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Full text of "Communist methods of infiltration (Government-labor) Hearings"

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COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

(GOVERNMENT— LABOR, Part 4) 



HEARINGS 

BEFORE THE 

COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

EIGHTY-THIRD CONGRESS 

SECOND SESSION 



JANUARY 13 AND DECEMBER 15, 1954 



Printed for the use of the Committee on Un-American Activities 
INCLUDING INDEX 




UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
55680 WASHINGTON : 1954 






Boston Public L brary 
Superintendent of Documents 

FEB 2 1955 



COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
United States House of Representatives 

HAROLD H. VELDE, Illinois, Chairman 
BERNARD W. KEARNEY, New York FRANCIS E. WALTER, Pennsylvania 

DONALD L. JACKSON, California MORGAN M. MOULDER, Missouri 

KIT CLARDY, Michigan CLYDE DOYLE, California 

GORDON H. SCHERER, Ohio JAMES B. FRAZIER, Jr., Tennessee 

Robert L. Kunzig, Counsel 

Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., Counsel 

Thomas W. Beale, Sr., Chief Clerk 

Raphael I. Nixon, Director of Research 

Courtney E. Owens, Chief Investigator 

II 



CONTENTS 

Page 

January 13, 1954, testimony of — 

Phillip Young 7271 

Whitley P. McCoy 7273 

December 15, 1954, testimony of — 

Arthur O'Hare 7275 

Index i 

in 



Public Law 601, 79th Congress 

The legislation under which the House Committee on Un-American 
Activities operates is Public Law 601, 79th Congress [1946], chapter 
753, 2d session, which provides : 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States 
of America in Congress assembled, * * * 

PART 2— RULES OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

******* 

Rule X 

SEC. 121. STANDING COMMITTEES 
******* 

17. Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine members. 
******* 

Rule XI 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 



(q) (1) Committee on Un-American Activities. 

(A) Un-American activities. 

(2) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by subcommit- 
tee, is authorized to make from time to time investigations of (i) the extent, 
character, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States, 
(ii) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-American propa- 
ganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin and 
attacks the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Constitu- 
tion, and (iii) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress 
in any necessary remedial legislation. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House (or to the 
Clerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such investi- 
gation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable. 

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-American 
Activities or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such 
times and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, 
has recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance 
of such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, and 
to take such testimony, as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued under 
the signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by any 
member designated by any such chairman, and may be served by any person 
designated by any such chairman or member. 



RULES ADOPTED BY THE S3D CONGRESS 

House Resolution 5, January 3, 19-">3 
* * * * * * * 

Rule X 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

1. There shall be elected by the House, at the commencement of each Con- 
gress, the following standing committees : 

******* 

(q) Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine members. 
***** * * 

Rule XI 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 
* * **>;;* * 

17. Committee on Un-American Activities. 

(a) Un-American activities. 

(b) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by subcommittee, 
is authorized to make from time to time, investigations of (1) the extent, char- 
acter, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States, 

(2) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-American propa- 
ganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin and attacks 
the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Constitution, and 

(3) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress in any neces- 
sary remedial legislation. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House ( or to the 
Clerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such investi- 
gation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable. 

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such times 
and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, has 
recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance 
of such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, and 
to take such testimony, as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued under 
the signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by any 
member designated by such chairman, and may be served by any person desig- 
nated by any such chairman or member. 

VI 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 
(Government— Labor Part 4) 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13, 1954 

United States House of Representatives, 

Committee on Un-American Activities, 

Washington, D. C. 

PUBLIC HEARING 

The Committee on Un-American Activities met, pursuant to call, 
at 11 : 10 a. m., in the House caucus room, Old House Office Building, 
Hon. Gordon H. Scherer presiding. 

Committee members present: Representatives Gordon H. Scherer 
and Francis E. Walter (appearance noted in record). 

Staff member present : Robert L. Kunzig, counsel. 

Mr. Scherer. The committee will be in order. 

The hearing this morning is a continuation of the hearing of Sep- 
tember 15, 1953, which has been referred to as the McNamara hearing. 
In that hearing the Civil Service Commission and the Federal Media- 
tion and Conciliation Service were subpenaed to produce certain rec- 
ords in the McNamara matter. At that time it is my recollection that 
the Mediation and Conciliation Service and the Civil Service Com- 
mission stated that they were not refusing, or not agreeing to turn 
over the records, and that if given time they felt they would be able 
to supply the committee with the information it needed to conclude 
the committee's investigation into the McNamara case. 

We are here this morning and would you, Mr. Counsel, call the 
witnesses? 

I might mention first for the record that on September 15, Francis 
Walter, of Pennsylvania, and myself were appointed a subcommittee 
to hear the McNamara case. That is the subcommittee. Mr. Walter 
has been delayed this morning. We have waited now about 35 min- 
utes. These gentlemen are here_, so we will proceed, hoping that Mr. 
Walter will make his appearance shortly. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Philip Young. 

TESTIMONY OF PHILIP YOUNG, COMMISSIONER OF THE 
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

Mr. Scherer. Mr. Young, you were sworn in this matter, were you 
not, the last time ? 

Mr. Young. Yes, sir. I believe that is correct. 

Mr. Scherer. Since this is a continuation of the other hearing I 
don't think it is necessary to swear the witness again. 

