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Full text of "Communist outlets for the distribution of Soviet propaganda in the United States : hearings before the Committee on Un-American activities, House of Representatives, Eighty-seventh Congress, second session, May 9, 10, and 17 and July 12, 1962, Index in part 2"

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Committee on Un-American Activities 
House 
87th Congress 

Table of Contents 

1. Testimony By and Concerning Paul Corbin "^li*/ 

2, The Communist Party's Cold War Against 
Congressional Investigation of Subversion V :• . 

5. Communist and Trotskyist Activity Within i ^c 
the Greater Los Angeles Chapter of the 

Fair Play for Cuba Committee 

i|— 5« Communist Outlets for the Distribution of ^j>> 
Soviet Propaganda in the United States. 
pt.1-2 

6. Communist Youth Activities ^t^b 

7-8. U.S. Communist Party Assistance to Foreign -^^z^ 
Commimist Governments, pt.1-2 , <e^.^i%\ 

9. Communist Activities in the Peace Movement '^^1*'* 



7 

COMMUNIST OUTLETS FOR THE DISTRIBUTION OF 
SOVIET PROPAGANDA IN THE UNITED STATES 

PART 1 



HEARINGS 

BEFORE THE 

COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
HOUSE OE REPRESENTATIVES 

EIGHTY-SEVENTH CONGRESS 

SECOND SESSION 



MAY 9, 10, AND 17 AND JULY 12, 1962 
INDEX IN PART 2 



Printed for the use of the 
Committee on Un-American Activities 




.* 5: 






U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
90460 WASHINGTON : 1962 



COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
United States House of Representatives 

FRANCIS E. WALTER, Pennsylvania, Chairman 
MORGAN M. MOULDER, Missouri GORDON H. SCHERER, Ohio 

CLYDE DOYLE, California AUGUST E. JOHANSEN, Michigan 

EDWIN E. WILLIS, Louisiana DONALD C. BRUCE, Indiana 

WILLIAM M. TUCK, Virginia HENRY C. SCHADEBERG, Wisconsin 

Francis J. McNamaea, Director 

Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., Oeneral Counsel 

Alfred M. Nittle, Comisel 



CONTENTS 



PART 1 

Page 
Synopsis 1587 

May 9, 1962: Testimony of— 

Myron Emanuel Sharpe 1599 

Afternoon session: 

Myron Emanuel Sharpe (resumed) 1622 

May 10, 1962: Testimony of— 

Maude Query Kelsey 1639 

May 17, 1962: Testimony of— 

Myron Emanuel Sharpe (resumed) 1654 

Afternoon session: 

Myron Emanuel Sharpe (resumed) 1663 

Joseph Felshin 1664 

July 12, 1962: Testimony of— 

LeRoy Wolins 1673 

David Simon Canter 1689 

(Index appears in Part 2) 



PART 2 

May 17, 1962: Testimony of— 

Allan Markoff 1700 

Serge P. Ushakoflf 1713 

Afternoon session: 

Serge P. Ushakoff (resumed) 1715 

Margaret Cowl 1735 

Philip Frankfeld 1742 

Julv 11, 1962: Testimony of— 

Helen Allison Winter 1752 

Carl Haessler 1761 

Gregory Boris Lotsman 1766 

Index i 

Note. — Testimony of witnesses does not follow in the order of their appearances. 
It is printed according to subject matter. 

Part 1 contains the testimony of publishers of Communist propaganda, and of 
Mrs. Maude Query Kelsey, a librarian and cooperative witness, who had re- 
ceived unsolicited Communist propaganda booklets from the Soviet Embassy. 

Part 2 contains the testimony of individuals engaged in the distribution of 
Communist propaganda. 

rn 



Public Law 601, 79th Congress 

The legislation under which the House Committee on Un-American 
Activities operates is Public Law 601, 79th Congress [19461; 60 Stat. 
812, which provides: 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States 
of America in Congress assembled, * * * 

PART 2— RULES OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

Rule X 

SEC. 121. STANDING COMMITTEES 

17. Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine Members. 

Rule XI 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 

(q)(l) Committee on Un-American Activities. 

(A) Un-American activities. 

(2) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by subcommit- 
tee, is authorized to make from time to time investigations of (i) tlie extent, 
character, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States, 
(ii) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-American propa- 
ganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin and attacks 
the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Constitution, and 
(iii) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress in any necessary 
remedial legislation. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House Cor to the 
Clerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such investi- 
gation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable. 

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such 
times and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, 
has recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance 
of such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, and 
to take such testimony, as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued under 
the signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by any 
member designated by any such chairman, and may be served by any person 
designated by any such chairman or member. 

Rule XII 

LEGISLATIVE OVERSIGHT BY STANDING COMMITTEES 

Sec. 136. To assist the Congress in appraising the administration of the laws 
and in developing such amendments or related legislation as it may deem neces- 
sary, each standing committee of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
shall exercise continuous watchfulness of the execution by the administrative 
agencies concerned of any laws, the subject matter of which is within the jurisdic- 
tion of such committee; and, for that purpose, shall study all pertinent reports 
and data submitted to the Congress by the agencies in the executive branch of 
the Government. 

V 



RULES ADOPTED BY THE 87TH CONGRESS 
House Resolution 8, January 3, 1961 

Rule X 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

1. There shall be elected by the House, at the commencement of each Congress, 
(r) Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine Members. 

Rule XI 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 

18. Committee on Un-American Activities. 

(a) Un-American activities. 

(b) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by subcommittee, 
is authorized to make from time to time investigations of (1) the extent, char- 
acter, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States, 
(2) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-American prop- 
aganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin and 
attacks the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Constitu- 
tion, and (3) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress in 
any necessary remedial legislation. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House (or to the 
Clerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such investi- 
gation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable. 

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such times 
and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, has 
recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings to require the attendance 
of such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, and 
to take such testimony, as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued under 
the signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by any 
member designated by any such chairman, and may be served by any person 
designated by any such chairman or member. 

27. To assist the House in appraising the administration of the laws and in 
developing such amendments or related legislation as it may deem necessary, 
each standing committee of the House shall exercise continuous watchfulness 
of the execution by the administrative agencies concerned of any laws, the subject 
matter of which is within the jurisdiction of such committee; and, for that purpose, 
shall study all pertinent reports and data submitted to the House by the agencies 
in the executive branch of the Government. ' 



SYNOPSIS 

The Soviet Union and its international network of Communist 
and Workers Parties utilize numerous weapons in their unrelenting 
revolutionary struggle to attain world conquest. One of the principal 
weapons in their arsenal is the ingenious application, on a tremendous 
scale, of a variety of propaganda devices. 

Stressing the formidable dangers of propaganda as utilized by the 
world Communist movement, Evron M. Kirkpatrick states in his 
book, Target: The World, that "only in the hands of the Nazi and 
Communist leaders has propaganda attained first-rate importance as 
a weapon for achieving national and international political goals." 

Dr. Kirkpatrick, executive director of the American Political Science 
Association, author of books on American government, and former 
Government official and chairman of the Social Science Division of the 
University of Minnesota, also wrote in the above-named study: 

Modern totalitarianism, of which Communism is the pre- 
eminent example, has harnessed technology and psychology 
to persuade, convince, confuse, demoralize, and control. 
Inside Communist countries propaganda is used to control 
the ideological environment of the people, to secure obedi- 
ence, consent, and conformity. Internationally, Communist 
leaders utilize propaganda to recruit followers, secure sym- 
pathy, and to divide and demoralize opposition. Univer- 
sall}^. Communists use propaganda in the effort to suggest 
and insinuate the view of the world most favorable to their 
temporary plans and policies and to their long-range goals. 
Aware that loyalty and action alike grow not so much from 
what happens as from what men think happens, the Com- 
munists have developed a huge, diversified propaganda 
operation at work night and day * * *. 

No one can read the history of the Communist movement, 
or for that matter the history of the world in this century, 
without being impressed with how crucial the use of the 
modern means of mass communications, of propaganda, is 
to Communist tactics. And yet, in spite of the obvious 
importance of propaganda and propaganda activities to 
the Communists, in spite of the role these activities have 
played in the cold war of recent years, there has been very 
little S3'stematic attention devoted to this propaganda effort. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities believes that propa- 
ganda directed from Soviet sources constitutes one of the greatest 
single threats to the security of the United States and the free world. 
Through this weapon, Khi'ushchev and other Soviet and national 
Communist leaders have succeeded in swaying many millions of non- 
Communists throughout the world, winning their support for Soviet 
policies and turning them against the programs and policies of the 
free world. 

1587 



1588 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

The worldwide Communist propaganda offensive is largely an 
insidious slander campaign against the United States. The Soviet 
propaganda machine consistently characterizes this country as 
"imperialistic," a "warmonger," and a participant in war crimes. 
The Communist propaganda effort within this country, implemented 
primarily through the dissemination of thousands of publications, is 
designed — by playing on the hopes and fears of the American people — 
to subvert the United States by undermining its foreign policy and 
Military Establishment. 

The world Communist movement allocates man}^ millions of dollars 
annually for the publication and distribution of propaganda docu- 
ments. While the Soviet Union publishes the bulk of this literature, 
Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Rumania, Poland, and Communist China 
are also producers of enormous quantities of printed material. 

The major source of printed literature emanating from the Soviet 
Union is the Foreign Languages Publishing House, located in Moscow, 
which produces material in scores of languages. Another official 
Soviet agency, Mezhdunarodnaya Kniga— International Book Com- 
pany, and hereinafter referred to as such — -operates as the exporter of 
propaganda documents to agents located in numerous countries 
throughout the world. The function of these agent-publishers is to 
print these documents in the language of the country of which they 
are residents and/or citizens. 

In May and July 1962, the committee held hearings in Washing- 
ton, D.C., on the publication and distribution within the United States 
of Communist propaganda material originating in foreign countries. 
The purpose of the hearings was to develop information which would 
assist the committee in weighing the merits of amendments to the 
Internal Security Act and the Foreign Agents Registration Act per- 
taining to the printing and dissemination of foreign propaganda, and 
also the administration of existing laws relating to this subject. 

As the hearings reflect, the witnesses subpenaed to testify were 
publishing, within the United States, translated material supplied to 
them by the International Book Company or other representatives of 
the Soviet Government, or were engaged in the importation of Com- 
munist propaganda material already published in the Soviet Union, 
chiefly in the English and Russian languages. 

A number of companies engaged in such activity are located in 
New York City. Under the ownership of Myron Emanuel Sharpe, 
they are known by the trade names of International Arts and Sciences 
Press, Bookfield House, Inc., Tradeworld, Inc., and Crosscurrents 
Press, Inc. Evidence obtained during the committee's investigation 
related primarily to Crosscurrents Press, Inc., and International Arts 
and Sciences Press. 

Myron Emanuel Sharpe testified during the hearings in response 
to a subpena. It was not the first time he had appeared before the 
committee. A 1954 committee hearing, in which he was also a wit- 
ness, revealed that Sharpe was then the leader of Communist students 
on the campus of the University of Michigan and also an official of 
the Michigan section of the Labor Youth League, a now defunct 
Communist youth organization. During his appearance before the 
committee in 1954, Sharpe refused to answer all questions concerning 
Communist Party membership and activities, invoking the fifth 
amendment and other constitutional privileges. 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGAJSTDA 1589 

During the current hearings, Sharpe again invoked constitutional 
privilege — ^the fii'st, fourth, and fifth amendments — ^in response to all 
questions concerning present or past membership in the Communist 
Party and also when interrogated about other matters pertinent to 
the subjects under inquiry. 

Four subpenas had been served on Sharpe in an attempt to obtain 
two of his companies' books of account so that the committee could 
adequately inform itself and the Congress about his propaganda 
operations and financial or other agreements with representatives of 
the Soviet Union. He produced for the hearings photocopies of only 
certain selected pages from his financial records. In doing so, he 
concealed his sources of income — and admitted this in the course of 
his testimony, claiming that he would bring harm to his customers if 
he disclosed their names. 

Dissemination reports filed by Sharpe with the Foreign Agents 
Registration Section of the Department of Justice stated that 10,000 
copies of the book, Proijram of the Communist Party oj the Soviet 
Union, were delivered to the New Era Book and Subscription Agency, 
Inc., and another 10,000 to the Fom* Continent Book Corporation, 
both of New York City. Tiie owner of the New Era Book and Sub- 
scription Agency, however, testified that he had canceled his order 
and returned his 10,000 copies after being subpenaed for the hearings 
and that, had he not done so, he would have been charged only 1^ 
each for these 50^ booklets. Moreover, the owner of the Four 
Continent Book Corporation informed the committee that he had 
not received 10,000, but only 185, copies of this booklet from Cross- 
currents Press. 

Sharpe invoked the fifth amendment in response to all questions 
asked him concerning his dealings with the New Era Book and 
Subscription Agency and the Four Continent Book Corporation and 
also concerning his reported distribution of the 20,000 copies of this 
book. 

Documents produced in the course of the hearings revealed that 
in 1959 Sharpe had entered into an agreement with representatives 
of the Soviet Government, whose identities are not known to the 
committee, to publish English translations of various Soviet docu- 
ments. Subsequently, under the name of the International Arts and 
Sciences Press, Sharpe published articles and photographs supplied by 
the International Book Company and Novosti Press Agency (also of 
Moscow) for a periodical first called Soviet Highlights and now known 
as Soviet Review. He also published in English, under the name of 
Crosscurrents Press, Inc., the proceedings of Soviet conventions and 
congresses and the complete texts of certain speeches of Nikita S. 
Khrushchev and other Soviet officials. 

The hearmgs disclosed that over 740,000 copies of these publications 
were printed between 1959 and mid-1962 and that the bulk of them 
was dehvered to the Soviet Embassy in Washington, D.C. The 
press department of the Soviet Embassy then distributed these books 
throughout the United States by unsolicited bulk mailings. The 
same publications were also distributed by personnel of the Soviet 
delegation to the United Nations and at a Soviet Children's Exhibit 
recently held in this country under the official Cultural Exchange 
Agreement between the United States and the Soviet Union. Docu- 
ments introduced in the hearings reveal that the Soviet Government 
paid Crosscurrents Press, Inc., a sum in excess of $240,000 for these 
books. 



1590 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

The U.S. Post Office delivered hundreds of thousands of these 
propaganda documents to individuals, organizations, and institutions 
in all parts of the country under less-than-cost mail rates — which 
means that the American taxpayers were, in part, subsidizing this 
Soviet propaganda project. 

It is also worth noting that the distribution of these documents at 
the Soviet Children's Exhibit was in violation of the Cultural Ex- 
change Agreement between the U.S. and U.S.S.R. and that the 
provision barring such distribution was included in the agreement at 
the insistence of the Soviet Union. 

The committee investigation revealed that Sharpe, in carrying out 
his agreement with the Soviet Union, first published propaganda 
material under the name of the International Arts and Sciences Press. 
The magazine Soviet Highlights was originally published under the 
name of this firm, which was not registered with the Department of 
Justice as the agent of a foreign principal. Sharpe then formed 
Crosscurrents Press, Inc., registered this firm with the Department of 
Justice, made it the publisher of Soviet Highlights, and published four 
properly labeled issues of the magazine under the Crosscurrents Press 
label. He next changed the format and the name of Soviet Highlights 
to Soviet Review and started publishing it once more under the name 
of the International Arts and Sciences Press, without registering it 
with the Department of Justice. 

Joseph Felshin, president of both the New Era Book and Subscrip- 
tion Agency, Inc., and New Century Publishers, Inc., of New York 
City, was subpenaed to testify in the hearings and was questioned 
about the financial arrangements existing between his organizations 
and Sharpe's Crosscurrents Press, Inc. New Century Publishers, 
previously cited by the committee as an official Communist Party 
publishing house, produces the journal Political Afairs, a monthly 
theoretical organ of the Communist Party, USA. 

Felshin, as previously indicated, testified that he had received 10,000 
copies of Sharpe's publication Program of the Communist Party oj the 
Soviet Union, but that he had returned all copies of the booldet (after 
receiving the committee's subpena). He also testified that Cross- 
currents Press had sold the 10,000 booklets to him for only $100, 
or Ij/i each. When asked the identity of the individual from whom 
he had learned he could obtain the booldets for only 1^ each, Felshin 
refused to answer, invoking the fifth amendment. He also took 
refuge behind the fifth amendment when asked about past or present 
membership in the Communist Party. 

Translation World Publishers, another firm engaged in the same 
type of publishing activity, is located in Chicago and is jointly owned 
by LeRoy Wolins and David S. Canter. The firm was formed for 
the purpose of publicizing the admissions made by U-2 pilot Gary 
F. Powers during his trial in Moscow. In order to expedite the publi- 
cation of a Soviet-serving report on this case, daily transcripts of the 
trial were cabled to Translation World Publishers from Moscow at 
no cost to the firm. The Trial of the U-2, its subsequently published 
account of the case, contained photographs of Powers and pictures of 
his equipment and demolished plane. These photographs, too, were 
furnished Translation World Publishers by Soviet sources at no cost. 
The publishing firm did not comply with the provisions of the 
Foreign Agents Registration Act by registering with the Department 
of Justice untU after it had printed and distributed two publications. 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1591 

The hearings disclosed that Translation World Publishers not only 
received trial transcripts and photographs pertaining to the Powers 
case on a gratis basis, but was also the recipient of the sum of $3,400 
from the Soviet Government. According to a registration statement 
filed under the Foreign Agents Registration Act, Wolins and Canter 
claimed that $2,400 of this amount had been advanced to Translation 
World Publishers for the purchase of copies of a geography book on 
the U.S.S.R. which they proposed to print but which was never pub- 
lished. An additional advance of $1,000 was for 1,000 copies of 
The Trial of the U-2. 

Both LeRoy Wolins and David S. Canter, co-owners of Translation 
World Publishers, have been identified as members of the Communist 
Party. Appearing before the committee, neither Wolins nor Canter 
would answer any questions propounded to them regarding their past 
or present membership in the Communist Party. They also invoked 
the fifth amendment and other constitutional privileges when asked 
about their activities in connection with the publication of The Trial 
of the U-2 and a subsequently published book entitled The Case 
Against General Heusinger. 

Records of the committee disclosed that Wolins and Canter failed 
to register under the Foreign Agents Registration Act until after pub- 
lication of The Trial of the U-2. On February 16, 1961, the day they 
filed as publishers of this book, they also formally terminated their 
registration. Therefore, when Translation World Publishers subse- 
quently published The Case Against General Heusinger, neither Wolins 
nor Canter was registered under the Foreign Agents Registration Act. 
Moreover, they were not registered at the time of their appearance 
before the committee. 

In publishing The Case Against General Heusinger, Wolins and 
Canter directly assisted the worldwide Communist campaign to dis- 
credit NATO, and particularly the United States and West Germany, 
by disseminating false charges against General Adolph Heusinger, the 
then newly appointed chairman of the NATO Permanent MUitary 
Committee. 

On December 12, 1961, the day General Heusinger's appointment 
to the NATO post was announced, the Soviet Union delivered a note 
to the United States demanding the extradition of General Heusinger 
on the grounds that he was guilty of "crimes against peace, war crimes, 
and crmies against hmnanity." Enclosed with the note were 67 
documents which purportedly substantiated the Soviet charges. 

On the very same date, a State Department official, in referring 
to the Soviet note and documents, stated at a press conference : 

This crude and ludicrous propaganda exercise is unworthy 
of notice and I have no intention of dignifying it with any 
comment. I would merely call your attention to the fact 
that it has become Soviet practice to engage in such propa- 
ganda activities on the eve of NATO Ministerial Meetings 
for the purpose of creating disunity within the alliance and 
discrediting the alliance. 

On October 23, 1961, immediately after the nomination of General 
Heusinger had been announced, the State Department issued an 
official release in reply to Communist-instigated criticisms of the 



1592 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

nomination. This three-and-a-half -page statement of fact pointed 
out, among other things, that: 

Thorough investigations by both Alhed authorities 
after the end of World War II as well as by scholarly non- 
governmental investigators into the events of World War II 
do not bear out any of the charges now being made against 
General Heusinger. In fact, after investigations conducted 
immediately after World War II had cleared Heusinger, he 
served as consultant to the United States prosecution at the 
Nuremberg trials. Nonetheless, the Department has care- 
fully reviewed the material sent us by various groups 
expressing objection to the appointment. On the basis of 
this review we have concluded that this material consists 
entirely of either allegations which are not supported by 
facts or interpretations of facts, often taken entirely out of 
their real context, which are not warranted. 

The record shows that General Heusinger was aware of 
the plot being conducted by a number of German officers 
against Hitler over a number of years which culminated in 
the events of July, 1944. While he was not personally in- 
volved in the details of that particular attempt and the 
actual placing of the bomb, he, as other German officers, 
was aware of the general outlines of the plot and s^^mpa- 
thized with it. This fact became known to the Gestapo. 
After the attempt failed, General Heusinger was arrested, 
and interrogated at length in a Gestapo prison. However, 
the Gestapo was unable to obtain sufficient proof to im- 
plicate him in this plot and consequently he was simply 
dismissed from the active service at that time and spent the 
remaining ten months of World War II in that status. 

A short while after the Soviet note was delivered to the United 
States, it was revealed that one of the documents submitted in sup- 
port of the charges against General Heusinger was fraudulent. It 
was a picture allegedly portraying German troops executing Russian 
partisans. Actually, however, the Soviet Union had previously" used 
this very same picture to portray alleged Japanese atrocities. 

The Wolins-Canter book on Heusinger reproduced 56 of the 67 
documents submitted with the Soviet note. It did not include the 
above-mentioned fraudulent document and nme others which did not 
pertain specifically to General Heusinger. 

Wolins refused to discuss with the committee the reasons for the 
deletion of certain of the Soviet documents in the publication. He 
also invoked constitutional privilege when asked about the deletion of 
one additional document which was signed not by General Heusinger, 
but by Vinzenz Mueller, creator of the post-World War II East 
German People's Army. 

Wolins and Canter prepared a foreword to The Case Against General 
Heusinger which condemned the United States and its allies for the 
Heusinger appointment. They did this in spite of the fact that the 
U.S. Government had exposed the fraudulent nature of the Soviet 
charges and all 14 governments represented on the NATO Mihtary 
Oommittee had unanimously approved Heu'^n^et's appointment aft^r 
dar^fuily wterghing all t»be facts in the ciase. 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1593 

The committee's hearings brought out the fact that an unsolicited 
general mailing of The Case Against General Heusinger was made by 
Translation World Publishers to members of the Washington press 
corps. When Wolins was questioned about the identity of the source 
which financed this mailing, he invoked the fifth amendment. The 
committee believes that it was im questionably financed by Soviet 
sources. 

Propaganda Retail Outlets 

In addition to the publishers of Soviet propaganda in the United 
States, there are certain domestic booksellers and book distributors 
actively engaged in spreading Soviet Communist literature through- 
out the country. Some of these booksellers and distributors not only 
import Soviet propaganda bulletins for retail purposes, but serve as 
"legal" intelligence agencies of the Soviet Government. An example 
of this type of operation was disclosed by the committee nearly 15 
years ago when it revealed that the Four Continent Book Corpora- 
tion was purchasing American patents for the Soviet Government for 
25^ each. 

The recent committee hearings disclosed that, between the years 
1946 and 1960, the Four Continent Book Corporation, located in 
New York City, had spent nearly a half million dollars annually for 
the purchase, from American sources, of books, periodicals, and public 
documents, including patents, for shipment to the Soviet Union. 
Since 1960, the committee learned, the Soviet Government has divided 
this operation among several agents. As a result, the sum expended 
by Four Continent Book Corporation for such purchases (exclusive of 
patents, which are now officially exchanged) was reduced to only 
$35,000 in 1961. 

During the period 1946 to 1950, Four Continent Book Corporation 
also imported from tlie Soviet Union printed material valued in excess 
of $1,000,000. Since 1960, however, the corporation's imports of 
printed matter from the U.S.S.R. have amounted to only a little over 
$110,000. 

Allan Markoff, who had become president of the Four Continent 
Book Corporation in 1948, testified that the fh-m had made no profits 
during the 11 years of his presidency. 

Despite this fact and the decline in Fom' Continent Book Corpora- 
tion's business since 1960, Serge P. Ushakoff, the present owner, testi- 
fied that he had recently invested $15,000 in the firm— $10,000 for 17 
shares of stock in the company which his predecessor had purchased 
for $8,840 and an additional $5,000 for the purchase of 8 shares from 
a third party. 

As an employee of the firm, Ushakoff had earned $75 a week. He 
testified that, as president of the firm, his salary is $125 per week. 
The increase in his weekly take-home pay, represented by these figures, 
would hardly justify the investment of $15,000 in a firm which had 
made no profit tlu'oughout its history. 

Ushakoff answered all questions asked hun by the committee. He 
denied that he had ever been under the du-ection of a foreign power. 
As previously indicated, he also testified, in contradiction to a state- 
ment filed with the Department of Justice by Mjrron Sharpe, that the 
Fom- Continent Book Corporation did not receive 10,000 copies of the 
Program of the Communist Party oj the Soviet Union published by 
Crosscurrents Press, Inc. 



1594 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Allan Markoff testified that he had become president of the Four 
Continent Book Corporation when he bought 10 shares of the firm's 
stock from the preceding president, Cyril Lambldn, in 1948. He de- 
nied having known at the time of purchase that Lambkin was a mem- 
ber of the Communist Party and had been so identified before this 
committee in 1947. Markoff's testimony was vague about the cir- 
cumstances under which, through an intermediary, he sold controlling 
interest in the corporation to Ushakoff for a profit of $1,160 in 1960. 

The sale of the Four Continent Book Corporation stock to Serge P. 
Ushakoft' in January 1960 ended, for a time, Markoff's role as an agent 
of a foreign principal. Markoff reregistered under the Foreign Agents 
Registration Act in January 1962 as an agent for an organization 
called Raznoiznos, a Bulgarian Government-owned firm engaged in 
the export of Communist propaganda. Markoft' acknowledged that 
he was currently registered as an agent of a foreign power, but refused 
to answer any questions concerning the services he rendered for the 
Communist government of Bulgaria through his principal, Raznoiznos, 
and refused to even aclaiowledge to the conmiittee that he was an 
agent for the Bulgarian Government. He invoked the fifth amend- 
ment when questioned concerning his recently formed business enter- 
prise, the FAM Book and Translation Service. Markoff also took 
refuge behmd the fifth amendment when questioned concerning his 
membership in the Fair Play for Cuba Committee. He denied mem- 
bership in the Commmiist Party, but refused to say whether he had 
ever rendered financial assistance to it. 

The committee hearings revealed that there is a definite relation- 
ship between membership in the Conmiunist Party of the United 
States and the ownership of bookstores which have contracts with 
Communist-controlled countries to import and export literature. 
Three such bookstores which were subjects of the committee's investi- 
gation and hearings are owned by persons who have served the cause 
of world communism by holding leadership positions in the Communist 
Partv of the United States. 

Imported Publications and Products, located in New York City, 
is owned by Mrs. Margaret Cowl. She is the widow of Charles 
Krumbein, who, prior to his death, was treasurer of the Communist 
Party. She herself served as a Communist agent in Russia and China 
in the 1930's. In her appearance before the committee, Mrs. Cowl 
revealed that she is registered with the Department of Justice as an 
agent for the International Book Company of the Soviet Union and 
Guozi Shudian of Communist China. She also testified that during 
the past 5 years she had shipped bulk literature received from the 
International Book Company in Moscow to various bookshops in the 
United States, including the International Bookstore in San Francisco, 
the Modern Book Store in Chicago, and the Jeft'erson Book Shop in 
New York City. Mrs. Cowl also stated that she had operated Im- 
ported Publications and Products since 1950. Slie invoked the fifth 
amendment when questioned about a statement she had made on a 
Foreign Agents Registration Act form filed June 4, 1958, to the effect 
that she was not a member of any nonbusiness organization. 

World Books, a newly established firm m New York City, is owned 
and operated by Philip Frankfeld, former chairman of the Com- 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1595 

munist Party of Maryland and the District of Columbia. Frankfeld 
was convicted under the Smith Act in 1952 for conspiring to teach 
and advocate the overthrow of the U.S. Government by force and 
violence. After his release from prison in 1956, he was employed by 
the Four Continent Book Corporation and remained witli it until 1960, 
according to the testimony of Markoff and Ushakoff. Frankfeld 
admitted that he has been a registered agent for the International 
Book Company of the Soviet Union and Guozi Shudian of Red China. 
On fifth amendment grounds, he refused to answer any questions 
concerning membership in the Communist Party. 

Global Books, located in Detroit, is owned and operated by Mrs. 
Helen Allison Winter, wife of Carl Winter, who recently resigned as 
chairman of the Communist Party of Michigan to avoid prosecution 
under the Internal Security Act. Mrs. Winter has been a member of 
the National Committee of the Communist Party and, lil^e Frankfeld 
and her husband, was convicted for violation of the Smith Act. Her 
conviction, however, was subsequently reversed because of the 
Supreme Court's decision in the Yates case. 

Carl Haessler, chairman-treasurer of Global Books Forum, invoked 
the first, fifth, and fourteenth amendments when questioned concern- 
ing Global Books and certain individuals affiliated with it. He 
denied ever having been a member of tlie Communist Party. 

Cross World Books and Periodicals of Chicago is co-owned by 
Alexander Svenchansky and Henry Levy. Svenchansky, in an 
appearance before the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee in 
1952, refused to respond to questions concerning his membership in 
the Communist Party. As a result of this, he was dismissed from 
employment with the United Nations. With an indemnit}^ payment 
which he received from the United Nations following his dismissal, 
Svenchansky was permitted by the Soviet Government to purchase a 
firm known as Parcels to Russia and since renamed Package Express 
and Travel Agency. 

Gregory Boris Lotsman, manager of Cross World Books and Peri- 
odicals, testified that, at the time they took over the firm, Svenchansky 
and Levy had entered into a contract to pay the International Book 
Company of Moscow $71,000 owed it by the previous owner for books 
in Cross World's possession. Mr. Lotsman expressed the opinion 
that this stock was not worth $10,000. Lotsman also testified that 
this $71,000 debt had been reduced by Svenchansky and Levy, 
through installment payments, to approximately $68,000. 

Cross World Books and Periodicals was subsequently extended 
additional credit of $25,000 to $50,000 by the International Book 
Cornpany, although the Moscow agency had been paid only $3,000 
against its note for $71,000. 



COMMUNIST OUTLETS FOR THE DISTRIBUTION OF 
SOVIET PROPAGANDA IN THE UNITED STATES 

PART 1 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 1962 

United States House of Representatives, 

Subcommittee of the 
Committee on Un-American Activities, 

Washington, D.C. 
public hearings 

The subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities 
met, pursuant to call, at 10:30 a.m., in the Caucus Room, Old House 
Office BuUding, Washington, D.C, Hon. Edwin E. Willis (chairman 
of the subcommittee) presiding. 

Subcommittee members: Representatives Edwin E, Willis, of Lou- 
isiana, chairman; William M. Tuck, of Virginia; and August E, 
Johansen, of Michigan. 

Committee members also present: Representatives Gordon H. 
Scherer, of Ohio, and Henry C. Schadeberg, of Wisconsin. 

Staff members present: Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., director; John C. 
Walsh, cocounsel, and Donald T. Appell, investigator, 

Mr. Willis. The subcommittee will please come to order. 

Let the record show that the Honorable Francis E. Walter, chair- 
man of the Committee on Un-American Activities, appointed a sub- 
committee to conduct these hearings consisting of Representatives 
William M. Tuck, August E. Johansen, and myself, Edwin E. Willis, 
as chairman, all of whom are present. 

The order of appointment will be set forth in the record at this 
point : 

May 8, 1962. 
To: Frank S. Tavenner, Jr. 
Director 
Committee on Un-American Activities 

Pursuant to the provisions of the law and the rules of this Committee, I hereby 
appoint a subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities, consisting 
of Honorable Edwin E. Willis as Chairman and Honorable William M. Tuck and 
Honorable August E. Johansen as associate members, to conduct a hearing in 
Washington, D.C, Wednesday, May 9, 1962, at 10:30 a.m., on subjects under 
investigation by the Committee and take such testimony on said day or succeed- 
ing days, as it may deem necessary. 

Please make this action a matter of Committee record. 

If any Member indicates his inability to serve, please notify me. 

Given under my hand this 8th day of May, 1962. 

/sgd./ Francis E. Walter, 

Chairman, 
Committee on Un-American Activities. 

1597 

90450— 62— pt. 1 2 



1598 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Willis. The committee resolution adopted April 9, 1962, 
authorizing these hearings sufficiently sets forth the subject and 
legislative purposes. 

