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Full text of "Communist methods of infiltration (Government-labor) Hearings"

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COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

(GOVERNMENT— LABOR, Part 3) 

(Based on Testimony of James McNamara) 



HEARINGS 

BEFORE THE 

COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

EIGHTY-THIRD CONGRESS 

FIRST SESSION 



SEPTEMBER 15, 1953 



Printed for the use of the Committee on Un-American Activities 
INCLUDING INDEX 




UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
39329 WASHINGTON : 1953 



y 



Boston Public Library 
Superintendent of Documents 

FEB 2 3 1954 



COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

United States House of Representatives 

HAROLD H. VELDE, Illinois, Chairman 

BERNARD W. KEARNEY, New York FRANCIS E. WALTER, Pennsylvania 

DONALD L. JACKSON, California MORGAN M. MOULDER, Missouri 

KIT CLARDY, Mlchipran CLYDE DOYLE, California 

GORDON H. SCHERER, Ohio JAMES B. FRAZ1ER, Jr., Tennessee 

Robert L. Kunzio, Counsel 

Frank S. Tavenxer, Jr., Counsel 

Louis J. Russell, Chief Investigator 

Thomas W. Beale, Sr., Chief Clerk 

Raphael I. Nixon, Director of Research 

U 



CONTENTS 



September 15, 1953, testimony of — p aM 

James McNamara 3025 

Whitley P. McCoy 3041 

Philip Young 3043 

Index 3053 

m 



Public Law 601, 79th Congress 

The legislation under which the House Committee on Un-American 
Activities operates is Public Law 601, 79th Congress [1946], chapter 
753, 2d session, which provides : 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States 
of America in Congress assembled, * * * 

PART 2— RULES OF THE HOUSE OR REPRESENTATIVES 

Rule X 

SEC. 121. STANDING COMMITTEES 
******* 

17. Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine members. 

Rule XI 

POWEBS AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 
******* 

(q) (1) Committee on Un-American Activities. 

(A) Un-American activities. 

(2) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by subcommit- 
tee, authorized to make from time to time investigations of (i) the extent, 
character, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States, 
(ii) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-American propa- 
ganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin and attacks 
the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Constitution, and 
(iii) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress in any neces- 
sary remedial legislation. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House (or to the 
Clerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such investi- 
gation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable. 

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such 
times and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, 
has recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance 
of such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, and 
to take such testimony, as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued under 
the signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by any 
member designated by any such chairman, and may be served by any person 
designated by any such chairman or member. 



RULES ADOPTED BY THE 83D CONGRESS 

House Resolution 5, January 3, 1953 

******* 

Rule X 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

1. There shall be elected by the House, at the commencement of each Congress, 
the following standing committees : 

******* 
(q) Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine members. 

******* 

Rule XI 

POWEES AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 
******* 

17. Committee on Un-American Activities. 

(a) Un-American Activities. 

(b) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by subcommittee, 
Is authorized to make from time to time, investigations of (1) the extent, char- 
acter, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States ; 
<2) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-American prop- 
aganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin and 
attacks the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Constitu- 
tion, and (3) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress 
in any necessary remedial legislation. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House (or to the 
Clerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such investi- 
gation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable. 

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, or any subcommitee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such times 
and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, has 
recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance 
of such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, and 
to take such testimony as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued under 
the signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by any 
member designated by such chairman, and may be served by any person desig* 
nated by any such chairman or member. 

VI 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

(Government-Labor, Part 3) 
(Based on Testimony of James McNamara) 



TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1953 

United States House of Representatives, 

Subcommittee of the Committee on 

Un-American Activities, 

Washington, D. C. 

public hearing 

The subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities 
met, pursuant to call, at 10 : 39 a. m., in the caucus room, Old House 
Office Building, Hon. Gordon H. Scherer presiding. 

Committee members present: Representatives Gordon H. Scherer 
and Francis E. Walter. 

Staff members present: Robert L. Kunzig, counsel; W. Jackson 
Jones, investigator; and Thomas W. Beale, Sr., chief clerk. 

Mr. Scherer. The committee will be in session. 

Let the record show that the Honorable Harold H. Velde, chairman 
of the House Committee on Un-American Activities, has appointed 
the Honorable Francis E. Walter and Gordon H. Scherer as a sub- 
committee, with the latter as chairman, for the purpose of this hear- 
ing. 

Mr. Counsel, are you ready to proceed ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Yes, sir. Will Mr. McNamara please step forward? 

Mr. Scherer. Would you raise your right hand to be sworn? 

In the testimony you are about to give before this committee, do 
you solemnly swear you will tell the truth, the whole truth, and noth- 
ing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. McNamara. I do. 

Mr. Scherer. Will you be seated? 

Mr. McNamara. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Scherer. Mr. Counsel, will you please proceed ? 

TESTIMONY OP JAMES McNAMARA 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. McNamara, would you give your full name for the 
record, please? 
Mr. McNamara. James McNamara. 
Mr. Kunzig. What is your present address? 
Mr. McNamara. 6231 Cambridge Avenue, Cincinnati 30, Ohio. 
Mr. Kunzig. Mr. McNamara, for the record I see that you are not 

3025 



3026 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

represented by counsel. I assume that you understand that rule 7 
of this committee says as follows : 

At every hearing, public or executive, every witness shall be accorded the 
privilege of having counsel of his own choosing. 

Mr. McNamara. I understand that. 

Mr. Kunzig. And you prefer to testify without counsel ? 

Mr. McNamara. I do. 

Mr. Kunzig. Where were you born, sir? 

Mr. McNamara. I was born in Baltimore, Md. 

Mr. Kunzig. When ? 

Mr. McNamara. December 29, 1901. 

Mr. Kunzig. Could you give the subcommittee a brief resume of 
your educational background, Mr. McNamara ? 

Mr. McNamara. I finished high school in Washington, Ind., at- 
tended Indiana University for a year, just A. B. work. I studied law 
for a year in St. Louis at St. Louis University and another year at 
Fordham University in New York City. 

Mr. Kunzig. That is the sum total of your official educational back- 
ground ? 

Mr. McNamara. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kunzig. Could you, in more detail, give the subcommittee a 
resume of your employment background ? By that I mean the main 
employment of your career. 

Mr. McNamara. Well, that is quite difficult, because up to the time 
I came to Washington in 1936, I believe it was, I had worked at per- 
haps 100 different types of jobs and occupations. I had sold various 
things. 

I had worked as a clerk. I had worked as a laborer. I had worked 
in shipyards. I had worked for railroads. I imagine I probably had 
40 or 50 different jobs. 

Mr. Kunzig. Well, then, starting in 1936, let us take it specifically 
from there on in. 

Mr. McNamara. I can do that ; yes. I would like to be sure whether 
that was 1936 or 1937 that I came to Washington. 

Mr. Kunzig. You may check any records that you wish to, Mr. 
McNamara. Look it up and take your time. 

Mr. McNamara. It is odd that you should ask me right at the be- 
ginning that I cannot remember. It was in 1937 when I came to Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Mr. Kunzig. Well, then, take up the occupational background from 
that time on. 

Mr. McNamara. Immediately before that I had been working out 
through Ohio, selling roofing to industrial concerns through the north- 
ern part of Ohio and I came to Washington. 

I was probably a little more familiar with this part of the country. 
I had previously worked for hotels. 

Mr. Kunzig. In what capacity? 

Mr. McNamara. The only capacity I had worked was as a clerk. I 
knew some of the hotel industry, so in coming to Washington I applied 
to perhaps 3 or 4 hotels. No ; it must have been more than half a dozen 
hotels, for work, and I received three replies offering me work. I 
accepted one at the Hay-Adams Hotel. 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 3027 

I worked there for a matter of months, I think as a clerk on the 
front desk when I learned of all of these workers in the hotel industry 
in Washington who were unorganized. 

That was in the summer of 1937. 

I investigated the union. I did not even know the name of the union 
having so-called jurisdiction over hotel workers at that time, but I 
learned about it and went down to the union office and joined the 
union. I was the only clerk in the union at the time, that is in Wash- 
ington. There were clerks, I believe, in San Francisco. 

1 continued to work for the hotel, meanwhile organizing for the 
union while I was working for the hotel. Hotel hours, as you prob- 
ably appreciate, are a little different. They are split shift. 

Mr. Kunzig. How long did you work there? 

Mr. McNamara. For maybe 6 months. 

Mr. Kunzig. What was the next phase of your work? 

Mr. McNamara. I quit the hotel and went to work for the local 
which I had organized. 

Mr. Kunzig. What was the official name and number of that local? 

Mr. McNamara. Local No. 80 of the Hotel and Kestaurant Workers. 
They have changed their name since. 

Mr. Kunzig. To the best of your recollection, then. 

Mr. McNamara. Hotel and Restaurant International Alliance and 
Bartenders International League of America. 

Mr. Kunzig. With what larger group union was it affiliated ? 

Mr. McNamara. With the American Federation of Labor. I had 
organized enough people by that time so that I could draw a weekly 
salary of $15 and on the $15 I quit the hotel job and went to work for 
the union. 

Mr. Kunzig. How long did you work for the union ? 

Mr. McNamara. I worked then for the union until January 1942. 

Mr. Kunzig. What position were you occupying by that time in the 
union ? 

Mr. McNamara. Well, I had gone through the various steps. I 
think I was first the secretary of the local. Then I became the business 
agent. Then, through my organization work — I was organizing 
rather fast — I became, I believe they called it, business representative 
of the local joint executive board. That is the board in charge of 
local activities in any one city, and then at the San Francisco conven- 
tion of the international union in 1938, which you will note was not 
very long from the time I joined in the summer, August 15, 1938, 1 was 
elected an international vice president of the union. 

I continued as international vice president and also as the local busi- 
ness agent and also as officer of the local joint board until the Cin- 
cinnati convention of the international union which was held the week 
of April 21, 1941. 