7271 



7272 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

Mr. Kuxzig. Mr. Young, you were present in this room in the last 
15 minutes and heard the statement made by the chairman of this 
subcommittee? Do you have the documents in question with you 
today ? 

Mr. Young. I do not have the documents in question with me to- 
day. I would like to say that the executive branch of the Govern- 
ment, Mr. Chairman, and specifically the Civil Service Commission, 
is most anxious and desirous to cooperate with you and with your 
subcommittee and with the committee in furnishing the information 
that you would like to have. There still seems to be some difficulty 
with regard to determining the extent to which that information can 
be furnished from the confidential investigative files of the executive 
branch. 

I would like to respectfully request another continuance for 30 
days in order to further clarify this matter. 

Mr. Scherer. Of course, this matter, Mr. Young, has been con- 
tinued now from September 15, and this is almost January 15. Is 
your staff making an investigation at the present time to determine 
whether or not the information we have requested is available ? 

Mr. Young. We have been actively pursuing this situation. Yes, 
sir. I feel quite strongly that at least a great deal of the information 
can be made available that you would like to have for the use of the 
committee. 

Mr. Scherer. Do you sincerely feel that a further study and analysis 
of the files would be helpful to the administration in giving us the 
information we need? 

Mr. Young. I believe that it would, Mr. Chairman, and I believe 
in the long run it will be of benefit to the work of the committee. 

Mr. Scherer. May I talk to Mr. Kunzig a minute ? 

(Discussion off the record.) 

Mr. Scherer. The press tells me they know where Mr. Walter is. 
He is over at the White House with the Commission on Congressional 
and Judicial Salaries. 

Now, Mr. Young, the committee will comply with your request 
and grant a 30-day continuance of this subpena. May I suggest that 
you admonish the staff to become as active as they possibly can in 
processing this file so that we do get the information at least within 
the next 20 days. 

Mr. Young. I will be glad to do that. 

Mr. Scherer. And we will continue the subpena for 30 days. 

Mr. Young. I will be very glad to do that, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Scherer. Of course, this is the last continuance. 

Mr. Young. I understand. 

Mr. Scherer. We want the information. I know of no reason 
why we should not have it without compelling vou to produce the raw 
file. 

With that understanding the subpena is continued for an additional 
30 days. Thank you very much. 

Mr. Young. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Kunzig. Whitley P. McCoy. 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 7273 

TESTIMONY OF WHITLEY P. McCOY 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. McCoy, you have testified here previously on 
September 15. Am I correct that you also have been in this room for 
the last 15 minutes and have heard the opening statement made by 
the chairman of this subcommittee, Mr. Scherer? 

Mr. McCoy. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, the witness was sworn in the previous 
hearing, and I respectfully suggest it is not necessary to swear him 
again. 

Do you, Mr. McCoy, have the documents with you under question? 

Mr. McCoy. Xo, sir; I do not. I should like to second the request 
made by Mr. Young. I want to express to the committee my sincere 
desire to furnish all of the information that I possibly can under the 
law. I think with a 30-day extension we will be able to supply the 
committee with some information. Perhaps not all, but certainly all 
that I can. 

I think it would be very helpful if the committee would extend the 
same extension to me that they have to Mr. Young. I think the two 
of us together can work something out and give the committee what it 
wants. 

Mr. Scherer. I understand, Mr. McCoy, that part of the files in the 
McNamara case are under your control and in your department, but 
that the major portion of the file is in the Civil Service Commission? 

Mr. McCoy. I think that is true, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Scherer. Do you know whether your subordinates have been 
in touch with the Civil Service staff with reference to this matter? 

Mr. McCoy. Yes, sir; they have. My staff is processing the mat- 
ter just as Mr. Young's is. 

(Representative Francis E. Walter entered the hearing room at this 
point.) 

Mr. Scherer. Mr. Walter concurs in my continuance of the subpena 
for Mr. Young, and your request will also be granted. 

I make the same statement, Mr. McCoy, to you that I made to Mr. 
Young. 

Mr. McCoy. In other words, I understand that this is the last 
continuance ? 

Mr. Scherer. This is the last continuance and we want the infor- 
mation. 

Mr. McCoy. Thank you very much, sir. 

Mr. Scherer. The hearing is adjourned. 

(Whereupon, at 11 : 20 a. m., the hearing was adjourned.) 



55680—54 — pt. 4- 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 
(Government— Labor Part 4) 



WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1954 

United States House of Representatives, 

Subcommittee of the Committee on 

Un-American Activities, 

Washington, D. C. 

PUBLIC HEARING 

The subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities 
met, pursuant to call, at 10 : 45 a. m., in the caucus room of the Old 
House Office Building, Hon. Kit Clardy presiding. 

Committee members present: Representatives Kit Clardy (presid- 
ing) , Gordon H. Scherer, and Francis E. Walter. 

Staff members present: Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., counsel; Robert L. 
Kunzig, counsel; Courtney E. Owens, chief investigator; Donald T. 
Appell, investigator; and Thomas W. Beale, Sr., chief clerk. 

Mr. Clardy. The committee will be in order. 

Are you ready to proceed, Mr. Counsel ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Yes, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Clardy. Will you call your first witness ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. O'Hare. 

Mr. Clardy. Will you hold up your right hand? Would you 
solemnly swear the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, 
the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. O'Hare. I do. 