The resolution will be set forth in the record at this point: 

BE IT RESOLVED, that hearings by the Committee on Un-American Ac- 
tivities, or a subcommittee thereof, be held in Washington, D.C., or at such other 
place or places as the Chairman may designate, and at such time or times as the 
Chairman may determine, relating to the publishing, printing, and distribution of 
Communist propaganda material that is instigated from foreign countries or is of 
a domestic origin, the legislative purposes of which are: 

1. To strengthen the provisions of Section 10 of the Internal Security Act of 
1950 so as to broaden the application of such section to cover persons, firms, asso- 
ciations and corporations engaged in the printing, publishing and dissemination 
of Soviet propaganda; 

2. To assist Congress, through the Committee's legislative oversight duties, in 
appraising the administration of laws relating to the introduction and dissemina- 
tion of Communist propaganda within the United States; and 

3. To consider and act upon clauses (c) and (d) of Section 312 of Title 3, H.R. 
6, introduced by Representative Walter on January 3, 1961, and referred to this 
Committee as part of H.R. 6, said clauses constituting proposed amendments of 
the Foreign Agents Registration Act. 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the action of the Chairman in issuing 
subpoenas for the appearance of MYRON SHARPE, in his individual capacity, 
and as president of Crosscurrents Press, Inc., be, and the same is hereby ratified 
and approved. 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Committee, or any subcommittee 
thereof, be authorized to investigate and hear any other matter within the juris- 
diction of the Committee which it, or any subcommittee thereof, appointed to 
conduct these hearings, may designate. 

Mr. Willis. For over a quarter of a century, the Communist 
Party of the Soviet Union, aided by the Government of the U.S.S.R., 
Soviet satellite governments, the Cominform and world Communist 
gatherings, has propagandized the non-Communist world. 

The United States has been and is receiving the brunt of this Com- 
munist attack through newspapers, books, and magazines, most of 
which are published in the English language by the Foreign Languages 
Publishing House, Moscow. 

Propaganda material is being imported into the United States 
through unsolicited mailings, addressed abroad, or by bulk to in- 
dividuals or firms registered as agents of a foreign power. This 
propaganda campaign is implemented by many publications of the 
Communist Party of the United States and by Communist-front 
organizations. 

In recent months many complaints have been received both from 
Members of Congress and American citizens urging investigation of 
the circumstances under which they are receiving through the mail 
material which they have not requested. 

This material has been described by these citizens as Communist 
propaganda designed to sell world communism. They have further 
charged that much of this material is intended to sell Americans on 
the foreign policy of the Soviet Union on such major international 
questions as Germany and disarmament. 

The committee desires to ascertain whether the printing and 
publishing of Communist Party propaganda in this country is a 
Communist device to conceal from the American people the true 
propaganda character of such material, and also whether it is a device 
for evading present and contemplated laws and regulations designed 
to prohibit or make less effective distribution in this country of 
foreign Communist propaganda. 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OP SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1599 

If the committee, as a result of these hearmgs, is justified in con- 
cluding that the printing and pubHshing of Communist Party material 
in this country is such a device, it will endeavor to find some legislative 
remedy. 

Is Myron Sharpe present? 

Please come forward, Mr. Sharpe. 

Please raise your right hand, sir. 

Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you are about to give 
will be the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth, so help 
you God? 

Mr. Sharpe. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF MYRON EMANUEL SHARPE, ACCOMPANIED BY 
COUNSEL, ELEANOR JACKSON PIEL 

Mr. Willis. Counsel, will you proceed? 

Mr. Walsh. What is your name? 

Mr. Sharpe. Myron Emanuel Sharpe. 

Mr. Walsh. And your present address? 

Mr. Sharpe. New York City. 

Mr. Walsh. Where in New York City? 

Mr. Sharpe. 156 Fifth Avenue. 

Mr. Walsh. I notice that you are represented by counsel. 

Will counsel please identify herself? 

Mrs. PiEL. My name is Eleanor Jackson Piel, and my offices are 
at 342 Madison Avenue, New York City. 

(At this point Mr. Scherer left the hearing room.) 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Chau-man, at this juncture I would like to intro- 
duce into evidence the certificate of incorporation of Crosscurrents 
Press, Incorporated, and have it marked as Sharpe Exhibit No. 1. 

Mr. Willis. It will be so introduced and marked. 

(Document marked "Sharpe Exhibit No. 1" and retained in com- 
mittee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. Pursuant to a subpena served on the Chemical Bank, 
New York Trust Company, on the 12th of April, 1962, which called 
for the photostats of a resolution, certificate of officers and signature 
card of Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated, President Myron E. Sharpe, 
I now introduce m evidence, pursuant to this subpena, a photostatic 
copy of agreement and official signatures of Crosscurrents Press, 
Incorporated, together with a certificate of officers, and the resolution 
which states that Mr. Myron Sharpe is the president and that he is 
the only one that is entitled to sign checks. 

I offer this as Sharpe Exhibit No. 2. 

Mr. Willis. Let it be so marked. 

(Document marked "Sharpe Exhibit No. 2" and retained in com- 
mittee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Sharpe, you are here pursuant to a subpena, are 
you not? 

Mr. Sharpe. That is correct. 

Mr. Walsh. And this subpena called for the production, as presi- 
dent of Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated, of all books of accounts 
and/or accounts reflecting all receipts of money by Crosscurrents 
Press, Incorporated, 156 Fifth Avenue, New York City, New York, 
from September 1, 1959, to date. 



1600 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Have you produced these records called for in the subpena which 
was served on you on April 11, 1962? 

Mr. Sharpe. I have a complete record of receipts which I am ready 
to produce pursuant to the subpena to me as president of Crosscurrents 
Press. 

Mr. Walsh. May I have them, sir? 

(Envelope handed to counsel.) 

Mr. Walsh. You also were served, Mr. Sharpe, to produce all 
books of accounts and records reflecting all receipts of money by 
Crossworld Press, Incorporated, 33 West 42nd Street, New York, 
New York, from September 1, 1959, to date. 

Have you produced such records? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. There is no such entity. 

Mr. Walsh. Had the entity, as you call it, Crossworld Press, 
Incorporated, ever existed? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mrs. PiEL. As a point of information, counsel. The witness has 
brought all of the records of his that he kept as Crosscurrents Press, 
Incorporated. 

There is another word in the other subpena. 

Mr. Sharpe. Crossworld. I think it is a typographical mistake. 
There is no such corporation, at least that I know of. 

Mr. Walsh. You did file with the United States Department of 
Justice on December 9, 1959, a registration statement in which you 
said the name of the registrant was Crossworld Press, Incorporated. 

Is that correct? 

Mr. Sharpe. If that is the case, it is a typographical error. It is 
Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated. 

Mr. Walsh. This is a typographical error? There was no such 
entity in existence at any time as Crossworld Press, Incorporated? 

Mr. Sharpe. That is correct. 

Mr. Walsh. May this be marked Sharpe Exhibit No. 3, the regis- 
tration statement, registration No. 1308, of Crossworld Press, 
Incorporated. 

The name of the person in charge of the principal office is Myron 
E. Sharpe. 

Mr. Willis. It will be so marked. 

(Document marked "Sharpe Exhibit No. 3" and retained in 
committee files.) 

Mr. Willis. Let me understand, counsel, that this is a registration 
or purported registration under the Foreign Agents Registration Act? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Willis. By this witness? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Willis. And on behalf of— — • 

Mr. Walsh. Crossworld Press, Incorporated. 

Mr, Willis. Is there another registration for Crosscurrents, also? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. That comes later. 

Mr. Willis. There is only one entity in this document you are now 
offering in evidence? 

Mr. Walsh. Crossworld Press, Incorporated. And the witness 
has testified that this was a typographical error. It was filed on 
December 9, 1959. 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1601 

Mr. JoHANSEN. May the record show what name appears as the 
title in the registration, which the witness says constitutes the 
typographical error? 

Mr. Walsh. I show you Exhibit No. 3, Mr. Witness, and ask you 
whether or not that states Crossworld Press, Incorporated? 

(Document handed to witness.) 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. Yes, it says Crossworld Press, Incorporated, which is 
a typographical error. 

Mr. Willis. And it was intended to be what? 

(Witness conferred with counsel) 

Mr. Sharpe. It was intended to be Crosscurrents Press, Incorpo- 
rated. 

Mr. Walsh. Would you outline your occupational background 
since 1954, Mr. Sharpe? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question. 

Mr. Walsh. On what grounds? 

Mr. Sharpe. On the following grounds: First of all, the first amend- 
ment, with particular emphasis on the guarantees relating to freedom 
of the press; secondly, the fourth amendment, which guarantees 
against illegal search and seizure; and the fifth amendment which de- 
fines the areas which may and may not be investigated, and which I 
have to invoke in order to protect my rights as a citizen. 

And finally, on the basis that the investigation tends to go counter 
to the concept of the exchange of information, freedom of informa- 
tion, which is vital to our democratic traditions. 

These are my grounds. If in the future I decline to answer any 
question, it will be the same grounds. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. Furthermore, that this question is irrelevant to the 
investigation of the committee. 

Mr. Willis, So we will avoid repetition, we may proceed along that 
line if that is your wish. But I will say that as far as this committee 
is concerned, the only valid objection I can act upon is the invocation 
of the fifth amendment. 

Later on, however, in the course of the examination, if it be decided 
that you be specific about your objections to a question, we will cross 
that bridge when we meet it. 

As I say, we accept only one ground here. Let us agree that that 
is the position of the committee. 

I did understand that you did invoke the provisions of the fifth 
amendment without going into detail. 

Mr. Sharpe. Right. 

Mr. Walsh. On the grounds that the answer you give or may not 
give would tend to incriminate you; is that correct? That is the fifth 
amendment. 

Mr. Sharpe. I think that I invoke it on the basis as described and 
written in the Bill of Rights, and it is clear without going into further 
definition of it. 

Mr. Willis. There is a fundamental right to invoke the provisions 
of the fifth amendment. You ate throwing in all the Bill o(f Rigiits. 
Left me ask yofu this que'stioin : 



1602 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Are you apprehensive and do you honestly fear that to answer the 
question may subject you to criminal prosecution? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question. 

Mr. Willis. Then I order and direct you to answer it because 
we do not accept your answer. 

I now order and direct you to answer the question because so far 
as the application or invocation of the fifth amendment is concerned 
there must be a basis of an honest fear or apprehension that to answer 
it would subject one to criminal prosecution. 

So I now order you to answer the question if you truly and honestly 
have that fear and apprehension. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. Well, I am invoking — I am declining on the grounds 
of the fifth amendment, and I believe that I have the right to invoke 
the ground of the fifth amendment including all of its clauses. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Including the self-incrimination provision of the 
fifth amendment; is that right? 

Mr. Sharpe. I said including all of its clauses so that is included. 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Sharpe, are you the same individual who appeared 
before this committee on May 10, 1954, during hearings in Lansing, 
Mich., and at that time you were a graduate student of the University 
of Michigan? 

Mr. Sharpe, I decline to answer on the previous grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. On the fifth amendment specifically? 

Mr. Sharpe. On the basis of the first, fourth, and fifth amendments. 

Mr. Walsh. On the ground that to do so would tend to incriminate 
you; is that correct? 

Mr. Sharpe. My previous answer to that question should stand 
throughout the entire hearing. 

Mr. Walsh. Is that the ruling of the Chair, sir? 

Mr. Willis. I order hmi to answer the question, so that there 
will be no dispute about it. 

The record will be examined from the point of view of whether 
it is an honest invocation of the fifth amendment. 

I do not want to be repetitious but I now order you to answer the 
question as a test of your right and honesty in the invocation of the 
provisions of the fifth amendment. 

I now ask 3"0U for the last time, do you fear or are jou apprehensive 
that to answer this question may subject you to criminal prosecution? 

I do not want it to appear that you have not been properly warned, 
and that our appreciation of your right to invoke the amendment is 
based on the grounds I have stated. 

You are represented by counsel. You may take the course you 
want to follow. But for the last time, I ask you are you invoking the 
protection of the fifth amendment on the ground that you fear that by 
supplying an answer to the question pending it would subject you to 
criminal prosecution? 

Mr. Tuck. Mr. Chairman, let me comment that unless his answer 
to the last question propounded is in the affirmative, then, in accord- 
ance with what I understand to be the law he is not properly invoking 
the fifth amendment; • 

Mr. Willis. That is the position, the pfiicial position, of the com- 
mittee. 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1603 

Mr. Sharpe. If there is any doubt about my previous answer, I 
repeat that I invoke the fifth amendment in its entirety, with all of 
its clauses, and I do not feel that a witness is called upon to give an 
explanation of the law. 

Mr. Willis. Proceed, with the conditions stated. 

Mr. Walsh. In 1950, you applied for and received a United 
States passport which you used to participate in the Communists' 
Thu'd World Youth Festival. Is that correct, sir? 

Mr. Sharpe. I dechne to answer that on the grounds previously 
stated. 

Mr. Walsh. Have you applied for any additional passports since 
June of 1950? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the grounds previously stated. 

Mr. Walsh. Have you made applications since 1950 and been 
denied a passport by the Department of State? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline on previous grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. I show you a copy of this application dated and exe- 
cuted on the 22d day of December 1955, and ask 3^ou whether or not 
that is an application which you submitted to the State Department 
for a passport. 

(Document handed to witness.) 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline on the previous gTounds to answer. 

(Document marked "Sharpe Exhibit No. 4" and retained in com- 
mittee files.) 

Mr. Willis. That was an application for a passport to travel 
where? 

Mr. Walsh. According to the application for the passport, he was 
supposed to go to France, England, Italy, Switzerland, probably 
Belgium and Holland, and the purpose of the trip was travel. 

Mr. Willis. Did you make that trip? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previous gTounds. 

Mr. Walsh. You will note that on this application, on page 1, 
according to the notation here, the fee was returned March 8, 1957, 
$9.00. 

Would you look at that and verify that, sir? 

(Document handed to witness.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Is that a fact? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline on the previous grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Will you tell the committee why the passport was 
denied and the fee returned? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that on the previous grounds. 

Mr, Walsh. I now show you Sharpe Exhibit No. 5, and ask you to 
look at that and tell me whether or not you ever received such a letter 
from the Department of State? 

(Document handed to witness.) 

(Witness conferred vnth counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline on the previous grounds. 

Mr. Willis. In order to set the record straight, may the Chair 
repeat that the position of the committee with respect to the declina- 
tion on the gromids indicated is the same as pointed out a moment 
ago, and that will apply to the questions asked up to now and those 



1604 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

to come, if there are to be some more indications of thie privileges of 
the Constitution. 

Mr. Sharps. I am sorry, I missed what you said. 

Mr. Willis. Read it. 

(The reporter read the record.) 

Mr. JoHANSEN. I think the record should show or at least the 
witness should indicate that when he says he declines on the same 
grounds, he is saying that he declines to answer on the same grounds. 

Is that correct? 

Mr. Sharpe. That is correct. 

Mr. Walsh. I again show you Exhibit No. 5, a letter dated Febru- 
ary 26, 1957, and signed by Frances G. Knight, Director, Passport 
Office. 

I ask you whether or not the second paragraph which I now read to 
you is contained in that letter: 

In our letter of January 12, 1956, you were requested to submit as part of 
your application an affidavit respecting present or past membership in the Com- 
munist Party, as provided for in Section 51.142 of the Passport Regulations. 
Since you have failed to comply with this request no action can be taken on 
your pending application as it is incomplete. 

Is that a correct statement of that which is contained in Exhibit 
No. 5? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previous grounds. 

Mr. Willis. Are you offering that letter? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, Mr. Chairman, Sharpe Exhibit No. 5. 

Mr. Willis. All right. 

(Document marked "Sharpe Exhibit No. 5" and retained in com- 
mittee files.) 

Mr. Willis. In other words, as I understand it, the passport appli- 
cation was not acted upon because it was incomplete in the sense that 
he failed to comply with the law and regulations requh'ing a disclosure 
of Communist affiliation? 

Mr. Walsh. Present or past; yes, sir; that is correct. 

Mr. Willis. All right. 

Mr. Walsh. When this letter was sent to you on February 26, 1957, 
were you at that time a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the previous 
grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Had you been a member of the Commimist Party 
prior to February 26, 1957? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline on the same grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Subsequently, you also filed a new passport applica- 
tion on January 16, 1959; is that correct? 

This is Sharpe Exhibit No. 6. I show this to you and ask you to 
tell us whether or not you are the individual who made the application 
for that passport? 

(Document handed to witness.) 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the stated 
grounds. 

(Document marked "Sharpe Exhibit No. 6" and retained in 
committee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. Is that a photostatic copy of your signature? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above grounds. 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1605 

Mr. Willis. Is this a series of applications? That is application 
No. 3, as I understand? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, Mr. Chairman. In this case, the passport was 
issued. 

Mr. Willis. It was issued? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Although you did not answer the questions in this application, 
Sharpe Exhibit No. 6, whether or not you were or had been a 
member of the Communist Party, nevertheless the [passport was 
issued to you; is that correct? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. And it was issued to you on February 13, 1959, is 
that correct? 

Mr. Sharpe. Was that a question? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes. 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that on the above stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Is there any reason why you did not execute these 
questions appearing under your picture, which read as follows: 

Are you now a member of the Communist Party? (Write "yes" or "no".) 
Have you ever been a member of the Communist Party? (Write "yes" or "no".) 
If ever a member, state period of membersliip, from, to. 

You did not fill that in, did you? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Why didn't you? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Was it because of the decision in Kent-Briehl v. Dulles, 
357 U.S. 116, in which the Supreme Court said that the State Depart- 
ment had no right to ask you these questions? 

Is that the reason you did not fill it in? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above stated grounds. 

Mr. Willis. Let me see if I understand the facts. Prior to the 
Kent-Briehl decision the Secretary of State required passport appli- 
cants to answer as to their past or present membership in the Com- 
munist Party. Then the Supreme Court in Kent-Briehl ruled that 
the Secretary had no authority to require this information. 

That is putting it bluntly. 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Willis. In other words, this witness applied for a passport on 
one or two occasions and the passport was denied? 

Mr. Walsh. As exemplified by Exhibit No. 4, in which the Director 
of the Passport Office on February 

Mr. Willis. On one previous occasion the passport was denied 
because the witness failed to answer the questions that the State 
Department required pursuant to law and regulations? 

Mr. Walsh. That is correct. 

Mr. Willis. And finally came the Supreme Court decision in Kent- 
Briehl which struck down those regulations, in effect, and he then was 
issued a passport pursuant to the Supreme Court decision? 

Mr. Walsh. That is correct. 

Mr. Willis. And I suppose there are many others in the same 
category. 

Mr. Walsh. Hundreds. 



1606 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. JoHANSEN. By invoking the self-incrimination provision of 
the fifth amendment in response to the last question the witness is, 
in effect, saying that to acknowledge that he availed himself of the 
benefits of the Supreme Court decision would be self-incriminating. 

Mr. Willis. That is a matter of interpretation. We are not put- 
ting words into the witness' mouth. He has invoked the fifth amend- 
ment under the conditions he outlined. 

Mr. Walsh. I previousl}^ asked 3^ou what was your occupation 
from 1954 to the present time. 

On this passport application which was issued to you on February 13, 
1959, Sharpe Exhibit No. 6, you state as your occupation ''Publisher." 

Is that correct? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the previously 
stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. In 1959, were 3^ou the publisher of any pamphlets 
or books? 

Mr. Sharpe. I invoke the same grounds which 1 stated previously. 

Mr. Walsh. I show you, Mr. Witness, Exhibit No. 7, which is a 
copy of a letter from International Arts and Sciences Press, 33 West 
42nd Street, New York 36, New York. It was signed by Myron E. 
Sharpe as president. 

I show this to you to refresh your recollection before I ask you the 
next question. 
;KDocument handed to witness.) 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 
\^'Mr. Walsh. Were you on February 7, 1959 the date of this letter, 
president of the International Arts and Sciences Press? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 
^ !Mr. Walsh. On the letterhead of International Arts and Sciences 
Press, you wrote to the Passport Office, Department of State, Wash- 
ington, D.C.: 

Dear Sir: I applied for a passport at the Passport Agency, Rockefeller Center, 
N.Y. It was to have been ready February 6, but there was a delay. I am 
therefore sending my representative to your office on Monday to pick up the 
passport in Washington. 

Who was your representative in Washington that you asked to pick 
up your passport? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the previous 
grounds. 

(Document marked "Sharpe Exhibit No. 7" and retained in 
committee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. On the ground that it would tend to incriminate you? 

Mr. Sharpe. I would simply repeat the same grounds upon which 
I answered that question before. 

Mr. Willis. And the Chair repeats its position. You understand 
our position, do you, so we won't have to haggle over it? 

Mr. Sharpe. I do. I hope you understand mine. 

Mr. Walsh. At the top of Sharpe Exhibit No. 7 there is printed 
"Problems of Economics, English Translation of the U.S.S.R. Monthly 
Journal, Voprosy Ekonomiki." 

Is that correct? 

(Document was handed to witness.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that on the above stated grounds. 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1607 

Mr. Walsh. Were you on February 7, 1959, the date of this letter, 
piibhshing Problems of Economics which is the Enghsh translation of 
the Soviet monthly journal? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above grounds. 

Mr. Willis. And does the letter show under what corporate entity 
he was publishing that material? 

Mr. Walsh. It is the International Arts and Sciences Press, accord- 
ing to Exhibit No. 7, and he signs "MjTon E. Sharpe, President," on 
this letter. 

Mr. Willis. Is that a separate entity or publication, separate from 
Crosscurrents Press previously referred to? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, Mr. Chairman. We will bring that out shortly. 

Mr. Willis. You have registered, individually, and perhaps in your 
capacity as an officer of an entity, under the Foreign Agents Regis- 
tration Act, have you? 

Mr. Sharpe. I am sorry, I cannot answer that question on the 
basis of the grounds which I invoked earlier. 

Mr. Willis. The record, Mr. Counsel, thus far so indicates that 
he registered, am I correct, under the Foreign Agents Registration 
Act, individually and as an officer of Crosscurrents? 

Mr. Walsh. Of Crosscurrents Press. 

Mr. Willis. The record shows that? 

Mr. Walsh. As of this time; yes, sir. 

Mr. Willis. And the record thus far also shows that he filed an 
application for registration under that same law, individually and/or 
as an officer of World — what? 

Mr. Walsh. Crossworld Press, which he said was a typographical 
error. 

We will bring out later, perhaps, the significance of the mistake in 
designating the organization Crossworld instead of Crosscurrents. 

Referring to Problems of Economics, which was the translation of a 
monthly journal, printed in the Soviet Union, did you have any 
representative in America that you conferred with, whereby you 
agreed to publish such material as Problems of Economics? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the previously 
stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you ever publish the Problems of Economics? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Would you tell the committee, please, how did you 
happen to get the translations of this monthly journal printed in 
Russia? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above grounds. 

Mr. Willis. And I suppose, Mr. Counsel, that you will produce 
evidence at an appropriate point — I do not want to anticipate your 
line of procedure — indicating the circulation of Crosscurrents material? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Willis. Does that include Problems of Economics? 

Mr. Walsh. No, sir, it does not include the Problems of Economics. 

Did the Soviet Union supply you with translations of the articles 
that appeared in its Problems of Economics? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the above stated 
grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Is the International Arts and Sciences Press a pruating 
company? Do they actuaUy print pamphlets or books? 



1608 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGAITOA 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Let me ask you this: Did you ever pay any royalties 
to any Soviet agency for the translated material that you copied from 
the Soviet monthly journal, Problems of Economics? 

Mr, Sharpe. 1 decUne to answer on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. It is pubUc knowledge, is it not, that certain of these 
pubhcations w^ere in existence and are in existence at the present time? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Did any Soviet agency ever buy aay quantities of 
these publications from you or from International Arts and Sciences 
Press, of which you are president? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Other than the Problems oj Economics, did Inter- 
national Arts and Sciences Press publish at that time any other pub- 
lications with reference to Soviet information? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above groimds. 

Mr. Willis. Mr. Counsel, you have asked whether, in effect, the 
Soviet Embassy was on the mailing list for a considerable amount of 
this material? Is that about the purport of your question? 

Mr. Walsh. Well, it is, but I am leading up to that later on, sir. 

Mr. Willis. Just in order to avoid the implication that those are 
wild questions, and I do not know what he is going to answer, frankly, 
wiU you offer proof that that is so, that a considerable amount of this 
material goes to the Soviet Embassy? 

Mr. Walsh. I would like to come to that in order, so that I may 
make it a complete picture, if I may. 

Mr. Willis. I am afraid you misunderstood my question. 

I said: Are you going to submit, through some witness, evidence 
that it is a fact — you asked the question — that material which you 
have been talking about, some of it, goes to the Soviet Embassy and 
some of it is distributed from there? 

Mr. Walsh. Material pubhshed by Mr. Sharpe from Crosscurrents 
Press, that is what we are going to prove. I was asking a prehminary 
question with reference to International Arts and Sciences Press. 

Mr. Willis. Well, so at least Crosscurrents is there. 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

In your passport application. Exhibit No. 6, issued February 13, 
1959, you stated that the purpose of your trip was business and that 
you intended to travel to France and England. Is that correct? 

Is that on your application? 

(Document handed to witness.) 
(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the previously 
stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Would you tell the committee whether or not you did, 
on that particular trip, when you left New York in February 1959, 
visit France and England? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the above grounds. 
Mr. Walsh. Did you visit any other country on that trip that you 
said was for business? 

Mr. Sharpe. The same answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you visit Moscow and the Soviet Union on the 
passport that was issued to you on February 13, 1959; Exhibit No. 6? 
Mr. Sharpe. The same answer. 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1609 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Sharpe, I show you a short-form registration 
statement. The name of the registrant is Crossworld Press, Incor- 
porated. 

This is Sliarpe Exhibit No. 8. It was executed by Myron Sharpe. 

I ask you to look on page 3 of Exhibit No. 8 and answer whether 
or not that is a photostatic copy of j^our signature? 

(Document handed to witness.) 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previous grounds. 

(Document marked "Sharpe Exhibit No. 8" and retained in com- 
mittee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. On this registration which was filed by you — a photo- 
static copy obtained from the Department of Justice — and signed by 
Myron E. Sharpe for Crossworld Press, Incorporated, paragraph No. 4 
has you stating that you visited France, Belgium and the U.S.S.R., 
and the purpose of the visit in these foreign countries was for business. 

Is that correct? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above groimds. 

Mr. Walsh. In your passport application, Sharpe Exhibit No. 6, 
you stated that you only intended to go to France and England. 
Was that a truthful answer when you made this application for your 
passport? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above grounds. 

Mr. Willis. The one that was granted? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Did you know at that time that you intended to go to Soviet 
Russia? 

Mr. Sharpe. The same answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Prior to the time that you left the United States in 
1959, and according to your own statement on Exhibit 8 that you did 
go to the U.S.S.R., had you discussed with anybody in the United 
States the business that you would conduct while you were in Soviet 
Russia? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that on the previous grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Did anyone in this country make any arrangements for 
you to meet with anyone while you were abroad? 

Mr. Sharpe. The same answer. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Willis. Have you finished conferring with counsel? 

Mrs. Piel. Just one moment. 

Mr. Willis. Surely. Take your time. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Walsh. On Sharpe Exhibit No. 8, the short-form registration 
statement which you signed, in Section 6(a) you state that the regis- 
trant has obtained the exclusive United States rights to publish 
and distribute books and pamphlets published by the principal and 
that registrant may sell, on occasion, some of the materials published 
by it, to the principal. 

Who was the principal j^ou referred to on the registration statement? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the previously 
stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Under Section 7, you sold certain of these books to the 
"IntematioDal Book Company." I won't tity tSo prOiJofimc'e thfe 
R'u^ia;a, but that is the literal translation of it. 



1610 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Are you familiar with the Mezhdunarodnaya Kniga, commonly 
referred to as AlezhKniga? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the above 
grounds. 

Mr. Walsh, Have you ever had any written communications with 
MezhKniga or the International Book Company in Moscow, with 
reference to items pubhshed by Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline on the same grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. But the principal from which you obtained the 
United States rights to publish and distribute books was the Inter- 
national Book Company in Moscow? Is that correct? 

Mr. Sharpe. The same grounds. 

Will you excuse me a minute while I confer with counsel? 

Mr. Walsh. Surely. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mrs. Piel. At this time, if I may interpose a remark 

Mr. W^illis. Yes, Mrs. Piel? 

Mrs. Piel. The witness has just recalled something which makes 
a previous statement of his in error with regard to his response to the 
subpena as to Crossworld Press, and he would like to make an explana- 
tion as to why he has not brought any records from Crossworld Press. 

Mr. Willis. That is perfectly proper. 

Mr. Sharpe. I want to correct that and say I believe it is in error. 
During the last few minutes, in reflecting about Crossworld Press, I 
believe the situation is that Crosscurrents Press was first incorporated 
as Crossworld Press, or at least an application for incorporation was 
made under that name, and it was subsequently found that there was 
another entity with that name, and we were obliged to change the 
name. 

This is the best of my recollection. I seem to recall this in the 
course of the last few minutes, but I am not absolutely sure. 

Mr. Willis. We are glad to have you make that statement. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Then the import of that statement is that the 
organization, the entity, did never exist under that name, you believe, 
because it was found that there was another organization by that name 
and for that reason you could not incorporate under it? 

Mr. Sharpe. I believe that is correct. It may have existed in 
some sense for a short period of time, a week, two weeks, or a month, 
or it may not have, if the application for incorporation was not 
accepted. 

I simply do not recall. It was several years ago, and it just struck 
me recently that this probably is the explanation. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. With whom would that application for incorpora- 
tion have been filed? 

Mr. Walsh. The Secretary of State of New York. 

Mr. Willis. It is a State corporation. 

Mr. Sharpe. That is correct. 

Mr. Willis. It is a New York corporation? 

Mr. Sharpe. That is right. 

Mr. Walsh. As of December 9, 1959, you were not cognizant of 
the fact, I presume, that there was another corporation known as 
Crossworld, Incorporated; is that what you have explained to us? 

Mr. Willis. In substance that is what he has said. 

Mr. Sharpe. Yes; that is correct. 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1611 

Mr. Walsh. What is the other corporation which also has "Cross- 
world" in it, and why did you change this Crossworld Press to Cross- 
currents Press? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe, I am afraid I will have to decline to answer that on 
the above stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Unfortunately, you have opened the door now, because 
you have given an explanation, and I think I am privileged at this 
time to pursue this matter more fully since you have given the 
explanation. You have waived your right in this particular instance. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I differ with your interpretation because I was simply 
identifying the subpena which has the term ''Crossworld Press" in it, 
and not responding to any question. 

I made a clarification of an earlier attempt to identify the term 
"Crossworld Press," and during the course of this hearing I had a 
recollection that there was this incorporation. 

So my answer is simply in identification of the subpena. 

Mr. Walsh. Let me ask you this question: You stated in your 
explanation that you had found out that there was another corpora- 
tion "Crossworld." Is that a fact? 

(Witness conferred with comisel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I stand on my previous explanation of that question. 

Mr. Walsh. Is not it a fact that the reason you changed Cross- 
world Press to Crosscurrents Press is due to the fact that in Chicago 
there is another corporation, the Cross World Books and Periodicals, 
Inc., which also has been registered under the Foreign Agents Regis- 
tration Act of 1938, as amended? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the above-stated 
grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Would you dkect the witness to answer that question? 

Mr. Willis. Mr. Counsel, in all fairness, the witness takes the 
position that his explanation of the two entities is directed to the 
fulfilhnent of a subpena identification. 

As I understand it our files, your files, show two applications by 
two entities, and you issued, properly, two subpenas. He has taken 
the position, and I will not be technical about it, that his explanation 
thus far has to do with an attempt to satisfy the two subpenas, the 
requirements of the two subpenas. 

But he did not want to go beyond that. I miderstand that. 
Because, and let us be fah about it, his answers here may subject him 
to contempt or whatever penalties may be attached to testifying under 
these circumstances. 

But, then, too, under the law, under a very separate provision of the 
law, failure to comply with a subpena for the production of books, 
subjects one to a dift'erent kind of penalty. 

So I am not going to press that. 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

In Sharpe Exhibit No. 8, in Section 7(b), you stated on September 
16, 1959, you received the sum of $9,300 from this International Book 
Company, Moscow, and also on October 5, 1959, for the sale of 
pamphlets, you received $10,600 from the International Book 
Company of Moscow. 



1612 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

I ask you : Where were these checks deposited and in whose account? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the above stated 
grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you have a bank account for Crossworld Press, 
Incorporated? 

Mr. Sharps. I decUne to answer on the same grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. You said you had no records. Did you have a bank 
account for Crossworld Press, Incorporated? 

Mr. Willis. I think I am going to order you to answer that ques- 
tion because it involves failure to comply with the subpena very 
definitely. 

That is a proper question in terms of whether you have complied 
with the subpena. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. To the best of my recollection, there never were any 
records under Crossworld Press. To the best of my recollection, it 
never functioned as the Crossworld Press. 

Mr. Walsh. Is that the International Book Company that you 
acted as agent for when you said the principal in this registration 
statement, Exhibit No. 8? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that under the same grounds as 
stated above. 

Mr. Walsh. I do not recall, but did you actually submit to the 
Secretary of State of New York the application for the incorporation 
of Crossworld Press? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I frankly do not recall. 

Mr. Walsh. Who was your lawyer at that time? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I think that is an improper question. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you have advice or did you request anybody to 
file the appHcation for a certificate of incorporation of Crossworld 
Press? 

Mr. Sharpe, I think the lawyer-client relationship precludes dis- 
cussion of that question. 

Mr. Walsh. I am not going to argue it, because it is not that 
important. 

Now, Mr. Sharpe, I show you a certificate of incorporation of Book- 
field House, Incorporated, which was filed in the Secretary of State's 
office on November 28, 1958, and I ask you if you are the Mr. Sharpe 
who incorporated Booldield House, Incorporated? 