Mr. Kunzig. What happened there ? 

Mr. McNamara. At that convention I lost my international job. 
The voting was in favor of a man from Chicago. 

Mr. Kunzig. So you lost the election and were no longer in the inter- 
national position in the union? 

Mr. McNamara. That is right. 

Mr. Kunzig. Is it then you went to work for the United States 
Government ? 



39329— 54— pt. 3- 



3028 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

Mr. McNamara. Not immediately, but I began looking for 
opportunities. 

Air. Kunztg. What was your next employment then ? 

Mr. McNamara. It was with the Federal Government. 

Mr. Kunzig. In what capacity, Mr. McNamara? 

Mr. McNamara. As a commissioner in the United States Concilia- 
tion Service, the Federal Mediation Service then was called the Media- 
tion Conciliation Service. 

Mr. Kunzig. You started working for the Federal Government at 
what time? 

Mr. McNamara. On January 30, 1942. 

Mr. Walter. At what convention were you elected ? 

Mr. McNamara. I was elected at the San Francisco convention of 
the union which began August 15, 1938. 

Mr. Kunzig. On January 30, 1942, you went to work for the Federal 
Government? 

Mr. McNamara. That is true. 

Mr. Kunzig. Have you worked with the Government continuously 
ever since? 

Mr. McNamara. I have. 

Mr. Kunzig. What was the final position that you occupied? 

Mr. McNamara. I was the commissioner in Cincinnati. 

Mr. Kunzig. Commissioner of what? 

Mr. McNamara. Conciliation Service. It is still called commis- 
sioner of conciliation. It is a mediator, labor mediator. 

Mr. Kunzig. On the 30th of January when you went to work for 
the Federal Government, as you just testified, you signed, I believe, 
and I have a copy in front of me, a personnel affidavit stating : 

I, James McNamara, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I have read and 
understand the foregoing ; that I do not advocate the overthrow of the Govern- 
ment of the United States by force or violence ; that I am not a member of 
any political party or organization that advocates the overthrow of the Gov- 
ernment of the United States by force or violence: and that during such time 
as I am an employee of the Federal Government, I will not advocate nor 
become a member of any political party or organization that advocates the over- 
throw of the Government of the United States by force or violence. 

Is that correct ? You did sign such a document ? 

Mr. McNamara. I would imagine so. 

Mr. Kunzig. I will hand you this document marked "McNamara 
Exhibit No. 1" and ask you if that is your signature? 

Mr. McNamara. Yes, it is. 

Mr. Kunztg. May I at this time offer McNamara exhibit No. 1 in 
evidence, Mr. Chairman? 

Mr. Scherer. It will be marked for identification and received in 
evidence. 

( Personnel affidavit, James McNamara, marked "McNamara Ex- 
hibit No. 1" for identification and received in evidence.) 

Mr. Kunzig. You also signed an oath-of-office form which I shall 
now mark as "McNamara Exhibit for Identification No. 2," which is 
the regular oath-of-office form of the United States Government, and 
among other things it says: 

I, further, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I am not a member of the 
Communist Party, the German Bund, or any other Communist, Nazi, or Fascist 
organization, and that I am not a member of any political party or organization 
which advocates the overthrow of our constitutional form of government in the 
United States. 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 3029 

Is that your signature there, Mr. McNamara? 

Mr. McNamara. It is. 

Mr. Kunzig. You did sign that document marked "McNamara 
Exhibit for Identification No. 2"? 

Mr. McNamara. I did. 

Mr. Kunzig. Or it is a copy of it, I should say. 

Mr. Chairman, I now offer this document, McNamara exhibit for 
identification No. 2 in evidence at this point. 

Mr. Scherer. It will be so received in evidence. 

(Oath of office of James McNamara was marked "McNamara Ex- 
hibit No. 2" for identification and received in evidence as "McNamara 
Exhibit No. 2.") 

Mr. Kunzig. Are you presently working for the United States 
Government ? 

Mr. McNamara. No; I am not. 

Mr. Kunzig. When did you resign or leave the service? 

Mr. McNamara. I resigned on September 10, 1953, this September. 

Mr. Kunzig. Was that after a subpena was served upon you by this 
committee? 

Mr. McNamara. It was. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. McNamara, I have before me testimony given on 
July 14, 1953, of this year by two different witnesses, under oath be- 
fore this committee at a hearing held in Albany, N. Y. I should like 
to read this testimony into the record. The first is testimony by Jack 
Davis, 92 Hudson Avenue, Albany, N. Y. 

Mr. Davis was asked by Mr. Tavenner : 

Will you proceed to state to the committee the names of those persons whom 
you are certain you met and with whom you sat in these fraction meetings? 

Fraction meetings were meetings of the Communist Party. The 
answer is: 

James McNamara, who in 1938 became vice president of the international at 
the convention in San Francisco. He was elected an international vice presi- 
dent. 

Mr. Tavenner. Of what union? 

Mr. Davis. Of the Hotel and Restaurant Workers Union. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know what James McNamara is doing now? 

Mr. Davis. No ; I cannot recall having seen him since 1941. I met with him 
on 1 or 2 occasions. I met with him in the fraction meeting of the Communist 
Party in the union. 

Mr. Tavenner. Nobody was present except members of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Davis. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. At the fraction meetings which you described? 

Mr. Davis. That is right. 

Then the testimony of Nicholas Campas, 129 Fourth Street, Troy, 
N. Y. Mr. Campas was asked the same questions and his answer 
was: 

James McNamara — M-c-N-a-m-a-r-a. He was an officer of the Hotel and. Res- 
taurant Workers' Union in the Washington, D. C, local 80. 

Mr. Scherer. You say he is a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Campas. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Scherer. Or he was a member? 

Mr. Campas. Well, he was at the time I am speaking of, between 1937 and 
1939—1937, 1938, and 1939. 

I now wish to ask you, Mr. McNamara, have you ever been a mem- 
ber of the Communist Party ? 



3030 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

Mr. McNamara. During the years — you realize that the years dull 
the edge of memory. 

Mr. Kunzig. I understand. 

Mr. McNamara. During the years 1938, 1939, and 1940 I attended, 
in Washington, D. C, several meetings of the Communist Party. How 
many there were it would be very difficult for me to say at this time. 
I tried to fix the number of them in my own mind a little while ago 
and the best figures I could arrive at to my own satisfaction was 10 
to 20. 

I believe that I paid dues to the Communist Party once or twice; 
at least I remember giving some money to someone who was there. 

Now, if that was dues money, that is what it was, but I gave some 
money to someone at one of these meetings. 

Mr. Ktjnzig. Did you receive a membership card ? 

Mr. McNamara. I never — I don't — I tried to search my brain for 
that. I don't think I ever had a membership card. I did not even 
know that they had membership cards, frankly. 

Mr. Kunzig. But you considered yourself a member in that par- 
ticular period of time ? 

Mr. McNamara. Ideologically I did not, and I know it may be 
difficult for people at this time to understand this, but I was organiz- 
ing a labor union and I was relatively new. I was not relatively new — 
I was new to this business of organizing and all of the other many 
activities involved in labor unionism, and I accepted help wherever 
I could find it. 

Mr. Ktjnzig. Did you get help from the Communist Party ? 

Mr. McNamara. I did. 

Mr. Kunzig. What kind of help ? 

Mr. McNamara. Of various kinds. 

Mr. Kunzig. Did it have anything to do with your meteoric rise in 
the labor movement? You admitted that it was quite fast and a 
distinguished rise. 

Mr. McNamara. Well, it might have. It probably did, but I 
wouldn't know all of those things. You see, I was not privy to much 
that was going on within the party because, as I have said, sometimes 
I have never felt as though I was completely accepted by them. I 
always think that they sort of kept me at arm's length. I don't think 
I was completely accepted. 

Let us put it on two scores. On the local level one would get help 
such as the following: Say that we were organizing in some hotel. 
Well, some party member might come in and say, "Here, Mac, here are 
half a dozen names." 

Or he might say, "See So-and-So out there." 

Or he might say, "See So-and-So, and they will help you with your 
organizing." 

And then when I started, of course, we had no money at all and 
I had to presume on other union people, use their halls or meeting 
spaces or offices and these people would make arrangements or try 
to make arrangements for that sort of thing. 

Mr. Kunzig. Did they help you financially ? 

Mr. McNamara. No, no, no, never. 

Mr. Kunzig. It was the other way around, they wanted money from 
you? 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 3031 

Mr. McNamara. That is true. I didn't get any money from them. 

On the other score, I know that must have been in the people's mind 
on what help, if any, the party was in my securing the international 
job. 

Mr. Kunzig. Yes. 

Mr. McNamara. Well, there must have been help there, but again 
I was not too familiar with it. When I left Washington to go to this 
convention in San Francisco I didn't know that I would be a candidate 
for office even. I was interested in the local scene. 

Mr. Kunzig. And you had only been on that scene for a year or 
two yourself? 

Mr. McNamara. That is true ; but as in many labor situations if a 
person gives his attention and is willing to work there are a lot of 
things that can be done. 

So I went to San Francisco, and as I recall they were electing for 
the first time an international vice president in charge of so-called 
service workers in hotels. 

Shall I explain what they are? They are a group of workers in the 
hotel which comprises about 50 percent of the workers in the hotel, and 
for the first time they were electing an officer to be in charge of those 
workers. 

Midway in the convention another delegate from Washington said 
to me: "Well, Mac, I think they are going to run you." 

Well, that was the first time I knew anything at all of the possi- 
bility of my being elected a vice president. 

Mr. Kunzig. And so you were elected ? 

Mr. McNamara. I was elected in opposition to — there was an in- 
teresting thing at that convention. The Capone people were in San 
Francisco and they alined themselves against the good government 
and the Communists who were united. It was an odd situation. 

Mr. Kunzig. You have no doubt that your activities in the Commu- 
nist Party at that time had a great deal to do with your being singled 
out after a year of activity, to be elected to the very important posi- 
tion? 

