feels that he 
owes his allegiance to a foreign power and not to the United States? 

Mr. DiIVIaria. That, sir, I could not answer. It is possible that 
many Communists do feel that they owe their first allegiance to the 
Soviet Union, but, on the other hand, I believe that there are many 
Communists who will place their allegiance to America above and 
beyond any allegiance as a Communist. 

Mr. Walter. I hope that those people will read the testimony that 
has been adduced here today, and if they do they will certainly learn 
a lesson from your experience, and the membership of the Communist 
Party, USiV, will dwindle to nothing within hours. 

Mr. DiMaria. Sir, I might like to point out, if I may, that it cer- 
tainly has not been a happy experience for me to testify before this 
committee today. However, if there are other members of the Com- 
munist Party who as a result of my testimony drop out of the Com- 
munist Party, then possibly, to myself at least, it will have meaning. 

Ml-. Walter. I am sure if anyone has any regard at all for the 



4416 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

United States, that is, any American Communist, and reads your tes- 
timony, he will be compelled to do ju.st exactly what you have done. 

Go ahead, Mr. Tavenner. 

Mr. Tavenner. I think the story of yonr experience as you have 
narrated it has demonstrated clearly how and why you ^ot out of the 
Communist Party. I want to ask you if your termination of your 
connection with the Communist Party is final and complete. 

Mr. DiMaria. It is absolutely final and complete and was in the 
spring of 1951. 

Mr. Tavenner. If there is anythino; you desire to rdd p.boi^t your 
reasons for leavino- the party, I would be very p:l;.d to ^>ive you this 
opportunity to state them. 

Mr. DiMaria. Well, I would like to add just this, that it is not a 
simple matter for any person who has been a member of an oroaniza- 
tion to suddenly arrive at the conclusion that the years that were spent 
in that oroanization have been fruitless and wasted. 

I joined the Communist Party in a period of time when — I would 
like to ^ive you one illustration — I was desperately seekin^j employ- 
ment in the late IDoO's. My son was about a year old and all he had to 
drink, which was provided by relief, was a half a pint of milk a day. 
1 couldn't ^et a job anywhere. I sought employment all over. I 
walked in any direction for a job. 

Allien I was presented with views that there was a possibility of 
doing away with iniemployment and that there was a possibility of 
doing away with many of the social injustices of our time, I thought 
that that was something good to fight for. I joined the Communist 
Party as a result of those thoughts. 

As a member of the Communist Party I have learned that those are 
not the objectives of the Communist Party because it is only in 
such times that the Communist Party grows and recruits thousands 
of new members. The Communist Party grows on the after effects 
of war. The Communist Party grows out of hunger. 

I think that the best method of combating conmiunism and the 
Communist Party is by the passage of l)road social legislation to in.sure 
the flourishing of American democracy. 

I believe, further, sir, that the American people will agree that the 
trade-union movement, the free, democratic trade-union movement is 
a vital necessity to the workingman to improve his standard of living 
and to improve his basic working conditions. 

I think that in the area of debate, and the arena of debate within 
the American trade-union movement, that the Connnunists will be 
exposed for what they are. I have seen that take place in local 155. 
I have seen the struggle of the honest, free American trade-unionist 
put up against the control of the Communist Party; and I see that 
they are winning in that struggle because at this moment I see only the 
decline and the destruction of the UE, not because it was not a big- 
union and a good union, because it was. It is simply because the 
Conununist Party has subverted it to its own interests as against tlie 
best interests of the members of that union. 

That is about all I have to say. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Walter. Any questions, Mr. Doyle ? 

Mr. DoTLE. I wish to compliment you, Mr. DiMaria, on your com- 
ing and cooperating with this committee voluntarily. I know from 



COMMUXIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4417 

what other witnesses have said yesterday and the day before here 
in Philadelphia, that certain of them said before this committee they 
felt that people who refused to claim their constitutional privilege 
allegedly were stool-pigeons and the lowest form of life. I, never- 
theless, wish to compliment you very earnestly and sincerely for tak- 
nig the position you have taken. I know it was not easy. 

But as I have seen witnesses before this committee here in Phila- 
<lelphia and in California and other places, by and large, the dif- 
ference between you as a witness and most of the witnesses who have 
claimed their constitutional privileges, is that too many of the people 
who have claimed the constitutional privilege are still active in the 
Communist Party. They have not made a choice like you have made. 

Some of those people know that the Communist Party, as told you 
by Sokolov, according to your testimony as I understand it, would 
expect you to participate in strikes and slow-downs in the event of a 
war between our Nation and Soviet Russia. Some of the witnesses 
who have come before this committee have chosen to hide the fact 
that the Communist Party in America is dedicated to strikes and 
slow-downs in national defense in the event of a war between our 
country and Russia. 

You. on the other hand, have chosen to place your loyalty to the 
United States of America first, as distinguished from them. I wish 
to compliment you. 

Perhaps it is only fair for me to say this : As my colleagues know I 
have just recently returned from Japan, Korea, Okinawa, Formosa, 
Kwajalein, Wake, and other places, and in conferences with Amer- 
ican intelligence officers over there they unanimously told me that 
the policy of the Communist Party in the United States advocating 
strikes and slow-downs, as you have testified, Mr. DiMaria, clearly 
emanated from the Soviet Union and that there is an international 
conspiracy, a world conspiracy. That is what you have designated 
as world communism. It is nothing less when you take its fake face 
off but an international conspiracy to use force and violence to over- 
throw the American form of government. 

Today you have given, sir, concrete and incontravertible evidence 
to that fact when you testified as you did about what Sokolov told you, 
that you would be expected to do those things. I want to compliment 
you, that the first time you learned that is what your duty would 
be as an undergTOimd member, on your resigning rather than becom- 
ing a traitor to your country. 

For my book if it isn't traitorous condTict, if a man isn't a traitor 
who advocates the instituting of strikes and slow-downs in American 
war production in the event of a difficulty with a foreign nation, if 
that isn't being a traitor, what is ? 

I am also convinced, and I have enough evidence before me as a 
lawyer and as a member of the committee, to be aware of the fact that 
the Communist Party in our Nation is dedicated, with its top leader- 
ship and its underground leadership, to the forceful overthrow of 
our form of government. 

I want to compliment you again and I wish you well. 

Mr. DiMaria. Thank you, sir. 

Mr. Doyle. I hope as a result of Mr. Di]\raria's coming before this 
committee voluntarily that other men and women — there may be some 



4418 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

in this room, I want to repeat it, there may be some in this room- 
will come forward and place the United States of America ahead of 
initiating strikes and hindering production of war materials in the 
event of a conflict — God forbid — if one comes. 

I want to invite the people of America to place their Nation foremost 
and to come on and clean np and help America be stronger than ever 
as a result of helping our national security defend itself against the 
program of initiating strikes and slow-downs of production as testi- 
fied to by Mr. DiMaria. 

Thank you very much, again, Mr. DiMaria. 

Mr. DiMaria. Thank you, sir. 

Mr. Walter. Mr. DiMaria, I join my colleague in congratulating 
you on this display of intestinal fortitude. During the course of your 
testimony you mentioned the names of a number of people. In con- 
formity with the practice of this conmiittee, the acting chairman ex- 
tends to everyone of those persons an invitation to give his name to 
the committee clerk so that he may have the opportunity to either deny 
what you have said, deny your testimony, or to make an explanation 
of it. 

I don't feel very confident that this invitation will be accepted by 
many, but there have been occasions when people have put the interests 
of this Republic ahead of other interests and have come forward and 
have given to the investigators of this committee very valuable infor- 
mation. 

I think you have made a great contribution to the security of Amer- 
ica and I am sure that one of the results of your testimony will be that 
many people will feel ashamed of themselves not having realized 
before this that they were innocent dupes, innocent or otherwise, of a 
foreign power. 

Is there any reason wdiy this witness can't be excused? 

Mr. Tavenner. No, sir. 

Mr. Walter. The witness is excused with the thanks of the com- 
mittee. 

Will you call your next witness. 

Mr. Tavenner. I will call Mr. Abe Sokolov, 

Mr. Longstreth. I am the attorney for Abe Sokolov and I am now 
presenting to you his protest about being called to testify before just 
two members of the Committee on un-American Activities because 
the statute that punishes a person for not testifying requires 

Mr. Walter. What is your name ? 

Mr. LoNGSTRETH. My name is Walter C. Longstreth. 

Mr. Walter. This man isn't being com])elled to testify to anything. 
He is here in compliance with a subpena and we trust that he will give 
this arm of your Government whatever information the committee 
counsel feels he is able to give us. This is not a trial, and you should 
know that as a member of the bar. 

Mr. Longstreth. His protest is against being required to testify 
before just two members of the House Committee which consists of 9 
members, because the Penal Code that punishes a man for not testifying 
says that he is to be punished if he does not testify before either 
Houses of Con.gress or any committe thereof and does not require 
him to testify before any subcommittee thereof. 

Mr. Walter. I think that you are mistaken about that. If you 
will look at the statute under which this committee was created, you 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4419 

will find the authority extends to hearings before a subcommittee 
of the full conunittee. 

Mr. LoNGSTRETii. Now, I have made a protest that he is not re- 
quired to, and if you overrule his protest, then under compulsion 
he will testify. 

Do you overrule my protest ? 

JNlr. Walter. We make no ruling at all. If you are attacking the 
validity of these proceedings, there is a place in which to do that and 
this is not the place. 

Mr. LoNGSTRETii. I liave told him he doesn't have to testify unless 
you overrule his protest. 

jNIr. Waeter. This isn't the forum in which to attack the validity 
of these proceedings. 

Mr. LoNosTRETH. But the Supreme Court in the case of Helen R. 
Bryan said that it is required to have a majority of the whole com- 
mittee, and the only reason that she was not defended there was 
because she refused to make a protest at the beginning. 

Mr. Walter. Let the record show that a protest has been filed 
and the Chair rules that this is not the place to raise the objection 
that was raised. 

Mr. Sokolov, will you stand and be sworn, please. 

Do 3^ou solemnly swear the evidence you give this committee shall 
be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you 
God? 

Mr. SoKOLOV. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF ABE SOKOLOV, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 
WALTER C. LONGSTRETH 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your name, please, sir ? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. Abe Sokolov. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you used or been known by any other name? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. I am applying my privilege under the Constitution 
and the fifth amendment of our Constitution and refuse to answer 
that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever used the name Ed Solway or have 
you been known by that name ? 

Mr. Sokolov. I refuse to answer for the same reason. 

Mr. Beale. Speak a little louder, please, we can't hear. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born, Mr. Sokolov ? 

Mr. Sokolov. I was born in Ukrainia in 1903. 

Mr. Doyle. Mr. Sokolov, will you speak up a little louder so we can 
hear you up here, please ? I didn't hear that answer. 

Mr. Sokolov. I w^as born in Ukrainia in 1903. 

]Mr. LoN(!STRETir. Mr. Chairman, it is very disconcerting to my 
<'lient to be photographed during his testimony, and I now ask you 
to ])rotect him against this unfair treatment of being photographed 
while he is being examined. 

Mr. Walter. I haven't heard him protest against it. 

Mr. Lonostretii. Do you protest? 

Mv. Sokolov. I do. 

Mr. Doyle. There is a constitutional provision in our own Consti- 
tution which provides for the freedom of the press. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did you come to this country, Mr. Sokolov? 



4420 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. SoKOLov. I refuse to answer for the same reason. 
Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, I can see no reason in the world why 
the witness should fear criminal prosecution in a truthful answer to 
a question of that kind, and I suggest that he be directed to answer 

the question unless he can show some reason 

Mr Walter. Do you feel that to answer that question might expose 
you to a criminal prosecution either for perjury or because of the 
answer itself ? 

Mr. ScKOLOv. May I consult my attorney, please? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. SoKOLOv. Well, I do feel that it would involve me and I refuse 
to answer, 

Mr. W^alter. Will you speak a little louder. 

Mr. SoKOLOv. I do feel that it would involve me and I refuse to 
answer on the same basis. 

Mr. Walter. The Chair directs you to answer the question. 

Mr. LoNGSiTJETH. I have advised him that he is relieved from the 
necessity. 

Mr. Walter. I am not concerned with your advice. I know what 
it is because I have sat in so many of these hearings throughout the 
Nation, so I know what your advice is. But we are waiting for his 
answer, not yours. 

Mr. SoKOLOv. I will answer under protest. 

Mr. Tavenner. Please answer. 

Mr. LoNGSTRETH. Now, I made a protest against this thing and I 
read a decision of our courts throwing out the proceedings where the 
court did allow that photograph and I say it is very unfair of you. 
Congressman Walter, to permit that sort of thing. 

Mr. Walter. Now I have been accused of being unfair before and 
I always consider the source, and it makes very little impression on me. 

Now, these photographers, I didn't know they were going to take 
the picture. I would like to admonish you of the rules of the com- 
mittee not to take pictures when the witness is testifying. 

What is your answer to that question ? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. Will you repeat the question again? 

(Whereupon, the pending question was read as follows : "When did 
you come to this country, Mr. Sokolov?") 

Mr. Tavenner. When did you come to the United States ? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. In 1921. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you a naturalized citizen of the United States ? 

Mr. SoKOLov. I am a citizen of the United States, derivative citizen- 
ship. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, then, let us have your father's name. 

Mr. SoKOLOV. I refuse to answer on the basis of my rights under the 
fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did you receive your citizenship through your 
father? 

Mr. SoKOLOV. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, then, let us have your father's name. 

