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Full text of "Community facilities plan and public improvements program, Hertford, North Carolina"

1 1 :H57/2 
c.2 



North Carolina SM* Library. 
Raleigh 



N. C 
Doc. 




COMMUNITY FACILITIES PLAN AND 
PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM 



HERTFORD, NORTH CAROLINA 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hil 



COMMUNITY FACILITIES PLAN AND 
PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM 



HERTFORD, NORTH CAROLINA 

http://www.archive.org/details/communityfacilitOOhert 



I he preparation of this report was financially aided through a 
rom the Deportment of Housing and Urban De- 
velopment under the Urban Planning Assistance program auth- 
y Section 701 of the Housing Act of 1954, as amended. 



PREPARED FOR 

THE TOWN OF HERTFORD, NORTH CAROLINA 
Emmett E. Landing, Mayor 



COMMISSIONERS 



W. D. Cox H. C. Sullivan 

Jesse Harris C. C. Winslow 



PREPARED BY 

THE HERTFORD PLANNING BOARD 

Jack Kanoy, Chairman 

J. Moody Matthews, Jr. Charles M. Harrell, Jr 

W. L. Tilley Ray Haskett 



TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE FROM 

NORTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT 
DIVISION OF COMMUNITY PLANNING 

George J. Monaghan, Administrator 

COASTAL AREA OFFICE 
James R. Hinkley, Director 



PROJECT STAFF 

William E. Howell, Community Planner 
Marian J. Alligood, Secretary 



December 1967 Price $1.00 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

COMMUNITY FACILITIES PLAN Page 

Introduct ion 

Purpose .......... ........ 1 

Scope 1 

Methodology 2 

Population Trends 2 

Governmental Organization 4 

Administrative Facilities 

Municipal Building 5 

City Garage 5 

Public Works Services 

Water System 13 

Sewerage System 15 

Street System ...................................... 17 

Refuse Collection and Disposal ...... .............. . 20 

Cemeteries ......................................... 21 

Public Parking ............ ........................ . 23 

Municipal Enterprises 

Electricity .............. ......................... . 25 

Ice Plant . ........... ..... 25 

Social and Cultural Services 

School System ....................... ....„„„....... . 27 

Public Library ..................................... 30 

Recreation ......................................... 31 

Public Welfare ..................................... 33 

Public Health ................................... 34 

Summary of Recommendations ............................ 35 

PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM 

Introduction 41 

Schedule of Improvements .,...,.....„„.....„„.......... 43 

LIST OF MAPS 

Water System „. 14 

Sewer System 16 

Street System 18 




COMMUNITY FACILITIES 

PLAN 



INTRODUCTION 



INTRODUCTION 

PURPOSE 

Today, municipal governments are called upon to render more 
and better services to their citizenry. Not only has a higher 
standard of living caused greater demand for such services, but 
a more educated public will no longer tolerate temporary and sub- 
standard measures to meet everyday needs of urban life. These 
persons realize that adequate water and sewerage facilities, 
drainage systems, schools, recreation facilities, and police and 
fire protection will increase property values and help stem the 
tide of blight into a neighborhood. Upgrading the level of these 
services will also make the town more attractive to prospective 
industries surveying the area. 

Most of the services discussed in this report are provided 
by the municipality; others are provided by the county government 
Since these services are for the benefit of the general public, 
the public has a right to expect these services to be provided 
under the principles of adequacy and efficiency. The inflating 
cost of maintaining and expanding these facilities has placed a 
premium on planning. Appropriations for projects that will be 
outdated in a few years cannot be tolerated. All expenditures 
should be carefully planned to insure that maximum benefit will 
be derived. 



SCOPE 

This report is an inventory and analysis of all existing 
public facilities and services of the Town of Hertford for the 

1 



purpose of determining the adequacy of the facilities in meeting 
present and future needs. Recommendations are included for the 
improvement or correction of present deficiencies and for meeting 
future demands. 

This report supplies the background data which is needed to 
formulate a Public Improvements Program for the town.. The Public 
Improvements Program will list the suggested improvements on a 
priority basis. This will help to insure that the recommendations 
in the Community Facilities Plan are provided in the proper place 
and at the proper time. 

METHODOLOGY 

Department heads and city officials were interviewed in 
order to obtain data on existing facilities, policies, and pro- 
posed future facilities. From this data, the various community 
facilities, service functions, and policies were analyzed and 
compared with acceptable local and national standards., Present 
levels of service were determined and capabilities for the future 
were ascertained. Certain needs and deficiencies were uncovered 
and in such cases recommendations for their alleviation were made, 

POPULATION 

Before any planning can be logically conducted, the current 
and projected population of Hertford must be examined. Hertford 
has maintained a population of approximately 2,000 since 1910. 
The growth of most towns depends primarily upon annexation. An 
aggressive annexation policy has been the mam factor that has 



kept Hertford's population around 2,000. Without substantial 
unforeseen growth, no more annexations will be feasible during 
the planning period. The following figures show the current and 
projected populations for Hertford reflecting the annexations of 
1962 and 1964. 

1960 1970 1980 1987 
2,068 2,183 2,032 1,927* 
*Source: Division of Community Planning 

Since the town is not expected to grow during the planning 
period, any facility that is adequate now will be adequate dur- 
ing the planning period unless it must be replaced. Therefore, 
any planning for Hertford should place emphasis upon the improve- 
ment of facilities and not their expansion. 



GOVERNMENT 
ORGANIZATION 



GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION 
The Town of Hertford is under the city manager form of 
government. The town has a mayor and four town commissioners, 
all elected for a term of four years. The mayor is customarily 
appointed as town manager and serves in this capacity on a part- 
time basis. The position of city manager is an endeavor that 
requires considerable skill and should be a full-time job. This 
is the only way a good working relationship with the department 
heads can be developed. Therefore, the Planning Board recommend, 
that the town hire a full-time city manager as soon as the finan 
cial situation permits. 

The organization as shown on the following chart will 
function better in the Town of Hertford. 



Town Clerk 

































































Planning 
Board 




Town 
Attorney 




MAYOR - COMMISSIONERS 










J 










1 




















Board of 
Adjustment 














TOWN MANAGER 





1 




Electrical 
Department 


Utilities 





GOVERNMENT 
FACILITIES 



MUNICIPAL BUILDING 

The municipal building is located on Grubb Street one block 
from the Central Business District. The building is 40 by 60 
feet in size, constructed upon a lot 90 by 115 feet. Built in 
1952, this brick structure is in good condition and is attractive 
in appearance. It houses the offices of the Town Clerk, Police 
Department, and the Perquimans County Chamber of Commerce. There 
also is a meeting hall which seats approximately 50 persons. All 
town meetings and many civic meetings are held in this room. 
Each office has adequate space for both current and future needs. 