(Document was handed to witness.) 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the previously 
stated grounds. 

(Document marked "Sharpe Exhibit No. 9" and retained in com- 
mittee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. Through exhibits heretofore introduced, and according 
to the exhibits, you are president of International Arts and Sciences 
Press. 

You are also president of Crosscurrents Press,' Incorporated, and 
also you state that you are president of Booldield House, Incor- 
porated, in another registration. 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1613 

Will you tell the committee what was the relationship and what 
were the functions of each of these associations or corporations which 
I have just listed, and which you, as president, would know? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the previously 
stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Pursuant to a subpena on the Chemical Bank New York 
Trust Company, or the accounts of Myron E. Sharpe as the president 
of Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated, I show you a copy of a check 
in the amount of $10,000 payable to the International Arts and 
Sciences Press. 

I ask you — it is rather dim, but I assure you that that is a proper 
statement that I have just made — I ask you whether or not you 
recognize that check? 

(Document handed to witness.) 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Walsh. That is a photostatic copy of a check. 

Mr. Sharpe. I decHne to answer that question on the above 
grounds. 

(Document marked "Sharpe Exhibit No. 10" and retained in com- 
mittee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. Could you tell the committee why Crosscurrents 
Press, Incorporated, issued a check to International Arts and Sciences 
Press in the amount of $10,000? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline on the same grounds. 

Mr. Willis. Let me ask you this question: Could you teU us what 
is the source of income of Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated? 

By that I mean, is it made up of the usual receipts from publications 
of that type and perhaps advertisements, or do you have any side 
contributions? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I am sorry, I have to decline to answer that question 
on the above grounds. 

Mr. Willis. I am sorry you decline to answer it, too, because this 
is very intriguing to me. 

Counsel, I go back to the first question I asked you. Do you pro- 
pose to show that the overwhelming production or output of Cross- 
currents Press is being purchased and distributed within the United 
States by an agency of the Soviet Union? 

Mr. Walsh. We intend to prove that very definitely, Mr. Chair- 
man. Practically all of the pamphlets which Crosscurrents Press 
published and issued were sold to the Soviet Embassy in Washington, 
D.C., which, in turn, utilizes a U.S. post office bulk mailing permit 
for the distribution of this material throughout the whole country. 

Mr. Willis. This goes into another question which has to do with 
the legislative purpose of these hearings. As I understand it, and see 
if you agree, we have a situation where this individual, in his capacity 
as an officer of Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated, perhaps satisfies 
the provisions of the Foreign Agents Registration Act, and then under 
the cloak of an American corporation prints, distributes and circulates 
this material, and again, perhaps, neatly evades the consequences of 
the Foreign Agents Registration Act. 

That is one of the major reasons for these hearings, to inquire, as 
we always must, into the possible finding of a loophole in that law. 
This could indicate what is going on. 

90450 — 62 — pt. 1 3 



1614 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

I am particularly interested in the source of revenues. I hope you 
might have something to say about that later on. 
Mr. Walsh. We will, sir. ^ 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Mr. Counsel, you referred to these mailings by the 
Soviet Embassy under the bulk rate. 
Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. By the bulk rate, you are referring to the third- 
class postal rate that is provided by the Congress? 
Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. And which is, in effect, a rate subsidized b^' the 
taxpayers? 

Mr. Walsh. That is correct, sir. 

Now, Mr. Sharpe, would you be kind enough to identify to the 
committee all persons who hold a financial interest in or the sharing 
of the profits in Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the above 
grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Will that be reflected in tlie books and records whicli 
we asked for in the subpena? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer^thatlon the same grounds. 
Mr. Walsh. How about International Arts and Sciences Press? 
Mr. Sharpe. The same answer. 
Mr. Walsh. And Bookfield House, Incorporated? 
Mr. Sharpe. The same answer. 

Mr. Johansen. Mr. Chairman, I do not want to quibble with the 
witness, but he frequently says "same answer" and actually he is not 
answering. 

In other words, you are declining to answer on the same grounds; 
is that correct? 

Mr. Sharpe. That is absolutely correct. 

Mr. Walsh. And Tradeworld, Incorporated, of which you also arc 
the president; would you identify the individuals who have a financial 
interest in Tradeworld, Incorporated, or share the profits in it? The 
certificate of incorporation for Tradeworld, Incorporated is Sharpe 
Exhibit No. 11. 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the previously 
stated grounds. 

(Document marked "Sharpe Exhibit No. 11" and retained in com- 
mittee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. Are you the principal stockholder in the four corpora- 
tions which I have just read to you? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the same grounds. 
Mr. Walsh. Other than the four that I have mentioned, are you 
interested in any other corporations which distribute or disseminate 
Communist propaganda in America? 

Mr. Sharpe. I dechne to answer on the same grounds. 
Mr. Walsh. Mr. Witness, in Exhibit No. 8, which is the short-form 
registration statement, under Section 5, you are asked to list all clubs, 
societies, committees and other nonbusiness organizations in the 
United States or elsewhere, including any active or military or naval 
forces, of which you have been a member, a director, officer, or em- 
ployee during the past 2 years. 

I show you page 2. You list Library For Intercultural Studies, 
Incorporated, 225 Lafayette St., New York, N.Y, 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1615 

I ask you to look at that and state if I have read correctly. 

(Document handed to witness.) 

Air. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the previously 
stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Is that a full and correct statement of all the organiza- 
tions, nonbusiness organizations and societies that you were a member 
of as of December 9, 1957? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the above stated 
grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Had you ceased to be a member of the Communist 
Party prior to December 9, 1957, which is 2 years prior to the date on 
this registration statement. Exhibit No. 8? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Were you a member of the Communist Party on De- 
cember 9, 1959, when you filed this statement? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that on the above stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. I again ask you now: Have you, in compliance with 
the registration requirement, listed the clubs, societies, and nonbusi- 
ness organizations that you were a member of for the past 2 years? 

The only one you list is Library for Intercultural Studies, Incorpo- 
rated. Is that a true and correct statement? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Library for Intercultural Studies, Incorporated, was 
incorporated by whom? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Were you one of the incorporators? 

Mr. Sharpe. The same answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Will you tell the committee what was the purpose of 
Library for Intercultural Studies and what it was supposed to do? 

Mr. Sharpe. The same grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you ever work for the Library for Intercultural 
Studies, Incorporated? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline on the above grounds to answer that. 

Mr. Walsh. You are listed as a director of the Library for Inter- 
cultural Studies. Is that true? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Do you know whether or not Corliss Lamont was the 
first president of this Library for Intercultural Studies? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question. 

Mr. Walsh. You were associated with it in November 1958; is that 
a fact? 

Mr. Sharpe. The same answer. 

Mr. Walsh. You will not teU the committee who the members or 
the directors or the officers of the Library for Intercultural Studies 
were? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you ever draw a salary when you were employed 
by — if you were employed by — Library for Intercultural Studies? 

Mr. wSharpe. I decline to answer on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Is there any relationship between the Library for 
Intercultural Studies, Incorporated, and Crosscurrents, or Bookfield, 
Incorporated? 

Mr. Sharpe. The same answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Or International Arts and Sciences Press? 

Mr. Sharpe. The same answer. 



1616 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Walsh. Or Tradeworld? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer. 

Mr. Walsh. But in this application, you do say that you were a 
director from November 1958, to date, which is December 9, 1959, of 
Library for Intercultural Studies, Incorporated. 

I show you this again to refresh yoiu- memory. 

(Document handed to witness.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the previously 
stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Will you tell me what were yom* duties as director of 
this organization? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. I show you a document which has already been 
marked Exhibit No. 1, and note on page 3 the names of the directors, 
Myron E. Sharpe, Jacqueline Steiner, and Jacqueline Lubell. 

Is that correct? 

(Document handed to witness.) 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the previously 
stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Was Jacqueline Lubell the wife of David G. LubeU, 
who acted as the notary in this particular certificate of incorporation, 
as shown in Exhibit No. 1? 

Mr. Sharpe. The same answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Do you know whether or not Jacqueline Steiner was 
ever known as Jacqueline Berman? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the previously 
stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Was that her married name at one time, Jacqueline 
Berman? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question. 

Mr. Walsh. Who is she now? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the previously 
stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Do you know a David G. Lubell? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. When this certificate of incorporation was filed on the 
16th day of December 1959, and David G. Lubell was the notary 
public, were you aware that he was a member of the Communist 
Party in December of 1959? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the same grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Did David Lubell ever advance any moneys for the 
incorporation for carrying out the purposes of Crosscurrents Press, 
Incorporated? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previous grounds. 

Mr. Willis. You have asked whether this witness was aware of 
the fact whether, on a specified date, Lubell was a member of the 
Communist Party. Has that individual been identified under oath as 
such a member? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

In the registration statement, which has been introduced into 
evidence and marked Exliibit 3, I show you the rider to Section 11(c), 
and ask you to laok at that and tell us whether or not these books and 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1617 

pamphlets were published by Crosswoiid, the name of the registrant, 
or was it Crosscurrents. 

Which? 

(Document handed to witness.) 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Walsh. Or was it International Arts and Sciences, which is 
indicated in the registration statement as the publisher? 

Will you tell me which of the three? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I dechne to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Will you tell the committee of any conversations, and 
with whom you had conversations with the International Book Com- 
pany in Moscow, whereby you became the sole distributor for certain 
books as listed in Exhibit 3? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Was a discussion had with anybody, either in this 
country or in Moscow, that perhaps it would be very beneficial to the 
propagandizing of Communist literature in this country if the pub- 
lications were printed in this country by an American corporation? 

Was that ever discussed? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. I am going to read to you from Exhibit No. 3, in 
which you state that 11,000 copies were printed of For Peaceful 
Competition and Cooperation, which was written by Khrushchev, and 
printed by International Arts and Sciences Press and that 10,051 
copies of the 11,000 were distributed by International Arts and Sciences 
Press to the principal, which is the International Book Company in 
Moscow. 

Is that a correct statement? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Were any copies distributed to any representative 
of the International Book Company in America? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline on the same grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Were these 10,051 copies delivered to the Soviet 
Embassy in Washington? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previous grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. You also list International Arts and Sciences Press 
as printing 6,000 copies of Gains in the Soviet Standard of Living Under 
the Seven Year Plan, and 5,086 were distributed to the principal. 

Who is the principal? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previous grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Was it the Soviet Embassy in the United States, in 
Washington? 

Mr, Sharpe. I decline on the same grounds. 

Mr. Willis. Mr. Counsel, do you have any evidence that any of the 
material printed and distributed, disseminated through any source, 
by Crosscurrents Press appears in Europe in identical or similar form? 

Mr. Walsh. We do, and we are coming to that later on, sir. 

13,000 copies of Higher Education in the USSR were printed by Inter- 
national Arts and Sciences Press of which 9,377, according to your 
sworn statement, went to the principal. 

I ask you again, were these delivered to Moscow, or were they 
delivered to a representative of the International Book Company, or 
were they delivered to the Soviet Embassy in Washington, D.C.? 



1618 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Sharps. I decline to answer on the above stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. There were printed 76,000 copies of Nikita Sergeyevich 
Khrushchev, On the Occasion of his Visit to the U.S. 75,051 copies 
were sent to the principal. 3,000 of The Soviet Economy 1959-1965 
were printed, of which 2,527 were sent to the principal; 15,000 copies 
of The Soviet Standard of Living: Social Benefits, of which 10,088 were 
sent to the principal. 

Is that correct? 
^'Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. According to Exliibit No. 3, International Arts and 
Sciences Press printed those pamphlets, the titles of which I have just 
read to you. 

Is it a fact that they did print them or did Crosscurrents print them? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previous grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Would I be factually correct in stating that Interna- 
tional Arts and Sciences Press was not registered under the Foreign 
Agents Registration Act at the time of the publication of these various 
pamphlets I have just enumerated? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Has International Arts and Sciences Press ever reg- 
istered as an agent under the Foreign Agents Registration Act? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Was Crossworld Press, or the company which later 
became Crosscurrents Press, incorporated for the purpose of elimi- 
nating the necessity of International Arts and Sciences Press labeling 
its publications as required by the Foreign Agents Registration Act? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the same grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. You were president of International Arts and Sciences 
Press, were you not? 

Mr. SHARPE.MThe same answer. 

Mr. Walsh. For the sake of brevity, Mr. Chairman, I would like 
to introduce in evidence Sharpe Exhibits 12 to 38, inclusive, which 
are dissemination reports under Registration No. 1308, which is the 
C-rosscurrents Press registration number with the Department of 
Justice. 

These dissemination reports show where the material was printed, 
how many copies, and to whom the copies were sent after being 
printed. 

Mr. Willis. Let those exhibits be made part of the record and 
marked as suggested. 

(Documents marked "Sharpe Exliibits Nos. 12 through 38" and 
retained in committee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. Of com-se, I have summarized this, but the figm-es 
that I will read are the identical figures that have been submitted 
by Crosscurrents Press to the Department of Justice in the dissemina- 
tion report under Registration No. 1308. 

Mr. Willis. By dissemination, you mean through the mails? 
Mr. Walsh. No, to the principal individual who got the bulk of 
it, who, in turn, disseminated it 

Mr. Willis. Who, in turn, disseminated those publications through 
the United States mail, subsidized by the taxpayers? 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1619 

Air. Walsh. Yes, sir. For instance, so that the committee will 
understand and the witness will understand, I would like to read 
Exhibit No. 12. 

It is The Kazakh Republic: 

1. This material, written by the Chairman of the Council of Ministers of the 
Kazakh Republic, is a political, historic and economic resume of the development 
of the Kazakh Republic since the establishment of the Soviet Government. 

2. The material was transmitted by commercial carrier. 

What do you mean by that, that the material for this booklet was 
transmitted by commercial carrier? 

Mr. Sharpb. I decline to answer that question on the previously 
stated groimds. 

Mr. Walsh. Would you make this concession? Was this dissemi- 
nation report filed by Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated, with the 
Department of Justice? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above grounds. 

Mr. WaLis. And that, no doubt, was in technical compliance with 
the Foreign Agents Registration Act? 

Mr. Walsh. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Willis. But carried through the cloak of an American cor- 
poration, distributed among other sources, througli the Soviet Em- 
bassy, and mailed out without being requested, to American citizens. 

Are universities included? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes; and libraries. 

Mr. Willis. At the taxpa^^ers' expense? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. [Reading:] 

3. The bulk of the transmission was made from the plant of Trade Bindry, 
636 Eleventh Avenue, New York, New York. 

Have you any financial interest in the Trade Bindry? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. [Reading:] 

4. Shipment was commenced on or about February 5, 1960. 

5. Approximately 10,500 copies of the material have been transmitted. 

6. The material in the main has been transmitted to the District of Columbia. 

7. Approximately 10,000 copies were transmitted to the Soviet Embassy. 

8. The registrant now has in his possession 500 copies of this material and 
contemplates making sales on an ad hoc basis to individuals, bookstores, and the 
like. It is contemplated that these sales will be in volume of less than 10 copies. 

Mr. Willis. The resume jj'ou have given from that exhibit is sub- 
stantially the same as disclosed in the other exhibits? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. In summarizing the following exhibits, I 
shall give the number of publications printed, the title, and the 
number of copies transmitted to the Soviet Embassy, Washington, 
D.C. 

Mr. Willis. Without going into detail as you have with Exhibit 
No. 12. 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Exhibit 'No. '13 — 7,500'copies oi The Russian Federation, Sipproxi- 
mately 7,000 of which went to the Soviet Embassy; 

Exhibit No. 14 — ^50,000, Khrushchev in America, 50,000 went to the 
Soviet Embassj^ in Washington, D.C; 

Exhibit No. 15 — ^21,000, The International Situation and Soviet 
Foreign Policy, 20,000 went to the Soviet Embassy; 

Exhibit No. 16 — 7,000, Khrushchev's Tour of Asia, 7,000 went to the 
Soviet Embassy; 



1620 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Exhibit No. 17 — 7,500, Report of an Investigation Into the War Crimes 
of Theodor Oberlander, 7,000 of which went to the Soviet Embassy; 

Exhibit No. 18 — 20,500, Raising the Soviet Standard of Living, 20,000 
went to the Soviet Embassy; 

Exhibit No. 19 — 3,500, Mikoyan in Cuba, 3,500 went to the Soviet 
Embassy in Washington, D.C.; 

Exhibit No. 20 — 4,000, A^". S. Khrushchev's Statement and Replies to 
Questions, etc. — The U-2 Plane Incident, 4,000, all of them went to 
the Soviet Embassy in Washington, D.C.; 

Exhibit No. 21 — 7,500, Soviet Policy in the Current International 
Situation, 7,500 went to the Soviet Embassy; 

Exhibit No. 22—2,800 copies, Speech by Nikita S. Khrushchev at the 
Third Congress of the Rumanian Workers' Party, 2,800 of the same 
went to the Soviet Embassy; 

Exhibit No. 23^ — ^25,000 copies of the Speech by Nikita S. Khrushchev 
at the Fifteenth Session of the UN General Assembly, 24,000 went to the 
Soviet Embassy; 

Exhibit No. 24 — 10,000 copies, Khrushchev in New York, 9,000 went 
to the Soviet Embassy; 

Exhibit No. 25—50,000 copies. The First Man In Space, 50,000 
copies went to the Soviet Embassy in Washington, D.C; 

Exhibit No. 26—6,000, Three Documents of Current History, 6,000 
copies went to the Soviet Embassy; 

Exhibit No. 27^ — ^20,000, Program of the Communist Party of the 
Soviet Union, approximately 19,900 went to the Soviet Embassy; 

Exhibit No. 28 — 5,000, A Peace Treaty with Germany, 5,000 of which 
went to the Soviet Embassy; 

Exhibit No. 29—41,000, The Soviet Stand on Germany, 41,000, 
approximately, went to the Soviet Embassy in Washington, D.C; 

Exhibit No. 30—25,000, A Letter to the American People From Nikita 
S. Khrushchev, approximately 25,000 — that "approximately" is in the 
dissemination statement — approximately 25,000 went to the Soviet 
Embassy in Washington ; 

Exhibit No. 31 — 25,000, Documents of the 22nd Congress of the 
CPSU, Volume I, approximately 25,000 of which went to the 
Soviet Embassy; 

Exhibit No. 32 — 25,000 copies of Documents of the 22nd Congress of 
the CPSU, Volume 11, approximately 25,000 went to the Soviet 
Embassy in Washington, D.C; 

Exhibit No. 33 — 25,000, Khrushchev Reports to the 22nd Congress of 
the CPSU, approximately 25,000 went to the Soviet Embassy in 
Washington, D.C ; 

Exhibit No. 34 — 25,000, Khrushchev on the Future, 25,000, approxi- 
mately, went to the Embassy in Washington, D.C 

Exhibit No. 35 — 50,000 copies, Gherman Titov, First Man to Spend a 
Day in Space, approximately 50,000 were sent to the Soviet Embassy; 

Exhibit No. 36—8,000, The Soviet Stand on Dis-Armament, 8,000, 
approximately, went to the Soviet Embassy; 

Exhibit No. 37 — 60,000, Program of the Communist Party of the 
Soviet Union, 32,325, approximately, went to the Soviet Embassy; 

Exhibit No. 38 — 10,000, Khrushchev Speaks to Moscow Voters, 6,500, 
approximately, went to the Soviet Embassy. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Wherever you read the word, Mr. Counsel, 
"approximately", it appears in the report? 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1621 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Willis. Are these reports to the Department of Justice made 
under oath? 

Mr. Walsh. They are sworn to; yes, sir. 

Now, Mr. Sharpe, also in the registration filed on July 29, 1960, 
there is listed under a rider to Section 10(a), payments received by 
Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated, from the Soviet Embassy in 
Washington, D.C., and you state the purpose for which received was 
the sale of pamphlets and periodicals. 

On January 14, 1960, the Soviet Embassy paid $3,500; on March 7, 

1960, the Soviet Embassy paid $7,909.15. On May 2, 1960, the Soviet 
Embassy paid $500. On May 4, 1960, the Soviet Embassy paid 
$3,650. On June 9, 1960, the Soviet Union Embassy paid $1,300. 

Mr. Willis. Paid to whom? 

Mr. Walsh. Paid to Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated. 

Mr. Willis. Now we come to the source of revenue. 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

On June 9, 1960, the Soviet Embassy paid to Crosscurrents Press, 
Incorporated, $9,100. 

Mr. Willis. And the statements you have been reading from are 
representations made under the signature of this witness to the De- 
partment of Justice? 

Mr. Walsh. That is correct. 

Mr. Willis. Those are not your figures. Those are his figures? 

Mr. Walsh. They are his figures. 

Mr. Willis. And all that is sworn to? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Under the rider of 10(a), on the registration, dated February 2, 

1961, there was paid to Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated, the follow- 
ing sums of money from the Soviet Embassy in Washington, D.C. I 
am not going to include the freight charges. 

Julv 14, 1960, $500; July 14, 1960, $2,900; Julv 25, 1960, $750; 
July 26, 1960, $9,500; August 4, 1960, $232.66; August 23, 1960, 
$1,000; October 4, 1960, $500; October 4, 1960, $25,000. 

There is a notation here that there was a refund made on October 14 
in the amount of $4,000, reflecting an error in registrant's invoice. 

On November 7, 1960, payment by the Soviet Embassy to Cross- 
currents Press, Incorporated, $500; on November 29, 1960, a payment 
of $15,026.79 made to Crosscurrents Press by the Soviet Union. 

There is also a notation here that there was a refund made on 
November 30, 1960, in the amount of $880, reflecting error in regis- 
trant's invoice. 

On November 30, 1960, the sum of $500 was paid to Crosscurrents 
Press by the Soviet Embassy in Washington, D.C. 

Mr. Willis. Did you tabulate, Mr. Counsel, in total what the pay- 
ments were by the Soviet Embassy to Crosscurrents Press, reflected 
from statements made under oath, or sworn to, by this individual to 
the Department of Justice? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. It is in excess of approximately $240,000. 

Mr. Willis. Over what period of time, roughly? 

Mr. Walsh. September of 1959 to date, according to the registra- 
tions which have been filed with the Department of Justice. 

Mr. Willis. That is about two years and a half. 



1622 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Walsh. And also the documents submitted by the witness this 
morning whichSweJhave analyzed during the course of this examination. 

Mr. Tuck. Mr. Chairman, that was a quorum call that just rang. 
I would suggest that we recess until 2:30. 

Mr. Willis. We will recess until 1:45. 

Mrs. PiEL. Mr, Chairman, may I ask you whether you intend to 
complete your investigation today of this witness, or whether it will 
go on until tomorrow? 

Mr. Walsh. We are going to do our best. 

Mr. Willis. Off the record. 

(Discussion off the record.) 

Mr. Willis. We will recess untU 1:45 this afternoon. 

(Members present at time of recess: Representatives Willis, Johan- 
sen, and Tuck.) 

(Whereupon, at 12:25 p.m., Wednesday, May 9, 1962, the subcom- 
mittee recessed, to reconvene at 1:45 p.m., the same day.) 

AFTERNOON SESSION, WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 1962 

(The subcommittee reconvened at 1:45 p.m.. May 9, 1962, Hon. 
Edwin E. Willis, presiding.) 

Mr. Willis. The subcommittee will please come to order. Counsel, 
you may proceed. 

Let the record show that three members of the subcommittee are 
present. 

You may proceed, Mr. Walsh. 

TESTIMONY OF MYRON EMANUEL SHARPE— Resumed 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Sharpe, starting with the publication For Peacejul 
Competition and Cooperation, would you kindly tell the committee in 
what manner and to what extent were you reimbursed by Soviet 
organizations or establishments for the publications prepared by 
your fu'm? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the grounds 
which I stated at the outset of the hearing this morning. 

Mr. Walsh. Do the records, which you have submitted in accord- 
ance with the subpena duces tecum or served on you and to which you 
responded today, reflect all payments received by you from Soviet 
organizations or establishments and persons other than Soviet 
organizations? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. The records which I turned over pursuant to the 
subpena duces tecum reflect all receipts of Crosscurrents Press to the 
best of my knowledge. 

Mr. Walsh. You have Us ted in that payments from the Soviet 
Embassy in Washington. My question is now: Do the records, which 
you produced this morning and pursuant to the subpena duces tecum, 
reflect payments to Crosscurrents Press for these publications other 
than payment from the Soviet Union or the Soviet Embassy in the 
United States? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. Do you mean by that question do those records reflect 
receipts from sources other than the payments from Soviet sources? 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1623 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, that is the question. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. They reflect all receipts as I previously testified, all 
receipts received by Crosscurrents Press, to the best of my knowledge 
and information. 

Mr. Walsh. Starting with the pubUcation For Peaceful Competition 
and Cooperation, have you ever caused to be mailed, or have you 
mailed, any of these publications which were paid for by an agency of 
the Soviet Government to any person or persons resident in the United 
States? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer this question on the grounds pre- 
viously stated. 

Mr. Walsh. Do you happen to have a permit from the Post Office 
for a bulk rate? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the previous 
grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Have you ever obtained or supplied any list to any 
Soviet organization, a list of names and addresses of residents in the 
United States? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Have you ever obtamed a list of libraries in the 
United States which you supplied to the Soviet Embassy in Wash- 
ington? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Again referring to the publication For Peaceful Compe- 
tition and Cooperation, have you received from any Soviet organization 
or Soviet establishment, names and addresses of residents of the United 
States which you have used to advertise literature or publications by 
Crosscurrent Press? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Would the same answer also be with reference to 
International Arts and Sciences Press? 

Mr. Sharpe. Yes; same answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Bookfield House, Incorporated? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Tradeworld, Incorporated? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same answer. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. The same answer meaning to decline to answer on 
the previously stated grounds? 

Mr. Sharpe. That is right. 

Mr. Walsh. Now, Mr. Sharpe, I have read to you this mornmg, 
some of the documents which were printed by Crosscurrents Press, 
and I specifically call your attention to Documents of the 22nd Congress 
of the CPSU Volume I. 

Are you familiar with that? 

Mr. Sharpe. I dechne to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. That same volume was repubfished and 25,000 copies 
were repubfished of the text — but the title and the format Khrushchev 
Reports to the 22nd Congress of the CPSU^sltq they one and the same 
book? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Is there any reason why you changed the format and 
title on the cover and reprinted the same document twice? 



1624 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the same grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. There were also printed by Crosscurrents Press, Doc- 
uments oj the 22nd Congress oj the CPSU Volume II. The format 
on that was changed and the same book was reissued under the title 
of Khrushchev on the Future. 

Is that a correct statement? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Did yon discuss with anyone the reasons why the 
format was changed in the two books I have just read to you although 
they are exactly the same in both instances? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline on the previous grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you ever discuss this chanse of format with your 
principal, the International Book Co. in Moscow? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same answer. I decline. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you have any correspondence vnih them or did 
they direct you to change the format of the books? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you ever have any conversation with representa- 
tives of the International Book Co. in this country with reference 
to the change in these books that I have just called to your attention? 

Mr. Sharpe. The same answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you ever have any conversation with any repre- 
sentative in the Soviet Embassy with reference to the changing of the 
format of these two books? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that. 

Mr. Walsh. Because, as you know, with the first two books you 
printed 25,000 each, and then you changed the fonnat and then you 
printed 25,000 additional copies of each book, and sold them to the 
Soviet Embassy. 

My question was directed as to the Soviet Embassy or any repre- 
sentative therein. 

Did anyone tell you to change the format and have it reprinted? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. For purposes of identification, may these two books 
be marked Sharpe Exhibits Nos. 39 and 40? 

Mr. Willis. It is so ordered. 

(Documents marked "Sharpe Exhibits Nos. 39 and 40" and re- 
tained in committee files.") 

Mr. Walsh. 1 have before me Sharpe Exhibit No. 39 and I call 
your attention to pages 30 and 31, the Report on the Program of the 
Communist Party of the Soviet Union, by N. S. Khrushchev. 

I read from page 30 that which is italicized : 

The new Program signifies a full realization in practice of the Party slogan, 
'^Everything for the sake of man, for the benefit of man." 

I ask you to look at that and tell us whether or not the italicized 
portion which I just read is correct? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Walsh. And on page 31 as long as you have the document 
there, it states, in italicized language : 

A document of true communist humanism; it is imhued with the ideas of peace and 
fraternity among nations. 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. In Exhibit No. 40, the title of which is Khrushchev on 

th4 Future, I again call your attention to paige dO and page 31 and 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1625 

that which I read to you from Exhibit No. 39 is exactly the same as 
appears in Exhibit No. 40, Khrushchev on the Future. I ask you to 
look at Exhibit No. 40 and tell me whether or not the italicized poition 
is exactly the same as that contained in Exhibit No. 39? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. This information that you received — ^you say in your 
registration statement that you receive and republish material from 
the Soviet Union— did you receive the translation or did you receive 
the contents of these two books, Exhibits 39 and 40, in the Russian 
language and have translations made by your office, Crosscurrents 
Press? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Where did you get the information, Mr. Sharpe, con- 
tained in these books? Where did Crosscurrents Press get that 
material? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you ever receive any plates from the International 
Book Company in Moscow with reference to these books, Exhibits 
39 and 40? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same answer. 

Mr. Walsh. On The Communist Party Program is Sharpe Exhibit 
No. 41. A comparison of this book has been made by the committee 
with Exhibits Nos. 39 and 40, just introduced in evidence. 

The actual title of this book is On the Communist Programme — Re- 
port on the Programme of the C.P.S.U. To the 22nd Congress of the 
Party. 

This is published by Foreign Languages Publishing House, Moscow. 
I call your attention to page 24 and page 25 and I ask you to note 
where I have marked with pencil which states: 

The new Programme signifies a full realisation in practice of the Party slogan, 
"Everything for the sake of man, for the benefit of man." 

Is that italicized in the same manner as that which I read to you 
from pages 30 of Sharpe Exhibits Nos. 39 and 40? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above stated grounds. 

(Document marked "Sharpe Exhibit No. 41" and retained in com- 
mittee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. You do note that this book which is exactly the same 
as Exhibits Nos. 39 and 40 was published by Foreign Languages 
Publishing House in Moscow? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Now, the list of books which I read to you this morn- 
ing, of which there were 33, how do you select these books or are you 
directed as to which books to publish? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. How do you know how many copies that the Soviet 
Embassy will buy of these particular books before you print them so 
that your budget will be taken care of in the printing of these books. 

Mr. Sharpe. Same answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Becaase I have noted and I again call to your atten- 
tion that 25,000 copies were printed by you and bought by the Soviet 
Embassy of Exhibit No. 39. 

And of Exhibit No. 40, 25,000 were printed by you and 25,000 were 
purchased by the Soviet Embassy. 



1626 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Now, does the Soviet Embassy tell you how many books it will 
pmxhase before you start printing? 

Mr. Sharps. I decline to answer on the same grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. According to the compilation made by the committee 
staff, we find that Crosscurrents Press published 33 pamphlets or 
booldets and approximately 718,300 copies were dehvered to the 
Soviet Embassy. 

Is that factual? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. But you do admit that you received approximately 
$240,000 from the Soviet Embassy, according to the documents you 
produced this morning pursuant to a subpena duces tecum, in your 
capacity as president of Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that on the previously stated 
grounds. 

The records speak for themselves and the records are a complete 
reflection of the receipts of Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated ; to the 
best of my knowledge. 

Mr. Walsh. Exhibit No. 23, already in evidence, is a dissemination 
report which is entitled A Speech by Nikita S. Khrushchev at the Fifteenth 
Session of the UN General Assembly. You reported that 24,000 
copies went to the Soviet Embassy in Washington. 

Do 3'ou know a man by the name of Hyman Lumer, educational 
director of the Communist Party of the United States? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that on the previously stated 
grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you, as president of Crosscurrents Press, In- 
corporated, deliver or cause to be delivered to Hyman Lumer, 500 
copies of this booklet I have just named? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. You will note that on this dissemination report, 
Exhibit No. 23, you have listed that you furnished 500 copies to 
Mr. Hyman Lumer, 23 West 26th Street, New York. 

I show you that to refresh your recollection, if possible. 

Is that a fact that you as president of the Crosscurrents Press, 
Incorporated, filed this dissemination report on November 7, 1960, 
with the Department of Justice pursuant to your duty under the law 
as an agent of a foreign government? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Will you tell us whether or not Crosscurrents Press 
was reimbursed for the 500 copies that you say or the Crosscurrents 
Press says were delivered to Hyman Lumer? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same answer as before. 

Mr. Walsh. Were you reimbursed by Hyman Lumer? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline on the same grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. In the records which you furnished us today, is there 
anything in those records which would show that you received any 
money from Hyman Lumer for these 500 copies? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the same grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Would your records show that you received any money 
from the Communist Party of the United States? 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1627 

Mr. Sharpe. Same answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Would your records show that you received reim- 
bursement for these 500 copies from any Soviet organization? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the same grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. If that amount of money was not in the records you 
gave today, would you state that you were not reimbursed for the 500 
copies which you delivered to Hyman Lumer? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. 1 decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. In 1960, did you know Anton Krchmarek to be 
chairman of the Ohio District of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the grounds previously stated. 

Mr. Walsh. Is it a fact that Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated, 
sent to Anton Krchmarek 100 copies of the Speech by Nikita S. 
Khrushchev at the Fifteenth Session of the UN General Assembly? 