Mr. SoKOLOV. My father's name is Louis Sokolov. 

Mr. Tavenner. How do you spell the last name? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. S-o-k-o-l-o-v. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where was he naturalized ? 

Mr. SoKOLOV. In the city of Philadelphia. 



COMJVIUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4421 

Mr. Tavenner. When? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. In 1922. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you give the committee, please, a resume of 
your educational background? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. Evening school and 2 years of college education. 

Mr. TA^T.NNER. Where? 

Mr. SoKOLov. Philadelphia. 

Mr. Tavenner. What school? 

Mr. SoKOLov. Temple University. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did you complete the 2 years" work at Temple 
University? 

Mr. SoKOLov. In 1926. 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you now employed ? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. I have a store ; self-employed, store. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where? 

Mr. SoKOLOV. In Frankfort. 

Mr. Tavenner. Frankfort, Pa.? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. P'rankfort, Philadelphia. 

Mr. TA^^:NNER. Frankfort, Philadelphia? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you been engaged in that business ? 

Mr.SoKOLOv. About 2 or 3 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Prior to that time, how were you employed? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. I refuse to answer on the basis of incrimination. 

Mr. Tavenner. Over how long a period of time were you engaged 
in work of a character which you say to testify truthfully about might 
tend to incriminate you ? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. I am sorry; I apply my privilege under the fifth 
amendment and refuse to answer this question. 

Mr. Walter. You might refresh his recollection by telling him what 
he was doing. That might be a more direct way to get at it, Mr. 
Counsel. 

Mr. Tavenner. No, Mr. Chairman, I don't believe I could go quite 
that far. I am not certain, however, that the witness has understood 
my question. 

You have stated that your employment prior to 1926 was of a 
character which you would refuse to testify about because to do so 
might tend to incriminate you. I meant to say 1946. How were you 
employed in 1945 ? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. I refuse to answer on the same basis. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. 1944? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. The same. 

Mr. Tavenner. 1943? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. The same. 

Mr. Tavenner. 1942? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. The same. 

Mr. Tavenner. 1941? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. The same. 

Mr. Tav-enner. 1940? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. The same. 

Mr. Tavenner. 1939? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. The same reason. 

Mr. Tavenner. 1938? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. The same. . 



4422 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavenner. 1937? 
Mr. SoKOLOv. The same reason. 
Mr. Tavenner. 1936? 
Mr. SoKOLOv. The same reason. 
Mr. Tavenner. 1935? 
Mr. SoKOLOv. The same reason. 
Mr. Tavenner. 1934? 
Mr. SoKOLOv. The same. 
Mr. Tavenner. 1933? 
Mr. SoKOLOv. The same reason. 
Mr. Tavenner. 1932? 
Mr. SoKOLov. The same reason. 
Mr. Tavenner. 1931? 
Mr. SoKOLOv. The same reason. 
Mr. Tavenner. 1930? 
Mr. SoKOLOv. The same. 
Mr. Tavenner. 1929? 
JNIr. SoKOLOV. I don't remember that far. 
Mr. Tavenner. Well, how v^^ere you employed in 1929 ? 
Mr. SoKOLOV. I couldn't tell; it is too long a time to tell exactly 
Avhat I Avas doing at that time. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was you first employment after leaving Tem- 
ple University in 192G? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. I was employed even in those days while I was going 
to school. 

Mr. Tavenner. What M^as your employment when you completed 
your training in 1926? 

Mr. SoKOLOV. The same as prior to it. 

Mr. Walter. Let us get the record straight because there may be 
future proceedings. In response to questions asked you as to what 
3^ou did during particular years, you have replied by saying "the 
same." By that, do I understand you to mean that you refuse to 
answer the question because under the fifth amendment of the Con- 
stitution, as you understand it, you are not required to answer the 
question ? 

Mr. SoKOLov. That is right. 
Mr. Walter. All right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, what was your employment in 1926 after 
completing your work at Temple University? 

Mr. SoKOLov. It was working in a factory, making quilts. 
Mr. Tavenner. What factory? 
Mr. SoKOLOv. Quilts, making quilts. 

Mr. Tavenner. I understood that, but what factory? What was 
the name of it? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. It will take me a long time to remember that — Woods 
& Logan. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did you work there, from 1926? 
Mr. SoKOLov. I couldn't recollect; I'm sorry. For a while any- 
how. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where did you work in 1927 ? 
Mr. SoKOLOv. I can't recollect that far. 
Mr. Tavenner. What did you work at in 1927? 
Mr. SoKOLov. I worked in the same trade. 
Mr. Tavenner. In what? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4423 

]\Ir. SoKOLov. The same trade. 

Mr. Tavenner. What trade is that? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. Quilts. 

Mr. Tavenner. How were you employed? By whom were you em- 
ployed ? 

Mr. SoKOLOV. Probably the same place. 

Mr. Tavenner. What about the year 1928 ? 

j\Ir. SoKOLOV. I can't answer that ; I don't remember. 

Mr. Ta\t2nner. In 1929 ? 

Mr. SoKOLOV. Well, I refuse to answer for the same reason and 
because I am uncertain of the place. 

Mr. Tavenner. I am reminded that counsel did not identify him- 
self for the record, although he mentioned his name prior to the call- 
ino- of the witness. 

Mr. Walter. He did identify himself. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you spell your name. 

Mr. Longstretii. L-o-n-g-s-t-r-e-t-h, 704 Bailey Building, Phila- 
delphia. 

jSIr. Tavenner. Mr. Sokolov, you were present in the hearing room 
during the testimony this afternoon of Mr. Samuel DiMaria ; weren't 
you ? 

Mr. Sokolov. Yes; 1 was. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you hear him in his testimony identify you as 
a member of the Communist Party and one who advised him of certain 
requirements that he should meet as a member of the underground 
apparatus of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Sokolov. I am claiming the privilege of the fifth amendment 
not to answer this question. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you a photostatic copy of the Daily Worker 
of January 4, 1930, and ask you to look at an article there, the heading 
of which is "Workers' School of Philadelphia." Will you examine it, 
please? 

(The document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. TA^^ENNER. Show it to counsel, also. 

(The document was shown to Mr. Longstretii.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you examine the document and state whether 
or not you see there the name of Ed Solway as an instructor in the 
Workers' School? Do you see that name? 

Mr. Sokolov. I see a name in the paper. 

Mr. Tavenner. AVell, what is that name? 

]\Ir. Sokolov. That is the way it reads, I imagine. 

Mr. Tamjnner. AVhat does it read? 

Mr. Sokolov. It says "Ed Sohvay." 

Mr. TA\Ti:NNER. Does it show that Ed Solway was an instructor in 
the Workers' School ? 

Mr. Sokolov. That is what it says in the paper. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you the Ed Solway referred to in that article? 

IVfr. Sokolov. I refuse to answer on the same basis, the same grounds. 

INIr. Tavenner. I desire to introduce the document in evidence and 
ask that it be marked "Sokolov Exhibit No. 1." 

Mr. Walter. It is marked and received. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Sokolov Exhibit No. 1," 
is filed herewith.) 

25241—52 9 



4424 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavenner. I show j-ou a photostatic copy of the issue of May 
24, 1938, of the Daily Worker, and ask you to examine an article 
entitled "Pennsylvania Election's Key to 1940, Says Satchel at Phila- 
delphia Convention," and ask 3- ou to look at the last paragraph of the 
article and state whether or not you see there among the delegates 
named attending the national convention of the Communist Party one 
Ed Solway. 

(The document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you see the name "Ed Solway'' listed as a 
delegate to that convention ? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. I see the name. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you the Ed Solway referred to in the article? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. I refuse to answer on the basis of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to introduce the document in evidence and 
ask that it be marked "Sokolov Exhibit No. 2." 

Mr. Walter. Mark it and it will be received. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Sokolov Exhibit No. 2," 
is filed herewith.) ^ 

Mr. Walter. How long did you use the name "Solway" ? 

Mr. Sokolov. I am sorry; I refuse to answer this question on the 
basis of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Sokolov, I hand you Ellis Exhibit No. 2, which 
is a pamphlet entitled "The Lenin Memorial Yearbook for 1939." 
There are a number of photographs appearing in this exhibit. I ask 
you to look at the photograph appearing on the left-hand lower column 
of the photographs. Does that photograph resemble any person that 
you know ? ^ 

(The document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Sokolov. It resembles, but I refuse to state who it is on the 
same basis. 

Mr. Ta%^nner. It resembles — whom does it resemble ? 

Mr. Sokolov. I refuse to answer this question under my rights 
under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Does it resemble you? 

Mr. Sokolov. It might. I Avould say it might. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, aren't you reasonably satisfied that it does 
resemble you ? 

Mr. Sokolov. I refuse to answer on the basis of my rights under 
the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. "^^^ose name appears underneath the photograph? 

Mr. Sokolov. There appears a name there. 

Mr. Tax^nner. What is that name? 

Mr. Sokolov. The counsel can read it. Am I instructed to read it? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. Sokolov. I am instructed to read it? 

Mr. Tavenner. Just state what appears on the paper. 

Mr, Sokolov. Under your instruction, I will read it : "Ed Solway." 

Mr. Tavenner. Is that a photograph of you ? 

Mr. Sokolov. I refuse to answer under the same basis. 

Mr. Tavenner. I would like to exhibit the photograph to the 
committee. 



^ See illustration facing p. 4470. 
« See p. 4448. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4425 

Mr. Walter. Mark it and let it be received. 

(The document was previously marked "Ellis Exhibit No. 2.")^ 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Walter Steele appeared as a witness before the 
Special Committee on Un-American Activities on August 16, 1938, and 
according to his testimony he identified one Ed Solway as a member 
of the State committee of the Communist Party of Pennsylvania. 
Were you the Ed Solway referred to in that testimony ? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. I refuse to answer on the same basis. 

]SIr. Tavenner. Were you ever a member of the State committee 
of the Communist Party of Pennsylvania ? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. I refuse to answer on the same basis. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you acquainted with Max Helf and ? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. I refuse to answer on the same basis. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you at any time turn over any funds of the 
Communist Party or any other funds to Samuel DiMaria ? 

Mr. SoKOLov. I refuse to answer on the same basis. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you acquainted with Joe Kuzma ? 

Mr. SoKOLov. I refuse to answer on the same basis. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you participate in the picketing of the Federal 
Courthouse, Ninth and Market Streets, Philadelphia, on September 25, 
1948, protesting the indictment of the 12 Communist Party leaders in 
New York City? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. I refuse to answer on the same reason. 

Mr. Tavenner. I show you a photograph of the picket line and ask 
you to see if you can identify the person carrying the first standard 
appearing in the picket line. 

(The photograph was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you examine the photograph and state whether 
you can identify the person shown to be carrying the first placard, the 
first from your left. 

Mr. SoKOLOv. I refuse to answer this question for the same reason. 

Mr. Walter. Does that person look familiar to you ? 

Mr. SoKOLov. I can't discuss it for the same reason, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to introduce the document in evidence and 
ask that it be marked as "Sokolov Exhibit No. 3." 

Mr. Walter. It is received. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Sokolov Exhibit No. 3," 
is filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavenner. It is noted that the first placard reads as follows, 
that is, the first from the left, the one asked you about : "We demand 
dismissal of indictments against 12 Communist leaders." Did you 
advocate the dismissal of the indictments against the 12 Communist 
leaders at any time ? 

Mr. Sokolov. I refuse to answer on the same basis. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Sokolov. I refuse to answer for the same reason. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you at any time been engaged in activities of 
the Communist Party as a member of it ? 

Mr. Sokolov. I refuse to answer for the same reason. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions. 

Mr. Walter. Do you have any questions ? 

' See pp. 4444-4468. 



4426 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Doyle. Mr. Sokolov, under what name were you naturalized 
when your father took his citizenship and you claim derivative 
citizenship ? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. The name that I am, Sokolov. 

Mr. Doyle. The name that you have ? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Doyle. Did you ever change your name in any court proceeding ? 

Mr. SoKOLOV. I am sorry, I can't testify on this question for the 
same reason. 

Mr. Doyle. Well, I am asking you about a public proceeding in our 
country. Did you ever appear in court on a change of name ? I am 
not asking you about anything secret or anything that might be crim- 
inal. I didn't know it was criminal or that there was a possibility of 
being criminal to change your name in a public court proceeding. 

Mr. SoKOLOv. I am sorry, but I can't answer. I base myself on the 
privilege of the fifth amendment to our Constitution. 

Mr. Doyle. Where do you now reside? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. 2^83 North Thirty-third Street. 

Mr. Doyle. What is your occupation now ? 

Mr. SoKOLOV. I have a store. 

Mr. Doyle. What store? 

Mr. Sokolov. Quilts. 

Mr. Doyle. Where ? 

Mr. Sokolov. Frankfort. 

Mr. Doyle. What street address? 

Mr. Sokolov. Orthodox. 

Mr. Doyle. What is the number of the place ? 

Mr. Sokolov. 2015. 

Mr. Doyle. Do you give your full time to that occupation? 

Mr. Sokolov. That is right. 

Mr. Doyle. I beg your pardon? 

Mr. Sokolov. That is right. 

Mr. Doyle. Full time ? 

Mr. Sokolov. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Doyle. Were you ever a member of the Nazi Bund? 

Mr. Sokolov. I am sorry, but I can't answer for the same reason. 

Mr. Doyle. Did you ever serve in the military in the interest of the 
United States? 

Mr. Sokolov. I am sorry, I can't answer this question. 