There is adequate parking at the municipal building for day- 
to-day business, but not for a meeting that has a large turnout. 
The unpaved, unorganized parking lot located behind the building 
has a capacity of about twenty cars. 

RECOMMENDATION 

The parking lot should be paved and parking should be 
organized. A better layout of the space will provide several 
additional parking spaces. 



CITY GARAGE 
City equipment is sheltered at the city garage located on 
Grubb Street three blocks from the Central Business District. 
The fire station, ice plant, water plant, and the offices of the 
town superintendent and utilities department are on this same 
lot. The garage consists of three separate, wooden structures. 



The garage is used to its capacity making expansion of equip- 
ment impossible. All major equipment is sheltered at present 
except large items such as utility poles that are stored in the 
open at another location. Two problems that exist are that all 
equipment is not under one roof, which makes organization diffi- 
cult, and small equipment of the fire department is mixed with 
street and utility equipment. 

Minor equipment repairs, such as patching and welding, are 
made by the town at the garage. Major maintenance work is done 
by private mechanics. 

These buildings used as garages are old and are nearing the 
end of their usefulness. The structures are cramped with equip- 
ment, leaving very little maneuvering room. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

The town should construct a new garage on another site in 
an area of town that is not congested, possibly on Edenton Road 
Street or Church Street, large enough to house all equipment 
of the town with adequate room for expansion. The new site 
should be large enough to provide for the parking of employees 
and should be fenced and lighted. 



PUBLIC SAFETY 
SERVICES 



VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The Hertford Fire Station is three blocks from the Central 
Business District on Grubb Street. The fire fighting equipment 
is housed in an old brick, building of poor appearance and poor 
condition that was constructed in 1922o In this same building 
is the Town Superintendent's Office, the. water plant, and the 
municipal ice plant. There is adequate room in the building for 
the fire trucks and a meeting hall, but accessory equipment has 
to be stored in a small building behind the main structure. It 
would be desirable to have all the equipment in the same place. 
The grounds are of adequate size with room for substantial off- 
street parking in the front of the building. 

The town has two fire trucks -a 1963 Howe and a 1940 Ameri- 
can LaFrance. The Howe has a storage capacity of 500 gallons 
and a pumping capacity of 750 gallons per minute. The American 
LaFrance has a storage capacity of 150 gallons and a pumping 
capacity of 500 gallons per minute. The Howe carries 1200 feet 
and the American 1000 feet of two and one-half inch hose. In 
addition, each truck carries 400 feet of one and one-half inch 
hose. The town also maintains and operates one pumper and one 
tanker for Perquimans County. The county pays Hertford $4,000 
annually for the maintenance and operation of these two trucks. 

The Howe answers all fire calls within the corporate limits 
and the American is used as a backup truck whenever the need 
arises. The two county trucks answer fire calls anywhere in 
Perquimans County. The town trucks never leave the corporate 



limits of Hertford unless the county pumper is out of operation 
or to recognize a call for help by a neighboring town such as 
Edenton or Elizabeth City. The county trucks can be used inside 
the corporate limits any time the two city trucks are inadequate. 
During an average year, the fire department answers about 20 fire 
calls in the town and 60 in the county. Since the town spent 
$5,828.74 during the last fiscal year and the county only gives 
$4,000 a year, the county is getting a bargain., On the other 
hand, this arrangement affords Hertford a large amount of addi- 
tional protection. 

The department has a volunteer fire chief and 28 volunteer 
firemen. These 29 men are divided into two companies; 19 are 
responsible for fire calls in Hertford and 10 are responsible 
for fire calls in the county. Ten is the minimum number of 
volunteers that can properly operate as a company. 

In order to become a fireman, the volunteer must be a 
responsible person who demonstrates a sincere desire to be a 
fireman. Each must be accepted by a vote of the present force. 
The by-laws of the fire department require 48 hours of training 
before a recruit can participate in fire fighting. Training 
consists of becoming familiar with all the equipment of the 
department, discussions of previous fires pointing out mistakes, 
and using floor plans of existing buildings for planning fire 
fighting in advance. The city encourages all firemen to attend 
lectures and short courses at nearby community colleges. The 
by-laws also require existing members to receive 36 hours of 



training a year. The firemen hold monthly meetings at the fire 
station for this purpose. 

The equipment and personnel of the Hertford Fire Department 
is good enough to be judged as a Class Eight organization by the 
American Insurance Association. Class Eight is the highest rank- 
ing a volunteer department can attain, The next ranking would 
require a full-time professional crew of firemen, but this is 
not deemed feasible at this time. 

The fire department conducts an annual inspection of all 
buildings in the Central Business District, all schools, and all 
governmental buildings in Hertford. Residences are inspected 
only upon request. In addition, the department gives programs 
at civic club meetings on proper techniques of fire prevention. 
These programs and the supervision of inspections is handled by 
the Fire Prevention Committee which consists of three experienced 
f ir emen . 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

1. Inspections should occur more often in high fire 
potent ial areas. 

2. One part of the firemen's training should be an 
understanding of the housing and building codes of 
the town. Firemen could look for violations when 
they are conducting their other duties. 

3. A program of condemnation and demolition of dilap- 
idated structures should be established and rigidly 
enforced . 

4. The zoning ordinance should be enforced in order to 
provide adequate fire breaks between buildings. 



5. In order to prevent narrow streets that will be hard 
to enter and exit with a fire truck, subdivision regu- 
lations should be adopted and followed. 

6. Hertford should try to get more money from the county 
for fire protection purposes. 

7. The Amer ican-LaFrance may have to be replaced during 
the planning period. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The police department is located in the municipal building. 
The office for the chief and the radio equipment is housed in 
one room. The town uses the county jail located in the Central 
Business District. The jail has seven cells with room for twelve 
prisoners. Two cells are separated from the other five and are 
used for women prisoners. "The Perquimans County jail as a 
facility is substandard and affords little or no security for tha 
prisoner or officer confining persons in it. This jail offers 
none of the accommodations that present day jails have and based 
on its age and condition, could not be renovated into a proper 
facility."* 

The personnel of the department consists of a chief and 
four full-time policeman. Recruits must have a high school 
diploma, be at least 21 years old, and have an upstanding char- 
acter. 



inspections of Correctional Institutions, N.C. Department 
of Public Welfare. 