Mr. McNamara. It probably did. 

Mr. Walter. You said at the convention this other delegate said, 
"I think they are going to run you." 

Did you ask whom he meant? 

Mr. McNamara. I think I did. 

Mr. Walter. He meant the Communists ? 

Mr. McNamara. Yes. There were other people. For example, I 
was nominated for the job by a man who to my knowledge is certainly 
no Communist. He is the present international president of the union, 
so you see there were other people also working with them in that 
situation. 

Mr. Walter. That is not uncommon. It is one of their devices. 

Mr. McNamara. That is true. 

Mr. Walter. You say you resigned your position on the 9th of this 
month from the Federal Government? 

Mr. McNamara. That is right, 

Mr. Walter. Were you asked to resign ? 

Mr. McNamara. No. 

Mr. Walter. Were you told ? 



3032 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

Mr. McNamara. No, I was not asked to resign. 

Mr. Walter. Were you told it was embarrassing to have you in the 
employ of the Federal Government because of your Communist ac- 
tivities ? 

Mr. McNamara. I will be glad to tell you that. I was called into 
Washington about a week before I resigned and they asked me to go on 
annual leave until today, the 15th, and I said to them, I said, "Would 
you prefer me to resign?" 

They said something to the effect "Well, Mac " 

Mr. Walter. Who do you mean by "they"? 

Mr. McNamara. Mr. McCoy said something to the effect that that 
might be the best thing. 

Mr. Walter. Did he tell you why ? 

Mr. McNamara. I don't believe he did. 

Mr. Walter. And you were not sufficiently interested in your job 
to inquire as to the reason why Mr. McCoy asked you to resign ? 

Mr. McNamara. Well, I had my own idea as to why he wanted me 
to resign, but I don't think I asked him. 

Mr. Walter. Thank you. 

Mr. Kunzig. May I proceed? 

Mr. Walter. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now, when you were working for the Federal Govern- 
ment 

Mr. Scherer. Before we get to that, you did read part of the testi- 
mony given in the Albany, N. Y., hearings? Was that Nicholas Cam- 
pas' testimony or Jack Davis' testimony? 

Mr. Kunzig. I read both Nicholas Campas' and Jack Davis' testi- 
mony, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. McNamara. There is one thing on Jack Davis' testimony, 
may I 

Mr. Kunzig. Yes, comment if you wish. 

Mr. McNamara. He said I attended a national fraction meeting, 
was that ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Of the Communist Party, is the way he phrased it. 

Mr. McNamara. That I do not remember at all, and I seriously 
doubt that it occurred. I notice he does not say where it was or any- 
thing of that sort. I wrote "when," but I don't 

Mr. Scherer. Do you know of any of these fraction meetings being 
held, whether they were on the national level or on a local level 
wherein members of the Communist Party who were also union 
officials gathered in advance of, say, a convention or an important 
union meeting to determine what policy would be carried out at that 
convention or union meeting? 

Mr. McNamara. Oh, yes, I think that is done, but I did not attend 
any such meetings either before the San Francisco convention or 
before the Cincinnati convention. 

Mr. Scherer. Did you attend any after those conventions? 

Mr. McNamara. Well — and I want to be sure of this date because 
it is important — in 1941 after the Cincinnati convention I was asked by 
Jay Rubin of New York to attend the meeting. 

Mr. Scherer. When you say "Jay Rubin," he was called the Com- 
munist food commissar of the country at one time, was he not ? 

Mr. McNamara. Well, I saw that title in some of the — oh, I think 
it was in one of the charges against me at the loyalty hearing of our 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 3033 

service, but honestly I never heard the title. That was the first time I 
ever heard of it. 

Mr. Scherer. Was he a Communist? 

Mr. McNamara. Oh, yes; he was recognized as a Communist. 

Mr. Scherer. In what field did he specialize? 

Mr. McNamara. In the hotel and restaurant field. 

Mr. Scherer. In the food field. 

Mr. McNamara. Yes. 

Mr. Scherer. And he was a top operator in that field? 

Mr. McNamara. Yes, he was. 

Mr. Scherer. Then that title would apply to him ? 

Mr. McNamara. It might very well. 

Mr. Scherer. Did you say you attended a fraction meeting after 
the San Francisco and Cincinnati conventions? 

Mr. McNamara. Well, if it was called a fraction. I don't know. 

Mr. Scherer. Well, a meeting at which were present union leaders 
who were members of the Communist Party. 

Mr. McNamara. I understood them to be members of the Commu- 
nist Party, and I attended a meeting. 

Mr. Scherer. As I understand it, the purpose of those meetings — 
and let us get it clear for the record — was to determine if possible the 
policy of a subsequent labor meeting or labor convention; is that 
right ? 

Mr. McNamara. Not at this one I attended. 

Mr. Scherer. Was that the general policy of such meetings? 

Mr. McNamara. Well, I am not too familiar with that. You see, 
as I say, I did not attend any. The only one that I remember is this 
one after the Cincinnati convention, and at that one what was dis- 
cussed was the convention and the elections that had just taken place. 

Mr. Scherer. Irrespective of your attendance at one or more meet- 
ings, as a matter of fact you knew that the Communists, by having 
these meetings, whether we call them fraction meetings or anything 
else, were highly successful in carrying out their program at the re- 
spective meetings or in the respective unions? 

Mr. McNamara. Oh, that is very true. I think that is well known. 
With a small number of people that can be done. 

Mr. Scherer. Go ahead, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Kunzig. Let me read to you a brief portion and phrase it for 
you as Mr. Campas did and we will see. 

Mr. McNamara. Wait a minute. We are speaking of Mr. Davis 
now. 

Mr. Kunzig. We are now talking about Mr. Campas. This is what 
he said at the Albany hearing : 

Mr. Campas. Well, their purpose was to coordinate the work of the Communist 
Party members within the Hotel and Restaurant Employees' Union. Then, 
they also planned the program and what action the Communist Party members 
would take at the national conventions of the union, such as resolutions. In 
other words, they planned what resolutions they would endorse and what resolu- 
tions they would introduce and what resolutions they would fight against. 

Mr. McNamara. That is true. 

Mr. Kunzig. You mentioned a little while ago, Mr. McNamara, 
loyalty hearings. 

Mr. McNamara. That is true. 



3034 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

Mr. Kttnzig. Would you tell the subcommittee how many, if there 
were more than one, loyalty hearings you had while working for the 
Federal Government from 1942 until the present time? 

Mr. McNamara. I shall be glad to. There have been held 3 loyalty 
hearings. 

The first of those hearings was before the loyalty board of my serv- 
ice on September 25, 1948. 

The second before the same board was held in September 1952. 

At each of these hearings the findings were that reasonable grounds 
did not exist for the belief that I was disloyal to the Government of 
the United States. 

Mr. Scherer. What were the dates of those hearings again ? 

Mr. McNamara. The first was August 25, 1948. 

Mr. Scherer. What was the finding of that board at that time? 

Mr. McNamara. That reasonable ground did not exist for the belief 
that I was disloyal to the Government of the United States. 

Mr. Scherer. Do you have a record as to who were the members of 
the panel at that time ? 

Mr. McNamara. Gee 

Mr. Scherer. Well, if you don't- 



Mr. McNamara. I do not have a record of it, but I could get it for 
you. 

Mr. Walter. At either of those hearings were you asked whether 
you were ever a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. McNamara. Yes. 

Mr. Walter. What was your answer ? 

Mr. McNamara. I told them "No." 

Mr. Kttnzig. You said the second hearing was in September 1952. 

Mr. McNamara. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. And you had said before on the record a moment ago 
that that hearing concluded, or the findings were that there were no 
reasonable grounds. 

It could not be reasonable grounds, because by that time it must 
have been reasonable doubt so that it must have been found that there 
was no reasonable doubt as to your loyalty. 

Mr. McNamara. That is true. 

Mr. Kunzig. What was the third hearing? 

Mr. McNamara. February 16, 1953, at Cincinnati, Ohio, by the 
Civil Service Loyalty Review Board. 

The review board affirmed the decisions of the Federal Mediation 
and Conciliation Loyalty Board and found "there is not a reasonable 
doubt" as to my loyalty. 

Mr. Walter. Was that a divided decision ? 

Mr. McNamara. I don't know. 

Mr. Walter. Did you testify at that hearing as to whether or not 
you were ever a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Kunzig. You are referring to the third hearing? 

Mr. Walter. Yes. 

Mr. McNamara. I do not remember now but I would imagine they 
asked me that question. 

Mr. Kunzig. What would you imagine that your answer was? 

Mr. McNamara. My answer would have been the same, that I was 
not. 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 3035 

Mr. Ku.n7.ii;. That you were nol \ 

Mr. McNamara. That is right, and of course I have not been ever 
since I have been in the Government. There is no question on that, is 
there? 

Mr. KrxziG. But when asked as to whether or not vou had ever 
been, is that true? 

Mr. McNamara. That is right. 

Mr. Sciierer. Were you under oath at that time? 

Mr. McNamara. Yes. 

Mr. Kuxzig. I have here a document marked for identification, Mc- 
Namara exhibit No. 3, which is your application for employment in 
the Federal Government, which is called a form 57. 

That was filled out by you in 1946, and the copy I have is the 1946 
copy of your form 57. 

Now, question No. 17 of that form reads as follows : 

Do you advocate or have you ever advocated, or are you now or have you ever 
been a member of any organization that advocates the overthrow of the 
Government of the United States by force or violence? 

And your answer to that is "No." 

I hand this to you and ask you whether that is your copy of it and 
whether you did at that time, as you did at the loyalty hearing, say 
"No," when asked this type of question ? 

Mr. McNamara. That is correct. Of course, as I said earlier, I 
know it is difficult for you gentlemen to agree with me or even sym- 
pathize with the thought, but in my own mind it will always be my 
contention that ideologically I was not the same. 