Mr. Walter. Do you think it might incriminate you to admit that 
you had been in the armed services of the United States? Is that 
What I am to understand? The Chair directs vou to answer that 
question. 

Mr. Sokolov. I am willing to answer more than one question, 

Mr. Walter. You answer that particular question. 

Mr. Sokolov. Provided you give me a chance. 

Mr. Walter. Did you ever serve in the Armed Forces of the United 
States? 

INIr. Sokolov. You know very well that I have not been in the Army 
and I haven't served, so that question is quite obvious. 

Mr. Walter. It is quite obvious for other reasons, but I didn't know. 
Now, did you or did you not serve in the Armed Forces of the United 
States? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4427 

Mr. SoKOLov. You instruct me to answer this question ? 

Mr. Walter. I instruct you. 

IMr. SoKOLov. I did not serve. 

Mv. Walter. All right. 

INIr. Doyle. You heard Mr. DiMaria testify that you had told him 
that it would be necessary for him to participate in advocating the 
institution of strikes and slowdowns in American war production in 
the event of war between Russia, the Soviet Union, and the United 
States. You heard him state that in substance, didn't you ? 

Mr. SoKOLov. Not exactly ; I didn't pay attention to it. 

INIr. Doyle. You were right in the front row with your lawyer. I 
noticed you all afternoon, I think. 

]Mr. SoKOLOV. I am afraid that he himself didn't pay attention to 
what he said, either. 

]\Ir. Doyle. You mean you sat in the front row and didn't hear 
what he said ? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. No. He is a stool pigeon and a rat and he doesn't de- 
serve any more than that. 

Mr. Walter. I wdsh you would speak English so I can understand 
you when you are applying those terms to that good American. 

Mr. Doyle. You heard 

]Mr. Longstreth. I object to your remark. Please have it entered 
in the record. 

Mr. Walter. It is in the record and it will remain. 

]\Ir. Longstreth. I object to that remark. 

jNIr. Doyle. Mr. Sokolov, you heard him testify that you had told 
him as a member of the Comnnmist Party — and you heard him state 
that you were a Communist — that you gave him instructions that it 
might be necessary for the group that he was in and you were in and 
the Communist Party to participate in strikes and advocating strikes 
and slowdowns in war production in the event of a war with Russia, 
didn't you ? 

Mv. SoKOLOv. What is the question ? 

]Mr. Doyle. You heard my question. You heard him state that in 
substance ? 

Mr. SoKOLOv. What is your question ? 

Mr. Doyle. My question is. Did you hear him? 

Mr. Sokolov. I heard him say something to that effect. 

Mr. Doyle. Do you deny it or not ? 

]Mr. SoKOLov. I refuse to answer this question 

jNIr. Doyle. Of course. 

Mr. SoKOLov. Under the privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Doyle. Well, this is your chance to deny that sort of thing. 
That is why I gave it to you deliberately. 

Mr. Sokolov. No — pardon me. May I say something at this mo- 
ment in answer to your question? 

Mr. Doyle. I think that that is all. 

Mr. Walter. Anything further? 

Mr. Beale. You have answered the question. 

Mr. Sokolov. I haven't answered the tjuestion. 

Mr. Walter. Is there anything further? 

Mr. Tavenner. No, sir. 



4428 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Walter. Is there any reason why the witness shouldn't be 
excused ? 

Mr. Tavenner. No, sir. 

Mr. Walter. Don't you think that instead of excusing him from 
this subpena that the subpena should be held open so that he could 
testify on the 18th of November when these hearings will be continued ? 

Mr. Tavenner. It may be advisable to do so. 

Mr. Walter. All right. The witness is instructed that the subpena 
under which he was required to appear on this day and testify before 
this committee is continued until the 18th of November, Washington, 
D. C, at the committee room of the Committee on Un-American Ac- 
tivities. The committee room is in the Old House Office Building. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right, sir. 

Mr. Walter. We are going to have adjourn at this point, Mr. 
Tavenner. 

The committee stands adjourned to meet at 10 o'clock tomorrow 
morning. 

(Whereupon, at 4 : 30 p. m., a recess was taken until 10 a. m., Thurs- 
day, October 16, 1952.) 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AEEA 



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1953 

United States House of Representatives, 

Subcommittee of the Committee on 

Un-American Activities, 

Philadelphia^ Pa. 

The subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities 
met at 10 a. m., pursuant to recess, in Federal Courtroom No. 1, Fed- 
eral Buildin,g, Philadelphia, Pa., Hon. John S. Wood (chairman) 
presiding. 

Committee members present: Representative John S. Wood (chair- 
man). 

Staff members present: Frank S. Ta vernier, Jr., counsel; Thomas 
W. Beale, Sr., assistant counsel ; John W. Carrington, clerk ; Raphael 
I. Nixon, research director; W. Jackson Jones, Earl L. Fuoss, and 
Frank Bonora, investigators ; and Thelma Scearce, staff member. 

Mr. Wood. The hearing will be in order. 

Let the record show that as chairman of the Committee on Un- 
American Activities of the House of Representatives, and acting under 
the authority of the resolution establishing that committee, I have 
set up for the purposes of continuing the hearing today a subcommit- 
tee consisting of one, that one member being the chairman of the 
committee, Mr. Wood, who is present. 

Mr. Tavenner, whom do you have as the first witness? 

Mr. LfONGSTRETH. May I make an application to you, Mr. Chair- 
man? I am the attorney for Abe Sokolov who testified yesterday, 
and at the conclusion of his testimony he was required to appear 
before your committee in Washington on November 18. Now, that 
would be a tremendous hardship on him because he has a store in which 
there is no assistant to help him out, and it would be subjecting lii'm 
to prosecution both in the District of Columbia and in the F^^stern 
[Judicial] District of Pennsylvania for refusal to answer j and it 
seems hard to put him to two prosecutions for the sf^^e offense. 

In view of the testimony against him given yesterday by Samuel 
DiMaria, it is obvious thaf it is not wise for him to answer questions, 
and he refuses. It would just be putting the Gov^ernment to addi- 
tional expense to bring him to Washington, and wasting the time of 
your committee just for a repetition of "I refuse to answer"; and so 
I am asking you to excuse him from coming to Washington. 

Mr. Wood. The motion is overruled. 

Wlio do you call, please? 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Michael Fersick. 

Mr. LoNGSTRETH. Mr. Chairman, I represent Michael Fersick, and 

I now present to you his objection to testifying before 

4429 



4430 COMM[JNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Wood. You have the ri^'ht, under the rules of this committee, 
to confer with your client as often as you see fit and to give him such 
instructions or advice as may be necessary. The witness will make his 
own choice as to whether or not he answers his questions. 

Mr. LoNGSTRETii. But I am puttinfj a formal application in advance, 
as the Supreme Court of the United States 

Mr. Wood. I have already ruled. 

Mr. LoNGSTRETH. The Supreme Court • 

Mr. Wood. I have already ruled. 

Will you stand and be sworn. 

Mr. LoNGSTRETH. Wait a minute. Say, "I object to testifying be- 
fore less than five members of this committee." 

Mr. Fersick. Could I talk with you for just a moment ? 

Mr. Wood. Will you raise j^our right hand and be sworn. 

Mr. LoNGSTRETii. You object first before you testify. 

Mr. Wood. He has been asked to be sworn. 

]Mr. LoxGSTRETii. Put in your objection before you are sworn. 

Mr. Fersick. Could I consult with my attorney before being sworn ? 

Mr. Wood, Yes. 

Mr. Fersick. Thank you. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Wood. Will the witness raise his right hand and be sworn ? 

Do you solemnly swear the evidence you Avill give this subcommittee 
shall be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help 
you God? 

Mr. Fersick. I do. 

Mr, Wood, Have a seat, 

TESTIMONY OF MICHAEL FERSICK, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 
WALTER C. LONGSTRETH 

Mr, Tavenner. What is your name, please, sir ? 

Mr. Fersick, Michael Fersick, 

Mr. Tavenner, Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr, Fersick, I am, sir, 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel please identify himself for the record. 

Mr. LoNGSTRETii. I am Walter C. Longstreth, of TOtt Bailey Build- 
ir'?c, Philadelphia, I am asking, Mr. Chairman, that you prohibit 
these photographers from taking pictures; they are upsetting my 
client. 

Mr, Wood. Does the witness object to being photographed? 

Mr. Fersiok. AYell, it is annoying. 

Mr. Wood. Then, I understand from that that vou do object. 

Mr. Fersick. I object, 

Mr. Wood. I am asking the photographers to refrain from taking 
pictures. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you spell your last name, Mr. Fersick ? 

Mr. Fersick. F-e-r-s-i-c-k, 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you appear here, Mr. Fersick, in response to a 
subpena served upon you by IVIr. Earl Fuoss, investigator of the House 
of Representatives? 

Mr, Fersick. I do. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4431 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the siibpena, with the return thereon, 
in evidence and ask it be marked "Fersick Exhibit No. 1." 

Mr. Wood. Very well ; it will be admitted. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Fersick Exhibit No. 1," 
is filed herewith.) 

jNIr. Ta^tenxer. When and where were you born, Mr. Fersick ? 

Mr. Fersick. January 7, 1018, Philadelphia, Pa. 

]Mr. Tavenner. Will you give the committee, please, a brief account 
of your educational training? 

]NIr. Fersick. I attended orammar school and completed high school 
here in Philadelphia. I graduated in 1935. 

]\Ir. Tavenner. How are you presently employed ? 

Mr. Fersick. I am an automobile salesman. 

]Mr. TA^'ENNER, Where do you reside ? 

Mr. Fersick. 1802 North Franklin Street. 

jNIr. Tavenner. How long have you been employed as an automobile 
salesman ? 

Mr. Fersick. Approximately 5 years. 

]Mr. Ta^-enner. Prior to that time, what was your employment ? 

Mr. Fersick. I was a shopworker. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where ? 

Mr. Fersick. At various shops. 

]Mr. Tavenner. '\^niat shops ? 

Mr. Fersick. Starting from my completion of high school, I worked 
at Countz & Eckman. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. A^^lat year would that be ? 

Mr. Fersick. I don't recollect the exact year ; I couldn't say exactly. 

Mr. TAM5NNER. Well, approximately. 

Mr. Fersick. I would say 1936. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right; beginning in 1936, what has been your 
employment ? 

Mr. Fersick. I am just trying to think. 

JSIr. Tavenner. I am not trying to hurry you. 

Mr. Fersick. Well, it is not clear to me. I had several — in fact, 
many — jobs from 1936 to 1939 in various shops. I worked in a large 
factory and I worked in a silk factory. 

Mr. TxVVENNER. Very well ; begin with 1939. 

Mr. Fersick. In 1939, I was employed at the Atlantic Elevator in 
Philadelphia. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did you work there? 

Mr. Fersick. From 1939 untiri946. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. What was the nature of your work? 

Mr. Fersick. I was a bench mechanic for most of the time, and 
toward the end I was an electrician. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Prior to 1943, were you affiliated in any manner with 
the Young Communist League? 

(Witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Fersick. I rely on my privilege under the fifth amendment of 
the Constitution of the United States and refuse to reply to that 
question. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you recruited into Branch 50 of the Fifth Dis- 
trict of the Communist Party in March of 1943, and assigned to tlie 
Metals Branch or the Metal Branch of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Fersick. I refuse to reply for the same reasons. 



4432 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavenner. When you stated you were employed from 1939 to 
1946, by whom did you say that you were employed ? 

Mr. Fersick. May I hear that question again ? 

Mr. Tavenner. By whom were you employed from 1939 to 1946? 
I didn't understand ; so will you tell me that ? 

Mr. Fersick. I worked at the Atlantic Elevator. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you belong to a union during that period of 
time? 

Mr. Fersick. I did, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What union was it ? 

Mr. Fersick. Local 155. 

Mr. Tavenner. Of the UE? 

Mr. Fersick. That is right, sir. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Did you hold any position in the local ? 

Mr. Fersick. I was a department steward in my shop. 

Mr. Tavenner. I am sorry. 

Mr. Fersick. I was a department steward in my shop. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you a steward in 1943 ? 

Mr. Fersick. I could not be sure, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, will you tell the committee the period over 
which you were a steward, as nearly as you can. 

Mr. Fersick. I know I was a steward there for a period, but the 
exact time I don't remember. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you remember how many years you were a 
steward ? 

Mr. Fersick. To the best of my recollection, I would say 3 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. During that period of time, were you also on the 
executive committee of your local 155 ? 

Mr. Fersick. Not that I remember. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you at any time a member of the executive 
committee of local 155 ? 

Mr. Fersick. Not that I remember. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you hold any — excuse me, you may confer. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Did you hold any other position besides that of 
steward, shop steward, in your local 155 ? 

Mr. Fersick. I think that I was a member. I am not sure of my 
capacity, but I think I was chairman of a youth committee, whose 
sole responsibility was to keep in contact with the boys in the service, 
send them packages. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you in the armed services during any period? 

Mr. Fersick. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What years ? 

Mr. Fersick. November 1943 to May 1944. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you a member of the Daily Worker Press 
Club at any time ? 

Mr. Fersick. Relying on the fifth amendment, I refuse to testify. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you at any time a delegate from the Kensing- 
ton Club of the Communist Party to a district convention of the 
Communist Party ? 

Mr. Fersick. Relying upon my privilege under the fifth amend- 
ment, I decline to testify. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you present in this hearing room yesterday 
when Mr. Samuel DiMaria testified? 

Mr. Fersick. I was. 