10 



New recruits patrol with a veteran policeman for two months 
before being allowed to function individually. For additional 
training, at least one policeman attends a three week course at 
the College of the Albemarle each year. Training for each offi- 
cer becomes even more important in small towns because of the 
scarcity of equipment and expert personnel. Areas that are usu- 
ally covered in training include first aid, use of firearms, basic 
penal code, investigation principles, and public relations. 

The men work in eight hour shifts six days a week for a 
total of 48 hours a week. Shifts are arranged so that two men 
are on duty at night at all times. 

The department has two radio equipped patrol cars, both 
1965 Plymouths. Each policeman is furnished with a gun, uniform, 
blackjack, and badge. The only additional equipment is a supply 
of tear gas held in reserve for emergencies. The major equip- 
ment deficiencies are the lack of photography and fingerprinting 
equ ipment . 

The accepted standard for adequate police protection is one 
officer for every 500 persons. With a population of approxi- 
mately 2,000 and a force of five, Hertford has a good ratio of 
one policeman for every 400 citizens. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

1. More training of personnel should be conducted. Attend- 
ance of courses at College of the Albemarle and other 
institutions should be continued. 



1 I 



2. Shifts should be standardized. Policemen then could 
plan their family life and recreation on a long-range 
basis. The most desirable shifts can be held as an 
incentive. 

3. A part-time policeman should be hired in order to 
relieve the chief of some of his patrol duties so 
that he can spend more time in the training of the 
staff. 



RESCUE SQUAD 
There is no rescue squad serving Hertford. A rescue squad 
is a volunteer organization composed of citizens dedicated to the 
safety and welfare of the community. These people are trained 
in rescue and civil defense techniques such as first aid and 
life saving. Where rescue squads exist, they are called upon in 
all types of emergencies such as auto and water accidents. Squads 
are available twenty-four hours a day, and their services are 
free of charge. 



RECOMMENDATIONS 

1. A rescue squad of at least 15 men should be initiated 
in Hertford. Probably the most feasible method of 
procuring a squad is to organize on a county wide basis 
Funds will come from the county government. 



2. Needed equipment would include; 

(a) an ambulance with a stretcher and a r esusc i ta tor ; 

(b) truck outfitted with a portable generator, stretch- 
ers, and a field first-aid chest; 

(c) an outboard motorboat with a trailer for water 
rescue operations. 

3. All rescue squad members should be trained in first 
aid and equipment operations. 

4. Since similar skills are required for both services, 
the rescue squad could be incorporated into the exist- 
ing volunteer fire department. However, volunteers 
should come from the entire county. 

12 



PUBLIC WORKS 
SERVICES 



WATER SYSTEM 

Probably the most valuable service a community can render 
its citizens is a clean and abundant water supply,, A good water 
supply is fundamental for the continued good health and welfare 
of its citizens. Moreover, quality and quantity of water are 
extremely important determinants in the growth of a community. 

Hertford obtains its water from two deep wells. These two 
wells have a combined pumping capacity of 600,000 gallons a day. 
Water is stored in two elevated tanks adjacent to the fire sta- 
tion. The larger of these tanks can store 100,000 gallons, and 
the smaller has a capacity of 60,000 gallons. In addition, there 
is a water reservoir with a capacity of 100,000 gallons. The 
water is treated with lime, chlorine, and alum. Water in Hert- 
ford is soft, having only five to seven calcium parts per mil- 
lion. 

The average daily water consumption is 200,000 gallons a 
day with a maximum daily use of 225,000 gallons. At this rate, 
the present facilities will supply the average daily needs of 
the town during the planning period. 

Storage facilities should be enough to provide stable water 
pressures throughout the system, to provide sufficient water at 
periods of peak demand, and to provide an emergency supply for 
fire fighting purposes. Studies by the American Insurance Asso- 
ciation, the latest being in 1964, have given Hertford an ade- 
quate rating in this respect. 



13 



LAND DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

I 


_^— "'* f 




I 


V / ^-^ | 


-T-— §—— / \ 


I 


LEGEND >w 1 


7 A 




RESIDENTIAL I* 1 * 


^^^- j 


\. 


| LOW DENSITY 


MEDIUM DENSITY 1 


1 HIGH DENSITY 


] COMMERCIAL 1 


] LIGHT INDUSTRIAL 1 


] HEAVY INDUSTRIAL 1 


] OPEN SPACES \ ^S 


I | WATER ^ 


HERTFORD 
NORTH CAROLINA 


EXISTING and PROPOSED 
WATER SYSTEM 


4- 


— — EXISTING 
«..«■■«« EXISTING 

_-__— i PPOPOSED 


LINES 

LINES TO BE ENLARGED 
LINES 



RECOMMENDATIONS 

It is recommended that new water lines be a minimum of six 
inches in diameter and that a program be started to replace old 
water lines of less than six inches with a priority placed on 
those where fire hydrants are located. 

SEWERAGE SYSTEM 
SANITARY SEWER 

An inadequate system of sewage disposal is probably the most 
serious threat to the health of the general publico Until re- 
cently, Hertford piped raw sewage into the Perquimans River, a 
system that was totally inadequate and unsanitary. 

In 1964, the town secured the services of L. E. Wooten & 
Company in order to have plans drafted for a sewage treatment 
system. In 1965, the plans were presented and accepted. Con- 
struction began in 1966 and the new facility began operations 
in April, 1967. 

Sewage flows with the aid of nine pumping stations to the 
treatment plant which is one-half mile northwest of the corpor- 
ate limits. The new aeration system can handle the needs of 
3,000 people and, if ever necessary, can be expanded. Without 
substantial unforeseen growth, this facility will operate at 
only approximately two-thirds capacity during the planning period, 
This is a very good situation. 



15 



LAND DEVELOPMENT PLAN 



SEWAGE PLANT 



LEGEND 



RESIDENTIAL 
LOW DENSITY 
MEDIUM DENSITY 
HIGH DENSITY 

COMMERCIAL 

LIGHT INDUSTRIAL 

HEAVY INDUSTRIAL 

OPEN SPACES 

WATER 




EXISTING and PROPOSED 
SEWER SYSTEM 

_— __ EXISTING LINES 

EXISTING PUMPING STATIONS 
EXISTING SEWAGE PLANT 

— — — — PROPOSED LINES 



STORM SEWERS 

Storm drainage is not a major problem in Hertford because 
of two factors. The town gradually slopes towards the Perqui- 
mans River and creeks run through the town and carry water to 
the river. All that is necessary to insure adequate storm drain- 
age is to get the water to the creeks or to the river itselfo 
This is accomplished by open ditches and underground conduits. 
The open ditches are all in good operating order and are regu- 
larly maintained by the street department. The only problem is 
on Edenton Road Street. The pipe under the street is too small 
and the street is covered by water during a major storm. This 
is state owned property and the state has been requested to cor- 
rect this situation. 

