(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Communist methods of infiltration (Government-labor) Hearings"

rf 



T. 



M ' 



Bl 




Given By 
IT S. SUPT. TS 



-3- 1 




COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

(GOVERNMENT— LABOR, PART 2) 



HEARING 

BEFORE THE 

COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
c«ve«*. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

EIGHTY-THIRD CONGRESS 

FIRST SESSION 



JULY 20, 1953 



Printed for the use of the Committee on Un-American Activities 



INCLUDING INDEX 




UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
36543 WASHINGTON : 1953 




Boston Public Library 
Superintendent of Documents 

AUG 1 9 1S53 

COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
United States House of Representatives 

HAROLD H. VELDE, Illinois, Chairman 
BERNARD W. KEARNEY, New York FRANCIS E. WALTER, Pennsylvania 

DONALD L. JACKSON, California MORGAN M. MOULDER, Missouri 

KIT CLARDY, Michigan CLYDE DOYLE, California 

GORDON H. SCHERER, Ohio JAMES B. FRAZIER, Jr., Tennessee 

Robert L. Kunzio, Counsel 

Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., Counsel 

Louis J. Russell, Chief Investigator 

Thomas W. Beale, Sr., Chief Clerk 

Rafhael I. Nixon, Director of Research 

II 



CONTENTS 



Testimony of — I'age 

I. Philip Sipser 1953 

\\ illiam Greenstein 1957 

Charles Klare 1960 

Index ~~~~ 1967 



1 1 r 



Public Law 601, 79th Congress 

The legislation under which the House Committee on Un-American 
Activities operates is Public Law 601, 79th Congress [1946], chapter 
753, 2d session, which provides: 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States 
of A merica in Congress assembled, * * * 

PART 2— RULES OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

Rule X 

SEC. 121. STANDING COMMITTEES 
******* 

17. Committee on Un-American Activites, to consist of nine members. 

Rule XI 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 

******* 

(q) (1) Committee on Un-American Activities. 

(A) Un-American activities 

(2) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by subcommit- 
tee, is authorized to make from time to time investigations of (i) the extent, 
character, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States, 
(ii) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-American propa- 
ganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin and attacks 
the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Constitution, and 
(iii) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress in any necessary 
remedial legislation. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House (or to the 
Clerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such investi- 
gation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable. 

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such 
times and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, 
has recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance 
of such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, and 
to take such testimony, as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued under 
the signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by any 
member designated by any such chairman, and may be served by any person 
designated by any such chairman or member. 



RULES ADOPTED BY THE 83d CONGRESS 

House Resolution 5, January 3, 1953 

******* 

Rule X 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

1. There shall be elected by the House, at the commencement of each Con- 
gress, following standing committees: 

(q) Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine members. 

^p ^ ^ ^ ^t ^ ^ 

Rule XI 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 

******* 

17. Committee on Un-American Activities. 

(a) Un-American Activities. 

(b) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by subcommittee, 
is authorized to make from time to time, investigations of (1) the extent, char- 
acter, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States, 
(2) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-American prop- 
aganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin and 
attacks the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Constitu- 
tion, and (3) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress 
in any necessary remedial legislation. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House (or to the 
Clerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such investi- 
gation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable. 

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such times 
and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, has 
recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance 
of such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, and 
to take such testimony, as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued under 
the signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by any 
member designated by such chairman, and may be served by any person desig- 
nated by any such chairman or member. 

VI 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION (GOVERN- 
MENT— LABOE, PART 2) 



MONDAY, JULY 20, 1953 

United States House of Representatives, 

Committee on Un-American Activities, 

Washington, D. C. 

EXECUTIVE SESSION l 

The Committee on Un-American Activities met, pursuant to call, 
at 2 p. m., in room 225, Old House Office Building, Washington, 
D. C, Hon. Harold H. Velde (chairman) presiding. 

Committee members present: Representatives Harold H. Velde, 
Kit Clardy, and Gordon H. Scherer. 

Staff members present: Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., counsel; W. Jack- 
son Jones, investigator; Leslie W. Scott, research analyst; and Dolores 
Anderson, reporter. 