Mr. Clardy. Be seated. 

Mr. Pollitt. I would like to ask that no pictures be taken during the 
testimony. 

Mr. Clardy. Counsel will refrain, please, from addressing the com- 
mittee. 

Are you ready, Mr. Kunzig ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Yes, sir. 

TESTIMONY OF ARTHUR O'HARE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

BASIL R. POLLITT 

Mr. Kunzig. Would you please state your name, sir? 

Mr. O'Hare. Arthur O'Hare. 

Mr. Kunzig. Is that O-'-H-a-r-e? 

Mr. O'Hare. O-'-H-a-r-e? 

Mr. Kunzig. What is your present address, Mr. O'Hare? 

Mr. O'Hare. 589 Congress Street, Phillipsburg, N. J. 

7275 



7276 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

Mr. Kunzig. I see that you are accompanied by counsel. Will 
counsel please state his name and office address for the record? 

Mr. Pollitt. My name is Basil K. Pollitt, of David Scrivner & 
Basil R. Pollitt, 11 East 51st Street, New York 22, N. Y. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. O'Hare, would you give the committee a brief 
resume of your education ? 

Mr. O'Hare. I went through grammar school and 3 years of high 
school. 

Mr. Scherer. I can't hear the witness. Would you move the mike a 
little closer ? 

Mr. Clardy. Yes. That puts the mike in a little bit better position, 
I believe. 

Mr. Kunzig. Would you repeat your education, please ? 

Mr. O'Hare. I went through grammar school and 3 years of high 
school. 

Mr. Kunzig. Where did you attend school? 

Mr. O'Hare. Phillipsburg High School. 

Mr. Kunzig. Did you complete that period of 3 years high school ? 

Mr. O'Hare. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. What year? 

Mr. O'Hare. 1928. I think it was 1928. 

Mr. Kunzig. When and where were you born, Mr. O'Hare ? 

Mr. O'Hare. Phillipsburg, N. J. 

Mr. Kunzig. When were you born, Mr. O'Hare? 

Mr. O'Hare. September 18, 1909. 

Mr. Kunzig. Could you give us a brief resume of your employ- 
ment — your work since you finished school? 

Mr. O'Hare. Most of the time I worked for Ingersoll-Rand. 

Mr. Scherer. You can talk a little louder, can't you? 

Mr. O'Hare. Most of the time I worked for Ingersoll-Rand. 

Mr. Kunzig. Where was that ? 

Mr. O'Hare. Phillipsburg, N. Y. 

Mr. Kunzig. Have you worked there ever since you finished school ? 

Mr. O'Hare. No. I worked a couple of years as a short-order cook 
in a lunch wagon. 

Mr. Kunzig. But the great majority of your work has been for 
Ingersoll-Rand ? 

Mr. O'Hare. Yes. Twenty-one years. 

Mr. Kunzig. What type of work do you do for Ingersoll-Rand ? 

Mr. O'Hare. I did various types of work for them that number of 
years. 

Mr. Kunzig. Tell us some of the types of work. 

Mr. O'Hare. I worked for the assembly; I worked most of the 
years, I worked in the shipping department. 

Mr. Kunzig. Are you working for Ingersoll-Rand now ? 

Mr. O'Hare. No. I am on leave as business agent for the local 
union. 

Mr. Kunzig. What union is that? 

Mr. O'Hare. United Electrical, Radio, and Machine Workers, 
local 451 

Mr. Kunzig. Local 451 of the UEW? 

Mr. O'Hare. Yes. 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 7277 

Mr. Kunzig. And you are business agent at the present moment 
of that union, on leave from Ingersoll-Rand. Is that right? 

Mr. O'Hare. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. When did you go on leave from Ingersoll-Rand? 

Mr. O'Hare. At January 1, 1953. 

Mr. Kunzig. I presume you have reemployment rights with Inger- 
soll-Rand ? 

Mr. O'Hare. Right. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. O'Hare, have you ever been a member of the 
Communist Party at any time? 

(At this point Mr. O'Hare conferred with Mr. Pollitt.) 

Mr. O'Hare. I claim my fifth amendment privilege as not being 
a witness against myself. 

Mr. Kunzig. And you refuse to answer that question on the grounds 
of the fifth amendment ? 

Mr. O'Hare. That's right. 

Mr. Kunzig. Are you now a member of the Communist Party at 
this very moment? 

Mr. O'Hare. I claim my fifth amendment privilege, not being a 
witness against myself. 

Mr. Kunzig. And you refuse to answer? 

Mr. O'Hare. I refuse to answer. 

Mr. Kunzig. Were you ever in the Armed Forces, Mr. O'Hare? 

Mr. O'Hare. No, sir. 

Mr. Kunzig. Where were you employed during the war? 

Mr. O'Hare. Ingersoll-Rand. 

Mr. Scherer. What type of work did you do at Ingersoll-Rand 
during the war? 

Mr. O'Hare. I worked in the shipping department as a checker. 

Mr. Scherer. What type of work was that company engaged in 
during the war? 

Mr. O'Hare. In the department I worked in it was pumps. 

Mr. Scherer. Do you know if the company at that time was manu- 
facturing any articles to be used in connection with the defense effort? 

Mr. O'Hare. Pumps were. 

Mr. Scherer. The pumps were? 

Mr. O'Hare. Yes. 