STREET SYSTEM 
The Hertford street system generally follows the gridiron 
pattern. There is a total of 11.9 miles of streets in Hertford. 
Of this total, 5.1 miles are town maintained. Included among 
the streets under town responsibility are .8 of a mile of un- 
paved streets. Most of the unpaved streets are not in low value 
areas but in the new subdivisions. Two other major street defi- 
ciencies are streets with inadequate width and dangerous inter- 
sections. It will be extremely difficult to eradicate these 
conditions, but their reoccurrence can be prevented in the future 
by the adoption and proper administration of subdivision regu- 
lations. 



17 




STATE MAINTAINED STREETS 
TOWN MAINTAINED STREETS PAVED 
TOWN MAINTAINED STREETS UNPAVEO 
DANGEROUS INTERSECTIONS 



Maintenance of the streets is administered by the town 
superintendent. Everything that is required to maintain the 
effectiveness of the streets is handled by the street department 
except street paving. Private contractors are used to pave and 
repave streets. All street improvements are financed at town 
expense . 

The work is conducted by nine men, two of whom work full- 
time cleaning the streets. Major equipment includes: 

1956 Elgin Street King 

1949 Chevrolet Dump Truck 1 ton 

1958 Ford Dump Truck 1 ton 

1959 Ford Dump Truck 1 ton 

The present equipment and number of personnel are both adequate 
for present and projected future needs. 

There is no policy toward constructing sidewalks in Hert- 
ford. The town should consider the placement of sidewalks with- 
in one block of all schools that have students walking to them. 
This will make walking to school much safer for the children and 
auto traffic will not be impeded. 

All of the business districts, high value residential dis- 
tricts, and many of the lower value residential districts are 
served by street lights. There are some old series lights still 
in use in Hertford, but most of the present lights are mercury 
vapor. Whenever an old light expires or new lights are erected, 
a mercury vapor light is added. There is no general plan for 
the placement of street lights; each request is handled individ- 
ually. 



19 



RECOMMENDATIONS 

1. Since the average life span of street pavement is 
10 years, Hertford should plan to resurface .5 of 
a mile of streets annually. 

2. A priority should be established for paving and other- 
wise improving existing streets. 

3. The platting of new streets should be in accord with 
the adopted thoroughfare plan. 

4. The town should study the feasibility of removing the 
existing dangerous intersection and other street 

def ic ienc ies <> 

5. Subdivision regulations should be adopted and properly 
administered in order to insure the proper layout of 
new subdivisions and to guarantee the dedication of 
adequate streets and to make sure that all new streets 
are paved with curb and gutter. 

6. Plans should be made to replace the 1949 dump truck 
in the near future. 

7. During the planning period, the 1956 Elgin Street King 
and the 1958 and 1959 dump trucks will need replacement 

8. A street lighting plan should be adopted with the aid 
of VEPCO. 



REFUSE COLLECTION AND DISPOSAL 
The collection and disposal of refuse is a process which 
must be carried out in such a manner as to protect the public 
health of the community and to provide a means of keeping the 
community attractive to its residents and to visitors. 

Collection service is provided to all areas within the 
corporate limits. Refuse is collected twice a week at all resi- 
dences and six times a week at all business and industrial 
es tab 1 ishment s . 



20 



The town uses a 1952 Chevrolet, one and one-half ton, open 
body truck to remove trash and garbage. The garbage crew con- 
sists of four men; three of these men operate the. truck and one 
man supervises the disposal grounds. 

The town disposes of its refuse at an open dump located off 
U.S. Highway 17 just northeast of town. Three main problems are 
presented by the city dump. The major problem is that an open 
dump is much less healthy than a properly administered sanitary 
land fill. Another problem is that the dump is not too close to 
town. When the refuse is burned and the wind is from the north, 
as it is six months out of the year, smoke is blown into town 
polluting the air. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

1 . A sanitary land fill should be placed into operation 
in a suitable location. A properly operated land 
fill will require about one-tenth of an acre annually 
for every 1,000 persons or about two acres for the 
next 20 years. 

2. The 1952 truck will have to be replaced soon. 

3. The dump should be fenced and entrance into the dump 
by the general public should not be allowed unless 
permission is given. 

4. If a sanitary land fill is put into use, a small 
crawler-type tractor capable of compacting the refuse 
should be purchased. 

5. The packer truck will soon have to be replaced since 
this type of truck has a short life span. 

CEMETERIES 
There are three cemeteries in Hertford owned by the town. 
One of these is Cedar Woods which is eld and completely filled. 

21 



Cedar Woods Annex still has some lots remaining to be sold. The 
third is Edenton Road Street Negro Cemetery of which the town 
owns a small portion. 

Lots in Cedar Woods Annex are 20 by 20 feet and sell for 
$300 to city residents and $400 to persons not city residents. 
The lots in the nonwhite cemetery are eight by 18 feet and sell 
for $150 to both residents and nonresidents. 

There are 35 unsold lots remaining in Cedar Woods Annex and 
85 unsold lots remain in Edenton Road Street Negro Cemetery. The 
town averages selling eight lots in each cemetery annually. There- 
fore, all lots presently owned by the town will be sold within 
five years in Cedar Woods Annex and within nine years in Edenton 
Road Street Negro Cemetery. Both of these cemeteries can be 
expanded, but the town has no plans for future expansion. 

One man, responsible to the town superintendent, maintains 
the three cemeteries in Hertford. One tractor mower is the only 
major equipment used in this work. All other equipment is bor- 
rowed from the street maintenance crew. The town appropriates 
approximately $2,500 a year for this function. Because of the 
sale of lots, this operation has been self-sufficient in the past. 

RECOMMENDATION 

The town should expand the cemeteries so that the revenue 
from the sale of lots will offset the continuing cost of mainte- 
nance . 



2 2 



PUBLIC PARKING 

The Town of Hertford has 72 on-street parking spaces; nine 
of these are angular and the remaining 63 spaces are parallel. 
All spaces have a ninety minute parking limitation., All meters 
have been removed in order to compete with a small, but modern, 
shopping center located six blocks from the Central Business 
District . 