COMMUlSnST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4433 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you hear his testimony relating to your activi- 
ties in the Communist Party ; I am askino; you merely if you heard 
his testimony regarding your activities? 
Mr. Fersick. I heard it. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you, according to his testimony, meet with 
Samuel DiMaria and Joseph Kuzma, in early 1949, for the purpose 
of discussing your assignment as a courier and contact man for the 
underground apparatus of the Communist Party in Philadelphia ? 

Mr. Fersick. I rely on my privileges of the fifth amendment and 
refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you, as testified by Mr. DiMaria, in your ca- 
pacity as courier or contact man, meet with Jack Mondress and 
discuss with him activities relating to the underground apparatus of 
the Communist Party in Philadelphia ? 

Mr. Fersick. Relying upon my privileges of the fifth amendment, 
I refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. DiMaria, in the course of his testimony, stated 
that he had delivered a mimeograph machine to you to be used by 
the Communist Party under certain circumstances. Was that testi- 
mony true or false ? 

Mr. Fersick. Relying upon my privileges of the fifth amendment, I 
decline to answer that question. 

Mr. TA^^NNER. Did you discuss with Mr. DiMaria, or any other per- 
son, the names of those who might be recruited into the underground 
work of the Communist Party in Philadelphia ? 

Mr. Fersick. I decline to answer that question for the same reasons. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. DiMaria identified you as a member of the Com- 
munist Party. Were you a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Fersick. Relying on my privileges of the fifth amendment, I 
decline to answer that question. 

Mr. TA^'ENNER. Are you now a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Fersick. I decline to answer for the same reason. 

Mr. Taat^nner. Did you participate in a picket-line demonstration 
at the Federal Courthouse, Ninth and Market Streets, Philadelphia, 
onMay 3, 1950? 

Mr. Fersick. I assert my privileges under the fifth amendment and 
decline to answer that question. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. I hand you a photograph of what appears to be a 
picket line and certain individuals are marked with ink, 1, 2, 3, and 4, 
and so forth. I will ask you to look at the photogi-aph of the person 
marked "No. 4" and state whether or not you can identify that 
individual. 

(The document was handed to the witness.) 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Fersick. I refuse to answer that question for the same reason. 

Mr. Tavenner, Does the photograph resemble you ? 

(Witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Fersick. Relying on my privileges of the fifth amendment, I 
decline to answer that question. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the photograph in evidence and ask 
that it be marked "Fersick Exhibit No. 2." 

Mr. Wood. It will be admitted as Fersick Exhibit No. 2. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Fersick Exhibit No. 2," 
is filed herewith.) 



4434 COMMUN/ST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavenner. No further questions. 

Mr. Wood. Is there any reason why the witness should not be excused 
from further attendance? 

Mr. Tavenner. No, sir. 

Mr. Wood. It is so ordered. 

(The witness was excused.) 

Mr. Wood. Who is the next witness? 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Mr. Sterling Rochester. 

Mr. Wood. Will you raise your riglit hand and be sworn. 

Do you solemnly swear the evidence you will give this subcommittee 
shall be the truth, the wliole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help 
you God ? 

Mr. Rochester. I do. 

Mr. Wood. Have a seat. 

TESTIMONY OF STEELING EOCHESTEE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, A. HAEEY LEVITAN 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your name, please ? 

Mr. Rochester. Mr. Sterling Rochester. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented by coimsel ? 

Mr. Rochester. I am, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel please identify himself for the record? 

Mr. Le\ttan. a. Harry Levitan, 1412 Fox Building. If the chair- 
man of this committee, please, I do not think it is conducive to the 
decorum of this proceeding to permit the constant taking of pictures 
and I object to it. I respectfully suggest that the chairman of this 
committee make this ruling before the taking of the pictures and not 
afterward. 

Mr. Wood. I have called attention of counsel to the same rule of the 
committee, that I presented to counsel before him, and that is that 
counsel before this connnittee are permitted to consult with his client 
and give him such advice as is necessary. If the witness objects I 
would be glad to hear from him, 

Mr. Rochester. I object, not from a point of view of the picture 
but because it is annoying. 

Mr. Wood. I will ask the photographers 

Mr. Levitan. May I say that this rule is made after the pictures 
are taken? I think that it would be well within the powers of this 
chairman 

Mr. Wood. The rule was made immediately upon being notified by 
the witness that he objected to it. 

Mr. Tavenner. I think the record should also show that photo- 
graphs were not being taken while the witness was being interrogated. 

Mr. Le\t:tan. The record might also show, if the chairman please, 
that the pictures were being taken as I was 

Mr. Wood. I have already ruled, and if you do not respect the ruling 
you will have to leave the room. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. When and where were you born, Mr. Rochester ? 

Mr. Rochester. I was born in 

Mr. Levitan. Excuse me, may it please the board, and may I ask 
that the record show that on behalf of ]Mr. Rochester I object to the 
questioning by you as chairman of this board on the groimd that a 
quorum of the subcommittee or of the committee is not present. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4435 

Mr. Wood. A quorum of the subcommittee is present, in fact, the 
whole subcommittee is present, but the objection will be noted. 

Proceed. 

JNIr. Tavenner. AVhen and where were you born ? 

Mv. KociiESTER. I was born, according to my parents, in the State 
of Maryland, Quincy County, 1901. 

]\Ir. Tavenner. Will you tell the committee what your educational 
trainino; has been? 

Mr. Rochester. Eighth grade. 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you now employed? 

Mr. Rochester. I am a leather worker. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you reside? 

Mr. Rochester. At 2o4() North Orkney Street, Philadelphia. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you been employed as a leather 
worker ? 

Mr. Rochester. For over 6 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. By whom are you employed? 

Mr. Rochester. A. J. Workman & Co. 

]\Ir. Tavenner. Prior to that employment, how were you employed? 

Mr. Rochester. Well, prior to that I was in the service. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many years were you in the service? 

Mr. Rochester. Two years, 10 months, and 23 days. 

Mr. Tavenner. 'Wlien did you go in and when did you come out? 

Mr. Rochester. I went in on the 12th of January in 1943, and 
I came out the 4th of December 1945. 

]\Ir. Tavenner. Prior to your service in the Army, how were you 
emplo3'ed ? 

Mr. Rochester. Well, I have been employed at a box factory, 
NickoFs Box Factory, and I was employed at Campbell Soups. 

Mr. Tavenner. Just a moment, when were you employed at Camp- 
bell Soup ? 

Mr. Rochester. Back in about 1923 and again, I think, around 
1925 or 1926. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, since that time, how have you been employed, 
up until the time you went into the service ? 

Mr. Rochester. Well, I have been, as I said, employed in a box 
factory, and I have been employed 

Mr. TA^^ENNER. How long w^ere you employed at the box factory? 

Mr. Rochester. For a number of years, from a period ranging 
from 1921 or 1922. 

Mr. TxWenner. Now I asked you just since 1928. 

Mr. Rochester. From 1928 up until the present 

Mr. Ta\t>nner. What box factory was that? 

Mr. Rochester. C. W. Nichols. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then what was your next employment ? 

Mr. Rochester. Well, I was employed as a construction worker at 
various times, and also 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Just a moment. Let us see if we can fix the dates. 

Mr. Rochester. The date? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. Rochester. Well, I worked as a construction worker during 
different times, during the 1920's. 

Mr. TxVvenner. We are up past the 1920's now. 

Mr. Rochester. You want to go into the 1930's ? 



4436 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Tavenner. Let iis come up to the 1930's. 

Mr. KocHESTER. Well, I worked for Stone & Webster, I think it was, 
for a short period around 1933. Then, of course, that was during the 
time of the depression, and I worked at odd jobs on the wharf on 
Callowhill Street, loading and unloading trucks. 

Mr. Tavenner. Over what period of time ? 

Mr. Rochester. I would say over a period of about 3 years during 
that time. 

Mr. Tavenner. That would be 1933 up to 1936, approximately. 

Mr. Rochester. Well, probably it was not that long, I will say for 
about, maybe, 2 years up to that time. 

Mr. Tavenner. That would bring us up to 1935, and then how were 
you employed from 1935 on to 1943 ? 

Mr. Rochester. Well, at that particular time — I will have to refuse 
to answer that question because to answer that question may tend to 
incriminate me, and therefore I plead the privilege of the fifth 
amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Does that cover the entire period from 1935 to 1943 ? 
You don't mean for it to cover that period of time, do you ? 

Mr. Rochester. No, sir. Not that period. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right, give us your employment during all of 
the period of time between 1935 and 1943 except that period which 
you claim an answer to the question might tend to incriminate you. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Rochester. Well, for what years? 

Mr. Tavenner. Beginning with 1935, how were you employed in 
1936? 

Mr. Rochester. That question I have to refuse to answer because 
the answer to that question might tend to incriminate me, and there- 
fore I plead the privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. How were you employed in 1937 ? 

Mr. Rochester. I will have to refuse to answer that question be- 
cause the answer to that might tend to incriminate me, and therefore 
I plead the privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Wood. Let me call your attention, please, to the fact you are 
under no compulsion here to refuse to answer any questions, and so 
when you state you have to refuse, please don't let us have a misunder- 
standing about it. If you desire to refuse, it is your voluntary act 
and not in compulsion. 

Mr. Tavenner. How were you employed in 1938 ? 

Mr. Rochester. In 1938, to the best of my ability, I worked as a 
door-to-door salesman for the J. R. Watkins & Co. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did you remain employed with that 
company ? 

Mr. Rochester. For about a year. 

Mr. Tavenner. How were you employed during the rest of the 
period? 

Mr. Rochester. I worked on a moving van. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. In Philadelphia? 

Mr. Rochester. In Philadelphia. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you out of the continental United States dur- 
ing the years 1936 and 1937? 

Mr. Rochester. That question I refuse to answer because the answer 
to thflt might tend to incriminate me and therefore I plead the privi- 
lege of the fifth amendment. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4437 

Mr. Tavenner, Did you ever apply for a passport to travel to a 
foreign country? 

Mr. Rochester. That question I will have to refuse to answer 
because the answer to that question might tend to incriminate me 
and therefore I plead the privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Wood. And for that reason do you refuse to answer ? For the 
reason you have stated, do you decline to answer the question ? 

Mr. Rochester. That it might incriminate me ; yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you a copy of the Daily Worker of July 14, 
1937, in which there appears an article entitled, "Lincoln Battalion 
Heroes Describe Fighting in Spain." Do you see the article? 

Mr. Rochester. I see the article. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you find there listed as one of the fighters in 
Spain the name "Sterling Rochester" ? 

Mr. Rochester. I see the name of Sterling Rochester. 

Mr. Tavenner. Listed as one of the fighters in Spain. 

Mr. Levtian. Excuse me, sir. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Rochester. I see it, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you tlie Sterling Rochester referred to in 
that article ? 

Mr. Rochester. That question I will have to refuse to answer be- 
cause the answer to that might tend to incriminate me and therefore 
I plead the privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the photostatic copy of the Daily 
Worker in evidence and ask that it be marked "Rochester Exhibit 
No. 1." 

Mr. Wood. It will be admitted. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Rochester Exhibit No. 1," 
is filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever participated in the organization 
work of the Veterans of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, Inc. ? 

Mr. Rochester. That question I refuse to answer because the an- 
swer to that might tend to incriminate me and therefore I plead the 
privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you a publication entitled, "Volunteer for 
Liberty," and I will ask you to look at page 10. It is the November 
1946 issue. This publication is the official publication of the Veterans 
of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade. Looking on page 10, do you find 
the listing of the name "Sterling Rochester," as a member of the 
national board ? 

Mr. Rochester. I see that name. 

Mr. Tavenner. Of the organization, Abraham Lincoln Brigade? 

Mr. Rochester. I see that name listed. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you see it listed as a member of the national 
board of the organization ? 

Mr. Rochester. Yes ; I see it. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you a member of the national board of that 
organization ? 

Mr. Rochester. That question I have to refuse to answer because 
(o answer that might tend to incriminate me and therefore I plead 
the privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the document in evidence and ask 
that it be marked "Rochester Exhibit No. 2." 



4438 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Mr. Wood, It may be admitted. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Rochester Exhibit No. 
2," is filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavenner. In the Daily Worker of January 7, 1 '.);>!), on pao-e 8^ 
there appears an announcement of welcome for one Sterlino- Roch- 
ester, Spanish veteran. Will you examine the photostatic copy of the 
issue of that date and state whether or not the name of Sterling Roch- 
ester appears there, in connection with the welcome being extended 
him? 

Mr. Rochester. I see that name. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you also note that the article welcomes Sterling 
Rochester into the twentieth ward branch of the Communist Party 
on Sunday, January 8, at 17-13 Eighth Street, or rather shows an 
announcement of a welcome that would be given to him at that place 
and at that time ? 

Mr. Rochester. I see that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you welcomed by the twentieth ward branch 
of the Communist Part}^ on Sunday, January 8, at 1743 Eighth Street,, 
as shown by that article l 

Mr. Rochester. That question I have to refuse to answer, sir, the 
answer to that might tend to incriminate me and therefore I plead 
the privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the document in evidence and ask 
it be marked "Rochester Exhibit No. 3." 