Mr Sharpe. Same answer as before. 

Mr. Walsh. For the purpose of refreshing your recollection, I call 
your attention to the fourth item from the bottom, in which it states 
100 copies. 

Does that refresh your recollection? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Was Crosscurrents Press reimbursed by Anton 
Krchmarek? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Or by the Communist Party of Ohio? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Were you paid for those 100 books? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same answer as before. 

Mr. Walsh. George A. Meyers is the chairman of the Comnmnist 
Party of Maryland. 

Do you Imow that? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you cause 50 copies of this document to be sent 
to George Meyers, chairman of the Maryland District of the Com- 
munist Party? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. I wish to correct the statement I made. Instead of 
50 I should have said 40; but if I said 40, would that change any of 
the answers that you previously made? 

Mr. Sharpe. I think not. 

Mr. Walsh. I show you this for the purpose of refreshing 3'our 
recollection. 

In the records, which you produced today pursuant to the subpena, 
which I will show you later, are there any notations for receipts of 
money from George Meyers? 

(Witness conferred wdth counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. How about any reimbursement for these 40 copies by 
the Communist Party of Maryland? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same reply. 

Mr. Walsh. Would you state that you were not reimbursed for 
these 40 copies? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above grounds. 



1628 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Walsh. Are you familiar with the New Era Book Agency? 

Mr. Sharpe. I dechne to answer on the original grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you Imow that the New Era Book Agency was 
the distributor for New Century Publishers in New York which 
publishes Political Affairs, Mainstream, and other Communist pub- 
lications? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Do you know Joseph Felshin, president of New Cen- 
tury Publishers? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Do you know whether or not New Era Book Agency 
has any official connection with the Communist Party of the United 
States? 

Mr. Sharpe. Previously strted grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Now, in a dissemination re^ ort filed by you, Exhibit 
No. 37, did you cause the 10,000 cories of this booklet, nrmely, 
Program of the Communist Party of tlie Soviet Union, to be delivered 
to New Era Book Agency between January and March of 1962? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to rnswer that question on the originclh* 
stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Were you reimbursed for these copies by New Era 
Book Agency? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same answer. 

Mr. Walsh. If you did receive a payment, would the rayment be 
reflected in that which you submitted in response to the subpena 
which had been served uron you on April 5? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Or by New Century Publishers? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same answer. 

Mr. W^ALSH. Or by the Communist Prrty of the United States? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you also between January and March of 1962 
cause to be delivered 10,000 copies of the Program of the Communist 
Party of the Soviet Union to Four Continent Book Corporation in 
New York City? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Are you familiar with any of the members who com- 
pose the corporation known as Four Continent Book Corporation? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. They are in the same building as you are, aren't they? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you ever have any conversation with any officer 
of Four Continent Book Corporation with reference to the dis- 
semination or the distribution of these 10,000 copies? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. In your registration statement you claim to possess a 
verbal contract with the International Book Company of Moscow, 
giving you the exclusive rights not only to publish, but to distribute 
books and pamphlets published by the International Book Com- 
pany. 

You have so stated in your registration statement, have you not? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh, I now show you a photostat of an amended state- 
ment to your registration statement No. 1308, filed February 10, 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1629 

1960 — to refresh your recollection — and ask you whether or not the 
statement there is true and correct. 

For the purpose of the record, I would like to read it. This is 
Sharpe Exhibit No. 42. 

There is no written agreement between the registrant and its "foreign principal." 
In substance, the agreement between the parties gives the registrant the exclu- 
sive United States rights to publish and distribute books and pamphlets published 
by the "principal." The registrant distributes and sells these books and pam- 
phlets in the United States for its own account, and not as agent for the "principal." 
The "principal" will, on occasion, order pamphlets and/or books from the regis- 
trant on a conventional vendor-vendee basis. 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above stated grounds. 

(Document marked "Sharpe Exhibit No. 42" and retained in 
committee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. In Exhibit No. 42, which I just read to you, you state 
that ,you have exclusive rights to the publishing of these books from 
the International Book Company of Moscow. 

According to our investigation, the Four Continent Book Corpora- 
tion also has a contract with the International Book Company of 
Moscow to distribute the books and pamphlets published. 

Do you know of any such arrangement? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you ever discuss this with any member or officer 
of Four Continent Book Corporation? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you ever discuss it with the International Book 
Company of Moscow? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Do they have a representative in this country? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Is there any financial relationship between Cross- 
currents Press, Incorporated, and Four Continent Book Corporation? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Do you have any financial interest in Four Con- 
tinent Book Corporation? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Right in the beginning of the session this morning 
we were talking about Crossworld Press, Incorporated, which you 
said was a typographical error; is that correct? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. Initially, that was my impression, but my further 
recollection was — ^I had a further recollection which I stated at the time 
the question came up. 

Mr. Walsh. Just for your information, the Cross World Books and 
Periodicals of Chicago has a contract with the International Book 
Company in Moscow and I was asking you a question whether or not 
you have^any financial interest in Cross World Books and Periodicals, 
Incorporated, of Chicago? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the above 
grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Would it be factual to state that after you were going 
to file for incorporation as Crossworld Press, Incorporated, that you 
were advised that there was already in existence the Cross World 
Books and Periodicals of Chicago? 

90450—62 — pt. 1 4 



1630 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you know that Cross World Books and Periodicals 
of Chicago were registered as foreign agents? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same reply. 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Sharpe, from our investigation and after studying 
your booklets it was determined that in London, England, there is a 
company known as Soviet Booldets. 

Several publications selected by Crosscurrents Press for distri- 
bution in English in the United States have been found to be identical 
with the books printed in English by Soviet Booklets for dissemina- 
tion in London. 

An illustration is Crosscurrents' reproduction of a booklet entitled 
Speech by Nikita S. Khrushchev at the Third Congress oj the Rumanian 
Workers^ Party and the booklet by the London company entitled 
Nikita S. Khrushchov Speech at the Third Congress of the Rumanian 
Workers' Party. Can you explain to the committee now how Cross- 
currents Press, Inc., happened to select for publication a document 
which was also published in London and which the committee under- 
stands was also published in English in the Soviet Union. 

Mr. Chairman, I show vou this, and ask that it be marked Sharpe 
Exhibit No. 43? 

Mr. Willis. It will be so marked. 

(Document marked "Sharpe Exhibit No. 43" and retained in com- 
mittee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. Would you look at that to refresh your recollection? 

Now wiU you look at Sharpe Exhibit No. 44 which I offer in evidence 
and tell me whether or not Crosscurrents printed that pamphlet? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the originally stated grounds. 

(Document marked "Sharpe Exhibit No. 44" and retained in 
committee file.) 

Mr. Walsh. Having seen both Sharpe Exhibits 43 and 44, can 
you tell the committee whether or not they are exactly the same? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline on the originally stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Have you any correspondence or any connection with 
Soviet Booklets, London, England? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same answer as before. 

Mr. Walsh. Do you have any financial interest in them? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same reply. 

Mr. Walsh. Do you correspond with them? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same reply. 

Mr. Walsh. Did they send to you the English context of the booklet 
which Crosscurrents printed, Sharpe Exhibit No. 44? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same reply. 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Sharpe, I wUl hand to you copies of certain pages 
of the World Marxist Revievj issue of February 1962, published in 
Canada by Progress Books. 

This publication is according to its masthead a "Theoretical and 
Information Journal of Commmiist and Workers' Parties." 

The issue of February 1962 contains a story, "Word of the Future," 
and relates itself to the text of the program and other documents of 
the 22nd Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union which 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1631 

the article claims to have been published in "nearly every country 
of the world." 

After setting forth the identity of the Commimist publishing houses 
which are publishing these documents in English and other languages, 
there is printed this sentence: 

In the United States the Congress documents were published in two volumes 
by Crosscurrents Press. 

Now I ask you to examine this document and the story to which 
I have referred and tell the committee whether you or Crosscurrents 
Press had been in contact with any of the establishments in connec- 
tion with the publication of the program, other documents of the 
22nd Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, and 
any other booklets contemplated to be published by Crosscurrents 
Press? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that on the originally stated 
gromids. 

Mr. Walsh. Do you or does Crosscurrents Press have a branch or 
an affiliate in Moscow? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline on the original grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Do you have any representatives of Crosscurrents 
Press, Incorporated, in any other location outside the continental 
limits of the United States? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Do you know what disposition was made of these 
booldets which we discussed this morning and which were delivered 
to the Soviet Embassy in Washington? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the original grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. There was recently a Soviet exhibition at Wheaton 
Plaza Shopping Center in Maryland which was produced under the 
Cultm-al Exchange Program between the United States and U.S.S.R. 

As part of the exhibit there were distributed booklets printed by 
Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated. 

Did you or any representative of Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated, 
distribute these booklets at the Wheaton Plaza Shopping Center 
exhibition? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline on the original grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Did jou know that booldets printed by Crosscurrents 
Press, Incorporated, were distributed at the Wheaton Plaza Shopping 
Center exhibition? 

As you know, Mr. Sharpe, many documents printed by the Cross- 
currents Press are mailed unsolicited to individuals, organizations, 
and societies in the United States and under the bulk mail permit 
your publications have been sent to libraries, private and public, 
throughout the United States, and to the working press in the Wash- 
ington metropolitan area. 

Does Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated, play any role in the prep- 
aration of these documents for dissemination by the press department 
of the Soviet Embassy in Washington, D.C.? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the original grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Crosscurrents Press printed a booklet entitled 2'he 
Soviet Stand on Germany and also reprinted in that document A 



1632 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Letter to the American People from Nikita S. Khrushchev in which 
he states: 

I consider it a sensible and timely show of initiative on the part of Crosscurrents 
Press to provide American readers with an opportunity to get acquainted with 
the speeches and documents stating the position of the Soviet Government in 
regard to the German problem, particularly concerning the question of concluding 
a peace treaty with Germany. 

I show you this book and ask you whether or not what I have read 
is correct. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Was that "letter" with reference to the Crosscurrents 
Press, solicited by you as president of Crosscurrents Press through 
the Soviet Embassy in Washington? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Had you any correspondence with Khrushchev with 
reference to the letter which appears in The Soviet Stand on Germany? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same reply. 

Mr. Walsh. Have you any contact with anybody connected with 
the Soviet Union wherein you were able to receive this letter, which 
I just read to you, from Nikita Khi-ushchev? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the original grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Would you tell the committee how you got the other 
documents which are contained in The Soviet Stand on Germany? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same reply. 

Mr. Walsh. May I have this marked as Sharpe Exhibit No. 45? 

Mr. Willis. It will be so marked. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you ever submit the documents in Exhibit No. 45 
to the State Department? 

Mr. Sharpe. I dechne to answer on the original grounds. 

(Document marked "Sharpe Exhibit No. 45" and retained in 
committee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. The purpose for which I asked that question was so 
that you could tell us if you had. Would it be for the purpose of 
finding out whether or not the foreign policy of this Government, 
with reference to Germany, was the same as the documents which 
you printed, as shown in Exhibit No. 45, and distributed it to the 
American people? 

Mr. Sharpe. I am sorry but I do not understand your question. 

Mr. Walsh. I will withdraw the question. 

Did you submit these documents which you received and printed 
(Exhibit No. 45) to the State Department so that it could inform you 
whether or not the statements contained in these documents were 
the same as the policy of the United States as then presented by the 
State Department? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the original grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. May we have a short recess? 

Mr. Willis. The committee will stand in recess for a few minutes. 

(Short recess taken.) 

Mr. Willis. The subcommittee will come to order. 

You may proceed, Mr. Walsh. 

Mr. Walsh. I hand you a copy of a check dated December 29, 
1961, in the amount of $25,000 and a check dated March 22, 1962, 
in the amount of $9,000. 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1633 

Both checks are payable to Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated, and 
are drawn on the account of the U.S.S.R. Magazine. I ask you to 
look at them. These checks, of course, were reproduced and given 
to us pursuant to a subpena served on the respective banks. 

May I mark these two checks Sharpe Exhibit No. 46? 

Mr. Willis. It is so ordered. 

Mr. Walsh. Do these checks indicate that your foreign principal 
is the U.S.S.R. Magazine? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the original grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Would you give the committee an explanation with 
respect to these checks and what they were for? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the same grounds. 

(Documents marked "Sharpe Exhibit No. 46" and retained in com- 
mittee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Sharpe, in August of 1959, did you under the 
trade name of International Arts and Sciences Press begin publishing 
a periodical known as Soviet Highlights? 

Mr. Sharpe. I dechne on the original grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. I show you Exhibit No. 47, Soviet Highlights, Volume 
I, No. 1. I ask you to look at that and teU us whether or not it was 
published by International Acts and Sciences Press of which you 
are the president? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decHne to answer on the original grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Volume I, No. 1, describes the objectives of Soviet 
Highlights, and announces that it \vill "make available English trans- 
lations of important articles and speeches appearing in Soviet publi- 
cations in order to expand the information that we have available 
about the Soviet Union." 

Were the translations which appear in this and in subsequent issues 
translated by the staff of International Arts and Sciences Press? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the original grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Or were they submitted to you in English and you 
just reprinted them? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same reply. 

Mr. Walsh. I show you now Soviet Highlights, Volume II, No. 7, 
July 1960, and call your attention to the fact that the publisher of this 
issue is listed as Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated. 

I call your attention to the fact that the label required of registrants 
under the Foreign Agents Registration Act also appears. 

Will you note that? 

Will you tell the committee who made the determination of dropping 
International Arts and Sciences Press as the publisher of the Soviet 
Highlights and substituting thereof Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated, 
and the inclusion of the Foreign Agents Registration statement? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the previously stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Is it true that this change was made because of the 
result of an inquiry by the Department of Justice? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same reply. 

Mr. Walsh. May these be marked Sharpe Exhibits Nos. 47 and 
48,— Volume I, No. 1 as Exhibit 47 and Volume II, No. 7, as Exhibit 48? 

Mr. Willis. Let the documents be so marked. 

(Documents marked "Sharpe Exhibits Nos. 47 and 48" and retained 
in committee files.) 



1634 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Walsh. From our investigation, Mr. Sharpe, it appears that 
the pubUcation of the Soviet Highlights discontinued with the July 
issue which I just showed you and was reissued in August of 1960 under 
the title The Soviet Review. 

The first copy of The Soviet Beview contains a letter from the pub- 
lishers. The first paragraph reads as follows: 

After a year of publishing Soviet Highlights and after many discussions with 
the readers, the editors have decided to make some important changes which we 
believe will produce a publication of significantly increased value. 

Does that paragi'aph which I have just read to 3-ou set forth fuUy 
the reasons for issuing the Soviet Highlights under its new title The 
Soviet Review? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the original grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Is it a fact that the publication was renamed The 
Soviet Review in order to di'op the Foreign Agents Registration label? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same reply. 

Mr. Walsh. May this be marked Sharpe Exhibit No. 49? 

Mr. Willis. The document wUl be so identified. 

(Document marked ''Sharpe Exhibit No. 49" and retained in com- 
mittee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. It is true, is it not, that the Embassy of theU.S.S.R. in 
Washington, D.C., on occasion through its press department gives out 
releases? I hand you one which is marked Sharpe Exhibit No. 50, 
and ask you to look at it. 

In that press release, dated September 6, 1961, which you have 
just looked at, there is this sentence: 

In connection with the great interest the American public has shown in the 
Soviet Union's position on the German question, the American publishing house 
Crosscurrents Press has issued in a mass edition a collection of documents com- 
piled by the Novosti Press Agency (APN). 

Did Crosscurrents Press request the issuance of this press release 
by the Soviet Embassy? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the originally stated grounds. 

(Document marked "Sharpe Exhibit No. 50" and retained in com- 
mittee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. Can you elaborate and inform the committee in any 
manner whatsoever what caused the Soviet Embassy to issue this 
release? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same reply. 

Mr. Walsh. Had you been in communication with them in order 
to further the sale of this pamphlet with reference to the Soviet 
Union's position on Germany? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same reply. 

Mr. Walsh. Have any of the publications of Soviet Highlights ever 
been purchased by Soviet organizations or establishments and if so, 
what distribution was made of such material by the people who pur- 
chased the Soviet Highlights? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that on the previously stated 
grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. I show you a document, a dissemination report, which 
you also submitted under your registration No. 1308 for Soviet High- 
lights, April 1960. 

In that I note that 525 copies were sent to the Soviet Embassy in 
Washington, D.C. 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1635 

Is that a correct statement? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the above grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. I also note that 50 copies were sent to the Soviet 
Embassy in Ottawa, Canada. Is that a factual statement and is 
that true? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same reply. 

Mr. Walsh. Did copies also go to the Soviet Mission to tlie United 
Nations in New York City? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same reply. 

Mr. Walsh. Were copies also sent to Soviet Booklets in London, 
England? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same reply. 

Mr, Walsh. Was the Four Continent Bookstore in New York also 
a subscriber to Soviet Highlights^ 

Mr. Sharpe. Same reply. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you also send copies to the International Book- 
store, Inc., in San Francisco? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same reply. 

Mr. Walsh. And to the Progressive Book Shop, Los Angeles? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same answer. 

Mr. Walsh. And the Jefferson Book Shop in New York City? 

Mr. Sharpe. Same answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Does the Soviet Embassy in the U.S., and the Soviet 
Embassy in Ottawa, Canada, also subscribe to The Soviet Reviewl 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the original grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Sharpe, are you presently a member of the 
Communist Party? 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer on the original grounds. 

Mr. Willis. I would like to supplement the statement I made at 
the opening of this hearing. 

I pointed out earlier that it seemed possible to me, to say the least, 
that the registration by this individual, Mr. Myron E. Sharpe, as 
president of Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated, was in technical com- 
pliance with the Foreign Agents Registration Act, but at the same 
tune operating under a loophole which cloaks a domestic corporation 
as it evades the law. 

I think from the documentary evidence offered, without, of course, 
the aid of the negative answers of the witness, it appears quite clear 
to me, anyway, that Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated, is operating 
in a way to be an agent of a foreign power. 

In fact, the supplemental registration statement No. 1308 of Cross- 
currents Press, Incorporated, designates as its ''Foreign principal" a 
Russian name which translated, I imderstand, means International 
Book Company. 

The Internal Security Act of 1950, which is another law separate 
from the Foreign Agents Registration Act, provides that a Communist- 
dominated organization as defined in that statute and a Communist- 
front organization as defined in that statute must register, and then 
after a certain period of time the officers and members of such orga- 
nizations must register aU under the sanctions and penalties of the 
Internal Security Act of 1950. 

I suggest that we look into the necessity for an amendment of the 
Foreign Agents Registration Act. 



1636 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

In my opening statement this morning, I said that one of the 
legislative purposes of this hearing was, 

To strengthen the provisions of Section 10 of the Internal Security Act of 
1950 so as to broaden the application of such section to cover persons, firms, 
associations, and corporations engaged in the printing, publishing, and dissemina- 
tion of Soviet propaganda. 

In the registration statement, it is said that the duties of the 
domestic agent of the foreign principal: Registrant is engaged, pur- 
suant to exclusive rights obtained by it, in the translation, publication, 
and distribution of articles, pamphlets, and periodicals published 
originally in the Soviet Union. 

Now, certainly if Communist-dominated organizations and Com- 
munist-front organizations as defined in the Internal Security Act of 
1950 are required to register under the pains and penalties of that 
law, then it seems to me, Mr. Counsel, you were so right in announcing 
that one of the purposes of this hearing is to consider amending the 
law to make it apply to an outfit of this kind. 

May I suggest that the staff discuss this wdth the Department of 
Justice and see first whether there is a violation, No. 1, of the Foreign 
Agents Registration Act; No. 2, a possible violation of the Internal 
Security Act, and, if not, let us get going with amending that statute. 

You may proceed, Mr. Walsh. 

Mr. Walsh. Pm'suant to the subpena under which you appeared 
here as president of Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated, the subpena 
read, 

All books of accounts and/or records reflecting all receipts of money by the 
Crosscurrents Press. 

Now that which you have delivered to the committee of the Cross- 
currents Press, Incorporated, is a report of money received from the 
Embassy of the U.S.S.R., Washington, D.C. 

Also, you delivered to the committee what appears to be customers' 
receipts, deposited in the bank account of Crosscurrents Press, 
Incorporated. 

According to the subpena, we asked you for all books of accounts. 
These are not books of accounts, which shows the individual who 
paid the money to the Crosscurrents Press. 

In other words, the committee has taken the position that you 
have not complied with the subpena. Do you have any reason or 
explanation why you have not produced the books and records reflect- 
ing all receipts? 

Mr. Sharpe. According to my understanding of the subpena to me 
as president of Crosscurrents Press, I was asked to supply records 
reflecting all receipts of Crosscurrents Press. 

These records, to the best of my knowledge, do, in fact, contain 
and reflect all receipts. They are a total reflection of receipts. 
There are no other receipts. 

Mr. Walsh. How about all your books of accounts reflecting 
receipts? 

Mr. Sharpe. There are no records which reflect any further or 
additional receipts than those which you have in your possession. 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Chairman, may we mark this Sharpe Exhibit 
No. 51. 

Mr. Willis. So ordered. 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1637 

Mr. Walsh. You list here reports of money received from the 
Embassy of the U.S.S.R. in Washington, D.C. From what books of 
account did you compile these figures? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. Crosscurrents Press has a cashbook and a general 
ledger which contains exactly the same information about receipts 
as that submitted. It contains no additional information about 
receipts. 

(Documents marked "Sharpe Exhibit No. 51" and retained in 
committee file.) 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Chairman, so that there will be no question or 
reference to the other cashbooks and ledgers that he has in his office, 
would you be kind enough to issue to him a subpena for the production 
of aU books of accounts that would reflect that which the committee 
in the first instance requested, namely, all books of accounts which 
show the receipts not only from the Soviet Embassy but all other 
individuals some of whom we have mentioned here today? 

Mr. Willis. Yes, I have discussed this with the members of the 
subcommittee and we all agree on that com-se of action. Perhaps 
there could have been room for misconstruction or misunderstanding 
of the subpena. 

In order that there may be no doubt about it, I have just issued, by 
direction of the subcommittee, two more subpenas which I now direct 
be served on Mr. Sharpe. 

(Subpenas handed to witness by staff investigator Donald T. 
AppeU.) 

Mr. Walsh. I have no other questions of this witness. 

Mr. Willis. I think the subpenas, on their face, show that they 
are returnable on the 17th, so there is ample time for consultation 
with counsel. 

Mr. Walsh. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mrs. PiEL. If, for any reason, this date is not agreeable to my 
calendar, might I be in touch with the committee? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes. 

Mr. Willis. The subcommittee wiU recess until 10:30 tomorrow 
morning. 

(Whereupon, at 4 p.m., Wednesday, May 9, 1962, the subcommittee 
recessed, to reconvene at 10:30 a.m., Thursday, May 10, 1962.) 



COMMUNIST OUTLETS FOR THE DISTRIBUTION OF 
SOVIET PROPAGANDA IN THE UNITED STATES 

PART 1 



THURSDAY, MAY 10, 1962 

United States House of Representatives, 

Subcommittee of the 
Committee on Un-American Activities, 

Washington, D. C. 
public hearings 

The subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities 
met, pursuant to recess, at 10:30 a.m., in room 445-A, Old House 
Office Building, Washington, D.C., Hon. Edwin E. Willis (chairman 
of the subcommittee) presiding. 

Subcommittee members: Representatives Edwin E. Willis, of 
Louisiana, chairman; Wilham M. Tuck, of Virginia; and August E. 
Johansen, of Michigan. 

Committee member also present: Representative Henry C. Scliade- 
berg, of Wisconsin. 

Staff members present: John C. Walsh, cocounsel, and Donald T. 
Appell, investigator. 

Mr. Willis. The subcommittee will please come to order. 

Our first witness this morning is Mrs. Maude Q. Kelsey. 

Mrs. Kelsey, do you solemnly swear the testimony you are about to 
give will be the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth, so 
help you God? 

Mrs. Kelsey. So help me God, I do declare. 

TESTIMONY OF MAUDE QUERY KELSEY 

Mr. Walsh. Will you give the committee your full name? 

Mrs. Kelsey. Mrs. Maude Query Kelsey. 

Mr. Walsh. \'\Tiere are you from? 

Mrs. Kelsey. I am now from Shelbj^, N.C. 

Mr. Walsh. Would you be kind enough to give to tlie committee a 
resume of your educational background? 

Mrs. Kelsey. I am a graduate of Women's College of Greensboro, 
of the University of North Carohna, Chapel Hill, and of Columbia 
University, New York City. 

Mr. Walsh. Wliat degrees do you hold? 

Mrs. Kelsey. An A.B. in English, an M.A. in English, and a 
Masters Degree in Library Science. 

Mr. Walsh. Wliat is your occupation? 

Mrs. Kelsey. I am a librarian. 

Mr. Walsh. How long have you been a librarian? 

1639 



1640 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mrs, Kelsey. Thirty years. 

Mr. Walsh. Have most of your duties as librarian been in North 
Carohna? 

Mrs. Kelsey. No; for 15 years I was in South Carohna. My first 
job was in Reynolds High School, Winston-Salem, N.C. ; next in 
Charlotte Public Library in Charlotte, N.C; then in Lancaster 
County for 10 years, and for 5 years Director of the Chester County 
Library in Chester, S.C. 

Since 1952, head librarian, or director, of the Shelby Public Library, 
Shelby, N.C, which is a countywide hbrary. 

Mr. Walsh. You are appearing here today not as a representative 
of any librarian group? 

Mrs. Kelsey. I am not. 

Mr. Walsh. Will you make a statement to that effect, please? 

Mrs. Kelsey. I belong to the North Carolina Library Association, 
the Southeastern Library Association, the American Library Associa- 
tion, and am a bona fide member and in good standing with each 
association. 

I do not represent them. I do not speak for them. I speak for 
myself alone as a librarian of Shelby Public Library in Cleveland 
County, and as a citizen. 

Mr. Walsh. During the 30 years that you have been librarian, you 
have studied many topics; is that correct? 

Mrs. Kelsey. That is correct. 

Mr. Walsh. Among those topics have been Marxism-Leninism, 
or communism and its effect in contradistinction to the principles of 
our Government? 

Mrs. Kelsey. That is correct. 

Mr. Walsh. Would you detail, to a certain degree, for the com- 
mittee your studies with Marxism-Leninism and communism, gen- 
erally? 

Mrs. Kelsey. I had some of it during my student days at the 
University of North Carolina and then I was connected with Great 
Books Program and they would go, to a certain extent, into the study 
of Marxism-Leninism. 

There was a group of us interested and we could see the thread 
running on right down to present-day communism and we went into 
it quite a bit and had discussion groups. 

In fact, I have led some of those discussion groups. 

Mr. Walsh. What discussion groups did you lead? 

Mrs. Kelsey. Ones on communism. 

Mr. Walsh. Where? 

Mrs. Kelsey. In South Carolina and in North Carolina, too. 

Mr. Walsh. In all of the various libraries where you participated 
as a librarian? 

Mrs. Kelsey. Yes; and before club groups, too. 

Mr. Walsh. You are familiar with the Aesopian language as used 
by the Communist writers, which means one thing to the Communist 
and something entirely different to those who have not studied 
Marxism-Leninism? 

Mrs. Kelsey. Yes; and this has me deeply concerned. 

I think perhaps there are some of our high school teachers who 
might think that some of this material we are going into in a few 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION" OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1641 

moments might be helpful to them as horrible examples, shall we 
say, but as I see it, that is an unwholesome and negative way of 
teaching. 

I sit here before you, facing the U.S. flag, and make this statement: 
When the day comes tluit I have to reach down into a dark cupboard 
and pull out material that will help a high school teacher teach our 
boys and girls of the devious methods of communism, then that is 
the day I am in the wi'ong profession. 

This is not the material to give to our high school teachers. 

Mr. Walsh. We will come to that in a few moments. 

Mrs. Kelsey. I would like to come back to that later. 

Mr. Walsh. In your opinion, what is the main function or purpose 
of a public library? 

Mrs. Kelsey. A public library is a center of information. I would 
like to repeat that, a public library is a center of information. 

It is not a propaganda center. There is a vast difference. 

Mr. Walsh. You did receive mail in which there were enclosed 
three books: Program of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union; 
Khrushchev Reports to the 22nd Congress of the CPSU, Volume I; 
and Khrushchev On the Future, Volume II; is that correct? 

Mrs. Kelsey. That is correct. 

Mr. Walsh. May I see the envelope in which you received that? 

May I mark this as Kelsey Exhibit No. 1 for reference purposes? 

Mr. Willis. You may. 

(Document marked "Kelsey Exhibit No. 1" and retained in com- 
mittee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. Would you read how it is addressed and from whom it 
has been sent? 

Mrs. Kelsey. It is addressed to the Shelby Public Library, 302 
So. Washington St., Shelby, N.C. That is our correct address. 

Up in the left hand corner it says, "Press Department, Embassy of 
the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, Washington 9, D.C." 

Mr. Walsh. Will you also read the bulk rate? 

Mrs. Kelsey. "POSTMASTER: This parcel may be opened for 
Postal Inspection, if necessary. Return Postage Guaranteed, bulk 
RATE U.S. POSTAGE PAID, Washington, D.C, Permit No. 41462." 

Mr. Walsh. Was this the first material you ever received from the 
Soviet Embassy? 

Mrs. Kelsey. This is the first material we have received direct 
from the Soviet Embassy. 

May I elaborate a moment? I would be naive, indeed, if I said I 
never saw Red propaganda. I have seen the leaflets they send out 
to the press but I have never before seen anything quite like this. 

Mr. Walsh. Is there a covering letter? 

Mrs. Kelsey. No explanation whatsoever. 

Mr. Walsh. From your experience as a librarian in your studies of 
Marxism-Leninism, have you read these three books? 

Mrs. Kelsey. Yes, I have. 

Mr. Walsh. Have you studied them? 

Mrs. Kelsey. I have. 

Mr. Walsh. Have you excerpted from them certain passages that 
you will speak about later? 

Mrs. Kelsey. Yes, I have. 



1642 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Walsh. After reading these thi'ee books we have mentioned, 
have you come to an opinion as to the detrimental effect the con- 
tents may have on the youth of this country and adult groups? 

Mrs. Kelsey. Yes, I have. 

Mr. Walsh. Would you elaborate on that, Mrs. Kelsey, please? 

Mrs. Kelsey. In working with the individual and with groups 
over a period of 30 years as a librarian, there are three distinct groups, 
I think, this might harm; and perhaps some teachers. 

The first group are our 3'oung people, immature in j^ears, and in 
emotional and mental development. A young person is looking 
to the librarian to help guide him in his reading habits. If he is 
exposed to this sort of stuff, and I wiU call it stuff — he might be 
easU}^ swayed by that. 

In this age group our youngsters are of two types that I would want 
you to consider — the boy or girl who will pass through and over this 
stage and gain his sea legs later and become mature ; and the boy or 
girl w^ho wUl always be swayed by this pie-in-the-sky sort of business 
and remain mixed up all of his life. 

To both of these groups, the one that finally matures and the one 
who never matures, I, as a librarian, have a moral responsibihty. 

The one who does overcome it, overcomes it at great cost and he 
can expect to have scars the rest of his life. 

In addition to that, there will always be that inner humiliation 
that at one time he was a gullible goat. There will always be a 
strike against him. 

Mr. Walsh. Before you come to the second category, have you 
seen — from your experience of 30 years — the scars that they leave 
on children? 

Mrs. Kelsey. Yes, I have. 

In the second category of people to whom this Communist propa- 
ganda can be poison, and I use the word "poison" with quotation 
marks, we fuid that person already grown as far as birthdays are con- 
cerned but who never actually reaches emotional and mental maturity. 

Among that group is the patient who keeps the psychiatrist's office 
full, that person we all know who bounces from one church to another 
hunting the great god ''security," and deeming that an end in itself. 

This group is fine fodder for the Communist machine. This group, 
I am sorry to say, is increasing. 

The third category is comprised of the well-known crackpots. 
Like the poor, we have them with us always. Somehow or other they 
never seem to have to work 8 hours a day for a living. I wish I had 
their recipe. 

Any librarian can teU you they spend most of their wakeful hours in 
or around a public library. They are just waiting for an opportunity 
to mount their soapbox. This communism misstatement of facts 
and truth is just the spark to set them off. 

The director of a public library has a great responsibility to each 
individual in this group. That responsibility very definitely includes 
keeping out of their hands this kind of propaganda. 

There is no need to leave a vacuum when you remove this. I have 
something 1 would like very much to recommend and I would like to 
recommend it to any liigh school teacher who thinks that making 
these books available is wonderful. 

This is what I would like to recommend. Let us depend for our 
knowledge of communism, as I do in my library with literature on 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1643 

open shelves, including all material that is coming out from our Gov- 
ernment, Congress, State Department, et cetera. I am going to 
mention a few: 

a. Facts on Communism, Volumes 1 and 2. These are put out bj'' 
the Committee on Un-American iVctivities, Government Printing 
Office Publication. 

6. Guide to Subversive Organizations and Publications. That is also 
put out by this committee. 

c. Soviet World Outlook, A Handbook of Communist Statements, 
(1950). This is put out b}^ the Bureau of Intelligence and Research, 
U.S. Department of State, available to anyone, available to all libraries 
and I keep it out on open shelves. 