Mr. Scherer. Anything else ? 

Mr. O'Hare. Well, I only worked in this one department of this 
company through these years. I never worked in any other depart- 
ment. 

Mr. Scherer. I understand that, but do you know if the company 
was making anything else besides pumps that were used in connection 
with the defense effort? 

Mr. O'Hare. Yes. 

Mr. Scherer. What was the product or products? 

Mr. O'Hare. I couldn't name them offhand. I know they were 
compressors. 

Mr. Kunzig. During the war when you were working for Ingersoll- 
Rand were you at that time a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. O'Hare. I claim my fifth-amendment privilege, not being a 
witness against myself. 



7278 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

Mr. Kunzig. I wish you would say, "I refuse to answer," so that 
the record would be clear, and then give the reason. Do you refuse 
to answer? 

Mr. O'Hare. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. On the grounds of the fifth amendment ? 

Mr. O'Hare. That's right. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. O'Hare, were you cleared to work on any secret 
projects of any kind during the war while you were working with 
Ingersoll-Rand ? 

Mr. O'Hare. I don't know. I was never asked by anybody. 

Mr. Clardy. You were never asked by anybody ? 

Mr. O'Hare. I was never asked by anybody if I was anything what- 
soever. I was never checked. 

Mr. Clardy. Do you mean by that you were not called upon to sign 
any form or take any oath, or make any statement concerning any 
past or present Communist Party affiliations? 

Mr. O'Hare. No, sir. 

Mr. Clardy. Nothing of that sort was done in your case? 

Mr. O'Hare. No, sir. 

Mr. Kunzig. Has that ever been done, so far as you know, at any 
time? Any clearance question? 

Mr. O'Hare. So far as I know, I don't know of any, whether they 
ever did it or not. 

Mr. Clardy. The plant at which you worked was engaged in doing 
business for the Government of the United States, as I understand it? 

Mr. O'Hare. That's right. 

Mr. Clardy. And yet there were no inquiries of any kind made of 
you with regard to whether or not you belonged to the subversive 
group we identify as the Communist Party? 

Mr. O'Hare. I was never questioned. 

Mr. Clardy. Do you know whether anyone else in the plant was 
required to ? 

Mr. O'Hare. No ; I don't know. 

Mr. Clardy. It sounds kind of careless to me. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. O'Hare, you have been identified as having been 
a member of the Communist Party by Mr. Herman E. Thomas, who 
testified as follows: 

Also in Eastern at one time was Al O'Hare. who is presently the business agent 
of the UEW Union in the Ingersoll-Rand plant at Phillipsburg, N. J. 

That was in connection with testimony naming men whom he knew 
to be members of the Communist Party. 

Is that testimony of his correct ? 

(At this point Mr. O'Hare conferred with Mr. Pollitt.) 

Mr. O'Hare. I refuse to answer and claim my fifth amendment 
privilege. 

Mr. Kunzig. Were you a member of the Fur Club of the Communist 
Party in Easton? 

Mr. O'Hare. I refuse to answer on the grounds of the fifth 
amendment. 

Mr. Kunzig. Is it a fact you are a member of the Fur Club of the 
Communist Party in Easton? 

Mr. O'Hare. I refuse to answer on the grounds of the fifth 
amendment. 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 7279 

Mr. Kuxzig. Did you ever have any connection with the Steel Club, 
No. 2, of the Communist Party? 

Mr. O'Hare. I refuse to answer under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Kuxzig. Did you ever have any connection with the Steel Club, 
No. 1, of Bethlehem, Pa.? 

Mr. O'Hare. I refuse to answer on the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Kuxzig. Will you give the committee all the knowledge you 
have of Communist activities in Bethlehem, Pa., in Easton, Pa., and 
in Phillipsburg, N. J.? 

Mr. O'Hare. I refuse to answer under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Clardy. Did I understand you were refusing to answer under 
the ground of the fifth amendment ? 

Mr. O'Hare. That's right. 

Mr. Kuxzig. Did you ever work for the Federal Government at any 
time ? 

Mr. O'Hare. No, sir. 

Mr. Kuxzig. I would like to turn to your employment as business 
agent at the present time of Local 451 of the UEW. 

Were you elected business agent ? 

Mr. O'Hare. That's right. 

Mr. Kuxzig. When were you elected business agent? 

Mr. O'Hare. In December of 1952 the election^ were held. 

Mr. Kuxzig. Where were those elections held ? In what city ? 

Mr. O'Hare. Phillipsburg. 

Mr. Kux t zig. In what building were they held ? 

Mr. O'Hare. They were held in the bar and grill — in the cellar of 
the bar and grill adjacent to the plant. 

Mr. Clardy. Would you say it louder so that I can hear you? 

Mr. Kuxzig. In the cellar of the bar and grill adjacent to the plant. 

Mr. Clardy. What was the name of the bar and grill, so that we 
will have better identification? 

Mr. O'Hare. Guy's. 

Mr. Clardy. Guy's? 

Mr. O'Hare. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kuxzig. How many members are there in this local of which 
you are business agent ? 

Mr. O'Hare. At the present time? 

Mr. Kuxzig. Yes. To the best of your knowledge, as close as you 
can get it. 

Mr. O'Hare. Approximately — I can't give it to you exactly — I 
would say 1,900. 

Mr. Kunzig. Was it roughly that same number that were members 
when you were elected ? 