Mr. Wood. It may be received. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Rochester Exhibit No. 
8," is filed herewith.) 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. AVill you tell the committee how you were recruited 
to fight in Spain, if you were so recruited 1 

Mr. Rochester. That question I have to refuse to answer, sir, the- 
answer to that might tend to incriminate me and therefore I plead 
the privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. The Daily Worker of May 24, 1938, lists one Ster- 
ling Rochester as an alternate delegate to the national convention of 
the Cornmimist Party to be held in Madison Square Garden, in New 
York City, on May 26, of that year. Will you examine the photo- 
static copy, and state whether or not you see the name of Sterling 
Rochester so listed ? 
■ ( The document was handed to the witness. ) 

Mr. Rochester. I see that iiame. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you an alternate delegate to that convention 
as stated in the issue of the jjaper ? 

Mr. Rochester. I have to refuse to answer that, sir, because the 
answer to that might tend to incriminate me and therefore I plead 
the privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the document in evidence and ask 
that it be marked as "Rochester Exhibit No. 4." 

Mr. Wood. Let it be received. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Rochester Exhibit No. 
4," is filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavenner. There has been introduced in evidence a x^age of 
the Lenin Memorial Yearbook of 1939, and it has been referred to as 
Ellis exhibit No. 2. I ask you to look at Ellis exhibit No. 2. 

(The document was handed to the witness.) 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4439 

Mr. Ta^t.nner. Can you state whether or not you see on the page 
presented to you, a photograph on the left-hand cohnnn of photo- 
graphs, the one that appears second from tlie top of the page and 
state ^Yhether or not you can identify the individual whose picture 
appeal's there. ^ You are not looking at the picture. 

Mr. Rochester. I refuse to identify that picture, sir, because the 
identification of that ])icture might tend to incriminate me. 

i\Ir. Tavenner. What name appears under tlie photograph? 

i\Ir. Rochester. The ]iame of Sterling Rochester. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you see any similarity between that picture and 
yourself ? 

Mr. Rochester. I refuse — 

]\Ir. Tavenner. Will you look at it ? 

Mr. Rochester. I see the picture, sir. I refuse to answer that, sir, 
because the answer to that might tend to incriminate me, and therefore 
I plead the privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you a document which is also an Ellis exhibit. 
This document or exhibit is a campaign document issued by the Com- 
numist Party for the Xovember 3, 1938, election.- Do you find the 
name of Sterling Rochester 

Ml'. Rochester. Excuse me just one moment, please. 

(The document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Rochester. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you find the name Sterling Rochester listed 
there as a candidate for magistrate in the city of Philadelphia, on the 
Communist Party ticket? 

Mr. Rochester. I see the name of Sterling Rochester. 

Mr. Ta\t.nner. Is it listed there as a candidate for magistrate on 
the Communist Party ticket? 

Mr. Rochester. It is. 

Mr. Tavenner. Does that refer to you ? 

Mr. Rochester. I have to refuse to answer that question, sir, because 
the answer to that might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. The ofiicial records of the Department of State, 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, a photostatic copy of which I now 
show you lists as a presidential elector one Sterling Rochester for 
the year 101:0. Will you examine that photostatic copy of the official 
records of the State Department and state whether or not your name 
does appear there as a presidential elector? 
(The document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Levitan. Excuse me a moment, sir. 
(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

^Ir. Rochester. I see that name. 

Mr. Tam^nner. Were you a presidential elector on the Communist 
Party ticket for 1940? 

Mr. Rochester. I refuse to answer that question, sir, the answer to 
that might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. TA^nENNER. I desire to offer the document in evidence and ask 
that it be marked "Rochester Exhibit No. 5." 

Mr. Wood. It will be received. 



1 See p. 4448. 

* See last illustration in tliis publication, on unnumbered page. 

25241—52 10 



4440 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

(The document above referred to, marked "Rochester Exhibit No. 
5," is filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tavenner. You stated you were in the military service from 
June 12, 1943, to December 4, 1945. 

Mr. Rochester. Not June. 

Mr. Tavenner. January 12, I am sorry. January 12, 1943, to De- 
cember 4, 1945. In what branch of the service were you a member? 

Mr. Rochester. The Navy. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the highest rank ? 

Mr. Rochester. Steward, third class. 

Mr. Ta\-enner. Well, do you recall after leaving the service, on 
February 26, 1946, having appeared at a meeting in Philadelphia 
which was a Lenin memorial meeting of the Communist Party held 
at the Metropolitan Opera House at Broad and Poplar Streets, in 
which you were wearing the uniform of a chief petty officer of the 
United'States Navy? 

Mr. Rochester. I refuse to answer that question because the answer 
to that might tend to incriminate me, and therefore I plead the privi- 
lege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Levitan. Will you excuse me ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Rochester. I would like to add that according to my rating 
in the Navy, I have a right to wear the uniform that resembles that 
of a petty officer — chief petty officer. 

Mr. Tavenner. One that resembled it, did you say ? 

Mr. Rochester. That is what I said. 

Mr. Ta^tsnner. Well, did you at any time after leaving the service, 
wear a uniform of a petty officer, or of a chief petty officer? 

Mr. Rochester. I refuse to answer that, sir, because the answer 
to that might tend to incriminate me, and therefore I plead the privi- 
lege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you wear a uniform that resembled that of 
a uniform of a chief petty officer ? 

Mr. Rochester. I refuse to answer that. 

Mr. Tavenner. After you were discharged from the Navy ? 

Mr. Rochester. I refuse to answer that, sir, because the answer 
to that might tend to incriminate me, and therefore I plead the privi- 
lege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you address a meeting as a speaker at the Met- 
ropolitan Opera House while you were wearing a uniform that was 
the uniform of a chief petty officer or one that resembled that of a 
uniform of a chief petty officer? 

Mr. Rochester. I refuse to answer that question, sir; the answer 
to that might tend to incriminate me, and therefore I plead the privi- 
lege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you a photostatic copy of the August 3, 1951, 
issue of the Daily Worker, and there you will see in the center of the 
page an article entitled "Negro Labor Leaders Urge Court Review 
of Smith Act." 

Mr. Levitan. Pardon me, I think the title is, "Philadelphia Negro 
Leaders," and the word "labor" is not in there. 

Mr. Tavenner. Let me ask the witness to read the title that he has 
in front of him. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4441 

Mr. Rochester. It says, "Philadelphia Xegro Leaders Vvge Court 
Review of Smith Act." 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you fiud in that article the name of Sterling 
Rochester, executive board member of local 30, International Fur and 
Leather Workers, as one of the signers of an appeal to President 
Truman with regard to the Smith Act. 

Mr. Rochester. I see that name. 

Mr. Tavenner. How was your name procured for use in that con- 
nection ? 

Mr. Rochester. I refuse to answer that question, sir, the answer to 
that might tend to incriminate me, and therefore I plead the privilege 
of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner, I desire to offer the document in evidence and ask 
that it be marked "Rochester Exhibit No. 6." 

Mr. Wood. It will be received. 

(The document above referred to, marked "Rochester Exhibit No. 
6," is filed herewith.) 

Mr. Tav^enner. Are you now a member of the executive board of 
local 30, International Fur and Leather Workers? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Rochester. Yes; I am. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you a member of the executive board of local 
30, International Fnr and Leather Workers on August 3, 1951 ? 

Mr. Rochester. Yes; I was a member. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you in this hearing room during the testimony 
of Mr. Thomas Delaney ? 

Mr. Rochester. No ; I was not here. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Thomas Delaney, in his testimony on Monday, 
identified you as a person known to him to be a member of the Com- 
munist Party. Was he truthful in making such an identification or 
was he in error about it? 

Mr. Rochester. I refuse to answer that, sir, because the answer to 
that might tend to incriminate me, and therefore I plead the privilege 
of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now a member of the Communist Part) ? 

Mr. Rochester. I refuse to answer that, sir, because the answer to 
that might tend to incriminate me and therefore I plead the privilege 
of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Rochester. I refuse to answer that, sir. The answer to that 
might tend to incriminate me and therefore I plead the privilege of 
the fifth amendment. 

Mv. Tavenner. I have no further questions. 

Mr. Wood. Is there any reason why the witness should not be ex- 
cused from further attendance on the committee ? 

Mr. Ta\^nner, No, sir. 

Mr. Wood, It is so ordered. 

Mr. Tavenner, I will call Detective Charles MacBride. 

Mr. Wood. Mr. MacBride, will you raise your right hand and be 
sworn ? 

Do you solmenly swear the evidence you will give this subcommittee 
shall be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help 
you God ? 

Mr. MacBride. I do. 



4442 COMMUNIST ACTH'ITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

TESTIMONY OF CHARLES WILLIAM MacBRIDE 

Mr. Ta\tnner. What is your name, please, sir ? 

Mr. MacBride. Detective Charles William MacBride. 

Mr. TA^^ENNER. You are employed by the city of Philadelphia? 

Mr. MacBride. I am. 

Mr. Tamsnner. How lono; have you been a detective in the employ- 
ment of the citv of Philadelphia? 

Mr. MacBride. Since 1930, April 17, 1930. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you have an occasion to attend a meeting on 
February 26, 1940, at \he Metropolitan Opera House, Broad and 
Poplar Streets, Philadelphia \ 

Mr. MacBride. Yes, sir ; I did. 

Mr. Ta\'ExVxek. The witness just preceding you on the witness stand 
was one Sterling Rochester. Did you see him at that meeting? 

Mr. MacBride. I did. 

Mr. Tavenxer. What was the occasion for your being present at 
that meeting. 

Mr. MacBride. May I relate to my notes here? 

Mr. Ta^^xner. Yes, sir. 

Mr. MacBride. I was detailed to attend this Lenin memorial meet- 
ing and concert at the Metropolitan Opera House at Broad and Poplar 
Streets, on February 26, 1946. 

]Mr. Ta\'exxer. Do you recall whether or not Sterling Rochester 
had a part in the program that was being presented there? 

Mr. MacBride. I do. 

Mr. Tavexxer. In what way did he have a part in the program? 

Mr. MacBride. He was introduced from the stage by Philip Bart. 

Mr. Tavexxer. By Philip Bart? 

Mr. MacBride. Yes, sir. 

Mr, Tavexxer. Do you recall how he appeared, in what dress or 
uniform? 

Mr. MacBride. My records show he was in the uniform of a United 
States Navy petty officer. 

Mr. Tavexxer. A petty officer of the United States Navy ? 

Mr. MacBride. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavexx^er. Did he address the meeting? 

Mr. MacBride. Yes, he did. 

Mr. Tavexx'er. Can you, by reference to your notes, indicate the 
nature of his address? First of all were the notes that you have 
before you compiled at the time of the meeting? 

Mr. MacBride. The record here is a copy of the notes and I jotted 
the notes down and returned to detective headquarters and I typed 
this. 

Mr. Taven'ner. Just what in brief was the character of the address 
that he made? 

Mr. MacBride. He was introduced by Bart, and he received an 
ovation. He was in the uniform of a United States petty officer. He 
stated that he had been in the Navy since 1937. and prior to that he 
was a member of the Lincoln Brigade, which fought in Spain. He 
gave the impression he was still an active member of the United States 
Navy, 

Mr. Tavenx^er. I have no further questions. 



COMMl^NIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4443 

Mr. Wood. Is there any reason why the witness shoukl not be ex- 
cused from further attendance on tlie committee? 

Mr. Tavexxer. No, sir. 

Mr. Wood. Thank yon, sir. 

(The witness was excused.) 

Mr. Wood. Tlie chairman announces that the remaininn: witnesses 
who have been subpenaed to appear at this hearing will be heard in 
tlie committee's hearing room in the old House Office Building, in the 
city of Washington, on November 18. 

i want to express my very deep appreciation as well as that of the 
members of the subcommittee who have been in attendance here this 
week for the very splendid cooperation extended to the committee 
and its staff by the office of the attorney general of Pennsylvania, and 
the Pennsylvania police and the Philadelphia city police and the board 
of registration commission, the United States marshal, and the clerk 
of the United States district court and the building superintendent 
and his staff, and to the many others who have, through their coopera- 
tion, made possible the holding of these hearings. I extend to each of 
you my sincere thanks and that of the other members of the subcom- 
mittee Avho have been Jiere. The hearings here will stand adjourned. 

(Whereupon, at 11 : 05 a. m., the hearing was adjourned.) 



4444 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 

Elus Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 1) 



LENIN MEMORIAL 



Hflin 




IflOi] BGDK 


"II 


:■ 




[11 


JANUARY 



COMMIINIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4445 



Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 

Elus Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 2) 



to tks. 

MEMBERS 

o( the 

LrNCOLN 



Philadelphia's heroes who fell in Spain in the front line 

of the fight to defend our democracy against 

fascist aggression. 



Luigi Borelli 
Morris H. Wickman 
Irving Keith 
George Dyken 
John Johnson 
Joseph Seligman 
Constantinos Romantzes 
Chester Mujianas 
Dmitri Semenoff 
Robert Greenleaf 
Aino Petaya 
Frank Watkins 
Harry Levine 




4446 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 

Ellis Exhibit No. 2 

(Part H) 





'^2. FOSTER BLLAR. 



^^Me^ 




PREAMBLE T: 
COMMUN8ST 



iE CONSTITUTION, 
TY OF THE U. S. A. 