I joined or associated with these people, perhaps, would be a bet- 
ter term, to assist me in my union organizing work, and I got assist- 
ance. That is the only thing I did. I was not interested in what their 
internaional program was, and all that sort of thing. 

Mr. Walter. Will you tell us something about your duties with the 
Feedral Government and the work you did.? 

Mr. McNamara. Yes. I was a labor mediator. It is a job that 
perhaps is a little difficult to describe because no two cases are the 
same. One approaches each labor problem just a little differently, 
depending on the people involved, the situation, and all the thousand 
and one other things that make up and may affect the situation, so 
it is rather difficult. 

Mr. Walter. In each case there is involved a dispute between an 
employer and employee. 

Mr. McNamara. That is correct. 

Mr. Walter. Do you know whether or not there were many people 
occupying the same position you did who were at some time or other 
officials in labor unions? 

Mr. McNamara. Yes; there were several. 

Mr. Walter. It looks to me as if it was a packed court. 

Mr. McNamara. Well, sometimes management felt that way. 

Either party to a labor dispute will see pretty quickly if the media- 
tor is favoring one side or the other. If he is a competent representa- 
tive he will know that about the mediator. 

Mr. Kuxzig. I would like to introduce in evidence the document I 
have described as Mr. McNamara's application for Federal employ- 
ment as McNamara exhibit No. 3 in evidence, Mr. Chairman. 

39329— 54— pt. 3 3 



3036 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

Mr. Scherer. The document will be so received in evidence. 

(Application of Mr. McNamara marked for identification and re- 
ceived in evidence as "McNamara Exhibit No. 3.") 

Mr. Kunzig. Were you connected, Mr. McNamara, with the Wash- 
ington Tom Mooney case back in 1939 when you were a member of 
the party ? Specifically, were you a sponsor ? 

Mr. McNamara. My sponsorship entailed the attendance at a ban- 
quet or a dinner they gave for Tom Mooney and frankly I did not 
know, and maybe this is difficult for the committee to believe, too, 
but I did not know at the time I attended that Mooney was said to have 
affiliated himself with the Communists after leaving jail in California. 
I f ranHy did not know it at that time. I may have Deen naive. 

Mr. Kunzig. I have a document which I would like to have marked 
as "McNamara Exhibit No. 4" for identification, which is a flier en- 
titled : "Hear Tom Mooney Speak on Labor and Civil Rights Tues- 
day, June 6, 1939." 

Among others, one of the sponsors was James McNamara. 

Mr. McNamara. I did not, as far as I know. 

Mr. Kunzig. Did you know that your name appears here on this 
exhibit No. 4 for identification? 

Mr. McNamara. I saw it afterward. 

Mr. Kunzig. The Washington Tom Mooney Committee has been 
cited as a Communist-front organization by the California Committee 
on Un-American Activities, Mr. Chairman. 

I offer McNamara exhibit No. 4 in evidence. 

Mr. Scherer. It will be so received. 

(Tom Mooney flier was marked "McNamara Exhibit No. 4" for 
identification and received in evidence as McNamara exhibit No. 4.) 

Mr. Kunzig. I have a document marked "McNamara Exhibit No. 5" 
which is a "Call to a Conference on Civil Rights April 20 and 21, 
1940, Washington Hotel, Hall of Nations" under the auspices of the 
Washington Committee for Democratic Action. 

Listed as a sponsor of the Washington Committee for Democratic 
Action is James McNamara. 

Were you that James McNamara? 

Mr. McNamara. That is a good way to put it. 

Mr. Kunzig. In other words, were you a sponsor of the Washing- 
ton Committee for Democratic Action? 

Mr. McNamara. That is one of the examples where a person in my 
unfortunate position is accused of several things he did not do. 

Mr. Kunzig. You have an opportunity to explain here. That is 
what this hearing is for. 

Mr. McNamara. Well I recall that conference and as I have testi- 
fied before on this subject at the loyalty board of my service and I 
believe before the Civil Service, I did not attend that conference and 
had nothing whatsoever to do with it, and I was asked evidently, or 
someone must have asked me, because I consulted the international 
president of my union in Buffalo and discussed it with him and I 
said : "Do you think I should attend this?" 

And he said: "No." 

So I did not attend. 

Mr. Walter. Did you ever testify before any other congressional 
committee ? 

Mr. McNamara. Yes. 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 3037 

Mr. Walter. What committee was that? 

Mr. McNamara. A subcommittee of the Committee on Education 
and Labor. 

Mr. Walter. Do you remember when that was, approximately ? 

Mr. McNamara. It was in 1948, the summer of 1948. 

Mr. Kunzig. To come back for a moment to this Washington Com- 
mittee for Democratic Action, did you authorize your name to be used 
as a sponsor? 

Mr. McNamara. No. 

M r. Kunzig. Did you know your name was used ? 

Mr. McNamara. Not until afterward. In fact, I did not know my 
name was used until I saw a copy of that, or a photostat of it. 

Mr. Kunzig. Do you think your name was used by the Communist 
group in control of this type of organization because they knew they 
could trust you as a member, so to speak? 

Mr. McNamara. I don't know whether they knew whether they 
could trust me as a member or not, but as soon as you become a very 
active unionist these groups grab your name and use it. 

Sometimes I would come in the office in the morning and I would 
see my name on some outfit for this or that or the other thing, and 
sometimes I would call them on the telephone and ask them why they 
used my name, and sometimes I was too busy and I would say "Well, 
the heck with it." 

Mr. Kunzig. At any time while the Communists were using your 
name did you protest to the newspapers or openly or in any other way 
that your name was being used ? 

Mr. McNamara. No; I did not. 

Mr. Kunzig. The Washington Committee for Democratic Action 
has been cited by Attorney General Tom Clark, Attorney General 
Francis Biddle, and the Special Committee on Un-American Activi- 
ties and by the California Committee on Un-American Activities, 
Mr. Chairman. 

I offer McNamara exhibit No. 5 into evidence at this time, Mr. 
Chairman. 

Mr. Scherer. It may be so marked and received in evidence. 

(Conference of Washington Committee for Democratic Action was 
marked for identification and received in evidence as McNamara Ex- 
hibit No. 5.) 

Mr. Kunzig. I have a document which I shall mark as McNamara 
Exhibit No. 6 for identification, Mr. McNamara, which is also a simi- 
lar situation. It is the same organization, the Washington Commit- 
tee for Democratic Action, sponsoring a Conference on Civil Rights. 

This is a letterhead dated April 26, 1940, which is a little later now, 
and under the list of sponsors again appears the name James Mc- 
Namara. 

I will hand you this document marked "Exhibit No. 6 for identifi- 
cation and ask you whether you knew at that time whether your name 
was being used by this Communist-front organization? 

Mr. McNamara. In 1940 ? The conference was in 1938. 

Mr. Kunzig. No, the other was in 1940 also and the one regarding 
Tom Mooney was in 1939. 

Mr. McNamara. This was at the same time as the conference. Well, 
no. 



3038 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

Mr. Kunzig. You did not know your name was being used on this 
letterhead ? 

Mr. McNamara. I may have seen a letterhead after it was on there, 
but I did not authorize it. 

Mr. Kunzig. I offer McNamara exhibit No. 6 in evidence, Mr. 
Chairman. 

Mr. Scherer. It may be admitted in evidence. 

(Conference on Civil Eights by Washington Committee for Demo- 
cratic Action, letterhead April 26, 1940, was marked for identification 
and received in evidence as "McNamara Exhibit No. 6.") 

Mr. Kunzig. I have a document which I shall mark as "McNamara 
Exhibit No. 7" for identification, which is a Call to a Conference on 
Constitutional Liberties in America. 

This was cited by Attorney General Francis Biddle in 1942, by the 
Special Committee on Un-American Activities in 1944, by the Cali- 
fornia Committee on Un-American Activities in 1948, and by the 
New York City Council Committee investigating the municipal civil- 
service commission. 

Out of this conference on Constitutional Liberties in America grew 
the National Federation for Constitutional Liberties, which is also a 
well-known and cited organization. 

Now, listed as a sponsor is James McNamara, of Washington, D. C. 

Were you a sponsor of this group ? 

Mr. McNamara. I was not. Mr. Chairman, these groups used my 
name almost indiscriminately. Certainly I should have used means 
to stop it, but on all of the charges brought up before having to do 
with my participation in groups such as that, I did not have time. 
I did not participate in them. 

Mr. Kunzig. They used your name indiscriminately, but you did 
nothing about it? 

Mr. McNamara. Yes ; I did do something about it. 

Mr. Kunzig. What did you do and when did you do it. 

Mr. McNamara. Here is one instance. This was all 15 years ago. 
Here is a letter in 1939. Is this in 1939 ? 

Mr. Kunzig. This was in 1940 ? 

Mr. McNamara. Here is a letter dated June 7, 1939, to the general 
president of the international union, a paragraph of which reads as 
follows : 

I am also enclosing copies of a number of letters having to do with the National 
Right-To-Work Congress and ask that you return these letters to me. I am 
sending them to you simply for your information because at times I know I am 
unfortunately cast in the role of a rabid radical. This organization used my 
name without my authorization. I promptly wrote them asking that they remove 
my name from any of their literature. Oftentimes organizations such as this 
use the name and standing of liberal individuals for their activities. 

That is just chance that I have that one letter. 

VerbalW perhaps I had done several things. 

Mr. Sciierer. Was that during the time that you were international 
vice president of the union ? 

Mr. McNamara. Yes, it was. 

Mr. Kunzig. During the time that you were active in Communist 
a flairs. 

Mr. McNamara. It was during the time that I associated with some 
Communists here in Washington. I would rather put it that way. 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 3039 

Mr. Scherer. Was that letter written because there were complaints 
within the union at that time about your Communist activities? 