There are two off-street parking spaces between Market and 
Grubb Street behind Main Street, It is organized and marked but 
not in an efficient manner. Twenty of these spaces are owned by 
the city and 22 spaces are owned by Darden's Department Stores. 
There are 20 spaces for parking behind the municipal building. 
These spaces are city owned but the lot is unpaved and parking 
is at random. 

The total customer parking spaces, both on-street and off- 
street, is 134. This does not include two spaces on Main Street 
reserved as a bus stop and another reserved for the county sheriff 

The parking situation in Hertford is better than in most 
towns. However, all merchants know that parking is not adequate 
for peak shopping hours. Hertford must add more parking spaces 
for the convenience of the prospective customers in order to com- 
pete with neighboring shopping centers. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

1. The lot to the west of Main Street should be purchased 
or leased by the city and reorganized and paved. 

2. The lot behind the City Hall should be paved for con- 
venience and organized for efficiency. 



23 



The purchase or lease of additional lots by the city 
will not only bring the Central Business District up 
to standards but could make it a very attractive place 
to shop. 

The 90-minute limitation on parking should be enforced 



2 4 



MUNICIPAL ENTERPRISES 



MUNICIPAL ENTERPRISES 
ELECTRICITY 

Hertford purchases electricity wholesale from Virginia 
Electric and Power Company (VEPCO) and distributes it within 
the city and the surrounding area. Electrical service extends 
one and one-half miles west and two and one-half miles southeast. 

Maintenance is handled by the town superintendent with the 
assistance of one general maintenance man. Financial aspects are 
the responsibility of the town clerk. 

The town plans to expand its electrical connections anywhere 
requested whenever the extensions appear feasible. Supply for 
present and future needs is adequate because the Her t f ord-VEPCO 
agreement calls for VEPCO to supply all the power that Hertford 
needs . 

ICE PLANT 

An ice plant owned and operated by a municipality is an 
extremely rare thing; however, one exists in Hertford. The ice 
plant location is a branch of the water department. Six employ- 
ees divide their labors between the ice plant and water plant, 

The plant does not return a huge profit, but the profit 
margin was a healthy 20 percent last year. Another benefit of 
the ice plant is that the plant and the fire station are in the 
same building. This guarantees that someone will be available 
to answer fire calls and ring the fire alarms 24 hours a day. 
This is the major benefit of having full-time personnel in a 
fire department. This factor is not recognized by the American 



25 



Insurance Association but the benefit to the citizens of Hert- 
ford and Perquimans County is unquestionable. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

1. The electrical business should be continued since it has 
been very lucrative in the past and will be in the future 

2. The ice plant should continue operations as long as it 
is profitable or even showing a minute loss because of 
the extra fire protection benefit since someone is always 
available to answer fire calls. 



26 



SOCIAL AND 
CULTURAL SERVICES 



SCHOOL SYSTEM 

The Perquimans County School Board operates five schools. 
This study will concern itself with four of these institutions 
since no students from Hertford attend the elementary school in 
Winfall. These four schools are the predominantly white Per- 
quimans County High School and Hertford Grammar School and the 
Negro King Street Elementary School in Hertford and Perquimans 
Union School in Winfall. 

The following is a brief analysis of each of the four school 
bui ldings : 

KING STREET ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

This plant, constructed in 1951 and 1957, is good structur- 
ally except for the west end of the new wing. The cracks should 
be corrected and if they reappear the foundation should be re- 
paired. The level of illumination should be improved when funds 
are avai lab le . 

HERTFORD GRAMMAR SCHOOL 

This plant was built in 1957 and is in good condition. 

PERQUIMANS COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL 

The original building, constructed in 1924, is a two-story 
structure that has many deficiencies. The exterior walls are 
leaking, plaster is deteriorating, floors are worn badly, the 
wooden stairways are badly worn, exterior walls need painting, 
and windows are poor. 



2 7 



Due to the age of the building and the other deficiencies, 
it will be difficult to justify major renovation. 

The gymnasium building has minor cracking in walls and the 
dressing and shower areas need renovating. 

The kitchen built in 1963 is in good condition. 

PERQUIMANS UNION SCHOOL 

The 1951 building is fair construction but has need for 
minor renovation such as: tile in corridors, improved toilets, 
plaster repair, and wall waterproofing. 

The wood frame building should be abandoned. 

The agriculture shop needs major renovations. The walls, 
floors, and ceilings are poor. Rewiring and relighting is needed 
if this building is continued in service. 

The 1963 addition is good.* 

In the process of examining present schools and planning 
future facilities, certain criteria should be remembered. 

1. Elementary schools should have a size of between 400 
and 800 pupi Is . 

2. High schools should range in size from a minimum of 700 
to a maximum of 2,000. 

3. There should be at least a classroom for every 30 stu- 
dents. 



r The preceding analyses were taken from: 

School Survey . Perquimans County, Division of School Plan 
ning, N.C. Department of Public Instruction, p. 35. 



2 8 



4. Elementary schools need a minimum of 10 acres plus 1 
acre for each 100 students. 

5. High schools need a minimum of 20 acres plus 1 acre 
for each 100 students, 

6. High schools should be assessible to major highways and 
elementary schools on minor streets in residential areas 

7. School locations should not be next to land uses which 
may be hazardous to the operation of the facilities. 

Table 1 shows some of the important facts about and evalua- 
tions of each school unit. 

TABLE 1 



Schools 



Grades Enroll- 
Taught ment 



Size 

of 
Site 



Site Class- Classroom 
Deficiency rooms Deficiency 



Hertford 
Grammar School 

King Street 

Elementary School 

Perquimans 

Union School 



12 935 



17.3 



37 



0.3 



Perquimans County 
High School 



14.0 



15 



As shown in the above table, all the schools have inadequate 
sites except Hertford Grammar School and the school units are 
operating at near capacity. Two influences render it very diffi- 
cult to judge whether the school units will become overcrowded. 
The county is losing population, leaving the county with less 
school age children. On the other hand, a higher percentage of 



29 



potential students are attending school and these same students 
are staying in school for a longer period of time. At present, 
these two forces are neutralizing each other,, If the county pop- 
ulation trend is reversed, these school units will become over- 
burdened. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

1. If a new high school is built to replace Perquimans High 
within Hertford, it should be located on Edenton Road 
Street, possibly adjacent to the existing school. 