THE COMMUNIST PARTY of the United States 
of flmerica is a working class political party 
carrying forward today the traditions of Jef- 
ferson, Paine, Jackson, and Lincoln, and of the 
Declaration of Independence; it upholds the 
achievements of democracy, the right of "life, 
liberty, and the pursuit of happiness," and de- 
fends the United States Constitution against its 
reactionary enemies who would destroy dem- 
ocracy and all popular liberties: it is devoted lo 
defense of the immediate interests of workers, 
farmers, and all toilers against capitalist exploi- 
tation, and to preparation of the working class 
for its historic mission to unite and lead the Am- 
erican people to extend these democratic princi- 
ples to their necessary and logical conclusions: 
By establishing common ownership of the 
national economy, through a government of the 
people, by the people, and for the people; the 
abolition of all exploitation of man by man, na- 
tion by nation, and race by roce, cind thereby 
the abolition of class divisions in society; that 
is, by the establishment of socialism, according 
to the scientific principles enunciated by the 
greatest teachers of mankind, Marx, Engels, 
Lenin, and Siclin, embodied in the Communist 
International; and the free cooperation of the 
American people with those of other lands, striv- 
ing toward a world without oppression and war. 
a world brotherhood of man 



LENIN MEMORIAL MEETING 

CONVENTION HALL 
Friday, January 20, 1939 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4447 

Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 

Elijs Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 4) 




4448 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 



Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. ' 

Ellis Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 5) 










COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4449 

Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 

Ellis Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 6) 



Why You Should Join 
The Communist Party 

• By SflM flDflMS DflRCY 

State' Organizer, 

C. P of Pennsylvania 

Many people live blindly — like bats. 

They look at the world about them every day, but they 
neither see nor understand it. Their lives are occupied with a 
constant scurry for food, clothing and shelter for themselves and 
their families. Those are very important matters. They should 
not be gone about blindly and individually. Also, how about our 
health, culture and social institutions? In short what about all the 
issues that are agitating Americans and the world today? 

People who live blindly, from hand to mouth, so to speak, 
know little or nothing of these things. Any shrewd weasel-mouth- 
ed demagogue who comes along with a smooth line of talk can 
influence them. Such demagogues are numerous. Rich people 
buy their services for a few dollars a week. They come offering 
new lines of hypocritical talk every year. When people get wise 
to Republican reactionary platforms — the Republicans come with 
a liberal platform — altho they do the very same things irrespect- 
ive of any platform. When people get suspicious of crooked poli- 
ticians they drag some Coughlin out and shamefully misuse the 
vensration of many people for the clothes of a Catholic priest in 
order to put over their hypocritical talk. Unfortunately these tac- 
tics actually work effectively on many people. That's because 
many people live blindly. 

More and more people are unsatisfied to live like that. The 
growth of support for the New Deal proves that. The rise of the 
trade union movement proves it. find most of all the great in- 
crease in the number of Communist Party members — to about 
100,000 today— proves it. 

Communists learn tho experiences of many generations of 
people before us. We do that by studying the teachings of the 
great leaders of the American people — Jefferson. Paine, Lincoln 
and others; the teachings of the great leaders of the American 
working class — Debs, Haywood, Ruthenberg, Foster and Brow- 
der; and the great teachers of all the peoples of the world — Marx, 
Engels, Lenin and Stalin. 

But we are not satisfied only to understand. We truly in- 
fluence the wofld. Look at Europe! Was it not the Communists 
who led the 170 million Russian people to overthrow reactionary 



4450 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 



DA"sas Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 

Ellis Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 7) 



anti-semitic. anti-cultural Czarism? Was it not the Communisis 
who helped lead the Spanish people to slop the spread of the 
Fascist pest? Even in dark Germany today, the chief hope for 
liberation lies in the work of Communists organized secretly to 
overthrow the Hitler regime. Look at Hsic! Is it not the great 
Chinese Communist Party that is providing the staunchest ob- 
stacle to Japanese fascism? Even in the United States — aren't the 
Communists one of the most important factors in building ihe 
forces of progress — trade unions, unemployed organizations, etc.? 

In Philadelphia, the Communist Party is playing a leading 
part in stopping new taxes, in fighting to break the grip of the 
bondholders who are taking 46 per cent of the taxes for their own 
profit, in uniting the forces of progress against fascism and re- 
action. 

Communists think even further than these questions. We have 
learned from our studies that we don't have to put up with a 
social system that breeds all the evils from which we suffer today. 
Our present capitalist system did not always exist. Other 
systems of society preceded it. Better systems will follow it. We 
can conceive of a system of society where we all don't have to 
live inadequately so a few can live in excessive luxury; a system 
of peace, co-operation, international brotherhood, and adequate 
living standards to replace capitalism v/ith its unemployment, 
war and bad living conditions and poverty. 

So — why should you live blindly, like a bat? Why just be a 
part of a passive mass which waits to be influenced? Why not 
live intelligently and serve yourself and all the common people 
well. Activity in our Party will fill your life with understanding, 
culture and vision besides helping to improve all material con- 
ditions of life. 



I would like to join the Communist Party. 

Name 

Address 

Occupation flge 

Now member of what organization 

Fill out and mail to C. P. of Philadelphia, 250 S. Broad St 






COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4451 



Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 

Ellis Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 8) 




The Communist Position 
on the City Charter 



• By FRANK HELLMfliN 

City Organizer 

C. P. of Philadelphia 



T 



HE COMMUNIST PARTY desires that the new City Charter, 
now before the state legislature, shall provide social security, 
freedom and democracy for the people of Philadelphia. But the 
Philadelphia Charter Commission has presented a City Manager 
plan which robs the people the right to elect their own mayor. 

The Charter provides proportional representation, v/hich is 
democratic and which is favored by the Communist Party. But 
the proposals of the City Charter Commission centering around 
the City Manager plan are reactionary, and in the interests of 
the bankers. The Charter Commission denies the people the 
right to elect their own mayor. 

The Commission proposes to reduce the number of council- 
men from tvv'-enty-two to eleven, thus going a long way towards 
nullifying proportional representation by making it difficult for 
minority parties to elect even one councilman, and reducing the 
democratic representation of the people. These eleven men 
would be given the power to appoint the mayor, who is robbed 
of o:ll important functions, and the city manager. The Charter 
Commission proposes to give the City Manager autocratic 
powers to appoint and remove all the important department 
heads who have the welfare of the people in their hands. City 
Council, elected by the people, is told specifically not to "inter- 
fere". The wealthy bondholders would be protected by a pro- 
vision guaranteeing payment of their interest, no matter what 
other items in the budget are lefl: unpaid. 

The City Charter Commission ignores the needs of the 
people. No department of housing is set up, no department of 
public assistance, and there is no provision for a minimum pro- 
gram of housing, health, jobs and relief, hospitals, playgrounds 
and other services to the people. No public hearings are provid- 
ed before laws take effect. No guarantee of the right to organize 
is given city employees. 



4452 COMMUNIST AC'IJVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 

Elus Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 9) 



i 
I 

' In order that the city charter shall be an instrument of the 

' people and no* the bankers, the Communist Party is presenting 

• a bill in the state legislature providing: 

• 1. That the charter must be voted on section by section and 
I not as a whole. 

j 2. Proportional representation is democratic and should be 

I passed. 

I 3. The citizens must protect their right to elect their own 

' mayor and leading city officials. The autocratic city manager 

! plan is opposed to democratic procedure and must be defeated. 

J 4. The City Council shall remain at the present size, shall | 

' be elected for two instead of four years (the mayor to be elected - 

- by popular vote also for a two year term). City Council shall ? 

' have the right to approve or rem.ove department heads who shall ! 

! be nominated by the elected mayor. City Council shall have un- | 

• restricted authority over the budget. | 



I 9. City employees shall be guaranteed the right to organize 

I and labor shall have adequate representation on the civil service 
I commission. 



i 5. Filing fees shall be $25 for candidates to City Council in- i 

i stead of the $250 proposed, and only 500 signatures shall be re- . 

I quired instead of the 2,000 now proposed. Candidates shall | 

I have the right to place their party emblem and party slogan on ! 

! the ballot. ' 

i I 

j 6. The charter must contain the initiative, referendum and j 

i recall. . 



I 7. There must be provisions in the charter against the use | 

I of police or outside strikebreakers in labor disputes. j 

? 8. The charter shall make adequate provision for the needs ' 

! of the people, with a department of housing and department of ' 

* public assistance. I 

I 
j 

i 
, i 

? The new charter must deliver the city from the clutches of i 

I bondholders, utilities and bankers, who strangle the city and i 

I take 46 per cent of the taxpayers m.oney every[ year. The city i 

I manager plan must be defeated. The City Charter must perserve j 

I the peoples right to elect their own mayor. The City Charter ; 

I must provide adequate welfare for the needs of the people of • 

I Philadelphia. j 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IX THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4453 



Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. ' 

Etjjs Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 10) 



Why We Honor 
Lenin s Memoiy 



• By RALPH GUCK 

Member District Buro 
C. P. of Eastern Pa, 

The people of Philadelphia honor Vladimir Ilyitch Lenin to- 
day because Lenin devoted his life to the ideals which are dear 
to the hearts of true Americans. It was under the leadership of 
Lenin that the peope of Russia destroyed Czarism and set up the. 
first successful working class state — the Soviet Union, where 
socialist democracy has been established. 

It was Lenin who, in 1903 founded the Communist Party of 
Russia (then the Bolsheviks), which has now become the great 
Communist Party of the Soviet Union at whose head stands Len- 
in's chief disciple, Stalin. 

We honor Lenin today because it was Lenin who showed 
the correct path for winning world peace and democracy. Dur- 
ing the lost world war of 1914-1918, Lenin exposed the treacher- 
ous Social Democratic leaders who y.upported the imperialist 
war-makers. Lenin explained the reactionary character of the 
last World War. He led the successful October, 1917, Soviet 
revolution in Russia, which brought the v/ar to an end. The sol- t 

diers, following Lenin's guidance, refused to fight for reaction j 

any longer. | 

Lenin, in 1919, called for the formation of a Marxist Interna- I 

tional, and in 1919 founded the Communist International, the j 

embodiment of the brotherhood of the toilers of all races and j 

nationalities, in the fight against imperialist exploitation j 

Lenin showed how the colonial people and the poor farmers j 

could win freedom in a common fight with the workers of the | 

world against imperialism. j 

The Soviet Union, the Communist International and the Com- 1 

munist Party of the Soviet Union, are great monuments to Len- j 

in's life and work. | 

Vladimir Ilyitch was born in Simbirsk, now called Ulyanovsk j 

in 1870. While Lenin was still a schoolboy, in 1887, Lenin's bro- j 

ther, Alexander was executed by the Czarist regime. Lenin grew j 

to manhood under the bloody terror of Czarism. In 1893, Lenin j 

went to St. Petersburg, a tireless, singleminded, Marxist revolu- j 

tionist. Lenin was arrested in 1895 and after two years in prison, 5 



4454 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 

Ellis Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 11) 



i 



Help rehabilitate the wounded American Volunteers 
of the Lincoln Brigade, just returned from Spain 

ATTEND THE WELCOME HOME 

MASS MEETING and CONCERT 

FR!., JANUARY 27, 1939, 8.30 P. M. 

at 

^ Musical Fund Hall - 810 Locust Street 



I 

i 

* was exiled to Siberia for three years. Lenin was then forced to 

J live in exile abroad. Lenin became the leading Russian Marxist. 

I In 1903, he organized the Bolsheviks into a well knit, disciplined 

I Marxist Party, which came to grips with all the enemies of the 

j Russian workers, distributing newspapers and leaflets through- 

, out Russia, fighting againt Czarism and for democracy, and for 

" better working and living conditions for the Russian workers 

? and peasants. The 1905 revolution was defeated, but Lenin ral- 

l lied the workers anew. 1905 was the "dress rehearsal" for 1917. 
j 

i Lenin returned to Russia after the March, 1917 revolution 

I which overthrew Czarism. In October, 1917, led by Lenin, the 

» people of Russia threw the Czarists out of power and took over 

I their own country, establishing a working class government— J 

I The Soviet Uriion. 5 

' During the last seven years of his life, Lenin led the Soviet I 

I government in conducting its victorious struggle against foreign | 

5 imperialist invasion, in rebuilding Russia's ruined economy, and 

} overcoming blockftde and famine. 

Today the Soviet Union, led by Stalin, follows the footsteps 

i of Lenin in defending peace and democracy against the fascist 

{ war makers. The Soviet Union aids the Spanish people, the 

j people of China and Ethiopia in defending themselves against 

j the bestial attacks of fascist Germany, Italy and Japan. 

I Lenin, by his living example as the head of the victorious 

I socialist government taught us the road to liberation of the 

] people of all lands from the rule of profiteers, from the exploita- 

l tion of bankers. He taught us how to establish the rule of the 

I people, how to win and maintain socialist democracy. Lenin 

' is dead. But today, fifteen years after Lenin's death — LENINISM 

\ LIVES. 



MAJOR MILTON WOLFF — Guest Speaker 

n E N D FRIENDS OF THE flBRftHflM LINCOLN BRIGADE 

Contributions to 1011 Chestnut Street Room 818 I 

j 
j 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4455 

Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 

Ellis Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 12) 



Rescue Philadelphia from 
the Grip of the Banks 

• By CARL REEVE 

Educational Director 

C. P. of Eastern Pennsylvania 

X he people of Philadelphia have v/on a victory in prevent- 
ing the Republican City Council from putting over the sales tax, 
■wage tax and higher water rates. The Communist Party play- 
ed a big part in thus saving the pocketbooks of the people from 
being picked. It was the picket lines, resolutions, and mass pro- 
tests participated in by labor unions, the business men, the Com- 
munist Party, and the majority of the population which gave the 
bankers' budget of the Republican Party this set-back. 