Mr. O'Hare. No ; there were more. 

Mr. Kuxzig. There were more ? 

Mr. O'Hare. Yes. 

Mr. Kuxzig. How many were there then ? 

Mr. O'Hare. Approximately 2,400. 

Mr. Kuxzig. Approximately 2,400 ? 

Mr. O'Hare. There were layoffs since that period. 

Mr. Kuxzig. I understand. How many of these 2,400 members of 
the local were present and voting in the basement of the bar and grill 
when you were elected, at the time you were elected business agent, to 
the best of your knowledge ? 



7280 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

Mr. O'Hare. To the best of my knowledge, it was around 500. 

Mr. Kunzig. Five hundred out of two thousand four hundred ? 

Mr. O'Hare. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. That is roughly one-fifth present, according to your 
testimony. 

What part did the Communist Party play in getting you elected 
business agent of your union ? 

(At this point Mr. O'Hare conferred with Mr. Pollitt.) 

Mr. O'Hare. I refuse to answer on the basis of my fifth-amendment 
privilege. 

Mr. Kunzig. Who nominated you to be business agent ? 

Mr. O'Hare. I would not remember that. 

Mr. Kunzig. Did the Communist Party have a caucus to discuss 
these elections prior to the elections ? 

(At this point Mr. O'Hare conferred with Mr. Pollitt.) 

Mr. O'Hare. I refuse to answer on my fifth- amendment privilege. 

Mr. Kunzig. Isn't it a fact that these things were planned by the 
Communist Party behind the scenes and that you were picked and you 
then became business agent and you are a member of the Communist 
Party at the same time as you are business agent ? 

Mr. O'Hare. I refuse to answer and claim my fifth-amendment 
privilege. 

Mr. Kunzig. That is all. 

Mr. Clardy. Any questions, Mr. Scherer ? 

Mr. Scherer. No, I have no questions. 

Mr. Clardy. Mr. Walter? 

Mr. Walter. Mr. O'Hare, you testified that there were 2,400 mem- 
bers of your union ? 

Mr. O'Hare. Yes. Approximately. 

Mr. Walter. Several years ago there were nearly 2,000 people who 
signed Communist Party nominating petitions in that area. Do you 
remember ? 

(At this point Mr. O'Hare conferred with Mr. Pollitt.) 

Mr. O'Hare. I don't remember. 

Mr. W^ALTER. The reason why I asked these questions is because the 
editorial writer for the Easton Express some time ago had an editorial 
in which he stated that attempts to infiltrate in that area were an 
abysmal failure, and it certainly seems to me that if 2,400 people can 
be prevailed upon to accept Communist-dominated leadership then 
the efforts to infiltrate are far from being unsuccessful, but are a huge 
success. 

I am just wondering if you can tell me why a reputable newspaper 
would apologize for that situation and try to minimize it. Have you 
any knowledge of it, or otherwise? 

Mr. O'Hare. I have no knowledge of it. 

Mr. Walter. Isn't it the fact that Ingersoll-Rand has made much 
of the equipment used in the atomic energy plants at Oak Ridge, and 
other places? 

Mr. O'Hare. Well, they made pumps for them in the department I 
worked. 

Mr. Walter. Yes. At about the time there was to be the delivery 
of some very important equipment was there not a strike at Ingersoll- 
Rand? 

Mr. O'Hare. There was a strike at Ingersoll-Rand in 1950. 

Mr. Walter. Do you remember when the strike was ? 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 7281 

Mr. O'Hare. It was in warm weather in 1950, 1 think. 

Mr. Walter. Who was responsible for that strike ? 

Mr. O'Hare. The membership, I would say. They were the ones 
who voted for it. 

Mr. Walter. Isn't it a fact that the strike was pulled off just in 
order to demonstrate the ability to stop work in that strategic plant 
if it was the desire to do so by anybody? 

Mr. O'Hare. In my opinion it was not. 

Mr. Walter. Have you ever been out of the country ? 

Mr. O'Hare. To Canada, once. 

Mr. Walter. Have you ever been to Europe ? 

Mr. O'Hare. Never. 

Mr. Walter. Did you ever attend any Communist Party training 
schools ? 

(At this point Mr. O'Hare conferred with Mr. Pollitt.) 

Mr. O'Hare. I have to use — I claim my fifth-amendment privilege 
and refuse to answer. 

Mr. Clardy. I can't hear you. 

Mr. O'Hare. I refuse to answer and claim my fifth-amendment 
privilege. 

Mr. Walter. Has any money ever been collected in the Phillipsburg- 
Easton area for the defense of Communists? 

(At this point Mr. O'Hare conferred with Mr. Pollitt.) 

Mr. O'Hare. I refuse to answer and claim my fifth-amendment 
privilege. 

Mr. Walter. This man Thomas that Mr. Ivunzig referred to testi- 
fied that upward of $3,000 was collected in Easton and Phillipsburg 
for the defense of those people who were convicted at Philadelphia, 
conspiring to overthrow the Government through force and violence. 
Did vou make any contribution to that fund ? 

(At this point Mr. O'Hare conferred with Mr. Pollitt.) 

Mr. O'Hare. I refuse to answer and claim my fifth-amendment 
privilege. 