Mr. McNamara. There might have been, yes. For example, I 
talked at the Wardman Park Hotel with Jim Carey at a breakfast 
given by some union organization and I said something to the effect 
that it would be better for the union movement as a whole if the CIO 
and the A. F. of L. got together. That got to my international presi- 
dent the next day. Those sort of things would get to him. Some of 
them considered me a little too liberal, I guess. 

Mr. Kunzig. When I asked you whether you were a member of the 
Communist Party you answered by saying that ideologically you did 
not consider yourself one of them, and you went on to discuss the meet- 
ings you went to and the assistance they gave you. At that time it is 
true, is it not, that you were a member ol the Communist Party ? That 
is in 1938, 1939, and 1940. 

Mr. McNamara. I suppose one would say that I was a member if one 
can be a member, if one can belong to a church and not believe what 
they teach. Then I was a member of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Kunzig. Excuse me just a moment. 

You have indicated to me in private that you would be willing to 
give the names of some of the people you associated with in the Com- 
munist Party and in labor unions in an executive session. 

Mr. McNamara. That is correct. 

Mr. Kunzig. Before this subcommittee. 

Mr. McNamara. That is true. 

Mr. Kunzig. Is that correct ? 

Mr. McNamara. That is true. 

Mr. Kunzig. And you will do that? 

Mr. McNamara. I will. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, in case I neglected to offer McNamara 
exhibit No. 7 in evidence, I do so now. 

Mr. Scherer. It may be admitted in evidence. 

(Call to Conference on Constitutional Liberties in America was 
marked for identification and received in evidence as "McNamara 
Exhibit^No. 7." ) 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, I recommend then that with regard 
to questions as to other names, that following the practice of this com- 
mittee here, we hold an executive session in order that our staff may 
have an opportunity to properly check these names before the release 
of such names, and I recommend that as to this series of questions we 
have an executive session at a later time. 

Mr. Scherer. The recommendation of counsel will be followed and 
we will hold an executive session at that time to be determined upon 
the conclusion of the hearing this morning. 

Do you have any further questions? 

Mr. Kunzig. I have no further questions in public session, Mr. 
Chairman. 

Mr. Scherer. Do you have any questions, Congressman Walter ? 

Mr. Walter. No further questions. 

Mr. Scherer. The first hearing, I believe you said, before a [loyalty] 
board was on August 25, 1948 ? 

Mr. McNamara. That is true. 

Mr. Scherer. And that was the agency board of the Mediation and 
Conciliation Service? 



3040 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

Mr. McNamara. That is true. 

Mr. Scheber. That decision was subsequently reviewed, was it not, 
by the Loyalty Review BoarcU 

Mr. McNamara. I don't know whether there was that decision. I 
had a loyalty hearing within my service before the loyalty board of 
my service. 

Mr. Scherer. Of the agency? 

Mr. McNamara. Yes. 

Mr. Scherer. And at least one of those hearings of the agency 
board was reviewed by the Loyalty Review Board? 

Mr. McNamara. That is true. 

Mr. Scherer. And that review took place in November 1948, did 
it not? 

Mr. McNamara. The review? 

Mr. Scherer. Yes. 

Mr. McNamara. No. The review was, the hearing was held in Cin- 
cinnati on February 16, 1953. 

Mr. Scherer. That was the last one. There was one before that, 
was there not? 

Mr. Walter. September 1952. 

Mr. McNamara. In September 1952 by our own service. 

Mr. Scherer. There was one in 1948 following your hearing be- 
fore the agency board, was there not ? 

Mr. McNamara. No, I think we are confused on this. 

Mr. Scheber. You may not know about that review, is that possible ? 

Mr. McNamara. No. I know of three hearings in which I partici- 
pated. The first of these hearings was before the loyalty board of my 
service held on August 25, 1948. 

The second hearing held before the loyalty board of my service was 
a 2-day hearing held in Washington in September 1952. The day 
of the month I do not have. 

Now then, a third hearing outside of my service was held by the 
Civil S >rvice Loyalty Review Board in Cincinnati, Ohio, on February 
16, 1953. 

Mr. Walter. Were there not review boards in the agency as well 
as in the other? 

Mr. McNamara. I do not think so, Congressman. 

Mr. Kunzig. You were present at those three hearings, were you? 

Mr. McNamar\. Oh, yes. 

Mr. Schebeb. And the one held on November 4, 1948, or there- 
abouts, reviewing the decision of August 25, 1948, was held and evi- 
dently you were not present ? 

Mr. McNamaba. That is true. 

Mr. Walteb. Let us get this straight. Then there is a review board 
in the agency. 

Mr. McNamaba. There must be. 1 did not know of it, frankly. 

Mr. Schebeb. Do you have any questions, Mr. Walter? 

Mr. Walter. Yes, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. McNamara, I direct your attention to the San Francisco con- 
vention. You say that on your way into the convention hall the dele- 
gate who accompanied you said "I think they — " meaning the Com- 
munists — "are going to run you." 

Who was the man who said that? 

Mr. McNamaba. Costas Alexiou. 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 3041 

Mr. Walter. Where does he live? 

Mr. McNamara. I believe he still lives in Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Walter. Did he indicate to you the reason why he made the 
statement that he made? 

Mr. McNamara. No, he did not, but I was very active on the con- 
vention floor at the time and they were looking for a vice president in 
charge of these workers and I suppose it appeared to everybody as 
though I probably knew as much about 

Mr. Walter. Was this man Costas a Communist? 

Mr. McNamara. I would believe he is, yes, sir. 

Mr. Walter. You know he is? 

Mr. McNamara. Well, I will talk to you about that later. 

Mr. Walter. All right. That is all. Thank you. 

Mr. Scherer. I have no further questions. 

The witness will be continued under subpena and we will advise you 
later in the day as to the time and place of the executive hearing. It 
will most likely be this afternoon, so you will remain under subpena 
and we will let you know. 

Mr. Kunzig. Thank you. That will be all for the time being, then. 

Mr. Scherer. What other witnesses have you ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Young, chairman of the Civil Service Commis- 
sion, and Mr. McCoy, director of the Federal Mediation Service. 

If Mr. McCoy is present we will call him first. 

Mr. Scherer. Will you stand up and be sworn, please, sir ? 

In the testimony you are about to give before this committee, do you 
solemnly swear you will tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing 
but the truth, so help you God? 
Mr. McCoy. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF WHITLEY P. McCOY 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. McCoy, will you please give your full name and 
title for the record? 

Mr. McCoy. .Whitley P. McCoy, Director, Federal Mediation and 
Conciliation Service. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. McCoy, it is my understanding that you have been 
subpenaed in person and to produce the files in the case of James 
McNamara, such as may be represented within your files in the Federal 
Mediation and Conciliation Service. Is that correct? 

Mr. McCoy. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kunzig. Do you have those files ? 

Mr. McCoy. I have just been handed this subpena. I have not 
looked it over. I suppose it is what you said. 

Mr. Kunzig. Do you have those files with you in person ? 

Mr. McCoy. I do not. I came over here this morning to request the 
committee very respectfully for a little more time in which to consult 
with the Department of Justice and my own people as to these matters. 

I have every desire to cooperate with this committee and the greatest 
respect for it. 

Mr. Walter. Why don't you demonstrate it, Mr. McCoy? 

Mr. McCoy. I am demonstrating it by being here, Congressman, 
trying to. 

Mr. Scherer. Do I understand, then 



3042 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

Mr. McCoy. I am just asking for a continuance of this matter, Con- 
gressman. 

Mr. Scherer. Then you are at this time not refusing or not agreeing 
to turn over to the committee the files ? 

Mr. McCoy. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Walter. In other words, you want an opinion as to whether 
or not you have to comply with the subpena duces tecum ? 

Mr. McCot. That is exactly right, sir. I just took office very re- 
cently, and with the difficulty of moving from Alabama, which I am 
sure you gentlemen will appreciate, having to go down and get my 
household goods and my family and find a home and that sort of 
thing, I have not had great deal of time on the job. 

Mr. Walter. Suppose you are advised that you do not have to 
comply with the subpena. Then what about the great respect you 
say you have for the work of this committee ? 

Mr. McCoy. If I am advised by competent advice that I am for- 
bidden to produce the records, my duty will be to refuse. It will 
not be disrespectful of the committee. 

Mr. Walter. Forbidden by whom ? 

Mr. McCoy. The President. 

Mr. Scherer. The Attorney General talked to me and said that 
the ag enc y had stated that they wanted to discuss this with the 
committee further and that the agency felt that it would be in a 
position to give us all of the information that we wanted. Is that 
your position? 

Mr. McCoy. I hope very much that I will be in a position to give 
you everything that I have got, Congressman. I just want a little 
more time. 

Mr. Walter. How much time do you want? Until 2 o'clock this 
afternoon? 

Mr. McCoy. I should hope that it would not require too much time, 
but I have no control over that. 

Mr. Scherer. Well, on Wednesday I am leaving for hearings of 
the Public Works Committee which will last 2 weeks. Therefore I 
will not be available for 2 weeks. 

The request of the Director of the Federal Mediation and Con- 
ciliation Service will be granted on the representation that was made 
to me by the Deputy Attorney General this morning, viz., that the 
agency felt that it could give to us, that is the committee, all of the 
information we needed with reference to this matter. 

The Deputy Attorney General represented that he did not want 
to give us this information publicly for security reasons. Personally 
I am at a loss to understand how the security of the country could be 
affected by giving us the information we requested publicly, but on 
his representation I am willing to look into the matter and determine 
with Mr. Walter whether or not any security measures are affected. 

Therefore the request will be granted and you will remain under 
subpena, Mr. McCoy. 

Mr. McCoy. Thank you, and may I add for the record what you 
already know personally, that our office has furnished the committee 
with certain documents which were requested. 