2. If any new school building is constructed, the standards 
of the Division of School Planning should be followed. 

3. The county should purchase enough land to bring the site 
sizes up to standard, wherever feasible. 

4. The county should maintain a student-classroom ratio of 
no more than 30 to 1. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 
There is no municipal library but the county library is 
located in Hertford and, in many ways, serves the purpose of a 
municipal library. The town makes an annual financial contribu- 
tion to the library. The central library is located at 110 W. 
Academy Street in a residential neighborhood three blocks from 
the Central Business District on a minor street, There is one 
branch located on King Street in a nonwhite residential area near 
the Negro school. The branch was placed on King Street for the 
convenience of the small children living in the area and is serv- 
ing this purpose well. 



3 



The library is housed in a building that is in good condition. 
The structure is 40 by 70 feet and located on a lot 100 by 100 
feet. The library has adequate, space at the present time and has 
room for some additional shelves. The library will become crowd- 
ed in about ten years. There is no off-street parking for either 
patrols or personnel. The library is open daily and two nights 
a week . 

The service area is the entire county which has a population 
of 9,178 people. As of the first of April, the library had 18,043 
volumes. There are 1.96 books per capita at the present. The 
library has increased the total number of volumes by nearly 600 
annually for the past few years. The American Library Association 
recommends two books per capita. At the present rate of progress, 
the library will reach this standard by 1968 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

1. The library board should purchase a small portion of the 
park neighboring the library, if possible, in order to 
provide room for two off-street parking spaces and pos- 
sible future expansion, 

2. The Town of Hertford should make a special contribution 
to the library to expand the magazine collection and for 
the purchase of additional, relaxing chairs. 

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 
People are beginning to place more and more emphasis upon 
the need for good wholesome recreation. One criteria that pro- 
spective industries usually examines is public recreation. 



31 



The Town of Hertford has no public recreational facilities. 
However, there is much private and semi-public recreation in Hert- 
ford. The woodlands around the town offer good hunting grounds 
for the outdoorsmen and the Perquimans River offers water recrea- 
tion of all kinds . 

There is one semi-public facility in the town. This is a 
park owned by a semi-public corporation located between West 
Academy Street and East Academy Street. This facility is for 
children and consists of approximately one and one-half acres. 

The three school units are also available for public use. 
These three schools have a combined size of 32 acres. Therefore, 
there is a total of 33,5 acres of land available for recreational 
purposes, not including the forests, river and open spaces within 
the town. The limitations of these assets should be kept in mind. 
School grounds cannot be used during school hours for anything 
except school purposes. Also, any program that may be proposed 
must be approved by the school officials and this approval can 
be rescinded at any time. Therefore, the town must realize that 
its recreational needs cannot be satisfactorily met by complete 
reliance upon school grounds, 

A means of determining the quantitative level of recreational 
facilities is to compare the existing acreage of parks against 
reasonable standards, The standards of the National Recreation 
Association is 10 to 15 acres of land for public recreation for 
each 1,000 people. With an approximate population of 2,000, Hert- 
ford needs about 25 acres of land. 



32 



The problem in Hertford is not only quantitative, but quali- 
tative. There is little diversification of activities. The semi- 
public park and the school grounds are for children. This leaves 
only hunting and water sports for adults. Other entertainment 
that could be added are such things as arts and crafts, checker 
tournaments, and card tournaments such as bridge and rook. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

1. Hertford should establish a Recreation Commission to 
coordinate, plan and administer recreational activi- 
ties in the town. 

2. A Recreation Director should be hired on a part-time 
basis. 

3. Land should be purchased so that a diversified park 
could be started on the waterfront. A major component 
of this park should be a boat launching site. 

4. The town, with the aid of civic clubs and private 
citizens, should build a community center. 



PUBLIC WELFARE 

The personnel of the Perquimans County Welfare Department 
consists of a director and three case workers. The department 
administers three major public assistance programs; old age assist- 
ance, aid to families with dependent children, and aid to the 
permanently and totally disabled. 

Other programs rendered do not involve direct monetary out- 
lays. Case workers visit homes and offer advice on family affairs. 
The surplus commodity program offers food to needy families. Other 
programs are medical aid for the aged, child welfare and super- 
vision of day care centers, and boarding homes. 

33 



PUBLIC HEALTH 

Public health programs in Perquimans County are administered 
by a four-county organization that also serves Pasquotank, Chowan, 
and Camden Counties. The main office of the organization is lo- 
cated in Elizabeth City, which is 15 miles from Hertford. Person- 
nel available to the people of Perquimans County are two public 
health nurses and a sanitarian. 

The health department concerns itself with health problems 
that cannot be solved by individual action, such as mental health 
and communicable disease control and problems that affect large 
numbers of people such as infant care and environmental sanita- 
tion. 

In order to solve these, problems, the health department pro- 
vides many services. The following are examples: immunizes 
against smallpox, polio, diptheria, whooping cough, and tetanus; 
does skin tests and chest x-rays to detect tuberculosis; gives 
examinations, diagnostic tests, and treatment for venereal dis- 
eases; provides home visits and advises citizens in health mat- 
ters; collects statistics and keeps records on births, deaths, 
and diseases; finds the source of communicable diseases, and acts 
to prevent their spread; provides prenatal and child care advice; 
distributes information on health facts, resources, and activities, 



34 



SUMMARY OF 
RECOMMENDATIONS 



SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS 

MUNICIPAL BUILDING 

The parking lot should be paved and parking should be organ- 
ized. A better layout of the space will provide several addi- 
tional parking spaces. 

CITY GARAGE 

The town should construct a new garage on another site in 
an area of town that is not congested, possibly on Edenton Road 
Street or Church Street, large enough to house all equipment of 
the town with adequate room for expansion. The new site should 
be large enough to provide for the parking of employees and should 
be fenced and lighted. 

VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Inspections should occur more often in high fire potential 
areas . 

One part of the firemen's training should be an under- 
standing of the housing and building codes of the town. Fire- 
men could look for violations when they are conducting their 
other duties. 

A program of condemnation and demolition of dilapidated 
structures should be established and rigidly enforced. 

The zoning ordinance should be enforced in order to provide 
adequate fire breaks between buildings.. 

In order to prevent narrow streets that will be hard to 

enter and exit with a fire truck, subdivision regulations should 

be adopted and followed. 

35 



Hertford should try to get more money from the county for 
fire protection purposes. 

The American-La France may have to be replaced during the 
p lanning period. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

More training of personnel should be conducted. Attendance 
of courses at College of the Albemarle and other institutions 
should be continued. 