TESTIMONY OF I. PHILIP SIPSER, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

JACOB SCHNEIDER 

Mr. Velde. Let the record show that I have appointed a subcom- 
mittee, consisting of Mr. Scherer, Mr. Clardy, and myself, Mr. Velde, 
as chairman, for the purpose of this hearing, and that all are present. 

Will the witness stand to be sworn, please? 

In the testimony you are about to give, do you solemnly swear to 
tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help 
you God? 

Mr. Sipser. I do. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, several communications to the 
committee have been received, which should probably be made a 
matter of record. Do you desire it to be done now? 

Mr. Velde. It depends on the nature of the material. 

Mr. Tavenner. There are several affidavits, explaining connections 
of certain individuals to activities under question by this committee, 
which have never been previously reported. 

Mr. Velde. I think we will proceed with the hearing now, and take 
the matter under advisement, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Clardy. May I see the documents, please? 

Mr. Tavenner. I understood he wanted it put in the record. 

Mr. Velde. I believe we should take this up at another time, Mr. 
Counsel. 

Mr. Tavenner. Very well, sir. 

i Released by the committee, July 31, 1953. 

1953 



1954 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

Will you state your name, please, sir? 

Mr. Sipser. My name is I. Philip Sipser. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you accompanied by counsel? 

Mr. Sipser. Yes, I am. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel please identify himself for the record? 

Mr. Schneider. My name is Jacob Schneider, of 50 Broad Street, 
?siew York, N. Y. 

Mr. Tavenner. "When and where were you born, Mr. Sipser? 

Mr. Sipser. I was born in 1918, in New York State. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your profession? 

Mr. Sipser. I am an attorney. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you been a practicing attorney? 

Mr. Sipser. If m)^ recollection is correct, I have been an attorney 
for 13 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell the committee, please, what your 
formal educational training has been? 

Mr. Sipser. I went to Public School 161 in Manhattan, then I 
\\ ent to Boys' High in Brooklyn, N. Y. I then went to Brooklyn 
College and to the Brooklyn Law School, in New York. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did you complete your legal training? 

Mr. Sipser. In 1940. 

Mr. Tavenner. Since that time you have been engaged in the 
practice of law? 

Mr. Sipser. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where have you been engaged in the practice 
of law — in what city? 

Mr. Sipser. In New York City. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Sipser, during the course of the investigation 
conducted before the committee in Los Angeles, considerable testi- 
mony was heard which indicated the activities of a Communist Party 
group within the National Lawyers' Guild. A witness by the name 
of David Aaron, an attorney, testified before the committee that he 
had been a member of the Communist Party and had withdrawn from 
the party along in 1946 or 1948, but that during his Communist Party 
membership, efforts were made by his Communist Party group to 
infiltrate the National Lawyer's Guild in Los Angeles. This witness 
advised the committee of the nature of that infiltration movement 
and the nature of the control the Communist Party endeavored to 
effect in that organization. The committee's investigation has dis- 
closed that you have been a member of the National Lawyers' Guild, 
and probably still are. Is that correct? 

Mr. Sipser. I refuse to answer that question, sir, on the grounds 
set forth in the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Clardy. Mr. Chairman, I don't think the fifth amendment 
can afford an excuse not to answer that question. I think he should 
be directed to answer. The Lawyers' Guild has not, in my opinion, 
been handled in such a way to afford him that protection. 

Mr. Velde. Are you familiar with the citation, Mr. Clardy? 

Mr. Clardy. It hasn't been called Communist, but a Communist 
front, which may mean a lot of things. 

Mr. Velde. I see no reason to direct him to answer that particular 
question. We should proceed. 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 1955 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Sipser, are you aware of any effort on the 
part of the Communist Party in the city of New York to infiltrate 
the National Lawyers' Guild in that city? 

Mr. Sipser. I decline to answer that question, Mr. Tavenner, on 
the same grounds stated before; that is, the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Sipser, committee investigation discloses that 
you have been active in the American Labor Party, certainly as early 
as 1944, and as late as 1950. In 1949 or 1950, during that period 
of time, investigation discloses that you were a candidate for elec- 
tion as delegate in the Sixth Assembly District in New York on the 
American Labor Party ticket for several years, and that you were on 
the administrative committee of the American Labor Party for Kings 
County, and that you were actively engaged in the work of that party. 
I would like to ask you whether, in connection with your work in the 
American Labor Party, you became acquainted with a person by the 
name of Morris Zuckman from Albany? 