Mr. Walter. Isn't it a fact that union dues — dues paid by the 
workers at the Ingersoll-Eand plant — were diverted for the defense 
of these nine Communists who were convicted in Philadelphia? 

(At this point Mr. O'Hare conferred with Mr. Pollitt.) 

Mr. O'Hare. It has not been done. 

Mr. Walter. It was not? Do you know that a collection was made 
for the defense of these people? Made among the workers of the 
UEW? 

(At this point Mr. O'Hare conferred with Mr. Pollitt.) 

Mr. O'Hare. I refuse to answer and claim my fifth-amendment 
privilege. 

Mr. Walter. I have just learned that Maurice Slater has made 
a statement in our community, let us call it, to the effect that the 
reason why he refused to answer was because he would be indicted 
for perjury if he answered, or if he denied that he was a member 
of the Communist Party. I want to assure you that nobody is in- 
dicted for perjury unless there is abundant proof that he has com- 
mitted perjury, or has lied, to make it brutally frank, and I am 
hoping that you are not taking the same position. 

I want to assure you that when you plead the fifth amendment you 
do not have to do it except for the reasons that you have given. We 



7282 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

are not indicting people or recommending that people be indicated 
because they tell the truth. If Mr. Slater had said that he was not 
a member of the Communist party, if that was true he would not 
have been indicted, and I strongly suspect the reason why he refuses 
to answer the question is because he was a member of the Communist 
Party and would not deny it because he didn't want to be indicted 
for perjury; because we believe that that would have been perjury. 

I have nothing more. 

Mr. Clardy. You made a statement in answer to a question by 
Congressman Walter a moment ago that intrigues me a little bit. 
Were you the treasurer of your union so that you would know all 
about the funds collected and disbursement of the funds? 

Mr. O'Hare. I was not the treasurer. 

Mr. Clardy. You were what? 

Mr. O'Hare. T was not the treasurer. 

Mr. Clardy. Then how on earth would you know a contribution 
was made for the defense of the Communists on trial at Philadelphia 
unless you were a Communist yourself and would know from that 
angle? " You said no contribution had been made and there had been 
no assessment, I am trying to find out how you would know that, 

(At this point. Mr. O'Hare conferred with Mr. Pollitt.) 

Mr. O'Hare. As business agent of the local I would know what 
transpired through the other officers of the union. 

Mr. Clardy. Then was any contribution of any kind, voluntary or 
otherwise, made for the defense of the Communists on trial at 
Philadelphia ? 

Mr. O'Hare. I would not know that. 

Mr. Clardy. You would not know that ? 

Mr. O'Hare. No. 

Mr. Clardy. Then why would you make your earlier statement 
that no contribution had been made? 

Mr. O'Hare. I think the contribution was 

Mr. Scherer. No; he didn't say that, Mr. Clardy. He said there 
had been no diversion of dues. 

Mr. Clardy. All right. We will put it that way. How do you 
know there was no diversion of dues ? 

Mr. O'Hare. Because I know what action the other officers of the 
union take. 

Mr. Clardy. T can't understand you. You are garbling your words. 

Mr. O'Hare. I have to sign all vouchers in the local. 

Mr. Clardy. And no contribution could possibly have been made 
without a proper voucher going through. 

Mr. O'Hare. Not through my treasury. 

Mr. Clardy. It could not have even ascribed one purpose for the 
contribution or for the payment and actually been for another purpose? 

Mr. O'Hare. No. Not to my knowledge it could not. 

Mr. Clardy. Do you know whether any individuals, including your- 
self, made any contributions to the defense of those Communists? 
(At this point Mr. O'Hare conferred with Mr. Pollitt.) 

Mr. O'Hare. I refuse, to answer and claim my fifth amendment 

privilege. 

Mr. ( Yardy. Of course, combined with your prior answers you leave 
the inescapable conclusion to my mind that there was such a contri- 
bution made. 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 7283 

Mr. Scherer. Are you finished? 

Mr. Clardy. No, but go ahead. 

Mr. Scherer. I understood before when you were asked the ques- 
tion whether or not a collection had been made among members of the 
union that you refused to answer. Is that right? 

(At this point Mr. O'Hare conferred with Mr. Pollitt.) 

Mr. O'Hare. Yes, it is. 

Mr. Scherer. Would you distinguish between a collection and an 
assessement? Is a collection voluntary? 

Mr. O'Hare. Any contributions made by individuals. 

Mr. Scherer. Voluntarily? 

Mr. O'Hare. If they made it for any reason. 

Mr. Scherer. I mean if somebody went around and solicited the 
members of the union ? 

Mr. 0*Hare. If he did it he was doing it as an individual. 

Mr. Scherer. If somebody w T ent around and solicited the members 
of the union for a donation you would call that a collection and dis- 
tinguish that from an assessment? 

Mr. O'Hare. That's right. 

Mr. Scherer. And I understand then you are refusing to say 
whether or not such a collection was made among union members? 

( At this point Mr. O'Hare conferred with Mr. Pollitt.) 

Mr. O'Hare. I do. 

Mr. Scherer. That is all. 

Mr. Clardy. Did you attend the trial of the Communists at Phila- 
delphia? 

( At this point Mr. O'Hare conferred with Mr. Pollitt.) 

Mr. O'Hare. I didn't attend. 

Mr. Clardy. You did not? 

Mr. O'Hare. No. 