Mr. Scherer. Let us say they were not the documents that I really 
wanted. They were very innocuous documents. 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 3043 

Mr. McCoy. I should like to renew the statement that I made, that 
I have the greatest respect for this committee and I hope 

Mr. Walter. Do you think you are cooperating with this com- 
mittee in its work when you do not send to the chairman of this com- 
mittee the documents he requested ? 

Mr. McCoy. No. 

Mr. Walter. Why did you send him any documents at all if you 
did not think the committee was entitled to the documents ? Why did 
you send a part of them? 

Mr. McCoy. I did not take that position. 

Mr. Walter. The chairman of this committee requested certain 
information and you sent a part of it and you did that deliberately, 
trying to create the impression that you had complied with his request, 
but you did not give him what he sought. 

Mr. McCoy. I don't know whether you saw the letter that I wrote 
to Congressman Scherer or not. 

Mr. Walter. I heard about that letter for the first time this 
morning. 

Mr. Scherer. Mr. Walter is correct with this exception. Mr. 
McCoy stated he would not give me the balance of the material which 
I requested, but he did tell me there were some that he was hoping he 
could bring in. 

Mr. McCoy. I hope I can bring it in the next time. 

Mr. Scherer. I hope so, too. 

You may be excused at this time, then, Mr. McCoy. 

Call your next witness, Mr. Kunzig. 

Mr. Kunzig. I call Mr. Philip Young. 

Mr. Scherer. Mr. Young, would you stand up, please, and be sworn ? 

In the testimony you are about to give before this committee, do 
you solemnly swear that you will tell the truth, the whole truth, and 
nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Young. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF PHILIP YOUNG 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Young, would you please give your full name 
for the record ? 

Mr. Young. Philip Young. 

Mr. Kunzig. And your present position? 

Mr. Young. Chairman of the Civil Service Commission. 

Mr. Kunzig. Am I correct in saying that you have been served 
with a subpena asking you to produce in general terms the files in 
the case of James McNamara ? 

Mr. Young. That is correct. 

Mr. Kunzig. Do you have those files with you this morning? 

Mr. Young. We do have the files with us and the Civil Service Com- 
mission in this matter is in the same position as the Federal Media- 
tion Service with respect to turning over their files to the committee. 

We are most anxious at the Commission to cooperate with the com- 
mittee. We are in perfect sympathy with the objectives of the commit- 
tee and you can be quite sure that we will make every effort to see 
that you have the factual information that will be of help and of 
constructive use to the committee from our records. 



3044 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

Mr. Scherer. I suppose you are asking for a continuance for the 
same reasons advanced by Mr. McCoy? 

Mr. Young. That is correct, Mr. Scherer. We are in the same 
position as the Federal Mediation Service in this. 

Mr. Scherer. Do you have the actual records, or does Mr. McCoy 
have the records ? 

Your letter to me told me the records were in the possession of Mr. 
McCoy. 

Mr. Young. We have certain records in the Civil Service Commis- 
sion, and Mr. Meloy, the chief law officer of the Civil Service Com- 
mission, who is here with me this morning, has those records. 

Mr. Scherer. When did you get those records? 

Mr. Young. In 1953. They have been in our possession since 1952. 

Mr. Scherer. I don't know whether you wrote this letter yourself 
but your signature appears on it. Why did you say that the files were 
in the possession of the Federal Conciliation and Mediation Service, 
and I would have to contact it? 

Mr. Young. Mr. Meloy advised me that we stated we did have the 
transcript of the Review Board and that the files were in the hands of 
Mr. McCoy in the Federal Mediation Service. 

Mr. Scherer. Your letter, Mr. Young, is dated August 14, 1953, 
and reads as follows: 

(Letter from Philip Young, Chairman of Civil Service Commis- 
sion, dated August 14, 1953, is as follows :) 

United States Civil Service Commission, 

Washington, D. C, August 14, 1953. 
Hon. Gordon H. Scherer, 

House of Representatives. 

Dear Mr. Scherer: Reference is made to your letter of August 1, 1953, ad- 
dressed to the Honorable Hiram Bingham, Chairman of the Loyalty Review 
Board, and to the reply thereto by the secretary of the Loyalty Review Board. 

I am informed that the case of Mr. James F. McNamara was an agency case 
under part II of Executive Order 9835 wherein it sets forth the provision per- 
taining to the adjudication of employees of departments and agencies. The mat- 
ter came to the Loyalty Review Board by way of postaudit of the decision ren- 
dered by the employing agency, the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. 
The complete file in this matter, including the transcript of testimony before the 
agency, was returned to the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service on or 
about April 9, 1953, after the Loyalty Review Board had considered it under 
postaudit. 

The only remaining part of the file in the possession of the Commission are 
copies of reports of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and a copy of the tran- 
script of the hearing held by the Loyalty Review Board with Mr. McNamara by a 
panel of the Loyalty Review Board during the post audit. 

Consequently the Commission is unable to furnish you copies of the complete 
file or a transcript of the testimony before the agency since these records aro 
now in the hands of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. 
Sincerely yours, 

Philip Young, Chairman. 

Mr. Scherer. And then I wrote you again following that and 
asked you to send me copies of the copies that you said you had, and 
of course I received no reply to that letter. 

So I followed it up with the Mediation and Conciliation Service 
but I did not get a reply. I did not get a reply to my letter about the 
copies that you say you had. You said that I would have to go to the 
Mediation and Conciliation Service. 

Mr. Young. You should have at least had the courtesy of a reply. 

Mr. Scherer. I got a lot of replies. I started 6 weeks ago and I 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 3045 

got a lot of replies advising me to go to different agencies in pursuit 
of these files. 

Well, the request will be granted and the witness will remain under 
subpena and we will see if we cannot finally get the information that 
we want. We are certain that if we had had the files which I think 
we are entitled to we could have presented and prepared this matter 
much better than we have today. 

There are many people in all three of these agencies I have con- 
tacted who know the contents of these files. It is inconceivable to 
me why a Member of Congress or a committee such as this investigat- 
ing a matter such as this is precluded from knowing what is in those 
files. 

How it affects the security of the country I am at a loss to under- 
stand. I think the security of the Nation would have been better 
served if this committee had had the opportunity to see these files. 

Thank you very much, Mr. Young ; you may be excused temporarily. 

Mr. Young. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Scherer. Mr. Walter and Mr. Counsel, I do have here a part, 
a very small part, of the file that I was attempting to get from one of 
these agencies whom we contacted. I did not obtain this file or part 
of the file from any of those agencies. I am not at liberty to disclose 
where I did obtain it and do not intend to, but it is interesting to note 
the contents of what I have, Mr. Walter. 

It is a report of the Loyalty Review Board's own examiner on this 
case, and the Loyalty Review Board in pasing on this case had this 
report of its own examiner before it at that time. I am going to read 
into the record that report : 

The evidence in this case is most conclusive on membership in the Com- 
munist Party. Employee was an active official in a local labor union and later 
in the international union. One witness, a member of the Communist Party 
in 1937 and 1938, stated she collected Communist Party dues from employees. 
This witness informed another witness, an official in the labor union, that she 
h;id also made out employee's Communist Party membership card and given it 
to him. Another witness testified that employee ordered and began a strike 
among hotel employees in Washington in Octoher 1939; that the reason for the 
strike was more a political than economical issue; that general president of the 
union wired McNamara to stop the strike and later came to Washington only 
to find McNamara unwilling to call off the strike. The union official, a non- 
Communist, then contacted one Jay Rubin, of New York City, who came to 
Washington and in his capacity as "Communist commissar of the food industry" 
stopped the strike. 

Mr. Sands, international representative of the union, stated that McNamara 
was placed in the position of vice president of the Hotel and Restaurant Em- 
ployees' Union by the Communist elements in the organization in 1939 and that 
McNamara was removed from that office in 1941 because of his persistence in 
following the Communist Party line within the union. 

Mr. Frank Fenton, international representative, American Federation of 
Labor, stated that he received information in 1940 that McNamara was a member 
of several Communist-front groups; that upon direction of the general president 
of the union he held a hearing in early 1941 at which time he confronted Mc- 
Namara with the person who had issued McNamara his Communist Party 
membership card • that McNamara became confused and did not deny his Com- 
munist Party membership but stated he did not understand the purposes of the 
Communist Party and how the American Federation of Labor regarded it. Mr. 
Fenton said he reported the facts to the general president who brought about 
the defeat of McNamara at the next convention of the union rather than remove 
him on charges of membership in the Communist Party. 



3046 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

The transcript of the hearing by the agency reveals that 25 pages of testi- 
mony by McNamara were devoted to a review of his life history and the trials 
and tribulations of a union organizer, all of which was immaterial to the charges. 
McNamara denied membership in the Communist Party in 1937 and denied 
membership in the Communist Party during the period of 1939 to 1941. He 
would neither deny or affirm membership in the League of Women Shoppers, 
Washington Committee for Democratic Action, American Peace Mobilization, 
or National Federation for Constitutional Liberties. 

At the hearing McNamara was asked if he recalled a meeting held at the office 
of Frank Fenton in 1940 when a woman was present. McNamara said he re- 
called the meeting. He was then asked if he remembered that the woman stated 
that she had issued him a membership card in the Communist Party. McNamara 
then replied that there was no woman in the Fenton office at that time but he 
thought the woman had been to the office before he got there. Mr. McNamara 
denied that he had ever been confronted by a woman at any time. The subject 
was then dropped. 

The agency loyalty board did not confront the employees with the information 
in the manner in which it had been developed by the investigation. The meet- 
ing referred to above was held in the office of Frank Fenton in 1941 and Mr. 
Fenton did not give any testimony in confidence. Mr. Sands, international repre- 
sentative of the Hotel and Restaurant Employees and Bartenders Internatioal 
Union and who is located in Washington gave considerable information regarding 
the Communist affiiliations by McNamara. Mr. Sands advised that he was avail- 
able to testify before the loyalty board but he was not called. 