I maintain no dark cupboard in my library. 

These documents state the plain truth. 

Parenthetically, let me sa}' I am not in the book-selling l)usiness. 
I am in the free book-lending business. 

May I mention some books here, too? 

There is one I mention — ^and when I do I almost feel like standing 
up — and that is J. Edgar Hoover's Masters of Deceit. That is a 
classic in this field. The high school teacher who wants to show the 
devious methods of communism in our country need only to have 
that book. 

Another one is Werner Keller's, a rather new book, East Minus 
West=Zero; Russia's Debt to the Western World, 862-1962. It gives 
complete background material and present-day information. 

Another is Joseph Novak's No Third Path. He is a native of a 
satellite country, studied and traveled extensively in Russia, and 
Novak is a pseudonym. He did not use his real name. 

Frederick Charles Schwarz's You Can Trust The Communists . . . 
[To Do Exactly As they Say]. 

Another one is Willard Cleon Skousen's The Naked Communist — a 
complete title because he strips him right down to the bone. 

There are other volumes that are chock full of authentic information 
on what the Communists are doing — trying, and hoping, and planning 
to do. 

I simply mention these as complete examples. 

Mr. Walsh. As you know, the Government Printing Office has a 
list of publications put out by this committee which are available 
to the public by purchase if the committee supply is exhausted. 

Mrs. Kelsey. Yes, sir; I do know that. 

Mr. Walsh. Will you take the Program of the Communist Party of 
the Soviet Union? You have read this book? 

Mrs. Kelsey. I have read this book and I have studied it, and I 
think I can truthfully say, thi'oughl}'. 

Mr. Walsh. You have taken excerpts from this book which you 
think are Communist propaganda, in your opinion? 

Mrs. Kelsey. Yes, I have. 

Mr. Walsh. May the record show, Mr. Chairman, that there was 
introduced during the hearings yesterday a book, entitled The Pro- 
gramme of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union which was pub- 
lished b}^ the Foreign Languages Publishing House, Moscow, 1961, 
and imported into this country for distribution. Other than gram- 
matical changes, it is exactly the same as Mrs. Kelsey will use with 



1644 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

reference to her opinion of the propaganda value of the book and 
from which she is about to read excerpts. 

On the cover of the booklet printed by Crosscurrents Press, it states: 

A book that belongs with the most important documents of world communism. 
It presents an analysis of world trends and a sweeping twenty-year program for 
the transition from socialism to communism in the USSR. A basic source for 
everyone who wants to understand the thinking of the Soviet Communist Party. 

This book contains two chapters or parts. 

Part 1 : The Transition From Capitalism to Communism is the 
Road of Human Progress. 

Part 2 : The Tasks of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in 
Building a Communist Society. 

Mr. Willis. These three books to which the witness has referred 
are the products of Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated? 

Mr. Walsh. That is right, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Willis. And delivered to the Soviet Embassy and in turn by 
the Embassy to the libraries? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. These are part of the 718,300 pamphlets 
which have been delivered to the Embassy for dissemination. 

Mr. Willis. And they were identified in the record yesterday? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. And they represent part of the $240,000 in round 
figures which the record showed j^^esterday was paid by the Soviet 
Embassy for the purchase of such literature? 

Mr. Walsh. That is correct, sir. 

Mrs. Kelsey. It says on the back cover: "Crosscurrents Press, 
156 Fifth Avenue, New York 10, N.Y." 

I now point out that they have world domination in mind, and I 
would like to read you some of this. 

Mr. Walsh. Would you mention the page number as you proceed. 

Mrs. Kelsey. Some of it is italicized, by whom I do not know. I 
am quoting from page 10 of Program of the Commuvist Party oj the 
Soviet Union: 

"Workers of all countries, unite!" The Party regards communist construction in 
the U.S.S.R. as the Soviet people's great internationalist task, in keeping with the 
interests of the world socialist system as a whole and with the interests of the 
international proletariat and all mankind. 

Communism accomplishes the historic mission of delivering all men from social 
inequality, from every form of oppression and exploitation, from the horrors of war, 
and proclaims Peace, Labor, Freedom, Equality, Fraternity and Happiness for all 
peoples of the earth. 

From page 11, and most of what I am reading is italicized and no 
one here needs to have an explanation of what we mean by that 
because that means calling emphasis to it. 

Capitalism is the last exploiting system 

We go now to page 14. I do not think Khrushchev had his shoes 
off here yet. 

Imperialism is decaying and moribund capitalism; it is the eve of the socialist 
revolution. The world capitalist system as a whole is ripe for the social revolution 
of the proletariat. 

Next, let us go to page 20 — 

The entire life of socialist society is based on the principle of broad democracy. 

The word "democracy" is italicized. 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGAXDA 1645 

On page 23, now we come to the high-sounding, flowing phrases: 

The high road to socialism has been paved. Many peoples are already marching 
along it, and it will be taken sooner or later by all peoples. 

On this same page: 

The Soviet Union is not pursuing the tasks of communist construction alone 
but in fraternal community with the other socialist countries. 

Now we want to go to page 33. Here they are referring to the 
United States. The paragraph preceding on this page also refers to 
the same subject. 

State-monopoly capitalism stimulates militarism to an unheard-of degree. The 
imperialist countries maintain immense armed forces even in peacetime. Military 
expenditures devour an ever-growing portion of the state budgets. The imperialist 
countries are turning into militarist, military-police states. Militarization per- 
vades the life of bourgeois society. 

On the same page a few Unes further down: 

The new war being hatched by the imperialists threatens mankind with unprece- 
dented human losses and destruction. Eveu the preparations for it bring suffering 
and privation to millions of people. 

Our next quotation comes from page 35 : 

Taking cover behind spurious professions of freedom and democracy, U.S. im- 
perialism is in effect performing the function of world gendarme, supporting reac- 
tionary dictatorial regimes and decayed monarchies, opposing democratic, revo- 
lutionary changes and launching aggressions against people fighting for inde- 
pendence. 

The next page will be 36 : 

The United States, the strongest capitalist power, it past its zenith and has 
entered the stage of decline. 

Mr. Walsh. May I interpolate at this time that most of that 
which you are reading is itahcized for emphasis. May I call the 
attention of the committee to the fact that the Program of the Com- 
munist Party of the Soviet Union published by the Crosscurrents Press 
is italicized in the same booklet pubUshed by the Foreign Languages 
Publishing House, Moscow, 1961, which booklet was imported by 
World Books, 747 Broadway, New York, from the International Book 
Company in Moscow. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Could the witness reread that last quotation? 

Mrs. Kelsey. I will be glad to. 

It is page 36: 

The United States, the strongest capitalist power, is past its zenith and has 
entered the stage of decline. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. In other words, the witness we had yesterday, is for 
personal profit, printing and selling to the Soviet Embassy and, the 
Soviet Embassy, in turn, is circulating to libraries and schools, propa- 
ganda to the efTect that the United States is past its zenith and is on 
the way to decline. 

I just wanted the record to underscore the relationship between 
the activities for profit of the witness of yesterday and the activities 
of the Soviet Embassy in this type of propaganda. 

Mr. Walsh. Would you continue. Airs. Kelsey? 

Mrs. Kelsey. On page 42: 

The struggle for democracy is a component of the struggle for socialism. 

00450— 62— pt. 1 5 



1646 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Now I want to go over to page 48 : 

The rise of socialism marks the advent of the era of emancipation of the oppressed 
peoples. 

Now to 52, also italicized: 

Capitalism is the road of suffering for the people. 

A few lines later on, page 53 : 

Socialism is the road to freedom and happiness for the peoples. 

The next page is 61 : 

The foreign policy of the socialist countries, which is based on the principles of 
peace, the equality and self-determination of nations, and respect for the inde- 
pendence and sovereignty of all countries, as well as the fair, humane methods of 
socialist diplomacy, are exerting, a growing influence on the world situation. 

Now page 63: 

The victory of socialism throughout the world will do away completely with the 
social and national causes of all wars. To abolish war and establish everlasting 
peace on earth is a historic mission of communism. 

Page 65, again italicized: 

The Soviet Union has consistently pursiied, and will continue to pursue, the policy 
of the peaceful coexistence of states with different social systems. 

Page 108: 

The transition to communism means the fullest extension of personal freedom and 
the rights of Soviet citizens. 

Mr. Walsh. With your 30 years of experience as a librarian in 
your studies of communism, would you say that the foregoing which 
you have just read is rank Communistic propaganda? 

Mrs. Kelsey. Definitely. It definitely is. 

Mr. Walsh. And it shows the pie-in-the-sky to the unaware? 

Mrs. Kelsey. It truly does. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. May I make one further inquiry? Is it not true 
that this document is one of the documents which declares that 
the United States is past its zenith and is on its decline, that the 
circulation of that from the Soviet Embassy is made under the benefit 
of the subsidies of the third-class bulk rate of United States mail? 

Mrs. Kelsey. That is right. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. So the American taxpayer is helping subsidize the 
distribution of this type of propaganda? 

Mrs. Kelsey. Yes, sir; and I am one of those taxpayers. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. I might say so are the members of this committee. 

Mr. Walsh. Would you take your next book, Volume I, entitled 
Khrushchev Reports to the 22nd Congress of the CPSU which was 
published by the Crosscurrents Press, New York. May I call to the 
attention of the committee the fact that the text of this booklet was 
also published, under the title An Account to The Party and the People, 
Report of the C.C, C.P.S. U. to the 22nd Congress of the Party, in Moscow 
by the Foreign Languages Publishing House and imported into this 
country by the World Books, 747 Broadway, from the International 
Press of Moscow. 

Would you continue now, Mrs. Kelsey? 

Mrs. Kelsey. I would like to say volume I contains three chapters 
or parts. Part 1 : The Present World Situation and the International 
Position of the Soviet Union. Part 2: The Soviet Union Enters the 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1647 

Period of Full-Scale Communist Construction. Part 3: The Leninist 
Party is the Organizer of the Struggle for the Victory of Communism. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. What was its date? 

Mr. Walsh. October 17, 1961. 

Mrs. Kelsey. The folio wmg is on page 10 and every word of it is 
italicized; bear in mind that this is Khrushchev's speech: 

The fact that it has been possible to prevent war, and that Soviet people and the 
peoples of other countries have been able to enjoy the benefits of peaceful life must be 
regarded as the chief result of the activities of our Party and its Central Committee in 
increasing the might of the Soviet slate and in implementing a Leninist foreign policy, 
as a result of the work of the fraternal parties of the socialist states and the greater 
activity of the peace forces in all countries. 

Mr. Walsh. May I interpolate again, Air. Chairman, to the effect 
that this book I have before me which was published in Moscow con- 
tains on page 9 the exact quotation in italics as appear on page 10 of 
the other copy. 

Therefore, it would appear that these publications are identical. 
Also that the text for each was prepared in Moscow even though one 
was published by Crosscurrents Press of New York City. 

Mrs. Kelsey. Now here comes one of their master statements of 
untruths, page 11: 

In the course of the peaceful competition between the two systems capitalism has 
suffered a profound moral defeat m the eyes of all peoples. 

We go now to page 114. All that comes in between is just about 
the same as what I have read. 

The national income per capita is increasing much more rapidly than in the highly 
developed capitalist countries. 

It is grossly misleading because it does not have anything to say 
about what the income was when it started, which was at rockbottom. 
Further down on page 114, do get this: 

Free education, free medical services, the absence of unemployment not to men- 
tion many other benefits enjoyed under socialism, have long since become a usual 
thing for Soviet people, something they take for granted. These, comrades 
constitute the greatest gains and our people are justly proud of them. In this sphere 
we have long since left the capitalist countries behind. 

Page 117, further italicized: 

The abolition of taxes will be a signal social gain of the Soviet people. 

That, alone, would attract some Americans, I know. 
Further on the same page: 

All for society, society for all — such is our hard and fast principle. 

Now to page 120: 

Our Party's pohcy is imbued with the lofty idea of Communism: everything 
for the sake of man for the benefit of man. 

On page 125, Khrushchev makes this statement: 

* * * Werner von Braun, the German rocket specialist now working in the U.S., 
has had to admit that the Russians have created, on the basis of their philosophy, 
a system which assures them these successes, and that, unfortunately, the system 
he is living under does not make it possible to achieve the successes scored by 
Russia. He could not have put it better, comrades. 

Now let us turn to page 135, some more italics: 

Of all the values created by the socialist system, the greatest one is the new man — the 
active builder of communism. The Soviet people are demonstrating what the 
really free man is capable of. 



1648 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Now I would like to go along to page 190, and the reason I am 
skipping that much is because he just goes along saying the same 
thing in another way. 

At the bottom of page 190, here comes the peace doves again — 
floating around up above: 

Long live world peace! 

Under the all-conquering banner of Marxism-Leninism, under the leadership of 
the Communist Party — forward to the triumph of communism! 

Mr. Walsh. You have just read from Volume I of Khrushchev 
Reports to the 22nd Congress of the CPSU. In your opinion, would 
you say this book is rank Communistic propaganda from your 30 
years of experience? 

Mrs. Kelsey. I would say it is definitely rank Communistic propa- 
ganda, and I would like to go on record as saying that. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. The witness is not at all surprised that this is rank 
propaganda in view of the fact that it presently comes from the present 
fountainhead of communism. 

Mrs. Kelsey. No, I am not surprised. I am just incensed. 

Mr. Walsh. Would you take Volume II, Khrushchev on the Future, 
which was published by the Crosscurrents Press, New York, sent to 
the Soviet Embassy and disseminated by them. 

Mrs. Kelsey. This volume has seven chapters or parts. Part 1: 
The Historic Victories of Socialism; Part 2: Communism — the Great 
Goal of the Party and the People; Part 3: From Socialist to Com- 
munist Economy; Part 4: Development of Communist Socialist Rela- 
tions and the Molding of the New Man; Part 5: Communism and 
Mankind's Progress; Part 6: Results of the Discussion of the Draft 
Program; Part 7: The Party in the Period of Full-Scale Communist 
Construction. 

The first quotation comes on page 8, also italicized: 

The Communists have entered history as the greatest creative force, a force trans- 
forming and renewing the world. 

Mr. Walsh. May I also note for the record that in the book that 
was published in Moscow from which Mrs. Kelsey is reading, on page 
8, the same statement is italicized, and at the end "(Prolonged 
applause)." I believe that was deleted in your book. 

Mrs. Kelsey. That is right; it was. 

Mr. Johansen. Was this an address that was delivered by 
Khrushchev? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes; on October 17, 1961. 

Mrs. Kelsey. These two books make up the address. 

Mr. Walsh. You are referring to Volume I and Volume II. 

Mrs. Kelsey. That is right; Volume I and Volume II make up the 
address. 

Page 12: 

In the social sphere the Party has realized the age-long hopes of the masses- 
All forms of oppression of man by man have been wiped out. 

May I repeat. "All forms of oppression of man by man have been 
wiped out." 

Two quotations from page 13: 

The man-hating ideas nurtured by private ownership have receded into the past. 
The Party has solved the problem of relations between nations, a most compli- 
cated problem that has troubled mankind for centuries and persists to this day in 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1649 

the capitalist world. * * * The Soviet Union is known as the fraternal family 
of peoples, a country where nations live in friendship and flourish. 

My next page is 18: 

The new system has ensured high rates of development of the productive forces, 
steadily rising living standards for the working people, freedom from exploitation, 
and broad social and political rights for the individual. 

Pago 21: 

* * * it should be noted that the economic instability of capitalism has increased 
sharply and the uneven development of some countries in relation to others has become 
far more marked * * *. Economic crises are becoming more frequent, especially 
in the United States. War production has become a permanent element of the 
economy. MiUtarism has swelled to enormous proportions. 

On page 22, and still italicized: 

The political instability of world capitalism has increased, * * * 

On page 31, speaking of their Communist program: 

The draft Program is a document of true communist humanism; it is imbued with 
the ideas of peace and fraternity among nations. 

Now page 37: 

What does it mean to build communism in the main? It means that: 
in the economic sphere the material and technical basis of communism will be 
created, the Soviet Union will surpass the economic level of the most developed 
capitalist countries and move into first place for production per head of the 
population, the world's highest living standard will be ensured, and all the pre- 
conditions created to attain an abundance of material and cultural values; * * * 

Now let us go to page 43 : 

In twenty years Soviet industry will produce nearly twice as much as is now 
produced in the luhole nonsocialist world. 

We go now to page 83, because the pages in between are practically 
a continuation of what I have just read to you. 

By the end of the first ten years all sections of Soviet people will enjoy plenty and 
will be well provided for. 

Page 83, further down: 

For the first time in history insufficiency will be fully and finally eliminated. This 
will be an imposing achievement of the new society. No capitalist country can 
set itself this task. 

Now I go to page 89: 

Full maintenance, at public expense, of all persons unfit for labor will be provided 
at the same time. 

Page 90: 

Rent-free modern housing and free basic communal services for every family will 
be a wonderful achievement of communist construction. 

I can see that particular American element that this might appeal 
to, too. 
Page 112: 

Our ideological opponents keep vociferating that capitalism is a free world 
and try to discredit our socialist democracy in every way. But the truth about 
socialist democracy, the finest democracy on earth, cannot be concealed. After 
all, it is an incontestable fact that the socialist world is steadily and consistently 
developing and extending democracy, while the capitalist world is abridging and 
curtailing what stunted democracy there is in bourgeois society. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Would the witness believe that that explains the 
substantial exodus from East Berhn to West Berlin prior to the 



1650 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

building of the wall, this superior democracy that they have in the 
Communist regime in East Germany? 

Mrs. Kelsey. It could explain some of it; it certainly could. 

Let us take a look at page 119. I have already used the expression 
"masterpiece of untruth." Well, let me use it again: 

Communism ennobles man. Communism is the supreme flowering of humanity 
and of the individual. 

Page 120: 

The bourgeoisie associates the freedom of the individual with private property. 
But millions of people in the capitalist countries have no property, and to them 
bourgeois property is not an earnest of freedom, but a heavy burden. To the 
petty proprietor property is not a condition for the development of the individual; 
rather, it is a chain that keeps him fully dependent on monopoly capital. 

Page 123 : 

For over a hundred years bourgeois ideologists have been accusing the Com- 
munists of negating morals, of undermining the moral pillars of society. The 
bourgeoisie needs this falsehood to cover up its own immorality. 

Page 125 and continued on page 126: 

People who say that the significance of the family lessens during the transition 
to communism, and that it disappears entirely with time, are absolutely wrong. 
In fact, the family will grow stronger under communism. Completely disencum- 
bered of material considerations, family relations will become very pure and 
lasting. 

Now, page 128: 

Socialist and communist culture is the new, the highest, stage in man's cultural 
development. We have all the necessary conditions to scale successfully the 
summits of communist culture. 

On page 130, and this one made me laugh: 

Some people say that figures are dull. But the figures reflecting the growth of 
our system are pleasant to quote and, I think, pleasant to hear. I remember 
that In my young days we used to sing a song, "Our steam locomotive is speeding 
forward, bound for communism." Today we and the entire socialist system are 
speeding forward not on a steam locomotive but on a powerful electric locomotive. 
There can be no doubt that our socialist express will overtake and leave the train 
of capitalism far behind. Capitalism has neither the strength nor the hauling 
power. 

Page 134: 

In the present epoch more favorable international conditions have arisen for the 
development of the world revolutionary movement, due mainly to the consolida- 
tion of the forces and the growth of the influence of the socialist system. The 
example set by socialism is exerting a powerful influence on people's minds, 
making them active fighters for the establishment of a new system. 

A few sentences from the next paragraph: 

In the present epoch internal conditions for the transition of new countries to 
socialism have also become more favorable. Among these conditions are the 
general weakening of capitalism, and the deepening of its contradictions. 

Now we go to page 142: 

The experience of history has shown that war goes hand in hand with imperi- 
alism in the same way as the struggle against imperialism and the policy of the 
consolidation of peace is inherent in socialism. Human memory cannot forget 
the events inscribed in the annals of history not in ink but in the blood of millions. 
From the time the U.S.A. unleashed the first war of the epoch of imperialism in 
1898, imperialism has let loose upon the peoples an unbroken series of "local 
wars," and has twice hurled mankind into world holocausts of unparalleled fury. 
Moreover, the ruins of towns and cities were still smouldering and the wounded 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1651 

hearts of millions who had lost relatives in the Second World War had not yet 
healed when the U.S. imperialists were already showing themselves eager to 
plunge into a third world war. 

In the imperialist camp, and first and foremost in the U.S.A., groups are operat- 
ing who behave like gamblers. They give no thought to the calamity that the 
new war they are hatching would bring mankind. 

On page 143: 

the Soviet Union, the mightiest power of today, is directing all its efforts towards 
the preservation and consolidation of world peace. 

Mr. Walsh. From your 30 years of experience and from your 
studies of Marxism-Leninism, would you classify the excerpts from 
the books you have read pure Communist propaganda? 

Mrs. Kelsey. I would so classify it as purest Communist propa- 
ganda of the most harmful sort. 

Mr. Walsh. If these three books, the excerpts from which you 
have read, got into the hands of these three groups you have previ- 
ously mentioned, would they bring the poison of communism to these 
groups? 

Mrs. Kelsey. I very much think that would be the case. 

Mr. Walsh. After studying Marxism-Leninism, is it your opinion 
that if these groups read these quotations and read the books, would 
that be harmful to the internal security of this country? 

Mrs. Kelsey. I think it definitely would be harmful to the internal 
security of our country. 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Chairman, I have no other questions of this 
witness at this tune unless she would like to make a statement. 

Mrs. Kelsey. May I? 

Mr. Willis. You may proceed. 

Mrs. Kelsey. I am quoting from this little leaflet. "You are 
Challenged to Consider National Goals." The opening sentence says: 

Consider the aims outlined by the President's Commission on National Goals 
"to preserve and enlarge our own liberties, to meet a deadly menace and to extend 
the areas of freedom throughout the world." These are high and difficult goals. 
Yet our past performance justifies the confidence that they can be achieved if 
every American will accept personal responsibility for them. 

I would like to read, too, what I wrote in the margins when I re- 
ceived this leaflet: 

How can we achieve this with the constant flow of red-hot liquid coming from 
that pipeline from Moscow? 

Mr. Walsh. Are there any questions by the committee? 

Mr. Willis. I believe not. 

Mr. Walsh. The committee's investigation has disclosed, Mr. 
Chairman, that these booklets from which Mrs. Kelsey has just read 
excerpts were mailed by the Soviet Embassy in Washington, D.C., 
not only to Mrs. Kelsey's library in Shelby, North Carolina, but to 
every public and private library in the United States, including the 
hospital libraries of the United States Veterans' Administration. 

Mr. Willis. I want to compliment you for coming before this 
committee and giving us the benefit of your long years of experience 
in this very serious threat to our Republic and we are grateful to you 
for coming to us. We appreciate your forthright and valuable state- 
ment. 

Mrs. Kelsey. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. 



1652 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Someone has said that "courage is fear that has said its prayers." 

Mr. Tuck. I would like to say the chairman has lull authority to 
speak for the entire committee, but 1 would like to make it affirma- 
tively known that I want my name associated with the statement 
which he has just made. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. I certainly want to do likewise. 

Mr. Walsh. 1 have no further questions. 

Mr. Willis. Thank 3'ou. 

The witness is excused. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. Willis. This will conclude the hearings today. 

The subcommittee is recessed subject to the call of the Chair. 

(Whereupon, at 11:45 a.m., Thursday, May 10, 1962, the hearings in 
the above-entitled matter were recessed, subject to the call of the 
Chair.) 



COMMUNIST OUTLETS FOR THE DISTRIBUTION OF 
SOVIET PROPAGANDA IN THE UNITED STATES 

PAIiT 1 



THURSDAY, MAY 17, 1962 

United States House of Representatives, 

Subcommittee of the 
Committee on Un-American Activities, 

Washington, B.C. 
public hearings 

The subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities 
met, pursuant to call, at 10:35 a.m. in the Caucus Room, Old House 
Office Building, Washington, D.C., Hon. William M. Tuck presiding. 

Subcommittee membeis: Representatives Edwin E. Willis, of 
Louisiana, chau'man; William M. Tuck, of Virginia; and August E. 
Johansen, of Michigan. 

Subcommittee members present: Representatives William M. Tuck 
and August E. Johansen. 

Committee members also present: Representatives Donald C. Bruce, 
of Indiana, and Henry C. Schadeberg, of Wisconsin. 

Staff members present: Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., director; Alfred M. 
Nittle, counsel; John C. Walsh, cocounsel; and Donald T. Appell, 
investigator. 

Mr. Tuck. The committee will come to order. 

I have a statement here I have prepared and which I will now read. 

The hearing this morning is a continuation of the hearings of the 
Committee on Un-American Activities held on May 9 and 10, 1962. 

The subcommittee authorized to conduct these hearings consists of 
Representatives William M. Tuck, August E. Johansen, and Edwin E. 
Willis, as chairman. 

Chairman Willis is not able to be present this morning, and I am 
acting in his stead, and a quorum is present in the persons of Congress- 
man Johansen and myself. 

Because some of the witnesses called before the Committee on Un- 
American Activities today were not present on May 9, I desire for 
their information to read the resolution which sets forth the subject 
and legislative purposes of these hearings: 

BE IT RESOLVED, that hearings by the Committee on Un-American Activi- 
ties, or a subcommittee thereof, be held in Washington, D.C., or at such other phice 
or places as the Chairman may designate, and at such time or times as the Chair- 
man may determine, relating to the publishing, printing and distribution of 
Communist propaganda material that is instigated from foreign countries or is of 
a domestic origin, the legislative purposes of which are: 

]. To strengthen the provisions of Section 10 of the Internal Security Act of 
1950 so as to broaden the application of such section to cover persons, firms, 

1G53 



1654 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

associations and corporations engaged in the printing, publishing and dissemin- 
ation of Soviet propaganda; 

2. To assist Congress, through the Committee's legislative oversight duties, 
in appraising the administration of laws relating to the introduction and dis- 
semination of Communist propaganda within the United States; and 

3. To consider and act upon clauses (c) and (d) of Section 312 of Title 3, H.R. 
6, introduced by Representative Walter on January 3, 1961, and referred to this 
Committee as part of H.R. 6, said clauses constituting proposed amendments of 
the Foreign Agents Registration Act. 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the action of the Chairman in issuing 
subpoenas for the appearance of Myron Sharpe, in his individual capacity, and 
as president of Crosscurrents Press, Inc., be, and the same is hereby ratified and 
approved. 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Committee, or any subcommittee 
thereof, be authorized to investigate and hear any other matter within the juris- 
diction of the Committee which it, or any subcommittee thereof, appointed to 
conduct these hearings, may designate. 

Are you ready to proceed, Counsel? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Myron E. Sharpe, please. 

Mr. Tuck. Mr. Sharpe, will you stand and raise your right hand? 

Do you solemnly swear the testimony you are about to give before 
this committee will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the 
truth, so help you God? 

Mr. Sharpe. I do. 

Mr. Tuck. You may be seated. 

I may add also for the record that, in addition to the associate 
members of the subcommittee, we have also present with us two other 
members of the Committee on Un-American Activities, the gentleman 
from Wisconsin, Mr. Schadeberg, and the gentleman from Indiana, 
Mr. Bruce. 

Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

TESTIMONY OF MYRON EMANUEL SHARPE— Resumed 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Sharpe, you were served a subpena on April 11, 
1962, and you appeared on May the 9th in this room before the 
committee. I asked you as president of Crosscurrents Press, Inc., 
to produce aU books of accounts and/or records reflecting all receipts 
of money by Crosscurrents, Inc., 156 Fifth Avenue, New York, 
New York, from September 1st. 

Mr. Tuck. Counsel, excuse me. I believe before you get into the 
substance of the examination, it might be better if you would let 
the record show that the witness is represented by counsel. 

Mr. Walsh. I wiU be very happy to. Would counsel please iden- 
tify herself? 

Mrs. PiEL. Eleanor Jackson Piel, 342 Madison Avenue, New York. 

Mr. Walsh. And you appeared on May 9 before the committee, 
and I then asked you to present to the committee that which was 
called for in the subpena which 1 had read to you and which was 
served upon you, and to which you responded as a witness to this 
committee. 

You at that time produced several deposit receipts or customer's 
receipts on stationery of Crosscurrents Press, Inc., 156 Fifth Avenue, 
New York, N.Y., and a statement of moneys received from the 
Embassy of the U.S.S.R., Washington, D.C, 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1655 

On the same day^ — and I read to you from page 103 of the record 
as of that date — I stated as follows: 

You list here reports of money received from the Embassy of the U.S.S.R. in 
Washington, D.C. From what books of account did you compile these figures? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. Crosscurrents Press has a cashbook and a general ledger which 
contains exactly the same information about receipts as that submitted. It con- 
tains no additional information about receipts. 

Now, I now ask you to produce, which you did not do on May 9th, 
the cashbook and the general ledger of Crosscurrents Press, Inc., 
by you and in your representative capacity as president of that cor- 
poration. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. There are certain records which I am going to give 
to the committee, and there are certain records which I am withholding 
from the committee. I would like to state my reasons for so doing, 
if I may. 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Witness, are you directing yourself to j^our refusal 
to present to the committee that which was called for in the subpena 
which I have just read to you, the cashbook and the general ledger, 
which you admitted having in your possession or in the possession of 
the corporation on May 9, 1962? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I am producing these records in response to the 
subpena presented to me at my last appearance. 

Mr. Walsh. I am asking you specifically: Have you produced 
the cashbook and the general ledger which you said you had in your 
possession in your representative capacity as president of Cross- 
currents Press, Incorporated? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. These are photostated copies of the pages in response 
to the subpena. 

Mr. Walsh. I did not ask you that. I asked you whether or not 
you are now producing the cashbook and the general ledger? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I would like to make m}'' statement of explanation as 
to what I am producing and what I am not producing, and my ground 
for so doing, if I may, now. 

Mr. Walsh. Would you answer specifically that question which I 
have just asked 3"ou? Are you producing at the present time, in 
pursuance to the subpena that was served on you, the cashbook and 
the general ledger of Crosscurrents Press, Inc., in your representative 
capacity as president of that corporation? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. Well, I have brought copies of records in response to 
the subpena. 

Mr. Walsh. I asked 3'ou, specifically, have you produced the cash- 
book and the general ledger, pursuant to the subpena which was served 
upon you, which you did not produce on May 9; and I am asking 
you now to produce those books which you said you had — the Cross- 
currents Press had — a cashbook and a general ledger — on May 9. 
It shows that they were in your possession as of that date. 

I am asking you now, specifically: Have you produced the cashbook 
and the general ledger? 



1656 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Tuck. The witness is ordered and directed to categorically 
answer the question. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. The book itself is not here, but these are copies of — 
photocopies of the pages which I was asked to produce in response to 
the subpena, with certain exceptions which I have withheld, which I 
would like to explain and state the ground for withholding. 

Mr. Walsh. In other words, j^^ou have refused to present to this 
committee that which was called for in the subpena to which you 
responded on May 9, the cashbook and the general ledger, and which 
you admitted having in your possession on May 9. 

r Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I have not refused. I have complied with the sub- 
pena, insofar as it is proper. 

Mr. Walsh. Let me ask you this question: Have you produced the 
cashbook and the general ledger of Crosscurrents Press, Inc., at this 
time? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I have produced photocopies of pages from my books. 

Mr. Tuck. We ask you now to produce the cashbook and general 
ledger as you are ordered to do under the subpena. 

C Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to do so on the following grounds 

Mr. Tuck. Well, now, I will say to the witness that we are not 
prepared this morning to subject ourselves to any stump speech. We 
have no objection to the witness stating briefly his reason for not 
producing the books and filing any kind of statement with the com- 
mittee in order to make up the record. 

You may proceed. 

Mr. Sharpe. Well, I will state as briefly as I can the grounds 

Mr. Walsh. Before 3'ou continue, to keep the record straight, you 
say you refuse to produce the cashbook. Do you also, in your 
explanation, refuse to submit the general ledger of Crosscurrents 
Press, Inc., in your representative capacity as president of Cross- 
currents Press, Inc.? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. May I respond to the chairman before answering 
that question? 

Mr. Tuck. Yes, j^ou may respond to mj^ question. 

Mr. Sharpe. I have a statement which I would like to submit in 
the record and which I will not read. 

Mr. Tuck. We will be glad to accept the statement. 

Mr. Sharpe. I will simply say in the statement my grounds for 
declining to produce certain records, if I may. 

Mr. Walsh. Referring specifically to the cashbook and the general 
ledger of Crosscurrents Press, Inc.? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. If I may respond, I will tell you. 

Mr. Johansen. Well now, Mr. Chairman, it seems to me the 
record ought to establish what the specific items are that he is declining 
to produce, before he states his alleged reasons for so declining. And 
I am not satisfied that the record establislies, in response to counsel's 
question, the specific items that he is refusing to produce. 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1657 

Mr. Sharpe. I believe that in my response I will indicate specifi- 
cally what I am producing and what I am declining to produce, if I 
may. 

Mr. Tuck. Will you now state succinctly what it is you are pro- 
ducing, in compliance with the subpena, and then state succinctly 
what it is j-ou decline or refuse to produce? 