Mr. Sipser. I decline to answer that question, Mr. Tavenner, and 
assert my privilege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. In connection with your work in the American 
Labor Party, did you become acquainted with a person by the name of 
I. Nathan Sidman of Troy, N. Y.? 

Mr. Sipser. I decline to answer, again asserting my privilege 
under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Testimony was introduced in the course of our 
recent hearings in Albany that these persons, members of the legal 
profession, were the heads of their respective groups of the American 
Labor Party. Considerable testimony was heard during these 
hearings, indicating that the Communist Party of the city of Albany, 
along with the Communist Party of Troy, N. Y., were conducting 
the affairs of the American Labor Party by placing in high office 
in the American Labor Party persons who were members of these 
Communist Party groups in those cities. 

Do you have any knowledge of that, sir? 

Mr. Sipser. I decline to answer that question, Mr. Tavenner, on 
the same grounds as stated previously; i. e., the grounds set forth 
in the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you have any knowledge of Communist Party 
activities within the American Labor Party during the period you 
have been active in the American Labor Party in New York? 

Mr. Sipser. I decline to answer that question on the grounds 
set forth in the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Scherer. The two lawyers referred to, Zuckman and Sidman, 
were both identified as members of the Communist Party in the 
hearings in Albany? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. What official position did you hold, Mr. 
Sipser, in the brewer's union to which you referred a few moments ago? 

Mr. Sipser. I hold no official position in the union, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. How were you employed in that union? 

Mr. Sipser. As general counsel of the joint local executive board. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you describe that setup for us, please? 

Mr. Sipser. The joint local executive board is a delegated body. 
There are eight local unions which sent representatives to the joint 



36543—53- 



1956 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

board. The joint board forms a common policy in connection with 
negotiations in matters affecting it, but contractual matters are 
handled by the brothers of the New York local in New York City. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is the exact title of the union? 

Mr. Sipser. Well, the exact title of the union about a month ago 
was the Brewery Workers Executive Board, Affiliated with the Inter- 
national Union of the Brewery, Cereal, Soft Drink, and so forth, and 
so forth. I have never remembered the full title, really. 

Mr. Clardy. You wouldn't be able to give us the alphabetical 
letters that referred to it ; would you? 

Mr. Sipser. I am afraid not, sir. The title has been changed to 
the Joint Local Board of Greater New York, affiliated with the Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Teamsters, AFL. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you been counsel for the Board? 

Mr. Sipser. Approximately four and a half years. 

Mr. Tavenner. During that period of time, Mr. Sipser, has any 
information come to your knowledge indicating an effort on the part 
of the Communist Party to infiltrate that union? 

Mr. Sipser. Sir, I decline to answer that question on the grounds 
set forth in the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Information has come to our attention, Mr. Sipser, 
that you were one of the sponsors of the Williamsburg Annex of the 
Jefferson School of Social Science at 13 Grant Avenue, at Debevoise 
Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. That was in the winter of 1947. Is that 
information correct? 

Mr. Sipser. I decline to answer that question, Mr. Tavenner, on 
the grounds set forth in the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you at any time affiliated with the Jefferson 
School of Social Science? 

Mr. Sipser. I decline to answer that question on the grounds set 
forth in the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you please state to the committee whether 
or not you have been a member of the Communist Party at any time 
when you were a candidate for political office on the ticket of the 
American Labor Party? 

Mr. Sipser. I decline to answer that question, sir, on the grounds 
set forth in the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you been a member of the Communist 
Party at any time while you were acting as counsel for the joint local 
executive board? 

Mr. Sipser. I will refuse to answer that question, asserting my 
privilege set forth in the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Sipser. I decline to answer that question, sir, on the same 
grounds set forth in the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Clardy? 