Shifts should be standardized. Policemen then could plan 
their family life and recreation on a long-range basis. The 
most desirable shifts can be held as an incentive. 

A part-time policeman should be hired in order to relieve 
the chief of some of his patrol duties so that he can spend more 
time in the training of the staff. 

RESCUE SQUAD 

A rescue squad of at least 15 men should be initiated in 
Hertford. Probably the most feasible method of procuring a squad 
is to organize on a county wide basis. Funds will come from the 
county government. 

Needed equipment would include: 

(a) an ambulance with a stretcher and a r esusc itat or ; 

(b) truck outfitted with a portable generator, stretchers, 
and a field first-aid chest; 

(c) an outboard motorboat with a trailer for water rescue 
operations. 

All rescue squad members should be trained in first aid 

and equipment operations. 



3 6 



Since similar skills are required for both services, the 
rescue squad could be incorporated into the existing volunteer 
fire department. However, volunteers should come from the entire 
county instead of Hertford. 

WATER SYSTEM 

It is recommended that new water lines be a minimum of six 
inches in diameter and that a program be started to replace old 
water lines of less than six inches with a priority placed on 
those where fire hydrants are located. 

STREET SYSTEM 

Since the average life span of street pavement is 10 years, 
Hertford should plan to resurface .5 of a mile of streets annu- 
ally. 

A priority should be established for paving and otherwise 
improving existing streets. 

The platting of new streets should be in accord with the 
adopted thoroughfare plan. 

The town should study the feasibility of removing the 
existing dangerous intersections and other street deficiencies. 

Subdivision regulations should be adopted and properly 
administered in order to insure the proper layout of new sub- 
divisions and to guarantee the dedication of adequate streets 
and to make sure that all new streets are paved with curb and 

gutter. 



37 



Plans should be made to replace the 1949 dump truck in the 
near future. 

During the planning period, the 1956 Elgin Street King and 
the 1958 and 1959 dump trucks will need replacement. 

A street lighting plan should be adopted with the aid of 
VEPCO. 

REFUSE COLLECTION AND DISPOSAL 

A sanitary land fill should be placed into operation in a 
suitable location. A properly operated land fill will require 
about one-tenth of an acre annually for every 1,000 persons or 
about two acres for the next 20 years. 

The 1952 truck will have to be replaced soon. 

The dump should be fenced and entrance into the dump by 
the general public should not be allowed unless permission is 
g iven. 

If a sanitary land fill is put into use, a small crawler- 
type tractor capable of compacting the refuse should be purchased 

The packer truck will soon have to be replaced since this 
type of truck has a short life span. 

CEMETERIES 

The town should expand the cemeteries so that the revenue 
from the sale of lots will offset the continuing cost of mainte- 
nance . 



38 



PUBLIC PARKING 

The lot to the west of Main Street should be purchased or 
leased by the city and reorganized and paved. 

The lot behind the City Hall should be paved for convenience 
and organized for efficiency. 

The purchase or lease of additional lots by the city will 
not only bring the Central Business District up to standards 
but could make it a very attractive place to shop. 

The 90-minute limitation on parking should be enforced. 

MUNICIPAL ENTERPRISES 

The electrical business should be continued since it has 
been very lucrative in the past and will be in the future. 

The ice plant should continue operations as long as it 
is profitable or even showing a minute loss because of the 
extra fire protection benefit since someone is always available 
to answer fire calls. 



SCHOOL SYSTEM 

If a new high school is built to replace Perquimans High 
within Hertford it should be located on Edenton Road Street, 
possibly adjacent to the existing schools 

If any new school building is constructed, the standards 
of the Division of School Planning should be followed. 

The county should purchase enough land to bring the site 
sizes up to standard, wherever feasible. 

The county should maintain a student-classroom ratio of 
no more than 30 to 1. 

39 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

The library board should purchase a small portion of the 
park neighboring the library, if possible, in order to provide 
room for two off-street parking spaces and possible future expan- 
sion. 

The Town of Hertford should make a special contribution to 
the library to expand the magazine collection and for the pur- 
chase of additional, relaxing chairs. 

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

Hertford should establish a Recreation Commission to coord- 
inate, plan and administer recreational activities in the town. 

A Recreation Director should be hired on a part-time basis. 

Land should be purchased so that a diversified park could 
be started on the waterfront. A major component of this park 
should be a boat launching site. 

The town, with the aid of civic clubs and private citizens, 
should build a community center. 



40 




PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS 

PROGRAM 



INTRODUCTION 

A few years ago, the Town of Hertford realized the need for 
comprehensive planning for the future development of the town, 
A planning board was established for the purpose of conducting 
needed studies and making recommendations to the town government. 
Financial assistance was received from the Federal Government and 
technical assistance was obtained from the Division of Community 
Planning of the North Carolina Department of Conservation and 
Development, Studies previously conducted include; Population 
and Economy Study, Neighborhood Analysis, Land Use Survey and 
Analysis, Land Development Plan, Zoning Ordinance, Subdivision 
Regulations, and Community Facilities Plan. 

The Community Facilities Plan isolated deficiencies in 
local governmental facilities and services. In the Public Im- 
provements Program, the removal of the deficiencies is scheduled 
in a logical sequence. Recommendations made to the county govern- 
ment are not included in the schedule. The study also suggests 
the most feasible method of financing the improvements. Specific 
improvements have been listed in fiscal periods of three years 
in order to retain a degree of flexibility in the administration 
of this program. 

Future extensions of the water and sewer lines are not in- 
cluded in the Public Improvements Program because of several 
major reasons. The first reason is that the cost of extensions 
inside the city must be borne by the landowner. Another reason 
is that is is impossible to project where development will take 



4] 



place outside the corporate limits. Another reason is that an 
engineering study, financed by Farmers Home Administration, is 
being conducted. Any decisions made before this study is com- 
pleted will be premature. 

Two major considerations in establishing a schedule are 
necessity and ability to pay. Small, "housekeeping" improvements 
such as replacing fire hose are not included in this schedule. 
Also, the feasibility of removing dangerous intersections and 
widening inadequate streets must be given more careful study than 
could be provided by this study. 

Cost estimates for the proposed improvements are not includ- 
ed. A great deal of further study is necessary before cost fig- 
ures can be derived accurately. Possible federal assistance may 
be available in some areas, but more study is necessary before 
applications can be made and aid is assured. The cost of equip- 
ment varies widely and land prices vary, especially when multiple 
sites are available. These factors should not lead the town to 
believe that it does not need to attempt to ascertain these costs 
well ahead of time. By conducting the proper studies, choosing 
sites for advance acquisition, choosing places from which to buy 
machinery, and by applying ahead of time for federal aid, Hert- 
ford can be quite sure of the costs it may incur. 