It it to be noted that Mr. Howard Colvin, associate director of the Federal 
Mediation and Conciliation Service was interviewed by the FBI in the investi- 
gation of McNamara. Mr. Colvin stated "he has no reason to question his (Mc- 
Namara's) loyalty to this Government and that in his estimation he is loyal 
and dependable." Mr. Colvin was a member of the agency loyalty board that 
rendered the favorable decision in the McNamara case. It is believed that his 
testimony to the FBI disqualifies him to pass on this case. 

A studied consideration of the entire file leaves the impression that the action 
of the agency loyalty board was merely a token compliance with the appropriate 
procedures. The finding favorable to the employee is contrary to the evidence in 
the case as well as the prescribed procedures. 

The Washington report of the FBI fails to show that the files of the House 
Committee on Un-American Activities were checked. The reports of that com- 
mittee reflect the following information regarding James McNamara. 

Sponsor, Conference on Constitutional Liberties in America, June 7-9, 1940 
(this organization launched the National Federation of Constitutional Liberties). 

See appendix 9, pages 651 and 1229. 

Sponsor and speaker, Conference on Civil Rights. This was under the 
auspices of the Washington Committee for Democratic Action April 20-21, 1940. 
See appendix 9, pages 1695 and 1696. 

Sponsor, Washington Tom Mooney Committee. See appendix 9, page 1713. 

Now, with this report of its own examiner before it, the Loyalty 
Review Board on March 9, 1949, rendered its decision. 

It will be noted that nothing whatsoever is said in this report about 
the findings of the examiner which I have just read. It is incon- 
ceivable to me that we could get such a decision out of the Loyalty 
Review Board, Mr. Walter. Not only were there illegalities in the 
procedures, as they admitted, but the Board had before it the report 
from the examiner which I just read. It is just amazing. 

Well, then, we had called to our attention this morning by Con- 
gressman Busbey, who is chairman of a Subcommittee on Appropria- 
tions, that this matter was brought to the attention of the Mediation 
and Conciliation Service by the Appropriations Committee. 

Mr. Kunzig will read from the hearings of the Committee on Appro- 
priations for the Labor Department and related independent agencies, 
held during the 82d Congress, 2d session, for the fiscal year 1953, the 
testimony beginning at page 67. 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 3047 

In view of the fact that we intend to go into this a little further 
insofar as the action of these boards or agencies are concerned, I 
think our records should contain the examination by Mr. Busbey of 
two witnesses from the agency. 

Mr. Kunzig (reading) : 

Status of loyalty investigations : 

Mr. Busbey. Mr. Ching, has your agency completed the investigation of all 
its employees under the loyalty program as provided by Executive Order 9835? 

Mr. Ching. We have some pending. 

Mr. Greenwood. We do not, of course, conduct the investigation. That is done 
by the FBI. We consider the cases. Our agency loyalty board considers the 
cases as we receive reports from the FBI. We can supply for the record the 
exact number, but in general, all of the personnel who were on the payroll prior 
to about 1 year ago have been investigated and cleared with 1 or 2 exceptions; 
and with respect to those who have come on within the past year, reports are 
coming in currently on them and they are cleared as the reports are received 

Mr. Busbey. I would like to take up an individual case. I assume that you 
are more familiar with it than Mr. Ching, so maybe I should direct my questions 
to you, Mr. Greenwood. 

Mr. Greenwood. That is perfectly all right. 

Mr. Busbey. I am particularly interested in the question of the employment 
of persons by the United States Government wherein there is reasonable doubt 
as to that person's loyalty to our form of government. Therefore, the questions 
I propose to ask you have to do with one certain man in your agency. 

This interest is not new on my part. I ask questions of this kind of other 
agencies. 

Have you in your agency a man holding the position of regional director or 
district director or conciliator, or whatever title it may be, who was practically 
forced out of the American Federation of Labor because of his membership in 
the Communist Party? 

Mr. Greenwood. Not to our knowledge. 

Mr. Busbey. Well, you certainly would have knowledge of anything like that, 
would you not? You are in contact with your agency loyalty board. 

Mr. Greenwood. I am chairman of the loyalty board for the agency. To the 
best of my knowledge, we have not received any reports from the FBI which 
would indicate that any one of our conciliators or regional directors has had 
that type of experience — that is, being forced out of the American Federation of 
Labor because of Communist activity or affiliation. 

Mr. Busbey. How long have you been acting as chairman of the agency loyalty 
board? 

Mr. Greenwood. I have been chairman for about a year and a half and prior 
to that time I was a member of the board, since its inception. 

Mr. Busbey. Would that be 1947? 

Mr. Greenwood. Well, the board was established in 1948, I think, when the 
Executive order came out. 

Mr. Busbey. If I recall correctly, the original Executive order came out March 
21, 1947. 

Mr. Greenwood. You may be correct. Of course, the agency was not established 
as an independent agency until August of 1947. The dates are a little fuzzy 
in my mind. I am not sure when we got around to establishing our board. It 
might have been late in 1947 or early 1948. 

Mr. Busbey. According to your answer to my last question in regard to this 
particular individual, you would not have any knowledge of his separation 
from the American Federation of Labor and his almost immediate employment 
by your agency? 

Mr. Greenwood. I cannot recall any such case. If you would like to furnish 
the name off the record, perhaps it would refresh my memory a little bit with 
respect to the details. 

Mr. Busbey. I would just as soon keep the individual's name off the record, 
but if you do not recognize him by the time I have finished my interrogation, 
which I think you should be able to do, I shall be very happy to furnish you 
the name of the individual. 

I am to understand, then, Mr. Greenwood, you do not have any knowledge 
whatever of an individual who, as I said, was dismissed from the American 
Federation of Labor because of his membership in the Communist Party and is 



3048 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

now employed in your agency in one of these positions of conciliator or regional 
director or commissioner or at least a high position? 

Mr. Greenwood. I do not recall anyone of that description at the moment. 

Mr. Busbey. Was your agency ever informed by any witness or witnesses that 
such a person in the employment of the agency previously had membership in 
the Communist Party? 

Mr. Greenwood. To the best of my knowledge and trusting my memory at this 
point, none of the official reports we have received have indicated that any 
member of our Service was himself a member of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Bushey. Now, will you answer my question, please? 

Mr. Greenwood. I'm sorry. Would you mind repeating it? 

Mr. Busbey. The question is : Was your agency informed by a witness or 
witnesses that an employee in such a position as I outlined had formerly had 
membership in the Communist Party? 

Mr. Greenwood. We have not had, as best I can recall at the moment, any 
witnesses at any of the hearings conducted by our board other than the individual 
employee himself, so the only testimony of witnesses we have received would be 
through FBI reports. 

Mr. Busbey. I again refer you to my question and will you please answer my 
question? I am not talking about FBI reports. I am not talking about any 
hearings of the loyalty board of your agency. May I repeat the question : Was 
your agency informed by a witness or any witnesses as to an employee of your 
agency in one of these positions that I outlined — that he had former membership 
in the Communist Party? 

Mr. Greenwood. The only knowledge I would have of witnesses would be those 
appearing before the agency board. How any other witness would appear, I do 
not know. So the only answer I can supply is what knowledge I have of the 
witnesses who might have appeared before the board, and there have been no 
witnesses before the board. Now, ordinarily we do not have witnesses appearing 
at any hearings of our agency. We do not have witnesses furnishing testimony 
in any other manner on such matters. So to the best of my knowledge I can say 
that no witness has ever furnished such information to our Service. 

Mr. Busbey. Let us approach it from another angle, then. Has anyone, to your 
knowledge, approached you or any member of your board and been willing to 
testify as to the particular individual I am talking about as to his membership 
in the Communist Party? 

Mr. Greenwood. No one has approached me with such an offer, and to the best 
of my knowledge no one has approached any other member of our board, but I 
cannot answer entirely for the other members of the board. 

Mr. Busbey. If you had in your employ a person in one of these positions 
that I think would be properly recognized as a high position, would you not be 
interested in finding out anything and everything you could from any source of 
information so you could check as to that individual's probable membership in 
the Communist Party? 

Mr. Greenwood. Very definitely. 

Mr. McGrath. You said in his employ. I did not quite get the import of that 
question. 

Mr. Busbey. The employ of the agency. Well, regardless of whether you 
received any derogatory information from the FBI investigation, would you not 
be interested in having any individual come in before your loyalty board and 
under oath testify as to what he knew in regard to an employee's membership 
in the Communist Party? 

Mr. Greenwood. I think we would; speaking for myself, I would. 

Mr. Bxtsbey. I was in hopes you might have identified the employee before 
now, because the next question I wanted to ask you, Mr. Greenwood, was whether 
or not this particular employee at any time denied before your loyalty board his 
membership in the Communist Party. I think I will have to reframe the ques- 
tion. Have you had any employee in such a position as I have designated before 
the loyalty board where you have had to interrogate him as to his membership 
in the Communist Party and he denied it? 

Mr. Greenwood. In each case our loyalty board has considered we have asked 
a question approximating that one — "Are you or have you ever been a member 
of the Communist Party?" — and in each instance the reply has been "No," so 
that to the best of my knowledge no employee whose case has been considered 
by our agency loyalty board has ever admitted having been a member of the 
Communist Party. 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 3049 

Mr. Busbey. Again, for the record, I take it from your past testimony that 
you have never had a witness before your agency loyalty board who has identi- 
fied anyone in the agency as a former member of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Greenwood. Subject to a check of the minutes of the meetings of the 
agency loyalty board, I would say "No." To the best of my memory at the 
moment I do not think we have ever had any witnesses before the agency loyalty 
board. 

Mr. Busbey. Mr. Chairman, I would like Mr. Greenwood to review the records 
of his agency and advise this subcommittee if this employee, whose name I will 
give to him off the record, is still in the agency and what action, if any, the 
agency has taken under the amendment to Executive Order 9835 wherein the 
standard or yardstick was changed from "belief that the employee is disloyal" to 
*'a reasonable doubt as to the employee's loyalty." 