Mr. Clardy. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Sipser. I decline to answer that question, sir, on the same 
grounds set forth in the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Clardy. Were you ever in any way affiliated with any affiliate 
of the Communist Party? 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 1957 

Mr. Sipser. I decline to answer that question, asserting my privilege 
on the grounds of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you ever a member of the A. Y. D., the 
American Youth for Democracy, or the Young Communist League, 
or any variation of that 'name? 

Mr. Sipser. I refuse to answer that question, sir, on the same 
grounds, the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Clardy. Those are all the questions I have to ask the witDess, 
Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Scherer? 

Mr. Scherer. I have no questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Do you have any further questions, Mr. Counsel, for 
this particular witness? 

Mr. Tavenner. No, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. If no one desires to ask any further questions, the wit- 
ness will be dismissed for the time being, but continued under subpena, 
subject to notification of the committee to appear. 

(Whereupon the witness was excused as stated by the chairman.) 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Tavenner, will you please call the next witness. 

Mr. Tavenner. William Greenstein. 

Mr. Velde. Will the witness stand and be sworn, please? 

In the testimony you are about to give, do you solemnly swear to 
tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you 
God? 

Mr. Greenstein. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF WILLIAM GREENSTEIN, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, I. PHILIP SIPSER AND JACOB SCHNEIDER 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, I think the record should show at 
this time that subpenas were issued for the three witnesses, and that 
at that time the committee had no knowledge or notice that Mr. 
Sipser was also counsel for two of the witnesses. I was notified of 
that immediately before this hearing began. 

Mr. Velde. The record will so show that fact. 

Mr. Clardy. I can verify that fact also, as the chairman knows 
when he was incapacitated in New York and had appointed me as 
acting chairman, that if that information had been available to us at 
that time, it would have been communicated to me, and it was not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state your name, please, sir? 

Mr. Greenstein. William Greenstein. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you accompanied by counsel? 

Mr. Greenstein. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel please identify himself for the record? 

Mr. Sipser. I am I. Philip Sipser, of 50 Broad Street, New York 
City. 

Mr. Schneider. I am Jacob Schneider, of the same address. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born, Mr. Greenstein? 

Mr. Greenstein. In Centerville, Mass., in 1905. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your training or profession? 

Mr. Greenstein. I am a truckdriver. 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you employed? 



1958 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

Mr. Greenstein. At the present time I am the secretary of the 
Brewery Workers Joint Board in New York City. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you held that position as secretary 
of the Brewery Workers Joint Board? 

Mr. Greenstein. Since the latter part of 1948. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state for the committee, please, what 
your formal educational training has been? 

Mr. Greenstein. I went to public school up to the seventh grade. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was your employment immediately prior to 
your becoming secretary of the joint board? 

Mr. Greenstein. I drove a beer truck in the city of New York. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long had you been so employed? 

Mr. Greenstein. Since 1933. 

Mr. Tavenner. During that period of time had you held another 
position? 

Mr. Greenstein. I was on a negotiating committee of the local 
union in New York City since 1939. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Greenstein, I hand you what purports to be 
a photostatic copy of a Communist Party nominating petition, bearing 
the date of September 22, 1941. I will ask you to state to the com- 
mittee, please, whether or not the fourth signature is yours? 

Mr. Greenstein. I shall assert my privilege of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Velde. Do you decline to answer that question by reason of 
the fifth amendment? 

Mr. Greenstein. I shall assert my privilege under the fifth 
amendment. 

Mr. Clardy. Mr. Chairman, he must either decline, or otherwise 
answer. I think counsel should instruct him that all he has to do is 
decline to answer, if he so chooses. 

Mr. Greenstein. Yes, I thought it was obvious. 

Mr. Clardy. It is, but it doesn't look that way in cold writing. 

Mr. Greenstein. Sorry. 

Mr. Clardy. You are declining, then, for the reason stated? 

Mr. Greenstein. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the document, and ask that it be 
marked "Greenstein Exhibit No. 1." 

Mr. Velde. For introduction into the record? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Velde. Without objection, it shall be introduced into the 
record as stated. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you reside, Mr. Greenstein? 

Mr. Greenstein. 2010 Ocean Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you examine the photostatic copy of exhibit 
No. 1 and state whether the same address appears thereon, opposite 
your name? 