Mr. Walsh. May I interrupt at this time, Mr. Chairman? There 
was another subpena served upon him on May 9 to produce, in 
addition thereto, otlier books. 1 was intending to come to that later. 
I am now confining myself strictly to the subpena that was served 
upon him and to which he responded on May 9, which called for all 
books of accounts, as I have previously stated. 

I also referred to the record of May 9 in which he said he had 
the cashbook and the ledger. I am now confining myself strictly 
to that one question, whether or not he has or has not produced the 
cashbook and the general ledger of Crosscurrents Press, Inc.? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Tuck. Well, we have asked him. The counsel has asked the 
witness, and members of the committee have asked the witness, to 
produce the cashbook, the cash accounts book. And I understood 
the witness to say that he refused to produce that book. 

Air. Sharpe. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Walsh. You refuse to produce the cashbook and the general 
ledger of Crosscurrents Press, Incorporated, at this time? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I have produced photocopies of pages of the cash- 
book. 

Mr. Walsh. I did not ask you that question, Mr. Witness. 

Mr. Sharpe. If I may, if I can answer, it will save a lot of time, and 
you will find out what I have produced and what I have not produced. 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Chairman, would you direct the witness to answer 
that specific question? 

Mr. Tuck. I direct the witness to answer the specific question pro- 
pounded to you by counsel. 

Mr. Sharpe. Would you repeat the question? 

Mr. Walsh. Have you produced today the cashbook and the 
general ledger of Crosscurrents Press, Inc., in your representative ca- 
pacity as president of Crosscurrents Press, Inc.? 

Mr. Sharpe. As I said before, I have not produced these books 
themselves. 

Mr. Tuck. Will you now produce them? We order you now to 
produce them. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. Would the chairman please explain the relevancy of 
the books as opposed to photocopies of the books? 

Mr. Walsh. Under the subpena, you are supposed to produce all 
books of accounts, and you admitted that you had in your possession 
on May 9 the cashbook and the general ledger. The chairman has 
directed you to produce those books at this time. 

The question propounded to you is whether or not you will produce 
those books, which were in your possession as of May 9, 1962. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. Well, if I may explain, now, what I have done and 
why I have done it 



1658 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Walsh. Well, answer the question, fost, and then any reason- 
able explanation that j^ou care to give will be very happily received 
by this committee. 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to produce the original books for the follow- 
ing reasons, and they are contained in the following explanation. 

I have been subpenaed to appear before this committee as, presi- 
dent of Crosscurrents Press and editor and publisher of International 
Arts and Sciences Press, and ordered to produce certain records which 
are described in the subpena — in two subpenas which you gave me 
last Wednesday, May the 9th. 

Mr. Walsh. Now I notice that the statements are rather long, 
consisting of many pages. I suggest, as the witness suggested before, 
that he file that statement with the committee but, at this time, pre- 
sent his legal reasons for not producing the books. 

Mr. Tuck. Will you file the statement of the witness with the clerk 
of the committee. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. Well, I am giving my legal reasons for declining to 
produce certain documents. 

Mr, Walsh. Specifically the cashbook and the general ledger. 

Mr. Sharpe. The committee has already learned through the rec- 
ords in its possession, which I have scrupulously filed with the Depart- 
ment of Justice, that pursuant to an understanding of the Soviet corpo- 
ration I published certain books and pamphlets which I feel would 
be of interest to libraries, students, and American readers concerned 
with developments in the Soviet Union. 

Mr. Walsh. I may interject an objection to this. That is not a 
legal reason for not producing the books. I ask that the witness be 
directed to state his legal reasons, and to file that statement with the 
committee. 

Mr. Tuck. I previously stated to the witness that we would be 
glad to hear from him briefly, orally, as to his additional reasons for 
not producing the documents that he was ordered to produce in the 
subpena. I have advised the witness that any statement which he 
has may be filed with the committee, to be made a part of the record 
in this case. 

I now ask the witness to file the statement, and suggest to the 
witness that he file the statement with the committee, if he wishes, 
and also suggest to him that he may now, if he wishes, give any 
statement of the legal grounds as to why he has not produced the 
records and books that he was ordered to produce in the subpena 
which was originally served upon him, specifically, the cashbook and 
the general ledger. 

Mr, Sharpe. Mr. Chairman, I will respond directly to your 
question. 

I have brought with me exact photostatic copies of my books of 
accounts and records, revealing in detail the amounts received by 
Crosscurrents Press from date of its formation to the present date. 

However, I have intentionally blanked out the names of persons 
and associations who have not purchased my publications in quantity 
or who are obviously not distributors of my publications. I have 
done so for six basic reasons. 

One: The first amendment guarantees the right to be free from 
governmental interference in the area of association, speech, and the 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1659 

press. The subpena invades mv freedom as a publisher by requiring 
the identification of my readers, and it invades the freedom of my 
readers by forcing disclosure of their identity. 

Two: It is inconceivable to me that there could be any legislative 
purpose which could be served b}' revealing the names of the individ- 
uals who have purchased individual copies of the books and pamphlets 
which I have published. 

Three: Nor is the identification of single-copy purchasers of nw 
publications pertinent to the subject of the committee's investigation. 

Four: A subpena requiring the compulsory identification of my 
readers would constitute an unreasonable search and seizure, in viola- 
tion of the fourth amendment. 

Five: There is a property right in the exclusive use of these names, 
which I assert as a publisher. Since the names of these customers 
have a monetary value, the subpena deprives me of property without 
due process of law under the fifth amendment. 

Six: Finally, the purpose behind the request for such names can 
only be the exposure and injury of the persons who have chosen, for 
whatever reason, to read this material, and 1 know that exposure 
alone is not a proper legislative purpose. 

Justice Brennan, of the United States Supreme Court, stated in a 
dissenting opinion. 

Mr. Tuck. You are arguing now. You can file that statement. 
You have stated your legal grounds. 

Mr. Sharpe. Right, then may 1 complete the grounds themselves? 

Mr. Tuck. 1 understood that you had finished the legal grounds. 
You may file your arguments. 

Mr. Sharpe. I stated the grounds in connection with the receipts, 
and now I would like to complete my statement in connection with 
disbursements. 

Mr. Walsh. We will come to that later. I am specifically referring 
now to the subpena which was served to you on April the 11th, and to 
which you responded as president of Crosscurrents Press. Are they 
the legal reasons on which you refuse to produce the cashbook and 
the general ledger? 

Mr. Tuck. I will inform the witness that the Chair expressly rejects 
the reasons which you have just stated and, as chairman of the sub- 
committee, I now order and direct you to produce the specific docu- 
ments adverted to by counsel in his question which he has recently 
propounded to you. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I stand on the grounds which I previously stated, and 
1 have submitted photostatic copies of the records as described by me 
in my statement. 

Mr. Tuck. Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Walsh. On May the 9th in this room, before the committee, 
you were served with another subpena in your capacity as president. 
Crosscurrents Press, Inc. And you were then directed by this com- 
mittee, according to the subpena, to produce all books and records 
described more fully on three typewritten pages thereto attached and 
made a part of the subpena. 

You received such a subpena on May 9, did you not? 

Mr. Sharpe. Yes. 



1660 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Walsh. The subpena reads as follows: 

All original books of accounts and/or records of Crosscurrents Press, Inc., * * * 
reflecting: 

1. The names of persons, associations, firms and corporations from whom 
money was received by Crosscurrents Press, Inc., from September 1, 1959, to 
date, as evidenced by records and receipts of deposit produced before a subcom- 
mittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities, in tlie Caucus Room of the 
House of Representatives by you. on I\Iay 9, 1962, * * *; 

2. The names of persons, associations, firms and corporations other than those 
furnished under the preceding paragraph, from whom money was received by 
Crosscurrents Press, Inc., from September 1, 1959, to date; and 

3. The names of persons, associations, firms and corporations to whom pay- 
ments were made by or on behalf of Crosscurrents Press, Inc., from September 1, 
19 ")9, to date, togethc>r with canceled checks evidencing such payments for printing 
and/or publishing the following documents: 

There are then listed 33 publications which you admitted were 
printed by Crosscurrents Press, Inc., as evidenced by statements 
which you have filed with the Department of Justice, pursuant to 
law, in your capacity as an agent for a foreign principal. 

I now ask you whether or not you have produced the names of 
persons, associations, firms, and corporations to whom payments were 
made by, or on behalf of, Crosscurrents Press from September 1, 1959, 
to date, together with the canceled checks evidencing such payments 
for printing and/or publishing the documents listed in the subpena? 
Have you produced that? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. In response to the subpena duces tecum, I have pro- 
duced copies of records of disbursements as listed in the subpena and 
copies of canceled checks of these disbursements. 

Mr. Walsh. On May 9, when you appeared at this hearing as a 
witness, in your representative capacity as president of Crosscurrents 
Press, you did have the cashbook and general ledger in your possession. 
Is that correct? On May 9? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. In response to the duces tecum subpena, I indicated 
then that I had control over these records, and I do so now. 

Mr. Walsh. What other books of account have you got, besides 
the cashbook and the general ledger, original books of accounts, which 
you keep for your corporation. Crosscurrents Press, Inc.? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. To the best of my knowledge, no other records. 

Mr. Walsh. You are president of the corporation, are you not? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on the ground which 
I stated at the previous hearing, which I will be glad to repeat, if 
necessary. 

Mr. Walsh. It is not necessary, but as president of the corporation, 
do you not know what original books of accounts you have, other than 
that which you admitted you had on May 9, 1962, to wit, the cash- 
book and the general ledger? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. Well, I beheve I had already answered that question. 

Mr. Walsh. I ask the chairman to direct the witness to answer. 

Mr. Tuck. The witness is ordered and directed to answer the 
question. 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1661 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. To the best of my knowledge, I believe that we do 
not have any other original records. 

Mr. Walsh. But you admit that on May 9, 1962, you did have in 
your possession the cashbook and the general ledger? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I stated that I had it under — had them under my 
control. I did not have them here, but I had them under my control. 

Mr. Walsh. They are still in existence, though? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I decline to answer that question on my previously 
stated grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. Do you invoke the fifth amendment as you previously 
did because an answer would tend to incriminate you? 

Mr. Sharpe. Not according to my memory of what I said before. 

Mr. Walsh. In addition to the other, the first amendment, and 
the other grounds? 

Mr. Sharpe. That was not my defuiition of the fifth amendment; 
that was yours. 

Mr. Walsh. You stated all of the grounds under — and I specifi- 
cally ask you now, Is the reason that you refuse to answer this, that 
it may tend to incriminate you if you do answer that question? 

Mr. Sharpe. The reason that I decline to answer the question is 
on the grounds of the first amendment, which includes freedom of 
the press; the fourth amendment, which precludes illegal search and 
seizure; and the fifth amendment, which prohibits committees from 
stepping over a line which invades the rights of the individual. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Mr. Counsel, is the witness invoking that portion 
of the fifth amendment which relates to self-incrimination, among the 
other reasons? 

Mr. Sharpe. I am invoking all of the fifth amendment, with all of 
its provisions. 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Sharpe, you were also served a subpena on May 9 
in this committee room addressed to M3Ton E. Sharpe, editor and 
publisher of International Arts and Sciences Press, 156 Fifth Avenue, 
New York. It called for all books of accounts and/or records de- 
scribed and more fully set forth on the typewritten pages thereto 
attached and by reference made a part of this subpena; and I read 
them: 

All books of accounts and/or records of International Arts and Sciences Press, 
156 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York, reflecting: 

1. The names of persons, associations, firms and corporations, from whom 
money was received by International Arts and Sciences Press, for printing, 
publishing and/or distribution of the following documents: 

And there are then six publications which are listed and which you 
listed as being published by the International Arts and Sciences in 
the statement that you filed with the Department of Justice. 

2. The names of persons, associations, firms and corporations to whom pay- 
ments were made by or on behalf of International Arts and Sciences Press, and/or 
Crosscurrents Press Inc., together with canceled checks evidencing such pay- 
ments, for printing, publishing and/or distributing the documents listed in the 
preceding paragraph. 

Have you produced such books? 
(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

90450— G2—pt. 1 6 



1662 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Sharpe. In response to this subpena, I have brought copies of 
my ledger books, revealing all pertinent information concerning re- 
ceipts on the same basis as set forth above with regard to Cross- 
currents Press, and, for the reasons already set forth, have refused to 
divulge the identity of individuals or entities who have not purchased 
publications in quantity. 

Mr. Walsh. Have you any documents which you have produced 
for the International Arts and Sciences Press? 

Mr. Sharpe. I have not finished my response. 

Mr. Walsh. I am sorry. 

Mr, Sharpe. I have further brought copies of the records to whom 
payments were made on behalf of International Arts and Sciences 
Press and Crosscurrents Press for printing and publishing of the same. 
I have blanked out my records insofar as they indicated matters not 
relevant to the committee's inquiry. 

Mr. Tuck. Have you complied with the subpena that was served 
upon you? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I have complied with it in every way that I believe 
to be proper. 

Mr. Tuck. In other words, you have put your own construction, 
rather than the construction of the committee? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I have complied with it in a way which I consider 
proper. Any person has to construe a subpena according to his 
ability. 

Mr. Tuck. The Chair now orders and directs you to produce the 
cashbooks. 

Mr. Sharpe. I have akeady tendered photocopies of the material 
which you previously described. 

Mr. Tuck. And you refuse to comply with the order. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Sharpe. I am not refusing to comply with the subpena. I 
would be happy to read, to state again my reasons for not giving the 
names of individuals. 

Mr. Tuck. We are familiar with the legal grounds which j'ou have 
stated. And you now refuse to produce? 

Go ahead, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Walsh. In view of the fact that the committee has ruled that 
this is not a compliance with the terms of the subpenas, number one, 
the subpena pursuant to which he appeared on May 9, 1962, and the 
two subpenas that were served on him — one in his representative 
capacity as president of Crosscurrents Press, Inc., returnable today, 
and also as Myron E. Sharpe, editor and publisher of International 
Arts and Sciences Press, 156 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York — • 
he has not complied, and the Chair has so ruled, and I, therefore, 
have no further questions to ask him. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Tuck. Do the members of the committee have any questions? 

Mr. Johansen. No questions. 

Mr. ScHADEBERG. No qucstious. 

Mr. Sharpe. I would like the record to show what I have sub- 
mitted. I have submitted records of receipts, including all figures 
to the best of my knowledge of receipts of Crosscurrents Press, includ- 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1663 

ing distributors, wholesalers, and excluding onlj^- individual buyers, 
and the same apphed in pursuance to the subpena duces tecum for 
receipts of International Arts and Sciences Press. 

With regard to disbursements, I have supphed all copies of records 
of disbursements pursuant to the tvt^o subpenas which I received on 
May 9. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Mr. Chairman, I think the record is abundantly 
clear that the witness has produced what he saw fit to produce and 
has, therefore, not complied with the subpena. 

Mr. Tuck. And has refused. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. And, therefore, has refused to comply, 

Mr. Walsh. These records which you have presented to the com- 
mittee, in 3'our conception of compliance with the committee, which 
the committee does not accept, will be studied by the committee ; and 
I would ask that the Chair direct the witness to remain under subpena 
so that, if necessary, we can question him later with reference to that 
which he has produced. 

But we do not admit that this is a compliance with the terms of 
the subpena as served upon him and about which I have just finished 
questioning him. 

Mr. Tuck. The witness may stand aside temporarily, but he will 
remain under the control of the subpena. 

Mr. Sharpe. I understand you want me to remain here today, 
then? Is that correct? 

Mr, Walsh. That is correct. 

Mr. Tuck. Remain here until later on. 

Mr. Sharpe. I would hke to submit my statement for the record, 
if I may. 

Mr. Tuck. The statement will be filed. 

Counsel, call the next witness.^ 

AFTERNOON SESSION— THURSDAY, MAY 17, 1962 

(The subcommittee reconvened at 2:20 p.m., Hon. William M. Tuck 
presiding.) 

Mr. Tuck. The committee will please come to order. 

Is Mr. Sharpe in the room? 

Mr. Walsh. Will both he and his counsel come up? 

TESTIMONY OF MYRON EMANUEL SHARPE— Resumed 

Mr. Tuck. Mr. Sharpe, I have a statement to make. The staff 
has not had sufficient time, in view of the recess, to adequately study 
the material which you brought. They offer the opinion that the 
material which you submitted is not in compliance with the subpena 
of the committee. 

However, they want to look at it further, and we are going to con- 
tinue your subpena, but release you today, and you are summoned 
for the record to appear back here on June 14th at 10 a.m. in this 
same room. 

Mrs. Piel. That date is very inconvenient for me. I wonder if we 
could put it over until July? 

Mr. Tuck. You will have to take it up with the committee. 

Mrs. Piel. I will be in touch with you. 

» The testimony of the next 2 witnesses, Allan Markofl and Serge P. Ushakoff, is printed in pt. 2, 
pp. 1700-1715. 



1664 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Sharpe. So your date is June the 14th? 

Mr. Tuck. June the 14th at 10 a.m. You take it up with the 
committee. 

Mr. Sharpe. 10 a.m. 

Mr. Walsh. Thank you. 

(Witness excused.) ' 

Mr. Tuck. Call your next witness.^ 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Felshin. 

Mr. Tuck. Will you stand and raise your right hand? 

Do you solemnly swear the testimony you are about to give before 
this committee will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but 
the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. Felshin. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF JOSEPH FELSHIN, ACCOMPANIED BY COUNSEL, 
DAVID M. FREEDMAN 

Mr. Walsh. Would you state \^our full name, Mr. Felshin. 

Mr. Felshin. Joseph, J-o-s-e-p-h, Felshin, F-e-1-s-h-i-n. 

Mr. Walsh. And would your counsel please identify himself, also? 

Mr. Freedman. David M. Freedman, F-r-e-e-d-m-a-n, 320 Broad- 
way, New York City. 

Mr. Walsh. And where do you live, Mr. Felshin? 

Mr. Felshin. Far Rockaway, New York. 

Mr. Walsh. I hand you a certificate ot incorporation, which was 
filed with the Department of State in New York, and ask you to look 
at that and tell me whether or not that is your corporation and were 
you one of the incorporators? 

(Document handed to ^\^tness.) 

Mr. Felshin. Right, it is. 

Mr. Walsh. Is that your signature? 

Mr. Felshin. I am sure it is the signature. 

Mr. Walsh. On the back page — you were one of the incorporators? 

Mr. Felshin. Right. 

!Mr. Walsh. Are the other two gentlemen whose names also appear 
there still directors of that corporation? 

Mr. Felshin. No. 

Mr. Walsh. Who are the directors at thesent time? 

Mr. Felshin. Mr. I. Gabin, and myself. 

Mr. Walsh. G-a-b-i-n? 

Mr. Felshin, G-a-b-i-n, and mj^self, that is all. Just two direc- 
tors. 

(Document marked "Felshin Exliibit No. 1" and retained in com- 
mittee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. In your capacit}^ as president of the New Era Book 
& Subscription Agency, Inc., you were served with a subpena to 
appear here and produce certain contracts. Without reading it at 
this time, have you done so? 

Mr. Felshin. There are no such contracts, for the simple reason 
that I don't import anything. I dcn't import books or pamphlets. 

Mr. Walsh. Well, what do you do? 

Mr. Felshin. I publish and distribute. 

1 Further appearance of witness cancelled by action of the committee. 

' The testimony of Serge P. Usbakofl (resumed), Margaret Cowl, and Philip Frankfeld, is printed in 
pt. 2, pp. 1715-1750. 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1665 

Mr. Walsh. Well, do you receive any publications from agents who 
do import books from the Soviet Union? 

Mr. Felshin. In the last few weeks, I made a purchase for the 
first time of 10,000 copies of the Program [oj the Communist Party oj 
the Soviet Union] that you refer to, the Program of the 22d Congress, 
and so forth 

Mr. Walsh. From whom? 

Mr. Felshin. From 

Mr. Walsh. From Crosscurrents — ■ — ■ 

Mr. Felshin. Crosscurrents. 

Mr. Walsh. — Press, Incorporated? 

Mr. Felshin. Right. And when I received the subpena, which 
indicated to me that you were interested or concerned with not only 
importing, but buying, from registered agents of other countries, I 
called up Crosscurrents and canceled the sale. 

Mr. Walsh. With whom did you speak? 

Mr. Felshin. I don't know. 

Mr. Walsh. Was it Myron Sharpe? 

Mr. Felshin. It might have been, but I don't know. I spoke to 
somebody there and left word that we wanted to cancel this sale. 

Mr. Walsh. In order to show you that we do not base our ques- 
tions on frivolous conjectures, I show you a dissemination report of 
the Crosscurrents Press, Inc., which was filed on April the 2d of 
19G2, and I ask you to look at the fifth item down, which states, "New 
Era Book Agency, New York, N.Y. 10,000 [copies]." I hand that 
document to you. It has been marked previously Sharpe Exhibit 
No. 37 for reference and is already in evidence. 

(Document handed to witness.) 

Mr. Felshin. Yes. Well, that is what I told you about, 10,000 
copies. I just told you about that, right? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, I understand, but I want you to know that we 
do not base our questions 

Mr. Felshin. Yes, I assumed that. 

Mr. Walsh. You said you canceled the order. 

Mr. Felshin. That is right. 

Mr. Walsh. But, according to this dissemination report, 10,000 
copies had already been sent to you? 

Mr. Felshin. That is right. They are on my floor and they are 
going to be sent back. I didn't sell one of them. 

Mr. Walsh. How long have you had them? 

Mr. Felshin. Oh, possibly 3 weeks, 2 weeks, something like that. 

Mr. Walsh. Would you tell the committee the reasons why you 
purchased these books in the first instance, or ordered the books? 

Mr. Felshin. Because it was a damned good bargain. It was 50 
cents a copy — the printed retail price was 50 cents a copy — and I got 
them for a penny apiece. So it was a good price. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you have any correspondence or negotiations 
with anybody in Crosscurrents Press that you could obtain these 
copies for a penny apiece? 

Mr. Felshin. Well, I hesrd that someone else, that they had been 
offered to someone else, so I called up and said I was interested in 
buying a quantity and I made a deal over the phone. 

Mr. Walsh, \\ith.whom? 



1666 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Felshin. I believe it was Mr. Sharpe. 

Mr. Walsh. Who was the person that told 3'ou that you could 
purchase these for a penny apiece? 

Mr. Felshin. I will have to take the fifth on that. 

Mr. Walsh. And by "the fifth" you mean what? 

Mr. Felshin. I don't want to make any statement that might be 
used to hurt me, injure me, in any wa}^. 

Mr. Walsh. In other words, that may incriminate you? 

Mr. Felshin. That is right. 

Mr. Walsh. Now will you tell to the committee how this corpo- 
ration, the New Era Book & Subscription Agency, was formed and 
the purpose for which it was formed? 

Mr. Felshin. I formed it. I am also the head of a firm called 
New Century Publishers, which publishes. But, in the course of the 
years, we get many orders from bookshops, libraries, universities, for 
books and periodicals, other than our own, and so T decided that I 
would set up a firm that would just not publish, but would buy and 
sell everybody's, any book, any pamphlet, any periodical that was 
salable, had a market. 

Mr, Walsh. Would you tell the committee what the New Century 
Publishers, Inc., prints and publishes? 

Mr. Felshin. It publishes pamphlets, books, and a magazine called 
Political Affairs. 

Mr. Walsh. Now I show you this Exhibit No. 2 (statement show- 
ing ownership, management, and circulation of Political Affairs) and 
ask you to look at that and tell us whether or not that is your signature 
on that statement? 

(Document handed to witness.) 

Mr. Felshin. Yes, that is. That is the statement of ownership. 

Mr, Walsh, Now according to this, the publisher [of Political 
Affairs] is New Century Publishers, Inc., and the editor is Herbert 
Aptheker, There is no managing editor, but the business manager is 
Joseph Felshin, which is you? 

Mr, Felshin. Right. 

Mr. Walsh. That is your signature? 

Mr. Felshin. Right, 

Mr, Walsh, And that is notarized before a notary public on 
October the 2d of 1961? 

Mr. Felshin. That is correct, 

(Document marked "Felshin Exhibit No, 2" and retained in com- 
mittee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. I show you Exhibit No, 3, and call your attention, 
which is Political Affairs, and on page 1, as a headline, it says, "Vol, 
XLI, No, 4, April 1962, Political Affairs,^' and then right underneath 
that, it states, "A Theoretical Organ of the Communist Party, 
U,S,A." 

Of your own knowledge, do you know whether or not it is considered 
the theoretical organ of the Communist Party of the United States? 

(Document handed to witness,) 

Mr, Felshin, Starting with the March issue, I changed the mast- 
head to this masthead, at the request of the editor. Prior to that 

Mr, Walsh. And the editor is Mr, Aptheker? 

Mr, Felshin, Mr, Aptheker, Prior to that, the masthead was 
"A Political and Theoretical Magazine of Scientific Socialism." 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1667 

Mr. Walsh. That is commonly known as Marxism-Leninism? 

Mr. Felshin. I would say that is correct. 

Mr. Walsh. Yes. 

Mr. Felshin. And at the request of the editor, who indicated to 
me that the Communist Party wanted to change that masthead 
because it was having some business with the Government, I acceded 
to the request, and I changed it. 

(Document marked "Felshin Exhibit No. 3" and retained in com- 
mittee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. Does the Communist Party of the United States have 
a financial interest in the New Century Publishers? 

Mr. Felshin. None whatsoever. 

Mr. Walsh. Who owns it? 

Mr. Felshin. I do. 

Mr. Walsh. Do you own all the stock? 

Mr. Felshin. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Walsh. How many shares? 

Mr. Felshin. All of them. 

Mr. Walsh. Well, how many are all? 

Mr. Felshin. It is 20. 

Mr. Walsh. Twenty. And how long have you owned all the 
shares? 

Mr. Felshin. Since I formed the company, in 1944. 

Mr. Walsh. And you have been president and business manager 
ever since? 

Mr. Felshin. Since the beginning, yes. 

Mr. Walsh. And did you hire Aptheker to be editor of Political 
Aifairsl 

Mr. Felshin. Yes sir. 

Mr. Walsh. You said that you incorporated this New Century 
PubHshers, Inc., in 1944? 

Mr, Felshin. Yes sir, at the end of 1944. 

Mr. Walsh. "V\Tiat was your connection with the Communist 
Party when you formed New Century Publishers, Inc.? 

Mr. Felshin. I will have to take the fifth on that. I will not answer 
questions which might involve me with the Communist Party on the 
ground that it may incriminate me. 

Mr. Walsh. So your answer would be the same, when you filed 
this statement required by the i^ct of August the 24th, the ownership, 
management, and circulation of a magazine? 

Mr. Felshin. I don't understand the question. 

Mr. Walsh. In other words, I am asking you whether or not you 
were a member of the Communist Party on October the 2nd, 1961. 

Mr. Felshin. I refuse to answer that on the ground that I will have 
to avail mj^self of the protection of the fifth amendment on that. 

Mr. Walsh. Now you do know David M. Freedman and Abraham 
Unger, do you not? 

Mr. Felshin. Yes. 

Mr. Walsh. And how long have you known them? 

Air. Felshin. Oh, a long time. I don't know just how long. 

Mr. Walsh. Approximately? 

Mr. Felshin. Well, Davey, how long do I know you? 

Mr. Freedman. Ten years, 15 years. 

Mr. Felshin. About 10 or 15 years. 



1668 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Walsh. Socially? 

Mr. Felshin. Socially. 

Mr. Walsh. And from a lawyer-client standpoint, also? 

Mr. Felshin. That is right. 

Mr. Walsh. And would the same answer refer to Mr. Unger? 

Mr. Felshin. Yes, approximately. 

Mr. Walsh. Did Mr. Freedman and Mr. Unger form the corpora- 
tion for you known as the New Century Publishers, Inc., in 1944? 

Mr. Felshin. No. 

Mr. Walsh. Now, in order to get the record straight, you owned 
the New Century Publishers, Inc.? 

Mr. Felshin. Right. 

Mr. Walsh. You also own New Era Book & Subscription Agency? 

Mr. Felshin. Correct. 

Mr. Walsh. All of the shares? 

Mr. Felshin. Correct. 

Mr. Walsh. Now who owns Masses and Mainstream, Inc.? 

Mr. Felshin. New Century Publishers own it; therefore, I own it. 

Mr. Walsh. That is a subsidiary of the New Century Publishers, 
Inc.? 

Mr. Felshin. Correct. 

Mr. Walsh. Wholl}^ owned by the New Century Publishers? 

Mr. Felshin. Correct. 

Mr. Walsh. And they publish Masses — they publish Mainstream^ 

Mr. Felshin. It is now called Mainstream. It used to be called 
Masses and Mainstream. 

Mr. Walsh. It is now known as Mainstream. 

Mr. Felshin. That is correct. 

Mr. Walsh. Is that also a theoretical organ of the Communist 
Party of the United States? 

Mr. Felshin. No, sir. 

Mr. Walsh. And here in Exhibit No. 4, (Statement showing 
Ownership, Management, and Circulation oi Mainstream) , you classify 
yourself as business manager. Is that correct? 

Mr. Felshin. Correct. 

Mr. Walsh. Is there any reason that you can give the committee 
why you signed this as business manager when you, in fact, are the 
owner? 

Mr. Felshin. No particular reason. I actually conduct the 
business of the magazine, so I signed as business manager. 

Mr. Walsh. How long have you known Robert Forrey, F-o-r-r-e-y, 
the managing editor of Adainstreaml 

Mr. Felshin. About 2 years, a little less than 2 years. 

(Document marked "Felshin Exhibit No. 4" and retained in 
committee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. Are you presently a member of the Communist Party 
of the United States? 

Mr. Felshin. Fifth amendment. 

Mr. Walsh. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Tuck. Any questions by the committee? 

Mr. JoHANSEN. I would like to get the record straight, Mr. Counsel, 
on one point. 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1669 

Did I understand the witness to testify that, on the request of the 
Communist Party, USA, the designation on the masthead [of Political 
Affairs] has been or is about to be changed? 

Mr. Walsh, As I understood his answer, it was changed. 

Mr. Felshin. Correct. 

Mr. Walsh. Would you elaborate on that, Mr. Felshin, and who 
told you to change it? 

Mr. P^ELSHi.v. Well, Mr. Aptheker came to me and said he had a 
request from the Communist Party that the masthead be changed, 
and I saw no reason not to, since it was well known that the material 
was Marxist-Leninist material and it said on the masthead before the 
"Theoretical and Political Magazine of Scientific Socialism," so I 
agreed to change it to "Organ of the Communist Party." 

Mr. JoHANSEN. And to refresh my memory, the new wording is 
what? 

Mr. Felshin. I think "Organ of the Communist Party, U.S.A." Is 
that right? 

Mr. Walsh. "The Theoretical Organ of the Communist Party, 
U.S.A." 

Mr. Felshin. That is right. There it is. 

Mr, Walsh. Did Mr. Aptheker tell you who in the Communist 
Party asked you to change that the to "Theoretical Organ of the 
Communist Party, U.S.A."? 

Mr. Felshin. No, sir, and I did not ask him. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. And do I understand that the record shows that 
you hired Mr. Aptheker as an editor? 

Mr. Felshin. Correct. 

Mr. Johansen. At the time you employed him as editor,*were you 
aware that this publication was, as it now officially proclaims, a theo- 
retical organ of the Communist Party, USA? 

Mr. Felshin. That is w4iy I hired Mr. Aptheker, because he is a 
leading Marxist-Leninist. He is recognized as such, and he is a very 
able Marxist-Leninist scholar. I thought he was the best man I 
could get for the job. 

Mr. Johansen. Pardon? 

Mr. Felshin. I thought he was the best man I could get for the 
job. 

Mr, Johansen. Does that statement that you just made equate 
with knowledge on 3^our part that Mr, Aptheker is himself a member 
of the Communist Party, USA? Are you saying that, in other 
words? 

Mr. Felshin. Well, first of all, let me say this, Mr. Johansen, that 
many people regard themselves as Marxist-Leninists in their philos- 
ophy, in their outlook on life, in their concept of the world, of society, 
and yet are not Communists in the sense that they have not joined, 
they don't want to be bothered. 

But in regard specifically to Mr. Aptheker, I will take the fifth. 

Mr. Johansen. Well, is it — and I don't want to belabor the point, 
I just have one further question — do 3^ou regard it as at all likely 
that the Communist Party, USA, would accept as the editor of a 
theoretical organ of the Communist Party, USA a person who was not 
a Communist? 



1670 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Felshin. Well, it does not seem likely. That is a matter of 
conjectm'e. You could easily make up your mind about that. It 
is obvious. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. I have no further questions. 

Mr. Walsh. I have one. 

Would you say that all Communists read Political Affairs so that 
they can get the latest line of the waj^ in which the Communist 
Party is going? 

Mr. Felshin. Well, I wish that was so, but, unfortunately, it is not. 

Mr. Walsh. In other words, your circulation would be bigger? 

Mr. Felshin. It would be, if ever3"body read it. 

Air. Walsh. No, I did not mean everybody. I only meant the 
Communists. 

Mr. Felshin. Well, I mean those who regard themselves as Marx- 
ists or are interested in Marxism. Listen, Political Affairs is ordered 
by hundreds of universities and libraries and many of your Govern- 
ment agencies, too. 