A long range Public Improvements Program provides many advan- 
tages to a town and its citizens including the following* 

1) Provides a means of assuring that the projects will be 

carried out in accordance with predetermined priorities. 



42 



2) Permits required bond issues to be foreseen and pro- 
visions to be made for the issuance of bonds. 

3) Provides the necessary time for adjustments in future 
tax policies „ 

4) Permits the advance acquisition of land needed for 
public improvement s a 

5) Provides adequate time for proper studies^ 

6) Inspires public confidence in the orderly process of 
government , 

1967 - 1970 



Improvement 

Purchase land for sani- 
tary land fill 

Purchase crawler type 
tractor 

Replace 1949 dump truck 

Replace street sweeper 

Purchase or lease park- 
ing lot behind Main 
Street 

Hire part time recrea- 
tion director 

Replace the two patrol 
cars 

Develop a capital im- 
provements budget 

Repave 1,5 miles of 
road pavement 



Source of 
Jus t i f i cat ion Funds 

To improve sanitation and G <, R„ 
prevent air pollution 

Necessary to compact re- G„ R„ 
fuse at land fill 

Good service life is G„ R, 

twenty years 

Good service life is 10 G „ R„ 
years 

To enable necessary im- G . R„ 
provements to be made 
for parking 

So that program can be Go R. 
coordinated and adminis- 
tered 

Five years or 50,000 G, Ro 

miles is good service 

life 

So that financing of rec- G„ R„ 
ommended improvements will 
be orderly 

2 
Lifespan of road pavement P » B „ 

averages ten years 



G. R. stands for General Revenue 



P. Bo means Powell Bill Funds 



43 



1970 



1973 



Improvement 

Hire part-time police- 
man 



Replace packer truck 

Pave lot behind Main 
Street 

Buy land for park near 
center of town and alonj 
r iver front 

Expand two cemeteries 
( 5 acres tota 1 ) 



Prepare to replace the 
1940 fire truck 

Repave L5 miles of 
road pavement 



Just if icat ion 

Will free the chief from 
some patrol duties in 
order to allow more time 
for administration 

Eight year life span will 
be over 

For efficiency and accom- 
modation of parking 

Public recreation is re- 
garded as a necessity 
to good government 

To continue the sale of 
lots in order to meet 
maintenance costs 

It will be old and may 
need replacement 

Lifespan of road pavement 
averages ten years 



Source of 
Funds 



G. 



Go R, 
G„ R, 



F. A, 

G, 0, 



Go R. 
P. B, 



1973 - 1976 



Improvement 



Justification 



Source o f 
Funds 



Construct or purchase a 
building to be used as 
a community center 

Further develop the two 
public parks 

Purchase or lease more 
land for off-street 
parking 

Purchase two new police 
cars 

Build new city garage 



Recreation should be pro- 
vided for persons of all ages 

Public recreation is re- 
garded as a necessity 

To provide adequate park- 
ing in the Central Busi- 
ness District 

5 years or 50,000 miles is 
the average span of good 
serv ice 

To replace old structures 
and to provide room for 
expansion 



R, 



F, A. stands for Federal Aid, 

G, 0. Bo stands for General Obligation Bonds, 

44 



1973 



1976 con't 



Improvement 

Renovate Fire Station 
Build ing 

Update capital improve- 
ments budget 

Pave lot behind Muni- 
cipal Building 

Repave 1.5 miles of 
road pavement 

Update Land Develop- 
ment Plan 



Source of 

Just if icat ion Funds 

This building is old and G. R. 
will need periodic repairs 

This should be done every G. R. 
six years 

To improve efficiency and G. R. 
accommodation of parking 

Lifespan of road pavement P. B. 
averages ten years 

Plans should be updated G. R. 

every ten years F. A. 



1976 



1979 



Improvement 



Just i f i cat ion 



Replace 1958 dump truck Twenty year life span will 

be over 

Replace 1959 dump truck Twenty year life span will 

be over 



Replace packer truck 



Eight year life span will 
be over 



Develop off-street park- Necessary to satisfy park- 
ing lot 



Contract for updating 
of Public Improvements 
Program 

Repave 1.5 miles of 
road pavement 



ing needs of Central Busi- 
ness District 

By this time unforeseen 
problems will exist and 
must be reckoned with 

Life span of road pavement 
averages ten years 



Source of 
Funds 

G. R. 

G. R. 

G. R. 

G. R. 



G. R, 

F. A, 



1979 



1982 



Impr oveme nt 

Purchase two new patrol 

cars 

Replace street sweeper 



Replace worn-out park 
equ ipment 



Justification 

50 ,000 miles will be 
travelled by then 

Ten year life span will 
have expired 

Much original equipment 
will need replacement 



Source of 
Funds 

G. R. 
G. R. 
G. R. 



45 



1979 - 1982 con't 



Improvement 

Develop a Capital Im- 
provements Budget 

Repave 1.5 miles of 
road pavement 



Just i f icat ion 

Should be developed 
every six years 

Lifespan of road pavement 
averages ten years 



lour ce of 
Funds 



G. R< 
P. B, 



Improvement 
Replace 1963 fire truck 



Replace worn-out park 
equ ipment 

Contract for a new com- 
prehensive planning pro- 
gram to update plans 

Repave 1.5 miles of 
road pavement 



1982 - 1985 



Justification 

Twenty years is the maxi- 
mum time that a fire truck 
will be considered for 
insurance purposes 

More equipment will need 
rep lacement 

Development plans should 
be updated every ten years 

Lifespan of road pavement 
averages ten years 



lour ce of 
Funds 



Go R, 
F. A, 



Po B. 



Improvements 

Purchase two new patrol 
cars 



Replace packer truck 

Repave 1.5 miles of 
road pavement 

The following items will 

be old and may need re— 

p lacement s 

A „ Park equipment 

B„ Crawler-type tractor 



1985 



Just ification 

It is more efficient to 
change cars every five 
years or 50,000 miles 

Eight year life span will 
be over 

Lifespan of road pavement 
averages ten years 

Good financial planning 
will include these items 
at this time even though 
they may not be needed 



Source of 
Funds 

Go R. 
G. Ro 

Po Bo 

Go R. 



STATE LIBRARY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



3 3091 00747 6823