Mr. Greenstein. I decline to answer, on the grounds of the fifth 
amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you a photostatic copy of what purports 
to be a Communist Party independent nominating petition, bearing 
a date of the 25th of August 1946. I will ask 3^011 to examine it and 
state whether or not your name appears as the fifth name of those 
signing the petition? 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 1959 

Mr. Greenstein. I decline to answer that on the grounds of the 
fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the document for introduction 
into the record, and ask that it be marked "Greenstein Exhibit No. 2." 

Mr. Velde. Without objection, it will be so marked and admitted 
into the record. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Greenstein, there appears in the Daily Worker, 
issue of April 3, 1950, a column under the headline "Form Brooklyn 
citizens' group against Mimdt bill." Among the persons alleged to 
be associated with the group appears the name William Greenstein. 
Will you examine the photostatic copy of this page which I hand 
you, and tell the committee the circumstances under which you 
became a member of that group, if you did? 

Mr. Greenstein. I decline to answer, on the grounds of the fifth 
amendment, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. You say, Mr. Greenstein, that you have been 
secretary of the Brewery Workers Joint Board since 1948. During 
that period of time did you become aware of, or do you know of 
your own personal knowledge of any efforts on the part of the Com 
munist Party to infiltrate your union? 

Mr. Greenstein. I will decline to answer that on the grounds of 
the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell the committee, please, whether, on 
the 22d day of September 1941, or the 25th day of August 1946, you 
were a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Greenstein. I decline to answer that on the grounds of the 
fifth amendment, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Greenstein. I decline to answer on the grounds of the fifth 
amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Greenstein. I decline to answer, on the grounds of the fifth 
amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman: 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Clardy? 

Mr. Clardy. I have none. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Scherer? 

Mr. Scherer. I have no questions. 

Mr. Velde. The witness will be dismissed at this time, but held 
under subpena, subject to further call by the committee. You will 
be notified, if you are called again. 

(Whereupon the witness was excused as stated by the chairman.) 

Mr. Velde. Will you call the next witness, Mr. Tavenner. 

Mr. Tavenner. Charles Klare. 

Mr. Velde. Will the witness stand and be sworn, please? 

In the testimony you are about to give, do you solemnly swear to 
tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you 
God? 

Mr. Klare. I do. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your name, please? 



1960 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

TESTIMONY OF CHARLES KLARE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 
I. PHILIP SIPSER AND JACOB SCHNEIDER 

Mr. Klare. My name is Charles Klare. 

Mr. Tavenner. How do you spell the last name, sir? 

Mr. Klare. K-1-a-r-e. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you accompanied by counsel? 

Mr. Klare. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel please identify himself for the record? 

Mr. Sipser. I. Philip Sipser, 50 Broad Street, New York City. 

Mr. Schneider. I am Jacob Schneider, of the same address. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were vou born, Mr. Klare? 

Mr. Klare. May 17, 1915, New York. N. Y. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your occupation? 

Mr. Klare. I am employed as the office secretary of the Brewery 
Workers' Joint Board in New York City. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you describe your position a little more fully? 

Mr. Klare. Well, sir, it is my job to do the clerical work in the 
office — the typing, filing and so forth. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do I understand correctly, that that is a secre- 
tarial office for a concern for which you work, or whether it is for a 
union? 

Mr. Klare. It is for the New York Brewery Workers' Joint Board. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you held that position? 

Mr. Klare. Approximately four and a half years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell the committee, please, what your 
formal educational training has been? 

Mr. Klare. I am a high school graduate, and I did attend classes 
in the College of the City of New York for about a year, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you attended any other school other than 
the College of the City of New York? 

Mr. Klare. May I ask if you are referring to a formal school of 
education, as compared, perhaps, with a school during my service in 
the Armed Forces? 

Mr.- Tavenner. I am not including training you took in the 
Armed Forces, but any other type of training which you may have 
had, or instruction. 

Mr. Klare. Sir, I would like to decline to answer that question 
on the grounds of my rights under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Clardy. You said you would like to. Do you? 

Mr. Klare. I do; yes sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was your employment prior to taking the 
secretarial position with the Brewery Workers' Joint Board? 