Mr. Walsh. When Mr. Johansen was asking you whether or not 
you knew that Mr. Aptheker was known as a Communist— I wonder 
if you would be good enough to distinguish, for the committee, the 
differentiation between membership in the Communist Party and an 
affiliate of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Felshin. I would not undertake to do that. I don't feel that 
I am qualified to do that. I would just give you a personal opinion, 
and that has no validity here. 

Mr. Walsh. I have no further questions. 

Mr. Tuck. Mr. Bruce? 

Mr. Bruce. Earlier, you stated that^you had changedjthe sub- 
heading on the masthead at the request of Mr. Aptheker. And you 
also stated, as I recall, that he said it was because he was having 
some business with the Government. 

Now would you elaborate on that? 

Mr. Felshin. Not he, personally. He indicated'^that'''the'^party 
was having some kind of litigation regarding the labeling provisions 
of the McCarran Act. 

Now the labeling provisions, I imagine, would pertain only to any 
magazine which was sort of operating under false colors or was trying 
to hide its views. 

Now here was a magazine that carried on its masthead, a "Theoreti- 
cal Magazine of Scientific Socialism." 

Mr. Bruce. But it had not stated 

Mr. Felshin. There is nothing wishy-washy about that. Never- 
theless — let me finish, since you asked me the question — nevertheless, 
since it was requested, I saw no reason not to accede to it. 

Mr. Bruce. Well, what you have said then, if I am interpreting 
what you have said correctly, is that the Communist Party decided 
that the prior wording on the masthead did not comply with the law. 

Mr. Felshin. No, no, I did not say that. I think that they felt 
it did comply. However 

Mr. Bruce. But they wanted to be sure. 

Mr. Felshin. That is right, to eliminate any doubt at all. 

Mr. Bruce. In other words, it had to be clear that it was an organ 
of the Communist Party? 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1671 

Mr. Felshin. I don't know. I cannot interpret the law, but that 
is what they wanted, and I saw no reason not to accede. It didn't 
affect the circulation of the magazine any. 

Mr. Bruce. But you have said, in effect, then, that they made this 
transition, and clearly stated it was an organ of the Communist 
JParty, USA, in order to be absolutely sure that they were operating 
within the law? 

Mr. Felshin. Well, I cannot vouch for what was in the mind of 
anybody else. I know that this request came. 

Mr. Bruce. You mentioned the fear of operating under false colors. 

Mr. Felshin. But it was not elaborated to me in such detail as you 
seem to be elaborating it. It merely came to me as a request because 
of some pressures under the McCarran Act, and I agreed. That is all, 
it is very simple. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. In other words, you have testified that it was your 
understanding that the change which was requested by the Com- 
munist Party to Mr. Aptheker, and by him to you, was the upshot and 
result of this difficulty with the Government 

Mr. Felshin. It may have been. I could not say absolutely. As 
far as I was informed 

Mr. Bruce. That is what you testified earlier, is it not? 

Mr. Felshin. As far as I was informed, that was the business that 
raised the whole question and started it. 

Mr. Bruce. I have no further questions. 

Mr. Tuck. Witness is excused. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. Tuck. The committee wiU now adjourn, subject to the call of 
the Chair. 

(Whereupon, at 4:40 p.m., Thursday, May 17, 1962, the subcom- 
mittee adjourned, subject to the call of the Chair.) 



COMMUNIST OUTLETS FOR THE DISTRIBUTION OF 
SOVIET PROPAGANDA IN THE UNITED STATES 

PART 1 



THURSDAY, JULY 12, 1962 

United States House of Representatives, 

Subcommittee of the 
Committee on Un-American Activities, 

Washington, D.C. 

PUBLIC hearings 

The subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities 
met, pursuant to recess, at 10 a.m., in the Caucus Room, Old House 
Office Building, Washington, D.C, Hon. Edwin E. Willis (chairman 
of the subcommittee) presiding. 

Subcommittee members: Representatives Edwin E. Willis, of 
Louisiana; William M. Tuck, of Virginia; and August E, Johansen, 
of Michigan. 

Committee members also present: Representatives Donald C. 
Bruce, of Indiana, and Henry C. Schadeberg, of Wisconsin. (Appear- 
ances as noted.) 

Staff members present: Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., director; John C. 
Walsh, cocounsel, and Donald T. Appell, investigator, 

Mr. Willis. The subcommittee will please come to order. 

Counsel, call your first witness. 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Wolins. 

Mr. Speiser. Mr. Chairman, before you swear the witness, he would 
like to tape his own testimony. Is this permissible? 

Mr. Willis. No; that is not permissible. 

Mr. Speiser. Very well. 

Mr. Willis. Please raise your right hand? Do you solemnly swear 
that the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help j^ou God? 

Mr. Wolins. I swear that the testimony I am about to give will be 
the truth and the whole truth. 

TESTIMONY OF LEROY WOLINS, ACCOMPANIED BY COUNSEL, 

LAWRENCE SPEISER 

Mr. Walsh. Would you give the committee your full name, sir? 
Mr. Wolins. My name is LeRoy Wolins. 
Mr. Walsh. And where do you live? 
Mr. WoLixN's. 2036 North Sawyer Avenue, Chicago, 111. 
Mr. Walsh. I would suggest that you take the microphone a little 
closer to you. 
Mr. Wolins. I'm sorry. 

1673 



1674 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Walsh. And you are represented by attorney? 

Mr. WoLiNS. That I am. 

Mr. Walsh. Will you kindly identify yourself, sir? 

Mr. Speiser. I am Lawrence Speiser, attorney with the American 
Civil Liberties Union, 1101 Vermont Avenue NW., Washington, D.C. 

Mr. Walsh. Would you give the committee your educational back- 
ground, Mr. Wolins? 

Mr. Willis. Is that the name? Wolins? 

Mr. Walsh. Wolins, W-o-l-i-n-s. 

Mr. Willis. Spell it again. 

Mr. Walsh. W-o-l-i-n-s. 

Mr. Wolins. I just received from one of the committee counsel 
the statement of purpose in the form of the resolution establishing 
this particular subcommittee 

Mr. Walsh. Would you answer my question? 

Mr. Wolins. Before I would proceed to answer any substantive 
questions I would like to inquire as to one point for clarification. 

Mr. Willis. Let's get finished. You are not even our witness yet. 

Mr. Wolins. I believe I am a witness. I was sworn in, sir. 

Mr. Willis. Well, let's get the preliminaries first. 

Mr. Wolins. I am trying to get a clarification in order to answer 
the questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Willis. What is the question pending? 

Mr. Walsh. What is your educational background? 

Mr. Wolins. I am interested to know the matter of whether this 
is pertinent to any legislative purpose. 

Now, I have before me 

Mr. Willis. It has been read before. 

Mr. Wolins. I have before me the statement of legislative purpose 
in which one word is unclear and I would like to ask some help before 
answering the question, and that is the legislative purpose was stated 
as being to inquire relating to the publishing, printing, and distribution 
of Communist propaganda, and I would like to know, in view of the 
first amendment, how the committee would define propaganda? 

Mr. Willis. Well, that is part of the Internal Security Act already. 
Look at the act itself. 

Mr. Wolins. Well, I was not told to read the act before I came 
here, so perhaps you could give me a definition of the word "propa- 
ganda," Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Willis. I think the resolution of the committee speaks for 
itself, and how propaganda will be defined beyond its present definition 
in the Internal Security Act of 1950 is one of the very things that we 
are inquiring into. 

Mr. Wolins. Since I have not been told how it is defined either by 
you or by the Internal Security Act of 1950, it is still unclear to me 
how it is defined. 

Mr. Willis. Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Walsh. Would you answer the last question? 

What is your educational backgi'ound, sir? 

Mr. Wolins. Since the legislative purpose is obviously still not 
clear to me and the committee seems not to be willing to make it 
clear to me as to what this has to do with investigating propaganda, 
whatever propaganda is, and as to what right this committee has to 
limit or abridge the right to publish anything, including propaganda, 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1675 

whatever that is, I think that that question serves no stated, or even 
imagined, as far as I can see, legislative purpose whatsoever. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. I suggest, Air. Chainnan, that the witness proceed 
to answer the questions. 

Mr. WoLiNS. I am trying to answer the question, but I am still 
not able to get from the committee a definition of propaganda and 
how my educational background 

Mr. Willis. Whatever legislation is on the books has already 
been • 

Mr. WoLiNS. But I have not seen it and I am asking to see it in 
that case. 

Mr. Willis. The legislation is now law. The constitutionality of 
it has been upheld, and one of the purposes of this hearing is a possible 
strengthening of Section 10 of the Internal Security Act of 1950, so 
I direct you to answer the question. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. WoLiNs. Well, in view of the apparent unwillingness or 
inability to give this legislative purpose, I must refuse, on that ground 
and also on the ground of the first amendment and the fifth amend- 
ment of the United States Constitution, to answer this question. 

Mr. Willis. Proceed with your next question. 

Mr. Walsh. Have you ever read the provisions of the Internal 
Security Act of 1950? 

Mr. Wolins. I think 

Mr. Walsh. Have you? 

Mr. Wolins. May I answer the question? 

Mr. Walsh. You may answer it yes or no. 

Mr. Wolins. I got about one and a half words out before I was 
interrupted. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. I think that is enough now. The witness just 
proceeds to answer and starts the argument. 

Mr. Wolins. Mr. Johansen, I am really trying. 

On the ground that I feel that would serve no legislative purpose 

Mr. Willis. That is not an answer to the question. 

Mr. Wolins. I am tiying to answer the question, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Willis. What is the question, Counselor? 

Mr. Walsh. Have you ever read the provisions of the Internal 
Security Act of 1950? 

Mr. Willis. I order you to answer that question. 

Mr. Wolins. And I will attempt to answer it, Mr. Chairman, if I 
am not interrupted. 

Mr. Willis. The question is, Have you read it? That's aU the 
pending question. 

Mr. Wolins. My answer will have to be my answer, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Walsh. In response to the question? 

Mr. Wolins. In response to the question, of course, Air. Counsel. 
The answer to the question is that the question serves no legislative 
intent or purpose of this committee whatever and is an infringement 
of my rights under the first and fifth amendments of the Constitution. 

Mr. Willis. That is not a responsive answer. 

Proceed with your next question. He has been ordered to answer 
it and be will not. 

Mr. Wolins. I am attempting. I have three times been inter- 
rupted. 



1676 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Willis. The question is, Have you read the act? 

Mr. WoLiNS. And I am answering that this question serves no 
legislative purpose. 

Mr. Willis. Proceed with the next question. 

Mr. WoLiNS. And is violative of my rights under the first and fifth 
amendments, and therefore I cannot be a party to violating my rights 
under the Constitution and will not answer that question under those 
facts and amendments of the Constitution. 

Mr. Willis. Proceed with the next question. 

Mr. Walsh. What is your occupation? 

Mr. WoLiNS. That question serves no legislative purpose whatso- 
ever and is in violation of my rights under the first and fifth amend- 
ments of the United States Constitution. 

Mr. Willis. Those are preliminary questions and are perfectly 
proper, and I direct you to answer that question. 

Mr. WoLiNs. I repeat, Mr. Chairman, that the question serves no 
legislative purpose whatsoever. If there is legislative purpose, de- 
pending on the definition of propaganda here, the question also vio- 
lates my rights under the first and fifth amendments of the United 
States Constitution, which rights I prize very highly and shall defend 
completely before this committee. 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. WoUns, I hand to you a registration statement 
and ask you to look on page 8. This is the registration statement 
filed February 16, 1961, by David S. Canter and LeRoy Wolins on 
behalf of the Translation World Publishers. 

Mr. Willis. What is the name of that outfit? 

Mr. Walsh. Translation World Publishers. 

Mr. Willis. World Publishers? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir, plural, Publishers. 

Mr. Willis. All right. 

Mr. Walsh. I ask you to look at page 8 of this photostatic copy of 
the registration statement filed by 3^ou and Mr. Canter and ask you 
whether or not that is your signature on page 8? 

Mr. Wolins. It is permissible to look at the other paper, Mr. 
Counsel? 

Mr. Walsh. You may look at anything you care to. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Wolins. Seeing nothing in this document to indicate the legis- 
lative purpose of asking the question, not having had propaganda yet 
defined to me in any way that I can understand, feeling that this 
violates my rights under the first and fifth amendments of the United 
States Constitution, I feel that I must refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Willis. That is a registration under what law and for what 
purpose? 

Mr. Walsh. Pursuant to section 2 of the Foreign Agents Registra- 
tion Act of 1938, as amended. 

Mr. Willis. And the applicant in that registration statement is 
applying to register as what? As a foreign agent? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir, under the name of the Translation World 
Publishers. 

Mr. Willis. Let me see it, Mr. Walsh? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

May I have this marked Wolins Exhibit No. 1 and filed for reference? 

Mr. Willis. It wiU be so marked. 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1677 

Mr. Walsh. Did you or Mr. Canter cause this registration state- 
ment, the registration number of which is 1426, to be filed wath the 
Department of Justice? 

Mr. WoLiNS. The answer to that is the same as the previous 
question. 

(Document marked "Wohns Exhibit No. 1" and retained in com- 
mittee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. Will you tell the committee what was the purpose for 
which the Translation World Publishers was organized? 

Mr. WoLiNS. In the belief that this serves no legislative purpose, 
is an infringement of freedom of the press under the first amendment 
in which Congress has no right to legislate, and in the belief that it 
violates my rights under the fifth amendment of the Constitution, I 
refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Walsh. Is your foreign principal the press department of the 
Embassy of the Soviet Union in Washington, D.C.? 

Mr. WoLiNs. I don't understand the question, sir. 

Mr. Walsh. I ask you whether or not 

Mr. WoLiNS. Excuse me, Mr. Counsel. May I consult with my 
counsel? 

Mr. Walsh. You may. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Walsh. Have you conferred with counsel? 

Mr. WoLiNS. Yes. 

Mr. Walsh. Now, will you answer the question? 

Mr. WoLiNS. I would like the question rephrased, I really did not 
understand it. 

Mr. Walsh. I wanted to know whether or not the principal or the 
foreign agent which you represent was N. V. Dyakanov, Press De- 
partment, Embassy of the Soviet Union, in Washington, D.C.? 

Mr. WoLiNS. Well, again, seeing no legislative purpose to the ques- 
tion, believing it to be a definite attempt to violate the rights of the 
freedom of the press guaranteed by the first amendment, and also 
feeling it, too, violates my rights under the fifth amendment of the 
Constitution, I refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Walsh. Do you know a David S. Canter, C-a-n-t-e-r? 

Mr. WoLiNS. I do not see how this is pertinent to any legislative 
purpose and it certainly is a violation in my opinion of the right to 
freedom of association guaranteed by the first amendment and I be- 
lieve also it violates my rights under the fifth amendment of the 
Constitution, and I refuse to answer that question on those grounds. 

Mr. Walsh. And is he your partner in Translation World Pub- 
lishers? 

Mr. WoLiNS. The answer to that question is obviously the same 
as the answer to the previous question. 

Mr. Walsh. I ask you to explain to the committee the purpose for 
which Translation World Publishers was formed. The registration 
statement filed by LeRoy Wolins and David S. Canter states as 
follows on page 2, paragraph 7: 

"State the nature and purpose of Registrant's representation of 
each foreign principal named under item 6," which is the Union of 



90450 — 62— pt. 1- 



1678 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

the Soviet Socialist Republics; Embassy of the U.S.S.R. (Press De- 
partment) Washington, D.C., and it states: 

Nature: The registrant accepted an order for $2,400.00 worth of a geography 
book on behalf of its proposed subsidiary, Three-Arrow PubUshers, from the prin- 
cipal, which book the subsidiary planned to pubhsh but was unable to publish 
because of financial losses on another publishing venture of the registrant. 

PURPOSE: There was no intended purpose of the registrant to represent the 
principal. The act which led to the requirement to register was accidental and 
unintended — $2,400.00 received for a bona fide order for books was in effect lost 
because of financial reverses on another publishing venture, "The Trial of the 
U-2", described more fully below. 

ACT IV IT Y: There was no activity of the registrant for or in the interest of 
the principal either intended or carried out. The other activities of the regis- 
trant with the principal consisted of purchasing rights to publish "The Trial of 
the U-2" and to sell the principal in a bona fide commercial transaction 1,000 
copies of the above-mentioned book, "The Trial of the U-2". 

Is that statement true or false? 

(At this point Mr. Bruce entered the hearing room.) 

Mr. WoLiNS. Seeing no legislative purpose 

Mr. Walsh. In order to 

Mr. WoLiNS. May I finish? 

Mr. Walsh. Just a moment. 

Mr. WoLiNS. Surely. 

Mr. Walsh. In order to save time I presume that you are going 
to make the same statement with reference to this, that you refuse 
to answer this question, as you have previously, and in order to save 
time, would you say, "I refuse to answer that on the same grounds," 
namely, the first and the fifth amendment? 

Mr. WoLiNS. May I consult with my counsel? 

Mr. Walsh. Surely. That is your privilege at all times. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. WoLiNS. On advice of my counsel I am agreeable to do that 

Mr. Walsh. And on the same grounds as previously stated? 

Mr. WoLiNS. On the grounds as previously stated, yes, sir. 

Mr. Walsh. Translation World Publishers proposed to form a 
subsidiary company known as the Three-Arrow Publishers. Will 
you explain to the committee the purpose for which the Three-Arrow 
Publishers was to be formed? 

Mr. WoLiNS. I refuse to answer that question on the same grounds 
as previously stated. 

Mr. Willis. Let me ask this question. 

With reference to the document that you were addressing yourself 
to previously, do I understand correctly that the substance of the 
application was the filing of it and saying, after all, he didn't want to 
register, or didn't have to register, or some such provision? 

I am addressing that to counsel. 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. This purportedly is the registration state- 
ment filed by this witness and by Mr. Canter who are partners under 
the trade name of Translation World Publishers, and this document, 
evidently prepared by this witness and his partner, was filed with 
the Department of Justice pursuant to section 2 of the Foreign Agents 
Registration Act of 1938, as amended, and I am asking him whether 
or not 

Mr. Willis. And then turn right around and say they don't have 
to register after all, or some such thing in substance? 

Mr. Walsh. As will be developed later, sir, on the same day that 
this was filed they also wrote a letter to the registration section of the 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1679 

Department of Justice withdrawing the registration and saying that 
it wasn't necessary. 

Mr. Willis. In other words, that statement there is a predicate for 
another Kne? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Now, in this Exhibit No. 1, mider item 1-b you state that the 
Translation World Publishers published a paperbook with the title 
The Trial of the U-2. You further state that in publishmg the 
book you were acting as an agent of the U.S.S.R. through its Embassy 
in Washington, D.C Will you kindly advise the committee in detail 
of the negotiations between 3^our partnership and the Embassy of the 
Soviet Union in Washmgton which led up to the publishing of this 
paperbook The Trial of th e U-2. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. WoLiNS. On the same grounds as previously stated, I refuse to 
answer that question. 

Mr. Willis. Well, the Chair ^vill say this. Apparently this wit- 
ness has in mind that he has a right to come before this committee and 
to stand mute and say absolutely nothing really on his theory, which 
we do not accept, of course, that this committee has no legislative 
purpose, and then to carry that out he mvokes the privileges of the 
first and the fifth amendments. I can't conceive of the witness 
having any right 

Mr. WoLiNS. That is not a correct statement of my refusal to 
answer the question, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Willis. You better clarify it, because thus far you liave re- 
fused to give us the name, your education, or anything on the pre- 
tended reliance on constitutional provisions, but reallj^ to shield your- 
self or to stand on the proposition that this committee has no legisla- 
tive purpose. 

Mr. WoLiNS. The first amendment to the Constitution, Mr. 
Chairman 

Mr. Willis. I want to sa}^ for the record that this committee does 
not accept that position. 

Mr. WoLiNS. The first amendment of the Constitution does not 
accept it, Mr. Chairman? 

Mr. Willis. I have made a statement. You are not kidding me or 
anybody else. I want to reflect the position of the committee in the 
record that we do not accept the sincerity of your standing mute on 
pretended reliance on constitutional provisions, and I can't conceive 
that it is the law. 

Mr. WoLiNS. I stand firmly on my feeling that the first amend- 
ment of the United States Constitution says Congress shall make no 
law respecting an establishing of religion or prohibiting the free 
exercise thereof or abridging the freedom of speech or of the press, 
and I have not been given any definition of how dealing with propa- 
ganda does not abridge freedom of the press. The committee has 
been unable to produce any definition whatsoever. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Are you telling this committee that if you answer 
any of the questions that you have declined to answer, it would make 
you liable to criminal prosecution? 

Mr. WoLiNS. I do not believe I said that. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. That is what you are saying when you invoke the 
fifth amendment. 



1680 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. WoLiNS. I am invoking the division of powers of the United 
States Constitution. I am invoking the prohibition in the Constitu- 
tion against Congress abridging the freedom of the press. I think 
that should be in the record very clearly. 

Mr. Willis. And it is on the basis of the invocation of the first 
amendment that you refuse to answer? 

Mr. WoLiNS. It is on the basis of no legislative purpose, of the first 
amendment, and of the fifth amendment of the United States 
Constitution. 

Mr. Willis. Do you apprehend or fear that to answer any of the 
questions that have been propounded to you, including your educa- 
tional background, your employment, would subject you to a criminal 
prosecution? 

Mr. WoLiNS. I refuse to be made a witness against myself as is 
provided under the fifth mendment of the Constitution of the United 
States. 

Mr. Willis. Well, the only basis upon which you can invoke the 
fifth amendment is an honest apprehension or fear that the answer 
would truly make you a witness against yourself and that you would 
be subject to crmiinal prosecution. If you have no such fear or 
apprehension you are not properly invoking the fifth amendment, 
and we certainly do not accept your invocation of the first amendment 
or your plea that this committee has no legislative purpose, so I am 
making that statement for the record. 

We do not accept your plea and we will see what will be done about 
it. 

Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Walsh. Now, I show you Registration Exhibit B, which was 
attached to the registration statement filed on February 16, 1961, 
with the statement which reads as follows: 

1. In August, 1960, during negotiations for purchase of the publishing rights to 
the trial transcript for the forthcoming trial of U-2 Pilot Powers in Moscow, 
Registrant mentioned its decision to publish a book on Geography of the USSR. 
Principal indicated a desire to purchase copies of this book, and to secure this 
order, Registrant asked for an advance payment. Principal agreed to pay 
$2,400.00 for 2,400 copies, and a check was received in the mail a few days later. 
Registrant failed to produce the book under the circumstances outlined in the 
Form FA-2 to which this Exhibit is an annex, thus breaching the agreement. 

2. In September, 1960, subsequent to publication of "The Trial of the U-2", 
Principal, through its press department [that is the Soviet Embassy], purchased 
1,000 copies of this book for $1,000.00. A check was forwarded in the mail. 

Is that factual? Is that statement factual? 

Mr. WoLiNS. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds pre- 
viously stated. 

Mr. Willis. May I see that paper, Mr. Walsh? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. And I ask that it be marked Wolins Exhibit 
No. 2. 

Mr. Willis. So ordered. 

Mr. Walsh. With whom did you negotiate in the Soviet Embassy 
with reference to the printing of this booklet The Trial of the U-21 

Mr. Wolins. I refuse to answer that question also on the grounds 
previously stated. 

(Document marked "Wolins Exhibit No. 2" and retained in 
committee files.) 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1681 

Mr. Walsh. Will you tell the committee why the Soviet Govern- 
ment advanced to Translation World Publishers, a partnership 
composed of yourself and Mr. Canter, the sum of $2,400? 

Mr. WoLiNS. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds 
previously stated. 

Mr. Tuck. Now, Mr. Chairman, the witness obviously has not 
properly invoked the protection of the fifth amendment, and even 
after having been advised by you as to the proper manner in which 
he could invoke it he declines to do so. I would suggest — — 

Mr. WoLiNS. Excuse me. I was told and requested by counsel of 
the committee 

Mr. Tuck. I ask you to order and direct the witness to answer 
the question. 

Mr. Willis. I direct you to answer the question. 

Mr. WoLiNS. I was requested by the counsel of the committee to 
save time by making a statement that I refuse to answer the questions 
on the gromids previously stated to save restating them in those cases 
where I feel that such an answer is necessary. If you would like, 
I can fully state each time the reasons for refusing to answer. This 
is completely at the discretion of the committee. 

Mr. Willis. We are in another area now. We are now in the area 
of my having ordered you, and you refuse to abide by the orders on 
the grounds previously stated. That is what it amoimts to. Is 
that correct? 

Mr. WoLiNs. 1 hope so. My counsel seems to feel so. I am willing 
to accept your word. 

Mr. Willis. It is very significant under the procedure, which is 
whether or not you are in contempt. 

Proceed. 

Mr. WoLiNS. I certainly feel no contempt for this committee. 

Mr. Willis. Pardon. 

Mr. WoLiNS. I certainly feel no contempt for this committee or 
any committee of the Congress. 

Mr. Walsh. Did the Translation World Publishers do anything 
at all in collecting material for the publishing of the geography of 
the U.S.S.R.? 

Mr. WoLiNS. I will refuse and must refuse to answer that question 
for the reasons previously stated. 

Mr. Walsh. Now, according to Exhibit No. 3, a short-form regis- 
tration statement filed with the Department of Justice and signed b}'' 
LeRoy Wolins, the registration number of which is 1426, you left the 
United States on August 10, 1960, visiting countries in Europe and 
Asia for the purpose of gathering information for potential trade 
publications, material for lectures, and Russian language study ma- 
terial for resale. Was any part of this $2,400 that was advanced to 
you by the Soviet Embassy used to defray the expenses of this trip? 

Mr. WoLiNS. On the grounds previously stated, I refuse to answer 
that question. 

(Document marked "Wolins Exhibit No. 3" and retained in com- 
mittee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. Did you actually receive $2,400 from the Soviet 
Embassy? 

Mr. Wolins. On the grounds previously stated I refuse to answer 
that question, counsel. 



1682 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Willis. Counsel, I didn't quite understand the trip. Is that 
pursuant to a passport? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Willis. He obtained a passport? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Willis. To travel somewhere? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Willis. Wliere did the passport saA' he would travel? 

IMr. Walsh. Well, in the registration statement he stated that he 
traveled Great Britain, trance, Germany, Poland, U.S.S.R., Turkey, 
Bulgaria, Greece, Egypt, Indhi. Singapore, Hong Kong, and Japan. 

Mr. Willis. Was that before he filed the application for registra- 
tion? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Willis. As a foreign agent? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Willis. That he made the trip? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. The trip was made on August 10, 1960. 

Mr. Willis. Do I understand the situation to be substantially 
this: That he obtained a passport; made a trip to these countries, 
including the Soviet Union and the Iron Curtain countries; he came 
back and pursuant to a law of Congress filed an application to be an 
agent of a foreign principal? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Willis. Namely, the Soviet Union through the Embass}-? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Willis. And the obvious reason, as stated in the application 
itself, was that he intended to be an agent in connection with the U-2 
trial and that he did publish his version of that trial. Is that correct? 

Mr. Walsh. Well, sir, he left in August ol 1960 a ' returned Oc- 
tober 31 of 1960. This registration statement is file February 16, 
1961, and with reference to a question in the registration statement, 
Number 4, ''All visits to or residence in foreign countries during ihe 
past 5 years," it was in response to that question that he stated 
that he had toured these various places together to gain information 
for potential trade publications, material for lectures, and Russian 
language study, material for resale. That was the purpose he left the 
United States" August 10, 1960. 

Mr. Willis. And he did publish the book? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Willis. And sold copies to the Soviet Embassy? 

Mr. Walsh. 1,000 copies. 

Mr. Willis. And in applying to be an agent of a foreign power it 
was disclosed necessarily that he intended to be an agent of that 
foreign power and it had to do with the publication of this book? 
That is what it amounts to, doesn't it? 

Mr. Walsh. I would say so, sir. 

Mr. Willis. And, of course, now he stands mute. He won't an- 
swer anything because allegedly Congress has no power in a mess of 
this kind. 

Proceed. 

Mr. Walsh. Did the Soviet Union, through its Embassy here in 
the United States, purchase 1,000 copies of the book The Trial of the 
C/-^ for $1,000? 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1683 

Mr. WoLiNS. On the grounds previously stated I will refuse to 
answer that question. 

Mr. Walsh. And was this money paid to the Translation World 
Publishers in addition to the $2,400 which you had previously received 
for the purpose of publishing a geography of the U.S.S.R.? 

Mr. WoLiNS. I will refuse to answer that question also on the 
grounds previously stated. 

Mr. Walsh. Well, has your partnership received any additional 
money from the Soviet Embassy in Washington in connection with 
the publication The Trial oj the U-21 

Mr. WoLiNS. I will refuse to answer that question also on the 
grounds previously stated. 

Mr. Walsh. Well, did you ever publish a geography of the U.S.S.R.? 

Mr. WoLiNS. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds 
previously stated. 

Mr. Walsh. Well, what did you do with the $2,400 for the purpose 
of publishing a geography which was never published? 

Mr. WoLiNS. I refuse to answer this question also on the grounds 
previously stated. 

Mr. Walsh. Did the partnership make any restitution to the 
Embassy of the Soviet Union in Washington, either in cash or through 
services, for the $2,400 that you had previously received? 

Mr. WoLiNS. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds 
previously stated. 

Mr. Walsh. Now, on Feburary 16, the date that the Translation 
World Publishers registered under the Foreign Agents Registration 
Act, it served formal notice of the termination of the registration. 
Subsequent to the termination of the registration, did this partnership 
publish any material supplied to it by a representative of the agency 
of the Soviet Union? 

Mr. WoLiNS. On the grounds previously stated, I will refuse to 
answer that question. 

Mr. Walsh. I show you Exhibit 4, which I ask to be marked and 
filed for reference, Mr. Chairman, and ask you, Mr. Wolins, to identify 
that paper and state whether or not that is your signature on it? 

Mr. Wolins. On the grounds previously stated, I will refuse to 
answer that question. 

(Document marked "Wolins Exhibit No. 4" and retained in com- 
mittee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. I now show you a book, the title of which is The Case 
Against General Heusinger, which was published by the Translation 
World Publishers, and ask you whether or not this book was prepared 
by the partnership. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Wolins. On the grounds previously stated, I refuse to answer 
that question. 

Mr. Walsh. Well, would you tell the committee with whom you 
had negotiations when this book was published by the Translation 
World Publishers? 

Mr. Wolins. On the grounds previously stated, 1 refuse to answer 
that question. 

Mr. Walsh. Was it anybody in the Soviet Embassy in Washington? 

Mr. Wolins. On the grounds previously stated, I refuse to answer 
that question. 



1684 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Walsh. Would you tell the committee where you got the 
translations and the documents that are contained in this book, 
The Case Against General Heusinger, published by the Translation 
World Publishers? 

Mr. WoLiNS. On the grounds previously stated, I refuse to answer 
that question. 

Mr. Walsh. Was any of the material contained in this book 
supplied to the Translation World Publishers by any person in the 
Soviet Embassy here in Washington? 

Mr. WoLiNS. On the gromids previously stated, I will refuse to 
answer that question. 

Mr. Willis. In the preparation of the book, did you collaborate 
with staff members of the Soviet Embassy? 

Mr. WoLiNS. On the grounds previously stated, I will refuse to 
answer that question. 

Mr. Willis. Did you collaborate with any persons known to you to 
be Commmiists? 

Mr. WoLiNS. I will refuse to answer that question also, on the 
grounds previously stated. 

Mr. Willis. With reference to the date of the application and the 
date of the book, which is dated first? The application, or the book? 

In other words, was he an apparent registered agent before the book 
was published, 

Mr. Walsh. He had withdrawn his registration prior to the publica- 
tion of this book which we are now speaking of, The Case Against 
General Heusinger. 

Mr. Willis. He filed the application on what date? 

Mr. Walsh. He filed application to be the agent of a foreign power 
on February 16, 1961. They are Exhibits 1,2, and 3. 

Then, on the same date, February 16, he withdrew his application, 
and this book was published 

Mr. Willis. The Case Against General Heusinger was — — 

Mr. Walsh. Was published subsequent to the time he withdrew 
his registration statement. 

Mr. Willis. And the other book, the U-2 Trial? 

Mr. Walsh. The Trial of the U-2. 

Mr. Willis. Was published before, or after, the filing of the appli- 
cation and the withdrawal? 

Mr. Walsh. Prior to. 

Mr. Willis. Prior to? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Willis. And the trip to these foreign countries, including the 
Soviet Union, was prior to the filing of the application? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Willis. All right. 

Mr. Walsh. Now, I again ask you who prepared the introduc- 
tion 

Mr. Willis. Let me say that I haven't examined the application 
or its withdrawal, but it is inconceivable to me that one has a riglit 
to file application because he thinks he should file in pursuant to law 
and that at his will willy-nilly withdraw it. If the law permits that, 
we better look into that, too. 

In other words, he filed application to be an agent of a foreign 
power because he thought he was obligat(Ml to do it under the Foreign 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1685 

Agents Registration Act, with which I am familiar, because one of 
its latest amendments, of 1950 or thereabouts, was reported out of 
committee by myself. Then he later on, or on the same day, just 
withdraws it. What kind of protection he thinks he can afford himself 
under these circumstances I don't know, but he is here, if he can talk 
about it. We welcome him to. 

Mr. Walsh. My question is the introduction of the book which was 
evidently prepared by the publishers, Translation World Publishers. 
Will you tell me who prepared the introduction to The Case Against 
General Heusinger. 