Mr. Greenwood. I will be happy to supply that information, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Fog arty. Off the record. 

(Discussion off the record.) 

And that ends that part. 

Mr. Scherer. Now, Mr. Counsel, a year later, and it was just on 
March 20, 1953, Mr. Busbey, sitting as chairman of the Subcommittee 
on Appropriations, had Mr. Greenwood before him again when that 
Service was asking for appropriations from Congress, will you read 
the testimony taken at that hearing. 

Mr. Kunzig (reading) : 

Action on loyalty review cases : 

Mr. Busbey. Mr. Greenwood, when we had the hearings for the fiscal year 
1953, I talked with you at quite some length about one of your conciliators that 
I had reason to believe should not be in Government employment. 

What, if anything, has happened to that man, as far as the Federal Mediation 
and Conciliation Service is concerned? 

Mr. Greenwood. He is still on the payroll, sir. 

Mr. Busbey. Has any further determination by the loyalty board in the agency 
been made since the hearings of last year? 

Mr. Greenwood. The case is now before the Loyalty Review Board and, under 
our instructions, any inquiry should be directed to that board rather than to our 
Service. 

Mr. Busbey. For the time being, at least, I am directing my inquiry to you. 
Does the Loyalty Review Board of the agency still think that this man should be 
in Government service? 

Mr. Greenwood. Under our instructions from the White House, Mr. Chairman, 
we are precluded from answering questions of that type. 

Mr. Busbey. How many persons in your agency have been up for review before 
the Loyalty Review Board under the President's directive of 1947? 

Mr. Greenwood. I do not have the exact figures. May we submit that for the 
record? 

Mr. Busbey. Yes ; and when you submit that for the record will you submit 
the number that have been passed on favorably and those that have been passed 
on unfavorably by your local board? 

Mr. Greenwood. I think we can do that. 

(The information requested is as follows:) 

Should I read these statistics into the record, Mr. Chairman? 
Mr. Scherer. It will not be necessary to read them, but we will 
incorporate them in the record. 

(At this point Mr. Walter left the hearing room.) 



3050 COMMUNIST METHODS of infiltration 

Mr. Kunzig (reading) : 









Summary of loyalty cases 



Number of cases received by agency board 14 

Employees separated prior to consideration by agency board 3 



Number of cases considered by agency board 11 






Favorable findings 11 

Unfavorable findings 

Number of cases referred to review board 11 

Employees separated prior to postaudit by review board 2 

Number of cases pending before review board Mar. 24, 1953 2 

4 

Number of cases postaudited by review board 7 

Agency findings accepted by review board 7 

Agency findings reversed by review board 

Mr. Busbey. As the record will show, I was very careful to keep that man's 
name out of the record last year. For the time being at least I am following 
the same procedure. 

Mr. Greenwood. We appreciate that. 

Mr. Busbey. Because I have no intention whatever of trying in any way to 
embarrass the individual, or the board, or the Federal Mediation and Con- 
ciliation Service. All I am trying to do is a constructive job of helping the 
agency. As evidence of that good faith on my part, I might say that I was 
responsible in great degree for having 10 people dismissed at one time from the 
State Department during the 80th Congress ; but I did not reveal their names, 
I did not make any speeches about it, I put no publicity in the papers. The only 
thing that I am trying to get is constructive results. 

When did the case of this individual go to the loyalty board for review? 

Mr. Greenwood. Do we have that information, Mr. Eady? 

Mr. Eady. Relying on memory, I think it was about February or March. 

Mr. Coee. May I say this — they have conducted a hearing, the Loyalty Review 
Board, in this case and have not yet made a ruling. 

Mr. Busbey. Well, I am just trying to ascertain if they have been moving with 
dispatch. 

Mr. Cole. Yes; they have completed the hearing, I understand. They con- 
ducted a hearing out in Ohio and the record is closed and their decision should 
be forthcoming soon, I would think. 

Mr. Busbey. And that case did not go to the Loyalty Review Board until 
February of this year? 

Mr. Eady. I was mistaken about the date. 

Mr. Busbey. On what date did it go to the Loyalty Review Board? 

Mr. Eady. Possibly about 4 months ago. 

Mr. Busbey. And it took the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service all 
that time to make its determination, Mr. Greenwood? 

Mr. Greenwood. I am not sure of the chronology at this time. I would have 
to look at the record. 

Mr. Busbey. I do not know why you would have to look at the record, when 
I brought the case up as long ago as February 7 of 1952, and, as Mr. Eady says, 
it went to the Loyalty Review Board about 4 months ago. It seems rather self- 
evident to me that it took the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service at 
least all that time to make its determination. 

Mr. Greenwood. As I recall, when we spoke to you at that time in the hearings 
last year, that case was before the Loyalty Review Board then. Subsequently, it 
was referred back to the Service, and when a case is closed by the agency board, 
the review board, at its own discretion, decides when to pick up that case for 
review. We do not make that decision. 

Mr. Busbey. When did this individual start to work in the Federal Mediation 
and Conciliation Service? 

Mr. Gkeenwood. I would have to supply that for the record. 

Mr. Busbey. Would you do that, please? 

Mr. Greenwood. Yes. 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 3051 

(The information is as follows:) 
January 30, 1942. 

And, Mr. Chairman, that date of January 30, 1942, is, of course, 
the exact date given by this witness this morning before this com- 
mittee. 

Now to continue with the testimony : 

Mr. Busbey. When you are supplying that for the record, will you also supply 
for the record the date that his case was first considered by the loyalty board 
of the agency ? 

Mr. Greenwood. I will see if we can supply that information. 

Mr. Busbey. Would there be any difficulty in supplying it? 

Mr. Greenwood. I am not sure what the terms of the White House order are 
on that score. 

Mr. Busbey. Well, I will tell you this : If you can find any terms of the White 
House order that would prevent you from doing that, and you do not do it, I am 
going to break this case wide open, and, for the record, I am getting sick and 
tired of continuing delay on a loyalty case such as that of this individual. I 
have been very lenient in this situation, but I do not propose to be lenient any 
longer. I hate to bring any agency into severe criticism, but I think from what 

1 know of this case that this agency should be criticized. Frankly, my patience 
is running to an end, especially in view of the testimony on February 7, 1952. 

And then follows a chronology on the case. 

Mr. Scherer. Do you know whether or not those witnesses were 
under oath at that time ? 

Mr. Kunzig. I understand from authorities and people who work 
with these loyalty boards that the witnesses who do appear are under 
oath. 

Mr. Scherer. Was Mr. Greenwood under oath, particularly with 
reference to his testimony at the previous Appropriations Committee 
hearing ? 

Mr. Kunzig. I would have to go back and check as to whether these 
witnesses were under oath. May I check that? 

Mr. Scherer. That can be done. 

Mr. Kunzig. And add it later ? 

Mr .Scherer. Yes ; it can be done later. 

Mr. Kunzig. I shall check that and supply it for the record. It 
is not evident from this document I have in front of me. 

Is there anything further, sir? I have nothing further to bring 
before the subcommittee at this time. 

Mr. Scherer. I just repeat for the record that it is almost incon- 
ceivable that this committee or the Appropriations Committee of the 
Congress should be deprived of the records we have requested in this 
case. 

The committee will adjourn and convene in executive session at 

2 o'clock this afternoon in the committee rooms at 227 House Office 
Building. 

(Thereupon, at 12: 23 p. m., the hearing was recessed until 2 p. m. 
of the same day in room 227, Old House Office Building, to go into 
executive session.) 



INDEX 

INDIVIDUALS 

Pag» 

Alexiou, Costas 3040, 3041 

Biddle, Francis 3037, 3038 

Bingham, Hiram 3044 

Busbv, Congressman 3046-3051 

Campas, Nicholas 3029, 3032, 3033 

Carey, Jim 3a39 

Ching, Mr 3047 

Clark, Tom 3037 

Cole, Mr 3050 

Colvin, Howard 30 '0 

Davis, Jack 3029, 3032, 3033 

Eady, Mr "0"i0 

Fenton, Frank 3045. 3046 

Greenwood, Mr 3047-3051 

McCoy, Whitley P 3032, 3041-3043 (testimony), 3044 

McNamara, James 3025-3041 (testimony), 3043-3046 

Meloy, Mr 3044 

Mooney, Tom 3036, 3046 

Rubin, Jay 3032, 3045 

Sands, Mr 3045. 3046 

Young, Philip 3041,3043-3045 (testimony) 

ORGANIZATIONS 

American Federation of Labor 3027, 3039, 3045, 3047 

American Peace Mobilization 3046 

Civil Service Commission 3043, 3044 

Civil Service Loyalty Review Board 3034, 3040 

Conference on Civil Rights 3046 

Conference on Constitutional Liberties in America 3038, 3039, 3046 

Congress of Industrial Organizations 3039 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 3046-3048 

Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service 3041, 3042, 3044, 3046, 3050 

Federal Mediation and Conciliation Loyalty Board 3034 

Federal Mediation Service 3028, 3043 

Fordham University 3026 

Hay-Adams Hotel 3026 

Hotel and Restaurant Employees' Union 3033, 3045 

Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International Union 3046 

Hotel and Restaurant International Alliance and Bartenders' Interna- 
tional League of America 3027 

Hotel and Restaurant Workers, Local No. 80, Washington, D. C 3027, 3029 

Hotel and Restaurant Workers' Union 3029 

Indiana University 3026 

League of Women Shoppers 3046 

Loyalty Review Board 3040, 3044-3046, 3049, 3050 

Mediation Conciliation Service 3028, 3039, ."051 

National Federation for Constitutional Liberties 3038, 3046 

National Right-to- Work Congress 3038 

St. Louis University 3026 

United States Conciliation Service 3028 

Washington Committee for Democratic Action 3036-3038, 3046 

Washington Tom Mooney Committee 3036, 3046 

3053 

o 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 05445 3137 



JAN 2 3