Mr. Klare. Sir, I refuse to answer that question on the grounds 
of my rights under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long were you employed in the capacity 
that you feel to describe might tend to incriminate you? 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer that on the grounds of the fifth 
amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. How were you employed in 1935? 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds of the 
fifth amendment. 

Mr. Scherer. Were you employed, during the period about which 
you refuse to answer, by the Communist Party? 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 1961 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer that question, sir, on the grounds 
of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. How were you employed in 1940? 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer that question, sir, on the grounds 
of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you affiliated at any time with the American 
Peace Mobilization? 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer that, sir, on the groups of the 
fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you a member of the New York CIO Council 
in 1946? 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer that question, sir, on the grounds 
of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Scherer. Mr. Chairman, I move that the witness be instructed 
to answer that question. 

Mr. Velde. Will the reporter read the question again? 

Reporter (reading): 

Were you a member of the New York CIO Council in 1946? 

Mr. Velde. Without objection from the members, Mr. Klare, 
you are instructed and directed to answer that question. I can see 
no way, and the other members can see no way, in which an answer 
to that question might possibly tend to incriminate you. 

Mr. Klare. I still refuse to answer the question, sir; on the grounds 
of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall that Philip Murray disbanded the 
council to which I just referred? That is, the New York CIO Council? 

Mr. Klare. I would like you to repeat that question, please. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall that Mr. Murray disbanded the 
New York CIO Council? 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds of the 
fifth amendment. 

Mr. Velde. Again you are directed to answer that question. 

Mr. Klare. Again, sir, I refuse to answer on the grounds of the 
fifth amendment. 

Mr. Scherer. Do you know whether Philip Murray issued an 
order disbanding the New York CIO Council? 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer, sir; on the grounds of the fifth 
amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall an incident in which some federation 
of a trade union sponsored a resolution before the New York City 
Council regarding the boycotting of Franco? 

Mr. Klare. Will you repeat the question, please? 

Mr. Velde. Read the question again, Miss Reporter. 

Reporter (reading) : 

Do you recall an incident in which some federation of a trade union sponsored a 
resolution before the New York City Council regarding the boycotting of Franco? 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer that question, sir, on the grounds 
of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Clardy. Mr. Counsel, is that a matter of public record, or 
recorded in the press at any time? 

Mr. Tavenner. I understand that this activity with regard to 
the boycotting is a matter of public record, but I doubt that the spon- 



1962 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

sorship of such a resolution before the CIO Council is. I don't think 
it is, sir. 

Mr. Clardy. I still think, Mr. Chairman, he should be directed to 
answer this question. I see no possible incrimination in the question. 

Mr. Velde. The Chair concurs, and I direct you to answer the 
question, sir. 

Mr. Klare. And I, sir, refuse to answer the question on the 
grounds of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you participated in any of the activities of 
the American Labor Party, and in its campaigns? 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer that question, sir, on the grounds 
of my rights under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have before me a photostatic copy of the Worker 
of June 6, 1948, and the Daily Worker of June 13, 1948, describing 
certain organized opposition to the Mundt bill. Your name is 
mentioned in both articles. In one of these articles you are referred 
to as Charles Klare, vets director of the Greater New York CIO 
Council. Will you tell us first what the vets director of the Greater 
New York CIO Council means? 

Mr. Klare. I decline to answer that question, sir, under the 
fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you the vets director of the Greater New 
York CIO Council? 

Mr. Klare. I decline to answer that question, sir, on the grounds 
of my rights under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you participate in the organization formed 
in 1948 to oppose the Mundt bill, and if so, I would like you to tell 
the committee the circumstances under which this took place in the 
organization? 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer this question, on the grounds of my 
rights under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you a member of the Communist Party 
at any time while you were office secretary of the Brewery Workers' 
Joint Board? 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer that question, sir, on the grounds 
of my rights under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Klare. I decline to answer that question, on the grounds of 
my rights under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Klare. I decline to answer that question, on the grounds of 
my rights under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Clardy? 