Mr. WoLiNS. On the same grounds as previously stated, I will 
refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Walsh. Well, did you laiow that at the time this book was 
published all the documents and other documents not contained 
therein had been submitted to the State Department and rejected by 
the State Department? Did you know that prior to the time that 
you published this book? 

Mr. WoLiNS. On the same grounds as previously stated, I will 
refuse to answer that question. 

Mr, JoHANSEN. To clarify the record, Mr. Counsel, submitted to 
the State Department by whom? 

Mr. Walsh. By the Soviet Union, Embassy of the Soviet Union 
in Washington, D.C 

Now, did the Translation World Publishers submit the docmnents 
contained in this book for the purpose of determining whether General 
Heusinger occupied the position he held on the date the documents 
were issued or for the determination as to the authenticity of the 
documents that are contained in this book? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Walsh. Evidently you must have received these documents 
from the Soviet Union, and prior to the time that you published this 
book, did you submit these documents to the State Department and 
ask the State Department whether or not they had checked their 
authenticity and whether or not they were correct and true? 

Mr. WoLiNs. On the grounds previously stated, I refuse to answer 
that question. 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Wolins, according to our information a Soviet 
note to the State Department of the United States contained 67 
documents. This document, The Case Against General Heusinger, 
contains the translation of 56 documents and does not include the 
original German text of 10 of these documents. Can you explain to 
the committee why the original German text of these 10 documents 
was eliminated at the time the book was printed by the Translation 
World Publishers? 

Mr. Wolins. On the grounds previously stated, I will refuse to 
answer that question. 

Mr. Walsh. In other words, the Soviet Union had supplied to the 
State Department prior to the publication of The Case Against General 
Heusinger, 67 documents, whereas you only used 56 documents in 
your publication. Can you explain to the committee why these 
documents were deleted? 

Mr. Wolins. Well, it is your presumption that I used anything, 
but the answer to the question specifically, I will refuse to answer on 
the grounds specifically stated. 

90450 — 62 — pt. 1 8 



1686 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Walsh. In the case of document No. 7, the original document 
is not produced and the Enghsh translation contained in your publica- 
tion, The Case Against General Heusinger, does not reflect that the 
document was actually signed, not by General Heusinger, but by 
Vinzenz Mueller, who was the creator of the postwar East German 
People's Army. Did you know that? 

Mr. WoLiNS. On the grounds previously stated, I refuse to answer 
the question. 

Mr. Walsh. Well, this one document was prepared by Vinzenz 
Mueller, who was the creator of the East German People's Army. 
He is the one that signed it, not General Heusinger, and how does that 
affect General Heusinger, if it was signed by Vinzenz Mueller? 

Mr. WoLiNS. On the grounds previously stated, I refuse to answer 
the question. 

Mr. Walsh. Well, how many copies of The Case Against General 
Heusinger were delivered to any individuals representing agencies of 
the Soviet Union? 

Mr. WoLiNS. On the grounds previously stated, I refuse to answer 
the question. 

Mr. Walsh. Will you tell me how you were compensated for 
publishing this book, The Case Against General Heusinger? 

Mr. WoLiNS. Again it is your assumption that I published it, but 
on the grounds previously stated, I refuse to answer the question. 

Mr. Walsh. According to the book it was published by the Trans- 
lation World Publishers and according to the documents 1, 2, 3 and 4 
in evidence LeRoy Wolins and David S. Canter were the partnership, 
according to the documents which you and your partner filed with the 
Department of Justice. That is my assumption. Had you broken 
up your partnership with Mr. Canter when this book. The Case 
Against General Heusinger, was published? 

Mr. Wolins. On the grounds previously stated, I will refuse to 
answer that question. 

Mr. Walsh. Are you still a partner of Mr. Canter in the Transla- 
tion World Publishers? 

Mr. Wolins. For the same reasons I will refuse to answer that 
question. 

Mr. Walsh. I shall hand you now an envelope addressed to 
McLellan Smith, National Press Building, Washington, D.C., with 
the return address of the Translation W^orld Publishers, postmarked 
Chicago, January 30, 1962, which contained a copy of the book The 
Case Against General Heusinger and a press release, and I ask you who 
stood the expense of this mailing? 

Mr. Wolins. On the grounds previously stated I refuse to answer 
the question. 

Mr. Walsh. Is your answer the same with reference to the press 
release? 

(Document handed to witness.) 

Mr. Wolins. I would say that on the grounds previously stated, I 
wiU refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Walsh. May I have these two documents, the envelope and 
the press release, marked Wolins Exhibits Nos. 5 and 6 respectively 
for reference by the committee? 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1687 

Mr. Willis. Let them be so marked. 

(Documents marked "Wolins Exhibits Nos. 5 and 6" and retained 
in committee files.) 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Walsh. Was this envelope which I showed you a part of the 
general mailing to the Washington press corps? 

Mr. WoLiNS. On the grounds previously stated, I refuse to answer 
that question. 

Mr. Walsh. Well, did you mail to any person unsolicited copies 
of this book? 

"Sir. Wolins. On the grounds previously stated I refuse to answer 
this question. 

Mr. Walsh. Now, Mr. Wolins, you were a witness before this 
committee on February 3, 1960. At that time you invoked the con- 
stitutional protection of the first and fifth amendments in refusing 
to identify to the committee your occupation. I now hand you the 
short-form registration filed February 16, 1961, and ask you if the 
information contained thereon, to the effect that you were on the date 
a clerical employee of Cross World Books and Periodicals and that 
previously you held the position of assistant manager, is factual? 

Mr. Wolins. Which paragraph did you say? 

Mr. Walsh. Give it back to me and I will show it to you. 

Mr. Wolins. On the grounds previously stated I will refuse to 
answer that question. 

Mr. Walsh. Now, I show you Wolins Exhibit No. 7 and ask you 
whether or not that is your signature on page 3? This was filed on 
March 3, 1960 in connection with a registration by "Rose Rose 
Doing Business as Cross World Books and Periodicals," and I ask 
you whether or not that is your signature on page 3? 

Mr. Willis. What is the date of that document? 

Mr. Walsh. That is March 3, 1960. 

Mr. Willis. That is an application for a registration under the 
Foreign Agents Registration Act? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Willis. Is that the same Cross World that we heard about 
yesterday? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Willis. That was taken over by Levy and Svenchansky? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, and under the general managership of Mr. 
Lotsman, and this is the Cross World Books and Periodicals. Is that 
your signature on page 3 of Exhibit 8 which I now hand you? 

Mr. Wolins. You have already handed it to me and I have looked 
at it. 

Mr. Walsh. I handed you 7. This is another. 

Mr. Wolins. Then I haven't answered the question that is pending. 

Mr. Walsh. You have answered the question. 

Mr. Wolins. I do not believe so. You may read the notes of the 
stenographer. 

Mr. Walsh. Will you answer it now if you haven't answered it 
before? 

Mr. Wolins. Could you check the record? If I have 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Wolins. We are dealing with Exhibit 7, as I understand it? 

Mr. Walsh. Seven first. 



1688 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. WoLiNS. And I have not answered if it was my signature on 
page 3 of the document? 

Mr. Walsh. That is correct. 

Mr. WoLiNS. I refuse to answer on the grounds previousl}^ stated. 

(Document marked "Wolins Exhibit No. 7" and retained in com- 
mittee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. I show you a short-form of the registration of the Cross 
World Books and Periodicals filed June 16, 1960, and ask 3-ou if that 
is your signature on page 3? 

i\.nd may this be marked Wolins Exhibit No. 8? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Willis. So ordered. As to the previous document referred to 
which you said was an application for registration under the Foreign 
Agents Registration Act, who was the foreign agent in that instance? 
The Soviet Embassy, just like the previous one? 

Mr. Walsh. No; that is MezhKniga. That is the International 
Book Company in Moscow. 

Mr. Willis. Moscow? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Willis. And this witness signed that application in what 
capacity? Let me put it this way. The applicant was whom? 

Mr. Walsh. The applicant was the Cross World Books and Peri- 
odicals and Mr. Wolins evidently signed as an employee and assistant 
manager. 

Mr. Willis. Who is named in there as the owner? 

Mr. Walsh. Rose Rose. 

Mr. Willis. Rose Rose? 

Mr. Walsh. She was the owner of this Cross World Books and 
Periodicals prior to the time that Mr. Lotsman came in. 

Mr. Willis. In any event, this witness signed this application on 
behalf of the applicant? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Willis. All right. 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Wolins, when you appeared 

Mr. Wolins. I believe there is a question pending. 

Mr. Walsh. I asked you whether or not you identify your signature 
on 

Mr. Wolins. You asked me and I did not have time to answer it. 

Mr. Walsh. Well, will you please answer it now? 

Mr. Wolins. The answer is that I refuse to answer that question 
on the grounds previously stated. 

(Document marked "Wolins Exhibit No. 8" and retained in 
committee files.) 

Mr. Walsh. I had presumed that that was your answer because 
I had heard it so many times before. 

Mr. Wolins, when you appeared before this committee on February 
3, 1960, you were asked whether or not you had prior to the time 
solicited or received funds from the Soviet Embassv in Washington, 
D.C. 

Mr. Willis. Louder, please. 

He was asked whether he had received funds from whom? 

Mr. Walsh. You were asked whether or not you had prior to the 
time solicited or received funds from the Soviet Embassy in Wash- 
ington, D.C. At that time you refused to answer seeking protection 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANiDA 1689 

under the fifth and first amendments of the Constitution. In hght 
of the fact that you, in your registration statement filed as coowner 
of the Translation World Publishers, acknowledged that you had 
received $2,400 from the Soviet Embassy, I will now ask you to detail 
for the committee all moneys received by you from the Soviet Embassy 
in Washington, D.C, or any Soviet agency during the last five years? 

Mr. WoLiNS. On the grounds previously stated I will refuse to 
answer the question. 

Mr. Walsh. Did they subsidize all the trips that you have taken 
to the Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia, and Poland? 

Mr. WoLiNS. On the grounds previously stated I refuse to answer. 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Wolins, are you now or have you ever been a 
member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Wolins. On the grounds previously stated I will refuse to 
answer that question. 

Mr. Walsh. I see no further need for questioning this witness, Mr. 
Chairman. I therefore ask that he be excused, unless you have 
questions. 

Mr. Willis. I have no questions. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. No questions. 

Mr. ScHADEBERG. I have nothing. 

Mr. Bruce. No. 

Mr. Willis. You are excused. 

Call your next witness, counsel. 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Canter. 

Mr. Willis. Please raise your right hand. 

Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you are about to give 
will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help 
you God? 

Mr. Canter. I do. 

Mr. Willis. What is his name? 

Mr. Walsh. David S. Canter. 

TESTIMONY OF DAVID SIMON CANTER, ACCOMPANIED BY 
COUNSEL, GEORGE B. KLEINDORFER 

Mr. Walsh. Will you give the committee your full name, sir, and 
where you live. 

Mr. Canter. David Simon Canter, spelled D-a-v-i-d, Simon spelled 
S-i-m-o-n, Canter spelled C-a-n-t-e-r, and I reside at 4730 South Kim- 
bark Avenue, Chicago 15, Illinois. Kimbark Avenue is spelled 
K-i-m-b-a-r-k. 

Mr. Walsh. You are represented by counsel, I notice. 

Mr. Canter. Yes. 

Mr. Walsh. Would you please identify yourself. 

Mr. Kleindorfer. Certainly, sir. My name is George B. Klein- 
dorfer, 1869 Mintwood Place NW., Washington, D.C. I am a mem- 
ber of the Bar of the District of Columbia, and I am appearing here 
at the request of the American Civil Liberties Union. 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Canter, would you give the committee your edu- 
cational background? 

Mr. Canter. I am very happy to answer this question. My answer 
to this question is, I must respectfully decline to answer this question 
for the folio wins; eis-ht lesal reasons: 



1690 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Legal reason No. 1, The mandate of this committee prohibits this 
committee from inquiring into any legislative area where it cannot 
legislate. The mandate of this committee prohibits this committee 
from legislating into an area prohibited by amendment No. 1 to the 
Constitution of the United States. 

Legal reason No. 2. The mandate of this committee and its legisla- 
tive purpose is so broad and so all-inclusive, as Mr. Justice Douglas 
has stated, that there cannot be any pertinence in this particular 
legislative purpose as far as the area of free press is concerned. 

Legal reason No. 3. The hearing today, as well as the line of inquir}'^ 
that has been presented in the first part of this session, has been of 
such a nature as to violate the separation of powers clause in the 
Constitution of the United States. This means, in my own personal 
opinion of course, that this committee hearing has invaded the co- 
ordinate branches of government in that it is a prosecuting as well as 
a judicial function. 

Legal reason No. 4. Amendment number five of the Constitution of 
the United States prohibits a witness from being compelled to testify 
against himself. If there are any violations of any laws of the L^nited 
States of America, if there are any indications of conspiracies or any 
crimes that have l)een committed, such information, such violations, 
shall be prosecuted by the executive branch of the Government in its 
proper functions, as well as the judicial branch of the Government, and 
not by a Congress, and, fui^ther, that such information shall be inde- 
pendent of any person's testimony against himself. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Legal reason No. 5. The sixth amendment to the Constitution of 
the United States grants a person the right of counsel, grants a person 
to be informed of the nature and the source of the various charges 
against him, grants him the right of cross-examination. When I was 
summoned here I was summoned here by a cryptic form of a subpena 
which did not inform me why I was summoned here. It did not 
enable me to give any time to prepare any kind of information, I 
knew not whatsoever what the purpose was, and yesterday, before I 
was summoned, of course, before I was a witness, I asked for a copy 
of the legislative purpose. I was denied such copy and only 5 minutes 
before this particular hearing opened was I given what the legislative 
purpose of this hearing was. If, gentlemen, this committee is to per- 
form what it feels its proper function, the least it can do is inform the 
witnesses of the charges, of the nature of the charges, against him. I 
want the record to show, with the permission, of course, of the counsel 
of the committee, that the original subpena, dated on the 22 d day of 
June in the year of our Lord 1962, issued a summons to David S. 
Canter, Translation World Publishers, and there was no matter 
whatsoever with respect to the nature of any charges, or any docu- 
ments, or any type of provision whatsoever. This I contend in my 
personal opinion violates amendment six to the Constitution of the 
United States of America. 

Mr. Walsh. What is the last statement on the bottom of the 
subpena? 

Mr. Canter. Is the committee asking me 

Mr. Walsh. Read it into the record, will you. 

Mr. Canter. Is the committee asking me a question? 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1691 

Mr. Walsh. I am asking you to read in the record — you have 
akeady started to read part of the subpena 

Mr. Canter. Does the committee reaHze I have not finished my 
legal reasons. I will be allowed to continue? 

Mr. Walsh. As long as we are on the subpena and it will be more 
continuous — ■ — ■ 

Mr. Canter. Provided I am allowed to continue my legal reasons. 

Mr. Walsh. I have not interrupted you as yet. All I asked you 
to do was read the last paragraph on the subpena as long as you are 
talking about the subpena, the footnote. 

Mr. Canter. I will be happy to cooperate Avitli the committee 
providing I have my rights to answer questions and not be interrupted. 
It states here: "If you desire a conference with a representative of the 
Committee prior to the date of the hearing, please caU or write to: 
Staff Director, Committee on Un-American Activities, Washington 
25, D.C., Telephone: CApital 4-3121— Ext. 3051." 

Mr. Walsh. Now, continue with your legal reasons. 

Mr. Canter. Thank you very much. 

Legal reason No. 6. The reason why I feel that my Constitutional 
rights are being invaded is because Rule 11 setting up the existence 
of this committee is so broad and so all-inclusive as to be violative of 
the due process clause of the fifth amendment to the Constitution of 
the United States. 

Legal reason No. 7. The composition of this committee in my 
personal opinion is illegal because it contravenes Section No. 2 of the 
fourteenth amendment to the Constitution of the United States. 

And, finally, my legal reason No. 8 is that this entire inquiry, as 
well as the nature of the specific question, has in effect violated the 
amendment No. 1 to the Constitution of the United States. 

Mr. Willis. Let me say this. Have you completed your reasons 
for not telling us about your educational background? 

Mr. Canter. Yes, sir. I thought I had completed all my eight 
legal reasons. 

Mr. Willis. And you specified your reasons for not answering a 
question which sought from you an explanation of your educational 
background. Is that it, counsel? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Willis. First, let me say that the Chair does not accept your 
reasons and the Department of Justice and the courts will have to 
decide it. We are not the courts here. Some of your reasons are 
so outlandish that I will not dignify them with an answer, but I 
might mention this. You labor the point that this committee has 
no legislative purpose. I call your attention to the fact that this 
committee, during the period of 1941 to 1960, as I recall, made 96 
separate legislative recommendations. Congress adopted 35 of them, 
and the executive departments have embodied 13 by administrative 
actions. During the present Congress, to date, five bills were enacted 
into law and three bills were passed by the House based upon this 
committee's recommendations. I think that the invocation of aU 
these beautiful provisions of the Constitution under which we live is 
not sincerely invoked. I simply say that we do not accept jour objec- 
tions and I, therefore, now order you, as a basis for possible contempt 
proceedings, to answer the pending question. 



1692 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Canter. Is the chairman ordering me to answer this question 
No. 2 with respect to educational background? 

Mr. Willis. That is right. 

Mr. Canter. I am more than happy to answer the question of the 
committee as directed by counsel. My answer to that question is as 
I have previously stated and my legal reasons for doing so. 

Mr. Willis. Proceed, then. 

Mr. Walsh. WUl you also tell the committee what work or what 
5'^our occupation is at the present time? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Canter. I am more than happy to answer the question of the 
counsel. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. Mr. Chairman, let me interrupt at this point. In 
view of the fact that that statement is preceded by his refusal to 
answer on constitutional grounds, I suggest that you dispense with it 
and respond simply to the question. 

Mr. Canter. With respect to the question just directed at me, 
question No. 3, I must respectfully decline to answer on the grounds 
previously stated in the answer to the previous question. 

Mr. Willis. Did that have to do with occupation? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Willis. I order and direct you to answer that question. 

Mr. Canter. Is the chairman of the committee directing me to 
answer a question with respect to occupation? 

Mr. Willis. That is right. 

Mr. Canter. I must, as I have stated before, respectfully decline 
to answer this question on the grounds that I have previously stated 
in the answer to your previous question No. 2. 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Canter, I show you Wolins Exhibit No. 1 and 
direct your attention to page 8. This is a registration statement 
filed by the Translation World Publishers and I ask you whether or 
not that is your signature on page 8 of the registration statement. 

Mr. Willis. And that is an application filed with the Department 
of Justice to register as an agent of a foreign principal? 

Mr. Walsh. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Willis. Under the provisions of the Foreign Agents Registra- 
tion Act? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir, of 1938, as amended. 

Mr. Willis. And one of the latest amendments was reported out 
by myself so I am quite familiar with it, so proceed. 

Mr. Canter. Do I understand the counsel's question correctly, 
that he is asking me only to identify the signature? 

Mr. Walsh. Is that your signature and will you please identify it 
as such? 

Mr. Canter. Only the signature and not the contents of the docu- 
ment? 

Mr. Walsh. That is correct. 

Mr. Canter. I am more than happy to answer the question of 
counsel. 

Mr. Willis. You mean you would be more than happy not to 
answer it? 

Mr. Canter. My answer is I must respectfully decline to answer 
on the previous grounds stated in answer to your question No. 2. 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1693 

Mr. Walsh. Well, did you execute that document on February 13, 
1961? 

Mr. Canter. My answer to your question No. 4 is the same as 
the answer to your question No. 2 and on the same legal grounds. 

Mr. Willis. Are you fearful or apprehensive that if you answered 
that question you would be subjected to possible criminal prosecution? 
And I am being objective for the sake of the record. I am laying the 
foundation to determine whether or not the invocation of the fifth 
amendment is a sincere and bona fide one. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Canter. I have already, Mr. Chairman, stated my reasons for 
declining to answer the second question, the third question, and the 
fourth question, and fifth question. My answer to you in your ques- 
tion, that is, committee question No. 6, is the same as I have answered 
question No. 2. 

Mr. Willis. Well, of course, one has a right for real reasons to 
invoke the protection of the fifth amendment, and this committee 
concedes that; but I do not accept the sincerity or propriety of your 
invocation in this instance because you will not answer the question 
as to whether the invocation is based upon fear or apprehension of 
getting you into trouble, let us say, or subject you to criminal prose- 
cution. 

Proceed. I am just making that for the record. 

Mr. Walsh. According to Wolins Exhibit No. 1, previously intro- 
duced, which is the registration statement filed by the Translation 
World Pubhshers with the Department of Justice pursuant to a law, 
it states here under 1(d) "Name of" 

Mr. Willis. Is that the same document you referred to a while 
ago? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. "Name of person or persons in charge 
of principal office. David S. Canter & LeRoy Wolins." Is that you 
that is mentioned as David S. Canter on Wolins Exhibit No. 1? 

(Witness handed document.) 

Mr. Canter. Counsel mentioned 1(d)? Was that the question? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes. 

Mr. Canter. My answer to your question No. 7, Mr. Counsel, is 
the same as I have given to you in question No. 2 and the legal 
grounds therefor. 

Mr. Walsh. You were in this Caucus Room and heard all of the 
questions which I propounded to LeRoy Wolins, were you not? 

Mr. Canter. I was present in the Caucus Room when a previous 
witness appeared upon the stand and was asked various questions. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you hear those questions? 

Mr. Canter. Provided my answer would not waive any of the 
previous rights which I have claimed in my answer to question No. 2. 

Mr. Walsh. But you were present when those questions were 
asked? 

Mr. Canter. My answer to that question is, as I have previously 
answered. 

Mr. Willis. He said he was present without waiving any of his 
rights, so for once he has answered. 



1694 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Walsh. Now, I propose to ask you, in order to get the back- 
ground of the Translation World Publishers and its various functions 
in the publishing business, the same as I asked Mr. Wolins. 

(At this point Mr. Tuck left hearing room.) 

Mr. Willis. Before you come to that, Counsel, this document you 
questioned him about was the registration of Cross World? 

Mr. Walsh. Translation World Publishers. 

Mr. Willis. Not Cross World? 

Mr. Walsh. No. 

Mr. Willis. All right. 

Mr. Walsh. I will withdraw that question and reframe it. You 
stated that 3"ou were present when the previous witness testified in 
this Caucus Room today. He immediately preceded you. His name 
was LeRoy Wolins. Now, I propose to ask you the same questions 
with reference to the Translation World Publishers as I asked him. 
And will you tell the committee whether or not you will persist in 
claiming the alleged reasons that you have previously stated and that 
you will refuse to answer all the questions that I propose to ask you at 
this time? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Canter. My answer to your prevous question is that I cannot ; 
in my answer to that last question, make a general refusal to answer 
all questions of the committee because 

Mr. Willis. Proceed, counsel. 

Mr. Canter. — it indicates contempt. I do not intend to do that. 
The answer is that, on each and every specific question, I want to 
consult with my counsel and answer it in the way I have ; and I have 
not, and if I have, the committee has misunderstood me — I do not 
intend a general refusal to all questions. Questions may be, in my 
opinion and in consultation with my counsel, perfectly valid ques- 
tions. Then I will answer, but if the committee feels that I am in 
general contempt of the committee, that is a different story. I am 
not and I insist that I am not. My question is each and every specific 
question. 

Mr. Willis. Proceed, Counsel. 

Mr. Canter. I hope that that answers your question. 

Mr. Walsh. What association did you have with LeRoy Wolins 
prior to the creation of the Translation World Publishers? 

Mr. Canter. My answer to that question is the same as I have 
answered question No. 2, in answer to your question No. 2, and with 
the legal grounds associated therewith. 

Mr. Walsh. What books, pamphlets, et cetera, other than The 
Trial oj the U-2 and The Case Against General Heusinger, did the 
Translation World Publishers publish? 

Mr. Canter. My answer to this question is the same as I have 
answered previously with the legal grounds therefor. 

Mr. Walsh. Now, I show you Exhibit B, which is an exhibit at- 
tached to the registration statement (previously introduced as Wo- 
lins Exhibit No. 2), which sets forth that, prior to Power's trial, nego- 
tiations were started in August of 1960 to receive and print the trial 
transcript of the U-2. Who instituted these negotiations, and with 
whom, in order to get the transcript? 

Mr. Canter. Are you showing me this document? 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1695 

Mr. Walsh. That is a statement that was made. 

(Witness handed document.) 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Canter. My answer to the pending question is the same answer 
that I have given in answer to your question No. 2 and the legal 
grounds therefor. 

Mr. Walsh. What money had the Translation World Publishers 
received from the Soviet Government through the Embassy in Wash- 
ington, D.C., prior to the receipt of the trial transcript? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Air. Canter. Could you be so kind as to repeat the question? I 
am not sure I understand it. 

Mr. Walsh. With whom did you have negotiations for the printing 
of the trial transcript of the U-2 incident? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Canter. My answer to that question is the same as my answer 
to your question No. 2 and the legal grounds cited therefor. 

Mr. Walsh. And did you receive any money from the Soviet Gov- 
ernment prior to your publishing this pamphlet, The Trial oi the U-21 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Canter. My answer to that question is the same answer as I 
have given to your question No. 2 and the legal grounds cited therefor. 

Mr. Walsh. Well, in Exhibit B (Wolins Exhibit No. 2), it is stated 
that you received from the Soviet Embassy in Washington the sum 
of $2,400, which was allegedly advance payment for 2,400 copies of 
a Geography of the USSR, which the Translation World Publishers 
was to produce and publish. Was this the real purpose for which the 
money was received? 

Mr. Canter. My answer to that question is the same answer I have 
given to you in response to your question No. 2 and the legal ground 
cited therefor. 

Mr. Walsh. How did the individuals, the partners in the Transla- 
tion World Publishers, use this $2,400? 

Air. Canter. My answer to that question is the same answer as I 
have previously given the committee in response to its question No. 2 
and the legal ground cited therefor. 

Mr. Willis. Counsel, do we have evidence that he procured a 
passport and made a trip to the same or other countries as the previous 
witness did? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Walsh. We have a registration statement, a short-form, which 
was signed by David S. Canter, and on December 27, 1959, he left 
this country and visited, according to the statement, England, 
Holland, Belgium, France, and Switzerland, and the purpose was to 
set up an automobile importing business, and also in the summer of 
1959 he was up in Canada on a vacation, according to this registration 
statement. 

Mr. Willis. All right. 

Mr. Walsh. Did the Translation World Publishers ever receive 
additional money, other than the $2,400 I just asked you about, from 
any Soviet representative? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Canter. My answer to that question is the same as I have 
given in answer to your question No. 2 and the legal grounds therefor. 



1696 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. Walsh. According to the record this committee has, it shows 
you, the Transhition World Pubhshers, did receive $3,400 from the 
Soviet Embassy in Washington, D.C., and for which you allegedly 
delivered to them 1,000 copies of the booklet The Trial of the U-2. 
Is that correct? 

Mr. Canter. My answer to that question is the same answer as 
I have given in response to your question No. 2 and the legal ground 
cited therefor. 

Mr. Walsh. On the same date that the Translation World Pub- 
lishers filed under the Foreign Agents Registration Act the fact that 
they were the agent for a foreign power, you also filed on the same day 
a notice of the termination of the registration. Is that correct? 
(Wolins Exhibit No. 4.) 

Mr. Canter. My answer to that question is the same as I have 
given in response to yom- question No. 2 and the legal grounds cited 
therefor. 

Mr. Walsh. Now, has the Translation World Publishers engaged 
in any activitv on behalf of the Soviet Government since February 13, 
1961? 

Mr. Canter. My answer to that question is the same as I have 
given in response to your question No. 2 and the legal grounds cited 
therefor. 

Mr. Walsh. I show you a paper-back booklet entitled The 
Case Against General Heusinger, and it was printed by the Transla- 
tion World Publishers. Will you tell the committee with whom 
Translation World Publishers negotiated for the documents and the 
translations contained in this booklet? 

(Witness handed booklet.) 

Mr. Canter. My answer to that question is the same as I have 
given in response to your question No. 2 and the legal reasons cited 
therefor. 

Mr. Walsh. Will you look at that booklet and look at the introduc- 
tion and tell the committee who prepared the introduction? 

Mr. Canter. Counsel has reference to the introductions on pages 
i to V, this Roman numeral i to v. 

Mr. Walsh. I would say so, yes. 

Mr. Canter. My answer to that question is the same as I have 
given in answer to your question No. 2 and the legal reasons cited 
therefor. 

Mr. Walsh. Were copies of this booklet transmitted by the Trans- 
lation World Publishers to the Soviet Government or to the Soviet 
Embassy here in Washington? 

Mr. Canter. I am not too sure I understand the question. Copies 
of the book of this? You are talking about this Case Against General 
Heusinger? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Canter. My answer to that question is the same as I have 
answered 3'^our previous question No. 2 and the legal reasons cited 
therefor. 

Mr. Walsh. Did you receive any money or compensation from any 
Soviet representative or the Soviet Embassy for the purchase of 
The Case Against General Heusinger? 

Mr. Canter. Counsel has asked me whether I have received any 
money 



OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 1697 

Mr. Walsh. I will withdraw that question. 

Mr. Canter. For the purchase of that book? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes. 

Mr. Canter. My answer to that question is the same as I have 
answered question No. 2 and the legal reasons cited therefor. 

Mr. Willis. Well, did you receive any money in connection with 
its publication? 

Mr. Canter. I thank the committee chairman. That is what I 
was thinking of really in answer to that question. 

^Ir. Willis. I do not think you answered my question. 

Mr. Canter. Oh, counsel is asking me a question. Oh, I'm sorry. 
My answer to counsel's question is, if I understood it, whether I 
have received any money from any Soviet Embassy or anyone in 
Moscow for the publication of this book. Is that my understanding 
of that question? 

Mr. Willis. Well, he asked "for the piu-chase." I asked you, 
"with its publication." It is a different question. 

Mr. Canter. Thank you very much for clarifying the question, 
Mr, Chairman. My answer to that question is the same as I have 
answered in response to your question No. 2 and the legal reasons 
cited therefor. 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Canter, have you ever had any formal affiliation 
with the Communist Party of the United States? 

Mr. Canter. My answer to that question is the same as I have 
answered to your previous question No. 2 and the legal reasons cited 
therefor. 

Mr. Walsh. Do you know a Carl Nelson of Chicago? 

Mr. Canter. My answer to that question is the same as I have 
previously answered to yoiu" question No. 2, and the legal reasons 
cited therefor. 

Mr. Walsh. Well, Mr. Nelson, Carl Nelson, appeared before this 
committee and identified himself as a member of the Communist 
Party. Did you know that Carl Nelson was a member of the Com- 
munist Party at any time? 

Mr. Canter. My answer to that question is the same as I have 
answered your previous question No. 2 and the legal reasons cited 
therefor. 

Mr. Walsh. Mr. Nelson told this committee that he knew you 
to be a member of the Communist Party. Is that true or false? 

Mr. Willis. And that statement was under oath? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Willis. All right. 

Mr. Walsh, Was he telling the truth when he stated under oath 
that he knew you to be a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Canter. My answer to that question is the same as I have 
answered in response to your question No. 2 and the legal reasons 
cited therefor. 

Mr, Willis. Well, are you now, or have you ever been, a member 
of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Canter. My answer to that question is the same as I have 
previously stated in response to your question No. 2 and the legal 
reasons cited therefor. 



1698 OUTLETS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SOVIET PROPAGANDA 

Mr. "Walsh. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. JoHANSEN. No questions. 

Mr. Bruce. Mr. Chairman, I would like to make an observation, 
I believe that this witness in his preliminary statement has stated as 
good a case for the existence of this committee as I have heard. He 
stated that the executive branch has the power of prosecution for 
criminal acts and violations of law. For a matter of record, I think 
it is very obvious that under our system of Government it is the 
prerogative of the United States to establish the laws by which the 
executive branch can determine what is a criminal act. It is the 
function of this committee to recommend to the Congress legislation 
in the interest of the internal security. The committee conducts 
investigations and hearings to determine the need for this law in order 
that the executive branch might have the authority to act. The 
executive branch must operate under legal authority, and that legal 
authority is provided by the Congress, so I think the witness has 
stated a very excellent case for the existence and perpetuation of this 
committee. 

Mr. Willis. I could not put it more forcefully and more clearly. 
Is that the last witness? 

Mr. Walsh. Yes, sir; he is the last witness. 

Mr. Willis. The Chair would Uke to say this in addition to what 
I have already said about the position of this committee in respect 
to the attitude of this witness: It is perfectly obvious to me, and we 
wiU have to discuss it in executive session of course, that the publica- 
tion of the book The Case Against General Heusinger, by Translation 
World Pubhshers is a clear case of violation of the Foreign Agents 
Registration Act and it will be my recommendation that this case be 
presented to the Department of Justice and that the record be sent 
there for consideration of prosecution. 

The committee will stand in recess subsequent to the call of the 
Chair. 

Mr. Canter. Does this mean that the witness has been dismissed? 

Mr. Willis. You are excused. 

Mr. Canter. Thank you. 

(Whereupon, at 11:55 a.m., Thursday, July 12, 1962, the hearings 
in the above-entitled matter were recessed, subject to the caU of the 
Chair.) 

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