But the fight is not over. Philadelphia is still in the grip of 
the banks. Forty-six per cent of the 1939 budget is still slated to 
go to the bankers. There is still an appropriation of $34,000,000 
in the 1939 budget for interest and other debt charge3 to be 
paid to the v/ealthy bondholders. However, the 1939 budget does 
not appropriate a cent for W. P. A. jobs, and almost nothing for 
health, housing, and other social welfare. 

The City Council appropriates only 70 cents per person for 
relief, whereas the fourteen largest American cities spend an av- 
erage of $9.90 per person for relief. But the City Council pays the 

wealthy bondholders 4^--^ per cent interest on their bonds, in- \ 

stead of the 1 J/< per cent interest paid by the federal govern - f 

ment. For every dollar the city borrows, the bondholders get \ 

$3.92. The ciity government has paid out $300,000,000 in inter- ! 

est on the city's outstanding debt of $410,000,000, and still owes | 

the entire principal. | 

City Council is now proposing all kinds of new taxes and I 

new debt schemes, the aim of which is to make the majority of I 

the people bear the tax burden, and to turn the biggest part of i 

these taxes over to the wealthy bondholders. They want to bor- [ 
row on the Gas Works, at big interest, and the people will have 
to foot the bill. 



i , .^ 

25241—52 11 



4456 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Davis Exhibit No. 4 

BteLFAND Exhibit No. 7 

Ellis Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 13) 



I The program of the Communist Party for refinancmg the ? 

I city debts and stopping the huge interest payments to the ' 

wealthy bondholders, has caught the imagination of the city. ! 

I The Communist program, which has now been taken up by the | 

I unions, and many other organizations, calls for: | 

1 ^ 

i 1. No new debts. No new taxes. These taxes and debts | 

I would come out of the pockets of the people. Against \ 

I all schemes to hand over the Gas Works to the public | 

I utilities companies or to borrow on the Gas Works. This I 

would only pile up more huge interest payments to the g 

wealthy bondholders. ' 

2. Reorganize and re-finance the city debt structure. Stop i 
payment of all interest and debt charges to the wealthy g 
bondholders. This would immediately save the people o 
$34,000,000. \ 

3. Tax on stocks and bonds, by state legislation if necessary. 1 

4. Collection of huge delinquent taxes owed the city by f 
wealthy corporations. | 

5. Raising assessments on property of the wealthy. | 

6. Exemption of small home owners from these taxes. | 

I 9 

I 7. For a budget that gives adequate appropriations for WPA i 

I jobs and relief, health, housing and slum clearance, and | 

I other social welfare. ■ 

i The Communist Party says:— LET THE WEALTHY BOND- \ 

S HOLDERS WAIT FOR THEIR HUGE INTEREST PAYMENTS. THE \ 

I UNEMPLOYED CANNOT WAIT FOR lOBS, THE SICK CANNOT I 

^ WAIT FOR MEDICAL CARE. THE POORLY HOUSED CANNOT j 

I WAIT FOR DECENT SHELTER. j 

j We want a People's Budget not a Bankers' Budget. Let us | 

i build the united front of business men, professionals and | 

i the labor movement to break the grip of the banks on Philadel- j 
\ phia. 

I Let us demand that the City Councilmen declare themselves | 

' on this program. Let us elect progressive councilmen in the | 

I coming city elections who will be pledged to fight for this pro- I 

I gram of guarding the welfare of the people. | 

I 

! I 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4457 

Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 

Elijs Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 14) 



I ■ \ 

\ The Dawn of a New China 1 



I • By THOMAS NflBRIED ^ 

I Chairman Negro Commission, i 

i C. P. of Eastern Pennsylvania : 

I ^ 

I "The peoples of the East will be able to see • 

I that no matter how weak they may appear to | 

I be, and no matter how strong and invincible ihe • 

!• power of the oppressors may seem to be, using, ? 

as they do, all the marvels of modern military | 

science and technique; a revolutionary war, | 

waged by the oppressed peoples can, provided j 

it is able to awake the millions of toilers and I 

! oppressed in its cause, nevertheless contain | 

within itself the possibility of such wonders that i 

the emancipation of the peoples of the East is | 

I already a practical possibility" | 
i —LENIN, 1919 



I 

I i 

!' The emancipation of the peoples of the East has begun! : 

The 450 million toilers of China have awakened! | 
J 

j Uniting behind the Chinese Nationalist Government, based | 

I on Kuomintang-Communist cooperation to defeat the Japanese t 

• aggressors, the Chinese people have built an army of over two j 

I million men. This army following the tactics of the glorious Red ' 

I Army of 600,000 men, led by Chu-Teh, has welded a powerful | 

I unity with the workers and peasants. 1 

i I 

\ The achievement of growing unity with the Chinese j 

j people has enabled the Chinese Army to achieve such huge vie- I 

j tories as at Taierchwang where a Japanese army of over 45,000 \ 

j v/as destroyed. This unity hoc been the basis for the tacticr- \ 

j worked out by the Red Army in view of its lack of equipment, \ 

I and now adopted by the Chinese government, to work in utmost j 

I secrecy, to strike like lightning and vanish — thus wearing down i 

I the enemy. | 

I I 

I The tenuous Japanese lines in China do not constitute con- | 

I quest. Their soldiers dare not move from these lines, knowing i 

■ the hatred of the aroused peasantry. In December 5,000 soldiers i 

! were sent to wipe out Chinese guerilla fiqhters — they never ro- | 

I turned. ; 

j 

I The awakening Chinese people are experiencing a political i 

! and cultural rebirth. The masses of China have gathered more ' 

I strongly than ever around the program of national liberation, • 

I advocated by the Chinese Communist Party, calling for democ- f 

j racy, freedom, for lower taxes, for land for the peasants, for edu- 

I 

! 



9 

J 



4458 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 

Ellis Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 15) 



cation of the people and for vigorous armed resistance against 
the invader. Traitors who want to sell out the country, including 
feudal lords, war-lords. Trotskyites and other lackeys of Japanese 
imperialism, are being weeded out of leading positions 
in the nationalist government. The national liberation program 
has taken root, especially in the Special District (formerly Soviet 
District) where a broad democracy of workers, peasants, and 
soldiers has been set up. Everyone over 16 can vote in the secret, 
direct elections, and over 30 per cent of the elected representa- 
tives are women, i-'ormerly, over 90 per cent were illiterate, 
today one third o| the ad^iits and two thirds of the children can 
read and write. Free schools are flourishing — over 200 gram- 
mar schools, a normal school, technical and military schools 
have been set up. Each city has clubs which organize singing, 
acting, reading, and sports. Wall newspapers tell of latest 
happenings. 

Contrast this with the suppression,, the taxes, and the terror 
imposed on the Japanese people by a reactionary government 
which this month placed itself, under Hiranuma, the Hitler of 
Japan. 

The United States and all other democracies should join in 
aiding China. 

The Communist Party of Eastern Pennsylvania urges you 
and your organization to help China in her heroic struggle for 
liberation. 

Demand an embargo on Japan No arms to Japan! 

Demand aid for China Credits for China! 

Boycott Japanese goods Don't wear silk! 



^/W 



Greetings from 

fl Group of Members of the 
flmerican League 



L_ 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4459 

Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 

Ellis Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 16) 



The Land of Peace 
and Socialism 

•By DflVID DflVIS 

Member District Euro, 

C. P. of Eastern Pennsylvania 

In the present world situation the Soviet Union stands out 
OS a beacon of light and inspiration to all the people of the world 
who aspire to prosperity and peace. 

Since 1929, while the capitalist world has suffered misery 
and unemployment, the first Socialist country, established under 
the leadership of V. 1. Lenin, has abolished unemployment. Its 
national income has trebled. Average wages and salaries have 
more than trebled, fl comprehensive system of social insurance, 
of a scope unknown to the capitalist world, provides medical 
care, payments for permanent or temporary disabilities, pensions 
to invalids and the aged, and maternity costs, all without deduc- 
tions from the wages of the workers. 

The Soviet Union is today the bulwark of international 
peace. The Soviet Union, following Lenin's principles, has per- 
sistently called for the cooperation of other nations which want 
peace to resist the aggression of fascism. Time and again the 
Soviet Union has pointed to the one way by which the demo- 
crcctic nations of the world can stop the war and devestation now 
raging in Spain and China and threatening the whole world 
i. e., International Cooperation for Peace ,and against Aggression. 

The Soviet Union is a country of peace and prosperity be- 
cause it is a workers government, a socialist land which ha', 
abolished the profit system, and operates in the interest of the 
people. 

Increasingly the American people, and particularly those or- 
ganized into Trade Unions are realizing the positive role for 
world peace played by the Soviet Union, A recent vote, where 
83% of the people of the United States favored victory of the 
Soviet Union as against Germany shows that the peace policy 
of the Soviet Union is commanding the respect and admiration 
of the people. 

The Soviet Union is carrying out in life the teachings of 
Lenin, under the personal leadership of his great disciple, Joseph 
Stalin and the Communist Party of .the Soviet Union, which was 
founded by Lenin. 






4460 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 

Ellis Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 17) 



Read Our Literature 
and the Daily Worker 

• By NAN PENDRELL j 

Literature flgent, | 

C. P. of Eastern Pa. \ 
f, 

The Daily Worker, and the Sunday Worker, are ammuni- i 

tion in the struggle for Democracy, Jobs, Peace and Security. J 

Daily these great newspapers, organs of the National Committee 'i 

of the Communist Party of the United States, bring us the essen- | 

tial news of the great movements of the people, all over the world. \ 

Without distortion, beholden to no dictation except the needs | 

of the people, these our newspapers clear through the lies and I 

provocations of a kept press, and blaze the trail to unity and j 

progress. I 

Newspapers published by the party of the people, they ore ! 

indespensible to an understanding of today's currents in a world j 

menaced by reaction and fascism. To bring these papers to new I 

readers constantly is the urgent task not only of Communists, j 

but all of those who would see democracy and peace triumph | 

over reaction and war. i 

Similarly the literature published by Workers Library and | 

I International Publishers charts the course ahead which the I 

I people must follow, and also explains the history of the past so j 

I that today's generations may be guided by what has gone be- | 

fore 

I Thus, "THE UNITED FRONT", by Dimitroff presents the pro- | 

I gram of the welding of all forces in progressive society in a i 

I common front against world reaction. "THE PEOPLE'S FRONT", f 

I by Earl.Browder shows specifically what path this ;x>mmon front I 

I is destined to take in America. How the people's front shall pro- j 

I ceed day-by-day, until it achieve3 its goal of democracy and | 

1 peace is revealed in Browder's most recent publication, the great I 
I pamphlet, "NATIONAL AND SOCIAL SECURITY" 



Along with these three historic documents stands the new 
book by James Ford, "THE NEGRO AND THE DEMOCRATIC 
FRONT", a monument to the revolutionary traditions of the Ne- 
gro people and a clarion call to unity of all toilers. 

All four of these publications form the cornerstone on which 
can be built a correct evaluation of the world today. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4461 

Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 

Elus Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 18) 



Help Democratic Spain 

• By MAC HARRIS 

Member Dist. Euro 
C. P. of Eastern Pa. 

In July 1936, the fascist generals, led by Franco, staged an 
armed rebellion against the democratic Spanish Peoples Front 
Government. Defeated by the people of Spain in the elections 
the fascists tried to maintain the rule of the reactionary imperial- 
ists and rich landlords by drowning the Peoples Front Govern- 
ment in blood. From the start the fascist rebellion was inspired, 
financed and carried on, by Mussolini and Hitler. The war in 
Spain is a struggle of the people of Spain to repel a foreign fas- 
cist invasion, and a fight for the right of the Spanish people to 
determine their own destiny. 

fit this moment the Spanish Loyalists are desperately trying 
to beat back another frantic attempt of Hitler, Mussolini and 
their puppet Franco, to drown in blood the fight of the Spanish 
people for a free and democratic Spain. Armed with millions of 
dollars worth of ammunition and warplanes, thousands upon 
thousands of Italian and German troops march to try to claim 
Spain for Fascism. With deathless heroism the Spanish People's 
flrmy defends itself and hurls counter attacks against Franco's 
lines. The Spanish soldiers know there is little food at home, and 
that the Fascists have superior implements of war. Yet they fight 
as they have fought for more than two' years, determined that 
the last loyal son will fall before the Spanish people will turn 
their homeland over to Fascism. 

For more than two years the Loyalists have looked to other 
democratic countries for aid. But only the Soviet Uniion has ? 

firmly and generously stood by the people of Spain. The Span- 
ish people know that without the aid of the Soviet Union, the 
suffering of the people at home would have been intensified, 
their own fight to stave off Fascism would have been weakened. | 

i 






_._«.j 



4462 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 

Ellis Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 19) 



I 

j The "neutrality" law of the United States, has helped the I 

I Fascist aggressors. The "neutrality" law prohibits help to Loya- j 

I list Spain but allows the fascist countries to buy unlimited war f 

I supplies from the United States. In reality the "neutrality" law | 

I has boycotted and blockaded democratic Spain and given un- | 

I stinted help to Hitler and Mussolini. The "neutrality" laws have 1 

I brought great misery and starvation to the masses of Spain. For j 

I Loyalist Spain has two thirds of the people of Spain, but only j 

one-third of the land with which to provide food. t 



I 

I The address of President Roosevelt to the opening session | 

j of the 76th Congress oj the United States took cognizance of some j 

I of these facts. He said, "... we can and should avoid any ac- | 

I tion, or any lack of action, which will encourage, assist, or build | 

Sup an aggressor. We have learned that when we deliberately f 
try to legislate neutrality, our neutrality laws may operate un- 
evenly and unfairly and may actually give aid to an aggressor 
and deny it to the victim. The instinct of self-preservation should 
warn us that we ought not to let that happen any more." The last 
sentence clearly explains that a victory for fascism in Spain 

would menace the peace and security of the American people. j 

Those who cherish liberty and freedom will leave no action | 

undone which will help lift the embargo against democratic | 

Spain. The U. S. government must translate President Roose- ! 

velt's words into action before it is too late. Immediately — tonight 1 

— tomorrow — write to your Congressman, your Senator, and the I 

President. Demand the lifting of the embargo against the Span- j 

ish people. Stop Hitler's war against democracy . Initiate in your I 

trade union a movement to send organized demands to Wash- | 

ington for lifting the embargo. PI telegram, a resolution should f 

go to Washington from every trade union local — from every or- | 

ganization and meeting — at the beginning of the 76th Congress. j 

Friends of Democracy— Work — fight to lift the embargo on | 

Spain! I 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4463 



Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 

Elus Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 20) 



THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER 



THE INTERNATIONAL 



Oh! say, can you see by the dawn's 
early light. 