Mr. Clardy. What other persons, aside from yourself and the two 
witnesses who immediately preceded you on the stand, Mr. Green- 
stein and Mr. Sipser, have anything to do with actually directing the 
activities of the union? 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer that question, sir, on the grounds 
of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Velde. I direct you to answer that question. I can see no 
way in which you can possibly incriminate yourself in answering such 
a question before the committee. 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 1963 

Mr. Klare. I still refuse to answer that question, sir, on the grounds 
of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Clardy. Isn't it true, Witness, from a certain standpoint, that 
you and the other two men I named substantially or jointly run and 
direct the affairs of the local? 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer the question, sir, on the grounds of 
the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Clardy. How many members are in your local? 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer that question, sir, on the grounds of 
the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Scherer. I believe, Mr. Chairman, that the witness should be 
directed to answer the question. 

Mr. Velde. Again you are directed to answer the question. 

Mr. Klare. Sir, I have stated that I am an employee of the 
Brewery Workers' Joint Board in New York. 

Mr. Clardy. The question is, How many are in the local? 

Mr. Klare. I decline to answer the question, sir, on the grounds 
of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Clardy. You ha Ye been directed to answer. Do you still 
decline? 

Mr. Klare. Yes, I still decline. 

Mr. Clardy. Witness, I asked how many were in the local and 
you have declined to answer. How many were in the entire group, 
composed of all the locals? 

Mr. Klare. There are approximately 6,000 to 6,500 members of 
the brewery workers that are in local unions affiliated with the New 
York Brewery Workers' Joint Board. 

Mr. Clardy. So, of necessity, a member of some one local affiliates 
with the entire group. What is it? 

Mr. Klare. I am not a member of any local, sir, other than the 
one in New York City. 

Mr. Clardy. Have you ever been? 

Mr. Klare. I have never been, sir. 

Mr. Clardy. What other persons besides yourself, Mr. Greenstein, 
and Mr. Sipser have anything to do with running the affairs of this 
joint organization? The one with which you have been tied up? 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer that question on the grounas of 
my rights under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Clardy. Are there any others, other than you three? 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer, sir, on the grounds of the fifth 
amendment. 

Mr. Clardy. Where does your group hold its meetings? 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer, sir, on grounds of the fifth amend- 
ment. 

Mr. Clardy. Are there any Communists in the organization that 
you know of? 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer this question, sir, on the grounds of 
my rights under the fifth amendment. 

Air. Clardy. Were you a veteran? 

Mr. Klare. Yes, sir; I am a veteran. 

Mr. Clardy. One of the earliest questions asked was something 
about directing the vets' affairs. Do you mean director of affairs 
dealing with veterans who are members of the various locals making 
up this group? 



1964 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer the question, sir, under the fifth 
amendment. 

Mr. Clardy. Mr. Chairman, I ask that he be directed to answer 
that question. 

Mr. Velde. The Chair will concur and, without objection, you are 
directed to answer the question. 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer, on grounds of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Clardy. When you were supposed to appear in New York 
City, and no subpena was served, and you did not appear, were you in 
the city at the time? 

Mr. Klare. I was in the city, sir, when I received a phone call to 
the effect that there was a subpena to be served. 

Mr. Clardy. Was that prior to the date of the hearing? 

Mr. Klare. That was on a Thursday afternoon. The Thursday 
before the Fourth of July weekend. 

Mr. Clardy. And did you leave town thereafter? 

Mr. Klare. I beg your pardon? 

Mr. Clardy. Did you leave the city of New York, or did you remain 
there after you learned of this fact? 

Mr. Klare. One moment, please. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer that question, on the grounds of my 
rights under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Velde. You are certainly directed to answer that question as to 
whether or not you left New York City. There is no way that could 
possibly incriminate you, that I can see. I direct you to answer. 

Mr. Klare. Nevertheless, sir, I refuse to answer that question on 
the grounds of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Clardy. You recall roughly the dates the committee held hear- 
ings in the city of New York recently; do you not? 

Mr. Klare. Roughly, yes. I think it was immediately after or 
during the Fourth of July weekend. I might add that the entire 
matter of the subpena was left in the hands of my counsel. 

Mr. Scherer. From whom did you receive that telephone call with 
respect to your appearance before the committee? 

Mr. Klare. I believe that was a Mr. Jones who called then. 

Mr. Clardy. Was that how it was brought to your attention? 