Mr. Clardy. Do you know of anybody connected with your local 
who did ? 

Mr. O'Hare. I don't know of anybody. 

Mr. Clardy. What? 

Mr. O'Hare. I don't know anybody that did. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. O'Hare, I have in my hand a clipping from the 
East on Express. December 10, 1954, which is a newspaper. The head- 
line says, "UEW Charges IR Violation of Contract in Firing Slater." 
Down further in the article it says : 

There is a statement on behalf of Slater released by Arthur O'Hare, business 
manager of local 451, as follows — 

And then there is quite a lengthy statement. 

Did you release a statement as business agent on behalf of Slater, 
the man who was mentioned by Congressman Walter a few moments 
ago ? 

Mr. O'Hare. Yes; under direction of the policy committee of the 
local. 

Mr. Kunzig. Then this statement represents not only your view- 
point but the policy committee of the whole local. Is that right ? 

Mr. O'Hare. That's right. 

Mr. Kunzig. When you released this, did you know that Slater had 
been publicly identified as a member of the Communist Party? 

(At this point Mr. O'Hare conferred with Mr. Pollitt.) 

Mr. O'Hare. Yes. Sure I knew it. 



7284 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

Mr. Kunzig. Pardon me ? 
Mr. O'Hare. I knew that. 
Mr. Kunzig. You knew it ? In the midst of this statement it says : 

Slater has been a responsible citizen of this community all of his life. 

Did you know Slater as a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. O'Hare. I have to claim I have to refuse to answer and claim 
my fifth-amendment privilege. 

Mr. Kunzig. Did you write this statement that Slater was a respon- 
sible citizen? 

Mr. O'Hare. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. Is it your opinion that members of the Communist 
Party are responsible citizens of the community of Easton, Pa., let 
us say, or Phillipsburg, X. J. ? 

(At this point Mr. O'Hare conferred with Mr. Pollitt.) 

Mr. O'Hare. I refuse to answer and claim my fifth-amendment 
privilege. 

Mr. Kunzig. As business agent of your union, would it be true that 
you had access to all parts of the plants and buildings of the company 
for which you worked ? 

Mr. O'Hare. No, sir. Only when I was accompanied by a repre- 
sentative of the company. 

Mr. Kunzig. When you were accompanied by a representative of 
the company? 

Mr. O'Hare. To go into certain departments where we had prob- 
lems. 

Mr. Kunzig. As a shipping department employee you said you 
worked for them ? 

Mr. O'Hare. The Cameron division of the pump department. 

Mr. Kunzig. As a shipping department employee of the company 
were you in a position to know where strategic materials were being- 
shipped or directed ? 

Mr. O'Hare. Did I know where they were being shipped? 

Mr. Kunzig. Were you in a position to see where they were being 
shipped from what was on the outside of the packages? 

Mr. O'Hare. From the orders and from the 

Mr. Kunzig. From the orders you knew it? Did you ever trans- 
mit any of this information as to where these items were being 
shipped, to the Communist Party? 

(At this point Mr. O'Hare conferred with Mr. Pollitt.) 

Mr. O'Hare. I never gave any information to anyone. 

Mr. Clardy. Would you read that answer? 

(Whereupon the last answer to Mr. Hare was read by the reporter.) 

Mr. Clardy. You mentioned a policy committee in connection with 
a statement. How many are on that policy committee ? 

Mr. O'Hare. Approximately about 90. 

Mr. Clardy. How many? 

Mr. O'Hare. Approximately about 90. 

Mr. Clardy. Nine? 

Mr. O'Hare. Ninety. All of the board members and stewards. 

Mr. Clardy. In connection with the issuance of this statement did 
you have a meeting of all of the 90 or how did you go about getting 
the direction, and how did you go about preparing the statement? 

Mr. O'Hare. We had a meeting of the entire group. 



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 7285 

Mr. Clardy. Was the statement prepared at that time in that meet- 
ing and read to them? 

Mr. O'Hare. The statement was made and read. Yes. 

Mr. Clardy. You prepared the statement and read it to them? 

Mr. O'Hare. The president of the local and myself. 

Mr. Clardy. You two prepared it and presented it to the group? 

Mr. O'Hare. And the secretary. 

Mr. Clardy. Do you know whether or not any members of that 
policy committee are members of the Communist Party? 

(At this point Mr. O'Hare conferred with Mr. Pollitt.) 

Mr. O'Hare. I refuse to answer under my fifth-amendment privi- 
lege. 

Mr. Clardy. Are there any more questions? Do you have any, Mr. 
Kunzig? 

Mr. Kunzig. No more questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Clardy. The witness is dismissed. Call your next witness. 

Mr. Kunzig. We have one other witness, Mr. Chairman, who was 
to appear, but became suddenly ill and is under a doctor's care, and the 
committee, following its policy, is postponing the hearing. 

Mr. Clardy. Is there anyone here representing the witness? 

Mr. Pollitt. Yes. I represent Mr. Mates. 1 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Pollitt, the counsel for the last witness, Mr. 
Chairman, apparently represents the other witness also. 

Mr. Clardy. Will you be seated there just a moment? 

Mr. Pollitt. Surely. 

Mr. Clardy. What is the nature of his illness, or do you know? 

Mr. Pollitt. Well, yes. Mr. Mates' doctor informed me that Mr. 
Mates was suffering from acute nervous exhaustion. 