What so proudly we hail'd at the twi- 
light's last gleaming! 

Whose broad stripes and bright stars 
thro the perilous fight, 

O'er the ramparts we watch'd were so 
gallantly streaming, 

And the rocket's red glare, the bombs 
bursting in air, 

Gave proof thro the night that our flag 
was still there. 

Oh! say, d .os that star spangled ban- 
ner yet wave. 

O'er the land of the free and the home 
of the brave! 



Arise, you prisoners of starvation! 
Arise you wretched of the earth. 
For justice thunders condemnation, 
A better world's in birth. 
No more tradition's chains shall bind us 
Arise, you slaves, no more in thrall! 
The earth shall rise on new foundations 
We have been naught; we shall be all 



'Tis the final conflict. 
Let each stand in his place; 
The International Soviet shall bs 
the human race! 



the 



AMERICA 



We want no condescending saviors 
To rule us from a judgment hall; 
We workers ask not for their favors. 
Let us consult for all. 
To make the thief disgorge his booty. 
To free the spirit from the cell. 
We must ourselves decide our duty 
We must decide and do it well. 

Refrain: 'Tis the final conflict. 



My country, 'tis of thee 

Sweet land of liberty. 

Of thee I sing; 

Land where my fathers died, 

Land of the Pilgrim's pride. 

From every mountain side. 

Let freedom ring. 

My native country, thee, 
Land of the noble free. 
Thy name I love; 
I love thy rocks and rills. 
Thy woods and templed hills. 
My heart with rapture thrills. 
Like that above. 



TRUTH TO YOUR EYES 

Reason to your ears. Truth to your eyes 

We are the women's and children's 
cries 

from Ethiopia, China, Spain 
over and over and over again 
All this blood, history will tell 
at what moment of what falling shell 
your hand moved, your voice cried: 
No! No morel Enough have died! 
Reason to your ears. Truth to your eyes 
Rise and stop this fascist slaughter! 
But rise! 

Poem by Walter Lowenfels 
Music by Ruth Josephs 



-. 



4464 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 

Ellis Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 21) 



P K €) CG K A\ Ml 



Opening of Meeting 

The Star Spangled Banner ( Sung by Massed Choruses 

The International ( Accompanied by Audience 

Himno De Riego 

(Spanish People's National flnthem) 

Sung by Spanish Popular 
Front Chorus 



Why We Celebrate Lenin Memorial Day 

Address By Russell Watson 



10. Star Spangled Banner and the International. 



! 

! 

i 

I 

3. Songs: Sam Woodmg's Negro Chorus i 

Go Down Moses — Joseph C. Williams, Soloist | 

Steal Away to Jesus — Marie Wyatt, Soloist 
Extra Gang, Clarence Williams, Composer, J. Williams Soloist 
St. Louis Blues, W. C. Handy, Composer, L. T. Watts, Soloist 

4. For a People's Budget and a People's Charter 

Address by S. A. Darcy 

5. March of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade Veterans 

Escort of Honor | 
by Young Communist League j 

6. A War Chest for Democracy Against Fascism | 

Address by Frank Hellman | 

7. Our Social and National Security Address by Earl Browder 

8. Light for the People Address by Carl Reeve 

9. Truth To Your Eyes Presented by the 

Communist Party Cuturol Committee 

Production Director Ruth Deacon 

Mass Movement Direction and Dances - Merle Hirsh 

Musical Direction Anthony Byrne 

Masks Louis Hirshman 

Costumer - Harriet Matthews 

Costumes by _ William Robertson 

Chief stage Manager Ted Cummings 

Technical Director Sue Jacobs 

Dancers. Merle Hirsh Dancers 

Chorus Freiheit Gesang Verein, Paul Held, Director 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4465 

Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 

Ellis Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 22) 



f i 

? w ^ 

j Y Ve wish to take this opportunity to ex- | 

i press our recognition and appreciation l 

I of the efforts of all those who by their | 

! loyalty and devotion to the ideals of I 

! progress, international brotherhood I 

! and social security, have helped build I 

I the International Workers Order in tiais • | 

district into one of the largest and j 

soundest workingmen's fraternal bene- I 

fit societies. | 

But the job is not yet finished. These 2 

are the days when the pace of pro- j 

gress must grow ever faster. The j 

ideals of international brotherhood .= 

must embrace broader masses of peo- i 

pie and penetrate ever deeper into the i 

hearts of man. Social security must be- i 

come fuller and more adequate. | 



THEREFORE. IF YOU ARE A MEMBER. BECOME fl BUILDER IN 
OUR PRESENT GRAND MEMBERSfflP DRIVE. 

If you are not a member 

JOIN NOW! 

LIFE INSURANCE • SICK BENEHTS 
Medical Service at Minimum Cost 



Phila. District Gommittee I. III. 0. 

RUSSIAN CITY COMMITTEE ITALIAN CITY COMMITTEE 

JEWISH CITY COMMITTEE UKRAINIAN CITY COMMITTEE 

POLISH CITY COMMITTEE 



I 



4466 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 



Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 

EriJS Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 23) 



PEOPLES FORUM ''-'""'.^l Phila. Workers School 



Sunday, January 22, 8:15 P. M. 

ANNA LOUISE STRONG 

World -traveler and reporter; auth- 
or of 'I Change Worlds', 'One- 
Fiflh of Mankind', etc. 

"China's Fight for Freedom" 



Sunday, January 29, 8:15 P. M. 

HARRY MflRTEL 

Return request lecture by this 
popular former teacher in the 
Phila. Workers School, now Edu- 
cational Director, Fur Dressers and 
Dyers Union. 

"The Catholics and the 

Communists" 

including an examination of the 

Father Coughlin-WDAS controversy. 




MUSiaflNS HALL — 120 North 18th Street 



• Subs. 25c 



COMING — Dr. Henry E. Sigerist ('Man and Medicine', The Great Doctors', 
'American Medicine', 'Socialized Medicine'). Mar. 5, Ruth McKenney 
('My Sister Eileen'). Mar. 12, Dr. Ch'ao-ting Chi. 



REVOLUTIONARY GREETINGS 

From 

THE FORTY-NINTH WARD BRANCH 

of the 

COMMUNIST PARTY U. S. A. 



L*. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4467 



Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 

Ellis Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 24) 



Medical Bureau and North flmerican 
Committee to flid Spanish Democracy 



MODERN 



r^ 



JL 

with 




n 



LU 



r^ 



L ! 



CI-LflN-CHEN 
Internationally known Chinese Dancer 

MERLE HIR-SH 
and Her Dance Group 

S AKI 

Noted Japanese Dancer 



ONE HUNDRED FIFTY NORTH BROAD STREET, PHILfiDELPHIfl 

(SCOTTISH RITE TEMPLE) 

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1939, 8:30 P. M. 

Tickets: 35c, 50c, 75c, and $1.00 may be secured at 
Gimbel Bros., 207 N. Broad Street, 322 South 
16th Street, 104 S. Ninth Street. 

For mail orders, write 207 N. Broad St., Phone, RIT 8907 

fjioce^ ta the. GMxhea'd. QW^ in £ficun 



MEDICm. BUREAU AND NORTH AMERICAN 
COMMITTEE TO AID SPANISH DEMOCRACY 

... is proud to announce the amazing NEW FILM FROM SPAIN 

RETURN TO LIFE 

This film, in sound, runs for almost one hour. It 

shows the front line battles, the bombardments, the 

work of the American Hospitals in Spain. 

Arrangements for showing this film can be made by calling 
PENnypacker 5344 RITtenhouse 8907 



^. 



4468 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 



Davis Exhibit No. 4 

Helfand Exhibit No. 7 

Elijs Exhibit No. 2 

(Part 25) 



REGISTER NOW for NEW COURSES in the| 

WORKERS SCHOOL 

Honor Lenin by Mastering Leninism! 



Master Lenin's teachings and make them live! You 
believe in struggles against fascism and war, for the 
liberation of the toiling masses from exploitation and 
misery . You must equip yourself with Marxist-Lenin- 
ist knowledge in order to aid the struggle for jobs, 
security, democracy, and peace. 



Courses begin week of January 30. Course of Joshua 
Kiuiitz begins next Thursday. 



PRINCIPLES OF 
COMMUNISM 

(in Yiddish) 

The basic principles 
o| Lenin's program to 
help mobilize the 
Jewish people. 

Mon. 8:50 P. M. $3 

A. OLKEN 



RUSSIflN LITERATURE AND 
SOVIET CULTURE 

by 
JOSHUA KUNITZ 

fl world authority and famous 
writer analyzes the great Russian 
writers and the phenomenal 
growth of cultural life in the Sov- 
iet Union under Socialism. 

Thurs. 8:50 P. M. Fee: $4 

The course begins next Thursday 



ENGLISH 

fl special class of- 
fered Tuesday at 
7:15 and Thursday ul 
8:50 especially to 
help Jewish workers 
increase their effect- 
iveness. 

Tues. & Thurs. $4 



Learn how to use the Accumulated Science 
of Centuries for the Welfare of the People I 



SCIENCE FOR THE 
MASSES 

The fundamental facts 
of science, fl discussion 
of its history and the 
great value science can 
be to people. 

Mon. 8:50 P. M. $3 



SOCIAL HEALTH 
AND DISEASE 

Social causes of disease 
Aimed to give an intelli- 
gent uriderstanding of 
the causes, nature and 
cure of tuberculosis, 
gonhorrea, syphilis 
Public Health programs. 

Mon. 7:15 P. M. $3 



MATHEMATICS 
AS A TOOL 

flrithmetic, algebra and 
trigonometry as applied 
to your work. Learn how 
to read and interpret 
charts and statistics. 

Fri. 7:15 P. M. $3 



PRINCIPLES OF COMMUNISM 

fin authoritative presentation. 
Thursday 8:50 P. M. Fee: $3 

NORRIS WOOD 

POLITICAL ECONOMY 

Fundamental economic teachings of 

Marx and Engels. 

Tuesday 8:50 P. M. Fee: $3 



CURRENT EVENTS 

fl political discussion of the nev/s 
week by week. Discussion of the ec- 
onomic and political forces shaping 
national and international events. 

Thursday 7:15 P. M. Fee: $3 

NflN PENDRELL 



Philadelphia Workers School 

1215 WALNUT STREET 

PENnypacker 8584 



CARL REEVE 

Director 



Courses begin week of 
JflNUflRY 30th — FERUflRY 4th 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 4469 



PHILADELPHIA EXHIBIT NO. 3 

(Testimony of Samuel Di Maria) 
(Part 1) 




4470 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

PHir.AnKT.PHiA Exhibit No. 3 

(Testimony of Samuel Di Maria) 

(Part 2) 



LII2RATURS - I.IAY 1944 



CLUB 


WQW 


COnCEHTRATION 


MASS 


MARXIST 




MISC. 


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23 






$7.4^ 


S6m Lee 


14 


50 


47 


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Pred Douglas 


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138 


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12.20 


24th Wc 


25 


loo 


269 


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C.45 


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46th W 


49 


109 1 


43.09 


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58 


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53 


10 


138 


; 6 




6.94 


22nd V/ 


30 


10 G 


102 


5 




7.66 


Olney 


38 


51 


102 

'"' 88 


~7 5 


i 

1 


9.49 


Upper Darby 


6 


25 


12.97 


cUy 


s 












3-1-2-3 


29 


lOO 


68 


i 1 




10.94 


bEQ 


2a 


2 


11 


1 6 




23.66 


«TW 


8 




100 


1 ^ 




4.10 


8T? 


10 




32 


_L,_5 


1 


8.50 


ST'^ 


, 




6 




8T0 


10 




IS 


t 


1 


1.60 


BIG 


6 




12 




1 




mi 


10 


71 


' 57 


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23.14 


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S* E* 


59 




3 


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40 ■ ■ 




I 523 


14 


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Chester ' ! 


Wilmington 


20 : 




^ 85^ 






17.98 


50IAL 


677 ' ' 


565 


2163 


lo4 




5 


?45.87 



LITERATURE SUMMARY - JAHUARY - APRIL, 1944 
MOUTH "0" MASS MARZ. COT TCaIM> MISC. DEAUS 



January 737 


616 


47 




1188.79 


6328 




Februar^i 82E 


1280 


58 


3477 


236.67 


649 




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1247 


42 


854 


213.34 


230 


April i 696 


1699 


50 


£359 


187.06 


68 


WBAl 2907 


6042 


197 


6690 


s^825.66 


7275 





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25-35 
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22nd V 

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3 9999 05442 1993