Mr. Klare. That was the person who brought it to my attention, 
or informed me about the subpena. A person who identified himself 
as Mr. Jones, from Washington, representing the House Committee 
on Un-American Activities. 

Mr. Scherer. What did you say to Mr. Jones? 

Mr. Klare. I told Mr. Jones I would call my counsel and tell him 
there was a subpena which was to be served. 

Mr. Clardy. Were you struck with any illness immediately after 
that information was given to you, or did you remain in good health 
until the hearings were over? 

Mr. Klare. The best of health, sir. 

Mr. Clardy. You had no difficulties at that time which prevented 
your attendance at the hearing? 

Mr. Klare. No, sir. As I say, the matter of the appearance was 
left in the hands of my counsel. I believe I referred Mr. Jones to my 
counsel. 

Mr. Scherer. Whom did you refer him to? 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 1965 

Mr. Klare. To the office of my counsel, Air. I. Philip Sipser. 

Mr. Clardy. Did you contact your counsel after that phone call? 

Mr. Klare. What was that, sir? 

Mr. Clardy. Did you contact your counsel after that phone call? 

Mr. Klare. I contacted Mr. Schneider, who is my counsel here 
today. 

Mr. Clardy. Did you advise him at that time of your desire to 
appear before the committee? 

Air. Klare. In my conversation, I informed him of the fact I had 
received a phone call from Mr. Jackson, saying there was a subpena 
to be served. 

Air. Scherer. Where were you at that time? 

Mr. Klare. At the office of the Brewery Workers' Joint Board, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Air. Clardy. So that there may be no mistake about it, at no time 
did you leave home, or leave the city of New York? 

Air. Klare. I declined to answer that question previously, and I 
do again decline, on my rights under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Clardy. To put it bluntly, did you skip out of town when you 
got that informatiDn? 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer that question, sir, under my rights 
under the fifth amendment. 

Air. Clardy. That is all the questions I have, Mr. Chairman. 

Air. Velde. Air. Scherer? 

Mr. Scherer. During this period about which you refuse to tell 
us concerning your employment, I will ask you now whether you 
were employed by the Communist Party then or at any time? 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer that question, sir, under the rights 
under the fifth amendment. 

Air. Scherer. Did you ever get any compensation from the 
Communist Party? 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer that question, under the fifth 
amendment. 

Air. Scherer. Did you ever collect any funds from union members 
for Communist causes? 

Air. Klare. I refuse to answer the question, under the fifth 
amendment. 

Air. Scherer. I have no further questions, Air. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Did you ever pay anything to the Communist Party 
of the United States? 

Mr. Klare. I refuse to answer that question, on my rights under 
the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Velde. Do you have anything further, Mr. Counsel? 

Air. Tavenner. No. sir. 

Mr. Velde. The witness is excused at this time, but held under 
subpena until further instructions from the committee. 

(Whereupon, at 3:15 p. m., the executive hearing adjourned, 
pursuant to further call of the Chair.) 



INDEX 



Individuals 

Page 

Aaron, David 1 954 

Greenstein, William 1957-1959 (testimony) , 1963 

Kiare, Charles 1959, 1960-1965 (testimony) 

Murray, Philip 1961 

Schneider, Jacob 1953-1965 

Sidman. I. Nathan 1955 

Sipser, I. Philip 1953-1957 (testimony), 1957-1965 

Zuckman, Morris 1 

Organizations and Publications 

American Labor Party 1955, 1962 

American Peace Mobilization 1961 

American Youth for Democracy 1957 

Brewery workers executive board, affiliated with the International Union 

of the Brewery, Cereal, Soft Drink, etc 1956 

Brewery Workers Joint Local Board of Greater New York 1956, 

1958-1960. 1962, 1963. 1965 

Brooklyn College 1954 

Brooidvn Law School 1 954 

Daily Worker 1959. 1962 

College of the City of New York 1960 

International Brotherhood of Teamsters, AFL 1956 

Jefferson School of Social Science 1 956 

National Lawyers' Guild 1954, 1955 

New York CIO Council 1961, 1962 

New York City Council 1961 

Williamsburg Annex of the Jefferson School of Social Science 1956 

Worker 1962 

Young Communist League 1957 

1967 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 05445 3137 



JAN 23 V