Mr. Clardy. When did this acute nervous exhaustion take posses- 
sion \ 

Mr. Pollitt. His doctor informs me that — he has informed me over 
the phone that Mates has had a tendency to this which is primarily 
a condition resulting from overwork for some time, and periodically 
he confines Mates to his bed. 

Mr. Clardy. I haven't seen a doctor's certificate as yet. Do you 
have a copy of the doctor's certificate ? 

Mr. Pollitt. I do not. I have just spoken to the doctor over the 
phone. I asked him to send a certificate to this committee and a copy 
to myself. It should be here presumably either today or tomorrow. 

Mr. Walter. Where is this man from ? 

Mr. Pollitt. Detroit. 

Mr. Walter. Detroit? 

Mr. Pollitt. Yes. 

Mr. Walter. Without any reflection on counsel — of course, people 
can retain anybody they like — but how did it happen that a man in 
Phillipsburg, X. J., and a man from Detroit, both of whom have been 
identified as Communists, should wind up in this case with the same 
lawyer, who is from New York ? 

Mr. Pollitt. It could be attributed to my skill. 

Mr. Walter. That I would doubt because I have known most of 
the lawyers in this eastern part of the United States for many years, 
and frankly, and without any reflection on you, I have never heard of 
you before. 

Mr. Pollitt. I am an attorney for the United Electrical Workers. 

1 David Mates. 



7286 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION 

Mr. Walter. Oh, I see. Then the United Electrical Workers pro- 
vide a New York lawyer for witnesses from Phillipsburg and Easton 
or Detroit, or wherever they are, in matters of this sort ? 

Mr. Pollitt. My relationship to my clients is a purely personal 
one — the attorney-client relationship at all times. 

Mr. Clardy. But you said you were an attorney for the UEW and 
thereby planted the impression in my mind, sir, that the only reason 
you are here is because they sent you here. 

Mr. Pollitt. No. That is not correct. I am here because these 
men asked me to come here. 

Mr. Clardy. Then the fact that you are counsel for the UEW 
has nothing to do with your appearance? 

Mr. Pollitt. Nothing to do, Mr. Clardy, with how it came about — 
how it happened. 

Mr. Walter. This happens to my mind frequently, because I see 
people from California here who pop up with a lawyer who yesterday 
represented somebody from the other end of the United States. I 
think that is perhaps something we ought to look into to find out 
whether or not the Communist Party, United States America, provides 
counsel for people. I think it might be very fertile field for inquiry. 

Mr. Clardy. I quite agree with you, Congressman. At any rate, 
it is your information that a doctor who is as yet unidentified has 
mailed some sort of a certificate? 

Mr. Pollitt. Yes. That is my information. 

Mr. Clardy. I haven't seen it yet and I presume the committee will 
do whatever it thinks is necessary after it gets an opportunity to 
inspect it: but I am a little disappointed because Mr. Mates was con- 
nected with and active on behalf of the Communists in connection 
with the strike at Detroit, and I wanted an opportunity to explore it. 
I am quite sure the new chairman of the committee will, in view of 
what he has just said, explore that thoroughly, even in my absence 
next year. 

Mr. Scherer. What is the doctor's name ? 

Mr. Pollitt. Shafarman. 

Mr. Scherer. Do you know his first name ? 

Mr. Pollitt. I think it is Eugene. I gave this information to Mr. 
Tavenner on Monday. 

Mr. Scherer. Oh, we have it? Do you have that information? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. Scherer. The certificate is on its way ? 

Mr. Tavenner. It is said to be on its way. 

Mr. Clardy. We can check on that. 

Mr. Tavenner. It has not arrived so far. 1 

Mr. Clardy. Of course, it is not a very good excuse. He should 
have provided you with the necessary ammunition in the form of a 
copy of a certificate, so that you could have presented it. Frankly, 
it is my opinion he is in contempt of the committee for handling it 
the way he did, but that, does not make any difference. 

Mr. Scherer. He got this suddenly. 

Mr. Clardy. After the service of the subpena, no doubt. 

That is all, Counsel. Do you have any further witnesses? 

Mr. Kunzig. That is all, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Clardy. The committee will stand adjourned. 

(Whereupon, at 11 : 20 a. m. the committee adjourned.) 

? A certificate by Dr. Eugene M. Shafarman to the effect that Mr. David Mates was 
physically incapacitated for appearance before the committee was received and filed with 
committee record*. 



INDEX 



Individuals 

Page 

Mates, David (Dave) 7285-7286 

McCoy, Whitley P 7272,7273 (testimony) 

McNamara, James 7271 

O'Hare, Arthur 7275-7285 (testimony) 

Pollitt, Basil R 7275-7286 

Slater, Maurice 7281-7284 

Shafarman, Eugene 7286 

Thomas. Herman E 7278, 7281 

Young, Philip 7271-7272 (testimony) 

Organizations 

Civil Service Commission 7271-7273 

Communist Party, Pennsylvania : 

Bethlehem, Steel Club No. 1 7279 

Easton : 

Fur Club 7278 

Steel Club, No. 2 7279 

Easton (Pa.) Express 7280,7283 

Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service 7271 

Ingersoll-Rand Co., Phillipsburg, N. J 7278, 7283 

United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers 7278,7283,7285,7286 

Local 451 7276, 7279, 7283 

i 

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